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Sample records for god improves response

  1. Godly play: an intervention for improving physical, emotional, and spiritual responses of chronically ill hospitalized children.

    PubMed

    Farrell, Joan; Cope, Scott Brooks; Cooper, James H; Mathias, Leigh

    2008-01-01

    An experimental two-group comparison pilot study of forty chronically ill hospitalized children was carried out at Wolfson Children's Hospital in Jacksonville, Florida. Three Godly Play interventions were given to participants in the experimental group. Children in the control group did not participate but received a fairy tale book as a control. The sample was evenly distributed with twenty (20) males and twenty (20) females. Ages ranged from six (6) to fifteen (15) years and all participants were chronically ill. Five (5) variables were studied. Of the five (5), three (3) showed significant differences before and after Godly Play: the Staic-Trait Anxiety Scale (p = .049), the Children's Depression Inventory (p = .011), and the McBride Spirituality Assessment (p = .033). A marginal difference in parent satisfaction with hospital care of children in the experimental and control groups was also determined (p = .058). Findings suggest that Godly Play had a significant effect on anxiety, depression, and spirituality of children and support the idea that the parents of children who participated in Godly Play were more satisfied with hospital care than those parents whose children did not engage in Godly Play.

  2. God will forgive: reflecting on God's love decreases neurophysiological responses to errors.

    PubMed

    Good, Marie; Inzlicht, Michael; Larson, Michael J

    2015-03-01

    In religions where God is portrayed as both loving and wrathful, religious beliefs may be a source of fear as well as comfort. Here, we consider if God's love may be more effective, relative to God's wrath, for soothing distress, but less effective for helping control behavior. Specifically, we assess whether contemplating God's love reduces our ability to detect and emotionally react to conflict between one's behavior and overarching religious standards. We do so within a neurophysiological framework, by observing the effects of exposure to concepts of God's love vs punishment on the error-related negativity (ERN)--a neural signal originating in the anterior cingulate cortex that is associated with performance monitoring and affective responses to errors. Participants included 123 students at Brigham Young University, who completed a Go/No-Go task where they made 'religious' errors (i.e. ostensibly exhibited pro-alcohol tendencies). Reflecting on God's love caused dampened ERNs and worse performance on the Go/No-Go task. Thinking about God's punishment did not affect performance or ERNs. Results suggest that one possible reason religiosity is generally linked to positive well-being may be because of a decreased affective response to errors that occurs when God's love is prominent in the minds of believers.

  3. 32 CFR 644.554 - Insurance against loss or damages to buildings and improvements by fire or acts of God.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Insurance against loss or damages to buildings and improvements by fire or acts of God. 644.554 Section 644.554 National Defense Department of... Procedure § 644.554 Insurance against loss or damages to buildings and improvements by fire or acts of...

  4. 32 CFR 644.554 - Insurance against loss or damages to buildings and improvements by fire or acts of God.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Insurance against loss or damages to buildings and improvements by fire or acts of God. 644.554 Section 644.554 National Defense Department of... Procedure § 644.554 Insurance against loss or damages to buildings and improvements by fire or acts of...

  5. 32 CFR 644.554 - Insurance against loss or damages to buildings and improvements by fire or acts of God.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Insurance against loss or damages to buildings and improvements by fire or acts of God. 644.554 Section 644.554 National Defense Department of... Procedure § 644.554 Insurance against loss or damages to buildings and improvements by fire or acts of...

  6. 32 CFR 644.554 - Insurance against loss or damages to buildings and improvements by fire or acts of God.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Insurance against loss or damages to buildings and improvements by fire or acts of God. 644.554 Section 644.554 National Defense Department of... Procedure § 644.554 Insurance against loss or damages to buildings and improvements by fire or acts of...

  7. 32 CFR 644.554 - Insurance against loss or damages to buildings and improvements by fire or acts of God.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Insurance against loss or damages to buildings and improvements by fire or acts of God. 644.554 Section 644.554 National Defense Department of... Procedure § 644.554 Insurance against loss or damages to buildings and improvements by fire or acts of...

  8. God will forgive: reflecting on God’s love decreases neurophysiological responses to errors

    PubMed Central

    Inzlicht, Michael; Larson, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    In religions where God is portrayed as both loving and wrathful, religious beliefs may be a source of fear as well as comfort. Here, we consider if God’s love may be more effective, relative to God’s wrath, for soothing distress, but less effective for helping control behavior. Specifically, we assess whether contemplating God’s love reduces our ability to detect and emotionally react to conflict between one’s behavior and overarching religious standards. We do so within a neurophysiological framework, by observing the effects of exposure to concepts of God’s love vs punishment on the error-related negativity (ERN)—a neural signal originating in the anterior cingulate cortex that is associated with performance monitoring and affective responses to errors. Participants included 123 students at Brigham Young University, who completed a Go/No-Go task where they made ‘religious’ errors (i.e. ostensibly exhibited pro-alcohol tendencies). Reflecting on God’s love caused dampened ERNs and worse performance on the Go/No-Go task. Thinking about God’s punishment did not affect performance or ERNs. Results suggest that one possible reason religiosity is generally linked to positive well-being may be because of a decreased affective response to errors that occurs when God’s love is prominent in the minds of believers. PMID:25062839

  9. Of God and Psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Karasu, T Byram

    2015-01-01

    Psychotherapy is an instrument for remediation of psychological deficits and conflict resolution, as well as an instrument for growth and self-cultivation. In fact, psychotherapy is the finest form of life education. All of this is done without psychotherapists' playing a teacher, a minister, a priest, a rabbi, an imam, or a Buddhist monk, but by being familiar with what they know and more. That "more" is about understanding "the attributes" of gods and religions as they serve the all-too-human needs of believing and belonging. It is about the distillation of common psychological, sociological, moral, and philosophical attributes of religions, and the recognition that the attributes themselves are faith and God. Attributes that serve the affiliative needs define faith, for example, belonging is faith; attributes that serve the divine needs define God, for example, compassion is God. Those who have recovered from their primitive innocence need to formulate their ideas of God and religion, regardless of their affiliation with a religious community. One may need to resonate emotionally with the God of his or her religion, but intellectually need to transcend all its dogma and cultivate a personal concept of divinity free from any theological structure. Such an enlightened person achieves enduring equanimity by striving to own the attributes of Gods--to be godly. This is equally true for psychotherapists as it is for their patients.

  10. How children and adults represent God's mind

    PubMed Central

    Heiphetz, Larisa; Lane, Jonathan D.; Waytz, Adam; Young, Liane L.

    2015-01-01

    For centuries, humans have contemplated the minds of gods. Research on religious cognition is spread across sub-disciplines, making it difficult to gain a complete understanding of how people reason about gods' minds. We integrate approaches from cognitive, developmental, and social psychology and neuroscience to illuminate the origins of religious cognition. First, we show that although adults explicitly discriminate supernatural minds from human minds, their implicit responses reveal far less discrimination. Next, we demonstrate that children's religious cognition often matches adults' implicit responses, revealing anthropomorphic notions of God's mind. Together, data from children and adults suggest the intuitive nature of perceiving God's mind as human-like. We then propose three complementary explanations for why anthropomorphism persists in adulthood, suggesting that anthropomorphism may be: 1) an instance of the anchoring and adjustment heuristic; 2) a reflection of early testimony; and/or 3) an evolutionary byproduct. PMID:25807973

  11. Anger toward God: social-cognitive predictors, prevalence, and links with adjustment to bereavement and cancer.

    PubMed

    Exline, Julie J; Park, Crystal L; Smyth, Joshua M; Carey, Michael P

    2011-01-01

    Many people see themselves as being in a relationship with God and see this bond as comforting. Yet, perceived relationships with God also carry the potential for experiencing anger toward God, as shown here in studies with the U.S. population (Study 1), undergraduates (Studies 2 and 3), bereaved individuals (Study 4), and cancer survivors (Study 5). These studies addressed 3 fundamental issues regarding anger toward God: perceptions and attributions that predict anger toward God, its prevalence, and its associations with adjustment. Social-cognitive predictors of anger toward God paralleled predictors of interpersonal anger and included holding God responsible for severe harm, attributions of cruelty, difficulty finding meaning, and seeing oneself as a victim. Anger toward God was frequently reported in response to negative events, although positive feelings predominated. Anger and positive feelings toward God showed moderate negative associations. Religiosity and age correlated negatively with anger toward God. Reports of anger toward God were slightly lower among Protestants and African Americans in comparison with other groups (Study 1). Some atheists and agnostics reported anger involving God, particularly on measures emphasizing past experiences (Study 2) and images of a hypothetical God (Study 3). Anger toward God was associated with poorer adjustment to bereavement (Study 4) and cancer (Study 5), particularly when anger remained unresolved over a 1-year period (Study 5). Taken together, these studies suggest that anger toward God is an important dimension of religious and spiritual experience, one that is measurable, widespread, and related to adjustment across various contexts and populations.

  12. The god within and the god without.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Teddi

    2013-09-01

    Spirituality enables the direct experience of connection between the individual and God, and can exist with or without an intermediary such as a religious institution. Via meditation or spiritual practice one can find God within oneself. Seeing oneself as a little Christ or Buddha affirms that one is sacred, and worthy of self-love and self-respect. This self-image is incongruent with violence to the self, such as substance misuse. Through spirituality we learn to see ourselves as parts of a whole, and worthy of the love and respect of others. This love is sustainable, and can fulfill what was unconsciously or consciously sought through the misuse of substances. From the point of view of the therapist, this is the beginning of healing.

  13. Gods behaving badly.

    PubMed

    Retsas, Spyros

    2015-02-01

    This paper addresses the myths surrounding the birth and death of Asclepios, the popular healing God of the Greeks and his place among other deities of the Greek Pantheon. The enigmatic invocation of Asclepios by Socrates, the Athenian philosopher condemned to take the hemlock, in his final moments is also discussed.

  14. Divine intuition: cognitive style influences belief in God.

    PubMed

    Shenhav, Amitai; Rand, David G; Greene, Joshua D

    2012-08-01

    Some have argued that belief in God is intuitive, a natural (by-)product of the human mind given its cognitive structure and social context. If this is true, the extent to which one believes in God may be influenced by one's more general tendency to rely on intuition versus reflection. Three studies support this hypothesis, linking intuitive cognitive style to belief in God. Study 1 showed that individual differences in cognitive style predict belief in God. Participants completed the Cognitive Reflection Test (CRT; Frederick, 2005), which employs math problems that, although easily solvable, have intuitively compelling incorrect answers. Participants who gave more intuitive answers on the CRT reported stronger belief in God. This effect was not mediated by education level, income, political orientation, or other demographic variables. Study 2 showed that the correlation between CRT scores and belief in God also holds when cognitive ability (IQ) and aspects of personality were controlled. Moreover, both studies demonstrated that intuitive CRT responses predicted the degree to which individuals reported having strengthened their belief in God since childhood, but not their familial religiosity during childhood, suggesting a causal relationship between cognitive style and change in belief over time. Study 3 revealed such a causal relationship over the short term: Experimentally inducing a mindset that favors intuition over reflection increases self-reported belief in God.

  15. Method for improving instrument response

    DOEpatents

    Hahn, David W.; Hencken, Kenneth R.; Johnsen, Howard A.; Flower, William L.

    2000-01-01

    This invention pertains generally to a method for improving the accuracy of particle analysis under conditions of discrete particle loading and particularly to a method for improving signal-to-noise ratio and instrument response in laser spark spectroscopic analysis of particulate emissions. Under conditions of low particle density loading (particles/m.sup.3) resulting from low overall metal concentrations and/or large particle size uniform sampling can not be guaranteed. The present invention discloses a technique for separating laser sparks that arise from sample particles from those that do not; that is, a process for systematically "gating" the instrument response arising from "sampled" particles from those responses which do not, is dislosed as a solution to his problem. The disclosed approach is based on random sampling combined with a conditional analysis of each pulse. A threshold value is determined for the ratio of the intensity of a spectral line for a given element to a baseline region. If the threshold value is exceeded, the pulse is classified as a "hit" and that data is collected and an average spectrum is generated from an arithmetic average of "hits". The true metal concentration is determined from the averaged spectrum.

  16. Do Scientists Really Reject God?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Eugenie C.

    1998-01-01

    Suggests that the title of the recent Larson and Witham article in the journal Nature, "Leading Scientists Still Reject God", is premature and without reliable data upon which to base it. (Author/CCM)

  17. Love's angry lament: confronting our anger with God: based on Lamentations 1-3.

    PubMed

    Leaman, Mel

    2009-01-01

    The author examines biblical characters who challenged the justice of God. He contends that these lamenters laid the foundation for the rabbinic tradition of chutzpah. They freely faced God with their disillusionment and anger. Their intimacy with the Divine is exemplary. The author acknowledges the ambiguities of God's response to despair and contextualizes lament in the case of a woman who has been sexually abused and seeks pastoral guidance. This article integrates exegesis and theology with theories of anger and intimacy.

  18. God as other, God as self, God as beyond: a cognitive analytic perspective on the relationship with God.

    PubMed

    Marsh, Robert; Low, James

    2006-06-01

    A case is made for the importance of working with religious material psychotherapeutically whilst at the same time being attentive to the pitfalls that may arise in doing so. A clinical vignette is presented illustrating some of these difficulties. Connections between constructions of self, other, and God are discussed using reciprocal roles, a concept from cognitive analytic therapy (CAT). A perspective offering a multiple and 'voiced' nature of self is explored; parallels are drawn with descriptions of God; and therapeutic implications are discussed.

  19. Spirituality in African Americans with diabetes: self-management through a relationship with God.

    PubMed

    Polzer, Rebecca L; Miles, Margaret S

    2007-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a theoretical model about how the spirituality of African Americans affects their self-management of diabetes. The sample consisted of 29 African American men and women, ages 40 to 75, with type 2 diabetes. The authors used a grounded theory design and collected data using minimally structured interviews. The method of analysis was constant comparison. The core concept identified was Self-Management Through a Relationship With God. Participants fell into one of three typologies: (a) Relationship and Responsibility: God Is in Background; (b) Relationship and Responsibility: God Is in Forefront: (c) Relationship and Relinquishing of Self-Management: God Is Healer. These typologies varied according to how participants viewed their relationship with God and the impact of this relationship on their self-management. The spirituality of these African Americans was an important factor that influenced the self-management of their diabetes.

  20. Immune responses to improving welfare.

    PubMed

    Berghman, L R

    2016-09-01

    The relationship between animal welfare and the immune status of an animal has a complex nature. Indeed, the intuitive notion that "increased vigilance of the immune system is by definition better" because it is expected to better keep the animal healthy, does not hold up under scrutiny. This is mostly due to the fact that the immune system consists of 2 distinct branches, the innate and the adaptive immune system. While they are intimately intertwined and synergistic in the living organism, they are profoundly different in their costs, both in terms of performance and wellbeing. In contrast to the adaptive immune system, the action of the innate immune system has a high metabolic cost as well as undesirable behavioral consequences. When a pathogen breaches the first line of defense (often a mucosal barrier), that organism's molecular signature is recognized by resident macrophages. The macrophages respond by releasing a cocktail of pro-inflammatory cytokines (including interleukin-1 and -6) that signal the brain via multiple pathways (humoral as well as neural) of the ongoing peripheral innate immune response. The behavioral response to the release of proinflammatory cytokines, known as "sickness behavior," includes nearly all the behavioral aspects that are symptomatic for clinical depression in humans. Hence, undesired innate immune activity, such as chronic inflammation, needs to be avoided by the industry. From an immunological standpoint, one of the most pressing poultry industry needs is the refinement of our current veterinary vaccine arsenal. The response to a vaccine, especially to a live attenuated vaccine, is often a combination of innate and adaptive immune activities, and the desired immunogenicity comes at the price of high reactogenicity. The morbidity, albeit limited and transient, caused by live vaccines against respiratory diseases and coccidiosis are good examples. Thankfully, the advent of various post-genomics technologies, such as DNA

  1. Thinking of God Moves Attention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chasteen, Alison L.; Burdzy, Donna C.; Pratt, Jay

    2010-01-01

    The concepts of God and Devil are well known across many cultures and religions, and often involve spatial metaphors, but it is not well known if our mental representations of these concepts affect visual cognition. To examine if exposure to divine concepts produces shifts of attention, participants completed a target detection task in which they…

  2. God-mother-baby: what children think they know.

    PubMed

    Kiessling, Florian; Perner, Josef

    2014-01-01

    This study tested one hundred and nine 3- to 6-year-old children on a knowledge-ignorance task about knowledge in humans (mother, baby) and God. In their responses, participants not reliably grasping that seeing leads to knowing in humans (pre-representational) were significantly influenced by own knowledge and marginally by question format. Moreover, knowledge was attributed significantly more often to mother than baby and explained by agent-based characteristics. Of participants mastering the task for humans (representational), God was largely conceived as ignorant "man in the sky" by younger and increasingly as "supernatural agent in the sky" by older children. Evidence for egocentrism and for anthropomorphizing God lends support to an anthropomorphism hypothesis. First-time evidence for an agent-based conception of others' knowledge in pre-representational children is presented.

  3. Immune responses to improving welfare

    PubMed Central

    Berghman, L. R.

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between animal welfare and the immune status of an animal has a complex nature. Indeed, the intuitive notion that “increased vigilance of the immune system is by definition better” because it is expected to better keep the animal healthy, does not hold up under scrutiny. This is mostly due to the fact that the immune system consists of 2 distinct branches, the innate and the adaptive immune system. While they are intimately intertwined and synergistic in the living organism, they are profoundly different in their costs, both in terms of performance and wellbeing. In contrast to the adaptive immune system, the action of the innate immune system has a high metabolic cost as well as undesirable behavioral consequences. When a pathogen breaches the first line of defense (often a mucosal barrier), that organism's molecular signature is recognized by resident macrophages. The macrophages respond by releasing a cocktail of pro-inflammatory cytokines (including interleukin-1 and -6) that signal the brain via multiple pathways (humoral as well as neural) of the ongoing peripheral innate immune response. The behavioral response to the release of proinflammatory cytokines, known as “sickness behavior,” includes nearly all the behavioral aspects that are symptomatic for clinical depression in humans. Hence, undesired innate immune activity, such as chronic inflammation, needs to be avoided by the industry. From an immunological standpoint, one of the most pressing poultry industry needs is the refinement of our current veterinary vaccine arsenal. The response to a vaccine, especially to a live attenuated vaccine, is often a combination of innate and adaptive immune activities, and the desired immunogenicity comes at the price of high reactogenicity. The morbidity, albeit limited and transient, caused by live vaccines against respiratory diseases and coccidiosis are good examples. Thankfully, the advent of various post-genomics technologies, such as DNA

  4. Meteor Beliefs Project: Spears of GodSpears of God

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendrix, Howard V.; McBeath, Alastair; Gheorghe, Andrei Dorian

    2012-04-01

    A selection of genuine or supposedly sky-fallen objects from real-world sources, a mixture of weapons, tools and "magical" objects of heavenly provenance, are drawn from their re-use in the near-future science-fiction novel Spears of God by author Howard V Hendrix, with additional discussion. The book includes other meteoric and meteoritic items too, some of which have been the subject of previous Meteor Beliefs Project examinations.

  5. Core Intuitions About Persons Coexist and Interfere With Acquired Christian Beliefs About God.

    PubMed

    Barlev, Michael; Mermelstein, Spencer; German, Tamsin C

    2016-11-24

    This study tested the hypothesis that in the minds of adult religious adherents, acquired beliefs about the extraordinary characteristics of God coexist with, rather than replace, an initial representation of God formed by co-option of the evolved person concept. In three experiments, Christian religious adherents were asked to evaluate a series of statements for which core intuitions about persons and acquired Christian beliefs about God were consistent (i.e., true according to both [e.g., "God has beliefs that are true"] or false according to both [e.g., "All beliefs God has are false"]) or inconsistent (i.e., true on intuition but false theologically [e.g., "God has beliefs that are false"] or false on intuition but true theologically [e.g., "All beliefs God has are true"]). Participants were less accurate and slower to respond to inconsistent versus consistent statements, suggesting that the core intuitions both coexisted alongside and interfered with the acquired beliefs (Experiments 1 and 2). In Experiment 2 when responding under time pressure participants were disproportionately more likely to make errors on inconsistent versus consistent statements than when responding with no time pressure, suggesting that the resolution of interference requires cognitive resources the functioning of which decreases under cognitive load. In Experiment 3 a plausible alternative interpretation of these findings was ruled out by demonstrating that the response accuracy and time differences on consistent versus inconsistent statements occur for God-a supernatural religious entity-but not for a natural religious entity (a priest).

  6. The clash of Gods: changes in a patient's use of God representations.

    PubMed

    Lamothe, Ryan

    2009-01-01

    In this article, I argue that manifest and latent intrapsychic and interpersonal clashes of god representations, which are inextricably yoked to transference and countertransference communications, signify the patient's and therapist's personal realities and histories. More specifically, the therapist's conscious (relatively speaking) commitment to a god representation will not only shape his/her analytic attitude-as well as interpretations and noninterpretive interventions-it may also be implicated in a patient altering his/her use of god representations. I suggest further that one way to understand the process of psychoanalytic therapy is how both analyst and analysand tacitly face and answer the following questions: What God(s) orients my life and relationships? What God(s) represents subjugation, fear, and the loss of freedom? What God(s) have I repressed? What God(s) represents the possibility and experience of being alive and real with others? In the end, what God(s) will I choose to serve, to surrender to?

  7. God's Punishment for Sin?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiest, Walter E.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the issue of moral blame as it relates to the AIDS epidemic. Argues that regarding AIDS as divine punishment for immorality is ethically and theologically unsound, resulting in a poor response to the AIDS crisis. States that self-righteous moral judgment is an inappropriate and un-Christian reaction toward AIDS victims. (GEA)

  8. The need to belong can motivate belief in God.

    PubMed

    Gebauer, Jochen E; Maio, Gregory R

    2012-04-01

    The need to belong can motivate belief in God. In Study 1, 40 undergraduates read bogus astrophysics articles "proving" God's existence or not offering proof. Participants in the proof-for-God condition reported higher belief in God (compared to control) when they chronically imagined God as accepting but lower belief in God when they imagined God as rejecting. Additionally, in Study 2 (72 undergraduates), these effects did not occur when participants' belongingness need was satisfied by priming close others. Study 3 manipulated 79 Internet participants' image of God. Chronic believers in the God-is-rejecting condition reported lower religious behavioral intentions than chronic believers in the God-is-accepting condition, and this effect was mediated by lower desires for closeness with God. In Study 4 (106 Internet participants), chronic believers with an accepting image of God reported that their belief in God is motivated by belongingness needs.

  9. [Traffic accidents during the Roman empire: to go to the doctor o to the god?].

    PubMed

    Gourevitch, Danielle

    2012-01-01

    A few pages by Galen and an inscription from Roman Egypt testify to two psychological attitudes towards diseases and accidents: either you feel responsible and go to the doctor, or you think you are in the hands of some god.

  10. Talking about God with Trauma Survivors.

    PubMed

    Ross, Colin A

    2016-12-31

    Severe, chronic childhood trauma commonly results in a set of negative core self-beliefs. These include blaming the self for the abuse, feeling unworthy and unlovable, believing the world would be better off if one committed suicide, and believing that one does not deserve peace or happiness. Linked to these cognitive errors are beliefs that one is not worthy of God's love, that God wanted the person to be abused, and that the person can avoid God's judgment if she does not go to church. Strategies for dealing with these cognitive errors about God are presented within the context of a secular psychotherapy.

  11. Humanitarian response: improving logistics to save lives.

    PubMed

    McCoy, Jessica

    2008-01-01

    Each year, millions of people worldwide are affected by disasters, underscoring the importance of effective relief efforts. Many highly visible disaster responses have been inefficient and ineffective. Humanitarian agencies typically play a key role in disaster response (eg, procuring and distributing relief items to an affected population, assisting with evacuation, providing healthcare, assisting in the development of long-term shelter), and thus their efficiency is critical for a successful disaster response. The field of disaster and emergency response modeling is well established, but the application of such techniques to humanitarian logistics is relatively recent. This article surveys models of humanitarian response logistics and identifies promising opportunities for future work. Existing models analyze a variety of preparation and response decisions (eg, warehouse location and the distribution of relief supplies), consider both natural and manmade disasters, and typically seek to minimize cost or unmet demand. Opportunities to enhance the logistics of humanitarian response include the adaptation of models developed for general disaster response; the use of existing models, techniques, and insights from the literature on commercial supply chain management; the development of working partnerships between humanitarian aid organizations and private companies with expertise in logistics; and the consideration of behavioral factors relevant to a response. Implementable, realistic models that support the logistics of humanitarian relief can improve the preparation for and the response to disasters, which in turn can save lives.

  12. "God Gave Us Two Ears and One Mouth for a Reason": Building on Cultural Wealth through a Call-and-Response Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marsh, Tyson E. J.; Desai, Shiv

    2012-01-01

    As presented by Lee and Majors (2003), "The use of call and response is a familiar structure [within communities of color] for sustaining talk, for communicating perspective, and for marking engagement" (p. 64). In this paper we delineate the need for a call-and-response pedagogy in engaging students of color in a responsive, critically…

  13. God and the Welfare State - Substitutes or Complements? An Experimental Test of the Effect of Belief in God's Control.

    PubMed

    Be'ery, Gilad; Ben-Nun Bloom, Pazit

    2015-01-01

    Belief in God's control of the world is common to many of the world's religions, but there are conflicting predictions regarding its role in shaping attitudes toward the welfare state. While the devout are expected to support pro-social values like helping others, and thus might be supportive of the welfare state, the possibility of taking action is undermined by the belief in God's absolute control over world affairs and in a morally perfect providence, who is responsible for the fates of individuals. As the literature provides mixed results on this question, this study examines the role of belief in God's control on welfare attitudes using three priming experiments and two priming tasks, carried out with a design that is both cross-cultural (US vs. Israel) and cross-religious tradition (Judaism vs. Catholicism). We find evidence that, largely, belief in God's control increases support for income redistribution among Israeli Jews (study 1), American Jews (study 2), and American Catholics (study 3). The findings suggest that the traditional and common political gap between the economic left and the religious, based on the evaluation that religious beliefs lead to conservative economic preferences, may be overstated.

  14. Stress and depression among older residents in religious monasteries: do friends and God matter?

    PubMed

    Bishop, Alex J

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to explore how friendship and attach-0 ment to God provide protective benefits against stress and depression. Participants included 235 men and women, age 64 and older, residing in religious monasteries affiliated with the Order of St. Benedict. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses were completed to assess main and moderating effects of friendship and attachment to God relative to the influence of stress on depressive symptomology. Lower degree of friendship closeness (beta = -.12, p < .10) and greater insecurity with God (beta = -.15, p < .01) were directly associated with greater depressive symptoms. A significant three-way interaction (Stress x Friendship x Attachment to God) also existed relative to depressive symptoms (beta = .14, p < .05). Three "stress-buffering" mechanisms emerged relative to the influence of stress on depressive symptomology. First, a greater degree of friendship closeness in combination with less secure attachment to God represented a greater risk for depressive symptoms. Second, greater friendship closeness in combination with greater secure attachment to God reduced the risk for depressive symptoms. Third, lower degree of friendship closeness combined with less secure attachment to God diminished the noxious effects of stress on depressive symptoms. This has implications relative to how social and spiritual resources can be used to reduce stress and improve quality of life for older adults residing in religious communities.

  15. How Children and Adults Represent God's Mind

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heiphetz, Larisa; Lane, Jonathan D.; Waytz, Adam; Young, Liane L.

    2016-01-01

    For centuries, humans have contemplated the minds of gods. Research on religious cognition is spread across sub-disciplines, making it difficult to gain a complete understanding of how people reason about gods' minds. We integrate approaches from cognitive, developmental, and social psychology and neuroscience to illuminate the origins of…

  16. Attachment to God, Images of God, and Psychological Distress in a Nationwide Sample of Presbyterians.

    PubMed

    Bradshaw, Matt; Ellison, Christopher G; Marcum, Jack P

    2010-01-01

    Drawing broadly on insights from attachment theory, the present study outlines a series of theoretical arguments linking styles of attachment to God, perceptions of the nature of God (i.e., God imagery), and stressful life events with psychological distress. Main effects and potential stress-moderator effects are then evaluated using data from a nationwide sample of elders and rank-and-file members of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.). Key findings indicate that secure attachment to God is inversely associated with distress, whereas both anxious attachment to God and stressful life events are positively related to distress. Once variations in patterns of attachment to God are controlled, there are no net effects of God imagery on levels of distress. There is only modest support for the hypothesis that God images moderate the effects of stressful life events on psychological distress, but no stress-moderator effects were found for attachment to God. Study limitations are identified, and findings are discussed in terms of their implications for religion-health research, as well as recent extensions of attachment theory.

