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Sample records for gnotobiotic mice infected

  1. The course of LCMV infection in gnotobiotic and conventional adult mice pretreated with attenuated NDV vaccine.

    PubMed

    Szeri, I; Csatáry, L K; Anderlik, P; Bános, Z; Nász, I; Barna, Z

    1990-01-01

    A single intraperitoneal treatment with two different doses of live Newcastle Disease Virus (NDV) containing attenuated NDV vaccine one day before intracerebral inoculation with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) had no influence on the ratio and time of deaths after infection with a 100 LD50 dose of LCMV either in gnotobiotic or in conventional mice. There was no difference either in the LD50 values determined on the basis of three parallel LCMV titration performed on mice pretreated with two different doses of vaccine or untreated. NDV vaccine pretreatment thus did not influence the cellular immune response to LCMV infection either in gnotobiotic or in conventional adult mice. As the NDV vaccine increased the cellular immune response to LCMV infection in suckling mice according to earlier results, the present results reinforce our earlier statement that the direction of immunomodulatory effects can be influenced by age.

  2. The Role of Gelatinases in Campylobacter Jejuni Infection of Gnotobiotic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Alutis, Marie E.; Grundmann, Ursula; Fischer, André; Hagen, Ulrike; Kühl, Anja A.; Göbel, Ulf B.; Bereswill, Stefan; Heimesaat, Markus M.

    2015-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMP)-2 and -9 (also referred to gelatinases-A and -B, respectively) are upregulated in the inflamed gut of mice and men. We recently demonstrated that synthetic gelatinase blockage reduced large intestinal pro-inflammatory immune responses and apoptosis following murine Campylobacter (C.) jejuni infection. In order to address which gelatinase mediates C. jejuni-induced immune responses, gnotobiotic MMP-2–/–, MMP-9–/–, and wildtype (WT) mice were generated by broadspectrum antibiotic treatment and perorally infected with C. jejuni strain 81-176. The pathogen stably colonized the murine intestinal tract irrespective of the genotype but did not translocate to extra-intestinal compartments. At days 8 and 14 postinfection (p.i.), less pronounced colonic histopathological changes were observed in infected MMP-2–/– mice, less distinct epithelial apoptosis, but more epithelial proliferation in both MMP-2–/– and MMP-9–/– mice, as compared to WT controls. Reduced immune responses in gelatinase-deficient mice were characterized by lower numbers of effector as well as innate and adaptive immune cells within the colonic mucosa and lamina propria. The expression of IL-22, IL-18, IL-17A, and IL-1β mRNA was higher in the colon of MMP-2–/– as compared to WT mice. In conclusion, both MMP-2 and MMP-9 are differentially involved in mediating C. jejuni-induced intestinal immunopathology. PMID:26716014

  3. Toll-Like Receptor-4 Dependent Intestinal Gene Expression During Arcobacter Butzleri Infection of Gnotobiotic Il-10 Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gölz1, Greta; Alter, Thomas; Bereswill, Stefan; Heimesaat, Markus M.

    2016-01-01

    We have previously shown that Arcobacter butzleri infection induces Toll-like receptor (TLR) -4 dependent immune responses in perorally infected gnotobiotic IL-10–/– mice. Here, we analyzed TLR-4-dependent expression of genes encoding inflammatory mediators and matrix-degrading gelatinases MMP-2 and -9 in the small and large intestines of gnotobiotic TLR-4-deficient IL-10–/– mice that were perorally infected with A. butzleri strains CCUG 30485 or C1, of human and chicken origin, respectively. At day 6 following A. butzleri infection, colonic mucin-2 mRNA, as integral part of the intestinal mucus layer, was downregulated in the colon, but not ileum, of IL-10–/– but not TLR-4–/– IL-10–/– mice. CCUG 30485 strain-infected TLR-4-deficient IL-10–/– mice displayed less distinctly upregulated IFN-γ, IL-17A, and IL-1β mRNA levels in ileum and colon, which was also true for colonic IL-22. These changes were accompanied by upregulated colonic MMP-2 and ileal MMP-9 mRNA exclusively in IL-10–/– mice. In conclusion, TLR-4 is essentially involved in A. butzleri mediated modulation of gene expression in the intestines of gnotobiotic IL-10–/– mice. PMID:27141316

  4. Intestinal Expression of Genes Encoding Inflammatory Mediators and Gelatinases During Arcobacter Butzleri Infection of Gnotobiotic Il-10 Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Heimesaat, Markus M.; Alter, Thomas; Bereswill, Stefan; Gölz, Greta

    2016-01-01

    We have previously shown that Arcobacter butzleri induces intestinal, extra-intestinal, and systemic immune responses in perorally infected gnotobiotic IL-10–/– mice in a strain-dependent fashion. Here, we present a comprehensive survey of small and large intestinal expression profiles of inflammatory and regulatory mediators as well as of the matrix-degrading gelatinases MMP-2 and MMP-9 following murine A. butzleri infection. Gnotobiotic IL-10–/– mice were infected with A. butzleri strains CCUG 30485 or C1 of human and chicken origin, respectively. At day 6 following A. butzleri infection, mucin-2 mRNA, an integral part of the intestinal mucus layer, was downregulated in the colon, whereas TNF and IL-23p19 mRNA were upregulated in the ileum. Furthermore, IFN-γ, IL-17A, IL-1β, and IL-22 mRNA were upregulated in both colonic and ileal ex vivo biopsies at day 6 post strain CCUG 30485 infection. These changes were accompanied by downregulated colonic MMP-9 levels, whereas both MMP-2 and MMP-9 mRNA were upregulated in the ileum. In conclusion, these data indicate that A. butzleri infection induces changes in the expression of genes involved in pro-inflammatory and regulatory immune responses as well as in tissue degradation. PMID:27141315

  5. The role of serine protease HtrA in acute ulcerative enterocolitis and extra-intestinal immune responses during Campylobacter jejuni infection of gnotobiotic IL-10 deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Heimesaat, Markus M.; Alutis, Marie; Grundmann, Ursula; Fischer, André; Tegtmeyer, Nicole; Böhm, Manja; Kühl, Anja A.; Göbel, Ulf B.; Backert, Steffen; Bereswill, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni infections have a high prevalence worldwide and represent a significant socioeconomic burden. C. jejuni can cross the intestinal epithelial barrier as visualized in biopsies derived from human patients and animal models, however, the underlying molecular mechanisms and associated immunopathology are still not well understood. We have recently shown that the secreted serine protease HtrA (high temperature requirement A) plays a key role in C. jejuni cellular invasion and transmigration across polarized epithelial cells in vitro. In the present in vivo study we investigated the role of HtrA during C. jejuni infection of mice. We used the gnotobiotic IL-10−/− mouse model to study campylobacteriosis following peroral infection with the C. jejuni wild-type (WT) strain NCTC11168 and the isogenic, non-polar NCTC11168ΔhtrA deletion mutant. Six days post infection (p.i.) with either strain mice harbored comparable intestinal C. jejuni loads, whereas ulcerative enterocolitis was less pronounced in mice infected with the ΔhtrA mutant strain. Moreover, ΔhtrA mutant infected mice displayed lower apoptotic cell numbers in the large intestinal mucosa, less colonic accumulation of neutrophils, macrophages and monocytes, lower large intestinal nitric oxide, IFN-γ, and IL-6 as well as lower TNF-α and IL-6 serum concentrations as compared to WT strain infected mice at day 6 p.i. Notably, immunopathological responses were not restricted to the intestinal tract given that liver and kidneys exhibited mild histopathological changes 6 days p.i. with either C. jejuni strain. We also found that hepatic and renal nitric oxide levels or renal TNF-α concentrations were lower in the ΔhtrA mutant as compared to WT strain infected mice. In conclusion, we show here that the C. jejuni HtrA protein plays a pivotal role in inducing host cell apoptosis and immunopathology during murine campylobacteriosis in the gut in vivo. PMID:24959425

  6. Enterobacter cloacae inhibits human norovirus infectivity in gnotobiotic pigs

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Shaohua; Samuel, Helen; Twitchell, Erica; Bui, Tammy; Ramesh, Ashwin; Wen, Ke; Weiss, Mariah; Li, Guohua; Yang, Xingdong; Jiang, Xi; Yuan, Lijuan

    2016-01-01

    Human noroviruses (HuNoVs) are the leading cause of epidemic gastroenteritis worldwide. Study of HuNoV biology has been hampered by the lack of an efficient cell culture system. Recently, enteric commensal bacteria Enterobacter cloacae has been recognized as a helper in HuNoV infection of B cells in vitro. To test the influences of E. cloacae on HuNoV infectivity and to determine whether HuNoV infects B cells in vivo, we colonized gnotobiotic pigs with E. cloacae and inoculated pigs with 2.74 × 104 genome copies of HuNoV. Compared to control pigs, reduced HuNoV shedding was observed in E. cloacae colonized pigs, characterized by significantly shorter duration of shedding in post-inoculation day 10 subgroup and lower cumulative shedding and peak shedding in individual pigs. Colonization of E. cloacae also reduced HuNoV titers in intestinal tissues and in blood. In both control and E. cloacae colonized pigs, HuNoV infection of enterocytes was confirmed, however infection of B cells was not observed in ileum, and the entire lamina propria in sections of duodenum, jejunum, and ileum were HuNoV-negative. In summary, E. cloacae inhibited HuNoV infectivity, and B cells were not a target cell type for HuNoV in gnotobiotic pigs, with or without E. cloacae colonization. PMID:27113278

  7. Antimicrobial Therapies for Helicobacter pylori Infection in Gnotobiotic Piglets

    PubMed Central

    Krakowka, Steven; Eaton, K. A.; Leunk, Robert D.

    1998-01-01

    Gnotobiotic piglets infected with Helicobacter pylori were treated with various antimicrobials as monotherapy and dual therapy, and the results were compared to those for piglets treated with a triple-therapy regimen (bismuth subsalicyclate at 5.7 mg/kg of body weight, metronidazole at 4.4 mg/kg, and amoxicillin at 6.8 mg/kg four times a day [QID]). Clearance of infection was assessed after 7 days of treatment, and eradication was assessed following 7 days of treatment and a 14-day posttreatment observation interval. Monotherapy with amoxicillin, clarithromycin, and ciprofloxacin cleared and eradicated the organism from porcine stomachs; monotherapy with metronidazole cleared the infection and eradicated it from some piglets. Metronidazole-resistant microbes were recovered from treated piglets which cleared but did not eradicate the infection. Monotherapy with bismuth subsalicylate, erythromycin, nitrofurantoin, and tetracycline in the dosage range of 5.0 to 7.1 mg/kg QID was less than 100% effective in clearance and eradication, in that these drugs cleared and/or eradicated the infection from some of the piglets but did not eradicate the infection from all of the piglets. Monotherapy with an H-2 receptor antagonist (ranitidine) or a proton pump inhibitor (omeprazole) was ineffective at either clearance or eradication. In vivo dose titrations with several effective monotherapies were performed to determine the lowest effective in vivo dose of drug. In piglets, eradication was associated with a statistically significant decline in serum H. pylori-specific immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibodies; the titers of both IgA and IgG also declined, but the values were not statistically significant. For many antimicrobials, piglets are more sensitive indicators of clearance and eradication than humans. These data establish the H. pylori-infected gnotobiotic piglet as a useful model for the identification of novel antimicrobials for the treatment of this disease and for drug

  8. Indigenous microorganisms prevent reduction in cecal size induced by Salmonella typhimurium in vaccinated gnotobiotic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Tannock, G W; Savage, D C

    1976-01-01

    Germfree CD-1 mice challenged by the oral route with Salmonella typhimurium had ceca that were abnormal in appearance and reduced in size compared to those of germfree controls. Similarly, germfree mice injected with heat-killed S. typhimurium or gnotobiotes associated with three indigenous microbes (Lactobacillus, Bacteroides, Clostridium), and subsequently challenged with S. typhimurium also had small ceca. By contrast, gnotobiotic mice that had been both injected with the heat-killed S. typhimurium and associated with the three indigenous microbes before challenge with S. typhimurium had ceca similar in size and appearance to germfree mice. Thus, indigenous microorganisms could interfere with the mechanism by which the pathogen induced the decrease in cecal size, but could do so only in mice injected with heat-killed bacteria. This phenomenon suggests synergism between the interference effected by the indigenous bacteria and the resistance mechanisms of the animal. Images PMID:765282

  9. Extensive personal human gut microbiota culture collections characterized and manipulated in gnotobiotic mice

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Andrew L.; Kallstrom, George; Faith, Jeremiah J.; Reyes, Alejandro; Moore, Aimee; Dantas, Gautam; Gordon, Jeffrey I.

    2011-01-01

    The proportion of the human gut bacterial community that is recalcitrant to culture remains poorly defined. In this report, we combine high-throughput anaerobic culturing techniques with gnotobiotic animal husbandry and metagenomics to show that the human fecal microbiota consists largely of taxa and predicted functions that are represented in its readily cultured members. When transplanted into gnotobiotic mice, complete and cultured communities exhibit similar colonization dynamics, biogeographical distribution, and responses to dietary perturbations. Moreover, gnotobiotic mice can be used to shape these personalized culture collections to enrich for taxa suited to specific diets. We also demonstrate that thousands of isolates from a single donor can be clonally archived and taxonomically mapped in multiwell format to create personalized microbiota collections. Retrieving components of a microbiota that have coexisted in single donors who have physiologic or disease phenotypes of interest and reuniting them in various combinations in gnotobiotic mice should facilitate preclinical studies designed to determine the degree to which tractable bacterial taxa are able to transmit donor traits or influence host biology. PMID:21436049

  10. Role of volatile fatty acids in colonization resistance to Clostridium difficile in gnotobiotic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Su, W J; Waechter, M J; Bourlioux, P; Dolegeal, M; Fourniat, J; Mahuzier, G

    1987-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is an agent involved in the development of antibiotic-associated pseudomembranous colitis. The purpose of this work was to investigate the role of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) in resistance to colonization by C. difficile by using a gnotobiotic animal model. Accordingly, germfree mice were associated with different hamster flora, and the VFAs in their cecal contents were measured by gas chromatography. The results showed that VFAs were produced mainly by the intestinal flora, especially by the strictly anaerobic bacteria. In these associated mice, the concentrations of acetic, propionic, and butyric acids were higher than those of other acids, but at pH 6.8 the MICs of these three acids in vitro for C. difficile were more than 200 mu eq/ml. In gnotobiotic mice monoassociated with C. difficile and in the isolated ceca of these mice, VFAs did not inhibit the growth of C. difficile. In gnotobiotic mice which were diassociated with C. difficile and C. butyricum and given drinking water with a lactose concentration of 20%, the cecal contents included about the same amount of butyric acid as did those of the monoassociated mice, although the population of C. difficile remained the same. Therefore, it is suggested that VFAs alone cannot inhibit intestinal colonization by C. difficile and that, consequently, other inhibitory mechanisms are also present. PMID:3596806

  11. Arcobacter butzleri Induce Colonic, Extra-Intestinal and Systemic Inflammatory Responses in Gnotobiotic IL-10 Deficient Mice in a Strain-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Alutis, Marie E.; Fischer, André; Kühl, Anja A.; Breithaupt, Angele; Göbel, Ulf B.; Alter, Thomas; Bereswill, Stefan; Heimesaat, Markus M.

    2015-01-01

    Background The immunopathological impact of human Arcobacter (A.) infections is under current debate. Episodes of gastroenteritis with abdominal pain and acute or prolonged watery diarrhea were reported for A. butzleri infected patients. Whereas adhesive, invasive and cytotoxic capacities have been described for A. butzleri in vitro, only limited information is available about the immunopathogenic potential and mechanisms of infection in vivo. Methodology/Principal Findings Gnotobiotic IL-10-/- mice were generated by broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment and perorally infected with the A. butzleri strains CCUG 30485 and C1 shown to be invasive in cell culture assays. Bacterial colonization capacities, clinical conditions, intestinal, extra-intestinal and systemic immune responses were monitored at day six and 16 postinfection (p.i.). Despite stable intestinal A. butzleri colonization at high loads, gnotobiotic IL-10-/- mice were virtually unaffected and did not display any overt symptoms at either time point. Notably, A. butzleri infection induced apoptosis of colonic epithelial cells which was paralleled by increased abundance of proliferating cells. Furthermore A. butzleri infection caused a significant increase of distinct immune cell populations such as T and B cells, regulatory T cells, macrophages and monocytes in the colon which was accompanied by elevated colonic TNF, IFN-γ, nitric oxide (NO), IL-6, IL-12p70 and MCP-1 concentrations. Strikingly, A. butzleri induced extra-intestinal and systemic immune responses as indicated by higher NO concentrations in kidney and increased TNF, IFN-γ, IL-12p70 and IL-6 levels in serum samples of infected as compared to naive mice. Overall, inflammatory responses could be observed earlier in the course of infection by the CCUG 30485 as compared to the C1 strain. Conclusion/Significance Peroral A. butzleri infection induced not only intestinal but also extra-intestinal and systemic immune responses in gnotobiotic IL-10

  12. A neonatal gnotobiotic pig model of human enterovirus 71 infection and associated immune responses.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xingdong; Li, Guohua; Wen, Ke; Bui, Tammy; Liu, Fangning; Kocher, Jacob; Jortner, Bernard S; Vonck, Marlice; Pelzer, Kevin; Deng, Jie; Zhu, Runan; Li, Yuyun; Qian, Yuan; Yuan, Lijuan

    2014-05-01

    Vaccine development and pathogenesis studies for human enterovirus 71 are limited by a lack of suitable animal models. Here, we report the development of a novel neonatal gnotobiotic pig model using the non-pig-adapted neurovirulent human enterovirus 71 strain BJ110, which has a C4 genotype. Porcine small intestinal epithelial cells, peripheral blood mononuclear cells and neural cells were infected in vitro. Oral and combined oral-nasal infection of 5-day-old neonatal gnotobiotic pigs with 5×10(8) fluorescence forming units (FFU) resulted in shedding up to 18 days post-infection, with viral titers in rectal swab samples peaking at 2.22×10(8) viral RNA copies/mL. Viral capsid proteins were detected in enterocytes within the small intestines on post-infection days (PIDs) 7 and 14. Additionally, viral RNA was detected in intestinal and extra-intestinal tissues, including the central nervous system, the lung and cardiac muscle. The infected neonatal gnotobiotic pigs developed fever, forelimb weakness, rapid breathing and some hand, foot and mouth disease symptoms. Flow cytometry analysis revealed increased frequencies of both CD4(+) and CD8(+) IFN-γ-producing T cells in the brain and the blood on PID 14, but reduced frequencies were observed in the lung. Furthermore, high titers of serum virus-neutralizing antibodies were generated in both orally and combined oral-nasally infected pigs on PIDs 7, 14, 21 and 28. Together, these results demonstrate that neonatal gnotobiotic pigs represent a novel animal model for evaluating vaccines for human enterovirus 71 and for understanding the pathogenesis of this virus and the associated immune responses. PMID:26038741

  13. In vivo activity of nifurzide and nifuroxazide in intestinal bacteria in man and gnotobiotic mice.

    PubMed

    Leonard, F; Andremont, A; Tancrede, C

    1985-06-01

    Although Gram-negative enteropathogenic bacteria are the target strains of nifurzide and nifuroxazide treatments, neither drug affected faecal counts of in vitro-susceptible Enterobacteriaceae in healthy volunteers. This absence of activity was shown to be due to the poor solubility of the drugs tested. Therefore, effect of high doses of nifurzide was investigated in gnotobiotic mice. Activity against in vitro susceptible enteropathogens was then observed. Normal bacterial cells were replaced in the faeces by elongated, nonseptate and unflagellated mutants. Moreover, the resistance to colonization by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli and Shigella flexeri of an anaerobic flora of human origin was sharply decreased. PMID:4030525

  14. Metabolome progression during early gut microbial colonization of gnotobiotic mice

    PubMed Central

    Marcobal, Angela; Yusufaly, Tahir; Higginbottom, Steven; Snyder, Michael; Sonnenburg, Justin L.; Mias, George I.

    2015-01-01

    The microbiome has been implicated directly in host health, especially host metabolic processes and development of immune responses. These are particularly important in infants where the gut first begins being colonized, and such processes may be modeled in mice. In this investigation we follow longitudinally the urine metabolome of ex-germ-free mice, which are colonized with two bacterial species, Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron and Bifidobacterium longum. High-throughput mass spectrometry profiling of urine samples revealed dynamic changes in the metabolome makeup, associated with the gut bacterial colonization, enabled by our adaptation of non-linear time-series analysis to urine metabolomics data. Results demonstrate both gradual and punctuated changes in metabolite production and that early colonization events profoundly impact the nature of small molecules circulating in the host. The identified small molecules are implicated in amino acid and carbohydrate metabolic processes, and offer insights into the dynamic changes occurring during the colonization process, using high-throughput longitudinal methodology. PMID:26118551

  15. Metabolome progression during early gut microbial colonization of gnotobiotic mice.

    PubMed

    Marcobal, Angela; Yusufaly, Tahir; Higginbottom, Steven; Snyder, Michael; Sonnenburg, Justin L; Mias, George I

    2015-01-01

    The microbiome has been implicated directly in host health, especially host metabolic processes and development of immune responses. These are particularly important in infants where the gut first begins being colonized, and such processes may be modeled in mice. In this investigation we follow longitudinally the urine metabolome of ex-germ-free mice, which are colonized with two bacterial species, Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron and Bifidobacterium longum. High-throughput mass spectrometry profiling of urine samples revealed dynamic changes in the metabolome makeup, associated with the gut bacterial colonization, enabled by our adaptation of non-linear time-series analysis to urine metabolomics data. Results demonstrate both gradual and punctuated changes in metabolite production and that early colonization events profoundly impact the nature of small molecules circulating in the host. The identified small molecules are implicated in amino acid and carbohydrate metabolic processes, and offer insights into the dynamic changes occurring during the colonization process, using high-throughput longitudinal methodology. PMID:26118551

  16. Establishment of gastric Campylobacter pylori infection in the neonatal gnotobiotic piglet.

    PubMed Central

    Krakowka, S; Morgan, D R; Kraft, W G; Leunk, R D

    1987-01-01

    Campylobacter pylori, a gram-negative microaerophilic bacterium, has been implicated in the genesis of human gastritis, dyspepsia, and gastroduodenal ulceration. Previous attempts to reproduce the diseases in conventional laboratory animal species have been unsuccessful. To determine if neonatal gnotobiotic piglets were susceptible to C. pylori, we orally challenged two litters (n = 17) with 10(9) CFU after pretreating them with cimetidine. Controls housed in separate units received nothing or peptone water alone. Piglets were examined 1, 2, 3, and 4 weeks after challenge. Colonization by the bacterium and inflammation of the gastric mucosa persisted throughout the study period. Organisms were revealed by Warthin-Starry silver stain to reside between the mucus layer and the gastric epithelium. Culturing of samples from sites along the gastrointestinal tract revealed that the bacterium colonized essentially only the gastric and proximal duodenal mucosae. Gross pathological changes were restricted to the stomachs of infected piglets and consisted of submucosal edema, increased gastric mucus production, and progressive development of mucosal lymphoid follicles. Microscopic lesions consisted of transient neutrophilic infiltrates followed by diffuse and follicular infiltrations of mononuclear leukocytes into the mucosa and submucosa. Alcian blue-periodic acid-Schiff stains suggested that the infection resulted in the depletion of mucopolysaccharide production by deep gastric glands. These data indicate that gnotobiotic piglets reproduce many of the features of diseases associated with C. pylori in humans. Images PMID:3666963

  17. Alleviation of high fat diet‐induced obesity by oligofructose in gnotobiotic mice is independent of presence of Bifidobacterium longum

    PubMed Central

    Pfeiffer, Nora; Hanske, Laura; Loh, Gunnar; Klaus, Susanne; Blaut, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Scope Diet‐induced obesity is associated with changes in the gut microbiota and low‐grade inflammation. Oligofructose was reported to ameliorate high fat diet‐induced metabolic disorders in mice by restoring the number of intestinal bifidobacteria. However, this has not been experimentally demonstrated. Methods and results We fed conventional mice, germfree mice, mice associated with a simplified human gut microbiota composed of eight bacterial species including Bifidobacterium longum (SIHUMI), and mice associated with SIHUMI without B. longum a low fat diet (LFD), a high fat diet (HFD), or a HFD containing 10% oligofructose (HFD + OFS) for five weeks. We assessed body composition, bacterial cell numbers and metabolites, markers of inflammation, and gut permeability. Conventional mice fed HFD or HFD + OFS did not differ in body weight gain and glucose tolerance. The gnotobiotic mouse groups fed LFD or HFD + OFS gained less body weight and body fat, and displayed an improved glucose tolerance compared with mice fed HFD. These differences were not affected by the presence of B. longum. Mice fed HFD showed no signs of inflammation or increased intestinal permeability. Conclusion The ability of oligofructose to reduce obesity and to improve glucose tolerance in gnotobiotic mice fed HFD was independent of the presence of B. longum. PMID:26202344

  18. Gnotobiotic Silage

    PubMed Central

    Huhtanen, C. N.; Pensack, J. M.

    1963-01-01

    Selected strains of lactic acid bacteria isolated from grass silage were found to flourish when inoculated into irradiation-sterilized forage under gnotobiotic conditions. The acid content and pH of these silages resembled naturally fermented silage. Inoculation of gnotobiotic silage with Clostridium sporogenes and C. tyrobutyricum failed to cause any noticeable deterioration of silage quality. PMID:16349642

  19. The impact of a consortium of fermented milk strains on the gut microbiome of gnotobiotic mice and monozygotic twins

    PubMed Central

    McNulty, Nathan P.; Yatsunenko, Tanya; Hsiao, Ansel; Faith, Jeremiah J.; Muegge, Brian D.; Goodman, Andrew L.; Henrissat, Bernard; Oozeer, Raish; Cools-Portier, Stéphanie; Gobert, Guillaume; Chervaux, Christian; Knights, Dan; Lozupone, Catherine A.; Knight, Rob; Duncan, Alexis E.; Bain, James R.; Muehlbauer, Michael J.; Newgard, Christopher B.; Heath, Andrew C.; Gordon, Jeffrey I.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding how the human gut microbiota and host are impacted by probiotic bacterial strains requires carefully controlled studies in humans and in mouse models of the gut ecosystem where potentially confounding variables that are difficult to control in humans can be constrained. Therefore, we characterized the fecal microbiomes and metatranscriptomes of adult female monozygotic twin pairs through repeated sampling 4 weeks prior to, 7 weeks during, and 4 weeks following consumption of a commercially available fermented milk product (FMP) containing a consortium of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis, two strains of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris, and Streptococcus thermophilus. In addition, gnotobiotic mice harboring a 15-species model human gut microbiota whose genomes contain 58,399 known or predicted protein-coding genes were studied prior to and after gavage with all five sequenced FMP strains. No significant changes in bacterial species composition or in the proportional representation of genes encoding known enzymes were observed in the feces of humans consuming the FMP. Only minimal changes in microbiota configuration were noted in mice following single or repeated gavage with the FMP consortium. However, RNA-Seq analysis of fecal samples and follow-up mass spectrometry of urinary metabolites disclosed that introducing the FMP strains into mice results in significant changes in expression of microbiome-encoded enzymes involved in numerous metabolic pathways, most prominently those related to carbohydrate metabolism. B. animalis subsp. lactis, the dominant persistent member of the FMP consortium in gnotobiotic mice, upregulates a locus in vivo that is involved in the catabolism of xylooligosaccharides, a class of glycans widely distributed in fruits, vegetables and other foods, underscoring the importance of these sugars to this bacterial species. The human fecal metatranscriptome exhibited significant

  20. The impact of a consortium of fermented milk strains on the gut microbiome of gnotobiotic mice and monozygotic twins.

    PubMed

    McNulty, Nathan P; Yatsunenko, Tanya; Hsiao, Ansel; Faith, Jeremiah J; Muegge, Brian D; Goodman, Andrew L; Henrissat, Bernard; Oozeer, Raish; Cools-Portier, Stéphanie; Gobert, Guillaume; Chervaux, Christian; Knights, Dan; Lozupone, Catherine A; Knight, Rob; Duncan, Alexis E; Bain, James R; Muehlbauer, Michael J; Newgard, Christopher B; Heath, Andrew C; Gordon, Jeffrey I

    2011-10-26

    Understanding how the human gut microbiota and host are affected by probiotic bacterial strains requires carefully controlled studies in humans and in mouse models of the gut ecosystem where potentially confounding variables that are difficult to control in humans can be constrained. Therefore, we characterized the fecal microbiomes and metatranscriptomes of adult female monozygotic twin pairs through repeated sampling 4 weeks before, 7 weeks during, and 4 weeks after consumption of a commercially available fermented milk product (FMP) containing a consortium of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis, two strains of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris, and Streptococcus thermophilus. In addition, gnotobiotic mice harboring a 15-species model human gut microbiota whose genomes contain 58,399 known or predicted protein-coding genes were studied before and after gavage with all five sequenced FMP strains. No significant changes in bacterial species composition or in the proportional representation of genes encoding known enzymes were observed in the feces of humans consuming the FMP. Only minimal changes in microbiota configuration were noted in mice after single or repeated gavage with the FMP consortium. However, RNA-Seq analysis of fecal samples and follow-up mass spectrometry of urinary metabolites disclosed that introducing the FMP strains into mice results in significant changes in expression of microbiome-encoded enzymes involved in numerous metabolic pathways, most prominently those related to carbohydrate metabolism. B. animalis subsp. lactis, the dominant persistent member of the FMP consortium in gnotobiotic mice, up-regulates a locus in vivo that is involved in the catabolism of xylooligosaccharides, a class of glycans widely distributed in fruits, vegetables, and other foods, underscoring the importance of these sugars to this bacterial species. The human fecal metatranscriptome exhibited significant changes

  1. Development of the gut microbiota and mucosal IgA responses in twins and gnotobiotic mice.

    PubMed

    Planer, Joseph D; Peng, Yangqing; Kau, Andrew L; Blanton, Laura V; Ndao, I Malick; Tarr, Phillip I; Warner, Barbara B; Gordon, Jeffrey I

    2016-05-25

    Immunoglobulin A (IgA), the major class of antibody secreted by the gut mucosa, is an important contributor to gut barrier function. The repertoire of IgA bound to gut bacteria reflects both T-cell-dependent and -independent pathways, plus glycans present on the antibody's secretory component. Human gut bacterial taxa targeted by IgA in the setting of barrier dysfunction are capable of producing intestinal pathology when isolated and transferred to gnotobiotic mice. A complex reorientation of gut immunity occurs as infants transition from passively acquired IgA present in breast milk to host-derived IgA. How IgA responses co-develop with assembly of the microbiota during this period remains poorly understood. Here, we (1) identify a set of age-discriminatory bacterial taxa whose representations define a program of microbiota assembly and maturation during the first 2 postnatal years that is shared across 40 healthy twin pairs in the USA; (2) describe a pattern of progression of gut mucosal IgA responses to bacterial members of the microbiota that is highly distinctive for family members (twin pairs) during the first several postnatal months then generalizes across pairs in the second year; and (3) assess the effects of zygosity, birth mode, and breast feeding. Age-associated differences in these IgA responses can be recapitulated in young germ-free mice, colonized with faecal microbiota obtained from two twin pairs at 6 and 18 months of age, and fed a sequence of human diets that simulate the transition from milk feeding to complementary foods. Most of these responses were robust to diet, suggesting that 'intrinsic' properties of community members play a dominant role in dictating IgA responses. The approach described can be used to define gut mucosal immune development in health and disease states and to help discover ways of repairing or preventing perturbations in this facet of host immunity.

  2. Development of the gut microbiota and mucosal IgA responses in twins and gnotobiotic mice.

    PubMed

    Planer, Joseph D; Peng, Yangqing; Kau, Andrew L; Blanton, Laura V; Ndao, I Malick; Tarr, Phillip I; Warner, Barbara B; Gordon, Jeffrey I

    2016-06-01

    Immunoglobulin A (IgA), the major class of antibody secreted by the gut mucosa, is an important contributor to gut barrier function. The repertoire of IgA bound to gut bacteria reflects both T-cell-dependent and -independent pathways, plus glycans present on the antibody's secretory component. Human gut bacterial taxa targeted by IgA in the setting of barrier dysfunction are capable of producing intestinal pathology when isolated and transferred to gnotobiotic mice. A complex reorientation of gut immunity occurs as infants transition from passively acquired IgA present in breast milk to host-derived IgA. How IgA responses co-develop with assembly of the microbiota during this period remains poorly understood. Here, we (1) identify a set of age-discriminatory bacterial taxa whose representations define a program of microbiota assembly and maturation during the first 2 postnatal years that is shared across 40 healthy twin pairs in the USA; (2) describe a pattern of progression of gut mucosal IgA responses to bacterial members of the microbiota that is highly distinctive for family members (twin pairs) during the first several postnatal months then generalizes across pairs in the second year; and (3) assess the effects of zygosity, birth mode, and breast feeding. Age-associated differences in these IgA responses can be recapitulated in young germ-free mice, colonized with faecal microbiota obtained from two twin pairs at 6 and 18 months of age, and fed a sequence of human diets that simulate the transition from milk feeding to complementary foods. Most of these responses were robust to diet, suggesting that 'intrinsic' properties of community members play a dominant role in dictating IgA responses. The approach described can be used to define gut mucosal immune development in health and disease states and to help discover ways of repairing or preventing perturbations in this facet of host immunity. PMID:27279225

  3. Experimental infection of gnotobiotic piglets with Escherichia coli strains positive for EAST1 and AIDA.

    PubMed

    Zajacova, Zuzana Sramkova; Faldyna, Martin; Kulich, Pavel; Kummer, Vladimir; Maskova, Jarmila; Alexa, Pavel

    2013-03-15

    The virulence factors EAST1 and AIDA are often detected in ETEC/VTEC strains isolated from pigs and their role in diarrhoeal infections is discussed. In order to elucidate the pathogenesis of AIDA, the colonisation patterns of F4 positive and AIDA positive strains were investigated. Two wild-type Escherichia coli strains AIDA/EAST1 and F4/EAST1 isolated from diarrhoeal piglets were used for animal experiment to evaluate the ability of the EAST1 toxin to be involved in induction of diarrhoea. Gnotobiotic piglets were supplemented with normal porcine serum and orally inoculated with the strains. Faecal bacterial shedding of the challenge strains was observed during the experiment. Light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to detect the colonisation pattern of both challenge strains. Although bacterial isolation demonstrated shedding of the challenge strains until the end of the experiment, diarrhoea did not develop in any piglet. Based on histological examination, piglets were more heavily colonised in the case of infection with E. coli O149/F4/EAST1 strain. Scanning electron microscopy showed bacterial cells of F4/EAST1 E. coli adhering to enterocytes, in contrast to AIDA/EAST1 which were poorly present on the intestinal surface. The EAST1 toxin alone was not able to induce diarrhoea in animals. Therefore our results demonstrate that the function/role of EAST1 and AIDA in colibacillosis of pigs remains to be elucidated. PMID:23068274

  4. Gnotobiotic Piglet Infection Model for Evaluating the Safe Use of Antibiotics against Escherichia coli O157:H7 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Quanshun; Donohue-Rolfe, Arthur; Krautz-Peterson, Greice; Sevo, Milica; Parry, Nicola; Abeijon, Claudia; Tzipori, Saul

    2010-01-01

    Background Shiga toxin (Stx)–producing Escherichia coli (STEC), especially O157:H7, cause bloody diarrhea, and in 3%–15% of individuals the infection leads to hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) or other complications. Use of antibiotics to treat STEC infections is controversial. Here, we describe the use of piglets to evaluate the efficacy and mechanism of action of antibiotics in these infections. Methods The effects of 2 antibiotics on STEC toxin production and their mechanisms of action were first determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and subsequently evaluated clinically in the gnotobiotic piglet infection model. Results In vitro treatment of clinical and isogenic strains with ciprofloxacin increased the production of Stx2 via phage induction but not the production of Stx1. Azithromycin caused no significant increase in toxin production. After treatment with ciprofloxacin, infected piglets had diarrhea and the severe fatal neurological symptoms associated with Stx2 intoxication. Characteristic petechial hemorrhages in the cerebellum were more severe in ciprofloxacin-treated animals than in control animals. In contrast, azithromycin-treated piglets survived the infection and had little or no brain hemorrhaging. Conclusions The increased in vitro toxin production caused by ciprofloxacin was strongly correlated with death and an increased rate of cerebellar hemorrhage, in contrast to the effect of azithromycin. The piglet is a suitable model for determining the effectiveness and safety of antibiotics available to treat patients. PMID:19125676

  5. Increased and prolonged human norovirus infection in RAG2/IL2RG deficient gnotobiotic pigs with severe combined immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Shaohua; Ryu, Junghyun; Wen, Ke; Twitchell, Erica; Bui, Tammy; Ramesh, Ashwin; Weiss, Mariah; Li, Guohua; Samuel, Helen; Clark-Deener, Sherrie; Jiang, Xi; Lee, Kiho; Yuan, Lijuan

    2016-01-01

    Application of genetically engineered (GE) large animals carrying multi-allelic modifications has been hampered by low efficiency in production and extended gestation period compared to rodents. Here, we rapidly generated RAG2/IL2RG double knockout pigs using direct injection of CRISPR/Cas9 system into developing embryos. RAG2/IL2RG deficient pigs were immunodeficient, characterized by depletion of lymphocytes and either absence of or structurally abnormal immune organs. Pigs were maintained in gnotobiotic facility and evaluated for human norovirus (HuNoV) infection. HuNoV shedding lasted for 16 days in wild type pigs, compared to 27 days (until the end of trials) in RAG2/IL2RG deficient pigs. Additionally, higher HuNoV titers were detected in intestinal tissues and contents and in blood, indicating increased and prolonged HuNoV infection in RAG2/IL2RG deficient pigs and the importance of lymphocytes in HuNoV clearance. These results suggest that GE immunodeficient gnotobiotic pigs serve as a novel model for biomedical research and will facilitate HuNoV studies. PMID:27118081

  6. Effect of intestinal colonisation by two Lactobacillus strains on the immune response of gnotobiotic mice.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, R S; Lima, M; Gomes de Oliveira, N L; Miyoshi, A; Nicoli, J R; Neumann, E; Nunes, A C

    2014-12-01

    The effect of intestinal colonisation on the immune system was investigated in germ-free mice monoassociated with Lactobacillus strains isolated from calf faeces. Single doses of Lactobacillus acidophilus L36 or Lactobacillus salivarius L38 were administered to germ-free mice by intragastric gavage. Ten days later, the mice were euthanised. Gene expression levels of interleukin 5 (IL-5), IL-6, IL-10, IL-12b, IL-17a, gamma interferon (IFN-γ), transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1), and tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) were quantified in segments of the small and large intestines by real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. All the mice were colonised rapidly after Lactobacillus administration with intestinal counts ranging from 6.53 to 8.26 log cfu/g. L. acidophilus L36 administration increased the expression of cytokines involved with the Th2 (IL-5, IL-6 and TGF-β1) and Th17 (IL-17a, TNF-α and IL-6) inflammatory response, whereas L. salivarius L38 appeared to stimulate a pattern of less diversified cytokines in the intestine. Intragastric gavage of L. acidophilus L36 and L. salivarius L38 induced similar levels of colonisation in the digestive tracts of germ-free mice but stimulated different immune responses in the intestinal mucosa. The different immunomodulation patterns might facilitate the potential use of these lactobacilli as probiotics to treat distinct pathological conditions, for example protection against Citrobacter rodentium infection by stimulating IL-17 production.

  7. Use of gnotobiotic mice to identify and characterize key microbes responsible for the development of the intestinal immune system

    PubMed Central

    UMESAKI, Yoshinori

    2014-01-01

    Symbiosis between intestinal microbiota and the host animal plays an important role in the homeostasis of host physiology. Since the first production of germ-free rodents in 1945, it has become increasingly clear that the intestinal immune system and the biochemical characteristics of epithelial cells differ greatly between conventional and germ-free rodents. However, questions remain about the types of microbes involved and the precise mechanism by which these microbes affect the host physiology. Here, we review experiments designed to answer these questions with the use of gnotobiotic mice. We have determined suitable biochemical and immunological markers for monitoring microbial effects in these mice. Using these markers, we have found clear differences in epithelial cell glycolipid biosynthesis and intraepithelial lymphocyte dynamics between germ-free and conventional mice. Furthermore, we have identified a key microbe that activates the mucosal immune system in the small intestine. This indigenous bacteria, called segmented filamentous bacteria, is a key symbiont in the host-microbiota interplay, including Th17 cell-inducing activity. PMID:25391317

  8. Effects of dietary inulin on bacterial growth, short-chain fatty acid production and hepatic lipid metabolism in gnotobiotic mice.

    PubMed

    Weitkunat, Karolin; Schumann, Sara; Petzke, Klaus Jürgen; Blaut, Michael; Loh, Gunnar; Klaus, Susanne

    2015-09-01

    In literature, contradictory effects of dietary fibers and their fermentation products, short-chain fatty acids (SCFA), are described: On one hand, they increase satiety, but on the other hand, they provide additional energy and promote obesity development. We aimed to answer this paradox by investigating the effects of fermentable and non-fermentable fibers on obesity induced by high-fat diet in gnotobiotic C3H/HeOuJ mice colonized with a simplified human microbiota. Mice were fed a high-fat diet supplemented either with 10% cellulose (non-fermentable) or inulin (fermentable) for 6 weeks. Feeding the inulin diet resulted in an increased diet digestibility and reduced feces energy, compared to the cellulose diet with no differences in food intake, suggesting an increased intestinal energy extraction from inulin. However, we observed no increase in body fat/weight. The additional energy provided by the inulin diet led to an increased bacterial proliferation in this group. Supplementation of inulin resulted further in significantly elevated concentrations of total SCFA in cecum and portal vein plasma, with a reduced cecal acetate:propionate ratio. Hepatic expression of genes involved in lipogenesis (Fasn, Gpam) and fatty acid elongation/desaturation (Scd1, Elovl3, Elovl6, Elovl5, Fads1 and Fads2) were decreased in inulin-fed animals. Accordingly, plasma and liver phospholipid composition were changed between the different feeding groups. Concentrations of omega-3 and odd-chain fatty acids were increased in inulin-fed mice, whereas omega-6 fatty acids were reduced. Taken together, these data indicate that, during this short-term feeding, inulin has mainly positive effects on the lipid metabolism, which could cause beneficial effects during obesity development in long-term studies.

  9. Effects of dietary inulin on bacterial growth, short-chain fatty acid production and hepatic lipid metabolism in gnotobiotic mice.

    PubMed

    Weitkunat, Karolin; Schumann, Sara; Petzke, Klaus Jürgen; Blaut, Michael; Loh, Gunnar; Klaus, Susanne

    2015-09-01

    In literature, contradictory effects of dietary fibers and their fermentation products, short-chain fatty acids (SCFA), are described: On one hand, they increase satiety, but on the other hand, they provide additional energy and promote obesity development. We aimed to answer this paradox by investigating the effects of fermentable and non-fermentable fibers on obesity induced by high-fat diet in gnotobiotic C3H/HeOuJ mice colonized with a simplified human microbiota. Mice were fed a high-fat diet supplemented either with 10% cellulose (non-fermentable) or inulin (fermentable) for 6 weeks. Feeding the inulin diet resulted in an increased diet digestibility and reduced feces energy, compared to the cellulose diet with no differences in food intake, suggesting an increased intestinal energy extraction from inulin. However, we observed no increase in body fat/weight. The additional energy provided by the inulin diet led to an increased bacterial proliferation in this group. Supplementation of inulin resulted further in significantly elevated concentrations of total SCFA in cecum and portal vein plasma, with a reduced cecal acetate:propionate ratio. Hepatic expression of genes involved in lipogenesis (Fasn, Gpam) and fatty acid elongation/desaturation (Scd1, Elovl3, Elovl6, Elovl5, Fads1 and Fads2) were decreased in inulin-fed animals. Accordingly, plasma and liver phospholipid composition were changed between the different feeding groups. Concentrations of omega-3 and odd-chain fatty acids were increased in inulin-fed mice, whereas omega-6 fatty acids were reduced. Taken together, these data indicate that, during this short-term feeding, inulin has mainly positive effects on the lipid metabolism, which could cause beneficial effects during obesity development in long-term studies. PMID:26033744

  10. Characterizing the Interactions between a Naturally Primed Immunoglobulin A and Its Conserved Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron Species-specific Epitope in Gnotobiotic Mice*

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Daniel A.; Planer, Joseph D.; Guruge, Janaki L.; Xue, Lai; Downey-Virgin, Whitt; Goodman, Andrew L.; Seedorf, Henning; Gordon, Jeffrey I.

    2015-01-01

    The adaptive immune response to the human gut microbiota consists of a complex repertoire of antibodies interacting with a broad range of taxa. Fusing intestinal lamina propria lymphocytes from mice monocolonized with Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron to a myeloma fusion partner allowed us to recover hybridomas that captured naturally primed, antigen-specific antibody responses representing multiple isotypes, including IgA. One of these hybridomas, 260.8, produced a monoclonal antibody that recognizes an epitope specific for B. thetaiotaomicron isolates in a large panel of hospital- and community-acquired Bacteroides. Whole genome transposon mutagenesis revealed a 19-gene locus, involved in LPS O-antigen polysaccharide synthesis and conserved among multiple B. thetaiotaomicron isolates, that is required for 260.8 epitope expression. Mutants in this locus exhibited marked fitness defects in vitro during growth in rich medium and in gnotobiotic mice colonized with defined communities of human gut symbionts. Expression of the 260.8 epitope was sustained during 10 months of daily passage in vitro and during 14 months of monocolonization of gnotobiotic wild-type, Rag1−/−, or Myd88−/− mice. Comparison of gnotobiotic Rag1−/− mice with and without subcutaneous 260.8 hybridomas disclosed that this IgA did not affect B. thetaiotaomicron population density or suppress 260.8 epitope production but did affect bacterial gene expression in ways emblematic of a diminished host innate immune response. Our study illustrates an approach for (i) generating diagnostic antibodies, (ii) characterizing IgA responses along a continuum of specificity/degeneracy that defines the IgA repertoire to gut symbionts, and (iii) identifying immunogenic epitopes that affect competitiveness and help maintain host-microbe mutualism. PMID:25795776

  11. Expression and Quorum Sensing Regulation of Type III Secretion System Genes of Vibrio harveyi during Infection of Gnotobiotic Brine Shrimp.

    PubMed

    Ruwandeepika, H A Darshanee; Karunasagar, Indrani; Bossier, Peter; Defoirdt, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Type III secretion systems enable pathogens to inject their virulence factors directly into the cytoplasm of the host cells. The type III secretion system of Vibrio harveyi, a major pathogen of aquatic organisms and a model species in quorum sensing studies, is repressed by the quorum sensing master regulator LuxR. In this study, we found that during infection of gnotobiotic brine shrimp larvae, the expression levels of three type III secretion operons in V. harveyi increased within the first 12h after challenge and decreased again thereafter. The in vivo expression levels were highest in a mutant with a quorum sensing system that is locked in low cell density configuration (minimal LuxR levels) and lowest in a mutant with a quorum sensing system that is locked in the high cell density configuration (maximal LuxR levels), which is consistent with repression of type III secretion by LuxR. Remarkably, in vivo expression levels of the type III secretion system genes were much (> 1000 fold) higher than the in vitro expression levels, indicating that (currently unknown) host factors significantly induce the type III secretion system. Given the fact that type III secretion is energy-consuming, repression by the quorum sensing master regulators might be a mechanism to save energy under conditions where it does not provide an advantage to the cells. PMID:26636765

  12. Expression and Quorum Sensing Regulation of Type III Secretion System Genes of Vibrio harveyi during Infection of Gnotobiotic Brine Shrimp

    PubMed Central

    Ruwandeepika, H. A. Darshanee; Karunasagar, Indrani; Bossier, Peter; Defoirdt, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Type III secretion systems enable pathogens to inject their virulence factors directly into the cytoplasm of the host cells. The type III secretion system of Vibrio harveyi, a major pathogen of aquatic organisms and a model species in quorum sensing studies, is repressed by the quorum sensing master regulator LuxR. In this study, we found that during infection of gnotobiotic brine shrimp larvae, the expression levels of three type III secretion operons in V. harveyi increased within the first 12h after challenge and decreased again thereafter. The in vivo expression levels were highest in a mutant with a quorum sensing system that is locked in low cell density configuration (minimal LuxR levels) and lowest in a mutant with a quorum sensing system that is locked in the high cell density configuration (maximal LuxR levels), which is consistent with repression of type III secretion by LuxR. Remarkably, in vivo expression levels of the type III secretion system genes were much (> 1000 fold) higher than the in vitro expression levels, indicating that (currently unknown) host factors significantly induce the type III secretion system. Given the fact that type III secretion is energy-consuming, repression by the quorum sensing master regulators might be a mechanism to save energy under conditions where it does not provide an advantage to the cells. PMID:26636765

  13. Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain 905 reduces the translocation of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium and stimulates the immune system in gnotobiotic and conventional mice.

    PubMed

    Martins, Flaviano S; Rodrigues, Ana Cristina P; Tiago, Fabiana C P; Penna, Francisco J; Rosa, Carlos A; Arantes, Rosa M E; Nardi, Regina M D; Neves, Maria J; Nicoli, Jacques R

    2007-03-01

    Previous results in the laboratory of the authors showed that Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain 905, isolated during 'cachaça' production, was able to colonize and survive in the gastrointestinal tract of germ-free and conventional mice, and to protect these animals against oral challenge with Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium or Clostridium difficile. In the present work, the effects of S. cerevisiae 905 on the translocation of Salm. Typhimurium (mesenteric lymph nodes, Peyer's patches, spleen, liver) as well as on the immune system (number of Küpffer cells, immunoglobulin production, clearance of Escherichia coli B41) were evaluated in gnotobiotic and/or conventional mice. The treatment with the yeast reduced significantly the translocation of Salm. Typhimurium to liver in gnotobiotic animals and to all the organs tested in conventional mice. The number of Küpffer cells per 100 hepatocytes in liver was significantly higher (P<0.05) in yeast mono-associated mice (52.9+/-15.7) than in germ-free controls (38.1+/-9.0). Probably as a consequence, clearance of E. coli B41 from the bloodstream was more efficient in yeast mono-associated animals when compared to germ-free mice. Higher levels (P<0.05) of secretory IgA in intestinal content and of IgA and IgM in serum were observed in yeast mono-associated mice when compared to germ-free group. Concluding, the protection against pathogenic bacteria observed in a previous study was probably due to a modulation of both local and systemic immunity of mice treated with S. cerevisiae 905.

  14. Identifying Gut Microbe-Host Phenotype Relationships Using Combinatorial Communities in Gnotobiotic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Faith, Jeremiah J.; Ahern, Philip P.; Ridaura, Vanessa K.; Cheng, Jiye; Gordon, Jeffrey I.

    2014-01-01

    Identifying a scalable, unbiased method for discovering which members of the human gut microbiota influence specific physiologic, metabolic and immunologic phenotypes remains a challenge. Here we describe a method in which a clonally-arrayed collection of cultured, sequenced bacteria was generated from one of several human fecal microbiota samples found to transmit a particular phenotype to recipient germ-free mice. Ninety-four bacterial consortia, of diverse size, randomly drawn from the culture collection, were introduced into germ-free animals. We identified an unanticipated range of bacterial strains that promoted accumulation of colonic regulatory T cells (Tregs) and expansion of Nrp1lo/− peripheral Tregs, as well as strains that modulated mouse adiposity and cecal metabolite concentrations using feature selection algorithms and follow-up mono-colonization. This combinatorial approach enabled a systems-level understanding of some of the microbial contributions to human biology. PMID:24452263

  15. Microorganisms linked to inflammatory bowel disease-associated dysbiosis differentially impact host physiology in gnotobiotic mice.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Thomas W; Pham, Hang-Phuong; Bridonneau, Chantal; Aubry, Camille; Lamas, Bruno; Martin-Gallausiaux, Camille; Moroldo, Marco; Rainteau, Dominique; Lapaque, Nicolas; Six, Adrien; Richard, Mathias L; Fargier, Emilie; Le Guern, Marie-Emmanuelle; Langella, Philippe; Sokol, Harry

    2016-02-01

    Studying host-microbiota interactions are fundamental to understanding the mechanisms involved in intestinal homeostasis and inflammation. In this work, we analyzed these interactions in mice that were mono-associated with six microorganisms that are representative of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)-associated dysbiosis: the bacteria Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, adhesive-invasive Escherichia coli (AIEC), Ruminococcus gnavus and Roseburia intestinalis; a yeast used as a probiotic drug, Saccharomyces boulardii CNCM I-745; and another yeast, Candida albicans. Extensive ex vivo analyses including colon transcriptomics, histology, immune response, bile acid metabolism and short-chain fatty acid production were studied. We showed that B. thetaiotaomicron had the highest impact on the immune system because it was almost able to recapitulate the effects of the entire conventional microbiota and notably induced Treg pathways. Furthermore, these analyses uncovered the effects of E. coli AIEC LF82 on indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase expression and of S. boulardii CNCM I-745 on angiogenesis. These results were confirmed in vitro in human cell lines. Finally, our results suggested that R. gnavus has major effects on metabolism, and notably on tryptophan metabolism. This work therefore reveals that microorganisms with a potential role in intestinal homeostasis and inflammation have specific impacts on the host, and it suggests several tracks to follow to understand intestinal homeostasis and IBD pathogenesis better, providing new insights to identify novel therapeutic targets.

  16. Study of gene transfer in vitro and in the digestive tract of gnotobiotic mice from Lactococcus lactis strains to various strains belonging to human intestinal flora.

    PubMed

    Gruzza, M; Fons, M; Ouriet, M F; Duval-Iflah, Y; Ducluzeau, R

    1994-07-01

    The use of genetically modified organisms (GMO) in dairy products requires evaluation of the DNA transfer capacity from such organisms among the human intestinal microflora. Thus, both in vitro and in vivo [in the digestive tract (DT) of mice] transfer from Lactococcus lactis donor strains of the conjugative plasmid pIL205 (CmR) and the non-conjugative plasmid pIL253 (EmR) to: (1) recipient strains isolated from human faecal flora Bacteroides sp., Bifidobacterium sp., Peptostreptococcus sp. (strictly anaerobic bacterial strains) and Enterococcus faecalis, (2) a whole human faecal flora, was studied. In both cases, no gene transfer was observed to strictly anaerobic bacterial strains. DNA transfer was only observed to the E. faecalis strain: in vivo CmR E. faecalis transconjugants were isolated from sequentially multi-associated mice and when the recipient strains associated with the mice, they were a defined mixture of Bacteroides sp., Bifidobacterium sp., Peptostreptococcus sp. and E. faecalis strains. When mice were associated with the whole human faecal flora, the plasmid pIL205 was transferred into some facultative anaerobic streptococci. It was also shown that DNA transfer occurred even when the lactococcal donor strain was transient in the DT of the gnotobiotic host animals.

  17. The gnotobiotic brine shrimp (Artemia franciscana) model system reveals that the phenolic compound pyrogallol protects against infection through its prooxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Baruah, Kartik; Duy Phong, Ho Phuong Pham; Norouzitallab, Parisa; Defoirdt, Tom; Bossier, Peter

    2015-12-01

    The phenolic compound pyrogallol is the functional unit of many polyphenols and currently there has been a growing interest in using this compound in human and animal health owing to its health-promoting effects. The biological actions of pyrogallol moiety (and polyphenols) in inducing health benefitting effects have been studied; however, the mechanisms of action remain unclear yet. Here, we aimed at unravelling the underlying mechanism of action behind the protective effects of pyrogallol against bacterial infection by using the gnotobiotically-cultured brine shrimp Artemia franciscana and pathogenic bacteria Vibrio harveyi as host-pathogen model system. The gnotobiotic test system represents an exceptional system for carrying out such studies because it eliminates any possible interference of microbial communities (naturally present in the experimental system) in mechanistic studies and furthermore facilitates the interpretation of the results in terms of a cause effect relationship. We provided clear evidences suggesting that pyrogallol pretreament, at an optimum concentration, induced protective effects in the brine shrimp against V. harveyi infection. By pretreating brine shrimp with pyrogallol in the presence or absence of an antioxidant enzyme mixture (catalase and superoxide dismutase), we showed that the Vibrio-protective effect of the compound was caused by its prooxidant action (e.g. generation of hydrogen peroxide, H2O2). We showed further that generation of prooxidant is linked to the induction of heat shock protein Hsp70, which is involved in eliciting the prophenoloxidase and transglutaminase immune responses. The ability of pyrogallol to induce protective immunity makes it a potential natural protective agent that might be a potential preventive modality for different host-pathogen systems. PMID:26459033

  18. Short-Chain Fructo-Oligosaccharides Modulate Intestinal Microbiota and Metabolic Parameters of Humanized Gnotobiotic Diet Induced Obesity Mice

    PubMed Central

    Respondek, Frederique; Gerard, Philippe; Bossis, Mathilde; Boschat, Laura; Bruneau, Aurélia; Rabot, Sylvie; Wagner, Anne; Martin, Jean-Charles

    2013-01-01

    Prebiotic fibres like short-chain fructo-oligosaccharides (scFOS) are known to selectively modulate the composition of the intestinal microbiota and especially to stimulate Bifidobacteria. In parallel, the involvement of intestinal microbiota in host metabolic regulation has been recently highlighted. The objective of the study was to evaluate the effect of scFOS on the composition of the faecal microbiota and on metabolic parameters in an animal model of diet-induced obesity harbouring a human-type microbiota. Forty eight axenic C57BL/6J mice were inoculated with a sample of faecal human microbiota and randomly assigned to one of 3 diets for 7 weeks: a control diet, a high fat diet (HF, 60% of energy derived from fat)) or an isocaloric HF diet containing 10% of scFOS (HF-scFOS). Mice fed with the two HF gained at least 21% more weight than mice from the control group. Addition of scFOS partially abolished the deposition of fat mass but significantly increased the weight of the caecum. The analysis of the taxonomic composition of the faecal microbiota by FISH technique revealed that the addition of scFOS induced a significant increase of faecal Bifidobacteria and the Clostridium coccoides group whereas it decreased the Clostridium leptum group. In addition to modifying the composition of the faecal microbiota, scFOS most prominently affected the faecal metabolome (e.g. bile acids derivatives, hydroxyl monoenoic fatty acids) as well as urine, plasma hydrophilic and plasma lipid metabolomes. The increase in C. coccoides and the decrease in C. leptum, were highly correlated to these metabolic changes, including insulinaemia, as well as to the weight of the caecum (empty and full) but not the increase in Bifidobacteria. In conclusion scFOS induce profound metabolic changes by modulating the composition and the activity of the intestinal microbiota, that may partly explain their effect on the reduction of insulinaemia. PMID:23951074

  19. Gnotobiotic pigs-derivation and rearing.

    PubMed

    Miniats, O P; Jol, D

    1978-10-01

    The procurement, rearing, nutrition and microbiological monitoring of gnotobiotic pigs and a method for conditioning of primary, colostrum-deprived, specific pathogen free pigs is described. As compared to the established hysterectomy and closed hysterotomy methods for the derivation of gnotobiotic piglets an alternative approach, open caesarian section with the sow maintained under general halothane-nitrous oxide anaesthesia and the introduction of each fetus into the sterile isolator via a liquid germicidal trap, was found to be more efficient and equally successful in providing viable and microbiologically sterile piglets. Two sterile commercially available milk diets, a special formula for orphan animals and condensed cow's milk, when the latter was supplemented with injectable vitamin E, selenium and iron, proved adequate for satisfactory health of the animals. Two types of pelleted starter rations, sterilized by 4.5 megarads of gamma irradiation, provided adequately for the nutritional needs of older gnotobiotic pigs. Results of microbiological monitoring indicated that the surgical and rearing methods employed were capable of preventing contamination of the animals with bacteria, mycoplasma, yeasts, molds, protozoa and helminths but probably could not exclude occasional vertically transmitted viral infections. Exposure of the animals for four weeks to selected strains of lactobacilli, fecal streptococci and Escherichia coli did not result in visible disease while they were maintained in isolators and conditioned them for transfer into a conventional microbial environment.

  20. Gnotobiotic pigs-derivation and rearing.

    PubMed Central

    Miniats, O P; Jol, D

    1978-01-01

    The procurement, rearing, nutrition and microbiological monitoring of gnotobiotic pigs and a method for conditioning of primary, colostrum-deprived, specific pathogen free pigs is described. As compared to the established hysterectomy and closed hysterotomy methods for the derivation of gnotobiotic piglets an alternative approach, open caesarian section with the sow maintained under general halothane-nitrous oxide anaesthesia and the introduction of each fetus into the sterile isolator via a liquid germicidal trap, was found to be more efficient and equally successful in providing viable and microbiologically sterile piglets. Two sterile commercially available milk diets, a special formula for orphan animals and condensed cow's milk, when the latter was supplemented with injectable vitamin E, selenium and iron, proved adequate for satisfactory health of the animals. Two types of pelleted starter rations, sterilized by 4.5 megarads of gamma irradiation, provided adequately for the nutritional needs of older gnotobiotic pigs. Results of microbiological monitoring indicated that the surgical and rearing methods employed were capable of preventing contamination of the animals with bacteria, mycoplasma, yeasts, molds, protozoa and helminths but probably could not exclude occasional vertically transmitted viral infections. Exposure of the animals for four weeks to selected strains of lactobacilli, fecal streptococci and Escherichia coli did not result in visible disease while they were maintained in isolators and conditioned them for transfer into a conventional microbial environment. PMID:154359

  1. Singular PCV2a or PCV2b Infection Results in Apoptosis of Hepatocytes in Clinically Affected Gnotobiotic Pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: Systemic infection with porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) is often clinically associated with respiratory signs, failure to thrive and diarrhea [1]. Currently, PCV2 can be further subdivided into two main genotypes, PCV2a and PCV2b which under experimental conditions result in very simi...

  2. Vaccination of gnotobiotic piglets against Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Eaton, K A; Ringler, S S; Krakowka, S

    1998-11-01

    To determine the effect of oral adjuvant-assisted and parenteral vaccination, germ-free piglets were vaccinated orally with and without labile toxin adjuvant or parenterally and challenged with viable Helicobacter pylori. All prechallenge vaccination regimens induced anti-H. pylori antibodies and suppressed bacterial colonization, but no vaccination regime completely prevented infection. Parenteral vaccination given after infection had no effect on bacterial colonization. Lymphocytic gastritis was present in all piglets challenged with live bacteria regardless of vaccination status. Neutrophilic gastritis was present in vaccinated challenged piglets but not in infected, unvaccinated piglets. Gastritis was not present in uninfected control piglets regardless of vaccination status. In gnotobiotic piglets, vaccination suppresses but does not prevent infection by H. pylori, and parenteral vaccination does not cure infected piglets. Vaccination does not ameliorate gastritis due to H. pylori in piglets but does induce neutrophilic gastric inflammation in some infected piglets.

  3. Light and transmission electron microscopy of Vibrio campbellii infection in gnotobiotic Artemia franciscana and protection offered by a yeast mutant with elevated cell wall glucan.

    PubMed

    Gunasekara, R A Y S Asanka; Defoirdt, Tom; Rekecki, Anamaria; Decostere, Annemie; Cornelissen, Maria; Sorgeloos, Patrick; Bossier, Peter; Van den Broeck, Wim

    2012-08-17

    Luminescent vibrios are amongst the most important pathogens in aquaculture, affecting almost all types of cultured organisms. Vibrio campbellii is one of these most important pathogens. In this study, the effects of feeding mnn9 yeast cell wall mutant and wild type yeast strain were investigated in the digestive tract of brine shrimp nauplii, Artemia franciscana, after experimental infection with V. campbellii (LMG 21363). Gnotobiotic A. franciscana nauplii were fed daily with dead Aeromonas hydrophila LVS3, and with either wild type strain of baker's yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, or mutant strain mnn9, of which the cell wall contains elevated chitin and glucan and lower mannose levels. After three days of feeding, some nauplii were challenged with V. campbellii. Mean survival (%), individual length (mm) and total length (mm) at one day and two days after challenge were significantly higher in the group fed mnn9 than in the group fed wild type yeast (81 ± 1.50 and 63 ± 0.49, 1.56 ± 0.07 and 1.13 ± 0.02, 38.21 ± 3.11 and 21.26 ± 0.81 respectively for one day and 50 ± 2.37 and 20 ± 1.41, 2.33 ± 0.01 and 1.24 ± 0.04, 34.97 ± 5.56 and 7.45 ± 1.63 for two days after challenge). Histological examination revealed that the luminal diameter and enterocyte height of both mid- and hindgut were larger in the mnn9-fed group. Colonization of the gut lumen by V. campbellii could be observed by transmission electron microscopy for the group of nauplii fed with wild type yeast. Furthermore, it was observed that V. campbellii caused damage to the gut epithelium including shortening and disappearance of the microvilli, destruction of the apical cell membrane and cell lysis in the nauplii fed wild type yeast. The gut epithelium remained intact in challenged nauplii fed mnn9 yeast. The morphological findings of the present study further substantiate previous studies reporting a protective effect of this yeast cell wall mutant. PMID:22464490

  4. Ultrastructural study of Helicobacter pylori adherence properties in gnotobiotic piglets.

    PubMed Central

    Rudmann, D G; Eaton, K A; Krakowka, S

    1992-01-01

    Ultrastructural examination of gastric mucosa from Helicobacter pylori-infected gnotobiotic piglets identified four general adherence patterns comparable to those observed in human patients. Intimate associations between the bacterial and mucosal cell membranes, including cuplike invaginations and adherence pedestals, were present and were accompanied by alterations to microvilli and cell membrane morphology. Images PMID:1563801

  5. Divergent immunomodulating effects of probiotics on T cell responses to oral attenuated human rotavirus vaccine and virulent human rotavirus infection in a neonatal gnotobiotic piglet disease model.

    PubMed

    Chattha, Kuldeep S; Vlasova, Anastasia N; Kandasamy, Sukumar; Rajashekara, Gireesh; Saif, Linda J

    2013-09-01

    Rotaviruses (RVs) are a leading cause of childhood diarrhea. Current oral vaccines are not effective in impoverished countries where the vaccine is needed most. Therefore, alternative affordable strategies are urgently needed. Probiotics can alleviate diarrhea in children and enhance specific systemic and mucosal Ab responses, but the T cell responses are undefined. In this study, we elucidated the T cell and cytokine responses to attenuated human RV (AttHRV) and virulent human RV (HRV) in gnotobiotic pigs colonized with probiotics (Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain GG [LGG] and Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12 [Bb12]), mimicking gut commensals in breastfed infants. Neonatal gnotobiotic pigs are the only animal model susceptible to HRV diarrhea. Probiotic colonized and nonvaccinated (Probiotic) pigs had lower diarrhea and reduced virus shedding postchallenge compared with noncolonized and nonvaccinated pigs (Control). Higher protection in the Probiotic group coincided with higher ileal T regulatory cells (Tregs) before and after challenge, and higher serum TGF-β and lower serum and biliary proinflammatory cytokines postchallenge. Probiotic colonization in vaccinated pigs enhanced innate serum IFN-α, splenic and circulatory IFN-γ-producing T cells, and serum Th1 cytokines, but reduced serum Th2 cytokines compared with noncolonized vaccinated pigs (Vac). Thus, LGG+Bb12 induced systemic Th1 immunostimulatory effects on oral AttHRV vaccine that coincided with lower diarrhea severity and reduced virus shedding postchallenge in Vac+Pro compared with Vac pigs. Previously unreported intestinal CD8 Tregs were induced in vaccinated groups postchallenge. Thus, probiotics LGG+Bb12 exert divergent immunomodulating effects, with enhanced Th1 responses to oral AttHRV vaccine, whereas inducing Treg responses to virulent HRV. PMID:23918983

  6. Transformation During Mixed Pneumococcal Infection of Mice

    PubMed Central

    Conant, James E.; Sawyer, William D.

    1967-01-01

    The recent demonstration by others of transformation during peritoneal infection of mice by two genetically distinct pneumococcal strains supports the notion that transformation may be significant in pneumococcal infection in nature. These studies confirm the occurrence of transformation during mixed infection of mice and define some conditions for its occurrence and its significance. Mice were inoculated with deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) donor (small type III capsule, low virulence, streptomycin-susceptible) and recipient (noncapsulated, low virulence, streptomycin-resistant) pneumococci, and the bacteremia in mice that died was evaluated. Transformants (large type III capsule, virulent, streptomycin-resistant) were isolated from up to 80% of mice that died from mixed peritoneal infection. Transformation occurred in mice that received donor and recipient 6 hr apart; hence, active DNA was released and competence developed during growth in vivo. Transformation was detected only with progressive infection by both strains, and then transformants were few in the blood and apparently were not responsible for the death of the animals. In doubly infected mice treated with streptomycin, transformation was enhanced; transformants numerically dominated the bacteremia and seemed to cause the death of the mice. Transformation was also demonstrated for the first time during infection of the respiratory tract. PMID:4381631

  7. Vaccination of mice against Mycobacterium leprae infection.

    PubMed Central

    Singh, N B; Lowe, A C; Rees, R J; Colston, M J

    1989-01-01

    Intradermal immunization with killed Mycobacterium leprae renders mice immune to infection with viable M. leprae. This protection is long lasting and systemic in that immunization in the left flank results in protection in both the left and right footpads. Immunization with Mycobacterium vaccae was ineffective in protecting mice against M. leprae infection, while Mycobacterium bovis BCG provided partial protection. Mycobacterium habana TMC 5135 (now known as Mycobacterium simiae) was found to be as effective as M. leprae in protecting mice against footpad infection. PMID:2643581

  8. Visualizing influenza virus infection in living mice

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Weiqi; Dong, Zhenyuan; Li, Feng; Meng, Weixu; Feng, Liqiang; Niu, Xuefeng; Li, Chufang; Luo, Qinfang; Li, Zhengfeng; Sun, Caijun; Chen, Ling

    2013-01-01

    Preventing and treating influenza virus infection remain a challenge because of incomplete understanding of the host–pathogen interactions, limited therapeutics and lack of a universal vaccine. So far, methods for monitoring the course of infection with influenza virus in real time in living animals are lacking. Here we report the visualization of influenza viral infection in living mice using an engineered replication-competent influenza A virus carrying luciferase reporter gene. After intranasal inoculation, bioluminescence can be detected in the chest and nasopharyngeal passage of living mice. The intensity of bioluminescence in the chest correlates with the dosage of infection and the viral load in the lung. Bioluminescence in the chest of infected mice diminishes on antiviral treatment. This work provides a novel approach that enables real-time study of influenza virus infection and effects of antiviral therapeutics in living animals. PMID:24022374

  9. Pathology of US Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Virus Strain PC21A in Gnotobiotic Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Kwonil; Scheuer, Kelly A.; Lu, Zhongyan; Zhang, Yan; Saif, Linda J.

    2014-01-01

    To understand the progression of porcine epidemic diarrhea virus infection, we inoculated gnotobiotic pigs with a newly emerged US strain, PC21A, of the virus. At 24–48 hours postinoculation, the pigs exhibited severe diarrhea and vomiting, fecal shedding, viremia, and severe atrophic enteritis. These findings confirm that strain PC21A is highly enteropathogenic. PMID:24795932

  10. Gnotobiotic Human Colon Ex Vivo

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, Frank D.; Folan, David M. A.; Winter, Des C.; Folan, Michael A.; Baird, Alan W.

    2015-01-01

    Background A novel emulsion with efficacy as an agent for eliminating biofilms was selected. The aim of this study was to examine efficacy and effect of a formulation of ML:8 against commensal bacteria harvested from ex vivo human colonic tissues. Methods Mucosal sheets, obtained at the time of surgery, were exposed for 2 minutes to one of four solutions: Krebs-Hensleit (KH) solution, saline (NaCl; 0.9%), povidone iodine (1%), or ML:8 (2%); n = 4. Lumenal surfaces were swabbed for culture under aerobic or anaerobic conditions. Following treatment, each sheet was mounted in Ussing chambers and voltage clamped. Tissues were challenged with carbachol. Permeability coefficient (Papp) was determined using mannitol fluxes. At the end of each experiment, tissues were examined histologically. Results Similar colony forming units grew in aerobic and anaerobic conditions in both control and NaCl treated tissues. Iodine reduced and ML:8 virtually abolished viable bacteria. Basal electrophysiological parameters were not different between treatments. Transepithelial electrical resistance values did not differ between groups. All tissues responded to carbachol, although this was attenuated in iodine treated tissue. Papp values were slightly elevated in all treated tissues but this did not reach significance. Histopathological assessment revealed no overt damage to tissues. Conclusion Brief exposure to ML:8 reduced culturable bacterial burden from human intestinal tissues harvested at the time of surgical resection. Such gnotobiotic tissues retain structural and functional integrity. This is a novel approach to reduce bacterial burden. PMID:27785304

  11. Studies of retroviral infection in humanized mice.

    PubMed

    Marsden, Matthew D; Zack, Jerome A

    2015-05-01

    Many important aspects of human retroviral infections cannot be fully evaluated using only in vitro systems or unmodified animal models. An alternative approach involves the use of humanized mice, which consist of immunodeficient mice that have been transplanted with human cells and/or tissues. Certain humanized mouse models can support robust infection with human retroviruses including different strains of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and human T cell leukemia virus (HTLV). These models have provided wide-ranging insights into retroviral biology, including detailed information on primary infection, in vivo replication and pathogenesis, latent/persistent reservoir formation, and novel therapeutic interventions. Here we describe the humanized mouse models that are most commonly utilized to study retroviral infections, and outline some of the important discoveries that these models have produced during several decades of intensive research.

  12. Studies of retroviral infection in humanized mice

    PubMed Central

    Marsden, Matthew D.; Zack, Jerome A.

    2015-01-01

    Many important aspects of human retroviral infections cannot be fully evaluated using only in vitro systems or unmodified animal models. An alternative approach involves the use of humanized mice, which consist of immunodeficient mice that have been transplanted with human cells and/or tissues. Certain humanized mouse models can support robust infection with human retroviruses including different strains of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and human T cell leukemia virus (HTLV). These models have provided wide-ranging insights into retroviral biology, including detailed information on primary infection, in vivo replication and pathogenesis, latent/persistent reservoir formation, and novel therapeutic interventions. Here we describe the humanized mouse models that are most commonly utilized to study retroviral infections, and outline some of the important discoveries that these models have produced during several decades of intensive research. PMID:25680625

  13. Pathogenesis of rotavirus infection in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Little, L M; Shadduck, J A

    1982-01-01

    Three parameters of rotavirus infection, i.e., clinical disease, viral antigen in infected intestines, and infectious virus in feces, were assessed in infant mice nursed by mothers with or without preexisting rotavirus antibody. Diarrhea was the only consistent sign of clinical disease, and its course followed that of infection by about 1 day. Infected intestinal epithelial cells, except crypt cells, were observed by immunofluorescence microscopy in the duodenum, jejunum, ileum, and colon. Infection progressed in a proximal-to-distal direction with time. Viral antigen appeared in intestinal tissue later, was present in lower amounts, and disappeared sooner from infants nursed by mothers with preexisting rotavirus antibody, indicating that protection was passively transferred to these infants although the course of clinical disease was not changed. Images PMID:6292110

  14. Intravenous infection of mice with Naegleria fowleri.

    PubMed

    May, R G; John, D T

    1982-01-01

    Naegleria fowleri produced fatal meningoencephalitis in mice following intravenous (i.v.) inoculation. Amebae were present in the peripheral circulation for 120 minutes after i.v. inoculation with a dose of 10(7) trophozoites per mouse. Amebae were cultured from and observed in brain (days 1-21), lung (days 1-12), and liver and kidney (days 1-5). Infected mice exhibited weight loss, leukocytosis, reduced lymphocyte/neutrophil ratio, neurologic symptoms, and mortality. Histologically, the disease was characterized by an acute, hemorrhagic, necrotizing meningoencephalitis. Although amebae were detected in tissues other than brain, pathologic involvement of these tissues was minimal.

  15. Cytomegalovirus excretion in gnotobiotic pigs.

    PubMed Central

    Edington, N.; Watt, R. G.; Plowright, W.

