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Sample records for gnotobiotic mice infected

  1. Role of Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha in Gnotobiotic Mice Infected with an Escherichia coli O157:H7 Strain

    PubMed Central

    Isogai, Emiko; Isogai, Hiroshi; Kimura, Koichi; Hayashi, Shunji; Kubota, Toru; Fujii, Nobuhiro; Takeshi, Koichi

    1998-01-01

    Gnotobiotic mice inoculated with an enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:H7 strain developed a flaccid paresis, usually culminating in death. The bacteria colonized feces at 109 to 1010 CFU per g (inoculum size: 2.0 × 109 CFU/mouse), and Shiga-like toxins (SLTs) were detected in the feces. A microscopic examination of colons showed mild inflammatory cell infiltration, thinning of the intestinal wall, or necrotic foci. Necrosis of tubular cells was noted in these symptomatic mice. Microhemorrhage, thrombosis, and edematous changes of the brain were also seen. Inflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin 1α (IL-1α), and IL-6, were detected in the kidney after EHEC infection, but not in the serum. In the brain, only TNF-α was detected. When 2.0 × 102 CFU of EHEC O157:H7 was fed to germ-free mice, the number of bacteria began to rise rapidly on day 1 and was maintained at 108 to 109 CFU/g of feces. SLTs were detected in the feces of the mice. However, the mice showed no histological changes and no cytokine responses, similar to what was found for controls. Treatment with TNF-α modified the clinical neural signs, histopathological changes, and cytokine responses; mice treated with TNF-α developed severe neurotoxic symptoms and had higher frequencies of systemic symptoms and glomerular pathology. Strong cytokine responses were seen in the kidney and brain. Serum cytokines were also detected in this group. In contrast, a TNF-α inhibitor (protease inhibitor) inhibited these responses, especially in the brain. However, local synthesis of the cytokines was observed in the kidney. Thus, TNF-α and the other proinflammatory cytokines could be important in modifying the disease caused by EHEC. PMID:9423858

  2. Effect of the Escherichia coli EMO strain on experimental infection by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in gnotobiotic mice.

    PubMed

    Lima-Filho, J V M; Vieira, L Q; Arantes, R M E; Nicoli, J R

    2004-07-01

    An experimental infection with Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium was evaluated in gnotobiotic mice previously exposed to a plasmid-free non-pathogenic Escherichia coli (EMO strain). Mice were exposed to EMO (experimental) or not (control) 10 days before challenge with Salmonella Typhimurium (10(2) colony forming units (CFU)/mouse). Survival after challenge was higher (P < 0.05) in the experimental group (16%) than in the control animals (0%). Histopathological examination of the colon and ileum mucosa of the experimental group showed less extensive lesions such as edema, cell inflammatory infiltration and hyperemia. The epithelial cells of the mucosal surface and the production of the mucous layer were also better preserved in the experimental group. The population levels of Salmonella Typhimurium in the feces were initially 10-fold lower (P < 0.05) in the experimental groups. However, 3 days after challenge both experimental and control groups showed similar population levels ranging from 10(8) to 10(9) CFU/g of feces. The intestinal contents of total and anti-Salmonella Typhimurium sIgA were higher in the experimental groups 10 days after inoculation of E. coli EMO strain. Translocation of Salmonella Typhimurium to the spleen was 10-fold lower (P < 0.05) in the experimental group only on day 3 after infection. This was not related to an increase in the bacterial blood clearance of the animals, as shown by experimental venous challenge with E. coli B41. In conclusion, treatment of mice with E. coli EMO strain promoted a relative protection against experimental infection with Salmonella Typhimurium. This protection was not due to the reduction of the population of pathogens in the intestine but was probably related to stimulation of the immune response.

  3. Effects of oxidative stress on the virulence profile of Prevotella intermedia during experimental infection in gnotobiotic mice.

    PubMed

    Santos, Simone G; Diniz, Claúdio G; Silva, Vânia L; Martins, Wanderlany A; Cara, Denise C; Souza, Natalia C; Serufo, José C; Nicoli, Jacques R; Carvalho, Maria Auxiliadora R; Farias, Luiz M

    2007-03-01

    Prevotella intermedia is a component of the indigenous microbiota but is also responsible for anaerobic infections of the gastrointestinal tract and oral cavity. The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of oxidative stress on the in vivo pathogenicity of P. intermedia. Germ-free mice were challenged intraperitoneally with parental (wt) or oxidative stress adapted (aero) strains. Bacterial virulence was evaluated by histopathology, hyperaemia and blood analysis [C-reactive protein (CRP), serum albumin and white blood cells (WBCs)], 3 and 10 days after challenge. CRP levels and WBC count were higher in animals challenged with the aero strain, and the albumin level was lower in this group, only 10 days after infection (P<0.05). Body weight gain was significantly reduced whereas hyperaemia and ratios of spleen/organ weight were increased in animals challenged with the aero strain (P<0.05). The liver of animals challenged with the aero strain showed hyperaemia, vasodilatation as well as an increase in the number of inflammatory cells and liver/organ weight ratio (P<0.05). Similar, but more discrete, alterations were observed in the small intestine of animals challenged with the aero strain. Studies on stress responses of this putative pathogen may help to better understand the aggressive potential and virulence markers of anaerobic bacteria.

  4. Prevention of Helicobacter pylori infection by lactobacilli in a gnotobiotic murine model.

    PubMed Central

    Kabir, A M; Aiba, Y; Takagi, A; Kamiya, S; Miwa, T; Koga, Y

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Helicobacter pylori is a bacterium which causes gastric inflammatory diseases. Oral inoculation of H pylori usually results in only a temporary colonisation without a successful infection in the stomach of conventional mice in which lactobacilli are the predominant indigenous bacteria. AIM: To determine whether lactobacilli exert an inhibitory effect on colonisation by H pylori in the stomach. METHODS: The effects of H pylori on attachment to murine and human gastric epithelial cells and the H pylori mediated release of interleukin-8 (IL-8) by these cells were examined in vitro. Lactobacillus salivarius infected gnotobiotic BALB/c mice and control germ free mice were inoculated orally with H pylori to examine whether L salivarius can inhibit colonisation by H pylori. RESULTS: L salivarius inhibited both the attachment and IL-8 release in vitro. H pylori could not colonise the stomach of L salivarius infected gnotobiotic BALB/c mice, but colonised in large numbers and subsequently caused active gastritis in germ free mice. In addition, L salivarius given after H pylori implantation could eliminate colonisation by H pylori. CONCLUSION: These findings suggest the possibility of lactobacilli being used as probiotic agents against H pylori. Images PMID:9274471

  5. Enterobacter cloacae inhibits human norovirus infectivity in gnotobiotic pigs

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Shaohua; Samuel, Helen; Twitchell, Erica; Bui, Tammy; Ramesh, Ashwin; Wen, Ke; Weiss, Mariah; Li, Guohua; Yang, Xingdong; Jiang, Xi; Yuan, Lijuan

    2016-01-01

    Human noroviruses (HuNoVs) are the leading cause of epidemic gastroenteritis worldwide. Study of HuNoV biology has been hampered by the lack of an efficient cell culture system. Recently, enteric commensal bacteria Enterobacter cloacae has been recognized as a helper in HuNoV infection of B cells in vitro. To test the influences of E. cloacae on HuNoV infectivity and to determine whether HuNoV infects B cells in vivo, we colonized gnotobiotic pigs with E. cloacae and inoculated pigs with 2.74 × 104 genome copies of HuNoV. Compared to control pigs, reduced HuNoV shedding was observed in E. cloacae colonized pigs, characterized by significantly shorter duration of shedding in post-inoculation day 10 subgroup and lower cumulative shedding and peak shedding in individual pigs. Colonization of E. cloacae also reduced HuNoV titers in intestinal tissues and in blood. In both control and E. cloacae colonized pigs, HuNoV infection of enterocytes was confirmed, however infection of B cells was not observed in ileum, and the entire lamina propria in sections of duodenum, jejunum, and ileum were HuNoV-negative. In summary, E. cloacae inhibited HuNoV infectivity, and B cells were not a target cell type for HuNoV in gnotobiotic pigs, with or without E. cloacae colonization. PMID:27113278

  6. Enterobacter cloacae inhibits human norovirus infectivity in gnotobiotic pigs.

    PubMed

    Lei, Shaohua; Samuel, Helen; Twitchell, Erica; Bui, Tammy; Ramesh, Ashwin; Wen, Ke; Weiss, Mariah; Li, Guohua; Yang, Xingdong; Jiang, Xi; Yuan, Lijuan

    2016-04-26

    Human noroviruses (HuNoVs) are the leading cause of epidemic gastroenteritis worldwide. Study of HuNoV biology has been hampered by the lack of an efficient cell culture system. Recently, enteric commensal bacteria Enterobacter cloacae has been recognized as a helper in HuNoV infection of B cells in vitro. To test the influences of E. cloacae on HuNoV infectivity and to determine whether HuNoV infects B cells in vivo, we colonized gnotobiotic pigs with E. cloacae and inoculated pigs with 2.74 × 10(4) genome copies of HuNoV. Compared to control pigs, reduced HuNoV shedding was observed in E. cloacae colonized pigs, characterized by significantly shorter duration of shedding in post-inoculation day 10 subgroup and lower cumulative shedding and peak shedding in individual pigs. Colonization of E. cloacae also reduced HuNoV titers in intestinal tissues and in blood. In both control and E. cloacae colonized pigs, HuNoV infection of enterocytes was confirmed, however infection of B cells was not observed in ileum, and the entire lamina propria in sections of duodenum, jejunum, and ileum were HuNoV-negative. In summary, E. cloacae inhibited HuNoV infectivity, and B cells were not a target cell type for HuNoV in gnotobiotic pigs, with or without E. cloacae colonization.

  7. Emergence in gnotobiotic mice of nontoxinogenic clones of Clostridium difficile from a toxinogenic one.

    PubMed Central

    Corthier, G; Muller, M C

    1988-01-01

    In previous studies, we showed that diet composition or Saccharomyces boulardii ingestion could protect gnotobiotic mice against lethal Clostridium difficile infection. Using an original method, we detected nontoxinogenic clones from feces of protected mice challenged with a toxinogenic clone of C. difficile. These clones became established at the same level as the toxinogenic one after about 30 days. In these protected mice bearing nontoxinogenic clones, no enterotoxin production could be detected and cytotoxin titers were highly reduced. These nontoxinogenic clones were genetically stable because nontoxinogenic clones and clones that produce intermediate levels of toxins in vivo did not revert to toxin production, even after repeated culture in vitro. Furthermore, the nontoxinogenic clones were shown to arise from a single toxinogenic clone and were identical to that clone in metabolic patterns and antibiotic sensitivity tests. When mice fed a nonprotective diet were challenged with a nontoxinogenic or intermediate clone, they remained healthy and no toxin production could be detected in their feces. Moreover, these mice were protected against further infections with toxinogenic strains of C. difficile, and a strong antagonism between nontoxinogenic and toxinogenic clones was observed. PMID:3372017

  8. A neonatal gnotobiotic pig model of human enterovirus 71 infection and associated immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xingdong; Li, Guohua; Wen, Ke; Bui, Tammy; Liu, Fangning; Kocher, Jacob; Jortner, Bernard S; Vonck, Marlice; Pelzer, Kevin; Deng, Jie; Zhu, Runan; Li, Yuyun; Qian, Yuan; Yuan, Lijuan

    2014-01-01

    Vaccine development and pathogenesis studies for human enterovirus 71 are limited by a lack of suitable animal models. Here, we report the development of a novel neonatal gnotobiotic pig model using the non-pig-adapted neurovirulent human enterovirus 71 strain BJ110, which has a C4 genotype. Porcine small intestinal epithelial cells, peripheral blood mononuclear cells and neural cells were infected in vitro. Oral and combined oral–nasal infection of 5-day-old neonatal gnotobiotic pigs with 5×108 fluorescence forming units (FFU) resulted in shedding up to 18 days post-infection, with viral titers in rectal swab samples peaking at 2.22×108 viral RNA copies/mL. Viral capsid proteins were detected in enterocytes within the small intestines on post-infection days (PIDs) 7 and 14. Additionally, viral RNA was detected in intestinal and extra-intestinal tissues, including the central nervous system, the lung and cardiac muscle. The infected neonatal gnotobiotic pigs developed fever, forelimb weakness, rapid breathing and some hand, foot and mouth disease symptoms. Flow cytometry analysis revealed increased frequencies of both CD4+ and CD8+ IFN-γ-producing T cells in the brain and the blood on PID 14, but reduced frequencies were observed in the lung. Furthermore, high titers of serum virus-neutralizing antibodies were generated in both orally and combined oral–nasally infected pigs on PIDs 7, 14, 21 and 28. Together, these results demonstrate that neonatal gnotobiotic pigs represent a novel animal model for evaluating vaccines for human enterovirus 71 and for understanding the pathogenesis of this virus and the associated immune responses. PMID:26038741

  9. In vivo activity of nifurzide and nifuroxazide in intestinal bacteria in man and gnotobiotic mice.

    PubMed

    Leonard, F; Andremont, A; Tancrede, C

    1985-06-01

    Although Gram-negative enteropathogenic bacteria are the target strains of nifurzide and nifuroxazide treatments, neither drug affected faecal counts of in vitro-susceptible Enterobacteriaceae in healthy volunteers. This absence of activity was shown to be due to the poor solubility of the drugs tested. Therefore, effect of high doses of nifurzide was investigated in gnotobiotic mice. Activity against in vitro susceptible enteropathogens was then observed. Normal bacterial cells were replaced in the faeces by elongated, nonseptate and unflagellated mutants. Moreover, the resistance to colonization by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli and Shigella flexeri of an anaerobic flora of human origin was sharply decreased.

  10. Deoxycholic acid formation in gnotobiotic mice associated with human intestinal bacteria.

    PubMed

    Narushima, Seiko; Itoha, Kikuji; Miyamoto, Yukiko; Park, Sang-Hee; Nagata, Keiko; Kuruma, Kazuo; Uchida, Kiyohisa

    2006-09-01

    In humans and animals, intestinal flora is indispensable for bile acid transformation. The goal of our study was to establish gnotobiotic mice with intestinal bacteria of human origin in order to examine the role of intestinal bacteria in the transformation of bile acids in vivo using the technique of gnotobiology. Eight strains of bile acid-deconjugating bacteria were isolated from ex-germ-free mice inoculated with a human fecal dilution of 10(-6), and five strains of 7alpha-dehydroxylating bacteria were isolated from the intestine of limited human flora mice inoculated only with clostridia. The results of biochemical tests and 16S rDNA sequence analysis showed that seven out of eight bile acid-deconjugating strains belong to a bacteroides cluster (Bacteroides vulgatus, B. distasonis, and B. uniformis), and one strain had high similarity with Bilophila wadsworthia. All five strains that converted cholic acid to deoxycholic acid had greatest similarity with Clostridium hylemonae. A combination of 10 isolated strains converted taurocholic acid into deoxycholic acid both in vitro and in the mouse intestine. These results indicate that the predominant bacteria, mainly Bacteroides, in human feces comprise one of the main bacterial groups for the deconjugation of bile acids, and clostridia may play an important role in 7aplha-dehydroxylation of free-form primary bile acids in the intestine although these strains are not predominant. The gnotobiotic mouse with bacteria of human origin could be a useful model in studies of bile acid metabolism by human intestinal bacteria in vivo.

  11. Predicting a human gut microbiota's response to diet in gnotobiotic mice.

    PubMed

    Faith, Jeremiah J; McNulty, Nathan P; Rey, Federico E; Gordon, Jeffrey I

    2011-07-01

    The interrelationships between our diets and the structure and operations of our gut microbial communities are poorly understood. A model community of 10 sequenced human gut bacteria was introduced into gnotobiotic mice, and changes in species abundance and microbial gene expression were measured in response to randomized perturbations of four defined ingredients in the host diet. From the responses, we developed a statistical model that predicted over 60% of the variation in species abundance evoked by diet perturbations, and we were able to identify which factors in the diet best explained changes seen for each community member. The approach is generally applicable, as shown by a follow-up study involving diets containing various mixtures of pureed human baby foods.

  12. Increased bacterial putrescine has no impact on gut morphology and physiology in gnotobiotic adolescent mice.

    PubMed

    Slezak, K; Hanske, L; Loh, G; Blaut, M

    2013-09-01

    Gut bacteria influence host anatomy and physiology. It has been proposed that bacterial metabolites including polyamines are responsible for intestinal maturation and mucosal growth. We have hypothesised that bacterially produced polyamines act as trophic factors and thereby influence large intestinal crypt depth and thickness of the different gut layers. For that purpose, germ-free mice were associated with two different microbial consortia. One group was colonised with a simplified human microbiota (SIHUMI). The second group was associated with SIHUMI + Fusobacterium varium (SIHUMI + Fv), which is known to produce high amounts of polyamines. Polyamine concentrations were measured by HPLC and morphological parameters were determined microscopically. Germ-free and conventional mice served as controls. The caecal putrescine concentration of the SIHUMI + Fv was 61.8 μM (47.6-75.5 μM), whereas that of conventional and SIHUMI mice was 28.8 μM (1.3-41.7 μM) and 24.5 μM (16.8-29.1 μM), respectively. The caecal putrescine concentration of germ-free mice was only 0.6 μM (0-1.0 μM). Caecal crypt depth and thickness of the different caecal layers revealed no significant differences between SIHUMI and SIHUMI + Fv mice. However, the crypt depth in the caeca of conventional, SIHUMI and SIHUMI + Fv mice was increased by 48.6% (P<0.001), 39.7% (P<0.001) and 28.5% (P<0.05), respectively, compared to germ-free mice. These findings indicate that increased intestinal putrescine concentrations do not influence gut morphology in our gnotobiotic adolescent mice.

  13. The impact of a consortium of fermented milk strains on the gut microbiome of gnotobiotic mice and monozygotic twins.

    PubMed

    McNulty, Nathan P; Yatsunenko, Tanya; Hsiao, Ansel; Faith, Jeremiah J; Muegge, Brian D; Goodman, Andrew L; Henrissat, Bernard; Oozeer, Raish; Cools-Portier, Stéphanie; Gobert, Guillaume; Chervaux, Christian; Knights, Dan; Lozupone, Catherine A; Knight, Rob; Duncan, Alexis E; Bain, James R; Muehlbauer, Michael J; Newgard, Christopher B; Heath, Andrew C; Gordon, Jeffrey I

    2011-10-26

    Understanding how the human gut microbiota and host are affected by probiotic bacterial strains requires carefully controlled studies in humans and in mouse models of the gut ecosystem where potentially confounding variables that are difficult to control in humans can be constrained. Therefore, we characterized the fecal microbiomes and metatranscriptomes of adult female monozygotic twin pairs through repeated sampling 4 weeks before, 7 weeks during, and 4 weeks after consumption of a commercially available fermented milk product (FMP) containing a consortium of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis, two strains of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris, and Streptococcus thermophilus. In addition, gnotobiotic mice harboring a 15-species model human gut microbiota whose genomes contain 58,399 known or predicted protein-coding genes were studied before and after gavage with all five sequenced FMP strains. No significant changes in bacterial species composition or in the proportional representation of genes encoding known enzymes were observed in the feces of humans consuming the FMP. Only minimal changes in microbiota configuration were noted in mice after single or repeated gavage with the FMP consortium. However, RNA-Seq analysis of fecal samples and follow-up mass spectrometry of urinary metabolites disclosed that introducing the FMP strains into mice results in significant changes in expression of microbiome-encoded enzymes involved in numerous metabolic pathways, most prominently those related to carbohydrate metabolism. B. animalis subsp. lactis, the dominant persistent member of the FMP consortium in gnotobiotic mice, up-regulates a locus in vivo that is involved in the catabolism of xylooligosaccharides, a class of glycans widely distributed in fruits, vegetables, and other foods, underscoring the importance of these sugars to this bacterial species. The human fecal metatranscriptome exhibited significant changes

  14. Amoxicillin-clavulanic acid and ciprofloxacin-treated SPF mice as gnotobiotic model.

    PubMed

    Popper, Miroslav; Gancarčíková, Soňa; Maďar, Marián; Mudroňová, Dagmar; Hrčková, Gabriela; Nemcová, Radomíra

    2016-11-01

    The experiment was carried out on 24 SPF BALB/c female mice and lasted for 15 days with a 5-day antibiotic (ATB) treatment and then 10 days without ATB treatment. The aim of our study was to acquire an animal model with reduced and controlled microflora and, at the same time, to ensure that the good health of these animals is maintained. Per oral administration of amoxicillin and clavulanate potassium in Amoksiklav (Sandoz, Slovenia) at a dose of 387.11 mg/kg body weight (0.2 ml of dilution per mouse) and subcutaneous administration of ciprofloxacin in Ciloxan (Alcon, Spain) at a dose of 18.87 mg/kg body weight (0.1 ml of dilution per mouse) were performed every 12 h during first 5 days of experiment. Five-day treatment with ATB led to a reduced survivability of microorganisms in faeces (28.33 ± 0.43 % on day 2) and caecum content (28.10 ± 1.56 %), where no cultivable microorganisms in faeces were present. Ten-day convalescence of decontaminated animals under gnotobiotic conditions prevented recovery of species diversity in mice gut microflora. This was reduced to two detectable cultivable species, namely Escherichia coli (GenBank KX086704) and Enterococcus sp. (GenBank KX086705) which were capable to restore its metabolic (CRL 2012) and morphological potential (Baratta et al. Histochem Cell Biol 131:713-726, 2009) within physiological range. Animals obtained under this procedure can be used in further studies. As a result, we created a mouse gnoto model with reduced and controlled microflora without alteration of the overall health status of the respective animals.

  15. Development of the gut microbiota and mucosal IgA responses in twins and gnotobiotic mice.

    PubMed

    Planer, Joseph D; Peng, Yangqing; Kau, Andrew L; Blanton, Laura V; Ndao, I Malick; Tarr, Phillip I; Warner, Barbara B; Gordon, Jeffrey I

    2016-06-09

    Immunoglobulin A (IgA), the major class of antibody secreted by the gut mucosa, is an important contributor to gut barrier function. The repertoire of IgA bound to gut bacteria reflects both T-cell-dependent and -independent pathways, plus glycans present on the antibody's secretory component. Human gut bacterial taxa targeted by IgA in the setting of barrier dysfunction are capable of producing intestinal pathology when isolated and transferred to gnotobiotic mice. A complex reorientation of gut immunity occurs as infants transition from passively acquired IgA present in breast milk to host-derived IgA. How IgA responses co-develop with assembly of the microbiota during this period remains poorly understood. Here, we (1) identify a set of age-discriminatory bacterial taxa whose representations define a program of microbiota assembly and maturation during the first 2 postnatal years that is shared across 40 healthy twin pairs in the USA; (2) describe a pattern of progression of gut mucosal IgA responses to bacterial members of the microbiota that is highly distinctive for family members (twin pairs) during the first several postnatal months then generalizes across pairs in the second year; and (3) assess the effects of zygosity, birth mode, and breast feeding. Age-associated differences in these IgA responses can be recapitulated in young germ-free mice, colonized with faecal microbiota obtained from two twin pairs at 6 and 18 months of age, and fed a sequence of human diets that simulate the transition from milk feeding to complementary foods. Most of these responses were robust to diet, suggesting that 'intrinsic' properties of community members play a dominant role in dictating IgA responses. The approach described can be used to define gut mucosal immune development in health and disease states and to help discover ways of repairing or preventing perturbations in this facet of host immunity.

  16. Experimental infection of gnotobiotic piglets with Escherichia coli strains positive for EAST1 and AIDA.

    PubMed

    Zajacova, Zuzana Sramkova; Faldyna, Martin; Kulich, Pavel; Kummer, Vladimir; Maskova, Jarmila; Alexa, Pavel

    2013-03-15

    The virulence factors EAST1 and AIDA are often detected in ETEC/VTEC strains isolated from pigs and their role in diarrhoeal infections is discussed. In order to elucidate the pathogenesis of AIDA, the colonisation patterns of F4 positive and AIDA positive strains were investigated. Two wild-type Escherichia coli strains AIDA/EAST1 and F4/EAST1 isolated from diarrhoeal piglets were used for animal experiment to evaluate the ability of the EAST1 toxin to be involved in induction of diarrhoea. Gnotobiotic piglets were supplemented with normal porcine serum and orally inoculated with the strains. Faecal bacterial shedding of the challenge strains was observed during the experiment. Light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to detect the colonisation pattern of both challenge strains. Although bacterial isolation demonstrated shedding of the challenge strains until the end of the experiment, diarrhoea did not develop in any piglet. Based on histological examination, piglets were more heavily colonised in the case of infection with E. coli O149/F4/EAST1 strain. Scanning electron microscopy showed bacterial cells of F4/EAST1 E. coli adhering to enterocytes, in contrast to AIDA/EAST1 which were poorly present on the intestinal surface. The EAST1 toxin alone was not able to induce diarrhoea in animals. Therefore our results demonstrate that the function/role of EAST1 and AIDA in colibacillosis of pigs remains to be elucidated.

  17. Development of the gut microbiota and mucosal IgA responses in twins and gnotobiotic mice

    PubMed Central

    Planer, Joseph D.; Peng, Yangqing; Kau, Andrew L.; Blanton, Laura V.; Ndao, I. Malick; Tarr, Phillip I.; Warner, Barbara B.; Gordon, Jeffrey I.

    2016-01-01

    Immunoglobulin A (IgA), the major class of antibody secreted by the gut mucosa, is an important contributor to gut barrier function1–3. The repertoire of IgA bound to gut bacteria reflects both T cell-dependent and -independent pathways4,5, plus glycans present on the antibody’s secretory component6. Human gut bacterial taxa targeted by IgA in the setting of intestinal barrier dysfunction are capable of producing intestinal pathology when isolated and transferred to gnotobiotic mice7,8. A complex reorientation of gut immunity occurs as infants transition from passively acquired IgA present in breast milk to host-derived IgA9–11. How IgA responses co-develop with assembly of the microbiota during this period remains poorly understood. Here, we (i) identify a set of age-discriminatory bacterial taxa whose representations define a program of microbiota assembly/maturation during the first 2 postnatal years that is shared across 40 healthy USA twin pairs; (ii) describe a pattern of progression of gut mucosal IgA responses to bacterial members of the microbiota that is highly distinctive for family members (twin pairs) during the first several postnatal months then generalizes across pairs in the second year; and (iii) assess the effects of zygosity, birth mode and breast feeding. Age-associated differences in these IgA responses can be recapitulated in young germ-free mice, colonized with fecal microbiota obtained from two twin pairs at 6 and 18 months of age, and fed a sequence of human diets that simulate the transition from milk feeding to complementary foods. The majority of these responses were robust to diet suggesting that ‘intrinsic’ properties of community members play a dominant role in dictating IgA responses. The approach described can be used to define gut mucosal immune development in health and disease states and help discover ways for repairing or preventing perturbations in this facet of host immunity. PMID:27279225

  18. Lactobacillus acidophilus and L. reuteri modulate cytokine responses in gnotobiotic pigs infected with human rotavirus

    PubMed Central

    Azevedo, M. S. P.; Zhang, W.; Wen, K.; Gonzalez, A. M.; Saif, L. J.; Yousef, A. E.; Yuan, L.

    2012-01-01

    Probiotic lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have been shown to alleviate inflammation, enhance the immunogenicity of rotavirus vaccines, or reduce the severity of rotavirus diarrhoea. Although the mechanisms are not clear, the differential Th1/Th2/Th3-driving capacities and modulating effects on cytokine production of different LAB strains may be the key. Our goal was to delineate the influence of combining two probiotic strains L. acidophilus and L. reuteri on the development of cytokine responses in neonatal gnotobiotic pigs infected with human rotavirus (HRV). We demonstrated that HRV alone, or HRV plus LAB, but not LAB alone, initiated serum cytokine responses, as indicated by significantly higher concentrations of IFN-α, IFN-γ, IL-12, and IL-10 at post-inoculation day (PID) 2 in the HRV only and LAB+HRV+ pigs compared to LAB only and LAB-HRV- pigs. Peak cytokine responses coincided with the peak of HRV replication. LAB further enhanced the Th1 and Th2 cytokine responses to HRV infection as indicated by significantly higher concentrations of IL-12, IFN-γ, IL-4 and IL-10 in the LAB+HRV+ pigs compared to the LAB-HRV+ pigs. The LAB+HRV+ pigs maintained relatively constant concentrations of TGF-β compared to the HRV only group which had a significant increase at PID 2 and decrease at PID 7, suggesting a regulatory role of LAB in maintaining gut homeostasis. At PID 28, cytokine secreting cell (CSC) responses, measured by ELISpot, showed increased Th1 (IL-12, IFN-γ) CSC numbers in the LAB+HRV+ and LAB-HRV+ groups compared to LAB only and LAB-HRV- pigs, with significantly increased IL-12 CSCs in spleen and PBMCs and IFN-γ CSCs in spleen of the LAB+HRV+ group. Thus, HRV infection alone, but not LAB alone was effective in inducing cytokine responses but LAB significantly enhanced both Th1 and Th2 cytokines in HRV-infected pigs. LAB may also help to maintain immunological homeostasis during HRV infection by regulating TGF-β production. PMID:22348907

  19. Analysis of Campylobacter jejuni infection in the gnotobiotic piglet and genome-wide identification of bacterial factors required for infection

    PubMed Central

    de Vries, Stefan P. W.; Linn, Aileen; Macleod, Kareen; MacCallum, Amanda; Hardy, Simon P.; Douce, Gill; Watson, Eleanor; Dagleish, Mark P.; Thompson, Hal; Stevenson, Andy; Kennedy, David; Baig, Abiyad; Coward, Chris; Maskell, Duncan J.; Smith, David G. E.; Grant, Andrew J.; Everest, Paul

    2017-01-01

    To investigate how Campylobacter jejuni causes the clinical symptoms of diarrhoeal disease in humans, use of a relevant animal model is essential. Such a model should mimic the human disease closely in terms of host physiology, incubation period before onset of disease, clinical signs and a comparable outcome of disease. In this study, we used a gnotobiotic piglet model to study determinants of pathogenicity of C. jejuni. In this model, C. jejuni successfully established infection and piglets developed an increased temperature with watery diarrhoea, which was caused by a leaky epithelium and reduced bile re-absorption in the intestines. Further, we assessed the C. jejuni genes required for infection of the porcine gastrointestinal tract utilising a transposon (Tn) mutant library screen. A total of 123 genes of which Tn mutants showed attenuated piglet infection were identified. Our screen highlighted a crucial role for motility and chemotaxis, as well as central metabolism. In addition, Tn mutants of 14 genes displayed enhanced piglet infection. This study gives a unique insight into the mechanisms of C. jejuni disease in terms of host physiology and contributing bacterial factors. PMID:28281647

  20. Analysis of Campylobacter jejuni infection in the gnotobiotic piglet and genome-wide identification of bacterial factors required for infection.

    PubMed

    de Vries, Stefan P W; Linn, Aileen; Macleod, Kareen; MacCallum, Amanda; Hardy, Simon P; Douce, Gill; Watson, Eleanor; Dagleish, Mark P; Thompson, Hal; Stevenson, Andy; Kennedy, David; Baig, Abiyad; Coward, Chris; Maskell, Duncan J; Smith, David G E; Grant, Andrew J; Everest, Paul

    2017-03-10

    To investigate how Campylobacter jejuni causes the clinical symptoms of diarrhoeal disease in humans, use of a relevant animal model is essential. Such a model should mimic the human disease closely in terms of host physiology, incubation period before onset of disease, clinical signs and a comparable outcome of disease. In this study, we used a gnotobiotic piglet model to study determinants of pathogenicity of C. jejuni. In this model, C. jejuni successfully established infection and piglets developed an increased temperature with watery diarrhoea, which was caused by a leaky epithelium and reduced bile re-absorption in the intestines. Further, we assessed the C. jejuni genes required for infection of the porcine gastrointestinal tract utilising a transposon (Tn) mutant library screen. A total of 123 genes of which Tn mutants showed attenuated piglet infection were identified. Our screen highlighted a crucial role for motility and chemotaxis, as well as central metabolism. In addition, Tn mutants of 14 genes displayed enhanced piglet infection. This study gives a unique insight into the mechanisms of C. jejuni disease in terms of host physiology and contributing bacterial factors.

  1. High Protective Efficacy of Probiotics and Rice Bran against Human Norovirus Infection and Diarrhea in Gnotobiotic Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Shaohua; Ramesh, Ashwin; Twitchell, Erica; Wen, Ke; Bui, Tammy; Weiss, Mariah; Yang, Xingdong; Kocher, Jacob; Li, Guohua; Giri-Rachman, Ernawati; Trang, Nguyen Van; Jiang, Xi; Ryan, Elizabeth P.; Yuan, Lijuan

    2016-01-01

    Probiotics have been recognized as vaccine adjuvants and therapeutic agents to treat acute gastroenteritis in children. We previously showed that rice bran (RB) reduced human rotavirus diarrhea in gnotobiotic pigs. Human noroviruses (HuNoVs) are the major pathogens causing non-bacterial acute gastroenteritis worldwide. In this study, Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) and Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 (EcN) were first screened for their ability to bind HuNoV P particles and virions derived from clinical samples containing HuNoV genotype GII.3 and GII.4, then the effects of LGG+EcN and RB on HuNoV infection and diarrhea were investigated using the gnotobiotic pig model. While LGG+EcN colonization inhibited HuNoV shedding, probiotic cocktail regimens in which RB feeding started 7 days prior to or 1 day after viral inoculation in the LGG+EcN colonized gnotobiotic pigs exhibited high protection against HuNoV diarrhea and shedding, characterized by significantly reduced incidence (89 versus 20%) and shorter mean duration of diarrhea (2.2 versus 0.2 days), as well as shorter mean duration of virus shedding (3.2 versus 1.0 days). In both probiotic cocktail groups, the diarrhea reduction rates were 78% compared with the control group, and diarrhea severity was reduced as demonstrated by the significantly lower cumulative fecal scores. The high protective efficacy of the probiotic cocktail regimens was attributed to stimulation of IFN-γ+ T cell responses, increased production of intestinal IgA and IgG, and maintenance of healthy intestinal morphology (manifested as longer villi compared with the control group). Therefore, probiotic cocktail regimens containing LGG+EcN and RB may represent highly efficacious strategies to prevent and treat HuNoV gastroenteritis, and potentially other human enteric pathogens. PMID:27853451

  2. High Protective Efficacy of Probiotics and Rice Bran against Human Norovirus Infection and Diarrhea in Gnotobiotic Pigs.

    PubMed

    Lei, Shaohua; Ramesh, Ashwin; Twitchell, Erica; Wen, Ke; Bui, Tammy; Weiss, Mariah; Yang, Xingdong; Kocher, Jacob; Li, Guohua; Giri-Rachman, Ernawati; Trang, Nguyen Van; Jiang, Xi; Ryan, Elizabeth P; Yuan, Lijuan

    2016-01-01

    Probiotics have been recognized as vaccine adjuvants and therapeutic agents to treat acute gastroenteritis in children. We previously showed that rice bran (RB) reduced human rotavirus diarrhea in gnotobiotic pigs. Human noroviruses (HuNoVs) are the major pathogens causing non-bacterial acute gastroenteritis worldwide. In this study, Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) and Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 (EcN) were first screened for their ability to bind HuNoV P particles and virions derived from clinical samples containing HuNoV genotype GII.3 and GII.4, then the effects of LGG+EcN and RB on HuNoV infection and diarrhea were investigated using the gnotobiotic pig model. While LGG+EcN colonization inhibited HuNoV shedding, probiotic cocktail regimens in which RB feeding started 7 days prior to or 1 day after viral inoculation in the LGG+EcN colonized gnotobiotic pigs exhibited high protection against HuNoV diarrhea and shedding, characterized by significantly reduced incidence (89 versus 20%) and shorter mean duration of diarrhea (2.2 versus 0.2 days), as well as shorter mean duration of virus shedding (3.2 versus 1.0 days). In both probiotic cocktail groups, the diarrhea reduction rates were 78% compared with the control group, and diarrhea severity was reduced as demonstrated by the significantly lower cumulative fecal scores. The high protective efficacy of the probiotic cocktail regimens was attributed to stimulation of IFN-γ(+) T cell responses, increased production of intestinal IgA and IgG, and maintenance of healthy intestinal morphology (manifested as longer villi compared with the control group). Therefore, probiotic cocktail regimens containing LGG+EcN and RB may represent highly efficacious strategies to prevent and treat HuNoV gastroenteritis, and potentially other human enteric pathogens.

  3. Increased and prolonged human norovirus infection in RAG2/IL2RG deficient gnotobiotic pigs with severe combined immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Shaohua; Ryu, Junghyun; Wen, Ke; Twitchell, Erica; Bui, Tammy; Ramesh, Ashwin; Weiss, Mariah; Li, Guohua; Samuel, Helen; Clark-Deener, Sherrie; Jiang, Xi; Lee, Kiho; Yuan, Lijuan

    2016-01-01

    Application of genetically engineered (GE) large animals carrying multi-allelic modifications has been hampered by low efficiency in production and extended gestation period compared to rodents. Here, we rapidly generated RAG2/IL2RG double knockout pigs using direct injection of CRISPR/Cas9 system into developing embryos. RAG2/IL2RG deficient pigs were immunodeficient, characterized by depletion of lymphocytes and either absence of or structurally abnormal immune organs. Pigs were maintained in gnotobiotic facility and evaluated for human norovirus (HuNoV) infection. HuNoV shedding lasted for 16 days in wild type pigs, compared to 27 days (until the end of trials) in RAG2/IL2RG deficient pigs. Additionally, higher HuNoV titers were detected in intestinal tissues and contents and in blood, indicating increased and prolonged HuNoV infection in RAG2/IL2RG deficient pigs and the importance of lymphocytes in HuNoV clearance. These results suggest that GE immunodeficient gnotobiotic pigs serve as a novel model for biomedical research and will facilitate HuNoV studies. PMID:27118081

  4. Effect of intestinal colonisation by two Lactobacillus strains on the immune response of gnotobiotic mice.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, R S; Lima, M; Gomes de Oliveira, N L; Miyoshi, A; Nicoli, J R; Neumann, E; Nunes, A C

    2014-12-01

    The effect of intestinal colonisation on the immune system was investigated in germ-free mice monoassociated with Lactobacillus strains isolated from calf faeces. Single doses of Lactobacillus acidophilus L36 or Lactobacillus salivarius L38 were administered to germ-free mice by intragastric gavage. Ten days later, the mice were euthanised. Gene expression levels of interleukin 5 (IL-5), IL-6, IL-10, IL-12b, IL-17a, gamma interferon (IFN-γ), transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1), and tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) were quantified in segments of the small and large intestines by real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. All the mice were colonised rapidly after Lactobacillus administration with intestinal counts ranging from 6.53 to 8.26 log cfu/g. L. acidophilus L36 administration increased the expression of cytokines involved with the Th2 (IL-5, IL-6 and TGF-β1) and Th17 (IL-17a, TNF-α and IL-6) inflammatory response, whereas L. salivarius L38 appeared to stimulate a pattern of less diversified cytokines in the intestine. Intragastric gavage of L. acidophilus L36 and L. salivarius L38 induced similar levels of colonisation in the digestive tracts of germ-free mice but stimulated different immune responses in the intestinal mucosa. The different immunomodulation patterns might facilitate the potential use of these lactobacilli as probiotics to treat distinct pathological conditions, for example protection against Citrobacter rodentium infection by stimulating IL-17 production.

  5. Induction of bacterial antigen-specific colitis by a simplified human microbiota consortium in gnotobiotic interleukin-10-/- mice.

    PubMed

    Eun, Chang Soo; Mishima, Yoshiyuki; Wohlgemuth, Steffen; Liu, Bo; Bower, Maureen; Carroll, Ian M; Sartor, R Balfour

    2014-06-01

    We evaluated whether a simplified human microbiota consortium (SIHUMI) induces colitis in germfree (GF) 129S6/SvEv (129) and C57BL/6 (B6) interleukin-10-deficient (IL-10(-/-)) mice, determined mouse strain effects on colitis and the microbiota, examined the effects of inflammation on relative bacterial composition, and identified immunodominant bacterial species in "humanized" IL-10(-/-) mice. GF wild-type (WT) and IL-10(-/-) 129 and B6 mice were colonized with 7 human-derived inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)-related intestinal bacteria and maintained under gnotobiotic conditions. Quantification of bacteria in feces, ileal and colonic contents, and tissues was performed using 16S rRNA gene selective quantitative PCR. Colonic segments were scored histologically, and gamma interferon (IFN-γ), IL-12p40, and IL-17 levels were measured in supernatants of unstimulated colonic tissue explants and of mesenteric lymph node (MLN) cells stimulated by lysates of individual or aggregate bacterial strains. Relative bacterial species abundances changed over time and differed between 129 and B6 mice, WT and IL-10(-/-) mice, luminal and mucosal samples, and ileal and colonic or fecal samples. SIHUMI induced colitis in all IL-10(-/-) mice, with more aggressive colitis and MLN cell activation in 129 mice. Escherichia coli LF82 and Ruminococcus gnavus lysates induced dominant effector ex vivo MLN TH1 and TH17 responses, although the bacterial mucosal concentrations were low. In summary, this study shows that a simplified human bacterial consortium induces colitis in ex-GF 129 and B6 IL-10(-/-) mice. Relative concentrations of individual SIHUMI species are determined by host genotype, the presence of inflammation, and anatomical location. A subset of IBD-relevant human enteric bacterial species preferentially stimulates bacterial antigen-specific TH1 and TH17 immune responses in this model, independent of luminal and mucosal bacterial concentrations.

  6. Effects of microbial and host variables on the interaction of rotavirus and Escherichia coli infections in gnotobiotic calves.

    PubMed

    Runnels, P L; Moon, H W; Matthews, P J; Whipp, S C; Woode, G N

    1986-07-01

    Naturally occurring mixed infections with Escherichia coli and rotavirus have been associated with fatal diarrhea of calves about 1 week old. Experiments were designed to reproduce this syndrome in gnotobiotic calves. Clinical, microbiological, and pathologic data were used to assess severity of disease and mechanisms of the interaction between the 2 infections. An initial study involved 5- to 8-day-old gnotobiotic calves inoculated with a strain of enterotoxigenic E coli (ETEC) and a strain of rotavirus. Calves were observed for 2 days after they were inoculated; fatal diarrhea was not produced. In later studies, variables were tested to identify those that might contribute to fatal diarrhea. Variables which did not result in fatal or severe diarrhea or which did not cause disease that was more severe in dually inoculated calves than that in monoinoculated calves were increasing feed to 2 times base line, increasing dose of ETEC to 10 times base line, inoculating calves when they were 2 days old, using a strain of E coli that causes colisepticemia, and using a different strain of rotavirus. When the observation period was extended from 2 days to 6 days after calves were inoculated, severe, watery, fatal diarrhea occurred in 6 of 12 calves by 32 to 72 hours after dual inoculation was given. Fatal diarrhea was associated with intensive colonization by the ETEC in the caudal half of the small intestine. Microscopic lesions were similar between dually inoculated and rotavirus-monoinoculated calves, except there was more severe atrophy of ileal villi of dually inoculated calves.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Microbiota composition of simultaneously colonized mice housed under either a gnotobiotic isolator or individually ventilated cage regime

    PubMed Central

    Lundberg, Randi; Bahl, Martin I.; Licht, Tine R.; Toft, Martin F.; Hansen, Axel K.

    2017-01-01

    Germ-free rodents colonized with microbiotas of interest are used for host-microbiota investigations and for testing microbiota-targeted therapeutic candidates. Traditionally, isolators are used for housing such gnotobiotic rodents due to optimal protection from the environment, but research groups focused on the microbiome are increasingly combining or substituting isolator housing with individually ventilated cage (IVC) systems. We compared the effect of housing systems on the gut microbiota composition of germ-free mice colonized with a complex microbiota and housed in either multiple IVC cages in an IVC facility or in multiple open-top cages in an isolator during three generations and five months. No increase in bacterial diversity as assessed by 16S rRNA gene sequencing was observed in the IVC cages, despite not applying completely aseptic cage changes. The donor bacterial community was equally represented in both housing systems. Time-dependent clustering between generations was observed in both systems, but was strongest in the IVC cages. Different relative abundance of a Rikenellaceae genus contributed to separate clustering of the isolator and IVC communities. Our data suggest that complex microbiotas are protected in IVC systems, but challenges related to temporal dynamics should be addressed. PMID:28169374

  8. Microbiota composition of simultaneously colonized mice housed under either a gnotobiotic isolator or individually ventilated cage regime.

    PubMed

    Lundberg, Randi; Bahl, Martin I; Licht, Tine R; Toft, Martin F; Hansen, Axel K

    2017-02-07

    Germ-free rodents colonized with microbiotas of interest are used for host-microbiota investigations and for testing microbiota-targeted therapeutic candidates. Traditionally, isolators are used for housing such gnotobiotic rodents due to optimal protection from the environment, but research groups focused on the microbiome are increasingly combining or substituting isolator housing with individually ventilated cage (IVC) systems. We compared the effect of housing systems on the gut microbiota composition of germ-free mice colonized with a complex microbiota and housed in either multiple IVC cages in an IVC facility or in multiple open-top cages in an isolator during three generations and five months. No increase in bacterial diversity as assessed by 16S rRNA gene sequencing was observed in the IVC cages, despite not applying completely aseptic cage changes. The donor bacterial community was equally represented in both housing systems. Time-dependent clustering between generations was observed in both systems, but was strongest in the IVC cages. Different relative abundance of a Rikenellaceae genus contributed to separate clustering of the isolator and IVC communities. Our data suggest that complex microbiotas are protected in IVC systems, but challenges related to temporal dynamics should be addressed.

  9. Effects of dietary inulin on bacterial growth, short-chain fatty acid production and hepatic lipid metabolism in gnotobiotic mice.

    PubMed

    Weitkunat, Karolin; Schumann, Sara; Petzke, Klaus Jürgen; Blaut, Michael; Loh, Gunnar; Klaus, Susanne

    2015-09-01

    In literature, contradictory effects of dietary fibers and their fermentation products, short-chain fatty acids (SCFA), are described: On one hand, they increase satiety, but on the other hand, they provide additional energy and promote obesity development. We aimed to answer this paradox by investigating the effects of fermentable and non-fermentable fibers on obesity induced by high-fat diet in gnotobiotic C3H/HeOuJ mice colonized with a simplified human microbiota. Mice were fed a high-fat diet supplemented either with 10% cellulose (non-fermentable) or inulin (fermentable) for 6 weeks. Feeding the inulin diet resulted in an increased diet digestibility and reduced feces energy, compared to the cellulose diet with no differences in food intake, suggesting an increased intestinal energy extraction from inulin. However, we observed no increase in body fat/weight. The additional energy provided by the inulin diet led to an increased bacterial proliferation in this group. Supplementation of inulin resulted further in significantly elevated concentrations of total SCFA in cecum and portal vein plasma, with a reduced cecal acetate:propionate ratio. Hepatic expression of genes involved in lipogenesis (Fasn, Gpam) and fatty acid elongation/desaturation (Scd1, Elovl3, Elovl6, Elovl5, Fads1 and Fads2) were decreased in inulin-fed animals. Accordingly, plasma and liver phospholipid composition were changed between the different feeding groups. Concentrations of omega-3 and odd-chain fatty acids were increased in inulin-fed mice, whereas omega-6 fatty acids were reduced. Taken together, these data indicate that, during this short-term feeding, inulin has mainly positive effects on the lipid metabolism, which could cause beneficial effects during obesity development in long-term studies.

  10. Constitutive Delivery of Bovine β-Lactoglobulin to the Digestive Tracts of Gnotobiotic Mice by Engineered Lactobacillus casei▿

    PubMed Central

    Hazebrouck, S.; Oozeer, R.; Adel-Patient, K.; Langella, P.; Rabot, S.; Wal, J.-M.; Corthier, G.

    2006-01-01

    The gut microbiota is critical for maturation of the immune system. Recent evidence suggests that early establishment of lactobacilli in the intestinal microbiota, during neonatal colonization or by probiotic supplementation, could prevent the development of allergic disorders. Postnatal maturation of the gut immune system with allergen-producing lactobacilli colonizing the digestive tract could then affect the development of further allergic sensitization. In this paper, we describe construction of a recombinant Lactobacillus casei strain that can constitutively deliver bovine β-lactoglobulin (BLG), a major cow's milk allergen, to the guts of gnotobiotic mice. The blg gene was inserted into the L. casei chromosome downstream of an endogenous promoter. BLG production was improved by fusing the propeptide LEISSTCDA (LEISS) to the BLG mature moiety. This led to a 10-fold increase in LEISS-BLG production compared to the production obtained without the propeptide and also led to enhanced secretion corresponding to 5% of the total production. After inoculation into germfree C3H/HeN mice, the genetic stability of the recombinant strain and in vivo BLG production were confirmed for at least 10 weeks. BLG stimulation of spleen cells from mice monoassociated with the BLG-producing lactobacilli induced secretion of the Th1 cytokine gamma interferon and, to a lesser extent, the Th2 cytokine interleukin-5. No BLG-specific immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1), IgG2a, or IgA was detected in sera or in fecal samples. These results suggest that gut colonization with allergen-producing lactobacilli could provide a useful model for studying the modulation of allergic disorders. PMID:16997983

  11. Constitutive delivery of bovine beta-lactoglobulin to the digestive tracts of gnotobiotic mice by engineered Lactobacillus casei.

    PubMed

    Hazebrouck, S; Oozeer, R; Adel-Patient, K; Langella, P; Rabot, S; Wal, J-M; Corthier, G

    2006-12-01

    The gut microbiota is critical for maturation of the immune system. Recent evidence suggests that early establishment of lactobacilli in the intestinal microbiota, during neonatal colonization or by probiotic supplementation, could prevent the development of allergic disorders. Postnatal maturation of the gut immune system with allergen-producing lactobacilli colonizing the digestive tract could then affect the development of further allergic sensitization. In this paper, we describe construction of a recombinant Lactobacillus casei strain that can constitutively deliver bovine beta-lactoglobulin (BLG), a major cow's milk allergen, to the guts of gnotobiotic mice. The blg gene was inserted into the L. casei chromosome downstream of an endogenous promoter. BLG production was improved by fusing the propeptide LEISSTCDA (LEISS) to the BLG mature moiety. This led to a 10-fold increase in LEISS-BLG production compared to the production obtained without the propeptide and also led to enhanced secretion corresponding to 5% of the total production. After inoculation into germfree C3H/HeN mice, the genetic stability of the recombinant strain and in vivo BLG production were confirmed for at least 10 weeks. BLG stimulation of spleen cells from mice monoassociated with the BLG-producing lactobacilli induced secretion of the Th1 cytokine gamma interferon and, to a lesser extent, the Th2 cytokine interleukin-5. No BLG-specific immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1), IgG2a, or IgA was detected in sera or in fecal samples. These results suggest that gut colonization with allergen-producing lactobacilli could provide a useful model for studying the modulation of allergic disorders.

  12. Characterizing the interactions between a naturally primed immunoglobulin A and its conserved Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron species-specific epitope in gnotobiotic mice.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Daniel A; Planer, Joseph D; Guruge, Janaki L; Xue, Lai; Downey-Virgin, Whitt; Goodman, Andrew L; Seedorf, Henning; Gordon, Jeffrey I

    2015-05-15

    The adaptive immune response to the human gut microbiota consists of a complex repertoire of antibodies interacting with a broad range of taxa. Fusing intestinal lamina propria lymphocytes from mice monocolonized with Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron to a myeloma fusion partner allowed us to recover hybridomas that captured naturally primed, antigen-specific antibody responses representing multiple isotypes, including IgA. One of these hybridomas, 260.8, produced a monoclonal antibody that recognizes an epitope specific for B. thetaiotaomicron isolates in a large panel of hospital- and community-acquired Bacteroides. Whole genome transposon mutagenesis revealed a 19-gene locus, involved in LPS O-antigen polysaccharide synthesis and conserved among multiple B. thetaiotaomicron isolates, that is required for 260.8 epitope expression. Mutants in this locus exhibited marked fitness defects in vitro during growth in rich medium and in gnotobiotic mice colonized with defined communities of human gut symbionts. Expression of the 260.8 epitope was sustained during 10 months of daily passage in vitro and during 14 months of monocolonization of gnotobiotic wild-type, Rag1-/-, or Myd88-/- mice. Comparison of gnotobiotic Rag1-/- mice with and without subcutaneous 260.8 hybridomas disclosed that this IgA did not affect B. thetaiotaomicron population density or suppress 260.8 epitope production but did affect bacterial gene expression in ways emblematic of a diminished host innate immune response. Our study illustrates an approach for (i) generating diagnostic antibodies, (ii) characterizing IgA responses along a continuum of specificity/degeneracy that defines the IgA repertoire to gut symbionts, and (iii) identifying immunogenic epitopes that affect competitiveness and help maintain host-microbe mutualism.

  13. R-plasmic transfer from Serratia liquefaciens to Escherichia coli in vitro and in vivo in the digestive tract of gnotobiotic mice associated with human fecal flora.

    PubMed

    Duval-Iflah, Y; Raibaud, P; Tancrede, C; Rousseau, M

    1980-06-01

    It was shown that a strain of Serratia liquefaciens harbors a conjugative R-plasmid responsible for reistance to the following 14 antibiotics: ampicillin, carbenicillin, cephalothin, butirosin, neomycin, paramomycin, kanamycin, lividomycin, gentamicin, tobramycin, streptomycin, tetracycline, sulfonamide, and chloramphenicol, which belong to five families, the beta-lactamines, the aminoglycosides, the tetracyclines, the sulfonamides, and the phenicols. Resistance to th 14 antibiotics was cotransferred by in vitro conjugation between S. liquefaciens and strains of Escherichia coli. Mating between S. liquefaciens and E. coli also occurred in vivo, in the digestive tract of axenic mice and gnotobiotic mice associated with the whole human fecal flora. It was also shown that mating between these two strains occurred even when the donor S. liquefaciens strain was only transient in the digestive tract of the gnotobiotic host animals. A dense population of Bacteroides (10(10) viable cells per g of fresh feces) did not hinder this mating. All the matings occurred in the absence of an antibiotic selection pressure, and the resulting transferred strain of E. coli did not have the same colonizing capacity as the recipient parental strain. However, during antibiotic administration to mice, and even after the end of the drug intake, the transconjugant became established in the dominant population and replaced the parental recipient strain.

  14. R-plasmic transfer from Serratia liquefaciens to Escherichia coli in vitro and in vivo in the digestive tract of gnotobiotic mice associated with human fecal flora.

    PubMed Central

    Duval-Iflah, Y; Raibaud, P; Tancrede, C; Rousseau, M

    1980-01-01

    It was shown that a strain of Serratia liquefaciens harbors a conjugative R-plasmid responsible for reistance to the following 14 antibiotics: ampicillin, carbenicillin, cephalothin, butirosin, neomycin, paramomycin, kanamycin, lividomycin, gentamicin, tobramycin, streptomycin, tetracycline, sulfonamide, and chloramphenicol, which belong to five families, the beta-lactamines, the aminoglycosides, the tetracyclines, the sulfonamides, and the phenicols. Resistance to th 14 antibiotics was cotransferred by in vitro conjugation between S. liquefaciens and strains of Escherichia coli. Mating between S. liquefaciens and E. coli also occurred in vivo, in the digestive tract of axenic mice and gnotobiotic mice associated with the whole human fecal flora. It was also shown that mating between these two strains occurred even when the donor S. liquefaciens strain was only transient in the digestive tract of the gnotobiotic host animals. A dense population of Bacteroides (10(10) viable cells per g of fresh feces) did not hinder this mating. All the matings occurred in the absence of an antibiotic selection pressure, and the resulting transferred strain of E. coli did not have the same colonizing capacity as the recipient parental strain. However, during antibiotic administration to mice, and even after the end of the drug intake, the transconjugant became established in the dominant population and replaced the parental recipient strain. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:6995330

  15. Expression and Quorum Sensing Regulation of Type III Secretion System Genes of Vibrio harveyi during Infection of Gnotobiotic Brine Shrimp.

    PubMed

    Ruwandeepika, H A Darshanee; Karunasagar, Indrani; Bossier, Peter; Defoirdt, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Type III secretion systems enable pathogens to inject their virulence factors directly into the cytoplasm of the host cells. The type III secretion system of Vibrio harveyi, a major pathogen of aquatic organisms and a model species in quorum sensing studies, is repressed by the quorum sensing master regulator LuxR. In this study, we found that during infection of gnotobiotic brine shrimp larvae, the expression levels of three type III secretion operons in V. harveyi increased within the first 12h after challenge and decreased again thereafter. The in vivo expression levels were highest in a mutant with a quorum sensing system that is locked in low cell density configuration (minimal LuxR levels) and lowest in a mutant with a quorum sensing system that is locked in the high cell density configuration (maximal LuxR levels), which is consistent with repression of type III secretion by LuxR. Remarkably, in vivo expression levels of the type III secretion system genes were much (> 1000 fold) higher than the in vitro expression levels, indicating that (currently unknown) host factors significantly induce the type III secretion system. Given the fact that type III secretion is energy-consuming, repression by the quorum sensing master regulators might be a mechanism to save energy under conditions where it does not provide an advantage to the cells.

  16. Identifying Gut Microbe-Host Phenotype Relationships Using Combinatorial Communities in Gnotobiotic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Faith, Jeremiah J.; Ahern, Philip P.; Ridaura, Vanessa K.; Cheng, Jiye; Gordon, Jeffrey I.

    2014-01-01

    Identifying a scalable, unbiased method for discovering which members of the human gut microbiota influence specific physiologic, metabolic and immunologic phenotypes remains a challenge. Here we describe a method in which a clonally-arrayed collection of cultured, sequenced bacteria was generated from one of several human fecal microbiota samples found to transmit a particular phenotype to recipient germ-free mice. Ninety-four bacterial consortia, of diverse size, randomly drawn from the culture collection, were introduced into germ-free animals. We identified an unanticipated range of bacterial strains that promoted accumulation of colonic regulatory T cells (Tregs) and expansion of Nrp1lo/− peripheral Tregs, as well as strains that modulated mouse adiposity and cecal metabolite concentrations using feature selection algorithms and follow-up mono-colonization. This combinatorial approach enabled a systems-level understanding of some of the microbial contributions to human biology. PMID:24452263

  17. Identifying gut microbe-host phenotype relationships using combinatorial communities in gnotobiotic mice.

    PubMed

    Faith, Jeremiah J; Ahern, Philip P; Ridaura, Vanessa K; Cheng, Jiye; Gordon, Jeffrey I

    2014-01-22

    Identifying a scalable, unbiased method for discovering which members of the human gut microbiota influence specific physiologic, metabolic, and immunologic phenotypes remains a challenge. We describe a method in which a clonally arrayed collection of cultured, sequenced bacteria was generated from one of several human fecal microbiota samples found to transmit a particular phenotype to recipient germ-free mice. Ninety-four bacterial consortia of diverse size, randomly drawn from the culture collection, were introduced into germ-free animals. We identified an unanticipated range of bacterial strains that promoted accumulation of colonic regulatory T cells (T(regs)) and expansion of Nrp1(lo/-) peripheral T(regs), as well as strains that modulated mouse adiposity and cecal metabolite concentrations, using feature selection algorithms and follow-up monocolonizations. This combinatorial approach enables a systems-level understanding of microbial contributions to human biology.

  18. Protein Malnutrition Modifies Innate Immunity and Gene Expression by Intestinal Epithelial Cells and Human Rotavirus Infection in Neonatal Gnotobiotic Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Paim, Francine C.; Kandasamy, Sukumar; Alhamo, Moyasar A.; Fischer, David D.; Langel, Stephanie N.; Deblais, Loic; Kumar, Anand; Chepngeno, Juliet; Shao, Lulu; Huang, Huang-Chi; Candelero-Rueda, Rosario A.; Rajashekara, Gireesh

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Malnutrition affects millions of children in developing countries, compromising immunity and contributing to increased rates of death from infectious diseases. Rotavirus is a major etiological agent of childhood diarrhea in developing countries, where malnutrition is prevalent. However, the interactions between the two and their combined effects on immune and intestinal functions are poorly understood. In this study, we used neonatal gnotobiotic (Gn) pigs transplanted with the fecal microbiota of a healthy 2-month-old infant (HIFM) and fed protein-deficient or -sufficient bovine milk diets. Protein deficiency induced hypoproteinemia, hypoalbuminemia, hypoglycemia, stunting, and generalized edema in Gn pigs, as observed in protein-malnourished children. Irrespective of the diet, human rotavirus (HRV) infection early, at HIFM posttransplantation day 3 (PTD3), resulted in adverse health effects and higher mortality rates (45 to 75%) than later HRV infection (PTD10). Protein malnutrition exacerbated HRV infection and affected the morphology and function of the small intestinal epithelial barrier. In pigs infected with HRV at PTD10, there was a uniform decrease in the function and/or frequencies of natural killer cells, plasmacytoid dendritic cells, and CD103+ and apoptotic mononuclear cells and altered gene expression profiles of intestinal epithelial cells (chromogranin A, mucin 2, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, SRY-Box 9, and villin). Thus, we have established the first HIFM-transplanted neonatal pig model that recapitulates major aspects of protein malnutrition in children and can be used to evaluate physiologically relevant interventions. Our findings provide an explanation of why nutrient-rich diets alone may lack efficacy in malnourished children. IMPORTANCE Malnutrition and rotavirus infection, prevalent in developing countries, individually and in combination, affect the health of millions of children, compromising their immunity and increasing

  19. Protein Malnutrition Modifies Innate Immunity and Gene Expression by Intestinal Epithelial Cells and Human Rotavirus Infection in Neonatal Gnotobiotic Pigs.

    PubMed

    Vlasova, Anastasia N; Paim, Francine C; Kandasamy, Sukumar; Alhamo, Moyasar A; Fischer, David D; Langel, Stephanie N; Deblais, Loic; Kumar, Anand; Chepngeno, Juliet; Shao, Lulu; Huang, Huang-Chi; Candelero-Rueda, Rosario A; Rajashekara, Gireesh; Saif, Linda J

    2017-01-01

    Malnutrition affects millions of children in developing countries, compromising immunity and contributing to increased rates of death from infectious diseases. Rotavirus is a major etiological agent of childhood diarrhea in developing countries, where malnutrition is prevalent. However, the interactions between the two and their combined effects on immune and intestinal functions are poorly understood. In this study, we used neonatal gnotobiotic (Gn) pigs transplanted with the fecal microbiota of a healthy 2-month-old infant (HIFM) and fed protein-deficient or -sufficient bovine milk diets. Protein deficiency induced hypoproteinemia, hypoalbuminemia, hypoglycemia, stunting, and generalized edema in Gn pigs, as observed in protein-malnourished children. Irrespective of the diet, human rotavirus (HRV) infection early, at HIFM posttransplantation day 3 (PTD3), resulted in adverse health effects and higher mortality rates (45 to 75%) than later HRV infection (PTD10). Protein malnutrition exacerbated HRV infection and affected the morphology and function of the small intestinal epithelial barrier. In pigs infected with HRV at PTD10, there was a uniform decrease in the function and/or frequencies of natural killer cells, plasmacytoid dendritic cells, and CD103(+) and apoptotic mononuclear cells and altered gene expression profiles of intestinal epithelial cells (chromogranin A, mucin 2, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, SRY-Box 9, and villin). Thus, we have established the first HIFM-transplanted neonatal pig model that recapitulates major aspects of protein malnutrition in children and can be used to evaluate physiologically relevant interventions. Our findings provide an explanation of why nutrient-rich diets alone may lack efficacy in malnourished children. IMPORTANCE Malnutrition and rotavirus infection, prevalent in developing countries, individually and in combination, affect the health of millions of children, compromising their immunity and increasing the rates

  20. Susceptibility of Gnotobiotic Swine to Escherichia coli Isolated from Nonenteric Human Infections

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, R. C.; Rhoades, H. E.; Simon, J.

    1972-01-01

    Newborn, germfree piglets were susceptible to Escherichia coli associated with human, nonenteric infections and should provide a useful model in the study of generalized E. coli infections. PMID:4557565

  1. Helicobacter saguini, a Novel Helicobacter Isolated from Cotton-Top Tamarins with Ulcerative Colitis, Has Proinflammatory Properties and Induces Typhlocolitis and Dysplasia in Gnotobiotic IL-10−/− Mice

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Z.; Mannion, A.; Whary, M. T.; Muthupalani, S.; Sheh, A.; Feng, Y.; Gong, G.; Vandamme, P.; Holcombe, H. R.; Paster, B. J.

    2016-01-01

    A urease-negative, fusiform, novel bacterium named Helicobacter saguini was isolated from the intestines and feces of cotton-top tamarins (CTTs) with chronic colitis. Helicobacter sp. was detected in 69% of feces or intestinal samples from 116 CTTs. The draft genome sequence, obtained by Illumina MiSeq sequencing, for H. saguini isolate MIT 97-6194-5, consisting of ∼2.9 Mb with a G+C content of 35% and 2,704 genes, was annotated using the NCBI Prokaryotic Genomes Automatic Annotation Pipeline. H. saguini contains homologous genes of known virulence factors found in other enterohepatic helicobacter species (EHS) and H. pylori. These include flagellin, γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (ggt), collagenase, the secreted serine protease htrA, and components of a type VI secretion system, but the genome does not harbor genes for cytolethal distending toxin (cdt). H. saguini MIT 97-6194-5 induced significant levels of interleukin-8 (IL-8) in HT-29 cell culture supernatants by 4 h, which increased through 24 h. mRNAs for the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), IL-10, and IL-6 and the chemokine CXCL1 were upregulated in cocultured HT-29 cells at 4 h compared to levels in control cells. At 3 months postinfection, all H. saguini-monoassociated gnotobiotic C57BL/129 IL-10−/− mice were colonized and had seroconverted to H. saguini antigen with a significant Th1-associated increase in IgG2c (P < 0.0001). H. saguini induced a significant typhlocolitis, associated epithelial defects, mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) hyperplasia, and dysplasia. Inflammatory cytokines IL-22, IL-17a, IL-1β, gamma interferon (IFN-γ), and TNF-α, as well as inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) were significantly upregulated in the cecal tissues of infected mice. The expression of the DNA damage response molecule γ-H2AX was significantly higher in the ceca of H. saguini-infected gnotobiotic mice than in the controls. This model using a nonhuman primate

  2. Functional Intestinal Bile Acid 7α-Dehydroxylation by Clostridium scindens Associated with Protection from Clostridium difficile Infection in a Gnotobiotic Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Studer, Nicolas; Desharnais, Lyne; Beutler, Markus; Brugiroux, Sandrine; Terrazos, Miguel A.; Menin, Laure; Schürch, Christian M.; McCoy, Kathy D.; Kuehne, Sarah A.; Minton, Nigel P.; Stecher, Bärbel; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan; Hapfelmeier, Siegfried

    2016-01-01

    Bile acids, important mediators of lipid absorption, also act as hormone-like regulators and as antimicrobial molecules. In all these functions their potency is modulated by a variety of chemical modifications catalyzed by bacteria of the healthy gut microbiota, generating a complex variety of secondary bile acids. Intestinal commensal organisms are well-adapted to normal concentrations of bile acids in the gut. In contrast, physiological concentrations of the various intestinal bile acid species play an important role in the resistance to intestinal colonization by pathogens such as Clostridium difficile. Antibiotic therapy can perturb the gut microbiota and thereby impair the production of protective secondary bile acids. The most important bile acid transformation is 7α-dehydroxylation, producing deoxycholic acid (DCA) and lithocholic acid (LCA). The enzymatic pathway carrying out 7α-dehydroxylation is restricted to a narrow phylogenetic group of commensal bacteria, the best-characterized of which is Clostridium scindens. Like many other intestinal commensal species, 7-dehydroxylating bacteria are understudied in vivo. Conventional animals contain variable and uncharacterized indigenous 7α-dehydroxylating organisms that cannot be selectively removed, making controlled colonization with a specific strain in the context of an undisturbed microbiota unfeasible. In the present study, we used a recently established, standardized gnotobiotic mouse model that is stably associated with a simplified murine 12-species “oligo-mouse microbiota” (Oligo-MM12). It is representative of the major murine intestinal bacterial phyla, but is deficient for 7α-dehydroxylation. We find that the Oligo-MM12 consortium carries out bile acid deconjugation, a prerequisite for 7α-dehydroxylation, and confers no resistance to C. difficile infection (CDI). Amendment of Oligo-MM12 with C. scindens normalized the large intestinal bile acid composition by reconstituting 7

  3. The gnotobiotic brine shrimp (Artemia franciscana) model system reveals that the phenolic compound pyrogallol protects against infection through its prooxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Baruah, Kartik; Duy Phong, Ho Phuong Pham; Norouzitallab, Parisa; Defoirdt, Tom; Bossier, Peter

    2015-12-01

    The phenolic compound pyrogallol is the functional unit of many polyphenols and currently there has been a growing interest in using this compound in human and animal health owing to its health-promoting effects. The biological actions of pyrogallol moiety (and polyphenols) in inducing health benefitting effects have been studied; however, the mechanisms of action remain unclear yet. Here, we aimed at unravelling the underlying mechanism of action behind the protective effects of pyrogallol against bacterial infection by using the gnotobiotically-cultured brine shrimp Artemia franciscana and pathogenic bacteria Vibrio harveyi as host-pathogen model system. The gnotobiotic test system represents an exceptional system for carrying out such studies because it eliminates any possible interference of microbial communities (naturally present in the experimental system) in mechanistic studies and furthermore facilitates the interpretation of the results in terms of a cause effect relationship. We provided clear evidences suggesting that pyrogallol pretreament, at an optimum concentration, induced protective effects in the brine shrimp against V. harveyi infection. By pretreating brine shrimp with pyrogallol in the presence or absence of an antioxidant enzyme mixture (catalase and superoxide dismutase), we showed that the Vibrio-protective effect of the compound was caused by its prooxidant action (e.g. generation of hydrogen peroxide, H2O2). We showed further that generation of prooxidant is linked to the induction of heat shock protein Hsp70, which is involved in eliciting the prophenoloxidase and transglutaminase immune responses. The ability of pyrogallol to induce protective immunity makes it a potential natural protective agent that might be a potential preventive modality for different host-pathogen systems.

  4. Enhanced resistance against Vibrio harveyi infection by carvacrol and its association with the induction of heat shock protein 72 in gnotobiotic Artemia franciscana.

    PubMed

    Baruah, Kartik; Norouzitallab, Parisa; Phong, Ho Phuong Pham Duy; Smagghe, Guy; Bossier, Peter

    2017-03-16

    Induction of HSP72 is a natural response of stressed organisms that protects against many insults including bacterial diseases in farm (aquatic) animals. It would therefore be of great health benefit to search for natural compounds that are clinically safe yet able to induce HSP72 in animals. The phenolic compound carvacrol, an approved food component, had been shown in in vitro study to act as a co-inducer of HSP72, enhancing HSP72 production only in combination with a bona fide stress compared to the compound alone. However, in vitro model systems do not completely represent an in vivo physiology. Here, using the well-established gnotobiotic Artemia model system, we determined whether carvacrol could induce HSP72 in vivo, whether this putative effect could generate resistance in Artemia against biotic/abiotic stress and also unraveled the mechanism behind the possible HSP72-inducing effect of carvacrol. The gnotobiotic system is crucial for such studies because it avoids the interference of any extraneous factors on host-compound interaction. Here, carvacrol was shown to be a potent HSP72 inducer. Induction of HSP72 was associated with the generation of resistance in Artemia larvae against subsequent lethal heat stress or pathogenic Vibrio harveyi. Our results also provided new insight on the mode of HSP72 inducing action of carvacrol, in which the initial generation of reactive molecule H2O2 by the compound plays a key role. Overall results add new information about the bioactivity of carvacrol and advance our knowledge of this compound as potential prophylactic agent for controlling Vibrio infection in aquaculture animals.

  5. Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae bacterins and porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) infection: induction of postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PMWS) in the gnotobiotic swine model of PCV2-associated disease.

    PubMed

    Krakowka, Steven; Ellis, John; McNeilly, Francis; Waldner, Cheryl; Rings, D Michael; Allan, Gordon

    2007-07-01

    Groups (5 to 15 per group) of gnotobiotic swine were infected oronasally with porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) at 3 days of age and then given 1 of 6 different commercial Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (M. hyopneumoniae) bacterins as either a single dose (7 d of age, 1 application products) or 2 doses (7 and 21 d of age, 2 application product). Control groups received PCV2 alone (n = 9) or were infected with PCV2 and immunized twice with keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) emulsified in incomplete Freund's adjuvant (ICFA) (n = 7). Five of 7 (71%) PCV2-infected piglets immunized with KLH/ICFA developed mild or overt PMWS, whereas none of 9 piglets infected with PCV2 alone developed PMWS. Five of 12 (42%) piglets vaccinated with a commercial bacterin containing mineral oil adjuvant developed PMWS following vaccination. None of the PCV2-infected piglets in the other bacterin-vaccinated groups developed PMWS in this model of PCV2-associated disease. This difference in prevalence of PMWS in piglets given the mineral oil-adjuvanted M. hyopneumoniae bacterin and the other M. hyopneumoniae bacterin vaccination groups was statistically significant (P < 0.05).

  6. A real-time PCR assay for accurate quantification of the individual members of the Altered Schaedler Flora microbiota in gnotobiotic mice.

    PubMed

    Gomes-Neto, João Carlos; Mantz, Sara; Held, Kyler; Sinha, Rohita; Segura Munoz, Rafael R; Schmaltz, Robert; Benson, Andrew K; Walter, Jens; Ramer-Tait, Amanda E

    2017-04-01

    Changes in the gastrointestinal microbial community are frequently associated with chronic diseases such as Inflammatory Bowel Diseases. However, understanding the relationship of any individual taxon within the community to host physiology is made complex due to the diversity and individuality of the gut microbiota. Defined microbial communities such as the Altered Schaedler Flora (ASF) help alleviate the challenges of a diverse microbiota by allowing one to interrogate the relationship between individual bacterial species and host responses. An important aspect of studying these relationships with defined microbial communities is the ability to measure the population abundance and dynamics of each member. Herein, we describe the development of an improved ASF species-specific and sensitive real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) for use with SYBR Green chemistry to accurately assess individual ASF member abundance. This approach targets hypervariable regions V1 through V3 of the 16S rRNA gene of each ASF taxon to enhance assay specificity. We demonstrate the reproducibility, sensitivity and application of this new method by quantifying each ASF bacterium in two inbred mouse lines. We also used it to assess changes in ASF member abundance before and after acute antibiotic perturbation of the community as well as in mice fed two different diets. Additionally, we describe a nested PCR assay for the detection of lowly abundant ASF members. Altogether, this improved qPCR method will facilitate gnotobiotic research involving the ASF community by allowing for reproducible quantification of its members under various physiological conditions.

