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Sample records for goat scrapie modulation

  1. Evidence of scrapie transmission to sheep via goat milk.

    PubMed

    Konold, Timm; Thorne, Leigh; Simmons, Hugh A; Hawkins, Steve A C; Simmons, Marion M; González, Lorenzo

    2016-09-17

    Previous studies confirmed that classical scrapie can be transmitted via milk in sheep. The current study aimed to investigate whether scrapie can also be transmitted via goat milk using in vivo (new-born lambs fed milk from scrapie-affected goats due to the unavailability of goat kids from guaranteed scrapie-free herds) and in vitro methods (serial protein misfolding cyclic amplification [sPMCA] on milk samples). In an initial pilot study, new-born lambs of two different prion protein gene (PRNP) genotypes (six VRQ/VRQ and five ARQ/ARQ) were orally challenged with 5 g brain homogenate from two scrapie-affected goats to determine susceptibility of sheep to goat scrapie. All sheep challenged with goat scrapie brain became infected based on the immunohistochemical detection of disease-associated PrP (PrP(sc)) in lymphoid tissue, with an ARQ/ARQ sheep being the first to succumb. Subsequent feeding of milk to eight pairs of new-born ARQ/ARQ lambs, with each pair receiving milk from a different scrapie-affected goat, resulted in scrapie in the six pairs that received the largest volume of milk (38-87 litres per lamb), whereas two pairs fed 8-9 litres per lamb, and an environmental control group raised on sheep milk from healthy ewes, did not show evidence of infection when culled at up to 1882 days of age. Infection in those 12 milk recipients occurred regardless of the clinical status, PrP(sc) distribution, caprine arthritis-encephalitis virus infection status and PRNP polymorphisms at codon 142 (II or IM) of the donor goats, but survival time was influenced by PRNP polymorphisms at codon 141. Serial PMCA applied to a total of 32 milk samples (four each from the eight donor goats collected throughout lactation) detected PrP(sc) in one sample each from two goats. The scrapie agent was present in the milk from infected goats and was able to transmit to susceptible species even at early preclinical stage of infection, when PrP(sc) was undetectable in the brain of the

  2. Role of PRNP S127 allele in experimental goat infection with classical caprine scrapie

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Classical scrapie is a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy that affects domestic goats and sheep. Experimental inoculation studies in sheep confirmed that classical caprine scrapie can readily transmit to sheep. Therefore, even if current scrapie eradication measures are successful in sheep, goa...

  3. The placenta shed from goats with classical scrapie is infectious to goat kids and lambs.

    PubMed

    Schneider, David A; Madsen-Bouterse, Sally A; Zhuang, Dongyue; Truscott, Thomas C; Dassanayake, Rohana P; O'Rourke, Katherine I

    2015-08-01

    The placenta of domestic sheep plays a key role in horizontal transmission of classical scrapie. Domestic goats are frequently raised with sheep and are susceptible to classical scrapie, yet potential routes of transmission from goats to sheep are not fully defined. Sparse accumulation of disease-associated prion protein in cotyledons casts doubt about the role of the goat's placenta. Thus, relevant to mixed-herd management and scrapie-eradication efforts worldwide, we determined if the goat's placenta contains prions orally infectious to goat kids and lambs. A pooled cotyledon homogenate, prepared from the shed placenta of a goat with naturally acquired classical scrapie disease, was used to orally inoculate scrapie-naïve prion genotype-matched goat kids and scrapie-susceptible lambs raised separately in a scrapie-free environment. Transmission was detected in all four goats and in two of four sheep, which importantly identifies the goat's placenta as a risk for horizontal transmission to sheep and other goats.

  4. The placenta shed from goats with classical scrapie is infectious to goat kids and lambs

    PubMed Central

    Madsen-Bouterse, Sally A.; Zhuang, Dongyue; Truscott, Thomas C.; Dassanayake, Rohana P.; O'Rourke, Katherine I.

    2015-01-01

    The placenta of domestic sheep plays a key role in horizontal transmission of classical scrapie. Domestic goats are frequently raised with sheep and are susceptible to classical scrapie, yet potential routes of transmission from goats to sheep are not fully defined. Sparse accumulation of disease-associated prion protein in cotyledons casts doubt about the role of the goat's placenta. Thus, relevant to mixed-herd management and scrapie-eradication efforts worldwide, we determined if the goat's placenta contains prions orally infectious to goat kids and lambs. A pooled cotyledon homogenate, prepared from the shed placenta of a goat with naturally acquired classical scrapie disease, was used to orally inoculate scrapie-naı¨ve prion genotype-matched goat kids and scrapie-susceptible lambs raised separately in a scrapie-free environment. Transmission was detected in all four goats and in two of four sheep, which importantly identifies the goat's placenta as a risk for horizontal transmission to sheep and other goats. PMID:25888622

  5. Extended scrapie incubation time in goats singly heterozygous for PRNP S146 or K222

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Scrapie is the transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) of sheep and goats, and scrapie eradication in sheep is based in part on strong genetic resistance to classical scrapie. Goats may serve as a scrapie reservoir, and to date there has been no experimental inoculation confirming strong genet...

  6. Resistance to classical scrapie in experimentally challenged goats carrying mutation K222 of the prion protein gene

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Susceptibility of sheep to scrapie, a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy of small ruminants, is strongly influenced by polymorphisms of the prion protein gene (PRNP). Breeding programs have been implemented to increase scrapie resistance in sheep populations; though desirable, a similar approach has not yet been applied in goats. European studies have now suggested that several polymorphisms can modulate scrapie susceptibility in goats: in particular, PRNP variant K222 has been associated with resistance in case-control studies in Italy, France and Greece. In this study we investigated the resistance conferred by this variant using a natural Italian goat scrapie isolate to intracerebrally challenge five goats carrying genotype Q/Q 222 (wild type) and five goats carrying genotype Q/K 222. By the end of the study, all five Q/Q 222 goats had died of scrapie after a mean incubation period of 19 months; one of the five Q/K 222 goats died after 24 months, while the other four were alive and apparently healthy up to the end of the study at 4.5 years post-challenge. All five of these animals were found to be scrapie negative. Statistical analysis showed that the probability of survival of the Q/K 222 goats versus the Q/Q 222 goats was significantly higher (p = 0.002). Our study shows that PRNP gene mutation K222 is strongly associated with resistance to classical scrapie also in experimental conditions, making it a potentially positive target for selection in the frame of breeding programs for resistance to classical scrapie in goats. PMID:22296670

  7. Resistance to classical scrapie in experimentally challenged goats carrying mutation K222 of the prion protein gene.

    PubMed

    Acutis, Pier Luigi; Martucci, Francesca; D'Angelo, Antonio; Peletto, Simone; Colussi, Silvia; Maurella, Cristiana; Porcario, Chiara; Iulini, Barbara; Mazza, Maria; Dell'atti, Luana; Zuccon, Fabio; Corona, Cristiano; Martinelli, Nicola; Casalone, Cristina; Caramelli, Maria; Lombardi, Guerino

    2012-02-01

    Susceptibility of sheep to scrapie, a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy of small ruminants, is strongly influenced by polymorphisms of the prion protein gene (PRNP). Breeding programs have been implemented to increase scrapie resistance in sheep populations; though desirable, a similar approach has not yet been applied in goats. European studies have now suggested that several polymorphisms can modulate scrapie susceptibility in goats: in particular, PRNP variant K222 has been associated with resistance in case-control studies in Italy, France and Greece. In this study we investigated the resistance conferred by this variant using a natural Italian goat scrapie isolate to intracerebrally challenge five goats carrying genotype Q/Q 222 (wild type) and five goats carrying genotype Q/K 222. By the end of the study, all five Q/Q 222 goats had died of scrapie after a mean incubation period of 19 months; one of the five Q/K 222 goats died after 24 months, while the other four were alive and apparently healthy up to the end of the study at 4.5 years post-challenge. All five of these animals were found to be scrapie negative. Statistical analysis showed that the probability of survival of the Q/K 222 goats versus the Q/Q 222 goats was significantly higher (p = 0.002). Our study shows that PRNP gene mutation K222 is strongly associated with resistance to classical scrapie also in experimental conditions, making it a potentially positive target for selection in the frame of breeding programs for resistance to classical scrapie in goats.

  8. Genetic resistance to scrapie infection in experimentally challenged goats.

    PubMed

    Lacroux, Caroline; Perrin-Chauvineau, Cécile; Corbière, Fabien; Aron, Naima; Aguilar-Calvo, Patricia; Torres, Juan Maria; Costes, Pierrette; Brémaud, Isabelle; Lugan, Séverine; Schelcher, François; Barillet, Francis; Andréoletti, Olivier

    2014-03-01

    In goats, several field studies have identified coding mutations of the gene encoding the prion protein (I/M142, N/D146, S/D146, R/Q211, and Q/K222) that are associated with a lower risk of developing classical scrapie. However, the data related to the levels of resistance to transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) of these different PRNP gene mutations are still considered insufficient for developing large-scale genetic selection against scrapie in this species. In this study, we inoculated wild-type (WT) PRNP (I142R154R211Q222) goats and homozygous and/or heterozygous I/M142, R/H154, R/Q211, and Q/K222 goats with a goat natural scrapie isolate by either the oral or the intracerebral (i.c.) route. Our results indicate that the I/M142 PRNP polymorphism does not provide substantial resistance to scrapie infection following intracerebral or oral inoculation. They also demonstrate that H154, Q211, and K222 PRNP allele carriers are all resistant to scrapie infection following oral exposure. However, in comparison to WT animals, the H154 and Q211 allele carriers displayed only moderate increases in the incubation period following i.c. challenge. After i.c. challenge, heterozygous K222 and a small proportion of homozygous K222 goats also developed the disease, but with incubation periods that were 4 to 5 times longer than those in WT animals. These results support the contention that the K222 goat prion protein variant provides a strong but not absolutely protective effect against classical scrapie.

  9. Genetic Resistance to Scrapie Infection in Experimentally Challenged Goats

    PubMed Central

    Lacroux, Caroline; Perrin-Chauvineau, Cécile; Corbière, Fabien; Aron, Naima; Aguilar-Calvo, Patricia; Torres, Juan Maria; Costes, Pierrette; Brémaud, Isabelle; Lugan, Séverine; Schelcher, François; Barillet, Francis

    2014-01-01

    In goats, several field studies have identified coding mutations of the gene encoding the prion protein (I/M142, N/D146, S/D146, R/Q211, and Q/K222) that are associated with a lower risk of developing classical scrapie. However, the data related to the levels of resistance to transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) of these different PRNP gene mutations are still considered insufficient for developing large-scale genetic selection against scrapie in this species. In this study, we inoculated wild-type (WT) PRNP (I142R154R211Q222) goats and homozygous and/or heterozygous I/M142, R/H154, R/Q211, and Q/K222 goats with a goat natural scrapie isolate by either the oral or the intracerebral (i.c.) route. Our results indicate that the I/M142 PRNP polymorphism does not provide substantial resistance to scrapie infection following intracerebral or oral inoculation. They also demonstrate that H154, Q211, and K222 PRNP allele carriers are all resistant to scrapie infection following oral exposure. However, in comparison to WT animals, the H154 and Q211 allele carriers displayed only moderate increases in the incubation period following i.c. challenge. After i.c. challenge, heterozygous K222 and a small proportion of homozygous K222 goats also developed the disease, but with incubation periods that were 4 to 5 times longer than those in WT animals. These results support the contention that the K222 goat prion protein variant provides a strong but not absolutely protective effect against classical scrapie. PMID:24284317

  10. The placenta shed from goats with classical scrapie is infectious to goat kids and lambs

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Classical scrapie is a natural prion disease of sheep in which the immediate postpartum period and, in particular, the placenta have long been known to play key roles in natural horizontal transmission. Goats, too, are a natural host of classical scrapie and are frequently raised with sheep; but the...

  11. Sparse PrP-Sc accumulation in the placentas of goats with naturally acquired scrapie

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Scrapie is a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy or prion disease, occurring in sheep and goats. First described 300 years ago, scrapie is the prototype prion disorder and the well characterized scrapie phenotypes provided important clues to the origin of kuru and bovine spongiform encephalopat...

  12. Extended scrapie incubation time in goats singly heterozygous for PRNP S146 or K222.

    PubMed

    White, Stephen N; Reynolds, James O; Waldron, Daniel F; Schneider, David A; O'Rourke, Katherine I

    2012-06-10

    Scrapie is the transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) of sheep and goats, and scrapie eradication in sheep is based in part on strong genetic resistance to classical scrapie. Goats may serve as a scrapie reservoir, and to date there has been no experimental inoculation confirming strong genetic resistance in goats. Two prion protein variants (amino acid substitutions S146 and K222) in goats have been significantly underrepresented in scrapie cases though present in scrapie-exposed flocks, and have demonstrated low cell-free protein conversion efficiency to the disease form (PrP(D)). To test degree of genetic resistance conferred in live animals with consistent exposure, we performed the first oral scrapie challenge of goats singly heterozygous for either PRNP S146 or K222. All N146-Q222 homozygotes became clinically scrapie positive by an average of 24months, but all S146 and K222 heterozygotes remain scrapie negative by both rectal biopsy and clinical signs at significantly longer incubation times (P<0.0001 for both comparisons). Recent reports indicate small numbers of S146 and K222 heterozygous goats have become naturally infected with scrapie, suggesting these alleles do not confer complete resistance in the heterozygous state but rather extend incubation. The oral challenge results presented here confirm extended incubation observed in a recent intracerebral challenge of K222 heterozygotes, and to our knowledge provide the first demonstration of extended incubation in S146 heterozygotes. These results suggest longer relevant trace-back histories in scrapie-eradication programs for animals bearing these alleles and strengthen the case for additional challenge experiments in both homozygotes to assess potential scrapie resistance.

  13. PrP-associated resistance to scrapie in five highly infected goat herds.

    PubMed

    Corbière, Fabien; Perrin-Chauvineau, Cécile; Lacroux, Caroline; Costes, Pierrette; Thomas, Myriam; Brémaud, Isabelle; Martin, Samuel; Lugan, Séverine; Chartier, Christophe; Schelcher, François; Barillet, Francis; Andreoletti, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    The PrP gene polymorphisms at codons 142 (I/M), 154 (R/H), 211 (R/Q), 222 (Q/K) and 240 (S/P) and their association with susceptibility to classical scrapie infection were investigated in five French goat herds displaying a high disease prevalence (>10%). On the basis of PrP(Sc) detection in the central nervous system and in various lymphoid tissues, 301 of 1343 goats were found to be scrapie infected. The statistical analyses indicated that while P(240) mutation had no direct impact on scrapie infection risk, the H(154), Q(211) and K(222) mutations were associated with high resistance to scrapie. The M(142) mutated allele was associated with a limited protection level against the disease. These results further reinforce the view that, like in sheep, the control and eradication of classical scrapie through the selection of certain PrP alleles could be envisaged in commercial goat population.

  14. Differential immunoreactivity of goat derived scrapie following in vitro misfolding versus mouse bioassay.

    PubMed

    Madsen-Bouterse, Sally A; Zhuang, Dongyue; O'Rourke, Katherine I; Schneider, David A

    2012-07-13

    The protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA) assay allows for detection of prion protein misfolding activity in tissues and fluids from sheep with scrapie where it was previously undetected by conventional western blot and immunohistochemistry assays. Studies of goats with scrapie have yet to take advantage of PMCA, which could aid in discerning the risk of transmission between goats and goats to sheep. The aim of the current study was to adapt PMCA for evaluation of scrapie derived from goats. Diluted brain homogenate from scrapie-infected goats (i.e., the scrapie seed, PrP(Sc)) was subjected to PMCA using normal brain homogenate from ovinized transgenic mice (tg338) as the source of normal cellular prion protein (the substrate, PrP(C)). The assay end-point was detection of the proteinase K-resistant misfolded prion protein core (PrP(res)) by western blot. Protein misfolding activity was consistently observed in caprine brain homogenate diluted 10,000-fold after 5 PMCA rounds. Epitope mapping by western blot analyses demonstrated that PrP(res) post-PMCA was readily detected with an N-terminus anti-PrP monoclonal antibody (P4), similar to scrapie inoculum from goats. This was in contrast to limited detection of PrP(res) with P4 following mouse bioassay. The inverse was observed with a monoclonal antibody to the C-terminus (F99/97.6.1). Thus, brain homogenate prepared from uninoculated tg338 served as an appropriate substrate for serial PMCA of PrP(Sc) derived from goats. These observations suggest that concurrent PMCA and bioassay with tg338 could improve characterization of goat derived scrapie.

  15. PRNP genetic variability and molecular typing of natural goat scrapie isolates in a high number of infected flocks.

    PubMed

    Fragkiadaki, Eirini G; Vaccari, Gabriele; Ekateriniadou, Loukia V; Agrimi, Umberto; Giadinis, Nektarios D; Chiappini, Barbara; Esposito, Elena; Conte, Michela; Nonno, Romolo

    2011-09-30

    One hundred and four scrapie positive and 77 negative goats from 34 Greek mixed flocks were analysed by prion protein gene sequencing and 17 caprine scrapie isolates from 11 flocks were submitted to molecular isolate typing. For the first time, the protective S146 variant was reported in Greece, while the protective K222 variant was detected in negative but also in five scrapie positive goats from heavily infected flocks. By immunoblotting six isolates, including two goat flockmates carrying the K222 variant, showed molecular features slightly different from all other Greek and Italian isolates co-analysed, possibly suggesting the presence of different scrapie strains in Greece.

  16. Genetic and Pathological Follow-Up Study of Goats Experimentally and Naturally Exposed to a Sheep Scrapie Isolate

    PubMed Central

    Maestrale, Caterina; Cancedda, Maria G.; Pintus, Davide; Masia, Mariangela; Nonno, Romolo; Ru, Giuseppe; Carta, Antonello; Demontis, Francesca; Santucciu, Cinzia

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Thirty-seven goats carrying different prion protein genotypes (PRNP) were orally infected with a classical scrapie brain homogenate from wild-type (ARQ/ARQ) sheep and then mated to obtain 2 additional generations of offspring, which were kept in the same environment and allowed to be naturally exposed to scrapie. Occurrence of clinical or subclinical scrapie was observed in the experimentally infected goats (F0) and in only one (F1b) of the naturally exposed offspring groups. In both groups (F0 and F1b), goats carrying the R154H, H154H, R211Q, and P168Q-P240P dimorphisms died of scrapie after a longer incubation period than wild-type, G37V, Q168Q-P240P, and S240P goats. In contrast, D145D and Q222K goats were resistant to infection. The immunobiochemical signature of the scrapie isolate and its pathological aspects observed in the sheep donors were substantially maintained over 2 goat generations, i.e., after experimental and natural transmission. This demonstrates that the prion protein gene sequence, which is shared by sheep and goats, is more powerful than any possible but unknown species-related factors in determining scrapie phenotypes. With regard to genetics, our study confirms that the K222 mutation protects goats even against ovine scrapie isolates, and for the first time, a possible association of D145 mutation with scrapie resistance is shown. In addition, it is possible that the sole diverse frequencies of these genetic variants might, at least in part, shape the prevalence of scrapie among naturally exposed progenies in affected herds. IMPORTANCE This study was aimed at investigating the genetic and pathological features characterizing sheep-to-goat transmission of scrapie. We show that in goats with different prion protein gene mutations, the K222 genetic variant is associated with scrapie resistance after natural and experimental exposure to ovine prion infectivity. In addition, we observed for the first time a protective effect of the D145

  17. Genetic and Pathological Follow-Up Study of Goats Experimentally and Naturally Exposed to a Sheep Scrapie Isolate.

    PubMed

    Maestrale, Caterina; Cancedda, Maria G; Pintus, Davide; Masia, Mariangela; Nonno, Romolo; Ru, Giuseppe; Carta, Antonello; Demontis, Francesca; Santucciu, Cinzia; Ligios, Ciriaco

    2015-10-01

    Thirty-seven goats carrying different prion protein genotypes (PRNP) were orally infected with a classical scrapie brain homogenate from wild-type (ARQ/ARQ) sheep and then mated to obtain 2 additional generations of offspring, which were kept in the same environment and allowed to be naturally exposed to scrapie. Occurrence of clinical or subclinical scrapie was observed in the experimentally infected goats (F0) and in only one (F1b) of the naturally exposed offspring groups. In both groups (F0 and F1b), goats carrying the R154H, H154H, R211Q, and P168Q-P240P dimorphisms died of scrapie after a longer incubation period than wild-type, G37V, Q168Q-P240P, and S240P goats. In contrast, D145D and Q222K goats were resistant to infection. The immunobiochemical signature of the scrapie isolate and its pathological aspects observed in the sheep donors were substantially maintained over 2 goat generations, i.e., after experimental and natural transmission. This demonstrates that the prion protein gene sequence, which is shared by sheep and goats, is more powerful than any possible but unknown species-related factors in determining scrapie phenotypes. With regard to genetics, our study confirms that the K222 mutation protects goats even against ovine scrapie isolates, and for the first time, a possible association of D145 mutation with scrapie resistance is shown. In addition, it is possible that the sole diverse frequencies of these genetic variants might, at least in part, shape the prevalence of scrapie among naturally exposed progenies in affected herds. This study was aimed at investigating the genetic and pathological features characterizing sheep-to-goat transmission of scrapie. We show that in goats with different prion protein gene mutations, the K222 genetic variant is associated with scrapie resistance after natural and experimental exposure to ovine prion infectivity. In addition, we observed for the first time a protective effect of the D145 goat variant against

  18. The limits of test-based scrapie eradication programs in goats.

    PubMed

    Corbière, Fabien; Chauvineau-Perrin, Cécile; Lacroux, Caroline; Lugan, Séverine; Costes, Pierrette; Thomas, Myriam; Brémaud, Isabelle; Chartier, Christophe; Barillet, Francis; Schelcher, François; Andréoletti, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Small ruminant post-mortem testing programs were initially designed for monitoring the prevalence of prion disease. They are now considered as a potential alternative to genetic selection for eradicating/controlling classical scrapie at population level. If such policy should be implemented, its success would be crucially dependent on the efficiency of the surveillance system used to identify infected flocks. In this study, we first determined the performance of post-mortem classical scrapie detection in eight naturally affected goat herds (total n = 1961 animals) according to the age at culling. These results provided us with necessary parameters to estimate, through a Monte Carlo simulation model, the performance of scrapie detection in a commercial population. According to this model, whatever the number of tests performed, post mortem surveillance will have limited success in identifying infected herds. These data support the contention that scrapie eradication programs relying solely on post mortem testing in goats will probably fail. Considering the epidemiological and pathological similarities of scrapie in sheep and goats, the efficiency of scrapie surveillance in both species is likely to be similar.

  19. Differential immunoreactivity of goat derived scrapie following in vitro misfolding versus mouse bioassay

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA) assay allows for detection of the disease associated isoform of the prion protein in tissues and fluids of sheep where it was previously undetected by conventional western blot and immunohistochemistry assays. Studies of goats with scrapie have yet ...

  20. Prenatal transmission of scrapie in sheep and goats: A case study for veterinary public health

    PubMed Central

    Adams, D.B.

    2016-01-01

    Unsettled knowledge as to whether scrapie transmits prenatally in sheep and goats and transmits by semen and preimplantation embryos has a potential to compromise measures for controlling, preventing and eliminating the disease. The remedy may be analysis according to a systematic review, allowing comprehensive and accessible treatment of evidence and reasoning, clarifying the issue and specifying the uncertainties. Systematic reviews have clearly formulated questions, can identify relevant studies and appraise their quality and can summarise evidence and reasoning with an explicit methodology. The present venture lays a foundation for a possible systematic review and applies three lines of evidence and reasoning to two questions. The first question is whether scrapie transmits prenatally in sheep and goats. It leads to the second question, which concerns the sanitary safety of artificial breeding technologies, and is whether scrapie transmits in sheep and goats by means of semen and washed or unwashed in vivo derived embryos. The three lines of evidence derive from epidemiological, field and clinical studies, experimentation, and causal reasoning, where inferences are made from the body of scientific knowledge and an understanding of animal structure and function. Evidence from epidemiological studies allow a conclusion that scrapie transmits prenatally and that semen and embryos are presumptive hazards for the transmission of scrapie. Evidence from experimentation confirms that semen and washed or unwashed in vivo derived embryos are hazards for the transmission of scrapie. Evidence from causal reasoning, including experience from other prion diseases, shows that mechanisms exist for prenatal transmission and transmission by semen and embryos in both sheep and goats. PMID:27928518

  1. Cell-surface expression of PrPC and the presence of scrapie prions in the blood of goats.

    PubMed

    Dassanayake, Rohana P; Schneider, David A; Herrmann-Hoesing, Lynn M; Truscott, Thomas C; Davis, William C; O'Rourke, Katherine I

    2012-05-01

    Although host-encoded prion protein (PrP(C)) expression in ovine PBMCs and prion infectivity in scrapie-infected sheep blood have been demonstrated, such studies have not been reported in goats. Therefore, this study characterized cell-surface expression of PrP(C) on PBMC subsets derived from normal goats and sheep, by flow cytometry, and determined prion infectivity in blood from a scrapie-infected goat using a transfusion bioassay in goat kids. Cell-surface PrP(C) expression was detected on all subsets of goat PBMCs. The highest PrP(C) cell-surface expression was found in CD2(+) T lymphocytes in goats. Transmission of infection was detected in all three recipients who received whole blood from a goat with classical scrapie. It was concluded that caprine PBMCs express PrP(C) similarly to sheep but with relative differences among PBMCs subsets, and that blood-borne infectious prions can be detected in scrapie-infected goats. Thus, similar to sheep, goat blood may be a suitable diagnostic target for the detection of scrapie infection.

  2. [Swiss scrapie surveillance. I. Clinical aspects of neurological diseases in sheep and goats].

    PubMed

    Maurer, E; Botteron, C; Ehrensperger, F; Fatzer, R; Jaggy, A; Kolly, C; Meylan, M; Zurbriggen, A; Doherr, M G

    2005-10-01

    Small ruminants infected with scrapie show a large range of often unspecific clinical symptoms. The most-often described signs, locomotion, sensibility and behavioural disorders and emaciation, rarely occur together, and cases have been described in which only one of those signs was detectable.Thus, formulating a well-circumscribed definition of a clinical suspect case is difficult. Most animals with CNS-effecting diseases such as listeriosis, polioencephalomacia, cerebrospinal nematidiasis and enterotoxemia will, in a thorough neurological examination, show at least some scrapie-like symptoms. Among the 22 neurological field cases examined in this study, a goat with cerebral gliomatosis and hair lice showed the closest similarity to clinical scrapie. The unilateral deficiency of the cerebral nerves has potential as an clinical exclusion criterion for scrapie. However, the laboratory confirmation--or exclusion--of scrapie remains important. It thus needs to be realized that a consistent and thorough examination of neurologically diseased small ruminants (including fallen stock) is the backbone of a good surveillance system for these diseases. This should be a motivation for submitting adult sheep and goats for neuropathological examination.

  3. Goat K222-PrP(C) polymorphic variant does not provide resistance to atypical scrapie in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Aguilar-Calvo, Patricia; Espinosa, Juan-Carlos; Andréoletti, Olivier; González, Lorenzo; Orge, Leonor; Juste, Ramón; Torres, Juan-María

    2016-09-22

    Host prion (PrP(C)) genotype is a major determinant for the susceptibility to prion diseases. The Q/K222-PrP(C) polymorphic variant provides goats and mice with high resistance against classical scrapie and bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE); yet its effect against atypical scrapie is unknown. Here, transgenic mice expressing the goat wild-type (wt) or the K222-PrP(C) variant were intracerebrally inoculated with several natural cases of atypical scrapie from sheep and goat and their susceptibility to the prion disease was determined. Goat wt and K222-PrP(C) transgenic mice were 100% susceptible to all the atypical scrapie isolates, showing similar survival times and almost identical disease phenotypes. The capacity of the K222-PrP(C) variant to replicate specifically the atypical scrapie strain as efficiently as the goat wt PrP(C), but not the classical scrapie or cattle-BSE as previously reported, further suggests the involvement of concrete areas of the host PrP(C) in the strain-dependent replication of prions.

  4. Caprine prion gene polymorphisms are associated with decreased incidence of classical scrapie in goat herds in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Goldmann, Wilfred; Ryan, Kelly; Stewart, Paula; Parnham, David; Xicohtencatl, Rosa; Fernandez, Nora; Saunders, Ginny; Windl, Otto; González, Lorenzo; Bossers, Alex; Foster, James

    2011-10-31

    The application of genetic breeding programmes to eradicate transmissible spongiform encephalopathies in goats is an important aim for reasons of animal welfare as well as human food safety and food security. Based on the positive impact of Prnp genetics on sheep scrapie in Europe in the past decade, we have established caprine Prnp gene variation in more than 1100 goats from the United Kingdom and studied the association of Prnp alleles with disease phenotypes in 150 scrapie-positive goats. This investigation confirms the association of the Met142 encoding Prnp allele with increased resistance to preclinical and clinical scrapie. It reveals a novel association of the Ser127 encoding allele with a reduced probability to develop clinical signs of scrapie in goats that are already positive for the accumulation of disease-specific prion protein in brain or periphery. A United Kingdom survey of Prnp genotypes in eight common breeds revealed eleven alleles in over thirty genotypes. The Met142 encoding allele had a high overall mean allele frequency of 22.6%, whereas the Ser127 encoding allele frequency was considerably lower with 6.4%. In contrast, a well known resistance associated allele encoding Lys222 was found to be rare (0.9%) in this survey. The analysis of Prnp genotypes in Mexican Criollas goats revealed nine alleles, including a novel Phe to Leu substitution in codon 201, confirming that high genetic variability of Prnp can be found in scrapie-free populations. Our study implies that it should be feasible to lower scrapie prevalence in goat herds in the United Kingdom by genetic selection.

  5. Caprine prion gene polymorphisms are associated with decreased incidence of classical scrapie in goat herds in the United Kingdom

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The application of genetic breeding programmes to eradicate transmissible spongiform encephalopathies in goats is an important aim for reasons of animal welfare as well as human food safety and food security. Based on the positive impact of Prnp genetics on sheep scrapie in Europe in the past decade, we have established caprine Prnp gene variation in more than 1100 goats from the United Kingdom and studied the association of Prnp alleles with disease phenotypes in 150 scrapie-positive goats. This investigation confirms the association of the Met142 encoding Prnp allele with increased resistance to preclinical and clinical scrapie. It reveals a novel association of the Ser127 encoding allele with a reduced probability to develop clinical signs of scrapie in goats that are already positive for the accumulation of disease-specific prion protein in brain or periphery. A United Kingdom survey of Prnp genotypes in eight common breeds revealed eleven alleles in over thirty genotypes. The Met142 encoding allele had a high overall mean allele frequency of 22.6%, whereas the Ser127 encoding allele frequency was considerably lower with 6.4%. In contrast, a well known resistance associated allele encoding Lys222 was found to be rare (0.9%) in this survey. The analysis of Prnp genotypes in Mexican Criollas goats revealed nine alleles, including a novel Phe to Leu substitution in codon 201, confirming that high genetic variability of Prnp can be found in scrapie-free populations. Our study implies that it should be feasible to lower scrapie prevalence in goat herds in the United Kingdom by genetic selection. PMID:22040234

  6. A cross-sectional study of PRNP gene in two native Sicilian goat populations in Italy: a relation between prion gene polymorphisms and scrapie incidence.

    PubMed

    Migliore, Sergio; Agnello, Stefano; D'Avola, Salvatore; Goldmann, Wilfred; Di Marco Lo Presti, Vincenzo; Vitale, Maria

    2017-06-01

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) are a group of neurodegenerative diseases affecting humans and animals, and scrapie in small ruminants is considered the archetype of TSEs. Derivata di Siria is a native dairy goat of Sicily (south Italy), which is related to Syrian goat breeds. Scrapie disease is considered endemic in Sicily since 1997, following the administration of an infected vaccine.Derivata di Siria goatswere involved in six of 66 scrapie-infected flocks in Sicily. Prion protein gene (PRNP) analysis revealed that none of the scrapie cases carried the p.Gln222Lys variant. Sequencing of PRNP in this goat population showed a high frequency (15%) of p.Gln222Lys variant confirming its association with scrapie resistance. PRNP polymorphisms were also analysed in the population of Pantelleria, a small Sicilian Island, where scrapie has never been reported. The native goat breed 'Pantesca' was maintained up to almost 80 years and the size of the sheep population on this island has historically been very low. Currently, a crossbreed goat population of 253 heads is present on the island. PRNP genotyping of Pantelleria goats showed genetic variation, with low presence of wild-type goats and the lack of protective alleles. These data reinforce the association between PRNP polymorphisms in small ruminants and scrapie incidence.

  7. Codon 141 polymorphisms of the ovine prion protein gene affect the phenotype of classical scrapie transmitted from goats to sheep.

    PubMed

    Konold, Timm; Phelan, Laura J; Donnachie, Ben R; Chaplin, Melanie J; Cawthraw, Saira; González, Lorenzo

    2017-05-04

    A study to investigate transmission of classical scrapie via goat milk was carried out in sheep: firstly, lambs were challenged orally with goat scrapie brain homogenate to confirm transmission of scrapie from goats to sheep. In the second study phase, milk from scrapie-infected goats was fed to lambs. Lambs were selected according to their prion protein gene (PRNP) genotype, which was either VRQ/VRQ or ARQ/ARQ, with or without additional polymorphisms at codon 141 (FF141, LF141 or LL141) of the ovine PRNP. This report describes the clinical, pathological and molecular phenotype of goat scrapie in those sheep that progressed to clinical end-stage. Ten sheep (six VRQ/VRQ and four ARQ/ARQ, of which three FF141 and one LL141) challenged with one of two scrapie brain homogenates, and six pairs of sheep (ARQ, of which five LL141 and seven LF141) fed milk from six different goats, developed clinical disease, which was characterised by a pruritic (all VRQ/VRQ and LL141 sheep) or a non-pruritic form (all LF141 and FF141 sheep). Immunohistochemical (IHC) examination revealed that the pattern of intra- and extracellular accumulation of disease-associated prion protein in the brain was also dependent on PRNP polymorphisms at codon 141, which was similar in VRQ and LL141 sheep but different from LF141 and FF141 sheep. The influence of codon 141 was also seen in discriminatory Western blot (WB), with LF141 and FF141 sheep showing a bovine spongiform encephalopathy-like profile (diminished reactivity with P4 antibody) on brain tissue. However, discriminatory WB in lymphoid tissues, and IHC pattern and profile both in lymphoid and brain tissue was consistent with classical scrapie in all sheep. This study provided further evidence that the clinical presentation and the pathological and molecular phenotypes of scrapie in sheep are influenced by PRNP polymorphisms, particularly at codon 141. Differences in the truncation of disease-associated prion protein between LL141 sheep and

  8. Allelic variants at codon 146 in the PRNP gene show significant differences in the risk for natural scrapie in Cypriot goats.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Pelaez, A; Georgiadou, S; Simmons, M M; Windl, O; Dawson, M; Arnold, M E; Neocleous, P; Papasavva-Stylianou, P

    2015-04-01

    Previous studies have shown the association between the polymorphisms serine (S) or aspartic acid (D) at codon 146 of the PRNP gene and resistance to scrapie. All goats aged >12 months (a total of 1075 animals) from four herds with the highest prevalence of scrapie in the country were culled and tested, of which 234 (21·7%) were positive by either the rapid test or immunohistochemistry (IHC) for any of the tissues tested. The odds of scrapie infection occurring in NN146 goats was 101 [95% credible interval (CrI) 19-2938] times higher than for non-NN146 or unknown genotypes. IHC applied to lymphoreticular tissue produced the highest sensitivity (94%, 95% CrI 90-97). The presence of putatively resistant non-NN146 alleles in the Cypriot goat population, severely affected by scrapie, provides a potential tool to reduce/eradicate scrapie provided that coordinated nationwide breeding programmes are implemented and maintained over time.

  9. Prion protein genotype survey confirms low frequency of scrapie-resistant K222 allele in British goat herds.

    PubMed

    Goldmann, W; Marier, E; Stewart, P; Konold, T; Street, S; Langeveld, J; Windl, O; Ortiz-Pelaez, A

    2016-02-13

    Scrapie in goats is a transmissible, fatal prion disease, which is endemic in the British goat population. The recent success in defining caprine PRNP gene variants that provide resistance to experimental and natural classical scrapie has prompted the authors to conduct a survey of PRNP genotypes in 10 goat breeds and 52 herds to find goats with the resistant K222 allele. They report here the frequencies in 1236 tested animals of the resistance-associated K222 and several other alleles by breed and herd. Eight animals were found to be heterozygous QK222 goats (0.64 per cent genotype frequency, 95 per cent CI 0.28 to 1.27 per cent) but no homozygous KK222 goats were detected. The K222 allele was found in Saanen, Toggenburg and Anglo-Nubian goats. The fact that only a few goats with the K222 allele have been identified does not preclude the possibility to design and implement successful breeding programmes at national level.

  10. Prion protein genotype survey confirms low frequency of scrapie-resistant K222 allele in British goat herds

    PubMed Central

    Goldmann, W.; Stewart, P.; Konold, T.; Street, S.; Langeveld, J.; Windl, O.; Ortiz-Pelaez, A.

    2016-01-01

    Scrapie in goats is a transmissible, fatal prion disease, which is endemic in the British goat population. The recent success in defining caprine PRNP gene variants that provide resistance to experimental and natural classical scrapie has prompted the authors to conduct a survey of PRNP genotypes in 10 goat breeds and 52 herds to find goats with the resistant K222 allele. They report here the frequencies in 1236 tested animals of the resistance-associated K222 and several other alleles by breed and herd. Eight animals were found to be heterozygous QK222 goats (0.64 per cent genotype frequency, 95 per cent CI 0.28 to 1.27 per cent) but no homozygous KK222 goats were detected. The K222 allele was found in Saanen, Toggenburg and Anglo-Nubian goats. The fact that only a few goats with the K222 allele have been identified does not preclude the possibility to design and implement successful breeding programmes at national level. PMID:26755614

  11. Sensitive and specific detection of classical scrapie prions in the brains of goats by real-time quaking-induced conversion.

    PubMed

    Dassanayake, Rohana P; Orrú, Christina D; Hughson, Andrew G; Caughey, Byron; Graça, Telmo; Zhuang, Dongyue; Madsen-Bouterse, Sally A; Knowles, Donald P; Schneider, David A

    2016-03-01

    Real-time quaking-induced conversion (RT-QuIC) is a rapid, specific and highly sensitive prion seeding activity detection assay that uses recombinant prion protein (rPrPSen) to detect subinfectious levels of the abnormal isoforms of the prion protein (PrPSc). Although RT-QuIC has been successfully used to detect PrPSc in various tissues from humans and animals, including sheep, tissues from goats infected with classical scrapie have not yet been tested. Therefore, the aims of the present study were to (1) evaluate whether prion seeding activity could be detected in the brain tissues of goats with scrapie using RT-QuIC, (2) optimize reaction conditions to improve scrapie detection in goats, and (3) compare the performance of RT-QuIC for the detection of PrPSc with the more commonly used ELISA and Western blot assays. We further optimized RT-QuIC conditions for sensitive and specific detection of goat scrapie seeding activity in brain tissue from clinical animals. When used with 200  mM sodium chloride, both full-length sheep rPrPSen substrates (PrP genotypes A136R154Q171 and V136R154Q171) provided good discrimination between scrapie-infected and normal goat brain samples at 10(- )3 dilution within 15  h. Our findings indicate that RT-QuIC was at least 10,000-fold more sensitive than ELISA and Western blot assays for the detection of scrapie seeding activity in goat brain samples. In addition to PRNP WT samples, positive RT-QuIC reactions were also observed with three PRNP polymorphic goat brain samples (G/S127, I/M142 and H/R143) tested. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that RT-QuIC sensitively detects prion seeding activity in classical scrapie-infected goat brain samples.

  12. [From the Scrapie syndrome of sheep and goat to the mad cow disease - the history of the discovery of prion].

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui; Weng, Yi

    2009-05-01

    Since the discovery of Scrapie Syndrome in sheep and goats in 1730, there emerged a series of diseases such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, kuru disease and mad cow disease etc. In the research of kuru disease, the American scientist D. Carlteton Gajdusek found a new virus without the characteristic of DNA and RNA, which was awarded the Nobel Prize in physiology in 1976. Since then another American scientist, Stanley B. Prusiner, found a new virus-prion, taking protein as the genetic medium, which was awarded the Nobel prize in physiology and medicine in 1997. The discovery of prion is a great landmark in the research of life science, which laid a theoretical foundation for people to conquer a series of diseases such as Scrapie syndrome in sheep and goats, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, kuru disease and mad cow disease etc.

  13. Perspectives of a scrapie resistance breeding scheme targeting Q211, S146 and K222 caprine PRNP alleles in Greek goats.

    PubMed

    Kanata, Eirini; Humphreys-Panagiotidis, Cynthia; Giadinis, Nektarios D; Papaioannou, Nikolaos; Arsenakis, Minas; Sklaviadis, Theodoros

    2014-04-09

    The present study investigates the potential use of the scrapie-protective Q211 S146 and K222 caprine PRNP alleles as targets for selective breeding in Greek goats. Genotyping data from a high number of healthy goats with special emphasis on bucks, revealed high frequencies of these alleles, while the estimated probabilities of disease occurrence in animals carrying these alleles were low, suggesting that they can be used for selection. Greek goats represent one of the largest populations in Europe. Thus, the considerations presented here are an example of the expected effect of such a scheme on scrapie occurrence and on stakeholders.

  14. Prion protein gene variability in Spanish goats. Inference through susceptibility to classical scrapie strains and pathogenic distribution of peripheral PrP(sc.).

    PubMed

    Acín, Cristina; Martín-Burriel, Inmaculada; Monleón, Eva; Lyahyai, Jaber; Pitarch, José Luis; Serrano, Carmen; Monzón, Marta; Zaragoza, Pilar; Badiola, Juan José

    2013-01-01

    Classical scrapie is a neurological disorder of the central nervous system (CNS) characterized by the accumulation of an abnormal, partially protease resistant prion protein (PrP(sc)) in the CNS and in some peripheral tissues in domestic small ruminants. Whereas the pathological changes and genetic susceptibility of ovine scrapie are well known, caprine scrapie has been less well studied. We report here a pathological study of 13 scrapie-affected goats diagnosed in Spain during the last 9 years. We used immunohistochemical and biochemical techniques to discriminate between classical and atypical scrapie and bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE). All the animals displayed PrP(sc) distribution patterns and western blot characteristics compatible with classical scrapie. In addition, we determined the complete open reading frame sequence of the PRNP in these scrapie-affected animals. The polymorphisms observed were compared with those of the herd mates (n = 665) and with the frequencies of healthy herds (n = 581) of native Spanish goats (Retinta, Pirenaica and Moncaina) and other worldwide breeds reared in Spain (Saanen, Alpine and crossbreed). In total, sixteen polymorphic sites were identified, including the known amino acid substitutions at codons G37V, G127S, M137I, I142M, H143R, R151H, R154H, R211Q, Q222K, G232W, and P240S, and new polymorphisms at codons G74D, M112T, R139S, L141F and Q215R. In addition, the known 42, 138 and 179 silent mutations were detected, and one new one is reported at codon 122. The genetic differences observed in the population studied have been attributed to breed and most of the novel polymorphic codons show frequencies lower than 5%. This work provides the first basis of polymorphic distribution of PRNP in native and worldwide goat breeds reared in Spain.

  15. Prion Protein Gene Variability in Spanish Goats. Inference through Susceptibility to Classical Scrapie Strains and Pathogenic Distribution of Peripheral PrPsc

    PubMed Central

    Acín, Cristina; Martín-Burriel, Inmaculada; Monleón, Eva; Lyahyai, Jaber; Pitarch, José Luis; Serrano, Carmen; Monzón, Marta; Zaragoza, Pilar; Badiola, Juan José

    2013-01-01

    Classical scrapie is a neurological disorder of the central nervous system (CNS) characterized by the accumulation of an abnormal, partially protease resistant prion protein (PrPsc) in the CNS and in some peripheral tissues in domestic small ruminants. Whereas the pathological changes and genetic susceptibility of ovine scrapie are well known, caprine scrapie has been less well studied. We report here a pathological study of 13 scrapie-affected goats diagnosed in Spain during the last 9 years. We used immunohistochemical and biochemical techniques to discriminate between classical and atypical scrapie and bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE). All the animals displayed PrPsc distribution patterns and western blot characteristics compatible with classical scrapie. In addition, we determined the complete open reading frame sequence of the PRNP in these scrapie-affected animals. The polymorphisms observed were compared with those of the herd mates (n = 665) and with the frequencies of healthy herds (n = 581) of native Spanish goats (Retinta, Pirenaica and Moncaina) and other worldwide breeds reared in Spain (Saanen, Alpine and crossbreed). In total, sixteen polymorphic sites were identified, including the known amino acid substitutions at codons G37V, G127S, M137I, I142M, H143R, R151H, R154H, R211Q, Q222K, G232W, and P240S, and new polymorphisms at codons G74D, M112T, R139S, L141F and Q215R. In addition, the known 42, 138 and 179 silent mutations were detected, and one new one is reported at codon 122. The genetic differences observed in the population studied have been attributed to breed and most of the novel polymorphic codons show frequencies lower than 5%. This work provides the first basis of polymorphic distribution of PRNP in native and worldwide goat breeds reared in Spain. PMID:23580248

  16. Goats with aspartic acid or serine at codon 146 of the PRNP gene remain scrapie-negative after lifetime exposure in affected herds in Cyprus.

    PubMed

    Georgiadou, S; Ortiz-Pelaez, A; Simmons, M M; Windl, O; Dawson, M; Neocleous, P; Papasavva-Stylianou, P

    2017-01-01

    The results of the study reported here are part of an ongoing integrated research programme aimed at producing additional, robust, evidence on the genetic resistance to classical scrapie in goats, with particular reference to codon 146. The study targeted animals aged ⩾6 years, which were born and raised in infected herds and were being culled for management reasons. A total of 556 animals were tested, and all positive animals (n = 117) were of the susceptible NN genotype. A total of 246 goats heterozygous or homozygous for putatively resistant alleles (S146 and D146) were screened with no positive results. The outcome of this study supports the hypothesis that the D146 and S146 alleles could be used as the basis for a nationwide strategy for breeding for resistance in the Cypriot goat population.

  17. Serial passage of sheep scrapie inoculum in Suffolk sheep

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Scrapie is a naturally occurring fatal neurodegenerative disease of sheep and goats. Susceptibility to the disease is partly dependent upon the genetic makeup of the host. In a recent study, it was shown that sheep intracerebrally inoculated with a US scrapie agent (No. 13-7) developed scrapie and s...

  18. Association of an indel polymorphism in the 3'UTR of the caprine SPRN gene with scrapie positivity in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Peletto, Simone; Bertolini, Silvia; Maniaci, Maria Grazia; Colussi, Silvia; Modesto, Paola; Biolatti, Cristina; Bertuzzi, Simone; Caramelli, Maria; Maurella, Cristiana; Acutis, Pier Luigi

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the SPRN genes of goats from several scrapie outbreaks in order to detect polymorphisms and to look for association with scrapie occurrence, by an unmatched case-control study. A region of the caprine SPRN gene encompassing the entire ORF and a fragment of the 3'UTR revealed a total of 11 mutations: 10 single-nucleotide polymorphisms and one indel polymorphism. Only two non-synonymous mutations occurring at very low incidence were identified. A significant association with scrapie positivity in the central nervous system was found for an indel polymorphism (602_606insCTCCC) in the 3'UTR. Bioinformatics analyses suggest that this indel may modulate scrapie susceptibility via a microRNA-mediated post-transcriptional mechanism. This is the first study to demonstrate an association between the SPRN gene and goat scrapie. The identified indel may serve as a genetic target other than PRNP to predict disease risk in future genetics-based scrapie-control approaches in goats.

  19. Circulation of prions within dust on a scrapie affected farm.

    PubMed

    Gough, Kevin C; Baker, Claire A; Simmons, Hugh A; Hawkins, Steve A; Maddison, Ben C

    2015-04-16

    Prion diseases are fatal neurological disorders that affect humans and animals. Scrapie of sheep/goats and Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) of deer/elk are contagious prion diseases where environmental reservoirs have a direct link to the transmission of disease. Using protein misfolding cyclic amplification we demonstrate that scrapie PrP(Sc) can be detected within circulating dusts that are present on a farm that is naturally contaminated with sheep scrapie. The presence of infectious scrapie within airborne dusts may represent a possible route of infection and illustrates the difficulties that may be associated with the effective decontamination of such scrapie affected premises.

  20. Comparison of two US sheep scrapie isolates supports identification as separate strains

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Scrapie is a naturally occurring transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) of sheep and goats. There are different strains of sheep scrapie that are associated with unique molecular, transmission, and phenotype characteristics, but very little is known about the potential presence of scrapie str...

  1. Fluorescence spectroscopy of the retina from scrapie-infected mice

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Recently, we have proposed that the fluorescence spectra of sheep retina can be well correlated to the presence or absence of scrapie. Scrapie is the most widespread TSE (transmissible spongiform encephalopathy) affecting sheep and goats worldwide. Mice eyes have been previously reported as a model ...

  2. A Targeted Survey for Scrapie in Jos Plateau State, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Nwankiti, O. O.; Ikeh, E. I.; Arowolo, O. A.; Nwankiti, A. J.; Odugbo, M. O.; Seuberlich, T.

    2013-01-01

    Scrapie, a disease of sheep and goats with a progressive course and fatal outcome, has not been identified in Nigeria. Anecdotal scrapie reports by livestock workers abound. Livestock diseases like scrapie form huddles in livestock economics of countries. For 8 months we surveyed for scrapie targeting emergency/casualty slaughter sheep and goats in Jos, Nigeria. We clinically examined 510 sheep and 608 goats of local breeds, aged from 12 months to 5 years. In total 31 (5.10%) goats and no sheep were clinically suspicious for scrapie. Caudal brainstem tissues of suspect animals collected postmortem were analyzed for the disease specific form of the prion protein, PrPSc, using Bio-Rad's TeSeE ELISA rapid test kit. No sample was positive for scrapie. Fluorescent antibody test for rabies and H&E staining on samples were carried out for differential diagnosis. These showed no pathological lesions indicative for neurological disease. While our findings do not exclude the presence of scrapie in Jos, we demonstrate that targeted sampling of small ruminants for neuroinfectious disease is feasible in developing countries, pointing to the possibility of implementing such a monitoring scheme in Nigeria to prevent economic losses in small ruminant livestock as scrapie caveats from endemic countries have shown. PMID:26464913

  3. Dietary nitrogen and calcium modulate bone metabolism in young goats.

    PubMed

    Elfers, Kristin; Liesegang, Annette; Wilkens, Mirja R; Breves, Gerhard; Muscher-Banse, Alexandra S

    2016-11-01

    Ruminants, possessing the rumino-hepatic circulation, are thought to cope easily with reduced dietary nitrogen (N) supply which is of economic and environmental interest to diminish N output. Nevertheless, feeding an N reduced diet to young goats resulted in a decrease in calcitriol and calcium (Ca) plasma concentrations. Although a dietary Ca reduction alone stimulated calcitriol synthesis and plasma Ca concentrations were restored, in combination with a reduced N supply this stimulating effect was abolished. Based on the important role bone tissue plays in maintaining Ca homeostasis, aim of the present study was to determine effects of an N reduced diet with or without a concomitant Ca reduction on bone metabolism in young goats. A dietary N reduction alone resulted in a significant rise in plasma concentrations of bone resorption marker C-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (CTX) and bone formation marker osteocalcin (OC), while reduced intake of Ca as well as the combination of both dietary interventions increased bone markers only slightly. Bone mineral content and bone mineral density of metatarsi were decreased by reduced N intake, while Ca and phosphorus (P) content of dried bones remained unaffected. In contrast, a dietary Ca reduction alone led to decreased Ca and P content of dried bones. From these data it can be concluded that a dietary N reduction alone or in combination with a reduced dietary Ca supply modulated bone metabolism in young goats. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Objects in Contact with Classical Scrapie Sheep Act as a Reservoir for Scrapie Transmission.

    PubMed

    Konold, Timm; Hawkins, Stephen A C; Thurston, Lisa C; Maddison, Ben C; Gough, Kevin C; Duarte, Anthony; Simmons, Hugh A

    2015-01-01

    Classical scrapie is an environmentally transmissible prion disease of sheep and goats. Prions can persist and remain potentially infectious in the environment for many years and thus pose a risk of infecting animals after re-stocking. In vitro studies using serial protein misfolding cyclic amplification (sPMCA) have suggested that objects on a scrapie-affected sheep farm could contribute to disease transmission. This in vivo study aimed to determine the role of field furniture (water troughs, feeding troughs, fencing, and other objects that sheep may rub against) used by a scrapie-infected sheep flock as a vector for disease transmission to scrapie-free lambs with the prion protein genotype VRQ/VRQ, which is associated with high susceptibility to classical scrapie. When the field furniture was placed in clean accommodation, sheep became infected when exposed to either a water trough (four out of five) or to objects used for rubbing (four out of seven). This field furniture had been used by the scrapie-infected flock 8 weeks earlier and had previously been shown to harbor scrapie prions by sPMCA. Sheep also became infected (20 out of 23) through exposure to contaminated field furniture placed within pasture not used by scrapie-infected sheep for 40 months, even though swabs from this furniture tested negative by PMCA. This infection rate decreased (1 out of 12) on the same paddock after replacement with clean field furniture. Twelve grazing sheep exposed to field furniture not in contact with scrapie-infected sheep for 18 months remained scrapie free. The findings of this study highlight the role of field furniture used by scrapie-infected sheep to act as a reservoir for disease re-introduction although infectivity declines considerably if the field furniture has not been in contact with scrapie-infected sheep for several months. PMCA may not be as sensitive as VRQ/VRQ sheep to test for environmental contamination.

  5. Monitoring of clinical signs in goats with transmissible spongiform encephalopathies

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background As there is limited information about the clinical signs of BSE and scrapie in goats, studies were conducted to describe the clinical progression of scrapie and BSE in goats and to evaluate a short clinical protocol for its use in detecting scrapie-affected goats in two herds with previously confirmed scrapie cases. Clinical assessments were carried out in five goats intracerebrally infected with the BSE agent as well as five reported scrapie suspects and 346 goats subject to cull from the two herds, 24 of which were retained for further monitoring. The brain and selected lymphoid tissue were examined by postmortem tests for disease confirmation. Results The sensitivity and specificity of the short clinical protocol in detecting a scrapie case in the scrapie-affected herds was 3.9% and 99.6%, respectively, based on the presence of tremor, positive scratch test, extensive hair loss, ataxia and absent menace response. All BSE- and scrapie-affected goats displayed abnormalities in sensation (over-reactivity to external stimuli, startle responses, pruritus, absent menace response) and movement (ataxia, tremor, postural deficits) at an advanced clinical stage but the first detectable sign associated with scrapie or BSE could vary between animals. Signs of pruritus were not always present despite similar prion protein genotypes. Clinical signs of scrapie were also displayed by two scrapie cases that presented with detectable disease-associated prion protein only in lymphoid tissues. Conclusions BSE and scrapie may present as pruritic and non-pruritic forms in goats. Signs assessed for the clinical diagnosis of scrapie or BSE in goats should include postural and gait abnormalities, pruritus and visual impairment. However, many scrapie cases will be missed if detection is solely based on the display of clinical signs. PrPd accumulation in the brain appeared to be related to the severity of clinical disease but not to the display of individual neurological signs

  6. 78 FR 25943 - Changes to Scrapie Flock Certification Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-03

    ... giving notice of changes to the Scrapie Flock Certification Program (SFCP), a voluntary program for sheep... sheep and goats. ] DATES: We will consider all comments that we receive on or before June 3, 2013... disease affecting the central nervous systems of sheep and goats. It belongs to a group of diseases...

  7. Clinical examination protocol to detect atypical and classical scrapie in sheep.

    PubMed

    Konold, Timm; Phelan, Laura

    2014-01-19

    The diagnosis of scrapie, a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSEs) of sheep and goats, is currently based on the detection of disease-associated prion protein by post mortem tests. Unless a random sample of the sheep or goat population is actively monitored for scrapie, identification of scrapie cases relies on the reporting of clinical suspects, which is dependent on the individual's familiarization with the disease and ability to recognize clinical signs associated with scrapie. Scrapie may not be considered in the differential diagnosis of neurological diseases in small ruminants, particularly in countries with low scrapie prevalence, or not recognized if it presents as nonpruritic form like atypical scrapie. To aid in the identification of clinical suspects, a short examination protocol is presented to assess the display of specific clinical signs associated with pruritic and nonpruritic forms of TSEs in sheep, which could also be applied to goats. This includes assessment of behavior, vision (by testing of the menace response), pruritus (by testing the response to scratching), and movement (with and without blindfolding). This may lead to a more detailed neurologic examination of reporting animals as scrapie suspects. It could also be used in experimental TSE studies of sheep or goats to evaluate disease progression or to identify clinical end-point.

  8. Characterization of a U.S. Sheep Scrapie Isolate with Short Incubation Time

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Scrapie is a naturally occurring fatal neurodegenerative disease of sheep and goats. Susceptibility to the disease is partly dependent upon the genetic makeup of the host. In a previous study it was shown that sheep intracerebrally inoculated with US scrapie inoculum (No. 13-7) developed terminal di...

  9. Fluorescence spectroscopy of the retina from scrapie-infected mice.

    PubMed

    Bose, Sayantan; Schönenbrücher, Holger; Richt, Jürgen A; Casey, Thomas A; Rasmussen, Mark A; Kehrli, Marcus E; Petrich, Jacob W

    2013-01-01

    Recently, we have proposed that the fluorescence spectra of sheep retina can be well correlated with the presence or absence of scrapie. Scrapie is the most widespread TSE (transmissible spongiform encephalopathy) affecting sheep and goats worldwide. Mice eyes have been previously reported as a model system to study age-related accumulation of lipofuscin, which has been investigated by monitoring the increasing fluorescence with age covering its entire life span. The current work aims at developing mice retina as a convenient model system to diagnose scrapie and other fatal TSE diseases in animals such as sheep and cows. The objective of the research reported here was to determine whether the spectral features are conserved between two different species namely mice and sheep, and whether an appropriate small animal model system could be identified for diagnosis of scrapie based on the fluorescence intensity in retina. The results were consistent with the previous reports on fluorescence studies of healthy and scrapie-infected retina of sheep. The fluorescence from the retinas of scrapie-infected sheep was significantly more intense and showed more heterogeneity than that from the retinas of uninfected mice. Although the structural characteristics of fluorescence spectra of scrapie-infected sheep and mice eyes are slightly different, more importantly, murine retinas reflect the enhancement of fluorescence intensity upon infecting the mice with scrapie, which is consistent with the observations in sheep eyes.

  10. 9 CFR 91.6 - Goats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... exported if it is a scrapie-positive animal or an exposed animal, as defined in 9 CFR parts 54 and 79, or... and 79; or if it is the progeny, parent, or sibling of any scrapie-positive animal. (4) Goats...

  11. Na+/K+-ATPase Is Present in Scrapie-Associated Fibrils, Modulates PrP Misfolding In Vitro and Links PrP Function and Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Graham, James F.; Kurian, Dominic; Agarwal, Sonya; Toovey, Lorna; Hunt, Lawrence; Kirby, Louise; Pinheiro, Teresa J. T.; Banner, Steven J.; Gill, Andrew C.

    2011-01-01

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies are characterised by widespread deposition of fibrillar and/or plaque-like forms of the prion protein. These aggregated forms are produced by misfolding of the normal prion protein, PrPC, to the disease-associated form, PrPSc, through mechanisms that remain elusive but which require either direct or indirect interaction between PrPC and PrPSc isoforms. A wealth of evidence implicates other non-PrP molecules as active participants in the misfolding process, to catalyse and direct the conformational conversion of PrPC or to provide a scaffold ensuring correct alignment of PrPC and PrPSc during conversion. Such molecules may be specific to different scrapie strains to facilitate differential prion protein misfolding. Since molecular cofactors may become integrated into the growing protein fibril during prion conversion, we have investigated the proteins contained in prion disease-specific deposits by shotgun proteomics of scrapie-associated fibrils (SAF) from mice infected with 3 different strains of mouse-passaged scrapie. Concomitant use of negative control preparations allowed us to identify and discount proteins that are enriched non-specifically by the SAF isolation protocol. We found several proteins that co-purified specifically with SAF from infected brains but none of these were reproducibly and demonstrably specific for particular scrapie strains. The α-chain of Na+/K+-ATPase was common to SAF from all 3 strains and we tested the ability of this protein to modulate in vitro misfolding of recombinant PrP. Na+/K+-ATPase enhanced the efficiency of disease-specific conversion of recombinant PrP suggesting that it may act as a molecular cofactor. Consistent with previous results, the same protein inhibited fibrillisation kinetics of recombinant PrP. Since functional interactions between PrPC and Na+/K+-ATPase have previously been reported in astrocytes, our data highlight this molecule as a key link between PrP function

  12. Modulating Effect of Ascorbic Acid on Transport-Induced Immunosuppression in Goats

    PubMed Central

    Minka, Ndazo Salka; Ayo, Joseph Olusegun

    2011-01-01

    The effect of 12 h road transportation on some basic blood cells and the modulating role of ascorbic acid were investigated in 40 adult Red Sokoto goats during the hot dry season. The animals were divided into two groups, GI (experimental; n = 20) and GII (control; n = 20). Group 1 was administered with ascorbic acid (AA) per os at a dosage rate of 100 mg/kg body weight, while GII was given 10 mL of sterile water per goat. Forty minutes after the administration and loading, the goats were transported for 12 h. The result obtained in GII goats showed that loading, transportation, high ambient temperature (AT), and relative humidity (RH) encountered during transportation induced lymphopenia, neutrophilia, and eosinopenia, which can cause immunosuppression. In GI goats, the administration of AA prior to loading and transportation ameliorated the adverse effects of loading and transportation stress on neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio and eosinopenia of the goats. PMID:23738106

  13. Modulation of joint moments and work in the goat hindlimb with locomotor speed and surface grade

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Allison S.; Lee, David V.; Biewener, Andrew A.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Goats and other quadrupeds must modulate the work output of their muscles to accommodate the changing mechanical demands associated with locomotion in their natural environments. This study examined which hindlimb joint moments goats use to generate and absorb mechanical energy on level and sloped surfaces over a range of locomotor speeds. Ground reaction forces and the three-dimensional locations of joint markers were recorded as goats walked, trotted and galloped over 0, +15 and −15 deg sloped surfaces. Net joint moments, powers and work were estimated at the goats' hip, knee, ankle and metatarsophalangeal joints throughout the stance phase via inverse dynamics calculations. Differences in locomotor speed on the level, inclined and declined surfaces were characterized and accounted for by fitting regression equations to the joint moment, power and work data plotted versus non-dimensionalized speed. During level locomotion, the net work generated by moments at each of the hindlimb joints was small (less than 0.1 J kg−1 body mass) and did not vary substantially with gait or locomotor speed. During uphill running, by contrast, mechanical energy was generated at the hip, knee and ankle, and the net work at each of these joints increased dramatically with speed (P<0.05). The greatest increases in positive joint work occurred at the hip and ankle. During downhill running, mechanical energy was decreased in two main ways: goats generated larger knee extension moments in the first half of stance, absorbing energy as the knee flexed, and goats generated smaller ankle extension moments in the second half of stance, delivering less energy. The goats' hip extension moment in mid-stance was also diminished, contributing to the decrease in energy. These analyses offer new insight into quadrupedal locomotion, clarifying how the moments generated by hindlimb muscles modulate mechanical energy at different locomotor speeds and grades, as needed to accommodate the

  14. 76 FR 43649 - Notice of Request for Extension of Approval of an Information Collection; Scrapie in Sheep and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-21

    ... Collection; Scrapie in Sheep and Goats; Interstate Movement Restrictions and Indemnity Program AGENCY: Animal... information collection associated with regulations for the interstate movement of sheep and goats and an... Goats; Interstate Movement Restrictions and Indemnity Program. OMB Number: 0579-0101. Type of Request...

  15. Transmissibility of caprine scrapie in ovine transgenic mice

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Scrapie is a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy or prion disease of domestic sheep and goats. The current US and Canadian control programs are based on diagnosis by identification of abnormal prion protein in brain or lymphoid tissues with selective culling of genetically susceptible sheep exp...

  16. Modulation of Mammary Gland Development and Milk Production by Growth Hormone Expression in GH Transgenic Goats.

    PubMed

    Bao, Zekun; Lin, Jian; Ye, Lulu; Zhang, Qiang; Chen, Jianquan; Yang, Qian; Yu, Qinghua

    2016-01-01

    Mammary gland development during puberty and reconstruction during pregnancy and lactation is under the control of circulating endocrine hormones, such as growth hormone, which are released from the pituitary. In this study, we explored the influence of overexpression of growth hormone in the mammary gland on breast development and milk production in goats. Using transcriptome sequencing, we found that the number of highly expressed genes was greater in GH transgenic goats than non-transgenic goats. Furthermore, KEGG pathway analysis showed that the majority of the genes belonged to the MAPK signaling pathway and the ECM-receptor interaction pathway. The expression of genes related to breast development was further confirmed using qRT-PCR. Interestingly, both milk production and milk quality were increased. The results of these experiments imply that overexpression of growth hormone in the breast may stimulate breast development and enhances milk production by modulating alveolar cell proliferation or branching through the MAPK signaling pathway.

  17. Classical scrapie prions are associated with peripheral blood monocytes and T-lymphocytes from naturally infected sheep

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Classical scrapie is a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy that affects sheep and goats. As detected by enzyme-linked immunoassay, previous studies suggested scrapie prions in the blood of sheep might be associated with B lymphocytes but not with monocytes or T lymphocytes. The association of sc...

  18. Scrapie prion liposomes and rods exhibit target sizes of 55,000 Da

    SciTech Connect

    Bellinger-Kawahara, C.G.; Kempner, E.; Groth, D.; Gabizon, R.; Prusiner, S.B.

    1988-06-01

    Scrapie is a degenerative neurologic disease in sheep and goats which can be experimentally transmitted to laboratory rodents. Considerable evidence suggests that the scrapie agent is composed largely, if not entirely, of an abnormal isoform of the prion protein (PrPSc). Inactivation of scrapie prions by ionizing radiation exhibited single-hit kinetics and gave a target size of 55,000 +/- 9000 mol wt. The inactivation profile was independent of the form of the prion. Scrapie agent infectivity in brain homogenates, microsomal fractions, detergent-extracted microsomes, purified amyloid rods, and liposomes exhibited the same inactivation profile. Our data are consistent with the hypothesis that the infectious particle causing scrapie contains approximately 2 PrPSc molecules.

  19. [Selection for disease and epidemic resistance in domestic ruminants and swine by indicator traits, marker and causal genes--a review. Part 2: Special immunogenetics of sheep and goats with particular regard for endoparasitoses, scrapie, foot rot and maedi-visna virus infection].

    PubMed

    Sipos, W; Schmoll, F; Wimmers, K

    2003-01-01

    The introduction of the first part deals with immunogenetic investigations on the field of life-stock. The main chapter is outlined as a tabular overview of current opportunities of the application of indicator traits as well as marker and causal genes in breeding for disease resistance in cattle, sheep, goats and swine. In the discussion of the second part, emphasis was laied on diseases of small ruminants in central and western Europe with special respect of endoparasitoses, scrapie, foot-rot and maedi-visna virus infection. Indicator traits are discussed with respect of their advantages and disadvantages. The rigorous selection on specific traits is connected with an increase of the number of homozygotes. In contrary, pathogens do undergo mutations, thus escaping the host's immune system. Out of this point of view it is advisable, to set on selection very cautiously. The role of technologies of modern immunogenetics is pointed out in respect of constructing disease resistant animals.

  20. Polymorphism and DNA methylation in the promoter modulate KISS1 gene expression and are associated with litter size in goats.

    PubMed

    An, X P; Hou, J X; Lei, Y N; Gao, T Y; Cao, B Y

    2015-04-01

    Polymorphisms in the promoter region are likely to impact KISS1 gene transcription and reproductive traits. In this study, Guanzhong (GZ, n=350) and Boer (BE, n=196) goats were used to detect polymorphism in the promoter of the goat KISS1 gene by DNA sequencing. In the GZ goats, the g.1384G>A mutation was identified in the promoter of the goat KISS1 gene. Guanzhong goats were in Hardy-Weinberg disequilibrium at g.1384G>A locus (P<0.05). The 1384A allele was predicted to eliminate methylation, AHR-arnt heterodimers and AHR-related factors (AHRR) and myoblast determining factors (MYOD) transcription factor-binding sites. Statistical results indicated that the g.1384G>A SNP was associated with litter size in the GZ goats (P<0.05). Luciferase assay analysis suggested that the 1384A allele increased luciferase activity when compared to the 1384G allele. The RT-qPCR assay also demonstrated that the 1384A allele had greater amounts of KISS1 mRNA than the 1384G allele in homozygous individuals. Functional analysis suggested that this g.1384G>A SNP may be an important genetic regulator of KISS1 gene expression with effects on downstream processes that are modulated by KISS1 gene because of the changes of methylation and transcription factor-binding sites. Therefore, the current study provides evidence in goats for genetic markers that might be used in breeding programs.

  1. SPINAL SEROTONIN RECEPTOR ACTIVATION MODULATES THE EXERCISE VENTILATORY RESPONSE WITH INCREASED DEAD SPACE IN GOATS

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, G. S.; Turner, D. L.; Henderson, D. R.; Foley, K. T.

    2008-01-01

    Small increases in respiratory dead space (VD) augment the exercise ventilatory response by a serotonin-dependent mechanism known as short-term modulation (STM). We tested the hypotheses that the relevant serotonin receptors for STM are in the spinal cord, and are of the 5-HT2-receptor subtype. After preparing adult female goats with a mid-thoracic (T6–T8) subarachnoid catheter, ventilation and arterial blood gases were measured at rest and during treadmill exercise (4.8 km/h; 5% grade) with and without an increased VD (0.2–0.3 L). Measurements were made before and after spinal or intravenous administration of a broad-spectrum serotonin receptor antagonist (methysergide, 1–2 mg total) and a selective 5-HT2-receptor antagonist (ketanserin, 5–12 mg total). Although spinal methysergide had no effect on the exercise ventilatory response in control conditions, the augmented response with increased VD was impaired, allowing PaCO2 to increase from rest to exercise. Spinal methysergide diminished both mean inspiratory flow and frequency responses to exercise with increased VD. Spinal ketanserin impaired PaCO2 regulation with increased VD, although its ventilatory effects were less clear. Intrathecal dye injections indicated CSF drug distribution was caudal to the upper cervical spinal cord and intravenous drugs at the same total dose did not affect STM. We conclude that spinal 5-HT2 receptors modulate the exercise ventilatory response with increased VD in goats. PMID:18396470

  2. Comparison of Two US Sheep Scrapie Isolates Supports Identification as Separate Strains.

    PubMed

    Moore, S J; Smith, J D; Greenlee, M H West; Nicholson, E M; Richt, J A; Greenlee, J J

    2016-11-01

    Scrapie is a naturally occurring transmissible spongiform encephalopathy of sheep and goats. There are different strains of sheep scrapie that are associated with unique molecular, transmission, and phenotype characteristics. However, in the United States, very little is known about the potential presence of scrapie strains. Scrapie strain and PRNP genotype could both affect susceptibility, potential for transmission, incubation period (IP), and control measures required for eliminating scrapie from a flock. The investigators evaluated 2 US scrapie isolates, No. 13-7 and x124, after intranasal inoculation to compare clinical signs, IPs, spongiform lesions, and patterns of PrP(Sc) deposition in sheep with scrapie-susceptible PRNP genotypes (QQ171). After inoculation with x124, susceptibility and IP were associated with valine at codon 136 (V136) of the prion protein: VV136 sheep had short IPs (6.9 months), those in AV136 sheep were 11.9 months, and AA136 sheep did not develop scrapie. All No. 13-7 inoculated sheep developed scrapie, with IPs of 20.1 months for AA136 sheep, 22.8 months for AV136 sheep, and 26.7 months for VV136 sheep. Patterns of immunoreactivity in the brain were influenced by inoculum isolate and host genotype. Differences in PrP(Sc) profiles versus isolate were most striking when examining brains from sheep with the VV136 genotype. Inoculation into C57BL/6 mice resulted in markedly different attack rates (90.5% for x124 and 5.9% for No. 13-7). Taken together, these data demonstrate that No. 13-7 and x124 represent 2 distinct strains of scrapie with different IPs, genotype susceptibilities, and PrP(Sc) deposition profiles. © The Author(s) 2016.

  3. Persistence of ovine scrapie infectivity in a farm environment following cleaning and decontamination.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Steve A C; Simmons, Hugh A; Gough, Kevin C; Maddison, Ben C

    2015-01-24

    Scrapie of sheep/goats and chronic wasting disease of deer/elk are contagious prion diseases where environmental reservoirs are directly implicated in the transmission of disease. In this study, the effectiveness of recommended scrapie farm decontamination regimens was evaluated by a sheep bioassay using buildings naturally contaminated with scrapie. Pens within a farm building were treated with either 20,000 parts per million free chorine solution for one hour or were treated with the same but were followed by painting and full re-galvanisation or replacement of metalwork within the pen. Scrapie susceptible lambs of the PRNP genotype VRQ/VRQ were reared within these pens and their scrapie status was monitored by recto-anal mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue. All animals became infected over an 18-month period, even in the pen that had been subject to the most stringent decontamination process. These data suggest that recommended current guidelines for the decontamination of farm buildings following outbreaks of scrapie do little to reduce the titre of infectious scrapie material and that environmental recontamination could also be an issue associated with these premises.