  17. Evolution is God's Method of Creation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Denack, Julia

    1973-01-01

    The scheme of evolution proposed by de Chardin encompasses the views of both creationists and evolutionists. Evolution is explained as act of God and the basic form of development of life from primordal matter. (PS)

  18. Image of God, religion, spirituality, and life changes in breast cancer survivors: a qualitative approach.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Judith A; Edward, Jean

    2015-04-01

    Religion and spirituality are much studied coping mechanisms; however, their relationship to changes in behaviors, relationships, and goals is unclear. This study explored the impact of a breast cancer diagnosis on religion/faith and changes in behaviors, relationship, or goals. In this qualitative study, women, who participated in a larger, quantitative study, completed written responses to questions regarding the role of religion/faith in their lives, the impact of their diagnosis on their image of God and on faith/religious beliefs, and any changes in behaviors, relationships, or life goals were examined. Based on previous findings noting differences in psychological outcomes based on a higher (HE) or lesser (LE) engaged view of God, 28 (14 HE; 14 LE) women were included in the analysis. Awareness of life and its fleeting nature was common to all. Ensuing behaviors varied from a need to focus on self-improvement-egocentrism (LE)-to a need to focus on using their experiences to help others-altruism (HE). Study results suggest that seemingly small, but highly meaningful, differences based on one's worldview result in considerably different attitudinal and behavioral outcomes.

  19. Improving Ecological Response Monitoring of Environmental Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Alison J.; Gawne, Ben; Beesley, Leah; Koehn, John D.; Nielsen, Daryl L.; Price, Amina

    2015-05-01

    Environmental flows are now an important restoration technique in flow-degraded rivers, and with the increasing public scrutiny of their effectiveness and value, the importance of undertaking scientifically robust monitoring is now even more critical. Many existing environmental flow monitoring programs have poorly defined objectives, nonjustified indicator choices, weak experimental designs, poor statistical strength, and often focus on outcomes from a single event. These negative attributes make them difficult to learn from. We provide practical recommendations that aim to improve the performance, scientific robustness, and defensibility of environmental flow monitoring programs. We draw on the literature and knowledge gained from working with stakeholders and managers to design, implement, and monitor a range of environmental flow types. We recommend that (1) environmental flow monitoring programs should be implemented within an adaptive management framework; (2) objectives of environmental flow programs should be well defined, attainable, and based on an agreed conceptual understanding of the system; (3) program and intervention targets should be attainable, measurable, and inform program objectives; (4) intervention monitoring programs should improve our understanding of flow-ecological responses and related conceptual models; (5) indicator selection should be based on conceptual models, objectives, and prioritization approaches; (6) appropriate monitoring designs and statistical tools should be used to measure and determine ecological response; (7) responses should be measured within timeframes that are relevant to the indicator(s); (8) watering events should be treated as replicates of a larger experiment; (9) environmental flow outcomes should be reported using a standard suite of metadata. Incorporating these attributes into future monitoring programs should ensure their outcomes are transferable and measured with high scientific credibility.

  20. Improving ecological response monitoring of environmental flows.

    PubMed

    King, Alison J; Gawne, Ben; Beesley, Leah; Koehn, John D; Nielsen, Daryl L; Price, Amina

    2015-05-01

    Environmental flows are now an important restoration technique in flow-degraded rivers, and with the increasing public scrutiny of their effectiveness and value, the importance of undertaking scientifically robust monitoring is now even more critical. Many existing environmental flow monitoring programs have poorly defined objectives, nonjustified indicator choices, weak experimental designs, poor statistical strength, and often focus on outcomes from a single event. These negative attributes make them difficult to learn from. We provide practical recommendations that aim to improve the performance, scientific robustness, and defensibility of environmental flow monitoring programs. We draw on the literature and knowledge gained from working with stakeholders and managers to design, implement, and monitor a range of environmental flow types. We recommend that (1) environmental flow monitoring programs should be implemented within an adaptive management framework; (2) objectives of environmental flow programs should be well defined, attainable, and based on an agreed conceptual understanding of the system; (3) program and intervention targets should be attainable, measurable, and inform program objectives; (4) intervention monitoring programs should improve our understanding of flow-ecological responses and related conceptual models; (5) indicator selection should be based on conceptual models, objectives, and prioritization approaches; (6) appropriate monitoring designs and statistical tools should be used to measure and determine ecological response; (7) responses should be measured within timeframes that are relevant to the indicator(s); (8) watering events should be treated as replicates of a larger experiment; (9) environmental flow outcomes should be reported using a standard suite of metadata. Incorporating these attributes into future monitoring programs should ensure their outcomes are transferable and measured with high scientific credibility.

  1. Improving Science Communication with Responsive Web Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilverda, M.

    2013-12-01

    the world use low-bandwidth connections. Communicating science effectively includes efficient delivery of the information to the reader. To meet this criteria, responsive designs should also incorporate "mobile first" elements such as serving ideal image sizes (a low resolution cell phone does not need to receive a large desktop image) and a focus on fast, readable content delivery. The technical implementation of responsive web design is constantly changing as new web standards and approaches become available. However, fundamental design principles such as grid layouts, clear typography, and proper use of white space should be an important part of content delivery within any responsive design. This presentation will discuss current responsive design approaches for improving scientific communication across multiple devices, operating systems, and bandwidth capacities. The presentation will also include example responsive designs for scientific papers and websites. Implementing a responsive design approach with a focus on content and fundamental design principles is an important step to ensuring scientific information remains clear and accessible as screens and devices continue to evolve.

  2. A journey toward wholeness, a journey to God: physical fitness as embodied spirituality.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, Tracey C; Delgado, Teresa

    2013-09-01

    Physical fitness expressed through exercise can be, if done with the right intention, a form of spiritual discipline that reflects the relational love of humanity to God as well as an expression of a healthy love of the embodied self. Through an analysis of the physiological benefits of exercise science applied to the human body, this paper will demonstrate how such attention to the optimal physical fitness of the body, including weight and cardiovascular training and nutrition, is an affirmation of three foundational theological principles of human embodiment: as created in the "imago Dei", as unified body/spirit, and as part of God's creation calling for proper stewardship. In a contemporary climate where women's bodies in particular are viewed through the lens of commodification-as visual objects for sale based on prescribed notions of superficial esthetics and beauty-as well as the consistently high rates of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, and obesity, authors Greenwood and Delgado offer a vision of how women and men can imagine a subjective relationship with their own bodies that reflects the abundant love of God for God's creation. Spoken from the lived experience of professional fitness competitor and trainer, as well as trained biokineticist, Dr. Greenwood presents the most current scientific data in the field of biokinetics that grounds the theological analysis offered by Dr. Delgado, whose personal journey through anorexia and scholarly emphasis on Christian theological anthropology inform this work. Taken together, Greenwood and Delgado suggest a response to God's love for humanity, including our physical bodily humanity, which entails a responsibility to attend to the physical fitness of our bodies in order to live into the fullness, flourishing and love of God's creation as God intended.

  3. Is God just a big person? Children's conceptions of God across cultures and religious traditions.

    PubMed

    Nyhof, Melanie A; Johnson, Carl N

    2017-03-01

    The present research examines the influence of intuitive cognitive domain and religion on the God concepts of children growing up in religious traditions that present God in ways varying from abstract to concrete. In Study 1, we compared children from a Latter-Day Saints (LDS) background with those from mainstream Christian (MC) backgrounds in the United States. In contrast to MC theology that holds that God is all-knowing, all-powerful, and disembodied, LDS theology depicts God as embodied. In Study 1, 3- to 7-year-olds from LDS and MC backgrounds were asked about supernatural mental and immaterial attributes of God, a ghost, a dad, and a bug. In Study 2, children ages 3-7 from Muslim and Catholic backgrounds in Indonesia were presented with a variant of Study 1. Taken together, the two studies examine the God concepts of children raised in three different religious traditions with God concepts that range from highly abstract to concrete. Overall, we find that the youngest children, regardless of religion, distinguish God from humans and hold similar ideas of God, attributing more supernatural psychological than physical properties. Older children's conceptions of God are more in line with the theological notions of their traditions. The results suggest that children are not simply anthropomorphic in their God concepts, but early on understand supernatural agents as having special mental properties and they continue to learn about differences between agents, influenced by their religious traditions. Statement of contribution What is already known on this subject Research on children's God concepts has established that children begin to distinguish the mind of God from that of humans by around age 4-5. The main debate in the field is whether children start out thinking about God in anthropomorphic terms or whether they start out with an undifferentiated idea of agents' minds as all having access to knowledge. Research on children's understanding of immortality has

  4. Fabrication of glucose fiber sensor based on immobilized GOD technique for rapid measurement.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ting-Qian; Lu, Yin-Lin; Hsu, Cheng-Chih

    2010-12-20

    The concentration and pH value of the immobilized glucose oxidase (GOD) are critical parameters in a glucose sensor. In this study, we develop a glucose fiber sensor integrated with heterodyne interferometry to measure the phase difference arising from the chemical reaction between glucose and GOD. Our studies show that the response time and resolution of this sensor will be strongly affected by the pH and concentration properties of GOD. In addition, the results show good linearity between the calibration curve for the glucose solution and serum based sample. The response time of this sensor can be shorter than 3 seconds and best resolutions are 0.1 and 0.136 mg/dl for glucose solution and serum based sample, respectively.

  5. Destroying False Images of God: the Experiences of LGBT Catholics.

    PubMed

    Deguara, Angele

    2017-04-10

    This paper is about how lesbian, gay, bisexual and trans (LGBT) Catholics imagine God1(1) and how images of God change in parallel with their self-image. The study is based on qualitative research with LGBT Catholics most of whom are members of Drachma LGBTI in Malta or Ali d'Aquila in Palermo, Sicily. LGBT Catholics' image of God changes as they struggle to reconcile their religious and sexual identities, as they go through a process of "conversion" from deviants and sinners to loved children of God. One study participant compares his faith in God to peeling an onion: "With every layer one peels off, one destroys false images of God." Most study participants have moved away from the image of God of a bearded old man and father of creation and moved more towards a conception of God as love once identity conflicts are resolved.

  6. When god sanctions killing: effect of scriptural violence on aggression.

    PubMed

    Bushman, Brad J; Ridge, Robert D; Das, Enny; Key, Colin W; Busath, Gregory L

    2007-03-01

    Violent people often claim that God sanctions their actions. In two studies, participants read a violent passage said to come from either the Bible or an ancient scroll. For half the participants, the passage said that God sanctioned the violence. Next, participants competed with an ostensible partner on a task in which the winner could blast the loser with loud noise through headphones (the aggression measure). Study 1 involved Brigham Young University students; 99% believed in God and in the Bible. Study 2 involved Vrije Universiteit-Amsterdam students; 50% believed in God, and 27% believed in the Bible. In Study 1, aggression increased when the passage was from the Bible or mentioned God. In Study 2, aggression increased when the passage mentioned God, especially among participants who believed in God and in the Bible. These results suggest that scriptural violence sanctioned by God can increase aggression, especially in believers.

  7. John of God: an enigma for the medical sciences.

    PubMed

    Bonilla, Ernesto

    2014-12-01

    Some cures carried out by Medium João Teixeira de Faría (John of God) are presented. He claims to channel spiritual entities (Drs. Augusto de Almeida, Oswaldo Cruz, and José Valdivino) that have instantaneous access to the physical, emotional and spiritual history of each patient who is then treated by physical or "spiritual" surgeries, herbs, meditation, prayers and the ingestion of "energized" water. People operated on have no pain during the interventions and infections have not been observed. The mechanisms responsible for the healings are unknown.

  8. [Gods, women and pharmacy in Greek Mythology].

    PubMed

    Vons, J

    2001-01-01

    The study of Greek Mythology fully justifies Herophilus's phrase: "Medicines are the hands of Gods" (third cent. B.C.). A number of Gods are said to be the inventors of the drugs which are useful to men. Their names are still alive in the scholarly or popular appellations of a great many medicinal herbs. However, insofar as the action of a drug (of a Pharmakon) remains mysterious, one finds it in essentially female practices as well as in medicine. The study of these ancient beliefs, which have survived in spite of the progress of twentieth century science, can develop the history of epistemology of pharmacy by stimulating interdisciplinary research.

  9. From Anticipatory Corpse to Posthuman God.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Jeffrey P

    2016-12-01

    The essays in this issue of JMP are devoted to critical engagement of my book, The Anticipatory Corpse The essays, for the most part, accept the main thrust of my critique of medicine. The main thrust of the criticism is whether the scope of the critique is too totalizing, and whether the proposed remedy is sufficient. I greatly appreciate these interventions because they allow me this occasion to respond and clarify, and to even further extend the argument of my book. In this response essay, I maintain that the regnant social imaginary of medicine is the regnant social imaginary of our time. It is grounded in a specific ontotheology: where ontology is a power ontology; where material is malleable to the open-ended organization of power and dependent only on working out the efficient mechanisms of its enactment; where ethically it is oriented only to the immanent telos of utility maximization in the short run, and ultimately to some posthuman future in the long run. This ontotheology originates in the anticipatory corpse and is ordered toward some god-like posthuman being. The entire ontotheology finds enactment through the political economy of neoliberalism. This social imaginary constantly works to insulate itself from other social imaginaries through the use of its institutional power, through marginalization, circumscription, or absorption. The modern social imaginary of neoliberal societies marginalizes and politically isolates other social imaginaries, or transforms them into something acceptable to the neoliberal imaginary. Yet, these other social imaginaries could influence the larger social imaginary in novel ways, sometimes through withdrawal and sometimes through challenges. These other practices-again, usually practices ordered according to different ontological and teleological purposes-might serve as a source of renewal and transformation, but only if the practitioners of these other social imaginaries understand the ontotheological powers that they

  10. Playing God in Frankenstein's Footsteps: Synthetic Biology and the Meaning of Life.

    PubMed

    van den Belt, Henk

    2009-12-01

    The emergent new science of synthetic biology is challenging entrenched distinctions between, amongst others, life and non-life, the natural and the artificial, the evolved and the designed, and even the material and the informational. Whenever such culturally sanctioned boundaries are breached, researchers are inevitably accused of playing God or treading in Frankenstein's footsteps. Bioethicists, theologians and editors of scientific journals feel obliged to provide an authoritative answer to the ambiguous question of the 'meaning' of life, both as a scientific definition and as an explication with wider existential connotations. This article analyses the arguments mooted in the emerging societal debates on synthetic biology and the way its practitioners respond to criticism, mostly by assuming a defiant posture or professing humility. It explores the relationship between the 'playing God' theme and the Frankenstein motif and examines the doctrinal status of the 'playing God' argument. One particularly interesting finding is that liberal theologians generally deny the religious character of the 'playing God' argument-a response which fits in with the curious fact that this argument is used mainly by secular organizations. Synthetic biology, it is therefore maintained, does not offend so much the God of the Bible as a deified Nature. While syntheses of artificial life forms cause some vague uneasiness that life may lose its special meaning, most concerns turn out to be narrowly anthropocentric. As long as synthetic biology creates only new microbial life and does not directly affect human life, it will in all likelihood be considered acceptable.

  11. Closeness to God among those doing God's work: a spiritual well-being measure for clergy.

    PubMed

    Proeschold-Bell, Rae Jean; Yang, Chongming; Toth, Matthew; Corbitt Rivers, Monica; Carder, Kenneth

    2014-06-01

    Measuring spiritual well-being among clergy is particularly important given the high relevance of God to their lives, and yet its measurement is prone to problems such as ceiling effects and conflating religious behaviors with spiritual well-being. To create a measure of closeness to God for Christian clergy, we tested survey items at two time points with 1,513 United Methodist Church clergy. The confirmatory factor analysis indicated support for two, six-item factors: Presence and Power of God in Daily Life, and Presence and Power of God in Ministry. The data supported the predictive and concurrent validity of the two factors and evidenced high reliabilities without ceiling effects. This Clergy Spiritual Well-being Scale may be useful to elucidate the relationship among dimensions of health and well-being in clergy populations.

  12. Big Gods: Extended prosociality or group binding?

    PubMed

    Galen, Luke W

    2016-01-01

    Big Gods are described as having a "prosocial" effect. However, this conflates parochialism (group cohesion) with cooperation extended to strangers or out-group members. An examination of the cited experimental studies indicates that religion is actually associated with increased within-group parochialism, rather than extended or universal prosociality, and that the same general mechanisms underlie both religious and secular effects.

  13. Provide History of Religion and God

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ginex, Nicholas P.

    2013-01-01

    There is a need for high school, college, and university educators to introduce their students to a history of mankind's development of religions and beliefs in God. Regarded as too sensitive a subject, students are deprived of learning how mankind has evolved ways to establish moral and righteous behavior to maintain harmony among competing…

  14. Doing God in a Liberal Democracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moulin, Daniel; Robson, James

    2012-01-01

    While we agree with Cooling's argument from fairness, we argue that Cooling fails to give an adequate account of how fairness can be conceived, particularly because he does not decisively tackle the issues surrounding doing God in a plural context, or the contentious issues of compulsory collective worship and faith schools. In order to explore an…

  15. Myths and Gods of Ancient Mexico.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rascon, Vincent P.

    Intended to help Americans of Mexican descent understand their rich cultural heritage, this portfolio contains 12 full-color drawings of the myths and gods of the Olmecs and Toltecs of Ancient Mexico. These original drawings are by Vincent P. Rascon. Information captions in English and Spanish are given for each drawing which is printed on heavy…

  16. Outsourcing punishment to God: beliefs in divine control reduce earthly punishment.

    PubMed

    Laurin, Kristin; Shariff, Azim F; Henrich, Joseph; Kay, Aaron C

    2012-08-22

    The sanctioning of norm-transgressors is a necessary--though often costly--task for maintaining a well-functioning society. Prior to effective and reliable secular institutions for punishment, large-scale societies depended on individuals engaging in 'altruistic punishment'--bearing the costs of punishment individually, for the benefit of society. Evolutionary approaches to religion suggest that beliefs in powerful, moralizing Gods, who can distribute rewards and punishments, emerged as a way to augment earthly punishment in large societies that could not effectively monitor norm violations. In five studies, we investigate whether such beliefs in God can replace people's motivation to engage in altruistic punishment, and their support for state-sponsored punishment. Results show that, although religiosity generally predicts higher levels of punishment, the specific belief in powerful, intervening Gods reduces altruistic punishment and support for state-sponsored punishment. Moreover, these effects are specifically owing to differences in people's perceptions that humans are responsible for punishing wrongdoers.

  17. Healing and Belonging: Godly Play in Pediatric Medicine and the Theology of Disability.

    PubMed

    Eddins, Sharon Lynn; Grogan, Nancy; Frick, Brandon

    2014-09-01

    Godly Play can serve as an effective therapeutic and spiritual intervention for children experiencing physical, emotional, and/or spiritual stress. As many pediatric healthcare providers note, this type of intervention is an important component to a child's healing. This article situates Wolfson Children's Hospital's practice of Godly Play within two larger discussions that advocate for improved care for children with mental and physical impairments and concludes that this practice provides insight for the church and society to create a world in which children with mental and physical impairments belong.

  18. Beliefs about God and mental health among American adults.

    PubMed

    Silton, Nava R; Flannelly, Kevin J; Galek, Kathleen; Ellison, Christopher G

    2014-10-01

    This study examines the association between beliefs about God and psychiatric symptoms in the context of Evolutionary Threat Assessment System Theory, using data from the 2010 Baylor Religion Survey of US Adults (N = 1,426). Three beliefs about God were tested separately in ordinary least squares regression models to predict five classes of psychiatric symptoms: general anxiety, social anxiety, paranoia, obsession, and compulsion. Belief in a punitive God was positively associated with four psychiatric symptoms, while belief in a benevolent God was negatively associated with four psychiatric symptoms, controlling for demographic characteristics, religiousness, and strength of belief in God. Belief in a deistic God and one's overall belief in God were not significantly related to any psychiatric symptoms.

  19. In the Classroom: Gifted Students, Philosophy--and the Existence of God.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, David A.

    2000-01-01

    This article discusses the use of the philosophical argument from design as a demonstration of the existence of God with gifted students in grades 6-8. It explains how this argument, originated by Thomas Aquinas, is presented to students and also describes student responses and curricular integration of Aquinas'"fifth way" into language arts,…

  20. Cytomegalovirus infection improves immune responses to influenza

    PubMed Central

    Furman, David; Jojic, Vladimir; Sharma, Shalini; Shen-Orr, Shai; Angel, Cesar J Lopez; Onengut-Gumuscu, Suna; Kidd, Brian; Maecker, Holden T; Concannon, Patrick; Dekker, Cornelia L; Thomas, Paul G; Davis, Mark M

    2015-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a beta-herpes virus present in a latent form in most people worldwide. In immunosuppressed individuals, CMV can reactivate and cause serious clinical complications, but the effect of the latent state on healthy people remains elusive. We undertook a systems approach to understand the differences between seropositive and negative subjects and measured hundreds of immune system components from blood samples including cytokines and chemokines, immune cell phenotyping, gene expression, ex vivo cell responses to cytokine stimuli and the antibody response to seasonal influenza vaccination. As expected, we found decreased responses to vaccination and an overall down-regulation of immune components in aged individuals regardless of CMV serostatus. In contrast, CMV-infected young adults exhibited an overall up-regulation of immune components including enhanced antibody responses to influenza vaccination, increased CD8+ T cell sensitivity, and elevated levels of circulating IFN-γ compared to uninfected individuals. Experiments with young mice infected with murine CMV also showed significant protection from an influenza virus challenge compared with uninfected animals, although this effect declined with time. These data show that CMV and its murine equivalent can have a beneficial effect on the immune response of young, healthy individuals, which may explain the continued coexistence of CMV and mammals throughout their evolution. PMID:25834109

  1. Social Responsibility as an Ethical Imperative in Performance Improvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatcher, Tim

    2003-01-01

    The relationship between social responsibility, ethics, and performance improvement has not been seriously or rigorously addressed in related literature or in professional dialogue. Examining the issue of social responsibility as an ethical imperative within performance improvement as a profession demands an understanding and rigorous examination…

  2. An Improved Analytic Model for Microdosimeter Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shinn, Judy L.; Wilson, John W.; Xapsos, Michael A.

    2001-01-01

    An analytic model used to predict energy deposition fluctuations in a microvolume by ions through direct events is improved to include indirect delta ray events. The new model can now account for the increase in flux at low lineal energy when the ions are of very high energy. Good agreement is obtained between the calculated results and available data for laboratory ion beams. Comparison of GCR (galactic cosmic ray) flux between Shuttle TEPC (tissue equivalent proportional counter) flight data and current calculations draws a different assessment of developmental work required for the GCR transport code (HZETRN) than previously concluded.

  3. OMG Earthquake! Can Twitter improve earthquake response?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Earle, P. S.; Guy, M.; Ostrum, C.; Horvath, S.; Buckmaster, R. A.

    2009-12-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is investigating how the social networking site Twitter, a popular service for sending and receiving short, public, text messages, can augment its earthquake response products and the delivery of hazard information. The goal is to gather near real-time, earthquake-related messages (tweets) and provide geo-located earthquake detections and rough maps of the corresponding felt areas. Twitter and other social Internet technologies are providing the general public with anecdotal earthquake hazard information before scientific information has been published from authoritative sources. People local to an event often publish information within seconds via these technologies. In contrast, depending on the location of the earthquake, scientific alerts take between 2 to 20 minutes. Examining the tweets following the March 30, 2009, M4.3 Morgan Hill earthquake shows it is possible (in some cases) to rapidly detect and map the felt area of an earthquake using Twitter responses. Within a minute of the earthquake, the frequency of “earthquake” tweets rose above the background level of less than 1 per hour to about 150 per minute. Using the tweets submitted in the first minute, a rough map of the felt area can be obtained by plotting the tweet locations. Mapping the tweets from the first six minutes shows observations extending from Monterey to Sacramento, similar to the perceived shaking region mapped by the USGS “Did You Feel It” system. The tweets submitted after the earthquake also provided (very) short first-impression narratives from people who experienced the shaking. Accurately assessing the potential and robustness of a Twitter-based system is difficult because only tweets spanning the previous seven days can be searched, making a historical study impossible. We have, however, been archiving tweets for several months, and it is clear that significant limitations do exist. The main drawback is the lack of quantitative information

  4. Good God?!? Lamentations as a model for mourning the loss of the good God.

    PubMed

    Houck-Loomis, Tiffany

    2012-09-01

    This article will address the devastating psychological and social effects due to the loss of one's primary love-object, namely God in the case of faith communities and religious individuals. By using Melanie Klein's Object Relations Theory (Klein in Envy and gratitude and other works 1946/1963. The Free Press, New York, 1975a) as a way to enter the text of Lamentations, I will articulate an alternative reading that can serve as a model for Pastors and Educators to use when walking with individuals and communities through unspeakable losses. I will argue that Lamentations may be used as a tool for naming confounding depression and anxiety that stems from a damaged introjected object (one's personal God). This tool may provide individuals and communities a framework for placing anger and contempt upon God in order to re-assimilate this loved yet hated object, eventually leading toward healing and restoration of the self.

  5. Benevolent Images of God, Gratitude, and Physical Health Status.

    PubMed

    Krause, Neal; Emmons, Robert A; Ironson, Gail

    2015-08-01

    This study has two goals. The first is to assess whether a benevolent image of God is associated with better physical health. The second goal is to examine the aspects of congregational life that is associated with a benevolent image of God. Data from a new nationwide survey (N = 1774) are used to test the following core hypotheses: (1) people who attend worship services more often and individuals who receive more spiritual support from fellow church members (i.e., informal assistance that is intended to increase the religious beliefs and behaviors of the recipient) will have more benevolent images of God, (2) individuals who believe that God is benevolent will feel more grateful to God, (3) study participants who are more grateful to God will be more hopeful about the future, and (4) greater hope will be associated with better health. The data provide support for each of these relationships.

  6. Engineering Titanium for Improved Biological Response

    SciTech Connect

    Orme, C; Bearinger, J; Dimasi, E; Gilbert, J

    2002-01-23

    The human body and its aggressive environment challenge the survival of implanted foreign materials. Formidable biocompatibility issues arise from biological, chemical, electrical, and tribological origins. The body's electrolytic solution provides the first point of contact with any kind of implant, and is responsible for transport, healing, integration, or attack. Therefore, determining how to successfully control the integration of a biomaterial should begin with an analysis of the early interfacial dynamics involved. setting, a complicated feedback system of solution chemistry, pH, ions, and solubility exists. The introduction of a fixation device instantly confounds this system. The body is exposed to a range of voltages, and wear can bring about significant shifts in potentials across an implant. In the environment of a new implant the solution pH becomes acidic, ionic concentrations shift, cathodic currents can lead to corrosion, and oxygen levels can be depleted; all of these impact the ability of the implant to retain its protective oxide layer and to present a stable interface for the formation of a biolayer. Titanium has been used in orthopedic and maxilofacial surgery for many years due to its reputation as being biocompatible and its ability to osseointegrate. Osseointegration is defined as direct structural and functional connection between ordered, living bone, and the surface of a load carrying implant. Branemark discovered this phenomenon in the 60's while examining titanium juxtaposed to bone. The mechanism by which titanium and its passivating oxide encourage osseosynthetic activity remains unknown. However in general terms the oxide film serves two purposes: first to provide a kinetic barrier that prevents titanium from corroding and second to provide a substrate that allows the constituents of bone (calcium phosphate crystals, cells, proteins, and collagen) to bond to it. We believe that the electrochemical environment dictates the titanium

  7. Mothers' attachment security predicts their children's sense of God's closeness.

    PubMed

    Cassibba, Rosalinda; Granqvist, Pehr; Costantini, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    The current research reports that mothers' security of attachment predicts their children's sense of God's closeness. A total of 71 mother-child dyads participated (children's M age = 7.5). Mothers' attachment organization was studied with the Adult Attachment Interview (AAI; Main, Goldwyn, & Hesse, 2003 ) and their religiosity and attachment to God were measured with questionnaires. Children were told stories about visually represented children in attachment-activating and attachment-neutral situations, and placed a God symbol on a felt board to represent God's closeness to the fictional children. Children of secure mothers placed the God symbol closer (d = .78) than children of insecure mothers across both types of situations, suggesting that children's experiences with secure-insecure mothers generalize to their sense of God's closeness. Also, girls (but not boys) placed the God symbol closer in attachment-activating than in attachment-neutral situations, giving partial support for an attachment normative God-as-safe-haven model. Finally, mothers' religiosity and attachment to God were unrelated to child outcomes.

