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Sample records for gm1 gangliosidosis patients

  1. GM1 gangliosidosis and Morquio B disease: an update on genetic alterations and clinical findings

    PubMed Central

    Caciotti, Anna; Garman, Scott C; Rivera-Colón, Yadilette; Procopio, Elena; Catarzi, Serena; Ferri, Lorenzo; Guido, Carmen; Martelli, Paola; Parini, Rossella; Antuzzi, Daniela; Battini, Roberta; Sibilio, Michela; Simonati, Alessandro; Fontana, Elena; Salviati, Alessandro; Akinci, Gulcin; Cereda, Cristina; Dionisi-Vici, Carlo; Deodato, Francesca; d’Amico, Adele; d’Azzo, Alessandra; Bertini, Enrico; Filocamo, Mirella; Scarpa, Maurizio; di Rocco, Maja; Tifft, Cynthia J; Ciani, Federica; Gasperini, Serena; Pasquini, Elisabetta; Guerrini, Renzo; Donati, Maria Alice; Morrone, Amelia

    2011-01-01

    GM1 gangliosidosis and Morquio B syndrome, both arising from beta-galactosidase (GLB1) deficiency, are very rare lysosomal storage diseases with an incidence of about 1:100,000– 1:200,000 live births worldwide. Here we report the beta-galactosidase gene (GLB1) mutation analysis of 21 unrelated GM1 gangliosidosis patients, and of 4 Morquio B patients, of whom two are brothers. Clinical features of the patients were collected and compared with those in literature. In silico analyses were performed by standard alignments tools and by an improved version of GLB1 three-dimensional models. The analysed cohort includes remarkable cases. One patient with GM1 gangliosidosis had a triple X syndrome. One patient with juvenile GM1 gangliosidosis was homozygous for a mutation previously identified in Morquio type B. A patient with infantile GM1 gangliosidosis carried a complex GLB1 allele harbouring two genetic variants leading to p.R68W and p.R109W amino acid changes, in trans with the known p.R148C mutation. Molecular analysis showed 27 mutations, 9 of which are new: 5 missense, 3 microdeletions and a nonsense mutation. We also identified four new genetic variants with a predicted polymorphic nature that was further investigated by in silico analyses. Three-dimensional structural analysis of GLB1 homology models including the new missense mutations and the p.R68W and p.R109W amino acid changes, showed that all the amino acids replacements affected the resulting protein structures in different ways, from changes in polarity to folding alterations. Genetic and clinical associations led us to undertake a critical review of the classifications of late-onset GM1 gangliosidosis and Morquio B disease. PMID:21497194

  2. MRI/MRS as a surrogate marker for clinical progression in GM1 gangliosidosis.

    PubMed

    Regier, Debra S; Kwon, Hyuk Joon; Johnston, Jean; Golas, Gretchen; Yang, Sandra; Wiggs, Edythe; Latour, Yvonne; Thomas, Sarah; Portner, Cindy; Adams, David; Vezina, Gilbert; Baker, Eva H; Tifft, Cynthia J

    2016-03-01

    Background GM1 gangliosidosis is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by mutations in GLB1, encoding β-galactosidase. The range of severity is from type I infantile disease, lethal in early childhood, to type III adult onset, resulting in gradually progressive neurological symptoms in adulthood. The intermediate group of patients has been recently classified as having type II late infantile subtype with onset of symptoms at one to three years of age or type II juvenile subtype with symptom onset at 2-10 years. To characterize disease severity and progression, six Late infantile and nine juvenile patients were evaluated using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and MR spectroscopy (MRS). Since difficulties with ambulation (gross motor function) and speech (expressive language) are often the first reported symptoms in type II GM1, patients were also scored in these domains. Deterioration of expressive language and ambulation was more rapid in the late infantile patients. Fourteen MRI scans in six Late infantile patients identified progressive atrophy in the cerebrum and cerebellum. Twenty-six MRI scans in nine juvenile patients revealed greater variability in extent and progression of atrophy. Quantitative MRS demonstrated a deficit of N-acetylaspartate in both the late infantile and juvenile patients with greater in the late infantile patients. This correlates with clinical measures of ambulation and expressive language. The two subtypes of type II GM1 gangliosidosis have different clinical trajectories. MRI scoring, quantitative MRS and brain volume correlate with clinical disease progression and may serve as important minimally-invasive outcome measures for clinical trials.

  3. Novel Biomarkers of Human GM1 Gangliosidosis Reflect the Clinical Efficacy of Gene Therapy in a Feline Model.

    PubMed

    Gray-Edwards, Heather L; Regier, Debra S; Shirley, Jamie L; Randle, Ashley N; Salibi, Nouha; Thomas, Sarah E; Latour, Yvonne L; Johnston, Jean; Golas, Gretchen; Maguire, Annie S; Taylor, Amanda R; Sorjonen, Donald C; McCurdy, Victoria J; Christopherson, Peter W; Bradbury, Allison M; Beyers, Ronald J; Johnson, Aime K; Brunson, Brandon L; Cox, Nancy R; Baker, Henry J; Denney, Thomas S; Sena-Esteves, Miguel; Tifft, Cynthia J; Martin, Douglas R

    2017-02-21

    GM1 gangliosidosis is a fatal neurodegenerative disease that affects individuals of all ages. Favorable outcomes using adeno-associated viral (AAV) gene therapy in GM1 mice and cats have prompted consideration of human clinical trials, yet there remains a paucity of objective biomarkers to track disease status. We developed a panel of biomarkers using blood, urine, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), electrodiagnostics, 7 T MRI, and magnetic resonance spectroscopy in GM1 cats-either untreated or AAV treated for more than 5 years-and compared them to markers in human GM1 patients where possible. Significant alterations were noted in CSF and blood of GM1 humans and cats, with partial or full normalization after gene therapy in cats. Gene therapy improved the rhythmic slowing of electroencephalograms (EEGs) in GM1 cats, a phenomenon present also in GM1 patients, but nonetheless the epileptiform activity persisted. After gene therapy, MR-based analyses revealed remarkable preservation of brain architecture and correction of brain metabolites associated with microgliosis, neuroaxonal loss, and demyelination. Therapeutic benefit of AAV gene therapy in GM1 cats, many of which maintain near-normal function >5 years post-treatment, supports the strong consideration of human clinical trials, for which the biomarkers described herein will be essential for outcome assessment.

  4. GM1-gangliosidosis in American black bears: clinical, pathological, biochemical and molecular genetic characterization.

    PubMed

    Muthupalani, Sureshkumar; Torres, Paola A; Wang, Betty C; Zeng, Bai Jin; Eaton, Samuel; Erdelyi, Ildiko; Ducore, Rebecca; Maganti, Rajanikarath; Keating, John; Perry, Bain J; Tseng, Florina S; Waliszewski, Nicole; Pokras, Mark; Causey, Robert; Seger, Rita; March, Philip; Tidwell, Amy; Pfannl, Rolf; Seyfried, Thomas; Kolodny, Edwin H; Alroy, Joseph

    2014-04-01

    G(M1)-gangliosidosis is a rare progressive neurodegenerative disorder due to an autosomal recessively inherited deficiency of lysosomal β-galactosidase. We have identified seven American black bears (Ursus americanus) found in the Northeast United States suffering from G(M1)-gangliosidosis. This report describes the clinical features, brain MRI, and morphologic, biochemical and molecular genetic findings in the affected bears. Brain lipids were compared with those in the brain of a G(M1)-mouse. The bears presented at ages 10-14 months in poor clinical condition, lethargic, tremulous and ataxic. They continued to decline and were humanely euthanized. The T(2)-weighted MR images of the brain of one bear disclosed white matter hyperintensity. Morphological studies of the brain from five of the bears revealed enlarged neurons with foamy cytoplasm containing granules. Axonal spheroids were present in white matter. Electron microscopic examination revealed lamellated membrane structures within neurons. Cytoplasmic vacuoles were found in the liver, kidneys and chondrocytes and foamy macrophages within the lungs. Acid β-galactosidase activity in cultured skin fibroblasts was only 1-2% of control values. In the brain, ganglioside-bound sialic acid was increased more than 2-fold with G(M1)-ganglioside predominating. G(A1) content was also increased whereas cerebrosides and sulfatides were markedly decreased. The distribution of gangliosides was similar to that in the G(M1)-mouse brain, but the loss of myelin lipids was greater in the brain of the affected bear than in the brain of the G(M1) mouse. Isolated full-length cDNA of the black bear GLB1 gene revealed 86% homology to its human counterpart in nucleotide sequence and 82% in amino acid sequence. GLB1 cDNA from liver tissue of an affected bear contained a homozygous recessive T(1042) to C transition inducing a Tyr348 to His mutation (Y348H) within a highly conserved region of the GLB1 gene. The coincidence of several

  5. Identification of a novel pseudodeficiency allele in the GLB1 gene in a carrier of GM1 gangliosidosis.

    PubMed

    Gort, L; Santamaria, R; Grinberg, D; Vilageliu, L; Chabás, A

    2007-08-01

    The term 'pseudodeficiency' is used in lysosomal storage diseases to denote the situation in which individuals show greatly reduced enzyme activity but remain clinically healthy. Pseudodeficiencies have been reported for several lysosomal hydrolases. GM1 gangliosidosis is a rare autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder caused by beta-galactosidase hydrolase deficiency as a result of mutations in the GLB1 gene. Until now, two variants altering the beta-galactosidase activity have been described, p.Arg521Cys and p.Ser532Gly. Here we report the new variant p.Arg595Trp in the GLB1 gene, which markedly reduces beta-galactosidase activity when expressed in COS-1 cells. The variant was identified in the healthy father of a girl with GM1 gangliosidosis. He was a heterozygous compound with p.Arg595Trp in trans with one of the disease-causing mutations identified in his daughter; in leukocytes and plasma he showed lower beta-galactosidase activity than that observed in GM1 gangliosidosis carriers. As this family originated from the Basque Country in the north of Spain, we decided to analyse individuals of Basque and non-Basque origin, finding the p.Arg595Trp allele in 3.2% of Basque and in 0.8% of non-Basque alleles. The detection of the presence of alterations resulting in pseudodeficient activity in leukocytes and plasma is important for the correct diagnosis of GM1 gangliosidosis.

  6. Systemic AAV9 gene transfer in adult GM1 gangliosidosis mice reduces lysosomal storage in CNS and extends lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Weismann, Cara M.; Ferreira, Jennifer; Keeler, Allison M.; Su, Qin; Qui, Linghua; Shaffer, Scott A.; Xu, Zuoshang; Gao, Guangping; Sena-Esteves, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    GM1 gangliosidosis (GM1) is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disease where GLB1 gene mutations result in a reduction or absence of lysosomal acid β-galactosidase (βgal) activity. βgal deficiency leads to accumulation of GM1-ganglioside in the central nervous system (CNS). GM1 is characterized by progressive neurological decline resulting in generalized paralysis, extreme emaciation and death. In this study, we assessed the therapeutic efficacy of an adeno-associated virus (AAV) 9-mβgal vector infused systemically in adult GM1 mice (βGal−/−) at 1 × 1011 or 3 × 1011 vector genomes (vg). Biochemical analysis of AAV9-treated GM1 mice showed high βGal activity in liver and serum. Moderate βGal levels throughout CNS resulted in a 36–76% reduction in GM1-ganglioside content in the brain and 75–86% in the spinal cord. Histological analyses of the CNS of animals treated with 3 × 1011 vg dose revealed increased presence of βgal and clearance of lysosomal storage throughout cortex, hippocampus, brainstem and spinal cord. Storage reduction in these regions was accompanied by a marked decrease in astrogliosis. AAV9 treatment resulted in improved performance in multiple tests of motor function and behavior. Also the majority of GM1 mice in the 3 × 1011 vg cohort retained ambulation and rearing despite reaching the humane endpoint due to weight loss. Importantly, the median survival of AAV9 treatment groups (316–576 days) was significantly increased over controls (250–264 days). This study shows that moderate widespread expression of βgal in the CNS of GM1 gangliosidosis mice is sufficient to achieve significant biochemical impact with phenotypic amelioration and extension in lifespan. PMID:25964428

  7. Systemic AAV9 gene transfer in adult GM1 gangliosidosis mice reduces lysosomal storage in CNS and extends lifespan.

    PubMed

    Weismann, Cara M; Ferreira, Jennifer; Keeler, Allison M; Su, Qin; Qui, Linghua; Shaffer, Scott A; Xu, Zuoshang; Gao, Guangping; Sena-Esteves, Miguel

    2015-08-01

    GM1 gangliosidosis (GM1) is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disease where GLB1 gene mutations result in a reduction or absence of lysosomal acid β-galactosidase (βgal) activity. βgal deficiency leads to accumulation of GM1-ganglioside in the central nervous system (CNS). GM1 is characterized by progressive neurological decline resulting in generalized paralysis, extreme emaciation and death. In this study, we assessed the therapeutic efficacy of an adeno-associated virus (AAV) 9-mβgal vector infused systemically in adult GM1 mice (βGal(-/-)) at 1 × 10(11) or 3 × 10(11) vector genomes (vg). Biochemical analysis of AAV9-treated GM1 mice showed high βGal activity in liver and serum. Moderate βGal levels throughout CNS resulted in a 36-76% reduction in GM1-ganglioside content in the brain and 75-86% in the spinal cord. Histological analyses of the CNS of animals treated with 3 × 10(11) vg dose revealed increased presence of βgal and clearance of lysosomal storage throughout cortex, hippocampus, brainstem and spinal cord. Storage reduction in these regions was accompanied by a marked decrease in astrogliosis. AAV9 treatment resulted in improved performance in multiple tests of motor function and behavior. Also the majority of GM1 mice in the 3 × 10(11) vg cohort retained ambulation and rearing despite reaching the humane endpoint due to weight loss. Importantly, the median survival of AAV9 treatment groups (316-576 days) was significantly increased over controls (250-264 days). This study shows that moderate widespread expression of βgal in the CNS of GM1 gangliosidosis mice is sufficient to achieve significant biochemical impact with phenotypic amelioration and extension in lifespan.

  8. Evaluation of N-nonyl-deoxygalactonojirimycin as a pharmacological chaperone for human GM1 gangliosidosis leads to identification of a feline model suitable for testing enzyme enhancement therapy

    PubMed Central

    Rigat, Brigitte A.; Tropak, Michael B.; Buttner, Justin; Crushell, Ellen; Benedict, Daphne; Callahan, John W.; Martin, Douglas R.; Mahuran, Don J.

    2012-01-01

    Deficiencies of lysosomal β-D-galactosidase can result in GM1 gangliosidosis, a severe neurodegenerative disease characterized by massive neuronal storage of GM1 ganglioside in the brain. Currently there are no available therapies that can even slow the progression of this disease. Enzyme enhancement therapy utilizes small molecules that can often cross the blood brain barrier, but are also often competitive inhibitors of their target enzyme. It is a promising new approach for treating diseases, often caused by missense mutations, associated with dramatically reduced levels of functionally folded enzyme. Despite a number of positive reports based on assays performed with patient cells, skepticism persists that an inhibitor-based treatment can increase mutant enzyme activity in vivo. To date no appropriate animal model, i.e., one that recapitulates a responsive human genotype and clinical phenotype, has been reported that could be used to validate enzyme enhancement therapy. In this report, we identify a novel enzyme enhancement-agent, N-nonyl-deoxygalactonojirimycin, that enhances the mutant β-galactosidase activity in the lysosomes of a number of patient cell lines containing a variety of missense mutations. We then demonstrate that treatment of cells from a previously described, naturally occurring feline model (that biochemically, clinically and molecularly closely mimics GM1 gangliosidosis in humans) with this molecule, results in a robust enhancement of their mutant lysosomal β-galactosidase activity. These data indicate that the feline model could be used to validate this therapeutic approach and determine the relationship between the disease stage at which this therapy is initiated and the maximum clinical benefits obtainable. PMID:22784478

  9. Central nervous system inflammation is a hallmark of pathogenesis in mouse models of GM1 and GM2 gangliosidosis.

    PubMed

    Jeyakumar, M; Thomas, R; Elliot-Smith, E; Smith, D A; van der Spoel, A C; d'Azzo, A; Perry, V Hugh; Butters, T D; Dwek, R A; Platt, F M

    2003-04-01

    Mouse models of the GM2 gangliosidoses [Tay-Sachs, late onset Tay-Sachs (LOTS), Sandhoff] and GM1 gangliosidosis have been studied to determine whether there is a common neuro-inflammatory component to these disorders. During the disease course, we have: (i) examined the expression of a number of inflammatory markers in the CNS, including MHC class II, CD68, CD11b (CR3), 7/4, F4/80, nitrotyrosine, CD4 and CD8; (ii) profiled cytokine production [tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha), transforming growth factor (TGF beta 1) and interleukin 1 beta (IL1 beta)]; and (iii) studied blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity. The kinetics of apoptosis and the expression of Fas and TNF-R1 were also assessed. In all symptomatic mouse models, a progressive increase in local microglial activation/expansion and infiltration of inflammatory cells was noted. Altered BBB permeability was evident in Sandhoff and GM1 mice, but absent in LOTS mice. Progressive CNS inflammation coincided with the onset of clinical signs in these mouse models. Substrate reduction therapy in the Sandhoff mouse model slowed the rate of accumulation of glycosphingolipids in the CNS, thus delaying the onset of the inflammatory process and disease pathogenesis. These data suggest that inflammation may play an important role in the pathogenesis of the gangliosidoses.

  10. Rapid and reliable genotyping technique for GM1 gangliosidosis in Shiba dogs by real-time polymerase chain reaction with TaqMan minor groove binder probes.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hye-Sook; Arai, Toshiro; Yabuki, Akira; Hossain, Mohammad A; Rahman, Mohammad M; Mizukami, Keijiro; Yamato, Osamu

    2010-03-01

    Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with TaqMan minor groove binder (MGB) probes was examined to establish a rapid and reliable genotyping technique for GM1 gangliosidosis in Shiba dogs. This technique was applied to DNA samples extracted from the blood, umbilical cord, or postmortem liver tissue specimens, and to DNA-containing solutions prepared from blood and saliva that had been applied to Flinders Technology Associates filter papers (FTA cards). The amplification of the targeted sequence in all the samples was sufficient to determine the genotypes of GM1 gangliosidosis. Forty-seven DNA samples that had previously been obtained from blood or tissue specimens of Shiba dogs were examined using this real-time PCR technique, and the findings were consistent with the data obtained by the earlier PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) assay. In addition, the use of this new technique in combination with FTA cards for sampling could markedly shorten the time required for genotyping, as well as simplify the procedure. Furthermore, in the present study, the results of a previous epidemiological screening of 96 Shiba dogs in the Czech Republic were rechecked by this real-time PCR technique using stored crude buccal cell DNA-containing solutions directly as DNA templates. The results provided clear-cut genotyping in all the samples although the earlier PCR-RFLP assay could not determine the genotype in all cases. In conclusion, this new real-time PCR technique is a simple, rapid, and reliable choice for large-scale screening to detect an abnormal allele indicating GM1 gangliosidosis in Shiba dogs.

  11. (5aR)-5a-C-Pentyl-4-epi-isofagomine: A powerful inhibitor of lysosomal β-galactosidase and a remarkable chaperone for mutations associated with GM1-gangliosidosis and Morquio disease type B.

    PubMed

    Front, Sophie; Biela-Banaś, Anna; Burda, Patricie; Ballhausen, Diana; Higaki, Katsumi; Caciotti, Anna; Morrone, Amelia; Charollais-Thoenig, Julie; Gallienne, Estelle; Demotz, Stéphane; Martin, Olivier R

    2017-01-27

    This report is about the identification, synthesis and initial biological characterization of derivatives of 4-epi-isofagomine as pharmacological chaperones (PC) for human lysosomal β-galactosidase. The two epimers of 4-epi-isofagomine carrying a pentyl group at C-5a, namely (5aR)- and (5aS)-5a-C-pentyl-4-epi-isofagomine, were prepared by an innovative procedure involving in the key step the addition of nitrohexane to a keto-pentopyranoside. Both epimers were evaluated as inhibitors of the human β-galactosidase: the (5aR)-stereoisomer (compound 1) was found to be a very potent inhibitor of the enzyme (IC50 = 8 nM, 30× more potent than 4-epi-isofagomine at pH 7.3) with a high selectivity for this glycosidase whereas the (5aS) epimer was a much weaker inhibitor. In addition, compound 1 showed a remarkable activity as a PC. It significantly enhanced the residual activity of mutant β-galactosidase in 15 patient cell lines out of 23, with enhancement factors greater than 3.5 in 10 cell lines and activity restoration up to 91% of normal. Altogether, these results indicated that (5aR)-5a-C-pentyl-4-epi-isofagomine constitutes a promising PC-based drug candidate for the treatment of GM1-gangliosidosis and Morquio disease type B.

  12. Genetics Home Reference: GM1 gangliosidosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... retina ) gradually deteriorates. An eye abnormality called a cherry-red spot, which can be identified with an ... experience developmental regression but usually do not have cherry-red spots, distinctive facial features, or enlarged organs. ...

  13. Newly observed thalamic involvement and mutations of the HEXA gene in a Korean patient with juvenile GM2 gangliosidosis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soon Min; Lee, Min Jung; Lee, Joon Soo; Kim, Heung Dong; Lee, Jin Sung; Kim, Jinna; Lee, Seung Koo; Lee, Young Mock

    2008-09-01

    Neuroimaging studies of patients with GM2 gangliosidosis are rare. The thalamus and basal ganglia are principally involved in patients affected by the infantile form of GM2 gangliosidosis. Unlike in the infantile form, in juvenile or adult type GM2 gangliosidosis, progressive cortical and cerebellar atrophy is the main abnormality seen on conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI); no basal ganglial or thalamic impairment were observed. This report is of a Korean girl with subacute onset, severe deficiency of hexosaminidase A activity and mutations (Arg137Term, Ala246Thr) of the HEXA gene. A 3.5-year-old girl who was previously in good health was evaluated for hypotonia and ataxia 3 months ago and showed progressive developmental deterioration, including cognitive decline. Serial brain MRI showed progressive overall volume decrease of the entire brain and thalamic atrophy. Fluorine-18 FDG PET scan showed severe decreased uptake in bilateral thalamus and diffuse cerebral cortex. We suggest, through our experience, that the thalamic involvement in MR imaging and FDG-PET can be observed in the juvenile form of GM2 gangliosidosis, and we suspect the association of mutations in the HEXA gene.

  14. Alterations in cholesterol and ganglioside GM1 content of lipid rafts in platelets from patients with Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li; Zhang, Ke; Tan, Liang; Chen, Yu-Hua; Cao, Yun-Peng

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the changes in the protein, cholesterol, and ganglioside GM1 content of lipid rafts in platelets from patients with Alzheimer disease (AD), and identify potential blood biomarkers of the disease. A total of 31 Chinese patients with AD and 31 aged-matched control subjects were selected. Lipid rafts were isolated from platelets using Optiprep gradient centrifugation. The protein content of lipid rafts was evaluated using Micro BCA assay, the cholesterol content using molecular probes, ganglioside GM1 content using colorimetry and dot-blotting analysis. The results showed that the cholesterol and ganglioside GM1 content of lipid rafts from platelets was significantly higher in patients with AD than aged-matched control subjects, whereas the protein content of lipid rafts did not show any differences between the 2 groups. These results indicate that the increases in the cholesterol and ganglioside GM1 content of lipid rafts from the platelets of patients with AD might serve as a biochemical adjunct to the clinical diagnosis of AD.

  15. Biological roles of anti-GM1 antibodies in patients with Guillain-Barré syndrome for nerve growth factor signaling.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Toshifumi; Furutama, Daisuke; Sakai, Reiko; Fujita, Atsushi; Kimura, Fumiharu; Tagami, Muneyoshi; Ohsawa, Nakaaki; Hanafusa, Toshiaki

    2007-05-01

    To reveal the biological and pathological roles of anti-GM1 antibody in Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS), we examined its effects on nerve growth factor (NGF) induced TrkA autophosphorylation (NGF-TrkA signaling) in PC12 cells, a sympathetic nerve cell line. The NGF-TrkA signaling is enhanced by exogenous GM1 ganglioside and this phenomenon is regarded as one of the functional aspects of GM1. The IgGs purified from patients' sera inhibited the NGF-TrkA signaling in GM1 pre-incubated PC12 cells. The degrees of inhibition by IgGs from patients paralleled their immunological reactivity to GM1. In addition, the IgGs also inhibited the neurite outgrowth of NGF-treated PC12 cells. Immunoglobulins in the rabbit sera, which were immunized by GM1, also caused a similar suppressive phenomenon. These results suggested that the anti-GM1 antibody could play roles in pathophysiology in anti-GM1 antibody positive GBS through interfering with the neurotrophic action of NGF and GM1 mediated signal modulation including NGF-TrkA signaling. It is suggested that the modulation of GM1 function is one important action of antibodies and could be one of the important mechanisms in GBS.

  16. Different attenuated phenotypes of GM2 gangliosidosis variant B in Japanese patients with HEXA mutations at codon 499, and five novel mutations responsible for infantile acute form.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Akemi; Hoang, Lan Thi Ngcok; Nishi, Yasuaki; Maniwa, Satoshi; Oka, Makio; Yamano, Tsunekazu

    2003-01-01

    Eight mutations of the alpha subunit of beta-hexosaminidase A gene ( HEXA) were identified in eight patients with GM2 gangliosidosis variant B. They were five missense mutations, two splice-site mutations, and one two-base deletion. Five of them, R252L (CGT-->CTT), N295S (AAT-->AAC), W420C (TGG-->TGT), IVS 13, +2A-->C, and del 265-266AC (exon 2), were novel mutations responsible for infantile acute form of GM2 gangliosidosis. Two missense mutations, R499H and R499C, were found in one allele of two patients with attenuated phenotypes. The patient with R499C showed a late infantile form, and the other patient with R499H showed a juvenile form. These two mutations have been reported previously in the patients of other ethnic groups, and they have been known to cause attenuated phenotypes. The milder phenotypes of GM2 gangliosidosis variant B, different from the infantile acute form, have not been reported so far in Japan, and this is the first report of Japanese patients with attenuated phenotypes and their molecular analysis.

  17. The pathology of feline GM2 gangliosidosis.

    PubMed

    Cork, L C; Munnell, J F; Lorenz, M D

    1978-03-01

    An 11-week-old and a 6-month-old kitten with feline GM2 gangliosidosis and deficiency in both A and B isoenzymes of beta-D-N-acetyl hexosaminidase were studied by light transmission (TEM), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Neurons throughout the nervous system contained cytoplasmic, membrane-bound inclusions which were PAS-positive at the fine structure level these inclusions were composed of membranous arrays in whorls, vesicles, or multilaminated stacks. Fusion of the bounding membranes of adjacent inclusions resulted in large inclusion-containing vacuoles. Hepatocytes and Kupffer cells contained inclusions slightly different from those in the central nervous system. SEM of cryofractured liver demonstrated their coalescence to form larger composite vacuoles. Vacuoles with inclusions were also seen in pancreatic acinar cells, endothelial cells, vascular smooth muscle, fibroblasts, myocardial cells, renal interstitial cells, corneal stromal cells, and R-E cells of bone marrow and spleen. The specific granules of eosinophils were swollen and took on bizarre forms. Pathologic manifestations of feline GM2 gangliosidosis differ from those seen in feline GM1 gangliosidosis but closely resemble those of Sandhoff disease in humans.

  18. The pathology of feline GM2 gangliosidosis.

    PubMed Central

    Cork, L. C.; Munnell, J. F.; Lorenz, M. D.

    1978-01-01

    An 11-week-old and a 6-month-old kitten with feline GM2 gangliosidosis and deficiency in both A and B isoenzymes of beta-D-N-acetyl hexosaminidase were studied by light transmission (TEM), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Neurons throughout the nervous system contained cytoplasmic, membrane-bound inclusions which were PAS-positive at the fine structure level these inclusions were composed of membranous arrays in whorls, vesicles, or multilaminated stacks. Fusion of the bounding membranes of adjacent inclusions resulted in large inclusion-containing vacuoles. Hepatocytes and Kupffer cells contained inclusions slightly different from those in the central nervous system. SEM of cryofractured liver demonstrated their coalescence to form larger composite vacuoles. Vacuoles with inclusions were also seen in pancreatic acinar cells, endothelial cells, vascular smooth muscle, fibroblasts, myocardial cells, renal interstitial cells, corneal stromal cells, and R-E cells of bone marrow and spleen. The specific granules of eosinophils were swollen and took on bizarre forms. Pathologic manifestations of feline GM2 gangliosidosis differ from those seen in feline GM1 gangliosidosis but closely resemble those of Sandhoff disease in humans. Images Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:415617

  19. GM2-gangliosidosis B1 variant: analysis of beta-hexosaminidase alpha gene abnormalities in seven patients.

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, A; Ohno, K; Sandhoff, K; Maire, I; Kolodny, E H; Brown, A; Suzuki, K

    1990-01-01

    A single nucleotide transition within exon 5 of the beta-hexosaminidase alpha chain gene was identified in a Puerto Rican patient with GM2-gangliosidosis B1 variant as the mutation responsible for the unusual enzymological characteristics of this variant (G533----A; Arg178----His) (the DN-allele). A total of seven patients with enzymological characteristics of B1 variant have since been studied. They were Puerto Rican (DN), Italian, French, Spanish, two patients of mixed ethnic origin (English/Italian/Hungarian and English/French/Azores), and a Czechoslovakian. In confirmation of our earlier finding based on screening with allele-specific probes, all patients except the one from Czechoslovakia carried the same DN-allele. A new point mutation found in this patient changed the same codon affected in the DN-allele (C532----T; Arg178----Cys). An asymptomatic Japanese individual included as a control also carried one allele with the DN-mutation. Site-directed mutagenesis and expression studies in COS I cells demonstrated that either of the two point mutations abolishes the catalytic activity of the alpha subunit. The Spanish patient was homozygous for the DN-allele, but others were all compound heterozygotes. The Puerto Rican patient was a compound heterozygote with the DN-mutation in one allele and with the four-base insertion in exon 11, one of the two mutations found in the classical Ashkenazi Jewish Tay-Sachs disease, in the other allele. Abnormalities of the other allele were not identified in all other compound heterozygous patients. In these patients, the level of mRNA derived from the other allele was variable, ranging from being undetectable to being much lower than normal. This series of studies uncovered a new B1 variant mutation, confirmed our preliminary finding that the DN-allele has a surprisingly wide geographic and ethnic distribution, and pointed out the highly complex nature of the molecular genetics of this rare disorder. They also support our

  20. Motor conduction block and high titres of anti-GM1 ganglioside antibodies: pathological evidence of a motor neuropathy in a patient with lower motor neuron syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Adams, D; Kuntzer, T; Steck, A J; Lobrinus, A; Janzer, R C; Regli, F

    1993-01-01

    A patient with a progressive lower motor neuron syndrome and neurophysiological evidence of motor axon loss, multifocal proximal motor nerve conduction block, and high titres of anti-ganglioside GM1 antibodies. Neuropathological findings included a predominantly proximal motor radiculoneuropathy with multifocal IgG and IgM deposits on nerve fibres associated with a loss of spinal motor neurons. These findings support an autoimmune origin of this lower motor neuron syndrome with retrograde degeneration of spinal motor neurons and severe neurogenic muscular atrophy. Images PMID:8410039

  1. Specific binding of GM1-binding peptides to high-density GM1 in lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, Teruhiko; Iijima, Kazutoshi; Nakamura, Miwa; Taki, Takao; Okahata, Yoshio; Sato, Toshinori

    2007-01-16

    The ganglioside Galbeta1-3GalNAcbeta1-4(Neu5Acalpha2-3)Galbeta1-4Glcbeta1-1'Cer (GM1) is an important receptor. We have previously identified GM1-binding peptides based on affinity selection from a random peptide library. In the present study, we determined the amino acids essential for binding GM1 and investigated the specific interaction with GM1 in the lipid membrane. Arginines and aromatic amino acids in the consensus sequence (W/F)RxL(xP/Px)xFxx(Rx/xR)xP contributed to the ability of the peptides to bind GM1. The peptide p3, VWRLLAPPFSNRLLP, having the consensus sequence, showed high affinity for GM1 with a dissociation constant of 1.2 microM. Furthermore, the density-dependent binding of p3 was investigated using mixed monolayers of GM1 and Glcbeta1-1'Cer (GlcCer). p3 binds preferentially to high-density GM1, and its interaction with GM1 was found to be cooperative based on a Hill plot. These results indicated that a lateral assembly of GM1 molecules was required for the recognition of carbohydrates by p3. The GM1-binding peptide played a role as a unique anti-GM1 probe differing from the cholera toxin B subunit or antibodies.

  2. An open-label Phase I/II clinical trial of pyrimethamine for the treatment of patients affected with chronic GM2 gangliosidosis (Tay-Sachs or Sandhoff variants).

    PubMed

    Clarke, Joe T R; Mahuran, Don J; Sathe, Swati; Kolodny, Edwin H; Rigat, Brigitte A; Raiman, Julian A; Tropak, Michael B

    2011-01-01

    Late-onset GM2 gangliosidosis is an autosomal recessive, neurodegenerative, lysosomal storage disease, caused by deficiency of ß-hexosaminidase A (Hex A), resulting from mutations in the HEXA (Tay-Sachs variant) or the HEXB (Sandhoff variant) genes. The enzyme deficiency in many patients with juvenile or adult onset forms of the disease results from the production of an unstable protein, which becomes targeted for premature degradation by the quality control system of the smooth endoplasmic reticulum and is not transported to lysosomes. In vitro studies have shown that many mutations in either the α or β subunit of Hex A can be partially rescued, i.e. enhanced levels of both enzyme protein and activity in lysosomes, following the growth of patient cells in the presence of the drug, pyrimethamine. The objectives of the present clinical trial were to establish the tolerability and efficacy of the treatment of late-onset GM2 gangliosidosis patients with escalating doses of pyrimethamine, to a maximum of 100 mg per day, administered orally in a single daily dose, over a 16-week period . The primary objective, tolerability, was assessed by regular clinical examinations, along with a panel of hematologic and biochemical studies. Although clinical efficacy could not be assessed in this short trial, treatment efficacy was evaluated by repeated measurements of leukocyte Hex A activity, expressed relative to the activity of lysosomal ß-glucuronidase. A total of 11 patients were enrolled, 8 males and 3 females, aged 23 to 50 years. One subject failed the initial screen, another was omitted from analysis because of the large number of protocol violations, and a third was withdrawn very early as a result of adverse events which were not drug-related. For the remaining 8 subjects, up to a 4-fold enhancement of Hex A activity at doses of 50 mg per day or less was observed. Additionally marked individual variations in the pharmacokinetics of the drug among the patients were

  3. Mutations in the lysosomal [beta]-galactosidase gene that cause the adult form of GMI gangliosidosis

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, S.; Rafi, M.A.; Wenger, D.A. )

    1994-06-01

    Three adult patients with acid-galactosidase deficiency/GM1 gangliosidosis who were from two unrelated families of Scandinavian descent were found to share a common point mutation in the coding region of the corresponding gene. The patients share common clinical features, including early dysarthria, mild ataxia, and bone abnormalities. When cDNA from the two patients in family 1 was PCR amplified and sequenced, most (39/41) of the clones showed a C-to-T transition (C[yields]T) at nucleotide 245 (counting from the initiation codon). This mutation changes the codon for the Thr(ACG) to Met(ATG). Mutant and normal sequences were also found in that position in genomic DNA, indicating the presence of another mutant allele. Genomic DNA from the patient in family 2 revealed the same point mutation in one allele. It was determined that in each family only the father carried the C[yields]T mutation. Expression studies showed that this mutation produced 3%-4% of [beta]-galactosidase activity, confirming its deleterious effects. The cDNA clones from the patients in family 1 that did not contain the C[yields]T revealed a 20-bp insertion of intronic sequence between nucleotides 75 and 76, the location of the first intron. Further analysis showed the insertion of a T near the 5[prime] splice donor site which led to the use of a cryptic splice site. It appears that the C[yields]T mutation results in enough functional enzyme to produce a mild adult form of the disease, even in the presence of a second mutation that likely produces nonfunctional enzyme. 31 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Deficiency of ganglioside GM1 correlates with Parkinson's disease in mice and humans.

    PubMed

    Wu, Gusheng; Lu, Zi-Hua; Kulkarni, Neil; Ledeen, Robert W

    2012-10-01

    Several studies have successfully employed GM1 ganglioside to treat animal models of Parkinson's disease (PD), suggesting involvement of this ganglioside in PD etiology. We recently demonstrated that genetically engineered mice (B4galnt1(-/-) ) devoid of GM1 acquire characteristic symptoms of this disorder, including motor impairment, depletion of striatal dopamine, selective loss of tyrosine hydroxylase-expressing neurons, and aggregation of α-synuclein. The present study demonstrates similar symptoms in heterozygous mice (HTs) that express only partial GM1 deficiency. Symptoms were alleviated by administration of L-dopa or LIGA-20, a membrane-permeable analog of GM1 that penetrates the blood-brain barrier and accesses intracellular compartments. Immunohistochemical analysis of paraffin sections from PD patients revealed significant GM1 deficiency in nigral dopaminergic neurons compared with age-matched controls. This was comparable to the GM1 deficiency of HT mice and suggests that GM1 deficiency may be a contributing factor to idiopathic PD. We propose that HT mice with partial GM1 deficiency constitute an especially useful model for PD, reflecting the actual pathophysiology of this disorder. The results point to membrane-permeable analogs of GM1 as holding promise as a form of GM1 replacement therapy.

  5. GD1b-specific antibodies may bind to complex of GQ1b and GM1, causing ataxia.

    PubMed

    Yuki, Nobuhiro; Fukami, Yuki; Yanaka, Chiaki; Koike, Saiko; Hirata, Koichi

    2014-08-01

    Monospecific IgG antibodies to GD1b ganglioside (GD1b-specific antibodies) have been found in patients with acute ataxic neuropathy and Guillain-Barré syndrome, but the association of the GD1b-specific antibodies with specific neurological conditions has yet to be established. We tested sera from more than 10,000 patients with various neurological disorders, and found six sera, which contained IgG antibodies to GD1b, but not to LM1, GM1, GM1b, GD1a, GalNAc-GD1a, GT1a, GT1b and GQ1b. All six patients who carried GD1b-specific antibodies presented with acute onset of ataxia and monophasic course of the illness, of whom five demonstrated cerebellar-like ataxia. Four patients had antecedent symptoms of upper respiratory tract infection. The six patients demonstrated areflexia, and four complained of distal numbness. All the six patients who had the GD1b-specific antibodies carried IgG antibodies to complex of GQ1b/GM1 and GT1a/GM1. GD1b-specific antibodies were significantly absorbed by GQ1b/GM1 and GT1a/GM1 and anti-GQ1b/GM1 and -GT1a/GM1 antibodies were absorbed by GD1b. In conclusion, the GD1b-specific antibodies, which recognizes GQ1b/GM1 or GT1a/GM1 complex, are associated with acute ataxia.

  6. Optimization of GM(1,1) power model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Dang; Sun, Yu-ling; Song, Bo

    2013-10-01

    GM (1,1) power model is the expansion of traditional GM (1,1) model and Grey Verhulst model. Compared with the traditional models, GM (1,1) power model has the following advantage: The power exponent in the model which best matches the actual data values can be found by certain technology. So, GM (1,1) power model can reflect nonlinear features of the data, simulate and forecast with high accuracy. It's very important to determine the best power exponent during the modeling process. In this paper, according to the GM(1,1) power model of albino equation is Bernoulli equation, through variable substitution, turning it into the GM(1,1) model of the linear albino equation form, and then through the grey differential equation properly built, established GM(1,1) power model, and parameters with pattern search method solution. Finally, we illustrate the effectiveness of the new methods with the example of simulating and forecasting the promotion rates from senior secondary schools to higher education in China.

  7. The Diagnostic Utility of Determining Anti-GM1: GalC Complex Antibodies in Multifocal Motor Neuropathy: A Validation Study

    PubMed Central

    Galban-Horcajo, Francesc; Vlam, Lotte; Delmont, Emilien; Halstead, Susan K.; van den Berg, Leonard; van der Pol, W-Ludo; Willison, Hugh J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN) is associated with IgM antibodies to GM1 ganglioside. The importance of the lipid milieu that might facilitate or inhibit antibody binding to GM1 in immunoassays is well recognised. Existing studies, using a range of different approaches, generally concur that anti-GM1 IgM antibody detection rates are improved by the addition of galactocerebroside (GalC) to the GM1 assay. Objective: The current study sought to formally evaluate the clinical utility of the GM1:GalC complex assay in the diagnosis of MMN. Methods: Anti-GM1 and -GM1:GalC antibodies were examined using ELISA and glycoarray (dot blot) in a fully blinded study design, consisting of 100 MMN patients, 100 ALS cases and 100 healthy controls. Results: The detection of anti-GM1 Abs using glycoarray was 67% sensitive and 85% specific. The addition of GalC to GM1, (1:1 weight to weight ratio), increased the sensitivity to 81% , whilst dropping specificity to 80% . Increasing the GalC content to a 1:5 ratio (or higher) further decreased specificity, and in doing so limited the usefulness of the GM1:GalC assay to the level of GM1 alone. The addition of GalC to the ELISA method also significantly increased sensitivity compared with GM1 alone, albeit with a significant decrease in specificity. Conclusions: This study indicates that the GM1:GalC assay is an advantageous assay adaptation for detecting anti-GM1 antibodies in MMN, using either glycoarray or ELISA, and warrants introduction into clinical diagnostic practice. PMID:27858734

  8. GM2 gangliosidosis in British Jacob sheep.

    PubMed

    Wessels, M E; Holmes, J P; Jeffrey, M; Jackson, M; Mackintosh, A; Kolodny, E H; Zeng, B J; Wang, C B; Scholes, S F E

    2014-01-01

    GM2 gangliosidosis (Tay-Sachs disease) was diagnosed in 6- to 8-month-old pedigree Jacob lambs from two unrelated flocks presenting clinically with progressive neurological dysfunction of 10 day's to 8 week's duration. Clinical signs included hindlimb ataxia and weakness, recumbency and proprioceptive defects. Histopathological examination of the nervous system identified extensive neuronal cytoplasmic accumulation of material that stained with periodic acid--Schiff and Luxol fast blue. Electron microscopy identified membranous cytoplasmic bodies within the nervous system. Serum biochemistry detected a marked decrease in hexosaminidase A activity in the one lamb tested, when compared with the concentration in age matched controls and genetic analysis identified a mutation in the sheep hexa allele G444R consistent with Tay-Sachs disease in Jacob sheep in North America. The identification of Tay-Sachs disease in British Jacob sheep supports previous evidence that the mutation in North American Jacob sheep originated from imported UK stock.

  9. Biochemical characterization of GM1 micelles-Amphotericin B interaction.

    PubMed

    Leonhard, Victoria; Alasino, Roxana V; Bianco, Ismael D; Garro, Ariel G; Heredia, Valeria; Beltramo, Dante M

    2015-01-01

    In this work a thorough characterization of the GM1 micelle-Amphotericin B (AmB) interaction was performed. The micelle formation as well as the drug loading occurs spontaneously, although influenced by the physicochemical conditions, pH and temperature. The chromatographic profile of GM1-AmB complexes at different molar ratios shows the existence of two populations. The differential absorbance of GM1, monomeric and aggregate AmB, allowed us to discriminate the presence of all of them in both fractions. Thus, we noted that at higher proportion of AmB in the complex, increases the larger population which is composed mainly of aggregated AmB. The physical behavior of these micelles shows that both GM1- AmB complexes were stable in solution for at least 30 days. However upon freeze-thawing or lyophilization-solubilization cycles, only the smallest population, enriched in monomeric AmB, showed a complete solubilization. In vitro, GM1-AmB micelles were significantly less toxic on cultured cells than other commercial micellar formulations as Fungizone, but had a similar behavior to liposomal formulations as Ambisome. Regarding the antifungal activity of the new formulation, it was very similar to that of other formulations. The characterization of these GM1-AmB complexes is discussed as a potential new formulation able to improve the antifungal therapeutic efficiency of AmB.

  10. THE EFFECT OF MONOSIALOGANGLYOSIDE (GM-1) ADMINISTRATION IN SPINAL CORD INJURY

    PubMed Central

    BARROS, TARCÍSIO ELOY PESSOA; ARAUJO, FERNANDO FLORES DE; HIGINO, LUCAS DA PAZ; MARCON, RAPHAEL MARTUS; CRISTANTE, ALEXANDRE FOGAÇA

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the effect of monosialoganglioside (GM-1) in spinal cord trauma patients seen in our service who have not been treated with methylprednisolone. Methods: Thirty patients with acute spinal cord trauma were randomly divided into two groups. In Group 1, patients received 200 mg GM-1 in the initial assessment and thereafter received 100 mg intravenous per day for 30 days and Group 2 (control) received saline. Patients were evaluated periodically (at 6 weeks, 6 months, one year and two years), using a standardized neurological assessment of the American Spinal Injury Association / International Spinal Cord Society. Results: The comparative statistical analysis of motor indices, sensitive indices for pain and touch according to the standardization of ASIA / ISCOS showed that the assessments at 6 weeks, 6 months and 2 years, GM-Group 1 patients had higher rates than the control group regarding sensitivity to pain and touch, with no statistically significant difference from the motor index. Conclusion: The functional assessment showed improvement in the sensitive indices of patients treated with GM1 after post-traumatic spinal cord injury compared to patients who received placebo. Level of Evidence IV, Prospective Case Studies Series. PMID:27217811

  11. Individual Restriction Of Fine Specificity Variability In Anti-GM1 IgG Antibodies Associated With Guillain-Barré Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lardone, Ricardo D.; Yuki, Nobuhiro; Irazoqui, Fernando J.; Nores, Gustavo A.

    2016-01-01

    Elevated titers of serum antibodies against GM1 ganglioside are associated with a variety of autoimmune neuropathies. Much evidence indicates these autoantibodies play a primary role in the disease processes, but the mechanism for their appearance is unclear. We studied the fine specificity of anti-GM1 antibodies of the IgG isotype present in sera from patients with Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS), using thin-layer chromatogram-immunostaining of GM1, asialo-GM1 (GA1), GD1b and GM1-derivatives with small modifications on the oligosaccharide moiety. We were able to distinguish populations of antibodies with different fine specificity. Remarkably, individual patients presented only one or two of them, and different patients had different populations. This restriction in the variability of antibody populations suggests that the appearance of the anti-GM1 antibodies is a random process involving restricted populations of lymphocytes. With the origin of disease-associated anti-GM1 antibodies as a context, this finding could provide explanation for the “host susceptibility factor” observed in GBS following enteritis with GM1 oligosaccharide-carrying strains of Campylobacter jejuni. PMID:26818965

  12. Intraventricular Sialidase Administration Enhances GM1 Ganglioside Expression and Is Partially Neuroprotective in a Mouse Model of Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Jay S.; Seyfried, Thomas N.; Choi, Hyo-S.; Kidd, Sarah K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Preclinical and clinical studies have previously shown that systemic administration of GM1 ganglioside has neuroprotective and neurorestorative properties in Parkinson’s disease (PD) models and in PD patients. However, the clinical development of GM1 for PD has been hampered by its animal origin (GM1 used in previous studies was extracted from bovine brains), limited bioavailability, and limited blood brain barrier penetrance following systemic administration. Objective To assess an alternative therapeutic approach to systemic administration of brain-derived GM1 to enhance GM1 levels in the brain via enzymatic conversion of polysialogangliosides into GM1 and to assess the neuroprotective potential of this approach. Methods We used sialidase from Vibrio cholerae (VCS) to convert GD1a, GD1b and GT1b gangliosides to GM1. VCS was infused by osmotic minipump into the dorsal third ventricle in mice over a 4-week period. After the first week of infusion, animals received MPTP injections (20 mg/kg, s.c., twice daily, 4 hours apart, for 5 consecutive days) and were euthanized 2 weeks after the last injection. Results VCS infusion resulted in the expected change in ganglioside expression with a significant increase in GM1 levels. VCS-treated animals showed significant sparing of striatal dopamine (DA) levels and substantia nigra DA neurons following MPTP administration, with the extent of sparing of DA neurons similar to that achieved with systemic GM1 administration. Conclusion The results suggest that enzymatic conversion of polysialogangliosides to GM1 may be a viable treatment strategy for increasing GM1 levels in the brain and exerting a neuroprotective effect on the damaged nigrostriatal DA system. PMID:26629687

  13. Animal models of GM2 gangliosidosis: utility and limitations

    PubMed Central

    Lawson, Cheryl A; Martin, Douglas R

    2016-01-01

    GM2 gangliosidosis, a subset of lysosomal storage disorders, is caused by a deficiency of the glycohydrolase, β-N-acetylhexosaminidase, and includes the closely related Tay–Sachs and Sandhoff diseases. The enzyme deficiency prevents the normal, stepwise degradation of ganglioside, which accumulates unchecked within the cellular lysosome, particularly in neurons. As a result, individuals with GM2 gangliosidosis experience progressive neurological diseases including motor deficits, progressive weakness and hypotonia, decreased responsiveness, vision deterioration, and seizures. Mice and cats are well-established animal models for Sandhoff disease, whereas Jacob sheep are the only known laboratory animal model of Tay–Sachs disease to exhibit clinical symptoms. Since the human diseases are relatively rare, animal models are indispensable tools for further study of pathogenesis and for development of potential treatments. Though no effective treatments for gangliosidoses currently exist, animal models have been used to test promising experimental therapies. Herein, the utility and limitations of gangliosidosis animal models and how they have contributed to the development of potential new treatments are described. PMID:27499644

  14. Animal models of GM2 gangliosidosis: utility and limitations.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Cheryl A; Martin, Douglas R

    2016-01-01

    GM2 gangliosidosis, a subset of lysosomal storage disorders, is caused by a deficiency of the glycohydrolase, β-N-acetylhexosaminidase, and includes the closely related Tay-Sachs and Sandhoff diseases. The enzyme deficiency prevents the normal, stepwise degradation of ganglioside, which accumulates unchecked within the cellular lysosome, particularly in neurons. As a result, individuals with GM2 gangliosidosis experience progressive neurological diseases including motor deficits, progressive weakness and hypotonia, decreased responsiveness, vision deterioration, and seizures. Mice and cats are well-established animal models for Sandhoff disease, whereas Jacob sheep are the only known laboratory animal model of Tay-Sachs disease to exhibit clinical symptoms. Since the human diseases are relatively rare, animal models are indispensable tools for further study of pathogenesis and for development of potential treatments. Though no effective treatments for gangliosidoses currently exist, animal models have been used to test promising experimental therapies. Herein, the utility and limitations of gangliosidosis animal models and how they have contributed to the development of potential new treatments are described.

  15. Clustering effects of GM1 and formation mechanisms of interdigitated liquid disordered domains in GM1/SM/CHOL-supported planar bilayers on mica surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Zhiguo; Mao, Yanli; Tero, Ryugo; Liu, Xinli; Hoshino, Tyuji; Tanaka, Motohiko; Urisu, Tsuneo

    2010-09-01

    We have observed by atomic force microscopy that an interdigitated liquid disordered domain (ILDD) is formed in the ganglioside (GM1)/sphingomyelin (SM)/cholesterol (CHOL) bilayers on a mica surface and accelerates the formation of fibriller Aβ agglomerates. By studies of the mechanisms using molecular dynamics simulations, we conclude that the ILDD structure is formed as a result of the phase separation to SM- and GM1-rich domains on the mica surface induced by the effects of GM1 clustering and the interaction between the GM1 head group and the water layer adsorbed in the ditrigonal cavity on the mica surface.

  16. [Recent advances in molecular genetics of GM2 gangliosidosis].

    PubMed

    Wakamatsu, N

    1995-12-01

    Recent advances in molecular genetics of GM2 gangliosidosis are reviewed. GM2 gangliosidosis is an autosomal recessive, neurodegenerative disease caused by a deficiency of beta-hexosaminidase (Hex, EC 3.2.1.52) A activity, resulting in accumulation of GM2 ganglioside in the lysosomes of neuronal cells. There are two catalytically active forms of this enzyme: Hex A, composed of one alpha and one beta subunits. Three forms of this disease, Tay-Sachs disease, Sandhoff disease, and GM2 activator deficiency, have been recognized according to whether the defect involves the alpha subunit, beta subunit, or GM2 activator protein, respectively. A number of gene abnormalities responsible for the disease have been identified and mutations specific for phenotypes and racial backgrounds are summarized. Recently, the murine models of human Tay-Sachs disease and Sandhoff disease have been produced. With the finding of dramatically clinical phenotypes in these mice, these models could be useful for research on the pathogenesis or therapy of these diseases.

  17. Picomolar inhibition of cholera toxin by a pentavalent ganglioside GM1os-calix[5]arene.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Hartjes, Jaime; Bernardi, Silvia; Weijers, Carel A G M; Wennekes, Tom; Gilbert, Michel; Sansone, Francesco; Casnati, Alessandro; Zuilhof, Han

    2013-07-14

    Cholera toxin (CT), the causative agent of cholera, displays a pentavalent binding domain that targets the oligosaccharide of ganglioside GM1 (GM1os) on the periphery of human abdominal epithelial cells. Here, we report the first GM1os-based CT inhibitor that matches the valency of the CT binding domain (CTB). This pentavalent inhibitor contains five GM1os moieties linked to a calix[5]arene scaffold. When evaluated by an inhibition assay, it achieved a picomolar inhibition potency (IC50 = 450 pM) for CTB. This represents a significant multivalency effect, with a relative inhibitory potency of 100,000 compared to a monovalent GM1os derivative, making GM1os-calix[5]arene one of the most potent known CTB inhibitors.

  18. GM1 ganglioside reduces ethanol intoxication and the development of ethanol dependence.

    PubMed

    Wallis, C J; Rezazadeh, S M; Lal, H

    1995-01-01

    The monosialoganglioside, GM1, protects the nervous system against a variety of insults. In this study, we evaluated the protective properties of GM1 on ethanol intoxication and development of dependence. GM1 (20-40 mg/kg, IP) reduced the extent and duration of ataxia produced by ethanol (2 g/kg, IP, 15-95 min), and delayed the onset of loss and reduced the duration of the righting reflex (LORR) produced by ethanol (4.2 g/kg, IP). GM1 did not alter ethanol-induced hypothermia or the rate of ethanol clearance. Rather, GM1 increased the waking blood ethanol concentration. In animals fed a complete liquid diet containing 4.5% ethanol, concurrent administration of GM1 (40 mg/kg/day) blocked the tremors, hypolocomotion, and anxiety-like behavior associated with ethanol withdrawal. These findings demonstrate that GM1 reduces both ethanol's acute intoxication and the signs and symptoms of ethanol withdrawal by a mechanism not related to ethanol pharmacokinetics.

  19. Effects of Methylprednisolone And Ganglioside GM-1 on a Spinal Lesion: A Functional Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Márcio Oliveira Penna; de Barros Filho, Tarcisio Eloy Pessoa; Tebet, Marcos Antonio

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The pharmacological effects of methylprednisolone (MP) and ganglioside GM-1 on spinal injuries have been thoroughly investigated, but only a few studies have evaluated the interaction between these two drugs. METHODS Twenty-four Wistar rats were subjected to contusive injury of the spinal cord produced by the NYU system. These animals were divided into four groups: group I was injected with MP; group II was injected with GM-1; group III was injected with MP together with GM-1; and group control received physiological serum. The animals were evaluated with regard to their recovery of locomotive function by means of the BBB test on the second, seventh and fourteenth days after receiving the contusive injury to the spinal cord. They were sacrificed on the fourteenth day. RESULTS This study demonstrated that the MP and GM-1 groups presented functional results that were better than those of the control group, although the enhanced recovery of group II (GM-1) relative to the control group was not statistically significant (p>0.05). The most notable recovery of locomotive function was observed in the group that received MP alone (p<0.05). The group that received MP together with GM-1 presented results that were better than those of the control group (p<0.05). CONCLUSION Administration of methylprednisolone alone or with GM-1 was shown to be effective for recovery of locomotive function. Combined administration of these drugs resulted in better outcomes than administration of methylprednisolone alone. PMID:18568249

  20. Silica supported phospholipid layers doped with GM1: A comparison between different methods.

    PubMed

    Santos, Olga; Arnebrant, Thomas

    2009-01-15

    A method to coat hydrophobic surfaces with lipid molecules in a reproducible manner and in which the lipid molecules are resistant to detergent washings, would benefit the development of new ELISA assays. This work presents different approaches to build 1,2-dioleolyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) layers doped with a monosialoganglioside (GM1) supported on silica surfaces, which are stable toward buffer rinsing and washing with surfactant (Tween 20). The three methods employed were: method 1, coadsorption of DOPC:GM1 (0-10 mol%) with the surfactant n-dodecyl-beta-D-maltoside (DDM) from micellar solutions, with successive adsorption and rinsing steps; method 2, vesicle fusion from DOPC: GM1 (0-10 mol%) liposomes; and method 3, deposition of GM1 from organic solvent (chloroform) and exposure to an aqueous environment (hydration method). The vesicle fusion method was also tested in polystyrene surfaces. Cholera toxin subunit B (CTB) was used to detect the presence of GM1 on the formed layers. The results indicated that the vesicle fusion was the only method that was successful in creating stable mono- and bilayers onto hydrophobized and hydrophilic silica, respectively. The mixed micellar solution method was suitable for creating pure lipid (DOPC) monolayers but the incorporation of GM1 in the micelles led to monolayers which were very unstable with respect to buffer rinsing. The hydration method led to monolayers of GM1 that were partly rinsed off by a continuous buffer flow. Adsorption of CTB was found to be proportional to the amount of GM1 present in the liposomes. The amount of CTB adsorbed onto the lipid bilayers was roughly the double as the one determined on the monolayers with the same liposome compositions. The vesicle fusion method was also able to create monolayers of pure DOPC and DOPC:10 mol% GM1 on the polystyrene surfaces.

  1. Decoupling Polarization of the Golgi Apparatus and GM1 in the Plasma Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Bisel, Blaine; Calamai, Martino; Vanzi, Francesco; Pavone, Francesco Saverio

    2013-01-01

    Cell polarization is a process of coordinated cellular rearrangements that prepare the cell for migration. GM1 is synthesized in the Golgi apparatus and localized in membrane microdomains that appear at the leading edge of polarized cells, but the mechanism by which GM1 accumulates asymmetrically is unknown. The Golgi apparatus itself becomes oriented toward the leading edge during cell polarization, which is thought to contribute to plasma membrane asymmetry. Using quantitative image analysis techniques, we measure the extent of polarization of the Golgi apparatus and GM1 in the plasma membrane simultaneously in individual cells subject to a wound assay. We find that GM1 polarization starts just 10 min after stimulation with growth factors, while Golgi apparatus polarization takes 30 min. Drugs that block Golgi polarization or function have no effect on GM1 polarization, and, conversely, inhibiting GM1 polarization does not affect Golgi apparatus polarization. Evaluation of Golgi apparatus and GM1 polarization in single cells reveals no correlation between the two events. Our results indicate that Golgi apparatus and GM1 polarization are controlled by distinct intracellular cascades involving the Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK and the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathways, respectively. Analysis of cell migration and invasion suggest that MEK/ERK activation is crucial for two dimensional migration, while PI3K activation drives three dimensional invasion, and no cumulative effect is observed from blocking both simultaneously. The independent biochemical control of GM1 polarity by PI3K and Golgi apparatus polarity by MEK/ERK may act synergistically to regulate and reinforce directional selection in cell migration. PMID:24312472

  2. Decoupling polarization of the Golgi apparatus and GM1 in the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Bisel, Blaine; Calamai, Martino; Vanzi, Francesco; Pavone, Francesco Saverio

    2013-01-01

    Cell polarization is a process of coordinated cellular rearrangements that prepare the cell for migration. GM1 is synthesized in the Golgi apparatus and localized in membrane microdomains that appear at the leading edge of polarized cells, but the mechanism by which GM1 accumulates asymmetrically is unknown. The Golgi apparatus itself becomes oriented toward the leading edge during cell polarization, which is thought to contribute to plasma membrane asymmetry. Using quantitative image analysis techniques, we measure the extent of polarization of the Golgi apparatus and GM1 in the plasma membrane simultaneously in individual cells subject to a wound assay. We find that GM1 polarization starts just 10 min after stimulation with growth factors, while Golgi apparatus polarization takes 30 min. Drugs that block Golgi polarization or function have no effect on GM1 polarization, and, conversely, inhibiting GM1 polarization does not affect Golgi apparatus polarization. Evaluation of Golgi apparatus and GM1 polarization in single cells reveals no correlation between the two events. Our results indicate that Golgi apparatus and GM1 polarization are controlled by distinct intracellular cascades involving the Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK and the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathways, respectively. Analysis of cell migration and invasion suggest that MEK/ERK activation is crucial for two dimensional migration, while PI3K activation drives three dimensional invasion, and no cumulative effect is observed from blocking both simultaneously. The independent biochemical control of GM1 polarity by PI3K and Golgi apparatus polarity by MEK/ERK may act synergistically to regulate and reinforce directional selection in cell migration.

  3. Alpha-locus hexosaminidase genetic compound with juvenile gangliosidosis phenotype: clinical, genetic, and biochemical studies.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, W G; Cohen, C S; Miranda, A F; Waran, S P; Chutorian, A M

    1980-01-01

    A 3-year-old boy developed progressive neurological deterioration in his third year, characterized by dementia, ataxia, myoclonic jerks, and bilateral macular cherry-red spots. Hexosaminidase A (HEX A) was partially decreased in the patient's serum, leukocytes, and cultured skin fibroblasts. Hexosaminidase was studied in serum and leukocytes from family members. Four members of the paternal branch appeared to be carriers of classical infantile Tay-Sachs allele, HEX alpha 2, probably receiving the gene from one great-grandparent of Ashkenazi origin. In the maternal branch, no one was a carrier of classical infantile Tay-Sachs disease, but five individuals were carriers of a milder alpha-locus defect. The patient, therefore, was a genetic compound of two different alpha-locus hexosaminidase mutations. At least 21 families with late-infantile or juvenile GM2 gangliosidosis have been reported, 18 of them with alpha-locus mutations, and three with beta-locus mutations. Genetic compounds of hexosaminidase have been reported in at least seven families, five with alpha-locus mutations and two with beta-locus mutations. The compound had the phenotype of infantile Tay-Sachs disease in one family, infantile Sandhoff disease in another, and the normal phenotype in the rest. PMID:6772023

  4. Recovery from Experimental Parkinsonism in Primates with GM1 Ganglioside Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, J. S.; Pope, Anne; Simpson, Kimberly; Taggart, James; Smith, M. G.; Distefano, L.

    1992-05-01

    A parkinsonian syndrome can be produced in nonhuman primates by administration of the neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP). Parkinsonian-like symptoms induced acutely by MPTP were ameliorated after treatment with GM1 ganglioside, a substance shown to have neurotrophic effects on the damaged dopamine system in rodents. Treatment with GM1 ganglioside also increased striatal dopamine and metabolite levels and enhanced the dopaminergic innervation of the striatum as demonstrated by tyrosine hydroxylase immunohistochemistry. These results suggest that GM1 ganglioside may hold promise as a therapeutic agent for the treatment of Parkinson's disease.

  5. Selection of ganglioside GM1-binding peptides by using a phage library.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, T; Ishikawa, D; Taki, T; Okahata, Y; Sato, T

    1999-08-06

    Ganglioside Gal beta1 --> 3GalNAc beta1 --> 4(NeuAc alpha2 --> 3) Gal beta1 --> 4Glc beta1 -->1'Cer (GM1)-binding peptides were obtained from a phage-displayed pentadecapeptide library by an affinity selection. The selection processes were in situ-monitored by a quartz-crystal microbalance method, on which a ganglioside GM1 monolayer was transferred. After five rounds of biopanning, the DNA sequencing of 18 selected phages showed that only three individual clones were selected. The peptide sequences of the random region were found to be DFRRLPGAFWQLRQP, GWWYKGRARPVSAVA and VWRLLAPPFSNRLLP. Binding constants of these phage clones to the GM1 monolayer were 10(10) M(-1). Three synthetic pentadecapeptides inhibited the binding of cholera toxin B subunit to the GM1 monolayer with an IC50 of 24, 13 and 1.0 microM, respectively. These peptides will be useful for searching functional roles of ganglioside GMI.

  6. Insights into the behavioral difference of water in the presence of GM1.

    PubMed

    Basu, Ipsita; Manna, Moutusi; Mukhopadhyay, Chaitali

    2015-12-21

    Studies on the structure and dynamics of interfacial water, emphasizing on the properties of water near the surface of biomolecules, are well reported, but there is a lack of evidence on the behavior of water near a comparatively rough surface containing molecules with a bulky head group like GM1. In this report we comparatively analyze the structure and dynamics of water as a function of distance from the lipid head group in GM1 containing lipid bilayers, with the lipid bilayers where GM1 is not present. This approach effectively demonstrates the behavioral difference and hence delayed convergence from bound water to bulk water in the presence of GM1 compared to a relatively smooth surface.