    1976-01-01

    Germ-free piglets were infected intranasally with porcine cytomegalovirus (PCMV) at 1 day (group A) or 3 weeks of age (group B). Viraemia and virus excretion by the nasal, pharyngeal and conjunctival routes was studied up to the time of death or to 12 weeks. Virus was also sought in tissues at death or at slaughter, as well as in a few urine samples. Viraemia was detected in group A between days 5 and 19 after infection and in group B between days 14 and 16 inclusive. The chief route of virus excretion was the nasal mucosa, followed by the pharynx and conjunctiva; the maximal duration of excretion by these routes was 32, 25 and 14 days for pigs of group A and 9, 7 and 4 days for group B. The quantity of virus was also greater in the former group, of which died of generalized PCMV infection. A viruria was demonstrated in 2 animals. Antibody detectable in indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) tests appeared towards the end of the third week, reaching maximal titres at 5 to 7 weeks after infection. The mean peak titre of antibody in group B was lower than in group A. Corticosteroid treatment at days 56--62 after infection resulted in some recrudescence of virus excretion, accompanied in group B by about a twofold increase in IIF antibody. PCMV was isolated in cultures of lung macrophages from 4 of 7 animals killed at about 12 weeks after inoculation. PMID:185292

  16. A Gnotobiotic Pig Model for Determining Human Norovirus Inactivation by High-Pressure Processing.

    PubMed

    Lou, Fangfei; Ye, Mu; Ma, Yuanmei; Li, Xinhui; DiCaprio, Erin; Chen, Haiqiang; Krakowka, Steven; Hughes, John; Kingsley, David; Li, Jianrong

    2015-10-01

    Human norovirus (NoV) is responsible for over 90% of outbreaks of acute nonbacterial gastroenteritis worldwide and accounts for 60% of cases of foodborne illness in the United States. Currently, the infectivity of human NoVs is poorly understood due to the lack of a cell culture system. In this study, we determined the survival of a human NoV genogroup II, genotype 4 (GII.4) strain in seeded oyster homogenates after high-pressure processing (HPP) using a novel receptor binding assay and a gnotobiotic pig model. Pressure conditions of 350 MPa at 0°C for 2 min led to a 3.7-log10 reduction in the number of viral RNA copies in oysters, as measured by the porcine gastric mucin-conjugated magnetic bead (PGM-MB) binding assay and real-time RT-PCR, whereas pressure conditions of 350 MPa at 35°C for 2 min achieved only a 1-log10 reduction in the number of RNA copies. Newborn gnotobiotic piglets orally fed oyster homogenate treated at 350 MPa and 0°C for 2 min did not have viral RNA shedding in feces, histologic lesions, or viral replication in the small intestine. In contrast, gnotobiotic piglets fed oysters treated at 350 MPa and 35°C for 2 min had high levels of viral shedding in feces and exhibited significant histologic lesions and viral replication in the small intestine. Collectively, these data demonstrate that (i) human NoV survival estimated by an in vitro PGM-MB virus binding assay is consistent with the infectivity determined by an in vivo gnotobiotic piglet model and (ii) HPP is capable of inactivating a human NoV GII.4 strain at commercially acceptable pressure levels.

  17. A Gnotobiotic Pig Model for Determining Human Norovirus Inactivation by High-Pressure Processing

    PubMed Central

    Lou, Fangfei; Ye, Mu; Ma, Yuanmei; Li, Xinhui; DiCaprio, Erin; Chen, Haiqiang; Krakowka, Steven; Hughes, John; Kingsley, David

    2015-01-01

    Human norovirus (NoV) is responsible for over 90% of outbreaks of acute nonbacterial gastroenteritis worldwide and accounts for 60% of cases of foodborne illness in the United States. Currently, the infectivity of human NoVs is poorly understood due to the lack of a cell culture system. In this study, we determined the survival of a human NoV genogroup II, genotype 4 (GII.4) strain in seeded oyster homogenates after high-pressure processing (HPP) using a novel receptor binding assay and a gnotobiotic pig model. Pressure conditions of 350 MPa at 0°C for 2 min led to a 3.7-log10 reduction in the number of viral RNA copies in oysters, as measured by the porcine gastric mucin-conjugated magnetic bead (PGM-MB) binding assay and real-time RT-PCR, whereas pressure conditions of 350 MPa at 35°C for 2 min achieved only a 1-log10 reduction in the number of RNA copies. Newborn gnotobiotic piglets orally fed oyster homogenate treated at 350 MPa and 0°C for 2 min did not have viral RNA shedding in feces, histologic lesions, or viral replication in the small intestine. In contrast, gnotobiotic piglets fed oysters treated at 350 MPa and 35°C for 2 min had high levels of viral shedding in feces and exhibited significant histologic lesions and viral replication in the small intestine. Collectively, these data demonstrate that (i) human NoV survival estimated by an in vitro PGM-MB virus binding assay is consistent with the infectivity determined by an in vivo gnotobiotic piglet model and (ii) HPP is capable of inactivating a human NoV GII.4 strain at commercially acceptable pressure levels. PMID:26187968

  18. Serospecific protection of mice against intranasal infection with Bordetella pertussis.

    PubMed

    Robinson, A; Gorringe, A R; Funnell, S G; Fernandez, M

    1989-08-01

    The ability of purified serospecific agglutinogens from Bordetella pertussis to protect mice against intranasal infection has been examined. Immunization with agglutinogen 2 protected mice against infection with 1.2.0 or 1.2.3 serotypes of B. pertussis, whereas immunization with agglutinogen 3 protected mice against infection with all serotypes. More importantly immunization with serospecific agglutinogen resulted in immune selection so that organisms recovered following infection did not express the immunizing antigen. The results are consistent with the suggestions that protection of children with whole cell pertussis vaccine is to some extent serospecific and that agglutinogens should be considered as constituents of acellular pertussis vaccines. PMID:2573215

  19. Blood-stage malaria infection in diabetic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Elased, K; De Souza, J B; Playfair, J H

    1995-01-01

    Infection of mice with blood-stage Plasmodium yoelii and P. chabaudi malaria induced hypoglycaemia in normal mice and normalized the hyperglycaemia of mice made moderately diabetic with streptozotocin (STZ). Injection of parasite supernatants induced hypoglycaemia accompanied by hyperinsulinaemia in normal mice, and in STZ-diabetic mice induced a profound drop in blood glucose and restored insulin secretion; however, severely diabetic mice (two injections of STZ) remained hyperglycaemic with no change in insulin levels. We conclude that malaria infection and parasite-derived molecules lower blood glucose concentration, but only in the presence of some residual pancreatic function. Diabetic mice were less anaemic, exerted a significant control of parasitaemia, and showed enhanced phagocytic activity compared with normal mice. PMID:7882567

  20. Immunofluorescence studies of disseminated Hantaan virus infection of suckling mice.

    PubMed

    Kurata, T; Tsai, T F; Bauer, S P; McCormick, J B

    1983-07-01

    Hantaan virus, the etiological agent of Korean hemorrhagic fever, was inoculated intracerebrally or intraperitoneally into suckling mice, and the course of the infection was followed by infectivity titration and immunofluorescence studies. Mice became ill and were moribund by 13 to 14 days postinfection. In mice inoculated either intracerebrally or intraperitoneally, virus antigen was present in brain, heart, lungs, liver, and kidney. Less consistently, specific fluorescence was observed in spleen, pituitary gland, thymus, lymph nodes, adrenal, pancreas, salivary glands, trigeminal ganglia, adipose tissue, intestine, and muscle. In all of these tissues, the primary target of infection was the capillary endothelium. In mice inoculated intracerebrally, virus antigen was present mainly in choroid plexus, hippocampal nuclei, and meninges, but in mice inoculated intraperitoneally, central nervous system infection was marked by antigen accumulation in cortical nuclei and thalamus.

  1. Coping with parvovirus infections in mice: health surveillance and control.

    PubMed

    Janus, Lydia M; Bleich, Andre

    2012-01-01

    Parvoviruses of mice, minute virus of mice (MVM) and mouse parvovirus (MPV), are challenging pathogens to eradicate from laboratory animal facilities. Due to the impediment on rodent-based research, recent studies have focused on the assessment of re-derivation techniques and parvoviral potential to induce persistent infections. Summarizing recent data, this review gives an overview on studies associated with parvoviral impact on research, diagnostic methods, parvoviral persistence and re-derivation techniques, demonstrating the complex nature of parvovirus infection in mice and unfolding the challenge of controlling parvovirus infections in laboratory animal facilities.

  2. Cordyceps sinensis mycelium protects mice from group A streptococcal infection.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Chih-Feng; Chen, Cheng-Chih; Luo, Yueh-Hsia; Huang, Robert Y; Chuang, Woei-Jer; Sheu, Chia-Chin; Lin, Yee-Shin

    2005-08-01

    Group A streptococcus (GAS) infection can cause severe invasive diseases, including necrotizing fasciitis and streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. Cordyceps sinensis, a Chinese herbal medicine, is an immunomodulator. In this study the air-pouch bacterial inoculation model was used to investigate the protective efficacy of C. sinensis mycelium extract against GAS infection. Force-feeding mice with C. sinensis mycelium extract for 3 consecutive days before GAS infection increased the survival rate and reduced local skin-tissue injury compared with mice fed PBS. Bacterial numbers in the air pouch exudates from C. sinensis-treated mice were lower than those from PBS-treated mice. Blood and organs in PBS-treated mice showed bacterial dissemination, but those in C. sinensis-treated mice did not. Three days of pretreatment with C. sinensis extract followed by C. sinensis treatment every other day after GAS infection resulted in 100% survival. The post-GAS-infection levels of aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase and blood urea nitrogen in the sera of C. sinensis-treated mice were lower than those of PBS-treated mice. Taken together, these results show that C. sinensis mycelium extract protects by decreasing bacterial growth and dissemination, thereby increasing mouse survival rate. IL-12 and IFN-gamma expression and macrophage phagocytic activity also increased after C. sinensis treatment. PMID:16014434

  3. ACUTE HEPATIC NECROSIS INDUCED BY BRUCELLA INFECTION IN HYPERTHYROID MICE

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, G. Mary; Spink, Wesley W.

    1959-01-01

    When small numbers of Brucella melitensis were inoculated into ABC mice, occasional hepatic granulomas without necrosis were demonstrated. The greatest multiplication of brucellae was detected in the spleens. Because it had been previously observed that ACTH or cortisone markedly accelerated the multiplication of brucellae in the livers of infected mice with destruction of liver cells, it was considered that triiodothyronine might likewise exaggerate a brucella infection by stimulating endogenous adrenal secretion. Although adrenal hypertrophy was produced, infection of mice treated with triiodothyronine resulted in severe hepatic necrosis or infarcts without the multiplication of brucellae in either the livers or spleens. The lesions were not encountered in untreated infected mice or in control mice treated with triiodothyronine. The necrosis was associated with minimal inflammatory reaction. The necrosis was not induced in mice treated with triiodothyronine and given brucella endotoxin. The precise genesis of the acute hepatic necrosis cited in these experiments remains undefined. Triiodothyronine did not cause deaths in mice infected with Br. melitensis. The infection was neither enhanced nor suppressed. PMID:13803714

  4. Effects of microbiota on GI health: gnotobiotic research.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Robert Doug

    2008-01-01

    The complex interactions between the GI tract microbiota and the immune system can be simplified for study using gnotobiotic animal models. The importance of cytokines, such as IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, TGF-beta, Interleukin-2, IL-4 and IL-10 in the host response to intestinal bacteria has been evaluated using gnotobiotic studies. Gnotobiotic experiments with immunodeficient animals have revealed insights into the relationships between innate, cell-mediated and antibody-mediated immune system components in resistance to infectious microorganisms. The development and maturation of the immune system is dependent on the presence of some members of the intestinal microbiota. The commensal microorganisms, in turn, are dependent on the environment and nutrients provided by the GI tract of the host. Gnotobiotic studies are starting to reveal how the microbiota influences oral tolerance to dietary and commensal bacterial antigens. The immunomodulatory effects of microbiota and probiotics for inflammatory bowel diseases and the role of bacteria in their etiologies are being studied in gnotobiotic systems. Many aspects of the host interaction with the microbiota have been and will continue to be best addressed in gnotobiotic experimental models. This chapter reviews the contributions that gnotobiology has made to our understanding of the microbiota and host GI tract health. PMID:18841702

  5. Oxygen effects on mortality of mice infected with Diplococcus pneumoniae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angrick, E. J.; Somerson, N. L.; Weiss, H. S.

    1974-01-01

    Mice infected by intraperitoneal injection of Diplococcus pneumoniae were held at 1 atm in either hypoxic (12%), hyperoxic (75%), or a normal (21%) oxygen environment. Mortality rates indicated prolongation of survival in hypoxia and shortened survival in hyperoxia. Exposure of mice to the experimental gas mixtures prior to inoculation did not alter the results.

  6. Bioluminescence imaging of Chlamydia muridarum ascending infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Jessica; Huang, Yumeng; Liu, Yuanjun; Schenken, Robert; Arulanandam, Bernard; Zhong, Guangming

    2014-01-01

    Chlamydial pathogenicity in the upper genital tract relies on chlamydial ascending from the lower genital tract. To monitor chlamydial ascension, we engineered a luciferase-expressing C. muridarum. In cells infected with the luciferase-expressing C. muridarum, luciferase gene expression and enzymatic activity (measured as bioluminescence intensity) correlated well along the infection course, suggesting that bioluminescence can be used for monitoring chlamydial replication. Following an intravaginal inoculation with the luciferase-expressing C. muridarum, 8 of 10 mice displayed bioluminescence signal in the lower with 4 also in the upper genital tracts on day 3 after infection. By day 7, all 10 mice developed bioluminescence signal in the upper genital tracts. The bioluminescence signal was maintained in the upper genital tract in 6 and 2 mice by days 14 and 21, respectively. The bioluminescence signal was no longer detectable in any of the mice by day 28. The whole body imaging approach also revealed an unexpected airway infection following the intravaginal inoculation. Although the concomitant airway infection was transient and did not significantly alter the genital tract infection time courses, caution should be taken during data interpretation. The above observations have demonstrated that C. muridarum can not only achieve rapid ascending infection in the genital tract but also cause airway infection following a genital tract inoculation. These findings have laid a foundation for further optimizing the C. muridarum intravaginal infection murine model for understanding chlamydial pathogenic mechanisms.

  7. Modeling Zika Virus Infection in Mice.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Shannan L; Vasilakis, Nikos

    2016-07-01

    Understanding the link between Zika virus (ZIKV) infection and microcephaly requires in vivo models of ZIKV infection in pregnant adults and fetuses. Three studies recently generated such mouse models of ZIKV infection, which corroborate previous in vitro evidence linking ZIKV infection and apoptosis induction in neurons and progenitors to microcephaly. PMID:27392219

  8. Modeling Zika Virus Infection in Mice.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Shannan L; Vasilakis, Nikos

    2016-07-01

    Understanding the link between Zika virus (ZIKV) infection and microcephaly requires in vivo models of ZIKV infection in pregnant adults and fetuses. Three studies recently generated such mouse models of ZIKV infection, which corroborate previous in vitro evidence linking ZIKV infection and apoptosis induction in neurons and progenitors to microcephaly.

  9. Theiler's virus infection of beta 2-microglobulin-deficient mice.

    PubMed Central

    Fiette, L; Aubert, C; Brahic, M; Rossi, C P

    1993-01-01

    Theiler's virus, a murine picornavirus, persists in the central nervous systems of susceptible mice and induces a chronic demyelinating disease. Susceptibility or resistance to this disease is controlled in part by the H2-D locus of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). For this reason, it has been proposed that CD8+ class I-restricted cytotoxic T cells play a main role in the pathogenesis of this viral infection. We recently reported the existence of anti-virus CD8+ cytotoxic T cells in the course of Theiler's virus infection. In the present study, we examined the role of these effector cells in mice in which the beta 2-microglobulin gene had been disrupted. These mice fail to express class I MHC molecules and therefore lack CD8+ T cells. The mice are derived from a C57BL/6 x 129/Ola cross and are H-2b, a haplotype associated with resistance to Theiler's virus infection. beta 2-Microglobulin-deficient mice (beta 2m-/-mice) failed to clear the virus, developed demyelination, and, interestingly, did not succumb to early infection. These results demonstrate that CD8+ T cells are required to clear Theiler's virus infection. In contrast with a current hypothesis, they also demonstrate that CD8+ T cells are not major mediators of the demyelinating disease. Images PMID:8416386

  10. Tumor suppressor p53 protects mice against Listeria monocytogenes infection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shaohui; Liu, Pingping; Wei, Jianchao; Zhu, Zixiang; Shi, Zixue; Shao, Donghua; Ma, Zhiyong

    2016-01-01

    Tumor suppressor p53 is involved in regulating immune responses, which contribute to antitumor and antiviral activity. However, whether p53 has anti-bacterial functions remains unclear. Listeria monocytogenes (LM) causes listeriosis in humans and animals, and it is a powerful model for studying innate and adaptive immunity. In the present study, we illustrate an important regulatory role of p53 during LM infection. p53 knockout (p53KO) mice were more susceptible to LM infection, which was manifested by a shorter survival time and lower survival rate. p53KO mice showed significant impairments in LM eradication. Knockdown of p53 in RAW264.7 and HeLa cells resulted in increased invasion and intracellular survival of LM. Furthermore, the invasion and intracellular survival of LM was inhibited in p53-overexpressing RAW264.7 and HeLa cells. LM-infected p53KO mice exhibited severe clinical symptoms and organ injury, presumably because of the abnormal production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-6, IL-12, and IL-18. Decreased IFN-γ and GBP1 productions were observed in LM-infected p53-deficient mice or cells. The combination of these defects likely resulted in the overwhelming LM infection in the p53KO mice. These observations indicate that p53 serves as an important regulator of the host innate immune that protects against LM infection. PMID:27644341

  11. Tumor suppressor p53 protects mice against Listeria monocytogenes infection

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shaohui; Liu, Pingping; Wei, Jianchao; Zhu, Zixiang; Shi, Zixue; Shao, Donghua; Ma, Zhiyong

    2016-01-01

    Tumor suppressor p53 is involved in regulating immune responses, which contribute to antitumor and antiviral activity. However, whether p53 has anti-bacterial functions remains unclear. Listeria monocytogenes (LM) causes listeriosis in humans and animals, and it is a powerful model for studying innate and adaptive immunity. In the present study, we illustrate an important regulatory role of p53 during LM infection. p53 knockout (p53KO) mice were more susceptible to LM infection, which was manifested by a shorter survival time and lower survival rate. p53KO mice showed significant impairments in LM eradication. Knockdown of p53 in RAW264.7 and HeLa cells resulted in increased invasion and intracellular survival of LM. Furthermore, the invasion and intracellular survival of LM was inhibited in p53-overexpressing RAW264.7 and HeLa cells. LM-infected p53KO mice exhibited severe clinical symptoms and organ injury, presumably because of the abnormal production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-6, IL-12, and IL-18. Decreased IFN-γ and GBP1 productions were observed in LM-infected p53-deficient mice or cells. The combination of these defects likely resulted in the overwhelming LM infection in the p53KO mice. These observations indicate that p53 serves as an important regulator of the host innate immune that protects against LM infection. PMID:27644341

  12. Tumor suppressor p53 protects mice against Listeria monocytogenes infection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shaohui; Liu, Pingping; Wei, Jianchao; Zhu, Zixiang; Shi, Zixue; Shao, Donghua; Ma, Zhiyong

    2016-01-01

    Tumor suppressor p53 is involved in regulating immune responses, which contribute to antitumor and antiviral activity. However, whether p53 has anti-bacterial functions remains unclear. Listeria monocytogenes (LM) causes listeriosis in humans and animals, and it is a powerful model for studying innate and adaptive immunity. In the present study, we illustrate an important regulatory role of p53 during LM infection. p53 knockout (p53KO) mice were more susceptible to LM infection, which was manifested by a shorter survival time and lower survival rate. p53KO mice showed significant impairments in LM eradication. Knockdown of p53 in RAW264.7 and HeLa cells resulted in increased invasion and intracellular survival of LM. Furthermore, the invasion and intracellular survival of LM was inhibited in p53-overexpressing RAW264.7 and HeLa cells. LM-infected p53KO mice exhibited severe clinical symptoms and organ injury, presumably because of the abnormal production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-6, IL-12, and IL-18. Decreased IFN-γ and GBP1 productions were observed in LM-infected p53-deficient mice or cells. The combination of these defects likely resulted in the overwhelming LM infection in the p53KO mice. These observations indicate that p53 serves as an important regulator of the host innate immune that protects against LM infection.

  13. Ferroportin-encapsulated nanoparticles reduce infection and improve immunity in mice infected with Leishmania major.

    PubMed

    Rafiee, Aras; Riazi-Rad, Farhad; Darabi, Haiedeh; Khaze, Vahid; Javadian, Seifoddin; Ajdary, Soheila; Bahrami, Fariborz; Alimohammadian, Mohammad Hossein

    2014-05-15

    Inoculation of inbred mice by Leishmania major results in two different patterns. C57BL/6 mice display resistance against L. major but BALB/c mice show susceptibility to L. major with visceral infection, anemia and death. In this study, the effects of treatment of L. major-infected BALB/c mice with a ferroportin (Fpn)-encoding construct via nanoparticles were evaluated. A fragment encoding Fpn, a major regulator of iron homeostasis, was amplified and sub-cloned to a GFP expression vector to express Fpn-EGFP protein. This construct was incorporated in nanoparticles of alginate/chitosan polymers and orally administered to L. major-infected BALB/c mice. Blood hematocrit and iron, footpad size, parasite load and concentration of IFNG, IL4 and IL10 by ELISA were measured in the treated and untreated mice. The results indicated that the treated mice had significantly higher hematocrit and iron levels while exhibited significantly lower footpad size and parasite load measurements. Moreover, lower levels of IL4 and IL10 and higher ratios of IFNG/IL4 or IFNG/IL10 were shown in the treated, compared to the untreated mice. In conclusion, treating BALB/c mice infected with L. major with encapsulated Fpn-encoding construct in alginate/chitosan nanoparticles were shown to reduce the infection and improve anemia and immunity in the animal model of leishmaniasis.

  14. Histologic Lesions Induced by Murine Norovirus Infection in Laboratory Mice.

    PubMed

    Hsu, C C; Piotrowski, S L; Meeker, S M; Smith, K D; Maggio-Price, L; Treuting, P M

    2016-07-01

    Murine noroviruses (MNVs) are highly prevalent in laboratory mice, can cause persistent infections, and have been shown to infect macrophages, dendritic cells, and B cells. To address the potential impact of MNV infection on research outcomes, numerous studies have been conducted with various mouse models of human disease and have generated mixed results, ranging from no impact to significant disease. Many of these studies included histologic evaluations after MNV infection, and these results have similarly been variable in terms of whether MNV induces lesions, despite the fact that localization of MNV by viral culture and molecular techniques have demonstrated systemic distribution regardless of mouse immune status. The aim of this review is to summarize the histologic findings that have been reported with MNV infection in several mouse models. The studies demonstrate that experimental infection of MNV in wild-type mice results in minimal to no histologic changes. In contrast, immunodeficient mice consistently have detectable MNV-induced lesions that are typically inflammatory and, in the most severe cases, accompanied by necrosis. In these, the liver is commonly affected, with more variable lesions reported in the lung, gastrointestinal tract, mesenteric lymph nodes, brain, and spleen. In specific disease models including atherosclerosis, MNV infection had a variable impact that was dependent on the mouse model, viral strain, timing of infection, or other experimental variables. It is important to recognize the reported MNV lesions to help discern the possible influence of MNV infection on data generated in mouse models. PMID:26792844

  15. Contrasting effects of immunosuppression on Theiler's virus infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Lipton, H L; Canto, C D

    1977-03-01

    In the present study, cyclophosphamide and rabbit anti-mouse thymocyte serum were used to immunosuppress SJL/J mice infected with Theiler's mouse encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) in order to delineate the potential mechanism(s) of virus-induced cellular injury in this infection. Whereas both immunosuppressive agents produced a significant increase in mortality, this treatment had differing effects on the pathological involvement of gray and white-matter structures in the central nervous system. The central nervous system of immunosuppressed TMEV-infected mice had increased microglial cell proliferation and neuronal necrosis, longer maintenance of high virus levels and spread of virus antigen to involve the neocortex and hippocampal complex. These observations indicate that TMEV causes a cytolotic infection of neurons and possibly other cells in gray matter. In contrast, immunosuppression produced a dramatic reduction in mononuclear inflammatory cells in the leptomeninges and spinal cord white matter of infected mice and prevented demyelination. Further, virus antigen was not detected in the leptomeninges and white matter of immunosuppressed and infected mice. These findings suggest that demyelination of TMEV infection is immune mediated.

  16. Effect of Sex Steroids on Babesia microti Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Mizuki; Fujii, Yoshito; Iwamoto, Maya; Ikadai, Hiromi

    2013-01-01

    Sex-based-differences are known to affect susceptibility to protozoan infections, but their effects on parasitemia and clinical symptoms in Babesia infections remain unclear. We examined the sex-based susceptibility of various mouse strains to Babesia microti Munich strain infection. In all strains, male mice exhibited significantly higher peak parasitemia and more severe anemia than female mice. Testosterone and estradiol-17β treatment caused an increase in parasitemia and aggravation of anemia. Orchidectomized male mice receiving testosterone exhibited smaller splenic macrophage populations three days after infection, smaller B cell populations 10 days after infection, and reduced splenic tumor necrosis factor-α and interferon-γ mRNA expression than mice that did not receive testosterone. Mice receiving estradiol-17β did not exhibit immunosuppressive effects. Thus, a weakened and delayed innate immunity response may lead to acquired immunity failure. The results suggested that testosterone directly affects T or B cells, leading to delayed acquired immunity, dramatically increased parasitemia, and severe anemia. PMID:23249689

  17. Adoptive transfer of macrophages from adult mice reduces mortality in mice infected with human enterovirus 71.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiangning; Li, Xiaoying; Fan, Xiaoxu; Ma, Chunmei; Qin, Chuan; Zhang, Lianfeng

    2013-02-01

    Human enterovirus 71 (EV71) causes hand, foot and mouth disease in children under 6 years of age, and the neurological complications of this virus can lead to death. Until now, no vaccines or drugs have been available for the clinical control of this epidemic. Macrophages can engulf pathogens and mediate a series of host immune responses that play a role in the defence against infectious diseases. Using immunohistochemistry, we observed the localizations of virus in muscle tissues of EV71-infected mice. The macrophages isolated from the adult mice could kill the virus gradually in vitro, as shown using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) and virus titration. Co-localisation of lysosomes and virus within macrophages suggested that the lysosomes were possibly responsible for the phagocytosis of EV71. Activation of the macrophages in the peritoneal cavity of mice four days pre-infection reduced the mortality of mice upon lethal EV71 infection. The adoptive transfer of macrophages from adult mice inhibited virus replication in the muscle tissues of infected mice, and this was followed by a relief of symptoms and a significant reduction of mortality, which suggested that the adoptive transfer of macrophages from adult humans represents a potential strategy to treat EV71-infected patients.

  18. Gastritis induced by Helicobacter pylori in gnotobiotic piglets.

    PubMed

    Krakowka, S; Eaton, K A; Rings, D M; Morgan, D R

    1991-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori has recently been recognized as a gastric pathogen in humans. Experimental oral inoculation of gnotobiotic piglets with this organism results in gastritis that exhibits many features of the corresponding disease in humans. In piglets the organism is restricted to the gastric microenvironment and persists in that location despite prompt humoral and cellular responses to antigens of H. pylori. The gnotobiotic piglet model is useful for delineation of the role of suspected bacterial virulence factors (i.e., motility and urease production) in gastric colonization and for preclinical determination of the efficacy of various antimicrobial substances.

  19. Cyclophilin A protects mice against infection by influenza A virus.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Chen, Can; Wong, Gary; Dong, Wei; Zheng, Weinan; Li, Yun; Sun, Lei; Zhang, Lianfeng; Gao, George F; Bi, Yuhai; Liu, Wenjun

    2016-01-01

    Our previous studies indicate that Cyclophilin A (CypA) impairs the replication of influenza A virus in vitro. To further evaluate the antiviral functions of CypA and explore its mechanism, transgenic mice with overexpression of CypA by two specific promoters with SPC (CypA-SPC) or CMV (CypA-CMV) were developed. After challenge with the A/WSN/33(H1N1) influenza virus, CypA-SPC and CypA-CMV transgenic mice displayed nearly 2.5- and 3.8-fold stronger disease resistance to virus infection, respectively, compared to wild-type animals. Virus replication, pathological lesions and inflammatory cytokines were substantially reduced in both lines of transgenic mice. In addition, after infection there was an upregulation of genes associated with cell migration, immune function, and organ development; and a downregulation of genes associated with the positive regulation of immune cells and apoptosis in the peritoneal macrophages of CypA-overexpressing transgenic mice (CypA+). These results indicate that CypA is a key modulator of influenza virus resistance in mice, and that CypA+ mice constitutes an important model to study the roles of CypA in the regulation of immune responses and infections. PMID:27354005

  20. Cyclophilin A protects mice against infection by influenza A virus

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Chen, Can; Wong, Gary; Dong, Wei; Zheng, Weinan; Li, Yun; Sun, Lei; Zhang, Lianfeng; Gao, George F.; Bi, Yuhai; Liu, Wenjun

    2016-01-01

    Our previous studies indicate that Cyclophilin A (CypA) impairs the replication of influenza A virus in vitro. To further evaluate the antiviral functions of CypA and explore its mechanism, transgenic mice with overexpression of CypA by two specific promoters with SPC (CypA-SPC) or CMV (CypA-CMV) were developed. After challenge with the A/WSN/33(H1N1) influenza virus, CypA-SPC and CypA-CMV transgenic mice displayed nearly 2.5- and 3.8-fold stronger disease resistance to virus infection, respectively, compared to wild-type animals. Virus replication, pathological lesions and inflammatory cytokines were substantially reduced in both lines of transgenic mice. In addition, after infection there was an upregulation of genes associated with cell migration, immune function, and organ development; and a downregulation of genes associated with the positive regulation of immune cells and apoptosis in the peritoneal macrophages of CypA-overexpressing transgenic mice (CypA+). These results indicate that CypA is a key modulator of influenza virus resistance in mice, and that CypA+ mice constitutes an important model to study the roles of CypA in the regulation of immune responses and infections. PMID:27354005

  1. Noninvasive monitoring of salmonella infections in young mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olomu, Isoken N.; Reilly-Contag, Pamela; Stevenson, David K.; Contag, Christopher H.

    1999-07-01

    A recently developed bioluminescent assay was used to study the influence of age and inoculum size on the acute susceptibility of newborn and juvenile BALB/c mice to Salmonella gastrointestinal infection. Three strains of Salmonella were tagged by expression of the lux operon from Photohabdus luminescenes. Using a range of inoculum sizes varied over 6 orders of magnitude, mice aged 0-6 weeks were infected by oral inoculation. LIght emitted from the tagged bacteria and transmitted through mouse tissues was used to noninvasively monitor disease progression over 7 days. In neonatal mice there was evidence of gastrointestinal infection at 24 hours even with small inocular, and at 4-7 days, the patterns of photon emission and remained and healthy throughout the study period. Inoculation of neonates with tagged LB5000 and BJ66 resulted in severe gastrointestinal infections with low and intermediate sizes of inocula respectively. These strains are known to be of reduced virulence in adult mice. These age-related differences in susceptibility emphasize the need to define virulence in the context of age of the host, and implicate maturation of innate resistance factors in determining disease patterns. Identifying these host-factors and further defining the bacterial determinants of virulence in the neonatal host will be facilitated by this noninvasive study of infection using bioluminenscent methods.

  2. Influenza A virus-infected hosts boost an invasive type of Streptococcus pyogenes infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Shigefumi; Kawabata, Shigetada; Nakagawa, Ichiro; Okuno, Yoshinobu; Goto, Toshiyuki; Sano, Kouichi; Hamada, Shigeyuki

    2003-04-01

    The apparent worldwide resurgence of invasive Streptococcus pyogenes infection in the last two decades remains unexplained. At present, animal models in which toxic shock-like syndrome or necrotizing fasciitis is induced after S. pyogenes infection are not well developed. We demonstrate here that infection with a nonlethal dose of influenza A virus 2 days before intranasal infection with a nonlethal dose of S. pyogenes strains led to a death rate of more than 90% in mice, 10% of which showed necrotizing fasciitis. Infection of lung alveolar epithelial cells by the influenza A virus resulted in viral hemagglutinin expression on the cell surface and promoted internalization of S. pyogenes. However, treatment with monoclonal antibodies to hemagglutinin markedly decreased this internalization. Our results indicate that prior infection with influenza A virus induces a lethal synergism, resulting in the induction of invasive S. pyogenes infection in mice.

  3. A method of decontaminating Strongyloides venezuelensis larvae for the study of strongyloidiasis in germ-free and conventional mice.

    PubMed

    Martins, W A; Melo, A L; Nicoli, J R; Cara, D C; Carvalho, M A; Lana, M A; Vieira, E C; Farias, L M

    2000-04-01

    To study the possible influence of intestinal micro-organisms on the course of strongyloidiasis in mice, a method was developed to obtain axenic infective larvae of Strongyloides venezuelensis. Cultured larvae from conventional mice were treated with sodium hypochlorite 0.25% for 10 min, washed in distilled water and then exposed to various combinations of antibiotics for 30 or 60 min. Success was achieved with a combination of penicillin 180 mg/L and ceftazidime 1 mg/ml. Decontamination of the larvae was determined by aerobic and anaerobic culture and by inoculation into gnotobiotic mice. Viability was established by subcutaneous inoculation of larvae into germ-free and conventional mice. Preliminary results showed that gnotobiotic mice were more susceptible than conventional mice to infection with axenic S. venezuelensis larvae as judged by faecal egg excretion, recovery of worms in the small intestine and histopathological examination of the duodenal mucosa. These results suggest that the normal intestinal flora protects the host against experimental infection with S. venezuelensis.

  4. PIR-B-deficient mice are susceptible to Salmonella infection.

    PubMed

    Torii, Ikuko; Oka, Satoshi; Hotomi, Muneki; Benjamin, William H; Takai, Toshiyuki; Kearney, John F; Briles, David E; Kubagawa, Hiromi

    2008-09-15

    Paired Ig-like receptors of activating (PIR-A) and inhibitory (PIR-B) isoforms are expressed by many hematopoietic cells, including B lymphocytes and myeloid cells. To determine the functional roles of PIR-A and PIR-B in primary bacterial infection, PIR-B-deficient (PIR-B(-/-)) and wild-type (WT) control mice were injected i.v. with an attenuated strain of Salmonella enterica Typhimurium (WB335). PIR-B(-/-) mice were found to be more susceptible to Salmonella infection than WT mice, as evidenced by high mortality rate, high bacterial loads in the liver and spleen, and a failure to clear bacteria from the circulation. Although blood levels of major cytokines and Salmonella-specific Abs were mostly comparable in the two groups of mice, distinct patterns of inflammatory lesions were found in their livers at 7-14 days postinfection: diffuse spreading along the sinusoids in PIR-B(-/-) mice vs nodular restricted localization in WT mice. PIR-B(-/-) mice have more inflammatory cells in the liver but fewer B cells and CD8(+) T cells in the spleen than WT mice at 14 days postinfection. PIR-B(-/-) bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMphi) failed to control intracellular replication of Salmonella in vitro, in part due to inefficient phagosomal oxidant production, when compared with WT BMMphi. PIR-B(-/-) BMMphi also produced more nitrite and TNF-alpha upon exposure to Salmonella than WT BMMphi did. These findings suggest that the disruption of PIR-A and PIR-B balance affects their regulatory roles in host defense to bacterial infection.

  5. Trypanosoma cruzi Infection through the Oral Route Promotes a Severe Infection in Mice: New Disease Form from an Old Infection?

    PubMed Central

    Barreto-de-Albuquerque, Juliana; Silva-dos-Santos, Danielle; Pérez, Ana Rosa; Berbert, Luiz Ricardo; de Santana-van-Vliet, Eliane; Farias-de-Oliveira, Désio Aurélio; Moreira, Otacilio C.; Roggero, Eduardo; de Carvalho-Pinto, Carla Eponina; Jurberg, José; Cotta-de-Almeida, Vinícius; Bottasso, Oscar; Savino, Wilson; de Meis, Juliana

    2015-01-01

    Oral transmission of Chagas disease has been documented in Latin American countries. Nevertheless, significant studies on the pathophysiology of this form of infection are largely lacking. The few studies investigating oral route infection disregard that inoculation in the oral cavity (Oral infection, OI) or by gavage (Gastrointestinal infection, GI) represent different infection routes, yet both show clear-cut parasitemia and heart parasitism during the acute infection. Herein, BALB/c mice were subjected to acute OI or GI infection using 5x104 culture-derived Trypanosoma cruzi trypomastigotes. OI mice displayed higher parasitemia and mortality rates than their GI counterparts. Heart histopathology showed larger areas of infiltration in the GI mice, whereas liver lesions were more severe in the OI animals, accompanied by higher Alanine Transaminase and Aspartate Transaminase serum contents. A differential cytokine pattern was also observed because OI mice presented higher pro-inflammatory cytokine (IFN-γ, TNF) serum levels than GI animals. Real-time PCR confirmed a higher TNF, IFN-γ, as well as IL-10 expression in the cardiac tissue from the OI group compared with GI. Conversely, TGF-β and IL-17 serum levels were greater in the GI animals. Immunolabeling revealed macrophages as the main tissue source of TNF in infected mice. The high mortality rate observed in the OI mice paralleled the TNF serum rise, with its inhibition by an anti-TNF treatment. Moreover, differences in susceptibility between GI versus OI mice were more clearly related to the host response than to the effect of gastric pH on parasites, since infection in magnesium hydroxide-treated mice showed similar results. Overall, the present study provides conclusive evidence that the initial site of parasite entrance critically affects host immune response and disease outcome. In light of the occurrence of oral Chagas disease outbreaks, our results raise important implications in terms of the current

  6. Trypanosoma cruzi Infection through the Oral Route Promotes a Severe Infection in Mice: New Disease Form from an Old Infection?

    PubMed

    Barreto-de-Albuquerque, Juliana; Silva-dos-Santos, Danielle; Pérez, Ana Rosa; Berbert, Luiz Ricardo; de Santana-van-Vliet, Eliane; Farias-de-Oliveira, Désio Aurélio; Moreira, Otacilio C; Roggero, Eduardo; de Carvalho-Pinto, Carla Eponina; Jurberg, José; Cotta-de-Almeida, Vinícius; Bottasso, Oscar; Savino, Wilson; de Meis, Juliana

    2015-06-01

    Oral transmission of Chagas disease has been documented in Latin American countries. Nevertheless, significant studies on the pathophysiology of this form of infection are largely lacking. The few studies investigating oral route infection disregard that inoculation in the oral cavity (Oral infection, OI) or by gavage (Gastrointestinal infection, GI) represent different infection routes, yet both show clear-cut parasitemia and heart parasitism during the acute infection. Herein, BALB/c mice were subjected to acute OI or GI infection using 5x10(4) culture-derived Trypanosoma cruzi trypomastigotes. OI mice displayed higher parasitemia and mortality rates than their GI counterparts. Heart histopathology showed larger areas of infiltration in the GI mice, whereas liver lesions were more severe in the OI animals, accompanied by higher Alanine Transaminase and Aspartate Transaminase serum contents. A differential cytokine pattern was also observed because OI mice presented higher pro-inflammatory cytokine (IFN-γ, TNF) serum levels than GI animals. Real-time PCR confirmed a higher TNF, IFN-γ, as well as IL-10 expression in the cardiac tissue from the OI group compared with GI. Conversely, TGF-β and IL-17 serum levels were greater in the GI animals. Immunolabeling revealed macrophages as the main tissue source of TNF in infected mice. The high mortality rate observed in the OI mice paralleled the TNF serum rise, with its inhibition by an anti-TNF treatment. Moreover, differences in susceptibility between GI versus OI mice were more clearly related to the host response than to the effect of gastric pH on parasites, since infection in magnesium hydroxide-treated mice showed similar results. Overall, the present study provides conclusive evidence that the initial site of parasite entrance critically affects host immune response and disease outcome. In light of the occurrence of oral Chagas disease outbreaks, our results raise important implications in terms of the current

  7. Targeted photodynamic therapy for infected wounds in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamblin, Michael R.; O'Donnell, David A.; Zahra, Touqir; Contag, Christopher H.; McManus, Albert T.; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2002-06-01

    Although many workers have used photodynamic therapy to kill bacteria in vitro, the use of this approach has seldom been reported in vivo in animal models of infection. We report on the use of a targeted polycationic photosensitizer conjugate between poly-L-lysine and chlorin(e6) that can penetrate the Gram (-) outer membrane together with red laser light to kill Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa infecting excisional wounds in mice. We used genetically engineered luminescent bacteria that allowed the infection to be imaged in mouse wounds using a sensitive CCD camera. Wounds were infected with 5x106 bacteria, followed by application of the conjugate in solution and illumination. There was a light-dose dependent loss of luminescence as measured by image analysis in the wound treated with conjugate and light, not seen in control wounds. This strain of E coli is non-invasive and the infection in untreated wounds spontaneously resolved in a few days and all wounds healed equally well showing the photodynamic treatment did not damage the host tissue. P aeruginosa is highly invasive and mice with untreated or control wounds all died while 90% of PDT treated mice survived. PDT may have a role to play in the rapid treatment of infected wounds in view of the worldwide rise in antibiotic resistance.

  8. Studying NK cell responses to ectromelia virus infections in mice.

    PubMed

    Fang, Min; Sigal, Luis

    2010-01-01

    Here we describe methods for the in vivo study of antiviral NK cell responses using the mouse Orthopoxvirus ectromelia virus as a model, the agent of mousepox. The methods include those specific for the preparation and use of ectromelia virus such as the production of virus stocks in tissue culture and in live mice, the purification of virus stocks, the titration of virus stocks and virus loads in organs, and the infection of mice. The chapter also includes methods for the specific study of NK cell responses in infected mice such as the preparation of organs (lymph nodes, spleen, and liver) for analysis, the study of NK cell responses by flow cytometry, the adoptive transfer of NK cells, the measurement of NK cell cytolytic activity ex vivo and in vivo, and the determination of NK cell proliferation by bromodeoxyuridine loading or by dilution of carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester (CFSE).

  9. Broad protection against influenza infection by vectored immunoprophylaxis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Balazs, Alejandro B.; Bloom, Jesse D.; Hong, Christin M.; Rao, Dinesh S.; Baltimore, David

    2014-01-01

    Neutralizing antibodies that target epitopes conserved among many strains of influenza virus have been recently isolated from humans. Here we demonstrate that adeno-associated viruses (AAV) encoding two such broadly neutralizing antibodies are protective against diverse influenza strains. Serum from mice that received a single intramuscular AAV injection efficiently neutralized all H1, H2 and H5 influenza strains tested. After infection with diverse strains of H1N1 influenza, treated mice showed minimal weight loss and lung inflammation. Protection lasted for at least 11 months after AAV injection. Notably, even immunodeficient and older mice were protected by this method, suggesting that expression of a monoclonal antibody alone is sufficient to protect mice from illness. If translated to humans, this prophylactic approach may be uniquely capable of protecting immunocompromised or elderly patient populations not reliably protected by existing vaccines. PMID:23728362

  10. Baylisascaris procyonis infection in white-footed mice: predicting patterns of infection from landscape habitat attributes.

    PubMed

    Beasley, J C; Eagan, T S; Page, L K; Hennessy, C A; Rhodes, O E

    2013-10-01

    There is a growing body of evidence that habitat fragmentation resulting from anthropogenic land use can alter the transmission dynamics of infectious disease. Baylisascaris procyonis , a parasitic roundworm with the ability to cause fatal central nervous system disease in many mammals, including humans, is a zoonotic threat, and research suggests that parasite recruitment rates by intermediate hosts are highly variable among forest patches in fragmented landscapes. During 2008, we sampled 353 white-footed mice ( Peromyscus leucopus ) from 22 forest patches distributed throughout a fragmented agricultural ecosystem to determine the influence of landscape-level habitat attributes on infection rates of B. procyonis in mice. We characterized each mouse in terms of infection status and intensity of infection, and calculated (on a patch-wide basis) prevalence, mean abundance of B. procyonis , and mean intensity of infection. We used an information-theoretic approach to develop a suite of candidate models characterizing the influence of landscape attributes on each of our measured characteristics of B. procyonis infection in white-footed mice, based on previous knowledge of raccoon ( Procyon lotor ) ecology and B. procyonis distribution in agricultural ecosystems. We observed evidence of B. procyonis infection in mice across all 22 habitat patches sampled. However, parasite recruitment rates and intensity were highly variable among patches, and the results of our analyses suggest that spatial variability in B. procyonis infections was primarily driven by emergent properties of fragmented ecosystems. In particular, prevalence, abundance, and intensity of B. procyonis infections in mice were negatively associated with the size and connectivity of forest patches. These results support previous studies indicating that habitat fragmentation can alter the transmission dynamics of infectious disease, and suggest that factors below the scale of landscape, i.e., fine

  11. BALB/c Mice resist infection with Bartonella bacilliformis

    PubMed Central

    Infante, Beronica; Villar, Sandra; Palma, Sandra; Merello, Jenny; Valencia, Roberto; Torres, Luis; Cok, Jamie; Ventosilla, Palmira; Manguiña, Ciro; Guerra, Humberto; Henriquez, Cesar

    2008-01-01

    Background Bartonellosis due to Bartonella bacilliformis is a highly lethal endemic and sometimes epidemic infectious disease in South America, and a serious public health concern in Perú. There is limited information on the immunologic response to B. bacilliformis infection. The objective of this research was to produce experimental infection of BALB/c mice to B. bacilliformis inoculation. Findings BALB/c mice were inoculated with 1.5, 3.0 or 4.5 × 108 live B. bacilliformis using different routes: intraperitoneal, intradermal, intranasal, and subcutaneous. Cultures of spleen, liver, and lymph nodes from one to 145 days yielded no cultivable organisms. No organs showed lesions at any time. Previously inoculated mice showed no changes in the reinoculation site. Conclusion Parenteral inoculation of live B. bacilliformis via different infection routes produced no macroscopic or microscopic organ lesions in BALB/c mice. It was not possible to isolate B. bacilliformis using Columbia blood agar from 1 to 15 days after inoculation. PMID:18957122

  12. Characterization of Lethal Zika Virus Infection in AG129 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Emma C.; Larkin, Katrina E.; Camacho, Erwin; Osorio, Jorge E.

    2016-01-01

    Background Mosquito-borne Zika virus (ZIKV) typically causes a mild and self-limiting illness known as Zika fever, which often is accompanied by maculopapular rash, headache, and myalgia. During the current outbreak in South America, ZIKV infection during pregnancy has been hypothesized to cause microcephaly and other diseases. The detection of ZIKV in fetal brain tissue supports this hypothesis. Because human infections with ZIKV historically have remained sporadic and, until recently, have been limited to small-scale epidemics, neither the disease caused by ZIKV nor the molecular determinants of virulence and/or pathogenicity have been well characterized. Here, we describe a small animal model for wild-type ZIKV of the Asian lineage. Methodology/Principal Findings Using mice deficient in interferon α/β and Ɣ receptors (AG129 mice), we report that these animals were highly susceptible to ZIKV infection and disease, succumbing within seven to eight days. Rapid viremic dissemination was observed in visceral organs and brain; but only was associated with severe pathologies in the brain and muscle. Finally, these results were consistent across challenge routes, age of mice, and inoculum doses. These data represent a mouse model for ZIKV that is not dependent on adapting ZIKV to intracerebral passage in mice. Conclusions/Significance Foot pad injection of AG129 mice with ZIKV represents a biologically relevant model for studying ZIKV infection and disease development following wild-type virus inoculation without the requirement for adaptation of the virus or intracerebral delivery of the virus. This newly developed Zika disease model can be exploited to identify determinants of ZIKV virulence and reveal molecular mechanisms that control the virus-host interaction, providing a framework for rational design of acute phase therapeutics and for vaccine efficacy testing. PMID:27093158

  13. Toll-Like Receptor-4 Dependent Small Intestinal Immune Responses Following Murine Arcobacter Butzleri Infection

    PubMed Central

    Heimesaat, Markus M.; Karadas, Gül; Fischer, André; Göbel, Ulf B.; Alter, Thomas; Bereswill, Stefan; Gölz, Greta

    2015-01-01

    Sporadic cases of gastroenteritis have been attributed to Arcobacter butzleri infection, but information about the underlying immunopathological mechanisms is scarce. We have recently shown that experimental A. butzleri infection induces intestinal, extraintestinal and systemic immune responses in gnotobiotic IL-10–/– mice. The aim of the present study was to investigate the immunopathological role of Toll-like Receptor-4, the receptor for lipopolysaccharide and lipooligosaccharide of Gram-negative bacteria, during murine A. butzleri infection. To address this, gnotobiotic IL-10–/– mice lacking TLR-4 were generated by broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment and perorally infected with two different A. butzleri strains isolated from a patient (CCUG 30485) or fresh chicken meat (C1), respectively. Bacteria of either strain stably colonized the ilea of mice irrespective of their genotype at days 6 and 16 postinfection. As compared to IL-10–/– control animals, TLR-4–/– IL-10–/– mice were protected from A. butzleri-induced ileal apoptosis, from ileal influx of adaptive immune cells including T lymphocytes, regulatory T-cells and B lymphocytes, and from increased ileal IFN-γ secretion. Given that TLR-4-signaling is essential for A. butzleri-induced intestinal inflammation, we conclude that bacterial lipooligosaccharide or lipopolysaccharide compounds aggravate intestinal inflammation and may thus represent major virulence factors of Arcobacter. Future studies need to further unravel the molecular mechanisms of TLR-4-mediated A. butzleri-host interactions. PMID:26716022

  14. Immune and pathologic responses in mice infected with Brucella abortus 19, RB51, or 2308.

    PubMed

    Stevens, M G; Olsen, S C; Pugh, G W; Palmer, M V

    1994-08-01

    Immune and pathologic responses were measured for 20 weeks after infection of mice with Brucella abortus 19, RB51, or 2308. Live bacteria and bacterial antigens of 19 and RB51 persisted in spleens for 10 and 4 weeks after infection, respectively, whereas 2308 bacteria and bacterial antigens persisted for at least 20 weeks. Small germinal centers and profound lymphoid depletion occurred in spleens of mice during the first 4 weeks of infection with strain 19 or 2308; however, mice infected with strain RB51 had much larger germinal centers but no lymphoid depletion. At 4 weeks, only spleen cells from RB51-infected mice proliferated when incubated with 2308 bacteria. Large germinal centers in the spleen and spleen cell proliferative responses to 2308 did not appear in strain 19-infected mice until 6 weeks or in strain 2308-infected mice until 10 weeks. Similar proliferative responses to 2308 occurred in mice infected with strain 19 or RB51 at 6 weeks and in mice infected with strain 19, RB51, or 2308 at 10 weeks. However, at 20 weeks, spleen cell proliferative responses to 2308 occurred in mice infected with strain 19 or 2308 but not in mice infected with strain RB51. Mice infected with strain RB51 had lower and less persistent antibody titers to 2308 than did mice infected with strain 19 or 2308. Collectively, these results indicate that RB51-infected mice have less persistent immune responses to 2308 than do mice infected with 19 or 2308. The shorter duration of the responses probably resulted because RB51 is considerably less pathogenic and is cleared more rapidly from mice than are 19 and 2308.

  15. Modification of resistance of mice to Naegleria fowleri infections.

    PubMed Central

    Adams, A C; John, D T; Bradley, S G

    1976-01-01

    Naegleria fowleri, which produces a fatal meningoencephalitis in humans, is also able to produce a progressive and fatal disease in mice. The course of the disease in DUB/ICR mice is dependent upon the infecting dose of organisms, whether administered intraperitoneally (i.p.) or intravenously (i.v.). All of the mice receiving 10(7) trophozoites/mouse i.v. or 4.85 X 10(7) trophozoites/mouse i.p. were killed within 10 days. Escherichia coli O26:B6 lipopolysaccharide, administered at a dose of 1 mg/kg 24 h prior to N. fowleri, afforded some protection for several days after challenge, but by day 8 there was no difference in survival of untreated and endotoxin-treated mice. No significant protection was afforded by a complex of lipid A with concanavalin A (ConA) or bovine serum albumin (BSA) or by dimethylmyristamide-BSA, dimethylmyristamide, BSA, beta-hydroxymyristic acid-ConA, beta-hydroxymyristic acid, ConA, myristic acid-BSA, or myristic acid. Mice surviving primary i.v. or i.p. challenge doses of N. fowleri, 5 X 10(6) and 10(7) trophozoites/mouse, respectively, were highly resistant to rechallenge with an i.v. dose of organisms (5 X 10(6) Naegleria/mouse) that produced uniformly fatal disease in untreated control mice. PMID:1270145

  16. Novel Murine Infection Models Provide Deep Insights into the “Ménage à Trois” of Campylobacter jejuni, Microbiota and Host Innate Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Bereswill, Stefan; Fischer, André; Plickert, Rita; Haag, Lea-Maxie; Otto, Bettina; Kühl, Anja A.; Dashti, Javid I.; Zautner, Andreas E.; Muñoz, Melba; Loddenkemper, Christoph; Groß, Uwe; Göbel, Ulf B.; Heimesaat, Markus M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Although Campylobacter jejuni-infections have a high prevalence worldwide and represent a significant socioeconomic burden, it is still not well understood how C. jejuni causes intestinal inflammation. Detailed investigation of C. jejuni-mediated intestinal immunopathology is hampered by the lack of appropriate vertebrate models. In particular, mice display colonization resistance against this pathogen. Methodology/Principal Findings To overcome these limitations we developed a novel C. jejuni-infection model using gnotobiotic mice in which the intestinal flora was eradicated by antibiotic treatment. These animals could then be permanently associated with a complete human (hfa) or murine (mfa) microbiota. After peroral infection C. jejuni colonized the gastrointestinal tract of gnotobiotic and hfa mice for six weeks, whereas mfa mice cleared the pathogen within two days. Strikingly, stable C. jejuni colonization was accompanied by a pro-inflammatory immune response indicated by increased numbers of T- and B-lymphocytes, regulatory T-cells, neutrophils and apoptotic cells, as well as increased concentrations of TNF-α, IL-6, and MCP-1 in the colon mucosa of hfa mice. Analysis of MyD88−/−, TRIF−/−, TLR4−/−, and TLR9−/− mice revealed that TLR4- and TLR9-signaling was essential for immunopathology following C. jejuni-infection. Interestingly, C. jejuni-mutant strains deficient in formic acid metabolism and perception induced less intestinal immunopathology compared to the parental strain infection. In summary, the murine gut flora is essential for colonization resistance against C. jejuni and can be overcome by reconstitution of gnotobiotic mice with human flora. Detection of C. jejuni-LPS and -CpG-DNA by host TLR4 and TLR9, respectively, plays a key role in immunopathology. Finally, the host immune response is tightly coupled to bacterial formic acid metabolism and invasion fitness. Conclusion/Significance We conclude that gnotobiotic and

  17. The response of aged mice to primary infection and re-infection with pneumonia virus of mice depends on their genetic background.

    PubMed

    Shrivastava, Pratima; Watkiss, Ellen; van Drunen Littel-van den Hurk, Sylvia

    2016-03-01

    The pneumonia virus of mice (PVM) model is used to study respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) pathogenesis. The outcome of PVM infection varies in different inbred mouse strains, BALB/c being highly susceptible and C57BL/6 more resistant. As the disease symptoms induced by RSV infection can become more severe as people age, we examined the primary and secondary immune responses to infection with PVM in aged BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice. Based on clinical parameters, aged C57BL/6 mice displayed less severe disease than young adult mice when infected with 3000pfu of PVM-15, while BALB/c mice were equally susceptible at both ages showing significant weight loss and high levels of virus replication. Furthermore, after primary infection the CD4(+) T cell numbers in the lungs were higher in young adult mice, while the CD8(+) T cell numbers were comparable in both age groups and strains. When either C57BL/6 or BALB/c mice were infected with PVM as young adults and then re-infected as aged mice, they were protected from clinical disease, while virus replication was reduced. In contrast to mice with a primary PVM-infection, re-infected mice did not have infiltration of neutrophils or inflammatory mediators in the lung. BALB/c mice had higher virus neutralizing antibody levels in the serum and lung than C57BL/6 mice upon re-infection. Re-infection with PVM led to significant influx of effector CD4(+) T cells into the lungs when compared to aged mice with a primary infection, while this cell population was decreased in the lung draining lymph nodes in both mouse strains. After re-infection the effector CD8(+) T cell population was also decreased in the lung draining lymph nodes in both mouse strain when compared to aged mice after primary infection. However, the central memory CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells were significantly enhanced in numbers in the lungs and draining lymph nodes of both mouse strains after re-infection, and these numbers were higher for C57BL/6 mice.

  18. Cytotoxic cells induced after Chlamydia psittaci infection in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Lammert, J.K.

    1982-03-01

    The ability of spleen cells from Chlamydia psittaci-infected mice to lyse C. psittaci-infected and uninfected target cell monolayers was studied. The cytotoxicity assay used was a terminal label method in which the number of adherent target cells surviving the interaction with effector cells was determined by measuring the uptake of (3H)uridine by such cells. It was observed that in the first few days postinfection (3 to 5), spleens contained cells that lysed infected and uninfected targets with equal efficiency. Subsequently, infected targets were killed primarily. The activity of effector spleen cells for infected targets continued, although at a reduced level, beyond 21 days postinfection. Intact effector cells were required since a disruption by sonication resulted in a loss of cytotoxicity. The enhanced killing observed with infected targets was also observed when target cells were sensitized with heat- or UV-inactivated C. psittaci. This study suggests that the induction of cytotoxic cells after C. psittaci infection may contribute to the ability of the host to control multiplication of the microorganism.

  19. Toxoplasma gondii Actively Inhibits Neuronal Function in Chronically Infected Mice

    PubMed Central

    Haroon, Fahad; Händel, Ulrike; Angenstein, Frank; Goldschmidt, Jürgen; Kreutzmann, Peter; Lison, Holger; Fischer, Klaus-Dieter; Scheich, Henning; Wetzel, Wolfram; Schlüter, Dirk; Budinger, Eike

    2012-01-01

    Upon infection with the obligate intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii, fast replicating tachyzoites infect a broad spectrum of host cells including neurons. Under the pressure of the immune response, tachyzoites convert into slow-replicating bradyzoites, which persist as cysts in neurons. Currently, it is unclear whether T. gondii alters the functional activity of neurons, which may contribute to altered behaviour of T. gondii–infected mice and men. In the present study we demonstrate that upon oral infection with T. gondii cysts, chronically infected BALB/c mice lost over time their natural fear against cat urine which was paralleled by the persistence of the parasite in brain regions affecting behaviour and odor perception. Detailed immunohistochemistry showed that in infected neurons not only parasitic cysts but also the host cell cytoplasm and some axons stained positive for Toxoplasma antigen suggesting that parasitic proteins might directly interfere with neuronal function. In fact, in vitro live cell calcium (Ca2+) imaging studies revealed that tachyzoites actively manipulated Ca2+ signalling upon glutamate stimulation leading either to hyper- or hypo-responsive neurons. Experiments with the endoplasmatic reticulum Ca2+ uptake inhibitor thapsigargin indicate that tachyzoites deplete Ca2+ stores in the endoplasmatic reticulum. Furthermore in vivo studies revealed that the activity-dependent uptake of the potassium analogue thallium was reduced in cyst harbouring neurons indicating their functional impairment. The percentage of non-functional neurons increased over time In conclusion, both bradyzoites and tachyzoites functionally silence infected neurons, which may significantly contribute to the altered behaviour of the host. PMID:22530040

  20. Borrelia persica Infection in Immunocompetent Mice - A New Tool to Study the Infection Kinetics In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Schwarzer, Sandra; Overzier, Evelyn; Hermanns, Walter; Baneth, Gad; Straubinger, Reinhard K.

    2016-01-01

    Borrelia persica, a bacterium transmitted by the soft tick Ornithodoros tholozani, causes tick-borne relapsing fever in humans in the Middle East, Central Asia and the Indian peninsula. Immunocompetent C3H/HeOuJ mice were infected intradermally with B. persica at varying doses: 1 x 106, 1 x 104, 1 x 102 and 4 x 100 spirochetes/mouse. Subsequently, blood samples were collected and screened for the presence of B. persica DNA. Spirochetes were detected in all mice infected with 1 x 106, 1 x 104 and 1 x 102 borrelia by real-time PCR targeting the flaB gene of the bacterium. Spirochetemia developed with a one- to two-day delay when 1 x 104 and 1 x 102 borrelia were inoculated. Mice injected with only four organisms were negative in all tests. No clinical signs were observed when infected mice were compared to negative control animals. Organs (heart, spleen, urinary bladder, tarsal joint, skin and brain) were tested for B. persica-specific DNA and cultured for the detection of viable spirochetes. Compiled data show that the target organs of B. persica infections are the brain and the skin. A newly developed serological two-tiered test system (ELISA and western blot) for the detection of murine IgM, IgG and IgA antibody titers against B. persica showed a vigorous antibody response of the mice during infection. In conclusion, the infection model described here for B. persica is a platform for in vivo studies to decipher the so far unexplored survival strategies of this Borrelia species. PMID:26890814

  1. In vivo imaging of mice infected with bioluminescent Trypanosoma cruzi unveils novel sites of infection

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The development of techniques that allow the imaging of animals infected with parasites expressing luciferase opens up new possibilities for following the fate of parasites in infected mammals. Methods D-luciferin potassium salt stock solution was prepared in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) at 15 mg/ml. To produce bioluminescence, infected and control mice received an intraperitoneal injection of luciferin stock solution (150 mg/kg). All mice were immediately anesthetized with 2% isofluorane, and after 10 minutes were imaged. Ex vivo evaluation of infected tissues and organs was evaluated in a 24-well plate in 150 μg/ml D-luciferin diluted in PBS. Images were captured using the IVIS Lumina image system (Xenogen). Dissected organs were also evaluated by microscopy of hematoxylin-eosin stained sections. Results Here we describe the results obtained using a genetically modified Dm28c strain of T. cruzi expressing the firefly luciferase to keep track of infection by bioluminescence imaging. Progression of infection was observed in vivo in BALB/c mice at various intervals after infection with transgenic Dm28c-luc. The bioluminescent signal was immediately observed at the site of T. cruzi inoculation, and one day post infection (dpi) it was disseminated in the peritoneal cavity. A similar pattern in the cavity was observed on 7 dpi, but the bioluminescence was more intense in the terminal region of the large intestine, rectum, and gonads. On 14 and 21 dpi, bioluminescent parasites were also observed in the heart, snout, paws, hind limbs, and forelimbs. From 28 dpi to 180 dpi in chronically infected mice, bioluminescence declined in regions of the body but was concentrated in the gonad region. Ex vivo evaluation of dissected organs and tissues by bioluminescent imaging confirmed the in vivo bioluminescent foci. Histopathological analysis of dissected organs demonstrated parasite nests at the rectum and snout, in muscle fibers of mice infected with Dm28c

  2. [Immunologic indicators in vaccinated mice with Machupo virus infection].

    PubMed

    Patrusheva, I V; Kaliberov, S A; Kashentseva, E A; Ignat'ev, G M

    1997-01-01

    The parameters of nonspecific immunity (interferon, interleukin-1, tumor necrosis factor, and natural killers) changed in immune BALB/c mice after challenge with Machupo virus in doses of 1000 and 5000 PFU. After challenge with 1000 PFU the activity of the above parameters increased during the first three days and no cases of animal death occurred. After challenge with 5000 PFU the maximal values of interferon, interleukin-1, tumor necrosis factor, and natural killers were observed on days 5-7, the animals dying at the height of these values. Hence, the formation of specific humoral and cell-mediated immune response in BALB/c mice immunized with inactivated Machupo virus does not protect the animals from infection with the homologous virus in a dose of 5000 PFU. High mediator activity of nonspecific immunity factors on days 5-7 after infection augments the disease course and leads to earlier death of vaccinated animals in comparison with the same dose of the virus in nonimmune mice.

  3. COMPARATIVE STUDY ON IMMUNOBLOT VERSUS PCR IN DIAGNOSIS OF SCHISTOSOMIASIS MANSONI IN EXPERIMENTAL INFECTED MICE.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Mousa A M; Mousa, Wahed Mohammed Ali; Abu-Sarea, Enas Yahia; Basyouni, Maha M A; Mohammed, Samah Sayed

    2016-04-01

    This study compared PCR and Western blot techniques in diagnosis of schistosomiasis mansoni. Forty Swiss albino mice were used, thirty two mice were infected with cercariae of S. mansoni and eight mice were kept uninfected which were used as a control. Blood was obtained from four infected mice weekly beginning from the 1st week to the 8th week post infection. The study found that PCR was positive from the first week post infection, while Western blot technique was positive from the second week post infection. Thus, PCR diagnosed schistosomiasis mansoni earlier than Western blot technique, but both were able to diagnose. PMID:27363045

  4. Evaluation of effects of ozone exposure on influenza infection in mice using several indicators of susceptibility

    SciTech Connect

    Selgrade, M.K.; Illing, J.W.; Starnes, D.M.; Stead, A.G.; Menache, M.G.; Stevens, M.A.

    1988-07-01

    Mice were exposed to 1 ppm O3, 3 hr/day, for 5 consecutive days. Separate groups of mice were infected with influenza following each of the individual exposures. A twofold increase in the incidence of mortality and a 3-day decrease in mean survival time were observed in mice infected after the second exposure. There were no effects on percentage mortality or mean survival time due to exposure to 1 ppm O3 in mice infected after the first, third, fourth, or fifth exposure. When the exposure concentration was lowered to 0.5 ppm, there were no effects on mortality in mice infected after the second exposure. Five, daily, 3-hr exposures to 1 ppm O3 had no effect on virus titers in the lungs of mice infected after either the second or fifth exposure. In contrast, wet lung weights were significantly enhanced over infected air controls in mice infected after the second O3 exposure at both 1 and 0.5 ppm but not at 0.25 ppm exposure concentrations. This effect on lung wet weight was observed in mice infected with a dose of virus which produced 7-33% mortality in controls as well as in mice infected with a sublethal dose of virus. Histopathologic changes due to sublethal influenza infection, including nonsuppurative pneumonitis and necrosis, squamous metaplasia and hyperplasia of the epithelium lining the bronchi and bronchioles, were more severe in mice infected after the second of five, 1 ppm O3 exposure than in comparable air controls. Sublethal infection caused a loss of lung volume with secondary reduction in diffusing capability and homogenity of ventilation distribution. These latter two effects were also exacerbated in mice infected after the second of five, 1 ppm O3 exposures as compared to air controls. When mice were infected after the fifth, 1 ppm O3 exposure, there was no effect due to ozone on either lung wet weight or histopathology.

  5. Cathepsin L Helps to Defend Mice from Infection with Influenza A

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiang; Greenland, John R.; Gotts, Jeffrey E.; Matthay, Michael A.; Caughey, George H.

    2016-01-01

    Host-derived proteases can augment or help to clear infections. This dichotomy is exemplified by cathepsin L (CTSL), which helps Hendra virus and SARS coronavirus to invade cells, but is essential for survival in mice with mycoplasma pneumonia. The present study tested the hypothesis that CTSL protects mice from serious consequences of infection by the orthomyxovirus influenza A, which is thought to be activated by host-supplied proteases other than CTSL. Ctsl-/- mice infected with influenza A/Puerto Rico/8/34(H1N1) had larger lung viral loads and higher mortality than infected Ctsl+/+ mice. Lung inflammation in surviving infected mice peaked 14 days after initial infection, accompanied marked focal distal airway bronchiolization and epithelial metaplasia followed by desquamation and fibrotic interstitial remodeling, and persisted for at least 6 weeks. Most deaths occurred during the second week of infection in both groups of mice. In contrast to mycoplasma pneumonia, infiltrating cells were predominantly mononuclear rather than polymorphonuclear. The histopathology of lung inflammation and remodeling in survivors was similar in Ctsl-/- and Ctsl+/+ mice, although Ctsl+/+ mice cleared immunoreactive virus sooner. Furthermore, Ctsl-/- mice had profound deficits in CD4+ lymphocytes before and after infection and weaker production of pathogen-specific IgG. Thus, CTSL appears to support innate as well as adaptive responses, which confer a survival advantage on mice infected with the orthomyxovirus influenza A. PMID:27716790

  6. F. novicida-Infected A. castellanii Does Not Enhance Bacterial Virulence in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ozanic, Mateja; Gobin, Ivana; Brezovec, Martin; Marecic, Valentina; Trobonjaca, Zlatko; Abu Kwaik, Yousef; Santic, Marina

    2016-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is a facultative intracellular bacterium that causes tularemia in humans and animals. Epidemiology of tularemia worldwide is often associated with water-borne transmission, which includes mosquitoes and amoebae as the potential host reservoirs of the bacteria in water environment. In vitro studies showed intracellular replication of F. tularensis within Acanthamoeba castellanii and Hartmanella vermiformis cells. While infection of amoeba by Legionella pneumophila has been shown to enhance infectivity of L. pneumophila the role of F. tularensis-infected protozoa in the pathogenesis of tularemia is not known. We used 6 h coculture of A. castellanii and F. novicida for investigation of the effect of inhaled amoeba on the pathogenesis of tularemia on in vivo model. Balb/c mice were infected intratracheally with F. novicida or with F. novicida-infected A. castellanii. Surprisingly, infection with F. novicida-infected A. castellanii did not lead to bronchopneumonia in Balb/c mice, and Francisella did not disseminate into the liver and spleen. Upon inhalation, F. novicida infects a variety of host cells, though neutrophils are the predominant cells early during infection in the lung infiltrates of pulmonary tularemia. The numbers of neutrophils in the lungs of Balb/c mice were significantly lower in the infection of mice with F. novicida-infected A. castellanii in comparison to group of mice infected only with F. novicida. These results demonstrate that following inoculation of mice with F. novicida-infected A. castellanii, mice did not develop tularemia. PMID:27242974

  7. F. novicida-Infected A. castellanii Does Not Enhance Bacterial Virulence in Mice.

    PubMed

    Ozanic, Mateja; Gobin, Ivana; Brezovec, Martin; Marecic, Valentina; Trobonjaca, Zlatko; Abu Kwaik, Yousef; Santic, Marina

    2016-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is a facultative intracellular bacterium that causes tularemia in humans and animals. Epidemiology of tularemia worldwide is often associated with water-borne transmission, which includes mosquitoes and amoebae as the potential host reservoirs of the bacteria in water environment. In vitro studies showed intracellular replication of F. tularensis within Acanthamoeba castellanii and Hartmanella vermiformis cells. While infection of amoeba by Legionella pneumophila has been shown to enhance infectivity of L. pneumophila the role of F. tularensis-infected protozoa in the pathogenesis of tularemia is not known. We used 6 h coculture of A. castellanii and F. novicida for investigation of the effect of inhaled amoeba on the pathogenesis of tularemia on in vivo model. Balb/c mice were infected intratracheally with F. novicida or with F. novicida-infected A. castellanii. Surprisingly, infection with F. novicida-infected A. castellanii did not lead to bronchopneumonia in Balb/c mice, and Francisella did not disseminate into the liver and spleen. Upon inhalation, F. novicida infects a variety of host cells, though neutrophils are the predominant cells early during infection in the lung infiltrates of pulmonary tularemia. The numbers of neutrophils in the lungs of Balb/c mice were significantly lower in the infection of mice with F. novicida-infected A. castellanii in comparison to group of mice infected only with F. novicida. These results demonstrate that following inoculation of mice with F. novicida-infected A. castellanii, mice did not develop tularemia.

  8. F. novicida-Infected A. castellanii Does Not Enhance Bacterial Virulence in Mice.

    PubMed

    Ozanic, Mateja; Gobin, Ivana; Brezovec, Martin; Marecic, Valentina; Trobonjaca, Zlatko; Abu Kwaik, Yousef; Santic, Marina

    2016-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is a facultative intracellular bacterium that causes tularemia in humans and animals. Epidemiology of tularemia worldwide is often associated with water-borne transmission, which includes mosquitoes and amoebae as the potential host reservoirs of the bacteria in water environment. In vitro studies showed intracellular replication of F. tularensis within Acanthamoeba castellanii and Hartmanella vermiformis cells. While infection of amoeba by Legionella pneumophila has been shown to enhance infectivity of L. pneumophila the role of F. tularensis-infected protozoa in the pathogenesis of tularemia is not known. We used 6 h coculture of A. castellanii and F. novicida for investigation of the effect of inhaled amoeba on the pathogenesis of tularemia on in vivo model. Balb/c mice were infected intratracheally with F. novicida or with F. novicida-infected A. castellanii. Surprisingly, infection with F. novicida-infected A. castellanii did not lead to bronchopneumonia in Balb/c mice, and Francisella did not disseminate into the liver and spleen. Upon inhalation, F. novicida infects a variety of host cells, though neutrophils are the predominant cells early during infection in the lung infiltrates of pulmonary tularemia. The numbers of neutrophils in the lungs of Balb/c mice were significantly lower in the infection of mice with F. novicida-infected A. castellanii in comparison to group of mice infected only with F. novicida. These results demonstrate that following inoculation of mice with F. novicida-infected A. castellanii, mice did not develop tularemia. PMID:27242974

  9. Suppressor cells in Trypanosoma congolense-infected mice.

    PubMed

    Pearson, T W; Roelants, G E; Lundin, L B; Mayor-Withey, K S

    1979-01-01

    Spleen cells from mice infected with T. congolense strongly suppressed lymphocyte stimulation induced in normal spleen cells by incubation with mitogens or allogeneic cells. Cell dilution studies showed that suppressor activity was extremely strong. Suppressor cell activity was markedly reduced by treatment of spleen cell populations with mitomycin-C and was unaffected by treatment with anti-Thy.1 sera and complement. Removal of cells which bound carbonyl iron or which bound to nylon columns, decreased but did not abolish suppressor activity. PMID:313686

  10. In vivo gut transcriptome responses to Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG and Lactobacillus acidophilus in neonatal gnotobiotic piglets

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Anand; Vlasova, Anastasia N; Liu, Zhe; Chattha, Kuldeep S; Kandasamy, Sukumar; Esseili, Malak; Zhang, Xiaoli; Rajashekara, Gireesh; Saif, Linda J

    2014-01-01

    Probiotics facilitate mucosal repair and maintain gut homeostasis. They are often used in adjunct with rehydration or antibiotic therapy in enteric infections. Lactobacillus spp have been tested in infants for the prevention or treatment of various enteric conditions. However, to aid in rational strain selection for specific treatments, comprehensive studies are required to delineate and compare the specific molecules and pathways involved in a less complex but biologically relevant model (gnotobiotic pigs). Here we elucidated Lactobacillus rhamnosus (LGG) and L. acidophilus (LA) specific effects on gut transcriptome responses in a neonatal gnotobiotic (Gn) pig model to simulate responses in newly colonized infants. Whole genome microarray, followed by biological pathway reconstruction, was used to investigate the host-microbe interactions in duodenum and ileum at early (day 1) and later stages (day 7) of colonization. Both LA and LGG modulated common responses related to host metabolism, gut integrity, and immunity, as well as responses unique to each strain in Gn pigs. Our data indicated that probiotic establishment and beneficial effects in the host are guided by: (1) down-regulation or upregulation of immune function-related genes in the early and later stages of colonization, respectively, and (2) alternations in metabolism of small molecules (vitamins and/or minerals) and macromolecules (carbohydrates, proteins, and lipids). Pathways related to immune modulation and carbohydrate metabolism were more affected by LGG, whereas energy and lipid metabolism-related transcriptome responses were prominently modulated by LA. These findings imply that identification of probiotic strain-specific gut responses could facilitate the rational design of probiotic-based interventions to moderate specific enteric conditions. PMID:24637605

  11. Hepatitis C Virus Infects Rhesus Macaque Hepatocytes and Simianized Mice

    PubMed Central

    Scull, Margaret A.; Shi, Chao; de Jong, Ype P.; Gerold, Gisa; Ries, Moritz; von Schaewen, Markus; Donovan, Bridget M.; Labitt, Rachael N.; Horwitz, Joshua A.; Gaska, Jenna M.; Hrebikova, Gabriela; Xiao, Jing W.; Flatley, Brenna; Fung, Canny; Chiriboga, Luis; Walker, Christopher M.; Evans, David T.; Rice, Charles M.; Ploss, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    At least 170 million people are chronically infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV). Due to the narrow host range of HCV and restricted use of chimpanzees, there is currently no suitable animal model for HCV pathogenesis studies or the development of a HCV vaccine. To identify cellular determinants of interspecies transmission and establish a novel immunocompetent model system, we examined the ability of HCV to infect hepatocytes from a small non-human primate, the rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta). We show that the rhesus orthologs of critical HCV entry factors support viral glycoprotein-dependent virion uptake. Primary hepatocytes from rhesus macaques are also permissive for HCV RNA replication and particle production, which is enhanced when antiviral signaling is suppressed. We demonstrate that this may be due to the diminished capacity of HCV to antagonize MAVS-dependent innate cellular defenses. To test the ability of HCV to establish persistent replication in vivo, we engrafted primary rhesus macaque hepatocytes into immunocompromised xenorecipients. Inoculation of resulting simian liver chimeric mice with either HCV genotype 1a or 2a resulted in HCV serum viremia for up to 10 weeks. Conclusion: Together, these data indicate that rhesus macaques may be a viable model for HCV and implicate host immunity as a potential species-specific barrier to HCV infection. We conclude that suppression of host immunity or further viral adaptation may allow robust HCV infection in rhesus macaques and creation of a new animal model for studies of HCV pathogenesis, lentivirus coinfection and vaccine development. PMID:25820364

  12. Chronic active gastritis due to Helicobacter pylori in immunized gnotobiotic piglets.

    PubMed

    Eaton, K A; Krakowka, S

    1992-11-01

    In gnotobiotic piglets, parenteral vaccination with formalin-killed Helicobacter pylori and oral vaccination with live bacteria induced H. pylori-specific serum immunoglobulins G, M, and A. Vaccination reduced but did not prevent infection by subsequent challenge with viable H. pylori. Oral vaccination with killed bacteria was less effective in inducing serum antibody and had no effect on bacterial colonization. Immunization status influenced the histologic response of piglets to challenge by H. pylori. Lymphoplasmacytic gastritis was more severe in parenterally vaccinated piglets than in the other groups. In addition, neutrophilic infiltrates and neutrophilic gland abscesses in the gastric mucosa were present in 5 of 7 parenterally immunized piglets, none of the orally immunized piglets, and only 1 of 8 infected nonimmune control piglets. Furthermore, there was a positive correlation between immunoglobulin G, M, and A titer at challenge and severity of both neutrophilic and lymphocytic inflammation. These results suggest that although vaccination does not prevent infection by H. pylori, infection of an immune host leads to increased severity and activity of gastritis.