  8. God put a thought into my mind: the charismatic Christian experience of receiving communications from God

    PubMed Central

    Dein, Simon; Cook, Christopher C.H.

    2015-01-01

    The agentive aspects of communicative religious experiences remain somewhat neglected in the social sciences literature. There is a need for phenomenological descriptions of these experiences and the ways in which they differ from culturally defined psychopathological states. In this semi-structured interview study, eight congregants attending an evangelical church in London were asked to describe their experiences of God communicating with them. Communications from God were related to current events rather than to the prediction of future events. These communications were received as thoughts and do not generally reveal metaphysical insights, but rather they relate to the mundane world. They provided direction, consolation and empowerment in the lives of those receiving them. Individuals recounted that on occasion God sometimes speaks audibly, or accompanied by supernatural phenomena, but in the vast majority of cases, the way God speaks is through thoughts or impressions. In all instances, agency is maintained, individuals can choose to obey the thoughts/voices or not. The findings are discussed in relation to externalisation of agency and the phenomenon of thought insertion in schizophrenia. PMID:25999778

  9. God put a thought into my mind: the charismatic Christian experience of receiving communications from God.

    PubMed

    Dein, Simon; Cook, Christopher C H

    2015-02-07

    The agentive aspects of communicative religious experiences remain somewhat neglected in the social sciences literature. There is a need for phenomenological descriptions of these experiences and the ways in which they differ from culturally defined psychopathological states. In this semi-structured interview study, eight congregants attending an evangelical church in London were asked to describe their experiences of God communicating with them. Communications from God were related to current events rather than to the prediction of future events. These communications were received as thoughts and do not generally reveal metaphysical insights, but rather they relate to the mundane world. They provided direction, consolation and empowerment in the lives of those receiving them. Individuals recounted that on occasion God sometimes speaks audibly, or accompanied by supernatural phenomena, but in the vast majority of cases, the way God speaks is through thoughts or impressions. In all instances, agency is maintained, individuals can choose to obey the thoughts/voices or not. The findings are discussed in relation to externalisation of agency and the phenomenon of thought insertion in schizophrenia.

  10. A Paradigm to Assess Implicit Attitudes towards God: The Positive/Negative God Associations Task.

    PubMed

    Pirutinsky, Steven; Carp, Sean; Rosmarin, David H

    2017-02-01

    Psychological research on the relationship between spirituality/religion and mental health has grown considerably over the past several decades and now constitutes a sizable body of scholarship. Among dimensions of S/R, positive beliefs about God have been significantly related to better mental health outcomes, and conversely negative beliefs about God are generally associated with more distress. However, prior research on this topic has relied heavily upon self-report Likert-type scales, which are vulnerable to self-report biases and measure only explicit cognitive processes. In this study, we developed and validated an implicit social cognition task, the Positive/Negative God Go/No-go Association Task (PNG-GNAT), for use in psychological research on spirituality and religion (S/R). Preliminary evidence in a large sample (N = 381) suggests that the PNG-GNAT demonstrates internal consistency, test-retest and split-half reliability, and concurrent evidence of validity. Further, our results suggest that PNG-GNAT scores represent different underlying dimensions of S/R than explicit self-report measures, and incrementally predict mental health above and beyond self-report assessment. The PNG-GNAT appears to be an effective tool for measuring implicit positive/negative beliefs about God.

  11. Exploring God: Using the Arts as a Way to Engage Secondary Students in Discussions about God

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reingold, Matt

    2016-01-01

    The article presents research from a practitioner research study conducted in a non-denominational Jewish secondary school. As part of the study, students created artistic works based on chapter 12 of the biblical book of Numbers. Four of the twelve student groups created works that directly engaged with their conceptions of God as represented in…

  12. God Loves Us All: Helping Christians Know and Name God in a Post-Holocaust Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nienhaus, Cyndi

    2011-01-01

    Reflection on the Holocaust is still critical today to help all educators teach their students about good and evil in the world today. In particular, reflection on the Holocaust is crucial for religious educators to help people know and name God, as well as help them deal with questions of theodicy, within their everyday life experiences. This…

  13. Retirement Planning Among Hispanics: In God's Hands?

    PubMed

    Blanco, Luisa R; Aguila, Emma; Gongora, Arturo; Duru, O Kenrik

    2016-12-15

    We conducted a qualitative study on retirement preparedness among middle-aged and older low-income Hispanics in Los Angeles. Data were derived from four focus groups conducted in the greater Los Angeles area. Findings demonstrate how behavioral and cultural factors-family experiences, religiosity, and denial of retirement-explain the lack of savings and preparedness for retirement. Findings also indicate that the majority of participants want to be economically independent and to keep working until they are unable to do so. Participants helped their parents financially but did not feel comfortable asking their own children for help. Instead, participants placed their survival in retirement "in God's hands."

  14. Improved Notch Filter For Synchronous-Response Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Bruce G.; Downer, James R.; Eisenhaure, David B.; Hockney, Richard; Misovec, Kathleen

    1991-01-01

    Tracking differential-notch filter (TDNF) developed to retain good synchronous-response performance of notch filter, but with vastly improved stability properties. Measurement error perfectly filtered from feedback signal used to drive compensator. Provides good stability of simple lead/lag compensator combined with good synchronous-response performance gained by addition of notch filter.

  15. Rapid response teams: a proactive strategy for improving patient care.

    PubMed

    Garretson, Sharon; Rauzi, Mary Beth; Meister, Janice; Schuster, Janet

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation success rates have not changed in 30 years. Patient outcomes may improve if changes in a patient's condition are addressed at the onset of subtle deteriorations, rather than at the point of cardiac arrest. The rapid response team involves early intervention that demonstrates the ability to decrease cardiac arrest rates and improve patient mortality.

  16. Nearness to God: A Perspective on Islamic Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alavi, Hamid Reza

    2008-01-01

    Islam, as one of the most important religions of the world, has particular and significant educational views. The purpose of this article is to extract and interpret Islam's view of education. Using classic texts and the author's scholarship, Islamic education is defined as a form of religious education drawing humans near to God and God's…

  17. Man and His Gods, English, World Literature: 5114.58.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL.

    This curriculum guide examines man's relation to his gods--his fear, love, obedience, worship, and imitation of God--as demonstrated in print and nonprint sources. Classical, Judaeo-Christian, and other outlooks are considered. Reading includes such works as "Oedipus Rex,""The Odyssey," selections from the New Testament,…

  18. Mask of Black God: The Pleiades in Navajo Cosmology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schulz, Teresa M.

    2005-01-01

    One Navajo legend attributes the creation of the primary stars and constellations to Black God. Today, a famous star cluster--the Pleiades--often appears on the traditional mask worn by chanters impersonating Black God during special ceremonies. In this case study, students learn about the Pleiades in Navajo cosmology while honing their…

  19. Divine Intuition: Cognitive Style Influences Belief in God

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shenhav, Amitai; Rand, David G.; Greene, Joshua D.

    2012-01-01

    Some have argued that belief in God is intuitive, a natural (by-)product of the human mind given its cognitive structure and social context. If this is true, the extent to which one believes in God may be influenced by one's more general tendency to rely on intuition versus reflection. Three studies support this hypothesis, linking intuitive…

  20. [Playing God? Critical consideration of biotechnology].

    PubMed

    ter Schegget, G H

    2002-05-01

    The ethics must do justice to the man who can freely decide and should pose to him the proper questions that can lead to a good choice. 'Playing God' is out of the question, because the biblical God has taken the enchantment out of the creation and produced man for him to shape and keep her. The zygote is already a human being in gestation. But not all stages of gestation of man have the right to the same reverence. The end justifies the means. Reason why this growing respect should be weighed against the use and meaning of the modifying action. The goal should be human in order to have a justifiable effect. Man is not determined by his genes but conditioned by them: they are pliable. Prenatal diagnostic tests and cloning should not be allowed to lead to the moulding of an 'Ubermensch'. It is indeed not yet technologically possible. Germination technology is justifiable provided that it is safely performed. DNA-profiling for identification of criminals is allowed. If only the profile and not the DNA were kept one could consider making a profile-bank. The patenting of discoveries should not stop developing countries from getting cheap medicines (e.g. for AIDS). Not everything that is possible is also allowed. Every time the reason and the benefit should be weighed against the damage and there must be a humane authority.

  1. Improving Emergency Response and Human-Robotic Performance

    SciTech Connect

    David I. Gertman; David J. Bruemmer; R. Scott Hartley

    2007-08-01

    Preparedness for chemical, biological, and radiological/nuclear incidents at nuclear power plants (NPPs) includes the deployment of well trained emergency response teams. While teams are expected to do well, data from other domains suggests that the timeliness and accuracy associated with incident response can be improved through collaborative human-robotic interaction. Many incident response scenarios call for multiple, complex procedure-based activities performed by personnel wearing cumbersome personal protective equipment (PPE) and operating under high levels of stress and workload. While robotic assistance is postulated to reduce workload and exposure, limitations associated with communications and the robot’s ability to act independently have served to limit reliability and reduce our potential to exploit human –robotic interaction and efficacy of response. Recent work at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) on expanding robot capability has the potential to improve human-system response during disaster management and recovery. Specifically, increasing the range of higher level robot behaviors such as autonomous navigation and mapping, evolving new abstractions for sensor and control data, and developing metaphors for operator control have the potential to improve state-of-the-art in incident response. This paper discusses these issues and reports on experiments underway intelligence residing on the robot to enhance emergency response.

  2. African American Elders' Serious Illness Experiences: Narratives of "God Did," "God Will," and "Life Is Better".

    PubMed

    Coats, Heather; Crist, Janice D; Berger, Ann; Sternberg, Esther; Rosenfeld, Anne G

    2015-12-22

    The foundation of culturally sensitive patient-centered palliative care is formed from one's social, spiritual, psychological, and physical experiences of serious illness. The purpose of this study was to describe categories and patterns of psychological, social, and spiritual healing from the perspectives of aging seriously ill African American (AA) elders. Using narrative analysis methodology, 13 open-ended interviews were collected. Three main patterns were "prior experiences," "I changed," and "across past, present experiences and future expectations." Themes were categorized within each pattern: been through it . . . made me strong, I thought about . . . others, went down little hills . . . got me down, I grew stronger, changed priorities, do things I never would have done, quit doing, God did and will take care of me, close-knit relationships, and life is better. "Faith" in God helped the aging seriously ill AA elders "overcome things," whether their current illness or other life difficulties.

  3. The minds of gods: a comparative study of supernatural agency.

    PubMed

    Purzycki, Benjamin Grant

    2013-10-01

    The present work is the first study to systematically compare the minds of gods by examining some of the intuitive processes that guide how people reason about them. By examining the Christian god and the spirit-masters of the Tyva Republic, it first confirms that the consensus view of the Christian god's mind is one of omniscience with acute concern for interpersonal social behavior (i.e., moral behaviors) and that Tyvan spirit-masters are not as readily attributed with knowledge or concern of moral information. Then, it reports evidence of a moralization bias of gods' minds; American Christians who believe that God is omniscient rate God as more knowledgeable of moral behaviors than nonmoral information. Additionally, Tyvans who do not readily report pro- or antisocial behavior among the things that spirit-masters care about will nevertheless rate spirit-masters' knowledge and concern of moral information higher than nonmoral information. However, this knowledge is distributed spatially; the farther away from spirits' place of governance a moral behavior takes place, the less they know and care about it. Finally, the wider the breadth of knowledge Tyvans attribute to spirit-masters, the more they attribute moral concern for behaviors that transpire beyond their jurisdiction. These results further demonstrate that there is a significant gulf between expressed beliefs and intuitive religious cognition and provides evidence for a moralization bias of gods' minds.

  4. the God Particle & the Delusion of Grandeur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksoed, Wh-

    2016-11-01

    It had been established that it was crystalline The inner core is isolated from the rest of earth by the low-viscosity fluid outer core, and it can rotate, nod, precess, wobble, oscillate and even flip over, being only loosely constrained by the surrounding shells- Anderson, 2002. Furthers in accordances of PMRI from Dr.Robert K. Sembiring to ASTRANOMICS, herewith Richard Dawkins: "the God delusion" - 2006 ever quotes by the Rector of the University of INDONESIA 2006 HE. Mr. Prof. Dr.derSoz Gumilar Rusliwa SOMANTRI: "Beyond 'delusion of grandeur' menuju INDONESIA baru Bebas Kemiskinan"ever retrieves Lester G. Telser- 1994: "the Usefulness of Core Theory in Economics" - "core theory furnishes a useful framework for a wide variety of economic problems. It has an undeserved reputation of being too abstract owing mainly to the manner in which it is employed in the theory of general equilibrium." Heartfelt Gratitudes to HE. Mr. Prof. Ir. Handojo.

  5. Some strategies for improving caloric responses with ferroelectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Scott, James F.; Dkhil, Brahim

    2016-06-01

    Many important breakthroughs and significant engineering developments have been achieved during the past two decades in the field of caloric materials. In this review, we address ferroelectrics emerging as ideal materials which permit both giant elastocaloric and/or electrocaloric responses near room temperature. We summarize recent strategies for improving caloric responses using geometrical optimization, maximizing the number of coexisting phases, combining positive and negative caloric responses, introducing extra degree of freedom like mechanical stress/pressure, and multicaloric effect driven by either single stimulus or multiple stimuli. This review highlights the promising perspective of ferroelectrics for developing next-generation solid-state refrigeration.

  6. A Quasi Meta-Analysis of the God Concept Literature from 1970 to 1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giesbrecht, Norman

    This literature review examines the "God concept," defined as the "cognitive or affective internal psychological representation of God." Most religions have a conception of God. In this review relevant literature focused on: (1) conceptual representations of God; (2) factors related to or predictive of these representations;…

  7. Zora Neale Hurston's "Their Eyes Were Watching God" and the Influence of Jens Peter Jacobsen's "Marie Grubbe."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodson, Jon

    1992-01-01

    Argues that Harlem Renaissance literary figure, Zora Neale Hurston, may have written her novel of a three-times married woman, "Their Eyes Were Watching God," under the influence of and in response to "Marie Grubbe," a novel by a nineteenth-century Danish man. (JB)

  8. Harlem Connections: Teaching Walter Dean Myers'"Scorpions" with Paul Laurence Dunbar's "The Sport of the Gods."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Mark I.

    1999-01-01

    Describes how the author, in a course titled "Literature for Adolescents" paired Walter Dean Myers' 1988 young adult novel, "Scorpions," with Paul Laurence Dunbar's 1902 novel for adults, "The Sport of the Gods." Describes student readers' responses to the pair of books, which focus on the difficulties of growing up…

  9. Improving Completion Rates in Adult Education through Social Responsibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wahlgren, Bjarne; Mariager-Anderson, Kristina

    2017-01-01

    Dropout is a serious problem within education. This article reports on an intervention project, titled "New Roles for the Teacher--Increased Completion Rates Through Social Responsibility," which sought to reduce nonattendance and drop-out rates in the Danish adult educational system by improving teachers' competences. This goal was…

  10. Does God Make it Real? Children's Belief in Religious Stories from the Judeo-Christian Tradition

    PubMed Central

    Vaden, Victoria Cox; Woolley, Jacqueline D.

    2010-01-01

    Four- to 6-year-old children heard religious or non-religious stories and were questioned about their belief in the reality status of the story characters and events. Children had low to moderate levels of belief in the story characters and events. Children in the religious story condition had higher levels of belief in the reality of the story characters and events than did children in the non-religious condition; this relationship strengthened with age. Children who used God as an explanation for the events showed higher levels of belief in the factuality of those events. Story familiarity and family religiosity also affected children's responses. We conclude that God's involvement in a story influences children's belief in the reality of the characters and events in that story. PMID:21466542

  11. Does God make it real? Children's belief in religious stories from the Judeo-Christian tradition.

    PubMed

    Vaden, Victoria Cox; Woolley, Jacqueline D

    2011-01-01

    Four- to 6-year-old children (N = 131) heard religious or nonreligious stories and were questioned about their belief in the reality of the story characters and events. Children had low to moderate levels of belief in the characters and events. Children in the religious story condition had higher levels of belief in the reality of the characters and events than did children in the nonreligious condition; this relation strengthened with age. Children who used God as an explanation for the events showed higher levels of belief in the factuality of those events. Story familiarity and family religiosity also affected children's responses. The authors conclude that God's involvement in a story influences children's belief in the reality of the characters and events in that story.

  12. The Social Responsibility Performance Outcomes Model: Building Socially Responsible Companies through Performance Improvement Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatcher, Tim

    2000-01-01

    Considers the role of performance improvement professionals and human resources development professionals in helping organizations realize the ethical and financial power of corporate social responsibility. Explains the social responsibility performance outcomes model, which incorporates the concepts of societal needs and outcomes. (LRW)

  13. God and the search for meaning among hospice caregivers.

    PubMed

    Mickley, J R; Pargament, K I; Brant, C R; Hipp, K M

    1998-01-01

    The purposes of this study were (1) to describe both religious and nonreligious appraisals of caregiving for a terminally ill patient and (2) to explore the relationship between these appraisals with situational outcomes, mental health outcomes, and spiritual health outcomes in the caregivers. Ninety-two caregivers completed a questionnaire consisting of religious and nonreligious appraisals, general and religious outcomes, depression, anxiety, and purpose in life. Caregivers who appraised their situation as part of God's plan or as a means of gaining strength or understanding from God reported positive outcomes while caregivers who viewed their situation as unjust, as unfair punishment from God, or as desertion from God had low scores on mental and spiritual health outcomes. Religious appraisals made a significant and unique contribution to the prediction of situational outcomes and mental and spiritual health outcomes above and beyond the effects of nonreligious appraisals.

  14. 212. MOUNT SINAI CHURCH OF GOD AT 530 SOUTH TWENTIETH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    212. MOUNT SINAI CHURCH OF GOD AT 530 SOUTH TWENTIETH STREET, SOUTH SIDE - Russell Neighborhood, Bounded by Congress & Esquire Alley, Fifteenth & Twenty-first Streets, Louisville, Jefferson County, KY

  15. 1. STREETSCAPE VIEW OF COMMUNITY PARK KNOWN AS GOD'S LITTLE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. STREETSCAPE VIEW OF COMMUNITY PARK KNOWN AS GOD'S LITTLE ACRE, STONE WALL, AND APPROACH TO BRIDGE, FACING NORTH. - West Branch Bridge, South Carolina Road S-569 spanning West Branch of Pacolet River, Pacolet, Spartanburg County, SC

  16. Novel glucose fiber sensor combining ThFBG with GOD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Mengmeng; Zhou, Ciming; Fan, Dian; Ou, Yiwen

    2016-10-01

    We propose a novel glucose fiber optic sensor combining a thinned cladding fiber Bragg grating (ThFBG) with glucose oxidase (GOD). By immobilizing GOD on the surface of a ThFBG, the fabricated sensor can obtain a high specificity to glucose. Because of the evanescent field, the sensor is very sensitive to the ambient refractive index change arising from the catalytic reaction between glucose and GOD. A four-level fiber model was simulated and verified the precision of the sensing principle. Two methods, glutaraldehyde crosslinking method (GCM) and 3-aminopropyl triethoxysilane covalent coupling method (ATCCM), were experimentally utilized to immobilize GOD. And sensor fabricated with the method ATCCM shows a measurement range of 0-0.82 mg/mL which is better than the sensor fabricated with the method GCM with measurement range of 0-0.67 mg/mL under the same condition. By using ATCCM to immobilize GOD with different concentrations, three sensors were fabricated and used for glucose measurement by monitoring the Bragg wavelength (λb) shifts, the results indicate a good linear relationship between wavelength shift and glucose concentration within a specific range, and the measurement range increases as GOD concentration increases. The highest sensitivity of sensor reaches up to 0.0549 nm/(mg.mL-1). The proposed sensor has distinct advantages in sensing structure, cost and specificity.

  17. Attributes of God: Conceptual Foundations of a Foundational Belief.

    PubMed

    Shtulman, Andrew; Lindeman, Marjaana

    2016-04-01

    Anthropomorphism, or the attribution of human properties to nonhuman entities, is often posited as an explanation for the origin and nature of God concepts, but it remains unclear which human properties we tend to attribute to God and under what conditions. In three studies, participants decided whether two types of human properties-psychological (mind-dependent) properties and physiological (body-dependent) properties-could or could not be attributed to God. In Study 1 (n = 1,525), participants made significantly more psychological attributions than physiological attributions, and the frequency of those attributions was correlated both with participants' religiosity and with their attribution of abstract, theological properties. In Study 2 (n = 99) and Study 3 (n = 138), participants not only showed the same preference for psychological properties but were also significantly faster, more consistent, and more confident when attributing psychological properties to God than when attributing physiological properties. And when denying properties to God, they showed the reverse pattern-that is, they were slower, less consistent, and less confident when denying psychological properties than when denying physiological properties. These patterns were observed both in a predominantly Christian population (Study 2) and a predominantly Hindu population (Study 3). Overall, we argue that God is conceptualized not as a person in general but as an agent in particular, attributed a mind by default but attributed a body only upon further consideration.

  18. Outsourcing punishment to God: beliefs in divine control reduce earthly punishment

    PubMed Central

    Laurin, Kristin; Shariff, Azim F.; Henrich, Joseph; Kay, Aaron C.

    2012-01-01

    The sanctioning of norm-transgressors is a necessary—though often costly—task for maintaining a well-functioning society. Prior to effective and reliable secular institutions for punishment, large-scale societies depended on individuals engaging in ‘altruistic punishment’—bearing the costs of punishment individually, for the benefit of society. Evolutionary approaches to religion suggest that beliefs in powerful, moralizing Gods, who can distribute rewards and punishments, emerged as a way to augment earthly punishment in large societies that could not effectively monitor norm violations. In five studies, we investigate whether such beliefs in God can replace people's motivation to engage in altruistic punishment, and their support for state-sponsored punishment. Results show that, although religiosity generally predicts higher levels of punishment, the specific belief in powerful, intervening Gods reduces altruistic punishment and support for state-sponsored punishment. Moreover, these effects are specifically owing to differences in people's perceptions that humans are responsible for punishing wrongdoers. PMID:22628465

  19. Direct electrochemistry of GOD on nitrogen-doped porous carbon and its biosensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Min; Liu, Hongyu; Chen, Shouhui; Song, Yonghai; Wang, Li

    2014-11-01

    Nitrogen-doped porous carbon (N-DPC) was prepared via a simple and effective method and was characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, N2 adsorption-desorption isotherms and scanning electron microscopy. The results showed that the N-DPC with two type reticular porosities in an average diameter of 10-100 nm has a large specific surface area, which is favorable to immobilize the redox proteins for constructing biosensors. Direct electrochemistry of glucose oxidase (GOD) on the N-DPC-modified electrode was investigated. UV-vis spectroscopy showed that GOD retained its catalytic activity in the N-DPC film. Electrochemical results indicated that the modified electrode exhibited effective direct electron transfer. It demonstrated that such N-DPC could provide a good matrix for direct electrochemistry of enzymes. A novel biosensor was developed by entrapping GOD in the N-DPC-modified electrode for glucose detection and showed a stable, rapid, and reproducible electrocatalytic response, a high sensitivity, a wide linear range and a low detection limit. Moreover, the biosensor can be applied in practical analysis and exhibit good reproducibility and long-term stability.

  20. A Christian faith-based recovery theory: understanding God as sponsor.

    PubMed

    Timmons, Shirley M

    2012-12-01

    This article reports the development of a substantive theory to explain an evangelical Christian-based process of recovery from addiction. Faith-based, 12-step, mutual aid programs can improve drug abstinence by offering: (a) an intervention option alone and/or in conjunction with secular programs and (b) an opportunity for religious involvement. Although literature on religion, spirituality, and addiction is voluminous, traditional 12-step programs fail to explain the mechanism that underpins the process of Christian-based recovery (CR). This pilot study used grounded theory to explore and describe the essence of recovery of 10 former crack cocaine-addicted persons voluntarily enrolled in a CR program. Data were collected from in-depth interviews during 4 months of 2008. Audiotapes were transcribed verbatim, and the constant comparative method was used to analyze data resulting in the basic social process theory, understanding God as sponsor. The theory was determined through writing theoretical memos that generated key elements that allow persons to recover: acknowledging God-centered crises, communicating with God, and planning for the future. Findings from this preliminary study identifies important factors that can help persons in recovery to sustain sobriety and program administrators to benefit from theory that guides the development of evidence-based addiction interventions.

  1. Neutralization of Tumor Acidity Improves Antitumor Responses to Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Pilon-Thomas, Shari; Kodumudi, Krithika N; El-Kenawi, Asmaa E; Russell, Shonagh; Weber, Amy M; Luddy, Kimberly; Damaghi, Mehdi; Wojtkowiak, Jonathan W; Mulé, James J; Ibrahim-Hashim, Arig; Gillies, Robert J

    2016-03-15

    Cancer immunotherapies, such as immune checkpoint blockade or adoptive T-cell transfer, can lead to durable responses in the clinic, but response rates remain low due to undefined suppression mechanisms. Solid tumors are characterized by a highly acidic microenvironment that might blunt the effectiveness of antitumor immunity. In this study, we directly investigated the effects of tumor acidity on the efficacy of immunotherapy. An acidic pH environment blocked T-cell activation and limited glycolysis in vitro. IFNγ release blocked by acidic pH did not occur at the level of steady-state mRNA, implying that the effect of acidity was posttranslational. Acidification did not affect cytoplasmic pH, suggesting that signals transduced by external acidity were likely mediated by specific acid-sensing receptors, four of which are expressed by T cells. Notably, neutralizing tumor acidity with bicarbonate monotherapy impaired the growth of some cancer types in mice where it was associated with increased T-cell infiltration. Furthermore, combining bicarbonate therapy with anti-CTLA-4, anti-PD1, or adoptive T-cell transfer improved antitumor responses in multiple models, including cures in some subjects. Overall, our findings show how raising intratumoral pH through oral buffers therapy can improve responses to immunotherapy, with the potential for immediate clinical translation.

  2. An Electron is the God Particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, Milo

    2001-04-01

    Philosophers, Clifford, Mach, Einstein, Wyle, Dirac & Schroedinger, believed that only a wave structure of particles could satisfy experiment and fulfill reality. A quantum Wave Structure of Matter is described here. It predicts the natural laws more accurately and completely than classic laws. Einstein reasoned that the universe depends on particles which are "spherically, spatially extended in space." and "Hence a discrete material particle has no place as a fundamental concept in a field theory." Thus the discrete point particle was wrong. He deduced the true electron is primal because its force range is infinite. Now, it is found the electron's wave structure contains the laws of Nature that rule the universe. The electron plays the role of creator - the God particle. Electron structure is a pair of spherical outward/inward quantum waves, convergent to a center in 3D space. This wave pair creates a h/4pi quantum spin when the in-wave spherically rotates to become the out-wave. Both waves form a spinor satisfying the Dirac Equation. Thus, the universe is binary like a computer. Reference: http://members.tripod.com/mwolff

  3. Response of a seagrass fish assemblage to improved wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Ourgaud, M; Ruitton, S; Bell, J D; Letourneur, Y; Harmelin, J G; Harmelin-Vivien, M L

    2015-01-15

    We compared the structure of a seagrass fish assemblage near a sewage outlet before and after improvements to wastewater treatment. To determine whether responses by the fish assemblage were due to changes in water quality or to other factors, comparisons were made with the structure of a fish assemblage from a nearby site unaffected by sewage effluent. Total species richness, density and biomass of fish, decreased at both sites over the 30-year period. An increase in mean trophic level near the sewage outlet following improvements in water quality indicated that wastewater treatment had another important effect. This result is consistent with the reductions in food webs supporting pelagic and benthic fishes that typically accompany decreases in nutrient inputs. Although improvements to wastewater treatment explained much of the variation in the structure of the fish assemblage at PC, our results also suggest that fishing and climate change, at both sites.