  7. Virus-specific intestinal IFN-gamma producing T cell responses induced by human rotavirus infection and vaccines are correlated with protection against rotavirus diarrhea in gnotobiotic pigs.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Lijuan; Wen, Ke; Azevedo, Marli S P; Gonzalez, Ana M; Zhang, Wei; Saif, Linda J

    2008-06-19

    We examined rotavirus-specific IFN-gamma producing CD4+, CD8+ and CD4+CD8+ T cell responses in gnotobiotic pigs infected with a virulent human rotavirus (VirHRV) or vaccinated with an attenuated (Att) HRV vaccine (AttHRV3x or AttHRV2x) or an AttHRV oral priming and 2/6-virus-like particle (VLP) intranasal boosting (AttHRV-2/6VLP) regimen. In VirHRV infected pigs, HRV-specific IFN-gamma producing T cells reside primarily in ileum. AttHRV-2/6VLP induced similar frequencies of intestinal IFN-gamma producing T cells as the VirHRV, whereas AttHRV3x or 2x vaccines were less effective. Protection rates against rotavirus diarrhea upon VirHRV challenge significantly correlated (r=0.97-1.0, p<0.005) with frequencies of intestinal IFN-gamma producing T cells, suggesting their role in protective immunity.

  8. Gnotobiotic pigs-derivation and rearing.

    PubMed Central

    Miniats, O P; Jol, D

    1978-01-01

    The procurement, rearing, nutrition and microbiological monitoring of gnotobiotic pigs and a method for conditioning of primary, colostrum-deprived, specific pathogen free pigs is described. As compared to the established hysterectomy and closed hysterotomy methods for the derivation of gnotobiotic piglets an alternative approach, open caesarian section with the sow maintained under general halothane-nitrous oxide anaesthesia and the introduction of each fetus into the sterile isolator via a liquid germicidal trap, was found to be more efficient and equally successful in providing viable and microbiologically sterile piglets. Two sterile commercially available milk diets, a special formula for orphan animals and condensed cow's milk, when the latter was supplemented with injectable vitamin E, selenium and iron, proved adequate for satisfactory health of the animals. Two types of pelleted starter rations, sterilized by 4.5 megarads of gamma irradiation, provided adequately for the nutritional needs of older gnotobiotic pigs. Results of microbiological monitoring indicated that the surgical and rearing methods employed were capable of preventing contamination of the animals with bacteria, mycoplasma, yeasts, molds, protozoa and helminths but probably could not exclude occasional vertically transmitted viral infections. Exposure of the animals for four weeks to selected strains of lactobacilli, fecal streptococci and Escherichia coli did not result in visible disease while they were maintained in isolators and conditioned them for transfer into a conventional microbial environment. PMID:154359

  9. Quantitative assessment of the impact of the gut microbiota on lysine epsilon-acetylation of host proteins using gnotobiotic mice.

    PubMed

    Simon, Gabriel M; Cheng, Jiye; Gordon, Jeffrey I

    2012-07-10

    The gut microbiota influences numerous aspects of human biology. One facet that has not been thoroughly explored is its impact on the host proteome. We hypothesized that the microbiota may produce certain of its effects through covalent modification of host proteins. We focused on protein lysine ε-acetylation because of its recently discovered roles in regulation of cell metabolism, and the potential for products of microbial fermentation to interact with the lysine acetylation machinery of host cells. Germ-free mice, fed a (15)N-labeled diet for two generations, were colonized as adults with a microbiota harvested from conventionally raised mouse donors. Using high-resolution mass spectrometry, we quantified 3,891 liver and proximal colonic proteins, 558 of which contained 1,602 sites of lysine acetylation, 43% not previously described. Multiple proteins from multiple subcellular compartments underwent microbiota-associated increases in their levels of lysine acetylation at one or more residues, in one or both tissues. Acetylated proteins were enriched in functions related to energy production, respiration, and primary metabolism. A number of the acetylation events affect lysine residues at or near the active sites of enzymes, whereas others occur at locations that may affect other facets of protein function. One of these modifications, affecting Lys292 in mouse α-1-antitrypsin, was detected in the corresponding lysine of the human serum protein. Methods described in this report can be applied to other co- or posttranslational modifications, and add quantitation of protein expression and covalent modification to the arsenal of techniques for characterizing the dynamic, important interactions between gut symbionts and their hosts.

  10. Species-specific but not genotype-specific primary and secondary isotype-specific NSP4 antibody responses in gnotobiotic calves and piglets infected with homologous host bovine (NSP4[A]) or porcine (NSP4[B]) rotavirus.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Lijuan; Honma, Shinjiro; Ishida, Shin-Ichi; Yan, Xiao-Yi; Kapikian, Albert Z; Hoshino, Yasutaka

    2004-12-05

    Using recombinant baculoviruses expressing rotavirus NSP4 [A], [B], [C], and [D] genotypes of bovine, porcine, human, simian, or murine origin, we analyzed serum antibody responses to NSP4s in gnotobiotic calves and piglets infected by the oral/alimentary or intraamniotic route with bovine (NSP4[A]) (Wyatt, R.G., Mebus, C.A., Yolken, R.H., Kalica, A.R., James, H.D., Jr., Kapikian, A.Z., Chanock, R.M., 1979. Rotaviral immunity in gnotobiotic calves: heterologous resistance to human virus induced by bovine virus. Science 203(4380), 548-550) or porcine (NSP4[B]) (Hoshino, Y., Saif, L.J., Sereno, M.M., Chanock, R.M., Kapikian, A.Z., 1988. Infection immunity of piglets to either VP3 or VP7 outer capsid protein confers resistance to challenge with a virulent rotavirus bearing the corresponding antigen. J. Virol. 62(3), 744-748) rotaviruses. Following primary infection and challenge with virulent rotaviruses, the animals developed higher or significantly higher antibody titers to homologous host homotypic NSP4s than to heterologous host homotypic or heterologous host heterotypic NSP4s, indicating that antibody responses were species specific rather than genotype specific. Antibody responses to NSP4s corresponded closely with the phylogenetic relationships of NSP4s within a species-specific region of amino acids (aa) 131-141. In contrast, NSP4 genotypes determined by amino acid full-length sequence identity predicted poorly their "serotypes". In piglets, antibodies to NSP4 induced by previous oral infection failed to confer protection against challenge from a porcine rotavirus bearing serotypically different VP4 and VP7 but essentially identical NSP4 to the porcine rotavirus in primary infection. Thus, in an approach to immunization with a live oral rotavirus vaccine, the NSP4 protein does not appear to play an important role in protection against rotavirus disease and infection.

  11. Divergent Immunomodulating Effects of Probiotics on T Cell Responses to Oral Attenuated Human Rotavirus Vaccine and Virulent Human Rotavirus Infection in a Neonatal Gnotobiotic Piglet Disease Model

    PubMed Central

    Chattha, Kuldeep S.; Vlasova, Anastasia N.; Kandasamy, Sukumar; Rajashekara, Gireesh; Saif, Linda J.

    2014-01-01

    Rotaviruses (RVs) are a leading cause of childhood diarrhea. Current oral vaccines are not effective in impoverished countries where the vaccine is needed most. Therefore, alternative affordable strategies are urgently needed. Probiotics can alleviate diarrhea in children and enhance specific systemic and mucosal Ab responses, but the T cell responses are undefined. In this study, we elucidated the T cell and cytokine responses to attenuated human RV (AttHRV) and virulent human RV (HRV) in gnotobiotic pigs colonized with probiotics (Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain GG [LGG] and Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12 [Bb12]), mimicking gut commensals in breastfed infants. Neonatal gnotobiotic pigs are the only animal model susceptible to HRV diarrhea. Probiotic colonized and nonvaccinated (Probiotic) pigs had lower diarrhea and reduced virus shedding postchallenge compared with noncolonized and nonvaccinated pigs (Control). Higher protection in the Probiotic group coincided with higher ileal T regulatory cells (Tregs) before and after challenge, and higher serum TGF-β and lower serum and biliary proinflammatory cytokines postchallenge. Probiotic colonization in vaccinated pigs enhanced innate serum IFN-α, splenic and circulatory IFN-γ−producing T cells, and serum Th1 cytokines, but reduced serum Th2 cytokines compared with noncolonized vaccinated pigs (Vac). Thus, LGG+Bb12 induced systemic Th1 immunostimulatory effects on oral AttHRV vaccine that coincided with lower diarrhea severity and reduced virus shedding postchallenge in Vac+Pro compared with Vac pigs. Previously unreported intestinal CD8 Tregs were induced in vaccinated groups postchallenge. Thus, probiotics LGG+Bb12 exert divergent immunomodulating effects, with enhanced Th1 responses to oral AttHRV vaccine, whereas inducing Treg responses to virulent HRV. PMID:23918983

  12. Divergent immunomodulating effects of probiotics on T cell responses to oral attenuated human rotavirus vaccine and virulent human rotavirus infection in a neonatal gnotobiotic piglet disease model.

    PubMed

    Chattha, Kuldeep S; Vlasova, Anastasia N; Kandasamy, Sukumar; Rajashekara, Gireesh; Saif, Linda J

    2013-09-01

    Rotaviruses (RVs) are a leading cause of childhood diarrhea. Current oral vaccines are not effective in impoverished countries where the vaccine is needed most. Therefore, alternative affordable strategies are urgently needed. Probiotics can alleviate diarrhea in children and enhance specific systemic and mucosal Ab responses, but the T cell responses are undefined. In this study, we elucidated the T cell and cytokine responses to attenuated human RV (AttHRV) and virulent human RV (HRV) in gnotobiotic pigs colonized with probiotics (Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain GG [LGG] and Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12 [Bb12]), mimicking gut commensals in breastfed infants. Neonatal gnotobiotic pigs are the only animal model susceptible to HRV diarrhea. Probiotic colonized and nonvaccinated (Probiotic) pigs had lower diarrhea and reduced virus shedding postchallenge compared with noncolonized and nonvaccinated pigs (Control). Higher protection in the Probiotic group coincided with higher ileal T regulatory cells (Tregs) before and after challenge, and higher serum TGF-β and lower serum and biliary proinflammatory cytokines postchallenge. Probiotic colonization in vaccinated pigs enhanced innate serum IFN-α, splenic and circulatory IFN-γ-producing T cells, and serum Th1 cytokines, but reduced serum Th2 cytokines compared with noncolonized vaccinated pigs (Vac). Thus, LGG+Bb12 induced systemic Th1 immunostimulatory effects on oral AttHRV vaccine that coincided with lower diarrhea severity and reduced virus shedding postchallenge in Vac+Pro compared with Vac pigs. Previously unreported intestinal CD8 Tregs were induced in vaccinated groups postchallenge. Thus, probiotics LGG+Bb12 exert divergent immunomodulating effects, with enhanced Th1 responses to oral AttHRV vaccine, whereas inducing Treg responses to virulent HRV.

  13. Efficacy of Urtoxazumab (TMA-15 Humanized Monoclonal Antibody Specific for Shiga Toxin 2) Against Post-Diarrheal Neurological Sequelae Caused by Escherichia coli O157:H7 Infection in the Neonatal Gnotobiotic Piglet Model

    PubMed Central

    Moxley, Rodney A.; Francis, David H.; Tamura, Mizuho; Marx, David B.; Santiago-Mateo, Kristina; Zhao, Mojun

    2017-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) is the most common cause of hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic uremic syndrome in human patients, with brain damage and dysfunction the main cause of acute death. We evaluated the efficacy of urtoxazumab (TMA-15, Teijin Pharma Limited), a humanized monoclonal antibody against Shiga toxin (Stx) 2 for the prevention of brain damage, dysfunction, and death in a piglet EHEC infection model. Forty-five neonatal gnotobiotic piglets were inoculated orally with 3 × 109 colony-forming units of EHEC O157:H7 strain EDL933 (Stx1+, Stx2+) when 22–24 h old. At 24 h post-inoculation, piglets were intraperitoneally administered placebo or TMA-15 (0.3, 1.0 or 3.0 mg/kg body weight). Compared to placebo (n = 10), TMA-15 (n = 35) yielded a significantly greater probability of survival, length of survival, and weight gain (p <0.05). The efficacy of TMA-15 against brain lesions and death was 62.9% (p = 0.0004) and 71.4% (p = 0.0004), respectively. These results suggest that TMA-15 may potentially prevent or reduce vascular necrosis and infarction of the brain attributable to Stx2 in human patients acutely infected with EHEC. However, we do not infer that TMA-15 treatment will completely protect human patients infected with EHEC O157:H7 strains that produce both Stx1 and Stx2. PMID:28134751

  14. Experimental anisakid infections in mice.

    PubMed

    Vericimo, M A; Figueiredo, I; Teixeira, G A P B; Clemente, S C São

    2015-09-01

    Anisakidosis is a human parasitic disease caused by infections with members of the Anisakidae family. Accidental infection after fish intake affects the gastrointestinal tract as a consequence of mechanical damage caused by migrating larvae. Infections can also trigger allergies, hives, severe asthma or anaphylaxis with angioedema. Although mouse models of intraperitoneal antigenic stimulation exist, enabling immunological studies, few models using gastric introduction of live larvae are available for the study of immunological and gastrointestinal damage in mice. This study was designed to characterize serum reactivity against Anisakis spp. and Contracaecum spp. in Balb/c mice following orogastric inoculation and to assess gastrointestinal damage. These anisakid species were classified at the Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF) School of Veterinary Medicine and materials for live larval inoculation were developed at the UFF Immunobiology laboratory. Live larvae were inoculated following injection with a NaCl solution. Blood samples were collected and sera screened for immunoglobulin (Ig)E and IgG anti-larva responses to both nematodes, specific for somatic and excretory/secretory antigens, by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The means of the optical densities were analysed using analysis of variance (ANOVA) with Tukey's post-hoc test and the general linear model. This analysis identified the presence of anti-IgG seroreactivity to both somatic and excretory/secretory Anisakis antigens in inoculated animals compared with controls (P< 0.001), and no gastric or intestinal damage was observed. These experiments demonstrated that introduction of live Contracaecum spp. into the gastrointestinal tract did not elicit serum sensitization in animals.

  15. Pathogenesis of intestinal cryptosporidiosis in conventional and gnotobiotic piglets.

    PubMed

    Vítovec, J; Koudela, B

    1992-06-01

    The pathogenesis of intestinal cryptosporidiosis was studied in 52 conventionally reared and 20 gnotobiotically reared piglets by inoculation with different doses of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts. The prepatent period of C. parvum in both groups of animals were variable, depending on the number of oocysts administered. The patent period of C. parvum in conventionally reared piglets was 8 or 9 days; in gnotobiotic piglets cryptosporidia were found in feces until Day post infection (DPI) 16, when the last piglet was necropsied. Cryptosporidiosis in conventionally reared piglets is a self-limited diarrheal disease associated with morphological changes within the intestine. The most severe lesion was seen in the posterior jejunum and ileum from DPI 3 to DPI 7, and consisted of villous atrophy, crypt hyperplasia and inflammatory infiltration in the lamina propria. In gnotobiotic piglets cryptosporidia induced severe enterocolitis which occurred at least until DPI 16. The characteristics of enteric lesions were similar to those found in conventionally reared piglets. Intestinal cryptosporidiosis in both groups of animals shifted in the course of infection in the caudal direction and terminated in the large intestine. Examination by scanning electron microscope showed that infected absorptive cells had thicker and longer microvilli than those on non-infected cells; neighboring non-infected cells were hypertrophic, bulbously protuberant with minute microvilli with no distinct intercellular borders. Numerous cryptosporidia in the heterotopic glandular epithelium in the submucosa of cecum and colon on DPI 9 and 10 were found. No differences in the location and degree of cryptosporidial infection between colostrum-fed and colostrum-deprived conventionally reared piglets were found. Sow's colostrum does not appear to protect piglets from C. parvum infection. The role of intestinal microflora in the pathogenesis of cryptosporidiosis in piglets is discussed.

  16. Zika Infection Shrinks Testicles in Mice

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163733.html Zika Infection Shrinks Testicles in Mice Study authors unsure ... 22, 2017 WEDNESDAY, Feb. 22, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Zika virus can be sexually transmitted through semen, and ...

  17. Gnotobiotic Human Colon Ex Vivo

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, Frank D.; Folan, David M. A.; Winter, Des C.; Folan, Michael A.; Baird, Alan W.

    2015-01-01

    Background A novel emulsion with efficacy as an agent for eliminating biofilms was selected. The aim of this study was to examine efficacy and effect of a formulation of ML:8 against commensal bacteria harvested from ex vivo human colonic tissues. Methods Mucosal sheets, obtained at the time of surgery, were exposed for 2 minutes to one of four solutions: Krebs-Hensleit (KH) solution, saline (NaCl; 0.9%), povidone iodine (1%), or ML:8 (2%); n = 4. Lumenal surfaces were swabbed for culture under aerobic or anaerobic conditions. Following treatment, each sheet was mounted in Ussing chambers and voltage clamped. Tissues were challenged with carbachol. Permeability coefficient (Papp) was determined using mannitol fluxes. At the end of each experiment, tissues were examined histologically. Results Similar colony forming units grew in aerobic and anaerobic conditions in both control and NaCl treated tissues. Iodine reduced and ML:8 virtually abolished viable bacteria. Basal electrophysiological parameters were not different between treatments. Transepithelial electrical resistance values did not differ between groups. All tissues responded to carbachol, although this was attenuated in iodine treated tissue. Papp values were slightly elevated in all treated tissues but this did not reach significance. Histopathological assessment revealed no overt damage to tissues. Conclusion Brief exposure to ML:8 reduced culturable bacterial burden from human intestinal tissues harvested at the time of surgical resection. Such gnotobiotic tissues retain structural and functional integrity. This is a novel approach to reduce bacterial burden. PMID:27785304

  18. Development of a bacterial challenge test for gnotobiotic Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus larvae.

    PubMed

    Situmorang, Magdalena Lenny; Dierckens, Kristof; Mlingi, Frank Thomas; Van Delsen, Bart; Bossier, Peter

    2014-04-23

    Gastrointestinal microbiota have an important impact on fish health and disease, stimulating interest in a better understanding of how these gastrointestinal microbial communities are composed and consequently affect host fitness. In this respect, probiotic microorganisms have been extensively used in recent aquaculture production. To study the use of probiotics in the treatment of infectious diseases, the establishment of a method of experimental infection to obtain consistent results for mortality and infection in challenge tests is important. In pathogen-screening tests, 4 candidate pathogenic bacteria strains (Edwardsiella ictaluri gly09, E. ictaluri gly10, E. tarda LMG2793 and Streptococcus agalactiae LMG15977) were individually tested on xenic Nile tilapia larvae. Only Edwardsiella strains delivered via Artemia nauplii, with or without additional pathogen delivery via the culture water, led to increased mortality in fish larvae. A gnotobiotic Nile tilapia larvae model system was developed to provide a research tool to investigate the effects and modes-of-action of probiotics under controlled conditions. A double disinfection procedure using hydrogen peroxide and sodium hypochlorite solution was applied to the fish eggs, which were subsequently incubated in a cocktail of antibiotic and antifungal agents. In the gnotobiotic challenge test, E. ictaluri gly09R was added to the model system via Artemia nauplii and culture water, resulting in a significant mortality of the gnotobiotic fish larvae. The developed gnotobiotic Nile tilapia model can be used as a tool to extend understanding of the mechanisms involved in host-microbe interactions and to evaluate new methods of disease control.

  19. Polyerositis and Arthritis Due to Escherichia coli in Gnotobiotic Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Waxler, G. L.; Britt, A. L.

    1972-01-01

    Forty gnotobiotic pigs from six litters were exposed orally to Escherichia coli 083:K·:NM at 69 to 148 hours of age, while 17 pigs from the same litters served as unexposed controls. Clinical signs of infection included fever, anorexia, diarrhea, lameness, and reluctance to move. Eighty-four percent of the exposed pigs in four litters died, while only 13% in two litters died. Gross and microscopic lesions included serofibrinous to fibrinopurulent polyserositis in 96% of the exposed pigs in four litters and 33% of the exposed pigs in two litters. A few pigs had gross and/or microscopic lesions of arthritis. Escherichia coli was routinely isolated from the serous and synovial cavities of infected pigs. Anti-hog cholera serum administered orally as a colostrum substitute gave partial protection against E. coli infection. ImagesFig. 1.Fig. 2.Fig. 3.Fig. 4.Fig. 5.Fig. 6.Fig. 7.Fig. 8. PMID:4261837

  20. Aerosol infection of mice with Bordetella pertussis.

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Y; Izumiya, K; Sato, H; Cowell, J L; Manclark, C R

    1980-01-01

    Aerosol inhalation of Bordetella pertussis Tohama phase I resulted in a reproducible and uniform infection of mice (strain DDY or ICR). Mice in groups of 10 exposed for 30 min to aerosols generated from bacterial suspensions of 10(9) and 10(10) organisms per ml resulted in mean bacterial counts of 2.3 (+/- 0.3) X 10(4) and 1.0 (+/- 0.3) X 10(5) colony-forming units, respectively, in the lung of each animal. Subsequent studies using a 30-min aerosol inoculation of ICR mice with 2 X 10(9) bacterial cells per ml showed: (i) B. pertussis cells reached a maximum of about 10(7) colony-forming units per lung 14 days after inhalation. (ii) Deaths (10 to 100%, depending on mouse age) occurred 10 to 14 days after exposure. (iii) The lung weight and the leukocyte count increased from basal values of 100 mg and 10(4) leukocytes per mm3 to a plateau of 950 mg and 1.95 X 10(5) leukocytes per mm3, respectively, 14 days after challenge. (iv) There was a significantly reduced rate of body weight gain by infected mice compared to noninfected mice. (v) With mortality as the criterion for disease, susceptibility varied with the age of mice as follows: 10 days old greater than 18 greater than 28 greater than 49. (vi) Bacteria were associated with ciliated respiratory epithelial cells by scanning electron microscopy. Images Fig. 4 PMID:6249758

  1. Skin Vaccination against Rotavirus Using Microneedles: Proof of Concept in Gnotobiotic Piglets

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuhuan; Vlasova, Anastasia; Velasquez, Daniel E.; Saif, Linda J.; Kandasamy, Sukumar; Kochba, Efrat; Levin, Yotam; Jiang, Baoming

    2016-01-01

    Live-attenuated oral rotavirus (RV) vaccines have lower efficacy in low income countries, and additionally are associated with a rare but severe adverse event, intussusception. We have been pursuing the development of an inactivated rotavirus vaccine (IRV) using the human rotavirus strain CDC-9 (G1P[8]) through parenteral immunization and previously demonstrated dose sparing and enhanced immunogenicity of intradermal (ID) unadjuvanted IRV using a coated microneedle patch in comparison with intramuscular (IM) administration in mice. The aim of this study was to evaluate the immune response and protection against RV infection and diarrhea conferred by the administration of the ID unadjuvanted IRV using the microneedle device MicronJet600® in neonatal gnotobiotic (Gn) piglets challenged with virulent Wa G1P[8] human RV. Three doses of 5 μg IRV when administered intradermally and 5 μg IRV formulated with aluminum hydroxide [Al(OH)3] when administered intramuscularly induced comparable rotavirus-specific antibody titers of IgA, IgG, IgG avidity index and neutralizing activity in sera of neonatal piglets. Both IRV vaccination regimens protected against RV antigen shedding in stools, and reduced the cumulative diarrhea scores in the piglets. This study demonstrated that the ID and IM administrations of IRV are immunogenic and protective against RV-induced diarrhea in neonatal piglets. Our findings highlight the potential value of an adjuvant sparing effect of the IRV ID delivery route. PMID:27824918

  2. Skin Vaccination against Rotavirus Using Microneedles: Proof of Concept in Gnotobiotic Piglets.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuhuan; Vlasova, Anastasia; Velasquez, Daniel E; Saif, Linda J; Kandasamy, Sukumar; Kochba, Efrat; Levin, Yotam; Jiang, Baoming

    2016-01-01

    Live-attenuated oral rotavirus (RV) vaccines have lower efficacy in low income countries, and additionally are associated with a rare but severe adverse event, intussusception. We have been pursuing the development of an inactivated rotavirus vaccine (IRV) using the human rotavirus strain CDC-9 (G1P[8]) through parenteral immunization and previously demonstrated dose sparing and enhanced immunogenicity of intradermal (ID) unadjuvanted IRV using a coated microneedle patch in comparison with intramuscular (IM) administration in mice. The aim of this study was to evaluate the immune response and protection against RV infection and diarrhea conferred by the administration of the ID unadjuvanted IRV using the microneedle device MicronJet600® in neonatal gnotobiotic (Gn) piglets challenged with virulent Wa G1P[8] human RV. Three doses of 5 μg IRV when administered intradermally and 5 μg IRV formulated with aluminum hydroxide [Al(OH)3] when administered intramuscularly induced comparable rotavirus-specific antibody titers of IgA, IgG, IgG avidity index and neutralizing activity in sera of neonatal piglets. Both IRV vaccination regimens protected against RV antigen shedding in stools, and reduced the cumulative diarrhea scores in the piglets. This study demonstrated that the ID and IM administrations of IRV are immunogenic and protective against RV-induced diarrhea in neonatal piglets. Our findings highlight the potential value of an adjuvant sparing effect of the IRV ID delivery route.

  3. A Gnotobiotic Pig Model for Determining Human Norovirus Inactivation by High-Pressure Processing

    PubMed Central

    Lou, Fangfei; Ye, Mu; Ma, Yuanmei; Li, Xinhui; DiCaprio, Erin; Chen, Haiqiang; Krakowka, Steven; Hughes, John; Kingsley, David

    2015-01-01

    Human norovirus (NoV) is responsible for over 90% of outbreaks of acute nonbacterial gastroenteritis worldwide and accounts for 60% of cases of foodborne illness in the United States. Currently, the infectivity of human NoVs is poorly understood due to the lack of a cell culture system. In this study, we determined the survival of a human NoV genogroup II, genotype 4 (GII.4) strain in seeded oyster homogenates after high-pressure processing (HPP) using a novel receptor binding assay and a gnotobiotic pig model. Pressure conditions of 350 MPa at 0°C for 2 min led to a 3.7-log10 reduction in the number of viral RNA copies in oysters, as measured by the porcine gastric mucin-conjugated magnetic bead (PGM-MB) binding assay and real-time RT-PCR, whereas pressure conditions of 350 MPa at 35°C for 2 min achieved only a 1-log10 reduction in the number of RNA copies. Newborn gnotobiotic piglets orally fed oyster homogenate treated at 350 MPa and 0°C for 2 min did not have viral RNA shedding in feces, histologic lesions, or viral replication in the small intestine. In contrast, gnotobiotic piglets fed oysters treated at 350 MPa and 35°C for 2 min had high levels of viral shedding in feces and exhibited significant histologic lesions and viral replication in the small intestine. Collectively, these data demonstrate that (i) human NoV survival estimated by an in vitro PGM-MB virus binding assay is consistent with the infectivity determined by an in vivo gnotobiotic piglet model and (ii) HPP is capable of inactivating a human NoV GII.4 strain at commercially acceptable pressure levels. PMID:26187968

  4. Studies of macrophage function during Trichinella spiralis infection in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Wing, E J; Krahenbuhl, J L; Remington, J S

    1979-01-01

    Studies were made to investigate the quantitative and functional changes which occur in peritoneal macrophage populations obtained from mice infected orally with Trichinella spiralis larvae. C57BL/6 mice infected with T. spiralis larvae became parasitized with adult worms which were rejected from the intestine from 14 to 20 days after infection. Infected mice developed a striking increase in peritoneal exudate cells, composed largely of macrophages, which was maximal at from 16 to 18 days after infection. T. spiralis larvae and eosinophils were not seen in the peritoneal exudates. Macrophages from mice infected more than 11 days earlier inhibited DNA synthesis of syngeneic and allogeneic tumour cells, a property atributed to activated macrophages. In addition, macrophages from T. spiralis-infected mice had the functional ability to kill EL-4 tumour cells as measured by 51Cr release. Unlike activated macrophages, however, macrophages from infected mice did not develop the ability to inhibit multiplication of the intracellular pathogen Toxoplasma gondii. These studies demonstrate that T. spiralis infection in mice induces changes in macrophage function that differ from changes associated with infections by intracellular pathogens. PMID:437839

  5. Experimental infection of mice with bovine viral diarrhea virus.

    PubMed

    Seong, Giyong; Oem, Jae-Ku; Lee, Kyung-Hyun; Choi, Kyoung-Seong

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this study was to test the ability of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) to infect mice. Two mice each were either mock infected or inoculated with one of three BVDV strains by the intraperitoneal (IP) (n = 8) or intranasal (IN) (n = 8) route. All mice were euthanized at day 7 postinfection (p.i.). None of the infected mice exhibited any clinical signs of illness; however, the tissues harvested after BVDV challenge showed significant histopathological changes. Blood samples from five mice that were injected IP and one mouse that was inoculated IN were positive for BVDV by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Immunohistochemistry (IHC) was used to assess the presence of viral antigen in the organs of mice infected with three BVDV strains. In IP-injected mice, BVDV antigen was detected in the spleen (5/6), mesenteric lymph nodes (4/6), lymphatic tissue of the lung (3/6), lung (1/6), and stomach (1/6) of the infected mice; however, it was not detected in the liver (0/6) or kidney (0/6). In IN-inoculated mice, BVDV antigen was detected in the lung and mesenteric lymph nodes of one BVDV-infected mouse but was not detected in other tissues. The results of this study suggest that the spleen is the most reliable tissue for BVDV antigen detection using IHC in the IP-injected group. Our study demonstrates that mice can be infected by BVDV. This is the first report of BVDV infection in mice.

  6. Dermal mast cell responses in Paragonimus westermani-infected mice.

    PubMed

    Shin, M H

    1997-12-01

    This study was carried out to determine whether dermal mast cell responses to Paragonimus westermani in an abnormal host, the mouse, were dependent on the site of metacercarial inoculation. In mice during subcutaneous infection, the number of dermal mast cells were increased significantly (p < 0.05) at the first week (38.3/mm2) and then persisted at a high level until the sixth week (45.2/mm2) of infection compared with PBS-injected (control) mice (range: 19.4-25.1/mm2). In mice during oral infection, the number of dermal mast cells were increased significantly (p < 0.05) at two weeks (33.5/mm2) after infection and remained at these levels thereafter compared with non-infected (control) mice (range: 17.4-22.3/mm2). In mice both during subcutaneous and oral infection, the recruited dermal mast cells showed extensive degranulation at the second week (68.4% and 60.7%, respectively), reached a peak at the third week (81.4%, and 92.1%, respectively) and then declined slightly thereafter. By contrast, in both control mice, about 10% of dermal mast cells were degranulated. In conclusion, this study suggests that dermal mast cell responses to P. westermani in mice are dependent on cutaneous sensitization by larval excretory-secretory antigens, irrespective of infection route.

  7. Sleep and fatigue in mice infected with murine gammaherpesvirus 68.

    PubMed

    Olivadoti, Melissa D; Weinberg, Jason B; Toth, Linda A; Opp, Mark R

    2011-05-01

    Fatigue, a common symptom of many acute and chronic medical conditions, reduces both quality of life and workplace productivity and can be disabling. However, the pathophysiologic mechanisms that underlie fatigue can be difficult to study in human populations due to the patient heterogeneity, the variety of underlying causes and potential triggering events, and an inability to collect samples that may be essential to elucidation of mechanisms (e.g., brain). Although the etiology of chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) remains elusive, some studies have implicated viral infections, including Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), a human gammaherpesvirus, as a potential factor in the pathogenesis of CFS. Murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (γHV68) is a mouse pathogen that shares many similarities with human γHVs, including EBV. In this study, we use γHV68-infected C57BL/6J mice as a model system for studying the impact of chronic viral infection on sleep-wake behavior, activity patterns, and body temperature profiles. Our data show that γHV68 alters sleep, activity, and temperature in a manner suggestive of fatigue. In mice infected with the highest dose used in this study (40,000plaque forming units), food intake, body weight, wheel running, body temperature, and sleep were normal until approximately 7days after infection. These parameters were significantly altered during days 7 through 11, returned to baseline levels at day 12 after infection, and remained within the normal range for the remainder of the 30-day period after inoculation. At that time, both infected and uninfected mice were injected with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and their responses monitored. Uninfected mice given LPS developed a modest and transient febrile response during the initial light phase (hours 12 through 24) after injection. In contrast, infected mice developed changes in core body temperatures that persisted for at least 5days. Infected mice showed an initial hypothermia that lasted for approximately 12h

  8. Infections of Brugia pahangi in conventional and nude (athymic) mice.

    PubMed

    Suswillo, R R; Owen, D G; Denham, D A

    1980-12-01

    AKR, BALB/c and CBA/Ca and T.O. mice were completely resistant to infection with third stage infective larvae of Brugia pahangi. Third, fourth and fifth stage worms transplanted from the peritoneal cavity of jirds into the peritoneal cavity of mice continued to develop. BALB/c mice were the most susceptible of the strains tested and adult worms were obtained after each type of transplanted infection. Congenitally athymic nude mice were much less resistant to transplanted worms and infective larvae developed to full maturity in most of them. Ten of 14 athymic mice infected by the intraperitoneal (ip) inoculation of infective larvae had microfilariae in their blood or peritoneal cavities. At autopsy a percentage recovery of adult worms of 0-38% (mean 11.1%) was obtained. Microfilariae were only found in the blood of 2 of 6 athymic mice infected by subcutaneous (sc) infection and at autopsy 0-19.1% (mean 6.1%) recoveries were obtained. The thymic littermates of the nudes were more resistant than those most of the other strains used.

  9. Coping with parvovirus infections in mice: health surveillance and control.

    PubMed

    Janus, Lydia M; Bleich, Andre

    2012-01-01

    Parvoviruses of mice, minute virus of mice (MVM) and mouse parvovirus (MPV), are challenging pathogens to eradicate from laboratory animal facilities. Due to the impediment on rodent-based research, recent studies have focused on the assessment of re-derivation techniques and parvoviral potential to induce persistent infections. Summarizing recent data, this review gives an overview on studies associated with parvoviral impact on research, diagnostic methods, parvoviral persistence and re-derivation techniques, demonstrating the complex nature of parvovirus infection in mice and unfolding the challenge of controlling parvovirus infections in laboratory animal facilities.

  10. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection Interferes with HIV Vaccination in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ignatowicz, Lech; Mazurek, Jolanta; Leepiyasakulchai, Chaniya; Sköld, Markus; Hinkula, Jorma; Källenius, Gunilla; Pawlowski, Andrzej

    2012-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) has emerged as the most prominent bacterial disease found in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive individuals worldwide. Due to high prevalence of asymptomatic Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infections, the future HIV vaccine in areas highly endemic for TB will often be administrated to individuals with an ongoing Mtb infection. The impact of concurrent Mtb infection on the immunogenicity of a HIV vaccine candidate, MultiHIV DNA/protein, was investigated in mice. We found that, depending on the vaccination route, mice infected with Mtb before the administration of the HIV vaccine showed impairment in both the magnitude and the quality of antibody and T cell responses to the vaccine components p24Gag and gp160Env. Mice infected with Mtb prior to intranasal HIV vaccination exhibited reduced p24Gag-specific serum IgG and IgA, and suppressed gp160Env-specific serum IgG as compared to respective titers in uninfected HIV-vaccinated controls. Importantly, in Mtb-infected mice that were HIV-vaccinated by the intramuscular route the virus neutralizing activity in serum was significantly decreased, relative to uninfected counterparts. In addition mice concurrently infected with Mtb had fewer p24Gag-specific IFN-γ-expressing T cells and multifunctional T cells in their spleens. These results suggest that Mtb infection might interfere with the outcome of prospective HIV vaccination in humans. PMID:22848444

  11. Kinetics of Bartonella birtlesii Infection in Experimentally Infected Mice and Pathogenic Effect on Reproductive Functions

    PubMed Central

    Boulouis, Henri J.; Barrat, Francine; Bermond, Delphine; Bernex, Florence; Thibault, Danièle; Heller, Rémy; Fontaine, Jean-Jacques; Piémont, Yves; Chomel, Bruno B.

    2001-01-01

    The kinetics of infection and the pathogenic effects on the reproductive function of laboratory mice infected with Bartonella birtlesii recovered from an Apodemus species are described. B. birtlesii infection, as determined by bacteremia, occurred in BALB/c mice inoculated intravenously. Inoculation with a low-dose inoculum (1.5 × 103 CFU) induced bacteremia in only 75% of the mice compared to all of the mice inoculated with higher doses (≥1.5 × 104). Mice became bacteremic for at least 5 weeks (range, 5 to 8 weeks) with a peak ranging from 2 × 103 to 105 CFU/ml of blood. The bacteremia level was significantly higher in virgin females than in males but the duration of bacteremia was similar. In mice infected before pregnancy (n = 20), fetal loss was evaluated by enumerating resorption and fetal death on day 18 of gestation. The fetal death and resorption percentage of infected mice was 36.3% versus 14.5% for controls (P < 0.0001). Fetal suffering was evaluated by weighing viable fetuses. The weight of viable fetuses was significantly lower for infected mice than for uninfected mice (P < 0.0002). Transplacental transmission of Bartonella was demonstrated since 76% of the fetal resorptions tested was culture positive for B. birtlesii. The histopathological analysis of the placentas of infected mice showed vascular lesions in the maternal placenta, which could explain the reproductive disorders observed. BALB/c mice appeared to be a useful model for studying Bartonella infection. This study provides the first evidence of reproductive disorders in mice experimentally infected with a Bartonella strain originating from a wild rodent. PMID:11500400

  12. Oxygen effects on mortality of mice infected with Diplococcus pneumoniae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angrick, E. J.; Somerson, N. L.; Weiss, H. S.

    1974-01-01

    Mice infected by intraperitoneal injection of Diplococcus pneumoniae were held at 1 atm in either hypoxic (12%), hyperoxic (75%), or a normal (21%) oxygen environment. Mortality rates indicated prolongation of survival in hypoxia and shortened survival in hyperoxia. Exposure of mice to the experimental gas mixtures prior to inoculation did not alter the results.

  13. Tumor development after polyoma infection in athymic nude mice.

    PubMed

    Stutman

    1975-04-01

    Nude (nu/nu) mice in a CBA/H background show an age-dependent ssuceptibility to tumor development after polyoma virus infection (strain LID-1) when compared with nu/ + or CBA/H mice, which is apparent when 15- or 30-day-old mice are used: tumor incidence was 83 to 90% in nudes and 0 to 10% in controls. Latent perids for tumor development were also shortened in nudes. However, with increasing age nude mice become partially resistant and only 25% develop tumors when infected at 120 days of age. This partial resistance could be transferred with spleen cells to newborn mice. The cells in spleen responsible for this transfer can be eliminated by lysis with anti-Ig and complement or by pre-treatment of the donor with 100 mg/kg of cyclophosphamide and were not affected by treatment in vitro with anti-Thy.1.2 or procedures that remove adherent cells and/or macrophages. When the cells in 15-day-old nu/ + spleen were studied, both anti-Ig or anti-Thy.1.2 treatment eliminated tranfer of resistance to newborn. Virus replication in tissues of nude mice was increased 5 days after infection when compared with nu/ + but became comparable by day 15 after infection. Hemagglutination-inhibition antibodies in serum of nude and nu/ + had comparable titers when measured early after infection but higher titers were observed in nu/ + later after infection.

  14. Bioluminescence imaging of Chlamydia muridarum ascending infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Jessica; Huang, Yumeng; Liu, Yuanjun; Schenken, Robert; Arulanandam, Bernard; Zhong, Guangming

    2014-01-01

    Chlamydial pathogenicity in the upper genital tract relies on chlamydial ascending from the lower genital tract. To monitor chlamydial ascension, we engineered a luciferase-expressing C. muridarum. In cells infected with the luciferase-expressing C. muridarum, luciferase gene expression and enzymatic activity (measured as bioluminescence intensity) correlated well along the infection course, suggesting that bioluminescence can be used for monitoring chlamydial replication. Following an intravaginal inoculation with the luciferase-expressing C. muridarum, 8 of 10 mice displayed bioluminescence signal in the lower with 4 also in the upper genital tracts on day 3 after infection. By day 7, all 10 mice developed bioluminescence signal in the upper genital tracts. The bioluminescence signal was maintained in the upper genital tract in 6 and 2 mice by days 14 and 21, respectively. The bioluminescence signal was no longer detectable in any of the mice by day 28. The whole body imaging approach also revealed an unexpected airway infection following the intravaginal inoculation. Although the concomitant airway infection was transient and did not significantly alter the genital tract infection time courses, caution should be taken during data interpretation. The above observations have demonstrated that C. muridarum can not only achieve rapid ascending infection in the genital tract but also cause airway infection following a genital tract inoculation. These findings have laid a foundation for further optimizing the C. muridarum intravaginal infection murine model for understanding chlamydial pathogenic mechanisms.

  15. Transmammary infection in BALB/c mice with chronic toxocariasis.

    PubMed

    de Souza Aguiar, Patricia; Furtado, Raquel Dutra; de Avila, Luciana Farias da Costa; de Lima Telmo, Paula; Martins, Lourdes Helena Rodrigues; Berne, Maria Elisabeth Aires; da Silva, Pedro Eduardo Almeida; Scaini, Carlos James

    2015-04-01

    Human toxocariasis is a neglected public health problem. Infection of humans generally results from the accidental ingestion of embryonated Toxocara canis eggs, but it is important to broaden knowledge about other forms of transmission. This study aimed to demonstrate the prevalence of transmammary transmission in mice with chronic toxocariasis. BALB/c mice in groups 1 (G1) and 3 (G3) were inoculated with 1200 T. canis eggs 60days before mating, whereas those of group 2 (G2) were not infected. After delivery, the G1 neonates were transferred to G2 females to be nursed, and vice versa. Thus, the mice generated by G2 females and breastfed by G1 females could be infected only during lactation. In the G3 group, offspring were not exchanged. The search for T. canis larvae in the bodies of the lactating females and their offspring was performed after weaning and at 60days old, respectively. The frequency of transmammary infection in the mice generated by G2 uninfected females and breastfed by G1 infected females was 19.8%, which was similar to that observed (19.6%) in the mice bred and fed by G3 females. The frequency of infection in the mice generated by G1 females and breastfed by G2 females was only 4.2%, which was lower than that of G1 (p=0.0064) and G3 (p=0.0062) groups. Transmammary infection by mice with chronic toxocariasis was found to be more prevalent than congenital infection.

  16. Tumor suppressor p53 protects mice against Listeria monocytogenes infection

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shaohui; Liu, Pingping; Wei, Jianchao; Zhu, Zixiang; Shi, Zixue; Shao, Donghua; Ma, Zhiyong

    2016-01-01

    Tumor suppressor p53 is involved in regulating immune responses, which contribute to antitumor and antiviral activity. However, whether p53 has anti-bacterial functions remains unclear. Listeria monocytogenes (LM) causes listeriosis in humans and animals, and it is a powerful model for studying innate and adaptive immunity. In the present study, we illustrate an important regulatory role of p53 during LM infection. p53 knockout (p53KO) mice were more susceptible to LM infection, which was manifested by a shorter survival time and lower survival rate. p53KO mice showed significant impairments in LM eradication. Knockdown of p53 in RAW264.7 and HeLa cells resulted in increased invasion and intracellular survival of LM. Furthermore, the invasion and intracellular survival of LM was inhibited in p53-overexpressing RAW264.7 and HeLa cells. LM-infected p53KO mice exhibited severe clinical symptoms and organ injury, presumably because of the abnormal production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-6, IL-12, and IL-18. Decreased IFN-γ and GBP1 productions were observed in LM-infected p53-deficient mice or cells. The combination of these defects likely resulted in the overwhelming LM infection in the p53KO mice. These observations indicate that p53 serves as an important regulator of the host innate immune that protects against LM infection. PMID:27644341

  17. Systemic Coccidioides immitis infection in nude and beige mice.

    PubMed Central

    Clemons, K V; Leathers, C R; Lee, K W

    1985-01-01

    The course of experimental systemic Coccidioides immitis infection was assessed quantitatively and histologically in beige mice, congenitally athymic nude mice, and their respective normal counterparts. After intravenous inoculation with 50 arthroconidia, the number of viable C. immitis cultured from the spleens, livers, and lungs progressively increased throughout the assay in the organs of all mice. During the first 2 weeks of infection, significantly greater numbers of CFU were recovered from the spleens and livers, but not the lungs, of nude mice than from the respective organs of their phenotypically normal littermates. Significantly greater numbers of CFU were cultured from the lungs and spleens of beige mice compared with the number recovered from their functionally normal littermates. After intranasal inoculation, extrapulmonary dissemination of C. immitis occurred at an equal rate and resulted in similar organ burdens in nude mice and their normal littermates. Histological examination of infected tissues revealed a characteristic mixed inflammatory cell infiltrate in euthymic mice; the response in nude mice was less severe, consisting predominantly, if not solely, of granulocytes. In addition, in tissue sections from nude mice, but not in those from their euthymic counterparts, mature spherules were frequently observed to be devoid of an associated inflammatory response. The inflammatory lesion in beige mice contained a predominance of mononuclear cells, whereas their littermates responded with a typical mixed granulomatous infiltrate. Collectively, these results provide evidence supporting the hypothesis that resistance to C. immitis infection involves two primary cell populations, one under the direct influence of T-cells and the other independent of T-lymphocytes. Images PMID:3972455

  18. Intramacrophage growth of Mycobacterium avium during infection of mice.

    PubMed Central

    Frehel, C; de Chastellier, C; Offredo, C; Berche, P

    1991-01-01

    Growth of the virulent Mycobacterium avium strain TMC 724 in host tissues during persistent infection of mice was studied. Following intravenous infection of C57BL/6 mice, the kinetics of bacterial growth was biphasic in the spleen and liver, with a significant reduction of the multiplication rate after day 21 to 28 of infection. An electron-microscopic study of the liver and spleen of infected mice showed that the bacteria were strictly intracellular. They were observed within inflammatory macrophages populating granulomas disseminated in host tissues. The bacteria were confined to the phagosome compartment, and they were encapsulated. Phagosome-lysosome fusions were encountered, but the bacteria showed no visible signs of degradation and continued to multiply. These results are the first in vivo evidence that virulent M. avium multiplies exclusively intracellularly and that encapsulated bacteria resist the microbicidal mechanisms of macrophages inside the phagosomal compartment. Images PMID:2037382

  19. Dissecting the Interplay Between Intestinal Microbiota and Host Immunity in Health and Disease: Lessons Learned from Germfree and Gnotobiotic Animal Models

    PubMed Central

    Fiebiger, Ulrike; Bereswill, Stefan; Heimesaat, Markus M.

    2016-01-01

    This review elaborates the development of germfree and gnotobiotic animal models and their application in the scientific field to unravel mechanisms underlying host–microbe interactions and distinct diseases. Strictly germfree animals are raised in isolators and not colonized by any organism at all. The germfree state is continuously maintained by birth, raising, housing and breeding under strict sterile conditions. However, isolator raised germfree mice are exposed to a stressful environment and exert an underdeveloped immune system. To circumvent these physiological disadvantages depletion of the bacterial microbiota in conventionally raised and housed mice by antibiotic treatment has become an alternative approach. While fungi and parasites are not affected by antibiosis, the bacterial microbiota in these “secondary abiotic mice” have been shown to be virtually eradicated. Recolonization of isolator raised germfree animals or secondary abiotic mice results in a gnotobiotic state. Both, germfree and gnotobiotic mice have been successfully used to investigate biological functions of the conventional microbiota in health and disease. Particularly for the development of novel clinical applications germfree mice are widely used tools, as summarized in this review further focusing on the modulation of bacterial microbiota in laboratory mice to better mimic conditions in the human host. PMID:27980855

  20. Effect of Amphotericin B Nanodisks on Leishmania major Infected Mice

    PubMed Central

    Cole, PA; Bishop, JV; Beckstead, JA; Titus, R; Ryan, RO

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the efficacy of a novel formulation of the polyene antibiotic, amphotericin B (AMB), as therapy for cutaneous leishmaniasis in different mouse strains. Methods (AMB), was formulated into water-soluble transport particles, termed nanodisks (ND). Balb/c and CH3 mice infected with Leishmania major on Day 0 were administered vehicle alone, empty ND or AMB-ND on Day 1 and day 7, via the tail vein. Mice were sacrificed 25 or 50 days post inoculation and tissue histology evaluated. Balb/c mice treated with vehicle or empty ND showed signs of severe infection while CH3 mice had less inflammation and fewer parasites. AMB-ND treatment (2 mg/kg) had a marked therapeutic effect on L. major infected Balb/c mice and a discernable therapeutic benefit on CH3 mice. Conclusions AMB-ND is efficacious in the treatment of cutaneous leishmaniasis in both susceptible and resistant mouse strains. It may be inferred that AMB-ND may be useful for prophylactic and/or treatment of early stage Leishmania spp. infection. PMID:25584195

  1. Fluorescence spectroscopy of the retina from scrapie-infected mice.

    PubMed

    Bose, Sayantan; Schönenbrücher, Holger; Richt, Jürgen A; Casey, Thomas A; Rasmussen, Mark A; Kehrli, Marcus E; Petrich, Jacob W

    2013-01-01

    Recently, we have proposed that the fluorescence spectra of sheep retina can be well correlated with the presence or absence of scrapie. Scrapie is the most widespread TSE (transmissible spongiform encephalopathy) affecting sheep and goats worldwide. Mice eyes have been previously reported as a model system to study age-related accumulation of lipofuscin, which has been investigated by monitoring the increasing fluorescence with age covering its entire life span. The current work aims at developing mice retina as a convenient model system to diagnose scrapie and other fatal TSE diseases in animals such as sheep and cows. The objective of the research reported here was to determine whether the spectral features are conserved between two different species namely mice and sheep, and whether an appropriate small animal model system could be identified for diagnosis of scrapie based on the fluorescence intensity in retina. The results were consistent with the previous reports on fluorescence studies of healthy and scrapie-infected retina of sheep. The fluorescence from the retinas of scrapie-infected sheep was significantly more intense and showed more heterogeneity than that from the retinas of uninfected mice. Although the structural characteristics of fluorescence spectra of scrapie-infected sheep and mice eyes are slightly different, more importantly, murine retinas reflect the enhancement of fluorescence intensity upon infecting the mice with scrapie, which is consistent with the observations in sheep eyes.

  2. Methods for generating and colonizing gnotobiotic zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Linh N.; Kanther, Michelle; Semova, Ivana; Rawls, John F.

    2008-01-01

    Vertebrates are colonized at birth by complex and dynamic communities of microorganisms that can contribute significantly to host health and disease. The ability to raise animals in the absence of microorganisms has been a powerful tool for elucidating the relationships between animal hosts and their microbial residents. The optical transparency of the developing zebrafish and relative ease of generating germ-free zebrafish makes it an attractive model organism for gnotobiotic research. Here we provide a protocol for: generating zebrafish embryos; deriving and rearing germ-free zebrafish; and colonizing zebrafish with microorganisms. Using these methods, we typically obtain 80–90% sterility rates in our germ-free derivations with 90% survival in germ-free animals and 50–90% survival in colonized animals through larval stages. Obtaining embryos for derivation requires approximately 1–2 hours with a 3–8 hour incubation period prior to derivation. Derivation of germ-free animals takes 1–1.5 hours, and daily maintenance requires 1–2 hours. PMID:19008873

  3. [Infection of Mice with Normal Immune Function by Taenia asiatica].

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-yan; Guo, Guang-wu; Chen, Li-hong; Mo, Xing-ze; Yu, Yue-sheng

    2015-08-01

    The Taenia asiatica eggs pre-incubated with sodium hypochlorite solution for 4 min, 6 min and 8 mins were subcutaneously injected into mice with normal immune function(groups Al-A3 respectively, n=20 in each) and mice with immunosuppression (groups B1-B3, n=20 in each). All groups of mice began to show body discomfort on day 5 after infection and develop lumps on the back about on day 15. In groups Al-A3, animal death occurred during days 7-15, with a same survival rate of 95.0%(19/20) and infection rate of 89.4%(17/19), 73.6%(14/19) and 47.3%(9/19) respectively. In groups B1-B3, animal death occurred during days 7-50, with survival rate of 60%(13/20), 55%(11/20)and 55%(11/20) and infection rate of 76.9% (10/13), 54.5% (6/11) and 45.4% (5/11) respectively. After the scolex of cysticercus was evaginated with 15% pig bile, four suckers, an apparent rostellum and two distinct hook-like puncta structures were seen. These results indicate that mice with normal immune function can be used as a replacement of immunosuppressive mice to establish a T. asiatica oncosphere infection model. In addition, the T. asiatica eggs pre-incubated with sodium hypochlorite solution for 4 min have the strongest infection ability.

  4. Virus Infections on Prion Diseased Mice Exacerbate Inflammatory Microglial Response

    PubMed Central

    Lins, Nara; Mourão, Luiz; Trévia, Nonata; Passos, Aline; Farias, José Augusto; Assunção, Jarila; Bento-Torres, João; Consentino Kronka Sosthenes, Marcia; Diniz, José Antonio Picanço; Vasconcelos, Pedro Fernando da Costa

    2016-01-01

    We investigated possible interaction between an arbovirus infection and the ME7 induced mice prion disease. C57BL/6, females, 6-week-old, were submitted to a bilateral intrahippocampal injection of ME7 prion strain (ME7) or normal brain homogenate (NBH). After injections, animals were organized into two groups: NBH (n = 26) and ME7 (n = 29). At 15th week after injections (wpi), animals were challenged intranasally with a suspension of Piry arbovirus 0.001% or with NBH. Behavioral changes in ME7 animals appeared in burrowing activity at 14 wpi. Hyperactivity on open field test, errors on rod bridge, and time reduction in inverted screen were detected at 15th, 19th, and 20th wpi respectively. Burrowing was more sensitive to earlier hippocampus dysfunction. However, Piry-infection did not significantly affect the already ongoing burrowing decline in the ME7-treated mice. After behavioral tests, brains were processed for IBA1, protease-resistant form of PrP, and Piry virus antigens. Although virus infection in isolation did not change the number of microglia in CA1, virus infection in prion diseased mice (at 17th wpi) induced changes in number and morphology of microglia in a laminar-dependent way. We suggest that virus infection exacerbates microglial inflammatory response to a greater degree in prion-infected mice, and this is not necessarily correlated with hippocampal-dependent behavioral deficits. PMID:28003864

  5. Noninvasive monitoring of salmonella infections in young mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olomu, Isoken N.; Reilly-Contag, Pamela; Stevenson, David K.; Contag, Christopher H.

    1999-07-01

    A recently developed bioluminescent assay was used to study the influence of age and inoculum size on the acute susceptibility of newborn and juvenile BALB/c mice to Salmonella gastrointestinal infection. Three strains of Salmonella were tagged by expression of the lux operon from Photohabdus luminescenes. Using a range of inoculum sizes varied over 6 orders of magnitude, mice aged 0-6 weeks were infected by oral inoculation. LIght emitted from the tagged bacteria and transmitted through mouse tissues was used to noninvasively monitor disease progression over 7 days. In neonatal mice there was evidence of gastrointestinal infection at 24 hours even with small inocular, and at 4-7 days, the patterns of photon emission and remained and healthy throughout the study period. Inoculation of neonates with tagged LB5000 and BJ66 resulted in severe gastrointestinal infections with low and intermediate sizes of inocula respectively. These strains are known to be of reduced virulence in adult mice. These age-related differences in susceptibility emphasize the need to define virulence in the context of age of the host, and implicate maturation of innate resistance factors in determining disease patterns. Identifying these host-factors and further defining the bacterial determinants of virulence in the neonatal host will be facilitated by this noninvasive study of infection using bioluminenscent methods.

  6. Cytokines profile in immunocompetent mice during Trichosporon asahii infection.

    PubMed

    Montoya, Alexandra M; González, Gloria M; Martinez-Castilla, Azalia M; Aguilar, Sonia A; Franco-Molina, Moises A; Coronado-Cerda, Erika; Rosas-Taraco, Adrián G

    2017-03-15

    Trichosporon asahii is an opportunistic yeastlike fungus commonly associated with systemic infections in immunocompromised patients. Neutropenia is recognized as the main risk factor in infections by T. asahii; however, little is known about the cytokine response during trichosporonosis. Here, we evaluated systemic and local cytokine production and histological damage in immunocompetent mice during systemic infection with T. asahii. We found a significant increased presence of G-CSF, TNF-α, IFN-γ, and IL-6 in sera samples. High levels of G-CSF were found in organs (kidney, liver and spleen); meanwhile IL-10, IL-17A, IL-2, IL-4 and TNF-α were found in low levels. Neutrophils and fungal structures were found in early stage in analyzed organs. Our results demonstrated that T. asahii induces a systemic inflammatory response and G-CSF environment in infected organs in immunocompetent mice and neutrophil recruitment in analyzed tissue suggests the importance of these cells for fungal control.

  7. THE INFECTION OF MICE WITH SWINE INFLUENZA VIRUS

    PubMed Central

    Shope, Richard E.

    1935-01-01

    The experiments confirm the earlier observation of Andrewes, Laidlaw and Smith that the swine influenza virus is pathogenic for white mice when administered intranasally. Two field strains of the swine influenza virus were found to differ in their initial pathogenicity for mice. One strain was apparently fully pathogenic even in its 1st mouse passage while the other required 2 or 3 mouse passages to acquire full virulence for this species. Both strains, however, were initially infectious for mice, without the necessity of intervening ferret passages. There is no evidence that bacteria play any significant rôle in the mouse disease though essential in that of swine, and fatal pneumonias can be produced in mice by pure virus infections. Mice surviving the virus disease are immune to reinfection for at least a month. In mice the disease is not contagious though it is notably so in swine. The virus, while regularly producing fatal pneumonias when administered intranasally to mice, appears to be completely innocuous when given subcutaneously or intraperitoneally. Prolonged serial passage of the virus in mice does not influence its infectivity or virulence for swine or ferrets. It is a stable virus so far as its infectivity is concerned, and can be transferred at will from any one of its three known susceptible hosts to any other. In discussing these facts the stability of the swine influenza virus has been contrasted with the apparent instability of freshly isolated strains of the human influenza virus. Though the mouse is an un-natural host for the virus it is, nevertheless, useful for the study of those aspects of swine influenza which have to do with the virus only. PMID:19870434

  8. Targeted photodynamic therapy for infected wounds in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamblin, Michael R.; O'Donnell, David A.; Zahra, Touqir; Contag, Christopher H.; McManus, Albert T.; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2002-06-01

    Although many workers have used photodynamic therapy to kill bacteria in vitro, the use of this approach has seldom been reported in vivo in animal models of infection. We report on the use of a targeted polycationic photosensitizer conjugate between poly-L-lysine and chlorin(e6) that can penetrate the Gram (-) outer membrane together with red laser light to kill Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa infecting excisional wounds in mice. We used genetically engineered luminescent bacteria that allowed the infection to be imaged in mouse wounds using a sensitive CCD camera. Wounds were infected with 5x106 bacteria, followed by application of the conjugate in solution and illumination. There was a light-dose dependent loss of luminescence as measured by image analysis in the wound treated with conjugate and light, not seen in control wounds. This strain of E coli is non-invasive and the infection in untreated wounds spontaneously resolved in a few days and all wounds healed equally well showing the photodynamic treatment did not damage the host tissue. P aeruginosa is highly invasive and mice with untreated or control wounds all died while 90% of PDT treated mice survived. PDT may have a role to play in the rapid treatment of infected wounds in view of the worldwide rise in antibiotic resistance.

  9. Trypanosoma cruzi Infection through the Oral Route Promotes a Severe Infection in Mice: New Disease Form from an Old Infection?

    PubMed Central

    Barreto-de-Albuquerque, Juliana; Silva-dos-Santos, Danielle; Pérez, Ana Rosa; Berbert, Luiz Ricardo; de Santana-van-Vliet, Eliane; Farias-de-Oliveira, Désio Aurélio; Moreira, Otacilio C.; Roggero, Eduardo; de Carvalho-Pinto, Carla Eponina; Jurberg, José; Cotta-de-Almeida, Vinícius; Bottasso, Oscar; Savino, Wilson; de Meis, Juliana

    2015-01-01

    Oral transmission of Chagas disease has been documented in Latin American countries. Nevertheless, significant studies on the pathophysiology of this form of infection are largely lacking. The few studies investigating oral route infection disregard that inoculation in the oral cavity (Oral infection, OI) or by gavage (Gastrointestinal infection, GI) represent different infection routes, yet both show clear-cut parasitemia and heart parasitism during the acute infection. Herein, BALB/c mice were subjected to acute OI or GI infection using 5x104 culture-derived Trypanosoma cruzi trypomastigotes. OI mice displayed higher parasitemia and mortality rates than their GI counterparts. Heart histopathology showed larger areas of infiltration in the GI mice, whereas liver lesions were more severe in the OI animals, accompanied by higher Alanine Transaminase and Aspartate Transaminase serum contents. A differential cytokine pattern was also observed because OI mice presented higher pro-inflammatory cytokine (IFN-γ, TNF) serum levels than GI animals. Real-time PCR confirmed a higher TNF, IFN-γ, as well as IL-10 expression in the cardiac tissue from the OI group compared with GI. Conversely, TGF-β and IL-17 serum levels were greater in the GI animals. Immunolabeling revealed macrophages as the main tissue source of TNF in infected mice. The high mortality rate observed in the OI mice paralleled the TNF serum rise, with its inhibition by an anti-TNF treatment. Moreover, differences in susceptibility between GI versus OI mice were more clearly related to the host response than to the effect of gastric pH on parasites, since infection in magnesium hydroxide-treated mice showed similar results. Overall, the present study provides conclusive evidence that the initial site of parasite entrance critically affects host immune response and disease outcome. In light of the occurrence of oral Chagas disease outbreaks, our results raise important implications in terms of the current

  10. Type I interferon signaling protects mice from lethal henipavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Dhondt, Kévin P; Mathieu, Cyrille; Chalons, Marie; Reynaud, Joséphine M; Vallve, Audrey; Raoul, Hervé; Horvat, Branka

    2013-01-01

    Hendra virus (HeV) and Nipah virus (NiV) are closely related, recently emerged paramyxoviruses that form Henipavirus genus and are capable of causing considerable morbidity and mortality in a number of mammalian species, including humans. However, in contrast to many other species and despite expression of functional virus entry receptors, mice are resistant to henipavirus infection. We report here the susceptibility of mice deleted for the type I interferon receptor (IFNAR-KO) to both HeV and NiV. Intraperitoneally infected mice developed fatal encephalitis, with pathology and immunohistochemical features similar to what was found in humans. Viral RNA was found in the majority of analyzed organs, and sublethally infected animals developed virus-specific neutralizing antibodies. Altogether, these results reveal IFNAR-KO mice as a new small animal model to study HeV and NiV pathogenesis, prophylaxis, and treatment and suggest the critical role of type I interferon signaling in the control of henipavirus infection.

  11. Zika virus infection damages the testes in mice.

    PubMed

    Govero, Jennifer; Esakky, Prabagaran; Scheaffer, Suzanne M; Fernandez, Estefania; Drury, Andrea; Platt, Derek J; Gorman, Matthew J; Richner, Justin M; Caine, Elizabeth A; Salazar, Vanessa; Moley, Kelle H; Diamond, Michael S

    2016-12-15

    Infection of pregnant women with Zika virus (ZIKV) can cause congenital malformations including microcephaly, which has focused global attention on this emerging pathogen. In addition to transmission by mosquitoes, ZIKV can be detected in the seminal fluid of affected males for extended periods of time and transmitted sexually. Here, using a mouse-adapted African ZIKV strain (Dakar 41519), we evaluated the consequences of infection in the male reproductive tract of mice. We observed persistence of ZIKV, but not the closely related dengue virus (DENV), in the testis and epididymis of male mice, and this was associated with tissue injury that caused diminished testosterone and inhibin B levels and oligospermia. ZIKV preferentially infected spermatogonia, primary spermatocytes and Sertoli cells in the testis, resulting in cell death and destruction of the seminiferous tubules. Less damage was caused by a contemporary Asian ZIKV strain (H/PF/2013), in part because this virus replicates less efficiently in mice. The extent to which these observations in mice translate to humans remains unclear, but longitudinal studies of sperm function and viability in ZIKV-infected humans seem warranted.

  12. Studying NK cell responses to ectromelia virus infections in mice.

    PubMed

    Fang, Min; Sigal, Luis

    2010-01-01

    Here we describe methods for the in vivo study of antiviral NK cell responses using the mouse Orthopoxvirus ectromelia virus as a model, the agent of mousepox. The methods include those specific for the preparation and use of ectromelia virus such as the production of virus stocks in tissue culture and in live mice, the purification of virus stocks, the titration of virus stocks and virus loads in organs, and the infection of mice. The chapter also includes methods for the specific study of NK cell responses in infected mice such as the preparation of organs (lymph nodes, spleen, and liver) for analysis, the study of NK cell responses by flow cytometry, the adoptive transfer of NK cells, the measurement of NK cell cytolytic activity ex vivo and in vivo, and the determination of NK cell proliferation by bromodeoxyuridine loading or by dilution of carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester (CFSE).

  13. Role of iron in Trypanosoma cruzi infection of mice.

    PubMed Central

    Lalonde, R G; Holbein, B E

    1984-01-01

    The role of iron in experimental infection of mice with Trypanosoma cruzi was investigated. B6 mice had a transient parasitemia and a transient anemia, both of maximal intensity 28 d after the inoculation of T. cruzi. There was a biphasic hypoferremic host response to infection with T. cruzi with the peak hypoferremia also occurring 28 d after inoculation of the parasite. The mortality rate from infection was increased from 23% in phosphate-buffered saline-treated B6 mice to 50% in a group of B6 mice receiving iron-dextran (P less than or equal to 0.025), whereas depletion of iron stores with the iron chelator desferrioxamine B and an iron-deficient diet provided complete protection of B6 mice (P less than or equal to 0.05). The mortality rate in the highly susceptible C3H strain was reduced from 100% in the control group to 45% (P less than or equal to 0.025) in the iron-depleted group. The tissue iron stores were altered in mice receiving either iron-dextran or desferrioxamine B and an iron-deficient diet. In vitro, T. cruzi was shown to require both a heme and a nonheme iron source for an optimal growth rate. The effects of iron excess or depletion on the outcome of infection with T. cruzi correlated both with the growth requirements of the parasite for iron and with the availability of intracellular iron. Thus, it was suggested that the hypoferremic response, by sequestering iron within intracellular stores, potentially enhanced the pathogenicity of the intracellular parasites. Furthermore, the in vivo effects of iron excess and depletion correlated with an effect of iron on the growth rate and pathogenicity of the parasite. PMID:6421877

  14. [Abortive infection of mice inoculated intraperitoneally with Chlamydia ovis].

    PubMed

    Rodolakis, A

    1976-01-01

    A mouse adaptated strain of Chlamydia ovis, when inoculated in the peritoneal cavity, caused the death of both pregnant and non pregnant mice. In addition, mice inoculated late in pregnancy (12 to 16 days after breeding) aborted 4 to 6 days after inoculation. Chlamydia was recovered from foetuses and from the organs of the mice (Liver, Spleen, Lungs). The severity of the disease was related to the inoculum concentration, so it was possible to induce late abortions with a rapid recovery of the females, like in the natural infection of the ewes. In the same conditions, the original Chlamydia strain maintained by passage on yolk sac, induced only an inapparent disease transmissible to the young mice.

  15. Clostridium difficile infection aggravates colitis in interleukin 10-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mi Na; Koh, Seong-Joon; Kim, Jung Mogg; Im, Jong Pil; Jung, Hyun Chae; Kim, Joo Sung

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) infection in an interleukin 10-deficient (IL-10-/-) mouse model of inflammatory bowel disease. METHODS: Bone marrow-derived dendritic cells isolated from wild type (WT) and IL-10-/-mice were stimulated for 4 h with C. difficile toxin A (200 μg/mL), and gene expression of interferon (IFN)-γ, IL-12 and IL-23 was determined by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. WT and IL-10-/- mice (n = 20 each) were exposed to an antibiotic cocktail for three days and then were injected with clindamycin (i.p.). Mice (n = 10 WT, 10 IL-10-/-) were then challenged with oral administration of C. difficile (1 × 105 colony forming units of strain VPI 10463). Animals were monitored daily for 7 d for signs of colitis. Colonic tissue samples were evaluated for cytokine gene expression and histopathologic analysis. RESULTS: C. difficile toxin A treatment induced IFN-γ gene expression to a level that was significantly higher in BDMCs from IL-10-/- compared to those from WT mice (P < 0.05). However, expression of IL-12 and IL-23 was not different among the groups. Following C. difficile administration, mice developed diarrhea and lost weight within 2-3 d. Weight loss was significantly greater in IL-10-/- compared to WT mice (P < 0.05). C. difficile infection induced histopathologic features typical of colitis in both IL-10-/- and WT mice. The histopathologic severity score was significantly higher in the IL-10-/- than in WT mice (mean ± standard error; 5.50 ± 0.53 vs 2.44 ± 0.46; P < 0.05). This was accompanied by a significantly greater increase in IFN-γ gene expression in colonic tissues from IL-10-/- than from WT mice challenged with C. difficile (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: These results indicate that colitis is more severe after C. difficile infection in IL-10-/-mice, and that IFN-γ expression is involved in this process. PMID:25493020

  16. Hepatitis in Mice Infected with Coxsackie Virus B1*

    PubMed Central

    Burch, G. E.; Tsui, C. Y.; Harb, J. M.

    1973-01-01

    The livers of mice of different ages were readily damaged by Coxsackie virus B1 infection. The severity of liver damage decreased as the age of the mice increased. Coxsackie B1 viral crystals were not found in the damaged liver cells in spite of severe pathological changes of the liver, both histologically and electron microscopically, and even though characteristic crystal formation was observed in the pancreas of three of these same animals. Nevertheless, the hepatic damage was considered to be due to direct viral invasion of the hepatic cells. This injury was followed by a variety of degenerative and necrotic processes displaying somewhat characteristic morphological manifestations. The severe hepatic infection produced in the newborn mice resulted in their death from a rather fulminating illness, whereas in the older mice there was recovery from mild to moderate hepatic injury with cellular regeneration by the fourth day after viral inoculation. The experimental preparation used here provides an excellent means for the study of the processes of injury and healing of the liver infected with a virus that is also infectious for man. ImagesFigs. 6-7Fig. 1Figs. 2-3Figs. 4-5 PMID:4718266

  17. Characterization of Lethal Zika Virus Infection in AG129 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Emma C.; Larkin, Katrina E.; Camacho, Erwin; Osorio, Jorge E.

    2016-01-01

    Background Mosquito-borne Zika virus (ZIKV) typically causes a mild and self-limiting illness known as Zika fever, which often is accompanied by maculopapular rash, headache, and myalgia. During the current outbreak in South America, ZIKV infection during pregnancy has been hypothesized to cause microcephaly and other diseases. The detection of ZIKV in fetal brain tissue supports this hypothesis. Because human infections with ZIKV historically have remained sporadic and, until recently, have been limited to small-scale epidemics, neither the disease caused by ZIKV nor the molecular determinants of virulence and/or pathogenicity have been well characterized. Here, we describe a small animal model for wild-type ZIKV of the Asian lineage. Methodology/Principal Findings Using mice deficient in interferon α/β and Ɣ receptors (AG129 mice), we report that these animals were highly susceptible to ZIKV infection and disease, succumbing within seven to eight days. Rapid viremic dissemination was observed in visceral organs and brain; but only was associated with severe pathologies in the brain and muscle. Finally, these results were consistent across challenge routes, age of mice, and inoculum doses. These data represent a mouse model for ZIKV that is not dependent on adapting ZIKV to intracerebral passage in mice. Conclusions/Significance Foot pad injection of AG129 mice with ZIKV represents a biologically relevant model for studying ZIKV infection and disease development following wild-type virus inoculation without the requirement for adaptation of the virus or intracerebral delivery of the virus. This newly developed Zika disease model can be exploited to identify determinants of ZIKV virulence and reveal molecular mechanisms that control the virus-host interaction, providing a framework for rational design of acute phase therapeutics and for vaccine efficacy testing. PMID:27093158

  18. Alopecia in mice infected with murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV).

    PubMed Central

    Mims, C. A.

    1985-01-01

    When mouse cytomegalovirus was injected subcutaneously into 4-12 day old CDI mice there was infection of dermal cells and the dermal papillae of hair follicles. Infected cells were never seen in the epidermis nor in the epithelium of hair follicles. When larger doses of virus (5 X 10(4) pfu) were given, dermal infection led to gross necrosis of the skin, ulceration, scabbing and healing with alopecia. Smaller doses (10(4) pfu) did not cause gross necrosis but damage to follicles resulted in alopecia or sparse hair growth. Skin lesions were not seen after infection of 4-8 week old mice, even when the inoculated skin area had been epilated, or when hyaluronidase was mixed with the virus inoculum. These experiments show that cytomegalovirus, in contrast to herpes simplex and varicella-zoster viruses, infects dermal but not epidermal cells, and that dermal tropism is age-restricted. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:3002414

  19. Effect of cobra venom factor on experimental infection of mice against Clostridium chauvoei.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Y; Kijima, M; Suzuki, S; Takahashi, T; Nakamura, M

    1992-10-01

    The effect of cobra venom factor (CoVF) treatment was examined to clarify the mechanism of resistance of mice to Clostridium chauvoei infection. In CoVF-treated mice inoculated with spores of C. chauvoei, no death occurred and the organisms in the infected muscle progressively decreased, similar to that of non-treated control mice. These results indicated that C3 did not play a significant role in the resistance of mice against C. chauvoei infection.

  20. Cytotoxic cells induced after Chlamydia psittaci infection in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Lammert, J.K.

    1982-03-01

    The ability of spleen cells from Chlamydia psittaci-infected mice to lyse C. psittaci-infected and uninfected target cell monolayers was studied. The cytotoxicity assay used was a terminal label method in which the number of adherent target cells surviving the interaction with effector cells was determined by measuring the uptake of (3H)uridine by such cells. It was observed that in the first few days postinfection (3 to 5), spleens contained cells that lysed infected and uninfected targets with equal efficiency. Subsequently, infected targets were killed primarily. The activity of effector spleen cells for infected targets continued, although at a reduced level, beyond 21 days postinfection. Intact effector cells were required since a disruption by sonication resulted in a loss of cytotoxicity. The enhanced killing observed with infected targets was also observed when target cells were sensitized with heat- or UV-inactivated C. psittaci. This study suggests that the induction of cytotoxic cells after C. psittaci infection may contribute to the ability of the host to control multiplication of the microorganism.

  1. The treatment of mice with Lactobacillus casei induces protection against Babesia microti infection.

    PubMed

    Bautista-Garfias, C R; Gómez, M B; Aguilar, B R; Ixta, O; Martínez, F; Mosqueda, J

    2005-12-01

    In this study, we report that administration of Lactobacillus casei confers protection to mice against the intracellular protozoan Babesia microti. Mice treated with L. casei orally or intraperitoneally were inoculated 7 days later with an infectious dose of B. microti. Mice treated with lactobacilli showed significant reduction in the percentage of parasitized erythrocytes (PPE) compared to untreated mice. When mice were inoculated intraperitoneally with L. casei 3 or 0 days before challenge with B. microti, the PPE was significantly lower compared to untreated mice and there were no differences between treated mice and mice immune to B. microti infection. When mice treated with live or dead L. casei were compared to mice inoculated with Freund Complete Adjuvant before a B. microti infection, a significant reduction of PPE was observed. These results show the protective effect of L. casei administered to mice against a B. microti infection and suggest that it might act by stimulating the innate immune system.

  2. Experimental Colibacillosis in Gnotobiotic Baby Pigs I. Microbiological and Clinical Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Christie, B. R.; Waxler, G. L.