  4. Atypical scrapie isolates involve a uniform prion species with a complex molecular signature.

    PubMed

    Götte, Dorothea R; Benestad, Sylvie L; Laude, Hubert; Zurbriggen, Andreas; Oevermann, Anna; Seuberlich, Torsten

    2011-01-01

    The pathobiology of atypical scrapie, a prion disease affecting sheep and goats, is still poorly understood. In a previous study, we demonstrated that atypical scrapie affecting small ruminants in Switzerland differs in the neuroanatomical distribution of the pathological prion protein (PrP(d)). To investigate whether these differences depend on host-related vs. pathogen-related factors, we transmitted atypical scrapie to transgenic mice over-expressing the ovine prion protein (tg338). The clinical, neuropathological, and molecular phenotype of tg338 mice is similar between mice carrying the Swiss atypical scrapie isolates and the Nor98, an atypical scrapie isolate from Norway. Together with published data, our results suggest that atypical scrapie is caused by a uniform type of prion, and that the observed phenotypic differences in small ruminants are likely host-dependant. Strikingly, by using a refined SDS-PAGE technique, we established that the prominent proteinase K-resistant prion protein fragment in atypical scrapie consists of two separate, unglycosylated peptides with molecular masses of roughly 5 and 8 kDa. These findings show similarities to those for other prion diseases in animals and humans, and lay the groundwork for future comparative research.

  5. Hydration state of goats transported by road for 12 hours during the hot-dry conditions and the modulating role of ascorbic acid.

    PubMed

    Minka, Salka Ndazo; Ayo, Joseph Olusegun

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of 12 hr of road transportation during the hot-dry conditions and the modulating role of ascorbic acid (AA) on the hydration state of goats. Twenty goats who served as treatment goats received oral administration of 100 mg/kg body weight of AA, whereas another 20 control goats received sterile water; thereafter, the goats were loaded and transported. The study determined changes in skin thickness; albumin (Alb); total protein (TP); elimination of the gut content; fecal water; urine specific gravity (SG); and pH before, during, and after the transportation. The result obtained in the control goats showed significant (p < .05) increases in the values of TP, Alb, urine SG, and pH; elimination; and drinking behavior, whereas skin thickness decreased over transportation. In the treatment goats who were administered AA, the changes observed in the values were insignificant (p > .05). In conclusion, 12-hr road transportation of goats induced dehydration, which may affect the welfare and health status of the goats. The administration of AA ameliorated the risk of adverse effects of handling, loading, transportation, and hot-dry conditions on hydration state of goats.

  6. A transfectant RK13 cell line permissive to classical caprine scrapie prion propagation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Classical scrapie is a form of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE) affecting domestic goats and sheep and disease is characterized by the accumulation of abnormal conformational isoform (PrP-Sc) of normal cellular prion protein (PrP-C) in the central nervous system and, in most cases, ly...

  7. Experimental transmission of U.S. scrapie agent to neonatal sheep by oral route

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Scrapie, a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE), is a naturally occurring fatal neurodegenerative disease of sheep and goats. This study documents incubation periods, pathological findings and distribution of abnormal prion proteins (PrP**Sc) by immunohistochemistry and Western blot in tiss...

  8. Cytokine antibody array analysis in brain and periphery of scrapie-infected Tg338 mice

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Scrapie is a naturally occurring transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) that affects sheep and goats. While a change in prion protein conformation has been established as an important aspect of disease, other aspects of TSE pathogenesis are not fully understood. The preset study used protei...

  9. Review: A review on classical and atypical scrapie in caprine: Prion protein gene polymorphisms and their role in the disease.

    PubMed

    Curcio, L; Sebastiani, C; Di Lorenzo, P; Lasagna, E; Biagetti, M

    2016-10-01

    Scrapie is a naturally occurring transmissible spongiform encephalopathy in sheep and goat. It has been known for ~250 years and is characterised by the accumulation of an abnormal isoform of a host-encoded prion protein that leads to progressive neurodegeneration and death. Scrapie is recognised in two forms, classical and atypical scrapie. The susceptibility to both types of scrapie is influenced by polymorphisms of the prion protein gene (PRNP). Sheep susceptibility or resistance to classical scrapie is strongly regulated by the polymorphisms at codons 136, 154 and 171 of the PRNP. The genetic role in atypical scrapie in sheep has been defined by polymorphisms at codons 141, 154 and 171, which are associated with different degrees of risk in the occurrence of the ovine disease. Progress has been achieved in the prevention of scrapie in sheep due to efficient genetic breeding programmes based on eradication and control of the disease. In Europe, the success of these programmes has been verified by applying eradication and genetic selection plans. In general terms, the ovine selection plans aim to eliminate and reduce the susceptible allele and to enrich the resistant allele ARR. During outbreaks all susceptible animals are slaughtered, only ARR/ARR resistant rams and sheep and semi-resistant females are preserved. In the occurrence of scrapie positive goats a complete cull of the flock (stamping out) is performed with great economic loss and severe risk of extinction for the endangered breeds. The ability to select scrapie-resistant animals allows to define new breeding strategies aimed to boost genetic progress while reducing costs during scrapie outbreaks. Allelic variants of PRNP can be protective for caprine scrapie, and the knowledge of their distribution in goats has become very important. Over the past few years, the integration of genetic information on goat populations could be used to make selection decisions, commonly referred to as genetic selection

  10. PRNP variants in goats reduce sensitivity of detection of PrPSc by immunoassay

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Immunoassays are extensively utilized in disease diagnostics with monoclonal antibodies serving as critical tools within the assay. Detection of scrapie in sheep and goats relies heavily on immunoassays including immunohistochemistry, western blotting, and ELISA. In the United States, regulatory tes...

  11. State-of-the-art review of goat TSE in the European Union, with special emphasis on PRNP genetics and epidemiology

    PubMed Central

    Vaccari, Gabriele; Panagiotidis, Cynthia H.; Acin, Cristina; Peletto, Simone; Barillet, Francis; Acutis, Pierluigi; Bossers, Alex; Langeveld, Jan; van Keulen, Lucien; Sklaviadis, Theodoros; Badiola, Juan J.; Andréoletti, Olivier; Groschup, Martin H.; Agrimi, Umberto; Foster, James; Goldmann, Wilfred

    2009-01-01

    Scrapie is a fatal, neurodegenerative disease of sheep and goats. It is also the earliest known member in the family of diseases classified as transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE) or prion diseases, which includes Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans, bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), and chronic wasting disease in cervids. The recent revelation of naturally occurring BSE in a goat has brought the issue of TSE in goats to the attention of the public. In contrast to scrapie, BSE presents a proven risk to humans. The risk of goat BSE, however, is difficult to evaluate, as our knowledge of TSE in goats is limited. Natural caprine scrapie has been discovered throughout Europe, with reported cases generally being greatest in countries with the highest goat populations. As with sheep scrapie, susceptibility and incubation period duration of goat scrapie are most likely controlled by the prion protein (PrP) gene (PRNP). Like the PRNP of sheep, the caprine PRNP shows significantly greater variability than that of cattle and humans. Although PRNP variability in goats differs from that observed in sheep, the two species share several identical alleles. Moreover, while the ARR allele associated with enhancing resistance in sheep is not present in the goat PRNP, there is evidence for the existence of other PrP variants related to resistance. This review presents the current knowledge of the epidemiology of caprine scrapie within the major European goat populations, and compiles the current data on genetic variability of PRNP. PMID:19505422

  12. Modulation of intestinal glucose transport in response to reduced nitrogen supply in young goats.

    PubMed

    Muscher-Banse, A S; Piechotta, M; Schröder, B; Breves, G

    2012-12-01

    The reduction of dietary protein is a common approach in ruminants to decrease the excretion of N because ruminants are able to recycle N efficiently by the rumino-hepatic circulation. In nonruminant species an impact on other metabolic pathways such as glucose metabolism was observed when dietary protein intake was reduced. However, an impact of dietary N reduction in goats on glucose metabolism especially on intestinal glucose absorption is questionable because ruminants have very efficient endogenous recycling mechanisms. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to characterize the intestinal absorption of glucose in growing goats kept on different N supply under isoenergetic conditions. The different CP concentrations (20, 16, 10, 9, and 7% CP) of the experimental diets were adjusted by adding urea to the rations. Intestinal flux rates of glucose were determined by Ussing chamber experiments. For a more mechanistic approach, the Na(+)-dependent uptake of glucose into intestinal brush-border membrane vesicles (BBMV) and the expression patterns of the Na(+)-dependent glucose transporter SGLT1 and the glucose transporter 2 (GLUT2) were determined. Reduced N intake resulted in a decrease of plasma glucose (P < 0.001) and insulin (P = 0.004) concentrations whereas the intestinal flux rates of glucose were elevated (P < 0.001), which were inhibited by phlorizin. However, the uptake of glucose into intestinal BBMV was not changed whereas the expression of SGLT1 on mRNA (P < 0.05) and protein abundance (P = 0.03) was decreased in response to a reduced N intake. The mRNA expression of GLUT2 was not affected. From these data, it can be concluded that the intestinal absorption of glucose was modulated by changes in dietary N intake. It is suggested that intracellular metabolism or basolateral transport systems or both might be activated during this feeding regimen because the apical located SGLT1 might not be involved. Therefore, an impact of dietary N reduction on

  13. Variation in the prion protein sequence in Dutch goat breeds.

    PubMed

    Windig, J J; Hoving, R A H; Priem, J; Bossers, A; van Keulen, L J M; Langeveld, J P M

    2016-10-01

    Scrapie is a neurodegenerative disease occurring in goats and sheep. Several haplotypes of the prion protein increase resistance to scrapie infection and may be used in selective breeding to help eradicate scrapie. In this study, frequencies of the allelic variants of the PrP gene are determined for six goat breeds in the Netherlands. Overall frequencies in Dutch goats were determined from 768 brain tissue samples in 2005, 766 in 2008 and 300 in 2012, derived from random sampling for the national scrapie surveillance without knowledge of the breed. Breed specific frequencies were determined in the winter 2013/2014 by sampling 300 breeding animals from the main breeders of the different breeds. Detailed analysis of the scrapie-resistant K222 haplotype was carried out in 2014 for 220 Dutch Toggenburger goats and in 2015 for 942 goats from the Saanen derived White Goat breed. Nine haplotypes were identified in the Dutch breeds. Frequencies for non-wild type haplotypes were generally low. Exception was the K222 haplotype in the Dutch Toggenburger (29%) and the S146 haplotype in the Nubian and Boer breeds (respectively 7 and 31%). The frequency of the K222 haplotype in the Toggenburger was higher than for any other breed reported in literature, while for the White Goat breed it was with 3.1% similar to frequencies of other Saanen or Saanen derived breeds. Further evidence was found for the existence of two M142 haplotypes, M142 /S240 and M142 /P240 . Breeds vary in haplotype frequencies but frequencies of resistant genotypes are generally low and consequently selective breeding for scrapie resistance can only be slow but will benefit from animals identified in this study. The unexpectedly high frequency of the K222 haplotype in the Dutch Toggenburger underlines the need for conservation of rare breeds in order to conserve genetic diversity rare or absent in other breeds. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  14. Scrapie Resistance in ARQ Sheep▿

    PubMed Central

    Laegreid, W. W.; Clawson, M. L.; Heaton, M. P.; Green, B. T.; O'Rourke, K. I.; Knowles, D. P.

    2008-01-01

    Variation in the ovine prion protein amino acid sequence influences scrapie progression, with sheep homozygous for A136R154Q171 considered susceptible. This study examined the association of survival time of scrapie-exposed ARQ sheep with variation elsewhere in the ovine prion gene. Four single nucleotide polymorphism alleles were associated with prolonged survival. One nonsynonymous allele (T112) was associated with an additional 687 days of survival for scrapie-exposed sheep compared to M112 sheep (odds ratio, 42.5; P = 0.00014). The only two sheep homozygous for T112 (TARQ) did not develop scrapie, suggesting that the allelic effect may be additive. These results provide evidence that TARQ sheep are genetically resistant to development of classical scrapie. PMID:18632863

  15. Scrapie resistance in ARQ sheep.

    PubMed

    Laegreid, W W; Clawson, M L; Heaton, M P; Green, B T; O'Rourke, K I; Knowles, D P

    2008-10-01

    Variation in the ovine prion protein amino acid sequence influences scrapie progression, with sheep homozygous for A(136)R(154)Q(171) considered susceptible. This study examined the association of survival time of scrapie-exposed ARQ sheep with variation elsewhere in the ovine prion gene. Four single nucleotide polymorphism alleles were associated with prolonged survival. One nonsynonymous allele (T112) was associated with an additional 687 days of survival for scrapie-exposed sheep compared to M112 sheep (odds ratio, 42.5; P = 0.00014). The only two sheep homozygous for T112 (TARQ) did not develop scrapie, suggesting that the allelic effect may be additive. These results provide evidence that TARQ sheep are genetically resistant to development of classical scrapie.

  16. Scrapie I. Transmission and Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Le Q. Darcel, C.; Merriman, M.; Beauregard, M.; Avery, R. J.; Kasting, R.

    1963-01-01

    Homogenized brain, extracts, and residues of brain from normal and scrapie sheep were inoculated into 116 sheep. Of 72 sheep inoculated with scrapie material 27 developed the disease, whereas four of 44 inoculated with `normal' brain material showed symptoms similar to those of scrapie. The scrapie agent survived extraction for 18 hours with diethyl ether followed by water for 24 hours. Similarly the agent survived extraction in a Soxhlet apparatus with 95 per cent ethanol containing 2.0 per cent 4 M HC1 for 24 hours. There was no evidence of demyelination in sections of brain and spinal cord supporting the view that allergic encephalomyelitis is not responsible for the scrapie symptoms. Liver function, as measured by the bromsulfalein test, remained normal until just before death. These results preclude that liver dysfunction contributes to the disease but do not exclude the possibilities of other metabolic derangements. PMID:17649434

  17. [Occurrence of scrapie in Switzerland: an anonymous cross-sectional study].

    PubMed

    Baumgarten, L; Heim, D; Zurbriggen, A; Doherr, M G

    2001-11-01

    Scrapie is a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy of sheep and goats, which leads to neurological signs and ends with the death of the infected animal. In Switzerland only a few cases were reported since 1982. In 1999, a questionnaire survey was conducted to increase information about neurological diseases in sheep and goat breeding farms. The aim was to estimate the frequency of neurological disorders including Scrapie and to increase the disease awareness of sheep and goat breeders. The main goal of the study was to increase the reporting of suspect cases of Scrapie and its differential diagnoses. Out of a database of all registered farms with at least five breeding sheep or breeding goats a random sample of 4711 was drawn to which anonymous questionnaires were sent. The return rate was 36%. In a parallel study, 150 voluntarily participants were interviewed using the same questionnaire. The results of both parts of the survey coincided. For the years 1997 and 1998, on average 1.0% of the breeding sheep and breeding goats showed neurological signs. 7.7% of the breeders indicated to have observed animals with neurological symptoms in their flock. At the population level, a total of 1954-2336 animals with neurological signs are observed in 691-929 flocks. The minority is reported to the veterinary authorities.

  18. Genetic, histochemical and biochemical studies on goat TSE cases from Cyprus.

    PubMed

    Niedermeyer, Susanne; Eiden, Martin; Toumazos, Pavlos; Papasavva-Stylianou, Penelope; Ioannou, Ioannis; Sklaviadis, Theodoros; Panagiotidis, Cynthia; Langeveld, Jan; Bossers, Alex; Kuczius, Thorsten; Kaatz, Martin; Groschup, Martin H; Fast, Christine

    2016-10-06

    Scrapie and bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) are transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE's) affecting sheep and goats. Susceptibility of goats to scrapie is influenced by polymorphisms of the prion protein gene (PRNP) of the host. Five polymorphisms are associated with reduced susceptibility to TSE's. In the study presented here caprine samples from a scrapie eradication program on Cyprus were genotyped and further characterized using BioRad TeSeE rapid test, histological, immunohistochemical and biochemical methods. In total 42 goats from 20 flocks were necropsied from which 25 goats showed a positive result in the rapid test, a spongiform encephalopathy and an accumulation of pathological prion protein (PrP(Sc)) in the obex. PrP(Sc) deposits were demonstrated in the placenta, peripheral nervous and lymphoreticular system. Two animals showed PrP(Sc)-accumulations in peripheral tissues only. By discriminatory immunoblots a scrapie infection could be confirmed for all cases. Nevertheless, slight deviations in the glycosylation pattern might indicate the presence of different scrapie strains. Furthermore scrapie samples from goats in the current study demonstrated less long term resistance to proteinase K than ovine or caprine BSE control samples. Reduced scrapie susceptibility according to the PRNP genotype was demonstrated (Fishers Exact test, p < 0.05) for the goats with at least one polymorphism (p = 0.023) at the six codons examined and in particular for those with polymorphisms at codon 146 (p = 0.016). This work characterizes scrapie in goats having implications for breeding and surveillance strategies.

  19. 9 CFR 54.22 - State scrapie certification boards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false State scrapie certification boards. 54... SCRAPIE Scrapie Flock Certification Program § 54.22 State scrapie certification boards. An area... a State scrapie certification board for the purpose of coordinating activities for the Scrapie...

  20. Modulation of electrolyte homeostasis by dietary nitrogen intake in growing goats.

    PubMed

    Muscher, Alexandra S; Piechotta, Marion; Breves, Gerhard; Huber, Korinna

    2011-06-01

    In goats, the combination of dietary N and Ca reduction caused hypocalcaemia and further changes in Ca homeostasis. The aim of the present study was to characterise the effects of dietary N reduction under normocalcaemia on mineral and bone metabolism in young goats. Young male goats of the Saanen breed were fed a diet reduced in N (8 %) for about 7 weeks (ten animals per group) and were compared with goats fed with an adequate N (14 %) diet. When N intake was reduced in young goats, plasma urea concentrations as well as renal elimination of urea were reduced. This was inversely related to creatinine in plasma and urine, which increased during a dietary N reduction as a function of reduced renal activity to save urea during N scarcity. During this decrease in renal function, associated with declined insulin-like growth factor 1 concentrations, a reduction in calcidiol and calcitriol concentrations could be observed. Meanwhile, carboxyterminal cross-linked telopeptide of type I collagen values and activity of total alkaline phosphatase were both elevated, indicating some bone remodelling processes taking place during a reduced N diet in young goats. The concentrations of inorganic phosphate (Pi) and total Ca were changed in several body fluids, indicating that Pi and Ca homeostasis was perturbed in goats fed a reduced N diet. Therefore, more research is needed to find the balance between reduction of environmental N pollution by reducing dietary N in ruminant feeding and maintaining the animal's health.

  1. Report of outbreaks of classical scrapie in Dorper sheep and associated prion protein gene polymorphisms in affected flocks.

    PubMed

    de Andrade, Caroline Pinto; de Oliveira, Eduardo Conceição; Leal, Juliano Souza; de Almeida, Laura Lopes; de Castro, Luiza Amaral; da Silva, Sergio Ceroni; Driemeier, David

    2015-08-01

    Scrapie is an infectious neurodegenerative disease affecting sheep and goats, related with conformational alteration of an isoform of the prion protein that leads to deposition and aggregation in the host's central nervous system. Occurrence of the natural disease can be influenced by host genetic factors, such as a single nucleotide polymorphism of the prion protein gene. This study reports three scrapie-affected Dorper flocks located on three different farms in Brazil. The objective of this study was to analyze these three flocks using scrapie diagnostics, combining histology, immunohistochemistry, genotyping, and western blot assays. For immunohistochemistry, 192 sheep were selected and 308 sheep blood samples were taken for genotyping. A total of 22 sheep were scrapie positive by immunohistochemistry. Of these, four presented clinical signs and had scrapie immunoreactivity at the obex in western blot assays. The sheep without clinical signs were positive in lymphoid organs, such as the third eyelid and rectal mucosa. The major genotypes found on the flocks were ARQ/ARQ, ARQ/ARR, and ARQ/VRQ for codons 136, 154, and 171. Most of the sheep were considered to be at moderate to high risk, based on risk groups for developing scrapie. Some blood samples were sequenced, and polymorphisms were identified in other codons, such as 127, 142, and 143. Our data demonstrate the importance of preclinical scrapie diagnosis in Brazilian sheep, as most of the affected sheep showed no clinical signs, and emphasize the relevance of genotyping other Dorper sheep to determine the genotypic profile of the breed.

  2. Accumulation of PrP-Sc in hemal nodes of naturally and experimentally scrapie-infected sheep

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Classical scrapie is a naturally occurring fatal disease of sheep and goats which is caused by prions, a novel class of infectious agent. Infection is accompanied by accumulation of abnormal isoforms of the prion protein (PrP-Sc) in certain neural and lymphoid tissues. Hemal nodes, which are unique ...

  3. Western-blot detection of PrP**sc in archived paraffin-embedded brainstem from scrapie-affected sheep

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Scrapie is a naturally occurring fatal neurodegenerative disease of adult sheep and goats, one of a group of mammalian diseases known as transmissible spongiform encephalopathies or prion diseases. Immunoassays that identify disease-associated prion protein (PrP**Sc) are integral to the diagnosis o...

  4. Caprine PrP variants harboring Asp-146, His-154 and Gln-211 alleles display reduced convertibility upon interaction with pathogenic murine prion protein in scrapie infected cells.

    PubMed

    Kanata, Eirini; Arsenakis, Minas; Sklaviadis, Theodoros

    2016-09-02

    Scrapie, the prion disease of sheep and goats, is a devastating malady of small ruminants. Due to its infectious nature, epidemic outbreaks may occur in flocks/herds consisting of highly susceptible animals. Field studies identified scrapie-protective caprine PrP variants, harboring specific single amino acid changes (Met-142, Arg-143, Asp-146, Ser-146, His-154, Gln-211 and Lys-222). Their effects are under further evaluation, and aim to determine the most protective allele. We assessed some of these variants (Asp-146, His-154, Gln-211 and Lys-222), after their exogenous expression as murine-caprine chimeras in a scrapie- infected murine cell line. We report that exogenously expressed PrPs undergo conformational conversion upon interaction with the endogenous pathological murine prion protein (PrP(SC)), which results in the detection of goat-specific and partially PK-resistant moieties. These moieties display a PK-resistance pattern distinct from the one detected in natural goat scrapie cases. Within this cellular model, distinct conformational conversion potentials were assigned to the tested variants. Molecules carrying the Asp-146, His-154 and Gln-211 alleles showed significantly lower conversion levels compared to wild type, confirming their protective effects against scrapie. Although we utilized a heterologous conversion system, this is to our knowledge, the first study of caprine PrP variants in a cellular context of scrapie, that confirms the protective effects of some of the studied alleles.

  5. Caprine PrP variants harboring Asp-146, His-154 and Gln-211 alleles display reduced convertibility upon interaction with pathogenic murine prion protein in scrapie infected cells

    PubMed Central

    Kanata, Eirini; Arsenakis, Minas; Sklaviadis, Theodoros

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Scrapie, the prion disease of sheep and goats, is a devastating malady of small ruminants. Due to its infectious nature, epidemic outbreaks may occur in flocks/herds consisting of highly susceptible animals. Field studies identified scrapie-protective caprine PrP variants, harboring specific single amino acid changes (Met-142, Arg-143, Asp-146, Ser-146, His-154, Gln-211 and Lys-222). Their effects are under further evaluation, and aim to determine the most protective allele. We assessed some of these variants (Asp-146, His-154, Gln-211 and Lys-222), after their exogenous expression as murine-caprine chimeras in a scrapie- infected murine cell line. We report that exogenously expressed PrPs undergo conformational conversion upon interaction with the endogenous pathological murine prion protein (PrPSC), which results in the detection of goat-specific and partially PK-resistant moieties. These moieties display a PK-resistance pattern distinct from the one detected in natural goat scrapie cases. Within this cellular model, distinct conformational conversion potentials were assigned to the tested variants. Molecules carrying the Asp-146, His-154 and Gln-211 alleles showed significantly lower conversion levels compared to wild type, confirming their protective effects against scrapie. Although we utilized a heterologous conversion system, this is to our knowledge, the first study of caprine PrP variants in a cellular context of scrapie, that confirms the protective effects of some of the studied alleles. PMID:27537339

  6. Detection of prions in the faeces of sheep naturally infected with classical scrapie

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Classical scrapie is a naturally transmitted prion disease of sheep and goats. Contaminated environments may contribute to the spread of disease and evidence from animal models has implicated urine, blood, saliva, placenta and faeces as possible sources of the infection. Here we sought to determine whether sheep naturally infected with classical scrapie shed prions in their faeces. We used serial protein misfolding cyclic amplification (sPMCA) along with two extraction methods to examine faeces from sheep during both the clinical and preclinical phases of the disease and showed amplification of PrPSc in 7 of 15 and 14 of 14 sheep respectively. However PrPSc was not amplified from the faeces of 25 sheep not exposed to scrapie. These data represent the first demonstration of prion shedding in faeces from a naturally infected host and thus a likely source of prion contamination in the environment. PMID:21592355

  7. Modulation of aquaporin 2 expression in the kidney of young goats by changes in nitrogen intake.

    PubMed

    Elfers, Kristin; Breves, Gerhard; Muscher-Banse, Alexandra S

    2014-10-01

    In ruminants, a decrease of dietary nitrogen (N) is an appropriate feeding concept to reduce environmental pollution and costs. In our previous study, when goats were kept on an N-reduced diet, a decrease of plasma urea concentration and an increase of renal urea transporters were demonstrated. Renal urea absorption plays a crucial role for renal water absorption and urine concentration. Renal collecting duct water absorption is mainly mediated by the water channel aquaporin 1 and 2 (AQP1 and AQP2). Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of a dietary N reduction on expression of renal AQP1 and AQP2 in young goats. Twenty male White Saanen goats, 3 months old, were divided equally into two feeding groups, receiving either a diet with an adequate or a reduced-N supply. Goats fed a reduced-N diet showed significantly higher amounts of AQP1 mRNA in cortical tissue, and the expression of AQP2 mRNA and protein were highly elevated in renal outer medulla. An increase of vasopressin concentrations in plasma were detected for the N-reduced fed goats. Therefore, a stimulation of renal water absorption can be assumed. This might be an advantage for ruminants in times of N reduction due to higher urea concentrations in the tubular fluid and which might result in higher absorption of urea by renal urea transporters. Therefore, interplay of aquaporin water channels and urea transporters in the kidney may occur to maintain urea metabolism in times of N scarcity in young goats.

  8. Seasonal modulation of immunity by melatonin and gonadal steroids in a short day breeder goat Capra hircus.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Somenath; Singh, Amaresh K; Haldar, Chandana

    2014-11-01

    Role of melatonin in regulation of immunity and reproduction has never been studied in detail in goats. The aim of the present study was to explore hormonal regulation of immunity in goats with special reference to melatonin. Plasma of male and female goats (n = 18 per sex per season) was processed for hormonal (estrogen, testostrone, and melatonin) and cytokine (interleukin [IL-2], IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor α) measurements during three seasons, i.e., summer, monsoon, and winter. To assess cell-mediated immune response, percent stimulation ratio of thymocytes was recorded during three seasons. To support and establish the modulation by hormones, Western blot analysis for expressions of melatonin receptors (MT1, MT2), androgen receptor, and estrogen receptor α and estimations of marker enzymes, arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase for melatonin and 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activities for steroidogenesis were performed in thymus. All the hormones and cytokines were estimated by commercial kits. Biochemical, immunologic, and Western blot analyses were done by standardized protocols. We noted a significant increase in estrogen and testosterone levels (P < 0.05) in circulation during monsoon along with melatonin (P < 0.05) presenting a parallel relationship. Expressions of melatonin receptors (MT1 and MT2) in thymus of both the sexes were significantly high (P < 0.01) during winter. Estrogen receptor α expression in female thymus was significantly high during monsoon (P < 0.05). However, androgen receptor showed almost static expression pattern in male thymus during three seasons. Further, both arylalkylamineN-acetyltransferase and 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase enzyme activities were significantly high (P < 0.05; P < 0.01, respectively) during monsoon. These results suggest that there may be a functional parallelism between gonadal steroids and melatonin as melatonin is progonadotrophic in goats. Cell-mediated immune parameters (percent stimulation

  9. Modulation of intestinal calcium and phosphate transport in young goats fed a nitrogen- and/or calcium-reduced diet.

    PubMed

    Elfers, Kristin; Wilkens, Mirja R; Breves, Gerhard; Muscher-Banse, Alexandra S

    2015-12-28

    Feeding ruminants a reduced N diet is a common approach to reduce N output based on rumino-hepatic circulation. However, a reduction in N intake caused massive changes in Ca and inorganic phosphate (Pi) homoeostasis in goats. Although a single dietary Ca reduction stimulated intestinal Ca absorption in a calcitriol-dependent manner, a concomitant reduction of Ca and N supply led to a decrease in calcitriol, and therefore a modulation of intestinal Ca and Pi absorption. The aim of this study was to examine the potential effects of dietary N or Ca reduction separately on intestinal Ca and Pi transport in young goats. Animals were allocated to a control, N-reduced, Ca-reduced or combined N- and Ca-reduced diet for about 6-8 weeks, whereby N content was reduced by 25 % compared with recommendations. In Ussing chamber experiments, intestinal Ca flux rates significantly decreased in goats fed a reduced N diet, whereas Pi flux rates were unaffected. In contrast, a dietary Ca reduction stimulated Ca flux rates and decreased Pi flux rates. The combined dietary N and Ca reduction withdrew the stimulating effect of dietary Ca reduction on Ca flux rates. The expression of Ca-transporting proteins decreased with a reduced N diet too, whereas Pi-transporting proteins were unaffected. In conclusion, a dietary N reduction decreased intestinal Ca transport by diminishing Ca-transporting proteins, which became clear during simultaneous N and Ca reduction. Therefore, N supply in young ruminant nutrition is of special concern for intestinal Ca transport.

  10. Feed supplementation of Lactobacillus plantarum PCA 236 modulates gut microbiota and milk fatty acid composition in dairy goats--a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Maragkoudakis, Petros A; Mountzouris, Konstantinos C; Rosu, Craita; Zoumpopoulou, Georgia; Papadimitriou, Konstantinos; Dalaka, Eleni; Hadjipetrou, Andreas; Theofanous, Giorgos; Strozzi, Gian Paolo; Carlini, Nancy; Zervas, George; Tsakalidou, Effie

    2010-07-31

    This study aimed to evaluate the potential of a promising Lactobacillus plantarum isolate (PCA 236) from cheese as a probiotic feed supplement in lactating goats. The ability of L. plantarum to survive transit through the goat gastrointestinal tract and to modulate selected constituents of the gut microbiota composition, monitored at faecal level was assessed. In addition, L. plantarum effects on plasma immunoglobulins and antioxidant capacity of the animals as well as on the milk fatty acid composition were determined. For the purpose of the experiment a field study was designed, involving 24 dairy goats of the Damascus breed, kept in a sheep and goat dairy farm. The goats were divided in terms of body weight in two treatments of 12 goats each, namely: control (CON) without addition of L. plantarum and probiotic (PRO) treatment with in feed administration of L. plantarum so that the goats would intake 12 log CFU/day. The experiment lasted 5 weeks and at weekly time intervals individual faecal, blood and milk samples were collected and analysed. All faecal samples were examined for the presence of L. plantarum PCA 236. In addition, the culturable population levels of mesophilic aerobes, coliforms lactic acid bacteria (LAB), Streptococcus, Enterococcus, mesophilic anaerobes, Clostridium and Bacteroides in faeces were also determined by enumeration on specific culture media. In parallel, plasma IgA, IgM and IgG and antioxidant capacity of plasma and milk were determined. No adverse effects were observed in the animals receiving the lactobacillus during the experiment. Lactobacillus plantarum PCA 236 was recovered in the faeces of all animals in the PRO treatment. In addition, PRO treatment resulted in a significant (Pgoat plasma did not differ between the

  11. Changes in brain gene expression shared by scrapie and Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed Central

    Duguid, J R; Bohmont, C W; Liu, N G; Tourtellotte, W W

    1989-01-01

    We have isolated two recombinant cDNAs whose corresponding RNAs have an increased abundance in scrapie-infected hamster brain. DNA sequence analysis has shown that these two recombinants represent the genes for sulfated glycoprotein 2 and transferrin. The abundance of sulfated glycoprotein 2 RNA is increased in hippocampus from patients with Alzheimer disease and Pick disease, whereas transferrin RNA is not strongly modulated in these conditions. Expression of two previously identified scrapie-modulated genes, encoding glial fibrillary acidic protein and metallothionein, is also increased in both of these neurodegenerative diseases. Images PMID:2780570

  12. Detection of Four Novel Polymorphisms in PrP gene of Pakistani sheep (Damani and Hashtnagri) and goats (Kamori and Local Hairy) breeds

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Scrapie is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder of sheep and goats caused by post-translational conformational change in the host-encoded prion protein (PrPC). Susceptibility or resistance to scrapie has been associated with the presence of polymorphisms in the prion protein (PrP) gene. In the present study, we analyzed the PrP gene sequence to determine the frequency of polymorphisms in 56 sheep (28 each from Damani and Hashtnagri breeds) and 56 goats (28 each from Kamori and Local Hairy breeds). A total of 7 amino acid polymorphisms were detected in the PrP gene for sheep and 4 for goats. These amino acid polymorphisms were combined in 13 alleles and 15 genotypes in sheep and 5 alleles and 6 genotypes in goats. The overall frequency of the most sheep scrapie-resistant polymorphism (Q171R) was calculated to be 0.107. The most scrapie-susceptible polymorphism (A136V) was not detected in any of the studied sheep. The overall frequency of scrapie-associated polymorphism (H143R) in goats was found to be 0.152. Along with already known amino acid polymorphisms, two novel polymorphisms were also detected for each of sheep (Q171N and T191I) and goats (G22C and P63L). However, the overall frequency of these polymorphisms was extremely low. PMID:21595993

  13. Long-term modulation of the exercise ventilatory response in goats.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, P A; Mitchell, G S

    1993-01-01

    1. To test the hypothesis that repeated associations of exercise and increased respiratory dead space elicit mechanisms that augment future ventilatory responses to exercise alone, experiments were conducted on normal adult goats familiarized with experimental procedures. 2. Measurements of ventilation, arterial blood gases and CO2 production were made at rest, during mild steady-state exercise (4 km h-1; 5% grade) and with increased dead space at rest in seven goats before and after training. In Series I experiments, training consisted of fourteen to twenty exercise trials explicitly paired with increased dead space (0.8 l) over 2 days. Increased dead space predominantly represents a CO2 chemoreceptor stimulus with only mild hypoxic stimulation. Post-training measurements were made 1-6 h and 1 week after training was completed. 3. The same goats repeated a slightly modified protocol several months later (Series II; 6 trials per day for 4 days) to determine if responses were both repeatable and reversible, and to investigate training effects on dynamic ventilatory responses at the onset of exercise. 4. In Series I experiments, resting minute ventilation and breathing frequency were elevated 1-6 h post-training compared to baseline (44 and 74% respectively), whereas resting tidal volume decreased (14%). One week post-training, resting values had returned to baseline. Series II training had no significant effects on resting measurements. 5. Relative to baseline, arterial partial pressure of CO2 (Pa,CO2) values decreased significantly more from rest to exercise 1-6 h post-training in both Series I (2.7 +/- 0.2 vs. 1.8 +/- 0.9 mmHg) and Series II (3.4 +/- 0.6 vs. 2.0 +/- 0.6 mmHg). The exercise ventilatory response increased 25-28% 1-6 h post-training (both series), largely due to a greater exercise frequency response, but returned to baseline 1 week post-training. Training had no effect on ventilatory responses to CO2 at rest, suggesting that decreases in CO2

  14. EU-approved rapid tests might underestimate bovine spongiform encephalopathy infection in goats.

    PubMed

    Meloni, Daniela; Bozzetta, Elena; Langeveld, Jan P M; Groschup, Martin H; Goldmann, Wilfred; Andrèoletti, Olivier; Lantier, Isabelle; Van Keulen, Lucien; Bossers, Alex; Pitardi, Danilo; Nonno, Romolo; Sklaviadis, Theodoros; Ingravalle, Francesco; Peletto, Simone; Colussi, Silvia; Acutis, Pier Luigi

    2017-03-01

    We report the diagnostic sensitivity of 3 EU-approved rapid tests (ELISAs; 1 from IDEXX and 2 from Bio-Rad) for the detection of transmissible spongiform encephalopathy diseases in goats. Ninety-eight goat brainstem samples were tested. All the rapid tests had 100% specificity and ≥80% sensitivity, with the IDEXX test significantly more sensitive than the 2 Bio-Rad tests. All tests detected 100% of samples from goats with clinical scrapie, but missed 8% (IDEXX) to 33% (Bio-Rad SG) of samples from preclinical goats. Importantly, only IDEXX picked up all samples from clinical bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE)-infected goats, whereas the other 2 rapid tests missed 15% (Bio-Rad SG) to 25% (Bio-Rad SAP). These results show that a fraction of preclinical scrapie infections are likely missed by EU surveillance, with sensitivity of detection strongly dependent on the choice of the rapid test. Moreover, a significant proportion of clinical BSE infections are underestimated by using either Bio-Rad test. Assuming that the same sensitivity on preclinical goats would also occur in BSE-infected goats, our data suggest that IDEXX is likely the most sensitive test for detecting preclinical field cases of BSE infection in goats, although with an 8% failure rate. These results raise some concerns about the reliability of current EU surveillance figures on BSE infection in goats.

  15. Investigation of a Simple Model for Within-Flock Transmission of Scrapie.

    PubMed

    Hagenaars, Thomas J; Windig, Jack J

    2015-01-01

    Genetic control programs for scrapie in sheep build on solid knowledge of how susceptibility to scrapie is modulated by the prion protein genotype at the level of an individual sheep. In order to satisfactorily analyze the effectivity of control programs at the population level, insight is needed at the flock level, i.e., how the grouping of sheep in flocks affects the population-level transmission risk. In particular, one would like to understand how this risk is affected by between-flock differences in genotype frequency distribution. A first step is to model the scrapie transmission risk within a flock as a function of the flock genotype profile. Here we do so by estimating parameters for a model of within-flock transmission using genotyping data on Dutch flocks affected by scrapie. We show that the data are consistent with a relatively simple transmission model assuming horizontal transmission and homogeneous mixing between animals. The model expresses the basic reproduction number for within-flock scrapie as a weighted average of genotype-specific susceptibilities, multiplied by a single overall transmission parameter. The value of the overall transmission parameter may vary between flocks to account for random between-flock variation in non-genetic determinants such as management practice. Here we provide an estimate of its mean value and variation for Dutch flocks.

  16. Investigation of a Simple Model for Within-Flock Transmission of Scrapie

    PubMed Central

    Hagenaars, Thomas J.; Windig, Jack J.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic control programs for scrapie in sheep build on solid knowledge of how susceptibility to scrapie is modulated by the prion protein genotype at the level of an individual sheep. In order to satisfactorily analyze the effectivity of control programs at the population level, insight is needed at the flock level, i.e., how the grouping of sheep in flocks affects the population-level transmission risk. In particular, one would like to understand how this risk is affected by between-flock differences in genotype frequency distribution. A first step is to model the scrapie transmission risk within a flock as a function of the flock genotype profile. Here we do so by estimating parameters for a model of within-flock transmission using genotyping data on Dutch flocks affected by scrapie. We show that the data are consistent with a relatively simple transmission model assuming horizontal transmission and homogeneous mixing between animals. The model expresses the basic reproduction number for within-flock scrapie as a weighted average of genotype-specific susceptibilities, multiplied by a single overall transmission parameter. The value of the overall transmission parameter may vary between flocks to account for random between-flock variation in non-genetic determinants such as management practice. Here we provide an estimate of its mean value and variation for Dutch flocks. PMID:26426269

  17. Sheep prions with molecular properties intermediate between classical scrapie, BSE and CH1641-scrapie.

    PubMed

    Langeveld, Jan P M; Jacobs, Jorg G; Erkens, Jo H F; Baron, Thierry; Andréoletti, Olivier; Yokoyama, Takahashi; van Keulen, Lucien J M; van Zijderveld, Fred G; Davidse, Aart; Hope, Jim; Tang, Yue; Bossers, Alex

    2014-01-01

    Efforts to differentiate bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) from scrapie in prion infected sheep have resulted in effective methods to decide about the absence of BSE. In rare instances uncertainties remain due to assumptions that BSE, classical scrapie and CH1641-a rare scrapie variant-could occur as mixtures. In field samples including those from fallen stock, triplex Western blotting analyses of variations in the molecular properties of the proteinase K resistant part of the disease‑associated form of prion protein (PrP(res)) represents a powerful tool for quick discrimination purposes. In this study we examined 7 deviant ovine field cases of scrapie for some typical molecular aspects of PrP(res) found in CH1641‑scrapie, classical scrapie and BSE. One case was most close to scrapie with respect to molecular mass of its non-glycosylated fraction and N-terminally located 12B2‑epitope content. Two cases were unlike classical scrapie but too weak to differentiate between BSE or CH1641. The other 4 cases appeared intermediate between scrapie and CH1641 with a reduced molecular mass and 12B2‑epitope content, together with the characteristic presence of a second PrP(res) population. The existence of these 2 PrP(res) populations was further confirmed through deglycosylation by PNGaseF. The findings indicate that discriminatory diagnosis between classical scrapie, CH1641 and BSE can remain inconclusive with current biochemical methods. Whether such intermediate cases represent mixtures of TSE strains should be further investigated e.g. in bioassays with rodent lines that are varying in their susceptibility or other techniques suitable for strain typing.

  18. Sheep prions with molecular properties intermediate between classical scrapie, BSE and CH1641–scrapie

    PubMed Central

    Langeveld, Jan PM; Jacobs, Jorg G; Erkens, Jo HF; Baron, Thierry; Andréoletti, Olivier; Yokoyama, Takahashi; van Keulen, Lucien JM; van Zijderveld, Fred G; Davidse, Aart; Hope, Jim; Tang, Yue; Bossers, Alex

    2014-01-01

    Efforts to differentiate bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) from scrapie in prion infected sheep have resulted in effective methods to decide about the absence of BSE. In rare instances uncertainties remain due to assumptions that BSE, classical scrapie and CH1641–a rare scrapie variant–could occur as mixtures. In field samples including those from fallen stock, triplex Western blotting analyses of variations in the molecular properties of the proteinase K resistant part of the disease‑associated form of prion protein (PrPres) represents a powerful tool for quick discrimination purposes. In this study we examined 7 deviant ovine field cases of scrapie for some typical molecular aspects of PrPres found in CH1641‑scrapie, classical scrapie and BSE. One case was most close to scrapie with respect to molecular mass of its non-glycosylated fraction and N-terminally located 12B2‑epitope content. Two cases were unlike classical scrapie but too weak to differentiate between BSE or CH1641. The other 4 cases appeared intermediate between scrapie and CH1641 with a reduced molecular mass and 12B2‑epitope content, together with the characteristic presence of a second PrPres population. The existence of these 2 PrPres populations was further confirmed through deglycosylation by PNGaseF. The findings indicate that discriminatory diagnosis between classical scrapie, CH1641 and BSE can remain inconclusive with current biochemical methods. Whether such intermediate cases represent mixtures of TSE strains should be further investigated e.g. in bioassays with rodent lines that are varying in their susceptibility or other techniques suitable for strain typing. PMID:25522672

  19. Genetics and polymorphism of the mouse prion gene complex: control of scrapie incubation time.

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, G A; Goodman, P A; Lovett, M; Taylor, B A; Marshall, S T; Peterson-Torchia, M; Westaway, D; Prusiner, S B

    1988-01-01

    The mouse prion protein (PrP) gene (Prn-p), which encodes the only macromolecule that has been identified in scrapie prions, is tightly linked or identical to a gene (Prn-i) that controls the duration of the scrapie incubation period in mice. Constellations of restriction fragment length polymorphisms distinguish haplotypes a to f of Prn-p. The Prn-pb allele encodes a PrP that differs in sequence from those encoded by the other haplotypes and, in inbred mouse strains, correlates with long scrapie incubation time (Westaway et al., Cell 51: 651-662, 1987). In segregating crosses of mice, we identified rare individuals with a divergent scrapie incubation time phenotype and Prn-p genotype, but progeny testing to demonstrate meiotic recombination was not possible because scrapie is a lethal disease. Crosses involving the a, d, and e haplotypes demonstrated that genes unlinked to Prn-p could modulate scrapie incubation time and that there were only two alleles of Prn-i among the mouse strains tested. All inbred strains of mice that had the Prnb haplotype were probably direct descendants of the I/LnJ progenitors. We established the linkage relationship between the prion gene complex (Prn) and other chromosome 2 genes; the gene order, proximal to distal, is B2m-II-1a-Prn-Itp-A. Recombination suppression in the B2m-Prn-p interval occurred during the crosses involved in transferring the I/LnJ Prnb complex into a C57BL/6J background. Transmission ratio distortion by Prna/Prnb heterozygous males was also observed in the same crosses. These phenomena, together with the founder effect, would favor apparent linkage disequilibrium between Prn-p and Prn-i. Therefore, transmission genetics may underestimate the number of genes in Prn. Images PMID:3149717

  20. Primary transmission of chronic wasting disease versus scrapie prions from small ruminants to transgenic mice expressing ovine or cervid prion protein

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, David A.; Zhuang, Dongyue; Dassanayake, Rohana P.; Balachandran, Aru; Mitchell, Gordon B.; O'Rourke, Katherine I.

    2016-01-01

    Development of mice expressing either ovine (Tg338) or cervid (TgElk) prion protein (PrP) have aided in characterization of scrapie and chronic wasting disease (CWD), respectively. Experimental inoculation of sheep with CWD prions has demonstrated the potential for interspecies transmission but, infection with CWD versus classical scrapie prions may be difficult to differentiate using validated diagnostic platforms. In this study, mouse bioassay in Tg338 and TgElk was utilized to evaluate transmission of CWD versus scrapie prions from small ruminants. Mice (≥5 per homogenate) were inoculated with brain homogenates from clinically affected sheep or goats with naturally acquired classical scrapie, white-tailed deer with naturally acquired CWD (WTD-CWD) or sheep with experimentally acquired CWD derived from elk (sheep-passaged-CWD). Survival time (time to clinical disease) and attack rates (brain accumulation of protease resistant PrP, PrPres) were determined. Inoculation with classical scrapie prions resulted in clinical disease and 100 % attack rates in Tg338, but no clinical disease at endpoint (>300 days post-inoculation, p.i.) and low attack rates (6.8 %) in TgElk. Inoculation with WTD-CWD prions yielded no clinical disease or brain PrPres accumulation in Tg338 at endpoint (>500 days p.i.), but rapid onset of clinical disease (~121 days p.i.) and 100 % attack rate in TgElk. Sheep-passaged-CWD resulted in transmission to both mouse lines with 100 % attack rates at endpoint in Tg338 and an attack rate of ~73 % in TgElk with some culled due to clinical disease. These primary transmission observations demonstrate the potential of bioassay in Tg338 and TgElk to help differentiate possible infection with CWD versus classical scrapie prions in sheep and goats. PMID:27393736

  1. Scrapie incidence and PRNP polymorphisms: rare small ruminant breeds of Sicily with TSE protecting genetic reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Vitale, Maria; Migliore, Sergio; La Giglia, Maria; Alberti, Placido; Di Marco Lo Presti, Vincenzo; Langeveld, Jan P M

    2016-07-15

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE) are fatal neurodegenerative diseases of several mammalian species, including humans. In Italy, the active surveillance through rapid tests on brain stem from small ruminants started in 2002 on randomly selected samples of healthy slaughtered animals. Sampling number was proportionally related to the regional small ruminant population. Of the twenty Italian regions, Sicily has the second largest population of small ruminants which is mainly constituted by crossbreed animals (>70 %). Sicily contains also three native sheep breeds Pinzirita, Comisana and Valle del Belice. Native goat breeds are Girgentana, Messinese, Argentata dell'Etna, Maltese and Rossa Mediterranea. The polymorphisms of prion protein gene (PRNP) may influence disease susceptibility and breeding programs for genetic TSE resistance are being applied in sheep. Protective alleles have been recently reported for goats also. These differ from those in sheep and may allow breeding programs in the near future. In this paper the data of active surveillance for scrapie control in general population of small ruminants in Sicily are reported together with the analysis on the polymorphism of PRNP in a number of Sicilian autochthonous breeds. The evaluation of the frequency of protective alleles is fundamental for the implementation of a TSE resistance breeding program. TSE surveillance in small ruminants in Sicily showed a of total fifty seven scrapie outbreaks from 1997 to 2014 involving mainly crossbreed animals. The PRNP polymorphism analysis in autochthonous breeds showed protective allele frequencies of 30-40 % ARR in sheep and 12-18 % K222 in three of the four goat breeds; these breeds are distributed over limited areas of the island. The study on PRNP polymorphisms in Sicilian small ruminant population showed higher frequency of the protective alleles compared to most other European breeds. Our results suggest that PRNP genetic variety in Sicilian sheep

  2. Evidence of in utero transmission of classical scrapie in sheep.

    PubMed

    Spiropoulos, John; Hawkins, Stephen A C; Simmons, Marion M; Bellworthy, Susan J

    2014-04-01

    Classical scrapie is one of the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs), a group of fatal infectious diseases that affect the central nervous system (CNS). Classical scrapie can transmit laterally from ewe to lamb perinatally or between adult animals. Here we report detection of infectivity in tissues of an unborn fetus, providing evidence that in utero transmission of classical scrapie is also possible.

  3. 9 CFR 54.10 - Tests for scrapie.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Tests for scrapie. 54.10 Section 54.10 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE... of scrapie conducted on live or dead animals for use in the Scrapie Eradication Program. The...

  4. 9 CFR 54.10 - Tests for scrapie.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Tests for scrapie. 54.10 Section 54.10 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE... of scrapie conducted on live or dead animals for use in the Scrapie Eradication Program. The...

  5. 9 CFR 54.10 - Tests for scrapie.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... of scrapie conducted on live or dead animals for use in the Scrapie Eradication Program. The... currently approved tests. For a test to be approved as a live animal screening test for the identification... proteinase resistant protein associated with scrapie, and that animal tests positive to such a test, the...

  6. 9 CFR 54.10 - Tests for scrapie.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... of scrapie conducted on live or dead animals for use in the Scrapie Eradication Program. The... currently approved tests. For a test to be approved as a live animal screening test for the identification... proteinase resistant protein associated with scrapie, and that animal tests positive to such a test, the...

  7. Evidence of In Utero Transmission of Classical Scrapie in Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, Stephen A. C.; Simmons, Marion M.; Bellworthy, Susan J.

    2014-01-01

    Classical scrapie is one of the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs), a group of fatal infectious diseases that affect the central nervous system (CNS). Classical scrapie can transmit laterally from ewe to lamb perinatally or between adult animals. Here we report detection of infectivity in tissues of an unborn fetus, providing evidence that in utero transmission of classical scrapie is also possible. PMID:24453368

  8. Proteinase K-resistant material in ARR/VRQ sheep brain affected with classical scrapie is composed mainly of VRQ prion protein.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, J G; Bossers, A; Rezaei, H; van Keulen, L J M; McCutcheon, S; Sklaviadis, T; Lantier, I; Berthon, P; Lantier, F; van Zijderveld, F G; Langeveld, J P M

    2011-12-01

    Classical scrapie is a prion disease in sheep and goats. In sheep, susceptibility to disease is genetically influenced by single amino acid substitutions. Genetic breeding programs aimed at enrichment of arginine-171 (171R) prion protein (PrP), the so-called ARR allele, in the sheep population have been demonstrated to be effective in reducing the occurrence of classical scrapie in the field. Understanding the molecular basis for this reduced prevalence would serve the assessment of ARR adaptation. The prion formation mechanism and conversion of PrP from the normal form (PrP(C)) to the scrapie-associated form (PrP(Sc)) could play a key role in this process. Therefore, we investigated whether the ARR allele substantially contributes to scrapie prion formation in naturally infected heterozygous 171Q/R animals. Two methods were applied to brain tissue of 171Q/R heterozygous sheep with natural scrapie to determine the relative amount of the 171R PrP fraction in PrP(res), the proteinase K-resistant PrP(Sc) core. An antibody test differentiating between 171Q and 171R PrP fragments showed that PrP(res) was mostly composed of the 171Q allelotype. Furthermore, using a novel tool for prion research, endoproteinase Lys-C-digested PrP(res) yielded substantial amounts of a nonglycosylated and a monoglycosylated PrP fragment comprising codons 114 to 188. Following two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, only marginal amounts (<9%) of 171R PrP(res) were detected. Enhanced 171R(res) proteolytic susceptibility could be excluded. Thus, these data support a nearly zero contribution of 171R PrP in PrP(res) of 171R/Q field scrapie-infected animals. This is suggestive of a poor adaptation of classical scrapie to this resistance allele under these natural conditions.

  9. Role of the Goat K222-PrPC Polymorphic Variant in Prion Infection Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar-Calvo, Patricia; Espinosa, Juan Carlos; Pintado, Belén; Gutiérrez-Adán, Alfonso; Alamillo, Elia; Miranda, Alberto; Prieto, Irene; Bossers, Alex; Andreoletti, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The prion protein-encoding gene (prnp) strongly influences the susceptibility of small ruminants to transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs). Hence, selective breeding programs have been implemented to increase sheep resistance to scrapie. For goats, epidemiological and experimental studies have provided some association between certain polymorphisms of the cellular prion protein (PrPC) and resistance to TSEs. Among them, the Q/K polymorphism at PrPC codon 222 (Q/K222) yielded the most promising results. In this work, we investigated the individual effects of the K222-PrPC variant on the resistance/susceptibility of goats to TSEs. For that purpose, we generated two transgenic mouse lines, expressing either the Q222 (wild type) or K222 variant of goat PrPC. Both mouse lines were challenged intracerebrally with a panel of TSE isolates. Transgenic mice expressing the wild-type (Q222) allele were fully susceptible to infection with all tested isolates, whereas transgenic mice expressing similar levels of the K222 allele were resistant to all goat scrapie and cattle BSE isolates but not to goat BSE isolates. Finally, heterozygous K/Q222 mice displayed a reduced susceptibility to the tested panel of scrapie isolates. These results demonstrate a highly protective effect of the K222 variant against a broad panel of different prion isolates and further reinforce the argument supporting the use of this variant in breeding programs to control TSEs in goat herds. IMPORTANCE The objective of this study was to determine the role of the K222 variant of the prion protein (PrP) in the susceptibility/resistance of goats to transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs). Results showed that transgenic mice expressing the goat K222-PrP polymorphic variant are resistant to scrapie and bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) agents. This protective effect was also observed in heterozygous Q/K222 animals. Therefore, the single amino acid exchange from Q to K at codon

  10. Characterization of an unusual transmissible spongiform encephalopathy in goat by transmission in knock-in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Rona; King, Declan; Hunter, Nora; Goldmann, Wilfred; Barron, Rona M

    2013-08-01

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder of cattle, and its transmission to humans through contaminated food is thought to be the cause of the variant form of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. BSE is believed to have spread from the recycling in cattle of ruminant tissue in meat and bone meal (MBM). However, during this time, sheep and goats were also exposed to BSE-contaminated MBM. Both sheep and goats are experimentally susceptible to BSE, and while there have been no reported natural BSE cases in sheep, two goat BSE field cases have been documented. While cases of BSE are rare in small ruminants, the existence of scrapie in both sheep and goats is well established. In the UK, during 2006-2007, a serious outbreak of clinical scrapie was detected in a large dairy goat herd. Subsequently, 200 goats were selected for post-mortem examination, one of which showed biochemical and immunohistochemical features of the disease-associated prion protein (PrP(TSE)) which differed from all other infected goats. In the present study, we investigated this unusual case by performing transmission bioassays into a panel of mouse lines. Following characterization, we found that strain properties such as the ability to transmit to different mouse lines, lesion profile pattern, degree of PrP deposition in the brain and biochemical features of this unusual goat case were neither consistent with goat BSE nor with a goat scrapie herdmate control. However, our results suggest that this unusual case has BSE-like properties and highlights the need for continued surveillance.

  11. Rapid Fermentable Substance Modulates Interactions between Ruminal Commensals and Toll-Like Receptors in Promotion of Immune Tolerance of Goat Rumen

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Hong; Lu, Zhongyan; Chen, Zhan; Wu, Yufeng; Shen, Zanming

    2016-01-01

    Whether dietary non-fiber carbohydrate (NFC), a rapid fermentable substance, affects immune homeostasis of rumen through the modulation of interactions of ruminal microbiota and epithelial toll-like receptors (TLRs) remains unclear. A combination of 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing and quantitative PCRs was applied to study the synergetic responses of ruminal microbiota and epithelial TLRs to the dietary NFC switch from 15 to 31% in the goat model. The results showed that the 31% NFC diet caused the radical increases on the richness and diversity of rumen microbiota. The phylum Verrucomicrobia was most significantly expanded, whereas opportunistic pathogens, namely Rikenella, Anaeroplasma, and Olsenella, were significantly decreased. In rumen epithelium, the significantly increased expressions of TLR1, 6, 10 were associated with the significantly decreased expressions of pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin-1beta (IL-1ß), IL-6, and anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. Constrained correlation analysis indicated that the increased abundance of commensal bacteria in Verrucomicrobia subdivision 5 contributed to the upregulation of TLR10 expression. Finally, the significantly increased concentrations of rumen short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), coupled with the significantly upregulated expressions of epithelial genes related to SCFA absorption were observed in goats fed with 31% NFC diet. Thus, the NFC-induced expansion of rumen microbiota promoted epithelium tolerance by enhancement of the intensity of TLR10 signaling. The newly established equilibrium benefited to the transport of ruminal energy substances into the blood. PMID:27909428

  12. Tea Catechins Protect Goat Skeletal Muscle against H₂O₂-Induced Oxidative Stress by Modulating Expression of Phase 2 Antioxidant Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Rong-Zhen; Fang, Yi; Qin, Gui-Xin; Li, Hao-Yang; Zhou, Dao-Wei

    2015-09-16

    To study the mechanisms of tea catechins (TCs) in goat muscles against oxidative stress, skeletal muscle cells (SMCs) induced by H2O2 or not were incubated with TCs or 3H-1,2-dithiole-3-thione (D3T) and were defined as H2O2, H2O2D3T, H2O2TC, D3T, and TC treatments, respectively. Results showed that, similar to effects of D3T, TCs regulated mRNA and protein expression of antioxidant enzymes by suppressing Keap1 protein expression in SMCs from 1.58 ± 0.12 to 0.71 ± 0.21 and 1.03 ± 0.11 in H2O2TC and TC groups, respectively; however, effects differed in oxidative condition of cells and among enzymes. In stressed cells, TCs increased catalase and glutathione S-transferases (GST) activities (P < 0.001), whereas both enzymes' activities decreased (P < 0.001) to 2.97 ± 0.37 U/mg protein or 42.1 ± 1.85 mU/mg protein, respectively, in unstressed SMCs. Subsequently, an in vivo experiment in goats fed grain supplemented with TCs or D3T following infusion with H2O2 was conducted to further verify mechanisms of TC action. As seen in vitro, TCs reduced Keap1 protein expression (P < 0.001) from 2.11 ± 0.37 to 1.34 ± 0.13 and 1.43 ± 0.23 in H2O2TC and TC groups, respectively, in muscle. However, dietary TCs increased plasma CuZn superoxide dismutase and GST activities (P < 0.001) regardless of oxidative stress. Moreover, feeding TCs to goats under both conditions increased meat color and tenderness (P ≤ 0.001). In conclusion, TCs protected goat muscles against oxidative stress and subsequently improved meat quality by modulating phase 2 antioxidant enzymes and Keap1 expression.

  13. Experimental infection of meadow voles (Microtus pennsylvanicus) with sheep scrapie.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Christina M; Schneider, Jay R; Pedersen, Joel A; Heisey, Dennis M; Johnson, Christopher J

    2015-01-01

    Meadow voles (Microtus pennsylvanicus) are permissive to chronic wasting disease (CWD) infection, but their susceptibility to other transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) is poorly characterized. In this initial study, we intracerebrally challenged 6 meadow voles with 2 isolates of sheep scrapie. Three meadow voles acquired a TSE after the scrapie challenge and an extended incubation period. The glycoform profile of proteinase K-resistant prion protein (PrP(res)) in scrapie-sick voles remained similar to the sheep inocula, but differed from that of voles clinically affected by CWD. Vacuolization patterns and disease-associated prion protein (PrP(Sc)) deposition were generally similar in all scrapie-affected voles, except in the hippocampus, where PrP(Sc) staining varied markedly among the animals. Our results demonstrate that meadow voles can acquire a TSE after intracerebral scrapie challenge and that this species could therefore prove useful for characterizing scrapie isolates.

  14. Experimental infection of meadow voles (Microtus pennsylvanicus) with sheep scrapie

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carlson, CM; Schneider, Jay R.; Pedersen, Janice C.; Heisey, Dennis M.; Johnson, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    Meadow voles (Microtus pennsylvanicus) are permissive to chronic wasting disease (CWD) infection, but their susceptibility to other transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) is poorly characterized. In this initial study, we intracerebrally challenged 6 meadow voles with 2 isolates of sheep scrapie. Three meadow voles acquired a TSE after the scrapie challenge and an extended incubation period. The glycoform profile of proteinase K-resistant prion protein (PrP(res)) in scrapie-sick voles remained similar to the sheep inocula, but differed from that of voles clinically affected by CWD. Vacuolization patterns and disease-associated prion protein (PrP(Sc)) deposition were generally similar in all scrapie-affected voles, except in the hippocampus, where PrP(Sc) staining varied markedly among the animals. Our results demonstrate that meadow voles can acquire a TSE after intracerebral scrapie challenge and that this species could therefore prove useful for characterizing scrapie isolates.

  15. Experimental infection of meadow voles (Microtus pennsylvanicus) with sheep scrapie

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Christina M.; Schneider, Jay R.; Pedersen, Joel A.; Heisey, Dennis M.; Johnson, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    Meadow voles (Microtus pennsylvanicus) are permissive to chronic wasting disease (CWD) infection, but their susceptibility to other transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) is poorly characterized. In this initial study, we intracerebrally challenged 6 meadow voles with 2 isolates of sheep scrapie. Three meadow voles acquired a TSE after the scrapie challenge and an extended incubation period. The glycoform profile of proteinase K-resistant prion protein (PrPres) in scrapie-sick voles remained similar to the sheep inocula, but differed from that of voles clinically affected by CWD. Vacuolization patterns and disease-associated prion protein (PrPSc) deposition were generally similar in all scrapie-affected voles, except in the hippocampus, where PrPSc staining varied markedly among the animals. Our results demonstrate that meadow voles can acquire a TSE after intracerebral scrapie challenge and that this species could therefore prove useful for characterizing scrapie isolates. PMID:25673912

  16. Susceptibility of GT1-7 cells to mouse-passaged field scrapie isolates with a long incubation.

    PubMed

    Miyazawa, Kohtaro; Okada, Hiroyuki; Iwamaru, Yoshifumi; Masujin, Kentaro; Yokoyama, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    A typical feature of scrapie in sheep and goats is the accumulation of disease-associated prion protein. Scrapie consists of many strains with different biological properties. Nine natural sheep scrapie cases were transmitted to wild-type mice and mouse-passaged isolates were classified into 2 types based on incubation time: short and long. These 2 types displayed a distinct difference in their pathology. We attempted to transmit these mouse-passaged isolates to 2 murine cell lines (GT1-7 and L929) to compare their properties. All of the isolates were transmitted to L929 cells. However, only mouse-passaged field isolates with a long incubation time were transmitted to GT1-7 cells. This specific susceptibility of GT1-7 cells was also confirmed with a primary-passaged isolate that was not completely adapted to the new host species. Characterization of the mechanisms of the specific susceptibility of GT1-7 cells to isolates with a long incubation time may lead to a greater understanding of the differences among prion strains.

  17. Goat Milk Yoghurt by Using Lacto-B Culture Modulates the Production of Tumor Necrosis Factor-Alpha and Interleukin-10 in Malnourished Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kandarina, BJ. Istiti; Kusuma, Sari; Trisnasari, Yunita Dewi

    2014-01-01

    Total spleen lymphocytes, lymphocyte proliferation, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and interleukin-10 (IL-10) in spleen lymphocyte culture were studied in malnourished Wistar rats fed with goat milk yoghurt. Malnourished rats were created by using standard feed restriction as much as 50% of normal rats for 21 d. Goat milk yoghurt containing three types of microorganism e.g., Lactobacillus acidophilus, Sterptococcus thermophilus and Bifidobacterium longum derived from Lacto-B culture in powder form. After 21 d, the rats continued to receive restricted feeding and supplemented with goat milk yoghurt for 7 d. Total splenocytes were counted by hemocytometer. Splenocytes proliferation was expressed as stimulation index, whereas the TNF-α and IL-10 of spleen lymphocyte culture were measured by ELISA technique. The total number of splenocytes and stimulation index of splenocytes in moderate malnourished and normal rats supplemented with goat milk yoghurt was not significantly different. The level of TNF-α in the rat supplemented with goat milk yoghurt was lower (p<0.05) than the control group, whereas the level of IL-10 in the rat supplemented with goat milk yoghurt was higher (p<0.05) than the control group. In conclusion, goat milk yoghurt supplementation in malnourished rats could decrease TNF-α as a representation of the proinflammatory cytokine, while it increases IL-10 as a representation of the anti-inflammatory cytokine. PMID:26760750

  18. Effect of Q211 and K222 PRNP Polymorphic Variants in the Susceptibility of Goats to Oral Infection With Goat Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Aguilar-Calvo, Patricia; Fast, Christine; Tauscher, Kerstin; Espinosa, Juan-Carlos; Groschup, Martin H; Nadeem, Muhammad; Goldmann, Wilfred; Langeveld, Jan; Bossers, Alex; Andreoletti, Olivier; Torres, Juan-María

    2015-08-15

    The prion protein-encoding gene (PRNP) is one of the major determinants for scrapie occurrence in sheep and goats. However, its effect on bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) transmission to goats is not clear. Goats harboring wild-type, R/Q211 or Q/K222 PRNP genotypes were orally inoculated with a goat-BSE isolate to assess their relative susceptibility to BSE infection. Goats were killed at different time points during the incubation period and after the onset of clinical signs, and their brains as well as several peripheral tissues were analyzed for the accumulation of pathological prion protein (PrP(Sc)) and prion infectivity by mouse bioassay. R/Q211 goats displayed delayed clinical signs compared with wild-type goats. Deposits of PrP(Sc) were detected only in brain, whereas infectivity was present in peripheral tissues too. In contrast, none of the Q/K222 goats showed any evidence of clinical prion disease. No PrP(Sc) accumulation was observed in their brains or peripheral tissues, but very low infectivity was detected in some tissues very long after inoculation (44-45 months). These results demonstrate that transmission of goat BSE is genotype dependent, and they highlight the pivotal protective effect of the K222 PRNP variant in the oral susceptibility of goats to BSE. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Evidence for zoonotic potential of ovine scrapie prions.

    PubMed

    Cassard, Hervé; Torres, Juan-Maria; Lacroux, Caroline; Douet, Jean-Yves; Benestad, Sylvie L; Lantier, Frédéric; Lugan, Séverine; Lantier, Isabelle; Costes, Pierrette; Aron, Naima; Reine, Fabienne; Herzog, Laetitia; Espinosa, Juan-Carlos; Beringue, Vincent; Andréoletti, Olivier

    2014-12-16

    Although Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) is the cause of variant Creutzfeldt Jakob disease (vCJD) in humans, the zoonotic potential of scrapie prions remains unknown. Mice genetically engineered to overexpress the human prion protein (tgHu) have emerged as highly relevant models for gauging the capacity of prions to transmit to humans. These models can propagate human prions without any apparent transmission barrier and have been used used to confirm the zoonotic ability of BSE. Here we show that a panel of sheep scrapie prions transmit to several tgHu mice models with an efficiency comparable to that of cattle BSE. The serial transmission of different scrapie isolates in these mice led to the propagation of prions that are phenotypically identical to those causing sporadic CJD (sCJD) in humans. These results demonstrate that scrapie prions have a zoonotic potential and raise new questions about the possible link between animal and human prions.

  20. Three scrapie prion isolates exhibit different accumulation patterns of the prion protein scrapie isoform.

    PubMed Central

    DeArmond, S J; Yang, S L; Lee, A; Bowler, R; Taraboulos, A; Groth, D; Prusiner, S B

    1993-01-01

    To investigate the molecular basis of prion diversity, we inoculated transgenic mice expressing the Syrian hamster prion protein (PrP) with three distinct prion isolates. We compared the three isolates designated Sc237, 139H, and Me7H in Tg(SHaPrP)7 mice with clinical signs of scrapie because the incubation times with these mice are considerably shorter than the times found with hamsters. Each prion isolate produced a distinctive pattern of the scrapie isoform of PrP (PrPSc) accumulation, as determined by histoblotting, a technique developed for the regional mapping of PrPSc deposition. The PrPSc pattern with the Me7H isolate was particularly interesting because it appeared to be confined to the hypothalamus and related structures--including the interstitial nucleus of the stria terminalis, the paraventricular nucleus of the thalamus, and periaqueductal grey. Additionally, the regions of PrPSc accumulation remained highly restricted, even though the incubation time for Me7H scrapie was significantly longer than with Sc237 and 139H isolates. Neuropathological changes characterized by neuronal vacuolation and astrocytic gliosis were confined to those regions where PrPSc accumulated. These findings argue that the cell-specific propagation of prion isolates may be responsible for different properties exhibited by each of the isolates. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:8101989

  1. Intraspecies Prion Transmission Results in Selection of Sheep Scrapie Strains

    PubMed Central

    Yokoyama, Takashi; Masujin, Kentaro; Schmerr, Mary Jo; Shu, Yujing; Okada, Hiroyuki; Iwamaru, Yoshifumi; Imamura, Morikazu; Matsuura, Yuichi; Murayama, Yuichi; Mohri, Shirou

    2010-01-01

    Background Sheep scrapie is caused by multiple prion strains, which have been classified on the basis of their biological characteristics in inbred mice. The heterogeneity of natural scrapie prions in individual sheep and in sheep flocks has not been clearly defined. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we intravenously injected 2 sheep (Suffolk and Corriedale) with material from a natural case of sheep scrapie (Suffolk breed). These 3 sheep had identical prion protein (PrP) genotypes. The protease-resistant core of PrP (PrPres) in the experimental Suffolk sheep was similar to that in the original Suffolk sheep. In contrast, PrPres in the Corriedale sheep differed from the original PrPres but resembled the unusual scrapie isolate, CH1641. This unusual PrPres was not detected in the original sheep. The PrPres distributions in the brain and peripheral tissues differed between the 2 breeds of challenged sheep. A transmission study in wild-type and TgBoPrP mice, which overexpressing bovine PrP, led to the selection of different prion strains. The pathological features of prion diseases are thought to depend on the dominantly propagated strain. Conclusions/Significance Our results indicate that prion strain selection occurs after both inter- and intraspecies transmission. The unusual scrapie prion was a hidden or an unexpressed component in typical sheep scrapie. PMID:21103326

  2. GOATS Image Projection Component

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haber, Benjamin M.; Green, Joseph J.

    2011-01-01

    When doing mission analysis and design of an imaging system in orbit around the Earth, answering the fundamental question of imaging performance requires an understanding of the image products that will be produced by the imaging system. GOATS software represents a series of MATLAB functions to provide for geometric image projections. Unique features of the software include function modularity, a standard MATLAB interface, easy-to-understand first-principles-based analysis, and the ability to perform geometric image projections of framing type imaging systems. The software modules are created for maximum analysis utility, and can all be used independently for many varied analysis tasks, or used in conjunction with other orbit analysis tools.

  3. Passage of scrapie to deer results in a new phenotype upon return passage to sheep

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Aims: We previously demonstrated that scrapie has a 100% attack rate in white-tailed deer after either intracranial or oral inoculation. Samples from deer that developed scrapie had two different western blot patterns: samples derived from cerebrum had a banding pattern similar to the scrapie inocu...

  4. Archival search for historical atypical scrapie in sheep reveals evidence for mixed infections.

    PubMed

    Chong, Angela; Kennedy, Iain; Goldmann, Wilfred; Green, Andrew; González, Lorenzo; Jeffrey, Martin; Hunter, Nora

    2015-10-01

    Natural scrapie in sheep occurs in classical and atypical forms, which may be distinguished on the basis of the associated neuropathology and properties of the disease-associated prion protein on Western blots. First detected in 1998, atypical scrapie is known to have occurred in UK sheep since the 1980s. However, its aetiology remains unclear and it is often considered as a sporadic, non-contagious disease unlike classical scrapie which is naturally transmissible. Although atypical scrapie tends to occur in sheep of prion protein (PRNP) genotypes that are different from those found predominantly in classical scrapie, there is some overlap so that there are genotypes in which both scrapie forms can occur. In this search for early atypical scrapie cases, we made use of an archive of fixed and frozen sheep samples, from both scrapie-affected and healthy animals (∼1850 individuals), dating back to the 1960s. Using a selection process based primarily on PRNP genotyping, but also on contemporaneous records of unusual clinical signs or pathology, candidate sheep samples were screened by Western blot, immunohistochemistry and strain-typing methods using tg338 mice. We identified, from early time points in the archive, three atypical scrapie cases, including one sheep which died in 1972 and two which showed evidence of mixed infection with classical scrapie. Cases with both forms of scrapie in the same animal as recognizable entities suggest that mixed infections have been around for a long time and may potentially contribute to the variety of scrapie strains.