  4. Improving Disaster Response Efforts Through the Development of a Disaster Health Care Response System.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Jonathan A; McKenzie, L Kendall; McLeod, W Terry; Darsey, Damon A; Craig, Jim

    2017-03-17

    We review the development of a disaster health care response system in Mississippi aimed at improving disaster response efforts. Large-scale disasters generate many injured and ill patients, which causes a significant utilization of emergency health care services and often requires external support to meet clinical needs. Disaster health care services require a solid infrastructure of coordination and collaboration to be effective. Following Hurricane Katrina, the state of Mississippi implemented best practices from around the nation to establish a disaster health care response system. The State Medical Response System of Mississippi provides an all-hazards system designed to support local response efforts at the time, scope, and scale required to successfully manage the incident. Components of this disaster health care response system can be replicated or adapted to meet the dynamic landscape of health care delivery following disasters. (Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2017;page 1 of 5).

  5. Improving Response Inhibition in Parkinson’s Disease with Atomoxetine

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Zheng; Altena, Ellemarije; Nombela, Cristina; Housden, Charlotte R.; Maxwell, Helen; Rittman, Timothy; Huddleston, Chelan; Rae, Charlotte L.; Regenthal, Ralf; Sahakian, Barbara J.; Barker, Roger A.; Robbins, Trevor W.; Rowe, James B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Dopaminergic drugs remain the mainstay of Parkinson’s disease therapy but often fail to improve cognitive problems such as impulsivity. This may be due to the loss of other neurotransmitters, including noradrenaline, which is linked to impulsivity and response inhibition. We therefore examined the effect of the selective noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor atomoxetine on response inhibition in a stop-signal paradigm. Methods This pharmacological functional magnetic resonance imaging study used a double-blinded randomized crossover design with low-frequency inhibition trials distributed among frequent Go trials. Twenty-one patients received 40 mg atomoxetine or placebo. Control subjects were tested on no-drug. The effects of disease and drug on behavioral performance, regional brain activity, and functional connectivity were analyzed using general linear models. Anatomical connectivity was examined using diffusion-weighted imaging. Results Patients with Parkinson’s disease had longer stop-signal reaction times, less stop-related activation in the right inferior frontal gyrus (RIFG), and weaker functional connectivity between the RIFG and striatum compared with control subjects. Atomoxetine enhanced stop-related RIFG activation in proportion to disease severity. Although there was no overall behavioral benefit from atomoxetine, analyses of individual differences revealed that enhanced response inhibition by atomoxetine was associated with increased RIFG activation and functional frontostriatal connectivity. Improved performance was more likely in patients with higher structural frontostriatal connectivity. Conclusions This study suggests that enhanced prefrontal cortical activation and frontostriatal connectivity by atomoxetine may improve response inhibition in Parkinson’s disease. These results point the way to new stratified clinical trials of atomoxetine to treat impulsivity in selected patients with Parkinson’s disease. PMID:24655598

  6. Improvement in medical consultation responses with a structured request form.

    PubMed

    Geist, Shin-Mey Rose Y; Geist, James R

    2008-05-01

    Physicians often do not provide adequate information regarding patients' medical conditions when presented with consultation requests (CR) generated by dental students and their instructors about the students' patients. We hypothesized that a structured CR form, which requests specific information by providing a checklist and/or closed-ended questions for physicians to answer, would lead to better communication and improved responses. We also hypothesized that providing in-service education to clinical faculty on the conditions that require and don't require CRs would reduce the number of unwarranted CRs sent to physicians. We assessed the responses obtained with the new form and compared them to findings over a similar period using our older, unstructured CR forms. We also evaluated the numbers of CRs written unnecessarily during both time periods. Improvements in the appropriateness of information provided by physicians were noted with the new CR forms for diabetes mellitus, hypertension, heart murmur, and anticoagulant therapy. The number of CRs written for conditions that did not need a consultation was approximately the same after provision of instruction as before. We conclude that structured CR forms improve the flow of information between dentists and physicians and should enhance student knowledge and skills in soliciting relevant information. Greater efforts must be taken to inform clinical faculty about the indications for CRs.

  7. Energy response improvement for photon dosimetry using pulse analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaki, Dizaji H.

    2016-02-01

    During the last few years, active personal dosimeters have been developed and have replaced passive personal dosimeters in some external monitoring systems, frequently using silicon diode detectors. Incident photons interact with the constituents of the diode detector and produce electrons. These photon-induced electrons deposit energy in the detector's sensitive region and contribute to the response of diode detectors. To achieve an appropriate photon dosimetry response, the detectors are usually covered by a metallic layer with an optimum thickness. The metallic cover acts as an energy compensating shield. In this paper, a software process is performed for energy compensation. Selective data sampling based on pulse height is used to determine the photon dose equivalent. This method is applied to improve the energy response in photon dosimetry. The detector design is optimized for the response function and determination of the photon dose equivalent. Photon personal dose equivalent is determined in the energy range of 0.3-6 MeV. The error values of the calculated data for this wide energy range and measured data for 133Ba, 137Cs, 60Co and 241Am-Be sources respectively are up to 20% and 15%. Fairly good agreement is seen between simulation and dose values obtained from our process and specifications from several photon sources.

  8. Improving the Material Response for Slow Heat of Energetic Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, A L

    2010-03-08

    The goal of modern high explosive slow heat cookoff modeling is to understand the level of mechanical violence. This requires understanding the coupled thermal-mechanical-chemical system that such an environment creates. Recent advances have improved our ability to predict the time to event, and we have been making progress on predicting the mechanical response. By adding surface tension to the product gas pores in the high explosive, we have been able to reduce the current model's tendency to overpressurize confinement vessels. We describe the model and demonstrate how it affects a LX-10 STEX experiment. Issues associated with current product gas equations of state are described and examined.

  9. Future of God in recovery from drug addiction.

    PubMed

    Sellman, John D; Baker, Michael P; Adamson, Simon J; Geering, Lloyd G

    2007-10-01

    The purpose of the present paper was to explore the concept and experience of God in relation to recovery from drug addiction from a scientific perspective. Examination of a diverse literature was undertaken, including five key threads: the universality of the experience of God; the induction of spiritual experiences of God through hallucinogenic drugs; the nature of drug addiction from an evolutionary neurobiological perspective; the 12 Step movement as the prototype for the place of God in recovery from drug addiction; and identified ingredients for successful recovery from addiction. The diverse threads of literature examined can be integrated around the concept of higher power as an important factor in recovery from drug addiction. Higher power can be manifested in individuals in diverse ways: religious, ethnic, spiritual including the use of entheogens, as well as cognitive behavioural development, but a common final pathway for all is the strengthening of executive functions (the brain's 'higher power'). Practical implications for assisting people with drug addiction to achieve recovery through their own experience of God/development of higher power are outlined.

  10. Mentalizing deficits constrain belief in a personal God.

    PubMed

    Norenzayan, Ara; Gervais, Will M; Trzesniewski, Kali H

    2012-01-01

    Religious believers intuitively conceptualize deities as intentional agents with mental states who anticipate and respond to human beliefs, desires and concerns. It follows that mentalizing deficits, associated with the autistic spectrum and also commonly found in men more than in women, may undermine this intuitive support and reduce belief in a personal God. Autistic adolescents expressed less belief in God than did matched neuro-typical controls (Study 1). In a Canadian student sample (Study 2), and two American national samples that controlled for demographic characteristics and other correlates of autism and religiosity (Study 3 and 4), the autism spectrum predicted reduced belief in God, and mentalizing mediated this relationship. Systemizing (Studies 2 and 3) and two personality dimensions related to religious belief, Conscientiousness and Agreeableness (Study 3), failed as mediators. Mentalizing also explained the robust and well-known, but theoretically debated, gender gap in religious belief wherein men show reduced religious belief (Studies 2-4).

  11. Unanswered prayers: religiosity and the god-serving bias.

    PubMed

    Riggio, Heidi R; Uhalt, Joshua; Matthies, Brigitte K

    2014-01-01

    Two self-report experiments examined how religiosity affects attributions made for a target person's death. Online adults (Study 1, N = 427) and undergraduate students (Study 2, N = 326) read about Chris who had a heart attack, used religious or health behaviors, and lived or died. Participants made attributions to Chris and God (both studies), and reported their emotions (Study 2). Participants made more attributions to Chris when he lived than when he died, but only when he used health behaviors. The highly religious made more attributions to God, but not when Chris used religious behaviors and died (the God-serving bias); they reported the most positive emotions when Chris lived after using religious behaviors (the Hallelujah effect). Directions for future research in terms of implicit religious beliefs and normative evaluations of religion are discussed.

  12. Mentalizing Deficits Constrain Belief in a Personal God

    PubMed Central

    Norenzayan, Ara; Gervais, Will M.; Trzesniewski, Kali H.

    2012-01-01

    Religious believers intuitively conceptualize deities as intentional agents with mental states who anticipate and respond to human beliefs, desires and concerns. It follows that mentalizing deficits, associated with the autistic spectrum and also commonly found in men more than in women, may undermine this intuitive support and reduce belief in a personal God. Autistic adolescents expressed less belief in God than did matched neuro-typical controls (Study 1). In a Canadian student sample (Study 2), and two American national samples that controlled for demographic characteristics and other correlates of autism and religiosity (Study 3 and 4), the autism spectrum predicted reduced belief in God, and mentalizing mediated this relationship. Systemizing (Studies 2 and 3) and two personality dimensions related to religious belief, Conscientiousness and Agreeableness (Study 3), failed as mediators. Mentalizing also explained the robust and well-known, but theoretically debated, gender gap in religious belief wherein men show reduced religious belief (Studies 2–4). PMID:22666332

  13. Beliefs about God, psychiatric symptoms, and evolutionary psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Flannelly, Kevin J; Galek, Kathleen; Ellison, Christopher G; Koenig, Harold G

    2010-06-01

    The present study analyzed the association between specific beliefs about God and psychiatric symptoms among a representative sample of 1,306 U.S. adults. Three pairs of beliefs about God served as the independent variables: Close and Loving, Approving and Forgiving, and Creating and Judging. The dependent variables were measures of General Anxiety, Depression, Obsessive-Compulsion, Paranoid Ideation, Social Anxiety, and Somatization. As hypothesized, the strength of participants' belief in a Close and Loving God had a significant salutary association with overall psychiatric symptomology, and the strength of this association was significantly stronger than that of the other beliefs, which had little association with the psychiatric symptomology. The authors discuss the findings in the context of evolutionary psychiatry, and the relevance of Evolutionary Threat Assessment Systems Theory in research on religious beliefs.

  14. Making God real and making God good: some mechanisms through which prayer may contribute to healing.

    PubMed

    Luhrmann, Tanya Marie

    2013-10-01

    Many social scientists attribute the health-giving properties of religious practice to social support. This paper argues that another mechanism may be a positive relationship with the supernatural, a proposal that builds upon anthropological accounts of symbolic healing. Such a mechanism depends upon the learned cultivation of the imagination and the capacity to make what is imagined more real and more good. This paper offers a theory of the way that prayer enables this process and provides some evidence, drawn from experimental and ethnographic work, for the claim that a relationship with a loving God, cultivated through the imagination in prayer, may contribute to good health and may contribute to healing in trauma and psychosis.

  15. 75 FR 51518 - Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: “Ballplayers, Gods, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF STATE Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: ``Ballplayers, Gods, and Rainmaker... objects to be included in the exhibition ``Ballplayers, Gods, and Rainmaker Kings: Masterpieces...

  16. Harnessing DNA-induced immune responses for improving cancer vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Herrada, Andrés A.; Rojas-Colonelli, Nicole; González-Figueroa, Paula; Roco, Jonathan; Oyarce, César; Ligtenberg, Maarten A.; Lladser, Alvaro

    2012-01-01

    DNA vaccines have emerged as an attractive strategy to promote protective cellular and humoral immunity against the encoded antigen. DNA vaccines are easy to generate, inexpensive to produce and purify at large-scale, highly stable and safe. In addition, plasmids used for DNA vaccines act as powerful “danger signals” by stimulating several DNA-sensing innate immune receptors that promote the induction of protective adaptive immunity. The induction of tumor-specific immune responses represents a major challenge for DNA vaccines because most of tumor-associated antigens are normal non-mutated self-antigens. As a consequence, induction of potentially self-reactive T cell responses against such poorly immunogenic antigens is controlled by mechanisms of central and peripheral tolerance as well as tumor-induced immunosuppression. Although several DNA vaccines against cancer have reached clinical testing, disappointing results have been observed. Therefore, the development of new adjuvants that strongly stimulate the induction of antitumor T cell immunity and counteract immune-suppressive regulation is an attractive approach to enhance the potency of DNA vaccines and overcome tumor-associated tolerance. Understanding the DNA-sensing signaling pathways of innate immunity that mediate the induction of T cell responses elicited by DNA vaccines represents a unique opportunity to develop novel adjuvants that enhance vaccine potency. The advance of DNA adjuvants needs to be complemented with the development of potent delivery systems, in order to step toward successful clinical application. Here, we briefly discuss recent evidence showing how to harness DNA-induced immune response to improve the potency of cancer vaccines and counteract tumor-associated tolerance. PMID:23111166

  17. Armenian Vahagn God as birth of four Cosmic elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harutyunian, H. A.

    2014-10-01

    The survived two snatches of the mythological history about Vahagn - the Armenian god of the Sun and Fire is analyzed to find fingerprints of ancient cosmology. In the first fragment known as "Birth of Vahagn" all the four primary elements are mentioned as travailing ones which brought the god into life. The second fragment devoted to the ancient conception on the formation of the Milky Way named in Armenian mythology "Straw Thief's Way". The fact that both survived fragments concern the structure of the Universe might be explained easily if the ode glorifying Vahagn was based on the ancient Armenian cosmological views.

  18. Practicing the Code of Ethics, finding the image of God.

    PubMed

    Hoglund, Barbara A

    2013-01-01

    The Code of Ethics for Nurses gives a professional obligation to practice in a compassionate and respectful way that is unaffected by the attributes of the patient. This article explores the concept "made in the image of God" and the complexities inherent in caring for those perceived as exhibiting distorted images of God. While the Code provides a professional standard consistent with a biblical worldview, human nature impacts the ability to consistently act congruently with the Code. Strategies and nursing interventions that support development of practice from a biblical worldview and the Code of Ethics for Nurses are presented.

  19. Active microwave responses - An aid in improved crop classification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenthal, W. D.; Blanchard, B. J.

    1984-01-01

    A study determined the feasibility of using visible, infrared, and active microwave data to classify agricultural crops such as corn, sorghum, alfalfa, wheat stubble, millet, shortgrass pasture and bare soil. Visible through microwave data were collected by instruments on board the NASA C-130 aircraft over 40 agricultural fields near Guymon, OK in 1978 and Dalhart, TX in 1980. Results from stepwise and discriminant analysis techniques indicated 4.75 GHz, 1.6 GHz, and 0.4 GHz cross-polarized microwave frequencies were the microwave frequencies most sensitive to crop type differences. Inclusion of microwave data in visible and infrared classification models improved classification accuracy from 73 percent to 92 percent. Despite the results, further studies are needed during different growth stages to validate the visible, infrared, and active microwave responses to vegetation.

  20. Interactive Voice Response Technology: A Tool for Improving Healthcare

    PubMed Central

    Kraft, Margaret Ross; Androwich, Ida

    2012-01-01

    The integration of telephony with computers has created interactive voice response technology that has begun to have many applications for healthcare. This technology has to turned touch-tone phones into virtual computer terminals. A number of IVRT applications have been developed with nursing involvement. Research on IVRT use shows major applications dealing with chronic disease management, medication management and the care of special populations.. It will be up to Nurse Informaticists to develop and test creative uses for IVRT that will both leverage technology and improve patient care. Use of the IVRT provides opportunities to educate as well as to monitor individuals on their self-management behaviors. As an understanding of the uses of IVRT in patient care grows, it will offer added value to healthcare services. PMID:24199090

  1. Authoritarian and benevolent god representations and the two sides of prosociality.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Kathryn A; Cohen, Adam B

    2016-01-01

    The Big Gods model focuses on belief in an authoritarian God as a psychological mechanism that inhibits antisocial behavior and facilitates the formation of tight, cohesive groups. Recent empirical evidence suggests, however, that belief in a benevolent God is more likely to inspire helping and inclusivity. Both kinds of beliefs are necessary to explain the development of large-scale societies.

  2. 27 CFR 25.282 - Beer lost by fire, theft, casualty, or act of God.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., casualty, or act of God. 25.282 Section 25.282 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO... From Liability § 25.282 Beer lost by fire, theft, casualty, or act of God. (a) General. The tax paid by... by fire, casualty, or act of God. The tax liability on excessive losses of beer from transfer...

  3. 27 CFR 25.282 - Beer lost by fire, theft, casualty, or act of God.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., casualty, or act of God. 25.282 Section 25.282 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO... From Liability § 25.282 Beer lost by fire, theft, casualty, or act of God. (a) General. The tax paid by... by fire, casualty, or act of God. The tax liability on excessive losses of beer from transfer...

  4. 27 CFR 25.282 - Beer lost by fire, theft, casualty, or act of God.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., casualty, or act of God. 25.282 Section 25.282 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO... From Liability § 25.282 Beer lost by fire, theft, casualty, or act of God. (a) General. The tax paid by... by fire, casualty, or act of God. The tax liability on excessive losses of beer from transfer...

  5. 27 CFR 25.282 - Beer lost by fire, theft, casualty, or act of God.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., casualty, or act of God. 25.282 Section 25.282 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO... From Liability § 25.282 Beer lost by fire, theft, casualty, or act of God. (a) General. The tax paid by... by fire, casualty, or act of God. The tax liability on excessive losses of beer from transfer...

  6. 27 CFR 25.282 - Beer lost by fire, theft, casualty, or act of God.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., casualty, or act of God. 25.282 Section 25.282 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO... From Liability § 25.282 Beer lost by fire, theft, casualty, or act of God. (a) General. The tax paid by... by fire, casualty, or act of God. The tax liability on excessive losses of beer from transfer...

  7. Improving T cell responses to modified peptides in tumor vaccines.

    PubMed

    Buhrman, Jonathan D; Slansky, Jill E

    2013-03-01

    Immune recognition and elimination of cancerous cells is the primary goal of cancer immunotherapy. However, obstacles including immune tolerance and tumor-induced immunosuppression often limit beneficial immune responses. Vaccination is one proposed intervention that may help to overcome these issues and is an active area of study in cancer immunotherapy. Immunizing with tumor antigenic peptides is a promising, straight-forward vaccine strategy hypothesized to boost preexisting antitumor immunity. However, tumor antigens are often weak T cell agonists, attributable to several mechanisms, including immune self-tolerance and poor immunogenicity of self-derived tumor peptides. One strategy for overcoming these mechanisms is vaccination with mimotopes, or peptide mimics of tumor antigens, which alter the antigen presentation and/or T cell activation to increase the expansion of tumor-specific T cells. Evaluation of mimotope vaccine strategies has revealed that even subtle alterations in peptide sequence can dramatically alter antigen presentation and T cell receptor recognition. Most of this research has been performed using T cell clones, which may not be accurate representations of the naturally occurring antitumor response. The relationship between clones generated after mimotope vaccination and the polyclonal T cell repertoire is unclear. Our work with mimotopes in a mouse model of colon carcinoma has revealed important insights into these issues. We propose that the identification of mimotopes based on stimulation of the naturally responding T cell repertoire will dramatically improve the efficacy of mimotope vaccination.

  8. Breaking the DNA damage response to improve cervical cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Wieringa, Hylke W; van der Zee, Ate G J; de Vries, Elisabeth G E; van Vugt, Marcel A T M

    2016-01-01

    Every year, cervical cancer affects ∼500,000 women worldwide, and ∼275,000 patients die of this disease. The addition of platin-based chemotherapy to primary radiotherapy has increased 5-year survival of advanced-stage cervical cancer patients, which is, however, still only 66%. One of the factors thought to contribute to treatment failure is the ability of tumor cells to repair chemoradiotherapy-induced DNA damage. Therefore, sensitization of tumor cells for chemoradiotherapy via inhibition of the DNA damage response (DDR) as a novel strategy to improve therapy effect, is currently studied pre-clinically as well as in the clinic. Almost invariably, cervical carcinogenesis involves infection with the human papillomavirus (HPV), which inactivates part of the DNA damage response. This HPV-mediated partial inactivation of the DDR presents therapeutic targeting of the residual DDR as an interesting approach to achieve chemoradio-sensitization for cervical cancer. How the DDR can be most efficiently targeted, however, remains unclear. The fact that cisplatin and radiotherapy activate multiple signaling axes within the DDR further complicates a rational choice of therapeutic targets within the DDR. In this review, we provide an overview of the current preclinical and clinical knowledge about targeting the DDR in cervical cancer.

  9. Improving models to predict phenological responses to global change

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, Andrew D.

    2015-11-25

    The term phenology describes both the seasonal rhythms of plants and animals, and the study of these rhythms. Plant phenological processes, including, for example, when leaves emerge in the spring and change color in the autumn, are highly responsive to variation in weather (e.g. a warm vs. cold spring) as well as longer-term changes in climate (e.g. warming trends and changes in the timing and amount of rainfall). We conducted a study to investigate the phenological response of northern peatland communities to global change. Field work was conducted at the SPRUCE experiment in northern Minnesota, where we installed 10 digital cameras. Imagery from the cameras is being used to track shifts in plant phenology driven by elevated carbon dioxide and elevated temperature in the different SPRUCE experimental treatments. Camera imagery and derived products (“greenness”) is being posted in near-real time on a publicly available web page (http://phenocam.sr.unh.edu/webcam/gallery/). The images will provide a permanent visual record of the progression of the experiment over the next 10 years. Integrated with other measurements collected as part of the SPRUCE program, this study is providing insight into the degree to which phenology may mediate future shifts in carbon uptake and storage by peatland ecosystems. In the future, these data will be used to develop improved models of vegetation phenology, which will be tested against ground observations collected by a local collaborator.

  10. Structural Plasticity Denoises Responses and Improves Learning Speed

    PubMed Central

    Spiess, Robin; George, Richard; Cook, Matthew; Diehl, Peter U.

    2016-01-01

    Despite an abundance of computational models for learning of synaptic weights, there has been relatively little research on structural plasticity, i.e., the creation and elimination of synapses. Especially, it is not clear how structural plasticity works in concert with spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) and what advantages their combination offers. Here we present a fairly large-scale functional model that uses leaky integrate-and-fire neurons, STDP, homeostasis, recurrent connections, and structural plasticity to learn the input encoding, the relation between inputs, and to infer missing inputs. Using this model, we compare the error and the amount of noise in the network's responses with and without structural plasticity and the influence of structural plasticity on the learning speed of the network. Using structural plasticity during learning shows good results for learning the representation of input values, i.e., structural plasticity strongly reduces the noise of the response by preventing spikes with a high error. For inferring missing inputs we see similar results, with responses having less noise if the network was trained using structural plasticity. Additionally, using structural plasticity with pruning significantly decreased the time to learn weights suitable for inference. Presumably, this is due to the clearer signal containing less spikes that misrepresent the desired value. Therefore, this work shows that structural plasticity is not only able to improve upon the performance using STDP without structural plasticity but also speeds up learning. Additionally, it addresses the practical problem of limited resources for connectivity that is not only apparent in the mammalian neocortex but also in computer hardware or neuromorphic (brain-inspired) hardware by efficiently pruning synapses without losing performance. PMID:27660610

  11. Using "Children of a Lesser God" To Teach Intercultural Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Proctor, Russell F., II; Rock, Roseanna

    One film widely recommended as an instructional resource for communication courses is "Children of a Lesser God," the 1986 movie starring Marlee Matlin and William Hurt. In this film, which can serve as a case study, James Leeds, a talented young teacher in a school for the deaf, falls in love with Sarah Norman, a graduate of the school…

  12. Faith Fictions: "The Word between This World and God"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Le Tran, Mai-Anh

    2009-01-01

    The search for religious truth and depth in "fiction" invites a conceptualization of life and fictional narratives as "faith fictions"--narrative accounts of human experiences and the human condition that bridge this world and God. This article juxtaposes "Mother Crocodile", "Hunger", and "Lost in Translation" to highlight the ways in which they,…

  13. Dewey's Democracy as the Kingdom of God on Earth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webster, R. Scott

    2009-01-01

    John Dewey has been portrayed as a sort of villain in Rosenow's (1997) article which appeared in this journal, apparently because he was unfairly opposed to God and to religion, and also because he deliberately usurped religious language to "camouflage" his secular ideas. By drawing mainly upon similar sources but with some important additions, I…

  14. Should God Get Tenure? Essays on Religion and Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gill, David W., Ed.

    Essays on the role of religion in higher education include: "Should God Get Tenure?" (David W. Gill); "On Being a Professor: The Case of Socrates" (Bruce R. Reichenbach); "Academic Excellence: Cliche or Humanizing Vision?" (Merold Westphal); "Religion, Science, and the Humanities in the Liberal Arts Curriculum" (H. Newton Maloney); "Tolstoy and…

  15. Prosthesis, Surrogation, and Relation in Arturo Islas's "The Rain God"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cutler, John Alba

    2008-01-01

    This essay seeks to intervene in critical discussions about Arturo Islas's 1984 novel "The Rain God", as well as to suggest the potential for synthesizing discourses heretofore deployed in disparate conversations about disability, sexuality, and ethnicity. I first demonstrate how the novel's queer characters, Miguel Chico and Felix, pose critical…

  16. Porch Talk: Reading "Their Eyes Were Watching God."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrigues, Lisa

    2003-01-01

    Discusses a four-week unit of study for an 11th-grade honors class on Zora Neale Hurston's "Their Eyes Were Watching God." Notes how they listened to the novel on audiocassette; discussed it in "Porch Groups"; reflected on what they read and heard in their notebooks; responded to each other's entries during Notebook Swaps; and invited a visiting…

  17. What If I Don't Want to Play God?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobrin, Kelly Hykes; Yarnall, Gary Dean

    The authors review technological advances in medicine, such as gene manipulation, amniocentesis, ultra sound, organ transplants, and cloning, and point out ethical and moral dilemmas resulting from such capabilities. Implications of overpopulation are briefly considered. The authors contend that the decision "to play God" has already been made,…

  18. Who's Crazy? Students Critique "The Gods Must Be Crazy"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawking, Chris

    2012-01-01

    On the surface, "The Gods Must Be Crazy" is a campy confluence of three independent plotlines involving Xi, a Kalahari tribesman, who journeys to the end of the earth to dispose of a Coke bottle that has begun to disrupt the harmony of his community; Mr. Steyn, a white scientist, and the beautiful blonde schoolteacher he escorts through the bush;…

  19. Scriptural Engagement, Communication with God, and Moral Behavior among Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ovwigho, Pamela Caudill; Cole, Arnold

    2010-01-01

    How often an individual reads or listens to scripture is one dimension of private spirituality rarely discussed in the literature. In this study, we use data from a random sample survey of 1009 American children (ages eight to 12) to explore children's engagement with the Christian Bible, their views of communicating with God, and their moral…

  20. God, Sport Philosophy, Kinesiology: A MacIntyrean Examination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Twietmeyer, Gregg

    2015-01-01

    Sport philosophy is in crisis. This subdiscipline of kinesiology garners little to no respect and few tenure track lines in kinesiology departments. Why is this the case? Why isn't philosophy held in greater esteem? Is it possible that philosopher Alasdair MacIntyre's (2009) diagnosis found in "God, Philosophy, Universities" could…

  1. View of main entrance of the Church of God. This ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of main entrance of the Church of God. This structure was originally a lodge hall for the Woodmen of the World from the adjacent mill neighborhoods such as Lincoln and Dallas Mill - 601 Humes Avenue (House), 601 Humes Avenue, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  2. The encounter with God in myth and madness

    PubMed Central

    Doerr, Otto; Velásquez, Óscar

    2007-01-01

    Background It is well known how often psychiatric patients report religious experiences. These are especially frequent in schizophrenic and epileptic patients as the subject of their delusions. The question we pose is: are there differences between this kind of religious experiences and those we find in religious texts or in the mythological tradition? Results An overview on famous mythological narratives, such as The Aeneid, allows us to establish that the divinities become recognizable to the human being at the moment of their departure. Thus, Aeneas does not recognise his mother, Venus, when she appears to him in the middle of the forest at the coast of Africa. A dialogue between the two takes place, and only at the end of the encounter, when she is going away and already with her back to Aeneas, she shows her son the signs of her divinity: the rose-flush emanating from her neck, her hair perfume and the majesty of her gait. Something analogous can be observed in the encounter of Moses with Yahweh on Mount Sinai. Moses asks God: "Show me your glory, I beg you". And God replies, among other things: "you shall see the back of me, but my face is not to be seen". In the same sense, the Emmaus disciples do not recognise Jesus till the moment of his disappearance ("but he had vanished from their sight"), and Saul of Tars falls off his horse just in the moment when he feels the divine presence. In short, the direct encounter with the divinity seems not to occur in the realm of myth or in religious tradition. The realm of madness is exactly the opposite. Our research on religious experiences in schizophrenic and epileptic patients leads us to conclude that God appears to them face to face, and the patient describes God the father, Jesus or the Virgin Mary in intimate detail, always in an everyday setting. So, the divinity is seen in the garden, or in the bedroom, or maybe above the wardrobe, without any of its majesty. The nearness to God also tends to be so extreme

  3. Improving alkenone paleothermometry by incorporating cell response to environmental stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prahl, F. G.; Wolfe, G. V.; Mix, A. C.; Sparrow, M. A.