  7. Galleria mellonella native and analogue peptides Gm1 and ΔGm1. I) biophysical characterization of the interaction mechanisms with bacterial model membranes.

    PubMed

    Correa, Wilmar; Manrique-Moreno, Marcela; Patiño, Edwin; Peláez-Jaramillo, Carlos; Kaconis, Yani; Gutsmann, Thomas; Garidel, Patrick; Heinbockel, Lena; Brandenburg, Klaus

    2014-10-01

    Natural occurring antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are important components of the innate immune system of animals and plants. They are considered to be promising alternatives to conventional antibiotics. Here we present a comparative study of two synthetic peptides: Gm1, corresponding to the natural overall uncharged peptide from Galleria mellonella (Gm) and ΔGm1, a modified overall positively charged Gm1 variant. We have studied the interaction of the peptides with lipid membranes composed of different kinds of lipopolysaccharides (LPS) and dimyristoylphosphatidylglycerol (DMPG), in some cases also dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DMPE) as representative lipid components of Gram-negative bacterial membranes, by applying Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Förster resonance energy transfer spectroscopy (FRET), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). Gm1 generates a destabilizing effect on the gel to liquid crystalline phase transition of the acyl chains of the lipids, as deduced from a decrease in the phase transition temperature and enthalpy, suggesting a fluidization, whereas ΔGm1 led to the opposite behavior. Further, FTIR analysis of the functional groups of the lipids participating in the interaction with the peptides indicated a shift in the band position and intensity of the asymmetric PO2(-) stretching vibration originating from the lipid phosphate groups, a consequence of the sterical changes in the head group region. Interestingly, FRET spectroscopy showed a similar intercalation of both peptides into the DMPG and LPS, but much less into the DMPE membrane systems. These results are discussed in the light of a possible use of the peptides as antimicrobial and anti-endotoxin drugs.

  8. Galleria mellonella native and analogue peptides Gm1 and ΔGm1. II) anti-bacterial and anti-endotoxic effects.

    PubMed

    Correa, Wilmar; Manrique-Moreno, Marcela; Behrends, Jochen; Patiño, Edwin; Marella, Chakravarthy; Peláez-Jaramillo, Carlos; Garidel, Patrick; Gutsmann, Thomas; Brandenburg, Klaus; Heinbockel, Lena

    2014-10-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are important components of the innate immune system of animals, plants, fungi and bacteria and are recently under discussion as promising alternatives to conventional antibiotics. We have investigated two cecropin-like synthetic peptides, Gm1, which corresponds to the natural overall uncharged Galleria mellonella native peptide and ΔGm1, a modified overall positively charged Gm1 variant. We have analysed these peptides for their potential to inhibit the endotoxin-induced secretion of tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) from human mononuclear cells. Furthermore, in a conventional microbiological assay, the ability of these peptides to inhibit the growth of the rough mutant bacteria Salmonella enterica Minnesota R60 and the polymyxin B-resistant Proteus mirabilis R45 was investigated and atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements were performed to characterize the morphology of the bacteria treated by the two peptides. We have also studied their cytotoxic properties in a haemolysis assay to clarify potential toxic effects. Our data revealed for both peptides minor anti-inflammatory (anti-endotoxin) activity, but demonstrated antimicrobial activity with differences depending on the endotoxin composition of the respective bacteria. In accordance with the antimicrobial assay, AFM data revealed a stronger morphology change of the R45 bacteria than for the R60. Furthermore, Gm1 had a stronger effect on the bacteria than ΔGm1, leading to a different morphology regarding indentations and coalescing of bacterial structures. The findings verify the biophysical measurements with the peptides on model systems. Both peptides lack any haemolytic activity up to an amount of 100μg/ml, making them suitable as new anti-infective agents.

  9. Localization and dynamics of the anticarcinogenic curcumin with GM1 and other miceller assemblies.

    PubMed

    Patra, Malay; Mandal, Manoj; Chakrabarti, Abhijit; Mukhopadhyay, Chaitali

    2017-04-01

    Structural transitions involving shape changes play an important role in cellular physiology and enhance the bioavailability of the natural food like curcumin in surfactant aggregates. In this work, we have studied the localization, dynamics and stability of curcumin in various miceller assemblies using a combination of absorbance and fluorescence spectroscopic approaches. The measurements of absorption and fluorescence spectra of curcumin revealed that the nature of interactions of ionic and nonionic surfactants and the glycosphingolipid, GM1 with curcumin is significantly different with surfactant concentrations. At low concentrations of SDS and the GM1 the head group of SDS and GM1 binds to the central β-diketone group of curcumin to form SDS-curcumin or GM1-curcumin complexes. At high concentrations, both formed micelles with curcumin completely solubilized inside. Cucurmin is solubilized in the stern layer of SDS micelles. Compared to spherical micelles, rod shaped micelles allow more curcumin to bind through hydrophobic interactions indicated by higher absorption and fluorescence, enhanced partition coefficient and stability. Whereas curcumin associates with GM1 micelles with lower partition coefficient, solubility and remain closer to aqueous phase decreasing its bioavailability and stability. While cucurmin is solubilized in the palisade layer of deoxycholate and octyl glucopyranoside micelles through the alkyl chains providing more hydrophobic microenvironment to curcumin with enhanced stability and bioavailability. Graphical abstract Schematic diagram of the two different types of detergent micelles and larger GM1 micelles.

  10. Bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate and ganglioside GM1 spontaneously form small homogeneous vesicles at specific concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Chebukati, Janetricks N.; Goff, Philip C.; Frederick, Thomas E.; Fanucci, Gail E.

    2010-04-09

    The morphology and size of hydrated lipid dispersions of bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate (BMP) mixed with varying mole percentages of the ganglioside GM1 were investigated by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy of these same mixtures, doped at 0.5 mol% with doxyl labeled lipids, was used to investigate acyl-chain packing. Results show that for 20-30% GM1, hydrated BMP:GM1 mixtures spontaneously form small spherical vesicles with diameters {approx}100 nm and a narrow size distribution profile. For other concentrations of GM1, hydrated dispersions with BMP have non-spherical shapes and heterogeneous size profiles, with average vesicle diameters >400 nm. All samples were prepared at pH 5.5 to mimic the lumen acidity of the late endosome where BMP is an essential component of intraendosomal vesicle budding, lipid sorting and trafficking. These findings indicate that GM1 and BMP under a limited concentration range spontaneously form small vesicles of homogeneous size in an energy independent manner without the need of protein templating. Because BMP is essential for intraendosomal vesicle formation, these results imply that lipid-lipid interactions may play a critical role in the endosomal process of lipid sorting and trafficking.

  11. Ganglioside GM2 N-acetyl-beta-D-galactosaminidase activity in cultured fibroblasts of late-infantile and adult GM2 gangliosidosis patients and of healthy probands with low hexosaminidase level.

    PubMed Central

    Conzelmann, E; Kytzia, H J; Navon, R; Sandhoff, K

    1983-01-01

    A sensitive assay was developed to assess the ability of extracts from cultured fibroblasts to catabolize ganglioside GM2, in the presence of the natural activator protein but without detergents. This method, which permitted the reliable determination of residual activities as low as 0.1% of normal controls, was then used to measure ganglioside GM2 hydrolase activities in fibroblasts from several hexosaminidase variants. The residual activities thus determined correlated well with the clinical status of the respective proband: infantile Tay-Sachs (0.1% of normal controls), late-infantile (0.5%), and adult GM2 gangliosidoses (2%-4%) and healthy probands with "low hexosaminidase" (11% and 20%). In contrast, beta-hexosaminidase A levels as measured with the synthetic substrate 4-MU-GlcNAc could not be relied on for diagnostic purposes (the late-infantile patient studied retained 80% of the activity of controls). PMID:6614006

  12. Degradation of membrane-bound ganglioside GM1. Stimulation by bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate and the activator proteins SAP-B and GM2-AP.

    PubMed

    Wilkening, G; Linke, T; Uhlhorn-Dierks, G; Sandhoff, K

    2000-11-17

    According to our hypothesis (Fürst, W., and Sandhoff, K. (1992) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1126, 1-16) glycosphingolipids of the plasma membrane are digested after endocytosis as components of intraendosomal and intralysosomal vesicles and membrane structures. The lysosomal degradation of glycosphingolipids with short oligosaccharide chains by acid exohydrolases requires small, non-enzymatic cofactors, called sphingolipid activator proteins (SAPs). A total of five activator proteins have been identified as follows: namely the saposins SAP-A, -B, -C, and -D, which are derived from the single chain SAP-precursor protein (prosaposin), and the GM2 activator protein. A deficiency of prosaposin results in the storage of ceramide and sphingolipids with short oligosaccharide head groups. The loss of the GM2 activator protein blocks the degradation of the ganglioside GM2. The enzymatic hydrolysis of the ganglioside GM1 is catalyzed by beta-galactosidase, a water-soluble acid exohydrolase. The lack of ganglioside GM1 accumulation in patients suffering from either prosaposin or GM2 activator protein deficiency has led to the hypothesis that SAPs are not needed for the hydrolysis of the ganglioside GM1 in vivo. In this study we demonstrate that an activator protein is required for the enzymatic degradation of membrane-bound ganglioside GM1 and that both SAP-B and the GM2 activator protein significantly enhance the degradation of the ganglioside GM1 by acid beta-galactosidase in a liposomal, detergent-free assay system. These findings offer a possible explanation for the observation that no storage of the ganglioside GM1 has been observed in patients with either isolated prosaposin or isolated GM2 activator deficiency. We also demonstrate that anionic phospholipids such as bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate and phosphatidylinositol, which specifically occur in inner membranes of endosomes and in lysosomes, are essential for the activator-stimulated hydrolysis of the ganglioside GM1

  13. Effects of neonatal ganglioside GM1 administration on memory in adult and old rats.

    PubMed

    Silv, R H; Bergamo, M; Frussa-Filho, R

    2000-09-01

    Numerous investigations have been reporting the involvement of GM1 ganglioside in central nervous system development and memory formation. The effects of neonatal treatment with GMI ganglioside on the performance of adult rats in a plus-maze discriminative avoidance task and old rats in a step-down passive avoidance task were investigated. Rats were injected subcutaneously from day 3 to 15 after birth with 10 mg/kg GM1 or saline. GM1 treatment did not modify indicative landmarks of physical and motor development. Behavioural tasks were carried out when the animals were 4 (discriminative avoidance) or 24 (passive avoidance) months old. Discriminative avoidance conditioning was performed in a modified elevated plus-maze. During the training session, the animals received aversive stimulation (light and hot air blow) in one of the enclosed arms. Tests were performed 7, 14 and 21 days after conditioning (tests 1, 2 and 3), in the absence of the aversive stimulation. In all tests, GM1-treated animals spent less time in the aversive arm than in the non-aversive enclosed arm. Control animals, however, spent a shorter time in the aversive arm only in tests 1 and 2. Passive avoidance conditioning was performed in an acrylic box with a grid floor, that was partially covered by an inclined platform. Animals were placed on the platform and received a 0,5 mA foot shock when stepped down. A test was performed 48 hr later. Latency to step down presented by GM 1-treated animals was significantly higher in the test session, whereas no significant increase in latency to step down was found for control animals. The results suggest a possible action of GM1 on the maturation of the central nervous system that persists during adulthood and ageing.

  14. The Natural History of Juvenile or Subacute GM2 Gangliosidosis: 21 New Cases and Literature Review of 134 Previously Reported

    PubMed Central

    Maegawa, Gustavo H. B.; Stockley, Tracy; Tropak, Michael; Banwell, Brenda; Blaser, Susan; Kok, Fernando; Giugliani, Roberto; Mahuran, Don; Clarke, Joe T. R.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Juvenile GM2 gangliosidosis is a group of inherited neurodegenerative diseases caused by deficiency of lysosomal β-hexosaminidase resulting in GM2 ganglioside accumulation in brain. The purpose of this study was to delineate the natural history of the condition and identify genotype-phenotype correlations that might be helpful in predicting the course of the disease in individual patients. METHODS A cohort of 21 patients with juvenile GM2 gangliosidosis, 15 with the Tay-Sachs variant and 6 with the Sandhoff variant, was studied prospectively in 2 centers. Our experience was compared with previously published reports on 134 patients. Information about clinical features, β-hexosaminidase enzyme activity, and mutation analysis was collected. RESULTS In our cohort of patients, the mean (±SD) age of onset of symptoms was 5.3 ± 4.1 years, with a mean follow-up time of 8.4 years. The most common symptoms at onset were gait disturbances (66.7%), incoordination (52.4%), speech problems (28.6%), and developmental delay (28.6%). The age of onset of gait disturbances was 7.1 ± 5.6 years. The mean time for progression to becoming wheelchair-bound was 6.2 ± 5.5 years. The mean age of onset of speech problems was 7.0 ± 5.6 years, with a mean time of progression to anarthria of 5.6 ± 5.3 years. Muscle wasting (10.6 ± 7.4 years), proximal weakness (11.1 ± 7.7 years), and incontinence of sphincters (14.6 ± 9.7 years) appeared later in the course of the disease. Psychiatric disturbances and neuropathy were more prevalent in patients with the Sandhoff variant than in those with the Tay-Sachs variant. However, dysphagia, sphincter incontinence, and sleep problems occurred earlier in those with the Tay-Sachs variant. Cerebellar atrophy was the most common finding on brain MRI (52.9%). The median survival time among the studied and reviewed patients was 14.5 years. The genotype-phenotype correlation revealed that in patients with the Tay-Sachs variant, the presence

  15. The Research of Improved Grey GM (1, 1) Model to Predict the Postprandial Glucose in Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yannian; Wei, Fenfen; Sun, Changqing; Li, Quanzhong

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes may result in some complications and increase the risk of many serious health problems. The purpose of clinical treatment is to carefully manage the blood glucose concentration. If the blood glucose concentration is predicted, treatments can be taken in advance to reduce the harm to patients. For this purpose, an improved grey GM (1, 1) model is applied to predict blood glucose with a small amount of data, and especially in terms of improved smoothness it can get higher prediction accuracy. The original data of blood glucose of type 2 diabetes is acquired by CGMS. Then the prediction model is established. Finally, 50 cases of blood glucose from the Henan Province People's Hospital are predicted in 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 minutes, respectively, in advance to verify the prediction model. The prediction result of blood glucose is evaluated by the EGA, MSE, and MAE. Particularly, the prediction results of postprandial blood glucose are presented and analyzed. The result shows that the improved grey GM (1, 1) model has excellent performance in postprandial blood glucose prediction. PMID:27314034

  16. GM1 ganglioside is involved in epigenetic activation loci of neuronal cells

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Yi-Tzang; Itokazu, Yutaka; Yu, Robert K.

    2015-01-01

    Gangliosides are sialic acid-containing glycosphingolipids that are most abundant in the nerve tissues. The quantity and expression pattern of gangliosides in brain change drastically throughout development and are mainly regulated through stage-specific expression of glycosyltransferase (ganglioside synthase) genes. We previously demonstrated that acetylation of histones H3 and H4 on the N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase I (GalNAcT, GA2/GM2/GD2/GT2-synthase) gene promoter resulted in recruitment of trans-activation factors. In addition, we reported that epigenetic activation of the GalNAcT gene was also detected as accompanied by an apparent induction of neuronal differentiation in neural stem cells responding to an exogenous supplement of ganglioside GM1. Here, we present evidence supporting the concept that nuclear GM1 is associated with gene regulation in neuronal cells. We found that nuclear GM1 binds acetylated histones on the promoters of the GalNAcT and NeuroD1 genes in differentiated neurons. Our study demonstrates for the first time that GM1 interacts with chromatin via acetylated histones at the nuclear periphery of neuronal cells. PMID:26498762

  17. GM1 Ganglioside Treatment Facilitates Behavioral Recovery from Bilateral Brain Damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabel, Bernhard A.; Slavin, Mary D.; Stein, Donald G.

    1984-07-01

    Adult rats with bilateral lesions of the caudate nucleus were treated with GM1 ganglioside. Although animals injected with a control solution were severely impaired in their ability to learn a complex spatial task, those treated with ganglioside were able to learn spatial reversals.

  18. Co-localization of the Ganglioside GM1 and Cholesterol Detected by Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Lozano, Mónica M.; Liu, Zhao; Sunnick, Eva; Janshoff, Andreas; Kumar, Krishna; Boxer, Steven G.

    2013-01-01

    The characterization of the lateral organization of components in biological membranes and the evolution of this arrangement in response to external triggers remains a major challenge. The concept of lipid rafts is widely invoked, however, direct evidence of the existence of these ephemeral entities remains elusive. We report here the use of Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) to image the cholesterol-dependent cohesive phase separation of the ganglioside GM1 into nano and micro-scale assemblies in a canonical lipid raft composition of lipids. This assembly of domains was interrogated in a model membrane system composed of palmitoyl sphingomyelin (PSM), cholesterol, and an unsaturated lipid (dioleoylphosphatidylcholine, DOPC). Orthogonal isotopic labeling of every lipid bilayer component and monofluorination of GM1 allowed generation of molecule specific images using a NanoSIMS. Simultaneous detection of six different ion species in SIMS, including secondary electrons, was used to generate ion ratio images whose signal intensity values could be correlated to composition through the use of calibration curves from standard samples. Images of this system provide the first direct, molecule specific, visual evidence for the co-localization of cholesterol and GM1 in supported lipid bilayers and further indicate the presence of three compositionally distinct phases: (1) the interdomain region; (2) micrometer-scale domains (d>3 μm); and, (3) nanometer-scale domains (d=100 nm − 1 μm) localized within the micrometer-scale domains and the interdomain region. PSM-rich, nanometer-scale domains prefer to partition within the more ordered, cholesterol-rich/DOPC-poor/GM1-rich micrometer-scale phase, while GM1-rich, nanometer-scale domains prefer to partition within the surrounding, disordered, cholesterol-poor/PSM-rich/DOPC-rich interdomain phase. PMID:23514537

  19. New Insights on Non-Enzymatic Oxidation of Ganglioside GM1 Using Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couto, Daniela; Melo, Tânia; Maciel, Elisabete; Campos, Ana; Alves, Eliana; Guedes, Sofia; Domingues, M. Rosário M.; Domingues, Pedro

    2016-12-01

    Gangliosides are acidic glycosphingolipids that are present in cell membranes and lipid raft domains, being particularly abundant in central nervous systems. They participate in modulating cell membrane properties, cell-cell recognition, cell regulation, and signaling. Disturbance in ganglioside metabolism has been correlated with the development of diseases, such as neurodegenerative diseases, and in inflammation. Both conditions are associated with an increased production of reactive oxidation species (ROS) that can induce changes in the structure of biomolecules, including lipids, leading to the loss or modification of their function. Oxidized phospholipids are usually involved in chronic diseases and inflammation. However, knowledge regarding oxidation of gangliosides is scarce. In order to evaluate the effect of ROS in gangliosides, an in vitro biomimetic model system was used to study the susceptibility of GM1 (Neu5Ac α2-3(Gal β1-3GalNAc β1-4)Gal β1-4Glc β1Cer) to undergo oxidative modifications. Oxidation of GM1 under Fenton reaction conditions was monitored using high resolution electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS). Upon oxidation, GM1 underwent oxidative cleavages in the carbohydrate chain, leading to the formation of other gangliosides GM2 (GalNAcβ1-4Gal(Neu5Acα2-3)1-4Glcβ1Cer), GM3 (Neu5Acα2-3Galβ1-4Glcβ1Cer), asialo-GM1 (Gal β1-3GalNAc β1-4Gal β1-4Glc β1Cer), asialo-GM2 (GalNAc β1-4Gal β1-4Glc β1Cer), of the small glycolipids lactosylceramide (LacCer), glucosylceramide (GlcCer), and of ceramide (Cer). In addition, oxygenated GM1 and GM2 (as keto and hydroxy derivatives), glycans, oxidized glycans, and oxidized ceramides were also identified. Nonenzymatic oxidation of GM1 under oxidative stress contributes to the generation of other gangliosides that may participate in the imbalance of gangliosides metabolism in vivo, through uncontrolled enzymatic pathways and, consequently, play

  20. Degradation of G(M1) and G(M2) by mammalian sialidases.

    PubMed Central

    Li, S C; Li, Y T; Moriya, S; Miyagi, T

    2001-01-01

    In mammalian tissues, the pathway known for the catabolism of G(M1) [Galbeta3GalNAcbeta4(Neu5Acalpha3)Galbeta4GlcCer; where Cer is ceramide] is the conversion of this ganglioside into G(M2) [GalNAcbeta4(Neu5Acalpha3)Galbeta4GlcbetaCer] by beta-galactosidase followed by the conversion of G(M2) into G(M3) (Neu5Acalpha3Galbeta4GlcbetaCer) by beta-N-acetylhexosaminidase A (Hex A). However, the question of whether or not G(M1) and G(M2) can also be respectively converted into asialo-G(M1) (Galbeta3GalNAcbeta4Galbeta4GlcCer; G(A1)) and asialo-G(M2) (GalNAcbeta4Galbeta4GlcbetaCer, G(A2)) by mammalian sialidases has not been resolved. This is due to the fact that sialidases purified from mammalian tissues always contained detergents that interfered with the in vitro hydrolysis of G(M1) and G(M2) in the presence of an activator protein. The mouse model of human type B Tay-Sachs disease created by the disruption of the Hexa gene showed no neurological abnormalities, with milder clinical symptoms than the human counterpart, and the accumulation of G(M2) in the brains of affected mice was only limited to certain regions [Sango, Yamanaka, Hoffmann, Okuda, Grinberg, Westphal, McDonald, Crawley, Sandhoff, Suzuki and Proia (1995) Nat. Genet. 11, 170-176]. These results suggest the possible presence of an alternative catabolic pathway (the G(A2) pathway) in mouse to convert G(M2) into G(A2) by sialidase. To show the existence of this pathway, we have used recombinant mammalian cytosolic sialidase and membrane-associated sialidase to study the desialylation of G(M1) and G(M2). We found that the mouse membrane-bound sialidase was able to convert G(M1) and G(M2) into their respective asialo-derivatives in the presence of human or mouse G(M2) activator protein. The cytosolic sialidase did not exhibit this activity. Our results suggest that, in vivo, the stable NeuAc of G(M1) and G(M2) may be removed by the mammalian membrane-associated sialidase in the presence of G(M2) activator protein. They also support the presence of the G(A2) pathway for the catabolism of G(M2) in mouse. PMID:11696012

  1. Preparation of Alexa Fluor 350-conjugated nonradioactive or 3H-labeled GM1 ganglioside derivatives with different ceramides.

    PubMed

    Panasiewicz, Mirosława; Domek, Hanna; Fedoryszak, Natalia; Pacuszka, Tadeusz

    2009-02-01

    Alexa Fluor 350 hydrazide (AF) was coupled to the aldehyde group at C-6 of terminal galactose of oxidized GM1 gangliosides containing different fatty acid residues (GM1s). The AF-GM1 hydrazones obtained were reduced with NaBH(4) or [3H]NaBH(4) and purified by high-performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC) and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Final yields of AF-GM1s exceeded 30%, purity was better than 97%, and radiochemical purity of 3H-labeled AF-GM1s was more than 94.5%. Structures of AF-GM1s were confirmed by electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). When added to HL-60 cell culture media, more than 81.6 or 78.9% of the AF-[3H]GM1s were taken up by cells in a bovine serum albumin- or trypsin-resistant manner, respectively. Approximately 70% of the AF-[3H]GM1s were recovered in HL-60 total plasma membrane fraction.

  2. Insights into binding of cholera toxin to GM1 containing membrane.

    PubMed

    Basu, Ipsita; Mukhopadhyay, Chaitali

    2014-12-23

    Interactions of cholera toxin (CT) with membrane are associated with the massive secretory diarrhea seen in Asiatic cholera. Ganglioside GM1 has been shown to be responsible for the binding of the B subunit of cholera toxin (CT-B), which then helps CT to pass through the membrane, but the exact mechanism remains to be explored. In this work, we have carried out atomistic scale molecular dynamics simulation to investigate the structural changes of CT upon membrane binding and alteration in membrane structure and dynamics. Starting from the initial structure where the five units of B subunit bind with five GM1, only three of five units remain bound and the whole CT is tilted such that the three binding units are deeper in the membrane. The lipids that are in contact with those units of the CT-B behave differently from the rest of the lipids. Altogether, our results demonstrate the atomistic interaction of CT with GM1 containing lipid membrane and provide a probable mechanism of the early stage alteration of lipid structure and dynamics, which can make a passage for penetration of CT on membrane surface.

  3. GM1 enhances dopaminergic markers in the brain of aged rats.

    PubMed

    Goettl, V M; Zhang, H; Burrows, A C; Wemlinger, T A; Neff, N H; Hadjiconstantinou, M

    2003-10-01

    A number of presynaptic markers are compromised in the dopaminergic neurons of aged Sprague-Dawley rats (22 months old) compared with young rats (3 months old). Indeed, in the striatum of the aged rats there is a diminished capacity to transport dopamine (DA), to bind the dopamine transporter (DAT) marker mazindol, to bind the vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) marker dihydrotetrabenazine, and to release DA under basal conditions or after induction by K(+) or amphetamine. Furthermore, the expression of DAT and VMAT2 mRNA in the midbrain is suppressed. GM1 ganglioside, 30 mg/kg ip daily, administered for 30 days, restores the afore-mentioned markers to values approaching those for young rats. Taken together with our published observations that GM1 partially restores tyrosine hydroxylase activity and DA metabolism in aged nigrostriatal and mesoaccumbal neurons and improves their morphology, our work suggests that GM1 might act as a dopaminergic neurotrophic factor in the aged brain and be a useful adjuvant for treating age-associated dopaminergic deficits.

  4. Interaction between Simian Virus 40 Major Capsid Protein VP1 and Cell Surface Ganglioside GM1 Triggers Vacuole Formation

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yong; Motamedi, Nasim; Magaldi, Thomas G.; Gee, Gretchen V.; Atwood, Walter J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Simian virus 40 (SV40), a polyomavirus that has served as an important model to understand many aspects of biology, induces dramatic cytoplasmic vacuolization late during productive infection of monkey host cells. Although this activity led to the discovery of the virus in 1960, the mechanism of vacuolization is still not known. Pentamers of the major SV40 capsid protein VP1 bind to the ganglioside GM1, which serves as the cellular receptor for the virus. In this report, we show that binding of VP1 to cell surface GM1 plays a key role in SV40 infection-induced vacuolization. We previously showed that SV40 VP1 mutants defective for GM1 binding fail to induce vacuolization, even though they replicate efficiently. Here, we show that interfering with GM1-VP1 binding by knockdown of GM1 after infection is established abrogates vacuolization by wild-type SV40. Vacuole formation during permissive infection requires efficient virus release, and conditioned medium harvested late during SV40 infection rapidly induces vacuoles in a VP1- and GM1-dependent fashion. Furthermore, vacuolization can also be induced by a nonreplicating SV40 pseudovirus in a GM1-dependent manner, and a mutation in BK pseudovirus VP1 that generates GM1 binding confers vacuole-inducing activity. Vacuolization can also be triggered by purified pentamers of wild-type SV40 VP1, but not by GM1 binding-defective pentamers or by intracellular expression of VP1. These results demonstrate that SV40 infection-induced vacuolization is caused by the binding of released progeny viruses to GM1, thereby identifying the molecular trigger for the activity that led to the discovery of SV40. PMID:27006465

  5. Distribution of ganglioside GM1 in L-alpha-dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine/cholesterol monolayers: a model for lipid rafts.

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, C; Johnston, L J

    2000-01-01

    The distribution of low concentrations of ganglioside GM1 in L-alpha-dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and DPPC/cholesterol monolayers supported on mica has been studied using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The monolayers studied correspond to a pure gel phase and a mixture of liquid-expanded (LE) and liquid-condensed (LC) phases for DPPC and to a single homogeneous liquid-ordered phase for 2:1 DPPC/cholesterol. The addition of 2.5-5% GM1 to phase-separated DPPC monolayers resulted in small round ganglioside-rich microdomains in the center and at the edges of the LC domains. Higher amounts of GM1 (10%) give numerous filaments in the center of the LC domains and larger patches at the edges. A gel phase DPPC monolayer containing GM1 showed large domains containing a network of GM1-rich filaments. The addition of GM1 to a liquid-ordered 2:1 DPPC/cholesterol monolayer gives small, round domains that vary in size from 50 to 150 nm for a range of surface pressures. Larger amounts of GM1 lead to coalescence of the small, round domains to give longer filaments that cover 30-40% of the monolayer surface for 10 mol % GM1. The results indicate that biologically relevant GM1 concentrations lead to submicron-sized domains in a cholesterol-rich liquid-ordered phase that is analogous to that found in detergent-insoluble membrane fractions, and are thought to be important in membrane microdomains or rafts. This demonstrates that AFM studies of model monolayers and bilayers provide a powerful method for the direct detection of microdomains that are too small for study with most other techniques. PMID:11053150

  6. Mutations in the GM1 Binding Site of Simian Virus 40 VP1 Alter Receptor Usage and Cell Tropism

    PubMed Central

    Magaldi, Thomas G.; Buch, Michael H. C.; Murata, Haruhiko; Erickson, Kimberly D.; Neu, Ursula; Garcea, Robert L.; Peden, Keith; Stehle, Thilo

    2012-01-01

    Polyomaviruses are nonenveloped viruses with capsids composed primarily of 72 pentamers of the viral VP1 protein, which forms the outer shell of the capsid and binds to cell surface oligosaccharide receptors. Highly conserved VP1 proteins from closely related polyomaviruses recognize different oligosaccharides. To determine whether amino acid changes restricted to the oligosaccharide binding site are sufficient to determine receptor specificity and how changes in receptor usage affect tropism, we studied the primate polyomavirus simian virus 40 (SV40), which uses the ganglioside GM1 as a receptor that mediates cell binding and entry. Here, we used two sequential genetic screens to isolate and characterize viable SV40 mutants with mutations in the VP1 GM1 binding site. Two of these mutants were completely resistant to GM1 neutralization, were no longer stimulated by incorporation of GM1 into cell membranes, and were unable to bind to GM1 on the cell surface. In addition, these mutant viruses displayed an infection defect in monkey cells with high levels of cell surface GM1. Interestingly, one mutant infected cells with low cell surface GM1 more efficiently than wild-type virus, apparently by utilizing a different ganglioside receptor. Our results indicate that a small number of mutations in the GM1 binding site are sufficient to alter ganglioside usage and change tropism, and they suggest that VP1 divergence is driven primarily by a requirement to accommodate specific receptors. In addition, our results suggest that GM1 binding is required for vacuole formation in permissive monkey CV-1 cells. Further study of these mutants will provide new insight into polyomavirus entry, pathogenesis, and evolution. PMID:22514351

  7. The Role of Ganglioside GM1 in Cellular Internalization Mechanisms of Poly(amidoamine) Dendrimers

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Seungpyo; Rattan, Rahul; Majoros, István J.; Mullen, Douglas G.; Peters, Jennifer L.; Shi, Xiangyang; Bielinska, Anna U.; Blanco, Luz; Orr, Bradford G.; Baker, James R.; Holl, Mark M. Banaszak

    2015-01-01

    Generation 7 (G7) poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimers with amine, acetamide, and carboxylate end groups were prepared to investigate polymer/cell membrane interactions in vitro. G7 PAMAM dendrimers were used in this study because higher generation of dendrimers are more effective in permeabilization of cell plasma membranes and in the formation of nanoscale holes in supported lipid bilayers than smaller, lower generation dendrimers. Dendrimer-based conjugates were characterized by 1H NMR, UV/Vis spectroscopy, GPC, HPLC, and CE. Positively charged amine-terminated G7 dendrimers (G7-NH2) were observed to internalize into KB, Rat2 and C6 cells at a 200 nM concentration. By way of contrast, neither negatively charged G7 carboxylate-terminated dendrimers (G7-COOH) nor neutral acetamide-terminated G7 dendrimers (G7-Ac) associated with the cell plasma membrane or internalized under similar conditions. A series of in vitro experiments employing endocytic markers cholera toxin subunit B (CTB), transferrin, and GM1-pyrene were performed to further investigate mechanisms of dendrimer internalization into cells. G7-NH2 dendrimers co-localized with CTB, however, experiments with C6 cells indicated that internalization of G7-NH2 was not ganglioside GM1 dependent. The G7/CTB co-localization was thus ascribed to an artifact of direct interaction between the two species. The presence of GM1 in the membrane also had no effect upon XTT assays of cell viability or lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assays of membrane permeability. PMID:19583240

  8. GM1 improves neurofascin155 association with lipid rafts and prevents rat brain myelin injury after hypoxia-ischemia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y P; Huang, Q L; Zhao, C M; Tang, J L; Wang, Y L

    2011-06-01

    White matter injury characterized by damage to myelin is an important process in hypoxic-ischemic brain damage (HIBD). Because the oligodendrocyte-specific isoform of neurofascin, neurofascin 155 (NF155), and its association with lipid rafts are essential for the establishment and stabilization of the paranodal junction, which is required for tight interaction between myelin and axons, we analyzed the effect of monosialotetrahexosyl ganglioside (GM1) on NF155 expression and its association with lipid rafts after HIBD in Sprague-Dawley rats, weighing 12-15 g, on day 7 post-partum (P7; N = 20 per group). HIBD was induced on P7 and the rats were divided into two groups: one group received an intraperitoneal injection of 50 mg/kg GM1 three times and the other group an injection of saline. There was also a group of 20 sham-operated rats. After sacrifice, the brains of the rats were removed on P30 and studied by immunochemistry, SDS-PAGE, Western blot analysis, and electron microscopy. Staining showed that the saline group had definite rarefaction and fragmentation of brain myelin sheaths, whereas the GM1 group had no obvious structural changes. The GM1 group had 1.9-2.9-fold more GM1 in lipid rafts than the saline group (fraction 3-6; all P < 0.05) and 0.5-2.4-fold higher expression of NF155 in lipid rafts (fraction 3-5; all P < 0.05). Injection of GM1 increased the content of GM1 in lipid rafts as well as NF155 expression and its lipid raft association in HIBD rat brains. GM1 may repair the structure of lipid rafts, promote the association of NF155 (or other important proteins) with lipid rafts, stabilize the structure of paranodes, and eventually prevent myelin sheath damage, suggesting a novel mechanism for its neuroprotective properties.

  9. Soluble Aβ oligomers are rapidly sequestered from brain ISF in vivo and bind GM1 ganglioside on cellular membranes

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Soyon; Ostaszewski, Beth L.; Yang, Ting; O'Malley, Tiernan T.; Jin, Ming; Yanagisawa, Katsuhiko; Li, Shaomin; Bartels, Tim; Selkoe, Dennis J.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Soluble Aβ oligomers contribute importantly to synaptotoxicity in Alzheimer's disease, but their dynamics in vivo remain unclear. Here, we found that soluble Aβ oligomers were sequestered from brain interstitial fluid onto brain membranes much more rapidly than non-toxic monomers and were recovered in part as bound to GM1 ganglioside on membranes. Aβ oligomers bound strongly to GM1 ganglioside, and blocking the sialic acid residue on GM1 decreased oligomer-mediated LTP impairment in mouse hippocampal slices. In a hAPP transgenic mouse model, substantial levels of GM1-bound Aβ42 were recovered from brain membrane fractions. We also detected GM1-bound Aβ in human CSF, and its levels correlated with Aβ42, suggesting its potential as a biomarker of Aβ-related membrane dysfunction. Together, these findings highlight a novel mechanism whereby hydrophobic Aβ oligomers become sequestered onto GM1 ganglioside and presumably other lipids on neuronal membranes, where they may induce progressive functional and structural changes. PMID:24685176

  10. The morphology of GM1 x/SM 0.6-x/Chol 0.4 planar bilayers supported on SiO 2 surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Yanli; Tero, Ryugo; Imai, Yosuke; Hoshino, Tyuji; Urisu, Tsuneo

    2008-07-01

    Ganglioside GM1 (GM1), sphingomyelin (SM) and cholesterol (Chol) are dominant lipid components of rafts in plasma membranes. The morphology of GM1 x/SM 0.6-x/Chol 0.4 SPBs on SiO 2 surfaces has been studied by atomic force microscopy and fluorescence microscopy at various ratios of GM1/SM ( x = 0-0.25). The unique changes in morphology depending on the GM1 concentrations are qualitatively explained by hydrogen bonding and the hydrophobic interactions between SM and Chol, and by hydrogen bonding and the steric effects between bulky GM1 headgroups under Ca 2+ existing conditions and the electrostatic repulsion between the negative charges of GM1 headgroups under Ca 2+ nonexisting conditions.

  11. Interaction between ganglioside G(M1) and diosgenin in langmuir monolayers at the air/water interface.

    PubMed

    Hao, Changchun; Zhang, Lei; Sun, Runguang; Yang, Jing; He, Guangxiao

    2014-01-01

    The interaction between ganglioside GM1 (GM1) and diosgenin (Dios) in mixed monolayers was investigated using surface pressure measurements and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The miscibility and stability of the mixed monolayer was evaluated both in a qualitative and quantitative way in terms of the excess mean molecular area (ΔAex), excess Gibbs energy (ΔGex). The ΔAex of mixed GM1/Dios monolayer was found to have positive deviations from ideality at low Dios mole fractions (XDios = 0.2). Above XDios = 0.2, there was a marked negative deviation from ideal mixing, indicating attractive interaction between G(M1) and Dios. According to the values of excess Gibbs energy of mixing monolayers, the more stable monolayers assayed was: XDios = 0.6. The compressibility coefficient was assessed at various surface pressures. The monolayer of Dios was more elasticity or rigid than G(M1). The AFM images for the mixed monolayers at 30 mN/m indicated there was obvious phase separation in the mixed monolayers. These findings will provide useful information for understanding the interaction between drug and lipids.

  12. Segregation of gangliosides GM1 and GD3 on cell membranes, isolated membrane rafts, and defined supported lipid monolayers.

    PubMed

    Vyas, K A; Patel, H V; Vyas, A A; Schnaar, R L

    2001-02-01

    Lateral assemblies of sphingolipids, glycosphingolipids and cholesterol, termed rafts, are postulated to be present in biological membranes and to function in important cellular phenomena. We probed whether rafts are heterogeneous by determining the relative distribution of two gangliosides, GM1 and GD3, in artificial supported monolayers, in intact rat primary cerebellar granule neurones, and in membrane rafts isolated from rat cerebellum. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) using fluorophore-labelled cholera toxin B subunit (which binds GM1) and mAb R24 (which binds GD3) revealed that GM1 spontaneously self-associates but does not co-cluster with GD3 in supported monolayers and on intact neurones. Cholera toxin and immunocytochemical labelling of isolated membrane rafts from rat cerebellum further demonstrated that GM1 does not co-localise with GD3. Furthermore, whereas the membrane raft resident proteins Lyn and caveolin both co-localise with GD3 in isolated membrane rafts, GM1 appears in separate and distinct aggregates. These data support prior reports that membrane rafts are heterogeneous, although the mechanisms for establishing and maintaining such heterogeneity remain to be determined.

  13. Interfacial stabilization of the antitumoral drug Paclitaxel in monolayers of GM1 and GD1a gangliosides.

    PubMed

    Heredia, Valeria; Maggio, Bruno; Beltramo, Dante M; Dupuy, Fernando G

    2015-10-01

    Molecular interactions between the anti-cancer agent Paclitaxel (Ptx), and two gangliosides with different sialic acid content, GM1 and GD1a, were investigated using the Langmuir film balance technique. Ptx showed interfacial activity reducing the air/water surface tension by 18 mN·m(-1). However, the drug was able to insert into preformed ganglioside monolayers at much higher surface pressures, indicating a preferential interaction of Ptx with GM1 and GD1a. Compression isotherms of binary mixtures of Ptx and GM1 or GD1a also indicated non-ideal mixed monolayers in which the drug became stabilized at the interface in the presence of gangliosides. Ptx reached much higher surface pressure values in the mixed monolayers than those sustained in pure Ptx, although partial desorption of the drug from the interface into the subphase was also observed at high Ptx contents. The mean molecular area of the mixtures showed condensation, mainly in the case of GD1a, whereas Ptx induced a decrease in the compressibility of monolayers when mixed with either GM1 or GD1a. Additionally, Brewster angle microscopy analysis indicated that higher amounts of Ptx are present at the mixed ganglioside/Ptx interface when compared to pure drug monolayers. Finally, GD1a micelles increased in size in the presence of Ptx, whereas GM1 micelles kept their diameter, according to dynamic light scattering measurements, which could be explained by the different properties of ganglioside monolayers. The results obtained on ganglioside-Ptx interactions allowed interpreting the different Ptx loading capacity of GM1 and GD1a, enabling them to act as potential drug carriers.

  14. Measuring Positive Cooperativity Using the Direct ESI-MS Assay. Cholera Toxin B Subunit Homopentamer Binding to GM1 Pentasaccharide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hong; Kitova, Elena N.; Klassen, John S.

    2014-01-01

    Direct electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) assay was used to investigate the stepwise binding of the GM1 pentasaccharide β- D-Gal p-(1→3)-β-D-Gal pNAc-(1→4)[α-D-Neu5Ac-(2→3)]-β- D-Gal p-(1→4)-β-D-Glc p (GM1os) to the cholera toxin B subunit homopentamer (CTB5) and to establish conclusively whether GM1os binding is cooperative. Apparent association constants were measured for the stepwise addition of one to five GM1os to CTB5 at pH 6.9 and 22 °C. The intrinsic association constant, which was established from the apparent association constant for the addition of a single GM1os to CTB5, was found to be (3.2 ± 0.2) × 106 M-1. This is in reasonable agreement with the reported value of (6.4 ± 0.3) × 106 M-1, which was measured at pH 7.4 and 25 °C using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). Analysis of the apparent association constants provides direct and unambiguous evidence that GM1os binding exhibits small positive cooperativity. Binding was found to be sensitive to the number of ligand-bound nearest neighbor subunits, with the affinities enhanced by a factor of 1.7 and 2.9 when binding occurs next to one or two ligand-bound subunits, respectively. These findings, which provide quantitative support for the binding model proposed by Homans and coworkers [14], highlight the unique strengths of the direct ESI-MS assay for measuring cooperative ligand binding.

  15. Role of lipid rafts and GM1 in the segregation and processing of prion protein.

    PubMed

    Botto, Laura; Cunati, Diana; Coco, Silvia; Sesana, Silvia; Bulbarelli, Alessandra; Biasini, Emiliano; Colombo, Laura; Negro, Alessandro; Chiesa, Roberto; Masserini, Massimo; Palestini, Paola

    2014-01-01

    The prion protein (PrPC) is highly expressed within the nervous system. Similar to other GPI-anchored proteins, PrPC is found in lipid rafts, membrane domains enriched in cholesterol and sphingolipids. PrPC raft association, together with raft lipid composition, appears essential for the conversion of PrPC into the scrapie isoform PrPSc, and the development of prion disease. Controversial findings were reported on the nature of PrPC-containing rafts, as well as on the distribution of PrPC between rafts and non-raft membranes. We investigated PrPC/ganglioside relationships and their influence on PrPC localization in a neuronal cellular model, cerebellar granule cells. Our findings argue that in these cells at least two PrPC conformations coexist: in lipid rafts PrPC is present in the native folding (α-helical), stabilized by chemico-physical condition, while it is mainly present in other membrane compartments in a PrPSc-like conformation. We verified, by means of antibody reactivity and circular dichroism spectroscopy, that changes in lipid raft-ganglioside content alters PrPC conformation and interaction with lipid bilayers, without modifying PrPC distribution or cleavage. Our data provide new insights into the cellular mechanism of prion conversion and suggest that GM1-prion protein interaction at the cell surface could play a significant role in the mechanism predisposing to pathology.

  16. Application of RBFN network and GM (1, 1) for groundwater level simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zijun; Yang, Qingchun; Wang, Luchen; Martín, Jordi Delgado

    2016-10-01

    Groundwater is a prominent resource of drinking and domestic water in the world. In this context, a feasible water resources management plan necessitates acceptable predictions of groundwater table depth fluctuations, which can help ensure the sustainable use of a watershed's aquifers for urban and rural water supply. Due to the difficulties of identifying non-linear model structure and estimating the associated parameters, in this study radial basis function neural network (RBFNN) and GM (1, 1) models are used for the prediction of monthly groundwater level fluctuations in the city of Longyan, Fujian Province (South China). The monthly groundwater level data monitored from January 2003 to December 2011 are used in both models. The error criteria are estimated using the coefficient of determination (R 2), mean absolute error (E) and root mean squared error (RMSE). The results show that both the models can forecast the groundwater level with fairly high accuracy, but the RBFN network model can be a promising tool to simulate and forecast groundwater level since it has a relatively smaller RMSE and MAE.

  17. Tissue resident NK cells mediate ischemic kidney injury and are not depleted by anti-Asialo GM1 antibody

    PubMed Central

    Victorino, Francisco; Sojka, Dorothy K.; Brodsky, Kelley S.; McNamee, Eoin N.; Masterson, Joanne C.; Homann, Dirk; Yokoyama, Wayne M.; Eltzschig, Holger K.; Clambey, Eric T.

    2015-01-01

    NK cells are innate lymphoid cells important for immune surveillance, identifying and responding to stress, infection, and/or transformation. While conventional NK (cNK) cells circulate systemically, many NK cells reside in tissues where they appear to be poised to locally regulate tissue function. Here we tested the contribution of tissue-resident NK (trNK) cells to tissue homeostasis by studying ischemic injury in the mouse kidney. Parabiosis experiments demonstrate that the kidney contains a significant fraction of trNK cells under homeostatic conditions. Kidney trNK cells developed independent of NFIL3 and Tbet, and expressed a distinct cell surface phenotype as compared to cNK cells. Among these, trNK cells had reduced asialo-GM1 (AsGM1) expression relative to cNK cells, a phenotype observed in trNK cells across multiple organs and mouse strains. Strikingly, anti-AsGM1 antibody treatment, commonly used as NK cell-depleting regimen, resulted in a robust and selective depletion of cNKs, leaving trNKs largely intact. Using this differential depletion, we tested the relative contribution of cNK and trNK cells in ischemic kidney injury. Whereas anti-NK1.1 antibody effectively depleted both trNK and cNK cells and protected against ischemic-reperfusion injury, anti-AsGM1 antibody preferentially depleted cNK cells and failed to protect against injury. These data demonstrate unanticipated specificity of anti-AsGM1 antibody depletion on NK cell subsets and reveal a new approach to study the contributions of cNK and trNK cells in vivo. In total, these data demonstrate that trNK cells play a key role in modulating local responses to ischemic tissue injury in the kidney and potentially other organs. PMID:26453755

  18. Effects of ganglioside G(M1) and erythropoietin on spinal cord lesions in rats: functional and histological evaluations

    PubMed Central

    Marcon, Raphael Martus; Cristante, Alexandre Fogaça; de Barros Filho, Tarcísio Eloy Pessoa; Ferreira, Ricardo; dos Santos, Gustavo Bispo

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the functional and histological effects of ganglioside G(M1) and erythropoietin after experimental spinal cord contusion injury. METHODS: Fifty male Wistar rats underwent experimental spinal cord lesioning using an NYU-Impactor device and were randomly divided into the following groups, which received treatment intraperitoneally. The G(M1) group received ganglioside G(M1) (30 mg/kg); the erythropoietin group received erythropoietin (1000 IU/kg); the combined group received both drugs; and the saline group received saline (0.9%) as a control. A fifth group was the laminectomy group, in which the animals were subjected to laminectomy alone, without spinal lesioning or treatment. The animals were evaluated according to the Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan (BBB) scale, motor evoked potential recordings and, after euthanasia, histological analysis of spinal cord tissue. RESULTS: The erythropoietin group had higher BBB scores than the G(M1) group. The combined group had the highest BBB scores, and the saline group had the lowest BBB scores. No significant difference in latency was observed between the three groups that underwent spinal cord lesioning and intervention. However, the combined group showed a significantly higher signal amplitude than the other treatment groups or the saline group (p<0.01). Histological tissue analysis showed no significant difference between the groups. Axonal index was significantly enhanced in the combined group than any other intervention (p<0.01). CONCLUSION: G(M1) and erythropoietin exert therapeutic effects on axonal regeneration and electrophysiological and motor functions in rats subjected to experimental spinal cord lesioning and administering these two substances in combination potentiates their effects. PMID:27438570

  19. GM2 gangliosidosis associated with a HEXA missense mutation in Japanese Chin dogs: a potential model for Tay Sachs disease.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Douglas N; Zeng, Rong; Wenger, David A; Johnson, Gary S; Johnson, Gayle C; Decker, Jared E; Katz, Martin L; Platt, Simon R; O'Brien, Dennis P

    2013-01-01

    GM2 gangliosidosis is a fatal lysosomal storage disease caused by a deficiency of β-hexosaminidase (EC 3.2.1.52). There are two major isoforms of the enzyme: hexosaminidase A composed of an α and a β subunit (encoded by HEXA and HEXB genes, respectively); and, hexosaminidase B composed of two β subunits. Hexosaminidase A requires an activator protein encoded by GM2A to catabolize GM2 ganglioside, but even in the absence of the activator protein, it can hydrolyze the synthetic substrates commonly used to assess enzyme activity. GM2 gangliosidosis has been reported in Japanese Chin dogs, and we identified the disease in two related Japanese Chin dogs based on clinical signs, histopathology and elevated brain GM2 gangliosides. As in previous reports, we found normal or elevated hexosaminidase activity when measured with the synthetic substrates. This suggested that the canine disease is analogous to human AB variant of G(M2) gangliosidosis, which results from mutations in GM2A. However, only common neutral single nucleotide polymorphisms were found upon sequence analysis of the canine ortholog of GM2A from the affected Japanese Chins. When the same DNA samples were used to sequence HEXA, we identified a homozygous HEXA:c967G>A transition which predicts a p.E323K substitution. The glutamyl moiety at 323 is known to make an essential contribution to the active site of hexosaminidase A, and none of the 128 normal Japanese Chins and 92 normal dogs of other breeds that we tested was homozygous for HEXA:c967A. Thus it appears that the HEXA:c967G>A transition is responsible for the GM2 gangliosidosis in Japanese Chins.

  20. A Trp474Cys mutation in the alpha-subunit of beta-hexosaminidase causes a subacute encephalopathic form of G{sub M2} gangliosidosis, type 1

    SciTech Connect

    Petroulakis, E.; Cao, Z.; Salo, T.

    1994-09-01

    Mutations in the HEXA gene that encodes the {alpha}-subunit of the heterodimeric lysosomal enzyme {beta}-hexosaminidase A, or Hex A ({alpha}{beta}), cause G{sub M2} gangliosidosis, type 1. The infantile form (Tay-Sachs disease) results when there is no residual Hex A activity, while less severe and more variable clinical phenotypes result when residual Hex A activity is present. A non-Jewish male who presented with an acute psychotic episode at age 16 was diagnosed with a subacute encephalopathic form of G{sub M2} gangliosidosis. At age 19, chronic psychosis with intermittent acute exacerbations remains the most disabling symptom in this patient and his affected brother although both exhibit some ataxia and moderately severe dysarthria. We have found a 4 bp insertion (+TATC 1278) associated with infantile Tay-Sachs disease on one allele; no previously identified mutation was found on the second allele. SSCP analysis detected a shift in exon 13 and sequencing revealed a G1422C mutation in the second allele that results in a Trp474Cys substitution. The presence of the mutation was confirmed by the loss of HaeIII and ScrFI sites in exon 13 PCR products from the subjects and their father. The mutation was introduced into the {alpha}-subunit cDNA and Hex S ({alpha}{alpha}) and Hex A ({alpha}{beta}) were transiently expressed in monkey COS-7 cells. The Trp474Cys mutant protein had approximately 5% and 12% of wild-type Hex S and Hex A activity, respectively. Western blot analysis revealed a small amount of residual mature {alpha}-subunit and a normal level of precursor protein. We conclude that the Trp474Cys mutation is the cause of the Hex A deficiency associated with a subacute (juvenile-onset) phenotype in this patient. Like other mutations in exon 13 of HEXA, it appears to affect intracellular processing. Studies of the defect in intracellular processing are in progress.

  1. Clinical and molecular analysis of GM2 gangliosidosis in two apparent littermate kittens of the Japanese domestic cat.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Daisuke; Yamato, Osamu; Kobayashi, Masanori; Fujita, Michio; Nakamura, Shinichiro; Takahashi, Kimimasa; Satoh, Hiroyuki; Shoda, Toru; Hayashi, Daisuke; Yamasaki, Masahiro; Maede, Yoshimitsu; Arai, Toshiro; Orima, Hiromitsu

    2007-06-01

    This case report documents clinical and molecular findings in two littermate kittens of the Japanese domestic cat with GM2 gangliosidosis variant 0. Analysis included detailed physical, magnetic resonance imaging, biochemical, pathological and genetic examinations. At first, these littermate kittens showed typical cerebellar signs at approximately 2 months of age. About 2 months later, they progressively showed other neurological signs and subsequently died at about 7 months of age. Magnetic resonance imaging just before the death showed an enlarged ventricular system, T1 hyperintensity in the internal capsule, and T2 hyperintensity in the white matter of the whole brain. Histological findings suggested a type of lysosomal storage disease. Biochemical studies demonstrated that the kittens were affected with GM2 gangliosidosis variant 0, and a DNA assay finally demonstrated that these animals were homozygous for the mutation, which the authors had identified in a different family of the Japanese domestic cat. The findings in the present cases provide useful information about GM2 gangliosidosis variant 0 in Japanese domestic cats.

  2. [Molecular pathogenesis and therapeutic approach of GM2 gangliosidosis].

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Daisuke

    2013-01-01

    Tay-Sachs and Sandhoff diseases (GM2 gangliosidoses) are autosomal recessive lysosomal storage diseases caused by gene mutations in HEXA and HEXB, each encoding human lysosomal β-hexosaminidase α-subunits and β-subunits, respectively. In Tay-Sachs disease, excessive accumulation of GM2 ganglioside (GM2), mainly in the central nervous system, is caused by a deficiency of the HexA isozyme (αβ heterodimer), resulting in progressive neurologic disorders. In Sandhoff disease, combined deficiencies of HexA and HexB (ββ homodimer) cause not only the accumulation of GM2 but also of oligosaccharides carrying terminal N-acetylhexosamine residues (GlcNAc-oligosaccharides), resulting in systemic manifestations including hepatosplenomegaly as well as neurologic symptoms. Hence there is little clinically effective treatment for these GM2 gangliosidoses. Recent studies on the molecular pathogenesis in Sandhoff disease patients and disease model mice have shown the involvement of microglial activation and chemokine induction in neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration in this disease. Experimental and therapeutic approaches, including recombinant enzyme replacement, have been performed using Sandhoff disease model mice, suggesting the future application of novel techniques to treat GM2 gangliosidoses (Hex deficiencies), including Sandhoff disease as well as Tay-Sachs disease. In this study, we isolated astrocytes and microglia from the neonatal brain of Sandhoff disease model mice and demonstrated abnormalities of glial cells. Moreover, we demonstrated the therapeutic effect of an intracerebroventricular administration of novel recombinant human HexA carrying a high content of M6P residue in Sandhoff disease model mice.

  3. Differential uPAR recruitment in caveolar-lipid rafts by GM1 and GM3 gangliosides regulates endothelial progenitor cells angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Margheri, Francesca; Papucci, Laura; Schiavone, Nicola; D'Agostino, Riccardo; Trigari, Silvana; Serratì, Simona; Laurenzana, Anna; Biagioni, Alessio; Luciani, Cristina; Chillà, Anastasia; Andreucci, Elena; Del Rosso, Tommaso; Margheri, Giancarlo; Del Rosso, Mario; Fibbi, Gabriella

    2015-01-01

    Gangliosides and the urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) tipically partition in specialized membrane microdomains called lipid-rafts. uPAR becomes functionally important in fostering angiogenesis in endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) upon recruitment in caveolar-lipid rafts. Moreover, cell membrane enrichment with exogenous GM1 ganglioside is pro-angiogenic and opposite to the activity of GM3 ganglioside. On these basis, we first checked the interaction of uPAR with membrane models enriched with GM1 or GM3, relying on the adoption of solid-supported mobile bilayer lipid membranes with raft-like composition formed onto solid hydrophilic surfaces, and evaluated by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) the extent of uPAR recruitment. We estimated the apparent dissociation constants of uPAR-GM1/GM3 complexes. These preliminary observations, indicating that uPAR binds preferentially to GM1-enriched biomimetic membranes, were validated by identifying a pro-angiogenic activity of GM1-enriched EPCs, based on GM1-dependent uPAR recruitment in caveolar rafts. We have observed that addition of GM1 to EPCs culture medium promotes matrigel invasion and capillary morphogenesis, as opposed to the anti-angiogenesis activity of GM3. Moreover, GM1 also stimulates MAPKinases signalling pathways, typically associated with an angiogenesis program. Caveolar-raft isolation and Western blotting of uPAR showed that GM1 promotes caveolar-raft partitioning of uPAR, as opposed to control and GM3-challenged EPCs. By confocal microscopy, we have shown that in EPCs uPAR is present on the surface in at least three compartments, respectively, associated to GM1, GM3 and caveolar rafts. Following GM1 exogenous addition, the GM3 compartment is depleted of uPAR which is recruited within caveolar rafts thereby triggering angiogenesis.

  4. Differential uPAR recruitment in caveolar-lipid rafts by GM1 and GM3 gangliosides regulates endothelial progenitor cells angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Margheri, Francesca; Papucci, Laura; Schiavone, Nicola; D'Agostino, Riccardo; Trigari, Silvana; Serratì, Simona; Laurenzana, Anna; Biagioni, Alessio; Luciani, Cristina; Chillà, Anastasia; Andreucci, Elena; Del Rosso, Tommaso; Margheri, Giancarlo; Del Rosso, Mario; Fibbi, Gabriella

    2015-01-01

    Gangliosides and the urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) tipically partition in specialized membrane microdomains called lipid-rafts. uPAR becomes functionally important in fostering angiogenesis in endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) upon recruitment in caveolar-lipid rafts. Moreover, cell membrane enrichment with exogenous GM1 ganglioside is pro-angiogenic and opposite to the activity of GM3 ganglioside. On these basis, we first checked the interaction of uPAR with membrane models enriched with GM1 or GM3, relying on the adoption of solid-supported mobile bilayer lipid membranes with raft-like composition formed onto solid hydrophilic surfaces, and evaluated by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) the extent of uPAR recruitment. We estimated the apparent dissociation constants of uPAR-GM1/GM3 complexes. These preliminary observations, indicating that uPAR binds preferentially to GM1-enriched biomimetic membranes, were validated by identifying a pro-angiogenic activity of GM1-enriched EPCs, based on GM1-dependent uPAR recruitment in caveolar rafts. We have observed that addition of GM1 to EPCs culture medium promotes matrigel invasion and capillary morphogenesis, as opposed to the anti-angiogenesis activity of GM3. Moreover, GM1 also stimulates MAPKinases signalling pathways, typically associated with an angiogenesis program. Caveolar-raft isolation and Western blotting of uPAR showed that GM1 promotes caveolar-raft partitioning of uPAR, as opposed to control and GM3-challenged EPCs. By confocal microscopy, we have shown that in EPCs uPAR is present on the surface in at least three compartments, respectively, associated to GM1, GM3 and caveolar rafts. Following GM1 exogenous addition, the GM3 compartment is depleted of uPAR which is recruited within caveolar rafts thereby triggering angiogenesis. PMID:25313007

  5. Expression of GM1, a marker of lipid rafts, defines two subsets of human monocytes with differential endocytic capacity and lipopolysaccharide responsiveness

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Altamirano, M Maximina Bertha; Aguilar-Carmona, Israel; Sánchez-García, F Javier

    2007-01-01

    Monocytes constitute 5–10% of total human peripheral blood leucocytes and remain in circulation for several days before replenishing the tissue macrophage populations. Monocytes display heterogeneity in size, granularity and nuclear morphology, and in the expression of cell membrane molecules, such as CD14, CD16, CD32, CD64, major histocompatibility complex class II, CCR2, CCR5, among others. This has led to the suggestion that individual monocyte/macrophage populations have specialized functions within their microenvironments. This study provides evidence for the occurrence of two peripheral blood monocyte subpopulations on the basis of their differential expression of GM1, a sphingolipid found mostly in lipid rafts, a CD14+ GM1low population and a CD14+ GM1high population comprising about 97·5% and 2·5% of total CD14+ cells, respectively. GM1 expression correlates with functional differences in terms of endocytic activity, susceptibility to mycobacterial infection, and response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (modulation of Toll-like receptor-4 expression). CD14+ GM1low cells proved to be less endocytic and more responsive to LPS, whereas CD14+ GM1high cells are more endocytic and less responsive to LPS. In addition, during monocyte to macrophage differentiation in vitro, the percentage of CD14+ GM1high cells increases from about 2·5% at day 1 to more than 50% at day 7 of culture. These results suggest that GM1low and GM1high monocytes in peripheral blood, represent either different stages of maturation or different subsets with specialized activities. The expression of CD16 on GM1high favours the first possibility and, on the other hand that up-regulation of GM1 expression and probably lipid rafts function is involved in the monocyte to macrophage differentiation process. PMID:17250589

  6. GM1 ganglioside reduces the motor incoordination and loss of righting reflex caused by acute ethanol in C57BL/6J mice

    SciTech Connect

    Wallis, C.; Rezazadeh, S.M.; Forster, M.J.; Lal, H. )

    1992-02-26

    Ethanol produces its intoxicating effects by modifying neuronal membranes. Gangliosides stabilize neuronal membranes and promote their recovery from a variety of insults. In this experiment, the efficacy of GM1(i.p.) to reverse ethanol intoxication was evaluated in male mice trained to run on a constantly accelerating rotorod. When mice were tested 15-min following saline or ethanol GM1 pre-treatment reduced rotorod performance by 15% but was ineffective in modifying the ethanol-impaired performance. However, when mice were tested at 15, 35, 55, 75, and 95 min intervals following ethanol, GM1 pre-treatments dose-dependently reduced the efficacy and duration of ethanol in producing motor incoordination. Further, GM1 given prior to ethanol significantly prolonged the time to onset of the loss of righting reflex from 1.4 to 1.9 min, and reduced the duration of the righting-reflex loss from 94 to 77 min. This GM1 effect was seen at 24 h, but not at 48 or 72 h after its administration. The blood ethanol concentration at awakening was significantly higher in 24h GM1-treated animals than in controls suggesting that the GM1 effect was not due to an alteration in ethanol clearance. These findings support the hypothesis that GM1 promotes recovery from ethanol intoxication via a neuroprotective mechanism.

  7. Induction of antibody to asialo GM1 by spermatozoa and its occurrence in the sera of homosexual men with the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS).

    PubMed Central

    Witkin, S S; Sonnabend, J; Richards, J M; Purtilo, D T

    1983-01-01

    Compared to healthy homosexual and heterosexual men, homosexual men with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) possessed significantly higher levels of IgG antibody to the neutral glycolipid asialo GM1 (ganglio-N-tetraosylceramide) (P less than 0.01). Of 31 homosexuals with AIDS, 36% possessed levels of this antibody that were at least two standard deviations above the mean of the healthy men. Furthermore, asialo GM1 antibody could be removed from serum by adsorption with spermatozoa. Weekly rectal insemination of male rabbits with rabbit semen also led to the appearance of antibody to asialo GM1 by 15 weeks. These results suggest that asialo GM1 is a component of ejaculated spermatozoa and demonstrate that rectal insemination by itself can lead to the production of antibodies to this glycolipid in the rabbit. In addition, asialo GM1 antibodies may be of value as a serological marker for the early detection of individuals with AIDS. PMID:6652964

  8. Biochemical characterization of the interactions between doxorubicin and lipidic GM1 micelles with or without paclitaxel loading

    PubMed Central

    Leonhard, Victoria; Alasino, Roxana V; Bianco, Ismael D; Garro, Ariel G; Heredia, Valeria; Beltramo, Dante M

    2015-01-01

    Doxorubicin (Dox) is an anthracycline anticancer drug with high water solubility, whose use is limited primarily due to significant side effects. In this study it is shown that Dox interacts with monosialoglycosphingolipid (GM1) ganglioside micelles primarily through hydrophobic interactions independent of pH and ionic strength. In addition, Dox can be incorporated even into GM1 micelles already containing highly hydrophobic paclitaxel (Ptx). However, it was not possible to incorporate Ptx into Dox-containing GM1 micelles, suggesting that Dox could be occupying a more external position in the micelles. This result is in agreement with a higher hydrolysis of Dox than of Ptx when micelles were incubated at alkaline pH. The loading of Dox into GM1 micelles was observed over a broad range of temperature (4°C–55°C). Furthermore, Dox-loaded micelles were stable in aqueous solutions exhibiting no aggregation or precipitation for up to 2 months when kept at 4°C–25°C and even after freeze–thawing cycles. Upon exposure to blood components, Dox-containing micelles were observed to interact with human serum albumin. However, the amount of human serum albumin that ended up being associated to the micelles was inversely related to the amount of Dox, suggesting that both could share their binding sites. In vitro studies on Hep2 cells showed that the cellular uptake and cytotoxic activity of Dox and Ptx from the micellar complexes were similar to those of the free form of these drugs, even when the micelle was covered with albumin. These results support the idea of the existence of different nano-domains in a single micelle and the fact that this micellar model could be used as a platform for loading and delivering hydrophobic and hydrophilic active pharmaceutical ingredients. PMID:26005348

  9. Interactions between the ganglioside GM1 and hexadecylphosphocholine (miltefosine) in monolayers at the air/water interface.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Serranillos, Isabel Rey; Miñones, José; Dynarowicz-Łatka, Patrycja; Iribarnegaray, Eduardo; Casas, Matilde

    2005-03-10

    The ganglioside, GM1, was studied as Langmuir monolayers at the air/water interface with surface pressure-area measurements in addition to Brewster angle microscopy. A characteristic plateau transition, observed on aqueous subphases of pH 2 and 6, 20 degrees C, at the surface pressure of ca. 20 mN/m, was attributed to the reorientation of GM1 polar group upon film compression. This transition was found to disappear at alkaline subphases (pH 10) due to the hydration of fully ionized polar group, hindering its reorientation. The interactions between GM1 and hexadecylphosphocholine (miltefosine) were investigated in mixed monolayers and analyzed with the mean molecular areas, excess areas of mixing and the excess free energy of mixing versus film composition plots. The monolayers stability, quantified by the collapse pressure values, as well as the strength of interaction was found to diminish in the following order: pH 6>pH 2>pH 10. The strongest interaction occurs for mixed films of miltefosine molar fraction, XM=0.7-0.8, especially at low pressure region, and are explained as being due to the surface complex formation of 3:1 or 4:1 (miltefosine:ganglioside) stoichiometry (XM=0.75 or 0.8, respectively).