  5. Polymorphisms of the prion protein gene and their effects on litter size and risk evaluation for scrapie in Chinese Hu sheep.

    PubMed

    Guan, Feng; Pan, Lei; Li, Jie; Tang, Hong; Zhu, Cheng; Shi, Guoqing

    2011-08-01

    It is well known that scrapie is a fatal, neurodegenerative disease in sheep and goat, which belongs to the group of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) or prion diseases. It has been confirmed that the polymorphisms of prion protein gene (PRNP) at codons 136, 154, and 171 have strong relationship with scrapie in sheep. In the present study, nine polymorphisms of PRNP at codons 136, 154, and 171 and other six loci (at codons 101, 112, 127, 137, 138, and 152) were detected in 180 Chinese Hu sheep. All the alleles at codons 136, 154, and 171 have been identified and resulted in three new genotypes. The frequencies of predominant alleles were 85% (A136), 99.40% (R154), and 37.78% (Q171), respectively. The predominant haplotype ARQ has a relatively high frequency of 57.77%. The frequencies of dominant genotypes of ARR/ARQ and ARQ/ARQ were 30 and 26.67%, respectively. Three new found genotypes named ARQ/TRK, ARQ/TRR, and TRR/TRQ had the same lower frequencies (0.56%). The relationship of PRNP genotype with scrapie risk and litter size showed that the predominant genotypes are corresponded to the risk score of R(1) (1.67%), R(2) (32.22%), and R(3) (42.22%). Just at the first parity, the individuals with ARH/ARH genotype had significantly larger litter size than the mean value and those with ARQ/ARQ and ARR/ARQ genotypes. In short, this study provided preliminary information about alleles and genotypes of PRNP in Chinese Hu sheep. It could be concluded that Hu sheep has a low susceptibility to natural scrapie, and the predominant PRNP genotype at least has no significant effect on litter size.

  6. Synthetic scrapie infectivity: interaction between recombinant PrP and scrapie brain-derived RNA.

    PubMed

    Simoneau, Steve; Thomzig, Achim; Ruchoux, Marie-Madeleine; Vignier, Nicolas; Daus, Martin L; Poleggi, Anna; Lebon, Pierre; Freire, Sophie; Durand, Valerie; Graziano, Silvia; Galeno, Roberta; Cardone, Franco; Comoy, Emmanuel; Pocchiari, Maurizio; Beekes, Michael; Deslys, Jean-Philippe; Fournier, Jean-Guy

    2015-01-01

    The key molecular event in human cerebral proteinopathies, which include Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases, is the structural conversion of a specific host protein into a β-sheet-rich conformer. With regards to this common mechanism, it appears difficult to explain the outstanding infectious properties attributed to PrP(Sc), the hallmark of another intriguing family of cerebral proteinopathies known as transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE) or prion diseases. The infectious PrP(Sc) or "prion" is thought to be composed solely of a misfolded form of the otherwise harmless cellular prion protein (PrP(c)). To gain insight into this unique situation, we used the 263K scrapie hamster model to search for a putative PrP(Sc)-associated factor that contributes to the infectivity of PrP(Sc) amyloid. In a rigorously controlled set of experiments that included several bioassays, we showed that originally innocuous recombinant prion protein (recPrP) equivalent to PrP(c) is capable of initiating prion disease in hamsters when it is converted to a prion-like conformation (β-sheet-rich) in the presence of RNA purified from scrapie-associated fibril (SAF) preparations. Analysis of the recPrP-RNA infectious mixture reveals the presence of 2 populations of small RNAs of approximately 27 and 55 nucleotides. These unprecedented findings are discussed in light of the distinct relationship that may exist between this RNA material and the 2 biological properties, infectivity and strain features, attributed to prion amyloid.

  7. A lympho-follicular microenvironment is required for pathological prion protein deposition in chronically inflamed tissues from scrapie-affected sheep.

    PubMed

    Maestrale, Caterina; Di Guardo, Giovanni; Cancedda, Maria Giovanna; Marruchella, Giuseppe; Masia, Mariangela; Sechi, Stefania; Macciocu, Simonetta; Santucciu, Cinzia; Petruzzi, Mara; Ligios, Ciriaco

    2013-01-01

    In sheep scrapie, pathological prion protein (PrP(Sc)) deposition occurs in the lymphoreticular and central nervous systems. We investigated PrP(Sc) distribution in scrapie-affected sheep showing simultaneous evidence of chronic lymphofollicular, lymphoproliferative/non-lymphofollicular, and/or granulomatous inflammations in their mammary gland, lung, and ileum. To do this, PrP(Sc) detection was carried out via immunohistochemistry and Western Blotting techniques, as well as through inflammatory cell immunophenotyping. Expression studies of gene coding for biological factors modulating the host's inflammatory response were also carried out. We demonstrated that ectopic PrP(Sc) deposition occurs exclusively in the context of lymphofollicular inflammatory sites, inside newly formed and well-organized lymphoid follicles harboring follicular dendritic cells. On the contrary, no PrP(Sc) deposition was detected in granulomas, even when they were closely located to newly formed lymphoid follicles. A significantly more consistent expression of lymphotoxin α and β mRNA was detected in lymphofollicular inflammation compared to the other two types, with lymphotoxin α and β signaling new lymphoid follicles' formation and, likely, the occurrence of ectopic PrP(Sc) deposition inside them. Our findings suggest that, in sheep co-affected by scrapie and chronic inflammatory conditions, only newly formed lymphoid follicles provide a suitable micro-environment that supports the scrapie agent's replication in inflammatory sites, with an increased risk of prion shedding through body secretions/excretions.

  8. A Lympho-Follicular Microenvironment Is Required for Pathological Prion Protein Deposition in Chronically Inflamed Tissues from Scrapie-Affected Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Maestrale, Caterina; Di Guardo, Giovanni; Cancedda, Maria Giovanna; Marruchella, Giuseppe; Masia, Mariangela; Sechi, Stefania; Macciocu, Simonetta; Santucciu, Cinzia; Petruzzi, Mara; Ligios, Ciriaco

    2013-01-01

    In sheep scrapie, pathological prion protein (PrPSc) deposition occurs in the lymphoreticular and central nervous systems. We investigated PrPSc distribution in scrapie-affected sheep showing simultaneous evidence of chronic lymphofollicular, lymphoproliferative/non-lymphofollicular, and/or granulomatous inflammations in their mammary gland, lung, and ileum. To do this, PrPSc detection was carried out via immunohistochemistry and Western Blotting techniques, as well as through inflammatory cell immunophenotyping. Expression studies of gene coding for biological factors modulating the host’s inflammatory response were also carried out. We demonstrated that ectopic PrPSc deposition occurs exclusively in the context of lymphofollicular inflammatory sites, inside newly formed and well-organized lymphoid follicles harboring follicular dendritic cells. On the contrary, no PrPSc deposition was detected in granulomas, even when they were closely located to newly formed lymphoid follicles. A significantly more consistent expression of lymphotoxin α and β mRNA was detected in lymphofollicular inflammation compared to the other two types, with lymphotoxin α and β signaling new lymphoid follicles’ formation and, likely, the occurrence of ectopic PrPSc deposition inside them. Our findings suggest that, in sheep co-affected by scrapie and chronic inflammatory conditions, only newly formed lymphoid follicles provide a suitable micro-environment that supports the scrapie agent’s replication in inflammatory sites, with an increased risk of prion shedding through body secretions/excretions. PMID:23658779

  9. Norwegian farmers' vigilance in reporting sheep showing scrapie-associated signs

    PubMed Central

    Hopp, Petter; Vatn, Synnøve; Jarp, Jorun

    2007-01-01

    Background Scrapie is a chronic neurodegenerative disease affecting small ruminants and belongs to the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. Scrapie is considered a serious animal disease and it has been notifiable in Norway since 1965. The clinical signs of scrapie might be vague and the farmers, if familiar with the signs of scrapie, are often in the best position for detecting scrapie suspects. In 2002, an anonymous questionnaire survey was conducted in order to assess Norwegian sheep farmers' vigilance of scrapie. Results Although the potential detection of a scrapie-positive animal would lead to the destruction of the sheep flock concerned, almost all the farmers (97 %) expressed their willingness to report scrapie suspects. This was most certainly dependent on the Government taking the economic responsibility for the control programme as nearly all the farmers responded that this was an important condition. Listeriosis is relatively common disease in Norwegian sheep and a differential diagnosis for scrapie. In a multinomial logistic regression the reporting behaviour for non-recovering listeriosis cases, used as a measurement of willingness to report scrapie, was examined. The reporting of non-recovering listeriosis cases increased as the knowledge of scrapie-associated signs increased, and the reporting behaviour was dependent on both economic and non-economic values. Conclusion The results indicate that in 2002 almost all sheep farmers showed willingness to report any scrapie suspects. Nevertheless there is an underreporting of scrapie suspects and the farmers' awareness and hence their vigilance of scrapie could be improved. Furthermore, the results suggest that to ensure the farmers' compliance to control programmes for serious infectious diseases, the farmers' concerns of non-economic as well as economic values should be considered. PMID:18076757

  10. Glutathione peroxidase (GPX) activity in blood of ewes on farms in different scrapie categories in Iceland.

    PubMed

    Gudmundsdóttir, Kristín B; Kristinsson, Jakob; Sigurdarson, Sigurdur; Eiríksson, Tryggvi; Jóhannesson, Torkell

    2008-06-23

    Preliminary studies indicated decreased glutathione peroxidase (GPX) activity in blood of ewes on scrapie-afflicted farms. Other studies have shown decreased GPX activity in brain of prion-infected mice and in prion-infected cells in vitro. The aim of this study was to examine the GPX activity in blood as well as the distribution of GPX-activity levels from ewes on farms in scrapie-afflicted areas in Iceland. Blood samples were collected from 635 ewes (non-pregnant [n = 297] and pregnant [n = 338]) on 40 farms in scrapie-afflicted areas during the years 2001-2005, for analysis of GPX activity. The farms were divided into three categories: 1. Scrapie-free farms (n = 14); 2. Scrapie-prone farms (earlier scrapie-afflicted, restocked farms) (n = 12); 3. Scrapie-afflicted farms (n = 14). For comparison, 121 blood samples were also collected from non-pregnant ewes on one farm (farm A) in a scrapie-free area (scrapie never registered). Chi-square test was used to test for normal distribution of GPX-results, and Kruskal-Wallis test to compare GPX-results between categories. The GPX-results appeared to be biphasically distributed in ewes in all three scrapie categories and on farm A. The presumptive breaking point was about 300 units g Hb-1. About 30-50% of the GPX-results from ewes in all three scrapie categories were below 300 units g Hb-1 but only about 13% of the GPX-results from ewes on farm A. The mean GPX activity was highest on farm A, and was significantly lower on scrapie-prone farms than on scrapie-free or scrapie-afflicted farms (non-pregnant and pregnant ewes: P < 0.005, respectively; non-pregnant and pregnant ewes combined: P < 0.0005). 1) the distribution of GPX-results in blood of Icelandic ewes apparently has a biphasic character; 2) the GPX-results were higher in ewes on one farm in a scrapie-free area than in ewes on farms in the scrapie-afflicted areas; 3) GPX-activity levels were significantly lowest on earlier scrapie-afflicted, restocked farms, which

  11. Evidence in sheep for pre-natal transmission of scrapie to lambs from infected mothers.

    PubMed

    Foster, James D; Goldmann, Wilfred; Hunter, Nora

    2013-01-01

    Natural scrapie transmission from infected ewes to their lambs is thought to occur by the oral route around the time of birth. However the hypothesis that scrapie transmission can also occur before birth (in utero) is not currently favoured by most researchers. As scrapie is an opportunistic infection with multiple infection routes likely to be functional in sheep, definitive evidence for or against transmission from ewe to her developing fetus has been difficult to achieve. In addition the very early literature on maternal transmission of scrapie in sheep was compromised by lack of knowledge of the role of the PRNP (prion protein) gene in control of susceptibility to scrapie. In this study we experimentally infected pregnant ewes of known PRNP genotype with a distinctive scrapie strain (SSBP/1) and looked for evidence of transmission of SSBP/1 to the offspring. The sheep were from the NPU Cheviot flock, which has endemic natural scrapie from which SSBP/1 can be differentiated on the basis of histology, genetics of disease incidence and strain typing bioassay in mice. We used embryo transfer techniques to allow sheep fetuses of scrapie-susceptible PRNP genotypes to develop in a range of scrapie-resistant and susceptible recipient mothers and challenged the recipients with SSBP/1. Scrapie clinical disease, caused by both natural scrapie and SSBP/1, occurred in the progeny but evidence (including mouse strain typing) of SSBP/1 infection was found only in lambs born to fully susceptible recipient mothers. Progeny were not protected from transmission of natural scrapie or SSBP/1 by washing of embryos to International Embryo Transfer Society standards or by caesarean derivation and complete separation from their birth mothers. Our results strongly suggest that pre-natal (in utero) transmission of scrapie may have occurred in these sheep.

  12. Evidence in Sheep for Pre-Natal Transmission of Scrapie to Lambs from Infected Mothers

    PubMed Central

    Foster, James D.; Goldmann, Wilfred; Hunter, Nora

    2013-01-01

    Natural scrapie transmission from infected ewes to their lambs is thought to occur by the oral route around the time of birth. However the hypothesis that scrapie transmission can also occur before birth (in utero) is not currently favoured by most researchers. As scrapie is an opportunistic infection with multiple infection routes likely to be functional in sheep, definitive evidence for or against transmission from ewe to her developing fetus has been difficult to achieve. In addition the very early literature on maternal transmission of scrapie in sheep was compromised by lack of knowledge of the role of the PRNP (prion protein) gene in control of susceptibility to scrapie. In this study we experimentally infected pregnant ewes of known PRNP genotype with a distinctive scrapie strain (SSBP/1) and looked for evidence of transmission of SSBP/1 to the offspring. The sheep were from the NPU Cheviot flock, which has endemic natural scrapie from which SSBP/1 can be differentiated on the basis of histology, genetics of disease incidence and strain typing bioassay in mice. We used embryo transfer techniques to allow sheep fetuses of scrapie-susceptible PRNP genotypes to develop in a range of scrapie-resistant and susceptible recipient mothers and challenged the recipients with SSBP/1. Scrapie clinical disease, caused by both natural scrapie and SSBP/1, occurred in the progeny but evidence (including mouse strain typing) of SSBP/1 infection was found only in lambs born to fully susceptible recipient mothers. Progeny were not protected from transmission of natural scrapie or SSBP/1 by washing of embryos to International Embryo Transfer Society standards or by caesarean derivation and complete separation from their birth mothers. Our results strongly suggest that pre-natal (in utero) transmission of scrapie may have occurred in these sheep. PMID:24260219

  13. hTERT-immortalized ovine microglia propagate natural scrapie isolates

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Scrapie is a transmissible fatal neurodegenerative disease of sheep that is caused by a novel infectious agent called a prion. The study of prions under controlled culture conditions is crucial to advancing knowledge regarding prion processes of replication and accumulation within cells. Unfortunate...

  14. Transcriptomic determinants of scrapie prion propagation in cultured ovine microglia

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    While infection by scrapie prions is dependent on expression of cellular prion protein (PrP-C), other factors must play a role since not all cells that express equivalent levels of PrP-C are permissive to infection. The aim of this study was to determine the cellular factors associated with permissi...

  15. 9 CFR 54.22 - State scrapie certification boards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... veterinarian in charge, after consulting with a State representative and industry representatives, may appoint... scrapie certification board shall include as members the area veterinarian in charge, one or more State representatives, one or more accredited veterinarians, when possible, and one or more owners of flocks, and, at...

  16. 9 CFR 54.22 - State scrapie certification boards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... veterinarian in charge, after consulting with a State representative and industry representatives, may appoint... scrapie certification board shall include as members the area veterinarian in charge, one or more State representatives, one or more accredited veterinarians, when possible, and one or more owners of flocks, and, at...

  17. 9 CFR 54.22 - State scrapie certification boards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... veterinarian in charge, after consulting with a State representative and industry representatives, may appoint... scrapie certification board shall include as members the area veterinarian in charge, one or more State representatives, one or more accredited veterinarians, when possible, and one or more owners of flocks, and, at...

  18. 9 CFR 54.22 - State scrapie certification boards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... veterinarian in charge, after consulting with a State representative and industry representatives, may appoint... scrapie certification board shall include as members the area veterinarian in charge, one or more State representatives, one or more accredited veterinarians, when possible, and one or more owners of flocks, and, at...

  19. Nor98 scrapie identified in the United States

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The transmissible spongiform encephalopathies of domestic livestock are fatal neurodegenerative disorders characterized by accumulation of an abnormal isoform of the host prion protein in brain. Scrapie is the prion disease of sheep and the abnormal protein usually accumulates in lymphoid tissues m...

  20. Eradication of scrapie with selective breeding: are we nearly there?

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Following EU decision 2003/100/EC Member States have recently implemented sheep breeding programmes to reduce the prevalence of sheep with TSE susceptible prion genotypes. The present paper investigates the progress of the breeding programme in the Netherlands. The PrP genotype frequencies were monitored through time using two sets of random samples: one set covers the years 2005 to 2008 and is taken from national surveillance programme; the other is taken from 168 random sheep farms in 2007. The data reveal that although the level of compliance to the breeding programme has been high, the frequency of susceptible genotypes varies substantially between farms. The 168 sheep farms are a subset of 689 farms participating in a postal survey inquiring about management and breeding strategies. This survey aimed to identify how much these strategies varied between farms, in order to inform assessment of the expected future progress towards eradication of classical scrapie. Results On the one hand, we found that compliance to the national breeding program has been high, and the frequency of resistant genotypes is expected to increase further in the next few years. On the other hand, we observed a large variation in prevalence of the scrapie resistant PrP genotype ARR between farms, implicating a large variation of genetic resistance between farms. Substantial between-flock differences in management and breeding strategies were found in the postal survey, suggesting considerable variation in risk of scrapie transmission between farms. Conclusions Our results show that although there has been a good progress in the breeding for scrapie resistance and the average farm-level scrapie susceptibility in the Netherlands has been significantly reduced, still a considerable proportion of farms contain high frequencies of susceptible genotypes in their sheep population. Since 2007 the breeding for genetic resistance is voluntarily again, and participation to selective

  1. GOATS - Orbitology Component

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haber, Benjamin M.; Green, Joseph J.

    2010-01-01

    The GOATS Orbitology Component software was developed to specifically address the concerns presented by orbit analysis tools that are often written as stand-alone applications. These applications do not easily interface with standard JPL first-principles analysis tools, and have a steep learning curve due to their complicated nature. This toolset is written as a series of MATLAB functions, allowing seamless integration into existing JPL optical systems engineering modeling and analysis modules. The functions are completely open, and allow for advanced users to delve into and modify the underlying physics being modeled. Additionally, this software module fills an analysis gap, allowing for quick, high-level mission analysis trades without the need for detailed and complicated orbit analysis using commercial stand-alone tools. This software consists of a series of MATLAB functions to provide for geometric orbit-related analysis. This includes propagation of orbits to varying levels of generalization. In the simplest case, geosynchronous orbits can be modeled by specifying a subset of three orbit elements. The next case is a circular orbit, which can be specified by a subset of four orbit elements. The most general case is an arbitrary elliptical orbit specified by all six orbit elements. These orbits are all solved geometrically, under the basic problem of an object in circular (or elliptical) orbit around a rotating spheroid. The orbit functions output time series ground tracks, which serve as the basis for more detailed orbit analysis. This software module also includes functions to track the positions of the Sun, Moon, and arbitrary celestial bodies specified by right ascension and declination. Also included are functions to calculate line-of-sight geometries to ground-based targets, angular rotations and decompositions, and other line-of-site calculations. The toolset allows for the rapid execution of orbit trade studies at the level of detail required for the

  2. Scrapie-Specific Pathology of Sheep Lymphoid Tissues

    PubMed Central

    McGovern, Gillian; Jeffrey, Martin

    2007-01-01

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) or prion diseases often result in accumulation of disease-associated PrP (PrPd) in the lymphoreticular system (LRS), specifically in association with follicular dendritic cells (FDCs) and tingible body macrophages (TBMs) of secondary follicles. We studied the effects of sheep scrapie on lymphoid tissue in tonsils and lymph nodes by light and electron microscopy. FDCs of sheep were grouped according to morphology as immature, mature or regressing. Scrapie was associated with FDC dendrite hypertrophy and electron dense deposit or vesicles. PrPd was located using immunogold labelling at the plasmalemma of FDC dendrites and, infrequently, mature B cells. Abnormal electron dense deposits surrounding FDC dendrites were identified as immunoglobulins suggesting that excess immune complexes are retained and are indicative of an FDC dysfunction. Within scrapie-affected lymph nodes, macrophages outside the follicle and a proportion of germinal centre TBMs accumulated PrPd within endosomes and lysosomes. In addition, TBMs showed PrPd in association with the cell membrane, non-coated pits and vesicles, and also with discrete, large and random endoplasmic reticulum networks, which co-localised with ubiquitin. These observations suggest that PrPd is internalised via the caveolin-mediated pathway, and causes an abnormal disease-related alteration in endoplasmic reticulum structure. In contrast to current dogma, this study shows that sheep scrapie is associated with cytopathology of germinal centres, which we attribute to abnormal antigen complex trapping by FDCs and abnormal endocytic events in TBMs. The nature of the sub-cellular changes in FDCs and TBMs differs from those of scrapie infected neurones and glial cells suggesting that different PrPd/cell membrane interactions occur in different cell types. PMID:18074028

  3. hTERT-immortalized ovine microglia propagate natural scrapie isolates.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Gutiérrez, Juan F; Schneider, David A; Baszler, Timothy V; Greenlee, Justin J; Nicholson, Eric M; Stanton, James B

    2015-02-16

    Ex vivo propagation of natural prion isolates (i.e., propagated solely in the natural host) is crucial for the characterization and study of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs). Several well-established, prion-permissive cell culture systems are available; however, only a few cell lines are permissive to natural prion isolates and these cells are not pathophysiologically relevant (e.g., renal epithelium and fibroblast-like cells). Therefore, a pathophysiologically relevant cell line derived from a natural TSE host could be used for propagation of natural prion isolates. In this study, ovine brain macrophages (microglia) were immortalized by transfection with the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) gene to identify cell lines (hTERT-microglia) permissive to natural scrapie prion isolates. Following transfection, hTERT-microglia were passaged up to 100 times and their lifespan was significantly longer compared to parental cells (Fisher's exact test, P<0.001). Multiple sublines were permissive to cell culture-adapted prions; two sublines were also permissive to natural scrapie isolates (i.e., derived from brain homogenates of sheep infected with scrapie). Prion infectivity and partial protease resistance of the prion protein were maintained in hTERT-microglia. Comparisons between scrapie-permissive and non-permissive hTERT-microglia sublines revealed that overall quantity of the normal cellular prion protein was not associated with prion permissiveness. The use of hTERT-microglia in future TSE studies may be more germane to the characterization of the cellular and subcellular pathophysiology of natural scrapie prion isolates and to investigate host-specific factors involved in prion replication. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Enhancement of immunohistochemical staining of scrapie proteins and immune cells within lymph nodes of early scrapie-infected sheep.

    PubMed

    Furr, Annissa; Knudsen, David; Hildreth, Michael B; Young, Alan J

    2011-08-31

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE) are a group of fatal neurodegenerative diseases that affect animals as well as humans. The oldest of these diseases is Scrapie seen in sheep. Scrapie is caused by an altered form (PrP(sc)), capable of inducing "self-replication" of the normal host prion protein (PrP(c)). There is currently no universal standard for antigen retrieval when using immunohistochemistry to simultaneously stain the PrP(c) protein and other cellular markers. The use of formalin-fixed tissue creates a challenge by concealing the antigenic sites where an antibody would bind, and lengthy antigen retrieval methods must be applied in order to facilitate staining. Further complicating sheep tissue immunohistochemistry is a significant lack of commercial antibodies to sheep cell markers available in research. Here we developed a novel immunohistochemical technique using trypsin, formic acid, and hydrated autoclaving using citraconic anhydride buffer to increase sensitivity of staining for scrapie proteins and immune cell subsets. This allowed us to stain and identify cells within lymphoid tissue associated with early lymphoid pathogenesis in scrapie.

  5. Sensitivity and specificity of a commercial BSE kit for the detection of ovine scrapie.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Takuji; Ushiki-Kaku, Yuko; Yokoyama, Takashi; Hattori, Shunji

    2013-06-01

    To examine the sensitivity of a commercially available bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) kit (NippIBL) for the detection of ovine scrapie, 50 scrapie-positive ovine samples from the UK, and 54 scrapie-negative ovine samples from Japan were obtain and tested using this kit. The sensitivity and specificity of NippIBL for ovine samples were 96% and 100%, respectively. The detection limit of the abnormal isoform of prion protein (PrP(Sc) ) of NippIBL was examined using diluted scrapie-positive samples. The sensitivity of NippIBL to ovine scrapie was 3-10 times superior to that of another commercial BSE diagnosis kit. Thus, the NippIBL kit proved more effective for the detection of ovine scrapie.

  6. Recombinant Haemonchus contortus 24 kDa excretory/secretory protein (rHcES-24) modulate the immune functions of goat PBMCs in vitro.

    PubMed

    Gadahi, Javaid Ali; Li, Baojie; Ehsan, Muhammad; Wang, Shuai; Zhang, Zhenchao; Wang, Yujian; Hasan, Muhammad Waqqas; Yan, Ruofeng; Song, Xiaokai; Xu, Lixin; Li, Xiangrui

    2016-12-20

    A 24 kDa protein is one of the important components in Haemonchus contortus (barber pole worm) excretory/secretory products (HcESPs), which was shown to have important antigenic function. However, little is known about the immunomodulatory effects of this proteinon host cell. In the present study gene encoding 24kDa excretory/secretory protein (HcES-24) was cloned. The recombinant protein of HcES-24 (rHcES-24) was expressed in a histidine-tagged fusion protein soluble form in Escherichia coli. Binding activity of rHcES-24 to goat PBMCs was confirmed by immunofluorescence assay (IFA) and its immunomudulatory effect on cytokine secretion, cell proliferation, cell migration and nitric oxide production were observed by co-incubation of rHcES-24. IFA results revealed that rHcES-24 could bind to the PBMCs. The interaction of rHcES-24 increased the production of IL4, IL10, IL17 and cell migration in dose dependent manner. However, rHcES-24 treatment significantly suppressed the production of IFNγ, proliferation of the PBMC and Nitric oxide (NO) production. Our findings showed that the rHcES-24 played important regulatory effects on the goat PBMCs.

  7. Recombinant Haemonchus contortus 24 kDa excretory/secretory protein (rHcES-24) modulate the immune functions of goat PBMCs in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Li, Baojie; Wang, Shuai; Zhang, Zhenchao; Wang, Yujian; Hasan, Muhammad Waqqas; Yan, Ruofeng; Song, Xiaokai; Xu, Lixin; Li, Xiangrui

    2016-01-01

    A 24 kDa protein is one of the important components in Haemonchus contortus (barber pole worm) excretory/secretory products (HcESPs), which was shown to have important antigenic function. However, little is known about the immunomodulatory effects of this proteinon host cell. In the present study gene encoding 24kDa excretory/secretory protein (HcES-24) was cloned. The recombinant protein of HcES-24 (rHcES-24) was expressed in a histidine-tagged fusion protein soluble form in Escherichia coli. Binding activity of rHcES-24 to goat PBMCs was confirmed by immunofluorescence assay (IFA) and its immunomudulatory effect on cytokine secretion, cell proliferation, cell migration and nitric oxide production were observed by co-incubation of rHcES-24. IFA results revealed that rHcES-24 could bind to the PBMCs. The interaction of rHcES-24 increased the production of IL4, IL10, IL17 and cell migration in dose dependent manner. However, rHcES-24 treatment significantly suppressed the production of IFNγ, proliferation of the PBMC and Nitric oxide (NO) production. Our findings showed that the rHcES-24 played important regulatory effects on the goat PBMCs. PMID:27893414

  8. Identification of the first case of atypical scrapie in Japan

    PubMed Central

    IMAMURA, Morikazu; MIYAZAWA, Kohtaro; IWAMARU, Yoshifumi; MATSUURA, Yuichi; YOKOYAMA, Takashi; OKADA, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    A Corriedale ewe was confirmed as the first atypical scrapie case during an active surveillance program for transmissible spongiform encephalopathies in small ruminants in Japan. The animal was homozygous for the AF141RQ haplotype of PRNP. The animal showed clinical neurological signs possibly due to listeriosis before culling. Western blot analysis showed an unusual multiple banded pattern with a low-molecular fragment at ~7 kDa. Histopathology revealed suppurative meningoencephalitis caused by listeriosis in the brainstem. Fine granular to globular immunostaining of disease-associated prion proteins was mainly detected in the neuropil of the spinal tract of the trigeminal nerve and in the white matter of the spinocerebellar tract. Based on these results, this case was conclusively diagnosed as atypical scrapie with encephalitic listeriosis. PMID:27616556

  9. Transmission of atypical scrapie to homozygous ARQ sheep.

    PubMed

    Okada, Hiroyuki; Miyazawa, Kohtaro; Imamura, Morikazu; Iwamaru, Yoshifumi; Masujin, Kentaro; Matsuura, Yuichi; Yokoyama, Takashi

    2016-11-01

    Two Cheviot ewes homozygous for the A136L141R154Q171 (AL141RQ) prion protein (PrP) genotype were exposed intracerebrally to brain pools prepared using four field cases of atypical scrapie from the United Kingdom. Animals were clinically normal until the end of the experiment, when they were culled 7 years post-inoculation. Limited accumulation of disease-associated PrP (PrP(Sc)) was observed in the cerebellar molecular layer by immunohistochemistry, but not by western blot or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In addition, PrP(Sc) was partially localized in astrocytes and microglia, suggesting that these cells have a role in PrP(Sc) processing, degradation or both. Our results indicate that atypical scrapie is transmissible to AL141RQ sheep, but these animals act as clinically silent carriers with long incubation times.

  10. Transmission of atypical scrapie to homozygous ARQ sheep

    PubMed Central

    OKADA, Hiroyuki; MIYAZAWA, Kohtaro; IMAMURA, Morikazu; IWAMARU, Yoshifumi; MASUJIN, Kentaro; MATSUURA, Yuichi; YOKOYAMA, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Two Cheviot ewes homozygous for the A136L141R154Q171 (AL141RQ) prion protein (PrP) genotype were exposed intracerebrally to brain pools prepared using four field cases of atypical scrapie from the United Kingdom. Animals were clinically normal until the end of the experiment, when they were culled 7 years post-inoculation. Limited accumulation of disease-associated PrP (PrPSc) was observed in the cerebellar molecular layer by immunohistochemistry, but not by western blot or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In addition, PrPSc was partially localized in astrocytes and microglia, suggesting that these cells have a role in PrPSc processing, degradation or both. Our results indicate that atypical scrapie is transmissible to AL141RQ sheep, but these animals act as clinically silent carriers with long incubation times. PMID:27320968

  11. An assessment of the efficiency of PrPsc detection in rectal mucosa and third-eyelid biopsies from animals infected with scrapie.

    PubMed

    Monleón, Eva; Garza, Ma Carmen; Sarasa, Rocío; Alvarez-Rodriguez, Javier; Bolea, Rosa; Monzón, Marta; Vargas, M Antonia; Badiola, Juan José; Acín, Cristina

    2011-01-27

    In classical scrapie, detection of PrPsc on lymphoreticular system is used for the in vivo and post mortem diagnosis of the disease. However, the sensitivity of this methodology is not well characterised because the magnitude and duration of lymphoid tissue involvement can vary considerably. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficiency of detecting PrPsc in rectal mucosa and third-eyelid biopsies. A total of 474 genetically susceptible sheep and 24 goats from three scrapie infected flocks were included in this study. A sample from rectal mucosa and a sample from third-eyelid lymphoid tissue were collected from each animal. Biopsy samples were fixed in formaldehyde and processed for immunohistochemical examination. Animals with negative biopsy results were studied more closely through a post mortem examination of central nervous and lymphoreticular systems and if there was a positive result, additional biopsy sections were further tested. The sensitivity of rectal mucosa and third-eyelid assays were 36% and 40% respectively on initial examination but increased to 48% and 44% respectively after retesting. The results of this field study show a high percentage of infected animals that do not have detectable levels of PrPsc in the biopsied lymphoid tissue, due mainly to the relatively high number of animals with minimal or no involvement of lymphoid tissue in the pathogenesis of the disease.

  12. In-situ spectroscopic investigation of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies: application of Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy to a scrapie-hamster model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kneipp, Janina; Lasch, Peter; Beekes, Michael; Naumann, Dieter

    2002-03-01

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE), such as BSE in cattle, scrapie in sheep and goats, and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in man are a group of fatal infectious diseases of the central nervous system that are far from being fully understood. Presuming the pathological changes to originate from small disease-specific compositional and structural modifications at the molecular level, Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy can be used to achieve insight into biochemical parameters underlying pathogenesis. We have developed an FTIR microspectroscopy-based strategy which, as a combination of image reconstruction and multivariate pattern recognition methods, permitted the comparison of identical substructures in the cerebellum of healthy and TSE-infected Syrian hamsters in the terminal stage of the disease. Here we present FTIR data about the pathological changes of scrapie-infected and normal tissue of the gray matter structures stratum granulosum and stratum moleculare. IR spectroscopy was also applied to tissue pieces of the medulla oblongata of infected and control Syrian hamsters. Mapping data were analyzed with cluster analysis and imaging methods. We found variations in the spectra of the infected tissue, which are due to changes in carbohydrates, nucleic acids, phospholipids, and proteins.

  13. Horny Goat Weed

    MedlinePlus

    ... horny goat weed for sexual performance problems including erectile dysfunction (ED) and involuntary ejaculation. It is also used ... cholesterol and increase estradiol levels in postmenopausal women. Erectile dysfunction (ED). Ejaculation problems. Sexual problems. Fatigue. Memory loss. ...

  14. Evidence of effective scrapie transmission via colostrum and milk in sheep

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Evidence for scrapie transmission from VRQ/VRQ ewes to lambs via milk was first reported in 2008 but in that study there were concerns that lateral transmission may have contributed to the high transmission rate observed since five control lambs housed with the milk recipients also became infected. This report provides further information obtained from two follow-up studies, one where milk recipients were housed separately after milk consumption to confirm the validity of the high scrapie transmission rate via milk and the second to assess any difference in infectivity from colostrum and subsequent milk. Protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA) was also used to detect prion protein in milk samples as a comparison with the infectivity data and extended to milk samples from ewes without a VRQ allele. Results Seven pairs of lambs fed colostrum and milk individually from seven scrapie-affected sheep (pre-clinical or clinical) presented with disease-associated prion protein, PrPd, in rectal lymphoid tissue at 4–5 months of age. Five further pairs of lambs fed either colostrum or subsequent milk from five pre-clinical scrapie-affected sheep equally presented with PrPd in lymphoid tissue by 9 months of age. Nine sheep were lost due to intercurrent diseases but all remaining milk or colostrum recipients, including those in the original study with the lateral transmission controls, developed clinical signs of scrapie from 19 months of age and scrapie was confirmed by brain examination. Unexposed control sheep totalling 19 across all three studies showed no evidence of infection. Scrapie PrP was amplified repeatedly by PMCA in all tested milk samples from scrapie-affected VRQ/VRQ sheep, and in one scrapie-affected ARQ/ARQ sheep. By contrast, milk samples from five VRQ/VRQ and 11 ARQ/ARQ scrapie-free sheep did not have detectable scrapie PrP on repeated tests. Conclusions Feeding of milk from scrapie-affected sheep results in a high transmission rate in VRQ

  15. Lipid profiles in brains from sheep with natural scrapie.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Antonella; Scano, Paola; Incani, Alessandra; Pilla, Federica; Maestrale, Caterina; Manca, Matteo; Ligios, Ciriaco; Pani, Alessandra

    2013-01-01

    Prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative disorders affecting many mammals, ovine scrapie being the archetypal prion disease. Several independent studies in murine and cell-based models of scrapie have highlighted the presence of a link between prion generation and lipid alterations; yet, no data on natural disease are available. In this study we investigated levels of total lipids and cholesterol as well as profiles of fatty acids in brain homogenates from symptomatic and asymptomatic scrapie-infected sheep vs. healthy sheep, all belonging to the same flock. Lipid extracts were analyzed by means of gas chromatography and high performance liquid chromatography. Data of fatty acids were submitted to multivariate statistical analysis to give a picture of the brain lipid profiles of sheep. Interestingly, results revealed abnormalities in the brain fatty acid unsaturation of infected/symptomatic animals. Significant reduction of monoene 18:1 n-9 was detected in brain lipids from infected/symptomatic sheep, as compared to healthy and infected/asymptomatic animals, and this alteration occurred in combination with a significant increase in 18:0 level. The unsupervised Principal Component Analysis showed that infected/symptomatic and healthy sheep samples lie in two different regions of the plot, infected/asymptomatic lie mostly next to healthy. The increase of cerebral saturated fatty acids provides a rough indication of presumed alterations in lipid raft domains of nervous cells during scrapie, suggesting that they may exist in a notable viscous liquid-ordered state. Such physicochemical alteration would have a profound impact on the raft thermodynamic properties, its spatial organization, and signal transduction, all potentially relevant for prion generation.

  16. Transcriptomic Determinants of Scrapie Prion Propagation in Cultured Ovine Microglia.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Gutiérrez, Juan F; Pierlé, Sebastián Aguilar; Schneider, David A; Baszler, Timothy V; Stanton, James B

    2016-01-01

    Susceptibility to infection by prions is highly dependent on the amino acid sequence and host expression of the cellular prion protein (PrPC); however, cellular expression of a genetically susceptible PrPC is insufficient. As an example, it has been shown in cultured cells that permissive and resistant sublines derived from the same parental population often have similar expression levels of PrPC. Thus, additional cellular factors must influence susceptibility to prion infection. The aim of this study was to elucidate the factors associated with relative permissiveness and resistance to scrapie prions in cultured cells derived from a naturally affected species. Two closely related ovine microglia clones with different prion susceptibility, but no detectable differences in PrPC expression levels, were inoculated with either scrapie-positive or scrapie-negative sheep brainstem homogenates. Five passages post-inoculation, the transcriptional profiles of mock and infected clones were sequenced using Illumina technology. Comparative transcriptional analyses identified twenty-two differentially transcribed genes, most of which were upregulated in poorly permissive microglia. This included genes encoding for selenoprotein P, endolysosomal proteases, and proteins involved in extracellular matrix remodeling. Furthermore, in highly permissive microglia, transforming growth factor β-induced, retinoic acid receptor response 1, and phosphoserine aminotranspherase 1 gene transcripts were upregulated. Gene Set Enrichment Analysis identified proteolysis, translation, and mitosis as the most affected pathways and supported the upregulation trend of several genes encoding for intracellular proteases and ribosomal proteins in poorly permissive microglia. This study identifies new genes potentially involved in scrapie prion propagation, corroborates results from other studies, and extends those results into another cell culture model.

  17. Transcriptomic Determinants of Scrapie Prion Propagation in Cultured Ovine Microglia

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Gutiérrez, Juan F.; Aguilar Pierlé, Sebastián; Schneider, David A.; Baszler, Timothy V.; Stanton, James B.

    2016-01-01

    Susceptibility to infection by prions is highly dependent on the amino acid sequence and host expression of the cellular prion protein (PrPC); however, cellular expression of a genetically susceptible PrPC is insufficient. As an example, it has been shown in cultured cells that permissive and resistant sublines derived from the same parental population often have similar expression levels of PrPC. Thus, additional cellular factors must influence susceptibility to prion infection. The aim of this study was to elucidate the factors associated with relative permissiveness and resistance to scrapie prions in cultured cells derived from a naturally affected species. Two closely related ovine microglia clones with different prion susceptibility, but no detectable differences in PrPC expression levels, were inoculated with either scrapie-positive or scrapie-negative sheep brainstem homogenates. Five passages post-inoculation, the transcriptional profiles of mock and infected clones were sequenced using Illumina technology. Comparative transcriptional analyses identified twenty-two differentially transcribed genes, most of which were upregulated in poorly permissive microglia. This included genes encoding for selenoprotein P, endolysosomal proteases, and proteins involved in extracellular matrix remodeling. Furthermore, in highly permissive microglia, transforming growth factor β–induced, retinoic acid receptor response 1, and phosphoserine aminotranspherase 1 gene transcripts were upregulated. Gene Set Enrichment Analysis identified proteolysis, translation, and mitosis as the most affected pathways and supported the upregulation trend of several genes encoding for intracellular proteases and ribosomal proteins in poorly permissive microglia. This study identifies new genes potentially involved in scrapie prion propagation, corroborates results from other studies, and extends those results into another cell culture model. PMID:26807844

  18. PrP(Sc) detection and infectivity in semen from scrapie-infected sheep.

    PubMed

    Rubenstein, Richard; Bulgin, Marie S; Chang, Binggong; Sorensen-Melson, Sharon; Petersen, Robert B; LaFauci, Giuseppe

    2012-06-01

    A scrapie-positive ewe was found in a flock that had been scrapie-free for 13 years, but housed adjacent to scrapie-positive animals, separated by a wire fence. Live animal testing of the entire flock of 24 animals revealed seven more subclinical scrapie-positive ewes. We hypothesized that they may have contracted the disease from scrapie-positive rams used for breeding 4 months prior, possibly through the semen. The genotypes of the ewe flock were highly scrapie-susceptible and the rams were infected with the 'Caine' scrapie strain having a short incubation time of 4.3-14.6 months in sheep with 136/171 VQ/VQ and AQ/VQ genotypes. PrP(Sc) accumulates in a variety of tissues in addition to the central nervous system. Although transmission of prion diseases, or transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, has been achieved via peripheral organ or tissue homogenates as well as by blood transfusion, neither infectivity nor PrP(Sc) have been found in semen from scrapie-infected animals. Using serial protein misfolding cyclic amplification followed by a surround optical fibre immunoassay, we demonstrate that semen from rams infected with a short-incubation-time scrapie strain contains prion disease-associated-seeding activity that generated PrP(Sc) in sPMCA (serial protein misfolding cyclic amplification). Injection of the ovinized transgenic mouse line TgSShpPrP with semen from scrapie-infected sheep resulted in PrP(Sc)-seeding activity in clinical and, probably as a result of the low titre, non-clinical mouse brain. These results suggest that the transmissible agent, or at least the seeding activity, for sheep scrapie is present in semen. This may be a strain-specific phenomenon.

  19. Interview with Alison Goate.

    PubMed

    Goate, Alison

    2008-12-01

    Alison M Goate is the Samuel & Mae S Ludwig Professor of Genetics in Psychiatry, Professor of Genetics and Professor of Neurology at Washington University School of Medicine in St Louis (MO, USA). Dr Goate studied for her undergraduate degree in biochemistry at the University of Bristol (UK) and received her graduate training at Oxford University (UK). She performed postdoctoral studies with Professor Theodore Puck, Professor Louis Lim and Dr John Hardy before receiving a Royal Society University Research Fellowship to support her independent research program at St Mary's Hospital Medical School in London. In 1991, Dr Goate and colleagues reported the first mutation linked to an inherited form of Alzheimer's disease, in the amyloid precursor protein (APP) gene on chromosome 21. The mutation was found to be linked to inherited cases of early-onset Alzheimer's disease. In 1992, Dr Goate moved to Washington University as an Associate Professor in Genetics and Psychiatry. Dr Goate and colleagues have since identified mutations in four other genes, including two that cause Alzheimer's disease and two that cause the related dementia frontotemporal dementia. In addition to her work on dementia, Dr Goate's laboratory also studies the genetics of alcohol and nicotine dependence. Dr Goate has received numerous awards including the Potamkin Award from the American Academy of Neurology, the Zenith Award from the Alzheimer's Association, the Senior Investigator Award from the Metropolitan Life Foundation, the St Louis Academy of Science Innovation Award and the Carl and Gerty Cori Faculty Achievement Award at Washington University. Dr Goate has been a member of many scientific Review Boards and currently serves on the Editorial Boards of several journals.

  20. Transmission of scrapie by steel-surface-bound prions.

    PubMed Central

    Flechsig, E.; Hegyi, I.; Enari, M.; Schwarz, P.; Collinge, J.; Weissmann, C.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Prions are unusually resistant to conventional disinfection procedures. An electrode used intracerebrally on a Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) patient transmitted the disease to two patients in succession and finally to a chimpanzee, despite attempted disinfection. Concerns that surgical instruments may transmit variant CJD have been raised by the finding of PrP(Sc), a surrogate marker for infectivity, in various tissues other than brain. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Stainless steel wire was exposed to scrapie-infected brain or brain homogenate, washed exhaustively and inserted into the brain of indicator mice to measure infectivity. RESULTS: A contact time of 5 min with scrapie-infected mouse brain suffices to render steel wire highly infectious and insertion of infectious wire into the brain of an indicator mouse for 30 min suffices to cause disease. Infectivity bound to wires persists far longer in the brain than when injected as homogenate, which can explain the extraordinary efficiency of wire-mediated infection. No detectable amounts of PrP could be eluted with NaOH, however the presence of PrP on infectious wires was demonstrated by chemiluminescence. Several recommended sterilisation procedures inactivated wire-bound mouse prions, but exposure to 10% formaldehyde was insufficient. CONCLUSIONS: Prions are readily and tightly bound to stainless steel surfaces and can transmit scrapie to recipient mice after short exposure times. This system mimics contaminated surgical instruments and will allow an assessment of sterilisation procedures. PMID:11713367

  1. Infectivity of scrapie prions bound to a stainless steel surface.

    PubMed Central

    Zobeley, E.; Flechsig, E.; Cozzio, A.; Enari, M.; Weissmann, C.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The transmissible agent of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) is not readily destroyed by conventional sterilization and transmissions by surgical instruments have been reported. Decontamination studies have been carried out thus far on solutions or suspensions of the agent and may not reflect the behavior of surface-bound infectivity. MATERIALS AND METHODS: As a model for contaminated surgical instruments, thin stainless-steel wire segments were exposed to scrapie agent, washed exhaustively with or without treatment with 10% formaldehyde, and implanted into the brains of indicator mice. Infectivity was estimated from the time elapsing to terminal disease. RESULTS: Stainless steel wire (0.15 x 5 mm) exposed to scrapie-infected mouse brain homogenate and washed extensively with PBS retained the equivalent of about 10(5) LD50 units per segment. Treatment with 10% formaldehyde for 1 hr reduced this value by only about 30-fold. CONCLUSIONS: The model system we have devised confirms the anecdotal reports that steel instruments can retain CJD infectivity even after formaldehyde treatment. It lends itself to a systematic study of the conditions required to effectively inactivate CJD, bovine spongiform encephalopathy, and scrapie agent adsorbed to stainless steel surfaces such as those of surgical instruments. PMID:10448646

  2. Thermal equilibrium of goats.

    PubMed

    Maia, Alex S C; Nascimento, Sheila T; Nascimento, Carolina C N; Gebremedhin, Kifle G

    2016-05-01

    The effects of air temperature and relative humidity on thermal equilibrium of goats in a tropical region was evaluated. Nine non-pregnant Anglo Nubian nanny goats were used in the study. An indirect calorimeter was designed and developed to measure oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production, methane production and water vapour pressure of the air exhaled from goats. Physiological parameters: rectal temperature, skin temperature, hair-coat temperature, expired air temperature and respiratory rate and volume as well as environmental parameters: air temperature, relative humidity and mean radiant temperature were measured. The results show that respiratory and volume rates and latent heat loss did not change significantly for air temperature between 22 and 26°C. In this temperature range, metabolic heat was lost mainly by convection and long-wave radiation. For temperature greater than 30°C, the goats maintained thermal equilibrium mainly by evaporative heat loss. At the higher air temperature, the respiratory and ventilation rates as well as body temperatures were significantly elevated. It can be concluded that for Anglo Nubian goats, the upper limit of air temperature for comfort is around 26°C when the goats are protected from direct solar radiation.

  3. An economic evaluation of preclinical testing strategies compared to the compulsory scrapie flock scheme in the control of classical scrapie.

    PubMed

    Boden, Lisa; Handel, Ian; Hawkins, Neil; Houston, Fiona; Fryer, Helen; Kao, Rowland

    2012-01-01

    Cost-benefit is rarely combined with nonlinear dynamic models when evaluating control options for infectious diseases. The current strategy for scrapie in Great Britain requires that all genetically susceptible livestock in affected flocks be culled (Compulsory Scrapie Flock Scheme or CSFS). However, this results in the removal of many healthy sheep, and a recently developed pre-clinical test for scrapie now offers a strategy based on disease detection. We explore the flock level cost-effectiveness of scrapie control using a deterministic transmission model and industry estimates of costs associated with genotype testing, pre-clinical tests and the value of a sheep culled. Benefit was measured in terms of the reduction in the number of infected sheep sold on, compared to a baseline strategy of doing nothing, using Incremental Cost Effectiveness analysis to compare across strategies. As market data was not available for pre-clinical testing, a threshold analysis was used to set a unit-cost giving equal costs for CSFS and multiple pre-clinical testing (MT, one test each year for three consecutive years). Assuming a 40% within-flock proportion of susceptible genotypes and a test sensitivity of 90%, a single test (ST) was cheaper but less effective than either the CSFS or MT strategies (30 infected-sales-averted over the lifetime of the average epidemic). The MT strategy was slightly less effective than the CSFS and would be a dominated strategy unless preclinical testing was cheaper than the threshold price of £6.28, but may be appropriate for flocks with particularly valuable livestock. Though the ST is not currently recommended, the proportion of susceptible genotypes in the national flock is likely to continue to decrease; this may eventually make it a cost-effective alternative to the MT or CSFS.

  4. 9 CFR 54.9 - Waiver of requirements for scrapie control pilot projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COOPERATIVE CONTROL AND ERADICATION OF LIVESTOCK OR POULTRY DISEASES...-risk animal, is unlikely to spread scrapie; and (b) The requirement that high-risk animals must be... the further spread of scrapie without removing high-risk animals from the flock. ...

  5. Quantitating PrP polymorphisms present in prions from heterozygous scrapie-infected sheep

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Scrapie is a prion (PrPSc) disease of sheep. The incubation period of sheep scrapie is strongly influenced by polymorphisms at positions 136, 154, and 171 of a sheep’s normal cellular prion protein (PrPC). Chymotrypsin was used to digest sheep recombinant PrP to identify a set of characteristic pept...

  6. In vitro propagation of the scrapie agent. I. Transformation of mouse glia and neuroblastoma cells after infection with the mouse-adapted scrapie strain c-506.

    PubMed

    Markovits, P; Dautheville, C; Dormont, D; Dianoux, L; Latarjet, R

    1983-01-01

    Seven cell lines including glia cells from mouse brains and mouse neuroblastoma cells were infected with the mouse-adapted scrapie strain c-506. During the early in vitro passages, a stimulation of growth was already observed but cellular morphology and differentiation did not alter. Later on, after 12-16 passages, six of the seven infected lines displayed cell proliferation and morphological alterations, suggesting an in vitro morphological transformation. At this stage, differentiation was no longer observed in the scrapie-infected neuroblastoma cells and all the scrapie-infected cells formed two to four times more colonies in liquid medium than the controls, and developed large tridimensional colonies in agar. The part played by the scrapie agent in these changes is discussed.

  7. Characterization of PRNP and SPRN coding regions from atypical scrapie cases diagnosed in Poland.

    PubMed

    Piestrzyńska-Kajtoch, Agata; Gurgul, Artur; Polak, Mirosław P; Smołucha, Grzegorz; Zmudziński, Jan F; Rejduch, Barbara

    2012-03-01

    Scrapie, a fatal transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) occurs in two phenotypes: classical and atypical. Many authors point out that the polymorphism of three codons (136, 154, 171) of the PRNP (PrP gene) is associated with a sheep susceptibility to classical scrapie. Until now, only one PRNP gene variant coding phenylalanine at codon 141 has been found to be associated with atypical scrapie. Another recently identified and interesting candidate gene for scrapie susceptibility in sheep is an SPRN gene coding for Shadoo protein (Sho). Sho is a highly interspecies conserved protein and an insertion/deletion (indel) found in a sheep Sho gene was associated with classical scrapie occurrence. Here we determined the polymorphism of PRNP and SPRN genes in nine atypical scrapie cases (six in native born sheep and three in imported sheep) and compared these results with a control group of healthy animals comprising six corresponding Polish sheep breeds. In atypical scrapie cases five PRNP diplotypes were identified: A(136)R(154)Q(171)/ARQ, AHQ/ARQ, ARR/ARQ, ARR/AHQ and AHQ/AHQ. The ARR/AHQ diplotype was found only in imported sheep. A previously unobserved SNP in PRNP (E224K) was also found in both atypical scrapie and in a few control animals. In the ORF of the SPRN gene, six SNPs and one indel were identified. None of these variations was exclusive for scrapie animals and they were probably, naturally occurring polymorphisms. Special attention was given to the 6-bp indel SPRN polymorphism which was previously associated with classical scrapie occurrence.

  8. Reproductive cycle of goats.

    PubMed

    Fatet, Alice; Pellicer-Rubio, Maria-Teresa; Leboeuf, Bernard

    2011-04-01

    Goats are spontaneously ovulating, polyoestrous animals. Oestrous cycles in goats are reviewed in this paper with a view to clarifying interactions between cyclical changes in tissues, hormones and behaviour. Reproduction in goats is described as seasonal; the onset and length of the breeding season is dependent on various factors such as latitude, climate, breed, physiological stage, presence of the male, breeding system and specifically photoperiod. In temperate regions, reproduction in goats is described as seasonal with breeding period in the fall and winter and important differences in seasonality between breeds and locations. In tropical regions, goats are considered continuous breeders; however, restricted food availability often causes prolonged anoestrous and anovulatory periods and reduced fertility and prolificacy. Different strategies of breeding management have been developed to meet the supply needs and expectations of consumers, since both meat and milk industries are subjected to growing demands for year-round production. Hormonal treatments, to synchronize oestrus and ovulation in combination with artificial insemination (AI) or natural mating, allow out-of-season breeding and the grouping of the kidding period. Photoperiodic treatments coupled with buck effect now allow hormone-free synchronization of ovulation but fertility results after AI are still behind those of hormonal treatments. The latter techniques are still under study and will help meeting the emerging social demand of reducing the use of hormones for the management of breeding systems.

  9. Renal mechanisms of calcium homeostasis in sheep and goats.

    PubMed

    Herm, G; Muscher-Banse, A S; Breves, G; Schröder, B; Wilkens, M R

    2015-04-01

    In small ruminants, the renal excretion of calcium (Ca) and phosphate (Pi) is not modulated in response to dietary Ca restriction. Although this lack of adaptation was observed in both sheep and goats, differences in renal function between these species cannot be excluded. Recent studies demonstrated that compared with sheep, goats have a greater ability to compensate for challenges to Ca homeostasis, probably due to a more pronounced increase in calcitriol production. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to examine the effect of 1) dietary Ca restriction, 2) administration of calcitriol, and 3) lactation on Ca and Pi transport mechanisms and receptors as well as enzymes involved in vitamin D metabolism in renal tissues of sheep and goats. Whereas RNA expression of renal transient receptor potential vanilloid channel type 5 was unaffected by changes in dietary Ca content, a significant stimulation was observed with administration of calcitriol in both sheep (P < 0.001) and goats (P < 0.01). Calbindin-D28K was downregulated during dietary Ca restriction in goats (P < 0.05). Expression of the sodium/Ca exchanger type 1 was decreased by low Ca intake in sheep (P < 0.05) and upregulated by calcitriol treatment in goats (P < 0.05). A significant reduction in RNA expression of the cytosolic and the basolateral Ca transporting proteins was also demonstrated for lactating goats in comparison to dried-off animals. Species differences were found for vitamin D receptor expression, which was stimulated by calcitriol treatment in sheep (P < 0.01) but not in goats. As expected, expression of 1α-hydroxylase was upregulated by dietary Ca restriction (P < 0.001; P < 0.05) and inhibited by exogenous calcitriol (P < 001; P < 0.05) in both sheep and goats. However, whereas 24-hydroxylase expression was stimulated to the same extent by calcitriol treatment in sheep, irrespective of the diet (P < 0.001), a modulatory effect of dietary Ca supply on 24-hydroxylase induction was

  10. The scrapie disease process is unaffected by ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Fraser, H.; Farquhar, C.F.; McConnell, I.; Davies, D. )

    1989-01-01

    The incubation period of scrapie, its degenerative neuropathology and the replication of its causal unconventional virus are all tightly controlled parameters of the experimental disease in mice. Each parameter can vary depending on the strain and dose of virus, on the route of infection, and on the host genotype. Exposure to whole-body gamma-irradiation from Cesium 137 has no effect on the progress or development of the disease, based on the three independent indices of incubation period, neuropathology, or infectibility by high or low doses of virus. These results are based on an extensive series of experiments in many mouse strains and are consistent using different strains (ME7, 22A, 79A, 87V) and doses of virus, routes of infection, timing and dose of radiation (3-15 Gy) administered as single or fractionated exposures with or without bone-marrow (b.m.) replacement therapy. Levels of infection in the spleen are unaltered after lethal whole-body irradiation of the scrapie-infected host, despite several-fold reductions in tissue mass due to the loss of proliferating myeloid and lymphoid precursor cells and their progeny. Contrary to our earlier suggestion, scrapie infection with the 22A virus does not reduce the effectiveness of post-exposure bone-marrow replacements to recolonize an infected host after repeated ionizing radiation totalling 15Gy. This work narrows the search for the candidate cells and biosynthetic systems which replicate the virus in the lymphoreticular and central nervous systems. Many programmed cellular events are radiation sensitive but protein synthesis is extremely radioresistant.

  11. Prions in milk from ewes incubating natural scrapie.

    PubMed

    Lacroux, Caroline; Simon, Stéphanie; Benestad, Sylvie L; Maillet, Séverine; Mathey, Jacinthe; Lugan, Séverine; Corbière, Fabien; Cassard, Hervé; Costes, Pierrette; Bergonier, Dominique; Weisbecker, Jean-Louis; Moldal, Torffin; Simmons, Hugh; Lantier, Frederic; Feraudet-Tarisse, Cécile; Morel, Nathalie; Schelcher, François; Grassi, Jacques; Andréoletti, Olivier

    2008-12-01

    Since prion infectivity had never been reported in milk, dairy products originating from transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE)-affected ruminant flocks currently enter unrestricted into the animal and human food chain. However, a recently published study brought the first evidence of the presence of prions in mammary secretions from scrapie-affected ewes. Here we report the detection of consistent levels of infectivity in colostrum and milk from sheep incubating natural scrapie, several months prior to clinical onset. Additionally, abnormal PrP was detected, by immunohistochemistry and PET blot, in lacteal ducts and mammary acini. This PrP(Sc) accumulation was detected only in ewes harbouring mammary ectopic lymphoid follicles that developed consequent to Maedi lentivirus infection. However, bioassay revealed that prion infectivity was present in milk and colostrum, not only from ewes with such lympho-proliferative chronic mastitis, but also from those displaying lesion-free mammary glands. In milk and colostrum, infectivity could be recovered in the cellular, cream, and casein-whey fractions. In our samples, using a Tg 338 mouse model, the highest per ml infectious titre measured was found to be equivalent to that contained in 6 microg of a posterior brain stem from a terminally scrapie-affected ewe. These findings indicate that both colostrum and milk from small ruminants incubating TSE could contribute to the animal TSE transmission process, either directly or through the presence of milk-derived material in animal feedstuffs. It also raises some concern with regard to the risk to humans of TSE exposure associated with milk products from ovine and other TSE-susceptible dairy species.

  12. 7 CFR 65.150 - Goat.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Goat. 65.150 Section 65.150 Agriculture Regulations of..., PORK, LAMB, CHICKEN, GOAT MEAT, PERISHABLE AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES, MACADAMIA NUTS, PECANS, PEANUTS, AND GINSENG General Provisions Definitions § 65.150 Goat. Goat means meat produced from goats....

  13. 7 CFR 65.150 - Goat.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Goat. 65.150 Section 65.150 Agriculture Regulations of..., PORK, LAMB, CHICKEN, GOAT MEAT, PERISHABLE AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES, MACADAMIA NUTS, PECANS, PEANUTS, AND GINSENG General Provisions Definitions § 65.150 Goat. Goat means meat produced from goats. ...

  14. 7 CFR 65.150 - Goat.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Goat. 65.150 Section 65.150 Agriculture Regulations of..., PORK, LAMB, CHICKEN, GOAT MEAT, PERISHABLE AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES, MACADAMIA NUTS, PECANS, PEANUTS, AND GINSENG General Provisions Definitions § 65.150 Goat. Goat means meat produced from goats. ...

  15. 7 CFR 65.150 - Goat.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Goat. 65.150 Section 65.150 Agriculture Regulations of..., PORK, LAMB, CHICKEN, GOAT MEAT, PERISHABLE AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES, MACADAMIA NUTS, PECANS, PEANUTS, AND GINSENG General Provisions Definitions § 65.150 Goat. Goat means meat produced from goats. ...

  16. 7 CFR 65.150 - Goat.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Goat. 65.150 Section 65.150 Agriculture Regulations of..., PORK, LAMB, CHICKEN, GOAT MEAT, PERISHABLE AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES, MACADAMIA NUTS, PECANS, PEANUTS, AND GINSENG General Provisions Definitions § 65.150 Goat. Goat means meat produced from goats. ...

  17. Kudzu -- Goat Interactions

    Treesearch

    Peter R. Mount

    1994-01-01

    Researchers at Tuskegee University have joined together to study the impact of grazing Angora goats on kudzu (Pueraria lobata). A pilot project funded by the Southern Forest Experiment Station of the USDA Forest Service was started in 1990. The problem was to find an environmentally acceptable way to control and eradicate kudzu in forest situations...

  18. Brock Cole's The Goats.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scales, Pat

    1997-01-01

    Summarizes Brock Cole's novel for young adolescents: "The Goats." Provides discussion questions and classroom activities in language arts, drama, research; mathematics, creative writing, similes; and presents an annotated bibliography of fiction for young adolescents dealing with runaways, self-reliance, family, friendship, courage, overweight,…

  19. Enterotoxaemia in goats.

    PubMed

    Uzal, F A; Kelly, W R

    1996-01-01

    Enterotoxaemia of sheep and goats occurs worldwide, but the condition in goats is poorly understood. The disease in goats is mostly caused by Clostridium perfringens type D, although the role of the toxins of this microorganism in the pathogenesis of the disease is not fully understood. The disease occurs in three forms, peracute, acute and chronic, the cardinal clinical sign of the acute and chronic forms being diarrhoea. The main biochemical alterations are hyperglycaemia and glycosuria, while at necropsy the disease is often characterized by haemorrhagic colitis. The typical histological changes observed in the brain of sheep with enterotoxaemia are not considered to be a common feature of enterotoxaemia in goats. Although the pathogenesis of caprine enterotoxaemia has not yet been properly defined, it is usually accepted that the presence of C. perfringens type D in the small bowel, together with a sudden change to a diet rich in carbohydrates, is the main predisposing factor for the disease. Vaccination seems to be poorly effective in preventing caprine enterotoxaemia, which might be due to the fact that the enteric form of the disease is partially independent of circulating C. perfringens toxin. More studies are needed on caprine enterotoxaemia, especially of its pathogenesis and immunity, in order to develop more efficient control measures for this disease.

  20. Brock Cole's The Goats.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scales, Pat

    1997-01-01

    Summarizes Brock Cole's novel for young adolescents: "The Goats." Provides discussion questions and classroom activities in language arts, drama, research; mathematics, creative writing, similes; and presents an annotated bibliography of fiction for young adolescents dealing with runaways, self-reliance, family, friendship, courage, overweight,…

  1. [In vitro modification of the morphology and the growth of cells infected with scrapie (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Markovits, P; Dormont, D; Maunoury, R; Delamarche, C; Delpech, A; Dianoux, L; Latarjet, R

    1982-02-15

    Seven cell lines originated either in brains or in neuroblastomas of Mice, were infected with Scrapie. After 12 to 16 in vitro passages, 6 lines out of 7 showed changes of their morphology, and of their growth, resembling those occurring in the course of a malignant transformation. The Scrapie infected cells acquired the capacity to form 2 to 4 times more colonies in liquid medium than the controls, and to develop large tridimensional colonies in semisolid medium. The role of Scrapie in these changes is discussed.

  2. Using genotype probabilities in survival analysis: a scrapie case

    PubMed Central

    Vitezica, Zulma G; Elsen, Jean-Michel; Rupp, Rachel; Díaz, Clara

    2005-01-01

    The objective was to evaluate the potential use of genotype probabilities to handle records of non-genotyped animals in the context of survival analysis. To do so, the risks associated with the PrP genotype and other transmission factors in relation to clinical scrapie were estimated. Data from 4049 Romanov sheep affected by natural scrapie were analyzed using survival analysis techniques. The original data set included 1310 animals with missing genotypes; five of those had uncensored records. Different missing genotype-information patterns were simulated for uncensored and censored records. Three strategies differing in the way genotype information was handled were tested. Firstly, records with unknown genotypes were discarded (P1); secondly, those records were grouped in an unknown class (P2). Finally the probabilities of genotypes were assigned (P3). Whatever the strategy, the ranking of relative risks for the most susceptible genotypes (VRQ-VRQ, ARQ-VRQ and ARQ-ARQ) was similar even when the non-genotyped animals were not a negligible part of uncensored records. However, P3 had a more efficient way of handling missing genotype information. As compared to P1, either P2 or P3 avoided discarding the records of non-genotyped animals; however, P3 eliminated the unknown class and the risk associated with this group. Genotype probabilities were shown to be a useful technique to handle records of individuals with unknown genotype. PMID:15943919

  3. Altered lipid and salt taste responsivity in ghrelin and GOAT null mice.

    PubMed

    Cai, Huan; Cong, Wei-Na; Daimon, Caitlin M; Wang, Rui; Tschöp, Matthias H; Sévigny, Jean; Martin, Bronwen; Maudsley, Stuart

    2013-01-01

    Taste perception plays an important role in regulating food preference, eating behavior and energy homeostasis. Taste perception is modulated by a variety of factors, including gastric hormones such as ghrelin. Ghrelin can regulate growth hormone release, food intake, adiposity, and energy metabolism. Octanoylation of ghrelin by ghrelin O-acyltransferase (GOAT) is a specific post-translational modification which is essential for many biological activities of ghrelin. Ghrelin and GOAT are both widely expressed in many organs including the gustatory system. In the current study, overall metabolic profiles were assessed in wild-type (WT), ghrelin knockout (ghrelin(-/-)), and GOAT knockout (GOAT(-/-)) mice. Ghrelin(-/-) mice exhibited decreased food intake, increased plasma triglycerides and increased ketone bodies compared to WT mice while demonstrating WT-like body weight, fat composition and glucose control. In contrast GOAT(-/-) mice exhibited reduced body weight, adiposity, resting glucose and insulin levels compared to WT mice. Brief access taste behavioral tests were performed to determine taste responsivity in WT, ghrelin(-/-) and GOAT(-/-) mice. Ghrelin and GOAT null mice possessed reduced lipid taste responsivity. Furthermore, we found that salty taste responsivity was attenuated in ghrelin(-/-) mice, yet potentiated in GOAT(-/-) mice compared to WT mice. Expression of the potential lipid taste regulators Cd36 and Gpr120 were reduced in the taste buds of ghrelin and GOAT null mice, while the salt-sensitive ENaC subunit was increased in GOAT(-/-) mice compared with WT mice. The altered expression of Cd36, Gpr120 and ENaC may be responsible for the altered lipid and salt taste perception in ghrelin(-/-) and GOAT(-/-) mice. The data presented in the current study potentially implicates ghrelin signaling activity in the modulation of both lipid and salt taste modalities.

  4. Atypical scrapie prions from sheep and lack of disease in transgenic mice overexpressing human prion protein.

    PubMed

    Wadsworth, Jonathan D F; Joiner, Susan; Linehan, Jacqueline M; Balkema-Buschmann, Anne; Spiropoulos, John; Simmons, Marion M; Griffiths, Peter C; Groschup, Martin H; Hope, James; Brandner, Sebastian; Asante, Emmanuel A; Collinge, John

    2013-11-01

    Public and animal health controls to limit human exposure to animal prions are focused on bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), but other prion strains in ruminants may also have zoonotic potential. One example is atypical/Nor98 scrapie, which evaded statutory diagnostic methods worldwide until the early 2000s. To investigate whether sheep infected with scrapie prions could be another source of infection, we inoculated transgenic mice that overexpressed human prion protein with brain tissue from sheep with natural field cases of classical and atypical scrapie, sheep with experimental BSE, and cattle with BSE. We found that these mice were susceptible to BSE prions, but disease did not develop after prolonged postinoculation periods when mice were inoculated with classical or atypical scrapie prions. These data are consistent with the conclusion that prion disease is less likely to develop in humans after exposure to naturally occurring prions of sheep than after exposure to epizootic BSE prions of ruminants.

  5. Transmission of scrapie prions to primate after an extended silent incubation period.

    PubMed

    Comoy, Emmanuel E; Mikol, Jacqueline; Luccantoni-Freire, Sophie; Correia, Evelyne; Lescoutra-Etchegaray, Nathalie; Durand, Valérie; Dehen, Capucine; Andreoletti, Olivier; Casalone, Cristina; Richt, Juergen A; Greenlee, Justin J; Baron, Thierry; Benestad, Sylvie L; Brown, Paul; Deslys, Jean-Philippe

    2015-06-30

    Classical bovine spongiform encephalopathy (c-BSE) is the only animal prion disease reputed to be zoonotic, causing variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) in humans and having guided protective measures for animal and human health against animal prion diseases. Recently, partial transmissions to humanized mice showed that the zoonotic potential of scrapie might be similar to c-BSE. We here report the direct transmission of a natural classical scrapie isolate to cynomolgus macaque, a highly relevant model for human prion diseases, after a 10-year silent incubation period, with features similar to those reported for human cases of sporadic CJD. Scrapie is thus actually transmissible to primates with incubation periods compatible with their life expectancy, although fourfold longer than BSE. Long-term experimental transmission studies are necessary to better assess the zoonotic potential of other prion diseases with high prevalence, notably Chronic Wasting Disease of deer and elk and atypical/Nor98 scrapie.

  6. Transmission of scrapie prions to primate after an extended silent incubation period

    PubMed Central

    Comoy, Emmanuel E.; Mikol, Jacqueline; Luccantoni-Freire, Sophie; Correia, Evelyne; Lescoutra-Etchegaray, Nathalie; Durand, Valérie; Dehen, Capucine; Andreoletti, Olivier; Casalone, Cristina; Richt, Juergen A.; Greenlee, Justin J.; Baron, Thierry; Benestad, Sylvie L.; Brown, Paul; Deslys, Jean-Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Classical bovine spongiform encephalopathy (c-BSE) is the only animal prion disease reputed to be zoonotic, causing variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) in humans and having guided protective measures for animal and human health against animal prion diseases. Recently, partial transmissions to humanized mice showed that the zoonotic potential of scrapie might be similar to c-BSE. We here report the direct transmission of a natural classical scrapie isolate to cynomolgus macaque, a highly relevant model for human prion diseases, after a 10-year silent incubation period, with features similar to those reported for human cases of sporadic CJD. Scrapie is thus actually transmissible to primates with incubation periods compatible with their life expectancy, although fourfold longer than BSE. Long-term experimental transmission studies are necessary to better assess the zoonotic potential of other prion diseases with high prevalence, notably Chronic Wasting Disease of deer and elk and atypical/Nor98 scrapie. PMID:26123044

  7. The natural atypical scrapie phenotype is preserved on experimental transmission and sub-passage in PRNP homologous sheep

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Atypical scrapie was first identified in Norwegian sheep in 1998 and has subsequently been identified in many countries. Retrospective studies have identified cases predating the initial identification of this form of scrapie, and epidemiological studies have indicated that it does not conform to the behaviour of an infectious disease, giving rise to the hypothesis that it represents spontaneous disease. However, atypical scrapie isolates have been shown to be infectious experimentally, through intracerebral inoculation in transgenic mice and sheep. The first successful challenge of a sheep with 'field' atypical scrapie from an homologous donor sheep was reported in 2007. Results This study demonstrates that atypical scrapie has distinct clinical, pathological and biochemical characteristics which are maintained on transmission and sub-passage, and which are distinct from other strains of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies in the same host genotype. Conclusions Atypical scrapie is consistently transmissible within AHQ homozygous sheep, and the disease phenotype is preserved on sub-passage. PMID:20219126

  8. Meat goat production and marketing.

    PubMed

    Glimp, H A

    1995-01-01

    Production opportunities, management strategies, and marketing options for meat goats in the United States are reviewed in this manuscript. The basis for any expansion must be goat production systems that are biologically and economically sustainable, meeting both producer and consumer needs. Meat goats historically have been kept for brush control. Their use to control noxious plants and in vegetation management will continue to be their primary role in the future. Meat goats are rarely the primary animal production enterprise in the United States, but they are becoming increasingly important contributors to the income of many producers. Meat goat marketing is highly unstructured in the United States, yet prices are generally higher on a per unit of weight basis than other red meat-producing species. Efforts to organize marketing have had only limited success. Over 90% of the world's goats are in developing countries. Goats are increasingly important in these countries as subsistence food producers. Production systems range from goats being a part of nomadic multispecies herds on arid desert rangelands, in agropastoral production systems, to goats being the primary animal enterprise in smallholder farming systems.