    1973-01-01

    Sixty-two gnotobiotic pigs were used in three experiments to determine the means whereby two related strains of Escherichia coli colonized the intestinal tract. Pigs were exposed by a method simulating neonatal contamination of the umbilical stump. Bacteremia was produced within one and one half hours, and by 24 hours the infection was generally well established in the gastrointestinal tract. By 48 hours after exposure, the bacteremia had subsided so that only an occasional isolation from organs other than the gastrointestinal tract was made. Oral exposure of one litter of germfree pigs produced heavy colonization of the entire gastrointestinal tract within four hours. Evidence of intermittent bacteremia was present in pigs of this litter. Diarrhea appeared earlier when pigs were exposed orally than when they were exposed by way of the umbilical stump. PMID:4270433

  3. Exacerbation of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia in immunodeficient (scid) mice by concurrent infection with a pneumovirus.

    PubMed

    Bray, M V; Barthold, S W; Sidman, C L; Roths, J; Smith, A L

    1993-04-01

    scid mice naturally infected with Pneumocystis carinii and inoculated with a normally apathogenic pneumovirus had significantly higher P. carinii cyst counts and developed significantly more severe P. carinii-related disease than did sham-inoculated, P. carinii-infected scid mice. P. carinii-free, virus-infected scid mice survived for 2 months despite high pulmonary virus titers. These results show that a respiratory virus infection can exacerbate P. carinii disease in an immunocompromised-rodent model.

  4. In vivo imaging of mice infected with bioluminescent Trypanosoma cruzi unveils novel sites of infection

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The development of techniques that allow the imaging of animals infected with parasites expressing luciferase opens up new possibilities for following the fate of parasites in infected mammals. Methods D-luciferin potassium salt stock solution was prepared in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) at 15 mg/ml. To produce bioluminescence, infected and control mice received an intraperitoneal injection of luciferin stock solution (150 mg/kg). All mice were immediately anesthetized with 2% isofluorane, and after 10 minutes were imaged. Ex vivo evaluation of infected tissues and organs was evaluated in a 24-well plate in 150 μg/ml D-luciferin diluted in PBS. Images were captured using the IVIS Lumina image system (Xenogen). Dissected organs were also evaluated by microscopy of hematoxylin-eosin stained sections. Results Here we describe the results obtained using a genetically modified Dm28c strain of T. cruzi expressing the firefly luciferase to keep track of infection by bioluminescence imaging. Progression of infection was observed in vivo in BALB/c mice at various intervals after infection with transgenic Dm28c-luc. The bioluminescent signal was immediately observed at the site of T. cruzi inoculation, and one day post infection (dpi) it was disseminated in the peritoneal cavity. A similar pattern in the cavity was observed on 7 dpi, but the bioluminescence was more intense in the terminal region of the large intestine, rectum, and gonads. On 14 and 21 dpi, bioluminescent parasites were also observed in the heart, snout, paws, hind limbs, and forelimbs. From 28 dpi to 180 dpi in chronically infected mice, bioluminescence declined in regions of the body but was concentrated in the gonad region. Ex vivo evaluation of dissected organs and tissues by bioluminescent imaging confirmed the in vivo bioluminescent foci. Histopathological analysis of dissected organs demonstrated parasite nests at the rectum and snout, in muscle fibers of mice infected with Dm28c

  5. Effect of phenylhydrazine pretreatment on splenectomized Rauscher leukemia virus-infected mice.

    PubMed

    Bergson, A; Lobue, J; Gordon, A S; Fredickson, T N

    1978-01-01

    The protective effect of phenylhydrazine pretreatment seen in Rauscher leukemia virus-infected intact mice is not observed when splenectomized mice are used. Such mice succumb to infection even earlier than viral potency controls. Since phenylhydrazine is known to increase both splenic erythropoiesis and hematopoietic stem cell numbers, the results suggest that these two events may be involved in phenylhydrazine prophylaxis.

  6. Vaccine protection of leukopenic mice against Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infection.

    PubMed

    Rauch, Sabine; Gough, Portia; Kim, Hwan Keun; Schneewind, Olaf; Missiakas, Dominique

    2014-11-01

    The risk for Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infection (BSI) is increased in immunocompromised individuals, including patients with hematologic malignancy and/or chemotherapy. Due to the emergence of antibiotic-resistant strains, designated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), staphylococcal BSI in cancer patients is associated with high mortality; however, neither a protective vaccine nor pathogen-specific immunotherapy is currently available. Here, we modeled staphylococcal BSI in leukopenic CD-1 mice that had been treated with cyclophosphamide, a drug for leukemia and lymphoma patients. Cyclophosphamide-treated mice were highly sensitive to S. aureus BSI and developed infectious lesions lacking immune cell infiltrates. Virulence factors of S. aureus that are key for disease establishment in immunocompetent hosts-α-hemolysin (Hla), iron-regulated surface determinants (IsdA and IsdB), coagulase (Coa), and von Willebrand factor binding protein (vWbp)-are dispensable for the pathogenesis of BSI in leukopenic mice. In contrast, sortase A mutants, which cannot assemble surface proteins, display delayed time to death and increased survival in this model. A vaccine with four surface antigens (ClfA, FnBPB, SdrD, and SpAKKAA), which was identified by genetic vaccinology using sortase A mutants, raised antigen-specific immune responses that protected leukopenic mice against staphylococcal BSI.

  7. Vaccine Protection of Leukopenic Mice against Staphylococcus aureus Bloodstream Infection

    PubMed Central

    Rauch, Sabine; Gough, Portia; Kim, Hwan Keun; Schneewind, Olaf

    2014-01-01

    The risk for Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infection (BSI) is increased in immunocompromised individuals, including patients with hematologic malignancy and/or chemotherapy. Due to the emergence of antibiotic-resistant strains, designated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), staphylococcal BSI in cancer patients is associated with high mortality; however, neither a protective vaccine nor pathogen-specific immunotherapy is currently available. Here, we modeled staphylococcal BSI in leukopenic CD-1 mice that had been treated with cyclophosphamide, a drug for leukemia and lymphoma patients. Cyclophosphamide-treated mice were highly sensitive to S. aureus BSI and developed infectious lesions lacking immune cell infiltrates. Virulence factors of S. aureus that are key for disease establishment in immunocompetent hosts—α-hemolysin (Hla), iron-regulated surface determinants (IsdA and IsdB), coagulase (Coa), and von Willebrand factor binding protein (vWbp)—are dispensable for the pathogenesis of BSI in leukopenic mice. In contrast, sortase A mutants, which cannot assemble surface proteins, display delayed time to death and increased survival in this model. A vaccine with four surface antigens (ClfA, FnBPB, SdrD, and SpAKKAA), which was identified by genetic vaccinology using sortase A mutants, raised antigen-specific immune responses that protected leukopenic mice against staphylococcal BSI. PMID:25183728

  8. An Ultrastructural Analysis of Nocardia During Experimental Infections in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Beaman, Blaine L.

    1973-01-01

    Several strains of Nocardia that varied from virulent to avirulent were injected intraperitoneally into young mice. Histological and ultrastructural analysis of the resultant infections revealed that the bacteria and the lesions they induced were different depending upon the strain of organism used. Further, the morphological and tinctorial characteristics of the bacteria grown in vitro changes during growth in vivo. These observations strongly suggested that chemical and physical alterations occurred in the cell envelope of the Nocardia when grown in mice. Electron microscopy confirmed that significant structural modification occurred, especially in the cell envelope, when the nocardial cells established themselves within the host tissue. It was shown that the least virulent strain exhibited the most dramatic changes whereas the most virulent organism appeared to be affected the least. Images PMID:4584055

  9. The migration of larvae of Toxascaris leonina (Linstow, 1909) in experimentally infected white mice.

    PubMed

    Prokopic, J; Figallová, V

    1982-01-01

    The migration of larvae of Toxascaris leonina was studied in 168 white mice. The larvae were found in lungs of 96% of infected mice on days 4-135, in genital organs (84%), intestinal mucosa (81%) and skeletal muscles (100%) on day 10 post infection. The maximum number of larvae were detected in intercostal muscles on day 105 post infection.

  10. Cathepsin L Helps to Defend Mice from Infection with Influenza A

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiang; Greenland, John R.; Gotts, Jeffrey E.; Matthay, Michael A.; Caughey, George H.

    2016-01-01

    Host-derived proteases can augment or help to clear infections. This dichotomy is exemplified by cathepsin L (CTSL), which helps Hendra virus and SARS coronavirus to invade cells, but is essential for survival in mice with mycoplasma pneumonia. The present study tested the hypothesis that CTSL protects mice from serious consequences of infection by the orthomyxovirus influenza A, which is thought to be activated by host-supplied proteases other than CTSL. Ctsl-/- mice infected with influenza A/Puerto Rico/8/34(H1N1) had larger lung viral loads and higher mortality than infected Ctsl+/+ mice. Lung inflammation in surviving infected mice peaked 14 days after initial infection, accompanied marked focal distal airway bronchiolization and epithelial metaplasia followed by desquamation and fibrotic interstitial remodeling, and persisted for at least 6 weeks. Most deaths occurred during the second week of infection in both groups of mice. In contrast to mycoplasma pneumonia, infiltrating cells were predominantly mononuclear rather than polymorphonuclear. The histopathology of lung inflammation and remodeling in survivors was similar in Ctsl-/- and Ctsl+/+ mice, although Ctsl+/+ mice cleared immunoreactive virus sooner. Furthermore, Ctsl-/- mice had profound deficits in CD4+ lymphocytes before and after infection and weaker production of pathogen-specific IgG. Thus, CTSL appears to support innate as well as adaptive responses, which confer a survival advantage on mice infected with the orthomyxovirus influenza A. PMID:27716790

  11. In vivo gut transcriptome responses to Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG and Lactobacillus acidophilus in neonatal gnotobiotic piglets

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Anand; Vlasova, Anastasia N; Liu, Zhe; Chattha, Kuldeep S; Kandasamy, Sukumar; Esseili, Malak; Zhang, Xiaoli; Rajashekara, Gireesh; Saif, Linda J

    2014-01-01

    Probiotics facilitate mucosal repair and maintain gut homeostasis. They are often used in adjunct with rehydration or antibiotic therapy in enteric infections. Lactobacillus spp have been tested in infants for the prevention or treatment of various enteric conditions. However, to aid in rational strain selection for specific treatments, comprehensive studies are required to delineate and compare the specific molecules and pathways involved in a less complex but biologically relevant model (gnotobiotic pigs). Here we elucidated Lactobacillus rhamnosus (LGG) and L. acidophilus (LA) specific effects on gut transcriptome responses in a neonatal gnotobiotic (Gn) pig model to simulate responses in newly colonized infants. Whole genome microarray, followed by biological pathway reconstruction, was used to investigate the host-microbe interactions in duodenum and ileum at early (day 1) and later stages (day 7) of colonization. Both LA and LGG modulated common responses related to host metabolism, gut integrity, and immunity, as well as responses unique to each strain in Gn pigs. Our data indicated that probiotic establishment and beneficial effects in the host are guided by: (1) down-regulation or upregulation of immune function-related genes in the early and later stages of colonization, respectively, and (2) alternations in metabolism of small molecules (vitamins and/or minerals) and macromolecules (carbohydrates, proteins, and lipids). Pathways related to immune modulation and carbohydrate metabolism were more affected by LGG, whereas energy and lipid metabolism-related transcriptome responses were prominently modulated by LA. These findings imply that identification of probiotic strain-specific gut responses could facilitate the rational design of probiotic-based interventions to moderate specific enteric conditions. PMID:24637605

  12. Infection dynamics and clinical features of cryptosporidiosis in SCID mice.

    PubMed Central

    Mead, J R; Ilksoy, N; You, X; Belenkaya, Y; Arrowood, M J; Fallon, M T; Schinazi, R F

    1994-01-01

    Cryptosporidial infections in severe combined immune deficient (SCID) mice produce a chronic disease state which in the later stages leads to extraintestinal involvement and hepatic dysfunction. To further characterize the infection dynamics in this model and monitor the changes in the hepatic system, a dose titration of the oocyst inoculum was performed and alkaline phosphatase levels in the sera were assayed. Ten SCID mice per dose were inoculated with 10(3), 10(4), 10(5), 10(6), or 10(7) oocysts. Oocyst shedding in the feces was quantified by microscopic enumeration. Mice inoculated with 10(6) oocysts and those inoculated with 10(7) oocysts demonstrated similar oocyst shedding patterns, but the 10(7)-oocyst group exhibited signs of distress (e.g., weight loss and icterus) earlier. The intensity of the infection increased markedly approximately 14 days postinoculation (p.i.) and continued to increase steadily over the next 6 weeks. Inoculation with lower oocyst doses produced a delay in patency (e.g., it occurred 7 days later with the 10(5)-oocyst inoculum and 14 days later with the 10(4)-oocyst inoculum). Mean serum alkaline phosphatase levels in the 10(7)-oocyst group were more than twice control values at 5 weeks p.i. and continued to increase over the next 8 weeks. Oocyst doses and alkaline phosphatase levels were positively correlated with hepatobiliary colonization (r = 0.71) and liver necrosis (r = 0.65) at 13 weeks p.i. A strong positive correlation between hepatobiliary colonization and liver necrosis at 13 weeks p.i. (r = 0.87) was observed. PMID:8168930

  13. F. novicida-Infected A. castellanii Does Not Enhance Bacterial Virulence in Mice.

    PubMed

    Ozanic, Mateja; Gobin, Ivana; Brezovec, Martin; Marecic, Valentina; Trobonjaca, Zlatko; Abu Kwaik, Yousef; Santic, Marina

    2016-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is a facultative intracellular bacterium that causes tularemia in humans and animals. Epidemiology of tularemia worldwide is often associated with water-borne transmission, which includes mosquitoes and amoebae as the potential host reservoirs of the bacteria in water environment. In vitro studies showed intracellular replication of F. tularensis within Acanthamoeba castellanii and Hartmanella vermiformis cells. While infection of amoeba by Legionella pneumophila has been shown to enhance infectivity of L. pneumophila the role of F. tularensis-infected protozoa in the pathogenesis of tularemia is not known. We used 6 h coculture of A. castellanii and F. novicida for investigation of the effect of inhaled amoeba on the pathogenesis of tularemia on in vivo model. Balb/c mice were infected intratracheally with F. novicida or with F. novicida-infected A. castellanii. Surprisingly, infection with F. novicida-infected A. castellanii did not lead to bronchopneumonia in Balb/c mice, and Francisella did not disseminate into the liver and spleen. Upon inhalation, F. novicida infects a variety of host cells, though neutrophils are the predominant cells early during infection in the lung infiltrates of pulmonary tularemia. The numbers of neutrophils in the lungs of Balb/c mice were significantly lower in the infection of mice with F. novicida-infected A. castellanii in comparison to group of mice infected only with F. novicida. These results demonstrate that following inoculation of mice with F. novicida-infected A. castellanii, mice did not develop tularemia.

  14. F. novicida-Infected A. castellanii Does Not Enhance Bacterial Virulence in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ozanic, Mateja; Gobin, Ivana; Brezovec, Martin; Marecic, Valentina; Trobonjaca, Zlatko; Abu Kwaik, Yousef; Santic, Marina

    2016-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is a facultative intracellular bacterium that causes tularemia in humans and animals. Epidemiology of tularemia worldwide is often associated with water-borne transmission, which includes mosquitoes and amoebae as the potential host reservoirs of the bacteria in water environment. In vitro studies showed intracellular replication of F. tularensis within Acanthamoeba castellanii and Hartmanella vermiformis cells. While infection of amoeba by Legionella pneumophila has been shown to enhance infectivity of L. pneumophila the role of F. tularensis-infected protozoa in the pathogenesis of tularemia is not known. We used 6 h coculture of A. castellanii and F. novicida for investigation of the effect of inhaled amoeba on the pathogenesis of tularemia on in vivo model. Balb/c mice were infected intratracheally with F. novicida or with F. novicida-infected A. castellanii. Surprisingly, infection with F. novicida-infected A. castellanii did not lead to bronchopneumonia in Balb/c mice, and Francisella did not disseminate into the liver and spleen. Upon inhalation, F. novicida infects a variety of host cells, though neutrophils are the predominant cells early during infection in the lung infiltrates of pulmonary tularemia. The numbers of neutrophils in the lungs of Balb/c mice were significantly lower in the infection of mice with F. novicida-infected A. castellanii in comparison to group of mice infected only with F. novicida. These results demonstrate that following inoculation of mice with F. novicida-infected A. castellanii, mice did not develop tularemia. PMID:27242974

  15. Hepatitis C Virus Infects Rhesus Macaque Hepatocytes and Simianized Mice

    PubMed Central

    Scull, Margaret A.; Shi, Chao; de Jong, Ype P.; Gerold, Gisa; Ries, Moritz; von Schaewen, Markus; Donovan, Bridget M.; Labitt, Rachael N.; Horwitz, Joshua A.; Gaska, Jenna M.; Hrebikova, Gabriela; Xiao, Jing W.; Flatley, Brenna; Fung, Canny; Chiriboga, Luis; Walker, Christopher M.; Evans, David T.; Rice, Charles M.; Ploss, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    At least 170 million people are chronically infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV). Due to the narrow host range of HCV and restricted use of chimpanzees, there is currently no suitable animal model for HCV pathogenesis studies or the development of a HCV vaccine. To identify cellular determinants of interspecies transmission and establish a novel immunocompetent model system, we examined the ability of HCV to infect hepatocytes from a small non-human primate, the rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta). We show that the rhesus orthologs of critical HCV entry factors support viral glycoprotein-dependent virion uptake. Primary hepatocytes from rhesus macaques are also permissive for HCV RNA replication and particle production, which is enhanced when antiviral signaling is suppressed. We demonstrate that this may be due to the diminished capacity of HCV to antagonize MAVS-dependent innate cellular defenses. To test the ability of HCV to establish persistent replication in vivo, we engrafted primary rhesus macaque hepatocytes into immunocompromised xenorecipients. Inoculation of resulting simian liver chimeric mice with either HCV genotype 1a or 2a resulted in HCV serum viremia for up to 10 weeks. Conclusion: Together, these data indicate that rhesus macaques may be a viable model for HCV and implicate host immunity as a potential species-specific barrier to HCV infection. We conclude that suppression of host immunity or further viral adaptation may allow robust HCV infection in rhesus macaques and creation of a new animal model for studies of HCV pathogenesis, lentivirus coinfection and vaccine development. PMID:25820364

  16. Spontaneous Hymenolepis nana infection in a breeding colony of nude mice.

    PubMed

    Hauff, P; Arnold, W

    1990-01-01

    The spontaneous occurrence of a parasitic infection with the dwarf tapeworm Hymenolepis nana is nude mice was observed under conventional conditions. Clinical, pathological and histological observations are described.

  17. Sarcocystis neurona infection in gamma interferon gene knockout (KO) mice: comparative infectivity of sporocysts in two strains of KO mice, effect of trypsin digestion on merozoite viability, and infectivity of bradyzoites to KO mice and cell culture.

    PubMed

    Dubey, J P; Sundar, N; Kwok, O C H; Saville, W J A

    2013-09-01

    The protozoan Sarcocystis neurona is the primary cause of Equine Protozoal Myeloencephalitis (EPM). EPM or EPM-like illness has been reported in horses, sea otters, and several other mammals. The gamma interferon gene knockout (KO) mouse is often used as a model to study biology and discovery of new therapies against S. neurona because it is difficult to induce clinical EPM in other hosts, including horses. In the present study, infectivity of three life cycle stages (merozoites, bradyzoites, sporozoites) to KO mice and cell culture was studied. Two strains of KO mice (C57-black, and BALB/c-derived, referred here as black or white) were inoculated orally graded doses of S. neurona sporocysts; 12 sporocysts were infective to both strains of mice and all infected mice died or became ill within 70 days post-inoculation. Although there was no difference in infectivity of sporocysts to the two strains of KO mice, the disease was more severe in black mice. S. neurona bradyzoites were not infectious to KO mice and cell culture. S. neurona merozoites survived 120 min incubation in 0.25% trypsin, indicating that trypsin digestion can be used to recover S. neurona from tissues of acutely infected animals.

  18. Mouse Adenovirus Type 1 Infection of Natural Killer Cell-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Welton, Amanda R.; Gralinski, Lisa E.; Spindler, Katherine R.

    2008-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells contribute to the initial nonspecific response to viral infection, and viruses exhibit a range of sensitivities to NK cells in vivo. We investigated the role of NK cells in infection of mice by mouse adenovirus type 1 (MAV-1) using antibody-mediated depletion and knockout mice. MAV-1 causes encephalomyelitis and replicates to highest levels in brains. NK cell-depleted mice infected with MAV-1 showed brain viral loads 8-20 days p.i. that were similar to wild-type control non-depleted mice. Mice genetically deficient for NK cells behaved similarly to wild-type control mice with respect to brain viral loads and survival. We conclude that NK cells are not required to control virus replication in the brains of MAV-1-infected mice. PMID:18155121

  19. Intestinal lesions caused by two swine chlamydial isolates in gnotobiotic pigs.

    PubMed

    Rogers, D G; Andersen, A A

    1996-10-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether 2 distinct chlamydial isolates recovered from the intestines and feces of diarrheic nursery pigs could cause intestinal lesions in gnotobiotic pigs. Both isolates share biological characteristics with Chlamydia trachomatis. Chlamydial isolates R27 and R19 were propagated in Vero cells or embryonated eggs, respectively, and suspended in sucrose-phosphate-glutamine buffer with 10% fetal bovine serum for inoculation. Sham inocula were prepared from uninfected cell culture lysates and from uninfected eggs. Each piglet was fed 1 ml of inoculum or sham inoculum at 3-4 days of age. Ten piglets were each fed 10(9) inclusion-forming-units (IFU) and 14 piglets were each fed 10(6) IFU of isolate R27; 5 control piglets were fed sham inoculum. Twenty piglets were each fed 10(5) IFU R19; 5 control piglets were fed sham inoculum. All infected piglets developed diarrhea 4-5 days postinfection (DPI). Most piglets fed 10(9) IFU R27 became anorexic, dehydrated, and weak and were necropsied 4-7 DPI. Piglets fed 10(6) IFU R27 or 10(5) IFU R19 were necropsied 4, 7, 10, 14, and 18 DPI. Diarrhea, although never profuse, persisted in the piglets fed 10(6) IFU R27 or 10(5) IFU R19 through 12 DPI. At necropsy, all diarrheic piglets had watery colonic contents with flecks of undigested curd. In small intestine, histologic lesions were seen most consistently in distal jejunum and ileum. Distal jejunum and ileum from piglets fed 10(9) IFU R27 and necropsied 4-5 DPI were characterized by villus atrophy and multifocal necrosis of villi; necrosis was limited to the tips or apical one half of villi. Mild to severe villus atrophy, lymphangitis, and perilymphangitis were seen in the distal jejunum and ileum from all infected piglets 7 and 10 DPI. Colon from 1 infected piglet necropsied 10 DPI had mild focal serositis; significant colonic lesions were not seen in the other infected piglets. Immunostaining done on sections of distal jejunum and ileum

  20. Effects of a gut pathobiont in a gnotobiotic mouse model of childhood undernutrition.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Vitas E; Dey, Neelendu; Guruge, Janaki; Hsiao, Ansel; Ahern, Philip P; Semenkovich, Nicholas P; Blanton, Laura V; Cheng, Jiye; Griffin, Nicholas; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus S; Ilkayeva, Olga; Newgard, Christopher B; Petri, William; Haque, Rashidul; Ahmed, Tahmeed; Gordon, Jeffrey I

    2016-11-23

    To model how interactions among enteropathogens and gut microbial community members contribute to undernutrition, we colonized gnotobiotic mice fed representative Bangladeshi diets with sequenced bacterial strains cultured from the fecal microbiota of two 24-month-old Bangladeshi children: one healthy and the other underweight. The undernourished donor's bacterial collection contained an enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis strain (ETBF), whereas the healthy donor's bacterial collection contained two nontoxigenic strains of B. fragilis (NTBF). Analyses of mice harboring either the unmanipulated culture collections or systematically manipulated versions revealed that ETBF was causally related to weight loss in the context of its native community but not when introduced into the healthy donor's community. This phenotype was transmissible from the dams to their offspring and was associated with derangements in host energy metabolism manifested by impaired tricarboxylic acid cycle activity and decreased acyl-coenzyme A utilization. NTBF reduced ETBF's expression of its enterotoxin and mitigated the effects of ETBF on the transcriptomes of other healthy donor community members. These results illustrate how intraspecific (ETBF-NTBF) and interspecific interactions influence the effects of harboring B. fragilis.

  1. Bordetella pertussis Infection or Vaccination Substantially Protects Mice against B. bronchiseptica Infection

    PubMed Central

    Goebel, Elizabeth M.; Zhang, Xuqing; Harvill, Eric T.

    2009-01-01

    Although B. bronchiseptica efficiently infects a wide range of mammalian hosts and efficiently spreads among them, it is rarely observed in humans. In contrast to the many other hosts of B. bronchiseptica, humans are host to the apparently specialized pathogen B. pertussis, the great majority having immunity due to vaccination, infection or both. Here we explore whether immunity to B. pertussis protects against B. bronchiseptica infection. In a murine model, either infection or vaccination with B. pertussis induced antibodies that recognized antigens of B. bronchiseptica and protected the lower respiratory tract of mice against three phylogenetically disparate strains of B. bronchiseptica that efficiently infect naïve animals. Furthermore, vaccination with purified B. pertussis-derived pertactin, filamentous hemagglutinin or the human acellular vaccine, Adacel, conferred similar protection against B. bronchiseptica challenge. These data indicate that individual immunity to B. pertussis affects B. bronchiseptica infection, and suggest that the high levels of herd immunity against B. pertussis in humans could explain the lack of observed B. bronchiseptica transmission. This could also explain the apparent association of B. bronchiseptica infections with an immunocompromised state. PMID:19707559

  2. Compensatory T cell responses in IRG-deficient mice prevent sustained Chlamydia trachomatis infections.

    PubMed

    Coers, Jörn; Gondek, Dave C; Olive, Andrew J; Rohlfing, Amy; Taylor, Gregory A; Starnbach, Michael N

    2011-06-01

    The obligate intracellular pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis is the most common cause of bacterial sexually transmitted diseases in the United States. In women C. trachomatis can establish persistent genital infections that lead to pelvic inflammatory disease and sterility. In contrast to natural infections in humans, experimentally induced infections with C. trachomatis in mice are rapidly cleared. The cytokine interferon-γ (IFNγ) plays a critical role in the clearance of C. trachomatis infections in mice. Because IFNγ induces an antimicrobial defense system in mice but not in humans that is composed of a large family of Immunity Related GTPases (IRGs), we questioned whether mice deficient in IRG immunity would develop persistent infections with C. trachomatis as observed in human patients. We found that IRG-deficient Irgm1/m3((-/-)) mice transiently develop high bacterial burden post intrauterine infection, but subsequently clear the infection more efficiently than wildtype mice. We show that the delayed but highly effective clearance of intrauterine C. trachomatis infections in Irgm1/m3((-/-)) mice is dependent on an exacerbated CD4(+) T cell response. These findings indicate that the absence of the predominant murine innate effector mechanism restricting C. trachomatis growth inside epithelial cells results in a compensatory adaptive immune response, which is at least in part driven by CD4(+) T cells and prevents the establishment of a persistent infection in mice.

  3. Interleukin-13 is involved in the formation of liver fibrosis in Clonorchis sinensis-infected mice.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yanquan; Liang, Pei; Bian, Meng; Chen, Wenjun; Wang, Xiaoyun; Lin, Jinsi; Shang, Mei; Qu, Hongling; Wu, Zhongdao; Huang, Yan; Yu, Xinbing

    2016-07-01

    Clonorchiasis is a chronic infection disease often accompanied by formation of liver fibrosis. Previous study has identified that Clonorchis sinensis (C. sinensis, Cs) infection and CsRNASET2 (a member of CsESPs) immunization can drive Th2 immune response. IL-13, a multifunctional Th2 cytokine, has been widely confirmed to be profibrotic mediator. We want to determine whether IL-13 is involved in the generation of liver fibrosis during C. sinensis infection. A part of mice were infected with C. sinensis or immunized with CsRNASET2, respectively. Another part of mice were intravenously injected with rIL-13. Liver tissues of C. sinensis-infected mice were stained with hematoxylin-eosin and Masson's trichrome, respectively. The transcriptional levels of collagen-I, collagen-III, α-SMA, and TIMP-1 in the livers of infected mice and rIL-13-treated mice were measured by quantitative RT-PCR. Besides, splenocytes of C. sinensis-infected and CsRNASET2-immunized mice were isolated, respectively. The levels of IL-13 in splenocytes were detected by ELISA. Our results displayed that the livers of C. sinensis-infected mice had serious chronic inflammation and collagen deposition. The transcriptional levels of collagen-I, collagen-III, α-SMA, and TIMP-1 in the livers of C. sinensis-infected mice were obviously increased. Splenocytes from both C. sinensis-infected and CsRNASET2-immunized mice expressed high levels of IL-13. Moreover, rIL-13 treatment markedly promoted the transcriptional levels of collagen-I, collagen-III, α-SMA, and TIMP-1. These data implied that hepatic fibrosis was formed in the livers of C. sinensis-infected mice, and IL-13 induced by C. sinensis infection and CsRNASET2 immunization might favor this progression.

  4. Sex influence on chronic intestinal inflammation in Helicobacter hepaticus-infected A/JCr mice.

    PubMed

    Livingston, Robert S; Myles, Mathew H; Livingston, Beth A; Criley, Jennifer M; Franklin, Craig L

    2004-06-01

    Helicobacter hepaticus is a bacterial pathogen of mice that has been reported to cause chronic intestinal inflammation in A/JCr, germfree Swiss Webster, and immunodeficient mice. To the authors' knowledge, the influence of sex on development of chronic intestinal inflammation in H. hepaticus-infected mice has not been investigated. The purposes of the study reported here were to determine whether severity of intestinal inflammation differs between male and female A/JCr mice chronically infected with H. hepaticus and to characterize the mucosal immune response in these mice. The cecum of male and female A/JCr mice infected with H. hepaticus for 1 month and 3 months was objectively evaluated histologically for intestinal disease. Also, semi-quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis was done to measure interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin 4 (IL-4), IL-10, macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha (MIP-1alpha), interferon-inducible protein of 10 kDa (IP-10), and monokine induced by gamma interferon (MIG) mRNA values in the cecal tissue of these mice. Significant differences in cecal lesion scores were not present at 1 month after infection. However, infected female mice had significantly up-regulated expression of cecal IL-10, MIP-1alpha, IP-10, and MIG mRNA compared with that in uninfected females, and expression of IL-10 and MIP-1alpha was significantly greater than that detected in infected male mice (P < or = 0.05). At 3 months after infection, cecal lesion scores were significantly (P < or = 0.05) increased in female and male mice compared with uninfected controls, and infected female mice had significantly (P < or = 0.05) higher cecal lesion scores than did infected male mice. In addition, infected females had significant (P < or = 0.05) increases in cecal IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, IL-10, MIP-1alpha, IP-10, and MIG mRNA values compared with values in uninfected females and infected males

  5. Participation of platelets in protection against larval Taenia taeniaeformis infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Kakuda, T; Ooi, H K; Oku, Y; Kamiya, M

    1996-03-01

    The participation of platelets in the protection against larval Taenia taeniaeformis was studied. CB-17 SCID mice, susceptible to T. taeniaeformis, were protected against a challenge infection with T. taeniaeformis by the passive transfer of platelets from T. taeniaeformis-infected normal CB-17 mice, resistant to T. taeniaeformis.

  6. Treatment of Mycobacterium intracellulare Infected Mice with Walter Reed Compound H

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-09-25

    including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Mycobacterium leprae , Staphylococcusaureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, enterococ----ci, Neissr•~n...97 SAD "Treatment of Mycobacterium intracellulare Infected Mice with Walter Reed Compound H" Final Comprehensive Report J. Kenneth McClatchy, Ph.D...REPORT & PERIOD COVERED "TREATMENT OF MYCOBACTERIUM INTRACELLULARE - Final Comprehensive Report INFECTED MICE WITH WALTER REED COMPOUND H"li G

  7. Immunopathological assessments of human Blastocystis spp. in experimentally infected immunocompetent and immunosuppresed mice.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Hafeez, Ekhlas H; Ahmad, Azza K; Abdelgelil, Noha H; Abdellatif, Manal Z M; Kamal, Amany M; Hassanin, Kamel M A; Abdel-Razik, Abdel-Razik H; Abdel-Raheem, Ehab M

    2016-05-01

    Blastocystis spp., one of the most common parasites colonizing the human intestine, is an extracellular, luminal protozoan with controversial pathogenesis. The host's immune response against Blastocystis spp. infection has also not been defined yet. Therefore, this research aimed to assess the potential pathogenicity of this parasite and its ability to modulate the immune response in experimental infected immunocompetent and immunosuppresed mice. These results demonstrated that the infected immunosuppressed mice were more affected than infected immunocompetent mice. Histopathological examination of the small intestine in the infected immunosuppressed mice showed that Blastocystis spp. infiltrated all the layers. Moreover, the epithelia showed exfoliation and inflammatory cell infiltration in submucosa compared to that of the infected immunocompetent mice. As well, examination of the large intestine of the infected immunosuppressed group showed severe goblet cell hyperplasia. Blastocystis spp. infiltrated all the large intestine layers compared to that of the infected immunocompetent group. Furthermore, there was a significant upregulation of the expression of proinflammatory cytokines: interleukin 12 (IL-12) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) in the infected immunosuppressed mice compared to that of the infected immunocompetent ones (p ≤ 0.004 and p ≤ 0.002, respectively). However, the expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-4 and IL-10) was significantly downregulated in the infected immunosuppressed group compared to that of the infected immunocompetent group one at 10 days postinfection (p ≤ 0.002 and p ≤ 0.001, respectively). The results of this study revealed that Blastocystis spp. affected the production of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in both groups of mice compared to healthy normal (naive) group. Additionally, these data showed that there was a significant upregulation (p ≤ 0.005) of the locally

  8. Changes in immunoglobulin levels in zinc-deficient mice infected with Trypanosoma musculi.

    PubMed Central

    Humphrey, P. A.; Lee, C. M.; Ashraf, M.

    1994-01-01

    A metabolic imbalance technique was used to study the effects of zinc deficiency on immunoglobulin levels in mice infected with Trypanosoma musculi or immunized with parasite products. Zinc-deficient mice developed higher numbers of parasitemia earlier and exhibited prolonged infection. Irrespective of the diet, higher IgG1, IgG2b, and IgM levels, lower IgG2a and IgA levels, and uniform IgG3 levels were exhibited primarily by mice infected with T musculi and to a lesser extent by mice immunized with parasite products. Zinc-deficient mice showed smaller increases in IgG1 and IgM, but larger gains in IgG2b compared with mice on full-complement and pair-fed diets. However, IgG2a decreased significantly in zinc-deficient mice. PMID:7932840

  9. Immunomodulatory effect of diethylcarbamazine in mice infected with Nocardia brasiliensis.

    PubMed

    García-Hernández, M; Castro-Corona, M A; Segoviano-Ramírez, J C; Brattig, N W; Medina-De la Garza, C E

    2014-11-01

    We tested whether diethylcarbamazine (DEC) or ivermectin (IVM), both antiparasitic drugs with reported immunomodulatory properties, were able to affect the immune system to potentiate host defense mechanisms and protect against actinomycetoma in a mouse model. Male BALB/c mice of 10-12 weeks of age were injected with either Nocardia brasiliensis or saline solution. Recorded were the effects of a treatment by DEC (6 mg/kg per os daily for one week) or IVM (200 μg/kg subcutaneously on days 1 and 3) on (i) the development of mycetoma lesion, (ii) the expression of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI) by phagocytes, (iii) the proliferation index of lymphocytes and (iv) antibody production of IgG and IgM. After an initial lesion in all mice, DEC inhibited a full development and progression of actinomycetoma resulting in a reduced lesion size (p < 0.001). IVM had no inhibitory effect on the development of mycetoma. Furthermore, DEC treatment was associated with a significant enhancement of ROI expression (p < 0.05) by polymorphonuclear neutrophils at day 3 after infection. Lymphocyte proliferation in response to N. brasiliensis antigens and concanavalin A in DEC-treated group was higher than in non-treated group at day 21 and 28 postinfection (p < 0.01). Significant changes in antibody response were not observed. By all parameters tested, DEC was superior to IVM regarding immunostimulatory potency. In conclusion, DEC expressed an in vivo influence on the immune status during the infection by N. brasiliensis leading to retrogression of the mycetoma and increasing cellular immune responses. Our findings may indicate a potential use of DEC as a putative adjuvant in infectious disease or vaccination.

  10. Enhancement of intestinal eosinophilia during Hymenolepis nana infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Niwa, A; Miyazato, T

    1996-03-01

    The ability of Hymenolepis nana oncosphere extract to induce eosinophil chemotactic response was examined in vitro and in vivo. The extract showed a chemotactic activity specific for eosinophils but not for neutrophils. Partially purified eosinophil chemotactic factors (ECFs) from the oncosphere extract showed apparent molecular mass from 5.5 to 9.6kDa and 30 to 40kDa. These were resistant to heating and proteinase K digestion but sensitive to periodate oxidation. Peritoneal injection of the crude extract or partially purified ECFs to mice resulted in a preferential eosinophil infiltration. The chemotactic activity for eosinophils was not separable from the adhesion molecule expression or oxygen radical-inducing activity by means of chromatography or chemical treatments. Furthermore, histological examination demonstrated a marked tissue eosinophilia around H. nana larvae in the intestinal lamina propria of both humoral and cell-mediated immunodeficiency mice. The present findings suggest that H. nana oncosphere-derived molecules facilitate in vivo the intestinal eosinophilia during the infection.

  11. Increased mucosal damage during parasite infection in mice fed an elemental diet.

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, A; Logan, R F; MacDonald, T T

    1980-01-01

    We have examined the effects of parasite infection on the mucosal architecture of mice maintained on an elemental diet (Vivonex). Techniques used were conventional histology, micro-dissection and measurement of individual villi and crypts, and measurement of crypt cell proliferation rate by a metaphase accumulation technique. In normal, non-parasitised mice the elemental diet caused no change in villus height, crypt depth, or crypt cell proliferation. Likewise, the only effects of chronic protozoal infection or Nippostrongylus brasiliensis infection on the intestine of mice fed a normal diet have been a slight crypt hypertrophy and an increase in crypt cell proliferation rate without villous atrophy. However, the combination of elemental diet and parasite infection resulted in increased mucosal damage when compared with infected mice on a normal diet. Elemental diet mice infected with the nematode Nippostrongylus brasiliensis had significantly reduced villus height and correspondingly raised crypt length and metaphase accumulation rate. Elemental diet mice infected with the protozoan Giardia muris did not have villous atrophy but there was a significant increase in crypt length and metaphase accumulation when compared with infected normal diet mice. These experiments show that in two animal models of enteric infection, elemental diet has altered the host parasite relationship to the detriment of the host. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 5 PMID:7364318

  12. Toxoplasma gondii: the effects of infection at different stages of pregnancy on the offspring of mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Liu, Min; Gao, Xiao-Jie; Zhao, Zhi-Jun; Chen, Xiao-Guang; Lun, Zhao-Rong

    2011-01-01

    Congenital toxoplasmosis can cause fetal damage in humans and domestic animals. This study was focused on the effects of Toxoplasma gondii (Prugniaud strain) infection at different stages of pregnancy on the offspring of mice. Results showed that newborn mice from all infected groups were significantly lower in weight than those from the control group but significant difference was not found among these groups at day 60 after birth. The survival rate of the offspring from the group of mice infected at the earlier stage of pregnancy was significantly lower than those of infected and control groups. The positive offspring (with cysts found in their brain tissues) born from the mice infected at the earlier and intermediate stages of pregnancy showed a shorter latency and greater number of errors in the step-through passive avoidance test than those born from the mice infected at the late stage of pregnancy, the control group and the negative offspring from the infected groups. The number of cysts in the brain tissue was significantly higher in the offspring born from the groups of mice infected at the earlier and intermediate stages of pregnancy than those from the group of mice infected at the late stage of pregnancy. In addition, our results indicated that a high congenital transmission rate (90%) occurred in this NIH mouse model. In conclusion, the earlier and intermediate maternal infection of T. gondii can result in severe congenital toxoplasmosis, exhibiting conditions such as stillbirth or non-viability, and learning or memory capability damage in this mouse model. These results not only provide useful data for better understanding the effects of T. gondii infection on the offspring of mice infected at different stages of pregnancy but also for better consideration of the effect of this infection on other mammalian hosts including humans.

  13. Baicalin Protects Mice from Lethal Infection by Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Qi, Zhimin; Liu, Yan; He, Wenqi; Yang, Cheng; Wang, Quan; Dong, Jing; Deng, Xuming

    2017-01-01

    Shiga-like toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O157:H7 poses grave challenges to public health by its ability to cause severe colonic diseases and renal failure in both human and animals. Shiga-like toxins are the major pathogenic factor for some highly virulent E. coli expecially Shiga-like toxin 2. Conventional treatments such as antibiotics can facilitate the release of the toxin thus potentially exacerbate the diseases. Small molecule inhibitors and antibodies capable of neutralizing the toxins are the two major venues for the development of therapeutics against enterohemorrhagic serotype E. coli infection. While promising and potentially effective at clinical settings, these approaches need to overcome obstacles such as the limited routes of administration, responses from the host immune system, which are known to differ greatly among individuals. Our previous studies demonstrate that Baicalin (BAI), a flavonoid compound isolated from Scutellaria baicalensis protects against rStx2-induced cell cytotoxicity and also protects mice from lethal rStx2 challenges by inducing Stx2 to form inactive oligomers. In this manuscript, we present some exciting work showing that baicalin is an effective agent for therapeutic treatment of STEC O157:H7 infection.

  14. Baicalin Protects Mice from Lethal Infection by Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong; Qi, Zhimin; Liu, Yan; He, Wenqi; Yang, Cheng; Wang, Quan; Dong, Jing; Deng, Xuming

    2017-01-01

    Shiga-like toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O157:H7 poses grave challenges to public health by its ability to cause severe colonic diseases and renal failure in both human and animals. Shiga-like toxins are the major pathogenic factor for some highly virulent E. coli expecially Shiga-like toxin 2. Conventional treatments such as antibiotics can facilitate the release of the toxin thus potentially exacerbate the diseases. Small molecule inhibitors and antibodies capable of neutralizing the toxins are the two major venues for the development of therapeutics against enterohemorrhagic serotype E. coli infection. While promising and potentially effective at clinical settings, these approaches need to overcome obstacles such as the limited routes of administration, responses from the host immune system, which are known to differ greatly among individuals. Our previous studies demonstrate that Baicalin (BAI), a flavonoid compound isolated from Scutellaria baicalensis protects against rStx2-induced cell cytotoxicity and also protects mice from lethal rStx2 challenges by inducing Stx2 to form inactive oligomers. In this manuscript, we present some exciting work showing that baicalin is an effective agent for therapeutic treatment of STEC O157:H7 infection. PMID:28337193

  15. Arthritis is developed in Borrelia-primed and -infected mice deficient of interleukin-17.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Joseph; Warner, Thomas F; Munson, Erik L; Nardelli, Dean T; Schell, Ronald F

    2016-10-01

    Interleukin-17 (IL-17) has been shown to participate in the development of Lyme arthritis in experimental mice. For example, neutralization of IL-17 with antibodies inhibits induction of arthritis in Borrelia-primed and -infected C57BL/6 wild-type mice. We hypothesized that mice lacking IL-17 would fail to develop Borrelia-induced arthritis. IL-17-deficient and wild-type C57BL/6 mice were primed with heat-inactivated Borrelia and then infected with viable spirochetes 3 weeks later. No swelling or major histopathological changes of the hind paws were detected in IL-17-deficient or wild-type mice that were primed with Borrelia or infected with viable spirochetes. By contrast, IL-17-deficient and wild-type mice that were primed and subsequently infected with heterologous Borrelia developed severe swelling and histopathological changes of the hind paws. In addition, Borrelia-primed and -infected IL-17-deficient mice exhibited elevated gamma-interferon (IFN-γ) levels in sera and increased frequencies of IFN-γ-expressing lymphocytes in popliteal lymph nodes compared to Borrelia-primed and -infected wild-type mice. These results demonstrate that IL-17 is not required for development of severe pathology in response to infection with Borrelia burgdorferi, but may contribute to disease through an interaction with IFN-γ.

  16. The Effect of Carbon Monoxide Exposure on Susceptibility of Mice to Respiratory Infection with Listeria Monocytogenes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1972-01-01

    flora in non - infected mice ............. ................. 34 3. Per cent mortality of CO exposed and non - exposed mice irfected with L. monocytogenes...Exposure for 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 days ........ ... 39 1+. Quantitative assay of listeria in peritoneal macrophages from CO and non CO exposed mice . . 45...5. Quantitative assay of listeria in alveolar macrophages from CO and non CO exposed mice . . 48 6. Spleen assay for L. monocytogenes from non

  17. Excessive inflammatory response of cystic fibrosis mice to bronchopulmonary infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Heeckeren, A; Walenga, R; Konstan, M W; Bonfield, T; Davis, P B; Ferkol, T

    1997-01-01

    In cystic fibrosis (CF), defective function of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) in airway epithelial cells and submucosal glands results in chronic pulmonary infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The pulmonary infection incites an intense host inflammatory response, causing progressive suppurative pulmonary disease. Mouse models of CF, however, fail to develop pulmonary disease spontaneously. We examined the effects of bronchopulmonary infection on mice homozygous for the S489X mutation of the CFTR gene using an animal model of chronic Pseudomonas endobronchial infection. Slurries of sterile agarose beads or beads containing a clinical isolate of mucoid P. aeruginosa were instilled in the right lung of normal or CF mice. The mortality of CF mice inoculated with Pseudomonas-laden beads was significantly higher than that of normal animals: 82% of infected CF mice, but only 23% of normal mice, died within 10 d of infection (P = 0.023). The concentration of inflammatory mediators, including TNF-alpha, murine macrophage inflammatory protein-2, and KC/N51, in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid in CF mice 3 d after infection and before any mortality, was markedly elevated compared with normal mice. This inflammatory response also correlated with weight loss observed in both CF and normal littermates after inoculation. Thus, this model may permit examination of the relationship of bacterial infections, inflammation, and the cellular and genetic defects in CF. PMID:9389746

  18. Cytokine patterns in experimental schistosomiasis mansoni infected mice treated with silymarin.

    PubMed

    El-Sayed, Nagwa Mostafa; Fathy, Ghada Mahmoud; Abdel-Rahman, Sara Abdel-Rahman; El-Shafei, Mahmoud Abdel-Atei

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine cytokine patterns in experimental schistosomiasis mansoni infected mice treated with silymarin. The study was conducted upon 100 mice that were divided into five groups; 20 each: uninfected control group, Schistosoma mansoni infected untreated mice (infected control), infected mice treated with praziquantel (PZQ), infected mice treated with silymarin and infected mice treated with both praziquantel and silymarin. 10 mice from each group were sacrificed at 10th and 18th weeks post infection respectively. Histopathological investigations were performed. Liver sections were stained with hematoxylin-eosin and Masson's trichrome stain to evaluate changes of granuloma sizes and numbers. Serum levels of the cytokines (TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-4 and TGF-β1) were assessed in the sera of all groups by immunoassay. The measured levels of cytokines (IFN-γ, IL-4, TNF-α, TGF-β1) were found to be significantly increased in infected mice compared to normal control. At the same time, treated groups with silymarin alone or combined with PZQ showed significant decrease in IL-4, TNF-α and TGF-β1 levels compared to infected control. On the other hand, there was a significant increase in IFN-γ level observed in all treated groups compared to infected control. In addition, the histopathological examination of the liver in the group treated with PZQ showed a reduction in the number of livers eggs granuloma at all periods of sacrification compared with the infected untreated group. However, there was more decrease in granulomas diameter in both silymarin treated group or combined with PZQ at all periods of sacrification when compared to infected untreated group. In conclusion; treatment with silymarin combined with PZQ in murine schistosomiasis could reduce hepatic fibrosis by their action on the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines.

  19. Resistance of mice to infection with the human strain of Hymenolepis nana.

    PubMed

    al-Baldawi, F A; Mahdi, N K; Abdul-Hafidh, B A

    1989-06-01

    Six attempts were made to infect mice by feeding them eggs of the human strain of Hymenolepis nana, but none was successful. No eggs were found in the mouse faeces 14 days after feeding, and no adult worms were recovered at post mortem examination. In attempts to induce cysticercoids to infect mice, beetles were either fed on infected human faeces or given Hymenolepis eggs on filter paper. Both methods were unsuccessful, as no cysticercoids were recovered six days after exposure of the beetles.

  20. Lactic dehydrogenase virus infection enhances parasite egg production and inhibits eosinophil and mast cell responses in mice infected with the nematode Nippostrongylus brasiliensis.

    PubMed Central

    Morimoto, M; Yamada, M; Arizono, N; Hayashi, T

    1998-01-01

    The effects of lactic dehydrogenase virus (LDV) infection on the protective immune responses to the nematode Nippostrongylus brasiliensis were studied. Mice with chronic LDV infection showed significantly higher levels of parasite egg production than non-LDV-infected (control) mice after N. brasiliensis infection. Concurrent LDV infection also suppressed peripheral blood eosinophilia and the lung mastocytosis induced by this nematode. LDV infection showed higher expression levels of the interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) mRNA in lymph nodes compared with control mice before N. brasiliensis infection. In addition, the IgG2a production in LDV-infected mice was higher than that in control mice before and after N. brasiliensis infection. These results suggest that LDV infection modulates protective immune responses against N. brasiliensis infection by the activation of T-helper type 1 cells. PMID:9659227

  1. Effect of the purinergic receptor P2X7 on Chlamydia infection in cervical epithelial cells and vaginally infected mice.

    PubMed

    Darville, Toni; Welter-Stahl, Lynn; Cruz, Cristiane; Sater, Ali Abdul; Andrews, Charles W; Ojcius, David M

    2007-09-15

    Ligation of the purinergic receptor, P2X7R, with its agonist ATP has been previously shown to inhibit intracellular infection by chlamydiae and mycobacteria in macrophages. The effect of P2X7R on chlamydial infection had never been investigated in the preferred target cells of chlamydiae, cervical epithelial cells, nor in vaginally infected mice. In this study, we show that treatment of epithelial cells with P2X7R agonists inhibits partially Chlamydia infection in epithelial cells. Chelation of ATP with magnesium or pretreatment with a P2X7R antagonist blocks the inhibitory effects of ATP. Similarly to previous results obtained with macrophages, ATP-mediated inhibition of infection in epithelial cells requires activation of host-cell phospholipase D. Vaginal infection was also more efficient in P2X7R-deficient mice, which also displayed a higher level of acute inflammation in the endocervix, oviduct, and mesosalpingeal tissues than in infected wild-type mice. However, secretion of IL-1beta, which requires P2X7R ligation during infection by other pathogens, was decreased mildly and only at short times of infection. Taken together, these results suggest that P2X7R affects Chlamydia infection by directly inhibiting infection in epithelial cells, rather than through the ability of P2X7R to modulate IL-1beta secretion.

  2. Dietary lactosucrose suppresses influenza A (H1N1) virus infection in mice

    PubMed Central

    KISHINO, Eriko; TAKEMURA, Naho; MASAKI, Hisaharu; ITO, Tetsuya; NAKAZAWA, Masatoshi

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the effects of lactosucrose (4G-β-D-galactosylsucrose) on influenza A virus infections in mice. First, the effects of lactosucrose on fermentation in the cecum and on immune function were investigated. In female BALB/c mice, lactosucrose supplementation for 6 weeks promoted cecal fermentation and increased both secretory IgA (SIgA) levels in feces and total IgA and IgG2a concentrations in serum. Both the percentage of CD4+ T cells in Peyer’s patches and the cytotoxic activity of splenic natural killer (NK) cells increased significantly in response to lactosucrose. Next, we examined the effects of lactosucrose on low-dose influenza A virus infection in mice. After 2 weeks of dietary supplementation with lactosucrose, the mice were infected with low-dose influenza A virus. At 7 days post infection, a comparison with control mice showed that weight loss was suppressed, as were viral titers in the lungs. In the spleens of lactosucrose-fed mice, there was an increase in the percentage of NK cells. Lastly, mice fed lactosucrose were challenged with a lethal dose of influenza A virus. The survival rate of these mice was significantly higher than that of mice fed a control diet. These results suggested that lactosucrose supplementation suppresses influenza A virus infection by augmenting innate immune responses and enhancing cellular and mucosal immunity. PMID:26594606

  3. VDUP1 exacerbates bacteremic shock in mice infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Piao, Zheng-Hao; Kim, Mi Sun; Jeong, Mira; Yun, Sohyun; Lee, Suk Hyung; Sun, Hu-Nan; Song, Hae Young; Suh, Hyun-Woo; Jung, Haiyoung; Yoon, Suk Ran; Kim, Tae-Don; Lee, Young-Ho; Choi, Inpyo

    2012-11-01

    Vitamin-D3 upregulated protein-1 (VDUP1) is a stress response protein. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) infection is a leading cause of death. Mice infected with live P. aeruginosa exhibit significantly decreased VDUP1 expression. However, the function of VDUP1 during P. aeruginosa-induced mouse bacteremic shock is unknown. To address the function of VDUP1 in P. aeruginosa-infected mice, we constructed a bacteremic shock model wherein both wild-type and VDUP1-deficient mice were infected intra-peritoneally with live P. aeruginosa. We found that VDUP1-deficient mice were more resistant to P. aeruginosa-induced bacteremic shock than wild-type mice, as shown by the increased survival, accelerated bacterial clearance and suppression of cytokine overproduction of the VDUP1-deficient mice. VDUP1 promoted the recruitment of neutrophils into the peritoneal cavities of infected mice. VDUP1 impeded the phagocytosis of non-opsonized P. aeruginosa via phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway in macrophages. P. aeruginosa infection induced the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and the increased production of ROS by the peritoneal cells of VDUP1-deficient mice was advantageous in clearing the bacteria. Overall, VDUP1 aggravates bacteremic shock; thus, VDUP1 can be considered a target molecule for the inhibition of P. aeruginosa-induced bacteremic shock.

  4. Interferon-γ-Induced Nitric Oxide Causes Intrinsic Intestinal Denervation in Trypanosoma cruzi-Infected Mice

    PubMed Central

    Arantes, Rosa M.E.; Marche, Homero H.F.; Bahia, Maria T.; Cunha, Fernando Q.; Rossi, Marcos A.; Silva, João S.

    2004-01-01

    In this study, the role of nitric oxide (NO) in neuronal destruction during acute-phase Trypanosoma cruzi infection was evaluated in male C57BL/6 (WT, wild-type) mice and knockout mice [inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS)−/− and interferon (IFN)−/−]. Selected animals were infected by intraperitoneal injection of 100 trypomastigote forms of the Y strain of T. cruzi. Others were injected intraperitoneally with an equal volume of saline solution and served as controls. Our findings support those of previous studies regarding myenteric denervation in acute-phase T. cruzi infection. In addition, we clearly demonstrate that, despite the fact that parasite nests and similar inflammatory infiltrate in the intestinal wall were more pronounced in infected iNOS−/− mice than in infected WT mice, the former presented no reduction in myenteric plexus neuron numbers. Neuronal nerve profile expression, as revealed by the general nerve marker PGP 9.5, was preserved in all knockout animals. Infected IFN−/− mice suffered no significant neuronal loss and there was no inflammatory infiltrate in the intestinal wall. On days 5 and 10 after infection, iNOS activity was greater in infected WT mice than in controls, whereas iNOS activity in infected knockout mice remained unchanged. These findings clearly demonstrate that neuronal damage does not occur in NO-impaired infected knockout mice, regardless of whether inflammatory infiltrate is present (iNOS−/−) or absent (IFN−/−). In conclusion, our observations strongly indicate that myenteric denervation in acute-phase T. cruzi infection is because of IFN-γ-elicited NO production resulting from iNOS activation in the inflammatory foci along the intestinal wall. PMID:15039223

  5. Gnotobiotic mouse model of phage-bacterial host dynamics in the human gut.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Alejandro; Wu, Meng; McNulty, Nathan P; Rohwer, Forest L; Gordon, Jeffrey I

    2013-12-10

    Bacterial viruses (phages) are the most abundant biological group on Earth and are more genetically diverse than their bacterial prey/hosts. To characterize their role as agents shaping gut microbial community structure, adult germ-free mice were colonized with a consortium of 15 sequenced human bacterial symbionts, 13 of which harbored one or more predicted prophages. One member, Bacteroides cellulosilyticus WH2, was represented by a library of isogenic transposon mutants that covered 90% of its genes. Once assembled, the community was subjected to a staged phage attack with a pool of live or heat-killed virus-like particles (VLPs) purified from the fecal microbiota of five healthy humans. Shotgun sequencing of DNA from the input pooled VLP preparation plus shotgun sequencing of gut microbiota samples and purified fecal VLPs from the gnotobiotic mice revealed a reproducible nonsimultaneous pattern of attack extending over a 25-d period that involved five phages, none described previously. This system allowed us to (i) correlate increases in specific phages present in the pooled VLPs with reductions in the representation of particular bacterial taxa, (ii) provide evidence that phage resistance occurred because of ecological or epigenetic factors, (iii) track the origin of each of the five phages among the five human donors plus the extent of their genome variation between and within recipient mice, and (iv) establish the dramatic in vivo fitness advantage that a locus within a B. cellulosilyticus prophage confers upon its host. Together, these results provide a defined community-wide view of phage-bacterial host dynamics in the gut.

  6. Efficacy of Microencapsulated Rifampin in Mycobacterium tuberculosis-Infected Mice

    PubMed Central

    Quenelle, Debra C.; Staas, Jay K.; Winchester, Gary A.; Barrow, Esther L. W.; Barrow, William W.

    1999-01-01

    Rifampin is a first-line drug useful in the treatment of tuberculosis. By using biocompatible polymeric excipients of lactide and glycolide copolymers, two microsphere formulations were developed for targeted and sustained delivery of rifampin, with minimal dosing. A small-microsphere formulation, with demonstrated ability to inhibit intracellularly replicating Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv, was tested along with a large-microsphere formulation in an infected mouse model. Results revealed that by using a single treatment of the large-microsphere formulation, it was possible to achieve a significant reduction in M. tuberculosis H37Rv CFUs in the lungs of mice by 26 days postinfection. A combination of small (given as two injections on day 0 and day 7) and large (given as one injection at day 0) rifampin-loaded microsphere formulations resulted in significant reductions in CFUs in the lungs by 26 days, achieving a 1.23 log10 reduction in CFUs. By comparison, oral treatment with 5, 10, or 20 mg of rifampin/kg of body weight, administered every day, resulted in a reduction of 0.42, 1.7, or 1.8 log10 units, respectively. Thus the microsphere formulations, administered in one or two doses, were able to achieve results in mice similar to those obtained with a daily drug regimen within the range of the highest clinically tolerated dosage in humans. These results demonstrate that microsphere formulations of antimycobacterial drugs such as rifampin can be used for therapy of tuberculosis with minimal dosing. PMID:10223927

  7. Course of Infection with the Emergent Pathogen Brucella microti in Immunocompromised Mice

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez de Bagüés, María P.; de Martino, Alba; Quintana, Juan F.; Alcaraz, Ana; Pardo, Julián

    2011-01-01

    A new Brucella species, Brucella microti, has been isolated from wild rodents and found to be pathogenic in mice. The biological relevance of this new mouse pathogen is clear, as it allows us to study Brucella infection in a species-specific model. The course of infection in wild-type (wt) and immunodeficient mice that lack B (Jh), T and B (SCID), or T, B, and NK (SCID.Beige) cells was analyzed over 3 weeks. wt mice completely cleared bacteria from the liver and spleen after that time. However, SCID mice showed a much higher bacterial load in the spleen and liver than wt and Jh mice after 1 week and maintained the same level during the next 2 weeks. All mice tested survived for the 3 weeks. In contrast, the bacterial levels in mice that lacked NK cell activity progressively increased and these mice succumbed to infection after 16 to 18 days. Histopathology analysis of infected mice showed extensive areas of necrotic tissue and thrombosis in liver after 1 week in all infected SCID.Beige mice but were not seen in either SCID or wt animals. These processes were dramatically increased after 21 days, corresponding with the death of SCID.Beige animals. Our results indicate that T and/or B cells are required for the control of infection with the mouse pathogen Brucella microti in liver and spleen but that NK cells are crucial for survival in the absence of B and T cells. In addition, they suggest that controlled granuloma formation is critical to clear this type of infection in wt mice. PMID:21825066

  8. Course of infection with the emergent pathogen Brucella microti in immunocompromised mice.

    PubMed

    Jiménez de Bagüés, María P; de Martino, Alba; Quintana, Juan F; Alcaraz, Ana; Pardo, Julián

    2011-10-01

    A new Brucella species, Brucella microti, has been isolated from wild rodents and found to be pathogenic in mice. The biological relevance of this new mouse pathogen is clear, as it allows us to study Brucella infection in a species-specific model. The course of infection in wild-type (wt) and immunodeficient mice that lack B (Jh), T and B (SCID), or T, B, and NK (SCID.Beige) cells was analyzed over 3 weeks. wt mice completely cleared bacteria from the liver and spleen after that time. However, SCID mice showed a much higher bacterial load in the spleen and liver than wt and Jh mice after 1 week and maintained the same level during the next 2 weeks. All mice tested survived for the 3 weeks. In contrast, the bacterial levels in mice that lacked NK cell activity progressively increased and these mice succumbed to infection after 16 to 18 days. Histopathology analysis of infected mice showed extensive areas of necrotic tissue and thrombosis in liver after 1 week in all infected SCID.Beige mice but were not seen in either SCID or wt animals. These processes were dramatically increased after 21 days, corresponding with the death of SCID.Beige animals. Our results indicate that T and/or B cells are required for the control of infection with the mouse pathogen Brucella microti in liver and spleen but that NK cells are crucial for survival in the absence of B and T cells. In addition, they suggest that controlled granuloma formation is critical to clear this type of infection in wt mice.

  9. EFFICACY OF NITAZOXANIDE AGAINST Toxocara canis: LARVAL RECOVERY AND HUMORAL IMMUNE RESPONSE IN EXPERIMENTALLY INFECTED MICE

    PubMed Central

    LESCANO, Susana A. Zevallos; dos SANTOS, Sergio Vieira; ASSIS, Jesiel Maurício Lemos; CHIEFFI, Pedro Paulo

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The efficacy of nitazoxanide (NTZ) against toxocariasis was investigated in an experimental murine model and results were compared to those obtained using mebendazole. Sixty male BALB/c mice, aged six to eight weeks-old, were divided into groups of 10 each; fifty were orally infected with 300 larvaed eggs of T. canisand grouped as follows, G I: infected untreated mice; G II: infected mice treated with MBZ (15 mg/kg/day) 10 days postinfection (dpi); G III: infected mice treated with NTZ (20 mg/kg/day) 10 dpi; G IV: infected mice treated with MBZ 60 dpi; G V: infected mice treated with NTZ 60 dpi; GVI: control group comprising uninfected mice. Mice were bled via retro-orbital plexus on four occasions between 30 and 120 dpi. Sera were processed using the ELISA technique to detect IgG anti- Toxocaraantibodies. At 120 dpi, mice were sacrificed for larval recovery in the CNS, liver, lungs, kidneys, eyes and carcass. Results showed similar levels of anti- ToxocaraIgG antibodies among mice infected but not submitted to treatment and groups treated with MBZ or NTZ, 10 and 60 dpi. Larval recovery showed similar values in groups treated with NTZ and MBZ 10 dpi. MBZ showed better efficacy 60 dpi, with a 72.6% reduction in the parasite load compared with NTZ, which showed only 46.5% reduction. We conclude that administration of these anthelmintics did not modify the humoral response in experimental infection by T. canis. No parasitological cure was observed with either drug; however, a greater reduction in parasite load was achieved following treatment with MBZ. PMID:26422159

  10. EFFICACY OF NITAZOXANIDE AGAINST Toxocara canis: LARVAL RECOVERY AND HUMORAL IMMUNE RESPONSE IN EXPERIMENTALLY INFECTED MICE.

    PubMed

    Lescano, Susana A Zevallos; Santos, Sergio Vieira dos; Assis, Jesiel Maurício Lemos; Chieffi, Pedro Paulo

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy of nitazoxanide (NTZ) against toxocariasis was investigated in an experimental murine model and results were compared to those obtained using mebendazole. Sixty male BALB/c mice, aged six to eight weeks-old, were divided into groups of 10 each; fifty were orally infected with 300 larvaed eggs of T. canis and grouped as follows, G I: infected untreated mice; G II: infected mice treated with MBZ (15 mg/kg/day) 10 days postinfection (dpi); G III: infected mice treated with NTZ (20 mg/kg/day) 10 dpi; G IV: infected mice treated with MBZ 60 dpi; G V: infected mice treated with NTZ 60 dpi; GVI: control group comprising uninfected mice. Mice were bled via retro-orbital plexus on four occasions between 30 and 120 dpi. Sera were processed using the ELISA technique to detect IgG anti- Toxocara antibodies. At 120 dpi, mice were sacrificed for larval recovery in the CNS, liver, lungs, kidneys, eyes and carcass. Results showed similar levels of anti- Toxocara IgG antibodies among mice infected but not submitted to treatment and groups treated with MBZ or NTZ, 10 and 60 dpi. Larval recovery showed similar values in groups treated with NTZ and MBZ 10 dpi. MBZ showed better efficacy 60 dpi, with a 72.6% reduction in the parasite load compared with NTZ, which showed only 46.5% reduction. We conclude that administration of these anthelmintics did not modify the humoral response in experimental infection by T. canis. No parasitological cure was observed with either drug; however, a greater reduction in parasite load was achieved following treatment with MBZ.

  11. Macrophages are the determinant of resistance to and outcome of nonlethal Babesia microti infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Terkawi, Mohamad Alaa; Cao, Shinuo; Herbas, Maria S; Nishimura, Maki; Li, Yan; Moumouni, Paul Franck Adjou; Pyarokhil, Asadullah Hamid; Kondoh, Daisuke; Kitamura, Nobuo; Nishikawa, Yoshifumi; Kato, Kentaro; Yokoyama, Naoaki; Zhou, Jinlin; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Igarashi, Ikuo; Xuan, Xuenan

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we examined the contributions of macrophages to the outcome of infection with Babesia microti, the etiological agent of human and rodent babesiosis, in BALB/c mice. Mice were treated with clodronate liposome at different times during the course of B. microti infection in order to deplete the macrophages. Notably, a depletion of host macrophages at the early and acute phases of infection caused a significant elevation of parasitemia associated with remarkable mortality in the mice. The depletion of macrophages at the resolving and latent phases of infection resulted in an immediate and temporal exacerbation of parasitemia coupled with mortality in mice. Reconstituting clodronate liposome-treated mice at the acute phase of infection with macrophages from naive mice resulted in a slight reduction in parasitemia with improved survival compared to that of mice that received the drug alone. These results indicate that macrophages play a crucial role in the control of and resistance to B. microti infection in mice. Moreover, analyses of host immune responses revealed that macrophage-depleted mice diminished their production of Th1 cell cytokines, including gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). Furthermore, depletion of macrophages at different times exaggerated the pathogenesis of the infection in deficient IFN-γ(-/-) and severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice. Collectively, our data provide important clues about the role of macrophages in the resistance and control of B. microti and imply that the severity of the infection in immunocompromised patients might be due to impairment of macrophage function.

  12. Effect of nematode Trichinella infection on glucose tolerance and status of macrophage in obese mice.

    PubMed

    Okada, Hideyuki; Ikeda, Takahide; Kajita, Kazuo; Mori, Ichiro; Hanamoto, Takayuki; Fujioka, Kei; Yamauchi, Masahiro; Usui, Taro; Takahashi, Noriko; Kitada, Yoshihiko; Taguchi, Koichiro; Uno, Yoshihiro; Morita, Hiroyuki; Wu, Zhiliang; Nagano, Isao; Takahashi, Yuzo; Kudo, Takuya; Furuya, Kazuki; Yamada, Takahiro; Ishizuka, Tatsuo

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the effect of Trichinella infection on glucose tolerance and (pro- or anti-inflammatory) macrophage status in adipose tissue. Ob/ob mice and high fat-fed mice (obesity model) and C57/BL mice (control mice) were orally infected with (infected group) or without (uninfected group) 400 Trichinella per mouse. Four weeks later, the mice were subjected to investigation, which showed that fasting plasma glucose levels decreased in the infected group of C57/BL and ob/ob mice. Glucose tolerance, evaluated with intraperitoneal GTT, improved in the infected group of ob/ob mice and high fat-fed mice compared with the uninfected groups. Additional assay included anti-inflammatory macrophage (M2) markers and pro-inflammatory macrophage (M1) markers, with the aim to explore the effect of Trichinella infection on adipose tissue inflammation, since our previous study identified anti-inflammatory substances in secreted proteins by Trichinella. The result showed that mRNA levels of M2 markers, such as CD206, arginase and IL-10, increased, whereas M1 markers, such as CD11c, iNOS and IL-6, decreased in the stromal vascular fraction (SVF) isolated from epididymal fat in ob/ob mice. Residential macrophages obtained from the peritoneal lavage exhibited lower M1 markers and higher M2 markers levels in the infected group than in the uninfected group. Trichinella infection increases the ratio of M2/M1 systemically, which results in an improvement in pro-inflammatory state in adipose tissue and amelioration of glucose tolerance in obese mice.

  13. Persistent hepatitis C virus infections and hepatopathological manifestations in immune-competent humanized mice

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jizheng; Zhao, Yang; Zhang, Chao; Chen, Hairong; Feng, Jin; Chi, Xiumei; Pan, Yu; Du, Jun; Guo, Min; Cao, Huang; Chen, Honghe; Wang, Zilong; Pei, Rongjuan; Wang, Qian; Pan, Lei; Niu, Junqi; Chen, Xinwen; Tang, Hong

    2014-01-01

    The majority of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection develops chronic infection, which causes steatosis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. However, understanding HCV chronicity and pathogenesis is hampered by its narrow host range, mostly restricted to human and chimpanzee. Recent endeavour to infect a variety of humanized mice has not been able to achieve persistent HCV infection unless the essential innate immune responsive genes are knocked out. Nevertheless, such immune-compromised humanized mice still lacked HCV infection-induced hepatopathogenesis. Here we report that transgenic mice in ICR background harboring both human CD81 and occludin genes (C/OTg) are permissive to HCV infection at a chronicity rate comparable to humans. In this mouse model, HCV accomplishes its replication cycle, leading to sustained viremia and infectivity for more than 12 months post infection with expected fibrotic and cirrhotic progression. Host factors favorable for HCV replication, and inadequate innate immune-response may contribute to the persistence. Lastly, NS3/4 protease inhibitor telaprevir can effectively inhibit de novo RNA synthesis and acute HCV infection of C/OTg mice. Thus, chronic HCV infection with complete replication cycle and hepatopathologic manifestations is recapitulated, for the first time, in immune-competent mice. This model will open a new venue to study the mechanisms of chronic hepatitis C and develop better treatments. PMID:25155355

  14. Stage-specific immunity to Taenia taeniaeformis infection in mice. A histological study of the course of infection in mice vaccinated with either oncosphere or metacestode antigens.

    PubMed

    Bøgh, H O; Lightowlers, M W; Sullivan, N D; Mitchell, G F; Rickard, M D

    1990-03-01

    The course of Taenia taeniaeformis infection in mice previously vaccinated with antigens prepared from either oncosphere (TtO) or metacestode (TtM) was followed by histological examination of livers from mice killed at various times post-infection (p.i.). Distinctly different immune responses occurred in the two groups. Very few cysts were seen at any stage of infection in TtO-vaccinated mice and most of those which were present appeared histologically similar to cysts in control mice. In TtM-vaccinated mice many cysts were present from early in infection but histologically it was apparent that most were dying from 15 days p.i. because the tegument had lost its integrity, and degranulated polymorphonuclear leucocytes were present inside the parasites. These findings support earlier suggestions that stage-specific antigens are expressed in oncospheres and metacestodes. Parasites developing normally were surrounded by a halo of alcian blue staining amorphous acellular material. This material appeared to act as a barrier to attack by host inflammatory cells, and disappearance of this layer signalled death of the parasite. The possibility that the gut acted as a barrier to delay migration of oncospheres to the liver in vaccinated mice was investigated, but no evidence for this could be found.

  15. Behavioral perturbation and sleep in healthy and virus-infected inbred mice.

    PubMed

    Trammell, Rita A; Toth, Linda A

    2014-08-01

    Murine gammaherpesvirus (MuGHV) is a natural pathogen of wild rodents that has been studied extensively in terms of host immune responses to herpesviruses during acute infection, latency, and reactivation from latency. Although herpesvirus infections in people can be associated with fatigue and excessive sleepiness during both acute and latent infection, MuGHV has not been assessed extensively as a model for studying the behavioral consequences of chronic latent herpesvirus infections. To assess MuGHV infection as a model for evaluating fatigue and assessing potential mechanisms that underlie the exacerbation of fatigue during chronic viral disease, we evaluated sleep, temperature, and activity after exposure of healthy and latently MuGHV-infected mice to sleep fragmentation and social interaction. Neither treatment nor infection significantly affected temperature. However, at some time points, latently infected mice that underwent sleep fragmentation had less locomotor activity and more slow-wave sleep than did mice exposed to social interaction. In addition, delta-wave amplitude during slow-wave sleep was lower in infected mice exposed to sleep fragmentation compared with uninfected mice exposed to the same treatment. Both reduced locomotor activity and increased time asleep could indicate fatigue in infected mice after sleep fragmentation; reduced delta-wave amplitude during slow-wave sleep indicates a light plane of sleep from which subjects would be aroused easily. Identifying the mechanisms that underlie sleep responses of mice with chronic latent MuGHV infection may increase our understanding of fatigue during infec- tions and eventually contribute to improving the quality of life for people with chronic viral infections.

  16. Detection of Corynebacterium bovis infection in athymic nude mice from a research animal facility in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Hyoun; Kim, Dong-Su; Han, Ju-Hee; Chang, Seo-Na; Kim, Kyung-Sul; Seok, Seung-Hyeok; Kim, Dong-Jae; Park, Jong-Hwan; Park, Jae-Hak

    2014-12-01

    Corynebacterium (C.) bovis infection in nude mice causes hyperkeratosis and weight loss and has been reported worldwide but not in Korea. In 2011, nude mice from an animal facility in Korea were found to have white flakes on their dorsal skin. Histopathological testing revealed that the mice had hyperkeratosis and Gram-positive bacteria were found in the skin. We identified isolated bacteria from the skin lesions as C. bovis using PCR and 16S rRNA sequencing. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of C. bovis infection in nude mice from Korea.