  10. Asymmetric Structural Features in Single Supported Lipid Bilayers Containing Cholesterol and GM1 Resolved with Synchrotron X-Ray Reflectivity

    PubMed Central

    Reich, Christian; Horton, Margaret R.; Krause, Bärbel; Gast, Alice P.; Rädler, Joachim O.; Nickel, Bert

    2008-01-01

    The cell membrane comprises numerous protein and lipid molecules capable of asymmetric organization between leaflets and liquid-liquid phase separation. We use single supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) to model cell membranes, and study how cholesterol and asymmetrically oriented ganglioside receptor GM1 affect membrane structure using synchrotron x-ray reflectivity. Using mixtures of cholesterol, sphingomyelin, and 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, we characterize the structure of liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered SLBs in terms of acyl-chain density, headgroup size, and leaflet thickness. SLBs modeling the liquid-ordered phase are 10 Å thicker and have a higher acyl-chain electron density (〈ρchain〉 = 0.33 e−/Å3) compared to SLBs modeling the liquid-disordered phase, or pure phosphatidylcholine SLBs (〈ρchain〉 = 0.28 e−/Å3). Incorporating GM1 into the distal bilayer leaflet results in membrane asymmetry and thickening of the leaflet of 4–9 Å. The structural effect of GM1 is more complex in SLBs of cholesterol/sphingomyelin/1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, where the distal chains show a high electron density (〈ρchain〉 = 0.33 e−/Å3) and the lipid diffusion constant is reduced by ∼50%, as measured by fluorescence microscopy. These results give quantitative information about the leaflet asymmetry and electron density changes induced by receptor molecules that penetrate a single lipid bilayer. PMID:18375517

  11. Cholesterol accelerates the binding of Alzheimer's β-amyloid peptide to ganglioside GM1 through a universal hydrogen-bond-dependent sterol tuning of glycolipid conformation.

    PubMed

    Fantini, Jacques; Yahi, Nouara; Garmy, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    Age-related alterations of membrane lipids in brain cell membranes together with high blood cholesterol are considered as major risk factors for Alzheimer's disease. Yet the molecular mechanisms by which these factors increase Alzheimer's risk are mostly unknown. In lipid raft domains of the plasma membrane, neurotoxic Alzheimer's beta-amyloid (Abeta) peptides interact with both cholesterol and ganglioside GM1. Recent data also suggested that cholesterol could stimulate the binding of Abeta to GM1 through conformational modulation of the ganglioside headgroup. Here we used a combination of physicochemical and molecular modeling approaches to decipher the mechanisms of cholesterol-assisted binding of Abeta to GM1. With the aim of decoupling the effect of cholesterol on GM1 from direct Abeta-cholesterol interactions, we designed a minimal peptide (Abeta5-16) containing the GM1-binding domain but lacking the amino acid residues involved in cholesterol recognition. Using the Langmuir technique, we showed that cholesterol (but not phosphatidylcholine or sphingomyelin) significantly accelerates the interaction of Abeta5-16 with GM1. Molecular dynamics simulations suggested that Abeta5-16 interacts with a cholesterol-stabilized dimer of GM1. The main structural effect of cholesterol is to establish a hydrogen-bond between its own OH group and the glycosidic-bond linking ceramide to the glycone part of GM1, thereby inducing a tilt in the glycolipid headgroup. This fine conformational tuning stabilizes the active conformation of the GM1 dimer whose headgroups, oriented in two opposite directions, form a chalice-shaped receptacle for Abeta. These data give new mechanistic insights into the stimulatory effect of cholesterol on Abeta/GM1 interactions. They also support the emerging concept that cholesterol is a universal modulator of protein-glycolipid interactions in the broader context of membrane recognition processes.

  12. Polycystic kidneys and GM2 gangliosidosis-like disease in neonatal springboks (Antidorcas marsupialis).

    PubMed

    Herder, V; Kummrow, M; Leeb, T; Sewell, A C; Hansmann, F; Lehmbecker, A; Wohlsein, P; Baumgärtner, W

    2015-05-01

    Clinical, gross, histopathologic, electron microscopic findings and enzymatic analysis of 4 captive, juvenile springboks (Antidorcas marsupialis) showing both polycystic kidneys and a storage disease are described. Springbok offspring (4 of 34; 12%) were affected by either one or both disorders in a German zoo within a period of 5 years (2008-2013). Macroscopic findings included bilaterally severely enlarged kidneys displaying numerous cysts in 4 animals and superior brachygnathism in 2 animals. Histopathologically, kidneys of 4 animals displayed cystic dilation of the renal tubules. In addition, abundant cytoplasmic vacuoles with a diameter ranging from 2 to 10 μm in neurons of the central and peripheral nervous system, hepatocytes, thyroid follicular epithelial cells, pancreatic islets of Langerhans and renal tubular cells were found in 2 springbok neonates indicative of an additional storage disease. Ultrastructurally, round electron-lucent vacuoles, up to 4 μm in diameter, were present in neurons. Enzymatic analysis of liver and kidney tissue of 1 affected springbok revealed a reduced activity of total hexosaminidase (Hex) with relatively increased HexA activity at the same level of total Hex, suggesting a hexosaminidase defect. Pedigree analysis suggested a monogenic autosomal recessive inheritance for both diseases. In summary, related springboks showed 2 different changes resembling both polycystic kidney and a GM2 gangliosidosis similar to the human Sandhoff disease. Whether the simultaneous occurrence of these 2 entities represents an incidental finding or has a genetic link needs to be investigated in future studies.

  13. Protease-resistant modified human β-hexosaminidase B ameliorates symptoms in GM2 gangliosidosis model.

    PubMed

    Kitakaze, Keisuke; Mizutani, Yasumichi; Sugiyama, Eiji; Tasaki, Chikako; Tsuji, Daisuke; Maita, Nobuo; Hirokawa, Takatsugu; Asanuma, Daisuke; Kamiya, Mako; Sato, Kohei; Setou, Mitsutoshi; Urano, Yasuteru; Togawa, Tadayasu; Otaka, Akira; Sakuraba, Hitoshi; Itoh, Kohji

    2016-05-02

    GM2 gangliosidoses, including Tay-Sachs and Sandhoff diseases, are neurodegenerative lysosomal storage diseases that are caused by deficiency of β-hexosaminidase A, which comprises an αβ heterodimer. There are no effective treatments for these diseases; however, various strategies aimed at restoring β-hexosaminidase A have been explored. Here, we produced a modified human hexosaminidase subunit β (HexB), which we have termed mod2B, composed of homodimeric β subunits that contain amino acid sequences from the α subunit that confer GM2 ganglioside-degrading activity and protease resistance. We also developed fluorescent probes that allow visualization of endocytosis of mod2B via mannose 6-phosphate receptors and delivery of mod2B to lysosomes in GM2 gangliosidosis models. In addition, we applied imaging mass spectrometry to monitor efficacy of this approach in Sandhoff disease model mice. Following i.c.v. administration, mod2B was widely distributed and reduced accumulation of GM2, asialo-GM2, and bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate in brain regions including the hypothalamus, hippocampus, and cerebellum. Moreover, mod2B administration markedly improved motor dysfunction and a prolonged lifespan in Sandhoff disease mice. Together, the results of our study indicate that mod2B has potential for intracerebrospinal fluid enzyme replacement therapy and should be further explored as a gene therapy for GM2 gangliosidoses.

  14. Protease-resistant modified human β-hexosaminidase B ameliorates symptoms in GM2 gangliosidosis model

    PubMed Central

    Mizutani, Yasumichi; Sugiyama, Eiji; Tasaki, Chikako; Tsuji, Daisuke; Maita, Nobuo; Hirokawa, Takatsugu; Asanuma, Daisuke; Kamiya, Mako; Sato, Kohei; Setou, Mitsutoshi; Urano, Yasuteru; Togawa, Tadayasu; Otaka, Akira; Sakuraba, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    GM2 gangliosidoses, including Tay-Sachs and Sandhoff diseases, are neurodegenerative lysosomal storage diseases that are caused by deficiency of β-hexosaminidase A, which comprises an αβ heterodimer. There are no effective treatments for these diseases; however, various strategies aimed at restoring β-hexosaminidase A have been explored. Here, we produced a modified human hexosaminidase subunit β (HexB), which we have termed mod2B, composed of homodimeric β subunits that contain amino acid sequences from the α subunit that confer GM2 ganglioside–degrading activity and protease resistance. We also developed fluorescent probes that allow visualization of endocytosis of mod2B via mannose 6-phosphate receptors and delivery of mod2B to lysosomes in GM2 gangliosidosis models. In addition, we applied imaging mass spectrometry to monitor efficacy of this approach in Sandhoff disease model mice. Following i.c.v. administration, mod2B was widely distributed and reduced accumulation of GM2, asialo-GM2, and bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate in brain regions including the hypothalamus, hippocampus, and cerebellum. Moreover, mod2B administration markedly improved motor dysfunction and a prolonged lifespan in Sandhoff disease mice. Together, the results of our study indicate that mod2B has potential for intracerebrospinal fluid enzyme replacement therapy and should be further explored as a gene therapy for GM2 gangliosidoses. PMID:27018595

  15. Binding Cooperativity Matters: A GM1-Like Ganglioside-Cholera Toxin B Subunit Binding Study Using a Nanocube-Based Lipid Bilayer Array

    PubMed Central

    Weatherston, Joshua D.

    2016-01-01

    Protein-glycan recognition is often mediated by multivalent binding. These multivalent bindings can be further complicated by cooperative interactions between glycans and individual glycan binding subunits. Here we have demonstrated a nanocube-based lipid bilayer array capable of quantitatively elucidating binding dissociation constants, maximum binding capacity, and binding cooperativity in a high-throughput format. Taking cholera toxin B subunit (CTB) as a model cooperativity system, we studied both GM1 and GM1-like gangliosides binding to CTB. We confirmed the previously observed CTB-GM1 positive cooperativity. Surprisingly, we demonstrated fucosyl-GM1 has approximately 7 times higher CTB binding capacity than GM1. In order to explain this phenomenon, we hypothesized that the reduced binding cooperativity of fucosyl-GM1 caused the increased binding capacity. This was unintuitive, as GM1 exhibited higher binding avidity (16 times lower dissociation constant). We confirmed the hypothesis using a theoretical stepwise binding model of CTB. Moreover, by taking a mixture of fucosyl-GM1 and GM2, we observed the mild binding avidity fucosyl-GM1 activated GM2 receptors enhancing the binding capacity of the lipid bilayer surface. This was unexpected as GM2 receptors have negligible binding avidity in pure GM2 bilayers. These unexpected discoveries demonstrate the importance of binding cooperativity in multivalent binding mechanisms. Thus, quantitative analysis of multivalent protein-glycan interactions in heterogeneous glycan systems is of critical importance. Our user-friendly, robust, and high-throughput nanocube-based lipid bilayer array offers an attractive method for dissecting these complex mechanisms. PMID:27070150

  16. The β-subunit of cholera toxin has a high affinity for ganglioside GM1 embedded into solid supported lipid membranes with a lipid raft-like composition.

    PubMed

    Margheri, G; D'Agostino, R; Trigari, S; Sottini, S; Del Rosso, M

    2014-02-01

    In this communication, we report on the fabrication of GM1-rich solid-supported bilayer lipid membranes (ssBLM) made of sphingomyelin and cholesterol, the main components of lipid rafts,which are the physiological hosting microenvironment of GM1 on the cell membrane. The functionality of the ganglioside has been checked by measuring the apparent dissociation constant K(D) of the complex formed by the β-subunit of the cholera toxin and GM1. The value found deviates less than one order of magnitude from that measured for in vivo cells, indicating the potential of these ssBLM as optimized in vitro biomimetic platforms.

  17. Ganglioside GM1-mediated transcytosis of cholera toxin bypasses the retrograde pathway and depends on the structure of the ceramide domain.

    PubMed

    Saslowsky, David E; te Welscher, Yvonne M; Chinnapen, Daniel J-F; Wagner, Jessica S; Wan, Joy; Kern, Eli; Lencer, Wayne I

    2013-09-06

    Cholera toxin causes diarrheal disease by binding ganglioside GM1 on the apical membrane of polarized intestinal epithelial cells and trafficking retrograde through sorting endosomes, the trans-Golgi network (TGN), and into the endoplasmic reticulum. A fraction of toxin also moves from endosomes across the cell to the basolateral plasma membrane by transcytosis, thus breeching the intestinal barrier. Here we find that sorting of cholera toxin into this transcytotic pathway bypasses retrograde transport to the TGN. We also find that GM1 sphingolipids can traffic from apical to basolateral membranes by transcytosis in the absence of toxin binding but only if the GM1 species contain cis-unsaturated or short acyl chains in the ceramide domain. We found previously that the same GM1 species are needed to efficiently traffic retrograde into the TGN and endoplasmic reticulum and into the recycling endosome, implicating a shared mechanism of action for sorting by lipid shape among these pathways.

  18. Endocytosis of cholera toxin in GERL-like structures of murine neuroblastoma cells pretreated with GM1 ganglioside. Cholera toxin internalization into Neuroblastoma GERL

    PubMed Central

    1979-01-01

    Cholera toxin (CT), covalently attached to horseradish peroxidase (HRP), is a specific cytochemical marker for GM1 ganglioside (GM1) and retains the ability of the native toxin to raise levels of cyclic AMP in avian erythrocytes. Using a cytochemical stain for HRP, we found that 9% of control cultured murine neuroblastoma cells bound cholera toxin-horseradish peroxidase conjugates (CT-HRP) on their surfaces after incubations for 1 h at 4 degrees C. Exogenous GM1, the natural receptor of CT, becomes associated in the culture medium with the plasma membranes of these cells so that 96% of cells are stained. Cells preincubated with GM1 at 4 degrees C were exposed to CT-HRP for 1 h at 4 degrees C. After washing, cells were incubated at 37 degrees C for 30 min-24 h. Endocytosis of CT-HRP occurred within 30 min and CT-HRP remained, throughout the 24-h period, in tubules, vesicles, and cisternae often found near the Golgi apparatus; this aggregate of peroxidase-positive elements probably corresponds to Golgi apparatus- endoplasmic reticulum-lysosomes (GERL) of neurons. In metaphase cells, CT-HRP was observed in aggregates of vesicles and tubules clustered near the centriole. Conjugates of HRP with subunit B, the GM1 binding component of CT, were internalized by cells pretreated with GM1 as was CT-HRP. The 9% of neuroblastoma cells binding CT-HRP in the absence of exogenous GM1 internalized the ligand in a manner indistinguishable from that of the treated cells. These findings indicate that, in neuroblastoma cells, a system of vesicles, tubules, and cisternae, analogous to GERL of neurons, is the primary recipient of adsorptive endocytosis of CT bound to endogenous or exogenously introduced GM1. PMID:457774

  19. [Electrodiagnosis of neuromuscular diseases--a syndrome of monomelic amyotrophy with spinal hemiatrophy, anti-GM1 antibodies and abnormal F-waves (MASH)].

    PubMed

    Kaji, R

    1994-12-01

    Electrodiagnosis rests upon sound anatomical and physiological bases of the peripheral nervous system, which are utilized for the dynamic process of differential diagnosis. If clinical and electrophysiological findings do not conform to any of the previously known diseases, there may be a chance of identifying a new entity. As an example, we report nine Japanese patients with unilateral atrophy of the distal upper limb and the cervical cord. Symptoms typically began insideously in young adulthood, progressed for a few years and then stabilized. Distribution of the muscle weakness usually corresponded to the territories of a few peripheral nerves, although not accompanied by sensory deficits. Serum anti-GM1 IgG antibodies were elevated in 6 out of 9 patients. Electrophysiological testings disclosed absent or delayed F-waves in the nerve involved. No long tract signs of the cord were demonstrated, although the spinal cord atrophy was extensive in some patients. Three showed partial clinical improvement after cyclophosphamide therapy or intravenous immunoglobulin. These findings may suggest that this entity is immune-mediated as in multifocal motor neuropathy, with its blunt of immune attack directed not only to peripheral motor nerves but also to spinal motor neurons.

  20. Comparison of two GM1-erythrocyte assays to detect heat-labile Escherichia coli enterotoxin in stool specimens.

    PubMed Central

    Germani, Y; Guesdon, J L; Phalente, L; Begaud, E; Moreau, J P

    1988-01-01

    Two erythrocyte immunoassay techniques to detect the presence of Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin (LTh) in stool supernatants and cell-free culture supernatants were compared. In the competitive assay, GM1 ganglioside was coated onto V-shaped-well microdilution plates and enterotoxin was coupled to sheep erythrocytes. As little as 0.8 ng of LTh per ml was detected by this method, which was based on the competition between the LTh of the test sample and the sensitized erythrocytes. The second assay made use of chimera antibody prepared by coupling polyclonal anti-LTh antibody to a monoclonal antibody specific for sheep erythrocytes. In this case, LTh, which was specifically bound to a GM1 ganglioside-coated plate, was detected by successively adding the chimera antibody and sheep erythrocytes. The limit of detection of the chimera antibody erythrocyte immunoassay was 0.2 ng/ml. Stool samples were collected from 167 infants hospitalized for diarrhea in the hospital of Noumea, New Caledonia. False-negative reactions due to proteases present in the stool samples were avoided by the addition of phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride. Images PMID:3290242

  1. Modes of Diffusion of Cholera Toxin Bound to GM1 on Live Cell Membrane by Image Mean Square Displacement Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Moens, Pierre D.J.; Digman, Michelle A.; Gratton, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    The image-mean square displacement technique applies the calculation of the mean square displacement commonly used in single-molecule tracking to images without resolving single particles. The image-mean square displacement plot obtained is similar to the mean square displacement plot obtained using the single-particle tracking technique. This plot is then used to reconstruct the protein diffusion law and to identify whether the labeled molecules are undergoing pure isotropic, restricted, corralled, transiently confined, or directed diffusion. In our study total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy images were taken of Cholera toxin subunit B (CtxB) membrane-labeled NIH 3T3 mouse fibroblasts and MDA 231 MB cells. We found a population of CTxB undergoing purely isotropic diffusion and one displaying restricted diffusion with corral sizes ranging from 150 to ∼1800 nm. We show that the diffusion rate of CTxB bound to GM1 is independent of the size of the confinement, suggesting that the mechanism of confinement is different from the mechanism controlling the diffusion rate of CtxB. We highlight the potential effect of continuous illumination on the diffusion mode of CTxB. We also show that aggregation of CTxB/GM1 in large complexes occurs and that these aggregates tend to have slower diffusion rates. PMID:25809257

  2. Restoring GM1 ganglioside expression ameliorates axonal outgrowth inhibition and cognitive impairments induced by blast traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Rubovitch, Vardit; Zilberstein, Yael; Chapman, Joab; Schreiber, Shaul; Pick, Chaim G.

    2017-01-01

    Blast induced traumatic brain injury (B-TBI) may cause various degrees of cognitive and behavioral disturbances but the exact brain pathophysiology involved is poorly understood. It was previously suggested that ganglioside alteration on the axon surface as well as axonal regenerating inhibitors (ARIs) such as myelin associated glycoprotein (MAG) were involved in axonal outgrowth inhibition (AOI), leading to brain damage. GM1 ganglioside content in the brain was significantly reduced while GD1 ganglioside was not affected. The axonal regeneration was also reduced as seen by the phosphorylated NF-H expression. Moreover, B-TBI induced a significant elevation in MAG expression in the brains of the injured mice. The blast injured mice exhibited a significant decline in spatial memory as seen by the Y-maze test. In addition, the injured mice showed pronounced damage to the visual memory (as evaluated by the Novel object recognition test). A single low dose of GM1 (2 mg/kg; IP), shortly after the injury, prevented both the cognitive and the cellular changes in the brains of the injured mice. These results enlighten part of the complicated mechanism that underlies the damage induced by B-TBI and may also suggest a potential new treatment strategy for brain injuries. PMID:28112258

  3. Modes of diffusion of cholera toxin bound to GM1 on live cell membrane by image mean square displacement analysis.

    PubMed

    Moens, Pierre D J; Digman, Michelle A; Gratton, Enrico

    2015-03-24

    The image-mean square displacement technique applies the calculation of the mean square displacement commonly used in single-molecule tracking to images without resolving single particles. The image-mean square displacement plot obtained is similar to the mean square displacement plot obtained using the single-particle tracking technique. This plot is then used to reconstruct the protein diffusion law and to identify whether the labeled molecules are undergoing pure isotropic, restricted, corralled, transiently confined, or directed diffusion. In our study total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy images were taken of Cholera toxin subunit B (CtxB) membrane-labeled NIH 3T3 mouse fibroblasts and MDA 231 MB cells. We found a population of CTxB undergoing purely isotropic diffusion and one displaying restricted diffusion with corral sizes ranging from 150 to ∼1800 nm. We show that the diffusion rate of CTxB bound to GM1 is independent of the size of the confinement, suggesting that the mechanism of confinement is different from the mechanism controlling the diffusion rate of CtxB. We highlight the potential effect of continuous illumination on the diffusion mode of CTxB. We also show that aggregation of CTxB/GM1 in large complexes occurs and that these aggregates tend to have slower diffusion rates.

  4. Novel GM1 ganglioside-like peptide mimics prevent the association of cholera toxin to human intestinal epithelial cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Yu, Robert K; Usuki, Seigo; Itokazu, Yutaka; Wu, Han-Chung

    2016-01-01

    Cholera is an acute diarrheal disease caused by infection in the gastrointestinal tract by the gram-negative bacterium, Vibrio cholerae, and is a serious public health threat worldwide. There has not been any effective treatment for this infectious disease. Cholera toxin (CT), which is secreted by V. cholerae, can enter host cells by binding to GM1, a monosialoganglioside widely distributed on the plasma membrane surface of various animal epithelial cells. The present study was undertaken to generate peptides that are conformationally similar to the carbohydrate epitope of GM1 for use in the treatment of cholera and related bacterial infection. For this purpose, we used cholera toxin B (CTB) subunit to select CTB-binding peptides that structurally mimic GM1 from a dodecamer phage-display library. Six GM1-replica peptides were selected by biopanning based on CTB recognition. Five of the six peptides showed inhibitory activity for GM1 binding to CTB. To test the potential of employing the peptide mimics for intervening with the bacterial infection, those peptides were examined for their binding capacity, functional inhibitory activity and in vitro effects using a human intestinal epithelial cell line, Caco-2 cells. One of the peptides, P3 (IPQVWRDWFKLP), was most effective in inhibiting cellular uptake of CTB and suppressing CT-stimulated cyclic adenosine monophosphate production in the cells. Our results thus provide convincing evidence that GM1-replica peptides could serve as novel agents to block CTB binding on epithelial cells and prevent the ensuing physiological effects of CT.

  5. Differential Anatomical Expression of Ganglioside GM1 Species Containing d18:1 or d20:1 Sphingosine Detected by MALDI Imaging Mass Spectrometry in Mature Rat Brain

    PubMed Central

    Weishaupt, Nina; Caughlin, Sarah; Yeung, Ken K.-C.; Whitehead, Shawn N.

    2015-01-01

    GM1 ganglioside plays a role in essential neuronal processes, including differentiation, survival, and signaling. Yet, little is known about GM1 species with different sphingosine bases, such as the most abundant species containing 18 carbon atoms in the sphingosine chain (GM1d18:1), and the less abundant containing 20 carbon atoms (GM1d20:1). While absent in the early fetal brain, GM1d20:1 continues to increase throughout pre- and postnatal development and into old age, raising questions about the functional relevance of the GM1d18:1 to GM1d20:1 ratio. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization imaging mass spectrometry is a novel technology that allows differentiation between these two GM1 species and quantification of their expression within an anatomical context. Using this technology, we find GM1d18:1/d20:1 expression ratios are highly specific to defined anatomical brain regions in adult rats. Thus, the ratio was significantly different among different thalamic nuclei and between the corpus callosum and internal capsule. Differential GM1d18:1/GM1d20:1 ratios measured in hippocampal subregions in rat brain complement previous studies conducted in mice. Across layers of the sensory cortex, opposing expression gradients were found for GM1d18:1 and GM1d20:1. Superficial layers demonstrated lower GM1d18:1 and higher GM1d20:1 signal than other layers, while in deep layers GM1d18:1 expression was relatively high and GM1d20:1 expression low. By far the highest GM1d18:1/d20:1 ratio was found in the amygdala. Differential expression of GM1 with d18:1- or d20:1-sphingosine bases in the adult rat brain suggests tight regulation of expression and points toward a distinct functional relevance for each of these GM1 species in neuronal processes. PMID:26648849

  6. Ganglioside GM1 induces phosphorylation of mutant huntingtin and restores normal motor behavior in Huntington disease mice

    PubMed Central

    Di Pardo, Alba; Maglione, Vittorio; Alpaugh, Melanie; Horkey, Melanie; Atwal, Randy S.; Sassone, Jenny; Ciammola, Andrea; Steffan, Joan S.; Fouad, Karim; Truant, Ray; Sipione, Simonetta

    2012-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is a progressive neurodegenerative monogenic disorder caused by expansion of a polyglutamine stretch in the huntingtin (Htt) protein. Mutant huntingtin triggers neural dysfunction and death, mainly in the corpus striatum and cerebral cortex, resulting in pathognomonic motor symptoms, as well as cognitive and psychiatric decline. Currently, there is no effective treatment for HD. We report that intraventricular infusion of ganglioside GM1 induces phosphorylation of mutant huntingtin at specific serine amino acid residues that attenuate huntingtin toxicity, and restores normal motor function in already symptomatic HD mice. Thus, our studies have identified a potential therapy for HD that targets a posttranslational modification of mutant huntingtin with critical effects on disease pathogenesis. PMID:22331905

  7. Neurotropin promotes NGF signaling through interaction of GM1 ganglioside with Trk neurotrophin receptor in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Yu; Fukui, Takao; Hikichi, Chika; Ishikawa, Tomomasa; Murate, Kenichiro; Adachi, Takeshi; Imai, Hideki; Fukuhara, Koki; Ueda, Akihiro; Kaplan, Allen P; Mutoh, Tatsuro

    2015-01-30

    Activation of the high-affinity nerve growth factor (NGF) receptor Trk occurs through multiple processes consisted of translocation and clustering within the plasma membrane lipid rafts, dimerization and autophosphorylation. Here we found that a nonprotein extract of inflamed rabbit skin inoculated with vaccinia virus (Neurotropin(®)) enhanced efficiency of NGF signaling. In rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cells overexpressing Trk (PCtrk cells), Neurotropin augmented insufficient neurite outgrowth observed at suboptimal concentration of NGF (2ng/mL) in a manner depending on Trk kinase activity. Cellular exposure to Neurotropin resulted in an accumulation of Trk-GM1 complexes without affecting dimerization or phosphorylation states of Trk. Following NGF stimulation, Neurotropin significantly facilitated the time course of NGF-induced Trk autophosphorylation. These observations provide a unique mechanism controlling efficiency of NGF signaling, and raise the therapeutic potential of Neurotropin for various neurological conditions associated with neurotrophin dysfunction.

  8. Simulation of carbohydrate-protein interactions: Computer-aided design of a second generation GM1 mimic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardi, Anna; Galgano, Marta; Belvisi, Laura; Colombo, Giorgio

    2001-02-01

    The oligosaccharide of ganglioside GM1 [Gal β1-3GalNAc β1-4(NeuAc α2-3)Gal β1-4Glc β1-1Cer] is the cellular target of two bacterial enterotoxins: the cholera toxin (CT) and the heat-labile toxin of E.coli (LT). We recently reported that the pseudosaccharide 2[Gal β1-3GalNAc β1-4(NeuAc α2-3)DCCHD] is a high-affinity ligand for CT, and thus a functional mimic of GM1 (Bernardi, A., Checchia, A., Brocca, P., Sonnino, S. and Zuccotto, F., J. Am. Chem. Soc., 121 (1999) 2032-2036). In this paper we describe the design of a second-generation mimic, formally obtained from 2 by inverting the configuration of a single stereocenter, thus transforming a N-acetyl galactosamine into a N-acetyl glucosamine. The design process involved modeling of the free ligand and its LT complex, followed by qualitative and quantitative comparison with the corresponding structures of 2. The protocol employed relied on both conformational search and molecular dynamics methodologies to account for the flexibility of both the ligand and the protein receptor. The conformational search of the LT:inhibitor complex showed that, compared to 2, the new compound can insert one more hydroxy group within the protein binding site. Molecular dynamics simulations showed that, in turn, this may trigger a series of rearrangements and reorientations of side chains and crystallographic water molecules in the toxin, leading to new H-bond contacts which may result in enhanced affinity of the new inhibitor. FEP calculations were performed by mutating the structure of 2 in solution and in the protein complex, and the prediction was made that the second-generation mimic should be a stronger binder than its parent compound.

  9. Carbohydrate-based anti-adhesive inhibition of Vibrio cholerae toxin binding to GM1-OS immobilized into artificial planar lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, Haydn R; Kemp, Fred; Slegte, Jaap de; Gibson, Glenn R; Rastall, Robert A

    2009-10-12

    We have studied 'food grade' sialyloligosaccharides (SOS) as anti-adhesive drugs or receptor analogues, since the terminal sialic acid residue has already been shown to contribute significantly to the adhesion and pathogenesis of the Vibrio cholerae toxin (Ctx). GM1-oligosaccharide (GM1-OS) was immobilized into a supporting POPC lipid bilayer onto a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) chip, and the interaction between uninhibited Ctx and GM1-OS-POPC was measured. SOS inhibited 94.7% of the Ctx binding to GM1-OS-POPC at 10mg/mL. The SOS EC(50) value of 5.521mg/mL is high compared with 0.2811microg/mL (182.5rhoM or 1.825x10(-10)M) for GM1-OS. The commercially available sialyloligosaccharide (SOS) mixture Sunsial E((R)) is impure, containing one monosialylated and two disialylated oligosaccharides in the ratio 9.6%, 6.5% and 17.5%, respectively, and 66.4% protein. However, these inexpensive food-grade molecules are derived from egg yolk and could be used to fortify conventional food additives, by way of emulsifiers, sweeteners and/or preservatives. The work further supports our hypothesis that SOS could be a promising natural anti-adhesive glycomimetic against Ctx and prevent subsequent onset of disease.

  10. Novel GM1 ganglioside-like peptide mimics prevent the association of cholera toxin to human intestinal epithelial cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Robert K; Usuki, Seigo; Itokazu, Yutaka; Wu, Han-Chung

    2016-01-01

    Cholera is an acute diarrheal disease caused by infection in the gastrointestinal tract by the gram-negative bacterium, Vibrio cholerae, and is a serious public health threat worldwide. There has not been any effective treatment for this infectious disease. Cholera toxin (CT), which is secreted by V. cholerae, can enter host cells by binding to GM1, a monosialoganglioside widely distributed on the plasma membrane surface of various animal epithelial cells. The present study was undertaken to generate peptides that are conformationally similar to the carbohydrate epitope of GM1 for use in the treatment of cholera and related bacterial infection. For this purpose, we used cholera toxin B (CTB) subunit to select CTB-binding peptides that structurally mimic GM1 from a dodecamer phage-display library. Six GM1-replica peptides were selected by biopanning based on CTB recognition. Five of the six peptides showed inhibitory activity for GM1 binding to CTB. To test the potential of employing the peptide mimics for intervening with the bacterial infection, those peptides were examined for their binding capacity, functional inhibitory activity and in vitro effects using a human intestinal epithelial cell line, Caco-2 cells. One of the peptides, P3 (IPQVWRDWFKLP), was most effective in inhibiting cellular uptake of CTB and suppressing CT-stimulated cyclic adenosine monophosphate production in the cells. Our results thus provide convincing evidence that GM1-replica peptides could serve as novel agents to block CTB binding on epithelial cells and prevent the ensuing physiological effects of CT. PMID:26405107

  11. A single native ganglioside GM1-binding site is sufficient for cholera toxin to bind to cells and complete the intoxication pathway.

    PubMed

    Jobling, Michael G; Yang, Zhijie; Kam, Wendy R; Lencer, Wayne I; Holmes, Randall K

    2012-10-30

    Cholera toxin (CT) from Vibrio cholerae is responsible for the majority of the symptoms of the diarrheal disease cholera. CT is a heterohexameric protein complex with a 240-residue A subunit and a pentameric B subunit of identical 103-residue B polypeptides. The A subunit is proteolytically cleaved within a disulfide-linked loop to generate the A1 and A2 fragments. The B subunit of wild-type (wt) CT binds 5 cell surface ganglioside GM(1) (GM(1)) molecules, and the toxin-GM(1) complex traffics from the plasma membrane (PM) retrograde through endosomes and the Golgi apparatus to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). From the ER, the enzymatic A1 fragment retrotranslocates to the cytosol to cause disease. Clustering of GM(1) by multivalent toxin binding can structurally remodel cell membranes in ways that may assist toxin uptake and retrograde trafficking. We have recently found, however, that CT may traffic from the PM to the ER by exploiting an endogenous glycosphingolipid pathway (A. A. Wolf et al., Infect. Immun. 76:1476-1484, 2008, and D. J. F. Chinnapen et al., Dev. Cell 23:573-586, 2012), suggesting that multivalent binding to GM(1) is dispensable. Here we formally tested this idea by creating homogenous chimeric holotoxins with defined numbers of native GM(1) binding sites from zero (nonbinding) to five (wild type). We found that a single GM(1) binding site is sufficient for activity of the holotoxin. Therefore, remodeling of cell membranes by mechanisms that involve multivalent binding of toxin to GM(1) receptors is not essential for toxicity of CT. Through multivalent binding to its lipid receptor, cholera toxin (CT) can remodel cell membranes in ways that may assist host cell invasion. We recently found that CT variants which bind no more than 2 receptor molecules do exhibit toxicity, suggesting that CT may be able to enter cells by coopting an endogenous lipid sorting pathway without clustering receptors. We tested this idea directly by using purified variants

  12. On the Emerging Role of Chemistry in the Fashioning of Biologics: Synthesis of a Bidomainal Fucosyl GM1-Based Vaccine, for the Treatment of Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nagorny, Pavel; Kim, Woo Han; Wan, Qian; Lee, Dongjoo; Danishefsky, Samuel J.

    2009-01-01

    The synthesis of the novel Small Cell Lung Cancer (SCLC) Fucosyl GM1-based vaccine construct, featuring insertion of the HLA-DR binding 15 amino acid sequence derived from Plasmodium Falciparum, is described. The resultant glycopeptide has been synthesized in an efficient manner. Finally, successful conjugation of the glycopeptide to the Keyhole Limpet Hemocyanin (KLH) carrier protein completed the preparation of the vaccine. PMID:19555091

  13. GM1 and GD1a gangliosides modulate toxic and inflammatory effects of E. coli lipopolysaccharide by preventing TLR4 translocation into lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Nikolaeva, Svetlana; Bayunova, Lubov; Sokolova, Tatyana; Vlasova, Yulia; Bachteeva, Vera; Avrova, Natalia; Parnova, Rimma

    2015-03-01

    Exogenous gangliosides are known to inhibit the effects of Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in different cells exhibiting anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive activities. The mechanisms underlying ganglioside action are not fully understood. Because LPS recognition and receptor complex formation occur in lipid rafts, and gangliosides play a key role in their maintenance, we hypothesize that protective effects of exogenous gangliosides would depend on inhibition of LPS signaling via prevention of TLR4 translocation into lipid rafts. The effect of GM1 and GD1a gangliosides on LPS-induced toxic and inflammatory reactions in PC12 cells, and in epithelial cells isolated from the frog urinary bladder, was studied. In PC12 cells, GD1a and GM1 significantly reduced the effect of LPS on the decrease of cell survival and on stimulation of reactive oxygen species production. In epithelial cells, gangliosides decreased LPS-stimulated iNOS expression, NO, and PGE2 production. Subcellular fractionation, in combination with immunoblotting, showed that pretreatment of cells with GM1, GD1a, or methyl-β-cyclodextrin, completely eliminated the effect of LPS on translocation of TLR4 into lipid rafts. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that ganglioside-induced prevention of TLR4 translocation into lipid rafts could be a mechanism of protection against LPS in various cells.

  14. Stem Cell Transplant for Inborn Errors of Metabolism

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-11-06

    Adrenoleukodystrophy; Metachromatic Leukodystrophy; Globoid Cell Leukodystrophy; Gaucher's Disease; Fucosidosis; Wolman Disease; Niemann-Pick Disease; Batten Disease; GM1 Gangliosidosis; Tay Sachs Disease; Sandhoff Disease

  15. Measurement of the binding of cholera toxin to GM1 gangliosides on solid supported lipid bilayer vesicles and inhibition by europium (III) chloride.

    PubMed

    Williams, Thomas L; Jenkins, A Toby A

    2008-05-21

    In this paper the immobilization of small unilamellar DMPC/GM1 lipid vesicles containing a water-soluble bodipy dye is described. The binding of the complete alphabeta toxin expressed by Vibrio cholerae to the attached vesicles was measured using Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) and a value of the dissociation constant K d obtained. Further measurements showed that the interaction of both the alphabeta-toxin and the beta-subunit alone resulted in the permeation of the lipid membrane, with release of a fluorophore contained within the vesicle being measured by combined SPR and Surface Plasmon enhanced Fluorescence Spectroscopy (SPFS). The leakage of dye through the membrane, measured by following the change in fluorescence, was fitted to a simple diffusion model. Finally, SPFS measurements of the effect of europium(III) chloride (EuCl 3) showed that cholera toxin binding and subsequent membrane permeation could be blocked by 1 micromol dm (-3) europium chloride. In view of the low oral toxicity of europium chloride, we speculate on the potential pharmaceutical applications of this molecule in the treatment of cholera infection.

  16. Anti-glycoprotein D monoclonal antibody protects against herpes simplex virus type 1-induced diseases in mice functionally depleted of selected T-cell subsets or asialo GM1+ cells.

    PubMed Central

    Staats, H F; Oakes, J E; Lausch, R N

    1991-01-01

    Passive transfer of a monoclonal antibody (MAb) specific for glycoprotein D (gD) is highly effective in preventing the development of herpes simplex virus type 1-induced stromal keratitis. In the present study, we investigated whether animals which had been functionally depleted of T-cell subsets or asialo GM1+ cells would continue to be responsive to MAb therapy. BALB/c mice were depleted of CD4+, CD8+, or asialo GM1+ cells by treatment with anti-L3T4, anti-Lyt 2.2, or anti-asialo GM1 antibodies, respectively. Functional depletion of CD4+ cells was documented by the loss of delayed-type hypersensitivity responsiveness, while CD8+ cell depletion was accompanied by abrogation of cytotoxic lymphocyte activity. Anti-asialo GM1 treatment led to the loss of natural killer cell lytic activity. Mice depleted of the desired cell population and infected on the scarified cornea with herpes simplex virus type 1 uniformly developed necrotizing stromal keratitis by 3 weeks postinfection. A single inoculation of anti-gD MAb (55 micrograms) given intraperitoneally 24 h postinfection strongly protected hosts depleted of CD4+ cells against stromal keratitis. Likewise, antibody treatment in CD8+ or asialo GM1+ cell-depleted hosts was as therapeutically effective as that seen in non-cell-depleted mice. We also observed that in cell-depleted mice, the virus spread into the central nervous system and caused encephalitis. The CD4+ cell-depleted mice were the most severely affected, as 100% developed fatal disease. Anti-gD MAb treatment successfully protected all (32 of 32) CD4+-, CD8+-, or asialo GM1(+)-depleted hosts against encephalitis. We therefore conclude that antibody-mediated prevention of stromal keratitis and encephalitis does not require the obligatory participation of CD4+, CD8+, or asialo GM1+ cells. However, when mice were simultaneously depleted of both CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell subsets, antibody treatment could not prevent fatal encephalitis. Thus, antibody can compensate for

  17. Anti-asialo GM1 antiserum treatment of lethally irradiated recipients before bone marrow transplantation: Evidence that recipient natural killer depletion enhances survival, engraftment, and hematopoietic recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Tiberghien, P.; Longo, D.L.; Wine, J.W.; Alvord, W.G.; Reynolds, C.W. )

    1990-10-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are reported to have an important role in the resistance of lethally irradiated recipients to bone marrow transplantation (BMT). Therefore, we investigated the effects of recipient NK depletion on survival, chimerism, and hematopoietic reconstitution after lethal irradiation and the transplantation of limiting amounts of T-cell-deficient bone marrow (BM). When administered before BMT, anti-asialo GM1 (ASGM1) antiserum treatment, effective in depleting in vivo NK activity, was associated with a marked increase in survival in 3 of 3 allogeneic combinations (BALB/c into C3H/HeN, C57B1/6, or C3B6F1). This enhanced survival was independent of the susceptibility of each recipient strain to accept BALB/c BM. Moreover, recipient anti-ASGM1 treatment was also effective in increasing survival in recipients of syngeneic BM, suggesting that NK cells can adversely affect engraftment independent of genetically controlled polymorphic cell surface determinants. Analysis of chimerism in surviving animals 2 months post-BMT showed that recipient NK depletion significantly increased the level of donor engraftment when high doses of BM were transplanted. These studies also demonstrated that anti-ASGM1 pretreatment mainly resulted in an increase in extramedullary hematopoiesis in the second and third week after irradiation. Anti-ASGM1 treatment also dramatically accelerated the rate of appearance of donor-derived cells with a higher level of donor-cell engraftment apparent at a time when the differences in survival between NK-depleted and control BMT recipients became significant. Peripheral cell counts were also affected by NK depletion, with significantly enhanced platelet and red blood cell recovery and a moderate increase in granulocyte recovery.

  18. Rapid and simple polymerase chain reaction-based diagnostic assays for GM2 gangliosidosis variant 0 (Sandhoff-like disease) in Japanese domestic cats.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Mohammad M; Shoubudani, Tomoaki; Mizukami, Keijiro; Chang, Hye-Sook; Hossain, Mohammad A; Yabuki, Akira; Mitani, Sawane; Higo, Takashi; Arai, Toshiro; Yamato, Osamu

    2011-03-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based assays combined with microchip electrophoresis were developed and evaluated for diagnosis and genotyping of GM2 gangliosidosis variant 0 (Sandhoff-like disease) in Japanese domestic cats. A preliminary genotyping survey was carried out in the population of Japanese domestic cats (1,015 cats in total) in southern Japan. Three kinds of assays including PCR primer-induced restriction analysis (PIRA) and mutagenically separated (MS)-PCR were carried out using blood-stained Flinders Technology Associates filter papers (FTA cards) as templates. The PCR products were analyzed by both agarose gel and microchip electrophoreses. All assays were sufficient to determine the genotypes of this disease, but MS-PCR offered the most rapid and simplest test, as it does not need the restriction enzyme step required in PCR-PIRA. The use of microchip electrophoresis in combination with FTA cards for sampling could shorten the time required for genotyping and simplify the procedure as well. The genotyping survey in the current study did not find any cats that possessed the mutant allele, suggesting that the prevalence of this allele is low (<0.1%) in southern Japan.

  19. Real-Time PCR Genotyping Assay for GM2 Gangliosidosis Variant 0 in Toy Poodles and the Mutant Allele Frequency in Japan

    PubMed Central

    RAHMAN, Mohammad Mahbubur; YABUKI, Akira; KOHYAMA, Moeko; MITANI, Sawane; MIZUKAMI, Keijiro; UDDIN, Mohammad Mejbah; CHANG, Hye-Sook; KUSHIDA, Kazuya; KISHIMOTO, Miori; YAMABE, Remi; YAMATO, Osamu

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT GM2 gangliosidosis variant 0 (Sandhoff disease, SD) is a fatal, progressive neurodegenerative lysosomal storage disease caused by mutations of the HEXB gene. In canine SD, a pathogenic mutation (c.283delG) of the canine HEXB gene has been identified in toy poodles. In the present study, a TaqMan probe-based real-time PCR genotyping assay was developed and evaluated for rapid and large-scale genotyping and screening for this mutation. Furthermore, a genotyping survey was carried out in a population of toy poodles in Japan to determine the current mutant allele frequency. The real-time PCR assay clearly showed all genotypes of canine SD. The assay was suitable for large-scale survey as well as diagnosis, because of its high throughput and rapidity. The genotyping survey demonstrated a carrier frequency of 0.2%, suggesting that the current mutant allele frequency is low in Japan. However, there may be population stratification in different places, because of the founder effect by some carriers. Therefore, this new assay will be useful for the prevention and control of SD in toy poodles. PMID:24161966

  20. Characterization of the cholera toxin receptor on Balb/c 3T3 cells as a ganglioside similar to, or identical with, ganglioside GM1. No evidence for galactoproteins with receptor activity.

    PubMed

    Critchley, D R; Streuli, C H; Kellie, S; Ansell, S; Patel, B

    1982-04-15

    Balb/c 3T3 cells contain a large number [(0.8-1.6) x 10(6)] of high-affinity (half-maximal binding at 0.2 nM) binding sites for cholera toxin that are resistant to proteolysis, but are quantitatively extracted with chloroform/methanol. The following evidence rigorously establishes that the receptor is a ganglioside similar to, or identical with, ganglioside GM1 by the galactose oxidase/NaB3H4 technique on intact cells was inhibited by cholera toxin. (2) Ganglioside GM1 was specifically adsorbed from Nonidet P40 extracts of both surface- (galactose oxidase/NaB3H4 technique) and metabolically ([1-14C]palmitate) labelled cells in the presence of cholera toxin, anti-toxin and Staphylococcus aureus. (3) Ganglioside GM1 was the only ganglioside labelled when total cellular gangliosides separated on silica-gel sheets were overlayed with 125I-labelled cholera toxin, although GM3 and GD1a were the major gangliosides present. In contrast no evidence for a galactoprotein with receptor activity was obtained. Cholera toxin did not protect the terminal galactose residues of cell-surface glycoproteins from labelling by the galactose oxidase/NaB3H4 technique. No toxin-binding proteins could be identified in Nonidet P40 extracts of [35S]-methionine-labelled cells by immunochemical means. After sodium dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis none of the major cellular galactoproteins identified by overlaying gels with 125I-labelled ricin were able to bind 125I-labelled cholera toxin. It is concluded that the cholera toxin receptor on Balb/c 3T3 cells is exclusively ganglioside GM1 (or a related species), and that cholera toxin can therefore be used to probe the function and organisation of gangliosides in these cells as previously outlined [Critchley, Ansell, Perkins, Dilks & Ingram (1979) J. Supramol. Struct. 12, 273-291].

  1. X-ray reflectivity and grazing incidence diffraction studies of interaction between human adhesion/growth-regulatory galectin-1 and DPPE-GM1 lipid monolayer at an air/water interface.

    PubMed

    Majewski, J; André, S; Jones, E; Chi, E; Gabius, H-J

    2015-07-01

    The specific interaction of ganglioside GM1 with the homodimeric (prototype) endogenous lectin galectin-1 triggers growth regulation in tumor and activated effector T cells. This proven biorelevance directed interest to studying association of the lectin to a model surface, i.e. a 1,2-dihexadecanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine/ganglioside GM1 (80 : 20 mol%) monolayer, at a bioeffective concentration. Surface expansion by the lectin insertion was detected at a surface pressure of 20 mN/m. On combining the methods of grazing incidence X-ray diffraction and X-ray reflectivity, a transient decrease in lipid-ordered phase of the monolayer was observed. The measured electron density distribution indicated that galectin-1 is oriented with its long axis in the surface plane, ideal for cis-crosslinking. The data reveal a conspicuous difference to the way the pentameric lectin part of the cholera toxin, another GM1-specific lectin, is bound to the monolayer. They also encourage further efforts to monitor effects of structurally different members of the galectin family such as the functionally antagonistic chimera-type galectin-3.

  2. Systemic Gene Transfer of a Hexosaminidase Variant Using an scAAV9.47 Vector Corrects GM2 Gangliosidosis in Sandhoff Mice.

    PubMed

    Osmon, Karlaina J L; Woodley, Evan; Thompson, Patrick; Ong, Katalina; Karumuthil-Melethil, Subha; Keimel, John G; Mark, Brian L; Mahuran, Don; Gray, Steven J; Walia, Jagdeep S

    2016-07-01

    GM2 gangliosidosis is a group of neurodegenerative diseases caused by β-hexosaminidase A (HexA) enzyme deficiency. There is currently no cure. HexA is composed of two similar, nonidentical subunits, α and β, which must interact with the GM2 activator protein (GM2AP), a substrate-specific cofactor, to hydrolyze GM2 ganglioside. Mutations in either subunit or the activator can result in the accumulation of GM2 ganglioside within neurons throughout the central nervous system. The resulting neuronal cell death induces the primary symptoms of the disease: motor impairment, seizures, and sensory impairments. This study assesses the long-term effects of gene transfer in a Sandhoff (β-subunit knockout) mouse model. The study utilized a modified human β-hexosaminidase α-subunit (μ-subunit) that contains critical sequences from the β-subunit that enables formation of a stable homodimer (HexM) and interaction with GM2AP to hydrolyze GM2 ganglioside. We investigated a self-complementary adeno-associated viral (scAAV) vector expressing HexM, through intravenous injections of the neonatal mice. We monitored one cohort for 8 weeks and another cohort long-term for survival benefit, behavioral, biochemical, and molecular analyses. Untreated Sandhoff disease (SD) control mice reached a humane endpoint at approximately 15 weeks, whereas treated mice had a median survival age of 40 weeks, an approximate 2.5-fold survival advantage. On behavioral tests, the treated mice outperformed their knockout age-matched controls and perform similarly to the heterozygous controls. Through the enzymatic and GM2 ganglioside analyses, we observed a significant decrease in the GM2 ganglioside level, even though the enzyme levels were not significantly increased. Molecular analyses revealed a global distribution of the vector between brain and spinal cord regions. In conclusion, the neonatal delivery of a novel viral vector expressing the human HexM enzyme is effective in ameliorating the SD

  3. Population analysis of the GLB1 gene in South Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Baiotto, Cléia; Sperb, Fernanda; Matte, Ursula; da Silva, Cláudia Dornelles; Sano, Renata; Coelho, Janice Carneiro; Giugliani, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    Infantile GM1 gangliosidosis is caused by the absence or reduction of lysosomal beta-galactosidase activity. Studies conducted in Brazil have indicated that it is one of the most frequent lysosomal storage disorders in the southern part of the country. To assess the incidence of this disorder, 390 blood donors were tested for the presence of two common mutations (1622–1627insG and R59H) in the GLB1 gene. Another group, consisting of 26 GM1 patients, and the blood donors were tested for the presence of two polymorphisms (R521C and S532G), in an attempt to elucidate whether there is a founder effect. The frequencies of the R59H and 1622–1627insG mutations among the GM1 patients studied were 19.2% and 38.5%, respectively. The frequency of polymorphism S532G was 16.7%, whereas R521C was not found in the patients. The overall frequency of either R59H or 1622–1627insG was 57.7% of the disease-causing alleles. This epidemiological study suggested a carrier frequency of 1:58. Seven different haplotypes were found. The 1622–1627insG mutation was not found to be linked to any polymorphism, whereas linkage disequilibrium was found for haplotype 2 (R59H, S532G) (p < 0.001). These data confirm the high incidence of GM1 gangliosidosis and the high frequency of two common mutations in southern Brazil. PMID:21637542

  4. Structural Basis of Pharmacological Chaperoning for Human β-Galactosidase*

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Hironori; Ohto, Umeharu; Higaki, Katsumi; Mena-Barragán, Teresa; Aguilar-Moncayo, Matilde; Ortiz Mellet, Carmen; Nanba, Eiji; Garcia Fernandez, Jose M.; Suzuki, Yoshiyuki; Shimizu, Toshiyuki

    2014-01-01

    GM1 gangliosidosis and Morquio B disease are autosomal recessive diseases caused by the defect in the lysosomal β-galactosidase (β-Gal), frequently related to misfolding and subsequent endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation. Pharmacological chaperone (PC) therapy is a newly developed molecular therapeutic approach by using small molecule ligands of the mutant enzyme that are able to promote the correct folding and prevent endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation and promote trafficking to the lysosome. In this report, we describe the enzymological properties of purified recombinant human β-GalWT and two representative mutations in GM1 gangliosidosis Japanese patients, β-GalR201C and β-GalI51T. We have also evaluated the PC effect of two competitive inhibitors of β-Gal. Moreover, we provide a detailed atomic view of the recognition mechanism of these compounds in comparison with two structurally related analogues. All compounds bind to the active site of β-Gal with the sugar-mimicking moiety making hydrogen bonds to active site residues. Moreover, the binding affinity, the enzyme selectivity, and the PC potential are strongly affected by the mono- or bicyclic structure of the core as well as the orientation, nature, and length of the exocyclic substituent. These results provide understanding on the mechanism of action of β-Gal selective chaperoning by newly developed PC compounds. PMID:24737316

  5. Diagnostic Approach to Childhood-onset Cerebellar Atrophy: A 10-Year Retrospective Study of 300 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Al-Maawali, Almundher; Blaser, Susan; Yoon, Grace

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary ataxias associated with cerebellar atrophy are a heterogeneous group of disorders. Selection of appropriate clinical and genetic tests for patients with cerebellar atrophy poses a diagnostic challenge. Neuroimaging is a crucial initial investigation in the diagnostic evaluation of ataxia in childhood, and the presence of cerebellar atrophy helps guide further investigations. We performed a detailed review of 300 patients with confirmed cerebellar atrophy on magnetic resonance imaging over a 10-year period. A diagnosis was established in 47% of patients: Mitochondrial disorders were most common, followed by the neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses, ataxia telangectasia, and late GM2-gangliosidosis. We review the common causes of cerebellar atrophy in childhood and propose a diagnostic approach based on correlating specific neuroimaging patterns with clinical and genetic diagnoses. PMID:22764178

  6. A chronic GM2 gangliosidosis variant with a HEXA splicing defect: quantitation of HEXA mRNAs in normal and mutant fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, M J; Hechtman, P; Boulay, B; Kaplan, F

    1997-01-01

    Over 72 mutations have been identified in the HEXA gene of which only four (T538C, A590C, G805A, and C1495T) are believed to cause a chronic form of Tay-Sachs disease (TSD). We identified a novel HEXA mutation (IVS7, -7 G-->A) leading to chronic TSD in a Canadian patient of English ancestry. The second allele in this patient was the exon 11 4-bp insertion mutation (/1277TATC), which is the most frequent TSD allele in Ashkenazi Jews. The IVS7, -7 G-->A mutation introduces a new 3' splice acceptor site 5 bp upstream of the normal intron 7 splice acceptor site. The mutation leads to reduction of steady-state levels of HEXA mRNA by more than 80%. Two mRNA species are produced by the IVS7, -7 G-->A allele; a normal nRNA species and an mRNA lacking exon 8. No mRNA species that was spliced at the upstream 3' splice acceptor site was detected. We used competitive PCR to quantitate mRNA species in fibroblasts obtained from this patient. We compared the amounts of three identified mRNA species to HEXA mRNA levels in cells from normal individuals and from individuals heterozygous for /1277TATC. The steady-state level of HEXA mRNA in cells from a normal individual was 17.3 pg/microg RNA. An individual heterozygous for /1277TATC produced 8.7 pg of normal HEXA mRNA/microg RNA. The HEXA mRNA species with the insertion mutation was present in patient cells at 4.8% of the level of normal HEXA nRNA in homozygous normal cells. In fibroblasts from the patient carrying the IVS7, -7 G-->A mutation, the steady-state level of exon 8-deleted HEXA mRNA was 5.9% the level of that produced by homozygous normal cells. The level of normal HEXA nRNA in this patient's cells was 10.4%.

  7. Magnetic resonance findings of the corpus callosum in canine and feline lysosomal storage diseases.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Daisuke; Tamura, Shinji; Nakamoto, Yuya; Matsuki, Naoaki; Takahashi, Kimimasa; Fujita, Michio; Uchida, Kazuyuki; Yamato, Osamu

    2013-01-01

    Several reports have described magnetic resonance (MR) findings in canine and feline lysosomal storage diseases such as gangliosidoses and neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis. Although most of those studies described the signal intensities of white matter in the cerebrum, findings of the corpus callosum were not described in detail. A retrospective study was conducted on MR findings of the corpus callosum as well as the rostral commissure and the fornix in 18 cases of canine and feline lysosomal storage diseases. This included 6 Shiba Inu dogs and 2 domestic shorthair cats with GM1 gangliosidosis; 2 domestic shorthair cats, 2 familial toy poodles, and a golden retriever with GM2 gangliosidosis; and 2 border collies and 3 chihuahuas with neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses, to determine whether changes of the corpus callosum is an imaging indicator of those diseases. The corpus callosum and the rostral commissure were difficult to recognize in all cases of juvenile-onset gangliosidoses (GM1 gangliosidosis in Shiba Inu dogs and domestic shorthair cats and GM2 gangliosidosis in domestic shorthair cats) and GM2 gangliosidosis in toy poodles with late juvenile-onset. In contrast, the corpus callosum and the rostral commissure were confirmed in cases of GM2 gangliosidosis in a golden retriever and canine neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses with late juvenile- to early adult-onset, but were extremely thin. Abnormal findings of the corpus callosum on midline sagittal images may be a useful imaging indicator for suspecting lysosomal storage diseases, especially hypoplasia (underdevelopment) of the corpus callosum in juvenile-onset gangliosidoses.

  8. Elevated serum titers of proinflammatory cytokines and CNS autoantibodies in patients with chronic spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Hayes, K C; Hull, T C L; Delaney, G A; Potter, P J; Sequeira, K A J; Campbell, K; Popovich, P G

    2002-06-01

    This study characterized the proinflammatory cytokines, interleukin-2 (IL-2) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha), the antiinflammatory cytokines, IL-4 and IL-10, autoantibodies specific for GM1 ganglioside (anti-GM1), IgG and IgM, and myelin-associated glycoprotein (anti-MAG), in the sera of infection-free, chronic (>12 months), traumatically injured SCI patients (n = 24). Healthy able-bodied subjects (n = 26) served as controls. The proinflammatory cytokines and anti-GM1 antibodies were of particular interest as they have been implicated in an autoimmune "channelopathy" component to central and peripheral conduction deficits in various chronic neuroinflammatory diseases. Antibody and cytokine titers were established using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA). The mean anti-GM(1) (IgM) titer value for the SCI group was significantly higher (p < 0.05) than controls. The SCI group also demonstrated significantly higher titers (p < 0.05) of IL-2 and TNF alpha than controls. No differences were found between the SCI group and control group mean levels of IL-4 or IL-10. Overall, the serum of 57% of SCI patients contained increased levels of autoantibodies or proinflammatory cytokines relative to control values. These results provide preliminary support for the hypothesis that chronic immunological activation in the periphery occurs in a subpopulation of chronic SCI patients. It remains to be established whether elevated serum titers of proinflammatory cytokines and autoantibodies against GM1 are beneficial to the patients or whether they are surrogate markers of a channelopathy that compounds the neurological impairment associated with traumatic axonopathy or myelinopathy.

  9. Clinical phenotype of patients with neuropathy associated with monoclonal gammopathy: a comparative study and a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Stork, Abraham C J; van der Pol, W-Ludo; Franssen, Hessel; Jacobs, Bart C; Notermans, Nicolette C

    2014-07-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate if the clinical and electrophysiological phenotype of patients with polyneuropathy associated with IgM monoclonal gammopathy (IgM-PNP) is related to the presence of antibodies against gangliosides or myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG). We compared clinical and nerve conduction study (NCS) characteristics of 11 IgM-PNP patients with antibodies against asialo-GM1 or gangliosides (GM1, GD1a, GD1b, GM2 or GQ1b) to 11 consecutive IgM-PNP patients with anti-MAG neuropathy and to 9 IgM-PNP patients without antibodies against either MAG or gangliosides. Patients with anti-ganglioside antibodies could not be differentiated from those with anti-MAG antibodies based on clinical characteristics. However, within the group of anti-ganglioside antibody positive patients, antibodies against GD1b and GQ1b were associated with a purely sensory neuropathy (p = 0.002), while asymmetric weakness with symmetric sensory loss was associated with anti-asialo-GM1 antibodies. In conclusion, polyneuropathy associated with IgM monoclonal gammopathy and anti-ganglioside antibodies clinically resembles anti-MAG neuropathy. Pure sensory neuropathy and marked asymmetry may suggest the presence of anti-ganglioside rather than anti-MAG antibodies.

  10. Sustained normalization of neurological disease after intracranial gene therapy in a feline model**

    PubMed Central

    McCurdy, Victoria J.; Johnson, Aime K.; Gray-Edwards, Heather; Randle, Ashley N.; Brunson, Brandon L.; Morrison, Nancy E.; Salibi, Nouha; Johnson, Jacob A.; Hwang, Misako; Beyers, Ronald J.; Leroy, Stanley G.; Maitland, Stacy; Denney, Thomas S.; Cox, Nancy R.; Baker, Henry J.; Sena-Esteves, Miguel; Martin, Douglas R.

    2015-01-01

    Progressive debilitating neurological defects characterize feline GM1 gangliosidosis, a lysosomal storage disease caused by deficiency of lysosomal β-galactosidase. No effective therapy exists for affected children, who often die before age 5. In the current study, an adeno-associated viral vector carrying the therapeutic gene was injected bilaterally into two brain targets (thalamus and deep cerebellar nuclei) of a feline model of GM1 gangliosidosis. Gene therapy normalized β-galactosidase activity and storage throughout the brain and spinal cord. The mean survival of 12 treated GM1 animals was >38 months compared to 8 months for untreated animals. Seven of the 8 treated animals remaining alive demonstrated normalization of disease, with abrogation of many symptoms including gait deficits and postural imbalance. Sustained correction of the GM1 gangliosidosis disease phenotype after limited intracranial targeting by gene therapy in a large animal model suggests that this approach may be useful for treating the human version of this lysosomal storage disorder. PMID:24718858

  11. Three Novel Mutations in Iranian Patients with Tay-Sachs Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jamali, Solmaz; Eskandari, Nasim; Aryani, Omid; Salehpour, Shadab; Zaman, Talieh; Kamalidehghan, Behnam; Houshmand, Massoud

    2014-01-01

    Background: Tay-Sachs disease (TSD), or GM2 gangliosidosis, is a lethal autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder, which is caused by a deficiency of beta-hexosaminidase A (HEXA), resulting in lysosomal accumulation of GM2 ganglioside. The aim of this study was to identify the TSD-causing mutations in an Iranian population. Methods: In this study, we examined 31 patients for TSD-causing mutations using PCR, followed by restriction enzyme digestion. Results: Molecular genetics analysis of DNA from 23 patients of TSD revealed mutations that has been previously reported, including four-base duplications c.1274_1277dupTATC in exon 11 and IVS2+1G>A, deletion TTAGGCAAGGGC in exon 10 as well as a few novel mutations, including C331G, which altered Gln>Glu in HEXB, A>G, T>C, and p.R510X in exon 14, which predicted a termination codon or nonsense mutation. Conclusion: In conclusion, with the discovery of these novel mutations, the genotypic spectrum of Iranian patients with TSD disease has been extended and could facilitate definition of disease-related mutations. PMID:24518553

  12. Mitochondrial respiratory chain function in skeletal muscle of ALS patients.

    PubMed

    Echaniz-Laguna, Andoni; Zoll, Joffrey; Ribera, Florence; Tranchant, Christine; Warter, Jean-Marie; Lonsdorfer, Jean; Lampert, Eliane

    2002-11-01

    Evidence implicating mitochondrial dysfunction in the central nervous system of patients with sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (SALS) has recently been accumulating. In contrast, data on mitochondrial function in skeletal muscle in SALS are scarce and controversial. We investigated the in situ properties of muscle mitochondria in patients with early-stage SALS and sedentary (SED) controls using the skinned fiber technique to determine whether respiration of muscle tissue is altered in early-stage SALS in comparison with SED. Musculus vastus lateralis biopsies were obtained from 7 SED group members and 14 patients with early-stage SALS (mean disease duration, 9 months). Muscle fibers were permeabilized with saponine and then skinned and placed in an oxygraphic chamber to measure basal (V(0)) and maximal (V(max)) adenosine diphosphate-stimulated respiration rates and to assess mitochondrial regulation by adenosine diphosphate. Muscle oxidative capacity, evaluated with V(max), was identical in patients in the SALS and SED groups (V(0): SALS, 1.1 +/- 0.1; SED, 0.8 +/- 0.1, micromol 0(2). min(-1). gm(-1)dw and V(max): SALS, 3.1 +/- 0.3; SED, 2.5 +/- 0.3, micromol 0(2). min(-1). gm(-1)dw). This study shows an absence of large mitochondrial damage in skeletal muscle of patients with early-stage SALS, suggesting that mitochondrial dysfunction in the earlier stages of SALS is almost certainly not systemic.

