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Sample records for gnrh-ii induce cell

  1. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone II (GnRH II) mediates the anorexigenic actions of α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH) and corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) in goldfish.

    PubMed

    Kang, Ki Sung; Shimizu, Kanako; Azuma, Morio; Ui, Yuhta; Nakamura, Kouta; Uchiyama, Minoru; Matsuda, Kouhei

    2011-01-01

    Intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of gonadotropin-releasing hormone II (GnRH II), which plays a crucial role in the regulation of reproduction in vertebrates, markedly reduces food intake in goldfish. However, the neurochemical pathways involved in the anorexigenic action of GnRH II and its interaction with other neuropeptides have not yet been identified. Alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH), corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and CRH-related peptides play a major role in feeding control as potent anorexigenic neuropeptides in goldfish. However, our previous study has indicated that the GnRH II-induced anorexigenic action is not blocked by treatment with melanocortin 4 receptor (MC4R) and CRH receptor antagonists. Therefore, in the present study, we further examined whether the anorexigenic effects of α-MSH and CRH in goldfish could be mediated through the GnRH receptor neuronal pathway. ICV injection of the MC4R agonist, melanotan II (80 pmol/g body weight; BW), significantly reduced food intake, and its anorexigenic effect was suppressed by ICV pre-administration of the GnRH type I receptor antagonist, antide (100 pmol/gBW). The CRH-induced (50 pmol/gBW) anorexigenic action was also blocked by treatment with antide. ICV injection of CRH (50 pmol/gBW) induced a significant increase of the GnRH II mRNA level in the hypothalamus, while ICV injection of melanotan II (80 pmol/gBW) had no effect on the level of GnRH II mRNA. These results indicate that, in goldfish, the anorexigenic actions of α-MSH and CRH are mediated through the GnRH type I receptor-signaling pathway, and that the GnRH II system regulates feeding behavior.

  2. An induced junction photovoltaic cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Call, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    Silicon solar cells operating with induced junctions rather than diffused junctions have been fabricated and tested. Induced junctions were created by forming an inversion layer near the surface of the silicon by supplying a sheet of positive charge above the surface. Measurements of the response of the inversion layer cell to light of different wavelengths indicated it to be more sensitive to the shorter wavelengths of the sun's spectrum than conventional cells. The greater sensitivity occurs because of the shallow junction and the strong electric field at the surface.

  3. Differential regulation of two forms of gonadotropin-releasing hormone messenger ribonucleic acid by gonadotropins in human immortalized ovarian surface epithelium and ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jung-Hye; Choi, Kyung-Chul; Auersperg, Nelly; Leung, Peter C K

    2006-06-01

    Although gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) has been shown to play a role as an autocrine/ paracrine regulator of cell growth in ovarian surface epithelium and ovarian cancer, the factors which regulate the expression of GnRH and its receptor in these cells are not well characterized. In the present study, we employed real-time PCR to determine the potential regulatory effect of gonadotropins on the expression levels of GnRH I (the mammalian GnRH), GnRH II (a second form of GnRH) and their common receptor (GnRHR) in immortalized ovarian surface epithelial (IOSE-80 and IOSE-80PC) cells and ovarian cancer cell lines (A2780, BG-1, CaOV-3, OVCAR-3 and SKOV-3). The cells were treated with increasing concentrations (100 and 1000 ng/ml) of recombinant follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) or luteinizing hormone (LH) for 24 h. Treatment with FSH or LH reduced GnRH II mRNA levels in both IOSE cell lines and in three out of five ovarian cancer cell lines (A2780, BG-1 and OVCAR-3). A significant decrease in GnRHR mRNA levels was observed in IOSE and ovarian cancer cells, except CaOV-3 cells, following treatment with FSH or LH. In contrast, treatment with either FSH or LH had no effect on GnRH I mRNA levels in these cells, suggesting that gonadotropins regulate the two forms of GnRH and its receptor differentially. In separate experiments, the effect of gonadotropins on the anti-proliferative action of GnRH I and GnRH II agonists in IOSE-80, OVCAR-3 and SKOV-3 cells was investigated. The cells were pretreated with FSH or LH (100 ng/ml) for 24 h after which they were treated with either GnRH I or GnRH II (100 ng/ml) for 2 days, and cell growth was assessed by the MTT [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazoliumbromide] assay. Pretreatment of the cells with FSH or LH significantly reversed the growth inhibitory effect of GnRH I and GnRH II agonists in these cell types. These results provide the first demonstration of a potential interaction between gonadotropins and the

  4. Cell-to-cell binding induced by different lectins.

    PubMed

    Rutishauser, U; Sachs, L

    1975-05-01

    The cell-to-cell binding induced by concanavalin A (Con A) and the lectins from wheatgerm, soybean, and waxbean has been analyzed by measuring the ability of single cells to bind to lectin-coated cells immobilized on nylon fibers. The cells used were lymphoma, myeloid leukemia, and normal fibroblast cells. With all lectins, cell-to-cell binding was inhibited if both cells were prefixed with glutaraldehyde. However, in most cases cell-to-cell binding was enhanced when only the lectin-coated cell was prefixed. With normal fibroblasts, treatment of either one or both cells with trypsin enhanced the cell-to-cell binding induced by Con A and the wheatgerm lectin. Neuraminidase, which increases the number of receptors for soybean agglutinin, increased cell-to-cell binding only if both cells were treated. Although cell-to-cell binding induced by the lectins from soybean and wheatgerm could be partially reversed by the appropriate competitive saccharide inhibitor, binding induced by Con A could not be reversed. The experiments indicate that cell-to-cell binding induced by a lectin can be prevented by an insufficient density of receptors for the lectin, insufficient receptor mobility, or induced clustering of receptors. These effects can explain the differences in cell-to-cell binding and agglutination observed with different cell types and lectins. They also suggest that cell-to-cell binding induced by different lectins with a variety of cell types is initiated by a mechanism involving the alignment of complementary receptors on the colliding cells for the formation of multiple cell-to-lectin-to-cell bridges.

  5. Parvovirus infection-induced cell death and cell cycle arrest

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Aaron Yun; Qiu, Jianming

    2011-01-01

    The cytopathic effects induced during parvovirus infection have been widely documented. Parvovirus infection-induced cell death is often directly associated with disease outcomes (e.g., anemia resulting from loss of erythroid progenitors during parvovirus B19 infection). Apoptosis is the major form of cell death induced by parvovirus infection. However, nonapoptotic cell death, namely necrosis, has also been reported during infection of the minute virus of mice, parvovirus H-1 and bovine parvovirus. Recent studies have revealed multiple mechanisms underlying the cell death during parvovirus infection. These mechanisms vary in different parvoviruses, although the large nonstructural protein (NS)1 and the small NS proteins (e.g., the 11 kDa of parvovirus B19), as well as replication of the viral genome, are responsible for causing infection-induced cell death. Cell cycle arrest is also common, and contributes to the cytopathic effects induced during parvovirus infection. While viral NS proteins have been indicated to induce cell cycle arrest, increasing evidence suggests that a cellular DNA damage response triggered by an invading single-stranded parvoviral genome is the major inducer of cell cycle arrest in parvovirus-infected cells. Apparently, in response to infection, cell death and cell cycle arrest of parvovirus-infected cells are beneficial to the viral cell lifecycle (e.g., viral DNA replication and virus egress). In this article, we will discuss recent advances in the understanding of the mechanisms underlying parvovirus infection-induced cell death and cell cycle arrest. PMID:21331319

  6. HIV transcription is induced in dying cells

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E.; Chang-Liu, Chin-Mei; Schreck, S. |; Panozzo, J.; Libertin, C.R.

    1996-02-01

    Using HeLa cells stably transfected with an HIV-LTR-CAT construct, we demonstrated a peak in CAT induction that occurs in viable (but not necessarily cell-division-competent) cells 24 h following exposure to some cell-killing agents. {gamma} rays were the only cell-killing agent which did not induce HIV transcription; this can be attributed to the fact that {gamma}-ray-induced apoptotic death requires functional p53, which is not present in HeLa cells. For all other agents, HIV-LTR induction was dose-dependent and correlated with the amount of cell killing that occurred in the culture. Doses which caused over 99% cell killing induced HIV-LTR transcription maximally, demonstrating that cells that will go on to die by 14 days are the cells expressing HIV-LTR-CAT.

  7. Local anesthetics induce human renal cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Lee, H Thomas; Xu, Hua; Siegel, Cory D; Krichevsky, Igor E

    2003-01-01

    Renal cell apoptosis contributes significantly to the pathogenesis of acute renal failure. Local anesthetics induce apoptosis in neuronal and lymphocytic cell lines. We examined the effects of chronic (48 h) local anesthetic treatment (lidocaine, bupivacaine and tetracaine) on human proximal tubular (HK-2) cells. Apoptosis induction was assessed by detecting poly(ADP)-ribose polymerase fragmentation, caspase activation, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase biotin-dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining, DNA laddering and by cellular morphology. Cell death was quantified by measuring neutral red dye uptake and lactate dehydrogenase released into the cell culture medium. All 3 local anesthetics caused concentration-dependent cell death, induced HK-2 cell apoptosis and potentiated TNF-alpha induced apoptosis. Local anesthetics induced HK-2 cell apoptosis by activation of caspases 3, 6, 7, 8 and 9. ZVAD-fmk, a pan-caspase inhibitor, blocked the local anesthetic induced HK-2 cell apoptosis. Local anesthetics also inhibited the activities of anti-apoptotic kinases protein kinase B (Akt) and extracellular signal regulated mitrogen-activated protein kinase. Local anesthetic's pro-apoptotic effects are independent of sodium channel inhibition as tetrodotoxin, a selective voltage-gated sodium channel blocker, failed to mimic local anesthetic-mediated induction or potentiation of HK-2 cell apoptosis. We conclude that local anesthetics induce human renal cell apoptotic signaling by caspase activation and via inhibition of pro-survival signaling pathways.

  8. Listeria monocytogenes induces mast cell extracellular traps.

    PubMed

    Campillo-Navarro, Marcia; Leyva-Paredes, Kahiry; Donis-Maturano, Luis; González-Jiménez, Marco; Paredes-Vivas, Yuriria; Cerbulo-Vázquez, Arturo; Serafín-López, Jeanet; García-Pérez, Blanca; Ullrich, Stephen E; Flores-Romo, Leopoldo; Pérez-Tapia, Sonia M; Estrada-Parra, Sergio; Estrada-García, Iris; Chacón-Salinas, Rommel

    2017-02-01

    Mast cells play an essential role in different immunological phenomena including allergy and infectious diseases. Several bacteria induce mast cell activation leading to degranulation and the production of several cytokines and chemokines. However, mast cells also have different microbicidal activities such as phagocytosis and the release of DNA with embedded granular proteins known as Mast Cell Extracellular Traps (MCETs). Although previous reports indicate that extracellular bacteria are able to induce MCETs little is known if intracellular bacteria can induce these structures. In this work, we evaluated MCETs induction by the intracellular bacteria Listeria monocytogenes. We found that mast cells released DNA after stimulation with L. monocytogenes, and this DNA was complexed to histone and tryptase. Before extracellular DNA release, L. monocytogenes induced modifications to the mast cell nuclear envelope and DNA was detected outside the nucleus. L. monocytogenes stimulated mast cells to produce significant amounts of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and blocking NADPH oxidase diminished DNA release by mast cells. Finally, MCETs showed antimicrobial activity against L. monocytogenes that was partially blocked when β-hexosaminidase activity was inhibited. These results show that L. monocytogenes induces mast cells to produce microbicidal MCETs, suggesting a role for mast cells in containing infection beyond the induction of inflammation.

  9. HIV transcription is induced with cell killing

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E.; Schreck, S.; Chang-Liu, Chin-Mei; Panozzo, J.; Libertin, C.R.

    1993-11-01

    In this report, we demonstrate that this induction of HIV-LTR transcription occurs when stably transfected HeLa cells are exposed to agents which mediate cell killing, such as UV radiation, electroporation of sucrose buffer, prolonged heating, and low and high pH. Cells cultured following UV exposure demonstrated a peak in CAT expression that is evident in viable (but not necessarily cell division-competent) cells 24 h after exposure; this inductive response continued until at least 72 h after exposure. HIV-LTR induction was dose-dependent, and the amount of CAT transcription induced was correlated with the amount of cell killing that occurred in the culture.

  10. Gangliosides induce autophagic cell death in astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jaegyu; Lee, Shinrye; Lee, Jung Tae; Kwon, Taeg Kyu; Kim, Deok Ryong; Kim, Ho; Park, Hae-Chul; Suk, Kyoungho

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: Gangliosides, sialic acid-containing glycosphingolipids, abundant in brain, are involved in neuronal function and disease, but the precise molecular mechanisms underlying their physiological or pathological activities are poorly understood. In this study, the pathological role of gangliosides in the extracellular milieu with respect to glial cell death and lipid raft/membrane disruption was investigated. Experimental approach: We determined the effect of gangliosides on astrocyte death or survival using primary astrocyte cultures and astrocytoma/glioma cell lines as a model. Signalling pathways of ganglioside-induced autophagic cell death of astrocytes were examined using pharmacological inhibitors and biochemical and genetic assays. Key results: Gangliosides induced autophagic cell death in based on the following observations. Incubation of the cells with a mixture of gangliosides increased a punctate distribution of fluorescently labelled microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (GFP-LC3), the ratio of LC3-II/LC3-I and LC3 flux. Gangliosides also increased the formation of autophagic vacuoles as revealed by monodansylcadaverine staining. Ganglioside-induced cell death was inhibited by either a knockdown of beclin-1/Atg-6 or Atg-7 gene expression or by 3-methyladenine, an inhibitor of autophagy. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) were involved in ganglioside-induced autophagic cell death of astrocytes, because gangliosides induced ROS production and ROS scavengers decreased autophagic cell death. In addition, lipid rafts played an important role in ganglioside-induced astrocyte death. Conclusions and implications: Gangliosides released under pathological conditions may induce autophagic cell death of astrocytes, identifying a neuropathological role for gangliosides. PMID:20067473

  11. HIV transcription is induced in dying cells

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E.; Chang-Liu, Chin-Mei; Schreck, S. |

    1995-06-01

    Using HeLa cells stably transfected with an HIV-LTR-CAT construct, we demonstrated a peak in CAT induction that occurs in viable (but not necessarily cell-division-competent) cells 24 h following exposure to some cell-killing agents. {gamma} rays were the only cell-killing agent which did not induce HIV transcription; this can be attributed to the fact that {gamma}-ray-induced apoptotic death requires functional p53, which is not present in HeLa cells. For all other agents, HIV-LTR induction was dose-dependent and correlated with the amount of cell killing that occurred in the culture. 14 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Hematopoietic cell differentiation from embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells, both embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells, are undifferentiated cells that can self-renew and potentially differentiate into all hematopoietic lineages, such as hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), hematopoietic progenitor cells and mature hematopoietic cells in the presence of a suitable culture system. Establishment of pluripotent stem cells provides a comprehensive model to study early hematopoietic development and has emerged as a powerful research tool to explore regenerative medicine. Nowadays, HSC transplantation and hematopoietic cell transfusion have successfully cured some patients, especially in malignant hematological diseases. Owing to a shortage of donors and a limited number of the cells, hematopoietic cell induction from pluripotent stem cells has been regarded as an alternative source of HSCs and mature hematopoietic cells for intended therapeutic purposes. Pluripotent stem cells are therefore extensively utilized to facilitate better understanding in hematopoietic development by recapitulating embryonic development in vivo, in which efficient strategies can be easily designed and deployed for the generation of hematopoietic lineages in vitro. We hereby review the current progress of hematopoietic cell induction from embryonic stem/induced pluripotent stem cells. PMID:23796405

  13. Invariant NKT cells increase drug-induced osteosarcoma cell death

    PubMed Central

    Fallarini, S; Paoletti, T; Orsi Battaglini, N; Lombardi, G

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE In osteosarcoma (OS) patients, only a limited number of drugs are active and the regimens currently in use include a combination of at least two of these drugs: doxorubicin, cisplatin, methotrexate and ifosfamide. Today, 30–40% of patients still die of OS highlighting the urgent need for new treatments. Invariant NKT (iNKT) cells are a lymphocyte lineage with features of both T and NK cells, playing important roles in tumour suppression. Our aim was to test whether the cytoxicity induced by cisplatin, doxorubicin and methotrexate against OS cells can be enhanced by iNKT cell treatment. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH iNKT cells were purified from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells by cell sorting (Vα24Vβ11+ cells) and used as effector cells against OS cells (U2-OS, HOS, MG-63). Cell death (calcein-AM method), perforin/granzyme B and Fas/FasL expressions were determined by flow cytometry. CD1d expression was analysed at both the gene and protein level. KEY RESULTS iNKT cells were cytotoxic against OS cells through a CD1d-dependent mechanism. This activity was specific for tumour cells, because human CD1d+ mesenchymal stem cells and CD1d- osteoblasts were not affected. iNKT cell treatment enhanced drug-induced OS cell death in a concentration-dependent manner and this effect was reduced in CD1d-silenced OS cells. CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS iNKT cells kill malignant, but not non-malignant, cells. iNKT cell treatment enhances the cytotoxicity of anti-neoplastic drugs against OS cells in a CD1d-dependent manner. The present data encourage further studies on the use of iNKT cells in OS therapy. PMID:22817659

  14. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells from Nonhuman Primates.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Anuja; Qiu, Zhifang; Farnsworth, Steven L; Hemmi, Jacob J; Li, Miao; Pickering, Alexander V; Hornsby, Peter J

    2016-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells from nonhuman primates (NHPs) have unique roles in cell biology and regenerative medicine. Because of the relatedness of NHPs to humans, NHP iPS cells can serve as a source of differentiated derivatives that can be used to address important questions in the comparative biology of primates. Additionally, when used as a source of cells for regenerative medicine, NHP iPS cells serve an invaluable role in translational experiments in cell therapy. Reprogramming of NHP somatic cells requires the same conditions as previously established for human cells. However, throughout the process, a variety of modifications to the human cell protocols must be made to accommodate significant species differences.

  15. Methadone induced lysis of mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Will, P C; Noteboom, W D

    1978-08-01

    Methadone induced lysis of human erythrocytes and mouse leukemic cells was studied. The cells lyse without prior swelling that is a necessary step of colloid osmotic lysis. Methadone is accumulated by both cell types, and is widely distributed intracellurly in mouse leukemic cells. The maximum lytic rate is roughly proportional to the amount of methadone uptake and the Q10 for lysis is equal to the Q10 for methadone partitioning between octanol and water. It is concluded that the cells lyse as a result of a non-specific disruption of the plasma membrane.

  16. Sulfur dioxide induced programmed cell death in Vicia guard cells.

    PubMed

    Yi, Huilan; Yin, Jingjing; Liu, Xin; Jing, Xiuqing; Fan, Sanhong; Zhang, Hufang

    2012-04-01

    Sulfur dioxide (SO(2)) induced nuclear condensation and nuclear fragmentation and rapid loss of guard cell viability in detached epidermis of Vicia leaves at concentrations of 1 mM and higher (3 h exposure). Caspase inhibitors Z-Asp-CH(2)-DCB (0.1 mM) and TLCK (0.1 mM) markedly suppressed SO(2)-induced cell death. The typical nuclear morphological changes and the inhibition effects of caspase inhibitors suggest the activation of a programmed cell death (PCD) pathway. SO(2)-induced cell death can be blocked by either antioxidants (0.1 mM AsA or 200 U/mL CAT) or Ca(2+) antagonists (0.1mM EGTA or LaCl(3)). AsA and CAT also blocked SO(2)-induced ROS production and [Ca(2+)](cyt) increase. However, EGTA and LaCl(3) can inhibit SO(2)-induced [Ca(2+)](cyt) increase, but cannot suppress SO(2)-induced ROS production. Our results indicate that high concentrations of SO(2) induce guard cell death via a PCD pathway through ROS mediating [Ca(2+)](cyt) elevation, which causes harmful effects to plants.

  17. Cell Chirality Induces Collective Cell Migration in Epithelial Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Katsuhiko; Hiraiwa, Tetsuya; Shibata, Tatsuo

    2015-10-01

    During early development, epithelial cells form a monolayer sheet and migrate in a uniform direction. Here, we address how this collective migration can occur without breaking the cell-to-cell attachments. Repeated contraction and expansion of the cell-to-cell interfaces enables the cells to rearrange their positions autonomously within the sheet. We show that when the interface tension is strengthened in a direction that is tilted from the body axis, cell rearrangements occur in such a way that unidirectional movement is induced. We use a vertex model to demonstrate that such anisotropic tension can generate the unidirectional motion of cell sheets. Our results suggest that cell chirality facilitates collective cell migration during tissue morphogenesis.

  18. An introduction to induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Hanley, Joanna; Rastegarlari, Ghasem; Nathwani, Amit C

    2010-10-01

    Recent landmark studies show that it is now possible to convert somatic cells, such as skin fibroblasts and B lymphocytes, into pluripotent stem cells that closely resemble embryonic stem cells. These induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells can be generated without using human embryos or oocytes, thus bypassing some of the ethical issues that have limited the use of human embryonic stems (hES) cells. Additionally, they can be derived from the patient to be treated, thereby overcoming problems of immunological rejection associated with the use of allogeneic hES cell derived progenitors. Whilst these patient-specific iPS cells have great clinical potential, their immediate utility is likely to be in drug screening and for understanding the disease process. This review discusses the promise of iPS cells as well as the challenges to their use in the clinic.

  19. HIV transcription is induced with cell killing

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E.; Schreck, S.; Chang-Liu, Chin Mei; Panozzo, J.; Libertin, C.R.

    1994-01-01

    Previous work has shown that HeLa cells stably transfected with an HIV-LTR-CAT construct are induced to express chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) following exposure to DNA-damaging agents such as ultraviolet radiation, {gamma} rays, neutrons, and others. In this report, the authors demonstrate that this induction of HIV-LTR transcription occurs when stably transfected HeLa cells are exposed to agents which mediate cell killing, such as UV radiation, electroporation of sucrose buffer, prolonged heating, and low and high pH. Cells cultured following UV exposure demonstrated a peak in CAT expression that is evidence in viable (but not necessarily cell division-competent) cells 24 h after exposure; this inductive response continued until at least 72 h after exposure. HIV-LTR induction was dose-dependent, and the amount of CAT transcription induced was correlated with the amount of cell killing that occurred in the culture. Other agents which caused no cell killing (such as heat-shock for up to 2 h, treatment with metronidazole, exposure to sunlight, vitamin C treatment, and others) had no effect on HIV-LTR induction. These results suggest that HIV transcription is induced as a consequence of the turn on of a cellular death or apoptotic pathway.

  20. Acetylsalicylic acid induces programmed cell death in Arabidopsis cell cultures.

    PubMed

    García-Heredia, José M; Hervás, Manuel; De la Rosa, Miguel A; Navarro, José A

    2008-06-01

    Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), a derivative from the plant hormone salicylic acid (SA), is a commonly used drug that has a dual role in animal organisms as an anti-inflammatory and anticancer agent. It acts as an inhibitor of cyclooxygenases (COXs), which catalyze prostaglandins production. It is known that ASA serves as an apoptotic agent on cancer cells through the inhibition of the COX-2 enzyme. Here, we provide evidences that ASA also behaves as an agent inducing programmed cell death (PCD) in cell cultures of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, in a similar way than the well-established PCD-inducing agent H(2)O(2), although the induction of PCD by ASA requires much lower inducer concentrations. Moreover, ASA is herein shown to be a more efficient PCD-inducing agent than salicylic acid. ASA treatment of Arabidopsis cells induces typical PCD-linked morphological and biochemical changes, namely cell shrinkage, nuclear DNA degradation, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, cytochrome c release from mitochondria and induction of caspase-like activity. However, the ASA effect can be partially reverted by jasmonic acid. Taking together, these results reveal the existence of common features in ASA-induced animal apoptosis and plant PCD, and also suggest that there are similarities between the pathways of synthesis and function of prostanoid-like lipid mediators in animal and plant organisms.

  1. Schwann cells induce neuronal differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Zurita, Mercedes; Vaquero, Jesús; Oya, Santiago; Miguel, Miriam

    2005-04-04

    Bone marrow stromal cells are multipotent stem cells that have the potential to differentiate into bone, cartilage, fat and muscle. Recently, bone marrow stromal cells have been shown to have the capacity to differentiate into neurons under specific experimental conditions, using chemical factors. We now describe how bone marrow stromal cells can be induced to differentiate into neuron-like cells when they are co-cultured with Schwann cells. When compared with chemical differentiation, expression of neuronal differentiation markers begins later, but one week after beginning co-culture, most bone marrow stromal cells showed a typical neuronal morphology. Our present findings support the transdifferentiation of bone marrow stromal cells, and the potential utility of these cells for the treatment of degenerative and acquired disorders of the nervous system.

  2. Cisplatin Induces Differentiation of Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Prabhakaran, Praseetha; Hassiotou, Foteini; Blancafort, Pilar; Filgueira, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Breast tumors are heterogeneous including cells with stem cell properties and more differentiated cells. This heterogeneity is reflected into the molecular breast cancer subtypes. Breast cancer stem cells are resistant to chemotherapy, thus recent efforts are focusing on identifying treatments that shift them toward a more differentiated phenotype, making them more susceptible to chemotherapy. We examined whether the drug cisplatin induces differentiation in breast cancer cell lines that represent different breast cancer subtypes. We used three cell lines representing triple-negative breast cancers, BT-549 and MDA-MB-231 (claudin-low), and MDA-MB-468 (basal-like), along with estrogen and progesterone receptor positive MCF-7 cells (luminal). Cisplatin was applied at 2.5, 5, 10, and 20 μM, and cell viability and proliferation were measured using MTS and BrdU assays, respectively. The effect of cisplatin on the cellular hierarchy was examined by flow cytometry, immunofluorescence and qRT-PCR. Cisplatin treatment of 10 and 20 μM reduced cell viability by 36–51% and proliferation capacity by 36–67%. Treatment with cisplatin resulted in 12–67% down-regulation of stem cell markers (CD49f, SSEA4) and 10–130% up-regulation of differentiation markers (CK18, SMA, β-tubulin). At the mRNA level, CD49f was down-regulated whilst β-tubulin was up-regulated in the claudin-low cell lines. SSEA4 protein expression decreased upon cisplatin treatment, but SSEA4 mRNA expression increased indicating a differential regulation of cisplatin at the post-transcriptional level. It is concluded that cisplatin reduces breast cancer cell survival and induces differentiation of stem/progenitor cell subpopulations within breast cancer cell lines. These effects indicate the potential of this drug to target specific chemotherapy-resistant cells within a tumor. PMID:23761858

  3. Induction of Trabecular Meshwork Cells From Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Qiong J.; Zhu, Wei; Cook, Amy C.; Anfinson, Kristin R.; Tucker, Budd A.; Kuehn, Markus H.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Loss or dysfunction of trabecular meshwork (TM) cells has been associated with the development of pathologically elevated IOP, and it is conceivable that replacement of damaged TM cells could restore function to the TM. We propose that the use of TM-like cells derived from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) created from a patient's own dermal fibroblasts offers the best solution to this challenge. Here we demonstrate that mouse iPSCs can be induced to differentiate into TM-like cells suitable for autologous transplantation. Methods. Directed induction of stem cell differentiation was achieved through coculture of mouse iPSCs with human TM cells for up to 21 days. The resultant TM-like cells (iPSC-TM) were characterized morphologically, immunohistochemically, and functionally. Results. The iPSC-TM cells closely resembled cultured human TM cells morphologically and began to express many markers of TM cells while ceasing to express pluripotency markers such as Nanog, Oct4, and Sox2. Functionally, these cells developed the ability to phagocytose particles. Finally, exposure to dexamethasone or phorbol 12-myristate acetate caused a distinct increase in the production and secretion of myocilin and matrix metalloproteinase-3, respectively, behavior characteristic of TM cells. Conclusions. Our data demonstrate that iPSCs can be induced to assume a phenotype that resembles native TM cells in many important aspects. Not only do these cells represent a valuable research tool, but transplantation into glaucomatous eyes with elevated IOP may also restore function to the TM, resulting in re-establishment of IOP. PMID:25298418

  4. Schwann cells induce cancer cell dispersion and invasion

    PubMed Central

    Deborde, Sylvie; Lyubchik, Anna; Zhou, Yi; He, Shizhi; McNamara, William F.; Chernichenko, Natalya; Lee, Sei-Young; Barajas, Fernando; Chen, Chun-Hao; Bakst, Richard L.; Vakiani, Efsevia; He, Shuangba; Hall, Alan; Wong, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Nerves enable cancer progression, as cancers have been shown to extend along nerves through the process of perineural invasion, which carries a poor prognosis. Furthermore, the innervation of some cancers promotes growth and metastases. It remains unclear, however, how nerves mechanistically contribute to cancer progression. Here, we demonstrated that Schwann cells promote cancer invasion through direct cancer cell contact. Histological evaluation of murine and human cancer specimens with perineural invasion uncovered a subpopulation of Schwann cells that associates with cancer cells. Coculture of cancer cells with dorsal root ganglion extracts revealed that Schwann cells direct cancer cells to migrate toward nerves and promote invasion in a contact-dependent manner. Upon contact, Schwann cells induced the formation of cancer cell protrusions in their direction and intercalated between the cancer cells, leading to cancer cell dispersion. The formation of these processes was dependent on Schwann cell expression of neural cell adhesion molecule 1 (NCAM1) and ultimately promoted perineural invasion. Moreover, NCAM1-deficient mice showed decreased neural invasion and less paralysis. Such Schwann cell behavior reflects normal Schwann cell programs that are typically activated in nerve repair but are instead exploited by cancer cells to promote perineural invasion and cancer progression. PMID:26999607

  5. Schwann cells induce cancer cell dispersion and invasion.

    PubMed

    Deborde, Sylvie; Omelchenko, Tatiana; Lyubchik, Anna; Zhou, Yi; He, Shizhi; McNamara, William F; Chernichenko, Natalya; Lee, Sei-Young; Barajas, Fernando; Chen, Chun-Hao; Bakst, Richard L; Vakiani, Efsevia; He, Shuangba; Hall, Alan; Wong, Richard J

    2016-04-01

    Nerves enable cancer progression, as cancers have been shown to extend along nerves through the process of perineural invasion, which carries a poor prognosis. Furthermore, the innervation of some cancers promotes growth and metastases. It remains unclear, however, how nerves mechanistically contribute to cancer progression. Here, we demonstrated that Schwann cells promote cancer invasion through direct cancer cell contact. Histological evaluation of murine and human cancer specimens with perineural invasion uncovered a subpopulation of Schwann cells that associates with cancer cells. Coculture of cancer cells with dorsal root ganglion extracts revealed that Schwann cells direct cancer cells to migrate toward nerves and promote invasion in a contact-dependent manner. Upon contact, Schwann cells induced the formation of cancer cell protrusions in their direction and intercalated between the cancer cells, leading to cancer cell dispersion. The formation of these processes was dependent on Schwann cell expression of neural cell adhesion molecule 1 (NCAM1) and ultimately promoted perineural invasion. Moreover, NCAM1-deficient mice showed decreased neural invasion and less paralysis. Such Schwann cell behavior reflects normal Schwann cell programs that are typically activated in nerve repair but are instead exploited by cancer cells to promote perineural invasion and cancer progression.

  6. Optically-Induced Cell Fusion on Cell Pairing Microstructures

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Po-Fu; Wang, Chih-Hung; Lee, Gwo-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Cell fusion is a critical operation for numerous biomedical applications including cell reprogramming, hybridoma formation, cancer immunotherapy, and tissue regeneration. However, unstable cell contact and random cell pairings have limited efficiency and yields when utilizing traditional methods. Furthermore, it is challenging to selectively perform cell fusion within a group of cells. This study reports a new approach called optically-induced cell fusion (OICF), which integrates cell-pairing microstructures with an optically-induced, localized electrical field. By projecting light patterns onto a photoconductive film (hydrogen-rich, amorphous silicon) coated on an indium-tin-oxide (ITO) glass while an alternating current electrical field was applied between two such ITO glass slides, “virtual” electrodes could be generated that could selectively fuse pairing cells. At 10 kHz, a 57% cell paring rate and an 87% fusion efficiency were successfully achieved at a driving voltage of 20  Vpp, suggesting that this new technology could be promising for selective cell fusion within a group of cells. PMID:26912054

  7. Optically-Induced Cell Fusion on Cell Pairing Microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Po-Fu; Wang, Chih-Hung; Lee, Gwo-Bin

    2016-02-01

    Cell fusion is a critical operation for numerous biomedical applications including cell reprogramming, hybridoma formation, cancer immunotherapy, and tissue regeneration. However, unstable cell contact and random cell pairings have limited efficiency and yields when utilizing traditional methods. Furthermore, it is challenging to selectively perform cell fusion within a group of cells. This study reports a new approach called optically-induced cell fusion (OICF), which integrates cell-pairing microstructures with an optically-induced, localized electrical field. By projecting light patterns onto a photoconductive film (hydrogen-rich, amorphous silicon) coated on an indium-tin-oxide (ITO) glass while an alternating current electrical field was applied between two such ITO glass slides, “virtual” electrodes could be generated that could selectively fuse pairing cells. At 10 kHz, a 57% cell paring rate and an 87% fusion efficiency were successfully achieved at a driving voltage of 20  Vpp, suggesting that this new technology could be promising for selective cell fusion within a group of cells.

  8. Induced pluripotent stem cells for regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Hirschi, Karen K; Li, Song; Roy, Krishnendu

    2014-07-11

    With the discovery of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, it is now possible to convert differentiated somatic cells into multipotent stem cells that have the capacity to generate all cell types of adult tissues. Thus, there is a wide variety of applications for this technology, including regenerative medicine, in vitro disease modeling, and drug screening/discovery. Although biological and biochemical techniques have been well established for cell reprogramming, bioengineering technologies offer novel tools for the reprogramming, expansion, isolation, and differentiation of iPS cells. In this article, we review these bioengineering approaches for the derivation and manipulation of iPS cells and focus on their relevance to regenerative medicine.

  9. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells for Regenerative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Hirschi, Karen K.; Li, Song; Roy, Krishnendu

    2014-01-01

    With the discovery of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, it is now possible to convert differentiated somatic cells into multipotent stem cells that have the capacity to generate all cell types of adult tissues. Thus, there is a wide variety of applications for this technology, including regenerative medicine, in vitro disease modeling, and drug screening/discovery. Although biological and biochemical techniques have been well established for cell reprogramming, bioengineering technologies offer novel tools for the reprogramming, expansion, isolation, and differentiation of iPS cells. In this article, we review these bioengineering approaches for the derivation and manipulation of iPS cells and focus on their relevance to regenerative medicine. PMID:24905879

  10. TALEN-Induced Translocations in Human Cells.

    PubMed

    Piganeau, Marion; Renouf, Benjamin; Ghezraoui, Hind; Brunet, Erika

    2016-01-01

    Induction of chromosomal translocations in human cells is of a great interest to study tumorigenesis and genome instability. Here, we explain in detail a method to induce translocations using the transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs). We describe how to detect translocation formation by PCR, calculate translocation frequency by 96-well PCR screen, and analyze breakpoint junctions. When inducing cancer translocations, it is also possible to detect the fusion gene by FISH analysis or western blot.

  11. Induced pluripotent stem cells and neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chao; Xiao, Shi-Fu

    2011-04-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, are characterized by idiopathic neuron loss in different regions of the central nervous system, which contributes to the relevant dysfunctions in the patients. The application of cell replacement therapy using human embryonic stem (hES) cells, though having attracted much attention, has been hampered by the intrinsic ethical problems. It has been demonstrated that adult somatic cells can be reprogrammed into the embryonic state, called induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. It is soon realized that iPS cells may be an alternative source for cell replacement therapy, because it raises no ethical problems and using patient-specific iPS cells for autologous transplantation will not lead to immunological rejection. What's more, certain types of neurons derived from patient-specific iPS cells may display disease-relevant phenotypes. Thus, patient-specific iPS cells can provide a unique opportunity to directly investigate the pathological properties of relevant neural cells in individual patient, and to study the vulnerability of neural cells to pathogenic factors in vitro, which may help reveal the pathogenesis of many neurodegenerative diseases. In this review, the recent development in cellular treatment of neurodegenerative diseases using iPS cells was summarized, and the potential value of iPS cells in the modeling of neurodegenerative disease was discussed.

  12. [Research for cell therapy by induced pluripotent stem cell].

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Hidetoshi; Yamanaka, Shinya

    2011-12-01

    Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, which are generated from somatic cells, are expected to be a hopeful source for cell therapy to treat intractable diseases due to its unlimited proliferation potential, differentiation potentials and the capability of autotransplantation characteristics. In this review, we have summarized the extension of iPS cell researches into cell therapy and the new researches associated with iPS cell technology. However, transplantation of iPS cell-derived tissue is considered to have a risk of tumorigenesis which is one of the major hurdles of using pluripotent stem cell in clinical application. This review is also focused on new strategies for reducing a risk of tumorigenesis.

  13. Failure of cell cleavage induces senescence in tetraploid primary cells.

    PubMed

    Panopoulos, Andreas; Pacios-Bras, Cristina; Choi, Justin; Yenjerla, Mythili; Sussman, Mark A; Fotedar, Rati; Margolis, Robert L

    2014-10-15

    Tetraploidy can arise from various mitotic or cleavage defects in mammalian cells, and inheritance of multiple centrosomes induces aneuploidy when tetraploid cells continue to cycle. Arrest of the tetraploid cell cycle is therefore potentially a critical cellular control. We report here that primary rat embryo fibroblasts (REF52) and human foreskin fibroblasts become senescent in tetraploid G1 after drug- or small interfering RNA (siRNA)-induced failure of cell cleavage. In contrast, T-antigen-transformed REF52 and p53+/+ HCT116 tumor cells rapidly become aneuploid by continuing to cycle after cleavage failure. Tetraploid primary cells quickly become quiescent, as determined by loss of the Ki-67 proliferation marker and of the fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicator/late cell cycle marker geminin. Arrest is not due to DNA damage, as the γ-H2AX DNA damage marker remains at control levels after tetraploidy induction. Arrested tetraploid cells finally become senescent, as determined by SA-β-galactosidase activity. Tetraploid arrest is dependent on p16INK4a expression, as siRNA suppression of p16INK4a bypasses tetraploid arrest, permitting primary cells to become aneuploid. We conclude that tetraploid primary cells can become senescent without DNA damage and that induction of senescence is critical to tetraploidy arrest.

  14. Induced DNA repair pathway in mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Overberg, R.

    1985-01-01

    The survival of cultured rat kangaroo cells (PtK-2) and human xeroderma pigmentosum cells incubated with 5 ..mu..M cycloheximide subsequent to ultraviolet irradiation is lower than that of cells incubated without cycloheximide. The drop in survival is considerably larger than that produced by incubation of unirradiated cells with cycloheximide. The phenomenon was also observed when PtK-2 cells were incubated with emetine, another protein synthesis inhibitor, or with 5,6-dichloro-1-..beta..-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole, a RNA synthesis inhibitor. PtK cells which received a preliminary UV treatment followed by an incubation period without cycloheximide and then a second irradiation and 24 hour incubation with cycloheximide, survived the effects of the second irradiation better than cells which were incubated in the presence of cycloheximide after the first and second UV irradiation. The application of cycloheximide for 24 hours after UV irradiation of PtK cells resulted in one-half as many 6-thioguanine resistant cells as compared to the number of 6-thioguanine resistant cells found when cycloheximide was not used. These experiments indicate that a UV-inducible cycloheximide-sensitive DNA repair pathway is present in PtK and xeroderma pigmentosum cells, which is error-prone in PtK cells.

  15. Induced pluripotent stem cells in cartilage repair

    PubMed Central

    Lietman, Steven A

    2016-01-01

    Articular cartilage repair techniques are challenging. Human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) theoretically provide an unlimited number of specialized cells which could be used in articular cartilage repair. However thus far chondrocytes from iPSCs have been created primarily by viral transfection and with the use of cocultured feeder cells. In addition chondrocytes derived from iPSCs have usually been formed in condensed cell bodies (resembling embryoid bodies) that then require dissolution with consequent substantial loss of cell viability and phenotype. All of these current techniques used to derive chondrocytes from iPSCs are problematic but solutions to these problems are on the horizon. These solutions will make iPSCs a viable alternative for articular cartilage repair in the near future. PMID:27004161

  16. Single-Cell-Precision Microplasma-Induced Cancer Cell Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xinpei; He, Guangyuan; Ostrikov, Kostya

    2014-01-01

    The issue of single-cell control has recently attracted enormous interest. However, in spite of the presently achievable intracellular-level physiological probing through bio-photonics, nano-probe-based, and some other techniques, the issue of inducing selective, single-cell-precision apoptosis, without affecting neighbouring cells remains essentially open. Here we resolve this issue and report on the effective single-cell-precision cancer cell treatment using the reactive chemistry of the localized corona-type plasma discharge around a needle-like electrode with the spot size ∼1 µm. When the electrode is positioned with the micrometer precision against a selected cell, a focused and highly-localized micro-plasma discharge induces apoptosis in the selected individual HepG2 and HeLa cancer cells only, without affecting any surrounding cells, even in small cell clusters. This is confirmed by the real-time monitoring of the morphological and structural changes at the cellular and cell nucleus levels after the plasma exposure. PMID:24971517

  17. Trophoblast lineage cells derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Ying; Wang, Kai; Chandramouli, Gadisetti V.R.; Knott, Jason G.; Leach, Richard

    2013-07-12

    Highlights: •Epithelial-like phenotype of trophoblast lineage cells derived from human iPS cells. •Trophoblast lineage cells derived from human iPS cells exhibit trophoblast function. •Trophoblasts from iPS cells provides a proof-of-concept in regenerative medicine. -- Abstract: Background: During implantation, the blastocyst trophectoderm attaches to the endometrial epithelium and continues to differentiate into all trophoblast subtypes, which are the major components of a placenta. Aberrant trophoblast proliferation and differentiation are associated with placental diseases. However, due to ethical and practical issues, there is almost no available cell or tissue source to study the molecular mechanism of human trophoblast differentiation, which further becomes a barrier to the study of the pathogenesis of trophoblast-associated diseases of pregnancy. In this study, our goal was to generate a proof-of-concept model for deriving trophoblast lineage cells from induced pluripotency stem (iPS) cells from human fibroblasts. In future studies the generation of trophoblast lineage cells from iPS cells established from patient’s placenta will be extremely useful for studying the pathogenesis of individual trophoblast-associated diseases and for drug testing. Methods and results: Combining iPS cell technology with BMP4 induction, we derived trophoblast lineage cells from human iPS cells. The gene expression profile of these trophoblast lineage cells was distinct from fibroblasts and iPS cells. These cells expressed markers of human trophoblasts. Furthermore, when these cells were differentiated they exhibited invasive capacity and placental hormone secretive capacity, suggesting extravillous trophoblasts and syncytiotrophoblasts. Conclusion: Trophoblast lineage cells can be successfully derived from human iPS cells, which provide a proof-of-concept tool to recapitulate pathogenesis of patient placental trophoblasts in vitro.

  18. Induced pluripotent stem cells in dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Sunil, Paramel Mohan

    2016-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), a path-breaking invention, have revolutionized the regenerative medicine field. The biggest advantage of this technology is its patient-specific nature and so it is nonimmunogenic. It involves autologous tissues with limitless source of cells throughout life. The Nobel-winning concept involves the reprograming of terminally differentiated cells by external factors and has a tremendous role in the treatment of genetic disorders, regeneration of tissues, drug discovery, and disease modeling. This short review aims at the probable applications of iPSC technology in dentistry with respect to regeneration of oral and maxillofacial tissues and also its role in oral malignancies. PMID:27829740

  19. Heat induces gene amplification in cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Bin; Ouyang, Ruoyun; Huang, Chenghui; Liu, Franklin; Neill, Daniel; Li, Chuanyuan; Dewhirst, Mark

    2012-10-26

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study discovered that heat exposure (hyperthermia) results in gene amplification in cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hyperthermia induces DNA double strand breaks. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA double strand breaks are considered to be required for the initiation of gene amplification. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The underlying mechanism of heat-induced gene amplification is generation of DNA double strand breaks. -- Abstract: Background: Hyperthermia plays an important role in cancer therapy. However, as with radiation, it can cause DNA damage and therefore genetic instability. We studied whether hyperthermia can induce gene amplification in cancer cells and explored potential underlying molecular mechanisms. Materials and methods: (1) Hyperthermia: HCT116 colon cancer cells received water-submerged heating treatment at 42 or 44 Degree-Sign C for 30 min; (2) gene amplification assay using N-(phosphoacetyl)-L-aspartate (PALA) selection of cabamyl-P-synthetase, aspartate transcarbarmylase, dihydro-orotase (cad) gene amplified cells; (3) southern blotting for confirmation of increased cad gene copies in PALA-resistant cells; (4) {gamma}H2AX immunostaining to detect {gamma}H2AX foci as an indication for DNA double strand breaks. Results: (1) Heat exposure at 42 or 44 Degree-Sign C for 30 min induces gene amplification. The frequency of cad gene amplification increased by 2.8 and 6.5 folds respectively; (2) heat exposure at both 42 and 44 Degree-Sign C for 30 min induces DNA double strand breaks in HCT116 cells as shown by {gamma}H2AX immunostaining. Conclusion: This study shows that heat exposure can induce gene amplification in cancer cells, likely through the generation of DNA double strand breaks, which are believed to be required for the initiation of gene amplification. This process may be promoted by heat when cellular proteins that are responsible for checkpoints, DNA replication, DNA repair and

  20. Honey induces apoptosis in renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Samarghandian, Saeed; Afshari, Jalil Tavakkol; Davoodi, Saiedeh

    2011-01-01

    Background: The fact that antioxidants have several preventative effects against different diseases, such as coronary diseases, inflammatory disorders, neurologic degeneration, aging, and cancer, has led to the search for food rich in antioxidants. Honey has been used as a traditional food and medical source since ancient times. However, recently many scientists have been concentrating on the antioxidant property of honey. By use of human renal cancer cell lines (ACHN), we investigated the antiproliferative activity, apoptosis, and the antitumor activity of honey. Materials and Methods: The cells were cultured in Dulbecco’s modified Eagle’s medium with 10% fetal bovine serum treated with different concentrations of honey for 3 consecutive days. Cell viability was quantitated by the 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. Apoptotic cells were determined using Annexin-V-fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) by flow cytometry. Results: Honey decreased the cell viability in the malignant cells in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. The IC 50 values against the ACHN cell lines were determined as 1.7 ± 0.04% and 2.1 ± 0.03% μg/mL after 48 and 72 h, respectively. Honey induced apoptosis of the ACHN cells in a concentration-dependent manner, as determined by flow cytometry histogram of treated cells. Conclusion: It might be concluded that honey may cause cell death in the ACHN cells, in which apoptosis plays an important role. Most of the drugs used in the cancer treatment are apoptotic inducers, hence apoptotic nature of honey is considered vital. Therefore, it prompted us to investigate honey as a potential candidate for renal cancer treatment. PMID:21472079

  1. Disease-specific induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Park, In-Hyun; Arora, Natasha; Huo, Hongguang; Maherali, Nimet; Ahfeldt, Tim; Shimamura, Akiko; Lensch, M William; Cowan, Chad; Hochedlinger, Konrad; Daley, George Q

    2008-09-05

    Tissue culture of immortal cell strains from diseased patients is an invaluable resource for medical research but is largely limited to tumor cell lines or transformed derivatives of native tissues. Here we describe the generation of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells from patients with a variety of genetic diseases with either Mendelian or complex inheritance; these diseases include adenosine deaminase deficiency-related severe combined immunodeficiency (ADA-SCID), Shwachman-Bodian-Diamond syndrome (SBDS), Gaucher disease (GD) type III, Duchenne (DMD) and Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD), Parkinson disease (PD), Huntington disease (HD), juvenile-onset, type 1 diabetes mellitus (JDM), Down syndrome (DS)/trisomy 21, and the carrier state of Lesch-Nyhan syndrome. Such disease-specific stem cells offer an unprecedented opportunity to recapitulate both normal and pathologic human tissue formation in vitro, thereby enabling disease investigation and drug development.

  2. Radiation induced genomic instability in bystander cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, H.; Gu, S.; Randers-Pehrson, G.; Hei, T.

    There is considerable evidence that exposure to ionizing radiation may induce a heritable genomic instability that leads to a persisting increased frequency of genetic and functional changes in the non-irradiated progeny of a wide variety of irradiated cells Genomic instability is measured as delayed expressions in chromosomal alterations micronucleus formation gene mutations and decreased plating efficiency During the last decade numerous studies have shown that radiation could induce bystander effect in non-irradiated neighboring cells similar endpoints have also been used in genomic instability studies Both genomic instability and the bystander effect are phenomena that result in a paradigm shift in our understanding of radiation biology In the past it seemed reasonable to assume that the production of single- and double-strand DNA breaks are due to direct energy deposition of energy by a charged particle to the nucleus It turns out that biology is not quite that simple Using the Columbia University charged particle microbeam and the highly sensitive human hamster hybrid AL cell mutagenic assay we irradiated 10 of the cells with a lethal dose of 30 alpha particles through the nucleus After overnight incubation the remaining viable bystander cells were replated in dishes for colony formation Clonal isolates were expanded and cultured for 6 consecutive weeks to assess plating efficiency and mutation frequency Preliminary results indicated that there was no significant decrease in plating efficiency among the bystander colonies when compared with

  3. Leukemia cells induce changes in human bone marrow stromal cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) are multipotent cells that support angiogenesis, wound healing, and immunomodulation. In the hematopoietic niche, they nurture hematopoietic cells, leukemia, tumors and metastasis. BMSCs secrete of a wide range of cytokines, growth factors and matrix proteins which contribute to the pro-tumorigenic marrow microenvironment. The inflammatory cytokines IFN-γ and TNF-α change the BMSC secretome and we hypothesized that factors produced by tumors or leukemia would also affect the BMSC secretome and investigated the interaction of leukemia cells with BMSCs. Methods BMSCs from healthy subjects were co-cultured with three myeloid leukemia cell lines (TF-1, TF-1α and K562) using a trans-well system. Following co-culture, the BMSCs and leukemia cells were analyzed by global gene expression analysis and culture supernatants were analyzed for protein expression. As a control, CD34+ cells were also cocultured with BMSCs. Results Co-culture induced leukemia cell gene expression changes in stem cell pluripotency, TGF-β signaling and carcinoma signaling pathways. BMSCs co-cultured with leukemia cells up-regulated a number of proinflammatory genes including IL-17 signaling-related genes and IL-8 and CCL2 levels were increased in co-culture supernatants. In contrast, purine metabolism, mTOR signaling and EIF2 signaling pathways genes were up-regulated in BMSCs co-cultured with CD34+ cells. Conclusions BMSCs react to the presence of leukemia cells undergoing changes in the cytokine and chemokine secretion profiles. Thus, BMSCs and leukemia cells both contribute to the creation of a competitive niche more favorable for leukemia stem cells. PMID:24304929

  4. Induced pluripotent stem cells meet genome editing

    PubMed Central

    Hockemeyer, Dirk; Jaenisch, Rudolf

    2016-01-01

    It is extremely rare for a single experiment to be so impactful and timely that it shapes and forecasts the experiments of the next decade. Here, we review how two such experiments --the generation of human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and the development of CRISPR/Cas9 technology-- have fundamentally reshaped our approach to biomedical research, stem cell biology and human genetics. We will also highlight the previous knowledge that iPSC and CRISPR/Cas9 technologies were built on as this groundwork demonstrated the need for solutions and the benefits that these technologies provided, and have set the stage for their success. PMID:27152442

  5. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Meet Genome Editing.

    PubMed

    Hockemeyer, Dirk; Jaenisch, Rudolf

    2016-05-05

    It is extremely rare for a single experiment to be so impactful and timely that it shapes and forecasts the experiments of the next decade. Here, we review how two such experiments-the generation of human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and the development of CRISPR/Cas9 technology-have fundamentally reshaped our approach to biomedical research, stem cell biology, and human genetics. We will also highlight the previous knowledge that iPSC and CRISPR/Cas9 technologies were built on as this groundwork demonstrated the need for solutions and the benefits that these technologies provided and set the stage for their success.

  6. Induced pluripotent stem cells: the new patient?

    PubMed

    Bellin, Milena; Marchetto, Maria C; Gage, Fred H; Mummery, Christine L

    2012-11-01

    Worldwide increases in life expectancy have been paralleled by a greater prevalence of chronic and age-associated disorders, particularly of the cardiovascular, neural and metabolic systems. This has not been met by commensurate development of new drugs and therapies, which is in part owing to the difficulty in modelling human diseases in laboratory assays or experimental animals. Patient-specific induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are an emerging paradigm that may address this. Reprogrammed somatic cells from patients are already applied in disease modelling, drug testing and drug discovery, thus enabling researchers to undertake studies for treating diseases 'in a dish', which was previously inconceivable.

  7. Virus-induced aggregates in infected cells.

    PubMed

    Moshe, Adi; Gorovits, Rena

    2012-10-17

    During infection, many viruses induce cellular remodeling, resulting in the formation of insoluble aggregates/inclusions, usually containing viral structural proteins. Identification of aggregates has become a useful diagnostic tool for certain viral infections. There is wide variety of viral aggregates, which differ by their location, size, content and putative function. The role of aggregation in the context of a specific virus is often poorly understood, especially in the case of plant viruses. The aggregates are utilized by viruses to house a large complex of proteins of both viral and host origin to promote virus replication, translation, intra- and intercellular transportation. Aggregated structures may protect viral functional complexes from the cellular degradation machinery. Alternatively, the activation of host defense mechanisms may involve sequestration of virus components in aggregates, followed by their neutralization as toxic for the host cell. The diversity of virus-induced aggregates in mammalian and plant cells is the subject of this review.

  8. Ischemia-induced endothelial cell dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Keep, R F; Andjelkovic, A V; Stamatovic, S M; Shakui, P; Ennis, S R

    2005-01-01

    Hemorrhagic transformation upon reperfusion therapy has focused attention on ischemia-induced endothelial dysfunction. This study examined whether hyperglycemia may induce hemorrhagic transformation by enhancing endothelial mitochondrial damage during ischemia and whether preconditioning (PC) stimuli may limit ischemia-induced endothelial damage. In vivo, rats received 2.8 M D-glucose or arabinose (1 ml/100 g; i.p.) prior to undergoing two hours of middle cerebral artery occlusion and transcardiac fixation for electron microscopy. In vitro, brain endothelial cells were exposed to a PC impulse (short-term oxygen glucose deprivation; OGD) prior to an injurious event (5 hours OGD). Endothelial injury was assessed by measuring lactate dehydrogenase release. Hyperglycemia during cerebral ischemia resulted in marked changes in endothelial morphology and mitochondrial swelling. Thus, in the ischemic hemisphere, there was no evidence of endothelial mitochondrial swelling in normoglycemic rats (mean profile width 0.22 +/- 0.04 vs. 0.17 +/- 0.01 microm in contralateral hemisphere) but there was marked swelling in hyperglycemic rats (0.44 +/- 0.02 microm). In vitro, cells preconditioned with one hour of OGD one day prior to 5 hours of OGD, showed reduced lactate dehydrogenase release (p < 0.05). In conclusion, hyperglycemia may have specific adverse effects on endothelial cell mitochondria during ischemia. Preventing those effects may help to ameliorate blood-brain barrier disruption on reperfusion. Insights into how to prevent endothelial injury may come from determining the mechanisms involved in endothelial preconditioning.

  9. Human mesenchymal stem cell homing induced by SKOV3 cells

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Dongmei; Xie, Xiaojuan; Qi, Pengwei; Yang, Xianan; Jin, Ximeng

    2017-01-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) homing is the migration of endogenous and exogenous hMSCS to the target organs and the subsequent colonization under the action chemotaxic factors. This is an important process involved in the repair of damaged tissues. However, we know little about the mechanism of hMSC homing. Stromal cell derived factor-1 (SDF-1) is a cytokine secreted by stromal cells. Its only receptor CXCR4 is widely expressed in blood cells, immune cells and cells in the central nervous system. SDF-1/CXCR4 signaling pathway plays an important role in hMSC homing and tissue repair. Human cbll1 gene encodes E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase Hakai (also known as CBLL1) consisting of RING-finger domain that is involved in ubiquitination, endocytosis and degradation of epithelial cadherin (E-cadherin) as well as in the regulation of cell proliferation. We successfully constructed LV3-CXCR4 siRNA lentiviral vector, LV3-CBLL1 RNAi lentiviral vector and the corresponding cell systems which were used to induce hMSC homing in the presence of SKOV3 cells. Thus the mechanism of hMSC homing was studied. PMID:28337256

  10. UV-Induced Cell Death in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Nawkar, Ganesh M.; Maibam, Punyakishore; Park, Jung Hoon; Sahi, Vaidurya Pratap; Lee, Sang Yeol; Kang, Chang Ho

    2013-01-01

    Plants are photosynthetic organisms that depend on sunlight for energy. Plants respond to light through different photoreceptors and show photomorphogenic development. Apart from Photosynthetically Active Radiation (PAR; 400–700 nm), plants are exposed to UV light, which is comprised of UV-C (below 280 nm), UV-B (280–320 nm) and UV-A (320–390 nm). The atmospheric ozone layer protects UV-C radiation from reaching earth while the UVR8 protein acts as a receptor for UV-B radiation. Low levels of UV-B exposure initiate signaling through UVR8 and induce secondary metabolite genes involved in protection against UV while higher dosages are very detrimental to plants. It has also been reported that genes involved in MAPK cascade help the plant in providing tolerance against UV radiation. The important targets of UV radiation in plant cells are DNA, lipids and proteins and also vital processes such as photosynthesis. Recent studies showed that, in response to UV radiation, mitochondria and chloroplasts produce a reactive oxygen species (ROS). Arabidopsis metacaspase-8 (AtMC8) is induced in response to oxidative stress caused by ROS, which acts downstream of the radical induced cell death (AtRCD1) gene making plants vulnerable to cell death. The studies on salicylic and jasmonic acid signaling mutants revealed that SA and JA regulate the ROS level and antagonize ROS mediated cell death. Recently, molecular studies have revealed genes involved in response to UV exposure, with respect to programmed cell death (PCD). PMID:23344059

  11. UV-Induced cell death in plants.

    PubMed

    Nawkar, Ganesh M; Maibam, Punyakishore; Park, Jung Hoon; Sahi, Vaidurya Pratap; Lee, Sang Yeol; Kang, Chang Ho

    2013-01-14

    Plants are photosynthetic organisms that depend on sunlight for energy. Plants respond to light through different photoreceptors and show photomorphogenic development. Apart from Photosynthetically Active Radiation (PAR; 400-700 nm), plants are exposed to UV light, which is comprised of UV-C (below 280 nm), UV-B (280-320 nm) and UV-A (320-390 nm). The atmospheric ozone layer protects UV-C radiation from reaching earth while the UVR8 protein acts as a receptor for UV-B radiation. Low levels of UV-B exposure initiate signaling through UVR8 and induce secondary metabolite genes involved in protection against UV while higher dosages are very detrimental to plants. It has also been reported that genes involved in MAPK cascade help the plant in providing tolerance against UV radiation. The important targets of UV radiation in plant cells are DNA, lipids and proteins and also vital processes such as photosynthesis. Recent studies showed that, in response to UV radiation, mitochondria and chloroplasts produce a reactive oxygen species (ROS). Arabidopsis metacaspase-8 (AtMC8) is induced in response to oxidative stress caused by ROS, which acts downstream of the radical induced cell death (AtRCD1) gene making plants vulnerable to cell death. The studies on salicylic and jasmonic acid signaling mutants revealed that SA and JA regulate the ROS level and antagonize ROS mediated cell death. Recently, molecular studies have revealed genes involved in response to UV exposure, with respect to programmed cell death (PCD).

  12. ER stress-induced cell death mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Sano, Renata; Reed, John C.

    2013-01-01

    The endoplasmic-reticulum (ER) stress response constitutes a cellular process that is triggered by a variety of conditions that disturb folding of proteins in the ER. Eukaryotic cells have developed an evolutionarily conserved adaptive mechanism, the unfolded protein response (UPR), which aims to clear unfolded proteins and restore ER homeostasis. In cases where ER stress cannot be reversed, cellular functions deteriorate, often leading to cell death. Accumulating evidence implicates ER stress-induced cellular dysfunction and cell death as major contributors to many diseases, making modulators of ER stress pathways potentially attractive targets for therapeutics discovery. Here, we summarize recent advances in understanding the diversity of molecular mechanisms that govern ER stress signaling in health and disease. PMID:23850759

  13. Derivation of induced pluripotent stem cells from pig somatic cells

    PubMed Central

    Ezashi, Toshihiko; Telugu, Bhanu Prakash V. L.; Alexenko, Andrei P.; Sachdev, Shrikesh; Sinha, Sunilima; Roberts, R. Michael

    2009-01-01

    For reasons that are unclear the production of embryonic stem cells from ungulates has proved elusive. Here, we describe induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) derived from porcine fetal fibroblasts by lentiviral transduction of 4 human (h) genes, hOCT4, hSOX2, hKLF4, and hc-MYC, the combination commonly used to create iPSC in mouse and human. Cells were cultured on irradiated mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF) and in medium supplemented with knockout serum replacement and FGF2. Compact colonies of alkaline phosphatase-positive cells emerged after ≈22 days, providing an overall reprogramming efficiency of ≈0.1%. The cells expressed porcine OCT4, NANOG, and SOX2 and had high telomerase activity, but also continued to express the 4 human transgenes. Unlike human ESC, the porcine iPSC (piPSC) were positive for SSEA-1, but negative for SSEA-3 and -4. Transcriptional profiling on Affymetrix (porcine) microarrays and real time RT-PCR supported the conclusion that reprogramming to pluripotency was complete. One cell line, ID6, had a normal karyotype, a cell doubling time of ≈17 h, and has been maintained through >220 doublings. The ID6 line formed embryoid bodies, expressing genes representing all 3 germ layers when cultured under differentiating conditions, and teratomas containing tissues of ectoderm, mesoderm, and endoderm origin in nude mice. We conclude that porcine somatic cells can be reprogrammed to form piPSC. Such cell lines derived from individual animals could provide a means for testing the safety and efficacy of stem cell-derived tissue grafts when returned to the same pigs at a later age. PMID:19541600

  14. Derivation of induced pluripotent stem cells from pig somatic cells.

    PubMed

    Ezashi, Toshihiko; Telugu, Bhanu Prakash V L; Alexenko, Andrei P; Sachdev, Shrikesh; Sinha, Sunilima; Roberts, R Michael

    2009-07-07

    For reasons that are unclear the production of embryonic stem cells from ungulates has proved elusive. Here, we describe induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) derived from porcine fetal fibroblasts by lentiviral transduction of 4 human (h) genes, hOCT4, hSOX2, hKLF4, and hc-MYC, the combination commonly used to create iPSC in mouse and human. Cells were cultured on irradiated mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF) and in medium supplemented with knockout serum replacement and FGF2. Compact colonies of alkaline phosphatase-positive cells emerged after approximately 22 days, providing an overall reprogramming efficiency of approximately 0.1%. The cells expressed porcine OCT4, NANOG, and SOX2 and had high telomerase activity, but also continued to express the 4 human transgenes. Unlike human ESC, the porcine iPSC (piPSC) were positive for SSEA-1, but negative for SSEA-3 and -4. Transcriptional profiling on Affymetrix (porcine) microarrays and real time RT-PCR supported the conclusion that reprogramming to pluripotency was complete. One cell line, ID6, had a normal karyotype, a cell doubling time of approximately 17 h, and has been maintained through >220 doublings. The ID6 line formed embryoid bodies, expressing genes representing all 3 germ layers when cultured under differentiating conditions, and teratomas containing tissues of ectoderm, mesoderm, and endoderm origin in nude mice. We conclude that porcine somatic cells can be reprogrammed to form piPSC. Such cell lines derived from individual animals could provide a means for testing the safety and efficacy of stem cell-derived tissue grafts when returned to the same pigs at a later age.

  15. Induced Accelerated Aging in Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Lines from Patients with Parkinson’s Disease

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-11-01

    Pluripotent Stem Cell Lines from Patients with Parkinson’s Disease PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. Birgitt Schuele CONTRACTING...5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Induced Accelerated Aging in Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Lines from Patients with Parkinson’s Disease 5b. GRANT...induced pluripotent stem cells , cellular model, accelerated aging, lamin A, progerin 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT

  16. Montelukast Induces Apoptosis-Inducing Factor-Mediated Cell Death of Lung Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Wei-An; Tsai, Pei-Hsun; Wu, Cheng-Ying; Ho, Ya-Wen; Yen, Meng-Chi; Lin, Yi-Shiuan; Kuo, Po-Lin; Hsu, Ya-Ling

    2017-01-01

    Developing novel chemo-prevention techniques and advancing treatment are key elements to beating lung cancer, the most common cause of cancer mortality worldwide. Our previous cohort study showed that cysteinyl leukotriene receptor antagonists, mainly montelukast, decreased the lung cancer risk in asthma patients. In the current study, we conducted in vivo and in vitro experiments to demonstrate the inhibiting effect of montelukast on lung cancer and to investigate the underlying mechanisms. Using Lewis lung carcinoma-bearing mice, we showed that feeding montelukast significantly delayed the tumor growth in mice (p < 0.0001). Montelukast inhibited cell proliferation and colony formation and induced the cell death of lung cancer cells. Further investigation showed the down-regulation of B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2), up-regulation of Bcl-2 homologous antagonist/killer (Bak), and nuclear translocation of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) in montelukast-treated lung cancer cells. Montelukast also markedly decreased the phosphorylation of several proteins, such as with no lysine 1 (WNK1), protein kinase B (Akt), extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (Erk1/2), MAPK/Erk kinase (MEK), and proline-rich Akt substrate of 40-kDa (PRAS40), which might contribute to cell death. In conclusion, montelukast induced lung cancer cell death via the nuclear translocation of AIF. This study confirmed the chemo-preventive effect of montelukast shown in our previous cohort study. The utility of montelukast in cancer prevention and treatment thus deserves further studies. PMID:28672809

  17. Reprogramming T cell Lymphocytes to Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bared, Kalia

    The discovery of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) provided a novel technology for the study of development and pharmacology and complement embryonic stem cells (ES) for cell therapy applications. Though iPSC are derived from adult tissue they are comparable to ES cells in their behavior; multi-lineage differentiation and self-renewal. This makes iPSC research appealing because they can be studied in great detail and expanded in culture broadly. Fibroblasts were the first cell type reprogrammed to an iPSC using a retrovirus vector, since then alternative cell types including lymphocytes have been used to generate iPSC. Different types of vectors have also been developed to enhance iPSC formation and quality. However, specific T lymphocyte subsets have not been shown to reprogram to a pluripotent state to date. Here, we proposed to derive iPSC from peripheral blood effector and central memory T cells, reasoning that the resultant iPSC will maintain the epigenetic memory of a T lymphocyte, including the T cell receptor (TCR) gene rearrangement. This epigenetic memory will enable the differentiation and expansion of T cell iPSC into professional T cells containing a specific TCR. These could then be used for cell therapy to target specific antigens, as well as to improve culture techniques to expand T cells in vitro. We studied different gene delivery methods to derive iPSC from different types of T lymphocytes. We assessed the viability of viral transduction using flow cytometry to detect green fluorescent marker contained in the viral construct and quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) to detect Oct4, Klf4, Sox2, and c-Myc gene expression. Our results demonstrate that the Sendai virus construct is the most feasible platform to reprogram T lymphocytes. We anticipate that this platform will provide an efficient and safe approach to derive iPSC from different T cell subsets, including memory T cells.

  18. Induction of Germ Cell-like Cells from Porcine Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hanning; Xiang, Jinzhu; Zhang, Wei; Li, Junhong; Wei, Qingqing; Zhong, Liang; Ouyang, Hongsheng; Han, Jianyong

    2016-01-01

    The ability to generate germ cells from pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) is valuable for human regenerative medicine and animal breeding. Germ cell-like cells (GCLCs) have been differentiated from mouse and human PSCs, but not from porcine PSCs, which are considered an ideal model for stem cell applications. Here, we developed a defined culture system for the induction of primordial germ cell-like cells (PGCLCs) from porcine induced PSCs (piPSCs). The identity of the PGCLCs was characterized by observing cell morphology, detecting germ cell marker gene expression and evaluating epigenetic properties. PGCLCs could further differentiate into spermatogonial stem cell-like cells (SSCLCs) in vitro. Importantly, meiosis occurred during SSCLC induction. Xenotransplantation of GCLCs into seminiferous tubules of infertile immunodeficient mice resulted in immunohistochemically identifiable germ cells in vivo. Overall, our study provides a feasible strategy for directing piPSCs to the germ cell fate and lays a foundation for exploring germ cell development mechanisms. PMID:27264660

  19. How tolerogenic dendritic cells induce regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Maldonado, Roberto A.; von Andrian, Ulrich H.