  17. Latent Herpes Simplex Virus Infections in Sensory Ganglia of Hairless Mice Prevented by Acycloguanosine†

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Richard J.; Friedman-Kien, Alvin E.; DeStefano, Eugene

    1979-01-01

    Acycloguanosine (ACG) was able to prevent the fatal outcome of herpes simplex virus-induced skin infections of the lumbosacral or orofacila area in hairless mice. Topical ACG treatment was more effective than systemic treatment in preventing the evolution of skin lesions. Acute ganglionic infections in the trigeminal ganglia were prevented by ACG, and latent ganglionic infections did not become established when the ACG treatment was initiated 3 h after infection. Serum antibody titers were, on the average, eight times higher in mice which developed latent ganglionic infections after ACG treatment than in mice without evidence of herpes simplex virus latency in ganglia. Reinoculation of ACG-treated mice at a site different from that of the primary inoculation did not lead to the establishment of a second latent infection with the homologous virus type when a latent infection was already present. In mice without evidence of latent infection after the primary inoculation, a latent infection at the site of reinoculation became established in 25% of the animals. PMID:230784

  18. Helminth infections predispose mice to pneumococcal pneumonia but not to other pneumonic pathogens.

    PubMed

    Apiwattanakul, Nopporn; Thomas, Paul G; Kuhn, Raymond E; Herbert, De'Broski R; McCullers, Jonathan A

    2014-10-01

    Pneumonia is the leading killer of children worldwide. Here, we report that helminth-infected mice develop fatal pneumonia when challenged with Streptococcus pneumoniae. Mice were chronically infected with either the flatworm Taenia crassiceps or the roundworm Heligmosomoides polygyrus. Upon challenge with a pneumonic type 3 strain of S. pneumoniae (A66.1), the worm-infected mice developed pneumonia at a rate and to a degree higher than age-matched control mice as measured by bioluminescent imaging and lung titers. This predisposition to pneumonia appears to be specific to S. pneumoniae, as worm-infected mice did not show evidence of increased morbidity when challenged with a lethal dose of influenza virus or sublethal doses of Staphylococcus aureus or Listeria monocytogenes. The defect was also present when worm-infected mice were challenged with a type 2 sepsis-causing strain (D39); an increased rate of pneumonia, decreased survival, and increased lung and blood titers were found. Pneumococcal colonization and immunity against acute otitis media were unaffected. Anti-helminthic treatment in the H. polygyrus model reversed this susceptibility. We conclude that helminth coinfection predisposes mice to fatal pneumococcal pneumonia by promoting increased outgrowth of bacteria in the lungs and blood. These data have broad implications for the prevention and treatment for pneumonia in the developing world, where helminth infections are endemic and pneumococcal pneumonia is common.

  19. Nramp1 Is Not a Major Determinant in the Control of Brucella melitensis Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Guilloteau, Laurence A.; Dornand, Jacques; Gross, Antoine; Olivier, Michel; Cortade, Fabienne; Vern, Yves Le; Kerboeuf, Dominique

    2003-01-01

    Brucella, the causative agent of brucellosis in animals and humans, can survive and proliferate within macrophages. Macrophages mediate mouse resistance to various pathogens through the expression of the Nramp1 gene. The role of this gene in the control of Brucella infection was investigated. When BALB/c mice (Nramp1s) and C.CB congenic mice (Nramp1r) were infected with Brucella melitensis, the number of Brucella organisms per spleen was significantly larger in the C.CB mice than in the BALB/c mice during the first week postinfection (p.i.). This Nramp1-linked susceptibility to Brucella was temporary, since similar numbers of Brucella were recovered from the two strains of mice 2 weeks p.i. The effect of Nramp1 expression occurred within splenocytes intracellularly infected by Brucella. However, there was no difference between in vitro replication rates of Brucella in macrophages isolated from the two strains of mice infected in vivo or in Nramp1 RAW264 transfectants. In mice, infection with Brucella induced an inflammatory response, resulting in splenomegaly and recruitment of phagocytes in the spleen, which was amplified in C.CB mice. Reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR), performed 5 days p.i., showed that inducible nitric oxide synthase, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-12 p40 (IL-12p40), gamma interferon (IFN-γ), and IL-10 mRNAs were similarly induced in spleens of the two strains. In contrast, the mRNA of KC, a C-X-C chemokine, was induced only in infected C.CB mice at this time. This pattern of mRNA expression was maintained at 14 days p.i., with IFN-γ and IL-12p40 mRNAs being more intensively induced in the infected C.CB mice, but TNF-α mRNA was no longer induced. The higher recruitment of neutrophils observed in the spleens of infected C.CB mice could explain the temporary susceptibility of C.CB mice to B. melitensis infection. In contrast to infections with Salmonella, Leishmania, and Mycobacterium, the expression of the Nramp1 gene

  20. Wound infection kinetics probed by MALDI-MS: rapid profiling of Staphylococcus aureus in mice.

    PubMed

    Narayana, Jayaram Lakshmaiah; Gopal, Judy; Wu, Hui-Fen

    2012-07-21

    Using direct matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS), we were able to investigate the role of the clinically important bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus, in wound infections using mice. The infection kinetics of S. aureus at the wound site and the host immune response has been investigated using MALDI-MS. In this study, for the first time, we report the growth pattern of S. aureus infection at a wound site. Using mice wound infection models; the following study fingerprints the bacterial-host (mice) response at the wound site as a function of increasing wound infection in order to establish the infection pattern of Staphylococcus aureus in wounds. The current approach is extremely simple, rapid, highly selective, sensitive and established MALDI-MS as a versatile tool for detecting bacteria in clinical samples, such as those collected from wound sites.

  1. Immunostimulatory nature of beta-glucans and baker's yeast in gnotobiotic Artemia challenge tests.

    PubMed

    Marques, Antonio; Dhont, Jean; Sorgeloos, Patrick; Bossier, Peter

    2006-05-01

    The use of new preventive approaches such as immunostimulants to reduce stress and mortalities, to maintain good health of cultured organisms and to stimulate the non-specific defence mechanism, is becoming increasingly important in aquaculture. Yet detailed analysis reveals that in most experiments the validity of some conclusions with respect to the benefit of immunostimulation is still doubtful, especially in invertebrates. The use of standardized trials under controlled rearing conditions, complemented with fundamental research on defence mechanisms can provide unequivocal evidence for the beneficial effects of immunostimulants in reducing invertebrate susceptibility to diseases or infections. This study investigated the use of small amounts of baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and glucan particles (obtained from baker's yeast) in gnotobiotic Artemia to overcome the pathogenicity of two organisms: Vibrio campbellii and V proteolyticus. Artemia supplemented with small quantities of a yeast strain presenting higher concentrations of beta-glucans or with glucan particles seemed to completely resist the detrimental effects of both pathogens. The higher amount and/or availability of beta-glucans in that yeast might play an essential role in such protection, as most probably glucans stimulate the immune response of the nauplii.

  2. Co-infection with Plasmodium berghei and Trypanosoma brucei increases severity of malaria and trypanosomiasis in mice.

    PubMed

    Ademola, Isaiah Oluwafemi; Odeniran, Paul Olalekan

    2016-07-01

    Individuals in natural populations may be infected with multiple different parasites at a time. These parasites may interact with each other or act independently in the host, and this may result to varying outcomes on host health and survival. This study therefore aimed at investigating the health impact of co-infection of mice with Plasmodium berghei and Trypanosoma brucei. Forty Swiss albino mice (14-17g) were divided into four groups of ten. Mice in groups A and B received 10(6)P. berghei and groups B and C 10(5)T. brucei, while group D were uninfected. The co-infected mice had higher P. berghei and T. brucei parasitaemia, compared with the mono-infected mice. The co-infected mice had significantly (p<0.05) lower survival rate compared with the mono-infected mice. Co-infection of mice with P. berghei and T. brucei resulted in rapid P. berghei and T. brucei development and increased parasitaemia. The leukocyte numbers significantly (p<0.05) reduced on days 12 and 15 post infection among P. berghei infected mice, in the presence or absence of T. brucei. Anaemia and hypoglycaemia was more severe in the co-infected mice. Therefore, co-infection of mice with P. berghei and T. brucei may increase pathologic impact to the host by increasing parasitaemia.

  3. Immune responses in mice against herpes simplex virus: mechanisms of protection against facial and ganglionic infections.

    PubMed Central

    Zweerink, H J; Martinez, D; Lynch, R J; Stanton, L W

    1981-01-01

    We performed experiments with mice to determine the nature of the immune response(s) that prevents primary infections of the skin and the trigeminal ganglia with herpes simplex virus. Immunization with infectious herpes simplex virus, inactivated virus, or material enriched for viral glycoproteins protected hairless mice against primary facial and ganglionic infections. Live and inactivated viruses induced neutralizing antibodies, whereas glycoprotein material did not. Instead, glycoprotein material induced antibodies that were largely directed against two glycopolypeptides with molecular weights of 120,000 to 130,000. Hairless mice immunized with glycoprotein material responded faster than control mice in the synthesis of neutralizing antibodies after challenge with infectious virus. Congenital athymic BALB/c (nu/nu) mice were protected against primary facial infections after immunization with glycoprotein material, but glycoprotein-specific antibodies were not induced. Images PMID:6260662

  4. Protection of mice from infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae by anti-phosphocholine antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Yother, J; Forman, C; Gray, B M; Briles, D E

    1982-01-01

    Anti-phosphocholine (PC) antibody mediated protection against many strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae, and hybridoma anti-PC antibodies protected mice from fatal infections with types 1 and 3 S. pneumoniae. Live types 1, 3, 5, 6A, and 19F S. pneumoniae had similar amounts of surface PC accessible to antibody. Furthermore, mice expressing the X-linked immunodeficiency (xid) of the CBA/N strain were found to be more susceptible to infection with S. pneumoniae of types 3, 6A, and 19F than were immunologically normal mice. The only exception to these results was with the type 5 strain, which was highly virulent for both xid and normal mice. In addition, we were unable to protect mice against infection with the type 5 strain by using anti-PC antibody. PMID:7076292

  5. A regulatory role of interleukin 15 in wound healing and mucosal infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Kagimoto, Yoshiko; Yamada, Hisakata; Ishikawa, Takahiro; Maeda, Naoyoshi; Goshima, Fumi; Nishiyama, Yukihiro; Furue, Masutaka; Yoshikai, Yasunobu

    2008-01-01

    IL-15 plays a critical role in the development and maturation of gammadelta intraepithelial T lymphocytes (IEL), which are known to play important roles in wound healing and resolving inflammation in mice. In this study, we found that IL-15 transgenic (Tg) mice, under the control of a MHC Class I promoter, exhibited accelerated wound healing but were highly susceptible to genital infection with HSV-2. The IEL in the skin and reproductive organs of IL-15 Tg mice produced an aberrantly higher level of TGF-beta1 upon TCR triggering than in control mice. In vivo neutralization of TGF-beta ameliorated the susceptibility of IL-15 Tg mice to genital HSV-2 infection. Taken together, overexpression of IL-15 may stimulate IEL to produce TGF-beta1, promoting wound healing but impeding protection against genital HSV-2 infection.

  6. Effects of muramyl dipeptide treatment on resistance to infection with Toxoplasma gondii in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Krahenbuhl, J L; Sharma, S D; Ferraresi, R W; Remington, J S

    1981-01-01

    Studies were carried out to determine whether treatment of mice with the synthetic adjuvant muramyl dipeptide afforded any resistance to infection with the obligate intracellular protozoan Toxoplasma gondii. Marked resistance to lethal challenge infection was observed in CBA but not C57BL/6 mice pretreated with muramyl dipeptide. In CBA mice, a single muramyl dipeptide treatment administered 14, 7, or 4 days before Toxoplasma challenge did not afford protection, whereas mice treated at -1 day were highly resistant. Additional studies carried out to investigate the mechanisms underlying the enhanced resistance to Toxoplasma in muramyl dipeptide-treated mice failed to reveal either enhanced cytolytic antibodies to the parasite or evidence that peritoneal macrophages from treated mice were activated as determined in vitro by their microbicidal capacity for Toxoplasma or cytotoxic capacity for tumor target cells. PMID:7216470

  7. Evaluation of Nitrofurantoin Combination Therapy of Metronidazole-Sensitive and -Resistant Helicobacter pylori Infections in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Jenks, Peter J.; Ferrero, Richard L.; Tankovic, Jacques; Thiberge, Jean-Michel; Labigne, Agnès

    2000-01-01

    The main objectives of this study were to determine whether the nitroreductase enzyme encoded by the rdxA gene of Helicobacter pylori was responsible for reductive activation of nitrofurantoin and whether a triple-therapy regimen with nitrofurantoin was able to eradicate metronidazole-sensitive and -resistant H. pylori infections from mice. The susceptibilities to nitrofurantoin of parent and isogenic rdxA mutant strains (three pairs), as well as a series of matched metronidazole-sensitive and -resistant strains isolated from mice (30) and patients (20), were assessed by agar dilution determination of the MIC. Groups of mice colonized with the metronidazole-sensitive H. pylori SS1 strain or a metronidazole-resistant rdxA SS1 mutant were treated with either metronidazole or nitrofurantoin as part of a triple-therapy regimen. One month after the completion of treatment the mice were sacrificed and their stomachs were cultured for H. pylori. The nitrofurantoin MICs for all strains tested were between 0.5 and 4.0 μg/ml. There was no significant difference between the susceptibility to nitrofurantoin of the parental strains and those of respective rdxA mutants or between those of matched metronidazole-sensitive and -resistant H. pylori isolates. The regimen with metronidazole eradicated infection from all eight SS1-infected mice and from one of eight mice inoculated with the rdxA mutant (P ≤ 0.001). The regimen with nitrofurantoin failed to eradicate infection from any of the six SS1-infected mice (P ≤ 0.001) and cleared infection from one of seven mice inoculated with the rdxA mutant. These results demonstrate that, despite the good in vitro activity of nitrofurantoin against H. pylori and the lack of cross-resistance between metronidazole and nitrofurantoin, eradication regimens involving nitrofurantoin are unable to eradicate either metronidazole-sensitive or -resistant H. pylori infections from mice. PMID:10991835

  8. Trypanosoma musculi Infections in Normocomplementemic, C5-Deficient, and C3-Depleted Mice

    PubMed Central

    Jarvinen, Julie A.; Dalmasso, Agustin P.

    1977-01-01

    The role of complement in host resistance to infection with Trypanosoma musculi was studied in normal, C5-deficient, and C3-depleted mice. Infections in normocomplementemic strains (CBA and B10.D2/n) were generally similar to those in strains genetically deficient in C5 (A and B10.D2/o). There were no differences in inhibition of reproduction, duration of infection, persistence of parasites in the kidneys, or resistance to reinfection. However, peak parasitemias in B10.D2/o mice were slightly greater than in B10.D2/n mice. In addition, B10.D2/o mice had slightly decreased serum levels of C1 early in the course of infection and of C3 early during the elimination of adult forms. These components were unchanged or increased in infections of B10.D2/n. Depletion of C3 and late-acting components in B10.D2/n mice by treatment with cobra venom factor during the reproductive stage of infection resulted in an increase of reproductive forms before the apparent development of ablastic immunity as well as slightly greater peak parasitemias when compared with those of untreated controls. Cobra venom factor treatment of B10.D2/o mice during the reproductive stage did not alter the course of infection. Cobra venom factor treatment of C3H mice during the adult stage prolonged infections by interfering with parasite elimination. It is concluded that complement-mediated lysis is not involved in control of T. musculi. It is not clear whether a C3-dependent function such as phagocytosis may facilitate elimination of the parasites. The major difference in degree of parasitemias among the various strains of mice studied is due to genetic factors rather than the levels of C3, C5, or late-acting complement components. PMID:863515

  9. Dynamics of antibody production in mice infected with Toxascaris leonina Linstow, 1909.

    PubMed

    Figallová, V; Prokopic, J

    1990-01-01

    Using counterimmunoelectrophoresis and ELISA tests the dynamics of antibody production in serum of mice experimentally infected with Toxascaris leonina was studied. The production of antibodies using both tests has already been detectable in serum of mice from 7 days post infection (DPI) and their level persisted till the end of the experiment, i.e. till 77 DPI. The most positive were reactions of sera with Antigens 1 and 3.

  10. Portal veins of mice infected with Schistosoma mansoni exhibit an increased reactivity to 5-hydroxytryptamine.

    PubMed

    Silva, C L; Morel, N; Noël, F

    1998-01-01

    In chronic severe infection with Schistosoma mansoni, portal hypertension and related vascular alterations usually develop as a consequence of granulomatous response to eggs. In order to investigate a putative direct effect of worms on the reactivity of their host portal vein, mice infected only with male worms were used in the present study. An higher reactivity to 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) characterized by an increase in the maximal contraction and sensitivity was observed in portal vein from infected mice compared to healthy mice. Blockade of NO-synthase with l-NAME induced a small increase in 5-HT potency in portal vein from non-infected mice without changing the amplitude of the contractions, whereas it did not alter the reactivity of veins from infected mice. The present results show that unisexual infection of mice with male S. mansoni increased the reactivity of the portal vein to 5-HT which seems to be partially related to an alteration in the nitric oxide release by endothelium.

  11. Increased reactivity to 5-hydroxytryptamine of portal veins from mice infected with Schistosoma mansoni.

    PubMed

    Silva, C L; Morel, N; Lenzi, H L; Noël, F

    1998-07-01

    In chronic severe infection with Schistosoma mansoni, portal hypertension accompanied by anatomical changes of the portal vasculature can develop as a consequence of granulomatous response to eggs. Mice infected unisexually with male worms were used in the present study in order to investigate a direct effect of worms on the reactivity of their host portal vein. A higher reactivity in the presence of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), but not in the presence of KCl 100 mM solution, was observed in portal vein from infected mice compared to healthy mice. It was characterized by an increase in the maximal contraction and sensitivity to 5-HT. Blockade of NO-synthase with N omega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) induced a small increase in 5-HT potency in the portal vein from non-infected mice, but did not change the amplitude of the contractions. In portal veins from infected mice, preincubation with L-NAME did not affect the reactivity to 5-HT. Histological analysis indicated endothelial damage, subendothelial fibrous plaques, and focal areas of inflammatory infiltrates in the adventitial layer. As a conclusion, these results show that unisexual infection of mice with male S. mansoni increased the reactivity of the portal vein to 5-HT which seems to be only partially related to an alteration in the endothelial production of nitric oxide.

  12. Genetic identification of unique immunological responses in mice infected with virulent and attenuated Francisella tularensis

    PubMed Central

    Kingry, Luke C.; Troyer, Ryan M.; Marlenee, Nicole L.; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, Helle; Bowen, Richard A.; Schenkel, Alan R.; Dow, Steven W.; Slayden, Richard A.

    2010-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is a category A select agent based on its infectivity and virulence but disease mechanisms in Francisella tularensis infection remain poorly understood. Murine pulmonary models of infection were therefore employed to assess and compare dissemination and pathology and to elucidate the host immune response to infection with the highly virulent Type A F. tularensis strain Schu4 versus the less virulent Type B live vaccine strain (LVS). We found that dissemination and pathology in the spleen was significantly greater in mice infected with F. tularensis Schu4 compared to mice infected with F. tularensis LVS. Using gene expression profiling to compare the response to infection with the two F. tularensis strains, we found that there were significant differences in the expression of genes involved in the apoptosis pathway, antigen processing and presentation pathways, and inflammatory response pathways in mice infected with Schu4 when compared to LVS. These transcriptional differences coincided with marked differences in dissemination and severity of organ lesions in mice infected with the Schu4 and LVS strains. Therefore, these findings indicate that altered apoptosis, antigen presentation and production of inflammatory mediators explain the differences in pathogenicity of F. tularensis Schu4 and LVS. PMID:21070859

  13. Enhancement of resistance to Escherichia coli infection in mice by dihydroheptaprenol, a synthetic polyprenol derivative.

    PubMed Central

    Araki, S; Kagaya, K; Kitoh, K; Kimura, M; Fukazawa, Y

    1987-01-01

    The effect of a chemically synthesized polyprenol derivative, dihydroheptaprenol (DHP), on the nonspecific resistance of mice to infection with Escherichia coli was investigated. Mice that had been injected intramuscularly with 100 mg of DHP per kg of body weight, prepared as a microemulsion with lecithin, 1 to 4 days before infection showed enhanced resistance to subcutaneous (s.c.) infection with E. coli. When DHP-injected mice were inoculated s.c. with 3 X 10(8) E. coli, which induces fatal acute systemic infection in normal mice, propagation of bacteria in the blood, liver, and spleen was significantly inhibited. Enhanced resistance of athymic (nude) mice to E. coli infection was also induced by DHP. DHP markedly stimulated the generation of peripheral blood neutrophils, significantly enhanced clearance of E. coli from the bloodstream, and activated neutrophils and peritoneal macrophages for H2O2 generation. DHP restored the resistance to E. coli infection in cyclophosphamide-treated mice over the normal level. Furthermore, DHP shortened the period of the recovery of neutrophils and also enhanced clearance of E. coli from the bloodstream in cyclophosphamide-treated mice. DHP was nontoxic for mice and rats (400 mg/kg intramuscularly and 800 mg/kg s.c.) and nonpyrogenic at a dose of 30 mg/kg when administered intravenously to rabbits. These results suggest that the mechanism of action of DHP for enhancing resistance in mice may be, at least in part, its ability to stimulate the generation of potent neutrophils and to activate macrophages in the reticuloendothelial system. PMID:3114147

  14. Taenia crassiceps infection disrupts estrous cycle and reproductive behavior in BALB/c female mice.

    PubMed

    Arteaga-Silva, Marcela; Vargas-Villavicencio, José Antonio; Vigueras-Villaseñor, Rosa María; Rodríguez-Dorantes, Mauricio; Morales-Montor, Jorge

    2009-02-01

    Previously, it has been shown that parasitic infections are able to alter the normal mammal physiology, at several extents. Thus, we investigated the effects on estrous cycle and sexual behavior induced by intraperitoneal infection with Taenia crassiceps in female host mice. Along the weeks of infection, parasites were collected from the peritoneal cavity of female mice, showing the maximum parasite load at 16 weeks. No parasites were found outside peritoneal cavity. Vaginal estrous cycle was monitored daily for 4, 8, 12 and 16 weeks of infection, and results compared against age-matched female mice. Female sexual behavior (FSB) tests were performed, one test per week. Immediately after the last behavioral test, blood was collected by cardiac puncture for steroid determinations. First of all, there was a strong tissular damage in the female reproductive tract in all infected females. The phases of the estrous cycle were interrupted at 12 and 16 weeks, with increased leukocytes and the presence of a few cornified epithelial cells and nucleated epithelial cells. The FSB decreased starting 6 weeks post infection. On the 16th week, all infected female mice ceased to exhibit sexual responses, and estradiol levels showed a significant decrease. Control mice continued showing FSB and the different phases of the estrous cycle throughout the observation period. Our results strength the notion that parasites may be considered as an evolutionary force in the reproductive ability of mammals.

  15. Host Transcriptional Profiles and Immunopathologic Response following Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Infection in Mice.

    PubMed

    Shin, Min-Kyoung; Park, Hongtae; Shin, Seung Won; Jung, Myunghwan; Lee, Su-Hyung; Kim, Dae-Yong; Yoo, Han Sang

    2015-01-01

    Paratuberculosis or Johne's disease is a chronic granulomatous enteropathy in ruminants caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) infection. In the present study, we examined the host response to MAP infection in spleens of mice in order to investigate the host immunopathology accompanying host-pathogen interaction. Transcriptional profiles of the MAP-infected mice at 3 and 6 weeks p.i. showed severe histopathological changes, whereas those at 12 weeks p.i. displayed reduced lesion severity in the spleen and liver. MAP-infected mice at 3 and 6 weeks p.i. showed up-regulation of interferon-related genes, scavenger receptor, and complement components, suggesting an initial innate immune reaction, such as macrophage activation, bactericidal activity, and macrophage invasion of MAP. Concurrently, MAP-infected mice at 3 and 6 weeks p.i. were also suggested to express M2 macrophage phenotype with up-regulation of Mrc1, and Marco and down-regulation of MHC class II, Ccr7, and Irf5, and canonical pathways related to the T cell response including ICOS-ICOSL signaling in T helper cells, calcium-induced T lymphocyte apoptosis, and CD28 signaling in T helper cell. These results provide information which furthers the understanding of the immunopathologic response to MAP infection in mice, thereby providing insights valuable for research into the pathogenesis for MAP infection.

  16. Host Transcriptional Profiles and Immunopathologic Response following Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Min-Kyoung; Park, Hongtae; Shin, Seung Won; Jung, Myunghwan; Lee, Su-Hyung; Kim, Dae-Yong; Yoo, Han Sang

    2015-01-01

    Paratuberculosis or Johne’s disease is a chronic granulomatous enteropathy in ruminants caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) infection. In the present study, we examined the host response to MAP infection in spleens of mice in order to investigate the host immunopathology accompanying host-pathogen interaction. Transcriptional profiles of the MAP-infected mice at 3 and 6 weeks p.i. showed severe histopathological changes, whereas those at 12 weeks p.i. displayed reduced lesion severity in the spleen and liver. MAP-infected mice at 3 and 6 weeks p.i. showed up-regulation of interferon-related genes, scavenger receptor, and complement components, suggesting an initial innate immune reaction, such as macrophage activation, bactericidal activity, and macrophage invasion of MAP. Concurrently, MAP-infected mice at 3 and 6 weeks p.i. were also suggested to express M2 macrophage phenotype with up-regulation of Mrc1, and Marco and down-regulation of MHC class II, Ccr7, and Irf5, and canonical pathways related to the T cell response including ICOS-ICOSL signaling in T helper cells, calcium-induced T lymphocyte apoptosis, and CD28 signaling in T helper cell. These results provide information which furthers the understanding of the immunopathologic response to MAP infection in mice, thereby providing insights valuable for research into the pathogenesis for MAP infection. PMID:26439498

  17. Hepatitis D Virus Infection of Mice Expressing Human Sodium Taurocholate Co-transporting Polypeptide

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Fengfeng; Jing, Zhiyi; Li, Yunfei; Liu, Yang; Peng, Bo; Yan, Huan; Qi, Yonghe; Sun, Yinyan; Guo, Ju-Tao; Sui, Jianhua; Wang, Fengchao; Li, Wenhui

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis D virus (HDV) is the smallest virus known to infect human. About 15 million people worldwide are infected by HDV among those 240 million infected by its helper hepatitis B virus (HBV). Viral hepatitis D is considered as one of the most severe forms of human viral hepatitis. No specific antivirals are currently available to treat HDV infection and antivirals against HBV do not ameliorate hepatitis D. Liver sodium taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide (NTCP) was recently identified as a common entry receptor for HDV and HBV in cell cultures. Here we show HDV can infect mice expressing human NTCP (hNTCP-Tg). Antibodies against critical regions of HBV envelope proteins blocked HDV infection in the hNTCP-Tg mice. The infection was acute yet HDV genome replication occurred efficiently, evident by the presence of antigenome RNA and edited RNA species specifying large delta antigen in the livers of infected mice. The resolution of HDV infection appears not dependent on adaptive immune response, but might be facilitated by innate immunity. Liver RNA-seq analyses of HDV infected hNTCP-Tg and type I interferon receptor 1 (IFNα/βR1) null hNTCP-Tg mice indicated that in addition to induction of type I IFN response, HDV infection was also associated with up-regulation of novel cellular genes that may modulate HDV infection. Our work has thus proved the concept that NTCP is a functional receptor for HDV infection in vivo and established a convenient small animal model for investigation of HDV pathogenesis and evaluation of antiviral therapeutics against the early steps of infection for this important human pathogen. PMID:25902143

  18. Glucocortiocoid Treatment of MCMV Infected Newborn Mice Attenuates CNS Inflammation and Limits Deficits in Cerebellar Development

    PubMed Central

    Kosmac, Kate; Bantug, Glenn R.; Pugel, Ester P.; Cekinovic, Djurdjica; Jonjic, Stipan; Britt, William J.

    2013-01-01

    Infection of the developing fetus with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a major cause of central nervous system disease in infants and children; however, mechanism(s) of disease associated with this intrauterine infection remain poorly understood. Utilizing a mouse model of HCMV infection of the developing CNS, we have shown that peripheral inoculation of newborn mice with murine CMV (MCMV) results in CNS infection and developmental abnormalities that recapitulate key features of the human infection. In this model, animals exhibit decreased granule neuron precursor cell (GNPC) proliferation and altered morphogenesis of the cerebellar cortex. Deficits in cerebellar cortical development are symmetric and global even though infection of the CNS results in a non-necrotizing encephalitis characterized by widely scattered foci of virus-infected cells with mononuclear cell infiltrates. These findings suggested that inflammation induced by MCMV infection could underlie deficits in CNS development. We investigated the contribution of host inflammatory responses to abnormal cerebellar development by modulating inflammatory responses in infected mice with glucocorticoids. Treatment of infected animals with glucocorticoids decreased activation of CNS mononuclear cells and expression of inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IFN-β and IFNγ) in the CNS while minimally impacting CNS virus replication. Glucocorticoid treatment also limited morphogenic abnormalities and normalized the expression of developmentally regulated genes within the cerebellum. Importantly, GNPC proliferation deficits were normalized in MCMV infected mice following glucocorticoid treatment. Our findings argue that host inflammatory responses to MCMV infection contribute to deficits in CNS development in MCMV infected mice and suggest that similar mechanisms of disease could be responsible for the abnormal CNS development in human infants infected in-utero with HCMV. PMID:23505367

  19. Endogenous gamma interferon, tumor necrosis factor, and interleukin-6 in Staphylococcus aureus infection in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Nakane, A; Okamoto, M; Asano, M; Kohanawa, M; Minagawa, T

    1995-01-01

    The production and roles of endogenous gamma interferon (IFN-gamma), tumor necrosis factor (TNF), and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in both lethal and nonlethal infections of Staphylococcus aureus were investigated in mice. In the case of nonlethal infection, although no bacteria were detected in the bloodstreams, bacteria that colonized and proliferated persistently for 3 weeks were found in the kidneys. All mice given lethal injections died within 7 days, and large numbers of bacteria were detected in the bloodstreams, spleens, and kidneys. The first peaks of IFN-gamma, TNF, and IL-6 were observed in the bloodstreams and spleens of the mice with nonlethal and lethal infections within 24 h. Thereafter, in the nonlethal cases, IFN-gamma, TNF, and IL-6 peaked again in the spleens and kidneys during the period of maximum growth of bacteria in the kidneys, although only IL-6 was detected in the sera. In contrast, in the case of lethal infection, the titers of IFN-gamma and IL-6 in the sera and TNF in the kidneys peaked before death. Effects of in vivo administration of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against IFN-gamma and TNF on the fates of S. aureus-infected mice were studied. In the nonlethal infections, anti-TNF alpha (anti-TNF-alpha) MAb-treated mice, but not anti-IFN-gamma MAb-treated mice, died as a result of worsening infection, suggesting that endogenous TNF plays a protective role in host resistance to S. aureus infection. In the mice that received lethal doses, injection of anti-TNF-alpha MAb accelerated death. However, although injection of anti-IFN-gamma MAb inhibited host resistance of the infected mice early in infection, most of the animals survived the lethal infection by injection of anti-IFN-gamma MAb, suggesting that endogenous IFN-gamma plays a detrimental role in S. aureus infection. Thus, this study demonstrated that IFN-gamma and TNF play different roles in S. aureus infection. PMID:7890367

  20. Reactive oxygen intermediates from eosinophils in mice infected with Hymenolepis nana.

    PubMed

    Niwa, A; Miyazato, T

    1996-06-01

    A large number of eosinophils were recruited to the intestinal villi after infection with Hymenolepis nana. Eosinophil numbers were increased more rapidly in challenged mice than in primary infected mice. Local intestinal eosinophils from challenged mice showed more extracellular oxygen radical release, as assessed by histochemical methods using nitro blue tetrazolium, accompanied with tissue injury and larval degradation. Intestinal eosinophils isolated from the lamina propria induced specific oxygen radical generation in response to H. nana oncosphere extract as measured by luminol-dependent chemiluminescence. This response was stronger in challenged mice than in primary infected mice. Radical generation from uninfected mice was negligible. Lipid peroxidation in the small intestine, as measured by formation of malondialdehyde, was increased during H. nana challenge infection, the peak activity coinciding with the elimination of challenge larvae. Continuous administration of a NADPH oxidase inhibitor to sensitized mice interfered with the degeneration of challenge larvae. These results suggest that intestinal eosinophils may be the major contributor to oxygen radical production in response to H. nana and that reactive oxygen species may play a part of effector molecule in the resistance to reinfection with H. nana.

  1. Hepatic temporal gene expression profiling in Helicobacter hepaticus-infected A/JCr mice.

    PubMed

    Boutin, Samuel R; Rogers, Arlin B; Shen, Zeli; Fry, Rebecca C; Love, Jennifer A; Nambiar, Prashant R; Suerbaum, Sebastian; Fox, James G

    2004-01-01

    Helicobacter hepaticus infection of A/JCr mice is a model of infectious liver cancer. We monitored hepatic global gene expression profiles in H. hepaticus infected and control male A/JCr mice at 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year of age using an Affymetrix-based oligonucleotide microarray platform on the premise that a specific genetic expression signature at isolated time points would be indicative of disease status. Model based expression index comparisons generated by dChip yielded consistent profiles of differential gene expression for H. hepaticus infected male mice with progressive liver disease versus uninfected control mice within each age group. Linear discriminant analysis and principal component analysis allowed segregation of mice based on combined age and lesion status, or age alone. Up-regulation of putative tumor markers correlated with advancing hepatocellular dysplasia. Transcriptionally down-regulated genes in mice with liver lesions included those related to peroxisome proliferator, fatty acid, and steroid metabolism pathways. In conclusion, transcriptional profiling of hepatic genes documented gene expression signatures in the livers of H. hepaticus infected male A/JCr mice with chronic progressive hepatitis and preneoplastic liver lesions, complemented the histopathological diagnosis, and suggested molecular targets for the monitoring and intervention of disease progression prior to the onset of hepatocellular neoplasia.

  2. CHARACTERIZATION OF A CRYPTOSPORIDIUM MURIS INFECTION AND REINFECTION IN CF-1 MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    To establish control values for circulating cells and immune associated organs over the course of a self-limiting Cryptosporidium muris infection and rechallenge infection, mice were evaluated at intervals starting before oral inoculation and ending after oocyst shedding had ceas...

  3. Characterization of Chronic Cutaneous Lesions from TNF-Receptor-1-Deficient Mice Infected by Leishmania major

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Carolina Ferreira; Manzoni-de-Almeida, Daniel; Mello, Paula Seixas; Natale, Caio Cotta; Santiago, Helton da Costa; Miranda, Luíza da Silva; Ferraz, Fernanda Oliveira; dos Santos, Liliane Martins; Teixeira, Mauro Martins; Arantes, Rosa Maria Esteves; Vieira, Leda Quercia

    2012-01-01

    Leishmania major-infected TNF receptor 1 deficient (TNFR1 KO) mice resolve parasitism but fail to resolve lesions, while wild-type mice completely heal. We investigated the cell composition, cytokine production, and apoptosis in lesions from L. major-infected TNFR1 KO and wild-type (WT) mice. Chronic lesions from L. major-infected TNFR1 KO mice presented larger number of CD8+ T and Ly6G+ cells. In addition, higher concentrations of mRNA for IFN-γ CCL2 and CCL5, as well as protein, but lower numbers of apoptotic cells, were found in lesions from TNFR1 KO mice than in WT, at late time points of infection. Our studies showed that persistent lesions in L. major-infected TNFR1 KO mice may be mediated by continuous migration of cells to the site of inflammation due to the presence of chemokines and also by lower levels of apoptosis. We suggest that this model has some striking similarities to the mucocutaneous clinical form of leishmaniasis. PMID:22203861

  4. Efficacy of UK-49,858 (fluconazole) against Candida albicans experimental infections in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Troke, P F; Andrews, R J; Brammer, K W; Marriott, M S; Richardson, K

    1985-01-01

    UK-49,858 (fluconazole), a new, orally absorbed bis-triazole derivative, has been evaluated against systemic infections with Candida albicans in normal and immunosuppressed mice and against an intestinal infection with C. albicans in immunosuppressed mice. Orally administered ketoconazole was used as a comparison agent throughout, and orally administered amphotericin B was included for comparative in the experimental intestinal infection. In a 10-day dosage regimen, UK-49,858 was far more active than ketoconazole against systemic infections with C. albicans in normal and immunosuppressed mice. In normal mice, extension of UK-49,858 dosing to 30 days resulted in prolongation of survival to over 90 days, and up to 60% of treated animals had no detectable C. albicans in their kidneys. In addition, over 90% of mice with intestinal candidiasis had culture-negative feces after a 3-day treatment with UK-49,858, but only 62 and 23% of mice gave this response after amphotericin B and ketoconazole therapy, respectively. These data suggest that UK-49,858 may be of value in the treatment of systemic and gastrointestinal infections due to C. albicans in humans. PMID:3002246

  5. A survey of Toxoplasma gondii and Neospora caninum infecting house mice from a hybrid zone.

    PubMed

    Hůrková-Hofmannová, L; Qablan, M A; Juránková, J; Modrý, D; Piálek, J

    2014-02-01

    Toxoplasma gondii and Neospora caninum are closely related coccidian parasites infecting a wide range of wild and domestic animals as intermediate hosts, and rodents serve as important reservoir hosts during the life cycles of these parasites. The present study is aimed at identifying T. gondii and N. caninum infection in 360 wild house mice (Mus musculus) collected across the Czech-German border, where 2 genetically distinct mouse subspecies meet and hybridize. Toxoplasma gondii or N. caninum DNA was detected in the brains of individual mice by PCR, but mixed infections were never observed. No significant differences in gender or trapping localities were found in the positive mice. The survey reveals a low frequency of T. gondii (0.6%) and N. caninum (3.6%) occurrence in the house mice population of the monitored part of the hybrid zone.

  6. Innate immune responses to human rotavirus in the neonatal gnotobiotic piglet disease model.

    PubMed

    González, Ana M; Azevedo, Marli S P; Jung, Kwonil; Vlasova, Anastasia; Zhang, Wei; Saif, Linda J

    2010-10-01

    Intestinal and systemic dendritic cell (DC) frequencies, serum and small intestinal content cytokines and uptake/binding of human rotavirus (HRV) virus-like particles (VLP) were studied in HRV acutely infected or mock-inoculated neonatal gnotobiotic piglets. Intestinal, mesenteric lymph node (MLN) and splenic plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs), conventional DCs (cDCs) and macrophages/monocytes were assessed by flow cytometry. In infected pigs, serum and small intestinal content interferon-α (IFN-α) were highest, interleukin-12 (IL-12) was lower and IL-10, tumour necrosis factor-α and IL-6 were minimal. Compared with mock-inoculated piglets, frequencies of total intestinal DCs were higher; splenic and MLN DC frequencies were lower. Most intestinal pDCs, but few cDCs, were IFN-α(+) and intestinal macrophages/monocytes were negative for IFN-α. Serum IFN-α levels and IFN-α(+) intestinal pDCs were highly correlated, suggesting IFN-α production in vivo by intestinal pDCs (r=0·8; P<0·01). The intestinal pDCs and cDCs, but not intestinal macrophages/monocytes, of HRV-infected piglets showed significantly lower VLP uptake/binding compared with mock-inoculated piglets, suggesting higher activation of pDCs and cDCs in infected piglets. Both intestinal pDCs and cDCs were activated (IFN-α(+) and lower VLP binding) after HRV infection, suggesting their role in induction of HRV-specific immunity. Dose-effects of HRV on serum IFN-α and IFN-α(+) DCs were studied by infecting piglets with 100-fold higher HRV dose. A high dose increased parameters associated with inflammation (diarrhoea, intestinal pathology) but serum IFN-α and IFN-α(+) DCs were similar between both groups. The pDCs have both anti- and pro-inflammatory functions. Stimulation of the anti-inflammatory effects of pDCs after the high dose, without increasing their pro-inflammatory impacts, may be critical to reduce further immunopathology during HRV infection.

  7. Molecular detection of bacterial contamination in gnotobiotic rodent units

    PubMed Central

    Packey, Christopher D; Shanahan, Michael T; Manick, Sayeed; Bower, Maureen A; Ellermann, Melissa; Tonkonogy, Susan L; Carroll, Ian M; Sartor, R Balfour

    2013-01-01

    Gnotobiotic rodents provide an important technique to study the functional roles of commensal bacteria in host physiology and pathophysiology. To ensure sterility, these animals must be screened frequently for contamination. The traditional screening approaches of culturing and Gram staining feces have inherent limitations, as many bacteria are uncultivable and fecal Gram stains are difficult to interpret. Thus, we developed and validated molecular methods to definitively detect and identify contamination in germ-free (GF) and selectively colonized animals. Fresh fecal pellets were collected from rodents housed in GF isolators, spontaneously contaminated ex-GF isolators, selectively colonized isolators and specific pathogen-free (SPF) conditions. DNA isolated from mouse and rat fecal samples was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and subjected to quantitative PCR (qPCR) using universal primers that amplify the 16S rRNA gene from all bacterial groups. PCR products were sequenced to identify contaminating bacterial species. Random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD) PCR profiles verified bacterial inoculation of selectively colonized animals. These PCR techniques more accurately detected and identified GF isolator contamination than current standard approaches. These molecular techniques can be utilized to more definitively screen GF and selectively colonized animals for bacterial contamination when Gram stain and/or culture results are un-interpretable or inconsistent. PMID:23887190

  8. Experimental Infection of Mice with Hamster Parvovirus: Evidence for Interspecies Transmission of Mouse Parvovirus 3

    PubMed Central

    Christie, Rachel D; Marcus, Emily C; Wagner, April M; Besselsen, David G

    2010-01-01

    Hamster parvovirus (HaPV) was isolated 2 decades ago from hamsters with clinical signs similar to those induced in hamsters experimentally infected with other rodent parvoviruses. Genetically, HaPV is most closely related to mouse parvovirus (MPV), which induces subclinical infection in mice. A novel MPV strain, MPV3, was detected recently in naturally infected mice, and genomic sequence analysis indicates that MPV3 is almost identical to HaPV. The goal of the present studies was to examine the infectivity of HaPV in mice. Neonatal and weanling mice of several mouse strains were inoculated with HaPV. Tissues, excretions, and sera were harvested at 1, 2, 4, and 8 wk after inoculation and evaluated by quantitative PCR and serologic assays specific for HaPV. Quantitative PCR detected viral DNA quantities that greatly exceeded the quantity of virus in inocula in multiple tissues of infected mice. Seroconversion to both nonstructural and structural viral proteins was detected in most immunocompetent mice 2 or more weeks after inoculation with HaPV. In neonatal SCID mice, viral transcripts were detected in lymphoid tissues by RT-PCR and viral DNA was detected in feces by quantitative PCR at 8 wk after inoculation. No clinical signs, gross, or histologic lesions were observed. These findings are similar to those observed in mice infected with MPV. These data support the hypothesis that HaPV and MPV3 are likely variants of the same viral species, for which the mouse is the natural rodent host with rare interspecies transmission to the hamster. PMID:20412687

  9. Experimental infection of mice with hamster parvovirus: evidence for interspecies transmission of mouse parvovirus 3.

    PubMed

    Christie, Rachel D; Marcus, Emily C; Wagner, April M; Besselsen, David G

    2010-04-01

    Hamster parvovirus (HaPV) was isolated 2 decades ago from hamsters with clinical signs similar to those induced in hamsters experimentally infected with other rodent parvoviruses. Genetically, HaPV is most closely related to mouse parvovirus (MPV), which induces subclinical infection in mice. A novel MPV strain, MPV3, was detected recently in naturally infected mice, and genomic sequence analysis indicates that MPV3 is almost identical to HaPV. The goal of the present studies was to examine the infectivity of HaPV in mice. Neonatal and weanling mice of several mouse strains were inoculated with HaPV. Tissues, excretions, and sera were harvested at 1, 2, 4, and 8 wk after inoculation and evaluated by quantitative PCR and serologic assays specific for HaPV. Quantitative PCR detected viral DNA quantities that greatly exceeded the quantity of virus in inocula in multiple tissues of infected mice. Seroconversion to both nonstructural and structural viral proteins was detected in most immunocompetent mice 2 or more weeks after inoculation with HaPV. In neonatal SCID mice, viral transcripts were detected in lymphoid tissues by RT-PCR and viral DNA was detected in feces by quantitative PCR at 8 wk after inoculation. No clinical signs, gross, or histologic lesions were observed. These findings are similar to those observed in mice infected with MPV. These data support the hypothesis that HaPV and MPV3 are likely variants of the same viral species, for which the mouse is the natural rodent host with rare interspecies transmission to the hamster.

  10. Onset of resistance to light Hymenolepis nana infection in mice of different strains.

    PubMed

    Conchedda, M; Gabriele, F; Bortoletti, G; Palmas, C

    1995-04-01

    Rapidity in onset of resistance against Hymenolepis nana egg infection after a light primary infection was studied in low and high responder mice challenged at different time intervals. A very rapid acquisition of protection was observed in C57 and a delayed response in C3H mice. In both cases the effect of resistance on weight or worm number was related to the time of challenge infection, suggesting a "race against time" involving host response and parasite development, the outcome varying according to host genetic background.

  11. Reproduction of epstein-barr virus infection and pathogenesis in humanized mice.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Shigeyoshi

    2014-02-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is etiologically associated with a variety of diseases including lymphoproliferative diseases, lymphomas, carcinomas, and autoimmune diseases. Humans are the only natural host of EBV and limited species of new-world monkeys can be infected with the virus in experimental conditions. Small animal models of EBV infection, required for evaluation of novel therapies and vaccines for EBV-associated diseases, have not been available. Recently the development of severely immunodeficient mouse strains enabled production of humanized mice in which human immune system components are reconstituted and express their normal functions. Humanized mice can serve as infection models for human-specific viruses such as EBV that target cells of the immune system. This review summarizes recent studies by the author's group addressing reproduction of EBV infection and pathogenesis in humanized mice.

  12. Immunomodulatory properties of borage (Echium amoenum) on BALB/c mice infected with Leishmania major.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Nahid; Abolhassani, Mohsen

    2011-06-01

    Leishmaniasis is caused by parasitic protozoa transmitted by the bite of a female sand fly and is currently endemic in 88 countries. BALB/c mice are highly susceptible to the infection with the parasite Leishmania major, and this susceptibility has been attributed, in part, to the expansion of Th2 cells, production of their cytokines, and downregulation of Th1 cytokine, interferon gamma (IFN-γ). In this report, we used both aqueous and alcoholic extracts of Iranian borage (Echium amoenum Fisch & C.A. Mey) for treatment of L. major infection in BALB/c mice. We found that both extracts had immunomodulatory properties and increased the level of IFN-γ and lowered the parasite burden in the proximal lymph nodes and prevented the necrosis of the footpad as compared with the untreated infected mice. These results may provide a basis for further studies directed toward the use of the Iranian borage against L. major infection.

  13. Mechanism of T-cell mediated protection in newborn mice against a Chlamydia infection.

    PubMed

    Pal, Sukumar; de la Maza, Luis M

    2013-01-01

    To determine the immune components needed for protection of newborn mice against Chlamydia muridarum, animals born to Chlamydia-immunized and to sham-immunized dams were infected intranasally with C. muridarum at 2 post-natal days. T-cells isolated from immunized or sham-immunized adult mice were adoptively transferred to newborn mice at the time of infection. Also, to establish what cytokines are involved in protection, IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-10, and IL-12 were passively transferred to newborn mice. To assess the Chlamydia burden in the lungs mice were euthanized at 12 post-natal days. When T-cells from immunized adult mice were transferred, mice born to and fed by immunized dams were significantly protected as evidenced by the reduced number of Chlamydia isolated from the lungs compared to mice born to and fed by sham-immunized dams. Transfer of IFN-γ and TNF-α also significantly reduced the number of Chlamydia in the lungs of mice born to immunized dams. Transfer of IL-10 or IL-12 did not result in a significant reduction of Chlamydia. In vitro T-cell proliferation data suggest that neonatal antigen presenting cells can present Chlamydia antigens to adult T-cells. In conclusion, maternal antibodies and Chlamydia specific T-cells or Th1 cytokines are required for protection of neonates against this pathogen.

  14. Cellular mechanisms involved in the increased contraction of portal veins from Schistosoma mansoni-infected mice.

    PubMed

    Silva, C L M; Lenzi, H L; Silva, V F M; Paulo, F O; Noël, F

    2003-01-01

    We previously reported that portal veins from mice infected with male Schistosoma mansoni exhibited an increased reactivity to 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT). Here, we extended our observations to mice infected by both male and female worms and we further investigated another constrictor agent and the mechanism(s) responsible for the enhanced maximal contraction ( E(max)). Bisexual infection increased the E(max) of 5-HT (from 0.66+/-0.06 mN.s to 1.56+/-0.38 mN.s), in a similar way to the unisexual (male) infection. Infection with male worms increased portal vein reactivity to acetylcholine, as revealed by a higher E(max) (1.03+/-0.2 mN.s) in relation to non-infected control animals ( E(max)= 0.54+/-0.08 mN.s). Sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA) inhibition with 100 nM thapsigargin reduced the E(max) of 5-HT by 35% in both tissues, discharging a deficiency of SERCA pump in infected animals. In contrast, the number of voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels (L-type) was higher in portal veins from infected than non-infected control mice. Inhibition of Ca(2+)-activated chloride channels (Cl(Ca)) with 10 micro M niflumic acid reduced the E(max) of 5-HT in portal veins more from infected than non-infected animals (remaining tension = 60.9+/-2.2% and 70.4+/-2.3%, respectively). Histopathological analysis revealed an increased content of collagen and elastin in portal veins from male S. mansoni-infected mice, compatible with an increased intraluminal pressure. In conclusion, male S. mansoni altered portal vein physiology, increasing the E(max) of two vasoconstrictors, possibly by increasing membrane depolarisation through a more effective opening of Cl(Ca) channels, with calcium entering through L-type Ca(2+) channels.

  15. Borrelia persica Infection in Immunocompetent Mice--A New Tool to Study the Infection Kinetics In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Schwarzer, Sandra; Overzier, Evelyn; Hermanns, Walter; Baneth, Gad; Straubinger, Reinhard K

    2016-02-01

    Borrelia persica, a bacterium transmitted by the soft tick Ornithodoros tholozani, causes tick-borne relapsing fever in humans in the Middle East, Central Asia and the Indian peninsula. Immunocompetent C3H/HeOuJ mice were infected intradermally with B. persica at varying doses: 1 x 10(6), 1 x 10(4), 1 x 10(2) and 4 x 10(0) spirochetes/mouse. Subsequently, blood samples were collected and screened for the presence of B. persica DNA. Spirochetes were detected in all mice infected with 1 x 10(6), 1 x 10(4) and 1 x 10(2) borrelia by real-time PCR targeting the flaB gene of the bacterium. Spirochetemia developed with a one- to two-day delay when 1 x 10(4) and 1 x 10(2) borrelia were inoculated. Mice injected with only four organisms were negative in all tests. No clinical signs were observed when infected mice were compared to negative control animals. Organs (heart, spleen, urinary bladder, tarsal joint, skin and brain) were tested for B. persica-specific DNA and cultured for the detection of viable spirochetes. Compiled data show that the target organs of B. persica infections are the brain and the skin. A newly developed serological two-tiered test system (ELISA and western blot) for the detection of murine IgM, IgG and IgA antibody titers against B. persica showed a vigorous antibody response of the mice during infection. In conclusion, the infection model described here for B. persica is a platform for in vivo studies to decipher the so far unexplored survival strategies of this Borrelia species.

  16. Preterm infant gut microbiota affects intestinal epithelial development in a humanized microbiome gnotobiotic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yueyue; Lu, Lei; Sun, Jun; Petrof, Elaine O; Claud, Erika C

    2016-09-01

    Development of the infant small intestine is influenced by bacterial colonization. To promote establishment of optimal microbial communities in preterm infants, knowledge of the beneficial functions of the early gut microbiota on intestinal development is needed. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of early preterm infant microbiota on host gut development using a gnotobiotic mouse model. Histological assessment of intestinal development was performed. The differentiation of four epithelial cell lineages (enterocytes, goblet cells, Paneth cells, enteroendocrine cells) and tight junction (TJ) formation was examined. Using weight gain as a surrogate marker for health, we found that early microbiota from a preterm infant with normal weight gain (MPI-H) induced increased villus height and crypt depth, increased cell proliferation, increased numbers of goblet cells and Paneth cells, and enhanced TJs compared with the changes induced by early microbiota from a poor weight gain preterm infant (MPI-L). Laser capture microdissection (LCM) plus qRT-PCR further revealed, in MPI-H mice, a higher expression of stem cell marker Lgr5 and Paneth cell markers Lyz1 and Cryptdin5 in crypt populations, along with higher expression of the goblet cell and mature enterocyte marker Muc3 in villus populations. In contrast, MPI-L microbiota failed to induce the aforementioned changes and presented intestinal characteristics comparable to a germ-free host. Our data demonstrate that microbial communities have differential effects on intestinal development. Future studies to identify pioneer settlers in neonatal microbial communities necessary to induce maturation may provide new insights for preterm infant microbial ecosystem therapeutics.

  17. Administration of kefir-fermented milk protects mice against Giardia intestinalis infection.

    PubMed

    Franco, Mariana Correa; Golowczyc, Marina A; De Antoni, Graciela L; Pérez, Pablo F; Humen, Martín; Serradell, María de los Angeles

    2013-12-01

    Giardiasis, caused by the protozoan Giardia intestinalis, is one of the most common intestinal diseases worldwide and constitutes an important problem for the public health systems of various countries. Kefir is a probiotic drink obtained by fermenting milk with 'kefir grains', which consist mainly of bacteria and yeasts that coexist in a complex symbiotic association. In this work, we studied the ability of kefir to protect mice from G. intestinalis infection, and characterized the host immune response to this probiotic in the context of the intestinal infection. Six- to 8-week-old C75BL/6 mice were separated into four groups: controls, kefir mice (receiving 1 : 100 dilution of kefir in drinking water for 14 days), Giardia mice (infected orally with 4×10(7) trophozoites of G. intestinalis at day 7) and Giardia-kefir mice (kefir-treated G. intestinalis-infected mice), and killed at 2 or 7 days post-infection. Kefir administration was able to significantly reduce the intensity of Giardia infection at 7 days post-infection. An increase in the percentage of CD4(+) T cells at 2 days post-infection was observed in the Peyer's patches (PP) of mice belonging to the Giardia group compared with the control and kefir groups, while the percentage of CD4(+) T cells in PP in the Giardia-kefir group was similar to that of controls. At 2 days post-infection, a reduction in the percentage of B220-positive major histocompatibility complex class II medium cells in PP was observed in infected mice compared with the other groups. At 7 days post-infection, Giardia-infected mice showed a reduction in RcFcε-positive cells compared with the control group, suggesting a downregulation of the inflammatory response. However, the percentages of RcFcε-positive cells did not differ from controls in the kefir and Giardia-kefir groups. An increase in IgA-positive cells was observed in the lamina propria of the kefir group compared with controls at 2 days post-infection. Interestingly, the

  18. Escherichia coli strains colonising the gastrointestinal tract protect germfree mice against Salmonella typhimurium infection

    PubMed Central

    Hudault, S; Guignot, J; Servin, A

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Escherichia coli is part of the normal gastrointestinal microflora which exerts a barrier effect against enteropathogens. Several E coli strains develop a protective effect against other Enterobacteriaceae.
AIMS—Two E coli strains, EM0, a human faecal strain, and JM105 K-12 were tested for their ability to prevent in vivo and in vitro infection by Salmonella typhimurium C5.
METHODS—Inhibition of C5 cell invasion by E coli was investigated in vitro using Caco-2/TC7 cells. The protective effect of E coli was examined in vivo in germfree or conventional C3H/He/Oujco mice orally infected by the lethal strain C5.
RESULTS—EMO expresses haemolysin and cytotoxic necrotising factor in vitro. In vitro, the two strains did not prevent the growth of C5 by secreted microcins or modified cell invasion of C5. In vivo, establishment of EM0 or JM105 in the gut of germfree mice resulted in a significant increase in the number of surviving mice: 11/12 and 9/12, respectively, at 58 days after infection (2×106/mouse) versus 0/12 in control germfree group at 13 days after infection. Colonisation level and translocation rate of C5 were significantly reduced during the three days after infection. In contrast, no reduction in faecal C5 excretion was observed in C5 infected conventional mice (1×108/mouse) receiving the EM0 or JM105 cultures daily.
CONCLUSIONS—Establishment of E coli strains, which do not display antimicrobial activity, protects germfree mice against infection and delays the establishment of C5 in the gut. Possible mechanisms of defence are discussed.


Keywords: Escherichia coli; gastrointestinal infection; Salmonella; germfree mice; bacterial antagonism PMID:11413110

  19. Antimalarial Potential of Carica papaya and Vernonia amygdalina in Mice Infected with Plasmodium berghei

    PubMed Central

    Habila, Nathan; Ikwebe, Joseph; Upev, Vincent A.; Isaac, Omiagocho T.

    2016-01-01

    The study determined if administration of Vernonia amygdalina and Carica papaya plants provides synergistic effects in ameliorating plasmodium infection in mice. Thirty mice (17.88–25.3 g) were divided into 6 groups of 5 mice each. Group 1 was normal control, while groups 2–6 were intraperitoneally inoculated 2.5 × 107 Plasmodium berghei parasitized red blood cell, followed by daily administration of 350 mg/kg aqueous leaf extracts after establishment of infection. Group 2 was disease control, while group 6 was treated with standard drug for four consecutive days. The results showed significant (P < 0.05) reduction in percentage of parasite load between the infected treatment groups and disease control group at day 3 after infection, which remained consistent until the end of the experiment. All infected treated groups showed significant (P < 0.05) increases in RBC and PCV recovery compared to the disease control, with the exception of WBC. There was insignificant (P > 0.05) change in mean body weight of all treated groups except in disease control group. Histological studies of the infected mice indicate recovery of hepatic cells from congested black pigmentation. The reduction in parasite load and recovery of hepatic cell damage/hematological parameters were induced by these plant extracts. This highlighted the important usage of the plant in traditional remedy of malaria infection. PMID:28042299

  20. Role of neutrophils in response to Bordetella pertussis infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Andreasen, Charlotte; Carbonetti, Nicholas H

    2009-03-01

    Pertussis is an acute respiratory disease caused by the bacterium Bordetella pertussis, for which humans are the only known reservoir. During infection, B. pertussis releases several toxins, including pertussis toxin (PT) and adenylate cyclase toxin (ACT), which have both been shown to play roles in promoting bacterial growth during early infection in a mouse model. Furthermore, in vitro and in vivo studies suggest that PT and ACT affect neutrophil chemotaxis and/or function, thereby altering the innate immune response. In this study we depleted animals of neutrophils to investigate whether neutrophils play a protective role during B. pertussis infection in mice. In addition, by infection with toxin-deficient strains, we investigated whether neutrophils are the main targets for PT and/or ACT activity in promoting bacterial growth. Surprisingly, we found no role for neutrophils during B. pertussis infection in naïve mice. However, in previously infected (immune) mice or in mice receiving immune serum, we observed a significant role for neutrophils during infection. Furthermore, in this immune mouse model our evidence indicates that neutrophils appear to be the main target cells for ACT, but not for PT.

  1. Antimalarial Potential of Carica papaya and Vernonia amygdalina in Mice Infected with Plasmodium berghei.

    PubMed

    Okpe, Oche; Habila, Nathan; Ikwebe, Joseph; Upev, Vincent A; Okoduwa, Stanley I R; Isaac, Omiagocho T

    2016-01-01

    The study determined if administration of Vernonia amygdalina and Carica papaya plants provides synergistic effects in ameliorating plasmodium infection in mice. Thirty mice (17.88-25.3 g) were divided into 6 groups of 5 mice each. Group 1 was normal control, while groups 2-6 were intraperitoneally inoculated 2.5 × 10(7)Plasmodium berghei parasitized red blood cell, followed by daily administration of 350 mg/kg aqueous leaf extracts after establishment of infection. Group 2 was disease control, while group 6 was treated with standard drug for four consecutive days. The results showed significant (P < 0.05) reduction in percentage of parasite load between the infected treatment groups and disease control group at day 3 after infection, which remained consistent until the end of the experiment. All infected treated groups showed significant (P < 0.05) increases in RBC and PCV recovery compared to the disease control, with the exception of WBC. There was insignificant (P > 0.05) change in mean body weight of all treated groups except in disease control group. Histological studies of the infected mice indicate recovery of hepatic cells from congested black pigmentation. The reduction in parasite load and recovery of hepatic cell damage/hematological parameters were induced by these plant extracts. This highlighted the important usage of the plant in traditional remedy of malaria infection.

  2. Petiveria alliacea L. extract protects mice against Listeria monocytogenes infection--effects on bone marrow progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Quadros, M R; Souza Brito, A R; Queiroz, M L

    1999-02-01

    In this study we have investigated the effects of Petiveria alliacea on the hematopoietic response of mice infected with Listeria monocytogenes. Our results demonstrate a protective effect of the crude extract of P. alliacea since the survival of the treated/infected was higher than that in the infected group. Moreover, the number of granulocyte/macrophage colonies (CFU-GM) and the serum colony stimulating activity levels were increased in the treated/infected mice in relation to the infected group. These results suggest an immunomodulation of Petiveria alliacea extract on hematopoiesis, which may be responsible, at least in part, for the increased resistance of mice to Listeria monocytogenes infection.

  3. A Tetraspecific VHH-Based Neutralizing Antibody Modifies Disease Outcome in Three Animal Models of Clostridium difficile Infection

    PubMed Central

    Beamer, Gillian; Tremblay, Jacqueline M.; Steele, Jennifer A.; Kim, Hyeun Bum; Wang, Yaunkai; Debatis, Michele; Sun, Xingmin; Kashentseva, Elena A.; Dmitriev, Igor P.; Curiel, David T.; Shoemaker, Charles B.

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), a leading cause of nosocomial infection, is a serious disease in North America, Europe, and Asia. CDI varies greatly from asymptomatic carriage to life-threatening diarrhea, toxic megacolon, and toxemia. The incidence of community-acquired infection has increased due to the emergence of hypervirulent antibiotic-resistant strains. These new strains contribute to the frequent occurrence of disease relapse, complicating treatment, increasing hospital stays, and increasing morbidity and mortality among patients. Therefore, it is critical to develop new therapeutic approaches that bypass the development of antimicrobial resistance and avoid disruption of gut microflora. Here, we describe the construction of a single heteromultimeric VHH-based neutralizing agent (VNA) that targets the two primary virulence factors of Clostridium difficile, toxins A (TcdA) and B (TcdB). Designated VNA2-Tcd, this agent has subnanomolar toxin neutralization potencies for both C. difficile toxins in cell assays. When given systemically by parenteral administration, VNA2-Tcd protected against CDI in gnotobiotic piglets and mice and to a lesser extent in hamsters. Protection from CDI was also observed in gnotobiotic piglets treated by gene therapy with an adenovirus that promoted the expression of VNA2-Tcd. PMID:27413067

  4. Pilot-Scale Pulsed UV Light Irradiation of Experimentally Infected Raspberries Suppresses Cryptosporidium parvum Infectivity in Immunocompetent Suckling Mice.

    PubMed

    Le Goff, L; Hubert, B; Favennec, L; Villena, I; Ballet, J J; Agoulon, A; Orange, N; Gargala, G

    2015-12-01

    Cryptosporidium spp., a significant cause of foodborne infection, have been shown to be resistant to most chemical food disinfectant agents and infective for weeks in irrigation waters and stored fresh vegetal produce. Pulsed UV light (PL) has the potential to inactivate Cryptosporidium spp. on surfaces of raw or minimally processed foods or both. The present study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of PL on viability and in vivo infectivity of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts present on raspberries, a known source of transmission to humans of oocyst-forming apicomplexan pathogens. The skin of each of 20 raspberries was experimentally inoculated with five 10-μl spots of an oocyst suspension containing 6 × 10(7) oocysts per ml (Nouzilly isolate). Raspberries were irradiated by PL flashes (4 J/cm(2) of total fluence). This dose did not affect colorimetric or organoleptic characteristics of fruits. After immunomagnetic separation from raspberries, oocysts were bleached and administered orally to neonatal suckling mice. Seven days after infection, mice were euthanized, and the number of oocysts in the entire small intestine was individually assessed by immunofluorescence flow cytometry. Three of 12 and 12 of 12 inoculated mice that received 10 and 100 oocysts isolated from nonirradiated raspberries, respectively, were found infected. Four of 12 and 2 of 12 inoculated mice that received 10(3) and 10(4) oocysts from irradiated raspberries, respectively, were found infected. Oocyst counts were lower in animals inoculated with 10(3) and 10(4) oocysts from irradiated raspberries (92 ± 144 and 38 ± 82, respectively) than in animals infected with 100 oocysts from nonirradiated raspberries (35,785 ± 66,221, P = 0.008). PL irradiation achieved oocyst reductions of 2 and 3 log for an inoculum of 10(3) and 10(4) oocysts, respectively. The present pilot-scale evaluation suggests that PL is an effective mode of decontamination for raspberries and prompts further applicability

  5. Noninvasive biophotonic imaging for monitoring of catheter-associated urinary tract infections and therapy in mice.

    PubMed

    Kadurugamuwa, Jagath L; Modi, Kshitij; Yu, Jun; Francis, Kevin P; Purchio, Tony; Contag, Pamela R

    2005-07-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are among the most common bacterial infections acquired by humans, particularly in catheterized patients. A major problem with catheterization is the formation of bacterial biofilms on catheter material and the risk of developing persistent UTIs that are difficult to monitor and eradicate. To better understand the course of UTIs and allow more accurate studies of in vivo antibiotic efficacy, we developed a catheter-based biofilm infection model with mice, using bioluminescently engineered bacteria. Two important urinary tract pathogens, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Proteus mirabilis, were made bioluminescent by stable insertion of a complete lux operon. Segments of catheter material (precolonized or postimplant infected) with either pathogen were placed transurethrally in the lumen of the bladder by using a metal stylet without surgical manipulation. The bioluminescent strains were sufficiently bright to be readily monitored from the outside of infected animals, using a low-light optical imaging system, including the ability to trace the ascending pattern of light-emitting bacteria through ureters to the kidneys. Placement of the catheter in the bladder not only resulted in the development of strong cystitis that persisted significantly longer than in mice challenged with bacterial suspensions alone but also required prolonged antibiotic treatment to reduce the level of infection. Treatment of infected mice for 4 days with ciprofloxacin at 30 mg/kg of body weight twice a day cured cystitis and renal infection in noncatheterized mice. Similarly, ciprofloxacin reduced the bacterial burden to undetectable levels in catheterized mice but did not inhibit rebound of the infection upon cessation of antibiotic therapy. This methodology easily allows spatial information to be monitored sequentially throughout the entire disease process, including ascending UTI, treatment efficacy, and relapse, all without exogenous sampling, which is not

  6. Contribution of dopamine neurotransmission in proconvulsant effect of Toxoplasma gondii infection in male mice.

    PubMed

    Babaie, Jalal; Sayyah, Mohammad; Fard-Esfahani, Pezhman; Golkar, Majid; Gharagozli, Kourosh

    2017-03-07

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurologic disorders worldwide with no distinguishable cause in 60% of patients. One-third of world's population is infected with Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii). This intracellular parasite has high tendency to excitable cells including neurons. We assessed seizure susceptibility and involvement of dopaminergic system in male mice with acute and chronic T. gondii infection. Mice were infected by intraperitoneal injection of T. gondii cysts. Acute and chronic stages of infection were determined by quantification of SAG1/BAG1 transcripts and level of repetitive REP-529 sequence in the brain of mice by real-time PCR. Threshold of clonic seizures was measured by tail vein infusion of pentylenetetrazole. The infected mice were pretreated with D1 and D2 dopamine receptor antagonists, and seizure threshold was measured. Moreover, seizure threshold was determined after treatment of toxoplasmosis by sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim. SAG1 level reached the maximum at week 2 after infection and then declined. The maximum level of BAG1 was observed at the week 3 and preserved till the week 8. REP-529 was detected at first week after infection, reached maximum at the week 3 and kept at this level till the eighth week. Threshold of seizures significantly decreased in both acute and chronic phases of infection. D1 and D2 receptors antagonists inhibited proconvulsant effect of toxoplasmosis. Chemotherapy inhibited parasite growth and multiplication, and returned seizure susceptibility to the level of non-infected mice. Dopaminergic neurotransmission participates in proconvulsant effect of T. gondii. The effect of parasite is eliminated by antibiotic therapy. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Heme oxygenase-1 regulates the immune response to influenza virus infection and vaccination in aged mice

    PubMed Central

    Cummins, Nathan W.; Weaver, Eric A.; May, Shannon M.; Croatt, Anthony J.; Foreman, Oded; Kennedy, Richard B.; Poland, Gregory A.; Barry, Michael A.; Nath, Karl A.; Badley, Andrew D.

    2012-01-01

    Underlying mechanisms of individual variation in severity of influenza infection and response to vaccination are poorly understood. We investigated the effect of reduced heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression on vaccine response and outcome of influenza infection. HO-1-deficient and wild-type (WT) mice (kingdom, Animalia; phylum, Chordata; genus/species, Mus musculus) were infected with influenza virus A/PR/8/34 with or without prior vaccination with an adenoviral-based influenza vaccine. A genome-wide association study evaluated the expression of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the HO-1 gene and the response to influenza vaccination in healthy humans. HO-1-deficient mice had decreased survival after influenza infection compared to WT mice (median survival 5.5 vs. 6.5 d, P=0.016). HO-1-deficient mice had impaired production of antibody following influenza vaccination compared to WT mice (mean antibody titer 869 vs. 1698, P=0.02). One SNP in HO-1 and one SNP in the constitutively expressed isoform HO-2 were independently associated with decreased antibody production after influenza vaccination in healthy human volunteers (P=0.017 and 0.014, respectively). HO-1 deficient mice were paired with sex- and age-matched WT controls. HO-1 affects the immune response to both influenza infection and vaccination, suggesting that therapeutic induction of HO-1 expression may represent a novel adjuvant to enhance influenza vaccine effectiveness.—Cummins, N. W., Weaver, E. A., May, S. M., Croatt, A. J., Foreman, O., Kennedy, R. B., Poland, G. A., Barry, M. A., Nath, K. A., Badley, A. D. Heme oxygenase-1 regulates the immune response to influenza virus infection and vaccination in aged mice. PMID:22490782

  8. Vaginal chlamydial clearance following primary or secondary infection in mice occurs independently of TNF-α.

    PubMed

    Kamalakaran, Sangamithra; Chaganty, Bharat K R; Gupta, Rishein; Guentzel, M Neal; Chambers, James P; Murthy, Ashlesh K; Arulanandam, Bernard P

    2013-01-01

    The role of TNF-α in chlamydial clearance is uncertain. Antibody-mediated depletion of TNF-α in mice and guinea pigs has been shown not to significantly affect chlamydial clearance, whereas production of TNF-α in addition to IFN-γ from T cells has been shown to correlate with enhanced clearance. The aim of our study is to evaluate the mechanistic role of TNF-α in clearance of primary and secondary chlamydial infection from the genital tract (GT) using C57BL/6 TNF-α deficient (TNF-α(-/-)) and wild type (WT) mice. Chlamydial shedding from the lower GT was evaluated following primary and secondary intravaginal challenge. Also, antibody and antigen specific cytokine responses were analyzed from the infected GT and spleens, and oviduct pathology determined to analyze the role of TNF-α in upper GT pathological sequelae. MHC II(-/-) mice, known to display muted adaptive immune responses and failure to resolve genital chlamydial infections, were used as a negative control. Following both primary and secondary genital chlamydial infection, TNF-α(-/-) mice exhibited elevated granzyme B production, but similar IFN-γ and antibody responses. Importantly, absence of TNF-α did not significantly alter the resolution of infection. However, TNF-α(-/-) mice displayed significantly reduced upper genital tract (UGT) pathology compared to WT mice. This study demonstrates mechanistically that optimal chlamydial clearance following primary and secondary chlamydial genital infection can occur in the complete absence of TNF-α, and considered with the reduction of upper GT pathology in TNF-α(-/-) mice, suggests that targeted induction of anti-chlamydial TNF-α responses by vaccination may be unnecessary, and moreover could be potentially pathogenic.

  9. Vaginal chlamydial clearance following primary or secondary infection in mice occurs independently of TNF-α

    PubMed Central

    Kamalakaran, Sangamithra; Chaganty, Bharat K. R.; Gupta, Rishein; Guentzel, M. Neal; Chambers, James P.; Murthy, Ashlesh K.; Arulanandam, Bernard P.

    2013-01-01

    The role of TNF-α in chlamydial clearance is uncertain. Antibody-mediated depletion of TNF-α in mice and guinea pigs has been shown not to significantly affect chlamydial clearance, whereas production of TNF-α in addition to IFN-γ from T cells has been shown to correlate with enhanced clearance. The aim of our study is to evaluate the mechanistic role of TNF-α in clearance of primary and secondary chlamydial infection from the genital tract (GT) using C57BL/6 TNF-α deficient (TNF-α−/−) and wild type (WT) mice. Chlamydial shedding from the lower GT was evaluated following primary and secondary intravaginal challenge. Also, antibody and antigen specific cytokine responses were analyzed from the infected GT and spleens, and oviduct pathology determined to analyze the role of TNF-α in upper GT pathological sequelae. MHC II−/− mice, known to display muted adaptive immune responses and failure to resolve genital chlamydial infections, were used as a negative control. Following both primary and secondary genital chlamydial infection, TNF-α−/− mice exhibited elevated granzyme B production, but similar IFN-γ and antibody responses. Importantly, absence of TNF-α did not significantly alter the resolution of infection. However, TNF-α−/− mice displayed significantly reduced upper genital tract (UGT) pathology compared to WT mice. This study demonstrates mechanistically that optimal chlamydial clearance following primary and secondary chlamydial genital infection can occur in the complete absence of TNF-α, and considered with the reduction of upper GT pathology in TNF-α−/− mice, suggests that targeted induction of anti-chlamydial TNF-α responses by vaccination may be unnecessary, and moreover could be potentially pathogenic. PMID:23483844

  10. IL-10 regulates viral lung immunopathology during acute respiratory syncytial virus infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Loebbermann, Jens; Schnoeller, Corinna; Thornton, Hannah; Durant, Lydia; Sweeney, Nathan P; Schuijs, Martijn; O'Garra, Anne; Johansson, Cecilia; Openshaw, Peter J

    2012-01-01

    Interleukin (IL-) 10 is a pleiotropic cytokine with broad immunosuppressive functions, particularly at mucosal sites such as the intestine and lung. Here we demonstrate that infection of BALB/c mice with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) induced IL-10 production by CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells in the airways at later time points (e.g. day 8); a proportion of these cells also co-produced IFN-γ. Furthermore, RSV infection of IL-10(-/-) mice resulted in more severe disease with enhanced weight loss, delayed recovery and greater cell infiltration of the respiratory tract without affecting viral load. In addition, IL-10(-/-) mice had a pronounced airway neutrophilia and heightened levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Notably, the proportion of lung T cells producing IFN-γ was enhanced, suggesting that IL-10 may act in an autocrine manner to dampen effector T cell responses. Similar findings were made in mice treated with anti-IL-10R antibody and infected with RSV. Therefore, IL-10 inhibits disease and inflammation in mice infected with RSV, especially during recovery from infection.