  13. Comparison of the canine and human acid {beta}-galactosidase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Ahern-Rindell, A.J.; Kretz, K.A.; O`Brien, J.S.

    1996-05-17

    Several canine cDNA libraries were screened with human {beta}-galactosidase cDNA as probe. Seven positive clones were isolated and sequenced yielding a partial (2060 bp) canine {beta}-galactosidase cDNA with 86% identity to the human {beta}-galactosidase cDNA. Preliminary analysis of a canine genomic library indicated conservation of exon number and size. Analysis by Northern blotting disclosed a single mRNA of 2.4 kb in fibroblasts and liver from normal dogs and dogs affected with GM1 gangliosidosis. Although incomplete, these results indicate canine GM1 gangliosidosis is a suitable animal model of the human disease and should further efforts to devise a gene therapy strategy for its treatment. 20 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  14. 4th Rare Disease South Eastern Europe (See) Meeting Skopje, Macedonia (November 14th, 2015).

    PubMed

    Gucev, Zoran; Tasic, Velibor; Polenakovic, Momir

    2015-01-01

    The 4th meeting on rare diseases in South Eastern Europe (SEE) was held in Skopje, at the Macedonian Academy of Sciences and Arts (MASA) on the 14(th) of November 2015. The focuses were metabolic, rare brain diseases as well as the rare dysmorphic syndrome. The authors of the report are particularly keen on stating that one of the main goals of the meeting, namely to help the treatment of patients with rare disease has begun to bear fruits. The talk on an iminosugar-based pharmacological chaperone compound as a drug candidate for the treatment of GM1-gangliosidosis and mucopolysaccharidosis IVB (Morquio disease type B) was enlightening. To date, there is no treatment available to be offered to patients, but chaperones lead mutated proteins to adopt a native-like conformation and to successfully traffic to their normal cellular destination. DORPHAN is developing an iminosugar-based pharmacological chaperone compound for the treatment of GM1-gangliosidosis and mucopolysaccharidosis IVB. A talk on recent developments in the laboratory diagnosis of mucopolysaccharidoses (MPS) was particularly interesting, covering the laboratory diagnosis of the MPS diseases by a strategy of clinical examination, biochemical analysis of urine samples, enzyme tests and genetic characterization of underlying mutations. New techniques were developed, including analysis of urinary glycosaminoglycans with tandem mass spectrometry, miniaturized enzyme tests or novel synthetic substrates for enzyme assays using mass spectrometry detection of products using dried blood spots. Feasibility and cost-effectiveness of these methods in newborn screening programs have been demonstrated. Neuromuscular RDs, and especially familial amyloid polyneuropathy (FAP) were a topic of the Bulgarian colleagues. Diagnosis, screening and the role of microglia were also topics of particular interest. In summary, this year RD meeting was exciting and productive on a wide range of diseases and on a novel insights on

  15. Immunogenetic differences in subpopulations of patients with IgA nephropathy (Berger's disease).

    PubMed

    Ockhuizen, T; Beukhof, J R; Westra, J; Halie, L M; Beelen, J M; van der Hem, G K

    1984-01-01

    Gm and Km as well as HLA-A, HLA-B, and HLA-DR phenotype frequencies were examined in 64 well-defined IgA nephropathy patients. The patients were divided into subpopulations according to clinical symptoms, e.g. macrohematuria and chronic renal failure (CRF). In patients with CRF the frequency of the Gm1,3,17;5,13,21 phenotype tended to be increased (p = 0.016; pcorr = 0.08). The frequency of the HLA-DR phenotype with only one antigen (HLA-DR-) was increased in the whole population (p less than 0.001; pcorr less than 0.011), which appeared to be confined to the patients with macrohematuria (p less than 0.001; pcorr less than 0.01) and non-CRF (p less than 0.001; pcorr less than 0.011). Patients with the Gm1,3,17;5,13,21 phenotype developed a CRF significantly earlier (p = 0.009; pcorr = 0.045) than patients with other Gm phenotypes. These data suggest that clinically observed subpopulations of IgA nephropathy patients differ in immunogenetic background.

  16. Genetics Home Reference: GM2-gangliosidosis, AB variant

    MedlinePlus

    ... Chen B, Rigat B, Curry C, Mahuran DJ. Structure of the GM2A gene: identification of an exon 2 nonsense mutation and a naturally occurring transcript with an in-frame deletion of exon 2. Am J Hum Genet. ...

  17. Molecular basis of adult-onset and chronic G sub M2 gangliosidoses in patients of Ashkenazi Jewish origin: Substitution of serine for glycine at position 269 of the. alpha. -subunit of. beta. -hexosaminidase

    SciTech Connect

    Paw, B.H.; Kaback, M.M.; Neufeld, E.F. )

    1989-04-01

    Chronic and adult-onset G{sub M2} gangliosidoses are neurological disorders caused by marked deficiency of the A isoenzyme of {beta}-hexosaminidase; they occur in the Ashkenazi Jewish population, though less frequently than classic (infantile) Tay-Sachs disease. Earlier biosynthetic studies had identified a defective {alpha}-subunit that failed to associate with the {beta}-subunit. The authors have now found a guanosine to adenosine transition at the 3{prime} end of exon 7, which causes substitution of serine for glycine at position 269 of the {alpha}-subunit. An RNase protection assay was used to localize the mutation to a segment of mRNA from fibroblasts of a patient with the adult-onset disorder. That segment of mRNA (after reverse transcription) and a corresponding segment of genomic DNA were amplified by the polymerase chain reaction and sequenced by the dideoxy method. The sequence analysis, together with an assay based on the loss of a ScrFI restriction site, showed that the patient was a compound heterozygote who had inherited the 269 (Gly {yields} Ser) mutation from his father and an allelic null mutation from his mother. The 269 (Gly {yields} Ser) mutation, in compound heterozygosity with a presumed null allele, was also found in fetal fibroblasts with an association-defective phenotype and in cells from five patients with chronic G{sub M2} gangliosidosis.

  18. Antidepressant-Like Effects of GM1 Ganglioside Involving the BDNF Signaling Cascade in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Song, Lu; Wang, Cheng-Niu; Zhang, Wei; Huang, Chao; Tong, Li-Juan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Depression is a serious psychiatric disorder that easily causes physical impairments and a high suicide rate. Monosialotetrahexosylganglioside is a crucial ganglioside for the central nervous system and has been reported to affect the function of the brain derived neurotrophic factor system. This study is aimed to evaluate whether monosialotetrahexosylganglioside has antidepressant-like effects. Methods: Antidepressant-like effects of monosialotetrahexosylganglioside were assessed in the chronic social defeat stress model of depression, and various behavioral tests were performed. Changes in the brain derived neurotrophic factor signaling pathway after chronic social defeat stress and monosialotetrahexosylganglioside treatment were also investigated. A tryptophan hydroxylase inhibitor and brain derived neurotrophic factor signaling inhibitors were used to determine the antidepressant mechanisms of monosialotetrahexosylganglioside. Results: Monosialotetrahexosylganglioside administration significantly reversed the chronic social defeat stress-induced reduction of sucrose preference and social interaction in mice and also prevented the increased immobility time in the forced swim test and tail suspension test. In addition, monosialotetrahexosylganglioside completely ameliorated the stress-induced dysfunction of brain derived neurotrophic factor signaling cascade in the hippocampus and medial prefrontal cortex, 2 regions closely involved in the pathophysiology of depression. Furthermore, the usage of brain derived neurotrophic factor signaling cascade inhibitors, K252a and anti-brain derived neurotrophic factor antibody, each abolished the antidepressant-like effects of monosialotetrahexosylganglioside, while the usage of a serotonin system inhibitor did not. Conclusions: Taken together, our findings suggest that monosialotetrahexosylganglioside indeed has antidepressant-like effects, and these effects were mediated through the activation of brain derived neurotrophic factor signaling cascade. PMID:27207911

  19. Genetic variants of immunoglobulin γ and κ chains influence humoral immunity to the cancer-testis antigen XAGE-1b (GAGED2a) in patients with non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Pandey, J P; Namboodiri, A M; Ohue, Y; Oka, M; Nakayama, E

    2014-04-01

    GM (γ marker) allotypes, genetic variants of immunoglobulin γ chains, have been reported to be associated strongly with susceptibility to lung cancer, but the mechanism(s) underlying this association is not known. One mechanism could involve their contribution to humoral immunity to lung tumour-associated antigens. In this study, we aimed to determine whether particular GM and KM (κ marker) allotypes were associated with antibody responsiveness to XAGE-1b, a highly immunogenic lung tumour-associated cancer-testis antigen. Sera from 89 patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) were allotyped for eight GM and two KM determinants and characterized for antibodies to a synthetic XAGE-1b protein. The distribution of various GM phenotypes was significantly different between XAGE-1b antibody-positive and -negative patients (P = 0·023), as well as in the subgroup of XAGE-1b antigen-positive advanced NSCLC (P = 0·007). None of the patients with the GM 1,17 21 phenotype was positive for the XAGE-1b antibody. In patients with antigen-positive advanced disease, the prevalence of GM 1,2,17 21 was significantly higher in the antibody-positive group than in those who lacked the XAGE-1b antibody (P = 0·026). This phenotype also interacted with a particular KM phenotype: subjects with GM 1,2,17 21 and KM 3,3 phenotypes were almost four times (odds ratio = 3·8) as likely to be positive for the XAGE-1b antibody as the subjects who lacked these phenotypes. This is the first report presenting evidence for the involvement of immunoglobulin allotypes in immunity to a cancer-testis antigen, which has important implications for XAGE-1b-based immunotherapeutic interventions in lung adenocarcinoma.

  20. The role of pharmacotherapy in modifying the neurological status of patients with spinal and spinal cord injuries.

    PubMed

    do Vale Ramos, Renato Carlos; Alegrete, Nuno

    2015-01-01

    The aim here was to conduct a review of the literature on pharmacological therapies for modifying the neurological status of patients with spinal cord injuries. The PubMed database was searched for articles with the terms "spinal cord injury AND methylprednisolone/GM1/apoptosis inhibitor/calpain inhibitor/naloxone/tempol/tirilazad", in Portuguese or in English, published over the last five years. Older studies were included because of their historical importance. The pharmacological groups were divided according to their capacity to interfere with the physiopathological mechanisms of secondary injuries. Use of methylprednisolone needs to be carefully weighed up: other anti-inflammatory agents have shown benefits in humans or in animals. GM1 does not seem to have greater efficacy than methylprednisolone, but longer-term studies are needed. Many inhibitors of apoptosis have shown benefits in in vitro studies or in animals. Naloxone has not shown benefits. Tempol inhibits the main consequences of oxidation at the level of the spinal cord and other antioxidant drugs seem to have an effect superior to that of methylprednisolone. There is an urgent need to find new treatments that improve the neurological status of patients with spinal cord injuries. The benefits from treatment with methylprednisolone have been questioned, with concerns regarding its safety. Other drugs have been studied, and some of these may provide promising alternatives. Additional studies are needed in order to reach conclusions regarding the benefits of these agents in clinical practice.

  1. The role of pharmacotherapy in modifying the neurological status of patients with spinal and spinal cord injuries☆

    PubMed Central

    do Vale Ramos, Renato Carlos; Alegrete, Nuno

    2015-01-01

    The aim here was to conduct a review of the literature on pharmacological therapies for modifying the neurological status of patients with spinal cord injuries. The PubMed database was searched for articles with the terms “spinal cord injury AND methylprednisolone/GM1/apoptosis inhibitor/calpain inhibitor/naloxone/tempol/tirilazad”, in Portuguese or in English, published over the last five years. Older studies were included because of their historical importance. The pharmacological groups were divided according to their capacity to interfere with the physiopathological mechanisms of secondary injuries. Use of methylprednisolone needs to be carefully weighed up: other anti-inflammatory agents have shown benefits in humans or in animals. GM1 does not seem to have greater efficacy than methylprednisolone, but longer-term studies are needed. Many inhibitors of apoptosis have shown benefits in in vitro studies or in animals. Naloxone has not shown benefits. Tempol inhibits the main consequences of oxidation at the level of the spinal cord and other antioxidant drugs seem to have an effect superior to that of methylprednisolone. There is an urgent need to find new treatments that improve the neurological status of patients with spinal cord injuries. The benefits from treatment with methylprednisolone have been questioned, with concerns regarding its safety. Other drugs have been studied, and some of these may provide promising alternatives. Additional studies are needed in order to reach conclusions regarding the benefits of these agents in clinical practice. PMID:27218071

  2. Measurement of Elevated Concentrations of Urine Keratan Sulfate by UPLC-MSMS in Lysosomal Storage Disorders (LSDs): Comparison of Urine Keratan Sulfate Levels in MPS IVA Versus Other LSDs.

    PubMed

    Ellsworth, Katarzyna A; Pollard, Laura M; Cathey, Sara; Wood, Tim

    2016-07-28

    Keratan sulfate (KS) is commonly elevated in urine samples from patients with mucopolysaccharidosis type IVA (MPS IVA) and is considered pathognomonic for the condition. Recently, a new method has been described by Martell et al. to detect and measure urinary KS utilizing LC-MS/MS. As a part of the validation of this method in our laboratory, we studied the sensitivity and specificity of elevated urine KS levels using 25 samples from 15 MPS IVA patients, and 138 samples from 102 patients with other lysosomal storage disorders, including MPS I (n = 9), MPS II (n = 13), MPS III (n = 23), MPS VI (n = 7), beta-galactosidase deficiency (n = 7), mucolipidosis (ML) type II, II/III and III (n = 51), alpha-mannosidosis (n = 11), fucosidosis (n = 4), sialidosis (n = 5), Pompe disease (n = 3), aspartylglucosaminuria (n = 4), and galactosialidosis (n = 1). As expected, urine KS values were significantly higher (fivefold average increase) than age-matched controls in all MPS IVA patients. Urine KS levels were also significantly elevated (threefold to fourfold increase) in patients with GM-1 gangliosidosis, MPS IVB, ML II and ML II/III, and fucosidosis. Urine KS was also elevated to a smaller degree (1.1-fold to 1.7-fold average increase) in patients with MPS I, MPS II, and ML III. These findings suggest that while the UPLC-MS/MS urine KS method is 100% sensitive for the detection of patients with MPS IVA, elevated urine KS is not specific for this condition. Therefore, caution is advised when interpreting urinary keratan sulfate results.

  3. Juvenile-onset spinal muscular atrophy caused by compound heterozygosity for mutations in the HEXA gene.

    PubMed

    Navon, R; Khosravi, R; Melki, J; Drucker, L; Fontaine, B; Turpin, J C; N'Guyen, B; Fardeau, M; Rondot, P; Baumann, N

    1997-05-01

    Progressive proximal muscle weakness is present both in spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) type III (Kugelberg-Welander disease) and in GM2 gangliosidosis, diseases that segregate in an autosomal recessive fashion. The SMN gene for SMA and the HEXA gene for GM2 gangliosidosis were investigated in a woman with progressive proximal muscle weakness, long believed to be SMA type III (Kugelberg-Welander type). She and her family underwent biochemical studies for GM2 gangliosidosis. Analysis of SMN excluded SMA. Biochemical studies on GM2 gangliosidosis showed deficiency in hexosaminidase A activity and increased GM2 ganglioside accumulation in the patient's fibroblasts. The HEXA gene was first analyzed for the Gly269-->Ser mutation characteristic for adult GM2 gangliosidosis. Since the patient was carrying the adult mutation heterozygously, all 14 exons and adjacent intron sequences were analyzed. A novel mutation in exon 1 resulting in an A-to-T change in the initiation codon (ATG to TTG) was identified. The adult patient is a compound heterozygote, with each allele containing a different mutation. Although mRNA was transcribed from the novel mutant allele, expression experiments showed no enzyme activity, suggesting that neither the TTG nor an alternative codon serve as an initiation codon in the HEXA gene.

  4. Follow-up study and response to treatment in 23 patients with Lewis-Sumner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Viala, K; Renié, L; Maisonobe, T; Béhin, A; Neil, J; Léger, J M; Bouche, P

    2004-09-01

    Lewis-Sumner syndrome (LSS) is a dysimmune peripheral nerve disorder, characterized by a predominantly distal, asymmetric weakness mostly affecting the upper limbs with sensory impairment, and by the presence of multifocal persistent conduction blocks. The nosological position of this neuropathy in relation to multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN) and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is still debated. We report the clinical, biological and electrophysiological features, the course and the response to treatment in 23 LSS patients. The initial symptoms started in the distal part of an upper limb in 70% of patients. They were sensorimotor in 65% and purely sensory in 35% of patients. A cranial nerve involvement was observed in 26% of patients and a distal limb amyotrophy in 52%. The CSF protein level was normal in 67% of patients and mildly elevated in the remainder. None had serum anti-GM1 antibodies. There were multiple motor conduction blocks (average of 2.87/patient), predominantly located in the forearm, whereas demyelinating features outside the blocked nerves were rare. Abnormal distal sensory potentials were found in 87% of patients. The electrophysiological pattern suggests a very focal motor fibre demyelination sparing the nerve endings, whereas sensory fibre involvement was widespread. The course was chronic progressive in 71% of patients and relapsing-remitting in the others. During the follow-up study (median duration of 4 years), half of the patients progressed with a multifocal pattern and the distribution of the motor deficit remained similar to the initial presentation. The other patients showed a progression to the other limbs, suggesting a more diffuse process. Fifty-four percent of the patients treated with intravenous immunoglobulin showed an improvement, compared with 33% of the patients treated with oral steroids. Overall, 73% of patients had a positive response to immune-mediated therapy. LSS may be distinguished

  5. Bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate: a secondary storage lipid in the gangliosidoses

    PubMed Central

    Akgoc, Zeynep; Sena-Esteves, Miguel; Martin, Douglas R.; Han, Xianlin; d’Azzo, Alessandra; Seyfried, Thomas N.

    2015-01-01

    Bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate (BMP) is a negatively charged glycerophospholipid with an unusual sn-1;sn-1′ structural configuration. BMP is primarily enriched in endosomal/lysosomal membranes. BMP is thought to play a role in glycosphingolipid degradation and cholesterol transport. Elevated BMP levels have been found in many lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs), suggesting an association with lysosomal storage material. The gangliosidoses are a group of neurodegenerative LSDs involving the accumulation of either GM1 or GM2 gangliosides resulting from inherited deficiencies in β-galactosidase or β-hexosaminidase, respectively. Little information is available on BMP levels in gangliosidosis brain tissue. Our results showed that the content of BMP in brain was significantly greater in humans and in animals (mice, cats, American black bears) with either GM1 or GM2 ganglioside storage diseases, than in brains of normal subjects. The storage of BMP and ganglioside GM2 in brain were reduced similarly following adeno-associated viral-mediated gene therapy in Sandhoff disease mice. We also found that C22:6, C18:0, and C18:1 were the predominant BMP fatty acid species in gangliosidosis brains. The results show that BMP accumulates as a secondary storage material in the brain of a broad range of mammals with gangliosidoses. PMID:25795792

  6. Incidence rates and deaths of tuberculosis in HIV-negative patients in the United States and Germany as analyzed by new predictive model for infection.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yudong; Ding, Fan; Suo, Siqingaowa; Bu, Ri-e; Zarlenga, Dante S; Ren, Xiaofeng

    2012-01-01

    Incidence and mortality due to tuberculosis (TB) have been decreasing worldwide. Given that TB is a cosmopolitan disease, proper surveillance and evaluation are critical for controlling dissemination. Herein, mathematical modeling was performed in order to: 1) demonstrate a correlation between the incidence of TB in HIV-free patients in the US and Germany, and their corresponding mortality rates; 2) show the utility of the newly developed D-R algorithm for analyzing and predicting the incidence of TB in both countries; and 3) inform us on population death rates due to TB in HIV-negative patients. Using data published by the World Health Organization between 1990 and 2009, the relationship between incidence and mortality that could not be ascribed to HIV infection was evaluated. Using linear, quadratic and cubic curves, we found that a cubic function provided the best fit with the data in both the US (Y = 2.3588+2.2459X+61.1639X(2)-60.104X(3)) and Germany (Y = 1.9271+9.4967X+18.3824X(2)-10.350X(3)) where the correlation coefficient (R) between incidence and mortality was 0.995 and 0.993, respectively. Second, we demonstrated that fitted curves using the D-R model were equal to or better than those generated using the GM(1,1) algorithm as exemplified in the relative values for Sum of Squares of Error, Relative Standard Error, Mean Absolute Deviation, Average Relative Error, and Mean Absolute Percentage Error. Finally, future trends using both the D-R and the classic GM(1,1) models predicted a continued decline in infection and mortality rates of TB in HIV-negative patients rates extending to 2015 assuming no changes to diagnosis or treatment regimens are enacted.

  7. A study of the strategic alliance for EMS industry: the application of a hybrid DEA and GM (1, 1) approach.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chia Nan; Nguyen, Nhu Ty; Tran, Thanh Tuyen; Huong, Bui Bich

    2015-01-01

    Choosing a partner is a critical factor for success in international strategic alliances, although criteria for partner selection vary between developed and transitional markets. This study aims to develop effective methods to assist enterprise to measure the firms' operation efficiency, find out the candidate priority under several different inputs and outputs, and forecast the values of those variables in the future. The methodologies are constructed by the concepts of Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) and grey model (GM). Realistic data in four consecutive years (2009-2012) a total of 20 companies of the Electronic Manufacturing Service (EMS) industry that went public are completely collected. This paper tries to help target company-DMU1-to find the right alliance partners. By our proposed approach, the results show the priority in the recent years. The research study is hopefully of interest to managers who are in manufacturing industry in general and EMS enterprises in particular.

  8. Intermittent horizontal saccade failure ('ocular motor apraxia') in children.

    PubMed Central

    Harris, C M; Shawkat, F; Russell-Eggitt, I; Wilson, J; Taylor, D

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ocular motor apraxia (OMA) in childhood is a poorly understood condition involving a failure of horizontal saccades. OMA is thought to be rare but the literature indicates wide clinical associations. OMA is often identified by abnormal head movements, but failure of reflexive quick phases has been reported in all but a few patients. The extent of this oculomotor disorder was examined in a large group of children with diverse clinical backgrounds. METHODS: The degree of quick phase failure during horizontal vestibular and optokinetic nystagmus was measured using DC electro-oculography and video in 74 affected children, aged 17 days to 14 years. RESULTS: All children showed an intermittent failure of nystagmic quick phases, except for total failure in one case. Other visuomotor abnormalities were common including saccadic hypometria (85%), low gain smooth pursuit (70%), neurological nystagmus (28%), strabismus (22%), and vertical abnormalities (11%). Non-ocular abnormalities were common including infantile hypotonia (61%), motor delay (77%), and speech delay (87%). There was a wide range of clinical associations including agenesis of the corpus callosum, Joubert syndrome, Dandy-Walker malformation, microcephaly, hydrocephalus, vermis hypoplasia, porencephalic cyst, megalocephaly, Krabbe leucodystrophy, Pelizaeus Merzbacher disease, infantile Gaucher disease, GM1 gangliosidosis, infantile Refsum's disease, propionic acidaemia, ataxia telangiectasia, Bardet-Biedl syndrome, vermis astrocytoma, vermis cyst, carotid fibromuscular hypoplasia, Cornelia de Lange syndrome, and microphthalmos. Perinatal and postnatal problems were found in 15% including perinatal hypoxia, meningitis, periventricular leucomalacia, athetoid cerebral palsy, perinatal septicaemia and anaemia, herpes encephalitis, and epilepsy. Only 27% were idiopathic. CONCLUSION: Quick phase failure is a constant feature of OMA, whereas abnormal head movements were detected in only about half

  9. Gene transfer corrects acute GM2 gangliosidosis--potential therapeutic contribution of perivascular enzyme flow.

    PubMed

    Cachón-González, M Begoña; Wang, Susan Z; McNair, Rosamund; Bradley, Josephine; Lunn, David; Ziegler, Robin; Cheng, Seng H; Cox, Timothy M

    2012-08-01

    The GM2 gangliosidoses are fatal lysosomal storage diseases principally affecting the brain. Absence of β-hexosaminidase A and B activities in the Sandhoff mouse causes neurological dysfunction and recapitulates the acute Tay-Sachs (TSD) and Sandhoff diseases (SD) in infants. Intracranial coinjection of recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors (rAAV), serotype 2/1, expressing human β-hexosaminidase α (HEXA) and β (HEXB) subunits into 1-month-old Sandhoff mice gave unprecedented survival to 2 years and prevented disease throughout the brain and spinal cord. Classical manifestations of disease, including spasticity-as opposed to tremor-ataxia-were resolved by localized gene transfer to the striatum or cerebellum, respectively. Abundant biosynthesis of β-hexosaminidase isozymes and their global distribution via axonal, perivascular, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) spaces, as well as diffusion, account for the sustained phenotypic rescue-long-term protein expression by transduced brain parenchyma, choroid plexus epithelium, and dorsal root ganglia neurons supplies the corrective enzyme. Prolonged survival permitted expression of cryptic disease in organs not accessed by intracranial vector delivery. We contend that infusion of rAAV into CSF space and intraparenchymal administration by convection-enhanced delivery at a few strategic sites will optimally treat neurodegeneration in many diseases affecting the nervous system.

  10. Association of antibodies to ganglioside complexes and conduction blocks in axonal Guillain-Barré syndrome presenting as acute motor conduction block neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Créange, Alain; Shahrizaila, Nortina; Salhi, Hayet; Lefaucheur, Jean-Pascal; Yuki, Nobuhiro

    2014-06-01

    A close relationship between acute motor conduction block neuropathy and antibodies against the complex of GM1 and GalNAc-GD1a has been reported. This study investigates the hypothesis that conduction block at the early phase of axonal Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) is also associated with such ganglioside complexes. Sera were obtained from seven French patients with initial evidence of isolated conduction blocks that resolved or progressed to acute motor axonal neuropathy. Serum IgG to asialo-GM1 and gangliosides of LM1, GM1, GM1b, GD1a, GalNAc-GD1a, GD1b, GT1a, GT1b, and GQ1b as well as their complexes were measured. Five of seven patients progressed within the first month of disease to AMAN. One patient had IgG antibodies against the complex of asialo-GM1 and each of the other ganglioside antigens. Another patient carried IgG antibodies against GM1 complex with GM1b, GD1a, and GT1a as well as asialo-GM1 complex with GD1a and GT1a. None had IgG antibodies against GM1/GalNAc-GD1a complex. Six patients had IgG against single antigens GM1, GD1a, GalNAc-GD1a, GD1b, and asialo-GM1. In three patients, a reduced reaction against GM1/GalNAc-GD1a complex was observed. The presence of conduction block in axonal GBS is not always associated with anti-GM1/GalNAc-GD1a complex antibodies.

  11. Neural precursor cell cultures from GM2 gangliosidosis animal models recapitulate the biochemical and molecular hallmarks of the brain pathology.

    PubMed

    Martino, Sabata; di Girolamo, Ilaria; Cavazzin, Chiara; Tiribuzi, Roberto; Galli, Rossella; Rivaroli, Anna; Valsecchi, Manuela; Sandhoff, Konrad; Sonnino, Sandro; Vescovi, Angelo; Gritti, Angela; Orlacchio, Aldo

    2009-04-01

    In this work we showed that genotype-related patterns of hexosaminidase activity, isoenzyme composition, gene expression and ganglioside metabolism observed during embryonic and postnatal brain development are recapitulated during the progressive stages of neural precursor cell (NPC) differentiation to mature glia and neurons in vitro. Further, by comparing NPCs and their differentiated progeny established from Tay-Sachs (TS) and Sandhoff (SD) animal models with the wild-type counterparts, we studied the events linking the accumulation of undegraded substrates to hexosaminidase activity. We showed that similarly to what observed in brain tissues in TS NPCs and progeny, the stored GM2 was partially converted by sialidase to GA2, which can be then degraded in the lysosomes to its components. The latter can be used in a salvage pathway for the formation of GM3. Interestingly, results obtained from ganglioside feeding assays and from measurement of lysosomal sialidase activity suggest that a similar pathway might work also in the SD model.

  12. A Study of the Strategic Alliance for EMS Industry: The Application of a Hybrid DEA and GM (1, 1) Approach

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chia Nan; Tran, Thanh Tuyen; Huong, Bui Bich

    2015-01-01

    Choosing a partner is a critical factor for success in international strategic alliances, although criteria for partner selection vary between developed and transitional markets. This study aims to develop effective methods to assist enterprise to measure the firms' operation efficiency, find out the candidate priority under several different inputs and outputs, and forecast the values of those variables in the future. The methodologies are constructed by the concepts of Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) and grey model (GM). Realistic data in four consecutive years (2009–2012) a total of 20 companies of the Electronic Manufacturing Service (EMS) industry that went public are completely collected. This paper tries to help target company—DMU1—to find the right alliance partners. By our proposed approach, the results show the priority in the recent years. The research study is hopefully of interest to managers who are in manufacturing industry in general and EMS enterprises in particular. PMID:25821859

  13. Patient Rights

    MedlinePlus

    ... have a patient bill of rights. An important patient right is informed consent. This means that if you need a treatment, your health care provider must give you the information you need to make a decision. Many hospitals have patient advocates who can help you if you have ...

  14. PATIENT NAVIGATION

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Kristen J.; Battaglia, Tracy A.; Dudley, Donald J.; Garcia, Roland; Greene, Amanda; Calhoun, Elizabeth; Mandelblatt, Jeanne S.; Paskett, Electra D.; Raich, Peter C.

    2008-01-01

    Background First implemented in 1990, patient navigation interventions are emerging as an approach to reduce cancer disparities. However, there is lack of consensus about how patient navigation is defined, what patient navigators do, and what their qualifications should be. Little is known about the efficacy and cost effectiveness of patient navigation. Methods We conducted a qualitative synthesis of published literature on cancer patient navigation. Using the keywords “navigator” or “navigation” and “cancer,” we identified 45 articles from Pubmed and reference searches that were published or in press through October 2007. 16 provided data on efficacy of navigation in improving timeliness and receipt of cancer screening, diagnostic follow-up care, and treatment. Patient navigation services are defined and differentiated from other outreach services. Results Overall there is evidence for some degree of efficacy for patient navigation in increasing participation in cancer screening and adherence to diagnostic follow-up care following an abnormality, with increases in screening ranging from 10.8% to 17.1% and increases in adherence to diagnostic follow-up care ranging from 21% to 29.2%, when compared to control patients. There is less evidence regarding efficacy of patient navigation in reducing either late stage cancer diagnosis or delays in initiation of cancer treatment or improving outcomes during cancer survivorship. There were methodological limitations in most studies, such as lack of control groups, small sample sizes, and contamination with other interventions. Conclusions Although cancer-related patient navigation interventions are being increasingly adopted across the U.S. and Canada, further research is necessary to evaluate their efficacy and cost-effectiveness in improving cancer care. PMID:18780320

  15. Patient management.

    PubMed

    Guptill, Lynn

    2015-03-01

    Hospital-associated infections, including those caused by zoonotic agents, represent an increasing concern in veterinary practice. Veterinarians and hospital staff are obligated and expected to provide education about and protection from transmission of pathogens among animal patients and between animal patients and human beings (eg, veterinary staff, volunteers, owners) who come into contact with infected animals. Patient management involves assessing risks of pathogen transmission, identification of animals either suspected of or proved to be infected with a transmissible infectious disease agent, and the implementation of measures that minimize the likelihood of transmission of the infectious agent.

  16. Patient Empowerment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Chat Social Home FAQ Start Here Learn About Kidney Cancer Guidelines for Patients Statistics and Survival Data (NIH) Cancer Term Dictionary (NCI) Surgery for Kidney Cancer Print Surgery Information Therapies for Advanced Kidney Cancer ...

  17. Patient Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    In photo above, the electrocardiogram of a hospitalized patient is being transmitted by telemetry. Widely employed in space operations, telemetry is a process wherein instrument data is converted to electrical signals and sent to a receiver where the signals are reconverted to usable information. In this instance, heart readings are picked up by the electrode attached to the patient's body and delivered by wire to the small box shown, which is a telemetry transmitter. The signals are relayed wirelessly to the console in the background, which converts them to EKG data. The data is displayed visually and recorded on a printout; at the same time, it is transmitted to a central control station (upper photo) where a nurse can monitor the condition of several patients simultaneously. The Patient Monitoring System was developed by SCI Systems, Inc., Huntsville, Alabama, in conjunction with Abbott Medical Electronics, Houston, Texas. In developing the system, SCI drew upon its extensive experience as a NASA contractor. The company applied telemetry technology developed for the Saturn launch vehicle and the Apollo spacecraft; instrumentation technology developed for heart, blood pressure and sleep monitoring of astronauts aboard NASA's Skylab long duration space station; and communications technology developed for the Space Shuttle.

  18. [Patient advice].

    PubMed

    Lucio-Villegas Menéndez, M Eulalia; González, Laura López; Gutiérrez Pérez, M Isabel; Lluch, Natalia Aresté; Morató Agustí, M Luisa; Cachafeiro, Santiago Pérez

    2014-05-01

    In wound care, knowing what to do is as important as knowing what not to do. The first step is to evaluate the severity of the lesion and to know whether it is necessary to attend a health center or not. If the wound is simple, the recommended course of action is cleansing with serum or water after washing one's hands, followed by wound disinfection with the most appropriate antiseptic. Antiseptics not should be used for wound cleansing (physiological serum or tap water should be used) or for wound healing with granulation tissue. Equally, antiseptics should not be used in the ear or near the eyes; if there is accidental application, the eye should be washed in abundant water. Povidone iodine should not be used in pregnant women, nor should iodine preparations be used in neonates, in patients with thyroid alterations or in those allergic to iodine. Currently, merbromine/mercurochrome is not used because of its mercury content. Before an antiseptic is applied, all inorganic residues (foreign bodies) and dead tissue should be removed; detritus, slough, purulent exudate, scabs… This will aid healing and the action of antiseptics, since they become inactive in the presence of organic material.

  19. Immunoglobulin G heavy chain (Gm) allotypes in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, J P; Goust, J M; Salier, J P; Fudenberg, H H

    1981-01-01

    Serum samples from 70 Caucasian patients with multiple sclerosis were typed for nine Gm markers. Significant association was found with the Gm 1,17;21 phenotype, and the relative risk for individuals with this phenotype was calculated at 3.6. The data indicate that Caucasians positive for Gm 1,17;21 are almost four times more likely to develop multiple sclerosis than those without this phenotype. PMID:6787085

  20. Immunoglobulin G heavy chain (Gm) allotypes in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Pandey, J P; Goust, J M; Salier, J P; Fudenberg, H H

    1981-06-01

    Serum samples from 70 Caucasian patients with multiple sclerosis were typed for nine Gm markers. Significant association was found with the Gm 1,17;21 phenotype, and the relative risk for individuals with this phenotype was calculated at 3.6. The data indicate that Caucasians positive for Gm 1,17;21 are almost four times more likely to develop multiple sclerosis than those without this phenotype.

  1. Achieving patient satisfaction: resolving patient complaints.

    PubMed

    Oxler, K F

    1997-07-01

    Patients demand to be active participants on and partners with the health care team to design their care regimen. Patients bring unique perceptions and expectations and use these to evaluate service quality and satisfaction. If customer satisfaction is not achieved and a patient complaint results, staff must have the skills to respond and launch a service recovery program. Service recovery, when done with style and panache, can retain loyal customers. Achieving patient satisfaction and resolving patient complaints require commitment from top leadership and commitment from providers to dedicate the time to understand their patients' needs.

  2. Patient-centered Radiology.

    PubMed

    Itri, Jason N

    2015-10-01

    Patient-centered care (ie, care organized around the patient) is a model in which health care providers partner with patients and families to identify and satisfy patients' needs and preferences. In this model, providers respect patients' values and preferences, address their emotional and social needs, and involve them and their families in decision making. Radiologists have traditionally been characterized as "doctor-to-doctor" consultants who are distanced from patients and work within a culture that does not value patient centeredness. As medicine becomes more patient driven and the trajectory of health care is toward increasing patient self-reliance, radiologists must change the perception that they are merely consultants and become more active participants in patient care by embracing greater patient interaction. The traditional business model for radiology practices, which devalues interaction between patients and radiologists, must be transformed into a patient-centered model in which radiologists are reintegrated into direct patient care and imaging processes are reorganized around patients' needs and preferences. Expanding radiology's core assets to include direct patient care may be the most effective deterrent to the threat of commoditization. As the assault on the growth of Medicare spending continues, with medical imaging as a highly visible target, radiologists must adapt to the changing landscape by focusing on their most important consumer: the patient. This may yield substantial benefits in the form of improved quality and patient safety, reduced costs, higher-value care, improved patient outcomes, and greater patient and provider satisfaction.

  3. Pharmacist-Patient Interaction and Patient Expectations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeSimone, Edward M.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    The nature of the professional interaction between the pharmacist and the patient was explored, with data collected from 3,743 questions asked of 16 pharmacists during an 8-week period. Factors that might affect the nature of the pharmacist-patient interaction are identified along with a cognitive-based profile of patient wants. (LBH)

  4. Counseling the Coronary Patient

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Semmler, Caryl; Semmler, Maynard

    1974-01-01

    The article discusses counseling sessions designed to a) help the coronary patient adjust to cardiovascular disease, b) diminish patient anxieties and fears, and c) educate the patient and family members on controlling risk factors to deter another coronary attack. (JS)

  5. Mongolian spots: How important are they?

    PubMed

    Gupta, Divya; Thappa, Devinder Mohan

    2013-11-16

    Mongolian spots (MS) are congenital birthmarks seen most commonly over the lumbosacral area. They are bluish-green to black in color and oval to irregular in shape. They are most commonly found in individuals of African or Asian ethnic background. Although these lesions resolve by one to two years of age, widespread, extrasacral and dark colored MS sometimes persist into adulthood. Aberrant MS over occiput, temple, mandibular area, shoulders and limbs may be confused with other dermal melanocytoses and bruises secondary to child abuse, thus necessitating documentation at birth. Although traditionally believed to be benign in nature, they have now been shown to co-exist with inborn errors of metabolism, most commonly GM1 gangliosidosis and mucopolysaccharidosis type I (Hurler's disease), followed by mucopolysaccharidosis type II (Hunter's syndrome), mucolipidosis, Niemann-Pick disease and mannosidosis. They have also been seen to co-exist with various vascular or other pigmented birthmarks like café-au-lait macules. Co-existing Mongolian spots and vascular birthmarks like nevus flammeus, nevus anemicus or nevus spilus is termed as phakomatosis pigmentovascularis. This review focuses on the important associations of Mongolian spots and stresses upon the importance of screening babies with extensive MS.

  6. Lysosomal Multienzyme Complex: Pros and Cons of Working Together

    PubMed Central

    Bonten, Erik J.; Annunziata, Ida; d’Azzo, Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    The ubiquitous distribution of lysosomes and their heterogeneous protein composition reflects the versatility of these organelles in maintaining cell homeostasis and their importance in tissue differentiation and remodeling. In lysosomes, the degradation of complex, macromolecular substrates requires the synergistic action of multiple hydrolases that usually work in a stepwise fashion. This catalytic machinery explains the existence of lysosomal enzyme complexes that can be dynamically assembled and disassembled to efficiently and quickly adapt to the pool of substrates to be processed or degraded, adding extra tiers to the regulation of the individual protein components. An example of such a complex is the one composed of three hydrolases that are ubiquitously but differentially expressed: the serine carboxypeptidase, Protective Protein/Cathepsin A (PPCA), the sialidase, Neuraminidase-1 (NEU1), and the glycosidase β-Galactosidase (β-GAL). Next to this ‘core’ complex, the existence of sub-complexes, that may contain additional components, and function at the cell surface or extracellularly, suggests as yet unexplored functions of these enzymes. Here we review how studies of basic biological processes in the mouse models of three lysosomal storage disorders, galactosialidosis, sialidosis, and GM1-gangliosidosis, revealed new and unexpected roles for the three respective affected enzymes, Ppca, Neu1 and β-Gal, that go beyond their canonical degradative activities. These findings have broadened our perspective on their functions and may pave the way for the development of new therapies for these lysosomal storage disorders. PMID:24337808

  7. Physician accountability, patient safety and patient compensation.

    PubMed

    Gray, John E

    2006-01-01

    In Canada, the response to adverse medical events follows one or more of three main paths: patient safety, physician accountability and patient compensation. While their goals differ, each of these responses serves a valuable function. There are however competing imperatives inherent in each response, particularly in terms of information disclosure: Effective patient safety depends on the full and protected disclosure of all information relevant to an adverse event and requires a "no blame" environment. While natural justice demands that a physician be held accountable for his actions, the doctor should be accorded the right of due process and be judged against an established standard of care. This is necessarily a fault-finding activity. Patient compensation meets both accountability demands and the social justice imperatives of supporting a patient injured through physician negligence. The most effective approach is one that achieves balance between competing imperatives. With clear information disclosure rules, patient safety, physician accountability and patient compensation can operate synergistically.

  8. [Patient education in France].

    PubMed

    Bertrand, Dominique

    2011-10-01

    Patient education is an increasingly important component of therapeutic strategies, especially for chronic illnesses, which currently affect about 12% of the French population and will undoubtedly increase in coming years. Patient education aims to enhance patients' personal responsibility and participation in their therapeutic management and quality of life. Article 84 of French health legislation passed in 2009 inscribes patient education in the Public Health Code for the first time. It distinguishes personalized therapeutic education, patient accompaniment, and learning programs. Direct links between patients and drug companies are prohibited. However, the notion of patient accompaniment remains to be defined, along with the evaluation of patient education, funding sources and practical modalities.

  9. 'Patient satisfaction' in hospitalized cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Skarstein, Jon; Dahl, Alv A; Laading, Jacob; Fosså, Sophie D

    2002-01-01

    Predictors of 'patient satisfaction' with hospitalization at a specialized cancer hospital in Norway are examined in this study. Two weeks after their last hospitalization, 2021 consecutive cancer patients were invited to rate their satisfaction with hospitalization, quality of life, anxiety and depression. Compliance rate was 72% (n = 1453). Cut-off levels separating dissatisfied from satisfied patients were defined. It was found that 92% of the patients were satisfied with their stay in hospital, independent of cancer type and number of previous admissions. Performance of nurses and physicians, level of information perceived, outcome of health status, reception at the hospital and anxiety independently predicted 'patient satisfaction'. The model explained 35% of the variance with an area under the curve of 0.76 of the Receiver Operator Curve. Cancer patients' satisfaction with their hospital stay was high, and predicted by four independently predictive variables related to the performance of caregivers. These suggest areas for further improvement in the healthcare service.

  10. Patient Satisfaction by Design.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Karen

    2016-11-01

    The concept of the patient experience as it relates to patient satisfaction is a complex dynamic. It is a dynamic that is becoming increasingly more important as patients are faced with multiple choices for their hearing and balance care. As reimbursement and performance policies have become more normative within health care, patient satisfaction has become a metric to measure quality. Patient satisfaction is no longer contained to just the interaction with the audiologist. It extends to the entire experience-the staff, the service, the product, and other factors. Many practices fail to capitalize on one of the primary components of the patient experience-office design. This article discusses the role of evidence-based design in facility planning as it relates to patient satisfaction. It will illustrate how design principles and ideal attributes may be used to send conscious and subconscious cues that will motivate staff, facilitate patient-centered care, and ultimately increase patient satisfaction.

  11. The Angry Dying Patient.

    PubMed

    Houston, Robert E.

    1999-02-01

    Over 25 years ago, Kubler-Ross identified anger as a predictable part of the dying process. When the dying patient becomes angry in the clinical setting, all types of communication become strained. Physicians can help the angry dying patient through this difficult time by using 10 rules of engagement. When physicians engage and empathize with these patients, they improve the patient's response to pain and they reduce patient suffering. When physicians educate patients on their normal responses to dying and enlist them in the process of family reconciliation, they can impact the end-of-life experience in a positive way.

  12. Repositioning the Patient:

    PubMed Central

    Mold, Alex

    2013-01-01

    Summary This article explores how and why the patient came to be repositioned as a political actor within British health care during the 1960s and 1970s. Focusing on the role played by patient organizations, it is suggested that the repositioning of the patient needs to be seen in the light of growing demands for greater patient autonomy and the application of consumerist principles to health. Examining the activities of two patient groups—the National Association for the Welfare of Children in Hospital (NAWCH) and the Patients Association (PA)—indicates that while such groups undoubtedly placed more emphasis on individual autonomy, collective concerns did not entirely fall away. The voices of patients, as well as the patient, continued to matter within British health care. PMID:23811711

  13. Managing patients with encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Matata, Claire; Easton, Ava; Michael, Benedict; Evans, Becky; Ward, Deborah; Solomon, Tom; Kneen, Rachel

    2015-11-11

    This article provides an overview of encephalitis and addresses its diagnosis, some of the common presenting signs and symptoms, and the different aspects of nursing care required for these patients. In particular, it addresses how to explain encephalitis to the patient's relatives, the rehabilitation needs of these patients, and important aspects of discharge planning. Tests that are necessary for diagnosis in patients with suspected encephalitis and the importance of these are explained.

  14. Patient blood management equals patient safety.

    PubMed

    Zacharowski, Kai; Spahn, Donat R

    2016-06-01

    Patient blood management (PBM) can be defined in many ways and may consist of hundreds of single measures to improve patient safety. Traditionally, PBM is based on three pillars and defined as (i) optimization of the endogenous red blood cell (RBC) mass through the targeted stimulation of erythropoiesis and the treatment of modifiable underlying disorders; (ii) minimization of diagnostic, interventional, and surgical blood loss to preserve the patient's RBC mass; and (iii) optimization of the patient-specific tolerance to anemia through strict adherence to physiological transfusion thresholds [1-4]. However, for this review, we have chosen the following three peri-interventional parts: (1) diagnosis and therapy of anemia, (2) optimal hemotherapy, and (3) minimization of hospital-acquired anemia. PBM is an evidence-based, multidisciplinary preventive, and therapeutic approach focusing each patient. The PBM concept involves the use of safe and effective medical and surgical methods and techniques designed to prevent peri-interventional anemia, rationalize use of blood products, and set good blood management measures in an effort to improve patient safety and outcome.

  15. Patient-centered Communication

    PubMed Central

    Swenson, Sara L; Buell, Stephanie; Zettler, Patti; White, Martha; Ruston, Delaney C; Lo, Bernard

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate patient preferences for a patient-centered or a biomedical communication style. DESIGN Randomized study. SETTING Urgent care and ambulatory medicine clinics in an academic medical center. PARTICIPANTS We recruited 250 English-speaking adult patients, excluding patients whose medical illnesses prevented evaluation of the study intervention. INTERVENTION Participants watched one of three videotaped scenarios of simulated patient-physician discussions of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). Each participant watched two versions of the scenario (biomedical vs. patient-centered communication style) and completed written and oral questionnaires to assess outcome measurements. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS Main outcome measures were 1) preferences for a patient-centered versus a biomedical communication style; and 2) predictors of communication style preference. Participants who preferred the patient-centered style (69%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 63 to 75) tended to be younger (82%[51/62] for age < 30; 68%[100/148] for ages 30–59; 55%[21/38] for age > 59; P < .03), more educated (76%[54/71] for postcollege education; 73%[94/128] for some college; 49%[23/47] for high school only; P = .003), use CAM (75%[140/188] vs. 55%[33/60] for nonusers; P = .006), and have a patient-centered physician (88%[74/84] vs. 30%[16/54] for those with a biomedical physician; P < .0001). On multivariate analysis, factors independently associated with preferring the patient-centered style included younger age, use of herbal CAM, having a patient-centered physician, and rating a “doctor's interest in you as a person” as “very important.” CONCLUSIONS Given that a significant proportion of patients prefer a biomedical communication style, practicing physicians and medical educators should strive for flexible approaches to physician-patient communication. PMID:15566435

  16. Why measure patient satisfaction?

    PubMed

    Riskind, Patty; Fossey, Leslie; Brill, Kari

    2011-01-01

    A practice that consistently and continuously measures patient perceptions will be more efficient and effective in its daily operations. With pay-for-performance requirements on the horizon and consumer rating sites already publicizing impressions from physician encounters, a practice needs to know how it is performing through the eyes of the patients. Azalea Orthopedics has used patient feedback to coach its physicians on better patient communication. The Orthopaedic Institute has used patient satisfaction results to reduce wait times and measure the return on investment from its marketing efforts. Patient survey results that are put to work can enhance the efficiency and effectiveness of practice operations as well as position the practice for increased profitability.

  17. Patient Education: An Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simmons, Jeannette

    Topics included in this annotated bibliography on patient education are (1) background on development of patient education programs, (2) patient education interventions, (3) references for health professionals, and (4) research and evaluation in patient education. (TA)

  18. Histoplasmosis in immunosuppressed patients.

    PubMed

    Kauffman, C A; Israel, K S; Smith, J W; White, A C; Schwarz, J; Brooks, G F

    1978-06-01

    Infection with Histoplasma capsulatum in 58 patients whose immune responses were suppressed (Immunosuppressed patients) (16 from the present series and 42 described previously) was analyzed. The most common underlying diseases were Hodgkin's disease (29 per cent), chronic lymphocytic leukemia (19 per cent) and acute lymphocytic leukemia (17 per cent). Sixty-three per cent of the patients had received cytotoxic drugs, and 57 per cent had taken corticosteroids. Widely disseminated infection occurred in 88 per cent of the patients, with predominant involvement of lungs and organs of the reticuloendothelial system. Localized pulmonary infection was present in the remaining patients. The most useful diagnostic method was bone marrow biopsy with microscopic examination for the intracellular yeast form of H. capsulatum. Biopsy of oral lesions, lung, liver and lymph node also proved diagnostically helpful. Growth of H. capsulatum in culture was frequently too slow to be beneficial in diagnosing histoplasmosis in ill patients. Serologic methods were of little diagnostic help in this population of immunosuppressed patients. The response to amphotericin B therapy was excellent (6.7 per cent mortality rate) in those patients in whom the diagnosis was established early and in whom a full course of antifungal therapy could be given. In contrast, the mortality rate in patients who received no antifungal therapy or less than 1 g of amphotericin B was 100 per cent.

  19. The critically ill immunosuppressed patient

    SciTech Connect

    Parrillo, J.E.; Masur, H. )

    1987-01-01

    This book discusses the papers on the diagnosis and management of immunosuppressed patient. Some of the topics are: life-threatening organ failure in immunosuppressed patients; diagnosis and therapy of respiratory disease in the immunosuppressed patient; CNS complication of immunosuppression; infections; antineoplastic therapy of immunosuppressed patient; radiation therapy-issues in critically ill patient; AIDS; and management of bone marrow transplant patients.

  20. A Patient Assessment Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuller, Dorothy; Rosenaur, Janet Allan

    1974-01-01

    Use of a nursing assessment/patient history tool developed by project faculty at the school of nursing, University of California, San Francisco and used in a primary care clinic assisted nursing students in collecting patient information, making home visits, functioning as team members, recording data, and in defining their nursing role. (EA)

  1. Patient Telmonitoring at Home

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Fraga , M. Lama and J. Vila. “Intelligent telemonitoring of critical care patients,” IEEE Eng. Med. & Biol. Mag., vol. 18, pp. 80-88, July/August...1999. [6] J. Presedo, D. Castro, J. Vila, M. Fernández-Delgado, S. Fraga , M. Lama and S. Barro. “Wireless interface for monitored patients in Coronary

  2. Patient Education Thesaurus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Lynn

    This thesaurus was compiled to make the materials in the Patient Education Room of the Donald J. Vincent Medical Library at Riverside Methodist Hospital, Columbus, Ohio, more accessible to patients. Subjects are grouped in fairly broad categories (e.g., Aging & Problems of Aging; Alcohol & Alcohol Abuse; Careers in the Medical Field; Childhood and…

  3. [Physiotherapy of cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Gomez, Izabella; Szekanecz, Éva; Szekanecz, Zoltán; Bender, Tamás

    2016-07-01

    Physiotherapy of cancer patients is one of the most controversial issues in our country. Malignant diseases are firstly mentioned as a contraindication of physiotherapy. Until now, physiotherapy was not suggested (or only in limited accessibility) for those patients who had malignant disease in medical history. International medical practice was less restrictive in managing this topic. The development of imaging techniques put this question in a new light. On the basis of evidence, the majority of articles have reported beneficial effects of physiotherapy in cancer patients, and only few articles mentioned it as harmful. Of course, each patient requires an individual assessment, however, if we exclude the possibility of tumor recurrence and metastasis, most of physiotherapy procedures can be used safely. One of the aims of this review is to support the physicians' decisions when to prescribe treatments, in such a way, that more patients could receive physiotherapy. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(31), 1224-1231.

  4. Doctor-patient relationship

    PubMed Central

    Chamsi-Pasha, Hassan; Albar, Mohammed A.

    2016-01-01

    The doctor-patient relationship is an intricate concept in which patients voluntarily approach a doctor and become part of a contract by which they tend to abide by doctor’s instructions. Over recent decades, this relationship has changed dramatically due to privatization and commercialization of the health sector. A review of the relevant literature in the database of MEDLINE published in English between 1966 and August 2015 was performed with the following keywords: doctor-patient relationship, physician-patient relationship, ethics, and Islam. The Muslim doctor should be familiar with the Islamic teachings on the daily issues faced in his/her practice and the relationship with his/her patients. PMID:26837392

  5. Patients living with disabilities

    PubMed Central

    Lofters, Aisha; Guilcher, Sara; Maulkhan, Niraj; Milligan, James; Lee, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare the potential risk factors for lower-quality primary care, the potential markers of unmet needs in primary care, and the willingness to participate in future research among primary care patients with versus without physical disabilities. Design A waiting room survey using a convenience sample. Setting A family health team (FHT) in Kitchener-Waterloo, Ont, with a designated Mobility Clinic. Participants A total of 40 patients seen at the FHT Mobility Clinic and 80 patients from the general patient population of the same FHT. Main outcome measures Socioeconomic status and social capital, number of self-reported emergency department visits and hospitalizations in the preceding year, and willingness of the patients in the 2 groups to participate in future research studies. Results Patients from the Mobility Clinic were more than twice as likely to be receiving benefits or social assistance (75.0% vs 32.1%, P < .001), were twice as likely to report an annual household income of less than $40000 (58.6% vs 29.2%, P = .006), and were more likely to report their health status to be fair or poor (42.5% vs 16.2%, P = .002). Half of Mobility Clinic patients had visited the emergency department at least once in the preceding year, compared with 29.7% in the general patient population (P = .027). When asked if they would be willing to provide their health card number in the future so that it could be linked to health care data for research, 82.5% of Mobility Clinic patients agreed versus 55.0% of those in the general patient population (P = .004). Conclusion In this study, patients with disabilities were at a social disadvantage compared with their peers without disabilities and were more likely to use the emergency department, suggesting that they had unmet health needs. Future research should continue to explore this patient population and to investigate if an interprofessional primary health care team approach focused on patients with disabilities can

  6. Patients with resistant hypertension.

    PubMed

    Amar, Jacques

    2007-06-01

    Hypertension remains uncontrolled in the majority of treated patients, especially those with multiple cardiovascular risk factors. This was demonstrated by a French study that showed that 70% of treated hypertensive patients are not controlled to the target level of 140/90 mmHg. This proportion reached 84% in hypertensive patients with diabetes (target level 130/85 mmHg). What are the reasons for this disappointing situation? Observational studies have shown that only a minority of patients with uncontrolled hypertension receive triple therapy including a diuretic. In this respect, self-measurement of blood pressure should improve the situation by allowing clinicians to base their decision to intensify hypertension treatment on more solid evidence than consultation blood pressure measurements alone. Patient-related factors may also contribute to this situation. Treated patients with uncontrolled hypertension often have multiple risk factors. This is associated with or is a source of poor treatment observance linked to patient psychological factors or a result of the increased consumption of medication. Finally, risk factors themselves may be responsible for problems with blood pressure control as a result of their detrimental effects on large arteries as well as the microvascular network. The early correction of such vascular anomalies is vital for medium and long-term blood pressure control.

  7. Bacteremia in hemodialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Masashi; Satoh, Nobuhiko; Nakamura, Motonobu; Horita, Shoko; Seki, George; Moriya, Kyoji

    2016-01-01

    Infection is a common complication and is the second leading cause of death in hemodialysis patients. The risk of bacteremia in hemodialysis patients is 26-fold higher than in the general population, and 1/2-3/4 of the causative organisms of bacteremia in hemodialysis patients are Gram-positive bacteria. The ratio of resistant bacteria in hemodialysis patients compared to the general population is unclear. Several reports have indicated that hemodialysis patients have a higher risk of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection. The most common site of infection causing bacteremia is internal prostheses; the use of a hemodialysis catheter is the most important risk factor for bacteremia. Although antibiotic lock of hemodialysis catheters and topical antibiotic ointment can reduce catheter-related blood stream infection (CRBSI), their use should be limited to necessary cases because of the emergence of resistant organisms. Systemic antibiotic administration and catheter removal is recommended for treating CRBSI, although a study indicated the advantages of antibiotic lock and guidewire exchange of catheters over systemic antibiotic therapy. An infection control bundle recommended by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention succeeded in reducing bacteremia in hemodialysis patients with either a catheter or arteriovenous fistula. Appropriate infection control can reduce bacteremia in hemodialysis patients. PMID:27872830

  8. Nutrition in dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Sen, D; Prakash, J

    2000-07-01

    Malnutrition is a common clinical problem in dialysis patients, which is multifactorial in origin. It is most often found in a patient of chronic renal failure (CRF) during the period when the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) falls below 10 ml/min, but dialysis is yet to be started. The loss of proteins, aminoacids and other essential nutrients during the procedure of dialysis may further aggravate the malnutrition. Poor nutrition in dialysis patients is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in the form of delayed wound healing, malaise, fatigue, increased susceptibility to infection and poor rehabilitation. In view of the above consequences, all patients on dialysis must undergo nutritional assessment. It is very vital to maintain good nutritional status in-patients on dialysis by adequate protein and calories intake, appropriate supplementation of iron, calcium, minerals and water-soluble vitamins and, of course, the supplementation should be individualised. Nutritional needs are enhanced in presence of stresses like infection or surgery to limit excessive tissue catabolism and therefore, these are the situations, which demand intensive nutrition therapy. Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) may be required for patients on dialysis in intensive care unit, using a central venous catheter. However, enteral route is always preferred to parenteral ones, whenever possible. Even after adequate dialysis has been given, dietary counselling is often required for both hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis patients to ensure that they ingest the recommended amount of protein, calories and essential micronutrients.

  9. Respecting patient confidentiality.

    PubMed

    Price, Bob

    2015-02-03

    Nurses face a particular challenge in respecting the confidentiality of patients in a world where information is quickly shared and where information about illness can be sensitive. We have a duty of care towards patients. That duty includes maintaining privacy (protecting them from undue intrusion), and confidentiality (by the discreet management of information about themselves that they share with us). Legislation on confidentiality comes from different sources and should be interpreted in the clinical setting. This article summarises the principal requirements set out in the legislation and directs readers to questions and tools designed to help them explore the extent to which patient confidentiality is respected where they work.

  10. Evaluation of Patient Welfare

    PubMed Central

    Piedmont, Eugene B.; Dornblaser, Bright M.

    1970-01-01

    A multifaceted attempt is made to measure patients' well-being quantitatively in a complex interdisciplinary research and experimental construction project. Parallel studies were conducted in adjoining traditionally shaped and spoke-design hospital buildings. Major innovations were made, in both plants, in the organization of nursing staffs and in communications and logistical support. Smaller nursing staffs achieved significant increases in time spent in direct patient (“bedside”) care, without negative effects on patient welfare, in both buildings; but these effects were maximized in the spoke-design building. PMID:5494267

  11. The patient with ataxia.

    PubMed

    Maggs, F G

    2014-01-01

    In this article we look at the causes of ataxia, and how the patient presenting with ataxia should be managed. One of the difficulties in managing the patient with ataxia is that acute ataxia has many causes, but usually these can be teased out by means of a careful history and examination. Investigations can then be targeted at confirming or disproving the differential diagnosis. Some patients with ataxia need to be managed in hospital, but many can be investigated, and receive therapy, as an outpatient.

  12. MRSA Information for Patients

    MedlinePlus

    ... can be spread when patients contact contaminated bed linens, bed rails, and medical equipment. Top of Page ... razors. Wash and dry your clothes and bed linens in the warmest temperatures recommended on the labels. ...

  13. Patient Treatment Tracking Chart

    MedlinePlus

    ... Celebrating America's Freedoms Special Events Adaptive Sports Program Creative Arts Festival Golden Age Games Summer Sports Clinic ... Patient Treatment Tutorial return to top CONNECT Veterans Crisis Line: 1-800-273-8255 (Press 1) Social ...

  14. [Patient safety: Glossary].

    PubMed

    Sabio Paz, Verónica; Panattieri, Néstor D; Cristina Godio, Farmacéutica; Ratto, María E; Arpí, Lucrecia; Dackiewicz, Nora

    2015-10-01

    Patient safety and quality of care has become a challenge for health systems. Health care is an increasingly complex and risky activity, as it represents a combination of human, technological and organizational processes. It is necessary, therefore, to take effective actions to reduce the adverse events and mitigate its impact. This glossary is a local adaptation of key terms and concepts from the international bibliographic sources. The aim is providing a common language for assessing patient safety processes and compare them.

  15. Patient care in radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Ehrlich, R.A.; McCloskey, E.D.

    1989-01-01

    This book focuses on patient care procedures for radiographers. The authors focus on the role of the radiographer as a member of the health care team. The authors report on such topics as communication in patient care: safety, medico-legal considerations, transfer and positioning; physical needs; infection control; medication; CPR standards, acute situations; examination of the GI tract; contrast media; special imaging techniques and bedside radiography.

  16. Turning patients over in bed

    MedlinePlus

    Roll patients in bed ... following steps should be followed: Explain to the patient what you are planning to do so the ... Stand on the side of the bed the patient will be turning towards and lower the bed ...

  17. Preventing Infections in Cancer Patients

    MedlinePlus

    ... Caregivers Flu Treatment for Cancer Patients and Survivors Flu Publications Stay Informed Cancer Home Information for Patients and Caregivers Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Cancer patients ...

  18. Cytomegalovirus Colitis in Immunocompetent Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Qulsoom; Shafique, Khurram; Tasleem, Syed H; Hurairah, Abu

    2016-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus colitis is common in immunocompromised patients, but rare in immunocompetent patients. The present study not only represents the colonoscopy and pathological findings, but also applies the method of diagnosing and treating cytomegalovirus colitis in immunocompetent patients. PMID:27980888

  19. [Urosepsis in Geriatric Patients].