    2003-04-01

    A linear, global coretop calibration now exists for the alkenone unsaturation index Uk’37 and mean annual SST (maSST). The calibration equation is statistically the same as that for a subarctic Pacific strain of Emiliania huxleyi (Ehux) grown exponentially under isothermal conditions in batch culture. Although the calibration has been applied widely for paleoSST reconstruction, uncertainty still exists, stemming from two key factors: genetic variability among strains, and physiologic response to stress and growth state. We will discuss in this talk the extent that Uk’37 and other aspects of cellular alkenone composition vary in response to nutrient depletion and light deprivation in isothermal (15^oC) batch cultures of Ehux isolated from three different ocean locations - a Norwegian fjord (CCMP370); the subarctic Pacific (CCMP1742) and the Sargasso Sea (CCMP 372). We will also present results from detailed alkenone compositional analysis in thirty surface sediments collected between ˜50^oS and 10^oS along the Chile-Peru margin in the SE Pacific Ocean. The Uk’37 - maSST relationship derived from this dataset is statistically indistinguishable from the global coretop calibration. But, comparison of other compositional properties shows that the alkenone signature preserved in the Chile-Peru margin sediments is also not consistent with that expressed by exponentially growing cells of any of the three cultured Ehux strains. Alkenone signatures preserved in sediments appear more like that in algal cells that have experienced some level of non-thermal, physiological stress such as nutrient and light limitation. Given our observations as a precedent, improved confidence in paleotemperature estimates derived from Uk’37 measurements may require interpretation of unsaturation patterns in full context with the overall alkenone composition preserved in the sediment.

  4. The role of religious context in children's differentiation between God's mind and human minds.

    PubMed

    Richert, Rebekah A; Saide, Anondah R; Lesage, Kirsten A; Shaman, Nicholas J

    2017-03-01

    The current study examined the cultural factors (i.e., religious background, religious participation, parents' views of prayer, and parents' concepts of God) that contribute to children's differentiation between the capabilities of human minds and God's mind. Protestant Christian, Roman Catholic, Muslim, and Religiously Non-Affiliated parents and their preschool-aged children were interviewed (N = 272). Children of Muslim parents differentiated the most between God's mind and human minds (i.e., human minds are fallible but God's is not), and children who had greater differentiation between God's and humans' minds had parents who had the least anthropomorphic conceptions of God. Additionally, there was a unique effect of being raised in a Religiously Non-Affiliated home on the degree of children's differentiation between God's and human minds after religious context factors had been accounted for; in other words, children of Religious Non-Affiliates differentiated between humans and God the least and their differentiation was unrelated to religious context factors. These findings delineate the ways in which religious context differences influence concepts of God from the earliest formation. Statement of contribution What is already known on this subject? Children's concept of God develops during the preschool years. The degree of anthropomorphism in children's concept of God varies. What does this study add? Muslim children have a strong differentiation between what God's mind and human minds can do. Religiously Non-Affiliated children have almost no differentiation between God's and human minds. Parent anthropomorphism explains variance in children's God concepts, both within and across religious groups.

  5. 34 CFR 200.49 - SEA responsibilities for school improvement, corrective action, and restructuring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false SEA responsibilities for school improvement, corrective... Agencies Lea and School Improvement § 200.49 SEA responsibilities for school improvement, corrective action... services. (1) Except as described in §§ 200.32(d) and 200.33(c), if a school was in school improvement...

  6. Improving Adaptive Learning Technology through the Use of Response Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mettler, Everett; Massey, Christine M.; Kellman, Philip J.

    2011-01-01

    Adaptive learning techniques have typically scheduled practice using learners' accuracy and item presentation history. We describe an adaptive learning system (Adaptive Response Time Based Sequencing--ARTS) that uses both accuracy and response time (RT) as direct inputs into sequencing. Response times are used to assess learning strength and…

  7. Improving Risk Characterizations Based on Time to Response

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-05-01

    response as a function of exposure . The type of modeling has generally been of the form where the frequency of response is modeled as a function of dose ...67 REFERENCES Armitage, P. (1982). The assessment of low- dose carcinogenicity. Biometrics 38 ( Supplement on Current Topics in Biostatistics and...important aspects of quantitative cancer risk assessment is to model the frequency of a carcinogenic response as a function of exposure . Most of the

  8. Teotlaqualli: the psychoactive food of the Aztec gods.

    PubMed

    Elferink, J G

    1999-01-01

    The Aztecs in pre-Columbian Mexico used not only a large number of single hallucinogens, they also used some combinations. The present article describes reports of the use of teotlaqualli, an unction prepared from ololiuhqui and picietl, with a large number of additions. The work of the chroniclers of pre-Columbian Mexico served as a source of information. The teotlaqualli was offered to the gods, for whom it served as food. The Aztec priests smeared themselves with this unction, to lose fear and to get the appropriate state of mind to serve the Aztec gods. A few cases are reported in which the Aztec emperor or soldiers were smeared with teotlaqualli. It is suggested that the black color of some Aztec deities, as depicted in the codices, was due to anointment with teotlaqualli. In addition to its use for psychoactive purposes, teotlaqualli was used in medicine under the name teopatli.

  9. God give me strength: exploring prayer as self-disclosure.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Patrick R; Elliott, Marta

    2013-03-01

    The current project was designed to examine the contention that written prayers about difficult life events function as self-disclosure to God and are structurally and effectively the same as other forms of written self-disclosure, at least in the short term. Over four writing sessions, 155 participants either wrote about mundane experiences (the control group) or wrote narratives about traumatic or stressful life events that were targeted at no one, targeted at a person of their choice, or construed as prayers to God. The results indicate that written prayers are lexically similar to the other two types of written narratives and distinct from the control group. Furthermore, the immediate effects of trauma writing on mood and physical well-being were similar as well. These findings have potentially important implications for understanding the relationship between personal prayer and a variety of health outcomes.

  10. Improved Response of ZnO Films for Pyroelectric Devices

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Chun-Ching; Yu, Shih-Yuan

    2012-01-01

    Increasing the temperature variation rate is a useful method for enhancing the response of pyroelectric devices. A three-dimensional ZnO film was fabricated by the aerosol deposition (AD) rapid process using the shadow mask method, which induces lateral temperature gradients on the sidewalls of the responsive element, thereby increasing the temperature variation rate. To enhance the quality of the film and reduce the concentration of defects, the film was further treated by laser annealing, and the integration of a comb-like top electrode enhanced the voltage response and reduced the response time of the resulting ZnO pyroelectric devices. PMID:23235444

  11. Experimenting with Spirituality: Analyzing The God Gene in a Nonmajors Laboratory Course

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    References linking genes to complex human traits, such as personality type or disease susceptibility, abound in the news media and popular culture. In his book The God Gene: How Faith is Hardwired into Our Genes, Dean Hamer argues that a variation in the VMAT2 gene plays a role in one's openness to spiritual experiences. In a nonmajors class, we read and discussed The God Gene and conducted on a small scale an extension of the study it describes. Students used polymerase chain reaction to replicate a portion of their VMAT2 genes, and they analyzed three polymorphic sites in the sequence of these products. Associations between particular VMAT2 alleles and scores on a personality test were assessed by t test. The course, of which this project was a major part, stimulated student learning; scores on a test covering basic genetic concepts, causation/correlation, and laboratory methodology improved after completion of the course. In a survey, students reported the laboratory project aided their learning, especially in the areas of statistics and the linking of genes to behaviors. They reported high levels of engagement with the project, citing in particular its personal nature as motivating their interest. PMID:18316816

  12. Newton's Metaphysics of Space as God's Emanative Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacquette, Dale

    2014-09-01

    In several of his writings, Isaac Newton proposed that physical space is God's "emanative effect" or "sensorium," revealing something interesting about the metaphysics underlying his mathematical physics. Newton's conjectures depart from Plato and Aristotle's metaphysics of space and from classical and Cambridge Neoplatonism. Present-day philosophical concepts of supervenience clarify Newton's ideas about space and offer a portrait of Newton not only as a mathematical physicist but an independent-minded rationalist philosopher.

  13. 42 CFR 441.745 - State plan HCBS administration: State responsibilities and quality improvement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... include all of the following: (i) Incorporate a continuous quality improvement process that includes... responsibilities and quality improvement. 441.745 Section 441.745 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID... and quality improvement. (a) State plan HCBS administration—(1) State responsibilities. The State...

  14. Removing the Stigma: For God and Country

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    men and women to defend the nation. The Code of Conduct codifies the responsibility of American combat soldiers and spells out how military members...were settled in the seventeenth century by men and women, who, in the face of European persecution, refused to compromise passionately held...of men ,” not only for Christians of every variety, but also for those of other religions as well.13 From 1500-1700 many religious sects throughout

  15. Examining attachment to God and health risk-taking behaviors in college students.

    PubMed

    Horton, Karissa D; Ellison, Christopher G; Loukas, Alexandra; Downey, Darcy L; Barrett, Jennifer B

    2012-06-01

    Drawing on insights from attachment theory, this study examined whether three types of attachment to God--secure, avoidant, and anxious--were associated with health-risk behaviors, over and above the effects of religious attendance, peer support, and demographic covariates, in a sample of 328 undergraduate college students. Contrary to prior theory, secure attachment to God is not inversely associated with recent alcohol or marijuana use, or substance use prior to last sexual intercourse. Instead, avoidant and anxious attachment to God are associated with higher levels of drinking; anxious attachment to God is associated with marijuana use; and avoidant attachment to God is associated with substance use prior to last sexual intercourse. These patterns are gender-specific; problematic attachment to God is linked with negative outcomes solely among men.

  16. Anticipating divine protection? Reminders of god can increase nonmoral risk taking.

    PubMed

    Kupor, Daniella M; Laurin, Kristin; Levav, Jonathan

    2015-04-01

    Religiosity and participation in religious activities have been linked with decreased risky behavior. In the current research, we hypothesized that exposure to the concept of God can actually increase people's willingness to engage in certain types of risks. Across seven studies, reminders of God increased risk taking in nonmoral domains. This effect was mediated by the perceived danger of a risky option and emerged more strongly among individuals who perceive God as a reliable source of safety and protection than among those who do not. Moreover, in an eighth study, when participants were first reminded of God and then took a risk that produced negative consequences (i.e., when divine protection failed to materialize), participants reported feeling more negatively toward God than did participants in the same situation who were not first reminded of God. This research contributes to an understanding of the divergent effects that distinct components of religion can exert on behavior.

  17. Improvements to a Response Surface Thermal Model for Orion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Stephen W.; Walker, William Q.

    2011-01-01

    A study was performed to determine if a Design of Experiments (DOE)/Response Surface Methodology could be applied to on-orbit thermal analysis and produce a set of Response Surface Equations (RSE) that predict Orion vehicle temperatures within 10 F. The study used the Orion Outer Mold Line model. Five separate factors were identified for study: yaw, pitch, roll, beta angle, and the environmental parameters. Twenty-three external Orion components were selected and their minimum and maximum temperatures captured over a period of two orbits. Thus, there are 46 responses. A DOE case matrix of 145 runs was developed. The data from these cases were analyzed to produce a fifth order RSE for each of the temperature responses. For the 145 cases in the DOE matrix, the agreement between the engineering data and the RSE predictions was encouraging with 40 of the 46 RSEs predicting temperatures within the goal band. However, the verification cases showed most responses did not meet the 10 F goal. After reframing the focus of the study to better align the RSE development with the purposes of the model, a set of RSEs for both the minimum and maximum radiator temperatures was produced which predicted the engineering model output within +/-4 F. Therefore, with the correct application of the DOE/RSE methodology, RSEs can be developed that provide analysts a fast and easy way to screen large numbers of environments and assess proposed changes to the RSE factors.

  18. Targeting the Immune System’s Natural Response to Cell Death to Improve Therapeutic Response in Breast Cancers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-13-1-0158 TITLE: Targeting the Immune System’s Natural Response to Cell Death to Improve Therapeutic Response in Breast...Targeting the Immune System’s Natural Response to Cell Death to 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-13-1-0158 Improve Therapeutic Response in Breast Cancers 5b...Appendix 1, Supplemental Figure S5E) E. Widespread cell death during post-partum involution induces M2 macrophage polarization, but this is blocked by

  19. Improved spatial frequency response in silver halide sensitized gelatin holograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beléndez, A.; Neipp, C.; Pascual, I.

    1998-10-01

    We report what we believe to be the best results obtained to date with regard to the spatial frequency response of silver halide sensitized gelatin (SHSG) holograms. A very high diffraction efficiency, as high as 91% (after allowing for reflection), and an almost flat spatial frequency response between 800 lines/mm and 2800 lines/mm have been achieved using the new BB-640 plates manufactured by Holographic Recording Technologies. The results are compared with those for gratings recorded in the familiar Agfa 8E75 HD emulsion under the same recording and processing conditions. Theoretical results obtained using Buschmann's weakly scattering model are also compared. Our investigations reveal that high quality SHSG transmission holograms with high spatial frequencies and an almost flat spatial frequency response may be obtained using the new BB-640 plates.

  20. Improving response rates and evaluating nonresponse bias in surveys: AMEE Guide No. 102.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Andrew W; Reddy, Shalini; Durning, Steven J

    2016-01-01

    Robust response rates are essential for effective survey-based strategies. Researchers can improve survey validity by addressing both response rates and nonresponse bias. In this AMEE Guide, we explain response rate calculations and discuss methods for improving response rates to surveys as a whole (unit nonresponse) and to questions within a survey (item nonresponse). Finally, we introduce the concept of nonresponse bias and provide simple methods to measure it.

  1. Affordable Strategies to Improve Industrial Responsiveness. Volume 2. Past and Present Uses of Voluntary Agreements.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-07-31

    understanding of how these authorities might be used to improve responsiveness of manufacturing and service sectors critical to national security. Keywords: Industrial production , Management information systems. (sdw)

  2. Divergent effects of activating thoughts of God on self-regulation.

    PubMed

    Laurin, Kristin; Kay, Aaron C; Fitzsimons, Gráinne M

    2012-01-01

    Despite the cultural ubiquity of ideas and images related to God, relatively little is known about the effects of exposure to God representations on behavior. Specific depictions of God differ across religions, but common to most is that God is (a) an omnipotent, controlling force and (b) an omniscient, all-knowing being. Given these 2 characteristic features, how might exposure to the concept of God influence behavior? Leveraging classic and recent theorizing on self-regulation and social cognition, we predict and test for 2 divergent effects of exposure to notions of God on self-regulatory processes. Specifically, we show that participants reminded of God (vs. neutral or positive concepts) demonstrate both decreased active goal pursuit (Studies 1, 2, and 5) and increased temptation resistance (Studies 3, 4, and 5). These findings provide the first experimental evidence that exposure to God influences goal pursuit and suggest that the ever-present cultural reminders of God can be both burden and benefit for self-regulation.

  3. Spiritual Struggle Among Patients Seeking Treatment for Chronic Headaches: Anger and Protest Behaviors Toward God.

    PubMed

    Exline, Julie J; Krause, Steven J; Broer, Karen A

    2016-10-01

    This study examined anger and protest behaviors toward God among 80 US adults seeking treatment for chronic headaches (66 women, 14 men; 71 completed treatment). Measures were administered before and after an intensive 3-week outpatient treatment program. At both times, anger and protest toward God correlated with lower pain acceptance, more emotional distress, and greater perceived disability. However, when considered simultaneously, anger predicted sustained distress, whereas protest behaviors (e.g., complaining, questioning, arguing) predicted both reduced distress and an increased sense of meaning. These findings suggest the utility of distinguishing between anger toward God and behaviors suggesting assertiveness toward God.

  4. The protective role of attachment to God against eating disorder risk factors: concurrent and prospective evidence.

    PubMed

    Homan, Kristin J; Boyatzis, Chris J

    2010-01-01

    This short-term longitudinal study explored whether a secure relationship with God would protect young women (N = 231, M = 19.2) from the impact of four risk factors for eating disturbance: pressure to be thin; thin-ideal internalization, body dissatisfaction; and dieting. Analyses showed that women with secure attachment to God experienced reduced levels of each risk factor. Prospective data showed that pressure to be thin and thin-ideal internalization predicted body dissatisfaction only for women with an anxious insecure attachment to God. The data indicate that women who feel loved and accepted by God are buffered from eating disorder risk factors.

  5. Parental and God Representations Among Individuals with Psychosis: A Grounded Theory Analysis.

    PubMed

    Prout, Tracy A; Ottaviano, Patricia; Taveras, Alexa; Sepulveda, Carolyn; Torres, Julian

    2016-12-01

    Religiousness, spirituality, and social support have all been identified as having a positive impact on overall mental health outcomes. The current study describes quantitative and qualitative assessment of parental and God representations among individuals diagnosed with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder (N = 46). Six salient themes emerged; participants described the importance of caregiver love and nurturance, need for God, loss of family members, love of God, concrete support provided by parents, and the ability to tolerate ambivalent feelings toward parents. Participants linked their relationships with parents and God to their process of recovery. Implications for clinical practice are discussed.

  6. The Relationship Between Trust-in-God, Positive and Negative Affect, and Hope.

    PubMed

    Fadardi, Javad S; Azadi, Zeinab

    2017-06-01

    We aimed to test the relationships between Trust-in-God, positive and negative affect, and feelings of hope. A sample of university students (N = 282, 50 % female) completed the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule, the Adult Dispositional Hope Scale, and a Persian measure of Trust-in-God for Muslims. The results of a series of hierarchical regression analyses indicated that Trust-in-God was positively associated with participants' scores for hope and positive affect but was negatively associated with their scores for negative affect. The results support the relationship between Trust-in-God and indices of mental health.

  7. God: Do I have your attention?

    PubMed

    Colzato, Lorenza S; van Beest, Ilja; van den Wildenberg, Wery P M; Scorolli, Claudia; Dorchin, Shirley; Meiran, Nachshon; Borghi, Anna M; Hommel, Bernhard

    2010-10-01

    Religion is commonly defined as a set of rules, developed as part of a culture. Here we provide evidence that practice in following these rules systematically changes the way people attend to visual stimuli, as indicated by the individual sizes of the global precedence effect (better performance to global than to local features). We show that this effect is significantly reduced in Calvinism, a religion emphasizing individual responsibility, and increased in Catholicism and Judaism, religions emphasizing social solidarity. We also show that this effect is long-lasting (still affecting baptized atheists) and that its size systematically varies as a function of the amount and strictness of religious practices. These findings suggest that religious practice induces particular cognitive-control styles that induce chronic, directional biases in the control of visual attention.

  8. 34 CFR 200.39 - Responsibilities resulting from identification for school improvement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... school improvement. 200.39 Section 200.39 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of... Lea and School Improvement § 200.39 Responsibilities resulting from identification for school improvement. (a) If an LEA identifies a school for school improvement under § 200.32— (1) The LEA must—...

  9. Science Partnerships Enabling Rapid Response: Designing a Strategy for Improving Scientific Collaboration during Crisis Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mease, L.; Gibbs, T.; Adiseshan, T.

    2014-12-01

    The 2010 Deepwater Horizon disaster required unprecedented engagement and collaboration with scientists from multiple disciplines across government, academia, and industry. Although this spurred the rapid advancement of valuable new scientific knowledge and tools, it also exposed weaknesses in the system of information dissemination and exchange among the scientists from those three sectors. Limited government communication with the broader scientific community complicated the rapid mobilization of the scientific community to assist with spill response, evaluation of impact, and public perceptions of the crisis. The lessons and new laws produced from prior spills such as Exxon Valdez were helpful, but ultimately did not lead to the actions necessary to prepare a suitable infrastructure that would support collaboration with non-governmental scientists. As oil demand pushes drilling into increasingly extreme environments, addressing the challenge of effective, science-based disaster response is an imperative. Our study employs a user-centered design process to 1) understand the obstacles to and opportunity spaces for effective scientific collaboration during environmental crises such as large oil spills, 2) identify possible tools and strategies to enable rapid information exchange between government responders and non-governmental scientists from multiple relevant disciplines, and 3) build a network of key influencers to secure sufficient buy-in for scaled implementation of appropriate tools and strategies. Our methods include user ethnography, complex system mapping, individual and system behavioral analysis, and large-scale system design to identify and prototype a solution to this crisis collaboration challenge. In this talk, we will present out insights gleaned from existing analogs of successful scientific collaboration during crises and our initial findings from the 60 targeted interviews we conducted that highlight key collaboration challenges that government

  10. Improving Military Response to Catastrophic Events Within the United States

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-03

    government’s ability to respond to catastrophic domestic events. With hard lessons comes change, which can be slow and difficult. Mark Twain said... Mark Twain , The Tragedy of Pudd’nhead Wilson, Pudd’nhead Wilson’s Calendar, 1894 2 Department of Homeland Security, National Response Framework

  11. Improving the Agility of the NATO Response Force (NRF)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-01

    the U.S. committed support to the South Vietnamese government and continued the Vietnam War against the communist North. 29 During the same year...humanitarian crisis) (3) Crisis Response Operations ( CRO ) including Peacekeeping (4) Support Counter Terror (CT) Operations (5) Embargo Operations (6...including satellite communication, air command and control systems, permanent military headquarters, aerial ports , fuel storage and distribution, seaport

  12. Improving Beta Test Evaluation Response Rates: A Meta-Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russ-Eft, Darlene; Preskill, Hallie

    2005-01-01

    This study presents a meta-evaluation of a beta-test of a customer service training program. The initial evaluation showed a low response rate. Therefore, the meta-evaluation focused on issues related to the conduct of the initial evaluation and reasons for nonresponse. The meta-evaluation identified solutions to the nonresponse problem as related…

  13. Improved response functions for gamma-ray skyshine analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shultis, J. K.; Faw, R. E.; Deng, X.

    1992-09-01

    A computationally simple method, based on line-beam response functions, is refined for estimating gamma skyshine dose rates. Critical to this method is the availability of an accurate approximation for the line-beam response function (LBRF). In this study, the LBRF is evaluated accurately with the point-kernel technique using recent photon interaction data. Various approximations to the LBRF are considered, and a three parameter formula is selected as the most practical approximation. By fitting the approximating formula to point-kernel results, a set of parameters is obtained that allows the LBRF to be quickly and accurately evaluated for energies between 0.01 and 15 MeV, for source-to-detector distances from 1 to 3000 m, and for beam angles from 0 to 180 degrees. This re-evaluation of the approximate LBRF gives better accuracy, especially at low energies, over a greater source-to-detector range than do previous LBRF approximations. A conical beam response function is also introduced for application to skyshine sources that are azimuthally symmetric about a vertical axis. The new response functions are then applied to three simple skyshine geometries (an open silo geometry, an infinite wall, and a rectangular four-wall building) and the results are compared to previous calculations and benchmark data.

  14. Chemical and Biological Terrorism: Improvements to Emergency Medical Response.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeGraffenreid, Jeff Gordon

    The challenge facing many emergency medical services (EMS) is the implementation of a comprehensive educational strategy to address emergency responses to terrorism. One such service, Johnson County (Kansas) Medical Action, needed a strategy that would keep paramedics safe and offer the community an effective approach to mitigation. A…

  15. What does God know? Supernatural agents' access to socially strategic and non-strategic information.

    PubMed

    Purzycki, Benjamin G; Finkel, Daniel N; Shaver, John; Wales, Nathan; Cohen, Adam B; Sosis, Richard

    2012-07-01

    Current evolutionary and cognitive theories of religion posit that supernatural agent concepts emerge from cognitive systems such as theory of mind and social cognition. Some argue that these concepts evolved to maintain social order by minimizing antisocial behavior. If these theories are correct, then people should process information about supernatural agents' socially strategic knowledge more quickly than non-strategic knowledge. Furthermore, agents' knowledge of immoral and uncooperative social behaviors should be especially accessible to people. To examine these hypotheses, we measured response-times to questions about the knowledge attributed to four different agents--God, Santa Claus, a fictional surveillance government, and omniscient but non-interfering aliens--that vary in their omniscience, moral concern, ability to punish, and how supernatural they are. As anticipated, participants respond more quickly to questions about agents' socially strategic knowledge than non-strategic knowledge, but only when agents are able to punish.

  16. Moralistic gods, supernatural punishment and the expansion of human sociality.

    PubMed

    Purzycki, Benjamin Grant; Apicella, Coren; Atkinson, Quentin D; Cohen, Emma; McNamara, Rita Anne; Willard, Aiyana K; Xygalatas, Dimitris; Norenzayan, Ara; Henrich, Joseph

    2016-02-18

    Since the origins of agriculture, the scale of human cooperation and societal complexity has dramatically expanded. This fact challenges standard evolutionary explanations of prosociality because well-studied mechanisms of cooperation based on genetic relatedness, reciprocity and partner choice falter as people increasingly engage in fleeting transactions with genetically unrelated strangers in large anonymous groups. To explain this rapid expansion of prosociality, researchers have proposed several mechanisms. Here we focus on one key hypothesis: cognitive representations of gods as increasingly knowledgeable and punitive, and who sanction violators of interpersonal social norms, foster and sustain the expansion of cooperation, trust and fairness towards co-religionist strangers. We tested this hypothesis using extensive ethnographic interviews and two behavioural games designed to measure impartial rule-following among people (n = 591, observations = 35,400) from eight diverse communities from around the world: (1) inland Tanna, Vanuatu; (2) coastal Tanna, Vanuatu; (3) Yasawa, Fiji; (4) Lovu, Fiji; (5) Pesqueiro, Brazil; (6) Pointe aux Piments, Mauritius; (7) the Tyva Republic (Siberia), Russia; and (8) Hadzaland, Tanzania. Participants reported adherence to a wide array of world religious traditions including Christianity, Hinduism and Buddhism, as well as notably diverse local traditions, including animism and ancestor worship. Holding a range of relevant variables constant, the higher participants rated their moralistic gods as punitive and knowledgeable about human thoughts and actions, the more coins they allocated to geographically distant co-religionist strangers relative to both themselves and local co-religionists. Our results support the hypothesis that beliefs in moralistic, punitive and knowing gods increase impartial behaviour towards distant co-religionists, and therefore can contribute to the expansion of prosociality.

  17. God's Thoughts: Practical Steps Toward a Theory of Everything

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lincoln, Don

    2017-04-01

    In 1922, Einstein was speaking to young Esther Salaman during a long walk; she was talking of her dreams and goals and he was sharing some of his thoughts. Among thoughts of travel, he described his core guiding intellectual principle when he said, "I want to know how God created this world [wie sich Gott die Welt beschaffen]. I'm not interested in this or that phenomenon, in the spectrum of this or that element. I want to know His thoughts; the rest are just details."

  18. [To God through science. Natural theology in Francoism].