  13. Mouse Adenovirus Type 1 Infection of Natural Killer Cell-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Welton, Amanda R.; Gralinski, Lisa E.; Spindler, Katherine R.

    2008-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells contribute to the initial nonspecific response to viral infection, and viruses exhibit a range of sensitivities to NK cells in vivo. We investigated the role of NK cells in infection of mice by mouse adenovirus type 1 (MAV-1) using antibody-mediated depletion and knockout mice. MAV-1 causes encephalomyelitis and replicates to highest levels in brains. NK cell-depleted mice infected with MAV-1 showed brain viral loads 8-20 days p.i. that were similar to wild-type control non-depleted mice. Mice genetically deficient for NK cells behaved similarly to wild-type control mice with respect to brain viral loads and survival. We conclude that NK cells are not required to control virus replication in the brains of MAV-1-infected mice. PMID:18155121

  14. Immunity to Cryptosporidium muris infection in mice is expressed through gut CD4+ intraepithelial lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, V; Robinson, H A; Kelly, J P; Bancroft, G J

    1996-01-01

    The role of gut intraepithelial lymphocytes (IEL) in immunity to cryptosporidial infection was investigated with a murine infection model involving Cryptosporidium muris. Oocyst shedding was monitored in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice infected with C. muris following intravenous injection of mesenteric lymph node (MLN) cells or intestinal IEL from BALB/c donor mice which were naive or previously infected with C. muris. SCID mice receiving no lymphoid cells developed chronic infections and excreted large numbers of oocysts until the end of the experiment. SCID mice injected with IEL from immune animals, however, were able to overcome the infection, and furthermore, these animals produced fewer oocysts and recovered sooner than ones which received IEL or MLN cells from naive BALB/c donors. Similar levels of protection were obtained in SCID mice injected with either 2 X 10(6) IEL or MLN cells from immune donor mice. Depletion of CD4+ cells from immune IEL, however, abrogated the ability to transfer immunity to SCID mice, while depletion of CD8+ cells only marginally reduced the protective capacity of immune IEL. Finally, control SCID mice which received no lymphocytes had < or = 1% CD4+ cells in the IEL from the small intestine, whereas the IEL from SCID mice recovered from infection, as a result of injection with immune IEL, contained 15% CD4+ cells. Thus, the ability to control C. muris infection correlated with the presence of the protective CD4+ cells in the gut epithelium. PMID:8698479

  15. Prolonged persistence of Listeria monocytogenes after intragastric infection in corticosteroid-treated mice.

    PubMed

    Prats, N; López, S; Domingo, M; Briones, V; García, J A; Domínguez, L; Marco, A J

    1997-10-31

    In an attempt to obtain a model more closely resembling natural listeriosis, we studied the course of infection in mice inoculated by the intragastric route with Listeria monocytogenes. Corticosteroid-treated, and untreated mice both developed subclinical infection without mortality, but faecal shedding and persistence of bacteria in the liver and spleen of corticosteroid-treated mice were significantly more protracted than in untreated mice. Untreated mice cleared the bacteria from their livers and spleens by day 5 postinfection (PI), whereas treated mice did not clear the organisms until 8-9 days PI. In untreated mice faecal shedding lasted 5 days PI, whereas in treated mice the organisms were recovered at significantly higher levels until day 9 PI. The only intestinal lesions observed were mild pyogranulomatous changes in the dome area of some Peyer's patches in treated mice.

  16. Sex influence on chronic intestinal inflammation in Helicobacter hepaticus-infected A/JCr mice.

    PubMed

    Livingston, Robert S; Myles, Mathew H; Livingston, Beth A; Criley, Jennifer M; Franklin, Craig L

    2004-06-01

    Helicobacter hepaticus is a bacterial pathogen of mice that has been reported to cause chronic intestinal inflammation in A/JCr, germfree Swiss Webster, and immunodeficient mice. To the authors' knowledge, the influence of sex on development of chronic intestinal inflammation in H. hepaticus-infected mice has not been investigated. The purposes of the study reported here were to determine whether severity of intestinal inflammation differs between male and female A/JCr mice chronically infected with H. hepaticus and to characterize the mucosal immune response in these mice. The cecum of male and female A/JCr mice infected with H. hepaticus for 1 month and 3 months was objectively evaluated histologically for intestinal disease. Also, semi-quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis was done to measure interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin 4 (IL-4), IL-10, macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha (MIP-1alpha), interferon-inducible protein of 10 kDa (IP-10), and monokine induced by gamma interferon (MIG) mRNA values in the cecal tissue of these mice. Significant differences in cecal lesion scores were not present at 1 month after infection. However, infected female mice had significantly up-regulated expression of cecal IL-10, MIP-1alpha, IP-10, and MIG mRNA compared with that in uninfected females, and expression of IL-10 and MIP-1alpha was significantly greater than that detected in infected male mice (P < or = 0.05). At 3 months after infection, cecal lesion scores were significantly (P < or = 0.05) increased in female and male mice compared with uninfected controls, and infected female mice had significantly (P < or = 0.05) higher cecal lesion scores than did infected male mice. In addition, infected females had significant (P < or = 0.05) increases in cecal IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, IL-10, MIP-1alpha, IP-10, and MIG mRNA values compared with values in uninfected females and infected males

  17. Allele- and Tir-Independent Functions of Intimin in Diverse Animal Infection Models

    PubMed Central

    Mallick, Emily M.; Brady, Michael J.; Luperchio, Steven A.; Vanguri, Vijay K.; Magoun, Loranne; Liu, Hui; Sheppard, Barbara J.; Mukherjee, Jean; Donohue-Rolfe, Art; Tzipori, Saul; Leong, John M.; Schauer, David B.

    2012-01-01

    Upon binding to intestinal epithelial cells, enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC), enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC), and Citrobacter rodentium trigger formation of actin pedestals beneath bound bacteria. Pedestal formation has been associated with enhanced colonization, and requires intimin, an adhesin that binds to the bacterial effector translocated intimin receptor (Tir), which is translocated to the host cell membrane and promotes bacterial adherence and pedestal formation. Intimin has been suggested to also promote cell adhesion by binding one or more host receptors, and allelic differences in intimin have been associated with differences in tissue and host specificity. We assessed the function of EHEC, EPEC, or C. rodentium intimin, or a set of intimin derivatives with varying Tir-binding abilities in animal models of infection. We found that EPEC and EHEC intimin were functionally indistinguishable during infection of gnotobiotic piglets by EHEC, and that EPEC, EHEC, and C. rodentium intimin were functionally indistinguishable during infection of C57BL/6 mice by C. rodentium. A derivative of EHEC intimin that bound Tir but did not promote robust pedestal formation on cultured cells was unable to promote C. rodentium colonization of conventional mice, indicating that the ability to trigger actin assembly, not simply to bind Tir, is required for intimin-mediated intestinal colonization. Interestingly, streptomycin pre-treatment of mice eliminated the requirement for Tir but not intimin during colonization, and intimin derivatives that were defective in Tir-binding still promoted colonization of these mice. These results indicate that EPEC, EHEC, and C. rodentium intimin are functionally interchangeable during infection of gnotobiotic piglets or conventional C57BL/6 mice, and that whereas the ability to trigger Tir-mediated pedestal formation is essential for colonization of conventional mice, intimin provides a Tir-independent activity during colonization

  18. Therapeutic effect of mefloquine on Schistosoma mansoni in experimental infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Abou-Shady, Omaima Mohammed; Mohammed, Soheir Sayed; Attia, Samar Sayed; Yusuf, Hebat-Allah Salah; Helmy, Dina Omar

    2016-06-01

    Schistosomiasis is one of the most prevalent parasitic infections worldwide. Praziquantel is the drug of choice for treatment of schistosomiasis for its high efficacy. The present work was carried out on 160 mice to evaluate the therapeutic effect of mefloquine on experimental schistosomiasis mansoni. Mice were classified into 3 groups; group I (20 infected non-treated mice), group II included 60 infected mice which were further divided into group IIm (20 mice treated with 400 mg/kg mefloquine), group IIp (20 mice treated with 1,000 mg/kg/2 days praziquantel) and group IIpm (20 mice treated with 200 mg/kg mefloquine and 500 mg/kg praziquantel), group III included 80 non-infected mice subdivided into group IIIn (20 non-treated mice), group IIIm (20 mice treated with 400 mg/kg mefloquine), group IIIp (20 mice treated with 1,000 mg/kg/2 days praziquantel), group IIIpm (20 mice treated with 200 mg mefloquine and 500 mg praziquantel). Mefloquine significantly reduced worm burden, tissue egg load, number of liver granulomas and increased the percent of dead ova within granulomas. Combination of mefloquine and praziquantel gave better curative effects than praziquantel or mefloquine given alone. PMID:27413290

  19. Immunopathological assessments of human Blastocystis spp. in experimentally infected immunocompetent and immunosuppresed mice.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Hafeez, Ekhlas H; Ahmad, Azza K; Abdelgelil, Noha H; Abdellatif, Manal Z M; Kamal, Amany M; Hassanin, Kamel M A; Abdel-Razik, Abdel-Razik H; Abdel-Raheem, Ehab M

    2016-05-01

    Blastocystis spp., one of the most common parasites colonizing the human intestine, is an extracellular, luminal protozoan with controversial pathogenesis. The host's immune response against Blastocystis spp. infection has also not been defined yet. Therefore, this research aimed to assess the potential pathogenicity of this parasite and its ability to modulate the immune response in experimental infected immunocompetent and immunosuppresed mice. These results demonstrated that the infected immunosuppressed mice were more affected than infected immunocompetent mice. Histopathological examination of the small intestine in the infected immunosuppressed mice showed that Blastocystis spp. infiltrated all the layers. Moreover, the epithelia showed exfoliation and inflammatory cell infiltration in submucosa compared to that of the infected immunocompetent mice. As well, examination of the large intestine of the infected immunosuppressed group showed severe goblet cell hyperplasia. Blastocystis spp. infiltrated all the large intestine layers compared to that of the infected immunocompetent group. Furthermore, there was a significant upregulation of the expression of proinflammatory cytokines: interleukin 12 (IL-12) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) in the infected immunosuppressed mice compared to that of the infected immunocompetent ones (p ≤ 0.004 and p ≤ 0.002, respectively). However, the expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-4 and IL-10) was significantly downregulated in the infected immunosuppressed group compared to that of the infected immunocompetent group one at 10 days postinfection (p ≤ 0.002 and p ≤ 0.001, respectively). The results of this study revealed that Blastocystis spp. affected the production of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in both groups of mice compared to healthy normal (naive) group. Additionally, these data showed that there was a significant upregulation (p ≤ 0.005) of the locally

  20. Transcriptional Modulation of Intestinal Innate Defense/Inflammation Genes by Preterm Infant Microbiota in a Humanized Gnotobiotic Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Lei; Yu, Yueyue; Guo, Yuee; Wang, Yunwei; Chang, Eugene B.; Claud, Erika C.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims It is known that postnatal functional maturation of the small intestine is facilitated by microbial colonization of the gut. Preterm infants exhibit defects in gut maturation, weak innate immunity against intestinal infection and increased susceptibility to inflammatory disorders, all of which may be related to the inappropriate microbial colonization of their immature intestines. The earliest microbes to colonize the preterm infant gut encounter a naïve, immature intestine. Thus this earliest microbiota potentially has the greatest opportunity to fundamentally influence intestinal development and immune function. The aim of this study was to characterize the effect of early microbial colonization on global gene expression in the distal small intestine during postnatal gut development. Methods Gnotobiotic mouse models with experimental colonization by early (prior to two weeks of life) intestinal microbiota from preterm human infants were utilized. Microarray analysis was used to assess global gene expression in the intestinal epithelium. Results and Conclusion Multiple intestinal genes involved in metabolism, cell cycle regulation, cell-cell or cell-extracellular matrix communication, and immune function are developmental- and intestinal microbiota- regulated. Using a humanized gnotobiotic mouse model, we demonstrate that certain early preterm infant microbiota from prior to 2 weeks of life specifically induce increased NF-κB activation and a phenotype of increased inflammation whereas other preterm microbiota specifically induce decreased NF-κB activation. These fundamental differences correlate with altered clinical outcomes and suggest the existence of optimal early microbial communities to improve health outcomes. PMID:25928420

  1. Post-parturient shedding of Listeria monocytogenes in breast milk of infected mice

    PubMed Central

    Poulsen, Keith P; Pillers, DeAnn M; Conway, James H; Faith, Nancy G; Czuprynski, Charles J

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to develop an animal model to study Listeria monocytogenes infection during the peri-parturient period and identify sources of maternal shedding of the pathogen. Peri-parturient mice were infected intragastrically with L. monocytogenes that expressed bacterial luciferase. Mice were then imaged in vivo over time. Secreted breast milk samples from mice infected after parturition were enriched and plated for culture and imaging. Bioluminescence imaging technology was able to detect luciferase emitting L. monocytogenes in vaginal secretions and maternal and fetal organs at 72 and 96 h post infection in mice infected prior to, or just after, parturition. The results from this study clearly show that L. monocytogenes is shed in vaginal secretions and disseminates to the mammary chain, from which it can be shed in the milk of peri-parturient mice. PMID:24246517

  2. An enterovirus 71 strain causes skeletal muscle damage in infected mice

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Peixin; Gao, Lulu; Huang, Yeen; Chen, Qing; Shen, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To study the target organs for enterovirus 71 (EV71) in infected suckling mice. Methods: 5-day-old BALB/c suckling mice were infected with an EV71 strain. Tissues of the infected mice were processed for histopathological examination, including immunohistochemistry, in situ hybridization, ultrastructural observation. Results: Some mice developed limb paralysis, trouble walking and loss of balance. Results of the histopathological study showed that a large amount of EV71 existed in the skeletal muscle tissues, accounting for the damage of the skeletal muscles. Conclusion: The EV71 clinical isolate used in this study presented evident myotropism. Skeletal muscles are important target organs for EV71 in the infected suckling mice. To clarify the relationship between EV71 infection and muscle diseases may contribute to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of EV71. PMID:26097530

  3. Chlamydia trachomatis genital tract infection of antibody-deficient gene knockout mice.

    PubMed Central

    Su, H; Feilzer, K; Caldwell, H D; Morrison, R P

    1997-01-01

    The importance of antibody-mediated immunity in primary and secondary Chlamydia trachomatis genital tract infections was examined by using a definitive model of B-cell deficiency, the microMT/microMT gene knockout mouse. Vaginally infected B-cell-deficient microMT/microMT mice developed a self-limiting primary infection that was indistinguishable from infection of control C57BL/6 mice. Sera and vaginal secretions from infected mice were analyzed for anti-Chlamydia antibodies. C57BL/6 mice produced high-titered serum anti-Chlamydia immunoglobulin G2a (IgG2a), IgG2b, and IgA antibodies, and vaginal washes contained predominately anti-Chlamydia IgA. Serum and vaginal washes from infected B-cell-deficient mice were negative for anti-Chlamydia antibody. T-cell proliferation and delayed-type hypersensitivity assays were used as measures of Chlamydia-specific cell-mediated immunity and were found to be comparable for C57BL/6 and B-cell-deficient mice. Seventy days following primary infection, mice were rechallenged to assess acquired immunity. B-cell-deficient mice which lack anti-Chlamydia antibodies were more susceptible to reinfection than immunocompetent C57BL/6 mice. However, acquired immune resistance was evident in both strains of mice and characterized by decreased shedding of chlamydiae and an infection of shorter duration. Thus, this study demonstrates that cell-mediated immune responses alone were capable of resolving chlamydial infection; however, in the absence of specific antibody, mice were more susceptible to reinfection. Therefore, these data suggest that both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses were important mediators of immune protection in this model, though cell-mediated immune responses appear to play a more dominant role. PMID:9169723

  4. An Overview of Typical Infections of Research Mice: Health Monitoring and Prevention of Infection.

    PubMed

    Fahey, James R; Olekszak, Haiyan

    2015-01-01

    There are many reasons to keep research mice healthy and free from infections. The two most important of these are to protect the health and welfare of research mice and to prevent infections from negatively impacting research. Just as the genetic integrity of a mouse strain will influence the reproducibility and validity of research data, so too will the microbiologic integrity of the animals. This has been repeatedly demonstrated in the literature of laboratory animal sciences wherein the direct impact of infections on physiologic parameters under study have been described. Therefore, it is of great importance that scientists pay close attention to the health status of their research animal colonies and maintain good communications with the animal facility personnel at their institution about mouse health issues. This overview provides information about animal health monitoring (HM) in research mouse colonies including commonly monitored agents, diagnostic methods, HM program, risk assessment, and animal facility biosecurity. Lastly, matters of communication with laboratory animal professionals at research institutions are also addressed.

  5. Prolonged survival of scavenger receptor class A-deficient mice from pulmonary Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection

    PubMed Central

    Sever-Chroneos, Zvjezdana; Tvinnereim, Amy; Hunter, Robert L.; Chroneos, Zissis C.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY The present study tested the hypothesis that the scavenger receptor SR-A modulates granuloma formation in response to pulmonary infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB). To test this hypothesis, we monitored survival and histopathology in WT and SR-A-deficient mice following aerosol infection with MTB Rv. SR-A-deficient (SR-A−/−) mice infected with MTB survived significantly longer than WT mice; the mean survival of SR-A−/− mice exceeded 430 days compared to 230 days for WT mice. Early granuloma formation was not impaired in SR-A−/− mice. The extended survival of SR-A−/− mice was associated with 13- and 3-fold higher number of CD4+ lymphocytes and antigen presenting cells in SR-A−/− lungs compared to WT mice 280 after infection. The histopathology of chronically infected SR-A−/− lungs, however, was marked by abundant cholesterol clefts in parenchymal lesions containing infection in multinucleated giant cells. The present study indicates SR-A as a candidate gene of the innate immune system influencing the chronic phase of M. tuberculosis infection. PMID:22088322

  6. Arthritis is developed in Borrelia-primed and -infected mice deficient of interleukin-17.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Joseph; Warner, Thomas F; Munson, Erik L; Nardelli, Dean T; Schell, Ronald F

    2016-10-01

    Interleukin-17 (IL-17) has been shown to participate in the development of Lyme arthritis in experimental mice. For example, neutralization of IL-17 with antibodies inhibits induction of arthritis in Borrelia-primed and -infected C57BL/6 wild-type mice. We hypothesized that mice lacking IL-17 would fail to develop Borrelia-induced arthritis. IL-17-deficient and wild-type C57BL/6 mice were primed with heat-inactivated Borrelia and then infected with viable spirochetes 3 weeks later. No swelling or major histopathological changes of the hind paws were detected in IL-17-deficient or wild-type mice that were primed with Borrelia or infected with viable spirochetes. By contrast, IL-17-deficient and wild-type mice that were primed and subsequently infected with heterologous Borrelia developed severe swelling and histopathological changes of the hind paws. In addition, Borrelia-primed and -infected IL-17-deficient mice exhibited elevated gamma-interferon (IFN-γ) levels in sera and increased frequencies of IFN-γ-expressing lymphocytes in popliteal lymph nodes compared to Borrelia-primed and -infected wild-type mice. These results demonstrate that IL-17 is not required for development of severe pathology in response to infection with Borrelia burgdorferi, but may contribute to disease through an interaction with IFN-γ. PMID:27493062

  7. Herpes simplex virus type 1 infection in mice with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID).

    PubMed

    Minagawa, H; Sakuma, S; Mohri, S; Mori, R; Watanabe, T

    1988-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection in mutant mice with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID mice), i.e., mice in which the differentiation of both T and B lymphocytes is severely impaired, was studied. All control (infected and not treated with antibodies or with immune spleen cells) SCID mice were dead by 17 days after intracutaneous injection in the right midflank with 1 x 10(5) PFU of a virulent HSV-1 strain, Hayashida. Immunization with an avirulent strain of HSV-1 (SKa) did not protect them from death or prolong the survival time. Tissue virus titration of infected mice killed at various times after inoculation detected infectious virus in various organs, dorsal root ganglia, spinal cord, brain, kidney and adrenal gland in addition to the inoculation site of the skin in SCID mice, whereas virus could be detected only in the inoculation site and the nervous tissues in euthymic BALB/c mice, and in the adrenal gland from only one out of 17 nude mice. Human gamma globulin containing neutralizing antibody against HSV-1 prolonged the survival time but did not protect SCID mice from death. Transfer of spleen cells from immunized BALB/c mice protected the infected SCID mice from death. Treatment of spleen cells with anti-Thy 1.2 monoclonal antibody and complement abolished the protection.

  8. Excessive inflammatory response of cystic fibrosis mice to bronchopulmonary infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Heeckeren, A; Walenga, R; Konstan, M W; Bonfield, T; Davis, P B; Ferkol, T

    1997-01-01

    In cystic fibrosis (CF), defective function of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) in airway epithelial cells and submucosal glands results in chronic pulmonary infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The pulmonary infection incites an intense host inflammatory response, causing progressive suppurative pulmonary disease. Mouse models of CF, however, fail to develop pulmonary disease spontaneously. We examined the effects of bronchopulmonary infection on mice homozygous for the S489X mutation of the CFTR gene using an animal model of chronic Pseudomonas endobronchial infection. Slurries of sterile agarose beads or beads containing a clinical isolate of mucoid P. aeruginosa were instilled in the right lung of normal or CF mice. The mortality of CF mice inoculated with Pseudomonas-laden beads was significantly higher than that of normal animals: 82% of infected CF mice, but only 23% of normal mice, died within 10 d of infection (P = 0.023). The concentration of inflammatory mediators, including TNF-alpha, murine macrophage inflammatory protein-2, and KC/N51, in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid in CF mice 3 d after infection and before any mortality, was markedly elevated compared with normal mice. This inflammatory response also correlated with weight loss observed in both CF and normal littermates after inoculation. Thus, this model may permit examination of the relationship of bacterial infections, inflammation, and the cellular and genetic defects in CF. PMID:9389746

  9. Lactic dehydrogenase virus infection enhances parasite egg production and inhibits eosinophil and mast cell responses in mice infected with the nematode Nippostrongylus brasiliensis.

    PubMed Central

    Morimoto, M; Yamada, M; Arizono, N; Hayashi, T

    1998-01-01

    The effects of lactic dehydrogenase virus (LDV) infection on the protective immune responses to the nematode Nippostrongylus brasiliensis were studied. Mice with chronic LDV infection showed significantly higher levels of parasite egg production than non-LDV-infected (control) mice after N. brasiliensis infection. Concurrent LDV infection also suppressed peripheral blood eosinophilia and the lung mastocytosis induced by this nematode. LDV infection showed higher expression levels of the interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) mRNA in lymph nodes compared with control mice before N. brasiliensis infection. In addition, the IgG2a production in LDV-infected mice was higher than that in control mice before and after N. brasiliensis infection. These results suggest that LDV infection modulates protective immune responses against N. brasiliensis infection by the activation of T-helper type 1 cells. PMID:9659227

  10. Cytokine patterns in experimental schistosomiasis mansoni infected mice treated with silymarin.

    PubMed

    El-Sayed, Nagwa Mostafa; Fathy, Ghada Mahmoud; Abdel-Rahman, Sara Abdel-Rahman; El-Shafei, Mahmoud Abdel-Atei

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine cytokine patterns in experimental schistosomiasis mansoni infected mice treated with silymarin. The study was conducted upon 100 mice that were divided into five groups; 20 each: uninfected control group, Schistosoma mansoni infected untreated mice (infected control), infected mice treated with praziquantel (PZQ), infected mice treated with silymarin and infected mice treated with both praziquantel and silymarin. 10 mice from each group were sacrificed at 10th and 18th weeks post infection respectively. Histopathological investigations were performed. Liver sections were stained with hematoxylin-eosin and Masson's trichrome stain to evaluate changes of granuloma sizes and numbers. Serum levels of the cytokines (TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-4 and TGF-β1) were assessed in the sera of all groups by immunoassay. The measured levels of cytokines (IFN-γ, IL-4, TNF-α, TGF-β1) were found to be significantly increased in infected mice compared to normal control. At the same time, treated groups with silymarin alone or combined with PZQ showed significant decrease in IL-4, TNF-α and TGF-β1 levels compared to infected control. On the other hand, there was a significant increase in IFN-γ level observed in all treated groups compared to infected control. In addition, the histopathological examination of the liver in the group treated with PZQ showed a reduction in the number of livers eggs granuloma at all periods of sacrification compared with the infected untreated group. However, there was more decrease in granulomas diameter in both silymarin treated group or combined with PZQ at all periods of sacrification when compared to infected untreated group. In conclusion; treatment with silymarin combined with PZQ in murine schistosomiasis could reduce hepatic fibrosis by their action on the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. PMID:27605811

  11. Dietary lactosucrose suppresses influenza A (H1N1) virus infection in mice

    PubMed Central

    KISHINO, Eriko; TAKEMURA, Naho; MASAKI, Hisaharu; ITO, Tetsuya; NAKAZAWA, Masatoshi

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the effects of lactosucrose (4G-β-D-galactosylsucrose) on influenza A virus infections in mice. First, the effects of lactosucrose on fermentation in the cecum and on immune function were investigated. In female BALB/c mice, lactosucrose supplementation for 6 weeks promoted cecal fermentation and increased both secretory IgA (SIgA) levels in feces and total IgA and IgG2a concentrations in serum. Both the percentage of CD4+ T cells in Peyer’s patches and the cytotoxic activity of splenic natural killer (NK) cells increased significantly in response to lactosucrose. Next, we examined the effects of lactosucrose on low-dose influenza A virus infection in mice. After 2 weeks of dietary supplementation with lactosucrose, the mice were infected with low-dose influenza A virus. At 7 days post infection, a comparison with control mice showed that weight loss was suppressed, as were viral titers in the lungs. In the spleens of lactosucrose-fed mice, there was an increase in the percentage of NK cells. Lastly, mice fed lactosucrose were challenged with a lethal dose of influenza A virus. The survival rate of these mice was significantly higher than that of mice fed a control diet. These results suggested that lactosucrose supplementation suppresses influenza A virus infection by augmenting innate immune responses and enhancing cellular and mucosal immunity. PMID:26594606

  12. VDUP1 exacerbates bacteremic shock in mice infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Piao, Zheng-Hao; Kim, Mi Sun; Jeong, Mira; Yun, Sohyun; Lee, Suk Hyung; Sun, Hu-Nan; Song, Hae Young; Suh, Hyun-Woo; Jung, Haiyoung; Yoon, Suk Ran; Kim, Tae-Don; Lee, Young-Ho; Choi, Inpyo

    2012-11-01

    Vitamin-D3 upregulated protein-1 (VDUP1) is a stress response protein. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) infection is a leading cause of death. Mice infected with live P. aeruginosa exhibit significantly decreased VDUP1 expression. However, the function of VDUP1 during P. aeruginosa-induced mouse bacteremic shock is unknown. To address the function of VDUP1 in P. aeruginosa-infected mice, we constructed a bacteremic shock model wherein both wild-type and VDUP1-deficient mice were infected intra-peritoneally with live P. aeruginosa. We found that VDUP1-deficient mice were more resistant to P. aeruginosa-induced bacteremic shock than wild-type mice, as shown by the increased survival, accelerated bacterial clearance and suppression of cytokine overproduction of the VDUP1-deficient mice. VDUP1 promoted the recruitment of neutrophils into the peritoneal cavities of infected mice. VDUP1 impeded the phagocytosis of non-opsonized P. aeruginosa via phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway in macrophages. P. aeruginosa infection induced the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and the increased production of ROS by the peritoneal cells of VDUP1-deficient mice was advantageous in clearing the bacteria. Overall, VDUP1 aggravates bacteremic shock; thus, VDUP1 can be considered a target molecule for the inhibition of P. aeruginosa-induced bacteremic shock.

  13. Interferon-γ-Induced Nitric Oxide Causes Intrinsic Intestinal Denervation in Trypanosoma cruzi-Infected Mice

    PubMed Central

    Arantes, Rosa M.E.; Marche, Homero H.F.; Bahia, Maria T.; Cunha, Fernando Q.; Rossi, Marcos A.; Silva, João S.

    2004-01-01

    In this study, the role of nitric oxide (NO) in neuronal destruction during acute-phase Trypanosoma cruzi infection was evaluated in male C57BL/6 (WT, wild-type) mice and knockout mice [inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS)−/− and interferon (IFN)−/−]. Selected animals were infected by intraperitoneal injection of 100 trypomastigote forms of the Y strain of T. cruzi. Others were injected intraperitoneally with an equal volume of saline solution and served as controls. Our findings support those of previous studies regarding myenteric denervation in acute-phase T. cruzi infection. In addition, we clearly demonstrate that, despite the fact that parasite nests and similar inflammatory infiltrate in the intestinal wall were more pronounced in infected iNOS−/− mice than in infected WT mice, the former presented no reduction in myenteric plexus neuron numbers. Neuronal nerve profile expression, as revealed by the general nerve marker PGP 9.5, was preserved in all knockout animals. Infected IFN−/− mice suffered no significant neuronal loss and there was no inflammatory infiltrate in the intestinal wall. On days 5 and 10 after infection, iNOS activity was greater in infected WT mice than in controls, whereas iNOS activity in infected knockout mice remained unchanged. These findings clearly demonstrate that neuronal damage does not occur in NO-impaired infected knockout mice, regardless of whether inflammatory infiltrate is present (iNOS−/−) or absent (IFN−/−). In conclusion, our observations strongly indicate that myenteric denervation in acute-phase T. cruzi infection is because of IFN-γ-elicited NO production resulting from iNOS activation in the inflammatory foci along the intestinal wall. PMID:15039223

  14. Effects of chronic methamphetamine exposure on heart function in uninfected and retrovirus-infected mice.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qianli; Montes, Sergio; Larson, Douglas F; Watson, Ronald R

    2002-07-12

    Methamphetamine (MA) increases catecholamine levels, which have detrimental effects on heart function through vasoconstriction, myocardial hypertrophy, and fibrosis. Murine retrovirus infection induces dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). The present study investigated the cardiovascular effects of chronic MA treatment on uninfected and retrovirus-infected mice. C57BL/6 mice were studied after 12 weeks treatment. The four study groups were (group I) uninfected, MA placebo; (group II) infected, MA placebo; (group III) uninfected, MA treatment; and (group IV) infected and MA treatment. MA injections were given i.p. once a day for 5 days/week with a increasing dose from 15 mg/kg to 40 mg/kg. Left ventricular mechanics were measured in situ a using Millar conductance catheter system for pressure-volume loop analysis. Cardiac pathology was determined with histological analysis. In the uninfected mice, the load independent contractile parameters, pre-load recruitable stroke work (PRSW) and dP/dt(max) vs. Ved, significantly decreased by 32% and 35% in MA treated mice when compared to the saline injected mice. In retrovirus-infected mice, although there were no significant difference in Ees, PRSW, and dP/dt(max) vs. Ved due to MA treatment, they were increased 45%, 15% and 42% respectively when compared to saline treated mice. No further lowered heart function during murine AIDS may be due to the counteraction of the retroviral DCM and the MA induced myocardial fibrosis and hypertrophy (thickening of the ventricular walls). This is supported by increases in the End-diastolic volume (Ved, 38%) and End-systolic volume (Ves, 84%) in the retrovirus-infected saline injected mice, the decreases of 33% and 17% in the uninfected MA-treated mice, but no significant changes in the retrovirus-infected MA treated mice when compared to uninfected saline injected mice. These data suggest that MA induced myocardial cellular changes compensate for retrovirus induced DCM. PMID:12084392

  15. Human enterovirus 71 subgenotype B3 lacks coxsackievirus A16-like neurovirulence in mice infection

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Yoke-Fun; AbuBakar, Sazaly

    2005-01-01

    Background At least three different EV-71 subgenotypes were identified from an outbreak in Malaysia in 1998. The subgenotypes C2 and B4 were associated with the severe and fatal infections, whereas the B3 virus was associated with mild to subclinical infections. The B3 virus genome sequences had ≥85% similarity at the 3' end to CV-A16. This offers opportunities to examine if there are characteristic similarities and differences in virulence between CV-A16, EV-71 B3 and EV-71 B4 and to determine if the presence of the CV-A16-liked genes in EV-71 B3 would also confer the virus with a CV-A16-liked neurovirulence in mice model infection. Results Analysis of human enterovirus 71 (EV-71) subgenotype B3 genome sequences revealed that the 3D RNA polymerase and domain Z of the 3'-untranslating region RNA secondary structure had high similarity to CV-A16. Intracerebral inoculation of one-day old mice with the virus resulted in 16% of the mice showing swollen hind limbs and significantly lower weight gain in comparison to EV-71 B4-infected mice. None of the mice presented with hind leg paralysis typical in all the CV-A16 infected mice. CV-A16 genome sequences were amplified from the CV-A16-infected mice brain but no amplification was obtained from all the EV-71-inoculated mice suggesting that no replication had taken place in the suckling mice brain. Conclusion The findings presented here suggest that EV-71 B3 viruses had CV-A16-liked non-structural gene features at the 3'-end of the genome. Their presence could have affected virulence by affecting the mice general health but was insufficient to confer the EV-71 B3 virus a CV-A16-liked neurovirulence in mice model infection. PMID:16122396

  16. Cytotoxic T cells isolated from the central nervous systems of mice infected with Theiler's virus.

    PubMed Central

    Lindsley, M D; Thiemann, R; Rodriguez, M

    1991-01-01

    Intracerebral inoculation of resistant mice (C57BL/10SNJ) with Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) results in acute encephalitis followed by subsequent clearance of virus from the central nervous system (CNS). In contrast, infection of susceptible mice (SJL/J) results in virus persistence and chronic immune-mediated demyelination. Both resistance and susceptibility to TMEV-induced disease appear to be immune mediated, since immunosuppression results in enhanced encephalitis in resistant mice but diminished demyelination in susceptible mice. The purpose of these experiments was to determine whether anti-TMEV cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) are generated during acute and chronic TMEV infection. Nonspecific lectin-dependent cellular cytotoxicity was used initially to detect the cytolytic potential of lymphocytes infiltrating the CNS irrespective of antigen specificity. Using TMEV-infected targets, H-2-restricted TMEV-specific CTLs of the CD8+ phenotype were demonstrated in lymphocytes from the CNS of susceptible and resistant mice, arguing against the hypothesis that the ability to generate CD8+ CTLs mediates resistance. In chronically infected SJL/J mice, TMEV-specific CTL activity was detected in the CNS as late as 226 days postinfection. These experiments demonstrate that virus-specific CTLs are present in the CNS during both acute and chronic TMEV infection. Anti-TMEV CTLs in the CNS of chronically infected SJL/J mice may play a role in demyelination through their ability to lyse TMEV-infected glial cells. PMID:1658365

  17. Cytotoxic T cells isolated from the central nervous systems of mice infected with Theiler's virus.

    PubMed

    Lindsley, M D; Thiemann, R; Rodriguez, M

    1991-12-01

    Intracerebral inoculation of resistant mice (C57BL/10SNJ) with Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) results in acute encephalitis followed by subsequent clearance of virus from the central nervous system (CNS). In contrast, infection of susceptible mice (SJL/J) results in virus persistence and chronic immune-mediated demyelination. Both resistance and susceptibility to TMEV-induced disease appear to be immune mediated, since immunosuppression results in enhanced encephalitis in resistant mice but diminished demyelination in susceptible mice. The purpose of these experiments was to determine whether anti-TMEV cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) are generated during acute and chronic TMEV infection. Nonspecific lectin-dependent cellular cytotoxicity was used initially to detect the cytolytic potential of lymphocytes infiltrating the CNS irrespective of antigen specificity. Using TMEV-infected targets, H-2-restricted TMEV-specific CTLs of the CD8+ phenotype were demonstrated in lymphocytes from the CNS of susceptible and resistant mice, arguing against the hypothesis that the ability to generate CD8+ CTLs mediates resistance. In chronically infected SJL/J mice, TMEV-specific CTL activity was detected in the CNS as late as 226 days postinfection. These experiments demonstrate that virus-specific CTLs are present in the CNS during both acute and chronic TMEV infection. Anti-TMEV CTLs in the CNS of chronically infected SJL/J mice may play a role in demyelination through their ability to lyse TMEV-infected glial cells.

  18. Nonspecific immune responses and mechanisms of resistance to Eimeria papillata infections in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Schito, M L; Barta, J R

    1997-01-01

    Severe combined immunodeficient (SCID)-beige mice inoculated with the intracellular parasite Eimeria papillata produced significantly more oocysts during primary infections than inoculated immunodeficient SCID mice. Therefore, the addition of the beige mutation, which detrimentally affects neutrophil and natural killer (NK) cell functions, enhanced the parasites' ability to reproduce within the small intestine. To identify which of these two cell types is responsible for a protective immune response during primary infection, the following groups of mice were inoculated: (i) SCID mice depleted of neutrophils with antigranulocyte monoclonal antibody (RB6-8C5), (ii) C57BL/6 mice depleted of NK cells with the anti-NK-1.1 monoclonal antibody (PK136), and (iii) transgenic Tg epsilon26++ mice (T and NK cell deficient). To identify the mechanisms of immunity during primary and secondary infections, gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) knockout and perforin knockout mice were inoculated. Oocyst output was found to be significantly higher during primary infection for mice depleted of NK cells by administration of anti-NK-1.1 antibodies, for Tg epsilon26++ mice, and for IFN-gamma knockout mice. During secondary infections, only perforin knockout mice produced significantly more oocysts compared to control mice. Our observations suggest that NK cells inhibit E. papillata oocyst output during primary infection by the production of IFN-gamma and that this inhibition is independent of perforin. Immunity to reinfection does not require IFN-gamma but appears to be mediated, at least in part, by a perforin-dependent mechanism. PMID:9234770

  19. Gnotobiotic mouse model of phage–bacterial host dynamics in the human gut

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, Alejandro; Wu, Meng; McNulty, Nathan P.; Rohwer, Forest L.; Gordon, Jeffrey I.

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial viruses (phages) are the most abundant biological group on Earth and are more genetically diverse than their bacterial prey/hosts. To characterize their role as agents shaping gut microbial community structure, adult germ-free mice were colonized with a consortium of 15 sequenced human bacterial symbionts, 13 of which harbored one or more predicted prophages. One member, Bacteroides cellulosilyticus WH2, was represented by a library of isogenic transposon mutants that covered 90% of its genes. Once assembled, the community was subjected to a staged phage attack with a pool of live or heat-killed virus-like particles (VLPs) purified from the fecal microbiota of five healthy humans. Shotgun sequencing of DNA from the input pooled VLP preparation plus shotgun sequencing of gut microbiota samples and purified fecal VLPs from the gnotobiotic mice revealed a reproducible nonsimultaneous pattern of attack extending over a 25-d period that involved five phages, none described previously. This system allowed us to (i) correlate increases in specific phages present in the pooled VLPs with reductions in the representation of particular bacterial taxa, (ii) provide evidence that phage resistance occurred because of ecological or epigenetic factors, (iii) track the origin of each of the five phages among the five human donors plus the extent of their genome variation between and within recipient mice, and (iv) establish the dramatic in vivo fitness advantage that a locus within a B. cellulosilyticus prophage confers upon its host. Together, these results provide a defined community-wide view of phage–bacterial host dynamics in the gut. PMID:24259713

  20. EFFICACY OF NITAZOXANIDE AGAINST Toxocara canis: LARVAL RECOVERY AND HUMORAL IMMUNE RESPONSE IN EXPERIMENTALLY INFECTED MICE.

    PubMed

    Lescano, Susana A Zevallos; Santos, Sergio Vieira dos; Assis, Jesiel Maurício Lemos; Chieffi, Pedro Paulo

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy of nitazoxanide (NTZ) against toxocariasis was investigated in an experimental murine model and results were compared to those obtained using mebendazole. Sixty male BALB/c mice, aged six to eight weeks-old, were divided into groups of 10 each; fifty were orally infected with 300 larvaed eggs of T. canis and grouped as follows, G I: infected untreated mice; G II: infected mice treated with MBZ (15 mg/kg/day) 10 days postinfection (dpi); G III: infected mice treated with NTZ (20 mg/kg/day) 10 dpi; G IV: infected mice treated with MBZ 60 dpi; G V: infected mice treated with NTZ 60 dpi; GVI: control group comprising uninfected mice. Mice were bled via retro-orbital plexus on four occasions between 30 and 120 dpi. Sera were processed using the ELISA technique to detect IgG anti- Toxocara antibodies. At 120 dpi, mice were sacrificed for larval recovery in the CNS, liver, lungs, kidneys, eyes and carcass. Results showed similar levels of anti- Toxocara IgG antibodies among mice infected but not submitted to treatment and groups treated with MBZ or NTZ, 10 and 60 dpi. Larval recovery showed similar values in groups treated with NTZ and MBZ 10 dpi. MBZ showed better efficacy 60 dpi, with a 72.6% reduction in the parasite load compared with NTZ, which showed only 46.5% reduction. We conclude that administration of these anthelmintics did not modify the humoral response in experimental infection by T. canis. No parasitological cure was observed with either drug; however, a greater reduction in parasite load was achieved following treatment with MBZ. PMID:26422159

  1. EFFICACY OF NITAZOXANIDE AGAINST Toxocara canis: LARVAL RECOVERY AND HUMORAL IMMUNE RESPONSE IN EXPERIMENTALLY INFECTED MICE

    PubMed Central

    LESCANO, Susana A. Zevallos; dos SANTOS, Sergio Vieira; ASSIS, Jesiel Maurício Lemos; CHIEFFI, Pedro Paulo

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The efficacy of nitazoxanide (NTZ) against toxocariasis was investigated in an experimental murine model and results were compared to those obtained using mebendazole. Sixty male BALB/c mice, aged six to eight weeks-old, were divided into groups of 10 each; fifty were orally infected with 300 larvaed eggs of T. canisand grouped as follows, G I: infected untreated mice; G II: infected mice treated with MBZ (15 mg/kg/day) 10 days postinfection (dpi); G III: infected mice treated with NTZ (20 mg/kg/day) 10 dpi; G IV: infected mice treated with MBZ 60 dpi; G V: infected mice treated with NTZ 60 dpi; GVI: control group comprising uninfected mice. Mice were bled via retro-orbital plexus on four occasions between 30 and 120 dpi. Sera were processed using the ELISA technique to detect IgG anti- Toxocaraantibodies. At 120 dpi, mice were sacrificed for larval recovery in the CNS, liver, lungs, kidneys, eyes and carcass. Results showed similar levels of anti- ToxocaraIgG antibodies among mice infected but not submitted to treatment and groups treated with MBZ or NTZ, 10 and 60 dpi. Larval recovery showed similar values in groups treated with NTZ and MBZ 10 dpi. MBZ showed better efficacy 60 dpi, with a 72.6% reduction in the parasite load compared with NTZ, which showed only 46.5% reduction. We conclude that administration of these anthelmintics did not modify the humoral response in experimental infection by T. canis. No parasitological cure was observed with either drug; however, a greater reduction in parasite load was achieved following treatment with MBZ. PMID:26422159

  2. Pathogenesis of acute murine cytomegalovirus infection in resistant and susceptible strains of mice.

    PubMed

    Mercer, J A; Spector, D H

    1986-02-01

    We have characterized the progress of acute murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) infection in the spleen, liver, and salivary gland of susceptible (BALB/c) and resistant (C3H) strains of mice after intraperitoneal inoculation. Viral replication was analyzed by virus titration, infectious-center assays, and in situ cytohybridization with cloned subgenomic fragments of the MCMV genome. The most striking differences between strains were observed in the spleen. At 24 h postinfection (p.i.), both strains had a similar number of infected spleen cells. At 48 h p.i., BALB/c mice showed marked dissemination of the splenic infection which continued until 96 h p.i. In contrast, the number of infected C3H spleen cells did not increase from the 24-h level but declined later on. This early block in dissemination of MCMV infection in C3H mouse spleens was not a result of the H-2k haplotype, as BALB.K (H-2k) mice, which show an intermediate level of resistance to MCMV infection, exhibited dissemination of the infection between 24 and 48 h p.i., albeit at a reduced level. However, between 72 and 96 h p.i., we observed a decline in the number of infected spleen cells in BALB.K mice similar to that observed in C3H mice. We also demonstrated by Southern blot analysis of DNA from the infected spleen cells that the termini of the MCMV genome fuse after in vivo infection.

  3. Tularemia among Free-Ranging Mice without Infection of Exposed Humans, Switzerland, 2012

    PubMed Central

    Origgi, Francesco C.; König, Barbara; Lindholm, Anna K.; Mayor, Désirée

    2015-01-01

    The animals primarily infected by Francisella tularensis are rapidly consumed by scavengers, hindering ecologic investigation of the bacterium. We describe a 2012 natural tularemia epizootic among house mice in Switzerland and the assessment of infection of exposed humans. The humans were not infected, but the epizootic coincided with increased reports of human cases in the area. PMID:25531919

  4. Tularemia among free-ranging mice without infection of exposed humans, Switzerland, 2012.

    PubMed

    Origgi, Francesco C; König, Barbara; Lindholm, Anna K; Mayor, Désirée; Pilo, Paola

    2015-01-01

    The animals primarily infected by Francisella tularensis are rapidly consumed by scavengers, hindering ecologic investigation of the bacterium. We describe a 2012 natural tularemia epizootic among house mice in Switzerland and the assessment of infection of exposed humans. The humans were not infected, but the epizootic coincided with increased reports of human cases in the area.

  5. Metastatic Listeria monocytogenes infection of the peritoneum in mice with cyclosporine a-induced peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Prats, N; López, S; Domingo, M; Briones, V; Domínguez, L; Marco, A J

    2002-01-01

    Inoculation of mice with Listeria monocytogenes intragastrically or by parenteral routes has not been reported to cause peritonitis. In this study, however, severe listerial peritonitis was induced in mice infected subcutaneously and treated intraperitoneally with cyclosporin A (Cs A) in an oil carrier. In both uninfected and listeria-infected mice, intraperitoneal administration of Cs A consistently produced overexpression of P-selectin in the peritoneal microvasculature and pyogranulomatous inflammation of the peritoneum, suggesting that Cs A causes endothelial damage. We suggest that in listeria-infected mice the non-specific irritant peritonitis induced by the intraperitoneal administration of Cs A results in transfer of listeria-infected phagocytes from the liver and spleen to the peritoneal microvasculature, producing metastatic infection.

  6. Aspirin Treatment of Mice Infected with Trypanosoma cruzi and Implications for the Pathogenesis of Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Shankar; Machado, Fabiana S.; Huang, Huang; Oz, Helieh S.; Jelicks, Linda A.; Prado, Cibele M.; Koba, Wade; Fine, Eugene J.; Zhao, Dazhi; Factor, Stephen M.; Collado, J. Elias; Weiss, Louis M.

    2011-01-01

    Chagas disease, caused by infection with Trypanosoma cruzi, is an important cause of cardiovascular disease. It is increasingly clear that parasite-derived prostaglandins potently modulate host response and disease progression. Here, we report that treatment of experimental T. cruzi infection (Brazil strain) beginning 5 days post infection (dpi) with aspirin (ASA) increased mortality (2-fold) and parasitemia (12-fold). However, there were no differences regarding histopathology or cardiac structure or function. Delayed treatment with ASA (20 mg/kg) beginning 60 dpi did not increase parasitemia or mortality but improved ejection fraction. ASA treatment diminished the profile of parasite- and host-derived circulating prostaglandins in infected mice. To distinguish the effects of ASA on the parasite and host bio-synthetic pathways we infected cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) null mice with the Brazil-strain of T. cruzi. Infected COX-1 null mice displayed a reduction in circulating levels of thromboxane (TX)A2 and prostaglandin (PG)F2α. Parasitemia was increased in COX-1 null mice compared with parasitemia and mortality in ASA-treated infected mice indicating the effects of ASA on mortality potentially had little to do with inhibition of prostaglandin metabolism. Expression of SOCS-2 was enhanced, and TRAF6 and TNFα reduced, in the spleens of infected ASA-treated mice. Ablation of the initial innate response to infection may cause the increased mortality in ASA-treated mice as the host likely succumbs more quickly without the initiation of the “cytokine storm” during acute infection. We conclude that ASA, through both COX inhibition and other “off-target” effects, modulates the progression of acute and chronic Chagas disease. Thus, eicosanoids present during acute infection may act as immunomodulators aiding the transition to and maintenance of the chronic phase of the disease. A deeper understanding of the mechanism of ASA action may provide clues to the differences

  7. Detection of Corynebacterium bovis infection in athymic nude mice from a research animal facility in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Hyoun; Kim, Dong-Su; Han, Ju-Hee; Chang, Seo-Na; Kim, Kyung-Sul; Seok, Seung-Hyeok; Kim, Dong-Jae; Park, Jong-Hwan; Park, Jae-Hak

    2014-12-01

    Corynebacterium (C.) bovis infection in nude mice causes hyperkeratosis and weight loss and has been reported worldwide but not in Korea. In 2011, nude mice from an animal facility in Korea were found to have white flakes on their dorsal skin. Histopathological testing revealed that the mice had hyperkeratosis and Gram-positive bacteria were found in the skin. We identified isolated bacteria from the skin lesions as C. bovis using PCR and 16S rRNA sequencing. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of C. bovis infection in nude mice from Korea.

  8. Pulmonary Immunostimulation with MALP-2 in Influenza Virus-Infected Mice Increases Survival after Pneumococcal Superinfection

    PubMed Central

    Reppe, Katrin; Radünzel, Peter; Dietert, Kristina; Tschernig, Thomas; Wolff, Thorsten; Hammerschmidt, Sven; Gruber, Achim D.; Suttorp, Norbert

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary infection with influenza virus is frequently complicated by bacterial superinfection, with Streptococcus pneumoniae being the most prevalent causal pathogen and hence often associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. Local immunosuppression due to pulmonary influenza virus infection has been identified as a major cause of the pathogenesis of secondary bacterial lung infection. Thus, specific local stimulation of the pulmonary innate immune system in subjects with influenza virus infection might improve the host defense against secondary bacterial pathogens. In the present study, we examined the effect of pulmonary immunostimulation with Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR-2)-stimulating macrophage-activating lipopeptide 2 (MALP-2) in influenza A virus (IAV)-infected mice on the course of subsequent pneumococcal superinfection. Female C57BL/6N mice infected with IAV were treated with MALP-2 on day 5 and challenged with S. pneumoniae on day 6. Intratracheal MALP-2 application increased proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine release and enhanced the recruitment of leukocytes, mainly neutrophils, into the alveolar space of IAV-infected mice, without detectable systemic side effects. Local pulmonary instillation of MALP-2 in IAV-infected mice 24 h before transnasal pneumococcal infection considerably reduced the bacterial number in the lung tissue without inducing exaggerated inflammation. The pulmonary viral load was not altered by MALP-2. Clinically, MALP-2 treatment of IAV-infected mice increased survival rates and reduced hypothermia and body weight loss after pneumococcal superinfection compared to those of untreated coinfected mice. In conclusion, local immunostimulation with MALP-2 in influenza virus-infected mice improved pulmonary bacterial elimination and increased survival after subsequent pneumococcal superinfection. PMID:26371127

  9. Latent Herpes Simplex Virus Infections in Sensory Ganglia of Hairless Mice Prevented by Acycloguanosine†

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Richard J.; Friedman-Kien, Alvin E.; DeStefano, Eugene

    1979-01-01

    Acycloguanosine (ACG) was able to prevent the fatal outcome of herpes simplex virus-induced skin infections of the lumbosacral or orofacila area in hairless mice. Topical ACG treatment was more effective than systemic treatment in preventing the evolution of skin lesions. Acute ganglionic infections in the trigeminal ganglia were prevented by ACG, and latent ganglionic infections did not become established when the ACG treatment was initiated 3 h after infection. Serum antibody titers were, on the average, eight times higher in mice which developed latent ganglionic infections after ACG treatment than in mice without evidence of herpes simplex virus latency in ganglia. Reinoculation of ACG-treated mice at a site different from that of the primary inoculation did not lead to the establishment of a second latent infection with the homologous virus type when a latent infection was already present. In mice without evidence of latent infection after the primary inoculation, a latent infection at the site of reinoculation became established in 25% of the animals. PMID:230784

  10. Impact of gold nanoparticles on brain of mice infected with Schistosoma mansoni.

    PubMed

    Dkhil, Mohamed A; Bauomy, Amira A; Diab, Marwa S M; Wahab, Rizwan; Delic, Denis; Al-Quraishy, Saleh

    2015-10-01

    Schistosomiasis is a condition characterized by high rates of morbidity and cognitive impairment. It afflicts many people in tropical and sub-tropical countries. Our study aimed to investigate the protective role of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) on the brain of mice infected with Schistosoma mansoni. Characterizations of GNPs were determined by using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Three doses of GNPs (0.25, 0.5, and 1.0 mg/kg body weight) were used to treat animals after S. mansoni infection. The infection induced impairments in histological picture as a result of schistosome infection resulting in a disturbance in the content of the brain neurotransmitters, norepinephrine (NE), and dopamine (DA). Also, the infection induced significant reduction in glutathione level; oppositely, the levels of nitric oxide and malondialdehyde were increased significantly. In addition, S. mansoni was able to disregulate the infected mice brain Cacnb4, Cabp4, Vdac3, Glrb, and Adam23 messenger RNA (mRNA). On the other hand, treatment of mice with GNPs could alleviate the histological impairments, the changes in the content of NE and DA, and the brain oxidative damage. Also, GNPs could regulate the gene expression due to S. mansoni infection. Generally, GNPs could decrease the neurooxidative stress and regulated the gene expression in the brain of infected mice. Consequently, our results revealed an anti-neuroschistosomal effect of GNPs in mice infected with S. mansoni. PMID:26122996

  11. Perturbation of the intestinal microbiota of mice infected with Cryptosporidium parvum.

    PubMed

    Ras, Refaat; Huynh, Kevin; Desoky, Enas; Badawy, Ahmed; Widmer, Giovanni

    2015-07-01

    Understanding the interaction between the intestinal microbiota (microbiome) and enteric pathogens is of interest in the development of alternative treatments that do not rely on chemotherapy and do not lead to drug resistance. We undertook research in a rodent model of cryptosporidiosis to assess whether the bacterial gut microbiota is impacted by infection with the protozoan pathogen Cryptosporidium parvum. The profile of the faecal bacterial microbiota in infected and uninfected animals was compared using 16S amplicon sequencing. In four independent experiments, the intestinal microbiota of infected mice differed from that of uninfected animals, regardless of the C. parvum isolate used to infect mice. The use of replicated treatment groups demonstrated that microbiota divergence between treatments was driven by the infection and did not result from spontaneous changes in the intestinal ecosystem unrelated to the infection. Microbiota perturbation induced by C. parvum appeared to be reversible, as we observed a tendency for the phylogenetic distance between infected and uninfected mice to diminish after mice cleared the infection. As mice infected with C. parvum do not develop diarrhoea, these observations indicate that microbiota perturbation results from other mechanisms than an accelerated movement of gut content. PMID:25913477

  12. Induction of protective immunity against Chlamydia muridarum intracervical infection in DBA/1j mice.

    PubMed

    Tang, Lingli; Yang, Zhangsheng; Zhang, Hongbo; Zhou, Zhiguang; Arulanandam, Bernard; Baseman, Joel; Zhong, Guangming

    2014-03-10

    We previously reported that intracervical inoculation with Chlamydia muridarum induced hydrosalpinx in DBA/1j mice, but intravaginal inoculation failed to do so. In the current study, we found unexpectedly that intrabursal inoculation of live chlamydial organisms via the oviduct failed to induce significant hydrosalpinx. We further tested whether primary infection via intravaginal or intrabursal inoculation could induce protective immunity against hydrosalpinx following intracervical challenge infection. Mice infected intravaginally with C. muridarum were fully protected from developing hydrosalpinx, while intrabursal inoculation offered partial protection. We then compared immune responses induced by the two genital tract inoculations. Both inoculations induced high IFNγ and IL-17 T cell responses although the ratio of IgG2a versus IgG1 in intravaginally infected mice was significantly higher than in mice infected intrabursally. When the antigen-specificities of antibody responses were compared, both groups of mice dominantly recognized 24 C. muridarum antigens, while each group preferentially recognized unique sets of antigens. Thus, we have demonstrated that intrabursal inoculation is neither effective for causing hydrosalpinx nor efficient in inducing protective immunity in DBA/1j mice. Intravaginal immunization, in combination with intracervical challenge infection in DBA/1j mice, can be a useful model for understanding mechanisms of chlamydial pathogenicity and protective immunity.

  13. Impaired Bacterial Clearance in Type 3 Deiodinase-Deficient Mice Infected with Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Boelen, Anita; Kwakkel, Joan; Wieland, Catharina W.; St. Germain, Donald L.; Fliers, Eric; Hernandez, Arturo

    2009-01-01

    The activation of type 3 deiodinase (D3) has been postulated to play a role in the reduction of thyroid hormone levels during illness. Using a mouse model of acute bacterial infection, we have recently demonstrated marked D3 immunostaining in neutrophils infiltrating infected organs. These observations suggest a possible additional role for this enzyme in the innate immune response. To further assess the role of D3 in the response to acute bacterial infection, we used null D3 [D3 knockout (D3KO)] and wild type (WT) mice and infected them with Streptococcus pneumoniae. Marked reductions in serum thyroid hormone levels were observed both in D3KO and WT mice. Infection resulted also in a decrease in liver D1 activity in WT, but not in infected D3KO mice. Upon infection, pulmonary neutrophilic influx (measured by myeloperoxidase levels) and IL-6 and TNF concentrations increased equally in D3KO and WT mice, and histological examination of infected mice showed similar pulmonary inflammation in both strains. However, D3KO animals demonstrated significantly higher bacterial load in blood, lung, and spleen compared with WT mice. We conclude that 1) D3 is not required to generate the systemic manifestations of the nonthyroidal illness syndrome in this model; 2) the lack of D3 does not affect the extent of pulmonary inflammation; and 3) bacterial outgrowth in blood, spleen, and lung of D3KO mice is significantly higher than in WT mice. Our results suggest a protective role for D3 in the defense against acute bacterial infection, probably by reinforcing the microbial killing capacity of neutrophils. PMID:19036878

  14. Co-infection with Plasmodium berghei and Trypanosoma brucei increases severity of malaria and trypanosomiasis in mice.

    PubMed

    Ademola, Isaiah Oluwafemi; Odeniran, Paul Olalekan

    2016-07-01

    Individuals in natural populations may be infected with multiple different parasites at a time. These parasites may interact with each other or act independently in the host, and this may result to varying outcomes on host health and survival. This study therefore aimed at investigating the health impact of co-infection of mice with Plasmodium berghei and Trypanosoma brucei. Forty Swiss albino mice (14-17g) were divided into four groups of ten. Mice in groups A and B received 10(6)P. berghei and groups B and C 10(5)T. brucei, while group D were uninfected. The co-infected mice had higher P. berghei and T. brucei parasitaemia, compared with the mono-infected mice. The co-infected mice had significantly (p<0.05) lower survival rate compared with the mono-infected mice. Co-infection of mice with P. berghei and T. brucei resulted in rapid P. berghei and T. brucei development and increased parasitaemia. The leukocyte numbers significantly (p<0.05) reduced on days 12 and 15 post infection among P. berghei infected mice, in the presence or absence of T. brucei. Anaemia and hypoglycaemia was more severe in the co-infected mice. Therefore, co-infection of mice with P. berghei and T. brucei may increase pathologic impact to the host by increasing parasitaemia. PMID:27021269

  15. Kinetics of Immune Responses in Deer Mice Experimentally Infected with Sin Nombre Virus

    PubMed Central

    Acuña-Retamar, Mariana; Feinstein, Shira; Prescott, Joseph; Torres-Perez, Fernando; Podell, Brendan; Peters, Staci; Ye, Chunyan; Black, William C.; Hjelle, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Deer mice are the principal reservoir hosts of Sin Nombre virus, the etiologic agent of most hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome cases in North America. Infection of deer mice results in persistence without conspicuous pathology, and most, if not all, infected mice remain infected for life, with periods of viral shedding. The kinetics of viral load, histopathology, virus distribution, and immune gene expression in deer mice were examined. Viral antigen was detected as early as 5 days postinfection and peaked on day 15 in the lungs, hearts, kidneys, and livers. Viral RNA levels varied substantially but peaked on day 15 in the lungs and heart, and antinucleocapsid IgG antibodies appeared in some animals on day 10, but a strong neutralizing antibody response failed to develop during the 20-day experiment. No clinical signs of disease were observed in any of the infected deer mice. Most genes were repressed on day 2, suggesting a typical early downregulation of gene expression often observed in viral infections. Several chemokine and cytokine genes were elevated, and markers of a T cell response occurred but then declined days later. Splenic transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) expression was elevated early in infection, declined, and then was elevated again late in infection. Together, these data suggest that a subtle immune response that fails to clear the virus occurs in deer mice. PMID:22787210

  16. Experimental oral infection of bluetongue virus serotype 8 in type I interferon receptor-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Calvo-Pinilla, Eva; Nieto, José María; Ortego, Javier

    2010-11-01

    The identification of transmission routes for bluetongue virus (BTV) is essential to improve the control of the disease. Although BTV is primarily transmitted by several species of Culicoides biting midges, there has been evidence of transplacental and oral transmission. We now report that IFNAR((-/-)) mice are susceptible to oral infection by BTV-8. Viraemia, clinical manifestations and tissue lesions are similar to those in intravenously infected mice. In addition, we show that the oral cavity and oesophagus are susceptible to BTV infection and replication, suggesting that these organs are possible entry routes during BTV oral infection.

  17. Modulation of cellular immune response by orbifloxacin in noninfected and E. coli-infected mice.

    PubMed

    Szczypka, Marianna; Gaweda, Bartosz; Obmińska-Mrukowicz, Bozena

    2005-01-01

    The studies were conducted on noninfected and Escherichia (E) coli-infected mice treated with orbifloxacin administered orally 10 times at 24-hr intervals at a dose of 2.5 mg/kg. Orbifloxacin did not change the activity of peritoneal macrophages in noninfected mice. Administration of orbifloxacin in E. coli-infected mice modulated the effects of infection on the percentage of phagocyting macrophages, the percentage of NBT-positive cells, and nitric oxide production. Orbifloxacin did not affect the synthesis and release of interleukin-1 by macrophages. Orbifloxacin exerted a modulating effect on the subsets of lymphocytes in thymus, spleen, and mesenteric lymph node cells in noninfected and E. coli-infected mice.

  18. Severe Leukopenia and Dysregulated Erythropoiesis in SCID Mice Persistently Infected with the Parvovirus Minute Virus of Mice

    PubMed Central

    Segovia, José C.; Gallego, Jesús M.; Bueren, Juan A.; Almendral, José M.

    1999-01-01

    Parvovirus minute virus of mice strain i (MVMi) infects committed granulocyte-macrophage CFU and erythroid burst-forming unit (CFU-GM and BFU-E, respectively) and pluripotent (CFU-S) mouse hematopoietic progenitors in vitro. To study the effects of MVMi infection on mouse hemopoiesis in the absence of a specific immune response, adult SCID mice were inoculated by the natural intranasal route of infection and monitored for hematopoietic and viral multiplication parameters. Infected animals developed a very severe viral-dose-dependent leukopenia by 30 days postinfection (d.p.i.) that led to death within 100 days, even though the number of circulating platelets and erythrocytes remained unaltered throughout the disease. In the bone marrow of every lethally inoculated mouse, a deep suppression of CFU-GM and BFU-E clonogenic progenitors occurring during the 20- to 35-d.p.i. interval corresponded with the maximal MVMi production, as determined by the accumulation of virus DNA replicative intermediates and the yield of infectious virus. Viral productive infection was limited to a small subset of primitive cells expressing the major replicative viral antigen (NS-1 protein), the numbers of which declined with the disease. However, the infection induced a sharp and lasting unbalance of the marrow hemopoiesis, denoted by a marked depletion of granulomacrophagic cells (GR-1+ and MAC-1+) concomitant with a twofold absolute increase in erythroid cells (TER-119+). A stimulated definitive erythropoiesis in the infected mice was further evidenced by a 12-fold increase per femur of recognizable proerythroblasts, a quantitative apoptosis confined to uninfected TER-119+ cells, as well as by a 4-fold elevation in the number of circulating reticulocytes. Therefore, MVMi targets and suppresses primitive hemopoietic progenitors leading to a very severe leukopenia, but compensatory mechanisms are mounted specifically by the erythroid lineage that maintain an effective erythropoiesis. The

  19. Lupus-prone mice fail to raise antigen-specific T cell responses to intracellular infection.

    PubMed

    Lieberman, Linda A; Tsokos, George C

    2014-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is characterized by multiple cellular abnormalities culminating in the production of autoantibodies and immune complexes, resulting in tissue inflammation and organ damage. Besides active disease, the main cause of morbidity and mortality in SLE patients is infections, including those from opportunistic pathogens. To understand the failure of the immune system to fend off infections in systemic autoimmunity, we infected the lupus-prone murine strains B6.lpr and BXSB with the intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii and survival was monitored. Furthermore, mice were sacrificed days post infection and parasite burden and cellular immune responses such as cytokine production and cell activation were assessed. Mice from both strains succumbed to infection acutely and we observed greater susceptibility to infection in older mice. Increased parasite burden and a defective antigen-specific IFN-gamma response were observed in the lupus-prone mice. Furthermore, T cell:dendritic cell co-cultures established the presence of an intrinsic T cell defect responsible for the decreased antigen-specific response. An antigen-specific defect in IFN- gamma production prevents lupus-prone mice from clearing infection effectively. This study reveals the first cellular insight into the origin of increased susceptibility to infections in SLE disease and may guide therapeutic approaches.

  20. Impact of benznidazole on infection course in mice experimentally infected with Trypanosoma cruzi I, II, and IV.

    PubMed

    Gruendling, Ana Paula; Massago, Miyoko; Teston, Ana Paula M; Monteiro, Wuelton M; Kaneshima, Edilson N; Araújo, Silvana M; Gomes, Mônica L; Barbosa, Maria das Graças V; Toledo, Max Jean O

    2015-06-01

    American trypanosomiasis is an emerging zoonosis in the Brazilian Amazon. Studies on benznidazole (BZ) chemotherapy with Trypanosoma cruzi from this region have great relevance, given the different discrete typing units (DTUs) that infect humans in the Amazon and other regions of Brazil. We performed a parasitological, histopathological, and molecular analysis of mice inoculated with strains of T. cruzi I, II, and IV that were BZ-treated during the acute phase of infection. Groups of Swiss mice were inoculated; 13 received oral BZ, whereas the other 13 comprised the untreated controls. Unlike parasitemia, the infectivity and mortality did not vary among the DTUs. Trypanosoma cruzi DNA was detected in all tissues analyzed and the proportion of organs parasitized varied with the parasite DTU. The BZ treatment reduced the most parasitological parameters, tissue parasitism and the inflammatory processes at all infection stages and for all DTUs. However, the number of significant reductions varied according to the DTU and infection phase.

  1. Hepatitis E Virus (HEV) Genotype 3 Infection of Human Liver Chimeric Mice as a Model for Chronic HEV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Pas, Suzan D.; van der Net, Guido; de Man, Robert A.; Osterhaus, Albert D. M. E.; Haagmans, Bart L.; Boonstra, Andre

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Genotype 3 (gt3) hepatitis E virus (HEV) infections are emerging in Western countries. Immunosuppressed patients are at risk of chronic HEV infection and progressive liver damage, but no adequate model system currently mimics this disease course. Here we explore the possibilities of in vivo HEV studies in a human liver chimeric mouse model (uPA+/+Nod-SCID-IL2Rγ−/−) next to the A549 cell culture system, using HEV RNA-positive EDTA-plasma, feces, or liver biopsy specimens from 8 immunocompromised patients with chronic gt3 HEV. HEV from feces- or liver-derived inocula showed clear virus propagation within 2 weeks after inoculation onto A549 cells, compared to slow or no HEV propagation of HEV RNA-positive, EDTA-plasma samples. These in vitro HEV infectivity differences were mirrored in human-liver chimeric mice after intravenous (i.v.) inoculation of selected samples. HEV RNA levels of up to 8 log IU HEV RNA/gram were consistently present in 100% of chimeric mouse livers from week 2 to week 14 after inoculation with human feces- or liver-derived HEV. Feces and bile of infected mice contained moderate to large amounts of HEV RNA, while HEV viremia was low and inconsistently detected. Mouse-passaged HEV could subsequently be propagated for up to 100 days in vitro. In contrast, cell culture-derived or seronegative EDTA-plasma-derived HEV was not infectious in inoculated animals. In conclusion, the infectivity of feces-derived human HEV is higher than that of EDTA-plasma-derived HEV both in vitro and in vivo. Persistent HEV gt3 infections in chimeric mice show preferential viral shedding toward mouse bile and feces, paralleling the course of infection in humans. IMPORTANCE Hepatitis E virus (HEV) genotype 3 infections are emerging in Western countries and are of great concern for immunosuppressed patients at risk for developing chronic HEV infection. Lack of adequate model systems for chronic HEV infection hampers studies on HEV infectivity and transmission

  2. Progression of intravaginal infection by herpes simplex-2 in genetically athymic mice.

    PubMed

    Sanjuan, N A

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to study the pathogenesis of wild-type Herpes simplex-2 (HSV-2) primary intravaginal (IVAG) infection in genetically athymic (nude) mice. Nude (nu/nu) N: NIH(S) and Balb/c mice, as well as their euthymic counterparts were IVAG infected with 5 x 10(5) pfu of HSV-2. The progression of the infection was followed by HSV-2 immunolabeling using the peroxidase-antiperoxidase technique in tissue sections of the whole body, electron microscopy, and viremia titration at two different time points. 70% of athymic NIH mice, 30% of euthymic NIH mice, and 80% of both athymic and euthymic Balb/c mice developed acute vulvovaginitis and died between 8-10 days post-infection (pi). Viremia was not detected in either athymic or euthymic mice. HSV-2 replicated in the vulvovaginal, vesical and perianal epithelia, then progressed towards the central nervous system mainly along autonomic nerves and ganglia. HSV-2 antigens were not detected in liver, spleen, kidney, skin, heart, lung or bone marrow. The conclusion is that the T-cell immune response seems to limit the IVAG infection of NIH mice at the inoculation site, but is not involved in preventing HSV-2 dissemination through the blood.

  3. The anti-infective activity of punicalagin against Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar typhimurium in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Guanghui; Feng, Yuqing; Xu, Yunfeng; Wu, Qian; Han, Qi'an; Liang, Xiujun; Yang, Baowei; Wang, Xin; Xia, Xiaodong

    2015-07-01

    Punicalagin, a major bioactive component of pomegranate peel, has been proven to have antioxidant, antiviral, anti-apoptosis, and hepatoprotective properties. The aim of this study was to investigate the anti-infective activity of punicalagin in a mouse model. C57BL/6 mice were initially challenged with Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar typhimurium (S. typhimurium) and then treated with punicalagin. Food and water consumption and body weight were recorded daily. On day 8 post infection, the mice were sacrificed to examine pathogen counts in tissues, hematological parameters, cytokine levels, and histological changes. Compared to mice only infected with S. typhimurium, punicalagin-treated mice had more food consumption and less weight loss. A higher survival rate and lower counts of viable S. typhimurium in feces, liver, spleen, and kidney were found in the punicalagin-treated mice. The enzyme linked immunosorbent assay showed that the levels of IL-6, IL-10, and IFN-γ in serum and the spleen and TNF-α in serum, the spleen and the liver were reduced by punicalagin. Moreover, more neutrophils and higher neutrophil-to-mononuclear cell ratios in the punicalagin-treated mice were observed. Histological examination showed that punicalagin protected cells in the liver and spleen from hemorrhagic necrosis. It is concluded that punicalagin has a beneficial effect against S. typhimurium infection in mice. The anti-infective properties, together with other nutritionally beneficial effects, make punicalagin a promising supplement in human food or animal feeds to prevent disease associated with S. typhimurium.