  9. Cloning of a Gene Whose Expression is Increased in Scrapie and in Senile Plaques in Human Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wietgrefe, S.; Zupancic, M.; Haase, A.; Chesebro, B.; Race, R.; Frey, W.; Rustan, T.; Friedman, R. L.

    1985-12-01

    A complementary DNA library was constructed from messenger RNA's extracted from the brains of mice infected with the scrapie agent. The library was differentially screened with the objectives of finding clones that might be used as markers of infection and finding clones of genes whose increased expression might be correlated with the pathological changes common to scrapie and Alzheimer's disease. A gene was identified whose expression is increased in scrapie. The complementary DNA corresponding to this gene hybridized preferentially and focally to cells in the brains of scrapie-infected animals. The cloned DNA also hybridized to the neuritic plaques found with increased frequency in brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease.

  10. Characteristics of 263K Scrapie Agent in Multiple Hamster Species

    PubMed Central

    Barbian, Kent D.; Race, Brent; Favara, Cynthia; Gardner, Don; Taubner, Lara; Porcella, Stephen; Race, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) diseases are known to cross species barriers, but the pathologic and biochemical changes that occur during transmission are not well understood. To better understand these changes, we infected 6 hamster species with 263K hamster scrapie strain and, after each of 3 successive passages in the new species, analyzed abnormal proteinase K (PK)–resistant prion protein (PrPres) glycoform ratios, PrPres PK sensitivity, incubation periods, and lesion profiles. Unique 263K molecular and biochemical profiles evolved in each of the infected hamster species. Characteristics of 263K in the new hamster species seemed to correlate best with host factors rather than agent strain. Furthermore, 2 polymorphic regions of the prion protein amino acid sequence correlated with profile differences in these TSE-infected hamster species. PMID:19193264

  11. Isolation of a Defective Prion Mutant from Natural Scrapie

    PubMed Central

    Migliore, Sergio; Cosseddu, Gian Mario; Pirisinu, Laura; Riccardi, Geraldina; Nonno, Romolo

    2016-01-01

    It is widely known that prion strains can mutate in response to modification of the replication environment and we have recently reported that prion mutations can occur in vitro during amplification of vole-adapted prions by Protein Misfolding Cyclic Amplification on bank vole substrate (bvPMCA). Here we exploited the high efficiency of prion replication by bvPMCA to study the in vitro propagation of natural scrapie isolates. Although in vitro vole-adapted PrPSc conformers were usually similar to the sheep counterpart, we repeatedly isolated a PrPSc mutant exclusively when starting from extremely diluted seeds of a single sheep isolate. The mutant and faithful PrPSc conformers showed to be efficiently autocatalytic in vitro and were characterized by different PrP protease resistant cores, spanning aa ∼155–231 and ∼80–231 respectively, and by different conformational stabilities. The two conformers could thus be seen as different bona fide PrPSc types, putatively accounting for prion populations with different biological properties. Indeed, once inoculated in bank vole the faithful conformer was competent for in vivo replication while the mutant was unable to infect voles, de facto behaving like a defective prion mutant. Overall, our findings confirm that prions can adapt and evolve in the new replication environments and that the starting population size can affect their evolutionary landscape, at least in vitro. Furthermore, we report the first example of “authentic” defective prion mutant, composed of brain-derived PrPC and originating from a natural scrapie isolate. Our results clearly indicate that the defective mutant lacks of some structural characteristics, that presumably involve the central region ∼90–155, critical for infectivity but not for in vitro replication. Finally, we propose a molecular mechanism able to account for the discordant in vitro and in vivo behavior, suggesting possible new paths for investigating the molecular bases of

  12. The Goat in the Rug.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blood, Charles L.; Link, Martin

    Based on the activities of the real Window Rock weaver, Glenmae, and her goat, Geraldine, this illustrated story incorporates authentic details relative to the Navajo art of rug weaving and is designed for children aged four to eight. Capitalizing on the humor inherent in Geraldine's point of view, the story centers on the goat's observation of…

  13. The Goat in the Rug.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blood, Charles L.; Link, Martin

    Based on the activities of the real Window Rock weaver, Glenmae, and her goat, Geraldine, this illustrated story incorporates authentic details relative to the Navajo art of rug weaving and is designed for children aged four to eight. Capitalizing on the humor inherent in Geraldine's point of view, the story centers on the goat's observation of…

  14. 7 CFR 65.165 - Ground goat.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Ground goat. 65.165 Section 65.165 Agriculture... OF BEEF, PORK, LAMB, CHICKEN, GOAT MEAT, PERISHABLE AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES, MACADAMIA NUTS, PECANS, PEANUTS, AND GINSENG General Provisions Definitions § 65.165 Ground goat. Ground goat means...

  15. 7 CFR 65.165 - Ground goat.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Ground goat. 65.165 Section 65.165 Agriculture... OF BEEF, PORK, LAMB, CHICKEN, GOAT MEAT, PERISHABLE AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES, MACADAMIA NUTS, PECANS, PEANUTS, AND GINSENG General Provisions Definitions § 65.165 Ground goat. Ground goat means comminuted...

  16. 7 CFR 65.165 - Ground goat.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Ground goat. 65.165 Section 65.165 Agriculture... OF BEEF, PORK, LAMB, CHICKEN, GOAT MEAT, PERISHABLE AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES, MACADAMIA NUTS, PECANS, PEANUTS, AND GINSENG General Provisions Definitions § 65.165 Ground goat. Ground goat means comminuted...

  17. 7 CFR 65.165 - Ground goat.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Ground goat. 65.165 Section 65.165 Agriculture... OF BEEF, PORK, LAMB, CHICKEN, GOAT MEAT, PERISHABLE AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES, MACADAMIA NUTS, PECANS, PEANUTS, AND GINSENG General Provisions Definitions § 65.165 Ground goat. Ground goat means comminuted...

  18. 7 CFR 65.165 - Ground goat.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Ground goat. 65.165 Section 65.165 Agriculture... OF BEEF, PORK, LAMB, CHICKEN, GOAT MEAT, PERISHABLE AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES, MACADAMIA NUTS, PECANS, PEANUTS, AND GINSENG General Provisions Definitions § 65.165 Ground goat. Ground goat means comminuted...

  19. Apparent reduction of ADAM10 in scrapie-infected cultured cells and in the brains of scrapie-infected rodents.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cao; Lv, Yan; Zhang, Bao-Yun; Zhang, Jin; Shi, Qi; Wang, Jing; Tian, Chan; Gao, Chen; Xiao, Kang; Ren, Ke; Zhou, Wei; Dong, Xiao-Ping

    2014-12-01

    It has been described that A disintegrin and metalloproteinase (ADAM10) may involve in the physiopathology of prion diseases, but the direct molecular basis still remains unsolved. In this study, we confirmed that ADAM10 was able to cleave recombinant human prion protein in vitro. Using immunoprecipitation tests (IP) and immunofluorescent assays (IFA), reliable molecular interaction between the native cellular form of PrP (PrP(C)) and ADAM10 was observed not only in various cultured neuronal cell lines but also in brain homogenates of healthy hamsters and mice. Only mature ADAM10 (after removal of its prodomain) molecules showed the binding activity with the native PrP(C). Remarkably more prion protein (PrP)-ADAM10 complexes were detected in the membrane fraction of cultured cells. In the scrapie-infected SMB cell model, the endogenous ADAM10 levels, especially the mature ADAM10, were significantly decreased in the fraction of cell membrane. IP and IFA tests of prion-infected SMB-S15 cells confirmed no detectable PrP-ADAM10 complex in the cellular lysates and PrP-ADAM10 co-localization on the cell surface. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the levels of ADAM10 in the brain homogenates of scrapie agent 263K-infected hamsters and agent ME7-infected mice were also almost diminished at the terminal stage, showing time-dependent decreases during the incubation period. Our data here provide the solid molecular basis for the endoproteolysis of ADAM10 on PrP molecules and interaction between ADAM10 and PrP(C). Obvious loss of ADAM10 during prion infection in vitro and in vivo highlights that ADAM10 may play essential pathophysiological roles in prion replication and accumulation.

  20. Quantitative detection and biological propagation of scrapie seeding activity in vitro facilitate use of prions as model pathogens for disinfection.

    PubMed

    Pritzkow, Sandra; Wagenführ, Katja; Daus, Martin L; Boerner, Susann; Lemmer, Karin; Thomzig, Achim; Mielke, Martin; Beekes, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Prions are pathogens with an unusually high tolerance to inactivation and constitute a complex challenge to the re-processing of surgical instruments. On the other hand, however, they provide an informative paradigm which has been exploited successfully for the development of novel broad-range disinfectants simultaneously active also against bacteria, viruses and fungi. Here we report on the development of a methodological platform that further facilitates the use of scrapie prions as model pathogens for disinfection. We used specifically adapted serial protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA) for the quantitative detection, on steel wires providing model carriers for decontamination, of 263K scrapie seeding activity converting normal protease-sensitive into abnormal protease-resistant prion protein. Reference steel wires carrying defined amounts of scrapie infectivity were used for assay calibration, while scrapie-contaminated test steel wires were subjected to fifteen different procedures for disinfection that yielded scrapie titre reductions of ≤10(1)- to ≥10(5.5)-fold. As confirmed by titration in hamsters the residual scrapie infectivity on test wires could be reliably deduced for all examined disinfection procedures, from our quantitative seeding activity assay. Furthermore, we found that scrapie seeding activity present in 263K hamster brain homogenate or multiplied by PMCA of scrapie-contaminated steel wires both triggered accumulation of protease-resistant prion protein and was further propagated in a novel cell assay for 263K scrapie prions, i.e., cerebral glial cell cultures from hamsters. The findings from our PMCA- and glial cell culture assays revealed scrapie seeding activity as a biochemically and biologically replicative principle in vitro, with the former being quantitatively linked to prion infectivity detected on steel wires in vivo. When combined, our in vitro assays provide an alternative to titrations of biological scrapie

  1. Quantitative Detection and Biological Propagation of Scrapie Seeding Activity In Vitro Facilitate Use of Prions as Model Pathogens for Disinfection

    PubMed Central

    Pritzkow, Sandra; Wagenführ, Katja; Daus, Martin L.; Boerner, Susann; Lemmer, Karin; Thomzig, Achim; Mielke, Martin; Beekes, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Prions are pathogens with an unusually high tolerance to inactivation and constitute a complex challenge to the re-processing of surgical instruments. On the other hand, however, they provide an informative paradigm which has been exploited successfully for the development of novel broad-range disinfectants simultaneously active also against bacteria, viruses and fungi. Here we report on the development of a methodological platform that further facilitates the use of scrapie prions as model pathogens for disinfection. We used specifically adapted serial protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA) for the quantitative detection, on steel wires providing model carriers for decontamination, of 263K scrapie seeding activity converting normal protease-sensitive into abnormal protease-resistant prion protein. Reference steel wires carrying defined amounts of scrapie infectivity were used for assay calibration, while scrapie-contaminated test steel wires were subjected to fifteen different procedures for disinfection that yielded scrapie titre reductions of ≤101- to ≥105.5-fold. As confirmed by titration in hamsters the residual scrapie infectivity on test wires could be reliably deduced for all examined disinfection procedures, from our quantitative seeding activity assay. Furthermore, we found that scrapie seeding activity present in 263K hamster brain homogenate or multiplied by PMCA of scrapie-contaminated steel wires both triggered accumulation of protease-resistant prion protein and was further propagated in a novel cell assay for 263K scrapie prions, i.e., cerebral glial cell cultures from hamsters. The findings from our PMCA- and glial cell culture assays revealed scrapie seeding activity as a biochemically and biologically replicative principle in vitro, with the former being quantitatively linked to prion infectivity detected on steel wires in vivo. When combined, our in vitro assays provide an alternative to titrations of biological scrapie infectivity

  2. Phenotype shift from atypical scrapie to CH1641 following experimental transmission in sheep.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Marion M; Moore, S Jo; Lockey, Richard; Chaplin, Melanie J; Konold, Timm; Vickery, Christopher; Spiropoulos, John

    2015-01-01

    The interactions of host and infecting strain in ovine transmissible spongiform encephalopathies are known to be complex, and have a profound effect on the resulting phenotype of disease. In contrast to classical scrapie, the pathology in naturally-occurring cases of atypical scrapie appears more consistent, regardless of genotype, and is preserved on transmission within sheep homologous for the prion protein (PRNP) gene. However, the stability of transmissible spongiform encephalopathy phenotypes on passage across and within species is not absolute, and there are reports in the literature where experimental transmissions of particular isolates have resulted in a phenotype consistent with a different strain. In this study, intracerebral inoculation of atypical scrapie between two genotypes both associated with susceptibility to atypical forms of disease resulted in one sheep displaying an altered phenotype with clinical, pathological, biochemical and murine bioassay characteristics all consistent with the classical scrapie strain CH1641, and distinct from the atypical scrapie donor, while the second sheep did not succumb to challenge. One of two sheep orally challenged with the same inoculum developed atypical scrapie indistinguishable from the donor. This study adds to the range of transmissible spongiform encephalopathy phenotype changes that have been reported following various different experimental donor-recipient combinations. While these circumstances may not arise through natural exposure to disease in the field, there is the potential for iatrogenic exposure should current disease surveillance and feed controls be relaxed. Future sheep to sheep transmission of atypical scrapie might lead to instances of disease with an alternative phenotype and onward transmission potential which may have adverse implications for both public health and animal disease control policies.

  3. Factors influencing temporal variation of scrapie incidence within a closed Suffolk sheep flock.

    PubMed

    González, Lorenzo; Dagleish, Mark P; Martin, Stuart; Finlayson, Jeanie; Sisó, Sílvia; Eaton, Samantha L; Goldmann, Wilfred; Witz, Janey; Hamilton, Scott; Stewart, Paula; Pang, Yvonne; Steele, Philip; Reid, Hugh W; Chianini, Francesca; Jeffrey, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Several studies have shown that transmission of natural scrapie can occur vertically and horizontally, and that variations in scrapie incidence between and within infected flocks are mostly due to differences in the proportion of sheep with susceptible and resistant PRNP genotypes. This report presents the results of a 12-year period of scrapie monitoring in a closed flock of Suffolk sheep, in which only animals of the ARQ/ARQ genotype developed disease. Among a total of 120 of these, scrapie attack rates varied between birth cohorts from 62.5 % (5/8) to 100 % (9/9), and the incidence of clinical disease among infected sheep from 88.9 % (8/9) to 100 % (in five birth cohorts). Susceptible sheep born to scrapie-infected ewes showed a slightly higher risk of becoming infected (97.2 %), produced earlier biopsy-positive results (mean 354 days) and developed disease at a younger age (median 736 days) than those born to non-infected dams (80.3 %, 451 and 782 days, respectively). Taken together, this was interpreted as evidence of maternal transmission. However, it was also observed that, for the birth cohorts with the highest incidence of scrapie (90-100 %), sheep born to infected and non-infected dams had a similar risk of developing scrapie (97.1 and 95.3 %, respectively). Compared with moderate-attack-rate cohorts (62.5-66.7 %), high-incidence cohorts had greater numbers of susceptible lambs born to infected ewes, suggesting that increased rates of horizontal transmission in these cohorts could have been due to high levels of environmental contamination caused by infected placentas.

  4. Characterization of mesenchymal stem cells in sheep naturally infected with scrapie.

    PubMed

    Mediano, Diego R; Sanz-Rubio, David; Bolea, Rosa; Marín, Belén; Vázquez, Francisco J; Remacha, Ana R; López-Pérez, Oscar; Fernández-Borges, Natalia; Castilla, Joaquin; Zaragoza, Pilar; Badiola, Juan; Rodellar, Clementina; Martín-Burriel, Inmaculada

    2015-12-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can be infected with prions and have been proposed as in vitro cell-based models for prion replication. In addition, autologous MSCs are of interest for cell therapy in neurodegenerative diseases. To the best of our knowledge, the effect of prion diseases on the characteristics of these cells has never been investigated. Here, we analysed the properties of MSCs obtained from bone marrow (BM-MSCs) and peripheral blood (PB-MSCs) of sheep naturally infected with scrapie — a large mammal model for the study of prion diseases. After three passages of expansion, MSCs derived from scrapie animals displayed similar adipogenic, chondrogenic and osteogenic differentiation ability as cells from healthy controls, although a subtle decrease in the proliferation potential was observed. Exceptionally, mesenchymal markers such as CD29 were significantly upregulated at the transcript level compared with controls. Scrapie MSCs were able to transdifferentiate into neuron-like cells, but displayed lower levels of neurogenic markers at basal conditions, which could limit this potential .The expression levels of cellular prion protein (PrPC) were highly variable between cultures, and no significant differences were observed between control and scrapie-derived MSCs. However, during neurogenic differentiation the expression of PrPC was upregulated in MSCs. This characteristic could be useful for developing in vitro models for prion replication. Despite the infectivity reported for MSCs obtained from scrapie-infected mice and Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease patients, protein misfolding cyclic amplification did not detect PrPSc in BM- or PB-MSCs from scrapie-infected sheep, which limits their use for in vivo diagnosis for scrapie.

  5. Scrapie epidemic in a fully PrP-genotyped sheep flock.

    PubMed

    Baylis, M; Goldmann, W; Houston, F; Cairns, D; Chong, A; Ross, A; Smith, A; Hunter, N; McLean, A R

    2002-11-01

    In scrapie-affected sheep flocks, host PrP genotype plays a vital role in determining which sheep will succumb to scrapie and the incubation period. Consequently, within-flock scrapie dynamics is best understood within the context of the genotype profile of the flock. Here we describe a 17 month epidemic of scrapie in a commercially farmed flock of 230 genotyped Texel sheep. At the start of the study, 70% of the sheep were of three genotypes only: ARR/ARQ, ARH/ARQ and ARQ/ARQ. Only 15% of sheep encoded the disease-associated VRQ allele and only a single sheep (0.4%) was of the most susceptible VRQ/VRQ genotype. For susceptible genotypes there was a marked deficit (P<0.025) of older animals (> or =3 years), implying that some cases of scrapie had occurred previously. In the ensuing 17 months, 18 sheep of known genotype were confirmed positive for the disease: seven VRQ/ARQ, six VRQ/ARH, two VRQ/ARR, three ARQ/ARQ. Median ages at death were 2.7, 2.8, 4.2 and 3.8 years respectively. Mortality rates were 55, 86, 13 and 3% respectively. Survival analysis revealed a highly significant effect of genotype on survivorship, but no difference between VRQ/ARQ and VRQ/ARH, or between VRQ/ARR and ARQ/ARQ. There was no difference in the survivorship of middle- and older-age cohorts of susceptible sheep. Scrapie risk group (as defined by PrP genotype) was not associated with submission as a scrapie suspect but later found to be negative, or with dying of unknown causes on the farm.

  6. Detection of PrPSc in Formalin Fixed Paraffin Embedded Tissue by Western Blot Differentiates Classical Scrapie, Nor98 Scrapie, and BSE

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies including bovine spongiform encephalopathy and scrapie are fatal neurodegenerative disorders associated with the presence of an infectious abnormal isoform of normal mammalian proteins called prions (PrP**Sc). Identification of PrP**Sc in the CNS is typicall...

  7. Gene expression in scrapie. Cloning of a new scrapie-responsive gene and the identification of increased levels of seven other mRNA transcripts.

    PubMed

    Dandoy-Dron, F; Guillo, F; Benboudjema, L; Deslys, J P; Lasmézas, C; Dormont, D; Tovey, M G; Dron, M

    1998-03-27

    To define genes associated with or responsible for the neurodegenerative changes observed in transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, we analyzed gene expression in scrapie-infected mouse brain using "mRNA differential display." The RNA transcripts of eight genes were increased 3-8-fold in the brains of scrapie-infected animals. Five of these genes have not previously been reported to exhibit increased expression in this disease: cathepsin S, the C1q B-chain of complement, apolipoprotein D, and two previously unidentified genes denominated scrapie-responsive gene (ScRG)-1 and ScRG-2, which are preferentially expressed in brain tissue. Increased expression of the three remaining genes, beta2 microglobulin, F4/80, and metallothionein II, has previously been reported to occur in experimental scrapie. Kinetic analysis revealed a concomitant increase in the levels of ScRG-1, cathepsin S, the C1q B-chain of complement, and beta2 microglobulin mRNA as well as glial fibrillary acidic protein and F4/80 transcripts, markers of astrocytosis and microglial activation, respectively. In contrast, the level of ScRG-2, apolipoprotein D, and metallothionein II mRNA was only increased at the terminal stage of the disease. ScRG-1 mRNA was found to be preferentially expressed in glial cells and to code for a short protein of 47 amino acids with a strong hydrophobic N-terminal region.

  8. Lack of prion accumulation in lymphoid tissues of PRNP ARQ/ARR sheep intracranially inoculated with the agent of scrapie

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sheep scrapie is a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy that can be transmitted horizontally. The prion protein gene (PRNP) profoundly influences the susceptibility of sheep to the scrapie agent and the tissue levels and distribution of PrPSc in affected sheep. The purpose of this study was to co...

  9. Classical natural ovine scrapie prions are detected in practical volumes of blood by lamb and transgenic mouse bioassay

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In vitro ligand-based immunoassay studies revealed abnormal isoforms of prion protein (PrP-Sc) are primarily associated with B lymphocytes of scrapie-infected sheep. Our recent study also demonstrated efficient transmission of scrapie to lambs following a transfusion of B lymphocytes isolated from 5...

  10. 9 CFR 54.11 - Approval of laboratories to run official scrapie tests and official genotype tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Approval of laboratories to run official scrapie tests and official genotype tests. 54.11 Section 54.11 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL... laboratories to run official scrapie tests and official genotype tests. (a) State, Federal, and...

  11. 9 CFR 54.11 - Approval of laboratories to run official scrapie tests and official genotype tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Approval of laboratories to run official scrapie tests and official genotype tests. 54.11 Section 54.11 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL... laboratories to run official scrapie tests and official genotype tests. (a) State, Federal, and...

  12. 9 CFR 54.11 - Approval of laboratories to run official scrapie tests and official genotype tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... official scrapie tests and official genotype tests. 54.11 Section 54.11 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL... laboratories to run official scrapie tests and official genotype tests. (a) State, Federal, and university laboratories, or in the case of genotype tests, private laboratories will be approved by the Administrator when...

  13. Experimental trichinellosis in goats.

    PubMed

    Reina, D; Muñoz-Ojeda, M C; Serrano, F; Molina, J M; Navarrete, I

    1996-03-01

    The susceptibility and distribution of Trichinella spiralis infection in goats were examined in ten autochthonous kids, 2 months old and about 10 kg body weight. The animals were divided into two groups: one experimental group with eight animals, infected with 10,000 T. spiralis 'T1' encysted larvae and a control group with two non-infected animals. All the animals of the experimental group infected by the parasite showed that Trichinella larvae have a special affinity for the tongue, masseters, diaphragm, flexor-extensor muscles, intercostal muscles and myocardium in decreasing order. The ELISA test carried out showed the first increments of optical density (OD) on Day 16 postinfection (p.i), peaking on Days 37-44 p.i. and remaining elevated from this day on, with a slight fall at the end of the experiment (Day 90 p.i.). No alterations were observed in the OD obtained in control animals throughout the experiment. The great muscular establishment of T. spiralis larvae and the sigmoidal evolution of antibody levels confirm the host character of the goat to the parasite.

  14. Assessment of the genetic susceptibility of sheep to scrapie by protein misfolding cyclic amplification and comparison with experimental scrapie transmission studies.

    PubMed

    Bucalossi, Cecilia; Cosseddu, Gianmario; D'Agostino, Claudia; Di Bari, Michele Angelo; Chiappini, Barbara; Conte, Michela; Rosone, Francesca; De Grossi, Luigi; Scavia, Gaia; Agrimi, Umberto; Nonno, Romolo; Vaccari, Gabriele

    2011-08-01

    The susceptibility of sheep to scrapie is influenced mainly by the prion protein polymorphisms A136V, R154H, and Q171R/H. Here we analyzed the ability of protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA) to model the genetic susceptibility of sheep to scrapie. For this purpose, we studied the efficiency of brain homogenates from sheep with different PrP genotypes to support PrP(Sc) amplification by PMCA using an ARQ/ARQ scrapie inoculum. The results were then compared with those obtained in vivo using the same sheep breed, genotypes, and scrapie inoculum. Genotypes associated with susceptibility (ARQ/ARQ, ARQ/AHQ, and AHQ/ARH) were able to sustain PrP(Sc) amplification in PMCA reactions, while genotypes associated with resistance to scrapie (ARQ/ARR and ARR/ARR) were unable to support the in vitro conversion. The incubation times of the experimental infection were then compared with the in vitro amplification factors. Linear regression analysis showed that the efficiency of in vitro PrP(Sc) amplification of the different genotypes was indeed inversely proportional to their incubation times. Finally, the rare ARQK₁₇₆/ARQK₁₇₆ genotype, for which no in vivo data are available, was studied by PMCA. No amplification was obtained, suggesting ARQK₁₇₆/ARQK₁₇₆ as an additional genotype associated with resistance, at least to the isolate tested. Our results indicate a direct correlation between the ability of different PrP genotypes to undergo PrP(C)-to-PrP(Sc) conversion by PMCA and their in vivo susceptibility and point to PMCA as an alternative to transmission studies and a potential tool to test the susceptibility of numerous sheep PrP genotypes to a variety of prion sources.

  15. Assessment of the Genetic Susceptibility of Sheep to Scrapie by Protein Misfolding Cyclic Amplification and Comparison with Experimental Scrapie Transmission Studies ▿

    PubMed Central

    Bucalossi, Cecilia; Cosseddu, GianMario; D'Agostino, Claudia; Di Bari, Michele Angelo; Chiappini, Barbara; Conte, Michela; Rosone, Francesca; De Grossi, Luigi; Scavia, Gaia; Agrimi, Umberto; Nonno, Romolo; Vaccari, Gabriele

    2011-01-01

    The susceptibility of sheep to scrapie is influenced mainly by the prion protein polymorphisms A136V, R154H, and Q171R/H. Here we analyzed the ability of protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA) to model the genetic susceptibility of sheep to scrapie. For this purpose, we studied the efficiency of brain homogenates from sheep with different PrP genotypes to support PrPSc amplification by PMCA using an ARQ/ARQ scrapie inoculum. The results were then compared with those obtained in vivo using the same sheep breed, genotypes, and scrapie inoculum. Genotypes associated with susceptibility (ARQ/ARQ, ARQ/AHQ, and AHQ/ARH) were able to sustain PrPSc amplification in PMCA reactions, while genotypes associated with resistance to scrapie (ARQ/ARR and ARR/ARR) were unable to support the in vitro conversion. The incubation times of the experimental infection were then compared with the in vitro amplification factors. Linear regression analysis showed that the efficiency of in vitro PrPSc amplification of the different genotypes was indeed inversely proportional to their incubation times. Finally, the rare ARQK176/ARQK176 genotype, for which no in vivo data are available, was studied by PMCA. No amplification was obtained, suggesting ARQK176/ARQK176 as an additional genotype associated with resistance, at least to the isolate tested. Our results indicate a direct correlation between the ability of different PrP genotypes to undergo PrPC-to-PrPSc conversion by PMCA and their in vivo susceptibility and point to PMCA as an alternative to transmission studies and a potential tool to test the susceptibility of numerous sheep PrP genotypes to a variety of prion sources. PMID:21680531

  16. The interpretation of disease phenotypes to identify TSE strains following murine bioassay: characterisation of classical scrapie.

    PubMed

    Beck, Katy E; Vickery, Christopher M; Lockey, Richard; Holder, Thomas; Thorne, Leigh; Terry, Linda A; Denyer, Margaret; Webb, Paul; Simmons, Marion M; Spiropoulos, John

    2012-11-01

    Mouse bioassay can be readily employed for strain typing of naturally occurring transmissible spongiform encephalopathy cases. Classical scrapie strains have been characterised historically based on the established methodology of assessing incubation period of disease and the distribution of disease-specific vacuolation across the brain following strain stabilisation in a given mouse line. More recent research has shown that additional methods could be used to characterise strains and thereby expand the definition of strain "phenotype". Here we present the phenotypic characteristics of classical scrapie strains isolated from 24 UK ovine field cases through the wild-type mouse bioassay. PrPSc immunohistochemistry (IHC), paraffin embedded tissue blots (PET-blot) and Western blotting approaches were used to determine the neuroanatomical distribution and molecular profile of PrPSc associated with each strain, in conjunction with traditional methodologies. Results revealed three strains isolated through each mouse line, including a previously unidentified strain. Moreover IHC and PET-blot methodologies were effective in characterising the strain-associated types and neuroanatomical locations of PrPSc. The use of Western blotting as a parameter to define classical scrapie strains was limited. These data provide a comprehensive description of classical scrapie strain phenotypes on isolation through the mouse bioassay that can provide a reference for further scrapie strain identification.

  17. Atypical/Nor98 scrapie in the Basque Country: a case report of eight outbreaks.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Martínez, Ana B; Garrido, Joseba M; Maza, Sonia; Benedicto, Leyre; Geijo, Mariví; Gómez, Nieves; Minguijón, Esmeralda; Benestad, Sylvie L; Juste, Ramón A

    2010-03-26

    Since 2002, an active surveillance program for transmissible spongiform encephalopathy in small ruminants in European Union countries allowed identification of a considerable number of atypical cases with similarities to the previously identified atypical scrapie cases termed Nor98. Here we report molecular and neuropathological features of eight atypical/Nor98 scrapie cases detected between 2002 and 2009. Significant features of the affected sheep included: their relatively high ages (mean age 7.9 years, range between 4.3 and 12.8), their breed (all Latxa) and their PRNP genotypes (AFRQ/ALRQ, ALRR/ALRQ, AFRQ/AFRQ, AFRQ/AHQ, ALRQ/ALRH, ALRQ/ALRQ). All the sheep were confirmed as atypical scrapie by immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting. Two cases presented more PrP immunolabelling in cerebral cortex than in cerebellum. This work indicates that atypical scrapie constitutes the most common small ruminant transmissible spongiform encephalopathy form in Latxa sheep in the Spanish Basque Country. Moreover, a new genotype (ALRQ/ALRH) was found associated to atypical scrapie.

  18. Extinction of Harrington's Mountain Goat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mead, Jim I.; Martin, Paul S.; Euler, Robert C.; Long, Austin; Jull, A. J. T.; Toolin, Laurence J.; Donahue, Douglas J.; Linick, T. W.

    1986-02-01

    Keratinous horn sheaths of the extinct Harrington's mountain goat, Oreamnos harringtoni, were recovered at or near the surface of dry caves of the Grand Canyon, Arizona. Twenty-three separate specimens from two caves were dated nondestructively by the tandem accelerator mass spectrometer (TAMS). Both the TAMS and the conventional dates indicate that Harrington's mountain goat occupied the Grand Canyon for at least 19,000 years prior to becoming extinct by 11,160 ± 125 radiocarbon years before present. The youngest average radiocarbon dates on Shasta ground sloths, Nothrotheriops shastensis, from the region are not significantly younger than those on extinct mountain goats. Rather than sequential extinction with Harrington's mountain goat disappearing from the Grand Canyon before the ground sloths, as one might predict in view of evidence of climatic warming at the time, the losses were concurrent. Both extinctions coincide with the regional arrival of Clovis hunters.

  19. Extinction of Harrington's mountain goat

    SciTech Connect

    Mead, J.I.; Martin, P.S.; Euler, R.C.; Long, A.; Jull, A.J.T.; Toolin, L.J.; Donahue, D.J.; Linick, T.W.

    1986-02-01

    Keratinous horn sheaths of the extinct Harrington's mountain goat, Oreamnos harringtoni, were recovered at or near the surface of dry caves of the Grand Canyon, Arizona. Twenty-three separate specimens from two caves were dated nondestructively by the tandem accelerator mass spectrometer (TAMS). Both the TAMS and the conventional dates indicate that Harrington's mountain goat occupied the Grand Canyon for at least 19,000 years prior to becoming extinct by 11,160 +/- 125 radiocarbon years before present. The youngest average radiocarbon dates on Shasta ground sloths, Nothrotheriops shastensis, from the region are not significantly younger than those on extinct mountain goats. Rather than sequential extinction with Harrington's mountain goat disappearing from the Grand Canyon before the ground sloths, as one might predict in view of evidence of climatic warming at the time, the losses were concurrent. Both extinctions coincide with the regional arrival of Clovis hunters.

  20. Extinction of Harrington's mountain goat

    PubMed Central

    Mead, Jim I.; Martin, Paul S.; Euler, Robert C.; Long, Austin; Jull, A. J. T.; Toolin, Laurence J.; Donahue, Douglas J.; Linick, T. W.

    1986-01-01

    Keratinous horn sheaths of the extinct Harrington's mountain goat, Oreamnos harringtoni, were recovered at or near the surface of dry caves of the Grand Canyon, Arizona. Twenty-three separate specimens from two caves were dated nondestructively by the tandem accelerator mass spectrometer (TAMS). Both the TAMS and the conventional dates indicate that Harrington's mountain goat occupied the Grand Canyon for at least 19,000 years prior to becoming extinct by 11,160 ± 125 radiocarbon years before present. The youngest average radiocarbon dates on Shasta ground sloths, Nothrotheriops shastensis, from the region are not significantly younger than those on extinct mountain goats. Rather than sequential extinction with Harrington's mountain goat disappearing from the Grand Canyon before the ground sloths, as one might predict in view of evidence of climatic warming at the time, the losses were concurrent. Both extinctions coincide with the regional arrival of Clovis hunters. Images PMID:16593655

  1. Cyclodextrins inhibit replication of scrapie prion protein in cell culture.

    PubMed

    Prior, Marguerite; Lehmann, Sylvain; Sy, Man-Sun; Molloy, Brendan; McMahon, Hilary E M

    2007-10-01

    Prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative disorders that are caused by the conversion of a normal host-encoded protein, PrP(C), to an abnormal, disease-causing form, PrP(Sc). This paper reports that cyclodextrins have the ability to reduce the pathogenic isoform of the prion protein PrP(Sc) to undetectable levels in scrapie-infected neuroblastoma cells. Beta-cyclodextrin removed PrP(Sc) from the cells at a concentration of 500 microM following 2 weeks of treatment. Structure activity studies revealed that antiprion activity was dependent on the size of the cyclodextrin. The half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) for beta-cyclodextrin was 75 microM, whereas alpha-cyclodextrin, which possessed less antiprion activity, had an IC(50) of 750 microM. This report presents cyclodextrins as a new class of antiprion compound. For decades, the pharmaceutical industry has successfully used cyclodextrins for their complex-forming ability; this ability is due to the structural orientation of the glucopyranose units, which generate a hydrophobic cavity that can facilitate the encapsulation of hydrophobic moieties. Consequently, cyclodextrins could be ideal candidates for the treatment of prion diseases.

  2. White-tailed deer are susceptible to the agent of sheep scrapie by intracerebral inoculation.

    PubMed

    Greenlee, Justin J; Smith, Jodi D; Kunkle, Robert A

    2011-10-11

    Interspecies transmission studies afford the opportunity to better understand the potential host range and origins of prion diseases. The purpose of this experiment was to determine susceptibility of white-tailed deer to the agent of scrapie after intracerebral inoculation and to compare clinical signs and lesions to those reported for chronic wasting disease (CWD). Deer (n = 5) were inoculated with 1 mL of a 10% (wt/vol) brain homogenate derived from a sheep clinically affected with scrapie. A non-inoculated deer was maintained as a negative control. Deer were observed daily for clinical signs of disease and euthanized and necropsied when unequivocal signs of scrapie were noted. One animal died 7 months post inoculation (pi) due to intercurrent disease. Examinations of brain tissue for the presence of the disease-associated abnormal prion protein (PrP(Sc)) by western blot (WB) and immunohistochemistry (IHC) were negative whereas IHC of lymphoid tissues was positive. Deer necropsied at 15-22 months pi were positive for scrapie by IHC and WB. Deer necropsied after 20 months pi had clinical signs of depression and progressive weight loss. Tissues with PrP(Sc) immunoreactivity included brain (at levels of cerebrum, hippocampus, colliculus, cerebellum, and brainstem), trigeminal ganglion, neurohypophysis, retina, spinal cord, and various lymphoid tissues including tonsil, retropharyngeal and mesenteric lymph nodes, Peyer's patches, and spleen. This work demonstrates for the first time that white-tailed deer are susceptible to sheep scrapie by intracerebral inoculation. To further test the susceptibility of white-tailed deer to scrapie these experiments will be repeated with a more natural route of inoculation.

  3. Prion protein gene polymorphism and genetic risk evaluation for scrapie in all Turkish native sheep breeds.

    PubMed

    Meydan, H; Yüceer, B; Degirmenci, R; Özkan, M M; Yildiz, M A

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the prion protein (PrP) gene polymorphism in a total of 1,110 healthy sheep from 18 Turkish native sheep breeds. There were nine alleles and 22 genotypes observed based on codons 136, 154, and 171 of the PrP gene. The ARQ allele was predominant for all breeds. The most resistant allele to scrapie, ARR, was present in all breeds. The VRQ allele, associated with the highest susceptibility to scrapie, was detected at low frequencies in İvesi (0.06), Kıvırcık (0.021), Sakız (0.010), Karayaka (0.011), Çine Çaparı (0.012), and Güneykaraman (0.017). In general, the ARQ/ARQ genotype was predominant in all breeds. The most resistant genotype to scrapie, ARR/ARR, was found with the frequency lower than 0.180. The most susceptible genotype, VRQ/VRQ, was found in only Kıvırcık. The TRR and TRH alleles and the genotypes of ARR/TRR, ARR/ARK, and ARH/TRH have been found for the first time in Turkish native sheep breeds. According to these results, all breeds belong to risk group R3 followed by R2. It is propounded that the susceptibility to scrapie increased from eastern to western part of Turkey. Our findings of Turkish native sheep breeds with PrP gene polymorphisms will assist the sheep breeding program for selection of scrapie resistance genotypes to reduce the risk of scrapie.

  4. Evidence for co-infection of ovine prion strains in classical scrapie isolates.

    PubMed

    Thackray, A M; Lockey, R; Beck, K E; Spiropoulos, J; Bujdoso, R

    2012-01-01

    The diversity of strains of ovine prions within classical scrapie isolates was investigated by transmission studies in wild type mice. To determine the maximum diversity of prion strains present in each ovine scrapie isolate examined, isolates from mice having the shortest and longest incubation times for terminal disease after primary inoculation were passaged serially. Serial passage of ARQ/ARQ scrapie isolates in RIII mice revealed the ME7 prion strain in mice with short incubation times for terminal prion disease and the 87A strain in those mice with long incubation times. Serial passage of VRQ/VRQ scrapie isolates in RIII mice led to emergence of the 221C prion strain in mice with short incubation times and a variant of the 221C strain in those mice with long incubation times. RIII mice with short incubation times had higher levels of total and proteinase K-resistant PrP(Sc) compared with those RIII mice with long incubation times, while mice with long incubation times had large aggregates and plaques of PrP(Sc). ME7 PrP(Sc) differed in stability compared with the 87A prion strain, while PrP(Sc) associated with 221C had similar stability to that of the 221C variant. Serial passage in VM mice led to identification of ME7 and 87V in the same scrapie isolate. The data show that different prion strains can emerge from the same ovine scrapie isolate following serial passage in wild type mice and that the transmission properties of these strains correlate with distinct patterns of PrP(Sc) deposition.

  5. Propagation of ovine prions from "poor" transmitter scrapie isolates in ovine PrP transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Thackray, Alana M; Hopkins, Lee; Lockey, Richard; Spiropoulos, John; Bujdoso, Raymond

    2012-02-01

    Ovine prion strains have typically been identified by their transmission properties, which include incubation time and lesion profile, in wild type mice. The existence of scrapie isolates that do not propagate in wild type mice, defined here as "poor" transmitters, are problematic for conventional prion strain typing studies as no incubation time or neuropathology can be recorded. This may arise because of the presence of an ovine prion strain within the original inoculum that does not normally cross the species barrier into wild type mice or the presence of a low dose of an infectious ovine prion strain that does. Here we have used tg59 and tg338 mouse lines, which are transgenic for ovine ARQ or VRQ PrP, respectively, to strain type "poor" transmitter ovine scrapie isolates. ARQ and VRQ homozygous "poor" transmitter scrapie isolates were successfully propagated in both ovine PrP transgenic mouse lines. We have used secondary passage incubation time, PrPSc immunohistochemistry and molecular profile, to show that different prion strains can be isolated from different "poor" transmitter samples during serial passage in ovine PrP transgenic mice. Our observations show that poor or inadequate transmissibility of some classical scrapie isolates in wild type mice is associated with unique ovine prion strains in these particular sheep scrapie samples. In addition, the analysis of the scrapie isolates used here revealed that the tg338 mouse line was more versatile and more robust at strain typing ovine prions than tg59 mice. These novel observations in ovine PrP transgenic mice highlight a new approach to ovine prion strain typing.

  6. Differential display detects host nucleic acid motifs altered in scrapie-infected brain.

    PubMed

    Lathe, Richard; Harris, Alyson

    2009-09-25

    The transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) including scrapie have been attributed to an infectious protein or prion. Infectivity is allied to conversion of the endogenous nucleic-acid-binding protein PrP to an infectious modified form known as PrP(sc). The protein-only theory does not easily explain the enigmatic properties of the agent including strain variation. It was previously suggested that a short nucleic acid, perhaps host-encoded, might contribute to the pathoetiology of the TSEs. No candidate host molecules that might explain transmission of strain differences have yet been put forward. Differential display is a robust technique for detecting nucleic acid differences between two populations. We applied this technique to total nucleic acid preparations from scrapie-infected and control brain. Independent RNA preparations from eight normal and eight scrapie-infected (strain 263K) hamster brains were randomly amplified and visualized in parallel. Though the nucleic acid patterns were generally identical in scrapie-infected versus control brain, some rare bands were differentially displayed. Molecular species consistently overrepresented (or underrepresented) in all eight infected brain samples versus all eight controls were excised from the display, sequenced, and assembled into contigs. Only seven ros contigs (RNAs over- or underrepresented in scrapie) emerged, representing <4 kb from the transcriptome. All contained highly stable regions of secondary structure. The most abundant scrapie-only ros sequence was homologous to a repetitive transposable element (LINE; long interspersed nuclear element). Other ros sequences identified cellular RNA 7SL, clathrin heavy chain, visinin-like protein-1, and three highly specific subregions of ribosomal RNA (ros1-3). The ribosomal ros sequences accurately corresponded to LINE; retrotransposon insertion sites in ribosomal DNA (p<0.01). These differential motifs implicate specific host RNAs in the pathoetiology

  7. Immunohistochemical distinction between preclinical bovine spongiform encephalopathy and scrapie infection in sheep.

    PubMed

    Thuring, C M A; van Keulen, L J M; Langeveld, J P M; Vromans, M E W; van Zijderveld, F G; Sweeney, T

    2005-01-01

    Sheep are susceptible experimentally to bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), the clinical signs being indistinguishable from those of scrapie. Because of the possibility of natural ovine BSE infection, laboratory tests are needed to distinguish between scrapie and BSE infection. The objectives of this study were to determine whether (1) PrPSc accumulates in biopsy samples of the tonsil or third eyelid, or both, of BSE-infected sheep before the appearance of clinical disease, and (2) such samples from BSE- and scrapie-infected sheep differ in respect of PrPSc accumulations. Homozygous ARQ sheep (n = 10) were dosed orally at 4-5 months of age with a brain homogenate from BSE-infected cattle. Third eyelid and tonsillar biopsy samples were taken at < or = 6 monthly intervals post-infection and examined immunohistochemically for PrPSc. Third eyelid protuberances were difficult to identify, resulting in many unsuitable samples; however, third eyelid samples shown to contain lymphoid follicles were invariably negative for PrPSc. In contrast, tonsillar biopsy samples became positive for PrPSc from 11 to 20 months post-infection. Consistent differences in the morphology of PrPSc granules in tingible body macrophages (TBMs) between BSE- and scrapie-infected sheep were detected with anti-peptide antibodies directed towards amino acids 93-106 of the ovine prion protein: thus, PrPSc appeared as single granules in TBMs of tonsillar sections from BSE-infected sheep, whereas clusters of PrPSc granules were observed within TBMs in the tonsils of scrapie-infected sheep. In contrast, antibodies against epitopes situated N- and C-terminally from the 93-106 region of the ovine prion protein revealed no differences between BSE- and scrapie-infected sheep in terms of PrPSc granules in TBMs.

  8. No temporal trends in the prevalence of atypical scrapie in British sheep, 2002–2006

    PubMed Central

    McIntyre, K Marie; del Rio Vilas, Victor J; Gubbins, Simon

    2008-01-01

    Background So-called atypical scrapie was first identified in Great Britain (GB) in 2002 following the introduction of wide-scale scrapie surveillance. In particular, abattoir and fallen stock surveys have been carried out in GB since 2002, with a total of 147 atypical positives identified by the end of 2006. The results of these surveys provide data with which to assess temporal trends in the prevalence of atypical scrapie in sheep in Great Britain between 2002 and 2006. Results Using the results of abattoir and fallen stock surveys, the prevalence of atypical scrapie (percentage of samples positive) was estimated. The prevalence in the abattoir and fallen stock surveys, for all years combined, was 0.09% (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.08%–0.11%) and 0.07% (95% CI: 0.05%–0.11%), respectively. There were no significant temporal trends in either survey. Comparing the surveys' results, there were no significant differences in annual prevalence or the prevalence within PrP genotypes. For the abattoir survey, the PrP genotype with the highest prevalence was AHQ/AHQ, which was significantly higher than all other genotypes, except ARR/AHQ, AHQ/ARH and ARH/ARQ. Conclusion The estimated prevalence of atypical scrapie was similar in both the abattoir and fallen stock surveys. Our results indicate there was no significant temporal trend in prevalence, adding to evidence that this atypical form of scrapie may be a sporadic condition or, if it is infectious, that the force of infection is very low. PMID:18384678

  9. Anchorless prion protein results in infectious amyloid disease without clinical scrapie.

    PubMed

    Chesebro, Bruce; Trifilo, Matthew; Race, Richard; Meade-White, Kimberly; Teng, Chao; LaCasse, Rachel; Raymond, Lynne; Favara, Cynthia; Baron, Gerald; Priola, Suzette; Caughey, Byron; Masliah, Eliezer; Oldstone, Michael

    2005-06-03

    In prion and Alzheimer's diseases, the roles played by amyloid versus nonamyloid deposits in brain damage remain unresolved. In scrapie-infected transgenic mice expressing prion protein (PrP) lacking the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) membrane anchor, abnormal protease-resistant PrPres was deposited as amyloid plaques, rather than the usual nonamyloid form of PrPres. Although PrPres amyloid plaques induced brain damage reminiscent of Alzheimer's disease, clinical manifestations were minimal. In contrast, combined expression of anchorless and wild-type PrP produced accelerated clinical scrapie. Thus, the PrP GPI anchor may play a role in the pathogenesis of prion diseases.

  10. Altered lymphocyte proliferation and innate immune function in scrapie 139A- and ME7-infected mice.

    PubMed

    Cho, In Soo; Spinner, Daryl S; Kascsak, Richard J; Meeker, H Cliff; Kim, Bo Sook; Park, Seung Yong; Schuller-Levis, Georgia; Park, Eunkyue

    2013-06-01

    Lymphoid organs play an important role in prion disease development and progression. While the role of lymphoid organs and changes in immune-related genes have been extensively investigated in scrapie-infected animals, innate immunity has not. Previous studies examined lymphocyte function in scrapie-infected C3H/HeJ mice, which exhibit defects in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) response now known to result from a mutation in Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4. We examined immune function in scrapie-infected CD1 mice, which are LPS responders. Lymphocyte proliferation from CD1 mice infected with either 139A or ME7 scrapie was measured in response to concanavalin (Con) A or LPS at 1 and 3 months after infection. Following LPS exposure, mice infected 3 months with ME7, but not 139A, demonstrated significantly decreased lymphocyte proliferation compared to controls. After Con A exposure, lymphocyte proliferation in scrapie-infected mice did not differ from controls. Gender-specific comparison of lymphocyte proliferation showed significant decreases in mitogenic responses in females infected 3 months with either 139A or ME7, compared to controls. Males infected for 3 months with ME7, but not 139A, showed significantly decreased proliferation after lymphocyte exposure to LPS, but not Con A. Neither gender showed changes in lymphocyte proliferation after 1 month of scrapie infection. Innate immune activation of peritoneal macrophages was determined via production of nitric oxide (NO), IL-6, and TNF-α after exposure to TLR ligands. TNF-α and IL-6 production were reduced in macrophages from females infected with either scrapie strain for 3 months, while NO production after TLR agonist plus IFN-γ exposure was decreased in both females and males infected for 3 months with 139A, compared to ME7. These data demonstrated altered innate immunity, suggesting hormonal and/or other gender-specific regulation may contribute to gender differences in some immune functions. Our data demonstrate

  11. Unusual resistance to ionizing radiation of the viruses of kuru, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, and scrapie.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, C J; Gajdusek, D C; Latarjet, R

    1978-12-01

    The titers of several preparations of kuru. Creutzfeldt-Jacob disease, and scrapie viruses were reduced by only 1/10th or less by high doses of gamma radiation of 50 kGy and by only 1/10th-1/1000th or less for 200 kGy. This unusual radiation resistance of the two human viruses further links them with the scrapie virus and suggests that the genetic information of all three viruses is considerably smaller than that of any other known viruses of mammals.

  12. Unusual resistance to ionizing radiation of the viruses of kuru, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, and scrapie.

    PubMed Central

    Gibbs, C J; Gajdusek, D C; Latarjet, R

    1978-01-01

    The titers of several preparations of kuru. Creutzfeldt-Jacob disease, and scrapie viruses were reduced by only 1/10th or less by high doses of gamma radiation of 50 kGy and by only 1/10th-1/1000th or less for 200 kGy. This unusual radiation resistance of the two human viruses further links them with the scrapie virus and suggests that the genetic information of all three viruses is considerably smaller than that of any other known viruses of mammals. PMID:104301

  13. Consequences of plant-chemical diversity for domestic goat food preference in Mediterranean forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baraza, Elena; Hódar, José A.; Zamora, Regino

    2009-01-01

    The domestic goat, a major herbivore in the Mediterranean basin, has demonstrated a strong ability to adapt its feeding behaviour to the chemical characteristics of food, selecting plants according to their nutritive quality. In this study, we determine some chemical characteristics related to plant nutritional quality and its variability among and within five tree species, these being the main components of the mountain forests of SE Spain, with the aim of determining their influence on food selection by this generalist herbivore. We analyse nitrogen, total phenols, condensed tannins and fibre concentration as an indicator of the nutritive value of the different trees. To determine the preference by the domestic goat, we performed two types of feeding-choice assays, where goats had to select between different species or between branches of the same species but from trees of different nutritional quality. The analysis of the plant nutritional quality showed significant differences in the chemical characteristics between species, and a high variability within species. However, when faced with different tree species, the domestic goat selected some of them but showed striking individual differences between goats. When selecting between trees of the same species, the goats showed no differential selection. This limited effect of chemical plant characteristics, together with the variability in foraging behaviour, resulted in a widespread consumption of diverse plant species, which can potentially modulate the effect of the goat on vegetation composition, and open the way for the conservation of traditional livestock grazing on natural protected areas.

  14. Gene expression profiling and association with prion-related lesions in the medulla oblongata of symptomatic natural scrapie animals.

    PubMed

    Filali, Hicham; Martin-Burriel, Inmaculada; Harders, Frank; Varona, Luis; Lyahyai, Jaber; Zaragoza, Pilar; Pumarola, Martí; Badiola, Juan J; Bossers, Alex; Bolea, Rosa

    2011-01-01

    The pathogenesis of natural scrapie and other prion diseases remains unclear. Examining transcriptome variations in infected versus control animals may highlight new genes potentially involved in some of the molecular mechanisms of prion-induced pathology. The aim of this work was to identify disease-associated alterations in the gene expression profiles of the caudal medulla oblongata (MO) in sheep presenting the symptomatic phase of natural scrapie. The gene expression patterns in the MO from 7 sheep that had been naturally infected with scrapie were compared with 6 controls using a Central Veterinary Institute (CVI) custom designed 4×44K microarray. The microarray consisted of a probe set on the previously sequenced ovine tissue library by CVI and was supplemented with all of the Ovis aries transcripts that are currently publicly available. Over 350 probe sets displayed greater than 2-fold changes in expression. We identified 148 genes from these probes, many of which encode proteins that are involved in the immune response, ion transport, cell adhesion, and transcription. Our results confirm previously published gene expression changes that were observed in murine models with induced scrapie. Moreover, we have identified new genes that exhibit differential expression in scrapie and could be involved in prion neuropathology. Finally, we have investigated the relationship between gene expression profiles and the appearance of the main scrapie-related lesions, including prion protein deposition, gliosis and spongiosis. In this context, the potential impacts of these gene expression changes in the MO on scrapie development are discussed.

  15. Gene Expression Profiling and Association with Prion-Related Lesions in the Medulla Oblongata of Symptomatic Natural Scrapie Animals

    PubMed Central

    Filali, Hicham; Martin-Burriel, Inmaculada; Harders, Frank; Varona, Luis; Lyahyai, Jaber; Zaragoza, Pilar; Pumarola, Martí; Badiola, Juan J.; Bossers, Alex; Bolea, Rosa

    2011-01-01

    The pathogenesis of natural scrapie and other prion diseases remains unclear. Examining transcriptome variations in infected versus control animals may highlight new genes potentially involved in some of the molecular mechanisms of prion-induced pathology. The aim of this work was to identify disease-associated alterations in the gene expression profiles of the caudal medulla oblongata (MO) in sheep presenting the symptomatic phase of natural scrapie. The gene expression patterns in the MO from 7 sheep that had been naturally infected with scrapie were compared with 6 controls using a Central Veterinary Institute (CVI) custom designed 4×44K microarray. The microarray consisted of a probe set on the previously sequenced ovine tissue library by CVI and was supplemented with all of the Ovis aries transcripts that are currently publicly available. Over 350 probe sets displayed greater than 2-fold changes in expression. We identified 148 genes from these probes, many of which encode proteins that are involved in the immune response, ion transport, cell adhesion, and transcription. Our results confirm previously published gene expression changes that were observed in murine models with induced scrapie. Moreover, we have identified new genes that exhibit differential expression in scrapie and could be involved in prion neuropathology. Finally, we have investigated the relationship between gene expression profiles and the appearance of the main scrapie-related lesions, including prion protein deposition, gliosis and spongiosis. In this context, the potential impacts of these gene expression changes in the MO on scrapie development are discussed. PMID:21629698

  16. The oral secretion of infectious scrapie prions occurs in preclinical sheep with a range of PRNP genotypes.

    PubMed

    Gough, Kevin C; Baker, Claire A; Rees, Helen C; Terry, Linda A; Spiropoulos, John; Thorne, Leigh; Maddison, Ben C

    2012-01-01

    Preclinical sheep with the highly scrapie-susceptible VRQ/VRQ PRNP genotype secrete prions from the oral cavity. In order to further understand the significance of orally available prions, buccal swabs were taken from sheep with a range of PRNP genotypes and analyzed by serial protein misfolding cyclic amplification (sPMCA). Prions were detected in buccal swabs from scrapie-exposed sheep of genotypes linked to high (VRQ/VRQ and ARQ/VRQ) and low (ARR/VRQ and AHQ/VRQ) lymphoreticular system involvement in scrapie pathogenesis. For both groups, the level of prion detection was significantly higher than that for scrapie-resistant ARR/ARR sheep which were kept in the same farm environment and acted as sentinel controls for prions derived from the environment which might contaminate the oral cavity. In addition, sheep with no exposure to the scrapie agent did not contain any measurable prions within the oral cavity. Furthermore, prions were detected in sheep over a wide age range representing various stages of preclinical disease. These data demonstrate that orally available scrapie prions may be a common feature in sheep incubating scrapie, regardless of the PRNP genotype and any associated high-level accumulation of PrP(Sc) within lymphoreticular tissues. PrP(Sc) was present in buccal swabs from a large proportion of sheep with PRNP genotypes associated with relatively low disease penetrance, indicating that subclinical scrapie infection is likely to be a common occurrence. The significance of positive sPMCA reactions was confirmed by the transmission of infectivity in buccal swab extracts to Tg338 mice, illustrating the likely importance of orally available prions in the horizontal transmission of scrapie.

  17. Incidence of infection in Prnp ARR/ARR sheep following experimental inoculation with or natural exposure to classical scrapie.

    PubMed

    Jeffrey, Martin; Martin, Stuart; Chianini, Francesca; Eaton, Samantha; Dagleish, Mark P; González, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    The prion protein gene (Prnp) is highly influential in determining risk and susceptibility of sheep exposed to classical scrapie. Sheep homozygous for alanine at codon 136 and arginine at codons 154 and 171 (ARR/ARR) of the Prnp gene are historically considered to be highly resistant to classical scrapie, although they form a significant fraction of cases of atypical scrapie. To date, experimental transmission of prions to ARR/ARR sheep has only been achieved with the BSE agent and mostly by the intracerebral route. We summarise here the results of six separate studies, in which 95 sheep of the ARR/ARR genotype were naturally exposed to (n = 18) or experimentally challenged with (n = 77) natural or experimental sources of classical scrapie by the oral, intra-intestinal, subcutaneous or intracerebral routes and allowed to survive for periods of up to 94 months post-infection. Only the intracerebral route resulted in disease and/or amplification of disease associated PrP (PrPd), and only in two of 19 sheep that survived for longer than 36 months. Discriminatory immunohistochemistry and Western blot confirmed the scrapie, non-BSE signature of PrPd in those two sheep. However, the neuropathological phenotype was different from any other scrapie (classical or atypical) or BSE source previously reported in sheep of any Prnp genotype. These studies confirm the widely held view that ARR/ARR sheep are highly resistant to classical scrapie infection, at least within their commercial lifespan. Moreover, within the constraints of the present studies (only two infected sheep), these results do not support the suggestion that atypical scrapie or BSE are generated by adaptation or mutation of classical scrapie in sheep of resistant ARR/ARR genotype.

  18. In vitro amplification of ovine prions from scrapie-infected sheep from Great Britain reveals distinct patterns of propagation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA) is a method that facilitates the detection of prions from many sources of transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE). Sheep scrapie represents a unique diversity of prion disease agents in a range of susceptible PRNP genotypes. In this study PMCA was assessed on a range of Great Britain (GB) sheep scrapie isolates to determine the applicability to veterinary diagnosis of ovine TSE. Results PrPSc amplification by protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA) was assessed as a diagnostic tool for field cases of scrapie. The technique was initially applied to thirty-seven isolates of scrapie from diverse geographical locations around GB, and involved sheep of various breeds and PRNP genotypes. All samples were amplified in either VRQ and/or ARQ PrPC substrate. For PrPSc from sheep with at least one VRQ allele, all samples amplified efficiently in VRQ PrPC but only PrPSc from ARH/VRQ sheep amplified in both substrates. PrPSc from ARQ/ARQ sheep displayed two amplification patterns, one that amplified in both substrates and one that only amplified in ARQ PrPC. These amplification patterns were consistent for a further 14/15 flock/farm mates of these sheep. Furthermore experimental scrapie strains SSBP1, Dawson, CH1641 and MRI were analysed. SSBP1 and Dawson (from VRQ/VRQ sheep) amplified in VRQ but not ARQ substrate. MRI scrapie (from ARQ/ARQ sheep) nor CH1641 did not amplify in ARQ or VRQ substrate; these strains required an enhanced PMCA method incorporating polyadenylic acid (poly(A)) to achieve amplification. Conclusions PrPsc from 52 classical scrapie GB field isolates amplified in VRQ or ARQ or both substrates and supports the use of PMCA as a rapid assay for the detection of a wide range of ovine classical scrapie infections involving multiple PRNP genotypes and scrapie strains. PMID:23153009

  19. In vitro amplification of ovine prions from scrapie-infected sheep from Great Britain reveals distinct patterns of propagation.

    PubMed

    Thorne, Leigh; Holder, Thomas; Ramsay, Andrew; Edwards, Jane; Taema, Maged Mohamed; Windl, Otto; Maddison, Ben Charles; Gough, Kevin Christopher; Terry, Linda Ann

    2012-11-15

    Protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA) is a method that facilitates the detection of prions from many sources of transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE). Sheep scrapie represents a unique diversity of prion disease agents in a range of susceptible PRNP genotypes. In this study PMCA was assessed on a range of Great Britain (GB) sheep scrapie isolates to determine the applicability to veterinary diagnosis of ovine TSE. PrPSc amplification by protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA) was assessed as a diagnostic tool for field cases of scrapie. The technique was initially applied to thirty-seven isolates of scrapie from diverse geographical locations around GB, and involved sheep of various breeds and PRNP genotypes. All samples were amplified in either VRQ and/or ARQ PrPC substrate. For PrPSc from sheep with at least one VRQ allele, all samples amplified efficiently in VRQ PrPC but only PrPSc from ARH/VRQ sheep amplified in both substrates. PrPSc from ARQ/ARQ sheep displayed two amplification patterns, one that amplified in both substrates and one that only amplified in ARQ PrPC. These amplification patterns were consistent for a further 14/15 flock/farm mates of these sheep. Furthermore experimental scrapie strains SSBP1, Dawson, CH1641 and MRI were analysed. SSBP1 and Dawson (from VRQ/VRQ sheep) amplified in VRQ but not ARQ substrate. MRI scrapie (from ARQ/ARQ sheep) nor CH1641 did not amplify in ARQ or VRQ substrate; these strains required an enhanced PMCA method incorporating polyadenylic acid (poly(A)) to achieve amplification. PrPsc from 52 classical scrapie GB field isolates amplified in VRQ or ARQ or both substrates and supports the use of PMCA as a rapid assay for the detection of a wide range of ovine classical scrapie infections involving multiple PRNP genotypes and scrapie strains.

  20. Incidence of Infection in Prnp ARR/ARR Sheep following Experimental Inoculation with or Natural Exposure to Classical Scrapie

    PubMed Central

    Jeffrey, Martin; Martin, Stuart; Chianini, Francesca; Eaton, Samantha; Dagleish, Mark P.; González, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    The prion protein gene (Prnp) is highly influential in determining risk and susceptibility of sheep exposed to classical scrapie. Sheep homozygous for alanine at codon 136 and arginine at codons 154 and 171 (ARR/ARR) of the Prnp gene are historically considered to be highly resistant to classical scrapie, although they form a significant fraction of cases of atypical scrapie. To date, experimental transmission of prions to ARR/ARR sheep has only been achieved with the BSE agent and mostly by the intracerebral route. We summarise here the results of six separate studies, in which 95 sheep of the ARR/ARR genotype were naturally exposed to (n = 18) or experimentally challenged with (n = 77) natural or experimental sources of classical scrapie by the oral, intra-intestinal, subcutaneous or intracerebral routes and allowed to survive for periods of up to 94 months post-infection. Only the intracerebral route resulted in disease and/or amplification of disease associated PrP (PrPd), and only in two of 19 sheep that survived for longer than 36 months. Discriminatory immunohistochemistry and Western blot confirmed the scrapie, non-BSE signature of PrPd in those two sheep. However, the neuropathological phenotype was different from any other scrapie (classical or atypical) or BSE source previously reported in sheep of any Prnp genotype. These studies confirm the widely held view that ARR/ARR sheep are highly resistant to classical scrapie infection, at least within their commercial lifespan. Moreover, within the constraints of the present studies (only two infected sheep), these results do not support the suggestion that atypical scrapie or BSE are generated by adaptation or mutation of classical scrapie in sheep of resistant ARR/ARR genotype. PMID:24614120

  1. 9 CFR 91.6 - Goats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Goats. 91.6 Section 91.6 Animals and... EXPORTATION Diagnostic Tests, Treatments § 91.6 Goats. (a) In order to be eligible for export, goats shall be...) Tuberculosis. All goats over 1 month of age shall be negative to a caudal intradermal tuberculin test using 0.1...

  2. 9 CFR 91.6 - Goats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Goats. 91.6 Section 91.6 Animals and... EXPORTATION Diagnostic Tests, Treatments § 91.6 Goats. (a) In order to be eligible for export, goats shall be...) Tuberculosis. All goats over 1 month of age shall be negative to a caudal intradermal tuberculin test using 0.1...

  3. Mechanism of Scrapie Prion Precipitation with Phosphotungstate Anions

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The phosphotungstate anion (PTA) is widely used to facilitate the precipitation of disease-causing prion protein (PrPSc) from infected tissue for applications in structural studies and diagnostic approaches. However, the mechanism of this precipitation is not understood. In order to elucidate the nature of the PTA interaction with PrPSc under physiological conditions, solutions of PTA were characterized by NMR spectroscopy at varying pH. At neutral pH, the parent [PW12O40]3– ion decomposes to give a lacunary [PW11O39]7– (PW11) complex and a single orthotungstate anion [WO4]2– (WO4). To measure the efficacy of each component of PTA, increasing concentrations of PW11, WO4, and mixtures thereof were used to precipitate PrPSc from brain homogenates of scrapie prion-infected mice. The amount of PrPSc isolated, quantified by ELISA and immunoblotting, revealed that both PW11 and WO4 contribute to PrPSc precipitation. Incubation with sarkosyl, PTA, or individual components of PTA resulted in separation of higher-density PrP aggregates from the neuronal lipid monosialotetrahexosylganglioside (GM1), as observed by sucrose gradient centrifugation. These experiments revealed that yield and purity of PrPSc were greater with polyoxometalates (POMs), which substantially supported the separation of lipids from PrPSc in the samples. Interaction of POMs and sarkosyl with brain homogenates promoted the formation of fibrillar PrPSc aggregates prior to centrifugation, likely through the separation of lipids like GM1 from PrPSc. We propose that this separation of lipids from PrP is a major factor governing the facile precipitation of PrPSc by PTA from tissue and might be optimized further for the detection of prions. PMID:25695325

  4. The distribution of four trace elements (Fe, Mn, Cu, Zn) in forage and the relation to scrapie in Iceland

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Previous studies indicated that the iron (Fe)/manganese (Mn) ratio in forage of sheep was significantly higher on scrapie-afflicted farms than on farms in other scrapie categories. This study was conducted to examine whether Fe and Mn in forage of sheep varied in general according to the scrapie status of different areas in the country. Copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn) were also included because of a possible relation to scrapie. Methods The country was subdivided into seven Areas (I-VII). Three Areas (I, IV, VII) were designated scrapie-free (never diagnosed or eradicated) and three as scrapie-endemic (II, III, VI); status of Area V was taken as unsettled. Of the harvest 2007 1552 samples were analysed from 344 farms all over the country, mostly grass silage from plastic bales (>90%) and from the first cut (70% or more). Results were expressed as mg kg-1 dry matter. Results Fe varied enormously from less than 100 mg kg-1 to 5000 mg kg-1. Mn varied nearly thirtyfold (17-470 mg kg-1). Fe concentration was significantly lower in Area I than in Areas II, V and VI. Mn concentration was significantly higher in Areas I, IV and VII than in Areas II, III, V and VI. The Fe/Mn ratio was significantly less in Area I than in the other areas (except Area IV). Mean Cu concentration was 6.6-8.3 mg kg-1 and the mean Zn concentration was 24-29 mg kg-1. They differed significantly in some areas. Conclusions 1) Fe tended to be in lower amounts in sheep forage in scrapie-free than in endemic areas; 2) Mn was in higher amounts in forage in scrapie-free than endemic areas; 3) the Fe/Mn ratio was lower in scrapie-free than in endemic areas; 4) the Fe/Mn ratio may possibly be used as an indicator of scrapie status; 5) Cu and Zn in sheep forage were not related to scrapie; 6) further study on the role of Fe and Mn in the occurrence of scrapie in Iceland is needed. PMID:20492671

  5. Temporospatial distribution of microglial activation in a murine model of scrapie

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Mouse models of prion disease offer the advantages of genetic homogeneity and short incubation times while retaining the disease phenotype of natural mammalian hosts. Intracranial (IC) inoculation of C57BL/6 mice with a mouse-adapted scrapie strain (RML) yields uniform incubation periods with a rapi...

  6. 9 CFR 54.9 - Waiver of requirements for scrapie control pilot projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... contains testing or other procedures that indicate that an animal, despite meeting the definition of high... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Waiver of requirements for scrapie control pilot projects. 54.9 Section 54.9 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION...

  7. 9 CFR 79.7 - Waiver of requirements for scrapie control pilot projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... contains testing or other procedures that indicate that an animal, despite meeting the definition of high... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Waiver of requirements for scrapie control pilot projects. 79.7 Section 79.7 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION...

  8. 9 CFR 79.7 - Waiver of requirements for scrapie control pilot projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... contains testing or other procedures that indicate that an animal, despite meeting the definition of high... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Waiver of requirements for scrapie control pilot projects. 79.7 Section 79.7 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION...

  9. 9 CFR 54.9 - Waiver of requirements for scrapie control pilot projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... contains testing or other procedures that indicate that an animal, despite meeting the definition of high... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Waiver of requirements for scrapie control pilot projects. 54.9 Section 54.9 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION...

  10. 9 CFR 79.7 - Waiver of requirements for scrapie control pilot projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... contains testing or other procedures that indicate that an animal, despite meeting the definition of high... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Waiver of requirements for scrapie control pilot projects. 79.7 Section 79.7 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION...

  11. 9 CFR 79.7 - Waiver of requirements for scrapie control pilot projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... contains testing or other procedures that indicate that an animal, despite meeting the definition of high... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Waiver of requirements for scrapie control pilot projects. 79.7 Section 79.7 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION...

  12. 9 CFR 54.9 - Waiver of requirements for scrapie control pilot projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... contains testing or other procedures that indicate that an animal, despite meeting the definition of high... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Waiver of requirements for scrapie control pilot projects. 54.9 Section 54.9 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION...

  13. 9 CFR 79.7 - Waiver of requirements for scrapie control pilot projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... contains testing or other procedures that indicate that an animal, despite meeting the definition of high... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Waiver of requirements for scrapie control pilot projects. 79.7 Section 79.7 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION...

  14. 9 CFR 54.9 - Waiver of requirements for scrapie control pilot projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... contains testing or other procedures that indicate that an animal, despite meeting the definition of high... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Waiver of requirements for scrapie control pilot projects. 54.9 Section 54.9 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION...

  15. Detection of PrPres in Genetically Susceptible Fetuses from Sheep with Natural Scrapie

    PubMed Central

    Garza, María Carmen; Fernández-Borges, Natalia; Bolea, Rosa; Badiola, Juan José; Castilla, Joaquín; Monleón, Eva

    2011-01-01

    Scrapie is a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy with a wide PrPres dissemination in many non-neural tissues and with high levels of transmissibility within susceptible populations. Mechanisms of transmission are incompletely understood. It is generally assumed that it is horizontally transmitted by direct contact between animals or indirectly through the environment, where scrapie can remain infectious for years. In contrast, in utero vertical transmission has never been demonstrated and has rarely been studied. Recently, the use of the protein misfolding cyclic amplification technique (PMCA) has allowed prion detection in various tissues and excretions in which PrPres levels have been undetectable by traditional assays. The main goal of this study was to detect PrPres in fetal tissues and the amniotic fluid from natural scrapie infected ewes using the PMCA technique. Six fetuses from three infected pregnant ewes in an advanced clinical stage of the disease were included in the study. From each fetus, amniotic fluid, brain, spleen, ileo-cecal valve and retropharyngeal lymph node samples were collected and analyzed using Western blotting and PMCA. Although all samples were negative using Western blotting, PrPres was detected after in vitro amplification. Our results represent the first time the biochemical detection of prions in fetal tissues, suggesting that the in utero transmission of scrapie in natural infected sheep might be possible. PMID:22194786

  16. Detection of PrPres in genetically susceptible fetuses from sheep with natural scrapie.

    PubMed

    Garza, María Carmen; Fernández-Borges, Natalia; Bolea, Rosa; Badiola, Juan José; Castilla, Joaquín; Monleón, Eva

    2011-01-01

    Scrapie is a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy with a wide PrPres dissemination in many non-neural tissues and with high levels of transmissibility within susceptible populations. Mechanisms of transmission are incompletely understood. It is generally assumed that it is horizontally transmitted by direct contact between animals or indirectly through the environment, where scrapie can remain infectious for years. In contrast, in utero vertical transmission has never been demonstrated and has rarely been studied. Recently, the use of the protein misfolding cyclic amplification technique (PMCA) has allowed prion detection in various tissues and excretions in which PrPres levels have been undetectable by traditional assays. The main goal of this study was to detect PrPres in fetal tissues and the amniotic fluid from natural scrapie infected ewes using the PMCA technique. Six fetuses from three infected pregnant ewes in an advanced clinical stage of the disease were included in the study. From each fetus, amniotic fluid, brain, spleen, ileo-cecal valve and retropharyngeal lymph node samples were collected and analyzed using Western blotting and PMCA. Although all samples were negative using Western blotting, PrPres was detected after in vitro amplification. Our results represent the first time the biochemical detection of prions in fetal tissues, suggesting that the in utero transmission of scrapie in natural infected sheep might be possible.