  11. Migration of epithelial cells in the small intestine of mice perorally infected with coxsackievirus B5.

    PubMed

    Shadoff, N; Loria, R M; Kibrick, S; Broitman, S A

    1979-03-01

    The rate of cell migration in the small intestine during enteric viral infections has not been assessed previously. CD-1 mice (33 days old) were infected perorally with 1.0 X 10(8) plague-forming units of coxsackievirus B5 and 12 hr later were injected intraperitoneally with 2 micron Ci of [3H]thymidine/g of body weight. After 2, 12, 24, 48, 60, and 72 hr, mice were killed, and the small intestine was removed. Specimens obtained at each interval were examined by radioautography; similar specimens were titrated for virus by plaque assay in HeLa cells. In mice perorally infected with coxsackievirus B5, epithelial cells migrated from crypt to villus tip in 60 hr, as compared with 48 hr in uninfected control mice and 24 hr previously reported for mice perorally infected with enteric bacteria (e.g., Salmonella typhimurium). Virus was recovered from intestinal tissue, but no inflammatory response in the limina propria was apparent. These observations are consistent with previous report that substrate absorption rates may be altered during viral and bacterial enteric infection.

  12. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles exacerbate pneumonia in respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)-infected mice.

    PubMed

    Hashiguchi, Seiko; Yoshida, Hiroki; Akashi, Toshi; Komemoto, Keiji; Ueda, Tomoyuki; Ikarashi, Yoshiaki; Miyauchi, Aki; Konno, Katsuhiko; Yamanaka, Sayoko; Hirose, Akihiko; Kurokawa, Masahiko; Watanabe, Wataru

    2015-03-01

    To reveal the effects of TiO2 nanoparticles, used in cosmetics and building materials, on the immune response, a respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection mouse model was used. BALB/c mice were exposed once intranasally to TiO2 at 0.5mg/kg and infected intranasally with RSV five days later. The levels of IFN-γ and chemokine CCL5, representative markers of pneumonia, in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluids of RSV-infected mice had increased significantly in TiO2-exposed mice compared with the control on day 5 post-infection, but not in uninfected mice. While pulmonary viral titers were not affected by TiO2 exposure, an increase in the infiltration of lymphocytes into the alveolar septa in lung tissues was observed. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed aggregation of TiO2 nanoparticles near inflammatory cells in the severely affected region. Thus, a single exposure to TiO2 nanoparticles affected the immune system and exacerbated pneumonia in RSV-infected mice.

  13. Impaired NLRP3 inflammasome function in elderly mice during influenza infection is rescued by treatment with nigericin.

    PubMed

    Stout-Delgado, Heather W; Vaughan, Sarah E; Shirali, Anushree C; Jaramillo, Richard J; Harrod, Kevin S

    2012-03-15

    The NLRP3 inflammasome is activated in the lung during influenza viral infection; however, the impact of aging on inflammasome function during influenza infection has not been examined. In this study, we show that elderly mice infected with a mouse-adapted strain of influenza produced lower levels of IL-1β during in vitro and in vivo infection. Dendritic cells from elderly mice exhibited decreased expression of ASC, NLRP3, and capase-1 but increased expression of pro-IL-1β, pro-IL-18, and pro-IL-33 compared with dendritic cells from young infected mice. Treatment with nigericin during influenza infection augmented IL-1β production, increased caspase-1 activity, and decreased morbidity and mortality in elderly mice. Our study demonstrates for the first time, to our knowledge, that during influenza viral infection, elderly mice have impaired NLRP3 inflammasome activity and that treatment with nigericin rescues NLRP3 activation in elderly hosts.

  14. Impaired NLRP3 Inflammasome Function in Elderly Mice during Influenza Infection is Rescued by Treatment with Nigericin1

    PubMed Central

    Stout-Delgado, Heather W.; Vaughan, Sarah E.; Shirali, Anushree C.; Jaramillo, Richard J.; Harrod, Kevin S.

    2012-01-01

    The NLRP3 inflammasome is activated in the lung during influenza viral infection; however the impact of aging on inflammasome function during influenza infection has not been examined. Here, we show that elderly mice infected with a mouse adapted strain of influenza produced lower levels of IL-1β during in vitro and in vivo infection. Dendritic cells from elderly mice exhibited decreased expression of ASC, NLRP3, and capase-1, but increased expression of pro-IL-1β, pro-IL-18, and pro-IL-33 when compared to young infected mice. Treatment with nigericin during influenza infection augmented IL-1β production, increased caspase-1 activity, and decreased morbidity and mortality in elderly mice. Our study demonstrates for the first time that during influenza viral infection, elderly mice have impaired NLRP3 inflammasome activity and that treatment with nigericin rescues NLRP3 activation in elderly hosts. PMID:22327078

  15. Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Humanized Mice Infected with HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Nusbaum, Rebecca J.; Calderon, Veronica E.; Huante, Matthew B.; Sutjita, Putri; Vijayakumar, Sudhamathi; Lancaster, Katrina L.; Hunter, Robert L.; Actor, Jeffrey K.; Cirillo, Jeffrey D.; Aronson, Judith; Gelman, Benjamin B.; Lisinicchia, Joshua G.; Valbuena, Gustavo; Endsley, Janice J.

    2016-01-01

    Co-infection with HIV increases the morbidity and mortality associated with tuberculosis due to multiple factors including a poorly understood microbial synergy. We developed a novel small animal model of co-infection in the humanized mouse to investigate how HIV infection disrupts pulmonary containment of Mtb. Following dual infection, HIV-infected cells were localized to sites of Mtb-driven inflammation and mycobacterial replication in the lung. Consistent with disease in human subjects, we observed increased mycobacterial burden, loss of granuloma structure, and increased progression of TB disease, due to HIV co-infection. Importantly, we observed an HIV-dependent pro-inflammatory cytokine signature (IL-1β, IL-6, TNFα, and IL-8), neutrophil accumulation, and greater lung pathology in the Mtb-co-infected lung. These results suggest that in the early stages of acute co-infection in the humanized mouse, infection with HIV exacerbates the pro-inflammatory response to pulmonary Mtb, leading to poorly formed granulomas, more severe lung pathology, and increased mycobacterial burden and dissemination. PMID:26908312

  16. Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Humanized Mice Infected with HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Nusbaum, Rebecca J; Calderon, Veronica E; Huante, Matthew B; Sutjita, Putri; Vijayakumar, Sudhamathi; Lancaster, Katrina L; Hunter, Robert L; Actor, Jeffrey K; Cirillo, Jeffrey D; Aronson, Judith; Gelman, Benjamin B; Lisinicchia, Joshua G; Valbuena, Gustavo; Endsley, Janice J

    2016-02-24

    Co-infection with HIV increases the morbidity and mortality associated with tuberculosis due to multiple factors including a poorly understood microbial synergy. We developed a novel small animal model of co-infection in the humanized mouse to investigate how HIV infection disrupts pulmonary containment of Mtb. Following dual infection, HIV-infected cells were localized to sites of Mtb-driven inflammation and mycobacterial replication in the lung. Consistent with disease in human subjects, we observed increased mycobacterial burden, loss of granuloma structure, and increased progression of TB disease, due to HIV co-infection. Importantly, we observed an HIV-dependent pro-inflammatory cytokine signature (IL-1β, IL-6, TNFα, and IL-8), neutrophil accumulation, and greater lung pathology in the Mtb-co-infected lung. These results suggest that in the early stages of acute co-infection in the humanized mouse, infection with HIV exacerbates the pro-inflammatory response to pulmonary Mtb, leading to poorly formed granulomas, more severe lung pathology, and increased mycobacterial burden and dissemination.

  17. Schistosoma mansoni experimental infection in Mus spretus (SPRET/EiJ strain) mice

    PubMed Central

    Pérez del Villar, Luis; Vicente, Belén; Galindo-Villardón, Purificación; Castellanos, Andrés; Pérez-Losada, Jesús; Muro, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Most Schistosoma mansoni experimental infections are developed in several inbred strains of Mus musculus as definitive host. In contrast, Mus spretus is unexplored in Schistosoma infection studies. Mus spretus provides a high variation of immunological phenotypes being an invaluable tool for genetic studies and gene mapping. The aim of this study is to characterize hematological and immunological responses against Schistosoma mansoni infection in Mus spretus (SPRET/EiJ strain) vs. Mus musculus (CD1 strain) mice. Nine weeks after cercarial exposure, animals were perfused and the parasite burden was assessed. The parasitological data suggests that SPRET/EiJ mice tolerate higher parasite loads compared to CD1 strain. In addition, hematological parameters measured in Mus spretus group showed a significant increase in granulocytes population in early stages of infection compared to the CD1 cohort. Meanwhile, CD1 presented higher levels of lymphocytes and IgG1 in the late stages of S. mansoni experimental infection. PMID:23985166

  18. Altered lymphocyte proliferation and innate immune function in scrapie 139A- and ME7-infected mice.

    PubMed

    Cho, In Soo; Spinner, Daryl S; Kascsak, Richard J; Meeker, H Cliff; Kim, Bo Sook; Park, Seung Yong; Schuller-Levis, Georgia; Park, Eunkyue

    2013-06-01

    Lymphoid organs play an important role in prion disease development and progression. While the role of lymphoid organs and changes in immune-related genes have been extensively investigated in scrapie-infected animals, innate immunity has not. Previous studies examined lymphocyte function in scrapie-infected C3H/HeJ mice, which exhibit defects in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) response now known to result from a mutation in Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4. We examined immune function in scrapie-infected CD1 mice, which are LPS responders. Lymphocyte proliferation from CD1 mice infected with either 139A or ME7 scrapie was measured in response to concanavalin (Con) A or LPS at 1 and 3 months after infection. Following LPS exposure, mice infected 3 months with ME7, but not 139A, demonstrated significantly decreased lymphocyte proliferation compared to controls. After Con A exposure, lymphocyte proliferation in scrapie-infected mice did not differ from controls. Gender-specific comparison of lymphocyte proliferation showed significant decreases in mitogenic responses in females infected 3 months with either 139A or ME7, compared to controls. Males infected for 3 months with ME7, but not 139A, showed significantly decreased proliferation after lymphocyte exposure to LPS, but not Con A. Neither gender showed changes in lymphocyte proliferation after 1 month of scrapie infection. Innate immune activation of peritoneal macrophages was determined via production of nitric oxide (NO), IL-6, and TNF-α after exposure to TLR ligands. TNF-α and IL-6 production were reduced in macrophages from females infected with either scrapie strain for 3 months, while NO production after TLR agonist plus IFN-γ exposure was decreased in both females and males infected for 3 months with 139A, compared to ME7. These data demonstrated altered innate immunity, suggesting hormonal and/or other gender-specific regulation may contribute to gender differences in some immune functions. Our data demonstrate

  19. Subcutaneous Infection Model Facilitates Treatment Assessment of Secondary Alveolar Echinococcosis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Küster, Tatiana; Hermann, Corina; Hemphill, Andrew; Gottstein, Bruno; Spiliotis, Markus

    2013-01-01

    Alveolar echinococcosis (AE) in humans is a parasitic disease characterized by severe damage to the liver and occasionally other organs. AE is caused by infection with the metacestode (larval) stage of the fox tapeworm Echinococcus multilocularis, usually infecting small rodents as natural intermediate hosts. Conventionally, human AE is chemotherapeutically treated with mebendazole or albendazole. There is, however still the need for improved chemotherapeutical options. Primary in vivo studies on drugs of interest are commonly performed in small laboratory animals such as mice and Mongolian jirds, and in most cases, a secondary infection model is used, whereby E. multilocularis metacestodes are directly injected into the peritoneal cavity or into the liver. Disadvantages of this methodological approach include risk of injury to organs during the inoculation and, most notably, a limitation in the macroscopic (visible) assessment of treatment efficacy. Thus, in order to monitor the efficacy of chemotherapeutical treatment, animals have to be euthanized and the parasite tissue dissected. In the present study, mice were infected with E. multilocularis metacestodes through the subcutaneous route and were then subjected to chemotherapy employing albendazole. Serological responses to infection were comparatively assessed in mice infected by the conventional intraperitoneal route. We demonstrate that the subcutaneous infection model for secondary AE facilitates the assessment of the progress of infection and drug treatment in the live animal. PMID:23717701

  20. Engrafted human cells generate adaptive immune responses to Mycobacterium bovis BCG infection in humanized mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Currently used mouse models fail to fully reflect human immunity to tuberculosis (TB), which hampers progress in research and vaccine development. Bone marrow-liver-thymus (BLT) mice, generated by engrafting human fetal liver, thymus, and hematopoietic stem cells in severely immunodeficient NOD/SCID/IL-2Rγ-/- (NSG) mice, have shown potential to model human immunity to infection. We engrafted HLA-A2-positive fetal tissues into NSG mice transgenically expressing human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A2.1 (NSG-A2) to generate NSG-A2-BLT mice and characterized their human immune response to Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) infection to assess the utility of this model for investigating human TB. Results NSG-A2-BLT mice were infected intravenously with BCG and the immune response of engrafted human immune cells was characterized. After ex vivo antigenic stimulation of splenocytes, interferon (IFN)-γ-producing cells were detected by ELISPOT from infected, but not uninfected NSG-A2-BLT mice. However, the levels of secreted IFN-γ, determined by ELISA, were not significantly elevated by antigenic stimulation. NSG-A2-BLT mice were susceptible to BCG infection as determined by higher lung bacillary load than the non-engrafted control NSG-A2 mice. BCG-infected NSG-A2-BLT mice developed lung lesions composed mostly of human macrophages and few human CD4+ or CD8+ T cells. The lesions did not resemble granulomas typical of human TB. Conclusions Engrafted human immune cells in NSG-A2-BLT mice showed partial function of innate and adaptive immune systems culminating in antigen-specific T cell responses to mycobacterial infection. The lack of protection was associated with low IFN-γ levels and limited numbers of T cells recruited to the lesions. The NSG-A2-BLT mouse is capable of mounting a human immune response to M. tuberculosis in vivo but a quantitatively and possibly qualitatively enhanced effector response will be needed to improve the utility of this

  1. Microarray analysis reveals altered circulating microRNA expression in mice infected with Coxsackievirus B3

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Chaoyu; Tong, Lei; Zhao, Wenran; Wang, Yan; Meng, Yuan; Lin, Lexun; Liu, Bingchen; Zhai, Yujia; Zhong, Zhaohua; Li, Xueqi

    2016-01-01

    Coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) is a common causative agent in the development of inflammatory cardiomyopathy. However, whether the expression of peripheral blood microRNAs (miRNAs) is altered in this process is unknown. The present study investigated changes to miRNA expression in the peripheral blood of CVB3-infected mice. Utilizing miRNA microarray technology, differential miRNA expression was examined between normal and CVB3-infected mice. The present results suggest that specific miRNAs were differentially expressed in the peripheral blood of mice infected with CVB3, varying with infection duration. Using miRNA microarray analysis, a total of 96 and 89 differentially expressed miRNAs were identified in the peripheral blood of mice infected with CVB3 for 3 and 6 days, respectively. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to validate differentially expressed miRNAs, revealing a consistency of these results with the miRNA microarray analysis results. The biological functions of the differentially expressed miRNAs were then predicted by bioinformatics analysis. The potential biological roles of differentially expressed miRNAs included hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, dilated cardiomyopathy and arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy. These results may provide important insights into the mechanisms responsible for the progression of CVB3 infection. PMID:27698715

  2. Parasitological and immunological aspects of early Ascaris spp. infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Gazzinelli-Guimarães, Pedro Henrique; Gazzinelli-Guimarães, Ana Clara; Silva, Flaviane Nunes; Mati, Vitor Luís Tenório; Dhom-Lemos, Lucas de Carvalho; Barbosa, Fernando Sérgio; Passos, Lívia Silva Araújo; Gaze, Soraya; Carneiro, Cláudia Martins; Bartholomeu, Daniella Castanheira; Bueno, Lilian Lacerda; Fujiwara, Ricardo Toshio

    2013-08-01

    Studies related to the immunobiological aspects of an Ascaris spp. infection are still scarce, especially those that aim to elucidate the early events of the immune response. In this study, we demonstrated a novel standardized method for early experimental Ascaris infection, providing additional information about the infectivity of eggs embryonated in vitro as well as the influence of host age on development of the infection. Finally, we characterised the immunopathology of early infection, focusing on the tissue and systemic cytokine profiles and the histopathology of infection in the lungs of BALB/c mice. Our results demonstrated that the highest egg infectivity occurred on the 100th and 200th days of in vitro embryonation and that 8 week-old BALB/c mice were more susceptible to infection than 16 week-old mice. Ascaris-infected mice showed an early, significant level of IL-5 production in the lungs 4 days p.i., followed by an increase in the level of neutrophils in the inflammatory infiltrate at 8 days p.i, which was correlated with the peak of larval migration in the tissue and a significant level of IL-6 production. The inflammatory infiltrate in the lungs was gradually replaced by mononuclear cells and eosinophils on the 10th and 12th days p.i., respectively, and an increase in TNF levels was observed. The downmodulation of systemic TCD4(+) cell numbers might suggest that T cell hyporesponsiveness was induced by the Ascaris spp. larvae, contributing to safeguarding parasite survival during larval migration. Taken together, the novel aspects of Ascaris infection presented here enabled a better understanding of the immunopathological events during larval migration, providing insight for further studies focused on immunisation and immunoprophylatic assays.

  3. Influence of amitriptyline on eryptosis, parasitemia and survival of Plasmodium berghei-infected mice.

    PubMed

    Brand, Verena; Koka, Saisudha; Lang, Camelia; Jendrossek, Verena; Huber, Stephan M; Gulbins, Erich; Lang, Florian

    2008-01-01

    Plasmodia express a sphingomyelinase, which is apparently required for their development. On the other hand, the sphingomyelinase product ceramide has previously been shown to delay parasite development. Moreover, ceramide triggers suicidal erythrocyte death or eryptosis, characterized by exposure of phosphatidylserine at the erythrocyte surface and cell shrinkage. Accelerated eryptosis of infected erythrocytes is considered to clear infected erythrocytes from circulating blood and, thus, to favourably influence the clinical course of malaria. The present experiments explored whether the sphingomyelinase inhibitor amitriptyline or genetic knockout of host acid sphingomyelinase influence in vitro parasite growth, eryptosis of Plasmodium falciparum-infected human erythrocytes, in vivo parasitemia and survival of P. berghei-infected mice. Phosphatidylserine exposure was determined by annexin V-binding and cell volume by forward scatter in FACS analysis. In vitro infection of human erythrocytes increased annexin- binding, an effect blunted in the presence of amitriptyline (>or=50 microM). Amitriptyline did not significantly alter intraerythrocytic parasite development but significantly (>or= 1 microM) delayed the increase in parasitemia in vitro. Most importantly, amitriptyline treatment (1 mM in drinking water) resulted in a significant delay of parasitemia and death of infected mice. However, upon infection, ceramide formation was stimulated in both, acid sphingomyelinase knockout mice (Smpd1(-/-)) and their wild type littermates (Smpd1(+/+)). Parasitemia following P. berghei infection was significantly lower in Smpd1(-/-) than in Smpd1(+/+) mice but did not significantly extend the life span of infected animals. In conclusion, mammalian and parasite sphingomyelinase contribute to ceramide formation during malaria, whereby the parasite sphingomyelinase ultimately determines the course of the infection. Amitriptyline presumably blocks both sphingomyelinases and, thus

  4. Lethal exacerbation of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia in severe combined immunodeficiency mice after infection by pneumonia virus of mice.

    PubMed

    Roths, J B; Smith, A L; Sidman, C L

    1993-04-01

    Mice homozygous for the mutant allele scid (severe combined immunodeficiency) have been described as excellent models for Pneumocystis carinii (Pc) pneumonia (PCP), a major health problem in patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and other immunodeficiency states. Other microorganisms have been shown to infect AIDS patients simultaneously with Pc, but whether one opportunist is able to directly influence the pathogenicity of another has not been determined previously. We have deliberately coinfected scid mice (with extent Pc infection) with a variety of primarily pneumotropic viruses and bacteria and have identified pneumonia virus of mice as causing a dramatic increase in the density of Pc organisms and the morbidity due to PCP in immunodeficient scid mice. This finding has clinical significance in the management of PCP, in that the identification and treatment of coinfecting pneumotropic pathogens may be as important as treatment targeted at Pc. A search for other synergistic (or antagonistic) microorganisms and determination of their mechanism(s) of action in altering the progression of PCP is indicated.

  5. Gnotobiotic Miniature Pig Interbreed Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer for Xenotransplantation.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jeong Ho; Kim, Sang Eun; Gupta, Mukesh Kumar; Lee, HoonTaek

    2016-08-01

    Transgenic animal producing technology has improved consistently over the last couple of decades. Among the available methods, somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) technology was officially the most popular. However, SCNT has low efficiency and requires a highly skilled individual. Additionally, the allo-SCNT nuclear reprogramming mechanism is poorly understood in the gnotobiotic miniature pig, which is a candidate for xenotransplantation, making sampling in oocytes very difficult compared to commercial hybrid pigs. Therefore, interbreed SCNT (ibSCNT), which is a combination of miniature pig and commercial pig (Landrace based), was analyzed and was found to be similar to SCNT in terms of the rate of blastocyst formation (12.6% ± 2.9% vs. 15.5% ± 2.2%; p > 0.05). However, a significantly lower fusion rate was observed in the ibSCNT compared to normal SCNT with Landrace pig somatic cells (29.6% ± 0.8% vs. 65.0% ± 4.9%). Thus, the optimization of fusion parameters was necessary for efficient SCNT. Our results further revealed that ibSCNT by the whole-cell intracytoplasmic injection (WCICI) method had a significantly higher blastocyst forming efficiency than the electrofusion method (31.1 ± 8.5 vs. 15.5% ± 2.2%). The nuclear remodeling and the pattern of changes in acetylation at H3K9 residue were similar in both SCNT and ibSCNT embryos.

  6. Treatment of trypanosome-infected mice with exogenous interferon, interferon inducers, or antibody to interferon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degee, Antonie L. W.; Mansfield, John M.; Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    1986-01-01

    Earlier studies have demonstrated that mice resistant to Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense (the B10.BR/SgSnJ strain) produces, upon infection by this parasite, two peaks of serum interferon (IFN), while the susceptible mice (C3HeB/FeJ) produces no IFN. In the present study, survival times were compared for B10.BR/SgSnJ, C3HeB/FeJ, and CBA/J (an intermediately resistant strain) mice that were injected, prior to infection with the parasite, with either of the following three preparations (1) IFN-gamma, (2) an antibody to IFN-gamma and (3) polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidylic acid (to induce IFN-alpha/beta). No effect on the survival times of mice by any of these preparations could be demonstrated, contrary to some previous reports.

  7. Inefficiency of C3H/HeN Mice to Control Chlamydial Lung Infection Correlates with Downregulation of Neutrophil Activation During the Late Stage of Infection

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xiaofei; Bu, Xiaokun; Zhang, Naihong; Li, Xiaoxia; Huang, Huanjun; Bai, Hong; Yang, Xi

    2009-01-01

    We previously reported that massive infiltration of neutrophils in C3H/HeN (C3H) mice could not efficiently control Chlamydia muridarum (Cm) infection and might contribute to the high susceptibility of these mice to lung infection. To further define the nature of neutrophil responses in C3H mice during chlamydial infection, we examine the expression of adhesion molecules and CD11b related to neutrophils infiltration and activation, respectively, following intranasal Cm infection. The results showed that the expression of selectins (E-selectin, P-selectin and L-selectin), and intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) in the lung of C3H mice increased more significantly than in C57BL/6 (B6) mice, the more resistant strain. These results correlated well with the massive neutrophils infiltration in C3H mice. In contrast, CD11b expression on peripheral blood and lung neutrophils in C3H mice exhibited a significant reduction compared with B6 mice during the late phage of infection (day 14). These findings suggest that the high-level expression of adhesion molecules in C3H mice may enhance neutrophils recruitment to the lung, but the decline of CD11b expression on neutrophils may attenuate neutrophil function. Therefore, CD11b down-regulation on neutrophils may contribute to the failure of C3H mice to control chlamydial lung infection. PMID:19728926

  8. Dysfunction of mitochondrial dynamics in the brains of scrapie-infected mice

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Hong-Seok; Choi, Yeong-Gon; Shin, Hae-Young; Oh, Jae-Min; Park, Jeong-Ho; Kim, Jae-Il; Carp, Richard I.; Choi, Eun-Kyoung; Kim, Yong-Sun

    2014-05-30

    Highlights: • Mfn1 and Fis1 are significantly increased in the hippocampal region of the ME7 prion-infected brain, whereas Dlp1 is significantly decreased in the infected brain. • Dlp1 is significantly decreased in the cytosolic fraction of the hippocampus in the infected brain. • Neuronal mitochondria in the prion-infected brains are enlarged and swollen compared to those of control brains. • There are significantly fewer mitochondria in the ME7-infected brain compared to the number in control brain. - Abstract: Mitochondrial dysfunction is a common and prominent feature of many neurodegenerative diseases, including prion diseases; it is induced by oxidative stress in scrapie-infected animal models. In previous studies, we found swelling and dysfunction of mitochondria in the brains of scrapie-infected mice compared to brains of controls, but the mechanisms underlying mitochondrial dysfunction remain unclear. To examine whether the dysregulation of mitochondrial proteins is related to the mitochondrial dysfunction associated with prion disease, we investigated the expression patterns of mitochondrial fusion and fission proteins in the brains of ME7 prion-infected mice. Immunoblot analysis revealed that Mfn1 was up-regulated in both whole brain and specific brain regions, including the cerebral cortex and hippocampus, of ME7-infected mice compared to controls. Additionally, expression levels of Fis1 and Mfn2 were elevated in the hippocampus and the striatum, respectively, of the ME7-infected brain. In contrast, Dlp1 expression was significantly reduced in the hippocampus in the ME7-infected brain, particularly in the cytosolic fraction. Finally, we observed abnormal mitochondrial enlargement and histopathological change in the hippocampus of the ME7-infected brain. These observations suggest that the mitochondrial dysfunction, which is presumably caused by the dysregulation of mitochondrial fusion and fission proteins, may contribute to the

  9. Clearance of experimental cutaneous Staphylococcus aureus infections in mice.

    PubMed

    Onunkwo, Charles C; Hahn, Beth L; Sohnle, Peter G

    2010-07-01

    Staphylococcal skin infections are quite common in human patients. These infections often clear spontaneously, but may also progress locally and/or disseminate to cause serious and sometimes fatal deep infections. The present studies were undertaken to examine the clearance phase of experimental cutaneous Staphylococcus aureus infections in a mouse model system. Previous work in this system has shown that staphylococci applied to the skin rapidly disseminate to the spleen and kidney. In the present experiments the bacteria were found to persist at the skin infection site at a time (8 days after inoculation) when they had disappeared from the spleen and kidney. Examination of the infected skin at earlier times revealed rapid (within 6 h) invasion into the stratum corneum, stratum Malpighii, and dermis, but subsequent redistribution of bacteria (at 1-2 days) to more superficial sites, particularly crusts located just above the skin surface. The crusts seen in these infections were of two distinct types, which were termed type 1 and type 2. Type 1 crusts appeared first, consisted of bacteria, inflammatory cells, and debris, and developed over an intact epidermis. Type 2 crusts arose from the process of dermal necrosis previously reported to take place at 2 days in this model system. In the latter situation the bacteria were not really cleared from the epidermis and dermis; rather those layers were transformed into a superficial crust that contained the bacteria. Deep hair follicle infections in the dermis were found in these infections, but they did not persist and did not seem to be a reservoir for organisms in the dermis. Resolution of these experimental infections appeared to involve redistribution of invading bacteria to more superficial locations in crusts above the skin surface, marked proliferation of the epidermis, loss of the bacteria-laden crusts from the skin, and eventual healing of the cutaneous damage.

  10. Reactivation of M. tuberculosis infection in trans-membrane tumour necrosis factor mice.

    PubMed

    Dambuza, Ivy; Keeton, Roanne; Allie, Nasiema; Hsu, Nai-Jen; Randall, Philippa; Sebesho, Boipelo; Fick, Lizette; Quesniaux, Valerie J F; Jacobs, Muazzam

    2011-01-01

    Of those individuals who are infected with M. tuberculosis, 90% do not develop active disease and represents a large reservoir of M. tuberculosis with the potential for reactivation of infection. Sustained TNF expression is required for containment of persistent infection and TNF neutralization leads to tuberculosis reactivation. In this study, we investigated the contribution of soluble TNF (solTNF) and transmembrane TNF (Tm-TNF) in immune responses generated against reactivating tuberculosis. In a chemotherapy induced tuberculosis reactivation model, mice were challenged by aerosol inhalation infection with low dose M. tuberculosis for three weeks to establish infection followed chemotherapeutic treatment for six weeks, after which therapy was terminated and tuberculosis reactivation investigated. We demonstrate that complete absence of TNF results in host susceptibility to M. tuberculosis reactivation in the presence of established mycobacteria-specific adaptive immunity with mice displaying unrestricted bacilli growth and diffused granuloma structures compared to WT control mice. Interestingly, bacterial re-emergence is contained in Tm-TNF mice during the initial phases of tuberculosis reactivation, indicating that Tm-TNF sustains immune pressure as in WT mice. However, Tm-TNF mice show susceptibility to long term M. tuberculosis reactivation associated with uncontrolled influx of leukocytes in the lungs and reduced IL-12p70, IFNγ and IL-10, enlarged granuloma structures, and failure to contain mycobacterial replication relative to WT mice. In conclusion, we demonstrate that both solTNF and Tm-TNF are required for maintaining immune pressure to contain reactivating M. tuberculosis bacilli even after mycobacteria-specific immunity has been established.

  11. Reactivation of M. tuberculosis Infection in Trans-Membrane Tumour Necrosis Factor Mice

    PubMed Central

    Dambuza, Ivy; Keeton, Roanne; Allie, Nasiema; Hsu, Nai-Jen; Randall, Philippa; Sebesho, Boipelo; Fick, Lizette; Quesniaux, Valerie J. F.; Jacobs, Muazzam

    2011-01-01

    Of those individuals who are infected with M. tuberculosis, 90% do not develop active disease and represents a large reservoir of M. tuberculosis with the potential for reactivation of infection. Sustained TNF expression is required for containment of persistent infection and TNF neutralization leads to tuberculosis reactivation. In this study, we investigated the contribution of soluble TNF (solTNF) and transmembrane TNF (Tm-TNF) in immune responses generated against reactivating tuberculosis. In a chemotherapy induced tuberculosis reactivation model, mice were challenged by aerosol inhalation infection with low dose M. tuberculosis for three weeks to establish infection followed chemotherapeutic treatment for six weeks, after which therapy was terminated and tuberculosis reactivation investigated. We demonstrate that complete absence of TNF results in host susceptibility to M. tuberculosis reactivation in the presence of established mycobacteria-specific adaptive immunity with mice displaying unrestricted bacilli growth and diffused granuloma structures compared to WT control mice. Interestingly, bacterial re-emergence is contained in Tm-TNF mice during the initial phases of tuberculosis reactivation, indicating that Tm-TNF sustains immune pressure as in WT mice. However, Tm-TNF mice show susceptibility to long term M. tuberculosis reactivation associated with uncontrolled influx of leukocytes in the lungs and reduced IL-12p70, IFNγ and IL-10, enlarged granuloma structures, and failure to contain mycobacterial replication relative to WT mice. In conclusion, we demonstrate that both solTNF and Tm-TNF are required for maintaining immune pressure to contain reactivating M. tuberculosis bacilli even after mycobacteria-specific immunity has been established. PMID:22132068

  12. Influence of infection by Toxoplasma gondii on purine levels and E-ADA activity in the brain of mice experimentally infected mice.

    PubMed

    Tonin, Alexandre A; Da Silva, Aleksandro S; Casali, Emerson A; Silveira, Stephanie S; Moritz, Cesar E J; Camillo, Giovana; Flores, Mariana M; Fighera, Rafael; Thomé, Gustavo R; Morsch, Vera M; Schetinger, Maria Rosa C; Rue, Mario De La; Vogel, Fernanda S F; Lopes, Sonia T A

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the purine levels and E-ADA activity in the brain of mice (BALB/c) experimentally infected with Toxoplasma gondii. In experiment I (n=24) the mice were infected with RH strain of T. gondii, while in experiment II (n=36) they were infected with strain ME-49 of T. gondii. Our results showed that, for RH strain (acute phase), an increase in both periods in the levels of ATP, ADP, AMP, adenosine, hypoxanthine, xanthine (only on day 6 PI) and uric acid (only on day 6 PI). By the other hand, the RH strain led, on days 4 and 6 PI, to a reduction in the concentration of inosine. ME-49, a cystogenic strain, showed some differences in acute and chronic phase, since on day 6 PI the levels of ATP and ADP were increased, while on day 30 these same nucleotides were reduced. On day 60 PI, ME-49 induced a reduction in the levels of ATP, ADP, AMP, adenosine, inosine and xanthine, while uric acid was increased. A decrease of E-ADA activity was observed in brain on days 4 and 6 PI (RH), and 30 PI (ME-49); however on day 60 PI E-ADA activity was increased for infection by ME-49 strain. Therefore, it was possible to conclude that infection with T. gondii changes the purine levels and the activity of E-ADA in brain, which may be associated with neurological signs commonly observed in this disease.

  13. Prevention of indigenous infection of mice with Escherichia coli by nonspecific immunostimulation.

    PubMed Central

    Nomoto, K; Yokokura, T; Mitsuyama, M; Yoshikai, Y; Nomoto, K

    1992-01-01

    We have previously reported that the lethal toxicity of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in specific-pathogen-free mice is due to an intestinal infection with indigenous Escherichia coli induced by the drug (K. Nomoto, T. Yokokura, Y. Yoshikai, M. Mitsuyama, and K. Nomoto, Can J. Microbiol. 37:244-247, 1991). In the present study we demonstrate that nonspecific immunostimulation is effective in the protection of mice from the lethal indigenous infection induced by 5-FU. Intravenous or subcutaneous injection of a preparation of heat-killed Lactobacillus casei YIT 9018, a potent nonspecific immunostimulant, into BALB/c mice reduced the lethal toxicity of 5-FU at doses ranging from 338 to 800 mg/kg of body weight if YIT 9018 was injected 7 to 40 days before administration of 5-FU. Systemic infection with E. coli developed in all of the 5-FU-treated control mice 7 days or more after administration of 5-FU in large doses and was accompanied by overgrowth of the bacteria in the intestinal tract. Pretreatment of mice with YIT 9018 resulted in a decreased occurrence of systemic infection with E. coli to levels of 0 to 20% and no significant changes in the population levels of E. coli in the intestinal tract during the 14 days after administration of 5-FU. The levels of leukopenia in the spleen and peripheral blood were lower, and recovery of granulocyte-macrophage precursor cells in the spleen and femur began earlier in the treated animals than in the 5-FU-treated controls. Intravenous transfusion of syngeneic normal bone marrow cells or spleen cells into the mice at an early period after administration of 5-FU diminished markedly the occurrence of the lethal indigenous infection, suggestion that an earlier recovery from chemotherapy-induced myelosuppression is important in the mechanisms of protection of the host from the infection. PMID:1605602

  14. Plasmodium berghei: influence of infection on the oxidant and antioxidants levels in pregnant BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Lalita; Kaur, Jagdeep; Rishi, Praveen; Shukla, Geeta

    2012-06-01

    Malarial infection during pregnancy has been associated with maternal anemia and death, abortion, still-birth and is a major cause of low birth weight, an important risk factor for infant morbidity and mortality in endemic areas. The present study was designed to delineate the oxidative stress in various organs (liver, spleen, kidney, brain and placenta) of pregnant Plasmodium berghei infected BALB/c mice. It was observed that pregnant-infected mice had higher parasitaemia than nonpregnant-infected mice. Most notably, levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), a measure of lipid peroxidation, reduced glutathione (GSH) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) levels were significantly higher in the liver, spleen, kidney and brain of pregnant-infected mice compared with pregnant mice. Although MDA levels were significantly higher, GSH and SOD levels remained unaltered in the placenta of pregnant-infected mice compared with pregnant mice. Furthermore, catalase activity was significantly lower in all the organs of pregnant-infected mice compared with pregnant mice. Histopathological observations in the organs clearly show the cellular and morphological alterations that may be occurring due to increased lipid peroxidation. Taken together, the data suggest that the increased severity of malarial infection during pregnancy may be due to accentuated oxidative stress.

  15. Development of a murine model for aerosolized ebolavirus infection using a panel of recombinant inbred mice.

    PubMed

    Zumbrun, Elizabeth E; Abdeltawab, Nourtan F; Bloomfield, Holly A; Chance, Taylor B; Nichols, Donald K; Harrison, Paige E; Kotb, Malak; Nalca, Aysegul

    2012-12-03

    Countering aerosolized filovirus infection is a major priority of biodefense research. Aerosol models of filovirus infection have been developed in knock-out mice, guinea pigs and non-human primates; however, filovirus infection of immunocompetent mice by the aerosol route has not been reported. A murine model of aerosolized filovirus infection in mice should be useful for screening vaccine candidates and therapies. In this study, various strains of wild-type and immunocompromised mice were exposed to aerosolized wild-type (WT) or mouse-adapted (MA) Ebola virus (EBOV). Upon exposure to aerosolized WT-EBOV, BALB/c, C57BL/6 (B6), and DBA/2 (D2) mice were unaffected, but 100% of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) and 90% of signal transducers and activators of transcription (Stat1) knock-out (KO) mice became moribund between 7-9 days post-exposure (dpe). Exposure to MA-EBOV caused 15% body weight loss in BALB/c, but all mice recovered. In contrast, 10-30% lethality was observed in B6 and D2 mice exposed to aerosolized MA-EBOV, and 100% of SCID, Stat1KO, interferon (IFN)-γ KO and Perforin KO mice became moribund between 7-14 dpe. In order to identify wild-type, inbred, mouse strains in which exposure to aerosolized MA-EBOV is uniformly lethal, 60 BXD (C57BL/6 crossed with DBA2) recombinant inbred (RI) and advanced RI (ARI) mouse strains were exposed to aerosolized MA-EBOV, and monitored for disease severity. A complete spectrum of disease severity was observed. All BXD strains lost weight but many recovered. However, infection was uniformly lethal within 7 to 12 days post-exposure in five BXD strains. Aerosol exposure of these five BXD strains to 10-fold less MA-EBOV resulted in lethality ranging from 0% in two strains to 90-100% lethality in two strains. Analysis of post-mortem tissue from BXD strains that became moribund and were euthanized at the lower dose of MA-EBOV, showed liver damage in all mice as well as lung lesions in two of the three strains. The two

  16. Role of Antibody Response in Recovery from K-Papovavirus Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Mokhtarian, Foroozan; Shah, Keerti V.

    1980-01-01

    Intraperitoneal inoculation of mouse K papovavirus into infant (2 to 4 days old) Swiss albino mice produced a high-titered viremia which persisted until death due to pneumonitis on day 9 postinfection. Lungs and livers of these mice had virus-specific immunofluorescence and histological lesions. K-virus antibody was undetectable. Three- to four-week-old mice, although as susceptible to infection as infant mice, remained healthy and developed a much lower-titered viremia, a transient lung infection, and K-virus antibody on 4 to 5 days postinfection. Three- to four-week-old mice treated with cyclophosphamide developed a high-titered viremia with death 10 to 17 days postinfection and no detectable antibodies. A single intraperitoneal inoculation of K-virus antibody at 5 h or 1 day postinfection completely protected the infant Swiss albino mice. Partial protection was achieved when antibody was transferred on days 2, 3, and 4 postinoculation. Transfer of antibody to cytoxan-treated Swiss albino mice on days 3 and 6 postinfection completely portected them against K-virus-induced lesions and mortality. Transfer of normal adult BALB/c splenocytes to syngeneic infant mice before K-virus infection did not protect from death but increased survival time. Transfer of 4- to 12-day K-virus-primed adult splenocytes before infection gave a nearly 100% protection. When given before infection, the protection afforded by T-cell-enriched and B-cell-enriched adult primed splenocytes was 0 and 100%, respectively. Transfer of primed B cells on day 1 post-inoculation completely protected the infant mice. This protection decreased to 86, 57, and 56% when the primed B cells were transferred on days 2, 3, and 4 post-inoculation, respectively. These data suggest that the antibody response is of critical importance in the recovery of mice from K-virus infection. Antibody probably acts by aborting viremia, thereby preventing extensive seeding of lungs with virus. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 2 PMID

  17. Infection mechanism of biofilm-forming Staphylococcus aureus on indwelling foreign materials in mice.

    PubMed

    Makino, Taro; Jimi, Shiro; Oyama, Takuto; Nakano, Yuki; Hamamoto, Kouichi; Mamishin, Kanako; Yahiro, Tomoko; Hara, Shuuji; Takata, Tohru; Ohjimi, Hiroyuki

    2015-04-01

    Indwelling foreign-body infections are a critical medical problem, especially in immunocompromised patients. To examine the pathogenicity of biofilm-forming bacteria settling on foreign materials, mice implanted with plastic discs were infected with Staphylococcus aureus. After opening a wide subcutaneous pocket on the dorsal side of mice with or without temporal leukocytopenia, a plastic sheet was placed in the left subcutaneous space; subsequently, bacteria in a planktonic state were dispersed over the subcutaneous space. Bacterial numbers were examined 7 days after inoculation. In subcutaneous tissue on the right, S. aureus was found only in leukocytopenic mice. Meanwhile, bacteria were detected on the plastic and neighbouring tissue in both leukocytopenic and normal mice; however, colony-forming analysis indicated that leukocytopenic mice possessed significantly more bacteria. Tissue reaction against bacteria was pathologically examined. Invading S. aureus induced severe inflammation. In transient leukocytopenic mice, bacterial microcolonies formed on the plastic as well as in the developed necrotic tissue - both of which were shielded from inflammatory cell infiltration - result in bacteraemia. These results indicate that biofilm-forming S. aureus settling on indwelling foreign material are tolerant against host immunity and assault neighbouring tissue, which may lead to chronic wound infection.

  18. Fluorescence spectroscopy of the retina from scrapie-infected mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recently, we have proposed that the fluorescence spectra of sheep retina can be well correlated to the presence or absence of scrapie. Scrapie is the most widespread TSE (transmissible spongiform encephalopathy) affecting sheep and goats worldwide. Mice eyes have been previously reported as a model ...

  19. Experimental diabetes in mice infected with Coxsackie viruses

    SciTech Connect

    Bocharov, E.F.; Shorin, Yu.P.; Solodovnikova, I.A.; Kazaryan, L.S.; Selyatitskaya, V.G.; Pal'chikova, N.A.

    1987-07-01

    The authors compare the effect of Coxsackie B4 and A13 viruses on the pancreas of strains of mice sensitive and resistant to diabetes, using subdiabetogenic doses of alloxan in the second case. The biochemical investigation included determination of immunoreactive insulin in the blood serum by radioimmunoassay. Biochemical changes were seen such as lowered glucose tolerance and disturbance of immunoreactive insulin synthesis.

  20. GRANZYME A AND B-CLUSTER DEFICIENCY DELAYS ACUTE LUNG INJURY IN PNEUMOVIRUS-INFECTED MICE

    PubMed Central

    Bem, Reinout A.; van Woensel, Job B.M.; Lutter, Rene; Domachowske, Joseph B.; Medema, Jan Paul; Rosenberg, Helene F.; Bos, Albert P.

    2009-01-01

    Lower respiratory tract infection by the human pneumovirus respiratory syncytial virus is a frequent cause of acute lung injury in children. Severe pneumovirus disease in humans is associated with activation of the granzyme pathway by effector lymphocytes, which may promote pathology by exaggerating pro-apoptotic caspase activity and pro-inflammatory activity. The main goal of this study was to determine whether granzymes contribute to the development of acute lung injury in pneumovirus-infected mice. Granzyme-expressing mice and granzyme A, and B-cluster single and double-gene deleted mice were inoculated with the rodent pneumovirus pneumonia virus of mice strain J3666, and were studied for markers of lung inflammation and injury. Expression of granzyme A and B is detected in effector lymphocytes in mouse lungs in response to pneumovirus infection. Mice deficient for granzyme A and the granzyme B-cluster have unchanged virus titers in the lungs, but show a significantly delayed clinical response to fatal pneumovirus infection, a feature that is associated with delayed neutrophil recruitment, diminished activation of caspase-3 and reduced lung permeability. We conclude that granzyme A and B-cluster deficiency delays the acute progression of pneumovirus disease by reducing alveolar injury. PMID:20018616

  1. Dysfunction of mitochondrial dynamics in the brains of scrapie-infected mice.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hong-Seok; Choi, Yeong-Gon; Shin, Hae-Young; Oh, Jae-Min; Park, Jeong-Ho; Kim, Jae-Il; Carp, Richard I; Choi, Eun-Kyoung; Kim, Yong-Sun

    2014-05-30

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is a common and prominent feature of many neurodegenerative diseases, including prion diseases; it is induced by oxidative stress in scrapie-infected animal models. In previous studies, we found swelling and dysfunction of mitochondria in the brains of scrapie-infected mice compared to brains of controls, but the mechanisms underlying mitochondrial dysfunction remain unclear. To examine whether the dysregulation of mitochondrial proteins is related to the mitochondrial dysfunction associated with prion disease, we investigated the expression patterns of mitochondrial fusion and fission proteins in the brains of ME7 prion-infected mice. Immunoblot analysis revealed that Mfn1 was up-regulated in both whole brain and specific brain regions, including the cerebral cortex and hippocampus, of ME7-infected mice compared to controls. Additionally, expression levels of Fis1 and Mfn2 were elevated in the hippocampus and the striatum, respectively, of the ME7-infected brain. In contrast, Dlp1 expression was significantly reduced in the hippocampus in the ME7-infected brain, particularly in the cytosolic fraction. Finally, we observed abnormal mitochondrial enlargement and histopathological change in the hippocampus of the ME7-infected brain. These observations suggest that the mitochondrial dysfunction, which is presumably caused by the dysregulation of mitochondrial fusion and fission proteins, may contribute to the neuropathological changes associated with prion disease.

  2. Inactivated and live, attenuated influenza vaccines protect mice against influenza: Streptococcus pyogenes super-infections.

    PubMed

    Chaussee, Michael S; Sandbulte, Heather R; Schuneman, Margaret J; Depaula, Frank P; Addengast, Leslie A; Schlenker, Evelyn H; Huber, Victor C

    2011-05-12

    Mortality associated with influenza virus super-infections is frequently due to secondary bacterial complications. To date, super-infections with Streptococcus pyogenes have been studied less extensively than those associated with Streptococcus pneumoniae. This is significant because a vaccine for S. pyogenes is not clinically available, leaving vaccination against influenza virus as our only means for preventing these super-infections. In this study, we directly compared immunity induced by two types of influenza vaccine, either inactivated influenza virus (IIV) or live, attenuated influenza virus (LAIV), for the ability to prevent super-infections. Our data demonstrate that both IIV and LAIV vaccines induce similar levels of serum antibodies, and that LAIV alone induces IgA expression at mucosal surfaces. Upon super-infection, both vaccines have the ability to limit the induction of pro-inflammatory cytokines within the lung, including IFN-γ which has been shown to contribute to mortality in previous models of super-infection. Limiting expression of these pro-inflammatory cytokines within the lungs subsequently limits recruitment of macrophages and neutrophils to pulmonary surfaces, and ultimately protects both IIV- and LAIV-vaccinated mice from mortality. Despite their overall survival, both IIV- and LAIV-vaccinated mice demonstrated levels of bacteria within the lung tissue that are similar to those seen in unvaccinated mice. Thus, influenza virus:bacteria super-infections can be limited by vaccine-induced immunity against influenza virus, but the ability to prevent morbidity is not complete.

  3. Protective immunity against Leishmania major induced by Leishmania tropica infection of BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Mahmoudzadeh-Niknam, Hamid; Kiaei, Simin Sadat; Iravani, Davood

    2011-02-01

    Leishmania (L.) tropica is a causative agent of human cutaneous and viscerotropic leishmaniasis. Immune response to L. tropica in humans and experimental animals are not well understood. We previously established that L. tropica infection induces partial protective immunity against subsequent challenge infection with Leishmania major in BALB/c mice. Aim of the present study was to study immunologic mechanisms of protective immunity induced by L. tropica infection, as a live parasite vaccine, in BALB/c mouse model. Mice were infected by L. tropica, and after establishment of the infection, they were challenged by L. major. Our findings shows that L. tropica infection resulted in protection against L. major challenge in BALB/c mice and this protective immunity is associated with: (1) a DTH response, (2) higher IFN-γ and lower IL-10 response at one week post-challenge, (3) lower percentage of CD4(+) lymphocyte at one month post-challenge, and (4) the source of IFN-γ and IL-10 were mainly CD4(-) lymphocyte up to one month post-challenge suggesting that CD4(-) lymphocytes may be responsible for protection induced by L. tropica infection in the studied intervals.

  4. [The protector effect of ribosomal preparations against experimental influenza infection in mice].

    PubMed

    Popa, L M; Repanovici, R; Iliescu, R

    1989-01-01

    A study was conducted on the protective effect of some ribosomal preparations, isolated from chorionic-allantoic membranes of chicken embryos, infected or not with parainfluenza (Sendai) or influenza (AoPR8) virus, in mice experimentally inoculated with influenza virus strain AoPR8 adapted to the mouse. Results showed that the tested preparation, containing ribosomes and polysomes isolated from chorio-allantoic membranes of Sendai virus inoculated chicken embryos, ensure the mice complete protection against AoPR8 virus, if administrated before the control infection.

  5. The importance of interferon-gamma in an early infection of Chlamydia psittaci in mice.

    PubMed Central

    McCafferty, M C; Maley, S W; Entrican, G; Buxton, D

    1994-01-01

    Athymic mice (nu/nu) and their hairy littermates (nu/+) were infected experimentally with Chlamydia psittaci and the role of endogenous interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) on the resolution of the infection was studied. The pathological changes produced in the spleen, liver and lung were exacerbated by administration of a monoclonal antibody (mAb) to IFN-gamma and an increased number of viable chlamydiae were recovered from the tissues of both nu/+ and nu/nu mice treated in this way. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8039814

  6. Innate immunity against Legionella pneumophila during pulmonary infections in mice.

    PubMed

    Park, Bonggoo; Park, Gayoung; Kim, Jiyoung; Lim, Seon Ah; Lee, Kyung-Mi

    2017-02-01

    Legionella pneumophila is an etiological agent of the severe pneumonia known as Legionnaires' disease (LD). This gram-negative bacterium is thought to replicate naturally in various freshwater amoebae, but also replicates in human alveolar macrophages. Inside host cells, legionella induce the production of non-endosomal replicative phagosomes by injecting effector proteins into the cytosol. Innate immune responses are first line defenses against legionella during early phases of infection, and distinguish between legionella and host cells using germline-encoded pattern recognition receptors such as Toll-like receptors , NOD-like receptors, and RIG-I-like receptors, which sense pathogen-associated molecular patterns that are absent in host cells. During pulmonary legionella infections, various inflammatory cells such as macrophages, neutrophils, natural killer (NK) cells, large mononuclear cells, B cells, and CD4+ and CD8+ T cells are recruited into infected lungs, and predominantly occupy interstitial areas to control legionella. During pulmonary legionella infections, the interplay between distinct cytokines and chemokines also modulates innate host responses to clear legionella from the lungs. Recognition by NK cell receptors triggers effector functions including secretion of cytokines and chemokines, and leads to lysis of target cells. Crosstalk between NK cells and dendritic cells, monocytes, and macrophages provides a major first-line defense against legionella infection, whereas activation of T and B cells resolves the infection and mounts legionella-specific memory in the host.

  7. Chlamydia pneumoniae Infection in Mice Induces Chronic Lung Inflammation, iBALT Formation, and Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Jupelli, Madhulika; Shimada, Kenichi; Chiba, Norika; Slepenkin, Anatoly; Alsabeh, Randa; Jones, Heather D.; Peterson, Ellena; Chen, Shuang

    2013-01-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae (CP) lung infection can induce chronic lung inflammation and is associated with not only acute asthma but also COPD exacerbations. However, in mouse models of CP infection, most studies have investigated specifically the acute phase of the infection and not the longer-term chronic changes in the lungs. We infected C57BL/6 mice with 5×105 CP intratracheally and monitored inflammation, cellular infiltrates and cytokine levels over time to investigate the chronic inflammatory lung changes. While bacteria numbers declined by day 28, macrophage numbers remained high through day 35. Immune cell clusters were detected as early as day 14 and persisted through day 35, and stained positive for B, T, and follicular dendritic cells, indicating these clusters were inducible bronchus associated lymphoid tissues (iBALTs). Classically activated inflammatory M1 macrophages were the predominant subtype early on while alternatively activated M2 macrophages increased later during infection. Adoptive transfer of M1 but not M2 macrophages intratracheally 1 week after infection resulted in greater lung inflammation, severe fibrosis, and increased numbers of iBALTS 35 days after infection. In summary, we show that CP lung infection in mice induces chronic inflammatory changes including iBALT formations as well as fibrosis. These observations suggest that the M1 macrophages, which are part of the normal response to clear acute C. pneumoniae lung infection, result in an enhanced acute response when present in excess numbers, with greater inflammation, tissue injury, and severe fibrosis. PMID:24204830

  8. The hepatoprotective activity of blue green algae in Schistosoma mansoni infected mice.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Azza H; Osman, Gamalat Y; Salem, Tarek A; Elmalawany, Alshimaa M

    2014-10-01

    This study aims to evaluate the immunomodulatory effects of a natural product, blue green algae (BGA) (100 mg/kg BW), alone or combined with praziquantel PZQ (250 mg/kg BW) on granulomatous inflammation, liver histopathology, some biochemical and immunological parameters in mice infected with Schistosoma mansoni. Results showed that the diameter and number of egg granuloma were significantly reduced after treatment of S. mansoni-infected mice with BGA, PZQ and their combination. The histopathological alterations observed in the liver of S. mansoni-infected mice were remarkably inhibited after BGA treatments. BGA decreased the activities of aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) as well as the level of total protein (TP) while the level of albumin was increased. Treatment of infected mice with BGA, PZQ as well as their combination led to significant elevation in the activities of hepatic antioxidant enzymes glutathione peroxidase (GPX) and glutathione-S-transferase (GST) as compared with control group. Combination of BGA and PZQ resulted in significant reduction in the level of intercellular adhesion molecules-1 (ICAM-1), vascular adhesion molecules-1 (VCAM-1) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) when compared to those of the S. mansoni-infected group. Overall, BGA significantly inhibited the liver damage accompanied with schistosomiasis, exhibited a potent antioxidant and immunoprotective activities. This study suggests that BGA can be considered as promising for development a complementary and/or alternative medicine against schistosomiasis.

  9. Systemic responses of BALB/c mice to Salmonella typhimurium infection.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaoyang; Lei, Hehua; Wu, Junfang; Li, Jia V; Tang, Huiru; Wang, Yulan

    2014-10-03

    Salmonella typhimurium is a bacterial pathogen that poses a great threat to humans and animals. In order to discover hosts' responses to S. typhimurium infection, we collected and analyzed biofluids and organ tissues from mice which had ingested S. typhimurium. We employed (1)H NMR spectroscopy coupled with multivariate data analysis and immunological techniques. The results indicate that infection leads to a severe impact on mice spleen and ileum, which are characterized by splenomegaly and edematous villi, respectively. We found that increased levels of itaconic acid were correlated with the presence of splenomegaly during infection and may play an important role in Salmonella-containing vacuole acidification. In addition, metabonomic analyses of urine displayed the development of salmonellosis in mice, which is characterized by dynamic changes in energy metabolism. Furthermore, we found that the presence of S. typhimurium activated an anti-oxidative response in infected mice. We also observed changes in the gut microbial co-metabolites (hippurate, TMAO, TMA, methylamine). This investigation sheds much needed light on the host-pathogen interactions of S. typhimurium, providing further information to deepen our understanding of the long co-evolution process between hosts and infective bacteria.

  10. Increased susceptibility to Salmonella infection in signal regulatory protein α-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Lin-Xi; Atif, Shaikh M; Schmiel, Shirdi E; Lee, Seung-Joo; McSorley, Stephen J

    2012-09-01

    Recent studies have shed light on the connection between elevated erythropoetin production/spleen erythropoiesis and increased susceptibility to Salmonella infection. In this article, we provide another mouse model, the SIRPα-deficient (Sirpα⁻/⁻) mouse, that manifests increased erythropoiesis as well as heightened susceptibility to Salmonella infection. Sirpα⁻/⁻ mice succumbed to systemic infection with attenuated Salmonella, possessing significantly higher bacterial loads in both the spleen and the liver. Moreover, Salmonella-specific Ab production and Ag-specific CD4 T cells were reduced in Sirpα⁻/⁻ mice compared with wild-type controls. To further characterize the potential mechanism underlying SIRPα-dependent Ag-specific CD4 T cell priming, we demonstrate that lack of SIRPα expression on dendritic cells results in less efficient Ag processing and presentation in vitro. Collectively, these findings demonstrate an indispensable role of SIRPα for protective immunity to Salmonella infection.

  11. Zika Virus Infection during Pregnancy in Mice Causes Placental Damage and Fetal Demise.

    PubMed

    Miner, Jonathan J; Cao, Bin; Govero, Jennifer; Smith, Amber M; Fernandez, Estefania; Cabrera, Omar H; Garber, Charise; Noll, Michelle; Klein, Robyn S; Noguchi, Kevin K; Mysorekar, Indira U; Diamond, Michael S

    2016-05-19

    Zika virus (ZIKV) infection in pregnant women causes intrauterine growth restriction, spontaneous abortion, and microcephaly. Here, we describe two mouse models of placental and fetal disease associated with in utero transmission of ZIKV. Female mice lacking type I interferon signaling (Ifnar1(-/-)) crossed to wild-type (WT) males produced heterozygous fetuses resembling the immune status of human fetuses. Maternal inoculation at embryonic day 6.5 (E6.5) or E7.5 resulted in fetal demise that was associated with ZIKV infection of the placenta and fetal brain. We identified ZIKV within trophoblasts of the maternal and fetal placenta, consistent with a trans-placental infection route. Antibody blockade of Ifnar1 signaling in WT pregnant mice enhanced ZIKV trans-placental infection although it did not result in fetal death. These models will facilitate the study of ZIKV pathogenesis, in utero transmission, and testing of therapies and vaccines to prevent congenital malformations.

  12. Mechanism of depletion of T lymphocytes from the spleen of mice infected with Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Y Y; Cheers, C

    1982-01-01

    Marked changes in the splenic lymphocyte populations during murine infection with Listeria monocytogenes were observed histologically and quantitated by the immunofluorescence of Thy-1+ immunoglobulin (Ig-) (T) and Ig+ (B) cells. Cells were depleted from the T-dependent areas of the spleen, and the number of T cells in suspensions prepared from spleens of mice 1 to 3 days after primary or secondary infection were less than 1/10 of normal. High numbers of alcohol-killed Listeria sp. did not cause any depletion. Depletion was not prevented by adrenalectomy. Although injected radiolabeled T cells distributed normally between spleen, liver, lymph node, and gut in infected mice, there appeared to be a barrier to their entry into depleted T-dependent areas of the spleen. Evidence for the destruction of T cells, but not of B cells, in the infected mouse spleen was obtained. Images PMID:6982869

  13. Characterization of IL-22 and antimicrobial peptide production in mice protected against pulmonary Cryptococcus neoformans infection.

    PubMed

    Wozniak, Karen L; Hole, Camaron R; Yano, Junko; Fidel, Paul L; Wormley, Floyd L

    2014-07-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is a significant cause of fungal meningitis in patients with impaired T cell-mediated immunity (CMI). Experimental pulmonary infection with a C. neoformans strain engineered to produce IFN-γ, H99γ, results in the induction of Th1-type CMI, resolution of the acute infection, and protection against challenge with WT Cryptococcus. Given that individuals with suppressed CMI are highly susceptible to pulmonary C. neoformans infection, we sought to determine whether antimicrobial peptides were produced in mice inoculated with H99γ. Thus, we measured levels of antimicrobial peptides lipocalin-2, S100A8, S100A9, calprotectin (S100A8/A9 heterodimer), serum amyloid A-3 (SAA3), and their putative receptors Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) in mice during primary and recall responses against C. neoformans infection. Results showed increased levels of IL-17A and IL-22, cytokines known to modulate antimicrobial peptide production. We also observed increased levels of lipocalin-2, S100A8, S100A9 and SAA3 as well as TLR4(+) and RAGE(+) macrophages and dendritic cells in mice inoculated with H99γ compared with WT H99. Similar results were observed in the lungs of H99γ-immunized, compared with heat-killed C. neoformans-immunized, mice following challenge with WT yeast. However, IL-22-deficient mice inoculated with H99γ demonstrated antimicrobial peptide production and no change in survival rates compared with WT mice. These studies demonstrate that protection against cryptococcosis is associated with increased production of antimicrobial peptides in the lungs of protected mice that are not solely in response to IL-17A and IL-22 production and may be coincidental rather than functional.

  14. Long-term selenium deficiency increases the pathogenicity of a Citrobacter rodentium infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Smith, Allen D; Cheung, Lumei; Botero, Sebastian

    2011-12-01

    Citrobacter rodentium is a mouse pathogen that causes infectious colitis and shares characteristics with human enteropathogenic (EPEC) and enterohemorrhagic (EHEC) Escherichia coli, including the ability to cause attaching and effacing lesions in the colon and serves as a useful model to study the pathogenicity of these bacteria. In this study, mice were fed a selenium-deficient diet for 5 or 20 weeks and then infected with C. rodentium. Colonization of the colon by C. rodentium was similar in mice fed adequate or selenium-deficient diets, but total bacterial colonization of the spleen was elevated in mice fed selenium-deficient diet for 20 weeks. Infection-induced changes to the colon included inflammatory cell infiltration, gross changes in crypt architecture, and ulceration and denuding of the epithelial layer that were greatest in mice fed a selenium-deficient diet for 20 weeks. Expression of pro-inflammatory genes was significantly higher 12-days post-infection in mice fed the selenium-deficient diet for 20 weeks compared to mice fed a selenium-adequate diet or selenium-deficient diet for 5 weeks. Diarrhea was prevalent in mice fed the selenium-deficient diet for 20 weeks but not 5 weeks, and this was associated with decreased expression of solute carrier family 26a3 and carbonic anhydrase IV, genes involved in ion transport. These results indicated that selenium played an important role in resistance to the pathological effects of a C. rodentium infection, and therefore, selenium status may be important in the expression of human disease caused by common food-borne bacteria.

  15. Mice lacking functional STAT1 are highly susceptible to lethal infection with Lassa virus.

    PubMed

    Yun, Nadezhda E; Seregin, Alexey V; Walker, David H; Popov, Vsevolod L; Walker, Aida G; Smith, Jeanon N; Miller, Milagros; de la Torre, Juan C; Smith, Jennifer K; Borisevich, Viktoriya; Fair, Joseph N; Wauquier, Nadia; Grant, Donald S; Bockarie, Bayon; Bente, Dennis; Paessler, Slobodan

    2013-10-01

    Lassa fever (LF) is a potentially lethal human disease that is caused by the arenavirus Lassa virus (LASV). Annually, around 300,000 infections with up to 10,000 deaths occur in regions of Lassa fever endemicity in West Africa. Here we demonstrate that mice lacking a functional STAT1 pathway are highly susceptible to infection with LASV and develop lethal disease with pathology similar to that reported in humans.

  16. Influence of Parasite Load on Renal Function in Mice Acutely Infected with Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Parreira, Ricardo Cambraia; Miguel, Renata Botelho; de Paula Rogerio, Alexandre; Oliveira, Carlo Jose Freire; Chica, Javier Emilio Lazo

    2013-01-01

    Background Chagas disease is a neglected tropical disease caused by Trypanosoma cruzi. Despite the vast number of studies evaluating the pathophysiological mechanisms of the disease, the influence of parasite burden on kidney lesions remains unclear. Thus, the main goal of this work was to evaluate the effect of T. cruzi infection on renal function and determine whether there was a correlation between parasite load and renal injury using an acute experimental model of the disease. Methodology/Principal Findings Low, medium and high parasite loads were generated by infecting C57BL/6 mice with 300 (low), 3,000 (medium) or 30,000 (high) numbers of “Y” strain trypomastigotes. We found that mice infected with T. cruzi trypomastigotes show increased renal injury. The infection resulted in reduced urinary excretion and creatinine clearance. We also observed a marked elevation in the ratio of urine volume to kidney and body weight, blood urea nitrogen, chloride ion, nitric oxide, pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines and the number of leukocytes in the blood and/or renal tissues of infected mice. Additionally, we observed the presence of the parasite in the cortical/medullary and peri-renal region, an increase of inflammatory infiltrate and of vascular permeability of the kidney. Overall, most renal changes occurred mainly in animals infected with high parasitic loads. Conclusions/Significance These data demonstrate that T. cruzi impairs kidney function, and this impairment is more evident in mice infected with high parasitic loads. Moreover, these data suggest that, in addition to the extensively studied cardiovascular effects, renal injury should be regarded as an important indicator for better understanding the pan-infectivity of the parasite and consequently for understanding the disease in experimental models. PMID:23951243

  17. Striatal pathology underlies prion infection-mediated hyperactivity in mice.

    PubMed

    Gunapala, Keith M; Chang, Daniel; Hsu, Cynthia T; Manaye, Kebreten; Drenan, Ryan M; Switzer, Robert C; Steele, Andrew D

    2010-01-01

    Although prion diseases are most commonly modeled using the laboratory mouse, the diversity of prion strains, behavioral testing and neuropathological assessments hamper our collective understanding of mouse models of prion disease. Here we compared several commonly used murine strains of prions in C57BL/6J female mice in a detailed home cage behavior detection system and a systematic study of pathological markers and neurotransmitter systems. We observed that mice inoculated with RML or 139A prions develop a severe hyperactivity phenotype in the home cage. A detailed assessment of pathology markers, such as microglial marker IBA1, astroglial marker GFAP and degeneration staining indicate early striatal pathology in mice inoculated with RML or 139A but not in those inoculated with 22L prions. An assessment of neuromodulatory systems including serotonin, dopamine, noradrenalin and acetylcholine showed surprisingly little decline in neuronal cell bodies or their innervations of regions controlling locomotor behavior, except for a small decrease in dopaminergic innervations of the dorsal striatum. These results implicate the dorsal striatum in mediating the major behavioral phenotype of 139A and RML prions. Further, they suggest that measurements of activity may be a sensitive manner in which to diagnose murine prion disease. With respect to neuropathology, our results indicate that pathological stains as opposed to neurotransmitter markers are much more informative and sensitive as markers of prion disease in mouse models.

  18. Aged mice display an altered pulmonary host response to Francisella tularensis live vaccine strain (LVS) infections

    PubMed Central

    CA, Mares; SS, Ojeda; Q, Li; EG, Morris; JJ, Coalson; JM, Teale

    2012-01-01

    Aging is a complex phenomenon that has been shown to affect many organ systems including the innate and adaptive immune systems. The current study was designed to examine the potential effect of immunosenescence on the pulmonary immune response using a Francisella tularensis live vaccine strain (LVS) inhalation infection model. F. tularensis is a gram-negative intracellular pathogen that can cause a severe pneumonia.In this study both young (8-12 week old) and aged (20-24 month old) mice were infected intranasally with LVS. Lung tissues from young and aged mice were used to assess pathology, recruitment of immune cell types and cytokine expression levels at various times post infection. Bacterial burdens were also assessed. Interestingly, the lungs of aged animals harbored fewer organisms at early time points of infection (day 1, day 3) compared with their younger counterparts. In addition, only aged animals displayed small perivascular aggregates at these early time points that appeared mostly mononuclear in nature. However, the kinetics of infiltrating polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) and increased cytokine levels measured in the bronchial alveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were delayed in infected aged animals relative to young infected animals with neutrophils appearing at day 5 post infection (PI) in the aged animals as opposed to day 3 PI in the young infected animals. Also evident were alterations in the ratios of mononuclear to PMNs at distinct post infection times. The above evidence indicates that aged mice elicit an altered immune response in the lung to respiratory Francisella tularensis LVS infections compared to their younger counterparts. PMID:19825409

  19. Chemokine response in mice infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Rhoades, E R; Cooper, A M; Orme, I M

    1995-01-01

    We show here that infection of murine macrophages with various strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis induces the rapid in vitro expression of genes encoding chemokines macrophage inflammatory protein 1 alpha and macrophage inflammatory protein 2, which recruit neutrophils to sites of infection, and macrophage-recruiting chemokines 10-kDa, interferon-inducible protein (IP-10) and macrophage chemotactic protein 1. Three strains of M. tuberculosis, Erdman and the clinical isolates CSU 22 and CSU 46, induced similar levels of secretion of macrophage chemotactic protein 1 from infected macrophage monolayers; however, the Erdman strain failed to induce levels of secretion of tumor necrosis factor alpha similar to those induced by either CSU 22 or CSU 46. Using a low-dose aerosol infection model, we also found that while the Erdman strain induced negligible increases in chemokine mRNA levels in the lungs, infection with either CSU 22 or CSU 46 resulted in greater levels of mRNA production for all four chemokines tested. The growth of these strains in the lungs was, however, equally well contained by acquired host immunity. These data allow us to hypothesize that the chemokine response in the lungs probably does not control the protective granulomatous response and that perhaps other T-cell- or macrophage-associated cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor alpha or interleukin 12 may be involved in this process. PMID:7558294

  20. High Dietary Folate in Mice Alters Immune Response and Reduces Survival after Malarial Infection

    PubMed Central

    Meadows, Danielle N.; Bahous, Renata H.; Best, Ana F.; Rozen, Rima

    2015-01-01

    Malaria is a significant global health issue, with nearly 200 million cases in 2013 alone. Parasites obtain folate from the host or synthesize it de novo. Folate consumption has increased in many populations, prompting concerns regarding potential deleterious consequences of higher intake. The impact of high dietary folate on the host’s immune function and response to malaria has not been examined. Our goal was to determine whether high dietary folate would affect response to malarial infection in a murine model of cerebral malaria. Mice were fed control diets (CD, recommended folate level for rodents) or folic acid-supplemented diets (FASD, 10x recommended level) for 5 weeks before infection with Plasmodium berghei ANKA. Survival, parasitemia, numbers of immune cells and other infection parameters were assessed. FASD mice had reduced survival (p<0.01, Cox proportional hazards) and higher parasitemia (p< 0.01, joint model of parasitemia and survival) compared with CD mice. FASD mice had lower numbers of splenocytes, total T cells, and lower numbers of specific T and NK cell sub-populations, compared with CD mice (p<0.05, linear mixed effects). Increased brain TNFα immunoreactive protein (p<0.01, t-test) and increased liver Abca1 mRNA (p<0.01, t-test), a modulator of TNFα, were observed in FASD mice; these variables correlated positively (rs = 0.63, p = 0.01). Bcl-xl/Bak mRNA was increased in liver of FASD mice (p<0.01, t-test), suggesting reduced apoptotic potential. We conclude that high dietary folate increases parasite replication, disturbs the immune response and reduces resistance to malaria in mice. These findings have relevance for malaria-endemic regions, when considering anti-folate anti-malarials, food fortification or vitamin supplementation programs. PMID:26599510

  1. High Dietary Folate in Mice Alters Immune Response and Reduces Survival after Malarial Infection.

    PubMed

    Meadows, Danielle N; Bahous, Renata H; Best, Ana F; Rozen, Rima

    2015-01-01

    Malaria is a significant global health issue, with nearly 200 million cases in 2013 alone. Parasites obtain folate from the host or synthesize it de novo. Folate consumption has increased in many populations, prompting concerns regarding potential deleterious consequences of higher intake. The impact of high dietary folate on the host's immune function and response to malaria has not been examined. Our goal was to determine whether high dietary folate would affect response to malarial infection in a murine model of cerebral malaria. Mice were fed control diets (CD, recommended folate level for rodents) or folic acid-supplemented diets (FASD, 10x recommended level) for 5 weeks before infection with Plasmodium berghei ANKA. Survival, parasitemia, numbers of immune cells and other infection parameters were assessed. FASD mice had reduced survival (p<0.01, Cox proportional hazards) and higher parasitemia (p< 0.01, joint model of parasitemia and survival) compared with CD mice. FASD mice had lower numbers of splenocytes, total T cells, and lower numbers of specific T and NK cell sub-populations, compared with CD mice (p<0.05, linear mixed effects). Increased brain TNFα immunoreactive protein (p<0.01, t-test) and increased liver Abca1 mRNA (p<0.01, t-test), a modulator of TNFα, were observed in FASD mice; these variables correlated positively (rs = 0.63, p = 0.01). Bcl-xl/Bak mRNA was increased in liver of FASD mice (p<0.01, t-test), suggesting reduced apoptotic potential. We conclude that high dietary folate increases parasite replication, disturbs the immune response and reduces resistance to malaria in mice. These findings have relevance for malaria-endemic regions, when considering anti-folate anti-malarials, food fortification or vitamin supplementation programs.

  2. Early detection of Trichinella spiralis DNA in the feces of experimentally infected mice by using PCR.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao Lin; Ren, Hua Nan; Shi, Ya Li; Hu, Chen Xi; Song, Yan Yan; Duan, Jiang Yang; Zhang, Hui Ping; Du, Xin Rui; Liu, Ruo Dan; Jiang, Peng; Wang, Zhong Quan; Cui, Jing

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to detect Trichinella spiralis DNA in mouse feces during the early stages of infection using PCR. The target gene fragment, a 1.6kb repetitive sequence of T. spiralis genome, was amplified by PCR from feces of mice infected with 100 or 300 larvae at 3-24h post infection (hpi) and 2-28dpi. The sensitivity of PCR was 0.016 larvae in feces. The primers used were highly specific for T. spiralis. No cross-reactivity was observed with the DNA of other intestinal helminths. T. spiralis DNA was detected in 100% (12/12) of feces of mice infected with 100 or 300 larvae as early as 3hpi, with the peak detection lasting to 12-24hpi, and then fluctuating before declining gradually. By 28dpi, the detection rate of T. spiralis DNA in feces of the two groups of infected mice decreased to 8.33% and 25%, respectively. PCR detection of T. spiralis DNA in feces is simple and specific; it might be useful for the early diagnosis of Trichinella infection.