  4. Peripheral effects induced in BALB/c mice infected with DENV by the intracerebral route.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, E R A; Amorim, J F S; Paes, M V; Azevedo, A S; Gonçalves, A J S; Costa, S M; Mantuano-Barradas, M; Póvoa, T F; de Meis, J; Basílio-de-Oliveira, C A; Nogueira, A C M A; Alves, A M B

    2016-02-01

    The lack of an immunocompetent animal model for dengue mimicking the disease in humans is a limitation for advances in this field. Inoculation by intracerebral route of neuroadapted dengue strains in mice is normally lethal and provides a straightforward readout parameter for vaccine testing. However, systemic effects of infection and the immune response elicited in this model remain poorly described. In the present work, BALB/c mice infected by the intracerebral route with neuroadapted DENV2 exhibited several evidences of systemic involvement. DENV-inoculated mice presented virus infective particles in the brain followed by viremia, especially in late stages of infection. Infection induced cellular and humoral responses, with presence of activated T cells in spleen and blood, lymphocyte infiltration and tissue damages in brain and liver, and an increase in serum levels of some pro-inflammatory cytokines. Data highlighted an interplay between the central nervous system commitment and peripheral effects under this experimental condition. PMID:26748331

  5. Differential Lymphocyte and Antibody Responses in Deer Mice Infected with Sin Nombre Hantavirus or Andes Hantavirus

    PubMed Central

    Quackenbush, Sandra; Rovnak, Joel; Haddock, Elaine; Black, William C.; Feldmann, Heinz; Prescott, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS) is a rodent-borne disease with a high case-fatality rate that is caused by several New World hantaviruses. Each pathogenic hantavirus is naturally hosted by a principal rodent species without conspicuous disease and infection is persistent, perhaps for life. Deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) are the natural reservoirs of Sin Nombre virus (SNV), the etiologic agent of most HCPS cases in North America. Deer mice remain infected despite a helper T cell response that leads to high-titer neutralizing antibodies. Deer mice are also susceptible to Andes hantavirus (ANDV), which causes most HCPS cases in South America; however, deer mice clear ANDV. We infected deer mice with SNV or ANDV to identify differences in host responses that might account for this differential outcome. SNV RNA levels were higher in the lungs but not different in the heart, spleen, or kidneys. Most ANDV-infected deer mice had seroconverted 14 days after inoculation, but none of the SNV-infected deer mice had. Examination of lymph node cell antigen recall responses identified elevated immune gene expression in deer mice infected with ANDV and suggested maturation toward a Th2 or T follicular helper phenotype in some ANDV-infected deer mice, including activation of the interleukin 4 (IL-4) pathway in T cells and B cells. These data suggest that the rate of maturation of the immune response is substantially higher and of greater magnitude during ANDV infection, and these differences may account for clearance of ANDV and persistence of SNV. IMPORTANCE Hantaviruses persistently infect their reservoir rodent hosts without pathology. It is unknown how these viruses evade sterilizing immune responses in the reservoirs. We have determined that infection of the deer mouse with its homologous hantavirus, Sin Nombre virus, results in low levels of immune gene expression in antigen-stimulated lymph node cells and a poor antibody response. However, infection

  6. Host Transcriptional Profiles and Immunopathologic Response following Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Min-Kyoung; Park, Hongtae; Shin, Seung Won; Jung, Myunghwan; Lee, Su-Hyung; Kim, Dae-Yong; Yoo, Han Sang

    2015-01-01

    Paratuberculosis or Johne’s disease is a chronic granulomatous enteropathy in ruminants caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) infection. In the present study, we examined the host response to MAP infection in spleens of mice in order to investigate the host immunopathology accompanying host-pathogen interaction. Transcriptional profiles of the MAP-infected mice at 3 and 6 weeks p.i. showed severe histopathological changes, whereas those at 12 weeks p.i. displayed reduced lesion severity in the spleen and liver. MAP-infected mice at 3 and 6 weeks p.i. showed up-regulation of interferon-related genes, scavenger receptor, and complement components, suggesting an initial innate immune reaction, such as macrophage activation, bactericidal activity, and macrophage invasion of MAP. Concurrently, MAP-infected mice at 3 and 6 weeks p.i. were also suggested to express M2 macrophage phenotype with up-regulation of Mrc1, and Marco and down-regulation of MHC class II, Ccr7, and Irf5, and canonical pathways related to the T cell response including ICOS-ICOSL signaling in T helper cells, calcium-induced T lymphocyte apoptosis, and CD28 signaling in T helper cell. These results provide information which furthers the understanding of the immunopathologic response to MAP infection in mice, thereby providing insights valuable for research into the pathogenesis for MAP infection. PMID:26439498

  7. Characterization of human influenza A (H5N1) virus infection in mice: neuro-, pneumo- and adipotropic infection.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, H; Itamura, S; Iwasaki, T; Kurata, T; Tashiro, M

    2000-10-01

    Mice (ddY strain, 4 weeks old) were infected intranasally with the H5N1 influenza viruses A/Hong Kong/156/97 (HK156) and A/Hong Kong/483/97 (HK483) isolated from humans. HK156 and HK483 required 200 and 5 p.f.u. of virus, respectively, to give a 50% lethal dose to the mice when the volume of inoculum was set at 10 microl. Both viruses caused encephalitis and severe bronchopneumonia in infected mice. The severity of lung lesions caused by the viruses was essentially similar, whereas HK483 caused more extensive lesions in the brain than did HK156. This was supported by the results of virus titration of organ homogenates, which showed that the virus titres in brains of HK483-infected mice were more than 100-fold higher than those of HK156-infected mice, while those in lungs were almost equivalent. Both viruses were detected in homogenates of the heart, liver, spleen and kidney and blood of the infected mice. Virus antigen was detected by immunohistology in the heart and liver, albeit sporadically, but caused no degenerative change in these organs. The antigen was not detected in the thymus, spleen, pancreas, kidney or gastrointestinal tract. In contrast, virus antigen was found frequently in adipose tissues attached to those organs. The adipose tissues showed severe degenerative change and the virus titres in the tissues were high and comparable to those in lungs. Thus, infection of HK156 and HK483 in our mouse model was pneumo-, neuro- and adipotropic, but not pantropic. Furthermore, HK483 showed higher neurotropism than HK156, which may account for its higher lethality.

  8. Murine Norovirus Infection Variably Alters Atherosclerosis in Mice Lacking Apolipoprotein E

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Charlie C; Paik, Jisun; Brabb, Thea L; O'Brien, Kevin D; Kim, Jinkyu; Sullivan, Brittany G; Hudkins, Kelly L; Seamons, Audrey; Finley, Jennifer C; Meeker, Stacey M; Maggio-Price, Lillian

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages play a key role in the development of atherosclerosis. Murine noroviruses (MNV) are highly prevalent in research mouse colonies and infect macrophages and dendritic cells. Our laboratory found that MNV4 infection in mice lacking the LDL receptor alters the development of atherosclerosis, potentially confounding research outcomes. Therefore, we investigated whether MNV4 likewise altered atherosclerosis in ApoE−/− mice. In the presence of oxidized LDL, MNV4 infection of ApoE−/− bone marrow-derived macrophages increased the gene expression of the inflammatory markers inducible nitric oxide synthase, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1, and IL6. In addition, proteins involved in cholesterol transport were altered in MNV4-infected ApoE−/− bone marrow-derived macrophages and consisted of increased CD36 and decreased ATP-binding cassette transporter A1. MNV4 infection of ApoE−/− mice at 12 wk of age (during the development of atherosclerosis) had a variable effect on atherosclerotic lesion size. In one study, MNV4 significantly increased atherosclerotic plaque area whereas in a second study, no effect was observed. Compared with controls, MNV4-infected mice had higher circulating Ly6C-positive monocytes, and viral RNA was detected in the aortas of some mice, suggesting potential mechanisms by which MNV4 alters disease progression. Plaque size did not differ when ApoE−/− mice were infected at 4 wk of age (early during disease development) or in ApoE−/− mice maintained on a high-fat, high-cholesterol diet. Therefore, these data show that MNV4 has the potential to exert a variable and unpredictable effect on atherosclerosis in ApoE−/− mice. We therefore propose that performing experiments in MNV-free mouse colonies is warranted. PMID:26473341

  9. Vascular leak ensues a vigorous proinflammatory cytokine response to Tacaribe arenavirus infection in AG129 mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Tacaribe virus (TCRV) is a less biohazardous relative of the highly pathogenic clade B New World arenaviruses that cause viral hemorrhagic fever syndromes and require handling in maximum containment facilities not readily available to most researchers. AG129 type I and II interferon receptor knockout mice have been shown to be susceptible to TCRV infection, but the pathogenic mechanisms contributing to the lethal disease are unclear. Methods To gain insights into the pathogenesis of TCRV infection in AG129 mice, we assessed hematologic and cytokine responses during the course of infection, as well as changes in the permeability of the vascular endothelium. We also treated TCRV-challenged mice with MY-24, a compound that prevents mortality without affecting viral loads during the acute infection, and measured serum and tissue viral titers out to 40 days post-infection to determine whether the virus is ultimately cleared in recovering mice. Results We found that the development of viremia and splenomegaly precedes an elevation in white blood cells and the detection of high levels of proinflammatory mediators known to destabilize the endothelial barrier, which likely contributes to the increased vascular permeability and weight loss that was observed several days prior to when the mice generally succumb to TCRV challenge. In surviving mice treated with MY-24, viremia and liver virus titers were not cleared until 2–3 weeks post-infection, after which the mice began to recover lost weight. Remarkably, substantial viral loads were still present in the lung, spleen, brain and kidney tissues at the conclusion of the study. Conclusions Our findings suggest that vascular leak may be a contributing factor in the demise of TCRV-infected mice, as histopathologic findings are generally mild to moderate in nature, and as evidenced with MY-24 treatment, animals can survive in the face of high viral loads. PMID:23816343

  10. Iron and copper accumulation in the brain of coxsackievirus-infected mice exposed to cadmium

    SciTech Connect

    Ilbaeck, N.-G. . E-mail: nils-gunnar.ilback@slv.se; Lindh, U.; Minqin, R.; Friman, G.; Watt, F.

    2006-11-15

    Cadmium (Cd) is a potentially toxic metal widely distributed in the environment and known to cause adverse health effects in humans. During coxsackievirus infection, the concentrations of essential and nonessential trace elements (e.g., iron (Fe), copper (Cu), and Cd) change in different target organs of the infection. Fe and Cu are recognized cofactors in host defence reactions, and Fe is known to be associated with certain pathological conditions of the brain. However, whether nonessential trace elements could influence the balance of essential trace elements in the brain is unknown. In this study the brain Fe, Cu, and Cd contents were measured through inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and their distributions determined by nuclear microscopy in the early phase (day 3) of coxsackievirus B3 (CB3) infection in nonexposed and in Cd-exposed female Balb/c mice. In CB3 infection the brain is a well-known target that has not been studied with regard to trace element balance. The brain concentration of Cu compared with that of noninfected control mice was increased by 9% (P<0.05) in infected mice not exposed to Cd and by 10% (not significant) in infected Cd-exposed mice. A similar response was seen for Fe, which in infected Cd-exposed mice, compared to noninfected control mice, tended to increase by 16%. Cu showed an even tissue distribution, whereas Fe was distributed in focal deposits. Changes in Cd concentration in the brain of infected mice were less consistent but evenly distributed. Further studies are needed to define whether the accumulation and distribution of trace elements in the brain have an impact on brain function.

  11. Iron and copper accumulation in the brain of coxsackievirus-infected mice exposed to cadmium.

    PubMed

    Ilbäck, N-G; Lindh, U; Minqin, R; Friman, G; Watt, F

    2006-11-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a potentially toxic metal widely distributed in the environment and known to cause adverse health effects in humans. During coxsackievirus infection, the concentrations of essential and nonessential trace elements (e.g., iron (Fe), copper (Cu), and Cd) change in different target organs of the infection. Fe and Cu are recognized cofactors in host defence reactions, and Fe is known to be associated with certain pathological conditions of the brain. However, whether nonessential trace elements could influence the balance of essential trace elements in the brain is unknown. In this study the brain Fe, Cu, and Cd contents were measured through inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and their distributions determined by nuclear microscopy in the early phase (day 3) of coxsackievirus B3 (CB3) infection in nonexposed and in Cd-exposed female Balb/c mice. In CB3 infection the brain is a well-known target that has not been studied with regard to trace element balance. The brain concentration of Cu compared with that of noninfected control mice was increased by 9% (P < 0.05) in infected mice not exposed to Cd and by 10% (not significant) in infected Cd-exposed mice. A similar response was seen for Fe, which in infected Cd-exposed mice, compared to noninfected control mice, tended to increase by 16%. Cu showed an even tissue distribution, whereas Fe was distributed in focal deposits. Changes in Cd concentration in the brain of infected mice were less consistent but evenly distributed. Further studies are needed to define whether the accumulation and distribution of trace elements in the brain have an impact on brain function.

  12. Passive immunity modulates genetic reassortment between rotaviruses in mixedly infected mice.

    PubMed

    Gombold, J L; Ramig, R F

    1989-11-01

    Genetic reassortment between simian rotavirus SA11 and rhesus rotavirus (RRV) occurs with high frequency following mixed infection of nonimmune suckling mice (J. L. Gombold and R. F. Ramig, J. Virol. 57:110-116, 1986). We examined the effects of passively acquired homotypic or heterotypic immunity on reassortment in vivo. Passively immune suckling mice obtained from dams immune to either serotype 3 simian rotavirus (SA11) or serotype 6 bovine rotavirus (NCDV) were infected orally with either SA11 or RRV or a mixture of SA11 and RRV (both serotype 3 viruses). At various times postinfection, signs of disease were noted and the intestines of individual mice were removed and homogenized for titration of infectious virus and isolation of progeny plaques. Electrophoresis of genomic RNA was used to identify reassortants among the viral progeny isolated from infected animals. No reassortants (less than 0.45%) were detected among 224 clones examined from mixedly infected, homotypically immune mice. Twenty-nine reassortants (10.66%) were identified among 272 progeny clones from mixedly infected, heterotypically immune mice. Thus, reassortment was reduced more than 50-fold by homotypic immunity and approximately threefold by heterotypic immunity compared with prior data obtained from mixed infections of nonimmune mice. In addition, reassortment between SA11 and RRV in nonimmune mice was shown to be dependent on the virus dose. Taken together, these results suggest that immune responses may modulate the frequency of reassortment by reducing the effective multiplicity of infection (by neutralization or other immune mechanisms), thereby preventing efficient mixed infection of enterocytes.

  13. IL-17 is essential for host defense against cutaneous Staphylococcus aureus infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Cho, John S; Pietras, Eric M; Garcia, Nairy C; Ramos, Romela Irene; Farzam, David M; Monroe, Holly R; Magorien, Julie E; Blauvelt, Andrew; Kolls, Jay K; Cheung, Ambrose L; Cheng, Genhong; Modlin, Robert L; Miller, Lloyd S

    2010-05-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is the most common cause of skin and soft tissue infections, and rapidly emerging antibiotic-resistant strains are creating a serious public health concern. If immune-based therapies are to be an alternative to antibiotics, greater understanding is needed of the protective immune response against S. aureus infection in the skin. Although neutrophil recruitment is required for immunity against S. aureus, a role for T cells has been suggested. Here, we used a mouse model of S. aureus cutaneous infection to investigate the contribution of T cells to host defense. We found that mice deficient in gammadelta but not alphabeta T cells had substantially larger skin lesions with higher bacterial counts and impaired neutrophil recruitment compared with WT mice. This neutrophil recruitment was dependent upon epidermal Vgamma5+ gammadelta T cell production of IL-17, but not IL-21 and IL-22. Furthermore, IL-17 induction required IL-1, TLR2, and IL-23 and was critical for host defense, since IL-17R-deficient mice had a phenotype similar to that of gammadelta T cell-deficient mice. Importantly, gammadelta T cell-deficient mice inoculated with S. aureus and treated with a single dose of recombinant IL-17 had lesion sizes and bacterial counts resembling those of WT mice, demonstrating that IL-17 could restore the impaired immunity in these mice. Our study defines what we believe to be a novel role for IL-17-producing epidermal gammadelta T cells in innate immunity against S. aureus cutaneous infection.

  14. Infection susceptibility and immune senescence with advancing age replicated in accelerated aging Lmna(Dhe) mice.

    PubMed

    Xin, Lijun; Jiang, Tony T; Kinder, Jeremy M; Ertelt, James M; Way, Sing Sing

    2015-12-01

    Aging confers increased susceptibility to common pathogens including influenza A virus. Despite shared vulnerability to infection with advancing age in humans and rodents, the relatively long time required for immune senescence to take hold practically restricts the use of naturally aged mice to investigate aging-induced immunological shifts. Here, we show accelerated aging Lmna(Dhe) mice with spontaneous mutation in the nuclear scaffolding protein, lamin A, replicate infection susceptibility, and substantial immune cell shifts that occur with advancing age. Naturally aged (≥ 20 month) and 2- to 3-month-old Lmna(Dhe) mice share near identically increased influenza A susceptibility compared with age-matched Lmna(WT) control mice. Increased mortality and higher viral burden after influenza infection in Lmna(Dhe) mice parallel reduced accumulation of lung alveolar macrophage cells, systemic expansion of immune suppressive Foxp3⁺ regulatory T cells, and skewed immune dominance among viral-specific CD8⁺T cells similar to the immunological phenotype of naturally aged mice. Thus, aging-induced infection susceptibility and immune senescence are replicated in accelerated aging Lmna(Dhe) mice. PMID:26248606

  15. Hepatic temporal gene expression profiling in Helicobacter hepaticus-infected A/JCr mice.

    PubMed

    Boutin, Samuel R; Rogers, Arlin B; Shen, Zeli; Fry, Rebecca C; Love, Jennifer A; Nambiar, Prashant R; Suerbaum, Sebastian; Fox, James G

    2004-01-01

    Helicobacter hepaticus infection of A/JCr mice is a model of infectious liver cancer. We monitored hepatic global gene expression profiles in H. hepaticus infected and control male A/JCr mice at 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year of age using an Affymetrix-based oligonucleotide microarray platform on the premise that a specific genetic expression signature at isolated time points would be indicative of disease status. Model based expression index comparisons generated by dChip yielded consistent profiles of differential gene expression for H. hepaticus infected male mice with progressive liver disease versus uninfected control mice within each age group. Linear discriminant analysis and principal component analysis allowed segregation of mice based on combined age and lesion status, or age alone. Up-regulation of putative tumor markers correlated with advancing hepatocellular dysplasia. Transcriptionally down-regulated genes in mice with liver lesions included those related to peroxisome proliferator, fatty acid, and steroid metabolism pathways. In conclusion, transcriptional profiling of hepatic genes documented gene expression signatures in the livers of H. hepaticus infected male A/JCr mice with chronic progressive hepatitis and preneoplastic liver lesions, complemented the histopathological diagnosis, and suggested molecular targets for the monitoring and intervention of disease progression prior to the onset of hepatocellular neoplasia.

  16. Evaluation of kynurenine pathway metabolism in Toxoplasma gondii-infected mice: implications for schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Notarangelo, F M; Wilson, E H; Horning, K J; Thomas, M A R; Harris, T H; Fang, Q; Hunter, C A; Schwarcz, R

    2014-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii, an intracellular protozoan parasite, is a major cause of opportunistic infectious disease affecting the brain and has been linked to an increased incidence of schizophrenia. In murine hosts, infection with T. gondii stimulates tryptophan degradation along the kynurenine pathway (KP), which contains several neuroactive metabolites, including 3-hydroxykynurenine (3-HK), quinolinic acid (QUIN) and kynurenic acid (KYNA). As these endogenous compounds may provide a mechanistic connection between T. gondii and the pathophysiology of schizophrenia, we measured KP metabolites in both the brain and periphery of T. gondii-treated C57BL/6 mice 8 and 28 days post-infection. Infected mice showed early decreases in the levels of tryptophan in the brain and serum, but not in the liver. These reductions were associated with elevated levels of kynurenine, KYNA, 3-HK and QUIN in the brain. In quantitative terms, the most significant increases in these KP metabolites were observed in the brain at 28 days post-infection. Notably, the anti-parasitic drugs pyrimethamine and sulfadiazine, a standard treatment of toxoplasmosis, significantly reduced 3-HK and KYNA levels in the brain of infected mice when applied between 28 and 56 days post-infection. In summary, T. gondii infection, probably by activating microglia and astrocytes, enhances the production of KP metabolites in the brain. However, during the first two months after infection, the KP changes in these mice do not reliably duplicate abnormalities seen in the brain of individuals with schizophrenia. PMID:24345671

  17. CHARACTERIZATION OF A CRYPTOSPORIDIUM MURIS INFECTION AND REINFECTION IN CF-1 MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    To establish control values for circulating cells and immune associated organs over the course of a self-limiting Cryptosporidium muris infection and rechallenge infection, mice were evaluated at intervals starting before oral inoculation and ending after oocyst shedding had ceas...

  18. [Experimental infection caused by Machupo virus in intact and immunosuppressed albino mice].

    PubMed

    Orlova, S V; Votiakov, V I

    1989-01-01

    Features of the course of experimental infection in white mice caused by Machupo virus in relation to their age, route of virus inoculation, and under conditions of normal and suppressed immune response created by antithymocyte globulin (ATG) were studied. The effect of different ATG doses and intervals of its administration on the experimental infection were demonstrated.

  19. Persistent Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus infection in mice depends on plaque size.

    PubMed

    Lipton, H L

    1980-01-01

    Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) is an enteric pathogen of mice which causes acute and chronic neurological disorders in the natural host. When brain-derived stocks of TMEV isolates are adapted to cell culture they predominantly form either large or small plaques. In this study the type of central nervous system (CNS) infection (acute versus chronic) and the associated disease occurring in mice inoculated intracerebrally with large and small plaque strains of TMEV was investigated. Large and small plaque strains of TMEV were found to vary in virulence, type of neurological disease produced and ability to establish persistent CNS infection in mice. Two large plaque strains, GDVII and FA viruses, were highly virulent, produced acute encephalitis, but were cleared from the nervous systems of surviving animals. Therefore, it appears that these large plaque variants do not cause persistent CNS infection in mice. In contrast, five small plaque strains, DA, WW, TO4, Yale and BeAn8386 viruses, were relatively avirulent, usually produced no illness during the first month after inoculation, but readily established persistent CNS infection in mice. Persistently infected mice later developed demyelinating disease. Having identified strains of TMEV that differ regarding their ability to persist, we now hope to be able to exploit this difference in elucidating the basic mechanism(s) of TMEV persistence.

  20. Detection of murine cytomegalovirus DNA in circulating leukocytes harvested during acute infection of mice

    SciTech Connect

    Bale, J.F. Jr.; O'Neil, M.E. )

    1989-06-01

    The authors used virus assay and in situ hybridization with a cloned fragment of the murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) genome to study MCMV infection of circulating leukocytes harvested from 3-week-old BALB/c, C57BL/6, and C3H mice infected with MCMV intraperitoneally. Infectious virus or MCMV DNA was detected in leukocytes on days 1 through 21 of infection in BALB/c mice and on days 3 through 7 in C57BL/6 mice. On days 5 and 7, MCMV DNA or infectious virus was detected in the leukocytes of 17 (94%) of 18 BALB/c mice and 10 (59%) of 17 C57BL/6 mice. In both strains infection peaked on days 5 and 7, when as many as 0.01 to 0.1% of the circulating leukocytes contained MCMV DNA. In C3H mice, however, infectious virus was rarely recovered from leukocyte fractions and MCMV DNA was detected in the circulating leukocytes of only one animal. Circulating leukocytes may have an important role in the dissemination of CMV infections in susceptible hosts.

  1. Characterization of chemokine and chemokine receptor expression during Pneumocystis infection in healthy and immunodeficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Lisa R.; Lionakis, Michail S.; Sassi, Monica; Murphy, Philip M.; Hu, Xiaojun; Huang, Da Wei; Sherman, Brad; Qiu, Ju; Yang, Jun; Lempicki, Richard A.; Kovacs, Joseph A.

    2015-01-01

    We examined gene expression levels of multiple chemokines and chemokine receptors during Pneumocystis murina infection in wild-type and immunosuppressed mice, using microarrays and qPCR. In wild-type mice, expression of chemokines that are ligands for Ccr2, Cxcr3, Cxcr6, and Cxcr2 increased at days 32 to 41 post-infection, with a return to baseline by day 75 to 150. Concomitant increases were seen in Ccr2 ,Cxcr3, and Cxcr6, but not in Cxcr2 expression. Induction of these same factors also occurred in CD40-ligand and CD40 knockout mice but only at a much later time-point, during uncontrolled Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP). Expression of CD4 Th1 markers was increased in wild-type mice during clearance of infection. Ccr2 and Cx3cr1 knockout mice cleared Pneumocystis infection with kinetics similar to wild-type mice, and all animals developed anti-Pneumocystis antibodies. Upregulation of Ccr2, Cxcr3, and Cxcr6 and their ligands supports an important role for T helper cells and mononuclear phagocytes in the clearance of Pneumocystis infection. However, based on the current and prior studies, no single chemokine receptor appears to be critical to the clearance of Pneumocystis. PMID:26052064

  2. Interferon α/β receptor knockout mice as a model to study bluetongue virus infection.

    PubMed

    Ortego, Javier; de la Poza, Francisco; Marín-López, Alejandro

    2014-03-01

    Bluetongue is an arthropod-borne disease caused by a virus of the genus Orbivirus, the bluetongue virus (BTV), which affects ruminant livestock such as cattle, sheep, and goats and wild ruminants such as deer, and camelids. Recently, adult mice with gene knockouts of the interferon α/β receptor (IFNAR-/-) have been described as a model of lethal BTV infection. IFNAR(-/-) mice are highly susceptible to BTV-1, BTV-4 and BTV-8 infection when the virus is administered intravenously or subcutaneosuly. Disease progression and pathogenesis closely mimics signs of bluetongue disease in ruminants. In the present paper we review the studies where IFNAR(-/-) mice have been used as an animal model to study BTV transmission, pathogenesis, virulence, and protective efficacy of inactivated and new recombinant marker BTV vaccines. Furthermore, we report new data on protective efficacy of different strategies of BTV vaccination and also on induction of interferon α/β and proinflammatory immune responses in IFNAR(-/-) mice infected with BTV.

  3. [The immunity indices in the infection of mice of different strains with the Machupo virus].

    PubMed

    Ignat'ev, G M; Tverdokhlebov, A V; Kaliberov, S A; Pereboeva, L A; Patrusheva, I V; Kashentseva, E A

    1993-01-01

    The pathomorphological patterns and the activity of serum interferon, interleukin-1, tumor necrosis factor, natural killers, and proliferative activity of lymphocytes were studied in BALB/c and C57B1/6 mice intracerebrally infected with Machupo virus. The BALB/c mice showed 100% lethality at 8-9 days after inoculation while C57B1/6 mice were found nonsusceptible to Machupo virus inoculation by this route. The pathomorphological findings at the peak of clinical manifestations in BALB/c mice revealed no organ whose functional deficiency could lead to the death of the animals. Investigations of nonspecific immunity parameters revealed a direct dependence between their high activity and susceptibility of the animals to Machupo virus infection. It is assumed that the endogenous shock due to the high activity of immune response mediators is the cause of death in Machupo virus infection.

  4. Efficacy of a virion envelope herpes simplex virus vaccine against experimental skin infections in hairless mice.

    PubMed

    Klein, R J; Buimovici-Klein, E; Moser, H; Moucha, R; Hilfenhaus, J

    1981-01-01

    Hairless mice were immunized with herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) envelope antigen (EAG), EAG in association with polyriboinosinic . polyribocytidylic acid-poly-L-lysine complexed with carboxymethylcellulose (PICLC), and inactivated purified HSV-1 (VAG). After 2 weeks the mice were challenged by a percutaneous HSV-1 infection in the orofacial (OF) or lumbosacral (LS) skin area. Following immunization a consistent cell-mediated immune response was observed in all immunized mice, although the humoral immune response was very low, or not detectable. After challenge, a marked secondary humoral and cell-mediated immune response developed in all immunized mice, and the animals were protected against the development of skin lesions and the fatal outcome of infection. However, the establishment of latent infections in the sensory ganglia was not prevented by the immunization procedure.

  5. Molecular detection of bacterial contamination in gnotobiotic rodent units

    PubMed Central

    Packey, Christopher D; Shanahan, Michael T; Manick, Sayeed; Bower, Maureen A; Ellermann, Melissa; Tonkonogy, Susan L; Carroll, Ian M; Sartor, R Balfour

    2013-01-01

    Gnotobiotic rodents provide an important technique to study the functional roles of commensal bacteria in host physiology and pathophysiology. To ensure sterility, these animals must be screened frequently for contamination. The traditional screening approaches of culturing and Gram staining feces have inherent limitations, as many bacteria are uncultivable and fecal Gram stains are difficult to interpret. Thus, we developed and validated molecular methods to definitively detect and identify contamination in germ-free (GF) and selectively colonized animals. Fresh fecal pellets were collected from rodents housed in GF isolators, spontaneously contaminated ex-GF isolators, selectively colonized isolators and specific pathogen-free (SPF) conditions. DNA isolated from mouse and rat fecal samples was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and subjected to quantitative PCR (qPCR) using universal primers that amplify the 16S rRNA gene from all bacterial groups. PCR products were sequenced to identify contaminating bacterial species. Random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD) PCR profiles verified bacterial inoculation of selectively colonized animals. These PCR techniques more accurately detected and identified GF isolator contamination than current standard approaches. These molecular techniques can be utilized to more definitively screen GF and selectively colonized animals for bacterial contamination when Gram stain and/or culture results are un-interpretable or inconsistent. PMID:23887190

  6. Trypanosoma cruzi Infection in Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor p55-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Castaños-Velez, Esmeralda; Maerlan, Stephanie; Osorio, Lyda M.; Åberg, Frederik; Biberfeld, Peter; Örn, Anders; Rottenberg, Martín E.

    1998-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor p55 (TNFRp55) mediates host resistance to several pathogens by allowing microbicidal activities of phagocytes. In the studies reported here, TNFRp55−/− mice infected with the intracellular parasite Trypanosoma cruzi showed clearly higher parasitemia and cumulative mortality than wild-type (WT) controls did. However, gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-activated macrophages from TNFRp55−/− mice produced control levels of nitric oxide and killed the parasite efficiently in vitro. Trypanocidal mechanisms of nonphagocytic cells (myocardial fibroblasts) from both TNFRp55−/− and WT mice were also activated by IFN-γ in a dose-dependent way. However, IFN-γ-activated TNFRp55−/− nonphagocytes showed less effective killing of T. cruzi than WT control nonphagocytes, even when interleukin 1β (IL-1β) was added as a costimulator. In vivo, T. cruzi-infected TNFRp55−/− mice and WT mice released similar levels of NO and showed similar levels of IFN-γ mRNA and inducible nitric oxide synthase mRNA in their tissues. Instead, increased susceptibility to T. cruzi of TNFRp55−/− mice was associated with reduced levels of parasite-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) (but not IgM) antibodies during infection, which is probably linked to abnormal B-cell differentiation in secondary lymphoid tissues of the mutant mice. Surprisingly, T. cruzi-infected TNFRp55−/− mice showed increased inflammatory and necrotic lesions in several tissues, especially in skeletal muscles, indicating that TNFRp55 plays an important role in controlling the inflammatory process. Accordingly, levels of Mn2+ superoxide dismutase mRNA, a TNF-induced enzyme which protects the cell from the toxic effects of superoxide, were lower in mutant than in WT infected mice. PMID:9596773

  7. Experimental infection of mice with hamster parvovirus: evidence for interspecies transmission of mouse parvovirus 3.

    PubMed

    Christie, Rachel D; Marcus, Emily C; Wagner, April M; Besselsen, David G

    2010-04-01

    Hamster parvovirus (HaPV) was isolated 2 decades ago from hamsters with clinical signs similar to those induced in hamsters experimentally infected with other rodent parvoviruses. Genetically, HaPV is most closely related to mouse parvovirus (MPV), which induces subclinical infection in mice. A novel MPV strain, MPV3, was detected recently in naturally infected mice, and genomic sequence analysis indicates that MPV3 is almost identical to HaPV. The goal of the present studies was to examine the infectivity of HaPV in mice. Neonatal and weanling mice of several mouse strains were inoculated with HaPV. Tissues, excretions, and sera were harvested at 1, 2, 4, and 8 wk after inoculation and evaluated by quantitative PCR and serologic assays specific for HaPV. Quantitative PCR detected viral DNA quantities that greatly exceeded the quantity of virus in inocula in multiple tissues of infected mice. Seroconversion to both nonstructural and structural viral proteins was detected in most immunocompetent mice 2 or more weeks after inoculation with HaPV. In neonatal SCID mice, viral transcripts were detected in lymphoid tissues by RT-PCR and viral DNA was detected in feces by quantitative PCR at 8 wk after inoculation. No clinical signs, gross, or histologic lesions were observed. These findings are similar to those observed in mice infected with MPV. These data support the hypothesis that HaPV and MPV3 are likely variants of the same viral species, for which the mouse is the natural rodent host with rare interspecies transmission to the hamster.

  8. High Pathogenicity of Wild-Type Measles Virus Infection in CD150 (SLAM) Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sellin, Caroline I.; Davoust, Nathalie; Guillaume, Vanessa; Baas, Dominique; Belin, Marie-Françoise; Buckland, Robin; Wild, T. Fabian; Horvat, Branka

    2006-01-01

    Measles virus (MV) infection causes an acute childhood disease, associated in certain cases with infection of the central nervous system and development of a severe neurological disease. We have generated transgenic mice ubiquitously expressing the human protein SLAM (signaling lymphocytic activation molecule), or CD150, recently identified as an MV receptor. In contrast to all other MV receptor transgenic models described so far, in these mice infection with wild-type MV strains is highly pathogenic. Intranasal infection of SLAM transgenic suckling mice leads to MV spread to different organs and the development of an acute neurological syndrome, characterized by lethargy, seizures, ataxia, weight loss, and death within 3 weeks. In addition, in this model, vaccine and wild-type MV strains can be distinguished by virulence. Furthermore, intracranial MV infection of adult transgenic mice generates a subclinical infection associated with a high titer of MV-specific antibodies in the serum. Finally, to analyze new antimeasles therapeutic approaches, we created a recombinant soluble form of SLAM and demonstrated its important antiviral activity both in vitro and in vivo. Taken together, our results show the high susceptibility of SLAM transgenic mice to MV-induced neurological disease and open new perspectives for the analysis of the implication of SLAM in the neuropathogenicity of other morbilliviruses, which also use this molecule as a receptor. Moreover, this transgenic model, in allowing a simple readout of the efficacy of an antiviral treatment, provides unique experimental means to test novel anti-MV preventive and therapeutic strategies. PMID:16775330

  9. Development of high-grade lymphoma in Helicobacter pylori-infected C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Willén, R; Andersson, C; Wadström, T

    2000-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, gastric adenocarcinoma and MALT lymphoma. Mice with H. pylori infection develop severe gastritis and atrophic changes in their stomachs after 6 months. We followed H. pylori-infected animals for 13 months to find out whether dysplasia, carcinoma or lymphoma developed. Six-week-old C57BL/6 mice were infected with the CagA-positive and VacA-positive H. pylori mouse-passaged strain 119/95, fed a low antioxidant diet, and kept in microisolated cages. Histopathological changes were examined after 13 months' infection. All H. pylori-inoculated mice (n = 5) developed a gastric squamous papilloma with nagging of the lamina muscularis after 13 months. Three out of five animals developed high-grade B-cell lymphoma derived from a MALT lymphoma at the squamous-corpus border with manifestations also in the liver, spleen and kidney. There was a suspicion of local gastric lymphoma in the two remaining mice but with no significant changes in the liver, spleen or kidney. The normal control mice showed no pathological changes in any of these organs. It is concluded that this mouse model with infection by the CagA-positive, vac-toxin-producing H. pylori strain 119/95 is suitable for use in the study of lymphoma development and also development of squamous cell papilloma with proliferative features.

  10. Distribution of rabies virus in infected mice, vaccinated and submitted to P. acnes as immunomodulator.

    PubMed

    Megid, J; Cremonini, D N; Leomil, H

    2002-07-01

    The lethality and distribution of rabies virus were evaluated in swiss mice experimentally infected with street rabies virus, vaccinated and submitted to immunomodulation by P .acnes (formerly Corynebacterium parvum). The animals were sacrificed at different times,when the different tissues were collected and submitted to fluorescent antibody test (FAT) and mouse inoculation test (MIT). The group submitted to vaccination and P. acnes treatment presented a percentage of survival superior to that observed in infected mice only treated with P. acnes. Control infected animals had the lowest survival rates. The distribution of rabies virus in spleen of infected mice, vaccinated and submitted to P. acnes was superior to that verified in infected mice not treated with P.acnes. The increased survival correlated with the distribution of rabies virus in lymphoid tissues, could be interpreted as the consequence of P. acnes activity on macrophages. The results suggest the role of macrophages against rabies virus infection in mice and the importance of vaccination in the post expositive treatment of rabies. PMID:12135238

  11. Control of trypanodestructive antibody responses and parasitemia in mice infected with Trypanosoma (Duttonella) vivax.

    PubMed Central

    Mahan, S M; Hendershot, L; Black, S J

    1986-01-01

    After infection with a cloned population of Trypanosoma vivax, C57BL/6 mice controlled parasitemia during the exponential growth phase and survived, with intermittent parasitemia, for several weeks. In contrast, most mice of the C3H/He strain did not control the first wave of parasitemia and died within 9 to 13 days after infection. Control of parasitemia in C57BL/6 mice was mediated by the production of a variant surface glycoprotein-specific trypanodestructive antibody response which was accompanied by production of antibodies against antigens shared between procyclic and bloodstream T. vivax as well as antibodies against trinitrophenyl (TNP) and sheep erythrocytes. The infected C3H/He mice did not produce trypanodestructive antibodies or antibodies against procyclic antigens or TNP but did produce antibodies against sheep erythrocytes. Although infected C57BL/6 mice produced levels of serum immunoglobulin M four times higher than infected C3H/He mice, their parasite-induced B-cell DNA synthetic responses were similar, and both sets of mice developed similar numbers of spleen cells with cytoplasmic immunoglobulin M, a proportion of which could react with TNP. In vitro biosynthetic labeling studies accompanied by immunoglobulin precipitation and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis demonstrated that the immunoglobulin-containing cells of infected C3H/He mice synthesized and secreted less immunoglobulin than similar cells from infected C57BL/6 mice. We concluded that some parasite-induced antibody-forming cells in C3H/He mice, perhaps including parasite-specific and certainly including TNP-specific cells, had an impaired capacity to make and release immunoglobulin. Within 24 h after Berenil-mediated elimination of T. vivax from infected C3H/He mice, a population of cyclophosphamide-sensitive spleen cells produced large amounts of parasite-specific and TNP-specific antibody. We concluded that the defect in terminal B-cell function leading to

  12. B-Cell Deficiency Predisposes Mice to Disseminating Anaerobic Infections: Protection by Passive Antibody Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Linda; Sasakj, Hajime; Stashenko, Philip

    2000-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that a high proportion of RAG-2 SCID knockout mice, which lack T and B cells, develop orofacial abscesses and disseminated infections following pulpal infection, whereas immunocompetent control mice do not. In the present study, we sought to identify the components of the adaptive immune response which contribute to protection against disseminating anaerobic infections and sepsis. For this purpose, various genetically engineered immunodeficient mice were employed, including RAG-2 SCID, Igh-6 (B-cell deficient), Tcrb Tcrd (T-cell deficient) and Hc0 (C5 deficient). For abscess induction, the mandibular first molars were subjected to pulp exposure on day 0. Teeth were infected with a mixture of four anaerobic pathogens, including Prevotella intermedia, Streptococcus intermedius, Fusobacterium nucleatum, and Peptostreptococcus micros, and teeth were sealed to prevent communication with the oral cavity. The findings demonstrate that both RAG-2 SCID and B-cell-deficient mice, but not T-cell- or C5-deficient mice, have increased susceptibility to the development of disseminating anaerobic infections. Abscess-susceptible RAG-2 SCID and B-cell-deficient mice also showed a significant loss of body weight, splenomegaly, and absent antibacterial antibody production. Furthermore, dissemination was significantly reduced, from 74 to 25%, in susceptible RAG-2 mice by passively transferred antibody, predominantly immunoglobulin G2b (IgG2b) and IgM, against the infecting bacterial innoculum. Fractionated IgG-enriched preparations were more efficient in transferring protection than IgM preparations. We conclude that an antibody-mediated mechanism(s), most likely bacterial opsonization, is of importance in localizing anaerobic root canal infections and in preventing their systemic spread. PMID:10992465

  13. Immunomodulatory properties of borage (Echium amoenum) on BALB/c mice infected with Leishmania major.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Nahid; Abolhassani, Mohsen

    2011-06-01

    Leishmaniasis is caused by parasitic protozoa transmitted by the bite of a female sand fly and is currently endemic in 88 countries. BALB/c mice are highly susceptible to the infection with the parasite Leishmania major, and this susceptibility has been attributed, in part, to the expansion of Th2 cells, production of their cytokines, and downregulation of Th1 cytokine, interferon gamma (IFN-γ). In this report, we used both aqueous and alcoholic extracts of Iranian borage (Echium amoenum Fisch & C.A. Mey) for treatment of L. major infection in BALB/c mice. We found that both extracts had immunomodulatory properties and increased the level of IFN-γ and lowered the parasite burden in the proximal lymph nodes and prevented the necrosis of the footpad as compared with the untreated infected mice. These results may provide a basis for further studies directed toward the use of the Iranian borage against L. major infection. PMID:21225450

  14. Immunomodulatory properties of borage (Echium amoenum) on BALB/c mice infected with Leishmania major.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Nahid; Abolhassani, Mohsen

    2011-06-01

    Leishmaniasis is caused by parasitic protozoa transmitted by the bite of a female sand fly and is currently endemic in 88 countries. BALB/c mice are highly susceptible to the infection with the parasite Leishmania major, and this susceptibility has been attributed, in part, to the expansion of Th2 cells, production of their cytokines, and downregulation of Th1 cytokine, interferon gamma (IFN-γ). In this report, we used both aqueous and alcoholic extracts of Iranian borage (Echium amoenum Fisch & C.A. Mey) for treatment of L. major infection in BALB/c mice. We found that both extracts had immunomodulatory properties and increased the level of IFN-γ and lowered the parasite burden in the proximal lymph nodes and prevented the necrosis of the footpad as compared with the untreated infected mice. These results may provide a basis for further studies directed toward the use of the Iranian borage against L. major infection.

  15. Mechanism of T cell mediated protection in newborn mice against a Chlamydia infection

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Sukumar; de la Maza, Luis M.

    2013-01-01

    To determine the immune components needed for protection of newborn mice against Chlamydia muridarum, animals born to Chlamydia-immunized and to sham-immunized dams were infected intranasally with C. muridarum at 2 post-natal days. T-cells isolated from immunized or sham-immunized adult mice were adoptively transferred to newborn mice at the time of infection. Also, to establish what cytokines are involved in protection, IFN-γ TNF-α, IL-10, and IL-12 were passively transferred to newborn mice. To assess the Chlamydia burden in the lungs mice were euthanized at 12 post-natal days. When T-cells from immunized adult mice were transferred, mice born to and fed by immunized dams were significantly protected as evidenced by the reduced number of Chlamydia isolated from the lungs compared to mice born to and fed by sham-immunized dams. Transfer of IFN-γ and TNF-α also significantly reduced the number of Chlamydia in the lungs of mice born to immunized dams. Transfer of IL-10 or IL-12 did not result in a significant reduction of Chlamydia. In vitro T-cell proliferation data suggest that neonatal antigen presenting cells can present Chlamydia antigens to adult T-cells. In conclusion, maternal antibodies and Chlamydia specific T-cells or Th1 cytokines are required for protection of neonates against this pathogen. PMID:23644176

  16. Mechanism of T-cell mediated protection in newborn mice against a Chlamydia infection.

    PubMed

    Pal, Sukumar; de la Maza, Luis M

    2013-01-01

    To determine the immune components needed for protection of newborn mice against Chlamydia muridarum, animals born to Chlamydia-immunized and to sham-immunized dams were infected intranasally with C. muridarum at 2 post-natal days. T-cells isolated from immunized or sham-immunized adult mice were adoptively transferred to newborn mice at the time of infection. Also, to establish what cytokines are involved in protection, IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-10, and IL-12 were passively transferred to newborn mice. To assess the Chlamydia burden in the lungs mice were euthanized at 12 post-natal days. When T-cells from immunized adult mice were transferred, mice born to and fed by immunized dams were significantly protected as evidenced by the reduced number of Chlamydia isolated from the lungs compared to mice born to and fed by sham-immunized dams. Transfer of IFN-γ and TNF-α also significantly reduced the number of Chlamydia in the lungs of mice born to immunized dams. Transfer of IL-10 or IL-12 did not result in a significant reduction of Chlamydia. In vitro T-cell proliferation data suggest that neonatal antigen presenting cells can present Chlamydia antigens to adult T-cells. In conclusion, maternal antibodies and Chlamydia specific T-cells or Th1 cytokines are required for protection of neonates against this pathogen.

  17. Borrelia persica Infection in Immunocompetent Mice--A New Tool to Study the Infection Kinetics In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Schwarzer, Sandra; Overzier, Evelyn; Hermanns, Walter; Baneth, Gad; Straubinger, Reinhard K

    2016-02-01

    Borrelia persica, a bacterium transmitted by the soft tick Ornithodoros tholozani, causes tick-borne relapsing fever in humans in the Middle East, Central Asia and the Indian peninsula. Immunocompetent C3H/HeOuJ mice were infected intradermally with B. persica at varying doses: 1 x 10(6), 1 x 10(4), 1 x 10(2) and 4 x 10(0) spirochetes/mouse. Subsequently, blood samples were collected and screened for the presence of B. persica DNA. Spirochetes were detected in all mice infected with 1 x 10(6), 1 x 10(4) and 1 x 10(2) borrelia by real-time PCR targeting the flaB gene of the bacterium. Spirochetemia developed with a one- to two-day delay when 1 x 10(4) and 1 x 10(2) borrelia were inoculated. Mice injected with only four organisms were negative in all tests. No clinical signs were observed when infected mice were compared to negative control animals. Organs (heart, spleen, urinary bladder, tarsal joint, skin and brain) were tested for B. persica-specific DNA and cultured for the detection of viable spirochetes. Compiled data show that the target organs of B. persica infections are the brain and the skin. A newly developed serological two-tiered test system (ELISA and western blot) for the detection of murine IgM, IgG and IgA antibody titers against B. persica showed a vigorous antibody response of the mice during infection. In conclusion, the infection model described here for B. persica is a platform for in vivo studies to decipher the so far unexplored survival strategies of this Borrelia species.

  18. Influence of certain immunodepressants on experimental flavivirus and enterovirus infections in mice.

    PubMed

    Semenov, B F; Vargin, V V; Zschiesche, W; Veckenstedt, A

    1975-01-01

    The effects of cyclophosphamide and 1,3-(piperidinomethyl)-5-phenyl-5-ethylbarbituric acid on certain flavi- and enterovirus infections in mice were studied. Differential enhancement of mortality rates after extraneural and, less markedly, intracerebral virus inoculation was noted. While depression of humoral and/or cell-mediated immunity is considered to be responsible for the effects observed in flavivirus infections, impaired function of the reticuloendothelial system seems to contribute mainly to the potentiation of Mengo virus infection by the immunodepressants used.

  19. Administration of kefir-fermented milk protects mice against Giardia intestinalis infection.

    PubMed

    Franco, Mariana Correa; Golowczyc, Marina A; De Antoni, Graciela L; Pérez, Pablo F; Humen, Martín; Serradell, María de los Angeles

    2013-12-01

    Giardiasis, caused by the protozoan Giardia intestinalis, is one of the most common intestinal diseases worldwide and constitutes an important problem for the public health systems of various countries. Kefir is a probiotic drink obtained by fermenting milk with 'kefir grains', which consist mainly of bacteria and yeasts that coexist in a complex symbiotic association. In this work, we studied the ability of kefir to protect mice from G. intestinalis infection, and characterized the host immune response to this probiotic in the context of the intestinal infection. Six- to 8-week-old C75BL/6 mice were separated into four groups: controls, kefir mice (receiving 1 : 100 dilution of kefir in drinking water for 14 days), Giardia mice (infected orally with 4×10(7) trophozoites of G. intestinalis at day 7) and Giardia-kefir mice (kefir-treated G. intestinalis-infected mice), and killed at 2 or 7 days post-infection. Kefir administration was able to significantly reduce the intensity of Giardia infection at 7 days post-infection. An increase in the percentage of CD4(+) T cells at 2 days post-infection was observed in the Peyer's patches (PP) of mice belonging to the Giardia group compared with the control and kefir groups, while the percentage of CD4(+) T cells in PP in the Giardia-kefir group was similar to that of controls. At 2 days post-infection, a reduction in the percentage of B220-positive major histocompatibility complex class II medium cells in PP was observed in infected mice compared with the other groups. At 7 days post-infection, Giardia-infected mice showed a reduction in RcFcε-positive cells compared with the control group, suggesting a downregulation of the inflammatory response. However, the percentages of RcFcε-positive cells did not differ from controls in the kefir and Giardia-kefir groups. An increase in IgA-positive cells was observed in the lamina propria of the kefir group compared with controls at 2 days post-infection. Interestingly, the

  20. Petiveria alliacea L. extract protects mice against Listeria monocytogenes infection--effects on bone marrow progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Quadros, M R; Souza Brito, A R; Queiroz, M L

    1999-02-01

    In this study we have investigated the effects of Petiveria alliacea on the hematopoietic response of mice infected with Listeria monocytogenes. Our results demonstrate a protective effect of the crude extract of P. alliacea since the survival of the treated/infected was higher than that in the infected group. Moreover, the number of granulocyte/macrophage colonies (CFU-GM) and the serum colony stimulating activity levels were increased in the treated/infected mice in relation to the infected group. These results suggest an immunomodulation of Petiveria alliacea extract on hematopoiesis, which may be responsible, at least in part, for the increased resistance of mice to Listeria monocytogenes infection.

  1. Preterm infant gut microbiota affects intestinal epithelial development in a humanized microbiome gnotobiotic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yueyue; Lu, Lei; Sun, Jun; Petrof, Elaine O; Claud, Erika C

    2016-09-01

    Development of the infant small intestine is influenced by bacterial colonization. To promote establishment of optimal microbial communities in preterm infants, knowledge of the beneficial functions of the early gut microbiota on intestinal development is needed. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of early preterm infant microbiota on host gut development using a gnotobiotic mouse model. Histological assessment of intestinal development was performed. The differentiation of four epithelial cell lineages (enterocytes, goblet cells, Paneth cells, enteroendocrine cells) and tight junction (TJ) formation was examined. Using weight gain as a surrogate marker for health, we found that early microbiota from a preterm infant with normal weight gain (MPI-H) induced increased villus height and crypt depth, increased cell proliferation, increased numbers of goblet cells and Paneth cells, and enhanced TJs compared with the changes induced by early microbiota from a poor weight gain preterm infant (MPI-L). Laser capture microdissection (LCM) plus qRT-PCR further revealed, in MPI-H mice, a higher expression of stem cell marker Lgr5 and Paneth cell markers Lyz1 and Cryptdin5 in crypt populations, along with higher expression of the goblet cell and mature enterocyte marker Muc3 in villus populations. In contrast, MPI-L microbiota failed to induce the aforementioned changes and presented intestinal characteristics comparable to a germ-free host. Our data demonstrate that microbial communities have differential effects on intestinal development. Future studies to identify pioneer settlers in neonatal microbial communities necessary to induce maturation may provide new insights for preterm infant microbial ecosystem therapeutics. PMID:27492329

  2. Preterm infant gut microbiota affects intestinal epithelial development in a humanized microbiome gnotobiotic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yueyue; Lu, Lei; Sun, Jun; Petrof, Elaine O; Claud, Erika C

    2016-09-01

    Development of the infant small intestine is influenced by bacterial colonization. To promote establishment of optimal microbial communities in preterm infants, knowledge of the beneficial functions of the early gut microbiota on intestinal development is needed. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of early preterm infant microbiota on host gut development using a gnotobiotic mouse model. Histological assessment of intestinal development was performed. The differentiation of four epithelial cell lineages (enterocytes, goblet cells, Paneth cells, enteroendocrine cells) and tight junction (TJ) formation was examined. Using weight gain as a surrogate marker for health, we found that early microbiota from a preterm infant with normal weight gain (MPI-H) induced increased villus height and crypt depth, increased cell proliferation, increased numbers of goblet cells and Paneth cells, and enhanced TJs compared with the changes induced by early microbiota from a poor weight gain preterm infant (MPI-L). Laser capture microdissection (LCM) plus qRT-PCR further revealed, in MPI-H mice, a higher expression of stem cell marker Lgr5 and Paneth cell markers Lyz1 and Cryptdin5 in crypt populations, along with higher expression of the goblet cell and mature enterocyte marker Muc3 in villus populations. In contrast, MPI-L microbiota failed to induce the aforementioned changes and presented intestinal characteristics comparable to a germ-free host. Our data demonstrate that microbial communities have differential effects on intestinal development. Future studies to identify pioneer settlers in neonatal microbial communities necessary to induce maturation may provide new insights for preterm infant microbial ecosystem therapeutics.

  3. Central nervous system immunity in mice infected with theiler's virus. I. Local neutralizing antibody response.

    PubMed

    Lipton, H L; Gonzalez-Scarano, F

    1978-02-01

    Experimental Theiler's mouse encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) infection in mice is atypical of most other picornavirus infections because virus persists in the host. It was shown previously that low levels of infectious virus are readily detectable in the central nervous system (CNS) despite the presence of substantial titers of serum neutralizing antibody. In this study antibody assays were performed on CNS tissue homogenates, and neutralizing antibody was regularly found in the CNS of TMEV-infected mice. That neutralization by infected CNS extracts was due to antibody was demonstrated by the specificity of neutralization for TMEV and by elimination or marked reduction of neutralization by in vitro treatment with goat antiserum to mouse IgG. In addition, immunofluorescent staining consistently revealed IgG- but not IgM-containing cells in perivascular cuffs and parenchymal lesions of the brains of infected animals. Evidence of local antibody formation in the CNS was found in the actual reversal of the serum-CNS antibody ratio in about one-third of infected mice after three weeks. In contrast, normal mice had a mean serum-CNS antibody ratio of approximately 100:1 after passive transfer of antibody. Possible reasons for the fact that TMEV is not neutralized by antibody and chronic infection is not aborted include the formation of complexes of infectious virus and antibody in the CNS and the production of antibodies with low affinity for TMEV.

  4. Interleukin-18 Antagonism Improved Histopathological Conditions of Malaria Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    JABBARZARE, Marzieh; CHIN, Voon Kin; TALIB, Herni; YAM, Mun Fei; ADAM, Siti Khadijah; HASSAN, Haniza; ABDUL MAJID, Roslaini; MAT TAIB, Che Norma; MOHD MOKLAS, Mohamad Aris; TAUFIK HIDAYAT, Mohamad; MOHD SIDEK, Hasidah; BASIR, Rusliza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Interleukin 18 (IL-18) exerts pleiotropic roles in many inflammatory-related diseases including parasitic infection. Previous studies have demonstrated the promising therapeutic potential of modulating IL-18 bioactivity in various pathological conditions. However, its involvement during malaria infection has yet to be established. In this study, we demonstrated the effect of modulating IL-18 on the histopathological conditions of malaria infected mice. Methods: Plasmodium berghei ANKA infection in male ICR mice was used as a model for malaria infection. Modulation of IL-18 release was carried out by treatment of malarial mice with recombinant mouse IL-18 (rmIL-18) and recombinant mouse IL-18 Fc chimera (rmIL-18Fc) intravenously. Histopathological study and analysis were performed on major organs including brain, liver, spleen, lungs and kidney. Results: Treatment with rmIL-18Fc resulted in significant improvements on the histopathological conditions of the organs in malaria-infected mice. Conclusion: IL-18 is an important mediator of malaria pathogenesis and targeting IL-18 could prove beneficial in malaria-infected host. PMID:26622294

  5. Bone marrow nitric oxide production and development of anemia in Trypanosoma brucei-infected mice.

    PubMed Central

    Mabbott, N; Sternberg, J

    1995-01-01

    Mice infected with Trypanosoma brucei rapidly develop anemia, with the number of circulating erythrocytes reduced by 50% within a week after infection. The present study investigated the relationship between anemia and bone marrow nitric oxide (NO) production. Bone marrow cell populations from T. brucei-infected mice exhibited elevated levels of NO synthase activity which was inhibitable by NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester. NO production was found to coincide with suppressed bone marrow T-cell proliferation in response to stimulation with the mitogen concanavalin A both in vitro and in vivo. As this indicated that NO may inhibit proliferation in other cell types, particularly hemopoietic precursors, we examined the role of NO in anemia during trypanosome infection. NO production correlated directly with the development of anemia, and treatment of infected mice with NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester in vivo to systemically inhibit NO synthesis led to a significant reduction in the anemia. Thus, elevated NO production in the bone marrow of T. brucei-infected mice is likely to play a significant role in the anemia resulting from T. brucei infection. PMID:7890423

  6. Highly active antiretroviral therapy potently suppresses HIV infection in humanized Rag2-/-gammac-/- mice.

    PubMed

    Sango, Kaori; Joseph, Aviva; Patel, Mahesh; Osiecki, Kristin; Dutta, Monica; Goldstein, Harris

    2010-07-01

    Humanized Rag2(-/-)gamma(c)(-/-) mice (Hu-DKO mice) become populated with functional human T cells, B cells, and dendritic cells following transplantation with human hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) and represent an improved model for studying HIV infection in vivo. In the current study we demonstrated that intrasplenic inoculation of hu-DKO mice with HIV-1 initiated a higher level of HIV infection than intravenous or intraperitoneal inoculation, associated with a reciprocal decrease in peripheral CD4(+) T cells and increase in peripheral CD8(+) T cells. HIV infection by intrasplenic injection increased serum levels of human IgG and IgM including human IgM and IgG specific for HIV-1 gp120. There was a significant inverse correlation between the level of HIV-1 infection and the extent of CD4(+) T cell depletion. Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) initiated 1 week after HIV-1 inoculation markedly suppressed HIV-1 infection and prevented CD4(+) T cell depletion. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that intrasplenic injection of hu-DKO mice with HIV is a more efficient route of HIV infection than intravenous or intraperitoneal injection and generates increased infection associated with an increased anti-HIV humoral response. This animal model can serve as a valuable in vivo model to study the efficacy of anti-HIV therapies.

  7. Eosinophilic myocarditis in CBA/J mice infected with Toxocara canis.

    PubMed Central

    Cookston, M.; Stober, M.; Kayes, S. G.

    1990-01-01

    In humans, chronic eosinophilia has been associated clinically with endomyocardial fibrosis and myocardial damage. Mice infected with Toxocara canis have a marked eosinophilia, and develop eosinophil-rich granulomatous lesions in the soft tissues of the body, especially the lungs, liver, brain, and skeletal muscle. Few reports have described myocardial lesions associated with T. canis infections in mice. We examined the hearts of CBA/J mice killed at weekly intervals over an 8-week period for evidence of myocardial damage that might be attributable to eosinophils. Total white blood cell counts and eosinophil counts were obtained during this period, and revealed a peak white blood cell count of approximately 28,000 cells/mm3 at day 7 after infection and a peak eosinophil count of approximately 4,000 cells/mm3 at day 14 after infection. Myocardial lesions in the ventricular wall began as focal infiltrates of eosinophils and histiocytes, then progressed into granulomata containing necrotic debris. Collagen deposition was noted by day 21 after infection. By day 42 after infection, the lesions had contracted greatly because of a loss of cellularity, and consisted mainly of fibroblasts and hemosiderin-laden macrophages. Myocyte damage, characterized by increased eosinophilia and necrosis, was observed. T. canis-infected CBA/J mice thus offer a useful model to study eosinophil-dependent myocardial damage. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:2349964

  8. Pilot-Scale Pulsed UV Light Irradiation of Experimentally Infected Raspberries Suppresses Cryptosporidium parvum Infectivity in Immunocompetent Suckling Mice.

    PubMed

    Le Goff, L; Hubert, B; Favennec, L; Villena, I; Ballet, J J; Agoulon, A; Orange, N; Gargala, G

    2015-12-01

    Cryptosporidium spp., a significant cause of foodborne infection, have been shown to be resistant to most chemical food disinfectant agents and infective for weeks in irrigation waters and stored fresh vegetal produce. Pulsed UV light (PL) has the potential to inactivate Cryptosporidium spp. on surfaces of raw or minimally processed foods or both. The present study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of PL on viability and in vivo infectivity of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts present on raspberries, a known source of transmission to humans of oocyst-forming apicomplexan pathogens. The skin of each of 20 raspberries was experimentally inoculated with five 10-μl spots of an oocyst suspension containing 6 × 10(7) oocysts per ml (Nouzilly isolate). Raspberries were irradiated by PL flashes (4 J/cm(2) of total fluence). This dose did not affect colorimetric or organoleptic characteristics of fruits. After immunomagnetic separation from raspberries, oocysts were bleached and administered orally to neonatal suckling mice. Seven days after infection, mice were euthanized, and the number of oocysts in the entire small intestine was individually assessed by immunofluorescence flow cytometry. Three of 12 and 12 of 12 inoculated mice that received 10 and 100 oocysts isolated from nonirradiated raspberries, respectively, were found infected. Four of 12 and 2 of 12 inoculated mice that received 10(3) and 10(4) oocysts from irradiated raspberries, respectively, were found infected. Oocyst counts were lower in animals inoculated with 10(3) and 10(4) oocysts from irradiated raspberries (92 ± 144 and 38 ± 82, respectively) than in animals infected with 100 oocysts from nonirradiated raspberries (35,785 ± 66,221, P = 0.008). PL irradiation achieved oocyst reductions of 2 and 3 log for an inoculum of 10(3) and 10(4) oocysts, respectively. The present pilot-scale evaluation suggests that PL is an effective mode of decontamination for raspberries and prompts further applicability

  9. Pilot-Scale Pulsed UV Light Irradiation of Experimentally Infected Raspberries Suppresses Cryptosporidium parvum Infectivity in Immunocompetent Suckling Mice.

    PubMed

    Le Goff, L; Hubert, B; Favennec, L; Villena, I; Ballet, J J; Agoulon, A; Orange, N; Gargala, G

    2015-12-01

    Cryptosporidium spp., a significant cause of foodborne infection, have been shown to be resistant to most chemical food disinfectant agents and infective for weeks in irrigation waters and stored fresh vegetal produce. Pulsed UV light (PL) has the potential to inactivate Cryptosporidium spp. on surfaces of raw or minimally processed foods or both. The present study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of PL on viability and in vivo infectivity of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts present on raspberries, a known source of transmission to humans of oocyst-forming apicomplexan pathogens. The skin of each of 20 raspberries was experimentally inoculated with five 10-μl spots of an oocyst suspension containing 6 × 10(7) oocysts per ml (Nouzilly isolate). Raspberries were irradiated by PL flashes (4 J/cm(2) of total fluence). This dose did not affect colorimetric or organoleptic characteristics of fruits. After immunomagnetic separation from raspberries, oocysts were bleached and administered orally to neonatal suckling mice. Seven days after infection, mice were euthanized, and the number of oocysts in the entire small intestine was individually assessed by immunofluorescence flow cytometry. Three of 12 and 12 of 12 inoculated mice that received 10 and 100 oocysts isolated from nonirradiated raspberries, respectively, were found infected. Four of 12 and 2 of 12 inoculated mice that received 10(3) and 10(4) oocysts from irradiated raspberries, respectively, were found infected. Oocyst counts were lower in animals inoculated with 10(3) and 10(4) oocysts from irradiated raspberries (92 ± 144 and 38 ± 82, respectively) than in animals infected with 100 oocysts from nonirradiated raspberries (35,785 ± 66,221, P = 0.008). PL irradiation achieved oocyst reductions of 2 and 3 log for an inoculum of 10(3) and 10(4) oocysts, respectively. The present pilot-scale evaluation suggests that PL is an effective mode of decontamination for raspberries and prompts further applicability

  10. Measles Virus Infection of SLAM (CD150) Knockin Mice Reproduces Tropism and Immunosuppression in Human Infection▿

    PubMed Central

    Ohno, Shinji; Ono, Nobuyuki; Seki, Fumio; Takeda, Makoto; Kura, Shinobu; Tsuzuki, Teruhisa; Yanagi, Yusuke

    2007-01-01

    The human signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM, also called CD150), a regulator of antigen-driven T-cell responses and macrophage functions, acts as a cellular receptor for measles virus (MV), and its V domain is necessary and sufficient for receptor function. We report here the generation of SLAM knockin mice in which the V domain of mouse SLAM was replaced by that of human SLAM. The chimeric SLAM had an expected distribution and normal function in the knockin mice. Splenocytes from the SLAM knockin mice permitted the in vitro growth of a virulent MV strain but not that of the Edmonston vaccine strain. Unlike in vitro infection, MV could grow only in SLAM knockin mice that also lacked the type I interferon receptor (IFNAR). After intraperitoneal or intranasal inoculation, MV was detected in the spleen and lymph nodes throughout the body but not in the thymus. Notably, the virus appeared first in the mediastinal lymph node after intranasal inoculation. Splenocytes from MV-infected IFNAR−/− SLAM knockin mice showed suppression of proliferative responses to concanavalin A. Thus, MV infection of SLAM knockin mice reproduces lymphotropism and immunosuppression in human infection, serving as a useful small animal model for measles. PMID:17135325

  11. Matrix Metalloproteinase-2 Mediates Intestinal Immunopathogenesis in Campylobacter Jejuni-Infected Infant Mice

    PubMed Central

    Alutis, Marie E.; Grundmann, Ursula; Hagen, Ulrike; Fischer, André; Kühl, Anja A.; Göbel, Ulf B.; Bereswill, Stefan; Heimesaat, Markus M.

    2015-01-01

    Increased levels of the matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs)-2 and -9 (also referred to gelatinase-A and -B, respectively) can be detected in the inflamed gut. We have recently shown that synthetic gelatinase blockage reduces colonic apoptosis and pro-inflammatory immune responses following murine Campylobacter (C.) jejuni infection. In order to dissect whether MMP-2 and/or MMP-9 is involved in mediating C. jejuni-induced immune responses, infant MMP-2–/–, MMP-9–/–, and wildtype (WT) mice were perorally infected with the C. jejuni strain B2 immediately after weaning. Whereas, at day 2 postinfection (p.i.), fecal C. jejuni B2 loads were comparable in mice of either genotype, mice expelled the pathogen from the intestinal tract until day 4 p.i. Six days p.i., colonic MMP-2 but not MMP-9 mRNA was upregulated in WT mice. Remarkably, infected MMP-2–/– mice exhibited less frequent abundance of blood in feces, less distinct colonic histopathology and apoptosis, lower numbers of effector as well as innate and adaptive immune cells within the colonic mucosa, and higher colonic IL-22 mRNA levels as compared to infected WT mice. In conclusion, these results point towards an important role of MMP-2 in mediating C. jejuni-induced intestinal immunopathogenesis. PMID:26495129

  12. Aging aggravates ischemic stroke-induced brain damage in mice with chronic peripheral infection.

    PubMed

    Dhungana, Hiramani; Malm, Tarja; Denes, Adam; Valonen, Piia; Wojciechowski, Sara; Magga, Johanna; Savchenko, Ekaterina; Humphreys, Neil; Grencis, Richard; Rothwell, Nancy; Koistinaho, Jari

    2013-10-01

    Ischemic stroke is confounded by conditions such as atherosclerosis, diabetes, and infection, all of which alter peripheral inflammatory processes with concomitant impact on stroke outcome. The majority of the stroke patients are elderly, but the impact of interactions between aging and inflammation on stroke remains unknown. We thus investigated the influence of age on the outcome of stroke in animals predisposed to systemic chronic infection. Th1-polarized chronic systemic infection was induced in 18-22 month and 4-month-old C57BL/6j mice by administration of Trichuris muris (gut parasite). One month after infection, mice underwent permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion and infarct size, brain gliosis, and brain and plasma cytokine profiles were analyzed. Chronic infection increased the infarct size in aged but not in young mice at 24 h. Aged, ischemic mice showed altered plasma and brain cytokine responses, while the lesion size correlated with plasma prestroke levels of RANTES. Moreover, the old, infected mice exhibited significantly increased neutrophil recruitment and upregulation of both plasma interleukin-17α and tumor necrosis factor-α levels. Neither age nor infection status alone or in combination altered the ischemia-induced brain microgliosis. Our results show that chronic peripheral infection in aged animals renders the brain more vulnerable to ischemic insults, possibly by increasing the invasion of neutrophils and altering the inflammation status in the blood and brain. Understanding the interactions between age and infections is crucial for developing a better therapeutic regimen for ischemic stroke and when modeling it as a disease of the elderly.

  13. Increased Susceptibility of Humanized NSG Mice to Panton-Valentine Leukocidin and Staphylococcus aureus Skin Infection

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Ching Wen; Kolar, Stacey L.; Müller, Sabrina; Rodriguez, Maria D.; Rezai-Zadeh, Kavon; Fan, Xuemo; Beenhouwer, David O.; Town, Terrence; Liu, George Y.

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of skin and soft-tissue infections worldwide. Mice are the most commonly used animals for modeling human staphylococcal infections. However a supra-physiologic S. aureus inoculum is required to establish gross murine skin pathology. Moreover, many staphylococcal factors, including Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) elaborated by community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA), exhibit selective human tropism and cannot be adequately studied in mice. To overcome these deficiencies, we investigated S. aureus infection in non-obese diabetic (NOD)/severe combined immune deficiency (SCID)/IL2rγnull (NSG) mice engrafted with human CD34+ umbilical cord blood cells. These “humanized” NSG mice require one to two log lower inoculum to induce consistent skin lesions compared with control mice, and exhibit larger cutaneous lesions upon infection with PVL+ versus isogenic PVL- S. aureus. Neutrophils appear important for PVL pathology as adoptive transfer of human neutrophils alone to NSG mice was sufficient to induce dermonecrosis following challenge with PVL+ S. aureus but not PVL- S. aureus. PMX53, a human C5aR inhibitor, blocked PVL-induced cellular cytotoxicity in vitro and reduced the size difference of lesions induced by the PVL+ and PVL- S. aureus, but PMX53 also reduced recruitment of neutrophils and exacerbated the infection. Overall, our findings establish humanized mice as an important translational tool for the study of S. aureus infection and provide strong evidence that PVL is a human virulence factor. PMID:26618545

  14. Hippocampal protection in mice with an attenuated inflammatory monocyte response to acute CNS picornavirus infection

    PubMed Central

    Howe, Charles L.; LaFrance-Corey, Reghann G.; Sundsbak, Rhianna S.; Sauer, Brian M.; LaFrance, Stephanie J.; Buenz, Eric J.; Schmalstieg, William F.

    2012-01-01

    Neuronal injury during acute viral infection of the brain is associated with the development of persistent cognitive deficits and seizures in humans. In C57BL/6 mice acutely infected with the Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus, hippocampal CA1 neurons are injured by a rapid innate immune response, resulting in profound memory deficits. In contrast, infected SJL and B6xSJL F1 hybrid mice exhibit essentially complete hippocampal and memory preservation. Analysis of brain-infiltrating leukocytes revealed that SJL mice mount a sharply attenuated inflammatory monocyte response as compared to B6 mice. Bone marrow transplantation experiments isolated the attenuation to the SJL immune system. Adoptive transfer of B6 inflammatory monocytes into acutely infected B6xSJL hosts converted these mice to a hippocampal damage phenotype and induced a cognitive deficit marked by failure to recognize a novel object. These findings show that inflammatory monocytes are the critical cellular mediator of hippocampal injury during acute picornavirus infection of the brain. PMID:22848791

  15. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles exacerbate pneumonia in respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)-infected mice.

    PubMed

    Hashiguchi, Seiko; Yoshida, Hiroki; Akashi, Toshi; Komemoto, Keiji; Ueda, Tomoyuki; Ikarashi, Yoshiaki; Miyauchi, Aki; Konno, Katsuhiko; Yamanaka, Sayoko; Hirose, Akihiko; Kurokawa, Masahiko; Watanabe, Wataru

    2015-03-01

    To reveal the effects of TiO2 nanoparticles, used in cosmetics and building materials, on the immune response, a respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection mouse model was used. BALB/c mice were exposed once intranasally to TiO2 at 0.5mg/kg and infected intranasally with RSV five days later. The levels of IFN-γ and chemokine CCL5, representative markers of pneumonia, in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluids of RSV-infected mice had increased significantly in TiO2-exposed mice compared with the control on day 5 post-infection, but not in uninfected mice. While pulmonary viral titers were not affected by TiO2 exposure, an increase in the infiltration of lymphocytes into the alveolar septa in lung tissues was observed. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed aggregation of TiO2 nanoparticles near inflammatory cells in the severely affected region. Thus, a single exposure to TiO2 nanoparticles affected the immune system and exacerbated pneumonia in RSV-infected mice.

  16. Exendin-4 improves resistance to Listeria monocytogenes infection in diabetic db/db mice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hsien Yueh; Chung, Chih-Yao; Yang, Wen-Chin; Liang, Chih-Lung; Wang, Chi-Young; Chang, Chih-Yu

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of diabetes mellitus is increasing among companion animals. This disease has similar characteristics in both humans and animals. Diabetes is frequently identified as an independent risk factor for infections associated with increased mortality. In the present study, homozygous diabetic (db/db) mice were infected with Listeria (L.) monocytogenes and then treated with the anti-diabetic drug exendin-4, a glucagon-like peptide 1 analogue. In aged db/db mice, decreased CD11b+ macrophage populations with higher lipid content and lower phagocytic activity were observed. Exendin-4 lowered high lipid levels and enhanced phagocytosis in macrophages from db/db mice infected with L. monocytogenes. Exendin-4 also ameliorated obesity and hyperglycemia, and improved ex vivo bacteria clearance by macrophages in the animals. Liver histology examined during L. monocytogenes infection indicated that abscess formation was much milder in exendin-4-treated db/db mice than in the control animals. Moreover, mechanistic studies demonstrated that expression of ATP binding cassette transporter 1, a sterol transporter, was higher in macrophages isolated from the exendin-4-treated db/db mice. Overall, our results suggest that exendin-4 decreases the risk of infection in diabetic animals by modifying the interaction between intracellular lipids and phagocytic macrophages. PMID:23000581

  17. Effect of UV irradiation on lethal infection of mice with Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Denkins, Y M; Kripke, M L

    1993-02-01

    Exposure of mice to UV radiation inhibits the induction and elicitation of the delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response to Candida albicans. To determine whether UV irradiation also affects the pathogenesis of systemic C. albicans infection, C3H mice were exposed to a single dose of 48 kJ/m2 UV-B radiation from FS40 sunlamps 5 days before or 5 days after sensitization with formalin-fixed C. albicans and challenged intravenously (i.v.) with a lethal dose of viable fungi 6 days after sensitization (11 or 1 days after UV irradiation). Exposing unsensitized mice to UV radiation 11 days before lethal challenge had no effect on survival, but the survival time of mice exposed to UV radiation 1 day before challenge was reduced by more than 50%. In the latter group, decreased survival time correlated with persistence of C. albicans in the brain and progressive growth of C. albicans in the kidneys. Sensitization of unirradiated mice with formalin-fixed C. albicans extended their survival time following lethal i.v. challenge with viable C. albicans. Exposing the mice to UV radiation 5 days before sensitization did not abrogate this beneficial effect of sensitization on survival, even though it significantly reduced the DTH response. Thus, immunity to systemic infection did not depend on the ability of the mice to exhibit a DTH response to C. albicans. The beneficial effect of sensitization on survival after lethal infection was abrogated, however, in mice exposed to UV radiation 1 day before lethal challenge with C. albicans. Furthermore, these mice were unable to contain the progressive growth of C. albicans in the kidneys, in contrast to sensitized, unirradiated mice. PMID:8451288

  18. Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Humanized Mice Infected with HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Nusbaum, Rebecca J.; Calderon, Veronica E.; Huante, Matthew B.; Sutjita, Putri; Vijayakumar, Sudhamathi; Lancaster, Katrina L.; Hunter, Robert L.; Actor, Jeffrey K.; Cirillo, Jeffrey D.; Aronson, Judith; Gelman, Benjamin B.; Lisinicchia, Joshua G.; Valbuena, Gustavo; Endsley, Janice J.

    2016-01-01

    Co-infection with HIV increases the morbidity and mortality associated with tuberculosis due to multiple factors including a poorly understood microbial synergy. We developed a novel small animal model of co-infection in the humanized mouse to investigate how HIV infection disrupts pulmonary containment of Mtb. Following dual infection, HIV-infected cells were localized to sites of Mtb-driven inflammation and mycobacterial replication in the lung. Consistent with disease in human subjects, we observed increased mycobacterial burden, loss of granuloma structure, and increased progression of TB disease, due to HIV co-infection. Importantly, we observed an HIV-dependent pro-inflammatory cytokine signature (IL-1β, IL-6, TNFα, and IL-8), neutrophil accumulation, and greater lung pathology in the Mtb-co-infected lung. These results suggest that in the early stages of acute co-infection in the humanized mouse, infection with HIV exacerbates the pro-inflammatory response to pulmonary Mtb, leading to poorly formed granulomas, more severe lung pathology, and increased mycobacterial burden and dissemination. PMID:26908312

  19. Zika Virus Infection in Mice Causes Panuveitis with Shedding of Virus in Tears.

    PubMed

    Miner, Jonathan J; Sene, Abdoulaye; Richner, Justin M; Smith, Amber M; Santeford, Andrea; Ban, Norimitsu; Weger-Lucarelli, James; Manzella, Francesca; Rückert, Claudia; Govero, Jennifer; Noguchi, Kevin K; Ebel, Gregory D; Diamond, Michael S; Apte, Rajendra S

    2016-09-20

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an emerging flavivirus that causes congenital abnormalities and Guillain-Barré syndrome. ZIKV infection also results in severe eye disease characterized by optic neuritis, chorioretinal atrophy, and blindness in newborns and conjunctivitis and uveitis in adults. We evaluated ZIKV infection of the eye by using recently developed mouse models of pathogenesis. ZIKV-inoculated mice developed conjunctivitis, panuveitis, and infection of the cornea, iris, optic nerve, and ganglion and bipolar cells in the retina. This phenotype was independent of the entry receptors Axl or Mertk, given that Axl(-/-), Mertk(-/-), and Axl(-/-)Mertk(-/-) double knockout mice sustained levels of infection similar to those of control animals. We also detected abundant viral RNA in tears, suggesting that virus might be secreted from lacrimal glands or shed from the cornea. This model provides a foundation for studying ZIKV-induced ocular disease, defining mechanisms of viral persistence, and developing therapeutic approaches for viral infections of the eye.