    2010-01-01

    Since their discovery by Steinman and Cohn in 1973, dendritic cells (DCs) have become increasingly recognized for their crucial role as regulators of innate and adaptive immunity. DCs are exquisitely adept at acquiring, processing and presenting antigens to T cells. They also adjust the context (and hence the outcome) of antigen presentation in response to a plethora of environmental inputs that signal the occurence of pathogens or tissue damage. Such signals generally boost DC maturation, which promotes their migration from peripheral tissues into and within secondary lymphoid organs and their capacity to induce and regulate effector T cell responses. Conversely, more recent observations indicate that DCs are also crucial to ensure immunological peace. Indeed, DCs constantly present innocuous self and non-self antigens in a fashion that promotes tolerance, at least in part, through the control of regulatory T cells (Tregs). Tregs are specialized T cells that exert their immuno-suppressive function through a variety of mechanisms affecting both DCs and effector cells. Here, we review recent advances in our understanding of the relationship between tolerogenic DCs and Tregs. PMID:21056730

  20. PMA and Ionomycin Induce Glioblastoma Cell Death: Activation-Induced Cell-Death-Like Phenomena Occur in Glioma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Han, Sheng; Tie, Xinxin; Meng, Lingxuan; Wang, Yunjie; Wu, Anhua

    2013-01-01

    Phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) and ionomycin (Io) can induce T cell activation and proliferation. Furthermore, they stimulate activation-induced cell death (AICD) in mature lymphocytes via Fas/Fas ligand (FasL) up-regulation. In this study, we explored the influence of PMA/Io treatment on glioblastoma cells, and found that AICD-like phenomena may also occur in glioma. Using the MTT assay and cell counting, we demonstrated that treatment of PMA/Io significantly inhibited the proliferation of glioma cell lines, U87 and U251. TUNEL assays and transmission electron microscopy revealed that PMA/Io markedly induced U87 and U251 cell apoptosis. Propidium iodide staining and flow cytometry showed that treatment with PMA/Io resulted in an arrestment of cell cycle and an increase in cell death. Using real-time PCR and western blot, we found that PMA/Io up-regulated the expression of Fas and FasL at both mRNA and protein level, which confirmed that PMA/Io induced glioma cell death. Specific knockdown of NFAT1 expression by small hairpin RNA greatly reduced the PMA/Io induced cell death and apoptosis by inhibition of FasL expression. Microarray analysis showed that the expression of NFAT1 significantly correlated with the expression of Fas. The coexistence of Fas with NFAT1 in vivo provides the background for AICD-like phenomena to occur in glioma. These findings demonstrate that PMA/Io can induce glioblastoma cell death through the NFAT1-Fas/FasL pathway. Glioma-related AICD-like phenomena may provide a novel avenue for glioma treatment. PMID:24130787

  1. Gambogic acid induces apoptosis in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma cells via inducing proteasome inhibition.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xianping; Lan, Xiaoying; Chen, Xin; Zhao, Chong; Li, Xiaofen; Liu, Shouting; Huang, Hongbiao; Liu, Ningning; Zang, Dan; Liao, Yuning; Zhang, Peiquan; Wang, Xuejun; Liu, Jinbao

    2015-04-08

    Resistance to chemotherapy is a great challenge to improving the survival of patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), especially those with activated B-cell-like DLBCL (ABC-DLBCL). Therefore it is urgent to search for novel agents for the treatment of DLBCL. Gambogic acid (GA), a small molecule derived from Chinese herb gamboges, has been approved for Phase II clinical trial for cancer therapy by Chinese FDA. In the present study, we investigated the effect of GA on cell survival and apoptosis in DLBCL cells including both GCB- and ABC-DLBCL cells. We found that GA induced growth inhibition and apoptosis of both GCB- and ABC-DLBCL cells in vitro and in vivo, which is associated with proteasome malfunction. These findings provide significant pre-clinical evidence for potential usage of GA in DLBCL therapy particularly in ABC-DLBCL treatment.

  2. Gambogic acid induces apoptosis in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma cells via inducing proteasome inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xianping; Lan, Xiaoying; Chen, Xin; Zhao, Chong; Li, Xiaofen; Liu, Shouting; Huang, Hongbiao; Liu, Ningning; Zang, Dan; Liao, Yuning; Zhang, Peiquan; Wang, Xuejun; Liu, Jinbao

    2015-01-01

    Resistance to chemotherapy is a great challenge to improving the survival of patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), especially those with activated B-cell-like DLBCL (ABC-DLBCL). Therefore it is urgent to search for novel agents for the treatment of DLBCL. Gambogic acid (GA), a small molecule derived from Chinese herb gamboges, has been approved for Phase II clinical trial for cancer therapy by Chinese FDA. In the present study, we investigated the effect of GA on cell survival and apoptosis in DLBCL cells including both GCB- and ABC-DLBCL cells. We found that GA induced growth inhibition and apoptosis of both GCB- and ABC-DLBCL cells in vitro and in vivo, which is associated with proteasome malfunction. These findings provide significant pre-clinical evidence for potential usage of GA in DLBCL therapy particularly in ABC-DLBCL treatment. PMID:25853502

  3. Solar light induced opacity of MIND cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznicki, Zbigniew T.; Meyrueis, Patrick

    2006-04-01

    Multi-interface novel devices (MIND) exhibit a dramatically low UV- and blue-spectrum photovoltaic (PV) performance. A paradox could even be observed, the better the electronic passivation the poorer the PV performance. The paradox appears under relatively low excitations in comparison with intense laser fluxes usually at its origin. The effect can be explained by solar light induced opacity, which reduces considerably or even totally the photon penetration into deeper layers, from which exclusively the photocarrier collection is possible. This opacity results from a feedback occasioned by the free-carrier absorption: better surface passivation, higher free-carrier density, stronger surface dead zone absorptance. The total energy of the incident short wavelength beam can be absorbed before a carrier collection limit buried in the emitter. This limit acts simultaneously on the electronic performance, blocking free-carriers, and on the optical performance, being at the origin of an enhancement of the surface absorptance. As a consequence, a thin surface zone dominates the optical functions of MIND cells through the free-carrier gas confined inside it. In this work we report specific effects concerning the solar-light induced opacity in MIND cells. The investigation allows modification of the free-carrier confinement using different device architectures. The main characterization methods were reflectivity and spectral response with a varying incident beam. The results prove the domination of the free-carrier optical functions on the MIND PV conversion.

  4. Strategies to generate induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Michael; Zavazava, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    The isolation of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) has furthered our understanding of normal embryonic development and fueled the progression of stem cell derived therapies. However, the generation of ESCs requires the destruction of an embryo, making the use of these cells ethically controversial. In 2006 the Yamanaka group overcame this ethical controversy when they described a protocol whereby somatic cells could be dedifferentiated into a pluripotent state following the transduction of a four transcription factor cocktail. Following this initial study numerous groups have described protocols to generate induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). These protocols have simplified the reprogramming strategy by employing polycistronic reprogramming cassettes and flanking such polycistronic cassettes with loxP or piggyBac recognition sequences. Thus, these strategies allow for excision of the entire transgene cassette, limiting the potential for the integration of exogenous transgenes to have detrimental effect. Others have prevented the potentially deleterious effects of integrative reprogramming strategies by using non-integrating adenoviral vectors, traditional recombinant DNA transfection, transfection of minicircle DNA, or transfection of episomally maintained EBNA1/OriP plasmids. Interestingly, transfection of mRNA or miRNA has also been shown to be capable of reprogramming cells, and multiple groups have developed protocols using cell penetrating peptide tagged reprogramming factors to de-differentiate somatic cells in the absence of exogenous nucleic acid. Despite the numerous different reprogramming strategies that have been developed, the reprogramming process remains extremely inefficient. To overcome this inefficiency multiple groups have successfully used small molecules such as valproic acid, sodium butyrate, PD0325901, and others to generate iPSCs.The fast paced field of cellular reprogramming has recently produced protocols to generate iPSCs using non

  5. Metabolic Stress Induced by Arginine Deprivation Induces Autophagy Cell Death in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-01

    Arginine deiminase as a novel therapy for prostate cancer induces autophagy and caspase-independent apoptosis. Cancer Research, 69(2):700-708...TITLE: Metabolic stress induced by arginine deprivation induces autophagy cell death in prostate cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Richard Bold, MD...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Metabolic stress induced by arginine deprivation induces autophagy cell 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER death in prostate cancer 5b

  6. [Current progress and application prospects of induced pluripotent stem cells].

    PubMed

    Qin, Tong; Miao, Xiang-Yang

    2010-12-01

    Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells can be directly generated from somatic cells by transduction of a few defined transcription factors. This technique avoids immunological rejection and ethical difficulties, which is a great revolution in life sciences. Like embryonic stem (ES) cells, iPS cells have the ability to self-renew through mitotic cell division and thus remain in its undifferentiated state and the ability to differentiate into not only all derivatives of the three primary germ layers: ectoderm, endoderm, and mesoderm, but also many mature cells in vitro. Therefore, iPS cells are important for theoretic study and therapeutic application. Here, we discuss recent advances in generating induced pluripotent stem cells, different reprogramming methods, and clinical applications of iPS cells. Finally, current problems of iPS cells and its prospects in transgenic animals are also discussed. This article is a summary of current research advances in reprogramming cells into induced pluripotent stem cells.

  7. Berberine Induces Caspase-Independent Cell Death in Colon Tumor Cells through Activation of Apoptosis-Inducing Factor

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lihong; Liu, Liping; Shi, Yan; Cao, Hanwei; Chaturvedi, Rupesh; Calcutt, M. Wade; Hu, Tianhui; Ren, Xiubao; Wilson, Keith T.; Polk, D. Brent; Yan, Fang

    2012-01-01

    Berberine, an isoquinoline alkaloid derived from plants, is a traditional medicine for treating bacterial diarrhea and intestinal parasite infections. Although berberine has recently been shown to suppress growth of several tumor cell lines, information regarding the effect of berberine on colon tumor growth is limited. Here, we investigated the mechanisms underlying the effects of berberine on regulating the fate of colon tumor cells, specifically the mouse immorto-Min colonic epithelial (IMCE) cells carrying the Apcmin mutation, and of normal colon epithelial cells, namely young adult mouse colonic epithelium (YAMC) cells. Berberine decreased colon tumor colony formation in agar, and induced cell death and LDH release in a time- and concentration-dependent manner in IMCE cells. In contrast, YAMC cells were not sensitive to berberine-induced cell death. Berberine did not stimulate caspase activation, and PARP cleavage and berberine-induced cell death were not affected by a caspase inhibitor in IMCE cells. Rather, berberine stimulated a caspase-independent cell death mediator, apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) release from mitochondria and nuclear translocation in a ROS production-dependent manner. Amelioration of berberine-stimulated ROS production or suppression of AIF expression blocked berberine-induced cell death and LDH release in IMCE cells. Furthermore, two targets of ROS production in cells, cathepsin B release from lysosomes and PARP activation were induced by berberine. Blockage of either of these pathways decreased berberine-induced AIF activation and cell death in IMCE cells. Thus, berberine-stimulated ROS production leads to cathepsin B release and PARP activation-dependent AIF activation, resulting in caspase-independent cell death in colon tumor cells. Notably, normal colon epithelial cells are less susceptible to berberine-induced cell death, which suggests the specific inhibitory effects of berberine on colon tumor cell growth. PMID:22574158

  8. [Application of small molecule compounds inducing differentiation of stem cells].

    PubMed

    Li, Xia; Shan, Lei; Li, Wen-lin; Zhang, Shou-de; Zhang, Wei-dong

    2011-02-01

    With the development of stem cells and regenerative medicine (treatment of various diseases using stem cells) research, the induction of differentiation of human stem cell technology has also made significant progress. The development of chemical biology offers a variety of small biological molecules for stem cell biology. This review focuses on how small molecule compounds (natural and synthetic) induce differentiation of stem cells.

  9. Bovine trophectoderm cells induced from bovine fibroblasts with induced pluripotent stem cell reprogramming factors.

    PubMed

    Talbot, Neil C; Sparks, Wendy O; Phillips, Caitlin E; Ealy, Alan D; Powell, Anne M; Caperna, Thomas J; Garrett, Wesley M; Donovan, David M; Blomberg, Le Ann

    2017-06-01

    Thirteen independent induced bovine trophectroderm (iBT) cell lines were established by reprogramming bovine fetal liver-derived fibroblasts after viral-vector transduction with either six or eight factors, including POU5F1 (OCT4), KLF4, SOX2, MYC, NANOG, LIN28, SV40 large T antigen, and hTERT. Light- and electron-microscopy analysis showed that the iBT cells had epithelial cell morphology typical of bovine trophectoderm cells. Reverse-transcription-PCR assays indicated that all of the cell lines expressed interferon-tau (IFNT) at passages 1 or 2. At later passages (≥ passage 8), however, immunoblot and antiviral activity assays revealed that more than half of the iBT cell lines had stopped expressing IFNT. Messenger RNAs specific to trophectoderm differentiation and function were found in the iBT cell lines, and 2-dimensional-gel analysis for cellular proteins showed an expression pattern similar to that of trophectoderm cell lines derived from bovine blastocysts. Integration of some of the human reprogramming factors, including POU5F1, KLF4, SOX2, MYC, NANOG, and LIN28, were detected by PCR, but their transcription was mostly absent in the iBT cell lines. Gene expression assessment of endogenous bovine reprogramming factor orthologs revealed endogenous bLIN28 and bMYC transcripts in all; bSOX2 and bNANOG in none; and bKLF4 and bPOU5F1 in less than half of the iBT cell lines. These results demonstrate that bovine trophectoderm can be induced via reprogramming factor expression from bovine liver-derived fibroblasts, although other fibroblast populations-e.g., derived from fetal thigh tissue-may produce similar results, albeit at lower frequencies. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Artesunate induces AIF-dependent apoptosis in A549 cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chen-juan; Chen, Tong-Sheng

    2012-03-01

    Artesunate (ART), a semi-synthetic derivative of the sesquiterpene artemisinin extracted from the Chinese herb Artemisia annua, exerts a broad spectrum of clinical activity against human cancers. It has been shown that ART induces cancer cells death through apoptosis pathway. This study investigated whether ART treatment induced reactive oxygen species (ROS)-dependent cell death in the apoptosis fashion in human lung adenocarconoma A549 cell line and the proapoptotic protein apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) is involved in ART-induced apoptosis. Cells treated with ART exhibited typical apoptotic morphology as chromatin condensation, margination and shrunken nucleus. ART treatment also induced a loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and AIF release from mitochondria. Silencing AIF can remarkable attenuated ART-induced apoptosis. Collectively, ART induces apoptosis by caspase-independent intrinsic pathway in A549 cells.

  11. PDGF upregulates CLEC-2 to induce T regulatory cells.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Sudhanshu; Ganguly, Sreerupa; Hajian, Pega; Cao, Jia-Ning; Agrawal, Anshu

    2015-10-06

    The effect of platelet derived growth factor (PDGF) on immune cells is not elucidated. Here, we demonstrate PDGF inhibited the maturation of human DCs and induced IL-10 secretion. Culture of PDGF-DCs with T cells induced the polarization of T cells towards FoxP3 expressing T regulatory cells that secreted IL-10. Gene expression studies revealed that PDGF induced the expression of C-type lectin like receptor member 2, (CLEC-2) receptor on DCs. Furthermore, DCs transfected with CLEC-2 induced T regulatory cells in DC-T cell co-culture. CLEC-2 is naturally expressed on platelets. Therefore, to confirm whether CLEC-2 is responsible for inducing the T regulatory cells, T cells were cultured with either CLEC-2 expressing platelets or soluble CLEC-2. Both conditions resulted in the induction of regulatory T cells. The generation of T regulatory cells was probably due to the binding of CLEC-2 with its ligand podoplanin on T cells, since crosslinking of podoplanin on the T cells also resulted in the induction of T regulatory cells. These data demonstrate that PDGF upregulates the expression of CLEC-2 on cells to induce T regulatory cells.

  12. [Dementia study using induced pluripotent stem cells].

    PubMed

    Matsuzono, Kosuke; Abe, Koji; Inoue, Haruhisa

    2016-03-01

    Recent developments in induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology have facilitated, and have contributed to overcome the difficulty of modeling dementia caused by Alzheimer's disease (AD), dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD), etc. The following models using iPSCs were reported: the pathophysiology caused by gene mutations such as presenilin or amyloid β precursor protein in AD, α-synuclein in DLB, and microtubule-associated protein tau, fused in sarcoma, progranulin, or chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 in FTLD, anti-AD drug screening, sortilin-related receptor L 1 haplotype influence in sporadic AD, and amyloid β secretion in Down syndrome. Patient-specific iPSC could be expected to reveal the disease pathology and lead to drug discoveries for dementia patients.

  13. Successful differentiation to T cells, but unsuccessful B-cell generation, from B-cell-derived induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wada, Haruka; Kojo, Satoshi; Kusama, Chie; Okamoto, Naoki; Sato, Yorino; Ishizuka, Bunpei; Seino, Ken-ichiro

    2011-01-01

    Forced expression of certain transcription factors in somatic cells results in generation of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, which differentiate into various cell types. We investigated T-cell and B-cell lineage differentiation from iPS cells in vitro. To evaluate the impact of iPS cell source, murine splenic B-cell-derived iPS (B-iPS) cells were generated after retroviral transduction of four transcription factors (Oct4, Sox2, Klf4 and c-Myc). B-iPS cells were identical to embryonic stem (ES) cells and mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF)-derived iPS cells in morphology, ES cell marker expression as well as teratoma and chimera mouse formation. Both B-iPS and MEF-derived iPS cells differentiated into lymphocytes in OP9 co-culture systems. Both efficiently differentiated into T-cell lineage that produced IFN-γ on T-cell receptor stimulation. However, iPS cells including B-iPS cells were relatively resistant to B-cell lineage differentiation. One of the reasons of the failure of B-cell lineage differentiation seemed due to a defect of Pax5 expression in the differentiated cells. Therefore, current in vitro differentiation systems using iPS cells are sufficient for inducing T-cell but not B-cell lineage.

  14. Mechanisms of sulindac-induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest.

    PubMed

    Jung, Barbara; Barbier, Valerie; Brickner, Howard; Welsh, John; Fotedar, Arun; McClelland, Michael

    2005-02-28

    The mechanism underlying the chemopreventive effects of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug sulindac remains unclear. Its active metabolite, sulindac sulfide, induces cell cycle arrest as well as apoptosis in mammalian cell lines. We now show that in murine thymocytes, sulindac sulfide-induced cell death is p53, bax, Fas, and FasL independent. In contrast, bcl2 transgenic thymocytes are resistant to sulindac sulfide-induced apoptosis. In addition, we demonstrate that sulindac sulfide-induced cell cycle arrest in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) is partly mediated by the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein (Rb) and the cyclin kinase inhibitor p21waf1/cip1. Furthermore, MEFs deficient in p21 or Rb are more susceptible to sulindac sulfide-induced cell death. These results suggest that sulindac may selectively target premalignant cells with cell cycle checkpoint deficits.

  15. α-Mangostin Induces Apoptosis and Cell Cycle Arrest in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cell

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Hyun-Ho; Park, Bong-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Mangosteen has long been used as a traditional medicine and is known to have antibacterial, antioxidant, and anticancer effects. Although the effects of α-mangostin, a natural compound extracted from the pericarp of mangosteen, have been investigated in many studies, there is limited data on the effects of the compound in human oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). In this study, α-mangostin was assessed as a potential anticancer agent against human OSCC cells. α-Mangostin inhibited cell proliferation and induced cell death in OSCC cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner with little to no effect on normal human PDLF cells. α-Mangostin treatment clearly showed apoptotic evidences such as nuclear fragmentation and accumulation of annexin V and PI-positive cells on OSCC cells. α-Mangostin treatment also caused the collapse of mitochondrial membrane potential and the translocation of cytochrome c from the mitochondria into the cytosol. The expressions of the mitochondria-related proteins were activated by α-mangostin. Treatment with α-mangostin also induced G1 phase arrest and downregulated cell cycle-related proteins (CDK/cyclin). Hence, α-mangostin specifically induces cell death and inhibits proliferation in OSCC cells via the intrinsic apoptosis pathway and cell cycle arrest at the G1 phase, suggesting that α-mangostin may be an effective agent for the treatment of OSCC. PMID:27478478

  16. Laser-induced lipolysis on adipose cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solarte, Efrain; Gutierrez, O.; Neira, Rodrigo; Arroyave, J.; Isaza, Carolina; Ramirez, Hugo; Rebolledo, Aldo F.; Criollo, Willian; Ortiz, C.

    2004-10-01

    Recently, a new liposuction technique, using a low-level laser (LLL) device and Ultrawet solution prior to the procedure, demonstrated the movement of fat from the inside to the outside of the adipocyte (Neira et al., 2002). To determine the mechanisms involved, we have performed Scanning and Transmission Electron Microscopy studies; Light transmittance measurements on adipocyte dilutions; and a study of laser light propagation in adipose tissue. This studies show: 1. Cellular membrane alterations. 2. LLL is capable to reach the deep adipose tissue layer, and 3. The tumescence solution enhances the light propagation by clearing the tissue. MRI studies demonstrated the appearance of fat on laser treated abdominal tissue. Besides, adipocytes were cultivated and irradiated to observe the effects on isolated cells. These last studies show: 1. 635 nm-laser alone is capable of mobilizing cholesterol from the cell membrane; this action is enhanced by the presence of adrenaline and lidocaine. 2. Intracellular fat is released from adipocytes by co joint action of adrenaline, aminophyline and 635 nm-laser. Results are consistent with a laser induced cellular process, which causes fat release from the adipocytes into the intercellular space, besides the modification of the cellular membranes.

  17. HIV transcription is induced with some forms of cell killing

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E.; Schreck, S.; Panozzo, J.; Chang-Liu, C.-M.; Libertin, C.R.

    1996-11-01

    Using HeLa cells stably transfected with an HIV-LTR-CAT construct`, we demonstrated a peak in CAT induction that occurs in viable (but not necessarily cell-division-competent) cells 24 h following exposure to some cell-killing agents. {Gamma} rays were the only cell-killing agent which did not induce HIV transcription; this can be attributed to the fact that {gamma}-ray-induced apoptotic death requires function p53, which is missing in HeLa cells. For all other agents, HIV-LTR induction was dose-dependent and correlated with the amount of cell killing that occurred in the culture.

  18. Molecular Mechanisms of Sulfur Mustard Vesicant-Induced Cell Death: Early and Late Cell Responses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-01

    Mechanisms of Sulfur Mustard Vesicant-Induced Cell Death : Early and late cell responses 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...It possess mutagenic, carcinogenic, cytotoxic, vesicating effects, and results in cell death . However, the biomedical mechanism of cell death induced... cell death via apoptosis: • In early stage, It induces JNK activity and then triggers apoptosis pathway. • In late stage, sulphur mustard attacks the

  19. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein induces hematopoietic stem cell senescence.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xian-Ping; Zhang, Gui-Hai; Wang, Yu-Ying; Liu, Jun; Wei, Qiang; Xu, Chun-Yan; Wang, Jian-Wei; Wang, Ya-Ping

    2013-09-01

    We have investigated oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) induced senescence in hematopoietic stem cells (HCs). Mouse Sca-1+ HCs were separated and purified using the magnetic activated cell sorting technique. Ox-LDL induced significant senescence in HCs measured by SA-β-Gal staining, and reduced CFU-Mix colony-forming capacity, arresting cells at G0/G1 phase. In agreement with the cell cycle arrest, ox-LDL markedly reduced the expression of CDK4, cyclin D, and cyclin E. As possible contributing factors for cell senescence, ox-LDL also induced cellular oxidative stress and reduced telomerase activity.

  20. Cannabinoids induce incomplete maturation of cultured human leukemia cells

    SciTech Connect

    Murison, G.; Chubb, C.B.H.; Maeda, S.; Gemmell, M.A.; Huberman, E.

    1987-08-01

    Monocyte maturation markers were induced in cultured human myeloblastic ML-2 leukemia cells after treatment for 1-6 days with 0.03-30 ..mu..M ..delta../sup 9/-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the major psychoactive component of marijuana. After a 2-day or longer treatment, 2- to 5-fold increases were found in the percentages of cells exhibiting reactivity with either the murine OKM1 monoclonal antibody of the Leu-M5 monoclonal antibody, staining positively for nonspecific esterase activity, and displaying a promonocyte morphology. The increases in these differentiation markers after treatment with 0.03-1 ..mu..M THC were dose dependent. At this dose range, THC did not cause an inhibition of cell growth. The THC-induced cell maturation was also characterized by specific changes in the patterns of newly synthesized proteins. The THC-induced differentiation did not, however, result in cells with a highly developed mature monocyte phenotype. However, treatment of these incompletely matured cells with either phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate of 1..cap alpha..,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol, which are inducers of differentiation in myeloid leukemia cells (including ML-2 cells), produced cells with a mature monocyte morphology. The ML-2 cell system described here may be a useful tool for deciphering critical biochemical events that lead to the cannabinoid-induced incomplete cell differentiation of ML-2 cells and other related cell types. Findings obtained from this system may have important implications for studies of cannabinoid effects on normal human bone-marrow progenitor cells.

  1. Glial cell derived neurotrophic factor induces spermatogonial stem cell marker genes in chicken mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Boozarpour, Sohrab; Matin, Maryam M; Momeni-Moghaddam, Madjid; Dehghani, Hesam; Mahdavi-Shahri, Naser; Sisakhtnezhad, Sajjad; Heirani-Tabasi, Asieh; Irfan-Maqsood, Muhammad; Bahrami, Ahmad Reza

    2016-06-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are known with the potential of multi-lineage differentiation. Advances in differentiation technology have also resulted in the conversion of MSCs to other kinds of stem cells. MSCs are considered as a suitable source of cells for biotechnology purposes because they are abundant, easily accessible and well characterized cells. Nowadays small molecules are introduced as novel and efficient factors to differentiate stem cells. In this work, we examined the potential of glial cell derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) for differentiating chicken MSCs toward spermatogonial stem cells. MSCs were isolated and characterized from chicken and cultured under treatment with all-trans retinoic acid (RA) or glial cell derived neurotrophic factor. Expression analysis of specific genes after 7days of RA treatment, as examined by RT-PCR, proved positive for some germ cell markers such as CVH, STRA8, PLZF and some genes involved in spermatogonial stem cell maintenance like BCL6b and c-KIT. On the other hand, GDNF could additionally induce expression of POU5F1, and NANOG as well as other genes which were induced after RA treatment. These data illustrated that GDNF is relatively more effective in diverting chicken MSCs towards Spermatogonial stem cell -like cells in chickens and suggests GDNF as a new agent to obtain transgenic poultry, nevertheless, exploitability of these cells should be verified by more experiments.

  2. Effect of chaetocin on renal cell carcinoma cells and cytokine-induced killer cells.

    PubMed

    Rombo, Roman; Weiher, Hans; Schmidt-Wolf, Ingo G H

    2016-01-01

    We examined the cytotoxic effects of chaetocin on clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) cells and the possibility to combine the effects of chaetocin with the effects of cytokine-induced killer cells (CIK) assayed by MTT assay and FACS analysis. Chaetocin is a thiodioxopiperazine produced by fungi belonging to the chaetomiaceae family. In 2007, it was first reported that chaetocin shows potent and selective ex vivo anti-cancer activity by inducing reactive oxygen species. CIK cells are generated from CD3+/CD56- T lymphocytes with double negative CD4-/CD8- phenotype that are isolated from human blood. The addition of distinct interleukins and antibodies results in the generation of CIK cells that are able to specifically target and destroy renal carcinoma cells. The results of this research state that the anti-ccRCC activity of chaetocin is weak and does not show a high grade of selectivity on clear cell renal cell carcinoma cells. Although the CIK cells show a high grade of selective anti-ccRCC activity, this effect could not be improved by the addition of chaetocin. So chaetocin seems to be no suitable agent for specific targeting ccRCC cells or for the combination therapy with CIK cells in renal cancer.

  3. Effect of chaetocin on renal cell carcinoma cells and cytokine-induced killer cells

    PubMed Central

    Rombo, Roman; Weiher, Hans; Schmidt-Wolf, Ingo G.H.

    2016-01-01

    We examined the cytotoxic effects of chaetocin on clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) cells and the possibility to combine the effects of chaetocin with the effects of cytokine-induced killer cells (CIK) assayed by MTT assay and FACS analysis. Chaetocin is a thiodioxopiperazine produced by fungi belonging to the chaetomiaceae family. In 2007, it was first reported that chaetocin shows potent and selective ex vivo anti-cancer activity by inducing reactive oxygen species. CIK cells are generated from CD3+/CD56- T lymphocytes with double negative CD4-/CD8- phenotype that are isolated from human blood. The addition of distinct interleukins and antibodies results in the generation of CIK cells that are able to specifically target and destroy renal carcinoma cells. The results of this research state that the anti-ccRCC activity of chaetocin is weak and does not show a high grade of selectivity on clear cell renal cell carcinoma cells. Although the CIK cells show a high grade of selective anti-ccRCC activity, this effect could not be improved by the addition of chaetocin. So chaetocin seems to be no suitable agent for specific targeting ccRCC cells or for the combination therapy with CIK cells in renal cancer. PMID:27141211

  4. Induced stem cells as a novel multiple sclerosis therapy

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Chong; Liu, Yan-qun; Guan, Yang-tai; Zhang, Guang-Xian

    2016-01-01

    Stem cell replacement is providing hope for many degenerative diseases that lack effective therapeutic methods including multiple sclerosis (MS), an inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system. Transplantation of neural stem cells or mesenchymal stem cells is a potential therapy for MS thanks to their capacity for cell repopulation as well as for their immunomodulatory and neurotrophic properties. Induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC), an emerging cell source in regenerative medicine, is also being tested for the treatment of MS. Remarkable improvement in mobility and robust remyelination have been observed after transplantation of iPSC-derived neural cells into demyelinated models. Direct reprogramming of somatic cells into induced neural cells, such as induced neural stem cells (iNSCs) and induced oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (iOPCs), without passing through the pluripotency stage, is an alternative for transplantation that has been proved effective in the congenital hypomyelination model. iPSC technology is rapidly progressing as efforts are being made to increase the efficiency of iPSC therapy and reduce its potential side effects. In this review, we discuss the recent advances in application of stem cells, with particular focus on induced stem/progenitor cells (iPSCs, iNSC, iOPCs), which are promising in the treatment of MS. PMID:25732737

  5. Induced Stem Cells as a Novel Multiple Sclerosis Therapy.

    PubMed

    Xie, Chong; Liu, Yan-Qun; Guan, Yang-Tai; Zhang, Guang-Xian

    2016-01-01

    Stem cell replacement is providing hope for many degenerative diseases that lack effective therapeutic methods including multiple sclerosis (MS), an inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system. Transplantation of neural stem cells or mesenchymal stem cells is a potential therapy for MS thanks to their capacity for cell repopulation as well as for their immunomodulatory and neurotrophic properties. Induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC), an emerging cell source in regenerative medicine, is also being tested for the treatment of MS. Remarkable improvement in mobility and robust remyelination have been observed after transplantation of iPSC-derived neural cells into demyelinated models. Direct reprogramming of somatic cells into induced neural cells, such as induced neural stem cells (iNSCs) and induced oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (iOPCs), without passing through the pluripotency stage, is an alternative for transplantation that has been proved effective in the congenital hypomyelination model. iPSC technology is rapidly progressing as efforts are being made to increase the efficiency of iPSC therapy and reduce its potential side effects. In this review, we discuss the recent advances in application of stem cells, with particular focus on induced stem/progenitor cells (iPSCs, iNSC, iOPCs), which are promising in the treatment of MS.

  6. Sertoli cell condition medium can induce germ like cells from bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Monfared, Mahdieh Hajian; Minaee, Bagher; Rastegar, Tayebeh; Khrazinejad, Ebrahim; Barbarestani, Mohammad

    2016-11-01

    Although many researchers have confirmed induction of germ cells from bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs), there are no reports that confirm spontaneous differentiation of germ cells from BMMSCs. In this study, we have evaluated the effect of adult Sertoli cell condition medium (SCCM) as a mutative factor in the induction of germ cells from BMMSCs. BMMSCs were collected from the bone marrow of 6-8-week old NMRI mice and their mesenchymal entities were proven using superficial markers (expression of CD44 and CD73 and non-expresion of CD45 and CD11b) by fow cytometry. Their multi-potential entities were proved with differentiation to osteogenic and adipogenic cells for 21 days. Also isolated Sertoli cells were enriched using lectin coated plates and Sertoli cell condition medium (SCCM) was collected. Sertoli cells were identified by immunocytochemistry and Vimentin marker. The cells were then differentiated into germ cells with SCCM for 2 weeks. Finally induced cells were evaluated by RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry. Differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells to osteoblast and adipocyte showed their multi-potential property. Expression of CD44 and CD73 and non-expression of CD45 and CD11b confirmed mesenchyme cells. Immunocytochemistry and RT-PCR results showed expression of germ cells specific marker (Mvh). This study confirmed the effect of SCCM as a motivational factor that can used for differentiation of germ cells from BMMSCs.

  7. Sertoli cell condition medium can induce germ like cells from bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Monfared, Mahdieh Hajian; Minaee, Bagher; Rastegar, Tayebeh; Khrazinejad, Ebrahim; Barbarestani, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Although many researchers have confirmed induction of germ cells from bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs), there are no reports that confirm spontaneous differentiation of germ cells from BMMSCs. In this study, we have evaluated the effect of adult Sertoli cell condition medium (SCCM) as a mutative factor in the induction of germ cells from BMMSCs. Materials and Methods: BMMSCs were collected from the bone marrow of 6-8-week old NMRI mice and their mesenchymal entities were proven using superficial markers (expression of CD44 and CD73 and non-expresion of CD45 and CD11b) by fow cytometry. Their multi-potential entities were proved with differentiation to osteogenic and adipogenic cells for 21 days. Also isolated Sertoli cells were enriched using lectin coated plates and Sertoli cell condition medium (SCCM) was collected. Sertoli cells were identified by immunocytochemistry and Vimentin marker. The cells were then differentiated into germ cells with SCCM for 2 weeks. Finally induced cells were evaluated by RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry. Results: Differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells to osteoblast and adipocyte showed their multi-potential property. Expression of CD44 and CD73 and non-expression of CD45 and CD11b confirmed mesenchyme cells. Immunocytochemistry and RT-PCR results showed expression of germ cells specific marker (Mvh). Conclusion: This study confirmed the effect of SCCM as a motivational factor that can used for differentiation of germ cells from BMMSCs. PMID:27917274

  8. Dendritic cells fused with different pancreatic carcinoma cells induce different T-cell responses

    PubMed Central

    Andoh, Yoshiaki; Makino, Naohiko; Yamakawa, Mitsunori

    2013-01-01

    Background It is unclear whether there are any differences in the induction of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) and CD4+CD25high regulatory T-cells (Tregs) among dendritic cells (DCs) fused with different pancreatic carcinomas. The aim of this study was to compare the ability to induce cytotoxicity by human DCs fused with different human pancreatic carcinoma cell lines and to elucidate the causes of variable cytotoxicity among cell lines. Methods Monocyte-derived DCs, which were generated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), were fused with carcinoma cells such as Panc-1, KP-1NL, QGP-1, and KP-3L. The induction of CTL and Tregs, and cytokine profile of PBMCs stimulated by fused DCs were evaluated. Results The cytotoxicity against tumor targets induced by PBMCs cocultured with DCs fused with QGP-1 (DC/QGP-1) was very low, even though PBMCs cocultured with DCs fused with other cell lines induced significant cytotoxicity against the respective tumor target. The factors causing this low cytotoxicity were subsequently investigated. DC/QGP-1 induced a significant expansion of Tregs in cocultured PBMCs compared with DC/KP-3L. The level of interleukin-10 secreted in the supernatants of PBMCs cocultured with DC/QGP-1 was increased significantly compared with that in DC/KP-3L. Downregulation of major histocompatibility complex class I expression and increased secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor were observed with QGP-1, as well as in the other cell lines. Conclusion The present study demonstrated that the cytotoxicity induced by DCs fused with pancreatic cancer cell lines was different between each cell line, and that the reduced cytotoxicity of DC/QGP-1 might be related to the increased secretion of interleukin-10 and the extensive induction of Tregs. PMID:23378772

  9. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells: Development in the Ophthalmologic Field

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are a type of stem cells that can be derived from human somatic cells by introducing certain transcription factors. Induced pluripotent stem cells can divide indefinitely and are able to differentiate into every cell type, which make them viable for transplantation and individual disease modeling. Recently, various ocular cells, including corneal epithelial-like cells, retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells displaying functions similar to native RPE, photoreceptors, and retinal ganglion cells, have all been successfully derived from iPSCs. Transplantation of these cells in animal models showed great promise for reversing blindness, and the first clinical trial on humans started in 2013. Despite these promising results, more research is in demand for preventing inadvertent tumor growth, developing precise functionality of the cells, and promoting integration into the host tissue. PMID:27594887

  10. Entamoeba histolytica induces cell death of HT29 colonic epithelial cells via NOX1-derived ROS.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyeong Ah; Kim, Ju Young; Lee, Young Ah; Min, Arim; Bahk, Young Yil; Shin, Myeong Heon

    2013-02-01

    Entamoeba histolytica, which causes amoebic colitis and occasionally liver abscess in humans, is able to induce host cell death. However, signaling mechanisms of colon cell death induced by E. histolytica are not fully elucidated. In this study, we investigated the signaling role of NOX in cell death of HT29 colonic epithelial cells induced by E. histolytica. Incubation of HT29 cells with amoebic trophozoites resulted in DNA fragmentation that is a hallmark of apoptotic cell death. In addition, E. histolytica generate intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in a contact-dependent manner. Inhibition of intracellular ROS level with treatment with DPI, an inhibitor of NADPH oxidases (NOXs), decreased Entamoeba-induced ROS generation and cell death in HT29 cells. However, pan-caspase inhibitor did not affect E. histolytica-induced HT29 cell death. In HT29 cells, catalytic subunit NOX1 and regulatory subunit Rac1 for NOX1 activation were highly expressed. We next investigated whether NADPH oxidase 1 (NOX1)-derived ROS is closely associated with HT29 cell death induced by E. histolytica. Suppression of Rac1 by siRNA significantly inhibited Entamoeba-induced cell death. Moreover, knockdown of NOX1 by siRNA, effectively inhibited E. histolytica-triggered DNA fragmentation in HT29 cells. These results suggest that NOX1-derived ROS is required for apoptotic cell death in HT29 colon epithelial cells induced by E. histolytica.

  11. X-ray-induced cell death: Apoptosis and necrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Nakano, Hisako; Shinohara, Kunio

    1994-10-01

    X-ray-induced cell death in MOLT-4N1, a subclone of MOLT-4 cells, and M10 cells was studied with respect to their modes of cell death, apoptosis and necrosis. MOLT-4N1 cells showed radiosensitivity similar to that of M10 cells, a radiosensitive mutant of L5178Y, as determined by the colony formation assay. Analysis of cell size demonstrated that MOLT-4N1 cells increased in size at an early stage after irradiation and then decreased to a size smaller than that of control cells, whereas the size of irradiated M10 cells increased continuously. Apoptosis detected by morphological changes and DNA ladder formation (the cleavage of DNA into oligonucleosomal fragments) occurred in X-irradiated MOLT-4N1 cells but not in M10 cells. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis showed that the ladder formation involved an intermediate-sized DNA (about 20 kbp). Most of the DNA was detected at the origin in both methods of electrophoresis in the case of M10 cells, though a trace amount of ladder formation was observed. Heat treatment of M10 cells induced apoptosis within 30 min after treatment, in contrast to MOLT-4N1 cells. The results suggest that apoptosis and necrosis are induced by X rays in a manner which is dependent on the cell line irrespective of the capability of the cells to develop apoptosis. DNA fragmentation was the earliest change observed in the development of apoptosis. 27 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Osteoblasts Protect AML Cells from SDF-1-Induced Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Kremer, Kimberly N.; Dudakovic, Amel; McGee-Lawrence, Meghan E.; Philips, Rachael L.; Hess, Allan D.; Smith, B. Douglas; van Wijnen, Andre J.; Karp, Judith E.; Kaufmann, Scott H.; Westendorf, Jennifer J.; Hedin, Karen E.

    2014-01-01

    The bone marrow provides a protective environment for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells that often allows leukemic stem cells to survive standard chemotherapeutic regimens. Targeting these leukemic stem cells within the bone marrow is critical for preventing relapse. We recently demonstrated that SDF-1, a chemokine abundant in the bone marrow, induces apoptosis in AML cell lines and in patient samples expressing high levels of its receptor, CXCR4. Here we show that a subset of osteoblast lineage cells within the bone marrow can protect AML cells from undergoing apoptosis in response to the SDF-1 naturally present in that location. In co-culture systems, osteoblasts at various stages of differentiation protected AML cell lines and patient isolates from SDF-1-induced apoptosis. The differentiation of the osteoblast cell lines, MC3T3 and W-20-17, mediated this protection via a cell contact-independent mechanism. In contrast, bone marrow-derived mesenchymal cells, the precursors of osteoblasts, induced apoptosis in AML cells via a CXCR4-dependent mechanism and failed to protect AML cells from exogenously added SDF-1. These results indicate that osteoblasts in the process of differentiation potently inhibit the SDF-1-driven apoptotic pathway of CXCR4-expressing AML cells residing in the bone marrow. Drugs targeting this protective mechanism could potentially provide a new approach to treating AML by enhancing the SDF-1-induced apoptosis of AML cells residing within the bone marrow microenvironment. PMID:24851270

  13. Interleukin-35 induces regulatory B cells that suppress autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ren-Xi; Yu, Cheng-Rong; Dambuza, Ivy M; Mahdi, Rashid M; Dolinska, Monika B; Sergeev, Yuri V; Wingfield, Paul T; Kim, Sung-Hye; Egwuagu, Charles E

    2014-06-01

    Interleukin-10 (IL-10)-producing regulatory B (Breg) cells suppress autoimmune disease, and increased numbers of Breg cells prevent host defense to infection and promote tumor growth and metastasis by converting resting CD4(+) T cells to regulatory T (Treg) cells. The mechanisms mediating the induction and development of Breg cells remain unclear. Here we show that IL-35 induces Breg cells and promotes their conversion to a Breg subset that produces IL-35 as well as IL-10. Treatment of mice with IL-35 conferred protection from experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU), and mice lacking IL-35 (p35 knockout (KO) mice) or defective in IL-35 signaling (IL-12Rβ2 KO mice) produced less Breg cells endogenously or after treatment with IL-35 and developed severe uveitis. Adoptive transfer of Breg cells induced by recombinant IL-35 suppressed EAU when transferred to mice with established disease, inhibiting pathogenic T helper type 17 (TH17) and TH1 cells while promoting Treg cell expansion. In B cells, IL-35 activates STAT1 and STAT3 through the IL-35 receptor comprising the IL-12Rβ2 and IL-27Rα subunits. As IL-35 also induced the conversion of human B cells into Breg cells, these findings suggest that IL-35 may be used to induce autologous Breg and IL-35(+) Breg cells and treat autoimmune and inflammatory disease.

  14. Distinct mechanisms of neonatal tolerance induced by dendritic cells and thymic B cells

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    To assess the role of different types of antigen-presenting cells (APC) in the induction of tolerance, we isolated B cells, macrophages, and dendritic cells from thymus and spleen, and injected these into neonatal BALB/c mice across an Mls-1 antigenic barrier. One week after injection of APC from Mls-1-incompatible mice or from control syngeneic mice, we measured the number of thymic, Mls-1a-reactive, V beta 6+ T cells and the capacity of thymocytes to induce a graft-vs.-host (GVH) reaction in popliteal lymph nodes of Mls-1a mice. Injection of thymic but not spleen B cells deleted thymic, Mls-1a-reactive V beta 6+ T cells and induced tolerance in the GVH assay. The thymic B cells were primarily of the CD5+ type, and fluorescence-activated cell sorter- purified CD5+ thymic B cells were active. Injection of dendritic cells from spleen or thymus also induced tolerance, but the V beta 6 cells were anergized rather than deleted. Macrophages from thymus did not induce tolerance. Dendritic cells and thymic B cells were also effective in inducing tolerance even when injected into Mls-, major histocompatibility complex-incompatible, I-E- mice, but only thymic B cells depleted V beta 6-expressing T cells. Therefore, different types of bone marrow-derived APC have different capacities for inducing tolerance, and the active cell types (dendritic cells and CD5+ thymic B cells) can act by distinct mechanisms. PMID:1900075

  15. Efficient killing of radioresistant breast cancer cells by cytokine-induced killer cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qingming; Zhu, Danni; Bu, Xiaocui; Wei, Xiaofang; Li, Changyou; Gao, Daiqing; Wei, Xiaoqiang; Ma, Xuezhen; Zhao, Peng

    2017-03-01

    Recurrence of breast cancer after radiotherapy may be partly explained by the presence of radioresistant cells. Thus, it would be desirable to develop an effective therapy against radioresistant cells. In this study, we demonstrated the intense antitumor activity of cytokine-induced killer cells against MCF-7 and radioresistant MCF-7 cells, as revealed by cytokine-induced killer-mediated cytotoxicity, tumor cell proliferation, and tumor invasion. Radioresistant MCF-7 cells were more susceptible to cytokine-induced killer cell killing. The stronger cytotoxicity of cytokine-induced killer cells against radioresistant MCF-7 cells was dependent on the expression of major histocompatibility complex class I polypeptide-related sequence A/B on radioresistant MCF-7 cells after exposure of cytokine-induced killer cells to sensitized targets. In addition, we demonstrated that cytokine-induced killer cell treatment sensitized breast cancer cells to chemotherapy via the downregulation of TK1, TYMS, and MDR1. These results indicate that cytokine-induced killer cell treatment in combination with radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy may induce synergistic antitumor activities and represent a novel strategy for breast cancer.

  16. Polyphosphate induces matrix metalloproteinase-3-mediated proliferation of odontoblast-like cells derived from induced pluripotent stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ozeki, Nobuaki; Hase, Naoko; Yamaguchi, Hideyuki; Hiyama, Taiki; Kawai, Rie; Kondo, Ayami; Nakata, Kazuhiko; Mogi, Makio

    2015-05-01

    Inorganic polyphosphate [Poly(P)] may represent a physiological source of phosphate and has the ability to induce bone differentiation in osteoblasts. We previously reported that cytokine-induced matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-3 accelerates the proliferation of purified odontoblast-like cells. In this study, MMP-3 small interfering RNA (siRNA) was transfected into odontoblast-like cells derived from induced pluripotent stem cells to investigate whether MMP-3 activity is induced by Poly(P) and/or is associated with cell proliferation and differentiation into odontoblast-like cells. Treatment with Poly(P) led to an increase in both cell proliferation and additional odontoblastic differentiation. Poly(P)-treated cells showed a small but significant increase in dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) and dentin matrix protein-1 (DMP-1) mRNA expression, which are markers of mature odontoblasts. The cells also acquired additional odontoblast-specific properties including adoption of an odontoblastic phenotype typified by high alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and a calcification capacity. In addition, Poly(P) induced expression of MMP-3 mRNA and protein, and increased MMP-3 activity. MMP-3 siRNA-mediated disruption of the expression of these effectors potently suppressed the expression of odontoblastic biomarkers ALP, DSPP, and DMP-1, and blocked calcification. Interestingly, upon siRNA-mediated silencing of MMP-3, we noted a potent and significant decrease in cell proliferation. Using specific siRNAs, we revealed that a unique signaling cascade, Poly(P)→MMP-3→DSPP and/or DMP-1, was intimately involved in the proliferation of odontoblast-like cells. - Highlights: • Polyphosphate increases proliferation of iPS cell-derived odontoblast-like cells. • Polyphosphate-induced MMP-3 results in an increase of cell proliferation. • Induced cell proliferation involves MMP-3, DSPP, and/or DMP-1 sequentially. • Induced MMP-3 also results in an increase of odontoblastic

  17. Mechanisms of Virus-Induced Neural Cell Death

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-09-01

    We are using experimental infection with reoviruses to study how viruses induce cell death . (apoptosis), and the significance of apoptosis in the...pathogenesis of viral infection. We have developed one of the best-characterized experimental models for investigating and manipulating viral cell death pathways...We have shown that apoptosis is a major mechanism of reovirus-induced cell death in murine models of key human viral infections including

  18. Tephrosin-induced autophagic cell death in A549 non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Wang, Xiao-Lu; Fang, Yu-Chun; Wang, Chang-Yun

    2010-11-01

    Anticancer effect of tephrosin (1) has been documented; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying the cytotoxicity of tephrosin in cancer cells remain unclear. In the present paper, the proliferation inhibition rate of several cancer cells was tested using the MTT assay; cell cycle, reactive oxygen species (ROS), and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) were determined by flow cytometry; poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage and heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) expression were evaluated by Western blotting; autophagy was examined by confocal microscopy and light chain 3 (LC3) conversion assay. The results showed that exposure of the cells to tephrosin induced significant proliferation inhibition in a dose-dependent manner, especially on A549 with G(2)/M being arrested. Tephrosin was not found to induce cell apoptosis as PARP cleavage was not detected after 24 h treatment, but the formation of acidic vesicular organelle of autophagy character was found, and autophagy was further confirmed by the increase in the ratio of LC3-II to LC3-I. It was observed that tephrosin induced ROS generation and Hsp90 expression inhibition. These results indicate that tephrosin induces A549 cancer cell death via the autophagy pathway, and the roles of ROS generation and Hsp90 expression inhibition in this process need further study in the future.

  19. Interferon induces natural killer cell blastogenesis in vivo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biron, C. A.; Sonnenfeld, G.; Welsh, R. M.

    1984-01-01

    Interferon (IFN), types beta and gamma, and IFN inducers polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid and lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus, all stimulated the generation of blast-natural killer (NK) cells in mouse spleens, Blast-NK cells were characterized on the basis of size, 3H-thymidine uptake, and NK cell markers These data indicate that in addition to augmenting NK cell-mediated lysis, IFN may regulate NK cell proliferation in vivo.

  20. Interferon induces natural killer cell blastogenesis in vivo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biron, C. A.; Sonnenfeld, G.; Welsh, R. M.

    1984-01-01

    Interferon (IFN), types beta and gamma, and IFN inducers polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid and lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus, all stimulated the generation of blast-natural killer (NK) cells in mouse spleens, Blast-NK cells were characterized on the basis of size, 3H-thymidine uptake, and NK cell markers These data indicate that in addition to augmenting NK cell-mediated lysis, IFN may regulate NK cell proliferation in vivo.

  1. Porcine circovirus-2 capsid protein induces cell death in PK15 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Walia, Rupali; Dardari, Rkia Chaiyakul, Mark; Czub, Markus

    2014-11-15

    Studies have shown that Porcine circovirus (PCV)-2 induces apoptosis in PK15 cells. Here we report that cell death is induced in PCV2b-infected PK15 cells that express Capsid (Cap) protein and this effect is enhanced in interferon gamma (IFN-γ)-treated cells. We further show that transient PCV2a and 2b-Cap protein expression induces cell death in PK15 cells at rate similar to PCV2 infection, regardless of Cap protein localization. These data suggest that Cap protein may have the capacity to trigger different signaling pathways involved in cell death. Although further investigation is needed to gain deeper insights into the nature of the pathways involved in Cap-induced cell death, this study provides evidence that PCV2-induced cell death in kidney epithelial PK15 cells can be mapped to the Cap protein and establishes the need for future research regarding the role of Cap-induced cell death in PCV2 pathogenesis. - Highlights: • IFN-γ enhances PCV2 replication that leads to cell death in PK15 cells. • IFN-γ enhances nuclear localization of the PCV2 Capsid protein. • Transient PCV2a and 2b-Capsid protein expression induces cell death. • Cell death is not dictated by specific Capsid protein sub-localization.

  2. Canthin-6-one induces cell death, cell cycle arrest and differentiation in human myeloid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Vieira Torquato, Heron F; Ribeiro-Filho, Antonio C; Buri, Marcus V; Araújo Júnior, Roberto T; Pimenta, Renata; de Oliveira, José Salvador R; Filho, Valdir C; Macho, Antonio; Paredes-Gamero, Edgar J; de Oliveira Martins, Domingos T

    2017-04-01

    Canthin-6-one is a natural product isolated from various plant genera and from fungi with potential antitumor activity. In the present study, we evaluate the antitumor effects of canthin-6-one in human myeloid leukemia lineages. Kasumi-1 lineage was used as a model for acute myeloid leukemia. Cells were treated with canthin-6-one and cell death, cell cycle and differentiation were evaluated in both total cells (Lin(+)) and leukemia stem cell population (CD34(+)CD38(-)Lin(-/low)). Among the human lineages tested, Kasumi-1 was the most sensitive to canthin-6-one. Canthin-6-one induced cell death with apoptotic (caspase activation, decrease of mitochondrial potential) and necrotic (lysosomal permeabilization, double labeling of annexin V/propidium iodide) characteristics. Moreover, canthin-6-one induced cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 (7μM) and G2 (45μM) evidenced by DNA content, BrdU incorporation and cyclin B1/histone 3 quantification. Canthin-6-one also promoted differentiation of Kasumi-1, evidenced by an increase in the expression of myeloid markers (CD11b and CD15) and the transcription factor PU.1. Furthermore, a reduction of the leukemic stem cell population and clonogenic capability of stem cells were observed. These results show that canthin-6-one can affect Kasumi-1 cells by promoting cell death, cell cycle arrest and cell differentiation depending on concentration used. Canthin-6-one presents an interesting cytotoxic activity against leukemic cells and represents a promising scaffold for the development of molecules for anti-leukemic applications, especially by its anti-leukemic stem cell activity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells: Characteristics and Perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantz, Tobias; Martin, Ulrich

    The induction of pluripotency in somatic cells is widely considered as a major breakthrough in regenerative medicine, because this approach provides the basis for individualized stem cell-based therapies. Moreover, with respect to cell transplantation and tissue engineering, expertise from bioengineering to transplantation medicine is now meeting basic research of stem cell biology.

  4. Induced pluripotent stem cells in cardiovascular drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Mercola, Mark; Colas, Alexandre; Willems, Erik

    2013-02-01

    The unexpected discovery that somatic cells can be reprogrammed to a pluripotent state yielding induced pluripotent stem cells has made it possible to produce cardiovascular cells exhibiting inherited traits and disorders. Use of these cells in high throughput analyses should broaden our insight into fundamental disease mechanisms and provide many benefits for patients, including new therapeutics and individually tailored therapies. Here we review recent progress in generating induced pluripotent stem cell-based models of cardiovascular disease and their multiple applications in drug development.

  5. Hyperthermia: an effective strategy to induce apoptosis in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Kanwal; Tabuchi, Yoshiaki; Kondo, Takashi

    2015-11-01

    Heat has been used as a medicinal and healing modality throughout human history. The combination of hyperthermia (HT) with radiation and anticancer agents has been used clinically and has shown positive results to a certain extent. However, the clinical results of HT treatment alone have been only partially satisfactory. Cell death following HT treatment is a function of both temperature and treatment duration. HT induces cancer cell death through apoptosis; the degree of apoptosis and the apoptotic pathway vary in different cancer cell types. HT-induced reactive oxygen species production are responsible for apoptosis in various cell types. However, the underlying mechanism of signal transduction and the genes related to this process still need to be elucidated. In this review, we summarize the molecular mechanism of apoptosis induced by HT, enhancement of heat-induced apoptosis, and the genetic network involved in HT-induced apoptosis.

  6. Inducible T cell tyrosine kinase regulates actin-dependent cytoskeletal events induced by the T cell antigen receptor.

    PubMed

    Grasis, Juris A; Browne, Cecille D; Tsoukas, Constantine D

    2003-04-15

    The tec family kinase, inducible T cell tyrosine kinase (Itk), is critical for both development and activation of T lymphocytes. We have found that Itk regulates TCR/CD3-induced actin-dependent cytoskeletal events. Expression of Src homology (SH) 2 domain mutant Itk transgenes into Jurkat T cells inhibits these events. Furthermore, Itk(-/-) murine T cells display significant defects in TCR/CD3-induced actin polymerization. In addition, Jurkat cells deficient in linker for activation of T cells expression, an adaptor critical for Itk activation, display impaired cytoskeletal events and expression of SH3 mutant Itk transgenes reconstitutes this impairment. Interestingly, expression of an Itk kinase-dead mutant transgene into Jurkat cells has no effect on cytoskeletal events. Collectively, these data suggest that Itk regulates TCR/CD3-induced actin-dependent cytoskeletal events, possibly in a kinase-independent fashion.

  7. Mechanisms Involved in Virus-Induced Neural Cell Death

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-09-01

    We are using experimental infection with reoviruses as a model to study how viruses induce cell death (apoptosis) and cause dysregulation of the cell...and their ligand (TRAIL). Apoptosis involves both death-receptor (DR) and mitochondrial-associated cell death pathways, and leads to the early

  8. Arsenic exposure induces the Warburg effect in cultured human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Fei; Severson, Paul; Pacheco, Samantha; Futscher, Bernard W.; Klimecki, Walter T.

    2013-08-15

    Understanding how arsenic exacts its diverse, global disease burden is hampered by a limited understanding of the particular biological pathways that are disrupted by arsenic and underlie pathogenesis. A reductionist view would predict that a small number of basic pathways are generally perturbed by arsenic, and manifest as diverse diseases. Following an initial observation that arsenite-exposed cells in culture acidify their media more rapidly than control cells, the report here shows that low level exposure to arsenite (75 ppb) is sufficient to induce aerobic glycolysis (the Warburg effect) as a generalized phenomenon in cultured human primary cells and cell lines. Expanded studies in one such cell line, the non-malignant pulmonary epithelial line, BEAS-2B, established that the arsenite-induced Warburg effect was associated with increased accumulation of intracellular and extracellular lactate, an increased rate of extracellular acidification, and inhibition by the non-metabolized glucose analog, 2-deoxy-D-glucose. Associated with the induction of aerobic glycolysis was a pathway-wide induction of glycolysis gene expression, as well as protein accumulation of an established glycolysis master-regulator, hypoxia-inducible factor 1A. Arsenite-induced alteration of energy production in human cells represents the type of fundamental perturbation that could extend to many tissue targets and diseases. - Highlights: • Chronic arsenite exposure induces aerobic glycolysis, dubbed the “Warburg effect”. • Arsenite-induced Warburg effect is a general phenomenon in cultured human cells. • HIF-1A may mediate arsenite induced Warburg effect.

  9. Ionizing Radiation-Induced Endothelial Cell Senescence and Cardiovascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yingying; Boerma, Marjan; Zhou, Daohong

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiation induces not only apoptosis but also senescence. While the role of endothelial cell apoptosis in mediating radiation-induced acute tissue injury has been extensively studied, little is known about the role of endothelial cell senescence in the pathogenesis of radiation-induced late effects. Senescent endothelial cells exhibit decreased production of nitric oxide and expression of thrombomodulin, increased expression of adhesion molecules, elevated production of reactive oxygen species and inflammatory cytokines and an inability to proliferate and form capillary-like structures in vitro. These findings suggest that endothelial cell senescence can lead to endothelial dysfunction by dysregulation of vasodilation and hemostasis, induction of oxidative stress and inflammation and inhibition of angiogenesis, which can potentially contribute to radiation-induced late effects such as cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). In this article, we discuss the mechanisms by which radiation induces endothelial cell senescence, the roles of endothelial cell senescence in radiation-induced CVDs and potential strategies to prevent, mitigate and treat radiation-induced CVDs by targeting senescent endothelial cells. PMID:27387862

  10. Hexavalent chromium induces chromosome instability in human urothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wise, Sandra S; Holmes, Amie L; Liou, Louis; Adam, Rosalyn M; Wise, John Pierce

    2016-04-01

    Numerous metals are well-known human bladder carcinogens. Despite the significant occupational and public health concern of metals and bladder cancer, the carcinogenic mechanisms remain largely unknown. Chromium, in particular, is a metal of concern as incidences of bladder cancer have been found elevated in chromate workers, and there is an increasing concern for patients with metal hip implants. However, the impact of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) on bladder cells has not been studied. We compared chromate toxicity in two bladder cell lines; primary human urothelial cells and hTERT-immortalized human urothelial cells. Cr(VI) induced a concentration- and time-dependent increase in chromosome damage in both cell lines, with the hTERT-immortalized cells exhibiting more chromosome damage than the primary cells. Chronic exposure to Cr(VI) also induced a concentration-dependent increase in aneuploid metaphases in both cell lines which was not observed after a 24h exposure. Aneuploidy induction was higher in the hTERT-immortalized cells. When we correct for uptake, Cr(VI) induces a similar amount of chromosome damage and aneuploidy suggesting that the differences in Cr(VI) sensitivity between the two cells lines were due to differences in uptake. The increase in chromosome instability after chronic chromate treatment suggests this may be a mechanism for chromate-induced bladder cancer, specifically, and may be a mechanism for metal-induced bladder cancer, in general.

  11. Hexavalent Chromium Induces Chromosome Instability in Human Urothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wise, Sandra S.; Holmes, Amie L.; Liou, Louis; Adam, Rosalyn M.; Wise, John Pierce

    2016-01-01

    Numerous metals are well-known human bladder carcinogens. Despite the significant occupational and public health concern of metals and bladder cancer, the carcinogenic mechanisms remain largely unknown. Chromium, in particular, is a metal of concern as incidences of bladder cancer have been found elevated in chromate workers, and there is an increasing concern for patients with metal hip implants. However, the impact of Cr(VI) on bladder cells has not been studied. We compared chromate toxicity in two bladder cell lines; primary human urothelial cells and hTERT-immortalized human urothelial cells. Hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) induced a concentration- and time-dependent increase in chromosome damage in both cell lines, with the hTERT-immortalized cells exhibiting more chromosome damage than the primary cells. Chronic exposure to Cr(VI) also induced a concentration-dependent increase in aneuploid metaphases in both cell lines which was not observed after a 24 h exposure. Aneuploidy induction was higher in the hTERT-immortalized cells. When we correct for uptake, Cr(VI) induces a similar amount of chromosome damage and aneuploidy suggesting that the differences in Cr(VI) sensitivity between the two cells lines were due to differences in uptake. The increase in chromosome instability after chronic chromate treatment suggests this may be a mechanism for chromate-induced bladder cancer specifically and may be a mechanism for metal-induced bladder cancer in general. PMID:26908176

  12. Ultraviolet Irradiation-Induced Volume Alteration of Corneal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ling; Lu, Luo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of the study is to understand how extracellular stresses, such as ultraviolet (UV) irradiation, affect corneal epithelial cells. Cell volume changes, damage to corneal epithelial integrity, and cellular responses were assessed after exposure to UVC stresses. Methods Primary human and rabbit corneal epithelial cells were exposed to UVC light in culture conditions. Ultraviolet C irradiation–induced changes in cell size and volume were measured by real-time microscopy and self-quenching of the fluorescent dye calcein, respectively. The effects of UVC irradiation on Src and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) phosphorylation and FAK-dependent integrin signaling were detected by ELISA, immunoblotting, and immunostaining. Results Ultraviolet C irradiation induced both size and volume shifts in human and rabbit corneal epithelial cells. Ultraviolet C irradiation-induced decrease of cell volume elicited activation of Src and FAK, characterized by increased phosphorylations of SrcY416, FAKY397, and FAKY925. In addition, immunostaining studies showed UVC irradiation–induced increases in phosphorylation of FAK and formation of integrin β5 clustering. Application of Kv channel blockers, including 4-aminopyridine (4-AP), α-DTX, and depressing substance-1 (BDS-1), effectively suppressed UVC irradiation–induced cell volume changes, and subsequently inhibited UVC irradiation–induced phosphorylation of Src/FAK, and formation of integrin β5 clustering, suggesting UVC irradiation–induced volume changes and Src/FAK activation. Hyperosmotic pressure–induced volume decreases were measured in comparison with effects of UVC irradiation on volume and Src/FAK activation. However, Kv channel blocker, 4-AP, had no effect on hyperosmotic pressure–induced responses. Conclusions The present study demonstrates that UVC irradiation–induced decreases in cell volume lead to Src/FAK activation due to a rapid loss of K ions through membrane Kv channels. PMID:27978555

  13. Inflammation-Induced Cell Proliferation Potentiates DNA Damage-Induced Mutations In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kiraly, Orsolya; Gong, Guanyu; Olipitz, Werner; Muthupalani, Sureshkumar; Engelward, Bevin P.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations are a critical driver of cancer initiation. While extensive studies have focused on exposure-induced mutations, few studies have explored the importance of tissue physiology as a modulator of mutation susceptibility in vivo. Of particular interest is inflammation, a known cancer risk factor relevant to chronic inflammatory diseases and pathogen-induced inflammation. Here, we used the fluorescent yellow direct repeat (FYDR) mice that harbor a reporter to detect misalignments during homologous recombination (HR), an important class of mutations. FYDR mice were exposed to cerulein, a potent inducer of pancreatic inflammation. We show that inflammation induces DSBs (γH2AX foci) and that several days later there is an increase in cell proliferation. While isolated bouts of inflammation did not induce HR, overlap between inflammation-induced DNA damage and inflammation-induced cell proliferation induced HR significantly. To study exogenously-induced DNA damage, animals were exposed to methylnitrosourea, a model alkylating agent that creates DNA lesions relevant to both environmental exposures and cancer chemotherapy. We found that exposure to alkylation damage induces HR, and importantly, that inflammation-induced cell proliferation and alkylation induce HR in a synergistic fashion. Taken together, these results show that, during an acute bout of inflammation, there is a kinetic barrier separating DNA damage from cell proliferation that protects against mutations, and that inflammation-induced cell proliferation greatly potentiates exposure-induced mutations. These studies demonstrate a fundamental mechanism by which inflammation can act synergistically with DNA damage to induce mutations that drive cancer and cancer recurrence. PMID:25647331

  14. Crizotinib induces PUMA-dependent apoptosis in colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xingnan; He, Kan; Zhang, Lin; Yu, Jian

    2013-05-01

    Oncogenic alterations in MET or anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) have been identified in a variety of human cancers. Crizotinib (PF02341066) is a dual MET and ALK inhibitor and approved for the treatment of a subset of non-small cell lung carcinoma and in clinical development for other malignancies. Crizotinib can induce apoptosis in cancer cells, whereas the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. In this study, we found that crizotinib induces apoptosis in colon cancer cells through the BH3-only protein PUMA. In cells with wild-type p53, crizotinib induces rapid induction of PUMA and Bim accompanied by p53 stabilization and DNA damage response. The induction of PUMA and Bim is mediated largely by p53, and deficiency in PUMA or p53, but not Bim, blocks crizotinib-induced apoptosis. Interestingly, MET knockdown led to selective induction of PUMA, but not Bim or p53. Crizotinib also induced PUMA-dependent apoptosis in p53-deficient colon cancer cells and synergized with gefitinib or sorafenib to induce marked apoptosis via PUMA in colon cancer cells. Furthermore, PUMA deficiency suppressed apoptosis and therapeutic responses to crizotinib in xenograft models. These results establish a critical role of PUMA in mediating apoptotic responses of colon cancer cells to crizotinib and suggest that mechanisms of oncogenic addiction to MET/ALK-mediated survival may be cell type-specific. These findings have important implications for future clinical development of crizotinib.

  15. Type I collagen gel protects murine fibrosarcoma L929 cells from TNFα-induced cell death

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hong-Ju; He, Wen-Qi; Chen, Ling; Liu, Wei-Wei; Xu, Qian; Xia, Ming-Yu; Hayashi, Toshihiko; Fujisaki, Hitomi; Hattori, Shunji; Tashiro, Shin-ichi; Onodera, Satoshi; Ikejima, Takashi

    2015-02-20

    Murine fibrosarcoma L929 cells have been used to test efficacy of proinflammatory cytokine TNFα. In the present study, we reported on protective effect of type I collagen gel used as L929 cell culture. L929 cell grew and proliferated well on collagen gel. However, the L929 cells exhibited cobblestone-like morphology which was much different from the spread fusiform shape when cultured on conventional cell dishes as well as the cells tended to aggregate. On conventional cell culture dishes, the cells treated with TNFα became round in shape and eventually died in a necroptotic manner. The cells cultured on collagen gel, however, were completely unaffected. TNFα treatment was reported to induce autophagy in L929 cells on the plastic dish, and therefore we investigated the effect of collagen gel on induction of autophagy. The results indicated that autophagy induced by TNFα treatment was much reduced when the cells were cultured on collagen gel. In conclusion, type I collagen gel protected L929 cell from TNFα-induced cell death. - Highlights: • Collagen gel culture changed the morphology of L929 cells. • L929 cell cultured on collagen gel were resistant to TNFα-induced cell death. • Collagen gel culture inhibited TNFα-induced autophagy in L929 cells.

  16. Ferroptosis is Involved in Acetaminophen Induced Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Lőrincz, Tamás; Jemnitz, Katalin; Kardon, Tamás; Mandl, József; Szarka, András

    2015-09-01

    The recently described form of programmed cell death, ferroptosis can be induced by agents causing GSH depletion or the inhibition of GPX4. Ferroptosis clearly shows distinct morphologic, biochemical and genetic features from apoptosis, necrosis and autophagy. Since NAPQI the highly reactive metabolite of the widely applied analgesic and antipyretic, acetaminophen induces a cell death which can be characterized by GSH depletion, GPX inhibition and caspase independency the involvement of ferroptosis in acetaminophen induced cell death has been investigated. The specific ferroptosis inhibitor ferrostatin-1 failed to elevate the viability of acetaminophen treated HepG2 cells. It should be noticed that these cells do not form NAPQI due to the lack of phase I enzyme expression therefore GSH depletion cannot be observed. However in the case of acetaminophen treated primary mouse hepatocytes the significant elevation of cell viability could be observed upon ferrostatin-1 treatment. Similar to ferrostatin-1 treatment, the addition of the RIP1 kinase inhibitor necrostatin-1 could also elevate the viability of acetaminophen treated primary hepatocytes. Ferrostatin-1 has no influence on the expression of CYP2E1 or on the cellular GSH level which suggest that the protective effect of ferrostatin-1 in APAP induced cell death is not based on the reduced metabolism of APAP to NAPQI or on altered NAPQI conjugation by cellular GSH. Our results suggest that beyond necroptosis and apoptosis a third programmed cell death, ferroptosis is also involved in acetaminophen induced cell death in primary hepatocytes.