    PubMed

    Heppner, H J; Yapan, F; Wiedemann, A

    2016-02-01

    Due to the demographic shift, increasing numbers of geriatric patients are admitted to acute care hospitals of all levels of care. This means that special challenges must be met in the medical care and management of these patients.Immunosenescence and multimorbidity make elderly patients vulnerable to infectious diseases. Urinary tract infections range from "simple" cystitis to pyelonephritis and urosepsis and, at 25%, are the second most common form of infection in geriatric patients. It is often difficult to make a diagnosis because typical symptoms do not always occur. Urosepsis, a hyperactive and uncontrolled immune response of the organism due to exogenous damage, is based on bacterial infection of the urogenital tract. Urinary retention, immunosuppressive medication, malignancy, diabetes mellitus and renal or prostatic processes promote the risk for urosepsis. Complicated urosepsis additionally comprises a structural or functional abnormality, including ureteral obstruction. Risk factors for urosepsis are urinary incontinence, an indwelling urinary catheter, hydronephrosis or ureteral calculi. Patients suffering from diabetes mellitus are also at a higher risk for urosepsis. When diagnosing elderly patients, one has to consider that the classic symptoms can be masked by multimorbidity, or septic encephalopathy and acute confusion (delirium) may be the only symptoms. Body temperature is lower in elderly patients and does not necessarily rise to 38°C or more in the acute phase. In patients older than 75 years who are suspicious for sepsis, temperatures as low as 37.4°C should be rated as fever. Treatment of urosepsis basically includes clearing the focus, antimicrobial treatment, stabilisation of circulation and replacement of failed organ functions. Initial empiric antibiotic treatment, depending on local resistance, should be done with acylaminopenicilline and beta-lactamase inhibitors (e. g. piperacillin/combactam or tazobactam or group 3 cephalosporins

  20. Mastocytosis among elderly patients

    PubMed Central

    Rouet, Audrey; Aouba, Achille; Damaj, Gandhi; Soucié, Erinn; Hanssens, Katia; Chandesris, Marie-Olivia; Livideanu, Cristina Bulai; Dutertre, Marine; Durieu, Isabelle; Grandpeix-Guyodo, Catherine; Barète, Stéphane; Bachmeyer, Claude; Soria, Angèle; Frenzel, Laurent; Fain, Olivier; Grosbois, Bernard; de Gennes, Christian; Hamidou, Mohamed; Arlet, Jean-Benoit; Launay, David; Lavigne, Christian; Arock, Michel; Lortholary, Olivier; Dubreuil, Patrice; Hermine, Olivier; Georgin-Lavialle, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Mastocytosis is a heterogeneous group of diseases with a young median age at diagnosis. Usually indolent and self-limited in childhood, the disease can exhibit aggressive progression in mid-adulthood. Our objectives were to describe the characteristics of the disease when diagnosed among elderly patients, for which rare data are available. The French Reference Center conducted a retrospective multicenter study on 53 patients with mastocytosis >69 years of age, to describe their clinical, biological, and genetic features. The median age of our cohort of patients was 75 years. Mastocytosis variants included were cutaneous (n = 1), indolent systemic (n = 5), aggressive systemic (n = 11), associated with a hematological non-mast cell disease (n = 34), and mast cell leukemia (n = 2). Clinical manifestations were predominantly mast cell activation symptoms (75.5%), poor performance status (50.9%), hepatosplenomegaly (50.9%), skin involvement (49.1%), osteoporosis (47.2%), and portal hypertension and ascites (26.4%). The main biological features were anemia (79.2%), thrombocytopenia (50.9%), leucopenia (20.8%), and liver enzyme abnormalities (32.1%). Of the 40 patients tested, 34 (85%), 2 (5%), and 4 (10%) exhibited the KIT D816V mutant, other KIT mutations and the wild-type form of the KIT gene, respectively. Additional sequencing detected significant genetic defects in 17 of 26 (65.3%) of the patients with associated hematological non-mast cell disease, including TET2, SRSF2, IDH2, and ASLX1 mutations. Death occurred in 19 (35.8%) patients, within a median delay of 9 months, despite the different treatment options available. Mastocytosis among elderly patients has a challenging early detection, rare skin involvement, and/or limited skin disease; it is heterogeneous and has often an aggressive presentation with nonfortuitous associated myeloid lineage malignant clones, and thus a poor overall prognosis. PMID:27310990

  1. Thromboprophylaxis in nonsurgical patients.

    PubMed

    Streiff, Michael B; Lau, Brandyn D

    2012-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is an important cause of preventable morbidity and mortality in medically ill patients. Randomized controlled trials indicate that pharmacologic prophylaxis reduces deep venous thrombosis (relative risk [RR] = 0.46; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.36-0.59) and pulmonary embolism (RR = 0.49; 95% CI, 0.33-0.72) with a nonsignificant trend toward more bleeding (RR = 1.36; 95% CI, 0.80-2.33]. Low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) and unfractionated heparin are equally efficacious in preventing deep venous thrombosis (RR = 0.85; 95% CI, 0.69-1.06) and pulmonary embolism (RR = 1.05; 95% CI, 0.47-2.38), but LMWH is associated with significantly less major bleeding (RR = 0.45; 95% CI, 0.23-0.85). LMWH is favored for VTE prophylaxis in critically ill patients. New VTE and bleeding risk stratification tools offer the potential to improve the risk-benefit ratio for VTE prophylaxis in medically ill patients. Intermittent pneumatic compression devices should be used for VTE prophylaxis in patients with contraindications to pharmacologic prophylaxis. Graduated compression stockings should be used with caution. VTE prevention in medically ill patients using extended-duration VTE prophylaxis and new oral anticoagulants warrant further investigation. VTE prophylaxis prescription and administration rates are suboptimal and warrant multidisciplinary performance improvement strategies.

  2. The moderators of patient satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Jessie L

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine which Department of Defense (DOD) active duty patient sociodemographic, health status, geographic location, and utilization factors, predict overall patient satisfaction with health care in military facilities. A theoretical framework developed from patient satisfaction and social identity theories and from previous empirical findings was used to develop a model to predict patient satisfaction and delineate moderating variables. The major finding indicated in this study was the significance of patients' characteristics in moderating their satisfaction. Principal components factor analysis and hierarchical linear regression revealed that patient specific factors predicted patients' satisfaction after controlling for factors depicting patients' evaluations of health system characteristics. Patient specific factors provided added, although very minimal, explanatory value to the determination of patients' satisfaction. The study findings can aid in the development of targeted, objectively prioritized programs of improvement and marketing by ranking variables using patients' passively derived importance schema.

  3. Hypertension in aging patients.

    PubMed

    Logan, Alexander G

    2011-01-01

    Hypertension, especially isolated systolic hypertension, is commonly found in older (60-79 years of age) and elderly (≥80 years of age) people. Antihypertensive drug therapy should be considered in all aging hypertensive patients, as treatment greatly reduces cardiovascular events. Most classes of antihypertensive medications may be used as first-line treatment with the possible exception of α- and β-blockers. An initial blood pressure treatment goal is less than 140/90 mmHg in all older patients and less than 150/80 mmHg in the nonfrail elderly. The current paradigm of delaying therapeutic interventions until people are at moderate or high cardiovascular risk, a universal feature of hypertensive patients over 60 years of age, leads to vascular injury or disease that is only partially reversible with treatment. Future management will likely focus on intervening earlier to prevent accelerated vascular aging and irreversible arterial damage.

  4. Patients' preferences for information

    PubMed Central

    Kindelan, K.; Kent, G.

    1986-01-01

    In a study of patients' views of the type of information they would like to receive from the doctor 265 patients from four general practices were given a list of five areas of information — diagnosis, prognosis, treatment, aetiology and social effects of their illness — and asked to rank these in order of importance for that visit. In general, information on diagnosis and prognosis was the most highly valued, while the ways the illness would affect daily activities was the least preferred. Although information on treatment was rarely selected as the first preference it was often the second or third preference. Conversely, diagnosis was the first choice of the largest proportion of patients and the least valued information for 26%. PMID:3440990

  5. Handedness in psychiatric patients.

    PubMed

    Fleminger, J J; Dalton, R; Standage, K F

    1977-11-01

    Eight hundred psychiatric patients and eight hundred controls completed a handedness preference questionnaire. There was no significant difference in handedness between the two samples, but, contrary to some previous reports, excess of sinistrality was not associated with male sex. The distribution of handedness was similar in neurotics and controls, but among psychotics in general there was a higher proportion of fully right-handed subjects. Among schizophrenics there was a significantly higher proportion of left-handed writers among males than females. There were relatively few left-handed writers of either sex among patients with affective psychosis. Female patients with personality disorders had a significantly higher proportion of mixed handedness than controls. The findings are considered in relation to suggestions that functional psychoses may be associated with asymmetrical cerebral dysfunction, and that poorly lateralized function may be related to anomalous psychological development.

  6. Creating virtual ARDS patients.

    PubMed

    Das, Anup; Haque, Mainul; Chikhani, Marc; Wenfei Wang; Hardman, Jonathan G; Bates, Declan G

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents the methodology used in patient-specific calibration of a novel highly integrated model of the cardiovascular and pulmonary pathophysiology associated with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS). We focus on data from previously published clinical trials on the static and dynamic cardio-pulmonary responses of three ARDS patients to changes in ventilator settings. From this data, the parameters of the integrated model were identified using an optimization-based methodology in multiple stages. Computational simulations confirm that the resulting model outputs accurately reproduce the available clinical data. Our results open up the possibility of creating in silico a biobank of virtual ARDS patients that could be used to evaluate current, and investigate novel, therapeutic strategies.

  7. Online patient information.

    PubMed

    Oakley, Amanda

    2002-09-01

    Information appropriate for patients with skin diseases is readily available on the Internet. Patients primarily seek disease-related information, but may also search for a dermatologist, shop for skin care products, or look to a consumer organization for support. Authoritative educational material is supplied by academic dermatologic associations and institutions and distributed by independent websites, large health portals, and search directories. Interactive opportunities include bulletin boards, ask-an-expert forums, and live chat. Although it is easy to find excellent dermatological information, the Internet is dynamic and unmoderated and patients can be misled or exploited by inaccurate or fraudulent websites. Health on the Net and other organizations have developed ethical principles to aid consumers in evaluating the quality of health-related information.

  8. [Toxoplasmosis in immunocompromised patients].

    PubMed

    Machala, L; Kodym, P; Malý, M; Geleneky, M; Beran, O; Jilich, D

    2015-06-01

    In humans, toxoplasmosis mostly occurs as a latent infection, but in immunocompromised individuals, the agent may reactivate and cause severe to life-threatening disease. HIV positive individuals and transplant recipients, in particular hematopoietic stem cell transplant and heart transplant recipients, are at highest risk. The disease most often affects the central nervous system but can involve any organ. Because of the alteration of the immune response in these patients, the serodiagnosis is not reliable and direct detection of the causative agent is needed--namely by microscopy and DNA PCR. If inadequately treated or left untreated, toxoplasmosis generally has a fatal prognosis in immunocompromised patients and therefore, the treatment must be started as early and energetically as possible. The gold standard both in the treatment of reactivation and secondary prophylaxis is the pyrimethamine-sulfadiazine combination while co-trimoxazole can be used in the primary prophylaxis for high-risk patients.

  9. [Respecting patient intimacy].

    PubMed

    2014-04-01

    Transparency as a general rule for all our professional acts casts doubts about the statement of the Hippocratic Oath that says "Whatever I see or hear in the lives of my patients, I will keep secret, as considering all such things to be private". Medical secrecy protects the intimacy of patients, who reveal to their physicians their most hidden secrets aiming to recover their health. Therefore, physicians should receive those secrets with reverence and care, as servers and not as their owners. The values associated with the respect for personal intimacy are the anthropological basis of medical confidentiality. A medical act is performed by definition between two equally honorable individuals. Therefore, the professional honors the trust of his patient, maintaining strict confidence of what is revealed. Therefore, medical secrecy must be strengthened rather than weakened, pursuing common wealth and dignity.

  10. Thromboprophylaxis for trauma patients

    PubMed Central

    Lozano, Luis Manuel Barrera; Perel, Pablo; Ker, Katharine; Cirocchi, Roberto; Farinella, Eriberto; Morales, Carlos Hernando

    2014-01-01

    This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows: To assess the effects of thromboprophylaxis in trauma patients on mortality and incidence of DVT and PE. To compare the effects of different thromboprophylaxis interventions and their relative effects according to the type of trauma. PMID:25267908

  11. [Healthcare patient loyalty].

    PubMed

    Ameri, Cinzia; Fiorini, Fulvio

    2016-01-01

    If the "old economy" preached standardization of products/services in order to reduce costs, the "new economy" is based on the recognition of the needs and the management of information. It is aimed at providing better and more usable services. One scenario is a national health service with regional management but based on competition between hospitals/companies.This led to a different handling of the user/patient, which has become the center of the health system: marketing seeks to retain the patient, trying to push a client-patient to not change their healthcare service provider. In costs terms, it is more economical to retain a customer rather than acquire a new one: a satisfied customer is also the best sounding board for each company. Customer equity is the management of relations with patients which can result in a greater customer value: it is possible to recognize an equity of the value, of the brand and of the report. Loyalty uses various marketing activities (basic, responsive, responsible, proactive and collaborative): each hospital/company chooses different actions depending on how many resources it plans to invest in loyalty.

  12. The Adolescent Patient.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniel, William A., Jr.

    Written to orient the physician and paramedical personnel to the adolescent patient, the book provides information concerning the changes of adolescence, and age-related problems and illnesses. Part 1 discusses the essence of adolescence by describing physical, mental, and emotional growth and development. Part 2, the major section, consists of 21…

  13. A Patient's Best Friend.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haggard, Ann

    1985-01-01

    The author describes the development of a pet therapy program at a rehabilitation unit of a hospital. She discusses documentation of the success of pet therapy programs, picking out the right pets, responsibilities of caring for the pet, training the pet, patient response, and program policies. (CT)

  14. Complement activity is associated with disease severity in multifocal motor neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Vlam, Lotte; Cats, Elisabeth A.; Harschnitz, Oliver; Jansen, Marc D.; Piepers, Sanne; Veldink, Jan Herman; Franssen, Hessel; Stork, Abraham C.J.; Heezius, Erik; Rooijakkers, Suzan H.M.; Herpers, Bjorn L.; van Strijp, Jos A.; van den Berg, Leonard H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether high innate activity of the classical and lectin pathways of complement is associated with multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN) and whether levels of innate complement activity or the potential of anti-GM1 antibodies to activate the complement system correlate with disease severity. Methods: We performed a case-control study including 79 patients with MMN and 79 matched healthy controls. Muscle weakness was documented with Medical Research Council scale sum score and axonal loss with nerve conduction studies. Activity of the classical and lectin pathways of complement was assessed by ELISA. We also determined serum mannose-binding lectin (MBL) concentrations and polymorphisms in the MBL gene (MBL2) and quantified complement-activating properties of anti-GM1 IgM antibodies by ELISA. Results: Activity of the classical and lectin pathways, MBL2 genotypes, and serum MBL concentrations did not differ between patients and controls. Complement activation by anti-GM1 IgM antibodies was exclusively mediated through the classical pathway and correlated with antibody titers (p < 0.001). Logistic regression analysis showed that both high innate activity of the classical pathway of complement and high complement-activating capacity of anti-GM1 IgM antibodies were significantly associated with more severe muscle weakness and axonal loss. Conclusion: High innate activity of the classical pathway of complement and efficient complement-activating properties of anti-GM1 IgM antibodies are determinants of disease severity in patients with MMN. These findings underline the importance of anti-GM1 antibody–mediated complement activation in the pathogenesis and clinical course of MMN. PMID:26161430

  15. Gastric Cancer in Young Patients

    PubMed Central

    Dhobi, Manzoor A.; Wani, Khursheed Alam; Parray, Fazl Qadir; Wani, Rouf A.; Peer, G. Q.; Abdullah, Safiya; Wani, Imtiyaz A.; Wani, Muneer A.; Shah, Mubashir A.; Thakur, Natasha

    2013-01-01

    Aim. The aim of this study was to see the clinical, pathological, and demographic profile of young patients with stomach carcinoma besides association with p53. Patients and Methods. Prospective study of young patients with stomach carcinoma from January 2005 to December 2009. A total of 50 patients with age less than 40 years were studied. Results. Male female ratio was 1 : 1.08 in young patients and 2.5 : 1 in older patients. A positive family history of stomach cancer in the first degree relatives was present in 10% of young patients. Resection was possible only in 50% young patients. 26% young patients underwent only palliative gastrojejunostomy. The most common operation was lower partial gastrectomy in 68%. Amongst the intraoperative findings peritoneal metastasis was seen in 17.4% in young patients. 50% young patients presented in stage IV as per AJCC classification (P value .004; sig.). None of the patients presented as stage 1 disease in young group. Conclusion. Early detection of stomach carcinoma is very important in all patients but in young patients it is of paramount importance. PMID:24381753

  16. Visualising patient flow.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Andrew; Boyle, Justin; Khanna, Sankalp

    2012-01-01

    We describe the development of a method to distil routinely collected clinical data into patient flow information to aid hospital bed management. Using data from state-wide emergency department and inpatient clinical information systems, a user-friendly interface was developed to visualise patient flow conditions for a particular hospital. The historical snapshots employ a variable time scale, allowing flow to be visualised across a day, week, month or year. Flow information includes occupancy, arrival and departure rates, length-of-stay and access block observations, which can be filtered by age, departure status, diagnosis, elective status, triage category, and admission unit. The tool may be helpful in supporting hospital bed managers in their daily decision making.

  17. Communicating with Latino patients.

    PubMed

    de Pheils, Pilar Bernal; Saul, Naledi Marie

    2009-09-01

    This article describes the efforts of the University of California, San Francisco, School of Nursing to develop the Spanish language and cultural competency skills of advanced practice nursing students by establishing an elective course, Communicating with the Latino Patient. The need for this training is reflected in the literature, which has shown that language barriers decrease patient satisfaction and quality of care and increase the likelihood of medical error. Fifty-seven first-year master's students participated in this course. The effectiveness of the training was monitored during and after each course by self-assessment surveys of the participants' language acquisition. The data suggest that the most successful outcomes result from limiting class size, emphasizing high interactivity, and incorporating clinical experiences in the instruction, as well as focusing exclusively on intermediate-level speakers when resources are limited. Training can be time consuming and costly, yet graduates agreed that the training was imperative and valuable.

  18. Teleophthalmology: improving patient outcomes?

    PubMed Central

    Sreelatha, Omana Kesary; Ramesh, Sathyamangalam VenkataSubbu

    2016-01-01

    Teleophthalmology is gaining importance as an effective eye care delivery modality worldwide. In many developing countries, teleophthalmology is being utilized to provide quality eye care to the underserved urban population and the unserved remote rural population. Over the years, technological innovations have led to improvement in evidence and teleophthalmology has evolved from a research tool to a clinical tool. The majority of the current teleophthalmology services concentrate on patient screening and appropriate referral to experts. Specialty care using teleophthalmology services for the pediatric group includes screening as well as providing timely care for retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). Among geriatric eye diseases, specialty teleophthalmology care is focused toward screening and referral for diabetic retinopathy (DR), glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration (ARMD), and other sight-threatening conditions. Comprehensive vision screening and refractive error services are generally covered as part of most of the teleophthalmology methods. Over the past decades, outcome assessment of health care system includes patients’ assessments on their health, care, and services they receive. Outcomes, by and large, remain the ultimate validators of the effectiveness and quality of medical care. Teleophthalmology produces the same desired clinical outcome as the traditional system. Remote portals allow specialists to provide care over a larger region, thereby improving health outcomes and increasing accessibility of specialty care to a larger population. A high satisfaction level and acceptance is reported in the majority of the studies because of increased accessibility and reduced traveling cost and time. Considering the improved quality of patient care and patient satisfaction reported for these telemedicine services, this review explores how teleophthalmology helps to improve patient outcomes. PMID:26929592

  19. The visually impaired patient.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Eric A; Sperazza, Laura C

    2008-05-15

    Blindness or low vision affects more than 3 million Americans 40 years and older, and this number is projected to reach 5.5 million by 2020. In addition to treating a patient's vision loss and comorbid medical issues, physicians must be aware of the physical limitations and social issues associated with vision loss to optimize health and independent living for the visually impaired patient. In the United States, the four most prevalent etiologies of vision loss in persons 40 years and older are age-related macular degeneration, cataracts, glaucoma, and diabetic retinopathy. Exudative macular degeneration is treated with laser therapy, and progression of nonexudative macular degeneration in its advanced stages may be slowed with high-dose antioxidant and zinc regimens. The value of screening for glaucoma is uncertain; management of this condition relies on topical ocular medications. Cataract symptoms include decreased visual acuity, decreased color perception, decreased contrast sensitivity, and glare disability. Lifestyle and environmental interventions can improve function in patients with cataracts, but surgery is commonly performed if the condition worsens. Diabetic retinopathy responds to tight glucose control, and severe cases marked by macular edema are treated with laser photocoagulation. Vision-enhancing devices can help magnify objects, and nonoptical interventions include special filters and enhanced lighting.

  20. "The impatient patient".

    PubMed

    Bos, Lodewijk; Carroll, Denis; Marsh, Andy

    2008-01-01

    Modern Healthcare Systems that have embraced ICT and Internet technologies (referred to as Health 1.0) are evolving towards self management but from a clinical knowledge perspective. In contrast, from a user experience perspective, and using the latest web 2.0 technologies, the developing healthcare social networking communities (referred to as Health 2.0) are evolving towards becoming online medical portals. The growing Grand Challenge for healthcare is therefore: how will health care services (Health 1.0) work together with user-generated health care (Health 2.0) in a consumer market place delivering self management services for a healthier lifestyle and medical compliance. What is foreseen is that the self care information tool of the future will be a combination between the patient's observation record and the Internet, with the doctor and the patient positioned together at the intersection but not having to pay attention to the technology. This article deals with various aspects related to this Grand Challenge like the paradigm shift towards a needs-led and consumer-oriented healthcare, the role, supply and quality of information and the changing doctor-patient relationship.

  1. Pain in burn patients.

    PubMed

    Latarjet, J; Choinère, M

    1995-08-01

    While severe pain is a constant component of the burn injury, inadequate pain management has been shown to be detrimental to burn patients. Pain-generating mechanisms in burns include nociception, primary and secondary hyperalgesia and neuropathy. The clinical studies of burn pain characteristics reveal very clear-cut differences between continuous pain and pain due to therapeutic procedures which have to be treated separately. Some of the main features of burn pain are: (1) its long-lasting course, often exceeding healing time, (2) the repetition of highly nociceptive procedures which can lead to severe psychological disturbances if pain control is inappropriate. Pharmaco-therapy with opioids is the mainstay for analgesia in burned patients, but non-pharmacological techniques may be useful adjuncts. Routine pain evaluation is mandatory for efficient and safe analgesia. Special attention must be given to pain in burned children which remains too often underestimated and undertreated. More educational efforts from physicians and nursing staff are necessary to improve pain management in burned patients.

  2. Angle closure in younger patients.

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Brian M; Liebmann, Jeffrey M; Ritch, Robert

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: Angle-closure glaucoma is rare in children and young adults. Only scattered cases associated with specific clinical entities have been reported. We evaluated the findings in patients in our database aged 40 or younger with angle closure. METHODS: Our database was searched for patients with angle closure who were 40 years old or younger. Data recorded included age at initial consultation; age at the time of diagnosis; gender; results of slit-lamp examination, gonioscopy, and ultrasound biomicroscopy (from 1993 onward); clinical diagnosis; and therapy. Patients with previous incisional surgery were excluded, as were patients with anterior chamber proliferative mechanisms leading to angle closure. RESULTS: Sixty-seven patients (49 females, 18 males) met entry criteria. Mean age (+/- SD) at the time of consultation was 34.4 +/- 9.4 years (range, 3-68 years). Diagnoses included plateau iris syndrome (35 patients), iridociliary cysts (8 patients), retinopathy of prematurity (7 patients), uveitis (5 patients), isolated nanophthalmos (3 patients), relative pupillary block (2 patients), Weill-Marchesani syndrome (3 patients), and 1 patient each with Marfan syndrome, miotic-induced angle closure, persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous, and idiopathic lens subluxation. CONCLUSION: The etiology of angle closure in young persons is different from that in the older population and is typically associated with structural or developmental ocular anomalies rather than relative pupillary block. Following laser iridotomy, these eyes should be monitored for recurrent angle closure and the need for additional laser or incisional surgical intervention. PMID:12545694

  3. The challenge of patient adherence

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Leslie R; Williams, Summer L; Haskard, Kelly B; DiMatteo, M Robin

    2005-01-01

    Quality healthcare outcomes depend upon patients' adherence to recommended treatment regimens. Patient nonadherence can be a pervasive threat to health and wellbeing and carry an appreciable economic burden as well. In some disease conditions, more than 40% of patients sustain significant risks by misunderstanding, forgetting, or ignoring healthcare advice. While no single intervention strategy can improve the adherence of all patients, decades of research studies agree that successful attempts to improve patient adherence depend upon a set of key factors. These include realistic assessment of patients' knowledge and understanding of the regimen, clear and effective communication between health professionals and their patients, and the nurturance of trust in the therapeutic relationship. Patients must be given the opportunity to tell the story of their unique illness experiences. Knowing the patient as a person allows the health professional to understand elements that are crucial to the patient's adherence: beliefs, attitudes, subjective norms, cultural context, social supports, and emotional health challenges, particularly depression. Physician–patient partnerships are essential when choosing amongst various therapeutic options to maximize adherence. Mutual collaboration fosters greater patient satisfaction, reduces the risks of nonadherence, and improves patients' healthcare outcomes. PMID:18360559

  4. Physician-Patient Communication and Patient Compliance: A Theoretical Orientation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clampitt, Phillip G.; Williams, M. Lee

    This paper synthesizes much of the literature concerning physician/patient communication as it relates to patient compliance. Using the theoretical perspective that deals with belief, attitude, intention, and behavior (a perspective generated by Martin Fishbein and Icek Ajzen), a new theoretical orientation for predicting patient compliance is…

  5. Choosing effective patient education materials

    MedlinePlus

    ... education. Tell your patient what to pay special attention to. Be sure to review any materials you plan to use before sharing them with the patient. Keep in mind that no resource is a substitute ...

  6. Patient Safety: Do Your Homework

    MedlinePlus

    American Society of Plastic Surgeons Home Cosmetic Reconstructive Before & After Photos Find A Surgeon Patient Safety News Patients of Courage About ASPS Menu More Call for a nearby plastic surgeon you can trust | 1-800-514-5058 ...

  7. Nutritional screening in surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Thompson, J S; Burrough, C A; Green, J L; Brown, G L

    1984-03-01

    Routine nutritional screening of patients admitted to the surgical services confirms a substantial prevalence of malnutrition. Identification of the malnourished patient and the patient who is likely to become malnourished should be done as early as possible in the hospital stay and usually requires only simple, readily available parameters. Nutritional screening is only the first step in the optimal nutritional management of surgical patients. This information should be used to determine the need for further nutritional assessment, the appropriate consultation, and nutritional therapy.

  8. Profile of Your Geriatric Patient

    PubMed Central

    Longhurst, Mark F.; Slade, Debra

    1990-01-01

    The family doctor cares for many geriatric patients. Many of these patients enter the family practice for the first time, having either recently moved to the area or to a nearby long-term care facility. Obtaining a meaningful patient profile is essential to the physicians' care, allowing future medical decisions to be made in the best interest of that person. Patients' beliefs motivate their functioning in a system. Any system has its own history, structure, and function. PMID:21234029

  9. Systems Thinking and Patient Safety

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    1 Prologue Systems Thinking and Patient Safety Paul M. Schyve Patient safety is a prominent theme in health care delivery today. This should...been “unenlightened,” to say the least; we would not have been able to apply systems thinking to patient safety. Even today, preventable patient...in the minds of many, to be met with blame and punishment. But systems thinking is now ubiquitous in health care—due, in large measure, to its

  10. The patient-friendly practice.

    PubMed

    Dooley, Sharon Kay

    2006-01-01

    In today's medical marketplace, patients see themselves as consumers of healthcare with certain customer-service expectations. The medical practice that is indifferent or resistant to these changes is at risk. Having a good understanding of patient-friendly changes can help a practice survive in a changing environment. A patient-friendly office will continue to meet the needs of the patient by adopting this new practice style.

  11. Patient-centered healthcare design.

    PubMed

    Stichler, Jaynelle F

    2011-12-01

    Patient-centered care focuses on the patient's and family's experience in the hospital, and the design of the healthcare environment should support the patient-centered care concept. The purpose of this facility design department is to expand nurse leaders' knowledge and competencies in health facility design and enable them to take leadership roles in design efforts. This article focuses on healthcare design guiding principles and features to support organizational cultural initiatives such as patient- and family-centered care and Planetree.

  12. Podcasting: contemporary patient education.

    PubMed

    Abreu, Daniel V; Tamura, Thomas K; Sipp, J Andrew; Keamy, Donald G; Eavey, Roland D

    2008-04-01

    Portable video technology is a widely available new tool with potential to be used by pediatric otolaryngology practices for patient and family education. Podcasts are media broadcasts that employ this new technology. They can be accessed via the Internet and viewed either on a personal computer or on a handheld device, such as an iPod or an MP3 player. We wished to examine the feasibility of establishing a podcast-hosting Web site. We digitally recorded pediatric otologic procedures in the operating room and saved the digital files to DVDs. We then edited the DVDs at home with video-editing software on a personal computer. Next, spoken narrative was recorded with audio-recording software and combined with the edited video clips. The final products were converted into the M4V file format, and the final versions were uploaded onto our hospital's Web site. We then downloaded the podcasts onto a high-quality portable media player so that we could evaluate their quality. All of the podcasts are now on the hospital Web site, where they can be downloaded by patients and families at no cost. The site includes instructions on how to download the appropriate free software for viewing the podcasts on a portable media player or on a computer. Using this technology for patient education expands the audience and permits portability of information. We conclude that a home computer can be used to inexpensively create informative surgery demonstrations that can be accessed via a Web site and transferred to portable viewing devices with excellent quality.

  13. Managing the chronically late patient.

    PubMed

    Baum, Neil

    2014-01-01

    Every practice has patients who are chronically late. This wrecks havoc with your schedule and makes you less productive. Patients can be trained to respect your time and arrive in the office on time. This article discusses several approaches to managing the chronically late patient.

  14. Dental problems in epileptic patients.

    PubMed

    Zioło, Anna; Mielnik-Błaszczak, Maria

    2004-01-01

    On the grounds of literature and own clinical experience, pathological changes in epilepitic patients have been described. Dental management procedures in these patients have also been presented. The unquestionable importance of prophylaxis, which may markedly minimize the impact of epilepsy on the incidence of mouth diseases, has been emphasised. It has also been stated that epileptic patients should receive specialised and integrated dental treatment.

  15. Medical Services: Patient Administration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    participants in Domestic Action Programs (formerly para 4-63). o Rescinds eligibility references to the Citizens Military Training Corps (formerly para 5...consolidated regulation p r e s c r i b e s p o l i c i e s a n d m a n d a t e d t a s k s governing the management and adminis- tration of patients...Security beneficiaries • 3–34, page 25 Micronesian citizens • 3–35, page 25 American Samoan citizens • 3–36, page 25 Section VIII Miscellaneous Categories

  16. Carctol: Profit before Patients?

    PubMed Central

    Ernst, Edzard

    2009-01-01

    Summary Background Carctol is a herbal remedy that recently was widely reported to offer a cure for a range of cancers. This article is aimed at evaluating the evidence that supports this claim. Methods In addition to numerous websites, we conducted systematic searches in six electronic databases. Any factual information relating to Carctol was considered. Results The websites provided the composition of the herbal mixture and numerous claims as to its effectiveness. However, not a single scientific study of any style was found. Conclusions The claim that Carctol is of any benefit to cancer patients is not supported by scientific evidence. PMID:20877681

  17. Caring for Latino patients.

    PubMed

    Juckett, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    Latinos comprise nearly 16 percent of the U.S. population, and this proportion is anticipated to increase to 30 percent by 2050. Latinos are a diverse ethnic group that includes many different cultures, races, and nationalities. Barriers to care have resulted in striking disparities in quality of health care for these patients. These barriers include language, lack of insurance, different cultural beliefs, and in some cases, illegal immigration status, mistrust, and illiteracy. The National Standards for Culturally and Linguistically Appropriate Services address these concerns with recommendations for culturally competent care, language services, and organizational support. Latinos have disproportionately higher rates of obesity and diabetes mellitus. Other health problems include stress, neurocysticercosis, and tuberculosis. It is important to explore the use of alternative therapies and belief in traditional folk illnesses, recognizing that health beliefs are dependent on education, socioeconomic status, and degree of acculturation. Many-but not all-folk and herbal treatments can be safely accommodated with conventional therapy. Physicians must be sensitive to Latino cultural values of simpatia (kindness), personalismo (relationship), respeto (respect), and modestia (modesty). The LEARN technique can facilitate cross-cultural interviews. Some cultural barriers may be overcome by using the "teach back" technique to ensure that directions are correctly understood and by creating a welcoming health care environment for Latino patients.

  18. Patient Zero”:

    PubMed Central

    McKay, Richard A.

    2014-01-01

    Summary This article contextualizes the production and reception of And the Band Played On, Randy Shilts’s popular history of the initial recognition of the American AIDS epidemic. Published over twenty-five years ago, the book and its most notorious character, “Patient Zero,” are in particular need of a critical historical treatment. The article presents a more balanced consideration—a “patient’s view”—of Gaétan Dugas’s experience of the early years of AIDS. I oppose the assertion that Dugas, the so-called Patient Zero, ignored incontrovertible information about the condition and was intent on spreading his infection. Instead I argue that scientific ideas in 1982 and 1983 about AIDS and the transmissibility of a causative agent were later portrayed to be more self-evident than they were at the time. The article also traces how Shilts’s highly selective—and highly readable—characterization of Dugas rapidly became embedded in discussions about the need to criminalize the reckless transmission of HIV. PMID:24769806

  19. [Neurological complications in cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Hundsberger, Thomas; Roth, Patrick; Roelcke, Ulrich

    2014-08-20

    Neurological symptoms in cancer patients have a great impact on quality of life and need an interdisciplinary approach. They lead to significant impairment in activities of daily living (gait disorders, dizziness), a loss of patients independency (vegetative disturbances, wheel-chair dependency) and interfere with social activities (ban of driving in case of epilepsy). In this article we describe three main and serious neurological problems in the context of oncological patients. These are chemotherapy-induced polyneuropathy, malignant spinal cord compression and epileptic seizures. Our aim is to increase the awareness of neurological complications in cancer patients to improve patients care.

  20. Financial Distress in Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Jonas A.; Wong, Yu-Ning

    2013-01-01

    Novel diagnostic and therapeutic options offer hope to cancer patients with both localized and advanced disease. However, many of these treatments are often costly and even well-insured patients can face high out-of-pocket costs. Families may also be at risk of financial distress due to lost wages and other treatment-related expenses. Research is needed to measure and characterize financial distress in cancer patients and understand how it affects their quality of life. In addition, health care providers need to be trained to counsel patients and their families so they can make patient-centered treatment decisions that reflect their preferences and values. PMID:24349677

  1. Bibliotherapy in a Patients' Library *

    PubMed Central

    McDowell, David J.

    1971-01-01

    This paper describes the involvement of patients in the Patients' Library at McLean Hospital, and the relationship between them and the librarian in library activities. The publication of a patients' magazine is discussed, with case histories of persons who had taken part in its production. The Patients' Librarian has a personal role in patient therapy, and accounts are given of various activities such as play-reading, poetry-reading, and the discussion of poems by established writers, with therapeutic aims in view. Actual clinical experiences are given. PMID:5146769

  2. [Treatment of patients with osteoarthritis].

    PubMed

    Vargas Negrín, Francisco; Medina Abellán, María D; Hermosa Hernán, Juan Carlos; de Felipe Medina, Ricardo

    2014-01-01

    The therapeutic management of patients with osteoarthritis aims to decrease pain and inflammation, improve physical function, and to apply safe and effective treatments. A patient-centered approach implies the active participation of the patient in the design of the treatment plan and in timely and informed decision-making at all stages of the disease. The nucleus of treatment is patient education, physical activity and therapeutic exercise, together with weight control in overweight or obese patients. Self-care by the individual and by the family is fundamental in day-to-day patient management. The use of physical therapies, technical aids (walking sticks, etc.) and simple analgesics, opium alkaloids, and antiinflammatory drugs have demonstrated effectiveness in controlling pain, improving physical function and quality of life and their use is clearly indicated in the treatment of osteoarthritis. Conservative surgery and joint replacement is indicated when treatment goals are not achieved in specific patients.

  3. [Autonomy of the patient with chronic diseases: from passive patient to active patient].

    PubMed

    González Mestre, Assumpció

    2014-01-01

    Due to social, economic and cultural changes, there has been a transformation of Health Services around the world. A new figure has emerged from this: the Active Patient, more responsible, with more information and willing to change his life as a chronic patient. In order to respond to this new situation, several countries have established initiatives such as self-reliance programmes for chronic patients. The aim of this article is to underline the Expert Patient Programme Catalonia(®) and to explain its operation and the results obtained up until now. The purpose of this program is to improve the experience of chronic disease by patients, from meetings in which an expert patient provides his knowledge and experiences to a group of patients with the same disease, with the aim of promoting changes in habits and lifestyles that improve the quality of life and the coexistence of the person with his chronic process.

  4. Improving emergency department patient flow.

    PubMed

    Jarvis, Paul Richard Edwin

    2016-06-01

    Emergency departments (ED) face significant challenges in delivering high quality and timely patient care on an ever-present background of increasing patient numbers and limited hospital resources. A mismatch between patient demand and the ED's capacity to deliver care often leads to poor patient flow and departmental crowding. These are associated with reduction in the quality of the care delivered and poor patient outcomes. A literature review was performed to identify evidence-based strategies to reduce the amount of time patients spend in the ED in order to improve patient flow and reduce crowding in the ED. The use of doctor triage, rapid assessment, streaming and the co-location of a primary care clinician in the ED have all been shown to improve patient flow. In addition, when used effectively point of care testing has been shown to reduce patient time in the ED. Patient flow and departmental crowding can be improved by implementing new patterns of working and introducing new technologies such as point of care testing in the ED.

  5. Creating the ideal patient experience.

    PubMed

    Purcărea, Th.V

    2016-01-01

    Healthcare industry continues to evolve under conditions of intense competition in approaching health prevention, protection, and promotion. Therefore, healthcare providers are challenged to always ensure better patient experience, winning patients' satisfaction, and loyalty and remain competitive on today's healthcare market. Healthcare markets bring together professionals and their patients into real collaborative relationships, which empower patients to contribute to the healthcare improvement. Within this competitive landscape, which is also characterized by digital health tools boosting patients' awareness and controlling their own health, medical providers need to be perceived as skilled and trustworthy in relying on patients' needs, expectations, and sacrifices are required in order to obtain the promised benefits. Moreover, while constantly providing a holistic assessment of the healthcare services' and experience attributes, acting on feedback and reaching healthcare service excellence, providing a better understanding of all the touch points with their patients and improving the quality and consistency of all these touch points, all these are achieved by employees, who are truly connected to the healthcare business. Today, patients are systematically becoming aware of the diversity of their choices, being increasingly involved in making better healthcare choices, and, so, more and more innovative products are introduced, targeting new patient segments. Findings from the last three years have shown that patients may achieve better outcomes due to the stakeholders' commitment to innovation within the context of the big-data revolution, by building new values.

  6. Hallux ulceration in diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    ElMakki Ahmed, Mohamed; Tamimi, Abdulhakim O; Mahadi, Seif I; Widatalla, Abubakr H; Shawer, Mohamed A

    2010-01-01

    We undertook a prospective cohort study to assess risk factors associated with hallux ulceration, and to determine the incidence of healing or amputation, in consecutive patients with diabetes mellitus who were treated over the observation period extending from September 2004 to March 2005, at the Jabir Abu Eliz Diabetic Centre, Khartoum City, Sudan. There were 122 diabetic patients in the cohort (92 males and 30 females) with an overall mean age of 58 +/- 9 years. Fifty-three percent of patients had complete healing within 8 weeks and 43% healed within 20 weeks. The overall mean time to healing was 16 +/- 8 weeks. In 32 (26.2%) patients, osteomyelitic bone was removed, leaving a healed and boneless hallux. The hallux was amputated in 17 (13.9%) patients; in 2 (1.6%) patients it was followed by forefoot amputation and in 7 (5.7%) patients by below-the-knee amputation. In 90 (73.8%) patients the initial lesion was a blister. In conclusion, hallux ulceration is common in patients with diabetes mellitus and is usually preceded by a blister. Neuropathy, foot deformity, and wearing new shoes are common causative factors; and ischemia, osteomyelitis, any form of wound infection, and the size of the ulcer are main outcome determinants. Complete healing occurred in 103 (85%) of diabetic patients with a hallux ulcer. Vascular intervention is important relative to limb salvage when ischemia is the main cause of the ulcer.

  7. Improving emergency department patient flow

    PubMed Central

    Jarvis, Paul Richard Edwin

    2016-01-01

    Emergency departments (ED) face significant challenges in delivering high quality and timely patient care on an ever-present background of increasing patient numbers and limited hospital resources. A mismatch between patient demand and the ED’s capacity to deliver care often leads to poor patient flow and departmental crowding. These are associated with reduction in the quality of the care delivered and poor patient outcomes. A literature review was performed to identify evidence-based strategies to reduce the amount of time patients spend in the ED in order to improve patient flow and reduce crowding in the ED. The use of doctor triage, rapid assessment, streaming and the co-location of a primary care clinician in the ED have all been shown to improve patient flow. In addition, when used effectively point of care testing has been shown to reduce patient time in the ED. Patient flow and departmental crowding can be improved by implementing new patterns of working and introducing new technologies such as point of care testing in the ED. PMID:27752619

  8. Patient-Specific Orthopaedic Implants.

    PubMed

    Haglin, Jack M; Eltorai, Adam E M; Gil, Joseph A; Marcaccio, Stephen E; Botero-Hincapie, Juliana; Daniels, Alan H

    2016-11-01

    Patient-specific orthopaedic implants are emerging as a clinically promising treatment option for a growing number of conditions to better match an individual's anatomy. Patient-specific implant (PSI) technology aims to reduce overall procedural costs, minimize surgical time, and maximize patient outcomes by achieving better biomechanical implant fit. With this commercially-available technology, computed tomography or magnetic resonance images can be used in conjunction with specialized computer programs to create preoperative patient-specific surgical plans and to develop custom cutting guides from 3-D reconstructed images of patient anatomy. Surgeons can then place these temporary guides or "jigs" during the procedure, allowing them to better recreate the exact resections of the computer-generated surgical plan. Over the past decade, patient-specific implants have seen increased use in orthopaedics and they have been widely indicated in total knee arthroplasty, total hip arthroplasty, and corrective osteotomies. Patient-specific implants have also been explored for use in total shoulder arthroplasty and spinal surgery. Despite their increasing popularity, significant support for PSI use in orthopaedics has been lacking in the literature and it is currently uncertain whether the theoretical biomechanical advantages of patient-specific orthopaedic implants carry true advantages in surgical outcomes when compared to standard procedures. The purpose of this review was to assess the current status of patient-specific orthopaedic implants, to explore their future direction, and to summarize any comparative published studies that measure definitive surgical characteristics of patient-specific orthopaedic implant use such as patient outcomes, biomechanical implant alignment, surgical cost, patient blood loss, or patient recovery.

  9. Patient reported outcomes and patient empowerment in clinical genetics services.

    PubMed

    McAllister, M; Dearing, A

    2015-08-01

    Evaluation of clinical genetics services (CGS), including genetic counseling and genetic testing, has been problematic. Patient mortality and morbidity are unlikely to be directly improved by interventions offered in CGS. Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) are not routinely measured in CGS evaluation, but this may change as patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) become a key part of how healthcare services are managed and funded across the world. However, there is no clear consensus about which PROMs are most useful for CGS evaluation. This review summarizes the published research on how PROs from CGS have been measured and how patients may benefit from using those services, with a focus on patient empowerment. Many patient benefits (PROs) identified repeatedly in the research literature can be re-interpreted within a patient empowerment framework. Other important PROs identified include family functioning, social functioning, altruism, sense of purpose, enabling development of future research and treatment/participating in research. Well-validated measures are available to capture (dimensions of) patient empowerment. Although generic measures of family functioning are available, suitable measures capturing social functioning, development of future treatments, and altruism were not identified in this review. Patient empowerment provides one useful approach to measuring PROs from CGS.

  10. [Anemia in peritoneal dialysis patients].

    PubMed

    Lausević, Mirjana; Nesić, Vidosava; Jovanović, Natasa; Stojimirović, Biljana

    2006-01-01

    A normocytic normochromic anemia is one of the first signs of renal failure. Since anemia increases morbidity and mortality, its elimination is one of the essential objectives of the treatment. Human recombinant erythropoietin (rHuEPO) has changed the therapeutical approach to anemia. The aim of the present study was to compare efficacy of anemia correction in peritoneal dialysis patients depending on treatment and dialysis modality. The study is the retrospective analysis of 64 patients who presented to our Clinic in 2003. Eighteen (28.13%) patients were treated with rHuEPO, 14 (28%) underwent continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD), 2 (100%)--automated peritoneal dialysis (APD) and 2 (33.3%)--intermittent peritoneal dialysis (IPD). Mean hemoglobin level was 98.6 +/- 17.82 g/l in patients treated with rHuEPO versus 98.81 +/- 15.14 g/l in patients without rHuEPO treatment. Erythropoietin requirements were 3392.85 +/- 1211.77 IU/week All patients received iron supplementation during rHuEPO therapy. Mean serum ferritin levels were 463.41 +/- 360 ug/l. Transferrin saturation (TSAT) was 0.35 +/- 0.16%. No difference of serum iron and TSAT levels was found between CAPD and IPD patients. The degree of anemia significantly differed between CAPD and IPD patients. A total of 17.11% of PD patients were given blood transfusions, most frequently during the first three months after the onset of dialysis. Our conclusion is that the number of patients receiving rHuEPO should be increased, as 50% of our patients should be substituted, while only 28% are being treated. As 50% of patients receiving rHuEPO failed to reach target Hgb levels, higher EPO doses should be considered. Iron stores should be continuously monitored, particularly in patients receiving rHuEPO, since iron deficiency is an important problem for patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis, especially during erythropoietin therapy. Oral iron supplementation is satisfactory in the majority of patients, and iron

  11. Oral lesions in haemopathic patients.

    PubMed

    Grande, M; Milano, V; Desiate, A; Martinelli, A; Iaffaldano, B

    1990-03-01

    This paper deals with the oral manifestations observed in patients with haemolymphopathies and oral complications associated with systemic cytotoxic chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy. We report the percentage of oral manifestations observed in 30 patients treated with cytotoxic drugs for malignant haemolymphopathies or other tumors after 2-4 cycles of systemic combinations chemotherapy. No sex or age differences were recorded except for abnormalities of taste present only in 13% treated patients older than 50. Stomatitis was more frequent in patients with malignant haemolymphopathies than in patient with other neoplastic diseases, probably due to the fact that in the former group neutropenia and thrombocytopenia induced by bone marrow infiltration or by more aggressive combination chemotherapy are most frequent. An oral care protocol for these patients is suggested.

  12. Pneumonia in renal transplant patients.

    PubMed Central

    Bowie, D. M.; Marrie, T. J.; Janigan, D. T.; MacKeen, A. D.; Belitsky, P.; MacDonald, A. S.; Lannon, S. G.; Cohen, A. D.

    1983-01-01

    Between January 1976 and March 1982, 28 episodes of pneumonia occurred in 26 renal transplant patients. The overall mortality rate was 46%. Of the 16 patients with nosocomial pneumonia 9 (56%) died, whereas of the 12 patients with community-acquired pneumonia 4 (33%) died. In all 9 cases of unknown cause the response to empiric treatment was prompt, whereas in 4 of the 10 cases of monomicrobial pneumonia and 8 of the 9 cases of polymicrobial pneumonia the patient died. Cytomegalovirus was the sole cause of the pneumonia in two patients and a contributing cause, along with aerobic gram-negative bacteria, in another five, four of whom also had a fungal infection. Two patients, both of whom survived, had nosocomial Legionnaires' disease. PMID:6342741

  13. Prioritization strategies for patient evacuations.

    PubMed

    Childers, Ashley Kay; Mayorga, Maria E; Taaffe, Kevin M

    2014-03-01

    Evacuation from a health care facility is considered last resort, and in the event of a complete evacuation, a standard planning assumption is that all patients will be evacuated. A literature review of the suggested prioritization strategies for evacuation planning-as well as the transportation priorities used in actual facility evacuations-shows a lack of consensus about whether critical or non-critical care patients should be transferred first. In addition, it is implied that these policies are "greedy" in that one patient group is given priority, and patients from that group are chosen to be completely evacuated before any patients are evacuated from the other group. The purpose of this paper is to present a dynamic programming model for emergency patient evacuations and show that a greedy, "all-or-nothing" policy is not always optimal as well as discuss insights of the resulting optimal prioritization strategies for unit- or floor-level evacuations.

  14. Trading patients. Lessons from Scandinavia.

    PubMed

    Botten, Grete; Grepperud, Sverre; Nerland, Sölve Mikal

    2004-09-01

    The next few decades will bring about more trade in services, among them health care. This paper describes a recent project on cross-border trading of patients initiated by the Norwegian parliament (The Patient Bridge). This health policy reform met some resistance among hospital physicians. However, patients were willing to participate if being properly informed and supported by local health care workers. The Patient Bridge turned out to be a relatively expensive project partly because of the transaction costs involved (transportation and escort) and partly because of high treatment costs. Excessive treatment costs were a result of insufficient cost-consciousness in the purchasing organization. The Patient Bridge revealed large price differentials not only between Norwegian and foreign hospitals, but also between hospitals abroad, even within the same country. This finding points to the possibilities of reaching mutual gains from trading patients across borders.

  15. Sinusitis: Special Considerations for Aging Patients

    MedlinePlus

    ... ENT Doctor Near You Sinusitis: Special Considerations for Aging Patients Sinusitis: Special Considerations for Aging Patients Patient ... for evaluation and possible surgical management. Sources For Aging Patients: Administration on Aging (AoA), U.S. Department of ...

  16. [Pulmonary Rehabilitation for Cancer Patients].

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kazuo; Gemma, Akihiko

    2015-07-01

    Dyspnea occurs in most cancer patients and is often associated with severe pain. Pulmonary rehabilitation has become increasingly important to improve ADL and QOL and to relieve pain that results from dyspnea. Although pulmonary rehabilitation is now provided mainly during the perioperative period, it has been recognized as an effective procedure for patients before, during, or after chemotherapy or radiotherapy. It is also useful for patients with advanced or terminal cancer. However, an evidence-based cancer rehabilitation procedure has to be established.

  17. Scripting patienthood with patient clothing.

    PubMed

    Topo, Päivi; Iltanen-Tähkävuori, Sonja

    2010-06-01

    The potential of care environments to promote patient healing has gained increasing attention over the last decade, with evidence-based designs used to explore developments in this field. Medical textiles, such as clothes provided to patients, are part of the care environment in many countries. Our study focuses on patients' experiences of such clothing. The goal of this research is to understand how patienthood is constructed in relation to patient clothing and the practices around their use. The study is based on four group interviews involving a total of 12 people with experience of being patients in a hospital or of visiting residential care environments. We employed an active interview format, and the medical textiles currently used in Finnish hospitals and residential care facilities were available for scrutiny during the interviews. Content analyses were carried out on the interview transcripts. Patient clothing was critically evaluated by the participants; they experienced giving up their own clothes as akin to a rite of passage into their new role as a patient. The low status of a patient in a hospital environment was symbolised by the outworn appearance of patient clothing and the problems in protecting privacy. Patient clothing was also felt to provide limited possibilities for being active and in some cases was found to be annoying or even harmful and upsetting. For patients, being dressed in patient clothing may be symbolic of lower status and narrowed agency in everyday life. We can conclude that artefacts such as clothing worn in care environments need to be given attention when considering possibilities for improving care.

  18. Expert patients: learning from HIV.

    PubMed

    Cooke, Molly

    2011-04-01

    The outbreak of HIV in the early 1980s saw widespread activism among patients and community supporters. The author, a young physician in San Francisco at the time, describes how coming of age as a clinician in the midst of this activism affected her concept of the patient-physician relationship. The insistence of a particular patient, Robert, on specifying his treatment goals illustrates that even people with substantial cognitive challenges can participate in their own care in an egalitarian and active manner.

  19. Corneal Protection for Burn Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    cornea’s defense mechanisms and subsequent events that may lead to cornea opacification and the need for cornea transplant . Currently these patients...cornea’s defense mechanisms and subsequent events that may lead to cornea opacification and the need for cornea transplant . Currently these patients...resistant crosslinked amniotic membranes for treating cornea of burn patients that were produced in Years 1 and 2. Major findings: Identified

  20. Tempus Pro Patient Monitoring System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-03

    AFRL-SA-WP-TR-2015-0006 Tempus Pro Patient Monitoring System Nigel D. Pritchard 3 April 2015 Final Report... System 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER Nigel D. Pritchard 5e. TASK NUMBER...subsequent demonstration of the Tempus Pro patient monitoring system to include the AF3899L critical care patient movement record. 15. SUBJECT TERMS

  1. [Sophrology for patients in oncology].

    PubMed

    Barré, Chantal; Falcou, Marie-Christine; Mosseri, Véronique; Carrié, Sylvie; Dolbeault, Sylvie

    2015-11-01

    It is important to support patients with cancer during their care pathway and even beyond. They undergo long and difficult treatments, all anxiety-causing situations and sources of stress. Sophrological techniques help patients to find calm, lessen their fears and offer them the opportunity to work on themselves through simple easily reproducible exercises. This observation has been verified by a study carried out at the Institut Curie with patients undergoing chemotherapy.

  2. Implementing national patient safety alerts.

    PubMed

    Moore, Sally; Taylor, Natalie; Lawton, Rebecca; Slater, Beverley

    National patient safety alerts are sometimes difficult to implement in an effective way. All trusts have to declare compliance with alerts as part of a three-step process to improve patient safety. This article discusses an alternative way of implementing national patient safety alerts and describes how behaviour-change methods can be used to successfully implement lasting changes in practice at ward or departmental level.

  3. Nutritional assessment of surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Brown, C S; Stegman, M R

    1988-10-01

    In order to test the sensitivity and specificity of the East Orange Nutritional Screening Form (EONSF), nutritional assessments were performed on a random sample of 10% of general medical/surgical admissions at a large midwestern veteran's administration hospital. Patients were followed until discharge to determine if they met the standard criteria of additional nutritional support. The tool correctly identified patients at nutritional risk (sensitivity) 95% of the time and patients not at nutritional risk (specificity) 89% of the time. It proved to be an effective, low-cost tool for identifying patients at risk and for planning appropriate nutritional strategies.

  4. Strategies for improving patient compliance.

    PubMed

    Strand, J

    1994-01-01

    Achieving patient compliance in taking prescribed medications is a formidable challenge for all clinicians. As PAs, we have daily opportunities to communicate with patients and improve their compliance. An office-based compliance program, combining patient education and behavior-modification components, can be beneficial in this regard. Strategies for improving compliance include giving clear, concise, and logical instructions in familiar language, adapting drug regimens to daily routines, eliciting patient participation through self-monitoring, and providing educational materials that promote overall good health in connection with medical treatment.

  5. Orthodontic treatment in oncological patients.

    PubMed

    Mituś-Kenig, Maria; Łoboda, Magdalena; Marcinkowska-Mituś, Agata; Durka-Zajac, Magdalena; Pawłowska, Elzbieta

    2015-01-01

    The progress in oncological treatment has led to the current increase of childhood cancer survival rate to 80%. That is why orthodontists more and more frequently consult patients who had completed a successful anti-cancer therapy in childhood. Oncological treatments such as chemotherapy, radiotherapy or supportive immunosuppressive therapy cause numerous side effects in growing patients, connected i.a. with growth, the development of teeth or the viscerocranium. This is a special group of patients that needs an optimised plan of orthodontic treatment and often has to accept a compromise result. The purpose of the current work is to discuss the results of orthodontic treatment in patients after an anti-cancer therapy. Time of treatment was 12,5 months. In 6 patients (from 40 undergoing orthodontic therapy) we haven't reached a normocclusion, in 9 patients we should have stopped the therapy because of the recurrence. In 11 patients we found mucosa inflammation and in 1 patient the therapy stopped before the end because of very low oral hygiene level. Bearing in mind the limited number of original works on the above topic in Polish medical literature, the study has been carried out in order to make Polish orthodontists more acquainted with the topic and the standards of dealing with an oncological patient.

  6. Engaging patients through your website.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Kimberlee; Ornes, Lynne L; Paulson, Pat

    2014-01-01

    Legislation requires the healthcare industry to directly engage patients through technology. This paper proposes a model that can be used to review hospital websites for features that engage patients in their healthcare. The model describes four levels of patient engagement in website design. The sample consisted of 130 hospital websites from hospitals listed on 2010 and 2011 Most Wired Hospitals. Hospital websites were analyzed for features that encouraged patient interaction with their healthcare according to the levels in the model. Of the four levels identified in the model, websites ranged from "informing" to "collaborative" in website design. There was great variation of features offered on hospital websites with few being engaging and interactive.

  7. Effective writing that attracts patients.

    PubMed

    Baum, Neil

    2015-01-01

    Doctors today not only must communicate verbally, they must also realize that the written word is important to their ability to connect with the patients that they already have and also to attract new patients. Doctors will be expected to write blogs, to create content for their Web sites, to write articles for local publications, and even to learn to express themselves in 140 characters or less (i.e., Twitter). This article presents 10 rules for selecting the right words to enhance your communication with existing patients and potentially to attract new patients to your practice.

  8. Government influence on patient organizations.

    PubMed

    Van de Bovenkamp, Hester M; Trappenburg, Margo J

    2011-12-01

    Patient organizations increasingly play an important role in health care decision-making in Western countries. The Netherlands is one of the countries where this trend has gone furthest. In the literature some problems are identified, such as instrumental use of patient organizations by care providers, health insurers and the pharmaceutical industry. To strengthen the position of patient organizations government funding is often recommended as a solution. In this paper we analyze the ties between Dutch government and Dutch patient organizations to learn more about the effects of such a relationship between government and this part of civil society. Our study is based on official government documents and existing empirical research on patient organizations. We found that government influence on patient organizations has become quite substantial with government influencing the organizational structure of patient organizations, the activities these organizations perform and even their ideology. Financing patient organizations offers the government an important means to hold them accountable. Although the ties between patient organizations and the government enable the former to play a role that can be valued as positive by both parties, we argue that they raise problems as well which warrant a discussion on how much government influence on civil society is acceptable.

  9. Psychological distress and patient satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Greenley, J R; Young, T B; Schoenherr, R A

    1982-04-01

    Psychologically distressed patients and clients of health care and social service organizations are found to report somewhat more dissatisfaction with services than do the nondistressed. Four explanations for this relationship are examined: 1) the psychologically distressed are generally dissatisfied; 2) service providers react negatively to the psychologically distressed; 3) psychologically distressed patients are dissatisfied when service providers do not respond to their psychological needs; and 4) patients who deny their psychological distress tend to be dissatisfied. The results show that the psychologically distressed report more dissatisfaction because of the very high levels of dissatisfaction found among patients who deny having personal problems.

  10. Violent psychiatric patients: a study.

    PubMed

    Kermani, E J

    1981-04-01

    In a study of fifty-three violent psychiatric patients in a psychiatric hospital setting, it was found that there are two distinct major groups of violent patients--one of patients with a long history of antisocial behavior who are often chronically homicidal and suicidal, and another of patients who neither have a history of destructive behavior nor exhibit homicidal or suicidal tendencies. The latter become acutely assaultive only during the course of psychiatric illness. The personality traits and background associated with these two groups offer additional contrasts. Each group presents different problems and, of major importance to the psychiatric practioner, each group requires different management.

  11. Patients' responsibilities in medical ethics.

    PubMed

    Draper, Heather; Sorell, Tom

    2002-08-01

    Patients have not been entirely ignored in medical ethics. There has been a shift from the general presumption that 'doctor knows best' to a heightened respect for patient autonomy. Medical ethics remains one-sided, however. It tends (incorrectly) to interpret patient autonomy as mere participation in decisions, rather than a willingness to take the consequences. In this respect, medical ethics remains largely paternalistic, requiring doctors to protect patients from the consequences of their decisions. This is reflected in a one-sided account of duties in medical ethics. Duties fall mainly on doctors and only exceptionally on patients. Medical ethics may exempt patient from obligations because they are the weaker or more vulnerable party in the doctor-patient relationship. We argue that vulnerability does not exclude obligation. We also look at other ways in which patient responsibilities flow from general ethics: for instance, from responsibilities to others and to the self, from duties of citizens, and from the responsibilities of those who solicit advice. Finally, we argue that certain duties of patients counterbalance an otherwise unfair capacity of doctors as helpers.

  12. Patient Education Leads to Better Care for Heart Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenberg, Stanley G.

    The staff of a heart and circulatory disease program of a State department of health conducted a special project at a city hospital which showed that a well-organized treatment and education program for patients with congestive heart failure increased the patient's knowledge of his disease, medication, and diet as well as his adherence to a…

  13. Patient or customer?

    PubMed

    Parker, J M

    1999-01-01

    This paper investigates caring in practice within the context of the global imperative of increasing rationalisation of care based on an economic ethic. The notion of the global marketplace has spread to the domain of health services, so that 'health' has come to be seen as a commodity, with the body as its site, and the 'patient' a customer; clinicians work to construct standard pathways through the healthcare supermarket. The challenge for nurses is to work within but also to challenge and resist the reductionist impetus of economically based and commercially driven approaches to health care. They must retain the sense of the value of the wholeness of the person, the deeply personal and profoundly significant professional-recipient relationship, and find ways of demonstrating their capacity to deliver high-quality care in a cost-effective way. Proper and appropriate accountability is a key strategy to maintaining quality nursing as a significant aspect of care. The expansion of the role of the advanced practice nurse is very useful in providing holistic and cost-effective care, though there are currently limitations to scope of practice that need to be removed. The metaphor of the marketplace, underpinned by powerful global economic forces, can draw us into unthinking compliance with its imperatives--but other metaphors are available. Metaphor and creativity are linked, and we need to consider how the creative use of language can facilitate the emergence of new ways of understanding in health care.

  14. Current status of patient-controlled analgesia in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Ripamonti, C; Bruera, E

    1997-03-01

    Patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) is a relatively new technique in which patients are able to self-administer small doses of opioid analgesics when needed. Many different devices are available for opioid infusion, including a syringe pump, disposable plastic cylinder, and battery-operated computer-driven pump. These devices allow patients to choose an intermittent (demand) bolus, continuous infusion, or both modes of administration. Parameters, such as route, drug concentration dose, frequency, and maximum daily or hourly dose, are programmed by the physician. The patient decides whether or not to take a dose. Devices can be used to deliver the drug into a running intravenous infusion, the epidural space, or subcutaneously. Controlled trials indicate that PCA is probably superior to regular opioid administration in postoperative pain. Reported advantages include greater patient satisfaction, decreased sedation and anxiety, and reduced nursing time and hospitalization. Preliminary experience suggests that PCA is also useful and safe for cancer pain, but further research is greatly needed.

  15. Elderly patients also have rights

    PubMed Central

    Pérez‐Cárceles, M D; Lorenzo, M D; Luna, A; Osuna, E

    2007-01-01

    Background Sharing information with relatives of elderly patients in primary care and in hospital has to fit into the complex set of obligations, justifications and pressures concerning the provision of information, and the results of some studies point to the need for further empirical studies exploring issues of patient autonomy, privacy and informed consent in the day‐to‐day care of older people. Objectives To know the frequency with which “capable” patients over 65 years of age receive information when admitted to hospital, the information offered to the families concerned, the person who gives consent for medical intervention, and the degree of satisfaction with the information received and the healthcare provided. Method A descriptive questionnaire given to 200 patients and 200 relatives during the patients' stay in hospital. Results Only 5% of patients confirmed that they had been asked whether information could be given to their relatives. A significantly higher proportion of relatives received information on the successive stages of the care offered than did patients themselves. As the age of the patients increased, so the number who were given information, understood the information and were asked for their consent for complementary tests decreased. The degree of satisfaction with the information offered was high for both patients and relatives (86.5% and 84%, respectively), despite the irregularities observed. Conclusions The capacity of elderly patients to participate in the decision‐making process is frequently doubted simply because they have reached a certain age and it is thought that relatives should act as their representatives. In Spain, the opinion of the family and doctors appears to play a larger role in making decisions than does the concept of patient autonomy. PMID:18055902

  16. National survey of hospital patients.

    PubMed Central

    Bruster, S.; Jarman, B.; Bosanquet, N.; Weston, D.; Erens, R.; Delbanco, T. L.