  17. Prion-like Doppel gene polymorphisms and scrapie susceptibility in Portuguese sheep breeds.

    PubMed

    Mesquita, P; Batista, M; Marques, M R; Santos, I C; Pimenta, J; Silva Pereira, M; Carolino, I; Santos Silva, F; Oliveira Sousa, M C; Gama, L T; Fontes, C M; Horta, A E M; Prates, J A M; Pereira, R M

    2010-06-01

    The establishment of an association between prion protein gene (PRNP) polymorphisms and scrapie susceptibility in sheep has enabled the development of breeding programmes to increase scrapie resistance in the European Union. Intense selection for PRNP genotype may lead to correlated selection for genes linked to PRNP. We intended to investigate if any association exists between genetic variation in prion-like protein Doppel gene (PRND) and scrapie susceptibility, determined through PRNP genotyping. Sampling included 460 sheep from eight Portuguese breeds and the PRND gene coding region was analysed by multiple restriction fragment-single strand conformation polymorphism (MRF-SSCP), whereas PRNP genotyping was carried out by primer extension. A synonymous substitution (c.78G>A) was detected in codon 26 of the PRND gene, in all breeds except Churra Mondegueira. Linkage disequilibrium was found between the PRND and PRNP loci (P = 0.000). Specifically, PRND was monomorphic in the 45 animals with the more resistant ARR/ARR PRNP genotype (P = 0.003), whereas a higher frequency of PRND heterozygotes (GA) was associated with ARQ/AHQ (P = 0.029). These results constitute preliminary evidence of an association between a polymorphism in the PRND gene and scrapie susceptibility, and indicate that the possibility of undesirable consequences from widespread selection for PRNP genotype on genetic diversity and reproduction traits needs to be further investigated.

  18. Presence of an acute phase response in sheep with clinical classical scrapie

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Work with experimental scrapie in sheep has been performed on-site for many years including studies on PrPSc dissemination and histopathology of organs and tissues both at preclinical and clinical stages. In this work serum was sampled at regular intervals from lambs which were infected immediately after birth and from parallel healthy controls, and examined for acute phase proteins. In contrast to earlier experiments, which extensively studied PrPSc dissemination and histopathology in peripheral tissues and brain, this experiment is focusing on examination of serum for non-PrPSc markers that discriminates the two groups, and give insight into other on-going processes detectable in serum samples. Results There was clear evidence of an acute phase response in sheep with clinical scrapie, both experimental and natural. All the three proteins, ceruloplasmin, haptoglobin and serum amyloid A, were increased at the clinical stage of scrapie. Conclusion There was evidence of a systemic measurable acute phase response at the clinical terminal end-stage of classical scrapie. PMID:22805457

  19. Lesion Profiling at Primary Isolation in RIII Mice is Insufficient in Distinguishing BSE from Classical Scrapie

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Katy E; Chaplin, Melanie; Stack, Michael; Sallis, Rosemary E; Simonini, Sarah; Lockey, Richard; Spiropoulos, John

    2010-01-01

    Primary isolation of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in RIII mice generates a lesion profile believed to be reproducible and distinct from that produced by classical scrapie. This profile, which is characterized by peaks at gray matter areas 1, 4 and 7 (dorsal medulla, hypothalamus and septal nuclei), is used to diagnose BSE on primary isolation. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the BSE agent could be present in sheep diagnosed with classical scrapie, using lesion profiles in RIII mice as a discriminatory method. Sixty-two positive scrapie field cases were collected from individual farms between 1996 and 1999 and bioassayed in RIII mice. Fifty-five of these isolates transmitted successfully to at least one mouse. Of the 31 that produced adequate data to allow lesion profile analysis, 10 showed a consistent profile with peaks at brain areas 1, 4 and 7. All inocula for this subgroup were derived from sheep of genotype ARQ/ARQ. While the 1-4-7-scrapie profile exhibited similarities to BSE in RIII mice at primary isolation, it was distinguishable based on histopathology, immunohistochemistry and cluster analysis. We conclude that caution should be taken to distinguish this profile from BSE and that additional parameters should be considered to reach a final diagnosis. PMID:19298598

  20. Reference genome of wild goat (capra aegagrus) and sequencing of goat breeds provide insight into genic basis of goat domestication.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yang; Zhang, Xiaolei; Xie, Min; Arefnezhad, Babak; Wang, Zongji; Wang, Wenliang; Feng, Shaohong; Huang, Guodong; Guan, Rui; Shen, Wenjing; Bunch, Rowan; McCulloch, Russell; Li, Qiye; Li, Bo; Zhang, Guojie; Xu, Xun; Kijas, James W; Salekdeh, Ghasem Hosseini; Wang, Wen; Jiang, Yu

    2015-06-05

    Domestic goats (Capra hircus) have been selected to play an essential role in agricultural production systems, since being domesticated from their wild progenitor, bezoar (Capra aegagrus). A detailed understanding of the genetic consequences imparted by the domestication process remains a key goal of evolutionary genomics. We constructed the reference genome of bezoar and sequenced representative breeds of domestic goats to search for genomic changes that likely have accompanied goat domestication and breed formation. Thirteen copy number variation genes associated with coat color were identified in domestic goats, among which ASIP gene duplication contributes to the generation of light coat-color phenotype in domestic goats. Analysis of rapidly evolving genes identified genic changes underlying behavior-related traits, immune response and production-related traits. Based on the comparison studies of copy number variation genes and rapidly evolving genes between wild and domestic goat, our findings and methodology shed light on the genetic mechanism of animal domestication and will facilitate future goat breeding.

  1. Dietary modulation of the expression of genes involved in short-chain fatty acid absorption in the rumen epithelium is related to short-chain fatty acid concentration and pH in the rumen of goats.

    PubMed

    Yan, Lei; Zhang, Bei; Shen, Zanming

    2014-09-01

    We have tested the hypothesis that increased concentrate intake induces mRNA abundance alterations of genes involved in short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) absorption in the rumen epithelium of goats and these changes of mRNA abundance are probably related to ruminal SCFA concentration and ruminal pH. Goats (n=12) were randomly allocated to 2 groups and fed either a low-concentrate (LC) diet (10% concentrate; n=6) or a medium-concentrate (MC) diet (35% concentrate; n=6) in 2 equal portions daily. Goats were fed separately with their respective diet for 3 wk. The goats were slaughtered 6h after the morning feeding on d 22. In vivo, goats in the MC treatment exhibited a greater ruminal SCFA concentration (81.9mM) compared with those in the LC treatment (58.0mM), and the pH decreased from 7.03 to 6.63. Correspondingly, mRNA expression of candidates for SCFA(-)/HCO3(-) exchangers, namely downregulated in adenoma (DRA), putative anion transporter 1 (PAT1), and anion exchanger 2 (AE2) were increased in the MC group. Further, upregulation in monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1) and monocarboxylate transporter 4 (MCT4) mRNA abundances was observed in the MC group. The expression of genes that help the rumen epithelial cells to maintain intracellular pH, including Na(+)/H(+) exchanger 1 (NHE1), NHE2, NHE3, vacuolar H(+) ATPase subunit B (vH(+)ATPase), and Na(+)/K(+) ATPase pump subunit α1 (Na(+)/K(+)ATPase) were also enhanced in the MC group relative to the LC group. During in vitro studies with isolated rumen epithelial cells from goats, exposure to a pH of 6.8 increased MCT1 mRNA expression after 24h of culture, whereas the mRNA expression of AE2 was downregulated. The presence of SCFA (20mM) in the medium increased DRA, PAT1, AE2, MCT1, and Na(+)/K(+)ATPase mRNA expression. The expression of vH(+)ATPase was decreased by increased SCFA concentration. The mRNA expression of MCT4 did not vary in vitro with pH (6.8) or SCFA (20mM). The expression of DRA was increased by

  2. Grayanotoxin poisoning in three goats.

    PubMed

    Puschner, B; Holstege, D M; Lamberski, N

    2001-02-15

    Six Nubian goats were exposed to an azalea branch (Rhododendron indica) at the Riverbanks Zoological Park in Columbia, South Carolina. The following day, 3 of the 6 goats were referred to the veterinary hospital of the Riverbanks Zoological Park with bloat, profuseregurgitation, and signs of depression, intermittent head pressing, and fine muscle tremors in the hind limbs. The goats were treated with magnesium hydroxide, activated charcoal, and lactated Ringer's solution and recovered within 24 hours. Definitive diagnosis of grayanotoxin exposure was accomplished by use of liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of urine and fecal samples. Rhododendron spp are members of the Ericaceae (Heath) family and may contain grayanotoxins, which exert toxic effects by binding to sodium channels in cell membranes and increasing the permeability of sodium ions in excitable membranes. Rhododendron poisoning should be considered in animals with clinical evidence of gastrointestinal tract irritation, cardiac arrhythmias, and neurologic signs.

  3. Changes in HSP gene and protein expression in natural scrapie with brain damage

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (Hsp) perform cytoprotective functions such as apoptosis regulation and inflammatory response control. These proteins can also be secreted to the extracellular medium, acting as inflammatory mediators, and their chaperone activity permits correct folding of proteins and avoids the aggregation of anomalous isoforms. Several studies have proposed the implication of Hsp in prion diseases. We analysed the gene expression and protein distribution of different members of the Hsp27, Hsp70, and Hsp90 families in the central nervous system of sheep naturally infected with scrapie. Different expression profiles were observed in the areas analysed. Whereas changes in transcript levels were not observed in the cerebellum or medulla oblongata, a significant decrease in HSP27 and HSP90 was detected in the prefrontal cortex. In contrast, HSP73 was over-expressed in diencephalons of scrapie animals. Western blotting did not reveal significant differences in Hsp90 and Hsp70 protein expression between scrapie and control animals. Expression rates identified by real-time RT-PCR and western blotting were compared with the extent of classical scrapie lesions using stepwise regression. Changes in Hsp gene and protein expression were associated with prion protein deposition, gliosis and spongiosis rather than with apoptosis. Finally, immunohistochemistry revealed intense Hsp70 and Hsp90 immunolabelling in Purkinje cells of scrapie sheep. In contrast, controls displayed little or no staining in these cells. The observed differences in gene expression and protein distribution suggest that the heat shock proteins analysed play a role in the natural form of the disease. PMID:21314976

  4. Medulla oblongata transcriptome changes during presymptomatic natural scrapie and their association with prion-related lesions

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The pathogenesis of natural scrapie and other prion diseases is still poorly understood. Determining the variations in the transcriptome in the early phases of the disease might clarify some of the molecular mechanisms of the prion-induced pathology and allow for the development of new biomarkers for diagnosis and therapy. This study is the first to focus on the identification of genes regulated during the preclinical phases of natural scrapie in the ovine medulla oblongata (MO) and the association of these genes with prion deposition, astrocytosis and spongiosis. Results A custom microarray platform revealed that 86 significant probes had expression changes greater than 2-fold. From these probes, we identified 32 genes with known function; the highest number of regulated genes was included in the phosphoprotein-encoding group. Genes encoding extracellular marker proteins and those involved in the immune response and apoptosis were also differentially expressed. In addition, we investigated the relationship between the gene expression profiles and the appearance of the main scrapie-associated brain lesions. Quantitative Real-time PCR was used to validate the expression of some of the regulated genes, thus showing the reliability of the microarray hybridization technology. Conclusions Genes involved in protein and metal binding and oxidoreductase activity were associated with prion deposition. The expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) was associated with changes in the expression of genes encoding proteins with oxidoreductase and phosphatase activity, and the expression of spongiosis was related to genes encoding extracellular matrix components or transmembrane transporters. This is the first genome-wide expression study performed in naturally infected sheep with preclinical scrapie. As in previous studies, our findings confirm the close relationship between scrapie and other neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:22897917

  5. Monte Carlo simulation of surveillance strategies for scrapie in Norwegian sheep.

    PubMed

    Hopp, Petter; Webb, Cerian R; Jarp, Jorun

    2003-10-15

    Our aim was to compare the efficiency of different surveillance strategies for detecting scrapie-infected sheep flocks in the Norwegian population using simulation modelling. The dynamic Monte Carlo simulation model has the flock as the unit. The input parameters include properties of the sheep population (number of flocks, flock size, age distribution, reasons for culling, breeds, prion protein-allele distribution); properties of scrapie (genotype-dependent infection rate and incubation periods, and age- and genotype-dependent prevalence of scrapie); properties of the surveillance strategy (selection of sheep for examination, period in which infected sheep are detectable, and properties of the diagnostic tests). For simplification, the prion protein-alleles were grouped into three allele groups: VRQ, ARR, and ARQ' (ARQ' represents ARQ, ARH and AHQ). Through either abattoir surveillance or surveillance of fallen stock, scrapie flocks were detected. The necessary sample size for detecting any particular number of scrapie flocks was considerably lower using surveillance of fallen stock than abattoir surveillance. After increasing the diagnostic method's sensitivity, only the efficiency of abattoir surveillance increased. The prion protein-genotypes ARQ'/ARQ', VRQ/ARQ' and VRQ/VRQ were overrepresented both in the sampled infected sheep and in the detected sheep. Sheep with ARQ'/ARQ' constituted >70% of the detected sheep (compared to 33% in the underlying population). The model output was sensitive to the susceptibility of infection for the genotype ARQ'/ARQ'. The effect was large for abattoir surveillance (increased susceptibility increased the efficiency of abattoir surveillance).

  6. Enhanced levels of scrapie responsive gene mRNA in BSE-infected mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Dandoy-Dron, F; Benboudjema, L; Guillo, F; Jaegly, A; Jasmin, C; Dormont, D; Tovey, M G; Dron, M

    2000-03-10

    The expression of the mRNA of nine scrapie responsive genes was analyzed in the brains of FVB/N mice infected with bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE). The RNA transcripts of eight genes were overexpressed to a comparable extent in both BSE-infected and scrapie-infected mice, indicating a common series of pathogenic events in the two transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs). In contrast, the serine proteinase inhibitor spi 2, an analogue of the human alpha-1 antichymotrypsin gene, was overexpressed to a greater extent in the brains of scrapie-infected animals than in animals infected with BSE, reflecting either an agent specific or a mouse strain specific response. The levels of spi 2 mRNA were increased during the course of scrapie prior to the onset of clinical signs of the disease and the increase reached 11 to 45 fold relative to uninfected controls in terminally ill mice. Spi 2, in common with four of the other scrapie responsive genes studied, is known to be associated with pro-inflammatory processes. These observations underline the importance of cell reactivity in TSE. In addition, scrg2 mRNA the level of which is enhanced in TSE-infected mouse brain, was identified as a previously unrecognized long transcript of the murine aldolase C gene. However, the level of the principal aldolase C mRNA is unaffected in TSE. The increased representation of the longer transcript in the late stage of the disease may reflect changes in mRNA processing and/or stability in reactive astrocytes or in damaged Purkinje cells.

  7. Medulla oblongata transcriptome changes during presymptomatic natural scrapie and their association with prion-related lesions.

    PubMed

    Filali, Hicham; Martin-Burriel, Inmaculada; Harders, Frank; Varona, Luis; Serrano, Carmen; Acín, Cristina; Badiola, Juan J; Bossers, Alex; Bolea, Rosa

    2012-08-16

    The pathogenesis of natural scrapie and other prion diseases is still poorly understood. Determining the variations in the transcriptome in the early phases of the disease might clarify some of the molecular mechanisms of the prion-induced pathology and allow for the development of new biomarkers for diagnosis and therapy. This study is the first to focus on the identification of genes regulated during the preclinical phases of natural scrapie in the ovine medulla oblongata (MO) and the association of these genes with prion deposition, astrocytosis and spongiosis. A custom microarray platform revealed that 86 significant probes had expression changes greater than 2-fold. From these probes, we identified 32 genes with known function; the highest number of regulated genes was included in the phosphoprotein-encoding group. Genes encoding extracellular marker proteins and those involved in the immune response and apoptosis were also differentially expressed. In addition, we investigated the relationship between the gene expression profiles and the appearance of the main scrapie-associated brain lesions. Quantitative Real-time PCR was used to validate the expression of some of the regulated genes, thus showing the reliability of the microarray hybridization technology. Genes involved in protein and metal binding and oxidoreductase activity were associated with prion deposition. The expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) was associated with changes in the expression of genes encoding proteins with oxidoreductase and phosphatase activity, and the expression of spongiosis was related to genes encoding extracellular matrix components or transmembrane transporters. This is the first genome-wide expression study performed in naturally infected sheep with preclinical scrapie. As in previous studies, our findings confirm the close relationship between scrapie and other neurodegenerative diseases.

  8. Changes in HSP gene and protein expression in natural scrapie with brain damage.

    PubMed

    Serrano, Carmen; Bolea, Rosa; Lyahyai, Jaber; Filali, Hicham; Varona, Luis; Marcos-Carcavilla, Ane; Acín, Cristina; Calvo, Jorge H; Serrano, Magdalena; Badiola, Juan J; Zaragoza, Pilar; Martín-Burriel, Inmaculada

    2011-01-24

    Heat shock proteins (Hsp) perform cytoprotective functions such as apoptosis regulation and inflammatory response control. These proteins can also be secreted to the extracellular medium, acting as inflammatory mediators, and their chaperone activity permits correct folding of proteins and avoids the aggregation of anomalous isoforms. Several studies have proposed the implication of Hsp in prion diseases. We analysed the gene expression and protein distribution of different members of the Hsp27, Hsp70, and Hsp90 families in the central nervous system of sheep naturally infected with scrapie. Different expression profiles were observed in the areas analysed. Whereas changes in transcript levels were not observed in the cerebellum or medulla oblongata, a significant decrease in HSP27 and HSP90 was detected in the prefrontal cortex. In contrast, HSP73 was over-expressed in diencephalons of scrapie animals. Western blotting did not reveal significant differences in Hsp90 and Hsp70 protein expression between scrapie and control animals. Expression rates identified by real-time RT-PCR and western blotting were compared with the extent of classical scrapie lesions using stepwise regression. Changes in Hsp gene and protein expression were associated with prion protein deposition, gliosis and spongiosis rather than with apoptosis. Finally, immunohistochemistry revealed intense Hsp70 and Hsp90 immunolabelling in Purkinje cells of scrapie sheep. In contrast, controls displayed little or no staining in these cells. The observed differences in gene expression and protein distribution suggest that the heat shock proteins analysed play a role in the natural form of the disease.

  9. Evaluation of two commercial, rapid, ELISA kits testing for scrapie in retro-pharyngeal lymph nodes in sheep.

    PubMed

    Kittelberger, R; McIntyre, L; Watts, J; MacDiarmid, S; Hannah, M J; Jenner, J; Bueno, R; Swainsbury, R; Langeveld, J P M; van Keulen, L J M; van Zijderveld, F G; Wemheuer, W M; Richt, J A; Sorensen, S J; Pigott, C J; O'Keefe, J S

    2014-11-01

    To estimate the number of cases of scrapie that would occur in sheep of different prion protein (PrP) genotypes if scrapie was to become established in New Zealand, and to compare the performance of two commercially available, rapid ELISA kits using ovine retro-pharyngeal lymph nodes (RLN) from non-infected and infected sheep of different PrP genotypes. Using published data on the distribution of PrP genotypes within the New Zealand sheep flock and the prevalence of cases of scrapie in these genotypes in the United Kingdom, the annual expected number of cases of scrapie per genotype was estimated, should scrapie become established in New Zealand, assuming a total population of 28 million sheep. A non-infected panel of RLN was collected from 737 sheep from New Zealand that had been culled, found in extremis or died. Brain stem samples were also collected from 131 of these sheep. A second panel of infected samples comprised 218 and 117 RLN from confirmed scrapie cases that had originated in Europe and the United States of America, respectively. All samples were screened using two commercial, rapid, transmissible spongiform encephalopathy ELISA kits: Bio-Rad TeSeE ELISA (ELISA-BR), and IDEXX HerdChek BSE-Scrapie AG Test (ELISA-ID). If scrapie became established in New Zealand, an estimated 596 cases would occur per year; of these 234 (39%) and 271 (46%) would be in sheep carrying ARQ/ARQ and ARQ/VRQ PrP genotypes, respectively. For the non-infected samples from New Zealand the diagnostic specificity of both ELISA kits was 100%. When considering all infected samples, the diagnostic sensitivity was 70.4 (95% CI=65.3-75.3)% for ELISA-BR and 91.6 (95% CI=88.2-94.4)% for ELISA-ID. For the ARQ/ARQ genotype (n=195), sensitivity was 66.2% for ELISA-BR and 90.8% for ELISA-ID, and for the ARQ/VRQ genotype (n=107), sensitivity was 81.3% for ELISA-BR and 98.1% for ELISA-ID. In this study, the ELISA-ID kit demonstrated a higher diagnostic sensitivity for detecting scrapie in

  10. Epidemiological investigations on the potential transmissibility of a rare disease: the case of atypical scrapie in Great Britain.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Peláez, A; Arnold, M E; Vidal-Diez, A

    2016-07-01

    Multiple cases of atypical scrapie in the same holding and co-existence with classical scrapie have been reported in Great Britain. A two-stage simulation tool was developed by combining a sampling algorithm and a hierarchical Bayesian model to simulate the number of positive cases of atypical scrapie from: (i) random sampling and (ii) using the actual sampled population in Great Britain, being the output probability of detection of flocks with one and more cases. Cluster analysis was conducted to assess the level of geographical over- and under-sampling over the years. The probability of detecting at least two cases of atypical scrapie in the same holding is much lower in simulated random data than in simulated actual data for all scenarios. Sampling bias in the selection of sheep for testing led to multiple sampling from fewer but larger holdings, Scotland, and areas of Wales were under-sampled and the South-West and East of England oversampled. The pattern of atypical scrapie cases observed is unlikely to be explained by a multi-case event epidemiologically linked. The co-existence of classical and atypical scrapie is a rare event with 19 holdings detected in GB and does not suggest an epidemiological link between the two types of disease.

  11. Transcriptional profiling of peripheral lymphoid tissue reveals genes and networks linked to SSBP/1 scrapie pathology in sheep.

    PubMed

    Gossner, Anton; Roupaka, Sofia; Foster, Jim; Hunter, Nora; Hopkins, John

    2011-12-15

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) are slow and progressive neurodegenerative diseases of humans and animals. The major target organ for all TSEs is the brain but some TSE agents are associated with prior accumulation within the peripheral lymphoid system. Many studies have examined the effects of scrapie infection on the expression of central nervous system (CNS) genes, but this study examines the progression of scrapie pathology in the peripheral lymphoid system and how scrapie infection affects the transcriptome of the lymph nodes and spleen. Infection of sheep with SSBP/1 scrapie resulted in PrP(Sc) deposition in the draining prescapular lymph node (PSLN) by 25 days post infection (dpi) in VRQ/VRQ genotype sheep and 75 dpi in tonsils and spleen. Progression of PrP(Sc) deposition in VRQ/ARR animals was 25 dpi later in the PSLN and 250 dpi later in spleen. Microarray analysis of 75 dpi tissues from VRQ/VRQ sheep identified 52 genes in PSLN and 37 genes in spleen cells that showed significant difference (P ≤ 0.05) between scrapie-infected and mock-infected animals. Transcriptional pathway analysis highlighted immunological disease, cell death and neurological disease as the biological pathways associated with scrapie pathogenesis in the peripheral lymphoid system. PrP(Sc) accumulation of lymphoid tissue resulted in the repression of genes linked to inflammation and oxidative stress, and the up-regulation of genes related to apoptosis.

  12. Classical natural ovine scrapie prions detected in practical volumes of blood by lamb and transgenic mouse bioassays.

    PubMed

    Dassanayake, Rohana P; Truscott, Thomas C; Zhuang, Dongyue; Schneider, David A; Madsen-Bouterse, Sally A; Young, Alan J; Stanton, James B; Davis, William C; O'Rourke, Katherine I

    2015-01-01

    Scrapie is diagnosed antemortem in sheep by detecting misfolded isoforms of prion protein (PrP(Sc)) in lymphoid follicles of the rectal mucosa and nictitating membranes. Assay sensitivity is limited if (a) the biopsy is collected early during disease development, (b) an insufficient number of follicles is collected, or (c) peripheral accumulation of PrP(Sc) is reduced or delayed. A blood test would be convenient for mass live animal scrapie testing. Currently approved techniques, however, have their own detection limits. Novel detection methods may soon offer a non-animal-based, rapid platform with detection sensitivities that rival the prion bioassay. In anticipation, we sought to determine if diseased animals could be routinely identified with a bioassay using B lymphocytes isolated from blood sample volumes commonly collected for diagnostic purposes in small ruminants. Scrapie transmission was detected in five of six recipient lambs intravenously transfused with B lymphocytes isolated from 5~10 mL of blood from a naturally scrapie-infected sheep. Additionally, scrapie transmission was observed in 18 ovinized transgenic Tg338 mice intracerebrally inoculated with B lymphocytes isolated from 5~10 mL of blood from two naturally scrapie-infected sheep. Based on our findings, we anticipate that these blood sample volumes should be of diagnostic value.

  13. Classical natural ovine scrapie prions detected in practical volumes of blood by lamb and transgenic mouse bioassays

    PubMed Central

    Truscott, Thomas C.; Zhuang, Dongyue; Schneider, David A.; Madsen-Bouterse, Sally A.; Young, Alan J.; Stanton, James B.; Davis, William C.; O'Rourke, Katherine I.

    2015-01-01

    Scrapie is diagnosed antemortem in sheep by detecting misfolded isoforms of prion protein (PrPSc) in lymphoid follicles of the rectal mucosa and nictitating membranes. Assay sensitivity is limited if (a) the biopsy is collected early during disease development, (b) an insufficient number of follicles is collected, or (c) peripheral accumulation of PrPSc is reduced or delayed. A blood test would be convenient for mass live animal scrapie testing. Currently approved techniques, however, have their own detection limits. Novel detection methods may soon offer a non-animal-based, rapid platform with detection sensitivities that rival the prion bioassay. In anticipation, we sought to determine if diseased animals could be routinely identified with a bioassay using B lymphocytes isolated from blood sample volumes commonly collected for diagnostic purposes in small ruminants. Scrapie transmission was detected in five of six recipient lambs intravenously transfused with B lymphocytes isolated from 5~10 mL of blood from a naturally scrapie-infected sheep. Additionally, scrapie transmission was observed in 18 ovinized transgenic Tg338 mice intracerebrally inoculated with B lymphocytes isolated from 5~10 mL of blood from two naturally scrapie-infected sheep. Based on our findings, we anticipate that these blood sample volumes should be of diagnostic value. PMID:25549221

  14. 4-H Club Goat Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, R. Kipp

    This guide provides information for 4-H Club members who have decided on a club goat project. Topics include general information in the following areas: show rules; facilities and equipment (barns/sheds, fences, feeders, water containers, and equipment); selection (structural correctness, muscle, volume and capacity, style and balance, and growth…

  15. Mouse-adapted scrapie strains 139A and ME7 overcome species barrier to induce experimental scrapie in hamsters and changed their pathogenic features.

    PubMed

    Shi, Qi; Zhang, Bao-Yun; Gao, Chen; Zhang, Jin; Jiang, Hui-Ying; Chen, Cao; Han, Jun; Dong, Xiao-Ping

    2012-03-09

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) diseases are known to be zoonotic diseases that can infect different kinds of animals. The transmissibility of TSE, like that of other infectious diseases, shows marked species barrier, either being unable to infect heterologous species or difficult to form transmission experimentally. The similarity of the amino acid sequences of PrP among species is believed to be one of the elements in controlling the transmission TSE interspecies. Other factors, such as prion strains and host's microenvironment, may also participate in the process. Two mouse-adapted strains 139A and ME7 were cerebrally inoculated to Golden hamsters. Presences of scrapie associate fibril (SAF) and PrPSc in brains of the infected animals were tested by TEM assays and Western blots dynamically during the incubation periods. The pathogenic features of the novel prions in hamsters, including electrophoretic patterns, glycosylating profiles, immunoreactivities, proteinase K-resistances and conformational stabilities were comparatively evaluated. TSE-related neuropathological changes were assayed by histological examinations. After long incubation times, mouse-adapted agents 139A and ME7 induced experimental scrapie in hamsters, respectively, showing obvious spongiform degeneration and PrPSc deposits in brains, especially in cortex regions. SAF and PrPSc in brains were observed much earlier than the onset of clinical symptoms. The molecular characteristics of the newly-formed PrPSc in hamsters, 139A-ha and ME7-ha, were obviously distinct from the original mouse agents, however, greatly similar as that of a hamster-adapted scrapie strain 263 K. Although the incubation times and main disease signs of the hamsters of 139A-ha and ME7-ha were different, the pathogenic characteristics and neuropathological changes were highly similar. This finding concludes that mouse-adapted agents 139A and ME7 change their pathogenic characteristics during the transmission to

  16. The early history of the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies exemplified by scrapie.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Kurt; Fangerau, Heiner; Michaelsen, Britta; Raab, Wolfgang H-M

    2008-12-16

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE) is a group of diseases that is unique in comprising disorders that can occur sporadically, are hereditary and/or infectious. The transmissible pathogen--the prion--is distinct from all other pathogens in being devoid of nucleic acids. During the elucidation of these disorders, many different--and contradictory--theories have been put forward. Early researchers, mostly driven by the economic impact of these diseases on sheep farming, engaged in heavy disputes concerning heredity vs. infectivity of scrapie. Following the experimental demonstration of scrapie's infectivity during the 20th century, research focused on the characterization of the nature of the transmissible agent. The current work comprehensively summarizes the available early literature on TSE research. A review of the historical literature is presented, describing the efforts in breeding, transmission experiments, and theories about the nature of the infectious agent.

  17. Scrapie infection can be established readily through skin scarification in immunocompetent but not immunodeficient mice.

    PubMed

    Taylor, D M; McConnell, I; Fraser, H

    1996-07-01

    Scarification of the skin is a possible route of entry for scrapie infectivity in sheep, and for Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease agent in humans within the context of occupational exposure to infected brain in the autopsy room or laboratory. The effectiveness of skin scarification routes as portals of entry for infectivity had not previously been tested experimentally but this study has shown that these are efficient routes for establishing infection in mice using the 139A and ME7 strains of scrapie agent. Scarification had much the same efficiency as inoculation by the intraperitoneal, intravenous or perivenous routes but was not effective in immunocompromised (SCID) mice. It was concluded that replication of infectivity within the lymphoreticular system, which is precluded in SCID mice, is a necessary prerequisite for the development of infection in the central nervous system following inoculation via scarification.

  18. Distribution of Peripheral PrPSc in Sheep with Naturally Acquired Scrapie

    PubMed Central

    Garza, María Carmen; Monzón, Marta; Marín, Belén; Badiola, Juan José; Monleón, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Accumulation of prion protein (PrPSc) in the central nervous system is the hallmark of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. However, in some of these diseases such as scrapie or chronic wasting disease, the PrPSc can also accumulate in other tissues, particularly in the lymphoreticular system. In recent years, PrPSc in organs other than nervous and lymphoid have been described, suggesting that distribution of this protein in affected individuals may be much larger than previously thought. In the present study, 11 non-nervous/non-lymphoid organs from 16 naturally scrapie infected sheep in advanced stages of the disease were examined for the presence of PrPSc. Fourteen infected sheep were of the ARQ/ARQ PRNP genotype and 2 of the VRQ/VRQ, where the letters A, R, Q, and V represent the codes for amino-acids alanine, arginine, glutamine and valine, respectively. Adrenal gland, pancreas, heart, skin, urinary bladder and mammary gland were positive for PrPSc by immunohistochemistry and IDEXX HerdChek scrapie/BSE Antigen EIA Test in at least one animal. Lung, liver, kidney and skeletal muscle exhibited PrPSc deposits by immunohistochemistry only. To our knowledge, this is the first report regarding the presence of PrPSc in the heart, pancreas and urinary bladder in naturally acquired scrapie infections. In some other organs examined, in which PrPSc had been previously detected, PrPSc immunolabeling was observed to be associated with new structures within those organs. The results of the present study illustrate a wide dissemination of PrPSc in both ARQ/ARQ and VRQ/VRQ infected sheep, even when the involvement of the lymphoreticular system is scarce or absent, thus highlighting the role of the peripheral nervous system in the spread of PrPSc. PMID:24828439

  19. Distribution of peripheral PrP(Sc) in sheep with naturally acquired scrapie.

    PubMed

    Garza, María Carmen; Monzón, Marta; Marín, Belén; Badiola, Juan José; Monleón, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Accumulation of prion protein (PrPSc) in the central nervous system is the hallmark of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. However, in some of these diseases such as scrapie or chronic wasting disease, the PrPSc can also accumulate in other tissues, particularly in the lymphoreticular system. In recent years, PrPSc in organs other than nervous and lymphoid have been described, suggesting that distribution of this protein in affected individuals may be much larger than previously thought. In the present study, 11 non-nervous/non-lymphoid organs from 16 naturally scrapie infected sheep in advanced stages of the disease were examined for the presence of PrPSc. Fourteen infected sheep were of the ARQ/ARQ PRNP genotype and 2 of the VRQ/VRQ, where the letters A, R, Q, and V represent the codes for amino-acids alanine, arginine, glutamine and valine, respectively. Adrenal gland, pancreas, heart, skin, urinary bladder and mammary gland were positive for PrPSc by immunohistochemistry and IDEXX HerdChek scrapie/BSE Antigen EIA Test in at least one animal. Lung, liver, kidney and skeletal muscle exhibited PrPSc deposits by immunohistochemistry only. To our knowledge, this is the first report regarding the presence of PrPSc in the heart, pancreas and urinary bladder in naturally acquired scrapie infections. In some other organs examined, in which PrPSc had been previously detected, PrPSc immunolabeling was observed to be associated with new structures within those organs. The results of the present study illustrate a wide dissemination of PrPSc in both ARQ/ARQ and VRQ/VRQ infected sheep, even when the involvement of the lymphoreticular system is scarce or absent, thus highlighting the role of the peripheral nervous system in the spread of PrPSc.

  20. Differential gene expression and apoptosis markers in presymptomatic scrapie affected sheep.

    PubMed

    Hedman, Carlos; Lyahyai, Jaber; Filali, Hicham; Marín, Belén; Serrano, Carmen; Monleón, Eva; Moreno, Bernardino; Zaragoza, Pilar; Badiola, Juan José; Martín-Burriel, Inmaculada; Bolea, Rosa

    2012-09-14

    Neuronal loss is one of the characteristics of scrapie neuropathology. Previous analysis of brains from sheep naturally infected with scrapie that were in a terminal stage did not detect a clear induction of apoptosis, although molecular changes were evidenced. As neuronal death could be occurring early in scrapie, we developed a neuropathological and gene expression study of sheep infected with scrapie in a presymptomatic stage. The histopathology, immunolabelling of PrP(Sc), Bax and activated caspase-3, and the analysis of the expression of 7 genes involved in the regulation of the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis were investigated in the following 4 central nervous system areas: medulla oblongata, diencephalon, frontal cortex and cerebellum. Moreover, TUNEL and NeuN immunolabelling was performed in the medulla oblongata. The PrP(Sc) immunolabelling in the four areas, as well as a neuropil spongiform change, were more evident in the terminal stage than in presymptomatic animals. Cytoplasmic Bax immunostaining was observed in the presymptomatic medulla oblongata. In contrast to symptomatic animals, the immunostaining was not extended to the hypothalamus, indicating the progression of Bax induction during the course of the disease. Although neither caspase-3 immunostaining nor the TUNEL technique detected neurons with apoptosis, NeuN-immunolabelled cell counting determined that presymptomatic animals have already suffered neuronal loss in a lower or equal degree than symptomatic animals. Finally, the gene expression profiles indicated that the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis was activated with higher intensity in presymptomatic animals than in symptomatic sheep and confirmed the implication of genes such as BAX or AIF in the disease.

  1. Scrapie Affects the Maturation Cycle and Immune Complex Trapping by Follicular Dendritic Cells in Mice

    PubMed Central

    McGovern, Gillian; Mabbott, Neil; Jeffrey, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) or prion diseases are infectious neurological disorders of man and animals, characterised by abnormal disease-associated prion protein (PrPd) accumulations in the brain and lymphoreticular system (LRS). Prior to neuroinvasion, TSE agents often accumulate to high levels within the LRS, apparently without affecting immune function. However, our analysis of scrapie-affected sheep shows that PrPd accumulations within the LRS are associated with morphological changes to follicular dendritic cells (FDCs) and tingible body macrophages (TBMs). Here we examined FDCs and TBMs in the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs) of scrapie-affected mice by light and electron microscopy. In MLNs from uninfected mice, FDCs could be morphologically categorised into immature, mature and regressing forms. However, in scrapie-affected MLNs this maturation cycle was adversely affected. FDCs characteristically trap and retain immune complexes on their surfaces, which they display to B-lymphocytes. In scrapie-affected MLNs, some FDCs were found where areas of normal and abnormal immune complex retention occurred side by side. The latter co-localised with PrPd plasmalemmal accumulations. Our data suggest this previously unrecognised morphology represents the initial stage of an abnormal FDC maturation cycle. Alterations to the FDCs included PrPd accumulation, abnormal cell membrane ubiquitin and excess immunoglobulin accumulation. Regressing FDCs, in contrast, appeared to lose their membrane-attached PrPd. Together, these data suggest that TSE infection adversely affects the maturation and regression cycle of FDCs, and that PrPd accumulation is causally linked to the abnormal pathology observed. We therefore support the hypothesis that TSEs cause an abnormality in immune function. PMID:19997557

  2. PrP genotype frequencies and risk evaluation for scrapie in dairy sheep breeds from southern Italy.

    PubMed

    Martemucci, Giovanni; Iamartino, Daniela; Blasi, Michele; D'Alessandro, Angela Gabriella

    2015-12-01

    Concerns regarding scrapie in sheep breeding have increased in the last few decades. The present study was carried out in dairy sheep breeds from southern Italy. In order to find breeding animals resistant to scrapie, the PrP genes of 1,205 animals from entire flocks of dairy native Apulian Leccese and Altamurana breeds, and Sicilian Comisana breed, were analysed for polymorphisms at codons 136, 154, and 171 related to scrapie resistance/susceptibility. The Altamurana breed was considered as two populations (Alt-Cav and Alt-Cra-Zoe), based on presumed cross-breeding. A total of five alleles and ten different genotypes were found. The ARQ allele was predominant for all breeds followed by ARR, the most resistant allele to scrapie, which was highly prevalent in Comisana (50%) and in native Alt-Cav (42.4%). The VRQ allele, associated with the highest susceptibility to scrapie, was detected at not negligeable levels in allocthonous Comisana (3.5%), at a low frequency (0.2%) in native Leccese and Alt-Cra-Zoe, while it was absent in Alt-Cav. The frequencies of PrP genotypes with a very low susceptibility risk to scrapie (R1) was higher in Comisana and Alt-Cav. The most susceptible genotype, ARQ/VRQ, was found only in Comisana. Within the Altamurana breed, there were notable differences between Alt-Cav and Alt-Cra-Zoe sheep. The Alt-Cav was characterised by the absence of VRQ and AHQ alleles and by the higher frequency of the ARR/ARR genotype (18.7%). Breeding programs, mainly in endangered breeds such as Altamurana, should be conducted gradually, combining resistance to scrapie, maintenance of genetic variability, and production.

  3. A bovine cell line that can be infected by natural sheep scrapie prions.

    PubMed

    Oelschlegel, Anja M; Geissen, Markus; Lenk, Matthias; Riebe, Roland; Angermann, Marlies; Schatzl, Herman; Schaetzl, Hermann; Groschup, Martin H

    2015-01-01

    Cell culture systems represent a crucial part in basic prion research; yet, cell lines that are susceptible to prions, especially to field isolated prions that were not adapted to rodents, are very rare. The purpose of this study was to identify and characterize a cell line that was susceptible to ruminant-derived prions and to establish a stable prion infection within it. Based on species and tissue of origin as well as PrP expression rate, we pre-selected a total of 33 cell lines that were then challenged with natural and with mouse propagated BSE or scrapie inocula. Here, we report the successful infection of a non-transgenic bovine cell line, a sub-line of the bovine kidney cell line MDBK, with natural sheep scrapie prions. This cell line retained the scrapie infection for more than 200 passages. Selective cloning resulted in cell populations with increased accumulation of PrPres, although this treatment was not mandatory for retaining the infection. The infection remained stable, even under suboptimal culture conditions. The resulting infectivity of the cells was confirmed by mouse bioassay (Tgbov mice, Tgshp mice). We believe that PES cells used together with other prion permissive cell lines will prove a valuable tool for ongoing efforts to understand and defeat prions and prion diseases.

  4. Quantitating PrP Polymorphisms Present in Prions from Heterozygous Scrapie-Infected Sheep.

    PubMed

    Silva, Christopher J; Erickson-Beltran, Melissa L; Hui, Colleen; Badiola, Juan José; Nicholson, Eric M; Requena, Jesús R; Bolea, Rosa

    2017-01-03

    Scrapie is a prion (PrP(Sc)) disease of sheep. The incubation period of sheep scrapie is strongly influenced by polymorphisms at positions 136, 154, and 171 of a sheep's normal cellular prion protein (PrP(C)). Chymotrypsin was used to digest sheep recombinant PrP to identify a set of characteristic peptides [M132LGSXMSRPL141 (X = A or V), Y153XENMY158 (X,= H or R), and Y166RPVDXY172 (X = H, K, Q, or R)] that could be used to detect and quantitate polymorphisms at positions 136, 154, and 171 of sheep PrP(C) or PrP(Sc). These peptides were used to develop a multiple reaction monitoring method (MRM) to detect the amounts of a particular polymorphism in a sample of PrP(Sc) isolated from sheep heterozygous for their PrP(C) proteins. The limit of detection for these peptides was less than 50 attomole. Spinal cord tissue from heterozygous (ARQ/VRQ or ARH/ARQ) scrapie-infected Rasa Aragonesa sheep was analyzed using this MRM method. Both sets of heterozygotes show the presence of both polymorphisms in PrP(Sc). This was true for samples containing both proteinase K (PK)-sensitive and PK-resistant PrP(Sc) and samples containing only the PK-resistant PrP(Sc). These results show that heterozygous animals contain PrP(Sc) that is composed of significant amounts of both PrP polymorphisms.

  5. Role of Palatine Tonsils as a Prion Entry Site in Classical and Atypical Experimental Sheep Scrapie

    PubMed Central

    Cancedda, Maria G.; Di Guardo, Giovanni; Chiocchetti, Roberto; Demontis, Francesca; Marruchella, Giuseppe; Sorteni, Caterina; Maestrale, Caterina; Lai, Alfio

    2014-01-01

    Atypical and classical scrapie-infected sheep brain tissue was monolaterally injected into the tonsils of lambs to investigate their role as a prion entry point. We first detected classical PrPSc within the inoculated tonsil and in the ipsilateral retropharyngeal lymph node at 3 months postinoculation (p.i.). At 7 months p.i., PrPSc colonized other lymphoid tissues bilaterally, including ileal Peyer's patches. The earliest PrPSc deposition within the brain was ipsilaterally observed at 9 months p.i. in the substantia reticularis of the medulla oblongata. At 12 months p.i., PrPSc deposition was present bilaterally in the nucleus parasympathicus nervi vagi, as well as in the intermediolateral cell column of the thoracolumbar spinal cord. No PrPSc was detected in the lambs inoculated with atypical scrapie. These findings suggest that neuroinvasion may naturally occur from the tonsil after a widespread prion replication within the lymphoid tissues during classical scrapie only, thus mimicking the pathogenesis after oral ingestion. PMID:24198416

  6. Rapid detection of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and scrapie prion proteins.

    PubMed

    Serban, D; Taraboulos, A; DeArmond, S J; Prusiner, S B

    1990-01-01

    Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) and Gerstmann-Sträussler syndrome (GSS) of humans as well as scrapie of animals are caused by prions. The scrapie prion protein isoform (PrPSc) is the only macromolecule identified to date which is a component of the infectious prion particle. PrPSc is converted to PrP 27-30 by limited proteolysis while the cellular isoform, designated PrPC, is completely digested under the same conditions. ELISA studies demonstrated that native PrP 27-30 bound to plastic surfaces resisted proteolysis and exhibited little or no immunoreactivity but after denaturation with guanidinium thiocyanate (GdnSCN), immunoreactivity was greatly enhanced. PrPSc bound to nitrocellulose also exhibited enhanced immunoreactivity after denaturation. PrPSc was readily detected in brain extracts from scrapie-infected hamsters, mice, and sheep by dot-blot immunoassays using limited proteolysis followed by GdnSCN denaturation. The high sensitivity and specificity of the immunoassay allowed detection of regional differences in PrPSc in sheep brain. CJD prion protein isoform (PrPCJD) was also detected in the brains of all 10 patients tested with neuropathologically confirmed CJD and in 1 patient with GSS. Enhanced immunoreactivity of PrPSc or PrPCJD after denaturation cannot only be used for immunodiagnosis of prion diseases but may also form the basis of new assays in experimental studies directed at the chemical structure of the prion particle.

  7. Prion protein is ubiquitinated after developing protease resistance in the brains of scrapie-infected mice.

    PubMed

    Kang, Shin-Chung; Brown, David R; Whiteman, Matthew; Li, Ruliang; Pan, Tao; Perry, George; Wisniewski, Thomas; Sy, Man-Sun; Wong, Boon-Seng

    2004-05-01

    Although the key event in the pathology of prion diseases is thought to be the conversion of cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) to the protease-resistant scrapie species termed PrP(Sc), the factors that contribute to neurodegeneration in scrapie-infected animals are poorly understood. One probable determinant could be when the accumulation of PrP(Sc) in infected brain overwhelms the ubiquitin-proteasome system and triggers the degenerative cascade. In the present study, it was found that in mouse brains infected with the ME7 scrapie strain, the level of ubiquitin protein conjugates increased significantly at approximately 144 days post-infection (pi) when clinical signs first become apparent. This elevation correlated with the detection of protease-resistant PrP(Sc) and a decline in two endopeptidase activities associated with proteasome function. However, ubiquitination of PrP was only detected at the terminal stage, 3 weeks after the development of clinical symptoms (approximately 165 days pi). These results suggest that ubiquitination of PrP is a late event phenomenon and this conjugation occurs after the formation of protease-resistant PrP(Sc). Whether this post-translational modification and the impairment of proteasome function are pivotal events in the pathogenesis of prion diseases remains to be determined.

  8. Transgenetic studies implicate interactions between homologous PrP isoforms in scrapie prion replication.

    PubMed

    Prusiner, S B; Scott, M; Foster, D; Pan, K M; Groth, D; Mirenda, C; Torchia, M; Yang, S L; Serban, D; Carlson, G A

    1990-11-16

    Transgenic (Tg) mice expressing both Syrian hamster (Ha) and mouse (Mo) prion protein (PrP) genes were used to probe the mechanism of scrapie prion replication. Four Tg lines expressing HaPrP exhibited distinct incubation times ranging from 48 to 277 days, which correlated inversely with HaPrP mRNA and HaPrPC. Bioassays of Tg brain extracts showed that the prion inoculum dictates which prions are synthesized de novo. Tg mice inoculated with Ha prions had approximately 10(9) ID50 units of Ha prions per gram of brain and less than 10 units of Mo prions. Conversely, Tg mice inoculated with Mo prions synthesized Mo prions but not Ha prions. Similarly, Tg mice inoculated with Ha prions exhibited neuropathologic changes characteristic of hamsters with scrapie, while Mo prions produced changes similar to those in non-Tg mice. Our results argue that species specificity of scrapie prions resides in the PrP sequence and prion synthesis is initiated by a species-specific interaction between PrPSc in the inoculum and homologous PrPC.

  9. Activation of the macroautophagic system in scrapie-infected experimental animals and human genetic prion diseases

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yin; Tian, Chan; Wang, Shao-Bin; Xie, Wu-Ling; Guo, Yan; Zhang, Jin; Shi, Qi; Chen, Cao; Dong, Xiao-Ping

    2012-01-01

    Macroautophagy is an important process for removing misfolded and aggregated protein in cells, the dysfunction of which has been directly linked to an increasing number of neurodegenerative disorders. However, the details of macroautophagy in prion diseases remain obscure. Here we demonstrated that in the terminal stages of scrapie strain 263K-infected hamsters and human genetic prion diseases, the microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3) was converted from the cytosolic form to the autophagosome-bound membrane form. Macroautophagy substrate sequestosome 1 (SQSTM1) and polyubiquitinated proteins were downregulated in the brains of sick individuals, indicating enhanced macroautophagic protein degradation. The levels of mechanistic target of rapamycin (MTOR) and phosphorylated MTOR (p-MTOR) were significantly decreased, which implies that this enhancement of the macroautophagic response is likely through the MTOR pathway which is a negative regulator for the initiation of macroautophagy. Dynamic assays of the autophagic system in the brains of scrapie experimental hamsters after inoculation showed that alterations of the autophagic system appeared along with the deposits of PrPSc in the infected brains. Immunofluorescent assays revealed specific staining of autophagosomes in neurons that were not colocalized with deposits of PrPSc in the brains of scrapie infected hamsters, however, autophagosome did colocalize with PrPSc in a prion-infected cell line after treatment with bafilomycin A1. These results suggest that activation of macroautophagy in brains is a disease-correlative phenomenon in prion diseases. PMID:22874564

  10. A Bovine Cell Line That Can Be Infected by Natural Sheep Scrapie Prions

    PubMed Central

    Oelschlegel, Anja M.; Geissen, Markus; Lenk, Matthias; Riebe, Roland; Angermann, Marlies; Schaetzl, Hermann; Groschup, Martin H.

    2015-01-01

    Cell culture systems represent a crucial part in basic prion research; yet, cell lines that are susceptible to prions, especially to field isolated prions that were not adapted to rodents, are very rare. The purpose of this study was to identify and characterize a cell line that was susceptible to ruminant-derived prions and to establish a stable prion infection within it. Based on species and tissue of origin as well as PrP expression rate, we pre-selected a total of 33 cell lines that were then challenged with natural and with mouse propagated BSE or scrapie inocula. Here, we report the successful infection of a non-transgenic bovine cell line, a sub-line of the bovine kidney cell line MDBK, with natural sheep scrapie prions. This cell line retained the scrapie infection for more than 200 passages. Selective cloning resulted in cell populations with increased accumulation of PrPres, although this treatment was not mandatory for retaining the infection. The infection remained stable, even under suboptimal culture conditions. The resulting infectivity of the cells was confirmed by mouse bioassay (Tgbov mice, Tgshp mice). We believe that PES cells used together with other prion permissive cell lines will prove a valuable tool for ongoing efforts to understand and defeat prions and prion diseases. PMID:25565633

  11. Prion protein gene polymorphisms in healthy and scrapie-affected sheep in Greece.

    PubMed

    Billinis, Charalambos; Psychas, Vassilios; Leontides, Leonidas; Spyrou, Vassiliki; Argyroudis, Stamatis; Vlemmas, Ioannis; Leontides, Sotirios; Sklaviadis, Theodoros; Papadopoulos, Orestis

    2004-02-01

    A total of 216 local crossbred sheep from 16 scrapie-affected Greek flocks and 210 purebred sheep of the milk breeds Chios and Karagouniko from healthy flocks were analysed for scrapie-linked polymorphisms in the prion protein (PrP) gene. Of the 216 sheep in this case-control study, 96 sheep were clinical cases, 25 subclinical cases (asymptomatic at the moment of euthanasia but positive by histopathology and/or ELISA detecting proteinase-resistant PrP) and 95 healthy controls (negative by all evaluations). Polymorphisms at codons 136, 154 and 171 were determined by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, followed by RFLP and sequencing. Scrapie, both clinical and subclinical, was associated with the genotypes ARQ/ARQ (88 of 110 sheep of that genotype), ARQ/TRQ (9 of 13), ARQ/AHQ (15 of 38) and VRQ/VRQ (9 of 17). Histopathological lesions were more severe in the clinical cases. Genotypes ARQ/ARR (26 sheep), ARQ/ARK (seven sheep), AHQ/ARR (one sheep), ARH/ARH (one sheep) and ARR/ARH (three sheep) were detected exclusively in healthy control sheep. In the purebred survey, four genotypes were present in the Chios sheep (ARQ/ARQ, ARQ/TRQ, ARQ/AHQ and ARQ/ARR) and four in the Karagouniko sheep (ARQ/ARQ, ARQ/AHQ, ARQ/ARR and ARQ/ARH).

  12. Comparison of brain PrPd distribution in ovine BSE and scrapie.

    PubMed

    Lezmi, S; Seuberlich, T; Oevermann, A; Baron, T; Bencsik, A

    2011-11-01

    Scrapie and bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) are both prion diseases affecting ruminants, and these diseases do not share the same public health concerns. Surveillance of the BSE agent in small ruminants has been a great challenge, and the recent identification of diverse prion diseases in ruminants has led to the development of new methods for strain typing. In our study, using immunohistochemistry (IHC), we assessed the distribution of PrP(d) in the brains of 2 experimentally BSE-infected sheep with the ARQ/ARQ genotype. Distribution of PrP(d) in the brain, from the spinal cord to the frontal cortex, was remarkably similar in the 2 sheep despite different inoculation routes and incubation periods. Comparatively, overall PrP(d) brain distribution, evaluated by IHC, in 19 scrapie cases with the ARQ/ARQ, ARQ/VRQ, and VRQ/VRQ genotypes, in some cases showed similarities to the experimentally BSE-infected sheep. There was no exclusive neuroanatomical site with a characteristic and specific PrP(d) type of accumulation induced by the BSE agent. However, a detailed analysis of the topography, types, and intensity of PrP(d) deposits in the frontal cortex, striatum, piriform cortex, hippocampus, mesencephalon, and cerebellum allowed the BSE-affected sheep group to be distinguished from the 19 scrapie cases analyzed in our study. These results strengthen and emphasize the potential interest of PrP(d) brain mapping to help in identifying prion strains in small ruminants.

  13. Predicted secondary structure and membrane topology of the scrapie prion protein.

    PubMed

    Bazan, J F; Fletterick, R J; McKinley, M P; Prusiner, S B

    1987-01-01

    The integral membrane sialoglycoprotein PrPSc is the only identifiable component of the scrapie prion. Scrapie in animals and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans are transmissible, degenerative neurological diseases caused by prions. Standard predictive strategies have been used to analyze the secondary structure of the prion protein in conjunction with Fourier analysis of the primary sequence hydrophobicities to detect potential amphipathic regions. Several hydrophobic segments, a proline- and glycine-rich repeat region and putative glycosylation sites are incorporated into a model for the integral membrane topology of PrP. The complete amino acid sequences of the hamster, human and mouse prion proteins are compared and the effects of residue substitutions upon the predicted conformation of the polypeptide chain are discussed. While PrP has a unique primary structure, its predicted secondary structure shares some interesting features with the serum amyloid A proteins. These proteins undergo a post-translational modification to yield amyloid A, molecules that share with PrP the ability to polymerize into birefringent filaments. Our analyses may explain some experimental observations on PrP, and suggest further studies on the properties of the scrapie and cellular PrP isoforms.

  14. Effect of chemicals, heat, and histopathologic processing on high-infectivity hamster-adapted scrapie virus.

    PubMed

    Brown, P; Rohwer, R G; Green, E M; Gajdusek, D C

    1982-05-01

    High-titered (greater than 10(10) LD50 [50% lethal dose[/g) preparations of scrapie virus-infected hamster brain were subjected to inactivation by various chemicals, autoclaving, and histopathologic processing. Sodium hypochlorite, which reduced infectivity by approximately 4 log LD50/g of brain (99.99%), was somewhat superior to sodium metaperiodate and clearly superior to chlorine dioxide, Lysol (National Laboratories, Montvale, N.J.), iodine, potassium permanganate, and hydrogen peroxide. Most inactivation occurred within 15-30 min of exposure to a chemical, and little if any additional inactivation occurred after 1 hr. Brains processed for histopathologic examination (formalin fixation followed by dehydration in methanol, clearing in chloroform, and embedding in paraffin) retained greater than or equal to 6.8 log LD50/g of the infectivity present in unprocessed control tissues (9.6 log LD50/g). One hour in an autoclave at 121 C reduced the titer of scrapie virus by approximately 7.5 log LD50/g of brain but left 2.5 log LD50/g of residual infectivity. A combination of exposure to chemicals and autoclaving may be necessary to sterilize high-titered scrapie virus-infected tissue.

  15. Cow's milk and goat's milk.

    PubMed

    Turck, Dominique

    2013-01-01

    Cow's milk is increasingly suggested to play a role in the development of chronic degenerative, non-communicable disorders whereas goat's milk is advocated as having several health benefits. Cow's milk is a rich and cheap source of protein and calcium, and a valuable food for bone health. Despite their high content in saturated fats, consumption of full-fat dairy products does not seem to cause significant changes in cardiovascular disease risk variables. Early introduction of cow's milk is a strong negative determinant of iron status. Unmodified cow's milk does not meet nutritional requirements of infants although it is acceptable to add small volumes of cow's milk to complementary foods. Cow's milk protein allergy has a prevalence ranging from 2 to 7%, and the age of recovery is usually around 2-3 years. The evidence linking cow's milk intake to a later risk of type 1 diabetes or chronic degenerative, non-communicable disorders (obesity, metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes, hypertension) is not convincing. Milk probably protects against colorectal cancer, diets high in calcium are a probable cause of prostate cancer, and there is limited evidence suggesting that high consumption of milk and dairy products increases the risk for prostate cancer. There is no evidence to support the use of a cow's milk-free diet as a primary treatment for individuals with autistic spectrum disorders. Unmodified goat's milk is not suitable for infants because of the high protein and minerals content and of a low folate content. Goat's milk has no clear nutritional advantage over cow's milk and is not less allergenic. The European Food Safety Authority recently stated that proteins from goat's milk can be suitable as a protein source for infant and follow-on formula, provided the final product complies with the compositional criteria laid down in Directive 2006/141/EC.

  16. Comparison of detergent and protease enzyme combinations for the detection of scrapie-associated fibrils from the central nervous system of sheep naturally affected with scrapie.

    PubMed

    Stack, M J; Aldrich, A M; Davis, L A

    1997-02-01

    Standardized samples of tissue from the central nervous system of four sheep naturally affected with scrapie and from four healthy control sheep were subjected to a centrifugal extraction technique used to obtain scrapie-associated fibrils; the latter were then demonstrated by negative-contrast transmission electron microscopy. This regime was used to evaluate the fibril yield obtained from the 25 possible combinations of five different detergents and five different proteolytic enzymes. N-lauroylsarcosine detergent was found to be the most efficient detergent for all five enzymes, followed by sulphabetaine 3-14. Sodium dodecyl sulphate detergent was successful only in combination with a subtilisin Carlsberg enzyme. Octylglucoside and nonidet P40 detergents did not produce fibrils with any of the enzymes. Proteinase K was the least efficient of the five enzymes when used in combination with N-lauroylsarcosine; subtilisin Carlsberg, clostripain, pronase and trypsin enzymes all gave higher fibril yields. A combination of N-lauroylsarcosine detergent and subtilisin Carlsberg proteolytic enzyme gave the highest fibril yield.

  17. Congenital abnormalities of the goat.

    PubMed

    Basrur, P K

    1993-03-01

    Congenital abnormalities of genetic and environmental causes constitute a striking proportion of the afflictions seen in goats. These include a variety of malformations and metabolic diseases that could occur in all breeds but tend to exhibit predisposition in some breeds of goats. Genetic abnormalities for which the carrier state is detectable with the aid of enzymes and surface protein markers can be eliminated from goat populations, whereas common polygenic disorders including udder problems in does and gynecomastia in bucks are more difficult to eradicate because the mutant genes responsible for these traits generally do not declare themselves until inbreeding brings together a critical concentration of liability genes to create a crisis. A substantial reduction of common abnormalities in this species, such as intersexuality in dairy breeds, abortion in Angora breed, and arthritis in the Pygmy breed, will require a change in breeders' preference and selection practice. In making these changes, however, the beneficial traits will have to be balanced against the undesirable effects of the selected mutant genes (pleiotropy), which hold the key to success or failure of a breed under domestication.

  18. Does the Presence of Scrapie Affect the Ability of Current Statutory Discriminatory Tests To Detect the Presence of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy?

    PubMed Central

    Chaplin, M. J.; Vickery, C. M.; Simon, S.; Davis, L.; Denyer, M.; Lockey, R.; Stack, M. J.; O'Connor, M. J.; Bishop, K.; Gough, K. C.; Maddison, B. C.; Thorne, L.; Spiropoulos, J.

    2015-01-01

    Current European Commission (EC) surveillance regulations require discriminatory testing of all transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE)-positive small ruminant (SR) samples in order to classify them as bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) or non-BSE. This requires a range of tests, including characterization by bioassay in mouse models. Since 2005, naturally occurring BSE has been identified in two goats. It has also been demonstrated that more than one distinct TSE strain can coinfect a single animal in natural field situations. This study assesses the ability of the statutory methods as listed in the regulation to identify BSE in a blinded series of brain samples, in which ovine BSE and distinct isolates of scrapie are mixed at various ratios ranging from 99% to 1%. Additionally, these current statutory tests were compared with a new in vitro discriminatory method, which uses serial protein misfolding cyclic amplification (sPMCA). Western blotting consistently detected 50% BSE within a mixture, but at higher dilutions it had variable success. The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method consistently detected BSE only when it was present as 99% of the mixture, with variable success at higher dilutions. Bioassay and sPMCA reported BSE in all samples where it was present, down to 1%. sPMCA also consistently detected the presence of BSE in mixtures at 0.1%. While bioassay is the only validated method that allows comprehensive phenotypic characterization of an unknown TSE isolate, the sPMCA assay appears to offer a fast and cost-effective alternative for the screening of unknown isolates when the purpose of the investigation was solely to determine the presence or absence of BSE. PMID:26041899

  19. Does the Presence of Scrapie Affect the Ability of Current Statutory Discriminatory Tests To Detect the Presence of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy?

    PubMed

    Simmons, M M; Chaplin, M J; Vickery, C M; Simon, S; Davis, L; Denyer, M; Lockey, R; Stack, M J; O'Connor, M J; Bishop, K; Gough, K C; Maddison, B C; Thorne, L; Spiropoulos, J

    2015-08-01

    Current European Commission (EC) surveillance regulations require discriminatory testing of all transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE)-positive small ruminant (SR) samples in order to classify them as bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) or non-BSE. This requires a range of tests, including characterization by bioassay in mouse models. Since 2005, naturally occurring BSE has been identified in two goats. It has also been demonstrated that more than one distinct TSE strain can coinfect a single animal in natural field situations. This study assesses the ability of the statutory methods as listed in the regulation to identify BSE in a blinded series of brain samples, in which ovine BSE and distinct isolates of scrapie are mixed at various ratios ranging from 99% to 1%. Additionally, these current statutory tests were compared with a new in vitro discriminatory method, which uses serial protein misfolding cyclic amplification (sPMCA). Western blotting consistently detected 50% BSE within a mixture, but at higher dilutions it had variable success. The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method consistently detected BSE only when it was present as 99% of the mixture, with variable success at higher dilutions. Bioassay and sPMCA reported BSE in all samples where it was present, down to 1%. sPMCA also consistently detected the presence of BSE in mixtures at 0.1%. While bioassay is the only validated method that allows comprehensive phenotypic characterization of an unknown TSE isolate, the sPMCA assay appears to offer a fast and cost-effective alternative for the screening of unknown isolates when the purpose of the investigation was solely to determine the presence or absence of BSE. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  20. The evolution of the prevalence of classical scrapie in sheep in Great Britain using surveillance data between 2005 and 2012.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Mark; Ortiz-Pelaez, Angel

    2014-11-01

    After the decline of the Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) epidemic in Great Britain (GB), scrapie remains the most prevalent animal Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathy (TSE) present in GB. A number of control measures have been implemented for classical scrapie, and since 2005 there has been a large reduction in the number of observed cases. The objective of this study is to estimate two measures of disease frequency using up to date surveillance data collected during and after the implementation of different control measures established since 2004, and breeding for resistance schemes that ran from 2001 until 2009. This would enable an assessment of the effectiveness of both the breeding for resistance programme and the compulsory eradication measures in reducing the prevalence of scrapie in GB. Evaluation of the sensitivity of the rapid post-mortem test for scrapie indicated that it detected scrapie in the last 25% of the incubation period. A back-calculation model was developed to estimate the prevalence of infection at animal and flock-level. The results of the model indicated a mean drop of infection prevalence of 31% each year, leading to a 90% drop in infection prevalence between 2005, with an estimate of 5737 infected sheep in GB in 2012. The risks of classical scrapie infection in animals with genotypes of National Scrapie Plan Types I-IV (all other genotypes), relative to Type V (all genotypes containing V136 R154 Q171 and not A136 R154 R171), were estimated to be: 0, 0.0008, 0.07, and 0.21 respectively. The model estimated a very low rate of reporting of clinical suspects and a large decline from 2007 of the probability of a sheep being reported as a clinical suspect. The model also estimated that the expected number of sheep holdings with classical scrapie in 2012 was 215 (95% confidence interval: 33-437), out of a total of approximately 72,000 sheep holdings in GB. Model estimates indicate that the prevalence in 2012 has dropped to 10% of that

  1. A sightability model for mountain goats

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rice, C.G.; Jenkins, K.J.; Chang, W.-Y.

    2009-01-01

    Unbiased estimates of mountain goat (Oreamnos americanus) populations are key to meeting diverse harvest management and conservation objectives. We developed logistic regression models of factors influencing sightability of mountain goat groups during helicopter surveys throughout the Cascades and Olympic Ranges in western Washington during summers, 20042007. We conducted 205 trials of the ability of aerial survey crews to detect groups of mountain goats whose presence was known based on simultaneous direct observation from the ground (n 84), Global Positioning System (GPS) telemetry (n 115), or both (n 6). Aerial survey crews detected 77 and 79 of all groups known to be present based on ground observers and GPS collars, respectively. The best models indicated that sightability of mountain goat groups was a function of the number of mountain goats in a group, presence of terrain obstruction, and extent of overstory vegetation. Aerial counts of mountain goats within groups did not differ greatly from known group sizes, indicating that under-counting bias within detected groups of mountain goats was small. We applied HorvitzThompson-like sightability adjustments to 1,139 groups of mountain goats observed in the Cascade and Olympic ranges, Washington, USA, from 2004 to 2007. Estimated mean sightability of individual animals was 85 but ranged 0.750.91 in areas with low and high sightability, respectively. Simulations of mountain goat surveys indicated that precision of population estimates adjusted for sightability biases increased with population size and number of replicate surveys, providing general guidance for the design of future surveys. Because survey conditions, group sizes, and habitat occupied by goats vary among surveys, we recommend using sightability correction methods to decrease bias in population estimates from aerial surveys of mountain goats.

  2. A Bayesian framework to assess the potential for controlling classical scrapie in sheep flocks using a live diagnostic test.

    PubMed

    Gryspeirt, Aiko; Gubbins, Simon

    2013-09-01

    Current strategies to control classical scrapie remove animals at risk of scrapie rather than those known to be infected with the scrapie agent. Advances in diagnostic tests, however, suggest that a more targeted approach involving the application of a rapid live test may be feasible in future. Here we consider the use of two diagnostic tests: recto-anal mucosa-associated lymphatic tissue (RAMALT) biopsies; and a blood-based assay. To assess their impact we developed a stochastic age- and prion protein (PrP) genotype-structured model for the dynamics of scrapie within a sheep flock. Parameters were estimated in a Bayesian framework to facilitate integration of a number of disparate datasets and to allow parameter uncertainty to be incorporated in model predictions. In small flocks a control strategy based on removal of clinical cases was sufficient to control disease and more stringent measures (including the use of a live diagnostic test) did not significantly reduce outbreak size or duration. In medium or large flocks strategies in which a large proportion of animals are tested with either live diagnostic test significantly reduced outbreak size, but not always duration, compared with removal of clinical cases. However, the current Compulsory Scrapie Flocks Scheme (CSFS) significantly reduced outbreak size and duration compared with both removal of clinical cases and all strategies using a live diagnostic test. Accordingly, under the assumptions made in the present study there is little benefit from implementing a control strategy which makes use of a live diagnostic test.

  3. Trends in genotype frequency resulting from breeding for resistance to classical scrapie in Belgium (2006~2011)

    PubMed Central

    Van der Heyden, Sara; Roels, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    In sheep, susceptibility to scrapie is mainly determined by codons 136, 154, and 171 of the PRNP gene. Five haplotypes are usually present (ARR, ARQ, ARH, AHQ, and VRQ). The ARR haplotype confers the greatest resistance to classical scrapie while VRQ renders animals most susceptible. In 2004, the European Union implemented a breeding program that promotes selection of the ARR haplotype while reducing the incidence of VRQ. From 2006 to 2011 in Belgium, frequency for the ARR/ARR genotypes increased from 38.3% to 63.8% (n = 6,437), the ARQ haplotype diminished from 21.1% to 12.9%, and the VRQ haplotype decreased from 2.0% to 1.7%. The status of codon 141, a determinant for atypical scrapie, was also evaluated. Out of 27 different breeds (n = 5,163), nine were abundant. The ARR/ARR frequency increased in eight of these nine major breeds. The selection program has had a major impact on the ARR haplotype frequency in Belgium. However, the occurrence of atypical scrapie represents a critical point for this program that warrants the continuous monitoring of scrapie. Additionally, genotype frequencies among the breeds varied greatly. Texel, a breed that is common in Belgium, can still be selected for due to its average ARR frequency. PMID:23388443

  4. Finishing Lambs and Goat Kids on Pasture

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Producing goats and lambs for ethnic markets offers an economic opportunity for small farm producers in the Appalachian Region of the U.S. There are a variety of forages used in goat and sheep production systems. Overall, nutrients available to ruminants depend upon the types and combinations of p...

  5. Goats, sheep, and cattle: some basics

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pasture-based finishing systems for meat goats, sheep and cattle are growing rapidly in the eastern USA. Increasing demand for pasture-raised meat and dairy products requires renewed efforts to communicate the best practical information in order to initiate mixed grazing with goats, sheep, and beef...

  6. The endogenous GABA bioactivity of camel, bovine, goat and human milks.

    PubMed

    Limon, Agenor; Gallegos-Perez, Jose-Luis; Reyes-Ruiz, Jorge M; Aljohi, Mohammad A; Alshanqeeti, Ali S; Miledi, Ricardo

    2014-02-15

    GABA orally administered has several beneficial effects on health, including the regulation of hyperglycaemic states in humans. Those effects are similar to the effects reported for camel milk (CMk); however, it is not known whether compounds with GABAergic activity are present in milk from camels or other species. We determined CMk free-GABA concentration by LS/MS and its bioactivity on human GABA receptors. We found that camel and goat milks have significantly more bioavailable GABA than cow and human milks and are able to activate GABAρ receptors. The relationship between GABA and taurine concentrations suggests that whole camel milk may be more efficient to activate GABAρ1 receptors than goat milk. Because GABAρ receptors are normally found in enteroendocrine cells in the lumen of the digestive tract, these results suggest that GABA in camel and goat milk may participate in GABA-modulated functions of enteroendocrine cells in the GI lumen.

  7. Progress report- African goat genome and genetic improvement project

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    An overview of the progress for the Feed the Future funded African Goat Project will be presented. The overview will include progress on producing a goat genome assembly from a San Clemente goat. Additional progress will be reported for phnotype and sample collection from African goat populations an...

  8. Lack of prion accumulation in lymphoid tissues of PRNP ARQ/ARR sheep intracranially inoculated with the agent of scrapie.

    PubMed

    Greenlee, Justin J; Kunkle, Robert A; Richt, Jürgen A; Nicholson, Eric M; Hamir, Amir N

    2014-01-01

    Sheep scrapie is a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy that can be transmitted horizontally. The prion protein gene (PRNP) profoundly influences the susceptibility of sheep to the scrapie agent and the tissue levels and distribution of PrPSc in affected sheep. The purpose of this study was to compare the survival time and PrPSc tissue distribution in sheep with highly resistant and highly susceptible PRNP genotypes after intracranial inoculation of the agent of scrapie. Five sheep each of genotype VRQ/VRQ, VRQ/ARR or ARQ/ARR were inoculated. Sheep were euthanized when clinical signs of scrapie became severe. Clinical signs, microscopic lesions, and western blot profiles were uniform across genotypes and consistent with manifestations of classical scrapie. Mean survival time differences were associated with the 171 polymorphic site with VRQ/VRQ sheep surviving 18 months, whereas VRQ/ARR and ARQ/ARR sheep survived 60 and 56 months, respectively. Labeling of PrPSc by immunohistochemistry revealed similar accumulations in central nervous system tissues regardless of host genotype. Immunoreactivity for PrPSc in lymphoid tissue was consistently abundant in VRQ/VRQ, present but confined to tonsil or retropharyngeal lymph node in 4/5 VRQ/ARR, and totally absent in ARQ/ARR sheep. The results of this study demonstrate the susceptibility of sheep with the ARQ/ARR genotype to scrapie by the intracranial inoculation route with PrPSc accumulation in CNS tissues, but prolonged incubation times and lack of PrPSc in lymphoid tissue.