  17. Chemically Induced Reprogramming of Somatic Cells to Pluripotent Stem Cells and Neural Cells

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Dhruba; Jiang, Peng

    2016-01-01

    The ability to generate transplantable neural cells in a large quantity in the laboratory is a critical step in the field of developing stem cell regenerative medicine for neural repair. During the last few years, groundbreaking studies have shown that cell fate of adult somatic cells can be reprogrammed through lineage specific expression of transcription factors (TFs)-and defined culture conditions. This key concept has been used to identify a number of potent small molecules that could enhance the efficiency of reprogramming with TFs. Recently, a growing number of studies have shown that small molecules targeting specific epigenetic and signaling pathways can replace all of the reprogramming TFs. Here, we provide a detailed review of the studies reporting the generation of chemically induced pluripotent stem cells (ciPSCs), neural stem cells (ciNSCs), and neurons (ciN). We also discuss the main mechanisms of actions and the pathways that the small molecules regulate during chemical reprogramming. PMID:26861316

  18. Chemically Induced Reprogramming of Somatic Cells to Pluripotent Stem Cells and Neural Cells.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Dhruba; Jiang, Peng

    2016-02-06

    The ability to generate transplantable neural cells in a large quantity in the laboratory is a critical step in the field of developing stem cell regenerative medicine for neural repair. During the last few years, groundbreaking studies have shown that cell fate of adult somatic cells can be reprogrammed through lineage specific expression of transcription factors (TFs)-and defined culture conditions. This key concept has been used to identify a number of potent small molecules that could enhance the efficiency of reprogramming with TFs. Recently, a growing number of studies have shown that small molecules targeting specific epigenetic and signaling pathways can replace all of the reprogramming TFs. Here, we provide a detailed review of the studies reporting the generation of chemically induced pluripotent stem cells (ciPSCs), neural stem cells (ciNSCs), and neurons (ciN). We also discuss the main mechanisms of actions and the pathways that the small molecules regulate during chemical reprogramming.

  19. Cell therapy using induced pluripotent stem cells or somatic stem cells: this is the question.

    PubMed

    Somoza, Rodrigo A; Rubio, Francisco J

    2012-05-01

    A lot of effort has been developed to bypass the use of embryonic stem cells (ES) in human therapies, because of several concerns and ethical issues. Some unsolved problems of using stem cells for human therapies, excluding the human embryonic origin, are: how to regulate cell plasticity and proliferation, immunological compatibility, potential adverse side-effects when stem cells are systemically administrated, and the in vivo signals to rule out a specific cell fate after transplantation. Currently, it is known that almost all tissues of an adult organism have somatic stem cells (SSC). Whereas ES are primary involved in the genesis of new tissues and organs, SSC are involved in regeneration processes, immuno-regulatory and homeostasis mechanisms. Although the differentiating potential of ES is higher than SSC, several studies suggest that some types of SSC, such as mesenchymal stem cells (MSC), can be induced epigenetically to differentiate into tissue-specific cells of different lineages. This unexpected pluripotency and the variety of sources that they come from, can make MSC-like cells suitable for the treatment of diverse pathologies and injuries. New hopes for cell therapy came from somatic/mature cells and the discovery that could be reprogrammed to a pluripotent stage similar to ES, thus generating induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS). For this, it is necessary to overexpress four main reprogramming factors, Sox2, Oct4, Klf4 and c-Myc. The aim of this review is to analyze the potential and requirements of cellular based tools in human therapy strategies, focusing on the advantage of using MSC over iPS.

  20. Induced pluripotent stem cells in hematology: current and future applications

    PubMed Central

    Focosi, D; Amabile, G; Di Ruscio, A; Quaranta, P; Tenen, D G; Pistello, M

    2014-01-01

    Reprogramming somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells is nowadays approaching effectiveness and clinical grade. Potential uses of this technology include predictive toxicology, drug screening, pathogenetic studies and transplantation. Here, we review the basis of current iPS cell technology and potential applications in hematology, ranging from disease modeling of congenital and acquired hemopathies to hematopoietic stem and other blood cell transplantation. PMID:24813079

  1. [Experiment of adipose derived stem cells induced into smooth muscle cells].

    PubMed

    Yang, Ping; Yin, Shuo; Cui, Lei; Li, Hong; Wu, Yingchen; Liu, Wei; Cao, Yilin

    2008-04-01

    To study the feasibility of human adipose derived stem cells (ADSCs) in monolayer culture induced into smooth muscle cells in vitro as seeding cells in vascular tissue engineering. The mononuclear cells in human adipose were separated by collagenase treatment and seeded on culture dishes with the density of 5 x 10(5)/cm2. Cells were cultured in M-199 plus 10% FBS. When reaching confluence, the cells were subcultured by 0.1% trypsin and 0.02% EDTA treatment, PDGF-BB (50 ng/mL) and TGF-beta1 (5 ng/mL) were added at the passage 1 to enhance the smooth muscle cells' phenotype. Cells were cultured under the inducing medium for 14 days. The morphology of induced cells was observed under the microscope. Cellular immunofluorescence and RT-PCR were used to determine the expression of smooth muscle cell markers of the post-induced cells. Flow cytometry (FACs) was used to examine the positive rate of induced team. Cocultured in M-199 media including TGF-beta1 and PDGF-BB, the proliferating capability of the induced cells was significantly downregulated compared with the uninduced cells (P < 0.01). The induced cells exhibited "Hill and Valley" morphology, while the uninduced cells were similar to ADSCs of P0 which had the fibroblast-like morphology. The results of immunofluorescence indicated that the induced cells expressed smoothmuscle (SM) cell-specific markers including a-smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA), SM-myosin heavy chain (SM-MHC) and Calponin. The results of RT-PCR revealed that the induced cells also expressed alpha-SMA, SM-MHC, Calponin and SM-22alpha. The positive rates of alpha-SMA, SM-MHC and Calponin in FACs were 3.26% +/- 1.31%, 3.55% +/- 1.6% and 4.02% +/- 1.81%, respectively, before the cells were induced. However, 14 days after the cell induction, the positive rates were 48.13% +/- 8.31%, 45.33% +/- 10.68% and 39.13% +/- 9.42%, respectively. The positive rates in induced cells were remarkably higher than those in uninduced cells (P < 0.01). The human ADSCs

  2. Isogambogenic acid induces apoptosis-independent autophagic cell death in human non-small-cell lung carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jianhong; Zhou, Yongzhao; Cheng, Xia; Fan, Yi; He, Shichao; Li, Shucai; Ye, Haoyu; Xie, Caifeng; Wu, Wenshuang; Li, Chunyan; Pei, Heying; Li, Luyuan; Wei, Zhe; Peng, Aihua; Wei, Yuquan; Li, Weimin; Chen, Lijuan

    2015-01-01

    To overcome drug resistance caused by apoptosis deficiency in patients with non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC), there is a need to identify other means of triggering apoptosis-independent cancer cell death. We are the first to report that isogambogenic acid (iso-GNA) can induce apoptosis-independent autophagic cell death in human NSCLC cells. Several features of the iso-GNA-treated NSCLC cells indicated that iso-GNA induced autophagic cell death. First, there was no evidence of apoptosis or cleaved caspase 3 accumulation and activation. Second, iso-GNA treatment induced the formation of autophagic vacuoles, increased LC3 conversion, caused the appearance of autophagosomes and increased the expression of autophagy-related proteins. These findings provide evidence that iso-GNA induces autophagy in NSCLC cells. Third, iso-GNA-induced cell death was inhibited by autophagic inhibitors or by selective ablation of Atg7 and Beclin 1 genes. Furthermore, the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin increased iso-GNA-induced cell death by enhancing autophagy. Finally, a xenograft model provided additional evidence that iso-GNA exhibited anticancer effect through inducing autophagy-dependent cell death in NSCLC cells. Taken together, our results demonstrated that iso-GNA exhibited an anticancer effect by inducing autophagy-dependent cell death in NSCLC cells, which may be an effective chemotherapeutic agent that can be used against NSCLC in a clinical setting. PMID:25571970

  3. Aspartame-induced apoptosis in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Horio, Yukari; Sun, Yongkun; Liu, Chuang; Saito, Takeshi; Kurasaki, Masaaki

    2014-01-01

    Aspartame is an artificial sweetner added to many low-calorie foods. The safety of aspartame remains controversial even though there are many studies on its risks. In this study, to understand the physiological effects of trace amounts of artificial sweetners on cells, the effects of aspartame on apoptosis were investigated using a PC12 cell system. In addition, the mechanism of apoptosis induced by aspartame in PC12 cells and effects on apoptotic factors such as cytochrome c, apoptosis-inducing factor, and caspase family proteins were studied by Western blotting and RT-PCR. Aspartame-induced apoptosis in PC12 cells in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, aspartame exposure increased the expressions of caspases 8 and 9, and cytochrome c. These results indicate that aspartame induces apoptosis mainly via mitochondrial pathway involved in apoptosis due to oxigen toxicity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Chemically induced bidirectional differentiation of embryonal carcinoma cells in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Speers, W. C.; Birdwell, C. R.; Dixon, F. J.

    1979-01-01

    N,N-dimethylacetamide, hexamethylene bisacetamide, and Polybrene induced rapid and extensive differentiation in vitro in an otherwise slowly differentiating subline of embryonal carcinoma cells. The type of differentiated cell induced was dependent on the spatial organization of the stem cells during drug treatment. In monalayer culture "epithelial" cells were produced exclusively. However, treatment of aggregated suspension cultures yielded predominantly "fibroblast-like" cells. The undifferentiated embryonal carcinoma cells and the two differentiated cell types were morphologically distinct when examined by light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy; and they had differences in cell surface antigens. Both differential cell types produced large amounts of fibronectin, whereas the embryonal carcinoma cells produced only minimal amounts. This system provides a convenient way to induce relatively synchronous differentiation of embryonal carcinoma cells into specific differentiated cell types. Images Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 PMID:507191

  5. Suppression of T cell-induced osteoclast formation

    SciTech Connect

    Karieb, Sahar; Fox, Simon W.

    2013-07-12

    Highlights: •Genistein and coumestrol prevent activated T cell induced osteoclast formation. •Anti-TNF neutralising antibodies prevent the pro-osteoclastic effect of activated T cells. •Phytoestrogens inhibit T cell derived TNF alpha and inflammatory cytokine production. •Phytoestrogens have a broader range of anti-osteoclastic actions than other anti-resorptives. -- Abstract: Inhibition of T cell derived cytokine production could help suppress osteoclast differentiation in inflammatory skeletal disorders. Bisphosphonates are typically prescribed to prevent inflammatory bone loss but are not tolerated by all patients and are associated with an increased risk of osteonecrosis of the jaw. In light of this other anti-resorptives such as phytoestrogens are being considered. However the effect of phytoestrogens on T cell-induced osteoclast formation is unclear. The effect of genistein and coumestrol on activated T cell-induced osteoclastogenesis and cytokine production was therefore examined. Concentrations of genistein and coumestrol (10{sup −7} M) previously shown to directly inhibit osteoclast formation also suppressed the formation of TRAP positive osteoclast induced by con A activated T cells, which was dependent on inhibition of T cell derived TNF-α. While both reduced osteoclast formation their mechanism of action differed. The anti-osteoclastic effect of coumestrol was associated with a dual effect on con A induced T cell proliferation and activation; 10{sup −7} M coumestrol significantly reducing T cell number (0.36) and TNF-α (0.47), IL-1β (0.23) and IL-6 (0.35) expression, whereas genistein (10{sup −7} M) had no effect on T cell number but a more pronounced effect on T cell differentiation reducing expression of TNF-α (0.49), IL-1β (0.52), IL-6 (0.71) and RANKL (0.71). Phytoestrogens therefore prevent the pro-osteoclastic action of T cells suggesting they may have a role in the control of inflammatory bone loss.

  6. MiR-122 Induces Radiosensitization in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Debin; Jia, Hui; Qin, Mengmeng; Dai, Wenjie; Wang, Tao; Liang, Erguang; Dong, Guofu; Wang, Zuojun; Zhang, Zhiyuan; Feng, Fan

    2015-01-01

    MiR-122 is a novel tumor suppresser and its expression induces cell cycle arrest, or apoptosis, and inhibits cell proliferation in multiple cancer cells, including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. Radioresistance of cancer cell leads to the major drawback of radiotherapy for NSCLC and the induction of radiosensitization could be a useful strategy to fix this problem. The present work investigates the function of miR-122 in inducing radiosensitization in A549 cell, a type of NSCLC cells. MiR-122 induces the radiosensitization of A549 cells. MiR-122 also boosts the inhibitory activity of ionizing radiation (IR) on cancer cell anchor-independent growth and invasion. Moreover, miR-122 reduced the expression of its targeted genes related to tumor-survival or cellular stress response. These results indicate that miR-122 would be a novel strategy for NSCLC radiation-therapy. PMID:26389880

  7. Substrate Induced Osteoblast-Like Differentiation of Stromal Stem Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belizar, Jacqueline; Glaser, Reena; Hung, Matthew; Simon, Marcia; Jurukovski, Vladimir; Rafailovich, Miriam; Shih, Alice

    2009-03-01

    We have demonstrated that Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) can be induced to biomineralize on a polybutadiene (PB) coated Si substrate. The cells began to generate calcium phosphate deposits after a five-day incubation period in the absence of dexamethasone. Control cells plated on tissue culture PS culture dish (TCP) did not biomineralize. In addition, the biomineralizing culture retained proliferative cells In order to determine whether the induction was transient, we transferred the cells exposed to polybutadiene after 14 and 28-day incubation periods to TCP dishes. These cells continued to biominerlize. Genetic testing is underway which will determine whether differentiation is maintained after transfer.

  8. Endosulfan affects GnRH cells in sexually differentiated juveniles of the perciform Cichlasoma dimerus.

    PubMed

    Piazza, Yanina; Pandolfi, Matías; Da Cuña, Rodrigo; Genovese, Griselda; Lo Nostro, Fabiana

    2015-06-01

    Endosulfan (ES) is an organochlorine pesticide widely used in agriculture despite its high toxicity towards non-target organisms such as fish. It has been demonstrated that ES can cause negative effects on aquatic animals, including disruption of hormonal systems. However, the alterations produced by this pesticide on the reproductive axis of fish prior to sexual maturity, as well as possible modes of action have hardly been studied. This study aimed at assessing the effect of waterborne exposure to the pesticide ES on the reproductive axis during sexual differentiation of juveniles of the South American freshwater cichlid fish Cichlasoma dimerus. No mortality was observed due to ES subchronic exposure (90 days post-fertilization). Exposure to ES did not affect body weight nor morphometric parameters, indicating that larvae nutritional state was not affected. Timing of sexual differentiation, gonadal morphology and sex ratio were likewise not altered by ES. However, ES acted as an endocrine disrupting chemical in this species as the morphometry of gonadotropin-releasing hormones (GnRH) producing cells was altered. Exposure to ES altered nuclear area, cell area and nucleus/cytoplasm ratio of GnRH II neurons, and cell and nuclear area and diameter of GnRH III neurons. Interestingly, in our previous study, exposure before sex differentiation (30 day exposure) caused no alteration to GnRH II and III, and did alter GnRH I and FSH cells. These alterations could lead to changes in circulating hormone levels, especially when fish are exposed for prolonged periods, ultimately impairing reproductive fitness. C. dimerus juveniles can be an interesting biological model to perform toxicological studies with the intent to assess early disruption endpoints in the reproductive axis during development.

  9. Eosinophils induce airway smooth muscle cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Halwani, Rabih; Vazquez-Tello, Alejandro; Sumi, Yuki; Pureza, Mary Angeline; Bahammam, Ahmed; Al-Jahdali, Hamdan; Soussi-Gounni, Abdelillah; Mahboub, Bassam; Al-Muhsen, Saleh; Hamid, Qutayba

    2013-04-01

    Asthma is characterized by eosinophilic airway inflammation and remodeling of the airway wall. Features of airway remodeling include increased airway smooth muscle (ASM) mass. However, little is known about the interaction between inflammatory eosinophils and ASM cells. In this study, we investigated the effect of eosinophils on ASM cell proliferation. Eosinophils were isolated from peripheral blood of mild asthmatics and non-asthmatic subjects and co-cultured with human primary ASM cells. ASM proliferation was estimated using Ki-67 expression assay. The expression of extracellular matrix (ECM) mRNA in ASM cells was measured using quantitative real-time PCR. The role of eosinophil derived Cysteinyl Leukotrienes (CysLTs) in enhancing ASM proliferation was estimated by measuring the release of leukotrienes from eosinophils upon their direct contact with ASM cells using ELISA. This role was confirmed either by blocking eosinophil-ASM contact or co-culturing them in the presence of leukotrienes antagonist. ASM cells co-cultured with eosinophils, isolated from asthmatics, but not non-asthmatics, had a significantly higher rate of proliferation compared to controls. This increase in ASM proliferation was independent of their release of ECM proteins but dependent upon eosinophils release of CysLTs. Eosinophil-ASM cell to cell contact was required for CysLTs release. Preventing eosinophil contact with ASM cells using anti-adhesion molecules antibodies, or blocking the activity of eosinophil derived CysLTs using montelukast inhibited ASM proliferation. Our results indicated that eosinophils contribute to airway remodeling during asthma by enhancing ASM cell proliferation and hence increasing ASM mass. Direct contact of eosinophils with ASM cells triggers their release of CysLTs which enhance ASM proliferation. Eosinophils, and their binding to ASM cells, constitute a potential therapeutic target to interfere with the series of biological events leading to airway remodeling

  10. Activation-induced CD154 expression abrogates tolerance induced by apoptotic cells*

    PubMed Central

    Gurung, Prajwal; Kucaba, Tamara A.; Ferguson, Thomas A.; Griffith, Thomas S.

    2009-01-01

    The decision to generate a productive immune response or tolerance often depends on the context in which T cells first see Ag. Using a classical system of tolerance induction, we examined the immunological consequence of Ag encountered in the presence of naïve or activated apoptotic cells. Naïve apoptotic cells induced tolerance when injected i.v.; however, previously activated apoptotic cells induced immunity. Further analysis revealed a key role for CD154, as tolerance resulted after i.v. injection of either naïve or activated apoptotic CD154−/− T cells, while co-injection of an agonistic anti-CD40 mAb with naïve apoptotic T cells induced robust immunity. DC fed activated apoptotic T cells in vitro produced IL-12p40 in a CD154-dependent manner, and the use of IL-12p40−/− mice or mAb-mediated neutralization of IL-12 revealed a link between CD154, IL-12, and the ability of activated apoptotic T cells to induce immunity rather than tolerance. Collectively these results show that CD154 expression on apoptotic T cells can determine the outcome of an immune response to Ag recognized within the context of the apoptotic cells, and suggest the balance between naïve and activated apoptotic T cells may dictate whether a productive immune response is encouraged. PMID:19841180

  11. Simulating cell apoptosis induced sinus node dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Kharche, Sanjay; Beling, John; Biktasheva, Irina V; Zhang, Henggui; Biktashev, Vadim N

    2013-01-01

    Sinus node dysfunction (SND) is correlated to the pacemaker sinoatrial node (SAN) cell apoptosis. This study explores the effect of such a dysfunctional SAN on electrical propagation into neighboring atrial tissue. The Fenton Karma model was extended to simulate mouse SAN and atrial cell action potentials. The cell models were incorporated into a 2D model consisting of a central SAN region surrounded by atrial tissue. The intercellular gap junctional coupling, as quantified by the diffusion constant, was estimated to give conduction speeds as observed in mouse atrial tissue. The size of mouse SAN pacemaking region was estimated using the 2D model. In multiple simulations, the effects of an increasing proportion of apoptotic pacemaker cells on atrial tissue pacing were simulated and quantified. The SAN size that gave a basal mouse atrial cycle length (ACL) of 295 ms was found to be 0.6 mm in radius. At low pacemaker cell apoptosis proportion, there was a drastic increase of ACL. At modest increase in the number of apoptotic cells, bradycardia was observed. The incidence of sinus arrest was also found to be high. When the number of apoptotic cells were 10% of the total number of pacemaking cells, all pacemaking was arrested. Phenomenological models have been developed to study mouse atrial electrophysiology and confirm experimental findings. The results show the significance of cell apoptosis as a major mechanism of SND.

  12. High dose of ascorbic acid induces cell death in mesothelioma cells.

    PubMed

    Takemura, Yukitoshi; Satoh, Motohiko; Satoh, Kiyotoshi; Hamada, Hironobu; Sekido, Yoshitaka; Kubota, Shunichiro

    2010-04-02

    Malignant mesothelioma is an asbestos-related fatal disease with no effective cure. Recently, high dose of ascorbate in cancer treatment has been reexamined. We studied whether high dose of ascorbic acid induced cell death of four human mesothelioma cell lines. High dose of ascorbic acid induced cell death of all mesothelioma cell lines in a dose-dependent manner. We further clarified the cell killing mechanism that ascorbic acid induced reactive oxygen species and impaired mitochondrial membrane potential. In vivo experiment, intravenous administration of ascorbic acid significantly decreased the growth rate of mesothelioma tumor inoculated in mice. These data suggest that ascorbic acid may have benefits for patients with mesothelioma.

  13. Inducible expression of endomorphins in murine dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaohuai; Xia, Hui; Chen, Yong; Liu, Xiaofen; Zhou, Cheng; Gao, Qin; Li, Zhenghong

    2012-12-15

    Bone marrow precursor cells were extracted from C57BL/6J mice aged 7-8 weeks, and dendritic cells were purified using anti-CD11c (a specific marker for dendritic cells) antibody-coated magnetic beads. Immunofluorescence staining revealed that the expression levels of endomorphin-1 and endomorphin-2 were upregulated in dendritic cells activated by lipopolysaccharide. An enzyme immunoassay showed that lipopolysaccharide and other Toll-like receptor ligands promoted the secretion of endomorphin-1 and endomorphin-2 from activated dendritic cells. [(3)H]-thymidine incorporation demonstrated that endomorphin-1 and endomorphin-2 both inhibited the proliferation of T lymphocyte induced by activated dendritic cells. Furthermore, this immunosuppressive effect was blocked by CTOP, a specific antagonist of µ-opioid receptors. Our experimental findings indicate that activated dendritic cells can induce the expression and secretion of endomorphins, and that endomorphins suppress T lymphocyte proliferation through activation of µ-opioid receptors.

  14. Ginsenoside compound K induces apoptosis in nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells via activation of apoptosis-inducing factor

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) has a high incidence rate in Southern China. Although there are conventional therapies, the side effects and toxicities are not always tolerable for patients. Recently, the tumoricidal effect of ginsenosides on different cancer cells has been studied. This study aims to investigate the anti-cancer effect of ginsenosides on NPC cells and their underlying mechanism. Methods The cytotoxicity of ginsenosides on NPC cell line HK-1 was measured by MTT assay. Apoptosis was detected by propidium iodide staining followed by flow cytometry. A xenograft tumor model was established by injecting nude mice with HK-1 cells. The activation of caspases and apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) were evaluated by Western blot analysis. Nuclear translocation of AIF was also studied by immunofluorescence staining. Mitochondrial membrane potential was measured by JC-1 dye using flow cytometry. Results Four ginsenosides, 20 (S)-Rh2, compound K (CK), panaxadiol (PD) and protopanaxadiol (PPD), induced apoptotic cell death in HK-1 cells in a concentration-dependent manner. CK inhibited HK-1 xenograft tumor growth most extensively and depleted mitochondrial membrane potential depolarization and induced translocation of AIF from cytoplasm to nucleus in HK-1 cells. In addition, depletion of AIF by siRNA abolished CK-induced HK-1 cell death. Conclusion Ginsenoside CK-induced apoptosis of HK-1 cells was mediated by the mitochondrial pathway and could significantly inhibit tumor growth in vivo. PMID:24690317

  15. Caffeine augments Alprazolam induced cytotoxicity in human cell lines.

    PubMed

    Saha, Biswarup; Mukherjee, Ananda; Samanta, Saheli; Saha, Piyali; Ghosh, Anup Kumar; Santra, Chitta Ranjan; Karmakar, Parimal

    2009-09-01

    Combined effects of alprazolam (Alp), a member of benzodiazepine group of drugs and caffeine on human cell lines, HeLa and THP1 were investigated in this study. Alp mediated cytotoxicity was enhanced while caffeine was present. The cell death was confirmed by observing morphological changes, LDH assay and membrane anisotropic study. Also such combined effects induced elevated level of ROS and depletion of GSH. The mechanism of cell death induced by simultaneous treatment of Alp and caffeine was associated with the calcium-mediated activation of mu-calpain, release of lysosomal protease cathepsin B, activation of PARP and cleavage of caspase 3. Our results indicate that, Alp alone induces apoptosis in human cells but in the presence of caffeine it augments necrosis in a well-regulated pathway. Thus our observations strongly suggest that, alprazolam and caffeine together produce severe cytotoxicity in human cell lines.

  16. Expression of Hyaluronidase by Tumor Cells Induces Angiogenesis in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dacai; Pearlman, Eric; Diaconu, Eugenia; Guo, Kun; Mori, Hiroshi; Haqqi, Tariq; Markowitz, Sanford; Willson, James; Sy, Man-Sun

    1996-07-01

    Hyaluronic acid is a proteoglycan present in the extracellular matrix and is important for the maintenance of tissue architecture. Depolymerization of hyaluronic acid may facilitate tumor invasion. In addition, oligosaccharides of hyaluronic acid have been reported to induce angiogenesis. We report here that a hyaluronidase similar to the one on human sperm is expressed by metastatic human melanoma, colon carcinoma, and glioblastoma cell lines and by tumor biopsies from patients with colorectal carcinomas, but not by tissues from normal colon. Moreover, angiogenesis is induced by hyaluronidase+ tumor cells but not hyaluronidase- tumor cells and can be blocked by an inhibitor of hyaluronidase. Tumor cells thus use hyaluronidase as one of the ``molecular saboteurs'' to depolymerize hyaluronic acid to facilitate invasion. As a consequence, breakdown products of hyaluronic acid can further promote tumor establishment by inducing angiogenesis. Hyaluronidase on tumor cells may provide a target for anti-neoplastic drugs.

  17. Expression of hyaluronidase by tumor cells induces angiogenesis in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, D; Pearlman, E; Diaconu, E; Guo, K; Mori, H; Haqqi, T; Markowitz, S; Willson, J; Sy, M S

    1996-01-01

    Hyaluronic acid is a proteoglycan present in the extracellular matrix and is important for the maintenance of tissue architecture. Depolymerization of hyaluronic acid may facilitate tumor invasion. In addition, oligosaccharides of hyaluronic acid have been reported to induce angiogenesis. We report here that a hyaluronidase similar to the one on human sperm is expressed by metastatic human melanoma, colon carcinoma, and glioblastoma cell lines and by tumor biopsies from patients with colorectal carcinomas, but not by tissues from normal colon. Moreover, angiogenesis is induced by hyaluronidase+ tumor cells but not hyaluronidase- tumor cells and can be blocked by an inhibitor of hyaluronidase. Tumor cells thus use hyaluronidase as one of the "molecular saboteurs" to depolymerize hyaluronic acid to facilitate invasion. As a consequence, breakdown products of hyaluronic acid can further promote tumor establishment by inducing angiogenesis. Hyaluronidase on tumor cells may provide a target for anti-neoplastic drugs. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8755562

  18. Clostridium perfringens Iota-Toxin b Induces Rapid Cell Necrosis▿

    PubMed Central

    Nagahama, Masahiro; Umezaki, Mariko; Oda, Masataka; Kobayashi, Keiko; Tone, Shigenobu; Suda, Taiji; Ishidoh, Kazumi; Sakurai, Jun

    2011-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens iota-toxin is a binary toxin composed of an enzyme component (Ia) and a binding component (Ib). Each component alone lacks toxic activity, but together they produce cytotoxic effects. We examined the cytotoxicity of iota-toxin Ib in eight cell lines. A431 and A549 cells were susceptible to Ib, but MDCK, Vero, CHO, Caco-2, HT-29, and DLD-1 cells were not. Ib bound and formed oligomers in the membranes of A431 and MDCK cells. However, Ib entered MDCK cells but not A431 cells, suggesting that uptake is essential for cellular survival. Ib also induced cell swelling and the rapid depletion of cellular ATP in A431 and A549 cells but not the insensitive cell lines. In A431 cells, Ib binds and oligomerizes mainly in nonlipid rafts in the membranes. Disruption of lipid rafts by methyl-β-cyclodextrin did not impair ATP depletion or cell death caused by Ib. Ib induced permeabilization by propidium iodide without DNA fragmentation in A431 cells. Ultrastructural studies revealed that A431 cells undergo necrosis after treatment with Ib. Ib caused a disruption of mitochondrial permeability and the release of cytochrome c. Staining with active-form-specific antibodies showed that the proapoptotic Bcl-2-family proteins Bax and Bak were activated and colocalized with mitochondria in Ib-treated A431 cells. We demonstrate that Ib by itself produces cytotoxic activity through necrosis. PMID:21911469

  19. Shear-induced Volume Decrease in MDCK Cells

    PubMed Central

    Heo, Jinseok; Sachs, Frederick; Wang, Jianbin; Hua, Susan Z.

    2013-01-01

    Using a microfluidic cell volume sensor we measured the change in the cell volume of Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) cells induced by shear stress. An increase in shear stress from 0.2 to 2.0 dyn/cm2 resulted in a volume decrease to a steady state volume ~ 20 – 30 % smaller than the initial resting cell volume. Independent experiments based on fluorescence quenching confirmed the volume reduction. This shear-induced cell shrinkage was irreversible on the time scale of the experiment (~ 30 min). Treatment of 0.1 μM Hg2+ significantly inhibited the volume decrease, suggesting that the shear-induced cell shrinkage is associated with water efflux through aquaporins. The volume decrease cannot be inhibited by 75 mM TEA, 100 μM DIDS, or 100 μM Gd3+ suggesting that volume reduction is not directly mediated by K+ and Cl− channels that typically function during regulatory volume decrease (RVD), nor is it through cationic stretch-activated ion channels (SACs). The process also appears to be Ca2+ independent because it was insensitive to intracellular Ca2+ level. Since cell volume is determined by the intracellular water content, we postulate that the shear induced reductions in cell volume may arise from increased intracellular hydrostatic pressure as the cell is deformed under flow, which promotes the efflux of water. The increase in internal pressure in a deformable object under the flow is supported by the finite element mechanical model. PMID:22759987

  20. Staphylococcal exotoxins induce interleukin 22 in human th22 cells.

    PubMed

    Niebuhr, Margarete; Mainardy, Julia; Heratizadeh, Annice; Satzger, Imke; Werfel, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    We have shown previously that T cells from atopic dermatitis (AD) patients produce more IL-22 upon staphylococcal exotoxin stimulation compared to psoriasis patients and healthy controls. The role of staphylococcal exotoxins on polarized memory T helper (Th)22 cells which are enriched in inflamed AD skin remains elusive. Our aim was to investigate IL-22 production in response to staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) and α-toxin stimulation in human memory T cells and polarized Th22 cells. IL-22 induction was investigated in human peripheral blood-derived CD4+CD45RO+CD45RA- T cells and polarized Th22 cells after SEB and sublytic α-toxin stimulation in a time-dependent manner at the mRNA and protein (ELISA) levels. Th22 cells secreted more IL-22 compared to freshly isolated peripheral blood-derived memory T cells. SEB and α-toxin induced IL-22 in memory T cells as well as in Th22 cells. More IL-22 was induced by SEB and α-toxin in freshly isolated peripheral blood memory T cells compared to Th22 cells derived from memory T cells in long-term cell culture without polarization and Th22 cells under Th22-promoting conditions with IL-6 and TNF-α. No differences in IL-22 induction by staphylococcal exotoxins were observed between cells from AD compared to psoriasis patients and healthy controls. Increased IL-22 secretion can promptly be induced by staphylococcal exotoxins in skin infiltrating CD4+CD45RO+CD45RA- memory T cells and can potentially amplify chronic skin inflammation in AD in the context of bacterial colonization and infection. This should be investigated further in detail in lesional skin of AD and psoriasis patients. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Apoptotic lymphocytes induce progenitor cell mobilization after exercise.

    PubMed

    Mooren, Frank C; Krüger, Karsten

    2015-07-15

    There is evidence that apoptotic cells and their components have immunmodulatory properties and signaling function. The present study investigated first whether exercise-induced apoptosis and exercise-induced mobilization of progenitor cells are similarly affected by subjects' training status and, second, whether the appearance of dying cells in the circulation might mobilize progenitor cells. CD1 SWISS mice were subjected to a 10-wk endurance training using free wheel running or served as untrained controls. Mice of both groups performed an intensive exercise test after the training period at a velocity corresponding to 80% maximal oxygen uptake for 30 min. Cells from blood and bone marrow were analyzed, and apoptosis and number of progenitor cells determined via flow cytometry. In a second experiment, apoptotic cells were transferred into recipient mice, and mobilization of progenitor cells was analyzed while vital cells served as controls. In untrained animals, the exhaustive exercise was followed by an enhanced rate of annexin V positive CD3(+) cells in blood and bone marrow (P < 0.05), whereas no increase was found in trained mice. Similarly, exercise mobilized Sca-1(+)/c-kit(+) and Sca-1(+)/Flk(+) cells in untrained (P < 0.05) but not trained mice. Furthermore, application of apoptotic cells and their supernatant mobilized Sca-1(+)/c-kit(+) cells into the blood (P < 0.05), whereas Sca-1(+)/Flk(+) cells were not affected. The present study demonstrated that both lymphocyte apoptosis, as well as mobilization of progenitor cells are similarly related to training status. Furthermore, apoptotic cells seem to induce signals that effectively mobilize hematopoietic progenitor cells. The relevance of this effect for the adaptation to exercise stimuli remains to be shown. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  2. An inducible caspase 9 safety switch can halt cell therapy-induced autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    de Witte, Moniek A; Jorritsma, Annelies; Swart, Erwin; Straathof, Karin C; de Punder, Karin; Haanen, John B A G; Rooney, Cliona M; Schumacher, Ton N M

    2008-05-01

    Transfer of either allogeneic or genetically modified T cells as a therapy for malignancies can be accompanied by T cell-mediated tissue destruction. The introduction of an efficient "safety switch" can potentially be used to control the survival of adoptively transferred cell populations and as such reduce the risk of severe graft-vs-host disease. In this study, we have tested the value of an inducible caspase 9-based safety switch to halt an ongoing immune attack in a murine model for cell therapy-induced type I diabetes. The data obtained in this model indicate that self-reactive T cells expressing this conditional safety switch show unimpaired lymphopenia- and vaccine-induced proliferation and effector function in vivo, but can be specifically and rapidly eliminated upon triggering. These data provide strong support for the evaluation of this conditional safety switch in clinical trials of adoptive cell therapy.

  3. Radiation-induced transmissable chromosomal instability in haemopoietic stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadhim, M. A.; Wright, E. G.

    Heritable radiation-induced genetic alterations have long been assumed to be ``fixed'' within the first cell division. However, there is a growing body of evidence that a considerable fraction of cells surviving radiation exposure appear normal, but a variety of mutational changes arise in their progeny due to a transmissible genomic instability. In our investigations of G-banded metaphases, non-clonal cytogenetic aberrations, predominantly chromatid-type aberrations, have been observed in the clonal descendants of murine and human haemopoietic stem cells surviving low doses (~1 track per cell) of alpha-particle irradiations. The data are consistent with a transmissible genetic instability induced in a stem cell resulting in a diversity of chromosomal aberrations in its clonal progeny many cell divisions later. Recent studies have demonstrated that the instability phenotype persists in vivo and that the expression of chromosomal instability has a strong dependence on the genetic characteristics of the irradiated cell. At the time when cytogenetic aberrations are detected, an increased incidence of hprt mutations and apoptotic cells have been observed in the clonal descendants of alpha-irradiated murine haemopoietic stem cells. Thus, delayed chromosomal abnormalities, delayed cell death by apoptosis and late-arising specific gene mutations may reflect diverse consequences of radiation-induced genomic instability. The relationship, if any, between these effects is not established. Current studies suggest that expression of these delayed heritable effects is determined by the type of radiation exposure, type of cell and a variety of genetic factors.

  4. NETRIN-4 protects glioblastoma cells FROM temozolomide induced senescence.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Hu, Yizhou; Ylivinkka, Irene; Li, Huini; Chen, Ping; Keski-Oja, Jorma; Hyytiäinen, Marko

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme is the most common primary tumor of the central nervous system. The drug temozolomide (TMZ) prolongs lifespan in many glioblastoma patients. The sensitivity of glioblastoma cells to TMZ is interfered by many factors, such as the expression of O-6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) and activation of AKT signaling. We have recently identified the interaction between netrin-4 (NTN4) and integrin beta-4 (ITGB4), which promotes glioblastoma cell proliferation via activating AKT-mTOR signaling pathway. In the current work we have explored the effect of NTN4/ITGB4 interaction on TMZ induced glioblastoma cell senescence. We report here that the suppression of either ITGB4 or NTN4 in glioblastoma cell lines significantly enhances cellular senescence. The sensitivity of GBM cells to TMZ was primarily determined by the expression of MGMT. To omit the effect of MGMT, we concentrated on the cell lines devoid of expression of MGMT. NTN4 partially inhibited TMZ induced cell senescence and rescued AKT from dephosphorylation in U251MG cells, a cell line bearing decent levels of ITGB4. However, addition of exogenous NTN4 displayed no significant effect on TMZ induced senescence rescue or AKT activation in U87MG cells, which expressed ITGB4 at low levels. Furthermore, overexpression of ITGB4 combined with exogenous NTN4 significantly attenuated U87MG cell senescence induced by TMZ. These data suggest that NTN4 protects glioblastoma cells from TMZ induced senescence, probably via rescuing TMZ triggered ITGB4 dependent AKT dephosphorylation. This suggests that interfering the interaction between NTN4 and ITGB4 or concomitant use of the inhibitors of the AKT pathway may improve the therapeutic efficiency of TMZ.

  5. PDT-apoptotic tumor cells induce macrophage immune response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Fei-fan; Xing, Da; Chen, Wei R.

    2008-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) functions as a cancer therapy through two major cell death mechanisms: apoptosis and necrosis. Immunological responses induced by PDT has been mainly associated with necrosis while apoptosis associated immune responses have not fully investigated. Heat shock proteins (HSPs) play an important role in regulating immune responses. In present study, we studied whether apoptotic tumor cells could induce immune response and how the HSP70 regulates immune response. The endocytosis of tumor cells by the activated macrophages was observed at single cell level by LSM. The TNF-α release of macrophages induced by co-incubated with PDT-apoptotic tumor cells was detected by ELISA. We found that apoptotic tumor cells treated by PDT could activate the macrophages, and the immune effect decreased evidently when HSP70 was blocked. These findings not only show that apoptosis can induce immunological responses, but also show HSP70 may serves as a danger signal for immune cells and induce immune responses to regulate the efficacy of PDT.

  6. Chlorpyrifos induces endoplasmic reticulum stress in JEG-3 cells.

    PubMed

    Reyna, Luciana; Flores-Martín, Jésica; Ridano, Magali E; Panzetta-Dutari, Graciela M; Genti-Raimondi, Susana

    2017-04-01

    Chlorpyrifos (CPF) is an organophosphorous pesticide widely used in agricultural, industrial, and household applications. We have previously shown that JEG-3 cells are able to attenuate the oxidative stress induced by CPF through the adaptive activation of the Nrf2/ARE pathway. Considering that there is a relationship between oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum stress (ER), herein we investigated whether CPF also induces ER stress in JEG-3 cells. Cells were exposed to 50μM or 100μM CPF during 24h in conditions where cell viability was not altered. Western blot and PCR assays were used to explore the protein and mRNA levels of ER stress biomarkers, respectively. CPF induced an increase of the typical ER stress-related proteins, such as GRP78/BiP and IRE1α, a sensor for the unfolded protein response, as well as in phospho-eIF2α and XBP1 mRNA splicing. Additionally, CPF led to a decrease in p53 protein expression. The downregulation of p53 levels induced by CPF was partially blocked when cells were exposed to CPF in the presence of the proteasome inhibitor MG132. Altogether, these findings point out that CPF induces ER stress in JEG-3 cells; however these cells are able to attenuate it downregulating the levels of the pro-apoptotic protein p53.

  7. High concentrations of NaCl induce cell swelling leading to senescence in human cells.

    PubMed

    Yamakami, Yoshimi; Yonekura, Ryuzo; Matsumoto, Yuko; Takauji, Yuki; Miki, Kensuke; Fujii, Michihiko; Ayusawa, Dai

    2016-01-01

    Cell swelling and retardation in DNA replication are always observed in senescent cells. When DNA replication is slowed down with RNA and protein syntheses unchanged in proliferating cells, it causes a phenomenon known as unbalanced growth. The purpose of this study is to assess the role of cell swelling in unbalanced growth in terms of senescence and investigate the mechanism underlying this phenomenon. We tried to induce cell swelling with minimum damage to cells in this study. We perturbed the osmoregulatory functions to induce cell swelling under hypotonic and hypertonic conditions in normal human fibroblasts. Addition of excess NaCl was found to induce significant cell and nuclear swelling in dose- and time-dependent manners. Excess NaCl immediately retarded DNA replication, accumulated cells at G1 phase of the cell cycle, and eventually deprived division potential of the cells. Such cells showed typical senescent cell shape followed by expression of the typical senescence-associated genes. Excess NaCl also activated ERK1/2, p38, and JNK of the mitogen activated protein kinase family. Addition of U0126, an inhibitor of ERK1/2, prevented appearance of senescent features induced by excess NaCl. These results suggest that hypertonic conditions induce cell swelling due to unbalanced growth, thereby leading to cellular senescence.

  8. Pseudolaric acid B induced cell cycle arrest, autophagy and senescence in murine fibrosarcoma l929 cell.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jing hua; Liu, Chun yu; Zheng, Gui bin; Zhang, Li Ying; Yan, Ming hui; Zhang, Wen yan; Meng, Xian ying; Yu, Xiao fang

    2013-01-01

    PAB induced various cancer cell apoptosis, cell cycle arrest and senescence. But in cell line murine fibrosarcoma L929, PAB did not induce apoptosis, but autophagy, therefore it was thought by us as a good model to research the relationship of cell cycle arrest, autophagy and senescence bypass apoptosis. Inhibitory ratio was assessed by 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) analysis. Phase contrast microscopy visualized cell morphology. Hoechst 33258 staining for nuclear change, propidium iodode (PI) staining for cell cycle, monodansylcadaverine (MDC) staining for autophagy, and rodanmine 123 staining for mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) were measured by fluorescence microscopy or flowcytometry. Apoptosis was determined by DNA ladder test. Protein kinase C (PKC) activity was detected by PKC assay kit. SA-β-galactosidase assay was used to detect senescence. Protein expression was examined by western blot. PAB inhibited L929 cell growth in time-and dose-dependent manner. At 12 h, 80 μmol/L PAB induced obvious mitotic arrest; at 24 h, PAB began to induce autophagy; at 36 h, cell-treated with PAB slip into G1 cell cycle; and 3 d PAB induced senescence. In time sequence PAB induced firstly cell cycle arrest, then autophagy, then slippage into G1 phase, lastly senescence. Senescent cells had high level of autophagy, inhibiting autophagy led to apoptosis, and no senescence. PAB activated PKC activity to induce cell cycle arrest, autophagy and senescence, inhibiting PKC activity suppressed cell cycle arrest, autophagy and senescence. PAB induced cell cycle arrest, autophagy and senescence in murine fibrosarcoma L929 cell through PKC.

  9. Cell membrane potentials induced during exposure to EMP fields

    SciTech Connect

    Gailey, P.C.; Easterly, C.E.

    1994-09-01

    Internal current densities and electric fields induced in the human body during exposure to EMP fields are reviewed and used to predict resulting cell membrane potentials. Using several different approaches, membrane potentials of about 100 mV are predicted. These values are comparable to the static membrane potentials maintained by cells as a part of normal physiological function, but the EMP-induced potentials persist for only about 10 ns. Possible biological implications of EMP-induced membrane potentials including conformational changes and electroporation are discussed.

  10. Matrine induces RIP3-dependent necroptosis in cholangiocarcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Beibei; Xu, Minying; Tian, Yuan; Yu, Qiang; Zhao, Yujie; Chen, Xiong; Mi, Panying; Cao, Hanwei; Zhang, Bing; Song, Gang; Zhan, Yan-yan; Hu, Tianhui

    2017-01-01

    The development of acquired resistance to pro-apoptotic antitumor agents is a major impediment to the cure of cholangiocarcinoma (CCA). Antitumor drugs inducing non-apoptotic cell death are considered as a new approach to overcome such drug resistance. Here, we reported for the first time that matrine-induced necroptosis in CCA cell lines, differing from its classical role to induce apoptosis in many other kinds of cancer cells. CCA cells under matrine treatment exhibited typical necrosis-like but not apoptotic morphologic change. These matrine-induced morphologic change and cell death in CCA cells were greatly attenuated by necroptosis inhibitor necrostatin-1, but not apoptosis inhibitor z-VAD-fmk. Unlike many cancer cells with negative receptor-interacting protein 3 (RIP3) expression, moderate expression of RIP3 in CCA cells was observed and was required for matrine to induce necroptosis, which was switched to apoptosis after knocking down endogenous RIP3. Moreover, matrine could increase RIP3 expression level, which may facilitate the necroptosis process. Translocation of mixed lineage kinase-domain like (MLKL) from cytoplasm to plasma membrane as a downstream event of RIP3, as well as the increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by RIP3/MLKL, was critical for matrine to induce necroptosis. In clinical study, we found RIP3 was lower but still moderately expressed in most CCA tissue samples compared with adjacent normal tissues. Taken together, we identified matrine as a necroptosis inducer in CCA by enhancing RIP3 expression and the following RIP3/MLKL/ROS signaling pathway, which provided new individualized strategies based on RIP3 expression to overcome chemoresistance in CCA therapy. PMID:28179994

  11. Bioactive compounds from crocodile (Crocodylus siamensis) white blood cells induced apoptotic cell death in hela cells.

    PubMed

    Patathananone, Supawadee; Thammasirirak, Sompong; Daduang, Jureerut; Chung, Jing Gung; Temsiripong, Yosapong; Daduang, Sakda

    2016-08-01

    Crocodile (Crocodylus siamensis) white blood cell extracts (WBCex) were examined for anticancer activity in HeLa cell lines using the MTT assay. The percentage viability of HeLa cells significantly deceased after treatment with WBCex in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The IC50 dose was suggested to be approximately 225 μg/mL protein. Apoptotic cell death occurred in a time-dependent manner based on investigation by flow cytometry using annexin V-FITC and PI staining. DAPI nucleic acid staining indicated increased chromatin condensation. Caspase-3, -8 and -9 activities also increased, suggesting the induction of the caspase-dependent apoptotic pathway. Furthermore, the mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm ) of HeLa cells was lost as a result of increasing levels of Bax and reduced levels of Bcl-2, Bcl-XL, Bcl-Xs, and XIAP. The decreased ΔΨm led to the release of cytochrome c and the activation of caspase-9 and -3. Apoptosis-inducing factor translocated into the nuclei, and endonuclease G (Endo G) was released from the mitochondria. These results suggest that anticancer agents in WBCex can induce apoptosis in HeLa cells via both caspase-dependent and -independent pathways. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 31: 986-997, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Acanthamoeba induces cell-cycle arrest in host cells.

    PubMed

    Sissons, James; Alsam, Selwa; Jayasekera, Samantha; Kim, Kwang Sik; Stins, Monique; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2004-08-01

    Acanthamoeba can cause fatal granulomatous amoebic encephalitis (GAE) and eye keratitis. However, the pathogenesis and pathophysiology of these emerging diseases remain unclear. In this study, the effects of Acanthamoeba on the host cell cycle using human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC) and human corneal epithelial cells (HCEC) were determined. Two isolates of Acanthamoeba belonging to the T1 genotype (GAE isolate) and T4 genotype (keratitis isolate) were used, which showed severe cytotoxicity on HBMEC and HCEC, respectively. No tissue specificity was observed in their ability to exhibit binding to the host cells. To determine the effects of Acanthamoeba on the host cell cycle, a cell-cycle-specific gene array was used. This screened for 96 genes specific for host cell-cycle regulation. It was observed that Acanthamoeba inhibited expression of genes encoding cyclins F and G1 and cyclin-dependent kinase 6, which are proteins important for cell-cycle progression. Moreover, upregulation was observed of the expression of genes such as GADD45A and p130 Rb, associated with cell-cycle arrest, indicating cell-cycle inhibition. Next, the effect of Acanthamoeba on retinoblastoma protein (pRb) phosphorylation was determined. pRb is a potent inhibitor of G1-to-S cell-cycle progression; however, its function is inhibited upon phosphorylation, allowing progression into S phase. Western blotting revealed that Acanthamoeba abolished pRb phosphorylation leading to cell-cycle arrest at the G1-to-S transition. Taken together, these studies demonstrated for the first time that Acanthamoeba inhibits the host cell cycle at the transcriptional level, as well as by modulating pRb phosphorylation using host cell-signalling mechanisms. A complete understanding of Acanthamoeba-host cell interactions may help in developing novel strategies to treat Acanthamoeba infections.

  13. Light induced drug delivery into cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Shamay, Yosi; Adar, Lily; Ashkenasy, Gonen; David, Ayelet

    2011-02-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) can be used for intracellular delivery of a broad variety of cargoes, including various nanoparticulate pharmaceutical carriers. However, the cationic nature of all CPP sequences, and thus lack of cell specificity, limits their in vivo use for drug delivery applications. Here, we have devised and tested a strategy for site-specific delivery of dyes and drugs into cancer cells by using polymers bearing a light activated caged CPP (cCPP). The positive charge of Lys residues on the minimum sequence of the CPP penetratin ((52)RRMKWKK(58)) was masked with photo-cleavable groups to minimize non-specific adsorption and cellular uptake. Once illuminated by UV light, these protecting groups were cleaved, the positively charged CPP regained its activity and facilitated rapid intracellular delivery of the polymer-dye or polymer-drug conjugates into cancer cells. We have found that a 10-min light illumination time was sufficient to enhance the penetration of the polymer-CPP conjugates bearing the proapoptotic peptide, (D)(KLAKLAK)(2), into 80% of the target cells, and to promote a 'switch' like cytotoxic activity resulting a shift from 100% to 10% in cell viability after 2 h. This report provides an example for tumor targeting by means of light activation of cell-penetrating peptides for intracellular drug delivery.

  14. Generation of induced pluripotent stem cells from the pig

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The value of stem cells has become increasingly evident in recent years with the advent of genetic engineering tools that allow site-specific modifications to the genome. The use of stem cells to induce modifications has several potential benefits for the livestock industry including improving anim...

  15. Oxidant-induced DNA damage of target cells.

    PubMed Central

    Schraufstätter, I; Hyslop, P A; Jackson, J H; Cochrane, C G

    1988-01-01

    In this study we examined the leukocytic oxidant species that induce oxidant damage of DNA in whole cells. H2O2 added extracellularly in micromolar concentrations (10-100 microM) induced DNA strand breaks in various target cells. The sensitivity of a specific target cell was inversely correlated to its catalase content and the rate of removal of H2O2 by the target cell. Oxidant species produced by xanthine oxidase/purine or phorbol myristate acetate-stimulated monocytes induced DNA breakage of target cells in proportion to the amount of H2O2 generated. These DNA strand breaks were prevented by extracellular catalase, but not by superoxide dismutase. Cytotoxic doses of HOCl, added to target cells, did not induce DNA strand breakage, and myeloperoxidase added extracellularly in the presence of an H2O2-generating system, prevented the formation of DNA strand breaks in proportion to its H2O2 degrading capacity. The studies also indicated that H2O2 formed hydroxyl radical (.OH) intracellularly, which appeared to be the most likely free radical responsible for DNA damage: .OH was detected in cells exposed to H2O2; the DNA base, deoxyguanosine, was hydroxylated in cells exposed to H2O2; and intracellular iron was essential for induction of DNA strand breaks. PMID:2843565

  16. Nimbolide induces apoptosis in human nasopharyngeal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chien, Su-Yu; Hsu, Ching-Hui; Lin, Chia-Chieh; Chuang, Yi-Ching; Lo, Yu-Sheng; Hsi, Yi-Ting; Hsieh, Ming-Ju; Chen, Mu-Kuan

    2017-08-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), a tumor arising from epithelial cells that cover the surface and line the nasopharynx, is a rare malignancy worldwide but is prevalent in certain geographical areas, such as Southern Asia (Taiwan, Hong Kong, Singapore, Malaysia, and Southern China) and North Africa. Despite advances in diagnostic techniques and improvements in treatment modalities, the prognosis of NPC remains poor. Therefore, an effective chemotherapy regimen that enhances tumor sensitivity to chemotherapeutics is urgently required. Nimbolide, derived from Azadirachta indica, has a wide range of beneficial effects, including anti-inflammatory and anticancer properties. The present study evaluated the antitumor activity of nimbolide in NPC cells and its underlying mechanisms. Our results revealed that the treatment of HONE-1 cells with nimbolide potently inhibited cell viability. Moreover, nimbolide led to cell cycle arrest, which subsequently activated caspase-3, -8, and -9 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase to induce cell apoptosis. Moreover, nimbolide induced Bik, Bax, and t-Bid expression in HONE-1 cells. The results indicated that nimbolide induces apoptosis through the modulation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) pathways. Nimbolide induces apoptosis in human NPC cells and is a potential chemopreventive agent against NPC proliferation. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 32: 2085-2092, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Resveratrol-induced autophagocytosis in ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Opipari, Anthony W; Tan, Lijun; Boitano, Anthony E; Sorenson, Dorothy R; Aurora, Anjili; Liu, J Rebecca

    2004-01-15

    Resveratrol (3,5,4-trihydroxystilbene), a natural phytoalexin present in grapes, nuts, and red wine, has antineoplastic activities. Several molecular mechanisms have been described to underlie its effects on cells in vitro and in vivo. In the present study, the response of ovarian cancer cells to resveratrol is explored. Resveratrol inhibited growth and induced death in a panel of five human ovarian carcinoma cell lines. The response was associated with mitochondrial release of cytochrome c, formation of the apoptosome complex, and caspase activation. Surprisingly, even with these molecular features of apoptosis, analysis of resveratrol-treated cells by light and electron microscopy revealed morphology and ultrastructural changes indicative of autophagocytic, rather than apoptotic, death. This suggests that resveratrol can induce cell death through two distinct pathways. Consistent with resveratrol's ability to kill cells via nonapoptotic processes, cells transfected to express high levels of the antiapoptotic proteins Bcl-x(L) and Bcl-2 are equally sensitive as control cells to resveratrol. Together, these findings show that resveratrol induces cell death in ovarian cancer cells through a mechanism distinct from apoptosis, therefore suggesting that it may provide leverage to treat ovarian cancer that is chemoresistant on the basis of ineffective apoptosis.

  18. Octylphenol induces vitellogenin production and cell death in fish hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Toomey, B.H.; Monteverdi, G.H.; Di Giulio, R.T.

    1999-04-01

    The effects of octylphenol (OP) on vitellogenin production and cell death in hepatocytes from brown bullhead catfish (Americurus nebulosus) were studied. Production of vitellogenin was induced in hepatocytes exposed to 10 to 50 {micro}M OP, whereas a higher concentration of OP (100 {micro}M) induced apoptotic cell death. By 3 h after the addition of 100 {micro}M OP, dying cells showed chromatin condensation and DNA fragmentation as determined by fluorescence microscopy and gel electrophoresis. Later stages of cell death (nuclear membrane breakdown and cell fragmentation into apoptotic bodies) were identified in cells exposed to OP for at least 6 h. Hepatocytes exposed to 100 {micro}M OP also produced less vitellogenin than cells exposed to 50 {micro}M OP. An estrogen receptor antagonist, tamoxifen, greatly decreased vitellogenin production in OP-exposed hepatocytes from male fish but did not decrease cell death in these cells. Thus, although the ability of OP to induce vitellogenin production is likely mediated through interactions with the estrogen receptor, the induction of apoptotic cell death by OP does not appear to be dependent on its estrogenic activity but may be a more general toxic effect.

  19. Hypoxia-induced dedifferentiation in neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Jögi, Annika; Øra, Ingrid; Nilsson, Helen; Poellinger, Lorenz; Axelson, Håkan; Påhlman, Sven

    2003-07-18

    Hypoxia in solid tumors is associated with aggressive behavior and poor outcome. We recently discovered that hypoxia alters the expression of differentiation marker genes in neuroblastoma cells, in that the tumor cells adjust to the hypoxic environment by down-regulating genes associated with a neuronal and upregulating genes associated with a neural crest-like phenotype. As there is a correlation in neuroblastoma between low stage of differentiation and high (aggressive) clinical stage, we propose that dedifferentiation of neuroblastoma cells in hypoxic tumor regions contribute to the malignancy of the tumor.

  20. Bax accelerates staurosporine-induced but suppresses nigericin-induced neuronal cell death.

    PubMed

    Oh, J H; O'Malley, K L; Krajewski, S; Reed, J C; Oh, Y J

    1997-05-27

    Bax, a member of the Bcl-2 multigene family, is known to promote apoptosis. To investigate the role of Bax in an experimentally induced cell death of the murine dopaminergic neuronal cell line (MN9D), we established MN9D cells stably over-expressing murine Bax (MN9D/ Bax) or vector alone (MN9D/Neo). In MN9D/Neo cells treated with either 1 microM staurosporine or 0.1 microM nigericin, a ladder pattern of DNA fragmentation was induced. As expected, over-expression of Bax in MN9D cells accelerated staurosporine-induced cell death as measured by the MTT reduction assay (62.3% survival in MN9D/Neo vs 27.0% survival in MN9D/Bax). Surprizingly, both nigericin-induced cell death and its accompanying DNA fragmentation were largely attenuated in MN9D/Bax cells (22.0% survival in MN9D/Neo vs 86.7% survival in MN9D/Bax). Similar patterns were observed in two other MN9D/Bax cell lines. Cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase caused by nigericin was greatly attenuated in MN9D/Bax cells suggesting that, like Bcl-2, Bax suppresses nigericin-induced cell death by inhibiting the activation of cysteine proteases. Thus, our data imply that Bax acts as a negative or positive regulator of cell death depending on the type of death stimulus applied to the cell.

  1. Bee Venom Protects against Rotenone-Induced Cell Death in NSC34 Motor Neuron Cells.

    PubMed

    Jung, So Young; Lee, Kang-Woo; Choi, Sun-Mi; Yang, Eun Jin

    2015-09-21

    Rotenone, an inhibitor of mitochondrial complex I of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, is known to elevate mitochondrial reactive oxygen species and induce apoptosis via activation of the caspase-3 pathway. Bee venom (BV) extracted from honey bees has been widely used in oriental medicine and contains melittin, apamin, adolapin, mast cell-degranulating peptide, and phospholipase A₂. In this study, we tested the effects of BV on neuronal cell death by examining rotenone-induced mitochondrial dysfunction. NSC34 motor neuron cells were pretreated with 2.5 μg/mL BV and stimulated with 10 μM rotenone to induce cell toxicity. We assessed cell death by Western blotting using specific antibodies, such as phospho-ERK1/2, phospho-JNK, and cleaved capase-3 and performed an MTT assay for evaluation of cell death and mitochondria staining. Pretreatment with 2.5 μg/mL BV had a neuroprotective effect against 10 μM rotenone-induced cell death in NSC34 motor neuron cells. Pre-treatment with BV significantly enhanced cell viability and ameliorated mitochondrial impairment in rotenone-treated cellular model. Moreover, BV treatment inhibited the activation of JNK signaling and cleaved caspase-3 related to cell death and increased ERK phosphorylation involved in cell survival in rotenone-treated NSC34 motor neuron cells. Taken together, we suggest that BV treatment can be useful for protection of neurons against oxidative stress or neurotoxin-induced cell death.

  2. Bee Venom Protects against Rotenone-Induced Cell Death in NSC34 Motor Neuron Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jung, So Young; Lee, Kang-Woo; Choi, Sun-Mi; Yang, Eun Jin

    2015-01-01

    Rotenone, an inhibitor of mitochondrial complex I of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, is known to elevate mitochondrial reactive oxygen species and induce apoptosis via activation of the caspase-3 pathway. Bee venom (BV) extracted from honey bees has been widely used in oriental medicine and contains melittin, apamin, adolapin, mast cell-degranulating peptide, and phospholipase A2. In this study, we tested the effects of BV on neuronal cell death by examining rotenone-induced mitochondrial dysfunction. NSC34 motor neuron cells were pretreated with 2.5 μg/mL BV and stimulated with 10 μM rotenone to induce cell toxicity. We assessed cell death by Western blotting using specific antibodies, such as phospho-ERK1/2, phospho-JNK, and cleaved capase-3 and performed an MTT assay for evaluation of cell death and mitochondria staining. Pretreatment with 2.5 μg/mL BV had a neuroprotective effect against 10 μM rotenone-induced cell death in NSC34 motor neuron cells. Pre-treatment with BV significantly enhanced cell viability and ameliorated mitochondrial impairment in rotenone-treated cellular model. Moreover, BV treatment inhibited the activation of JNK signaling and cleaved caspase-3 related to cell death and increased ERK phosphorylation involved in cell survival in rotenone-treated NSC34 motor neuron cells. Taken together, we suggest that BV treatment can be useful for protection of neurons against oxidative stress or neurotoxin-induced cell death. PMID:26402700

  3. Paclitaxel inhibits the hyper-activation of spleen cells by lipopolysaccharide and induces cell death

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun-Ji

    2016-01-01

    Paclitaxel was isolated from the bark of the Pacific yew, Taxus brevifolia, and used as an anticancer agent. Paclitaxel prevents cancer cell division by inhibiting spindle fiber function, inducing cell death. A recent study demonstrated that paclitaxel binds to myeloid differentiation protein-2 of Toll-like receptor 4 and prevents the signal transduction of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Paclitaxel converts immune cells hypo-responsive to LPS. In this study, we investigated whether paclitaxel can inhibit the phenotype and function of immune cells. To accomplish this, we used spleen cells, a major type of immune cell, LPS, a representative inflammatory agent and a mitogen for B lymphocytes. LPS profoundly increased the activation and cytokine production of spleen cells. However, paclitaxel significantly inhibited LPS-induced hyper-activation of spleen cells. Furthermore, we found that paclitaxel induced cell death of LPS-treated spleen cells. These results suggest that paclitaxel can inhibit the hyper-immune response of LPS in spleen cells via a variety of mechanisms. These findings suggest that paclitaxel can be used as a modulating agent for diseases induced by hyper-activation of B lymphocytes. Taken together, these results demonstrate that paclitaxel inhibits the function of spleen cells activated by LPS, and further induces cell death. PMID:27030196

  4. Paclitaxel inhibits the hyper-activation of spleen cells by lipopolysaccharide and induces cell death.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun-Ji; Joo, Hong-Gu

    2016-12-30

    Paclitaxel was isolated from the bark of the Pacific yew, Taxus brevifolia, and used as an anticancer agent. Paclitaxel prevents cancer cell division by inhibiting spindle fiber function, inducing cell death. A recent study demonstrated that paclitaxel binds to myeloid differentiation protein-2 of Toll-like receptor 4 and prevents the signal transduction of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Paclitaxel converts immune cells hypo-responsive to LPS. In this study, we investigated whether paclitaxel can inhibit the phenotype and function of immune cells. To accomplish this, we used spleen cells, a major type of immune cell, LPS, a representative inflammatory agent and a mitogen for B lymphocytes. LPS profoundly increased the activation and cytokine production of spleen cells. However, paclitaxel significantly inhibited LPS-induced hyper-activation of spleen cells. Furthermore, we found that paclitaxel induced cell death of LPS-treated spleen cells. These results suggest that paclitaxel can inhibit the hyper-immune response of LPS in spleen cells via a variety of mechanisms. These findings suggest that paclitaxel can be used as a modulating agent for diseases induced by hyper-activation of B lymphocytes. Taken together, these results demonstrate that paclitaxel inhibits the function of spleen cells activated by LPS, and further induces cell death.

  5. Methylglyoxal Induces Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Cell Death in Liver

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Kyuhwa; Ki, Sung Hwan

    2014-01-01

    Degradation of glucose is aberrantly increased in hyperglycemia, which causes various harmful effects on the liver. Methylglyoxal is produced during glucose degradation and the levels of methylglyoxal are increased in diabetes patients. In this study we investigated whether methylglyoxal induces mitochondrial impairment and apoptosis in HepG2 cells and induces liver toxicity in vivo. Methylglyoxal caused apoptotic cell death in HepG2 cells. Moreover, methylglyoxal significantly promoted the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and depleted glutathione (GSH) content. Pretreatment with antioxidants caused a marked decrease in methylglyoxal-induced apoptosis, indicating that oxidant species are involved in the apoptotic process. Methylglyoxal treatment induced mitochondrial permeability transition, which represents mitochondrial impairment. However, pretreatment with cyclosporin A, an inhibitor of the formation of the permeability transition pore, partially inhibited methylglyoxal-induced cell death. Furthermore, acute treatment of mice with methylglyoxal increased the plasma levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST), indicating liver toxicity. Collectively, our results showed that methylglyoxal increases cell death and induces liver toxicity, which results from ROS-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress. PMID:25343013

  6. ER stress induced by ionising radiation in IEC-6 cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Wang, Yan; Pang, Xueli; Su, Yongping; Ai, Guoping; Wang, Tao

    2010-06-01

    Ionising radiation (IR) can evoke a series of biochemical events inside the cell. However, whether IR can directly induce endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is not clear. In our previous study, we found that there might be a causative link between IR and ER stress. In this study, we further characterised the type of ER stress induced by IR. Rat intestinal epithelial cells IEC-6 were irradiated at a dose of 10 Gy, and total RNA and proteins were harvested at indicated time points. The mRNA and protein expression of immunoglobulin heavy chain binding protein (BiP) and glucose regulated protein 94 (GRP94) was detected along with proteins associated with ER stress signal pathways. Our results indicated that IR induced up-regulation of ER stress marker including BiP and GRP94 at protein and mRNA levels in IEC-6 cells. Increased phosphorylation of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2 (eIF2alpha) and induced mRNA splicing of X-box binding protein 1 (XBP1) suggested that PERK (interferon-induced double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase (PRKR) -like endoplasmic reticulum kinase) and IRE1 (inositol requirement 1) signal transduction pathways were involved in this kind of ER stress. However, the active form of activating transcription factor 6 (ATF6) did not change significantly in irradiated cells, which suggested that the ATF6 pathway was not involved. Thus, we concluded that IR could induce moderate ER stress directly in IEC-6 cells.

  7. FOXL2-induced follistatin attenuates activin A-stimulated cell proliferation in human granulosa cell tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Jung-Chien; Chang, Hsun-Ming; Qiu, Xin; Fang, Lanlan; Leung, Peter C.K.

    2014-01-10

    Highlights: •Activin A stimulates cell proliferation in KGN human granulosa cell tumor-derived cell line. •Cyclin D2 mediates activin A-induced KGN cell proliferation. •FOXL2 induces follistatin expression in KGN cells. •FOXL2-induced follistatin attenuates activin A-stimulated KGN cell proliferation. -- Abstract: Human granulosa cell tumors (GCTs) are rare, and their etiology remains largely unknown. Recently, the FOXL2 402C > G (C134W) mutation was found to be specifically expressed in human adult-type GCTs; however, its function in the development of human GCTs is not fully understood. Activins are members of the transforming growth factor-beta superfamily, which has been shown to stimulate normal granulosa cell proliferation; however, little is known regarding the function of activins in human GCTs. In this study, we examined the effect of activin A on cell proliferation in the human GCT-derived cell line KGN. We show that activin A treatment stimulates KGN cell proliferation. Treatment with the activin type I receptor inhibitor SB431542 blocks activin A-stimulated cell proliferation. In addition, our results show that cyclin D2 is induced by treatment with activin A and is involved in activin A-stimulated cell proliferation. Moreover, the activation of Smad signaling is required for activin A-induced cyclin D2 expression. Finally, we show that the overexpression of the wild-type FOXL2 but not the C134W mutant FOXL2 induced follistatin production. Treatment with exogenous follistatin blocks activin A-stimulated cell proliferation, and the overexpression of wild-type FOXL2 attenuates activin A-stimulated cell proliferation. These results suggest that FOXL2 may act as a tumor suppressor in human adult-type GCTs by inducing follistatin expression, which subsequently inhibits activin-stimulated cell proliferation.

  8. A minimum number of autoimmune T cells to induce autoimmunity?

    PubMed

    Bosch, Angela J T; Bolinger, Beatrice; Keck, Simone; Stepanek, Ondrej; Ozga, Aleksandra J; Galati-Fournier, Virginie; Stein, Jens V; Palmer, Ed

    2017-03-12

    While autoimmune T cells are present in most individuals, only a minority of the population suffers from an autoimmune disease. To better appreciate the limits of T cell tolerance, we carried out experiments to determine how many autoimmune T cells are required to initiate an experimental autoimmune disease. Variable numbers of autoimmune OT-I T cells were transferred into RIP-OVA mice, which were injected with antigen-loaded DCs in a single footpad; this restricted T cell priming to a few OT-I T cells that are present in the draining popliteal lymph node. Using selective plane illumination microscopy (SPIM) we counted the number of OT-I T cells present in the popliteal lymph node at the time of priming. Analysis of our data suggests that a single autoimmune T cell cannot induce an experimental autoimmune disease, but a "quorum" of 2-5 autoimmune T cells clearly has this capacity.