  3. Mild Staphylococcus aureus Skin Infection Improves the Course of Subsequent Endogenous S. aureus Bacteremia in Mice

    PubMed Central

    van den Berg, Sanne; de Vogel, Corné P.; van Belkum, Alex; Bakker-Woudenberg, Irma A. J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus carriers with S. aureus bacteremia may have a reduced mortality risk compared to non-carriers. A role for the immune system is suggested. Here, we study in mice the effect of mild S. aureus skin infection prior to endogenous or exogenous S. aureus bacteremia, and evaluate protection in relation to anti-staphylococcal antibody levels. Skin infections once or twice by a clinical S. aureus isolate (isolate P) or S. aureus strain 8325-4 were induced in mice free of S. aureus and anti-staphylococcal antibodies. Five weeks later, immunoglobulin G (IgG) levels in blood against 25 S. aureus antigens were determined, and LD50 or LD100 bacteremia caused by S. aureus isolate P was induced. S. aureus skin infections led to elevated levels of anti-staphylococcal IgG in blood. One skin infection improved the course of subsequent severe endogenous bacteremia only. A second skin infection further improved animal survival rate, which was associated with increased pre-bacteremia IgG levels against Efb, IsaA, LukD, LukE, Nuc, PrsA and WTA. In conclusion, S. aureus isolate P skin infection in mice reduces the severity of subsequent endogenous S. aureus bacteremia only. Although cellular immune effects cannot be rules out, anti-staphylococcal IgG against specified antigens may contribute to this effect. PMID:26060995

  4. Mild Staphylococcus aureus Skin Infection Improves the Course of Subsequent Endogenous S. aureus Bacteremia in Mice.

    PubMed

    van den Berg, Sanne; de Vogel, Corné P; van Belkum, Alex; Bakker-Woudenberg, Irma A J M

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus carriers with S. aureus bacteremia may have a reduced mortality risk compared to non-carriers. A role for the immune system is suggested. Here, we study in mice the effect of mild S. aureus skin infection prior to endogenous or exogenous S. aureus bacteremia, and evaluate protection in relation to anti-staphylococcal antibody levels. Skin infections once or twice by a clinical S. aureus isolate (isolate P) or S. aureus strain 8325-4 were induced in mice free of S. aureus and anti-staphylococcal antibodies. Five weeks later, immunoglobulin G (IgG) levels in blood against 25 S. aureus antigens were determined, and LD50 or LD100 bacteremia caused by S. aureus isolate P was induced. S. aureus skin infections led to elevated levels of anti-staphylococcal IgG in blood. One skin infection improved the course of subsequent severe endogenous bacteremia only. A second skin infection further improved animal survival rate, which was associated with increased pre-bacteremia IgG levels against Efb, IsaA, LukD, LukE, Nuc, PrsA and WTA. In conclusion, S. aureus isolate P skin infection in mice reduces the severity of subsequent endogenous S. aureus bacteremia only. Although cellular immune effects cannot be rules out, anti-staphylococcal IgG against specified antigens may contribute to this effect.

  5. Targeted photodynamic therapy of established soft-tissue infections in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gad, Faten; Zahra, Touqir; Hasan, Tayyaba; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2004-06-01

    The worldwide rise in antibiotic resistance necessitates the development of novel antimicrobial strategies. Although many workers have used photodynamic therapy (PDT) to kill bacteria in vitro, the use of this approach has seldom been reported in vivo in animal models of infection. We have previously described the first use of PDT to treat excisional wound infections by Gram-negative bacteria in living mice. However these infected wound models used a short time after infection (30 min) before PDT. We now report on the use of PDT to treat an established soft-tissue infection in mice. We used Staphylococcus aureus stably transformed with a Photorhabdus luminescens lux operon (luxABCDE) that was genetically modified to be functional in Gram-positive bacteria. These engineered bacteria emitted bioluminescence allowing the progress of the infection to be monitored in both space and time with a lowlight imaging charged couple device (CCD) camera. One million cells were injected into one or both thigh muscles of mice that had previously been rendered neutropenic by cyclophosphamide administration. Twenty-four hours later the bacteria had multiplied more than one hundred-fold, and poly-L-lysine chlorin(e6) conjugate or free chlorin(e6) was injected into one area of infected muscle and imaged with the CCD camera. Thirty-minutes later red light from a diode laser was delivered as a surface spot or by interstitial fiber into the infection. There was a lightdose dependent loss of bioluminescence (to < 5% of that seen in control infections) not seen in untreated or light alone treated infections, but in some cases the infection recurred. Conjugate alone led to a lesser reduction in bioluminescence. Infections treated with free chlorin(e6) responded less and the infection subsequently increased over the succeeding days, probably due to PDT-mediated tissue damage. PDT-treated infected legs healed better than legs with untreated infections. This data shows that PDT may have

  6. Diphenyl Diselenide Reduces Oxidative Stress and Toxicity Caused by HSV-2 Infection in Mice.

    PubMed

    Sartori, Gláubia; Jardim, Natália Silva; Sari, Marcel Henrique Marcondes; Flores, Eduardo F; Prigol, Marina; Nogueira, Cristina W

    2017-05-01

    Herpes simplex viruses can cause uncommon systemic complications as acute liver failure (ALT) or urinary tract dysfunctions. Diphenyl diselenide, (PhSe)2 , a classical studied organic selenium compound, has a novel antiviral action against HSV-2 infection and well-known antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. This study aimed to investigate if (PhSe)2 reduces oxidative stress and systemic toxicity caused by HSV-2 infection in mice. Adult BALB/c mice were pre-treated with (PhSe)2 (5 mg kg(-1) /day, intragastric, i.g.) during 5 days; at day 6 mice were infected with HSV-2 (10 μl-10(5) PFU/mL(-1) ) and post-treated with (PhSe)2 for more 5 days. At day 11, they were killed and samples of liver and kidney were obtained to determine: reactive species (RS); malondialdehyde (MDA), and non-protein thiols (NPSH) levels; the activities of antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutase (SOD), and catalase (CAT). The activities of adenosine deaminase (ADA), Na(+) /K(+) -ATPase (liver and kidney); alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and the levels of urea (plasma) were determined as markers of hepatic and renal toxicity. The results revealed that (PhSe)2 treatment was effective against the increase of renal and hepatic oxidative stress in infected mice and also normalized hepatic and renal ADA activity. It recovered the activity of Na(+) /K(+) - and was not effective against the increase in urea levels in infected mice. Different from (PhSe)2 , acyclovir (positive control), caused an increase in ADA activity and a decrease in hepatic CAT activity. Considering the interest of alternative therapies to treat HSV-2 infections and secondary complications, (PhSe)2 become a notable candidate. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 1028-1037, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Buparvaquone is active against Neospora caninum in vitro and in experimentally infected mice

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Joachim; Aguado-Martinez, Adriana; Manser, Vera; Balmer, Vreni; Winzer, Pablo; Ritler, Dominic; Hostettler, Isabel; Arranz-Solís, David; Ortega-Mora, Luis; Hemphill, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The naphthoquinone buparvaquone is currently the only drug used against theileriosis. Here, the effects of buparvaquone were investigated in vitro and in an experimental mouse model for Neospora caninum infection. In 4-day proliferation assays, buparvaquone efficiently inhibited N. caninum tachyzoite replication (IC50 = 4.9 nM; IC100 = 100 nM). However, in the long term tachyzoites adapted and resumed proliferation in the presence of 100 nM buparvaquone after 20 days of cultivation. Parasiticidal activity was noted after 9 days of culture in 0.5 µM or 6 days in 1 µM buparvaquone. TEM of N. caninum infected fibroblasts treated with 1 µM buparvaquone showed that the drug acted rather slowly, and ultrastructural changes were evident only after 3–5 days of treatment, including severe alterations in the parasite cytoplasm, changes in the composition of the parasitophorous vacuole matrix and a diminished integrity of the vacuole membrane. Treatment of N. caninum infected mice with buparvaquone (100 mg/kg) either by intraperitoneal injection or gavage prevented neosporosis symptoms in 4 out of 6 mice in the intraperitoneally treated group, and in 6 out of 7 mice in the group receiving oral treatment. In the corresponding controls, all 6 mice injected intraperitoneally with corn oil alone died of acute neosporosis, and 4 out of 6 mice died in the orally treated control group. Assessment of infection intensities in the treatment groups showed that, compared to the drug treated groups, the controls showed a significantly higher parasite load in the lungs while cerebral parasite load was higher in the buparvaquone-treated groups. Thus, although buparvaquone did not eliminate the parasites infecting the CNS, the drug represents an interesting lead with the potential to eliminate, or at least diminish, fetal infection during pregnancy. PMID:25941626

  8. Buparvaquone is active against Neospora caninum in vitro and in experimentally infected mice.

    PubMed

    Müller, Joachim; Aguado-Martinez, Adriana; Manser, Vera; Balmer, Vreni; Winzer, Pablo; Ritler, Dominic; Hostettler, Isabel; Arranz-Solís, David; Ortega-Mora, Luis; Hemphill, Andrew

    2015-04-01

    The naphthoquinone buparvaquone is currently the only drug used against theileriosis. Here, the effects of buparvaquone were investigated in vitro and in an experimental mouse model for Neospora caninum infection. In 4-day proliferation assays, buparvaquone efficiently inhibited N. caninum tachyzoite replication (IC50 = 4.9 nM; IC100 = 100 nM). However, in the long term tachyzoites adapted and resumed proliferation in the presence of 100 nM buparvaquone after 20 days of cultivation. Parasiticidal activity was noted after 9 days of culture in 0.5 µM or 6 days in 1 µM buparvaquone. TEM of N. caninum infected fibroblasts treated with 1 µM buparvaquone showed that the drug acted rather slowly, and ultrastructural changes were evident only after 3-5 days of treatment, including severe alterations in the parasite cytoplasm, changes in the composition of the parasitophorous vacuole matrix and a diminished integrity of the vacuole membrane. Treatment of N. caninum infected mice with buparvaquone (100 mg/kg) either by intraperitoneal injection or gavage prevented neosporosis symptoms in 4 out of 6 mice in the intraperitoneally treated group, and in 6 out of 7 mice in the group receiving oral treatment. In the corresponding controls, all 6 mice injected intraperitoneally with corn oil alone died of acute neosporosis, and 4 out of 6 mice died in the orally treated control group. Assessment of infection intensities in the treatment groups showed that, compared to the drug treated groups, the controls showed a significantly higher parasite load in the lungs while cerebral parasite load was higher in the buparvaquone-treated groups. Thus, although buparvaquone did not eliminate the parasites infecting the CNS, the drug represents an interesting lead with the potential to eliminate, or at least diminish, fetal infection during pregnancy.

  9. Marrow-dependent cells depleted by 89Sr mediate genetic resistance to herpes simplex virus type 1 infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Lopez, C; Ryshke, R; Bennett, M

    1980-06-01

    Adult mice resistant to infection with 10(6) plaque-forming units of a virulent strain of herpes simplex virus type 1 were treated with 89Sr to abrogate marrow-dependent cell functions. Treated mice were found to be much more susceptible to the herpes simplex virus type 1 infection than untreated mice. The virus persisted in the visceral tissues of 89Sr-treated mice for 3 or more days postinfection but not in those of untreated mice. The virus also spread to the spinal cords of treated but not untreated mice. A marrow-dependent cell appeared to mediate resistance to herpes simplex virus type 1 by controlling the infection early after inoculation and not allowing the infection spread to the central nervous system.

  10. Interplay between vesicoureteric reflux and kidney infection in the development of reflux nephropathy in mice.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Samantha E; Watt, Christine L; Murawski, Inga J; Gupta, Indra R; Abraham, Soman N

    2013-07-01

    Vesicoureteric reflux (VUR) is a common congenital defect of the urinary tract that is usually discovered after a child develops a urinary tract infection. It is associated with reflux nephropathy, a renal lesion characterized by the presence of chronic tubulointersitial inflammation and fibrosis. Most patients are diagnosed with reflux nephropathy after one or more febrile urinary tract infections, suggesting a potential role for infection in its development. We have recently shown that the C3H mouse has a 100% incidence of VUR. Here, we evaluate the roles of VUR and uropathogenic Escherichia coli infection in the development of reflux nephropathy in the C3H mouse. We find that VUR in combination with sustained kidney infection is crucial to the development of reflux nephropathy, whereas sterile reflux alone fails to induce reflux nephropathy. A single bout of kidney infection without reflux fails to induce reflux nephropathy. The host immune response to infection was examined in two refluxing C3H substrains, HeN and HeJ. HeJ mice, which have a defect in innate immunity and bacterial clearance, demonstrate more significant renal inflammation and reflux nephropathy compared with HeN mice. These studies demonstrate the crucial synergy between VUR, sustained kidney infection and the host immune response in the development of reflux nephropathy in a mouse model of VUR.

  11. Heterologous Infection of Pregnant Mice Induces Low Birth Weight and Modifies Offspring Susceptibility to Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Ankur; Conteh, Solomon; Langhorne, Jean; Duffy, Patrick E.

    2016-01-01

    Pregnancy malaria (PM) is associated with poor pregnancy outcomes, and can arise due to relapse, recrudescence or a re-infection with heterologous parasites. We have used the Plasmodium chabaudi model of pregnancy malaria in C57BL/6 mice to examine recrudescence and heterologous infection using CB and AS parasite strains. After an initial course of patent parasitemia and first recrudescence, CB but not AS parasites were observed to recrudesce again in most animals that became pregnant. Pregnancy exacerbated heterologous CB infection of AS-experienced mice, leading to mortality and impaired post-natal growth of pups. Parasites were detected in placental blood without evidence of sequestration, unlike P. falciparum but similar to other malaria species that infect pregnant women. Inflammatory cytokine levels were elevated in pregnant females during malaria, and associated with intensity of infection and with poor outcomes. Pups born to dams during heterologous infection were more resistant to malaria infections at 6–7 weeks of age, compared to pups born to malaria-experienced but uninfected dams or to malaria-naïve dams. In summary, our mouse model reproduces several features of human PM, including recrudescences, heterologous infections, poor pregnancy outcomes associated with inflammatory cytokines, and modulation of offspring susceptibility to malaria. This model should be further studied to explore mechanisms underlying PM pathogenesis. PMID:27467392

  12. Toxoplasma gondii infection blocks the development of allergic airway inflammation in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Fenoy, I; Giovannoni, M; Batalla, E; Martin, V; Frank, F M; Piazzon, I; Goldman, A

    2009-02-01

    There is a link between increased allergy and a reduction of some infections in western countries. Epidemiological data also show that respiratory allergy is less frequent in people exposed to orofaecal and foodborne microbes such as Toxoplasma gondii. Infection with T. gondii induces a strong cell-mediated immunity with a highly polarized T helper type 1 (Th1) response in early stages of infection. Using a well-known murine model of allergic lung inflammation, we sought to investigate whether T. gondii infection could modulate the susceptibility to develop respiratory allergies. Both acute and chronic infection with T. gondii before allergic sensitization resulted in a diminished allergic inflammation, as shown by a decrease in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) eosinophilia, mononuclear and eosinophil cell infiltration around airways and vessels and goblet cell hyperplasia. Low allergen-specific immunoglobulin (Ig)E and IgG1 and high levels of allergen-specific IgG2a serum antibodies were detected. A decreased interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-5 production by lymph node cells was observed, while no antigen-specific interferon-gamma increase was detected. Higher levels of the regulatory cytokine IL-10 were found in BAL from infected mice. These results show that both acute and chronic parasite infection substantially blocked development of airway inflammation in adult BALB/c mice. Our results support the hypothesis that T. gondii infection contributes to protection against allergy in humans.

  13. Host resistance of CD18 knockout mice against systemic infection with Listeria monocytogenes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Huaizhu; Prince, Joseph E.; Brayton, Cory F.; Shah, Chirayu; Zeve, Daniel; Gregory, Stephen H.; Smith, C. Wayne; Ballantyne, Christie M.

    2003-01-01

    Mice with targeted mutations of CD18, the common beta2 subunit of CD11/CD18 integrins, have leukocytosis, impaired transendothelial neutrophil emigration, and reduced host defense to Streptococcus pneumoniae, a gram-positive extracellular bacterium. Previous studies using blocking monoclonal antibodies suggested roles for CD18 and CD11b in hepatic neutrophil recruitment and host innate response to Listeria monocytogenes, a gram-positive intracellular bacterium. We induced systemic listeriosis in CD18 knockout (CD18-ko) and wild-type (WT) mice by tail vein injection with Listeria. By 14 days postinjection (dpi), 8 of 10 WT mice died, compared with 2 of 10 CD18-ko mice (P < 0.01). Quantitative organ culture showed that numbers of Listeria organisms in livers and spleens were similar in both groups at 20 min postinfection. By 3, 5, and 7 dpi, however, numbers of Listeria organisms were significantly lower in livers and spleens of CD18-ko mice than in WT mice. Histopathology showed that following Listeria infection, CD18-ko mice had milder inflammatory and necrotizing lesions in both spleens and livers than did WT mice. Cytokine assays indicated that baseline interleukin-1beta and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) levels were higher in CD18-ko mice than in WT mice and that CD18-ko splenocytes produced higher levels of interleukin-1beta and G-CSF than WT splenocytes under the same amount of Listeria stimulation. These findings show that CD18 is not an absolute requirement for antilisterial innate immunity or hepatic neutrophil recruitment. We propose that the absence of CD18 in the mice results in the priming of innate immunity, as evidenced by elevated cytokine expression, and neutrophilic leukocytosis, which augments antilisterial defense.

  14. NON-FATAL INFECTION OF MICE FOLLOWING INTRACEREBRAL INOCULATION OF YELLOW FEVER VIRUS

    PubMed Central

    Fox, John P.

    1943-01-01

    Observations have been reported which indicate that mice inoculated intracerebrally with active yellow fever virus may develop an infection which is not only non-fatal but may also be completely inapparent. The most extensive observations were made on mice which showed signs of infection but were still alive 22 days after inoculation with virus of one or another of several 17D substrains. In such cases, the infection usually progressed no further and partial or complete recovery often ensued. Agents other than yellow fever virus were excluded as a significant cause of such nonfatal infections by the failure of repeated attempts to isolate other infective agents, by the demonstration of antibodies against yellow fever virus in the sera of the mice, and by the demonstration of a high degree of resistance on the part of such surviving mice to reinoculation with large doses of neurotropic yellow fever virus. Completely inapparent infections with 17D virus were also shown to occur. Studies of apparently normal survivors of 17D virus titrations revealed a small but significant number of animals resistant to intracerebral challenge with neurotropic yellow fever virus. Further, pooled sera from such mice were shown to contain specific protective antibodies. The occurrence of non-fatal infections with 17D virus was found related to virus dose and substrain. Small doses of virus provoked a significantly higher proportion of non-fatal infections than large doses; while different 17D substrains, tested over equivalent ranges of virus dose, varied greatly with respect to the proportion of infections which did not terminate with death. In the case of two substrains (17DD low and 17D3), non-fatal infections (as demonstrated by resistance to intracerebral challenge with neurotropic virus) were sufficiently frequent to cause an increase, when included in the computation of the infective titers, of 25 per cent above the figures based on deaths alone. The demonstration of non

  15. Murine Cytomegalovirus Infection Induces Susceptibility to EAE in Resistant BALB/c Mice

    PubMed Central

    Milovanovic, Jelena; Popovic, Branka; Milovanovic, Marija; Kvestak, Daria; Arsenijevic, Aleksandar; Stojanovic, Bojana; Tanaskovic, Irena; Krmpotic, Astrid; Arsenijevic, Nebojsa; Jonjic, Stipan; Lukic, Miodrag L.

    2017-01-01

    In contrast to C57BL/6 mice, BALB/c mice are relatively resistant to the induction of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) after challenge with MOG35–55 peptide. Here, we provide the first evidence that infection with murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) in adulthood abrogates this resistance. Infected BALB/c mice developed clinical and histological signs similar to those seen in susceptible C57BL/6 mice. In addition to CD4+ cells, large proportion of cells in the infiltrate of diseased BALB/c mice was CD8+, similar with findings in multiple sclerosis. CD8+ cells that responded to ex vivo restimulation with MOG35–55 were not specific for viral epitopes pp89 and m164. MCMV infection favors proinflammatory type of dendritic cells (CD86+CD40+CD11c+) in the peripheral lymph organs, M1 type of microglia in central nervous system, and increases development of Th1/Th17 encephalitogenic cells. This study indicates that MCMV may enhance autoimmune neuropathology and abrogate inherent resistance to EAE in mouse strain by enhancing proinflammatory phenotype of antigen-presenting cells, Th1/Th17, and CD8 response to MOG35–55. PMID:28289417

  16. Immunoproteasomes are essential for survival and expansion of T cells in virus-infected mice.

    PubMed

    Moebius, Jacqueline; van den Broek, Maries; Groettrup, Marcus; Basler, Michael

    2010-12-01

    Immunoproteasomes containing the IFN-inducible subunits β1i (LMP2), β2i (MECL-1) and β5i (LMP7) alter proteasomal cleavage preference and optimize the generation of peptide ligands of MHC class I molecules. Here, we report on an unexpected new function of immunoproteasome subunits for the survival and expansion of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells during viral infection of mice. The effect of immunoproteasome subunit deficiency on T-cell survival upon adoptive transfer was most prominent for the lack of LMP7 followed by MECL-1 and LMP2. The survival of T cells in uninfected mice or the homeostatic expansion after transfer into RAG-2(-/-) mice was not affected by the lack of the immunosubunits. Lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV)-specific CD8(+) T cells lacking LMP7 or MECL-1 started to divide after transfer into LCMV-infected mice but experienced a considerable cell loss within 2 days after transfer. We provide strong evidence that the loss of immunoproteasome-deficient T cells after transfer is not a consequence of graft rejection by the host, but instead is based on the requirement for immunoproteasomes for the survival of T cells in LCMV-infected mice. Therefore, the immunoproteasome may qualify as a potential new target for the suppression of undesired proinflammatory T-cell responses.

  17. Immunosuppressive and antiparasitic effects of cyclosporin A on Hymenolepis nana infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Matsuzawa, K; Nakamura, F; Abe, M; Okamoto, K

    1998-04-01

    The effect of cyclosporin A, which is known to act both as immunosuppressant and as an antiparasitic drug in many host-parasite systems, was examined in a mouse-Hymenolepis nana system. When BDF1 mice were injected s.c. with cyclosporin A (100 mg kg-1 day-1) every 48 h from 11 days p.i. with eggs, expulsion of the adult worms from the intestines of mice was prevented completely until at least 30 days p.i. Worm burden, dry weight and the number of gravid proglottids were not significantly reduced. By contrast, in untreated mice most of the worms were eliminated by 19 days p.i. The drug also completely abolished acquired resistance to a challenge infection with eggs when mice were injected s.c. with cyclosporin A (100 mg kg-1 day-1) around the time of challenge infection (Days -2, -1, 0, 1 and 2 relative to challenge). Such immunosuppressive effects of cyclosporin A on worm expulsion and protective immunity to reinfection were similar to those of another immunosuppressant, cyclophosphamide. As for the antiparasitic action of cyclosporin A against H. nana, a smaller number of cysticercoids developed from eggs in mice given cyclosporin A (100 mg kg-1 day-1) for 5 days beginning 1 day before infection, than in untreated controls.

  18. Control of Mycobacterial Infections in Mice Expressing Human Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) but Not Mouse TNF.

    PubMed

    Olleros, Maria L; Chavez-Galan, Leslie; Segueni, Noria; Bourigault, Marie L; Vesin, Dominique; Kruglov, Andrey A; Drutskaya, Marina S; Bisig, Ruth; Ehlers, Stefan; Aly, Sahar; Walter, Kerstin; Kuprash, Dmitry V; Chouchkova, Miliana; Kozlov, Sergei V; Erard, François; Ryffel, Bernard; Quesniaux, Valérie F J; Nedospasov, Sergei A; Garcia, Irene

    2015-09-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is an important cytokine for host defense against pathogens but is also associated with the development of human immunopathologies. TNF blockade effectively ameliorates many chronic inflammatory conditions but compromises host immunity to tuberculosis. The search for novel, more specific human TNF blockers requires the development of a reliable animal model. We used a novel mouse model with complete replacement of the mouse TNF gene by its human ortholog (human TNF [huTNF] knock-in [KI] mice) to determine resistance to Mycobacterium bovis BCG and M. tuberculosis infections and to investigate whether TNF inhibitors in clinical use reduce host immunity. Our results show that macrophages from huTNF KI mice responded to BCG and lipopolysaccharide similarly to wild-type macrophages by NF-κB activation and cytokine production. While TNF-deficient mice rapidly succumbed to mycobacterial infection, huTNF KI mice survived, controlling the bacterial burden and activating bactericidal mechanisms. Administration of TNF-neutralizing biologics disrupted the control of mycobacterial infection in huTNF KI mice, leading to an increased bacterial burden and hyperinflammation. Thus, our findings demonstrate that human TNF can functionally replace murine TNF in vivo, providing mycobacterial resistance that could be compromised by TNF neutralization. This new animal model will be helpful for the testing of specific biologics neutralizing human TNF.

  19. Dietary Chitosan Supplementation Increases Microbial Diversity and Attenuates the Severity of Citrobacter rodentium Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongbing; Xiong, Xia; Tan, Bie; Al-Dhabi, Naif Abdullah; Fang, Jun

    2016-01-01

    C57BL/6 mice were tested in order to investigate the effects of dietary chitosan (COS) supplements on intestinal microflora and resistance to Citrobacter rodentium infection. The findings reveal that, after consuming a 300 mg/kg COS diet for 14 days, microflora became more diverse as a result of the supplement. Mice receiving COS exhibited an increase in the percentage of Bacteroidetes phylum and a decrease in the percentage of Firmicutes phylum. After Citrobacter rodentium infection, the histopathology scores indicated that COS feeding resulted in less severe colitis. IL-6 and TNF-α were significantly lower in colon from COS-feeding mice than those in the control group. Furthermore, mice in COS group were also found to experience inhibited activation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) in the colonic tissue. Overall, the findings revealed that adding 300 mg/kg COS to the diet changed the composition of the intestinal microflora of mice, resulting in suppressed NF-κB activation and less production of TNF-α and IL-6; and these changes led to better control of inflammation and resolution of infection with C. rodentium. PMID:27761062

  20. Spontaneous generation of prion infectivity in fatal familial insomnia knockin mice.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Walker S; Borkowski, Andrew W; Faas, Henryk; Steele, Andrew D; King, Oliver D; Watson, Nicki; Jasanoff, Alan; Lindquist, Susan

    2009-08-27

    A crucial tenet of the prion hypothesis is that misfolding of the prion protein (PrP) induced by mutations associated with familial prion disease is, in an otherwise normal mammalian brain, sufficient to generate the infectious agent. Yet this has never been demonstrated. We engineered knockin mice to express a PrP mutation associated with a distinct human prion disease, fatal familial insomnia (FFI). An additional substitution created a strong transmission barrier against pre-existing prions. The mice spontaneously developed a disease distinct from that of other mouse prion models and highly reminiscent of FFI. Unique pathology was transmitted from FFI mice to mice expressing wild-type PrP sharing the same transmission barrier. FFI mice were highly resistant to infection by pre-existing prions, confirming infectivity did not arise from contaminating agents. Thus, a single amino acid change in PrP is sufficient to induce a distinct neurodegenerative disease and the spontaneous generation of prion infectivity.

  1. Spontaneous generation of prion infectivity in fatal familial insomnia knock-in mice

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Walker S.; Borkowski, Andrew; Faas, Henryk; Steele, Andrew; King, Oliver D.; Watson, Nicki; Jasanoff, Alan; Lindquist, Susan

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY A crucial tenet of the prion hypothesis is that misfolding of the prion protein (PrP) induced by mutations associated with familial prion disease is, in an otherwise normal mammalian brain, sufficient to generate the infectious agent. Yet this has never been demonstrated. We engineered knock-in mice to express a PrP mutation associated with a distinct human prion disease, fatal familial insomnia (FFI). An additional substitution created a strong transmission barrier against pre-existing prions. The mice spontaneously developed a disease distinct from that of other mouse prion models and highly reminiscent of FFI. Unique pathology was transmitted from FFI mice to mice expressing wild-type PrP sharing the same transmission barrier. FFI mice were highly resistant to infection by pre-existing prions, confirming infectivity did not arise from contaminating agents. Thus a single amino acid change in PrP is sufficient to induce a distinct neurodegenerative disease and the spontaneous generation of prion infectivity. PMID:19709627

  2. Control of Mycobacterial Infections in Mice Expressing Human Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) but Not Mouse TNF

    PubMed Central

    Olleros, Maria L.; Chavez-Galan, Leslie; Segueni, Noria; Bourigault, Marie L.; Vesin, Dominique; Kruglov, Andrey A.; Drutskaya, Marina S.; Bisig, Ruth; Ehlers, Stefan; Aly, Sahar; Walter, Kerstin; Kuprash, Dmitry V.; Chouchkova, Miliana; Kozlov, Sergei V.; Erard, François; Ryffel, Bernard; Quesniaux, Valérie F. J.; Nedospasov, Sergei A.

    2015-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is an important cytokine for host defense against pathogens but is also associated with the development of human immunopathologies. TNF blockade effectively ameliorates many chronic inflammatory conditions but compromises host immunity to tuberculosis. The search for novel, more specific human TNF blockers requires the development of a reliable animal model. We used a novel mouse model with complete replacement of the mouse TNF gene by its human ortholog (human TNF [huTNF] knock-in [KI] mice) to determine resistance to Mycobacterium bovis BCG and M. tuberculosis infections and to investigate whether TNF inhibitors in clinical use reduce host immunity. Our results show that macrophages from huTNF KI mice responded to BCG and lipopolysaccharide similarly to wild-type macrophages by NF-κB activation and cytokine production. While TNF-deficient mice rapidly succumbed to mycobacterial infection, huTNF KI mice survived, controlling the bacterial burden and activating bactericidal mechanisms. Administration of TNF-neutralizing biologics disrupted the control of mycobacterial infection in huTNF KI mice, leading to an increased bacterial burden and hyperinflammation. Thus, our findings demonstrate that human TNF can functionally replace murine TNF in vivo, providing mycobacterial resistance that could be compromised by TNF neutralization. This new animal model will be helpful for the testing of specific biologics neutralizing human TNF. PMID:26123801

  3. Course of induced infection by Eimeria krijgsmannni in immunocompetent and immunodeficient mice.

    PubMed

    Ono, Yuina; Matsubayashi, Makoto; Kawaguchi, Hiroaki; Tsujio, Masashi; Mizuno, Masanobu; Tanaka, Tetsuya; Masatani, Tatsunori; Matsui, Toshihiro; Matsuo, Tomohide

    2016-01-01

    Recently, we have demonstrated the utility of Eimeria krijgsmanni as a novel mouse eimerian parasite for elucidating the biological diversity. The parasite showed notable infectivity to mice with various levels of immune status and susceptibility to antimicrobial agents including coccidiostat. However, the detailed lifecycle of E. krijgsmanni had not yet been determined and this information was lacking in discussion of previous findings. In the present study, we clarified the morphological characteristics of E. krijgsmanni and its lifecycle in normal mice, and examined the effects in immunodeficient mice and lifecycle stage for challenge infections after the primary inoculation. In immunocompetent mice, the lifecycle consisted of four asexual stages and the sexual sages followed by formation of oocysts during the prepatent periods. Interestingly, the second-generation meronts were detected in all observation periods after the disappearance of the other stages. For the challenge infection of immunodeficient mice, all developmental stages except for the second generation meronts were temporarily vanished. This finding suggests a "rest" or marked delay in development and a "restart" of the promotion toward the next generations. The second generation meronts may play an important role in the lifecycle of E. krijgsmanni.

  4. Bordetella pseudohinzii spp. nov. infects C57Bl6 mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clinical studies rely heavily on mouse models of infection. Precise identification and control of contaminating pathogens that circulate in mouse colonies is an important task. Over the past decade, there have been several reports documenting the isolation of Bordetella spp. from purported pathog...

  5. Failure of mice infected with Rauscher leukemia virus (RLV-A) to develop splenic colonies.

    PubMed

    Bergson, A; LoBue, J; Fredrickson, T N; Gordon, A S

    1977-01-01

    A progressive increase occurs in the CFU-S/10(6) spleen cells with the development of RLV-A-induced erythroleukemia. In addition, alteration of the spleen by the RLV-A appears to prevent the seeding and development of spleen colonies in infected mice.

  6. Infectivity and development of the human strain of Hymenolepis nana in ICR mice.

    PubMed

    Fan, P C

    2005-01-01

    In order to study the infectivity and development of the human strain of Hymenolepis nana in mice, a human strain of H. nana was inoculated into ICR mice. H. nana eggs were concentrated by the sedimentation method and inoculated by a disposable syringe (1 ml) connected to a long needle (8 cm) into the stomach of mice. Mouse feces were examined daily beginning day 5 after inoculation and the mice were sacrificed from days 19 to 65 post-infection (PI). The infection rate and worm recovery rate were 69% and 17%, respectively. The prepatent period ranged from 7 to 23 days. Autoinfection was found to occur in an ICR mouse infected with 60 eggs; 102 worms were recovered from its small intestinal lumen on day 19 PI. One row of hooklets was found on the scolex and the mean number of hooks was 19. The average length, width, and number of segments were 51 mm, 0.6 mm, and 1,099, respectively. The mean length and number of immature segments were 9 mm and 414 segments, mature segments 20 mm and 390 segments, and gravid segments 22 mm and 295 segments. The average length, width, and number of segments in 26 autoinfected worms were 11.5 mm, 0.3 mm, and 189 segments. The mean length and number of immature segments were 3.9 mm and 41 segments, mature segments 4.4 mm and 65 segments, and gravid segments 3.2 mm and 83 segments, respectively.

  7. Long-term flaxseed oil supplementation diet protects BALB/c mice against Streptococcus pneumoniae infection.

    PubMed

    Saini, Archana; Harjai, Kusum; Mohan, Harsh; Punia, Raj Pal Singh; Chhibber, Sanjay

    2010-02-01

    Intense host immune response to infection contributes significantly to the pathology of pneumococcal pneumonia. Therefore, the regulation of host immune response is critical for the successful outcome of pneumonia in such patients. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of n-3 PUFA, i.e. flaxseed oil supplementation for short (4 weeks) as well as long (9 weeks) term, on the course of S. pneumoniae D39 serotype 2 infection in mice. The efficacy of flaxseed oil supplementation was investigated in terms of survival of animals and production of various inflammatory molecules (malondialdehyde, myeloperoxidase, nitric oxide) in the lung homogenate of animals. This was correlated with bacteriological and histopathological parameters. The immunomodulation was studied in terms of cytokines in the lungs following infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae. Results suggest that long-term flaxseed supplementation protected the mice against bacterial colonization of lungs with Streptococcus pneumoniae with reduced histopathological involvement of lung tissue. Moderate pneumonia was observed in supplemented, infected mice compared to severe pneumonia seen in control mice. This was accompanied by decreased inflammatory markers (malondialdehyde, myeloperoxidase, nitric oxide) as the disease progressed. In addition, difference in the levels of pro-inflammatory (TNF-alpha and IL-1beta) and anti-inflammatory (IL-10) cytokines was observed in the flaxseed fed animals. On the contrary, short-term supplementation did not show such an effect on lung colonization.

  8. Extraneural manifestations of prion infection in GPI-anchorless transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Andrew M.; Paulsson, Johan F.; Cruite, Justin; Andaya, Abegail A.; Trifilo, Matthew J.; Oldstone, Michael B.A.

    2011-03-01

    Earlier studies indicated that transgenic (tg) mice engineered to express prion protein (PrP) lacking the glycophosphatidylinositol (GPI{sup -/-}) membrane anchor formed abnormal proteinase-resistant prion (PrPsc) amyloid deposits in their brains and hearts when infected with the RML strain of murine scrapie. In contrast, RML scrapie infection of normal mice with a GPI-anchored PrP did not deposit amyloid with PrPsc in the brain or the heart. Here we report that scrapie-infected GPI{sup -/-} PrP tg mice also deposit PrP and transmissible infectious material in the gut, kidneys, and islets of Langerhans. Similar to previously reported amyloid deposits in the brain and heart, amyloid deposits were found in the gut; however, no amyloid deposited in the islets. By high-resolution electron microscopy, we show PrP is located primarily in {alpha} cells and also {beta} cells. Islets contain abundant insulin and there is no abnormality in glucose metabolism in infected GPI{sup -/-} PrP tg mice.

  9. Apoptosis of lymphocytes in mice induced by infection with Rickettsia tsutsugamushi.

    PubMed Central

    Kasuya, S; Nagano, I; Ikeda, T; Goto, C; Shimokawa, K; Takahashi, Y

    1996-01-01

    Histological examinations of mice infected with either a lethal (Karp) or a self-limitating (Gilliam) strain of Rickettsia tsutsugamushi were performed. Tingible body macrophages in the spleen and necrotizing lymphadenitis in regional lymph nodes were prominent only in the former. Apoptotic legions in the lymphocytes of these organs were clearly demonstrated by histochemical and electron microscopical examinations. PMID:8751955

  10. Immunostimulation of sugar cane extract on neutrophils to Salmonella typhimurium infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ming-Hua; Lo, Dan-Yuan; Liao, Jiunn-Wang; Hsuan, Shih-Ling; Chien, Maw-Sheng; Lin, Cheng-Chung; Chen, Ter-Hsin; Lee, Wei-Cheng

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the immunomodulatory effects of sugar cane extract (SCE) on the biological activities of neutrophils in mice. Six-week-old BALB/c mice were fed 1250 mg/kg of SCE once. The generation, migration and biological functions of neutrophils and the survival rates of the mice in response to Salmonella typhimurium infection were evaluated. The results show that the numbers of both bone marrow cells and neutrophils were significantly increased in response to SCE administration (p < 0.05) compared with controls. The migration, phagocytosis and H₂O₂ generation of neutrophils were all significantly enhanced in SCE-treated mice (p < 0.05). After challenge with S. typhimurium (lethal dose, 50% (LD₅₀), SCE-treated mice had a 19.2% higher survival rate and milder hepatic lesions than the controls. Additionally, fewer invasive bacteria were recovered from the spleens of SCE-treated mice. In conclusion, our results suggest that SCE has a positive regulatory effect on the biological function of mouse neutrophils that may increase host resistance against bacterial infections.

  11. Schmallenberg virus infection of adult type I interferon receptor knock-out mice.

    PubMed

    Wernike, Kerstin; Breithaupt, Angele; Keller, Markus; Hoffmann, Bernd; Beer, Martin; Eschbaumer, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Schmallenberg virus (SBV), a novel orthobunyavirus, was discovered in Europe in late 2011. It causes mild and transient disease in adult ruminants, but fetal infection can lead to abortion or severe malformations. There is considerable demand for SBV research, but in vivo studies in large animals are complicated by their long gestation periods and the cost of high containment housing. The goal of this study was to investigate whether type I interferon receptor knock-out (IFNAR(-/-)) mice are a suitable small animal model for SBV. Twenty IFNAR(-/-) mice were inoculated with SBV, four were kept as controls. After inoculation, all were observed and weighed daily; two mice per day were sacrificed and blood, brain, lungs, liver, spleen, and intestine were harvested. All but one inoculated mouse lost weight, and two mice died spontaneously at the end of the first week, while another two had to be euthanized. Real-time RT-PCR detected large amounts of SBV RNA in all dead or sick mice; the controls were healthy and PCR-negative. IFNAR(-/-) mice are susceptible to SBV infection and can develop fatal disease, making them a handy and versatile tool for SBV vaccine research.

  12. Differential expression of anti-glycan antibodies in schistosome-infected humans, rhesus monkeys and mice

    PubMed Central

    Luyai, Anthony E; Heimburg-Molinaro, Jamie; Prasanphanich, Nina Salinger; Mickum, Megan L; Lasanajak, Yi; Song, Xuezheng; Nyame, A Kwame; Wilkins, Patricia; Rivera-Marrero, Carlos A; Smith, David F; Van Die, Irma; Secor, W Evan; Cummings, Richard D

    2014-01-01

    Schistosomiasis is a debilitating parasitic disease of humans, endemic in tropical areas, for which no vaccine is available. Evidence points to glycan antigens as being important in immune responses to infection. Here we describe our studies on the comparative humoral immune responses to defined schistosome-type glycan epitopes in Schistosoma mansoni-infected humans, rhesus monkeys and mice. Rhesus anti-glycan responses over the course of infection were screened on a defined glycan microarray comprising semi-synthetic glycopeptides terminating with schistosome-associated or control mammalian-type glycan epitopes, as well as a defined glycan microarray of mammalian-type glycans representing over 400 glycan structures. Infected rhesus monkeys generated a high immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody response to the core xylose/core α3 fucose epitope of N-glycans, which peaked at 8–11 weeks post infection, coinciding with maximal ability to kill schistosomula in vitro. By contrast, infected humans generated low antibody levels to this epitope. At 18 months following praziquantel therapy to eliminate the parasite, antibody levels were negligible. Mice chronically infected with S. mansoni generated high levels of anti-fucosylated LacdiNAc (GalNAcβ1, 4(Fucα1, 3)GlcNAc) IgM antibodies, but lacked a robust response to the core xylose/core α3 fucose N-glycan antigens compared with other species studied, and their sera demonstrated an intermediate level of schistosomula killing in vitro. These differential responses to parasite glycan antigens may be related to the ability of rhesus monkeys to self-cure in contrast to the chronic infection seen in humans and mice. Our results validate defined glycan microarrays as a useful technology to evaluate diagnostic and vaccine antigens for schistosomiasis and perhaps other infections. PMID:24727442

  13. Mucosal and systemic T cell response in mice intragastrically infected with Neospora caninum tachyzoites

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The murine model has been widely used to study the host immune response to Neospora caninum. However, in most studies, the intraperitoneal route was preferentially used to establish infection. Here, C57BL/6 mice were infected with N. caninum tachyzoites by the intragastric route, as it more closely resembles the natural route of infection through the gastrointestinal tract. The elicited T-cell mediated immune response was evaluated in the intestinal epithelium and mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN). Early upon the parasitic challenge, IL-12 production by conventional and plasmacytoid dendritic cells was increased in MLN. Accordingly, increased proportions and numbers of TCRαβ+CD8+IFN-γ+ lymphocytes were detected, not only in the intestinal epithelium and MLN, but also in the spleen of the infected mice. In this organ, IFN-γ-producing TCRαβ+CD4+ T cells were also found to increase in the infected mice, however later than CD8+ T cells. Interestingly, splenic and MLN CD4+CD25+ T cells sorted from infected mice presented a suppressive activity on in vitro T cell proliferation and cytokine production above that of control counterparts. These results altogether indicate that, by producing IFN-γ, TCRαβ+CD8+ cells contribute for local and systemic host protection in the earliest days upon infection established through the gastrointestinal tract. Nevertheless, they also provide substantial evidence for a parasite-driven reinforcement of T regulatory cell function which may contribute for parasite persistence in the host and might represent an additional barrier to overcome towards effective vaccination. PMID:23937079

  14. Antiheart antibody-dependent cytotoxicity in the sera of mice chronically infected with Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed Central

    Laguens, R P; Meckert, P C; Chambó, J G

    1988-01-01

    Sera of mice chronically infected with Trypanosoma cruzi contain antibodies that bind to the surface of living adult syngeneic heart muscle cells. In a syngeneic system, with nonadherent spleen mononuclear cells as effector cells and cardiocytes as targets, antibody-dependent cytotoxicity (ADCC), revealed by the liberation of creatine phosphokinase from damaged cardiocytes, was observed after incorporation of serum samples from infected mice. Target damage was decreased after absorption with syngeneic myocardium, but absorption with T. cruzi epimastigotes or trypomastigotes or with syngeneic skeletal muscle had no effect on ADCC. No complement-dependent lysis against heart muscle cells was detected in the same serum samples. These observations indicate that serum from chronically chagasic mice contain antibodies that bind to the surface of living adult syngeneic cardiocytes and are able to exert ADCC, suggesting that they could play a role in the pathogenesis of the heart damage that occurs in Chagas' disease. Images PMID:3126153

  15. Immunotherapeutical Potential of Mycobacterium Vaccae on M. Tuberculosis Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Lijun; Wang, Yanyan; Zheng, Xiaodong; Gui, Xiangdong; Tao, Lifeng; Wei, Haiming

    2009-01-01

    Tuberculosis remains the worldwide infectious disease. To identify the therapeutic potential of M. vaccae in treating tuberculosis, M. vaccae was injected into Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) infected mice. The optimal dose of M. vaccae (22.5 µg/mouse) treated mice showed lower pathological change index, spleen weight index, lung weight index and vital M. tuberculosis count than those of the untreated group. Treatment with M. vaccae enhanced the percentages of CD3+ and CD4+ T cells, IFN-γ+CD4+ T cells, innate immune cells including NK cells, NK1.1+ T cells and γδ T cells, and reduced the percentage of IL-4+CD4+ T cells. Therefore, M. vaccae could protect the mice from M. tuberculosis infection and improved mouse innate and adaptive cell-mediated immunity, suggesting that M. vaccae is a potential immunotherapeutic agent in pulmonary tuberculosis. PMID:19254482

  16. De Novo Generated Human Red Blood Cells in Humanized Mice Support Plasmodium falciparum Infection.

    PubMed

    Amaladoss, Anburaj; Chen, Qingfeng; Liu, Min; Dummler, Sara K; Dao, Ming; Suresh, Subra; Chen, Jianzhu; Preiser, Peter R

    2015-01-01

    Immunodeficient mouse-human chimeras provide a powerful approach to study host specific pathogens like Plasmodium (P.) falciparum that causes human malaria. Existing mouse models of P. falciparum infection require repeated injections of human red blood cells (RBCs). In addition, clodronate lipsomes and anti-neutrophil antibodies are injected to suppress the clearance of human RBCs by the residual immune system of the immunodeficient mice. Engraftment of NOD-scid Il2rg-/- mice with human hematopoietic stem cells leads to reconstitution of human immune cells. Although human B cell reconstitution is robust and T cell reconstitution is reasonable in the recipient mice, human RBC reconstitution is generally poor or undetectable. The poor reconstitution is mainly the result of a deficiency of appropriate human cytokines that are necessary for the development and maintenance of these cell lineages. Delivery of plasmid DNA encoding human erythropoietin and interleukin-3 into humanized mice by hydrodynamic tail-vein injection resulted in significantly enhanced reconstitution of erythrocytes. With this improved humanized mouse, here we show that P. falciparum infects de novo generated human RBCs, develops into schizonts and causes successive reinvasion. We also show that different parasite strains exhibit variation in their ability to infect these humanized mice. Parasites could be detected by nested PCR in the blood samples of humanized mice infected with P. falciparum K1 and HB3 strains for 3 cycles, whereas in other strains such as 3D7, DD2, 7G8, FCR3 and W2mef parasites could only be detected for 1 cycle. In vivo adaptation of K1 strain further improves the infection efficiency and parasites can be detected by microscopy for 3 cycles. The parasitemia ranges between 0.13 and 0.25% at the first cycle of infection, falls between 0.08 and 0.15% at the second cycle, and drops to barely detectable levels at the third cycle of infection. Compared to existing mouse models, our

  17. Treatment of Early and Established Cryptococcus neoformans Infection with Radiolabeled Antibodies in Immunocompetent Mice

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zewei; Bryan, Ruth A.; Morgenstern, Alfred; Bruchertseifer, Frank; Casadevall, Arturo

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the utility of radioimmunotherapy (RIT) in early and established cryptococcal infection in immunocompetent mice. RIT with 213Bi-18B7 antibody completely eliminated fungus from mouse lungs and brains for early infection, while 188Re-18B7 significantly reduced CFU in the lungs or both lungs and brains during early and established infection, respectively. The results point to the independence of RIT of the immune status of the host, which is encouraging for translation of this strategy into the clinic. PMID:22005995

  18. Cytologic evaluation of experimental type 2 herpes simplex infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Williams, D R; Whitney, J E; Harding, M; Bodfish, K; Skinner, G R

    1978-01-01

    The nature and frequency of cytopathologic changes in female mice genitally infected with type 2 herpes simplex virus have been investigated. The extent of virus infection in an individual mouse was assessed by a system of "plus scoring". Exfoliative cytology clearly provided a reliable evaluation of the extent of virus infection and a reliable prognostic index of mouse mortality. A composite index combining both cytologic and virologic information ('vircyt' value) was derived and shown to provide a convenient and precise prognostic index of mouse mortality.

  19. Parainfluenza Virus 5 Expressing the G Protein of Rabies Virus Protects Mice after Rabies Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ying; Chen, Zhenhai; Huang, Junhua

    2014-01-01

    Rabies remains a major public health threat around the world. Once symptoms appear, there is no effective treatment to prevent death. In this work, we tested a recombinant parainfluenza virus 5 (PIV5) strain expressing the glycoprotein (G) of rabies (PIV5-G) as a therapy for rabies virus infection: we have found that PIV5-G protected mice as late as 6 days after rabies virus infection. PIV5-G is a promising vaccine for prevention and treatment of rabies virus infection. PMID:25552723

  20. Transplantation of skin grafts and organs infected with Toxoplasma gondii as a source of toxoplasmosis in immunocompromised mice.

    PubMed

    Belal, Usama Salah; Norose, Kazumi; Mohamed, Rabie Mohamed; Naoi, Koji; Yano, Akihiko

    2011-01-01

    The possibility of Toxoplasma gondii infection resulting from transplantation of a skin graft and various organs has been investigated. The parasite was detected in very low numbers in all organs examined in wild-type (WT) BALB/c (B/c) mice that received skin grafts from infected interferon gamma knockout (GKO) B/c mice both with and without sulfamethoxazole treatment; all recipient mice survived. In contrast, transplantation of skin grafts from untreated infected WT B/c mice to naïve GKO B/c mice led to the death of all recipients within 20 days post-transplantation; T. gondii was found to be disseminated in all organs examined. Similar results were obtained after transplantation of skin from untreated and treated GKO B/c mice to naïve GKO B/c mice, whereas the recipient GKO B/c mice died within 10 days after intraperitoneal transplantation of lung, heart, brain or small intestine from infected untreated GKO B/c mice. These results indicate that skin grafts as well as various organs infected with T. gondii can be sources of infection in immunocompromised hosts. Toxoplasmosis should therefore be taken into consideration during organ transplantation to immunocompromised hosts.

  1. Reactive Oxygen Species Produced by the NOX2 Complex in Monocytes Protect Mice from Bacterial Infections1, 2, 3

    PubMed Central

    Pizzolla, Angela; Hultqvist, Malin; Nilson, Bo; Grimm, Melissa J.; Eneljung, Tove; Jonsson, Ing-Marie; Verdrengh, Margareta; Kelkka, Tiina; Gjertsson, Inger; Segal, Brahm H.; Holmdahl, Rikard

    2012-01-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is an inherited disorder characterized by recurrent life-threatening bacterial and fungal infections. CGD results from defective production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by phagocytes caused by mutations in genes encoding the NADPH oxidase 2 (NOX2) complex subunits. Mice with a spontaneous mutation in Ncf1, which encodes the NCF1 (p47phox) subunit of NOX2, have defective phagocyte NOX2 activity. These mice occasionally develop local spontaneous infections by Staphylococcus xylosus or by the common CGD pathogen S. aureus. Ncf1 mutant mice were more susceptible to systemic challenge with these bacteria than wild type mice. Transgenic Ncf1 mutant mice harboring wild type Ncf1 gene under the human CD68 promoter (MN+ mice) gained the expression of NCF1 and functional NOX2 activity specifically in monocyte/macrophages, although minimal NOX2 activity was detected also in some CD11b+Ly6G+ cells defined as neutrophils. MN+ mice did not develop spontaneous infection and were more resistant to administered staphylococcal infections compared to MN− mice. Most strikingly, MN+ mice survived after administered Burkholderia cepacia, an opportunistic pathogen in CGD patients, whereas MN− mice died. Thus, monocyte/macrophage expression of functional NCF1 protected against spontaneous and administered bacterial infections. PMID:22491245

  2. Effects of gamma radiation and azathioprine on Brucella abortus infection in BALB/c mice

    SciTech Connect

    Elzer, P.H.; Rowe, G.E.; Enright, F.M.; Winter, A.J. )

    1991-06-01

    Sublethal irradiation of BALB/c mice 4 hours prior to inoculation with 5 {times} 10(4) virulent Brucella abortus, caused significant (P less than 0.01) reductions in bacterial numbers in comparison with numbers in unirradiated controls. Numbers of brucellae in the spleen were significantly lower by 5 days after inoculation and decreased thereafter, so that at 2 and 3 weeks after inoculation, there were up to 1,000-fold fewer organisms in the spleen of irradiated mice. The number of brucellae in the spleen increased in irradiated mice thereafter. The course of events in the liver was similar, but developed more slowly, and peak differences in bacterial numbers were about 1 log less. These phenomena were not attributable to differences in implantation of brucellae in the liver or spleen, nor to an abnormal distribution of organisms in other organs of irradiated mice. Irradiation of mice during the plateau phase of infection also resulted in significant (P less than 0.05) reductions in bacterial counts in the spleen during the succeeding 4 weeks. Macrophage activation in the spleen, measured by a Listeria monocytogenes-killing assay, was significantly (P less than 0.01) increased by irradiation alone at 1 week after inoculation and at that time was significantly (P less than 0.01) greater in B abortus-infected, irradiated mice than in B abortus-infected controls. Histologic, cytologic, and immunologic studies revealed that the decrease in numbers of organisms between 1 and 2 weeks after inoculation in irradiated mice occurred at a time when their immune response to B abortus was suppressed and when numbers of neutrophils and monocytes infiltrating the spleen were significantly (P less than 0.01) diminished.

  3. Experimental infection by Trypanosoma evansi in sheep: Occurrence of transplacental transmission and mice infection by parasite present in the colostrum and milk of infected ewes.

    PubMed

    Campigotto, Gabriela; Da Silva, Aleksandro S; Volpato, Andreia; Balzan, Alexandre; Radavelli, Willian M; Soldá, Natan M; Grosskopf, Hyolanda M; Stefani, Lenita M; Bianchi, Anderson E; Monteiro, Silvia G; Tonin, Alexandre A; Weiss, Paulo H E; Miletti, Luiz C; Lopes, Sonia T A

    2015-09-15

    The aims of this study were to evaluate vertical transmission of Trypanosoma evansi in sheep experimentally infected, in addition to the mammary transmission by colostrum or milk of these infected sheep to mice. Three pregnant sheep were used: one uninfected, four months pregnant (Sheep A); and two (Sheep B and C) infected intravenously by T. evansi trypomastigotes (4.6×10(6) per animal) on the third (Sheep C) and fourth (Sheep B) month of pregnancy. Both infected sheep developed low and oscillating parasitemia measured by blood smears. Hemogram was performed at seven day intervals, showing anemia, leukocytosis, and lymphocytosis on sheep B and C. Three sheep had twins, where sheep A delivered healthy lambs and both infected sheep had delivered at least one stillborn. Additionally, lambs from sheep B and C died 24 and 72 h post-partum, respectively. Before colostrum intake, four lambs from infected sheep were positives for T. evansi according to blood smear evaluation, serology (CATT/T. evansi), and PCR. Sheep colostrum and milk samples collected from the first four days post-partum were positives for T. evansi on PCR, and these samples were able to infect seven mice (out of 10) orally (n=4/5) and intraperitoneally (n=3/5). Therefore, we conclude that the vertical transmission of T. evansi occurs in pregnant sheep, in addition to a strong possibility of the transmission by colostrum and milk.

  4. Ectopic expression of gamma interferon in the eye protects transgenic mice from intraocular herpes simplex virus type 1 infections.

    PubMed Central

    Geiger, K; Howes, E L; Sarvetnick, N

    1994-01-01

    Transgenic (rho gamma) mice provide a model for studying the influence of gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) produced in the eye on ocular and cerebral viral infection. To establish this model, we injected BALB/c- and C57BL/6-derived transgenic and nontransgenic mice of different ages intravitreally with herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) strain F. Eye and brain tissues of these mice were assessed for pathological and immunocytochemical changes. HSV-1 infection induced severe retinitis of the injected eyes and infection of the brain in all mice. In transgenic mice inoculated with HSV-1, the left, nontreated eyes were protected from retinitis, whereas nontransgenic mice developed bilateral retinitis. Additional intravitreal injection of IFN-gamma with the virus protected the noninoculated eyes of nontransgenic mice. Three-week-old nontransgenic mice died from HSV-1 infection, whereas transgenic mice of the same age and nontransgenic mice intravitreally treated with IFN-gamma survived. Ocular IFN-gamma production increased the extent of inflammation in transgenic mice but did not have a significant influence on the growth of HSV-1 until day 3 after inoculation and did not influence the neuroinvasion of this virus. Thus, the effects of IFN-gamma were not caused by an early block of viral replication. Possible mechanisms of IFN-gamma action include activation of the immune response, alteration of the properties of the virus, and direct protection of neurons. Images PMID:8057437

  5. Comparative analysis of different oral approaches to treat Vibrio cholerae infection in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Abhishek; Koley, Hemanta; Mitra, Soma; Saha, Dhira Rani; Sarkar, Banwarilal

    2014-05-01

    In this study, we have established an oral phage cocktail therapy in adult mice model and also performed a comparative analysis between phage cocktail, antibiotic and oral rehydration treatment for orally developed Vibrio cholerae infection. Four groups of mice were orally infected with Vibrio cholerae MAK 757 strain. Phage cocktail and antibiotic treated groups received 1×10(8) plaque forming unit/ml (once a daily) and 40mg/kg (once a daily) as an oral dose respectively for consecutive three days after bacterial infection. In case of oral rehydration group, the solution was supplied after bacterial infection mixed with the drinking water. To evaluate the better and safer approach of treatment, tissue and serum samples were collected. Here, phage cocktail treated mice reduced the log10 numbers of colony per gram by 3log10 (p<0.05); however, ciprofloxacin treated mice reduced the viable numbers up to 5log10 (p<0.05). Whereas, the oral rehydration solution application was not able to reduce the viable bacterial count but the disease progress was much more diminished (p>0.05). Besides, it was evident that antibiotic and phage cocktail treated group had a gradual decrease in both IL-6 and TNF-α level for 3 days (p<0.05) but the scenario was totally opposite in bacterial control and oral hydration treated group. Histological examinations also endorsed the phage cocktail and ciprofloxacin treatment in mice. Although, in this murine model of cholera ciprofloxacin was found to be a better antimicrobial agent, but from the safety and specificity point of view, a better method of application could fill the bridge and advances the phages as a valuable agent in treating Vibrio cholerae infection.

  6. Photodynamic Therapy for Acinetobacter baumannii Burn Infections in Mice

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-29

    rapidly expanding approach to the treatment of diseases because it eliminates unwanted cells, such as malig- nant cancer cells and infectious...of mouse models, and its long-lasting properties are probably due to the high biofilm -forming capac- ity of the A. baumannii strain (28). It appeared...results of previous studies (13, 22), the bacteria had penetrated deep into the burns and the infection became es- tablished by forming a biofilm ; as a

  7. Noninvasive bioluminescence imaging of dengue virus infection in the brain of A129 mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Feng; Deng, Yong-Qiang; Zhao, Hui; Ye, Qing; Wang, Hong-Jiang; Li, Shi-Hua; Zhu, Shun-Ya; Shi, Pei-Yong; Qin, E-De; Zhang, Bo; Qin, Cheng-Feng

    2013-05-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) infection is one of the most important public health threats globally; however, no vaccines or effective antivirals are currently available. The bioluminescence imaging technique has emerged as a powerful tool for studies on viral pathogenesis in vitro and in vivo. In this study, using a recombinant DENV that stably expressed Renilla luciferase (Rluc-DENV), we used bioluminescence for imaging of DENV infection in the brain of A129 mice that lacked type I interferon receptors. Upon intracranial inoculation with Rluc-DENV, A129 mice developed typical neurological symptoms and rapidly succumbed to viral infection. Real-time bioluminescence intensity analysis revealed the replication kinetics of Rluc-DENV in the brain of A129 mice. Linear regression analyses showed a good correlation between photon flux and viral titers (R(2) = 0.9923). Finally, the bioluminescence model was validated using a known mouse monoclonal antibody, 2A10G6, and the therapeutic effects of this neutralizing antibody were readily monitored by live imaging in the same animal. The noninvasive bioluminescence imaging of DENV infection as described here shows distinct advantages over traditional animal models and provides a powerful tool for potential antiviral or vaccine assays against DENV infection in vivo.

  8. Natural history of Sin Nombre virus infection in deer mice in urban parks in Oregon.

    PubMed

    Dizney, Laurie; Jones, Philip D; Ruedas, Luis A

    2010-04-01

    Sin Nombre virus (SNV), one of at least 45 hantaviruses described worldwide, is hosted by the deer mouse, Peromyscus maniculatus, a common species throughout most of North America. Herein, we describe general life-history characteristics of deer mice and the ways in which these factors relate to the incidence of SNV infections among populations of this host species in and around Portland, Oregon. In total, 3,175 deer mice were captured from October 2002 to September 2005. Transmission of SNV appears to be associated with male breeding behaviors, as more males and adults were infected than expected by capture rate; spring and summer had the highest infection prevalence, as well as scrotal male captures. Wounding rates between infected and uninfected deer mice were not different in any age or sex class. Capture rates were significantly and positively related to the interaction of temperature departure from normal, total precipitation, and number of clear days from two seasons previous (P=0.029), while infection prevalence was significantly and negatively related to the capture rate of juveniles from two seasons previous (P=0.029).

  9. Protective immunization against Staphylococcus aureus infection in a novel experimental wound model in mice.

    PubMed

    Schennings, Torgny; Farnebo, Filip; Szekely, Laszlo; Flock, Jan-Ingmar

    2012-10-01

    A novel murine experimental wound infection model was used to assess the efficacy of multi-component immunization against Staphylococcus aureus infection. Necrotic lesions were induced in mice with venom from Bothrops asper and infected with a low inoculum, 1 × 10(2) CFU. The wound infection model therefore more resembles a clinical case of S. aureus infection compared with conventional infection models where far more bacteria are required. Before infection, mice were immunized with four recombinant S.aureus proteins expressed from Escherichia coli: (i) domains 1-3 of Extracellular adherence protein (Eap), (ii) Efb - D (fusion protein combining Extracellular fibrinogen binding protein (Efb) and a fibronectin binding domain (D) of the fibronectin binding protein (FnBP) and (iii) clumping factor A (ClfA). In the immunized group, lower bacterial colonization, undisturbed crust formation and significantly faster wound healing were found compared with the unimmunized control group. Efb and Eap have previously been found to impair wound healing and neutralization of these proteins by antibodies restores a more natural wound healing process. This effect is further also enhanced by the proposed opsonic activity of antibodies against ClfA and FnBP.

  10. Hydrophobic Gentamicin-Loaded Nanoparticles Are Effective against Brucella melitensis Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Imbuluzqueta, Edurne; Gamazo, Carlos; Lana, Hugo; Campanero, Miguel Ángel; Salas, David; Gil, Ana Gloria; Elizondo, Elisa; Ventosa, Nora; Veciana, Jaume

    2013-01-01

    The clinical management of human brucellosis is still challenging and demands in vitro active antibiotics capable of targeting the pathogen-harboring intracellular compartments. A sustained release of the antibiotic at the site of infection would make it possible to reduce the number of required doses and thus the treatment-associated toxicity. In this study, a hydrophobically modified gentamicin, gentamicin-AOT [AOT is bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate sodium salt], was either microstructured or encapsulated in poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles. The efficacy of the formulations developed was studied both in vitro and in vivo. Gentamicin formulations reduced Brucella infection in experimentally infected THP-1 monocytes (>2-log10 unit reduction) when using clinically relevant concentrations (18 mg/liter). Moreover, in vivo studies demonstrated that gentamicin-AOT-loaded nanoparticles efficiently targeted the drug both to the liver and the spleen and maintained an antibiotic therapeutic concentration for up to 4 days in both organs. This resulted in an improved efficacy of the antibiotic in experimentally infected mice. Thus, while 14 doses of free gentamicin did not alter the course of the infection, only 4 doses of gentamicin-AOT-loaded nanoparticles reduced the splenic infection by 3.23 logs and eliminated it from 50% of the infected mice with no evidence of adverse toxic effects. These results strongly suggest that PLGA nanoparticles containing chemically modified hydrophobic gentamicin may be a promising alternative for the treatment of human brucellosis. PMID:23650167

  11. Modulation of cytokine secretion by mesenteric lymph node cells from vitamin A-deficient mice during Hymenolepis nana infection.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, K; Matsuo, S; Asano, K; Okamoto, K

    1994-01-01

    The influence of vitamin A deficiency on the development of cellular immune responses was examined using vitamin A-deficient mice (A mice)/Hymenolepis nana system. Mesenteric lymph node cells (MLNC) prepared from both normal BALB/c mice and A mice during H. nana infection proliferated extensively when cultured with soluble egg antigen of H. nana as assessed by 3H-thymidine incorporation. MLNC from normal mice secreted significantly more IL-2 and significantly less IFN-gamma than A mice when the cells were cultured in the presence of soluble egg antigen.

  12. Regulators of gut motility revealed by a gnotobiotic model of diet-microbiome interactions related to travel.

    PubMed

    Dey, Neelendu; Wagner, Vitas E; Blanton, Laura V; Cheng, Jiye; Fontana, Luigi; Haque, Rashidul; Ahmed, Tahmeed; Gordon, Jeffrey I

    2015-09-24

    To understand how different diets, the consumers' gut microbiota, and the enteric nervous system (ENS) interact to regulate gut motility, we developed a gnotobiotic mouse model that mimics short-term dietary changes that happen when humans are traveling to places with different culinary traditions. Studying animals transplanted with the microbiota from humans representing diverse culinary traditions and fed a sequence of diets representing those of all donors, we found that correlations between bacterial species abundances and transit times are diet dependent. However, the levels of unconjugated bile acids-generated by bacterial bile salt hydrolases (BSH)-correlated with faster transit, including during consumption of a Bangladeshi diet. Mice harboring a consortium of sequenced cultured bacterial strains from the Bangladeshi donor's microbiota and fed a Bangladeshi diet revealed that the commonly used cholekinetic spice, turmeric, affects gut motility through a mechanism that reflects bacterial BSH activity and Ret signaling in the ENS. These results demonstrate how a single food ingredient interacts with a functional microbiota trait to regulate host physiology.

  13. Status of ammonia, glutamate, lactate and pyruvate during Plasmodium yoelii infection and pyrimethamine treatment in mice.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, A; Tripathi, L M; Pandey, V C

    1997-09-01

    Ammonia, lactate, glutamate and pyruvate levels in blood, liver, brain, spleen and kidney were determined during Plasmodium yoelii infection and pyrimethamine treatment in mice. Ammonia and lactate levels showed significant increase with rise in parasitaemia except in spleen where decrease in the lactate levels was observed. The glutamate level displayed a marked decrease in blood, liver and splenic tissues, whereas, significant increase in glutamate level in kidney was observed, although its level in cerebral tissue remained unaltered. The pyruvate level in blood and liver showed a noticeable decrease but brain, spleen and kidney registered an elevation of the same due to the parasitic infection. Pyrimethamine (oral) treatment (10 mg/kg body weight) to infected mice (5-10%) for four days brought back the altered levels of the above cellular constituents in different tissues to normal, a week after cessation of drug treatment.

  14. Effects of High Ambient Temperature on Various Stages of Rabies Virus Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bell, J. F.; Moore, G. J.

    1974-01-01

    Effects of high ambient temperatures on various stages of rabies virus infection have been studied. Ambient temperature increased within the tolerated range was found to have little effect upon body temperature of normal mice, but caused marked elevation of temperature during illness. Temperatures at onset of patent illness in mice were lower than normal. Increased body temperature in the higher thermic ambience during the incubation period was associated with decreased mortality and frequent abortive infections. Exposure to high ambient temperature late in the incubation period delayed onset of illness, decreased mortality, and increased frequency of abortive infections, but exposure to high ambient temperature after onset of patent illness did not affect the course of the disease. PMID:4426698

  15. Calbindin distribution in cortical and subcortical brain structures of normal and rabies-infected mice.

    PubMed

    Torres-Fernández, Orlando; Yepes, Gloria E; Gómez, Javier E; Pimienta, Hernán J

    2005-10-01

    Rabies has been an enigmatic disease of the nervous system because microscopic findings in the brain tissue are not paralleled by the severity of the clinical illness. The calcium binding protein calbindin (CB) is a neuronal marker of great interest in neuroanatomy and neuropathology. CB-ir neurons in the striatum and cerebral cortex are gabaergic cells. In the present work CB-immunoreactivity was evaluated in brains of normal and rabies-infected mice. Rabies infection caused loss of CB-immunostaining in the cortical supragranular layers as well as in the striatum. Loss of CB in the brains of mice infected with rabies virus can produce impairment in Ca++ homeostasis and in the gabaergic neurotransmission.

  16. Protection against Influenza Virus Infection of Mice Fed Bifidobacterium breve YIT4064

    PubMed Central

    Yasui, Hisako; Kiyoshima, Junko; Hori, Tetuji; Shida, Kan

    1999-01-01

    Mice fed Bifidobacterium breve YIT4064 and immunized orally with influenza virus were more strongly protected against influenza virus infection of the lower respiratory tract than ones immunized with influenza virus only. The number of mice with enhanced anti-influenza virus immunoglobulin G (IgG) in serum upon oral administration of B. breve YIT4064 and oral immunization with influenza virus was significantly greater than that upon oral immunization with influenza virus only. These findings demonstrated that the oral administration of B. breve YIT4064 increased anti-influenza virus IgG antibodies in serum and protected against influenza virus infection. The oral administration of B. breve YIT4064 may enhance antigen-specific IgG against various pathogenic antigens taken orally and induce protection against various virus infections. PMID:10066652

  17. The effect of centaurein on interferon-{gamma} expression and Listeria infection in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, S.-L.; Yeh, H.-H.; Lin, Y.-S.; Chiang, Y.-M.; Wu, T.-K. . E-mail: tkwmll@mail.nctu.edu.tw; Yang, W.-C. . E-mail: wcyang@gate.sinica.edu.tw

    2007-02-15

    We previously found that centaurein enhanced IFN-{gamma} transcription in T cells. Here, we demonstrate that centaurein increased the IFN-{gamma} expression in T and NK cells and the serum IFN-{gamma} level in mice. Centaurein elevated the transcription of T-bet but not GATA-3, which is consistent with its effect on that of IFN-{gamma} but not IL-4. Additionally, centaurein effectively protected mice against Listeria infection. Moreover, centaurein per se or in combination with antibiotics could treat Listeria infection. Our mechanistic studies suggest that centaurein augments IFN-{gamma} expression via a transcriptional up-regulation of T-bet and that centaurein protects against or treats Listeria infection via a modulation of IFN-{gamma} expression.

  18. Prebiotic inulin supplementation modulates the immune response and restores gut morphology in Giardia duodenalis-infected malnourished mice.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Geeta; Bhatia, Ruchika; Sharma, Anuj

    2016-11-01

    Malnutrition induces a state of growth retardation and immunologic depression, enhancing the host susceptibility to various infections. In the present study, it was observed that prebiotic supplementation either prior or simultaneously with Giardia infection in malnourished mice significantly reduced the severity of giardiasis and increased the body and small intestine mass, along with increased lactobacilli counts in faeces compared with malnourished-Giardia-infected mice. More specifically, prebiotic supplementation significantly increased the levels of anti-giardial IgG and IgA antibodies and anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and IL-10 and reduced the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-α, along with increased levels of nitric oxide in both the serum and intestinal fluid of malnourished-prebiotic-Giardia-infected mice compared with malnourished-Giardia-infected mice. Histopathology and scanning electron microscopy of the small intestine also revealed less cellular and mucosal damage in the microvilli of prebiotic-supplemented malnourished-Giardia-infected mice compared with severely damaged mummified and blunted villi of malnourished-Giardia-infected mice. This is the first study to report that prebiotic supplementation modulated the gut morphology and improved the immune status even in malnourished-Giardia-infected mice.

  19. Nitric Oxide Synthase Expression in Macrophages of Histoplasma capsulatum-Infected Mice Is Associated with Splenocyte Apoptosis and Unresponsiveness

    PubMed Central

    Wu-Hsieh, Betty A.; Chen, Wen; Lee, Hsin-Ju

    1998-01-01

    Splenic macrophages from Histoplasma capsulatum-infected mice express inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and the iNOS expression correlates with severity of the infection. We examined whether production of NO is responsible for apoptosis and the anti-lymphoproliferative response of splenocytes from mice infected with H. capsulatum. In situ terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase nick end labeling revealed apoptotic nuclei in cryosections of spleen from infected but not normal mice. Splenocytes of infected mice were unresponsive to stimulation by either concanavalin A or heat-killed H. capsulatum yeast cells. Splenocyte responsiveness was restored by addition to the medium of NG-monomethyl-l-arginine, a known inhibitor of NO production. The proliferative response of splenocytes from infected mice was also restored by depletion of macrophages or by replacement with macrophages from normal mice. In addition, expression of iNOS returned to its basal level when the animals had recovered from infection. These results suggest that suppressor cell activity of macrophages is associated with production of NO, which also appears to be an effector molecule for apoptosis of cultured splenocytes from infected mice. PMID:9784566

  20. Anti-inflammatory and Anti-tumorigenic Effects of Açai Berry in Helicobacter felis-infected mice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ju Yup; Kim, Nayoung; Choi, Yoon Jeong; Nam, Ryoung Hee; Lee, Seonmin; Ham, Min Hee; Suh, Ji Hyung; Choi, Yoon Jin; Lee, Hye Seung; Lee, Dong Ho

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate the anti-inflammatory and anti-tumorigenic effect of açai berry after chronic Helicobacter felis colonization in the stomachs of C57BL/6 mice. Methods: A total of 57 four-week-old female C57BL/6 mice (18 control mice and 39 experimental mice) were used. The mice were administered orogastrically with vehicle only or vehicle containing H. felis, 5 times every other day. After inoculation of H. felis, mice were fed either a standard or an açai-containing diet and then sacrificed at 4, 24, and 52 weeks. The infection status and degree of inflammation were determined by culture and histopathology. The level of gastric mucosal myeloperoxidase (MPO), TNF-α, and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) were measured by ELISA. Results: At 24 weeks after inoculation, mucosal atrophy and mucous metaplasia appeared in all infected mice. At 52 weeks after inoculation, dysplastic change was noted in 10%, 25%, and 50% of mice in the H. felis-control, H. felis-açai 5%, and H. felis-açai 10% groups, respectively. The neutrophil, monocyte, atrophy, and metaplasia grades of infected mice showed no significant difference among the H. felis-infected groups. H. felis-infected mice fed with açai berry showed no significant difference compared with H. felis-infected control mice in gastric mucosal MPO, TNF-α, and IL-1β levels. Conclusions: H. felis that colonized the stomachs of C57BL/6 mice provoked inflammation, and induced mucosal atrophy, metaplasia, and dysplasia. However, açai berry did not effectively prohibit the gastric carcinogenesis which was induced by chronic H. felis infection. PMID:27051649

  1. Pathological features of experimental gonococcal infection in mice and guinea pigs.

    PubMed Central

    Chandler, F W; Kraus, S J; Watts, J C

    1976-01-01

    The histopathological and immunofluorescent findings in tissues within and surrounding artificially created subcutaneous tissue cavities infected with Neisseria gonorrhoeae for 1 to 30 days were studied in mice and guinea pigs. Findings in the tissue cavities of the animal models were similar to the findings of disseminated gonococcal infection in humans. These similarities included an intense persistent polymorphonuclear leukocytic response with tissue necrosis, hemorrhage into the early lesion, a perivascular leukocytic response in adjacent tissue, difficulty in detecting large numbers of discrete morphologically typical gonococci by the tissue Gram stain and direct fluorescent antibody techniques, a decrease in the number of identifiable gonococci with duration of the infection, and moderate amounts of extracellular and intracellular immunofluorescent gonococcal debris. Studies into the pathogenesis of the animal infections may enhance our understanding of the pathogenic mechanism (s) associated with gonococcal infection in humans. Images PMID:818019

  2. Humoral Immunity through Immunoglobulin M Protects Mice from an Experimental Actinomycetoma Infection by Nocardia brasiliensis

    PubMed Central

    Salinas-Carmona, Mario C.; Pérez-Rivera, Isabel

    2004-01-01

    An experimental model of infection with Nocardia brasiliensis, used as an example of a facultative intracellular pathogen, was tested. N. brasiliensis was injected into the rear foot pads of BALB/c mice to establish an infection. Within 30 days, infected animals developed a chronic actinomycetoma infection. Batch cultures of N. brasiliensis were used to purify P61, P38, and P24 antigens; P61 is a catalase, and P38 is a protease with strong caseinolytic activity. Active and passive immunizations of BALB/c mice with these three purified soluble antigens were studied. Protection was demonstrated for actively immunized mice. However, immunity lasted only 30 days. Other groups of immunized mice were bled at different times, and their sera were passively transferred to naive recipients that were then infected with N. brasiliensis. Sera collected 5, 6, and 7 days after donor immunization conferred complete, long-lasting protection. The protective effect of passive immunity decreased when sera were collected 2 weeks after donor immunization. However, neither the early sera (1-, 2-, and 3-day sera) nor the later sera (30- or 45-day sera) prevented the infection. Hyperimmune sera with the highest levels of immunoglobulin G (IgG) to N. brasiliensis antigens did not protect at all. The antigens tested induced two IgM peaks. The first peak was present 3 days after immunization but was not antigen specific and did not transfer protection. The second peak was evident 7 days after immunization, was an IgM response, was antigen specific, and conferred protection. This results clearly demonstrate that IgM antibodies protect the host against a facultative intracellular bacterium. PMID:15385456

  3. Role of oxidative stress on diesel-enhanced influenza infection in mice

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Numerous studies have shown that air pollutants, including diesel exhaust (DE), reduce host defenses, resulting in decreased resistance to respiratory infections. This study sought to determine if DE exposure could affect the severity of an ongoing influenza infection in mice, and examine if this could be modulated with antioxidants. BALB/c mice were treated by oropharyngeal aspiration with 50 plaque forming units of influenza A/HongKong/8/68 and immediately exposed to air or 0.5 mg/m3 DE (4 hrs/day, 14 days). Mice were necropsied on days 1, 4, 8 and 14 post-infection and lungs were assessed for virus titers, lung inflammation, immune cytokine expression and pulmonary responsiveness (PR) to inhaled methacholine. Exposure to DE during the course of infection caused an increase in viral titers at days 4 and 8 post-infection, which was associated with increased neutrophils and protein in the BAL, and an early increase in PR. Increased virus load was not caused by decreased interferon levels, since IFN-β levels were enhanced in these mice. Expression and production of IL-4 was significantly increased on day 1 and 4 p.i. while expression of the Th1 cytokines, IFN-γ and IL-12p40 was decreased. Treatment with the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine did not affect diesel-enhanced virus titers but blocked the DE-induced changes in cytokine profiles and lung inflammation. We conclude that exposure to DE during an influenza infection polarizes the local immune responses to an IL-4 dominated profile in association with increased viral disease, and some aspects of this effect can be reversed with antioxidants. PMID:21092162

  4. Effect of systemic infection induced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa on the brain uptake of colistin in mice.