  9. Scrapie Agent (Strain 263K) Can Transmit Disease via the Oral Route after Persistence in Soil over Years

    PubMed Central

    Groschup, Martin H.; Peters, Rainer; Beekes, Michael; Terytze, Konstantin

    2007-01-01

    The persistence of infectious biomolecules in soil constitutes a substantial challenge. This holds particularly true with respect to prions, the causative agents of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) such as scrapie, bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), or chronic wasting disease (CWD). Various studies have indicated that prions are able to persist in soil for years without losing their pathogenic activity. Dissemination of prions into the environment can occur from several sources, e.g., infectious placenta or amniotic fluid of sheep. Furthermore, environmental contamination by saliva, excrements or non-sterilized agricultural organic fertilizer is conceivable. Natural transmission of scrapie in the field seems to occur via the alimentary tract in the majority of cases, and scrapie-free sheep flocks can become infected on pastures where outbreaks of scrapie had been observed before. These findings point to a sustained contagion in the environment, and notably the soil. By using outdoor lysimeters, we simulated a contamination of standard soil with hamster-adapted 263K scrapie prions, and analyzed the presence and biological activity of the soil-associated PrPSc and infectivity by Western blotting and hamster bioassay, respectively. Our results showed that 263K scrapie agent can persist in soil at least over 29 months. Strikingly, not only the contaminated soil itself retained high levels of infectivity, as evidenced by oral administration to Syrian hamsters, but also feeding of aqueous soil extracts was able to induce disease in the reporter animals. We could also demonstrate that PrPSc in soil, extracted after 21 months, provides a catalytically active seed in the protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA) reaction. PMCA opens therefore a perspective for considerably improving the detectability of prions in soil samples from the field. PMID:17502917

  10. Lack of Prion Accumulation in Lymphoid Tissues of PRNP ARQ/ARR Sheep Intracranially Inoculated with the Agent of Scrapie

    PubMed Central

    Greenlee, Justin J.; Kunkle, Robert A.; Richt, Jürgen A.; Nicholson, Eric M.

    2014-01-01

    Sheep scrapie is a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy that can be transmitted horizontally. The prion protein gene (PRNP) profoundly influences the susceptibility of sheep to the scrapie agent and the tissue levels and distribution of PrPSc in affected sheep. The purpose of this study was to compare the survival time and PrPSc tissue distribution in sheep with highly resistant and highly susceptible PRNP genotypes after intracranial inoculation of the agent of scrapie. Five sheep each of genotype VRQ/VRQ, VRQ/ARR or ARQ/ARR were inoculated. Sheep were euthanized when clinical signs of scrapie became severe. Clinical signs, microscopic lesions, and western blot profiles were uniform across genotypes and consistent with manifestations of classical scrapie. Mean survival time differences were associated with the 171 polymorphic site with VRQ/VRQ sheep surviving 18 months, whereas VRQ/ARR and ARQ/ARR sheep survived 60 and 56 months, respectively. Labeling of PrPSc by immunohistochemistry revealed similar accumulations in central nervous system tissues regardless of host genotype. Immunoreactivity for PrPSc in lymphoid tissue was consistently abundant in VRQ/VRQ, present but confined to tonsil or retropharyngeal lymph node in 4/5 VRQ/ARR, and totally absent in ARQ/ARR sheep. The results of this study demonstrate the susceptibility of sheep with the ARQ/ARR genotype to scrapie by the intracranial inoculation route with PrPSc accumulation in CNS tissues, but prolonged incubation times and lack of PrPSc in lymphoid tissue. PMID:25233232

  11. Statins are ineffective at reducing neuroinflammation or prolonging survival in scrapie-infected mice.

    PubMed

    Carroll, James A; Race, Brent; Phillips, Katie; Striebel, James F; Chesebro, Bruce

    2017-08-01

    Neuroinflammation is a prominent component of several neurodegenerative diseases, including multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, tauopathies, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and prion diseases. In such conditions, the ability to decrease neuroinflammation by drug therapy may influence disease progression. Statins have been used to treat hyperlipidemia as well as reduce neuroinflammation and oxidative stress in various tissues. In previous studies, treatment of scrapie-infected mice with the type 1 statins, simvastatin or pravastatin, showed a small beneficial effect on survival time. In the current study, to increase the effectiveness of statin therapy, we treated infected mice with atorvastatin, a type 2 statin that has improved pharmacokinetics over many type 1 statins. Treatments with either simvastatin or pravastatin were tested for comparison. We evaluated scrapie-infected mice for protease-resistant PrP (PrPres) accumulation, gliosis, neuroinflammation and time until advanced clinical disease requiring euthanasia. All three statin treatments reduced total serum cholesterol ≥40 % in mice. However, gliosis and PrPres deposition were similar in statin-treated and untreated infected mice. Time to euthanasia due to advanced clinical signs was not changed in statin-treated mice relative to untreated mice, a finding at odds with previous reports. Expression of 84 inflammatory genes involved in neuroinflammation was also quantitated. Seven genes were reduced by pravastatin, and one gene was reduced by atorvastatin. In contrast, simvastatin therapy did not reduce any of the tested genes, but did slightly increase the expression of Ccl2 and Cxcl13. Our studies indicate that none of the three statins tested were effective in reducing scrapie-induced neuroinflammation or neuropathogenesis.

  12. Early behavioural changes in scrapie-affected mice and the influence of dapsone.

    PubMed

    Guenther, K; Deacon, R M; Perry, V H; Rawlins, J N

    2001-07-01

    Behavioural testing can reveal effects in scrapie-infected mice long before overt clinical signs appear (Betmouni et al., 1999, Psychobiology, 27, 63-71). These effects may be partly attributable to an early, atypical inflammatory response in the brain (Betmouni et al., 1996, Neuroscience, 74, 1-5). The present study replicated and extended these findings, and examined the effect of chronic treatment with dapsone. This anti-inflammatory compound has been reported to delay disease onset in a rat model of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (Manuelidis et al., 1998, Lancet, 352, 456). Although the doses used in the present study were higher than those of Manuelidis et al. (1998), no attenuation of the disease was seen in either behavioural or subsequent histological tests. Burrowing, i.e. displacing food pellets from a tube in the home cage, decreased from around week 12 in scrapie-infected mice, as did consumption of palatable glucose solution. Concurrently, ambulation in an open field increased, as did rearing at around week 17. Spontaneous alternation was impaired around this time. Around 18 weeks, motor performance on an inverted screen, horizontal bar, rotating rod and static rods decreased. Nest construction was impaired at 20 weeks. Overt clinical signs (reduction in mobility, hunched posture, poor coat condition, bladder enlargement) only occurred after week 20, when the mice were prepared for histology. The ME7 scrapie-infected mice thus showed a characteristic complex of neurological and behavioural changes during the course of the disease that were not ameliorated by dapsone. These changes appeared well before clinical signs were prominent.

  13. Potent inhibition of scrapie prion replication in cultured cells by bis-acridines

    PubMed Central

    May, Barnaby C. H.; Fafarman, Aaron T.; Hong, Septima B.; Rogers, Michael; Deady, Leslie W.; Prusiner, Stanley B.; Cohen, Fred E.

    2003-01-01

    Prion diseases are characterized by an accumulation of PrPSc, a misfolded isoform of the normal cellular prion protein, PrPC. We previously reported the bioactivity of acridine-based compounds against PrPSc replication in scrapie-infected neuroblastoma cells and now report the improved potency of bis-acridine compounds. Bis-acridines are characterized by a dimeric motif, comprising two acridine heterocycles tethered by a linker. A library of bis-(6-chloro-2-methoxy-acridin-9-yl) and bis-(7-chloro-2-methoxy-benzo[b][1,5]naphthyridin-10-yl) analogs was synthesized to explore the effect of structurally diverse linkers on PrPSc replication in scrapie-infected neuroblastoma cells. Structure–activity analysis revealed that linker length and structure are important determinants for inhibition of prion replication in cultured scrapied cells. Three bis-acridine analogs, (6-chloro-2-methoxy-acridin-9-yl)-(3-{4-[3-(6-chloro-2-methoxy-acridin-9-ylamino)-propyl]-piperazin-1-yl}-propyl)-amine, N,N′-bis-(6-chloro-2-methoxy-acridin-9-yl)-1,8-diamino-3,6-dioxaoctane, and (1-{[4-(6-chloro-2-methoxy-acridin-9-ylamino)-butyl]-[3-(6-chloro-2-methoxy-acridin-9-ylamino)-propyl]-carbamoyl}-ethyl)-carbamic acid tert-butyl ester, showed half-maximal inhibition of PrPSc formation at 40, 25, and 30 nM, respectively, and were not cytotoxic to uninfected neuroblastoma cells at concentrations of 500 nM. Our data suggest that bis-acridine analogs may provide a potent alternative to the acridine-based compound quinacrine, which is currently under clinical evaluation for the treatment of prion disease. PMID:12626750

  14. Eimeria species in dairy goats in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Cavalcante, Antônio César Rocha; Teixeira, Marcel; Monteiro, Jomar Patrício; Lopes, Carlos Wilson Gomes

    2012-02-10

    The focus of this work is to determine the distribution and identify species of Eimeria parasites of dairy goats in the livestock of the National Goat and Sheep Research Center in Sobral, State of Ceará, Northeast Brazil. Results showed the presence of multiple species in 196 of 215 analyzed samples (91.2%). Fifty five out of these were from kids (28%) and 141 from adult goats (72%). Eight different Eimeria species were identified and their prevalence in the herd was: Eimeria alijevi Musaev, 1970 (26.7%), E. arloingi (Marotel, 1905) Martin, 1909 (20.6%), E. hirci Chevalier, 1966 (18%), E. ninakohlyakimovae Yakimoff & Rastegaieff, 1930 (16.2%), E. jolchijevi Musaev, 1970 (8.7%), E. christenseni Levine, Ivens & Fritz, 1962 (6%), E. caprovina Lima, 1980 (2.8%) and E. caprina Lima, 1979 (1%). Moreover, E. ninakohlyakimovae showed higher prevalence in kids (97%), followed by E. arloingi and E. alijevi (88%). On the other hand, E. alijevi (77%) was more common in adult goats followed by E. hirci (74%) and E. ninakohlyakimovae (70%). The species E. caprina had low frequency in both kids (27%) and adult goats (13%). Data indicated that infection was relatively common among kids and adult goats. The implementation of a routine diagnostic strategy can be useful in maintaining Eimeria populations under monitoring and will enable the determination of its potential impact on dairy goat herds in Northeast Brazil.

  15. Toxoplasmosis and iodine deficiency in Angora goats.

    PubMed

    Slosárková, S; Literák, I; Skrivánek, M; Svobodová, V; Suchý, P; Herzig, I

    1999-02-25

    Toxoplasmosis was diagnosed in two goat herds in the Czech Republic. The 1996 outbreak in the herd of Angora goats was associated with abortions and births of weak kids. No apparent signs of toxoplasmosis were observed in the herd of White Short-Haired (WSH) goats reared under similar conditions. Seroprevalences of 60% and 66% tested by complement fixation and indirect fluorescent antibody tests, respectively, were found in the herd of Angora goats during the outbreak of clinical toxoplasmosis. Significantly lower values were recorded in this herd in years 1994 and 1997 and in the herd of WSH goats between years 1994-1996. Iodine deficiency was also demonstrated in the herd of Angora goats in 1996. Goitre was detected by clinical examination in 39% of animals and mean urinary iodine concentration was 8.0+/-4.65 microg per 11. This concentration rose significantly to 15.7+/-5.02 microg per 11 in the subsequent year. Effects of iodine deficiency on clinical manifestation of toxoplasmosis in Angora goats were discussed.

  16. Copper toxicosis in a dairy goat herd.

    PubMed

    Cornish, Jennifer; Angelos, John; Puschner, Birgit; Miller, Grant; George, Lisle

    2007-08-15

    A closed herd of 400 mixed-breed dairy goats was examined because of a decrease in milk production and increase in mortality rate. Nine animals had died within a 1-month period. Clinical signs were evident only in lactating goats and included anorexia and recumbency. In the most severely affected goats, signs progressed to neurologic abnormalities and death. Serum aspartate aminotransferase activity, gamma-glutamyltransferase activity, and total bilirubin concentration were high in clinically affected does, but no evidence of hemolysis was found. A diagnosis of copper toxicosis was made on the basis of high liver and kidney copper concentrations and histologic evidence of hepatic necrosis. Goats were found to have been fed a mineral mix containing 3,050 ppm copper for 9 months prior to the onset of copper toxicosis. Overall, there was no consistent relationship between serum hepatic enzyme activities, serum copper concentration, and liver copper concentration. Clinically affected goats were treated with penicillamine, ammonium molybdate, sodium thiosulfate, and vitamin E. Penicillamine increased urine copper excretion in treated does versus untreated control animals. An increased incidence of infectious disease was identified in the herd 9 months later. Liver vitamin E concentration was low in 10 of the 12 goats that underwent necropsy. Findings suggested that penicillamine may be an effective treatment for goats with copper toxicosis. Production losses months after the diagnosis was made suggested that the intoxication had a prolonged animal welfare and economic impacts.

  17. Transabdominal ultrasonographic findings in goats with paratuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Tharwat, Mohamed; Al-Sobayil, Fahd; Hashad, Mahmoud; Buczinski, Sébastien

    2012-01-01

    This study describes the transabdominal ultrasonographic findings in 54 goats with confirmed Johne’s disease (JD). Compared with the control group (0.8 ± 0.4 mm thick), the test group presented with mild (2.8 ± 0.2 mm), moderate (4.2 ± 0.4 mm), and severe (6.9 ± 1.1 mm) thickening of the intestinal wall. The most outstanding ultrasonographic findings were pronounced enlargement of the mesenteric lymph nodes in 49 goats. In 36 goats, the enlarged lymph nodes showed a hypoechoic cortex and a hyperechoic medulla. In 7 goats, the cortex and medulla were hypoechoic. In 5 goats, the cortex and the medulla could not be differentiated. In the remaining cases, the cortex and medulla contained small hypoechoic lesions. Necropsy findings included enlarged mesenteric lymph nodes in 52 goats and thickening of the small intestinal wall in 30 goats. Compared with the postmortem results, the antemortem ultrasound sensitivity in detecting intestinal wall thickness and enlarged mesenteric lymph nodes was 80% and 94%, respectively. PMID:23543924

  18. Eimeria infections in goats in Southern Portugal.

    PubMed

    Silva, Liliana Machado Ribeiro da; Vila-Viçosa, Maria João Martins; Nunes, Telmo; Taubert, Anja; Hermosilla, Carlos; Cortes, Helder Carola Espiguinha

    2014-01-01

    Coccidiosis caused by Eimeria species is a major form of intestinal infection affecting intensively and semi-intensively reared goats. The province of Alentejo is the main goat-producing area in Portugal. Therefore, all 15 Serpentina goat farms in Alentejo were analyzed regarding the occurrence and diversity of Eimeria species. Fecal samples obtained from 144 animals (52.1% dairy goats, 47.9% pre-pubertal goats) were examined using the modified McMaster technique to determine the number of oocysts per gram of feces. Eimeria spp. oocysts were present in 98.61% of the fecal samples and, overall, nine different Eimeria species were identified. The most prevalent species were E. ninakohlyakimovae (88%) and E. arloingi (85%), followed by E. alijevi (63%) and E. caprovina (63%). The average number of oocysts shed was significantly lower in dairy goats than in pre-adult animals. Astonishingly, no clinical signs of coccidiosis were observed in any of the animals examined, even though they were shedding high numbers of oocysts and were infected with highly pathogenic species. Thus, implementation of routine diagnostic investigation of the occurrence and diversity of caprine Eimeria species may be a useful tool for determination and better understanding of their potential economic impact on goat herds in southern Portugal.

  19. Hepatic necrosis following halothane anesthesia in goats.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, T D; Raffe, M R; Cox, V S; Stevens, D L; O'Leary, T P

    1986-12-15

    One goat anesthetized with thiamylal sodium, xylazine, and halothane for repair of an abominal hernia, and 7 of 29 goats similarly anesthetized for an experiment unrelated to considerations of anesthesia, developed signs of hepatic failure within 24 hours of anesthesia. Affected goats had high values for serum aspartate transaminase and serum total bilirubin by 12 to 24 hours after induction of anesthesia. Necropsy of the 8 affected goats revealed centrilobular to massive hepatic necrosis (8 of 8), brain lesions consistent with hepatic encephalopathy (3 of 4), and acute renal tubular necrosis (6 of 6). Two unaffected goats had no hepatic necrosis. Causes of hepatic necrosis other than those related to anesthesia (eg, infectious agents, toxins) were ruled out by lack of supporting necropsy findings or were considered unlikely because of lack of opportunity for exposure. Hepatic lesions in these goats closely resembled those described in human beings with halothane-associated hepatic injury, although in both species these lesions are nonspecific at the gross and light microscopic levels. The pathogenesis of halothane-associated hepatic injury in goats, as in human beings, remains to be determined.

  20. Gene expression profiling of mesenteric lymph nodes from sheep with natural scrapie

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Prion diseases are characterized by the accumulation of the pathogenic PrPSc protein, mainly in the brain and the lymphoreticular system. Although prions multiply/accumulate in the lymph nodes without any detectable pathology, transcriptional changes in this tissue may reflect biological processes that contribute to the molecular pathogenesis of prion diseases. Little is known about the molecular processes that occur in the lymphoreticular system in early and late stages of prion disease. We performed a microarray-based study to identify genes that are differentially expressed at different disease stages in the mesenteric lymph node of sheep naturally infected with scrapie. Oligo DNA microarrays were used to identify gene-expression profiles in the early/middle (preclinical) and late (clinical) stages of the disease. Results In the clinical stage of the disease, we detected 105 genes that were differentially expressed (≥2-fold change in expression). Of these, 43 were upregulated and 62 downregulated as compared with age-matched negative controls. Fewer genes (50) were differentially expressed in the preclinical stage of the disease. Gene Ontology enrichment analysis revealed that the differentially expressed genes were largely associated with the following terms: glycoprotein, extracellular region, disulfide bond, cell cycle and extracellular matrix. Moreover, some of the annotated genes could be grouped into 3 specific signaling pathways: focal adhesion, PPAR signaling and ECM-receptor interaction. We discuss the relationship between the observed gene expression profiles and PrPSc deposition and the potential involvement in the pathogenesis of scrapie of 7 specific differentially expressed genes whose expression levels were confirmed by real time-PCR. Conclusions The present findings identify new genes that may be involved in the pathogenesis of natural scrapie infection in the lymphoreticular system, and confirm previous reports describing scrapie

  1. Gene expression profiling of mesenteric lymph nodes from sheep with natural scrapie.

    PubMed

    Filali, Hicham; Martín-Burriel, Inmaculada; Harders, Frank; Varona, Luis; Hedman, Carlos; Mediano, Diego R; Monzón, Marta; Bossers, Alex; Badiola, Juan J; Bolea, Rosa

    2014-01-23

    Prion diseases are characterized by the accumulation of the pathogenic PrPSc protein, mainly in the brain and the lymphoreticular system. Although prions multiply/accumulate in the lymph nodes without any detectable pathology, transcriptional changes in this tissue may reflect biological processes that contribute to the molecular pathogenesis of prion diseases. Little is known about the molecular processes that occur in the lymphoreticular system in early and late stages of prion disease. We performed a microarray-based study to identify genes that are differentially expressed at different disease stages in the mesenteric lymph node of sheep naturally infected with scrapie. Oligo DNA microarrays were used to identify gene-expression profiles in the early/middle (preclinical) and late (clinical) stages of the disease. In the clinical stage of the disease, we detected 105 genes that were differentially expressed (≥2-fold change in expression). Of these, 43 were upregulated and 62 downregulated as compared with age-matched negative controls. Fewer genes (50) were differentially expressed in the preclinical stage of the disease. Gene Ontology enrichment analysis revealed that the differentially expressed genes were largely associated with the following terms: glycoprotein, extracellular region, disulfide bond, cell cycle and extracellular matrix. Moreover, some of the annotated genes could be grouped into 3 specific signaling pathways: focal adhesion, PPAR signaling and ECM-receptor interaction. We discuss the relationship between the observed gene expression profiles and PrPSc deposition and the potential involvement in the pathogenesis of scrapie of 7 specific differentially expressed genes whose expression levels were confirmed by real time-PCR. The present findings identify new genes that may be involved in the pathogenesis of natural scrapie infection in the lymphoreticular system, and confirm previous reports describing scrapie-induced alterations in the

  2. Heterogeneity of the Abnormal Prion Protein (PrPSc) of the Chandler Scrapie Strain

    PubMed Central

    Kasai, Kazuo; Iwamaru, Yoshifumi; Masujin, Kentaro; Imamura, Morikazu; Mohri, Shirou; Yokoyama, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    The pathological prion protein, PrPSc, displays various sizes of aggregates. In this study, we investigated the conformation, aggregation stability and proteinase K (PK)-sensitivity of small and large PrPSc aggregates of mouse-adapted prion strains. We showed that small PrPSc aggregates, previously thought to be PK-sensitive, are resistant to PK digestion. Furthermore, we showed that small PrPSc aggregates of the Chandler scrapie strain have greater resistance to PK digestion and aggregation-denaturation than large PrPSc aggregates of this strain. We conclude that this strain consists of heterogeneous PrPSc. PMID:25436883

  3. Pharmacokinetics of difloxacin in goats.

    PubMed

    Atef, M; el-Banna, H A; Abd El-Aty, A M; Goudah, A

    2002-07-01

    The pharmacokinetic properties of difloxacin following intravenous (i.v.) and intramuscular (i.m.) administration in goats were investigated. Difloxacin was administered in a single dose of 5 mg/kg body weight for both routes and was assayed in biological fluids (serum and urine) to determine its concentrations, kinetic behaviour and systemic availability. Following a single i.v. injection, the serum difloxacin level was best approximated to follow a two-compartment open model using weighted non-linear regression analysis. The elimination half-life (t1/2 beta) was 6.3 +/- 0.11 h. The volume of distribution at steady-state (Vdss) was 1.1 +/- 0.012 L/kg and the total body clearance (Cltot) was 0.13 +/- 0.001 L/kg/h. Following a single i.m. administration, difloxacin was rapidly absorbed and the mean peak serum concentration (4.1 +/- 0.23 micrograms/ml) was achieved 1 h post administration. The extent of serum protein binding of difloxacin in goats was 13.79 +/- 1.02% and the systemic availability was 95.4 +/- 1.17%. Following i.m. injection of difloxacin at a dose rate of 5 mg/kg b.wt for 5 consecutive days, the drug could not be detected in serum and urine at 4th day from the last injection.

  4. Prevalence of Campylobacter among goats and retail goat meat in Congo.

    PubMed

    a Mpalang, Rosette Kabwang; Boreux, Raphaël; Melin, Pierrette; Akir Ni Bitiang, Khang'Mate; Daube, Georges; De Mol, Patrick

    2014-02-13

    The prevalence of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli was determined in goat and goat meat sold at retail outlets in Lubumbashi, Democratic Republic of Congo (DR Congo). A total of 644 samples, including 177 goat meat, 86 goat stomachs, 139 ready to eat (RTE) goat skewers, and 242 goat faecal samples were examined for the presence of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli using polymerase chain reaction. Overall, Campylobacter spp. were found in 34.6% of the examined samples. C. jejuni was isolated in 10.1% and C. coli in 26.7% of samples. Only 2.2% of all samples were positive for both species. There was a significant association between the prevalence of C. coli and the type of sample (p < 0.05). The overall prevalence of Campylobacter in different sample groups was 41.2%, 37.2%, 23.7%, and 35.1% for goat meat, goat stomachs, RTE goat skewers, and goat faecal samples, respectively. There was no significant difference (p > 0.05) between the prevalence observed in the rainy season (16.7%) and the dry season (20.0%). Moreover, the overall prevalence of Campylobacter in slaughter sites, open-air markets, warehouses, and semi-open-air markets was 28.2%, 34.2%, 35.4%, and 42.9%, respectively. Statistically, there was no influence of the sample collection site on the frequency of isolation of Campylobacter (p > 0.05). This study shows that, considering the relatively high prevalence of this pathogen, live goat and goat meat are major sources of human and environmental contamination by Campylobacter spp. in Lubumbashi.

  5. Case-control study on the use of pituitary-derived hormones from sheep as a potential risk factor for the occurrence of atypical scrapie in Great Britain.

    PubMed

    Marier, E; Dawson, M; Simmons, M; Hope, J; Ortiz-Peláez, A

    2017-02-17

    A case-control study was conducted in 2013 to investigate the use of pituitary-derived hormones from sheep as a potential risk factor for the presence of atypical scrapie in Great Britain sheep holdings. One hundred and sixty-five holdings were identified as cases. Two equal sets of controls were selected: no case of scrapie and cases of classical scrapie. A total of 495 holdings were selected for the questionnaire survey, 201 responses were received and 190 (38.3 per cent) were suitable for analysis. The variables 'use-of-heat-synchronisation/superovulation' and 'flock size' were significantly associated with the occurrence of atypical scrapie. Farms with atypical cases were less likely (OR 0.25, 95 per cent CI 0.07 to 0.89) to implement heat synchronisation/superovulation in the flock than the control group. Atypical cases were 3.3 times (95 per cent CI 1.38 to 8.13) more likely to occur in large holdings (>879 sheep) than in small flocks (<164 sheep). If the 'use-of-heat-synchronisation/superovulation' is a proxy for the use of pituitary-derived hormones, the significant negative association between having a case of atypical scrapie and the use of these practices rules out the initial hypothesis that using these drugs is a risk factor for the occurrence of atypical scrapie. Flock size was a significant risk factor for atypical scrapie, consistent with a previous generic case-control study.

  6. Persistent infections after natural transmission of bovine viral diarrhoea virus from cattle to goats and among goats.

    PubMed

    Bachofen, Claudia; Vogt, Hans-Rudolf; Stalder, Hanspeter; Mathys, Tanja; Zanoni, Reto; Hilbe, Monika; Schweizer, Matthias; Peterhans, Ernst

    2013-05-15

    Bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) is an economically important pathogen of cattle worldwide. Infection of a pregnant animal may lead to persistent infection of the foetus and birth of a persistently infected (PI) calf that sheds the virus throughout its life. However, BVD viruses are not strictly species specific. BVDV has been isolated from many domesticated and wild ruminants. This is of practical importance as virus reservoirs in non-bovine hosts may hamper BVDV control in cattle. A goat given as a social companion to a BVDV PI calf gave birth to a PI goat kid. In order to test if goat to goat infections were possible, seronegative pregnant goats were exposed to the PI goat. In parallel, seronegative pregnant goats were kept together with the PI calf. Only the goat to goat transmission resulted in the birth of a next generation of BVDV PI kids whereas all goats kept together with the PI calf aborted. To our knowledge, this is the first report which shows that a PI goat cannot only transmit BVD virus to other goats but that such transmission may indeed lead to the birth of a second generation of PI goats. Genetic analyses indicated that establishment in the new host species may be associated with step-wise adaptations in the viral genome. Thus, goats have the potential to be a reservoir for BVDV. However, the PI goats showed growth retardation and anaemia and their survival under natural conditions remains questionable.

  7. Persistent infections after natural transmission of bovine viral diarrhoea virus from cattle to goats and among goats

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) is an economically important pathogen of cattle worldwide. Infection of a pregnant animal may lead to persistent infection of the foetus and birth of a persistently infected (PI) calf that sheds the virus throughout its life. However, BVD viruses are not strictly species specific. BVDV has been isolated from many domesticated and wild ruminants. This is of practical importance as virus reservoirs in non-bovine hosts may hamper BVDV control in cattle. A goat given as a social companion to a BVDV PI calf gave birth to a PI goat kid. In order to test if goat to goat infections were possible, seronegative pregnant goats were exposed to the PI goat. In parallel, seronegative pregnant goats were kept together with the PI calf. Only the goat to goat transmission resulted in the birth of a next generation of BVDV PI kids whereas all goats kept together with the PI calf aborted. To our knowledge, this is the first report which shows that a PI goat cannot only transmit BVD virus to other goats but that such transmission may indeed lead to the birth of a second generation of PI goats. Genetic analyses indicated that establishment in the new host species may be associated with step-wise adaptations in the viral genome. Thus, goats have the potential to be a reservoir for BVDV. However, the PI goats showed growth retardation and anaemia and their survival under natural conditions remains questionable. PMID:23675947

  8. Immune response, productivity and quality of milk from grazing goats as affected by dietary polyunsaturated fatty acid supplementation.

    PubMed

    Caroprese, Mariangela; Ciliberti, Maria Giovana; Santillo, Antonella; Marino, Rosaria; Sevi, Agostino; Albenzio, Marzia

    2016-04-01

    This study was undertaken to assess how diet supplemented with fish oil and linseed improve the immune profile, the production performance, and milk quality of grazing goats by a diet supplementation of fish oil or linseed. Twenty-four Garganica grazing goats were divided into three groups named control (CON), fish oil (FO) and linseed (LIN) according to the fat supplement received in their diet. In vivo immune responses were evaluated by monitoring cell-mediated and humoral immune responses in order to verify the effects of polyunsaturated fatty acids supplementation on goats' health status. Goat milk samples were analysed weekly to determine milk chemical composition, fatty acid profile, and somatic cell count. Diet based on linseed supplementation (LIN) significantly increased milk yield by 30%, milk fat yield by 67%, protein yield by 34%, and casein yield by 41% as compared with CON. Fat content increased by 30% in LIN milk as compared with CON milk, and by 12% as compared with FO milk. Linseed modified milk fatty acid profile; LIN milk showed lower SFA and higher PUFA than FO milk. The modified fatty acid composition of LIN milk resulted in lower AI and TI indexes than FO and CON milk. Linseed and fish oil administration can reduce humoral immunity of goats, but has no effect in their cellular immunity. Dietary linseed supplementation in grazing dairy goat supports feeding programs to improve milk composition and quality, and a modulation of their immune responses.

  9. Further characterisation of transmissible spongiform encephalopathy phenotypes after inoculation of cattle with two temporally separated sources of sheep scrapie from Great Britain.

    PubMed

    Konold, Timm; Nonno, Romolo; Spiropoulos, John; Chaplin, Melanie J; Stack, Michael J; Hawkins, Steve A C; Cawthraw, Saira; Wilesmith, John W; Wells, Gerald A H; Agrimi, Umberto; Di Bari, Michele A; Andréoletti, Olivier; Espinosa, Juan C; Aguilar-Calvo, Patricia; Torres, Juan M

    2015-07-24

    The infectious agent responsible for the bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) epidemic in Great Britain is a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) strain with uniform properties but the origin of this strain remains unknown. Based on the hypothesis that classical BSE may have been caused by a TSE strain present in sheep, cattle were inoculated intracerebrally with two different pools of brains from scrapie-affected sheep sourced prior to and during the BSE epidemic to investigate resulting disease phenotypes and characterise their causal agents by transmission to rodents. As reported in 2006, intracerebral inoculation of cattle with pre-1975 and post-1990 scrapie brain pools produced two distinct disease phenotypes, which were unlike classical BSE. Subsequent to that report none of the remaining cattle, culled at 10 years post inoculation, developed a TSE. Retrospective Western immunoblot examination of the brains from TSE cases inoculated with the pre-1975 scrapie pool revealed a molecular profile similar to L-type BSE. The inoculation of transgenic mice expressing the bovine, ovine, porcine, murine or human prion protein gene and bank voles with brains from scrapie-affected cattle did not detect classical or atypical BSE strains but identified two previously characterised scrapie strains of sheep. Characterisation of the causal agents of disease resulting from exposure of cattle to naturally occurring scrapie agents sourced in Great Britain did not reveal evidence of classical or atypical BSE, but did identify two distinct previously recognised strains of scrapie. Although scrapie was still recognizable upon cattle passage there were irreconcilable discrepancies between the results of biological strain typing approaches and molecular profiling methods, suggesting that the latter may not be appropriate for the identification and differentiation of atypical, particularly L-type, BSE agents from cattle experimentally infected with a potential mixture of

  10. Relationships between PrPSc stability and incubation time for United States scrapie strains in a natural host system

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs), including scrapie in sheep (Ovis aries), are fatal neurodegenerative diseases caused by the misfolding of the cellular prion protein (PrP**C) into a beta-rich conformer (PrP**Sc) that accumulates into higher-order structures in the brain and other ti...

  11. 9 CFR 79.4 - Designation of scrapie-positive animals, high-risk animals, exposed animals, suspect animals...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... designated scrapie epidemiologist may conduct testing of animals if he or she determines such testing is... epidemiologist will select animals for testing in a manner that will provide a 95 percent confidence of detecting... lambed in the flock are available for testing, may limit the testing to all exposed and suspect animals...

  12. 9 CFR 79.4 - Designation of scrapie-positive animals, high-risk animals, exposed animals, suspect animals...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... designated scrapie epidemiologist may conduct testing of animals if he or she determines such testing is... epidemiologist will select animals for testing in a manner that will provide a 95 percent confidence of detecting... lambed in the flock are available for testing, may limit the testing to all exposed and suspect animals...

  13. 9 CFR 79.4 - Designation of scrapie-positive animals, high-risk animals, exposed animals, suspect animals...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... designated scrapie epidemiologist may conduct testing of animals if he or she determines such testing is... epidemiologist will select animals for testing in a manner that will provide a 95 percent confidence of detecting... lambed in the flock are available for testing, may limit the testing to all exposed and suspect animals...

  14. 9 CFR 79.4 - Designation of scrapie-positive animals, high-risk animals, exposed animals, suspect animals...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... designated scrapie epidemiologist may conduct testing of animals if he or she determines such testing is... epidemiologist will select animals for testing in a manner that will provide a 95 percent confidence of detecting... lambed in the flock are available for testing, may limit the testing to all exposed and suspect animals...

  15. 9 CFR 79.4 - Designation of scrapie-positive animals, high-risk animals, exposed animals, suspect animals...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... designated scrapie epidemiologist may conduct testing of animals if he or she determines such testing is... epidemiologist will select animals for testing in a manner that will provide a 95 percent confidence of detecting... lambed in the flock are available for testing, may limit the testing to all exposed and suspect animals...

  16. 9 CFR 54.11 - Approval of laboratories to run official scrapie tests and official genotype tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Approval of laboratories to run... laboratories to run official scrapie tests and official genotype tests. (a) State, Federal, and university laboratories, or in the case of genotype tests, private laboratories will be approved by the Administrator when...

  17. Transmission of the agent of sheep scrapie to deer results in PrPSc with two distinct molecular profiles

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The purpose of this work was to determine susceptibility of white-tailed deer (WTD) to the agent of sheep scrapie and to compare the resultant PrPSc to that of the original inoculum and chronic wasting disease (CWD). We inoculated WTD by a natural route of exposure (concurrent oral and intranasal (I...

  18. 9 CFR 54.11 - Approval of laboratories to run official scrapie tests and official genotype tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... trained by the National Veterinary Services Laboratories (NVSL) or who have completed equivalent training... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Approval of laboratories to run... laboratories to run official scrapie tests and official genotype tests. (a) State, Federal, and university...

  19. Comparison of protease-resistant prion protein inhibitors in cell cultures infected with two strains of mouse and sheep scrapie.

    PubMed

    Kocisko, David A; Engel, Abbi L; Harbuck, Kristin; Arnold, Kevin M; Olsen, Emily A; Raymond, Lynne D; Vilette, Didier; Caughey, Byron

    2005-11-11

    The transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) are fatal neurodegenerative diseases. A primary therapeutic target for TSE intervention has been a protease-resistant form of prion protein known as PrP(Sc) or PrP-res. In vitro testing of mouse scrapie-infected cell cultures has identified many PrP-res inhibitors that also have activity in vivo. Here we identify 32 new inhibitors of two strains of mouse scrapie PrP-res. Furthermore, to investigate the species-specificity of these and other PrP-res inhibitors, we have developed a high-throughput cell culture assay based on Rov9 cells chronically-infected with sheep scrapie. Of 32 inhibitors of murine PrP-res that were also tested in the Rov9 cells, only six showed inhibitory activity against sheep PrP-res. The three most potent inhibitors of both murine and ovine PrP-res formation (with 50% inhibition at < or =5 microM) were tannic acid, pentosan polysulfate and Fe(III) deuteroporphyrin 2,4-bisethyleneglycol. The latter two have anti-mouse scrapie activity in vivo. These results identify new inhibitors of murine and ovine PrP-res formation and reinforce the idea that compounds effective against PrP-res from one species or strain cannot be assumed to be active against others.

  20. Relationships between PrPSc Stability and Incubation Time for United States Scrapie Isolates in a Natural Host System

    PubMed Central

    Vrentas, Catherine E.; Greenlee, Justin J.; Tatum, Trudy L.; Nicholson, Eric M.

    2012-01-01

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs), including scrapie in sheep (Ovis aries), are fatal neurodegenerative diseases caused by the misfolding of the cellular prion protein (PrPC) into a â-rich conformer (PrPSc) that accumulates into higher-order structures in the brain and other tissues. Distinct strains of TSEs exist, characterized by different pathologic profiles upon passage into rodents and representing distinct conformations of PrPSc. One biochemical method of distinguishing strains is the stability of PrPSc as determined by unfolding in guanidine hydrochloride (GdnHCl), which is tightly and positively correlated with the incubation time of disease upon passage into mice. Here, we utilize a rapid, protease-free version of the stability assay to characterize naturally occurring scrapie samples, including a fast-acting scrapie inoculum for which incubation time is highly dependent on the amino acid at codon 136 of the prion protein. We utilize the stability methodology to identify the presence of two distinct isolates in the inoculum, and compare isolate properties to those of a host-stabilized reference scrapie isolate (NADC 13-7) in order to assess the stability/incubation time correlation in a natural host system. We demonstrate the utility of the stability methodology in characterizing TSE isolates throughout serial passage in livestock, which is applicable to a range of natural host systems, including strains of bovine spongiform encephalopathy and chronic wasting disease. PMID:22916207

  1. Paratuberculosis in sheep and goats.

    PubMed

    Windsor, P A

    2015-12-14

    Paratuberculosis is a chronic insidious, often serious, disease of the global small ruminant industries, mainly causing losses from mortalities and reduced productivity on-farm, interference in trading and, in Australia, profound socio-economic impacts that have periodically compromised harmony of rural communities. The pathogenesis, diagnosis, impacts and disease management options for ovine and caprine paratuberculosis are reviewed, comparing current controls in the extensive management system for sheep in wool flocks in Australia with the semi-intensive system of dairy flocks/herds in Greece. Improved understanding of the immune and cellular profiles of sheep with varying paratuberculosis outcomes and the recognition of the need for prolonged vaccination and biosecurity is considered of relevance to future control strategies. Paratuberculosis in goats is also of global distribution although the prevalence, economic impact and strategic control options are less well recognized, possibly due to the relatively meagre resources available for goat industry research. Although there have been some recent advances, more work is required on developing control strategies for goats, particularly in dairy situations where there is an important need for validation of improved diagnostic assays and the recognition of the potential impacts for vaccination. For all species, a research priority remains the identification of tests that can detect latent and subclinical infections to enhance removal of future sources of infectious material from flocks/herds and the food chain, plus predict the likely outcomes of animals exposed to the organism at an early age. Improving national paratuberculosis control programs should also be a priority to manage disease risk from trade. The importance of strong leadership and communication, building trust within rural communities confused by the difficulties in managing this insidious disease, reflects the importance of change management

  2. Eprinomectin in goat: assessment of subcutaneous administration.

    PubMed

    Lespine, A; Sutra, J F; Dupuy, J; Alvinerie, M

    2003-01-01

    Eprinomectin is only available as a topically applied anthelmintic for dairy cattle. To determine whether eprinomectin can be administered in the goat as an injectable formulation, it was subcutaneously delivered to six goats and measured in the plasma at different times after administration. The area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) reported after subcutaneous administration of 0.2 mg kg(-1) eprinomectin (68.5+/-23.2 ng day(-1) ml(-1)) was similar to the AUC previously reported for goats after a pour-on administration of 0.5 mg kg(-1) eprinomectin. Thus, our results clearly show that subcutaneous administration is 2.5 times more effective than pour-on administration, in terms of amount of drug present in the organism. This work should encourage the development of a subcutaneous formulation of eprinomectin and should contribute to defining optimal therapeutic conditions for goat anthelmintic treatment.

  3. [Anesthesia and zootechnical interference in goats].

    PubMed

    Ganter, M

    1992-04-01

    Some particularities in anesthesia and surgical procedures are discussed. The combination of xylazine with ketamine is recommended for general anesthesia. Particular aspects of the castration of billy goats, deodorization and dehorning are also discussed.

  4. Genetic control of amyloid plaque production and incubation period in scrapie-infected mice.

    PubMed

    Bruce, M E; Dickinson, A G

    1985-05-01

    The extent of amyloid plaque production was investigated in three inbred mouse strains carrying the p7 allele of the scrapie incubation (Sinc) gene (VM, IM and MB). With either ME7 or 87V scrapie, many more plaques were seen in the MB strain than in VM or IM mice. A backcrossing experiment using 87V suggested the involvement of more than one gene. Within this backcrossing experiment there was a positive correlation between mean plaque count and mean incubation period for the various strains and crosses. Also male mice tended to have higher plaque counts and longer incubation periods than female mice of the same genotype. These results suggest that some of the genes controlling minor variation in the incubation period also influence plaque production. This is consistent with previous evidence that the number of amyloid plaques depends, to some extent, on the duration of agent replication within the brain. This study has also identified a high plaque model (MB mice infected with 87V) for future investigation of the nature of the amyloid protein.

  5. Assessment of inbreeding resulting from selection for scrapie resistance: a model for rare sheep breeds.

    PubMed

    Brown, C; Orford, M; Tzamaloukas, O; Mavrogenis, A P; Miltiadou, D

    Inbreeding in a small population of Chios sheep undergoing intense selection for the PrP gene was assessed 10 years after the beginning of a scrapie resistance selection programme. Inbreeding in this stock, already under selection for production traits, was analysed by using pedigree records containing 10,492 animals from 1968 to 2008, and also by genotyping 192 individuals with a panel of 15 microsatellites. Genetic markers indicated a loss of heterozygosity (FIS over all loci was 0.059) and allelic diversity (mean effective number of alleles was 3.075±0.275). The annual rate of inbreeding increased significantly after the start of the scrapie resistance programme, ΔF=0.005 compared with ΔF=0.001 before 1999, and was subjected to several genetic bottlenecks, mainly due to the low initial frequency of resistant animals. However, the mean individual inbreeding coefficient estimated from the pedigree - in this closed stock resembling the case of a rare breed - stood at the level of 4.5 per cent, five generations after the implementation of selection for the PrP gene. The inbreeding coefficient estimated by genetic markers was 4.37 per cent, implying that such a marker panel could be a useful and cost-effective tool for estimating inbreeding in unrecorded populations.

  6. Dysfunction of mitochondrial dynamics in the brains of scrapie-infected mice.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hong-Seok; Choi, Yeong-Gon; Shin, Hae-Young; Oh, Jae-Min; Park, Jeong-Ho; Kim, Jae-Il; Carp, Richard I; Choi, Eun-Kyoung; Kim, Yong-Sun

    2014-05-30

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is a common and prominent feature of many neurodegenerative diseases, including prion diseases; it is induced by oxidative stress in scrapie-infected animal models. In previous studies, we found swelling and dysfunction of mitochondria in the brains of scrapie-infected mice compared to brains of controls, but the mechanisms underlying mitochondrial dysfunction remain unclear. To examine whether the dysregulation of mitochondrial proteins is related to the mitochondrial dysfunction associated with prion disease, we investigated the expression patterns of mitochondrial fusion and fission proteins in the brains of ME7 prion-infected mice. Immunoblot analysis revealed that Mfn1 was up-regulated in both whole brain and specific brain regions, including the cerebral cortex and hippocampus, of ME7-infected mice compared to controls. Additionally, expression levels of Fis1 and Mfn2 were elevated in the hippocampus and the striatum, respectively, of the ME7-infected brain. In contrast, Dlp1 expression was significantly reduced in the hippocampus in the ME7-infected brain, particularly in the cytosolic fraction. Finally, we observed abnormal mitochondrial enlargement and histopathological change in the hippocampus of the ME7-infected brain. These observations suggest that the mitochondrial dysfunction, which is presumably caused by the dysregulation of mitochondrial fusion and fission proteins, may contribute to the neuropathological changes associated with prion disease.

  7. Evidence for degradation of abnormal prion protein in tissues from sheep with scrapie during composting

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hongsheng; Spencer, J. Lloyd; Soutyrine, Andrei; Guan, Jeiwen; Rendulich, Jasmine; Balachandran, Aru

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated whether the abnormal prion protein (PrPSc) in tissues from sheep with scrapie would be destroyed by composting. Tissues from sheep naturally infected with scrapie were placed within fiberglass mesh bags and buried in compost piles for 108 d in experiment 1 or 148 d in experiment 2. The temperature in the compost piles rose quickly; it was above 60°C for about 2 wk and then slowly declined to the ambient temperature. Before composting, PrPSc was detected in all the tissues by Western blotting. In experiment 1, PrPSc was not detected after composting in the tissue remnants or the surrounding sawdust. In experiment 2, 1 of 5 specimens tested negative after composting, whereas PrPSc was detected in the other 4 bags, though in reduced amounts compared with those before composting. Tissue weights were reduced during composting. Analysis of the tissue remnants for microbial 16S ribosomal DNA demonstrated that there were more diverse microbes involved in experiment 1 than in experiment 2 and that the guanine and cytosine content of the microbial 16S DNA was higher in the specimens of experiment 1 than in those of experiment 2, which suggests greater dominance of thermophilic microbes in experiment 1. These results indicate that composting may have value as a means for degrading PrPSc in carcasses and other wastes. PMID:17193880

  8. Manipulation of PrPres production in scrapie-infected neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Bate, Clive; Langeveld, Jan; Williams, Alun

    2004-09-30

    In the present study the accumulation of protease resistant prion protein (PrPres) in scrapie-infected neuroblastoma cells (ScN2a cells) was shown to be dependent on culture conditions. The highest levels of PrPres were found in slow growing cells. Further increases in PrPres accumulation were observed in ScN2a cells treated with retinoic acid, a compound that is associated with neuronal differentiation. The effects of retinoic acid were dose-dependent with a maximal effect at 200 ng/ml. A similar increase in PrPres was observed in another prion-infected cell line, scrapie-mouse brain (SMB) cells, treated with retinoic acid while retinoic acid increased the amount of PrPC in non-infected cells. Other drugs reported to cause neuronal differentiation, such as phorbol esters, did not increase the PrPres content of ScN2a cells. The survival of retinoic acid-treated ScN2a cells co-cultured with microglia was significantly reduced when compared to untreated ScN2a cells and an inverse correlation was demonstrated between the PrPres content of cells and their survival when co-cultured with microglia. The production of interleukin-6 by microglia cultured with retinoic acid-treated ScN2a cells was significantly higher than that of microglia cultured with untreated ScN2a cells.

  9. Merino sheep breed's genetic resistance to scrapie: genetic structure and comparison of five eradication strategies.

    PubMed

    Molina, A; Juárez, M; Rodero, A

    2006-08-17

    Three thousand one hundred and ninety-three Merino-breeding males were genotyped for Scrapie-resistance gene. They showed a high frequency of ARQ allele while VRQ allele frequency, linked to the highest susceptibility, was close to 0. Alleles linked to Scrapie-susceptibility frequencies have been studied in different Merino flocks. Most of the variability is intraflock, not interflock. In addition, there is an excess of heterozygotes due to crossbreeding or Wahlund effect. Five control and prevention strategies were studied: first genotyping males and females and eliminating VRQ carriers and ARQ/ARQ rams; second genotyping males and females and eliminating VRQ carriers; third genotyping males and eliminating VRQ carriers and ARQ/ARQ rams; fourth genotyping males and using only as breeders ARR/ARR, ARR/AHQ, AHQ/AHQ and ARQ/ARQ rams; fifth genotyping males and using only as breeders ARR/ARR, ARR/AHQ and AHQ/AHQ rams. They were simulated from allelic and genotypic frequencies to decide which animals had to be genotyped and which animals had to be eliminated due to their genotypes and risk levels. The third option, to genotype rams and to eliminate ARQ/ARQ and VRQ carriers, would be the best strategy to improve the resistance and would cause minimal cost and loss of animals.

  10. Membrane Toxicity of Abnormal Prion Protein in Adrenal Chromaffin Cells of Scrapie Infected Sheep

    PubMed Central

    McGovern, Gillian; Jeffrey, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) or prion diseases are associated with accumulations of disease specific PrP (PrPd) in the central nervous system (CNS) and often the lymphoreticular system (LRS). Accumulations have additionally been recorded in other tissues including the peripheral nervous system and adrenal gland. Here we investigate the effect of sheep scrapie on the morphology and the accumulation of PrPd in the adrenal medulla of scrapie affected sheep using light and electron microscopy. Using immunogold electron microscopy, non-fibrillar forms of PrPd were shown to accumulate mainly in association with chromaffin cells, occasional nerve endings and macrophages. PrPd accumulation was associated with distinctive membrane changes of chromaffin cells including increased electron density, abnormal linearity and invaginations. Internalisation of PrPd from the chromaffin cell plasma membrane occurred in association with granule recycling following hormone exocytosis. PrPd accumulation and internalisation from membranes is similarly associated with perturbations of membrane structure and trafficking in CNS neurons and tingible body macrophages of the LRS. These data suggest that a major toxic effect of PrPd is at the level of plasma membranes. However, the precise nature of PrPd-membrane toxicity is tissue and cell specific suggesting that the normal protein may act as a multi-functional scaffolding molecule. We further suggest that the co-localisation of PrPd with exocytic granules of the hormone trafficking system may provide an additional source of infectivity in blood. PMID:23469286

  11. Enzymatic Formulation Capable of Degrading Scrapie Prion under Mild Digestion Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Okoroma, Emeka A.; Purchase, Diane; Garelick, Hemda; Morris, Roger; Neale, Michael H.; Windl, Otto; Abiola, Oduola O.

    2013-01-01

    The prion agent is notoriously resistant to common proteases and conventional sterilisation procedures. The current methods known to destroy prion infectivity such as incineration, alkaline and thermal hydrolysis are harsh, destructive, environmentally polluting and potentially hazardous, thus limit their applications for decontamination of delicate medical and laboratory devices, remediation of prion contaminated environment and for processing animal by-products including specified risk materials and carcases. Therefore, an environmentally friendly, non-destructive enzymatic degradation approach is highly desirable. A feather-degrading Bacillus licheniformis N22 keratinase has been isolated which degraded scrapie prion to undetectable level of PrPSc signals as determined by Western Blot analysis. Prion infectivity was verified by ex vivo cell-based assay. An enzymatic formulation combining N22 keratinase and biosurfactant derived from Pseudomonas aeruginosa degraded PrPSc at 65°C in 10 min to undetectable level -. A time-course degradation analysis carried out at 50°C over 2 h revealed the progressive attenuation of PrPSc intensity. Test of residual infectivity by standard cell culture assay confirmed that the enzymatic formulation reduced PrPSc infectivity to undetectable levels as compared to cells challenged with untreated standard scrapie sheep prion (SSBP/1) (p-value = 0.008 at 95% confidence interval). This novel enzymatic formulation has significant potential application for prion decontamination in various environmentally friendly systems under mild treatment conditions. PMID:23874511

  12. Coronary artery anatomy of the goat.

    PubMed

    Lipovetsky, G; Fenoglio, J J; Gieger, M; Srinivasan, M R; Dobelle, W H

    1983-05-01

    The coronary arteries of the goat heart were studied using angiographic techniques and molds of the coronary vessel trees. Blood supplies to the left and right ventricles, interventricular septum, atrioventricular node, and apex of the caprine heart were studied. The goat possesses a left dominant pattern of coronary supply with relatively uniform coronary anatomy and may provide a good large animal model for testing cardiovascular assist devices.

  13. Experimental studies with Stronglyloides papillosus in goats.

    PubMed

    Pienaar, J G; Basson, P A; du Plessis, J L; Collins, H M; Naude, T W; Boyazoglu, P A; Boomker, J; Reyers, F; Pienaar, W L

    1999-09-01

    Unusual clinical and pathological observations in the field in goats and sheep suffering from Strongyloides papillosus infection prompted experimental work on this parasite. Goats were infected percutaneously with either single or multiple, low or high levels of S. papillosus. Young goats up to 12 months of age were found to be the most susceptible. Some animals, however, showed substantial resistance to infective doses. Clinical signs included transient diarrhoea, misshapen, elongated faecal pellets terminally, dehydration, anorexia, cachexia, gnashing of teeth, foaming at the mouth, anaemia and nervous signs such as ataxia, a wide-based stance, stupor and nystagmus. A 'pushing syndrome' was seen in 22% of the animals. The pathological changes are described and included enteritis, status spongiosus in the brain, hepatosis leading to rupture of the liver, nephrosis, pulmonary oedema, interstitial pneumonia and pneumonia. About 6% of the goats died acutely from fatal hepatic rupture. The development of an acquired immunity was determined. The immunity elicited an allergic skin reaction at the application site of larvae or injection sites of larval metabolites. This immunity, however, could be breached by large doses of larvae. The most profound clinicopathological changes induced by the parasites were an anaemia (most pronounced in the young goats) and hypophosphataemia. Trace element analyses provided evidence of Cu, Mn and possibly Se deficiencies in some goats.

  14. Stability of murine scrapie strain 87V after passage in sheep and comparison with the CH1641 ovine strain.

    PubMed

    González, Lorenzo; Chianini, Francesca; Hunter, Nora; Hamilton, Scott; Gibbard, Louise; Martin, Stuart; Dagleish, Mark P; Sisó, Sílvia; Eaton, Samantha L; Chong, Angela; Algar, Lynne; Jeffrey, Martin

    2015-12-01

    Breed- and prion protein (PRNP) genotype-related disease phenotype variability has been observed in sheep infected with the 87V murine scrapie strain. Therefore, the stability of this strain was tested by inoculating sheep-derived 87V brain material back into VM mice. As some sheep-adapted 87V disease phenotypes were reminiscent of CH1641 scrapie, transgenic mice (Tg338) expressing ovine prion protein (PrP) were inoculated with the same sheep-derived 87V sources and with CH1641. Although at first passage in VM mice the sheep-derived 87V sources showed some divergence from the murine 87V control, all the characteristics of murine 87V infection were recovered at second passage from all sheep sources. These included 100 % attack rates and indistinguishable survival times, lesion profiles, immunohistochemical features of disease-associated PrP accumulation in the brain and PrP biochemical properties. All sheep-derived 87V sources, as well as CH1641, were transmitted to Tg338 mice with identical clinical, pathological, immunohistochemical and biochemical features. While this might potentially indicate that sheep-adapted 87V and CH1641 are the same strain, profound divergences were evident, as murine 87V was unable to infect Tg338 mice but was lethal for VM mice, while the reverse was true for CH1641. These combined data suggest that: (i) murine 87V is stable and retains its properties after passage in sheep; (ii) it can be isolated from sheep showing a CH1641-like or a more conventional scrapie phenotype; and (iii) sheep-adapted 87V scrapie, with conventional or CH1641-like phenotype, is biologically distinct from experimental CH1641 scrapie, despite the fact that they behave identically in a single transgenic mouse line.

  15. Comparison of cattle and sheep colonic permeabilities to horseradish peroxidase and hamster scrapie prion protein in vitro

    PubMed Central

    McKie, A; Zammit, P; Naftalin, R

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Paracellular permeability to solutes across the descending colon is much higher in cattle than sheep. This is a possible route for transmission of infective materials, such as scrapie prion.
AIMS—To compare the permeabilities of labelled scrapie prion protein and other macromolecules in bovine and ovine descending colons in vitro.
METHODS—Using fresh slaughterhouse material, transepithelial fluxes of macromolecules across colonic mucosae mounted in Ussing chambers were measured by monitoring transport of either enzyme activity or radioactivity.
RESULTS—The comparative bovine to ovine permeability ratio of the probes increased with molecular weight: from 3.1 (0.13) for PEG400 to 10.67 (0.20) (p<0.001) for PEG4000; and from 1.64 (0.17) for microperoxidase to 7.03 (0.20) (p<0.001) for horseradish peroxidase (HRP). The permeability of 125I-labelled inactivated Syrian hamster scrapie prion protein (ShaPrPsc) was 7.02 (0.33)-fold higher in bovine than ovine colon (p<0.0025). In each species, the probe permeabilities decreased according to the formula: P = Po.exp(−K.ra). The "ideal" permeabilities, Po are similar, however, K(ovine) = 2.46 (0.20) cm/h/nm exceeds K(bovine) = 0.85 (0.15) cm/h/nm (p<0.001) indicating that bovine colon has a higher proportion of wide pores than ovine. Image analysis confirmed that HRP permeated through the bovine mucosal layer via a pericryptal paracellular route much more rapidly than in sheep.
CONCLUSIONS—These data may imply that scrapie prion is transmitted in vivo more easily across the low resistance bovine colonic barrier than in other species.


Keywords: cattle; sheep; colon; paracellular permeability; horseradish peroxidase; hamster scrapie prion protein PMID:10562587

  16. Investigation of serum protein profiles in scrapie infected sheep by means of SELDI-TOF-MS and multivariate data analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Classical scrapie in sheep is a fatal neurodegenerative disease associated with the conversion PrPC to PrPSc. Much is known about genetic susceptibility, uptake and dissemination of PrPSc in the body, but many aspects of prion diseases are still unknown. Different proteomic techniques have been used during the last decade to investigate differences in protein profiles between affected animals and healthy controls. We have investigated the protein profiles in serum of sheep with scrapie and healthy controls by SELDI-TOF-MS and LC-MS/MS. Latent Variable methods such as Principal Component Analysis, Partial Least Squares-Discriminant Analysis and Target Projection methods were used to describe the MS data. Results The serum proteomic profiles showed variable differences between the groups both throughout the incubation period and at the clinical end stage of scrapie. At the end stage, the target projection model separated the two groups with a sensitivity of 97.8%, and serum amyloid A was identified as one of the protein peaks that differed significantly between the groups. Conclusions At the clinical end stage of classical scrapie, ten SELDI peaks significantly discriminated the scrapie group from the healthy controls. During the non-clinical incubation period, individual SELDI peaks were differently expressed between the groups at different time points. Investigations of differences in -omic profiles can contribute to new insights into the underlying disease processes and pathways, and advance our understanding of prion diseases, but comparison and validation across laboratories is difficult and challenging. PMID:24229425

  17. Vaccination against Louping Ill Virus Protects Goats from Experimental Challenge with Spanish Goat Encephalitis Virus.

    PubMed

    Salinas, L M; Casais, R; García Marín, J F; Dalton, K P; Royo, L J; Del Cerro, A; Gayo, E; Dagleish, M P; Alberdi, P; Juste, R A; de la Fuente, J; Balseiro, A

    2017-05-01

    Spanish goat encephalitis virus (SGEV) is a recently described member of the genus Flavivirus belonging to the tick-borne encephalitis group of viruses, and is closely related to louping ill virus (LIV). Naturally acquired disease in goats results in severe, acute encephalitis and 100% mortality. Eighteen goats were challenged subcutaneously with SGEV; nine were vaccinated previously against LIV and nine were not. None of the vaccinated goats showed any clinical signs of disease or histological lesions, but all of the non-vaccinated goats developed pyrexia and 5/9 developed neurological clinical signs, primarily tremors in the neck and ataxia. All non-vaccinated animals developed histological lesions restricted to the central nervous system and consistent with a lymphocytic meningomyeloencephalitis. Vaccinated goats had significantly (P <0.003) greater concentrations of serum IgG and lower levels of IgM (P <0.0001) compared with unvaccinated animals. SGEV RNA levels were below detectable limits in the vaccinated goats throughout the experiment, but increased rapidly and were significantly (P <0.0001) greater 2-10 days post challenge in the non-vaccinated group. In conclusion, vaccination of goats against LIV confers highly effective protection against SGEV; this is probably mediated by IgG and prevents an increase in viral RNA load in serum such that vaccinated animals would not be an effective reservoir of the virus. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Altered Lipid and Salt Taste Responsivity in Ghrelin and GOAT Null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Daimon, Caitlin M.; Wang, Rui; Tschöp, Matthias H.; Sévigny, Jean; Martin, Bronwen; Maudsley, Stuart

    2013-01-01

    Taste perception plays an important role in regulating food preference, eating behavior and energy homeostasis. Taste perception is modulated by a variety of factors, including gastric hormones such as ghrelin. Ghrelin can regulate growth hormone release, food intake, adiposity, and energy metabolism. Octanoylation of ghrelin by ghrelin O-acyltransferase (GOAT) is a specific post-translational modification which is essential for many biological activities of ghrelin. Ghrelin and GOAT are both widely expressed in many organs including the gustatory system. In the current study, overall metabolic profiles were assessed in wild-type (WT), ghrelin knockout (ghrelin−/−), and GOAT knockout (GOAT−/−) mice. Ghrelin−/− mice exhibited decreased food intake, increased plasma triglycerides and increased ketone bodies compared to WT mice while demonstrating WT-like body weight, fat composition and glucose control. In contrast GOAT−/− mice exhibited reduced body weight, adiposity, resting glucose and insulin levels compared to WT mice. Brief access taste behavioral tests were performed to determine taste responsivity in WT, ghrelin−/− and GOAT−/− mice. Ghrelin and GOAT null mice possessed reduced lipid taste responsivity. Furthermore, we found that salty taste responsivity was attenuated in ghrelin−/− mice, yet potentiated in GOAT−/− mice compared to WT mice. Expression of the potential lipid taste regulators Cd36 and Gpr120 were reduced in the taste buds of ghrelin and GOAT null mice, while the salt-sensitive ENaC subunit was increased in GOAT−/− mice compared with WT mice. The altered expression of Cd36, Gpr120 and ENaC may be responsible for the altered lipid and salt taste perception in ghrelin−/− and GOAT−/− mice. The data presented in the current study potentially implicates ghrelin signaling activity in the modulation of both lipid and salt taste modalities. PMID:24124572

  19. The complete nucleotide sequence of goat (Capra hircus) mitochondrial genome. Goat mitochondrial genome.

    PubMed

    Parma, Pietro; Pietro, Parma; Feligini, Maria; Maria, Feligini; Greeppi, Gianfranco; Gianfranco, Greppi; Enne, Giuseppe; Giuseppe, Enne

    2003-06-01

    The goat mtDNA sequences reported to date are fragmentary. By using both in silico cloning procedure and conventional molecular biology techniques we have determined the complete nucleotide sequence of the goat (Capra hircus) mitochondrial genome. The length of the sequence was 16.640 bp. Genes responsible for 12S and 16S rRNAs, 22 tRNAs and 13 protein-coding regions are found. The genome organization is conformed to those of other mitochondrial genomes. Comparison between the 13 protein coding genes of goat, cow and sheep reveals that the difference range from 1.2 to 12.2% with a mean of 7.3% between goat and cow and from 0 to 15.6% (mean 4.7%) between goat and sheep.

  20. 6. Boathouse, looking northwest, southwest and southeast sides Goat ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Boathouse, looking northwest, southwest and southeast sides - Goat Island Light Station, Goat Island, next to entrance to Cape Porpoise Harbor, just south of Trott Island, Cape Porpoise, York County, ME

  1. 4. Light tower, interior from entrance, looking southeast Goat ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Light tower, interior from entrance, looking southeast - Goat Island Light Station, Goat Island, next to entrance to Cape Porpoise Harbor, just south of Trott Island, Cape Porpoise, York County, ME

  2. Cestrum laevigatum poisoning in goats in southeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Peixoto, P V; Brust, L C; Duarte, M D; Franca, T N; Duarte, V C; Barros, C S

    2000-02-01

    Natural and experimental poisonings by Cestrum laevigatum are described in goats. Histologically, livers had marked centrolobular and midzonal coagulative necrosis and hemorrhage. Spontaneous toxicosis by this plant in goats has not been previously reported.

  3. Increases of Galectin-1 and its S-nitrosylated form in the Brain Tissues of Scrapie-Infected Rodent Models and Human Prion Diseases.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yan-Jun; Shi, Qi; Yang, Xiao-Dong; Li, Jian-Le; Ma, Yue; Xiao, Kang; Chen, Cao; Han, Jun; Dong, Xiao-Ping

    2016-05-23

    Galectin-1 (Gal-1) shows neuroprotective activity in brain ischemia, spinal cord injury, and autoimmune neuroinflammation. To evaluate the Gal-1 situation in the brains of prion disease, the brain levels of Gal-1 in several scrapie-infected experimental rodent models were tested by Western blot, including agents 263K-infected hamsters, 139A-, ME7-, and S15-infected mice. Remarkable increases of brain Gal-1 were observed in all tested scrapie-infected rodents at the terminal stage. The brain levels of Gal-1 showed time-dependent increases along with the prolonging of incubation times. Immunohistochemical assays illustrated much stronger stainings in the brain sections of scrapie-infected rodents. Quantitative RT-PCR of Gal-1 gene demonstrated increased transcription in the brains of scrapie-infected mice. Gal-1 was colocalized with GFAP- and NeuN-positive cells, but not with Iba-1-positive cells in immunofluorescent test. Increases of Gal-1 were also detected in the several postmortem cortex regions of human prion diseases. Moreover, the S-nitrosylated forms of Gal-1 in the brains of scrapie-infected rodents were significantly higher than those of normal ones. Our finding here demonstrates markedly increased brain Gal-1 and S-nitrosylated Gal-1 both in scrapie-infected rodents and human prion diseases.

  4. Educational Possibilities of Keeping Goats in Elementary Schools in Japan.

    PubMed

    Koda, Naoko; Kutsumi, Shiho; Hirose, Toshiya; Watanabe, Gen

    2016-01-01

    Many Japanese elementary schools keep small animals for educational purposes, and the effects and challenges have been investigated. Although goats are medium-sized animals that are familiar to Japanese, few practical studies have been conducted on keeping goats in schools. This study investigated the effects and challenges of keeping goats in elementary schools and discussed its educational possibilities. A semi-structured interview survey was conducted with 11 personnel that were responsible for keeping goats in 6 elementary schools in urban areas. They described benefits, problems, and tips related to keeping goats. Participant observation was also conducted on daily human-goat interactions in these schools. The results indicated that children in all six grades were able to care for goats. Goats were used for various school subjects and activities. As a result of keeping goats, children developed affection for them, attitude of respect for living things, greater sense of responsibility, and enhanced interpersonal interactional skills. Stronger ties between the schools and parents and community were developed through cooperation in goat-keeping. Some anxieties existed about the risk of injury to children when interacting with goats. Other challenges included the burden of taking care of the goats on holidays and insufficient knowledge about treatment in case of their illness or injury. The results suggested similarities to the benefits and challenges associated with keeping small animals in elementary schools, although the responsibility and the burden on the schools were greater for keeping goats than small animals because of their larger size and the need for children to consider the goats' inner state and to cooperate with others when providing care. At the same time, goats greatly stimulated interest, cooperation, and empathy in children. Goats can expand educational opportunities and bring about many positive effects on child development.

  5. Assaying prions in cell culture: the standard scrapie cell assay (SSCA) and the scrapie cell assay in end point format (SCEPA).

    PubMed

    Mahal, Sukhvir P; Demczyk, Cheryl A; Smith, Emery W; Klohn, Peter-Christian; Weissmann, Charles

    2008-01-01

    Prions are usually quantified by bioassays based on intracerebral inoculation of animals, which are slow, imprecise, and costly. We have developed a cell-based prion assay that is based on the isolation of cell lines highly susceptible to certain strains (Rocky Mountain Laboratory and 22L) of mouse prions and a method for identifying individual, prion-infected cells and quantifying them. In the standard scrapie cell assay (SSCA), susceptible cells are exposed to prion-containing samples for 4 days, grown to confluence, passaged two or three times, and the proportion of rPrP(Sc)-containing cells is determined with automated counting equipment. The dose response is dynamic over 2 logs of prion concentrations. The SSCA has a standard error of +/-20-30%, is as sensitive as the mouse bioassay, 10 times faster, at least 2 orders of magnitude less expensive, and it is suitable for robotization. Assays performed in a more time-consuming end point titration format extend the sensitivity and show that infectivity titers measured in tissue culture and in the mouse are similar.

  6. 9 CFR 309.14 - Brucellosis-reactor goats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Brucellosis-reactor goats. 309.14 Section 309.14 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE... INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION ANTE-MORTEM INSPECTION § 309.14 Brucellosis-reactor goats. Goats which...

  7. 9 CFR 309.14 - Brucellosis-reactor goats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Brucellosis-reactor goats. 309.14 Section 309.14 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE... INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION ANTE-MORTEM INSPECTION § 309.14 Brucellosis-reactor goats. Goats which...

  8. Contagious ecthyma in mountain goat of coastal British Columbia.

    PubMed

    Hebert, D M; Samuel, W M; Smith, G W

    1977-04-01

    Contagious ecthyma has been reported previously from mountain goat (Oreamnos americanus) in one restricted area of eastern British Columbia. A second focus of infection is reported for mountain goat from western British Columbia. Diagnosis was based on appearance of lesions at necropsy, histopathology and demonstration of poxvirus with the electron microscope. The epizootiology of this infection in mountain goat is discussed briefly.

  9. 21 CFR 135.115 - Goat's milk ice cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Goat's milk ice cream. 135.115 Section 135.115... Goat's milk ice cream. (a) Description. Goat's milk ice cream is the food prepared in the same manner... and hydrolyzed milk proteins may not be used; and paragraphs (f)(1) and (g) of § 135.110 shall not...

  10. Traditional goat husbandry may substantially contribute to human toxoplasmosis exposure

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Raising goats in settings that are highly contaminated with oocysts of Toxoplasma gondii may contribute significantly to human exposure to this zoonotic parasite. Increasing consumption of young goats in Romania, where goats are typically reared in backyards that are also home to cats (the definitiv...

  11. Weed management using goats: Effects on water infiltration rate

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Goats are used increasingly for weed control, fire fuel reduction and ecological restoration. The high stocking rates typical of these applications have been reported to decrease the rate of water infiltration in goat pastures. The hypothesis that annual goat browsing for weed control decreases infi...

  12. Xenogenous fertilization of goat ova in the rabbit oviduct.

    PubMed

    Rao, V H; Sarmah, B C; Bhattacharyya, N K

    1984-07-01

    Eggs from superovulated goats were surgically placed in the oviducts of pseudopregnant rabbits previously inseminated with goat semen. Out of 81 eggs, 30 (37%) exhibited two pronuclei or two blastomeres when recovered 24-36 h later. Transplantation of these embryos into foster nanny goats resulted in the birth of kids.

  13. 9 CFR 309.14 - Brucellosis-reactor goats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Brucellosis-reactor goats. 309.14 Section 309.14 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE... INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION ANTE-MORTEM INSPECTION § 309.14 Brucellosis-reactor goats. Goats which have...

  14. 9 CFR 309.14 - Brucellosis-reactor goats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Brucellosis-reactor goats. 309.14 Section 309.14 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE... INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION ANTE-MORTEM INSPECTION § 309.14 Brucellosis-reactor goats. Goats which have...

  15. 9 CFR 309.14 - Brucellosis-reactor goats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Brucellosis-reactor goats. 309.14 Section 309.14 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE... INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION ANTE-MORTEM INSPECTION § 309.14 Brucellosis-reactor goats. Goats which have...

  16. Admixture and linkage disequilibrium analysis of meat goat breeds

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Understanding the population structure and variation within the genome will assist with efforts to make genetic gains for meat goat production. A recently developed Illumina Goat 50K SNP panel containing 52,295 SNP loci was created primarily from SNPs identified in European dairy goat breeds and Asi...

  17. 21 CFR 135.115 - Goat's milk ice cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... and hydrolyzed milk proteins may not be used; and paragraphs (f)(1) and (g) of § 135.110 shall not... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Goat's milk ice cream. 135.115 Section 135.115... Goat's milk ice cream. (a) Description. Goat's milk ice cream is the food prepared in the same...

  18. 21 CFR 135.115 - Goat's milk ice cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... and hydrolyzed milk proteins may not be used; and paragraphs (f)(1) and (g) of § 135.110 shall not... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Goat's milk ice cream. 135.115 Section 135.115... Goat's milk ice cream. (a) Description. Goat's milk ice cream is the food prepared in the same...

  19. 21 CFR 135.115 - Goat's milk ice cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... and hydrolyzed milk proteins may not be used; and paragraphs (f)(1) and (g) of § 135.110 shall not... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Goat's milk ice cream. 135.115 Section 135.115... Goat's milk ice cream. (a) Description. Goat's milk ice cream is the food prepared in the same...

  20. 21 CFR 135.115 - Goat's milk ice cream.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... and hydrolyzed milk proteins may not be used; and paragraphs (f)(1) and (g) of § 135.110 shall not... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Goat's milk ice cream. 135.115 Section 135.115... Goat's milk ice cream. (a) Description. Goat's milk ice cream is the food prepared in the same...