  9. Human B cells induce dendritic cell maturation and favour Th2 polarization by inducing OX-40 ligand

    PubMed Central

    Maddur, Mohan S.; Sharma, Meenu; Hegde, Pushpa; Stephen-Victor, Emmanuel; Pulendran, Bali; Kaveri, Srini V.; Bayry, Jagadeesh

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play a critical role in immune homeostasis by regulating the functions of various immune cells, including T and B cells. Notably, DCs also undergo education on reciprocal signalling by these immune cells and environmental factors. Various reports demonstrated that B cells have profound regulatory functions, although only few reports have explored the regulation of human DCs by B cells. Here we demonstrate that activated but not resting B cells induce maturation of DCs with distinct features to polarize Th2 cells that secrete interleukin (IL)-5, IL-4 and IL-13. B-cell-induced maturation of DCs is contact dependent and implicates signalling of B-cell activation molecules CD69, B-cell-activating factor receptor, and transmembrane activator and calcium-modulating cyclophilin ligand interactor. Mechanistically, differentiation of Th2 cells by B-cell-matured DCs is dependent on OX-40 ligand. Collectively, our results suggest that B cells have the ability to control their own effector functions by enhancing the ability of human DCs to mediate Th2 differentiation. PMID:24910129

  10. Rationale and Methodology of Reprogramming for Generation of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells and Induced Neural Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Zuojun; Guo, Fuzheng; Biswas, Sangita; Deng, Wenbin

    2016-01-01

    Great progress has been made regarding the capabilities to modify somatic cell fate ever since the technology for generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) was discovered in 2006. Later, induced neural progenitor cells (iNPCs) were generated from mouse and human cells, bypassing some of the concerns and risks of using iPSCs in neuroscience applications. To overcome the limitation of viral vector induced reprogramming, bioactive small molecules (SM) have been explored to enhance the efficiency of reprogramming or even replace transcription factors (TFs), making the reprogrammed cells more amenable to clinical application. The chemical induced reprogramming process is a simple process from a technical perspective, but the choice of SM at each step is vital during the procedure. The mechanisms underlying cell transdifferentiation are still poorly understood, although, several experimental data and insights have indicated the rationale of cell reprogramming. The process begins with the forced expression of specific TFs or activation/inhibition of cell signaling pathways by bioactive chemicals in defined culture condition, which initiates the further reactivation of endogenous gene program and an optimal stoichiometric expression of the endogenous pluri- or multi-potency genes, and finally leads to the birth of reprogrammed cells such as iPSCs and iNPCs. In this review, we first outline the rationale and discuss the methodology of iPSCs and iNPCs in a stepwise manner; and then we also discuss the chemical-based reprogramming of iPSCs and iNPCs. PMID:27104529

  11. Rationale and Methodology of Reprogramming for Generation of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells and Induced Neural Progenitor Cells.

    PubMed

    Tian, Zuojun; Guo, Fuzheng; Biswas, Sangita; Deng, Wenbin

    2016-04-20

    Great progress has been made regarding the capabilities to modify somatic cell fate ever since the technology for generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) was discovered in 2006. Later, induced neural progenitor cells (iNPCs) were generated from mouse and human cells, bypassing some of the concerns and risks of using iPSCs in neuroscience applications. To overcome the limitation of viral vector induced reprogramming, bioactive small molecules (SM) have been explored to enhance the efficiency of reprogramming or even replace transcription factors (TFs), making the reprogrammed cells more amenable to clinical application. The chemical induced reprogramming process is a simple process from a technical perspective, but the choice of SM at each step is vital during the procedure. The mechanisms underlying cell transdifferentiation are still poorly understood, although, several experimental data and insights have indicated the rationale of cell reprogramming. The process begins with the forced expression of specific TFs or activation/inhibition of cell signaling pathways by bioactive chemicals in defined culture condition, which initiates the further reactivation of endogenous gene program and an optimal stoichiometric expression of the endogenous pluri- or multi-potency genes, and finally leads to the birth of reprogrammed cells such as iPSCs and iNPCs. In this review, we first outline the rationale and discuss the methodology of iPSCs and iNPCs in a stepwise manner; and then we also discuss the chemical-based reprogramming of iPSCs and iNPCs.

  12. Endothelial cell-derived microparticles induce plasmacytoid dendritic cell maturation: potential implications in inflammatory diseases

    PubMed Central

    Angelot, Fanny; Seillès, Estelle; Biichlé, Sabeha; Berda, Yael; Gaugler, Béatrice; Plumas, Joel; Chaperot, Laurence; Dignat-George, Françoise; Tiberghien, Pierre; Saas, Philippe; Garnache-Ottou, Francine

    2009-01-01

    Background Increased circulating endothelial microparticles, resulting from vascular endothelium dysfunction, and plasmacytoid dendritic cell activation are both encountered in common inflammatory disorders. The aim of our study was to determine whether interactions between endothelial microparticles and plasmacytoid dendritic cells could contribute to such pathologies. Design and Methods Microparticles generated from endothelial cell lines, platelets or activated T cells were incubated with human plasmacytoid dendritic cells sorted from healthy donor blood or with monocyte-derived dendritic cells. Dendritic cell maturation was evaluated by flow cytometry, cytokine secretion as well as naive T-cell activation and polarization. Labeled microparticles were also used to study cellular interactions. Results Endothelial microparticles induced plasmacytoid dendritic cell maturation. In contrast, conventional dendritic cells were resistant to endothelial microparticle-induced maturation. In addition to upregulation of co-stimulatory molecules, endothelial microparticle-matured plasmacytoid dendritic cells secreted inflammatory cytokines (interleukins 6 and 8, but no interferon-α) and also induced allogeneic naive CD4+ T cells to proliferate and to produce type 1 cytokines such as interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α. Endothelial microparticle endocytosis by plasmacytoid dendritic cells appeared to be required for plasmacytoid dendritic cell maturation. Importantly, the ability of endothelial microparticles to induce plasmacytoid dendritic cells to mature was specific as microparticles derived from activated T cells or platelets (the major source of circulating microparticules in healthy subjects) did not induce such plasmacytoid dendritic cell maturation. Conclusions Our data show that endothelial microparticles specifically induce plasmacytoid dendritic cell maturation and production of inflammatory cytokines. This novel activation pathway may be implicated in

  13. Resveratrol induces cell death and inhibits human herpesvirus 8 replication in primary effusion lymphoma cells.

    PubMed

    Tang, Feng-Yi; Chen, Chang-Yu; Shyu, Huey-Wen; Hong, Shin; Chen, Hung-Ming; Chiou, Yee-Hsuan; Lin, Kuan-Hua; Chou, Miao-Chen; Wang, Lin-Yu; Wang, Yi-Fen

    2015-12-05

    Resveratrol (3,4',5-trihydroxy-trans-stilbene) has been reported to inhibit proliferation of various cancer cells. However, the effects of resveratrol on the human herpesvirus 8 (HHV8) harboring primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) cells remains unclear. The anti-proliferation effects and possible mechanisms of resveratrol in the HHV8 harboring PEL cells were examined in this study. Results showed that resveratrol induced caspase-3 activation and the formation of acidic vacuoles in the HHV8 harboring PEL cells, indicating resveratrol treatment could cause apoptosis and autophagy in PEL cells. In addition, resveratrol treatment increased ROS generation but did not lead to HHV8 reactivation. ROS scavenger (N-acetyl cysteine, NAC) could attenuate both the resveratrol induced caspase-3 activity and the formation of acidic vacuoles, but failed to attenuate resveratrol induced PEL cell death. Caspase inhibitor, autophagy inhibitors and necroptosis inhibitor could not block resveratrol induced PEL cell death. Moreover, resveratrol disrupted HHV8 latent infection, inhibited HHV8 lytic gene expression and decreased virus progeny production. Overexpression of HHV8-encoded viral FLICE inhibitory protein (vFLIP) could partially block resveratrol induced cell death in PEL cells. These data suggest that resveratrol-induced cell death in PEL cells may be mediated by disruption of HHV8 replication. Resveratrol may be a potential anti-HHV8 drug and an effective treatment for HHV8-related tumors.

  14. Anti-apoptotic effect of clusterin on cisplatin-induced cell death of retinoblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Song, Hyun Beom; Jun, Hyoung-Oh; Kim, Jin Hyoung; Yu, Young Suk; Kim, Kyu-Won; Min, Bon Hong; Kim, Jeong Hun

    2013-12-01

    Clusterin is a cytoprotective chaperone protein that is known to protect various retinal cells. It was also reported to be overexpressed in several types of malignant tumors, whose chemoresistance correlates with the expression of clusterin. Herein, we investigated the effect of clusterin on cisplatin-induced cell death of retinoblastoma cells. Firstly, evaluation of clusterin expression demonstrated that it was highly expressed in human retinoblastoma tissues and cell lines (SNUOT-Rb1 and Y79) particularly in the area between viable cells around vessels and necrotic zones in the relatively avascular area in human retinoblastoma tissues. Furthermore, the effects of cisplatin on retinoblastoma cells were evaluated. Cisplatin (1 µg/ml) significantly affected cell viability of SNUOT-Rb1 cells by inducing caspase-3-dependent apoptosis. Notably, the cell death due to cisplatin was prevented by 5 µg/ml of clusterin administered 4 h prior to cisplatin treatment by inhibiting cisplatin-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, overexpression of clusterin exerted its anti-apoptotic effect on cisplatin-induced apoptosis, and effectively prevented cisplatin-induced cell death. These data suggest that clusterin, found to be expressed in human retinoblastoma, may exert anti-apoptotic effects on cisplatin-induced apoptosis and prevent cell death. Therefore, clusterin can contribute to cisplatin resistance of retinoblastoma.

  15. Omi/HtrA2 protease mediates cisplatin-induced cell death in renal cells.

    PubMed

    Cilenti, Lucia; Kyriazis, George A; Soundarapandian, Mangala M; Stratico, Valerie; Yerkes, Adam; Park, Kwon Moo; Sheridan, Alice M; Alnemri, Emad S; Bonventre, Joseph V; Zervos, Antonis S

    2005-02-01

    Omi/HtrA2 is a mitochondrial proapoptotic serine protease that is able to induce both caspase-dependent and caspase-independent cell death. After apoptotic stimuli, Omi is released to the cytoplasm where it binds and cleaves inhibitor of apoptosis proteins. In this report, we investigated the role of Omi in renal cell death following cisplatin treatment. Using primary mouse proximal tubule cells, as well as established renal cell lines, we show that the level of Omi protein is upregulated after treatment with cisplatin. This upregulation is followed by the release of Omi from mitochondria to the cytoplasm and degradation of XIAP. Reducing the endogenous level of Omi protein using RNA interference renders renal cells resistant to cisplatin-induced cell death. Furthermore, we show that the proteolytic activity of Omi is necessary and essential for cisplatin-induced cell death in this system. When renal cells are treated with Omi's specific inhibitor, ucf-101, they become significantly resistant to cisplatin-induced cell death. Ucf-101 was also able to minimize cisplatin-induced nephrotoxic injury in animals. Our results demonstrate that Omi is a major mediator of cisplatin-induced cell death in renal cells and suggest a way to limit renal injury by specifically inhibiting its proteolytic activity.

  16. Induced Accelerated Aging in Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Lines from Patients with Parkinson’s Disease

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-01

    Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Lines from Patients with Parkinson’s Disease PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. Birgitt Schuele CONTRACTING...contained in this report are those of the author( s ) and should not be construed as an official Department of the Army position, policy or decision...Aging in Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Lines from Patients with Parkinson’s Disease 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0003 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER

  17. Stem cell therapy for abrogating stroke-induced neuroinflammation and relevant secondary cell death mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Stonesifer, Connor; Corey, Sydney; Ghanekar, Shaila; Diamandis, Zachary; Acosta, Sandra A; Borlongan, Cesar V

    2017-07-23

    Ischemic stroke is a leading cause of death worldwide. A key secondary cell death mechanism mediating neurological damage following the initial episode of ischemic stroke is the upregulation of endogenous neuroinflammatory processes to levels that destroy hypoxic tissue local to the area of insult, induce apoptosis, and initiate a feedback loop of inflammatory cascades that can expand the region of damage. Stem cell therapy has emerged as an experimental treatment for stroke, and accumulating evidence supports the therapeutic efficacy of stem cells to abrogate stroke-induced inflammation. In this review, we investigate clinically relevant stem cell types, such as hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), very small embryonic-like stem cells (VSELs), neural stem cells (NSCs), extraembryonic stem cells, adipose tissue-derived stem cells, breast milk-derived stem cells, menstrual blood-derived stem cells, dental tissue-derived stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), teratocarcinoma-derived Ntera2/D1 neuron-like cells (NT2N), c-mycER(TAM) modified NSCs (CTX0E03), and notch-transfected mesenchymal stromal cells (SB623), comparing their potential efficacy to sequester stroke-induced neuroinflammation and their feasibility as translational clinical cell sources. To this end, we highlight that MSCs, with a proven track record of safety and efficacy as a transplantable cell for hematologic diseases, stand as an attractive cell type that confers superior anti-inflammatory effects in stroke both in vitro and in vivo. That stem cells can mount a robust anti-inflammatory action against stroke complements the regenerative processes of cell replacement and neurotrophic factor secretion conventionally ascribed to cell-based therapy in neurological disorders. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. Glioma-Derived ADAM10 Induces Regulatory B Cells to Suppress CD8+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wen-sheng; Luo, Lun; Huang, Zhen-chao; Guo, Ying

    2014-01-01

    CD8+ T cells play an important role in the anti-tumor activities of the body. The dysfunction of CD8+ T cells in glioma is unclear. This study aims to elucidate the glioma cell-derived ADAM10 (A Disintegrin and metalloproteinase domain-containing protein 10) in the suppression of CD8+ effector T cells by the induction of regulatory B cells. In this study, glioma cells were isolated from surgically removed glioma tissue and stimulated by Phorbol myristate acetage (PMA) in the culture. The levels of ADAM10 in the culture were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Immune cells were assessed by flow cytometry. The results showed that the isolated glioma cells express ADAM10, which was markedly up regulated after stimulated with PMA. The glioma-derived ADAM10 induced activated B cells to differentiate into regulatory B cells, the later suppressed CD8+ T cell proliferation as well as the induced regulatory T cells, which also showed the immune suppressor effect on CD8+ effector T cell proliferation. In conclusion, glioma cells produce ADAM10 to induce Bregs; the latter suppresses CD8+ T cells and induces Tregs. PMID:25127032

  19. The synthetic purine reversine selectively induces cell death of cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Piccoli, Marco; Palazzolo, Giacomo; Conforti, Erika; Lamorte, Giuseppe; Papini, Nadia; Creo, Pasquale; Fania, Chiara; Scaringi, Raffaella; Bergante, Sonia; Tringali, Cristina; Roncoroni, Leda; Mazzoleni, Stefania; Doneda, Luisa; Galli, Rossella; Venerando, Bruno; Tettamanti, Guido; Gelfi, Cecilia; Anastasia, Luigi

    2012-10-01

    The synthetic purine reversine has been shown to possess a dual activity as it promotes the de-differentiation of adult cells, including fibroblasts, into stem-cell-like progenitors, but it also induces cell growth arrest and ultimately cell death of cancer cells, suggesting its possible application as an anti-cancer agent. Aim of this study was to investigate the mechanism underneath reversine selectivity in inducing cell death of cancer cells by a comparative analysis of its effects on several tumor cells and normal dermal fibroblasts. We found that reversine is lethal for all cancer cells studied as it induces cell endoreplication, a process that malignant cells cannot effectively oppose due to aberrations in cell cycle checkpoints. On the other hand, normal cells, like dermal fibroblasts, can control reversine activity by blocking the cell cycle, entering a reversible quiescent state. However, they can be induced to become sensitive to the molecule when key cell cycle proteins, e.g., p53, are silenced. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Dissociation of NSC606985 induces atypical ER-stress and cell death in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liping; Fu, Pengcheng; Zhao, Yuan; Wang, Guo; Yu, Richard; Wang, Xin; Tang, Zehai; Imperato-McGinley, Julianne; Zhu, Yuan-Shan

    2016-08-01

    Castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) is a major cause of prostate cancer (Pca) death. Chemotherapy is able to improve the survival of CRPC patients. We previously found that NSC606985 (NSC), a highly water-soluble camptothecin analog, induced cell death in Pca cells via interaction with topoisomerase 1 and activation of the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. To further elucidate the role of NSC, we studied the effect of NSC on ER-stress and its association with NSC-induced cell death in Pca cells. NSC produced a time- and dose-dependent induction of GRP78, CHOP and XBP1s mRNA, and CHOP protein expression in Pca cells including DU145, indicating an activation of ER-stress. However, unlike conventional ER-stress in which GRP78 protein is increased, NSC produced a time- and dose-dependent U-shape change in GRP78 protein in DU145 cells. The NSC-induced decrease in GRP78 protein was blocked by protease inhibitors, N-acetyl-L-leucyl-L-leucylnorleucinal (ALLN), a lysosomal protease inhibitor, and epoxomicin (EPO), a ubiquitin-protease inhibitor. ALLN, but not EPO, also partially inhibited NSC-induced cell death. However, both 4-PBA and TUDCA, two chemical chaperons that effectively reduced tunicamycin-induced ER-stress, failed to attenuate NSC-induced GRP78, CHOP and XBP1s mRNA expression and cell death. Moreover, knockdown of NSC induction of CHOP expression using a specific siRNA had no effect on NSC-induced cytochrome c release and NSC-induced cell death. These results suggest that NSC produced an atypical ER-stress that is dissociated from NSC-induced activation of the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway and NSC-induced cell death in DU145 prostate cancer cells.

  1. Generation of functional podocytes from human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ciampi, Osele; Iacone, Roberto; Longaretti, Lorena; Benedetti, Valentina; Graf, Martin; Magnone, Maria Chiara; Patsch, Christoph; Xinaris, Christodoulos; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Benigni, Ariela; Tomasoni, Susanna

    2016-07-01

    Generating human podocytes in vitro could offer a unique opportunity to study human diseases. Here, we describe a simple and efficient protocol for obtaining functional podocytes in vitro from human induced pluripotent stem cells. Cells were exposed to a three-step protocol, which induced their differentiation into intermediate mesoderm, then into nephron progenitors and, finally, into mature podocytes. After differentiation, cells expressed the main podocyte markers, such as synaptopodin, WT1, α-Actinin-4, P-cadherin and nephrin at the protein and mRNA level, and showed the low proliferation rate typical of mature podocytes. Exposure to Angiotensin II significantly decreased the expression of podocyte genes and cells underwent cytoskeleton rearrangement. Cells were able to internalize albumin and self-assembled into chimeric 3D structures in combination with dissociated embryonic mouse kidney cells. Overall, these findings demonstrate the establishment of a robust protocol that, mimicking developmental stages, makes it possible to derive functional podocytes in vitro.

  2. Metformin prevents methylglyoxal-induced apoptosis of mouse Schwann cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ota, Kimiko; Nakamura, Jiro; Li, Weiguo; Kozakae, Mika; Watarai, Atsuko; Nakamura, Nobuhisa; Yasuda, Yutaka; Nakashima, Eirtaro; Naruse, Keiko; Watabe, Kazuhiko; Kato, Koichi; Oiso, Yutaka; Hamada, Yoji . E-mail: yhama@med.nagoya-u.ac.jp

    2007-05-25

    Methylglyoxal (MG) is involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications via the formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and reactive oxygen species (ROS). To clarify whether the antidiabetic drug metformin prevents Schwann cell damage induced by MG, we cultured mouse Schwann cells in the presence of MG and metformin. Cell apoptosis was evaluated using Hoechst 33342 nuclear staining, caspase-3 activity, and c-Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) phosphorylation. Intracellular ROS formation was determined by flow cytometry, and AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation was also examined. MG treatment resulted in blunted cell proliferation, an increase in the number of apoptotic cells, and the activation of caspase-3 and JNK along with enhanced intracellular ROS formation. All of these changes were significantly inhibited by metformin. No significant activation of AMPK by MG or metformin was observed. Taken together, metformin likely prevents MG-induced apoptotic signals in mouse Schwann cells by inhibiting the formation of AGEs and ROS.

  3. Stapled peptide induces cancer cell death.

    PubMed

    Whelan, Jo

    2004-11-01

    Hydrocarbon stapling could enable peptides from the key domains of natural proteins to be used therapeutically. Using the technique on a peptide involved in apoptosis, researchers have succeeded in destroying cancer cells in a mouse model of leukaemia.

  4. Lysophosphatidic acid-induced chemotaxis of bone cells.

    SciTech Connect

    Karagiosis, Sue A.; Masiello, Lisa M.; Bollinger, Nikki; Karin, Norm J.

    2006-07-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a platelet-derived bioactive lipid that is postulated to regulate wound healing. LPA activates G protein-coupled receptors to induce Ca2+ signaling in MC3T3-E1 pre-osteoblasts, and is a potent chemotactic stimulus for these cells. Since bone fracture healing requires the migration of osteoblast progenitors, we postulate that LPA is among the factors that stimulate bone repair. UMR 106-01 cells, which express a more mature osteoblastic phenotype than MC3T3-E1 cells, did not migrate in response to LPA, although they express LPA receptors and exhibit LPA-induced Ca2+ signals. This suggests that LPA differentially induces pre-osteoblast chemotaxis, consistent with our hypothesis that LPA stimulates the motility of osteoblast progenitors during bone healing. LPA-stimulated MC3T3-E1 cells exhibit striking changes in morphology and F-actin architecture, and phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K) is required for motility-associated cytoskeletal rearrangements in many cell types. We found a dose-dependent reduction in LPA-induced osteoblast migration when cells also were treated with the PI3K inhibitor, LY294002. Treatment of many cell types with LPA is associated with an autocrine/paracrine transactivation of the EGF receptor (EGFR) via shedding of surface-tethered EGFR ligands, a phenomenon often required for LPA-induced chemotaxis. MC3T3-E1 cells express multiple EGFR ligands (epigen, epiregulin, HB-EGF and amphiregulin) and migrated in response to EGF. However, while EGF-stimulated motility in MC3T3-E1 cells was blocked by an EGFR inhibitor, there was no significant effect on LPA-induced chemotaxis. Activation of MAP kinases is a hallmark of EGFR-mediated signaling, and EGF treatment of MC3T3-E1 cells led to a strong stimulation of ERK1/2 kinase. In contrast, LPA induced only a minor elevation in ERK activity. Thus, it is likely that the increase in ERK activity by LPA is related to cell proliferation associated with lipid treatment. We

  5. Diphenylhydantoin-induced pure red cell aplasia.

    PubMed

    Rusia, Usha; Malhotra, Purnima; Joshi, Panul

    2006-01-01

    Pure red cell aplasia is an uncommon complication of diphenylhydantoin therapy. It has not been reported in Indian literature. Awareness of the entity helps in establishing the cause of anaemia in these patients and alerts the physicians to the need of comprehensive haematological monitoring in these patients. A case of 58-year-old male who developed pure red cell aplasia following three months of diphenylhydantoin therapy is reported here.

  6. Exploiting poly(I:C) to induce cancer cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Francesca; Pretto, Samantha; Tagliabue, Elda; Balsari, Andrea; Sfondrini, Lucia

    2017-09-07

    TLR3 belong to the Toll-like receptors family, it is mainly expressed on immune cells where it senses pathogen-associated molecular patterns and initiates innate immune response. TLR3 agonist poly(I:C) was developed to mimic pathogens infection and boost immune system activation to promote anti-cancer therapy. Accordingly, TLR agonists were included in the National Cancer Institute list of immunotherapeutic agents with the highest potential to cure cancer. Besides well known effects on immune cells, poly(I:C) was also shown, in experimental models, to directly induce apoptosis in cancer cells expressing TLR3. This review presents the current knowledge on the mechanism of poly(I:C)-induced apoptosis in cancer cells. Experimental evidences on positive or negative regulators of TLR3-mediated apoptosis induced by poly(I:C) are reported and strategies are proposed to successfully promote this event in cancer cells. Cancer cells apoptosis is an additional arm offered by poly(I:C), besides activation of immune system, for the treatment of various type of cancer. A further dissection of TLR3 signaling would contribute to greater resolution of the critical steps that impede full exploitation of the poly(I:C)-induced apoptosis. Experimental evidences about negative regulator of poly(I:C)-induced apoptotic program should be considered in combinations with TLR3 agonists in clinical trials.

  7. Significant differences in genotoxicity induced by retrovirus integration in human T cells and induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Weiyan; Wang, Yingjia; Chang, Tammy; Huang, He; Yee, Jiing-Kuan

    2013-04-25

    Retrovirus is frequently used in the genetic modification of mammalian cells and the establishment of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) via cell reprogramming. Vector-induced genotoxicity could induce profound effect on the physiology and function of these stem cells and their differentiated progeny. We analyzed retrovirus-induced genotoxicity in somatic cell Jurkat and two iPSC lines. In Jurkat cells, retrovirus frequently activated host gene expression and gene activation was not dependent on the distance between the integration site and the transcription start site of the host gene. In contrast, retrovirus frequently down-regulated host gene expression in iPSCs, possibly due to the action of chromatin silencing that spreads from the provirus to the nearby host gene promoter. Our data raises the issue that some of the phenotypic variability observed among iPSC clones derived from the same parental cell line may be caused by retrovirus-induced gene expression changes rather than by the reprogramming process itself. It also underscores the importance of characterizing retrovirus integration and carrying out risk assessment of iPSCs before they can be applied in basic research and clinics. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Temperature dependence of optically induced cell deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritsch, Anatol; Kiessling, Tobias R.; Stange, Roland; Kaes, Josef A.

    2012-02-01

    The mechanical properties of any material change with temperature, hence this must be true for cellular material. In biology many functions are known to undergo modulations with temperature, like myosin motor activity, mechanical properties of actin filament solutions, CO2 uptake of cultured cells or sex determination of several species. As mechanical properties of living cells are considered to play an important role in many cell functions it is surprising that only little is known on how the rheology of single cells is affected by temperature. We report the systematic temperature dependence of single cell deformations in Optical Stretcher (OS) measurements. The temperature is changed on a scale of about 20 minutes up to hours and compared to defined temperature shocks in the range of milliseconds. Thereby, a strong temperature dependence of the mechanics of single suspended cells is revealed. We conclude that the observable differences arise rather from viscosity changes of the cytosol than from structural changes of the cytoskeleton. These findings have implications for the interpretation of many rheological measurements, especially for laser based approaches in biological studies.

  9. UV-induced changes in cell cycle and gene expression within rabbit lens epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sidjanin, D.; Grdina, D.; Woloschak, G.E.

    1994-11-01

    Damage to lens epithelial cells is a probable initiation process in cataract formation induced by ultraviolet radiation. These experiments investigated the ability of 254 nm radiation on cell cycle progression and gene expression in rabbit lens epithelial cell line N/N1003A. No changes in expression of c-fos, c-jun, alpha- tubulin, or vimentin was observed following UV exposure. Using flow cytometry, an accumulation of cells in G1/S phase of the cell cycle 1 hr following exposure. The observed changes in gene expression, especially the decreased histone transcripts reported here may play a role in UV induced inhibition of cell cycle progression.

  10. Towards Personalized Regenerative Cell Therapy: Mesenchymal Stem Cells Derived from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lin; Bolund, Lars; Luo, Yonglun

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are adult stem cells with the capacity of self-renewal and multilineage differentiation, and can be isolated from several adult tissues. However, isolating MSCs from adult tissues for cell therapy is hampered by the invasive procedure, the rarity of the cells and their attenuated proliferation capacity when cultivated and expanded in vitro. Human MSCs derived from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC-MSCs) have now evolved as a promising alternative cell source for MSCs and regenerative medicine. Several groups, including ours, have reported successful derivation of functional iPSC-MSCs and applied these cells in MSC-based therapeutic testing. Still, the current experience and understanding of iPSC-MSCs with respect to production methods, safety and efficacy are primitive. In this review, we highlight the methodological progress in iPSC-MSC research, describing the importance of choosing the right sources of iPSCs, iPSC reprogramming methods, iPSC culture systems, embryoid body intermediates, pathway inhibitors, basal medium, serum, growth factors and culture surface coating. We also highlight some progress in the application of iPSC-MSCs in direct cell therapy, tissue engineering and gene therapy.

  11. Glioblastoma cells block radiation-induced programmed cell death of endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Brown, Charles K; Khodarev, Nikolai N; Yu, Jianqing; Moo-Young, Tricia; Labay, Edwardine; Darga, Thomas E; Posner, Mitchell C; Weichselbaum, Ralph R; Mauceri, Helena J

    2004-05-07

    We demonstrate that human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) grown in co-culture (CC) with U87 glioblastoma cells transfected with green fluorescent protein (GFP-U87) exhibit resistance to radiation-mediated apoptosis. cDNA macroarray analysis reveals increases in the accumulation of RNAs for HUVEC genes encoding cell adhesion molecules, growth factor-related proteins, and cell cycle regulatory/DNA repair proteins. An increase in protein expression of integrin alphav, integrin beta1, MAPK(p42), Rad51, DNA-PK(CS), and ataxia telangiectasia gene (ATM) was detected in HUVEC grown in CC with GFP-U87 cells compared with HUVEC grown in mono-culture. Treatment with anti-VEGF antibody decreases the expression of integrin alphav, integrin beta1, DNA-PK(CS) and ATM with a corresponding increase in ionizing radiation (IR)-induced apoptosis. These data support the concept that endothelial cells growing in the tumor microenvironment may develop resistance to cytotoxic therapies due to the up-regulation by tumor cells of endothelial cells genes associated with survival.

  12. Tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells induce tumor cell resistance to cytotoxic T cells in mice.

    PubMed

    Lu, Tangying; Ramakrishnan, Rupal; Altiok, Soner; Youn, Je-In; Cheng, Pingyan; Celis, Esteban; Pisarev, Vladimir; Sherman, Simon; Sporn, Michael B; Gabrilovich, Dmitry

    2011-10-01

    Cancer immunotherapeutic approaches induce tumor-specific immune responses, in particular CTL responses, in many patients treated. However, such approaches are clinically beneficial to only a few patients. We set out to investigate one possible explanation for the failure of CTLs to eliminate tumors, specifically, the concept that this failure is not dependent on inhibition of T cell function. In a previous study, we found that in mice, myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are a source of the free radical peroxynitrite (PNT). Here, we show that pre-treatment of mouse and human tumor cells with PNT or with MDSCs inhibits binding of processed peptides to tumor cell-associated MHC, and as a result, tumor cells become resistant to antigen-specific CTLs. This effect was abrogated in MDSCs treated with a PNT inhibitor. In a mouse model of tumor-associated inflammation in which the antitumor effects of antigen-specific CTLs are eradicated by expression of IL-1β in the tumor cells, we determined that therapeutic failure was not caused by more profound suppression of CTLs by IL-1β-expressing tumors than tumors not expressing this proinflammatory cytokine. Rather, therapeutic failure was a result of the presence of PNT. Clinical relevance for these data was suggested by the observation that myeloid cells were the predominant source of PNT in human lung, pancreatic, and breast cancer samples. Our data therefore suggest what we believe to be a novel mechanism of MDSC-mediated tumor cell resistance to CTLs.

  13. Novel synthetic organosulfur compounds induce apoptosis of human leukemic cells.

    PubMed

    Wong, W W; Macdonald, S; Langler, R F; Penn, L Z

    2000-01-01

    It has been well documented that natural organosulfur compounds (OSCs) derived from plants such as garlic, onions and mahogany trees possess antiproliferative properties; however, the essential chemical features of the active OSC compounds remain unclear. To investigate the association between OSC structure and growth inhibitory activity, we synthesized novel relatives of dysoxysulfone, a natural OSC derived from the Fijian medicinal plant, Dysoxylum richii. In this study, we have examined the antiproliferative effects of these novel OSCs on a model human leukemic cell system and show that the compounds segregate into three groups. Group I, consisting of compounds A, B, G and J, did not affect either cell proliferation or the cell cycle profile of the leukemic cell lines. Group II, consisting of compounds F and H, induced the cells to undergo apoptosis from the G2/M phase of the cell cycle. Group III, consisting of compounds C, D, E and I, decreased cell proliferation and induced apoptosis throughout the cell cycle. The apoptotic agonists of Group II and III shared a common disulfide moiety, essential for leukemic cell cytotoxicity. Interestingly, Group II compounds did not affect cell viability of normal human diploid cells, suggesting the regions flanking the disulfide group contributes to the specificity of cell killing. Thus, we provide evidence that structure-activity analysis of natural products can identify novel compounds for the development of new therapeutics that can trigger apoptosis in a tumor-specific manner.

  14. Bisphenol A-induced apoptosis of cultured rat Sertoli cells.

    PubMed

    Iida, Hiroshi; Maehara, Kazue; Doiguchi, Masamichi; Mōri, Takayuki; Yamada, Fumio

    2003-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) was examined for its effects on cultured Sertoli cells established from 18-day-old rat testes. We demonstrated that exposure of cultured Sertoli cells to BPA decreased the cell viability in a dose- and a time-dependent manner and that exposure to BPA brought about morphologic changes of the cells, such as membrane blebs, cell rounding, cytoskeletal collapse, and chromatin condensation or fragmentation, all of which conform to the morphologic criteria for apoptosis. Immunocytochemistry showed that active caspase-3, a major execution caspase, was expressed in round Sertoli cells positively labeled by the TUNEL method. Co-localization of active caspase-3 and aggregated actin fragments was also observed in the round Sertoli cells. Theses results suggest that BPA induces cell death of Sertoli cells by promoting apoptosis. Apoptosis-inducing cell death was observed in cells exposed to 150-200 microM BPA, while BPA at <100 microM had only slight cytotoxic effects on the cells.

  15. Advances and applications of induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Pietronave, Stefano; Prat, Maria

    2012-03-01

    Direct reprogramming of somatic cells into pluripotent cells is an emerging technology for creating patient-specific cells, and potentially opens new scenarios in medical and pharmacological fields. From the discovery of Shinya Yamanaka, who first obtained pluripotent cells from fibroblasts by retrovirus-derived ectopic expression of defined embryonic transcription factors, new methods have been developed to generate safe induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells without genomic manipulations. This review will focus on the recent advances in iPS technology and their application in pharmacology and medicine.

  16. Stellate Cells Orchestrate Concanavalin A-Induced Acute Liver Damage.

    PubMed

    Rani, Richa; Tandon, Ashish; Wang, Jiang; Kumar, Sudhir; Gandhi, Chandrashekhar R

    2017-09-01

    Concanavalin A (ConA) causes immune cell-mediated liver damage, but the contribution of resident nonparenchymal cells (NPCs) is also evident. Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) induce hepatic inflammation and immunological reactions; we therefore investigated their role in ConA-induced liver injury. ConA was administered i.v. to control or HSC-depleted mice; hepatic histopathology and cytokines/chemokines were determined after 6 hours. In vitro, effects of ConA-conditioned HSC medium on hepatocytes were determined. ConA induced inflammation, sinusoidal congestion, and extensive midzonal hepatocyte death in control mice, which were strongly minimized in HSC-depleted mice. CD4 and natural killer T cells and neutrophils were markedly reduced in ConA-treated HSC-depleted mice compared with control mice. The increase in cytokines/chemokines of hepatic injury was much higher in ConA-treated control mice than in HSC-depleted mice. ConA-treated HSCs showed increased expression of interferon-β, tumor necrosis factor-α, and CXCL1, induced oxidative stress in hepatocytes, and caused hepatocyte apoptosis. ConA induced nuclear translocation of interferon-regulatory factor-1 (IRF1) in hepatocytes in vivo, and ConA/HSC induced a similar effect in cultured hepatocytes. IRF1-knockout mice were resistant to ConA-induced liver damage, and anti-interferon β antibody mitigated ConA/HSC-induced injury. In HSC-NPC co-culture, ConA-induced expression of inflammatory cytokines/chemokines was significantly augmented compared with NPCs alone. HSCs play an essential role in ConA-induced liver injury directly via the interferon-β/IRF1 axis, and by modulating properties of NPCs. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Butyrate-Induced Apoptosis in Prostate Cancer Cell Lines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-09-01

    butyrate-induced apoptosis was independent of cell cycle phase. 14. SUBJECT TERMS 15. NUMBER OF PAGES prostate cancer, histone deacetylase inhibitors, bone...of cells plated) HDI histone deacetylase inhibitor SBHA suberoylbishydroxamate PKC protein kinase C activator SDS-PAGE SDS polyacrylamide gel...cancer cell lines 1. Summary of goals and findings Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDI) such as butyrate and suberoylbishydroxamate (SBHA) have

  18. Elastase induces lung epithelial cell autophagy through placental growth factor

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Hsin-Han; Cheng, Shih-Lung; Chung, Kuei-Pin; Kuo, Mark Yen-Ping; Yeh, Cheng-Chang; Chang, Bei-En; Lu, Hsuan-Hsuan; Wang, Hao-Chien; Yu, Chong-Jen

    2014-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a devastating disease, which is associated with increasing mortality and morbidity. Therefore, there is a need to clearly define the COPD pathogenic mechanism and to explore effective therapies. Previous studies indicated that cigarette smoke (CS) induces autophagy and apoptosis in lung epithelial (LE) cells. Excessive ELANE/HNE (elastase, neutrophil elastase), a factor involved in protease-antiprotease imbalance and the pathogenesis of COPD, causes LE cell apoptosis and upregulates the expression of several stimulus-responsive genes. However, whether or not elastase induces autophagy in LE cell remains unknown. The level of PGF (placental growth factor) is higher in COPD patients than non-COPD controls. We hypothesize that elastase induces PGF expression and causes autophagy in LE cells. In this study, we demonstrated that porcine pancreatic elastase (PPE) induced PGF expression and secretion in LE cells in vitro and in vivo. The activation of MAPK8/JNK1 (mitogen-activated protein kinase 8) and MAPK14/p38alpha MAPK signaling pathways was involved in the PGF mediated regulation of the TSC (tuberous sclerosis complex) pathway and autophagy in LE cells. Notably, PGF-induced MAPK8 and MAPK14 signaling pathways mediated the inactivation of MTOR (mechanistic target of rapamycin), the upregulation of MAP1LC3B/LC3B (microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 β) and the increase of autophagosome formation in mice. Furthermore, the PPE-induced autophagy promotes further apoptosis in vitro and in vivo. In summary, elastase-induced autophagy promotes LE cell apoptosis and pulmonary emphysema through the upregulation of PGF. PGF and its downstream MAPK8 and MAPK14 signaling pathways are potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of emphysema and COPD. PMID:24988221

  19. Targeting prohibitins induces apoptosis in acute myeloid leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Pomares, Helena; Palmeri, Claudia M; Iglesias-Serret, Daniel; Moncunill-Massaguer, Cristina; Saura-Esteller, José; Núñez-Vázquez, Sonia; Gamundi, Enric; Arnan, Montserrat; Preciado, Sara; Albericio, Fernando; Lavilla, Rodolfo; Pons, Gabriel; González-Barca, Eva M

    2016-01-01

    Fluorizoline is a new synthetic molecule that induces apoptosis by selectively targeting prohibitins (PHBs). In this study, the pro-apoptotic effect of fluorizoline was assessed in two cell lines and 21 primary samples from patients with debut of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Fluorizoline induced apoptosis in AML cells at concentrations in the low micromolar range. All primary samples were sensitive to fluorizoline irrespectively of patients' clinical or genetic features. In addition, fluorizoline inhibited the clonogenic capacity and induced differentiation of AML cells. Fluorizoline increased the mRNA and protein levels of the pro-apoptotic BCL-2 family member NOXA both in cell lines and primary samples analyzed. These results suggest that targeting PHBs could be a new therapeutic strategy for AML. PMID:27542247

  20. Material-induced shunts in multicrystalline silicon solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Breitenstein, O. Bauer, J.; Rakotoniaina, J. P.

    2007-04-15

    By applying lock-in thermography imaging, light-beam-induced current imaging, electron-beam-induced current imaging at different stages of sample preparation, and infrared light microscopy in transmission mode, the physical nature of the dominant material-induced shunts in multicrystalline solar cells made from p-type silicon material has been investigated. It turns out that these shunts are due to silicon carbide (SiC) filaments, which grow preferentially in grain boundaries and cross the whole cell. These filaments are highly n-type doped, like the emitter layer on the surface of the cells. They are electrically connected both with the emitter and with the back contact, thereby producing internal shunts in the solar cell.

  1. Natural killer cells induce activated murine B cells to secrete Ig.

    PubMed

    Snapper, C M; Yamaguchi, H; Moorman, M A; Sneed, R; Smoot, D; Mond, J J

    1993-11-15

    We previously demonstrated that dextran-conjugated anti-IgD antibodies (alpha delta-dex) induce proliferation of small, B cell-enriched murine spleen cells (Be cells), and in the presence of IL-2, stimulate Ig secretion in vitro. We have shown that alpha delta-dex-stimulated B cells provide an in vitro model for studying B cell activation by T cell-independent type 2 (TI-2) Ag, as exemplified by the bacterial polysaccharides. We now show that highly purified resting B cells, obtained by electronic cell sorting (Bsp cells), fail to secrete Ig in the presence of alpha delta-dex + IL-2. The alpha delta-dex + IL-2-induced Ig secretory response of Bsp cells is restored upon addition of splenic non-B, non-T cells or a pure population of in vitro-generated NK cells. Similarly, pretreatment of Be cells with anti-AsGm-1 plus complement inhibits Ig secretion in response to alpha delta-dex + IL-2. An IL-2-induced NK cell supernatant (NKSN) is equally potent at stimulating Ig secretion by alpha delta-dex-activated Bsp cells, indicating that cell contact between Bsp and activated NK cells is not required for this effect. IL-2 stimulates not only NK cells, but B cells as well, since addition of anti-IL-2 + anti-IL-2R antibodies to Bsp cell cultures, in the presence of alpha delta-dex + NKSN, inhibits Ig secretion. These data describe a novel animal model for NK cell-induced B cell maturation to Ig secretion and suggest a pathway for Ig production in response to T1-2 Ag.

  2. Limited hair cell induction from human induced pluripotent stem cells using a simple stepwise method.

    PubMed

    Ohnishi, Hiroe; Skerleva, Desislava; Kitajiri, Shin-ichiro; Sakamoto, Tatsunori; Yamamoto, Norio; Ito, Juichi; Nakagawa, Takayuki

    2015-07-10

    Disease-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS) cells are expected to contribute to exploring useful tools for studying the pathophysiology of inner ear diseases and to drug discovery for treating inner ear diseases. For this purpose, stable induction methods for the differentiation of human iPS cells into inner ear hair cells are required. In the present study, we examined the efficacy of a simple induction method for inducing the differentiation of human iPS cells into hair cells. The induction of inner ear hair cell-like cells was performed using a stepwise method mimicking inner ear development. Human iPS cells were sequentially transformed into the preplacodal ectoderm, otic placode, and hair cell-like cells. As a first step, preplacodal ectoderm induction, human iPS cells were seeded on a Matrigel-coated plate and cultured in a serum free N2/B27 medium for 8 days according to a previous study that demonstrated spontaneous differentiation of human ES cells into the preplacodal ectoderm. As the second step, the cells after preplacodal ectoderm induction were treated with basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) for induction of differentiation into otic-placode-like cells for 15 days. As the final step, cultured cells were incubated in a serum free medium containing Matrigel for 48 days. After preplacodal ectoderm induction, over 90% of cultured cells expressed the genes that express in preplacodal ectoderm. By culture with bFGF, otic placode marker-positive cells were obtained, although their number was limited. Further 48-day culture in serum free media resulted in the induction of hair cell-like cells, which expressed a hair cell marker and had stereocilia bundle-like constructions on their apical surface. Our results indicate that hair cell-like cells are induced from human iPS cells using a simple stepwise method with only bFGF, without the use of xenogeneic cells.

  3. Mitochondrial DNA damage induces apoptosis in senescent cells

    PubMed Central

    Laberge, R-M; Adler, D; DeMaria, M; Mechtouf, N; Teachenor, R; Cardin, G B; Desprez, P-Y; Campisi, J; Rodier, F

    2013-01-01

    Senescence is a cellular response to damage and stress. The senescence response prevents cancer by suppressing the proliferation of cells with a compromised genome and contributes to optimal wound healing in normal tissues. Persistent senescent cells are also thought to drive aging and age-associated pathologies through their secretion of inflammatory factors that modify the tissue microenvironment and alter the function of nearby normal or transformed cells. Understanding how senescent cells alter the microenvironment would be aided by the ability to induce or eliminate senescent cells at will in vivo. Here, we combine the use of the synthetic nucleoside analog ganciclovir (GCV) with herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSVtk) activity to create or eliminate senescent human cells. We show that low concentrations of GCV induce senescence through the accumulation of nuclear DNA damage while higher concentrations of GCV, similar to those used in vivo, kill non-dividing senescent cells via mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage and caspase-dependent apoptosis. Using this system, we effectively eliminated xenografted normal human senescent fibroblasts or induced senescence in human breast cancer cells in vivo. Thus, cellular senescence and mtDNA damage are outcomes of synthetic nucleoside analog treatment, indicating that the GCV–HSVtk combination can be used effectively to promote the targeted formation or eradication of senescent cells. PMID:23868060

  4. Mitochondrial DNA damage induces apoptosis in senescent cells.

    PubMed

    Laberge, R-M; Adler, D; DeMaria, M; Mechtouf, N; Teachenor, R; Cardin, G B; Desprez, P-Y; Campisi, J; Rodier, F

    2013-07-18

    Senescence is a cellular response to damage and stress. The senescence response prevents cancer by suppressing the proliferation of cells with a compromised genome and contributes to optimal wound healing in normal tissues. Persistent senescent cells are also thought to drive aging and age-associated pathologies through their secretion of inflammatory factors that modify the tissue microenvironment and alter the function of nearby normal or transformed cells. Understanding how senescent cells alter the microenvironment would be aided by the ability to induce or eliminate senescent cells at will in vivo. Here, we combine the use of the synthetic nucleoside analog ganciclovir (GCV) with herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSVtk) activity to create or eliminate senescent human cells. We show that low concentrations of GCV induce senescence through the accumulation of nuclear DNA damage while higher concentrations of GCV, similar to those used in vivo, kill non-dividing senescent cells via mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage and caspase-dependent apoptosis. Using this system, we effectively eliminated xenografted normal human senescent fibroblasts or induced senescence in human breast cancer cells in vivo. Thus, cellular senescence and mtDNA damage are outcomes of synthetic nucleoside analog treatment, indicating that the GCV-HSVtk combination can be used effectively to promote the targeted formation or eradication of senescent cells.

  5. Honokiol-induced apoptosis and autophagy in glioblastoma multiforme cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ken-Hu; Yan, Ming-DE; Yao, Chih-Jung; Lin, Pei-Chun; Lai, Gi-Ming

    2013-11-01

    Honokiol, a hydroxylated biphenyl compound isolated from the Chinese herb Magnolia officinalis, has been reported to have anticancer activities in a variety of cancer cell lines. The present study aimed to evaluate the anticancer effect and possible molecular mechanisms of honokiol in a glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cell line. The anticancer activities of honokiol were investigated in the DBTRG-05MG GBM cell line. The effect of honokiol on cell growth was determined using a sulforhodamine B assay. Flow cytometry and immunoblotting were used to measure honokiol-induced apoptosis (programmed cell death type I) and autophagy (programmed cell death type II). Honokiol was observed to reduce DBTRG-05MG cell viability in a dose-dependent manner. At a dose of 50 μM, honokiol markedly decreased the expression of Rb protein and led to the cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase and Bcl-xL to promote apoptosis in the cancer cells. In addition, markers of autophagy, including Beclin-1 and LC3-II, were also significantly increased. In addition to apoptosis, honokiol was also able to induce autophagy in the DBTRG-05MG cells. The mechanisms that are responsible for the correlation between honokiol-induced apoptosis and autophagy require further investigation. Such efforts may provide a potential strategy for improving the clinical outcome of GBM treatment.

  6. DA-6034 Induces [Ca(2+)]i Increase in Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yu-Mi; Park, Soonhong; Ji, Hyewon; Kim, Tae-Im; Kim, Eung Kweon; Kang, Kyung Koo; Shin, Dong Min

    2014-04-01

    DA-6034, a eupatilin derivative of flavonoid, has shown potent effects on the protection of gastric mucosa and induced the increases in fluid and glycoprotein secretion in human and rat corneal and conjunctival cells, suggesting that it might be considered as a drug for the treatment of dry eye. However, whether DA-6034 induces Ca(2+) signaling and its underlying mechanism in epithelial cells are not known. In the present study, we investigated the mechanism for actions of DA-6034 in Ca(2+) signaling pathways of the epithelial cells (conjunctival and corneal cells) from human donor eyes and mouse salivary gland epithelial cells. DA-6034 activated Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channels (CaCCs) and increased intracellular calcium concentrations ([Ca(2+)]i) in primary cultured human conjunctival cells. DA-6034 also increased [Ca(2+)]i in mouse salivary gland cells and human corneal epithelial cells. [Ca(2+)]i increase of DA-6034 was dependent on the Ca(2+) entry from extracellular and Ca(2+) release from internal Ca(2+) stores. Interestingly, these effects of DA-6034 were related to ryanodine receptors (RyRs) but not phospholipase C/inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3) pathway and lysosomal Ca(2+) stores. These results suggest that DA-6034 induces Ca(2+) signaling via extracellular Ca(2+) entry and RyRs-sensitive Ca(2+) release from internal Ca(2+) stores in epithelial cells.

  7. Dexamethasone induced ultrastructural changes in cultured human trabecular meshwork cells.

    PubMed

    Wilson, K; McCartney, M D; Miggans, S T; Clark, A F

    1993-09-01

    Glucocorticoid-induced ocular hypertension has been demonstrated in both animals and humans. It is possible that glucocorticoid-induced changes in trabecular meshwork (TM) cells are responsible for this hypertension. In order to elaborate further the effect of glucocorticoids on the trabecular meshwork, the ultrastructural consequences of dexamethasone (DEX) treatment were examined in three different human TM cell lines. Confluent TM cells were treated with 0.1 microM of DEX for 14 days, and then processed for light, epifluorescent microscopy or transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The effect of DEX treatment on TM cell and nuclear size was quantified using computer assisted morphometrics. Morphometric analysis showed a significant increase in both TM cell and nuclear size after 14 days of DEX treatment. Epifluorescent microscopy of rhodamine-phalloidin stained, control TM cells showed the normal arrangement of stress fibers. In contrast, DEX-treated TM cells showed unusual geodesic dome-like cross-linked actin networks. Control TM cells had the normal complement and arrangement of organelles as well as electron dense inclusions and large vacuoles. DEX-treated TM cells showed stacked arrangements of smooth and rough endoplasmic reticulum, proliferation of the Golgi apparatus, pleomorphic nuclei and increased amounts of extracellular matrix material. The DEX-induced alterations observed in the present study may be an indication of the processes that are occurring in the in vivo disease process.

  8. Mitochondrial control of cell death induced by hyperosmotic stress.

    PubMed

    Criollo, Alfredo; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Maiuri, M Chiara; Tasdemir, Ezgi; Lavandero, Sergio; Kroemer, Guido

    2007-01-01

    HeLa and HCT116 cells respond differentially to sorbitol, an osmolyte able to induce hypertonic stress. In these models, sorbitol promoted the phenotypic manifestations of early apoptosis followed by complete loss of viability in a time-, dose-, and cell type-specific fashion, by eliciting distinct yet partially overlapping molecular pathways. In HCT116 but not in HeLa cells, sorbitol caused the mitochondrial release of the caspase-independent death effector AIF, whereas in both cell lines cytochrome c was retained in mitochondria. Despite cytochrome c retention, HeLa cells exhibited the progressive activation of caspase-3, presumably due to the prior activation of caspase-8. Accordingly, caspase inhibition prevented sorbitol-induced killing in HeLa, but only partially in HCT116 cells. Both the knock-out of Bax in HCT116 cells and the knock-down of Bax in A549 cells by RNA interference reduced the AIF release and/or the mitochondrial alterations. While the knock-down of Bcl-2/Bcl-X(L) sensitized to sorbitol-induced killing, overexpression of a Bcl-2 variant that specifically localizes to mitochondria (but not of the wild-type nor of a endoplasmic reticulum-targeted form) strongly inhibited sorbitol effects. Thus, hyperosmotic stress kills cells by triggering different molecular pathways, which converge at mitochondria where pro- and anti-apoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family exert their control.

  9. Dracorhodin perchlorate induces the apoptosis of glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xin; Luo, Junjie; Meng, Linghu; Pan, Taifeng; Zhao, Binjie; Tang, Zhen-Gang; Dai, Yongjian

    2016-04-01

    Dracorhodin perchlorate (Dp), a synthetic analogue of the antimicrobial anthocyanin red pigment, has recently been shown to induce apoptotic cell death in various types of cancer cells. Yet, the inhibitory effect of Dp on human glioma cells remains uninvestigated. Therefore, in the present study, 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and flow cytometry were used to detect cell viability and cell cycle progression in glioma U87MG and T98G cells, respectively. Annexin V-FITC/propidium iodide double staining and JC-1 staining were separately applied to determine cellular apoptosis and mitochondrial membrane potential damage in the cells. The expression levels of associated proteins involved in cell cycle progression and apoptosis were measured by western blotting. The activities of caspase‑9/-3 were determined by Caspase-Glo-9/3 assay. The results indicated that Dp treatment significantly inhibited cell proliferation in a dose- and time-dependent manner, and blocked cell cycle progression at the G1/S phase in the U87MG and T98G cells via the upregulation of p53 and p21 protein expression, and simultaneous downregulation of Cdc25A, Cdc2 and P-Cdc2 protein expression. Additionally, Dp treatment led to the loss of cellular mitochondrial membrane potential, and the release of cytochrome c, and strongly induced the occurence of apoptosis. Increased expression levels of Bim and Bax protein and the downregulated expression of Bcl-2 protein were observed. Caspase-9/-3 were activated and their activities were elevated after Dp treatment. These findings indicate that Dp inhibits cell proliferation, induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in glioma cells, and is a possible candidate for glioma treatment.

  10. Gentian violet induces wtp53 transactivation in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Garufi, Alessia; D'Orazi, Valerio; Arbiser, Jack L; D'Orazi, Gabriella

    2014-04-01

    Recent studies suggest that gentian violet (GV) may have anticancer activity by inhibiting for instance NADPH oxidases (Nox genes) whose overexpression is linked to tumor progression. Nox1 overexpression has been shown to inhibit transcriptional activity of the oncosuppressor p53, impairing tumor cell response to anticancer drugs. The tumor suppressor p53 is a transcription factor that, upon cellular stress, is activated to induce target genes involved in tumor cell growth inhibition and apoptosis. Thus, its activation is important for efficient tumor eradication. In this study, we examined the effect of GV on wild-type (wt) p53 activity in cancer cells. We found that GV was able to overcome the inhibitory effect of the NADPH oxidase Nox1 on p53 transcriptional activity. For the first time we show that GV was able to directly induce p53/DNA binding and transcriptional activity. In vitro, GV markedly induced cancer cell death and apoptotic marker PARP cleavage in wtp53-carrying cells. GV-induced cell death was partly inhibited in cells deprived of p53, suggesting that the anticancer activity of GV may partly depend on p53 activation. GV is US Food and Drug Administration approved for human use and may, therefore, have therapeutic potential in the management of cancer through p53 activation.

  11. Gentian violet induces wtp53 transactivation in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    GARUFI, ALESSIA; D’ORAZI, VALERIO; ARBISER, JACK L.; D’ORAZI, GABRIELLA

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that gentian violet (GV) may have anticancer activity by inhibiting for instance NADPH oxidases (Nox genes) whose overexpression is linked to tumor progression. Nox1 overexpression has been shown to inhibit transcriptional activity of the oncosuppressor p53, impairing tumor cell response to anticancer drugs. The tumor suppressor p53 is a transcription factor that, upon cellular stress, is activated to induce target genes involved in tumor cell growth inhibition and apoptosis. Thus, its activation is important for efficient tumor eradication. In this study, we examined the effect of GV on wild-type (wt) p53 activity in cancer cells. We found that GV was able to overcome the inhibitory effect of the NADPH oxidase Nox1 on p53 transcriptional activity. For the first time we show that GV was able to directly induce p53/DNA binding and transcriptional activity. In vitro, GV markedly induced cancer cell death and apoptotic marker PARP cleavage in wtp53-carrying cells. GV-induced cell death was partly inhibited in cells deprived of p53, suggesting that the anticancer activity of GV may partly depend on p53 activation. GV is US Food and Drug Administration approved for human use and may, therefore, have therapeutic potential in the management of cancer through p53 activation. PMID:24535435

  12. Mitochondrial DNA damage by bleomycin induces AML cell death.

    PubMed

    Yeung, ManTek; Hurren, Rose; Nemr, Carine; Wang, Xiaoming; Hershenfeld, Samantha; Gronda, Marcela; Liyanage, Sanduni; Wu, Yan; Augustine, Jeevan; Lee, Eric A; Spagnuolo, Paul A; Southall, Noel; Chen, Catherine; Zheng, Wei; Jeyaraju, Danny V; Minden, Mark D; Laposa, Rebecca; Schimmer, Aaron D

    2015-06-01

    Mitochondria contain multiple copies of their own 16.6 kb circular genome. To explore the impact of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage on mitochondrial (mt) function and viability of AML cells, we screened a panel of DNA damaging chemotherapeutic agents to identify drugs that could damage mtDNA. We identified bleomycin as an agent that damaged mtDNA in AML cells at concentrations that induced cell death. Bleomycin also induced mtDNA damage in primary AML samples. Consistent with the observed mtDNA damage, bleomycin reduced mt mass and basal oxygen consumption in AML cells. We also demonstrated that the observed mtDNA damage was functionally important for bleomycin-induced cell death. Finally, bleomycin delayed tumor growth in xenograft mouse models of AML and anti-leukemic concentrations of the drug induced mtDNA damage in AML cells preferentially over normal lung tissue. Taken together, mtDNA-targeted therapy may be an effective strategy to target AML cells and bleomycin could be useful in the treatment of this disease.

  13. Cell cycle-arrested tumor cells exhibit increased sensitivity towards TRAIL-induced apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Ehrhardt, H; Wachter, F; Grunert, M; Jeremias, I

    2013-01-01

    Resting tumor cells represent a huge challenge during anticancer therapy due to their increased treatment resistance. TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a putative future anticancer drug, currently in phases I and II clinical studies. We recently showed that TRAIL is able to target leukemia stem cell surrogates. Here, we tested the ability of TRAIL to target cell cycle-arrested tumor cells. Cell cycle arrest was induced in tumor cell lines and xenografted tumor cells in G0, G1 or G2 using cytotoxic drugs, phase-specific inhibitors or RNA interference against cyclinB and E. Biochemical or molecular arrest at any point of the cell cycle increased TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Accordingly, when cell cycle arrest was disabled by addition of caffeine, the antitumor activity of TRAIL was reduced. Most important for clinical translation, tumor cells from three children with B precursor or T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia showed increased TRAIL-induced apoptosis upon knockdown of either cyclinB or cyclinE, arresting the cell cycle in G2 or G1, respectively. Taken together and in contrast to most conventional cytotoxic drugs, TRAIL exerts enhanced antitumor activity against cell cycle-arrested tumor cells. Therefore, TRAIL might represent an interesting drug to treat static-tumor disease, for example, during minimal residual disease. PMID:23744361

  14. Activated microglia cause reversible apoptosis of pheochromocytoma cells, inducing their cell death by phagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Hornik, Tamara C; Vilalta, Anna; Brown, Guy C

    2016-01-01

    Some apoptotic processes, such as phosphatidylserine exposure, are potentially reversible and do not necessarily lead to cell death. However, phosphatidylserine exposure can induce phagocytosis of a cell, resulting in cell death by phagocytosis: phagoptosis. Phagoptosis of neurons by microglia might contribute to neuropathology, whereas phagoptosis of tumour cells by macrophages might limit cancer. Here, we examined the mechanisms by which BV-2 microglia killed co-cultured pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells that were either undifferentiated or differentiated into neuronal cells. We found that microglia activated by lipopolysaccharide rapidly phagocytosed PC12 cells. Activated microglia caused reversible phosphatidylserine exposure on and reversible caspase activation in PC12 cells, and caspase inhibition prevented phosphatidylserine exposur and decreased subsequent phagocytosis. Nitric oxide was necessary and sufficient to induce the reversible phosphatidylserine exposure and phagocytosis. The PC12 cells were not dead at the time they were phagocytised, and inhibition of their phagocytosis left viable cells. Cell loss was inhibited by blocking phagocytosis mediated by phosphatidylserine, MFG-E8, vitronectin receptors or P2Y6 receptors. Thus, activated microglia can induce reversible apoptosis of target cells, which is insufficient to cause apoptotic cell death, but sufficient to induce their phagocytosis and therefore cell death by phagoptosis.

  15. Activated microglia cause reversible apoptosis of pheochromocytoma cells, inducing their cell death by phagocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Hornik, Tamara C.; Vilalta, Anna; Brown, Guy C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Some apoptotic processes, such as phosphatidylserine exposure, are potentially reversible and do not necessarily lead to cell death. However, phosphatidylserine exposure can induce phagocytosis of a cell, resulting in cell death by phagocytosis: phagoptosis. Phagoptosis of neurons by microglia might contribute to neuropathology, whereas phagoptosis of tumour cells by macrophages might limit cancer. Here, we examined the mechanisms by which BV-2 microglia killed co-cultured pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells that were either undifferentiated or differentiated into neuronal cells. We found that microglia activated by lipopolysaccharide rapidly phagocytosed PC12 cells. Activated microglia caused reversible phosphatidylserine exposure on and reversible caspase activation in PC12 cells, and caspase inhibition prevented phosphatidylserine exposur and decreased subsequent phagocytosis. Nitric oxide was necessary and sufficient to induce the reversible phosphatidylserine exposure and phagocytosis. The PC12 cells were not dead at the time they were phagocytised, and inhibition of their phagocytosis left viable cells. Cell loss was inhibited by blocking phagocytosis mediated by phosphatidylserine, MFG-E8, vitronectin receptors or P2Y6 receptors. Thus, activated microglia can induce reversible apoptosis of target cells, which is insufficient to cause apoptotic cell death, but sufficient to induce their phagocytosis and therefore cell death by phagoptosis. PMID:26567213

  16. Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1α Inactivation Unveils a Link between Tumor Cell Metabolism and Hypoxia-Induced Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Favaro, Elena; Nardo, Giorgia; Persano, Luca; Masiero, Massimo; Moserle, Lidia; Zamarchi, Rita; Rossi, Elisabetta; Esposito, Giovanni; Plebani, Mario; Sattler, Ulrike; Mann, Thomas; Mueller-Klieser, Wolfgang; Ciminale, Vincenzo; Amadori, Alberto; Indraccolo, Stefano

    2008-01-01

    Hypoxia and the acquisition of a glycolytic phenotype are intrinsic features of the tumor microenvironment. The hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) pathway is activated under hypoxic conditions and orchestrates a complex transcriptional program that enhances cell survival. Although the consequences of HIF-1α inactivation in cancer cells have been widely investigated, only a few studies have addressed the role of HIF-1α in the survival of cancer cells endowed with different glycolytic capacities. In this study, we investigated this aspect in ovarian cancer cells. Hypoxia-induced toxicity was increased in highly glycolytic cells compared with poorly glycolytic cells; it was also associated with a sharp decrease in intracellular ATP levels and was prevented by glucose supplementation. Stable HIF-1α silencing enhanced hypoxia-induced cell death in vitro due to a lack of cell cycle arrest. Tumors bearing attenuated HIF-1α levels had similar growth rates and vascularization as did controls, but tumors showed higher proliferation levels and increased necrosis. Moreover, tumors formed by HIF-1α deficient cells had higher levels of lactate and lower ATP concentrations than controls as shown by metabolic imaging. The findings that such metabolic properties can affect the survival of cancer cells under hypoxic conditions and that these properties contribute to the determination of the consequences of HIF-1α inactivation could have important implications on the understanding of the effects of anti-angiogenic and HIF-1α-targeting drugs in cancer. PMID:18772337

  17. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells: Emerging Techniques for Nuclear Reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ji Woong

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Introduction of four transcription factors, Oct3/4, Sox2, Klf4, and c-Myc, can successfully reprogram somatic cells into embryonic stem (ES)-like cells. These cells, which are referred to as induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, closely resemble embryonic stem cells in genomic, cell biologic, and phenotypic characteristics, and the creation of these special cells was a major triumph in cell biology. In contrast to pluripotent stem cells generated by somatic cell nuclear-transfer (SCNT) or ES cells derived from the inner cell mass (ICM) of the blastocyst, direct reprogramming provides a convenient and reliable means of generating pluripotent stem cells. iPS cells have already shown incredible potential for research and for therapeutic applications in regenerative medicine within just a few years of their discovery. In this review, current techniques of generating iPS cells and mechanisms of nuclear reprogramming are reviewed, and the potential for therapeutic applications is discussed. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 15, 1799–1820. PMID:21194386

  18. Peroxide-induced cell death and lipid peroxidation in C6 glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Linden, Arne; Gülden, Michael; Martin, Hans-Jörg; Maser, Edmund; Seibert, Hasso

    2008-08-01

    Peroxides are often used as models to induce oxidative damage in cells in vitro. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the role of lipid peroxidation in peroxide-induced cell death. To this end (i) the ability to induce lipid peroxidation in C6 rat astroglioma cells of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), cumene hydroperoxide (CHP) and t-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BuOOH) (ii) the relation between peroxide-induced lipid peroxidation and cell death in terms of time and concentration dependency and (iii) the capability of the lipid peroxidation chain breaking alpha-tocopherol to prevent peroxide-induced lipid peroxidation and/or cell death were investigated. Lipid peroxidation was characterised by measuring thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and, by HPLC, malondialdehyde (MDA), 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) and hexanal. Within 2 h CHP, t-BuOOH and H2O2 induced cell death with EC50 values of 59+/-9 microM, 290+/-30 microM and 12+/-1.1 mM, respectively. CHP and t-BuOOH, but not H2O2 induced lipid peroxidation in C6 cells with EC50 values of 15+/-14 microM and 130+/-33 microM, respectively. The TBARS measured almost exclusively consisted of MDA. 4-HNE was mostly not detectable. The concentration of hexanal slightly increased with increasing concentrations of organic peroxides. Regarding time and concentration dependency lipid peroxidation preceded cell death. Pretreatment with alpha-tocopherol (10 microM, 24 h) prevented both, peroxide-induced lipid peroxidation and cell death. The results strongly indicate a major role of lipid peroxidation in the killing of C6 cells by organic peroxides but also that lipid peroxidation is not involved in H2O2 induced cell death.

  19. Light regulation of cadmium-induced cell death in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Sarah J; Wang, Yun; Slabas, Antoni R; Chivasa, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Cadmium is an environmental pollutant with deleterious effects on both prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. In plants, the effects of cadmium toxicity are concentration dependent; lower doses destabilize many physiological processes and inhibit cell growth and multiplication, while higher doses evoke a more severe response that triggers activation of cell death. We recently investigated the effects of light on cadmium toxicity in Arabidopsis using a cell suspension culture system. Although not affecting the inhibitory effects on cell multiplication, we found that light is a powerful regulator of Cd-induced cell death. A very specific proteomic response, which was clearly controlled by light, preceded cell death. Here we discuss the implications of these findings and highlight similarities between the regulation of cell death triggered by Cd and fumonisin B1. We consider how both compounds could be useful tools in dissecting plant cell death signaling. PMID:24398567

  20. Inducible human immunodeficiency virus type 1 packaging cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Yu, H; Rabson, A B; Kaul, M; Ron, Y; Dougherty, J P

    1996-01-01

    Packaging cell lines are important tools for transferring genes into eukaryotic cells. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-based packaging cell lines are difficult to obtain, in part owing to the problem that some HIV-1 proteins are cytotoxic in a variety of cells. To overcome this, we have developed an HIV-1-based packaging cell line which has an inducible expression system. The tetracycline-inducible expression system was utilized to control the expression of the Rev regulatory protein, which in turn controls the expression of the late proteins including Gag, Pol, and Env. Western blotting (immunoblotting) demonstrated that the expression of p24gag and gp120env from the packaging cells peaked on days 6 and 7 postinduction. Reverse transcriptase activity could be detected by day 4 after induction and also peaked on days 6 and 7. Defective vector virus could be propagated, yielding titers as high as 7 x 10(3) CFU/ml, while replication-competent virus was not detectable at any time. Thus, the cell line should enable the transfer of specific genes into CD4+ cells and should be a useful tool for studying the biology of HIV-1. We have also established an inducible HIV-1 Env-expressing cell line which could be used to propagate HIV-1 vectors that require only Env in trans. The env-minus vector virus titer produced from the Env-expressing cells reached 2 x 10(4) CFU/ml. The inducible HIV-1 Env-expressing cell line should be a useful tool for the study of HIV-1 Env as well. PMID:8676479

  1. Mechanisms of radiation-induced neoplastic cell transformation

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, T.C.H.; Tobias, C.A.

    1984-04-01

    Studies with cultured mammalian cells demonstrated clearly that radiation can transform cells directly and can enhance the cell transformation by oncogenic DNA viruses. In general, high-LET heavy-ion radiation can be more effective than X and gamma rays in inducing neoplastic cell transformation. Various experimental results indicate that radiation-induced DNA damage, most likely double-strand breaks, is important for both the initiation of cell transformation and for the enhancement of viral transformation. Some of the transformation and enhancement lesions can be repaired properly in the cell, and the amount of irrepairable lesions produced by a given dose depends on the quality of radiation. An inhibition of repair processes with chemical agents can increase the transformation frequency of cells exposed to radiation and/or oncogenic viruses, suggesting that repair mechanisms may play an important role in the radiation transformation. The progression of radiation-transformed cells appears to be a long and complicated process that can be modulated by some nonmutagenic chemical agents, e.g., DMSO. Normal cells can inhibit the expression of transforming properties of tumorigenic cells through an as yet unknown mechanism. The progression and expression of transformation may involve some epigenetic changes in the irradiated cells. 38 references, 15 figures, 1 table.