    PubMed

    Jin, Liang; Li, Jian; Nation, Roger L; Nicolazzo, Joseph A

    2012-10-01

    In view of reports of colistin-induced neurotoxicity in infected patients, the aim of this study was to assess whether the integrity of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and the brain uptake of colistin are altered in the presence of systemic Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. Bacteremia was confirmed 8 h after intramuscular administration of P. aeruginosa ATCC 27853 to Swiss Outbred mice, at which time a single subcutaneous dose of colistin sulfate (40 mg/kg of body weight) or an intravenous dose of [(14)C]sucrose (2 μCi) was administered. Despite a substantial elevation in plasma levels of the proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-1β, and interleukin-6 during bacterial infection, the brain uptake of colistin was similar between infected and noninfected mice with AUC(brain)/AUC(plasma) (where AUC(brain) is the area under the brain concentration-time curve and AUC(plasma) is the area under the plasma concentration-time curve) ratios of 0.023 and 0.024, respectively. Similarly, the brain-to-plasma ratios of [(14)C]sucrose were no different between infected and noninfected mice, consistent with a lack of effect of bacteremia on BBB integrity. To further correlate any relationship between BBB disruption and plasma levels of proinflammatory cytokines, BBB integrity, colistin brain uptake, and plasma proinflammatory cytokines were measured following the administration of Salmonella enterica lipopolysaccharide (LPS), an agent known to induce BBB disruption. Despite LPS inducing a 4-fold increase in colistin brain uptake and a significant (P < 0.05) 1.2-fold increase in [(14)C]sucrose BBB penetration, plasma cytokine levels were lower with LPS treatment relative to those obtained with bacterial infection with P. aeruginosa. This study demonstrates that the brain uptake of colistin is not increased in mice during P. aeruginosa-induced systemic bacteremia despite a significant increase in plasma levels of three proinflammatory cytokines.

  5. Multiplex polymerase chain reaction assay for the detection of minute virus of mice and mouse parvovirus infections in laboratory mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, K W; Chueh, L L; Wang, M H; Huang, Y T; Fang, B H; Chang, C Y; Fang, M C; Chou, J Y; Hsieh, S C; Wan, C H

    2013-04-01

    Mouse parvoviruses are among the most prevalent infectious pathogens in contemporary mouse colonies. To improve the efficiency of routine screening for mouse parvovirus infections, a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay targeting the VP gene was developed. The assay detected minute virus of mice (MVM), mouse parvovirus (MPV) and a mouse housekeeping gene (α-actin) and was able to specifically detect MVM and MPV at levels as low as 50 copies. Co-infection with the two viruses with up to 200-fold differences in viral concentrations can easily be detected. The multiplex PCR assay developed here could be a useful tool for monitoring mouse health and the viral contamination of biological materials.

  6. Early local cytokine profiles in strains of mice with different outcomes from chlamydial genital tract infection.

    PubMed

    Darville, T; Andrews, C W; Sikes, J D; Fraley, P L; Rank, R G

    2001-06-01

    In this study, we expand on the examination of genetically determined differences in host responses that correlate with clearance of Chlamydia trachomatis from the genital tract. We infected C57BL/6, BALB/c, and C3H/HeN mice with the mouse pneumonitis agent of C. trachomatis (MoPn). C57BL/6 mice had the shortest course of infection (22 days) and the lowest incidence of severe hydrosalpinx. BALB/c mice also had a short course of infection (25 days), but all developed hydrosalpinx. C3H/HeN mice had the longest course of infection (38 days), and all developed severe hydrosalpinx. Determination of local cytokine responses by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) of genital tract secretions revealed that the levels of the proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) were significantly increased in the C57BL/6 and BALB/c strains compared to those in the C3H/HeN strain whereas the level of IL-6 was not different. The level of the neutrophil chemokine macrophage inflammatory protein 2 (MIP-2) was increased during the first week of infection in all three strains but was significantly higher in the BALB/c strain, the strain with the most rapid influx of neutrophils into the genital tract. Prolonged detection of MIP-2 in C3H/HeN mice was associated with a protracted presence of neutrophils in the genital tract. Early increases in the levels of the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-alpha and IL-1beta are associated with earlier eradication of infection in the C57BL/6 and BALB/c strains than in the C3H/HeN strain. Increased levels of MIP-2 and neutrophils in BALB/c and C3H/HeN mice relative to C57BL/6 mice suggest that these responses may contribute to pathology.

  7. Progression of chronic hepatitis and preneoplasia in Helicobacter hepaticus-infected A/JCr mice.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Arlin B; Boutin, Samuel R; Whary, Mark T; Sundina, Nataliya; Ge, Zhongming; Cormier, Kathleen; Fox, James G

    2004-01-01

    Helicobacter hepaticus infection induces sustained inflammation and carcinoma of the liver in A/JCr mice, and serves as a model of human cancers associated with viral hepatitis and H. pylorichronic gastritis. Here we describe the pathogenesis of premalignant disease in A/JCr mice infected with H. hepaticus. We inoculated dams intragestationally and/or pups postnatally, and evaluated offspring at 3, 6, or 12 months. Mice infected at or before 3 weeks of age, but not at 12 weeks, developed disease. Male mice were most affected, but expressed a bimodal pattern of susceptibility. Males exhibited lobular necrogranulomatous and interface (chronic active) hepatitis, while females usually developed intraportal (chronic persistent) hepatitis. Portal inflammation was slowly progressive, with tertiary lymphoid nodule development by 12 months. Hepatic bacterial load and preneoplastic lesions, including clear and tigroid cell foci of cellular alteration, were correlated with lobular hepatitis severity. No extrahepatic surrogate disease marker reliably predicted individual hepatitis grade. In conclusion, gender and bacterial exposure timing are key determinants of H. hepaticus disease outcomes. Intrahepatic inflammation is driven by local signals characterized by a vigorous but nonsterilizing immune response. Continued study of chronic hepatitis progression may reveal therapeutic targets to reduce the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma.

  8. In vivo Antimalarial Activities of Russelia Equisetiformis in Plasmodium Berghei Infected Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ojurongbe, O.; Ojo, J. A.; Adefokun, D. I.; Abiodun, O. O.; Odewale, G.; Awe, E. O.

    2015-01-01

    The rising problem of resistance to most commonly used antimalarials remains a major challenge in the control of malaria suggesting the need for new antimalarial agents. This work explores the antiplasmodial potential of ethanol extract of Russelia equisetiformis in chloroquine Plasmodium berghei infected mice. Swiss albino mice were intraperitoneally infected with chloroquine-resistant P. berghei (ANKA). Experimental mice were treated for four days consecutively with graded doses of plant extracts and standard antimalarial drugs (artesunate and chloroquine) at a dose of 10 mg/kg body weight used as control. The extract showed a dose-dependent activity in the chemosuppression of P. berghei parasites by 31.6, 44.7, 48.4 and 86.5% at doses of 100, 200, 400 and 800 mg/kg, while chloroquine (10 mg/kg) and artesunate produced 59.4 and 68.4%, respectively. The extract showed a significant decrease in parasitaemia (P<0.05). The level of parasitemia and decrease in weight in all the treated groups was significantly lower (P<0.05) compared with the infected but untreated mice. The plant extract was devoid of toxicity at the highest dose tested (5000 mg/kg). The study concluded that the ethanol extract of R. equisetiformis possesses antimalarial effect, which supports the folk medicine claim of its use in the treatment of malaria. PMID:26664070

  9. Vaccine-mediated immune responses to experimental pulmonary Cryptococcus gattii infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Ashok K; Hameed, Rumanasma S; Wozniak, Karen L; Hole, Camaron R; Leopold Wager, Chrissy M; Weintraub, Susan T; Lopez-Ribot, Jose L; Wormley, Floyd L

    2014-01-01

    Cryptococcus gattii is a fungal pathogen that can cause life-threatening respiratory and disseminated infections in immune-competent and immune-suppressed individuals. Currently, there are no standardized vaccines against cryptococcosis in humans, underlying an urgent need for effective therapies and/or vaccines. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of intranasal immunization with C. gattii cell wall associated (CW) and/or cytoplasmic (CP) protein preparations to induce protection against experimental pulmonary C. gattii infection in mice. BALB/c mice immunized with C. gattii CW and/or CP protein preparations exhibited a significant reduction in pulmonary fungal burden and prolonged survival following pulmonary challenge with C. gattii. Protection was associated with significantly increased pro-inflammatory and Th1-type cytokine recall responses, in vitro and increased C. gattii-specific antibody production in immunized mice challenged with C. gattii. A number of immunodominant proteins were identified following immunoblot analysis of C. gattii CW and CP protein preparations using sera from immunized mice. Immunization with a combined CW and CP protein preparation resulted in an early increase in pulmonary T cell infiltrates following challenge with C. gattii. Overall, our studies show that C. gattii CW and CP protein preparations contain antigens that may be included in a subunit vaccine to induce prolonged protection against pulmonary C. gattii infection.

  10. Vaccine-Mediated Immune Responses to Experimental Pulmonary Cryptococcus gattii Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chaturvedi, Ashok K.; Hameed, Rumanasma S.; Wozniak, Karen L.; Hole, Camaron R.; Leopold Wager, Chrissy M.; Weintraub, Susan T.; Lopez-Ribot, Jose L.; Wormley, Floyd L.

    2014-01-01

    Cryptococcus gattii is a fungal pathogen that can cause life-threatening respiratory and disseminated infections in immune-competent and immune-suppressed individuals. Currently, there are no standardized vaccines against cryptococcosis in humans, underlying an urgent need for effective therapies and/or vaccines. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of intranasal immunization with C. gattii cell wall associated (CW) and/or cytoplasmic (CP) protein preparations to induce protection against experimental pulmonary C. gattii infection in mice. BALB/c mice immunized with C. gattii CW and/or CP protein preparations exhibited a significant reduction in pulmonary fungal burden and prolonged survival following pulmonary challenge with C. gattii. Protection was associated with significantly increased pro-inflammatory and Th1-type cytokine recall responses, in vitro and increased C. gattii-specific antibody production in immunized mice challenged with C. gattii. A number of immunodominant proteins were identified following immunoblot analysis of C. gattii CW and CP protein preparations using sera from immunized mice. Immunization with a combined CW and CP protein preparation resulted in an early increase in pulmonary T cell infiltrates following challenge with C. gattii. Overall, our studies show that C. gattii CW and CP protein preparations contain antigens that may be included in a subunit vaccine to induce prolonged protection against pulmonary C. gattii infection. PMID:25119981

  11. Pathogenesis of Vesicular Stomatitis New Jersey Virus Infection in Deer Mice ( Peromyscus maniculatus) Transmitted by Black Flies ( Simulium vittatum).

    PubMed

    Mesquita, L P; Diaz, M H; Howerth, E W; Stallknecht, D E; Noblet, R; Gray, E W; Mead, D G

    2017-01-01

    The natural transmission of vesicular stomatitis New Jersey virus (VSNJV), an arthropod-borne virus, is not completely understood. Rodents may have a role as reservoir or amplifying hosts. In this study, juvenile and nestling deer mice ( Peromyscus maniculatus) were exposed to VSNJV-infected black fly ( Simulium vittatum) bites followed by a second exposure to naive black flies on the nestling mice. Severe neurological signs were observed in some juvenile mice by 6 to 8 days postinoculation (DPI); viremia was not detected in 25 juvenile deer mice following exposure to VSNJV-infected fly bites. Both juvenile and nestling mice had lesions and viral antigen in the central nervous system (CNS); in juveniles, their distribution suggested that the sensory pathway was the most likely route to the CNS. In contrast, a hematogenous route was probably involved in nestling mice, since all of these mice developed viremia and had widespread antigen distribution in the CNS and other tissues on 2 DPI. VSNJV was recovered from naive flies that fed on viremic nestling mice. This is the first report of viremia in a potential natural host following infection with VSNJV via insect bite and conversely of an insect becoming infected with VSNJV by feeding on a viremic host. These results, along with histopathology and immunohistochemistry, show that nestling mice have widespread dissemination of VSNJV following VSNJV-infected black fly bite and are a potential reservoir or amplifying host for VSNJV.

  12. Evidence for a protective role of tumor necrosis factor in the acute phase of Trypanosoma cruzi infection in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Lima, E C; Garcia, I; Vicentelli, M H; Vassalli, P; Minoprio, P

    1997-01-01

    A possible role for tumor necrosis factor (TNF) alpha during Trypanosoma cruzi infection was explored by using transgenic mice expressing in blood high levels of a soluble TNFR1-FcIgG3 fusion protein, which neutralizes the effects of TNF in vivo. Nontransgenic littermates were used as controls. The transgenic mice showed high susceptibility to T. cruzi infection. Inocula sublethal for control mice resulted in over 80% mortality associated with higher levels of parasites in the blood. In histological sections of the hearts of transgenic mice, large parasitic clusters without inflammatory cell infiltrates around the parasites were seen, while smaller parasitic clusters associated with leukocytes were seen in control mice. No difference in specific antibody response or lymphocyte composition of the spleen was found between transgenic and control mice, although the unresponsiveness of spleen cells to concanavalin A stimulation in vitro, typical of the acute phase of T. cruzi infection, was less pronounced in transgenic mice. Infected transgenic mice produced higher levels of gamma interferon than did control mice. These results confirm that TNF is involved in mechanisms leading to parasite clearance and protection from death in the acute phase of T. cruzi infection. More importantly, the data reveal that TNF is necessary for the establishment of effective tissue inflammation and parasite load control in acute experimental Chagas' disease myocarditis. PMID:9009297

  13. Cytolytic T lymphocytes specific for tumors and infected cells from mice with a retrovirus-induced immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Erbe, J G; Green, K A; Crassi, K M; Morse, H C; Green, W R

    1992-01-01

    LP-BM5 retrovirus complex-infected C57BL/6 mice develop immunodeficiency, somewhat analogous to AIDS, termed murine AIDS (MAIDS). After secondary stimulation with syngeneic B-cell lymphomas from LP-BM5-infected mice, C57BL/6 mice produced vigorous CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes specific for MAIDS-associated tumors. An anti-LP-BM5 specificity was suggested because spleen and lymph node cells from LP-BM5-infected mice served as target cells in competition assays, and cells from LP-BM5, but not ecotropic, virus-infected mice functioned as secondary in vitro stimulators to generate cytotoxic T lymphocytes to MAIDS tumors. PMID:1560546

  14. Gene Expression Profile in the Liver of BALB/c Mice Infected with Fasciola hepatica

    PubMed Central

    Rojas-Caraballo, Jose; López-Abán, Julio; Fernández-Soto, Pedro; Vicente, Belén; Collía, Francisco; Muro, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Background Fasciola hepatica infection still remains one of the helminthic neglected tropical diseases (NTDs). It has a huge worldwide distribution, affecting mainly cattle and, sometimes, human beings. In addition to data reported about the immunological response induced by helminthic infections and that induced by Fasciola hepatica, little is known about the gene expression profile in its organ target, the liver, which is where adult worms are established and live for long periods of time, causing its characteristic pathology. In the present work, we study both the early and late gene expression profiles in the livers of mice infected with F. hepatica metacercariae using a microarray-based methodology. Methodology A total of 9 female-6-week-old BALB/c mice (Charles River Laboratories, Barcelona, Spain) weighing 20 to 35 g were used for the experiments. Two groups of BALB/c mice were orally infected with seven F. hepatica metacercariae, and the other group remained untreated and served as a control. Mice were humanely euthanized and necropsied for liver recovery, histological assessment of hepatic damage, RNA isolation, microarray design and gene expression analysis on the day of infection (t0), seven days post-infection (t7) and twenty-one days post-infection (t21). Results We found that F. hepatica infection induces the differential expression of 128 genes in the liver in the early stage of infection and 308 genes in the late stage, and most of them are up-regulated. The Ingenuity Pathway Analysis revealed significant changes in the pathways related to metabolism, biosynthesis and signaling as well as genes implicated in inducing liver-toxicity, injury and death. Conclusion The present study provides us insights at the molecular level about the underlying mechanisms used by F. hepatica, leading to liver damage and its subsequent pathophysiology. The expression pattern obtained here could also be used to explain the lack of association between infection with F

  15. Dietary Bifidobacterium lactis (HN019) enhances resistance to oral Salmonella typhimurium infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Shu, Q; Lin, H; Rutherfurd, K J; Fenwick, S G; Prasad, J; Gopal, P K; Gill, H S

    2000-01-01

    The ability of a newly identified probiotic lactic acid bacterial strain, Bifidobacterium lactis (HN019), to confer protection against Salmonella typhimurium was investigated in BALB/c mice. Feeding mice with B. lactis conferred a significant degree of protection against single or multiple oral challenge with virulent S. typhimurium, in comparison to control mice that did not receive B. lactis. Protection included a ten-fold increase in survival rate, significantly higher post-challenge food intake and weight gain, and reduced pathogen translocation to visceral tissues (spleen and liver). Furthermore, the degree of pathogen translocation showed a significant inverse correlation with splenic lymphocyte proliferative responses to mitogens, blood and peritoneal cell phagocytic activity and intestinal mucosal anti-S. typhimurium antibody titers in infected mice; all of these immune parameters were enhanced in mice fed B. lactis. Together, these results suggest that dietary B. lactis can provide a significant degree of protection against Salmonella infection by enhancing various parameters of immune function that are relevant to the immunological control of salmonellosis. Thus dietary supplementation with B. lactis provides a unique opportunity for developing immune-enhancing probiotic dairy food products with proven health benefits.

  16. Pathogenesis of Lassa fever virus infection: I. Susceptibility of mice to recombinant Lassa Gp/LCMV chimeric virus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Andrew M; Cruite, Justin; Welch, Megan J; Sullivan, Brian; Oldstone, Michael B A

    2013-08-01

    Lassa virus (LASV) is a BSL-4 restricted agent. To allow study of infection by LASV under BSL-2 conditions, we generated a recombinant virus in which the LASV glycoprotein (Gp) was placed on the backbone of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) Cl13 nucleoprotein, Z and polymerase genes (rLCMV Cl13/LASV Gp). The recombinant virus displayed high tropism for dendritic cells following in vitro or in vivo infection. Inoculation of immunocompetent adults resulted in an acute infection, generation of virus-specific CD8(+) T cells and clearance of the infection. Inoculation of newborn mice with rLCMV Cl13/LASV Gp resulted in a life-long persistent infection. Interestingly, adoptive transfer of rLCMV Cl13/LASV Gp immune memory cells into such persistently infected mice failed to purge virus but, in contrast, cleared virus from mice persistently infected with wt LCMV Cl13.

  17. In Vivo Antimalarial Activity of Annona muricata Leaf Extract in Mice Infected with Plasmodium berghei

    PubMed Central

    Somsak, Voravuth; Polwiang, Natsuda; Chachiyo, Sukanya

    2016-01-01

    Malaria is one of the most important infectious diseases in the world. The choice for the treatment is highly limited due to drug resistance. Hence, finding the new compounds to treat malaria is urgently needed. The present study was attempted to evaluate the antimalarial activity of the Annona muricata aqueous leaf extract in Plasmodium berghei infected mice. Aqueous leaf extract of A. muricata was prepared and tested for acute toxicity in mice. For efficacy test in vivo, standard 4-day suppressive test was carried out. ICR mice were inoculated with 107 parasitized erythrocytes of P. berghei ANKA by intraperitoneal injection. The extracts (100, 500, and 1000 mg/kg) were then given orally by gavage once a day for 4 consecutive days. Parasitemia, percentage of inhibition, and packed cell volume were subsequently calculated. Chloroquine (10 mg/kg) was given to infected mice as positive control while untreated control was given only distilled water. It was found that A. muricata aqueous leaf extract at doses of 100, 500, and 1000 mg/kg resulted in dose dependent parasitemia inhibition of 38.03%, 75.25%, and 85.61%, respectively. Survival time was prolonged in infected mice treated with the extract. Moreover, no mortality to mice was observed with this extract up to a dose of 4000 mg/kg. In conclusion, the A. muricata aqueous leaf extract exerted significant antimalarial activity with no toxicity and prolonged survival time. Therefore, this extract might contain potential lead molecule for the development of a new drug for malaria treatment. PMID:27092277

  18. Dapagliflozin‐lowered blood glucose reduces respiratory Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    Åstrand, Annika; Wingren, Cecilia; Benjamin, Audra; Tregoning, John S; Garnett, James P; Groves, Helen; Gill, Simren; Orogo‐Wenn, Maria; Lundqvist, Anders J; Walters, Dafydd; Smith, David M; Taylor, John D; Baker, Emma H

    2017-01-01

    Background and Purpose Hyperglycaemia increases glucose concentrations in airway surface liquid and increases the risk of pulmonary Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. We determined whether reduction of blood and airway glucose concentrations by the anti‐diabetic drug dapagliflozin could reduce P. aeruginosa growth/survival in the lungs of diabetic mice. Experimental Approach The effect of dapagliflozin on blood and airway glucose concentration, the inflammatory response and infection were investigated in C57BL/6J (wild type, WT) or leptin receptor‐deficient (db/db) mice, treated orally with dapagliflozin prior to intranasal dosing with LPS or inoculation with P. aeruginosa. Pulmonary glucose transport and fluid absorption were investigated in Wistar rats using the perfused fluid‐filled lung technique. Key Results Fasting blood, airway glucose and lactate concentrations were elevated in the db/db mouse lung. LPS challenge increased inflammatory cells in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from WT and db/db mice with and without dapagliflozin treatment. P. aeruginosa colony‐forming units (CFU) were increased in db/db lungs. Pretreatment with dapagliflozin reduced blood and bronchoalveolar lavage glucose concentrations and P. aeruginosa CFU in db/db mice towards those seen in WT. Dapagliflozin had no adverse effects on the inflammatory response in the mouse or pulmonary glucose transport or fluid absorption in the rat lung. Conclusion and Implications Pharmacological lowering of blood glucose with dapagliflozin effectively reduced P. aeruginosa infection in the lungs of diabetic mice and had no adverse pulmonary effects in the rat. Dapagliflozin has potential to reduce the use, or augment the effect, of antimicrobials in the prevention or treatment of pulmonary infection. PMID:28192604

  19. A mouse-adapted enterovirus 71 strain causes neurological disease in mice after oral infection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ya-Fang; Chou, Chun-Ting; Lei, Huan-Yao; Liu, Ching-Chuan; Wang, Shih-Min; Yan, Jing-Jou; Su, Ih-Jen; Wang, Jen-Reng; Yeh, Trai-Ming; Chen, Shun-Hua; Yu, Chun-Keung

    2004-08-01

    A mouse-adapted enterovirus 71 (EV71) strain with increased virulence in mice, MP4, was generated after four serial passages of the parental EV71 strain 4643 in mice. Strain MP4 exhibited a larger plaque size, grew more rapidly, and was more cytotoxic in vitro than strain 4643. Although strains 4643 and MP4 both induced apoptosis of SK-N-SH human neuroblastoma cells, MP4 was more virulent than 4643 in 1-day-old mice (50% lethal doses, 10(2) and 10(4) PFU/mouse, respectively). Strain MP4 (5 x 10(6) PFU/mouse), but not 4643, could orally infect 7-day-old mice, resulting in rear-limb paralysis followed by death 5 to 9 days after inoculation with the virus. Histopathologically, neuronal loss and apoptosis were evident in the spinal cords as well as the brain stems of the infected mice. The limb muscles displayed massive necrosis. There was early and transient virus replication in the intestines, whereas the spinal cord, brain, and muscle became the sites of viral replication during the late phase of the infection. Virus transmission occurred among infected and noninfected cagemates, as demonstrated by the occurrence of seroconversion and the presence of viable viruses in the stool samples of the latter. Protection against EV71 challenge was demonstrated following administration of hyperimmune serum 1 day after inoculation with the virus. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the genome of EV71 strain MP4 revealed four nucleotide changes on the 5' untranslated region, three on the VP2 region, and eight on the 2C region, resulting in one and four amino acid substitutions in the VP2 and 2C proteins, respectively.

  20. No Evidence that Infection Alters Global Recombination Rate in House Mice.

    PubMed

    Dumont, Beth L; Devlin, Amy A; Truempy, Dana M; Miller, Jennifer C; Singh, Nadia D

    2015-01-01

    Recombination rate is a complex trait, with genetic and environmental factors shaping observed patterns of variation. Although recent studies have begun to unravel the genetic basis of recombination rate differences between organisms, less attention has focused on the environmental determinants of crossover rates. Here, we test the effect of one ubiquitous environmental pressure-bacterial infection-on global recombination frequency in mammals. We applied MLH1 mapping to assay global crossover rates in male mice infected with the pathogenic bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme Disease, and uninfected control animals. Despite ample statistical power to identify biologically relevant differences between infected and uninfected animals, we find no evidence for a global recombination rate response to bacterial infection. Moreover, broad-scale patterns of crossover distribution, including the number of achiasmate bivalents, are not affected by infection status. Although pathogen exposure can plastically increase recombination in some species, our findings suggest that recombination rates in house mice may be resilient to at least some forms of infection stress. This negative result motivates future experiments with alternative house mouse pathogens to evaluate the generality of this conclusion.

  1. Proteomic analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid proteins from mice infected with Francisella tularensis ssp novicida

    SciTech Connect

    Varnum, Susan M.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Pounds, Joel G.; Moore, Ronald J.; Smith, Richard D.; Frevert, Charles; Skerret, Shawn J.; Wunschel, David S.

    2012-07-06

    Francisella tularensis causes the zoonosis tularemia in humans and is one of the most virulent bacterial pathogens. We utilized a global proteomic approach to characterize protein changes in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from mice exposed to one of three organisms, F. tularensis ssp. novicida, an avirulent mutant of F. tularensis ssp. novicida (F.t. novicida-ΔmglA); and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The composition of BALF proteins was altered following infection, including proteins involved in neutrophil activation, oxidative stress and inflammatory responses. Components of the innate immune response were induced including the acute phase response and the complement system, however the timing of their induction varied. Francisella tularensis ssp. novicida infected mice do not appear to have an effective innate immune response in the first hours of infection, however within 24 hours they show an upregulation of innate immune response proteins. This delayed response is in contrast to P. aeruginosa infected animals which show an early innate immune response. Likewise, F.t. novicida-ΔmglA infection initiates an early innate immune response, however this response is dimished by 24 hours. Finally, this study identifies several candidate biomarkers, including Chitinase 3-like-1 (CHI3L1 or YKL-40) and peroxiredoxin 1, that are associated with F. tularensis ssp. novicida but not P. aeruginosa infection.

  2. Trypanosoma cruzi: desferrioxamine decreases mortality and parasitemia in infected mice through a trypanostatic effect.

    PubMed

    Arantes, Jerusa Marilda; Francisco, Amanda Fortes; de Abreu Vieira, Paula Melo; Silva, Maisa; Araújo, Márcio Sobreira Silva; de Carvalho, Andréa Teixeira; Pedrosa, Maria Lúcia; Carneiro, Cláudia Martins; Tafuri, Washington Luiz; Martins-Filho, Olindo Assis; Elói-Santos, Silvana Maria

    2011-08-01

    Desferrioxamine (DFO) is a potent iron chelator that is also known to modulate inflammation and act as an efficient antioxidant under normal conditions and under oxidative stress. Many in vitro and in vivo studies have shown the efficacy of DFO in the treatment of viral, bacterial and protozoan infections. DFO is known to reduce the intensity of Trypanosoma cruzi infections in mice even during a course of therapy that is not effective in maintaining anaemia or low iron levels. To further clarify these findings, we investigated the action of DFO on mouse T. cruzi infection outcomes and the direct impact of DFO on parasites. Infected animals treated with DFO (5 mg/animal/day) for 35 days, beginning 14 days prior to infection, presented lower parasitemia and lower cumulative mortality rate. No significant effect was observed on iron metabolism markers, erythrograms, leukograms or lymphocyte subsets. In the rapid method for testing in vivo T. cruzi susceptibility, DFO also induced lower parasitemia. In regard to its direct impact on parasites, DFO slightly inhibited the growth of amastigotes and trypomastigotes in fibroblast culture. Trypan blue staining showed no effects of DFO on parasite viability, and only minor apoptosis in trypomastigotes was observed. Nevertheless, a clear decrease in parasite mobility was detected. In conclusion, the beneficial actions of DFO on mice T. cruzi infection seem to be independent of host iron metabolism and free of significant haematological side effects. Through direct action on the parasite, DFO has more effective trypanostatic than trypanocidal properties.

  3. Differential pulmonic NK and NKT cell responses in Schistosoma japonicum-infected mice.

    PubMed

    Cha, Hefei; Qin, Wenjuan; Yang, Quan; Xie, Hongyan; Qu, Jiale; Wang, Mei; Chen, Daixiong; Wang, Fang; Dong, Nuo; Chen, Longhua; Huang, Jun

    2017-02-01

    Natural killer cells (NK cells) and natural killer T cells (NKT cells) play a role in anti-infection, anti-tumor, transplantation immunity, and autoimmune regulation. However, the role of NK and NKT cells during Schistosoma japonicum (S. japonicum) infection has not been widely reported, especially regarding lung infections. The aim of this study was to research the NK and NKT cell response to S. japonicum infection in the lungs of mice. Using immunofluorescent histological analysis, NK and NKT cells were found near pulmonary granulomas. Moreover, flow cytometry revealed that the percentage and number of pulmonic NK cells in S. japonicum-infected mice were significantly increased (P < 0.05). However, the percentage and cell number of NKT cells were decreased compared to those of normal mice (P < 0.05). The expression of CD69 on pulmonic NK and NKT cells was increased after infection (P < 0.05), and CD25 expression increased only on NKT cells (P < 0.05). Intracellular cytokine staining showed a higher percentage of IFN-γ(+) and lower percentage of IL-5(+) pulmonic NK cells (P < 0.05) compared to controls. However, the percentage of IL-17(+), IL-10(+), and IL-5(+) pulmonic NKT cells significantly increased (P < 0.05). Additionally, there was a significant decrease in NKG2A/C/E (CD94) expression and an increase of NKG2D (CD314) expression on pulmonic NKT cells (P < 0.05), which might serve as a mechanism for NKT cell activation during S. japonicum infection.

  4. Topical Resiquimod Protects against Visceral Infection with Leishmania infantum chagasi in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Craft, Noah; Birnbaum, Ron; Quanquin, Natalie; Erfe, Marie Crisel B.; Quant, Cara; Haskell, Jacquelyn

    2014-01-01

    New prevention and treatment strategies are needed for visceral leishmaniasis, particularly ones that can be deployed simply and inexpensively in areas where leishmaniasis is endemic. Synthetic molecules that activate Toll-like receptor 7 and 8 (TLR7/8) pathways have previously been demonstrated to enhance protection against cutaneous leishmaniasis. We initially sought to determine whether the TLR7/8-activating molecule resiquimod might serve as an effective vaccine adjuvant targeting visceral leishmaniasis caused by infection with Leishmania infantum chagasi. Resiquimod was topically applied to the skin of mice either prior to or after systemic infection with L. infantum chagasi, and parasite burdens were assessed. Surprisingly, topical resiquimod application alone, in the absence of vaccination, conferred robust resistance to mice against future intravenous challenge with virulent L. infantum chagasi. This protection against L. infantum chagasi infection persisted as long as 8 weeks after the final topical resiquimod treatment. In addition, in mice with existing infections, therapeutic treatment with topical resiquimod led to significantly lower visceral parasite loads. Resiquimod increased trafficking of leukocytes, including B cells, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, dendritic cells, macrophages, and granulocytes, in livers and spleens, which are the key target organs of visceralizing infection. We conclude that topical resiquimod leads to systemic immune modulation and confers durable protection against visceralizing L. infantum chagasi infection, in both prophylactic and therapeutic settings. These studies support continued studies of TLR-modulating agents to determine mechanisms of protection and also provide a rationale for translational development of a critically needed, novel class of topical, preventative, and therapeutic agents for these lethal infections. PMID:25030052

  5. Aerosolized amphotericin B-liposomes for treatment of systemic Candida infections in mice.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, B E; Wyde, P R; Lopez-Berestein, G; Wilson, S Z

    1994-02-01

    Mice lethally infected with Candida albicans were exposed to small-particle aerosols containing amphotericin B-liposomes. The drug, when administered twice daily for 2 h (0.58 mg/kg of body weight per day) on days 1, 2, and 3 postinoculation, significantly reduced the numbers of Candida organisms in the kidneys. Aerosol treatment increased the survival time of mice given 2 2-h treatments once a week for 4 weeks. A twice-weekly, 2-h small-particle aerosol administration of amphotericin B-liposomes for 1, 2, or 3 weeks significantly increased both the mean time of survival and percent survival.

  6. Cytokine profile and natural killer cell activity in Listeria monocytogenes infected mice treated orally with Petiveria alliacea extract.

    PubMed

    Queiroz, M L; Quadros, M R; Santos, L M

    2000-08-01

    In this work, we investigated the effects of Petiveria alliacea extract on the production of Th1-type and Th2-type cytokines and on NK cells activity in normal and Listeria monocytogenes infected mice. Our results demonstrated that in normal/non-infected mice P. alliacea administration led to increased levels of Interleukin-2 (IL-2). The infection alone enhanced INF-gamma levels and NK cell activity at 48 and 72 hours of infection. The treatment with five consecutive doses of 1000 mg/kg/day of P. alliacea extract, given previously to infection, led to further increases in IL-2 levels, in relation to normal/non-infected/P. alliacea treated controls, and in INF-gamma levels at 72 h of infection, compared to infected mice. On the other hand, the production of IL-4 and IL-10 were not altered either by the infection or by the treatment with P. alliacea extract. NK cells activity increased at 48 h and 72 h following the inoculation of the bacteria. When mice were treated with P. alliacea previously to infection, NK activity was higher than that observed at 48 h, 72 h and 120 h of infection in the infected animal. Based on these findings we suggest that P. alliacea up-regulates anti-bacterial immune response by enhancing both Th1 function and the activity of NK cells.

  7. Experimental infection with Cryptosporidium parvum IIaA21G1R1 subtype in immunosuppressed mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cryptosporidium parvum subtype IIaA21G1R1 oocysts were used to infect dexamethasone immunosuppressed N: NIH Swiss mice. Histology showed developmental stages in the duodenum, proximal and distal jejunum, ileum, cecum and colon, with the small intestine remaining infected until day 35 post infection....

  8. Tamoxifen Is Effective in the Treatment of Leishmania amazonensis Infections in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Miguel, Danilo C.; Yokoyama-Yasunaka, Jenicer K. U.; Uliana, Silvia R. B.

    2008-01-01

    Background Chemotherapy is still a critical issue in the management of leishmaniasis. Until recently, pentavalent antimonials, amphotericin B or pentamidine compounded the classical arsenal of treatment. All these drugs are toxic and have to be administered by the parenteral route. Tamoxifen has been used as an antiestrogen in the treatment and prevention of breast cancer for many years. Its safety and pharmacological profiles are well established in humans. We have shown that tamoxifen is active as an antileishmanial compound in vitro, and in this paper we analyzed the efficacy of tamoxifen for the treatment of mice infected with Leishmania amazonensis, an etiological agent of localized cutaneous leishmaniasis and the main cause of diffuse cutaneous leishmaniasis in South America. Methodology/Principal Findings BALB/c mice were infected with L. amazonensis promastigotes. Five weeks post-infection, treatment with 15 daily intraperitoneal injections of 20 mg/kg tamoxifen was administered. Lesion and ulcer sizes were recorded and parasite burden quantified by limiting dilution. A significant decrease in lesion size and ulcer development was noted in mice treated with tamoxifen as compared to control untreated animals. Parasite burden in the inoculation site at the end of treatment was reduced from 108.5±0.7 in control untreated animals to 105.0±0.0 in tamoxifen-treated mice. Parasite load was also reduced in the draining lymph nodes. The reduction in parasite number was sustained: 6 weeks after the end of treatment, 1015.5±0.5 parasites were quantified from untreated animals, as opposed to 105.1±0.1 parasites detected in treated mice. Conclusions/Significance Treatment of BALB/c mice infected with L. amazonensis for 15 days with tamoxifen resulted in significant decrease in lesion size and parasite burden. BALB/c mice infected with L. amazonensis represents a model of extreme susceptibility, and the striking and sustained reduction in the number of parasites in

  9. Infection Susceptibility in Gastric Intrinsic Factor (Vitamin B12)-Defective Mice Is Subject to Maternal Influences

    PubMed Central

    Mottram, Lynda; Speak, Anneliese O.; Selek, Reza M.; Cambridge, Emma L.; McIntyre, Zoe; Kane, Leanne; Mukhopadhyay, Subhankar; Grove, Carolyn; Colin, Amy; Brandt, Cordelia; Duque-Correa, Maria A.; Forbester, Jessica; Nguyen, Tu Anh Pham; Hale, Christine; Vasilliou, George S.; Arends, Mark J.; Wren, Brendan W.; Dougan, Gordon

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mice harboring a mutation in the gene encoding gastric intrinsic factor (Gif), a protein essential for the absorption of vitamin B12/cobalamin (Cbl), have potential as a model to explore the role of vitamins in infection. The levels of Cbl in the blood of Giftm1a/tm1a mutant mice were influenced by the maternal genotype, with offspring born to heterozygous (high Cbl, F1) mothers exhibiting a significantly higher serum Cbl level than those born to homozygous (low Cbl, F2) equivalents. Low Cbl levels correlated with susceptibility to an infectious challenge with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium or Citrobacter rodentium, and this susceptibility phenotype was moderated by Cbl administration. Transcriptional and metabolic profiling revealed that Cbl deficient mice exhibited a bioenergetic shift similar to a metabolic phenomenon commonly found in cancerous cells under hypoxic conditions known as the Warburg effect, with this metabolic effect being exacerbated further by infection. Our findings demonstrate a role for Cbl in bacterial infection, with potential general relevance to dietary deficiency and infection susceptibility. PMID:27329747

  10. HIV-1 cellular and tissue replication patterns in infected humanized mice

    PubMed Central

    Araínga, Mariluz; Su, Hang; Poluektova, Larisa Y.; Gorantla, Santhi; Gendelman, Howard E.

    2016-01-01

    Humanized mice have emerged as a testing platform for HIV-1 pathobiology by reflecting natural human disease processes. Their use to study HIV-1 biology, virology, immunology, pathogenesis and therapeutic development has served as a robust alternative to more-well developed animal models for HIV/AIDS. A critical component in reflecting such human pathobiology rests in defining the tissue and cellular sites for HIV-1 infection. To this end, we examined the tissue sites for viral infection in bone marrow, blood, spleens, liver, gut, brain, kidney and lungs of human CD34+ hematopoietic stem cell engrafted virus-infected NOD.Cg-Prkdcscid Il2rgtm1Wjl/SzJ mice. Cells were analyzed by flow cytometry and sorted from species mixtures defined as CD34+ lineage negative progenitor cells, CD14+CD16+ monocyte-macrophages and central, stem cell and effector memory T cells. The cell distribution and viral life cycle were found dependent on the tissue compartment and time of infection. Cell subsets contained HIV-1 total and integrated DNA as well as multi-spliced and unspliced RNA in divergent proportions. The data support the idea that humanized mice can provide a means to examine the multifaceted sites of HIV-1 replication including, but not limited to progenitor cells and monocyte-macrophages previously possible only in macaques and human. PMID:26996968

  11. Species-specific immunity induced by infection with Entamoeba histolytica and Entamoeba moshkovskii in mice.

    PubMed

    Shimokawa, Chikako; Culleton, Richard; Imai, Takashi; Suzue, Kazutomo; Hirai, Makoto; Taniguchi, Tomoyo; Kobayashi, Seiki; Hisaeda, Hajime; Hamano, Shinjiro

    2013-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica, the parasitic amoeba responsible for amoebiasis, causes approximately 100,000 deaths every year. There is currently no vaccine against this parasite. We have previously shown that intracecal inoculation of E. histolytica trophozoites leads to chronic and non-healing cecitis in mice. Entamoeba moshkovskii, a closely related amoeba, also causes diarrhea and other intestinal disorders in this model. Here, we investigated the effect of infection followed by drug-cure of these species on the induction of immunity against homologous or heterologous species challenge. Mice were infected with E. histolytica or E. moshkovskii and treated with metronidazole 14 days later. Re-challenge with E. histolytica or E. moshkovskii was conducted seven or 28 days following confirmation of the clearance of amoebae, and the degree of protection compared to non-exposed control mice was evaluated. We show that primary infection with these amoebae induces a species-specific immune response which protects against challenge with the homologous, but not a heterologous species. These findings pave the way, therefore, for the identification of novel amoebae antigens that may become the targets of vaccines and provide a useful platform to investigate host protective immunity to Entamoeba infections.

  12. Pyruvate kinase deficiency confers susceptibility to Salmonella typhimurium infection in mice

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Marie-France; Riendeau, Noémie; Bédard, Christian; Hélie, Pierre; Min-Oo, Gundula; Turcotte, Karine; Gros, Philippe; Canonne-Hergaux, François; Malo, Danielle

    2007-01-01

    The mouse response to acute Salmonella typhimurium infection is complex, and it is under the influence of several genes, as well as environmental factors. In a previous study, we identified two novel Salmonella susceptibility loci, Ity4 and Ity5, in a (AcB61 × 129S6)F2 cross. The peak logarithm of odds score associated with Ity4 maps to the region of the liver and red blood cell (RBC)–specific pyruvate kinase (Pklr) gene, which was previously shown to be mutated in AcB61. During Plasmodium chabaudi infection, the Pklr mutation protects the mice against this parasite, as indicated by improved survival and lower peak parasitemia. Given that RBC defects have previously been associated with resistance to malaria and susceptibility to Salmonella, we hypothesized that Pklr is the gene underlying Ity4 and that it confers susceptibility to acute S. typhimurium infection in mice. Using a fine mapping approach combined with complementation studies, comparative studies, and functional analysis, we show that Pklr is the gene underlying Ity4 and that it confers susceptibility to acute S. typhimurium infection in mice through its effect on the RBC turnover and iron metabolism. PMID:17998386

  13. Effect of elevated environmental temperature on the antibody response of mice to Trypanosoma cruzi during the acute phase of infection.

    PubMed Central

    Dimock, K A; Davis, C D; Kuhn, R E

    1991-01-01

    When held at 36 degrees C, Trypanosoma cruzi-infected C3H mice survive an otherwise lethal infection with significantly decreased parasitemia levels and enhanced immune responsiveness. Treatment of T. cruzi-infected mice with the immunosuppressive agent cyclophosphamide indicated that the positive effects of increased environmental temperature were primarily due to enhancement of immunity. A parasite-specific, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunoblot analysis were used to examine the effect of elevated environmental temperature on the production of anti-T. cruzi antibodies. Both the reactivity and diversity of anti-T. cruzi antibodies were found to be lower in infected mice held at 36 degrees C than in infected mice held at room temperature. However, reactivity and diversity could be enhanced by vaccination with culture forms of the parasite. Images PMID:1937796

  14. Modulation of IL-12 and IFNγ by probiotic supplementation promotes protection against Toxocara canis infection in mice.

    PubMed

    de Avila, L F D C; de Leon, P M M; de Moura, M Q; Berne, M E A; Scaini, C J; Leivas Leite, F P

    2016-05-01

    In this study, supplementation with the probiotic Saccharomyces boulardii promoted a reduction in intensity of infection by Toxocara canis and modulates cytokines mRNA expression in experimentally infected mice. IL-12 gene transcription had 40-fold increase in S. boulardii supplemented uninfected mice and sevenfold increase in supplemented infected mice comparing with not supplemented group. Regarding IFNγ, similar results were observed, since probiotic supplementation induced approximately 43-fold increase, but only in uninfected mice (P < 0·05). T. canis infection upregulated IL-10 expression while S. boulardii downregulated it and no change was observed for IL-4. Thus, based in these findings; we suggest that one possible mechanism responsible for S. boulardii protection effect against T. canis infection is by the modulation of cytokines expression, especially IL-12.

  15. Concomitant Benznidazole and Suramin Chemotherapy in Mice Infected with a Virulent Strain of Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Santos, Eliziária C; Novaes, Rômulo D; Cupertino, Marli C; Bastos, Daniel S S; Klein, Raphael C; Silva, Eduardo A M; Fietto, Juliana L R; Talvani, André; Bahia, Maria T; Oliveira, Leandro L

    2015-10-01

    Although suramin (Sur) is suggested as a potential drug candidate in the management of Chagas disease, this issue has not been objectively tested. In this study, we examined the applicability of concomitant treatment with benznidazole (Bz) and suramin in mice infected with a virulent strain of Trypanosoma cruzi. Eighty 12-week-old male C57BL/6 mice were equally randomized in eight groups: (i) noninfected mice (negative control) and mice infected with T. cruzi Y strain receiving (ii) no treatment (positive control), (iii) Bz, 100 mg/kg of body weight per day, (iv) Sur, 20 mg/kg/day, and (v to viii) Sur, 20 mg/kg/day, combined with Bz, 100, 50, 25, or 5 mg/kg/day. Bz was administered by gavage, and Sur was administered intraperitoneally. Sur dramatically increased the parasitemia, cardiac content of parasite DNA, inflammation, oxidative tissue damage, and mortality. In response to high parasitic load in cardiac tissue, Sur stimulated the immune system in a manner typical of the acute phase of Chagas disease, increasing tissue levels of gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and inducing a preferential IgG2a anti-T. cruzi serum pattern. When Sur and Bz were combined, the infection severity was attenuated, showing a dose-dependent Bz response. Sur therapy had a more harmful effect on the host than on the parasite and reduced the efficacy of Bz against T. cruzi infection. Considering that Sur drastically reinforced the infection evolution, potentiating the inflammatory process and the severity of cardiac lesions, the in vivo findings contradicted the in vitro anti-T. cruzi potential described for this drug.

  16. Pathological Characterization Of IFNAR(-/-) Mice Infected With Bluetongue Virus Serotype 4

    PubMed Central

    Marín-López, Alejandro; Bermúdez, Roberto; Calvo-Pinilla, Eva; Moreno, Sandra; Brun, Alejandro; Ortego, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Bluetongue virus (BTV) replicates in lymphoid tissues where infected mononuclear leukocytes secrete proinflammatory and vasoactive mediators that can contribute to bluetongue (BT) pathogenesis. Using the well-characterized IFNAR(-/-) mice animal model, we have now studied the histopathology and dynamics of leukocyte populations in different target tissues (spleen, thymus, and lung) during BTV-4 infection by histological and immunohistochemical techniques. The spleen and thymus of BTV-4 infected mice showed severe lymphoid depletion on H&E stained sections. This finding was confirmed by IHC, showing moderate decreased immunopositivity against CD3 in the thymus, and scarce immunoreactivity against CD3 and CD79 in the rest of the white pulp in the spleen, together with an increase in MAC387 immunostaining. BTV-4 infection also induced the expression of active caspase-3 in the spleen, where apoptotic debris was observed by H&E. A dramatic increase in iNOS immunoreactivity associated to necrotic areas of the white pulp was observed, being less noticeable in the thymus and the lung. The induction of pro-inflammatory cytokines in tissues where BTV replicates was evaluated by measuring transcript levels by RT-qPCR. BTV-4 infection led to enhance transcription of IFN-γ, TNF, IL-6, IL-12-p40, and IL-1β mRNA in the thymus, spleen and lung, correlating with the level of virus replication in these tissues. Disease progression and pathogenesis in IFNAR(-/-) mice closely mimics hallmarks of bluetongue disease in ruminants. IFNAR(-/-) mice are a good choice to facilitate a faster advance in the field of orbiviruses. PMID:27994510

  17. The propensity of voles and mice to transmit Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato infection to feeding ticks.

    PubMed

    Radzijevskaja, Jana; Paulauskas, Algimantas; Rosef, Olav; Petkevičius, Saulius; Mažeika, Vytautas; Rekašius, Tomas

    2013-10-18

    Lyme borreliosis (LB) caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato is the most common tick-borne zoonosis in the Northern Hemisphere. B. burgdorferi s.l. can infect humans and wild and domestic animals. Ixodes ricinus is the main vector, and small rodents are the most important mammalian reservoirs hosts of B. burgdorferi s.l. in Europe. The prevalence of B. burgdorferi s.l. in I. ricinus ticks from captured rodents, calculated specific infectivities, and transmission coefficients were estimated in order to investigate the role of voles and mice in transmission of the LB causative agent. A total of 12.3% (53 out of 431) of immature I. ricinus ticks from rodents in Lithuania and 3.25% (21 out of 646) in Norway were infected with B. burgdorferi s.l. In Lithuania a total of 40% infested Microtus arvalis, 29% of Myodes glareolus and 4.8% of Apodemus flavicollis carried infected larvae and 67% of M. glareolus, 36% of M. arvalis but none of A. flavicollis carried infected nymphs. In Norway, 2.4% of larvae and 12.1% of nymphs feeding on A. flavicollis were infected. A total of 9% of infested A. flavicollis carried infected larvae and 13% - infected nymphs. Borrelia afzelii was the single genospecies identified in ticks feeding on rodents in Lithuania, and was predominant in ticks collected from rodents in Norway. According to calculated indices of specific infectivity and tick-to host transmission coefficient, M. arvalis and M. glareolus voles were found to be more efficient in transmitting B. burgdorferi s.l. to ticks than A. flavicollis mice. GLMM analysis showed that rodent species significantly influenced the probability of a larva being infected with B. burgdorferi s.l. The larvae feeding on M. arvalis and M. glareolus were more likely to be infected with B. burgdorferi s.l. than those feeding on A. flavicollis. This is the first study to report the quantitative roles of voles and mice in the transmission of B. burgdorferi s.l. to larval ticks in

  18. [The recovery and rearing of gnotobiotic lambs and their use in veterinary medicine].

    PubMed

    Bomba, A; Králicek, L; Koniarová, I; Lesník, F; Posivák, J; Bucko, V; Zitnan, R

    1993-01-01

    Our own innovated method of the hysterectomy recovery of gnotobiotic lambs, modified equipment for gnotobiote rearing, management and tending techniques were tested in this study. A hysterectomy hood (Fig. 1) was made from plexiglass and it fully met the requirements for simple and rapid handling. Our own modified isolator for gnotobiotic lamb rearing (Fig. 2) made out of glass-reinforced plastic with plexiglass sight holes was used for group rearing. It was more resistant to mechanical damage in comparison with the isolators equipped with PVC sheet pouches. The use of an isolator for feed and material (Fig. 3) and of an isolator for waste material storage with a PVC sheet pouch was found to be very practical; these isolators were connected to the rearing isolator through piping. The ventilation system was sufficient enough. An emasculator was used for hysterectomy. The method is simple and rapid, reliable and it enabled to preserve lambing ewes for other experimental purposes. Gnotobiotic lambs were successfully fed a milk replacer for calves. Samples of biological material (blood, rumen fluid, droppings) were taken from lambs kept in the isolator. The isolators were sterilized with 2% solution of peracetic acid sprayed as aerosol. Milk, materials made of glass and metal were autoclaved at a temperature of 121 degrees C, pressure 1.2 atm, for 30 minutes, and the concentrate mixture was sterilized with an X-ray dose of 2.5 Mrad. All the used methods of sterilization were fully efficient. A modified method reliably detecting lamb and isolator contamination was used for microbiological monitoring.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Cell migration is another player of the minute virus of mice infection

    SciTech Connect

    Garcin, Pierre O.; Panté, Nelly

    2014-11-15

    The parvovirus minute virus of mice, prototype strain (MVMp), preferentially infects and kills cancer cells. This intrinsic MVMp oncotropism may depend in part on the early stages of MVMp infection. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the early events of MVMp infection in mouse LA9 fibroblasts and a highly invasive mouse mammary tumor cell line derived from polyomavirus middle T antigen-mediated transformation. Using a combination of fluorescence and electron microscopy, we found that various parameters of the cell migration process affect MVMp infection. We show that, after binding to the plasma membrane, MVMp particles rapidly cluster at the leading edge of migrating cells, which exhibit higher levels of MVMp uptake than non-motile cells. Moreover, promoting cell migration on a fibronectin matrix increased MVMp infection, and induction of epithelial–mesenchymal transition allowed MVMp replication in non-permissive epithelial cells. Hence, we propose that cell migration influences the early stages of MVMp infection. - Highlights: • We document early steps of MVMp infection. • We report that a fibronectin matrix promotes MVMp infection. • We show that cellular migration plays a role in MVMp uptake. • We show that epithelial–mesenchymal transition allows MVMp replication.

  20. Immunomodulatory and antiparasitic effects of garlic extract on Eimeria vermiformis-infected mice.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Atef Mohammed; Yasuda, Masahiro; Farid, Ayman Samir; Desouky, Mohamed Ibrahim; Mohi-Eldin, Mouchira Mohammed; Haridy, Mohie; Horii, Yoichiro

    2015-07-01

    We investigated the immunomodulatory and parasiticidal effects of garlic extract on coccidiosis caused by Eimeria vermiformis infection in male ICR mice. One group received garlic extract daily until the end of the experiment by the oral route from 10 days prior to oral infection with 300 sporulated E. vermiformis oocysts (infected-garlic(+)). The other group served as a control positive with E. vermiformis infection alone (infected-garlic(-)). In the infected-garlic(+) group, garlic extract treatment induced a significant reduction in fecal oocyst output when compared with the infected-garlic(-) group. Histopathological, immunohistochemical, and gene expression analysis for inflammatory cytokines in ileal tissues showed that the garlic extract treatment impaired intracellular development of E. vermiformis during the early stages by increasing the number of intraepithelial CD8(+) T cells and decreasing IL-10 expression. This induced cell cytotoxicity which was reflected by a decrease in oocyst numbers in the intestinal villi and the feces, indicating anticoccidial effects of the garlic extract. However, further studies to explore the precise mechanism of the observed effects of garlic treatment during Eimeria infection are needed to verify our results.

  1. Equine Immunoglobulin and Equine Neutralizing F(ab')₂ Protect Mice from West Nile Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jiannan; Zhao, Yongkun; Wang, Hualei; Qiu, Boning; Cao, Zengguo; Li, Qian; Zhang, Yanbo; Yan, Feihu; Jin, Hongli; Wang, Tiecheng; Sun, Weiyang; Feng, Na; Gao, Yuwei; Sun, Jing; Wang, Yanqun; Perlman, Stanley; Zhao, Jincun; Yang, Songtao; Xia, Xianzhu

    2016-12-18

    West Nile virus (WNV) is prevalent in Africa, Europe, the Middle East, West Asia, and North America, and causes epidemic encephalitis. To date, no effective therapy for WNV infection has been developed; therefore, there is urgent need to find an efficient method to prevent WNV disease. In this study, we prepared and evaluated the protective efficacy of immune serum IgG and pepsin-digested F(ab')₂ fragments from horses immunized with the WNV virus-like particles (VLP) expressing the WNV M and E proteins. Immune equine F(ab')₂ fragments and immune horse sera efficiently neutralized WNV infection in tissue culture. The passive transfer of equine immune antibodies significantly accelerated the virus clearance in the spleens and brains of WNV infected mice, and reduced mortality. Thus, equine immunoglobulin or equine neutralizing F(ab')₂ passive immunotherapy is a potential strategy for the prophylactic or therapeutic treatment of patients infected with WNV.

  2. Equine Immunoglobulin and Equine Neutralizing F(ab′)2 Protect Mice from West Nile Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Jiannan; Zhao, Yongkun; Wang, Hualei; Qiu, Boning; Cao, Zengguo; Li, Qian; Zhang, Yanbo; Yan, Feihu; Jin, Hongli; Wang, Tiecheng; Sun, Weiyang; Feng, Na; Gao, Yuwei; Sun, Jing; Wang, Yanqun; Perlman, Stanley; Zhao, Jincun; Yang, Songtao; Xia, Xianzhu

    2016-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) is prevalent in Africa, Europe, the Middle East, West Asia, and North America, and causes epidemic encephalitis. To date, no effective therapy for WNV infection has been developed; therefore, there is urgent need to find an efficient method to prevent WNV disease. In this study, we prepared and evaluated the protective efficacy of immune serum IgG and pepsin-digested F(ab′)2 fragments from horses immunized with the WNV virus-like particles (VLP) expressing the WNV M and E proteins. Immune equine F(ab′)2 fragments and immune horse sera efficiently neutralized WNV infection in tissue culture. The passive transfer of equine immune antibodies significantly accelerated the virus clearance in the spleens and brains of WNV infected mice, and reduced mortality. Thus, equine immunoglobulin or equine neutralizing F(ab′)2 passive immunotherapy is a potential strategy for the prophylactic or therapeutic treatment of patients infected with WNV. PMID:27999340

  3. Differential immune response associated to malaria outcome is detectable in peripheral blood following Plasmodium yoelii infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Azcárate, Isabel G; Marín-García, Patricia; Kamali, Alí N; Pérez-Benavente, Susana; Puyet, Antonio; Diez, Amalia; Bautista, José M

    2014-01-01

    Malaria infection in humans elicits a wide range of immune responses that can be detected in peripheral blood, but we lack detailed long-term follow-up data on the primary and subsequent infections that lead to naturally acquired immunity. Studies on antimalarial immune responses in mice have been based on models yielding homogenous infection profiles. Here, we present a mouse model in which a heterogeneous course of Plasmodium yoelii lethal malaria infection is produced in a non-congenic ICR strain to allow comparison among different immunological and clinical outcomes. Three different disease courses were observed ranging from a fatal outcome, either early or late, to a self-resolved infection that conferred long-term immunity against re-infection. Qualitative and quantitative changes produced in leukocyte subpopulations and cytokine profiles detected in peripheral blood during the first week of infection revealed that monocytes, dendritic cells and immature B cells were the main cell subsets present in highly-parasitized mice dying in the first week after infection. Besides, CD4(+)CD25(high) T cells expanded at an earlier time point in early deceased mice than in surviving mice and expressed higher levels of intracellular Foxp3 protein. In contrast, survivors showed a limited increase of cytokines release and stable circulating innate cells. From the second week of infection, mice that would die or survive showed similar immune profiles, although CD4(+)CD25(high) T cells number increased earlier in mice with the worst prognosis. In surviving mice the expansion of activated circulating T cell and switched-class B cells with a long-term protective humoral response from the second infection week is remarkable. Our results demonstrate that the follow-up studies of immunological blood parameters during a malaria infection can offer information about the course of the pathological process and the immune response.

  4. Zinc treatment is efficient against Escherichia coli α-haemolysin-induced intestinal leakage in mice

    PubMed Central

    Wiegand, Stephanie; Zakrzewski, Silke S.; Eichner, Miriam; Schulz, Emanuel; Günzel, Dorothee; Pieper, Robert; Rosenthal, Rita; Barmeyer, Christian; Bleich, André; Dobrindt, Ulrich; Schulzke, Jörg-Dieter; Bücker, Roland

    2017-01-01

    Zinc homoeostasis exerts protective effects in inflammatory intestinal diseases and zinc supplementation has been successfully used for treating infectious diarrhoea. This study aimed at a characterisation of zinc effects on focal leak induction by α-haemolysin (HlyA)-producing Escherichia coli (E. coli) as protective mechanism for colitis. We conducted in vivo experiments by oral challenge of gnotobiotic mice colonised with HlyA-expressing E. coli-536. Mice were either fed a defined normal or high zinc diet to analyse effects of zinc as a therapeutic regimen. HlyA-deficient E. coli-536 mutants were used as controls. Mice infected with HlyA-producing E. coli showed impaired barrier integrity when receiving normal zinc. High zinc supplementation in HlyA-producing E. coli-infected mice reduced epithelial dysfunction as indicated by ameliorated macromolecule permeability. Reduced size of focal leaks with diminished bacterial translocation was observed as inherent mechanisms of this zinc action. In human colon cell monolayers application of zinc rescued the HlyA-dependent decline in transepithelial electrical resistance via reduction of the calcium entry into HlyA-exposed cells. Calcium-dependent cell exfoliation was identified as mechanism for focal leak induction. In conclusion, zinc supplementation protects from HlyA-induced barrier dysfunction in vivo and in vitro, providing an explanation for the protective efficacy of zinc in intestinal disorders. PMID:28361997

  5. Outbreak of otitis media caused by Burkholderia gladioli infection in immunocompromised mice.

    PubMed

    Foley, Patricia L; Lipuma, John J; Feldman, Sanford H

    2004-02-01

    An athymic nude mouse with severe head tilt due to otitis media was identified. Within weeks of identification of this first case, immune-deficient mice of various genotypes from the same facility were similarly affected, and cases from other facilities were found within two months. Culture of ear exudate specimens from affected mice yielded bacteria that were initially identified as Burkholderia cepacia, a plant pathogen considered an important opportunistic pathogen in persons with cystic fibrosis or chronic granulomatous disease. Several of these isolates, however, were subsequently identified as B. gladioli on the basis of results of biochemical analysis and a species-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay. Genotyping analysis revealed clonality among the isolates, indicating a shared strain among affected mice. A 16S rDNA-based PCR assay specific for the genera Burkholderia and Ralstonia, and a selective culture medium were used in efforts to characterize the epidemiology of this outbreak. In addition to culture of specimens from the oropharyngeal cavity of affected mice, samples were obtained from the environment, feces, sipper tubes, drinking water, and soiled bedding from cages of affected individuals. Burkholderia gladioli was most consistently detected in oropharyngeal swab specimens from affected mice. The PCR assay was equivalent to selective culture in identifying mice in the carrier state that did not have clinical signs of infection. However, neither detection method had sufficient sensitivity to reliably identify all carrier mice, causing the organism to persist at low levels unless entire colonies of immune-deficient mice were removed. The organism was highly resistant to antibiotic therapy. The source and epidemiology of this organism remain unknown. This epizootic serves as an important reminder that immunocompromised rodent colonies may harbor important human opportunistic pathogens.

  6. Generation of insulin-producing cells from gnotobiotic porcine skin-derived stem cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ji Hoon; Lee, Sung Ho; Heo, Young Tae; Uhm, Sang Jun; Lee, Hoon Taek

    2010-07-09

    A major problem in the treatment of type 1 diabetes mellitus is the limited availability of alternative sources of insulin-producing cells for islet transplantation. In this study, we investigated the effect of bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP-4) treatments of gnotobiotic porcine skin-derived stem cells (gSDSCs) on their reprogramming and subsequent differentiation into insulin-producing cells (IPCs). We isolated SDSCs from the ear skin of a gnotobiotic pig. During the proliferation period, the cells expressed stem-cell markers Oct-4, Sox-2, and CD90; nestin expression also increased significantly. The cells could differentiate into IPCs after treatments with activin-A, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), and nicotinamide. After 15days in the differentiation medium, controlled gSDSCs began expressing endocrine progenitor genes and proteins (Ngn3, Neuro-D, PDX-1, NKX2.2, NKX6.1, and insulin). The IPCs showed increased insulin synthesis after glucose stimulation. The results indicate that stem cells derived from the skin of gnotobiotic pigs can differentiate into IPCs under the appropriate conditions in vitro. Our three-stage induction protocol could be applied without genetic modification to source IPCs from stem cells in the skin of patients with diabetes for autologous transplantation.

  7. Generation of insulin-producing cells from gnotobiotic porcine skin-derived stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Ji Hoon; Lee, Sung Ho; Heo, Young Tae; Uhm, Sang Jun; Lee, Hoon Taek

    2010-07-09

    A major problem in the treatment of type 1 diabetes mellitus is the limited availability of alternative sources of insulin-producing cells for islet transplantation. In this study, we investigated the effect of bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP-4) treatments of gnotobiotic porcine skin-derived stem cells (gSDSCs) on their reprogramming and subsequent differentiation into insulin-producing cells (IPCs). We isolated SDSCs from the ear skin of a gnotobiotic pig. During the proliferation period, the cells expressed stem-cell markers Oct-4, Sox-2, and CD90; nestin expression also increased significantly. The cells could differentiate into IPCs after treatments with activin-A, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), and nicotinamide. After 15 days in the differentiation medium, controlled gSDSCs began expressing endocrine progenitor genes and proteins (Ngn3, Neuro-D, PDX-1, NKX2.2, NKX6.1, and insulin). The IPCs showed increased insulin synthesis after glucose stimulation. The results indicate that stem cells derived from the skin of gnotobiotic pigs can differentiate into IPCs under the appropriate conditions in vitro. Our three-stage induction protocol could be applied without genetic modification to source IPCs from stem cells in the skin of patients with diabetes for autologous transplantation.

  8. Depletion of Neutrophils Exacerbates the Early Inflammatory Immune Response in Lungs of Mice Infected with Paracoccidioides brasiliensis

    PubMed Central

    Lopera, Damaris; Urán-Jiménez, Martha Eugenia

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils predominate during the acute phase of the Paracoccidioides brasiliensis infection. Herein, we determined the role of the neutrophil during the early stages of experimental pulmonary paracoccidioidomycosis using a monoclonal antibody (mAb) specific for neutrophils. Male BALB/c mice were inoculated intranasally with 1.5 × 106 or 2 × 106 P. brasiliensis yeast cells. The mAb was administered 24 h before infection, followed by doses every 48 h until mice were sacrificed. Survival time was evaluated and mice were sacrificed at 48 h and 96 h after inoculation to assess cellularity, fungal load, cytokine/chemokine levels, and histopathological analysis. Neutrophils from mAb-treated mice were efficiently depleted (99.04%). Eighty percent of the mice treated with the mAb and infected with 1.5 × 106 yeast cells died during the first two weeks after infection. When mice were treated and infected with 2 × 106 yeast cells, 100% of them succumbed by the first week after infection. During the acute inflammatory response significant increases in numbers of eosinophils, fungal load and levels of proinflammatory cytokines/chemokines were observed in the mAb-treated mice. We also confirmed that neutrophils are an important source of IFN-γ and IL-17. These results indicate that neutrophils are essential for protection as well as being important for regulating the early inflammatory immune response in experimental pulmonary paracoccidioidomycosis. PMID:27642235

  9. Role of major histocompatibility complex class II in resistance of mice to naturally acquired infection with Syphacia obvelata

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Patricia W.; Chapes, Stephen K.

    2003-01-01

    Genetics plays a substantial role in host resistance in many host-parasite interactions. We examined the prevalence of naturally acquired infection with Syphacia obvelata in a number of mouse strains housed in a non-barrier facility. These mice, which included cross-bred and congenic, inbred strains on various genetic backgrounds, differ in the loci for the immune function genes--major histocompatibility complex class II (MHCII), toll-like receptor 4 (Tlr4), and solute carrier family 11, member 1 (Slc11a1)--which allowed comparisons of the impact of these genes on resistance to pinworm infection. Male and female mice of various ages were sampled over an 18-month period; infection was determined by use of the cellophane tape test. Results indicated that mice that were MHCII+/+ had a significantly lower prevalence of infection than did mice that were MHCII-/-. Differences were not seen between male and female mice. Although MHCII+/+ mice had an age-associated decrease in infection prevalence, such decrease was not seen in MHCII-/- mice. In contrast, infection prevalence in mice with the normal Tlr4 gene (Tlr4(LPS-n/LPS-n)) gene did not differ significantly compared with that in mice that were homozygous for either the point mutation (Tlr4(LPS-d/LPS-d)) or deletion (Tlr4(LPS-del/LPS-del)) of that gene. Likewise, the presence (Sle11a1r/r) or absence (Slc11a1s/s) of functional alleles for Slc11a1 had no effect on the prevalence of infection with S. obvelata. In conclusion, presence of MHCII, but not Tlr4 or Slc11a1 significantly influences prevalence of naturally acquired infection with S. obvelata. These data justify further comprehensive analyses of the immune components that are involved in pinworm resistance.

  10. Rotavirus Infection Activates Dendritic Cells from Peyer's Patches in Adult Mice ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Guerrero, Delia V.; Meza-Perez, Selene; Ramirez-Pliego, Oscar; Santana-Calderon, Maria A.; Espino-Solis, Pavel; Gutierrez-Xicotencatl, Lourdes; Flores-Romo, Leopoldo; Esquivel-Guadarrama, Fernando R.

    2010-01-01

    This study used an in vivo mouse model to analyze the response of dendritic cells (DCs) in Peyer's patches (PPs) within the first 48 h of infection with the wild-type murine rotavirus EDIM (EDIMwt). After the infection, the absolute number of DCs was increased by 2-fold in the PPs without a modification of their relative percentage of the total cell number. Also, the DCs from PPs of infected mice showed a time-dependent migration to the subepithelial dome (SED) and an increase of the surface activation markers CD40, CD80, and CD86. This response was more evident at 48 h postinfection (p.i.) and depended on viral replication, since DCs from PPs of mice inoculated with UV-treated virus did not show this phenotype. As a result of the activation, the DCs showed an increase in the expression of mRNA for the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-12/23p40 (IL-12/23p40), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and beta interferon (IFN-β), as well as for the regulatory cytokine IL-10. These results suggest that, a short time after rotavirus infection, the DCs from PPs play a critical role in controlling the infection and, at the same time, avoiding an excessive inflammatory immune response. PMID:20007263

  11. Experimental and natural infections in MyD88- and IRAK-4-deficient mice and humans

    PubMed Central

    von Bernuth, Horst; Picard, Capucine; Puel, Anne; Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2013-01-01

    Most Toll-like-receptors (TLRs) and interleukin-1 receptors (IL-1Rs) signal via myeloid differentiation primary response 88 (MyD88) and interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase 4 (IRAK-4). The combined roles of these two receptor families in the course of experimental infections have been assessed in MyD88- and IRAK-4-deficient mice for almost fifteen years. These animals have been shown to be susceptible to 46 pathogens: 27 bacteria, 8 viruses, 7 parasites, and 4 fungi. Humans with inborn MyD88 or IRAK-4 deficiency were first identified in 2003. They suffer from naturally occurring life-threatening infections caused by a small number of bacterial species, although the incidence and severity of these infections decrease with age. Mouse TLR- and IL-1R-dependent immunity mediated by MyD88 and IRAK-4 seems to be vital to combat a wide array of experimentally administered pathogens at most ages. By contrast, human TLR- and IL-1R-dependent immunity mediated by MyD88 and IRAK-4 seems to be effective in the natural setting against only a few bacteria and is most important in infancy and early childhood. The roles of TLRs and IL-1Rs in protective immunity deduced from studies in mutant mice subjected to experimental infections should therefore be reconsidered in the light of findings for natural infections in humans carrying mutations as discussed in this review. PMID:23255009

  12. No Evidence that Infection Alters Global Recombination Rate in House Mice

    PubMed Central

    Dumont, Beth L.; Devlin, Amy A.; Truempy, Dana M.; Miller, Jennifer C.; Singh, Nadia D.

    2015-01-01

    Recombination rate is a complex trait, with genetic and environmental factors shaping observed patterns of variation. Although recent studies have begun to unravel the genetic basis of recombination rate differences between organisms, less attention has focused on the environmental determinants of crossover rates. Here, we test the effect of one ubiquitous environmental pressure–bacterial infection–on global recombination frequency in mammals. We applied MLH1 mapping to assay global crossover rates in male mice infected with the pathogenic bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme Disease, and uninfected control animals. Despite ample statistical power to identify biologically relevant differences between infected and uninfected animals, we find no evidence for a global recombination rate response to bacterial infection. Moreover, broad-scale patterns of crossover distribution, including the number of achiasmate bivalents, are not affected by infection status. Although pathogen exposure can plastically increase recombination in some species, our findings suggest that recombination rates in house mice may be resilient to at least some forms of infection stress. This negative result motivates future experiments with alternative house mouse pathogens to evaluate the generality of this conclusion. PMID:26550833

  13. Pneumonia Virus of Mice Severe Respiratory Virus Infection in a Natural Host

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Helene F.; Domachowske, Joseph B.