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To survey patients' opinions of their experiences in hospital in order to produce data that can help managers and doctors to identify and solve problems. DESIGN--Random sample of 36 NHS hospitals, stratified by size of hospital (number of beds), area (north, midlands, south east, south west), and type of hospital (teaching or non-teaching, trust or directly managed). From each hospital a random sample of, on average, 143 patients was interviewed at home or the place of discharge two to four weeks after discharge by means of a structured questionnaire about their treatment in hospital. SUBJECTS--5150 randomly chosen NHS patients recently discharged from acute hospitals in England. Subjects had been patients on medical and surgical wards apart from paediatric, maternity, psychiatric, and geriatric wards. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Patients' responses to direct questions about preadmission procedures, admission, communication with staff, physical care, tests and operations, help from staff, pain management, and discharge planning. Patients' responses to general questions about their degree of satisfaction in hospitals. RESULTS--Problems were reported by patients, particularly with regard to communication with staff (56% (2824/5020) had not been given written or printed information); pain management (33% (1042/3162) of those suffering pain were in pain all or most of the time); and discharge planning (70% (3599/5124) had not been told about warning signs and 62% (3177/5119) had not been told when to resume normal activities). Hospitals failed to reach the standards of the Patient's Charter--for example, in explaining the treatment proposed and giving patients the option of not taking part in student training. Answers to questions about patient satisfaction were, however, highly positive but of little use to managers. CONCLUSIONS--This survey has highlighted several problems with treatment in NHS hospitals. Asking patients direct questions about what happened

  17. Patient preference: a comparison of electronic patient-completed questionnaires with paper among cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Martin, P; Brown, M C; Espin-Garcia, O; Cuffe, S; Pringle, D; Mahler, M; Villeneuve, J; Niu, C; Charow, R; Lam, C; Shani, R M; Hon, H; Otsuka, M; Xu, W; Alibhai, S; Jenkinson, J; Liu, G

    2016-03-01

    In this study, we compared cancer patients preference for computerised (tablet/web-based) surveys versus paper. We also assessed whether the understanding of a cancer-related topic, pharmacogenomics is affected by the survey format, and examined differences in demographic and medical characteristics which may affect patient preference and understanding. Three hundred and four cancer patients completed a tablet-administered survey and another 153 patients completed a paper-based survey. Patients who participated in the tablet survey were questioned regarding their preference for survey format administration (paper, tablet and web-based). Understanding was assessed with a 'direct' method, by asking patients to assess their understanding of genetic testing, and with a 'composite' score. Patients preferred administration with tablet (71%) compared with web-based (12%) and paper (17%). Patients <65 years old, non-Caucasians and white-collar professionals significantly preferred the computerised format following multivariate analysis. There was no significant difference in understanding between the paper and tablet survey with direct questioning or composite score. Age (<65 years) and white-collar professionals were associated with increased understanding (both P = 0.03). There was no significant difference in understanding between the tablet and print survey in a multivariate analysis. Patients overwhelmingly preferred computerised surveys and understanding of pharmacogenomics was not affected by survey format.

  18. [Delirium in patients with cancer].

    PubMed

    Staniszewska, Agnieszka; Kłoszewska, Iwona

    2007-01-01

    Delirium is a frequent complication of cancer. It is the cause of patients' suffering and due to worsening of communication, the impediment to clinical assessment. It lowers the quality of life of family caregivers as well. Instant diagnosis and therapy of delirium are essential in clinical practice. In this review etiology, prevalence, clinical features and management of delirium in cancer patients are described.

  19. Viscoelastic cushion for patient support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sauers, D. G.

    1971-01-01

    Flexible container, filled with liquid, provides supportive device which conforms to patient's anatomy. Uniform cushion pressure prevents formation of decubitus ulcers, while the porous sponge substructure damps fluid movement through cushion response so that patient is not dumped when his weight shifts.

  20. Art Therapy with Laryngectomy Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anand, Susan Ainlay; Anand, Vinod K.

    1997-01-01

    Reports on the experiences of patients with laryngeal cancer who used art therapy. Drawing on 14 years of experience and 109 laryngeal cancer patients, describes treatment results and the case material substantiating the distinct role of art therapy. Provides an overview of the special medical and therapeutic needs of this group. (RJM)

  1. Corneal Protection for Burn Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    cornea transplant . Currently these patients receive frequent application of topical lubricants and anti-inflammatory medications, an imperfect solution...of the degradation-resistant crosslinked amniotic membranes for treating cornea of burn patients that were produced in Years 1 and 2. Major findings...Identified membrane stiffness as a critical parameter for a successful cornea -protective membrane and quantitatively assessed this parameter

  2. Corneal Protection for Burn Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-01

    cornea transplant . Currently these patients receive frequent application of topical lubricants and anti-inflammatory medications, an imperfect... cornea as is done in amniotic membrane transplantation . However we proposed and, have now tested, an alternative method for securing the... cornea of burn patients that were produced in Year 1. Major findings: Established that 2 and 3 layer crosslinked amniotic membrane composites are more

  3. Burns in Morbidly Obese Patients,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-12-01

    tract infection and one episode C obesity. The clinical records of these patients were reviewed in of sinusitis. Two patients had documented bacteremias...veloped pneumonia and two developed tracheobronchitis. 0 Research, seven of whom clearly fulfilled the criteria for morbid There were one urinary

  4. Virtual Patients in Geriatric Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tan, Zaldy S.; Mulhausen, Paul L.; Smith, Stephen R.; Ruiz, Jorge G.

    2010-01-01

    The virtual patient is a case-based computer program that combines textual information with multimedia elements such as audio, graphics, and animation. It is increasingly being utilized as a teaching modality by medical educators in various fields of instruction. The inherent complexity of older patients and the shortage of geriatrics educators…

  5. Virtual Patients in Pharmacy Education

    PubMed Central

    Jabbur-Lopes, Monique O.; Mesquita, Alessandra R.; Silva, Leila M. A.; De Almeida Neto, Abilio

    2012-01-01

    A review of the literature relating to the use of virtual patients in teaching pharmaceutical care to pharmacy students was conducted. Only 7 articles met the inclusion criteria for the review and 4 of the studies were conducted in North America. Few articles identified by the review used virtual patient technology that was true-to-life and/or validated. PMID:22761533

  6. Gadobutrol in Renally Impaired Patients

    PubMed Central

    Michaely, Henrik J.; Aschauer, Manuela; Deutschmann, Hannes; Bongartz, Georg; Gutberlet, Matthias; Woitek, Ramona; Ertl-Wagner, Birgit; Kucharczyk, Walter; Hammerstingl, Renate; De Cobelli, Francesco; Rosenberg, Martin; Balzer, Thomas; Endrikat, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to assess the potential risk of gadobutrol-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with moderate to severe renal impairment for the development of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF). Materials and Methods We performed a prospective, international, multicenter, open-label study in 55 centers. Patients with moderate to severe renal impairment scheduled for any gadobutrol-enhanced MRI were included. All patients received a single intravenous bolus injection of gadobutrol at a dose of 0.1 mmol/kg body weight. The primary target variable was the number of patients who develop NSF within a 2-year follow-up period. Results A total of 908 patients were enrolled, including 586 with moderate and 284 with severe renal impairment who are at highest risk for developing NSF. The mean time since renal disease diagnosis was 1.83 and 5.49 years in the moderate and severe renal impairment cohort, respectively. Overall, 184 patients (20.3%) underwent further contrast-enhanced MRI with other gadolinium-based contrast agents within the 2-year follow-up. No patient developed symptoms conclusive of NSF. Conclusions No safety concerns with gadobutrol in patients with moderate to severe renal impairment were identified. There were no NSF cases. PMID:27529464

  7. Pharmacotherapeutics for the AIDS Patient.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fife, Kenneth H.

    1991-01-01

    Anticipated shifts in the demographics of the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) epidemic are examined, current state-of-the-art AIDS patient management is summarized, and some unique facets of drug therapy in the AIDS patient are discussed, including adverse reactions, complex drug interactions, use of investigational drugs, and…

  8. The Coronary Patient in Industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuster, B.

    1971-01-01

    The coronary patient, as he pertains to industry particularly NASA, is discussed. Concepts of precoronary care, acute attacks which may develop while on the job, and the return of the cardiac patient to work are covered. Major emphasis was on the prevention of sudden death due to coronary disease.

  9. Patient Disclosure of Medical Misdeeds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergen, Clara; Stivers, Tanya

    2013-01-01

    Modern patients walk a tightrope between respecting medical authority and acting as knowledgeable advocates regarding health issues, with the agency and responsibilities that come with this. This article uses conversation analysis to explore this balance in relation to patient disclosures of medical misdeeds in video-recorded primary care medical…

  10. Idiom Comprehension in Aphasic Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papagno, Costanza; Tabossi, Patrizia; Colombo, Maria Rosa; Zampetti, Patrizia

    2004-01-01

    Idiom comprehension was assessed in 10 aphasic patients with semantic deficits by means of a string-to-picture matching task. Patients were also submitted to an oral explanation of the same idioms, and to a word comprehension task. The stimuli of this last task were the words following the verb in the idioms. Idiom comprehension was severely…

  11. Rhinoplasty in Middle Eastern Patients.

    PubMed

    Sajjadian, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Rhinoplasty in patients of Middle Eastern origin requires complete understanding of nasal morphology and an individualized approach to create a racially congruent and aesthetically pleasing outcome. In this article, common anatomic features and characteristics and detailed steps, surgical techniques, and operative maneuvers that can lead to predictable outcome in rhinoplasty of Middle Eastern patients are discussed.

  12. Patient safety: honoring advanced directives.

    PubMed

    Tice, Martha A

    2007-02-01

    Healthcare providers typically think of patient safety in the context of preventing iatrogenic injury. Prevention of falls and medication or treatment errors is the typical focus of adverse event analyses. If healthcare providers are committed to honoring the wishes of patients, then perhaps failures to honor advanced directives should be viewed as reportable medical errors.

  13. Patient's breath controls comfort devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrader, M.; Carpenter, B.; Nichols, C. D.

    1972-01-01

    Patient assist system for totally disabled persons was developed which permits a person, so paralyzed as to be unable to move, to activate by breathing, a call system to summon assistance, turn the page of a book, ajust his bed, or do any one of a number of other things. System consists of patient assist control and breath actuated switch.

  14. Inflatable stretcher to transport patients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, C. C.; Gordon, F. T., Jr.; Schmidt, C. B.

    1970-01-01

    Inflatable plastic bag inside strong, inflexible outer bag facilitates emergency transport of seriously burned or disabled patients. When the bag is inflated the patient is completely immobilized and cushioned from external shock. Air for breathing, temperature controls and communications may be provided by appropriate plug-in connections.

  15. Are rhinoplasty patients potentially mad?

    PubMed

    Slator, R; Harris, D L

    1992-01-01

    Rhinoplasty patients have long been considered to be psychologically unstable and therefore a "risky" group upon which to operate. Patients who had rhinoplastic operations more than 5 years ago were contacted by post and their psychological health assessed by the use of psychometric tests. The results show no evidence to support earlier suggestions that requests for rhinoplasty may be early symptoms of severe psychiatric disease. However, several points do emerge. Male patients show more symptoms of anxiety and depression than normal, and female patients who give no history of injury preceding their operation behave in a more extrovert and sociable manner than normal. Furthermore, patients of both sexes who give no history of injury before their operation, even though pleased with the operative results, are more self-conscious of their appearance than those who were injured prior to their rhinoplasty.

  16. Oocyte cryopreservation in oncological patients.

    PubMed

    Porcu, Eleonora; Fabbri, Raffaella; Damiano, Giuseppe; Fratto, Rosita; Giunchi, Susanna; Venturoli, Stefano

    2004-04-05

    The use of chemotherapy and radiotherapy in oncological patients may reduce their reproductive potential. Sperm cryopreservation has been already used in men affected by neoplastic disease. Oocyte cryopreservation might be an important solution for these patients at risk of losing ovarian function. A program of oocyte cryopreservation for oncological patients is also present in our center. From June 1996 to January 2000, 18 patients awaiting chemotherapy and radiotherapy for neoplastic disease were included in our oocyte cryopreservation program. Our experience documents that oocyte storage may be a concrete and pragmatic alternative for oncological patients. The duration of oocyte storage does not seem to interfere with oocyte survival as pregnancies occurred even after several years of gamete cryopreservation in liquid nitrogen.

  17. Endodontics and the ageing patient.

    PubMed

    Johnstone, M; Parashos, P

    2015-03-01

    Patients are living longer and the rate of edentulism is decreasing. Endodontic treatment is an essential part of maintaining the health and well-being of the elderly. Retention of natural teeth improves the quality of life and the overall health and longevity of ageing patients. Also, teeth that might be otherwise extracted may be strategically valuable to retain a prosthesis, and elderly patients are more likely to have medical complications that may prevent dental extractions from being safely performed. The technical goals of endodontic treatment in the elderly are the same as those for younger patients. However, the pulpo-dentinal complex undergoes calcific changes over time, which may pose challenges for the clinician. The purposes of this review are to discuss age changes in the pulp and the challenges posed by diagnosing, treatment planning and treating the elderly endodontic patient.

  18. Developing patient safety in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Pemberton, M N

    2014-10-01

    Patient safety has always been important and is a source of public concern. Recent high profile scandals and subsequent reports, such as the Francis report into the failings at Mid Staffordshire, have raised those concerns even higher. Mortality and significant morbidity associated with the practice of medicine has led to many strategies to help improve patient safety, however, with its lack of associated mortality and lower associated morbidity, dentistry has been slower at systematically considering how patient safety can be improved. Recently, several organisations, researchers and clinicians have discussed the need for a patient safety culture in dentistry. Strategies are available to help improve patient safety in healthcare and deserve further consideration in dentistry.

  19. Hormone therapy for transgender patients

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Many transgender men and women seek hormone therapy as part of the transition process. Exogenous testosterone is used in transgender men to induce virilization and suppress feminizing characteristics. In transgender women, exogenous estrogen is used to help feminize patients, and anti-androgens are used as adjuncts to help suppress masculinizing features. Guidelines exist to help providers choose appropriate candidates for hormone therapy, and act as a framework for choosing treatment regimens and managing surveillance in these patients. Cross-sex hormone therapy has been shown to have positive physical and psychological effects on the transitioning individual and is considered a mainstay treatment for many patients. Bone and cardiovascular health are important considerations in transgender patients on long-term hormones, and care should be taken to monitor certain metabolic indices while patients are on cross-sex hormone therapy. PMID:28078219

  20. Patient With Borderline Personality Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, Dorothy E.

    1989-01-01

    Every family practice includes people who are difficult to manage. Persons with a borderline personality disorder can be the most difficult of all. They will trust no one, and consequently few, if any, others will be able to tolerate their profoundly difficult interpersonal communication style. These patients will present to their family physician more and more often with a variety of somatic and emotional symptoms. They will demand, either verbally or silently, that these symptoms be relieved immediately. This increasing demand for immediate response may eventually cause the physician to reject the patient. An understanding of this condition and how it develops in infancy may enable the physician to help the patient. A family physician who can set appropriate limits to the patient's demands may slowly convince the patient that he can trust and not be hurt. PMID:21248944

  1. Longitudinal deteriorations in patient reported outcomes in patients with COPD.

    PubMed

    Oga, Toru; Nishimura, Koichi; Tsukino, Mitsuhiro; Sato, Susumu; Hajiro, Takashi; Mishima, Michiaki

    2007-01-01

    Goals of effective management of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) include relieving their symptoms and improving their health status. We examined how such patient reported outcomes would change longitudinally in comparison to physiological outcomes in COPD. One hundred thirty-seven male outpatients with stable COPD were recruited for the study. The subjects health status was evaluated using the St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ) and the Chronic Respiratory Disease Questionnaire (CRQ). Their dyspnoea using the modified Medical Research Council (MRC) scale and their psychological status using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) were assessed upon entry and every 6 months thereafter over a 5-year period. Pulmonary function and exercise capacity as evaluated by peak oxygen uptake (VO2) on progressive cycle ergometry were also followed over the same time. Using mixed effects models to estimate the slopes for the changes, scores on the SGRQ, the CRQ, the MRC and the HADS worsened in a statistically significant manner over time. However, changes only weakly correlated with changes in forced expiratory volume in 1s (FEV(1)) and peak (VO2). We demonstrated that although changes in pulmonary function and exercise capacity are well known in patients with COPD, patient reported outcomes such as health status, dyspnoea and psychological status also deteriorated significantly over time. In addition, deteriorations in patient reported outcomes only weakly correlated to changes in physiological indices. To capture the overall deterioration of COPD from the subjective viewpoints of the patients, patient reported outcomes should be followed separately from physiological outcomes.

  2. Do patient assessments of primary care differ by patient ethnicity?

    PubMed Central

    Taira, D A; Safran, D G; Seto, T B; Rogers, W H; Inui, T S; Montgomery, J; Tarlov, A R

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine if patient assessments (reports and ratings) of primary care differ by patient ethnicity. DATA SOURCES/STUDY DESIGN: A self-administered patient survey of 6,092 Massachusetts employees measured seven defining characteristics of primary care: (1) access (financial, organizational); (2) continuity (longitudinal, visit based); (3) comprehensiveness (knowledge of patient, preventive counseling); (4) integration; (5) clinical interaction (communication, thoroughness of physical examinations); (6) interpersonal treatment; and (7) trust. The study employed a cross-sectional observational design. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Asians had the lowest primary care performance assessments of any ethnic group after adjustment for socioeconomic and other factors. For example, compared to whites, Asians had lower scores for communication (69 vs. 79, p = .001) and comprehensive knowledge of patient (56 vs. 48, p = .002), African Americans and Latinos had less access to care, and African Americans had less longitudinal continuity than whites. CONCLUSIONS: We do not know what accounts for the observed differences in patient assessments of primary care. The fact that patient reports as well as the more subjective ratings of care differed by ethnicity suggests that quality differences might exist that need to be addressed. PMID:11775667

  3. Preoperative patient assessment: Identifying patients at high risk.

    PubMed

    Boehm, O; Baumgarten, G; Hoeft, A

    2016-06-01

    Postoperative mortality remains alarmingly high with a mortality rate ranging between 0.4% and 4%. A small subgroup of multimorbid and/or elderly patients undergoing different surgical procedures naturally confers the highest risk of complications and perioperative death. Therefore, preoperative assessment should identify these high-risk patients and stratify them to individualized monitoring and treatment throughout all phases of perioperative care. A "tailored" perioperative approach might help further reduce perioperative morbidity and mortality. This article aims to elucidate individual morbidity-specific risks. It further suggests approaches to detect patients at the risk of perioperative complications.

  4. HPV Carcinomas in Immunocompromised Patients

    PubMed Central

    Reusser, Nicole M.; Downing, Christopher; Guidry, Jacqueline; Tyring, Stephen K.

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the most common sexually transmitted disease worldwide and can result in pre-malignancies or overt malignancies of the skin and mucosal surfaces. HPV-related illnesses are an important personal and public health problem causing physical, mental, sexual and financial detriments. Moreover, this set of malignancies severely affects the immunosuppressed population, particularly HIV-positive patients and organ-transplant recipients. There is growing incidence of HPV-associated anogenital malignancies as well as a decrease in the average age of affected patients, likely related to the rising number of high-risk individuals. Squamous cell carcinoma is the most common type of HPV-related malignancy. Current treatment options for HPV infection and subsequent disease manifestations include imiquimod, retinoids, intralesional bleomycin, and cidofovir; however, primary prevention with HPV vaccination remains the most effective strategy. This review will discuss anogenital lesions in immunocompromised patients, cutaneous warts at nongenital sites, the association of HPV with skin cancer in immunocompromised patients, warts and carcinomas in organ-transplant patients, HIV-positive patients with HPV infections, and the management of cutaneous disease in the immunocompromised patient. PMID:26239127

  5. [The AIDS patient in anesthesia].

    PubMed

    Jalowy, A; Flesche, C W; Lorenz, C

    1997-02-01

    Treatment of a patient with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) is very challenging, and makes great demands on the anaesthesiologist. Any of an AIDS patient's vital organ systems may be compromised, either by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) itself, opportunistic infections, by tumours, or as a result of AIDS-related drug therapies. Infections of the lungs (e.g., Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia) are prevalent, and cardiac impairment can be found in as many as 50% of AIDS patients. In addition, disorders of the central and peripheral nervous system and water and electrolyte imbalances are often seen. Perioperatively, the AIDS patient is especially prone to infections as a result of a compromised immune system. The choice of anaesthetic procedure for the AIDS patient-aside from the type of operation-depends on the severity of the illness and progression of organ impairment. All anaesthesia personnel must be careful to avoid infection, as they frequently come in contact with the blood or body fluids of their patients. However, the risk of being infected by an AIDS patient is very low, provided hygiene regulations are followed strictly. The rate of seroconversion after accidental needle-stick injury is below 1%. If exposure does occur, regular serologic controls should be continued for one year. Prophylactic treatment with azidothymidine after exposition to HIV is recommended.

  6. [Adrenal insufficiency in cirrhotic patients].

    PubMed

    Orozco, Federico; Anders, María; Mella, José; Antinucci, Florencia; Pagano, Patricia; Esteban, Paula; Cartier, Mariano; Romero, Gustavo; Francini, Bettina; Mastai, Ricardo

    Relative adrenal insufficiency (RAI) is a common finding in cirrhotic patients with severe sepsis, and increased mortality. Its significance is unknown in stable conditions. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of RAI in stable cirrhotic patients at different stages of the disease. Also, the impact of RAI on the survival was evaluated and basal cortisol levels between plasma and saliva was correlated in control subjects and cirrhotic patients. Forty seven ambulatory patients and 16 control subjects were studied. RAI was defined as a serum cortisol increase of less than 9 υg/dl from baseline after the stimulation with 250 mg of synthetic ACTH. Twenty two had Child-Pugh = 8 and 25 = 9. The prevalence of RAI in patients with stable cirrhosis was 22%. A higher incidence of RAI was observed in patients with a Child-Pugh = 9 (8/32) than in those with = 8 (3/13, p < 0.05). A correlation between salivary cortisol and basal plasma cortisol (r = 0.6, p < 0.0004) was observed. Finally, survival at 1 year (97%) and 3 years (91%) was significantly higher without RAI than those who developed this complication (79% and 51%, p < 0.05, respectively). In summary, the prevalence of RAI is frequent in patients with stable cirrhosis and that it is related to the severity of liver diseaseand increased mortality.

  7. Creating the ideal patient experience

    PubMed Central

    Purcărea, Th.V

    2016-01-01

    Healthcare industry continues to evolve under conditions of intense competition in approaching health prevention, protection, and promotion. Therefore, healthcare providers are challenged to always ensure better patient experience, winning patients’ satisfaction, and loyalty and remain competitive on today’s healthcare market. Healthcare markets bring together professionals and their patients into real collaborative relationships, which empower patients to contribute to the healthcare improvement. Within this competitive landscape, which is also characterized by digital health tools boosting patients’ awareness and controlling their own health, medical providers need to be perceived as skilled and trustworthy in relying on patients’ needs, expectations, and sacrifices are required in order to obtain the promised benefits. Moreover, while constantly providing a holistic assessment of the healthcare services’ and experience attributes, acting on feedback and reaching healthcare service excellence, providing a better understanding of all the touch points with their patients and improving the quality and consistency of all these touch points, all these are achieved by employees, who are truly connected to the healthcare business. Today, patients are systematically becoming aware of the diversity of their choices, being increasingly involved in making better healthcare choices, and, so, more and more innovative products are introduced, targeting new patient segments. Findings from the last three years have shown that patients may achieve better outcomes due to the stakeholders’ commitment to innovation within the context of the big-data revolution, by building new values. PMID:27928442

  8. Confabulations in alcoholic Korsakoff patients.

    PubMed

    Borsutzky, Sabine; Fujiwara, Esther; Brand, Matthias; Markowitsch, Hans J

    2008-11-01

    Besides forgetting, memory is also prone to distortions, errors and illusions. Confabulation is one type of memory distortion that may occur in cases of brain damage. Although confabulations are described anecdotally in patients with alcoholic Korsakoff syndrome (KS), there are few systematic investigations of the presence and nature of these types of false memories in KS. Moreover, it is unclear whether KS patients' confabulations evenly affect all types of memories, or whether certain memory domains are more susceptible. Our study attempted to clarify two questions: first, whether confabulations are a critical feature of the cognitive impairment associated with long-term KS in a large sample of patients (N=42). Second, we investigated which memory domain is most likely affected by confabulations in KS. To elicit confabulations, we used a Confabulation Interview containing questions from different memory domains. We found that KS patients overall confabulated more compared to a group of healthy subjects. Furthermore, we found that patients confabulated most within the episodic/autobiographical memory domain. Our results imply that besides pronounced memory deficits typically associated with KS, confabulation can also be regarded as a clinical feature of the disease. The preponderance of episodic confabulation obtained here by using a standardized test, confirms anecdotic reports that KS patients confabulate in everyday life mainly with respect to their personal past and present. Thus, for a detailed description of the memory profile of KS patients, the screening of confabulation tendencies may be a useful supplementary clinical tool.

  9. Psychological care in trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Mohta, Medha; Sethi, A K; Tyagi, Asha; Mohta, Anup

    2003-01-01

    The clinician manages trauma patients in the emergency room, operation theatre, intensive care unit and trauma ward with an endeavour to provide best possible treatment for physical injuries. At the same time, it is equally important to give adequate attention to behavioural and psychological aspects associated with the event. Knowledge of the predisposing factors and their management helps the clinician to prevent or manage these psychological problems. Various causes of psychological disturbances in trauma patients have been highlighted. These include pain, the sudden and unexpected nature of events and the procedures and interventions necessary to resuscitate and stabilise the patient. The ICU and trauma ward environment, sleep and sensory deprivation, impact of injury on CNS, medications and associated pre-morbid conditions are also significant factors. Specific problems that concern the traumatised patients are helplessness, humiliation, threat to body image and mental symptoms. The patients react to these stressors by various defence mechanisms like conservation withdrawal, denial, regression, anger, anxiety and depression. Some of them develop delirium or even more severe problems like acute stress disorder or post-traumatic stress disorder. Physical, pharmacological or psychological interventions can be performed to prevent or minimise these problems in trauma patients. These include adequate pain relief, prevention of sensory and sleep deprivation, providing familiar surroundings, careful explanations and reassurance to the patient, psychotherapy and pharmacological treatment whenever required.

  10. [Neurologically critical patient. Nurses' care].

    PubMed

    López Díaz, Cristina

    2009-12-01

    Handling a neurologically critical patient requires some necessary knowledge and aptitudes in order to avoid risks and complications which could worsen a patient's prognosis. To that end, in this article the author deals with two important points nursing personnel need to bear in mind: the distinct methods and catheters which can be used to monitor intracranial pressure, obtaining an important parameter for evaluation purposes and therapeutic follow-up on these patients, placing special emphasis on ventricular drainage and nursing care, and the operations nurses take when dealing with patients who present a risk of intracranial hypertension, setting up a protocol based on seven necessities in the Virginia Henderson model: breathing, elimination, temperature, hygiene and skin, feeding and hydration, mobility and safety. In each of these necessities, the author studies the problems these patients present, identifying them with a series of diagnoses according to NANDA (North American Nursing Diagnosis Association), and defining the care or nursing activities for each of them, which will prove essential to prevent cerebral ischemia after suffering a primary cerebral injury due to a "TCE"(Cranial Encephalic Trauma) hemorrhage, etc. Nurses' role in caring for neurologically critical patients proves to be of vital importance since these professionals must be capable of evaluating, preventing, controlling and identifying those risk situations which neurologically critical patients could present, avoiding possible complications, aiding their recuperation, and providing quality health care.

  11. Informational Needs of Postmastectomy Patients

    PubMed Central

    Yeşilyurt, Duygu Soydaş; Fındık, Ümmü Yıldız

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to determine informational needs of postmastectomy patients. Materials and Methods This descriptive study was conducted in the general surgery clinics of a university health center for medical research and practice with 72 voluntary patients. For data collection, a patient identification form was used, which was prepared by the researchers in accordance with the literature. Results The mean age of the patients was 52.66±13.39 years, 87% were married, 58% had primary school education, 76% had moderate economic status, and 53% had undergone simple mastectomy. It was determined that 83% of the patients wanted to be informed about hospital and home care interventions, 82% about symptoms and prevention of post-surgical problems, 76% regarding breast cancer and treatment options, and in the range of 54–68%, patients wanted information on the effects of surgery on the body, shoulder and arm exercises, breast self-examination, the effects of breast cancer on family and work life, lymphedema and prevention interventions. Conclusion We recommend that patients with mastectomy should be informed about topics including care interventions, breast cancer and treatment options, effects of surgery, and reducing these effects.

  12. Patient satisfaction: focusing on "excellent".

    PubMed

    Otani, Koichiro; Waterman, Brian; Faulkner, Kelly M; Boslaugh, Sarah; Burroughs, Thomas E; Dunagan, W Claiborne

    2009-01-01

    In an emerging competitive market such as healthcare, managers should focus on achieving excellent ratings to distinguish their organization from others. When it comes to customer loyalty, "excellent" has a different meaning. Customers who are merely satisfied often do not come back. The purpose of this study was to find out what influences adult patients to rate their overall experience as "excellent." The study used patient satisfaction data collected from one major academic hospital and four community hospitals. After conducting a multiple logistic regression analysis, certain attributes were shown to be more likely than others to influence patients to rate their experiences as excellent. The study revealed that staff care is the most influential attribute, followed by nursing care. These two attributes are distinctively stronger drivers of overall satisfaction than are the other attributes studied (i.e., physician care, admission process, room, and food). Staff care and nursing care are under the control of healthcare managers. If improvements are needed, they can be accomplished through training programs such as total quality management or continuous quality improvement, through which staff employees and nurses learn to be sensitive to patients' needs. Satisfying patients' needs is the first step toward having loyal patients, so hospitals that strive to ensure their patients are completely satisfied are more likely to prosper.

  13. Quality of Doctor-Patient Communication through the Eyes of the Patient: Variation According to the Patient's Educational Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aelbrecht, Karolien; Rimondini, Michela; Bensing, Jozien; Moretti, Francesca; Willems, Sara; Mazzi, Mariangela; Fletcher, Ian; Deveugele, Myriam

    2015-01-01

    Good doctor-patient communication may lead to better compliance, higher patient satisfaction, and finally, better health. Although the social variance in how physicians and patients communicate is clearly demonstrated, little is known about what patients with different educational attainments actually prefer in doctor-patient communication. In…

  14. Contribution of patient and hospital characteristics to adverse patient incidents.

    PubMed Central

    Elnicki, R A; Schmitt, J P

    1980-01-01

    The 1974 medical malpractice "crisis" brought about extensive legislation and insurance regulation in the United States. Hospitals in many states are now required to support risk management programs that include investigation and systematic analyses of adverse patient incidents. However, no research supports the hypothesis that systematic analysis of adverse patient incidents can identify contributory factors. In this study, a simple prediction model was used to estimate relationships between adverse incidents and selected patient and environmental characteristics in a large hospital. While some of the incident-characteristic relationships were significant, none of the estimated equations yielded results that could be logically translated into policy recommendations for the hospital. These results point to the need for further research. The benefits that positive research results would have for patients, hospitals, an the bill-paying public are obvious. Additional negative results would suggest that many legislative bodies and regulatory agencies were presumptions in requiring hospitals to conduct analyses of incidents. PMID:7461973

  15. Maintaining primacy of the patient perspective in the development of patient-centered patient reported outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Garver, Amanda; Ljungberg, Inger H.; Schladen, Manon M.; Groah, Suzanne L.

    2017-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to describe and demonstrate a new model of developing patient reported outcomes (PROs) that are patient-centered, and to test the hypothesis that following this model would result in a qualitatively different PRO than if the typical PRO development model were followed. The typical process of developing PROs begins with an initial list of signs or symptoms originating from clinicians or PRO developers; patient validation of this list ensures that the list (i.e., the new PRO) is interpretable by patients, but not that patient perspectives are central or even represented. The new model begins with elicitation from clinicians and patients independently and separately. These perspectives are formally analyzed qualitatively, and the results are iteratively integrated by researchers, supporting clinical relevance and patient centeredness. We describe the application of this new model to the development of a PRO for urinary signs and symptoms in individuals with neuropathic bladder, and test the hypothesis that the two processes generate qualitatively different instruments using a national validation sample of 300 respondents. Of its 29 items, the new instrument included 13 signs/symptoms derived from existing clinical practice guidelines, with 16 others derived from the patient/focus groups. The three most-endorsed items came from the patients, and the three least-endorsed items came from clinical guidelines. Thematic qualitative analysis of the elicitation process, as well as the results from our national sample, support the conclusion that the new model yields an instrument that is clinically interpretable, but more patient-centered, than the typical model would have done in this context. PMID:28257414

  16. [Patients's with aphasia communication problems].

    PubMed

    Matuszak, Katarzyna; Bonikowska, Agata; Kuczma, Monika; Hagner, Wojciech

    2011-01-01

    Aphasia is a speech disorder caused by disorders of speech centre in brain cortex. Patient with aphasia compensates communication disorders by communication strategy, witch are spontaneous mechanisms, and uses individual rehabilitation methods. Compensation mechanisms are divided in to: phonetic, inflective, formative, semantic, discursive and structural. Patients with aphasia early therapy have to be individual and consists in not only articulation correction, but in establish over verbal contact or verbal, and improvement this contacts, to create patients ability of communication with society. Later therapy is oriented on improvement of cognitive functions for possibility of participation in social live and if it is possible for return to work.

  17. Diarrhea in the immunocompromised patient.

    PubMed

    Krones, Elisabeth; Högenauer, Christoph

    2012-09-01

    Diarrhea is a common problem in patients with immunocompromising conditions. The etiologic spectrum differs from patients with diarrhea who have a normal immune system. This article reviews the most important causes of diarrhea in immunocompromised patients, ranging from infectious causes to noninfectious causes of diarrhea in the setting of HIV infection as a model for other conditions of immunosuppression. It also deals with diarrhea in specific situations, eg, after hematopoietic stem cell or solid organ transplantation, diarrhea induced by immunosuppressive drugs, and diarrhea in congenital immunodeficiency syndromes.

  18. [The magnetotherapy of hypertension patients].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, S G; Smirnov, V V; Solov'eva, F V; Liashevskaia, S P; Selezneva, L Iu

    1990-01-01

    A study was made of the influence of the constant MKM2-1 magnets on patients suffering from essential hypertension. Continuous action of the magnetic field, created by such magnets, on the patients with stage II essential hypertension was noted to result in a decrease of arterial pressure without the occurrence of any side effects and in a simultaneous reduction of the scope of drug administration. Apart from that fact, magnetotherapy was discovered to produce a beneficial effect on the central hemodynamics and microcirculation. The use of the MKM2-1 magnets may be regarded as a feasible method of the treatment of essential hypertension patients at any medical institution.

  19. Improving oral hygiene for patients.

    PubMed

    Bonetti, Debbie; Hampson, Victoria; Queen, Kerry; Kirk, Donna; Clarkson, Jan; Young, Linda

    2015-01-13

    Systematic reviews and patient safety initiatives recommend that oral hygiene should be part of routine patient care. However, evidence suggests it is often neglected in hospitals and care homes. Research recommends encouraging beliefs that support oral hygiene, and teaching nurses appropriate skills, as necessary prerequisites to implementing best practice in hospital wards. This article describes a pilot study of an educational workshop on oral hygiene. Results from the pilot study suggest that this workshop is a feasible intervention for a service-wide trial. The literature suggests that other interventions are required to complement this approach if nurses are to make oral hygiene a priority in daily patient care.

  20. Erectile dysfunction in COPD patients.

    PubMed

    Turan, Onur; Ure, Iyimser; Turan, Pakize Ayse

    2016-02-01

    Sexual dysfunction is a common problem in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We aimed to assess the presence of erectile dysfunction (ED) in COPD patients. Ninety-three outpatients who had been diagnosed as COPD and followed in Bolvadin State Hospital, Afyon, Turkey, were included in the study. All patients underwent pulmonary function tests and arterial blood gas analysis. They completed International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ), Medical Research Council (MRC) Dyspnea Scale, Short Form 36-item Scale (SF-36), and International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) Questionnaire. The mean age of 10 (10.8%) mild, 46 (49.5%) moderate, 28 (30.1%) severe, and 9 (9.7%) very severe COPD patients was 61.4 ± 9.8 years. Varying degrees of ED were detected in 67.7% of COPD patients. All patients with hypoxemia had ED. IPAQ score and all SF-36 parameters were low in patients with ED, while MRC score was high. Forced expiratory volume in one second, forced vital capacity, partial pressure of oxygen in blood, oxygen (O2) saturation, IPAQ score, and role-physical parameters were statistically low in ED patients (p = 0.04, 0.02, <0.01, <0.01, 0.02, and 0.04, respectively); MRC score was statistically higher in patients with ED (p = 0.02). Patients with moderate and severe ED had statistically lower score of mental health (p < 0.01 and p = 0.02, respectively). There was a positive correlation between IIEF score and IPAQ scores (p < 0.01), MRC scores (p = 0.01), general health (p < 0.01), role-physical (p < 0.01), role-emotional (p < 0.01), physical functioning (p < 0.01), and mental health (p < 0.01) parameters in SF-36. ED is frequently seen in COPD patients. Hypoxemia, smoking, and limitation of physical activity are thought to be associated with ED in COPD as mechanisms. Quality of life and the functional capacity are negatively affected with the presence of ED. It is important for a physician to question the sexual functions in patients with COPD. The

  1. Patient risk from interproximal radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, S.J.; Pujol, A. Jr.; Chen, T.S.; Malcolm, A.W.; James, A.E. Jr.

    1984-09-01

    Computer simulation methods for determining patient dose from dental radiography have demonstrated that patient risk from a two-film interproximal examination ranges from 1.1 X 10(-8) to 3.4 X 10(-7) using 90-kVp beams, depending on film speed, projection technique, and age and sex of the patient. Further, changing from a short-cone round-beam to a long-cone technique with rectangular collimation reduces risk by a factor of 2.9, independent of other factors.

  2. How important is patient education?

    PubMed

    Ramos-Remus, C; Salcedo-Rocha, A L; Prieto-Parra, R E; Galvan-Villegas, F

    2000-12-01

    The prevalence and disability rate of rheumatic diseases are increasing. It seems that non-medical causes play an important role in the morbidity, disability and mortality of these patients. Efforts to reduce their impact are extremely important. Patient education is thought to be one way to limit disability in rheumatic diseases and to achieve an improvement in quality of life. In this chapter, we review the influence of non-medical causes of morbidity on disease outcome, some basic aspects of education and the evidence of the effectiveness of patient education in diseases such as ankylosing spondylitis, systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis and fibromyalgia syndrome.

  3. With patient satisfaction under increasing scrutiny, consider patient callbacks.

    PubMed

    2011-07-01

    Under the final rules for Medicare's value-based purchasing program, one-third of the funding that is set aside to reward quality will be based on how patients rate their hospital experience. However, some EDs are already working to maximize patient satisfaction by implementing programs or policies whereby patients who have been discharged are routinely called to make sure their recovery is going well, as well as to intervene if there is an opportunity for service recovery. There are benefits to having ED clinicians make the follow-up calls themselves, but some health care organizations are also reaping benefits by having non-clinicians collect feedback on individual clinicians as well as specific facilities. In addition to potentially boosting quality and customer service, experts say callbacks are useful in curbing malpractice litigation. To avoid pushback among staff, consider beginning a program of patient callbacks by asking clinicians to call back just two patients per shift worked, and to share their experiences with colleagues. For maximum value, experts recommend that patient callbacks be made within one to four days of discharge.

  4. Simulated Patients vs. Standardized Patients in Objective Structured Clinical Examinations

    PubMed Central

    Austin, Zubin; Gregory, Paul; Tabak, Diana

    2006-01-01

    Objectives To describe the use of patient-actors as educators in a senior-level pharmacy practice course, and to contrast the value and application of “standardized patient” and “simulated patient” educational methodologies. Design The objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) of the licensing examination were utilized during and at the end of the course along with external assessment to determine the impact of this educational methodology. Interviews with a randomly selected cohort of 14 students were undertaken 3 years after graduation and licensure to evaluate long-term impact of this course. Assessment Overall, students responded positively to the shift from “standardized” patients to “simulated” patients, recognizing their value in teaching clinical and pharmaceutical care skills. Concerns were expressed regarding objectivity in assessment and individual grading. Over 98% of students successfully passed the OSCE component of the licensing examination. Long-term follow-up suggests students valued this approach to education and that it provided them with a foundation for better understanding of the psychosocial needs of patients in practice. Conclusions Simulated-patient educators can play an important role in the pharmacy curriculum, and can complement practitioner-educators in providing students with a real-world context for understanding complex patient care needs. PMID:17149448

  5. Immunoglobulin GM and KM Allotypes and Prevalence of Anti-LKM1 Autoantibodies in Patients with Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Muratori, Paolo; Sutherland, Susan E.; Muratori, Luigi; Granito, Alessandro; Guidi, Marcello; Pappas, Georges; Lenzi, Marco; Bianchi, Francesco B.; Pandey, Janardan P.

    2006-01-01

    GM and KM allotypes—genetic markers of immunoglobulin (Ig) γ and κ chains, respectively—are associated with humoral immunity to several infection- and autoimmunity-related epitopes. We hypothesized that GM and KM allotypes contribute to the generation of autoantibodies to liver/kidney microsomal antigen 1 (LKM1) in hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected persons. To test this hypothesis, we characterized 129 persons with persistent HCV infection for several GM and KM markers and for anti-LKM1 antibodies. The heterozygous GM 1,3,17 23 5,13,21 phenotype was significantly associated with the prevalence of anti-LKM1 antibodies (odds ratio, 5.13; P = 0.002), suggesting its involvement in this autoimmune phenomenon in HCV infection. PMID:16641304

  6. Antibodies to single glycolipids and glycolipid complexes in Guillain-Barré syndrome subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Shahrizaila, Nortina; Kokubun, Norito; Sawai, Setsu; Umapathi, Thirugnanam; Chan, Yee-Cheun; Kuwabara, Satoshi; Hirata, Koichi

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To comprehensively investigate the relationship between antibodies to single glycolipids and their complexes and Guillain-Barré syndrome subtypes and clinical features. Methods: In acute sera from 199 patients with Guillain-Barré syndrome, immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies to glycolipids and ganglioside complexes were tested using ELISA against individual antigens from single glycolipids including gangliosides (LM1, GM1, GM1b, GD1a, GalNAc-GD1a, GD1b, GT1a, GT1b, GQ1b) and a neutral glycolipid, asialo-GM1 (GA1), and antigens from the combination of 2 different glycolipids. Based on serial nerve conduction studies, the electrodiagnoses were as follows: 69 demyelinating subtype, 85 axonal subtypes, and 45 unclassified. Results: Significant associations were detected between acute motor axonal neuropathy subtype and IgG antibodies to GM1, GalNAc-GD1a, GA1, or LM1/GA1 complex. Reversible conduction failure was significantly associated with IgG antibodies to GM1, GalNAc-GD1a, GD1b, or complex of LM1/GA1. No significant association was demonstrated between acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy and any of the glycolipids or ganglioside complexes. Anti-ganglioside complex antibodies alone were detected in 7 patients (5 axonal subtype). Conclusions: The current study demonstrates that antibodies to single glycolipids and ganglioside complexes are associated with acute motor axonal neuropathy or acute motor conduction block neuropathy but not acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class II evidence that antibodies to glycolipids are increased in patients with acute motor axonal neuropathy and acute motor conduction block neuropathy but not acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy. PMID:24920848

  7. Interaction of Fibroblast Growth Factor-2 (FGF-2) with Free Gangliosides: Biochemical Characterization and Biological Consequences in Endothelial Cell Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Rusnati, Marco; Tanghetti, Elena; Urbinati, Chiara; Tulipano, Giovanni; Marchesini, Sergio; Ziche, Marina; Presta, Marco

    1999-01-01

    while asialo-GM1, neuraminic acid, N-acetylneuramin-lactose, galactosyl-ceramide, and sulfatide were ineffective. In conclusion, the data demonstrate the capacity of exogenous gangliosides to interact with FGF-2. This interaction involves the COOH terminus of the FGF-2 molecule and depends on the structure of the oligosaccharide chain and on the presence of sialic acid residue(s) in the ganglioside molecule. Exogenous gangliosides act as FGF-2 antagonists when added to endothelial cell cultures. Since gangliosides are extensively shed by tumor cells and reach elevated levels in the serum of tumor-bearing patients, our data suggest that exogenous gangliosides may affect endothelial cell function by a direct interaction with FGF-2, thus modulating tumor neovascularization. PMID:9950679

  8. Implant rehabilitation in bruxism patient

    PubMed Central

    Goiato, Marcelo Coelho; Sonego, Mariana Vilela; dos Santos, Daniela Micheline; da Silva, Emily Vivianne Freitas

    2014-01-01

    A white female patient presented to the university clinic to obtain implant retained prostheses. She had an edentulous maxillary jaw and presented three teeth with poor prognosis (33, 34 and 43). The alveolar bone and the surrounding tissues were healthy. The patient did not report any relevant medical history contraindicating routine dental treatment or implant surgery, but self-reported a dental history of asymptomatic nocturnal bruxism. The treatment plan was set and two Branemark protocols supported by six implants in each arch were installed after a 6-month healing period. A soft occlusal splint was made due to the patient's history of bruxism, and the lack of its use by the patient resulted in an acrylic fracture. The prosthesis was repaired and the importance of using the occlusal splint was restated. In the 4-year follow-up no fractures were reported. PMID:24907215

  9. Transfusion medicine in trauma patients

    PubMed Central

    Murthi, Sarah B; Dutton, Richard P; Edelman, Bennett B; Scalea, Thomas M; Hess, John R

    2011-01-01

    Injured patients stress the transfusion service with frequent demands for uncrossmatched red cells and plasma, occasional requirements for large amounts of blood products and the need for new and better blood products. Transfusion services stress trauma centers with demands for strict accountability for individual blood component units and adherence to indications in a clinical field where research has been difficult, and guidance opinion-based. New data suggest that the most severely injured patients arrive at the trauma center already coagulopathic and that these patients benefit from prompt, specific, corrective treatment. This research is clarifying trauma system requirements for new blood products and blood-product usage patterns, but the inability to obtain informed consent from severely injured patients remains an obstacle to further research. PMID:21083009

  10. Connecting Patients With Specialty Products

    PubMed Central

    MCCAIN, JACK

    2012-01-01

    Previously, this series described distribution channels through which specialty drugs move to patients. This installment discusses changes and challenges that lie ahead, especially at the dispensing end. PMID:23091429

  11. The patient with daily headaches.

    PubMed

    Maizels, Morris

    2004-12-15

    The term "chronic daily headache" (CDH) describes a variety of headache types, of which chronic migraine is the most common. Daily headaches often are disabling and may be challenging to diagnose and treat. Medication overuse, or drug rebound headache, is the most treatable cause of refractory daily headache. A pathologic underlying cause should be considered in patients with recent-onset daily headache, a change from a previous headache pattern, or associated neurologic or systemic symptoms. Treatment of CDH focuses on reduction of headache triggers and use of preventive medication, most commonly anti-depressants, antiepileptic drugs, and beta blockers. Medication overuse must be treated with discontinuation of symptomatic medicines, a transitional therapy, and long-term prophylaxis. Anxiety and depression are common in patients with CDH and should be identified and treated. Although the condition is challenging, appropriate treatment of patients with CDH can bring about significant improvement in the patient's quality-of-life.

  12. Implant rehabilitation in bruxism patient.

    PubMed

    Goiato, Marcelo Coelho; Sonego, Mariana Vilela; dos Santos, Daniela Micheline; da Silva, Emily Vivianne Freitas

    2014-06-06

    A white female patient presented to the university clinic to obtain implant retained prostheses. She had an edentulous maxillary jaw and presented three teeth with poor prognosis (33, 34 and 43). The alveolar bone and the surrounding tissues were healthy. The patient did not report any relevant medical history contraindicating routine dental treatment or implant surgery, but self-reported a dental history of asymptomatic nocturnal bruxism. The treatment plan was set and two Branemark protocols supported by six implants in each arch were installed after a 6-month healing period. A soft occlusal splint was made due to the patient's history of bruxism, and the lack of its use by the patient resulted in an acrylic fracture. The prosthesis was repaired and the importance of using the occlusal splint was restated. In the 4-year follow-up no fractures were reported.

  13. Should Immunocompromised Patients Have Pets?

    PubMed Central

    Steele, Russell W.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the risks and benefits of pet ownership by immunodeficient patients, focusing primarily on organisms that colonize animals and are transmitted to humans. Those diseases that are known to be progressive or more severe in patients with altered immune function are emphasized. Methods: A review of the medical and veterinary literature pertaining to zoonoses transmitted by domestic animals was completed. Information pertaining to issues involving immunosuppressed patients including AIDS was carefully evaluated and summarized for inclusion. Results: There are significant clinical and psychosocial benefits to pet ownership. However, numerous diseases can be acquired from these animals which may be more severe in immunocompromised individuals. Conclusion: Simple guidelines for pet ownership by immunosuppressed patients can be implemented to reduce their risk of disease and allow them to safely interchange with their pets. PMID:21603465

  14. Vaccines for Patients with COPD.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Dolores; Barroso, Judith; Garcia, Alexis

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a lung disease characterized by chronic obstruction of lung airflow limitation. This disease is currently the fourth higher cause of death in the world, and it is predicted to be the third by the year 2020. Patients with COPD are frequently exposed to Human Rhinovirus, Respiratory Syncytial and Influenza Virus, as well as to Haemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Moraxella catarrhalis. These infectious agents are responsible for exacerbations increasing morbidity and mortality in COPD patients. Prevention of infectious exacerbations by vaccination would improve quality of life and patient survival. A literature search: "vaccination of COPD patients" was performed using Medline, the Cochrane Library and other Non-Indexed Citations for this review. This article presents a brief overview of the different studies found, on the new patents, and the future strategies on the field.

  15. Fluconazole Pharmacokinetics in Burn Patients

    PubMed Central

    Boucher, Bradley A.; King, Stephen R.; Wandschneider, Heidi L.; Hickerson, William L.; Hanes, Scott D.; Herring, Vanessa L.; Canada, Todd W.; Hess, Mary M.

    1998-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of fluconazole in nine adult patients with severe (30 to 95% total body surface area) burns were studied. There was no significant difference in half-life (t1/2), clearance (CL), or volume of distribution (V) over time in five patients on days 3 and 8 of the study (P > 0.05). Combined parameter estimates (means ± standard deviations) for all nine patients for the two study periods were as follows: t1/2, 24.4 ± 5.8 h; CL, 0.36 ± 0.09 ml/min/kg; and V, 0.72 ± 0.12 liters/kg. These estimates of t1/2 and CL in burn patients were approximately 13% shorter and 30% more rapid, respectively, than the most extreme estimates reported for other populations. PMID:9559811

  16. [Food habits among HIV patients].

    PubMed

    Parrilla Saldaña, Josefa; Muñoz Sánchez, Isabel; Peñalver Jiménez, Carmen; Castro Rodríguez, Encarnación; Quero Haro, Antonia; Largo García, Esperanza

    2003-01-01

    The authors analyze the eating habits of a group of 108 patients suffering from HIV. The authors elaborate a chart about the composition and distribution of foods which contains all the required food groups necessary for a complete diet. This food chart lists the variable of this study as well as the frequency of their consummation. Once this chart was drawn up, it was approved by the Nutrition and Dietetic Unit at the Virgen de Valma University Hospital. Among the results obtained, there is a relationship between the necessity these patients have regarding eating a complete diet and diverse nutrients that are easy to chew as well as an abundance of liquids. The article "Nutrition for Patients suffering from HIV" written by the same authors published in the Revista ROL de Enfermera 2002; 25(12):816-820, is recommended in order to have a more complete understanding of this topic, nutrition for patients suffering from HIV.

  17. Cockroach hypersensitivity in asthmatic patients.

    PubMed

    Pola, J; Valdivieso, R; Zapata, C; Moneo, I; Duce, F; Larrad, L; Losada, E

    1988-01-01

    Hypersensitivity to cockroach antigen has been recognized as an important cause of perennial allergic rhinitis and asthma. To assess the frequency of cockroach hypersensitivity in our country, 150 asthmatic atopic subjects were studied using skin testing and in vitro assays for cockroach-specific IgE antibodies (Oriental and German cockroaches). Twenty-two of 61 patients who had a positive history of cockroach exposure had positive skin tests, and only 3 of 89 patients who had no history of exposure had positive skin reactions. Of 25 patients with positive skin tests, 23 showed specific IgE antibodies against oriental and German cockroaches using RAST and EIA techniques. In summary, approximately 15% of asthmatic atopics in Madrid area are sensitive to cockroaches (positive skin test + specific IgE antibodies). These results indicate that cockroach hypersensitivity should be considered in every patient with perennial asthma.

  18. Bathing a patient in bed

    MedlinePlus

    You will need: Large bowl of warm water Soap (regular or non-rinse soap) Two washcloths or sponges Dry towel Lotion Shaving ... skin, then gently apply a small amount of soap. Check with the patient to make sure you ...

  19. CCCT - Patient Advocate Steering Committee

    Cancer.gov

    The Patient Advocate Steering Committee (PASC) works to ensure advocates involved with the Scientific Steering Committees (SSCs) are completely integrated in the development, implementation, and monitoring of clinical trials within those groups.

  20. Dealing with the difficult patient.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, S.

    1995-01-01

    Dealing with difficult patients can represent a significant burden in the life of doctors. It is more productive, however, to view this burden as a product of the interaction between doctor and patient, for which both have a responsibility, rather than attributing any problems encountered to shortcomings of the patient alone. There is a significant risk in such situations of potentially harmful over-medicalisation. It behoves doctors, therefore, to try to prevent such problems becoming established, or make some attempt to rectify matters if they have already become so. Much is known about the factors that contribute to successful and unsuccessful clinical transactions. The awareness of what doctors bring both as professionals and as individual people to this interaction, will count as much as the practical clinical efforts made towards helping patients. PMID:7494768

  1. Helping Patients To Quit Smoking

    PubMed Central

    Bass, Frederic

    1989-01-01

    Years ago, the tobacco leaf offered its users many social and ceremonial benefits. But today, throughout the world, the manufactured cigarette wreaks biological havoc. Clinically, physicians can make a small, but significant, contribution to their patients' stopping smoking. Family physicians who want to offer systematic aid to their smoking patients should assess the amount of time and energy they are willing to invest in patients' smoking and the probable rewards of such efforts. Behavioural change comprises four stages: a pre-motivational phase, a motivational phase, a behavioural-change phase, and a maintenance phase. Anyone who has ever smoked belongs to one of these phases and should be treated accordingly. Paradoxically, the physician should support consonant smoking (the patient freely choosing to smoke) except when the smoker is actively engaged in changing behaviour. PMID:21248907

  2. 'The patient is medically cleared'.

    PubMed

    Beale, Chloe; Turner, Trevor

    2013-09-01

    It is standard practice for psychiatric nurses and junior doctors working in emergency departments to ask that patients be 'medically cleared' before psychiatric admission or even assessment. However, there is a lack of agreement over what this process should entail.

  3. Corneal temperature in schizophrenia patients.

    PubMed

    Shiloh, Roni; Munitz, Hanan; Portuguese, Shirley; Gross-Isseroff, Ruth; Sigler, Mayanit; Bodinger, Liron; Katz, Nachum; Stryjer, Rafael; Hermesh, Haggai; Weizman, Abraham

    2005-12-01

    Most data imply that dopaminergic transmission is essential for proper hypothalamic-mediated core temperature regulation. Altered central dopaminergic transmission is suggested to be involved in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Thus, hypothetically, schizophrenia patients might be at increased risk of developing thermoregulatory dysregulation manifested by alterations in core temperature, as well as in peripheral tissue, the temperature of which has been shown to correlate with core temperature (e.g. cornea). Previous small pilot studies of ours showed that schizophrenia patients may exhibit corneal temperature abnormalities. Hence, we assessed corneal temperature in a controlled sample of drug-free ( n =11) and medicated ( n =28) schizophrenia patients compared to healthy comparison subjects ( n =9), using a FLIR thermal imaging camera. Drug-free schizophrenia patients exhibited significantly higher corneal temperature compared to healthy subjects, typical antipsychotic drug (APD)-treated patients ( n =16) and atypical APD-treated patients ( n =12) (37.08+/-1.46 degrees C vs. 33.37+/-2.51 degrees C, 31.08+/-1.43 degrees C and 31.67+/-0.44 degrees C respectively, p <0.0001; p <0.001 vs. each group separately). The healthy comparison subjects and the atypical APD-treated patients exhibited comparable corneal temperatures and these two groups exhibited higher corneal temperatures compared to the typical APD-treated patients ( p <0.01 and p =0.051 respectively). In conclusion, this study indicates that drug-free schizophrenia patients exhibit substantially higher corneal temperature compared to healthy comparison subjects or medicated patients, and that APDs may decrease corneal temperature either to normal (atypical APD) or to subnormal (typical APD) values. The relevance of these phenomena to the pathophysiology of schizophrenia, the biological mechanism underlying drug-induced corneal temperature alterations, the possible role of temperature-lowering drugs

  4. [Ocular changes in dialysis patients].

    PubMed

    Popa, M; Nicoară, S

    2000-01-01

    The study analyzes the ocular aspects in patients receiving hemodialysis, in order to define the importance of the ophthalmological exam as prognosis and follow-up parameter. The prospective study includes 84 patients with renal insufficiency who received hemodialysis between 1994-1998. The ocular aspects and their connection with the dialysis and the basic disease are described and analyzed. The most important were the retinal vascular complications: hypertensive retinopathy, anterior optic ischaemic neuropathy, central retinal artery occlusion, diabetic retinopathy.

  5. Seeing Patients Through Genetic Lenses

    PubMed Central

    FELCONE, LINDA HULL

    2005-01-01

    Biotechnology is changing how doctors ‘see’ patients and disease processes. Optical probes and computer-assisted genetic screening tools let researchers peer into the structure and functions of cellular proteins on a molecular level. Soon, this clearer vision of individual patients will be available in the clinic, making drug and biologic treatments safer. These new lenses will push medicine toward risk prediction and away from acute intervention. PMID:23393472

  6. Nutritional Considerations for Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Angela

    1985-01-01

    Although weight loss is a frequent, though not invariable, component of the cancer syndrome, the associated malnutrition is a poor prognostic sign among both children and adults. This article describes the possible mechanisms of cancer cachexia; reviews the present state of nutritional support in cancer patients; identifies nutritional problems and workable approaches during the pre- and post-treatment periods; discusses the unconventional nutritional practices commonly encountered and lists resource materials for patients and families. PMID:21274086

  7. Dental management of anticoagulated patients.

    PubMed

    Carr, M M; Mason, R B

    1992-10-01

    Today's trend toward ambulatory medical care will bring more pharmacological problems into the dental office. While the dental management of patients taking oral anticoagulants is controversial, current research supports the contention that they can be safely treated on an outpatient basis. The use of the International Normalized Ratio (INR) has made better estimates of prothrombin time possible, and patients can be maintained in a narrow therapeutic range. Postoperative hemorrhage can be avoided or controlled with local hemostatic agents.

  8. Intragastric Balloon for Overweight Patients

    PubMed Central

    Martins Fernandes, Flavio Augusto; Lima, Diego L.; Rao, Prashanth; Shadduck, Phillip P.; Montandon, Isabelle D.; de Souza Barros, Juscielle; Rodrigues, Ingrid Lais Vieira

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Current treatments for overweight adults include reduced-calorie diet, exercise, behavior modification, and selective use of medications. Many achieve suboptimal results with these measures and progress to obesity. Whether the intragastric balloon (IGB), a reversible device approved for treatment of obesity, is a safe and effective option in overweight adults is less well studied. We conducted a study to prospectively analyze the safety and effectiveness of IGB in overweight adults, to compare the results to a simultaneously studied cohort of obese patients, and to share procedural tips for safe IGB placement and removal. Methods: One hundred thirty-nine patients were evaluated in this prospective, nonrandomized study. Twenty-six overweight [body mass index (BMI), 26–30)] and 113 obese (BMI > 30) patients underwent outpatient, endoscopic IGB placement under intravenous sedation. The IGB was filled with a 550–900 mL (average, 640 mL) solution of saline, radiological contrast, and methylene blue, with an approximate final proportion of 65:2:1. The patients were followed up at 1–2 weeks and then monthly for 6 months. At 6 months, they underwent IGB removal via an esophageal overtube to optimize safety, and then they were observed for 6 more months. Results: IGB time was 190 ± 36 d in the overweight patients and 192 ± 43 d in the obese patients. Symptoms of IGB intolerance included nausea and pain, which were transiently present in 50–95% of patients for several days, and necessitated early IGB removal in 6% of patients. There were no procedure-related complications and no IGB-related esophagitis, erosion, perforation, or obstruction. The percentage of excess weight loss (EWL%) was 96 ± 54% in the overweight group and 41 ± 26% in the obese group (P < 0.001). Conclusion: In overweight adults failing standard treatments, IGB placement for 6 months had an acceptable safety profile and excellent weight loss. PMID:26955259

  9. [Orthodontic treatment in periodontal patients].

    PubMed

    Krausz, E; Einy, S; Aizenbud, D; Levin, L

    2011-07-01

    Orthodontic treatment poses a significant challenge in patients suffering from periodontal disease. Providing orthodontic treatment to periodontal patients should be carefully planned and performed in a tight collaboration between the orthodontist and periodontist. Resolution and stabilization of the periodontal condition is a pre-requisite for orthodontic treatment initiation. Careful oral hygiene performance and highly frequent recall periodontal visits are also crucial. Pre- or post- orthodontic periodontal surgery might help providing better treatment outcomes.

  10. Depression and the Suicidal Patient.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Dick C; Tran, Mina; Shah, Asim A; Matorin, Anu

    2015-11-01

    Depression is the most common psychiatric illness in the general community, with 3% to 4% of depressives dying by suicide today. Studies have shown that depression has considerable morbidity and mortality. This article focuses on depressed patients and their management within the emergency department. Understanding the intricacies of the interview process and identifying which patients need immediate attention are important skills for the emergency physician.

  11. [Risk management and patient safety].

    PubMed

    Lessing, C

    2009-06-01

    Risk management and patient safety are of indisputable importance for the quality of health care. At the same time they confront all professional groups in the health system with high demands. The Action Alliance for Patient Safety inc. wants to demonstrate ways in which measures for avoiding errors and improving safety can reach the healthcare practice. Interdisciplinary cooperation and the availability of mutually developed materials are the maxims of the work of the society.

  12. Paradoxical emboli in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Vella, M; McNabb, R; Lewis, R; Sulke, N; Poston, R; Lugon, M

    1992-01-01

    We report two elderly patients who each had a patent foramen ovale (PFO) and were considered to have had paradoxical emboli. In one patient the PFO was detected by contrast two-dimensional echocardiography, whereas in the other it was demonstrated at post-mortem examination. This is an unusual but treatable condition, particularly difficult to diagnose in older people and probably occurring more frequently than is generally suspected.

  13. Information technologies and patient safety.

    PubMed

    Ellner, Scott J; Joyner, Paul W

    2012-02-01

    Advances in health information technology provide significant opportunities for improvements in surgical patient safety. The adoption and use of electronic health records can enhance communication along the surgical spectrum of care. Bar coding and radiofrequency identification technology are strategies to prevent retained surgical sponges and for tracking the operating room supply chain. Computerized intraoperative monitoring systems can improve the performance of the operating room team. Automated data registries collect patient information to be analyzed and used for surgical quality improvement.

  14. Patient Simulators Train Emergency Caregivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2014-01-01

    Johnson Space Center teamed up with Sarasota, Florida-based METI (now CAE Healthcare) through the STTR program to ruggedize the company’s patient simulators for training astronauts in microgravity environments. The design modifications were implemented in future patient simulators that are now used to train first responders in the US military as well as fire departments and other agencies that work in disaster zones.

  15. Establishing an active patient partnership.

    PubMed

    Herrier, R N; Boyce, R W

    1995-04-01

    Pharmacists face many changes in the coming decade, some of which threaten their professional survival. Although uncertainty may currently prevail, one of these changes, the shift in the patient-health care professional relationship from the patient taking a passive role to an active partnering role, provides pharmacists with many opportunities to realize the vision of patient-centered care that has been advocated by pharmacy innovators and leaders for almost three decades. To take advantage of these changes, pharmacists must modify their practice paradigms and use their existing strengths, such as easy patient access and high levels of patient trust, to help develop a new model of pharmaceutical care. The concern that the magnitude of these changes will prevent successful practice transformations may be exaggerated. In reality, these proposed "new" roles have been in existence for much of this century. Most pharmacists can expand and enhance their traditional roles as self-care advisors and patient educators simply by incremental improvements in interpersonal and clinical skills. Rather than a Star Trek approach to "go where no man has gone before," the profession needs only a pharmaceutical sequel to Back to the Future.

  16. Toothbrush pressures of orthodontic patients.

    PubMed

    White, L

    1983-02-01

    The intention of this study was to determine whether toothbrushing pressures varied significantly between groups of orthodontic patients who were good toothbrushers and those who were poor toothbrushers. Seventy-two patients undergoing full-banded orthodontic treatment were selected from the author's practice and were subjectively paired by him according to their habitual oral hygiene. One group of thirty-six patients who habitually displayed poor oral hygiene was compared to a group of thirty-six patients who habitually displayed good oral hygiene. A specially designed strain gauge with a force-averaging feedback mechanism was attached to each patient's manual toothbrush, and the force with which that patient brushed was averaged and recorded in pounds. The poor brushers averaged 0.20 pound, whereas the average pressure of the good brushers was 0.89 pound. The statistical evidence indicates that the difference between the two groups is highly significant and is unlikely to be due to chance alone. This study has shown that toothbrush pressures can be easily and accurately measured. The attempt to objectify a single characteristic of toothbrushing behavior in an orthodontic population is an effort to avoid the medical model explanation of behavior vis-a-vis the nonspecific and subjective word attitude. Future studies will determine whether poor toothbrushers can be changed into good toothbrushers through the progressive acquisition of greater toothbrushing forces.