  2. Prostate cancer cells induce osteoblastic differentiation via semaphorin 3A.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fuzhou; Shen, Weiwei; Qiu, Hao; Hu, Xu; Zhang, Chao; Chu, Tongwei

    2015-03-01

    Prostate cancer metastasis to bone is the second most commonly diagnosed malignant disease among men worldwide. Such metastatic disease is characterized by the presence of osteoblastic bone lesions, and is associated with high rates of mortality. However, the various mechanisms involved in prostate cancer-induced osteoblastic differentiation have not been fully explored. Semaphorin 3A (Sema 3A) is a newly identified regulator of bone metabolism which stimulates differentiation of pre-osteoblastic cells under physiological conditions. We investigated in this study whether prostate cancer cells can mediate osteoblastic activity through Sema 3A. We cultured osteoprogenitor MC3T3-E1 cells in prostate cancer-conditioned medium, and analyzed levels of Sema 3A protein in diverse prostate cancer cell lines to identify cell lines in which Sema 3A production showed a positive correlation with osteo-stimulation. C4-2 cells were stably transfected with Sema 3A short hairpin RNA to further determine whether Sema 3A contributes to the ability of C4-2 cells to induce osteoblastic differentiation. Down-regulation of Sema 3A expression decreased indicators of C4-2 CM-induced osteoblastic differentiation, including alkaline phosphatase production and mineralization. Additionally, silencing or neutralizing Sema 3A in C4-2 cells resulted in diminished β-catenin expression in osteogenitor MC3T3-E1 cells. Our results suggest that prostate cancer-induced osteoblastic differentiation is at least partially mediated by Sema 3A, and may be regulated by the β-catenin signalling pathway. Sema 3A may represent a novel target for treatment of prostate cancer-induced osteoblastic lesions. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Optimizing atoh1 induced vestibular hair cell regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Staecker, Hinrich; Schlecker, Christina; Kraft, Shannon; Praetorius, Mark; Hsu, Chi; Brough, Douglas E.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives/Hypothesis Determine the optimal design characteristics of an adenoviral vector to deliver atoh1 and induce regeneration of vestibular hair cells. Study Design Evaluation of a mouse model of intra-labyrinthine gene delivery. Tissue culture of mouse and human macular organs. Methods Macular organs from adult C57Bl/6 mice were treated with binding modified and alternate adenovectors expressing green fluorescent protein (gfp) or luciferase (L). Expression of marker genes was determined over time to determine vector transfection efficiency. The inner ear of adult mice was then injected with modified vectors. Expression of gfp and distribution of vector DNA was followed. Hearing and balance function was evaluated in normal animals to ensure safety of the novel vector designs. An optimized vector was identified and tested for its ability to induce hair cell regeneration in a mouse vestibulopathy model. Finally this vector was tested for its ability to induce hair cell regeneration in human tissue. Results Ad5 serotype based vectors were identified as having a variety of different binding capacities for inner ear tissue. This makes it difficult to limit the dose of vector due to entry into non-targeted cells. Screening of rare adenovector serotypes demonstrated that Ad28 based vectors were ideally suited for delivery to supporting cells and therefore useful for hair cell regeneration studies. Utilization of an Ad28 based vector to deliver atoh1 to a mouse model of vestibular loss resulted significant functional recovery of balance. This vector was also capable of transfecting human macular organs and inducing regeneration of human vestibular hair cells in vitro. Conclusions Improvement in vector design can lead to more specific cell based delivery and reduction of non specific delivery of the trans gene leading to the development of optimized molecular therapeutics to induce hair cell regeneration. Level of Evidence N/A Controlled basic science study. PMID

  4. Ionizing radiation induces tumor cell lysyl oxidase secretion

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Ionizing radiation (IR) is a mainstay of cancer therapy, but irradiation can at times also lead to stress responses, which counteract IR-induced cytotoxicity. IR also triggers cellular secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor, transforming growth factor β and matrix metalloproteinases, among others, to promote tumor progression. Lysyl oxidase is known to play an important role in hypoxia-dependent cancer cell dissemination and metastasis. Here, we investigated the effects of IR on the expression and secretion of lysyl oxidase (LOX) from tumor cells. Methods LOX-secretion along with enzymatic activity was investigated in multiple tumor cell lines in response to irradiation. Transwell migration assays were performed to evaluate invasive capacity of naïve tumor cells in response to IR-induced LOX. In vivo studies for confirming IR-enhanced LOX were performed employing immunohistochemistry of tumor tissues and ex vivo analysis of murine blood serum derived from locally irradiated A549-derived tumor xenografts. Results LOX was secreted in a dose dependent way from several tumor cell lines in response to irradiation. IR did not increase LOX-transcription but induced LOX-secretion. LOX-secretion could not be prevented by the microtubule stabilizing agent patupilone. In contrast, hypoxia induced LOX-transcription, and interestingly, hypoxia-dependent LOX-secretion could be counteracted by patupilone. Conditioned media from irradiated tumor cells promoted invasiveness of naïve tumor cells, while conditioned media from irradiated, LOX- siRNA-silenced cells did not stimulate their invasive capacity. Locally applied irradiation to tumor xenografts also increased LOX-secretion in vivo and resulted in enhanced LOX-levels in the murine blood serum. Conclusions These results indicate a differential regulation of LOX-expression and secretion in response to IR and hypoxia, and suggest that LOX may contribute towards an IR-induced migratory phenotype in

  5. Cell membrane thermal gradients induced by electromagnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garner, Allen L.; Deminsky, Maxim; Bogdan Neculaes, V.; Chashihin, V.; Knizhnik, Andrey; Potapkin, Boris

    2013-06-01

    While electromagnetic fields induce structural changes in cell membranes, particularly electroporation, much remains to be understood about membrane level temperature gradients. For instance, microwaves induce cell membrane temperature gradients (∇T) and bioeffects with little bulk temperature change. Recent calculations suggest that nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs) may also induce such gradients that may additionally impact the electroporation threshold. Here, we analytically and numerically calculate the induced ∇T as a function of pulse duration and pulse repetition rate. We relate ∇T to the thermally induced cell membrane electric field (Em) by assuming the membrane behaves as a thermoelectric such that Em ˜ ∇T. Focusing initially on applying nsPEFs to a uniform membrane, we show that reducing pulse duration and increasing pulse repetition rate (or using higher frequency for alternating current (AC) fields) maximizes the magnitude and duration of ∇T and, concomitantly, Em. The maximum ∇T initially occurs at the interface between the cell membrane and extracellular fluid before becoming uniform across the membrane, potentially enabling initial molecular penetration and subsequent transport across the membrane. These results, which are equally applicable to AC fields, motivate further studies to elucidate thermoelectric behavior in a model membrane system and the coupling of the Em induced by ∇T with that created directly by the applied field.

  6. Tumour-cell-induced endothelial cell necroptosis via death receptor 6 promotes metastasis.

    PubMed

    Strilic, Boris; Yang, Lida; Albarrán-Juárez, Julián; Wachsmuth, Laurens; Han, Kang; Müller, Ulrike C; Pasparakis, Manolis; Offermanns, Stefan

    2016-08-11

    Metastasis is the leading cause of cancer-related death in humans. It is a complex multistep process during which individual tumour cells spread primarily through the circulatory system to colonize distant organs. Once in the circulation, tumour cells remain vulnerable, and their metastatic potential largely depends on a rapid and efficient way to escape from the blood stream by passing the endothelial barrier. Evidence has been provided that tumour cell extravasation resembles leukocyte transendothelial migration. However, it remains unclear how tumour cells interact with endothelial cells during extravasation and how these processes are regulated on a molecular level. Here we show that human and murine tumour cells induce programmed necrosis (necroptosis) of endothelial cells, which promotes tumour cell extravasation and metastasis. Treatment of mice with the receptor-interacting serine/threonine-protein kinase 1 (RIPK1)-inhibitor necrostatin-1 or endothelial-cell-specific deletion of RIPK3 reduced tumour-cell-induced endothelial necroptosis, tumour cell extravasation and metastasis. In contrast, pharmacological caspase inhibition or endothelial-cell-specific loss of caspase-8 promoted these processes. We furthermore show in vitro and in vivo that tumour-cell-induced endothelial necroptosis leading to extravasation and metastasis requires amyloid precursor protein expressed by tumour cells and its receptor, death receptor 6 (DR6), on endothelial cells as the primary mediators of these effects. Our data identify a new mechanism underlying tumour cell extravasation and metastasis, and suggest endothelial DR6-mediated necroptotic signalling pathways as targets for anti-metastatic therapies.

  7. Xylitol induces cell death in lung cancer A549 cells by autophagy.

    PubMed

    Park, Eunjoo; Park, Mi Hee; Na, Hee Sam; Chung, Jin

    2015-05-01

    Xylitol is a widely used anti-caries agent that has anti-inflammatory effects. We have evaluated the potential of xylitol in cancer treatment. It's effects on cell proliferation and cytotoxicity were measured by MTT assay and LDH assay. Cell morphology and autophagy were examined by immunostaining and immunoblotting. Xylitol inhibited cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner in these cancer cells: A549, Caki, NCI-H23, HCT-15, HL-60, K562, and SK MEL-2. The IC50 of xylitol in human gingival fibroblast cells was higher than in cancer cells, indicating that it is more specific for cancer cells. Moreover, xylitol induced autophagy in A549 cells that was inhibited by 3-methyladenine, an autophagy inhibitor. These results indicate that xylitol has potential in therapy against lung cancer by inhibiting cell proliferation and inducing autophagy of A549 cells.

  8. Oligogalacturonides induce flowers in tobacco thin cell layers

    SciTech Connect

    Marfa-Riera, V.; Gollin, D.; Mohnen, D.; Darvill, A.; Albersheim, P. )

    1989-04-01

    An optimized tobacco thin-cell-layer (TCL) bioassay was used to study the induction of flowers by plant oligosaccharins. Endopolygalacturonase (EPG)-released fragments of suspension-cultured sycamore cell walls induced flowers on TCLs grown on a medium containing 1.5 {mu}M IBA and 0.9 {mu}M kinetin. The EPG-released fragments were primarily composed of the polysaccharides rhamnogalacturonan I (RG-I), rhamnogalacturonan II (RG-II), and {alpha}-1,4-linked oligogalacturonides. The {alpha}-1,4-linked oligogalacturonides, subsequently purified from the EPG-released sycamore cell wall fragment mixture, induced flowers on TCLs. Purified RG-I and RG-II did not induce flowers. Oligosaccharide fragments, generated by partial acid hydrolysis of citrus pectin, were also capable of inducing flowers on the TCLs. The active components in the pectin fragment mixture were {alpha}-1,4-linked oligogalacturonides. Oligogalacturonides with a degree of polymerization (DP) of 8-16, at concentrations of {approx} 0.1 {mu}M, induced flowers, while oligogalacturonides with a DP 2-7, even at higher concentrations, did not. Oligogalacturonides have previously been shown to induce the synthesis of phytoalexins, protease inhibitors, lignin, and ethylene in other plant systems. Thus, the ability of {alpha}-1,4-linked oligogalacturonides to induce flower formation in the tobacco TCLs represents a new biological activity of these oligosaccharins.

  9. Human papillomavirus 16 E5 induces bi-nucleated cell formation by cell-cell fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Lulin; Plafker, Kendra; Vorozhko, Valeriya; Zuna, Rosemary E.; Hanigan, Marie H.; Gorbsky, Gary J.; Plafker, Scott M.; Angeletti, Peter C.; Ceresa, Brian P.

    2009-02-05

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) 16 is a DNA virus encoding three oncogenes - E5, E6, and E7. The E6 and E7 proteins have well-established roles as inhibitors of tumor suppression, but the contribution of E5 to malignant transformation is controversial. Using spontaneously immortalized human keratinocytes (HaCaT cells), we demonstrate that expression of HPV16 E5 is necessary and sufficient for the formation of bi-nucleated cells, a common characteristic of precancerous cervical lesions. Expression of E5 from non-carcinogenic HPV6b does not produce bi-nucleate cells. Video microscopy and biochemical analyses reveal that bi-nucleates arise through cell-cell fusion. Although most E5-induced bi-nucleates fail to propagate, co-expression of HPV16 E6/E7 enhances the proliferation of these cells. Expression of HPV16 E6/E7 also increases bi-nucleated cell colony formation. These findings identify a new role for HPV16 E5 and support a model in which complementary roles of the HPV16 oncogenes lead to the induction of carcinogenesis.

  10. Angiotensin II induces apoptosis in renal proximal tubular cells.

    PubMed

    Bhaskaran, Madhu; Reddy, Krishna; Radhakrishanan, Neetu; Franki, Nicholas; Ding, Guohua; Singhal, Pravin C

    2003-05-01

    ANG II has been demonstrated to play a role in the progression of tubulointerstial injury. We studied the direct effect of ANG II on apoptosis of cultured rat renal proximal tubular epithelial cells (RPTECs). ANG II promoted RPTEC apoptosis in a dose- and time-dependent manner. This effect of ANG II was attenuated by anti-transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta antibody. Moreover, TGF-beta triggered RPTEC apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. ANG II also enhanced RPTEC expression of Fas and Fas ligand (FasL); furthermore, anti-FasL antibody attenuated ANG II-induced RPTEC apoptosis. In addition, ANG II increased RPTEC expression of Bax, a cell death protein. Both ANG II type 1 (AT(1)) and type 2 (AT(2)) receptor blockers inhibited ANG II-induced RPTEC apoptosis. SB-202190, an inhibitor of p38 MAPK phosphorylation, and caspase-3 inhibitor also attenuated ANG II-induced RPTEC apoptosis. ANG II enhanced RPTEC heme oxygenase (HO)-1 expression. Interestingly, pretreatment with hemin as well as curcumin (inducers of HO-1) inhibited the ANG II-induced tubular cell apoptosis; conversely, pretreatment with zinc protoporphyrin, an inhibitor of HO-1 expression, promoted the effect of ANG II. These results suggest that ANG II-induced apoptosis is mediated via both AT(1) and AT(2) receptors through the generation of TGF-beta, followed by the transcription of cell death genes such as Fas, FasL, and Bax. Modulation of tubular cell expression of HO-1 has an inverse relationship with the ANG II-induced tubular cell apoptosis.

  11. Irradiation strongly reduces tumorigenesis of human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Inui, Shoki; Minami, Kazumasa; Ito, Emiko; Imaizumi, Hiromasa; Mori, Seiji; Koizumi, Masahiko; Fukushima, Satsuki; Miyagawa, Shigeru; Sawa, Yoshiki; Matsuura, Nariaki

    2017-03-03

    Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells have demonstrated they can undergo self-renewal, attain pluripotency, and differentiate into various types of functional cells. In clinical transplantation of iPS cells, however, a major problem is the prevention of tumorigenesis. We speculated that tumor formation could be inhibited by means of irradiation. Since the main purpose of this study was to explore the prevention of tumor formation in human iPS (hiPS) cells, we tested the effects of irradiation on tumor-associated factors such as radiosensitivity, pluripotency and cell death in hiPS cells. The irradiated hiPS cells showed much higher radiosensitivity, because the survival fraction of hiPS cells irradiated with 2 Gy was < 10%, and there was no change of pluripotency. Irradiation with 2 and 4 Gy caused substantial cell death, which was mostly the result of apoptosis. Irradiation with 2 Gy was detrimental enough to cause loss of proliferation capability and trigger substantial cell death in vitro. The hiPS cells irradiated with 2 Gy were injected into NOG mice (NOD/Shi-scid, IL-2 Rγnull) for the analysis of tumor formation. The group of mice into which hiPS cells irradiated with 2 Gy was transplanted showed significant suppression of tumor formation in comparison with that of the group into which non-irradiated hiPS cells were transplanted. It can be presumed that this diminished rate of tumor formation was due to loss of proliferation and cell death caused by irradiation. Our findings suggest that tumor formation following cell therapy or organ transplantation induced by hiPS cells may be prevented by irradiation.

  12. Jasmonic acid signaling modulates ozone-induced hypersensitive cell death.

    PubMed

    Rao, M V; Lee, H; Creelman, R A; Mullet, J E; Davis, K R

    2000-09-01

    Recent studies suggest that cross-talk between salicylic acid (SA)-, jasmonic acid (JA)-, and ethylene-dependent signaling pathways regulates plant responses to both abiotic and biotic stress factors. Earlier studies demonstrated that ozone (O(3)) exposure activates a hypersensitive response (HR)-like cell death pathway in the Arabidopsis ecotype Cvi-0. We now have confirmed the role of SA and JA signaling in influencing O(3)-induced cell death. Expression of salicylate hydroxylase (NahG) in Cvi-0 reduced O(3)-induced cell death. Methyl jasmonate (Me-JA) pretreatment of Cvi-0 decreased O(3)-induced H(2)O(2) content and SA concentrations and completely abolished O(3)-induced cell death. Cvi-0 synthesized as much JA as did Col-0 in response to O(3) exposure but exhibited much less sensitivity to exogenous Me-JA. Analyses of the responses to O(3) of the JA-signaling mutants jar1 and fad3/7/8 also demonstrated an antagonistic relationship between JA- and SA-signaling pathways in controlling the magnitude of O(3)-induced HR-like cell death.

  13. Langerhans Cells Facilitate UVB-induced Epidermal Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Julia M.; Bürgler, Christina D.; Freudzon, Marianna; Golubets, Kseniya; Gibson, Juliet F.; Filler, Renata B.; Girardi, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Ultraviolet B (UVB) light is considered the major environmental inducer of human keratinocyte DNA mutations, including within the tumor-suppressor gene p53, and chronic exposure is associated with cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) formation. Langerhans cells (LC) comprise a dendritic network within the suprabasilar epidermis, yet the role of LC in UVB-induced carcinogenesis is largely unknown. Herein, we show that LC-intact epidermis develops UVB-induced tumors more readily than LC-deficient epidermis. While levels of epidermal cyclopyrimidine dimers (CPD) following acute UVB exposure are equivalent in the presence or absence of LC, chronic UVB-induced p53 mutant clonal islands expand more readily in association with LC which remain largely intact and are preferentially found in proximity to the expanding mutant keratinocyte populations. The observed LC facilitation of mutant p53 clonal expansion is completely αβ and γδ T-cell independent, and is associated with increased intraepidermal expression of interleukin (IL)-22 and the presence of group 3 innate lymphoid cells (ILC3). These data demonstrate that LC play a key role in UVB-induced cutaneous carcinogenesis, and suggest that LC locally stimulate keratinocyte proliferation and innate immune cells that provoke tumor outgrowth. PMID:26053049

  14. Unraveling the mechanism of cell death induced by chemical fibrils

    PubMed Central

    Julien, Olivier; Kampmann, Martin; Bassik, Michael C.; Zorn, Julie A.; Venditto, Vincent J.; Shimbo, Kazutaka; Agard, Nicholas J.; Shimada, Kenichi; Rheingold, Arnold L.; Stockwell, Brent R.; Weissman, Jonathan S.

    2014-01-01

    We previously discovered a small-molecule inducer of cell death, named 1541, that non-covalently self-assembles into chemical fibrils (“chemi-fibrils”) and activates procaspase-3 in vitro. We report here that 1541-induced cell death is caused by the fibrillar, rather than the soluble form of the drug. An shRNA screen reveals that knockdown of genes involved in endocytosis, vesicle trafficking, and lysosomal acidification causes partial 1541 resistance. We confirm the role of these pathways using pharmacological inhibitors. Microscopy shows that the fluorescent chemi-fibrils accumulate in punctae inside cells that partially co-localize with lysosomes. Notably, the chemi-fibrils bind and induce liposome leakage in vitro, suggesting they may do the same in cells. The chemi-fibrils induce extensive proteolysis including caspase substrates, yet modulatory profiling reveals that chemi-fibrils form a distinct class from existing inducers of cell death. The chemi-fibrils share similarities to proteinaceous fibrils and may provide insight into their mechanism of cellular toxicity. PMID:25262416

  15. [Cell cycle arrest at M phase induced by vinblastine in MOLT-4 cells].

    PubMed

    Zhong, Yi-Sheng; Pan, Chang-Chuan; Jin, Chang-Nan; Li, Jian-Jun; Xiong, Gong-Peng; Zhang, Jian-Xi; Gong, Jian-Ping

    2009-04-01

    This study was purposed to investigate the biological effect of vinblastine (VLS), usually known as inductor of mitotic arrest, on MOLT-4 of ALL cells and to evaluate its significance. The cell arrest in M phase and/or cell apoptosis were induced by treatment of MOLT-4 cells with 0.05 microg/ml VLS for 0 - 12 hours; the DNA histogram was detected by flow cytometry; the morphological changes of cells were observed by confocal microscopy; the cell cycle distribution, cell apoptosis and morphological changes of cells before and after arrest were analyzed by using arrest increasing rate (AIR), arrest efficiency (AE), apoptosis rate (AR) and morphologic parameters respectively. The results indicated that the cell arrest did not accompanied by significant increase of apoptosis rate; the DNA histogram of cell arrest showed dynamic change of cell cycle in time-dependent manner; the arrest efficiency could be quantified. The cell arrest at M phase was accompanied by cell stack in S phase, the cell proliferation rate dropped after cell arrest occurred. The cells arrested at M phase possessed of characteristic morphologic features in cell mitosis. It is concluded that the vinblastine can solely induce arrest of MOLT-4 cells at M phase. This study provides experimental basis for further investigating the relation of cell cycle arrest to apoptosis, mechanism of checkpoint and development of new anticancer drugs.

  16. [Experiment on inducing human dental pulp stem cells into neural-like cells].

    PubMed

    He, Hui-xia; Jin, Yan; Shi, Jun-nan; Luo, Yu-qing; Zhou, Yan-ni; Peng, Zhi; Xu, Yu-he

    2007-08-01

    To explore the multi-differentiated capability of human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) obtained by cell-clone culture approach and to determine the appropriate induced medium. The cloned isolation and expansion of hDPSCs were preinduced for 24 h, and were subsequently replaced with neural-inductive medium containing certain concentration of dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), butylated hydroxyanisode (BHA), forskolin, P-mercaptoethanol (p-ME) and hydrocortisone for 4 days. Then induced cells were analyzed by morphological observation, immnocytochemical staining for non-specific esterase (NSE) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression, RT-PCR for GFAP mRNA. Meanwhile, the uninduced hDPSCs were used as negative control. The morphology of induced cells changed at the initial 12 h, and displayed a typical neuron-like cells at 24 h. There was a gradual increase in the number of these neuronal differentiated cells with continuous induction. Furthermore, immnocytochemical staining showed that the induced cell expressed NSE and GFAP, two marked enzymes of neuron cell. The GFAP mRNA was also detected in induced cells by RT-PCR assay. In contrast, the uninduced cells maintained its original appearance and had no expression on them. hDPSCs may possess potential of multiple-differentiation and may differentiate into neuron-like cells on certain inductive condition.

  17. Role of hypoxia‑inducible factor‑1α in autophagic cell death in microglial cells induced by hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xintao; Ma, Jun; Fu, Qiang; Zhu, Lei; Zhang, Zhiling; Zhang, Fan; Lu, Nan; Chen, Aimin

    2017-03-01

    Microglial cells are phagocytic cells of the central nervous system (CNS) and have been proposed to be a primary component of the innate immune response and maintain efficient CNS homeostasis. Microglial cells are activated during various phases of tissue repair and participate in various pathological conditions in the CNS. Following spinal cord injury (SCI), anoxemia is a key problem that results in tissue destruction. Hypoxia‑inducible factor 1‑α (HIF‑1α) may protect hypoxic cells from apoptosis or necrosis under ischemic and anoxic conditions. However, numerous studies have revealed that hypoxia upregulates HIF‑1α expression leading to the death of microglial cells. The present study investigated the alterations in HIF‑1α expression levels and the mechanism of autophagic cell death mediated by HIF‑1α in microglial cells induced by hypoxia. Hypoxia was demonstrated to induce HIF‑1α expression and autophagic cell death in microglial cells. Enhanced autophagy reduced cell death during the initial stages by restraining the functions of autophagy‑associated genes (microtubule‑associated protein 1A/1B‑light chain 3 phosphatidylethanolamine conjugate and Beclin‑1) and modulating the expression of inflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor‑α and interleukin‑1β). Target value was determined by Cell Counting Kit 8 and cell death by flow cytometry. Transmission electron microscopy, immunohistochemical staining, reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction, western blotting, and ELISA were used for further analysis. However, increased expression of HIF‑1α induced cell death and autophagic cell death in microglial cells. Furthermore, the effects of the HIF‑1α inhibitor 2‑methoxyestradiol and HIF‑1α small interfering RNA on the death and autophagy of microglial cells in vitro were investigated. These investigations revealed the suppression of autophagy, the decrease of cell viability and the increase of

  18. Reversine Induced Multinucleated Cells, Cell Apoptosis and Autophagy in Human Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ching-Yen; Chen, Yih-Yuan; Chen, Ping-Tzu; Tseng, Ya-Shih

    2016-01-01

    Reversine, an A3 adenosine receptor antagonist, has been shown to induce differentiated myogenic-lineage committed cells to become multipotent mesenchymal progenitor cells. We and others have reported that reversine has an effect on human tumor suppression. This study revealed anti-tumor effects of reversine on proliferation, apoptosis and autophagy induction in human non-small cell lung cancer cells. Treatment of these cells with reversine suppressed cell growth in a time- and dosage-dependent manner. Moreover, polyploidy occurred after reversine treatment. In addition, caspase-dependent apoptosis and activation of autophagy by reversine in a dosage-dependent manner were also observed. We demonstrated in this study that reversine contributes to growth inhibition, apoptosis and autophagy induction in human lung cancer cells. Therefore, reversine used as a potential therapeutic agent for human lung cancer is worthy of further investigation. PMID:27385117

  19. Baicalein protects rat insulinoma INS-1 cells from palmitate-induced lipotoxicity by inducing HO-1.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Hyun Jeong; Yang, Dongki; Hwang, Yongha; Jun, Hee-Sook; Cheon, Hyae Gyeong

    2017-01-01

    β-Cell dysfunction plays a central role in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes (T2D), and the identification of novel approaches to improve β-cell function is essential to treat this disease. Baicalein, a flavonoid originally isolated from the root of Scutellaria Baicalensis, has been shown to have beneficial effects on β-cell function. Here, the authors investigated the molecular mechanism responsible for the protective effects of baicalein against palmitate (PA)-induced impaired β-cell function, and placed focus on the role of heme oxygenase (HO)-1. Rat pancreatic β-cell line INS-1 cells or mouse pancreatic islets were cultured with PA (500 μM) to induce lipotoxicity in the presence or absence of baicalein (50 μM), and the expressions of the ER stress markers, ATF-3, CHOP and GRP78 were detected by Western blotting and/or qPCR. The involvement of HO-1 was evaluated by HO-1 siRNA transfection and using the HO-1 inhibitor ZnPP. Baicalein reduced PA-induced ER stress and inflammation and enhanced insulin secretion, and these effects were associated with the induction of HO-1. Furthermore, these protective effects were attenuated by ZnPP and by HO-1 siRNA. Pretreatment of PD98059 (an ERK inhibitor) significantly inhibited the protective effects of baicalein and blocked HO-1 induction. On the other hand, CO production by RuCO (a CO donor) ameliorated PA-induced ER stress, suggesting that CO production followed by HO-1 induction may contribute to the protective effects of baicalein against PA-induced β-cell dysfunction. Baicalein protects pancreatic β-cells from PA-induced ER stress and inflammation via an ERK-HO-1 dependent pathway. The authors suggest HO-1 induction in pancreatic β-cells appears to be a promising therapeutic strategy for T2D.

  20. Sodium azide induces necrotic cell death in rat squamous cell carcinoma SCC131.

    PubMed

    Sato, Eiju; Suzuki, Toshimitsu; Hoshi, Nobuo; Sugino, Takashi; Hasegawa, Hiroshi

    2008-12-01

    Sodium azide (NaN(3)) is widely used in industry and agriculture, and also in laboratories as a potent preservative. NaN(3) induces cell death when applied to cultured cells. However, whether the mode of cell death is apoptosis or necrosis remains a subject of debate. There have been no previous reports on NaN(3)-induced cell death in squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), and so we studied the mode of cell death induced by NaN(3) using the rat SCC cell line, SCC131. In this experiment, SCC131 cells died 48-72 h after NaN(3) treatment with concentrations greater than 5 mM. The NaN(3) treatment reduced the mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP content. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling and DNA ladder detection assay indicated that no DNA fragmentation occurred. In addition, phosphatidyl serine did not appear on the cell surface, according to the findings of dye-uptake bioassay and flow cytometric analysis of Annexin V labeling. Electron microscopic analysis revealed that the NaN(3)-treated cells showed mitochondrial swelling and rupture of the cell membrane. In conclusion, NaN(3) induces necrotic cell death in SCC131. This experimental model may be used in the study of necrotic cell death.

  1. Linalool Induces Cell Cycle Arrest and Apoptosis in Leukemia Cells and Cervical Cancer Cells through CDKIs.

    PubMed

    Chang, Mei-Yin; Shieh, Den-En; Chen, Chung-Chi; Yeh, Ching-Sheng; Dong, Huei-Ping

    2015-11-26

    Plantaginaceae, a popular traditional Chinese medicine, has long been used for treating various diseases from common cold to cancer. Linalool is one of the biologically active compounds that can be isolated from Plantaginaceae. Most of the commonly used cytotoxic anticancer drugs have been shown to induce apoptosis in susceptible tumor cells. However, the signaling pathway for apoptosis remains undefined. In this study, the cytotoxic effect of linalool on human cancer cell lines was investigated. Water-soluble tetrazolium salts (WST-1) based colorimetric cellular cytotoxicity assay, was used to test the cytotoxic ability of linalool against U937 and HeLa cells, and flow cytometry (FCM) and genechip analysis were used to investigate the possible mechanism of apoptosis. These results demonstrated that linalool exhibited a good cytotoxic effect on U937 and HeLa cells, with the IC50 value of 2.59 and 11.02 μM, respectively, compared with 5-FU with values of 4.86 and 12.31 μM, respectively. After treating U937 cells with linalool for 6 h, we found an increased sub-G1 peak and a dose-dependent phenomenon, whereby these cells were arrested at the G0/G1 phase. Furthermore, by using genechip analysis, we observed that linalool can promote p53, p21, p27, p16, and p18 gene expression. Therefore, this study verified that linalool can arrest the cell cycle of U937 cells at the G0/G1 phase and can arrest the cell cycle of HeLa cells at the G2/M phase. Its mechanism facilitates the expression of the cyclin-dependent kinases inhibitors (CDKIs) p53, p21, p27, p16, and p18, as well as the non-expression of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) activity.

  2. Linalool Induces Cell Cycle Arrest and Apoptosis in Leukemia Cells and Cervical Cancer Cells through CDKIs

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Mei-Yin; Shieh, Den-En; Chen, Chung-Chi; Yeh, Ching-Sheng; Dong, Huei-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Plantaginaceae, a popular traditional Chinese medicine, has long been used for treating various diseases from common cold to cancer. Linalool is one of the biologically active compounds that can be isolated from Plantaginaceae. Most of the commonly used cytotoxic anticancer drugs have been shown to induce apoptosis in susceptible tumor cells. However, the signaling pathway for apoptosis remains undefined. In this study, the cytotoxic effect of linalool on human cancer cell lines was investigated. Water-soluble tetrazolium salts (WST-1) based colorimetric cellular cytotoxicity assay, was used to test the cytotoxic ability of linalool against U937 and HeLa cells, and flow cytometry (FCM) and genechip analysis were used to investigate the possible mechanism of apoptosis. These results demonstrated that linalool exhibited a good cytotoxic effect on U937 and HeLa cells, with the IC50 value of 2.59 and 11.02 μM, respectively, compared with 5-FU with values of 4.86 and 12.31 μM, respectively. After treating U937 cells with linalool for 6 h, we found an increased sub-G1 peak and a dose-dependent phenomenon, whereby these cells were arrested at the G0/G1 phase. Furthermore, by using genechip analysis, we observed that linalool can promote p53, p21, p27, p16, and p18 gene expression. Therefore, this study verified that linalool can arrest the cell cycle of U937 cells at the G0/G1 phase and can arrest the cell cycle of HeLa cells at the G2/M phase. Its mechanism facilitates the expression of the cyclin-dependent kinases inhibitors (CDKIs) p53, p21, p27, p16, and p18, as well as the non-expression of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) activity. PMID:26703569

  3. Quantification of Depletion-Induced Adhesion of Red Blood Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffen, P.; Verdier, C.; Wagner, C.

    2013-01-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) are known to form aggregates in the form of rouleaux due to the presence of plasma proteins under physiological conditions. The formation of rouleaux can also be induced in vitro by the addition of macromolecules to the RBC suspension. Current data on the adhesion strength between red blood cells in their natural discocyte shapes mostly originate from indirect measurements such as flow chamber experiments, but data is lacking at the single cell level. Here, we present measurements on the dextran-induced aggregation of red blood cells using atomic force microscopy-based single cell force spectroscopy. The effects of dextran concentration and molecular weight on the interaction energy of adhering RBCs were determined. The results on adhesion energy are in excellent agreement with a model based on the depletion effect and previous experimental studies. Furthermore, our method allowed to determine the adhesion force, a quantity that is needed in theoretical investigations on blood flow.

  4. Tau oligomers and fibrils induce activation of microglial cells.

    PubMed

    Morales, Inelia; Jiménez, José M; Mancilla, Marcela; Maccioni, Ricardo B

    2013-01-01

    Neuroinflammation is a process related to the onset of several neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Increasing sets of evidence support the major role of deregulation of the interaction patterns between glial cells and neurons in the pathway toward neuronal degeneration, a process we are calling neuroimmunomodulation in AD. On the basis of the hypothesis that pathological tau aggregates induce microglial activation with the subsequent events of the neuroinflammatory cascade, we have studied the effects of tau oligomeric species and filamentous structures over microglial cells in vitro. Tau oligomers and fibrils were induced by arachidonic acid and then their actions assayed upon addition to microglial cells. We showed activation of the microglia, with significant morphological alterations as analyzed by immunofluorescence. The augmentation of nitrites and the proinflammatory cytokine IL-6 was evaluated in ELISA assays. Furthermore, conditioned media of stimulated microglia cells were exposed to hippocampal neurons generating altered patterns in these cells, including shortening of neuritic processes and cytoskeleton reorganization.

  5. Quantification of depletion-induced adhesion of red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Steffen, P; Verdier, C; Wagner, C

    2013-01-04

    Red blood cells (RBCs) are known to form aggregates in the form of rouleaux due to the presence of plasma proteins under physiological conditions. The formation of rouleaux can also be induced in vitro by the addition of macromolecules to the RBC suspension. Current data on the adhesion strength between red blood cells in their natural discocyte shapes mostly originate from indirect measurements such as flow chamber experiments, but data is lacking at the single cell level. Here, we present measurements on the dextran-induced aggregation of red blood cells using atomic force microscopy-based single cell force spectroscopy. The effects of dextran concentration and molecular weight on the interaction energy of adhering RBCs were determined. The results on adhesion energy are in excellent agreement with a model based on the depletion effect and previous experimental studies. Furthermore, our method allowed to determine the adhesion force, a quantity that is needed in theoretical investigations on blood flow.

  6. Cuprous oxide nanoparticles selectively induce apoptosis of tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ye; Zi, Xiao-Yuan; Su, Juan; Zhang, Hong-Xia; Zhang, Xin-Rong; Zhu, Hai-Ying; Li, Jian-Xiu; Yin, Meng; Yang, Feng; Hu, Yi-Ping

    2012-01-01

    In the rapid development of nanoscience and nanotechnology, many researchers have discovered that metal oxide nanoparticles have very useful pharmacological effects. Cuprous oxide nanoparticles (CONPs) can selectively induce apoptosis and suppress the proliferation of tumor cells, showing great potential as a clinical cancer therapy. Treatment with CONPs caused a G1/G0 cell cycle arrest in tumor cells. Furthermore, CONPs enclosed in vesicles entered, or were taken up by mitochondria, which damaged their membranes, thereby inducing apoptosis. CONPs can also produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) and initiate lipid peroxidation of the liposomal membrane, thereby regulating many signaling pathways and influencing the vital movements of cells. Our results demonstrate that CONPs have selective cytotoxicity towards tumor cells, and indicate that CONPs might be a potential nanomedicine for cancer therapy. PMID:22679374

  7. Shape anisotropy induces rotations in optically trapped red blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bambardekar, Kapil; Dharmadhikari, Jayashree A.; Dharmadhikari, Aditya K.; Yamada, Toshihoro; Kato, Tsuyoshi; Kono, Hirohiko; Fujimura, Yuichi; Sharma, Shobhona; Mathur, Deepak

    2010-07-01

    A combined experimental and theoretical study is carried out to probe the rotational behavior of red blood cells (RBCs) in a single beam optical trap. We induce shape changes in RBCs by altering the properties of the suspension medium in which live cells float. We find that certain shape anisotropies result in the rotation of optically trapped cells. Indeed, even normal (healthy) RBCs can be made to rotate using linearly polarized trapping light by altering the osmotic stress the cells are subjected to. Hyperosmotic stress is found to induce shape anisotropies. We also probe the effect of the medium's viscosity on cell rotation. The observed rotations are modeled using a Langevin-type equation of motion that takes into account frictional forces that are generated as RBCs rotate in the medium. We observe good correlation between our measured data and calculated results.

  8. Imipramine protects mouse hippocampus against tunicamycin-induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Ono, Yoko; Shimazawa, Masamitsu; Ishisaka, Mitsue; Oyagi, Atsushi; Tsuruma, Kazuhiro; Hara, Hideaki

    2012-12-05

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is implicated in various diseases. Recently, some reports have suggested that the sigma-1 receptor may play a role in ER stress, and many antidepressants have a high affinity for the sigma-1 receptor. In the present study, we focused on imipramine, a widely used antidepressant, and investigated whether it might protect against the neuronal cell death induced by tunicamycin, an ER stress inducer. In mouse cultured hippocampal HT22 cells, imipramine inhibited cell death and caspase-3 activation induced by tunicamycin, although it did not alter the elevated expressions of 78 kDa glucose-regulated protein (GRP78) and C/EBP-homologous protein (CHOP). Interestingly, in such cells application of imipramine normalized the expression of the sigma-1 receptor, which was decreased by treatment with tunicamycin alone. Additionally, NE-100, a selective sigma-1 receptor antagonist, abolished the protective effect of imipramine against such tunicamycin-induced cell death. Imipramine inhibited the reduction of mitochondrial membrane potential induced by tunicamycin, and NE-100 blocked this modulating effect of imipramine. Furthermore, in anesthetized mice intracerebroventricular administration of tunicamycin decreased the number of neuronal cells in the hippocampus, particularly in the CA1 and dentate gyrus (DG) areas, and 7 days' imipramine treatment (10mg/kg/day; i.p.) significantly suppressed these reductions in CA1 and DG. These findings suggest that imipramine protects against ER stress-induced hippocampal neuronal cell death both in vitro and in vivo. Such protection may be partly due to the sigma-1 receptor.

  9. Epithelium-derived chemokines induce airway smooth muscle cell migration.

    PubMed

    Takeda, N; Sumi, Y; Préfontaine, D; Al Abri, J; Al Heialy, N; Al-Ramli, W; Michoud, M-C; Martin, J G; Hamid, Q

    2009-07-01

    The remodelling of airway smooth muscle (ASM) associated with asthma severity may involve the migration of ASM cells towards the epithelium. However, little is known about the mechanisms of cell migration and the effect of epithelial-derived mediators on this process. The main objective of the current study is to assess the effects of epithelial-derived chemokines on ASM cell migration. Normal human ASM cells were incubated with supernatants from cells of the bronchial epithelial cell line BEAS-2B and normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells. To induce chemokine production, epithelial cells were treated with TNF-alpha. Chemokine expression by epithelial cells was evaluated by quantitative real-time PCR, ELISA and membrane antibody array. To identify the role of individual chemokines in ASM cell migration, we performed migration assays with a modified Boyden chamber using specific neutralizing antibodies to block chemokine effects. Supernatants from BEAS-2B cells treated with TNF-alpha increased ASM cell migration; migration was increased 1.6 and 2.5-fold by supernatant from BEAS-2B cells treated with 10 and 100 ng/mL TNF-alpha, respectively. Protein levels in supernatants and mRNA expression by BEAS-2B cells of regulated on activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted (RANTES) and IL-8 were significantly increased by 100 ng/mL TNF-alpha treatment. The incubation of supernatant with antibodies to RANTES or IL-8 significantly reduced ASM cell migration, and the combined antibodies further inhibited the cell migration. The migratory effects of supernatants and inhibiting effects of RANTES and/or IL-8 were confirmed also using NHBE cells. The results show that chemokines from airway epithelial cells cause ASM cell migration and might potentially play a role in the process of airway remodelling in asthma.

  10. Autophagonizer, a novel synthetic small molecule, induces autophagic cell death

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, In-Kwon; Cho, Yoon Sun; Jung, Hye Jin; Kwon, Ho Jeong

    2010-03-19

    Autophagy is an apoptosis-independent mechanism of cell death that protects the cell from environmental imbalances and infection by pathogens. We identified a novel small molecule, 2-(3-Benzyl-4-oxo-3,4,5,6,7,8-hexahydro-benzo[4,5]thieno[2,3-d] pyrimidin-2-ylsulfanylmethyl)-oxazole-4-carboxylic acid (2-pyrrolidin-1-yl-ethyl)-amide (referred as autophagonizer), using high-content cell-based screening and the autophagosome marker EGFP-LC3. Autophagonizer inhibited growth and induced cell death in the human tumor cell lines MCF7, HeLa, HCT116, A549, AGS, and HT1080 via a caspase-independent pathway. Conversion of cytosolic LC3-I to autophagosome-associated LC3-II was greatly enhanced by autophagonizer treatment. Transmission electron microscopy and acridine orange staining revealed increased autophagy in the cytoplasm of autophagonizer-treated cells. In conclusion, autophagonizer is a novel autophagy inducer with unique structure, which induces autophagic cell death in the human tumor cell lines.

  11. Effect of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Technology in Blood Banking

    PubMed Central

    Focosi, Daniele

    2016-01-01

    Summary Population aging has imposed cost-effective alternatives to blood donations. Artificial blood is still at the preliminary stages of development, and the need for viable cells seems unsurmountable. Because large numbers of viable cells must be promptly available for clinical use, stem cell technologies, expansion, and banking represent ideal tools to ensure a regular supply. Provided key donors can be identified, induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology could pave the way to a new era in transfusion medicine, just as it is already doing in many other fields of medicine. The present review summarizes the current state of research on iPSC technology in the field of blood banking, highlighting hurdles, and promises. Significance The aging population in Western countries is causing a progressive reduction of blood donors and a constant increase of blood recipients. Because blood is the main therapeutic option to treat acute hemorrhage, cost-effective alternatives to blood donations are being actively investigated. The enormous replication capability of induced pluripotent stem cells and their promising results in many other fields of medicine could be an apt solution to produce the large numbers of viable cells required in transfusion and usher in a new era in transfusion medicine. The present report describes the potentiality, technological hurdles, and promises of induced pluripotent stem cells to generate red blood cells by redifferentiation. PMID:26819256

  12. Current progress and prospects of induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, LingYi; Liu, Lin

    2009-07-01

    Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are derived from somatic cells by ectopic expression of few transcription factors. Like embryonic stem (ES) cells, iPS cells are able to self-renew indefinitely and to differentiate into all types of cells in the body. iPS cells hold great promise for regenerative medicine, because iPS cells circumvent not only immunological rejection but also ethical issues. Since the first report on the derivation of iPS cells in 2006, many laboratories all over the world started research on iPS cells and have made significant progress. This paper reviews recent progress in iPS cell research, including the methods to generate iPS cells, the molecular mechanism of reprogramming in the formation of iPS cells, and the potential applications of iPS cells in cell replacement therapy. Current problems that need to be addressed and the prospects for iPS research are also discussed.

  13. Retinoic acid from retinal pigment epithelium induces T regulatory cells.

    PubMed

    Kawazoe, Yuko; Sugita, Sunao; Keino, Hiroshi; Yamada, Yukiko; Imai, Ayano; Horie, Shintaro; Mochizuki, Manabu

    2012-01-01

    Primary cultured retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells can convert T cells into T regulatory cells (Tregs) through inhibitory factor(s) including transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) in vitro. Retinoic acid (RA) enhances induction of CD4(+) Tregs in the presence of TGFβ. We investigated whether RA produced by RPE cells can promote generation of Tregs. We found that in vitro, RA-treated T cells expressed high levels of Foxp3 in the presence of recombinant TGFβ. In GeneChip analysis, cultured RPE cells constitutively expressed RA-associated molecules such as RA-binding proteins, enzymes, and receptors. RPE from normal mice, but not vitamin A-deficient mice, contained significant levels of TGFβ. RPE-induced Tregs from vitamin A-deficient mice failed to suppress activation of target T cells. Only a few Foxp3(+) T cells were found in intraocular cells from vitamin A-deficient experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU) mice, whereas expression was higher in cells from normal EAU mice. RA receptor antagonist-pretreated or RA-binding protein-siRNA-transfected RPE cells failed to convert CD4(+) T cells into Tregs. Our data support the hypothesis that RPE cells produce RA, thereby enabling bystander T cells to be converted into Tregs through TGFβ promotion, which can then participate in the establishment of immune tolerance in the eye.

  14. Cell-Cell Fusion Induced by Measles Virus Amplifies the Type I Interferon Response▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Herschke, F.; Plumet, S.; Duhen, T.; Azocar, O.; Druelle, J.; Laine, D.; Wild, T. F.; Rabourdin-Combe, C.; Gerlier, D.; Valentin, H.

    2007-01-01

    Measles virus (MeV) infection is characterized by the formation of multinuclear giant cells (MGC). We report that beta interferon (IFN-β) production is amplified in vitro by the formation of virus-induced MGC derived from human epithelial cells or mature conventional dendritic cells. Both fusion and IFN-β response amplification were inhibited in a dose-dependent way by a fusion-inhibitory peptide after MeV infection of epithelial cells. This effect was observed at both low and high multiplicities of infection. While in the absence of virus replication, the cell-cell fusion mediated by MeV H/F glycoproteins did not activate any IFN-α/β production, an amplified IFN-β response was observed when H/F-induced MGC were infected with a nonfusogenic recombinant chimerical virus. Time lapse microscopy studies revealed that MeV-infected MGC from epithelial cells have a highly dynamic behavior and an unexpected long life span. Following cell-cell fusion, both of the RIG-I and IFN-β gene deficiencies were trans complemented to induce IFN-β production. Production of IFN-β and IFN-α was also observed in MeV-infected immature dendritic cells (iDC) and mature dendritic cells (mDC). In contrast to iDC, MeV infection of mDC induced MGC, which produced enhanced amounts of IFN-α/β. The amplification of IFN-β production was associated with a sustained nuclear localization of IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF-3) in MeV-induced MGC derived from both epithelial cells and mDC, while the IRF-7 up-regulation was poorly sensitive to the fusion process. Therefore, MeV-induced cell-cell fusion amplifies IFN-α/β production in infected cells, and this indicates that MGC contribute to the antiviral immune response. PMID:17898060

  15. C/EBPα poises B cells for rapid reprogramming into induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Di Stefano, Bruno; Sardina, Jose Luis; van Oevelen, Chris; Collombet, Samuel; Kallin, Eric M; Vicent, Guillermo P; Lu, Jun; Thieffry, Denis; Beato, Miguel; Graf, Thomas

    2014-02-13

    CCAAT/enhancer binding protein-α (C/EBPα) induces transdifferentiation of B cells into macrophages at high efficiencies and enhances reprogramming into induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells when co-expressed with the transcription factors Oct4 (Pou5f1), Sox2, Klf4 and Myc (hereafter called OSKM). However, how C/EBPα accomplishes these effects is unclear. Here we find that in mouse primary B cells transient C/EBPα expression followed by OSKM activation induces a 100-fold increase in iPS cell reprogramming efficiency, involving 95% of the population. During this conversion, pluripotency and epithelial-mesenchymal transition genes become markedly upregulated, and 60% of the cells express Oct4 within 2 days. C/EBPα acts as a 'path-breaker' as it transiently makes the chromatin of pluripotency genes more accessible to DNase I. C/EBPα also induces the expression of the dioxygenase Tet2 and promotes its translocation to the nucleus where it binds to regulatory regions of pluripotency genes that become demethylated after OSKM induction. In line with these findings, overexpression of Tet2 enhances OSKM-induced B-cell reprogramming. Because the enzyme is also required for efficient C/EBPα-induced immune cell conversion, our data indicate that Tet2 provides a mechanistic link between iPS cell reprogramming and B-cell transdifferentiation. The rapid iPS reprogramming approach described here should help to fully elucidate the process and has potential clinical applications.

  16. Long-term maintenance of human induced pluripotent stem cells by automated cell culture system

    PubMed Central

    Konagaya, Shuhei; Ando, Takeshi; Yamauchi, Toshiaki; Suemori, Hirofumi; Iwata, Hiroo

    2015-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells, such as embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, are regarded as new sources for cell replacement therapy. These cells can unlimitedly expand under undifferentiated conditions and be differentiated into multiple cell types. Automated culture systems enable the large-scale production of cells. In addition to reducing the time and effort of researchers, an automated culture system improves the reproducibility of cell cultures. In the present study, we newly designed a fully automated cell culture system for human iPS maintenance. Using an automated culture system, hiPS cells maintained their undifferentiated state for 60 days. Automatically prepared hiPS cells had a potency of differentiation into three germ layer cells including dopaminergic neurons and pancreatic cells. PMID:26573336

  17. Long-term maintenance of human induced pluripotent stem cells by automated cell culture system.

    PubMed

    Konagaya, Shuhei; Ando, Takeshi; Yamauchi, Toshiaki; Suemori, Hirofumi; Iwata, Hiroo

    2015-11-17

    Pluripotent stem cells, such as embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, are regarded as new sources for cell replacement therapy. These cells can unlimitedly expand under undifferentiated conditions and be differentiated into multiple cell types. Automated culture systems enable the large-scale production of cells. In addition to reducing the time and effort of researchers, an automated culture system improves the reproducibility of cell cultures. In the present study, we newly designed a fully automated cell culture system for human iPS maintenance. Using an automated culture system, hiPS cells maintained their undifferentiated state for 60 days. Automatically prepared hiPS cells had a potency of differentiation into three germ layer cells including dopaminergic neurons and pancreatic cells.

  18. ARSENIC EXPOSURE INDUCES THE WARBURG EFFECT IN CULTURED HUMAN CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Fei; Severson, Paul; Pacheco, Samantha; Futscher, Bernard W.; Klimecki, Walter T.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding how arsenic exacts its diverse, global disease burden is hampered by a limited understanding of the particular biological pathways that are disrupted by arsenic and underlie pathogenesis. A reductionist view would predict that a small number of basic pathways are generally perturbed by arsenic, and manifest as diverse diseases. Following an initial observation that arsenite-exposed cells in culture acidify their media more rapidly than control cells, the report here shows that low level exposure to arsenite (75 ppb) is sufficient to induce aerobic glycolysis (the Warburg effect) as a generalized phenomenon in cultured human primary cells and cell lines. Expanded studies in one such cell line, the non-malignant pulmonary epithelial line, BEAS-2B, established that the arsenite-induced Warburg effect was associated with increased accumulation of intracellular and extracellular lactate, an increased rate of extracellular acidification, and inhibition by the non-metabolized glucose analog, 2-deoxyglucose. Associated with the induction of aerobic glycolysis was a pathway-wide induction of glycolysis gene expression, as well as protein accumulation of an established glycolysis master-regulator, hypoxia-inducible factor 1α. Arsenite-induced alteration of energy production in human cells represents the type of fundamental perturbation that could extend to many tissue targets and diseases. PMID:23648393

  19. Cysteine aggravates palmitate-induced cell death in hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Dou, Xiaobing; Wang, Zhigang; Yao, Tong; Song, Zhenyuan

    2011-01-01

    Aims Lipotoxicity, defined as cell death induced by excessive fatty acids, especially saturated fatty acids, is critically involved in the development of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Recent studies report that plasma cysteine concentrations is elevated in the subjects with either alcoholic steatohepatitis (ASH) or NASH than normal subjects. The present study was conducted to determine if elevation of cysteine could be a deleterious factor in palmitate-induced hepatocyte cell death. Main methods HepG2 and Hep3B cells were treated with palmitate with/without the inclusion of cysteine in the media for 24 hours. The effects of cysteine inclusion on palmitate induced cell death were determined by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release and MTT assay. Oxidative stress was evaluated by intracellular glutathione (GSH) level, malondialdehyde (MDA) formation, and DCFH-DA assay. Western blotting was performed to detect the changes of endoplasmic reticulum(ER) stress markers: C/EBP homologous transcription factor (CHOP), GRP-78, and phosphorylated c-jun N-terminal kinase (p-JNK). Key findings Elevated intracellular cysteine aggravates hepatocytes to palmitate-induced cell death. Enhancement of ER stress, specifically increased activation of JNK pathway, contributed to this cell death process. Significance Increase of plasma cysteine levels, as observed in both ASH and NASH patients, may play a pathological role in the development of the liver diseases. Manipulation of dietary amino acids supplementation could be a therapeutic choice. PMID:22008477

  20. Modeling human neurological disorders with induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Imaizumi, Yoichi; Okano, Hideyuki

    2014-05-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells obtained by reprogramming technology are a source of great hope, not only in terms of applications in regenerative medicine, such as cell transplantation therapy, but also for modeling human diseases and new drug development. In particular, the production of iPS cells from the somatic cells of patients with intractable diseases and their subsequent differentiation into cells at affected sites (e.g., neurons, cardiomyocytes, hepatocytes, and myocytes) has permitted the in vitro construction of disease models that contain patient-specific genetic information. For example, disease-specific iPS cells have been established from patients with neuropsychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia and autism, as well as from those with neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease. A multi-omics analysis of neural cells originating from patient-derived iPS cells may thus enable investigators to elucidate the pathogenic mechanisms of neurological diseases that have heretofore been unknown. In addition, large-scale screening of chemical libraries with disease-specific iPS cells is currently underway and is expected to lead to new drug discovery. Accordingly, this review outlines the progress made via the use of patient-derived iPS cells toward the modeling of neurological disorders, the testing of existing drugs, and the discovery of new drugs. The production of human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells from the patients' somatic cells and their subsequent differentiation into specific cells have permitted the in vitro construction of disease models that contain patient-specific genetic information. Furthermore, innovations of gene-editing technologies on iPS cells are enabling new approaches for illuminating the pathogenic mechanisms of human diseases. In this review article, we outlined the current status of neurological diseases-specific iPS cell research and described recently obtained

  1. Enhancing cytokine-induced killer cell therapy of multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chunsheng; Suksanpaisan, Lukkana; Chen, Yun-Wen; Russell, Stephen J; Peng, Kah-Whye

    2013-06-01

    Cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells are in clinical testing against various tumor types, including multiple myeloma. In this study, we show that CIK cells have activity against subcutaneous and disseminated models of human myeloma (KAS-6/1), which can be enhanced by infecting the CIK cells with an oncolytic measles virus (MV) or by pretreating the myeloma cells with ionizing radiation (XRT). KAS-6/1 cells were killed by coculture with CIK or MV-infected CIK (CIK/MV) cells, and the addition of an anti-NKG2D antibody inhibited cytolysis by 50%. However, human bone marrow stromal cells can reduce CIK and CIK/MV mediated killing of myeloma cells (RPMI 8226, JJN-3 and MM1). In vivo, CIK and CIK/MV prolonged the survival of mice with systemic myeloma, although CIK/MV showed enhanced antitumor activity compared with CIK. Irradiation of the KAS-6/1 cells induced mRNA and protein expression of NKG2D ligands, MICA, and MICB in a dose-dependent manner and enhanced delivery of CIK/MV to the irradiated tumors. In both subcutaneous and disseminated myeloma models, XRT at 2 Gy resulted in superior prolongation of the survival of mice given CIK/MV therapy compared with CIK/MV with no XRT. This study demonstrates the potential of CIK against myeloma and that the combination of virotherapy with radiation could be used to further enhance therapeutic outcome using CIK cells.

  2. Serum-Induced Differentiation of Human Meibomian Gland Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, David A.; Liu, Yang; Kam, Wendy R.; Ding, Juan; Green, Karin M.; Shaffer, Scott A.; Hatton, Mark P.; Liu, Shaohui

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. We hypothesize that culturing immortalized human meibomian gland epithelial cells in serum-containing medium will induce their differentiation. The purpose of this investigation was to begin to test our hypothesis, and explore the impact of serum on gene expression and lipid accumulation in human meibomian gland epithelial cells. Methods. Immortalized and primary human meibomian gland epithelial cells were cultured in the presence or absence of serum. Cells were evaluated for lysosome and lipid accumulation, polar and neutral lipid profiles, and gene expression. Results. Our results support our hypothesis that serum stimulates the differentiation of human meibomian gland epithelial cells. This serum-induced effect is associated with a significant increase in the expression of genes linked to cell differentiation, epithelium development, the endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus, vesicles, and lysosomes, and a significant decrease in gene activity related to the cell cycle, mitochondria, ribosomes, and translation. These cellular responses are accompanied by an accumulation of lipids within lysosomes, as well as alterations in the fatty acid content of polar and nonpolar lipids. Of particular importance, our results show that the molecular and biochemical changes of immortalized human meibomian gland epithelial cells during differentiation are analogous to those of primary cells. Conclusions. Overall, our findings indicate that immortalized human meibomian gland epithelial cells may serve as an ideal preclinical model to identify factors that control cellular differentiation in the meibomian gland. PMID:24867579

  3. Chestnut extract induces apoptosis in AGS human gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun Sook; Kim, Eun Ji; Kim, Sun Hyo

    2011-06-01

    In Korea, chestnut production is increasing each year, but consumption is far below production. We investigated the effect of chestnut extracts on antioxidant activity and anticancer effects. Ethanol extracts of raw chestnut (RCE) or chestnut powder (CPE) had dose-dependent superoxide scavenging activity. Viable numbers of MDA-MD-231 human breast cancer cells, DU145 human prostate cancer cells, and AGS human gastric cancer cells decreased by 18, 31, and 69%, respectively, following treatment with 200 µg/mL CPE for 24 hr. CPE at various concentrations (0-200 µg/mL) markedly decreased AGS cell viability and increased apoptotic cell death dose and time dependently. CPE increased the levels of cleaved caspase-8, -7, -3, and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase in a dose-dependent manner but not cleaved caspase-9. CPE exerted no effects on Bcl-2 and Bax levels. The level of X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein decreased within a narrow range following CPE treatment. The levels of Trail, DR4, and Fas-L increased dose-dependently in CPE-treated AGS cells. These results show that CPE decreases growth and induces apoptosis in AGS gastric cancer cells and that activation of the death receptor pathway contributes to CPE-induced apoptosis in AGS cells. In conclusion, CPE had more of an effect on gastric cancer cells than breast or prostate cancer cells, suggesting that chestnuts would have a positive effect against gastric cancer.

  4. Macrophages overexpressing Aire induce CD4+Foxp3+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jitong; Fu, Haiying; Wu, Jing; Zhu, Wufei; Li, Yi; Yang, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Aire plays an important role in central immune tolerance by regulating the transcription of thousands of genes. However, the role of Aire in the peripheral immune system is poorly understood. Regulatory T (Treg) cells are considered essential for the maintenance of peripheral tolerance, but the effect of Aire on Treg cells in the peripheral immune system is currently unknown. In this study, we investigated the effects of macrophages overexpressing Aire on CD4+Foxp3+ Treg cells by co-culturing Aire-overexpressing RAW264.7 cells or their supernatant with splenocytes. The results show that macrophages overexpressing Aire enhanced the expression of Foxp3 mRNA and induced different subsets of Treg cells in splenocytes through cell-cell contact or a co-culture supernatants. TGF-β is a key molecule in the increases of CD4+CD45RA+Foxp3hi T cell and activating Treg (aTreg) levels observed following cell‑supernatant co-culturing. Subsets of Treg cells were induced by Aire-overexpressing macrophages, and the manipulation of Treg cells by the targeting of Aire may provide a method for the treatment of inflammatory or autoimmune diseases.

  5. Cellular senescence determines endothelial cell damage induced by uremia.

    PubMed

    Carracedo, Julia; Buendía, Paula; Merino, Ana; Soriano, Sagrario; Esquivias, Elvira; Martín-Malo, Alejandro; Aljama, Pedro; Ramírez, Rafael

    2013-08-01

    Renal dysfunction is closely associated with endothelial damage leading to cardiovascular disease. However, the extent to which endothelial damage induced by uremia is modulated by aging is poorly known. Aging can render endothelial cells more susceptible to apoptosis through an oxidative stress-dependent pathway. We examined whether senescence-associated to oxidative stress determines the injury induced by the uremia in endothelial cells. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) was incubated with human uremic serum and, in the animal model, endothelial cells were obtained from aortas of uremic and no uremic rats. Vitamin C was used to prevent oxidative stress. Senescence, assessed by telomere length and enzyme-betagalactosidase (β-gal), reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitochondrial depolarization (JC-1 probe), caspase 3, and apoptosis were determined by flow cytometry. NF-κB activity was determined by Western blot. Uremic serum increased ROS and NF-κB in young and aging HUVEC. However only in aging cells, uremic serum induced apoptosis (vs young HUVEC, p<0.01). The endothelial damage induced by uremia seems to be related with the increased oxidative stress, since in both HUVEC and in the experimental model of renal disease in rats, vitamin C prevents endothelial apoptosis. However, vitamin C did not decrease the oxidative stress associated to senescence. These results showed that as compared with young cells, senescent cells have high sensitivity to damage associated to the oxidative stress induced by the uremia. Consequently, protecting senescent endothelial cells from increased oxidative stress might be an effective therapeutic approach in the treatment of vascular disorders in chronic kidney diseases. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Dendroaspis natriuretic peptide induces the apoptosis of cardiac muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Ha, Ki-Chan; Chae, Han-Jung; Piao, Cheng-Shi; Kim, Suhn-Hee; Kim, Hyung-Ryong; Chae, Soo-Wan

    2005-01-01

    Early heart failure is characterized by elevated plasma Dendroaspis natriuretic peptide-like immunoreactivity (DNP-LI). However, the direct effects of DNP on heart or the heart-associated cell system are not well known. Therefore, we investigated whether DNP induces the apoptosis of H9c2 cardiac muscle cells. H9c2 cardiac muscle cells and rat neonatal cardiomyocytes were treated with various concentrations of DNP. Cell viability and nuclear morphology change were determined by trypan blue staining and Hoechst 33258 staining, respectively. Caspase-3-like activity was measured using specific fluorogenic substrates. Pro-and antiapoptotic proteins were assayed by Western blotting. DNP induced the apoptosis of H9c2 cardiac muscle cells in a dose-dependent manner. Maximum effects occurred at 100 nM concentration of DNP, with a 7-8-fold increase in apoptotic cells, to reach a maximum apoptotic index of 17%. We also identified that H9c2 cardiac muscle cells expressed Natriuretic peptide reactor -A and -B, which respond to DNP to generate cGMP. The treatment with DNP also markedly reduced levels of Bcl-2, inhibitor of apoptosis protein-1, and inhibitor of apoptosis protein-2 and increased the level of Bax and cytochrome c release into cytoplasm and subsequent caspase-3 activation, which co-occurred with increased apoptosis. DNP-induced apoptosis was mediated by cyclic GMP, and this effect was mimicked by dibutylyl-cGMP (30 microM), a membrane permeable analog of cGMP. Furthermore, DNP-induced apoptosis was observed in rat neonatal cardiomyocytes. These results suggest that DNP induces the apoptosis of H9c2 cardiac muscle cells and of cardiomyocytes via cGMP and demonstrate that the operative mechanism includes the regulation of Bcl-2 family proteins.

  7. Novel Glycopyrrolidine Compounds Inhibit Human Cancer Cell Proliferation and Induce Apoptotic Mode of Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Bhoopalan, Hemadev; Tentu, Shilpa; R, Prasana; S, Purushothaman; Venu, Akkanapally; Raghunathan, Ragavachary; Pakala, Suresh Babu; Rayala, Suresh Kumar; Venkatraman, Ganesh

    2017-04-21

    Spirocyclic compounds, present in a number of bioactive natural alkaloids, are cyclic systems containing one carbon atom common to two rings. A highly regioselective glycopyrrolidine compound library was synthesized using 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition method, and its efficacy was tested on cell lines representing most commonly occurring cancers and the molecular mechanism of cell death deciphered. Results showed that among the 16 compounds screened, RPRR210 showed the most potent anticancer activity and induced cell cycle arrest, inhibited migration, caused cell death by inducing apoptosis through the intrinsic pathway, and were nontoxic to normal cells.

  8. Prazosin induces p53-mediated autophagic cell death in H9C2 cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi-Fan; Wu, Chau-Chung; Chen, Wen-Pin; Chen, Yuh-Lien; Su, Ming-Jai

    2011-08-01

    Prazosin, a quinazoline-based α(1)-adrenoceptor antagonist, is known to induce cell death, and this effect is independent of its α-blockade activity. However, the detailed molecular mechanisms involved are still not fully understood. In this study, we found that prazosin, but not doxazosin, could induce patterns of autophagy in H9C2 cells, including intracellular vacuole formation, microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3) conversion, and acidic vesicular organelle (AVO) augmentation. Western blot analysis of phosphorylated proteins showed that exposure to prazosin increased the levels of phospho-p53 and phospho-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) but dramatically decreased the levels of phospho-mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), phospho-protein kinase B (Akt), and phospho-ribosomal protein S6 kinase (p70S6K). Furthermore, although pretreatments with the pharmacological autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine and the p53 inhibitor pifithrin-α suppressed prazosin-induced AVO formation, they did not reverse prazosin-induced decline in cell viability but enhanced prazosin-induced caspase-3 activation. From these results we suggest that prazosin induces autophagic cell death via a p53-mediated mechanism. When the autophagy pathway was inhibited, prazosin still induced programmed cell death, at least in part through apoptotic caspase-3 cascade enhancement. Thus, our results indicate a potential new target in prazosin-induced cell death.

  9. Photo-Induced Effect on Bacterial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Batanouny, M. H.; Amin, Rehab M.; Naga, M. I.; Ibrahim, M. K.

    2010-04-01

    Bacterial resistance against antibiotics is an increasing problem in medicine. This stimulates study of other bactericidal regimens, one of which is photodynamic therapy (PDT), which involves the killing of bacterial species by low power laser light (LLL) in the presence of photosensitizing agent. It has already been shown that, various gram- negative and gram-positive bacteria can be killed by photodynamic therapy in vitro, using exogenous sensitizers. The mechanisms of laser action on bacteria are not adequately understood. Here, PDT on H. pylori, as an example of gram negative bacteria was studied. The ultra structure changes of the organism after PDT were examined under electron microscope. Neither Irradiation with laser without sensitizer nor sensitizing without laser has any lethal effect on bacterial cells. However, the successful lethal photosensitization was achieved by applying certain laser dose with the corresponding concentration of the photosensitizer. On the other hand, PDT has no significant effect on the genomic DNA of the cells.

  10. Simvastatin suppresses breast cancer cell proliferation induced by senescent cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Su; Uppal, Harpreet; Demaria, Marco; Desprez, Pierre-Yves; Campisi, Judith; Kapahi, Pankaj

    2015-01-01

    Cellular senescence suppresses cancer by preventing the proliferation of damaged cells, but senescent cells can also promote cancer though the pro-inflammatory senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP). Simvastatin, an HMG-coA reductase inhibitor, is known to attenuate inflammation and prevent certain cancers. Here, we show that simvastatin decreases the SASP of senescent human fibroblasts by inhibiting protein prenylation, without affecting the senescent growth arrest. The Rho family GTPases Rac1 and Cdc42 were activated in senescent cells, and simvastatin reduced both activities. Further, geranylgeranyl transferase, Rac1 or Cdc42 depletion reduced IL-6 secretion by senescent cells. We also show that simvastatin mitigates the effects of senescent conditioned media on breast cancer cell proliferation and endocrine resistance. Our findings identify a novel activity of simvastatin and mechanism of SASP regulation. They also suggest that senescent cells, which accumulate after radio/chemo therapy, promote endocrine resistance in breast cancer and that simvastatin might suppress this resistance. PMID:26658759

  11. Derivation of Induced Trophoblast Cell Lines in Cattle by Doxycycline-Inducible piggyBac Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Masafumi; Tsukiyama, Tomoyuki; Kimura, Koji; Matsuyama, Shuichi; Minami, Naojiro; Yamada, Masayasu; Imai, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Trophectoderm lineage specification is one of the earliest differentiation events in mammalian development. The trophoblast lineage, which is derived from the trophectoderm, mediates implantation and placental formation. However, the processes involved in trophoblastic differentiation and placental formation in cattle remain unclear due to interspecies differences when compared with other model systems and the small repertoire of available trophoblast cell lines. Here, we describe the generation of trophoblast cell lines (biTBCs) from bovine amnion-derived cells (bADCs) using an induced pluripotent stem cell technique. bADCs were introduced with piggyBac vectors containing doxycycline (Dox)-inducible transcription factors (Oct3⁄4(POU5F1), Sox2, Klf4, and c-Myc). Colonies that appeared showed a flattened epithelial-like morphology similar to cobblestones, had a more definite cell boundary between cells, and frequently formed balloon-like spheroids similar to trophoblastic vesicles (TVs). biTBCs were propagated for over 60 passages and expressed trophoblast-related (CDX2, ELF5, ERRβ, and IFN-τ) and pluripotency-related genes (endogenous OCT3/4, SOX2, KLF4, and c-MYC). Furthermore, when biTBCs were induced to differentiate by removing Dox from culture, they formed binucleate cells and began to express pregnancy-related genes (PL, PRP1, and PAG1). This is the first report demonstrating that the induction of pluripotency in bovine amniotic cells allows the generation of trophoblastic cell lines that possess trophoblast stem cell-like characteristics and have the potential to differentiate into the extra-embryonic cell lineage. These cell lines can be a new cell source as a model for studying trophoblast cell lineages and implantation processes in cattle. PMID:27907214

  12. Fluorescence lifetime imaging of induced pluripotent stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchugonova, Aisada; Batista, Ana; König, Karsten

    2014-02-01

    The multiphoton FLIM tomograph MPTflex with its flexible scan head, articulated arm, and the tunable femtosecond laser source was employed to study cell monolayers and 3D cell clusters. FLIM was performed with 250 ps temporal resolution and submicron special resolution using time-correlated single photon counting. The autofluorescence based on NAD(P)H and flavins/flavoproteins has been measured in mouse embryonic fibroblasts, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS cells) originated from mouse embryonic fibroblasts and non-proliferative mouse embryonic fibroblasts.