    2008-01-01

    Pneumonia virus of mice (PVM; family Paramyxoviridae, genus Pneumovirus) is a natural mouse pathogen that is closely related to the human and bovine respiratory syncytial viruses. Among the prominent features of this infection, robust replication of PVM takes place in bronchial epithelial cells in response to a minimal virus inoculum. Virus replication in situ results in local production of proinflammatory cytokines (MIP-1α, MIP-2, MCP-1 and IFNγ) and granulocyte recruitment to the lung. If left unchecked, PVM infection and the ensuing inflammatory response ultimately lead to pulmonary edema, respiratory compromise and death. In this review, we consider the recent studies using the PVM model that have provided important insights into the role of the inflammatory response in the pathogenesis of severe respiratory virus infection. We also highlight several works that have elucidated acquired immune responses to this pathogen, including T cell responses and the development of humoral immunity. Finally, we consider several immunomodulatory strategies that have been used successfully to reduce morbidity and mortality when administered to PVM infected, symptomatic mice, and thus hold promise as realistic therapeutic strategies for severe respiratory virus infections in human subjects. PMID:18471897

  14. EXPERIMENTAL ENTERIC SHIGELLA AND VIBRIO INFECTIONS IN MICE AND GUINEA PIGS

    PubMed Central

    Freter, Rolf

    1956-01-01

    A method has been devised for inhibiting the normal enteric flora, permitting long term asymptomatic enteric infections of mice and guinea pigs with streptomycin-resistant strains of Shigella flexneri or Vibrio cholerae. Introduction of a streptomycin-resistant strain of E. coli into the intestinal tract of experimental animals resulted in a rapid elimination of the enteric pathogens studied. No in vitro production of antibiotic substances by this coli strain could be demonstrated. Active and oral passive immunization did not noticeably influence the number of Shigella or Vibrio organisms recoverable from the feces of infected animals. PMID:13357693

  15. PCR detection of colonization by Helicobacter pylori in conventional, euthymic mice based on the 16S ribosomal gene sequence.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, J G; Kong, L; Abruzzo, G K; Gill, C J; Flattery, A M; Scott, P M; Bramhill, D; Cioffe, C; Thompson, C M; Bartizal, K

    1996-01-01

    Many animal models of Helicobacter infection have been described, including infection in rhesus monkeys, ferrets, gnotobiotic piglets, and mice. These animal models utilize a combination of detection methods, including culture, urease testing, and histopathology, all of which may be unreliable, insensitive, or labor-intensive. Development of new animal models of Helicobacter pylori requires new methods of detection with increased sensitivity and specificity. We have developed sensitive and specific PCR primers based on the 16S ribosomal gene sequence of H. pylori. The primers detected single-copy 16S DNA representing 0.2 cell of pure H. pylori (2 cells in the presence of mouse stomach mucosal DNA) and did not cross-react with closely related bacteria. We were able to detect colonization by H. pylori in conventional, euthymic, outbred mice up to 4 weeks postinoculation with a high percentage of isolates tested. One isolate of H. pylori was detected by PCR in 100% of the mice at 6 months and 60% of the mice 1 year after inoculation. Approximately 10(3) to 10(4) H. pylori cells per stomach were detected by utilizing this PCR methodology semiquantitatively. These primers and PCR methodology have facilitated detection of H. pylori colonization in conventional, euthymic mice, colonization which may not have been detectable by other methods. PMID:8770506

  16. The effect of cowpox virus infection on fecundity in bank voles and wood mice.

    PubMed Central

    Feore, S M; Bennett, M; Chantrey, J; Jones, T; Baxby, D; Begon, M

    1997-01-01

    Although epidemic infectious diseases are a recognized cause of changes in host population dynamics, there is little direct evidence for the effect of endemic infections on populations. Cowpox virus is an orthopoxvirus which is endemic in bank voles (Clethrionomys glareolus), wood mice (Apodemus sylvaticus) and field voles (Microtus agrestis) in Great Britain. It does not cause obvious signs of disease nor does it affect survival, but in this study we demonstrate experimentally that it can reduce the fecundity of bank voles and wood mice by increasing the time to first litter by 20-30 days. The pathogenic mechanisms causing this effect are at present not known, but this finding suggests that natural subclinical infection could have a considerable effect on the dynamics of wild populations. PMID:9364786

  17. MERS-CoV spike nanoparticles protect mice from MERS-CoV infection.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Christopher M; Venkataraman, Thiagarajan; Liu, Ye V; Glenn, Gregory M; Smith, Gale E; Flyer, David C; Frieman, Matthew B

    2017-03-14

    The Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) was first discovered in late 2012 and has gone on to cause over 1800 infections and 650 deaths. There are currently no approved therapeutics or vaccinations for MERS-CoV. The MERS-CoV spike (S) protein is responsible for receptor binding and virion entry to cells, is immunodominant and induces neutralizing antibodies in vivo, all of which, make the S protein an ideal target for anti-MERS-CoV vaccines. In this study, we demonstrate protection induced by vaccination with a recombinant MERS-CoV S nanoparticle vaccine and Matrix-M1 adjuvant combination in mice. The MERS-CoV S nanoparticle vaccine produced high titer anti-S neutralizing antibody and protected mice from MERS-CoV infection in vivo.

  18. Unchanged survival rates of Shadoo knockout mice after infection with mouse-adapted scrapie

    PubMed Central

    Li, Sha; Ju, Chuanjing; Han, Chao; Li, Zhongyi; Liu, Wensen; Ye, Xuemin; Xu, Jing; Xulong, Liang; Wang, Xiong; Chen, Zhibao; Meng, Keyin; Wan, Jiayu

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that Shadoo (Sho), a GPI-linked glycoprotein encoded by the Sprn gene with a membrane localization similar to PrPC, is reduced in the brains of rodents with terminal prion disease. To determine the functional significance of Sho in prion disease pathogenesis, Sho-deficient mice were generated by gene targeting. Sho knockout and control wild-type (WT) mice were infected with themouse-adapted scrapie strains 22L or RML. No significant differences in survival, the incubation period of prion disease or other disease features were observed between Sho mutant and WT mice. In this model of prion disease, Sho removal had no effect on disease pathogenesis. PMID:25495671

  19. Litomosoides sigmodontis: a simple method to infect mice with L3 larvae obtained from the pleural space of recently infected jirds (Meriones unguiculatus).

    PubMed

    Hübner, Marc P; Torrero, Marina N; McCall, John W; Mitre, Edward

    2009-09-01

    Litomosoides sigmodontis is a filarial nematode that is used as a mouse model for human filarial infections. The life cycle of L. sigmodontis comprises rodents as definitive hosts and tropical rat mites as alternate hosts. Here, we describe a method of infecting mice with third stage larvae (L3) extracted from the pleural space of recently infected jirds (Meriones unguiculatus). This method enables infection of mice with a known number of L3 larvae without the time-consuming dissection of L3 larvae from mites and results in higher worm recovery and patency rates than conventional methods. Additionally, this method allows for geographical separation of the facility maintaining the L. sigmodontis life cycle from the institution at which mice are infected.

  20. HTLV-1 Infection and Neuropathogenesis in the Context of Rag1(-/-)γc(-/-) (RAG1-Hu) and BLT Mice.

    PubMed

    Ginwala, Rashida; Caruso, Breanna; Khan, Zafar K; Pattekar, Ajinkya; Chew, Glen M; Corley, Michael J; Loonawat, Ronak; Jacobson, Steven; Sreedhar, Sreesha; Ndhlovu, Lishomwa C; Jain, Pooja

    2017-04-04

    To date, the lack of a suitable small animal model has hindered our understanding of Human T-cell lymphotropic virus (HTLV)-1 chronic infection and associated neuropathogenesis defined as HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). The host immune response plays a critical role in the outcome of HTLV-1 infection, which could be better tested in the context of humanized (hu) mice. Thus, we employ here the Balb/c-Rag1(-/-)γc(-/-) or Rag1 as well as Bone marrow-Liver-Thymic (BLT) mouse models for engraftment of human CD34(+) hematopoietic stem cells. Flow cytometry and histological analyses confirmed reconstitution of Rag1 and BLT mice with human immune cells. Following HTLV-1 infection, proviral load (PVL) was detected in the blood of Rag-1 and BLT hu-mice as early as 2 weeks post-infection (wpi) with sustained elevation in the subsequent weeks followed by Tax expression. Additionally, infection was compared between adult and neonatal Rag1 mice with both PVL and Tax expression considerably higher in the adult Rag1 mice as compared to the neonates. Establishment of peripheral infection led to lymphocytic infiltration with concomitant Tax expression and resulting myelin disruption within the central nervous system of infected mice. In addition, up-regulation in the expression of several immune checkpoint mediators such as programmed cell death-1 (PD-1), T-cell Ig and ITIM domain (TIGIT), and T cell Ig and mucin domain-3 protein (Tim-3) were observed on CD8(+) T cells in various organs including the CNS of infected hu-mice. Collectively, these studies represent the first attempt to establish HTLV-1 neuropathogenesis in the context of Rag-1 and BLT hu-mice as potential novel tools for understanding HTLV-1 neuropathogenesis and testing of novel therapies such as immune checkpoint blockade in the amelioration of chronic HTLV-1 infection.

  1. Effects of sulfur dioxide on resistance to bacterial infection in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Azoulay-Dupuis, E.; Bouley, G.; Blayo, M.C.

    1982-12-01

    Continuous exposure to approximately a 10-ppm concentration of sulfur dioxide for periods of up to 3 weeks reduced the resistance of female mice to infection by aerosol inoculation with Klebsiella pneumoniae. The mortality rate rose and survival time shortened in SO/sub 2/-exposed animals compared to controls. Insofar as these results can be extrapolated to humans, the SO/sub 2/ concentration used in this work is only found on certain industrial premises.

  2. Experimental therapeutic studies of Solanum aculeastrum Dunal. on Leishmania major infection in BALB/c mice

    PubMed Central

    Laban, Linet T; Anjili, Christopher O; Mutiso, Joshua M; Ingonga, Johnstone; Kiige, Samuel G; Ngedzo, Mgala M; Gicheru, Michael M

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): Solanum acueastrum Dunal. has been shown to have some chemotherapeutic value. Leaf and berry water and methanol compounds of S. acueastrum were evaluated for possible antileishmanial activity In vivo on BALB/c mice and in vitro against Leishmania major promastigotes, amastigotes and vero cells. Materials and Methods: Dry S. aculeastrum berry and leaf material were extracted in methanol and water. L. major parasites were exposed to different concentrations of S. aculeastrum fruit and leaf compounds and the IC50 on the promastigotes, percentage of infection rate of macrophages by amastigotes and the toxicological effect on vero cells were determined. BALB/c mice were infected subcutaneously with 1×106 promastigotes and kept for four weeks to allow for disease establishment. Infected mice were treated with fruit and leaf methanolic and water compounds, amphotericin B (AmB), and sterile phosphate buffered saline (PBS). Results: Fruit methanol compound was most effective in inhibiting the growth of promastigotes with IC5078.62 μg/ml. Fruit water compound showed the best activity in inhibiting infection of macrophages by amastigotes. Fruit methanol compound was more toxic at Ld50=8.06 mg/ml to vero cells than amphotericin B. Analysis of variance computation indicated statistically significant difference in lesion sizes between experimental and control mice groups (P=0.0001). Splenic impression smears ANOVA indicated a highly significant difference in parasitic numbers between the experimental and the control groups (P=0.0001). Conclusion: The results demonstrate that compounds from S. aculeastrum have potential anti-leishmanial activities and the medicinal use of the plant poses considerable toxicity against dividing vero cells. PMID:25810878

  3. 2-deoxy-D-glucose-induced metabolic stress enhances resistance to Listeria monocytogenes infection in mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, E. S.; Bates, R. A.; Koebel, D. A.; Fuchs, B. B.; Sonnenfeld, G.

    1998-01-01

    Exposure to different forms of psychological and physiological stress can elicit a host stress response, which alters normal parameters of neuroendocrine homeostasis. The present study evaluated the influence of the metabolic stressor 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG; a glucose analog, which when administered to rodents, induces acute periods of metabolic stress) on the capacity of mice to resist infection with the facultative intracellular bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes. Female BDF1 mice were injected with 2-DG (500 mg/kg b. wt.) once every 48 h prior to, concurrent with, or after the onset of a sublethal dose of virulent L. monocytogenes. Kinetics of bacterial growth in mice were not altered if 2-DG was applied concurrently or after the start of the infection. In contrast, mice exposed to 2-DG prior to infection demonstrated an enhanced resistance to the listeria challenge. The enhanced bacterial clearance in vivo could not be explained by 2-DG exerting a toxic effect on the listeria, based on the results of two experiments. First, 2-DG did not inhibit listeria replication in trypticase soy broth. Second, replication of L. monocytogenes was not inhibited in bone marrow-derived macrophage cultures exposed to 2-DG. Production of neopterin and lysozyme, indicators of macrophage activation, were enhanced following exposure to 2-DG, which correlated with the increased resistance to L. monocytogenes. These results support the contention that the host response to 2-DG-induced metabolic stress can influence the capacity of the immune system to resist infection by certain classes of microbial pathogens.

  4. Therapeutic Potential of Myrrh and Ivermectin against Experimental Trichinella spiralis Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    El-Sabaa, Abdel-Aleem A.

    2013-01-01

    Trichinosis is a parasitic zoonosis caused by the nematode Trichinella spiralis. Anthelmintics are used to eliminate intestinal adults as well as tissue-migrating and encysted larvae. This study aimed to investigate the effects of ivermectin and myrrh obtained from the aloe-gum resin of Commiphora molmol on experimental trichinosis. Ninety albino mice were orally infected with 300 T. spiralis larvae. Drugs were tested against adult worms at day 0 and day 5 and against encysted larvae on day 15 and day 35 post-infection (PI). Mature worms and encysted larvae were counted in addition to histopathological examination of muscle specimens. Serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), total protein, albumin, globulin, urea, and creatinine values were estimated. Significant reductions in mean worm numbers were detected in ivermectin treated mice at day 0 and day 5 PI achieving efficacies of 98.5% and 80.0%, while efficacies of myrrh in treated mice were 80.7% and 51.5%, respectively. At days 15 and 35 post-infection, ivermectin induced significant reduction in encysted larval counts achieving efficacies of 76.5% and 54.0%, respectively, while myrrh efficacies were 76.6% and 35.0%, respectively. AST, ALT, urea, and creatinine levels were reduced, while total proteins were increased in response to both treatments compared to their values in the infected non-treated mice. Ivermectin use for controlling T. spiralis could be continued. Myrrh was effective and could be a promising drug against the Egyptian strains of T. spiralis with results nearly comparable to ivermectin. PMID:23864740

  5. Consistency and Reproducibility of Bioaerosol Delivery for Infectivity Studies on Mice

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    respiration, the most common being the common laboratory rat (strains of Rattus norvegicus) and mouse ( Mus musculus ). Animal respiratory systems are...validation U U U UU 92 Joseph D. Wander Reset CONSISTENCY AND REPRODUCIBILITY OF BIOAEROSOL DELIVERY FOR INFECTIVITY STUDIES ON MICE...design and construction phase of the project. The data from this thesis appear as part of the US Air Force Research Laboratory technical report AFRL

  6. VT-1161 Protects Immunosuppressed Mice from Rhizopus arrhizus var. arrhizus Infection.

    PubMed

    Gebremariam, Teclegiorgis; Wiederhold, Nathan P; Fothergill, Annette W; Garvey, Edward P; Hoekstra, William J; Schotzinger, Robert J; Patterson, Thomas F; Filler, Scott G; Ibrahim, Ashraf S

    2015-12-01

    We studied the efficacy of the investigational drug VT-1161 against mucormycosis. VT-1161 had more potent in vitro activity against Rhizopus arrhizus var. arrhizus than against R. arrhizus var. delemar. VT-1161 treatment demonstrated dose-dependent plasma drug levels with prolonged survival time and lowered tissue fungal burden in immunosuppressed mice infected with R. arrhizus var. arrhizus and was as effective as high-dose liposomal amphotericin B treatment. These results support further development of VT-1161 against mucormycosis.

  7. Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium fimbrial proteins serve as antigens during infection of mice.

    PubMed

    Humphries, Andrea; Deridder, Sandra; Bäumler, Andreas J

    2005-09-01

    The Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium genome contains 13 operons with homology to fimbrial gene sequences. Here we investigated the role of 11 serotype Typhimurium fimbrial proteins, including FimA, AgfA (CsgA), BcfA, StbA, SthA, LpfA, PefA, StdA, StcA, StiA, and StfA, as antigens during the infection of genetically resistant mice (CBA). Upon the growth of serotype Typhimurium in standard laboratory broth culture, only the expression of FimA could be detected by Western blot analysis. The infection of mice with serotype Typhimurium grown in broth culture, followed by at least one subsequent infection, resulted in seroconversion of animals to FimA, AgfA, BcfA, StbA, SthA, LpfA, PefA, StdA, StcA, StiA, and StfA positivity. Most animals seroconverted to only a subset of these fimbrial antigens. The immunization of mice with glutathione S-transferase (GST)-FimA, GST-AgfA, GST-BcfA, GST-StbA, GST-SthA, GST-LpfA, GST-PefA, GST-StdA, GST-StcA, GST-StiA, and GST-StfA fusion proteins resulted in reduced fecal shedding of serotype Typhimurium during a challenge compared to that by a control group immunized with purified GST protein. Collectively, these data suggest that the expression of serotype Typhimurium fimbrial antigens is induced during the infection of mice.

  8. Different types of tea products attenuate inflammation induced in Trypanosoma brucei infected mice.

    PubMed

    Karori, S M; Ngure, R M; Wachira, F N; Wanyoko, J K; Mwangi, J N

    2008-09-01

    An in vivo study was carried out to determine the effect of different types of Kenyan tea extracts on male Swiss albino mice infected with Trypanosoma brucei brucei isolate KETRI 2710. The isolate produced a similar clinical picture after a pre-patent period of 5 days post-infection (DPI). Parasitemia levels in the untreated mice and those given different teas developed exponentially at similar rates reaching similar densities at the peak of parasitemia 8 DPI. Between 9 and 13 DPI parasitemia decreased more rapidly in tea treated compared to the untreated mice which indicated that tea lowered parasitemia level. Anaemia indicated by a fall in erythrocyte packed cell volume (PCV) occurred within 4 DPI and remained below the normal levels until the terminal stages of the disease. A significant difference (P<0.05) was observed 11 DPI between the tea treated and the untreated mice indicating that tea enhanced resistance to erythrocyte destruction. Mice treated with tea exhibited significantly (P<0.01) reduced parasite-induced hypoalbuminemia as compared to the untreated. Since albumin is a negative acute phase protein, it shows a decrease during inflammatory conditions and therefore its elevation in the mice given tea in this study clearly demonstrated that tea ameliorated inflammation induced by T. b. brucei. Although green and white teas were superior in most of these characteristics, black tea, which is the principle tea product from Kenya, displayed remarkable properties some even comparable to those of green tea. Interestingly, tea was more efficacious than dexamethasone an established anti-inflammatory drug, demonstrating its therapeutic potential.

  9. An in vitro model for infection with Leishmania major that mimics the immune response in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Soares, M B; David, J R; Titus, R G

    1997-01-01

    By using a primary in vitro response specific for Leishmania major, normal T cells from resistant CBA/CaH-T6J and susceptible BALB/c mice commit to a Th1 and a Th2 response, respectively. Since commitment occurred, we measured the production of gamma interferon (IFN-gamma), interleukin-1 (IL-1), IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-10, and IL-12, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta), and nitric oxide in the first 7 days of the response to identify factors that are critical for Th1 and Th2 development. While cells from resistant CBA mice produced more IFN-gamma, IL-10, and nitric oxide, cells from susceptible BALB/c mice produced more IL-1alpha, IL-5, PGE2, and TGF-beta. Although substantial amounts of IL-12 were detected, IL-12 did not associate with either Th1 or Th2 development. We did not anticipate that cells from resistant CBA mice would make more IL-10 in vitro. However, this also occurred in vivo since CBA mice produced substantial amounts of IL-10 following infection with L. major. Moreover, adding anti-IL-10 to primary in vitro responses enhanced production of IFN-gamma and nitric oxide by cells from CBA and BALB/c mice. Therefore, IL-10 cannot be regarded as a cytokine that associates with susceptibility to infection with L. major. Finally, the data presented here suggest that a collection of factors that can be produced by accessory cells influence Th commitment (e.g., IL-1, PGE2, and TGF-beta favor Th2 development). PMID:9199457

  10. Reduction of Influenza Virus Titer and Protection against Influenza Virus Infection in Infant Mice Fed Lactobacillus casei Shirota

    PubMed Central

    Yasui, Hisako; Kiyoshima, Junko; Hori, Tetsuji

    2004-01-01

    We investigated whether oral administration of Lactobacillus casei strain Shirota to neonatal and infant mice ameliorates influenza virus (IFV) infection in the upper respiratory tract and protects against influenza infection. In a model of upper respiratory IFV infection, the titer of virus in the nasal washings of infant mice administered L. casei Shirota (L. casei Shirota group) was significantly (P < 0.05) lower than that in infant mice administered saline (control group) (102.48 ± 100.31 and 102.78 ± 100.4, respectively). Further, the survival rate of the L. casei Shirota group was significantly (P < 0.05) higher than that of the control group (14.3 versus 40.0%). One day after infection, pulmonary NK cell activity and interleukin-12 production by mediastinal lymph node cells of mice in the L. casei Shirota group were significantly greater than those of mice in the control group. These findings suggest that oral administration of L. casei Shirota activates the immature immune system of neonatal and infant mice and protects against IFV infection. Therefore, oral administration of L. casei Shirota may accelerate the innate immune response of the respiratory tract and protect against various respiratory infections in neonates, infants, and children, a high risk group for viral and bacterial infections. PMID:15242940

  11. Alpha-tocopherol transfer protein gene inhibition enhances the acquired immune response during malaria infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Herbas, Maria Shirley; Natama, Magloire Hamtandi; Suzuki, Hiroshi

    2014-03-01

    Immune response to malaria infection is complex and seems to be regulated by innate and adaptive immune response as well as environmental factors such as host genetics and nutritional status. Previously, we have reported that α-tocopherol transfer protein knockout (α-ttp(Δ)) mice, showing low concentrations of α-tocopherol in circulation, infected with Plasmodium berghei NK65 survived significantly longer as compared with the wild-type mice. In addition, Plasmodium yoelii XL-17, a lethal strain, showed non-lethal virulence in α-ttp(Δ) mice. Thus, we hypothesized that the ability of the α-ttp(Δ) mice to control P. yoelli XL-17 proliferation may allow them to build an efficient immune response against murine malaria infection. On 15 days after infection with P. yoelli XL-17, α-ttp(Δ) mice were challenged to infection with P. berghei NK65. Results indicated that α-ttp(Δ) mice infected with P. yoelli XL-17 built a protective immunity against P. berghei NK65 associated to extremely low levels of parasitemia, a controlled inflammatory response, and a robust antibody response. Moreover, the importance of α-tocopherol for parasite proliferation was remarkable. The results suggest that inhibition of α-tocopherol transfer protein activity is effective for the enhancement of acquired immunity in murine malaria infection.

  12. Intestinal helminthic infections in striped field mice, Apodemus agrarius, from two southern regions of Korea.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Woon-Mok; Na, Byoung-Kuk; Song, Hyeon-Je; Kim, Chung-Mo; Nam, Gi-Jin

    2014-08-01

    The present study was performed to know the infection status of intestinal helminths in a most common species of field mice, Apodemus agrarius, from 2 southern regions of Korea. Total 133 and 103 mice were collected by the mouse trap in Hapcheon-gun, Gyeongsangnam-do and Gurye-gun, Jeollanam-do, respectively, from July 2005 to June 2006. The small intestine of each mouse was resected and longitudinally opened with a pair of scissors. The intestinal contents were washed with 0.85% saline until the supernatant became clear. Helminths were collected with naked eyes or under a stereomicroscope from the sediment of the intestinal content. More than 11 species of helminths (4 nematode spp., 5 trematode spp., and 2 cestode spp.) were recovered. Among these, heligmosomoid nematodes (97.5%) was the most highly and heavily infected species. As the members of trematodes, Plagiorchis muris, Brachylaima sp., Echinostoma hortense, Echinostoma cinetorchis, and unidentified echinostome larvae were found in the small intestines of 35 (14.8%), 12 (5.1%), 6 (2.5%), 1 (0.4%), and 1 (0.4%) mice respectively. Two species of tapeworms, Hymenolepis nana and Hymenolepis diminuta were also detected in 79 (33.5%) and 21 (8.9%) mice, respectively. Conclusively, heligmosomoid nematodes were the most prevalent (dominant) species among more than 11 helminth species detected, and Brachylaima sp. fluke is newly added in the list of intestinal trematodes in Korea.

  13. Kinetics and pathogenicity of oral infection by equine herpesvirus-9 in mice and suckling hamsters.

    PubMed

    El-Nahass, E; El-Habashi, N; Abdelaziz, A A; Nayel, M; Kasem, S; Fukushi, H; Tuji, H; Hirata, A; Sakai, H; Yanai, T

    2012-01-01

    The pathogenesis and kinetics of oral infection by equine herpesvirus (EHV)-9 were studied in mice and hamsters. After oral inoculation of 10(5) plaque-forming units (PFU) of virus, 1-week-old suckling hamsters showed varying severity of neurological disease from 72 hours post inoculation (hpi) and all of these animals had died by 96 hpi. Four-week-old ICR mice inoculated orally with 4 × 10(4)PFU of virus showed no clinical signs, but they developed erosive and ulcerative gastritis from 36 hpi. Varying degrees of encephalitis were seen in infected mice and hamsters, and the hamsters also developed myelitis by 96 hpi. Immunohistochemistry performed on whole body sections of suckling hamsters revealed the kinetics of spread of the virus to the central nervous system. EHV-9 antigen was detected initially in macrophages of the oral and lingual submucosa. At 36 hpi virus antigen was detected in the nerve fibres and pseudounipolar neurons of the trigeminal ganglion and at 96 hpi antigen was present in the myenteric plexuses of the intestine. Virus antigen was also detected in the liver, lungs and heart of affected animals. EHV-9 DNA was detected by polymerase chain reaction in the brain, blood and spinal cord of suckling hamsters at 36, 48 and 96 hpi. These findings show that EHV-9 may spread via the trigeminal nerve when mice and hamsters are inoculated orally with virus.

  14. Convection-Enhanced Delivery of AAV2-PrPshRNA in Prion-Infected Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Misol; Bajsarowicz, Krystyna; Oehler, Abby; Lemus, Azucena; Bankiewicz, Krystof; DeArmond, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    Prion disease is caused by a single pathogenic protein (PrPSc), an abnormal conformer of the normal cellular prion protein PrPC. Depletion of PrPC in prion knockout mice makes them resistant to prion disease. Thus, gene silencing of the Prnp gene is a promising effective therapeutic approach. Here, we examined adeno-associated virus vector type 2 encoding a short hairpin RNA targeting Prnp mRNA (AAV2-PrP-shRNA) to suppress PrPC expression both in vitro and in vivo. AAV2-PrP-shRNA treatment suppressed PrP levels and prevented dendritic degeneration in RML-infected brain aggregate cultures. Infusion of AAV2-PrP-shRNA-eGFP into the thalamus of CD-1 mice showed that eGFP was transported to the cerebral cortex via anterograde transport and the overall PrPC levels were reduced by ∼70% within 4 weeks. For therapeutic purposes, we treated RML-infected CD-1 mice with AAV2-PrP-shRNA beginning at 50 days post inoculation. Although AAV2-PrP-shRNA focally suppressed PrPSc formation in the thalamic infusion site by ∼75%, it did not suppress PrPSc formation efficiently in other regions of the brain. Survival of mice was not extended compared to the untreated controls. Global suppression of PrPC in the brain is required for successful therapy of prion diseases. PMID:24866748

  15. Toxoplasma gondii Infection Suppresses House Dust Mite Extract-Induced Atopic Dermatitis in NC/Nga Mice

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Young-Il; Hong, Sung-Hee; Cho, Shin-Hyeong; Lee, Won-Ja

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii) is an obligate intracellular protozoan parasite that infects humans and animals via congenital or postnatal routes, and it is found worldwide. Modulation of the immune system by parasite infection is proposed to suppress allergic inflammation. Growing evidences have shown that interleukin (IL)-10-producing regulatory B cells (Bregs) and CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) induced by parasite infection play a critical role in allergic or autoimmune diseases because these cells regulate negatively cellular immune responses and inflammation. Currently, the role of IL-10-producing regulatory B cells in host immune response during T. gondii infection is unknown. In this study, we investigate whether T. gondii infection can suppress the development of unrelated atopic dermatitis (AD)-like lesions. Methods AD is a chronically relapsing inflammatory skin disease accompanied by severe itching; for this, we used NC/Nga mice, a well-known experimental model of systemic AD. Repeated exposure to Dermatophagoides farinae crude extract (DfE), known as a major environmental allergen, evokes AD-like skin lesions in NC/Nga mice under specific pathogen-free conditions. NC/Nga mice were intraperitoneally infected with 10 cysts of T. gondii. Results T. gondii infection significantly ameliorated AD-like skin lesions in NC/Nga mice. The subpopulation of Bregs and Tregs in the AD mice was expanded in the course of T. gondii infection. In addition, T. gondii infection inhibited Th2 and enhanced Th1 immune response in the DfE-treated AD mice. Conclusions We have experimentally demonstrated for the first time that T. gondii infection ameliorated AD-like skin lesions in a mouse model of AD. Our study could in part explain the mechanisms of how parasite infection prevents the development of allergic disorder. Therefore, these immunemechanisms induced by T. gondii infection may be beneficial for the host in terms of reduced risk of allergic immune

  16. Effect of different stages of Schistosoma mansoni infection on the parasite burden and immune response to Strongyloides venezuelensis in co-infected mice.

    PubMed

    de Rezende, Michelle Carvalho; Araújo, Emília Souza; Moreira, João Marcelo Peixoto; Rodrigues, Vanessa Fernandes; Rodrigues, Jailza Lima; Pereira, Cíntia A de Jesus; Negrão-Corrêa, Deborah

    2015-12-01

    Multiple schistosome and soil-transmitted nematode infections are frequently reported in human populations living in tropical areas of developing countries. In addition to exposure factors, the host immune response plays an important role in helminth control and morbidity in hosts with multiple infections; however, these aspects are difficult to evaluate in human populations. In the current study, female Swiss mice were simultaneously co-infected with Strongyloides venezuelensis and Schistosoma mansoni or infected with St. venezuelensis at 2, 4, or 14 weeks after Sc. mansoni infection. The simultaneously infected mice showed a similar parasite burden for St. venezuelensis compared with mono-infected mice. In contrast, there was a significant reduction of St. venezuelensis burden (primarily during the migration of the larvae) in mice that were previously infected with Sc. mansoni at the acute or chronic phase. Independent of the stage of Sc. mansoni infection, the St. venezuelensis co-infection was capable of inducing IL-4 production in the small intestine, increasing the IgE concentration in the serum and increasing eosinophilia in the lungs and intestine. This result suggests that the nematode infection stimulates local type 2 immune responses independently of the schistosomiasis stage. Moreover, previous Sc. mansoni infection stimulated early granulocyte infiltration in the lungs and trematode-specific IgM and IgG1 production that recognized antigens from St. venezuelensis infective larvae; these immune responses would act in the early control of St. venezuelensis larvae. Our data suggest that the effect of multiple helminth infections on host susceptibility and morbidity largely depends on the species of parasite and the immune response.

  17. Identification of an immunogenic protein of Giardia lamblia using monoclonal antibodies generated from infected mice.

    PubMed

    Quintero, Jael; Figueroa, Diana Carolina; Barcelo, Rafael; Breci, Linda; Astiazaran-Garcia, Humberto; Rascon, Lucila; Robles-Zepeda, Ramon; Garibay-Escobar, Adriana; Velazquez-Contreras, Enrique; Avila, Gloria Leon; Hernandez-Hernandez, Jose Manuel; Velazquez, Carlos

    2013-08-01

    The humoral immune response plays an important role in the clearance of Giardia lamblia. However, our knowledge about the specific antigens of G. lamblia that induce a protective immune response is limited. The purpose of this study was to identify and characterise the immunogenic proteins of G. lamblia in a mouse model. We generated monoclonal antibodies (moAbs) specific to G. lamblia (1B10, 2C9.D11, 3C10.E5, 3D10, 5G8.B5, 5F4, 4C7, 3C5 and 3C6) by fusing splenocytes derived from infected mice. Most of these moAbs recognised a band of ± 71 kDa (5G8 protein) and this protein was also recognised by serum from the infected mice. We found that the moAbs recognised conformational epitopes of the 5G8 protein and that this antigen is expressed on the cell surface and inside trophozoites. Additionally, antibodies specific to the 5G8 protein induced strong agglutination (> 70-90%) of trophozoites. We have thus identified a highly immunogenic antigen of G. lamblia that is recognised by the immune system of infected mice. In summary, this study describes the identification and partial characterisation of an immunogenic protein of G. lamblia. Additionally, we generated a panel of moAbs specific for this protein that will be useful for the biochemical and immunological characterisation of this immunologically interesting Giardia molecule.

  18. The efficacy of cidofovir treatment of mice infected with ectromelia (mousepox) virus encoding interleukin-4.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Samantha J; Jackson, Ronald J; Fenner, Frank; Beaton, Sandra; Medveczky, Jill; Ramshaw, Ian A; Ramsay, Alistair J

    2005-04-01

    Improved vaccines and therapies for virulent poxvirus infection are required, particularly in the light of recent threats of bioterrorism. Cidofovir (HPMPC) is an acyclic nucleoside analog with proven efficacy against poxviruses. Here, we evaluated HPMPC in mice given a recombinant ectromelia virus (ECTV) encoding interleukin-4 (ECTV-IL-4) that is highly immune suppressive. Mousepox-sensitive BALB/c mice given HPMPC for five consecutive days after infection were protected against the lethal effects of a control ECTV recombinant, although they suffered a chronic form of mousepox disease. High doses of the drug resulted in a milder localized disease. In contrast, HPMPC failed to protect mousepox-resistant C57BL/6 mice against ECTV-IL-4, although its lethal effects were delayed by five daily doses of 20 mg/kg or a single dose of 100 mg/kg. Higher daily doses further delayed mortality, although the majority of animals eventually succumbed to infection. It appears that HPMPC inhibited ECTV-IL-4 replication without clearance, with the virus having a lethal effect when the drug was removed. Resistance of ECTV-IL-4 to HPMPC treatment may relate to the virus's ability to inhibit antiviral cell-mediated immunity. Interestingly, ECTV-IL-4-mediated immune suppression was not accompanied by a reduction in systemic IFN-gamma expression, suggestive of an alternative or highly localized suppressive mechanism.

  19. Immunization of mice with Plasmodium TCTP delays establishment of Plasmodium infection.

    PubMed

    Taylor, K J; Van, T T H; MacDonald, S M; Meshnick, S R; Fernley, R T; Macreadie, I G; Smooker, P M

    2015-01-01

    Translationally controlled tumour protein (TCTP) may play an important role in the establishment or maintenance of parasitemia in a malarial infection. In this study, the potential of TCTP as a malaria vaccine was investigated in two trials. In the initial vaccine trial, Plasmodium falciparum TCTP (PfTCTP) was expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and used to immunize BALB/c mice. Following challenge with Plasmodium yoelii YM, parasitemia was significantly reduced during the early stages of infection. In the second vaccine trial, the TCTP from P. yoelii and P. berghei was expressed in Escherichia coli and used in several mouse malaria models. A significant reduction in parasitemia in the early stages of infection was observed in BALB/c mice challenged with P. yoelii YM. A significantly reduced parasitemia at each day leading up to a delayed and reduced peak parasitemia was also observed in BALB/c mice challenged with the nonlethal Plasmodium chabaudi (P.c.) chabaudi AS. These results suggest that TCTP has an important role for parasite establishment and may be important for pathogenesis.

  20. Induction of ulcerative colitis in mice influences the course of infection with the nematode Trichuris muris.

    PubMed

    Vegas-Sánchez, M C; Rollán-Landeras, E; García-Rodríguez, J J; Bolás-Fernández, F

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of infection with the nematode whipworm Trichuris muris on the course of chemically induced acute ulcerative colitis in CBA/J mice, a strain proven to be highly resistant to infection with T. muris. Each mouse was infected with 50 embryonated eggs of T. muris by oral gavage. Acute colitis was triggered by administering 4% dextran sulphate sodium (DSS) in the drinking water for nine consecutive days at different times after infection. Concurrent infection and DSS administration exacerbate the severity of the colitis while favouring the permanence of parasites in the intestine. The induction of ulcerative colitis from days 54 to 62 post-infection (p.i.), when all worms had been expelled, ameliorated the course of the inflammatory disease. When ulcerative colitis was triggered earlier on, from days 27 to 35 p.i., the beneficial effects on inflammatory events were clearly shown with signs of mucosal epithelization and regeneration as early as day 1 after DSS administration. Previous infections by T. muris therefore accelerate recovery from subsequently induced inflammatory bowel disease and such an effect assists the nematode to persist in the intestinal niche.

  1. ATG16L1 governs placental infection risk and preterm birth in mice and women

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Bin; Macones, Colin; Mysorekar, Indira U.

    2016-01-01

    The placenta is a barrier against maternal-fetal transmission of pathogens. Placental infections can cause several adverse pregnancy outcomes, including preterm birth (PTB). Yet, we have limited knowledge regarding the mechanisms the placenta uses to control infections. Here, we show that autophagy, a cellular recycling pathway important for host defense against pathogens, and the autophagy gene Atg16L1 play a key role in placental defense and are negatively associated with PTB in pregnant women. First, we demonstrate that placentas from women who delivered preterm exhibit reduced autophagy activity and are associated with higher infection indicators. Second, we identify the cellular location of the autophagy activity as being in syncytial trophoblasts. Third, we demonstrate that higher levels of autophagy and ATG16L1 in human trophoblasts were associated with increased resistance to infection. Accordingly, loss of autophagy or ATG16L1 impaired trophoblast antibacterial defenses. Fourth, we show that Atg16l1-deficient mice gave birth prematurely upon an inflammatory stimulus and their placentas were significantly less able to withstand infection. Finally, global induction of autophagy in both mouse placentas and human trophoblasts increased infection resistance. Our study has significant implications for understanding the etiology of placental infections and prematurity and developing strategies to mitigate placental infection–induced PTB. PMID:28018968

  2. Experimental chemotherapy of Trypanosoma cruzi infection: persistence of parasite antigens and positive serology in parasitologically cured mice.

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, S. G.; Freitas, L. A.; Peyrol, S.; Pimentel, A. R.; Sadigursky, M.

    1991-01-01

    Mice infected with Trypanosoma cruzi, but parasitologically cured after specific chemotherapy, continued to exhibit positive indirect immunofluorescence serological tests 3-6 months after the therapy. Treatment of trypanosome antigens with monospecific antisera produced in rabbits, and examination by immunoelectron-microscopy following peroxidase labelling disclosed the presence of membrane deposits in cell processes in the spleens of the mice. Similar deposits were observed in the external membranes of T. cruzi amastigotes in the spleens of acutely infected mice, but not in normal control mice. No reaction occurred in tissues not previously treated with the monospecific anti-T. cruzi serum. Positive cells in treated and cured mice, as well as in the not cured or untreated control mice, were located in germinal centres of the splenic white pulp and presented long and branching cytoplasmic processes, which are indicative of dendritic cells of the lymphoid follicles of the spleen. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:1907221

  3. Moderate physical exercise reduces parasitaemia and protects colonic myenteric neurons in mice infected with Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, Neide M; Santos, Franciele d N; Toledo, Max Jean d O; Moraes, Solange M F d; Araujo, Eduardo J d A; Sant'Ana, Debora d M G; Araujo, Silvana M d

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of moderate physical exercise on the myenteric neurons in the colonic intestinal wall of mice that had been infected with Trypanosoma cruzi. Parasitology and immunological aspects of the mice were considered. Forty-day-old male Swiss mice were divided into four groups: Trained Infected (TI), Sedentary Infected (SI), Trained Control (TC), and Sedentary Control (SC). The TC and TI were subjected to a moderate physical exercise program on a treadmill for 8 weeks. Three days after finishing exercise, the TI and SI groups were inoculated with 1,300 blood trypomastigotes of the Y strain-T. cruzi. After 75 days of infection results were obtained. Kruskal-Wallis or Analyze of variance (Tukey post hoc test) at 5% level of significance was performed. Moderate physical exercise reduced both the parasite peak (day 8 of infection) and total parasitemia compared with the sedentary groups (P < 0.05). This activity also contributed to neuronal survival (P < 0.05). Exercise caused neuronal hypertrophy (P < 0.05) and an increase in the total thickness of the intestinal wall (P < 0.05). The TI group exhibited an increase in the number of intraepithelial lymphocytes (P > 0.05). In trained animals, the number of goblet cells was reduced compared with sedentary animals (P < 0.05). Physical exercise prevented the formation of inflammatory foci in the TI group (P < 0.05) and increased the synthesis of TNF-α (P < 0.05) and TGF-β (P > 0.05). The present results demonstrated the benefits of moderate physical exercise, and reaffirmed the possibility of that it may contribute to improving clinical treatment in Chagas' disease patients. PMID:24205797

  4. Evaluation of Imiquimod for Topical Treatment of Vaccinia Virus Cutaneous Infections in Immunosuppressed Hairless Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tarbet, E. Bart; Larson, Deanna; Anderson, Bentley J.; Bailey, Kevin W.; Wong, Min-Hui; Smee, Donald F.

    2011-01-01

    Imiquimod is an immune response modifier prescribed as a topical medication for a number of viral and neoplastic conditions. We evaluated the antiviral activity of imiquimod against vaccinia virus (WR strain) cutaneous infections in immunosuppressed (with cyclophosphamide) hairless mice when administered after virus exposure. Primary lesions progressed in severity, satellite lesions developed, and infection eventually killed the mice. Once daily topical treatment with 1% imiquimod cream for three, four, or five days were compared to twice daily topical treatment with 1% cidofovir cream for seven days. Survival time of mice in all treated groups was significantly prolonged compared to placebo controls. The mean day of death for the placebo group, three-day imiquimod, four day imiquimod, five-day imiquimod, and cidofovir groups were 15.5, 20.0, 20.5, 19.5, and 20.5 days post-infection, respectively. All treatment groups showed significant reductions in primary lesion size and in the number of satellite lesions. The cidofovir and 4-day imiquimod treatments delayed the appearance of lung virus titers by 3 and 6 days, respectively, although cutaneous lesion and snout virus titers were not as affected by treatment. Benefits in survival and lesion reduction were observed when imiquimod treatment was delayed from 24, 48 and 72 hours post-infection. However, increasing the treatment dose of imiquimod from 1% to 5% led to a significant decrease in antiviral efficacy. These results demonstrate the protective effects of topically administered imiquimod against a disseminated vaccinia virus infection in this mouse model. PMID:21439326

  5. Schistosoma japonicum: susceptibility of neonate mice born to infected and noninfected mothers following subsequent challenge.

    PubMed

    Zhao, F; Huang, X; Hou, X; Deng, Y; Wu, M; Guan, F; Liu, W; Li, Y; Lei, J

    2013-01-01

    This study was to investigate the differences between neonate mice born to Schistosoma japonicum-infected mothers and those born to noninfected mothers in subsequent challenge. The intensity of infection (evidenced by worm burden and liver egg burden) and liver immunopathology (number and size of liver granulomas) were significantly reduced in neonates from infected mothers (I.M.) compared with neonates from noninfected mothers (N.M.). Anti-soluble worm antigen of S. japonicum (SWA) IgG could be detected in sera of neonates from I.M. (N.N./I.M.) at 1 week after delivery, remained a plateau for 2 weeks and gradually decreased until 8 weeks of age. Parasite-specific IgM was not detected in sera from N.N./I.M. at any time after delivery. At 6 weeks after infection, the level of anti-SWA IgG in infected neonates from I.M. (I.N./I.M.) was significantly higher than that of infected neonates from N.M. (I.N./N.M.). In addition, production of IFN-γ, IL-12 and TGF-β by cultured splenocytes from I.N./I.M. was significantly increased, while the level of IL-4 was significantly decreased when compared to those from I.N./N.M.. These data demonstrate that congenital exposure to schistosomiasis japonica may render neonatal mice born to I.M. less susceptible to subsequent challenge and result in down-regulation of both infection intensity and immunopathology.

  6. Control of the Bcg gene of early resistance in mice to infections with BCG substrains and atypical mycobacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Denis, M; Forget, A; Pelletier, M; Turcotte, R; Skamene, E

    1986-01-01

    The effect of the Bcg gene on the early host response to intravenous infection with a variety of BCG substrains and some atypical mycobacteria was investigated. The numbers of live bacilli of BCG Pasteur and BCG Tice recovered from the spleens of Bcgs mice (C57BL/6, B10.A and BALB/c) at 3 weeks following infection exceeded the bacterial dose injected, whereas the number of CFU recovered from the spleens of Bcgr mice (A/J, DBA/2 and C3H/HeN) did not exceed the number of CFU injected, thus following the pattern observed in Bcgr mice and Bcgs infected with BCG Montreal. BCG Russia failed to multiply in both test groups; however, the number of CFU recovered in Bcgr mice was significantly lower than in Bcgs mice. On the other hand, the presence of live bacilli in the spleens of either Bcgr or Bcgs mice injected with BCG Japan was undetectable in most cases. Involvement of the Bcg gene in the early resistance to infection with BCG Pasteur, BCG Russia, Mycobacterium kansasii and M. intracellulare was documented by the significant differences in the kinetics of infections in mice of the C.D2 (BALB/c-Bcgr) and BALB/c (Bcgs) congenic lines. In BCG Russia, M. intracellulare and M. fortuitum infections, the phenotypic expression of the Bcg gene resulted in a more rapid elimination of the bacteria in the spleens of Bcgr when compared with Bcgs mice. On the other hand, the hepatic granuloma formation correlated with bacterial load except when C.D2 mice were infected with a small dose of BCG Pasteur or M. kansasii where extensive granulomatous hepatitis developed although no bacterial multiplication occurred in the spleen. It is suggested that granuloma formation could depend of the properties of the mycobacteria as well as the genetic background of the host without implicating the bacterial burden. PMID:3086001

  7. The effect of low-power GaAlAs laser radiation on Mycobacterium bovis infection in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fathi, Yashar; Golmaii, Poone; Rabiee, Atoosa; Samadpoor, Ali; Shahverdi, Nooshin; Nikbin, Behrooz

    2003-12-01

    The effects of laser on the immune system have not been extensively characterized. Low power laser sources, such as GaAlAs laser have been found to produce photo biological effects with evidence of interference with immunological functions. We have investigated the effects of GaAlAs laser irradiation on the immune response due to Mycobacterium bovis BCG infection in mice. BALB/C mice were exposed on the abdomen skin to GaAlAs laser radiation (810 nm) for 3 consequent days (Days = -2, -1, 0) before infection with 1 x 106 live units of Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) in the footpad. 21 days later groups of mice were tested for a delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) response to the purified protein derivative (PPD) of tubercle bacilli and the course of infection was monitored by measuring the size of the infected footpad. In the mice treated by laser, the DTH response to PPD was significantly suppressed (P-value<0.045) compared to unirradiated mice, when tested 21 days after BCG infection. When laser irradiated 13 days after BCG infection (Days: +13, +14, +15) BALB/C mice did not show a significant decrease in their DTH response to PPD indicating that the laser-induced suppression of BCG occurs only at the induction stage of the immune response. Thus mice exposed to the laser radiation before BCG infection showed an impaired DTH response to Mycobacterium, whereas mice exposed to the laser irradiation after BCG did not. These studies demonstrate that a systemic effect of laser irradiation can suppress the development and expression of immunity to pathogenic bacteria in mice. This suppression could be at the induction stage of the immune response (DTH) but not the elicitation stage. Also it seems that laser radiation, potentially, could have side effects for the immune system, on the basis of suppression effects it has shown on DTH response.

  8. Effect of dietary supplementation with white button mushrooms on host resistance to influenza infection and immune function in mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previously we showed that mice fed white button mushrooms (WBM) had enhanced immune functions known to help the body’s antiviral defense. In this study, we tested if WBM could afford protection against viral infection. Young (4-mo) and old (22-mo) C57BL/6 mice were fed a diet containing 0, 2 per cen...

  9. Non-sand fly transmission of a North American isolate of Leishmania infantum in experimentally infected BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Rosypal, Alexa C; Lindsay, David S

    2005-10-01

    Leishmania infantum, an etiologic agent of zoonotic visceral leishmaniasis, is endemic in the foxhound population in the United States and Canada. Leishmaniasis is usually transmitted by blood-feeding sand flies; however, epidemiological data do not support a significant role for sand flies in the maintenance of foxhound infections in North America, and an alternate mode of transmission may exist. The present study was conducted to determine if transplacental or direct transmission occurs in pregnant BALB/c mice experimentally infected with L. infantum isolated from a naturally infected foxhound from Virginia as well as to determine if the parasite was directly transmitted to the males used to breed the mice. Female BALB/c mice were intravenously inoculated with 1 x 10(6) promastigotes of the LIVT-1 strain of L. infantum. Mice were bred to uninfected male BALB/c mice 2 mo postinoculation. Pregnant mice were killed between days 13 and 18 of gestation. Pups and placentas were collected at necropsy, divided, and used for parasite culture and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analyses. Culture and PCR analyses were performed on spleens from the male mice to determine the possibility of sexual transmission. Leishmania sp. DNA was detected in 4 of 88 pups and 3 of 16 placentas from LIVT-1-inoculated mice. One male mouse used to breed infected females was PCR positive. This work provides evidence for a low level of nonvector transmission of North American L. infantum in a mouse model.

  10. Prevention of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Infection in BALB/c Mice by Feeding Lactobacillus acidophilus Strain NP-51

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The immune responses of 390 BALB/c mice fed the probiotic Lactobacillus acidophilus strain NP51® and infected with Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) were evaluated in a 6-month trial. Mice were randomized to nine treatment groups fed either viable- or heat-killed NP51 and inocula...

  11. Mice that exclusively express TLR4 on endothelial cells can efficiently clear a lethal systemic Gram-negative bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Andonegui, Graciela; Zhou, Hong; Bullard, Daniel; Kelly, Margaret M; Mullaly, Sarah C; McDonald, Braedon; Long, Elizabeth M; Robbins, Stephen M; Kubes, Paul

    2009-07-01

    Recognition of LPS by TLR4 on immune sentinel cells such as macrophages is thought to be key to the recruitment of neutrophils to sites of infection with Gram-negative bacteria. To explore whether endothelial TLR4 plays a role in this process, we engineered and imaged mice that expressed TLR4 exclusively on endothelium (known herein as EndotheliumTLR4 mice). Local administration of LPS into tissue induced comparable neutrophil recruitment in EndotheliumTLR4 and wild-type mice. Following systemic LPS or intraperitoneal E. coli administration, most neutrophils were sequestered in the lungs of wild-type mice and did not accumulate at primary sites of infection. In contrast, EndotheliumTLR4 mice showed reduced pulmonary capillary neutrophil sequestration over the first 24 hours; as a result, they mobilized neutrophils to primary sites of infection, cleared bacteria, and resisted a dose of E. coli that killed 50% of wild-type mice in the first 48 hours. In fact, the only defect we detected in EndotheliumTLR4 mice was a failure to accumulate neutrophils in the lungs following intratracheal administration of LPS; this response required TLR4 on bone marrow-derived immune cells. Therefore, endothelial TLR4 functions as the primary intravascular sentinel system for detection of bacteria, whereas bone marrow-derived immune cells are critical for pathogen detection at barrier sites. Nonendothelial TLR4 contributes to failure to accumulate neutrophils at primary infection sites in a disseminated systemic infection.

  12. Human metapneumovirus infection activates the TSLP pathway that drives excessive pulmonary inflammation and viral replication in mice.

    PubMed

    Lay, Margarita K; Céspedes, Pablo F; Palavecino, Christian E; León, Miguel A; Díaz, Rodrigo A; Salazar, Francisco J; Méndez, Gonzalo P; Bueno, Susan M; Kalergis, Alexis M

    2015-06-01

    Human metapneumovirus (hMPV) is a leading cause of acute respiratory tract infections in children and the elderly. The mechanism by which this virus triggers an inflammatory response still remains unknown. Here, we evaluated whether the thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) pathway contributes to lung inflammation upon hMPV infection. We found that hMPV infection promotes TSLP expression both in human airway epithelial cells and in the mouse lung. hMPV infection induced lung infiltration of OX40L(+) CD11b(+) DCs. Mice lacking the TSLP receptor deficient mice (tslpr(-/-) ) showed reduced lung inflammation and hMPV replication. These mice displayed a decreased number of neutrophils as well a reduction in levels of thymus and activation-regulated chemokine/CCL17, IL-5, IL-13, and TNF-α in the airways upon hMPV infection. Furthermore, a higher frequency of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells was found in tslpr(-/-) mice compared to WT mice, which could contribute to controlling viral spread. Depletion of neutrophils in WT and tslpr(-/-) mice decreased inflammation and hMPV replication. Remarkably, blockage of TSLP or OX40L with specific Abs reduced lung inflammation and viral replication following hMPV challenge in mice. Altogether, these results suggest that activation of the TSLP pathway is pivotal in the development of pulmonary pathology and pulmonary hMPV replication.

  13. Murine leukemia virus infects early bone marrow progenitors in immunocompetent mice.

    PubMed

    Tumas-Brundage, K M; Garret, W; Blank, K; Prystowsky, M B

    1996-10-15

    Chronic murine leukemia viruses (MuLVs) are retroviruses which induce leukemias/lymphomas after long latency periods. The induction of leukemia by MuLVs is complex, requiring multiple steps beginning with infection of an appropriate target cell. A number of investigators have proposed a bone marrow-thymus axis in the development of retrovirus induced T-cell lymphoma in which cells are initially infected in the bone marrow. These bone marrow cells or their progeny migrate to the thymus during the disease process. In our system using adult, immunocompetent BALB.K mice infected with E-55(+) MuLV, a similar pattern is seen; integrated virus is initially detectable in the bone marrow and spleen and only later in the thymus. In order to better understand the leukemic process, we analyzed the bone marrow from adult, immunocompetent BALB.K mice infected with the E-55(+) MuLV in bone marrow colony assays. The results from these assays demonstrate that either a pluripotent progenitor cell or an early progenitor cell is a target in the bone marrow for the virus.

  14. Experimental Zika virus infection induces spinal cord injury and encephalitis in newborn Swiss mice.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Natália C C A; Nogueira, Juliana S; Réssio, Rodrigo A; Cirqueira, Cinthya S; Kimura, Lidia M; Fernandes, Karolina R; Cunha, Mariana S; Souza, Renato P; Guerra, Juliana M

    2017-02-01

    A widespread epidemic of Zika virus (ZIKV) infection was reported in 2015 in South and Central America, with neurological symptons including meningoencephalitis and Guillain-Barré syndrome in adults, besides an apparent increased incidence of microcephaly in infants born to infected mothers. It is becoming a necessity to have a trustworthy animal model to better understand ZIKV infection. In this study we used newborn white Swiss mice as a model to investigate the ZIKV strain recently isolated in Brazil. ZIKV was inoculated via intracerebral and subcutaneous routes and analysed through gross histopathology and immunohistochemistry. Here we demonstrated first that the intracerebral group (ICG) displayed severe cerebral lesions, with neuronal death, presence of apoptotic bodies, white matter degeneration and neutrophil perivascular cuffing. In the subcutaneous group (SCG), we observed moderate cerebral lesions, morphologically similar to that found in ICG and additional myelopathy, with architectural loss, marked by neuronal death and apoptotic bodies. Interestingly, we found an intense astrogliosis in brain of both groups, with increased immunoexpression of GFAP (glial fibrillary acidic protein) and presence of hypertrophic astrocytes. The spinal cord of subcutaneous group (SCG) exhibited reduction of astrocytes, but those positive for GFAP were hypertrophic and presented prolonged cellular processes. Finally significant lesions in the central nervous system (CNS) were present in newborn mice inoculated by both routes, but SCG method led to an important neurological manifestations (including myelopathy), during a longer period of time and appears for us to be a better model for ZIKV infection.

  15. Probucol-Induced α-Tocopherol Deficiency Protects Mice against Malaria Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ishida, Noriko; Kume, Aiko; Hagihara, Yoshihisa; Yoshida, Yasukazu; Suzuki, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of malaria pathogens having resistance against antimalarials implies the necessity for the development of new drugs. Recently, we have demonstrated a resistance against malaria infection of α-tocopherol transfer protein knockout mice showing undetectable plasma levels of α-tocopherol, a lipid-soluble antioxidant. However, dietary restriction induced α-tocopherol deficiency is difficult to be applied as a clinical antimalarial therapy. Here, we report on a new strategy to potentially treat malaria by using probucol, a drug that can reduce the plasma α-tocopherol concentration. Probucol pre-treatment for 2 weeks and treatment throughout the infection rescued from death of mice infected with Plasmodium yoelii XL-17 or P. berghei ANKA. In addition, survival was extended when the treatment started immediately after parasite inoculation. The ratio of lipid peroxidation products to parent lipids increased in plasma after 2 weeks treatment of probucol. This indicates that the protective effect of probucol might be mediated by the oxidative stressful environment induced by α-tocopherol deficiency. Probucol in combination with dihydroartemisin suppressed the proliferation of P. yoelii XL-17. These results indicated that probucol might be a candidate for a drug against malaria infection by inducing α-tocopherol deficiency without dietary α-tocopherol restriction. PMID:26296197

  16. Tolerance to staphylococcal enterotoxin B initiated Th1 cell differentiation in mice infected with Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Romani, L; Puccetti, P; Mencacci, A; Spaccapelo, R; Cenci, E; Tonnetti, L; Bistoni, F

    1994-01-01

    Staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) is a bacterial superantigen that specifically activates T cells bearing V beta 8 T-cell receptor domains, which eventually leads to a long-lasting state of clonal anergy accompanied by selective cell death in the targeted CD4+ subset. Because the superantigen is known to promote Th1 cell differentiation in vitro, we have investigated the effect of SEB treatment on the course of Th2-associated progressive disease in mice infected systemically with Candida albicans. On the basis of the kinetics of SEB-induced changes in CD4+ cells and production in sera of interleukin 4 (IL-4), IL-10, and gamma interferon, we obtained evidence that V beta 8+ cell anergy concomitant with infection abolished the early IL-4/IL-10 response of the host to the yeast, ultimately leading to a state of resistance characterized by gamma interferon secretion in vitro by antigen-specific CD4+ cells. In contrast, SEB administered near the time of challenge resulted in accelerated mortality. Significant resistance to infection was also afforded by exposure of mice to a retrovirally encoded endogenous superantigen. These data suggest that CD4+ V beta 8+ T cells play an important role in vivo in the initiation of a Th2 response to C. albicans and that suppression of their activity may alter the qualitative development of the T-cell response and the outcome of infection. PMID:7914883

  17. Paradoxical activity of beta-lactam antibiotics against Proteus vulgaris in experimental infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Y; Fukuoka, Y; Motomura, K; Yasuda, T; Nishino, T

    1990-01-01

    In previous papers (Y. Ikeda and T. Nishino, Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 32:1073-1077, 1988; Y. Ikeda, T. Nishino, and T. Tanino, Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 31:865-869, 1987), we reported that many of the 7-aminothiazolyl cephalosporins, such as cefmenoxime, showed paradoxically reduced activity against Proteus vulgaris at higher concentrations, whereas these paradoxical effects were not observed for other types of cephalosporins, such as cefbuperazone and cefoperazone. In this study, we compare the therapeutic effect of cefmenoxime with that of cefbuperazone and explore the in vivo paradoxical effect of cefmenoxime by using an experimental infection model in mice. In an intraperitoneal infection with P. vulgaris 11, the survival rate with cefmenoxime was increased to 43% at 3.13 mg/kg but was lower at higher doses. On the other hand, cefbuperazone did not show such a paradoxical therapeutic effect. In mice infected with P. vulgaris 11, cefmenoxime levels in both serum and peritoneal washings were rapidly reduced and beta-lactamase activities in the peritoneal cavity were increased at higher cefmenoxime doses. These findings suggested that high levels of cefmenoxime at the infection site induced increased production of beta-lactamase, which then rapidly inactivated the antibiotic. We conclude that the paradoxical therapeutic effect of cefmenoxime against P. vulgaris occurs by the same mechanisms as the in vitro effect and that the high beta-lactamase inducibility and low beta-lactamase stability may account for the paradoxical therapeutic effect of cefmenoxime against P. vulgaris.

  18. Probucol-Induced α-Tocopherol Deficiency Protects Mice against Malaria Infection.

    PubMed

    Herbas, Maria Shirely; Shichiri, Mototada; Ishida, Noriko; Kume, Aiko; Hagihara, Yoshihisa; Yoshida, Yasukazu; Suzuki, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of malaria pathogens having resistance against antimalarials implies the necessity for the development of new drugs. Recently, we have demonstrated a resistance against malaria infection of α-tocopherol transfer protein knockout mice showing undetectable plasma levels of α-tocopherol, a lipid-soluble antioxidant. However, dietary restriction induced α-tocopherol deficiency is difficult to be applied as a clinical antimalarial therapy. Here, we report on a new strategy to potentially treat malaria by using probucol, a drug that can reduce the plasma α-tocopherol concentration. Probucol pre-treatment for 2 weeks and treatment throughout the infection rescued from death of mice infected with Plasmodium yoelii XL-17 or P. berghei ANKA. In addition, survival was extended when the treatment started immediately after parasite inoculation. The ratio of lipid peroxidation products to parent lipids increased in plasma after 2 weeks treatment of probucol. This indicates that the protective effect of probucol might be mediated by the oxidative stressful environment induced by α-tocopherol deficiency. Probucol in combination with dihydroartemisin suppressed the proliferation of P. yoelii XL-17. These results indicated that probucol might be a candidate for a drug against malaria infection by inducing α-tocopherol deficiency without dietary α-tocopherol restriction.

  19. In vivo optical imaging of bacterial infection and antibiotic response in intact nude mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Tao; Chen, Yanping; Chu, Jun; Zhang, Zhihong; Liu, Bifeng; Luo, Qingming

    2005-03-01

    We describe imaging the luminance of red fluorescent protein (DsRed2)-expressing bacteria from outside intact infected animals. This simple, nonintrusive technique can show in great detail the temporal behavior of the infectious process. Fluorescence stereo microscope, laser and cooled CCD are expensive to many institutes, we set up an inexpensive compact whole-body fluorescent imaging tool, which consisted of a digital camera, fluorescence filters and a mercury 50-W lamp power supply as excitation light source. The bacteria, expressing the DsRed2, are sufficiently bright as to be clearly visible from outside the infected animal and recorded with simple equipment. Introduced bacteria were observed in the abdomen. Instantaneous real-time images of the infectious process were acquired by using a digital camera by simply illuminating nude mice with mercury lamp. The development of infection over 48 hours and its regression after kanamycin treatment were visualized by whole-body imaging. The DsRed2 was excited directly by mercury lamp with EF500/50 nm band-pass filter and fluorescence was recorded by digital camera with CB580 nm long-pass filter. By this easy operation tool, the authors imaged, in real time, fluorescent tumors growing in live mice. The imaging system is external and noninvasive. For one year our experiments suggested the imaging scheme was feasible, which affords a powerful approach to visualizing the infection process.

  20. SPECT/CT analysis of splenic function in genistein-treated malaria-infected mice.

    PubMed

    Ha, Young Ran; Kang, Sung-A; Ryu, Jeongeun; Yeom, Eunseop; Kim, Mun Ki; Lee, Sang Joon

    2016-11-01

    Spleen traps malaria-infected red blood cells, thereby leading to splenomegaly. Splenomegaly induces impairment in splenic function, i.e., rupture. Therefore, splenomegaly inhibition is required to protect the spleen. In our previous study, genistein was found to have an influence on malaria-induced splenomegaly. However, the effect of genistein in malaria-induced splenomegaly, especially on the function of spleen, has not been fully investigated. In this study, hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining images show that genistein partially prevents malaria-induced architectural disruption of spleen. In addition, genistein decreases transgenic Plasmodium parasites accumulation in the spleen. Genistein treatment can protect splenic function from impairment caused by malaria infection. To examine the functions of malaria-infected spleen, we employed single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) technology. Red blood cells are specifically radiolabeled with Technetium-99m pertechnetate ((99m)TcO4(-)) and trapped inside the spleen. The standardized uptake values (SUVs) in the spleen of infected mice are higher than those of naive and genistein-treated mice. However, genistein reduces the malaria-induced trapping capacity of spleen for heat-damaged radiolabeled RBCs, while exhibiting a protective effect against malaria. Considering these results, we suggested that genistein could be effectively used in combination therapy for malaria-induced splenic impairment.

  1. Eosinophils Promote Antiviral Immunity in Mice Infected with Influenza A Virus

    PubMed Central

    Melo, Rossana C. N.; Duan, Susu; LeMessurier, Kim S.; Liedmann, Swantje; Surman, Sherri L.; Lee, James J.; Hurwitz, Julia L.; Thomas, Paul G.; McCullers, Jonathan A.

    2017-01-01

    Eosinophils are multifunctional cells of the innate immune system linked to allergic inflammation. Asthmatics were more likely to be hospitalized but less likely to suffer severe morbidity and mortality during the 2009 influenza pandemic. These epidemiologic findings were recapitulated in a mouse model of fungal asthma wherein infection during heightened allergic inflammation was protective against influenza A virus (IAV) infection and disease. Our goal was to delineate a mechanism(s) by which allergic asthma may alleviate influenza disease outcome, focused on the hypothesis that pulmonary eosinophilia linked with allergic respiratory disease is able to promote antiviral host defenses against the influenza virus. The transfer of eosinophils from the lungs of allergen-sensitized and challenged mice into influenza virus–infected mice resulted in reduced morbidity and viral burden, improved lung compliance, and increased CD8+ T cell numbers in the airways. In vitro assays with primary or bone marrow–derived eosinophils were used to determine eosinophil responses to the virus using the laboratory strain (A/PR/08/1934) or the pandemic strain (A/CA/04/2009) of IAV. Eosinophils were susceptible to IAV infection and responded by activation, piecemeal degranulation, and upregulation of Ag presentation markers. Virus- or viral peptide–exposed eosinophils induced CD8+ T cell proliferation, activation, and effector functions. Our data suggest that eosinophils promote host cellular immunity to reduce influenza virus replication in lungs, thereby providing a novel mechanism by which hosts with allergic asthma may be protected from influenza morbidity. PMID:28283567

  2. Antimalarial and antioxidant activities of methanolic extract of Nigella sativa seeds (black cumin) in mice infected with Plasmodium yoelli nigeriensis.

    PubMed

    Okeola, Valeelat O; Adaramoye, Oluwatosin A; Nneji, Chiaka M; Falade, Catherine O; Farombi, E Olatunde; Ademowo, Olusegun G

    2011-06-01

    The antimalarial and antioxidant activities of methanolic extract of Nigella sativa seeds (MENS) were investigated against established malaria infection in vivo using Swiss albino mice. The antimalarial activity of the extract against Plasmodium yoelli nigeriensis (P. yoelli) was assessed using the Rane test procedure. Chloroquine (CQ)-treated group served as positive control. The extract, at a dose of 1.25 g/kg body weight significantly (p<0.05) suppressed P. yoelli infection in the mice by 94%, while CQ, the reference drug, produced 86% suppression when compared to the untreated group after the fifth day of treatment. P. yoelli infection caused a significant (p<0.05) increase in the levels of red cell and hepatic malondialdehyde (MDA), an index of lipid peroxidation (LPO) in the mice. Serum and hepatic LPO levels were increased by 71% and 113%, respectively, in the untreated infected mice. Furthermore, P. yoelli infection caused a significant (p<0.05) decrease in the activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione-S-transferase and the level of reduced glutathione in tissues of the mice. Treatment with MENS significantly (p<0.05) attenuated the serum and hepatic MDA levels in P. yoelli-infected mice. In addition, MENS restored the activities of red cell antioxidant enzymes in the infected mice to near normal. Moreover, MENS was found to be more effective than CQ in parasite clearance and, in the restoration of altered biochemical indices by P. yoelli infection. These results suggest that N. sativa seeds have strong antioxidant property and, may be a good phytotherapeutic agent against Plasmodium infection in malaria.

  3. Variable maturation and oviposition by female Schistosoma japonicum in mice: the effects of irradiation of the host prior to infection

    SciTech Connect

    Cheever, A.W.; Duvall, R.H.

    1987-11-01

    The maturation of female Schistosoma japonicum was found to vary greatly within each of two Philippine strains of this parasite and some females did not contain uterine eggs 7 to 15 weeks after infection while others contained numerous eggs before the fifth week of infection. It was found that female worms containing less than 20 uterine eggs contributed little to the accumulation of eggs in the tissues of infected mice. Such worms also generally appeared to be immature. The variable rate of maturation of worms is likely to have profound effects on the immune reactions of mice as well as on the pathologic response to infection. Systematic delay in oviposition was serendipitously found in worms from mice which had been irradiated for other purposes prior to exposure to S. japonicum, and from the fourth to the sixth week after infection egg production by worms in irradiated mice lagged well behind that in intact mice. Seven to 10 weeks after infection these worms were laying normal numbers of eggs, as judged by egg passage per worm pair in the feces and the accumulation of eggs in the tissues. S. mansoni developed normally in irradiated mice.

  4. Establishment of a murine model of cerebral malaria in KunMing mice infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yan; Xu, Wenyue; Zhou, Taoli; Liu, Taiping; Zheng, Hong; Fu, Yong

    2016-10-01

    Malaria remains one of the most devastating diseases. Cerebral malaria (CM) is a severe complication of Plasmodium falciparum infection resulting in high mortality and morbidity worldwide. Analysis of precise mechanisms of CM in humans is difficult for ethical reasons and animal models of CM have been employed to study malaria pathogenesis. Here, we describe a new experimental cerebral malaria (ECM) model with Plasmodium berghei ANKA infection in KunMing (KM) mice. KM mice developed ECM after blood-stage or sporozoites infection, and the development of ECM in KM mice has a dose-dependent relationship with sporozoites inoculums. Histopathological findings revealed important features associated with ECM, including accumulation of mononuclear cells and red blood cells in brain microvascular, and brain parenchymal haemorrhages. Blood-brain barrier (BBB) examination showed that BBB disruption was present in infected KM mice when displaying clinical signs of CM. In vivo bioluminescent imaging experiment indicated that parasitized red blood cells accumulated in most vital organs including heart, lung, spleen, kidney, liver and brain. The levels of inflammatory cytokines interferon-gamma, tumour necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin (IL)-17, IL-12, IL-6 and IL-10 were all remarkably increased in KM mice infected with P. berghei ANKA. This study indicates that P. berghei ANKA infection in KM mice can be used as ECM model to extend further research on genetic, pharmacological and vaccine studies of CM.

  5. Dual role for Fcγ receptors in host defense and disease in Borrelia burgdorferi-infected mice.

    PubMed

    Belperron, Alexia A; Liu, Nengyin; Booth, Carmen J; Bockenstedt, Linda K

    2014-01-01

    Arthritis in mice infected with the Lyme disease spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi, results from the influx of innate immune cells responding to the pathogen in the joint and is influenced in part by mouse genetics. Production of inflammatory cytokines by innate immune cells in vitro is largely mediated by Toll-like receptor (TLR) interaction with Borrelia lipoproteins, yet surprisingly mice deficient in TLR2 or the TLR signaling molecule MyD88 still develop arthritis comparable to that seen in wild type mice after B. burgdorferi infection. These findings suggest that other, MyD88-independent inflammatory pathways can contribute to arthritis expression. Clearance of B. burgdorferi is dependent on the production of specific antibody and phagocytosis of the organism. As Fc receptors (FcγR) are important for IgG-mediated clearance of immune complexes and opsonized particles by phagocytes, we examined the role that FcγR play in host defense and disease in B. burgdorferi-infected mice. B. burgdorferi-infected mice deficient in the Fc receptor common gamma chain (FcεRγ(-/-) mice) harbored ~10 fold more spirochetes than similarly infected wild type mice, and this was associated with a transient increase in arthritis severity. While the elevated pathogen burdens seen in B. burgdorferi-infected MyD88(-/-) mice were not affected by concomitant deficiency in FcγR, arthritis was reduced in FcεRγ(-/-) MyD88(-/-) mice in comparison to wild type or single knockout mice. Gene expression analysis from infected joints demonstrated that absence of both MyD88 and FcγR lowers mRNA levels of proteins involved in inflammation, including Cxcl1 (KC), Xcr1 (Gpr5), IL-1beta, and C reactive protein. Taken together, our results demonstrate a role for FcγR-mediated immunity in limiting pathogen burden and arthritis in mice during the acute phase of B. burgdorferi infection, and further suggest that this pathway contributes to the arthritis that develops in B. burgdorferi-infected MyD88

  6. Control of Mycobacterium fortuitum and Mycobacterium intracellulare infections with respect to distinct granuloma formations in livers of BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Silva, Tânia Regina Marques da; Petersen, Antonio Luis de Oliveira Almeida; Santos, Theo de Araújo; Almeida, Taís Fontoura da; Freitas, Luiz Antônio Rodrigues da; Veras, Patrícia Sampaio Tavares

    2010-08-01

    Mycobacterium fortuitum is a rapidly growing nontuberculous Mycobacterium that can cause a range of diseases in humans. Complications from M. fortuitum infection have been associated with numerous surgical procedures. A protective immune response against pathogenic mycobacterial infections is dependent on the granuloma formation. Within the granuloma, the macrophage effector response can inhibit bacterial replication and mediate the intracellular killing of bacteria. The granulomatous responses of BALB/c mice to rapidly and slowly growing mycobacteria were assessed in vivo and the bacterial loads in spleens and livers from M. fortuitum and Mycobacterium intracellulare-infected mice, as well as the number and size of granulomas in liver sections, were quantified. Bacterial loads were found to be approximately two times lower in M. fortuitum-infected mice than in M. intracellulare-infected mice and M. fortuitum-infected mice presented fewer granulomas compared to M. intracellulare-infected mice. These granulomas were characterized by the presence of Mac-1+ and CD4+ cells. Additionally, IFN-γmRNA expression was higher in the livers of M. fortuitum-infected mice than in those of M. intracellulare-infected mice. These data clearly show that mice are more capable of controlling an infection with M. fortuitum than M. intracellulare. This capacity is likely related to distinct granuloma formations in mice infected with M. fortuitum but not with M. intracellulare.

  7. Spontaneous arthritis in MRL/lpr mice is aggravated by Staphylococcus aureus and ameliorated by Nippostrongylus brasiliensis infections.

    PubMed

    Salinas-Carmona, Mario C; de la Cruz-Galicia, Guadalupe; Pérez-Rivera, Isabel; Solís-Soto, Juan M; Segoviano-Ramirez, Juan C; Vázquez, Anna Velia; Garza, Mario A

    2009-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease that affects human beings worldwide. Infections have been associated to autoimmune diseases because their ability to induce a dominant cytokine response. Joint inflammation has been related to Th1 response because they induce high expression of proinflammatory cytokines TNF-alpha, IL-1, IFN-gamma. MRL/lpr mice spontaneously develop an autoimmune disease affecting joints, kidneys, etc. We compared incidence and severity of arthritis, antibody response, cytokine production, in mice infected with bacteria or helminthes in the Murphy Roths Large (MRL)lpr mice. Infections with helminthes Heligmosomoides polygyrus, Nippostrongylus brasiliensis or bacteria Nocardia brasiliensis and Staphylococcus aureus were studied. IL-4, IFN-gamma and IgG1, IgG2a antibody productions were determined. IFN-gamma was increased in all groups, the highest production was observed after bacterial infection; IL-4 production was higher after helminthes infection. IgG1 sera levels were increased in the helminthes <