  1. Prevalence of Yersinia species in goat flocks.

    PubMed

    Lanada, E B; Morris, R S; Jackson, R; Fenwick, S G

    2005-09-01

    To investigate the epidemiology of Yersinia species in healthy goats in New Zealand, in particular to determine the prevalence of farms with infected goats, the prevalence of infected goats on those farms, the serotypes involved, and potential risk factors for carriage. A cross-sectional study of the prevalence of Yersinia infection in infected flocks in a study population of thirty commercial goat farms in the Manawatu region of New Zealand. Infection was detected on 60% of farms in an initial study. In a prevalence study on 18 infected farms, the study population comprised 6770 animals (mean of 376, median of 175 and range of 36 to 1295 goats/farm). Of 902 goats (296 < 1 year, 178 1 to 2 years, and 428 > 2 years) sampled from the study population, 135 (73 < 1 year, 21 1 to 2 years, and 41 > 2 years) were excreting Yersinia spp, giving an overall prevalence of 14.97% (95% confidence interval [CI]; 12.8 to 17.4) with individual farm prevalences ranging from 0.0 (+ 7.9) to 58.14% (95% Cl, 43.3 to 71.6). Goats < 1 year were more likely to be infected than 1-2 year and > 2 year old animals (relative risk [RR] = 2.1; 95% Cl, 1.3 to 3.3) and 2.6 (95% Cl, 1.8 to 3.6) respectively), but there was no significant difference between risks for 1 to 2 year and > 2 year goats (RR = 1.2; 95% CI, 0.7 to 2.0). Yersinia enterocolitica was the most common species isolated in the youngest age group, with prevalence declining with increasing age, while other species were more common in the older age groups. Yersinia infections were common in goats in the study region, with younger animals apparently more susceptible to infection and in particular to infection with Y enterocolitica. The prevalence on infected farms appeared to decrease as flock size increased and to increase as stocking rates and the number of paddocks grazed increased.

  2. Definition of prepartum hyperketonemia in dairy goats.

    PubMed

    Doré, V; Dubuc, J; Bélanger, A M; Buczinski, S

    2015-07-01

    A prospective cohort study was conducted on 1,081 dairy goats from 10 commercial herds in Québec (Canada) to define prepartum hyperketonemia based on optimal blood β-hydroxybutyrate acid threshold values for the early prediction of pregnancy toxemia (PT) and mortality in late-gestation dairy goats. All pregnant goats had blood sampled weekly during the last 5wk of pregnancy. The blood was analyzed directly on the farm for β-hydroxybutyrate acid quantification using a Precision Xtra meter (Abbott Diabetes Care, Saint-Laurent, QC, Canada). Body condition scores on the lumbar region and sternum were noted. Each goat was classified as being at low (n=973) or high risk (n=108) of having PT by producers based on a standardized definition. The optimal threshold for predicting a PT diagnosis or mortality for each week before kidding was determined based on the highest sum of sensitivity and specificity. The association between hyperketonemia and subsequent PT was tested using a multivariable logistic regression model considering hyperketonemia at wk 4 prepartum, litter size, and body condition score at wk 4 prepartum as covariates, and herd and parturition cohort as random effects. The association between mortality and hyperketonemia was also tested using a logistic regression model accounting for the presence or absence of treatment during the last month of pregnancy. The hyperketonemia definition based on PT varied between ≥0.4 and ≥0.9mmol/L during the last 5wk prepartum. Goats affected by hyperketonemia at wk 4 prepartum and with a large litter size (≥3 fetuses) had 2.1 and 40.5 times the odds, respectively, of subsequent PT than other goats. Hyperketonemia definitions based on mortality varied between ≥0.6 and ≥1.4mmol/L during the last 4wk prepartum, and was ≥1.7mmol/L during the first week postpartum. Goats affected by hyperketonemia and treated by producers had 3.4 and 11.8 times the odds, respectively, of subsequent mortality than did other goats

  3. Activity of an alkaline 'cleaner' in the inactivation of the scrapie agent.

    PubMed

    Baier, M; Schwarz, A; Mielke, M

    2004-05-01

    The capacity of a routinely available alkaline cleaner for medical devices to inactivate the causative agent of a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) was tested. The co-incubation of brain homogenates, prepared from terminally ill scrapie-infected hamsters, with the cleaner led to the denaturation of misfolded protein as the proteinase K-resistant prion protein was no longer detectable after such treatment. In addition, intra-cerebral inoculation of hamsters with the alkaline cleaner-treated and subsequently neutralized samples reduced the level of infectivity of the material below the limit of detection. This report shows the possibility that a routinely available alkaline cleaner could reduce the infectivity of TSE agents and so minimize the risk of iatrogenic transmission of TSEs by asymptomatic carriers. This study is intended to encourage further investigations in this field.

  4. Unchanged survival rates of Shadoo knockout mice after infection with mouse-adapted scrapie

    PubMed Central

    Li, Sha; Ju, Chuanjing; Han, Chao; Li, Zhongyi; Liu, Wensen; Ye, Xuemin; Xu, Jing; Xulong, Liang; Wang, Xiong; Chen, Zhibao; Meng, Keyin; Wan, Jiayu

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that Shadoo (Sho), a GPI-linked glycoprotein encoded by the Sprn gene with a membrane localization similar to PrPC, is reduced in the brains of rodents with terminal prion disease. To determine the functional significance of Sho in prion disease pathogenesis, Sho-deficient mice were generated by gene targeting. Sho knockout and control wild-type (WT) mice were infected with themouse-adapted scrapie strains 22L or RML. No significant differences in survival, the incubation period of prion disease or other disease features were observed between Sho mutant and WT mice. In this model of prion disease, Sho removal had no effect on disease pathogenesis. PMID:25495671

  5. Frequency and distribution of nerves in scrapie-affected and unaffected Peyer's patches and lymph nodes.

    PubMed

    McGovern, G; Martin, S; González, L; Witz, J; Jeffrey, M

    2009-03-01

    Transmission of sheep scrapie and some other prion diseases, including variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease of man, probably occurs via the oral route. A disease-associated variant of the host-coded prion protein (PrP(d)) accumulates in germinal center follicles of lymphoid tissues, including Peyer's patches of the gut, where it can be detected before its accumulation in the central nervous system. To investigate the potential role of lymphoid tissue nerves in neuroinvasion, we used immunohistochemical methods to study the frequency and distribution of nerves and PrP(d) accumulation in Peyer's patches and other lymphoid tissues from scrapie-affected and unaffected sheep. Nerves were infrequently found in secondary follicles of Peyer's patches, but never in germinal centers of the other lymphoid tissues tested. No differences in the frequency or distribution of nerves were found in relation to the presence or absence of PrP(d) accumulation. PrP(d) accumulation and nerves were only infrequently present together in Peyer's patches. These results suggest that, even if amplification of infectivity in lymphoid tissues facilitates neuroinvasion, nerves within lymph nodes and germinal centers of Peyer's patches do not play a primary role in transport of infectivity to the central nervous system. However, sheep between 2 and 4 months of age had significantly more nerve fibers within follicles than older groups. It is therefore possible that a general increase in nerve density of the intestine during early phases of life may contribute to an increased susceptibility of young animals to oral prion infection.

  6. Evaluation of the Possible Transmission of BSE and Scrapie to Gilthead Sea Bream (Sparus aurata)

    PubMed Central

    Teliousis, Konstantinos; Petrakis, Spyros; Eleftheriadis, Eleftherios; Arapoglou, Fotis; Grigoriadis, Nikolaos; Nicolaou, Anna; Kaldrymidou, Eleni; Krey, Grigorios; Sklaviadis, Theodoros

    2009-01-01

    In transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs), a group of fatal neurodegenerative disorders affecting many species, the key event in disease pathogenesis is the accumulation of an abnormal conformational isoform (PrPSc) of the host-encoded cellular prion protein (PrPC). While the precise mechanism of the PrPC to PrPSc conversion is not understood, it is clear that host PrPC expression is a prerequisite for effective infectious prion propagation. Although there have been many studies on TSEs in mammalian species, little is known about TSE pathogenesis in fish. Here we show that while gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata) orally challenged with brain homogenates prepared either from a BSE infected cow or from scrapie infected sheep developed no clinical prion disease, the brains of TSE-fed fish sampled two years after challenge did show signs of neurodegeneration and accumulation of deposits that reacted positively with antibodies raised against sea bream PrP. The control groups, fed with brains from uninfected animals, showed no such signs. Remarkably, the deposits developed much more rapidly and extensively in fish inoculated with BSE-infected material than in the ones challenged with the scrapie-infected brain homogenate, with numerous deposits being proteinase K-resistant. These plaque-like aggregates exhibited congophilia and birefringence in polarized light, consistent with an amyloid-like component. The neurodegeneration and abnormal deposition in the brains of fish challenged with prion, especially BSE, raises concerns about the potential risk to public health. As fish aquaculture is an economically important industry providing high protein nutrition for humans and other mammalian species, the prospect of farmed fish being contaminated with infectious mammalian PrPSc, or of a prion disease developing in farmed fish is alarming and requires further evaluation. PMID:19636413

  7. Detection of Prion Protein Particles in Blood Plasma of Scrapie Infected Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Reinartz, Elke; Jaeger, Karl-Erich; Langeveld, Jan P. M.; Rohwer, Robert G.; Gregori, Luisa; Terry, Linda A.; Willbold, Dieter; Riesner, Detlev

    2012-01-01

    Prion diseases are transmissible neurodegenerative diseases affecting humans and animals. The agent of the disease is the prion consisting mainly, if not solely, of a misfolded and aggregated isoform of the host-encoded prion protein (PrP). Transmission of prions can occur naturally but also accidentally, e.g. by blood transfusion, which has raised serious concerns about blood product safety and emphasized the need for a reliable diagnostic test. In this report we present a method based on surface-FIDA (fluorescence intensity distribution analysis), that exploits the high state of molecular aggregation of PrP as an unequivocal diagnostic marker of the disease, and show that it can detect infection in blood. To prepare PrP aggregates from blood plasma we introduced a detergent and lipase treatment to separate PrP from blood lipophilic components. Prion protein aggregates were subsequently precipitated by phosphotungstic acid, immobilized on a glass surface by covalently bound capture antibodies, and finally labeled with fluorescent antibody probes. Individual PrP aggregates were visualized by laser scanning microscopy where signal intensity was proportional to aggregate size. After signal processing to remove the background from low fluorescence particles, fluorescence intensities of all remaining PrP particles were summed. We detected PrP aggregates in plasma samples from six out of ten scrapie-positive sheep with no false positives from uninfected sheep. Applying simultaneous intensity and size discrimination, ten out of ten samples from scrapie sheep could be differentiated from uninfected sheep. The implications for ante mortem diagnosis of prion diseases are discussed. PMID:22567169

  8. Subcellular colocalization of the cellular and scrapie prion proteins in caveolae-like membranous domains

    PubMed Central

    Vey, Martin; Pilkuhn, Susanne; Wille, Holger; Nixon, Randal; DeArmond, Stephen J.; Smart, Eric J.; Anderson, Richard G. W.; Taraboulos, Albert; Prusiner, Stanley B.

    1996-01-01

    Results of transgenetic studies argue that the scrapie isoform of the prion protein (PrPSc) interacts with the substrate cellular PrP (PrPC) during conversion into nascent PrPSc. While PrPSc appears to accumulate primarily in lysosomes, caveolae-like domains (CLDs) have been suggested to be the site where PrPC is converted into PrPSc. We report herein that CLDs isolated from scrapie-infected neuroblastoma (ScN2a) cells contain PrPC and PrPSc. After lysis of ScN2a cells in ice-cold Triton X-100, both PrP isoforms and an N-terminally truncated form of PrPC (PrPC-II) were found concentrated in detergent-insoluble complexes resembling CLDs that were isolated by flotation in sucrose gradients. Similar results were obtained when CLDs were purified from plasma membranes by sonication and gradient centrifugation; with this procedure no detergents are used, which minimizes artifacts that might arise from redistribution of proteins among subcellular fractions. The caveolar markers ganglioside GM1 and H-ras were found concentrated in the CLD fractions. When plasma membrane proteins were labeled with the impermeant reagent sulfo-N-hydroxysuccinimide-biotin, both PrPC and PrPSc were found biotinylated in CLD fractions. Similar results on the colocalization of PrPC and PrPSc were obtained when CLDs were isolated from Syrian hamster brains. Our findings demonstrate that both PrPC and PrPSc are present in CLDs and, thus, support the hypothesis that the PrPSc formation occurs within this subcellular compartment. PMID:8962161

  9. Different 2-Aminothiazole Therapeutics Produce Distinct Patterns of Scrapie Prion Neuropathology in Mouse Brains.

    PubMed

    Giles, Kurt; Berry, David B; Condello, Carlo; Hawley, Ronald C; Gallardo-Godoy, Alejandra; Bryant, Clifford; Oehler, Abby; Elepano, Manuel; Bhardwaj, Sumita; Patel, Smita; Silber, B Michael; Guan, Shenheng; DeArmond, Stephen J; Renslo, Adam R; Prusiner, Stanley B

    2015-10-01

    Because no drug exists that halts or even slows any neurodegenerative disease, developing effective therapeutics for any prion disorder is urgent. We recently reported two compounds (IND24 and IND81) with the 2-aminothiazole (2-AMT) chemical scaffold that almost doubled the incubation times in scrapie prion-infected, wild-type (wt) FVB mice when given in a liquid diet. Remarkably, oral prophylactic treatment with IND24 beginning 14 days prior to intracerebral prion inoculation extended survival from ∼120 days to over 450 days. In addition to IND24, we evaluated the pharmacokinetics and efficacy of five additional 2-AMTs; one was not followed further because its brain penetration was poor. Of the remaining four new 2-AMTs, IND114338 doubled and IND125 tripled the incubation times of RML-inoculated wt and Tg4053 mice overexpressing wt mouse prion protein (PrP), respectively. Neuropathological examination of the brains from untreated controls showed a widespread deposition of self-propagating, β-sheet-rich "scrapie" isoform (PrP(Sc)) prions accompanied by a profound astrocytic gliosis. In contrast, mice treated with 2-AMTs had lower levels of PrP(Sc) and associated astrocytic gliosis, with each compound resulting in a distinct pattern of deposition. Notably, IND125 prevented both PrP(Sc) accumulation and astrocytic gliosis in the cerebrum. Progressive central nervous system dysfunction in the IND125-treated mice was presumably due to the PrP(Sc) that accumulated in their brainstems. Disappointingly, none of the four new 2-AMTs prolonged the lives of mice expressing a chimeric human/mouse PrP transgene inoculated with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease prions. Copyright © 2015 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  10. Membrane toxicity of abnormal prion protein in adrenal chromaffin cells of scrapie infected sheep.

    PubMed

    McGovern, Gillian; Jeffrey, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) or prion diseases are associated with accumulations of disease specific PrP (PrP(d)) in the central nervous system (CNS) and often the lymphoreticular system (LRS). Accumulations have additionally been recorded in other tissues including the peripheral nervous system and adrenal gland. Here we investigate the effect of sheep scrapie on the morphology and the accumulation of PrP(d) in the adrenal medulla of scrapie affected sheep using light and electron microscopy. Using immunogold electron microscopy, non-fibrillar forms of PrP(d) were shown to accumulate mainly in association with chromaffin cells, occasional nerve endings and macrophages. PrP(d) accumulation was associated with distinctive membrane changes of chromaffin cells including increased electron density, abnormal linearity and invaginations. Internalisation of PrP(d) from the chromaffin cell plasma membrane occurred in association with granule recycling following hormone exocytosis. PrP(d) accumulation and internalisation from membranes is similarly associated with perturbations of membrane structure and trafficking in CNS neurons and tingible body macrophages of the LRS. These data suggest that a major toxic effect of PrP(d) is at the level of plasma membranes. However, the precise nature of PrP(d)-membrane toxicity is tissue and cell specific suggesting that the normal protein may act as a multi-functional scaffolding molecule. We further suggest that the co-localisation of PrP(d) with exocytic granules of the hormone trafficking system may provide an additional source of infectivity in blood.

  11. Pathological findings in retina and visual pathways associated to natural Scrapie in sheep.

    PubMed

    Hortells, Paloma; Monzón, Marta; Monleón, Eva; Acín, Cristina; Vargas, Antonia; Bolea, Rosa; Luján, Lluís; Badiola, Juan José

    2006-09-07

    This work represents a comprehensive pathological description of the retina and visual pathways in naturally affected Scrapie sheep. Twenty naturally affected Scrapie sheep and 6 matched controls were used. Eyes, optic nerves and brain from each animal were fixed and histologically processed using hematoxylin-eosin, followed by immunohistochemical staining for prion protein (PrPsc) and glial fibrillar acidic protein (GFAP). Retinal histopathological changes were observed in only 7 clinically affected animals and mainly consisted of loss of outer limitant layer definition, outer plexiform layer atrophy, disorganization and loss of nuclei in both nuclear layers, and Müller glia hypertrophy. PrPsc was detected in the retina of 19 of the 20 sheep and characterized by a disseminated granular deposit across layers and intraneuronally in ganglion cells. The inner plexiform and the ganglion cell layers were the structures most severely affected by PrPsc deposits. PrPsc exhibited a tendency to spread from these two layers to the others. A marked increase in the number and intensity of GFAP-expressing Müller cells was observed in the clinical stage, especially at the terminal stage of the disease. Spongiosis and PrPsc were detected within the visual pathways at the preclinical stage, their values increasing during the course of the disease but varying between the areas examined. PrPsc was detected in only 3 optic nerves. The results suggest that the presence of PrPsc in the retina correlates with disease progression during the preclinical and clinical stages, perhaps using the inner plexiform layer as a first entry site and diffusing from the brain using a centrifugal model.

  12. Dysfunction of mitochondrial dynamics in the brains of scrapie-infected mice

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Hong-Seok; Choi, Yeong-Gon; Shin, Hae-Young; Oh, Jae-Min; Park, Jeong-Ho; Kim, Jae-Il; Carp, Richard I.; Choi, Eun-Kyoung; Kim, Yong-Sun

    2014-05-30

    Highlights: • Mfn1 and Fis1 are significantly increased in the hippocampal region of the ME7 prion-infected brain, whereas Dlp1 is significantly decreased in the infected brain. • Dlp1 is significantly decreased in the cytosolic fraction of the hippocampus in the infected brain. • Neuronal mitochondria in the prion-infected brains are enlarged and swollen compared to those of control brains. • There are significantly fewer mitochondria in the ME7-infected brain compared to the number in control brain. - Abstract: Mitochondrial dysfunction is a common and prominent feature of many neurodegenerative diseases, including prion diseases; it is induced by oxidative stress in scrapie-infected animal models. In previous studies, we found swelling and dysfunction of mitochondria in the brains of scrapie-infected mice compared to brains of controls, but the mechanisms underlying mitochondrial dysfunction remain unclear. To examine whether the dysregulation of mitochondrial proteins is related to the mitochondrial dysfunction associated with prion disease, we investigated the expression patterns of mitochondrial fusion and fission proteins in the brains of ME7 prion-infected mice. Immunoblot analysis revealed that Mfn1 was up-regulated in both whole brain and specific brain regions, including the cerebral cortex and hippocampus, of ME7-infected mice compared to controls. Additionally, expression levels of Fis1 and Mfn2 were elevated in the hippocampus and the striatum, respectively, of the ME7-infected brain. In contrast, Dlp1 expression was significantly reduced in the hippocampus in the ME7-infected brain, particularly in the cytosolic fraction. Finally, we observed abnormal mitochondrial enlargement and histopathological change in the hippocampus of the ME7-infected brain. These observations suggest that the mitochondrial dysfunction, which is presumably caused by the dysregulation of mitochondrial fusion and fission proteins, may contribute to the

  13. Thermosensitivity of the goat's brain.

    PubMed Central

    Heath, M E; Jessen, C

    1988-01-01

    1. Experiments were done in conscious goats to estimate the gain of brain temperature sensors and to evaluate that fraction of the thermosensitivity of the entire brain which can be determined by a thermode located in the hypothalamus. 2. The animals were implanted with local thermodes, carotid loops and intravascular heat exchangers permitting independent control of hypothalamic temperature, extrahypothalamic brain temperature and trunk core temperature. 3. Small and slow ramp-like displacements of hypothalamic temperature generated continuously increasing thermoregulatory responses without any dead band, if a negative feed-back from extrahypothalamic sources was suppressed. 4. The hypothalamic sensitivity determined by the metabolic response to slow ramp-like cooling of the thermode amounted to -1.4 W/(kg degrees C) and equalled approximately 30% of what had been found for total body core sensitivity in another series of experiments. 5. Total brain thermosensitivity was -1.6 W/(kg degrees C), which implies that a large thermode centred in the hypothalamus can detect approximately 85% of the thermosensitivity of the entire brain. PMID:3418538

  14. New Jersey 4-H Goat Extravaganza: Efficiently Meeting the Educational Needs of 4-H Goat Project Members, Volunteers, and Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ripberger, Chad

    2014-01-01

    The 4-H Goat Extravaganza maximizes limited resources to help youth and adults develop knowledge and skills in goat care and management. It capitalizes on the talents and interests of volunteers to efficiently combine a goat-themed art show, team presentation contest, quiz bowl, skillathon, and adult workshop into 1 day. This article outlines the…

  15. New Jersey 4-H Goat Extravaganza: Efficiently Meeting the Educational Needs of 4-H Goat Project Members, Volunteers, and Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ripberger, Chad

    2014-01-01

    The 4-H Goat Extravaganza maximizes limited resources to help youth and adults develop knowledge and skills in goat care and management. It capitalizes on the talents and interests of volunteers to efficiently combine a goat-themed art show, team presentation contest, quiz bowl, skillathon, and adult workshop into 1 day. This article outlines the…

  16. Genetic Variation of Goat Interferon Regulatory Factor 3 Gene and Its Implication in Goat Evolution.

    PubMed

    Okpeku, Moses; Esmailizadeh, Ali; Adeola, Adeniyi C; Shu, Liping; Zhang, Yesheng; Wang, Yangzi; Sanni, Timothy M; Imumorin, Ikhide G; Peters, Sunday O; Zhang, Jiajin; Dong, Yang; Wang, Wen

    2016-01-01

    The immune systems are fundamentally vital for evolution and survival of species; as such, selection patterns in innate immune loci are of special interest in molecular evolutionary research. The interferon regulatory factor (IRF) gene family control many different aspects of the innate and adaptive immune responses in vertebrates. Among these, IRF3 is known to take active part in very many biological processes. We assembled and evaluated 1356 base pairs of the IRF3 gene coding region in domesticated goats from Africa (Nigeria, Ethiopia and South Africa) and Asia (Iran and China) and the wild goat (Capra aegagrus). Five segregating sites with θ value of 0.0009 for this gene demonstrated a low diversity across the goats' populations. Fu and Li tests were significantly positive but Tajima's D test was significantly negative, suggesting its deviation from neutrality. Neighbor joining tree of IRF3 gene in domesticated goats, wild goat and sheep showed that all domesticated goats have a closer relationship than with the wild goat and sheep. Maximum likelihood tree of the gene showed that different domesticated goats share a common ancestor and suggest single origin. Four unique haplotypes were observed across all the sequences, of which, one was particularly common to African goats (MOCH-K14-0425, Poitou and WAD). In assessing the evolution mode of the gene, we found that the codon model dN/dS ratio for all goats was greater than one. Phylogenetic Analysis by Maximum Likelihood (PAML) gave a ω0 (dN/dS) value of 0.067 with LnL value of -6900.3 for the first Model (M1) while ω2 = 1.667 in model M2 with LnL value of -6900.3 with positive selection inferred in 3 codon sites. Mechanistic empirical combination (MEC) model for evaluating adaptive selection pressure on particular codons also confirmed adaptive selection pressure in three codons (207, 358 and 408) in IRF3 gene. Positive diversifying selection inferred with recent evolutionary changes in domesticated goat IRF3

  17. Risk factors for calcium carbonate urolithiasis in goats.

    PubMed

    Nwaokorie, Eugene E; Osborne, Carl A; Lulich, Jody P; Fletcher, Thomas F; Ulrich, Lisa K; Koehler, Lori A; Buettner, Michelle T

    2015-08-01

    To identify demographic or signalment factors associated with calcium carbonate urolith formation in goats. Retrospective case series and case-control study. 354 goats with calcium carbonate uroliths (case animals) and 16,366 goats without urinary tract disease (control animals). Medical records of the Minnesota Urolith Center were reviewed to identify case goats for which samples were submitted between January 1, 1984, and December 31, 2012. Control goats evaluated at US veterinary teaching hospitals in the same time period were identified by searching Veterinary Medical Database records. Age, breed, sex, reproductive status, geographic location, season, and anatomic location of collected uroliths were analyzed to identify risk or protective factors associated with calcium carbonate urolithiasis. Nigerian dwarf goats had higher odds of developing calcium carbonate uroliths than did Pygmy goats (reference group). Several breeds had lower odds of this finding, compared with Pygmy goats; odds were lowest for mixed, Anglo-Nubian, and Toggenburg breeds. Breeds of African origin (Pygmy, Nigerian Dwarf, and Boer) comprised 146 of 275 (53%) case goats with data available. Goats of African descent had a higher risk of developing calcium carbonate uroliths than did goats of non-African descent (reference group). Males and neutered goats had higher odds of calcium carbonate urolithiasis, compared with females and sexually intact goats, respectively. Age category, geographic location, and season were associated with detection of calcium carbonate uroliths. Goats with calcium carbonate uroliths were typically neutered males, > 1 year of age, and of African descent. This study identified factors associated with calcium carbonate urolithiasis in goats; however, these associations do not allow conclusions regarding cause-and-effect relationships.

  18. Educational Possibilities of Keeping Goats in Elementary Schools in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Koda, Naoko; Kutsumi, Shiho; Hirose, Toshiya; Watanabe, Gen

    2016-01-01

    Many Japanese elementary schools keep small animals for educational purposes, and the effects and challenges have been investigated. Although goats are medium-sized animals that are familiar to Japanese, few practical studies have been conducted on keeping goats in schools. This study investigated the effects and challenges of keeping goats in elementary schools and discussed its educational possibilities. A semi-structured interview survey was conducted with 11 personnel that were responsible for keeping goats in 6 elementary schools in urban areas. They described benefits, problems, and tips related to keeping goats. Participant observation was also conducted on daily human–goat interactions in these schools. The results indicated that children in all six grades were able to care for goats. Goats were used for various school subjects and activities. As a result of keeping goats, children developed affection for them, attitude of respect for living things, greater sense of responsibility, and enhanced interpersonal interactional skills. Stronger ties between the schools and parents and community were developed through cooperation in goat-keeping. Some anxieties existed about the risk of injury to children when interacting with goats. Other challenges included the burden of taking care of the goats on holidays and insufficient knowledge about treatment in case of their illness or injury. The results suggested similarities to the benefits and challenges associated with keeping small animals in elementary schools, although the responsibility and the burden on the schools were greater for keeping goats than small animals because of their larger size and the need for children to consider the goats’ inner state and to cooperate with others when providing care. At the same time, goats greatly stimulated interest, cooperation, and empathy in children. Goats can expand educational opportunities and bring about many positive effects on child development. PMID:28083538

  19. Occipitoatlantoaxial malformation in an adult goat.

    PubMed

    Seva, Juan I; Gómez, Serafin; Pallarés, Francisco J; Sánchez, Pedro; Bernabé, Antonio

    2008-09-01

    An occipitoatlantoaxial malformation was diagnosed in a 1-year-old Murciano-Granadina goat. At clinical examination, the head and cranial part of the neck were deviated to the right. Clinical signs of spinal cord or brain disease were not observed. At necropsy, morphological abnormalities were seen in the craniovertebral junction and cervical vertebrae, characterized by a firm attachment and incomplete articulation between the occipital bone and the atlas, and scoliosis in the cervical regions. The definitive diagnosis was bilateral asymmetrical occipitoatlantoaxial fusion with rotation of the atlas and atlantoaxial subluxation. To the authors' knowledge, this case report is the second occipitoatlantoaxial malformation described in a goat and the first description in an adult goat.

  20. Isolation and characterization of orf viruses from Korean black goats.

    PubMed

    Oem, Jae-Ku; Chung, Joon-Yee; Kim, Yong-Joo; Lee, Kyoung-Ki; Kim, Seong-Hee; Jung, Byeong-Yeal; Hyun, Bang-Hun

    2013-01-01

    Five cases of orf virus infection in Korean black goats were diagnosed in our laboratory between 2010 and 2011. One orf virus (ORF/2011) was isolated from an ovine testis cell line (OA3.Ts) for use as a vaccine candidate. Sequences of the major envelope protein and orf virus interferon resistance genes were determined and compared with published reference sequences. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that orf viruses from Korean black goats were most closely related to an isolate (ORF/09/Korea) from dairy goats in Korea. This result indicates that the orf viruses might have been introduced from dairy goats into the Korean black goat population.

  1. Subependymal plaques in scrapie-affected hamster brains--why are they so different from compact kuru plaques?

    PubMed

    Sikorska, Beata; Liberski, Paweł P; Brown, Paul

    2008-01-01

    We report here routine thin-section and immunogold electron microscopic studies on diffuse plaques in scrapie-affected hamster brains. These plaques were not discernible by routine HE staining. Ultrastructurally, plaques were recognized as areas of low electron density containing haphazardly-oriented fibrils, but not as stellate compact structures typical of mouse scrapie models; hence we labelled them "loose plaques". Following immunohistochemistry at the electron microscopy level, fibrils within plaques were heavily decorated with PrP-conjugated gold particles. Loose plaques were located beneath the basal border of the ependymal cells and around blood vessels in the adjacent subependymal neuropil. When dystrophic neurites containing electron-dense inclusion bodies, some of them autophagic vacuoles [59], were seen within the plaque perimeter, they always remained PrP-negative. Some microglial cells were observed in close contact with PrP-positive plaques, and secondary lysosomes within these cells were heavily decorated with gold particles.

  2. The abnormal isoform of the prion protein accumulates in late-endosome-like organelles in scrapie-infected mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Arnold, J E; Tipler, C; Laszlo, L; Hope, J; Landon, M; Mayer, R J

    1995-08-01

    The prion encephalopathies are characterized by accumulation in the brain of the abnormal form PrPsc of a normal host gene product PrPc. The mechanism and site of formation of PrPsc from PrPc are currently unknown. In this study, ME7 scrapie-infected mouse brain was used to show, both biochemically and by double-labelled immunogold electron microscopy, that proteinase K-resistant PrPsc is enriched in subcellular structures which contain the cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate receptor, ubiquitin-protein conjugates, beta-glucuronidase, and cathepsin B, termed late endosome-like organelles. The glycosylinositol phospholipid membrane-anchored PrPc will enter such compartment for normal degradation and the organelles may therefore act as chambers for the conversion of PrPc into infectious PrPsc in this murine model of scrapie.

  3. Thermoregulatory responses of goats in hot environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maia, Alex Sandro Campos; da Silva, Roberto Gomes; Nascimento, Sheila Tavares; Nascimento, Carolina Cardoso Nagib; Pedroza, Heloisa Paula; Domingos, Herica Girlane Tertulino

    2015-08-01

    Notwithstanding the solar radiation is recognized as a detrimental factor to the thermal balance and responses of animals on the range in tropical conditions, studies on the amount of thermal radiation absorbed by goats therein associated with data on their production and heat exchange are still lacking. Metabolic heat production and the heat exchange of goats in the sun and in the shade were measured simultaneously, aiming to observe its thermal equilibrium. The results showed that black goats absorb twice as much as the white goats under intense solar radiation (higher than 800 W m-2). This observation leads to a higher surface temperature of black goats, but it must not be seen as a disadvantage, because they increase their sensible heat flow in the coat-air interface, especially the convection heat flow at high wind speeds. In the shade, no difference between the coat colours was observed and both presented a lower absorption of heat and a lower sensible heat flow gain. When solar radiation levels increases from 300 to 1000 W m-2, we observed an increase of the heat losses through latent flow in both respiratory and cutaneous surface. Cutaneous evaporation was responsible for almost 90 % of the latent heat losses, independently of the coat colour. Goats decrease the metabolic heat production under solar radiation levels up to 800 W m-2, and increase in levels higher than this, because there is an increase of the respiratory rate and of the respiratory flow, but the fractions of consumed oxygen and produced carbon dioxide are maintained stable. The respiratory rate of black goats was higher than the white ones, under 300 W m-2 (55 and 45 resp min-1) and 1000 W m-2 (120 and 95 resp min-1, respectively). It was concluded that shade or any protection against solar radiation levels above 800 Wm-2 is critical to guarantee goat's thermal equilibrium. Strategies concerning the grazing period in accordance with the time of the day alone are not appropriate, because the

  4. Thermoregulatory responses of goats in hot environments.

    PubMed

    Maia, Alex Sandro Campos; da Silva, Roberto Gomes; Nascimento, Sheila Tavares; Nascimento, Carolina Cardoso Nagib; Pedroza, Heloisa Paula; Domingos, Herica Girlane Tertulino

    2015-08-01

    Notwithstanding the solar radiation is recognized as a detrimental factor to the thermal balance and responses of animals on the range in tropical conditions, studies on the amount of thermal radiation absorbed by goats therein associated with data on their production and heat exchange are still lacking. Metabolic heat production and the heat exchange of goats in the sun and in the shade were measured simultaneously, aiming to observe its thermal equilibrium. The results showed that black goats absorb twice as much as the white goats under intense solar radiation (higher than 800 W m(-2)). This observation leads to a higher surface temperature of black goats, but it must not be seen as a disadvantage, because they increase their sensible heat flow in the coat-air interface, especially the convection heat flow at high wind speeds. In the shade, no difference between the coat colours was observed and both presented a lower absorption of heat and a lower sensible heat flow gain. When solar radiation levels increases from 300 to 1000 W m(-2), we observed an increase of the heat losses through latent flow in both respiratory and cutaneous surface. Cutaneous evaporation was responsible for almost 90 % of the latent heat losses, independently of the coat colour. Goats decrease the metabolic heat production under solar radiation levels up to 800 W m(-2), and increase in levels higher than this, because there is an increase of the respiratory rate and of the respiratory flow, but the fractions of consumed oxygen and produced carbon dioxide are maintained stable. The respiratory rate of black goats was higher than the white ones, under 300 W m(-2) (55 and 45 resp min(-1)) and 1000 W m(-2) (120 and 95 resp min(-1), respectively). It was concluded that shade or any protection against solar radiation levels above 800 Wm(-2) is critical to guarantee goat's thermal equilibrium. Strategies concerning the grazing period in accordance with the time of the day alone are not

  5. Renal (uremic) encephalopathy in a goat.

    PubMed

    Radi, Z A; Thomsen, B V; Summers, B A

    2005-10-01

    Renal encephalopathy was diagnosed in a 2-year-old male boar goat with a history of chronic weight loss and ataxia. Histopathological examination of the brain revealed a striking myelin vacuolation distributed mainly in two patterns: (i) along the junction of the neocortex and corona radiata, and (ii) in the bundles of the internal capsule as it dissects through the basal nuclei. The kidneys had diffuse severe tubular and glomerular necrosis and degeneration. The neural lesions are consistent with renal (uremic) encephalopathy. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of renal encephalopathy in a goat.

  6. Vesicopreputial anastomosis for the treatment of obstructive urolithiasis in goats.

    PubMed

    Cypher, Elizabeth Erin; van Amstel, Sarel R; Videla, Ricardo; Force Clark, Kyle; Anderson, David E

    2017-02-01

    To describe a novel surgical technique for the correction of recurrent obstructive urolithiasis in male goats. Clinical case series. Castrated male goats (n = 4). Medical records of male goats having undergone vesicopreputial anastomosis (VPA) as a treatment for obstructive urolithiasis were reviewed for history, signalment, clinical signs, and intraoperative and postoperative complications. Long-term follow-up (≥12 months) was obtained by telephone interview with owners or by clinical examination. All goats had undergone at least one surgical procedure (median, 2.5, range 2-4) to correct obstructive urolithiasis before undergoing VPA. Postoperative complications included premature removal of the tube from the bladder (1 goat), bacterial cystitis (2), and abscess formation (1). One goat suffered stricture of the anastomosis site 3 months following the original procedure and underwent a second VPA and 1 goat died 7 months after surgery due to severe, acute hydronephrosis and renal failure. Long-term survival ≥12 months was good with 3/4 goats (75%) or 3/5 VPA procedures (60%) having unobstructed urine flow at 12 months. Vesicopreputial anastomosis is a feasible surgical procedure for the correction of recurrent obstructive urolithiasis in male goats and one that can result in a favorable clinical outcome. Further investigation in a larger population of goats is warranted for the evaluation of the suitability of VPA in male goats with obstructive urolithiasis. © 2017 The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  7. Communal goat production in Southern Africa: a review.

    PubMed

    Rumosa Gwaze, F; Chimonyo, M; Dzama, K

    2009-10-01

    Despite the fact that about 64% of goats in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) are located in rural arid (38%) and semi-arid (26%) agro-ecological zones and that more than 90% of goats in these zones are indigenous, information on indigenous breeds is inadequate. This paper reviews the social and economic importance of goats to the communal farmer and assesses the potential of using goats in rural development in Southern Africa. Farmers in Southern Africa largely use the village goat management system. There are various goat breeds in Southern Africa, of which the Mashona, Matabele, Tswana, Nguni and the Landim are the dominant ones. It is, however, not clear if these breeds are distinct. Major constraints to goat production include high disease and parasite prevalence, low levels of management, limited forage availability and poor marketing management. Potential research areas that are required to ensure that goats are vehicles for rural development include evaluation of constraints to goat production, assessing the contribution of goats to household economies and food securities throughout the year, genetic and phenotypic characterisation of the indigenous breeds to identify appropriate strains and sustainable methods of goat improvement through either selection or crossbreeding.

  8. Two USA Ehrlichia spp. cause febrile illness in goats.

    PubMed

    Loftis, Amanda D; Levin, Michael L; Spurlock, J Paul

    2008-08-25

    Ehrlichia spp. are not currently recognized as a cause of illness in goats in the USA, but three Ehrlichia are enzootic in lone star ticks (Amblyomma americanum) in the eastern USA, and related bacteria in other countries cause illness in goats. We exposed naïve goats to Ehrlichia-infected Amblyomma and demonstrated that infection and clinical illness can be caused by two USA species, E. ewingii and the recently discovered Panola Mountain Ehrlichia sp. Clinical features in all five goats are described; ehrlichioses were associated with pyrexia, serous nasal discharge, inappetance, lethargy, decreased alkaline phosphatase, and, in most cases, neutropenia. Goats remained chronically infected for several months following exposure to ehrlichiae and transmitted the pathogens to uninfected ticks. In the eastern USA, undifferentiated febrile illness in goats might be caused by previously unrecognized ehrlichial infections, and pastures housing-infected goats could become infested with a large number of infected ticks.

  9. Disruption of glycosylation enhances ubiquitin-mediated proteasomal degradation of Shadoo in Scrapie-infected rodents and cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin; Guo, Yan; Xie, Wu-Ling; Xu, Yin; Ren, Ke; Shi, Qi; Zhang, Bao-Yun; Chen, Cao; Tian, Chan; Gao, Chen; Dong, Xiao-Ping

    2014-06-01

    Shadoo (Sho) is an N-glycosylated glycophosphatidylinositol-anchored protein that is expressed in the brain and exhibits neuroprotective properties. Recently, research has shown that a reduction of Sho levels may reflect the presence of PrPSc in the brain. However, the possible mechanism by which prion infection triggers down-regulation of Sho remains unclear. In the present study, Western blot and immunohistochemical assays revealed that Sho, especially glycosylated Sho, declined markedly in the brains of five scrapie agent-infected hamsters and mice at the terminal stages. Analyses of the down-regulation of Sho levels with the emergence of PrPSc C2 proteolytic fragments did not identify close association in all tested scrapie-infected models. To further investigate the mechanism of depletion of Sho in prion disease, a Sho-expressing plasmid with HA tag was introduced into a scrapie-infected cell line, SMB-S15, and its normal cell line, SMB-PS. Western blot assay revealed dramatically decreased Sho in SMB-S15 cells, especially its glycosylated form. Proteasome inhibitor MG132 reversed the decrease of nonglycosylated Sho, but had little effect on glycosylated Sho. N-acetylglucosamine transferase inhibitor tunicamycin efficiently reduced the glycosylations of Sho and PrPC in SMB-PS cells, while two other endoplasmic reticulum stress inducers showed clear inhibition of diglycosylated PrPC, but did not change the expression level and profile of Sho. Furthermore, immunoprecipitation of HA-Sho illustrated ubiquitination of Sho in SMB-S15 cells, but not in SMB-PS cells. We propose that the depletions of Sho in scrapie-infected cell lines due to inhibition of glycosylation mediate protein destabilization and subsequently proteasome degradation after modification by ubiquitination.

  10. Comparative Susceptibility of Sheep of Different Origins, Breeds and PRNP Genotypes to Challenge with Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy and Scrapie

    PubMed Central

    Houston, Fiona; Goldmann, Wilfred; Foster, James; González, Lorenzo; Jeffrey, Martin; Hunter, Nora

    2015-01-01

    Sheep are natural hosts of the prion disease, scrapie. They are also susceptible to experimental challenge with various scrapie strains and with bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), which affects cattle and has been accidentally transmitted to a range of other species, including man. Incidence and incubation period of clinical disease in sheep following inoculation is controlled by the PRNP gene, which has different alleles defined on the basis of polymorphisms, particularly at codons 136, 154 and 171, although other codons are associated with survival time, and the exact responses of the sheep may be influenced by other breed-related differences. Here we report the results of a long term single study of experimental scrapie and BSE susceptibility of sheep of Cheviot, Poll Dorset and Suffolk breeds, originating from New Zealand and of a wide range of susceptible and resistant PRNP genotypes. Responses were compared with those of sheep from a closed Cheviot flock of UK origin (Roslin Cheviot flock). The unusually long observation period (6–8 years for most, but up to 12 years for others) allows us to draw robust conclusions about rates of survival of animals previously regarded as resistant to infection, particularly PRNP heterozygotes, and is the most comprehensive such study reported to date. BSE inoculation by an intracerebral route produced disease in all genotype groups with differing incubation periods, although M112T and L141F polymorphisms seemed to give some protection. Scrapie isolate SSBP/1, which has the shortest incubation period in sheep with at least one VRQ PRNP allele, also produced disease following sub-cutaneous inoculation in ARQ/ARQ animals of New Zealand origin, but ARQ/ARQ sheep from the Roslin flock survived the challenge. Our results demonstrate that the links between PRNP genotype and clinical prion disease in sheep are much less secure than previously thought, and may break down when, for example, a different breed of sheep is moved

  11. Comparative Susceptibility of Sheep of Different Origins, Breeds and PRNP Genotypes to Challenge with Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy and Scrapie.

    PubMed

    Houston, Fiona; Goldmann, Wilfred; Foster, James; González, Lorenzo; Jeffrey, Martin; Hunter, Nora

    2015-01-01

    Sheep are natural hosts of the prion disease, scrapie. They are also susceptible to experimental challenge with various scrapie strains and with bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), which affects cattle and has been accidentally transmitted to a range of other species, including man. Incidence and incubation period of clinical disease in sheep following inoculation is controlled by the PRNP gene, which has different alleles defined on the basis of polymorphisms, particularly at codons 136, 154 and 171, although other codons are associated with survival time, and the exact responses of the sheep may be influenced by other breed-related differences. Here we report the results of a long term single study of experimental scrapie and BSE susceptibility of sheep of Cheviot, Poll Dorset and Suffolk breeds, originating from New Zealand and of a wide range of susceptible and resistant PRNP genotypes. Responses were compared with those of sheep from a closed Cheviot flock of UK origin (Roslin Cheviot flock). The unusually long observation period (6-8 years for most, but up to 12 years for others) allows us to draw robust conclusions about rates of survival of animals previously regarded as resistant to infection, particularly PRNP heterozygotes, and is the most comprehensive such study reported to date. BSE inoculation by an intracerebral route produced disease in all genotype groups with differing incubation periods, although M112T and L141F polymorphisms seemed to give some protection. Scrapie isolate SSBP/1, which has the shortest incubation period in sheep with at least one VRQ PRNP allele, also produced disease following sub-cutaneous inoculation in ARQ/ARQ animals of New Zealand origin, but ARQ/ARQ sheep from the Roslin flock survived the challenge. Our results demonstrate that the links between PRNP genotype and clinical prion disease in sheep are much less secure than previously thought, and may break down when, for example, a different breed of sheep is moved

  12. Molecular and transmission characteristics of primary-passaged ovine scrapie isolates in conventional and ovine PrP transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Thackray, Alana M; Hopkins, Lee; Spiropoulos, John; Bujdoso, Raymond

    2008-11-01

    A more complete assessment of ovine prion strain diversity will be achieved by complementing biological strain typing in conventional and ovine PrP transgenic mice with a biochemical analysis of the resultant PrPSc. This will provide a correlation between ovine prion strain phenotype and the molecular nature of different PrP conformers associated with particular prion strains. Here, we have compared the molecular and transmission characteristics of ovine ARQ/ARQ and VRQ/VRQ scrapie isolates following primary passage in tg338 (VRQ) and tg59 (ARQ) ovine PrP transgenic mice and the conventional mouse lines C57BL/6 (Prnp(a)), RIII (Prnp(a)), and VM (Prnp(b)). Our data show that these different genotypes of scrapie isolates display similar incubation periods of >350 days in conventional and tg59 mice. Facilitated transmission of sheep scrapie isolates occurred in tg338 mice, with incubation times reduced to 64 days for VRQ/VRQ inocula and to scrapie isolates. In contrast, the lesion profiles, quantities, and stability of PrPSc induced by the same inocula in tg338 mice were more similar than in the other mouse lines. Our data show that primary transmission of different genotypes of ovine prions is associated with the formation of different conformers of PrPSc with distinct molecular properties and provide the basis of a molecular approach to identify the true diversity of ovine prion strains.

  13. Genetic Variation of Goat Interferon Regulatory Factor 3 Gene and Its Implication in Goat Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Liping; Zhang, Yesheng; Wang, Yangzi; Sanni, Timothy M.; Imumorin, Ikhide G.; Peters, Sunday O.; Zhang, Jiajin; Dong, Yang; Wang, Wen

    2016-01-01

    The immune systems are fundamentally vital for evolution and survival of species; as such, selection patterns in innate immune loci are of special interest in molecular evolutionary research. The interferon regulatory factor (IRF) gene family control many different aspects of the innate and adaptive immune responses in vertebrates. Among these, IRF3 is known to take active part in very many biological processes. We assembled and evaluated 1356 base pairs of the IRF3 gene coding region in domesticated goats from Africa (Nigeria, Ethiopia and South Africa) and Asia (Iran and China) and the wild goat (Capra aegagrus). Five segregating sites with θ value of 0.0009 for this gene demonstrated a low diversity across the goats’ populations. Fu and Li tests were significantly positive but Tajima’s D test was significantly negative, suggesting its deviation from neutrality. Neighbor joining tree of IRF3 gene in domesticated goats, wild goat and sheep showed that all domesticated goats have a closer relationship than with the wild goat and sheep. Maximum likelihood tree of the gene showed that different domesticated goats share a common ancestor and suggest single origin. Four unique haplotypes were observed across all the sequences, of which, one was particularly common to African goats (MOCH-K14-0425, Poitou and WAD). In assessing the evolution mode of the gene, we found that the codon model dN/dS ratio for all goats was greater than one. Phylogenetic Analysis by Maximum Likelihood (PAML) gave a ω0 (dN/dS) value of 0.067 with LnL value of -6900.3 for the first Model (M1) while ω2 = 1.667 in model M2 with LnL value of -6900.3 with positive selection inferred in 3 codon sites. Mechanistic empirical combination (MEC) model for evaluating adaptive selection pressure on particular codons also confirmed adaptive selection pressure in three codons (207, 358 and 408) in IRF3 gene. Positive diversifying selection inferred with recent evolutionary changes in domesticated goat

  14. Production, composition, fatty acid profile and sensory analysis of goat milk in goats fed buriti oil.

    PubMed

    Morais, J S; Bezerra, L R; Silva, A M A; Araújo, M J; Oliveira, R L; Edvan, R L; Torreão, J N C; Lanna, D P D

    2017-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of replacing ground corn with buriti oil ( L.) on feed intake and digestibility and on the production, composition, fatty acid profile and sensory characteristics of goat milk. A double Latin square (4 × 4) was used; eight goats were distributed in a completely randomized design. The square comprised four periods and four buriti oil concentration (0.00; 1.50; 3.00 and 4.50% of total DM) replacing corn. Intakes of DM, CP, NDF, ADF, non-fibrous carboydrates (NFC) and TDN were not affected by the replacement of corn with oil in the diet. However, lipids intake was increased ( < 0.01) by 100% in the diet of goats with 4.50% oil inclusion, as total DM. DM and CP digestibility were similar between the buriti oil concentrations. However, lipid digestibility increased linearly ( = 0.01) and may have contributed to a quadratic reduction in NDF digestibility ( = 0.01) and a linear reduction of NFC ( = 0.04) with buriti oil content in the goat feed. Goat milk production, corrected production and chemical composition were not influenced by the concentration of buriti oil replacement; however, milk fat concentration ( = 0.04) and feed efficiency ( < 0.01) increased linearly with the amount of buriti oil in the diet. There was a linear reduction on hypercholesterolemic SFA such as C12:0 ( < 0.01) and C14:0 ( < 0.01) as well as the atherogenic index (AI; < 0.01) with buriti oil inclusion in goat's diet. In contrast, the fatty acids C18:0 ( < 0.01) and C18:1 9 ( < 0.01) increased linearly in the milk of goats that were fed with buriti oil. However, CLA ( < 0.01) varied quadratically; the maximum production of 0.62 g/100 g of fat was observed when using 1.50% buriti oil. The sensory characteristics of the milk were not changed ( > 0.05) by the replacement of corn with buriti oil in the goats' diet. It is recommended to replace corn with buriti oil in goat feed by up to 4.5% of total DM, resulting in improved feed efficiency and milk fat without

  15. The cardiac biomarkers troponin I and CK-MB in nonpregnant and pregnant goats, goats with normal birth, goats with prolonged birth, and goats with pregnancy toxemia.

    PubMed

    Tharwat, M; Al-Sobayil, F; Al-Sobayil, K

    2012-10-15

    This study was designed to establish the reference range for the cardiac biomarkers cardiac troponin I (cTnI) and creatine kinase myocardial band (CK-MB) in nonpregnant and pregnant goats, goats with normal birth, goats with prolonged birth associated with dystocia, and goats with pregnancy toxemia. Fifty-seven does, categorized into three groups (G1 to G3), were used. These groups were comprised of 20 healthy does (G1), 19 does with prolonged birth (G2), and 18 does with pregnancy toxemia (G3). Six blood samples (T0 to T5) were collected from G1. The first blood sample (T0) was taken before insemination, the second (T1) at the first trimester, the third (T2) at the second trimester, the fourth (T3) at the last trimester, the fifth (T4) within 12 h of parturition, and the sixth blood sample (T5) was taken 10 days after parturition. A sample of blood was obtained from G2 and G3 upon admission to the hospital. At T0 to T3, no cTnI was detected in any of the 20 does in G1. At parturition (T4), seven of the 20 goats (35%) exhibited slightly elevated cTnI concentrations (range, 0.01 to 0.04 ng/mL). Ten days after parturition (T5), cTnI was not detected in any of the 20 goats. In 10 of the 19 goats (53%) with prolonged birth (G2), the cTnI was significantly elevated to a mean value of 0.094 ± 0.155 ng/mL, with a maximum value of 0.61 ng/mL. In 16 of the 18 goats (89%) with pregnancy toxemia (G3), the cTnI was significantly elevated to a value of 0.852 ± 1.472 ng/mL, with a maximum value of 5.219 ng/mL. Comparing the values of CK-MB in G1 (T0 to T5), G2 and G3 revealed nonsignificant differences. Only a slight elevation in the CK-MB levels in goats with prolonged birth (G2) was noted. We concluded that in healthy does, the cardiac biomarker cTnI is not elevated during normal pregnancy. The serum cTnI concentration may be elevated in a number of goats at normal vaginal or cesarean delivery. Finally, cTnI is significantly elevated in does with pregnancy toxemia and could

  16. Rapid chemical decontamination of infectious CJD and scrapie particles parallels treatments known to disrupt microbes and biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Botsios, Sotirios; Tittman, Sarah; Manuelidis, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Neurodegenerative human CJD and sheep scrapie are diseases caused by several different transmissible encephalopathy (TSE) agents. These infectious agents provoke innate immune responses in the brain, including late-onset abnormal prion protein (PrP-res) amyloid. Agent particles that lack detectable PrP sequences by deep proteomic analysis are highly infectious. Yet these agents, and their unusual resistance to denaturation, are often evaluated by PrP amyloid disruption. To reexamine the intrinsic resistance of TSE agents to denaturation, a paradigm for less resistant viruses and microbes, we developed a rapid and reproducible high yield agent isolation procedure from cultured cells that minimized PrP amyloid and other cellular proteins. Monotypic neuronal GT1 cells infected with the FU-CJD or 22L scrapie agents do not have complex brain changes that can camouflage infectious particles and prevent their disruption, and there are only 2 reports on infectious titers of any human CJD strain treated with chemical denaturants. Infectious titers of both CJD and scrapie were reduced by >4 logs with Thiourea-urea, a treatment not previously tested. A mere 5 min exposure to 4M GdnHCl at 22°C reduced infectivity by >5 logs. Infectious 22L particles were significantly more sensitive to denaturation than FU-CJD particles. A protocol using sonication with these chemical treatments may effectively decontaminate complicated instruments, such as duodenoscopes that harbor additional virulent microbes and biofilms associated with recent iatrogenic infections. PMID:26556670

  17. Topographic distribution of scrapie amyloid-immunoreactive plaques in chronic wasting disease in captive mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus hemionus).

    PubMed

    Guiroy, D C; Williams, E S; Yanagihara, R; Gajdusek, D C

    1991-01-01

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD), a progressive neurological disorder of captive mule deer, black-tailed deer, hybrids of mule deer and white-tailed deer and Rocky Mountain elk, is characterized neuropathologically by widespread spongiform change of the neuropil, intracytoplasmic vacuolation in neuronal perikarya and astrocytic hypertrophy and hyperplasia. We report the topographic distribution of amyloid plaques reactive to antibodies prepared against scrapie amyloid in CWD-affected captive mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus hemionus). Scrapie amyloid-immunoreactive plaques were found in the cerebral gray and white matter, in deep subcortical nuclei, in isolation or in clusters in areas of vacuolation, and perivascularly, in subpial and subependymal regions. In the cerebellum, immunoreactive amyloid plaques were observed in the molecular, pyramidal and granular layers. Scrapie amyloid-immunoreactive deposits were also seen in neuronal perikarya. Furthermore, amyloid plaques in CWD-affected captive mule deer were alcianophilic at 0.3 M magnesium chloride indicating the presence of weakly to moderately sulfated glycosaminoglycans. Our data corroborate that CWD in captive mule deer belongs to the subacute virus spongiform encephalopathies.

  18. Microsecond Unfolding Kinetics of Sheep Prion Protein Reveals an Intermediate that Correlates with Susceptibility to Classical Scrapie

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kai-Chun; Xu, Ming; Wedemeyer, William J.; Roder, Heinrich

    2011-01-01

    The microsecond folding and unfolding kinetics of ovine prion proteins (ovPrP) were measured under various solution conditions. A fragment comprising residues 94–233 of the full-length ovPrP was studied for four variants with differing susceptibilities to classical scrapie in sheep. The observed biexponential unfolding kinetics of ovPrP provides evidence for an intermediate species. However, in contrast to previous results for human PrP, there is no evidence for an intermediate under refolding conditions. Global analysis of the kinetic data, based on a sequential three-state mechanism, quantitatively accounts for all folding and unfolding data as a function of denaturant concentration. The simulations predict that an intermediate accumulates under both folding and unfolding conditions, but is observable only in unfolding experiments because the intermediate is optically indistinguishable from the native state. The relative population of intermediates in two ovPrP variants, both transiently and under destabilizing equilibrium conditions, correlates with their propensities for classical scrapie. The variant susceptible to classical scrapie has a larger population of the intermediate state than the resistant variant. Thus, the susceptible variant should be favored to undergo the PrPC to PrPSc conversion and oligomerization. PMID:21889460

  19. Rapid chemical decontamination of infectious CJD and scrapie particles parallels treatments known to disrupt microbes and biofilms.

    PubMed

    Botsios, Sotirios; Tittman, Sarah; Manuelidis, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Neurodegenerative human CJD and sheep scrapie are diseases caused by several different transmissible encephalopathy (TSE) agents. These infectious agents provoke innate immune responses in the brain, including late-onset abnormal prion protein (PrP-res) amyloid. Agent particles that lack detectable PrP sequences by deep proteomic analysis are highly infectious. Yet these agents, and their unusual resistance to denaturation, are often evaluated by PrP amyloid disruption. To reexamine the intrinsic resistance of TSE agents to denaturation, a paradigm for less resistant viruses and microbes, we developed a rapid and reproducible high yield agent isolation procedure from cultured cells that minimized PrP amyloid and other cellular proteins. Monotypic neuronal GT1 cells infected with the FU-CJD or 22L scrapie agents do not have complex brain changes that can camouflage infectious particles and prevent their disruption, and there are only 2 reports on infectious titers of any human CJD strain treated with chemical denaturants. Infectious titers of both CJD and scrapie were reduced by >4 logs with Thiourea-urea, a treatment not previously tested. A mere 5 min exposure to 4M GdnHCl at 22°C reduced infectivity by >5 logs. Infectious 22L particles were significantly more sensitive to denaturation than FU-CJD particles. A protocol using sonication with these chemical treatments may effectively decontaminate complicated instruments, such as duodenoscopes that harbor additional virulent microbes and biofilms associated with recent iatrogenic infections.

  20. Genetic relatedness between Ardi, Black Bedouin and Damascus goat breeds.

    PubMed

    Al-Atiyat, R M; Aljumaah, R S

    2014-06-18

    The present study aimed to analyze genetic relatedness and differentiation of common native goat populations in some countries of the Middle East. The populations were Ardi, Black Bedouin, and Damascus goats in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, Jordan, and Syria, respectively. Domesticated goats of the Middle East are mostly related to common ancestors, but there is limited molecular genetic evidence. Four microsatellite DNA markers were genotyped in 89 individuals of the three populations using an automated genetic analyzer. Ardi, Black Bedouin, and Damascus goats exhibited high average allele number and expected heterozygosity of 8.25, 9, and 7.25, and 0.750, 0.804, and 0.779, respectively. F-statistics for population differentiation showed 6.0% of total genetic variation, whereas 94.0% as differentiation between individuals within all populations. The least varied within populations was Ardi goats, then Damascus goats and finally Black Bedouin goats. Furthermore, the Damascus goat population was more differentiated from Black Bedouin goats than from Ardi goats. On the other hand, there was strong evidence of admixture between the majority of Ardi and Black Bedouin goat individuals but little with those of Damascus goats. Genetic distance between Ardi and Black Bedouin goats was the shortest, whereas it was the longest between Ardi and Damascus goats. The phylogenetic tree clearly revealed the expected degree of differentiation in the three populations. From a genetic conservation point of view, it is recommended to maintain the biodiversity of these distinct populations in case genetic migration of genetic resources and genetic conservation are absent.

  1. Genetic Differentiation of Chinese Indigenous Meat Goats Ascertained Using Microsatellite Information

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Y. H.; Zhang, X. D.; Yao, N.; Ding, J. P.; Chen, H. Q.; Zhang, Z. J.; Zhang, Y. H.; Ren, C. H.; Ma, Y. H.; Zhang, X. R.

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the genetic diversity of seven Chinese indigenous meat goat breeds (Tibet goat, Guizhou white goat, Shannan white goat, Yichang white goat, Matou goat, Changjiangsanjiaozhou white goat and Anhui white goat), explain their genetic relationship and assess their integrity and degree of admixture, 302 individuals from these breeds and 42 Boer goats introduced from Africa as reference samples were genotyped for 11 microsatellite markers. Results indicated that the genetic diversity of Chinese indigenous meat goats was rich. The mean heterozygosity and the mean allelic richness (AR) for the 8 goat breeds varied from 0.697 to 0.738 and 6.21 to 7.35, respectively. Structure analysis showed that Tibet goat breed was genetically distinct and was the first to separate and the other Chinese goats were then divided into two sub-clusters: Shannan white goat and Yichang white goat in one cluster; and Guizhou white goat, Matou goat, Changjiangsanjiaozhou white goat and Anhui white goat in the other cluster. This grouping pattern was further supported by clustering analysis and Principal component analysis. These results may provide a scientific basis for the characteristization, conservation and utilization of Chinese meat goats. PMID:25049548

  2. In vitro development of goat-sheep and goat-goat zona-free cloned embryos in different culture media.

    PubMed

    Khan, F A; Bhat, M H; Yaqoob, S H; Waheed, S M; Naykoo, N A; Athar, H; Khan, H M; Fazili, M R; Ganai, N A; Singla, S K; Shah, R A

    2014-02-01

    The gradual decline in the genetic diversity of farm animals has threatened their survival and risk of their extinction has increased many fold in the recent past. Endangered species could be rescued using interspecies embryo production. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of three different culture media on the development of Handmade cloned intraspecies (goat-goat) and interspecies (goat-sheep) embryo reconstructs. Research vitro cleave media (RVCL) yielded higher cleavage and morula-blastocyst development in intraspecies and interspecies nuclear transfer groups compared with G1.G2 and modified synthetic oviductal fluid (mSOFaaci). Cleavage frequency of intraspecies cloned embryos in RVCL, mSOFaaci, and G1.G2 did not differ significantly (87.12%, 82.45%, and 92.52%, respectively). However, the morula/blastocyst frequency in RVCL was greater in mSOFaaci and G1.G2 (51.18% vs. 38.28% vs. 36.50%, respectively). Cleavage and morula/blastocyst frequency in interspecies cloned embryos was greater in RVCL than in mSOFaaci and G1.G2 (76.14% and 42.3% vs. 65.9% and 38.3% vs. 58.56% and 33.1%, respectively). Goat oocytes were parthenogenetically activated and cultured in RVCL, mSOFaaci, and G1.G2 and kept as control. Cleavage and morula/blastocyst frequency in this group was greater in RVCL than in mSOFaaci and G1.G2 (89.66% and 65.26% vs. 85.44% and 48.05% vs. 86.58% and 42.06%, respectively). Conclusively, the results suggest that not only can the interspecies embryos of goat be produced using sheep oocytes as donor cytoplast but also the percentages can be improved by using RVCL media for culturing of the embryos.

  3. Frequently Asked Questions on BSE (Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy or Mad Cow Disease)

    MedlinePlus

    ... also includes scrapie of sheep and goats and chronic wasting disease (CWD) of elk and deer. Q. What are ... include, among others, scrapie in sheep and goats, chronic wasting disease in deer and elk, transmissible mink encephalopathy, and ...

  4. Kuru

    MedlinePlus

    ... cow disease), scrapie in sheep and goats, and chronic wasting disease in deer and elk. × Definition Kuru is a ... cow disease), scrapie in sheep and goats, and chronic wasting disease in deer and elk. View Full Definition Treatment ...

  5. Viable transgenic goats derived from skin cells.

    PubMed

    Behboodi, Esmail; Memili, Erdogan; Melican, David T; Destrempes, Margaret M; Overton, Susan A; Williams, Jennifer L; Flanagan, Peter A; Butler, Robin E; Liem, Hetty; Chen, Li How; Meade, Harry M; Gavin, William G; Echelard, Yann

    2004-06-01

    The current study was undertaken to evaluate the possibility of expanding transgenic goat herds by means of somatic cell nuclear transfer (NT) using transgenic goat cells as nucleus donors. Skin cells from adult, transgenic goats were first synchronized at quiescent stage (G0) by serum starvation and then induced to exit G0 and proceed into G1. Oocytes collected from superovulated donors were enucleated, karyoplast-cytoplast couplets were constructed, and then fused and activated simultaneously by a single electrical pulse. Fused couplets were either co-cultured with oviductal cells in TCM-199 medium (in vitro culture) or transferred to intermediate recipient goat oviducts (in vivo culture) until final transfer. The resulting morulae and blastocysts were transferred to the final recipients. Pregnancies were confirmed by ultrasonography 25-30 days after embryo transfer. In vitro cultured NT embryos developed to morulae and blastocyst stages but did not produce any pregnancies while 30% (6/20) of the in vivo derived morulae and blastocysts produced pregnancies. Two of these pregnancies were resorbed early in gestation. Of the four recipients that maintained pregnancies to term, two delivered dead fetuses 2-3 days after their due dates, and two recipients gave birth to healthy kids at term. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis confirmed that both kids were transgenic and had integration sites consistent with those observed in the adult cell line.

  6. 9 CFR 91.6 - Goats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Goats. 91.6 Section 91.6 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE EXPORTATION AND IMPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS INSPECTION AND HANDLING OF LIVESTOCK FOR...

  7. 9 CFR 91.6 - Goats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Goats. 91.6 Section 91.6 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE EXPORTATION AND IMPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS INSPECTION AND HANDLING OF LIVESTOCK FOR...

  8. Ectoparasites of goats in the UK.

    PubMed

    Cornall, Katherine; Wall, Richard

    2015-01-15

    The goat industry in the UK has expanded rapidly in recent years, but at present there is only a poor understanding of the prevalence of parasitic diseases in this farming system. Here, a questionnaire survey of 110 goat owners was used to address this issue. Problems with louse infestation in the previous 12 months were reported by 23% of owners and 19% reported mange. Chorioptic mange was the most common form, with 14 of 21 cases. Sarcoptic mage accounted for only 3 cases and demodex and psoroptic mange each made up 2 cases. Only 53 farmers (48%) said that they took preventative measures to protect their animals against ectoparasite infestation; 20 of these relied on macrocyclic lactones (MLs), the most common product specified was ivermectin. Therapeutic treatment was used by all respondents who said that they had experienced ectoparasites, and again ivermectin was the most common treatment. The use of fipronil was specified by 3 respondents, including one commercial meat producer. Four farmers said that they used antibiotics as an ectoparasiticide. This pattern of treatment for ectoparasites, with reliance on MLs, has implications for the inadvertent selection of resistance in endoparasites. The results suggest that ectoparasites are a major problem for many goat owners, both commercial and non-commercial, but that there is a need for better information for the goat producing community about the optimum approaches to parasite prevention and treatment.

  9. Fatal melioidosis in goats in Bangkok, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Tonpitak, Walaiporn; Sornklien, Chulabha; Chawanit, Mongkol; Pavasutthipaisit, Suvarin; Wuthiekanun, Vanaporn; Hantrakun, Viriya; Amornchai, Premjit; Thaipadungpanit, Janjira; Day, Nicholas P J; Yingst, Samuel; Peacock, Sharon J; Limmathurotsakul, Direk

    2014-08-01

    Bangkok, Thailand, is a city considered to be at low risk for melioidosis. We describe 10 goats that died of melioidosis in Bangkok. Half of them were born and reared in the city. Multilocus sequence typing ruled out an outbreak. This finding challenges the assumption that melioidosis is rarely acquired in central Thailand.

  10. Identification of caseins in goat milk.

    PubMed

    Roncada, Paola; Gaviraghi, Alessandro; Liberatori, Sabrina; Canas, Benito; Bini, Luca; Greppi, Gian Franco

    2002-06-01

    The importance of goat milk in infant diet is growing, because it is reported that goat's milk in some cases is less allergenic than cow's milk. This is due probably to the lower presence of caseins associated with a specific type of alpha(s1)-casein. In caprine breeds, four types of alpha(s1)-casein alleles are identified and associated with various amounts of this protein in milk. The contribution of strong alleles to the goat milk is approximately 3.6 g/L of alpha(s1)-casein, while for middle alleles is only 1.6 g/L, weak alleles 0.6 g/L. The contribution of null allele is very low (or non-existent). The quantity of total caseins in caprine milk is positively correlated with the amount of alpha(s1)-casein. Milk from animals possessing strong alleles contain significantly more total caseins than milk from animals without those alleles. This is important because animals with mild alleles can be employed to produce milk for allergic subjects while the other animals can be used to produce milk for the dairy industry. This work shows casein profiles of two types of classified goat milk (B, strong alpha(s1) allele, 0, null alpha(s1) allele) with two-dimensional electrophoresis coupled with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry, and it confirms the different polymorphisms at locus alpha(s1) casein.

  11. Infiltrative Cutaneous Hemangiolipoma in a Goat

    PubMed Central

    Collier, Jessica R.; Byers, Stacey R.; Schaffer, Paula A.; Worley, Deanna R.; Ehrhart, E. J.; Duncan, Colleen G.; Grossman, Alicia N.; Holt, Timothy; Callan, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    An approximately 4-year-old castrated male, Saanen cross goat presented to the Colorado State University Veterinary Teaching Hospital for evaluation and removal of a 22 cm × 22 cm, dark red, thickened, and crusted cutaneous lesion along the left ventrolateral thorax. An initial incisional biopsy performed approximately 8 weeks earlier was suspicious for cutaneous hemangiosarcoma. Surgical excision was deemed to be the most appropriate treatment option for this goat. A complete physical exam, complete blood count, and chemistry profile were performed and results were within normal limits. Thoracic radiographs and abdominal ultrasound were performed to rule out metastatic disease and comorbid conditions; no metastatic lesions or other abnormalities were observed. En bloc surgical excision of the affected skin was performed and the entire tissue was submitted for histopathology. A final diagnosis of cutaneous hemangiolipoma was reached upon extensive sectioning and histologic examination of the larger tissue specimen. The goat recovered well from surgery and has had no further complications up to 9 months postoperatively. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of a hemangiolipoma in a goat and surgical excision for such lesions appears to be a viable treatment method. PMID:23956926

  12. Palatability of Forage Chicory Cultivars for Goats

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sesquiterpene lactones (SL) in forage chicory (Cichorium intybus L.) may have anthelmintic activity against gastrointestinal parasites in sheep and goats, but have been implicated in poor palatability of forage. We used three levels of soil P fertilization to influence SL concentrations in three cu...

  13. Intravenous anaesthesia in goats: a review.

    PubMed

    Dzikiti, T Brighton

    2013-02-13

    Intravenous anaesthesia is gradually becoming popular in veterinary practice. Traditionally, general anaesthesia is induced with intravenous drugs and then maintained with inhalation agents. Inhalation anaesthetic agents cause more significant dose-dependent cardiorespiratory depression than intravenous anaesthetic drugs, creating a need to use less of the inhalation anaesthetic agents for maintenance of general anaesthesia by supplementing with intravenous anaesthesia drugs. Better still, if anaesthesia is maintained completely with intravenous anaesthetic drugs, autonomic functions remain more stable intra-operatively. Patient recovery from anaesthesia is smoother and there is less pollution of the working environment than happens with inhalation anaesthetic agents. Recently, a number of drugs with profiles (pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic) suitable for prolonged intravenous anaesthesia have been studied, mostly in humans and, to a certain extent, in dogs and horses. There is currently very little scientific information on total intravenous anaesthesia in goats, although, in the past few years, some scholarly scientific articles on drugs suitable for partial intravenous anaesthesia in goats have been published. This review article explored the information available on drugs that have been assessed for partial intravenous anaesthesia in goats, with the aim of promoting incorporation of these drugs into total intravenous anaesthesia protocols in clinical practice. That way, balanced anaesthesia, a technique in which drugs are included in anaesthetic protocols for specific desired effects (hypnosis, analgesia, muscle relaxation, autonomic stabilisation) may be utilised in improving the welfare of goats undergoing general anaesthesia.

  14. Oral inoculation of neonatal Suffolk sheep with the agent of classical scrapie results in PrP(Sc) accumulation in sheep with the PRNP ARQ/ARQ but not the ARQ/ARR genotype.

    PubMed

    Greenlee, Justin J; Smith, Jodi D; Hamir, Amir N

    2016-04-01

    Scrapie is a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy that can be transmitted amongst susceptible sheep. The prion protein gene (PRNP) profoundly influences the susceptibility of sheep to the scrapie agent. This study reports the failure to detect PrP(Sc) in nervous or lymphoid tissues of Suffolk sheep of the PRNP ARQ/ARR genotype after oral inoculation with a U.S. scrapie isolate. Lambs were inoculated within the first 24 h of birth with 1 ml of a 10% (wt./vol.) brain homogenate derived from a clinically affected ARQ/ARQ sheep. The inoculated sheep were observed daily throughout the experiment for clinical signs suggestive of scrapie until they were necropsied at 86 months post inoculation. Tissues were collected for examination by immunohistochemistry and enzyme immunoassay, but all failed to demonstrate evidence of scrapie infection. Neonatal sheep of the ARQ/ARQ genotype receiving the same inoculum developed scrapie within 24 months. Lambs of the ARQ/ARR genotype that received the same inoculum by intracranial inoculation develop scrapie with a prolonged incubation period and with abnormal prion present within the central nervous system, but not peripheral lymphoid tissues. Results of this study suggest that ARQ/ARR sheep are resistant to oral infection with the scrapie isolate used even during the neonatal period.