    PubMed

    Paniagua, Francisco Blázquez

    2011-01-01

    In Spain, during Franco's dictatorship (1939-1975) the teaching and divulgation of science were subordinated to the Catholic religion and many books defended a theistic and creationistic point of view of biology that accepted a literal interpretation of the Book of Genesis and denied the theory of evolution, especially as it relates to human origin. This article is devoted to the main books and characteristics of this way of thinking which reproduced arguments and metaphors of the pre-Darwinian natural theology, arguing that nature was ruled by God and living organisms were the results of his design.

  19. The Iconography and Symbolism of Sun God in Urartian Art

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poghosyan, Gayane

    2016-12-01

    The predominating symbol of the winged sun disc in Urartian religious iconography testifies the significant role and importance of the sun in worship. The stylistic variation and peculiar iconographic features of the winged discs, sacred animals and divine images associated with solar deity shows the relationship between the cult of the sun god, sequence of the different phases of the year and constellations in Urartian culture. Such kind of iconography is possibly formed and stylized in result of interaction of ancient human imaginations, influence of rock paintings and religious beliefs.

  20. 34 CFR 403.204 - What are the State's responsibilities for program evaluation and improvement?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... responsibilities for program evaluation and improvement? (a) If, one year after an eligible recipient has... 34 Education 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What are the State's responsibilities for program evaluation and improvement? 403.204 Section 403.204 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department...

  1. 34 CFR 403.204 - What are the State's responsibilities for program evaluation and improvement?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... responsibilities for program evaluation and improvement? (a) If, one year after an eligible recipient has... 34 Education 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What are the State's responsibilities for program evaluation and improvement? 403.204 Section 403.204 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department...

  2. 34 CFR 403.204 - What are the State's responsibilities for program evaluation and improvement?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... responsibilities for program evaluation and improvement? (a) If, one year after an eligible recipient has... 34 Education 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What are the State's responsibilities for program evaluation and improvement? 403.204 Section 403.204 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department...

  3. 34 CFR 403.204 - What are the State's responsibilities for program evaluation and improvement?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... responsibilities for program evaluation and improvement? (a) If, one year after an eligible recipient has... 34 Education 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What are the State's responsibilities for program evaluation and improvement? 403.204 Section 403.204 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department...

  4. Improving Item Response Theory Model Calibration by Considering Response Times in Psychological Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ranger, Jochen; Kuhn, Jorg-Tobias

    2012-01-01

    Research findings indicate that response times in personality scales are related to the trait level according to the so-called speed-distance hypothesis. Against this background, Ferrando and Lorenzo-Seva proposed a latent trait model for the responses and response times in a test. The model consists of two components, a standard item response…

  5. Improving Kepler Pipeline Sensitivity with Pixel Response Function Photometry.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Robert L.; Bryson, Steve; Jenkins, Jon Michael; Smith, Jeffrey C

    2014-06-01

    We present the results of our investigation into the feasibility and expected benefits of implementing PRF-fitting photometry in the Kepler Science Processing Pipeline. The Kepler Pixel Response Function (PRF) describes the expected system response to a point source at infinity and includes the effects of the optical point spread function, the CCD detector responsivity function, and spacecraft pointing jitter. Planet detection in the Kepler pipeline is currently based on simple aperture photometry (SAP), which is most effective when applied to uncrowded bright stars. Its effectiveness diminishes rapidly as target brightness decreases relative to the effects of noise sources such as detector electronics, background stars, and image motion. In contrast, PRF photometry is based on fitting an explicit model of image formation to the data and naturally accounts for image motion and contributions of background stars. The key to obtaining high-quality photometry from PRF fitting is a high-quality model of the system's PRF, while the key to efficiently processing the large number of Kepler targets is an accurate catalog and accurate mapping of celestial coordinates onto the focal plane. If the CCD coordinates of stellar centroids are known a priori then the problem of PRF fitting becomes linear. A model of the Kepler PRF was constructed at the time of spacecraft commissioning by fitting piecewise polynomial surfaces to data from dithered full frame images. While this model accurately captured the initial state of the system, the PRF has evolved dynamically since then and has been seen to deviate significantly from the initial (static) model. We construct a dynamic PRF model which is then used to recover photometry for all targets of interest. Both simulation tests and results from Kepler flight data demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach. Kepler was selected as the 10th mission of the Discovery Program. Funding for this mission is provided by NASA’s Science

  6. Disasters, the environment, and public health: improving our response.

    PubMed Central

    Logue, J N

    1996-01-01

    Natural and human-made disasters continue to adversely affect all areas of the world in both predictable and unpredictable ways. To highlight the importance of natural disasters, the United Nations declared the 1990s the International Decade for Natural Disaster Reduction. This paper considers the public health response to disasters. It highlights environmental health issues and approaches since disasters are extreme environmental events, and it reviews developments relating to capacity building, training, and collaboration. Although progress is noted, a comprehensive federal or academic approach is not evident in the United States and the proper linkage to environmental health is lacking. With the International Decade now half over, public health professionals and others involved with disaster management should reflect on progress made to date and goals for the future. PMID:8806369

  7. European consumer response to packaging technologies for improved beef safety.

    PubMed

    Van Wezemael, Lynn; Ueland, Øydis; Verbeke, Wim

    2011-09-01

    Beef packaging can influence consumer perceptions of beef. Although consumer perceptions and acceptance are considered to be among the most limiting factors in the application of new technologies, there is a lack of knowledge about the acceptability to consumers of beef packaging systems aimed at improved safety. This paper explores European consumers' acceptance levels of different beef packaging technologies. An online consumer survey was conducted in five European countries (n=2520). Acceptance levels among the sample ranged between 23% for packaging releasing preservative additives up to 73% for vacuum packaging. Factor analysis revealed that familiar packaging technologies were clearly preferred over non-familiar technologies. Four consumer segments were identified: the negative (31% of the sample), cautious (30%), conservative (17%) and enthusiast (22%) consumers, which were profiled based on their attitudes and beef consumption behaviour. Differences between consumer acceptance levels should be taken into account while optimising beef packaging and communicating its benefits.

  8. Commentary training improves responsiveness to hazards in a driving simulator.

    PubMed

    Crundall, David; Andrews, Ben; van Loon, Editha; Chapman, Peter

    2010-11-01

    Can commentary driving produce safer drivers? Producing a verbal commentary of potential hazards during driving has long been considered by the police to improve hazard perception skills. In this study we investigated whether learner drivers would benefit from being trained to produce a commentary drive. All learners were initially assessed on a virtual route in a driving simulator that contained 9 hazards. One group of drivers was then trained in commentary driving, and their subsequent simulated driving behaviour was compared to a control group. The results showed that the trained group had fewer crashes, reduced their speed sooner on approach to hazards, and applied pressure to the brakes sooner than untrained drivers. Conversely the untrained drivers' behaviour on approach to hazards was symptomatic of being surprised at the appearance of the hazards. The benefit of training was found to be greater for certain types of hazard than others.

  9. Theoretical Model of God: The Key to Correct Exploration of the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalanov, Temur Z.

    2007-04-01

    The problem of the correct approach to exploration of the Universe cannot be solved if there is no solution of the problem of existence of God (Creator, Ruler) in science. In this connection, theoretical proof of existence of God is proposed. The theoretical model of God -- as scientific proof of existence of God -- is the consequence of the system of the formulated axioms. The system of the axioms contains, in particular, the following premises: (1) all objects formed (synthesized) by man are characterized by the essential property: namely, divisibility into aspects; (2) objects which can be mentally divided into aspects are objects formed (synthesized); (3) the system ``Universe'' is mentally divided into aspects. Consequently, the Universe represents the system formed (synthesized); (4) the theorem of existence of God (i.e. Absolute, Creator, Ruler) follows from the principle of logical completeness of system of concepts: if the formed (synthesized) system ``Universe'' exists, then God exists as the Absolute, the Creator, the Ruler of essence (i.e. information) and phenomenon (i.e. material objects). Thus, the principle of existence of God -- the content of the theoretical model of God -- must be a starting-point and basis of correct gnosiology and science of 21 century.

  10. God's Categories: The Effect of Religiosity on Children's Teleological and Essentialist Beliefs about Categories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diesendruck, Gil; Haber, Lital

    2009-01-01

    Creationism implies that God imbued each category with a unique nature and purpose. These implications closely correspond to what some cognitive psychologists define as an essentialistic and teleological stance towards categories. This study assessed to what extent the belief in God as creator of categories is related to the mappings of these…

  11. 75 FR 15764 - Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: “Gods of Angkor: Bronzes...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: ``Gods of Angkor: Bronzes From the... 15, 2003 , I hereby determine that the objects to be included in the exhibition ``Gods of...

  12. Children's Image of God and Their Parents: Explorations in Children's Spirituality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baring, Rito

    2012-01-01

    Exploring children's image of God and parents has invited interest among program preparers for children's spirituality in the Philippines. This research seeks to find out the fundamental orientation of children's image of God as well as their perceptions of father and mother from 241 fifth graders in three selected government primary schools in…

  13. Assessing God Locus of Control as a Factor in College Students' Alcohol Use and Sexual Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Erin W.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: This study explored God locus of control beliefs (ie, God's control over behavior) regarding their influence on alcohol use and sexual behavior as an alternative religiosity measure to religious behaviors, which does not capture perceived influence of religiosity. Additionally, demographic differences in religious beliefs were…

  14. Disappointment with God and Well-Being: The Mediating Influence of Relationship Quality and Dispositional Forgiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strelan, Peter; Acton, Collin; Patrick, Kent

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the extent to which disappointment with God influenced the psychological and spiritual well-being of 160 churchgoers, and the potential mediating influences of relationship quality (spiritual maturity and relationship commitment) and dispositional forgiveness. Disappointment with God was positively related to depression and…

  15. Images of a Loving God and Sense of Meaning in Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stroope, Samuel; Draper, Scott; Whitehead, Andrew L.

    2013-01-01

    Although prior studies have documented a positive association between religiosity and sense of meaning in life, the role of specific religious beliefs is currently unclear. Past research on images of God suggests that loving images of God will positively correlate with a sense of meaning and purpose. Mechanisms for this hypothesized relationship…

  16. My Hero, My Friend: Exploring Honduran Youths' Lived Experience of the God-Individual Relationship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Monique B.; Silver, Christopher F.; Ross, Christopher F. J.

    2012-01-01

    Extensive social science research has focused on God image and God concept through the lens of attachment theory and the parental relationship. While vast theoretical frameworks exist, the authors suggest that more focused phenomenological research would shed light on adolescent lived experience within experiential descriptive language and…

  17. Chinese Christians in America: Attachment to God, Stress, and Well-Being

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wei, Meifen; Ku, Tsun-Yao; Chen, Hwei-Jane; Wade, Nathaniel; Liao, Kelly Yu-Hsin; Guo, Gwo-Jen

    2012-01-01

    This study examined whether attachment to God moderated the relation between perceived stress and well-being (i.e., life satisfaction and positive affect) among 183 Chinese Christian international students and immigrants. Results showed significant main effects of (a) perceived stress on life satisfaction and (b) secure attachment to God and…

  18. What's "up" with God? Vertical space as a representation of the divine.

    PubMed

    Meier, Brian P; Hauser, David J; Robinson, Michael D; Friesen, Chris Kelland; Schjeldahl, Katie

    2007-11-01

    "God" and "Devil" are abstract concepts often linked to vertical metaphors (e.g., "glory to God in the highest," "the Devil lives down in hell"). It is unknown, however, whether these metaphors simply aid communication or implicate a deeper mode of concept representation. In 6 experiments, the authors examined the extent to which the vertical dimension is used in noncommunication contexts involving God and the Devil. Experiment 1 established that people have implicit associations between God-Devil and up-down. Experiment 2 revealed that people encode God-related concepts faster if presented in a high (vs. low) vertical position. Experiment 3 found that people's memory for the vertical location of God- and Devil-like images showed a metaphor-consistent bias (up for God; down for Devil). Experiments 4, 5a, and 5b revealed that people rated strangers as more likely to believe in God when their images appeared in a high versus low vertical position, and this effect was independent of inferences related to power and likability. These robust results reveal that vertical perceptions are invoked when people access divinity-related cognitions.

  19. A Revised Semantic Differential Scale Distinguishing between Negative and Positive God Images

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Francis, Leslie J.; Robbins, Mandy; Gibson, Harry M.

    2006-01-01

    A sample of 755 school pupils between the ages of 11 and 18 years completed the Benson and Spilka semantic differential measure of God images. Factor analysis indicated the advantages of re-scoring the measure as an eight item unidimensional index, defining semantic space relating to God images ranging from negative affect to positive affect.…

  20. Extending Ideas on Improving Teaching: Response to Lampert; Lewis, Perry, Friedkin, and Roth; and Zeichner

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hiebert, James; Morris, Anne K.

    2012-01-01

    This article presents the authors' response to the comments of their article about extending ideas on improving teaching. The authors continue the conversation about improving teaching by focusing on two points that deserve further consideration: (1) the willingness or motivation of teachers to engage in the work of improving teaching; and (2) the…

  1. Improved diffusion chamber cultures for cytokinetic analysis of antibody response

    PubMed Central

    Nettesheim, P.; Makinodan, T.; Chadwick, Carol J.

    1966-01-01

    Diffusion chambers (3×10 mm) constructed with 0.1 μ porosity filters, but not with 0.45 μ or greater porosity filters, were found to be consistently cell impermeable, with use of acryloid as the glueing agent. The filters permit free diffusion of 19S and 7S antibodies into `empty' chambers in vivo and in vitro. Pronase treatment of the chamber dissolves the clot and frees cells attached to the inner surfaces. This permits almost complete recovery of the chamber culture cells. Chamber cultures can be readily transferred from one host to another and kept in vitro at room temperature for at least 6 hours without any loss of activity. In vivo diffusion problems arise after 1 month of culture, most probably due to excessive growth of peritoneal cells on the outer surface of the filters; this limitation can be overcome by serial in vivo transfer of the chamber and wiping the outer surface at the time of transfer. The diffusion chamber culture method as described here fulfills all the prerequisites of an assay system with which one can perform precise cytokinetic analysis of antibody response. ImagesFIG. 3 PMID:5926065

  2. Improving OCD time to solution using Signal Response Metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Fang; Zhang, Xiaoxiao; Vaid, Alok; Pandev, Stilian; Sanko, Dimitry; Ramanathan, Vidya; Venkataraman, Kartik; Haupt, Ronny

    2016-03-01

    In recent technology nodes, advanced process and novel integration scheme have challenged the precision limits of conventional metrology; with critical dimensions (CD) of device reduce to sub-nanometer region. Optical metrology has proved its capability to precisely detect intricate details on the complex structures, however, conventional RCWA-based (rigorous coupled wave analysis) scatterometry has the limitations of long time-to-results and lack of flexibility to adapt to wide process variations. Signal Response Metrology (SRM) is a new metrology technique targeted to alleviate the consumption of engineering and computation resources by eliminating geometric/dispersion modeling and spectral simulation from the workflow. This is achieved by directly correlating the spectra acquired from a set of wafers with known process variations encoded. In SPIE 2015, we presented the results of SRM application in lithography metrology and control [1], accomplished the mission of setting up a new measurement recipe of focus/dose monitoring in hours. This work will demonstrate our recent field exploration of SRM implementation in 20nm technology and beyond, including focus metrology for scanner control; post etch geometric profile measurement, and actual device profile metrology.

  3. Mifepristone improves chemo-radiation response in glioblastoma xenografts

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background We have investigated the ability of Mifepristone, an anti-progestin and anti-glucocorticoid drug, to modulate the antitumor effect of current standard clinical treatment in glioblastoma xenografts. Methods The effect of radiation alone or combined with Mifepristone and Temozolamide was evaluated on tumor growth in glioblastoma xenografts, both in terms of preferentially triggering tumor cell death and inhibiting angiogenesis. Tumor size was measured once a week using a caliper and tumor metabolic-activity was carried out by molecular imaging using a microPET/CT scanner. The effect of Mifepristone on the expression of angiogenic factors after concomitant radio-chemotherapy was determined using a quantitative real-time PCR analysis of VEGF gene expression. Results The analysis of the data shows a significant antitumoral effect by the simultaneous administration of radiation-Mifepristone-Temozolamide in comparison with radiation alone or radiation-Temozolamide. Conclusion Our results suggest that Mifepristone could improve the efficacy of chemo-radiotherapy in Glioblastoma. The addition of Mifepristone to standard radiation-Temozolamide therapy represents a potential approach as a chemo-radio-sensitizer in treating GBMs, which have very limited treatment options. PMID:23530939

  4. Social Involvement in Religious Institutions and God-Mediated Control Beliefs: A Longitudinal Investigation.

    PubMed

    Krause, Neal M

    2007-12-07

    This study examines the relationships among race, education, formal as well as informal involvement in the church, and God-mediated control. Formal involvement in the church was assessed by the frequency of attendance at worship services, Bible study groups, and prayer groups. Informal involvement was measured with an index of spiritual support provided by fellow church members. Data from a nationwide longitudinal survey of older people suggest that both formal and informal church involvement tend to sustain feelings of God-mediated control over time. The findings further reveal that compared to older whites, older African Americans are more likely to have stronger feelings of God-mediated control at the baseline survey and older blacks are more likely to sustain their sense of God-mediated control over time. In contrast, the data suggest that education is not significantly related to feelings of God-mediated control.

  5. Representations of God uncovered in a spirituality group of borderline inpatients.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Geoff; Manierre, Amy

    2008-01-01

    We present aspects of a psychoanalytically-oriented, exploratory spirituality group for nine female psychiatric inpatients diagnosed with borderline personality disorder. Through drawings and group process, the patients uncovered and elaborated on their representations of God. Two patterns of representations were identified: (1) representations of a punitive, judgmental, rigid God that seemed directly to reflect and correspond with parental representations and (2) representations of a depersonified, inanimate, abstract God entailing aspects of idealization that seemed to compensate for parental representations. Interestingly, the second pattern was associated with comorbid narcissistic features in the patients. Those patients who presented punitive God representations were able to begin the process of re-creating these representations toward more benign or benevolent images in the context of this group, while those participants who presented depersonified God representations seemed unable to do so.

  6. God attachment, mother attachment, and father attachment in early and middle adolescence.

    PubMed

    Sim, Tick Ngee; Yow, Amanda Shixian

    2011-06-01

    The present study examined the interplay of attachment to God, attachment to mother, and attachment to father with respect to adjustment (hope, self-esteem, depression) for 130 early and 106 middle adolescents in Singapore. Results showed that the parental attachments were generally linked (in expected directions) to adjustment. God attachment, however, had unique results. At the bivariate level, God attachment was only linked to early adolescents' self-esteem. When considered together with parental attachments (including interactions), God attachment did not emerge as the key moderator in attachment interactions and yielded some unexpected results (e.g., being positively linked to depression). These results are discussed viz-a-viz the secure base and safe haven functions that God and parental attachments may play during adolescence.

  7. Blaming god for our pain: human suffering and the divine mind.

    PubMed

    Gray, Kurt; Wegner, Daniel M

    2010-02-01

    Believing in God requires not only a leap of faith but also an extension of people's normal capacity to perceive the minds of others. Usually, people perceive minds of all kinds by trying to understand their conscious experience (what it is like to be them) and their agency (what they can do). Although humans are perceived to have both agency and experience, humans appear to see God as possessing agency, but not experience. God's unique mind is due, the authors suggest, to the uniquely moral role He occupies. In this article, the authors propose that God is seen as the ultimate moral agent, the entity people blame and praise when they receive anomalous harm and help. Support for this proposition comes from research on mind perception, morality, and moral typecasting. Interestingly, although people perceive God as the author of salvation, suffering seems to evoke even more attributions to the divine.

  8. Spirituality among African American cancer survivors: having a personal relationship with God.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Jill B; Powe, Barbara D; Pollard, Alton B; Lee, Karen J; Felton, Alexandria M

    2007-01-01

    African American breast and prostate cancer survivors describe their personal relationship with God as very real, close, and intimate. During their cancer trajectory, God was there with them, healing, protecting, and in control of their lives. Participants believed that God provided types of support not available from family members or friends. In return, these participants dedicated their lives to God through service in their churches or through helping others. Findings can help healthcare professionals and others in clinical practice to understand the reliance that many African American cancer survivors have on their spirituality. These findings also suggest that many African Americans perceive their survival from cancer as a gift from God. Therefore, for them, finding a way to give back is an important component of their spirituality.

  9. Social Involvement in Religious Institutions and God-Mediated Control Beliefs: A Longitudinal Investigation

    PubMed Central

    KRAUSE, NEAL M.

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the relationships among race, education, formal as well as informal involvement in the church, and God-mediated control. Formal involvement in the church was assessed by the frequency of attendance at worship services, Bible study groups, and prayer groups. Informal involvement was measured with an index of spiritual support provided by fellow church members. Data from a nationwide longitudinal survey of older people suggest that both formal and informal church involvement tend to sustain feelings of God-mediated control over time. The findings further reveal that compared to older whites, older African Americans are more likely to have stronger feelings of God-mediated control at the baseline survey and older blacks are more likely to sustain their sense of God-mediated control over time. In contrast, the data suggest that education is not significantly related to feelings of God-mediated control. PMID:21359114

  10. Improving policy responses to the risk of air pollution.

    PubMed

    Rabl, Ari; Nathwani, Jatin; Pandey, Mahesh; Hurley, Fintan

    2007-02-01

    This paper offers a brief review of the need for cost-benefit analysis (CBA) and the available policy instruments for air pollution. To prioritize different possible actions, one needs to know which source of pollution causes how much damage. This requires an impact pathway analysis, that is, an analysis of the chain emission --> dispersion --> dose-response function --> monetary valuation. The methodology for this is described and illustrated with the results of the ExternE (External Costs of Energy) project series of the European Commission. Two examples of an application to CBA are shown: one where a proposed reduction of emission limits is justified, and one where it is not. It is advisable to subject any proposed regulation to a CBA, including an analysis of the uncertainties. Even if the uncertainties are large and a policy decision may have to take other considerations into account, a well-documented CBA clarifies the issues and provides a basis for rational discussion. One of the main sources of uncertainty lies in the monetary valuation of premature mortality, the dominant contribution to the damage cost of air pollution. As an alternative, an innovative policy tool is described, the Life Quality Index (LQI), a compound indicator comprising societal wealth and life expectancy. It is applied to the Canada-wide standards for particulate matter and ozone. Regardless of monetary valuation, a 50% reduction of PM10 concentrations in Europe and North America has been shown to yield a population-average life expectancy increase on the order of 4 to 5 mo.

  11. Changes in cerebro-cerebellar interaction during response inhibition after performance improvement.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Satoshi; Jimura, Koji; Kunimatsu, Akira; Abe, Osamu; Ohtomo, Kuni; Miyashita, Yasushi; Konishi, Seiki

    2014-10-01

    It has been demonstrated that motor learning is supported by the cerebellum and the cerebro-cerebellar interaction. Response inhibition involves motor responses and the higher-order inhibition that controls the motor responses. In this functional MRI study, we measured the cerebro-cerebellar interaction during response inhibition in two separate days of task performance, and detected the changes in the interaction following performance improvement. Behaviorally, performance improved in the second day, compared to the first day. The psycho-physiological interaction (PPI) analysis revealed the interaction decrease from the right inferior frontal cortex (rIFC) to the cerebellum (lobule VII or VI). It was also revealed that the interaction increased from the same cerebellar region to the primary motor area. These results suggest the involvement of the cerebellum in response inhibition, and raise the possibility that the performance improvement was supported by the changes in the cerebro-cerebellar interaction.

  12. Investigations of the mechanisms by which lower body negative pressure (LBNP) improves orthostatic responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fortney, S. M.; Steinmann, L.; Dussack, L.; Wood, M.; Cintron, N.; Whitson, P.

    1992-01-01

    Saline ingestion during LBNP is a counter measure proposed to improve orthostatic function during space flight. To understand the mechanism(s) responsible for this effect, body fluid, endocrine, and orthostatic responses (graded LBNP tests) were measured during bed rest (BR) and after 2 hr and 4 hr LBNP/saline treatments (-30 mm Hg and 1 liter of isotonic saline). PV (from I-125 and hematocrit measurements) decreased during BR but was restored to the pre-bed rest level (3157 +/- 161 ml) 20 hrs after both 2 hr (3109 +/- 146 ml) and 4 hr (3144 +/- 173 ml) LBNP. The heart rate response to graded LBNP tests was significantly improved after the 4 hr, but not after the 2 hr treatment. These results suggest PV expansion may be responsible for some improvement in orthostatic responses, but other mechanisms also must contribute.

  13. Accidents and acts of God: a history of the terms.

    PubMed Central

    Loimer, H; Guarnieri, M

    1996-01-01

    Despite criticism from safety professionals, scientists continue to use the word accident, meaning an unexpected, unintended injury, or event. Some argue for its use based on tradition, but "traditional" arguments appear to be invalid given our examination of the history of the word and its companion phrase act of God in statistics, law, and religion. People who were interested in public health recognized in the 1600s that unintended injuries were neither random nor unexpected. Legal scholars in the 1800s saw the word was useless for technical purposes. The word does not appear in the Bible until the mid 1900s and then only in a para-phrased edition. Others have maintained that the meaning of accident is well understood, even though it has not been perfectly defined. We maintain that without a clear definition, people substitute an image, which may be distorted or damaging. Images p102-a p104-a p105-a PMID:8561226

  14. Accidents and acts of God: a history of the terms.

    PubMed

    Loimer, H; Guarnieri, M

    1996-01-01

    Despite criticism from safety professionals, scientists continue to use the word accident, meaning an unexpected, unintended injury, or event. Some argue for its use based on tradition, but "traditional" arguments appear to be invalid given our examination of the history of the word and its companion phrase act of God in statistics, law, and religion. People who were interested in public health recognized in the 1600s that unintended injuries were neither random nor unexpected. Legal scholars in the 1800s saw the word was useless for technical purposes. The word does not appear in the Bible until the mid 1900s and then only in a para-phrased edition. Others have maintained that the meaning of accident is well understood, even though it has not been perfectly defined. We maintain that without a clear definition, people substitute an image, which may be distorted or damaging.

  15. Community psychology is (thank God) more than science.

    PubMed

    Rappaport, Julian

    2005-06-01

    Thinking about Community Psychology primarily as a science may make it harder, rather than easier, to embrace certain aspects of the field to which we are deeply committed, but usually fall outside the conventional meaning of "doing science." While community psychologists use (and expand) the tools of science, this is different than saying that Community Psychology is only, or even primarily, a science. The field is just as much social criticism as it is science. In order to further conversation about these matters, seven thoughts about why (thank God) community psychology is more than a science are offered, the most basic of which is that today the greatest danger to freedom is not in the union of church and state, but in the union of science and state.

  16. Work of the Gods: Tatai Arorangi (Maori Astronomy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leather, Kay; Hall, Richard

    Knowledgeable elders of ancient times, and their descendants today, studied the heavens and the stars - such was matai whetu, study of the stars - to identify the heavenly bodies and their relationships to each other. The knowledge gained was arranged in whakapapa, genealogies. Recitation of the star names was known as tatai whetu; navigation across the seas was tatai aro rangi: finding the appropriate path by the stars. The maramataka, or literally moon calendar, and the seasons were determined by the heliacal rising (rising just before the Sun) of certain stars. Knowledge of their world was the tool the ancients used to order their lives. From the first twitch in Te Kore, which gave life, to the continuous flow of creation, carried in the waters of life, even unto the breath of life, which allows creatures to move under their own mana, all the universe shares the tapu and the mana of the gods.

  17. Preparedness and emergency response research centers: using a public health systems approach to improve all-hazards preparedness and response.

    PubMed

    Leinhos, Mary; Qari, Shoukat H; Williams-Johnson, Mildred

    2014-01-01

    In 2008, at the request of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Institute of Medicine (IOM) prepared a report identifying knowledge gaps in public health systems preparedness and emergency response and recommending near-term priority research areas. In accordance with the Pandemic and All-Hazards Preparedness Act mandating new public health systems research for preparedness and emergency response, CDC provided competitive awards establishing nine Preparedness and Emergency Response Research Centers (PERRCs) in accredited U.S. schools of public health. The PERRCs conducted research in four IOM-recommended priority areas: (1) enhancing the usefulness of public health preparedness and response (PHPR) training, (2) creating and maintaining sustainable preparedness and response systems, (3) improving PHPR communications, and (4) identifying evaluation criteria and metrics to improve PHPR for all hazards. The PERRCs worked closely with state and local public health, community partners, and advisory committees to produce practice-relevant research findings. PERRC research has generated more than 130 peer-reviewed publications and nearly 80 practice and policy tools and recommendations with the potential to significantly enhance our nation's PHPR to all hazards and that highlight the need for further improvements in public health systems.