  13. Black cohosh inhibits 17β-estradiol-induced cell proliferation of endometrial adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Park, So Yun; Kim, Hee Ja; Lee, Sa Ra; Choi, Youn-Hee; Jeong, Kyungah; Chung, Hyewon

    2016-10-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effect of black cohosh (BC) extract on the proliferation and apoptosis of Ishikawa cells. Ishikawa human endometrial adenocarcinoma cells were treated with or without BC (1, 5, 10 and 25 μM) and cell proliferation and cytotoxicity were measured by CCK-8 assays and flow cytometry analysis. Additionally, Ishikawa cells were treated with 17β-estradiol (E2), E2 + progesterone and E2 + BC (5 and 10 μM) and the effect of BC and progesterone on E2-induced cell proliferation was analyzed. BC decreased the proliferation of Ishikawa cells at a dose-dependent rate compared with the control group (p < 0.05). The proliferation of Ishikawa cells increased in the presence of E2, whereas the subsequent addition of progesterone or BC decreased proliferation to the level of the control group (p < 0.05). The inhibitory effect of BC on E2-induced cell proliferation was greater than the inhibitory effect of progesterone. In conclusion, BC induces apoptosis in Ishikawa cells and suppresses E2-induced cell proliferation in Ishikawa cells. BC could be considered a candidate co-treatment agent of estrogen-dependent tumors, especially those involving endometrial cells.

  14. Gingerol sensitizes TRAIL-induced apoptotic cell death of glioblastoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Dae-Hee; Kim, Dong-Wook; Jung, Chang-Hwa; Lee, Yong J.; Park, Daeho

    2014-09-15

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most lethal and aggressive astrocytoma of primary brain tumors in adults. Although there are many clinical trials to induce the cell death of glioblastoma cells, most glioblastoma cells have been reported to be resistant to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Here, we showed that gingerol as a major component of ginger can induce TRAIL-mediated apoptosis of glioblastoma. Gingerol increased death receptor (DR) 5 levels in a p53-dependent manner. Furthermore, gingerol decreased the expression level of anti-apoptotic proteins (survivin, c-FLIP, Bcl-2, and XIAP) and increased pro-apoptotic protein, Bax and truncate Bid, by generating reactive oxygen species (ROS). We also found that the sensitizing effects of gingerol in TRAIL-induced cell death were blocked by scavenging ROS or overexpressing anti-apoptotic protein (Bcl-2). Therefore, we showed the functions of gingerol as a sensitizing agent to induce cell death of TRAIL-resistant glioblastoma cells. This study gives rise to the possibility of applying gingerol as an anti-tumor agent that can be used for the purpose of combination treatment with TRAIL in TRAIL-resistant glioblastoma tumor therapy. - Highlights: • Most GBM cells have been reported to be resistant to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. • Gingerol enhances the expression level of anti-apoptotic proteins by ROS. • Gingerol enhances TRAIL-induced apoptosis through actions on the ROS–Bcl2 pathway.

  15. Role of cells in freezing-induced cell-fluid-matrix interactions within engineered tissues.

    PubMed

    Seawright, Angela; Ozcelikkale, Altug; Dutton, Craig; Han, Bumsoo

    2013-09-01

    During cryopreservation, ice forms in the extracellular space resulting in freezing-induced deformation of the tissue, which can be detrimental to the extracellular matrix (ECM) microstructure. Meanwhile, cells dehydrate through an osmotically driven process as the intracellular water is transported to the extracellular space, increasing the volume of fluid for freezing. Therefore, this study examines the effects of cellular presence on tissue deformation and investigates the significance of intracellular water transport and cell-ECM interactions in freezing-induced cell-fluid-matrix interactions. Freezing-induced deformation characteristics were examined through cell image deformetry (CID) measurements of collagenous engineered tissues embedded with different concentrations of MCF7 breast cancer cells versus microspheres as their osmotically inactive counterparts. Additionally, the development of a biophysical model relates the freezing-induced expansion of the tissue due to the cellular water transport and the extracellular freezing thermodynamics for further verification. The magnitude of the freezing-induced dilatation was found to be not affected by the cellular water transport for the cell concentrations considered; however, the deformation patterns for different cell concentrations were different suggesting that cell-matrix interactions may have an effect. It was, therefore, determined that intracellular water transport during freezing was insignificant at the current experimental cell concentrations; however, it may be significant at concentrations similar to native tissue. Finally, the cell-matrix interactions provided mechanical support on the ECM to minimize the expansion regions in the tissues during freezing.

  16. Astaxanthin Inhibits Proliferation and Induces Apoptosis and Cell Cycle Arrest of Mice H22 Hepatoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Yiye; Ni, Yanbo; Yang, Jing; Lin, Xutao; Li, Jun; Zhang, Lixia

    2016-01-01

    Background It is widely recognized that astaxanthin (ASX), a member of the carotenoid family, has strong biological activities including antioxidant, anti-inflammation, and immune-modulation activities. Previous studies have confirmed that ASX can effectively inhibit hepatoma cells in vitro. Material/Methods MTT was used to assay proliferation of mice H22 cells, and flow cytometry was used to determine apoptosis and cell cycle arrest of H22 cells in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, anti-tumor activity of ASX was observed in mice. Results ASX inhibited the proliferation of H22 cells, promoted cell necrosis, and induced cell cycle arrest in G2 phase in vitro and in vivo. Conclusions This study indicated that ASX can inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in mice H22 hepatoma cells in vitro and in vivo. PMID:27333866

  17. Human induced pluripotent stem cells: A disruptive innovation.

    PubMed

    De Vos, J; Bouckenheimer, J; Sansac, C; Lemaître, J-M; Assou, S

    2016-01-01

    This year (2016) will mark the 10th anniversary of the discovery of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). The finding that the transient expression of four transcription factors can radically remodel the epigenome, transcriptome and metabolome of differentiated cells and reprogram them into pluripotent stem cells has been a major and groundbreaking technological innovation. In this review, we discuss the major applications of this technology that we have grouped in nine categories: a model to study cell fate control; a model to study pluripotency; a model to study human development; a model to study human tissue and organ physiology; a model to study genetic diseases in a dish; a tool for cell rejuvenation; a source of cells for drug screening; a source of cells for regenerative medicine; a tool for the production of human organs in animals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Taurine prevents ultraviolet B induced apoptosis in retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Dayang, Wu; Dongbo, Pang

    2017-06-07

    Compatible osmolytes accumulation is an active resistance response in retina under ultraviolet radiation and hypertonicity conditions. The purpose of this research is to investigate the protective role of taurine on retina under ultraviolet B radiation. Osmolytes transporters was measured by quantitative realtime PCR. Osmolytes uptake was estimated by radioimmunoassay. Cell viability was caculated by MTT assay. Cell apoptosis was measured by flow cytometry analysis. Hypertonicity accelerated osmolytes uptake into retinal ganglion cells including taurine, betaine and myoinositol. Ultraviolet B radiation increased osmolytes transporter expression and osmolytes uptake. In addition, osmolyte taurine remarkably prevented ultraviolet B radiation induced cell apoptosis in retinal ganglion cells. The effect of compatible osmolyte taurine on cell survival rate may play an important role in cell resistance and adaption to UVB exposure.

  19. Multiple sclerosis: getting personal with induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Di Ruscio, A; Patti, F; Welner, R S; Tenen, D G; Amabile, G

    2015-07-09

    Human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells can be derived from lineage-restricted cells and represent an important tool to develop novel patient-specific cell therapies and research models for inherited and acquired diseases. Recently, patient-derived iPS cells, containing donor genetic background, have offered a breakthrough approach to study human genetics of neurodegenerative diseases. By offering an unlimited source of patient-specific disease-relevant cells, iPS cells hold great promise for understanding disease mechanisms, identifying molecular targets and developing phenotypic screens for drug discovery. This review will discuss the potential impact of using iPS cell-derived models in multiple sclerosis (MS) research and highlight some of the current challenges and prospective for generating novel therapeutic treatments for MS patients.

  20. Induced pluripotent stem cells in the study of neurological diseases

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Five years after their initial derivation from mouse somatic cells, induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are an important tool for the study of neurological diseases. By offering an unlimited source of patient-specific disease-relevant neuronal and glial cells, iPS cell-based disease models hold enormous promise for identification of disease mechanisms, discovery of molecular targets and development of phenotypic screens for drug discovery. The present review focuses on the recent advancements in modeling neurological disorders, including the demonstration of disease-specific phenotypes in iPS cell-derived neurons generated from patients with spinal muscular atrophy, familial dysautonomia, Rett syndrome, schizophrenia and Parkinson disease. The ability of this approach to detect treatment effects from known therapeutic compounds has also been demonstrated, providing proof of principle for the use of iPS cell-derived cells in drug discovery. PMID:21936964

  1. Multiple sclerosis: getting personal with induced pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Di Ruscio, A; Patti, F; Welner, R S; Tenen, D G; Amabile, G

    2015-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells can be derived from lineage-restricted cells and represent an important tool to develop novel patient-specific cell therapies and research models for inherited and acquired diseases. Recently, patient-derived iPS cells, containing donor genetic background, have offered a breakthrough approach to study human genetics of neurodegenerative diseases. By offering an unlimited source of patient-specific disease-relevant cells, iPS cells hold great promise for understanding disease mechanisms, identifying molecular targets and developing phenotypic screens for drug discovery. This review will discuss the potential impact of using iPS cell-derived models in multiple sclerosis (MS) research and highlight some of the current challenges and prospective for generating novel therapeutic treatments for MS patients. PMID:26158512

  2. Apoptosis induced by propolis in human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Choi, Y H; Lee, W Y; Nam, S Y; Choi, K C; Park, Y E

    1999-07-01

    Propolis has been reported to exhibit a wide spectrum of activities including antibiotic, antiviral, anti-inflammatory, immunostimulatory and tumor carcinostatic properties. We showed propolis induced apoptosis in a human hepatoma cell line (SNU449) by FITC-Annexin V/PI staining. We also compared the apoptosis inducing effect between Korean and Commercial (Sigma # p-1010) propolis. There was no difference on apoptosis between them.

  3. Bovine herpesvirus type 1 induces cell death by a cell-type-dependent fashion.

    PubMed

    Geiser, Vicki; Rose, Suzanne; Jones, Clinton

    2008-06-01

    Bovine herpesvirus 1 (BHV-1), a member of the alpha-herpesvirinae sub-family, causes significant losses to the cattle industry. BHV-1 establishes latency in trigeminal ganglionic sensory neurons, but periodically reactivates from latency. Previous studies suggested that infection with BHV-1-induced novel morphological changes in rabbit skin (RS) cells versus bovine kidney cells (MDBK). Consequently, we hypothesized that viral infection led to a novel form of cell death in RS cells compared to MDBK cells. To test this hypothesis, we examined the levels of apoptosis in these cell types following infection with BHV-1. Infection of RS, but not MDBK, cells leads to high levels of apoptosis compared to mock-infected cells. Previous studies indicated that a BHV-1 recombinant virus that does not express the bICP0 protein grows poorly in permissive cells and induces a persistent-like infection. This suggested that bICP0 played an important role in regulating cell death following infection. To test this hypothesis, we compared the levels of apoptosis in cells infected with the bICP0 null mutant versus viral strains that expressed bICP0. The bICP0 null mutant induces low levels of apoptosis in RS or MDBK cells. When MDBK cells are treated with UV light prior to infection, bICP0 expressing viral strains, but not the bICP0 null mutant, inhibited UV-induced apoptosis. Infection of MDBK cells with the bICP0 null mutant, leads to an accumulation of autophagosomes that are not detected following infection with bICP0 expressing viruses. These studies suggest that the bICP0 null mutant induces autophagy in MDBK cells, and bICP0 protein expression mediates cell-type specific cytotoxicity.

  4. Cell Therapy for Chemically Induced Ovarian Failure in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Terraciano, Paula; Durli, Isabel; Baggio, Melchiani; Kuhl, Cristiana Palma; Laurino, Claudia; Passos, Eduardo; Paz, Ana Helena; Cirne-Lima, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Cell therapy has been linked to an unexplained return of ovarian function and fertility in some cancer survivors. Studies modeling this in mice have shown that cells transplantation generates donor-derived oocytes in chemotherapy-treated recipients. This study was conducted to further clarify the impact of cell transplantation from different sources on female reproductive function after chemotherapy using a preclinical mouse model. Methods. Female mice were administered 7.5 mg/kg cisplatin followed by cell transplantation (one week later) using GFP+ female cell donors. For cell tracking, adipose derived stem cell GFP+ (ADSC), female germline stem cell GFP+/MVH+ (FGSC), or ovary cell suspension GFP+ mice were transplanted into cisplatin-treated wild-type recipients. After 7 or 14 days animals were killed and histological analysis, IHQ for GFP cells, and ELISA for estradiol were performed. Results. Histological examinations showed that ADSC, ovary cell suspension, and FGSC transplant increase the number of follicles with apparent normal structure in the cells recipient group euthanized on day 7. Cell tracking showed GFP+ samples 7 days after transplant. Conclusion. These data suggest that intraovarian injection of ADSCs and FGSC into mice with chemotherapy-induced ovarian failure diminished the damage caused by cisplatin. PMID:25548574

  5. The role of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α in radiation-induced autophagic cell death in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Rui; Xu, Huiying; Chen, Ge; Zhao, Gang; Gao, Yan; Liu, Xiaodong; Ma, Shumei; Dong, Lihua

    2015-09-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) is a major effector in cell survival response to hypoxia, while the roles of HIF-1α in radiation-induced autophagy are still unclear in breast cancer cells. Human breast cancer carcinoma MCF-7 cells were stably transfected with pSUPER-shRNA against human HIF-1α or a scrambled sequence with no homology to mammalian genes, named as pSUPER-HIF-1α and pSUPER-SC, respectively. Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) assay and colony formation assay were used to detect cell viability, Western blot was used to detect protein expression, monodansylcadaverine (MDC) staining was used to analyze autophagy, and Hoechts/PI staining was used to assess apoptosis. Ionizing radiation (IR) and cobalt chloride (CoCl2) could induce HIF-1α expression and increase the microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (MAPLC3)-II/MAPLC3-I ratio, especially in radiation + CoCl2 group. After the silencing of HIF-1α, the radiosensitivity of MCF-7 cells increased and the autophagy level decreased in response to DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation, but there was no influence on IR-induced apoptosis. HIF-1α silencing also increased the expression of phospho-Akt, mTOR, and P70S6K and activated the mTOR signals significantly. Hypoxia can induce autophagy and also improve the IR-induced autophagy via the suppression of Akt/mTOR/P70S6K pathway, which consequently lead to radioresistance.

  6. Autophagy Protects Against Aminochrome-Induced Cell Death in Substantia Nigra-Derived Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Paris, Irmgard; Muñoz, Patricia; Huenchuguala, Sandro; Couve, Eduardo; Sanders, Laurie H.; Greenamyre, John Timothy; Caviedes, Pablo; Segura-Aguilar, Juan

    2011-01-01

    Aminochrome, the precursor of neuromelanin, has been proposed to be involved in the neurodegeneration neuromelanin-containing dopaminergic neurons in Parkinson’s disease. We aimed to study the mechanism of aminochrome-dependent cell death in a cell line derived from rat substantia nigra. We found that aminochrome (50μM), in the presence of NAD(P)H-quinone oxidoreductase, EC 1.6.99.2 (DT)-diaphorase inhibitor dicoumarol (DIC) (100μM), induces significant cell death (62 ± 3%; p < 0.01), increase in caspase-3 activation (p < 0.001), release of cytochrome C, disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential (p < 0.01), damage of mitochondrial DNA, damage of mitochondria determined with transmission electron microscopy, a dramatic morphological change characterized as cell shrinkage, and significant increase in number of autophagic vacuoles. To determine the role of autophagy on aminochrome-induced cell death, we incubated the cells in the presence of vinblastine and rapamycin. Interestingly, 10μM vinblastine induces a 5.9-fold (p < 0.001) and twofold (p < 0.01) significant increase in cell death when the cells were incubated with 30μM aminochrome in the absence and presence of DIC, respectively, whereas 10μM rapamycin preincubated 24 h before addition of 50μM aminochrome in the absence and the presence of 100μM DIC induces a significant decrease (p < 0.001) in cell death. In conclusion, autophagy seems to be an important protective mechanism against two different aminochrome-induced cell deaths that initially showed apoptotic features. The cell death induced by aminochrome when DT-diaphorase is inhibited requires activation of mitochondrial pathway, whereas the cell death induced by aminochrome alone requires inhibition of autophagy-dependent degrading of damaged organelles and recycling through lysosomes. PMID:21427056

  7. IL-33 induces both regulatory B cells and regulatory T cells in dextran sulfate sodium-induced colitis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Junfeng; Xu, Ying; Zhu, Chunyu; Zhao, Jian; Meng, Xinrui; Chen, Siyao; Wang, Tianqi; Li, Xue; Zhang, Li; Lu, Changlong; Liu, Hongsheng; Sun, Xun

    2017-05-01

    Interleukin (IL)-33 is a member of the IL-1 family. Serum levels of IL-33 are increased in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), suggesting that IL-33 is involved in the pathogenesis of IBD, although its role is not clear. In this study, we investigated the role of IL-33 in the regulation of T-helper (Th) cell and B cell responses in mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) in mice with dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis. Here, we showed that IL-33-treated mice were susceptible to DSS-induced colitis as compared with PBS-treated mice. The production of spontaneous inflammatory cytokines production by macrophages or dendritic cells (DC) in MLN significantly increased, and the responses of Th2, regulatory T cells (Treg) and regulatory B cells (Breg) were markedly upregulated, while Th1 responses were significantly downregulated in MLN of IL-33-treated mice with DSS-induced colitis. Our results demonstrate that IL-33 contributes to the pathogenesis of DSS-induced colitis in mice by promoting Th2 responses, but suppressing Th1 responses, in MLN. Moreover, IL-33 treatment increased Breg and Treg responses in MLN in mice with DSS-induced colitis. Therefore, modulation of IL-33/ST2 signaling is implicated as a novel biological therapy for inflammatory diseases associated with Th1 responses.

  8. Polar/apolar compounds induce leukemia cell differentiation by modulating cell-surface potential.

    PubMed Central

    Arcangeli, A; Carlà, M; Del Bene, M R; Becchetti, A; Wanke, E; Olivotto, M

    1993-01-01

    The mechanism of action of polar/apolar inducers of cell differentiation, such as dimethyl sulfoxide and hexamethylene-bisacetamide, is still obscure. In this paper evidence is provided that their effects on murine erythroleukemia cells are modulated by various extracellular cations as a precise function of the cation effects on membrane surface potential. The interfacial effects of the inducers were directly measured on the charged electrode, showing that both dimethyl sulfoxide and hexamethylene-bisacetamide, at the effective concentrations for cell differentiation and within the physiological range of charge density, adsorb at the charged surface and produce a potential shift. A linear correlation was found between this shift and the inducer effects on cell differentiation. Besides offering a different interpretation of the mechanism of action of the inducers, these findings indicate that surface potential has a signaling function. They may also be relevant to cancer treatments based on tumor-cell commitment to terminal differentiation. Images Fig. 1 PMID:8516337

  9. Autophagy Regulates Colistin-Induced Apoptosis in PC-12 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ling; Zhao, Yonghao; Ding, Wenjian; Jiang, Guozheng; Lu, Ziyin; Li, Li; Wang, Jinli

    2015-01-01

    Colistin is a cyclic cationic polypeptide antibiotic with activity against multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria. Our recent study demonstrated that colistin induces apoptosis in primary chick cortex neurons and PC-12 cells. Although apoptosis and autophagy have different impacts on cell fate, there is a complex interaction between them. Autophagy plays an important role as a homeostasis regulator by removing excessive or unnecessary proteins and damaged organelles. The aim of the present study was to investigate the modulation of autophagy and apoptosis regulation in PC-12 cells in response to colistin treatment. PC-12 cells were exposed to colistin (125 to 250 μg/ml), and autophagy was detected by visualization of monodansylcadaverine (MDC)-labeled vacuoles, LC3 (microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3) immunofluorescence microscopic examination, and Western blotting. Apoptosis was measured by flow cytometry, Hoechst 33258 staining, and Western blotting. Autophagosomes were observed after treatment with colistin for 12 h, and the levels of LC3-II gene expression were determined; observation and protein levels both indicated that colistin induced a high level of autophagy. Colistin treatment also led to apoptosis in PC-12 cells, and the level of caspase-3 expression increased over the 24-h period. Pretreatment of cells with 3-methyladenine (3-MA) increased colistin toxicity in PC-12 cells remarkably. However, rapamycin treatment significantly increased the expression levels of LC3-II and beclin 1 and decreased the rate of apoptosis of PC-12 cells. Our results demonstrate that colistin induced autophagy and apoptosis in PC-12 cells and that the latter was affected by the regulation of autophagy. It is very likely that autophagy plays a protective role in the reduction of colistin-induced cytotoxicity in neurons. PMID:25645826

  10. Fucoidan inhibits angiogenesis induced by multiple myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fen; Luo, Guoping; Xiao, Qing; Chen, Liping; Luo, Xiaohua; Lv, Jinglong; Chen, Lixue

    2016-10-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) remains an incurable hematological neoplasms. Our previous studies showed that Fucoidan possessed anti-myeloma effect by inducing apoptosis and inhibiting invasion of myeloma cells. In this study, we evaluated the effect of Fucoidan on angiogenesis induced by human myeloma cells and elucidated its possible mechanisms. Multiple myeloma cells were treated with Fucoidan at different concentrations, then the conditioned medium (CM) was collected. The levels of VEGF in the CM were tested by ELISA. The results showed that Fucoidan significantly decreased VEGF secretion by RPMI-8226 and U266 cells. The tube formation assay and migration test on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were used to examine the effect of Fucoidan on angiogenesis induced by human myeloma cells. The results showed that Fucoidan decreased HUVECs formed tube structures and inhibited HUVECs migration, and suppressed the angiogenic ability of multiple myeloma RPMI-8226 and U266 cells in a dose-dependent manner. The study also showed that Fucoidan downregulated the expression of several kinds of proteins, which may be correlated with the reduction of angiogenesis induced by myeloma cells. Moreover, results were compared from normoxic and hypoxic conditions, they showed that Fucoidan had anti-angiogenic activity. Furthermore, in a multiple myeloma xenograft mouse model, it indicated that Fucoidan negatively affected tumor growth and angiogenesis in vivo. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that Fucoidan was able to interfere with angiogenesis of multiple myeloma cells both in vitro and in vivo and may have a substantial potential in the treatment of MM.

  11. Signaling events in pathogen-induced macrophage foam cell formation.

    PubMed

    Shaik-Dasthagirisaheb, Yazdani B; Mekasha, Samrawit; He, Xianbao; Gibson, Frank C; Ingalls, Robin R

    2016-08-01

    Macrophage foam cell formation is a key event in atherosclerosis. Several triggers induce low-density lipoprotein (LDL) uptake by macrophages to create foam cells, including infections with Porphyromonas gingivalis and Chlamydia pneumoniae, two pathogens that have been linked to atherosclerosis. While gene regulation during foam cell formation has been examined, comparative investigations to identify shared and specific pathogen-elicited molecular events relevant to foam cell formation are not well documented. We infected mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages with P. gingivalis or C. pneumoniae in the presence of LDL to induce foam cell formation, and examined gene expression using an atherosclerosis pathway targeted plate array. We found over 30 genes were significantly induced in response to both pathogens, including PPAR family members that are broadly important in atherosclerosis and matrix remodeling genes that may play a role in plaque development and stability. Six genes mainly involved in lipid transport were significantly downregulated. The response overall was remarkably similar and few genes were regulated in a pathogen-specific manner. Despite very divergent lifestyles, P. gingivalis and C. pneumoniae activate similar gene expression profiles during foam cell formation that may ultimately serve as targets for modulating infection-elicited foam cell burden, and progression of atherosclerosis.

  12. The antiangiogenic agent Neovastat (AE-941) induces endothelial cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Boivin, Dominique; Gendron, Sébastien; Beaulieu, Edith; Gingras, Denis; Béliveau, Richard

    2002-08-01

    Neovastat (AE-941), a naturally occurring multifunctional antiangiogenic agent, has been shown to inhibit key components of the angiogenic process, including matrix metalloproteinases and vascular endothelial growth factor-mediated signaling events. In this study, we report the presence of a proapoptotic activity within this compound. Neovastat treatment of bovine aortic endothelial cells caused cell death with characteristics of apoptosis, including chromatin condensation and DNA fragmentation. Neovastat markedly induced caspase-3, caspase-8, and caspase-9 activities, at similar levels to those measured in cells treated with tumor necrosis factor-alpha. Activation of caspases by Neovastat appears to be essential for its proapoptotic effects because all apoptotic features were blocked by zVAD-fmk, a broad-spectrum caspase inhibitor. The activation of caspases was correlated with the cleavage of the nuclear substrate poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, and by a concomitant release of cytochrome c from mitochondria to the cytoplasm. Neovastat-induced apoptosis appears to be specific to endothelial cells because treatment of other cell types such as U-87, COS-7, NIH-3T3, and SW1353 did not result in increased caspase-3 activity. These results demonstrate that Neovastat contains a proapoptotic factor that specifically induces the activation of caspases in endothelial cells and the resulting apoptosis of these cells.

  13. Apoptotic pathway induced by noscapine in human myelogenous leukemic cells.

    PubMed

    Heidari, Nastaran; Goliaei, Bahram; Moghaddam, Parvaneh Rahimi; Rahbar-Roshandel, Nahid; Mahmoudian, Massoud

    2007-11-01

    It has been shown that noscapine, an opium-derived phthalideisoquinoline alkaloid that is currently being used as an oral antitussive drug, induces apoptosis in myeloid leukemia cells. The molecular mechanism responsible for the anticancer effects of noscapine is poorly understood. In the current study, the apoptotic effects of noscapine on two myeloid cell lines, apoptosis-proficient HL60 cells and apoptosis-resistant K562 cells, were analyzed. An increase in the activity of caspase-2, -3, -6, -8 and -9, poly(ADP ribose) polymerase cleavage, detection of phosphatidylserine on the outer layer of the cell membrane, nucleation of chromatin, and DNA fragmentation suggested the induction of apoptosis. Noscapine increased the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio with a significant decrease of Bcl-2 expression accompanied with Bcl-2 phosphorylation. Using an inhibitory approach, the activation of the caspase cascade involved in the noscapine-induced apoptosis was analyzed. We observed no inhibitory effect of the caspase-8 inhibitor on caspase-9 activity. In view of these results and taking into consideration that K562 cells are Fas-null, we suggested that caspase-8 is activated in a Fas-independent manner downstream of caspase-9. In conclusion, noscapine can induce apoptosis in both apoptosis-proficient and apoptosis-resistant leukemic cells, and it can be a novel candidate in the treatment of hematological malignancies.

  14. Aging Converts Innate B1a Cells into Potent CD8+ T Cell Inducers

    PubMed Central

    Lee-Chang, Catalina; Bodogai, Monica; Moritoh, Kanako; Chen, Xin; Wersto, Robert; Sen, Ranjan; Young, Howard A.; Croft, Michael; Ferrucci, Luigi; Biragyn, Arya

    2016-01-01

    B-cell dysregulation in aging is thought to mostly occur in conventional B2 cells without affecting innate B1 cells. Elderly humans and mice also accumulate 4-1BBL+ MHC class-IHi CD86Hi B cells of unknown origin. Here we report that these cells, termed 4BL cells, are activated murine and possibly human B1a cells. The activation is mediated by aging human monocytes and murine peritoneal macrophages. The 4BL cells induce expression of 4-1BBL and IFNγR1 on B1a cells resulting in subsequent up regulation of membrane TNFα (mTNFα) and CD86. As a result, B1a cells induce expression of granzyme B in CD8+T cells by targeting TNFR2 via mTNFα while providing co-stimulation with CD86. Thus, for the first time, these results indicate that aging affects the function of B1a cells. Upon aging, these cells lose their tumor-supporting activity and become inducers of potentially antitumor and autoimmune CD8+T cells. PMID:26983789

  15. Inducible immortality in hTERT-human mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Piper, Samantha L; Wang, Miqi; Yamamoto, Akira; Malek, Farbod; Luu, Andrew; Kuo, Alfred C; Kim, Hubert T

    2012-12-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) are attractive candidates for tissue engineering and cell-based therapy because of their multipotentiality and availability in adult donors. However, in vitro expansion and differentiation of these cells is limited by replicative senescence. The proliferative capacity of hMSCs can be enhanced by ectopic expression of telomerase, allowing for long-term culture. However, hMSCs with constitutive telomerase expression demonstrate unregulated growth and even tumor formation. To address this problem, we used an inducible Tet-On gene expression system to create hMSCs in which ectopic telomerase expression can be induced selectively by the addition of doxycycline (i-hTERT hMSCs). i-hTERT hMSCs have inducible hTERT expression and telomerase activity, and are able to proliferate significantly longer than wild type hMSCs when hTERT expression is induced. They stop proliferating when hTERT expression is turned off and can be rescued when expression is re-induced. They retain multipotentiality in vitro even at an advanced age. We also used a selective inhibitor of telomere elongation to show that the mechanism driving immortalization of hMSCs by hTERT is dependent upon maintenance of telomere length. Thanks to their extended lifespan, preserved multipotentiality and controlled growth, i-hTERT hMSCs may prove to be a useful tool for the development and testing of novel stem cell therapies.

  16. ATF-2 regulates lipopolysaccharide-induced transcription in macrophage cells.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Noriyuki; Maekawa, Toshio; Shinagawa, Toshie; Ishii, Shunsuke

    2009-07-17

    The transcription factor ATF-2, a member of the ATF/CREB family, is a target of p38 that are involved in stress-induced apoptosis and in Toll-like receptor (TLR)-mediated signaling. Phosphorylation of ATF-2 at Thr-71 was enhanced by treating of RAW264.7 macrophage cells with either LPS, MALP-2, or CpG-ODN. LPS treatment enhanced the trans-activation capacity of ATF-2. Among multiple LPS-induced genes, the LPS-induced expression of Socs-3 was significantly reduced by the treatment of RAW264.7 cells with an Atf-2 siRNA. Transcription from the Socs-3 promoter was synergistically stimulated by ATF-2 and LPS, whereas it was suppressed by Atf-2 siRNA. Histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1) interacted with ATF-2 after LPS treatment, but not before treatment. Treatment of RAW264.7 cells with trichostatin A, an inhibitor of HDAC, suppressed the LPS-induced Socs-3 expression, suggesting that HDAC1 positively regulates the LPS-induced transcription of Socs-3. Thus, ATF-2 plays an important role in TLR-mediated transcriptional control in macrophage cells.

  17. Statins and Voriconazole Induce Programmed Cell Death in Acanthamoeba castellanii

    PubMed Central

    López-Arencibia, Atteneri; Sifaoui, Ines; Reyes-Batlle, María; Valladares, Basilio; Martínez-Carretero, Enrique; Piñero, José E.; Maciver, Sutherland K.; Lorenzo-Morales, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Members of the genus Acanthamoeba are facultative pathogens of humans, causing a sight-threatening keratitis and a life-threatening encephalitis. In order to treat those infections properly, it is necessary to target the treatment not only to the trophozoite but also to the cyst. Furthermore, it may be advantageous to avoid parasite killing by necrosis, which may induce local inflammation. We must also avoid toxicity of host tissue. Many drugs which target eukaryotes are known to induce programmed cell death (PCD), but this process is poorly characterized in Acanthamoeba. Here, we study the processes of programmed cell death in Acanthamoeba, induced by several drugs, such as statins and voriconazole. We tested atorvastatin, fluvastatin, simvastatin, and voriconazole at the 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) and IC90s that we have previously established. In order to evaluate this phenomenon, we investigated the DNA fragmentation, one of the main characteristics of PCD, with quantitative and qualitative techniques. Also, the changes related to phosphatidylserine exposure on the external cell membrane and cell permeability were studied. Finally, because caspases are key to PCD pathways, caspase activity was evaluated in Acanthamoeba. All the drugs assayed in this study induced PCD in Acanthamoeba. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study where PCD induced by drugs is described quantitatively and qualitatively in Acanthamoeba. PMID:25733513

  18. Upregulation of LYAR induces neuroblastoma cell proliferation and survival.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuting; Atmadibrata, Bernard; Yu, Denise; Wong, Matthew; Liu, Bing; Ho, Nicholas; Ling, Dora; Tee, Andrew E; Wang, Jenny; Mungrue, Imran N; Liu, Pei Y; Liu, Tao

    2017-09-01

    The N-Myc oncoprotein induces neuroblastoma by regulating gene transcription and consequently causing cell proliferation. Paradoxically, N-Myc is well known to induce apoptosis by upregulating pro-apoptosis genes, and it is not clear how N-Myc overexpressing neuroblastoma cells escape N-Myc-mediated apoptosis. The nuclear zinc finger protein LYAR has recently been shown to modulate gene expression by forming a protein complex with the protein arginine methyltransferase PRMT5. Here we showed that N-Myc upregulated LYAR gene expression by binding to its gene promoter. Genome-wide differential gene expression studies revealed that knocking down LYAR considerably upregulated the expression of oxidative stress genes including CHAC1, which depletes intracellular glutathione and induces oxidative stress. Although knocking down LYAR expression with siRNAs induced oxidative stress, neuroblastoma cell growth inhibition and apoptosis, co-treatment with the glutathione supplement N-acetyl-l-cysteine or co-transfection with CHAC1 siRNAs blocked the effect of LYAR siRNAs. Importantly, high levels of LYAR gene expression in human neuroblastoma tissues predicted poor event-free and overall survival in neuroblastoma patients, independent of the best current markers for poor prognosis. Taken together, our data suggest that LYAR induces proliferation and promotes survival of neuroblastoma cells by repressing the expression of oxidative stress genes such as CHAC1 and suppressing oxidative stress, and identify LYAR as a novel co-factor in N-Myc oncogenesis.

  19. Polyploidization induced by acridine orange in mouse osteosarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Kusuzaki, K; Takeshita, H; Murata, H; Gebhardt, M C; Springfield, D S; Mankin, H J; Ashihara, T; Hirasawa, Y

    2000-01-01

    This study was undertaken to clarify the in vitro effect of acridine orange (AO) on the cell kinetics of mouse osteosarcoma cells, as well as the mechanism of cell growth inhibition induced by AO. A mouse osteosarcoma cell line (MOS), established from a radiation-induced mouse osteosarcoma, was cultured under exposure to 0.05, 0.5, 5, and 50 micrograms/ml of AO, either continuously or for 10 minutes. The cell kinetic analysis was performed using the following parameters: tumor cell growth by trypan blue exclusion test, mitotic activity, DNA synthetic activity by BrdU labeling and DNA ploidy by cytofluorometry. The results showed that continuous exposure to 5 and 50 micrograms/ml of AO or 10 minute exposure to 50 micrograms/ml of AO quickly killed the tumor cells within 12 hours, whereas continuous exposure to 0.5 microgram/ml of AO or 10 minute exposure to 5 micrograms/ml of AO gradually inhibited tumor cell growth. Under the latter conditions, mitotic activity was rapidly and completely inhibited within 48 hours but DNA synthetic activity was not completely inhibited even after 96 hours. DNA ploidy analysis demonstrated that most of the tumor cells arrested at the S-G2 phase after 12 hours, followed by G2 phase arrest after 24 hours and progressive DNA synthesis to a higher DNA ploidy class after 48 to 96 hours. We therefore concluded that a high concentration of AO has a strong cytocidal effect due to cytotoxicity whilst a moderate concentration of AO induces progressive and synchronous polyploidization by mitotic inhibition without DNA damage in MOS cells. We presume that this in vitro effect on MOS cells may be caused by protein synthetic inhibition after transfer RNA inactivation caused by AO binding.

  20. Noscapine induces apoptosis in human glioma cells by an apoptosis-inducing factor-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Newcomb, Elizabeth W; Lukyanov, Yevgeniy; Smirnova, Iva; Schnee, Tona; Zagzag, David

    2008-07-01

    Previously, we identified noscapine as a small molecule inhibitor of the hypoxia-inducible factor-1 pathway in hypoxic human glioma cells and human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Noscapine is a nontoxic ingredient in cough medicine currently used in clinical trials for patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma or chronic lymphocytic leukemia to assess antitumor efficacy. Here, we have evaluated the sensitivity of four human glioma cell lines to noscapine-induced apoptosis. Noscapine was a potent inhibitor of proliferation and inducer of apoptosis. Induction of apoptosis was associated with activation of the c-jun N-terminal kinase signaling pathway concomitant with inactivation of the extracellular signal regulated kinase signaling pathway and phosphorylation of the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2. Noscapine-induced apoptosis was associated with the release of mitochondrial proteins apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) and/or cytochrome c. In some glioma cell lines, only AIF release occurred without cytochrome c release or poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage. Knock-down of AIF decreased noscapine-induced apoptosis. Our results suggest the potential importance of noscapine as a novel agent for use in patients with glioblastoma owing to its low toxicity profile and its potent anticancer activity.

  1. Tartrazine-induced chromosomal aberrations in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Patterson, R M; Butler, J S

    1982-08-01

    Tartrazine (FD & C Yellow No.5) has been shown to induce chromosomal aberrations in fibroblast cells of Muntiacus muntjac in vitro. M. muntjac cells were exposed to various concentrations of tartrazine (in the 5-20 micrograms/ml range) and were evaluated for induced chromosomal aberrations after two different periods of culture. Total percentages of chromosomal aberrations were significantly increased above control levels in all experimental groups. The results suggest that further studies are needed to determine the potential mutagenic effects of tartrazine.

  2. The physics of photon induced degradation of perovskite solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Pranav H.; Zhang, Liang; Hossain, Istiaque M.; Abbas, Hisham A.; Kottokkaran, Ranjith; Nehra, Satyapal P.; Dhaka, Mahendra; Noack, Max; Dalal, Vikram L.

    2016-11-01

    Lead-trihalide perovskite solar cells are an important photovoltaic technology. We investigate the effect of light induced degradation on perovskite solar cells. During exposure, the open-circuit voltage (Voc) of the device increases, whereas the short-circuit current (Isc) shows a decrease. The degradation can be completely recovered using thermal annealing in dark. We develop a model based on light induced generation of ions and migration of these ions inside the material to explain the changes in Isc, Voc, capacitance and dark current upon light exposure and post-exposure recovery. There was no change in defect density in the material upon exposure.

  3. Chromomycin A2 Induces Autophagy in Melanoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Guimarães, Larissa Alves; Jimenez, Paula Christine; Sousa, Thiciana da Silva; Freitas, Hozana Patrícia S.; Rocha, Danilo Damasceno; Wilke, Diego Veras; Martín, Jesús; Reyes, Fernando; Pessoa, Otília Deusdênia Loiola; Costa-Lotufo, Letícia Veras

    2014-01-01

    The present study highlights the biological effects of chromomycin A2 toward metastatic melanoma cells in culture. Besides chromomycin A2, chromomycin A3 and demethylchromomycin A2 were also identified from the extract derived from Streptomyces sp., recovered from Paracuru Beach, located in the northeast region of Brazil. The cytotoxic activity of chromomycin A2 was evaluated across a panel of human tumor cell lines, which found IC50 values in the nM-range for exposures of 48 and 72 h. MALME-3M, a metastatic melanoma cell line, showed the highest sensitivity to chromomycin A2 after 48h incubation, and was chosen as a model to investigate this potent cytotoxic effect. Treatment with chromomycin A2 at 30 nM reduced cell proliferation, but had no significant effect upon cell viability. Additionally, chromomycin A2 induced accumulation of cells in G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle, with consequent reduction of S and G2/M and unbalanced expression of cyclins. Chromomycin A2 treated cells depicted several cellular fragments resembling autophagosomes and increased expression of proteins LC3-A and LC3-B. Moreover, exposure to chromomycin A2 also induced the appearance of acidic vacuolar organelles in treated cells. These features combined are suggestive of the induction of autophagy promoted by chromomycin A2, a feature not previously described for chromomycins. PMID:25486109

  4. Mechanical Stress Promotes Cisplatin-Induced Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Riad, Sandra; Bougherara, Habiba

    2015-01-01

    Cisplatin (CisPt) is a commonly used platinum-based chemotherapeutic agent. Its efficacy is limited due to drug resistance and multiple side effects, thereby warranting a new approach to improving the pharmacological effect of CisPt. A newly developed mathematical hypothesis suggested that mechanical loading, when coupled with a chemotherapeutic drug such as CisPt and immune cells, would boost tumor cell death. The current study investigated the aforementioned mathematical hypothesis by exposing human hepatocellular liver carcinoma (HepG2) cells to CisPt, peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and mechanical stress individually and in combination. HepG2 cells were also treated with a mixture of CisPt and carnosine with and without mechanical stress to examine one possible mechanism employed by mechanical stress to enhance CisPt effects. Carnosine is a dipeptide that reportedly sequesters platinum-based drugs away from their pharmacological target-site. Mechanical stress was achieved using an orbital shaker that produced 300 rpm with a horizontal circular motion. Our results demonstrated that mechanical stress promoted CisPt-induced death of HepG2 cells (~35% more cell death). Moreover, results showed that CisPt-induced death was compromised when CisPt was left to mix with carnosine 24 hours preceding treatment. Mechanical stress, however, ameliorated cell death (20% more cell death). PMID:25685789

  5. Chromomycin A2 induces autophagy in melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Larissa Alves; Jimenez, Paula Christine; Sousa, Thiciana da Silva; Freitas, Hozana Patrícia S; Rocha, Danilo Damasceno; Wilke, Diego Veras; Martín, Jesús; Reyes, Fernando; Deusdênia Loiola Pessoa, Otília; Costa-Lotufo, Letícia Veras

    2014-12-04

    The present study highlights the biological effects of chromomycin A2 toward metastatic melanoma cells in culture. Besides chromomycin A2, chromomycin A3 and demethylchromomycin A2 were also identified from the extract derived from Streptomyces sp., recovered from Paracuru Beach, located in the northeast region of Brazil. The cytotoxic activity of chromomycin A2 was evaluated across a panel of human tumor cell lines, which found IC50 values in the nM-range for exposures of 48 and 72 h. MALME-3M, a metastatic melanoma cell line, showed the highest sensitivity to chromomycin A2 after 48h incubation, and was chosen as a model to investigate this potent cytotoxic effect. Treatment with chromomycin A2 at 30 nM reduced cell proliferation, but had no significant effect upon cell viability. Additionally, chromomycin A2 induced accumulation of cells in G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle, with consequent reduction of S and G2/M and unbalanced expression of cyclins. Chromomycin A2 treated cells depicted several cellular fragments resembling autophagosomes and increased expression of proteins LC3-A and LC3-B. Moreover, exposure to chromomycin A2 also induced the appearance of acidic vacuolar organelles in treated cells. These features combined are suggestive of the induction of autophagy promoted by chromomycin A2, a feature not previously described for chromomycins.

  6. The hypoxia-inducible factor renders cancer cells more sensitive to vitamin C-induced toxicity.

    PubMed

    Tian, Weihua; Wang, Yu; Xu, Yan; Guo, Xiangpeng; Wang, Bo; Sun, Li; Liu, Longqi; Cui, Fenggong; Zhuang, Qiang; Bao, Xichen; Schley, Gunnar; Chung, Tung-Liang; Laslett, Andrew L; Willam, Carsten; Qin, Baoming; Maxwell, Patrick H; Esteban, Miguel A

    2014-02-07

    Megadose vitamin C (Vc) is one of the most enduring alternative treatments for diverse human diseases and is deeply engrafted in popular culture. Preliminary studies in the 1970s described potent effects of Vc on prolonging the survival of patients with terminal cancer, but these claims were later criticized. An improved knowledge of the pharmacokinetics of Vc and recent reports using cancer cell lines have renewed the interest in this subject. Despite these findings, using Vc as an adjuvant for anticancer therapy remains questionable, among other things because there is no proper mechanistic understanding. Here, we show that a Warburg effect triggered by activation of the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) pathway greatly enhances Vc-induced toxicity in multiple cancer cell lines, including von Hippel-Lindau (VHL)-defective renal cancer cells. HIF increases the intracellular uptake of oxidized Vc through its transcriptional target glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1), synergizing with the uptake of its reduced form through sodium-dependent Vc transporters. The resulting high levels of intracellular Vc induce oxidative stress and massive DNA damage, which then causes metabolic exhaustion by depleting cellular ATP reserves. HIF-positive cells are particularly sensitive to Vc-induced ATP reduction because they mostly rely on the rather inefficient glycolytic pathway for energy production. Thus, our experiments link Vc-induced toxicity and cancer metabolism, providing a new explanation for the preferential effect of Vc on cancer cells.

  7. Expression of inducible nitric oxide in human lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Robbins, R A; Barnes, P J; Springall, D R; Warren, J B; Kwon, O J; Buttery, L D; Wilson, A J; Geller, D A; Polak, J M

    1994-08-30

    Nitric oxide (NO) is increased in the exhaled air of subjects with several airway disorders. To determine if cytokines could stimulate epithelial cells accounting for the increased NO, the capacity of the proinflammatory cytokines (cytomix: tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-1 beta, and interferon-gamma) to increase inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) was investigated in A549 and primary cultures of human bronchial epithelial cells. Cytomix induced a time-dependent increase in nitrite levels in culture supernatant fluids (p < 0.05). Increased numbers of cells stained for iNOS and increased iNOS mRNA was detected in the cytokine-stimulated cells compared to control (p < 0.05). Dexamethasone diminished the cytokine-induced increase in nitrite, iNOS by immunocytochemistry, and iNOS mRNA. These data demonstrate that cytokines, such as those released by mononuclear cells, can induce lung epithelial iNOS expression and NO release, and that this is attenuated by dexamethasone.

  8. Ethylene insensitivity modulates ozone-induced cell death in birch.

    PubMed

    Vahala, Jorma; Ruonala, Raili; Keinänen, Markku; Tuominen, Hannele; Kangasjärvi, Jaakko

    2003-05-01

    We have used genotypic variation in birch (Betula pendula Roth) to investigate the roles of ozone (O(3))-induced ethylene (ET), jasmonic acid, and salicylic acid in the regulation of tissue tolerance to O(3). Of these hormones, ET evolution correlated best with O(3)-induced cell death. Disruption of ET perception by transformation of birch with the dominant negative mutant allele etr1-1 of the Arabidopsis ET receptor gene ETR1 or blocking of ET perception with 1-methylcyclopropene reduced but did not completely prevent the O(3)-induced cell death, when inhibition of ET biosynthesis with aminooxyacetic acid completely abolished O(3) lesion formation. This suggests the presence of an ET-signaling-independent but ET biosynthesis-dependent component in the ET-mediated stimulation of cell death in O(3)-exposed birch. Functional ET signaling was required for the O(3) induction of the gene encoding beta-cyanoalanine synthase, which catalyzes detoxification of the cyanide formed during ET biosynthesis. The results suggest that functional ET signaling is required to protect birch from the O(3)-induced cell death and that a decrease in ET sensitivity together with a simultaneous, high ET biosynthesis can potentially cause cell death through a deficient detoxification of cyanide.

  9. Dichloroacetate induces protective autophagy in esophageal squamous carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Jia, Hong-Yu; Wang, He-Nan; Xia, Feng-Yu; Sun, Yan; Liu, Hong-Li; Yan, Li-Li; Li, Shan-Shan; Jiang, Dong-Chun; Xu, Mei-Mei

    2017-09-01

    Dichloroacetate (DCA) is an inhibitor of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase, which promotes the flux of carbohydrates into mitochondria and enhances the aerobic oxidation of glucose. DCA has previously been demonstrated to exhibit antitumor properties. The present study revealed that treatment with DCA induced increased levels of autophagy-associated proteins in esophageal squamous carcinoma cells while minimally affecting apoptosis. The present study examined the localization of light chain (LC)-3 by adenovirus infection with a green fluorescent protein (FP)-red FP-LC3 reporter construction and confirmed that DCA treatment induced significant autophagy. Furthermore, the inhibition of DCA-induced autophagy facilitated cell apoptosis and improved the drug sensitivity of esophageal squamous carcinoma cells to DCA and 5-FU (5-fluorouracil). The proliferation of TE-1 cells was markedly inhibited at low concentrations of DCA and 5-FU treatment when subjected to Atg5 mRNA interference, indicating that autophagy performed a protective role in cell survival upon DCA treatment. To determine the underlying mechanism of DCA-induced autophagy, the present study measured alterations in autophagy-associated signaling pathways. Notably, the protein kinase B (Akt)-mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway, an important negative regulator of autophagy, was demonstrated to be suppressed by DCA treatment. These results may direct the development of novel strategies for the treatment of esophageal squamous carcinoma based on the combined use of DCA and autophagy inhibitors.

  10. Roles for Cell-Cell Adhesion and Contact in Obesity-Induced Hepatic Myeloid Cell Accumulation and Glucose Intolerance.

    PubMed

    Miyachi, Yasutaka; Tsuchiya, Kyoichiro; Komiya, Chikara; Shiba, Kumiko; Shimazu, Noriko; Yamaguchi, Shinobu; Deushi, Michiyo; Osaka, Mizuko; Inoue, Kouji; Sato, Yuta; Matsumoto, Sayaka; Kikuta, Junichi; Wake, Kenjiro; Yoshida, Masayuki; Ishii, Masaru; Ogawa, Yoshihiro

    2017-03-14

    Obesity promotes infiltration of inflammatory cells into various tissues, leading to parenchymal and stromal cell interaction and development of cellular and organ dysfunction. Liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) are the first cells that contact portal blood cells and substances in the liver, but their functions in the development of obesity-associated glucose metabolism remain unclear. Here, we find that LSECs are involved in obesity-associated accumulation of myeloid cells via VLA-4-dependent cell-cell adhesion. VLA-4 blockade in mice fed a high-fat diet attenuated myeloid cell accumulation in the liver to improve hepatic inflammation and systemic glucose intolerance. Ex vivo studies further show that cell-cell contact between intrahepatic leukocytes and parenchymal hepatocytes induces gluconeogenesis via a Notch-dependent pathway. These findings suggest that cell-cell interaction between parenchymal and stromal cells regulates hepatic glucose metabolism and offers potential strategies for treatment or prevention of obesity-associated glucose intolerance.

  11. Inhibition of inducible heat shock protein-70 (hsp72) enhances bortezomib-induced cell death in human bladder cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Qi, Wei; White, Matthew C; Choi, Woonyoung; Guo, Charles; Dinney, Colin; McConkey, David J; Siefker-Radtke, Arlene

    2013-01-01

    The proteasome inhibitor bortezomib (Velcade) is a promising new agent for bladder cancer therapy, but inducible cytoprotective mechanisms may limit its potential efficacy. We used whole genome mRNA expression profiling to study the effects of bortezomib on stress-induced gene expression in a panel of human bladder cancer cell lines. Bortezomib induced strong upregulation of the inducible HSP70 isoforms HSPA1A and HSPA1B isoforms of Hsp72 in 253J B-V and SW780 (HSPA1A(high)) cells, but only induced the HSPA1B isoform in UM-UC10 and UM-UC13 (HSPA1A(low)) cells. Bortezomib stimulated the binding of heat shock factor-1 (HSF1) to the HSPA1A promoter in 253JB-V but not in UM-UC13 cells. Methylation-specific PCR revealed that the HSPA1A promoter was methylated in the HSPA1A(low) cell lines (UM-UC10 and UM-UC13), and exposure to the chromatin demethylating agent 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine restored HSPA1A expression. Overexpression of Hsp72 promoted bortezomib resistance in the UM-UC10 and UM-UC13 cells, whereas transient knockdown of HSPA1B further sensitized these cells to bortezomib, and exposure to the chemical HSF1 inhibitor KNK-437 promoted bortezomib sensitivity in the 253J B-V cells. Finally, shRNA-mediated stable knockdown of Hsp72 in 253J B-V promoted sensitivity to bortezomib in vitro and in tumor xenografts in vivo. Together, our results provide proof-of-concept for using Hsp72 inhibitors to promote bortezomib sensitivity in bladder cancers and suggest that selective targeting of HSPA1B could produce synthetic lethality in tumors that display HSPA1A promoter methylation.

  12. Sphingosine kinase-1 mediates androgen-induced osteoblast cell growth

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Claire; Lafosse, Jean-Michel; Malavaud, Bernard; Cuvillier, Olivier

    2010-01-01

    Herein we report that the lipid kinase sphingosine kinase-1 (SphK1) is instrumental in mediating androgen-induced cell proliferation in osteoblasts. Dihydrotestosterone (DHT) triggered cell growth in steroid-deprived MC3T3 cells, which was associated with a rapid stimulation of SphK1 and activation of both Akt and ERK signaling pathways. This mechanism relied on functional androgen receptor/PI3K/Akt nongenotropic signaling as pharmacological antagonists could block SphK1 stimulation by DHT and its consequences. Finally, SphK1 inhibition not only abrogated DHT-induced ERK activation but also blocked cell proliferation, while ERK inhibition had no impact, suggesting that SphK1 was critical for DHT signaling yet independently of the ERK.

  13. Epicutaneous immunotherapy induces gastrointestinal LAP(+) regulatory T cells and prevents food-induced anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Tordesillas, Leticia; Mondoulet, Lucie; Blazquez, Ana Belen; Benhamou, Pierre-Henri; Sampson, Hugh A; Berin, M Cecilia

    2017-01-01

    The attempt to induce oral tolerance as a treatment for food allergy has been hampered by a lack of sustained clinical protection. Immunotherapy by nonoral routes, such as the skin, may be more effective for the development of maintained tolerance to food allergens. We sought to determine the efficacy and mechanism of tolerance induced by epicutaneous immunotherapy (EPIT) in a model of food-induced anaphylaxis. C3H/HeJ mice were sensitized to ovalbumin (OVA) orally or through the skin and treated with EPIT using OVA-Viaskin patches or oral immunotherapy using OVA. Mice were orally challenged with OVA to induce anaphylaxis. Antigen-specific regulatory T (Treg)-cell induction was assessed by flow cytometry using a transgenic T-cell transfer model. By using an adjuvant-free model of food allergy generated by epicutaneous sensitization and reactions triggered by oral allergen challenge, we found that EPIT induced sustained protection against anaphylaxis. We show that the gastrointestinal tract is deficient in de novo generation of Treg cells in allergic mice. This defect was tissue-specific, and epicutaneous application of antigen generated a population of gastrointestinal-homing LAP(+)Foxp3(-) Treg cells. The mechanism of protection was found to be a novel pathway of direct TGF-β-dependent Treg-cell suppression of mast cell activation, in the absence of modulation of T- or B-cell responses. Our data highlight the immune communication between skin and gastrointestinal tract, and identifies novel mechanisms by which epicutaneous tolerance can suppress food-induced anaphylaxis. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Functional inactivation of Rb sensitizes cancer cells to TSC2 inactivation induced cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Danos, Arpad M.; Liao, Yang; Li, Xuan; Du, Wei

    2012-01-01

    We showed previously that inactivation of TSC2 induces death in cancer cells lacking the Retinoblastoma (Rb) tumor suppressor under stress conditions, suggesting that inactivation of TSC2 can potentially be used as an approach to specifically kill cancers that have lost WT Rb. As Rb is often inactivated in cancers by overexpression of cyclin D1, loss of p16ink4a cdk inhibitor, or expression of viral oncoproteins, it will be interesting to determine if such functional inactivation of Rb would similarly sensitize cancer cells to TSC2 inactivation induced cell death. In addition, many cancers lack functional Pten, resulting in increased PI3K/Akt signaling that has been shown to modulate E2F-induced cell death. Therefore it will be interesting to test whether loss of Pten will affect TSC2 inactivation induced killing of Rb mutant cancer cells. Here, we show that overexpression of Cyclin D1 or the viral oncogene E1a sensitizes cancer cells to TSC2 knockdown induced cell death and growth inhibition. On the other hand, knockdown of p16ink4a sensitizes cancer cells to TSC2 knockdown induced cell death in a manner that is likely dependant on serum induction of Cyclin D1 to inactivate the Rb function. Additionally, we demonstrate that loss of Pten does not interfere with TSC2 knockdown induced cell death in Rb mutant cancer cells. Together, these results suggest that TSC2 is potentially a useful target for a large spectrum of cancer types with an inactivated Rb pathway. PMID:23022476

  15. Functional inactivation of Rb sensitizes cancer cells to TSC2 inactivation induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Danos, Arpad M; Liao, Yang; Li, Xuan; Du, Wei

    2013-01-01

    We showed previously that inactivation of TSC2 induces death in cancer cells lacking the Retinoblastoma (Rb) tumor suppressor under stress conditions, suggesting that inactivation of TSC2 can potentially be used as an approach to specifically kill cancers that have lost WT Rb. As Rb is often inactivated in cancers by overexpression of cyclin D1, loss of p16(ink4a) cdk inhibitor, or expression of viral oncoproteins, it will be interesting to determine if such functional inactivation of Rb would similarly sensitize cancer cells to TSC2 inactivation induced cell death. In addition, many cancers lack functional Pten, resulting in increased PI3K/Akt signaling that has been shown to modulate E2F-induced cell death. Therefore it will be interesting to test whether loss of Pten will affect TSC2 inactivation induced killing of Rb mutant cancer cells. Here, we show that overexpression of Cyclin D1 or the viral oncogene E1a sensitizes cancer cells to TSC2 knockdown induced cell death and growth inhibition. On the other hand, knockdown of p16(ink4a) sensitizes cancer cells to TSC2 knockdown induced cell death in a manner that is likely dependant on serum induction of Cyclin D1 to inactivate the Rb function. Additionally, we demonstrate that loss of Pten does not interfere with TSC2 knockdown induced cell death in Rb mutant cancer cells. Together, these results suggest that TSC2 is potentially a useful target for a large spectrum of cancer types with an inactivated Rb pathway.

  16. Recent Advances in Therapeutic Applications of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Rami, Farzaneh; Beni, Shamsi Naderi; Kahnamooi, Mahboobeh Mojaver; Rahimmanesh, Ilnaz; Salehi, Ahmad Reza; Salehi, Rasoul

    2017-04-01

    Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are generated by reprogramming of differentiated somatic cells. These cells are identical to human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) in gene expression pattern and the ability to differentiate. iPS cells can be used in in vitro modeling of diseases, testing drugs, assessing gene therapy methods, and cell therapy. Yet, the most important and promising application of iPS cells is in regenerative medicine. Regenerative medicine is a novel area in medicine aiming at the treatment of impaired or lost tissues by replacing them with functional and healthy ones. Currently, organ transplantation, which is considered the only treatment and cure for a number of diseases, is limited by shortage of organ donors and availability of the right match. Therefore, utilization of an alternative source of cells and tissues is critical in transplantation therapy. In this study, we review recent advances in therapeutic application of iPS cells in diseases where organ transplantation remains the only solution and will discuss the potential and usage of iPS cells in different areas of regenerative medicine. The primary theory of using iPS cells in regenerative medicine has brought lots of promises due to its potential for solving the immunological, social, and ethical problems of using ESCs. Nevertheless, several issues and problems have to be resolved before applying iPS cells in therapeutic applications.

  17. Conditions That Induce Tolerance in Mature CD4+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lanoue, Astrid; Bona, Constantin; von Boehmer, Harald; Sarukhan, Adelaida

    1997-01-01

    Establishment of antigen-specific tolerance among mature T cells has been a long debated, yet poorly understood issue. In this study we have used transgenic mice bearing a class II–restricted TCR specific for the hemmagglutinin of the influenza virus in order to test the behavior of CD4+ T cells upon exposure to antigen in different forms and doses. We first studied the fate of T cells expressing the transgenic TCR (6.5) in double transgenic mice where HA was expressed as a self antigen by hemapoietic cells. In these mice, we found some mature T cells in periphery that had escaped thymic deletion and that showed signs of activation but which were anergic. Mature CD4+6.5+ cells that were transferred into antigen-containing recipients went through an initial phase of expansion after which most cells were deleted and those remaining became unresponsive, as previously described for CD8+ cells. Inducing tolerance in CD4+6.5+ cells in situ in single transgenic mice proved a difficult task: classical protocols using single doses of soluble or deaggregated antigen as well as feeding antigen all failed to induce antigen-specific unresponsiveness. It was only after decreasing cell numbers by CD4 antibody treatment and by repeatedly reintroducing antigen thereafter that unresponsiveness of 6.5+ cells was achieved and maintained. In no case could we observe the appearance of antigen-specific T cells with a Th2 cytokine profile among the remaining cells and therefore conclude that deletion and anergy represent the major mechanisms of tolerance in our studies. PMID:9053441

  18. Apoptosis of ATII cells in mice induced by phosgene.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen-li; Hai, Chun-xu; Liang, Xin; Zhang, Xiao-di; Chen, Hong-li; Qin, Xu-jun; Liu, Riu; He, Wei; Wang, Peng; Li, Bo

    2006-01-01

    Phosgene inhalation can induced pulmonary edema formation. The purpose of this study was to investigate cell of apoptosis in pulmonary edema mice induced by phosgene. Fifty-two BALB/c mice were random divided into a negative group and a positive group with 26 mice in each. Mice were exposed for 5 min to air and phosgene in the negative group and in the positive one, respectively. The dose of phosgene was 539 ppm. After 4 h of exposure, all mice were anesthetized. Lungs were analyzed for lung wet/dry weight ratio and pathological alternation. The method of isolation and culture of alveolar type II cells (ATII cells) was established to observe their apoptosis by electron microscope and flow cytometry. Apoptosis of lung cells was observed by DNA gel electrophoresis and TUNEL. The lung wet/dry weight ratio was significantly higher in the positive group (6.42 +/- 1.00) than in the negative group (4.25 +/- 0.47, p < 0.05). A large amount of fluid effusion was observed in the alveolus of mice induced by phosgene. Alveolar type II cells were identified by tannic acid staining and electron microscope. The apoptotic signs in alveolar type II cells, alveolar type I cells, eosinophils, macrophages, symphocytes, and ciliated cells were viewed under electron microscope in positive group. The ratio of apoptosis cells (40.26 +/- 7.74) in positive was higher than that (1.58 +/- 1.01, p < 0.001) in the negative group by flow cytometry. DNA ladder alternation was seen through DNA gel electrophoresis. Apoptosis of epithelia and vascular endothelia in lung were found by TUNEL. These results indicate that there is success in establishing a model of pulmonary edema and method of isolation and culture of AT II cells in BALB/c mice. Phosgene can induce apoptosis of cells in the lungs of BALB/c mice, and this indicates that pulmonary edema is related to apoptosis of lung cells in mice, induced by phosgene.

  19. Ultraviolet-induced cell death is independent of DNA replication in rat kangaroo cells.

    PubMed

    Miyaji, E N; Menck, C F

    1995-05-01

    Rat kangaroo (Potorous tridactylus) cells have an efficient repair system for photoreactivation of lethal lesions induced by 254 nm UV. However, this ability is lost with increasing time after UV, being completely ineffective after 24 h. Critical events leading to UV-induced cell death must occur within this period of time. DNA synthesis was inhibited by the DNA polymerase inhibitor aphidicolin and the loss of the capability to photorepair lethal lesions was maintained as for replicating cells. Similar data were obtained in synchronized cells UV irradiated immediately before S phase. Under the same conditions, the ability to remove cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers by photoreactivation in these cells remained unchanged 24 h after irradiation. These data indicate that the critical events responsible for UV-induced cell death occur in the absence of DNA replication.

  20. The tricyclic antidepressant imipramine induces autophagic cell death in U-87MG glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Seung-Hyun; Kim, Se Hyun; Kim, Yeni; Kim, Yong Sik; Lim, Yoongho; Lee, Young Han; Shin, Soon Young

    2011-09-23

    In this study, we investigated the antitumor effects of the tricyclic antidepressant 3-(10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[b,f]azepin-5-yl)-N,N-dimethylpropan-1-amine (imipramine) on glioma cells. We found that exposure of U-87MG cells to imipramine resulted in the inhibition of PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling, reduction of clonogenicity, and induction of cell death. Imipramine stimulated the formation of acidic vesicular organelles, the conversion of LC3-I to LC3-II, and the redistribution of LC3 to autophagosomes, suggesting that it stimulates the progression of autophagy. It did not, however, induce apoptosis. We further showed that knockdown of Beclin-1 using siRNA abrogated imipramine-induced cell death. These results suggest that imipramine exerts antitumor effects on PTEN-null U-87MG human glioma cells by inhibiting PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling and by inducing autophagic cell death.

  1. Salidroside induces cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis in human breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Xiaolan; Zhang, Xianqi; Qiu, Shuifeng; Yu, Daihua; Lin, Shuxin

    2010-07-16

    Research highlights: {yields} Salidroside inhibits the growth of human breast cancer cells. {yields} Salidroside induces cell-cycle arrest of human breast cancer cells. {yields} Salidroside induces apoptosis of human breast cancer cell lines. -- Abstract: Recently, salidroside (p-hydroxyphenethyl-{beta}-D-glucoside) has been identified as one of the most potent compounds isolated from plants of the Rhodiola genus used widely in traditional Chinese medicine, but pharmacokinetic data on the compound are unavailable. We were the first to report the cytotoxic effects of salidroside on cancer cell lines derived from different tissues, and we found that human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells (estrogen receptor negative) were sensitive to the inhibitory action of low-concentration salidroside. To further investigate the cytotoxic effects of salidroside on breast cancer cells and reveal possible ER-related differences in response to salidroside, we used MDA-MB-231 cells and MCF-7 cells (estrogen receptor-positive) as models to study possible molecular mechanisms; we evaluated the effects of salidroside on cell growth characteristics, such as proliferation, cell cycle duration, and apoptosis, and on the expression of apoptosis-related molecules. Our results demonstrated for the first time that salidroside induces cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis in human breast cancer cells and may be a promising candidate for breast cancer treatment.

  2. [Establishment of hemophilia A patient-specific inducible pluripotent stem cells with urine cells].

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhiqing; Hu, Xuyun; Pang, Jialun; Wang, Xiaolin; Lin Peng, Siyuan; Li, Zhuo; Wu, Yong; Wu, Lingqian; Liang, Desheng

    2015-10-01

    OBJECTIVE To generate hemophilia A (HA) patient-specific inducible pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and induce endothelial differentiation. METHODS Tubular epithelial cells were isolated and cultured from the urine of HA patients. The iPSCs were generated by forced expression of Yamanaka factors (Oct4, Sox2, c-Myc and Klf4) using retroviruses and characterized by cell morphology, pluripotent marker staining and in vivo differentiation through teratoma formation. Induced endothelial differentiation of the iPSCs was achieved with the OP9 cell co-culture method. RESULTS Patient-specific iPSCs were generated from urine cells of the HA patients, which could be identified by cell morphology, pluripotent stem cell surface marker staining and in vivo differentiation of three germ layers. The teratoma experiment has confirmed that such cells could differentiate into endothelial cells expressing the endothelial-specific markers CD144, CD31 and vWF. CONCLUSION HA patient-specific iPSCs could be generated from urine cells and can differentiate into endothelial cells. This has provided a new HA disease modeling approach and may serve as an applicable autologous cell source for gene correction and cell therapy studies for HA.

  3. Phenylpropenoic Acid Glucoside from Rooibos Protects Pancreatic Beta Cells against Cell Death Induced by Acute Injury

    PubMed Central

    Himpe, Eddy; Cunha, Daniel A.; Song, Imane; Bugliani, Marco; Marchetti, Piero; Cnop, Miriam; Bouwens, Luc

    2016-01-01

    Objective Previous studies demonstrated that a phenylpropenoic acid glucoside (PPAG) from rooibos (Aspalathus linearis) extract had anti-hyperglycemic activity and significant protective effects on the pancreatic beta cell mass in a chronic diet-induced diabetes model. The present study evaluated the cytoprotective effect of the phytochemical on beta cells exposed to acute cell stress. Methods Synthetically prepared PPAG was administered orally in mice treated with a single dose of streptozotocin to acutely induce beta cell death and hyperglycemia. Its effect was assessed on beta cell mass, proliferation and apoptotic cell death. Its cytoprotective effect was also studied in vitro on INS-1E beta cells and on human pancreatic islet cells. Results Treatment with the phytochemical PPAG protected beta cells during the first days after the insult against apoptotic cell death, as evidenced by TUNEL staining, and prevented loss of expression of anti-apoptotic protein BCL2 in vivo. In vitro, PPAG protected INS-1E beta cells from streptozotocin-induced apoptosis and necrosis in a BCL2-dependent and independent way, respectively, depending on glucose concentration. PPAG also protected human pancreatic islet cells against the cytotoxic action of the fatty acid palmitate. Conclusions These findings show the potential use of PPAG as phytomedicine which protects the beta cell mass exposed to acute diabetogenic stress. PMID:27299564

  4. Aging Converts Innate B1a Cells into Potent CD8+ T Cell Inducers.

    PubMed

    Lee-Chang, Catalina; Bodogai, Monica; Moritoh, Kanako; Chen, Xin; Wersto, Robert; Sen, Ranjan; Young, Howard A; Croft, Michael; Ferrucci, Luigi; Biragyn, Arya

    2016-04-15

    B cell dysregulation in aging is thought to mostly occur in conventional B2 cells without affecting innate B1 cells. Elderly humans and mice also accumulate 4-1BBL(+)MHC class-I(Hi)CD86(Hi)B cells of unknown origin. In this article, we report that these cells, termed 4BL cells, are activated murine and possibly human B1a cells. The activation is mediated by aging human monocytes and murine peritoneal macrophages. They induce expression and activation of 4-1BBL and IFN-γR1 on B1a cells to subsequently upregulate membrane TNF-α and CD86. As a result, activated B1a/4BL cells induce expression of granzyme B in CD8(+)T cells by targeting TNFR2 via membrane TNF-α and providing costimulation with CD86. Thus, for the first time, to our knowledge, these results indicate that aging affects the function of B1a cells. Upon aging, these cells lose their tumor-supporting activity and become inducers of potentially antitumor and autoimmune CD8(+)T cells. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  5. A green-light inducible lytic system for cyanobacterial cells.