  20. Zika Virus Infection in Mice Causes Panuveitis with Shedding of Virus in Tears.

    PubMed

    Miner, Jonathan J; Sene, Abdoulaye; Richner, Justin M; Smith, Amber M; Santeford, Andrea; Ban, Norimitsu; Weger-Lucarelli, James; Manzella, Francesca; Rückert, Claudia; Govero, Jennifer; Noguchi, Kevin K; Ebel, Gregory D; Diamond, Michael S; Apte, Rajendra S

    2016-09-20

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an emerging flavivirus that causes congenital abnormalities and Guillain-Barré syndrome. ZIKV infection also results in severe eye disease characterized by optic neuritis, chorioretinal atrophy, and blindness in newborns and conjunctivitis and uveitis in adults. We evaluated ZIKV infection of the eye by using recently developed mouse models of pathogenesis. ZIKV-inoculated mice developed conjunctivitis, panuveitis, and infection of the cornea, iris, optic nerve, and ganglion and bipolar cells in the retina. This phenotype was independent of the entry receptors Axl or Mertk, given that Axl(-/-), Mertk(-/-), and Axl(-/-)Mertk(-/-) double knockout mice sustained levels of infection similar to those of control animals. We also detected abundant viral RNA in tears, suggesting that virus might be secreted from lacrimal glands or shed from the cornea. This model provides a foundation for studying ZIKV-induced ocular disease, defining mechanisms of viral persistence, and developing therapeutic approaches for viral infections of the eye. PMID:27612415

  1. A Tetraspecific VHH-Based Neutralizing Antibody Modifies Disease Outcome in Three Animal Models of Clostridium difficile Infection.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Diane J; Beamer, Gillian; Tremblay, Jacqueline M; Steele, Jennifer A; Kim, Hyeun Bum; Wang, Yaunkai; Debatis, Michele; Sun, Xingmin; Kashentseva, Elena A; Dmitriev, Igor P; Curiel, David T; Shoemaker, Charles B; Tzipori, Saul

    2016-09-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), a leading cause of nosocomial infection, is a serious disease in North America, Europe, and Asia. CDI varies greatly from asymptomatic carriage to life-threatening diarrhea, toxic megacolon, and toxemia. The incidence of community-acquired infection has increased due to the emergence of hypervirulent antibiotic-resistant strains. These new strains contribute to the frequent occurrence of disease relapse, complicating treatment, increasing hospital stays, and increasing morbidity and mortality among patients. Therefore, it is critical to develop new therapeutic approaches that bypass the development of antimicrobial resistance and avoid disruption of gut microflora. Here, we describe the construction of a single heteromultimeric VHH-based neutralizing agent (VNA) that targets the two primary virulence factors of Clostridium difficile, toxins A (TcdA) and B (TcdB). Designated VNA2-Tcd, this agent has subnanomolar toxin neutralization potencies for both C. difficile toxins in cell assays. When given systemically by parenteral administration, VNA2-Tcd protected against CDI in gnotobiotic piglets and mice and to a lesser extent in hamsters. Protection from CDI was also observed in gnotobiotic piglets treated by gene therapy with an adenovirus that promoted the expression of VNA2-Tcd. PMID:27413067

  2. A Tetraspecific VHH-Based Neutralizing Antibody Modifies Disease Outcome in Three Animal Models of Clostridium difficile Infection

    PubMed Central

    Beamer, Gillian; Tremblay, Jacqueline M.; Steele, Jennifer A.; Kim, Hyeun Bum; Wang, Yaunkai; Debatis, Michele; Sun, Xingmin; Kashentseva, Elena A.; Dmitriev, Igor P.; Curiel, David T.; Shoemaker, Charles B.

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), a leading cause of nosocomial infection, is a serious disease in North America, Europe, and Asia. CDI varies greatly from asymptomatic carriage to life-threatening diarrhea, toxic megacolon, and toxemia. The incidence of community-acquired infection has increased due to the emergence of hypervirulent antibiotic-resistant strains. These new strains contribute to the frequent occurrence of disease relapse, complicating treatment, increasing hospital stays, and increasing morbidity and mortality among patients. Therefore, it is critical to develop new therapeutic approaches that bypass the development of antimicrobial resistance and avoid disruption of gut microflora. Here, we describe the construction of a single heteromultimeric VHH-based neutralizing agent (VNA) that targets the two primary virulence factors of Clostridium difficile, toxins A (TcdA) and B (TcdB). Designated VNA2-Tcd, this agent has subnanomolar toxin neutralization potencies for both C. difficile toxins in cell assays. When given systemically by parenteral administration, VNA2-Tcd protected against CDI in gnotobiotic piglets and mice and to a lesser extent in hamsters. Protection from CDI was also observed in gnotobiotic piglets treated by gene therapy with an adenovirus that promoted the expression of VNA2-Tcd. PMID:27413067

  3. Microarray analysis reveals altered circulating microRNA expression in mice infected with Coxsackievirus B3

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Chaoyu; Tong, Lei; Zhao, Wenran; Wang, Yan; Meng, Yuan; Lin, Lexun; Liu, Bingchen; Zhai, Yujia; Zhong, Zhaohua; Li, Xueqi

    2016-01-01

    Coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) is a common causative agent in the development of inflammatory cardiomyopathy. However, whether the expression of peripheral blood microRNAs (miRNAs) is altered in this process is unknown. The present study investigated changes to miRNA expression in the peripheral blood of CVB3-infected mice. Utilizing miRNA microarray technology, differential miRNA expression was examined between normal and CVB3-infected mice. The present results suggest that specific miRNAs were differentially expressed in the peripheral blood of mice infected with CVB3, varying with infection duration. Using miRNA microarray analysis, a total of 96 and 89 differentially expressed miRNAs were identified in the peripheral blood of mice infected with CVB3 for 3 and 6 days, respectively. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to validate differentially expressed miRNAs, revealing a consistency of these results with the miRNA microarray analysis results. The biological functions of the differentially expressed miRNAs were then predicted by bioinformatics analysis. The potential biological roles of differentially expressed miRNAs included hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, dilated cardiomyopathy and arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy. These results may provide important insights into the mechanisms responsible for the progression of CVB3 infection. PMID:27698715

  4. Microarray analysis reveals altered circulating microRNA expression in mice infected with Coxsackievirus B3

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Chaoyu; Tong, Lei; Zhao, Wenran; Wang, Yan; Meng, Yuan; Lin, Lexun; Liu, Bingchen; Zhai, Yujia; Zhong, Zhaohua; Li, Xueqi

    2016-01-01

    Coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) is a common causative agent in the development of inflammatory cardiomyopathy. However, whether the expression of peripheral blood microRNAs (miRNAs) is altered in this process is unknown. The present study investigated changes to miRNA expression in the peripheral blood of CVB3-infected mice. Utilizing miRNA microarray technology, differential miRNA expression was examined between normal and CVB3-infected mice. The present results suggest that specific miRNAs were differentially expressed in the peripheral blood of mice infected with CVB3, varying with infection duration. Using miRNA microarray analysis, a total of 96 and 89 differentially expressed miRNAs were identified in the peripheral blood of mice infected with CVB3 for 3 and 6 days, respectively. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to validate differentially expressed miRNAs, revealing a consistency of these results with the miRNA microarray analysis results. The biological functions of the differentially expressed miRNAs were then predicted by bioinformatics analysis. The potential biological roles of differentially expressed miRNAs included hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, dilated cardiomyopathy and arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy. These results may provide important insights into the mechanisms responsible for the progression of CVB3 infection.

  5. Infection of SCID mice with Montana Myotis leukoencephalitis virus as a model for flavivirus encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Charlier, Nathalie; Leyssen, Pieter; Paeshuyse, Jan; Drosten, Christian; Schmitz, Herbert; Van Lommel, Alfons; De Clercq, Erik; Neyts, Johan

    2002-08-01

    We have established a convenient animal model for flavivirus encephalitis using Montana Myotis leukoencephalitis virus (MMLV), a bat flavivirus. This virus has the same genomic organization, and contains the same conserved motifs in genes that encode potential antiviral targets, as flaviviruses that cause disease in man (N. Charlier et al., accompanying paper), and has a similar particle size (approximately 40 nm). MMLV replicates well in Vero cells and appears to be equally as sensitive as yellow fever virus and dengue fever virus to a selection of experimental antiviral agents. Cells infected with MMLV show dilation of the endoplasmic reticulum, a characteristic of flavivirus infection. Intraperitoneal, intranasal or direct intracerebral inoculation of SCID mice with MMLV resulted in encephalitis ultimately leading to death, whereas immunocompetent mice were refractory to either intranasal or intraperitoneal infection with MMLV. Viral RNA and/or antigens were detected in the brain and serum of MMLV-infected SCID mice, but not in any other organ examined: MMLV was detected in the olfactory lobes, the cerebral cortex, the limbic structures, the midbrain, cerebellum and medulla oblongata. Infection was confined to neurons. Treatment with the interferon-alpha/beta inducer poly(I).poly(C) protected SCID mice against MMLV-induced morbidity and mortality, and this protection correlated with a reduction in infectious virus titre and viral RNA load. This validates the MMLV model for use in antiviral drug studies. The MMLV SCID model may, therefore, be attractive for the study of chemoprophylactic or chemotherapeutic strategies against flavivirus infections causing encephalitis.

  6. Immunity to Trichinella spiralis infection in vitamin A-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Vitamin A-deficient (A-) mice make strikingly poor IgG responses when they are immunized with purified protein antigens. Previously, we showed that A- T cells overproduce interferon gamma (IFN-gamma), which then could inhibit interleukin 4 (IL-4)-stimulated B cell IgG responses. To determine if the altered IFN-gamma regulation pattern and its immunological consequences would extend to a natural infection, we studied mice infected with the parasitic helminth Trichinella spiralis. The course of the infection was similar in A- and A-sufficient (A+) mice. These mice did not differ with respect to newborn larvae/female/hour produced in the intestine, or muscle larvae burden 5 wk postinfection. They also did not differ in the intestinal worm expulsion rate until day 15, when A- mice still harbored parasites, whereas A+ mice had cleared intestinal worms. Vitamin A deficiency reduced both the frequency of B lymphocytes secreting IgG1 antibodies to parasite antigens, and the bone marrow eosinophilia associated with helminth infection. The cytokine secretion patterns in infected mice were consistent with these observations and with previous studies. Mesenteric lymph node cells from infected A- mice secreted significantly more IFN-gamma, and significantly less IL-2, IL-4, and IL- 5 than infected A+ controls. A- splenocytes secreted significantly more IFN-gamma, and equivalent amounts of IL-2, IL-4, and IL-5 compared with A+ controls. Interestingly, CD4-CD8- cells secreted the majority of the IL-4 produced in the spleen. The IL-2, IL-4, and IL-5 steady-state transcript levels correlated with secreted protein levels, but IFN- gamma transcripts did not. Although they secreted more protein, A- cells contained fewer IFN-gamma transcripts than A+ cells. These results suggest two vitamin A-mediated regulation steps in IFN-gamma gene expression: positive regulation of IFN-gamma transcript levels, and negative regulation posttranscriptionally. The essentially unaltered outcome of T

  7. Apolipoprotein E plays a key role against cryptosporidial infection in transgenic undernourished mice.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Orleâncio G R; Bolick, David T; Roche, James K; Pinkerton, Relana F; Lima, Aldo A M; Vitek, Michael P; Warren, Cirle A; Oriá, Reinaldo B; Guerrant, Richard L

    2014-01-01

    Apolipoliprotein E (apoE), a critical targeting protein in lipid homeostasis, has been found to have immunoinflammatory effects on murine models of infection and malnutrition. The effects of apoE in undernourished and Cryptosporidium parvum-infected mice have not been investigated. In order to study the role of apoE in a model of C. parvum infection, we used the following C57BL6J mouse genetic strains: APOE-deficient, wild-type controls, and APOE targeted replacement (TR) mice expressing human APOE genes (E3/3; E4/4). Experimental mice were orally infected with 10(7)-unexcysted-C. parvum oocysts between post-natal days 34-35 followed by malnutrition induced with a low-protein diet. Mice were euthanized seven days after C. parvum-challenge to investigate ileal morphology, cytokines, and cationic arginine transporter (CAT-1), arginase 1, Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9), and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression. In addition, we analyzed stool oocyst shedding by qRT-PCR and serum lipids. APOE4/4-TR mice had better weight gains after infection plus malnutrition compared with APOE3/3-TR and wild-type mice. APOE4/4-TR and APOE knockout mice had lower oocyst shedding, however the latter exhibited with villus blunting and higher ileal pro-inflammatory cytokines and iNOS transcripts. APOE4/4-TR mice had increased ileal CAT-1, arginase-1, and TLR9 transcripts relative to APOE knockout. Although with anti-parasitic effects, APOE deficiency exacerbates intestinal inflammatory responses and mucosal damage in undernourished and C. parvum-infected mice. In addition, the human APOE4 gene was found to be protective against the compounded insult of Cryptosporidium infection plus malnutrition, thus extending our previous findings of the protection against diarrhea in APOE4 children. Altogether our findings suggest that apoE plays a key role in the intestinal restitution and immunoinflammatory responses with Cryptosporidium infection and malnutrition.

  8. Parasitological and immunological aspects of early Ascaris spp. infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Gazzinelli-Guimarães, Pedro Henrique; Gazzinelli-Guimarães, Ana Clara; Silva, Flaviane Nunes; Mati, Vitor Luís Tenório; Dhom-Lemos, Lucas de Carvalho; Barbosa, Fernando Sérgio; Passos, Lívia Silva Araújo; Gaze, Soraya; Carneiro, Cláudia Martins; Bartholomeu, Daniella Castanheira; Bueno, Lilian Lacerda; Fujiwara, Ricardo Toshio

    2013-08-01

    Studies related to the immunobiological aspects of an Ascaris spp. infection are still scarce, especially those that aim to elucidate the early events of the immune response. In this study, we demonstrated a novel standardized method for early experimental Ascaris infection, providing additional information about the infectivity of eggs embryonated in vitro as well as the influence of host age on development of the infection. Finally, we characterised the immunopathology of early infection, focusing on the tissue and systemic cytokine profiles and the histopathology of infection in the lungs of BALB/c mice. Our results demonstrated that the highest egg infectivity occurred on the 100th and 200th days of in vitro embryonation and that 8 week-old BALB/c mice were more susceptible to infection than 16 week-old mice. Ascaris-infected mice showed an early, significant level of IL-5 production in the lungs 4 days p.i., followed by an increase in the level of neutrophils in the inflammatory infiltrate at 8 days p.i, which was correlated with the peak of larval migration in the tissue and a significant level of IL-6 production. The inflammatory infiltrate in the lungs was gradually replaced by mononuclear cells and eosinophils on the 10th and 12th days p.i., respectively, and an increase in TNF levels was observed. The downmodulation of systemic TCD4(+) cell numbers might suggest that T cell hyporesponsiveness was induced by the Ascaris spp. larvae, contributing to safeguarding parasite survival during larval migration. Taken together, the novel aspects of Ascaris infection presented here enabled a better understanding of the immunopathological events during larval migration, providing insight for further studies focused on immunisation and immunoprophylatic assays. PMID:23665127

  9. Immune response in the adipose tissue of lean mice infected with the protozoan parasite Neospora caninum.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Luzia; Moreira, João; Melo, Joana; Bezerra, Filipa; Marques, Raquel M; Ferreirinha, Pedro; Correia, Alexandra; Monteiro, Mariana P; Ferreira, Paula G; Vilanova, Manuel

    2015-06-01

    The adipose tissue can make important contributions to immune function. Nevertheless, only a limited number of reports have investigated in lean hosts the immune response elicited in this tissue upon infection. Previous studies suggested that the intracellular protozoan Neospora caninum might affect adipose tissue physiology. Therefore, we investigated in mice challenged with this protozoan if immune cell populations within adipose tissue of different anatomical locations could be differently affected. Early in infection, parasites were detected in the adipose tissue and by 7 days of infection increased numbers of macrophages, regulatory T (Treg) cells and T-bet(+) cells were observed in gonadal, mesenteric, omental and subcutaneous adipose tissue. Increased expression of interferon-γ was also detected in gonadal adipose tissue of infected mice. Two months after infection, parasite DNA was no longer detected in these tissues, but T helper type 1 (Th1) cell numbers remained above control levels in the infected mice. Moreover, the Th1/Treg cell ratio was higher than that of controls in the mesenteric and subcutaneous adipose tissue. Interestingly, chronically infected mice presented a marked increase of serum leptin, a molecule that plays a role in energy balance regulation as well as in promoting Th1-type immune responses. Altogether, we show that an apicomplexa parasitic infection influences immune cellular composition of adipose tissue throughout the body as well as adipokine production, still noticed at a chronic phase of infection when parasites were already cleared from that particular tissue. This strengthens the emerging view that infections can have long-term consequences for the physiology of adipose tissue.

  10. Immune response in the adipose tissue of lean mice infected with the protozoan parasite Neospora caninum

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Luzia; Moreira, João; Melo, Joana; Bezerra, Filipa; Marques, Raquel M; Ferreirinha, Pedro; Correia, Alexandra; Monteiro, Mariana P; Ferreira, Paula G; Vilanova, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    The adipose tissue can make important contributions to immune function. Nevertheless, only a limited number of reports have investigated in lean hosts the immune response elicited in this tissue upon infection. Previous studies suggested that the intracellular protozoan Neospora caninum might affect adipose tissue physiology. Therefore, we investigated in mice challenged with this protozoan if immune cell populations within adipose tissue of different anatomical locations could be differently affected. Early in infection, parasites were detected in the adipose tissue and by 7 days of infection increased numbers of macrophages, regulatory T (Treg) cells and T-bet+ cells were observed in gonadal, mesenteric, omental and subcutaneous adipose tissue. Increased expression of interferon-γ was also detected in gonadal adipose tissue of infected mice. Two months after infection, parasite DNA was no longer detected in these tissues, but T helper type 1 (Th1) cell numbers remained above control levels in the infected mice. Moreover, the Th1/Treg cell ratio was higher than that of controls in the mesenteric and subcutaneous adipose tissue. Interestingly, chronically infected mice presented a marked increase of serum leptin, a molecule that plays a role in energy balance regulation as well as in promoting Th1-type immune responses. Altogether, we show that an apicomplexa parasitic infection influences immune cellular composition of adipose tissue throughout the body as well as adipokine production, still noticed at a chronic phase of infection when parasites were already cleared from that particular tissue. This strengthens the emerging view that infections can have long-term consequences for the physiology of adipose tissue. PMID:25581844

  11. Gnotobiotic Miniature Pig Interbreed Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer for Xenotransplantation.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jeong Ho; Kim, Sang Eun; Gupta, Mukesh Kumar; Lee, HoonTaek

    2016-08-01

    Transgenic animal producing technology has improved consistently over the last couple of decades. Among the available methods, somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) technology was officially the most popular. However, SCNT has low efficiency and requires a highly skilled individual. Additionally, the allo-SCNT nuclear reprogramming mechanism is poorly understood in the gnotobiotic miniature pig, which is a candidate for xenotransplantation, making sampling in oocytes very difficult compared to commercial hybrid pigs. Therefore, interbreed SCNT (ibSCNT), which is a combination of miniature pig and commercial pig (Landrace based), was analyzed and was found to be similar to SCNT in terms of the rate of blastocyst formation (12.6% ± 2.9% vs. 15.5% ± 2.2%; p > 0.05). However, a significantly lower fusion rate was observed in the ibSCNT compared to normal SCNT with Landrace pig somatic cells (29.6% ± 0.8% vs. 65.0% ± 4.9%). Thus, the optimization of fusion parameters was necessary for efficient SCNT. Our results further revealed that ibSCNT by the whole-cell intracytoplasmic injection (WCICI) method had a significantly higher blastocyst forming efficiency than the electrofusion method (31.1 ± 8.5 vs. 15.5% ± 2.2%). The nuclear remodeling and the pattern of changes in acetylation at H3K9 residue were similar in both SCNT and ibSCNT embryos. PMID:27459580

  12. Treatment of trypanosome-infected mice with exogenous interferon, interferon inducers, or antibody to interferon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degee, Antonie L. W.; Mansfield, John M.; Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    1986-01-01

    Earlier studies have demonstrated that mice resistant to Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense (the B10.BR/SgSnJ strain) produces, upon infection by this parasite, two peaks of serum interferon (IFN), while the susceptible mice (C3HeB/FeJ) produces no IFN. In the present study, survival times were compared for B10.BR/SgSnJ, C3HeB/FeJ, and CBA/J (an intermediately resistant strain) mice that were injected, prior to infection with the parasite, with either of the following three preparations (1) IFN-gamma, (2) an antibody to IFN-gamma and (3) polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidylic acid (to induce IFN-alpha/beta). No effect on the survival times of mice by any of these preparations could be demonstrated, contrary to some previous reports.

  13. Protection of mice from lethal influenza virus infection with high dose-short duration ribavirin aerosol.

    PubMed Central

    Wyde, P R; Wilson, S Z; Gilbert, B E; Smith, R H

    1986-01-01

    An aerosol generated from a reservoir containing 60 mg of ribavirin per ml given for 2 h twice daily for 4 days afforded the same high level of protection against lethal influenza virus infection of mice as a longer, conventional treatment schedule (20 mg/ml given for 11 h daily for 4 days). Incremental decreases in ribavirin concentration made while maintaining the 2-h intermittent schedule provided progressively less protection of mice. Mice exposed to the 60-mg/ml doses had significantly increased pulmonary and serum drug levels when compared with mice given 20 mg of drug per ml, these increases were transient, and no evidence of pulmonary intolerance was detected. These studies suggest that protective effects of ribavirin against influenza virus infection can be achieved without untoward effects if higher doses and shorter periods of administration are used. PMID:3813516

  14. Dysfunction of mitochondrial dynamics in the brains of scrapie-infected mice

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Hong-Seok; Choi, Yeong-Gon; Shin, Hae-Young; Oh, Jae-Min; Park, Jeong-Ho; Kim, Jae-Il; Carp, Richard I.; Choi, Eun-Kyoung; Kim, Yong-Sun

    2014-05-30

    Highlights: • Mfn1 and Fis1 are significantly increased in the hippocampal region of the ME7 prion-infected brain, whereas Dlp1 is significantly decreased in the infected brain. • Dlp1 is significantly decreased in the cytosolic fraction of the hippocampus in the infected brain. • Neuronal mitochondria in the prion-infected brains are enlarged and swollen compared to those of control brains. • There are significantly fewer mitochondria in the ME7-infected brain compared to the number in control brain. - Abstract: Mitochondrial dysfunction is a common and prominent feature of many neurodegenerative diseases, including prion diseases; it is induced by oxidative stress in scrapie-infected animal models. In previous studies, we found swelling and dysfunction of mitochondria in the brains of scrapie-infected mice compared to brains of controls, but the mechanisms underlying mitochondrial dysfunction remain unclear. To examine whether the dysregulation of mitochondrial proteins is related to the mitochondrial dysfunction associated with prion disease, we investigated the expression patterns of mitochondrial fusion and fission proteins in the brains of ME7 prion-infected mice. Immunoblot analysis revealed that Mfn1 was up-regulated in both whole brain and specific brain regions, including the cerebral cortex and hippocampus, of ME7-infected mice compared to controls. Additionally, expression levels of Fis1 and Mfn2 were elevated in the hippocampus and the striatum, respectively, of the ME7-infected brain. In contrast, Dlp1 expression was significantly reduced in the hippocampus in the ME7-infected brain, particularly in the cytosolic fraction. Finally, we observed abnormal mitochondrial enlargement and histopathological change in the hippocampus of the ME7-infected brain. These observations suggest that the mitochondrial dysfunction, which is presumably caused by the dysregulation of mitochondrial fusion and fission proteins, may contribute to the

  15. Clearance of experimental cutaneous Staphylococcus aureus infections in mice

    PubMed Central

    Onunkwo, Charles C.; Hahn, Beth L.

    2010-01-01

    Staphylococcal skin infections are quite common in human patients. These infections often clear spontaneously, but may also progress locally and/or disseminate to cause serious and sometimes fatal deep infections. The present studies were undertaken to examine the clearance phase of experimental cutaneous Staphylococcus aureus infections in a mouse model system. Previous work in this system has shown that staphylococci applied to the skin rapidly disseminate to the spleen and kidney. In the present experiments the bacteria were found to persist at the skin infection site at a time (8 days after inoculation) when they had disappeared from the spleen and kidney. Examination of the infected skin at earlier times revealed rapid (within 6 h) invasion into the stratum corneum, stratum Malpighii, and dermis, but subsequent redistribution of bacteria (at 1–2 days) to more superficial sites, particularly crusts located just above the skin surface. The crusts seen in these infections were of two distinct types, which were termed type 1 and type 2. Type 1 crusts appeared first, consisted of bacteria, inflammatory cells, and debris, and developed over an intact epidermis. Type 2 crusts arose from the process of dermal necrosis previously reported to take place at 2 days in this model system. In the latter situation the bacteria were not really cleared from the epidermis and dermis; rather those layers were transformed into a superficial crust that contained the bacteria. Deep hair follicle infections in the dermis were found in these infections, but they did not persist and did not seem to be a reservoir for organisms in the dermis. Resolution of these experimental infections appeared to involve redistribution of invading bacteria to more superficial locations in crusts above the skin surface, marked proliferation of the epidermis, loss of the bacteria-laden crusts from the skin, and eventual healing of the cutaneous damage. PMID:20130894

  16. α-Galactosylceramide protects mice from lethal Coxsackievirus B3 infection and subsequent myocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, C Y; Feng, Y; Qian, G C; Wu, J H; Luo, J; Wang, Y; Chen, G J; Guo, X K; Wang, Z J

    2010-01-01

    Myocarditis is an inflammation of the myocardium which often follows virus infections. Coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3), as a marker of the enterovirus group, is one of the most important infectious agents of virus-induced myocarditis. Using a CVB3-induced myocarditis model, we show that injection α-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer), a ligand for invariant natural killer (NK) T (iNK T) cells, can protect the mice from viral myocarditis. After the systemic administration of α-GalCer in CVB3 infected mice, viral transcription and titres in mouse heart, sera and spleen were reduced, and the damage to the heart was ameliorated. This is accompanied by a better disease course with an improved weight loss profile. Compared with untreated mice, α-GalCer-treated mice showed high levels of interferon (IFN)-γ and interleukin (IL)-4, and reduced proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines in their cardiac tissue. Anti-viral immune response was up-regulated by α-GalCer. Three days after CVB3 infection, α-GalCer-administered mice had larger spleens. Besides NK T cells, more macrophages and CD8+ T cells were found in these spleens. Upon stimulation with phorbol myristate acetate plus ionomycin, splenocytes from α-GalCer-treated mice produced significantly more cytokines [including IFN-γ, tumour necrosis factor-α, IL-4 and IL-10] than those from untreated mice. These data suggest that administration of α-GalCer during acute CVB3 infection is able to protect the mice from lethal myocarditis by local changes in inflammatory cytokine patterns and enhancement of anti-viral immune response at the early stage. α-GalCer is a potential candidate for viral myocarditis treatment. Our work supports the use of anti-viral treatment early to reduce the incidence of virus-mediated heart damage. PMID:20726989

  17. Immunofluorescence for detection of viral antigen in mice infected with Sendai virus.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, E; Kinoshita, K; Muto, T; Nakagawa, M; Imaizumi, K

    1982-04-01

    Sendai virus infection transmitted by contact from cagemates was followed by virus titration and immunofluorescence. The virus grew in the respiratory tract and caused macroscopic lesions in all contact mice. The virus grew to a higher titer in the lung than in the trachea. Tracheal smears, however, were found to be the most suitable for the diagnosis of Sendai virus infection by immunofluorescence, since they contained a large number of cells with intense fluorescence. Diagnosis of Sendai virus infection was made by immunofluorescence within a few hours after autopsy made at early stages of infection.

  18. Cell phenotypic change due to Cryptosporidium parvum infection in immunocompetent mice.

    PubMed

    Codices, Vera; Martins, Catarina; Novo, Carlos; Pinho, Mário; de Sousa, Bruno; Lopes, Angela; Borrego, Miguel; Matos, Olga

    2013-03-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum is an intracellular parasite causing enteritis which can become life-threatening in immunocompromised host. Immunoregulatory T cells play a central role in the regulatory network of the host. Here, we proposed to characterize the populations of immune cells during infection and reinfection with C. parvum. Four-week-old BALB/C mice were inoculated with oocysts of C. parvum at days 0 and 22. Fecal and blood samples, spleens, and small intestines were collected for analysis. Peripheral blood and spleen cell populations were characterized by flow cytometry. After infection (days 0 to 21), mice presented higher values of neutrophils, eosinophils, NK cells and CD4(+)CD25(high) T cells in peripheral blood. After reinfection, this upward trend continued in the following days for all four populations in infected mice. At day 35, infected mice presented similar values to the control group, except for CD4(+)CD25(high) T cells, which remained higher in infected mice. A possible correlation between alterations in blood and spleen cell populations was also studied, but no consistent association could be established. Small intestine sections were screened for intracellular stages of the parasite but no evidence of pathology was observed. Here, we report information which may be important for the understanding of the specific cell-mediated response in immunocompetent mice to C. parvum infection. Although some questions remain unanswered and complementary studies are needed, our results are expected to contribute to a better understanding of innate and Treg cells role in the clearance process of this parasite.

  19. Dietary L-glutamine supplementation improves pregnancy outcome in mice infected with type-2 porcine circovirus.

    PubMed

    Ren, Wenkai; Luo, Wei; Wu, Miaomiao; Liu, Gang; Yu, Xinglong; Fang, Jun; Li, Teijun; Yin, Yulong; Wu, Guoyao

    2013-09-01

    Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) causes reproductive failure in swine. As glutamine can enhance immune function in animals, this study was conducted with mice to test the hypothesis that dietary glutamine supplementation will improve pregnancy outcome in PCV2-infected dams. Beginning on day 0 of gestation, mice were fed a standard diet supplemented with 1.0% L-glutamine or 1.22% L-alanine (isonitrogenous control). All mice were infected with PCV2 (2000 TCID50) on day 10 of gestation. On day 17 of gestation, six mice from each group were euthanized to obtain maternal tissues and fetuses for hematology and histopathology tests. The remaining mice continued to receive their respective diets supplemented with 1.0% L-glutamine or 1.22% L-alanine through lactation. The PCV2 virus was present in maternal samples (serum and lung) of most mice in the control group but was not detected in the glutamine-supplemented mice. Dietary glutamine supplementation reduced abortion, decreased fetal deaths, and enhanced neonatal survival. The glutamine treatment also reduced concentrations of interleukin-6, while increasing concentrations of tumor necrosis factor-α and C-reactive protein, in the maternal serum of mice. Furthermore, glutamine supplementation attenuated microscopic lesions in maternal tissues (lung, spleen, and liver). Collectively, these results indicate that dietary glutamine supplementation is beneficial for ameliorating reproductive failure in virus-infected mice. The findings support the notion that gestating dams require adequate amounts of dietary glutamine for the optimal survival and growth of embryos, fetuses, and neonates, and have important implications for nutritional support of mammals (including swine and humans) during gestation and lactation.

  20. Resistance of mice vaccinated with rabies virus internal structural proteins to lethal infection.

    PubMed

    Takita-Sonoda, Y; Fujii, H; Mifune, K; Ito, Y; Hiraga, M; Nishizono, A; Mannen, K; Minamoto, N

    1993-01-01

    Mice were vaccinated with recombinant vaccinia virus (rVac) expressing the glycoprotein (G), nucleoprotein (N), phosphoprotein (NS) or matrix protein (M) of rabies virus and their resistance to peripheral lethal infection with street rabies virus was examined. Mice vaccinated with rVac-G or rVac-N developed strong antibody responses to the corresponding proteins and essentially all mice survived challenge infection. Mice vaccinated with rVac-NS or rVac-M developed only a slight antibody response, however, a significant protection (59%) was observed in the rVac-NS-vaccinated mice, whereas rVac-M-vaccinated mice were not protected. No anti-G antibodies were detected in the sera of mice which has been vaccinated with rVac-N or rVac-NS and survived challenge infection. Passive transfer of anti-N monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) recognizing an epitope located on amino acids 1-224 of the protein prior to challenge resulted in significant protection, although the protection was not complete even with a high amount of antibodies. In contrast, none of the mice given MAbs recognizing an epitope of amino acids 247-415 or F(ab')2 fragments from a protective MAb IgG were protected. Administration of anti-CD 8 MAb to rVac-N-vaccinated mice showed no significant effect on protection. Our observations suggest that a considerable part of the protection achieved by the vaccination with rVac-N can be ascribed to the intact anti-N antibodies recognizing an epitope located on amino acids 1-224 of the protein.

  1. Pathogenesis of infection with a virulent allotropic variant of minute virus of mice and regulation by host genotype.

    PubMed

    Brownstein, D G; Smith, A L; Jacoby, R O; Johnson, E A; Hansen, G; Tattersall, P

    1991-09-01

    Neonates of various inbred strains of mice expressed three susceptibility phenotypes in response to infection with the lymphocyte-specific variant of minute virus of mice (MVMi). MVMi caused asymptomatic infections in C57BL/6 (B6) mice, lethal infections with intestinal hemorrhage in DBA/2 mice, and lethal infections with renal papillary hemorrhage in BALB/c, SWR, SJL, CBA, and C3H (H) mice. Sequential virus titration, histology, in situ hybridization with a full-length MVMi genomic probe, and immunohistochemistry for viral capsid antigen were used to compare the pathogenesis of MVMi infection in B6 and H mice. Peak infectious virus titers in heart, lung, liver, spleen, kidney and intestine did not differ between strains but brains of B6 mice, unlike H mice, were refractory to infection. Lesions in H mice consisted of renal papillary infarcts and accelerated involution of hepatic erythropoietic foci. No lesions were seen in B6 mice. In situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry indicated that three cell types were primary targets of MVMi; endothelium, lymphocytes, and hepatic erythropoietic precursors. Renal papillary infarcts in H mice were associated with virus replication in endothelial nuclei of the vasa recta. In contrast to the parity of infectious virus titers between strains, fewer cells in target organs of B6 mice were labeled with the MVMi probe then were labeled in H mice and fewer cells expressed viral capsid antigen. These results indicate (a) that the allotropic variants of minute virus of mice may be useful tools to dissect molecular mechanisms of parvovirus virulence, (b) that the virulence of MVMi for neonatal mice does not reside in its lymphotropism, and (c) that genetic susceptibility to lethal MVMi infection may result from overproduction of noninfectious virus products.

  2. Infection mechanism of biofilm-forming Staphylococcus aureus on indwelling foreign materials in mice.

    PubMed

    Makino, Taro; Jimi, Shiro; Oyama, Takuto; Nakano, Yuki; Hamamoto, Kouichi; Mamishin, Kanako; Yahiro, Tomoko; Hara, Shuuji; Takata, Tohru; Ohjimi, Hiroyuki

    2015-04-01

    Indwelling foreign-body infections are a critical medical problem, especially in immunocompromised patients. To examine the pathogenicity of biofilm-forming bacteria settling on foreign materials, mice implanted with plastic discs were infected with Staphylococcus aureus. After opening a wide subcutaneous pocket on the dorsal side of mice with or without temporal leukocytopenia, a plastic sheet was placed in the left subcutaneous space; subsequently, bacteria in a planktonic state were dispersed over the subcutaneous space. Bacterial numbers were examined 7 days after inoculation. In subcutaneous tissue on the right, S. aureus was found only in leukocytopenic mice. Meanwhile, bacteria were detected on the plastic and neighbouring tissue in both leukocytopenic and normal mice; however, colony-forming analysis indicated that leukocytopenic mice possessed significantly more bacteria. Tissue reaction against bacteria was pathologically examined. Invading S. aureus induced severe inflammation. In transient leukocytopenic mice, bacterial microcolonies formed on the plastic as well as in the developed necrotic tissue - both of which were shielded from inflammatory cell infiltration - result in bacteraemia. These results indicate that biofilm-forming S. aureus settling on indwelling foreign material are tolerant against host immunity and assault neighbouring tissue, which may lead to chronic wound infection.

  3. Cumulative neonatal oxygen exposure predicts response of adult mice infected with influenza A virus

    PubMed Central

    Maduekwe, Echezona T.; Buczynski, Bradley W.; Yee, Min; Rangasamy, Tiruamalai; Stevens, Timothy P.; Lawrence, B. Paige; O'Reilly, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary An acceptable level of oxygen exposure in preterm infants that maximizes efficacy and minimizes harm has yet to be determined. Quantifying oxygen exposure as an area-under-the curve (OAUC) has been predictive of later respiratory symptoms among former low birth weight infants. Here, we test the hypothesis that quantifying OAUC in newborn mice can predict their risk for altered lung development and respiratory viral infections as adults. Newborn mice were exposed to room air or a FiO2 of 100% oxygen for 4 days, 60% oxygen for 8 days, or 40% oxygen for 16 days (same cumulative dose of excess oxygen). At 8 weeks of age, mice were infected intranasally with a non-lethal dose of influenza A virus. Adult mice exposed to 100% oxygen for 4 days or 60% oxygen for 8 days exhibited alveolar simplification and altered elastin deposition compared to siblings birthed into room air, as well as increased inflammation and fibrotic lung disease following viral infection. These changes were not observed in mice exposed to 40% oxygen for 16 days. Our findings in mice support the concept that quantifying OAUC over a currently unspecified threshold can predict human risk for respiratory morbidity later in life. PMID:24850805

  4. Delayed-type hypersensitivity responses in infected mice elicited by cytoplasmic fractions of Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed Central

    Hay, R J; Reiss, E

    1978-01-01

    Four subcellular fractions of Cryptococcus neoformans prepared by differential centrifugation of disrupted whole yeast and a 3-day culture filtrate were examined for their ability to elicit delayed-type hypersensitivity in sensitized animals. The methods used to detect sensitization were (i) the footpad swelling test and inhibition of peritoneal macrophage migration in mice and (ii) skin testing in guinea pigs. Two entities, the post-mitochondrial supernatant and the culture filtrate, showed considerable activity in the footpad test, with 26- and 30-microliter 24-h swellings, respectively, at 6 weeks after infection. With the latter there was interference from a strong antibody-mediated 4-h skin reaction. The post-mitochondrial supernatant produced strong delayed-type hypersensitivity in guinea pigs at a dose of 69 microgram, and there was no demonstrable cross-reactivity in animals sensitized with heterologous fungi. The footpad swelling in mice correlated well with the macrophage migration inhibition test, with 71% inhibition in mice infected subcutaneously with C. neoformans at 6 weeks. However, mice infected intravenously developed poorer cell-mediated immunity than the subcutaneously infected mice. The post-mitochondrial supernatant was found to contain detectable amounts of cryptococcal capsular polysaccharide. Images PMID:365751

  5. Tregs control the development of symptomatic West Nile virus infection in humans and mice.

    PubMed

    Lanteri, Marion C; O'Brien, Katie M; Purtha, Whitney E; Cameron, Mark J; Lund, Jennifer M; Owen, Rachel E; Heitman, John W; Custer, Brian; Hirschkorn, Dale F; Tobler, Leslie H; Kiely, Nancy; Prince, Harry E; Ndhlovu, Lishomwa C; Nixon, Douglas F; Kamel, Hany T; Kelvin, David J; Busch, Michael P; Rudensky, Alexander Y; Diamond, Michael S; Norris, Philip J

    2009-11-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) causes asymptomatic infection in most humans, but for undefined reasons, approximately 20% of immunocompetent individuals develop West Nile fever, a potentially debilitating febrile illness, and approximately 1% develop neuroinvasive disease syndromes. Notably, since its emergence in 1999, WNV has become the leading cause of epidemic viral encephalitis in North America. We hypothesized that CD4+ Tregs might be differentially regulated in subjects with symptomatic compared with those with asymptomatic WNV infection. Here, we show that in 32 blood donors with acute WNV infection, Tregs expanded significantly in the 3 months after index (RNA+) donations in all subjects. Symptomatic donors exhibited lower Treg frequencies from 2 weeks through 1 year after index donation yet did not show differences in systemic T cell or generalized inflammatory responses. In parallel prospective experimental studies, symptomatic WNV-infected mice also developed lower Treg frequencies compared with asymptomatic mice at 2 weeks after infection. Moreover, Treg-deficient mice developed lethal WNV infection at a higher rate than controls. Together, these results suggest that higher levels of peripheral Tregs after infection protect against severe WNV disease in immunocompetent animals and humans.

  6. The antiviral effectiveness of butylated hydroxytoluene on herpes cutaneous infections in hairless mice

    SciTech Connect

    Keith, A.D.; Arruda, D.; Snipes, W.; Frost, P.

    1982-06-01

    Hairless mice, cutaneously infected with herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), were treated topically with butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT). The effectiveness of BHT in shortening the duration of infections was assayed under three conditions. In the first experiments, mice undergoing primary infections with no prior immunity to HSV-1 were utilized. These animals tended to develop deep lesions that were not typical of recurrent HSV-1 infections in humans. A second set of experiments utilized mice that had recovered from a primary infection and that were immunosuppressed by ..gamma.. irradiation. Immunosuppression was essential for the full development of lesions upon reinfection. The lesions in these animals remained more localized with less tendency to spread into deep tissues. A third set of experiments utilized animals that were subcutaneously inoculated with human serum ..gamma..-globulin 24 hr prior to infection. Lesions on these animals also remained localized and did not penetrate into deep tissues. Under all three conditions, BHT was found to be effective in reducing the clearance time of HSV-1 cutaneous lesions when applied topically to the infected area.

  7. Effect of bee venom or proplis on molecular and parasitological aspects of Schistosoma mansoni infected mice.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Azza H; Hassab El-Nabi, Sobhy E; Bayomi, Asmaa E; Abdelaal, Ahmed A

    2016-06-01

    The present study was performed to elucidate the efficacy of Apis mellifera L bee venom (BV) or proplis (200 mg/kg orally for three consecutive days) on Schistosoma mansoni infected mice. The results recorded reduction in the total worm burden, numbers of immature eggs and the ova count in hepatic tissue in BV (sting or injection) or proplis treated groups as compared to the infected group. Histological examination illustrated a significant increase (P ≤ 0.05) in the diameter of hepatic granuloma in BV treated groups (272.78 and 266.9, respectively) and a significant decrease in proplis treated mice (229.35) compared with the infected group (260.67). Electrophoretic pattern of RNA showed a decrease in mean of maximal optical density in liver and intestine of S. mansoni infected mice treated with bee venom (sting or injection) as compared with infected group. Flow cytometry analyses of RNA or apoptotic percentage of worms recovered from BV sting (19 and 49 % respectively); BV injected (20.5 and 51.17 %, respectively) and proplis (35 and 23.93 %, respectively) groups were compared with S. mansoni infected group (37.87 and 39.21 %, respectively). It can be concluded that administration of bee venom or proplis are effective in case of S. mansoni infection. Although bee venom cause increase of granuloma diameter and this might be due to venom concentration and further studies are required to avoid such harmful effect. PMID:27413311

  8. [The protector effect of ribosomal preparations against experimental influenza infection in mice].

    PubMed

    Popa, L M; Repanovici, R; Iliescu, R

    1989-01-01

    A study was conducted on the protective effect of some ribosomal preparations, isolated from chorionic-allantoic membranes of chicken embryos, infected or not with parainfluenza (Sendai) or influenza (AoPR8) virus, in mice experimentally inoculated with influenza virus strain AoPR8 adapted to the mouse. Results showed that the tested preparation, containing ribosomes and polysomes isolated from chorio-allantoic membranes of Sendai virus inoculated chicken embryos, ensure the mice complete protection against AoPR8 virus, if administrated before the control infection. PMID:2549704

  9. Pathological changes of cochlear in deaf mice at different time after mouse cytomegalovirus infection

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Yongyuan; Liu, Xinguo; Liu, Hongjian; Xing, Jinyan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study aims to observe the pathological changes of inner ear in deaf mice at different time after mouse cytomegalovirus infection. Methods: A total of 60 BALB/C mice were divided into 2 groups randomly: model group (A) and control group (B). In model group, 10 μl of MCMV was injected into the brain of each mouse while 10 μl of physiological saline was injected in control group. 10 cochlear samples were taken from 5 mice selected from each group randomly after infection for 1, 3, 5, 7, 14 and 21 days respectively. They were detected with PCR and HE staining methods. Auditory brain stem response was determined. The apoptosis of spiral ganglion (SGN) cells was detected by apoptosis assay kit. The levels of Bcl-2 and Bax were detected by RT-PCR and western blotting methods. Results: In group A, PCR results were negative after infection for 1 day, they were positive after infection for 3 days to 21 days. In group B, PCR results were negative in the experimental period. Compared with group B, ABR I wave latency and threshold increased while ABR I wave decreased in group A. There were no obvious hyperemia and inflammatory cells infiltration in group B, In group A, hemorrhage of scala tympani and scala vestibule appeared and reached highest peak after infection for 3 days accompanied by inflammatory cell infiltration; the vestibular membrane thickened after infection for 5 days; cell gap of SGN cells widened, arranged more sparsely with cell edema after infection for 7 days accompanied by infiltration of plasma cells; fibroblast proliferation and fibrosis appeared after infection for 14 days. Conclusions: MCMV infection occurred in cochlear after MCMV infection for 3 days and could sustain, the continues pathological changes of inner will bring difficulties to the treatment of CMV deafness, further studies on the specific mechanism of SGN changes caused by CMV infection will provide an important target for the treatment of CMV deafness. PMID:26221258

  10. Identification of Candidate Serum Biomarkers for Schistosoma mansoni Infected Mice Using Multiple Proteomic Platforms

    PubMed Central

    Kardoush, Manal I.

    2016-01-01

    Background Schistosomiasis is an important helminth infection of humans. There are few reliable diagnostic biomarkers for early infection, for recurrent infection or to document successful treatment. In this study, we compared serum protein profiles in uninfected and infected mice to identify disease stage-specific biomarkers. Methods Serum collected from CD1 mice infected with 50–200 Schistosoma mansoni cercariae were analyzed before infection and at 3, 6 and 12 weeks post-infection using three mass spectrometric (MS) platforms. Results Using SELDI-TOF MS, 66 discriminating m/z peaks were detected between S. mansoni infected mice and healthy controls. Used in various combinations, these peaks could 1) reliably diagnose early-stage disease, 2) distinguish between acute and chronic infection and 3) diagnose S. mansoni infection regardless the parasite burden. The most important contributors to these diagnostic algorithms were peaks at 3.7, 13 and 46 kDa. Employing sample fractionation and differential gel electrophoresis, we analyzed gel slices either by MALDI-TOF MS or Velos Orbitrap MS. The former yielded eight differentially-expressed host proteins in the serum at different disease stages including transferrin and alpha 1- antitrypsin. The latter suggested the presence of a surprising number of parasite-origin proteins in the serum during both the acute (n = 200) and chronic (n = 105) stages. The Orbitrap platform also identified many differentially-expressed host-origin serum proteins during the acute and chronic stages (296 and 220 respectively). The presence of one of the schistosome proteins, glutathione S transferase (GST: 25 KDa), was confirmed by Western Blot. This study provides proof-of-principle for an approach that can yield a large number of novel candidate biomarkers for Schistosoma infection. PMID:27138990

  11. Cellular changes and cytokine expression in the ilea of gnotobiotic piglets resulting from peroral Salmonella typhimurium challenge.

    PubMed Central

    Trebichavský, I; Dlabac, V; Reháková, Z; Zahradnícková, M; Splíchal, I

    1997-01-01

    Two stable rough mutants of Salmonella spp. were studied as live peroral vaccines. The SF1591 mutant of S. typhimurium (Ra chemotype) protected germ-free piglets against subsequent infection with virulent smooth S. typhimurium LT2, whereas a deep-rough mutant of S. minnesota mR595 (Re chemotype) did not. We investigated cytokine and leukocyte profiles in the ilea of gnotobiotic piglets colonized for 1 week either with rough mutants alone or with rough mutants followed by S. typhimurium LT2. The ileal mucosae of piglets associated with strain SF1591 alone were not inflamed. Villi contained activated macrophages, and enterocytes expressed transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta). Subsequent infection of piglets with S. typhimurium LT2 resulted in immigration of alphabeta T cells and immunoglobulin A (IgA) response. In contrast, the ileal mucosae of piglets associated with strain mR595 alone expressed heat shock proteins and inflammatory cytokines but not TGF-beta. Acellular villi contained numerous gammadelta T cells but no alphabeta T cells. After subsequent challenge with the LT2 strain, most piglets died of sepsis. Intestinal mucosae contained IgG but no IgA. These findings suggest the importance of cytokine signals in the regulation of intestinal responses against Salmonella infection. PMID:9393822

  12. Reduced immune responsiveness and lymphoid depletion in mice infected with Ehrlichia risticii.

    PubMed Central

    Rikihisa, Y; Johnson, G C; Burger, C J

    1987-01-01

    The histopathology of the thymus and spleen and the response of spleen cells to mitogenic stimuli were evaluated in Sprague-Dawley CF-1 mice infected with Ehrlichia risticii. Intraperitoneal injection of 10(4) or 10(6) E. risticii-infected U-937 cells into mice resulted in 100% morbidity and partial mortality. Thymic atrophy became significant between 1 and 2 weeks postinfection and remained for the duration of the study. The atrophy appeared associated with antecedent destruction and rarefaction of lymphocytes, resulting in the loss of corticomedullary demarcation. Splenomegaly was prominent; significantly increased weights were detected 7 days postinfection. Histopathologic examination revealed rarefaction of lymphocytes around central arteries, the presence of necrotic debris in histiocytes, and replacement of erythropoiesis by granulopoiesis in the red pulp. Marked and acute reduction of in vitro proliferative responses of spleen cells to concanavalin A (ConA) and phytohemagglutinin were observed in mice infected with 10(4) or 10(6) E. risticii-infected U-937 cells. Interleukin-2 activity in the supernatant of ConA-stimulated spleen cells was also severely reduced. Both changes were time- and dose-dependent and were not associated with decreased spleen cell viability. Neither morbidity nor mortality occurred in mice infected with 10(2) E. risticii-infected U-937 cells. Although there was temporal reduction in phytohemagglutinin-driven lymphocyte proliferation, reduction in neither ConA-driven lymphocyte proliferation nor interleukin-2 activity was observed with this dosage. All E. risticii-inoculated mice seroconverted between days 18 and 25, as detected by the indirect fluorescent-antibody procedure. The findings indicate for the first time the hypoimmune responsiveness and histopathologic changes in lymphoid organs associated with E. risticii infection. Images PMID:3497879

  13. Immunization of mice and guinea-pigs against Salmonella dublin infection with live and inactivated vaccine.

    PubMed

    Cameron, C M; Fuls, W J

    1975-06-01

    The immunogenicity of a number of avirulent rough Salmonella dublin mutants was compared in mice and guinea-pigs. Live vaccine prepared from Strain HB 1/17 at doses of 5 X 10(7) per mouse usually gave an immunity of between 70 and 80% but in certain experiments the results were more variable and always poorer. This strain gave a cross protection of 28,5% to S. typhimurium in mice. In guinea-pigs it evoked an average protection of approximately 46% to homologous challenge and approximately 26% to challenge with S. tryphimurium. Strain 5765 protected up to 80% of mice against S. dublin infection and was generally superior to Strain HB 1/17 in this respect. It was, however, less effective in protecting mice against S. tryphimurium (20%). In guinea-pigs it was also less effective than Strain HB 1/17, giving 34% protection against homologous and 20% against heterologous challenge. Other strains also produced immunity in mice but they were not studied in detail. Formalin-inactivated alum-precipitated vaccine prepared from avirulent smooth strain and containing 0,5% packed cells proved to be extremely effective in protecting mice against S. dublin infection. It produced an average immunity of 75% and was often 100% effective. It also protected 60% of mice against challenge with S. tryphimurium. In guinea-pigs it was, however, totally ineffective against challenge with both S. dublin and S. tryphimurium.

  14. Mucosal and systemic immunity to intestinal reovirus infection in aged mice.

    PubMed

    Fulton, Jonathan R; Cuff, Christopher F

    2004-09-01

    Systemic immunity is progressively impaired in aging, predisposing to morbidity and mortality from neoplasia and infectious disease. However, the effect of aging on mucosal immunity is controversial. To assess intestinal immunity in aging, young and aged mice were orally exposed to reovirus or cholera toxin (CT) and specific antibody and reovirus-specific cytotoxic T-cell (CTL) responses were assessed. As previously reported, aged mice immunized orally with CT mounted diminished intestinal IgA responses to CT compared to young mice. In contrast, aged mice yielded two to three-fold more reovirus-specific IgA-producing cells in the Peyers's patches (PP) compared to young mice, and higher titers of reovirus-specific IgA in fragment culture supernatants. Cytotoxicity and CTL frequencies from aged mice were not different from those of young mice. Together, these results suggest a diminished potential for systemic and intestinal immunity to orally applied protein antigens in aging, but an intact ability to respond to intestinal virus infection. Infection with a replicating virus may induce inflammatory mediators and innate immune factors that potentiate the priming of mucosal immunity; overcoming aging related deficits otherwise observed following oral immunization with non-replicating antigens, and suggests the importance of antigen replication to antigen-specific immunotherapy strategies in the elderly. PMID:15489051

  15. Virus-like particle-based vaccine against coxsackievirus A6 protects mice against lethal infections.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chaoyun; Ku, Zhiqiang; Zhou, Yu; Li, Dapeng; Wang, Lili; Lan, Ke; Liu, Qingwei; Huang, Zhong

    2016-07-25

    Coxsackievirus A6 (CA6) is emerging as one of the major causative agents of hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) worldwide. However, no vaccine is currently available for preventing CA6 infection. Here, we report the development of a virus-like particle (VLP)-based recombinant vaccine for CA6. We produced CA6 VLPs in insect cells by infecting the cells with a baculovirus coexpressing the genes encoding CA6 P1 and 3CD. Biochemical analyses showed that the produced VLPs consisted of VP0, VP1, and VP3 capsid subunit proteins generated by the cleavage of P1 by 3CD. Mice immunized with these VLPs produced CA6-specific serum antibodies. Passive transfer of antisera from CA6 VLP-immunized mice protected recipient mice from lethal infections caused by homologous and heterologous CA6 strains. Moreover, active immunization of mice with CA6 VLPs efficiently conferred protection against both homologous and heterologous CA6 infections. These results suggested that CA6 VLP-based recombinant vaccine is a promising candidate vaccine for preventing CA6 infection and can be incorporated into a multivalent HFMD vaccine formulation to achieve broad-spectrum and effective prevention of this disease. PMID:27340093

  16. Estradiol-Treated Female Mice as Surrogate Hosts for Neisseria gonorrhoeae Genital Tract Infections.

    PubMed

    Jerse, Ann E; Wu, Hong; Packiam, Mathanraj; Vonck, Rachel A; Begum, Afrin A; Garvin, Lotisha E

    2011-01-01

    Historically, animal modeling of gonorrhea has been hampered by the exclusive adaptation of Neisseria gonorrhoeae to humans. Genital tract infection can be established in female mice that are treated with 17β-estradiol, however, and many features of experimental murine infection mimic human infection. Here we review the colonization kinetics and host response to experimental murine gonococcal infection, including mouse strain differences and evidence that IL-17 responses, toll-like receptor 4, and T regulatory cells play a role in infection. We also discuss the strengths and limitations of the mouse system and the potential of transgenic mice to circumvent host restrictions. Additionally, we review studies with genetically defined mutants that demonstrated a role for sialyltransferase and the MtrC-MtrD-MtrE active efflux pump in evading innate defenses in vivo, but not for factors hypothesized to protect against the phagocytic respiratory burst and H(2)O(2)-producing lactobacilli. Studies using estradiol-treated mice have also revealed the existence of non-host-restricted iron sources in the female genital tract and the influence of hormonal factors on colonization kinetics and selection for opacity (Opa) protein expression. Recent work by others with estradiol-treated mice that are transgenic for human carcinoembryonic adhesion molecules (CEACAMs) supports a role for Opa proteins in enhancing cellular attachment and thus reduced shedding of N. gonorrhoeae. Finally we discuss the use of the mouse model in product testing and a recently developed gonorrhea chlamydia coinfection model.

  17. Effect of infection with Spirometra erinacei plerocercoid on thyroid hormone in mice.

    PubMed

    Hirai, K; Tsuboi, T; Torii, M

    1988-01-01

    Young, male ICR mice were given tap water or distilled water containing 200 mg/l propylthiouracil (PTU) and were then infected with 10 plerocercoids of Spirometra erinacei to investigate the effect of plerocercoid infection on thyroid hormone in their hosts. Plerocercoid infection stimulated growth in PTU-induced hypothyroid mice as if they had never received PTU treatment: there were increases in weight in the liver, skeletal muscle, and spleen, as well as enhancement of the head and body length, in spite of a greater decrease in serum T4 levels than was observed in PTU-treated controls. Furthermore, the intact mice infected with plerocercoids showed a decrease in serum T4 levels as well as in the concentration of T4-binding globulin. These observations suggest that the growth stimulation and the decrease in concentrations of serum T4 and T4-binding globulin associated with plerocercoid infection in mice probably resulted from secretion of a growth hormone-like substance produced by plerocercoids of S. erinacei.

  18. Protective effect of Plantago major L. Pectin polysaccharide against systemic Streptococcus pneumoniae infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Hetland, G; Samuelsen, A B; Løvik, M; Paulsen, B S; Aaberge, I S; Groeng, E C; Michaelsen, T E

    2000-10-01

    The antibacterial effect of a soluble pectin polysaccharide, PMII, isolated from the leaves of Plantago major, was examined in inbred NIH/OlaHsd and Fox Chase SCID mice experimentally infected with Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 6B. Serotype 6B is known to give a more protracted infection when injected intraperitoneally into susceptible mice than more virulent serotypes like type 4. PMII was administered i.p. either once 3 days before challenge or once to thrice from 3 to 48 h after challenge. The number of bacteria in blood and the mouse survival rate were recorded. Pre-challenge administration of PMII and also lipopolysaccharide (LPS), included as a control, gave a dose-dependent protective effect against S. pneumoniae type 6B infection. However, injection of PMII after establishment of the infection in NIH/OlaHsd mice had no effect. The data demonstrate that, firstly, the polysaccharide fraction PMII from P. major protects against pneumococcal infection in mice when administered systemically prechallenge, and secondly that the protective effect is owing to stimulation of the innate and not the adaptive immune system. PMID:11013005

  19. Immunosuppression transfer by spleen cells from young to adult mice previous to Histoplasma capsulatum infection.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Montes, M R; García-Camacho, M P; Casasola, J; Taylor, M L

    1988-02-01

    The passive transfer of spleen cells from 1 month old mice into adult syngeneic mice, abrogates their resistance to histoplasmal infection. This suppressive state was detected in two cell populations, one non-adherent and another adherent with radioresistant characteristics. The transferred spleen cells were treated by different anti-sera: anti-theta, anti-adherent cells (produced in rabbits) and monoclonal anti-Thy 1.2 respectively. The irradiated and non-irradiated adult recipient mice were infected with Histoplasma yeasts utilizing the Lethal Dose50 for 1 month old mice. The infection course was determined by death percentage, the histoplasmosis murine signs and the number of the fungal colony forming units (CFU) from the infected spleens. The results of the anti-sera treatment suggest that non-adherent as well as adherent cells participate in the suppressive phenomena. A lower number of CFU was identified in infected animals which received cells treated with anti-Thy 1.2 anti-sera.

  20. Protective effect of Plantago major L. Pectin polysaccharide against systemic Streptococcus pneumoniae infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Hetland, G; Samuelsen, A B; Løvik, M; Paulsen, B S; Aaberge, I S; Groeng, E C; Michaelsen, T E

    2000-10-01

    The antibacterial effect of a soluble pectin polysaccharide, PMII, isolated from the leaves of Plantago major, was examined in inbred NIH/OlaHsd and Fox Chase SCID mice experimentally infected with Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 6B. Serotype 6B is known to give a more protracted infection when injected intraperitoneally into susceptible mice than more virulent serotypes like type 4. PMII was administered i.p. either once 3 days before challenge or once to thrice from 3 to 48 h after challenge. The number of bacteria in blood and the mouse survival rate were recorded. Pre-challenge administration of PMII and also lipopolysaccharide (LPS), included as a control, gave a dose-dependent protective effect against S. pneumoniae type 6B infection. However, injection of PMII after establishment of the infection in NIH/OlaHsd mice had no effect. The data demonstrate that, firstly, the polysaccharide fraction PMII from P. major protects against pneumococcal infection in mice when administered systemically prechallenge, and secondly that the protective effect is owing to stimulation of the innate and not the adaptive immune system.

  1. Role of vacuolating cytotoxin in gastritis due to Helicobacter pylori in gnotobiotic piglets.

    PubMed

    Eaton, K A; Cover, T L; Tummuru, M K; Blaser, M J; Krakowka, S

    1997-08-01

    To investigate the role of the Helicobacter pylori cytotoxin in the pathogenesis of gastritis, gnotobiotic piglets were colonized with either toxigenic H. pylori or a nontoxigenic isogenic mutant. Only piglets given the toxigenic strain developed toxin-neutralizing antibodies (indicating that toxin is expressed in vivo), but there was no difference in bacterial colonization, epithelial vacuolation, or gastritis between the two groups of piglets.

  2. Remote sensing and geographic information systems: charting Sin Nombre virus infections in deer mice.

    PubMed Central

    Boone, J. D.; McGwire, K. C.; Otteson, E. W.; DeBaca, R. S.; Kuhn, E. A.; Villard, P.; Brussard, P. F.; St Jeor, S. C.

    2000-01-01

    We tested environmental data from remote sensing and geographic information system maps as indicators of Sin Nombre virus (SNV) infections in deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus) populations in the Walker River Basin, Nevada and California. We determined by serologic testing the presence of SNV infections in deer mice from 144 field sites. We used remote sensing and geographic information systems data to characterize the vegetation type and density, elevation, slope, and hydrologic features of each site. The data retroactively predicted infection status of deer mice with up to 80% accuracy. If models of SNV temporal dynamics can be integrated with baseline spatial models, human risk for infection may be assessed with reasonable accuracy. PMID:10827114

  3. Zika Virus Infection during Pregnancy in Mice Causes Placental Damage and Fetal Demise.

    PubMed

    Miner, Jonathan J; Cao, Bin; Govero, Jennifer; Smith, Amber M; Fernandez, Estefania; Cabrera, Omar H; Garber, Charise; Noll, Michelle; Klein, Robyn S; Noguchi, Kevin K; Mysorekar, Indira U; Diamond, Michael S

    2016-05-19

    Zika virus (ZIKV) infection in pregnant women causes intrauterine growth restriction, spontaneous abortion, and microcephaly. Here, we describe two mouse models of placental and fetal disease associated with in utero transmission of ZIKV. Female mice lacking type I interferon signaling (Ifnar1(-/-)) crossed to wild-type (WT) males produced heterozygous fetuses resembling the immune status of human fetuses. Maternal inoculation at embryonic day 6.5 (E6.5) or E7.5 resulted in fetal demise that was associated with ZIKV infection of the placenta and fetal brain. We identified ZIKV within trophoblasts of the maternal and fetal placenta, consistent with a trans-placental infection route. Antibody blockade of Ifnar1 signaling in WT pregnant mice enhanced ZIKV trans-placental infection although it did not result in fetal death. These models will facilitate the study of ZIKV pathogenesis, in utero transmission, and testing of therapies and vaccines to prevent congenital malformations.

  4. Induction of depression-related behaviors by reactivation of chronic Toxoplasma gondii infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Motamed Elsayed; Ihara, Fumiaki; Fereig, Ragab M; Nishimura, Maki; Nishikawa, Yoshifumi

    2016-02-01

    Although Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii) infection is relevant to many psychiatric disorders, the fundamental mechanisms of its neurobiological correlation with depression are poorly understood. Here, we show that reactivation of chronic infection by an immunosuppressive regimen caused induction of depressive-like behaviors without obvious sickness symptoms. However, the depression-related behaviors in T. gondii-infected mice, specifically, reduced sucrose preference and increased immobility in the forced-swim test were observed at the reactivation stage, but not in the chronic infection. Interestingly, reactivation of T. gondii was associated with production of interferon-gamma and activation of brain indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase, which converts tryptophan to kynurenine and makes it unavailable for serotonin synthesis. Furthermore, serotonin turnover to its major metabolite, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, was also enhanced at the reactivation stage. Thus, enhanced tryptophan catabolic shunt and serotonin turnover may be implicated in development of depressive-like behaviors in mice with reactivated T. gondii. PMID:26554725

  5. Effect of Chlorovirus ATCV-1 infection on behavior of C57Bl/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Petro, Marilyn S; Agarkova, Irina V; Petro, Thomas M

    2016-08-15

    Neuroinflammation induced during immune responses to viral infections in the brain affect behavior. Unexpected evidence that oral gavage of an algal virus in its host algal cells could alter cognition was further examined by directly injecting purified algal virus ATCV-1 intracranially into C57BL/6 mice. After 4weeks, the ATCV-1 infection impaired delayed location recognition memory, and also reduced and anxiety. Corresponding to these effects, heightened ATCV-1, IL-6, iNOS, IFN-γ, and CD11b expression in brains was observed 3-days and/or 8-weeks post infection compared with control mice. These results imply that ATCV-1 infection damages the hippocampus via induction of inflammatory factors. PMID:27397075

  6. Competitive inhibitor of cellular α-glucosidases protects mice from lethal dengue virus infection.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jinhong; Schul, Wouter; Yip, Andy; Xu, Xiaodong; Guo, Ju-Tao; Block, Timothy M

    2011-11-01

    Dengue virus infection causes diseases in people, ranging from the acute febrile illness dengue fever, to life-threatening dengue hemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome. We previously reported that a host cellular α-glucosidases I and II inhibitor, imino sugar CM-10-18, potently inhibited dengue virus replication in cultured cells, and significantly reduced viremia in dengue virus infected AG129 mice. In this report we show that CM-10-18 also significantly protects mice from death and/or disease progress in two mouse models of lethal dengue virus infection. Our results thus provide a strong support for the development of CM-10-18 or its derivatives as antiviral agents to treat servere dengue virus infections.

  7. Primary Babesia rodhaini infection followed by recovery confers protective immunity against B. rodhaini reinfection and Babesia microti challenge infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guanbo; Efstratiou, Artemis; Adjou Moumouni, Paul Franck; Liu, Mingming; Jirapattharasate, Charoonluk; Guo, Huanping; Gao, Yang; Cao, Shinuo; Zhou, Mo; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Igarashi, Ikuo; Xuan, Xuenan

    2016-10-01

    In the present study, we investigated the protective immunity against challenge infections with Babesia rodhaini and Babesia microti in the mice recovered from B. rodhaini infection. Six groups with 5 test mice in each group were used in this study, and were intraperitoneally immunized with alive and dead B. rodhaini. The challenge infections with B. rodhaini or B. microti were performed using different time courses. Our results showed that the mice recovered from primary B. rodhaini infection exhibited low parasitemia and no mortalities after the challenge infections, whereas mock mice which had received no primary infection showed a rapid increase of parasitemia and died within 7 days after the challenge with B. rodhaini. Mice immunized with dead B. rodhaini were not protected against either B. rodhaini or B. microti challenge infections, although high titers of antibody response were induced. These results indicate that only mice immunized with alive B. rodhaini could acquire protective immunity against B. rodhaini or B. microti challenge infection. Moreover, the test mice produced high levels of antibody response and low levels of cytokines (INF-γ, IL-4, IL-12, IL-10) against B. rodhaini or B. microti after challenge infection. Mock mice, however, showed rapid increases of these cytokines, which means disordered cytokines secretion occurred during the acute stage of challenge infection. The above results proved that mice immunized with alive B. rodhaini could acquire protective immunity against B. rodhaini and B. microti infections. PMID:27423972

  8. Mycobacterium bovis BCG-induced protection against cutaneous and systemic Leishmania major infections of mice.

    PubMed Central

    Fortier, A H; Mock, B A; Meltzer, M S; Nacy, C A

    1987-01-01

    We examined the protective effects of Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) administration on Leishmania major infections of BALB/c and P/J mice. There were two treatment protocols. In the first, the footpads of naive animals were inoculated with mixtures of L. major and BCG (viable or heat killed) or the soluble mycobacterial antigen, purified protein derivative. Viable BCG, but not heat-killed BCG or purified protein derivative, inoculated with L. major amastigotes into the footpads of naive BALB/c or P/J mice protected these animals from the metastatic spread of parasites to the viscera and from ensuing lethal systemic infection. This treatment also induced cures of the cutaneous lesions of P/J mice but not of BALB/c mice. In the second protocol, we induced an immune response to BCG before inoculation of L. major. BCG given intraperitoneally 10 days before infection of footpads with leishmania offered protection against the metastatic spread of amastigotes in both P/J and BALB/c mice, regardless of intralesional treatment, and modulated the severity of cutaneous infection by 30 to 50%. Inoculation of a mixture of viable BCG and L. major amastigotes into BCG-immune mice completely protected both BALB/c and P/J strains from cutaneous disease; we recovered no parasites from the inoculated footpads of these animals. Furthermore, each of the nonspecifically protected mice of both the BALB/c and P/J strains developed immunity to rechallenge with viable L. major. Injection of amastigotes at a site remote from the original lesion, the contralateral footpad, resulted in the complete clearance of parasites in the inoculum with no evidence of either cutaneous or systemic disease over an extended observation period. PMID:3298065

  9. Influence of Parasite Load on Renal Function in Mice Acutely Infected with Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Parreira, Ricardo Cambraia; Miguel, Renata Botelho; de Paula Rogerio, Alexandre; Oliveira, Carlo Jose Freire; Chica, Javier Emilio Lazo

    2013-01-01

    Background Chagas disease is a neglected tropical disease caused by Trypanosoma cruzi. Despite the vast number of studies evaluating the pathophysiological mechanisms of the disease, the influence of parasite burden on kidney lesions remains unclear. Thus, the main goal of this work was to evaluate the effect of T. cruzi infection on renal function and determine whether there was a correlation between parasite load and renal injury using an acute experimental model of the disease. Methodology/Principal Findings Low, medium and high parasite loads were generated by infecting C57BL/6 mice with 300 (low), 3,000 (medium) or 30,000 (high) numbers of “Y” strain trypomastigotes. We found that mice infected with T. cruzi trypomastigotes show increased renal injury. The infection resulted in reduced urinary excretion and creatinine clearance. We also observed a marked elevation in the ratio of urine volume to kidney and body weight, blood urea nitrogen, chloride ion, nitric oxide, pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines and the number of leukocytes in the blood and/or renal tissues of infected mice. Additionally, we observed the presence of the parasite in the cortical/medullary and peri-renal region, an increase of inflammatory infiltrate and of vascular permeability of the kidney. Overall, most renal changes occurred mainly in animals infected with high parasitic loads. Conclusions/Significance These data demonstrate that T. cruzi impairs kidney function, and this impairment is more evident in mice infected with high parasitic loads. Moreover, these data suggest that, in addition to the extensively studied cardiovascular effects, renal injury should be regarded as an important indicator for better understanding the pan-infectivity of the parasite and consequently for understanding the disease in experimental models. PMID:23951243

  10. Systemic and mucosal immune reactivity upon Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Koc, Arzu; Bargen, Imke; Suwandi, Abdulhadi; Roderfeld, Martin; Tschuschner, Annette; Rath, Timo; Gerlach, Gerald F; Hornef, Mathias; Goethe, Ralph; Weiss, Siegfried; Roeb, Elke

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is the cause of Johne's disease, an inflammatory bowel disorder of ruminants. Due to the similar pathology, MAP was also suggested to cause Crohn's disease (CD). Despite of intensive research, this question is still not settled, possibly due to the lack of versatile mouse models. The aim of this study was to identify basic immunologic mechanisms in response to MAP infection. Immune compromised C57BL/6 Rag2-/- mice were infected with MAP intraperitoneally. Such chronically infected mice were then reconstituted with CD4+ and CD8+ T cells 28 days after infection. A systemic inflammatory response, detected as enlargement of the spleen and granuloma formation in the liver, was observed in mice infected and reconstituted with CD4+ T cells. Whereby inflammation in infected and CD4+CD45RB(hi) T cell reconstituted animals was always higher than in the other groups. Reconstitution of infected animals with CD8+ T cells did not result in any inflammatory signs. Interestingly, various markers of inflammation were strongly up-regulated in the colon of infected mice reconstituted with CD4+CD45RB(lo/int) T cells. We propose, the usual non-colitogenic CD4+CD45RB(lo/int) T cells were converted into inflammatory T cells by the interaction with MAP. However, the power of such cells might be not sufficient for a fully established inflammatory response in the colon. Nevertheless, our model system appears to mirror aspects of an inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) like CD and Johne's diseases. Thus, it will provide an experimental platform on which further knowledge on IBD and the involvement of MAP in the induction of CD could be acquired.

  11. Intrarectal transmission, systemic infection, and CD4+ T cell depletion in humanized mice infected with HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhifeng; Denton, Paul W; Estes, Jacob D; Othieno, Florence A; Wei, Bangdong L; Wege, Anja K; Melkus, Michael W; Padgett-Thomas, Angela; Zupancic, Mary; Haase, Ashley T; Garcia, J Victor

    2007-04-16

    Intrarectal infection between men who have sex with men represents a predominant form of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission in developed countries. Currently there are no adequate small animal models that recapitulate intrarectal HIV transmission. Here we demonstrate that human lymphocytes generated in situ from hematopoietic stem cells reconstitute the gastrointestinal tract of humanized mice with human CD4(+) T cells rendering them susceptible to intrarectal HIV transmission. HIV infection after a single intrarectal inoculation results in systemic infection with depletion of CD4(+) T cells in gut-associated lymphoid tissue and other pathologic sequela that closely mimics those observed in HIV infected humans. This novel model provides the basis for the development and evaluation of novel approaches aimed at immune reconstitution of human gut-associated lymphoid tissue and for the development, testing, and implementation of microbicides to prevent intrarectal HIV-1 transmission. PMID:17389241

  12. Infection with Cytotoxic T-Lymphocyte Escape Mutants Results in Increased Mortality and Growth Retardation in Mice Infected with a Neurotropic Coronavirus

    PubMed Central

    Pewe, Lecia; Xue, Shurong; Perlman, Stanley

    1998-01-01

    C57BL/6 mice infected with mouse hepatitis virus strain JHM (MHV-JHM) develop a chronic demyelinating encephalomyelitis several weeks after inoculation. Previously, we showed that mutations in the immunodominant CD8 T-cell epitope (S-510-518) could be detected in nearly all samples of RNA and virus isolated from these mice. These mutations abrogated recognition by T cells harvested from the central nervous systems of infected mice in direct ex vivo cytotoxicity assays. These results suggested that cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) escape mutants contributed to virus amplification and the development of clinical disease in mice infected with wild-type virus. In the present study, the importance of these mutations was further evaluated by infecting naive mice with MHV-JHM variants isolated from infected mice and in which epitope S-510-518 was mutated. Compared to mice infected with wild-type virus, variant virus-infected animals showed higher mortality and morbidity manifested by decreased weight gain and neurological signs. Although a delay in the kinetics of virus clearance has been demonstrated in previous studies of CTL escape mutants, this is the first illustration of significant changes in clinical disease resulting from infection with viruses able to evade the CD8 T-cell immune response. PMID:9621053

  13. Characterization and pathological significance of monoclonal DNA-binding antibodies from mice with experimental malaria infection.