  15. Oral inoculation of neonatal Suffolk sheep with the agent of classical scrapie results in PrPSc accumulation in sheep with the PRNP ARQ/ARQ but not the ARQ/ARR genotype

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background Scrapie is a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy that can be transmitted amongst susceptible sheep. The prion protein gene (PRNP) profoundly influences the susceptibility of sheep to the scrapie agent. Findings This study reports the failure to detect PrPSc in nervous or lymphoid tis...

  16. Dynamics of goat distal hind limb muscle–tendon function in response to locomotor grade

    PubMed Central

    McGuigan, M. Polly; Yoo, Edwin; Lee, David V.; Biewener, Andrew A.

    2009-01-01

    Summary The functional roles of the lateral gastrocnemius (LG), medial gastrocnemius (MG) and superficial digital flexor (SDF) muscle–tendon units (MTUs) in domestic goats (N=6) were studied as a function of locomotor grade, testing the hypothesis that changes in distal limb muscle work would reflect changes in mechanical work requirements while goats walked or trotted on the level, 15 deg. decline and 15 deg. incline. As steep terrain-adapted animals, changes in muscle work output are expected to be particularly important for goats. In vivo muscle–tendon forces, fascicle length changes and muscle activation were recorded via tendon force buckles, sonomicrometry and electromyography to evaluate the work performance and elastic energy recovery of the three distal MTUs. These recordings confirmed that fascicle strain and force within goat distal hind limb muscles are adjusted in response to changes in mechanical work demand associated with locomotor grade. In general, muscle work was modulated most consistently by changes in fascicle strain, with increased net shortening (P<0.001) observed as goats switched from decline to level to incline locomotion. Peak muscle stresses increased as goats increased speed from a walk to a trot within each grade condition (P<0.05), and also increased significantly with grade (P<0.05 to P<0.01). Due to the increase in net fascicle shortening and muscle force, net muscle work per cycle also increased significantly (P<0.05 to P<0.005) as goats switched from decline to level to incline conditions (LG work: 20 mJ to 56 mJ to 209 mJ; MG work: –7 mJ to 34 mJ to 179 mJ; SDF work: –42 mJ to 14 mJ to 71 mJ, at a 2.5 ms–1 trot). Although muscle work was modulated in response to changes in grade, the amount of work produced by these three distal pennate muscles was small (being <3%) in comparison with the change in mechanical energy required of the limb as a whole. Elastic energy recovery in the SDF and gastrocnemius (GA) tendons was

  17. Sensitive and specific detection of classical scrapie prions in the brain of goats by real-time quaking-induced conversion

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The real-time quaking-induced conversion (RT-QuIC) is a rapid, specific, and sensitive prion seeding activity detection assay that uses recombinant prion protein (rPrPSen) to detect sub-infectious levels of the abnormal isoforms of the prion protein (PrPSc). Although RT-QuIC has been successfully us...

  18. Experimental evaluation of urinary bladder marsupialization in male goats.

    PubMed

    May, Kimberly A; Moll, H David; Duncan, Robert B; Moon, Martha M; Pleasant, R Scott; Howard, Rick D

    2002-01-01

    To evaluate the outcome of urinary bladder marsupialization in male goats. Prospective, experimental study. Six healthy mixed-breed male goats. After experimentally induced urethral obstruction, 6 male goats had urinary bladder marsupialization. Renal ultrasonography, complete blood count, and serum biochemical analysis were evaluated preoperatively (day 0), at 7 postoperative days, and then at 30-day intervals until 180 days. Stomal diameter was recorded immediately postoperatively and at each postoperative interval. Necropsy examination was performed on day 180 or when stomal stricture or death occurred. Stomal stricture occurred in 1 goat at 120 days. Another goat was found dead at 150 days; severe, suppurative cystitis was identified on necropsy. All goats had mild urine scald dermatitis. Serum biochemical values remained within normal limits, but significant decreases in white blood cell count, serum creatinine concentration, and stomal diameter occurred. At necropsy, all bladders were tubular in shape. Histological evidence of chronic suppurative cystitis and chronic, mild lymphoplasmacytic pyelitis occurred in all goats. Bacterial culture of renal tissue yielded growth in 3 goats, and bladder mucosal swabs yielded bacterial growth in all goats. Although clinical signs of ascending urinary tract infection were not observed in goats with patent stomata, urinary bladder marsupialization may result in ascending urinary tract inflammation or infection. Based on our results, urinary bladder marsupialization should be recommended with caution as the primary method for management of urinary tract obstruction in clinical cases. Copyright 2002 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons

  19. Use of microsatellite markers to assign goats to their breeds.

    PubMed

    Aljumaah, R S; Alobre, M M; Al-Atiyat, R M

    2015-08-07

    We investigated the potential of 17 microsatellite markers for assigning Saudi goat individuals to their breeds. Three local breeds, Bishi, Jabali, and Tohami were genotyped using these markers, and Somali goats were used as a reference breed. The majority of alleles were shared between the breeds, except for some that were specific to each breed. The Garza-Williamson index was lowest in the Bishi breed, indicating that a recent bottleneck event occurred. The overall results assigned the goat individuals (based on their genotypes) to the same breeds from which they were sampled, except in a few cases. The individuals' genotypes were sufficient to provide a clear distinction between the Somali goat breed and the others. In three factorial dimensions, the results of a correspondence analysis indicated that the total variation for the first and second factors was 48.85 and 31.43%, respectively. Consequently, Jabali, Bishi, and Tohami goats were in separate groups. The Jabali goat was closely related to the Bishi goat. Somali goats were distinguished from each other and from individuals of the other three goat breeds. The markers were successful in assigning individual goats to their breeds, based on the likelihood of a given individual's genotype.

  20. Cloning and functional analysis of goat SWEET1.

    PubMed

    Zhu, L Q; Bao, Z K; Hu, W W; Lin, J; Yang, Q; Yu, Q H

    2015-12-16

    SWEETs are a recently discovered class of sugar transporters that mediate glucose uptake in the intestine and mammary glands. Our objectives were to clone goat SWEET1 and conduct a functional analysis of its effect on glucose efflux in goat mammary gland epithelial cells. We cloned and sequenced the goat SWEET1 gene from goat mammary glands, then conducted an analysis of the structure of goat SWEET1, including a prediction of the transmembrane helices and potential N-glycosylation sites. To investigate the biological function of goat SWEET1, we also generated goat SWEET1-transfected goat mammary gland epithelial cells using the eukaryotic expression vector pcDNA3.1-gSWEET1. Goat SWEET1 overexpression can reduce glucose absorption in mammary gland epithelial cells with increasing expression of GLUT1, GLUT4, and GLUT12, which may be attributed to glucose efflux arising from the leading role played by goat SWEET1. This study will improve our understanding of the glucose balance in mammary glands and the level of glucose in milk.

  1. Focal symmetrical encephalomalacia in a goat.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Diego M; Pimentel, Luciano A; Pessoa, André F; Dantas, Antônio F M; Uzal, Francisco; Riet-Correa, Franklin

    2010-09-01

    Focal symmetrical encephalomalacia (FSE) is the most prominent lesion seen in the chronic form of enterotoxemia caused by Clostridium perfringens type D in sheep. However, this lesion has not been reported in goats. The current paper reports a case of FSE in a goat from the state of Paraíba in the Brazilian semiarid region. As reported by the farmer, 30, 4-48-month-old animals from a flock of 150 goats died after showing nervous signs, including blindness and recumbence, for periods varying between 1 and 14 days. The flock was grazing native pasture supplemented with wheat and corn bran. Additionally, lactating goats were supplemented with soybeans. A 4-month-old goat with nervous signs was examined clinically and then necropsied 3 days after the onset of clinical signs. Bilateral, focal, and symmetrical areas of brown discoloration were observed in the internal capsule and thalamus. Histologic lesions in these areas consisted of multifocal, bilateral malacia with a few neutrophils; endothelial cell swelling; perivascular edema; and hemorrhages. The etiology of these lesions was not determined. However, FSE is considered pathognomonic for C. perfringens type D enterotoxemia in sheep, and it is speculated that this microorganism was the etiologic agent in the present case. The flock had been vaccinated against type D enterotoxemia only once, approximately 3 months before the beginning of the outbreak. Insufficient immunity due to the incorrect vaccination protocol, low efficacy of the vaccine used, and a diet including large amounts of highly fermentable carbohydrates were suspected to be predisposing factors for this outbreak.

  2. Video tracking analysis of behavioral patterns during estrus in goats.

    PubMed

    Endo, Natsumi; Rahayu, Larasati Puji; Arakawa, Toshiya; Tanaka, Tomomi

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report a new method for measuring behavioral patterns during estrus in goats based on video tracking analysis. Data were collected from cycling goats, which were in estrus (n = 8) or not in estrus (n = 8). An observation pen (2.5 m × 2.5 m) was set up in the corner of the female paddock with one side adjacent to a male paddock. The positions and movements of goats were tracked every 0.5 sec for 10 min by using a video tracking software, and the trajectory data were used for the analysis. There were no significant differences in the durations of standing and walking or the total length of movement. However, the number of approaches to a male and the duration of staying near the male were higher in goats in estrus than in goats not in estrus. The proposed evaluation method may be suitable for detailed monitoring of behavioral changes during estrus in goats.

  3. Heavy metal levels in goats from Notasulga, Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, A.T.; Diffay, B.C.; Forester, D.M.; Thompson, S.J.; Mielke, H.W.

    1994-12-31

    Goat meat farming is increasing in popularity in southeastern region of United States. In order to monitor environmental contamination of heavy metals in goat meat, samples of liver, kidney, and muscle were collected from 20 goats on a goat farm in Notasulga, Alabama. These samples were analyzed by Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopy. The copper concentration was significantly higher in livers than the concentration in kidneys and muscles. Lead, cadmium, and zinc levels did not show any significant differences between liver, kidney, and muscle samples. The concentrations of lead and copper in livers and cadmium in kidneys were significantly different in males when compared to females. However, in muscle, the concentrations of lead, cadmium, copper, and zinc showed no significant difference between male and female or between young and old goats. Further, the concentrations of lead in livers and cadmium in kidneys showed a significant difference between young and old goats.

  4. Paternal phylogeography and genetic diversity of East Asian goats.

    PubMed

    Waki, A; Sasazaki, S; Kobayashi, E; Mannen, H

    2015-06-01

    This study was a first analysis of paternal genetic diversity for extensive Asian domestic goats using SRY gene sequences. Sequencing comparison of the SRY 3'-untranslated region among 210 Asian goats revealed four haplotypes (Y1A, Y1B, Y2A and Y2B) derived from four variable sites including a novel substitution detected in this study. In Asian goats, the predominant haplotype was Y1A (62%) and second most common was Y2B (30%). Interestingly, the Y2B was a unique East Asian Y chromosomal variant, which differentiates eastern and western Eurasian goats. The SRY geographic distribution in Myanmar and Cambodia indicated predominant the haplotype Y1A in plains areas and a high frequency of Y2B in mountain areas. The results suggest recent genetic infiltration of modern breeds into South-East Asian goats and an ancestral SRY Y2B haplotype in Asian native goats.

  5. p.Asn176Lys and p.Met137Thr dimorphisms of the PRNP gene significantly decrease the susceptibility to classical scrapie in ARQ/ARQ sheep.

    PubMed

    Maestrale, C; Carta, A; Attene, S; Galistu, A; Santucciu, C; Cancedda, M G; Saba, M; Sechi, S; Patta, C; Bandino, E; Ligios, C

    2009-12-01

    In this study, we investigated the susceptibility to scrapie of Sarda breed sheep carrying the genotype ARQ/ARQ with additional polymorphisms at the PRNP gene. To do this, we examined 256 scrapie-affected sheep and 320 flock-mate negative controls from 24 flocks. Logistic regression analysis demonstrated that sheep carrying the ARQ/ARQ genotype with additional dimorphisms had lower risk of becoming scrapie affected when compared with those with ARQ/ARQ(wildtype) genotype. ARQ/ARQ genotypes that were detected with heterozygous or homozygous p.Asn176Lys and p.Met137Thr dimorphisms were associated with the lowest susceptibility to the disease. A significant lower risk was also associated with the p.Arg154His dimorphism, while p.Leu141Phe had a protective effect that was not statistically significant.

  6. Two Severe Cases of Tungiasis in Goat Kids in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Mutebi, Francis; Krücken, Jürgen; Mencke, Norbert; Feldmeier, Hermann; von Samson-Himmelstjerna, Georg; Waiswa, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Tungiasis ensues from the penetration and burrowing of female sand fleas (Tunga spp.; Siphonaptera: Tungidae) in the skin of mammals. There are few case reports of severe tungiasis in goats and in these cases the Tunga species were not in most cases clearly identified. Two cases of severe tungiasis caused by Tunga penetrans in goat kids from tungiasis-endemic rural Uganda are reported. These are the first severe cases of tungiasis in goats reported from outside South America. PMID:27012871

  7. Efficient Uptake and Dissemination of Scrapie Prion Protein by Astrocytes and Fibroblasts from Adult Hamster Brain

    PubMed Central

    Hollister, Jason R.; Lee, Kil Sun; Dorward, David W.; Baron, Gerald S.

    2015-01-01

    Prion infections target neurons and lead to neuronal loss. However, the role of non-neuronal cells in the initiation and spread of infection throughout the brain remains unclear despite the fact these cells can also propagate prion infectivity. To evaluate how different brain cells process scrapie prion protein (PrPres) during acute infection, we exposed neuron-enriched and non-neuronal cell cultures from adult hamster brain to fluorescently-labeled purified PrPres and followed the cultures by live cell confocal imaging over time. Non-neuronal cells present in both types of cultures, specifically astrocytes and fibroblasts, internalized PrPres more efficiently than neurons. PrPres was trafficked to late endosomal/lysosomal compartments and rapidly transported throughout the cell bodies and processes of all cell types, including contacts between astrocytes and neurons. These observations suggest that astrocytes and meningeal fibroblasts play an as yet unappreciated role in prion infections via efficient uptake and dissemination of PrPres. PMID:25635871

  8. Efficient uptake and dissemination of scrapie prion protein by astrocytes and fibroblasts from adult hamster brain.

    PubMed

    Hollister, Jason R; Lee, Kil Sun; Dorward, David W; Baron, Gerald S

    2015-01-01

    Prion infections target neurons and lead to neuronal loss. However, the role of non-neuronal cells in the initiation and spread of infection throughout the brain remains unclear despite the fact these cells can also propagate prion infectivity. To evaluate how different brain cells process scrapie prion protein (PrPres) during acute infection, we exposed neuron-enriched and non-neuronal cell cultures from adult hamster brain to fluorescently-labeled purified PrPres and followed the cultures by live cell confocal imaging over time. Non-neuronal cells present in both types of cultures, specifically astrocytes and fibroblasts, internalized PrPres more efficiently than neurons. PrPres was trafficked to late endosomal/lysosomal compartments and rapidly transported throughout the cell bodies and processes of all cell types, including contacts between astrocytes and neurons. These observations suggest that astrocytes and meningeal fibroblasts play an as yet unappreciated role in prion infections via efficient uptake and dissemination of PrPres.

  9. Transgenic Rabbits Expressing Ovine PrP Are Susceptible to Scrapie.

    PubMed

    Sarradin, Pierre; Viglietta, Céline; Limouzin, Claude; Andréoletti, Olivier; Daniel-Carlier, Nathalie; Barc, Céline; Leroux-Coyau, Mathieu; Berthon, Patricia; Chapuis, Jérôme; Rossignol, Christelle; Gatti, Jean-Luc; Belghazi, Maya; Labas, Valérie; Vilotte, Jean-Luc; Béringue, Vincent; Lantier, Frédéric; Laude, Hubert; Houdebine, Louis-Marie

    2015-08-01

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) are a group of neurodegenerative diseases affecting a wide range of mammalian species. They are caused by prions, a proteinaceous pathogen essentially composed of PrPSc, an abnormal isoform of the host encoded cellular prion protein PrPC. Constrained steric interactions between PrPSc and PrPC are thought to provide prions with species specificity, and to control cross-species transmission into other host populations, including humans. Transgenetic expression of foreign PrP genes has been successfully and widely used to overcome the recognized resistance of mouse to foreign TSE sources. Rabbit is one of the species that exhibit a pronounced resistance to TSEs. Most attempts to infect experimentally rabbit have failed, except after inoculation with cell-free generated rabbit prions. To gain insights on the molecular determinants of the relative resistance of rabbits to prions, we generated transgenic rabbits expressing the susceptible V136R154Q171 allele of the ovine PRNP gene on a rabbit wild type PRNP New Zealand background and assessed their experimental susceptibility to scrapie prions. All transgenic animals developed a typical TSE 6-8 months after intracerebral inoculation, whereas wild type rabbits remained healthy more than 700 days after inoculation. Despite the endogenous presence of rabbit PrPC, only ovine PrPSc was detectable in the brains of diseased animals. Collectively these data indicate that the low susceptibility of rabbits to prion infection is not enciphered within their non-PrP genetic background.

  10. Urine proteins identified by two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis facilitate the differential diagnoses of scrapie.

    PubMed

    Lamoureux, Lise; Simon, Sharon L R; Plews, Margot; Ruddat, Viola; Brunet, Simone; Graham, Catherine; Czub, Stefanie; Knox, J David

    2013-01-01

    The difficulty in developing a diagnostic assay for Creutzfeldt - Jakob disease (CJD) and other transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) stems in part from the fact that the infectious agent is an aberrantly folded form of an endogenous cellular protein. This precludes the use of the powerful gene based technologies currently applied to the direct detection of other infectious agents. To circumvent this problem our research objective has been to identify a set of proteins exhibiting characteristic differential abundance in response to TSE infection. The objective of the present study was to assess the disease specificity of differentially abundant urine proteins able to identify scrapie infected mice. Two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis was used to analyze longitudinal collections of urine samples from both prion-infected mice and a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease. The introduction of fluorescent dyes, that allow multiple samples to be co-resolved and visualized on one two dimensional gel, have increased the accuracy of this methodology for the discovery of robust protein biomarkers for disease. The accuracy of a small panel of differentially abundant proteins to correctly classify an independent naïve sample set was determined. The results demonstrated that at the time of clinical presentation the differential abundance of urine proteins were capable of identifying the prion infected mice with 87% sensitivity and 93% specificity. The identity of the diagnostic differentially abundant proteins was investigated by mass spectrometry.

  11. Prion protein amyloid: separation of scrapie infectivity from PrP polymers.

    PubMed

    Wille, H; Baldwin, M A; Cohen, F E; DeArmond, S J; Prusiner, S B

    1996-01-01

    The prion protein (PrP) undergoes a profound conformational change when the cellular isoform (PrPc) is converted into the scrapie form (PrPSc). Limited proteolysis of PrPSc produces PrP27-30 which readily polymerizes into amyloid. To study the structure of PrP amyloid, we employed organic solvents that perturb protein conformation. 1,1,1,3,3,3-Hexafluoro-2-propanol (HFIP), which promotes alpha-helix formation, modified the ultrastructure of rod-shaped PrP amyloids, producing flattened ribbons with a more regular substructure. As the concentration of HFIP was increased, the beta-sheet content and proteinase K resistance of PrP27-30 as well as prion infectivity diminished. HFIP reversibly decreased the binding of Congo red dye to the rods, whereas inactivation of prion infectivity was irreversible. In contrast to 10% HFIP, 1,1,1-trifluoro-2-propanol (TFIP) did not inactivate prion infectivity but, similarly to HFIP, TFIP did alter the morphology of the rods and abolished Congo red binding. Our studies separate prion infectivity from the amyloid properties of PrP27-30 and underscore the dependence of prion infectivity on PrPSc conformation. Our results also demonstrate that the specific beta-sheet-rich structures required for prion infectivity are different from those needed for amyloid formation.

  12. Separation of scrapie prion infectivity from PrP amyloid polymers.

    PubMed

    Wille, H; Zhang, G F; Baldwin, M A; Cohen, F E; Prusiner, S B

    1996-06-21

    The prion protein (PrP) undergoes a profound conformational change when the cellular isoform (PrPC) is converted into the scrapie form (PrPSc). Limited proteolysis of PrPsc produces PrP 27-30 which readily polymerizes into amyloid. To study the structure of PrP amyloid, we employed organic solvents that perturb protein conformation. Hexafluoro-2-propanol (HFIP), which promotes alpha-helix formation, modified the ultrastructure of rod-shaped PrP amyloids; flattened ribbons with a more regular substructure were found. As the concentration of HFIP was increased, the beta-sheet content and proteinase K resistance of PrP 27-30 as well as prion infectivity diminished. HFIP reversibly decreased the binding of Congo red dye to the rods while inactivation of prion infectivity was irreversible. In contrast to 10% HFIP, 1,1,1-trifluoro-2-propanol (TFIP) did not inactivate prion infectivity but like HFIP, TFIP did alter the morphology of the rods and abolish Congo red binding. This study separates prion infectivity from the amyloid properties of PrP 27-30 and underscores the dependence of prion infectivity on PrPSc conformation. The results also demonstrate that the specific beta-sheet-rich structures required for prion infectivity can be differentiated from those needed for amyloid formation as determined by Congo red binding.

  13. Characterization of the human analogue of a Scrapie-responsive gene.

    PubMed

    Dron, M; Dandoy-Dron, F; Guillo, F; Benboudjema, L; Hauw, J J; Lebon, P; Dormont, D; Tovey, M G

    1998-07-17

    We have recently described a novel mRNA denominated ScRG-1, the level of which is increased in the brains of Scrapie-infected mice (Dandoy-Dron, F., Guillo, F., Benboudjema, L., Deslys, J.-P., Lasmézas, C., Dormont, D., Tovey, M. G., and Dron, M. (1998) J. Biol. Chem. 273, 7691-7697). The increase in ScRG-1 mRNA in the brain follows the accumulation of PrPSc, the proteinase K-resistant form of the prion protein (PrP), and precedes the widespread neuronal death that occurs in late stage disease. In the present study, we have isolated a cDNA encoding the human counterpart of ScRG-1. Comparison of the human and mouse transcripts firmly established that both sequences encode a highly conserved protein of 98 amino acids that contains a signal peptide, suggesting that the protein may be secreted. Examination of the distribution of human ScRG-1 mRNA in adult and fetal tissues revealed that the gene was expressed primarily in the central nervous system as a 0.7-kilobase message and was under strict developmental control.

  14. Protein misfolding cyclic amplification corroborates the absence of PrP(Sc) accumulation in placenta from foetuses with the ARR/ARQ genotype in natural scrapie.

    PubMed

    Garza, María Carmen; Eraña, Hasier; Castilla, Joaquín; Acín, Cristina; Vargas, Antonia; Badiola, Juan José; Monleón, Eva

    2017-05-01

    Ovine scrapie is a worldwide spread prion disease that is transmitted horizontally under field conditions. Placenta from scrapie-infected ewes is an important source of infection, since this tissue can accumulate high amounts of PrP(Sc) depending on the foetal genotype. Therefore, placentas carrying susceptible foetuses can accumulate PrP(Sc) but there is not PrP(Sc) accumulation in presence of foetuses with at least one ARR haplotype. In scrapie eradication programs, ARR/ARR males are used for breeding to increase the resistant progeny and reduce the horizontal transmission of the disease through the placenta. The development of highly sensitive techniques, that allow the detection of minimal amounts of PrP(Sc), has caused many secretions/excretions and tissues that had previously been deemed negative to be relabeled as positive for PrP(Sc). This has raised concerns about the possible presence of minimal amounts of PrP(Sc) in placentas from ARR foetuses that conventional techniques had indicated were negative. In the present study we examined 30 placentas from a total of 23 gestations; 15 gestations resulted from naturally ARQ/ARQ scrapie-infected ewes mated with ARR/ARR rams. The absence of PrP(Sc) in placentas carrying the foetal ARR haplotype (n=19) was determined by IDEXX HerdChek scrapie/BSE Antigen EIA Test, Prionics(®)-Check WESTERN and corroborated by the highly sensitive Protein Misfolding Cyclic Amplification technique (PMCA). By immunohistochemistry, several unspecific stainings that might mislead a diagnosis were observed. The results of the present study support that using ARR/ARR males in scrapie eradication programs efficiently decreases the spreading of the agent in the environment via shed placentas. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Calcium metabolism in normal and thyro-parathyroidectomized goats

    PubMed Central

    Payne, J. M.; Sansom, B. F.

    1966-01-01

    1. The effects of thyro-parathyroidectomy on calcium metabolism in the goat have been investigated using stable calcium balance techniques and the isotopes 45Ca, 47Ca and 85Sr. 2. Thyro-parathyroidectomized goats, whether receiving supplementary thyroxine or not, are in negative calcium balance, whereas normal or thyroidectomized animals are in positive balance. 3. Gastro-intestinal absorption of 45Ca is less in thyro-parathyroidectomized goats, whether receiving supplementary thyroxine or not, than in either normal goats or thyroidectomized goats receiving thyroxine supplements. 4. The rate of endogenous secretion of calcium into the gastro-intestinal tract is unchanged by either thyroidectomy or thyro-parathyroidectomy. Urinary excretion of calcium is also apparently unchanged. 5. The bone calcium accretion rate is reduced to approximately the same extent in thyroidectomized and thyro-parathyroidectomized goats. Thyroxine supplements restore the bone accretion rate of both groups of animals to normal or greater than normal levels. 6. The bone calcium resorption rate is greater in thyro-parathyroidectomized goats, whether receiving thyroxine supplements or not, than in either normal goats or thyroidectomized goats receiving thyroxine supplements. ImagesFig. 1 PMID:5921839

  16. Mitochondrial DNA diversity of Anatolian indigenous domestic goats.

    PubMed

    Akis, I; Oztabak, K; Mengi, A; Un, C

    2014-12-01

    Anatolia has been an important region for civilizations and agricultural revolution as a major domestication centre for livestock species. Goats (Capra hircus) were among the earliest domesticated animals in this region. In this study, genetic diversity of Anatolian goat breeds was characterized by comparison of mitochondrial DNA hypervariable region 1. A total of 295 individuals, including 99 Anatolian Black goats, 96 Angora goats and 100 Kilis goats, were used. Haplogroup A was found to be the dominant haplogroup in all three breeds. The highest haplogroup diversity, including haplogroups A, B2, C and G, was observed in the Anatolian Black breed. Haplogroup D was only observed in Kilis and Angora goats. Haplogroup G was found in Angora and Anatolian Black breeds. The Anatolian goat breeds had high genetic diversity values and a weak phylogeographical structure. The nucleotide diversity values were found to be higher than those in previously studied goat breeds. The fact that Anatolia is a domestication centre and its geographical position as a junction of trade routes may have caused the higher genetic diversity of Anatolian goat breeds. © 2014 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  17. Efficacy of closantel against Fasciola hepatica in Korean native goats.

    PubMed

    Lee, C G; Cho, S H; Kim, J T; Lee, C Y

    1996-10-25

    Closantel (Flukiver), a salicylanilide antiparasitic compound, was tested in Korean native goats infected with Fasciola hepatica. The goats were administered closantel once orally at a dose of 10 mg/kg body weight. Efficacy was monitored weekly by fecal examination of all infected animals starting the second week post-treatment and continuing for 3 weeks. Closantel elicited 80.3, 97.8 and 92.7% efficacy in goats with naturally-acquired fasciolosis at the second, third and fourth week post-treatment, respectively. It elicited a 100% efficacy in goats experimentally infected with F. hepatica metacercariae and treated at 18 weeks post-infection.

  18. Multiple maternal origins and weak phylogeographic structure in domestic goats

    PubMed Central

    Luikart, Gordon; Gielly, Ludovic; Excoffier, Laurent; Vigne, Jean-Denis; Bouvet, Jean; Taberlet, Pierre

    2001-01-01

    Domestic animals have played a key role in human history. Despite their importance, however, the origins of most domestic species remain poorly understood. We assessed the phylogenetic history and population structure of domestic goats by sequencing a hypervariable segment (481 bp) of the mtDNA control region from 406 goats representing 88 breeds distributed across the Old World. Phylogeographic analysis revealed three highly divergent goat lineages (estimated divergence >200,000 years ago), with one lineage occurring only in eastern and southern Asia. A remarkably similar pattern exists in cattle, sheep, and pigs. These results, combined with recent archaeological findings, suggest that goats and other farm animals have multiple maternal origins with a possible center of origin in Asia, as well as in the Fertile Crescent. The pattern of goat mtDNA diversity suggests that all three lineages have undergone population expansions, but that the expansion was relatively recent for two of the lineages (including the Asian lineage). Goat populations are surprisingly less genetically structured than cattle populations. In goats only ≈10% of the mtDNA variation is partitioned among continents. In cattle the amount is ≥50%. This weak structuring suggests extensive intercontinental transportation of goats and has intriguing implications about the importance of goats in historical human migrations and commerce. PMID:11344314

  19. Antibiotic pretreatment minimizes dietary effects on reconstructure of rumen fluid and mucosal microbiota in goats.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hong; Lu, Zhongyan; Xu, Zhihui; Shen, Zanming

    2017-10-05

    We used 16S rRNA gene sequencing to examine the posteffects of antibiotic treatment on the structure and metabolism of rumen microbiota. Twelve goats were randomly assigned into two groups, with one group receiving intramuscular streptomycin injection at 40 mg/kg bodyweight daily for 10 days. At 4 weeks after treatment with antibiotic, three goats were randomly selected from each group and switched to a 35% concentrate diet. The remaining six goats continued with the 10% concentrate diet. At 4 weeks after dietary shift, ruminal fluid and epithelium were collected to analyze the microbiota composition and short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) concentrations of the rumen. We found that antibiotic administration led to increases in the diversity and richness of recovered mucosal microbiota and to decreases in those of recovered fluid microbiota. When dietary modulation was performed after antibiotic intake, both communities showed little difference in structure from premodulated states. Additionally, antibiotic pretreatment reduced the basal lines of individual SCFAs but did not affect the increased percentages of SCFAs. Overall, our results indicate that antibiotic administration affects the structure of both rumen fluid and mucosal microbiota and reduces the functional redundancy of rumen microbiota. © 2017 The Authors. MicrobiologyOpen published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Goat paddock cryptoexplosion crater, Western Australia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harms, J.E.; Milton, D.J.; Ferguson, J.; Gilbert, D.J.; Harris, W.K.; Goleby, B.

    1980-01-01

    Goat Paddock, a crater slightly over 5 km in diameter (18??20??? S, 126??40???E), lies at the north edge of the King Leopold Range/Mueller Range junction in the Kimberley district, Western Australia (Fig. 1). It was noted as a geological anomaly in 1964 during regional mapping by the Bureau of Mineral Resources, Geology and Geophysics and the Geological Survey of Western Australia. The possibility of its being a meteorite impact crater has been discussed1, although this suggestion was subsequently ignored2. Two holes were drilled by a mining corporation in 1972 to test whether kimberlite underlay the structure. Here we report the findings of five days of reconnaissance in August 1979 which established that Goat Paddock is a cryptoexplosion crater containing shocked rocks and an unusually well exposed set of structural features. ?? 1980 Nature Publishing Group.

  1. Cerebral vasoconstriction produced by vasopressin in conscious goats: role of vasopressin V1 and V2 receptors and nitric oxide

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Nuria; Martínez, María Angeles; García-Villalón, Angel Luis; Monge, Luis; Diéguez, Godofredo

    2001-01-01

    To examine the role of vasopressin V1 and V2 receptors, nitric oxide and prostanoids in the cerebrovascular effects of arginine vasopressin, cerebral blood flow was electromagnetically measured in awake goats.In 16 animals, vasopressin (0.03 – 1 μg), injected into the cerebral circulation, caused increments of resting cerebrovascular resistance which ranged from 18% (0.03 μg, P<0.01) to 79% (1 μg, P<0.01). Desmopressin (0.03 – 1 μg, four goats) did not affect significantly cerebrovascular resistance.The cerebrovascular resistance increases by vasopressin were reduced significantly by the antagonist for vasopressin V1 receptors d(CH2)5Tyr(Me)-AVP in a rate depending way (five (six goats) and 15 (four goats) μg min−1), and by the mixed antagonist for vasopressin V1 and V2 receptors desGly-d(CH2)5-D-Tyr(Et)Val-AVP (5 μg min−1, four goats), and they were not significantly affected by the antagonist for vasopressin V2 receptors d(CH2)5, D-Ile2, Ile4-AVP (5 μg min−1, four goats).The inhibitor of nitric oxide synthesis Nw-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, 47 mg kg−1 i.v., five goats) augmented cerebrovascular resistance by 130% (P<0.01), and for 24 h after this treatment the cerebrovascular effects of vasopressin were potentiated.The inhibitor of cyclo-oxygenase meclofenamate (6 mg kg−1 i.v., five goats) did not modify significantly resting haemodynamic variables measured or the cerebrovascular effects of vasopressin.Therefore, the vasopressin-induced cerebral vasoconstriction may be mediated by vasopressin V1 receptors, without involvement of vasopressin V2 receptors, and may be modulated by nitric oxide but not by prostanoids. PMID:11309256

  2. Potential of goat probiotic to bind mutagens.

    PubMed

    Apás, Ana Lidia; González, Silvia Nelina; Arena, Mario Eduardo

    2014-08-01

    The mutagen binding ability of the goat probiotics (Lactobacillus reuteri DDL 19, Lactobacillus alimentarius DDL 48, Enterococcus faecium DDE 39, and Bifidobacterium bifidum DDBA) was evaluated. The oral administration of these probiotics reduced fecal mutagens and intestinal cancer markers in goats. Secondly, the effects of probiotics against the mutagenesis induced by sodium azide (SA), and Benzopyrene (B[α]P) by performing the modified Ames test using Salmonella typhimurium TA 100 was investigated. The capacity to bind benzopyrene and the stability of the bacterial-mutagen complex was analyzed by HPLC. The dismutagenic potential against both mutagens was proportional to probiotic concentration. Results showed that probiotic antimutagenic capacity against SA was ranging from 13 to 78%. The mixture of four goat probiotics (MGP) displayed higher antimutagenic activity against SA than any individual strains at the same cell concentration. This study shows that the highest diminution of mutagenicity in presence of B[α]P (74%) was observed in presence of MGP. The antimutagenic activity of nearly all the individual probiotic and the MGP were in concordance with the B[α]P binding determined by HPLC. According to our results, the B[α]P binding to probiotic was irreversible still after being washed with DMSO solution. The stability of the toxic compounds-bacterial cell binding is a key consideration when probiotic antimutagenic property is evaluated. MGP exhibits the ability to bind and detoxify potent mutagens, and this property can be useful in supplemented foods for goats since it can lead to the removal of potent mutagens and protect and enhance ruminal health and hence food safety of consumers.

  3. GOATS 2008 Autonomous, Adaptive Multistatic Acoustic Sensing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-30

    adaptive, bi- and multi-static, passive and active sonar configurations for concurrent detection, classification and localization of subsea and bottom...classification and localization of subsea and bottom objects.. 15. SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT Same as...very shallow water (VSW). The fundamental approach of GOATS is the development of the concept of a network of AUVs as an array of Virtual Sensors

  4. GOATS 2008: Autonomous, Adaptive Multistatic Acoustic Sensing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-30

    develop the OASES -3d modeling framework for target scattering and reverberation in shallow ocean waveguides. As has been the case for the autonomous...using Green’s functions using legacy environmental acoustic models such as OASES , CSNAP, and RAM. This new unique simulation environment allows for...MIT are being maintained and dissiminated under the GOATS grant. The OASES and CSNAP environmental acoustic modeling codes are used extensively in

  5. Epidemiological features of Morel's disease in goats.

    PubMed

    Szaluś-Jordanow, O; Kaba, J; Czopowicz, M; Witkowski, L; Nowicki, M; Nowicka, D; Stefańska, I; Rzewuska, M; Sobczak-Filipiak, M; Binek, M; Frymus, T

    2010-01-01

    Morel's disease caused by Staphylococcus aureus subsp. anaerobius was diagnosed for the first time in Poland in October 2006 in a goat flock. A second infected flock was found two months later. The course of the disease in both flocks was observed for 15-17 months. Clinical manifestation was confined to abscesses located near major superficial lymph nodes, mostly: superficial cervical, subiliac, parotid and mandibular. At necropsy no other lesions were found. The incubation period was estimated at 3 weeks. Clinical signs were seen both in young and adult goats and up to 7 abscesses in one animal were noted. Abscesses tended to persist for 1 to 5 months, then rupture and heal completely. The initial high in-flock point prevalence in both flocks (93.6% and 84.4%) dropped to approximately 10-30% during next 3-4 months. Until the end of the observation period the in-flock point prevalence remained at this level and only single abscesses were observed, mainly in young animals. No influence of the concurrent caprine arthritis encephalitis virus (CAEV) infection on the clinical course of Morel's disease was noticed. It is to be concluded that the clinical course of Morel's disease in a goat flock resembles caseous lymphadenitis (CLA). However, in Morel's disease abscesses occur more frequently in young goats and are located near, not inside, the lymph nodes, as in the case with CLA. Also, the incubation period of Morel's disease seems to be shorter (3 weeks versus 2-6 months in CLA).

  6. Anesthesia and analgesia in sheep and goats.

    PubMed

    Galatos, Apostolos D

    2011-03-01

    Physical or chemical restraint, with or without local anesthesia, has been extensively used to perform diagnostic or minor surgical procedures in small ruminants. However, anesthetic and analgesic techniques are required when specific diagnostic procedures and painful surgery are to be performed. Apart from improving animal welfare standards, anesthesia and analgesia are essential to make the procedures easier and improve both animal and personnel safety. This article provides an overview of the anesthetic and analgesic agents and techniques commonly used in sheep and goats.

  7. Bacteriocinogenic Bacteria Isolated from Raw Goat Milk and Goat Cheese Produced in the Center of México.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Saldaña, Oscar F; Valencia-Posadas, Mauricio; de la Fuente-Salcido, Norma M; Bideshi, Dennis K; Barboza-Corona, José E

    2016-09-01

    Currently, there are few reports on the isolation of microorganisms from goat milk and goat cheese that have antibacterial activity. In particular, there are no reports on the isolation of microorganisms with antibacterial activity from these products in central Mexico. Our objective was to isolate bacteria, from goat products, that synthesized antimicrobial peptides with activity against a variety of clinically significant bacteria. We isolated and identified Lactobacillus rhamnosus, L. plantarum, L. pentosus, L. helveticus and Enterococcus faecium from goat cheese, and Aquabacterium fontiphilum, Methylibium petroleiphilum, Piscinobacter aquaticus and Staphylococcus xylosus from goat milk. These bacteria isolated from goat cheese were able to inhibit Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus, Escherichia coli, Listeria monocytogenes, L. inoccua, Pseudomona aeruginosa, Shigella flexneri, Serratia marcescens, Enterobacter cloacae and Klebsiella pneumoniae. In addition, bacteria from goat milk showed inhibitory activity against B. cereus, L. lactis, E. coli, S. flexneri, E. cloacae and K. pneumonia; S. aureus, L. innocua, S. agalactiae and S. marcescens. The bacteriocins produced by these isolates were shown to be acid stable (pH 2-6) and thermotolerant (up to 100 °C), but were susceptible to proteinases. When screened by PCR for the presence of nisin, pediocin and enterocin A genes, none was found in isolates recovered from goat milk, and only the enterocin A gene was found in isolates from goat cheese.

  8. Transcriptome analysis of CNS immediately before and after the detection of PrP(Sc) in SSBP/1 sheep scrapie.

    PubMed

    Gossner, Anton G; Hopkins, John

    2014-10-10

    Sheep scrapie is a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE), progressive and fatal neurodegenerative diseases of the central nervous system (CNS) linked to the accumulation of misfolded prion protein, PrP(Sc). New Zealand Cheviot sheep, homozygous for the VRQ genotype of the PRNP gene are most susceptible with an incubation period of 193 days with SSBP/1 scrapie. However, the earliest time point that PrP(Sc) can be detected in the CNS is 125 days (D125). The aim of this study was to quantify changes to the transcriptome of the thalamus and obex (medulla) at times immediately before (D75) and after (D125) PrP(Sc) was detected. Affymetrix gene arrays were used to quantify gene expression in the thalamus and Illumina DGE-tag profiling for obex. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis was used to help describe the biological processes of scrapie pathology. Neurological disease and Cancer were common Bio Functions in each tissue at D75; inflammation and cell death were major processes at D125. Several neurological receptors were significantly increased at D75 (e.g. CHRNA6, GRM1, HCN2), which might be clues to the molecular basis of psychiatric changes associated with TSEs. No genes were significantly differentially expressed at both D75 and D125 and there was no progression of events from earlier to later time points. This implies that there is no simple linear progression of pathological or molecular events. There seems to be a step-change between D75 and D125, correlating with the detection of PrP(Sc), resulting in the involvement of different pathological processes in later TSE disease.

  9. Aberrant Alterations of Mitochondrial Factors Drp1 and Opa1 in the Brains of Scrapie Experiment Rodents.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiao -Dong; Shi, Qi; Sun, Jing; Lv, Yan; Ma, Yue; Chen, Cao; Xiao, Kang; Zhou, Wei; Dong, Xiao-Ping

    2017-03-01

    The abnormal mitochondrial dynamics has been reported in the brains of some neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD), but limitedly described in prion disease. Dynamin-related protein 1 (Drpl) and optic atrophy protein 1 (Opa1) are two essential elements for mitochondria fission and fusion. To evaluate possible changes of mitochondria dynamics during prion infection, the situations of brain Drp1 and Opa1 of scrapie strains 139A, ME7, and S15 mice, as well as 263K-infected hamsters, were analyzed. Significant decreases of brain Drp1 were observed in scrapie-infected rodents at terminal stage by Western blots and immunohistochemical assays, while the levels of Opa1 also showed declined tendency in the brains of scrapie-infected rodents. Immunofluorescent assays illustrated well localization of Drp1 or Opa1 within NeuN-positive cells. Moreover, the S-nitrosylated forms of Drp1significantly increased in the brain tissues of 139A- and ME7-infected mice at terminal stage. Dynamic analysis of Drp1 and SNO-Dpr1 in the brains collected at different time points within the incubation period of 139A-infected mice demonstrated that the whole Drp1 decreased at all tested samples, whereas the SNO-Drp1 remarkably increased in the sample of 90-day post-infection (dpi), reached to the peak in that of 120 dpi and dropped down but still maintained at higher level at the end of disease. The levels of apoptotic factors cleaved caspase 9, caspase 3, and Bax were also markedly increased in the brain tissues of the mice infected with agents 139A and ME7. Our data indicate a disorder of mitochondria dynamics in the brains of prion infection, largely depending on the abnormal alteration of brain Drp1.

  10. Temporary Blockade of the Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor Signaling Pathway Impedes the Spread of Scrapie to the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Mabbott, Neil A.; McGovern, Gillian; Jeffrey, Martin; Bruce, Moira E.

    2002-01-01

    Although the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) are neurodegenerative diseases, their agents usually replicate and accumulate in lymphoid tissues long before infection spreads to the central nervous system (CNS). Studies of a mouse scrapie model have shown that mature follicular dendritic cells (FDCs), which express the host prion protein (PrPc), are critical for replication of infection in lymphoid tissues. In the absence of mature FDCs, the spread of infection to the CNS is significantly impaired. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) secretion by lymphocytes is important for maintaining FDC networks, and signaling is mediated through TNF receptor 1 (TNFR-1) expressed on FDCs and/or their precursors. A treatment that blocks TNFR signaling leads to the temporary dedifferentiation of mature FDCs, raising the hypothesis that a similar treatment would significantly delay the peripheral pathogenesis of scrapie. Here, specific neutralization of the TNFR signaling pathway was achieved through treatment with a fusion protein consisting of two soluble human TNFR (huTNFR) (p80) domains linked to the Fc portion of human immunoglobulin G1 (huTNFR:Fc). A single treatment of mice with huTNFR:Fc before or shortly after intraperitoneal injection with the ME7 scrapie strain significantly delayed the onset of disease in the CNS and reduced the early accumulation of disease-specific PrP in the spleen. These effects coincided with a temporary dedifferentiation of mature FDCs within 5 days of huTNFR:Fc treatment. We conclude that treatments that specifically inhibit the TNFR signaling pathway may present an opportunity for early intervention in peripherally transmitted TSEs. PMID:11967328

  11. Efficacy of pharmacokinetic interactions between piperonyl butoxide and albendazole against gastrointestinal nematodiasis in goats.

    PubMed

    Kumbhakar, N K; Sanyal, P K; Rawte, D; Kumar, D; Kerketta, A E; Pal, S

    2016-09-01

    To test the hypothesis that modulation of hepatic microsomal sulphoxidation and sulphonation by the cytochrome P450 inhibitor piperonyl butoxide could increase bioavailability of albendazole, the present study was undertaken to understand the pharmacokinetics of albendazole in goats at a dose of 7.5 mg kg- 1 body weight with and without co-administration with piperonyl butoxide at 63.0 mg kg- 1 body weight. Plasma albendazole sulphoxide metabolite, the anthelmintically active moiety, reached its maximum concentration of 0.322 ± 0.045 μg ml- 1 and 0.384 ± 0.013 μg ml- 1 at 18 h and 24 h after administration of albendazole alone and co-administration of albendazole with piperonyl butoxide, respectively. Analysis of the data revealed statistically increased albendazole sulphoxide levels at 24 (P 0.05) in values of maximum concentration (normal and calculated) could be observed between groups of goats. However, values of time to reach the concentration maximum (normal and calculated), area under the concentration-time curve (0-∞ and calculated), minimum residence time, distribution half-life, elimination half-life and total area under the first movement of plasma drug concentration-time curve were significantly higher (P <  0.05) in plasma levels of albendazole sulphoxide in goats following single oral co-administration of albendazole with piperonyl butoxide. The faecal egg count reduction and lower 95% confidence limit for the group treated with albendazole alone were 97 and 68%, while for co-administration of albendazole and piperonyl butoxide the values were 99 and 97%, respectively. The ED50 for egg hatch was 0.196, indicating suspected resistance to benzimidazole anthelmintics. The drug combination proved efficacious against an albendazole-resistant nematode parasite population in goats.

  12. Reduction in heat-induced gastrointestinal hyperpermeability in rats by bovine colostrum and goat milk powders.

    PubMed

    Prosser, C; Stelwagen, K; Cummins, R; Guerin, P; Gill, N; Milne, C

    2004-02-01

    Male Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to one of three dietary groups [standard diet (Cont; n = 8), standard diet plus bovine colostrum powder (BColost 1.7 g/kg; n = 8), or goat milk powder (GMilk 1.7 g/kg; n = 8)] to determine the ability of these supplements to reduce gastrointestinal hyperpermeability induced by heat. Raising core body temperature of rats to 41.5 degrees C increased transfer of (51)Cr-EDTA from gut into blood 34-fold relative to the ambient temperature value (P < 0.05) in the Cont group of rats, indicative of increased gastrointestinal permeability. Significantly less (P < 0.01) (51)Cr-EDTA was transferred into the blood of rats in either the BColost (27% of Cont) or GMilk group (10% of Cont) after heating, showing that prior supplementation with either bovine colostrum or goat milk powder significantly reduced the impact of heat stress on gastrointestinal permeability. The changes in the BColost group were not significantly different than those of the GMilk group. The potential mechanism of the protective effect of bovine colostrum and goat milk powders may involve modulation of tight junction permeability, because both powders were able to maintain transepithelial resistance in Madin Darby canine kidney cells challenged with EGTA compared with cells maintained in media only. The results show that bovine colostrum powder can partially alleviate the effects of hyperthermia on gastrointestinal permeability in the intact animal. Moreover, goat milk powder was equally as effective as bovine colostrum powder, and both may be of benefit in other situations where gastrointestinal barrier function is compromised.

  13. Age, sex, and lactating status regulate ghrelin secretion and GOAT mRNA levels from isolated rat stomach.

    PubMed

    Al-Massadi, O; Crujeiras, A B; González, R C; Pardo, M; Diéguez, C; Casanueva, F F; Seoane, L M

    2010-09-01

    Ghrelin is a stomach derivate peptide involved in energy homeostasis regulation, and ghrelin O-acyltransferase (GOAT) is the enzyme responsible for ghrelin acylation. Puberty is a period characterized by profound changes in the metabolic requirements and notable variations of sexual hormone levels. On the other hand, the weaning process is a fundamental modification of the diet, which implicates several adaptations of the gastrointestinal tract physiology. Until now the direct secretion of ghrelin by the stomach in these conditions, without interferences from other organs, has never been studied. The main objective of this article was to investigate how the stomach modulates ghrelin production and secretion as well as GOAT expression on these periods of life. Gastric ghrelin secretion is regulated through postnatal life in an independent way of gastric expression and circulating levels of this hormone. The present work shows a strong regulation of gastric ghrelin secretion by estrogens. The weaning strongly regulates gastric ghrelin secretion. Animals subjected to delayed weaning present a lower body weight than the corresponding controls. For the first time, it is shown that a noticeable decrease in circulating levels of testosterone and estrogens is associated with delay of weaning. GOAT mRNA levels in the stomach are strongly regulated by age, breastfeeding, and testosterone. In conclusion, the stomach itself regulates ghrelin and GOAT production to adapt the organism to the metabolic requirements demanded through each stage of life.

  14. Effect of plane of nutrition on seasonality of reproduction in Spanish Payoya goats.

    PubMed

    Zarazaga, L A; Guzmán, J L; Domínguez, C; Pérez, M C; Prieto, R

    2005-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if there is a seasonal pattern of sexual activity in female Payoya goats and if this seasonality could be modulated by nutrition. During the experimental period of 20 months, 43 non-pregnant adults goats were penned under natural photoperiod at latitude 37 degrees 15'N. At the onset of the experiment, the animals were allocated to three experimental groups differing in the level of nutrition and whether the animals were entire or ovariectomized does. The high nutrition group (H, n = 16 entire does) receiving 1.5 times maintenance requirements. The low nutrition group (L, n = 16 entire does) and an ovariectomized and oestradiol treated group (OVX, n = 11 ovariectomized does) received a diet supporting their maintenance requirements. The groups were balanced for live weight (LW) and body condition score (BCS) at the beginning of the study. In entire goats, oestrus was tested daily using aproned males, ovulation rate was assessed by laparoscopy 7 days after identification of oestrus and plasma samples were obtained twice per week for progesterone assay. OVX goats were isolated from the other groups and bucks, plasma samples were assayed twice per week for LH and there were four intensive sampling periods during the year to determine LH pulsatility. LW and BCS were recorded for all animals once a week. A clear circannual cycle in live weight change was observed in all experimental groups, being relatively stable or slightly decreasing in summer and autumn and increasing during winter and spring. The effect of exposure to high (H) rather than low (L) nutrition was to cause earlier onset of ovarian activity (5 versus 17 August; P < 0.05), and expression of oestrous (16 August versus 2 September; P < 0.01) and later cessation of reproductive activity (ovulation 11 February versus 17 January; P < 0.01). Consequently, seasonal anoestrus was 32 days shorter in does on the higher plane of nutrition (P < 0.01). The seasonality of

  15. Characterization of local goat breeds using RAP-DNA markers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Barzinji, Yousif M. S.; Hamad, Aram O.

    2017-09-01

    The present study was conducted on different colors of local goat breeds. A number of 216 does were sampled from the seven groups. Genomic DNA was extracted from the blood samples. From the twenty used RAPD primers 12 of them were amplified, and presence of bands. The total fragment number of 12 primers over all the goat breed samples was 485 fragments. Out of the 485 fragments, 90 of them were Polymorphic fragments numbers (PFN). From all bands obtained, 20 of them possessed unique bands. The highest unique band was found in locus RAP 6 which has 4 unique bands, three of them in the Maraz Brown and one in the local Koor. Nei's gene diversity and Shanon's information index in this study were averaged 0.38 and 0.60, respectively. The genetic distance among several goat breeds ranged from 9.11 to 43.33%. The highest genetic distance 43.33% recorded between Maraz goat and other goat breeds and between local Koor and other goat (except Maraz goats) breeds (37.79%). However, the lowest genetic distance recorded between local white and Pnok. The distance between (local Black and Pnok) and (local Black and local white) was 22.75%. In conclusions, the high distance among these goat breeds, polymorphism and high numbers of unique bands found in present study indicates that these goat breeds have the required amount of genetic variation to made genetic improvement. This study helps us to clarify the image of the genetic diversity of the local goat breeds and the breeders can used it for mating system when need to make the crossing among these goat breeds.

  16. Introduction of distillate rosemary leaves into the diet of the Murciano-Granadina goat: transfer of polyphenolic compounds to goats' milk and the plasma of suckling goat kids.

    PubMed

    Jordán, Maria José; Moñino, María Inmaculada; Martínez, Cristina; Lafuente, Arturo; Sotomayor, José Antonio

    2010-07-28

    The effect of the introduction of distilled rosemary leaves into the diet of the Murciano-Granadina goat on the polyphenolic profile of the goats' milk during the physiological stages of gestation and lactation was studied. The inclusion of rosemary leaves into the animal diet modified neither animal productivity (milk yield) nor milk quality. The following components were found in increased concentration (P < 0.05) in the goats' milk after the introduction of rosemary leaves into their diet: flavonoids hesperidin, naringin, and genkwanin; gallic acid; and phenolic diterpenes carnosol and carnosic acid. With regard to the transfer of polyphenols to the plasma of the suckling goat kid, a statistically significant increase (P < 0.05) in rosmarinic acid, carnosic acid, and carnosol concentrations was detected. From this point of view, distillate rosemary leaves can be proposed as an ingredient in ruminant feed because they both alter neither the yield nor the quality of Murciano-Granadina goats' milk and allow for an increased concentration of polyphenolic components in the goats' milk and in the plasma of the suckling goat kid.

  17. Research update: finishing lambs and meat goat kids on pasture

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Traditional sheep (Ovis aries), hair sheep and meat goat (Capra hircus) industries are growing rapidly in the Appalachian Region to help produce meats for ethnic markets. This niche market offers an economic opportunity for owners of small farms. Control of gastrointestinal (GI) parasites in goats...

  18. Dietary copper sulfate for control of gastrointestinal nematodes in goats

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Prevalence of anthelmintic resistance in goats has necessitated studies for alternative means of gastrointestinal nematode (GIN) control. The objective was to determine the effectiveness of dietary copper sulfate for control of GIN in meat goats. Naturally infected buck kids received 0 (LC), 78 (M...

  19. ADAPTmap: International coordinated data resource for improving goat production effiency

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Goats provide vital food and economic security, particularly in developing countries. We created a database that is a nexus for all performance, type, geographic information system (GIS), production environment, and genome information on goats. This resource provides a platform for meta-analysis tha...

  20. Sarcocystis oreamni n. sp. from the mountain goat (oreamnos americanus)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Numerous species of Sarcocystis have been reported from wild ruminants but none has been named from the Rocky Mountain goat (Oreamnos americanus). Mature sarcocysts were found in frozen muscle samples of 3 of 7 mountain goats from Alaska, USA. Two morphological types of sarcocysts were found; 1 had ...

  1. ISOLATION OF TOXOPLASMA GONDII FROM GOATS FROM BRAZIL

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Goats are economically important in many countries and little is known of caprine toxoplasmosis in Brazil. Antibodies to T. gondii were assayed in the sera of 143 goats from 3 Brazilian States, using modified agglutination test (MAT titer =1:25); 46 (32.2%) tested positive. Samples of brain, heart, ...

  2. The GOAT Effect's Impact upon Educational R and D.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kean, Michael H.; McNamara, Thomas C.

    1979-01-01

    The "Goodbye To All That" (GOAT) Effect is introduced as a special research and evaluation "outcome" effect characterizing decision making unduly influenced by abandoning "write-off" tendencies. The "gradual refinement" approach offers an antidote to the GOAT Effect because it does not use the systems…

  3. Ghrelin O-acyltransferase (GOAT) and energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Li, Ziru; Mulholland, Michael; Zhang, Weizhen

    2016-03-01

    Ghrelin O-acyltransferase (GOAT), a member of MBOATs family, is essential for octanoylation of ghrelin, which is required for active ghrelin to bind with and activate its receptor. GOAT is expressed mainly in the stomach, pancreas and hypothalamus. Levels of GOAT are altered by energy status. GOAT contains 11 transmembrane helices and one reentrant loop. Its invariant residue His-338 and conserved Asn-307 are located in the endoplasmic reticulum lumen and cytosol respectively. GOAT contributes to the regulation of food intake and energy expenditure, as well as glucose and lipids homeostasis. Deletion of GOAT blocks the acylation of ghrelin leading to subsequent impairment in energy homeostasis and survival when mice are challenged with high energy diet or severe caloric restriction. GO-CoA-Tat, a peptide GOAT inhibitor, attenuates acyl-ghrelin production and prevents weight gain induced by a medium-chain triglycerides-rich high fat diet. Further, GO-CoA-Tat increases glucose- induced insulin secretion. Overall, inhibition of GOAT is a novel strategy for treatment of obesity and related metabolic disorders.

  4. Relation between mountain goats and their habitat in southeastern Alaska.

    Treesearch

    J.L. Fox; C.A. Smith; J.W. Schoen

    1989-01-01

    Mountain goats in southeastern Alaska occupy habitats providing abundant areas of highquality forage during summer but only limited feeding areas during winter because of deep snow. Winter is a period of severe utritional deprivation, and goats converge into areas with available forage, often within old-growth forest where relatively low snow depths and litterfall...

  5. Isolation of caprine arthritis encephalitis virus from goats in Mexico.

    PubMed Central

    Daltabuit Test, M; de la Concha-Bermejillo, A; Espinosa, L E; Loza Rubio, E; Aguilar Setién, A

    1999-01-01

    A lentivirus was isolated from 2 goats in Mexico that were seropositive to caprine arthritis encephalitis virus (CAEV) by the agar gel immunodiffusion (AGID) test. The lentivirus was identified as CAEV by the observation of giant multinucleated cells (syncytia) in goat synovial membrane (GSM) monolayers co-cultivated with blood mononuclear (BMN) cells from the seropositive goats, and by amplifying a DNA segment of the CAEV gag gene using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique. Subsequently, cell supernatants from the GSM cells co-cultivated with BMN cells were used to infect 2 CAEV-seronegative goats. These goats seroconverted to CAEV as determined by the AGID test, and CAEV was re-isolated from these goats. One of the goats developed polyarthritis 8 mo after inoculation. Previous serological surveys indicate that infection with CAEV is prevalent among goats in Mexico. To our knowledge this is the first report of CAEV isolation in Mexico. Because of globalization of markets and increased trading among nations, the rapid identification and reporting of diseases such as CAEV are important to prevent the dissemination of these diseases. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. PMID:10480464

  6. Dairy goat demography and Q fever infection dynamics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Between 2007 and 2009, the largest human Q fever epidemic ever described occurred in the Netherlands. The source was traced back to dairy goat farms, where abortion storms had been observed since 2005. Since one putative cause of these abortion storms is the intensive husbandry systems in which the goats are kept, the objective of this study was to assess whether these could be explained by herd size, reproductive pattern and other demographic aspects of Dutch dairy goat herds alone. We adapted an existing, fully parameterized simulation model for Q fever transmission in French dairy cattle herds to represent the demographics typical for Dutch dairy goat herds. The original model represents the infection dynamics in a herd of 50 dairy cows after introduction of a single infected animal; the adapted model has 770 dairy goats. For a full comparison, herds of 770 cows and 50 goats were also modeled. The effects of herd size and goat versus cattle demographics on the probability of and time to extinction of the infection, environmental bacterial load and abortion rate were studied by simulation. The abortion storms could not be fully explained by demographics alone. Adequate data were lacking at the moment to attribute the difference to characteristics of the pathogen, host, within-herd environment, or a combination thereof. The probability of extinction was higher in goat herds than in cattle herds of the same size. The environmental contamination was highest within cattle herds, which may be taken into account when enlarging cattle farming systems. PMID:23621908

  7. The GOAT Effect's Impact upon Educational R and D.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kean, Michael H.; McNamara, Thomas C.

    1979-01-01

    The "Goodbye To All That" (GOAT) Effect is introduced as a special research and evaluation "outcome" effect characterizing decision making unduly influenced by abandoning "write-off" tendencies. The "gradual refinement" approach offers an antidote to the GOAT Effect because it does not use the systems…

  8. The resolution of rayless goldenrod (Isocoma pluriflora) poisoning in goats

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rayless goldenrod (Isocoma pluriflora) occasionally poisons livestock causing myocardial and skeletal muscle degeneration and necrosis. The objectives of this study were to describe the resolution of the clinical and pathologic changes of rayless goldenrod poisoning in goats. Eight goats were gava...

  9. Effect of selenium supplementation on spermatogenic cells of goats.

    PubMed

    Ganabadi, S; Halimatun, Y; Amelia Choong, K L; Nor Jawahir, A; Mohammed Hilmi, A

    2010-04-01

    Selenium is an essential trace mineral that is required for many physiological functions in animals and the potential relevance of selenium to the reproductive system of livestock has been considered by many researchers. The objective of this study was to examine the effect of selenium supplementation on the spermatogenic cells of goat. Eight young male crossbred (Katjang x Boer) goats, aged between 9 to 11 months, were used in this study. The control group (CON; n = 4) was fed with a diet consisting of 60% Guinea grass and 40% concentrates while the treatment group (Se-SUP; n = 4) was fed with the same diet as the goats in the control group but with supplementation of 0.6mg selenium (sodium selenite powder) per goat daily for 100 days and were slaughtered on the 101st day. There were no significant differences (p>0.05) in the mean number of spermatogonium, spermatocytes, spermatozoa and the total number of spermatogenic cells between the CON and Se-SUP goat respectively. However, there was a significant increase (p< 0.05) of spermatid in Se-SUP goats. The mean percentage of spermatids was significantly increased (p< 0.05) while spermatozoa was significantly decreased (p< 0.05) in Se-SUP goats. In conclusion, selenium supplementation increased the percentages of spermatids and decreased the percentages of spermatozoa in the seminiferous tubules in goats.

  10. Determination of sex and scrapie resistance genotype in preimplantation ovine embryos.

    PubMed

    Guignot, Florence; Baril, Gerard; Dupont, Francis; Cognie, Yves; Folch, Jose; Alabart, Jose Luis; Poulin, Naty; Beckers, Jean-Francois; Bed'hom, Bertrand; Babilliot, Jean-Marc; Mermillod, Pascal

    2009-02-01

    The aim of this study was to test the accuracy of genotype diagnosis after pre-amplification of DNA extracted from biopsies obtained by microblade cutting of ovine embryos and to evaluate the viability of biopsied embryos after vitrification/warming and transfer to recipients. Sex and PrP genotypes were determined. Sex diagnosis was done by PCR amplification of ZFX/ZFY and SRY sequences after PEP-PCR while PrP genotype determination was performed after specific pre-amplification of specific target including codons 136, 154 and 171. Embryos were collected at Day 7 after oestrus. Blastocysts and expanded blastocysts were biopsied immediately after collection whereas compacted morulae were biopsied after 24 hr of in vitro culture. Eighty-nine biopsied embryos were frozen by vitrification. Fresh and vitrified whole embryos were kept as control. DNA of biopsies was extracted and pre-amplified. Sex diagnosis was efficient for 96.6% of biopsies and PrP genotyping was determined in 95.8% of codons. After embryo transfer, no significant difference was observed in lambing rate between biopsied, vitrified control and fresh embryos (54.5%, 60% and 66.6%, respectively). Embryo survival rate was not different between biopsied and whole vitrified embryos (P = 0.38). At birth, 96.7% of diagnosed sex and 95.4% of predetermined codons were correct. Lamb PrP profiles were in agreement with parental genotype. PEP-PCR coupled with sex diagnosis and nested PCR coupled with PrP genotype predetermination are very accurate techniques to genotype ovine embryo before transfer. These original results allow planning of selection of resistant genotype to scrapie and sex of offspring before transfer of cryopreserved embryo.

  11. Transgenic Rabbits Expressing Ovine PrP Are Susceptible to Scrapie

    PubMed Central

    Sarradin, Pierre; Viglietta, Céline; Limouzin, Claude; Andréoletti, Olivier; Daniel-Carlier, Nathalie; Barc, Céline; Leroux-Coyau, Mathieu; Berthon, Patricia; Chapuis, Jérôme; Rossignol, Christelle; Gatti, Jean-Luc; Belghazi, Maya; Labas, Valérie; Vilotte, Jean-Luc; Béringue, Vincent; Lantier, Frédéric; Laude, Hubert; Houdebine, Louis-Marie

    2015-01-01

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) are a group of neurodegenerative diseases affecting a wide range of mammalian species. They are caused by prions, a proteinaceous pathogen essentially composed of PrPSc, an abnormal isoform of the host encoded cellular prion protein PrPC. Constrained steric interactions between PrPSc and PrPC are thought to provide prions with species specificity, and to control cross-species transmission into other host populations, including humans. Transgenetic expression of foreign PrP genes has been successfully and widely used to overcome the recognized resistance of mouse to foreign TSE sources. Rabbit is one of the species that exhibit a pronounced resistance to TSEs. Most attempts to infect experimentally rabbit have failed, except after inoculation with cell-free generated rabbit prions. To gain insights on the molecular determinants of the relative resistance of rabbits to prions, we generated transgenic rabbits expressing the susceptible V136R154Q171 allele of the ovine PRNP gene on a rabbit wild type PRNP New Zealand background and assessed their experimental susceptibility to scrapie prions. All transgenic animals developed a typical TSE 6–8 months after intracerebral inoculation, whereas wild type rabbits remained healthy more than 700 days after inoculation. Despite the endogenous presence of rabbit PrPC, only ovine PrPSc was detectable in the brains of diseased animals. Collectively these data indicate that the low susceptibility of rabbits to prion infection is not enciphered within their non-PrP genetic background. PMID:26248157

  12. Replication and spread of CJD, kuru and scrapie agents in vivo and in cell culture.

    PubMed

    Miyazawa, Kohtaro; Emmerling, Kaitlin; Manuelidis, Laura

    2011-01-01

    Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathy (TSE) agents are defined by their virulence for particular species, their spread in the population, their incubation time to cause disease, and their neuropathological sequelae. Murine adapted human agents, including sporadic CJD (sCJD), New Guinea kuru, and Japanese CJD agents, display particularly distinct incubation times and maximal infectious brain titers. They also induce agent-specific patterns of neurodegeneration. When these TSE agents are transmitted to cultured hypothalamic GT1 cells they maintain their unique identities. Nevertheless, the human kuru (kCJD) and Japanese FU-CJD agents, as well as the sheep 22L and 263K scrapie agents display doubling times that are 8x to 33x faster in cells than in brain, indicating release from complex innate immune responses. These data are most consistent with a foreign viral structure, rather than an infectious form of host prion protein (PrP-res). Profound agent-specific inhibitory effects are also apparent in GT1 cells, and maximal titer plateau in kCJD and FU-CJD differed by 1,000-fold in a cell-based assay. Remarkably, the lower titer kCJD agent rapidly induced de novo PrP-res in GT1 cells, whereas the high titer FU-CJD agent replicated silently for multiple passages. Although PrP-res is often considered to be toxic, PrP-res instead may be part of a primal defense and/or clearance mechanism against TSE environmental agents. Limited spread of particular TSE agents through nanotubes and cell-to-cell contacts probably underlies the long peripheral phase of human CJD.

  13. Faecal shedding, alimentary clearance and intestinal spread of prions in hamsters fed with scrapie.

    PubMed

    Krüger, Dominique; Thomzig, Achim; Lenz, Gudrun; Kampf, Kristin; McBride, Patricia; Beekes, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Shedding of prions via faeces may be involved in the transmission of contagious prion diseases. Here, we fed hamsters 10mg of 263K scrapie brain homogenate and examined the faecal excretion of disease-associated prion protein (PrP(TSE)) during the course of infection. The intestinal fate of ingested PrP(TSE) was further investigated by monitoring the deposition of the protein in components of the gut wall using immunohistochemistry and paraffin-embedded tissue (PET) blotting. Western blotting of faecal extracts showed shedding of PrP(TSE) in the excrement at 24-72 h post infection (hpi), but not at 0-24 hpi or at later preclinical or clinical time points. About 5% of the ingested PrP(TSE) were excreted via the faeces. However, the bulk of PrP(TSE) was cleared from the alimentary canal, most probably by degradation, while an indiscernible proportion of the inoculum triggered intestinal infection. Components of the gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT) and the enteric nervous system (ENS) showed progressing accumulation of PrP(TSE) from 30 days post infection (dpi) and 60 dpi, respectively. At the clinical stage of disease, substantial deposits of PrP(TSE) were found in the GALT in close vicinity to the intestinal lumen. Despite an apparent possibility of shedding from Peyer's patches that may involve the follicle-associated epithelium (FAE), only small amounts of PrP(TSE) were detected in faeces from clinically infected animals by serial protein misfolding cyclic amplification (sPMCA). Although excrement may thus provide a vehicle for the release of endogenously formed PrP(TSE), intestinal clearance mechanisms seem to partially counteract such a mode of prion dissemination.

  14. Replication and spread of CJD, kuru and scrapie agents in vivo and in cell culture

    PubMed Central

    Miyazawa, Kohtaro; Emmerling, Kaitlin

    2011-01-01

    Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathy (TSE) agents are defined by their virulence for particular species, their spread in the population, their incubation time to cause disease, and their neuropathological sequelae. Murine adapted human agents, including sporadic CJD (sCJD), New Guinea kuru, and Japanese CJD agents, display particularly distinct incubation times and maximal infectious brain titers. They also induce agent-specific patterns of neurodegeneration. When these TSE agents are transmitted to cultured hypothalamic GT1 cells they maintain their unique identities. Nevertheless, the human kuru (kCJD) and Japanese FU-CJD agents, as well as the sheep 22L and 263K scrapie agents display doubling times that are 8× to 33× faster in cells than in brain, indicating release from complex innate immune responses. These data are most consistent with a foreign viral structure, rather than an infectious form of host prion protein (PrP-res). Profound agent-specific inhibitory effects are also apparent in GT1 cells, and maximal titer plateau in kCJD and FU-CJD differed by 1,000-fold in a cell-based assay. Remarkably, the lower titer kCJD agent rapidly induced de novo PrP-res in GT1 cells, whereas the high titer FU-CJD agent replicated silently for multiple passages. Although PrP-res is often considered to be toxic, PrP-res instead may be part of a primal defense and/or clearance mechanism against TSE environmental agents. Limited spread of particular TSE agents through nanotubes and cell-to-cell contacts probably underlies the long peripheral phase of human CJD. PMID:21527829

  15. Different 2-Aminothiazole Therapeutics Produce Distinct Patterns of Scrapie Prion Neuropathology in Mouse Brains

    PubMed Central

    Giles, Kurt; Berry, David B.; Condello, Carlo; Hawley, Ronald C.; Gallardo-Godoy, Alejandra; Bryant, Clifford; Oehler, Abby; Elepano, Manuel; Bhardwaj, Sumita; Patel, Smita; Silber, B. Michael; Guan, Shenheng; DeArmond, Stephen J.; Renslo, Adam R.

    2015-01-01

    Because no drug exists that halts or even slows any neurodegenerative disease, developing effective therapeutics for any prion disorder is urgent. We recently reported two compounds (IND24 and IND81) with the 2-aminothiazole (2-AMT) chemical scaffold that almost doubled the incubation times in scrapie prion-infected, wild-type (wt) FVB mice when given in a liquid diet. Remarkably, oral prophylactic treatment with IND24 beginning 14 days prior to intracerebral prion inoculation extended survival from ∼120 days to over 450 days. In addition to IND24, we evaluated the pharmacokinetics and efficacy of five additional 2-AMTs; one was not followed further because its brain penetration was poor. Of the remaining four new 2-AMTs, IND114338 doubled and IND125 tripled the incubation times of RML-inoculated wt and Tg4053 mice overexpressing wt mouse prion protein (PrP), respectively. Neuropathological examination of the brains from untreated controls showed a widespread deposition of self-propagating, β-sheet-rich “scrapie” isoform (PrPSc) prions accompanied by a profound astrocytic gliosis. In contrast, mice treated with 2-AMTs had lower levels of PrPSc and associated astrocytic gliosis, with each compound resulting in a distinct pattern of deposition. Notably, IND125 prevented both PrPSc accumulation and astrocytic gliosis in the cerebrum. Progressive central nervous system dysfunction in the IND125-treated mice was presumably due to the PrPSc that accumulated in their brainstems. Disappointingly, none of the four new 2-AMTs prolonged the lives of mice expressing a chimeric human/mouse PrP transgene inoculated with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease prions. PMID:26224882

  16. Goat milk acceptance and promotion methods in Japan: The questionnaire survey to middle class households.

    PubMed

    Ozawa, Takeyuki; Mukuda, Kumiko; Fujita, Masaru; Nishitani, Jiro

    2009-04-01

    A consumer questionnaire conducted with the purpose of ascertaining the acceptability of goat milk and related products in Japan was carried out on 345 guarantees of Nippon Veterinary and Life Science University in December 2006. 275 effective responses (79%) representing middle class urban households were returned. The results revealed that (1) 30% of respondents have experienced drinking goat milk and only 10% are aware of the current retail situation of goat milk and related products; (2) over 70% of goat milk drinkers raised goats by hand at some point in their past and their first experience drinking goat milk was in infancy; (3) those with experience in drinking goat milk expressed a vague evaluation and minimal understanding of drinking goat milk; (4) respondents who were inexperienced goat milk drinkers expressed a strong desire to taste and a weak desire to purchase goat milk; (5) respondents expressed low r