    PubMed

    Miyake, Kotone; Abe, Koichi; Ferri, Stefano; Nakajima, Mitsuharu; Nakamura, Mayumi; Yoshida, Wataru; Kojima, Katsuhiro; Ikebukuro, Kazunori; Sode, Koji

    2014-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are an attractive candidate for the production of biofuel because of their ability to capture carbon dioxide by photosynthesis and grow on non-arable land. However, because huge quantities of water are required for cultivation, strict water management is one of the greatest issues in algae- and cyanobacteria-based biofuel production. In this study, we aim to construct a lytic cyanobacterium that can be regulated by a physical signal (green-light illumination) for future use in the recovery of biofuel related compounds. We introduced T4 bacteriophage-derived lysis genes encoding holin and endolysin under the control of the green-light regulated cpcG2 promoter in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. When cells harboring the lysis genes were illuminated with both red and green light, we observed a considerable decrease in growth rate, a significant increase in cellular phycocyanin released in the medium, and a considerable fraction of dead cells. These effects were not observed when these cells were illuminated with only red light, or when cells not containing the lysis genes were grown under either red light or red and green light. These results indicate that our constructed green-light inducible lytic system was clearly induced by green-light illumination, resulting in lytic cells that released intracellular phycocyanin into the culture supernatant. This property suggests a future possibility to construct photosynthetic genetically modified organisms that are unable to survive under sunlight exposure. Expression of the self-lysis system with green-light illumination was also found to greatly increase the fragility of the cell membrane, as determined by subjecting the induced cells to detergent, osmotic-shock, and freeze-thaw treatments. A green-light inducible lytic system was constructed in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. The engineered lytic cyanobacterial cells should be beneficial for the recovery of biofuels and related compounds from cells with minimal effort

  6. A green-light inducible lytic system for cyanobacterial cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cyanobacteria are an attractive candidate for the production of biofuel because of their ability to capture carbon dioxide by photosynthesis and grow on non-arable land. However, because huge quantities of water are required for cultivation, strict water management is one of the greatest issues in algae- and cyanobacteria-based biofuel production. In this study, we aim to construct a lytic cyanobacterium that can be regulated by a physical signal (green-light illumination) for future use in the recovery of biofuel related compounds. Results We introduced T4 bacteriophage-derived lysis genes encoding holin and endolysin under the control of the green-light regulated cpcG2 promoter in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. When cells harboring the lysis genes were illuminated with both red and green light, we observed a considerable decrease in growth rate, a significant increase in cellular phycocyanin released in the medium, and a considerable fraction of dead cells. These effects were not observed when these cells were illuminated with only red light, or when cells not containing the lysis genes were grown under either red light or red and green light. These results indicate that our constructed green-light inducible lytic system was clearly induced by green-light illumination, resulting in lytic cells that released intracellular phycocyanin into the culture supernatant. This property suggests a future possibility to construct photosynthetic genetically modified organisms that are unable to survive under sunlight exposure. Expression of the self-lysis system with green-light illumination was also found to greatly increase the fragility of the cell membrane, as determined by subjecting the induced cells to detergent, osmotic-shock, and freeze-thaw treatments. Conclusions A green-light inducible lytic system was constructed in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. The engineered lytic cyanobacterial cells should be beneficial for the recovery of biofuels and related compounds

  7. CD4+ regulatory T cell responses induced by T cell vaccination in patients with multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jian; Zang, Ying C. Q.; Nie, Hong; Zhang, Jingwu Z.

    2006-01-01

    Immunization with irradiated autologous T cells (T cell vaccination) is shown to induce regulatory T cell responses that are poorly understood. In this study, CD4+ regulatory T cell lines were generated from patients with multiple sclerosis that received immunization with irradiated autologous myelin basic protein-reactive T cells. The resulting CD4+ regulatory T cell lines had marked inhibition on autologous myelin basic protein-reactive T cells and displayed two distinctive patterns distinguishable by the expression of transcription factor Foxp3 and cytokine profile. The majority of the T cell lines had high Foxp3 expression and secreted both IFN-γ and IL-10 as compared with the other pattern characteristic of low Foxp3 expression and predominant production of IL-10 but not IFN-γ. CD4+ regulatory T cell lines of both patterns expressed CD25 and reacted with activated autologous T cells but not resting T cells, irrespective of antigen specificity of the target T cells. It was evident that they recognized preferentially a synthetic peptide corresponding to residues 61–73 of the IL-2 receptor α chain. T cell vaccination correlated with increased Foxp3 expression and T cell reactivity to peptide 61–73. The findings have important implications in the understanding of the role of CD4+ regulatory T cell response induced by T cell vaccination. PMID:16547138

  8. Monomethylarsonous acid induces transformation of human bladder cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bredfeldt, Tiffany G.; Jagadish, Bhumasamudram; Eblin, Kylee E.; Mash, Eugene A.; Gandolfi, A. Jay . E-mail: gandolfi@pharmacy.arizona.edu

    2006-10-01

    Arsenic is a human bladder carcinogen. Arsenic is methylated to both monomethyl and dimethyl metabolites which have been detected in human urine. The trivalent methylated arsenicals are more toxic than inorganic arsenic. It is unknown if these trivalent methylated metabolites can directly cause malignant transformation in human cells. The goal of this study is determine if monomethylarsonous acid (MMA{sup III}) can induce malignant transformation in a human bladder urothelial cell line. To address this goal, a non-tumorigenic human urothelial cell line (UROtsa) was continuously exposed to 0.05 {mu}M MMA{sup III} for 52 weeks. Hyperproliferation was the first phenotypic change observed in exposed UROtsa (URO-MSC). After 12 weeks of exposure, doubling time had decreased from 42 h in unexposed control cells to 27 h in URO-MSC. Hyperproliferation continued to be a quality possessed by the URO-MSC cells after both 24 and 52 weeks of exposure to MMA{sup III}, which had a 40-50% reduction in doubling time. Throughout the 52-week exposure, URO-MSC cells retained an epithelial morphology with subtle morphological differences from control cells. 24 weeks of MMA{sup III} exposure was required to induce anchorage-independent growth as detected by colony formation in soft agar, a characteristic not found in UROtsa cells. To further substantiate that malignant transformation had occurred, URO-MSC cells were tested after 24 and 52 weeks of exposure to MMA{sup III} for the ability to form tumors in SCID mice. Enhanced tumorigenicity in SCID mouse xenografts was observed after 52 weeks of treatment with MMA{sup III}. These observations are the first demonstration of MMA{sup III}-induced malignant transformation in a human bladder urothelial cell line and provide important evidence that MMA{sup III} may be carcinogenic in human tissues.

  9. Chitosan-induced programmed cell death in plants.

    PubMed

    Vasil'ev, L A; Dzyubinskaya, E V; Zinovkin, R A; Kiselevsky, D B; Lobysheva, N V; Samuilov, V D

    2009-09-01

    Chitosan, CN(-), or H(2)O(2) caused the death of epidermal cells (EC) in the epidermis of pea leaves that was detected by monitoring the destruction of cell nuclei; chitosan induced chromatin condensation and marginalization followed by the destruction of EC nuclei and subsequent internucleosomal DNA fragmentation. Chitosan did not affect stoma guard cells (GC). Anaerobic conditions prevented the chitosan-induced destruction of EC nuclei. The antioxidants nitroblue tetrazolium or mannitol suppressed the effects of chitosan, H(2)O(2), or chitosan + H(2)O(2) on EC. H(2)O(2) formation in EC and GC mitochondria that was determined from 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein fluorescence was inhibited by CN(-) and the protonophoric uncoupler carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone but was stimulated by these agents in GC chloroplasts. The alternative oxidase inhibitors propyl gallate and salicylhydroxamate prevented chitosan- but not CN(-)-induced destruction of EC nuclei; the plasma membrane NADPH oxidase inhibitors diphenylene iodonium and quinacrine abolished chitosan- but not CN(-)-induced destruction of EC nuclei. The mitochondrial protein synthesis inhibitor lincomycin removed the destructive effect of chitosan or H(2)O(2) on EC nuclei. The effect of cycloheximide, an inhibitor of protein synthesis in the cytoplasm, was insignificant; however, it was enhanced if cycloheximide was added in combination with lincomycin. The autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine removed the chitosan effect but exerted no influence on the effect of H(2)O(2) as an inducer of EC death. The internucleosome DNA fragmentation in conjunction with the data on the 3-methyladenine effect provides evidence that chitosan induces programmed cell death that follows a combined scenario including apoptosis and autophagy. Based on the results of an inhibitor assay, chitosan-induced EC death involves reactive oxygen species generated by the NADPH oxidase of the plasma membrane.

  10. Urokinase induces activation of STAT3 in lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Sreerama; Rao, Gadiparthi N; Cines, Douglas B; Bdeir, Khalil

    2006-10-01

    Urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) is a serine protease that plays a major role in diverse physiological and pathological processes. Studies from our laboratory have shown that exposure of human lung epithelial cells to uPA induces proliferation. To understand uPA mitogenic signaling events, we sought to elucidate its effects on tyrosine phosphorylation in a human bronchial epithelial cell line (Beas2B). uPA induced tyrosine phosphorylation of several proteins in a time-dependent manner. One of these proteins was identified as the 91-kDa signal transduction activator transcription (Stat)3 moiety. Tyrosine phosphorylation of Stat3 by uPA was time dependent. uPA induced Stat3-DNA binding activity in a time-dependent manner. uPA-induced Stat3 activation does not require uPA catalytic activity, as the uPA amino-terminal fragment alone was as potent as active two-chain uPA (tcuPA) in causing this effect. Single-chain uPA likewise induced tyrosine phosphorylation of Stat3 to a similar extent as intact tcuPA. Plasmin did not alter uPA-induced Stat3 activation. Furthermore, transfection of Beas2B cells with dominant-negative Stat3 blocked uPA-induced DNA synthesis. These results reveal for the first time that the uPA-uPAR interaction leads to activation of Stat3, independent of its catalytic activity but dependent on its interaction with its receptor, uPAR, leading to DNA synthesis in lung epithelial cells.

  11. Differentiation state affects morphine induced cell regulation in neuroblastoma cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Fiore, Giovina; Ghelardini, Carla; Bruni, Giancarlo; Guarna, Massimo; Bianchi, Enrica

    2013-10-25

    Neuroblastoma (NB) is the most common extracranial solid cancer in childhood and the most common cancer in infancy. Our purpose was to investigate in vitro how cancer cell survival occurs in presence of morphine in undifferentiated and differentiated SHSY-5Y human neuroblastoma cultured cell line. Exposure of differentiated cells to morphine dose-dependently induced apoptosis in these cells through c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)/caspase pathway. Otherwise, morphine induced activation for mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway, caused positive regulation of cell survival in undifferentiated cells. Therefore, cell differentiation state bimodally affects the cellular regulation activity triggered by morphine in isolated cultured neuroblastoma cells raising concerns about the application of morphine to this type of cancer patients.

  12. Involvement of ROS in Curcumin-induced Autophagic Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Lee, Youn Ju; Kim, Nam-Yi; Suh, Young-Ah; Lee, Chuhee

    2011-02-01

    Many anticancer agents as well as ionizing radiation have been shown to induce autophagy which is originally described as a protein recycling process and recently reported to play a crucial role in various disorders. In HCT116 human colon cancer cells, we found that curcumin, a polyphenolic phytochemical extracted from the plant Curcuma longa, markedly induced the conversion of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3)-I to LC3-II and degradation of sequestome-1 (SQSTM1) which is a marker of autophagosome degradation. Moreover, we found that curcumin caused GFP-LC3 formation puncta, a marker of autophagosome, and decrease of GFP-LC3 and SQSTM1 protein level in GFP-LC3 expressing HCT116 cells. It was further confirmed that treatment of cells with hydrogen peroxide induced increase of LC3 conversion and decrease of GFP-LC3 and SQSTM1 levels, but these changes by curcumin were almost completely blocked in the presence of antioxidant, N-acetylcystein (NAC), indicating that curcumin leads to reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, which results in autophagosome development and autolysosomal degradation. In parallel with NAC, SQSTM1 degradation was also diminished by bafilomycin A, a potent inhibitor of autophagosome-lysosome fusion, and cell viability assay was further confirmed that cucurmin-induced cell death was partially blocked by bafilomycin A as well as NAC. We also observed that NAC abolished curcumin-induced activation of extracelluar signal-regulated kinases (ERK) 1/2 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK), but not Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). However, the activation of ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK seemed to have no effect on the curcumin-induced autophagy, since both the conversion of LC3 protein and SQSTM1 degradation by curcumin was not changed in the presence of NAC. Taken together, our data suggest that curcumin induced ROS production, which resulted in autophagic activation and concomitant cell death in HCT116 human colon cancer cell

  13. Involvement of ROS in Curcumin-induced Autophagic Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Youn Ju; Kim, Nam-Yi; Suh, Young-Ah

    2011-01-01

    Many anticancer agents as well as ionizing radiation have been shown to induce autophagy which is originally described as a protein recycling process and recently reported to play a crucial role in various disorders. In HCT116 human colon cancer cells, we found that curcumin, a polyphenolic phytochemical extracted from the plant Curcuma longa, markedly induced the conversion of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3)-I to LC3-II and degradation of sequestome-1 (SQSTM1) which is a marker of autophagosome degradation. Moreover, we found that curcumin caused GFP-LC3 formation puncta, a marker of autophagosome, and decrease of GFP-LC3 and SQSTM1 protein level in GFP-LC3 expressing HCT116 cells. It was further confirmed that treatment of cells with hydrogen peroxide induced increase of LC3 conversion and decrease of GFP-LC3 and SQSTM1 levels, but these changes by curcumin were almost completely blocked in the presence of antioxidant, N-acetylcystein (NAC), indicating that curcumin leads to reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, which results in autophagosome development and autolysosomal degradation. In parallel with NAC, SQSTM1 degradation was also diminished by bafilomycin A, a potent inhibitor of autophagosome-lysosome fusion, and cell viability assay was further confirmed that cucurmin-induced cell death was partially blocked by bafilomycin A as well as NAC. We also observed that NAC abolished curcumin-induced activation of extracelluar signal-regulated kinases (ERK) 1/2 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK), but not Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). However, the activation of ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK seemed to have no effect on the curcumin-induced autophagy, since both the conversion of LC3 protein and SQSTM1 degradation by curcumin was not changed in the presence of NAC. Taken together, our data suggest that curcumin induced ROS production, which resulted in autophagic activation and concomitant cell death in HCT116 human colon cancer cell

  14. Lysophosphatidate Induces Chemo-Resistance by Releasing Breast Cancer Cells from Taxol-Induced Mitotic Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Samadi, Nasser; Bekele, Raie T.; Goping, Ing Swie; Schang, Luis M.; Brindley, David N.

    2011-01-01

    Background Taxol is a microtubule stabilizing agent that arrests cells in mitosis leading to cell death. Taxol is widely used to treat breast cancer, but resistance occurs in 25–69% of patients and it is vital to understand how Taxol resistance develops to improve chemotherapy. The effects of chemotherapeutic agents are overcome by survival signals that cancer cells receive. We focused our studies on autotaxin, which is a secreted protein that increases tumor growth, aggressiveness, angiogenesis and metastasis. We discovered that autotaxin strongly antagonizes the Taxol-induced killing of breast cancer and melanoma cells by converting the abundant extra-cellular lipid, lysophosphatidylcholine, into lysophosphatidate. This lipid stimulates specific G-protein coupled receptors that activate survival signals. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study we determined the basis of these antagonistic actions of lysophosphatidate towards Taxol-induced G2/M arrest and cell death using cultured breast cancer cells. Lysophosphatidate does not antagonize Taxol action in MCF-7 cells by increasing Taxol metabolism or its expulsion through multi-drug resistance transporters. Lysophosphatidate does not lower the percentage of cells accumulating in G2/M by decreasing exit from S-phase or selective stimulation of cell death in G2/M. Instead, LPA had an unexpected and remarkable action in enabling MCF-7 and MDA-MB-468 cells, which had been arrested in G2/M by Taxol, to normalize spindle structure and divide, thus avoiding cell death. This action involves displacement of Taxol from the tubulin polymer fraction, which based on inhibitor studies, depends on activation of LPA receptors and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase. Conclusions/Significance This work demonstrates a previously unknown consequence of lysophosphatidate action that explains why autotaxin and lysophosphatidate protect against Taxol-induced cell death and promote resistance to the action of this important therapeutic

  15. Vincristine sulfate-induced cell transformation, mitotic inhibition and aneuploidy in cultured Syrian hamster embryo cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tsutsui, T.; Suzuki, N.; Maizumi, H.; Barrett, J.C.

    1986-01-01

    Vincristine, a naturally occurring Vinca alkaloid and widely used anti-neoplastic agent, was examined for its ability to induce cell transformation, inhibition of growth and mitosis, and genetic effects in Syrian hamster embryo cells in culture. Treatment of the cells with doses of less than or equal to 1 ng/ml vincristine sulfate (VCR) had no effect on cell growth, while exposure to greater than or equal to 3 ng/ml reduced the growth rate and treatment with 30 ng/ml resulted in no detectable increase in cell number. At this latter dose the mitotic index of the cells increased significantly suggesting that VCR delayed completion of mitosis. Exposure of the cells to VCR at doses of 1-10 ng/ml for 48 h resulted in morphological transformation of the cells in a doserelated fashion. The vincristine-treated transformed colonies were morphologically indistinguishable from colonies transformed by benzo(a)pyrene or other chemical carcinogens. Morphological transformation was induced by VCR at non-toxic and slightly toxic doses as measured by a reduction in colony-forming ability of the treated cells. Over the dose range which resulted in cell transformation, VCR failed to induce either detectable gene mutations at two genetic loci, unscheduled DNA synthesis, or chromosome aberrations in the Syrian hamster embryo cells. However, a significant dose-dependent increase in aneuploid cells with a near-diploid chromosome number was induced by VCR. Both chromosome losses and gains were induced which is consistent with a non-disjunctional mechanism. These results further support our hypothesis that aneuploidy is one possible mechanism for induction of this early step in the neoplastic transformation of Syrian hamster embryo cells. Furthermore, these findings indicate that VCR may have some carcinogenic potential if exposure to rapidly dividing cells occurs.

  16. Stem Cell Conditioned Culture Media Attenuated Albumin-Induced Epithelial– Mesenchymal Transition in Renal Tubular Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Junping; Zhu, Qing; Li, Pin-Lan; Wang, Weili; Yi, Fan; Li, Ningjun

    2015-01-01

    Background Proteinuria-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) plays an important role in progressive renal tubulointerstitial fibrosis in chronic renal disease. Stem cell therapy has been used for different diseases. Stem cell conditioned culture media (SCM) exhibits similar beneficial effects as stem cell therapy. The present study tested the hypothesis that SCM inhibits albumin-induced EMT in cultured renal tubular cells. Methods Rat renal tubular cells were treated with/without albumin (20 μmg/ml) plus SCM or control cell media (CCM). EMT markers and inflammatory factors were measured by Western blot and fluorescent images. Results Albumin induced EMT as shown by significant decreases in levels of epithelial marker E-cadherin, increases in mesenchymal markers fibroblast-specific protein 1 and α-smooth muscle actin, and elevations in collagen I. SCM inhibited all these changes. Meanwhile, albumin induced NF-κB translocation from cytosol into nucleus and that SCM blocked the nuclear translocation of NF-κB. Albumin also increased the levels of pro-inflammatory factor monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP)-1 by nearly 30 fold compared with control. SCM almost abolished albumin-induced increase of MCP-1. Conclusion These results suggest that SCM attenuated albumin-induced EMT in renal tubular cells via inhibiting activation of inflammatory factors, which may serve as a new therapeutic approach for chronic kidney diseases. PMID:25832005

  17. Cytoprotective effects of fisetin against hypoxia-induced cell death in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pei-Yi; Ho, Yi-Ru; Wu, Ming-Jiuan; Huang, Shun-Ping; Chen, Po-Kong; Tai, Mi-Hsueh; Ho, Chi-Tang; Yen, Jui-Hung

    2015-01-01

    Fisetin (3,7,3',4'-tetrahydroxyflavone), a flavonol compound of flavonoids, exhibits a broad spectrum of biological activities including anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer and neuroprotective effects. The aim of this study is to investigate the cytoprotective effect of fisetin and the underlying molecular mechanism against hypoxia-induced cell death in PC12 cells. The results of this study showed that fisetin significantly restored the cell viability of PC12 cells under both cobalt chloride (CoCl₂)- and low oxygen-induced hypoxic conditions. Treatment with fisetin successfully reduced the CoCl₂-mediated reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, which was accompanied by an increase in the cell viability of PC12 cells. Furthermore, we found that treatment of PC12 cells with fisetin markedly upregulated hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α), its nuclear accumulation and the hypoxia-response element (HRE)-driven transcriptional activation. The fisetin-mediated cytoprotection during CoCl₂ exposure was significantly attenuated through the administration of HIF-1α siRNA. Moreover, we demonstrated that MAPK/ERK kinase 1/2 (MEK1/2), p38 MAPK and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3 K) inhibitors significantly blocked the increase in cell survival that was induced by fisetin treatment under hypoxic conditions. Consistently, increased phosphorylation of ERK, p38 and Akt proteins was observed in PC12 cells treated with fisetin. However, the fisetin-induced HRE-driven transcription was not affected by inhibition of these kinase signaling pathways. Current results reveal for the first time that fisetin promotes cell survival and protects against hypoxia-induced cell death through ROS scavenging and the activation of HIF1α-, MAPK/ERK-, p38 MAPK- and PI3 K/Akt-dependent signaling pathways in PC12 cells.

  18. Late steps of parvoviral infection induce changes in cell morphology.

    PubMed

    Pakkanen, Kirsi; Nykky, Jonna; Vuento, Matti

    2008-11-01

    Previously, virus-induced non-filopodial extensions have not been encountered in connection with viral infections. Here, we report emergence of long extensions protruding from Norden laboratory feline kidney (NLFK) and A72 (canine fibroma) cells infected with canine parvovirus for 72 h. These extensions significantly differ in length and number from those appearing in control cells. The most striking feature in the extensions is the length, reaching up to 130 microm, almost twice the average length of a healthy NLFK cell. In A72 cells, the extensions were even longer, up to 200 microm. The results presented here also suggest that the events leading to the growth of these extensions start earlier in infection and abnormal extension growth is detectable already at 24-h post-infection (p.i.). These extensions may have a vital role in the cell-to-cell transmission of the virus.

  19. Induced pluripotent stem cells: developmental biology to regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Timothy J; Martinez-Fernandez, Almudena; Terzic, Andre

    2010-12-01

    Nuclear reprogramming of somatic cells with ectopic stemness factors to bioengineer pluripotent autologous stem cells signals a new era in regenerative medicine. The study of developmental biology has provided a roadmap for cardiac differentiation from embryonic tissue formation to adult heart muscle rejuvenation. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of stem-cell-derived cardiogenesis enables the reproducible generation, isolation, and monitoring of progenitors that have the capacity to recapitulate embryogenesis and differentiate into mature cardiac tissue. With the advent of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell technology, patient-specific stem cells provide a reference point to systematically decipher cardiogenic differentiation through discrete stages of development. Interrogation of iPS cells and their progeny from selected cohorts of patients is an innovative approach towards uncovering the molecular mechanisms of disease. Thus, the principles of cardiogenesis can now be applied to regenerative medicine in order to optimize personalized therapeutics, diagnostics, and discovery-based science for the development of novel clinical applications.

  20. Induced pluripotent stem cells: a new revolution for clinical neurology?

    PubMed

    Mattis, Virginia B; Svendsen, Clive N

    2011-04-01

    Why specific neuronal populations are uniquely susceptible in neurodegenerative diseases remains a mystery. Brain tissue samples from patients are rarely available for testing, and animal models frequently do not recapitulate all features of a specific disorder; therefore, pathophysiological investigations are difficult. An exciting new avenue for neurological research and drug development is the discovery that patients' somatic cells can be reprogrammed to a pluripotent state; these cells are known as induced pluripotent stem cells. Once pluripotency is reinstated, cell colonies can be expanded and differentiated into specific neural populations. The availability of these cells enables the monitoring in vitro of temporal features of disease initiation and progression, and testing of new drug treatments on the patient's own cells. Hence, this swiftly growing area of research has the potential to contribute greatly to our understanding of the pathophysiology of neurodegenerative and neurodevelopmental diseases.

  1. Idelalisib induces PUMA-dependent apoptosis in colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shida; Zhu, Zhiyong; Zhang, Xiaobing; Zhang, Ning; Yao, Zhicheng

    2017-01-24

    Idelalisib, a PI3K inhibitor, specifically targeting p110δ, has been approved for the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma and follicular lymphoma. However, the mechanisms of action of idelalisib in colon cancer cells are not well understood. We investigated how idelalisib suppresses colon cancer cells growth and potentiates effects of other chemotherapeutic drugs. In this study, we found that idelalisib treatment induces PUMA in colon cancer cells irrespective of p53 status through the p65 pathway following AKT inhibition and glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) activation. PUMA is necessary for idelalisib-induced apoptosis in colon cancer cells. Idelalisib also synergized with 5-FU or regorafenib to induce marked apoptosis via PUMA in colon cancer cells. Furthermore, PUMA deficiency suppressed apoptosis and antitumor effect of idelalisib in xenograft model. These results demonstrate a critical role of PUMA in mediating the anticancer effects of idelalisib in colon cancer cells and suggest that PUMA induction can be used as an indicator of idelalisib sensitivity, and also have important implications for it clinical applications.

  2. Stress-induced cleavage of Myc promotes cancer cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Conacci-Sorrell, Maralice; Ngouenet, Celine; Anderson, Sarah; Brabletz, Thomas; Eisenman, Robert N.

    2014-01-01

    Evasion of apoptosis is critical in Myc-induced tumor progression. Here we report that cancer cells evade death under stress by activating calpain-mediated proteolysis of Myc. This generates Myc-nick, a cytoplasmic, transcriptionally inactive cleavage product of Myc. We found conversion of Myc into Myc-nick in cell lines and tissues derived from multiple cancers. In colon cancer, the production of Myc-nick is enhanced under stress conditions such as hypoxia and nutrient deprivation. Under these conditions, ectopic expression of Myc-nick promotes anchorage-independent growth and cell survival at least in part by promoting autophagy. Myc-nick also delays colon cancer cell death after treatment with chemotherapeutic drugs such as etoposide, cisplatin, and imatinib. Furthermore, colon cancer cells expressing a cleavage-resistant form of Myc undergo extensive apoptosis but are rescued by overexpression of Myc-nick. We also found that ectopic expression of Myc-nick results in the induction of the actin-bundling protein fascin, formation of filopodia, and increased cell motility—all mediators of tumor metastasis. Myc-nick-induced survival, autophagy, and motility require Myc box II (MBII), a region of Myc-nick that recruits acetyltransferases that in turn modify cytoplasmic proteins, including α-tubulin and ATG3. Our results suggest that Myc-nick-induced survival and motility contribute to colon cancer progression and metastasis. PMID:24696454

  3. Lipopolysaccharide induces autotaxin expression in human monocytic THP-1 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li Song; Zhang Junjie

    2009-01-09

    Autotaxin (ATX) is a secreted enzyme with lysophospholipase D (lysoPLD) activity, which converts lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) into lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), a bioactive phospholipid involved in numerous biological activities, including cell proliferation, differentiation, and migration. In the present study, we found that bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a well-known initiator of the inflammatory response, induced ATX expression in monocytic THP-1 cells. The activation of PKR, JNK, and p38 MAPK was required for the ATX induction. The LPS-induced ATX in THP-1 cells was characterized as the {beta} isoform. In the presence of LPC, ATX could promote the migrations of THP-1 and Jurkat cells, which was inhibited by pertussis toxin (PTX), an inhibitor of Gi-mediated LPA receptor signaling. In summary, LPS induces ATX expression in THP-1 cells via a PKR, JNK and p38 MAPK-mediated mechanism, and the ATX induction is likely to enhance immune cell migration in proinflammatory response by regulating LPA levels in the microenvironment.

  4. Antithymocyte Globulin Induces a Tolerogenic Phenotype in Human Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Roider, Tobias; Katzfuß, Michael; Matos, Carina; Singer, Katrin; Renner, Kathrin; Oefner, Peter J; Dettmer-Wilde, Katja; Herr, Wolfgang; Holler, Ernst; Kreutz, Marina; Peter, Katrin

    2016-12-11

    Antithymocyte globulin (ATG) is used in the prevention of graft-versus-host disease during allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. It is generally accepted that ATG mediates its immunosuppressive effect primarily via depletion of T cells. Here, we analyzed the impact of ATG-Fresenius (now Grafalon(®)) on human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DC). ATG induced a semi-mature phenotype in DC with significantly reduced expression of CD14, increased expression of HLA-DR, and intermediate expression of CD54, CD80, CD83, and CD86. ATG-DC showed an increase in IL-10 secretion but no IL-12 production. In line with this tolerogenic phenotype, ATG caused a significant induction of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase expression and a concomitant increase in levels of tryptophan metabolites in the supernatants of DC. Further, ATG-DC did not induce the proliferation of allogeneic T cells in a mixed lymphocyte reaction but actively suppressed the T cell proliferation induced by mature DC. These data suggest that besides its well-known effect on T cells, ATG modulates the phenotype of DC in a tolerogenic way, which might constitute an essential part of its immunosuppressive action in vivo.

  5. Idelalisib induces PUMA-dependent apoptosis in colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shida; Zhu, Zhiyong; Zhang, Xiaobing; Zhang, Ning; Yao, Zhicheng

    2017-01-01

    Idelalisib, a PI3K inhibitor, specifically targeting p110δ, has been approved for the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma and follicular lymphoma. However, the mechanisms of action of idelalisib in colon cancer cells are not well understood. We investigated how idelalisib suppresses colon cancer cells growth and potentiates effects of other chemotherapeutic drugs. In this study, we found that idelalisib treatment induces PUMA in colon cancer cells irrespective of p53 status through the p65 pathway following AKT inhibition and glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) activation. PUMA is necessary for idelalisib-induced apoptosis in colon cancer cells. Idelalisib also synergized with 5-FU or regorafenib to induce marked apoptosis via PUMA in colon cancer cells. Furthermore, PUMA deficiency suppressed apoptosis and antitumor effect of idelalisib in xenograft model. These results demonstrate a critical role of PUMA in mediating the anticancer effects of idelalisib in colon cancer cells and suggest that PUMA induction can be used as an indicator of idelalisib sensitivity, and also have important implications for it clinical applications. PMID:28008149

  6. Viral infection induces cytokine release by beta islet cells.

    PubMed Central

    Cavallo, M G; Baroni, M G; Toto, A; Gearing, A J; Forsey, T; Andreani, D; Thorpe, R; Pozzilli, P

    1992-01-01

    Viral infection has been suggested to play a triggering role in the pancreatic beta cell destruction which occurs in insulin-dependent diabetes (IDDM). However, the underlying mechanism of this phenomenon is unknown. In this study a human insulinoma cell line has been infected with measles, mumps and rubella viruses since a temporal association is reported between the clinical onset of IDDM and diseases caused by these viruses. The infection with measles and mumps viruses induced the release of interleukin-1 (IL-1) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) by the cell line as assessed by a bioassay and up-regulated the expression of human leucocyte antigen (HLA) class I and class II antigens as evaluated by cytofluorimetric analysis. Stimulation with rubella virus induced the release of IL-6 only and had no effect on HLA antigen expression. These data show for the first time that IL-1 and IL-6 secretion by an insulinoma cell line may occur after viral infection and suggest that cytokine release and increased expression of HLA molecules by beta cells may act to induce the immune response towards beta cells in IDDM. PMID:1592439

  7. Interferon-inducible GTPases in cell autonomous and innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Meunier, Etienne; Broz, Petr

    2016-02-01

    Detection and clearance of invading pathogens requires a coordinated response of the adaptive and innate immune system. Host cell, however, also features different mechanisms that restrict pathogen replication in a cell-intrinsic manner, collectively referred to as cell-autonomous immunity. In immune cells, the ability to unleash those mechanisms strongly depends on the activation state of the cell, which is controlled by cytokines or the detection of pathogen-associated molecular patterns by pattern-recognition receptors. The interferon (IFN) class of cytokines is one of the strongest inducers of antimicrobial effector mechanisms and acts against viral, bacterial and parasitic intracellular pathogens. This has been linked to the upregulation of several hundreds of IFN-stimulated genes, among them the so-called IFN-inducible GTPases. Two subfamilies of IFN-inducible GTPases, the immunity-related GTPases (IRGs) and the guanylate-binding proteins (GBPs), have gained attention due to their exceptional ability to specifically target intracellular vacuolar pathogens and restrict their replication by destroying their vacuolar compartment. Their repertoire has recently been expanded to the regulation of inflammasome complexes, which are cytosolic multi-protein complexes that control an inflammatory cell death called pyroptosis and the release of cytokines like interleukin-1β and interleukin-18. Here we discuss recent advances in understanding the function, the targeting and regulation of IRG and GBP proteins during microbial infections.

  8. Antithymocyte Globulin Induces a Tolerogenic Phenotype in Human Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Roider, Tobias; Katzfuß, Michael; Matos, Carina; Singer, Katrin; Renner, Kathrin; Oefner, Peter J.; Dettmer-Wilde, Katja; Herr, Wolfgang; Holler, Ernst; Kreutz, Marina; Peter, Katrin

    2016-01-01

    Antithymocyte globulin (ATG) is used in the prevention of graft-versus-host disease during allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. It is generally accepted that ATG mediates its immunosuppressive effect primarily via depletion of T cells. Here, we analyzed the impact of ATG-Fresenius (now Grafalon®) on human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DC). ATG induced a semi-mature phenotype in DC with significantly reduced expression of CD14, increased expression of HLA-DR, and intermediate expression of CD54, CD80, CD83, and CD86. ATG-DC showed an increase in IL-10 secretion but no IL-12 production. In line with this tolerogenic phenotype, ATG caused a significant induction of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase expression and a concomitant increase in levels of tryptophan metabolites in the supernatants of DC. Further, ATG-DC did not induce the proliferation of allogeneic T cells in a mixed lymphocyte reaction but actively suppressed the T cell proliferation induced by mature DC. These data suggest that besides its well-known effect on T cells, ATG modulates the phenotype of DC in a tolerogenic way, which might constitute an essential part of its immunosuppressive action in vivo. PMID:27973435

  9. Fractalkine-induced smooth muscle cell proliferation in pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Perros, F; Dorfmüller, P; Souza, R; Durand-Gasselin, I; Godot, V; Capel, F; Adnot, S; Eddahibi, S; Mazmanian, M; Fadel, E; Hervé, P; Simonneau, G; Emilie, D; Humbert, M

    2007-05-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is characterised by a progressive increase in pulmonary arterial resistance due to endothelial and smooth muscle cell proliferation resulting in chronic obstruction of small pulmonary arteries. There is evidence that inflammatory mechanisms may contribute to the pathogenesis of human and experimental pulmonary hypertension. The aim of the study was to address the role of fractalkine (CX3CL1) in the inflammatory responses and pulmonary vascular remodelling of a monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension model. The expression of CX3CL1 and its receptor CX3CR1 was studied in monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension by means of immunohistochemistry and quantitative reverse-transcription PCR on laser-captured microdissected pulmonary arteries. It was demonstrated that CX3CL1 was expressed by inflammatory cells surrounding pulmonary arterial lesions and that smooth muscle cells from these vessels had increased CX3CR1 expression. It was then shown that cultured rat pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells expressed CX3CR1 and that CX3CL1 induced proliferation but not migration of these cells. In conclusion, the current authors proposed that fractalkine may act as a growth factor for pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells. Chemokines may thus play a role in pulmonary artery remodelling.

  10. Influenza vaccine induces intracellular immune memory of human NK cells.

    PubMed

    Dou, Yaling; Fu, Binqing; Sun, Rui; Li, Wenting; Hu, Wanfu; Tian, Zhigang; Wei, Haiming

    2015-01-01

    Influenza vaccines elicit antigen-specific antibodies and immune memory to protect humans from infection with drift variants. However, what supports or limits vaccine efficacy and duration is unclear. Here, we vaccinated healthy volunteers with annual vaccine formulations and investigated the dynamics of T cell, natural killer (NK) cell and antibody responses upon restimulation with heterologous or homologous influenza virus strains. Influenza vaccines induced potential memory NK cells with increased antigen-specific recall IFN-γ responses during the first 6 months. In the absence of significant changes in other NK cell markers (CD45RO, NKp44, CXCR6, CD57, NKG2C, CCR7, CD62L and CD27), influenza vaccines induced memory NK cells with the distinct feature of intracellular NKp46 expression. Indeed, surface NKp46 was internalized, and the dynamic increase in NKp46(intracellular)+CD56dim NK cells positively correlated with increased IFN-γ production to influenza virus restimulation after vaccination. In addition, anti-NKp46 antibodies blocked IFN-γ responses. These findings provide insights into a novel mechanism underlying vaccine-induced immunity and NK-related diseases, which may help to design persisting and universal vaccines in the future.

  11. Generation of Colonies of Induced Trophoblast Cells During Standard Reprogramming of Porcine Fibroblasts to Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells1

    PubMed Central

    Ezashi, Toshihiko; Matsuyama, Haruyo; Telugu, Bhanu Prakash V.L.; Roberts, R. Michael

    2011-01-01

    During reprogramming of porcine mesenchymal cells with a four-factor (POU5F1/SOX2/KLF4/MYC) mixture of vectors, a fraction of the colonies had an atypical phenotype and arose earlier than the recognizable porcine induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell colonies. Within days after each passage, patches of cells with an epithelial phenotype formed raised domes, particularly under 20% O2 conditions. Relative to gene expression of the iPS cells, there was up-regulation of genes for transcription factors associated with trophoblast (TR) lineage emergence, e.g., GATA2, PPARG, MSX2, DLX3, HAND1, GCM1, CDX2, ID2, ELF5, TCFAP2C, and TEAD4 and for genes required for synthesis of products more typical of differentiated TR, such as steroids (HSD17B1, CYP11A1, and STAR), pregnancy-associated glycoproteins (PAG6), and select cytokines (IFND, IFNG, and IL1B). Although POU5F1 was down-regulated relative to that in iPS cells, it was not silenced in the induced TR (iTR) cells over continued passage. Like iPS cells, iTR cells did not senesce on extended passage and displayed high telomerase activity. Upon xenografting into immunodeficient mice, iTR cells formed nonhemorrhagic teratomas composed largely of layers of epithelium expressing TR markers. When cultured under conditions that promoted embryoid body formation, iTR cells formed floating spheres consisting of a single epithelial sheet whose cells were tethered laterally by desmosome-like structures. In conclusion, reprogramming of porcine fibroblasts to iPS cells generates, as a by-product, colonies composed of self-renewing populations of TR cells, possibly containing TR stem cells. PMID:21734265

  12. Generation of colonies of induced trophoblast cells during standard reprogramming of porcine fibroblasts to induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ezashi, Toshihiko; Matsuyama, Haruyo; Telugu, Bhanu Prakash V L; Roberts, R Michael

    2011-10-01

    During reprogramming of porcine mesenchymal cells with a four-factor (POU5F1/SOX2/KLF4/MYC) mixture of vectors, a fraction of the colonies had an atypical phenotype and arose earlier than the recognizable porcine induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell colonies. Within days after each passage, patches of cells with an epithelial phenotype formed raised domes, particularly under 20% O(2) conditions. Relative to gene expression of the iPS cells, there was up-regulation of genes for transcription factors associated with trophoblast (TR) lineage emergence, e.g., GATA2, PPARG, MSX2, DLX3, HAND1, GCM1, CDX2, ID2, ELF5, TCFAP2C, and TEAD4 and for genes required for synthesis of products more typical of differentiated TR, such as steroids (HSD17B1, CYP11A1, and STAR), pregnancy-associated glycoproteins (PAG6), and select cytokines (IFND, IFNG, and IL1B). Although POU5F1 was down-regulated relative to that in iPS cells, it was not silenced in the induced TR (iTR) cells over continued passage. Like iPS cells, iTR cells did not senesce on extended passage and displayed high telomerase activity. Upon xenografting into immunodeficient mice, iTR cells formed nonhemorrhagic teratomas composed largely of layers of epithelium expressing TR markers. When cultured under conditions that promoted embryoid body formation, iTR cells formed floating spheres consisting of a single epithelial sheet whose cells were tethered laterally by desmosome-like structures. In conclusion, reprogramming of porcine fibroblasts to iPS cells generates, as a by-product, colonies composed of self-renewing populations of TR cells, possibly containing TR stem cells.

  13. N-acetylcysteine protects dental pulp stromal cells from HEMA-induced apoptosis by inducing differentiation of the cells.

    PubMed

    Paranjpe, Avina; Cacalano, Nicholas A; Hume, Wyatt R; Jewett, Anahid

    2007-11-15

    Resin-based materials are now widely used in dental restorations. Although the use of these materials is aesthetically appealing to patients, it carries the risk of local and systemic adverse effects. The potential risks are direct damage to the cells and induction of immune-based hypersensitivity reactions. Dental pulp stromal cells (DPSCs) and oral keratinocytes are the major cell types which may come in contact with dental resins such as 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) after dental restorations. Here we show that N-acetylcysteine (NAC) inhibits HEMA-induced apoptotic cell death and restores the function of DPSCs and oral epithelial cells. NAC inhibits HEMA-mediated toxicity through induction of differentiation in DPSCs, because the genes for dentin sialoprotein, osteopontin (OPN), osteocalcin, and alkaline phosphatase, which are induced during differentiation, are also induced by NAC. Unlike NAC, vitamins E and C, which are known antioxidant compounds, failed to prevent either HEMA-mediated cell death or the decrease in VEGF secretion by human DPSCs. More importantly, when added either alone or in combination with HEMA, vitamin E and vitamin C did not increase the gene expression for OPN, and in addition vitamin E inhibited the protective effect of NAC on DPSCs. NAC inhibited the HEMA-mediated decrease in NF-kappaB activity, thus providing a survival mechanism for the cells. Overall, the studies reported in this paper indicate that undifferentiated DPSCs have exquisite sensitivity to HEMA-induced cell death, and their differentiation in response to NAC resulted in an increased NF-kappaB activity, which might have provided the basis for their increased protection from HEMA-mediated functional loss and cell death.

  14. Therapeutic potential of lung epithelial progenitor cells derived from embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wetsel, Rick A; Wang, Dachun; Calame, Daniel G

    2011-01-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells derived from preimplantation blastocysts and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells generated from somatic cell sources are pluripotent and capable of indefinite expansion in vitro. They provide a possible unlimited source of cells that could be differentiated into lung progenitor cells for potential clinical use in pulmonary regenerative medicine. Because of inherent difficulties in deriving endodermal cells from undifferentiated cell cultures, applications using lung epithelial cells derived from ES and iPS cells have lagged behind similar efforts devoted to other tissues, such as the heart and spinal cord. However, during the past several years, significant advances in culture, differentiation, and purification protocols, as well as in bioengineering methodologies, have fueled enthusiasm for the development of stem cell-based lung therapeutics. This article provides an overview of recent research achievements and discusses future technical challenges that must be met before the promise of stem cell applications for lung disease can be realized.

  15. Cell transplantation therapies for spinal cord injury focusing on induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Masaya; Okano, Hideyuki

    2013-01-01

    Stimulated by the 2012 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine awarded for Shinya Yamanaka and Sir John Gurdon, there is an increasing interest in the induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells and reprograming technologies in medical science. While iPS cells are expected to open a new era providing enormous opportunities in biomedical sciences in terms of cell therapies and regenerative medicine, safety-related concerns for iPS cell-based cell therapy should be resolved prior to the clinical application of iPS cells. In this review, the pre-clinical investigations of cell therapy for spinal cord injury (SCI) using neural stem/progenitor cells derived from iPS cells, and their safety issues in vivo, are outlined. We also wish to discuss the strategy for the first human trails of iPS cell-based cell therapy for SCI patients.

  16. Pleiotrophin Induces Nitric Oxide Dependent Migration of Endothelial Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Heiss, Christian; Wong, Maelene L.; Block, Vanessa I.; Lao, David; Real, Wendy May; Yeghiazarians, Yerem; Lee, Randall J.; Springer, Matthew L.

    2009-01-01

    Pleiotrophin (PTN) is produced under ischemic conditions and has been shown to induce angiogenesis in vivo. We studied whether or not PTN exerts chemotaxis of pro-angiogenic early endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), a population of circulating cells that have been reported to participate in and stimulate angiogenesis. Chemotaxis of EPCs, isolated from blood of healthy humans (n=5), was measured in transwell assays. PTN at 10–500 ng/mL elicited dose-dependent chemotaxis of both EPCs and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), but not of human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (CASMCs) and T98G glioblastoma cells that lack PTN receptors. The degree of chemotaxis was comparable to that induced by the angiogenic factors VEGF and SDF-1α. Chemotaxis to PTN was blocked by the NOS inhibitors L-NNA and L-NMMA, the NO scavenger PTIO, the phosphoinositide-3 kinase inhibitor wortmannin, and the guanylyl cyclase inhibitor ODQ, suggesting dependence of EPC chemotaxis on these pathways. PTN induced NOS-dependent production of NO to a similar degree as did VEGF, as indicated by the NO indicator DAF-2. PTN increased proliferation in EPCs and HUVECs to a similar extent as VEGF, but did not induce proliferation of CASMCs. While L-NNA abolished PTN-induced migration in EPCs and HUVECs, it did not inhibit PTN- and VEGF-enhanced proliferation and also caused proliferation by itself. These data suggest that PTN may mediate its pro-angiogenic effects by increasing the local number of not only endothelial cells but also early EPCs at angiogenic sites. PMID:17960557

  17. [Mechanisms of gamma-inducible death of Jurkat cells line].

    PubMed

    Gamkrelidze, M M; Bezhitashvili, N D; Pavliashvili, A T; Mchedlishvili, T V; Sanikidze, T V

    2008-06-01

    Mechanisms of radio-inducible death of Jurkat cells were investigated. Human lymphoblastoid T-cell line Jurkat is widely established model for studying apoptosis mechanisms. The cell was radiated by "Teragam" (Czech Republic) by dose 2 g during 1 minute. After radiation cells were incubated at standard conditions during 24 hours. After gamma radiation in cell population amount of cells in gaplois (apoptotic G 0) stage was increased 8,2 folds, in diplois (G 0/G1) stage - by 17%, in synthetic (S) stage decreased by 35% and tetraploid (G2/M) stage by 73% in comparison to control group. It was revealed intensive production of free radicals of oxygen and nitric oxide and decreasing activity of antioxidant enzymes (superoxidismutasa, catalasa and glutathione peroxidase). Revealed dependence between intensification of apoptosis and radiation-induced arrest of cell cycle G2/M phase may be determined by excess amount of free oxygen and nitrogen radicals generated in Jurkat cells as a result of nondirect effects of low doses of gamma radiation.

  18. Laser-induced endothelial cell activation supports fibrin formation

    PubMed Central

    Atkinson, Ben T.; Jasuja, Reema; Chen, Vivien M.; Nandivada, Prathima; Furie, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    Laser-induced vessel wall injury leads to rapid thrombus formation in an animal thrombosis model. The target of laser injury is the endothelium. We monitored calcium mobilization to assess activation of the laser-targeted cells. Infusion of Fluo-4 AM, a calcium-sensitive fluorochrome, into the mouse circulation resulted in dye uptake in the endothelium and circulating hematopoietic cells. Laser injury in mice treated with eptifibatide to inhibit platelet accumulation resulted in rapid calcium mobilization within the endothelium. Calcium mobilization correlated with the secretion of lysosomal-associated membrane protein 1, a marker of endothelium activation. In the absence of eptifibatide, endothelium activation preceded platelet accumu-lation. Laser activation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells loaded with Fluo-4 resulted in a rapid increase in calcium mobilization associated cell fluorescence similar to that induced by adenosine diphosphate (10μM) or thrombin (1 U/mL). Laser activation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells in the presence of corn trypsin inhibitor treated human plasma devoid of platelets and cell microparticles led to fibrin for-mation that was inhibited by an inhibitory monoclonal anti–tissue factor antibody. Thus laser injury leads to rapid endothelial cell activation. The laser activated endothelial cells can support formation of tenase and prothrombinase and may be a source of activated tissue factor as well. PMID:20675401

  19. Monitoring of Viral Induced Cell Death Using Real Time Cell Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-11-01

    UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED Monitoring of Viral-Induced Cell Death Using Real-Time Cell Analysis David Thirkettle-Watts and Penny...identification of cytopathic effect (CPE) by eye. To ascertain whether the xCELLigence real-time cell analysis (RTCA) platform could be used to...infection of cells . RELEASE LIMITATION Approved for public release UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED Produced by Land Division 506 Lorimer

  20. Mercury induces inflammatory mediator release from human mast cells

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Mercury is known to be neurotoxic, but its effects on the immune system are less well known. Mast cells are involved in allergic reactions, but also in innate and acquired immunity, as well as in inflammation. Many patients with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) have "allergic" symptoms; moreover, the prevalence of ASD in patients with mastocytosis, characterized by numerous hyperactive mast cells in most tissues, is 10-fold higher than the general population suggesting mast cell involvement. We, therefore, investigated the effect of mercuric chloride (HgCl2) on human mast cell activation. Methods Human leukemic cultured LAD2 mast cells and normal human umbilical cord blood-derived cultured mast cells (hCBMCs) were stimulated by HgCl2 (0.1-10 μM) for either 10 min for beta-hexosaminidase release or 24 hr for measuring vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and IL-6 release by ELISA. Results HgCl2 induced a 2-fold increase in β-hexosaminidase release, and also significant VEGF release at 0.1 and 1 μM (311 ± 32 pg/106 cells and 443 ± 143 pg/106 cells, respectively) from LAD2 mast cells compared to control cells (227 ± 17 pg/106 cells, n = 5, p < 0.05). Addition of HgCl2 (0.1 μM) to the proinflammatory neuropeptide substance P (SP, 0.1 μM) had synergestic action in inducing VEGF from LAD2 mast cells. HgCl2 also stimulated significant VEGF release (360 ± 100 pg/106 cells at 1 μM, n = 5, p < 0.05) from hCBMCs compared to control cells (182 ± 57 pg/106 cells), and IL-6 release (466 ± 57 pg/106 cells at 0.1 μM) compared to untreated cells (13 ± 25 pg/106 cells, n = 5, p < 0.05). Addition of HgCl2 (0.1 μM) to SP (5 μM) further increased IL-6 release. Conclusions HgCl2 stimulates VEGF and IL-6 release from human mast cells. This phenomenon could disrupt the blood-brain-barrier and permit brain inflammation. As a result, the findings of the present study provide a biological mechanism for how low levels of mercury may contribute to ASD

  1. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells: Challenges and Opportunities for Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Sachamitr, Patty; Hackett, Simon; Fairchild, Paul Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Despite recent advances in cancer treatment over the past 30 years, therapeutic options remain limited and do not always offer a cure for malignancy. Given that tumor-associated antigens (TAA) are, by definition, self-proteins, the need to productively engage autoreactive T cells remains at the heart of strategies for cancer immunotherapy. These have traditionally focused on the administration of autologous monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDC) pulsed with TAA, or the ex vivo expansion and adoptive transfer of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) as a source of TAA-specific cytotoxic T cells (CTL). Although such approaches have shown some efficacy, success has been limited by the poor capacity of moDC to cross present exogenous TAA to the CD8+ T-cell repertoire and the potential for exhaustion of CTL expanded ex vivo. Recent advances in induced pluripotency offer opportunities to generate patient-specific stem cell lines with the potential to differentiate in vitro into cell types whose properties may help address these issues. Here, we review recent success in the differentiation of NK cells from human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells as well as minor subsets of dendritic cells (DCs) with therapeutic potential, including CD141+XCR1+ DC, capable of cross presenting TAA to naïve CD8+ T cells. Furthermore, we review recent progress in the use of TIL as the starting material for the derivation of iPSC lines, thereby capturing their antigen specificity in a self-renewing stem cell line, from which potentially unlimited numbers of naïve TAA-specific T cells may be differentiated, free of the risks of exhaustion. PMID:24860566

  2. Quercetin-Induced Cell Death in Human Papillary Thyroid Cancer (B-CPAP) Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mutlu Altundağ, Ergül; Kasacı, Tolga; Yılmaz, Ayşe Mine; Karademir, Betül; Koçtürk, Semra; Taga, Yavuz; Yalçın, A. Süha

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we have investigated the antiproliferative effect of quercetin on human papillary thyroid cancer cells and determined the apoptotic mechanisms underlying its actions. We have used different concentrations of quercetin to induce apoptosis and measured cell viability. Apoptosis and cell cycle analysis was determined by flow cytometry using Annexin V and propidium iodide. Finally, we have measured changes in caspase-3 and cleaved poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) protein expression levels as hallmarks of apoptosis and Hsp90 protein expression level as a marker of proteasome activity in treated and control cells. Quercetin treatment of human papillary thyroid cancer cells resulted in decreased cell proliferation and increased rate of apoptosis by caspase activation. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that quercetin induces cancer cell apoptosis by downregulating the levels of Hsp90. In conclusion, we have shown that quercetin induces downregulation of Hsp90 expression that may be involved in the decrease of chymotrypsin-like proteasome activity which, in order, induces inhibition of growth and causes cell death in thyroid cancer cells. Thus, quercetin appears to be a promising candidate drug for Hsp90 downregulation and apoptosis of thyroid cancer cells. PMID:27057371

  3. URI prevents potassium dichromate-induced oxidative stress and cell death in gastric cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Dongwei; Xu, Zhonghai; Hu, Xiaoxia; Zhang, Fei; Bian, Huiqin; Li, Na; Wang, Qian; Lu, Yaojuan; Zheng, Qiping; Gu, Junxia

    2016-01-01

    Chromium VI can provoke oxidative stress, DNA damage, cytotoxicity, mutagenesis and carcinogenesis. Aberrantly high level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) has been associated with oxidative stress and subsequent DNA damage. Notably, multiple previous studies have shown the increased level of ROS in chromium (VI) induced oxidative stress, but its effect on cell death and the underlying mechanism remain to be determined. In this study, we aimed to investigate the role of URI, an unconventional prefoldin RBP5 interactor, in potassium dichromate induced oxidative stress and cell death through in vitro loss-of-function studies. We have shown that knockdown of URI in human gastric cancer SGC-7901 cells by URI siRNA enhanced potassium dichromate-induced production of ROS. The level of rH2AX, a marker of DNA damage, was significantly increased, along with a reduced cell viability in URI siRNA treated cells that were also exposed to potassium dichromate. Comet assay showed that URI knockdown increased the tail moment in potassium dichromate-treated SGC-7901 cells. Accordingly, the cell rates of apoptosis and necrosis were also increased in URI knockdown cells treated with potassium dichromate at different concentrations. Together, these results suggest that URI is preventive for the oxidative stress and cell death induced by potassium dichromate, which potentially leads to cancer cell survival and therapeutic resistance. PMID:28078011

  4. Tumourigenicity and Immunogenicity of Induced Neural Stem Cell Grafts Versus Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Grafts in Syngeneic Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Mou; Yao, Hui; Dong, Qin; Zhang, Hongtian; Yang, Zhijun; Yang, Yang; Zhu, Jianwei; Xu, Minhui; Xu, Ruxiang

    2016-01-01

    Along with the development of stem cell-based therapies for central nervous system (CNS) disease, the safety of stem cell grafts in the CNS, such as induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and induced neural stem cells (iNSCs), should be of primary concern. To provide scientific basis for evaluating the safety of these stem cells, we determined their tumourigenicity and immunogenicity in syngeneic mouse brain. Both iPSCs and embryonic stem cells (ESCs) were able to form tumours in the mouse brain, leading to tissue destruction along with immune cell infiltration. In contrast, no evidence of tumour formation, brain injury or immune rejection was observed with iNSCs, neural stem cells (NSCs) or mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). With the help of gene ontology (GO) enrichment analysis, we detected significantly elevated levels of chemokines in the brain tissue and serum of mice that developed tumours after ESC or iPSC transplantation. Moreover, we also investigated the interactions between chemokines and NF-κB signalling and found that NF-κB activation was positively correlated with the constantly rising levels of chemokines, and vice versa. In short, iNSC grafts, which lacked any resulting tumourigenicity or immunogenicity, are safer than iPSC grafts. PMID:27417157

  5. BONE FORMATION INDUCED IN MOUSE THIGH BY CULTURED HUMAN CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, H. Clarke; Coulter, P. R.

    1967-01-01

    Cultured FL human amnion cells injected intramuscularly into cortisone-conditioned mice proliferate to form discrete nodules which become surrounded by fibroblasts. Within 12 days, fibroblastic zones differentiate into cartilage which calcifies to form bone. Experiments were conducted to test the hypothesis that FL cells behave as an inductor of bone formation. In the electron microscope, FL cells were readily distinguished from surrounding fibroblasts. Transitional forms between the two cell types were not recognized. Stains for acid mucopolysaccharides emphasized the sharp boundary between metachromatic fibroblastic and cartilaginous zones and nonmetachromatic FL cells. 35S was taken up preferentially by fibroblasts and chondrocytes and then deposited extracellularly in a manner suggesting active secretion of sulfated mucopolysaccharides. FL cells showed negligible 35S utilization and secretion. FL cells, labeled in vitro with thymidine-3H, were injected and followed radioautographically, during bone formation. Nuclear label of injected FL cells did not appear in adjacent fibroblasts in quantities sufficient to indicate origin of the latter from FL cells. The minimal fibroblast nuclear labeling seen may represent reutilization of label from necrotic FL cells. It is suggested that FL cells injected into the mouse thigh induced cartilage and bone formation by host fibroblasts. PMID:4226746

  6. Bone formation induced in mouse thigh by cultured human cells.

    PubMed

    Anderson, H C; Coulter, P R

    1967-04-01

    Cultured FL human amnion cells injected intramuscularly into cortisone-conditioned mice proliferate to form discrete nodules which become surrounded by fibroblasts. Within 12 days, fibroblastic zones differentiate into cartilage which calcifies to form bone. Experiments were conducted to test the hypothesis that FL cells behave as an inductor of bone formation. In the electron microscope, FL cells were readily distinguished from surrounding fibroblasts. Transitional forms between the two cell types were not recognized. Stains for acid mucopolysaccharides emphasized the sharp boundary between metachromatic fibroblastic and cartilaginous zones and nonmetachromatic FL cells. (35)S was taken up preferentially by fibroblasts and chondrocytes and then deposited extracellularly in a manner suggesting active secretion of sulfated mucopolysaccharides. FL cells showed negligible (35)S utilization and secretion. FL cells, labeled in vitro with thymidine-(3)H, were injected and followed radioautographically, during bone formation. Nuclear label of injected FL cells did not appear in adjacent fibroblasts in quantities sufficient to indicate origin of the latter from FL cells. The minimal fibroblast nuclear labeling seen may represent reutilization of label from necrotic FL cells. It is suggested that FL cells injected into the mouse thigh induced cartilage and bone formation by host fibroblasts.

  7. PTPN2 attenuates T-cell lymphopenia-induced proliferation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiede, Florian; La Gruta, Nicole L.; Tiganis, Tony

    2014-01-01

    When the peripheral T-cell pool is depleted, T cells undergo homoeostatic expansion. This expansion is reliant on the recognition of self-antigens and/or cytokines, in particular interleukin-7. The T cell-intrinsic mechanisms that prevent excessive homoeostatic T-cell responses and consequent overt autoreactivity remain poorly defined. Here we show that protein tyrosine phosphatase N2 (PTPN2) is elevated in naive T cells leaving the thymus to restrict homoeostatic T-cell proliferation and prevent excess responses to self-antigens in the periphery. PTPN2-deficient CD8+ T cells undergo rapid lymphopenia-induced proliferation (LIP) when transferred into lymphopenic hosts and acquire the characteristics of antigen-experienced effector T cells. The enhanced LIP is attributed to elevated T-cell receptor-dependent, but not interleukin-7-dependent responses, results in a skewed T-cell receptor repertoire and the development of autoimmunity. Our results identify a major mechanism by which homoeostatic T-cell responses are tuned to prevent the development of autoimmune and inflammatory disorders.

  8. Glutathione-Induced Calcium Shifts in Chick Retinal Glial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, Hercules R.; Ferraz, Gabriel; Ferreira, Gustavo C.; Ribeiro-Resende, Victor T.; Chiarini, Luciana B.; do Nascimento, José Luiz M.; Matos Oliveira, Karen Renata H.; Pereira, Tiago de Lima; Ferreira, Leonardo G. B.; Kubrusly, Regina C.; Faria, Robson X.

    2016-01-01

    Neuroglia interactions are essential for the nervous system and in the retina Müller cells interact with most of the neurons in a symbiotic manner. Glutathione (GSH) is a low-molecular weight compound that undertakes major antioxidant roles in neurons and glia, however, whether this compound could act as a signaling molecule in neurons and/or glia is currently unknown. Here we used embryonic avian retina to obtain mixed retinal cells or purified Müller glia cells in culture to evaluate calcium shifts induced by GSH. A dose response curve (0.1–10mM) showed that 5–10mM GSH, induced calcium shifts exclusively in glial cells (later labeled and identified as 2M6 positive cells), while neurons responded to 50mM KCl (labeled as βIII tubulin positive cells). BBG 100nM, a P2X7 blocker, inhibited the effects of GSH on Müller glia. However, addition of DNQX 70μM and MK-801 20μM, non-NMDA and NMDA blockers, had no effect on GSH calcium induced shift. Oxidized glutathione (GSSG) at 5mM failed to induce calcium mobilization in glia cells, indicating that the antioxidant and/or structural features of GSH are essential to promote elevations in cytoplasmic calcium levels. Indeed, a short GSH pulse (60s) protects Müller glia from oxidative damage after 30 min of incubation with 0.1% H2O2. Finally, GSH induced GABA release from chick embryonic retina, mixed neuron-glia or from Müller cell cultures, which were inhibited by BBG or in the absence of sodium. GSH also induced propidium iodide uptake in Müller cells in culture in a P2X7 receptor dependent manner. Our data suggest that GSH, in addition to antioxidant effects, could act signaling calcium shifts at the millimolar range particularly in Müller glia, and could regulate the release of GABA, with additional protective effects on retinal neuron-glial circuit. PMID:27078878

  9. Glutathione-Induced Calcium Shifts in Chick Retinal Glial Cells.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Hercules R; Ferraz, Gabriel; Ferreira, Gustavo C; Ribeiro-Resende, Victor T; Chiarini, Luciana B; do Nascimento, José Luiz M; Matos Oliveira, Karen Renata H; Pereira, Tiago de Lima; Ferreira, Leonardo G B; Kubrusly, Regina C; Faria, Robson X; Herculano, Anderson Manoel; Reis, Ricardo A de Melo

    2016-01-01

    Neuroglia interactions are essential for the nervous system and in the retina Müller cells interact with most of the neurons in a symbiotic manner. Glutathione (GSH) is a low-molecular weight compound that undertakes major antioxidant roles in neurons and glia, however, whether this compound could act as a signaling molecule in neurons and/or glia is currently unknown. Here we used embryonic avian retina to obtain mixed retinal cells or purified Müller glia cells in culture to evaluate calcium shifts induced by GSH. A dose response curve (0.1-10 mM) showed that 5-10 mM GSH, induced calcium shifts exclusively in glial cells (later labeled and identified as 2M6 positive cells), while neurons responded to 50 mM KCl (labeled as βIII tubulin positive cells). BBG 100 nM, a P2X7 blocker, inhibited the effects of GSH on Müller glia. However, addition of DNQX 70 μM and MK-801 20 μM, non-NMDA and NMDA blockers, had no effect on GSH calcium induced shift. Oxidized glutathione (GSSG) at 5 mM failed to induce calcium mobilization in glia cells, indicating that the antioxidant and/or structural features of GSH are essential to promote elevations in cytoplasmic calcium levels. Indeed, a short GSH pulse (60s) protects Müller glia from oxidative damage after 30 min of incubation with 0.1% H2O2. Finally, GSH induced GABA release from chick embryonic retina, mixed neuron-glia or from Müller cell cultures, which were inhibited by BBG or in the absence of sodium. GSH also induced propidium iodide uptake in Müller cells in culture in a P2X7 receptor dependent manner. Our data suggest that GSH, in addition to antioxidant effects, could act signaling calcium shifts at the millimolar range particularly in Müller glia, and could regulate the release of GABA, with additional protective effects on retinal neuron-glial circuit.

  10. [Experiment on inducing human periodontal ligament stem cells into adipose cells].

    PubMed

    He, Hui-xia; Liu, Hong-chen; Wang, Dong-sheng; Cao, Jun-kai; Zhang, Hai-zhong; E, Ling-ling

    2010-04-01

    To explore the capability of human periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) differentiating into adipose cells in vitro and to determine their changes in cell morphology, structure and function during differentiation. PDLSCs isolated by magnetic-activated cell selection were treated continuously with adipogenic medium for 21 d. Then the cell morphology, ultrastructure, adipose specific markers of low density lipoprotein (LPL) and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-gamma (PPAR-gamma) were analyzed by inverted contrast microscope, trans mission electron microscope (TEM), flow cytometry, immunofluorescence, RT-PCR and Western blot, respectively. These adipose-like cells were also identified by oil red O staining to determine the formation of lipid droplet, and the non-induced cells were used as control. After continuous induction, the treated cells differentiated into adipose-like cells with round shape, and large amount of lipid drop in cytoplasm. 96.54% of the PDLSCs were found to differentiate into adipose cells as showed by flow cytometry, the specific markers of LPL mRNA and PPAR-gamma mRNA, and oil red O staining, respectively. Further, PPAR-gamma protein was detected in the induced cells in a time-dependent manner. Human PDLSCs have the potential of differentiating into adipose cells under appropriate condition, and the differentiated cells exhibited characteristics of adipose cells both from cell morphology and from their functions.

  11. Defining the chromatin signature of inducible genes in T cells

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Specific chromatin characteristics, especially the modification status of the core histone proteins, are associated with active and inactive genes. There is growing evidence that genes that respond to environmental or developmental signals may possess distinct chromatin marks. Using a T cell model and both genome-wide and gene-focused approaches, we examined the chromatin characteristics of genes that respond to T cell activation. Results To facilitate comparison of genes with similar basal expression levels, we used expression-profiling data to bin genes according to their basal expression levels. We found that inducible genes in the lower basal expression bins, especially rapidly induced primary response genes, were more likely than their non-responsive counterparts to display the histone modifications of active genes, have RNA polymerase II (Pol II) at their promoters and show evidence of ongoing basal elongation. There was little or no evidence for the presence of active chromatin marks in the absence of promoter Pol II on these inducible genes. In addition, we identified a subgroup of genes with active promoter chromatin marks and promoter Pol II but no evidence of elongation. Following T cell activation, we find little evidence for a major shift in the active chromatin signature around inducible gene promoters but many genes recruit more Pol II and show increased evidence of elongation. Conclusions These results suggest that the majority of inducible genes are primed for activation by having an active chromatin signature and promoter Pol II with or without ongoing elongation. PMID:19807913

  12. Sulfated lentinan induced mitochondrial dysfunction leads to programmed cell death of tobacco BY-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jie; Wang, Yaofeng; Shen, Lili; Qian, Yumei; Yang, Jinguang; Wang, Fenglong

    2017-04-01

    Sulphated lentinan (sLTN) is known to act as a resistance inducer by causing programmed cell death (PCD) in tobacco suspension cells. However, the underlying mechanism of this effect is largely unknown. Using tobacco BY-2 cell model, morphological and biochemical studies revealed that mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and mitochondrial dysfunction contribute to sLNT induced PCD. Cell viability, and HO/PI fluorescence imaging and TUNEL assays confirmed a typical cell death process caused by sLNT. Acetylsalicylic acid (an ROS scavenger), diphenylene iodonium (an inhibitor of NADPH oxidases) and protonophore carbonyl cyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenyl hydrazone (a protonophore and an uncoupler of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation) inhibited sLNT-induced H2O2 generation and cell death, suggesting that ROS generation linked, at least partly, to a mitochondrial dysfunction and caspase-like activation. This conclusion was further confirmed by double-stained cells with the mitochondria-specific marker MitoTracker RedCMXRos and the ROS probe H2DCFDA. Moreover, the sLNT-induced PCD of BY-2 cells required cellular metabolism as up-regulation of the AOX family gene transcripts and induction of the SA biosynthesis, the TCA cycle, and miETC related genes were observed. It is concluded that mitochondria play an essential role in the signaling pathway of sLNT-induced ROS generation, which possibly provided new insight into the sLNT-mediated antiviral response, including PCD.