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, C M; Collins, I; Belcher, A J; Manuelpillai, N; Wozencraft, A O; Staines, N A

    1994-01-01

    Malaria infection is accompanied by the production of a number of autoantibodies, including some that react with DNA. Epidemiological evidence implicates these in the nephritides that arise in human quartan malaria and in experimental malaria infections in mice. Through parallels with the involvement of DNA-reactive antibodies in the autoimmune syndrome systemic lupus erythematosus, a role for DNA-reactive antibodies in forming phlogistic immune deposits in the kidneys is implied. To more fully understand the relationship between antibodies of this specificity made in malaria and systemic lupus erythematosus, we prepared monoclonal DNA-reactive antibodies from BALB/c mice infected with Plasmodium berghei (clone RC) and compared their properties with those of other antibodies previously isolated from lupous MRL/Mp lpr/lpr and (NZB x NZW)F1 mice. Antibodies from malarial mice were all immunoglobulin M class and bound to single-stranded but not double-stranded DNA in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. They also reacted with synthetic polyribonucleotides in the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and with parasitized erythrocytes and parasite pigment in kidney sections. None of the antibodies from lupous mice had identical specificities. The potential involvement of the DNA-reactive antibodies in malarial nephritis was demonstrated, by use of immunocytochemical methods, on the basis of their binding to existing immune deposits in kidney sections from malarial mice, a similar property having been previously demonstrated for antibodies from lupous mice. Furthermore, antibodies from malarial mice expressed public idiotypes, notably Id.V-88, which is a member of the Id.16/6 family, commonly found on DNA-reactive antibodies in lupus and other infectious and connective tissue diseases. This study indicates that DNA-reactive antibodies in malaria have immunochemical properties similar but not identical to those of such antibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus and that they

  14. High Dietary Folate in Mice Alters Immune Response and Reduces Survival after Malarial Infection

    PubMed Central

    Meadows, Danielle N.; Bahous, Renata H.; Best, Ana F.; Rozen, Rima

    2015-01-01

    Malaria is a significant global health issue, with nearly 200 million cases in 2013 alone. Parasites obtain folate from the host or synthesize it de novo. Folate consumption has increased in many populations, prompting concerns regarding potential deleterious consequences of higher intake. The impact of high dietary folate on the host’s immune function and response to malaria has not been examined. Our goal was to determine whether high dietary folate would affect response to malarial infection in a murine model of cerebral malaria. Mice were fed control diets (CD, recommended folate level for rodents) or folic acid-supplemented diets (FASD, 10x recommended level) for 5 weeks before infection with Plasmodium berghei ANKA. Survival, parasitemia, numbers of immune cells and other infection parameters were assessed. FASD mice had reduced survival (p<0.01, Cox proportional hazards) and higher parasitemia (p< 0.01, joint model of parasitemia and survival) compared with CD mice. FASD mice had lower numbers of splenocytes, total T cells, and lower numbers of specific T and NK cell sub-populations, compared with CD mice (p<0.05, linear mixed effects). Increased brain TNFα immunoreactive protein (p<0.01, t-test) and increased liver Abca1 mRNA (p<0.01, t-test), a modulator of TNFα, were observed in FASD mice; these variables correlated positively (rs = 0.63, p = 0.01). Bcl-xl/Bak mRNA was increased in liver of FASD mice (p<0.01, t-test), suggesting reduced apoptotic potential. We conclude that high dietary folate increases parasite replication, disturbs the immune response and reduces resistance to malaria in mice. These findings have relevance for malaria-endemic regions, when considering anti-folate anti-malarials, food fortification or vitamin supplementation programs. PMID:26599510

  15. Chemokine response in mice infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Rhoades, E R; Cooper, A M; Orme, I M

    1995-01-01

    We show here that infection of murine macrophages with various strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis induces the rapid in vitro expression of genes encoding chemokines macrophage inflammatory protein 1 alpha and macrophage inflammatory protein 2, which recruit neutrophils to sites of infection, and macrophage-recruiting chemokines 10-kDa, interferon-inducible protein (IP-10) and macrophage chemotactic protein 1. Three strains of M. tuberculosis, Erdman and the clinical isolates CSU 22 and CSU 46, induced similar levels of secretion of macrophage chemotactic protein 1 from infected macrophage monolayers; however, the Erdman strain failed to induce levels of secretion of tumor necrosis factor alpha similar to those induced by either CSU 22 or CSU 46. Using a low-dose aerosol infection model, we also found that while the Erdman strain induced negligible increases in chemokine mRNA levels in the lungs, infection with either CSU 22 or CSU 46 resulted in greater levels of mRNA production for all four chemokines tested. The growth of these strains in the lungs was, however, equally well contained by acquired host immunity. These data allow us to hypothesize that the chemokine response in the lungs probably does not control the protective granulomatous response and that perhaps other T-cell- or macrophage-associated cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor alpha or interleukin 12 may be involved in this process. PMID:7558294

  16. Protective Effect of Moderate Exercise for BALB/c Mice with Salmonella Typhimurium Infection.

    PubMed

    Campos-Rodríguez, R; Godínez-Victoria, M; Arciniega-Martínez, I M; Reséndiz-Albor, A A; Reyna-Garfias, H; Cruz-Hernández, T R; Drago-Serrano, M E

    2016-01-01

    Moderate exercise enhances resistance to pathogen-associated infections. However, its influence on intestinal IgA levels and resistance to Salmonella typhimurium in mice has not been reported. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of moderate exercise on bacterial resistance and the intestinal-IgA response in a murine typhoid model. Sedentary and exercised (under a protocol of moderate swimming) BALB/c mice were orally infected with Salmonella typhimurium and sacrificed on days 7 or 14 post-infection (n=5 per group). Compared with infected sedentary mice, infected exercised animals had i) lower intestinal and systemic bacterial loads; ii) higher total and specific intestinal-IgA levels, iii) a higher percentage of IgA plasma cells in lamina propria; iv) a higher level on day 7 and lower level on day 14 of intestinal α- and J-chain mRNA and plasma corticosterone, v) unchanged mRNA expression of intestinal pIgR, and vi) a higher mRNA expression of liver pIgR, α-chain and J-chain on day 7. Hence, it is likely that an increase in corticosterone levels (stress response) induced by moderate exercise increased intestinal IgA levels by enabling greater liver expression of pIgR mRNA, leading to a rise in IgA transcytosis from the liver to intestine. The overall effect of these changes is an enhanced resistance to infection.

  17. Targeted photodynamic therapy of established soft-tissue infections in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gad, Faten; Zahra, Touqir; Hasan, Tayyaba; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2004-06-01

    The worldwide rise in antibiotic resistance necessitates the development of novel antimicrobial strategies. Although many workers have used photodynamic therapy (PDT) to kill bacteria in vitro, the use of this approach has seldom been reported in vivo in animal models of infection. We have previously described the first use of PDT to treat excisional wound infections by Gram-negative bacteria in living mice. However these infected wound models used a short time after infection (30 min) before PDT. We now report on the use of PDT to treat an established soft-tissue infection in mice. We used Staphylococcus aureus stably transformed with a Photorhabdus luminescens lux operon (luxABCDE) that was genetically modified to be functional in Gram-positive bacteria. These engineered bacteria emitted bioluminescence allowing the progress of the infection to be monitored in both space and time with a lowlight imaging charged couple device (CCD) camera. One million cells were injected into one or both thigh muscles of mice that had previously been rendered neutropenic by cyclophosphamide administration. Twenty-four hours later the bacteria had multiplied more than one hundred-fold, and poly-L-lysine chlorin(e6) conjugate or free chlorin(e6) was injected into one area of infected muscle and imaged with the CCD camera. Thirty-minutes later red light from a diode laser was delivered as a surface spot or by interstitial fiber into the infection. There was a lightdose dependent loss of bioluminescence (to < 5% of that seen in control infections) not seen in untreated or light alone treated infections, but in some cases the infection recurred. Conjugate alone led to a lesser reduction in bioluminescence. Infections treated with free chlorin(e6) responded less and the infection subsequently increased over the succeeding days, probably due to PDT-mediated tissue damage. PDT-treated infected legs healed better than legs with untreated infections. This data shows that PDT may have

  18. Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections Enhance Cigarette Smoke Induced COPD in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Foronjy, Robert F.; Dabo, Abdoulaye J.; Taggart, Clifford C.; Weldon, Sinead; Geraghty, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial viral (RSV) infections are a frequent cause of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exacerbations, which are a major factor in disease progression and mortality. RSV is able to evade antiviral defenses to persist in the lungs of COPD patients. Though RSV infection has been identified in COPD, its contribution to cigarette smoke-induced airway inflammation and lung tissue destruction has not been established. Here we examine the long-term effects of cigarette smoke exposure, in combination with monthly RSV infections, on pulmonary inflammation, protease production and remodeling in mice. RSV exposures enhanced the influx of macrophages, neutrophils and lymphocytes to the airways of cigarette smoke exposed C57BL/6J mice. This infiltration of cells was most pronounced around the vasculature and bronchial airways. By itself, RSV caused significant airspace enlargement and fibrosis in mice and these effects were accentuated with concomitant smoke exposure. Combined stimulation with both smoke and RSV synergistically induced cytokine (IL-1α, IL-17, IFN-γ, KC, IL-13, CXCL9, RANTES, MIF and GM-CSF) and protease (MMP-2, -8, -12, -13, -16 and cathepsins E, S, W and Z) expression. In addition, RSV exposure caused marked apoptosis within the airways of infected mice, which was augmented by cigarette smoke exposure. RSV and smoke exposure also reduced protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) and protein tyrosine phosphates (PTP1B) expression and activity. This is significant as these phosphatases counter smoke-induced inflammation and protease expression. Together, these findings show for the first time that recurrent RSV infection markedly enhances inflammation, apoptosis and tissue destruction in smoke-exposed mice. Indeed, these results indicate that preventing RSV transmission and infection has the potential to significantly impact on COPD severity and progression. PMID:24587397

  19. Buparvaquone is active against Neospora caninum in vitro and in experimentally infected mice.

    PubMed

    Müller, Joachim; Aguado-Martinez, Adriana; Manser, Vera; Balmer, Vreni; Winzer, Pablo; Ritler, Dominic; Hostettler, Isabel; Arranz-Solís, David; Ortega-Mora, Luis; Hemphill, Andrew

    2015-04-01

    The naphthoquinone buparvaquone is currently the only drug used against theileriosis. Here, the effects of buparvaquone were investigated in vitro and in an experimental mouse model for Neospora caninum infection. In 4-day proliferation assays, buparvaquone efficiently inhibited N. caninum tachyzoite replication (IC50 = 4.9 nM; IC100 = 100 nM). However, in the long term tachyzoites adapted and resumed proliferation in the presence of 100 nM buparvaquone after 20 days of cultivation. Parasiticidal activity was noted after 9 days of culture in 0.5 µM or 6 days in 1 µM buparvaquone. TEM of N. caninum infected fibroblasts treated with 1 µM buparvaquone showed that the drug acted rather slowly, and ultrastructural changes were evident only after 3-5 days of treatment, including severe alterations in the parasite cytoplasm, changes in the composition of the parasitophorous vacuole matrix and a diminished integrity of the vacuole membrane. Treatment of N. caninum infected mice with buparvaquone (100 mg/kg) either by intraperitoneal injection or gavage prevented neosporosis symptoms in 4 out of 6 mice in the intraperitoneally treated group, and in 6 out of 7 mice in the group receiving oral treatment. In the corresponding controls, all 6 mice injected intraperitoneally with corn oil alone died of acute neosporosis, and 4 out of 6 mice died in the orally treated control group. Assessment of infection intensities in the treatment groups showed that, compared to the drug treated groups, the controls showed a significantly higher parasite load in the lungs while cerebral parasite load was higher in the buparvaquone-treated groups. Thus, although buparvaquone did not eliminate the parasites infecting the CNS, the drug represents an interesting lead with the potential to eliminate, or at least diminish, fetal infection during pregnancy. PMID:25941626

  20. Buparvaquone is active against Neospora caninum in vitro and in experimentally infected mice

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Joachim; Aguado-Martinez, Adriana; Manser, Vera; Balmer, Vreni; Winzer, Pablo; Ritler, Dominic; Hostettler, Isabel; Arranz-Solís, David; Ortega-Mora, Luis; Hemphill, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The naphthoquinone buparvaquone is currently the only drug used against theileriosis. Here, the effects of buparvaquone were investigated in vitro and in an experimental mouse model for Neospora caninum infection. In 4-day proliferation assays, buparvaquone efficiently inhibited N. caninum tachyzoite replication (IC50 = 4.9 nM; IC100 = 100 nM). However, in the long term tachyzoites adapted and resumed proliferation in the presence of 100 nM buparvaquone after 20 days of cultivation. Parasiticidal activity was noted after 9 days of culture in 0.5 µM or 6 days in 1 µM buparvaquone. TEM of N. caninum infected fibroblasts treated with 1 µM buparvaquone showed that the drug acted rather slowly, and ultrastructural changes were evident only after 3–5 days of treatment, including severe alterations in the parasite cytoplasm, changes in the composition of the parasitophorous vacuole matrix and a diminished integrity of the vacuole membrane. Treatment of N. caninum infected mice with buparvaquone (100 mg/kg) either by intraperitoneal injection or gavage prevented neosporosis symptoms in 4 out of 6 mice in the intraperitoneally treated group, and in 6 out of 7 mice in the group receiving oral treatment. In the corresponding controls, all 6 mice injected intraperitoneally with corn oil alone died of acute neosporosis, and 4 out of 6 mice died in the orally treated control group. Assessment of infection intensities in the treatment groups showed that, compared to the drug treated groups, the controls showed a significantly higher parasite load in the lungs while cerebral parasite load was higher in the buparvaquone-treated groups. Thus, although buparvaquone did not eliminate the parasites infecting the CNS, the drug represents an interesting lead with the potential to eliminate, or at least diminish, fetal infection during pregnancy. PMID:25941626

  1. Chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection-induced chronic bronchitis and emphysematous changes in CCSP-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Takemasa; Fujita, Masaki; Hirano, Ryosuke; Uchino, Junji; Tajiri, Yukari; Fukuyama, Satoru; Morimoto, Yasuo; Watanabe, Kentaro

    2016-01-01

    The club cell secretory protein (CCSP) is a regulator of lung inflammation following acute respiratory infection or lung injury. Recently, the relationship between CCSP and COPD has been reported. Since COPD results from an abnormal inflammatory response, we hypothesized that CCSP could have a protective role against chronic inflammation-induced lung damage. To address this issue, the pathophysiology of chronic lung inflammation induced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in CCSP-deficient mice was determined. A tube of 5 mm in length was soaked in a fluid containing P. aeruginosa (PAO01 strain) for 1 week and inserted into the trachea of CCSP-deficient mice. One week later, P. aeruginosa was administered into the trachea. Five weeks after insertion of tube, the mice were sacrificed. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluids were collected to determine the bacterial growth, and the lung histology and physiology were also examined. P. aeruginosa was continuously detected in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids during the study. Neutrophils were increased in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluids from the CCSP-deficient mice in comparison to wild-type mice. A histological study demonstrated chronic inflammation around bronchus, serious bronchial stenosis, and alveolar enlargement in the CCSP-deficient mice. The lung physiology study demonstrated an increase in the lung compliance of the CCSP-deficient mice. Chronic P. aeruginosa inflammation resulted in chronic bronchitis and emphysematous changes in the CCSP-deficient mice. CCSP could play an important role in protecting the host from the chronic inflammation-induced lung damage. PMID:27703342

  2. Toxoplasma gondii infection blocks the development of allergic airway inflammation in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Fenoy, I; Giovannoni, M; Batalla, E; Martin, V; Frank, F M; Piazzon, I; Goldman, A

    2009-02-01

    There is a link between increased allergy and a reduction of some infections in western countries. Epidemiological data also show that respiratory allergy is less frequent in people exposed to orofaecal and foodborne microbes such as Toxoplasma gondii. Infection with T. gondii induces a strong cell-mediated immunity with a highly polarized T helper type 1 (Th1) response in early stages of infection. Using a well-known murine model of allergic lung inflammation, we sought to investigate whether T. gondii infection could modulate the susceptibility to develop respiratory allergies. Both acute and chronic infection with T. gondii before allergic sensitization resulted in a diminished allergic inflammation, as shown by a decrease in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) eosinophilia, mononuclear and eosinophil cell infiltration around airways and vessels and goblet cell hyperplasia. Low allergen-specific immunoglobulin (Ig)E and IgG1 and high levels of allergen-specific IgG2a serum antibodies were detected. A decreased interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-5 production by lymph node cells was observed, while no antigen-specific interferon-gamma increase was detected. Higher levels of the regulatory cytokine IL-10 were found in BAL from infected mice. These results show that both acute and chronic parasite infection substantially blocked development of airway inflammation in adult BALB/c mice. Our results support the hypothesis that T. gondii infection contributes to protection against allergy in humans. PMID:19032550

  3. Effect of myrrh extract on the liver of normal and bilharzially infected mice. An ultrastructural study.

    PubMed

    Massoud, Ahmed M A; El Ebiary, Faika H; Abd El Salam, Nevert F

    2004-04-01

    In the present work, the efficacy of purified oloe-resin extract of myrrh derived from Commiphora molmol tree (commercially known as Mirazid) as a new, natural antischistosomal drug was investigated. The effect of myrrh on the ultrastructural profile of the non infected normal mice liver was also studied. Sixty male mice were used throughout this work and they were divided into 3 main groups (20 animals each): group I, non infected control animals, group II, infected animals and group III, infected animals treated with myrrh extract 8 weeks post infection (500 mg/kg body weight). The drug was given orally on an empty stomach after overnight fasting for five successive days. All animals were sacrificed after 12 weeks from the beginning of the experiment and small pieces of the liver were excised and prepared for ultrastructural study. The liver of the non infected animals which received myrrh extract (group IA) showed a more or less normal ultrastructural profile. Infected groups showed alterations of the ultrastructure of most of the hepatocytes with extensive intercellular fibrosis with abundant granulomas in the portal tract. In the infected treated group, most of the hepatocytes showed normal organelles with numerous microvilli extending into patent spaces of Disse. Marked reduction of granulomas in the portal areas and amelioration of intercellular fibrosis was also observed. On the basis of the observed results, it was concluded that myrrh extract has a promising antischistosomal non hepatotoxic activity. PMID:15125513

  4. Global Metabolomic Profiling of Mice Brains following Experimental Infection with the Cyst-Forming Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Elsheikha, Hany M.; Liu, Guang-Xue; Suo, Xun; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2015-01-01

    The interplay between the Apicomplexan parasite Toxoplasma gondii and its host has been largely studied. However, molecular changes at the metabolic level in the host central nervous system and pathogenesis-associated metabolites during brain infection are largely unexplored. We used a global metabolomics strategy to identify differentially regulated metabolites and affected metabolic pathways in BALB/c mice during infection with T. gondii Pru strain at 7, 14 and 21 days post-infection (DPI). The non-targeted Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (LC-MS) metabolomics analysis detected approximately 2,755 retention time-exact mass pairs, of which more than 60 had significantly differential profiles at different stages of infection. These include amino acids, organic acids, carbohydrates, fatty acids, and vitamins. The biological significance of these metabolites is discussed. Principal Component Analysis and Orthogonal Partial Least Square-Discriminant Analysis showed the metabolites’ profile to change over time with the most significant changes occurring at 14 DPI. Correlated metabolic pathway imbalances were observed in carbohydrate metabolism, lipid metabolism, energetic metabolism and fatty acid oxidation. Eight metabolites correlated with the physical recovery from infection-caused illness were identified. These findings indicate that global metabolomics adopted in this study is a sensitive approach for detecting metabolic alterations in T. gondii-infected mice and generated a comparative metabolic profile of brain tissue distinguishing infected from non-infected host. PMID:26431205

  5. Heterologous Infection of Pregnant Mice Induces Low Birth Weight and Modifies Offspring Susceptibility to Malaria.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ankur; Conteh, Solomon; Langhorne, Jean; Duffy, Patrick E

    2016-01-01

    Pregnancy malaria (PM) is associated with poor pregnancy outcomes, and can arise due to relapse, recrudescence or a re-infection with heterologous parasites. We have used the Plasmodium chabaudi model of pregnancy malaria in C57BL/6 mice to examine recrudescence and heterologous infection using CB and AS parasite strains. After an initial course of patent parasitemia and first recrudescence, CB but not AS parasites were observed to recrudesce again in most animals that became pregnant. Pregnancy exacerbated heterologous CB infection of AS-experienced mice, leading to mortality and impaired post-natal growth of pups. Parasites were detected in placental blood without evidence of sequestration, unlike P. falciparum but similar to other malaria species that infect pregnant women. Inflammatory cytokine levels were elevated in pregnant females during malaria, and associated with intensity of infection and with poor outcomes. Pups born to dams during heterologous infection were more resistant to malaria infections at 6-7 weeks of age, compared to pups born to malaria-experienced but uninfected dams or to malaria-naïve dams. In summary, our mouse model reproduces several features of human PM, including recrudescences, heterologous infections, poor pregnancy outcomes associated with inflammatory cytokines, and modulation of offspring susceptibility to malaria. This model should be further studied to explore mechanisms underlying PM pathogenesis. PMID:27467392

  6. Heterologous Infection of Pregnant Mice Induces Low Birth Weight and Modifies Offspring Susceptibility to Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Ankur; Conteh, Solomon; Langhorne, Jean; Duffy, Patrick E.

    2016-01-01

    Pregnancy malaria (PM) is associated with poor pregnancy outcomes, and can arise due to relapse, recrudescence or a re-infection with heterologous parasites. We have used the Plasmodium chabaudi model of pregnancy malaria in C57BL/6 mice to examine recrudescence and heterologous infection using CB and AS parasite strains. After an initial course of patent parasitemia and first recrudescence, CB but not AS parasites were observed to recrudesce again in most animals that became pregnant. Pregnancy exacerbated heterologous CB infection of AS-experienced mice, leading to mortality and impaired post-natal growth of pups. Parasites were detected in placental blood without evidence of sequestration, unlike P. falciparum but similar to other malaria species that infect pregnant women. Inflammatory cytokine levels were elevated in pregnant females during malaria, and associated with intensity of infection and with poor outcomes. Pups born to dams during heterologous infection were more resistant to malaria infections at 6–7 weeks of age, compared to pups born to malaria-experienced but uninfected dams or to malaria-naïve dams. In summary, our mouse model reproduces several features of human PM, including recrudescences, heterologous infections, poor pregnancy outcomes associated with inflammatory cytokines, and modulation of offspring susceptibility to malaria. This model should be further studied to explore mechanisms underlying PM pathogenesis. PMID:27467392

  7. Global Metabolomic Profiling of Mice Brains following Experimental Infection with the Cyst-Forming Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chun-Xue; Zhou, Dong-Hui; Elsheikha, Hany M; Liu, Guang-Xue; Suo, Xun; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2015-01-01

    The interplay between the Apicomplexan parasite Toxoplasma gondii and its host has been largely studied. However, molecular changes at the metabolic level in the host central nervous system and pathogenesis-associated metabolites during brain infection are largely unexplored. We used a global metabolomics strategy to identify differentially regulated metabolites and affected metabolic pathways in BALB/c mice during infection with T. gondii Pru strain at 7, 14 and 21 days post-infection (DPI). The non-targeted Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (LC-MS) metabolomics analysis detected approximately 2,755 retention time-exact mass pairs, of which more than 60 had significantly differential profiles at different stages of infection. These include amino acids, organic acids, carbohydrates, fatty acids, and vitamins. The biological significance of these metabolites is discussed. Principal Component Analysis and Orthogonal Partial Least Square-Discriminant Analysis showed the metabolites' profile to change over time with the most significant changes occurring at 14 DPI. Correlated metabolic pathway imbalances were observed in carbohydrate metabolism, lipid metabolism, energetic metabolism and fatty acid oxidation. Eight metabolites correlated with the physical recovery from infection-caused illness were identified. These findings indicate that global metabolomics adopted in this study is a sensitive approach for detecting metabolic alterations in T. gondii-infected mice and generated a comparative metabolic profile of brain tissue distinguishing infected from non-infected host. PMID:26431205

  8. Host resistance of CD18 knockout mice against systemic infection with Listeria monocytogenes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Huaizhu; Prince, Joseph E.; Brayton, Cory F.; Shah, Chirayu; Zeve, Daniel; Gregory, Stephen H.; Smith, C. Wayne; Ballantyne, Christie M.

    2003-01-01

    Mice with targeted mutations of CD18, the common beta2 subunit of CD11/CD18 integrins, have leukocytosis, impaired transendothelial neutrophil emigration, and reduced host defense to Streptococcus pneumoniae, a gram-positive extracellular bacterium. Previous studies using blocking monoclonal antibodies suggested roles for CD18 and CD11b in hepatic neutrophil recruitment and host innate response to Listeria monocytogenes, a gram-positive intracellular bacterium. We induced systemic listeriosis in CD18 knockout (CD18-ko) and wild-type (WT) mice by tail vein injection with Listeria. By 14 days postinjection (dpi), 8 of 10 WT mice died, compared with 2 of 10 CD18-ko mice (P < 0.01). Quantitative organ culture showed that numbers of Listeria organisms in livers and spleens were similar in both groups at 20 min postinfection. By 3, 5, and 7 dpi, however, numbers of Listeria organisms were significantly lower in livers and spleens of CD18-ko mice than in WT mice. Histopathology showed that following Listeria infection, CD18-ko mice had milder inflammatory and necrotizing lesions in both spleens and livers than did WT mice. Cytokine assays indicated that baseline interleukin-1beta and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) levels were higher in CD18-ko mice than in WT mice and that CD18-ko splenocytes produced higher levels of interleukin-1beta and G-CSF than WT splenocytes under the same amount of Listeria stimulation. These findings show that CD18 is not an absolute requirement for antilisterial innate immunity or hepatic neutrophil recruitment. We propose that the absence of CD18 in the mice results in the priming of innate immunity, as evidenced by elevated cytokine expression, and neutrophilic leukocytosis, which augments antilisterial defense.

  9. Protective effects of Chlorella vulgaris in lead-exposed mice infected with Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Queiroz, Mary L S; Rodrigues, Ana P O; Bincoletto, Claudia; Figueirêdo, Camila A V; Malacrida, Solange

    2003-06-01

    Chlorella vulgaris extract (CVE) was examined for its chelating effects on the myelosuppression induced by lead in Listeria monocytogenes-infected mice. The reduction in the number of bone marrow granulocyte-macrophage progenitors (CFU-GM) observed after the infection was more severe in the groups previously exposed to lead. Extramedullar hematopoiesis, which was drastically increased after the infection, was not altered by the presence of lead. Treatment with CVE, given simultaneously or following lead exposure, restored to control values the myelosuppression observed in infected/lead-exposed mice and produced a significant increase in serum colony-stimulating activity. The benefits of the CVE treatment were also evident in the recovery of thymus weight, since the reduction produced by the infection was further potentiated by lead exposure. The efficacy of CVE was evident when infected and infected/lead-exposed mice were challenged with a lethal dose of L. monocytogenes after a 10-day treatment with 50 mg/kg CVE/day, given simultaneously to the exposure to 1300 ppm lead acetate in drinking water. Survival rates of 30% for the infected group and of 20% for the infected/lead-exposed groups were observed. Evidence that these protective effects of CVE are partly due to its chelating effect was given by the changes observed in blood lead levels. We have observed in the group receiving the CVE/lead simultaneous exposure a dramatic reduction of 66.03% in blood lead levels, when compared to lead-exposed nontreated control. On the other hand, CVE treatment following lead exposure produced a much less effective chelating effect. CVE treatments for 3 or 10 days, starting 24 h following lead exposure, produced a reduction in blood lead levels of 13.5% and 17%, respectively, compared to lead-exposed nontreated controls. The significantly better response observed with the simultaneous CVE/lead administration indicates that the immunomodulation effect of CVE plays an important

  10. Dietary Chitosan Supplementation Increases Microbial Diversity and Attenuates the Severity of Citrobacter rodentium Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongbing; Xiong, Xia; Tan, Bie; Al-Dhabi, Naif Abdullah; Fang, Jun

    2016-01-01

    C57BL/6 mice were tested in order to investigate the effects of dietary chitosan (COS) supplements on intestinal microflora and resistance to Citrobacter rodentium infection. The findings reveal that, after consuming a 300 mg/kg COS diet for 14 days, microflora became more diverse as a result of the supplement. Mice receiving COS exhibited an increase in the percentage of Bacteroidetes phylum and a decrease in the percentage of Firmicutes phylum. After Citrobacter rodentium infection, the histopathology scores indicated that COS feeding resulted in less severe colitis. IL-6 and TNF-α were significantly lower in colon from COS-feeding mice than those in the control group. Furthermore, mice in COS group were also found to experience inhibited activation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) in the colonic tissue. Overall, the findings revealed that adding 300 mg/kg COS to the diet changed the composition of the intestinal microflora of mice, resulting in suppressed NF-κB activation and less production of TNF-α and IL-6; and these changes led to better control of inflammation and resolution of infection with C. rodentium. PMID:27761062

  11. Control of Mycobacterial Infections in Mice Expressing Human Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) but Not Mouse TNF.

    PubMed

    Olleros, Maria L; Chavez-Galan, Leslie; Segueni, Noria; Bourigault, Marie L; Vesin, Dominique; Kruglov, Andrey A; Drutskaya, Marina S; Bisig, Ruth; Ehlers, Stefan; Aly, Sahar; Walter, Kerstin; Kuprash, Dmitry V; Chouchkova, Miliana; Kozlov, Sergei V; Erard, François; Ryffel, Bernard; Quesniaux, Valérie F J; Nedospasov, Sergei A; Garcia, Irene

    2015-09-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is an important cytokine for host defense against pathogens but is also associated with the development of human immunopathologies. TNF blockade effectively ameliorates many chronic inflammatory conditions but compromises host immunity to tuberculosis. The search for novel, more specific human TNF blockers requires the development of a reliable animal model. We used a novel mouse model with complete replacement of the mouse TNF gene by its human ortholog (human TNF [huTNF] knock-in [KI] mice) to determine resistance to Mycobacterium bovis BCG and M. tuberculosis infections and to investigate whether TNF inhibitors in clinical use reduce host immunity. Our results show that macrophages from huTNF KI mice responded to BCG and lipopolysaccharide similarly to wild-type macrophages by NF-κB activation and cytokine production. While TNF-deficient mice rapidly succumbed to mycobacterial infection, huTNF KI mice survived, controlling the bacterial burden and activating bactericidal mechanisms. Administration of TNF-neutralizing biologics disrupted the control of mycobacterial infection in huTNF KI mice, leading to an increased bacterial burden and hyperinflammation. Thus, our findings demonstrate that human TNF can functionally replace murine TNF in vivo, providing mycobacterial resistance that could be compromised by TNF neutralization. This new animal model will be helpful for the testing of specific biologics neutralizing human TNF.

  12. Spontaneous generation of prion infectivity in fatal familial insomnia knockin mice.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Walker S; Borkowski, Andrew W; Faas, Henryk; Steele, Andrew D; King, Oliver D; Watson, Nicki; Jasanoff, Alan; Lindquist, Susan

    2009-08-27

    A crucial tenet of the prion hypothesis is that misfolding of the prion protein (PrP) induced by mutations associated with familial prion disease is, in an otherwise normal mammalian brain, sufficient to generate the infectious agent. Yet this has never been demonstrated. We engineered knockin mice to express a PrP mutation associated with a distinct human prion disease, fatal familial insomnia (FFI). An additional substitution created a strong transmission barrier against pre-existing prions. The mice spontaneously developed a disease distinct from that of other mouse prion models and highly reminiscent of FFI. Unique pathology was transmitted from FFI mice to mice expressing wild-type PrP sharing the same transmission barrier. FFI mice were highly resistant to infection by pre-existing prions, confirming infectivity did not arise from contaminating agents. Thus, a single amino acid change in PrP is sufficient to induce a distinct neurodegenerative disease and the spontaneous generation of prion infectivity.

  13. In vivo assessment of effect of fermented milk diet on course of infection in mice with bioluminescent Salmonella.

    PubMed

    Brovko, Lubov Y; Vandenende, Chris; Chu, Byron; Ng, Kwok-Yu; Brooks, Andrew; Griffiths, Mansel W

    2003-11-01

    A novel method for assessing the effect of fermented milk and its components on the course of Salmonella infection in live mice is described. Following a period of feeding with whole fermented milk (group W), a cell-free fraction of fermented milk (group S), or saline (group C, control), mice were challenged by oral gavage with a bioluminescent strain of Salmonella Enteritidis. Colonization of the gastrointestinal tract and subsequent infection could be followed by bioluminescent imaging of live mice with a cooled slow-scan CCD camera. Each group of mice was fed for 7 days with the appropriate product. On the eighth day, all mice were orally infected with 10(6) Salmonella cells. On the sixth day after infection, mice in groups W and C showed evidence of disease. No bioluminescent signal was observed for any of the mice in group S. The physical condition of the mice in groups W and S was normal, but some deterioration in the health of the mice in the control group (group C) occurred. On the eighth day after infection, a weak bioluminescence signal was observed for the mice in group W, but still no signal was observed for any of the mice in group S. Mice in both of these groups appeared normal, but the mice in group C showed strong evidence of infection and marked deterioration in their physical condition accompanied by a bioluminescence signal. This method allows the assessment of the effects of potential nutraceutical agents on the course of infection by foodborne pathogens in live animals in real time.

  14. Extraneural manifestations of prion infection in GPI-anchorless transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Andrew M.; Paulsson, Johan F.; Cruite, Justin; Andaya, Abegail A.; Trifilo, Matthew J.; Oldstone, Michael B.A.

    2011-03-01

    Earlier studies indicated that transgenic (tg) mice engineered to express prion protein (PrP) lacking the glycophosphatidylinositol (GPI{sup -/-}) membrane anchor formed abnormal proteinase-resistant prion (PrPsc) amyloid deposits in their brains and hearts when infected with the RML strain of murine scrapie. In contrast, RML scrapie infection of normal mice with a GPI-anchored PrP did not deposit amyloid with PrPsc in the brain or the heart. Here we report that scrapie-infected GPI{sup -/-} PrP tg mice also deposit PrP and transmissible infectious material in the gut, kidneys, and islets of Langerhans. Similar to previously reported amyloid deposits in the brain and heart, amyloid deposits were found in the gut; however, no amyloid deposited in the islets. By high-resolution electron microscopy, we show PrP is located primarily in {alpha} cells and also {beta} cells. Islets contain abundant insulin and there is no abnormality in glucose metabolism in infected GPI{sup -/-} PrP tg mice.

  15. Oral lactoferrin treatment resolves amoebic intracecal infection in C3H/HeJ mice.

    PubMed

    León-Sicairos, Nidia; Martínez-Pardo, Leonardo; Sánchez-Hernández, Beatriz; de la Garza, Mireya; Carrero, Julio César

    2012-06-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is a protozoan parasite that causes amoebiasis, an illness that affects many people around the world. We have previously reported that lactoferrin is able to kill E. histolytica in in vitro cultures. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the therapeutic effect of orally administered bovine lactoferrin in the control of intestinal amoebiasis of susceptible C3H/HeJ mice. The results showed that 20 mg lactoferrin/kg orally administered each day for 1 week was able to eliminate the infection in 63% of the mice, since neither trophozoites nor evidence of epithelial damage and (or) swelling were found in tissue sections of the cecum. The rest of the treated animals (37%) showed a decrease in trophozoite numbers and mucus secreted to the lumen, as compared with untreated and infected mice (p < 0.05). By immunohistochemistry, the profile of secreted cytokines in the cecum revealed that infected but untreated animals showed a mixed Th1/regulatory cytokines profile, whereas the cecum of mice treated (cured) showed a Th2 cytokine profile (IL-4) and expression of the multifunctional IL-6. In addition, cytokines and increasing cecal production of total IgA antibodies were found associated with little inflammation and disease control observed in the cecum of lactoferrin-treated animals. These results suggest that oral administration of lactoferrin can control intestinal amoebic infection probably by killing amoebas or favoring their removal and reestablish the antiinflammatory intestinal environment.

  16. Antiplasmodial Effect of Anthocleista vogelii on Albino Mice Experimentally Infected with Plasmodium berghei berghei (NK 65)

    PubMed Central

    Gboeloh, Lebari Barine; Okon, Okpok Eta; Udoh, Samuel Effiong

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the antiplasmodial effect of the ethanolic stem bark extract of Anthocleista vogelii at different doses in albino mice infected with Plasmodium berghei berghei (NK 65). Thirty-six mice were divided into six groups of six mice each. Five groups (B1–B3, D, and G) were infected with Plasmodium berghei berghei parasitized red blood cells. Groups D, H, and G served as the controls. Six days after infection, mice in groups B1, B2, and B3 were treated orally with 100, 200, and 400 mg/kg body weight of Anthocleista vogelii, respectively, for six executive days. Group D was treated with 5 mg/kg body weight of chloroquine while Group G was given distilled water. Group H was not infected and was not treated. It served as the normal control. The extracts exhibited significant (P < 0.05) dose-dependent chemosuppression of P. berghei. The extract exhibited average chemosuppressive effects of 48.5%, 78.5%, and 86.6% at dose levels of 100, 200, and 400 mg/kg body weight, respectively. Phytochemical screening of the plant extract revealed the presence of saponins, cardiac glycosides, flavonoids, terpenes, alkaloids, and steroid. The acute toxicity (LD50) of the plant was estimated to be 3162 mg/kg body weight. It showed that the stem bark of A. vogelii possesses antiplasmodial property. PMID:24900913

  17. 5-Lipoxygenase Negatively Regulates Th1 Response during Brucella abortus Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Fahel, Júlia Silveira; de Souza, Mariana Bueno; Gomes, Marco Túlio Ribeiro; Corsetti, Patricia P.; Carvalho, Natalia B.; Marinho, Fabio A. V.; de Almeida, Leonardo A.; Caliari, Marcelo V.; Machado, Fabiana Simão

    2015-01-01

    Brucella abortus is a Gram-negative bacterium that infects humans and cattle, causing a chronic inflammatory disease known as brucellosis. A Th1-mediated immune response plays a critical role in host control of this pathogen. Recent findings indicate contrasting roles for lipid mediators in host responses against infections. 5-Lipoxygenase (5-LO) is an enzyme required for the production of the lipid mediators leukotrienes and lipoxins. To determine the involvement of 5-LO in host responses to B. abortus infection, we intraperitoneally infected wild-type and 5-LO-deficient mice and evaluated the progression of infection and concomitant expression of immune mediators. Here, we demonstrate that B. abortus induced the upregulation of 5-LO mRNA in wild-type mice. Moreover, this pathogen upregulated the production of the lipid mediators leukotriene B4 and lipoxin A4 in a 5-LO-dependent manner. 5-LO-deficient mice displayed lower bacterial burdens in the spleen and liver and less severe liver pathology, demonstrating an enhanced resistance to infection. Host resistance paralleled an increased expression of the proinflammatory mediators interleukin-12 (IL-12), gamma interferon (IFN-γ), and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) during the course of infection. Moreover, we demonstrated that 5-LO downregulated the expression of IL-12 in macrophages during B. abortus infection. Our results suggest that 5-LO has a major involvement in B. abortus infection, by functioning as a negative regulator of the protective Th1 immune responses against this pathogen. PMID:25583526

  18. Immunostimulation of sugar cane extract on neutrophils to Salmonella typhimurium infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ming-Hua; Lo, Dan-Yuan; Liao, Jiunn-Wang; Hsuan, Shih-Ling; Chien, Maw-Sheng; Lin, Cheng-Chung; Chen, Ter-Hsin; Lee, Wei-Cheng

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the immunomodulatory effects of sugar cane extract (SCE) on the biological activities of neutrophils in mice. Six-week-old BALB/c mice were fed 1250 mg/kg of SCE once. The generation, migration and biological functions of neutrophils and the survival rates of the mice in response to Salmonella typhimurium infection were evaluated. The results show that the numbers of both bone marrow cells and neutrophils were significantly increased in response to SCE administration (p < 0.05) compared with controls. The migration, phagocytosis and H₂O₂ generation of neutrophils were all significantly enhanced in SCE-treated mice (p < 0.05). After challenge with S. typhimurium (lethal dose, 50% (LD₅₀), SCE-treated mice had a 19.2% higher survival rate and milder hepatic lesions than the controls. Additionally, fewer invasive bacteria were recovered from the spleens of SCE-treated mice. In conclusion, our results suggest that SCE has a positive regulatory effect on the biological function of mouse neutrophils that may increase host resistance against bacterial infections.

  19. Effect of N-acetylchitohexaose against Candida albicans infection of tumor-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, M; Watanabe, T; Suzuki, S; Suzuki, M

    1990-01-01

    A water-soluble oligosaccharide, N-acetylchitohexaose (NACOS-6), was able to enhance the protective effect against Candida albicans infection in mice during the early phase of tumor-bearing. A significant decrease in the number of C. albicans cells in the kidneys of NACOS-6-treated tumor-bearing mice was observed 8 days after the fungal infection, or 15 days after the tumor transplantation. The candidacidal activity of polymorphonuclear leukocytes from NACOS-6-treated tumor-bearing mice did not differ from that of NACOS-6-untreated tumor-bearing mice. On the other hand, the candidacidal activities of both macrophages and T lymphocytes increased following administration of NACOS-6 in the early phase of tumor-bearing. The culture supernatant of T lymphocytes from NACOS-6-treated tumor-bearing mice also potentiated the candidacidal activity of casein-induced macrophages. An enhancement of natural killer cell activity of splenic lymphocytes obtained from NACOS-6-treated tumor-bearing mice was also observed.

  20. Bordetella pseudohinzii spp. nov. infects C57Bl6 mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clinical studies rely heavily on mouse models of infection. Precise identification and control of contaminating pathogens that circulate in mouse colonies is an important task. Over the past decade, there have been several reports documenting the isolation of Bordetella spp. from purported pathog...

  1. Activity of 5-chloro-pyrazinamide in mice infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis or Mycobacterium bovis

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Zahoor; Tyagi, Sandeep; Minkowski, Austin; Almeida, Deepak; Nuermberger, Eric L.; Peck, Kaitlin M.; Welch, John T.; Baughn, Anthony D.; Jacobs, Williams R.; Grosset, Jacques H.

    2012-01-01

    Background & objectives: Pyrazinamide is an essential component of first line anti-tuberculosis regimen as well as most of the second line regimens. This drug has a unique sterilizing activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Its unique role in tuberculosis treatment has lead to the search and development of its structural analogues. One such analogue is 5-chloro-pyrazinamide (5-Cl-PZA) that has been tested under in vitro conditions against M. tuberculosis. The present study was designed with an aim to assess the activity of 5-Cl-PZA, alone and in combination with first-line drugs, against murine tuberculosis. Methods: The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 5-Cl-PZA in Middlebrook 7H9 broth (neutral pH) and the inhibitory titre of serum from mice that received a 300 mg/kg oral dose of 5-Cl-PZA 30 min before cardiac puncture were determined. To test the tolerability of orally administered 5-Cl-PZA, uninfected mice received doses up to 300 mg/kg for 2 wk. Four weeks after low-dose aerosol infection either with M. tuberculosis or M. bovis, mice were treated 5 days/wk with 5-Cl-PZA, at doses ranging from 37.5 to 150 mg/kg, either alone or in combination with isoniazid and rifampicin. Antimicrobial activity was assessed by colony-forming unit counts in lungs after 4 and 8 wk of treatment. Results: The MIC of 5-Cl-PZA against M. tuberculosis was between 12.5 and 25 μg/ml and the serum inhibitory titre was 1:4. Under the same experimental conditions, the MIC of pyrazinamide was >100 μg/ml and mouse serum had no inhibitory activity after a 300 mg/kg dose; 5-Cl-PZA was well tolerated in uninfected and infected mice up to 300 and 150 mg/kg, respectively. While PZA alone and in combination exhibited its usual antimicrobial activity in mice infected with M. tuberculosis and no activity in mice infected with M. bovis, 5-Cl-PZA exhibited antimicrobial activity neither in mice infected with M. tuberculosis nor in mice infected with M. bovis. Interpretation

  2. Suppression of humoral response during the course of Candida albicans infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Valdez, J C; Meson, O E; de Valdez, G A; Sirena, A

    1984-10-30

    This paper aims at demonstrating the non-specific immunosuppression as regards thyme-dependent antigens sheep erythrocytes (SRBC) during the course of Candida albicans systemic infection. Three lots of syngeneic/BALB/c mice, 8-12 weeks of age, were used. The first normal lot was inoculated via the intraperitoneal route with a (SRBC) suspension (4 X 10(8) cells ml) in a Hank's balanced saline solution. The primary response of antibodies formed by splenic cells was measured from 4 to 8 days after inoculation using the direct plaque forming cells technique. The second lot was infected by the same route with a suspension of Candida albicans (1 X 10(7) cells). Positive retrocultures from the blood and kidneys of these infected mice were obtained. These yeasts cultivated in a Sabouraud medium were harvested after 20 h at 37 degrees C. Following the same methodology the immune response to SRBC was determined. The serum obtained from infected mice was transferred to a third lot of mice at different intervals during the course of the infection. The immune response to SRBC was done by the direct plaque-forming cells technique. Controls were carried out using normal donors and recipients. A suppression of the immune response was obtained as from the 2nd day of inoculation up to the 28th day. It was not possible to transfer such suppression passively by means of the serum. These results suggest that the systemic infection by Candida albicans induce a non-specific immunosuppression in the organism, already demonstrated in viral infections, bacteria, protozoaria and metazoaria in mammals. In some way, this will contribute to explain the mechanisms of immune response to Candida albicans.

  3. Mucosal and systemic T cell response in mice intragastrically infected with Neospora caninum tachyzoites

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The murine model has been widely used to study the host immune response to Neospora caninum. However, in most studies, the intraperitoneal route was preferentially used to establish infection. Here, C57BL/6 mice were infected with N. caninum tachyzoites by the intragastric route, as it more closely resembles the natural route of infection through the gastrointestinal tract. The elicited T-cell mediated immune response was evaluated in the intestinal epithelium and mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN). Early upon the parasitic challenge, IL-12 production by conventional and plasmacytoid dendritic cells was increased in MLN. Accordingly, increased proportions and numbers of TCRαβ+CD8+IFN-γ+ lymphocytes were detected, not only in the intestinal epithelium and MLN, but also in the spleen of the infected mice. In this organ, IFN-γ-producing TCRαβ+CD4+ T cells were also found to increase in the infected mice, however later than CD8+ T cells. Interestingly, splenic and MLN CD4+CD25+ T cells sorted from infected mice presented a suppressive activity on in vitro T cell proliferation and cytokine production above that of control counterparts. These results altogether indicate that, by producing IFN-γ, TCRαβ+CD8+ cells contribute for local and systemic host protection in the earliest days upon infection established through the gastrointestinal tract. Nevertheless, they also provide substantial evidence for a parasite-driven reinforcement of T regulatory cell function which may contribute for parasite persistence in the host and might represent an additional barrier to overcome towards effective vaccination. PMID:23937079

  4. Suppression of humoral response during the course of Candida albicans infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Valdez, J C; Meson, O E; de Valdez, G A; Sirena, A

    1984-10-30

    This paper aims at demonstrating the non-specific immunosuppression as regards thyme-dependent antigens sheep erythrocytes (SRBC) during the course of Candida albicans systemic infection. Three lots of syngeneic/BALB/c mice, 8-12 weeks of age, were used. The first normal lot was inoculated via the intraperitoneal route with a (SRBC) suspension (4 X 10(8) cells ml) in a Hank's balanced saline solution. The primary response of antibodies formed by splenic cells was measured from 4 to 8 days after inoculation using the direct plaque forming cells technique. The second lot was infected by the same route with a suspension of Candida albicans (1 X 10(7) cells). Positive retrocultures from the blood and kidneys of these infected mice were obtained. These yeasts cultivated in a Sabouraud medium were harvested after 20 h at 37 degrees C. Following the same methodology the immune response to SRBC was determined. The serum obtained from infected mice was transferred to a third lot of mice at different intervals during the course of the infection. The immune response to SRBC was done by the direct plaque-forming cells technique. Controls were carried out using normal donors and recipients. A suppression of the immune response was obtained as from the 2nd day of inoculation up to the 28th day. It was not possible to transfer such suppression passively by means of the serum. These results suggest that the systemic infection by Candida albicans induce a non-specific immunosuppression in the organism, already demonstrated in viral infections, bacteria, protozoaria and metazoaria in mammals. In some way, this will contribute to explain the mechanisms of immune response to Candida albicans. PMID:6392889

  5. Evaluation of the efficacy of a specific hyperimmune serum in experimental influenza infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Marinescu, Bogdan; Coman, Cristin; Iancu, Adina Daniela; Stavaru, Crina; Lupulescu, Emilia; Onu, Adrian; Radu, Dorel Lucian

    2009-01-01

    Serotherapy still remains a way of treatment in some diseases, and it could be consider superior to any other mode of action because the protecting substances of the body are the products of the organism itself. The aim of the study was to establish an "in vivo" method for testing the efficacy of therapeutic serum. Hyperimmune serum for influenza A/PR8/34 viral strain, was prepared in sheep, and tested for inhibition of haemagglutination and microneutralisation. Seroprotection was evaluated in mice one day after being challenged with a lethal dose of the same virus. Our study shows that protection occurred in all mice treated with undiluted hyperimmune serum one day post infection (no clinical signs, faster recovery of the body weight after the first three days of the infection, all mice survived).

  6. Infections of neonatal and adult mice with murine CMV HaNa1 strain upon oronasal inoculation: New insights in the pathogenesis of natural primary CMV infections.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Jun; Zhang, Shunchuan; Nauwynck, Hans

    2016-01-01

    In healthy individuals, naturally acquired infections of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) are generally asymptomatic. Animal models mimicking the natural primary HCMV infections in infants and adults are scarce. Here, neonatal and adult BALB/c mice were inoculated oronasally with a Belgian isolate HaNa1 of murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV). None of the mice showed clinical symptoms. In neonatal mice, a typical systemic infection occurred. In adult mice, viral replication was restricted to the nasal mucosa and submandibular glands. Infectious virus was not detected in trachea, oral mucosa, pharynx, esophagus, small intestines of both neonatal and adult mice at all time points. Nose was demonstrated to be the entry site. Double immunofluorescence staining showed that in nose infected cells were olfactory neurons and sustentacular cells in olfactory epithelium and were macrophages and dendritic cells in nasopharynx-associated lymphoid tissues (NALT). Neonatal and adult mice developed similar antibody response pattern, though former magnitude was lower. In summary, we have established intranasal (without anesthesia) infections of neonatal and adult mice with murine CMV HaNa1 strain, which mimic the range and extent of virus replication during natural primary HCMV infections in healthy infants and adults. These findings might bring new insights in the pathogenesis of natural primary CMV infections. PMID:26474525

  7. De Novo Generated Human Red Blood Cells in Humanized Mice Support Plasmodium falciparum Infection.

    PubMed

    Amaladoss, Anburaj; Chen, Qingfeng; Liu, Min; Dummler, Sara K; Dao, Ming; Suresh, Subra; Chen, Jianzhu; Preiser, Peter R

    2015-01-01

    Immunodeficient mouse-human chimeras provide a powerful approach to study host specific pathogens like Plasmodium (P.) falciparum that causes human malaria. Existing mouse models of P. falciparum infection require repeated injections of human red blood cells (RBCs). In addition, clodronate lipsomes and anti-neutrophil antibodies are injected to suppress the clearance of human RBCs by the residual immune system of the immunodeficient mice. Engraftment of NOD-scid Il2rg-/- mice with human hematopoietic stem cells leads to reconstitution of human immune cells. Although human B cell reconstitution is robust and T cell reconstitution is reasonable in the recipient mice, human RBC reconstitution is generally poor or undetectable. The poor reconstitution is mainly the result of a deficiency of appropriate human cytokines that are necessary for the development and maintenance of these cell lineages. Delivery of plasmid DNA encoding human erythropoietin and interleukin-3 into humanized mice by hydrodynamic tail-vein injection resulted in significantly enhanced reconstitution of erythrocytes. With this improved humanized mouse, here we show that P. falciparum infects de novo generated human RBCs, develops into schizonts and causes successive reinvasion. We also show that different parasite strains exhibit variation in their ability to infect these humanized mice. Parasites could be detected by nested PCR in the blood samples of humanized mice infected with P. falciparum K1 and HB3 strains for 3 cycles, whereas in other strains such as 3D7, DD2, 7G8, FCR3 and W2mef parasites could only be detected for 1 cycle. In vivo adaptation of K1 strain further improves the infection efficiency and parasites can be detected by microscopy for 3 cycles. The parasitemia ranges between 0.13 and 0.25% at the first cycle of infection, falls between 0.08 and 0.15% at the second cycle, and drops to barely detectable levels at the third cycle of infection. Compared to existing mouse models, our

  8. Chemometric analysis of biofluids from mice experimentally infected with Schistosoma mansoni

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The urinary metabolic fingerprint of a patent Schistosoma mansoni infection in the mouse has been characterized using spectroscopic methods. However, the temporal dynamics of metabolic alterations have not been studied at the systems level. Here, we investigated the systems metabolic changes in the mouse upon S. mansoni infection by modeling the sequence of metabolic events in urine, plasma and faecal water. Methods Ten female NMRI mice, aged 5 weeks, were infected with 80 S. mansoni cercariae each. Ten age- and sex-matched mice remained uninfected and served as a control group. Urine, plasma and faecal samples were collected 1 day before, and on eight time points until day 73 post-infection. Biofluid samples were subjected to 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and multivariate statistical analyses. Results Differences between S. mansoni-infected and uninfected control mice were found from day 41 onwards. One of the key metabolic signatures in urine and faecal extracts was an alteration in several gut bacteria-related metabolites, whereas the plasma reflected S. mansoni infection by changes in metabolites related to energy homeostasis, such as relatively higher levels of lipids and decreased levels of glucose. We identified 12 urinary biomarkers of S. mansoni infection, among which hippurate, phenylacetylglycine (PAG) and 2-oxoadipate were particularly robust with regard to disease progression. Thirteen plasma metabolites were found to differentiate infected from control mice, with the lipid components, D-3-hydroxybutyrate and glycerophosphorylcholine showing greatest consistency. Faecal extracts were highly variable in chemical composition and therefore only five metabolites were found discriminatory of infected mice, of which 5-aminovalerate was the most stable and showed a positive correlation with urinary PAG. Conclusions The composite metabolic signature of S. mansoni in the mouse derived from perturbations in urinary, faecal and

  9. Transplantation of skin grafts and organs infected with Toxoplasma gondii as a source of toxoplasmosis in immunocompromised mice.

    PubMed

    Belal, Usama Salah; Norose, Kazumi; Mohamed, Rabie Mohamed; Naoi, Koji; Yano, Akihiko

    2011-01-01

    The possibility of Toxoplasma gondii infection resulting from transplantation of a skin graft and various organs has been investigated. The parasite was detected in very low numbers in all organs examined in wild-type (WT) BALB/c (B/c) mice that received skin grafts from infected interferon gamma knockout (GKO) B/c mice both with and without sulfamethoxazole treatment; all recipient mice survived. In contrast, transplantation of skin grafts from untreated infected WT B/c mice to naïve GKO B/c mice led to the death of all recipients within 20 days post-transplantation; T. gondii was found to be disseminated in all organs examined. Similar results were obtained after transplantation of skin from untreated and treated GKO B/c mice to naïve GKO B/c mice, whereas the recipient GKO B/c mice died within 10 days after intraperitoneal transplantation of lung, heart, brain or small intestine from infected untreated GKO B/c mice. These results indicate that skin grafts as well as various organs infected with T. gondii can be sources of infection in immunocompromised hosts. Toxoplasmosis should therefore be taken into consideration during organ transplantation to immunocompromised hosts.

  10. ELEVATED γ-GLOBULIN AND INCREASED ANTIBODY PRODUCTION IN MICE INFECTED WITH LACTIC DEHYDROGENASE VIRUS

    PubMed Central

    Notkins, Abner Louis; Mergenhagen, Stephan E.; Rizzo, Anthony A.; Scheele, Christina; Waldmann, Thomas A.

    1966-01-01

    Infection of mice with the lactic dehydrogenase virus (LDV) resulted in an elevated level of γ-globulin. Histologic examination of the spleen and lymph nodes revealed that the number of germinal centers was greatly increased. Immunization with human γ-globulin showed that the capacity of the virus-infected animal to produce anti-human γ-globulin was greatly enhanced and that the virus acted as an adjuvant. From these experiments it is concluded that a virus infection (LDV) can affect the immunologic response of the host to a heterologous antigen. PMID:4159522

  11. Nasopharyngeal Infection of Mice with Streptococcus pyogenes and In Vivo Detection of Superantigen Activity.

    PubMed

    Zeppa, Joseph J; Wakabayashi, Adrienne T; Kasper, Katherine J; Xu, Stacey X; Haeryfar, S M Mansour; McCormick, John K

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes is a globally prominent human-specific pathogen that is responsible for an enormous burden of infectious disease. Despite intensive experimental efforts to understand the molecular correlates that contribute to invasive infections, there has been less focus on S. pyogenes carriage and local infection of the nasopharynx. This chapter describes an acute nasopharyngeal infection model in mice that is utilized in our laboratory to study the role of superantigen toxins in the biology of S. pyogenes. We also describe a method to detect superantigen-specific T cell activation in vivo.

  12. Effects of gamma radiation and azathioprine on Brucella abortus infection in BALB/c mice

    SciTech Connect

    Elzer, P.H.; Rowe, G.E.; Enright, F.M.; Winter, A.J. )

    1991-06-01

    Sublethal irradiation of BALB/c mice 4 hours prior to inoculation with 5 {times} 10(4) virulent Brucella abortus, caused significant (P less than 0.01) reductions in bacterial numbers in comparison with numbers in unirradiated controls. Numbers of brucellae in the spleen were significantly lower by 5 days after inoculation and decreased thereafter, so that at 2 and 3 weeks after inoculation, there were up to 1,000-fold fewer organisms in the spleen of irradiated mice. The number of brucellae in the spleen increased in irradiated mice thereafter. The course of events in the liver was similar, but developed more slowly, and peak differences in bacterial numbers were about 1 log less. These phenomena were not attributable to differences in implantation of brucellae in the liver or spleen, nor to an abnormal distribution of organisms in other organs of irradiated mice. Irradiation of mice during the plateau phase of infection also resulted in significant (P less than 0.05) reductions in bacterial counts in the spleen during the succeeding 4 weeks. Macrophage activation in the spleen, measured by a Listeria monocytogenes-killing assay, was significantly (P less than 0.01) increased by irradiation alone at 1 week after inoculation and at that time was significantly (P less than 0.01) greater in B abortus-infected, irradiated mice than in B abortus-infected controls. Histologic, cytologic, and immunologic studies revealed that the decrease in numbers of organisms between 1 and 2 weeks after inoculation in irradiated mice occurred at a time when their immune response to B abortus was suppressed and when numbers of neutrophils and monocytes infiltrating the spleen were significantly (P less than 0.01) diminished.

  13. Endogenous Interleukin-12 Is Not Required for Resolution of Chlamydophila abortus (Chlamydia psittaci Serotype 1) Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Del Río, Laura; Buendía, Antonio J.; Sánchez, Joaquín; Gallego, María C.; Caro, María R.; Ortega, Nieves; Seva, Juan; Pallarés, Francisco J.; Cuello, Francisco; Salinas, Jesús

    2001-01-01

    A Th1 immune response involving gamma interferon (IFN-γ) production is required to eliminate Chlamydophila abortus infections. In this study, the role of interleukin-12 (IL-12) in protecting against C. abortus infection was investigated using IL-12−/− and wild-type (WT) C57BL/6 mice to determine the role of this Th1-promoting cytokine. IL-12−/− mice were able to eliminate the C. abortus infection in a primary infection. However, there was a delay in the clearance of bacteria when IL-12−/− mice were infected with a sublethal dose of C. abortus, the delay being associated with a lower production of IFN-γ. The low level of IFN-γ was essential for survival of IL-12−/− infected mice. Both WT and IL-12−/− mice developed a Th1 immune response against C. abortus infection, since they both produced IFN-γ and immunoglobulin G2a antibody isotype. In addition, when mice were given a secondary infectious challenge with C. abortus, a protective host response which resolved the secondary infection was developed by both WT and IL-12−/− mice. The lack of IL-12 resulted in few infiltrating CD4+ T cells in the liver relative to the number in WT mice, although the number of CD8+ T cells was slightly higher. The more intense Th1 response presented by WT mice may have a pathogenic effect, as the animals showed higher morbidity after the infection. In conclusion, these results suggest that although IL-12 expedites the clearance of C. abortus infection, this cytokine is not essential for the establishment of a protective host response against the infection. PMID:11447154

  14. Mode of inoculation of the Lyme disease agent Borrelia burgdorferi influences infection and immune responses in inbred strains of mice.

    PubMed

    Gern, L; Schaible, U E; Simon, M M

    1993-04-01

    Mice were infected with Borrelia burgdorferi by infection via Ixodes ricinus and experimental inoculation to determine whether transmission rates of spirochetes and antibody responses are influenced. Mice infected by the natural route were substantially more infective for ticks; two- to sixfold more tick larvae were positive for B. burgdorferi than those fed on experimentally inoculated mice. In natural infection, spirochetemia may be greater or spirochetes may be more accessible for transmission. Thus, this form of xenodiagnosis could be used to determine levels of spirochetes in the vertebrate host. Similar levels of antibody were present in all mice; however, those infected by the natural route lacked antibodies to outer surface proteins (Osp) A and B. The small antigen dose given through a tick bite may not have been sufficient to induce rapid OspA or OspB antibodies, thereby allowing the later development of higher levels of spirochetemia.

  15. Role of Capsule and Suilysin in Mucosal Infection of Complement-Deficient Mice with Streptococcus suis

    PubMed Central

    Seitz, Maren; Beineke, Andreas; Singpiel, Alena; Willenborg, Jörg; Dutow, Pavel; Goethe, Ralph; Valentin-Weigand, Peter; Klos, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Virulent Streptococcus suis serotype 2 strains are invasive extracellular bacteria causing septicemia and meningitis in piglets and humans. One objective of this study was to elucidate the function of complement in innate immune defense against S. suis. Experimental infection of wild-type (WT) and C3−/− mice demonstrated for the first time that the complement system protects naive mice against invasive mucosal S. suis infection. S. suis WT but not an unencapsulated mutant caused mortality associated with meningitis and other pathologies in C3−/− mice. The capsule contributed also substantially to colonization of the upper respiratory tract. Experimental infection of C3−/− mice with a suilysin mutant indicated that suilysin expression facilitated an early disease onset and the pathogenesis of meningitis. Flow cytometric analysis revealed C3 antigen deposition on the surface of ca. 40% of S. suis WT bacteria after opsonization with naive WT mouse serum, although to a significantly lower intensity than on the unencapsulated mutant. Ex vivo multiplication in murine WT and C3−/− blood depended on capsule but not suilysin expression. Interestingly, S. suis invasion of inner organs was also detectable in C5aR−/− mice, suggesting that chemotaxis and activation of immune cells via the anaphylatoxin receptor C5aR is, in addition to opsonization, a further important function of the complement system in defense against mucosal S. suis infection. In conclusion, we unequivocally demonstrate here the importance of complement against mucosal S. suis serotype 2 infection and that the capsule of this pathogen is also involved in escape from complement-independent immunity. PMID:24686060

  16. Analysis of antiviral resistance in the intestinal tracts of nude mice infected with a mouse adenovirus.

    PubMed

    Umehara, K; Tazume, S; Hashimoto, K

    1987-05-01

    Upon intestinal infection of heterozygous (nu/+) mice with mouse adenovirus, antiviral resistance can be seen in the form of negative-recovery of virus from feces 2-3 wks post infection. On the other hand, in similar infections in BALB/c nude (nu/nu) mice, the antiviral resistance is manifested as negative-recovery of virus from feces at a later stage, i.e., at around 6 wks post infection. This resistance was not accompanied by rises in interferon titer, rises in natural killer (NK) cell activity, nor was the resistance affected by the introduction of anti-asialo GM1 antibody. No distinct loss of resistance was observed upon administration of carrageenan, but the resistance in the group given carrageenan immediately before and after viral challenge seemed to be slightly reduced. In all infected nu/nu mice, neither neutralizing antibody (NT-Ab) nor complement-dependent NT-Ab could be detected by the usual tube method. On the other hand, a complete abolishment of the antiviral resistance was seen following cyclophosphamide administration. For clarification of the antiviral resistance factor in nu/nu mice, the analysis of antibody other than NT-Ab and complement-dependent NT-Ab, and the problem of resolution of antibody titration remain. Furthermore, it has been noted that the serum IgG titer is high in nu/nu mice and that this level is depressed by cyclophosphamide administration. It is believed that this may be in some way involved with the loss of antiviral resistance observed.

  17. Comparative analysis of different oral approaches to treat Vibrio cholerae infection in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Abhishek; Koley, Hemanta; Mitra, Soma; Saha, Dhira Rani; Sarkar, Banwarilal

    2014-05-01

    In this study, we have established an oral phage cocktail therapy in adult mice model and also performed a comparative analysis between phage cocktail, antibiotic and oral rehydration treatment for orally developed Vibrio cholerae infection. Four groups of mice were orally infected with Vibrio cholerae MAK 757 strain. Phage cocktail and antibiotic treated groups received 1×10(8) plaque forming unit/ml (once a daily) and 40mg/kg (once a daily) as an oral dose respectively for consecutive three days after bacterial infection. In case of oral rehydration group, the solution was supplied after bacterial infection mixed with the drinking water. To evaluate the better and safer approach of treatment, tissue and serum samples were collected. Here, phage cocktail treated mice reduced the log10 numbers of colony per gram by 3log10 (p<0.05); however, ciprofloxacin treated mice reduced the viable numbers up to 5log10 (p<0.05). Whereas, the oral rehydration solution application was not able to reduce the viable bacterial count but the disease progress was much more diminished (p>0.05). Besides, it was evident that antibiotic and phage cocktail treated group had a gradual decrease in both IL-6 and TNF-α level for 3 days (p<0.05) but the scenario was totally opposite in bacterial control and oral hydration treated group. Histological examinations also endorsed the phage cocktail and ciprofloxacin treatment in mice. Although, in this murine model of cholera ciprofloxacin was found to be a better antimicrobial agent, but from the safety and specificity point of view, a better method of application could fill the bridge and advances the phages as a valuable agent in treating Vibrio cholerae infection.

  18. Role of capsule and suilysin in mucosal infection of complement-deficient mice with Streptococcus suis.

    PubMed

    Seitz, Maren; Beineke, Andreas; Singpiel, Alena; Willenborg, Jörg; Dutow, Pavel; Goethe, Ralph; Valentin-Weigand, Peter; Klos, Andreas; Baums, Christoph G

    2014-06-01

    Virulent Streptococcus suis serotype 2 strains are invasive extracellular bacteria causing septicemia and meningitis in piglets and humans. One objective of this study was to elucidate the function of complement in innate immune defense against S. suis. Experimental infection of wild-type (WT) and C3(-/-) mice demonstrated for the first time that the complement system protects naive mice against invasive mucosal S. suis infection. S. suis WT but not an unencapsulated mutant caused mortality associated with meningitis and other pathologies in C3(-/-) mice. The capsule contributed also substantially to colonization of the upper respiratory tract. Experimental infection of C3(-/-) mice with a suilysin mutant indicated that suilysin expression facilitated an early disease onset and the pathogenesis of meningitis. Flow cytometric analysis revealed C3 antigen deposition on the surface of ca. 40% of S. suis WT bacteria after opsonization with naive WT mouse serum, although to a significantly lower intensity than on the unencapsulated mutant. Ex vivo multiplication in murine WT and C3(-/-) blood depended on capsule but not suilysin expression. Interestingly, S. suis invasion of inner organs was also detectable in C5aR(-/-) mice, suggesting that chemotaxis and activation of immune cells via the anaphylatoxin receptor C5aR is, in addition to opsonization, a further important function of the complement system in defense against mucosal S. suis infection. In conclusion, we unequivocally demonstrate here the importance of complement against mucosal S. suis serotype 2 infection and that the capsule of this pathogen is also involved in escape from complement-independent immunity.

  19. Protective effect of humus extract against Trypanosoma brucei infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Hiroshi; Denso; Okazaki, Fumi; Ishida, Saeko

    2008-11-01

    Humic substances are formed during the decomposition of organic matter in humus, and are found in many natural environments in which organic materials and microorganisms are present. Oral administration of humus extract to mice successfully induced effective protection against experimental challenge by the two subspecies, Trypanosoma brucei brucei and T. brucei gambiense. Mortality was most reduced among mice who received a 3% humus extract for 21 days in drinking water ad libitum. Spleen cells from humus-administered mice exhibited significant non-specific cytotoxic activity against L1210 mouse leukemia target cells. Also, spleen cells produced significantly higher amounts of Interferon-gamma when stimulated in vitro with Concanavalin A than cells from normal controls. These results clearly show that administration to mice of humus extract induced effective resistance against Trypanosoma infection. Enhancement of the innate immune system may be involved in host defense against trypanosomiasis.

  20. Dendritic-cell expression of Ship1 regulates Th2 immunity to helminth infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Gold, Matthew J; Antignano, Frann; Hughes, Michael R; Zaph, Colby; McNagny, Kelly M

    2016-01-01

    In mouse models of infection with the gastrointestinal parasite Trichuris muris, appropriate dendritic-cell (DC) Ag sampling, migration, and presentation to T cells are necessary to mount a protective Th2-polarized adaptive immune response, which is needed to clear infection. SH2-containing inositol 5'-phosphatase 1 (SHIP-1) has been shown to be an important regulator of DC function in vitro through the negative regulation of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway, but its role in vivo is relatively unexplored. In the current work, mice with a specific deletion of SHIP-1 in DCs (Ship1(ΔDC) ) were infected with the parasite T. muris. Ship1(ΔDC) mice were susceptible to infection due to ineffective priming of Th2-polarized responses. This is likely due to an increased production of interleukin (IL) 12p40 by SHIP-1-deficient DCs, as in vivo antibody blockade of IL-12p40 was able to facilitate the clearing of infection in Ship1(ΔDC) mice. Our results describe a critical role for SHIP-1 in regulating the ability of DCs to efficiently prime Th2-type responses. PMID:26518471

  1. Noninvasive bioluminescence imaging of dengue virus infection in the brain of A129 mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Feng; Deng, Yong-Qiang; Zhao, Hui; Ye, Qing; Wang, Hong-Jiang; Li, Shi-Hua; Zhu, Shun-Ya; Shi, Pei-Yong; Qin, E-De; Zhang, Bo; Qin, Cheng-Feng

    2013-05-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) infection is one of the most important public health threats globally; however, no vaccines or effective antivirals are currently available. The bioluminescence imaging technique has emerged as a powerful tool for studies on viral pathogenesis in vitro and in vivo. In this study, using a recombinant DENV that stably expressed Renilla luciferase (Rluc-DENV), we used bioluminescence for imaging of DENV infection in the brain of A129 mice that lacked type I interferon receptors. Upon intracranial inoculation with Rluc-DENV, A129 mice developed typical neurological symptoms and rapidly succumbed to viral infection. Real-time bioluminescence intensity analysis revealed the replication kinetics of Rluc-DENV in the brain of A129 mice. Linear regression analyses showed a good correlation between photon flux and viral titers (R(2) = 0.9923). Finally, the bioluminescence model was validated using a known mouse monoclonal antibody, 2A10G6, and the therapeutic effects of this neutralizing antibody were readily monitored by live imaging in the same animal. The noninvasive bioluminescence imaging of DENV infection as described here shows distinct advantages over traditional animal models and provides a powerful tool for potential antiviral or vaccine assays against DENV infection in vivo.

  2. Dengue virus 3 clinical isolates show different patterns of virulence in experimental mice infection.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Gustavo P; Figueiredo, Leandra B; Coelho, Luiz F L; S, Policarpo A; Cecilio, Alzira B; Ferreira, Paulo C P; Bonjardim, Cláudio A; Arantes, Rosa M E; Campos, Marco A; Kroon, Erna G

    2010-07-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) may cause symptomatic infection with mild, undifferentiated febrile illness called classical dengue fever (DF) or a more severe disease, potentially fatal, known as dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) or dengue shock syndrome. The pathogenesis of DHF is based on the virulence of the infecting DENV and depends on the infecting serotypes and genotypes; it is also based on the immunopathogenesis that is mediated by host immune responses, including dengue virus-cross-reactive antibodies that augment the severity of infections. Involvement of central nervous system (CNS) is extensively described. The present study describes the virulence of DENV-3 isolates in a mouse model by intracranial (i.c.) inoculation with genotypes I and III. Our data suggest that, in this experimental model, DENV-3 genotype I may have the propensity to cause neurological disease in mice, whereas the genotype III is associated with asymptomatic infection in mice. Additionally, the symptomatic mice show a decrease of white blood cell count, infectious DENV in the brains and alterations in levels of IFN-gamma, IL-6 and MCP-1. The results confirm the mouse model as a way to study the biology of DENV-3 isolates and to improve the knowledge about the neurovirulence of the different genotypes of DENV.

  3. Goblet Cells and Mucin Related Gene Expression in Mice Infected with Eimeria papillata

    PubMed Central

    Dkhil, Mohamed A.; Delic, Denis

    2013-01-01

    Coccidiosis causes considerable economic loss in the poultry industry. The current study aimed to investigate the response of goblet cells as well as the induced tissue damage during Eimeria papillata infection. Mice were infected with sporulated E. papillata oocytes. On day 5 postinfection, the fecal output was determined. Also, the jejunum was prepared for the histological, histochemical, and molecular studies. Our results revealed that the intestinal coccidian infection with E. papillata induced a marked goblet cell hypoplasia and depleted mucus secretion. Also, the infection was able to alter the jejunal architecture and increased the apoptotic cells inside the villi. In addition, the real-time PCR results indicated that the inflammatory cytokines: TNF-α, iNOS, IFN-γ, and IL-1β, were significantly upregulated. In contrast, the mRNA expression patterns of IL-6 in response to E. papillata infection did not differ significantly between control and infected mice. Moreover, the mRNA expression of TLR4 was significantly upregulated, whereas the expression of MUC2 is significantly downregulated upon infection. Further studies are required to understand the regulatory mechanisms of goblet cells related genes. PMID:24367242

  4. Hydrophobic Gentamicin-Loaded Nanoparticles Are Effective against Brucella melitensis Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Imbuluzqueta, Edurne; Gamazo, Carlos; Lana, Hugo; Campanero, Miguel Ángel; Salas, David; Gil, Ana Gloria; Elizondo, Elisa; Ventosa, Nora; Veciana, Jaume

    2013-01-01

    The clinical management of human brucellosis is still challenging and demands in vitro active antibiotics capable of targeting the pathogen-harboring intracellular compartments. A sustained release of the antibiotic at the site of infection would make it possible to reduce the number of required doses and thus the treatment-associated toxicity. In this study, a hydrophobically modified gentamicin, gentamicin-AOT [AOT is bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate sodium salt], was either microstructured or encapsulated in poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles. The efficacy of the formulations developed was studied both in vitro and in vivo. Gentamicin formulations reduced Brucella infection in experimentally infected THP-1 monocytes (>2-log10 unit reduction) when using clinically relevant concentrations (18 mg/liter). Moreover, in vivo studies demonstrated that gentamicin-AOT-loaded nanoparticles efficiently targeted the drug both to the liver and the spleen and maintained an antibiotic therapeutic concentration for up to 4 days in both organs. This resulted in an improved efficacy of the antibiotic in experimentally infected mice. Thus, while 14 doses of free gentamicin did not alter the course of the infection, only 4 doses of gentamicin-AOT-loaded nanoparticles reduced the splenic infection by 3.23 logs and eliminated it from 50% of the infected mice with no evidence of adverse toxic effects. These results strongly suggest that PLGA nanoparticles containing chemically modified hydrophobic gentamicin may be a promising alternative for the treatment of human brucellosis. PMID:23650167

  5. Protective effect of picolinic acid on mice intracerebrally infected with lethal doses of Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Blasi, E; Mazzolla, R; Pitzurra, L; Barluzzi, R; Bistoni, F

    1993-01-01

    We have studied the effects of picolinic acid (PLA), a product of tryptophan degradation, on mouse susceptibility to intracerebral infection with Candida albicans. We show that intraperitoneal administration of PLA significantly enhances the median survival time of mice inoculated with the lethal challenge. Furthermore, intracerebral administration of this agent induces a protective state against the local lethal infection, the phenomenon depending upon the administration schedule and doses of PLA employed. According to survival data, yeast growth in the brain as well as yeast colonization of the kidneys are drastically reduced in PLA-treated mice compared with those for untreated controls. Northern (RNA) blot analysis of brain tissues demonstrates that mRNA levels specific for tumor necrosis factor and interleukin 1 are augmented and induced, respectively, after inoculation of PLA. These results indicate that PLA has a protective effect likely involving elicitation of a cytokine response in vivo against fungal infections. Images PMID:7506894

  6. The effect of centaurein on interferon-{gamma} expression and Listeria infection in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, S.-L.; Yeh, H.-H.; Lin, Y.-S.; Chiang, Y.-M.; Wu, T.-K. . E-mail: tkwmll@mail.nctu.edu.tw; Yang, W.-C. . E-mail: wcyang@gate.sinica.edu.tw

    2007-02-15

    We previously found that centaurein enhanced IFN-{gamma} transcription in T cells. Here, we demonstrate that centaurein increased the IFN-{gamma} expression in T and NK cells and the serum IFN-{gamma} level in mice. Centaurein elevated the transcription of T-bet but not GATA-3, which is consistent with its effect on that of IFN-{gamma} but not IL-4. Additionally, centaurein effectively protected mice against Listeria infection. Moreover, centaurein per se or in combination with antibiotics could treat Listeria infection. Our mechanistic studies suggest that centaurein augments IFN-{gamma} expression via a transcriptional up-regulation of T-bet and that centaurein protects against or treats Listeria infection via a modulation of IFN-{gamma} expression.