  18. Absence of spontaneous response improvement beyond day +100 after autologous stem cell transplantation in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Fernández de Larrea, C; Dávila, J; Isola, I; Ocio, E M; Rosiñol, L; García-Sanz, R; Cibeira, M T; Tovar, N; Rovira, M; Mateos, M V; Miguel, J S; Bladé, J

    2017-04-01

    The response evaluation after autologous stem-cell transplantation (ASCT) is usually performed at day +100 in patients with multiple myeloma (MM). A recent report suggests that improvement in the response can be observed beyond day +100. The aim of the present study has been to evaluate the rate of improved response and outcome beyond day +100 after ASCT, with and without maintenance therapy. One hundred and forty-four patients who underwent single ASCT with chemosensitive disease and achieved less than CR at day 100 post ASCT were evaluated. Seventy-four patients (51.4%) did not receive any maintenance with only one of them showing an upgrade in the response. The remaining 70 patients (48.6%) received maintenance therapy; eleven of them (15.7%) improved their response beyond day +100. The outcome of these patients was better than those who did not upgrade their response in both progression-free survival and overall survival (P=0.019 and P=0.031, respectively). In conclusion, the improvement in response beyond day +100 after ASCT in patients not receiving any therapy is exceedingly rare. A minority of patients receiving maintenance therapy after ASCT upgrades their response and this finding is associated with better outcome.

  19. Improving Survey Response Rates of School Counselors: Comparing the Use of Incentives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauman, Sheri

    2007-01-01

    This article examines the effectiveness of incentives in improving survey response rates of school counselors and compares the findings with those of previously researched populations. A $1 cash incentive increased response rates for a one-wave mailing of a questionnaire, while a raffle opportunity did not. The number and length of optional…

  20. Response to Intervention: Does It Improve Literacy Skills for At-Risk Students?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vatakis, Tiffany

    2016-01-01

    Response to Intervention (RTI) has been used in the public school system to improve student achievement in areas of weakness and identify students who may need further resources. The local goal is to improve the retention rate and identify those students that may need additional support systems. The overall goal is to decrease the number of…

  1. Mind over Matter: Reappraising Arousal Improves Cardiovascular and Cognitive Responses to Stress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jamieson, Jeremy P.; Nock, Matthew K.; Mendes, Wendy Berry

    2012-01-01

    Researchers have theorized that changing the way we think about our bodily responses can improve our physiological and cognitive reactions to stressful events. However, the underlying processes through which mental states improve downstream outcomes are not well understood. To this end, we examined whether reappraising stress-induced arousal could…

  2. Does the perception that God controls health outcomes matter for health behaviors?

    PubMed

    Karvinen, Kristina H; Carr, Lucas J

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the associations between God Locus of Health Control, health behaviors, and beliefs utilizing a cross-sectional online survey (N = 549). Results indicated that God Locus of Health Control was correlated with alcohol use, physical activity, perceived risk of chronic disease, and beliefs that poor health behaviors contribute to chronic disease (all p values < .05). Multiple regression analyses including covariates and other locus of control variables revealed that God Locus of Health Control was only an independent correlate of the belief that physical inactivity contributed to chronic disease. Insights from this study may be important for future faith-based health behavior change interventions.

  3. Different effects of religion and God on prosociality with the ingroup and outgroup.

    PubMed

    Preston, Jesse Lee; Ritter, Ryan S

    2013-11-01

    Recent studies have found that activating religious cognition by priming techniques can enhance prosocial behavior, arguably because religious concepts carry prosocial associations. But many of these studies have primed multiple concepts simultaneously related to the sacred. We argue here that religion and God are distinct concepts that activate distinct associations. In particular, we examine the effect of God and religion on prosociality toward the ingroup and outgroup. In three studies, we found that religion primes enhanced prosociality toward ingroup members, consistent with ingroup affiliation, whereas, God primes enhanced prosociality toward outgroup member, consistent with concerns of moral impression management. Implications for theory and methodology in religious cognition are discussed.

  4. The Importance of Terminal Values and Religious Experience of God's Presence and God's Absence in the Lives of University Students with Various Levels of Empathy.

    PubMed

    Głaz, Stanisław

    2015-06-01

    The aims of the research I embarked on were: (a) to show the preference of terminal values in personal and in social character, as well to determine the level of religious experience--God's presence and God's absence, in groups of young people characterized by a high and low level of empathy and (b) to show the relation between terminal values in personal and in social character and religious experience: God's presence and God's absence, in groups of young people with a high and low level of empathy. In the research, the following methods were applied: The Scale of Religious Experience by Głaz-in order to define the level of religious experience: God's presence and God's absence, and Mehrabian and Epstein's Questionnaire Measure of Emotional Empathy-in order to define the level of empathy. In order to show the terminal values preference amongst young people, the Rokeach Value Survey was applied. The research was carried out in Kraków amongst 200 university students. The research has shown that students with a high level of empathy reveal a higher level of experience of God's presence than the people with a low level of it. University students with a high level of empathy amongst terminal values prefer most two values in personal character, that is wisdom and pleasure, and one in social character-family security. Similarly, students with a low level of empathy prefer most also two values in personal character, that is pleasure and freedom, and one in social character-family security. In the group of people with a high level of empathy, it is value in personal character-a sense of accomplishment-that contribute more to explaining the variance of religious experience of God's presence, and in group of people with a low level of empathy, it is social value-social recognition. Whereas in the group of people with a high level of empathy it is value in social character-equality-that contribute more to explaining the variance of religious experience of God's absence, and

  5. A Puzzle Unsolved: Failure to Observe Different Effects of God and Religion Primes on Intergroup Attitudes.

    PubMed

    Ramsay, Jonathan E; Tong, Eddie M W; Pang, Joyce S; Chowdhury, Avijit

    2016-01-01

    Religious priming has been found to have both positive and negative consequences, and recent research suggests that the activation of God-related and community-related religious cognitions may cause outgroup prosociality and outgroup derogation respectively. The present research sought to examine whether reminders of God and religion have different effects on attitudes towards ingroup and outgroup members. Over two studies, little evidence was found for different effects of these two types of religious primes. In study 1, individuals primed with the words "religion", "God" and a neutral control word evaluated both ingroup and outgroup members similarly, although a marginal tendency towards more negative evaluations of outgroup members by females exposed to religion primes was observed. In study 2, no significant differences in attitudes towards an outgroup member were observed between the God, religion, and neutral priming conditions. Furthermore, the gender effect observed in study 1 did not replicate in this second study. Possible explanations for these null effects are discussed.

  6. Attachment to God, religious tradition, and firm attributes in workplace commitment.

    PubMed

    Kent, Blake Victor

    2016-09-29

    Research on organizational commitment suggests there is an association between American theists' emotional attachment to God and their emotional commitment to the workplace. A sense of divine calling has been shown to partially mediate this association but, beyond that, little is known. The purpose of this study is to shed further light on the relationship between secure attachment to God and affective organizational commitment. I do so by testing whether the employee's religious tradition is associated with affective organizational commitment and whether the employee's firm attributes moderate the relationship between attachment to God and organizational commitment. Results suggest that: 1) Catholics evince higher levels of organizational commitment than Evangelicals, and 2) firm size significantly moderates the relationship between attachment to God and organizational commitment across religious affiliations.

  7. Forgiveness by God, Forgiveness of Others, and Psychological Well-Being in Late Life

    PubMed Central

    Krause, Neal; Ellison, Christopher G.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the relationships among forgiveness by God, forgiveness of others, and psychological well-being with data provided by a nationwide survey of older adults. Three main findings emerge from the analyses. First, the data suggest that forgiving others tends to enhance psychological well-being, and these salubrious effects are greater than those associated with forgiveness by God. Second, the findings indicate that how older people go about forgiving others is important: older adults who require transgressors to perform acts of contrition experience more psychological distress than those who forgive unconditionally. Third, the results reveal that forgiveness by God may be involved in this process because older people who feel they are forgiven by God are less likely to expect transgressors to perform acts of contrition. PMID:21373377

  8. A Decline in Response Variability Improves Neural Signal Detection during Auditory Task Performance.

    PubMed

    von Trapp, Gardiner; Buran, Bradley N; Sen, Kamal; Semple, Malcolm N; Sanes, Dan H

    2016-10-26

    The detection of a sensory stimulus arises from a significant change in neural activity, but a sensory neuron's response is rarely identical to successive presentations of the same stimulus. Large trial-to-trial variability would limit the central nervous system's ability to reliably detect a stimulus, presumably affecting perceptual performance. However, if response variability were to decrease while firing rate remained constant, then neural sensitivity could improve. Here, we asked whether engagement in an auditory detection task can modulate response variability, thereby increasing neural sensitivity. We recorded telemetrically from the core auditory cortex of gerbils, both while they engaged in an amplitude-modulation detection task and while they sat quietly listening to the identical stimuli. Using a signal detection theory framework, we found that neural sensitivity was improved during task performance, and this improvement was closely associated with a decrease in response variability. Moreover, units with the greatest change in response variability had absolute neural thresholds most closely aligned with simultaneously measured perceptual thresholds. Our findings suggest that the limitations imposed by response variability diminish during task performance, thereby improving the sensitivity of neural encoding and potentially leading to better perceptual sensitivity.

  9. Balance perturbation system to improve balance compensatory responses during walking in old persons

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Ageing commonly disrupts the balance control and compensatory postural responses that contribute to maintaining balance and preventing falls during perturbation of posture. This can lead to increased risk of falling in old adults (65 years old and over). Therefore, improving compensatory postural responses during walking is one of the goals in fall prevention programs. Training is often used to achieve this goal. Most fall prevention programs are usually directed towards improving voluntary postural control. Since compensatory postural responses triggered by a slip or a trip are not under direct volitional control these exercises are less expected to improve compensatory postural responses due to lack of training specificity. Thus, there is a need to investigate the use balance perturbations during walking to train more effectively compensatory postural reactions during walking. This paper describes the Balance Measure & Perturbation System (BaMPer System) a system that provides small, controlled and unpredictable perturbations during treadmill walking providing valuable perturbation, which allows training compensatory postural responses during walking which thus hypothesize to improve compensatory postural responses in older adults. PMID:20630113

  10. Believers' estimates of God's beliefs are more egocentric than estimates of other people's beliefs

    PubMed Central

    Epley, Nicholas; Converse, Benjamin A.; Delbosc, Alexa; Monteleone, George A.; Cacioppo, John T.

    2009-01-01

    People often reason egocentrically about others' beliefs, using their own beliefs as an inductive guide. Correlational, experimental, and neuroimaging evidence suggests that people may be even more egocentric when reasoning about a religious agent's beliefs (e.g., God). In both nationally representative and more local samples, people's own beliefs on important social and ethical issues were consistently correlated more strongly with estimates of God's beliefs than with estimates of other people's beliefs (Studies 1–4). Manipulating people's beliefs similarly influenced estimates of God's beliefs but did not as consistently influence estimates of other people's beliefs (Studies 5 and 6). A final neuroimaging study demonstrated a clear convergence in neural activity when reasoning about one's own beliefs and God's beliefs, but clear divergences when reasoning about another person's beliefs (Study 7). In particular, reasoning about God's beliefs activated areas associated with self-referential thinking more so than did reasoning about another person's beliefs. Believers commonly use inferences about God's beliefs as a moral compass, but that compass appears especially dependent on one's own existing beliefs. PMID:19955414

  11. Relationship with God and the quality of life of prostate cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Gall, Terry Lynn

    2004-10-01

    This study explored the role of relationship with God with respect to the quality of life of men with prostate cancer. Thirty-four men with prostate cancer completed questionnaires on demographic and illness factors, aspects of relationship with God (e.g., God image), nonreligious resources (e.g., optimism) and physical, social and emotion functioning. Results showed that relationship with God was a significant factor in the prediction of role, emotional and social functioning for these men after controlling for age, reported severity of treatment reactions and nonreligious resources. Notably, different aspects of relationship with God (e.g., causal attribution) evidenced different associations with functioning and the nonreligious resource of perceived health control. Such results suggest that relationship with God may function in a complex manner as a resource in coping with prostate cancer. Longitudinal research is needed to clarify the role of religious/spiritual resources in the short- and long-term quality of life of men with prostate cancer.

  12. Assessing and improving cross-border chemical incident preparedness and response across Europe.

    PubMed

    Stewart-Evans, James; Hall, Lisbeth; Czerczak, Slawomir; Manley, Kevin; Dobney, Alec; Hoffer, Sally; Pałaszewska-Tkacz, Anna; Jankowska, Agnieszka

    2014-11-01

    Good practices in emergency preparedness and response for chemical incidents include practices specific to the different functions of exposure assessment (e.g., within the monitoring function, the use of mobile monitoring equipment; within the modelling function, the use of rapid dispersion models with integrated mapping software) and generic practices to engage incident response stakeholders to maximise exposure assessment capabilities (e.g., sharing protocols and pre-prepared information and multi-agency training and exercising). Such practices can optimise cross-border collaboration. A wide range of practices have been implemented across MSs during chemical incident response, particularly during incidents that have cross-border and trans-boundary impacts. This paper proposes a self-assessment methodology to enable MSs, or organisations within MSs, to examine exposure assessment capabilities and communication pathways between exposure assessors and public health risk assessors. Where gaps exist, this methodology provides links to good practices that could improve response, communication and collaboration across local, regional and national borders. A fragmented approach to emergency preparedness for chemical incidents is a major obstacle to improving cross-border exposure assessment. There is no one existing body or structure responsible for all aspects of chemical incident preparedness and response in the European Union. Due to the range of different organisations and networks involved in chemical incident response, emergency preparedness needs to be drawn together. A number of recommendations are proposed, including the use of networks of experts which link public health risk assessors with experts in exposure assessment, in order to coordinate and improve chemical incident emergency preparedness. The EU's recent Decision on serious cross-border threats to health aims to facilitate MSs' compliance with the International Health Regulations, which require

  13. Understanding plant response to nitrogen limitation for the improvement of crop nitrogen use efficiency.

    PubMed

    Kant, Surya; Bi, Yong-Mei; Rothstein, Steven J

    2011-02-01

    Development of genetic varieties with improved nitrogen use efficiency (NUE) is essential for sustainable agriculture. Generally, NUE can be divided into two parts. First, assimilation efficiency involves nitrogen (N) uptake and assimilation and second utilization efficiency involves N remobilization. Understanding the mechanisms regulating these processes is crucial for the improvement of NUE in crop plants. One important approach is to develop an understanding of the plant response to different N regimes, especially to N limitation, using various methods including transcription profiling, analysing mutants defective in their normal response to N limitation, and studying plants that show better growth under N-limiting conditions. One can then attempt to improve NUE in crop plants using the knowledge gained from these studies. There are several potential genetic and molecular approaches for the improvement of crop NUE discussed in this review. Increased knowledge of how plants respond to different N levels as well as to other environmental conditions is required to achieve this.

  14. Ongoing efforts to improve the international nuclear and radiological emergency response.

    PubMed

    Ugletveit, Finn; Molhoek, Wim

    2004-01-01

    It is recognised that states, through the development of a consistent, coherent and sustainable joint programme for improved and more efficient international responses to nuclear and radiological emergencies, could achieve a better and more cost-effective response capability. Enhanced efforts by IAEA member states and the IAEA secretariat to improve the implementation of the Convention on Early Notification of a Nuclear Accident and the Convention on Assistance in Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency have been initiated, establishing a national competent authority coordination group (NCACG) and a long-term action plan for the work.

  15. Development of Vestibular Stochastic Resonance as a Sensorimotor Countermeasure: Improving Otolith Ocular and Motor Task Responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulavara, Ajitkumar; Fiedler, Matthew; DeDios,Yiri E.; Galvan, Raquel; Bloomberg, Jacob; Wood, Scott

    2011-01-01

    Astronauts experience disturbances in sensorimotor function after spaceflight during the initial introduction to a gravitational environment, especially after long-duration missions. Stochastic resonance (SR) is a mechanism by which noise can assist and enhance the response of neural systems to relevant, imperceptible sensory signals. We have previously shown that imperceptible electrical stimulation of the vestibular system enhances balance performance while standing on an unstable surface. The goal of our present study is to develop a countermeasure based on vestibular SR that could improve central interpretation of vestibular input and improve motor task responses to mitigate associated risks.

  16. On timing response improvement of an NE213 scintillator attached to two PMTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zare, S.; Ghal-Eh, N.; Bayat, E.

    2013-09-01

    A 5 cm diameter by 6 cm height NE213 scintillator attached to two XP2282 PHOTONIS photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) exposed to 241Americium-Berylium (Am-Be) neutron-gamma source has been used for timing response studies. The neutron-gamma discrimination (NGD) measurements based on a modified zero-crossing (ZC) method show that the discrimination quality, usually expressed in figure-of-merit (FoM) and peak-to-valley (P/V) values, has been improved. The timing response evaluated with Monte Carlo light transport code, PHOTRACK, also verifies this improvement.

  17. Use of the Vocera Communications Badge Improves Public Safety Response Times

    PubMed Central

    Joslin, Jeremy D.; Goldberger, David; Johnson, Loretta; Waltz, D. Paul

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. Violence in the Emergency Department (ED) has been a long-standing issue complicated by deficiencies in staff training, ease of weapons access, and response availability of public safety officers. The Vocera Badge is being used by our staff to request public safety assistance in lieu of a formal phone call to the University Police Communications Center. We sought to learn if use of this technology improved officer response times to the ED. Methods. Mean response times were reviewed and descriptive statistics analyzed to determine if the use of the Vocera Badge improved public safety officer response times to the ED. Results. Average response times improved from an average of 3.2 minutes (SD = 0.456) in the 6 months before the use of the communication badges to an average of 1.02 minutes (SD = 0.319) in the 6 months after use began. Conclusions. The use of the Vocera Badge seemed to decrease response times of public safety officers to our ED compared with the traditional method of calling a dispatch center to request assistance. PMID:27127654

  18. Improving response rate and quality of survey data with a scratch lottery ticket incentive

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The quality of data collected in survey research is usually indicated by the response rate; the representativeness of the sample, and; the rate of completed questions (item-response). In attempting to improve a generally declining response rate in surveys considerable efforts are being made through follow-up mailings and various types of incentives. This study examines effects of including a scratch lottery ticket in the invitation letter to a survey. Method Questionnaires concerning oral health were mailed to a random sample of 2,400 adults. A systematically selected half of the sample (1,200 adults) received a questionnaire including a scratch lottery ticket. One reminder without the incentive was sent. Results The incentive increased the response rate and improved representativeness by reaching more respondents with lower education. Furthermore, it reduced item nonresponse. The initial incentive had no effect on the propensity to respond after the reminder. Conclusion When attempting to improve survey data, three issues become important: response rate, representativeness, and item-response. This study shows that including a scratch lottery ticket in the invitation letter performs well on all the three. PMID:22515335

  19. Fingers-of-God effect of infalling satellite galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hikage, Chiaki; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Non-linear redshift-space distortion known as the Fingers-of-God (FoG) effect is a major systematic uncertainty in redshift-space distortion studies conducted to test gravity models. The FoG effect has been usually attributed to the random motion of galaxies inside their clusters. When the internal galaxy motion is not well virialized, however, the coherent infalling motion towards the cluster centre generates the FoG effect. Here, we derive an analytical model of the satellite velocity distribution due to the infall motion combined with the random motion. We show that the velocity distribution becomes far from Maxwellian when the infalling motion is dominant. We use simulated subhalo catalogues to find that the contribution of infall motion is important to massive subhaloes and that the velocity distribution has a top-hat like shape as expected from our analytic model. We also study the FoG effect due to infall motion on the redshift-space power spectrum. Using simulated mock samples of luminous red galaxies constructed from haloes and massive subhaloes in N-body simulations, we show that the redshift-space power spectra can differ from expectations when the infall motion is ignored.

  20. Design of energy storage system to improve inertial response for large scale PV generation

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Xiaoyu; Yue, Meng

    2016-07-01

    With high-penetration levels of renewable generating sources being integrated into the existing electric power grid, conventional generators are being replaced and grid inertial response is deteriorating. This technical challenge is more severe with photovoltaic (PV) generation than with wind generation because PV generation systems cannot provide inertial response unless special countermeasures are adopted. To enhance the inertial response, this paper proposes to use battery energy storage systems (BESS) as the remediation approach to accommodate the degrading inertial response when high penetrations of PV generation are integrated into the existing power grid. A sample power system was adopted and simulated usingmore » PSS/E software. Here, impacts of different penetration levels of PV generation on the system inertial response were investigated and then BESS was incorporated to improve the frequency dynamics.« less

  1. Design of energy storage system to improve inertial response for large scale PV generation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xiaoyu; Yue, Meng

    2016-07-01

    With high-penetration levels of renewable generating sources being integrated into the existing electric power grid, conventional generators are being replaced and grid inertial response is deteriorating. This technical challenge is more severe with photovoltaic (PV) generation than with wind generation because PV generation systems cannot provide inertial response unless special countermeasures are adopted. To enhance the inertial response, this paper proposes to use battery energy storage systems (BESS) as the remediation approach to accommodate the degrading inertial response when high penetrations of PV generation are integrated into the existing power grid. A sample power system was adopted and simulated using PSS/E software. Here, impacts of different penetration levels of PV generation on the system inertial response were investigated and then BESS was incorporated to improve the frequency dynamics.

  2. The place of God in synthetic biology: how will the Catholic Church respond?

    PubMed

    Heavey, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Some religious believers may see synthetic biology as usurping God's creative role. The Catholic Church has yet to issue a formal teaching on the field (though it has issued some informal statements in response to Craig Venter's development of a 'synthetic' cell). In this paper I examine the likely reaction of the Catholic Magisterium to synthetic biology in its entirety. I begin by examining the Church's teaching role, from its own viewpoint, to set the necessary backround and context for the discussion that follows. I then describe the Church's attitude to science, and particularly to biotechnology. From this I derive a likely Catholic theology of synthetic biology. The Church's teachings on scientific and biotech research show that it is likely to have a generally positive disposition to synbio, if it and its products can be acceptably safe. Proper evaluation of, and protection against, risk will be a significant factor in determining the morality of the research. If the risks can be minimized through regulation or other means, then the Church is likely to be supportive. The Church will also critique the social and legal environment in which the research is done, evaluating issues such as the patenting of scientific discoveries and of life.

  3. Centrilobular emphysema combined with pulmonary fibrosis results in improved survival: a response.

    PubMed

    Cottin, Vincent; Cordier, Jean-François; Wells, Athol U

    2011-07-25

    Better survival in combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema than in lone pulmonary fibrosis: bias or reality? A response to Centrilobular emphysema combined with pulmonary fibrosis results in improved survival by Todd et al., Fibrogenesis & Tissue Repair 2011, 4:6.Please see related letter http://fibrogenesis.com/content/4/1/17.

  4. Changes in Sensory Evoked Responses Coincide with Rapid Improvement in Speech Identification Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alain, Claude; Campeanu, Sandra; Tremblay, Kelly

    2010-01-01

    Perceptual learning is sometimes characterized by rapid improvements in performance within the first hour of training (fast perceptual learning), which may be accompanied by changes in sensory and/or response pathways. Here, we report rapid physiological changes in the human auditory system that coincide with learning during a 1-hour test session…

  5. Improving Instructor Response to Student E-Mails Using Template and Reminder Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elbeck, Matthew; Song, Minjung

    2011-01-01

    Student e-mails without the student's name, message, file attachment, and other identifying information may impede a timely and thorough instructor response. To help resolve this issue, we apply template and reminder interventions to improve student e-mail format defined as the degree of agreement between a student's e-mail format and an…

  6. Interventions to Improve Responses of Helping Professionals to Intimate Partner Violence: A Quick Scoping Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Y. Joon; An, Soonok

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of the study is to systematically review the available evidence on the effectiveness of interventions to improve the response of various helping professionals who come into contact with female victims of intimate partner violence (IPV). Methods: Several databases were searched, and N = 38 studies met the inclusion criteria…

  7. Early Symptom Improvement as a Predictor of Response to Extended Release Quetiapine in Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    McIntyre, Roger S.; Gorwood, Philip; Thase, Michael E.; Liss, Charlie; Desai, Dhaval; Chen, Ji; Bauer, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this post-hoc analysis was to determine whether early symptom improvement with extended release quetiapine (quetiapine XR) may predict treatment outcome in patients with major depressive disorder. Data were from 6, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies of quetiapine XR (2 fixed-dose and 2 flexible-dose monotherapy and 2 adjunct studies) in adult patients with major depressive disorder. Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) and Clinical Global Impression-Severity Score (CGI-S) were assessed at baseline, weeks 2, 4, and 6. Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D) was assessed at baseline and week 6. The MADRS improvement at week 2 (15%, 20%, 25%, 30%) was used to predict response and remission, based on MADRS (50% improvement; total score ≤ 12) or HAM-D (50% improvement; total score ≤ 7). The CGI-S improvement (1 point) at week 2 was used to predict final outcome (CGI-S score ≤ 2). The predictive value for early improvement with quetiapine XR was found to be “very strong” (Yule’s Q coefficient, a combined measure of sensitivity and specificity) using 30% MADRS improvement as the threshold. This was relatively comparable for response and remission and for fixed-dose, flexible-dose, and adjunct studies. This was also observed for placebo. Exceptions were: adjunct studies (where predictivity was lower for ongoing antidepressant/placebo), and for remission (predictivity for remission appeared lower than for response with placebo). In conclusion, outcome at week 6 with quetiapine XR for a major depressive episode could be predicted by 30% improvement after 2 weeks, a finding that could give doctors confidence to continue treatment and may facilitate adherence in patients. PMID:26474010

  8. Optimization of an Active Twist Rotor Blade Planform for Improved Active Response and Forward Flight Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sekula, Martin K; Wilbur, Matthew L.

    2014-01-01

    A study was conducted to identify the optimum blade tip planform for a model-scale active twist rotor. The analysis identified blade tip design traits which simultaneously reduce rotor power of an unactuated rotor while leveraging aeromechanical couplings to tailor the active response of the blade. Optimizing the blade tip planform for minimum rotor power in forward flight provided a 5 percent improvement in performance compared to a rectangular blade tip, but reduced the vibration control authority of active twist actuation by 75 percent. Optimizing for maximum blade twist response increased the vibration control authority by 50 percent compared to the rectangular blade tip, with little effect on performance. Combined response and power optimization resulted in a blade tip design which provided similar vibration control authority to the rectangular blade tip, but with a 3.4 percent improvement in rotor performance in forward flight.

  9. The 6 "ws" of rapid response systems: best practices for improving development, implementation, and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Lazzara, Elizabeth H; Benishek, Lauren E; Sonesh, Shirley C; Patzer, Brady; Robinson, Patricia; Wallace, Ruth; Salas, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Delays in care have been cited as one of the primary contributors of preventable mortality; thus, quality patient safety is often contingent upon the delivery of timely clinical care. Rapid response systems (RRSs) have been touted as one mechanism to improve the ability of suitable staff to respond to deteriorating patients quickly and appropriately. Rapid response systems are defined as highly skilled individual(s) who mobilize quickly to provide medical care in response to clinical deterioration. While there is mounting evidence that RRSs are a valid strategy for managing obstetric emergencies, reducing adverse events, and improving patient safety, there remains limited insight into the practices underlying the development and execution of these systems. Therefore, the purpose of this article was to synthesize the literature and answer the primary questions necessary for successfully developing, implementing, and evaluating RRSs within inpatient settings-the Who, What, When, Where, Why, and How of RRSs.