  13. IL-1 beta induces dendritic cells to produce IL-12.

    PubMed

    Wesa, A K; Galy, A

    2001-08-01

    The cytokine IL-12, a product of dendritic cells (DC), plays a major role in cellular immunity, notably by inducing lymphocytes to produce IFN-gamma. Microbial products, T cell signals and cytokines induce the production of IL-12. Here, IL-1 beta is identified as a new IL-12-inducing agent, acting conjointly with CD40 ligand (CD40L) on human monocyte-derived DC in vitro. The effects of IL-1 beta were dose dependent, specifically blocked by neutralizing antibodies, and were observed both in immature and mature DC. Immature DC secreted more IL-12 than mature DC, but the effects of IL-1 beta were not due to a block of DC maturation as determined by analysis of DC surface markers. The mechanisms of action of IL-1 beta could be contrasted to that of other inducers of IL-12 such as IFN-gamma and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Either IL-1 beta or IFN-gamma co-induced IL-12 with CD40L but conjointly, IL-1 beta, CD40L and IFN-gamma synergized, inducing very high levels of IL-12. The effects of IL-1 beta differed from those of LPS in that IL-1 beta, unlike LPS, could not induce IL-12 solely after IFN-gamma priming; and when combined with CD40L, IL-1 beta, unlike LPS, induced little IL-10. The mechanism of action of IL-1 beta involves IL-12 alpha mRNA up-regulation, and we show that the combination of CD40L and IL-1 beta induces high levels of IL-12 alpha and IL-12 beta mRNA in DC. Altogether, these results delineate a new mechanism linking adaptive and innate immune responses for the regulation of IL-12 production in DC and for the role of IL-1 beta in the development of cellular immunity.

  14. Radiation-induced bystander signaling from somatic cells to germ cells in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaoying; Sun, Jie; Bian, Po; Chen, Lianyun; Zhan, Furu; Wang, Jun; Xu, An; Wang, Yugang; Hei, Tom K; Wu, Lijun

    2013-09-01

    Recently, radiation-induced bystander effects (RIBE) have been studied in mouse models in vivo, which clearly demonstrated bystander effects among somatic cells. However, there is currently no evidence for RIBE between somatic cells and germ cells in animal models in vivo. In the current study, the model animal Caenorhabditis elegans was used to investigate the bystander signaling from somatic cells to germ cells, as well as underlying mechanisms. C. elegans body size allows for precise microbeam irradiation and the abundant mutant strains for genetic dissection relative to currently adopted mouse models make it ideal for such analysis. Our results showed that irradiation of posterior pharynx bulbs and tails of C. elegans enhanced the level of germ cell apoptosis in bystander gonads. The irradiation of posterior pharynx bulbs also increased the level of DNA damage in bystander germ cells and genomic instability in the F1 progeny of irradiated worms, suggesting a potential carcinogenic risk in progeny even only somatic cells of parents are exposed to ionizing radiation (IR). It was also shown that DNA damage-induced germ cell death machinery and MAPK signaling pathways were both involved in the induction of germ cell apoptosis by microbeam induced bystander signaling, indicating a complex cooperation among multiple signaling pathways for bystander effects from somatic cells to germ cells.

  15. The fungicide mancozeb induces toxic effects on mammalian granulosa cells

    SciTech Connect

    Paro, Rita; Tiboni, Gian Mario; Buccione, Roberto; Rossi, Gianna; Cellini, Valerio; Canipari, Rita; Cecconi, Sandra

    2012-04-15

    The ethylene-bis-dithiocarbamate mancozeb is a widely used fungicide with low reported toxicity in mammals. In mice, mancozeb induces embryo apoptosis, affects oocyte meiotic spindle morphology and impairs fertilization rate even when used at very low concentrations. We evaluated the toxic effects of mancozeb on the mouse and human ovarian somatic granulosa cells. We examined parameters such as cell morphology, induction of apoptosis, and p53 expression levels. Mouse granulosa cells exposed to mancozeb underwent a time- and dose-dependent modification of their morphology, and acquired the ability to migrate but not to proliferate. The expression level of p53, in terms of mRNA and protein content, decreased significantly in comparison with unexposed cells, but no change in apoptosis was recorded. Toxic effects could be attributed, at least in part, to the presence of ethylenthiourea (ETU), the main mancozeb catabolite, which was found in culture medium. Human granulosa cells also showed dose-dependent morphological changes and reduced p53 expression levels after exposure to mancozeb. Altogether, these results indicate that mancozeb affects the somatic cells of the mammalian ovarian follicles by inducing a premalignant-like status, and that such damage occurs to the same extent in both mouse and human GC. These results further substantiate the concept that mancozeb should be regarded as a reproductive toxicant. Highlights: ► The fungicide mancozeb affects oocyte spindle morphology and fertilization rate. ► We investigated the toxic effects of mancozeb on mouse and human granulosa cells. ► Granulosa cells modify their morphology and expression level of p53. ► Mancozeb induces a premalignant-like status in exposed cells.

  16. Flavonoids inhibit cell growth and induce apoptosis in B16 melanoma 4A5 cells.

    PubMed

    Iwashita, K; Kobori, M; Yamaki, K; Tsushida, T

    2000-09-01

    We investigated the growth inhibitory activity of several flavonoids, including apigenin, luteolin, kaempherol, quercetin, butein, isoliquiritigenin, naringenin, genistein, and daizein against B16 mouse melanoma 4A5 cells. Isoliquiritigenin and butein, belonging to the chalcone group, markedly suppressed the growth of B16 melanoma cells and induced cell death. The other flavonoids tested showed little growth inhibitory activity and scarcely caused cell death. In cells treated with isoliquiritigenin or butein, condensation of nuclei and fragmentation of nuclear DNA, which are typical phenomena of apoptosis, were observed by Hoechst 33258 staining and by agarose gel electrophoresis of DNA. Flowcytometric analysis showed that isoliquiritigenin and butein increased the proportion of hypodiploid cells in the population of B16 melanoma cells. These results demonstrate that isoliquiritigenin and butein inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis in B16 melanoma cells. Extracellular glucose decreased the proportion of hypodiploid cells that appeared as a result of isoliquiritigenin treatment. p53 was not detected in cells treated with either of these chalcones, however, protein of the Bcl-2 family were detected. The level of expression of Bax in cells treated with either of these chalcones was markedly elevated and the level of Bcl-XL decreased slightly. Isoliquiritigenin did not affect Bcl-2 expression, but butein down-regulated Bcl-2 expression. From these results, it seems that the pathway by which the chalcones induce apoptosis may be independent of p53 and dependent on proteins of the Bcl-2 family. It was supposed that isoliquiritigenin induces apoptosis in B16 cells by a mechanism involving inhibition of glucose transmembrane transport and promotion of Bax expression. On the other hand, it was suggested that butein induces apoptosis via down-regulation of Bcl-2 expression and promotion of Bax expression. This mechanism differs from the isoliquiritigenin induction

  17. NAP reduces murine microvascular endothelial cells proliferation induced by hyperglycemia.

    PubMed

    D'Amico, Agata Grazia; Scuderi, Soraya; Maugeri, Grazia; Cavallaro, Sebastiano; Drago, Filippo; D'Agata, Velia

    2014-11-01

    Hyperglycemia has been identified as a risk factor responsible for micro- and macrovascular complications in diabetes. NAP (Davunetide) is a peptide whose neuroprotective actions are widely demonstrated, although its biological role on endothelial dysfunctions induced by hyperglycemia remains uninvestigated. In the present study we hypothesized that NAP could play a protective role on hyperglycemia-induced endothelial cell proliferation. To this end we investigated the effects of NAP on an in vitro model of murine microvascular endothelial cells grown in high glucose for 7 days. The MTT (3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay and cyclin D1 protein expression analysis revealed that NAP treatment significantly reduces viability and proliferation of the cells. Hyperglycemia induced the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase and/or phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase/Akt pathways in a time-dependent manner. NAP treatment reduced the phosphorylation levels of ERK and AKT in cells grown in high glucose. These evidences suggest that NAP might be effective in the regulation of endothelial dysfunction induced by hyperglycemia.

  18. NITROTYROSINE ATTENUATES RSV-INDUCED INFLAMMATION IN AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nitrotyrosine attenuates RSV-induced inflammation in airway epithelial cells. Joleen Soukup, Zuowei Li, Susanne Becker and Yuh-Chin Huang. NHEERL, ORD, USEPA, RTP, North Carolina, CEMALB, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina

    Nitrotyrosine (NO2Tyr) is a...

  19. NITROTYROSINE ATTENUATES RSV-INDUCED INFLAMMATION IN AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nitrotyrosine attenuates RSV-induced inflammation in airway epithelial cells. Joleen Soukup, Zuowei Li, Susanne Becker and Yuh-Chin Huang. NHEERL, ORD, USEPA, RTP, North Carolina, CEMALB, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina

    Nitrotyrosine (NO2Tyr) is a...

  20. Calcium accentuates injury induced by ethanol in human gastric cells.

    PubMed

    Kokoska, E R; Smith, G S; Deshpande, Y; Wolff, A B; Rieckenberg, C; Miller, T A

    1999-01-01

    The mechanism(s) whereby ethanol induces cellular injury remains poorly understood. Furthermore, the role of calcium in gastric mucosal injury under in vitro conditions is poorly defined. The major objectives of this study were to (1) define the temporal relationship between intracellular calcium accumulation induced by ethanol and cellular injury, (2) characterize the mechanism(s) whereby ethanol increases cellular calcium content, and (3) determine whether calcium removal would attenuate ethanol-induced cellular injury. Human gastric cells (AGS) were used for all experiments. Sustained intracellular calcium accumulation induced by ethanol, but not transient changes, preceded and directly correlated with cellular injury. Cells exposed to damaging concentrations of ethanol demonstrated an initial calcium surge that appeared to be a consequence of inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3) generation and subsequent internal store release followed by a sustained plateau resulting from extracellular calcium influx through store-operated calcium channels. Finally, both morphologic (cellular injury) and functional (clearance of bovine serum albumin) changes induced by ethanol were significantly attenuated when extracellular Ca(+&plus) influx was prevented, and further decreased when intracellular Ca(++) stores were depleted. These data indicate that calcium plays a significant role in cellular injury induced by ethanol.

  1. Involvement of ethylene and lipid signalling in cadmium-induced programmed cell death in tomato suspension cells.

    PubMed

    Yakimova, E T; Kapchina-Toteva, V M; Laarhoven, L-J; Harren, F M; Woltering, E J

    2006-10-01

    Cadmium-induced cell death was studied in suspension-cultured tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) cells (line MsK8) treated with CdSO(4). Within 24 h, cadmium treatment induced cell death in a concentration-dependent manner. Cell cultures showed recovery after 2-3 days which indicates the existence of an adaptation mechanism. Cadmium-induced cell death was alleviated by the addition of sub muM concentrations of peptide inhibitors specific to human caspases indicating that cell death proceeds through a mechanism with similarities to animal programmed cell death (PCD, apoptosis). Cadmium-induced cell death was accompanied by an increased production of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and simultaneous addition of antioxidants greatly reduced cell death. Inhibitors of phospholipase C (PLC) and phospholipase D (PLD) signalling pathway intermediates reduced cadmium-induced cell death. Treatment with the G-protein activator mastoparan and a cell permeable analogue of the lipid signal second messenger phosphatidic acid (PA) induced cell death. Ethylene, while not inducing cell death when applied alone, stimulated cadmium-induced cell death. Application of the ethylene biosynthesis inhibitor aminoethoxy vinylglycine (AVG) reduced cadmium-induced cell death, and this effect was alleviated by simultaneous treatment with ethylene. Together the results show that cadmium induces PCD exhibiting apoptotic-like features. The cell death process requires increased H(2)O(2) production and activation of PLC, PLD and ethylene signalling pathways.

  2. Interferon-inducible effector mechanisms in cell-autonomous immunity.

    PubMed

    MacMicking, John D

    2012-04-25

    Interferons (IFNs) induce the expression of hundreds of genes as part of an elaborate antimicrobial programme designed to combat infection in all nucleated cells - a process termed cell-autonomous immunity. As described in this Review, recent genomic and subgenomic analyses have begun to assign functional properties to novel IFN-inducible effector proteins that restrict bacteria, protozoa and viruses in different subcellular compartments and at different stages of the pathogen life cycle. Several newly described host defence factors also participate in canonical oxidative and autophagic pathways by spatially coordinating their activities to enhance microbial killing. Together, these IFN-induced effector networks help to confer vertebrate host resistance to a vast and complex microbial world.

  3. SPARC expression induces cell cycle arrest via STAT3 signaling pathway in medulloblastoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chetty, Chandramu; Dontula, Ranadheer; Gujrati, Meena; Lakka, Sajani S.

    2012-01-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ectopic expression of SPARC impaired cell proliferation in medulloblastoma cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SPARC expression induces STAT3 mediated cell cycle arrest in medulloblastoma cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SPARC expression significantly inhibited pre-established tumor growth in nude-mice. -- Abstract: Dynamic cell interaction with ECM components has profound influence in cancer progression. SPARC is a component of the ECM, impairs the proliferation of different cell types and modulates tumor cell aggressive features. We previously reported that SPARC expression significantly impairs medulloblastoma tumor growth in vivo. In this study, we demonstrate that expression of SPARC inhibits medulloblastoma cell proliferation. MTT assay indicated a dose-dependent reduction in tumor cell proliferation in adenoviral mediated expression of SPARC full length cDNA (Ad-DsRed-SP) in D425 and UW228 cells. Flow cytometric analysis showed that Ad-DsRed-SP-infected cells accumulate in the G2/M phase of cell cycle. Further, immunoblot and immunoprecipitation analyses revealed that SPARC induced G2/M cell cycle arrest was mediated through inhibition of the Cyclin-B-regulated signaling pathway involving p21 and Cdc2 expression. Additionally, expression of SPARC decreased STAT3 phosphorylation at Tyr-705; constitutively active STAT3 expression reversed SPARC induced G2/M arrest. Ad-DsRed-SP significantly inhibited the pre-established orthotopic tumor growth and tumor volume in nude-mice. Immunohistochemical analysis of tumor sections from mice treated with Ad-DsRed-SP showed decreased immunoreactivity for pSTAT3 and increased immunoreactivity for p21 compared to tumor section from mice treated with mock and Ad-DsRed. Taken together our studies further reveal that STAT3 plays a key role in SPARC induced G2/M arrest in medulloblastoma cells. These new findings provide a molecular basis for the mechanistic understanding of the

  4. Mast Cell Hyperplasia and Eosinophilia Induced by Ascaris Body Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Archer, G. T.; Binet, J.-L.

    1971-01-01

    Daily i.p. injections of dilute Ascaris body fluid into rats induced peritoneal eosinophilia and the formation of pin-point follicles in the omentum. The follicles comprised plasma cells, macrophages and fibroblasts together with large numbers of eosinophils and mast cells. Electron microscopy of eosinophils in the follicles revealed loss of cytoplasmic granules and numerous vesicular and tubular structures in the cytoplasm. The mast cells showed clear areas round the granules, suggesting dissolution of granule components. ImagesFigs. 4-6Figs. 7-8Figs. 13-14Figs. 9-10Figs. 1-3Figs. 11-12 PMID:5135540

  5. Induced pluripotent stem cells in research and therapy.

    PubMed

    Teoh, Hoon-Koon; Cheong, Soon-Keng

    2012-06-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) are derived from human somatic cells through ectopic expression of transcription factors. This landmark discovery has been considered as a major development towards patient-specific iPSC for various biomedical applications. Unlimited self renewal capacity, pluripotency and ease of accessibility to donor tissues contribute to the versatility of iPSC. The therapeutic potential of iPSC in regenerative medicine, cell-based therapy, disease modelling and drug discovery is indeed very promising. Continuous progress in iPSC technology provides clearer understanding of disease pathogenesis and ultimately new optimism in developing treatment or cure for human diseases.

  6. Present and future challenges of induced pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Ohnuki, Mari; Takahashi, Kazutoshi

    2015-01-01

    Growing old is our destiny. However, the mature differentiated cells making up our body can be rejuvenated to an embryo-like fate called pluripotency which is an ability to differentiate into all cell types by enforced expression of defined transcription factors. The discovery of this induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology has opened up unprecedented opportunities in regenerative medicine, disease modelling and drug discovery. In this review, we introduce the applications and future perspectives of human iPSCs and we also show how iPSC technology has evolved along the way. PMID:26416678

  7. Contact Lens-induced Limbal Stem Cell Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Rossen, Jennifer; Amram, Alec; Milani, Behrad; Park, Dongwook; Harthan, Jennifer; Joslin, Charlotte; McMahon, Timothy; Djalilian, Ali

    2016-10-01

    Limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD) is a pathologic condition caused by the dysfunction and/or destruction of stem cell precursors of the corneal epithelium, typified clinically by corneal conjunctivalization. The purpose of this review is to critically discuss a less well-known cause of limbal stem cell disease: contact lens (CL) wear. A literature search was conducted to include original articles containing patients with CL-induced LSCD. This review describes epidemiology, diagnostic strategies, pathogenesis, differential diagnosis, and treatment modalities for this condition.

  8. Chemotactic signals induce cell differentiation in Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed Central

    Darmon, M; Brachet, P; Da Silva, L H

    1975-01-01

    Experiments carried out with the aid of cellophane membranes demonstrate that the morphogenetic block of certain nonaggregating, "aggregateless," mutants may be overcome by diffusible factors excreted by aggregating wild-type cells. The same differentiation process into aggregation-competent cell is observed if mutant amoebae are subjected to external 3':5'-cAMP pulses imposed at 5 min intervals. Wild-type amoebae also respond to cAMP pulses, since the onset of differentiation is more precocious in pulsed than in unpulsed populations. These data suggest that chemotactic signals act as an inducer of cell differentiation. Images PMID:171655

  9. Transcription factor-induced enhancer modulations during cell fate conversions.

    PubMed

    van Oevelen, C; Kallin, E M; Graf, T

    2013-10-01

    The activity of transcription factors (TFs) has empowered the reprogramming of differentiated cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and alternative lineages. Elucidation of the molecular mechanisms underpinning these processes has expanded our understanding of how novel gene expression programs become activated while old ones are silenced. How TFs modify chromatin and activate requisite enzymes during these processes has recently been discussed in several excellent reviews. Here we discuss the questions of how ectopically expressed TFs access chromatin to modulate enhancers and establish a novel transcriptome during cell reprogramming, lineage conversions and differentiation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Crowding induces live cell extrusion to maintain homeostatic cell numbers in epithelia.

    PubMed

    Eisenhoffer, George T; Loftus, Patrick D; Yoshigi, Masaaki; Otsuna, Hideo; Chien, Chi-Bin; Morcos, Paul A; Rosenblatt, Jody

    2012-04-15

    For an epithelium to provide a protective barrier, it must maintain homeostatic cell numbers by matching the number of dividing cells with the number of dying cells. Although compensatory cell division can be triggered by dying cells, it is unknown how cell death might relieve overcrowding due to proliferation. When we trigger apoptosis in epithelia, dying cells are extruded to preserve a functional barrier. Extrusion occurs by cells destined to die signalling to surrounding epithelial cells to contract an actomyosin ring that squeezes the dying cell out. However, it is not clear what drives cell death during normal homeostasis. Here we show in human, canine and zebrafish cells that overcrowding due to proliferation and migration induces extrusion of live cells to control epithelial cell numbers. Extrusion of live cells occurs at sites where the highest crowding occurs in vivo and can be induced by experimentally overcrowding monolayers in vitro. Like apoptotic cell extrusion, live cell extrusion resulting from overcrowding also requires sphingosine 1-phosphate signalling and Rho-kinase-dependent myosin contraction, but is distinguished by signalling through stretch-activated channels. Moreover, disruption of a stretch-activated channel, Piezo1, in zebrafish prevents extrusion and leads to the formation of epithelial cell masses. Our findings reveal that during homeostatic turnover, growth and division of epithelial cells on a confined substratum cause overcrowding that leads to their extrusion and consequent death owing to the loss of survival factors. These results suggest that live cell extrusion could be a tumour-suppressive mechanism that prevents the accumulation of excess epithelial cells.

  11. Cytokine-induced killer cells: NK-like T cells with cytotolytic specificity against leukemia.

    PubMed

    Linn, Y C; Hui, Kam M

    2003-09-01

    Cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells are a unique population of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) with the characteristic CD3+CD56+ phenotype. These cells have demonstrated higher proliferative and cytolytic activities in comparison to the reported CD3-CD56+ lymphokine activated killer (LAK) cells that are essentially activated natural killer (NK) cells. CIK cells are non-MHC-restricted in target cell recognition and killing. We have shown the feasibility of generating CIK cells from a series of marrow samples of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) collected at diagnosis. At maturity, the CIK cells exhibit potent cytotoxicity against autologous AML targets as well as allogeneic myeloid leukemia cells, regardless of the HLA types of these targets. This observed cytotoxicity is not entirely due to NK cells as prior pre-absorption of the NK cells cytolytic activities does not abolish the subsequent cytotolytic activities against leukemic targets. It has also been reported by others that CIK cells are cytolytic against chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) cells, both in vitro and in the SCID mouse tumor model. In a mouse transplant model across MHC barrier, the CIK cells generated from the donor do not induce graft vs. host disease as observed for unfractionated donor splenocytes. In comparison to untreated control mice, the infusion of CIK cells results in the prolonged survival of murine leukemia-bearing mice. CIK cells also express CD94, part of the NK receptor comprising of CD94-NKG2 heterodimer. However, only low level of the killer immunoglobulin-like receptors are expressed by the CIK cells. In addition, as reported for the classical CTL, CIK cells could interact with dendritic cells (DC) to result in the enhancement of cytotolytic activities against tumor cells. The characteristic biological properties of the CIK cells would, therefore, enable them to be exploited for anti-leukemic therapy.

  12. Adenosine induces G2/M cell-cycle arrest by inhibiting cell mitosis progression.

    PubMed

    Jia, Kun-Zhi; Tang, Bo; Yu, Lu; Cheng, Wei; Zhang, Rong; Zhang, Jian-Fa; Hua, Zi-Chun

    2009-12-16

    Cellular adenosine accumulates under stress conditions. Few papers on adenosine are concerned with its function in the cell cycle. The cell cycle is the essential mechanism by which all living things reproduce and the target machinery when cells encounter stresses, so it is necessary to examine the relationship between adenosine and the cell cycle. In the present study, adenosine was found to induce G-2/M cell-cycle arrest. Furthermore, adenosine was found to modulate the expression of some important proteins in the cell cycle, such as cyclin B and p21, and to inhibit the transition of metaphase to anaphase in mitosis.

  13. Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells from human fetal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Guillot, Pascale V

    2016-02-01

    Pluripotency defines the ability of stem cells to differentiate into all the lineages of the three germ layers and self-renew indefinitely. Somatic cells can regain the developmental potential of embryonic stem cells following ectopic expression of a set of transcription factors or, in certain circumstances, via modulation of culture conditions and supplementation with small molecule, that is, induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. Here, we discuss the use of fetal tissues for reprogramming, focusing in particular on stem cells derived from human amniotic fluid, and the development of chemical reprogramming. We next address the advantages and disadvantages of deriving pluripotent cells from fetal tissues and the potential clinical applications.

  14. Sonoporation-Induced Apoptosis and Cell Cycle Arrest: Initial Findings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Wenjing; Sit, Wai Hung; Wan, Jennifer M. F.; Yu, Alfred C. H.

    2011-09-01

    Sonoporation is known to be able to temporarily permeabilize cells, but during this process it may have traumatic impact on cell viability. In this work, we found that sonoporation may induce apoptosis and G2/M-phase cell cycle arrest in some cells hours after ultrasonic exposure in vitro. Methods: Suspensions of HL-60 leukemia cells were prepared (106 cells/ml), and a 1% v/v microbubble solution was added to induce sonoporation during ultrasound exposure. They were then placed 7 cm away from a 2.54 cm-diameter, 1 MHz unfocused ultrasound probe, and these samples were insonated for 1 min with ultrasound pulses (10% duty cycle, 1 kHz pulse repetition frequency). In this study, two levels of peak negative ultrasound pressure were used: 0.3 MPa and 0.5 MPa. After exposure, the cell suspensions were further incubated. They were harvested after 4 h, 8 h, 12 h and 24 h to analyze the cell-cycle distribution (sub-G1, G0/G1, S, G2/M) at these time points using propidium iodide staining and flow cytometry. Results: Some sonoporation-treated cells had undergone apoptosis by 4h, and the largest number of apoptotic cells (sub-G1 phase) was observed after 12h (0.3 MPa group: 25.0%; 0.5 MPa group: 27.2%). Also, after experiencing sonoporation, some viable cells were stopped in the G2/M phase without undergoing cytokinesis, and the maximum G2/M population rise was seen after 12h (0.3 MPa group: +12.2%; 0.5 MPa group: +14.7%). This was accompanied by decreases in the populations of G0/G1-phase and S-phase.

  15. Cofilin mediates ATP depletion-induced endothelial cell actin alterations.

    PubMed

    Suurna, Maria V; Ashworth, Sharon L; Hosford, Melanie; Sandoval, Ruben M; Wean, Sarah E; Shah, Bijal M; Bamburg, James R; Molitoris, Bruce A

    2006-06-01

    Ischemia and sepsis lead to endothelial cell damage, resulting in compromised microvascular flow in many organs. Much remains to be determined regarding the intracellular structural events that lead to endothelial cell dysfunction. To investigate potential actin cytoskeletal-related mechanisms, ATP depletion was induced in mouse pancreatic microvascular endothelial cells (MS1). Fluorescent imaging and biochemical studies demonstrated a rapid and progressive increase in F-actin along with a decrease in G-actin at 60 min. Confocal microscopic analysis showed ATP depletion resulted in destruction of actin stress fibers and accumulation of F-actin aggregates. We hypothesized these actin alterations were secondary to dephosphorylation/activation of actin-depolymerizing factor (ADF)/cofilin proteins. Cofilin, the predominant isoform expressed in MS1 cells, was rapidly dephosphorylated/activated during ATP depletion. To directly investigate the role of cofilin activation on the actin cytoskeleton during ischemia, MS1 cells were infected with adenoviruses containing the cDNAs for wild-type Xenopus laevis ADF/cofilin green fluorescent protein [XAC(wt)-GFP], GFP, and the constitutively active and inactive isoforms XAC(S3A)-GFP and XAC(S3E)-GFP. The rate and extent of cortical actin destruction and actin aggregate formation were increased in ATP-depleted XAC(wt)-GFP- and XAC(S3A)-GFP-expressing cells, whereas increased actin stress fibers were observed in XAC(S3E)-GFP-expressing cells. To investigate the upstream signaling pathway of ADF/cofilin, LIM kinase 1-GFP (LIMK1-GFP) was expressed in MS1 cells. Cells expressing LIMK1-GFP protein had higher levels of phosphorylated ADF/cofilin, increased stress fibers, and delayed F-actin cytoskeleton destruction during ATP depletion. These results strongly support the importance of cofilin regulation in ischemia-induced endothelial cell actin cytoskeleton alterations leading to cell damage and microvascular dysfunction.

  16. Targeting SLUG sensitizes leukemia cells to ADR-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Wei, Chang-Rong; Liu, Jun; Yu, Xiao-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Slug is an E-cadherin repressor and a suppressor of PUMA (p53 upregulated modulator of apoptosis) and it has recently been demonstrated that Slug plays an important role in controlling apoptosis. In this study, we examined whether Slug's ability to silence expression suppresses the growth of leukemia HL-60 cells and/or sensitizes leukemia HL-60 cells to adriamycin (ADR) through induction of apoptosis. SLUG siRNA was transfected into the HL-60 and HL-60(ADR) cell lines (an adriamycin resistant cell line). The stably SLUG siRNA transfected HL-60 and HL-60(ADR) cells was transiently transfected with PUMA siRNA. The mRNA and protein expression of SLUG and PUMA were determined by Quantitative real-time RT-PCR and Western blot assay. The effects of SLUG siRNA alone or combined with ADR or PUMA siRNA on growth and apoptosis in HL-60 and HL-60(ADR) cells was detected by MTT, ELISA and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay. The results showed that SLUG was less expressed in the HL-60 cells, and high expressed in the HL-60(ADR) cells. Obvious down-regulation of SLUG mRNA and protein levels and up-regulation of PUMA mRNA and protein levels after SLUG siRNA transfection was showed in the HL-60(ADR) cells. Treatment with ADR induced SLUG mRNA and protein in the HL-60 cells. Significant positive correlation was observed between basal SLUG mRNA and protein and ADR sensitivity. SLUG gene silencing by SLUG siRNA transfection inhibited growth and induced apoptosis, and increased ADR killing of the HL-60 and HL-60(ADR) cell lines. After the SLUG siRNA transfected HL-60 and HL-60(ADR) cells was transiently transfected with PUMA siRNA, did not increase ADR killing of the HL-60 and HL-60(ADR) cell lines. SLUG level positively correlated with sensitivity to ADR. SLUG siRNA could effectively reduce SLUG expression and induce PUMA expression and restore the drug sensitivity of resistant leukemic cells to conventional chemotherapeutic agents.

  17. NIF (neurite-inducing factor): a novel peptide inducing neurite formation in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Wagner, J A

    1986-01-01

    Neurite-inducing factor (NIF) is a novel protein that has been partially purified from mouse submaxillary glands. NIF induces neurite formation in PC12 pheochromocytoma cells, and the NIF-induced neurites are indistinguishable from NGF-induced neurites in both their morphology and the time course of their formation. Neurite-inducing activity can be recovered at a position corresponding to a molecular weight of 20,000 Da after fractionation of partially purified preparations via SDS-PAGE. Partially purified preparations of NIF are about half as potent as pure beta NGF, and since the neurite-inducing activity does not correspond to any of the major proteins in this fraction, specific activity of purified NIF will probably be significantly greater than the 60 ng/ml found for our partially purified material. NIF is distinct from beta NGF by four criteria: (1) antibodies to beta NGF can block the activity of beta NGF, but not the activity of NIF; (2) beta NGF can induce ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) in PC12 cells at concentrations significantly below those required to induce neurites, while NIF induces ODC only at concentrations greatly in excess of those required to induce neurite formation; (3) by the criterion of SDS-PAGE, there is insufficient beta NGF in our partially purified preparations of NIF to explain the biological activity of this fraction; and (4) the biological activity of NIF has a molecular weight (20,000 Da) that is distinct from beta NGF (13,000 Da). We conclude that NIF is probably a novel peptide that is very active in promoting morphological differentiation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. The DNA damage-induced cell death response: a roadmap to kill cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Matt, Sonja; Hofmann, Thomas G

    2016-08-01

    Upon massive DNA damage cells fail to undergo productive DNA repair and trigger the cell death response. Resistance to cell death is linked to cellular transformation and carcinogenesis as well as radio- and chemoresistance, making the underlying signaling pathways a promising target for therapeutic intervention. Diverse DNA damage-induced cell death pathways are operative in mammalian cells and finally culminate in the induction of programmed cell death via activation of apoptosis or necroptosis. These signaling routes affect nuclear, mitochondria- and plasma membrane-associated key molecules to activate the apoptotic or necroptotic response. In this review, we highlight the main signaling pathways, molecular players and mechanisms guiding the DNA damage-induced cell death response.

  19. Osteopontin Facilitates Ultraviolet B-induced Squamous Cell Carcinoma Development

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Pi-Ling; Hsieh, Yu-Hua; Wang, Chao-Cheng; Juliana, M. Margaret; Tsuruta, Yuko; Timares, Laura; Elmets, Craig; Ho, Kang-Jey

    2014-01-01

    Background Osteopontin (OPN) is a matricellular glycoprotein that is markedly expressed in cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas (cSCCs) and in actinic keratoses implicating its role in photocarcinogenesis. Objective To determine whether OPN facilitates the development of cSCC and its function. Methods cSCCs development was compared between wild-type (WT) and OPN-null mice subjected to UVB irradiation for 43 weeks. UVB-induced OPN expression was determined by Western blot, immunoprecipitation, ELISA, and semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Epidermal layer and TUNEL analyses assessed if OPN mediates UVB-induced epidermal hyperplasia or suppresses UVB-induced apoptosis of basal keratinocytes, respectively. In vitro experiments determined whether OPN enhances cell survival of UVB-induced apoptosis and its potential mechanisms. Immunohistochemical analyses of epidermis assessed the expression of CD44 and focal adhesion kinase (FAK), molecules that mediate OPN survival function. Results Compared to female WT mice, OPN-null mice did not develop cSCCs. UVB irradiation stimulated OPN protein expression in the dorsal skin by 11 h and remains high at 24 to 48h.OPN did not mediate UVB-induced epidermal hyperplasia; instead, it protected basal keratinocytes from undergoing apoptosis upon UVB exposure. Likewise, the addition of OPN suppressed UVB-induced OPN-null cSCC cell apoptosis, the activation of caspase-9 activity, and increased phosphorylation of FAK at Y397. Furthermore, the expression of CD44 and FAK in WT mice epidermis was greater than that of OPN-null mice prior to and during early acute UVB exposure. Conclusion These data support the hypothesis that chronic UVB-induced OPN expression protects the survival of initiated basal keratinocytes and, consequently, facilitates cSCC develop. PMID:24888687

  20. Therapeutic Potential of Lung Epithelial Progenitor Cells Derived from Embryonic and Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wetsel, Rick A.; Wang, Dachun; Calame, Daniel G.

    2015-01-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells derived from preimplantation blastocysts and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells generated from somatic cell sources are pluripotent and capable of indefinite expansion in vitro. They provide a possible unlimited source of cells that could be differentiated into lung progenitor cells for potential clinical use in pulmonary regenerative medicine. Because of inherent difficulties in deriving endodermal cells from undifferentiated cell cultures, applications using lung epithelial cells derived from ES and iPS cells have lagged behind similar efforts devoted to other tissues, such as the heart and spinal cord. However, during the past several years, significant advances in culture, differentiation, and purification protocols, as well as in bioengineering methodologies, have fueled enthusiasm for the development of stem cell–based lung therapeutics. This article provides an overview of recent research achievements and discusses future technical challenges that must be met before the promise of stem cell applications for lung disease can be realized. PMID:21226612

  1. Generation of parthenogenetic induced pluripotent stem cells from parthenogenetic neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Do, Jeong Tae; Joo, Jin Young; Han, Dong Wook; Araúzo-Bravo, Marcos J; Kim, Min Jung; Greber, Boris; Zaehres, Holm; Sobek-Klocke, Ingeborg; Chung, Hyung Min; Schöler, Hans R

    2009-12-01

    Somatic cells can achieve a pluripotent cell state in a process called pluripotential reprogramming. Multipotent stem cells can differentiate into cells of only one lineage, but pluripotent stem cells can give rise to cells of all three germ layers of an organism. In this study, we generated induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells from bimaternal (uniparental) parthenogenetic neural stem cells (pNSCs) by transduction with either four (4F: Oct4, Klf4, Sox2, and c-Myc) or two (2F: Oct4 and Klf4) transcription factors. The resultant maternal iPS cells, which were reprogrammed directly from pNSCs, were capable of generating germ line-competent chimeras. Interestingly, analysis of global gene expression and imprinting status revealed that parthenogenetic iPS cells clustered closer to parthenogenetic ESCs than to female ESCs, with patterns that were clearly distinct from those of pNSCs.

  2. NKT Cells in the Induced Sputum of Severe Asthmatics

    PubMed Central

    Hamzaoui, Agnes; Cheik Rouhou, Sana; Graïri, Hedia; Abid, Hanadi; Ammar, Jamel; Chelbi, Hanene; Hamzaoui, Kamel

    2006-01-01

    To determine whether there was a specific inflammatory process in severe asthmatics, the phenotypic characteristics of induced sputum immune cells were analysed among patients with severe asthma. Twenty-two induced sputa (10 severe asthmatics) were studied. Flow cytometric analysis was performed using immune cells of the sputum and monoclonal antibodies to CD3, CD4, CD8, CD56, CD25, and TCRγδ. The number of NKT (CD3+CD56+) cells was significantly higher in the sputum of severe asthmatics compared with mild asthmatic and healthy control groups (P < .05). CD8+CD56+ cells were the predominant subtype of the increased NKT cells in severe asthmatics. CD3+CD56+Vα24+, TCRγδ+ CD56+, and CD4+CD25+ T cells were significantly increased in severe asthmatic patients. These results suggest that the immunopathogenesis of severe asthmatics vary between severe and mild asthmatics, and that CD8+CD56+ NKT cells may play an important role in the immunopathogenesis of severe asthma. PMID:16883065

  3. Genetic variation in radiation-induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Smirnov, Denis A; Brady, Lauren; Halasa, Krzysztof; Morley, Michael; Solomon, Sonia; Cheung, Vivian G

    2012-02-01

    Radiation exposure through environmental, medical, and occupational settings is increasingly common. While radiation has harmful effects, it has utility in many applications such as radiotherapy for cancer. To increase the efficacy of radiation treatment and minimize its risks, a better understanding of the individual differences in radiosensitivity and the molecular basis of radiation response is needed. Here, we integrated human genetic and functional genomic approaches to study the response of human cells to radiation. We measured radiation-induced changes in gene expression and cell death in B cells from normal individuals. We found extensive individual variation in gene expression and cellular responses. To understand the genetic basis of this variation, we mapped the DNA sequence variants that influence expression response to radiation. We also identified radiation-responsive genes that regulate cell death; silencing of these genes by small interfering RNA led to an increase in radiation-induced cell death in human B cells, colorectal and prostate cancer cells. Together these results uncovered DNA variants that contribute to radiosensitivity and identified genes that can be targeted to increase the sensitivity of tumors to radiation.

  4. Heme oxygenase-1 accelerates erastin-induced ferroptotic cell death.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Min-Young; Park, Eunhee; Lee, Seon-Jin; Chung, Su Wol

    2015-09-15

    The oncogenic RAS-selective lethal small molecule Erastin triggers a unique iron-dependent form of nonapoptotic cell death termed ferroptosis. Ferroptosis is dependent upon the production of intracellular iron-dependent reactive oxygen species (ROS), but not other metals. However, key regulators remain unknown. The heme oxygenase (HO) is a major intracellular source of iron. In this study, the role of heme oxygenase in Erastin-triggered ferroptotic cancer cell death has been investigated. Zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPP), a HO-1 inhibitor, prevented Erastin-triggered ferroptotic cancer cell death. Furthermore, Erastin induced the protein and mRNA levels of HO-1 in HT-1080 fibrosarcoma cells. HO-1+/+ and HO-1-/- fibroblast, HO-1 overexpression, and chycloheximide-treated experiments revealed that the expression of HO-1 has a decisive effects in Erastin-triggered cell death. Hemin and CO-releasing molecules (CORM) promote Erastin-induced ferroptotic cell death, not by biliverdin and bilirubin. In addition, hemin and CORM accelerate the HO-1 expression in the presence of Erastin and increase membranous lipid peroxidation. Thus, HO-1 is an essential enzyme for iron-dependent lipid peroxidation during ferroptotic cell death.

  5. Phorbol esters induce multidrug resistance in human breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fine, R.L.; Patel, J.; Chabner, B.A.

    1988-01-01

    Mechanisms responsible for broad-based resistance to antitumor drugs derived from natural products (multidrug resistance) are incompletely understood. Agents known to reverse the multidrug-resistant phenotype (verapamil and trifluoperazine) can also inhibit the activity of protein kinase C. When the authors assayed human breast cancer cell lines for protein kinase C activity, they found that enzyme activity was 7-fold higher in the multidrug-resistance cancer cells compared with the control, sensitive parent cells. Exposure of drug-sensitive cells to the phorbol ester phorbol 12,13-dibutyate (P(BtO)/sub 2/) led to an increase in protein kinase C activity and induced a drug-resistance phenotype, whereas exposure of drug-resistant cells to P(BtO)/sub 2/ further increased drug resistance. In sensitive cells, this increased resistance was accomplished by a 3.5-fold increased phosphorylation of a 20-kDa particulate protein and a 35-40% decreased intracellular accumulation of doxorubicin and vincristine. P(BtO)/sub 2/ induced resistance to agents involved in the multidrug-resistant phenotype (doxorubicin and vincristine) but did not affect sensitivity to an unrelated alkylating agent (melphalan). The increased resistance was partially or fully reversible by the calcium channel blocker verapamil and by the calmodulin-antagonist trifluoperazine. These data suggest that stimulation of protein kinase C playus a role in the drug-transport changes in multidrug-resistant cells. This may occur through modulation of an efflux pump by protein phosphorylation.

  6. Ayanin diacetate-induced cell death is amplified by TRAIL in human leukemia cells

    SciTech Connect

    Marrero, Maria Teresa; Estevez, Sara; Negrin, Gledy; Quintana, Jose; Leon, Francisco; Estevez, Francisco

    2012-11-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ayanin diacetate as apoptotic inducer in leukemia cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cell death was prevented by caspase inhibitors and by the overexpression of Bcl-x{sub L}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The intrinsic and the extrinsic pathways are involved in the mechanism of action. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Death receptors are up-regulated and TRAIL enhances apoptotic cell death. -- Abstract: Here we demonstrate that the semi-synthetic flavonoid ayanin diacetate induces cell death selectively in leukemia cells without affecting the proliferation of normal lymphocytes. Incubation of human leukemia cells with ayanin diacetate induced G{sub 2}-M phase cell cycle arrest and apoptosis which was prevented by the non-specific caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk and reduced by the overexpression of Bcl-x{sub L}. Ayanin diacetate-induced cell death was found to be associated with: (i) loss of inner mitochondrial membrane potential, (ii) the release of cytochrome c, (iii) the activation of multiple caspases, (iv) cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase and (v) the up-regulation of death receptors for TRAIL, DR4 and DR5. Moreover, the combined treatment with ayanin diacetate and TRAIL amplified cell death, compared to single treatments. These results provide a basis for further exploring the potential applications of this combination for the treatment of cancer.

  7. Pterostilbene induces accumulation of autophagic vacuoles followed by cell death in HL60 human leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Siedlecka-Kroplewska, K; Jozwik, A; Boguslawski, W; Wozniak, M; Zauszkiewicz-Pawlak, A; Spodnik, J H; Rychlowski, M; Kmiec, Z

    2013-10-01

    Pterostilbene, a naturally occurring structural analog of resveratrol, has been reported to exert antiproliferative and proapoptotic effects in various cancer types. Recently, it has been demonstrated to induce both autophagy and apoptosis in human bladder and breast cancer cell lines. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of pterostilbene on HL60 human leukemia cells. Cell morphology was examined using confocal and electron microscopy. Cell viability was determined by MTT, neutral red uptake and trypan blue exclusion assays. LC3 processing was studied based on Western blotting and immunofluorescence analyses. Flow cytometry was used to study cell cycle distribution, phosphatidylserine externalization, caspase activation, disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential and intracellular production of reactive oxygen species. DNA degradation was examined by gel electrophoresis. We found that treatment of HL60 cells with pterostilbene at the IC90 concentration resulted in the G0/G1 cell cycle arrest. Pterostilbene induced conversion of cytosolic LC3-I to membrane-bound LC3-II and accumulation of large LC3-positive vacuolar structures. Pterostilbene also led to phosphatidylserine externalization, internucleosomal DNA fragmentation, caspase activation and disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential. Moreover, it did not induce oxidative stress. Our results suggest that pterostilbene induces accumulation of autophagic vacuoles followed by cell death in HL60 cells.

  8. Lipopolysaccharide induces a fibrotic-like phenotype in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Echeverría, César; Montorfano, Ignacio; Sarmiento, Daniela; Becerra, Alvaro; Nuñez-Villena, Felipe; Figueroa, Xavier F; Cabello-Verrugio, Claudio; Elorza, Alvaro A; Riedel, Claudia; Simon, Felipe

    2013-06-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is crucial in endotoxaemia-derived sepsis syndrome pathogenesis. It is well accepted that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induces endothelial dysfunction through immune system activation. However, LPS can also directly generate actions in endothelial cells (ECs) in the absence of participation by immune cells. Although interactions between LPS and ECs evoke endothelial death, a significant portion of ECs are resistant to LPS challenge. However, the mechanism that confers endothelial resistance to LPS is not known. LPS-resistant ECs exhibit a fibroblast-like morphology, suggesting that these ECs enter a fibrotic programme in response to LPS. Thus, our aim was to investigate whether LPS is able to induce endothelial fibrosis in the absence of immune cells and explore the underlying mechanism. Using primary cultures of ECs and culturing intact blood vessels, we demonstrated that LPS is a crucial factor to induce endothelial fibrosis. We demonstrated that LPS was able and sufficient to promote endothelial fibrosis, in the absence of immune cells through an activin receptor-like kinase 5 (ALK5) activity-dependent mechanism. LPS-challenged ECs showed an up-regulation of both fibroblast-specific protein expression and extracellular matrix proteins secretion, as well as a down-regulation of endothelial markers. These results demonstrate that LPS is a crucial factor in inducing endothelial fibrosis in the absence of immune cells through an ALK5-dependent mechanism. It is noteworthy that LPS-induced endothelial fibrosis perpetuates endothelial dysfunction as a maladaptive process rather than a survival mechanism for protection against LPS. These findings are useful in improving current treatment against endotoxaemia-derived sepsis syndrome and other inflammatory diseases.

  9. Cadmium induces direct morphological changes in mesangial cell culture.

    PubMed

    L'Azou, Béatrice; Dubus, Isabelle; Ohayon-Courtès, Céline; Labouyrie, Jean; Perez, Laurent; Pouvreau, Carole; Juvet, Ludivine; Cambar, Jean

    2002-10-15

    The cadmium produced by industrial and agricultural practice represents a major environmental pollutant which may induce severe damage, especially in the kidney where cadmium accumulates. While cadmium is known to severely impair renal tubular functions, glomerular structures are also potential targets. The present study investigated the effects of cadmium on glomerular mesangial cell cultures after short- and long-term exposures, requiring for each endpoint specific culture conditions. After 30 min exposure to 1 microM CdCl(2), used as non-lethal concentration, 0.14 ng/microg proteins of cadmium was internalized by the cells as evaluated by atomic emision spectrometry and induced a significant, cell surface reduction (8.9+/-1.9%). These morphological changes could be correlated to smooth muscle alpha-actin disorganization, without quantitative change in its protein expression level as evaluated by Western-blot and Northern-blot analysis (SMAmRNA/28sRNA, 1.78 CdCl(2) vs. 1.42 control). For longer exposure times, in complex medium, cadmium uptake was efficient (0.36 ng/microg proteins) and induced changes in the actin cytoskeleton with no loss of cell membrane integrity. This study suggests that cultured mesangial cells provide an alternative model to study the effect of cadmium, and underlines the importance of using well-defined conditions to study further intracellular mechanisms.

  10. Clostridium perfringens Delta-Toxin Induces Rapid Cell Necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Seike, Soshi; Miyamoto, Kazuaki; Kobayashi, Keiko; Takehara, Masaya; Nagahama, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens delta-toxin is a β-pore-forming toxin and a putative pathogenic agent of C. perfringens types B and C. However, the mechanism of cytotoxicity of delta-toxin remains unclear. Here, we investigated the mechanisms of cell death induced by delta-toxin in five cell lines (A549, A431, MDCK, Vero, and Caco-2). All cell lines were susceptible to delta-toxin. The toxin caused rapid ATP depletion and swelling of the cells. Delta-toxin bound and formed oligomers predominantly in plasma membrane lipid rafts. Destruction of the lipid rafts with methyl β-cyclodextrin inhibited delta-toxin-induced cytotoxicity and ATP depletion. Delta-toxin caused the release of carboxyfluorescein from sphingomyelin-cholesterol liposomes and formed oligomers; toxin binding to the liposomes declined with decreasing cholesterol content in the liposomes. Flow cytometric assays with annexin V and propidium iodide revealed that delta-toxin treatment induced an elevation in the population of annexin V-negative and propidium iodide-positive cells. Delta-toxin did not cause the fragmentation of DNA or caspase-3 activation. Furthermore, delta-toxin caused damage to mitochondrial membrane permeability and cytochrome c release. In the present study, we demonstrate that delta-toxin produces cytotoxic activity through necrosis. PMID:26807591

  11. Two endogenous proteins that induce cell wall extension in plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McQueen-Mason, S.; Durachko, D. M.; Cosgrove, D. J.

    1992-01-01

    Plant cell enlargement is regulated by wall relaxation and yielding, which is thought to be catalyzed by elusive "wall-loosening" enzymes. By employing a reconstitution approach, we found that a crude protein extract from the cell walls of growing cucumber seedlings possessed the ability to induce the extension of isolated cell walls. This activity was restricted to the growing region of the stem and could induce the extension of isolated cell walls from various dicot stems and the leaves of amaryllidaceous monocots, but was less effective on grass coleoptile walls. Endogenous and reconstituted wall extension activities showed similar sensitivities to pH, metal ions, thiol reducing agents, proteases, and boiling in methanol or water. Sequential HPLC fractionation of the active wall extract revealed two proteins with molecular masses of 29 and 30 kD associated with the activity. Each protein, by itself, could induce wall extension without detectable hydrolytic breakdown of the wall. These proteins appear to mediate "acid growth" responses of isolated walls and may catalyze plant cell wall extension by a novel biochemical mechanism.

  12. Environmental stress induces trinucleotide repeat mutagenesis in human cells.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Nimrat; Lin, Yunfu; Santillan, Beatriz A; Yotnda, Patricia; Wilson, John H

    2015-03-24

    The dynamic mutability of microsatellite repeats is implicated in the modification of gene function and disease phenotype. Studies of the enhanced instability of long trinucleotide repeats (TNRs)-the cause of multiple human diseases-have revealed a remarkable complexity of mutagenic mechanisms. Here, we show that cold, heat, hypoxic, and oxidative stresses induce mutagenesis of a long CAG repeat tract in human cells. We show that stress-response factors mediate the stress-induced mutagenesis (SIM) of CAG repeats. We show further that SIM of CAG repeats does not involve mismatch repair, nucleotide excision repair, or transcription, processes that are known to promote TNR mutagenesis in other pathways of instability. Instead, we find that these stresses stimulate DNA rereplication, increasing the proportion of cells with >4 C-value (C) DNA content. Knockdown of the replication origin-licensing factor CDT1 eliminates both stress-induced rereplication and CAG repeat mutagenesis. In addition, direct induction of rereplication in the absence of stress also increases the proportion of cells with >4C DNA content and promotes repeat mutagenesis. Thus, environmental stress triggers a unique pathway for TNR mutagenesis that likely is mediated by DNA rereplication. This pathway may impact normal cells as they encounter stresses in their environment or during development or abnormal cells as they evolve metastatic potential.

  13. Environmental stress induces trinucleotide repeat mutagenesis in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Nimrat; Lin, Yunfu; Santillan, Beatriz A.; Yotnda, Patricia; Wilson, John H.

    2015-01-01

    The dynamic mutability of microsatellite repeats is implicated in the modification of gene function and disease phenotype. Studies of the enhanced instability of long trinucleotide repeats (TNRs)—the cause of multiple human diseases—have revealed a remarkable complexity of mutagenic mechanisms. Here, we show that cold, heat, hypoxic, and oxidative stresses induce mutagenesis of a long CAG repeat tract in human cells. We show that stress-response factors mediate the stress-induced mutagenesis (SIM) of CAG repeats. We show further that SIM of CAG repeats does not involve mismatch repair, nucleotide excision repair, or transcription, processes that are known to promote TNR mutagenesis in other pathways of instability. Instead, we find that these stresses stimulate DNA rereplication, increasing the proportion of cells with >4 C-value (C) DNA content. Knockdown of the replication origin-licensing factor CDT1 eliminates both stress-induced rereplication and CAG repeat mutagenesis. In addition, direct induction of rereplication in the absence of stress also increases the proportion of cells with >4C DNA content and promotes repeat mutagenesis. Thus, environmental stress triggers a unique pathway for TNR mutagenesis that likely is mediated by DNA rereplication. This pathway may impact normal cells as they encounter stresses in their environment or during development or abnormal cells as they evolve metastatic potential. PMID:25775519

  14. Chlorambucil effectively induces deletion mutations in mouse germ cells.

    PubMed Central

    Russell, L B; Hunsicker, P R; Cacheiro, N L; Bangham, J W; Russell, W L; Shelby, M D

    1989-01-01

    The chemotherapeutic agent chlorambucil was found to be more effective than x-rays or any chemical investigated to date in inducing high yields of mouse germ-line mutations that appear to be deletions or other structural changes. Induction of mutations involving seven specific loci was studied after exposures of various male germ-cell stages to chlorambucil at 10-25 mg/kg. A total of 60,750 offspring was scored. Mutation rates in spermatogonial stem cells were not significantly increased over control values; this negative result is not attributable to selective elimination of mutant cells. Mutations were, however, clearly induced in treated post-stem-cell stages, among which marked variations in mutational response were found. Maximum yield occurred after exposure of early spermatids, with approximately 1% of all offspring carrying a specific-locus mutation in the 10 mg/kg group. The stage-response pattern for chlorambucil differs from that of all other chemicals investigated to date in the specific-locus test. Thus far, all but one of the tested mutations induced by chlorambucil in post-stem-cell stages have been proved deletions or other structural changes by genetic, cytogenetic, and/or molecular criteria. Deletion mutations have recently been useful for molecular mapping and for structure-function correlations of genomic regions. For generating presumed large-lesion germ-line mutations at highest frequencies, chlorambucil may be the mutagen of choice. Images PMID:2726748

  15. Two endogenous proteins that induce cell wall extension in plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McQueen-Mason, S.; Durachko, D. M.; Cosgrove, D. J.

    1992-01-01

    Plant cell enlargement is regulated by wall relaxation and yielding, which is thought to be catalyzed by elusive "wall-loosening" enzymes. By employing a reconstitution approach, we found that a crude protein extract from the cell walls of growing cucumber seedlings possessed the ability to induce the extension of isolated cell walls. This activity was restricted to the growing region of the stem and could induce the extension of isolated cell walls from various dicot stems and the leaves of amaryllidaceous monocots, but was less effective on grass coleoptile walls. Endogenous and reconstituted wall extension activities showed similar sensitivities to pH, metal ions, thiol reducing agents, proteases, and boiling in methanol or water. Sequential HPLC fractionation of the active wall extract revealed two proteins with molecular masses of 29 and 30 kD associated with the activity. Each protein, by itself, could induce wall extension without detectable hydrolytic breakdown of the wall. These proteins appear to mediate "acid growth" responses of isolated walls and may catalyze plant cell wall extension by a novel biochemical mechanism.

  16. DNA damage in cells exhibiting radiation-induced genomic instability

    SciTech Connect

    Keszenman, Deborah J.; Kolodiuk, Lucia; Baulch, Janet E.

    2015-02-22

    Cells exhibiting radiation induced genomic instability exhibit varied spectra of genetic and chromosomal aberrations. Even so, oxidative stress remains a common theme in the initiation and/or perpetuation of this phenomenon. Isolated oxidatively modified bases, abasic sites, DNA single strand breaks and clustered DNA damage are induced in normal mammalian cultured cells and tissues due to endogenous reactive oxygen species generated during normal cellular metabolism in an aerobic environment. While sparse DNA damage may be easily repaired, clustered DNA damage may lead to persistent cytotoxic or mutagenic events that can lead to genomic instability. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that DNA damage signatures characterised by altered levels of endogenous, potentially mutagenic, types of DNA damage and chromosomal breakage are related to radiation-induced genomic instability and persistent oxidative stress phenotypes observed in the chromosomally unstable progeny of irradiated cells. The measurement of oxypurine, oxypyrimidine and abasic site endogenous DNA damage showed differences in non-double-strand breaks (DSB) clusters among the three of the four unstable clones evaluated as compared to genomically stable clones and the parental cell line. These three unstable clones also had increased levels of DSB clusters. The results of this study demonstrate that each unstable cell line has a unique spectrum of persistent damage and lead us to speculate that alterations in DNA damage signaling and repair may be related to the perpetuation of genomic instability.

  17. Chlorambucil effectively induces deletion mutations in mouse germ cells

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, L.B.; Hunsicker, P.R.; Cacheiro, N.L.A.; Bangham, J.W.; Russell, W.L.; Shelby, M.D. )

    1989-05-01

    The chemotherapeutic agent chlorambucil was found to be more effective than x-rays or any chemical investigated to data in inducing high yields of mouse germ-line mutations that appear to be deletions or other structural changes. Induction of mutations involving seven specific loci was studied after exposures of various male germ-cell stages to chlorambucil at 10-25 mg/kg. A total of 60,750 offspring was scored. Mutation rates in spermatogonial stem cells were not significantly increased over control values; this negative result is not attributable to selective elimination of mutant cells. Mutations were, however, clearly induced in treated post-stem-cell stages, among which marked variations in mutational response were found. Maximum yield occurred after exposure of early spermatids, with {approx} 1% of all offspring carrying a specific-locus mutation in the 10 mg/kg group. The stage-response pattern for chlorambucil differs from that of all other chemicals investigated to date in the specific-locus test. Thus far, all but one of the tested mutations induced by chlorambucil in post-stem-cell stages have been proved deletions or other structural changes by genetic, cytogenetic, and/or molecular criteria. Deletion mutations have recently been useful for molecular mapping and for structure-function correlations of genomic regions. For generating presumed large-lesion germline mutations at highest frequencies, chlorambucil may be the mutagen of choice.

  18. Pyrintegrin Induces Soft Tissue Formation by Transplanted or Endogenous Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Bhranti S.; Chen, Mo; Suzuki, Takahiro; Embree, Mildred; Kong, Kimi; Lee, Chang H.; He, Ling; Xiang, Lusai; Ahn, Jeffrey A.; Ding, Sheng; Mao, Jeremy J.

    2017-01-01

    Focal adipose deficiency, such as lipoatrophy, lumpectomy or facial trauma, is a formidable challenge in reconstructive medicine, and yet scarcely investigated in experimental studies. Here, we report that Pyrintegrin (Ptn), a 2,4-disubstituted pyrimidine known to promote embryonic stem cells survival, is robustly adipogenic and induces postnatal adipose tissue formation in vivo of transplanted adipose stem/progenitor cells (ASCs) and recruited endogenous cells. In vitro, Ptn stimulated human adipose tissue derived ASCs to differentiate into lipid-laden adipocytes by upregulating peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPARγ) and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-α (C/EBPα), with differentiated cells increasingly secreting adiponectin, leptin, glycerol and total triglycerides. Ptn-primed human ASCs seeded in 3D-bioprinted biomaterial scaffolds yielded newly formed adipose tissue that expressed human PPARγ, when transplanted into the dorsum of athymic mice. Remarkably, Ptn-adsorbed 3D scaffolds implanted in the inguinal fat pad had enhanced adipose tissue formation, suggesting Ptn’s ability to induce in situ adipogenesis of endogenous cells. Ptn promoted adipogenesis by upregulating PPARγ and C/EBPα not only in adipogenesis induction medium, but also in chemically defined medium specifically for osteogenesis, and concurrently attenuated Runx2 and Osx via BMP-mediated SMAD1/5 phosphorylation. These findings suggest Ptn’s novel role as an adipogenesis inducer with a therapeutic potential in soft tissue reconstruction and augmentation. PMID:28128224

  19. DNA damage in cells exhibiting radiation-induced genomic instability

    DOE PAGES

    Keszenman, Deborah J.; Kolodiuk, Lucia; Baulch, Janet E.

    2015-02-22

    Cells exhibiting radiation induced genomic instability exhibit varied spectra of genetic and chromosomal aberrations. Even so, oxidative stress remains a common theme in the initiation and/or perpetuation of this phenomenon. Isolated oxidatively modified bases, abasic sites, DNA single strand breaks and clustered DNA damage are induced in normal mammalian cultured cells and tissues due to endogenous reactive oxygen species generated during normal cellular metabolism in an aerobic environment. While sparse DNA damage may be easily repaired, clustered DNA damage may lead to persistent cytotoxic or mutagenic events that can lead to genomic instability. In this study, we tested the hypothesismore » that DNA damage signatures characterised by altered levels of endogenous, potentially mutagenic, types of DNA damage and chromosomal breakage are related to radiation-induced genomic instability and persistent oxidative stress phenotypes observed in the chromosomally unstable progeny of irradiated cells. The measurement of oxypurine, oxypyrimidine and abasic site endogenous DNA damage showed differences in non-double-strand breaks (DSB) clusters among the three of the four unstable clones evaluated as compared to genomically stable clones and the parental cell line. These three unstable clones also had increased levels of DSB clusters. The results of this study demonstrate that each unstable cell line has a unique spectrum of persistent damage and lead us to speculate that alterations in DNA damage signaling and repair may be related to the perpetuation of genomic instability.« less

  20. Mortalin sensitizes human cancer cells to MKT-077-induced senescence.

    PubMed

    Deocaris, Custer C; Widodo, Nashi; Shrestha, Bhupal G; Kaur, Kamaljit; Ohtaka, Manami; Yamasaki, Kazuhiko; Kaul, Sunil C; Wadhwa, Renu

    2007-07-18

    Mortalin is a chaperone protein that functions in many cellular processes such as mitochondrial biogenesis, intracellular trafficking, cell proliferation and signaling. Its upregulation in many human cancers makes it a candidate target for therapeutic intervention by small molecule drugs. In continuation to our earlier studies showing mortalin as a cellular target of MKT-077, a mitochondrion-seeking delocalized cationic dye that causes selective death of cancer cells, in this work, we report that MKT-077 binds to the nucleotide-binding domain of mortalin, causes tertiary structural changes in the protein, inactivates its chaperone function, and induces senescence in human tumor cell lines. Interestingly, in tumor cells with elevated level of mortalin expression, fairly low drug doses were sufficient to induce senescence. Guided by molecular screening for mortalin in tumor cells, our results led to the idea that working at low doses of the drug could be an alternative senescence-inducing cancer therapeutic strategy that could, in theory, avoid renal toxicities responsible for the abortion of MKT-077 clinical trials. Our work may likely translate to a re-appraisal of the therapeutic benefits of low doses of several classes of anti-tumor drugs, even of those that had been discontinued due to adverse effects.

  1. Rapid flow-induced responses in endothelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stamatas, G. N.; McIntire, L. V.

    2001-01-01

    Endothelial cells alter their morphology, growth rate, and metabolism in response to fluid shear stress. To study rapid flow-induced responses in the 3D endothelial cell morphology and calcium distribution, coupled fluorescence microscopy with optical sectioning, digital imaging, and numerical deconvolution techniques have been utilized. Results demonstrate that within the first minutes of flow application nuclear calcium is increasing. In the same time frame whole cell height and nuclear height are reduced by about 1 microm. Whole cell height changes may facilitate reduction of shear stress gradients on the luminal surface, whereas nuclear structural changes may be important for modulating endothelial growth rate and metabolism. To study the role of the cytoskeleton in these responses, endothelial cells have been treated with specific disrupters (acrylamide, cytochalasin D, and colchicine) of each of the cytoskeleton elements (intermediate filaments, microfilaments, and microtubules, respectively). None of these compounds had any effect on the shear-induced calcium response. Cytochalasin D and acrylamide did not affect the shear-induced nuclear morphology changes. Colchicine, however, completely abrogated the response, indicating that microtubules may be implicated in force transmission from the plasma membrane to the nucleus. A pedagogical model based on tensegrity theory principles is presented that is consistent with the results on the 3D endothelial morphology.

  2. Rapid flow-induced responses in endothelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stamatas, G. N.; McIntire, L. V.

    2001-01-01

    Endothelial cells alter their morphology, growth rate, and metabolism in response to fluid shear stress. To study rapid flow-induced responses in the 3D endothelial cell morphology and calcium distribution, coupled fluorescence microscopy with optical sectioning, digital imaging, and numerical deconvolution techniques have been utilized. Results demonstrate that within the first minutes of flow application nuclear calcium is increasing. In the same time frame whole cell height and nuclear height are reduced by about 1 microm. Whole cell height changes may facilitate reduction of shear stress gradients on the luminal surface, whereas nuclear structural changes may be important for modulating endothelial growth rate and metabolism. To study the role of the cytoskeleton in these responses, endothelial cells have been treated with specific disrupters (acrylamide, cytochalasin D, and colchicine) of each of the cytoskeleton elements (intermediate filaments, microfilaments, and microtubules, respectively). None of these compounds had any effect on the shear-induced calcium response. Cytochalasin D and acrylamide did not affect the shear-induced nuclear morphology changes. Colchicine, however, completely abrogated the response, indicating that microtubules may be implicated in force transmission from the plasma membrane to the nucleus. A pedagogical model based on tensegrity theory principles is presented that is consistent with the results on the 3D endothelial morphology.

  3. Turkish propolis supresses MCF-7 cell death induced by homocysteine.

    PubMed

    Tartik, Musa; Darendelioglu, Ekrem; Aykutoglu, Gurkan; Baydas, Giyasettin

    2016-08-01

    Elevated plasma homocysteine (Hcy) level is a most important risk factor for various vascular diseases including coronary, cerebral and peripheral arterial and venous thrombosis. Propolis is produced by honeybee from various oils, pollens and wax materials. Therefore, it has various biological properties including antioxidant, antitumor and antimicrobial activities. This study investigated the effects of propolis and Hcy on apoptosis in cancer cells. According to our findings, Hcy induced apoptosis in human breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7) cells by regulating numerous genes and proteins involved in the apoptotic signal transduction pathway. In contrast, treatment with propolis inhibited caspase- 3 and -9 induced by Hcy in MCF-7 cells. It can be concluded that Hcy may augment the activity of anticancer agents that induce excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and apoptosis in their target cells. In contrast to the previous studies herein we found that propolis in low doses protected cancer cells inhibiting cellular apoptosis mediated by intracellular ROS-dependent mitochondrial pathway. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Cholesterol induces proliferation of chicken primordial germ cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dongyang; Chen, Meijuan; Lu, Zhenping; Yang, Mengmeng; Xie, Long; Zhang, Wenxin; Xu, Huiyan; Lu, Kehuan; Lu, Yangqing

    2016-08-01

    Primordial germ cells (PGCs) are the precursors of sperm and eggs and may serve as suitable cells for use in research in developmental biology and transgenic animals. However, the long-term propagation of PGCs in vitro has so far been plagued by the loss of their germ cell characteristics. This is largely because of the scarcity of knowledge concerning cell division and proliferation in these cells and the poor optimization of the culture medium. The sonic hedgehog (SHH) signaling pathway is involved in proliferation of many types of cells, but little is known about its role in chicken PGCs. The results of the current study indicate that the proliferation of chicken PGCs increases significantly when cholesterol, a molecule that facilitates the trafficking of HH ligands, is supplemented in the culture medium. This effect was attenuated when an SHH antagonist, cyclopamine was added, suggesting the involvement of SHH signaling in this process. The characterization of PGCs treated with cholesterol has shown that these cells express germ-cell-related markers and retain their capability to colonize the embryonic gonad after re-introduction to vasculature of stage-15 HH embryos, indicating that proliferation of PGCs induced by cholesterol does not alter the germ cell characteristics of these cells.

  5. Translational prospects for human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Csete, Marie

    2010-07-01

    The pace of research on human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells is frantic worldwide, based on the enormous therapeutic potential of patient-specific pluripotent cells free of the ethical and political issues that plagued human embryonic stem cell research. iPS cells are now relatively easy to isolate from somatic cells and reprogramming can be accomplished using nonmutagenic technologies. Access to iPS cells is already paying dividends in the form of new disease-in-a-dish models for drug discovery and as scalable sources of cells for toxicology. For translation of cell therapies, the major advantage of iPS cells is that they are autologous, but for many reasons, perfect immunologic tolerance of iPS-based grafts should not be assumed. This article focuses on the functional identity of iPS cells, anticipated safety and technical issues in their application, as well as a survey of the progress likely to be realized in clinical applications in the next decade.

  6. Heat stress induces ferroptosis-like cell death in plants.

    PubMed

    Distéfano, Ayelén Mariana; Martin, María Victoria; Córdoba, Juan Pablo; Bellido, Andrés Martín; D'Ippólito, Sebastián; Colman, Silvana Lorena; Soto, Débora; Roldán, Juan Alfredo; Bartoli, Carlos Guillermo; Zabaleta, Eduardo Julián; Fiol, Diego Fernando; Stockwell, Brent R; Dixon, Scott J; Pagnussat, Gabriela Carolina

    2017-02-01

    In plants, regulated cell death (RCD) plays critical roles during development and is essential for plant-specific responses to abiotic and biotic stresses. Ferroptosis is an iron-dependent, oxidative, nonapoptotic form of cell death recently described in animal cells. In animal cells, this process can be triggered by depletion of glutathione (GSH) and accumulation of lipid reactive oxygen species (ROS). We investigated whether a similar process could be relevant to cell death in plants. Remarkably, heat shock (HS)-induced RCD, but not reproductive or vascular development, was found to involve a ferroptosis-like cell death process. In root cells, HS triggered an iron-dependent cell death pathway that was characterized by depletion of GSH and ascorbic acid and accumulation of cytosolic and lipid ROS. These results suggest a physiological role for this lethal pathway in response to heat stress in Arabidopsis thaliana The similarity of ferroptosis in animal cells and ferroptosis-like death in plants suggests that oxidative, iron-dependent cell death programs may be evolutionarily ancient. © 2017 Distéfano et al.

  7. Heat stress induces ferroptosis-like cell death in plants

    PubMed Central

    D’Ippólito, Sebastián; Colman, Silvana Lorena; Soto, Débora; Bartoli, Carlos Guillermo; Fiol, Diego Fernando

    2017-01-01

    In plants, regulated cell death (RCD) plays critical roles during development and is essential for plant-specific responses to abiotic and biotic stresses. Ferroptosis is an iron-dependent, oxidative, nonapoptotic form of cell death recently described in animal cells. In animal cells, this process can be triggered by depletion of glutathione (GSH) and accumulation of lipid reactive oxygen species (ROS). We investigated whether a similar process could be relevant to cell death in plants. Remarkably, heat shock (HS)–induced RCD, but not reproductive or vascular development, was found to involve a ferroptosis-like cell death process. In root cells, HS triggered an iron-dependent cell death pathway that was characterized by depletion of GSH and ascorbic acid and accumulation of cytosolic and lipid ROS. These results suggest a physiological role for this lethal pathway in response to heat stress in Arabidopsis thaliana. The similarity of ferroptosis in animal cells and ferroptosis-like death in plants suggests that oxidative, iron-dependent cell death programs may be evolutionarily ancient. PMID:28100685