  7. Effect of Daucus carota var. boissieri extracts on immune response of Schistosoma mansoni infected mice.

    PubMed

    Shalaby, N M; Maghraby, A S; el-Hagrassy, A M

    1999-01-01

    Isolation and structure elucidation was carried out of flavonoid constituents found in fractionated extracts of the seeds and green leaves of Daucus carota L. var. boissieri (Apiaceae). The flavonoids are mainly apigenin, luteolin, their glycosidic precursors and 2,4,5-trimethoxybenzaldehyde. Fatty acids, hydrocarbons and sterols were identified by GLC. The effect of various carrot extracts on the immune responses of Schistosoma mansoni infected mice was studied. The rate of reduction in worm infestation in mice injected with some fractions indicated a strong protection. Some extracts induced humoral immune response through raising the IgG level at 2, 4 and 6 weeks post-infection as compared with infected control. The phenotypic analysis of the cellular immune response in spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes was accomplished by direct immunofluorescence. The data showed that some extracts stimulated the blastogenesis of CD4(+)-T splenocytes and mesenteric lymph node cells.

  8. Calbindin distribution in cortical and subcortical brain structures of normal and rabies-infected mice.

    PubMed

    Torres-Fernández, Orlando; Yepes, Gloria E; Gómez, Javier E; Pimienta, Hernán J

    2005-10-01

    Rabies has been an enigmatic disease of the nervous system because microscopic findings in the brain tissue are not paralleled by the severity of the clinical illness. The calcium binding protein calbindin (CB) is a neuronal marker of great interest in neuroanatomy and neuropathology. CB-ir neurons in the striatum and cerebral cortex are gabaergic cells. In the present work CB-immunoreactivity was evaluated in brains of normal and rabies-infected mice. Rabies infection caused loss of CB-immunostaining in the cortical supragranular layers as well as in the striatum. Loss of CB in the brains of mice infected with rabies virus can produce impairment in Ca++ homeostasis and in the gabaergic neurotransmission.

  9. Monoclonal antibody immunotherapy in nude mice persistently infected with Cryptosporidium parvum.

    PubMed Central

    Bjorneby, J M; Hunsaker, B D; Riggs, M W; Perryman, L E

    1991-01-01

    Three groups of congenitally athymic nude mice were persistently infected following oral administration of 2 x 10(7) Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts. Two groups were treated once daily for 10 days with either neutralizing monoclonal antibody (MAb) 17.41 or an isotype control MAb. The third group received no treatment. Intestinal-infection scores were significantly decreased in nude mice treated with MAb 17.41 compared with isotype control MAb-treated and nontreated control groups (P less than 0.005). Biliary and pancreatic cryptosporidial-infection scores were similar for the MAb 17.41-treated and isotype control MAb-treated groups (P greater than 0.05). Images PMID:1997419

  10. Pathogenesis of herpetic neuritis and ganglionitis in mice: evidence for intra-axonal transport of infection.

    PubMed

    Cook, M L; Stevens, J G

    1973-02-01

    The pathogenesis of acute herpetic infection in the nervous system has been studied following rear footpad inoculation of mice. Viral assays performed on appropriate tissues at various time intervals indicated that the infection progressed sequentially from peripheral to the central nervous system, with infectious virus reaching the sacrosciatic spinal ganglia in 20 to 24 hr. The infection also progressed to ganglia in mice given high levels of anti-viral antibody. Immunofluorescent techniques demonstrated that both neurons and supporting cells produced virus-specific antigens. By electron microscopy, neurons were found to produce morphologically complete virions, but supporting cells replicated principally nucleocapsids. These results are discussed in the context of possible mechanisms by which herpes simplex virus might travel in nerve trunks. They are considered to offer strong support for centripetal transport in axons.

  11. Anti-inflammatory and Anti-tumorigenic Effects of Açai Berry in Helicobacter felis-infected mice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ju Yup; Kim, Nayoung; Choi, Yoon Jeong; Nam, Ryoung Hee; Lee, Seonmin; Ham, Min Hee; Suh, Ji Hyung; Choi, Yoon Jin; Lee, Hye Seung; Lee, Dong Ho

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate the anti-inflammatory and anti-tumorigenic effect of açai berry after chronic Helicobacter felis colonization in the stomachs of C57BL/6 mice. Methods: A total of 57 four-week-old female C57BL/6 mice (18 control mice and 39 experimental mice) were used. The mice were administered orogastrically with vehicle only or vehicle containing H. felis, 5 times every other day. After inoculation of H. felis, mice were fed either a standard or an açai-containing diet and then sacrificed at 4, 24, and 52 weeks. The infection status and degree of inflammation were determined by culture and histopathology. The level of gastric mucosal myeloperoxidase (MPO), TNF-α, and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) were measured by ELISA. Results: At 24 weeks after inoculation, mucosal atrophy and mucous metaplasia appeared in all infected mice. At 52 weeks after inoculation, dysplastic change was noted in 10%, 25%, and 50% of mice in the H. felis-control, H. felis-açai 5%, and H. felis-açai 10% groups, respectively. The neutrophil, monocyte, atrophy, and metaplasia grades of infected mice showed no significant difference among the H. felis-infected groups. H. felis-infected mice fed with açai berry showed no significant difference compared with H. felis-infected control mice in gastric mucosal MPO, TNF-α, and IL-1β levels. Conclusions: H. felis that colonized the stomachs of C57BL/6 mice provoked inflammation, and induced mucosal atrophy, metaplasia, and dysplasia. However, açai berry did not effectively prohibit the gastric carcinogenesis which was induced by chronic H. felis infection. PMID:27051649

  12. Increased Infectivity of Anchorless Mouse Scrapie Prions in Transgenic Mice Overexpressing Human Prion Protein

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Katie; Meade-White, Kimberly; Striebel, James; Chesebro, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Prion protein (PrP) is found in all mammals, mostly as a glycoprotein anchored to the plasma membrane by a C-terminal glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) linkage. Following prion infection, host protease-sensitive prion protein (PrPsen or PrPC) is converted into an abnormal, disease-associated, protease-resistant form (PrPres). Biochemical characteristics, such as the PrP amino acid sequence, and posttranslational modifications, such as glycosylation and GPI anchoring, can affect the transmissibility of prions as well as the biochemical properties of the PrPres generated. Previous in vivo studies on the effects of GPI anchoring on prion infectivity have not examined cross-species transmission. In this study, we tested the effect of lack of GPI anchoring on a species barrier model using mice expressing human PrP. In this model, anchorless 22L prions derived from tg44 mice were more infectious than 22L prions derived from C57BL/10 mice when tested in tg66 transgenic mice, which expressed wild-type anchored human PrP at 8- to 16-fold above normal. Thus, the lack of the GPI anchor on the PrPres from tg44 mice appeared to reduce the effect of the mouse-human PrP species barrier. In contrast, neither source of prions induced disease in tgRM transgenic mice, which expressed human PrP at 2- to 4-fold above normal. IMPORTANCE Prion protein (PrP) is found in all mammals, usually attached to cells by an anchor molecule called GPI. Following prion infection, PrP is converted into a disease-associated form (PrPres). While most prion diseases are species specific, this finding is not consistent, and species barriers differ in strength. The amino acid sequence of PrP varies among species, and this variability affects prion species barriers. However, other PrP modifications, including glycosylation and GPI anchoring, may also influence cross-species infectivity. We studied the effect of PrP GPI anchoring using a mouse-to-human species barrier model. Experiments showed that

  13. Role of Macrophage Scavenger Receptors in Response to Listeria monocytogenes Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ishiguro, Takuro; Naito, Makoto; Yamamoto, Takashi; Hasegawa, Go; Gejyo, Fumitake; Mitsuyama, Masao; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Kodama, Tatsuhiko

    2001-01-01

    Type I and type II macrophage scavenger receptors (SR-A I/II) recognize a variety of polyanions including bacterial cell-wall products such as lipopolysaccharide, suggesting a role for SR-A I/II in immunity against bacterial infection. SR-A I/II-deficient (MSR-A−/−) mice were more susceptible to infection with listeriolysin-O (LLO)-producing Listeria monocytogenes. After infection, Kupffer cells in wild-type (MSR-A+/+) mice phagocytized larger numbers of Listeria than those in MSR-A−/− mice. The number and the diameter of hepatic granulomas were larger in MSR-A−/− mice than MSR-A+/+ mice. L. monocytogenes replicated at higher levels in the liver of MSR-A−/− mice compared with MSR-A+/+ mice, and macrophages from MSR-A−/− mice showed impaired ability to kill Listeria in vitro. However, macrophages from MSR-A+/+ and MSR-A−/− mice showed similar levels of listericidal activity against isogenic mutant L. monocytogenes with an inactivated LLO gene. The listerial phagocytic activities of MSR-A+/+ macrophages treated with an anti-SR-A I/II antibody (2F8) and MSR-A−/− macrophages were significantly impaired compared with untreated MSR-A+/+ macrophages, indicating that SR-A I/II function as a receptor for L. monocytogenes. Electron microscopy revealed that most L. monocytogenes had been eliminated from the lysosomes of MSR-A+/+ macrophages in vivo and in vitro. In contrast, L. monocytogenes rapidly lysed the phagosomal membrane and escaped to the cytosol in MSR-A−/− macrophages and in MSR-A+/+ macrophages treated with 2F8 before phagosome-lysosome fusion. These findings imply that SR-A I/II plays a crucial role in host defense against listerial infection not only by functioning as a receptor but also by mediating listericidal mechanisms through the regulation of LLO-dependent listerial escape from the macrophages. PMID:11141491

  14. Accumulation of 2',5'-oligoadenylates in encephalomyocarditis virus-infected mice.

    PubMed Central

    Hearl, W G; Johnston, M I

    1987-01-01

    Levels of 2',5'-oligoadenylates (2-5A) in various tissues of murine encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV)-infected mice were determined and compared with those found in pathogen-free mice and in mice treated with the interferon inducer poly(I).poly(C). In control, pathogen-free mice, liver, spleen, brain, and kidney tissues possessed levels of 2-5A below 1 pmol/g of tissue, demonstrating that 2-5A was not a major component of uninfected mouse tissue. All control tissues had low basal levels (0.3 to 2.0 pmol/h per g) of 2-5A synthetase, the enzyme responsible for 2-5A production. After mice were injected intravenously with the interferon inducer poly(I).poly(C), circulating interferon, 2-5A synthetase, and 2-5A were elevated with increasing doses of double-stranded RNA. The greatest response to poly(I).poly(C) occurred in the kidney, in which enzyme levels increased 5-fold and 2-5A levels increased 24-fold to 15 pmol/g. Mice that were infected with EMCV also possessed elevated levels of 2-5A and 2-5A synthetase in the four tissues examined, although the relative distribution differed from that observed with poly(I).poly(C), indicating that the interferon inducer affects the concentration and location of intracellular 2-5A. Brain, spleen, and kidney tissues from EMCV-infected mice contained seven- to eightfold more 2-5A than control tissues did. The nanomolar levels of 2-5A in the tissues of EMCV-infected mice provide evidence that 2-5A may play a role in the antiviral response in an intact animal. In both poly(I).poly(C)- and EMCV-treated mice, the levels of 2-5A recovered from the tissues were not directly proportional to the amount of 2-5A synthetase present. These results indicate that factors other than the level of 2-5A synthetase controlled the accumulation of 2-5A in tissues. PMID:2437319

  15. Effects of Enterococcus faecalis CECT 7121 on Cryptosporidium parvum infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Del Coco, Valeria F; Sparo, Mónica D; Sidoti, Alicia; Santín, Mónica; Basualdo, Juan Angel; Córdoba, María Alejandra

    2016-08-01

    Cryptosporidium is an opportunistic protozoan parasite of humans and animals worldwide and causes diarrheal disease that is typically self-limiting in immunocompetent hosts but often life threatening to immunocompromised individuals. However, there is a lack of completely efficient therapy available. Probiotics have attracted the attention as potential antiparasite compounds against protozoa involved in intestinal infections. This study investigated the effects of administration of probiotic Enterococcus faecalis CECT 7121 on Cryptosporidium parvum infection in immunosuppressed mice. Effects on C. parvum infection at the intestinal mucosa were studied and scored at each portion of the gut. It was demonstrated that Ef CECT 7121 interfered with C. parvum infection when both probiotic and parasite were present in the same intestinal location suggesting that Ef CECT 7121 supplementation can alleviate the negative effects of C. parvum infection. PMID:27193238

  16. Role of oxidative stress on diesel-enhanced influenza infection in mice

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Numerous studies have shown that air pollutants, including diesel exhaust (DE), reduce host defenses, resulting in decreased resistance to respiratory infections. This study sought to determine if DE exposure could affect the severity of an ongoing influenza infection in mice, and examine if this could be modulated with antioxidants. BALB/c mice were treated by oropharyngeal aspiration with 50 plaque forming units of influenza A/HongKong/8/68 and immediately exposed to air or 0.5 mg/m3 DE (4 hrs/day, 14 days). Mice were necropsied on days 1, 4, 8 and 14 post-infection and lungs were assessed for virus titers, lung inflammation, immune cytokine expression and pulmonary responsiveness (PR) to inhaled methacholine. Exposure to DE during the course of infection caused an increase in viral titers at days 4 and 8 post-infection, which was associated with increased neutrophils and protein in the BAL, and an early increase in PR. Increased virus load was not caused by decreased interferon levels, since IFN-β levels were enhanced in these mice. Expression and production of IL-4 was significantly increased on day 1 and 4 p.i. while expression of the Th1 cytokines, IFN-γ and IL-12p40 was decreased. Treatment with the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine did not affect diesel-enhanced virus titers but blocked the DE-induced changes in cytokine profiles and lung inflammation. We conclude that exposure to DE during an influenza infection polarizes the local immune responses to an IL-4 dominated profile in association with increased viral disease, and some aspects of this effect can be reversed with antioxidants. PMID:21092162

  17. A Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study of Intestinal Dilation in Trypanosoma cruzi–infected Mice Deficient in Nitric Oxide Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Ny, Lars; Li, Hua; Mukherjee, Shankar; Persson, Katarina; Holmqvist, Bo; Zhao, Dazhi; Shtutin, Vitaliy; Huang, Huan; Weiss, Louis M.; Machado, Fabiana S.; Factor, Stephen M.; Chan, John; Tanowitz, Herbert B.; Jelicks, Linda A.

    2009-01-01

    Infection with Trypanosoma cruzi causes megasyndromes of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. We used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to monitor alterations in the GI tract of T. cruzi–infected mice, and to assess the role of nitric oxide (NO) in the development of intestinal dilation. Brazil strain–infected C57BL/6 wild-type (WT) mice exhibited dilatation of the intestines by 30 days post-infection. Average intestine lumen diameter increased by 72%. Levels of intestinal NO synthase (NOS) isoforms, NOS2 and NOS3, were elevated in infected WT mice. Inflammation and ganglionitis were observed in all infected mice. Intestinal dilation was observed in infected WT, NOS1, NOS2, and NOS3 null mice. This study demonstrates that MRI is a useful tool to monitor intestinal dilation in living mice and that these alterations may begin during acute infection. Furthermore, our data strongly suggests that NO may not be the sole contributor to intestinal dysfunction resulting from this infection. PMID:18981519

  18. Mice chronically infected with chimeric HIV resist peripheral and brain superinfection: a model of protective immunity to HIV.

    PubMed

    Kelschenbach, Jennifer L; Saini, Manisha; Hadas, Eran; Gu, Chao-Jiang; Chao, Wei; Bentsman, Galina; Hong, Jessie P; Hanke, Tomas; Sharer, Leroy R; Potash, Mary Jane; Volsky, David J

    2012-06-01

    Infection by some viruses induces immunity to reinfection, providing a means to identify protective epitopes. To investigate resistance to reinfection in an animal model of HIV disease and its control, we employed infection of mice with chimeric HIV, EcoHIV. When immunocompetent mice were infected by intraperitoneal (IP) injection of EcoHIV, they resisted subsequent secondary infection by IP injection, consistent with a systemic antiviral immune response. To investigate the potential role of these responses in restricting neurotropic HIV infection, we established a protocol for efficient EcoHIV expression in the brain following intracranial (IC) inoculation of virus. When mice were inoculated by IP injection and secondarily by IC injection, they also controlled EcoHIV replication in the brain. To investigate their role in EcoHIV antiviral responses, CD8+ T lymphocytes were isolated from spleens of EcoHIV infected and uninfected mice and adoptively transferred to isogenic recipients. Recipients of EcoHIV primed CD8+ cells resisted subsequent EcoHIV infection compared to recipients of cells from uninfected donors. CD8+ spleen cells from EcoHIV-infected mice also mounted modest but significant interferon-γ responses to two HIV Gag peptide pools. These findings suggest EcoHIV-infected mice may serve as a useful system to investigate the induction of anti-HIV protective immunity for eventual translation to human beings.

  19. Multiplex polymerase chain reaction assay for the detection of minute virus of mice and mouse parvovirus infections in laboratory mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, K W; Chueh, L L; Wang, M H; Huang, Y T; Fang, B H; Chang, C Y; Fang, M C; Chou, J Y; Hsieh, S C; Wan, C H

    2013-04-01

    Mouse parvoviruses are among the most prevalent infectious pathogens in contemporary mouse colonies. To improve the efficiency of routine screening for mouse parvovirus infections, a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay targeting the VP gene was developed. The assay detected minute virus of mice (MVM), mouse parvovirus (MPV) and a mouse housekeeping gene (α-actin) and was able to specifically detect MVM and MPV at levels as low as 50 copies. Co-infection with the two viruses with up to 200-fold differences in viral concentrations can easily be detected. The multiplex PCR assay developed here could be a useful tool for monitoring mouse health and the viral contamination of biological materials.

  20. Complement-enhanced immunity to infection with Neisseria gonorrhoeae in mice.

    PubMed

    Arko, R J; Wong, K H; Steurer, F J; Schalla, W O

    1979-05-01

    Subcutaneous chambers were implanted in mice, injected with Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and supplemented with complement as a model for studying the immunogenicity and strain diversity of N. gonorrhoeae. Immunotypic resistance to N. gonorrhoeae in immunized mice was significantly (P less than 0.01) increased by injection of exogenous guinea pig complement into the host before challenge with gonococci. By using this model to test gonococcal isolates from various geographical areas, two highly immunogenic but immunotypically different gonococcal strains were identified. The piliated cells of these strains induced both complement-enhanced immunity and a degree of exogenous complement-independent immunity. The immunity in mice not treated with complement developed more slowly, was less effective, and waned earlier than that which was complement-dependent. Pretreatment with complement, although highly effective in preventing infection in immunized mice, was much less beneficial in terminating already established infections, even though bactericidal antibodies were present at the time of complement treatment. The mouse chamber model in which both complement-mediated and complement-independent mechanisms of protection can be evaluated may provide an additional tool for elucidating the immunology of gonococcal or other microbial infections.

  1. Vaccine-Mediated Immune Responses to Experimental Pulmonary Cryptococcus gattii Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chaturvedi, Ashok K.; Hameed, Rumanasma S.; Wozniak, Karen L.; Hole, Camaron R.; Leopold Wager, Chrissy M.; Weintraub, Susan T.; Lopez-Ribot, Jose L.; Wormley, Floyd L.

    2014-01-01

    Cryptococcus gattii is a fungal pathogen that can cause life-threatening respiratory and disseminated infections in immune-competent and immune-suppressed individuals. Currently, there are no standardized vaccines against cryptococcosis in humans, underlying an urgent need for effective therapies and/or vaccines. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of intranasal immunization with C. gattii cell wall associated (CW) and/or cytoplasmic (CP) protein preparations to induce protection against experimental pulmonary C. gattii infection in mice. BALB/c mice immunized with C. gattii CW and/or CP protein preparations exhibited a significant reduction in pulmonary fungal burden and prolonged survival following pulmonary challenge with C. gattii. Protection was associated with significantly increased pro-inflammatory and Th1-type cytokine recall responses, in vitro and increased C. gattii-specific antibody production in immunized mice challenged with C. gattii. A number of immunodominant proteins were identified following immunoblot analysis of C. gattii CW and CP protein preparations using sera from immunized mice. Immunization with a combined CW and CP protein preparation resulted in an early increase in pulmonary T cell infiltrates following challenge with C. gattii. Overall, our studies show that C. gattii CW and CP protein preparations contain antigens that may be included in a subunit vaccine to induce prolonged protection against pulmonary C. gattii infection. PMID:25119981

  2. Protective effect of N-acetyl chitohexaose on Listeria monocytogenes infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Tokoro, A; Kobayashi, M; Tatewaki, N; Suzuki, K; Okawa, Y; Mikami, T; Suzuki, S; Suzuki, M

    1989-01-01

    A water-soluble oligosaccharide, N-acetyl chitohexaose (NACOS-6) was able to enhance the protecting effect of BALB/c male mice against Listeria monocytogenes infection, when administered intraperitoneally 24 hr before the challenge with this microbe. Significant decrease in number of microbes within the peritoneal cavity, spleen, and liver from the mice of NACOS-6-administered group was not observed 1 day after the infection but 4 days after the infection. Administration of NACOS-6 enhanced the delayed-type hypersensitivity response against sheep red blood cells (SRBC) or heat-killed L. monocytogenes. Splenic T lymphocytes from mice administered NACOS-6 released macrophage activating factor (MAF). These results suggested that NACOS-6 was also able to elevate the function of cellular immunity. Macrophages treated with a combination of NACOS-6 and the culture supernatant of splenic T lymphocytes from mice administered NACOS-6, "NACOS-6 sup," were found to exert a fairly strong growth-inhibitory effect on L. monocytogenes. Interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and interleukin 2 (IL-2) were able to enhance the growth-inhibitory effect on L. monocytogenes by the NACOS-6-treated macrophages.

  3. Progression of chronic hepatitis and preneoplasia in Helicobacter hepaticus-infected A/JCr mice.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Arlin B; Boutin, Samuel R; Whary, Mark T; Sundina, Nataliya; Ge, Zhongming; Cormier, Kathleen; Fox, James G

    2004-01-01

    Helicobacter hepaticus infection induces sustained inflammation and carcinoma of the liver in A/JCr mice, and serves as a model of human cancers associated with viral hepatitis and H. pylorichronic gastritis. Here we describe the pathogenesis of premalignant disease in A/JCr mice infected with H. hepaticus. We inoculated dams intragestationally and/or pups postnatally, and evaluated offspring at 3, 6, or 12 months. Mice infected at or before 3 weeks of age, but not at 12 weeks, developed disease. Male mice were most affected, but expressed a bimodal pattern of susceptibility. Males exhibited lobular necrogranulomatous and interface (chronic active) hepatitis, while females usually developed intraportal (chronic persistent) hepatitis. Portal inflammation was slowly progressive, with tertiary lymphoid nodule development by 12 months. Hepatic bacterial load and preneoplastic lesions, including clear and tigroid cell foci of cellular alteration, were correlated with lobular hepatitis severity. No extrahepatic surrogate disease marker reliably predicted individual hepatitis grade. In conclusion, gender and bacterial exposure timing are key determinants of H. hepaticus disease outcomes. Intrahepatic inflammation is driven by local signals characterized by a vigorous but nonsterilizing immune response. Continued study of chronic hepatitis progression may reveal therapeutic targets to reduce the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma.

  4. Gene Expression Profile in the Liver of BALB/c Mice Infected with Fasciola hepatica

    PubMed Central

    Rojas-Caraballo, Jose; López-Abán, Julio; Fernández-Soto, Pedro; Vicente, Belén; Collía, Francisco; Muro, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Background Fasciola hepatica infection still remains one of the helminthic neglected tropical diseases (NTDs). It has a huge worldwide distribution, affecting mainly cattle and, sometimes, human beings. In addition to data reported about the immunological response induced by helminthic infections and that induced by Fasciola hepatica, little is known about the gene expression profile in its organ target, the liver, which is where adult worms are established and live for long periods of time, causing its characteristic pathology. In the present work, we study both the early and late gene expression profiles in the livers of mice infected with F. hepatica metacercariae using a microarray-based methodology. Methodology A total of 9 female-6-week-old BALB/c mice (Charles River Laboratories, Barcelona, Spain) weighing 20 to 35 g were used for the experiments. Two groups of BALB/c mice were orally infected with seven F. hepatica metacercariae, and the other group remained untreated and served as a control. Mice were humanely euthanized and necropsied for liver recovery, histological assessment of hepatic damage, RNA isolation, microarray design and gene expression analysis on the day of infection (t0), seven days post-infection (t7) and twenty-one days post-infection (t21). Results We found that F. hepatica infection induces the differential expression of 128 genes in the liver in the early stage of infection and 308 genes in the late stage, and most of them are up-regulated. The Ingenuity Pathway Analysis revealed significant changes in the pathways related to metabolism, biosynthesis and signaling as well as genes implicated in inducing liver-toxicity, injury and death. Conclusion The present study provides us insights at the molecular level about the underlying mechanisms used by F. hepatica, leading to liver damage and its subsequent pathophysiology. The expression pattern obtained here could also be used to explain the lack of association between infection with F

  5. Susceptibility of inbred mice to chronic central nervous system infection by Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus.

    PubMed

    Lipton, H L; Dal Canto, M C

    1979-10-01

    The present study demonstrated that the clinicopathological expression of the late demyelinating disease due to chronic central nervous system infection by Theiler's mouse encephalomyelitis virus was dependent, at least in part, on the strain of mouse used as host. A range of involvement was observed, with late disease being most severe in the SJL strain, intermediate in the CBA and C3H/He strains, and least in C57BL/6 mice. The lack of clinical signs in seven other inbred strains of mice indicates that their response to chronic infection was similar to C57BL/6 mice. SJL, CBA, C3H/He, and C57BL/6 mice all generated similar levels of neutralizing antibody. A correlation between the severity of late disease and central nervous system virus content was not demonstrated, which indirectly suggests an immunopathological rather than a cytolytic mechanism of myelin injury during the late disease period. Finally, in addition to being more extensive, SJL demyelinating lesions contained a disproportionately large number of macrophages compared with those of similar lesions in CBA and C3H/He mice.

  6. In Vivo Antimalarial Activity of Annona muricata Leaf Extract in Mice Infected with Plasmodium berghei.

    PubMed

    Somsak, Voravuth; Polwiang, Natsuda; Chachiyo, Sukanya

    2016-01-01

    Malaria is one of the most important infectious diseases in the world. The choice for the treatment is highly limited due to drug resistance. Hence, finding the new compounds to treat malaria is urgently needed. The present study was attempted to evaluate the antimalarial activity of the Annona muricata aqueous leaf extract in Plasmodium berghei infected mice. Aqueous leaf extract of A. muricata was prepared and tested for acute toxicity in mice. For efficacy test in vivo, standard 4-day suppressive test was carried out. ICR mice were inoculated with 10(7) parasitized erythrocytes of P. berghei ANKA by intraperitoneal injection. The extracts (100, 500, and 1000 mg/kg) were then given orally by gavage once a day for 4 consecutive days. Parasitemia, percentage of inhibition, and packed cell volume were subsequently calculated. Chloroquine (10 mg/kg) was given to infected mice as positive control while untreated control was given only distilled water. It was found that A. muricata aqueous leaf extract at doses of 100, 500, and 1000 mg/kg resulted in dose dependent parasitemia inhibition of 38.03%, 75.25%, and 85.61%, respectively. Survival time was prolonged in infected mice treated with the extract. Moreover, no mortality to mice was observed with this extract up to a dose of 4000 mg/kg. In conclusion, the A. muricata aqueous leaf extract exerted significant antimalarial activity with no toxicity and prolonged survival time. Therefore, this extract might contain potential lead molecule for the development of a new drug for malaria treatment.

  7. Oral delivery of curcumin bound to chitosan nanoparticles cured Plasmodium yoelii infected mice.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, Feroz; Rizvi, M Moshahid Alam; Kar, Santosh Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Curcumin has been shown to have anti malarial activity, but poor bioavailability and chemical instability has hindered its development as a drug. We have bound curcumin to chitosan nanoparticles to improve its bioavailability and chemical stability. We found that curcumin bound to chitosan nanoparticles did not degrade that rapidly in comparison to free curcumin when such particles were incubated in mouse plasma in vitro at room temperature. The uptake of bound curcumin from chitosan nanoparticles by mouse RBC was much better than from free curcumin. Oral delivery of curcumin bound chitosan nanoparticles to normal mice showed that they can cross the mucosal barrier intact and confocal microscopy detected the nanoparticles in the blood. Curcumin loaded chitosan nanoparticles when delivered orally improved the bioavailability of curcumin in the plasma and RBC. While mice infected with a lethal strain of Plasmodium yoelii (N-67) died between 8 and 9 days post infection, feeding of chitosan nanoparticles alone made them to survive for five more days. Feeding 1mg of native curcumin to infected mice per day for seven days resulted in survival of one third of mice but under the same condition when 1mg of curcumin bound to chitosan nanoparticles was fed all the mice survived. Like chloroquine, curcumin inhibited parasite lysate induced heme polymerization in vitro in a dose dependent manner and curcumin had a lower IC(50) value than chloroquine. We believe that binding of curcumin to chitosan nanoparticles increases its chemical stability and enhances its bioavailability when fed to mice. In vitro data suggest that it can inhibit hemozoin synthesis which is lethal for the parasite.

  8. In Vivo Antimalarial Activity of Annona muricata Leaf Extract in Mice Infected with Plasmodium berghei

    PubMed Central

    Somsak, Voravuth; Polwiang, Natsuda; Chachiyo, Sukanya

    2016-01-01

    Malaria is one of the most important infectious diseases in the world. The choice for the treatment is highly limited due to drug resistance. Hence, finding the new compounds to treat malaria is urgently needed. The present study was attempted to evaluate the antimalarial activity of the Annona muricata aqueous leaf extract in Plasmodium berghei infected mice. Aqueous leaf extract of A. muricata was prepared and tested for acute toxicity in mice. For efficacy test in vivo, standard 4-day suppressive test was carried out. ICR mice were inoculated with 107 parasitized erythrocytes of P. berghei ANKA by intraperitoneal injection. The extracts (100, 500, and 1000 mg/kg) were then given orally by gavage once a day for 4 consecutive days. Parasitemia, percentage of inhibition, and packed cell volume were subsequently calculated. Chloroquine (10 mg/kg) was given to infected mice as positive control while untreated control was given only distilled water. It was found that A. muricata aqueous leaf extract at doses of 100, 500, and 1000 mg/kg resulted in dose dependent parasitemia inhibition of 38.03%, 75.25%, and 85.61%, respectively. Survival time was prolonged in infected mice treated with the extract. Moreover, no mortality to mice was observed with this extract up to a dose of 4000 mg/kg. In conclusion, the A. muricata aqueous leaf extract exerted significant antimalarial activity with no toxicity and prolonged survival time. Therefore, this extract might contain potential lead molecule for the development of a new drug for malaria treatment. PMID:27092277

  9. Comparative infectivity of oocysts and bradyzoites of Toxoplasma gondii for intermediate (mice) and definitive (cats) hosts.

    PubMed

    Dubey, J P

    2006-08-31

    Tachyzoites, bradyzoites (in tissue cysts), and sporozoites (in oocysts) are the three infectious stages of Toxoplasma gondii. The prepatent period (time to shedding of oocysts after primary infection) varies with the stage of T. gondii ingested by the cat. The prepatent period (pp) after ingesting bradyzoites is short (3-10 days) while it is long (18 days or longer) after ingesting oocysts or tachyzoites. The conversion of bradyzoites to tachyzoites and tachyzoites to bradyzoites is biologically important in the life cycle of T. gondii and it has been proposed that the pp can be used to study stage conversion. In the present study, infectivity of oocysts and bradyzoites released from tissue cysts of a recent isolate of T. gondii, TgCkAr23, to cats and mice was compared. Ten-fold dilutions of oocysts or bradyzoites were administered orally to cats, and orally and subcutaneously to mice. Of the 29 cats each fed 1-10 million oocysts only one cat shed oocysts and the pp was 23 days; all cats remained asymptomatic. In contrast, all mice administered the same 10-fold dilutions of oocysts either orally or subcutaneously died of toxoplasmosis. The results confirm that infectivity of the oocysts to cats is lower than for mice and that oocysts are non-pathogenic for cats. Of the 41 cats each fed 1-1,000 free bradyzoites, 15 shed oocysts with a short pp of 4-9 days, and all remained asymptomatic. The infectivity of bradyzoites to mice by the oral route was approximately 100 times lower than that by the subcutaneous route. The results confirm the hypothesis that the pp in cats is stage and not dose dependent, and that transmission of T. gondii is most efficient when cats consume tissue cysts (carnivory) or when intermediate hosts consume oocysts (fecal-oral transmission).

  10. Proteomic analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid proteins from mice infected with Francisella tularensis ssp novicida

    PubMed Central

    Varnum, Susan M.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Pounds, Joel G.; Moore, Ronald J.; Smith, Richard D.; Frevert, Charles W.; Skerrett, Shawn J.; Wunschel, David

    2012-01-01

    Francisella tularensis causes the zoonosis tularemia in humans and is one of the most virulent bacterial pathogens. We utilized a global proteomic approach to characterize protein changes in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from mice exposed to one of three organisms, F. tularensis ssp. novicida, an avirulent mutant of F. tularensis ssp. novicida (F.t. novicida-ΔmglA); and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The composition of BALF proteins was altered following infection, including proteins involved in neutrophil activation, oxidative stress and inflammatory responses. Components of the innate immune response were induced including the acute phase response and the complement system, however the timing of their induction varied. Francisella tularensis ssp. novicida infected mice do not appear to have an effective innate immune response in the first hours of infection, however within 24 hours they show an upregulation of innate immune response proteins. This delayed response is in contrast to P. aeruginosa infected animals which show an early innate immune response. Likewise, F.t. novicida-ΔmglA infection initiates an early innate immune response, however this response is dimished by 24 hours. Finally, this study identifies several candidate biomarkers, including Chitinase 3-like-1 (CHI3L1 or YKL-40) and peroxiredoxin 1, that are associated with F. tularensis ssp. novicida but not P. aeruginosa infection. PMID:22663564

  11. Proteomic analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid proteins from mice infected with Francisella tularensis ssp novicida

    SciTech Connect

    Varnum, Susan M.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Pounds, Joel G.; Moore, Ronald J.; Smith, Richard D.; Frevert, Charles; Skerret, Shawn J.; Wunschel, David S.

    2012-07-06

    Francisella tularensis causes the zoonosis tularemia in humans and is one of the most virulent bacterial pathogens. We utilized a global proteomic approach to characterize protein changes in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from mice exposed to one of three organisms, F. tularensis ssp. novicida, an avirulent mutant of F. tularensis ssp. novicida (F.t. novicida-ΔmglA); and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The composition of BALF proteins was altered following infection, including proteins involved in neutrophil activation, oxidative stress and inflammatory responses. Components of the innate immune response were induced including the acute phase response and the complement system, however the timing of their induction varied. Francisella tularensis ssp. novicida infected mice do not appear to have an effective innate immune response in the first hours of infection, however within 24 hours they show an upregulation of innate immune response proteins. This delayed response is in contrast to P. aeruginosa infected animals which show an early innate immune response. Likewise, F.t. novicida-ΔmglA infection initiates an early innate immune response, however this response is dimished by 24 hours. Finally, this study identifies several candidate biomarkers, including Chitinase 3-like-1 (CHI3L1 or YKL-40) and peroxiredoxin 1, that are associated with F. tularensis ssp. novicida but not P. aeruginosa infection.

  12. Antimicrobial activity of curcumin against Helicobacter pylori isolates from India and during infections in mice.

    PubMed

    De, Ronita; Kundu, Parag; Swarnakar, Snehasikta; Ramamurthy, T; Chowdhury, Abhijit; Nair, G Balakrish; Mukhopadhyay, Asish K

    2009-04-01

    Treatment failure is a major cause of concern for the Helicobacter pylori-related gastroduodenal diseases like gastritis, peptic ulcer, and gastric cancer. Curcumin, diferuloylmethane from turmeric, has recently been shown to arrest H. pylori growth. The antibacterial activity of curcumin against 65 clinical isolates of H. pylori in vitro and during protection against H. pylori infection in vivo was examined. The MIC of curcumin ranges from 5 microg/ml to 50 microg/ml, showing its effectiveness in inhibiting H. pylori growth in vitro irrespective of the genetic makeup of the strains. The nucleotide sequences of the aroE genes, encoding shikimate dehydrogenase, against which curcumin seems to act as a noncompetitive inhibitor, from H. pylori strains presenting differential curcumin MICs showed that curcumin-mediated growth inhibition of Indian H. pylori strains may not be always dependent on the shikimate pathway. The antimicrobial effect of curcumin in H. pylori-infected C57BL/6 mice and its efficacy in reducing the gastric damage due to infection were examined histologically. Curcumin showed immense therapeutic potential against H. pylori infection as it was highly effective in eradication of H. pylori from infected mice as well as in restoration of H. pylori-induced gastric damage. This study provides novel insights into the therapeutic effect of curcumin against H. pylori infection, suggesting its potential as an alternative therapy, and opens the way for further studies on identification of novel antimicrobial targets of curcumin. PMID:19204190

  13. Theiler's virus infection in nude mice: viral RNA in vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Zurbriggen, A; Fujinami, R S

    1988-01-01

    Infection of athymic (nu/nu) mice with Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus results in an acute encephalitis which resembles poliomyelitis. Immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization were used to delineate the presence of viral proteins and RNA in the nervous systems of nude mice infected with the Daniels strain of Theiler's virus. This system permits the analysis of a viral infection in the absence of an effective immune response. By immunohistochemistry, viral antigen was found in the processes and cell bodies of neurons and glial cells. Besides the presence of viral antigen in these cell types, by in situ hybridization, Theiler's virus RNA was also found in cells associated with vascular endothelium in the brains and spinal cords of these infected mice. Theiler's virus RNA-positive endothelial cells were observed not only near the primary lesions but also away from demonstrable lesions in normal-appearing regions in the central nervous system. Earlier work had suggested an intra-axonal dissemination for this virus (M. C. Dal Canto and H. L. Lipton, Am. J. Pathol. 106:20-29, 1982). Our findings are consistent with this model but also suggest an additional mechanism for virus spread within the central nervous system, i.e., by infecting vascular cells and crossing the blood-brain barrier. Lastly, after Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus infection, not only glial cells but also endothelial cells express major histocompatibility complex class II (la) antigen on their surface (M. Rodriguez, M. L. Pierce, and E. A. Howie, J. Immunol. 138:3438-3442, 1987). Our demonstration of Theiler's virus-infected endotheliumlike cells may explain interactions of virus products in stimulating antigen presentation. Images PMID:2843661

  14. Theiler's virus infection in nude mice: viral RNA in vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zurbriggen, A; Fujinami, R S

    1988-10-01

    Infection of athymic (nu/nu) mice with Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus results in an acute encephalitis which resembles poliomyelitis. Immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization were used to delineate the presence of viral proteins and RNA in the nervous systems of nude mice infected with the Daniels strain of Theiler's virus. This system permits the analysis of a viral infection in the absence of an effective immune response. By immunohistochemistry, viral antigen was found in the processes and cell bodies of neurons and glial cells. Besides the presence of viral antigen in these cell types, by in situ hybridization, Theiler's virus RNA was also found in cells associated with vascular endothelium in the brains and spinal cords of these infected mice. Theiler's virus RNA-positive endothelial cells were observed not only near the primary lesions but also away from demonstrable lesions in normal-appearing regions in the central nervous system. Earlier work had suggested an intra-axonal dissemination for this virus (M. C. Dal Canto and H. L. Lipton, Am. J. Pathol. 106:20-29, 1982). Our findings are consistent with this model but also suggest an additional mechanism for virus spread within the central nervous system, i.e., by infecting vascular cells and crossing the blood-brain barrier. Lastly, after Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus infection, not only glial cells but also endothelial cells express major histocompatibility complex class II (la) antigen on their surface (M. Rodriguez, M. L. Pierce, and E. A. Howie, J. Immunol. 138:3438-3442, 1987). Our demonstration of Theiler's virus-infected endotheliumlike cells may explain interactions of virus products in stimulating antigen presentation.

  15. Housing Conditions Modulate the Severity of Mycoplasma pulmonis Infection in Mice Deficient in Class A Scavenger Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Booth, Jennifer L; Umstead, Todd M; Hu, Sanmei; Dybvig, Kevin F; Cooper, Timothy K; Wilson, Ronald P; Chroneos, Zissis C

    2014-01-01

    Mycoplasmosis is a frequent causative microbial agent of community-acquired pneumonia and has been linked to exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The macrophage class A scavenger receptor (SRA) facilitates the clearance of noxious particles, oxidants, and infectious organisms by alveolar macrophages. We examined wildtype and SRA−/− mice, housed in either individually ventilated or static filter-top cages that were cycled with fresh bedding every 14 d, as a model of gene–environment interaction on the outcome of pulmonary Mycoplasma pulmonis infection. Intracage NH3 gas measurements were recorded daily prior to infection. Mice were intranasally infected with 1 × 107 cfu M. pulmonis UAB CT and evaluated at 3, 7, and 14 d after inoculation. Wildtype mice cleared 99.5% of pulmonary M. pulmonis by 3 d after infection but remained chronically infected through the study. SRA−/− mice were chronically infected with 40-fold higher mycoplasma numbers than were wildtype mice. M. pulmonis caused a chronic mixed inflammatory response that was accompanied with high levels of IL1β, KC, MCP1, and TNFα in SRA−/− mice, whereas pulmonary inflammation in WT mice was represented by a monocytosis with elevation of IL1β. Housing had a prominent influence on the severity and persistence of mycoplasmosis in SRA−/− mice. SRA-/- mice housed in static cages had an improved recovery and significant changes in surfactant proteins SPA and SPD compared with baseline levels. These results indicate that SRA is required to prevent chronic mycoplasma infection of the lung. Furthermore, environmental conditions may exacerbate chronic inflammation in M. pulmonis-infected SRA−/− mice. PMID:25527023

  16. Experimental infection with Cryptosporidium parvum IIaA21G1R1 subtype in immunosuppressed mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cryptosporidium parvum subtype IIaA21G1R1 oocysts were used to infect dexamethasone immunosuppressed N: NIH Swiss mice. Histology showed developmental stages in the duodenum, proximal and distal jejunum, ileum, cecum and colon, with the small intestine remaining infected until day 35 post infection....

  17. Cytokine profile and natural killer cell activity in Listeria monocytogenes infected mice treated orally with Petiveria alliacea extract.

    PubMed

    Queiroz, M L; Quadros, M R; Santos, L M

    2000-08-01

    In this work, we investigated the effects of Petiveria alliacea extract on the production of Th1-type and Th2-type cytokines and on NK cells activity in normal and Listeria monocytogenes infected mice. Our results demonstrated that in normal/non-infected mice P. alliacea administration led to increased levels of Interleukin-2 (IL-2). The infection alone enhanced INF-gamma levels and NK cell activity at 48 and 72 hours of infection. The treatment with five consecutive doses of 1000 mg/kg/day of P. alliacea extract, given previously to infection, led to further increases in IL-2 levels, in relation to normal/non-infected/P. alliacea treated controls, and in INF-gamma levels at 72 h of infection, compared to infected mice. On the other hand, the production of IL-4 and IL-10 were not altered either by the infection or by the treatment with P. alliacea extract. NK cells activity increased at 48 h and 72 h following the inoculation of the bacteria. When mice were treated with P. alliacea previously to infection, NK activity was higher than that observed at 48 h, 72 h and 120 h of infection in the infected animal. Based on these findings we suggest that P. alliacea up-regulates anti-bacterial immune response by enhancing both Th1 function and the activity of NK cells.

  18. Species-specific immunity induced by infection with Entamoeba histolytica and Entamoeba moshkovskii in mice.

    PubMed

    Shimokawa, Chikako; Culleton, Richard; Imai, Takashi; Suzue, Kazutomo; Hirai, Makoto; Taniguchi, Tomoyo; Kobayashi, Seiki; Hisaeda, Hajime; Hamano, Shinjiro

    2013-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica, the parasitic amoeba responsible for amoebiasis, causes approximately 100,000 deaths every year. There is currently no vaccine against this parasite. We have previously shown that intracecal inoculation of E. histolytica trophozoites leads to chronic and non-healing cecitis in mice. Entamoeba moshkovskii, a closely related amoeba, also causes diarrhea and other intestinal disorders in this model. Here, we investigated the effect of infection followed by drug-cure of these species on the induction of immunity against homologous or heterologous species challenge. Mice were infected with E. histolytica or E. moshkovskii and treated with metronidazole 14 days later. Re-challenge with E. histolytica or E. moshkovskii was conducted seven or 28 days following confirmation of the clearance of amoebae, and the degree of protection compared to non-exposed control mice was evaluated. We show that primary infection with these amoebae induces a species-specific immune response which protects against challenge with the homologous, but not a heterologous species. These findings pave the way, therefore, for the identification of novel amoebae antigens that may become the targets of vaccines and provide a useful platform to investigate host protective immunity to Entamoeba infections.

  19. Infection Susceptibility in Gastric Intrinsic Factor (Vitamin B12)-Defective Mice Is Subject to Maternal Influences

    PubMed Central

    Mottram, Lynda; Speak, Anneliese O.; Selek, Reza M.; Cambridge, Emma L.; McIntyre, Zoe; Kane, Leanne; Mukhopadhyay, Subhankar; Grove, Carolyn; Colin, Amy; Brandt, Cordelia; Duque-Correa, Maria A.; Forbester, Jessica; Nguyen, Tu Anh Pham; Hale, Christine; Vasilliou, George S.; Arends, Mark J.; Wren, Brendan W.; Dougan, Gordon

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mice harboring a mutation in the gene encoding gastric intrinsic factor (Gif), a protein essential for the absorption of vitamin B12/cobalamin (Cbl), have potential as a model to explore the role of vitamins in infection. The levels of Cbl in the blood of Giftm1a/tm1a mutant mice were influenced by the maternal genotype, with offspring born to heterozygous (high Cbl, F1) mothers exhibiting a significantly higher serum Cbl level than those born to homozygous (low Cbl, F2) equivalents. Low Cbl levels correlated with susceptibility to an infectious challenge with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium or Citrobacter rodentium, and this susceptibility phenotype was moderated by Cbl administration. Transcriptional and metabolic profiling revealed that Cbl deficient mice exhibited a bioenergetic shift similar to a metabolic phenomenon commonly found in cancerous cells under hypoxic conditions known as the Warburg effect, with this metabolic effect being exacerbated further by infection. Our findings demonstrate a role for Cbl in bacterial infection, with potential general relevance to dietary deficiency and infection susceptibility. PMID:27329747

  20. HIV-1 cellular and tissue replication patterns in infected humanized mice.

    PubMed

    Araínga, Mariluz; Su, Hang; Poluektova, Larisa Y; Gorantla, Santhi; Gendelman, Howard E

    2016-01-01

    Humanized mice have emerged as a testing platform for HIV-1 pathobiology by reflecting natural human disease processes. Their use to study HIV-1 biology, virology, immunology, pathogenesis and therapeutic development has served as a robust alternative to more-well developed animal models for HIV/AIDS. A critical component in reflecting such human pathobiology rests in defining the tissue and cellular sites for HIV-1 infection. To this end, we examined the tissue sites for viral infection in bone marrow, blood, spleens, liver, gut, brain, kidney and lungs of human CD34+ hematopoietic stem cell engrafted virus-infected NOD.Cg-Prkdc(scid) Il2rg(tm1Wjl)/SzJ mice. Cells were analyzed by flow cytometry and sorted from species mixtures defined as CD34+ lineage negative progenitor cells, CD14+CD16+ monocyte-macrophages and central, stem cell and effector memory T cells. The cell distribution and viral life cycle were found dependent on the tissue compartment and time of infection. Cell subsets contained HIV-1 total and integrated DNA as well as multi-spliced and unspliced RNA in divergent proportions. The data support the idea that humanized mice can provide a means to examine the multifaceted sites of HIV-1 replication including, but not limited to progenitor cells and monocyte-macrophages previously possible only in macaques and human. PMID:26996968

  1. Loss of oral infectivity of tissue cysts of Toxoplasma gondii RH strain to outbred Swiss Webster mice.

    PubMed

    Villard, O; Candolfi, E; Ferguson, D J; Marcellin, L; Kien, T

    1997-12-01

    We have developed a method for obtaining cysts of Toxoplasma gondii RH strain. Outbred Swiss Webster mice were infected subcutaneously (s.c.) or intraperitoneally (i.p) with 10(5) tachyzoites and given sulfadiazine 400 mg l-1 + NaHCO3 10 g l-1 in drinking water from day 1 to day 15 post-infection (p.i.). None of the mice infected i.p. survived, compared with 50% of the mice infected s.c. Cysts were detectable in the brain on day 45 p.i., and had ultrastructural features consistent with those of bradyzoites. However, these cysts were incapable of infecting mice via the oral route. In addition, immunofluorescence studies showed the persistence of P36 protein expression, indicating that the conversion to bradyzoites was incomplete.

  2. Modulation of IL-12 and IFNγ by probiotic supplementation promotes protection against Toxocara canis infection in mice.

    PubMed

    de Avila, L F D C; de Leon, P M M; de Moura, M Q; Berne, M E A; Scaini, C J; Leivas Leite, F P

    2016-05-01

    In this study, supplementation with the probiotic Saccharomyces boulardii promoted a reduction in intensity of infection by Toxocara canis and modulates cytokines mRNA expression in experimentally infected mice. IL-12 gene transcription had 40-fold increase in S. boulardii supplemented uninfected mice and sevenfold increase in supplemented infected mice comparing with not supplemented group. Regarding IFNγ, similar results were observed, since probiotic supplementation induced approximately 43-fold increase, but only in uninfected mice (P < 0·05). T. canis infection upregulated IL-10 expression while S. boulardii downregulated it and no change was observed for IL-4. Thus, based in these findings; we suggest that one possible mechanism responsible for S. boulardii protection effect against T. canis infection is by the modulation of cytokines expression, especially IL-12. PMID:26971490

  3. Effect of elevated environmental temperature on the antibody response of mice to Trypanosoma cruzi during the acute phase of infection.

    PubMed Central

    Dimock, K A; Davis, C D; Kuhn, R E

    1991-01-01

    When held at 36 degrees C, Trypanosoma cruzi-infected C3H mice survive an otherwise lethal infection with significantly decreased parasitemia levels and enhanced immune responsiveness. Treatment of T. cruzi-infected mice with the immunosuppressive agent cyclophosphamide indicated that the positive effects of increased environmental temperature were primarily due to enhancement of immunity. A parasite-specific, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunoblot analysis were used to examine the effect of elevated environmental temperature on the production of anti-T. cruzi antibodies. Both the reactivity and diversity of anti-T. cruzi antibodies were found to be lower in infected mice held at 36 degrees C than in infected mice held at room temperature. However, reactivity and diversity could be enhanced by vaccination with culture forms of the parasite. Images PMID:1937796

  4. Immune response to a Trichinella spiralis infection in house mice from lines selectively bred for high voluntary wheel running.

    PubMed

    Dlugosz, Elizabeth M; Schutz, Heidi; Meek, Thomas H; Acosta, Wendy; Downs, Cynthia J; Platzer, Edward G; Chappell, Mark A; Garland, Theodore

    2013-11-15

    Four lines of mice bred for high voluntary wheel running (HR lines) have high baseline circulating corticosterone levels and increased daily energy expenditure as compared with four non-selected control (C) lines. High corticosterone may suppress immune function and competing energy demands may limit ability to mount an immune response. We hypothesized that HR mice have a reduced immune response and therefore a decreased ability to fight an infection by Trichinella spiralis, an ecologically relevant nematode common in mammals. Infections have an acute, intestinal phase while the nematode is migrating, reproducing and traveling throughout the bloodstream, followed by a chronic phase with larvae encysted in muscles. Adult males (generation 55 of the selection experiment) were sham-infected or infected by oral gavage with ~300 J1 T. spiralis larvae. During the chronic phase of infection, mice were given wheel access for 6 days, followed by 2 days of maximum aerobic performance trials. Two weeks post-infection, infected HR had significantly lower circulating immunoglobulin E levels compared with infected C mice. However, we found no statistical difference between infected HR and C mice in numbers of encysted larvae within the diaphragm. As expected, both voluntary running and maximum aerobic performance were significantly higher in HR mice and lower in infected mice, with no line type-by-infection interactions. Results complement those of previous studies suggesting decreased locomotor abilities during the chronic phase of T. spiralis infection. However, despite reduced antibody production, breeding for high voluntary wheel exercise does not appear to have a substantial negative impact on general humoral function.

  5. Concomitant Benznidazole and Suramin Chemotherapy in Mice Infected with a Virulent Strain of Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Eliziária C.; Cupertino, Marli C.; Bastos, Daniel S. S.; Klein, Raphael C.; Silva, Eduardo A. M.; Fietto, Juliana L. R.; Talvani, André; Bahia, Maria T.

    2015-01-01

    Although suramin (Sur) is suggested as a potential drug candidate in the management of Chagas disease, this issue has not been objectively tested. In this study, we examined the applicability of concomitant treatment with benznidazole (Bz) and suramin in mice infected with a virulent strain of Trypanosoma cruzi. Eighty 12-week-old male C57BL/6 mice were equally randomized in eight groups: (i) noninfected mice (negative control) and mice infected with T. cruzi Y strain receiving (ii) no treatment (positive control), (iii) Bz, 100 mg/kg of body weight per day, (iv) Sur, 20 mg/kg/day, and (v to viii) Sur, 20 mg/kg/day, combined with Bz, 100, 50, 25, or 5 mg/kg/day. Bz was administered by gavage, and Sur was administered intraperitoneally. Sur dramatically increased the parasitemia, cardiac content of parasite DNA, inflammation, oxidative tissue damage, and mortality. In response to high parasitic load in cardiac tissue, Sur stimulated the immune system in a manner typical of the acute phase of Chagas disease, increasing tissue levels of gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and inducing a preferential IgG2a anti-T. cruzi serum pattern. When Sur and Bz were combined, the infection severity was attenuated, showing a dose-dependent Bz response. Sur therapy had a more harmful effect on the host than on the parasite and reduced the efficacy of Bz against T. cruzi infection. Considering that Sur drastically reinforced the infection evolution, potentiating the inflammatory process and the severity of cardiac lesions, the in vivo findings contradicted the in vitro anti-T. cruzi potential described for this drug. PMID:26169419

  6. Concomitant Benznidazole and Suramin Chemotherapy in Mice Infected with a Virulent Strain of Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Santos, Eliziária C; Novaes, Rômulo D; Cupertino, Marli C; Bastos, Daniel S S; Klein, Raphael C; Silva, Eduardo A M; Fietto, Juliana L R; Talvani, André; Bahia, Maria T; Oliveira, Leandro L

    2015-10-01

    Although suramin (Sur) is suggested as a potential drug candidate in the management of Chagas disease, this issue has not been objectively tested. In this study, we examined the applicability of concomitant treatment with benznidazole (Bz) and suramin in mice infected with a virulent strain of Trypanosoma cruzi. Eighty 12-week-old male C57BL/6 mice were equally randomized in eight groups: (i) noninfected mice (negative control) and mice infected with T. cruzi Y strain receiving (ii) no treatment (positive control), (iii) Bz, 100 mg/kg of body weight per day, (iv) Sur, 20 mg/kg/day, and (v to viii) Sur, 20 mg/kg/day, combined with Bz, 100, 50, 25, or 5 mg/kg/day. Bz was administered by gavage, and Sur was administered intraperitoneally. Sur dramatically increased the parasitemia, cardiac content of parasite DNA, inflammation, oxidative tissue damage, and mortality. In response to high parasitic load in cardiac tissue, Sur stimulated the immune system in a manner typical of the acute phase of Chagas disease, increasing tissue levels of gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and inducing a preferential IgG2a anti-T. cruzi serum pattern. When Sur and Bz were combined, the infection severity was attenuated, showing a dose-dependent Bz response. Sur therapy had a more harmful effect on the host than on the parasite and reduced the efficacy of Bz against T. cruzi infection. Considering that Sur drastically reinforced the infection evolution, potentiating the inflammatory process and the severity of cardiac lesions, the in vivo findings contradicted the in vitro anti-T. cruzi potential described for this drug.

  7. Experimental infection with cytopathic bovine viral diarrhea virus in mice induces megakaryopoiesis in the spleen and bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Seong, Giyong; Lee, Jin-Sol; Lee, Kyung-Hyun; Choi, Kyoung-Seong

    2016-02-01

    Here, we infected mice with cytopathic bovine viral diarrhea virus 1 (cp BVDV1) by oral inoculation and investigated the effects of infection by histopathological, immunohistochemical (IHC), hematological methods. Twelve mice were infected, and samples were obtained at day 2, 5, and 9 postinfection (pi). Most of the infected mice exhibited clinical signs of illness such as reduced movement, crouching, loose feces, loss of appetite, and reduced water intake. Blood samples from six mice were positive for BVDV based on reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Blood analysis also revealed thrombocytopenia and lymphopenia. Viral antigens were detected in the spleen (12/12), bone marrow (12/12), and/or mesenteric lymph nodes (4/12) of all infected mice by IHC analysis. The spleens showed significant histopathological changes including (i) substantially increased numbers of megakaryocytes, (ii) lymphocyte depletion, and (iii) hemorrhages. The bone marrow also had an increased number of megakaryocytes, although this increase was not as strong as it was in the spleen. Severe lymphoid depletion was observed in the mesenteric lymph nodes. Viral infections were present in the lymphocytes but not detected in megakaryocytes of the spleen, bone marrow, or mesenteric lymph nodes. These results suggest that the increased numbers of megakaryocytes may be a direct result of BVDV infection. BVDV infection in mice following oral inoculation of cp BVDV1 leads to megakaryopoiesis in the spleen and bone marrow to replenish the platelets.

  8. Adverse events post smallpox-vaccination: insights from tail scarification infection in mice with Vaccinia virus.

    PubMed

    Mota, Bruno E F; Gallardo-Romero, Nadia; Trindade, Giliane; Keckler, M Shannon; Karem, Kevin; Carroll, Darin; Campos, Marco A; Vieira, Leda Q; da Fonseca, Flávio G; Ferreira, Paulo C P; Bonjardim, Cláudio A; Damon, Inger K; Kroon, Erna G

    2011-04-15

    Adverse events upon smallpox vaccination with fully-replicative strains of Vaccinia virus (VACV) comprise an array of clinical manifestations that occur primarily in immunocompromised patients leading to significant host morbidity/mortality. The expansion of immune-suppressed populations and the possible release of Variola virus as a bioterrorist act have given rise to concerns over vaccination complications should more widespread vaccination be reinitiated. Our goal was to evaluate the components of the host immune system that are sufficient to prevent morbidity/mortality in a murine model of tail scarification, which mimics immunological and clinical features of smallpox vaccination in humans. Infection of C57BL/6 wild-type mice led to a strictly localized infection, with complete viral clearance by day 28 p.i. On the other hand, infection of T and B-cell deficient mice (Rag1(-/-)) produced a severe disease, with uncontrolled viral replication at the inoculation site and dissemination to internal organs. Infection of B-cell deficient animals (µMT) produced no mortality. However, viral clearance in µMT animals was delayed compared to WT animals, with detectable viral titers in tail and internal organs late in infection. Treatment of Rag1(-/-) with rabbit hyperimmune anti-vaccinia serum had a subtle effect on the morbidity/mortality of this strain, but it was effective in reduce viral titers in ovaries. Finally, NUDE athymic mice showed a similar outcome of infection as Rag1(-/-), and passive transfer of WT T cells to Rag1(-/-) animals proved fully effective in preventing morbidity/mortality. These results strongly suggest that both T and B cells are important in the immune response to primary VACV infection in mice, and that T-cells are required to control the infection at the inoculation site and providing help for B-cells to produce antibodies, which help to prevent viral dissemination. These insights might prove helpful to better identify individuals with

  9. Antileishmanial activity of licochalcone A in mice infected with Leishmania major and in hamsters infected with Leishmania donovani.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, M; Christensen, S B; Theander, T G; Kharazmi, A

    1994-01-01

    This study was designed to examine the antileishmanial activity of the oxygenated chalcone licochalcone A in mice and hamsters infected with Leishmania parasites. Intraperitoneal administration of licochalcone A at doses of 2.5 and 5 mg/kg of body weight per day completely prevented lesion development in BALB/c mice infected with Leishmania major. Treatment of hamsters infected with L. donovani with intraperitoneal administration of licochalcone A at a dose of 20 mg/kg of body weight per day for 6 consecutive days resulted in a > 96% reduction of parasite load in the liver and the spleen compared with values for untreated control animals. The [3H]thymidine uptake by the parasites isolated from the treated hamsters was only about 1% of that observed in parasites isolated from the controls. Oral administration of licochalcone A at concentrations of 5 to 150 mg/kg of body weight per day for 6 consecutive days resulted in > 65 and 85% reductions of L. donovani parasite loads in the liver and the spleen, respectively, compared with those of untreated control hamsters. These data clearly demonstrate that licochalcone A is a promising lead for the development of a new drug against leishmaniases. PMID:8092835

  10. Experimental infection with non-cytopathic bovine viral diarrhea virus 1 in mice induces inflammatory cell infiltration in the spleen.

    PubMed

    Han, Yu-Jung; Kwon, Young-Je; Lee, Kyung-Hyun; Choi, Eun-Jin; Choi, Kyoung-Seong

    2016-09-01

    Previously, our study showed that oral inoculation of mice with cytopathic (cp) bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) led to lymphocyte depletion and increased numbers of megakaryocytes in the spleen as well as thrombocytopenia and lymphopenia. In the present study, to investigate the possible differences in the detection of viral antigen, histopathological lesions, and hematologic changes between non-cytopathic (ncp) BVDV1 and cp BVDV1, mice were orally administered low and high doses of ncp BVDV1 and were necropsied at days 0, 2, 5, and 9 postinfection (pi). None of the ncp BVDV1-infected mice exhibited clinical signs of illness, unlike those infected with cp BVDV1. Statistically significant thrombocytopenia was observed during ncp BVDV1 infection, and lymphopenia was found only in mice infected with a high dose at day 9 pi. Interestingly, ncp BVDV1 infection increased the numbers of basophils, eosinophils, neutrophils, and monocytes in some infected mice. Viral antigen was detected in the lymphocytes of the spleen, mesenteric lymph nodes, Peyer's patches, and bone marrow by immunohistochemistry. Lymphoid depletion was evident in the mesenteric lymph nodes of mice infected with a high dose and also found in the Peyer's patches of some infected mice. Infiltration of inflammatory cells, including neutrophils and monocytes, and an increased number of megakaryocytes were seen in the spleen. These results suggest that the distribution of viral antigens is not associated with the presence of histopathological lesions. Inflammatory cell infiltration was observed in the spleens as a result of viral replication and may be attributable to the host reaction to ncp BVDV1 infection. Together, these findings support the possibility that mice can be used as an animal model for BVDV infection.

  11. Identification of an Astrovirus Commonly Infecting Laboratory Mice in the US and Japan

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Terry Fei Fan; Kondov, Nikola O.; Hayashimoto, Nobuhito; Uchida, Ritsuki; Cha, Yunhee; Beyer, Ashley I.; Wong, Walt; Pesavento, Patricia A.; Suemizu, Hiroshi; Muench, Marcus O.; Delwart, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Mice (Mus musculus) are the most commonly used laboratory animals. Viral metagenomics on tissues of immunodeficient mice revealed sequences of a novel mammalian astrovirus. Using PCR, we screened mice from 4 breeders, 4 pharmaceutical companies, 14 research institutes and 30 universities in the US and Japan. Mice from one US breeder tested positive while none from Japanese breeders were positive for MuAstV. Mice in over half of the universities (19/30), institutes (7/14) and pharmaceutical animal facilities (2/4) investigated revealed the presence of MuAstV. Nine mice strains tested positive including both immunodeficient strains (NSG, NOD-SCID, NSG-3GS, C57BL6-Timp-3−/−, and uPA-NOG) and immunocompetent strains (B6J, ICR, Bash2, BALB/c). Our data indicates that MuAstV has a wide geographical, institutional and host strain distribution. Comparison of the MuAstV RdRp sequences showed numerous mutations indicating ongoing viral divergence in different facilities. This study demonstrates the need for metagenomic screening of laboratory animals to identify adventitious infections that may affect experimental outcomes. PMID:23825590

  12. Identification of an astrovirus commonly infecting laboratory mice in the US and Japan.

    PubMed

    Ng, Terry Fei Fan; Kondov, Nikola O; Hayashimoto, Nobuhito; Uchida, Ritsuki; Cha, Yunhee; Beyer, Ashley I; Wong, Walt; Pesavento, Patricia A; Suemizu, Hiroshi; Muench, Marcus O; Delwart, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Mice (Mus musculus) are the most commonly used laboratory animals. Viral metagenomics on tissues of immunodeficient mice revealed sequences of a novel mammalian astrovirus. Using PCR, we screened mice from 4 breeders, 4 pharmaceutical companies, 14 research institutes and 30 universities in the US and Japan. Mice from one US breeder tested positive while none from Japanese breeders were positive for MuAstV. Mice in over half of the universities (19/30), institutes (7/14) and pharmaceutical animal facilities (2/4) investigated revealed the presence of MuAstV. Nine mice strains tested positive including both immunodeficient strains (NSG, NOD-SCID, NSG-3GS, C57BL6-Timp-3 (-/-), and uPA-NOG) and immunocompetent strains (B6J, ICR, Bash2, BALB/c). Our data indicates that MuAstV has a wide geographical, institutional and host strain distribution. Comparison of the MuAstV RdRp sequences showed numerous mutations indicating ongoing viral divergence in different facilities. This study demonstrates the need for metagenomic screening of laboratory animals to identify adventitious infections that may affect experimental outcomes.

  13. Comparative study of protective effects of chitin, chitosan, and N-acetyl chitohexaose against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Listeria monocytogenes infections in mice.

    PubMed

    Okawa, Yoshio; Kobayashi, Makiko; Suzuki, Shigeo; Suzuki, Masuko

    2003-06-01

    We conducted a comparative study of the protective effects of chitin, chitosan, and N-acetyl chitohexaose (NACOS-6) against mice infected intravenously or intraperitoneally with Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Listeria monocytogenes. Mice pretreated with chitin, chitosan, and NACOS-6 showed resistance to intraperitoneal infections by both microbes. Only mice pretreated with chitin and chitosan showed resistance to intravenous infections by both microbes. The number, active oxygen generation, and myeloperoxidase activity of peritoneal exudate cells (PEC) in the chitin, chitosan, and NACOS-6-treated mice were greater than those of the untreated mice. Also, these PEC factors from mice pretreated with chitin and chitosan were greater than those from the NACOS-6-treated mice.

  14. Competitive gut exclusion of avian pathogens by Lactobacillus acidophilus in gnotobiotic chicks.

    PubMed

    Watkins, B A; Miller, B F

    1983-09-01

    A total of 205 Grey Leghorn chicks were hatched germfree for separate trials to determine the effects of Lactobacillus acidophilus treatment on pathogenic Salmonella typhimurium and Staphlococcus aureus. Prophylactic and therapeutic treatments with L. acidophilus were administered either before or after the pathogens were introduced. Prophylactic treatments significantly reduced chick mortality (P less than .01) and shedding of the pathogens (P less than .05). The L. acidophilus prophylactic treatments were also effective qualitatively in reducing the isolation of S. typhimurium and Staph. aureus from crop contents but not, to a great extent, from cecal or rectal contents of gnotobiotic chicks at postmortem. The average surface pH values for the crop, proventriculus, duodenum, cecum, and rectum for gnotobiotic chicks were 5.43, 5.02, 6.18, 6.56, and 6.71, respectively. The L. acidophilus treatments did not significantly affect surface pH of the various segments of the intestinal tract.

  15. Rearing the Fruit Fly Drosophila melanogaster Under Axenic and Gnotobiotic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Koyle, Melinda L; Veloz, Madeline; Judd, Alec M; Wong, Adam C-N; Newell, Peter D; Douglas, Angela E; Chaston, John M

    2016-01-01

    The influence of microbes on myriad animal traits and behaviors has been increasingly recognized in recent years. The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster is a model for understanding microbial interactions with animal hosts, facilitated by approaches to rear large sample sizes of Drosophila under microorganism-free (axenic) conditions, or with defined microbial communities (gnotobiotic). This work outlines a method for collection of Drosophila embryos, hypochlorite dechorionation and sterilization, and transfer to sterile diet. Sterilized embryos are transferred to sterile diet in 50 ml centrifuge tubes, and developing larvae and adults remain free of any exogenous microbes until the vials are opened. Alternatively, flies with a defined microbiota can be reared by inoculating sterile diet and embryos with microbial species of interest. We describe the introduction of 4 bacterial species to establish a representative gnotobiotic microbiota in Drosophila. Finally, we describe approaches for confirming bacterial community composition, including testing if axenic Drosophila remain bacteria-free into adulthood. PMID:27500374

  16. Cell migration is another player of the minute virus of mice infection

    SciTech Connect

    Garcin, Pierre O.; Panté, Nelly

    2014-11-15

    The parvovirus minute virus of mice, prototype strain (MVMp), preferentially infects and kills cancer cells. This intrinsic MVMp oncotropism may depend in part on the early stages of MVMp infection. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the early events of MVMp infection in mouse LA9 fibroblasts and a highly invasive mouse mammary tumor cell line derived from polyomavirus middle T antigen-mediated transformation. Using a combination of fluorescence and electron microscopy, we found that various parameters of the cell migration process affect MVMp infection. We show that, after binding to the plasma membrane, MVMp particles rapidly cluster at the leading edge of migrating cells, which exhibit higher levels of MVMp uptake than non-motile cells. Moreover, promoting cell migration on a fibronectin matrix increased MVMp infection, and induction of epithelial–mesenchymal transition allowed MVMp replication in non-permissive epithelial cells. Hence, we propose that cell migration influences the early stages of MVMp infection. - Highlights: • We document early steps of MVMp infection. • We report that a fibronectin matrix promotes MVMp infection. • We show that cellular migration plays a role in MVMp uptake. • We show that epithelial–mesenchymal transition allows MVMp replication.

  17. Immunomodulatory and antiparasitic effects of garlic extract on Eimeria vermiformis-infected mice.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Atef Mohammed; Yasuda, Masahiro; Farid, Ayman Samir; Desouky, Mohamed Ibrahim; Mohi-Eldin, Mouchira Mohammed; Haridy, Mohie; Horii, Yoichiro

    2015-07-01

    We investigated the immunomodulatory and parasiticidal effects of garlic extract on coccidiosis caused by Eimeria vermiformis infection in male ICR mice. One group received garlic extract daily until the end of the experiment by the oral route from 10 days prior to oral infection with 300 sporulated E. vermiformis oocysts (infected-garlic(+)). The other group served as a control positive with E. vermiformis infection alone (infected-garlic(-)). In the infected-garlic(+) group, garlic extract treatment induced a significant reduction in fecal oocyst output when compared with the infected-garlic(-) group. Histopathological, immunohistochemical, and gene expression analysis for inflammatory cytokines in ileal tissues showed that the garlic extract treatment impaired intracellular development of E. vermiformis during the early stages by increasing the number of intraepithelial CD8(+) T cells and decreasing IL-10 expression. This induced cell cytotoxicity which was reflected by a decrease in oocyst numbers in the intestinal villi and the feces, indicating anticoccidial effects of the garlic extract. However, further studies to explore the precise mechanism of the observed effects of garlic treatment during Eimeria infection are needed to verify our results.

  18. Colonization resistance and microbial ecophysiology: using gnotobiotic mouse models and single-cell technology to explore the intestinal jungle.

    PubMed

    Stecher, Bärbel; Berry, David; Loy, Alexander

    2013-09-01

    The highly diverse intestinal microbiota forms a structured community engaged in constant communication with itself and its host and is characterized by extensive ecological interactions. A key benefit that the microbiota affords its host is its ability to protect against infections in a process termed colonization resistance (CR), which remains insufficiently understood. In this review, we connect basic concepts of CR with new insights from recent years and highlight key technological advances in the field of microbial ecology. We present a selection of statistical and bioinformatics tools used to generate hypotheses about synergistic and antagonistic interactions in microbial ecosystems from metagenomic datasets. We emphasize the importance of experimentally testing these hypotheses and discuss the value of gnotobiotic mouse models for investigating specific aspects related to microbiota-host-pathogen interactions in a well-defined experimental system. We further introduce new developments in the area of single-cell analysis using fluorescence in situ hybridization in combination with metabolic stable isotope labeling technologies for studying the in vivo activities of complex community members. These approaches promise to yield novel insights into the mechanisms of CR and intestinal ecophysiology in general, and give researchers the means to experimentally test hypotheses in vivo at varying levels of biological and ecological complexity.

  19. Neonatal infection with neurotropic influenza A virus affects working memory and expression of type III Nrg1 in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Asp, Linnéa; Beraki, Simret; Kristensson, Krister; Ogren, Sven Ove; Karlsson, Håkan

    2009-08-01

    Epidemiological studies suggest that early life infections may contribute to the development of psychiatric disorders characterized by cognitive deficits. Here, we studied the effects of a neonatal influenza A/WSN/33 virus infection on locomotor activity, working memory and emotional behavior in adult mice. In addition to wild type mice, immunodeficient (Tap1(-/-)) mice lacking functional CD8(+) T cells, were included in the study to model the potential influence of a genetic deficit relating to virus clearance. Three to four months after the infection, infected Tap1(-/-) mice, but not wild type mice, exhibited deficits in working memory as well as increased rearing activity and anxiety. In the medial prefrontal cortices of these infected Tap1(-/-) mice reduced levels of type III Nrg1 transcripts were observed supporting a role for neuregulin 1 signaling in neuronal circuits involved in working memory. Virus replication, distribution or clearance did not differ between the two genotypes. The lack of CD8(+) T cells, however, appeared to contribute to a more pronounced glia response in Tap1(-/-) than in wild type mice. Thus, the present study suggest that the risk of developing deficits in cognitive and emotional behavior following a CNS infection during brain development is influenced by genetic variation in genes involved in the immune response.

  20. Depletion of Neutrophils Exacerbates the Early Inflammatory Immune Response in Lungs of Mice Infected with Paracoccidioides brasiliensis

    PubMed Central

    Lopera, Damaris; Urán-Jiménez, Martha Eugenia

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils predominate during the acute phase of the Paracoccidioides brasiliensis infection. Herein, we determined the role of the neutrophil during the early stages of experimental pulmonary paracoccidioidomycosis using a monoclonal antibody (mAb) specific for neutrophils. Male BALB/c mice were inoculated intranasally with 1.5 × 106 or 2 × 106 P. brasiliensis yeast cells. The mAb was administered 24 h before infection, followed by doses every 48 h until mice were sacrificed. Survival time was evaluated and mice were sacrificed at 48 h and 96 h after inoculation to assess cellularity, fungal load, cytokine/chemokine levels, and histopathological analysis. Neutrophils from mAb-treated mice were efficiently depleted (99.04%). Eighty percent of the mice treated with the mAb and infected with 1.5 × 106 yeast cells died during the first two weeks after infection. When mice were treated and infected with 2 × 106 yeast cells, 100% of them succumbed by the first week after infection. During the acute inflammatory response significant increases in numbers of eosinophils, fungal load and levels of proinflammatory cytokines/chemokines were observed in the mAb-treated mice. We also confirmed that neutrophils are an important source of IFN-γ and IL-17. These results indicate that neutrophils are essential for protection as well as being important for regulating the early inflammatory immune response in experimental pulmonary paracoccidioidomycosis.