  17. Cancer patient satisfaction with care.

    PubMed

    Wiggers, J H; Donovan, K O; Redman, S; Sanson-Fisher, R W

    1990-08-01

    A diagnosis of cancer places considerable stress on patients and requires them to make major adjustments in many areas of their lives. As a consequence, considerable demands are placed on health care providers to satisfy the complex care needs of cancer patients. Currently, there is little available information to indicate the extent to which cancer patients are satisfied with the quality of care they receive. The present study assessed the perceptions of 232 ambulatory cancer patients about the importance of and satisfaction with the following aspects of care: doctors technical competence and interpersonal and communication skills, accessibility and continuity of care, hospital and clinic care, nonmedical care, family care, and finances. The results indicate that all 60 questionnaire items used were considered to reflect important aspects of care, but that greater importance was given to the technical quality of medical care, the interpersonal and communication skills of doctors, and the accessibility of care. Most patients were satisfied with the opportunities provided to discuss their needs with doctors, the interpersonal support of doctors, and the technical competence of doctors. However, few patients were satisfied with the provision of information concerning their disease, treatment, and symptom control and the provision of care in the home and to family and friends.

  18. [Orthodontics for mentally handicapped patients].

    PubMed

    Remmelink, H J

    2006-12-01

    The mentally handicapped exhibit a 3 times higher incidence of malocclusions and related functional problems than the general population. In contrast there is little available literature relating to the orthodontic treatment of handicapped patients. Based on published articles on orthodontic treatment of disabled patients the following recommendations can be given. First of all for each patient a 'problem list' should be drawn up, based on the diagnosis. In this list the orthodontic problems are formulated. Additionally, the list makes clear who is responsible for providing services related to orthodontic care, such as oral hygiene and transportation of the patient to the orthodontist. When deciding whether or not orthodontic treatment should be administered to a patient with a mental handicap the same functional and aesthetic considerations as with any other orthodontic case must be taken into account. Furthermore, the severity of the handicap and possible associated psychosocial and medical limitations as well as the extent to which it will be possible to treat the patient have to be considered. Contraindications are a severe mental handicap, inability to remain still in the dental chair, insufficient co-operation of parents/carers, open bite resulting from abnormal oral function, and a mild malocclusion. The orthodontic treatment should aim for an acceptable result, and not for orthodontic perfection.

  19. [Fertility in testicular cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Shin, Takeshi; Miyata, Akane; Arai, Gaku; Okada, Hiroshi

    2015-03-01

    Testicular cancer(TC)is the most common and curable cancer affecting men of reproductive age. Successful treatment approaches have resulted in longer life expectancy in TC survivors. The most frequently used treatment for TC is a combination of inguinal orchiectomy, and either radiotherapy or cisplatin-based chemotherapy. In many TC patients, sperm quality is already abnormal and there may even be a lack of viable spermatozoa at the time of diagnosis. Therefore, the effect of cancer treatment on fertility is a potentially significant issue. Fertility preservation in these men has become essential and needs to be discussed prior to the start of cancer treatment. The only currently established fertility preservation method is the cryopreservation of sperm before therapy. For most patients seeking cryopreservation, the semen sample is collected via masturbation. If the patient is unable to ejaculate for any reason, other techniques such as vibratory stimulation and electroejaculation can be performed. In azoospermic or severely oligozoospermic patients, testicular sperm extraction at the time of the inguinal orchiectomy is a useful technique for obtaining spermatozoa before cytotoxic therapy. We herein present an overview of the current topics on fertility in TC patients, including the effects of surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy. We also describe the strategy for fertility preservation in these patients.

  20. The Zest for Patient Empowerment

    PubMed Central

    Thawani, Vijay

    2016-01-01

    Patient Empowerment (PE) can be considered as an active and self-determining role of patient than a passive recipient of health related services. It encourages the provider–patient relationship to blossom and helps in clearing patients’ doubts, confusion and fears to bring in clarity, relief and assurance. For the active involvement of the patient’s in own health management they need to be awakened, motivated, educated and enlightened to enable them to exercise their rights. Active patient involvement in the decision-making achieves favourable health outcome. In an empowerment based approach, the focus is not on defining a particular type of behaviour, but on how the behaviour is defined as a goal to be achieved by a particular individual. As a result of their empowerment process, the patients can better self-manage their illness and their lives. Thus empowerment of the patients will positively help medical uprising of the community by creating an educated, health aware, informed and health conscious mass. PMID:27504307

  1. Peripapillary Retinoschisis in Glaucoma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bayraktar, Serife; Cebeci, Zafer; Kabaalioglu, Melis; Ciloglu, Serife; Kir, Nur; Izgi, Belgin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate peripapillary retinoschisis and its effect on retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness measurements by using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) in glaucomatous eyes. Methods. Circumpapillary RNFL (cpRNFL) B-scan images of 940 glaucoma patients (Group 1) and 801 glaucoma-suspect patients (Group 2) obtained by SD-OCT were reviewed. The structural and clinical characteristics of the retinoschisis were investigated. The RNFL thickness measurements taken at the time of retinoschisis diagnosis and at the follow-up visits were also compared. Results. Twenty-nine retinoschisis areas were found in 26 of the 940 glaucoma patients (3.1%) in Group 1 and seven areas were found in 801 patients (0.87%) in Group 2. In glaucomatous eyes, the retinoschisis was attached to the optic disc and overlapped with the RNFL defect. At the time of retinoschisis, the RNFL thickness was statistically greater in the inferior temporal quadrant when compared with the follow-up scans (p < 0.001). No macular involvement or retinal detachment was observed. Conclusion. The present study investigated 33 peripapillary retinoschisis patients. Increase in RNFL thickness measurements was observed at the time of retinoschisis. It is important to examine the cpRNFL B-scan images of glaucoma patients so that the RNFL thickness is not overestimated. PMID:27069674

  2. Hypothermia and the trauma patient

    PubMed Central

    Kirkpatrick, Andrew W.; Chun, Rosaleen; Brown, Ross; Simons, Richard K.

    Hypothermia has profound effects on every system in the body, causing an overall slowing of enzymatic reactions and reduced metabolic requirements. Hypothermic, acutely injured patients with multisystem trauma have adverse outcomes when compared with normothermic control patients. Trauma patients are inherently predisposed to hypothermia from a variety of intrinsic and iatrogenic causes. Coagulation and cardiac sequelae are the most pertinent physiological concerns. Hypothermia and coagulopathy often mandate a simplified approach to complex surgical problems. A modification of traditional classification systems of hypothermia, applicable to trauma patients is suggested. There are few controlled investigations, but clinical opinion strongly supports the active prevention of hypothermia in the acutely traumatized patient. Preventive measures are simple and inexpensive, but the active reversal of hypothermia is much more complicated, often invasive and controversial. The ideal method of rewarming is unclear but must be individualized to the patient and is institution specific. An algorithm reflecting newer approaches to traumatic injury and technical advances in equipment and techniques is suggested. Conversely, hypothermia has selected clinical benefits when appropriately used in cases of trauma. Severe hypothermia has allowed remarkable survivals in the course of accidental circulatory arrest. The selective application of mild hypothermia in severe traumatic brain injury is an area with promise. Deliberate circulatory arrest with hypothermic cerebral protection has also been used for seemingly unrepairable injuries and is the focus of ongoing research. PMID:10526517

  3. ETHICAL MODELS OF PHYSICIAN--PATIENT RELATIONSHIP REVISITED WITH REGARD TO PATIENT AUTONOMY, VALUES AND PATIENT EDUCATION.

    PubMed

    Borza, Liana Rada; Gavrilovici, Cristina; Stockman, René

    2015-01-01

    The present paper revisits the ethical models of patient--physician relationship from the perspective of patient autonomy and values. It seems that the four traditional models of physician--patient relationship proposed by Emanuel & Emanuel in 1992 closely link patient values and patient autonomy. On the other hand, their reinterpretation provided by Agarwal & Murinson twenty years later emphasizes the independent expression of values and autonomy in individual patients. Additionally, patient education has been assumed to join patient values and patient autonomy. Moreover, several authors have noted that, over the past few decades, patient autonomy has gradually replaced the paternalistic approach based on the premise that the physician knows what is best for the patient. Neither the paternalistic model of physician-patient relationship, nor the informative model is considered to be satisfactory, as the paternalistic model excludes patient values from decision making, while the informative model excludes physician values from decision making. However, the deliberative model of patient-physician interaction represents an adequate alternative to the two unsatisfactory approaches by promoting shared decision making between the physician and the patient. It has also been suggested that the deliberative model would be ideal for exercising patient autonomy in chronic care and that the ethical role of patient education would be to make the deliberative model applicable to chronic care. In this regard, studies have indicated that the use of decision support interventions might increase the deliberative capacity of chronic patients.

  4. A Patient Safety Dilemma: Obesity in the Surgical Patient.

    PubMed

    Goode, Victoria; Phillips, Elayne; DeGuzman, Pamela; Hinton, Ivora; Rovnyak, Virginia; Scully, Kenneth; Merwin, Elizabeth

    2016-12-01

    Patient safety and the delivery of quality care are major concerns for healthcare in the United States. Special populations (eg, obese patients) need study in order to support patient safety, quantify risks, advance education for healthcare-workers, and establish healthcare policy. Obesity is a complex chronic disease and is considered the second leading cause of preventable death in the United States with approximately 300,000 deaths per year. Obesity is recognized by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) as a comorbid condition. These concerns emphasize the need to focus further research on the obese patient. Through the use of clinical and administrative data, this study examines the incidence of adverse outcomes in the obese surgical population through AHRQ Patient Safety Indicators (PSI) and allows for the engagement PSIs as measures to guide and improve performance. In this study, the surgical population was overwhelmingly positive for obesity. Body mass index (BMI) was also a significant positive predictor for 2 of 3 postoperative outcomes. This finding suggests that as BMI reaches the classification of obesity, the risk of these adverse outcomes increases. It further suggests there exists a threshold BMI that requires anticipation of alterations to systems and processes to revise outcomes.

  5. Supporting patient autonomy: the importance of clinician-patient relationships.

    PubMed

    Entwistle, Vikki A; Carter, Stacy M; Cribb, Alan; McCaffery, Kirsten

    2010-07-01

    Personal autonomy is widely valued. Recognition of its vulnerability in health care contexts led to the inclusion of respect for autonomy as a key concern in biomedical ethics. The principle of respect for autonomy is usually associated with allowing or enabling patients to make their own decisions about which health care interventions they will or will not receive. In this paper, we suggest that a strong focus on decision situations is problematic, especially when combined with a tendency to stress the importance of patients' independence in choosing. It distracts attention from other important aspects of and challenges to autonomy in health care. Relational understandings of autonomy attempt to explain both the positive and negative implications of social relationships for individuals' autonomy. They suggest that many health care practices can affect autonomy by virtue of their effects not only on patients' treatment preferences and choices, but also on their self-identities, self-evaluations and capabilities for autonomy. Relational understandings de-emphasise independence and facilitate well-nuanced distinctions between forms of clinical communication that support and that undermine patients' autonomy. These understandings support recognition of the value of good patient-professional relationships and can enrich the specification of the principle of respect for autonomy.

  6. [Nutritional support in stroke patients].

    PubMed

    Burgos Peláez, Rosa; Segurola Gurrutxaga, Hegoi; Bretón Lesmes, Irene

    2014-01-01

    Stroke is a public health problem of the first order. In developed countries is one of the leading causes of death, along with cardiovascular disease and cancer. In addition, stroke is the leading cause of permanent disability in adulthood. Many of the patients who survive do so with significant sequelae that limit them in their activities of daily living. Most strokes (80-85%) are due to ischemia, while the rest are hemorrhagic. We have identified many modifiable risk factors, some with an important relationship with dietary factors or comorbidities in wich the diet has a significant impact. The incidence of malnutrition in stroke patients is not well known, but most likely impacts on patient prognosis. Furthermore, the nutritional status of patients admitted for stroke often deteriorates during hospitalization. It is necessary to perform a nutritional assessment of the patient in the early hours of admission, to determine both the nutritional status and the presence of dysphagia. Dysphagia, through alteration of the safety and efficacy of swallowing, is a complication that has an implication for nutritional support, and must be treated to prevent aspiration pneumonia, which is the leading cause of mortality in the stroke patient. Nutritional support should begin in the early hours. In patients with no or mild dysphagia that can be controlled by modifying the texture of the diet, they will start oral diet and oral nutritional supplementation will be used if the patient does not meet their nutritional requirements. There is no evidence to support the use of nutritional supplements routinely. Patients with severe dysphagia, or decreased level of consciousness will require enteral nutrition. Current evidence indicates that early nutrition should be initiated through a nasogastric tube, with any advantages of early feeding gastrostomy. Gastrostomy will be planned when the enteral nutrition support will be expected for long-term (4 weeks). Much evidence points to the

  7. Antimicrobial Dose in Obese Patient

    PubMed Central

    Kassab, Sawsan; Syed Sulaiman, Syed Azhar; Abdul Aziz, Noorizan

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Obesity is a chronic disease that has become one of major public health issue in Malaysia because of its association with other disease states including cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Despite continuous efforts to educate the public about the health risks associated with obesity, prevalence of the disease continues to increase. Dosing of many medications are based on weight, limited data are available on how antimicrobial agents should be dosed in obesity. The aim of this case presentation is to discuss dose of antibiotic in obese patient. Case report: Patient: GMN, Malay, Female, 45 year old, 150kg, transferred from medical ward to ICU with problems of fever, orthopnea, sepsis secondary to nosocomial pneumonia. She was admitted to hospital a week ago for SOB on exertion, cyanosis, mildly dyspneic, somasthenia, bilateral ankle swelling. There was no fever, cough, chest pain, clubbing, flapping tremor. Her grand father has pre-morbid history of obesity, HPT, DM and asthma. She was non alcoholic, smoker, and not on diet control. The diagnosis Pickwickian syndrome was made. Patient was treated with IV Dopamine 11mcg/kg/min, IV Morphine 4mg/h. IV GTN 15mcg/min, IV Ca gluconate 10g/24h for 3/7, IV Zantac 50mg tds, IV Augmentin 1.2g tds, IV Lasix 40mg od, IV Plasil 10mg tds, S.c heparin 5000IU bd. patient become stable and moved to medical ward to continue her treatment. Discussion: The altered physiologic function seen in obese patients is a concern in patients receiving antimicrobial agents because therapeutic outcomes depend on achieving a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). The therapeutic effect of any drug can be altered when any of the 4 pharmacokinetic processes (absorption, distribution, metabolism, or elimination) are altered. Decreased blood flow rates and increased renal clearance in obese patients can affect drug distribution and elimination. Changes in serum protein levels can change the metabolism and distribution of drugs that are

  8. Mycoses in the transplanted patient.

    PubMed

    Dictar, M O; Maiolo, E; Alexander, B; Jacob, N; Verón, M T

    2000-01-01

    The incidence of invasive fungal infection (IFI) has increased considerably over the past 20 years, and transplant recipients are at especially high risk for fungal infections owing to their overall immunosuppressed condition. Organ transplantation procedures were incorporated as a therapeutic option for many patients who lacked the normal functions of organs such as the heart, liver, kidney, lung, pancreas and small bowel. The prevalence of IFI in solid organ transplant (SOTR) patients ranges from 5 to 50% in kidney and liver transplants, respectively. In bone marrow transplant (BMT) patients, IFI are major causes of morbidity and mortality due to the protracted neutropenic period and graft-versus-host disease. Candida spp. and Aspergillus spp. account for >80% of fungal episodes in both SOTR and BMT. The development of new immunosuppressive agents, new prophylaxis strategies (as pre-emptive therapy) and the improvement in surgical techniques led to increase survival of transplant recipients. In this session, a clear and concise update of the recent advances in the laboratory diagnosis of candidiasis and aspergillosis in this kind of patients was presented. However, we still need to establish more rapid, sensitive and specific methods for IFI diagnosis. Representatives of the 'Subcomision de Infecciones en el Paciente Neutropenico y Transplantado (SIPNYT)' de la Sociedad Argentina de Infectologia (SADI), presented the results of an unusual multicenter study both retrospective and descriptive studies of IFI in SOTR and BMT patients in Argentina. In addition, a study of IFI in 1,861 SOTR patients from four centers and the analysis of IFI in 2,066 BMT patients from all 12 BMT centers from Argentina was presented. From these studies it can be concluded that 'all transplant recipients are not the same' and that they should be stratified according to their different risk degrees in order to determine the best prophylaxis and treatment strategies.

  9. Managing diabetes in dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    O'Toole, Sam M; Fan, Stanley L; Yaqoob, M Magdi; Chowdhury, Tahseen A

    2012-03-01

    Burgeoning levels of diabetes are a major concern for dialysis services, as diabetes is now the most common cause of end-stage renal disease in most developed nations. With the rapid rise in diabetes prevalence in developing countries, the burden of end stage renal failure due to diabetes is also expected to rise in such countries. Diabetic patients on dialysis have a high burden of morbidity and mortality, particularly from cardiovascular disease, and a higher societal and economic cost compared to non-diabetic subjects on dialysis. Tight glycaemic and blood pressure control in diabetic patients has an important impact in reducing risk of progression to end stage renal disease. The evidence for improving glycaemic control in patients on dialysis having an impact on mortality or morbidity is sparse. Indeed, many factors make improving glycaemic control in patients on dialysis very challenging, including therapeutic difficulties with hypoglycaemic agents, monitoring difficulties, dialysis strategies that exacerbate hyperglycaemia or hypoglycaemia, and possibly a degree of therapeutic nihilism or inertia on the part of clinical diabetologists and nephrologists. Standard drug therapy for hyperglycaemia (eg, metformin) is clearly not possible in patients on dialysis. Thus, sulphonylureas and insulin have been the mainstay of treatment. Newer therapies for hyperglycaemia, such as gliptins and glucagon-like peptide-1 analogues have become available, but until recently, renal failure has precluded their use. Newer gliptins, however, are now licensed for use in 'severe renal failure', although they have yet to be trialled in dialysis patients. Diabetic patients on dialysis have special needs, as they have a much greater burden of complications (cardiac, retinal and foot). They may be best managed in a multidisciplinary diabetic-renal clinic setting, using the skills of diabetologists, nephrologists, clinical nurse specialists in nephrology and diabetes, along with

  10. Patient Informatics: Technology in the Service of Patient Care

    PubMed Central

    Brennan, Patricia Flatley

    1990-01-01

    Care of the patient at home challenges the health care system with both the quantity and diversity of services required. Informatics technologies may provide mechanisms to relieve the burden of traditional services while meeting the unique needs of home-based patients in a timely and effective manner. Capitalizing on an existing, free, public-access computer network we developed the COMPUTERLINK, a set of utilities designed to provide home-care support to persons living with AIDS/ARC (PLWA) in the community. The pilot study presented here we demonstrate the feasibility of using home-based computer networks to provide information, communication and decision assistance to PLWA. The success experienced with this particular group provides sufficient encouragement to extend this intervention to other groups of community-based patients.

  11. [Tracheotomy in brain injured patients: which patients? Why? When? How?].

    PubMed

    Richard, I; Hamon, M-A; Ferrapie, A-L; Rome, J; Brunel, P; Mathé, J-F

    2005-06-01

    The aim of this study is to determine, from the data available in the literature, the indications of tracheostomy in brain injured patients, the incidence and risk factors for complications and the follow-up required until decannulation. The incidence of tracheostomy is 10% in TBI and 50 to 70% in subpopulations with a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) below 9. Early complications are not specific. The most frequent late complication is laryngotracheal stenosis, which occurs in 15% and is more frequently observed in the most severe patients with major hypertonia. It is likely that tracheostomy, if needed, should be performed early and the prognosis as to whether it will be required, can be made at the end of the first week. The follow-up of these patients includes surveillance of multiresistant colonisations and systematic performance of fibroscopy before decannulation. Cuffless, small diameters, soft tracheostomy tubes, are preferred on the long-term unless the risk of aspiration remains high.

  12. Research without informed patient consent in incompetent patients.

    PubMed

    Dobb, G J

    2015-05-01

    Most patients needing intensive care cannot give informed consent to participation in research. This includes the most acutely and severely ill, with the highest mortality and morbidity where research has the greatest potential to improve patient outcomes. In these circumstances consent is usually sought from a substitute decision maker, but while survivors of intensive care believe substitute decision makers will look after their interests, evidence suggests substitute decision makers are poorly equipped for this task. Various models have been suggested for research without patient informed consent when intervention is urgent and cannot wait until first person consent is possible, including a waiver of consent if conditions are met. A nationally consistent model is proposed for Australia with a robust process for initial waiver of consent followed by first person consent to further research-related procedures or ongoing follow-up when this can be competently provided.

  13. Verbal hallucinations in psychotic patients.

    PubMed

    Ettinger, B; Telerand, A; Kronenberg, Y; Gaoni, B

    1991-01-01

    "Verbal hallucinations" are sentences that psychotic patients may say repeatedly throughout a conversation which are out of context or unconnected to the topic of conversation. These hallucinations are not the outcome of a remembrance of an experience or an event and do not bring about any emotional relief or catharsis, but they supply valuable information. They resemble Jacques Lacan's description of the psychotic mechanism "Forclusion." This mechanism relates to experiences that did not undergo the process of primary symbolization through language, and experiences where words were attached but were not bound to the language structure. The result being that these experiences did not enter into the unconscious discourse of the subject. This information can reappear as verbal hallucinations in the psychotic patient. In such cases, the therapist, with the assistance of the patient's family, must investigate the meaning of the verbal hallucinations through research into the patient's and family's history in the phase prior to language development. When such a connection is discovered, the therapist must then bridge the hallucinations with the events unknown to the patient but contained in his subconscious. The therapist's role in such cases resembles that of a parent with a child: To translate the subject's experience through language from the physical schema to the body image and symbolic plane and in so doing, give meaning to meaninglessness. In our paper three short clinical cases are presented.

  14. Creating Simulated Microgravity Patient Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurst, Victor; Doerr, Harold K.; Bacal, Kira

    2004-01-01

    The Medical Operational Support Team (MOST) has been tasked by the Space and Life Sciences Directorate (SLSD) at the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) to integrate medical simulation into 1) medical training for ground and flight crews and into 2) evaluations of medical procedures and equipment for the International Space Station (ISS). To do this, the MOST requires patient models that represent the physiological changes observed during spaceflight. Despite the presence of physiological data collected during spaceflight, there is no defined set of parameters that illustrate or mimic a 'space normal' patient. Methods: The MOST culled space-relevant medical literature and data from clinical studies performed in microgravity environments. The areas of focus for data collection were in the fields of cardiovascular, respiratory and renal physiology. Results: The MOST developed evidence-based patient models that mimic the physiology believed to be induced by human exposure to a microgravity environment. These models have been integrated into space-relevant scenarios using a human patient simulator and ISS medical resources. Discussion: Despite the lack of a set of physiological parameters representing 'space normal,' the MOST developed space-relevant patient models that mimic microgravity-induced changes in terrestrial physiology. These models are used in clinical scenarios that will medically train flight surgeons, biomedical flight controllers (biomedical engineers; BME) and, eventually, astronaut-crew medical officers (CMO).

  15. Immunoglobulin levels of vitiligo patients.

    PubMed

    Ali, Rubaiya; Ahsan, Mohammad Shamsul; Azad, Mohammad Abul Kalam; Ullah, Md Ashik; Bari, Wasimul; Islam, Sheikh Nazrul; Yeasmin, Sabina; Hasnat, Abul

    2010-01-01

    In the present study, the serum immunoglobulin profiles of vitiligo patients were compared with that of cohort control and evaluated the correlation between immunoglobulin level with their socioeconomic factors and nutritional status. Thirty vitiligo patients were recruited randomly from the Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University Hospital, Dhaka, Bangladesh for this study. Thirty healthy individuals as control group matched by age, sex, education and socioeconomic factors to the patient group were selected. Serum immunoglobulin concentrations were determined by turbidimetry method using immunoglobulin kit. The concentration of IgG and IgA decreased significantly (P<0.05), but the change of IgM was not significant. Socioeconomic data revealed that most of the patients were young and female. Moreover statistical analysis revealed that there was significant correlation between immunoglobulin (IgG and IgA only) concentrations and BMI and number of depigmented patches with IgG concentrations. Finally it can be concluded that the change of serum immunoglobulin concentration in vitiligo patients could be due to the disease condition as pathomechanism suggested the aberrations in cellular immunity. But study with larger number of population is required for further evaluation of the relationship between the immune response and disease state to confirm these findings.

  16. Psychoneuroimmunology in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    DeKeyser, Freda

    2003-02-01

    Psychoneuroimmunology is the study of the interactions among behavior, neural, and endocrine functions and the immune system. The purpose of this review is to briefly summarize the evidence concerning interactions among behavior, the neuroendocrine system, and the immune system, and to show how this evidence relates to critical care patients. It has been shown that the immune function of many patients in the intensive care unit is suppressed as a result of trauma, sepsis, or profound physiologic and psychological stress. Three of the most common stressors among patients in the intensive care unit are pain, sleep deprivation, and fear or anxiety. Findings have shown each of these stressors to be associated with decreased immune functioning. Nurses have an important responsibility to protect their patients from infection and promote their ability to heal. Several actions are suggested that can help the nurse achieve these goals. It is hoped that nurses would keep these interactions in mind while caring for their patients in the intensive care unit.

  17. Prescribing and partnership with patients

    PubMed Central

    Bond, Christine; Blenkinsopp, Alison; Raynor, David K

    2012-01-01

    There have been widespread changes in society and the roles of professionals. This change is also reflected in health care, where there is now acceptance of the need to involve patients in decision making. In prescribing specifically, the concordance agenda was developed alongside these initiatives to encourage improved medication taking and reduce wastage. However the extent to which these partnerships are delivered in practice remains unclear. This paper explores some of the issues to be considered when preparing patients and professionals for partnership and summarizes the limited evidence of barriers to, and benefits of, this approach. Firstly patients must be given the confidence, skills and knowledge to be partners. They need information about medicines, provided in ways known to be acceptable to them. Likewise professionals may need new skills to be partners. They need to understand the patient agenda and may need training and support to change the ways in which they consult with patients. There are also practical issues such as the perceived increase in time taken when consulting in partnership mode, room layout, computer interfaces and record keeping. Health care professionals other than doctors are also expected to behave in partnership mode, whether this is as prescribers in their own right or in supporting the prescribing of others. Whilst much has been claimed for the benefit of partnership approaches, hard evidence is limited. However whilst there is still much more to understand there will be no going back to the paternalistic model of the mid 20th century. PMID:22621201

  18. OPSI threat in hematological patients

    PubMed Central

    Serio, B; Pezzullo, L; Giudice, V; Fontana, R; Annunziata, S; Ferrara, I; Rosamilio, R; De Luca, C; Rocco, M; Montuori, N; Selleri, C

    Overwhelming post-splenectomy infection (OPSI) is a rare medical emergency, mainly caused by encapsulated bacteria, shortly progressing from a mild flu-like syndrome to a fulminant, potentially fatal, sepsis. The risk of OPSI is higher in children and in patients with underlying benign or malignant hematological disorders. We retrospectively assessed OPSI magnitude in a high risk cohort of 162 adult splenectomized patients with malignant (19%) and non malignant (81%) hematological diseases, over a 25-year period: 59 of them splenectomized after immunization against encapsulated bacteria, and 103, splenectomized in the previous 12-year study, receiving only life-long oral penicillin prophylaxis. The influence of splenectomy on the immune system, as well as the incidence, diagnosis, risk factors, preventive measures and management of OPSI are also outlined. OPSI occurred in 7 patients (4%) with a median age of 37 years at time interval from splenectomy ranging from 10 days to 12 years. All OPSIs occurred in non immunized patients, except one fatal Staphylococcus aureus -mediated OPSI in a patient adequately immunized before splenectomy. Our analysis further provides evidence that OPSI is a lifelong risk and that current immune prophylaxis significantly decreases OPSI development. Improvement in patients’ education about long-term risk of OPSI and increased physician awareness to face a potentially lethal medical emergency, according to the current surviving sepsis guidelines, represent mandatory strategies for preventing and managing OPSI appropriately. PMID:24251241

  19. [Multifocal tuberculosis in immunocompetent patients].

    PubMed

    Rezgui, Amel; Fredj, Fatma Ben; Mzabi, Anis; Karmani, Monia; Laouani, Chadia

    2016-01-01

    Multifocal tuberculosis is defined as the presence of lesions affecting at least two extrapulmonary sites, with or without pulmonary involvement. This retrospective study of 10 cases aims to investigate the clinical and evolutionary characteristics of multifocal tuberculosis. It included 41 cases with tuberculosis collected between 1999 and 2013. Ten patients had multifocal tuberculosis (24%): 9 women and 1 man, the average age was 50 years (30-68 years). Our patients were correctly BCG vaccinated. The evaluation of immunodepression was negative in all patients. 7 cases had lymph node tuberculosis, 3 cases digestive tuberculosis, 2 cases pericardial tuberculosis, 2 cases osteoarticular tuberculosis, 1 case brain tuberculosis, 2 cases urinary tuberculosis, 4 cases urogenital tuberculosis, 1 case adrenal tuberculosis, 1 case cutaneous and 1 case muscle tuberculosis. All patients received anti-tuberculosis treatment for a mean duration of 10 months, with good evolution. Multifocal tuberculosis is difficult to diagnose. It can affect immunocompetent patients but often has good prognosis. Anti-tuberculosis therapy must be initiated as soon as possible to avoid sequelae.

  20. Patient blood management in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Shander, A.; Van Aken, H.; Colomina, M. J.; Gombotz, H.; Hofmann, A.; Krauspe, R.; Lasocki, S.; Richards, T.; Slappendel, R.; Spahn, D. R.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Preoperative anaemia is common in patients undergoing orthopaedic and other major surgery. Anaemia is associated with increased risks of postoperative mortality and morbidity, infectious complications, prolonged hospitalization, and a greater likelihood of allogeneic red blood cell (RBC) transfusion. Evidence of the clinical and economic disadvantages of RBC transfusion in treating perioperative anaemia has prompted recommendations for its restriction and a growing interest in approaches that rely on patients' own (rather than donor) blood. These approaches are collectively termed ‘patient blood management’ (PBM). PBM involves the use of multidisciplinary, multimodal, individualized strategies to minimize RBC transfusion with the ultimate goal of improving patient outcomes. PBM relies on approaches (pillars) that detect and treat perioperative anaemia and reduce surgical blood loss and perioperative coagulopathy to harness and optimize physiological tolerance of anaemia. After the recent resolution 63.12 of the World Health Assembly, the implementation of PBM is encouraged in all WHO member states. This new standard of care is now established in some centres in the USA and Austria, in Western Australia, and nationally in the Netherlands. However, there is a pressing need for European healthcare providers to integrate PBM strategies into routine care for patients undergoing orthopaedic and other types of surgery in order to reduce the use of unnecessary transfusions and improve the quality of care. After reviewing current PBM practices in Europe, this article offers recommendations supporting its wider implementation, focusing on anaemia management, the first of the three pillars of PBM. PMID:22628393

  1. Aztreonam pharmacokinetics in burn patients.

    PubMed Central

    Friedrich, L V; White, R L; Kays, M B; Brundage, D M; Yarbrough, D

    1991-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of aztreonam in eight adult patients with severe burn injuries (total body surface area burn, 49% +/- 21% [mean +/- standard deviation]) were studied. The time of initiation of study following burn injury was 7.0 +/- 1.4 days. Four patients at first dose and at steady state were studied. Aztreonam concentrations were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography, and a two-compartment model was used to fit the data. No significant differences in any pharmacokinetic parameters between first dose and steady state were observed. Volume of distribution of the central compartment after first dose (0.14 liters/kg) and volume of distribution at steady state (0.31 liters/kg) were approximately 30% higher than those reported for other patient populations. Total drug clearance and renal drug clearance when normalized to creatinine clearance (CLCR) were similar to those previously reported for other critically ill patients. CLCR was strongly correlated with renal drug clearance (r = 0.94) and total drug clearance (r = 0.95). The extent and degree of burn (percent second or third degree burn) were poorly correlated with all pharmacokinetic parameters with the exception of the volume of distribution at steady state, which was correlated with both total body surface area burn (r = 0.95) and percent second degree burn (r = 0.83). Aztreonam pharmacokinetics are altered as a result of thermal injury; however, CLCR can be used to assess the clearance of aztreonam in burn patients. PMID:2014982

  2. Prognosis of mechanically ventilated patients.

    PubMed Central

    Papadakis, M A; Lee, K K; Browner, W S; Kent, D L; Matchar, D B; Kagawa, M K; Hallenbeck, J; Lee, D; Onishi, R; Charles, G

    1993-01-01

    In this Department of Veterans Affairs cooperative study, we examined predictors of in-hospital and 1-year mortality of 612 mechanically ventilated patients from 6 medical intensive care units in a retrospective cohort design. The outcome variable was vital status at hospital discharge and after 1 year. The results showed that 97% of patients were men, the mean age was 63 +/- 11 years (SD), and hospital mortality was 64% (95% confidence interval, 60% to 68%). Within the next year, an additional 38% of hospital survivors died, for a total 1-year mortality of 77% (95% confidence interval, 73% to 80%). Hospital and 1-year mortality, respectively, for patients older than 70 years was 76% and 94%, for those with serum albumin levels below 20 grams per liter it was 92% and 96%, for those with an Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) score greater than 35 it was 91% and 98%, and for patients who were being mechanically ventilated after cardiopulmonary resuscitation it was 86% and 90%. The mortality ratio (actual mortality versus APACHE II-predicted mortality) was 1.15. Conclusions are that patient age, APACHE II score, serum albumin levels, or the use of cardiopulmonary resuscitation may identify a subset of mechanically ventilated veterans for whom mechanical ventilation provides little or no benefit. PMID:8128673

  3. Polyneuropathy in critically ill patients.

    PubMed Central

    Bolton, C F; Gilbert, J J; Hahn, A F; Sibbald, W J

    1984-01-01

    Five patients developed a severe motor and sensory polyneuropathy at the peak of critical illness (sepsis and multiorgan dysfunction complicating a variety of primary illnesses). Difficulties in weaning from the ventilator as the critical illness subsided and the development of flaccid and areflexic limbs were early clinical signs. However, electrophysiological studies, especially needle electrode examination of skeletal muscle, provided the definite evidence of polyneuropathy. The cause is uncertain, but the electrophysiological and morphological features indicate a primary axonal polyneuropathy with sparing of the central nervous system. Nutritional factors may have played a role, since the polyneuropathy improved in all five patients after total parenteral nutrition had been started, including the three patients who later died of unrelated causes. The features allow diagnosis during life, and encourage continued intensive management since recovery from the polyneuropathy may occur. Images PMID:6094735

  4. Zinc supplementation in burn patients.

    PubMed

    Caldis-Coutris, Nancy; Gawaziuk, Justin P; Logsetty, Sarvesh

    2012-01-01

    Micronutrient supplementation is a common practice throughout many burn centers across North America; however, uncertainty pertaining to dose, duration, and side effects of such supplements persists. The authors prospectively collected data from 23 hospitalized patients with burn sizes ranging from 10 to 93% TBSA. Each patient received a daily multivitamin and mineral supplement, 50 mg zinc (Zn) daily, and 500 mg vitamin C twice daily. Supplements were administered orally or enterally. Albumin, prealbumin, C-reactive protein, serum Zn, and serum copper were measured weekly during hospital admission until levels were within normal reference range. Our study concluded that 50 mg daily dose of Zn resulted in normal serum levels in 19 of 23 patients at discharge; 50 mg Zn supplementation did not interfere with serum copper levels; and Zn supplements, regardless of administration route, did not result in gastrointestinal side effects.

  5. Liver Illness and Psychiatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Carrier, Paul; Debette-Gratien, Marilyne; Girard, Murielle; Jacques, Jérémie; Nubukpo, Philippe; Loustaud-Ratti, Véronique

    2016-01-01

    Patients with psychiatric disorders are usually more exposed to multiple somatic illnesses, including liver diseases. Specific links are established between psychiatric disorders and alcohol hepatitis, hepatitis B, and hepatitis C in the population as a whole, and specifically in drug abusers. Metabolic syndrome criteria, and associated steatosis or non-alcoholic steato-hepatitis (NASH) are frequent in patients with chronic psychiatric disorders under psychotropic drugs, and should be screened. Some psychiatric medications, such as neuroleptics, mood stabilizers, and a few antidepressants, are often associated with drug-induced liver injury (DILI). In patients with advanced chronic liver diseases, the prescription of some specific psychiatric treatments should be avoided. Psychiatric disorders can be a limiting factor in the decision-making and following up for liver transplantation. PMID:28123443

  6. Gas gangrene in orthopaedic patients.

    PubMed

    Ying, Zhimin; Zhang, Min; Yan, Shigui; Zhu, Zhong

    2013-01-01

    Clostridial myonecrosis is most often seen in settings of trauma, surgery, malignancy, and other underlying immunocompromised conditions. Since 1953 cases of gas gangrene have been reported in orthopaedic patients including open fractures, closed fractures, and orthopaedic surgeries. We present a case of 55-year-old obese woman who developed rapidly progressive gas gangrene in her right leg accompanied by tibial plateau fracture without skin lacerations. She was diagnosed with clostridial myonecrosis and above-the-knee amputation was carried out. This patient made full recovery within three weeks of the initial episode. We identified a total of 50 cases of gas gangrene in orthopaedic patients. Several factors, if available, were analyzed for each case: age, cause of injury, fracture location, pathogen, and outcome. Based on our case report and the literature review, emergency clinicians should be aware of this severe and potentially fatal infectious disease and should not delay treatment or prompt orthopedic surgery consultation.

  7. Patients as partners in innovation.

    PubMed

    Barnett, Sean J; Katz, Aviva

    2015-06-01

    As the culture of medical practice has evolved, so has the relationship between the physician and patient. This is decidedly true with regards to the introduction of innovative therapies, especially in the surgical arena. A critical challenge is identifying and defining innovative therapy. Is the proposed treatment an incremental change, a research proposal, or more commonly someplace in between? This gray area creates a transition zone commonly referred to as innovative therapy. Given the complexities of the current landscape of innovation, innovation therapy committees may provide a mechanism to help to guide both physicians and patients through such difficult topics as the process of informed consent, managing conflicts of interest, and how to evaluate the outcomes of innovative therapies. As surgical innovation remains critical to the advancement of care, it must occur in a transparent partnership with patients, under the eye of guiding entities, aimed at ultimately improving outcomes and care.

  8. Doppler ultrasonography in tinnitus patients.

    PubMed

    Bertora, Guillermo O; Bergman, Julia M

    2002-01-01

    Tinnitus can be functionally measured and localized through sensorimotor and neurosensory tests. According to our Neurofisiología Otooftalmológica data bank, 60% of patients requiring a consultation have a history of cardiocirculatory disorders. This figure has moved us to study cerebrovascular processes in those patients seeking consultation for a tinnitus symptom only. The sudden appearance of the tinnitus symptom alone independent of patient age, leads us to consider a pathology of vascular origin, which should be evaluated and treated immediately. A mistake or delay in the diagnosis could cause the symptom to become chronic, owing to the appearance of microlesions at any level of the auditory pathway, as has been demonstrated in former investigations.

  9. Antifungal Prophylaxis in Immunocompromised Patients

    PubMed Central

    Vazquez, Lourdes

    2016-01-01

    Invasive fungal infections (IFIs) represent significant complications in patients with hematological malignancies. Chemoprevention of IFIs may be important in this setting, but most antifungal drugs have demonstrated poor efficacy, particularly in the prevention of invasive aspergillosis. Antifungal prophylaxis in hematological patients is currently regarded as the gold standard in situations with a high risk of infection, such as acute leukemia, myelodysplastic syndromes, and autologous or allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Over the years, various scientific societies have established a series of recommendations for antifungal prophylaxis based on prospective studies performed with different drugs. However, the prescription of each agent must be personalized, adapting its administration to the characteristics of individual patients and taking into account possible interactions with concomitant medication. PMID:27648203

  10. Antibiotic resistance in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Gudiol, Carlota; Carratalà, Jordi

    2014-08-01

    Bacterial infection is one of the most frequent complications in cancer patients and hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients. In recent years, the emergence of antimicrobial resistance has become a significant problem worldwide, and cancer patients are among those affected. Treatment of infections due to multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacteria represents a clinical challenge, especially in the case of Gram-negative bacilli, since the therapeutic options are often very limited. As the antibiotics active against MDR bacteria present several disadvantages (limited clinical experience, higher incidence of adverse effects, and less knowledge of the pharmacokinetics of the drug), a thorough acquaintance with the main characteristics of these drugs is mandatory in order to provide safe treatment to cancer patients with MDR bacterial infections. Nevertheless, the implementation of antibiotic stewardship programs and infection control measures is the cornerstone for controlling the development and spread of these MDR pathogens.

  11. Lung cancer in elderly patients

    PubMed Central

    Diso, Daniele; Onorati, Ilaria; Anile, Marco; Mantovani, Sara; Rendina, Erino A.

    2016-01-01

    There is a worldwide-accepted evidence of a population shift toward older ages. This shift favors an increased risk of developing lung cancer that is primarily a disease of older populations. Decision making is extremely difficult in elderly patients, since this group is under-represented in clinical trials with only 25% of them historically opening to patients older than 65 years. For all these reasons, a “customized” preoperative assessment to identify physiological or pathological frailty should be encouraged since standard tools may be less reliable. The work already done to improve patient selection for lung surgery in the elderly population clearly shows that surgical resection seems the treatment of choice for early stage lung cancer. Further studies are required to improve outcome by reducing postoperative morbidity and mortality. PMID:27942414

  12. Gas Gangrene in Orthopaedic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ying, Zhimin; Zhang, Min; Yan, Shigui; Zhu, Zhong

    2013-01-01

    Clostridial myonecrosis is most often seen in settings of trauma, surgery, malignancy, and other underlying immunocompromised conditions. Since 1953 cases of gas gangrene have been reported in orthopaedic patients including open fractures, closed fractures, and orthopaedic surgeries. We present a case of 55-year-old obese woman who developed rapidly progressive gas gangrene in her right leg accompanied by tibial plateau fracture without skin lacerations. She was diagnosed with clostridial myonecrosis and above-the-knee amputation was carried out. This patient made full recovery within three weeks of the initial episode. We identified a total of 50 cases of gas gangrene in orthopaedic patients. Several factors, if available, were analyzed for each case: age, cause of injury, fracture location, pathogen, and outcome. Based on our case report and the literature review, emergency clinicians should be aware of this severe and potentially fatal infectious disease and should not delay treatment or prompt orthopedic surgery consultation. PMID:24288638

  13. Patient advocacy: the technologist's role.

    PubMed

    Church, Elizabeth J

    2004-01-01

    This article provides an overview of the various ways in which imaging professionals can demonstrate patient advocacy on a day-to-day basis and throughout their careers. Advocacy encompasses a wide range of attitudes and activities, and implementing its principles can bring new enthusiasm to the workplace and increase job satisfaction. After completing this article, readers will: Describe the fundamental aspects of advocacy. Know how to handle conflict and explain why conflict is necessary. Understand the challenges to advocacy. Apply patient advocacy in the context of diagnostic imaging. Recognize the radiologic technologist's important role in ensuring patient safety. Identify how professional codes and standards, as well as federal and state laws, encourage advocacy efforts.

  14. Seizure Treatment in Transplant Patients

    PubMed Central

    Shepard, Paul W.

    2013-01-01

    Opinion statement Solid organ transplantation is frequently complicated by a spectrum of seizure types, including single partial-onset or generalized tonic-clonic seizures, acute repetitive seizures or status epilepticus, and sometimes the evolution of symptomatic epilepsy. There is currently no specific evidence involving the transplant patient population to guide the selection, administration, or duration of antiepileptic drug (AED) therapy, so familiarity with clinical AED pharmacology and application of sound judgment are necessary for successful patient outcomes. An initial detailed search for symptomatic seizure etiologies, including metabolic, infectious, cerebrovascular, and calcineurin inhibitor treatment-related neuro-toxic complications such as posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES), is imperative, as underlying central nervous system disorders may impose additional serious risks to cerebral or general health if not promptly detected and appropriately treated. The mainstay for post-transplant seizure management is AED therapy directed toward the suspected seizure type. Unfavorable drug interactions could place the transplanted organ at risk, so choosing an AED with limited interaction potential is also crucial. When the transplanted organ is dysfunctional or vulnerable to rejection, AEDs without substantial hepatic metabolism are favored in post-liver transplant patients, whereas after renal transplantation, AEDs with predominantly renal elimination may require dosage adjustment to prevent adverse effects. Levetiracetam, gabapentin, pregabalin, and lacosamide are drugs of choice for treatment of partial-onset seizures in post-transplant patients given their efficacy spectrum, generally excellent tolerability, and lack of drug interaction potential. Levetiracetam is the drug of choice for primary generalized seizures in post-transplant patients. When intravenous drugs are necessary for acute seizure management, benzodiazepines and

  15. Hepatitis C in hemodialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    Marinaki, Smaragdi; Boletis, John N; Sakellariou, Stratigoula; Delladetsima, Ioanna K

    2015-01-01

    Despite reduction of hepatitis C prevalence after recognition of the virus and testing of blood products, hemodialysis (HD) patients still comprise a high risk group. The natural history of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in dialysis is not fully understood while the clinical outcome differs from that of the general population. HD patients show a milder liver disease with lower aminotransferase and viral levels depicted by milder histological features on liver biopsy. Furthermore, the “silent” clinical course is consistent with a slower disease progression and a lower frequency of cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Potential explanations for the “beneficial” impact of uremia and hemodialysis on chronic HCV infection are impaired immunosurveillance leading to a less aggressive host response to the virus and intradialytic release of “hepatoprotective” cytokines such as interferon (IFN)-α and hepatocyte growth factor. However, chronic hepatitis C is associated with a higher liver disease related cardiovascular and all-cause mortality of HD patients. Therapy is indicated in selected patients groups including younger patients with low comorbidity burden and especially renal transplant candidates, preferably after performance of a liver biopsy. According to current recommendations, choice of treatment is IFN or pegylated interferon with a reported sustained viral response at 30%-40% and a withdrawal rate ranging from 17% to 30%. New data regarding combination therapy with low doses of ribavirin which provide higher standard variable rates and good safety results, offer another therapeutic option. The new protease inhibitors may be the future for HCV infected HD patients, though data are still lacking. PMID:25848478

  16. Infrared-Guided Patient Setup for Lung Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Lyatskaya, Yulia; James, Steven; Killoran, Joseph H.; Soto, Ricardo; Mamon, Harvey J.; Chin, Lee

    2008-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the utility of an infrared-guided patient setup (iGPS) system to reduce the uncertainties in the setup of lung cancer patients. Methods and Materials: A total of 15 patients were setup for lung irradiation using skin tattoos and lateral leveling marks. Daily electronic portal device images and iGPS marker locations were acquired and retrospectively reviewed. The iGPS-based shifts were compared with the daily electronic portal device image shifts using both the central axis iGPS marker and all five iGPS markers. For shift calculation using the five markers, rotational misalignment was included. The level of agreement between the iGPS and portal imaging to evaluate the setup was evaluated as the frequency of the shift difference in the range of 0-5 mm, 5-10 mm, and >10 mm. Results: Data were obtained for 450 treatment sessions for 15 patients. The difference in the isocenter shifts between the weekly vs. daily images was 0-5 mm in 42%, 5-10 mm in 30%, and >10 mm in 10% of the images. The shifts seen using the iGPS data were 0-5 mm in 81%, 5-10 mm in 14%, and >10 mm in 5%. Using only the central axis iGPS marker, the difference between the iGPS and portal images was <5 mm in 77%, 5-10 mm in 16%, and >10 mm in 7% in the left-right direction and 73%, 18%, and 9% in the superoinferior direction, respectively. When all five iGPS markers were used, the disagreements between the iGPS and portal image shifts >10 mm were reduced from 7% to 2% in the left-right direction and 9% to 3% in the superoinferior direction. Larger reductions were also seen (e.g., a reduction from 50% to 0% in 1 patient). Conclusion: The daily iGPS-based shifts correlated well with the daily electronic portal device-based shifts. When patient movement has nonlinear rotational components, a combination of surface markers and portal images might be particularly beneficial to improve the setup for lung cancer patients.

  17. Case study: a patient's survival.

    PubMed

    Nauer, K A; Kramer, L; Lockard, K L

    2000-05-01

    Presentation of a case study involving a female patient, in her 20s, undergoing routine surgery for removal of atrial myxoma leading to a heart transplant. This case study will show the progression from postcardiotomy failure, the emergent use of the extracorporeal membrane oxygenator device, the insertion of the HeartMate device, and the final return to the operating room for a heart transplant. The case study will examine the physiologic demands on the patient, as well as the psychological effects from the various life-saving devices.

  18. Patient-friendly financial options.

    PubMed

    Levin, R P

    1999-03-01

    Having flexible payment options ensures that patients will have all of the motivation and information they need to accept care in your office. The HCCC simply offers the chance to make more expensive treatment available to those who need or want it. The small cost of using a HCCC program more than pays for itself--in fact, it costs less than one-third of what you would spend if you were to bill these patients instead. Having consistent financial policies and flexible payment options can dramatically increase your office's productivity and profitability, while expressing your commitment to customer service and high-quality dentistry.

  19. Patient-friendly financial options.

    PubMed

    Levin, R P

    2000-01-01

    Having flexible payment options ensures that patients will have all of the motivation and information that they need to accept care in your office. The HCCC simply offers you the chance to make more expensive treatment available to those who need or want it. The small cost of using an HCCC program more than pays for itself--in fact, it costs less than one-third of what you would spend if you were to bill these patients instead. Having consistent financial policies and flexible payment options can dramatically increase your office's productivity and profitability, while expressing your commitment to customer service and high-quality dentistry.

  20. Space Technology for Patient Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    A contract for the development of an astronaut monitoring system in the early days of the space program provided Mennen Medical, Inc. with a foundation in telemetry that led to the development of a computerized medical electronic system used by hospitals. Mennen was the first company to adopt solid state design in patient monitoring and to offer multipatient telemetry monitoring. Telemetry converts instrument data to electrical signals and relays them to a remote receiver where they are displayed. From a central station, a nurse can monitor several patients. Company products include VISTA systems and Horizon 2000 Monitor.

  1. How to Feed Cleft Patient?

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Saima Yunus

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cleft lip and palate patients have all rights like other normal individuals, to enjoy the benefits of nourishment. Knowledge has to be there about the different feeding positions like straddle, dancer hand position along with the use of specially designed bottles and nipples. Parent's should be trained about the correct positions of feeding, in extreme of the cases in which parents are not able to follow these instructions, feeding obturators can be given. How to cite this article: Jindal MK, Khan SY. How to Feed Cleft Patient? Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2013;6(2):100-103. PMID:25206201

  2. Managing complications in cirrhotic patients

    PubMed Central

    Angeli, Paolo; Cordoba, Juan; Farges, Oliver; Valla, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    Liver cirrhosis is a serious and potentially life-threatening condition. This life-threatening condition usually arises from complications of cirrhosis. While variceal bleeding is the most acute and probably best studied, several other complications of liver cirrhosis are more insidious in their onset but nevertheless more important for the long-term management and outcome of these patients. This review summarizes the topics discussed during the UEG-EASL Hepatology postgraduate course of the United European Gastroenterology Week 2013 and discusses emergency surgical conditions in cirrhotic patients, the management of hepatic encephalopathy, ascites and hepatorenal syndrome, coagulation disorders, and liver cancer. PMID:25653862

  3. Liver Replacement for Pediatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Starzl, Thomas E.; Koep, Lawrence J.; Schröter, Gerhard P. J.; Halgrimson, Charles G.; Porter, Kendrick A.; Weil, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Between March 1963 and January 1978, 74 patients 18 years of age or younger have had liver replacements at the University of Colorado Medical Center, Denver. The most common cause of native liver failure was biliary atresia (48/74, 65%); the second most common cause was chronic aggressive hepatitis (12/74, 16%). Twenty-nine patients (39%) lived for at least one year, and 16 are still alive one to nine years after transplantation. Technical surgical problems, rejection, and infection were the main causes of death. Improved immunosuppression is needed; nevertheless, the quality of life in the long-term survivors has encouraged continuation of this difficult work. PMID:377201

  4. [Weight loss in cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Lordick, Florian; Hacker, Ulrich

    2016-02-01

    Cancer patients are regularly affected by malnutrition which often leads to a worsened quality of life and activity in daily living, more side effects and complications during anticancer treatment and shorter survival times. The early diagnosis and treatment of malnutrition are therefore relevant components of oncological treatment. The assessment of the nutritional status and determination of the body-mass-index should be done in every patient with cancer. The clinical examination delivers important findings and indications for malnutrition. Bioimpedance analysis can deliver additional objective information. The treatment of malnutrition should start early and follows a step-wise escalation reaching from nutritional counseling to enteral nutritional support to parenteral nutrition.

  5. Patient diaries: charting the course.

    PubMed

    Zanni, Guido R

    2007-06-01

    Clinical diaries are a way for patients to assess their own health status without clinician bias or interpretation. Diaries are especially useful in understanding symptoms' temporal dynamics, including triggers that exacerbate symptoms; they also help individuals to evaluate the impact of their treatment. Diary format should be patient-specific, with thoughtful consideration given to rating scales, symptom descriptors, number of daily entries required, and the duration of diary recording. While compliance, recall biases, and diary fatigue affect data quality, a diary's potential for individualizing treatment strategies is tremendous.

  6. Nutritional support of reptile patients.

    PubMed

    De Voe, Ryan S

    2014-05-01

    Providing nutritional support to reptile patients is a challenging and often misunderstood task. Ill reptiles are frequently anorexic and can benefit greatly from appropriate nutrition delivered via a variety of assist-feeding techniques. Neonatal reptiles can also be very challenging patients because many fail to thrive without significant efforts to establish normal feeding behaviors. This article presents ideas supporting the benefit of timely nutritional support as well as specific recommendations for implementation of assist feeding. Also discussed are a few nutritional issues that affect captive reptile species.

  7. [Electronic patient record as the tool for better patient safety].

    PubMed

    Schneider, Henning

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies indicate again that there is a deficit in the use of electronic health records (EHR) in German hospitals. Despite good arguments in favour of their use, such as the rapid availability of data, German hospitals shy away from a wider implementation. The reason is the high cost of installing and maintaining the EHRs, for the benefit is difficult to evaluate in monetary terms for the hospital. Even if a benefit can be shown it is not necessarily evident within the hospital, but manifests itself only in the health system outside. Many hospitals only manage to partly implement EHR resulting in increased documentation requirements which reverse their positive effect.In the United States, electronic medical records are also viewed in light of their positive impact on patient safety. In particular, electronic medication systems prove the benefits they can provide in the context of patient safety. As a result, financing systems have been created to promote the digitalisation of hospitals in the United States. This has led to a large increase in the use of IT systems in the United States in recent years. The Universitätsklinikum Eppendorf (UKE) introduced electronic patient records in 2009. The benefits, in particular as regards patient safety, are numerous and there are many examples to illustrate this position. These positive results are intended to demonstrate the important role EHR play in hospitals. A financing system of the ailing IT landscape based on the American model is urgently needed to benefit-especially in terms of patient safety-from electronic medical records in the hospital.

  8. Do patient autonomy preferences matter? Linking patient-centered care to patient-physician relationships and health outcomes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yin-Yang; Lin, Julia L

    2010-11-01

    As health care systems seek to provide patient-centered care as a cornerstone of quality, the link between patient-centeredness and patient outcomes is a concern. Past research reveals inconsistent findings regarding the impact of patient-centeredness on patient outcomes, and few studies have investigated the factors that moderate this relationship. Most studies have used self-rated outcomes on a cross-sectional basis, even though most patient care is inherently longitudinal. The current study extends past research by examining the theoretical and empirical relationships between patients' perceptions of autonomy support and autonomy preferences with regard to their health outcomes. We hypothesized that autonomy preferences moderate the positive relationships between perceived autonomy support and patient-physician relationships, and on self-rated and objective health outcomes such that the relationships are more positive when patient autonomy preferences are high. Data were collected 3 times over a one-year period from a sample of 614 patients with type 2 diabetes in Taiwan. The results revealed strong support for the hypothesized relationships between perceived autonomy support and patient trust, satisfaction, and mental health-related quality of life (HRQoL) after adjusting for baseline scores; however, the direct link between autonomy support and patients' glycemic control was not significant. Specifically, patients with high decisional preference experienced a greater increase in subsequent trust and satisfaction than patients with low decisional preference. Further, patients with high information preference had a higher level of satisfaction over time than patients with low information preference. In addition, it was found that perceived autonomy support improved both physical and mental HRQoL but only if combined with high levels of information preference. This study provides evidence of a contingency perspective of the relationship between patient autonomy

  9. Transforming consumer health informatics through a patient work framework: connecting patients to context.

    PubMed

    Valdez, Rupa S; Holden, Richard J; Novak, Laurie L; Veinot, Tiffany C

    2015-01-01

    Designing patient-centered consumer health informatics (CHI) applications requires understanding and creating alignment with patients' and their family members' health-related activities, referred to here as 'patient work'. A patient work approach to CHI draws on medical social science and human factors engineering models and simultaneously attends to patients, their family members, activities, and context. A patient work approach extends existing approaches to CHI design that are responsive to patients' biomedical realities and personal skills and behaviors. It focuses on the embeddedness of patients' health management in larger processes and contexts and prioritizes patients' perspectives on illness management. Future research is required to advance (1) theories of patient work, (2) methods for assessing patient work, and (3) techniques for translating knowledge of patient work into CHI application design. Advancing a patient work approach within CHI is integral to developing and deploying consumer-facing technologies that are integrated with patients' everyday lives.

  10. 21 CFR 880.2720 - Patient scale.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Patient scale. 880.2720 Section 880.2720 Food and... Patient scale. (a) Identification. A patient scale is a device intended for medical purposes that is used to measure the weight of a patient who cannot stand on a scale. This generic device includes...

  11. 21 CFR 880.2720 - Patient scale.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Patient scale. 880.2720 Section 880.2720 Food and... Patient scale. (a) Identification. A patient scale is a device intended for medical purposes that is used to measure the weight of a patient who cannot stand on a scale. This generic device includes...

  12. 21 CFR 880.2720 - Patient scale.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Patient scale. 880.2720 Section 880.2720 Food and... Patient scale. (a) Identification. A patient scale is a device intended for medical purposes that is used to measure the weight of a patient who cannot stand on a scale. This generic device includes...

  13. 21 CFR 880.2720 - Patient scale.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Patient scale. 880.2720 Section 880.2720 Food and... Patient scale. (a) Identification. A patient scale is a device intended for medical purposes that is used to measure the weight of a patient who cannot stand on a scale. This generic device includes...

  14. 21 CFR 880.2720 - Patient scale.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Patient scale. 880.2720 Section 880.2720 Food and... Patient scale. (a) Identification. A patient scale is a device intended for medical purposes that is used to measure the weight of a patient who cannot stand on a scale. This generic device includes...

  15. 29 CFR 525.4 - Patient workers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Patient workers. 525.4 Section 525.4 Labor Regulations... WITH DISABILITIES UNDER SPECIAL CERTIFICATES § 525.4 Patient workers. With respect to patient workers... disabilities normally perform, in whole or in part in the institution or elsewhere. However, a patient does...

  16. Thallium-201 stress imaging in hypertensive patients

    SciTech Connect

    Schulman, D.S.; Francis, C.K.; Black, H.R.; Wackers, F.J.

    1987-07-01

    To assess the potential effect of hypertension on the results of thallium-201 stress imaging in patients with chest pain, 272 thallium-201 stress tests performed in 133 hypertensive patients and 139 normotensive patients over a 1-year period were reviewed. Normotensive and hypertensive patients were similar in age, gender distribution, prevalence of cardiac risk factors (tobacco smoking, hyperlipidemia, and diabetes mellitus), medications, and clinical symptoms of coronary disease. Electrocardiographic criteria for left ventricular hypertrophy were present in 16 hypertensive patients. Stepwise probability analysis was used to determine the likelihood of coronary artery disease for each patient. In patients with mid to high likelihood of coronary disease (greater than 25% probability), abnormal thallium-201 stress images were present in 54 of 60 (90%) hypertensive patients compared with 51 of 64 (80%) normotensive patients. However, in 73 patients with a low likelihood of coronary disease (less than or equal to 25% probability), abnormal thallium-201 stress images were present in 21 patients (29%) of the hypertensive group compared with only 5 of 75 (7%) of the normotensive patients (p less than 0.001). These findings suggest that in patients with a mid to high likelihood of coronary artery disease, coexistent hypertension does not affect the results of thallium-201 exercise stress testing. However, in patients with a low likelihood of coronary artery disease, abnormal thallium-201 stress images are obtained more frequently in hypertensive patients than in normotensive patients.

  17. The patient portal: Considerations for NPs.

    PubMed

    Elkind, Elizabeth C; Higgins, Kathleen M

    2017-03-07

    Hospitals, patient-centered medical homes, and provider practices have either introduced or are in the process of planning for patient portals. The NP plays an important role in the patient engagement initiative. This article explores patient portal strategies and resources to support this technology integration and practice change.

  18. 42 CFR 2.14 - Minor patients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... treatment until the minor patient consents to the disclosure necessary to obtain reimbursement, but refusal... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Minor patients. 2.14 Section 2.14 Public Health... ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE PATIENT RECORDS General Provisions § 2.14 Minor patients. (a) Definition of...

  19. 42 CFR 2.14 - Minor patients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... treatment until the minor patient consents to the disclosure necessary to obtain reimbursement, but refusal... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Minor patients. 2.14 Section 2.14 Public Health... ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE PATIENT RECORDS General Provisions § 2.14 Minor patients. (a) Definition of...

  20. 42 CFR 2.14 - Minor patients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... treatment until the minor patient consents to the disclosure necessary to obtain reimbursement, but refusal... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Minor patients. 2.14 Section 2.14 Public Health... ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE PATIENT RECORDS General Provisions § 2.14 Minor patients. (a) Definition of...

  1. Deinstitutionalizing Elderly Patients: A Program of Resocialization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegel, Barry; Lasker, Judith

    1978-01-01

    In a program of deinstitutionalization 61 elderly state hospital patients were successfully placed outside the institution. Changes in definition of the patients' situation, collective approach to resocialization, careful medical evaluation, and familiarity of patients with possible alternatives help reduce patients' commitment to the institution…

  2. Patient safety: the what, how, and when.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Roxie M

    2015-12-01

    Patient safety is a construct that implies behavior intended to minimize the risk of harm to patients through effectiveness and individual performance designed to avoid injuries to patients from the care that is intended to help them. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education has made patient safety a focused area in the new Clinical Learning Environment Review process. This lecture will focus on definitions of patient safety terminology; describe the culture of patient safety and a just culture; discuss what to report, who to report it too, and methods of conducting patient safety investigations.

  3. Addressing challenges and needs in patient education targeting hardly reached patients with chronic diseases.

    PubMed

    Varming, Annemarie Reinhardt; Torenholt, Rikke; Møller, Birgitte Lund; Vestergaard, Susanne; Engelund, Gitte

    2015-01-01

    Some patients do not benefit from participation in patient education due to reasons related to disease burden, literacy, and socioeconomic challenges. In this communication, we address more specifically both the challenges that these hardly reached patients face in relation to patient education programs and the challenges educators face when conducting patient education with hardly reached patients. We define principles for the format and content of dialogue tools to better support this patient group within the population of individuals with diabetes.