  1. Depletion of Neutrophils Exacerbates the Early Inflammatory Immune Response in Lungs of Mice Infected with Paracoccidioides brasiliensis

    PubMed Central

    Lopera, Damaris; Urán-Jiménez, Martha Eugenia

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils predominate during the acute phase of the Paracoccidioides brasiliensis infection. Herein, we determined the role of the neutrophil during the early stages of experimental pulmonary paracoccidioidomycosis using a monoclonal antibody (mAb) specific for neutrophils. Male BALB/c mice were inoculated intranasally with 1.5 × 106 or 2 × 106 P. brasiliensis yeast cells. The mAb was administered 24 h before infection, followed by doses every 48 h until mice were sacrificed. Survival time was evaluated and mice were sacrificed at 48 h and 96 h after inoculation to assess cellularity, fungal load, cytokine/chemokine levels, and histopathological analysis. Neutrophils from mAb-treated mice were efficiently depleted (99.04%). Eighty percent of the mice treated with the mAb and infected with 1.5 × 106 yeast cells died during the first two weeks after infection. When mice were treated and infected with 2 × 106 yeast cells, 100% of them succumbed by the first week after infection. During the acute inflammatory response significant increases in numbers of eosinophils, fungal load and levels of proinflammatory cytokines/chemokines were observed in the mAb-treated mice. We also confirmed that neutrophils are an important source of IFN-γ and IL-17. These results indicate that neutrophils are essential for protection as well as being important for regulating the early inflammatory immune response in experimental pulmonary paracoccidioidomycosis. PMID:27642235

  2. Role of major histocompatibility complex class II in resistance of mice to naturally acquired infection with Syphacia obvelata

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Patricia W.; Chapes, Stephen K.

    2003-01-01

    Genetics plays a substantial role in host resistance in many host-parasite interactions. We examined the prevalence of naturally acquired infection with Syphacia obvelata in a number of mouse strains housed in a non-barrier facility. These mice, which included cross-bred and congenic, inbred strains on various genetic backgrounds, differ in the loci for the immune function genes--major histocompatibility complex class II (MHCII), toll-like receptor 4 (Tlr4), and solute carrier family 11, member 1 (Slc11a1)--which allowed comparisons of the impact of these genes on resistance to pinworm infection. Male and female mice of various ages were sampled over an 18-month period; infection was determined by use of the cellophane tape test. Results indicated that mice that were MHCII+/+ had a significantly lower prevalence of infection than did mice that were MHCII-/-. Differences were not seen between male and female mice. Although MHCII+/+ mice had an age-associated decrease in infection prevalence, such decrease was not seen in MHCII-/- mice. In contrast, infection prevalence in mice with the normal Tlr4 gene (Tlr4(LPS-n/LPS-n)) gene did not differ significantly compared with that in mice that were homozygous for either the point mutation (Tlr4(LPS-d/LPS-d)) or deletion (Tlr4(LPS-del/LPS-del)) of that gene. Likewise, the presence (Sle11a1r/r) or absence (Slc11a1s/s) of functional alleles for Slc11a1 had no effect on the prevalence of infection with S. obvelata. In conclusion, presence of MHCII, but not Tlr4 or Slc11a1 significantly influences prevalence of naturally acquired infection with S. obvelata. These data justify further comprehensive analyses of the immune components that are involved in pinworm resistance.

  3. No Evidence that Infection Alters Global Recombination Rate in House Mice

    PubMed Central

    Dumont, Beth L.; Devlin, Amy A.; Truempy, Dana M.; Miller, Jennifer C.; Singh, Nadia D.

    2015-01-01

    Recombination rate is a complex trait, with genetic and environmental factors shaping observed patterns of variation. Although recent studies have begun to unravel the genetic basis of recombination rate differences between organisms, less attention has focused on the environmental determinants of crossover rates. Here, we test the effect of one ubiquitous environmental pressure–bacterial infection–on global recombination frequency in mammals. We applied MLH1 mapping to assay global crossover rates in male mice infected with the pathogenic bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme Disease, and uninfected control animals. Despite ample statistical power to identify biologically relevant differences between infected and uninfected animals, we find no evidence for a global recombination rate response to bacterial infection. Moreover, broad-scale patterns of crossover distribution, including the number of achiasmate bivalents, are not affected by infection status. Although pathogen exposure can plastically increase recombination in some species, our findings suggest that recombination rates in house mice may be resilient to at least some forms of infection stress. This negative result motivates future experiments with alternative house mouse pathogens to evaluate the generality of this conclusion. PMID:26550833

  4. Immunomodulation over the course of experimental Arthrographis kalrae infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Nagashima, Luciene Airy; Sano, Ayako; de Almeida Araújo, Eduardo José; Álvares E Silva, Paula Leonello; Assolini, João Paulo; Itano, Eiko Nakagawa

    2016-10-01

    Arthrographis kalrae is occasionally described as an opportunistic human pathogen. This study investigated the immune response to A. kalrae during murine experimental infection (7, 14, 28 and 56 days post infection). The fungal load was higher in the early phase and mice presented with neurological syndrome over the course of the infection. There was a gradual increase in the level of anti-A. kalrae IgG and increased levels of DTH at 14 days. There was decreased IFN-γ (14-56 days) and an increase in IL-4 (7 and 56 days). Decreased levels of cytokines (IFN-γ, IL-4, IL-10 and IL-17) were observed in the brain at 56 days p.i. The results suggest that the immune response during murine A. kalrae infection modulates to the pattern of Th2 response. This study shows for the first time the cytokines and cellular immunomodulation that occur in response to an experimental infection with A. kalrae in mice. PMID:27638123

  5. Immune response in mice infected with Candida albicans in the mycelial form.

    PubMed

    Bibas Bonet de Jorrat, M E; de Valdez, G A; de Petrino, S F; Sirena, A; Perdigón, G

    1989-05-01

    The effect of the infection with the mycelial form of a Candida albicans strain (Mycology Dept.) upon the immune system in mice was studied. BALB/c mice were infected intraperitoneally in a single dose of a 3 x 10(6), 6 x 10(6) and 12 x 10(6) cell suspension of the strain. Macrophages's activity was studied the days 7, 14, 21, 28, 35, and 42 after inoculation, by the following assays: phagocytosis in vitro, mononucleated phagocytic system by the colloidal carbon clearance technique, the lymphocyte's activity by the direct plaque forming cells technique (PFC) and delayed hypersensitivity (DTH). Infection with the mycelial form did not affect the peritoneal macrophage's phagocytic ability, neither modified the delayed hypersensitivity to sheep red blood cells (SRBC). However, a slight and transient depression of the lymphocyte stimulation was found. Suppression of PFC to SRBC was high when a 12 x 10(6) cell suspension was used in contrast to the infection with blastospores. These results suggest that systemic infection by Candida albicans in its mycelial form do not induce a non specific immunosuppression.

  6. Genistein-Supplemented Diet Decreases Malaria Liver Infection in Mice and Constitutes a Potential Prophylactic Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Prudêncio, Miguel; Gonçalves, Lígia A.; Casalou, Cristina; Buger, Dominik; Sauerwein, Robert; Haas, Werner; Mota, Maria M.

    2008-01-01

    In tropical regions millions of people still live at risk of malaria infection. Indeed the emergence of resistance to chloroquine and other drugs in use in these areas reinforces the need to implement alternative prophylactic strategies. Genistein is a naturally occurring compound that is widely used as a food supplment and is thought to be effective in countering several pathologies. Results presented here show that genistein inhibits liver infection by the Plasmodium parasite, the causative agent of malaria. In vitro, genistein decreased the infection rates of both mouse and human hepatoma cells by inhibiting the early stages of the parasite's intracellular development. Oral or intraperitoneal administration of genistein decreased the liver parasite load of P. berghei-infected mice. Moreover, mice fed on a genistein-supplemented diet showed a significant reduction in Plasmodium liver infection as well as a reduced blood parasitemia and partial protection from severe disease. Since genistein is a safe, low-cost, natural compound that can be used permanently in a diet, we propose its use as a prophylactic agent against malaria for endemic populations and long-time travelers. PMID:18628947

  7. Antiviral Therapy Can Reverse the Development of Immune Senescence in Elderly Mice with Latent Cytomegalovirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Pachnio, Annette; Lauder, Sarah N.; Sweet, Clive; Moss, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection leads to the development of adaptive and humoral immune responses that are among the largest for any pathogen, and intriguingly, the magnitude of the immune response increases with age, a phenomenon termed “memory inflation.” Elevated CMV-specific immunity has been correlated with an increased mortality rate in elderly individuals and with impaired vaccination responses. The latent phase of CMV infection is characterized by intermittent episodes of subclinical viral reactivation and the production of immunogenic transcripts that may maintain memory inflation of virus-specific cytotoxic lymphocytes. However, the relative importance of CMV reactivation in the development of memory inflation is uncertain, as is the potential for antiviral treatment to reverse this effect. Here, we administered valaciclovir for up to 12 months in mice with established murine CMV (MCMV) infection. Treatment reduced the magnitude of the MCMV-specific CD8+ T-lymphocyte response by 80%, and the residual MCMV tetramer-specific lymphocytes exhibited a less differentiated phenotype. In addition, latent MCMV infection suppressed the proportion of naïve CD8+ T cells by 60% compared to antiviral-treated mice or MCMV-negative animals. Furthermore, treatment led to a reduction in influenza A viral loads following a challenge in elderly MCMV-infected animals and also reduced the differentiation of influenza virus-specific cytotoxic lymphocytes. These observations demonstrate that MCMV-specific memory inflation is maintained by viral replication and that therapeutic intervention could lead to improved immune function. PMID:23115277

  8. Immune response in mice infected with Candida albicans in the mycelial form.

    PubMed

    Bibas Bonet de Jorrat, M E; de Valdez, G A; de Petrino, S F; Sirena, A; Perdigón, G

    1989-05-01

    The effect of the infection with the mycelial form of a Candida albicans strain (Mycology Dept.) upon the immune system in mice was studied. BALB/c mice were infected intraperitoneally in a single dose of a 3 x 10(6), 6 x 10(6) and 12 x 10(6) cell suspension of the strain. Macrophages's activity was studied the days 7, 14, 21, 28, 35, and 42 after inoculation, by the following assays: phagocytosis in vitro, mononucleated phagocytic system by the colloidal carbon clearance technique, the lymphocyte's activity by the direct plaque forming cells technique (PFC) and delayed hypersensitivity (DTH). Infection with the mycelial form did not affect the peritoneal macrophage's phagocytic ability, neither modified the delayed hypersensitivity to sheep red blood cells (SRBC). However, a slight and transient depression of the lymphocyte stimulation was found. Suppression of PFC to SRBC was high when a 12 x 10(6) cell suspension was used in contrast to the infection with blastospores. These results suggest that systemic infection by Candida albicans in its mycelial form do not induce a non specific immunosuppression. PMID:2677735

  9. Mucin model for group B type III streptococcal infection in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, D O

    1980-01-01

    An experimental murine infection was established by the intraperitoneal injection of a log-phase culture of a laboratory reference strain of Streptococcus agalactiae, Lancefield group B, type III (strain SS620), suspended in sterile hog gastric mucin. The enhancement of streptococcal virulence was measured by a significantly increased mortality in outbred ICR Swiss mice. An inbred C57BL6 strain of mice was resistant to the mucin-bacterial combination. Mucin, treated with Desferal to chelate the iron, did not lose the capacity to enhance the virulence of group B, type III streptococci in ICR Swiss mice. Iron-dextran was not a suitable substitute for mucin and failed to enhance the virulence of group B, type III streptococci. The results of these studies indicate that iron is not the resistance-lowering factor in this group B, type III streptococci-mucin model. PMID:6155334

  10. Borrelia burgdorferi infection in white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus) in hemlock (Tsuga canadensis) habitat in western Pennsylvania.

    PubMed

    Lord, R D; Humphreys, J G; Lord, V R; McLean, R G; Garland, C L

    1992-07-01

    White-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus) were captured and their tissues sampled from 27 sites in seven counties of western Pennsylvania in 1990 for isolation and identification of Borrelia burgdorferi. Two hundred sixty mice were captured from which there were 27 isolations. Significantly more mice were captured and significantly more isolations made from hemlock (Tsuga canadensis) habitat than from deciduous species forest. Hemlock habitat is sparse and focal but evidently increases winter survival of mice, and thus possibly results in increased infection rates in mice.

  11. Generation of insulin-producing cells from gnotobiotic porcine skin-derived stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Ji Hoon; Lee, Sung Ho; Heo, Young Tae; Uhm, Sang Jun; Lee, Hoon Taek

    2010-07-09

    A major problem in the treatment of type 1 diabetes mellitus is the limited availability of alternative sources of insulin-producing cells for islet transplantation. In this study, we investigated the effect of bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP-4) treatments of gnotobiotic porcine skin-derived stem cells (gSDSCs) on their reprogramming and subsequent differentiation into insulin-producing cells (IPCs). We isolated SDSCs from the ear skin of a gnotobiotic pig. During the proliferation period, the cells expressed stem-cell markers Oct-4, Sox-2, and CD90; nestin expression also increased significantly. The cells could differentiate into IPCs after treatments with activin-A, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), and nicotinamide. After 15 days in the differentiation medium, controlled gSDSCs began expressing endocrine progenitor genes and proteins (Ngn3, Neuro-D, PDX-1, NKX2.2, NKX6.1, and insulin). The IPCs showed increased insulin synthesis after glucose stimulation. The results indicate that stem cells derived from the skin of gnotobiotic pigs can differentiate into IPCs under the appropriate conditions in vitro. Our three-stage induction protocol could be applied without genetic modification to source IPCs from stem cells in the skin of patients with diabetes for autologous transplantation.

  12. Delayed-type hypersensitivity to Babesia microti-infected erythrocytes in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Ruebush, M.J.; Troutman, E.H.; Kennedy, D.A.

    1986-04-01

    Strong delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) to Babesia microti was elicited when intraerythrocytic parasites (IEP) were inoculated subcutaneously into the flank of normal mice 6 to 14 days before challenge in the ipsilateral footpad with 10(8) IEP. Intraperitoneal or intravenous administration of antigen did not sensitize mice for DTH. When challenge was given 21 days after immunization, the response was approximately half of the maximum and then rose again slowly over the next 3 weeks to levels that were not significantly different from those maximal values. The response was classified as a true DTH reaction on the basis of kinetics, histology, and the transfer of responsiveness with immune T lymphocytes of the Ly 1+ phenotype, but not with serum. The reaction was specific for IEP since control groups given two injections of red blood cells from uninfected syngeneic mice (NRBC) or one injection of NRBC or sheep red blood cells (SRBC) and one of IEP never developed significant footpad swelling. Freed parasites obtained by osmotic rupture, density gradient sedimentation, and lethally irradiated IEP were also effective for elicitation of DTH. Anti-IEP DTH was expressed in a dose-dependent fashion with 10(6), 10(7), or 10(8) parasites sufficing for immunizing inoculum as long as 10(8) parasites were used as the challenge dose. Mice immunized and challenged with 10(8) lethally irradiated IEP (60 krad, 60Co), were protected against subsequent intraperitoneal challenge with 10(8) viable IEP. If mice were infected intraperitoneally with 10(8) IEP at any time between 21 days before immunization to 2 hr after challenge, their ability to respond to immunization and challenge was profoundly depressed. Development of a strong anti-parasite DTH response can occur in parallel with resistance to infection, but is not a rapid sequela of bloodborne infection.

  13. OspA immunization decreases transmission of Borrelia burgdorferi spirochetes from infected Peromyscus leucopus mice to larval Ixodes scapularis ticks.

    PubMed

    Tsao, J; Barbour, A G; Luke, C J; Fikrig, E; Fish, D

    2001-01-01

    Recombinant outer surface protein A (OspA) vaccination of wild animal reservoirs has potential application for reducing Borrelia burgdorferi transmission in nature and subsequent risk of human infection. As a major reservoir host, the white-footed mouse (Peromyscus leucopus) is a candidate for a vaccination program designed to reduce infection prevalence in vector ticks. In this study we characterized the effect of various levels of immunization with recombinant OspA-glutathione transferase fusion protein on transmission dynamics from infected P. leucopus to larval ticks. Control mice were vaccinated with glutathione transferase alone. All mice were experimentally infected with B. burgdorferi before vaccination. The immune responses of the immunized mice were assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for antibodies to OspA. Transmission of B. burgdorferi from infected mice was determined by xenodiagnosis with uninfected larval ticks. Spirochetes in ticks were counted by direct immunofluorescence assay. The concentration of antibody to OspA increased with each OspA vaccination but most markedly after the first and second vaccinations. In comparison with control mice, there was reduced transmission by OspA-vaccinated mice to uninfected ticks. One, two, or three doses of OspA reduced infection prevalence in xenodiagnostic ticks by 48%, 92%, or 99% and the numbers of spirochetes per tick by 84%, 98%, or 99%, respectively. This study suggests that vaccination of P. leucopus with OspA could reduce transmission to the tick vector in nature despite prior infection of the reservoir host.

  14. VT-1161 Protects Immunosuppressed Mice from Rhizopus arrhizus var. arrhizus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Gebremariam, Teclegiorgis; Wiederhold, Nathan P.; Fothergill, Annette W.; Garvey, Edward P.; Hoekstra, William J.; Schotzinger, Robert J.; Patterson, Thomas F.; Filler, Scott G.

    2015-01-01

    We studied the efficacy of the investigational drug VT-1161 against mucormycosis. VT-1161 had more potent in vitro activity against Rhizopus arrhizus var. arrhizus than against R. arrhizus var. delemar. VT-1161 treatment demonstrated dose-dependent plasma drug levels with prolonged survival time and lowered tissue fungal burden in immunosuppressed mice infected with R. arrhizus var. arrhizus and was as effective as high-dose liposomal amphotericin B treatment. These results support further development of VT-1161 against mucormycosis. PMID:26369977

  15. Restricted virus replication in the spinal cords of nude mice infected with a Theiler's virus variant.

    PubMed

    Zurbriggen, A; Yamada, M; Thomas, C; Fujinami, R S

    1991-02-01

    The Daniels strain of Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis produces a chronic disease which is an animal model for human demyelinating disorders. Previously, we selected a neutralization-resistant virus variant producing an altered and diminished central nervous system disease in immunocompetent mice which was evident during the later stage of infection (after 4 weeks) (A. Zurbriggen and R. S. Fujinami, J. Virol. 63:1505-1513, 1989). The exact epitope determining neurovirulence was precisely mapped to a capsid protein, VP-1, and represents a neutralizing region (A. Zurbriggen, J. M. Hogle, and R. S. Fujinami, J. Exp. Med. 170:2037-2049, 1989). Here, we present experiments with immunoincompetent animals to determine viral replication, spread, and targeting to the central nervous system in the absence of detectable antibodies or functional T cells. Nude mice were infected orally, and the virus was monitored by plaque assay, immunohistochemistry, and in situ hybridization. Early during the infection (1 week), the variant virus induced an acute disease comparable to that induced by the wild-type virus in these nude mice. Alterations in tropism in the central nervous system were not apparent when wild-type parental Daniels strain virus was compared with the variant virus. Moreover, variant virus replicated in tissue culture (BHK-21 cells) to similarly high titers in a time course identical to that of the wild-type virus (A. Zurbriggen and R. S. Fujinami, J. Virol. 63:1505-1513, 1989). However, replication of the variant virus versus the wild-type virus within the spinal cord of athymic nude mice infected per os was substantially restricted by 6 weeks postinfection. Therefore, the reduced neurovirulence in the later stage (6 weeks) of the disease is most likely due to a diminished growth rate or spread of the variant virus in the central nervous system rather than to marked differences in viral tropism.

  16. Restricted virus replication in the spinal cords of nude mice infected with a Theiler's virus variant.

    PubMed Central

    Zurbriggen, A; Yamada, M; Thomas, C; Fujinami, R S

    1991-01-01

    The Daniels strain of Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis produces a chronic disease which is an animal model for human demyelinating disorders. Previously, we selected a neutralization-resistant virus variant producing an altered and diminished central nervous system disease in immunocompetent mice which was evident during the later stage of infection (after 4 weeks) (A. Zurbriggen and R. S. Fujinami, J. Virol. 63:1505-1513, 1989). The exact epitope determining neurovirulence was precisely mapped to a capsid protein, VP-1, and represents a neutralizing region (A. Zurbriggen, J. M. Hogle, and R. S. Fujinami, J. Exp. Med. 170:2037-2049, 1989). Here, we present experiments with immunoincompetent animals to determine viral replication, spread, and targeting to the central nervous system in the absence of detectable antibodies or functional T cells. Nude mice were infected orally, and the virus was monitored by plaque assay, immunohistochemistry, and in situ hybridization. Early during the infection (1 week), the variant virus induced an acute disease comparable to that induced by the wild-type virus in these nude mice. Alterations in tropism in the central nervous system were not apparent when wild-type parental Daniels strain virus was compared with the variant virus. Moreover, variant virus replicated in tissue culture (BHK-21 cells) to similarly high titers in a time course identical to that of the wild-type virus (A. Zurbriggen and R. S. Fujinami, J. Virol. 63:1505-1513, 1989). However, replication of the variant virus versus the wild-type virus within the spinal cord of athymic nude mice infected per os was substantially restricted by 6 weeks postinfection. Therefore, the reduced neurovirulence in the later stage (6 weeks) of the disease is most likely due to a diminished growth rate or spread of the variant virus in the central nervous system rather than to marked differences in viral tropism. Images PMID:1987366

  17. Therapeutic potential of myrrh and ivermectin against experimental Trichinella spiralis infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Basyoni, Maha M A; El-Sabaa, Abdel-Aleem A

    2013-06-01

    Trichinosis is a parasitic zoonosis caused by the nematode Trichinella spiralis. Anthelmintics are used to eliminate intestinal adults as well as tissue-migrating and encysted larvae. This study aimed to investigate the effects of ivermectin and myrrh obtained from the aloe-gum resin of Commiphora molmol on experimental trichinosis. Ninety albino mice were orally infected with 300 T. spiralis larvae. Drugs were tested against adult worms at day 0 and day 5 and against encysted larvae on day 15 and day 35 post-infection (PI). Mature worms and encysted larvae were counted in addition to histopathological examination of muscle specimens. Serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), total protein, albumin, globulin, urea, and creatinine values were estimated. Significant reductions in mean worm numbers were detected in ivermectin treated mice at day 0 and day 5 PI achieving efficacies of 98.5% and 80.0%, while efficacies of myrrh in treated mice were 80.7% and 51.5%, respectively. At days 15 and 35 post-infection, ivermectin induced significant reduction in encysted larval counts achieving efficacies of 76.5% and 54.0%, respectively, while myrrh efficacies were 76.6% and 35.0%, respectively. AST, ALT, urea, and creatinine levels were reduced, while total proteins were increased in response to both treatments compared to their values in the infected non-treated mice. Ivermectin use for controlling T. spiralis could be continued. Myrrh was effective and could be a promising drug against the Egyptian strains of T. spiralis with results nearly comparable to ivermectin. PMID:23864740

  18. VT-1161 Protects Immunosuppressed Mice from Rhizopus arrhizus var. arrhizus Infection.

    PubMed

    Gebremariam, Teclegiorgis; Wiederhold, Nathan P; Fothergill, Annette W; Garvey, Edward P; Hoekstra, William J; Schotzinger, Robert J; Patterson, Thomas F; Filler, Scott G; Ibrahim, Ashraf S

    2015-12-01

    We studied the efficacy of the investigational drug VT-1161 against mucormycosis. VT-1161 had more potent in vitro activity against Rhizopus arrhizus var. arrhizus than against R. arrhizus var. delemar. VT-1161 treatment demonstrated dose-dependent plasma drug levels with prolonged survival time and lowered tissue fungal burden in immunosuppressed mice infected with R. arrhizus var. arrhizus and was as effective as high-dose liposomal amphotericin B treatment. These results support further development of VT-1161 against mucormycosis. PMID:26369977

  19. Therapeutic Potential of Myrrh and Ivermectin against Experimental Trichinella spiralis Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    El-Sabaa, Abdel-Aleem A.

    2013-01-01

    Trichinosis is a parasitic zoonosis caused by the nematode Trichinella spiralis. Anthelmintics are used to eliminate intestinal adults as well as tissue-migrating and encysted larvae. This study aimed to investigate the effects of ivermectin and myrrh obtained from the aloe-gum resin of Commiphora molmol on experimental trichinosis. Ninety albino mice were orally infected with 300 T. spiralis larvae. Drugs were tested against adult worms at day 0 and day 5 and against encysted larvae on day 15 and day 35 post-infection (PI). Mature worms and encysted larvae were counted in addition to histopathological examination of muscle specimens. Serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), total protein, albumin, globulin, urea, and creatinine values were estimated. Significant reductions in mean worm numbers were detected in ivermectin treated mice at day 0 and day 5 PI achieving efficacies of 98.5% and 80.0%, while efficacies of myrrh in treated mice were 80.7% and 51.5%, respectively. At days 15 and 35 post-infection, ivermectin induced significant reduction in encysted larval counts achieving efficacies of 76.5% and 54.0%, respectively, while myrrh efficacies were 76.6% and 35.0%, respectively. AST, ALT, urea, and creatinine levels were reduced, while total proteins were increased in response to both treatments compared to their values in the infected non-treated mice. Ivermectin use for controlling T. spiralis could be continued. Myrrh was effective and could be a promising drug against the Egyptian strains of T. spiralis with results nearly comparable to ivermectin. PMID:23864740

  20. Lymph node colonization dynamics after oral Salmonella Typhimurium infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Patrick; Slack, Emma; Grant, Andrew J; Hardt, Wolf-Dietrich; Regoes, Roland R

    2013-09-01

    An understanding of how pathogens colonize their hosts is crucial for the rational design of vaccines or therapy. While the molecular factors facilitating the invasion and systemic infection by pathogens are a central focus of research in microbiology, the population biological aspects of colonization are still poorly understood. Here, we investigated the early colonization dynamics of Salmonella enterica subspecies 1 serovar Typhimurium (S. Tm) in the streptomycin mouse model for diarrhea. We focused on the first step on the way to systemic infection -- the colonization of the cecal lymph node (cLN) from the gut -- and studied roles of inflammation, dendritic cells and innate immune effectors in the colonization process. To this end, we inoculated mice with mixtures of seven wild type isogenic tagged strains (WITS) of S. Tm. The experimental data were analyzed with a newly developed mathematical model describing the stochastic immigration, replication and clearance of bacteria in the cLN. We estimated that in the beginning of infection only 300 bacterial cells arrive in the cLN per day. We further found that inflammation decreases the net replication rate in the cLN by 23%. In ccr7(-/-) mice, in which dendritic cell movement is impaired, the bacterial migration rate was reduced 10-fold. In contrast, cybb(-/-) mice that cannot generate toxic reactive oxygen species displayed a 4-fold higher migration rate from gut to cLN than wild type mice. Thus, combining infections with mixed inocula of barcoded strains and mathematical analysis represents a powerful method for disentangling immigration into the cLN from replication in this compartment. The estimated parameters provide an important baseline to assess and predict the efficacy of interventions.

  1. 2-deoxy-D-glucose-induced metabolic stress enhances resistance to Listeria monocytogenes infection in mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, E. S.; Bates, R. A.; Koebel, D. A.; Fuchs, B. B.; Sonnenfeld, G.

    1998-01-01

    Exposure to different forms of psychological and physiological stress can elicit a host stress response, which alters normal parameters of neuroendocrine homeostasis. The present study evaluated the influence of the metabolic stressor 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG; a glucose analog, which when administered to rodents, induces acute periods of metabolic stress) on the capacity of mice to resist infection with the facultative intracellular bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes. Female BDF1 mice were injected with 2-DG (500 mg/kg b. wt.) once every 48 h prior to, concurrent with, or after the onset of a sublethal dose of virulent L. monocytogenes. Kinetics of bacterial growth in mice were not altered if 2-DG was applied concurrently or after the start of the infection. In contrast, mice exposed to 2-DG prior to infection demonstrated an enhanced resistance to the listeria challenge. The enhanced bacterial clearance in vivo could not be explained by 2-DG exerting a toxic effect on the listeria, based on the results of two experiments. First, 2-DG did not inhibit listeria replication in trypticase soy broth. Second, replication of L. monocytogenes was not inhibited in bone marrow-derived macrophage cultures exposed to 2-DG. Production of neopterin and lysozyme, indicators of macrophage activation, were enhanced following exposure to 2-DG, which correlated with the increased resistance to L. monocytogenes. These results support the contention that the host response to 2-DG-induced metabolic stress can influence the capacity of the immune system to resist infection by certain classes of microbial pathogens.

  2. Effects of sulfur dioxide on resistance to bacterial infection in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Azoulay-Dupuis, E.; Bouley, G.; Blayo, M.C.

    1982-12-01

    Continuous exposure to approximately a 10-ppm concentration of sulfur dioxide for periods of up to 3 weeks reduced the resistance of female mice to infection by aerosol inoculation with Klebsiella pneumoniae. The mortality rate rose and survival time shortened in SO/sub 2/-exposed animals compared to controls. Insofar as these results can be extrapolated to humans, the SO/sub 2/ concentration used in this work is only found on certain industrial premises.

  3. Experimental therapeutic studies of Solanum aculeastrum Dunal. on Leishmania major infection in BALB/c mice

    PubMed Central

    Laban, Linet T; Anjili, Christopher O; Mutiso, Joshua M; Ingonga, Johnstone; Kiige, Samuel G; Ngedzo, Mgala M; Gicheru, Michael M

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): Solanum acueastrum Dunal. has been shown to have some chemotherapeutic value. Leaf and berry water and methanol compounds of S. acueastrum were evaluated for possible antileishmanial activity In vivo on BALB/c mice and in vitro against Leishmania major promastigotes, amastigotes and vero cells. Materials and Methods: Dry S. aculeastrum berry and leaf material were extracted in methanol and water. L. major parasites were exposed to different concentrations of S. aculeastrum fruit and leaf compounds and the IC50 on the promastigotes, percentage of infection rate of macrophages by amastigotes and the toxicological effect on vero cells were determined. BALB/c mice were infected subcutaneously with 1×106 promastigotes and kept for four weeks to allow for disease establishment. Infected mice were treated with fruit and leaf methanolic and water compounds, amphotericin B (AmB), and sterile phosphate buffered saline (PBS). Results: Fruit methanol compound was most effective in inhibiting the growth of promastigotes with IC5078.62 μg/ml. Fruit water compound showed the best activity in inhibiting infection of macrophages by amastigotes. Fruit methanol compound was more toxic at Ld50=8.06 mg/ml to vero cells than amphotericin B. Analysis of variance computation indicated statistically significant difference in lesion sizes between experimental and control mice groups (P=0.0001). Splenic impression smears ANOVA indicated a highly significant difference in parasitic numbers between the experimental and the control groups (P=0.0001). Conclusion: The results demonstrate that compounds from S. aculeastrum have potential anti-leishmanial activities and the medicinal use of the plant poses considerable toxicity against dividing vero cells. PMID:25810878

  4. Kinetics and pathogenicity of oral infection by equine herpesvirus-9 in mice and suckling hamsters.

    PubMed

    El-Nahass, E; El-Habashi, N; Abdelaziz, A A; Nayel, M; Kasem, S; Fukushi, H; Tuji, H; Hirata, A; Sakai, H; Yanai, T

    2012-01-01

    The pathogenesis and kinetics of oral infection by equine herpesvirus (EHV)-9 were studied in mice and hamsters. After oral inoculation of 10(5) plaque-forming units (PFU) of virus, 1-week-old suckling hamsters showed varying severity of neurological disease from 72 hours post inoculation (hpi) and all of these animals had died by 96 hpi. Four-week-old ICR mice inoculated orally with 4 × 10(4)PFU of virus showed no clinical signs, but they developed erosive and ulcerative gastritis from 36 hpi. Varying degrees of encephalitis were seen in infected mice and hamsters, and the hamsters also developed myelitis by 96 hpi. Immunohistochemistry performed on whole body sections of suckling hamsters revealed the kinetics of spread of the virus to the central nervous system. EHV-9 antigen was detected initially in macrophages of the oral and lingual submucosa. At 36 hpi virus antigen was detected in the nerve fibres and pseudounipolar neurons of the trigeminal ganglion and at 96 hpi antigen was present in the myenteric plexuses of the intestine. Virus antigen was also detected in the liver, lungs and heart of affected animals. EHV-9 DNA was detected by polymerase chain reaction in the brain, blood and spinal cord of suckling hamsters at 36, 48 and 96 hpi. These findings show that EHV-9 may spread via the trigeminal nerve when mice and hamsters are inoculated orally with virus.

  5. Convection-Enhanced Delivery of AAV2-PrPshRNA in Prion-Infected Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Misol; Bajsarowicz, Krystyna; Oehler, Abby; Lemus, Azucena; Bankiewicz, Krystof; DeArmond, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    Prion disease is caused by a single pathogenic protein (PrPSc), an abnormal conformer of the normal cellular prion protein PrPC. Depletion of PrPC in prion knockout mice makes them resistant to prion disease. Thus, gene silencing of the Prnp gene is a promising effective therapeutic approach. Here, we examined adeno-associated virus vector type 2 encoding a short hairpin RNA targeting Prnp mRNA (AAV2-PrP-shRNA) to suppress PrPC expression both in vitro and in vivo. AAV2-PrP-shRNA treatment suppressed PrP levels and prevented dendritic degeneration in RML-infected brain aggregate cultures. Infusion of AAV2-PrP-shRNA-eGFP into the thalamus of CD-1 mice showed that eGFP was transported to the cerebral cortex via anterograde transport and the overall PrPC levels were reduced by ∼70% within 4 weeks. For therapeutic purposes, we treated RML-infected CD-1 mice with AAV2-PrP-shRNA beginning at 50 days post inoculation. Although AAV2-PrP-shRNA focally suppressed PrPSc formation in the thalamic infusion site by ∼75%, it did not suppress PrPSc formation efficiently in other regions of the brain. Survival of mice was not extended compared to the untreated controls. Global suppression of PrPC in the brain is required for successful therapy of prion diseases. PMID:24866748

  6. Inhibition of infection-mediated preterm birth by administration of broad spectrum chemokine inhibitor in mice.

    PubMed

    Shynlova, Oksana; Dorogin, Anna; Li, Yunqing; Lye, Stephen

    2014-09-01

    Preterm birth (PTB) is the single most important cause of perinatal and infant mortality worldwide. Maternal infection can result in PTB. We investigated the ability of a Broad Spectrum Chemokine Inhibitor (BSCI) to prevent infection-induced PTB in mice. PTB was initiated in pregnant mice by intraperitoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 50 μg). Half the mice received BSCI (10 mg/kg) 24 hrs prior to and immediately before LPS administration. The impact of LPS alone or LPS plus BSCI was assessed on (i) injection-to-delivery interval, foetal survival rate, placental and neonates' weight; (ii) amniotic fluid and maternal plasma cytokine levels (by Luminex assay); foetal and maternal tissue cytokine gene expression levels (by Real-Time RT-PCR); (iii) immune cells infiltration into the uterine tissue (by stereological immunohistochemistry). Pre-treatment with BSCI (i) decreased LPS-induced PTB (64% versus 100%, P < 0.05); (ii) significantly attenuated cytokine/chemokine expression in maternal tissues (plasma, liver, myometrium, decidua); (iii) significantly decreased neutrophil infiltration in the mouse myometrium. BSCI-treated mice in which PTB was delayed till term had live foetuses with normal placental and foetal weight. BSCI represents a promising new class of therapeutics for PTB. In a mouse model of preterm labour, BCSI suppresses systemic inflammation in maternal tissues which resulted in the reduced incidence of LPS-mediated PTB. These data provide support for efforts to target inflammatory responses as a means of preventing PTB. PMID:24894878

  7. Theory of hantavirus infection spread incorporating localized adult and itinerant juvenile mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenkre, V. M.; Giuggioli, L.; Abramson, G.; Camelo-Neto, G.

    2007-02-01

    A generalized model of the spread of the Hantavirus in mice populations is presented on the basis of recent observational findings concerning the movement characteristics of the mice that carry the infection. The factual information behind the generalization is based on mark-recapture observations reported in Giuggioli et al. [Bull. Math. Biol. 67, 1135 (2005)] that have necessitated the introduction of home ranges in the simple model of Hantavirus spread presented by Abramson and Kenkre [Phys. Rev. E 66, 11912 (2002)]. The essential feature of the model presented here is the existence of adult mice that remain largely confined to locations near their home ranges, and itinerant juvenile mice that are not so confined, and, during their search for their own homes, move and infect both other juveniles and adults that they meet during their movement. The model is presented at three levels of description: mean field, kinetic and configuration. Results of calculations are shown explicitly from the mean field equations and the simulation rules, and are found to agree in some respects and to differ in others. The origin of the differences is shown to lie in spatial correlations. It is indicated how mark-recapture observations in the field may be employed to verify the applicability of the theory.

  8. Saccharomyces cerevisiae expressing Gp43 protects mice against Paracoccidioides brasiliensis infection.

    PubMed

    Assis-Marques, Mariana Aprigio; Oliveira, Aline Ferreira; Ruas, Luciana Pereira; dos Reis, Thaila Fernanda; Roque-Barreira, Maria Cristina; Coelho, Paulo Sergio Rodrigues

    2015-01-01

    The dimorphic fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis is the etiological agent of paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM). It is believed that approximately 10 million people are infected with the fungus and approximately 2% will eventually develop the disease. Unlike viral and bacterial diseases, fungal diseases are the ones against which there is no commercially available vaccine. Saccharomyces cerevisiae may be a suitable vehicle for immunization against fungal infections, as they require the stimulation of different arms of the immune response. Here we evaluated the efficacy of immunizing mice against PCM by using S. cerevisiae yeast expressing gp43. When challenged by inoculation of P. brasiliensis yeasts, immunized animals showed a protective profile in three different assays. Their lung parenchyma was significantly preserved, exhibiting fewer granulomas with fewer fungal cells than found in non-immunized mice. Fungal burden was reduced in the lung and spleen of immunized mice, and both organs contained higher levels of IL-12 and IFN-γ compared to those of non-vaccinated mice, a finding that suggests the occurrence of Th1 immunity. Taken together, our results indicate that the recombinant yeast vaccine represents a new strategy to confer protection against PCM.

  9. Induction of ulcerative colitis in mice influences the course of infection with the nematode Trichuris muris.

    PubMed

    Vegas-Sánchez, M C; Rollán-Landeras, E; García-Rodríguez, J J; Bolás-Fernández, F

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of infection with the nematode whipworm Trichuris muris on the course of chemically induced acute ulcerative colitis in CBA/J mice, a strain proven to be highly resistant to infection with T. muris. Each mouse was infected with 50 embryonated eggs of T. muris by oral gavage. Acute colitis was triggered by administering 4% dextran sulphate sodium (DSS) in the drinking water for nine consecutive days at different times after infection. Concurrent infection and DSS administration exacerbate the severity of the colitis while favouring the permanence of parasites in the intestine. The induction of ulcerative colitis from days 54 to 62 post-infection (p.i.), when all worms had been expelled, ameliorated the course of the inflammatory disease. When ulcerative colitis was triggered earlier on, from days 27 to 35 p.i., the beneficial effects on inflammatory events were clearly shown with signs of mucosal epithelization and regeneration as early as day 1 after DSS administration. Previous infections by T. muris therefore accelerate recovery from subsequently induced inflammatory bowel disease and such an effect assists the nematode to persist in the intestinal niche.

  10. CCR5 plays a critical role in the development of myocarditis and host protection in mice infected with Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Machado, Fabiana S; Koyama, Natalia S; Carregaro, Vanessa; Ferreira, Beatriz R; Milanezi, Cristiane M; Teixeira, Mauro M; Rossi, Marcos A; Silva, João S

    2005-02-15

    The pathogenesis of myocarditis during Trypanosoma cruzi infection is poorly understood. We investigated the role played by chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) in the influx of T cells to the cardiac tissue of T. cruzi-infected mice. mRNA and protein for the CCR5 ligands CCL3, CCL4, and CCL5 were detected in the hearts of infected mice in association with CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. There was a high level of CCR5 expression on CD8+ T cells in the hearts of infected mice. Moreover, CCR5 expression on CD8+ T cells was positively modulated by T. cruzi infection. CCR5-deficient mice infected with T. cruzi experienced a dramatically inhibited migration of T cells to the heart and were also more susceptible to infection. These results suggest that CCR5 and its ligands play a central role in the control of T cell influx in T. cruzi-infected mice. Knowledge of the mechanisms that trigger and control the migration of cells to the heart in patients with Chagas disease may help in the design of drugs that prevent myocarditis and protect against the development of severe disease.

  11. Moderate physical exercise reduces parasitaemia and protects colonic myenteric neurons in mice infected with Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, Neide M; Santos, Franciele d N; Toledo, Max Jean d O; Moraes, Solange M F d; Araujo, Eduardo J d A; Sant'Ana, Debora d M G; Araujo, Silvana M d

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of moderate physical exercise on the myenteric neurons in the colonic intestinal wall of mice that had been infected with Trypanosoma cruzi. Parasitology and immunological aspects of the mice were considered. Forty-day-old male Swiss mice were divided into four groups: Trained Infected (TI), Sedentary Infected (SI), Trained Control (TC), and Sedentary Control (SC). The TC and TI were subjected to a moderate physical exercise program on a treadmill for 8 weeks. Three days after finishing exercise, the TI and SI groups were inoculated with 1,300 blood trypomastigotes of the Y strain-T. cruzi. After 75 days of infection results were obtained. Kruskal-Wallis or Analyze of variance (Tukey post hoc test) at 5% level of significance was performed. Moderate physical exercise reduced both the parasite peak (day 8 of infection) and total parasitemia compared with the sedentary groups (P < 0.05). This activity also contributed to neuronal survival (P < 0.05). Exercise caused neuronal hypertrophy (P < 0.05) and an increase in the total thickness of the intestinal wall (P < 0.05). The TI group exhibited an increase in the number of intraepithelial lymphocytes (P > 0.05). In trained animals, the number of goblet cells was reduced compared with sedentary animals (P < 0.05). Physical exercise prevented the formation of inflammatory foci in the TI group (P < 0.05) and increased the synthesis of TNF-α (P < 0.05) and TGF-β (P > 0.05). The present results demonstrated the benefits of moderate physical exercise, and reaffirmed the possibility of that it may contribute to improving clinical treatment in Chagas' disease patients. PMID:24205797

  12. Partial Protection against Brucella Infection in Mice by Immunization with Nonpathogenic Alphaproteobacteria▿

    PubMed Central

    Delpino, M. Victoria; Estein, Silvia M.; Fossati, Carlos A.; Baldi, Pablo C.

    2007-01-01

    Previous findings indicate that Brucella antigens and those from nonpathogenic alphaproteobacteria (NPAP) are cross-recognized by the immune system. We hypothesized that immunization with NPAP would protect mice from Brucella infection. Mice were immunized subcutaneously with heat-killed Ochrobactrum anthropi, Sinorhizobium meliloti, Mesorhizobium loti, Agrobacterium tumefaciens, or Brucella melitensis H38 (standard positive control) before intravenous challenge with Brucella abortus 2308. Cross-reacting serum antibodies against Brucella antigens were detected at the moment of challenge in all NPAP-immunized mice. Thirty days after B. abortus challenge, splenic CFU counts were significantly lower in mice immunized with O. anthropi, M. loti, and B. melitensis H38 than in the phosphate-buffered saline controls (protection levels were 0.80, 0.66, and 1.99 log units, respectively). In mice immunized intraperitoneally with cytosoluble extracts from NPAP or Brucella abortus, protection levels were 1.58 for the latter, 0.63 for O. anthropi, and 0.40 for M. loti. To test whether the use of live NPAP would increase protection further, mice were both immunized and challenged by the oral route. Immunization with NPAP induced a significant increase in serum immunoglobulin G (IgG), but not serum or fecal IgA, against Brucella antigens. After challenge, anti-Brucella IgA increased significantly in the sera and feces of mice orally immunized with O. anthropi. For all NPAP, protection levels were higher than those obtained with systemic immunizations but were lower than those obtained by oral immunization with heat-killed B. abortus. These results show that immunization with NPAP, especially O. anthropi, confers partial protection against Brucella challenge. However, such protection is lower than that conferred by immunization with whole Brucella or its cytosoluble fraction. PMID:17715332

  13. Effect of dietary supplementation with white button mushrooms on host resistance to influenza infection and immune function in mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previously we showed that mice fed white button mushrooms (WBM) had enhanced immune functions known to help the body’s antiviral defense. In this study, we tested if WBM could afford protection against viral infection. Young (4-mo) and old (22-mo) C57BL/6 mice were fed a diet containing 0, 2 per cen...

  14. Regulatory T cells inhibit T cell proliferation and decrease demyelination in mice chronically infected with a coronavirus1

    PubMed Central

    Trandem, Kathryn; Anghelina, Daniela; Zhao, Jingxian; Perlman, Stanley

    2010-01-01

    Mice infected with the neurotropic JHM strain of mouse hepatitis virus (JHMV) develop acute and chronic demyelinating diseases with histopathological similarities to MS. The process of demyelination is largely immune-mediated, as immunodeficient mice (RAG1−/− mice) do not develop demyelination upon infection; however, demyelination develops if these mice are reconstituted with either JHMV-immune CD4 or CD8 T cells. Since myelin destruction is a consequence of the inflammatory response associated with virus clearance, we reasoned that decreasing the amount of inflammation would diminish clinical disease and demyelination. Given that regulatory T cells (Tregs) have potent anti-inflammatory effects, we adoptively transferred Tregs into infected C57BL/6 and RAG1−/− mice. In both instances, transfer of Tregs decreased weight loss, clinical scores and demyelination. Transferred Tregs were not detected in the CNS of infected RAG1−/− mice, but rather appeared to mediate their effects in the draining cervical lymph nodes. We show that Tregs dampen the inflammatory response mediated by transferred JHMV-immune splenocytes in infected RAG1−/− mice by decreasing T cell proliferation, dendritic cell activation and pro-inflammatory cytokine/chemokine production, without inducing apoptosis. By extension, decreasing inflammation, whether by Treg transfer or by otherwise enhancing the anti-inflammatory milieu, could contribute to improved clinical outcomes in patients with virus-induced demyelination. PMID:20208000

  15. Polymeric inhibitor of influenza virus attachment protects mice from experimental influenza infection.

    PubMed

    Gambaryan, A S; Tuzikov, A B; Chinarev, A A; Juneja, L R; Bovin, N V; Matrosovich, M N

    2002-07-01

    Synthetic sialic acid-containing macromolecules inhibit influenza virus attachment to target cells and suppress the virus-mediated hemagglutination and neutralize virus infectivity in cell culture. To test the protective effects of attachment inhibitors in vivo, mice were infected with mouse-adapted influenza virus A/Aichi/2/68 (H3N2) and treated with synthetic polyacrylamide-based sialylglycopolymer PAA-YDS bearing moieties of (Neu5Acalpha2-6Galbeta1-4GlcNAcbeta1-2Manalpha1)2-3,6Manbeta1-4GlcNAcbeta1-4GlcNAc. Single intranasal inoculations with PAA-YDS 30 min before or 10 min after infection increased the survival of mice (P<0.01). Multiple treatments with aerosolized PAA-YDS on days 2-5 post infection also increased survival (P<0.01), alleviated disease symptoms, and decreased lesions in the mouse lungs. These data suggest that synthetic polyvalent inhibitors of virus attachment can be used for prevention and treatment of influenza.

  16. Oral administration of Bifidobacterium longum ameliorates influenza virus infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Iwabuchi, Noriyuki; Xiao, Jin-Zhong; Yaeshima, Tomoko; Iwatsuki, Keiji

    2011-01-01

    We investigated whether the oral administration of Bifidobacterium longum BB536 could ameliorate influenza virus (IFV) infection in a mice model. Mice were orally administrated BB536 or saline for 2 weeks and then infected with IFV. Orally administered BB536 significantly alleviated symptoms, reduced the loss of body weight, and inhibited viral proliferation in the lungs relative to the control group findings. Histopathological findings in the lungs were improved in the BB536 group compared to control group findings. There was no significant difference in the levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6), interferon-γ (IFN-γ), IL-10 and IL-12p40 in the lungs between the groups, but the levels of IL-6 and IFN-γ were lower (p=0.076, 0.103, respectively) in the BB536 group compared with those of control group. The levels of IL-6 and IL-10 correlated significantly with the values of weight loss, and the levels of IFN-γ correlated with the virus titers in the lungs. These results suggested the potential of the oral administration of BB536 in ameliorating IFV infection and the possible involvement of anti-inflammatory effects of BB536 in the anti-infection effects against IFV.

  17. In vivo optical imaging of bacterial infection and antibiotic response in intact nude mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Tao; Chen, Yanping; Chu, Jun; Zhang, Zhihong; Liu, Bifeng; Luo, Qingming

    2005-03-01

    We describe imaging the luminance of red fluorescent protein (DsRed2)-expressing bacteria from outside intact infected animals. This simple, nonintrusive technique can show in great detail the temporal behavior of the infectious process. Fluorescence stereo microscope, laser and cooled CCD are expensive to many institutes, we set up an inexpensive compact whole-body fluorescent imaging tool, which consisted of a digital camera, fluorescence filters and a mercury 50-W lamp power supply as excitation light source. The bacteria, expressing the DsRed2, are sufficiently bright as to be clearly visible from outside the infected animal and recorded with simple equipment. Introduced bacteria were observed in the abdomen. Instantaneous real-time images of the infectious process were acquired by using a digital camera by simply illuminating nude mice with mercury lamp. The development of infection over 48 hours and its regression after kanamycin treatment were visualized by whole-body imaging. The DsRed2 was excited directly by mercury lamp with EF500/50 nm band-pass filter and fluorescence was recorded by digital camera with CB580 nm long-pass filter. By this easy operation tool, the authors imaged, in real time, fluorescent tumors growing in live mice. The imaging system is external and noninvasive. For one year our experiments suggested the imaging scheme was feasible, which affords a powerful approach to visualizing the infection process.

  18. Tolerance to staphylococcal enterotoxin B initiated Th1 cell differentiation in mice infected with Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Romani, L; Puccetti, P; Mencacci, A; Spaccapelo, R; Cenci, E; Tonnetti, L; Bistoni, F

    1994-01-01

    Staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) is a bacterial superantigen that specifically activates T cells bearing V beta 8 T-cell receptor domains, which eventually leads to a long-lasting state of clonal anergy accompanied by selective cell death in the targeted CD4+ subset. Because the superantigen is known to promote Th1 cell differentiation in vitro, we have investigated the effect of SEB treatment on the course of Th2-associated progressive disease in mice infected systemically with Candida albicans. On the basis of the kinetics of SEB-induced changes in CD4+ cells and production in sera of interleukin 4 (IL-4), IL-10, and gamma interferon, we obtained evidence that V beta 8+ cell anergy concomitant with infection abolished the early IL-4/IL-10 response of the host to the yeast, ultimately leading to a state of resistance characterized by gamma interferon secretion in vitro by antigen-specific CD4+ cells. In contrast, SEB administered near the time of challenge resulted in accelerated mortality. Significant resistance to infection was also afforded by exposure of mice to a retrovirally encoded endogenous superantigen. These data suggest that CD4+ V beta 8+ T cells play an important role in vivo in the initiation of a Th2 response to C. albicans and that suppression of their activity may alter the qualitative development of the T-cell response and the outcome of infection. PMID:7914883

  19. Zika Virus Infection during Pregnancy in Mice Causes Placental Damage and Fetal Demise.

    PubMed

    Miner, Jonathan J; Cao, Bin; Govero, Jennifer; Smith, Amber M; Fernandez, Estefania; Cabrera, Omar H; Garber, Charise; Noll, Michelle; Klein, Robyn S; Noguchi, Kevin K; Mysorekar, Indira U; Diamond, Michael S

    2016-05-19

    Zika virus (ZIKV) infection in pregnant women causes intrauterine growth restriction, spontaneous abortion, and microcephaly. Here, we describe two mouse models of placental and fetal disease associated with in utero transmission of ZIKV. Female mice lacking type I interferon signaling (Ifnar1(-/-)) crossed to wild-type (WT) males produced heterozygous fetuses resembling the immune status of human fetuses. Maternal inoculation at embryonic day 6.5 (E6.5) or E7.5 resulted in fetal demise that was associated with ZIKV infection of the placenta and fetal brain. We identified ZIKV within trophoblasts of the maternal and fetal placenta, consistent with a trans-placental infection route. Antibody blockade of Ifnar1 signaling in WT pregnant mice enhanced ZIKV trans-placental infection although it did not result in fetal death. These models will facilitate the study of ZIKV pathogenesis, in utero transmission, and testing of therapies and vaccines to prevent congenital malformations. PMID:27180225

  20. Probucol-Induced α-Tocopherol Deficiency Protects Mice against Malaria Infection.

    PubMed

    Herbas, Maria Shirely; Shichiri, Mototada; Ishida, Noriko; Kume, Aiko; Hagihara, Yoshihisa; Yoshida, Yasukazu; Suzuki, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of malaria pathogens having resistance against antimalarials implies the necessity for the development of new drugs. Recently, we have demonstrated a resistance against malaria infection of α-tocopherol transfer protein knockout mice showing undetectable plasma levels of α-tocopherol, a lipid-soluble antioxidant. However, dietary restriction induced α-tocopherol deficiency is difficult to be applied as a clinical antimalarial therapy. Here, we report on a new strategy to potentially treat malaria by using probucol, a drug that can reduce the plasma α-tocopherol concentration. Probucol pre-treatment for 2 weeks and treatment throughout the infection rescued from death of mice infected with Plasmodium yoelii XL-17 or P. berghei ANKA. In addition, survival was extended when the treatment started immediately after parasite inoculation. The ratio of lipid peroxidation products to parent lipids increased in plasma after 2 weeks treatment of probucol. This indicates that the protective effect of probucol might be mediated by the oxidative stressful environment induced by α-tocopherol deficiency. Probucol in combination with dihydroartemisin suppressed the proliferation of P. yoelii XL-17. These results indicated that probucol might be a candidate for a drug against malaria infection by inducing α-tocopherol deficiency without dietary α-tocopherol restriction. PMID:26296197

  1. Specific Humoral Immune Response Induced by Propionibacterium acnes Can Prevent Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Feng; Ma, Qiuyue; Huang, Jing; Ji, Qun; Zhai, Ruidong; Wang, Lei; Wang, Yu; Li, Linxi; Sun, Changjiang; Feng, Xin; Han, Wenyu

    2014-01-01

    Porcine contagious pleuropneumonia, caused by Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, has a major impact on economics, ecology, and animal welfare in the pig-rearing industry. Propionibacterium acnes, a facultative anaerobic Gram-positive corynebacterium, exists widely in normal healthy adult animals. We have shown previously that P. acnes can prevent A. pleuropneumoniae infections in mice and pigs. To elucidate the mechanism of this effect and to identify novel A. pleuropneumoniae vaccines, the role of anti-P. acnes antibodies in preventing infection was analyzed by indirect immunofluorescence and opsonophagocytosis assays in vitro. The role of the specific humoral immune response induced by P. acnes was confirmed in a B cell depletion mouse model. The survival rates of mice challenged with A. pleuropneumoniae exhibited a highly significant positive rank correlation with the levels of anti-P. acnes antibodies. The specific antibodies induced by P. acnes had the ability to combine with A. pleuropneumoniae and increase opsonization of A. pleuropneumoniae for phagocytosis. Furthermore, analysis in the murine B cell depletion model confirmed that the humoral immune response induced by P. acnes played an important role in resistance to A. pleuropneumoniae infection. In this study, we further elucidated the reasons that P. acnes can prevent A. pleuropneumoniae infection, which provides useful evidence for the development of heterologous vaccines for the control of porcine contagious pleuropneumonia. PMID:24429068

  2. Probucol-Induced α-Tocopherol Deficiency Protects Mice against Malaria Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ishida, Noriko; Kume, Aiko; Hagihara, Yoshihisa; Yoshida, Yasukazu; Suzuki, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of malaria pathogens having resistance against antimalarials implies the necessity for the development of new drugs. Recently, we have demonstrated a resistance against malaria infection of α-tocopherol transfer protein knockout mice showing undetectable plasma levels of α-tocopherol, a lipid-soluble antioxidant. However, dietary restriction induced α-tocopherol deficiency is difficult to be applied as a clinical antimalarial therapy. Here, we report on a new strategy to potentially treat malaria by using probucol, a drug that can reduce the plasma α-tocopherol concentration. Probucol pre-treatment for 2 weeks and treatment throughout the infection rescued from death of mice infected with Plasmodium yoelii XL-17 or P. berghei ANKA. In addition, survival was extended when the treatment started immediately after parasite inoculation. The ratio of lipid peroxidation products to parent lipids increased in plasma after 2 weeks treatment of probucol. This indicates that the protective effect of probucol might be mediated by the oxidative stressful environment induced by α-tocopherol deficiency. Probucol in combination with dihydroartemisin suppressed the proliferation of P. yoelii XL-17. These results indicated that probucol might be a candidate for a drug against malaria infection by inducing α-tocopherol deficiency without dietary α-tocopherol restriction. PMID:26296197

  3. Increased susceptibility to lethal Candida infections in burned mice preinfected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa or pretreated with proteolytic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Neely, A N; Law, E J; Holder, I A

    1986-04-01

    Lethal Candida infections in burn patients are frequently preceded by or occur concomitantly with bacterial infections, which are often due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In this study, we developed a burned, mixed-challenge mouse model, which was designed to determine whether and how a recent bacterial infection could influence the development of subsequent candidosis. In this model, burned mice that were preinfected with a sublethal challenge of elastase-producing P. aeruginosa strain WR-5 and then sublethally challenged with Candida albicans exhibited a mortality rate of 60%, while unburned mice challenged in the same way and burned mice that received only one challenge organism exhibited mortality rates of less than 10%. Quantitative microbial counts performed with the kidneys, livers, and eschars of burned mice challenged with both organisms indicated that the deaths were due to Candida infection. Substitution of an elastase-negative P. aeruginosa strain for strain WR-5 in the model resulted in significantly lower mortality rates and lower microbial numbers in the organs. When the Pseudomonas enzyme elastase was substituted for the elastase-positive bacteria in the model, both the mortality rates and the organ counts were comparable to the values found after preinfection with strain WR-5. Another protease, thermolysin, was substituted for the elastase and produced similar mortality results. When the protease inhibitor alpha 2-macroglobulin was given to burned mice infected with the two organisms, it prevented the deaths due to Candida infection. We concluded that this model is one way to study bacterial-fungal infections in burned mice, that recent Pseudomonas infections could predispose burned mice to fatal candidosis, and that the proteolytic activity generated by the bacteria was primarily responsible for the establishment of lethal fungal infections.

  4. Pregnancy reduces the genetic resistance of C57BL/6 mice to Listeria monocytogenes infection by intragastric inoculation

    PubMed Central

    Poulsen, Keith P.; Faith, Nancy G.; Steinberg, Howard; Czuprynski, Charles J.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we compared genetically resistant C57BL/6 and susceptible A/J mice for their resistance to L. monocytogenes infection model during pregnancy. Intragastric infection with modest numbers of bacterial cells (105 CFU) caused reproducible fetal infection and abortion in both mouse strains. Bioluminescence imaging demonstrated dissemination of L. monocytogenes cells from maternal to fetal organs within 3 days of intragastric infection. Although non-pregnant C57BL/6 mice were significantly more resistant to infection than non-pregnant A/J mice, C57BL/6 and A/J mice had similar microbial loads (CFU) in maternal and fetal tissues during pregnancy. Inflammation and necrosis, however, were more severe in A/J mice as evaluated by semi-quantitative histopathology. Although the microbial load in fetal tissues was similar for all fetuses within a single uterus, inflammation and necrosis varied among individual fetuses and placentas. We also noted that the uterus is a target for L. monocytogenes infection in non-pregnant mice. PMID:21320586

  5. Establishment of a murine model of cerebral malaria in KunMing mice infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yan; Xu, Wenyue; Zhou, Taoli; Liu, Taiping; Zheng, Hong; Fu, Yong

    2016-10-01

    Malaria remains one of the most devastating diseases. Cerebral malaria (CM) is a severe complication of Plasmodium falciparum infection resulting in high mortality and morbidity worldwide. Analysis of precise mechanisms of CM in humans is difficult for ethical reasons and animal models of CM have been employed to study malaria pathogenesis. Here, we describe a new experimental cerebral malaria (ECM) model with Plasmodium berghei ANKA infection in KunMing (KM) mice. KM mice developed ECM after blood-stage or sporozoites infection, and the development of ECM in KM mice has a dose-dependent relationship with sporozoites inoculums. Histopathological findings revealed important features associated with ECM, including accumulation of mononuclear cells and red blood cells in brain microvascular, and brain parenchymal haemorrhages. Blood-brain barrier (BBB) examination showed that BBB disruption was present in infected KM mice when displaying clinical signs of CM. In vivo bioluminescent imaging experiment indicated that parasitized red blood cells accumulated in most vital organs including heart, lung, spleen, kidney, liver and brain. The levels of inflammatory cytokines interferon-gamma, tumour necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin (IL)-17, IL-12, IL-6 and IL-10 were all remarkably increased in KM mice infected with P. berghei ANKA. This study indicates that P. berghei ANKA infection in KM mice can be used as ECM model to extend further research on genetic, pharmacological and vaccine studies of CM. PMID:27574013

  6. Variable maturation and oviposition by female Schistosoma japonicum in mice: the effects of irradiation of the host prior to infection

    SciTech Connect

    Cheever, A.W.; Duvall, R.H.

    1987-11-01

    The maturation of female Schistosoma japonicum was found to vary greatly within each of two Philippine strains of this parasite and some females did not contain uterine eggs 7 to 15 weeks after infection while others contained numerous eggs before the fifth week of infection. It was found that female worms containing less than 20 uterine eggs contributed little to the accumulation of eggs in the tissues of infected mice. Such worms also generally appeared to be immature. The variable rate of maturation of worms is likely to have profound effects on the immune reactions of mice as well as on the pathologic response to infection. Systematic delay in oviposition was serendipitously found in worms from mice which had been irradiated for other purposes prior to exposure to S. japonicum, and from the fourth to the sixth week after infection egg production by worms in irradiated mice lagged well behind that in intact mice. Seven to 10 weeks after infection these worms were laying normal numbers of eggs, as judged by egg passage per worm pair in the feces and the accumulation of eggs in the tissues. S. mansoni developed normally in irradiated mice.

  7. Protective effect of recombinant murine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor against Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in leukocytopenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, T.; Okamura, S.; Okada, K.; Suga, A.; Shimono, N.; Ohhara, N.; Hirota, Y.; Sawae, Y.; Niho, Y.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of recombinant murine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rmGM-CSF) against Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in ICR mice were investigated. Mice were treated with cyclophosphamide (CPA) and were then injected intraperitoneally with rmGM-CSF three times daily, beginning on the day after CPA treatment, for 7 days. The number of peripheral blood leukocytes in both CPA- and rmGM-CSF-treated mice and control CPA-treated mice reached a nadir on day 4, when P. aeruginosa was injected intraperitoneally. The administration of rmGM-CSF significantly increased the proportion of survivors among mice infected with a lethal dose of P. aeruginosa. This effect was further analyzed by monitoring sequential changes in leukocyte count and bacterial growth in various organs. The number of bacteria in the peritoneal cavities, peripheral blood samples, and livers of GM-CSF-treated mice decreased to an undetectable level after a transient increase, and the number was significantly lower than that in control mice. In GM-CSF-treated mice, the neutrophil levels in peripheral blood started to increase 5 days after CPA administration and were consistently higher than those in controls. Furthermore, the neutrophils in GM-CSF-treated mice were more mature morphologically. Thus, the prophylactic effect of rmGM-CSF against P. aeruginosa infection may result from a rapid recovery of myelopoiesis and a partial enhancement of mature neutrophil function. PMID:2656523

  8. Dual role for Fcγ receptors in host defense and disease in Borrelia burgdorferi-infected mice

    PubMed Central

    Belperron, Alexia A.; Liu, Nengyin; Booth, Carmen J.; Bockenstedt, Linda K.

    2014-01-01

    Arthritis in mice infected with the Lyme disease spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi, results from the influx of innate immune cells responding to the pathogen in the joint and is influenced in part by mouse genetics. Production of inflammatory cytokines by innate immune cells in vitro is largely mediated by Toll-like receptor (TLR) interaction with Borrelia lipoproteins, yet surprisingly mice deficient in TLR2 or the TLR signaling molecule MyD88 still develop arthritis comparable to that seen in wild type mice after B. burgdorferi infection. These findings suggest that other, MyD88-independent inflammatory pathways can contribute to arthritis expression. Clearance of B. burgdorferi is dependent on the production of specific antibody and phagocytosis of the organism. As Fc receptors (FcγR) are important for IgG-mediated clearance of immune complexes and opsonized particles by phagocytes, we examined the role that FcγR play in host defense and disease in B. burgdorferi-infected mice. B. burgdorferi-infected mice deficient in the Fc receptor common gamma chain (FcεRγ−/− mice) harbored ~10 fold more spirochetes than similarly infected wild type mice, and this was associated with a transient increase in arthritis severity. While the elevated pathogen burdens seen in B. burgdorferi-infected MyD88−/− mice were not affected by concomitant deficiency in FcγR, arthritis was reduced in FcεRγ−/−MyD88−/− mice in comparison to wild type or single knockout mice. Gene expression analysis from infected joints demonstrated that absence of both MyD88 and FcγR lowers mRNA levels of proteins involved in inflammation, including Cxcl1 (KC), Xcr1 (Gpr5), IL-1beta, and C reactive protein. Taken together, our results demonstrate a role for FcγR-mediated immunity in limiting pathogen burden and arthritis in mice during the acute phase of B. burgdorferi infection, and further suggest that this pathway contributes to the arthritis that develops in B. burgdorferi-infected

  9. Toxoplasma gondii Infection in Mice Impairs Long-Term Fear Memory Consolidation through Dysfunction of the Cortex and Amygdala.

    PubMed

    Ihara, Fumiaki; Nishimura, Maki; Muroi, Yoshikage; Mahmoud, Motamed Elsayed; Yokoyama, Naoaki; Nagamune, Kisaburo; Nishikawa, Yoshifumi

    2016-10-01

    Chronic infection with Toxoplasma gondii becomes established in tissues of the central nervous system, where parasites may directly or indirectly modulate neuronal function. Epidemiological studies have revealed that chronic infection in humans is a risk factor for developing mental diseases. However, the mechanisms underlying parasite-induced neuronal dysfunction in the brain remain unclear. Here, we examined memory associated with conditioned fear in mice and found that T. gondii infection impairs consolidation of conditioned fear memory. To examine the brain pathology induced by T. gondii infection, we analyzed the parasite load and histopathological changes. T. gondii infects all brain areas, yet the cortex exhibits more severe tissue damage than other regions. We measured neurotransmitter levels in the cortex and amygdala because these regions are involved in fear memory expression. The levels of dopamine metabolites but not those of dopamine were increased in the cortex of infected mice compared with those in the cortex of uninfected mice. In contrast, serotonin levels were decreased in the amygdala and norepinephrine levels were decreased in the cortex and amygdala of infected mice. The levels of cortical dopamine metabolites were associated with the time spent freezing in the fear-conditioning test. These results suggest that T. gondii infection affects fear memory through dysfunction of the cortex and amygdala. Our findings provide insight into the mechanisms underlying the neurological changes seen during T. gondii infection. PMID:27456832

  10. Toxoplasma gondii Infection in Mice Impairs Long-Term Fear Memory Consolidation through Dysfunction of the Cortex and Amygdala.

    PubMed

    Ihara, Fumiaki; Nishimura, Maki; Muroi, Yoshikage; Mahmoud, Motamed Elsayed; Yokoyama, Naoaki; Nagamune, Kisaburo; Nishikawa, Yoshifumi

    2016-10-01

    Chronic infection with Toxoplasma gondii becomes established in tissues of the central nervous system, where parasites may directly or indirectly modulate neuronal function. Epidemiological studies have revealed that chronic infection in humans is a risk factor for developing mental diseases. However, the mechanisms underlying parasite-induced neuronal dysfunction in the brain remain unclear. Here, we examined memory associated with conditioned fear in mice and found that T. gondii infection impairs consolidation of conditioned fear memory. To examine the brain pathology induced by T. gondii infection, we analyzed the parasite load and histopathological changes. T. gondii infects all brain areas, yet the cortex exhibits more severe tissue damage than other regions. We measured neurotransmitter levels in the cortex and amygdala because these regions are involved in fear memory expression. The levels of dopamine metabolites but not those of dopamine were increased in the cortex of infected mice compared with those in the cortex of uninfected mice. In contrast, serotonin levels were decreased in the amygdala and norepinephrine levels were decreased in the cortex and amygdala of infected mice. The levels of cortical dopamine metabolites were associated with the time spent freezing in the fear-conditioning test. These results suggest that T. gondii infection affects fear memory through dysfunction of the cortex and amygdala. Our findings provide insight into the mechanisms underlying the neurological changes seen during T. gondii infection.

  11. Kallistatin Modulates Immune Cells and Confers Anti-Inflammatory Response To Protect Mice from Group A Streptococcal Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Shiou-Ling; Tsai, Chiau-Yuang; Luo, Yueh-Hsia; Kuo, Chih-Feng; Lin, Wei-Chieh; Chang, Yu-Tzu; Wu, Jiunn-Jong; Chuang, Woei-Jer; Liu, Ching-Chuan; Chao, Lee; Chao, Julie

    2013-01-01

    Group A streptococcus (GAS) infection may cause severe life-threatening diseases, including necrotizing fasciitis and streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. Despite the availability of effective antimicrobial agents, there has been a worldwide increase in the incidence of invasive GAS infection. Kallistatin (KS), originally found to be a tissue kallikrein-binding protein, has recently been shown to possess anti-inflammatory properties. However, its efficacy in microbial infection has not been explored. In this study, we transiently expressed the human KS gene by hydrodynamic injection and investigated its anti-inflammatory and protective effects in mice via air pouch inoculation of GAS. The results showed that KS significantly increased the survival rate of GAS-infected mice. KS treatment reduced local skin damage and bacterial counts compared with those in mice infected with GAS and treated with a control plasmid or saline. While there was a decrease in immune cell infiltration of the local infection site, cell viability and antimicrobial factors such as reactive oxygen species actually increased after KS treatment. The efficiency of intracellular bacterial killing in neutrophils was directly enhanced by KS administration. Several inflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin 1β, and interleukin 6, in local infection sites were reduced by KS. In addition, KS treatment reduced vessel leakage, bacteremia, and liver damage after local infection. Therefore, our study demonstrates that KS provides protection in GAS-infected mice by enhancing bacterial clearance, as well as reducing inflammatory responses and organ damage. PMID:23959316

  12. A Coccidioides posadasii CPS1 Deletion Mutant Is Avirulent and Protects Mice from Lethal Infection.

    PubMed

    Narra, Hema P; Shubitz, Lisa F; Mandel, M Alejandra; Trinh, Hien T; Griffin, Kurt; Buntzman, Adam S; Frelinger, Jeffrey A; Galgiani, John N; Orbach, Marc J

    2016-10-01

    The CPS1 gene was identified as a virulence factor in the maize pathogen Cochliobolus heterostrophus Hypothesizing that the homologous gene in Coccidioides posadasii could be important for virulence, we created a Δcps1 deletion mutant which was unable to cause disease in three strains of mice (C57BL/6, BALB/c, or the severely immunodeficient NOD-scid,γc(null) [NSG]). Only a single colony was recovered from 1 of 60 C57BL/6 mice following intranasal infections of up to 4,400 spores. Following administration of very high doses (10,000 to 2.5 × 10(7) spores) to NSG and BALB/c mice, spherules were observed in lung sections at time points from day 3 to day 10 postinfection, but nearly all appeared degraded with infrequent endosporulation. Although the role of CPS1 in virulence is not understood, phenotypic alterations and transcription differences of at least 33 genes in the Δcps1 strain versus C. posadasii is consistent with both metabolic and regulatory functions for the gene. The in vitro phenotype of the Δcps1 strain showed slower growth of mycelia with delayed and lower spore production than C. posadasii, and in vitro spherules were smaller. Vaccination of C57BL/6 or BALB/c mice with live Δcps1 spores either intranasally, intraperitoneally, or subcutaneously resulted in over 95% survival with mean residual lung fungal burdens of <1,000 CFU from an otherwise lethal C. posadasii intranasal infection. Considering its apparently complete attenuation of virulence and the high degree of resistance to C. posadasii infection when used as a vaccine, the Δcps1 strain is a promising vaccine candidate for preventing coccidioidomycosis in humans or other animals. PMID:27481239

  13. Retinoid Levels Influence Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli Infection and Shiga Toxin 2 Susceptibility in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Cabrera, Gabriel; Fernández-Brando, Romina J.; Abrey-Recalde, María Jimena; Baschkier, Ariela; Pinto, Alipio; Goldstein, Jorge; Zotta, Elsa; Meiss, Roberto; Rivas, Marta

    2014-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) is a food-borne pathogen that produces Shiga toxin (Stx) and causes hemorrhagic colitis. Under some circumstances, Stx produced within the intestinal tract enters the bloodstream, leading to systemic complications that may cause the potentially fatal hemolytic-uremic syndrome. Although retinoids like vitamin A (VA) and retinoic acid (RA) are beneficial to gut integrity and the immune system, the effect of VA supplementation on gastrointestinal infections of different etiologies has been controversial. Thus, the aim of this work was to study the influence of different VA status on the outcome of an EHEC intestinal infection in mice. We report that VA deficiency worsened the intestinal damage during EHEC infection but simultaneously improved survival. Since death is associated mainly with Stx toxicity, Stx was intravenously inoculated to analyze whether retinoid levels affect Stx susceptibility. Interestingly, while VA-deficient (VA-D) mice were resistant to a lethal dose of Stx2, RA-supplemented mice were more susceptible to it. Given that peripheral blood polymorphonuclear cells (PMNs) are known to potentiate Stx2 toxicity, we studied the influence of retinoid levels on the absolute number and function of PMNs. We found that VA-D mice had decreased PMN numbers and a diminished capacity to produce reactive oxygen species, while RA supplementation had the opposite effect. These results are in line with the well-known function of retinoids in maintaining the homeostasis of the gut but support the idea that they have a proinflammatory effect by acting, in part, on the PMN population. PMID:25001607

  14. Inducible nitric oxide synthase response and associated cytokine gene expression in the spleen of mice infected with Clonorchis sinensis.

    PubMed

    Shen, Ji-Qing; Yang, Qing-Li; Xue, Yan; Cheng, Xiao-Bing; Jiang, Zhi-Hua; Yang, Yi-Chao; Chen, Ying-Dan; Zhou, Xiao-Nong

    2015-05-01

    Clonorchis sinensis is a food-borne parasite that induces a permanent increase of nitrosation in the body upon infection. The spleen is an important secondary lymphoid organ for the regulation of immune responses locally and in the whole body. However, the functions and mechanisms of the spleen in nitric oxide (NO) responses after C. sinensis infection remain unknown. In this study, BALB/c mice were infected with 20, 40, and 80 C. sinensis metacercariae to simulate mild, moderate, and severe infections, respectively. We examined the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in the spleen and the relevant cytokine transcription in splenocytes from the mice infected with different amounts of metacercariae. The iNOS of the mice infected with 80 metacercariae was expressed in the spleen as early as 10 days post-infection (dpi) and gradually increased until 90 dpi. The iNOS expression in the mice infected with 40 metacercariae was detected only at 45 and 90 dpi, but not in the mice infected with 20 metacercariae. The level of interferon (IFN)-γ messenger RNA (mRNA) transcription in splenocytes significantly increased at 10 and 20 dpi (P < 0.05) in response to mild/moderate infection but gradually decreased to normal levels after 45 dpi. The level of IL-12p35 mRNA transcription did not change at 10 and 20 dpi