  4. Addressing challenges and needs in patient education targeting hardly reached patients with chronic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Varming, Annemarie Reinhardt; Torenholt, Rikke; Møller, Birgitte Lund; Vestergaard, Susanne; Engelund, Gitte

    2015-01-01

    Some patients do not benefit from participation in patient education due to reasons related to disease burden, literacy, and socioeconomic challenges. In this communication, we address more specifically both the challenges that these hardly reached patients face in relation to patient education programs and the challenges educators face when conducting patient education with hardly reached patients. We define principles for the format and content of dialogue tools to better support this patient group within the population of individuals with diabetes. PMID:25729695

  5. The Wired Patient: Patterns of Electronic Patient Portal Use Among Patients With Cardiac Disease or Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, Jonathan P; Shah, Nirav R; Stewart, Walter F

    2015-01-01

    Background As providers develop an electronic health record–based infrastructure, patients are increasingly using Web portals to access their health information and participate electronically in the health care process. Little is known about how such portals are actually used. Objective In this paper, our goal was to describe the types and patterns of portal users in an integrated delivery system. Methods We analyzed 12 months of data from Web server log files on 2282 patients using a Web-based portal to their electronic health record (EHR). We obtained data for patients with cardiovascular disease and/or diabetes who had a Geisinger Clinic primary care provider and were registered “MyGeisinger” Web portal users. Hierarchical cluster analysis was applied to longitudinal data to profile users based on their frequency, intensity, and consistency of use. User types were characterized by basic demographic data from the EHR. Results We identified eight distinct portal user groups. The two largest groups (41.98%, 948/2258 and 24.84%, 561/2258) logged into the portal infrequently but had markedly different levels of engagement with their medical record. Other distinct groups were characterized by tracking biometric measures (10.54%, 238/2258), sending electronic messages to their provider (9.25%, 209/2258), preparing for an office visit (5.98%, 135/2258), and tracking laboratory results (4.16%, 94/2258). Conclusions There are naturally occurring groups of EHR Web portal users within a population of adult primary care patients with chronic conditions. More than half of the patient cohort exhibited distinct patterns of portal use linked to key features. These patterns of portal access and interaction provide insight into opportunities for electronic patient engagement strategies. PMID:25707036

  6. Haematuria in Postrenal Transplant Patients

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ziting; Vathsala, Anantharaman; Tiong, Ho Yee

    2015-01-01

    Haematuria has a prevalence of 12% in the postrenal transplant patient population. It heralds potentially dangerous causes which could threaten graft loss. It is important to consider causes in light of the unique, urological, and immunological standpoints of these patients. We review the literature on common causes of haematuria in postrenal transplant patients and suggest the salient approach to the evaluation of this condition. A major cause of haematuria is urinary tract infections. There should be a higher index of suspicion for mycobacterial, fungal, and viral infection in this group of immunosuppressed patients. Measures recommended in the prevention of urinary tract infections include early removal of foreign bodies as well as prophylactic antibiotics during the early transplant phase. Another common cause of haematuria is that of malignancies, in particular, renal cell carcinomas. When surgically managing cancer in the setting of a renal transplant, one has to be mindful of the limited retropubic space and the need to protect the anastomoses. Other causes include graft rejections, recurrences of primary disease, and calculus formation. It is important to perform a comprehensive evaluation with the aid of an experienced multidisciplinary transplant team. PMID:25918706

  7. Patient privacy and social media.

    PubMed

    Hader, Amy L; Brown, Evan D

    2010-08-01

    Healthcare providers using social media must remain mindful of professional boundaries and patients' privacy rights. Facebook and other online postings must comply with the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA), applicable facility policy, state law, and AANA's Code of Ethics.

  8. Orthogeriatric care: improving patient outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Tarazona-Santabalbina, Francisco José; Belenguer-Varea, Ángel; Rovira, Eduardo; Cuesta-Peredó, David

    2016-01-01

    Hip fractures are a very serious socio-economic problem in western countries. Since the 1950s, orthogeriatric units have introduced improvements in the care of geriatric patients admitted to hospital because of hip fractures. During this period, these units have reduced mean hospital stays, number of complications, and both in-hospital mortality and mortality over the middle term after hospital discharge, along with improvements in the quality of care and a reduction in costs. Likewise, a recent clinical trial has reported greater functional gains among the affected patients. Studies in this field have identified the prognostic factors present upon admission or manifesting themselves during admission and that increase the risk of patient mortality or disability. In addition, improved care afforded by orthogeriatric units has proved to reduce costs. Nevertheless, a number of management issues remain to be clarified, such as the optimum anesthetic, analgesic, and thromboprophylactic protocols; the type of diagnostic and therapeutic approach best suited to patients with cognitive problems; or the efficiency of the programs used in convalescence units or in home rehabilitation care. Randomized clinical trials are needed to consolidate the evidence in this regard. PMID:27445466

  9. Physical evaluation of the patient.

    PubMed

    Sykes, P; Lipp, M; Malamed, S F; Kubota, Y; Matsuura, H

    1992-01-01

    The physical evaluation of the patient before and during anesthesia and sedation is assuming an ever greater importance with the advent of sophisticated and reliable monitoring devices. This paper reviews the possible methods of evaluation and describes the types of mechanical monitors most suited to the dental office.

  10. [Patient evaluation and outcome measures].

    PubMed

    Nieto Pol, Enrique

    2014-01-01

    Both the initial evaluation and follow-up of patients with osteoarthritis require systematic evaluation of the indicators that provide information on the degree of involvement of the disease and allow its quantification. Reliable measures of disease progression help decision-making by clinicians and provide valid information on treatment response and the effectiveness of the distinct therapeutic interventions. The instruments recommended in research, as outcome measures in osteoarthritis, are pain evaluation, assessment of physical function, and self-reported global evaluation. In studies lasting more than 1 year, structural changes are evaluated through simple X-ray. Self-reported quality of life assessment and physician global assessment are also recommended as options. These indicators should be incorporated into routine clinical practice for adequate evaluation and correct follow-up of patients with osteoarthritis. The recommended pain evaluation method for use in clinical practice is the visual analog scale (VAS). The best instrument to evaluate physical function in patients with hip or knee osteoarthritis is the WOMAC scale (Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index). For patient-reported global assessment in routine practice, the recommended scales are VAS or the SF-12 (12-item short-form health survey).

  11. Imaging Pregnant and Lactating Patients.

    PubMed

    Tirada, Nikki; Dreizin, David; Khati, Nadia J; Akin, Esma A; Zeman, Robert K

    2015-10-01

    As use of imaging in the evaluation of pregnant and lactating patients continues to increase, misperceptions of radiation and safety risks have proliferated, which has led to often unwarranted concerns among patients and clinicians. When radiologic examinations are appropriately used, the benefits derived from the information gained usually outweigh the risks. This review describes appropriateness and safety issues, estimated doses for imaging examinations that use iodizing radiation (ie, radiography, computed tomography, nuclear scintigraphy, and fluoroscopically guided interventional radiology), radiation risks to the mother and conceptus during various stages of pregnancy, and use of iodinated or gadolinium-based contrast agents and radiotracers in pregnant and lactating women. Maternal radiation risk must be weighed with the potential consequences of missing a life-threatening diagnosis such as pulmonary embolus. Fetal risks (ie, spontaneous abortion, teratogenesis, or carcinogenesis) vary with gestational age and imaging modality and should be considered in the context of the potential benefit of medically necessary diagnostic imaging. When feasible and medically indicated, modalities that do not use ionizing radiation (eg, magnetic resonance imaging) are preferred in pregnant and lactating patients. Radiologists should strive to minimize risks of radiation to the mother and fetus, counsel patients effectively, and promote a realistic understanding of risks related to imaging during pregnancy and lactation.

  12. BAYESIAN BICLUSTERING FOR PATIENT STRATIFICATION.

    PubMed

    Khakabimamaghani, Sahand; Ester, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The move from Empirical Medicine towards Personalized Medicine has attracted attention to Stratified Medicine (SM). Some methods are provided in the literature for patient stratification, which is the central task of SM, however, there are still significant open issues. First, it is still unclear if integrating different datatypes will help in detecting disease subtypes more accurately, and, if not, which datatype(s) are most useful for this task. Second, it is not clear how we can compare different methods of patient stratification. Third, as most of the proposed stratification methods are deterministic, there is a need for investigating the potential benefits of applying probabilistic methods. To address these issues, we introduce a novel integrative Bayesian biclustering method, called B2PS, for patient stratification and propose methods for evaluating the results. Our experimental results demonstrate the superiority of B2PS over a popular state-of-the-art method and the benefits of Bayesian approaches. Our results agree with the intuition that transcriptomic data forms a better basis for patient stratification than genomic data.

  13. Compensation culture. Do patients justice.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Jennifer

    2008-11-20

    Complexity of cases means some negligence claims against the NHS take years to settle. Many patients or relatives want only an apology, not money. Surgery is subject to the highest number of claims, and fear of complaints can deter medics from innovating.

  14. Poetic Interventions with Forensic Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berger, Art; Giovan, Marti

    1990-01-01

    Describes the use of poetry, music, and creative writing with forensic patients at a state mental health institute. Demonstrates that expressive interventions were helpful in group treatment by promoting verbalization, decision making, and the recognition of personal responsibility for incarceration. (SR)

  15. Exercise for the Overweight Patient.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Work, Janis A.

    1990-01-01

    Exercise can help patients maintain lean body mass during weight loss. Although exercise is not extremely useful in shedding excess pounds, it helps keep off weight lost through calorie restriction. This article discusses the specifics of exercise prescription, types of exercise, motivation to exercise, and special problems such as diabetes. (SM)

  16. Temporomandibular disorders in headache patients

    PubMed Central

    Mello, Christiane-Espinola-Bandeira; Oliveira, José-Luiz-Góes; Jesus, Alan-Chester-Feitosa; Maia, Mila-Leite-de Moraes; de Santana, Jonielly-Costa-Vasconcelos; Andrade, Loren-Suyane-Oliveira; Siqueira Quintans, Jullyana-de Souza; Quintans-Junior, Lucindo-José; Conti, Paulo-César-Rodrigues

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To identify the frequency of signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorder (TMD) and its seve-rity in individuals with headache. Study Design: 60 adults divided into three groups of 20 individuals: chronic daily headache (CDH), episodic headache (EH) and a control group without headache (WH). Headache diagnosis was performed according to the criteria of International Headache Society and the signs and symptoms of TMD were achieved by using a clinical exam and an anamnestic questionnaire. The severity of TMD was defined by the temporomandibular index (TMI). Results: The TMD signs and symptoms were always more frequent in individuals with headache, especially report of pain in TMJ area (CDH, n=16; EH, n=12; WH, n=6), pain to palpation on masseter (CDH, n=19; EH, n=16; WH, n=11) which are significantly more frequent in episodic and chronic daily headache. The mean values of temporomandibular and articular index (CDH patients) and muscular index (CDH and EH patients) were statistically higher than in patients of the control group, notably the articular (CDH=0.38; EH=0.25;WH=0.19) and muscular (CDH=0.46; EH=0.51; WH=0.26) indices. Conclusions: These findings allow us to speculate that masticatory and TMJ pain are more common in headache subjects. Besides, it seems that the TMD is more severe in headache patients. Key words:Temporomandibular dysfunction, headache disorders. PMID:22926473

  17. Hypertension in Patients with Cancer

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Vinicius Barbosa; Silva, Eduardo Nani; Ribeiro, Mario Luiz; Martins, Wolney de Andrade

    2015-01-01

    There is a known association between chemotherapy and radiotherapy for treatment of cancer patients and development or worsening of hypertension. The aim of this article is to review this association. A literature search was conducted for articles reporting this association on the databases PubMed, SciELO and LILACS between 1993 and 2013. There was a high coprevalence of hypertension and cancer, since both diseases share the same risk factors, such as sedentary lifestyle, obesity, smoking, unhealthy diet and alcohol abuse. The use of chemotherapy and adjuvant drugs effective in the treatment of cancer increased the survival rate of these patients and, consequently, increased the incidence of hypertension. We described the association between the use of angiogenesis inhibitors (bevacizumab, sorafenib and sunitinib), corticosteroids, erythropoietin and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs with the development of hypertension. We also described the relationship between hypertension and carotid baroreceptor injury secondary to cervical radiotherapy. Morbidity and mortality increased in patients with cancer and hypertension without proper antihypertensive treatment. We concluded that there is need for early diagnosis, effective monitoring and treatment strategies for hypertension in cancer patients in order to reduce cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. PMID:25742420

  18. Urotherapy for patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Eldor, J

    1997-04-01

    Cancer cells release various antigens, some of which appear in the urine. Oral autourotherapy is suggested as a new treatment modality for cancer patients. It will provide the intestinal lymphatic system with the many tumor antigens against which antibodies may be produced. These antibodies may be pierced through the blood stream and attack the tumor and its cells.

  19. [Management of patients with stomas].

    PubMed

    Simon, Anne

    2016-01-01

    With the occurrence of an intestinal obstruction, many patients may need an intestinal stoma. This decision is often taken in an emergency context but may also be planned. The treatment will be multi-disciplinary involving the surgeon, anaesthetist, nurse, health care assistant, physiotherapist, dietician and stoma therapist.

  20. Patient perspectives of telemedicine quality

    PubMed Central

    LeRouge, Cynthia M; Garfield, Monica J; Hevner, Alan R

    2015-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to explore the quality attributes required for effective telemedicine encounters from the perspective of the patient. Methods We used a multi-method (direct observation, focus groups, survey) field study to collect data from patients who had experienced telemedicine encounters. Multi-perspectives (researcher and provider) were used to interpret a rich set of data from both a research and practice perspective. Results The result of this field study is a taxonomy of quality attributes for telemedicine service encounters that prioritizes the attributes from the patient perspective. We identify opportunities to control the level of quality for each attribute (ie, who is responsible for control of each attribute and when control can be exerted in relation to the encounter process). This analysis reveals that many quality attributes are in the hands of various stakeholders, and all attributes can be addressed proactively to some degree before the encounter begins. Conclusion Identification of the quality attributes important to a telemedicine encounter from a patient perspective enables one to better design telemedicine encounters. This preliminary work not only identifies such attributes, but also ascertains who is best able to address quality issues prior to an encounter. For practitioners, explicit representation of the quality attributes of technology-based systems and processes and insight on controlling key attributes are essential to implementation, utilization, management, and common understanding. PMID:25565781

  1. [Outpatient care for urological patients].

    PubMed

    Kul'chitskiĭ, V V

    1999-01-01

    The presence of adequately equipped surgical unit in outpatient clinics provides surgical aid to more patients with urological diseases. Preoperative preparation, aseptic and antiseptic measures, local anesthesia were routine. 64 operations for phimosis, condylomatous growth of the foreskin, hydrocele, cyst of the epididymis and spermatic cord, chronic epididymitis, short frenulum of the prepuce were performed in outpatient setting. Recovery lasted as usual.

  2. Depressive symptoms in schizophrenic patients.

    PubMed

    Gozdzik-Zelazny, A; Borecki, L; Pokorski, M

    2011-12-02

    Distinction between true negative and depressive symptoms in schizophrenia is difficult. In the present study we seek to establish the psychological profile of depression-prone schizophrenic patients. We addressed the issue by comparing the expression of psychological indices, such as the feelings of being in control of events, anxiety, mood, and the style of coping with stress in depressive and non-depressive schizophrenics. We also analyzed the strength of the association of these indices with the presence of depressive symptoms. A total of 49 patients (18 women and 31 men, aged 23-59) were enrolled into the study, consisting of a self-reported psychometric survey. We found that the prevalence of clinically significant depression in schizophrenic patients was 61%. The factors which contributed to the intensification of depressive symptoms were the external locus of control, anxiety, gloomy mood, and the emotion-oriented coping with stress. We conclude that psychological testing may discern those schizophrenic patients who would be at risk of depression development and may help separate the blurred boundaries between depressive and negative symptoms of schizophrenia.

  3. Haematuria in postrenal transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ziting; Vathsala, Anantharaman; Tiong, Ho Yee

    2015-01-01

    Haematuria has a prevalence of 12% in the postrenal transplant patient population. It heralds potentially dangerous causes which could threaten graft loss. It is important to consider causes in light of the unique, urological, and immunological standpoints of these patients. We review the literature on common causes of haematuria in postrenal transplant patients and suggest the salient approach to the evaluation of this condition. A major cause of haematuria is urinary tract infections. There should be a higher index of suspicion for mycobacterial, fungal, and viral infection in this group of immunosuppressed patients. Measures recommended in the prevention of urinary tract infections include early removal of foreign bodies as well as prophylactic antibiotics during the early transplant phase. Another common cause of haematuria is that of malignancies, in particular, renal cell carcinomas. When surgically managing cancer in the setting of a renal transplant, one has to be mindful of the limited retropubic space and the need to protect the anastomoses. Other causes include graft rejections, recurrences of primary disease, and calculus formation. It is important to perform a comprehensive evaluation with the aid of an experienced multidisciplinary transplant team.

  4. Nursing care of patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Szigeti, E

    1988-01-01

    Nursing interventions for each of the symptoms of Parkinson's disease, muscle rigidity, bradykinesia, tremors at rest and postural reflex abnormalities, are designed to increase the patient's quality of life by minimizing symptoms. Nurses are responsible for planning patient medication schedules to maximize drug effectiveness. Dietary implications include a low-protein regimen for the patient during the day, eliminating foods high in Vitamin B6, high caloric foods, and soft-solid foods offered at frequent feedings. Constipation is addressed by increasing the patient's fiber and fluid intake and by increasing the patient's mobility. Patient mobility is increased when the patient is taught purposeful activities and to concentrate on the way he walks. Communication is facilitated if the patient takes deep breaths before speaking and uses diaphragmatic speech. A telephone receiver which amplifies the patient's voice is also available. Interventions are good only if the patient chooses to implement them; he is the head of the health team planning his care.

  5. Noise control considerations for patient rooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davenny, Benjamin

    2005-09-01

    The patient room envelope is a path between outside noise sources and the patient receiver. Within the patient room there are several sources including televisions, clinical monitor alarms, medical pumps, etc. Noise control in patient rooms relies on a combination of the sound transmission loss of the patient room envelope and the level of background sound at the patient's head. Guidelines published by the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE), American Institute of Architects (AIA), and the U.S. Department of Defense for background noise and sound transmission loss in patient rooms will be discussed. Appropriate levels, spectra, and temporal characteristics of background sound at the patient head location may be helpful in raising the threshold of annoying sounds. Various means of personal hearing protection for patients will be discussed. Sound-pressure levels in patient rooms reported in previous literature will also be discussed.

  6. [Patients' rights--doctors' duties].

    PubMed

    Jaeger, L; Bertram, E; Grate, S; Mischkowsky, T; Paul, D; Probst, J; Scala, E; Wbllenweber, H D

    2015-06-01

    On 26 February 2013 the new "Law on Patients' Rights" (hereinafter also the "Law") became effective. This Law strengthens patients' rights vis-à-vis the insurdnce company and also regulates patients' rights regarding their relation to the doctor. This has consequences for the laws on medical liability all doctors must consider. The doctor's performance is and remains a service and such service does not hold any guarantee of success. Nevertheless, this Law primarily reads as a "law on the duties of physicians". To duly take into account these duties and to avoid mistakes and misinterpretation of the Law, the Ethics Committee of the Consortium of Osteosynthesis Trauma Germany (AOTRAUMA-D) has drafted comments on the Law. Brief summaries of its effects are to be found at the end of the respective comment under the heading "Consequences for Practice". The text of the law was influenced particularly by case law, as continuously developed by the German Federal Court of Justice ("BGH"). The implementation of the Law on Patients' Rights was effected by the newly inserted sections 630a to 630h of the German Civil Code (the "BGB"), which are analysed below. The following comments are addressed to physicians only and do not deal with the specific requirements and particularities of the other medical professions such as physiotherapy, midwifery and others so on. Special attention should be paid to the comments on the newly inserted Duty to inform, which has to be fullfilled prior to any diagnostic or therapeutic procedure (sec. 630c para 2 sentence 1 BGB). Under certain conditions the doctor also has to inform the patient about the circumstances that lead to the presumed occurance of a therapeutic or diagnostic malpractice (sec. 630c para. 2 sentence 2 BGB), based on the manifestation of an undesired event or an undesired outcome. As before, the patient's valid consent to any procedure (sec. 630d BGB) is directly linked to the comprehensive and timely provision of information

  7. Costs and prevention of patient defection.

    PubMed

    Clarke, R N

    2001-01-01

    Although other industries have recognized that increased customer loyalty brings increased revenues and profitability, few medical practices have sought even to measure patient retention or loyalty. When patients leave a practice, new patients must be attracted to replace lost ones at significant cost, often invisible to and underestimated by physicians. Understanding the lifetime value of a patient may be one route that leads to better patient loyalty practices and enhanced profitability.

  8. HDBuzz: empowering patients through accessible education.

    PubMed

    Wild, Edward J; Carroll, Jeffrey B

    2012-01-01

    Research and patient communities are firmly interdependent. Engaged patient communities provide biological samples and data that drive discoveries which, in turn, fuel the development of novel therapies. Historically, Huntington's disease (HD) has benefited from trusting interactions between scientists and patients. However, even for HD, communication between the research and patient communities is suboptimal. The web platform HDBuzz was created to rectify this situation by providing accurate, accessible information on the latest HD research to patients and their supporters.

  9. ECLS in Pediatric Cardiac Patients

    PubMed Central

    Di Nardo, Matteo; MacLaren, Graeme; Marano, Marco; Cecchetti, Corrado; Bernaschi, Paola; Amodeo, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Extracorporeal life support (ECLS) is an important device in the management of children with severe refractory cardiac and or pulmonary failure. Actually, two forms of ECLS are available for neonates and children: extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) and use of a ventricular assist device (VAD). Both these techniques have their own advantages and disadvantages. The intra-aortic balloon pump is another ECLS device that has been successfully used in larger children, adolescents, and adults, but has found limited applicability in smaller children. In this review, we will present the “state of art” of ECMO in neonate and children with heart failure. ECMO is commonly used in a variety of settings to provide support to critically ill patients with cardiac disease. However, a strict selection of patients and timing of intervention should be performed to avoid the increase in mortality and morbidity of these patients. Therefore, every attempt should be done to start ECLS “urgently” rather than “emergently,” before the presence of dysfunction of end organs or circulatory collapse. Even though exciting progress is being made in the development of VADs for long-term mechanical support in children, ECMO remains the mainstay of mechanical circulatory support in children with complex anatomy, particularly those needing rapid resuscitation and those with a functionally univentricular circulation. With the increase in familiarity with ECMO, new indications have been added, such as extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (ECPR). The literature supporting ECPR is increasing in children. Reasonable survival rates have been achieved after initiation of support during active compressions of the chest following in-hospital cardiac arrest. Contraindications to ECLS have reduced in the last 5 years and many centers support patients with functionally univentricular circulations. Improved results have been recently achieved in this complex subset of patients. PMID

  10. [Hemorheological alterations in hypertensive patients].

    PubMed

    Foresto, Patricia; D'Arrigo, Mabel; Filippini, Fernando; Gallo, Roberto; Barberena, Liliana; Racca, Liliana; Valverde, Juana; Rasia, Rodolfo J

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the blood viscosity profile and to evaluate the influence of plasmatic (fibrinogen) and cellular (erythrocyte aggregation) factors in a group of hypertensive patients, compared with a normotensive group. We worked with anticoagulated blood of both non diabetic hypertensive patients (n=31), and healthy individuals (n=40). The plasmatic viscosity and whole blood determination were obtained with a cone-plate viscometer. Erythrocyte aggregation was studied by microscopical observation and quantified by an Aggregate Shape Parameter (ASP), defined as the relation projected area/perimeter. Fibrinogen was determined by the Clauss method with a coagulometer. A comparison between these groups led us to assert that whole blood viscosity was significantly higher in hypertensive patients than in the controls at all shear rates. Plasma viscosity values only showed significant differences between both groups at low shear rate (1.15 a 11.56 seg(-1)). The hypertensive patients showed irregular and amorphous aggregates so that ASP appeared significantly higher (p< 0.001) in patients with hypertension (0.69 +/- 0.11) than in healthy subjects (0.25 +/- 0.12). Fibrinogen appeared slightly higher (p<0.01) in the hypertensive group than in the normal group. Several hemorheological parameters play important roles in the pathogenesis of hypertension. Among these factors, several hemorheological parameters could be altered in hypertension (hematocrit, plasma fibrinogen level, erythrocyte deformability and aggregability, plasma and whole blood viscosity). An increased RBC aggregation has been identified as an important factor responsible for disturbing blood rheological behavior in the microcirculation. The present study demonstrates an abnormal erythrocyte aggregation, which was detected by increased ASP values that could be responsible for vascular complications in hypertension.

  11. Patient recruitment workflow with and without a patient recruitment system.

    PubMed

    Trinczek, Benjamin; Schulte, Britta; Breil, Bernhard; Dugas, Martin

    2013-01-01

    In clinical trials (CTs), the process of patient recruitment (PR) is one of the main risk factors, as almost half of all trial delays are caused by problems in PR. To our knowledge, no publication in this field describes the process of PR. Therefore, weak spots and potential benefits cannot be identified. By interviewing six domain experts and modeling the workflow in a standardized way, we describe the actors, tasks and tools within PR. We compare the current workflow with Patient Recruitment System (PRS)-supported PR. The identification of eligible participants is the most complex part, but adding a PRS simplifies it by automating repetitive tasks and taking work off the Investigators' hands. This work contributes to a common understanding of the PR process.

  12. Applicability of different types of Patient Records for Patient Recruitment Systems.

    PubMed

    Schreiweis, Björn; Bergh, Björn

    2015-01-01

    Patient records--types of Electronic Medical Records--are implemented to support patient recruitment. Different types of patient records have not yet been analyzed as to the number of Patient Recruitment System requirements can be found in each type of patient record. According to our analysis, personal electronic health records (PEHRs) tend to allow for most requirements to be found.

  13. Ethically optimal interventions with impaired patients.

    PubMed

    Howe, Edmund G

    2014-01-01

    It may be difficult to imagine having a severe impairment such as quadriplegia or being dependent on a respirator. There is evidence that when careproviders make treatment decisions for patients who are in these situations, we imagine the patients are worse-off than they report they are -- most patients with even very severe impairments report that they greatly value being alive. This misperception may cause us to make treatment decisions for patients with impairments that we might not make for other patients. In this article I describe how to provide better care for patients who have impairments. This includes not presupposing that the patients' quality of life is decreased, considering with patients how outside factors may be limiting their functioning, and seeking to help offset these factors, if we can, when they exist, to avoid allowing patients' impairments to result in their being truly "disabled".

  14. Patient Experience in Health Center Medical Homes.

    PubMed

    Cook, Nicole; Hollar, Lucas; Isaac, Emmanuel; Paul, Ludmilla; Amofah, Anthony; Shi, Leiyu

    2015-12-01

    The Human Resource and Services Administration, Bureau of Primary Health Care Health Center program was developed to provide comprehensive, community-based quality primary care services, with an emphasis on meeting the needs of medically underserved populations. Health Centers have been leaders in adopting innovative approaches to improve quality care delivery, including the patient centered medical home (PCMH) model. Engaging patients through patient experience assessment is an important component of PCMH evaluation and a vital activity that can help drive patient-centered quality improvement initiatives. A total of 488 patients from five Health Center PCMHs in south Florida were surveyed in order to improve understanding of patient experience in Health Center PCMHs and to identify quality improvement opportunities. Overall patients reported very positive experience with patient-centeredness including being treated with courtesy and respect (85 % responded "always") and communication with their provider in a way that was easy to understand (87.7 % responded "always"). Opportunities for improvement included patient goal setting, referrals for patients with health conditions to workshops or educational programs, contact with the Health Center via phone and appointment availability. After adjusting for patient characteristics, results suggest that some patient experience components may be modified by educational attainment, years of care and race/ethnicity of patients. Findings are useful for informing quality improvement initiatives that, in conjunction with other patient engagement strategies, support Health Centers' ongoing transformation as PCMHs.

  15. Patient-Centered Communication: Basic Skills.

    PubMed

    Hashim, M Jawad

    2017-01-01

    Communication skills needed for patient-centered care include eliciting the patient's agenda with open-ended questions, especially early on; not interrupting the patient; and engaging in focused active listening. Understanding the patient's perspective of the illness and expressing empathy are key features of patient-centered communication. Understanding the patient's perspective entails exploring the patient's feelings, ideas, concerns, and experience regarding the impact of the illness, as well as what the patient expects from the physician. Empathy can be expressed by naming the feeling; communicating understanding, respect, and support; and exploring the patient's illness experience and emotions. Before revealing a new diagnosis, the patient's prior knowledge and preferences for the depth of information desired should be assessed. After disclosing a diagnosis, physicians should explore the patient's emotional response. Shared decision making empowers patients by inviting them to consider the pros and cons of different treatment options, including no treatment. Instead of overwhelming the patient with medical information, small chunks of data should be provided using repeated cycles of the "ask-tell-ask" approach. Training programs on patient-centered communication for health care professionals can improve communication skills.

  16. Renal failure in patients with multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Almueilo, Samir H

    2015-01-01

    Renal dysfunction is encountered in 20-25% of patients with multiple myeloma (MM) at the time of diagnosis. There is often a precipitating event. Several biochemical and clinical correlations with renal failure in MM have been reported. Renal failure in MM is associated with worse outcome of the disease. We retrospectively analyzed the medical records of 64 patients with MM admitted to our institution during the period January 1992 to December 2012. Abnormal renal function was observed in 24 (37.5%) patients and 17 (26.6%) of them had renal failure; 14 of the 17 (82.4%) of patients with renal failure had Stage III MM. Urine Bence- Jones protein was positive in ten (58.8%) patients with renal failure versus ten (21.3%) patients without renal failure (P = 0.004). Potential precipitating factors of renal failure were determined in nine patients. Renal function normalized in 11 patients with simple measures, while six patients required hemodialysis; one remained dialysis dependent till time of death. Early mortality occurred in five (29.4%) patients with renal failure as compared with two (4.3%) patients in the group without renal failure (P = 0.005). In conclusion, renal failure is associated with a higher tumor burden and Bence-Jones proteinuria in patients with MM. It is reversible in the majority of patients; however, early mortality tends to be higher in patients with persistent renal failure.

  17. Hypotensive Resuscitation among Trauma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Carrick, Matthew M.; Leonard, Jan; Slone, Denetta S.; Mains, Charles W.

    2016-01-01

    Hemorrhagic shock is a principal cause of death among trauma patients within the first 24 hours after injury. Optimal fluid resuscitation strategies have been examined for nearly a century, more recently with several randomized controlled trials. Hypotensive resuscitation, also called permissive hypotension, is a resuscitation strategy that uses limited fluids and blood products during the early stages of treatment for hemorrhagic shock. A lower-than-normal blood pressure is maintained until operative control of the bleeding can occur. The randomized controlled trials examining restricted fluid resuscitation have demonstrated that aggressive fluid resuscitation in the prehospital and hospital setting leads to more complications than hypotensive resuscitation, with disparate findings on the survival benefit. Since the populations studied in each randomized controlled trial are slightly different, as is the timing of intervention and targeted vitals, there is still a need for a large, multicenter trial that can examine the benefit of hypotensive resuscitation in both blunt and penetrating trauma patients. PMID:27595109

  18. [Patient safety in management contracts].

    PubMed

    Campillo-Artero, C

    2012-01-01

    Patient safety is becoming commonplace in management contracts. Since our experience in patient safety still falls short of other clinical areas, it is advisable to review some of its characteristics in order to improve its inclusion in these contracts. In this paper opinions and recommendations concerning the design and review of contractual clauses on safety are given, as well as reflections drawn from methodological papers and informal opinions of clinicians, who are most familiar with the nuances of safe and unsafe practices. After reviewing some features of these contracts, criteria for prioritizing and including safety objectives and activities in them, and key points for their evaluation are described. The need to replace isolated activities by systemic and multifaceted ones is emphasized. Errors, limitations and improvement opportunities observed when contracts are linked to indicators, information and adverse event reporting systems are analysed. Finally, the influence of the rules of the game, and clinicians behaviour are emphasised.

  19. Cardiac Emergencies in Neurosurgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    Petropolis, Andrea; Cappellani, Ronald B.

    2015-01-01

    Perioperative safety concerns are a major area of interest in recent years. Severe cardiac perturbation such as cardiac arrest is one of the most dreaded complications in the intraoperative period; however, little is known about the management of these events in the patients undergoing elective neurosurgery. This special group needs further attention, as it is often neither feasible nor appropriate to apply conventional advanced cardiac life support algorithms in patients undergoing neurosurgery. Factors such as neurosurgical procedure and positioning can also have a significant effect on the occurrence of cardiac arrest. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to describe the various causes and management of cardiac emergencies with special reference to cardiac arrest during elective neurosurgical procedures, including discussion of position-related factors and resuscitative considerations in these situations. This will help to formulate possible guidelines for management of such events. PMID:25692145

  20. Thromboembolic disease in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Hindi, Nadia; Cordero, Nazaret; Espinosa, Enrique

    2013-05-01

    Thromboembolic events are common among patients with cancer as a consequence of cancer- and treatment-related factors. As these events are the second most frequent cause of death in this population, their prevention and treatment are important. Venous ultrasonography is the technique of choice for diagnosis, with sensitivity and specificity above 95 % in symptomatic thrombosis. Routine prophylaxis is not recommended for ambulatory patients, although it could be useful in selected cases. On the other hand, all inpatients should receive prophylactic therapy unless contraindicated. Therapy of thromboembolic disease is based on anticoagulants. Clinical trials demonstrate that the use of low-weight heparins is associated with a lower incidence of bleeding and recurrent thrombosis as compared with non-fractionated heparin or warfarin. Options for recurrent thrombosis include change to another anticoagulant agent, increasing doses of the same agent and cava filters.

  1. When the patient says no.

    PubMed

    Soriano, Maria Aileen; Lagman, Ruth

    2012-08-01

    The need to ascertain appropriate decision-making capacity is greatest when dealing with refusals of lifesaving or life-prolonging treatment. This may be complicated by delirium, concurrent depression, metabolic disturbances or significant symptom burden, family conflicts, and social issues. This is a case of a 48-year-old patient with a long-standing history of a symptomatic pan-invasive pituitary adenoma who refused life-prolonging treatment. Ultimately, a patient must be able to understand the information given to him, evaluate the consequences of the options presented, deliberate on these options based on his values, communicate this choice, and maintain consistency overtime. These refusals of treatment may fluctuate with time and intensity of the illness. Denial of this right of autonomy and self-determination may worsen the individual's physical and existential suffering.

  2. Should psychiatrists 'Google' their patients?

    PubMed

    Ashby, G Alice; O'Brien, Aileen; Bowman, Deborah; Hooper, Carwyn; Stevens, Toby; Lousada, Esther

    2015-12-01

    Since its beginnings in the 1980s the internet has come to shape our everyday lives, but doctors still seem rather afraid of it. This anxiety may be explained by the fact that researchers and regulatory bodies focus less on the way that the internet can be used to enhance clinical work and more on the potential and perceived risks that this technology poses in terms of boundary violations and accidental breaches of confidentiality. Some aspects of the internet's impact on medicine have been better researched than others, for example, whether email communication, social media and teleconferencing psychotherapy could be used to improve the delivery of care. However, few authors have considered the specific issue of searching online for information about patients and much of the guidance published by regulatory organisations eludes this issue. In this article we provide clinical examples where the question 'should I Google the patient?' may arise and present questions for future research.

  3. Vascular aging and geriatric patient.

    PubMed

    Nicita-Mauro, V; Maltese, G; Nicita-Mauro, C; Basile, G

    2007-08-01

    Advancing age is associated with changes in structure and function of different segments of the vascular system and is the dominant risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. The oxidative stress represents a key event of vascular aging, mainly characterized by endothelium dysfunction and reduced arterial elasticity. Age-related changes include intimal and medial thickening, arterial calcification, increased deposition of matrix substances, thus leading to a reduced compliance and increased wall stiffness, that significantly contributes to an increase in systolic blood pressure. Frail elderly patients, because of their complex clinical presentations and needs, require a special approach: the comprehensive geriatric assessment, a multidimensional process intended to determine medical, psychosocial and functional capabilities and problems in order to develop a plan for treatment and continued care. All physicians, and geriatricians in particular, must, therefore, educate their patients to healthy lifestyle to prevent or delay vascular aging, cardiovascular diseases, and to maintain a good quality of life and increase life expectancy.

  4. Implementing an interprofessional patient record.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Paul; Anderson, Alan; Coyne, Clare; Beastall, Helen; Hill, Joanne

    2011-04-01

    This paper describes the implementation of an interprofessional patient record (IPPR) at Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust (STHFT). The IPPR was a two-year project, commencing in May 2008, aimed at creating a single IPPR to which all staff contribute. Prior to the IPPR, records were profession specific with nursing, medical and therapy staff keeping separate ones. This paper describes the process for the project including the stakeholder engagement plan, the development of IPPR standards, the education and training programme and the key measures used to assess implementation. The staff survey and clinical audit data suggest that the IPPR was successfully implemented with many of the perceived benefits realised. The keys to success of this major change project were: time spent engaging clinical staff, board level support, the appointment of a dedicated project team and the involvement and support of many staff involved in patient records throughout STHFT.

  5. Suspected infection in afebrile patients

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Fernanda de Souza; Guedes, Gisele Giuliane; Santos, Thiago Martins; de Carvalho-Filho, Marco A.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract We prospectively evaluated afebrile patients admitted to an emergency department (ED), with suspected infection and only tachycardia or tachypnea. The white blood cell count (WBC) was obtained, and patients were considered septic if leukocyte count was >12,000 μL–1 or <4000 μL–1 or with >10% of band forms. Clinical data were collected to examine whether sepsis could be predicted. Seventy patients were included and 37 (52.86%) met sepsis criteria. Self-measured fever showed an odds ratio (OR) of 5.936 (CI95% 1.450–24.295; P = 0.0133) and increased pulse pressure (PP) showed an OR of 1.405 (CI95% 1.004–1.964; P = 0.0471) on multivariate analysis. When vital signs were included in multivariate analysis, the heart rate showed an OR of 2.112 (CI95% 1.400–3.188; P = 0.0004). Self-measured fever and mean arterial pressure <70 mm Hg had high positive likelihood ratios (3.86 and 2.08, respectively). The nomogram for self-measured fever showed an increase of sepsis chance from 53% (pretest) to approximately 80% (post-test). The recognition of self-measured fever, increased PP, and the intensity of heart rate response may improve sepsis recognition in afebrile patients with tachycardia or tachypnea. These results are important for medical assessment of sepsis in remote areas, crowded and low-resourced EDs, and low-income countries, where WBC may not be readily available. PMID:28272257

  6. [Nutritional anemias in elderly patients].

    PubMed

    Serraj, Khalid; Federici, Laure; Kaltenbach, Georges; Andrès, Emmanuel

    2008-09-01

    Nutritional deficiencies cause one third of the cases of anemia in the elderly. The urgency of anemia management in elderly patients depends on tolerance and repercussions, rather than only on the hemoglobin level. Iron, vitamin B12 and folate are the most common deficiencies, and their levels should be tested. Chronic gastrointestinal bleeding is the principal cause of iron-deficiency anemia. Management is based on supplementation combined with effective etiological treatment.

  7. Observations on Hospitalized Dengue Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-01

    DENGUE PATIENTS IN MANILA Carman. R. Min oto* be" S. Siqpo Ommon D. Leus** Curds G. Ibyes* INTRODUCION to the Hospital of Infant Jesus between October...31, 1983 and March 31, 1984: Criteria for the diagnosis of dengue Dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) has been recognized infection were based on the...titer of later sample < 1:640. DHF epidemic.4𔃿 Since that time, there have only been a few- was differentiated from dengue fever (DF), and DHF was

  8. Ophthalmic Disparities in Transgender Patients.

    PubMed

    Hollar, Matthew W; Zhang, Matthew M; Mawn, Louise A

    2016-01-01

    Transgender individuals experience unique challenges with regards to discrimination and access to health care. Further, their unique health-care needs and challenges lead to greater rates of morbidity. This article seeks to review the unique biology of transgender patients and the effects of cross-sex hormone therapy on ophthalmic and non-ophthalmic pathology. Attention is given to topics in neuro-ophthalmology, oculoplastics, and retinal disease.

  9. Dental anomalies in mental patients.

    PubMed

    Moraes, N; Moraes, E; Cunha Marques, H H

    1975-01-01

    Fifty-three patients were examined for dental abnormalities at an institution specializing in care of the mentally deficient in Bauru, São Paulo State. The incidence of teeth with abnormal morphology, mainly second molars with an abnormal number of cusps, was extremely high. Enamel hypoplasia was frequently found in anterior teeth, and the percentage of fractured maxillary incisors was significantly higher than that observed in normal individuals.

  10. Prescribing for patients on dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Smyth, Brendan; Jones, Ceridwen; Saunders, John

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY The pharmacokinetics of a drug may be altered in patients with renal impairment who require dialysis. Some drugs are contraindicated. The drug’s clearance and therapeutic index determine if a dose adjustment is needed. A lower dose or less frequent dosing may be required. Consult a reference source or the patient’s nephrologist before prescribing. Start at a low dose and increase gradually. If possible give once-daily drugs after dialysis. PMID:27041803

  11. [Injuries in the elderly patients].

    PubMed

    Hładki, Waldemar; Brongel, Leszek; Lorkowski, Jacek

    2006-01-01

    More and more higher development of civilisation causes constant lengthening of life in humans. Changes, which occur during growing old of organism predispose to increased risk of trauma. Financial cost of medical treatment of injuries in elderly are higher and higher. Degenerative disease of joints, osteoporosis, earlier body injuries and co-existing other diseases are important risk factors of trauma. Deficiencies of eyesight, hearing and prolonged time reaction are other strengthening risk of trauma. Falls and motor-vehicle accidents are the most frequent causes of trauma in elderly. Distal radius fracture, fracture of the proximal femur bone and compressive vertebral fracture of spine are typical fractures in the skeletal system. Head injuries are the most frequent cause of death in this group of patients. Limited functional reserves, especially in the respiratory and circulatory system brings difficulties in the treatment of even not dangerous injuries of chest and increases risks of infectious complications in respiratory system and finally may lead to organ failure. Elderly patients need more precise physical examination and diagnostics because essential information from the patient's history are often difficult to obtain. Indications to hospitalisation should be often widened even at not dangerous injuries, because the patients may demand intensive analgesic treatment and nursing. Necessity of care provided by other persons, poor care in household conditions, and inadequate social circumstances extend also indications to hospitalisation. There is a need to creation of nursing care departments for considerable group of injured persons who finished proper hospital-treatment, but because of the above-mentioned reasons cannot exist at home.

  12. [Deglutition disorders in elderly patients].

    PubMed

    Menasria, Feriel; Lakroun, Samia; David, Jean-Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Deglutition disorders are frequent in elderly patients and can lead to serious consequences in terms of morbidity and mortality. Despite an easy screening test with the water, they are ignored or underestimated. Moreover, early detection and treatment focused essentially on the adaptation of textures, postures as well as the provision of information and training to all the people involved in feeding the elderly person require few resources and provide a real benefit.

  13. Oral complications in cancer patients

    SciTech Connect

    Carl, W.

    1983-02-01

    Ionizing radiation used in treating the head and neck area produces oral side effects such as mucositis, salivary changes, trismus and radiation caries. Sequelae of cancer chemotherapy often include oral stomatitis, myelosuppression and immunosuppression. Infections of dental origin in compromised patients are potentially lethal. Specific programs to eliminate dental pathology before radiation and chemotherapy, and to maintain oral hygiene during and after therapy, will minimize these complications.

  14. [Levofloxacin prophylaxis in neutropenic patients].

    PubMed

    Carena, Alberto A; Jorge, Laura; Bonvehí, Pablo; Temporiti, Elena; Zárate, Mariela S; Herrera, Fabián

    2016-01-01

    Fluorquinolone-prophylaxis has proven useful in preventing infections in high risk neutropenic patients. The objective of this study was to describe the clinical, microbiological and therapeutic characteristics, and outcome of patients in the first episode of febrile neutropenia, comparing those who received levofloxacin prophylaxis with those who didn't. It was a prospective observational study that included all the episodes of inpatients with febrile neutropenia (February 1997- November 2014), also including the first episode in a same patient in different hospitalizations. Of 946 episodes here included, 821 presented high risk febrile neutropenia. A total of 264 cases (27.9%) received levofloxacin prophylaxis. This group consisted of a higher proportion of high risk febrile neutropenia (99.2% vs. 82.3%, p = 0.0001) and patients that had received an hematopoietic stem cell transplant (67.8% vs. 29.3%, p = 0.0001) compared to those who didn't receive prophylaxis. Those who received levofloxacin prophylaxis presented a similar frequency of clinically diagnosed but a lower proportion of microbiologically documented infections (28.8% vs. 37.5%, p = 0.012) than those who didn't receive prophylaxis. The episodes of bacteremia that occurred in the first group were more frequently caused by multidrug resistant bacteria (MDRB) (34.5% vs. 17.3%, p = 0.007) and by extended spectrum beta lactamase producing Enterobacteriaceae (19% vs. 3.8%, p = 0.0001). The group that received prophylaxis had a lower proportion of adequate empirical antibiotic treatment (69.7% vs. 83.7%, p = 0.009), with similar outcomes in both groups. We suggest that levofloxacin prophylaxis should be stopped whenever there is a rise in the frequency of MDRB infections in this population.

  15. Cancer Screening in Older Patients.

    PubMed

    Salzman, Brooke; Beldowski, Kathryn; de la Paz, Amanda

    2016-04-15

    Although cancer is the second leading cause of death among persons 65 years and older, there is a paucity of clinical trial data about the effectiveness and harms of cancer screening in this population. Given the heterogeneous nature of the older population, cancer screening in these patients should not be based on age alone. Studies suggest that a life expectancy of at least 10 years is necessary to derive a survival benefit from screening for breast and colorectal cancers; therefore, screening for these cancers is not recommended in those with a life expectancy of less than 10 years. Prostate cancer screening, if performed at all, should not be performed after 69 years of age. Cervical cancer screening may be stopped after 65 years of age if the patient has an adequate history of negative screening results. An individualized approach to cancer screening decisions involves estimating life expectancy, determining the potential benefits and harms of screenings, and weighing those benefits and harms in relation to the patient's values and preferences.

  16. Rehabilitation of the burn patient

    PubMed Central

    Procter, Fiona

    2010-01-01

    Rehabilitation is an essential and integral part of burn treatment. It is not something which takes place following healing of skin grafts or discharge from hospital; instead it is a process that starts from day one of admission and continues for months and sometimes years after the initial event. Burns rehabilitation is not something which is completed by one or two individuals but should be a team approach, incorporating the patient and when appropriate, their family. The term ‘Burns Rehabilitation’ incorporates the physical, psychological and social aspects of care and it is common for burn patients to experience difficulties in one or all of these areas following a burn injury. Burns can leave a patient with severely debilitating and deforming contractures, which can lead to significant disability when left untreated. The aims of burn rehabilitation are to minimise the adverse effects caused by the injury in terms of maintaining range of movement, minimising contracture development and impact of scarring, maximising functional ability, maximising psychological wellbeing, maximising social integration PMID:21321643

  17. Piperacillin pharmacokinetics in pediatric patients.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, C B; Koup, J R; Opheim, K E; Adelman, L A; Levy, J; Stull, T L; Clausen, C; Smith, A L

    1982-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of piperacillin were studied in 15 pediatric patients (age range, 3.3 to 14.3 years). Piperacillin was administered in a dosage of 1.5 +/- 0.4 g/m2 (mean +/- standard deviation) every 4 to 6 h. Peak serum concentrations ranged from 69 to 354 micrograms/ml. The mean elimination half-life was 37.0 +/- 13.3 min, which is shorter than that observed in most adults with normal renal function. The mean elimination half-life in three patients with renal impairment was 60.1 +/- 12.4 min, and the mean ratio of renal clearance to total clearance was 0.57. These results suggest a significant nonrenal elimination of piperacillin. Based on these data, a dosage of 1.5 g/m2 given as a 30-min infusion every 4 h is suggested for children with normal renal function. For patients with renal impairment, the daily dosage could be calculated as follows: corrected dose = normal dose x (0.35 + [0.65 x (ClCr/0.06)]), where ClCr is the creatinine clearance expressed as liters per minute per square meter. PMID:6215893

  18. Dimensional psychopharmacology in somatising patients.

    PubMed

    Biondi, Massimo; Pasquini, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Despite the recent DSM-5 review of somatoform disorders, which are now called somatic symptom and related disorders, the categorical definitions of these syndromes have inherent limitations because their causal mechanism or presumed aetiologies are still unknown. These limitations may affect everyday clinical practice and decision-making abilities. As a result, physicians have limited information at their disposal to treat these patients. Furthermore, the clinical presentations of somatic disorders may vary a lot. The purpose of this chapter is to illustrate a psychopathological dimensional approach to the somatising patient. This approach is constantly unconsciously applied in clinical practice using continuous variables, such as rating scales. Moreover, treatment strategies might be improved by adding a dimensional approach, simply recognising the prominent components of the presenting psychopathology of a given patient and addressing them with drugs according to their different mechanisms, targeting circuits and neurotransmitters. Some authors have proposed a shift from the nosological to functional application of psychotropic drugs, in which functional psychopharmacology will be dysfunction oriented and therefore inevitably geared towards utilising drug combinations. Here, we present a summary of the advantages of functional/dimensional psychopharmacology for the treatment of somatic symptoms and related disorders.

  19. Carnitine in maintenance hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Guarnieri, Gianfranco

    2015-03-01

    Carnitine is a conditionally essential metabolite that plays a critical role in cell physiology. Carnitine is necessary for fatty acid transport to sites of beta-oxidation in the mitochondria, where it also helps to prevent organic acid accumulation. Because of these key regulatory functions, carnitine represents a crucial determinant of mitochondrial energy metabolism, whose deficiency may lead to metabolic and clinical disturbances. Loss of carnitine through dialytic membranes occurs in maintenance hemodialysis, resulting in potential carnitine depletion and relative increments of esterified carnitine forms. Carnitine supplementation has been reported to counteract some of these alterations and has been associated with some clinical benefits, such as enhanced response to erythropoietin as well as improvement in exercise tolerance, intradialytic symptom, hyperparathyroidism, insulin resistance, inflammatory and oxidant status, protein balance, lipid profile, cardiac function, and quality of life. Carnitine supplementation has an attractive theoretical rationale; however, there are no definitive supportive studies and conclusive evidence that L-carnitine supplementation in maintenance hemodialysis patients could improve these conditions. A trial of carnitine administration could be attempted for 6 to 12 months only in selected patients on dialysis who do not adequately respond to standard therapies, in the presence of symptomatology, and in conjunction with patient dialysis age and documented L-carnitine deficiency.

  20. Delirium in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Slooter, A J C; Van De Leur, R R; Zaal, I J

    2017-01-01

    Delirium is common in critically ill patients and associated with increased length of stay in the intensive care unit (ICU) and long-term cognitive impairment. The pathophysiology of delirium has been explained by neuroinflammation, an aberrant stress response, neurotransmitter imbalances, and neuronal network alterations. Delirium develops mostly in vulnerable patients (e.g., elderly and cognitively impaired) in the throes of a critical illness. Delirium is by definition due to an underlying condition and can be identified at ICU admission using prediction models. Treatment of delirium can be improved with frequent monitoring, as early detection and subsequent treatment of the underlying condition can improve outcome. Cautious use or avoidance of benzodiazepines may reduce the likelihood of developing delirium. Nonpharmacologic strategies with early mobilization, reducing causes for sleep deprivation, and reorientation measures may be effective in the prevention of delirium. Antipsychotics are effective in treating hallucinations and agitation, but do not reduce the duration of delirium. Combined pain, agitation, and delirium protocols seem to improve the outcome of critically ill patients and may reduce delirium incidence.

  1. Patient advocacy and DSM-5.

    PubMed

    Stein, Dan J; Phillips, Katharine A

    2013-05-17

    The revision of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) provides a useful opportunity to revisit debates about the nature of psychiatric classification. An important debate concerns the involvement of mental health consumers in revisions of the classification. One perspective argues that psychiatric classification is a scientific process undertaken by scientific experts and that including consumers in the revision process is merely pandering to political correctness. A contrasting perspective is that psychiatric classification is a process driven by a range of different values and that the involvement of patients and patient advocates would enhance this process. Here we draw on our experiences with input from the public during the deliberations of the Obsessive Compulsive-Spectrum Disorders subworkgroup of DSM-5, to help make the argument that psychiatric classification does require reasoned debate on a range of different facts and values, and that it is appropriate for scientist experts to review their nosological recommendations in the light of rigorous consideration of patient experience and feedback.

  2. Patient dosimetry in nuclear medicine.

    PubMed

    Mattsson, Sören

    2015-07-01

    In diagnostic nuclear medicine, the biokinetics of the radiopharmaceutical (actually of the radionuclide) is determined for a number of representative patients. At therapy, it is essential to determine the patient's individual biokinetics of the radiopharmaceutical in order to calculate the absorbed doses to critical normal organs/tissues and to the target volume(s) with high accuracy. For the diagnostic situations, there is still a lack of quantitative determinations of the organ/tissue contents of radiopharmaceuticals and their variation with time. Planar gamma camera imaging using the conjugate view technique combined with a limited number of SPECT/CT images is the main method for such studies. In a similar way, PET/CT is used for 3D image-based internal dosimetry for PET substances. The transition from stylised reference phantoms to voxel phantoms will lead to improved dose estimates for diagnostic procedures. Examples of dose coefficients and effective doses for diagnostic substances are given. For the therapeutic situation, a pre-therapeutic low activity administration is used for quantitative measurements of organ/tissue distribution data by a gamma camera or a SPECT- or PET-unit. Together with CT and/or MR images this will be the base for individual dose calculations using Monte Carlo technique. Treatments based on administered activity should only be used if biological variations between patients are small or if a pre-therapeutic activity administration is impossible.

  3. Quality Assurance: Patient Chart Reviews

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oginni, B. M.; Odero, D. O.

    2009-07-01

    Recent developments in radiation therapy have immensely impacted the way the radiation dose is delivered to patients undergoing radiation treatments. However, the fundamental quality assurance (QA) issues underlying the radiation therapy still remain the accuracy of the radiation dose and the radiation safety. One of the major duties of clinical medical physicists in the radiation therapy departments still revolves around ensuring the accuracy of dose delivery to the planning target volume (PTV), the reduction of unintended radiation to normal organs and minimization of the radiation exposure to the medical personnel based on ALARA (as low as reasonably achievable) principle. Many of the errors in radiation therapy can be minimized through a comprehensive program of periodic checks. One of the QA procedures on the patient comes in the form of chart reviews which could be in either electronic or paper-based format. We present the quality assurance procedures that have to be performed on the patient records from the beginning and periodically to the end of the treatment, based on the guidelines from the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) and American College of Physicians (ACP).

  4. Patient moderator interaction in online health communities.

    PubMed

    Huh, Jina; McDonald, David W; Hartzler, Andrea; Pratt, Wanda

    2013-01-01

    An increasing number of people visit online health communities to share experiences and seek health information. Although studies have enumerated reasons for patients' visits to online communities for health information from peers, we know little about how patients gain health information from the moderators in these communities. We qualitatively analyze 480 patient and moderator posts from six communities to understand how moderators fulfill patients' information needs. Our findings show that patients use the community as an integral part of their health management practices. Based on our results, we suggest enhancements to moderated online health communities for their unique role to support patient care.

  5. How to Create "Wow" for Your Patients.

    PubMed

    Hyken, Shep; Baum, Neil

    2015-01-01

    It is going to become very important to pay attention to patient satisfaction, because soon physicians' incomes will be based on how well they provide their patients with a positive experience. It will not be adequate to just make the diagnosis and treat the patient successfully. All physicians are trained to do that. Now patient satisfaction will require that physicians go above and beyond merely providing a diagnosis and treatment. This article suggests 11 techniques to provide patients with a "wow" experience and achieve outstanding patient satisfaction.

  6. 76 FR 7853 - Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Delisting From Oregon Patient Safety Commission

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-11

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Delisting From Oregon Patient Safety Commission AGENCY: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), HHS. ACTION: Notice of delisting. SUMMARY: Oregon Patient Safety Commission: AHRQ has accepted...

  7. 76 FR 9350 - Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Delisting From Rocky Mountain Patient Safety Organization

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-17

    ... Delisting From Rocky Mountain Patient Safety Organization AGENCY: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), HHS. ACTION: Notice of Delisting. SUMMARY: Rocky Mountain Patient Safety Organization: AHRQ has accepted a notification of voluntary relinquishment from Rocky Mountain Patient Safety Organization,...

  8. 78 FR 40146 - Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Relinquishment From Northern Metropolitan Patient Safety...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-03

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Relinquishment From Northern Metropolitan Patient Safety Institute AGENCY: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), HHS. ACTION: Notice of Delisting. SUMMARY: The Patient Safety and Quality Improvement...

  9. 78 FR 59036 - Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Relinquishment From Cogent Patient Safety Organization, Inc.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-25

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Relinquishment From Cogent Patient Safety Organization, Inc. AGENCY: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality... Patient Safety Organizations (PSOs), which collect, aggregate, and analyze confidential...

  10. Dissociative symptomatology in cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Civilotti, Cristina; Castelli, Lorys; Binaschi, Luca; Cussino, Martina; Tesio, Valentina; Di Fini, Giulia; Veglia, Fabio; Torta, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The utilization of the post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) diagnostic spectrum is currently being debated to categorize psychological adjustment in cancer patients. The aims of this study were to: (1) evaluate the presence of cancer-related traumatic dissociative symptomatology in a sample of cancer patients; (2) examine the correlation of cancer-related dissociation and sociodemographic and medical variables, anxiety, depression, and post-traumatic stress symptomatology; (3) investigate the predictors of cancer-related dissociation. Methods: Ninety-two mixed cancer patients (mean age: 58.94, ds = 10.13) recruited from two hospitals in northern Italy were administered a questionnaire on sociodemographic and medical characteristics, the Karnofsky Scale to measure the level of patient activity and medical care requirements, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) to evaluate the presence of anxiety and depression, the Impact of Event Scale Revised (IES-R) to assess the severity of intrusion, avoidance, and hypervigilance, and the Peritraumatic Dissociative Experiences Questionnaire (PDEQ) to quantify the traumatic dissociative symptomatology. Results: 31.5% of participants report a PDEQ score above the cutoff. The results indicated that dissociative symptomatology was positively correlated with HADS scores (HADS-Anxiety: r = 0.476, p < 0.001; HADS-Depression: r = 0.364, p < 0.001) and with IES-R scores (IES-R-Intrusion: r = 0.698, p < 0.001; IES-R-Avoidance: r = 0.619, p < 0.001; IES-R- Hypervigilance: r = 0.681, p < 0.001). A stepwise regression analysis was performed in order to find the predictors of cancer-related traumatic dissociative symptomatology. The results converged on a three predictor model revealing that IES-R-Intrusion, IES-R-Avoidance, and IES-R-Hyperarousal accounted for 53.9% of the explained variance. Conclusion: These findings allow us to hypothesize a specific psychological reaction which may be ascribed to the traumatic

  11. Partnering With a Patient and Family Advisory Council to Improve Patient Care Experiences With Pain Management.

    PubMed

    Bookout, Michelle L; Staffileno, Beth A; Budzinsky, Christine M

    2016-04-01

    Patient-centered care is a key driver for the nation's health system, yet patient experience surveys indicate that hospitals are far from achieving favorable outcomes. Partnering with patients and families through a patient and family advisory council (PFAC) advances the practice of patient-centered care to improve outcomes and experiences. This article describes the process of implementing a PFAC and presents outcomes related to patients' perception of pain management in the acute care hospital setting.

  12. Patients’ views on electronic patient information leaflets

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background: Information in society and in health care is currently undergoing a transition from paper to digital formats, and the main source of information will probably be electronic in the future. Objective: To explore patients’ use and perceptions of the patient information leaflet included in the medication package, and their attitude towards a transition to an electronic version. Methods: The data was collected during October to November 2014 among individuals in South-Eastern Sweden, using a questionnaire (n=406, response rate 78%) and interviews (n=15). Results: The questionnaire showed that the majority of the respondents (52%) occasionally read the patient information leaflet, 37% always read it, and 11% never read it. Almost half of the patients (41%) were positive towards reading the patient information leaflet electronically while 32% were hesitant and 26% neutral. A majority of the patients would request to get the patient information leaflet printed at the pharmacy if it was not included in the package. There were differences in attitude related to age and gender. The interviews showed that patients had mixed views on a transition to an electronic patient information leaflet. The patients perceived several positive aspects with an electronic patient information leaflet but were concerned about elderly patients. Conclusion: Although many were positive towards reading the patient information leaflet electronically, the majority prefer the patient information leaflet in paper form. Providing appropriate and useful eHealth services for patients to access the patient information leaflet electronically, along with education, could prepare patients for a transition to electronic patient information leaflet. PMID:27382423

  13. Patient-to-patient transmission of hepatitis B virus associated with oral surgery.

    PubMed

    Redd, John T; Baumbach, Joan; Kohn, William; Nainan, Omana; Khristova, Marina; Williams, Ian

    2007-05-01

    We used molecular epidemiologic techniques to document patient-to-patient transmission of hepatitis B virus (HBV) between 2 outpatient oral surgery patients operated on 161 min apart. Serological testing of 25 (93%) of 27 patients operated on after the source patient revealed that 19 (76%) of 25 were previously immune to HBV; no additional cases were identified. We found no deficiencies in infection control practices. Transmission may have been limited by the high prevalence (64%) of patients vaccinated against HBV. To our knowledge, this is the first documented case of patient-to-patient transmission of a bloodborne pathogen in a dental setting in the United States.

  14. Splitting in-patient and out-patient responsibility does not improve patient care.

    PubMed

    Burns, Tom; Baggaley, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Over the past 15 years there has been a move away from consultants having responsibility for the care of patients both in the community and when in hospital towards a functional split in responsibility. In this article Tom Burns and Martin Baggaley debate the merits or otherwise of the split, identifying leadership, expertise and continuity of care as key issues; both recognise that this move is not evidence based.

  15. Pulling a patient up in bed

    MedlinePlus

    Moving a patient in bed ... takes at least 2 people to safely move a patient up in bed. Friction from rubbing can ... A slide sheet is the best way to prevent friction. If you do not have one, you ...

  16. Small spinal fractures in back pain patients.

    PubMed Central

    Sims-Williams, H; Jayson, M I; Baddeley, H

    1978-01-01

    Small fractures in the posterior elements of the spine were identified by stereoscopic radiography in 7 patients suffering from back pain. The clinical data on these 7 patients are presented. Images PMID:150824

  17. Preoperative nuclear scans in patients with melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Au, F.C.; Maier, W.P.; Malmud, L.S.; Goldman, L.I.; Clark, W.H. Jr.

    1984-05-15

    One hundred forty-one liver scans, 137 brain scans, and 112 bone scans were performed in 192 patients with clinical Stage 1 melanoma. One liver scan was interpreted as abnormal; liver biopsy of that patient showed no metastasis. There were 11 suggestive liver scans; three of the patients with suggestive liver scans had negative liver biopsies. The remaining eight patients were followed from 4 to 6 years and none of those patients developed clinical evidence of hepatic metastases. All of the brain scans were normal. Five patients had suggestive bone scans and none of those patients had manifested symptoms of osseous metastases with a follow-up of 2 to 4.5 years. This study demonstrates that the use of preoperative liver, brain and bone scan in the evaluation of patients with clinical Stage 1 melanoma is virtually unproductive.

  18. Mechanisms of hyponatraemia in alcohol patients.

    PubMed

    Liamis, G L; Milionis, H J; Rizos, E C; Siamopoulos, K C; Elisaf, M S

    2000-01-01

    Hyponatraemia is commonly reported in chronic alcoholic patients. However, the underlying pathogenetic mechanisms are not well delineated. In the current study, we analysed the possible pathophysiological mechanisms of hyponatraemia in a group of alcoholic patients (n = 127) admitted to our hospital for causes related to alcohol misuse. Hyponatraemia (serum sodium <134 mmol/l) was found in 22 patients (17.3%). The most common cause of hyponatraemia in our cohort was hypovolaemia (12 patients); pseudohyponatraemia was diagnosed in six patients with alcohol-induced severe hypertriglyceridaemia. It is of interest that two patients fulfilled the criteria of the so-called 'beer potomania' syndrome, while in two others, hyponatraemia was due to reset osmostat or to cerebral salt wasting syndrome, not previously described in alcoholic patients. It is concluded that hyponatraemia is a frequently observed electrolyte disorder in hospitalized alcoholic patients and is related to various pathophysiological mechanisms.

  19. Reconstruction of mandibular defects in irradiated patients

    SciTech Connect

    Klotch, D.W.; Gump, J.; Kuhn, L. )

    1990-10-01

    In this prospective study, mandibular reconstruction using titanium plates was evaluated in 31 patients treated between July 1988 and January 1990. Sixteen patients had prior surgery; 13 had prior radiotherapy. In 11 patients, prior radiation and surgery had failed. Sixteen patients received postoperative radiotherapy either in standard or accelerated fractions. Twelve patients had complications of either intraoral (8), extraoral (5), or combined (1) plate exposure or fistula formation (2). Factors significantly related to complications were poor nutrition, accelerated radiation, and recurrence. Sixty-one percent of all patients healed uneventfully. When patients with complications secondary to recurrence who subsequently died were excluded, the success rate was 73%. Only one patient had an unacceptable result that produced a cosmetic and functional deformity despite secondary repair.

  20. Integrating protocol schedules with patients' personal calendars.

    PubMed

    Civan, Andrea; Gennari, John H; Pratt, Wanda

    2006-01-01

    We propose a new approach for integrating protocol care schedules into patients' personal calendars. This approach could provide patients with greater control over their current and future scheduling demands as they seek and receive protocol-based care.