  10. Improvement in the colloidal stability of protein kinase-responsive polyplexes by PEG modification.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Akira; Naritomi, Yuki; Kushio, Satoshi; Kang, Jeong-Hun; Murata, Masaharu; Hashizume, Makoto; Mori, Takeshi; Niidome, Takuro; Katayama, Yoshiki

    2012-05-01

    We have reported a disease-cell specific gene expression system that is responsive to intracellular signaling proteins (e.g., protein kinases and proteases) hyperactivated in diseased cells. For this system, cationic peptide-grafted polymers were synthesized for polyplex formation with genes. Here, we modified poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) to a protein kinase A (PKA)-responsive polymer to improve polyplex stability. PEG modification neutralized the surface charge of the polyplex and successfully increased polyplex stability at physiological conditions. However, PEG modification (PEG contents, 0.6 and 3.3 mol %) showed almost negligible effects on the reactivity of grafted peptides to PKA and the promotion of gene expression responding to PKA activity. Excessive modification of PEG (PEG contents, 6.8 mol %) inhibited polyplex formation. These results indicate that moderate modification of PEG to the enzyme-responsive polymer improves polyplex stability without inhibiting the reaction with enzymes.

  11. Synthesising empirical results to improve predictions of post-wildfire runoff and erosion response

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shakesby, Richard A.; Moody, John A.; Martin, Deborah A.; Robichaud, Peter R.

    2016-01-01

    Advances in research into wildfire impacts on runoff and erosion have demonstrated increasing complexity of controlling factors and responses, which, combined with changing fire frequency, present challenges for modellers. We convened a conference attended by experts and practitioners in post-wildfire impacts, meteorology and related research, including modelling, to focus on priority research issues. The aim was to improve our understanding of controls and responses and the predictive capabilities of models. This conference led to the eight selected papers in this special issue. They address aspects of the distinctiveness in the controls and responses among wildfire regions, spatiotemporal rainfall variability, infiltration, runoff connectivity, debris flow formation and modelling applications. Here we summarise key findings from these papers and evaluate their contribution to improving understanding and prediction of post-wildfire runoff and erosion under changes in climate, human intervention and population pressure on wildfire-prone areas.

  12. Improving Access to Medicines in Low and Middle Income Countries: Corporate Responsibilities in Context

    PubMed Central

    Leisinger, Klaus Michael; Garabedian, Laura Faden; Wagner, Anita Katharina

    2012-01-01

    More than two billion people in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC) lack adequate access to essential medicines. In this paper, we make strong public health, human rights and economic arguments for improving access to medicines in LMIC and discuss the different roles and responsibilities of key stakeholders, including national governments, the international community, and non-governmental organizations (NGOs). We then establish a framework of pharmaceutical firms’ corporate responsibilities - the “must,” the “ought to,” and the “can” dimensions - and make recommendations for actionable business strategies for improving access to medicines. We discuss controversial topics, such as pharmaceutical profits and patents, with the goal of building consensus around facts and working towards a solution. We conclude that partnerships and collaboration among multiple stakeholders are urgently needed to improve equitable access to medicines in LMIC. PMID:23535994

  13. Relationships between God and people in the Bible: a core conflictual relationship theme study of the Pentateuch/Torah.

    PubMed

    Popp, Carol A; Luborsky, Lester; Andrusyna, Tomasz P; Cotsonis, George; Seligman, David

    2002-01-01

    The most widely known images of God are from the Bible. An important characteristic of these images is their portrayal of God's interactions with people. Although there have been many religious and literary discussions of God's relationships with people in the Bible, no systematic psychological assessment has been reported. Therefore, the aim of this study was an innovation: to identify patterns of relationship between God and people portrayed in the first five books of the Bible, the Pentateuch or Torah, by using the core conflictual relationship theme (CCRT) method, a widely used scoring system for the assessment of interpersonal relationships. Reliability for the application of the CCRT method to relationship episode narratives in the Pentateuch/Torah was assessed and found to be very good. Results show that the most frequent theme in relationship episode narratives about God and people is that God is helpful. Two less frequent but also highly repetitive themes are that God controls or hurts the other person. Many differences were found between relationship themes defined by the type of person with whom God interacted: patriarch, Moses, woman, non-Israelite, or not a non-Israelite. Thus, the CCRT results identify several different patterns of relationship between God and people.

  14. Human observing: maintained by negative informative stimuli only if correlated with improvement in response efficiency.

    PubMed

    Case, D A; Fantino, E; Wixted, J

    1985-05-01

    Two experiments investigated the effect of observing responses that enabled college students to emit more efficient distributions of reinforced responses. In Experiment 1, the gains of response efficiency enabled by observing were minimized through use of identical low-effort response requirements in two alternating variable-interval schedules. These comprised a mixed schedule of reinforcement; they differed in the number of money-backed points per reinforcer. In each of three choices between two stimuli that varied in their correlation with the variable-interval schedules, the results showed that subjects preferred stimuli that were correlated with the larger average amount of reinforcement. This is consistent with a conditioned-reinforcement hypothesis. Negative informative stimuli--that is, stimuli correlated with the smaller of two rewards--did not maintain as much observing as stimuli that were uncorrelated with amount of reward. In Experiment 2, savings in effort made possible by producing S- were varied within subjects by alternately removing and reinstating the response-reinforcement contingency in a mixed variable-interval/extinction schedule of reinforcement. Preference for an uncorrelated stimulus compared to a negative informative stimulus (S-) decreased for each of six subjects, and usually reversed when observing permitted a more efficient temporal distribution of the responses required for reinforcement; in this case, the responses were pulls on a relatively high-effort plunger. When observing the S- could not improve response efficiency, subjects again chose the control stimulus. All of these results were inconsistent with the uncertainty-reduction hypothesis.

  15. Improved anamnestic response among adolescents boosted with a higher dose of the hepatitis B vaccine.

    PubMed

    Chaves, Sandra S; Groeger, Justina; Helgenberger, Louisa; Auerbach, Steven B; Bialek, Stephanie R; Hu, Dale J; Drobeniuc, Jan

    2010-04-01

    Some hepatitis B vaccine booster studies have suggested waning of vaccine-induced immunity in adolescents vaccinated starting at birth. Those studies, however, used a pediatric formulation of the hepatitis B vaccine as a booster to detect anamnestic response. We compared adolescents boosted with an adult dose of hepatitis B vaccine with those boosted with a pediatric dose. Among adolescents who had lost protective antibody levels against hepatitis B, a higher proportion had an anamnestic response when boosted with the adult dose (60.0% vs. 43.8%). Thus, higher antigen concentrations may be required to elicit an adequate immune memory response. Despite improved anamnestic response, our study still raises concerns about whether children immunized in early infancy will remain protected from hepatitis B as they age into adulthood.

  16. Dampening Spontaneous Activity Improves the Light Sensitivity and Spatial Acuity of Optogenetic Retinal Prosthetic Responses

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, John Martin; Hilgen, Gerrit; Sernagor, Evelyne

    2016-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa is a progressive retinal dystrophy that causes irreversible visual impairment and blindness. Retinal prostheses currently represent the only clinically available vision-restoring treatment, but the quality of vision returned remains poor. Recently, it has been suggested that the pathological spontaneous hyperactivity present in dystrophic retinas may contribute to the poor quality of vision returned by retinal prosthetics by reducing the signal-to-noise ratio of prosthetic responses. Here, we investigated to what extent blocking this hyperactivity can improve optogenetic retinal prosthetic responses. We recorded activity from channelrhodopsin-expressing retinal ganglion cells in retinal wholemounts in a mouse model of retinitis pigmentosa. Sophisticated stimuli, inspired by those used in clinical visual assessment, were used to assess light sensitivity, contrast sensitivity and spatial acuity of optogenetic responses; in all cases these were improved after blocking spontaneous hyperactivity using meclofenamic acid, a gap junction blocker. Our results suggest that this approach significantly improves the quality of vision returned by retinal prosthetics, paving the way to novel clinical applications. Moreover, the improvements in sensitivity achieved by blocking spontaneous hyperactivity may extend the dynamic range of optogenetic retinal prostheses, allowing them to be used at lower light intensities such as those encountered in everyday life. PMID:27650332

  17. Osmyb4 expression improves adaptive responses to drought and cold stress in transgenic apples.

    PubMed

    Pasquali, Gemma; Biricolti, Stefano; Locatelli, Franca; Baldoni, Elena; Mattana, Monica

    2008-10-01

    Constitutive expression of the rice cold-inducible Osmyb4 gene in transgenic Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants improves adaptive responses to cold and drought stress, most likely due to the constitutive activation of several stress-inducible pathways and to the accumulation of several compatible solutes (e.g., glucose, fructose, sucrose, proline, glycine betaine and some aromatic compounds). Although the Osmyb4 gene seems able to activate stress responsive pathways in different species, we previously reported that its specific effect on stress tolerance depends on the transformed species. In the present work, we report the effects of the Osmyb4 expression for improving the stress response in apple (Malus pumila Mill.) plants. Namely, we found that the ectopic expression of the Myb4 transcription factor improved physiological and biochemical adaptation to cold and drought stress and modified metabolite accumulation. Based on these results it may be of interest to use Osmyb4 as a tool for improving the productivity of woody perennials under environmental stress conditions.

  18. Nanotextured stainless steel for improved corrosion resistance and biological response in coronary stenting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, Chandini C.; Prabhath, Anupama; Cherian, Aleena Mary; Vadukumpully, Sajini; Nair, Shantikumar V.; Chennazhi, Krishnaprasad; Menon, Deepthy

    2014-12-01

    Nanosurface engineering of metallic substrates for improved cellular response is a persistent theme in biomaterials research. The need to improve the long term prognosis of commercially available stents has led us to adopt a `polymer-free' approach which is cost effective and industrially scalable. In this study, 316L stainless steel substrates were surface modified by hydrothermal treatment in alkaline pH, with and without the addition of a chromium precursor, to generate a well adherent uniform nanotopography. The modified surfaces showed improved hemocompatibility and augmented endothelialization, while hindering the proliferation of smooth muscle cells. Moreover, they also exhibited superior material properties like corrosion resistance, surface integrity and reduced metal ion leaching. The combination of improved corrosion resistance and selective vascular cell viability provided by nanomodification can be successfully utilized to offer a cell-friendly solution to the inherent limitations pertinent to bare metallic stents.

  19. The Association Between Belief in God and Fertility Desires in Slovenia and the Czech Republic

    PubMed Central

    Cranney, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Context Research on the association between religiosity and fertility—and, particularly, on the effects of secularization on fertility desires and outcomes—has been concerned primarily with mechanisms that are fundamentally institutional and are embedded in formal religious structures. Supplementary explanations focused on noninstitutional dimensions of religiosity have never been tested. Methods Conventional ordinary least-squares regression was used to test the association between belief in God (i.e., a personal God or some sort of life force) and fertility desires among 2,251 women aged 18–45 in Slovenia and 951 women aged 15–44 in the Czech Republic who participated in the European Family and Fertility Survey in the mid-1990s. Results In both samples, substantial proportions of women either were nonbelievers or believed in God but were not institutionally religious. Belief in God was independently associated with fertility desires even in analyses controlling for self-reported religiosity. Women who believed in a personal God wanted approximately 0.2 more children, and those who believed in a life force wanted approximately 0.1 more children, than nonbelievers. Results were similar across several alternative measures of religiosity. Conclusions At least some of the connection between religiosity and fertility apparently is attributable to metaphysical beliefs. Future research on the effect of secularization on fertility decline should investigate the potentially distinct effects of different dimensions of religiosity. PMID:25682844

  20. The relationship between core self-evaluations, views of god, and intrinsic/extrinsic religious motivation.

    PubMed

    Smither, James W; Walker, Alan G

    2015-04-01

    Core self-evaluations refer to a higher-order construct that subsumes four well-established traits in the personality literature: self-esteem, generalized self-efficacy, (low) neuroticism, and (internal) locus of control. Studies that have examined the relationship between various measures of religiosity and individual components of core self-evaluations show no clear pattern of relationships. The absence of a clear pattern may be due to the failure of most previous studies in this area to use theory to guide research. Therefore, theories related to core self-evaluations, religious motivation, and views of God were used to develop and test four hypotheses. 220 adults completed measures of four religious attitudes (intrinsic religious motivation, extrinsic religious motivation, viewing God as loving, and viewing God as punitive), general religiosity, and core self-evaluations, separated by 6 weeks (with the order of measures counterbalanced). Multivariate multiple regression, controlling for general religiosity, showed that core self-evaluations were positively related to viewing God as loving, negatively related to viewing God as punitive, and negatively related to extrinsic religious motivation. The hypothesis that core self-evaluations would be positively related to intrinsic religious motivation was not supported.

  1. God-Mediated Control and Change in Self-Rated Health.

    PubMed

    Krause, Neal

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to see if feelings of God-mediated control are associated with change in self-rated health over time. In the process, an effort was made to see if a sense of meaning in life and optimism mediated the relationship between God-mediated control and change in health. The following hypothesized relationships were contained in the conceptual model that was developed to evaluate these issues: (1) people who go to church more often tend to have stronger God-mediated control beliefs than individuals who do not attend worship services as often; (2) people with a strong sense of God-mediated control are more likely to find a sense of meaning in life and be more optimistic than individuals who do not have a strong sense of God-mediated control; (3) people who are optimistic and who have a strong sense of meaning in life will rate their health more favorably over time than individuals who are not optimistic, as well as individuals who have not found a sense of meaning in life. Data from a longitudinal nationwide survey of older adults provided support for each of these hypotheses.

  2. View of God as benevolent and forgiving or punishing and judgmental predicts HIV disease progression.

    PubMed

    Ironson, Gail; Stuetzle, Rick; Ironson, Dale; Balbin, Elizabeth; Kremer, Heidemarie; George, Annie; Schneiderman, Neil; Fletcher, Mary Ann

    2011-12-01

    This study assessed the predictive relationship between View of God beliefs and change in CD4-cell and Viral Load (VL) in HIV positive people over an extended period. A diverse sample of HIVseropositive participants (N = 101) undergoing comprehensive psychological assessment and blood draws over the course of 4 years completed the View of God Inventory with subscales measuring Positive View (benevolent/forgiving) and Negative View of God (harsh/judgmental/punishing). Adjusting for initial disease status, age, gender, ethnicity, education, and antiretroviral medication (at every 6-month visit), a Positive View of God predicted significantly slower disease-progression (better preservation of CD4-cells, better control of VL), whereas a Negative View of God predicted faster disease-progression over 4 years. Effect sizes were greater than those previously demonstrated for psychosocial variables known to predict HIV-disease-progression, such as depression and coping. Results remained significant even after adjusting for church attendance and psychosocial variables (health behaviors, mood, and coping). These results provide good initial evidence that spiritual beliefs may predict health outcomes.

  3. God-Mediated Control and Change in Self-Rated Health

    PubMed Central

    Krause, Neal

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to see if feelings of God-mediated control are associated with change in self-rated health over time. In the process, an effort was made to see if a sense of meaning in life and optimism mediated the relationship between God-mediated control and change in health. The following hypothesized relationships were contained in the conceptual model that was developed to evaluate these issues: (1) people who go to church more often tend to have stronger God-mediated control beliefs than individuals who do not attend worship services as often; (2) people with a strong sense of God-mediated control are more likely to find a sense of meaning in life and be more optimistic than individuals who do not have a strong sense of God-mediated control; (3) people who are optimistic and who have a strong sense of meaning in life will rate their health more favorably over time than individuals who are not optimistic, as well as individuals who have not found a sense of meaning in life. Data from a longitudinal nationwide survey of older adults provided support for each of these hypotheses. PMID:21057586

  4. HIV/AIDS support and African pentecostalism: the case of the Redeemed Christian Church of God (RCCG).

    PubMed

    Adogame, Afe

    2007-05-01

    International and African discourses on the HIV/AIDS pandemic and intervention neglect the role of religion and religious organizations. Social science perspectives in tackling health and disease neglect religious doctrines and faith central to worldviews and praxis of religious groups. Both aspects are important for religious groups and individuals affected by HIV/AIDS. Informed by a religious studies paradigm and through the religious ethnography of the Redeemed Christian Church of God (RCCG) in Nigeria and the Diaspora, this article demonstrates mechanisms employed by African Pentecostals to combat the epidemic and provide support for infected members. The RCCG conceptualization of disease and healing is central to understanding responses and measures in combating HIV/AIDS.

  5. Action video games and improved attentional control: Disentangling selection- and response-based processes.

    PubMed

    Chisholm, Joseph D; Kingstone, Alan

    2015-10-01

    Research has demonstrated that experience with action video games is associated with improvements in a host of cognitive tasks. Evidence from paradigms that assess aspects of attention has suggested that action video game players (AVGPs) possess greater control over the allocation of attentional resources than do non-video-game players (NVGPs). Using a compound search task that teased apart selection- and response-based processes (Duncan, 1985), we required participants to perform an oculomotor capture task in which they made saccades to a uniquely colored target (selection-based process) and then produced a manual directional response based on information within the target (response-based process). We replicated the finding that AVGPs are less susceptible to attentional distraction and, critically, revealed that AVGPs outperform NVGPs on both selection-based and response-based processes. These results not only are consistent with the improved-attentional-control account of AVGP benefits, but they suggest that the benefit of action video game playing extends across the full breadth of attention-mediated stimulus-response processes that impact human performance.

  6. Improved time response for polymer fibre Bragg grating based humidity sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, W.; Webb, D. J.; Peng, G.-D.

    2011-05-01

    In this work we experimentally investigate the response time of humidity sensors based on polymer optical fibre (POF) Bragg gratings. By the use of etching with acetone we can control the diameter of POF based on poly (methyl methacrylate) in order to reduce the diffusion time of water into the polymer and hence speed up the relative wavelength change caused by humidity variations. A much improved response time of 11 minutes has been achieved by using a POF FBG with a reduced diameter of 135 microns.

  7. Improved Lunar Lander Handling Qualities Through Control Response Type and Display Enhancements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Eric Richard; Bilimoria, Karl D.; Frost, Chad Ritchie

    2010-01-01

    A piloted simulation that studied the handling qualities for a precision lunar landing task from final approach to touchdown is presented. A vehicle model based on NASA's Altair Lunar Lander was used to explore the design space around the nominal vehicle configuration to determine which combination of factors provides satisfactory pilot-vehicle performance and workload; details of the control and propulsion systems not available for that vehicle were derived from Apollo Lunar Module data. The experiment was conducted on a large motion base simulator. Eight Space Shuttle and Apollo pilot astronauts and three NASA test pilots served as evaluation pilots, providing Cooper-Harper ratings, Task Load Index ratings and qualitative comments. Each pilot flew seven combinations of control response types and three sets of displays, including two varieties of guidance and a nonguided approach. The response types included Rate Command with Attitude Hold, which was used in the original Apollo Moon landings, a Velocity Increment Command response type designed for up-and-away flight, three response types designed specifically for the vertical descent portion of the trajectory, and combinations of these. It was found that Velocity Increment Command significantly improved handling qualities when compared with the baseline Apollo design, receiving predominantly Level 1 ratings. This response type could be flown with or without explicit guidance cues, something that was very difficult with the baseline design, and resulted in approximately equivalent touchdown accuracies and propellant burn as the baseline response type. The response types designed to be used exclusively in the vertical descent portion of the trajectory did not improve handling qualities.

  8. Delayed vaccination does not improve antibody responses in splenectomized rats experiencing hypovolemic shock.

    PubMed

    Werner, A M; Katner, H P; Vogel, R; Southerla, S S; Ashley, A V; Floyd, J C; Brown, C; Ashley, D W

    2001-09-01

    Delayed vaccination after splenectomy has been shown to increase the antibody response in normotensive rats. The purpose of this experiment was to study the effect of timing of vaccination on antibody responses in rats undergoing splenectomy and experiencing hypovolemic shock. Sixty male Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 250 to 400 g underwent either a sham abdominal surgery or splenectomy after a 30-minute period of controlled hypovolemic shock. All rats then received pneumococcal vaccinations one day, 7 days, or 28 days postoperatively. Antibody levels were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay 3 weeks after vaccination. Results were compared by analysis of variance. Animals vaccinated one day postoperatively had similar or higher antibody responses than did rats receiving delayed vaccinations after 7 or 28 days. These results were similar for immunoglobulins G and M and more importantly were consistent for animals undergoing splenectomy and sham operations. Delayed vaccinations failed to improve antibody responses when hypovolemic shock preceded splenectomy. We propose that this is the result of complex cytokine responses to hypovolemic shock. These responses have been studied extensively in the setting of septic shock but not in the setting of hypovolemic or hemorrhagic shock.

  9. Adolescents’ relationship with God and internalizing adjustment over time: The moderating role of maternal religious coping

    PubMed Central

    Goeke-Morey, Marcie C.; Taylor, Laura K.; Merrilees, Christine E.; Shirlow, Peter; Cummings, E. Mark

    2015-01-01

    A growing literature supports the importance of understanding the link between religiosity and youths’ adjustment and development, but in the absence of rigorous, longitudinal designs, questions remain about the direction of effect and the role of family factors. This paper investigates the bi-directional association between adolescents’ relationship with God and their internalizing adjustment. Results from two-wave, SEM cross-lag analyses of data from 667 mother/adolescent dyads in Belfast, Northern Ireland (50% male, M age = 15.75 years old) supports a risk model suggesting that greater internalizing problems predicts a weaker relationship with God one year later. Significant moderation analyses suggest that a stronger relationship with God predicted fewer depression and anxiety symptoms for youth whose mothers used more religious coping. PMID:24955590

  10. Feelings of Gratitude Toward God Among Older Whites, Older African Americans, and Older Mexican Americans.

    PubMed

    Krause, Neal

    2012-03-01

    The first goal of this study is to see if social relationships in the church influence feelings of gratitude toward God. The second goal is to assess the impact of race and ethnicity on this relationship. The data support the following hypotheses: (1) older people who go to church more often tend to receive more spiritual support from fellow church members; (2) older adults who receive more spiritual support at church will derive a deeper understanding of themselves and others; (3) older people who develop greater insight into themselves and others will derive a greater sense of religious meaning in life; and (4) older adults who develop a deeper sense of religious meaning in life will feel more grateful to God. The results also indicate that the study model explains how feelings of gratitude toward God arise among older blacks and whites, but not older Mexican Americans.

  11. Adolescents' relationship with God and internalizing adjustment over time: the moderating role of maternal religious coping.

    PubMed

    Goeke-Morey, Marcie C; Taylor, Laura K; Merrilees, Christine E; Shirlow, Peter; Cummings, E Mark

    2014-12-01

    A growing literature supports the importance of understanding the link between religiosity and youths' adjustment and development, but in the absence of rigorous, longitudinal designs, questions remain about the direction of effect and the role of family factors. This paper investigates the bidirectional association between adolescents' relationship with God and their internalizing adjustment. Results from 2-wave, SEM cross-lag analyses of data from 667 mother/adolescent dyads in Belfast, Northern Ireland (50% male, M age = 15.75 years old) supports a risk model suggesting that greater internalizing problems predict a weaker relationship with God 1 year later. Significant moderation analyses suggest that a stronger relationship with God predicted fewer depression and anxiety symptoms for youth whose mothers used more religious coping.

  12. Blockade of pathological retinal ganglion cell hyperactivity improves optogenetically evoked light responses in rd1 mice

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, John M.; Degenaar, Patrick; Sernagor, Evelyne

    2015-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a progressive retinal dystrophy that causes visual impairment and eventual blindness. Retinal prostheses are the best currently available vision-restoring treatment for RP, but only restore crude vision. One possible contributing factor to the poor quality of vision achieved with prosthetic devices is the pathological retinal ganglion cell (RGC) hyperactivity that occurs in photoreceptor dystrophic disorders. Gap junction blockade with meclofenamic acid (MFA) was recently shown to diminish RGC hyperactivity and improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of RGC responses to light flashes and electrical stimulation in the rd10 mouse model of RP. We sought to extend these results to spatiotemporally patterned optogenetic stimulation in the faster-degenerating rd1 model and compare the effectiveness of a number of drugs known to disrupt rd1 hyperactivity. We crossed rd1 mice with a transgenic mouse line expressing the light-sensitive cation channel channelrhodopsin2 (ChR2) in RGCs, allowing them to be stimulated directly using high-intensity blue light. We used 60-channel ITO multielectrode arrays to record ChR2-mediated RGC responses from wholemount, ex-vivo retinas to full-field and patterned stimuli before and after application of MFA, 18-β-glycyrrhetinic acid (18BGA, another gap junction blocker) or flupirtine (Flu, a Kv7 potassium channel opener). All three drugs decreased spontaneous RGC firing, but 18BGA and Flu also decreased the sensitivity of RGCs to optogenetic stimulation. Nevertheless, all three drugs improved the SNR of ChR2-mediated responses. MFA also made it easier to discern motion direction of a moving bar from RGC population responses. Our results support the hypothesis that reduction of pathological RGC spontaneous activity characteristic in retinal degenerative disorders may improve the quality of visual responses in retinal prostheses and they provide insights into how best to achieve this for optogenetic prostheses

  13. Improved photometric redshifts via enhanced estimates of system response, galaxy templates and magnitude priors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Samuel J.; Thorman, Paul

    2013-05-01

    Wide, deep photometric surveys require robust photometric redshift estimates (photo-zs) for studies of large-scale structure. These estimates depend critically on accurate photometry. We describe the improvements to the photometric calibration and the photo-z estimates in the Deep Lens Survey (DLS) from correcting three of the inputs to the photo-z calculation: the system response as a function of wavelength, the spectral energy distribution templates and template prior probabilities as a function of magnitude. We model the system response with a physical model of the MOSAIC camera's CCD, which corrects a 0.1 mag discrepancy in the colours of type M2 and later stars relative to the Sloan Digital Sky Survey z photometry. We provide our estimated z response function for the use of other surveys that used MOSAIC before its recent detector upgrade. The improved throughput curve, template set and Bayesian prior lead to general improvement in the predicted photometric redshifts, including a 20 per cent reduction in photo-z scatter at low redshift and a reduction of the bias by a factor of more than 2 at high redshift. This paper serves as both a photo-z data release description for DLS and a guide for testing the quality of photometry and resulting photo-zs generally.

  14. Akt inhibition improves irinotecan treatment and prevents cell emergence by switching the senescence response to apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Vétillard, Alexandra; Jonchère, Barbara; Moreau, Marie; Toutain, Bertrand; Henry, Cécile; Fontanel, Simon; Bernard, Anne-Charlotte; Campone, Mario; Guette, Catherine; Coqueret, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Activated in response to chemotherapy, senescence is a tumor suppressive mechanism that induces a permanent loss of proliferation. However, in response to treatment, it is not really known how cells can escape senescence and how irreversible or incomplete this pathway is. We have recently described that cells that escape senescence are more transformed than non-treated parental cells, they resist anoikis and rely on Mcl-1. In this study, we further characterize this emergence in response to irinotecan, a first line treatment used in colorectal cancer. Our results indicate that Akt was activated as a feedback pathway during the early step of senescence. The inhibition of the kinase prevented cell emergence and improved treatment efficacy, both in vitro and in vivo. This improvement was correlated with senescence inhibition, p21waf1 downregulation and a concomitant activation of apoptosis due to Noxa upregulation and Mcl-1 inactivation. The inactivation of Noxa prevented apoptosis and increased the number of emergent cells. Using either RNA interference or p21waf1-deficient cells, we further confirmed that an intact p53-p21-senescence pathway favored cell emergence and that its downregulation improved treatment efficacy through apoptosis induction. Therefore, although senescence is an efficient suppressive mechanism, it also generates more aggressive cells as a consequence of apoptosis inhibition. We therefore propose that senescence-inducing therapies should be used sequentially with drugs favoring cell death such as Akt inhibitors. This should reduce cell emergence and tumor relapse through a combined induction of senescence and apoptosis. PMID:26485768

  15. Using galaxy-galaxy weak lensing measurements to correct the finger of God

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hikage, Chiaki; Takada, Masahiro; Spergel, David N.

    2012-02-01

    For decades, cosmologists have been using galaxies to trace the large-scale distribution of matter. At present, the largest source of systematic uncertainty in this analysis is the challenge of modelling the complex relationship between galaxy redshift and the distribution of dark matter. If all galaxies sat in the centres of haloes, there would be minimal finger-of-God (FoG) effects and a simple relationship between the galaxy and matter distributions. However, many galaxies, even some of the luminous red galaxies (LRGs), do not lie in the centres of haloes. Because the galaxy-galaxy lensing is also sensitive to the off-centred galaxies, we show that we can use the lensing measurements to determine the amplitude of this effect and to determine the expected amplitude of FoG effects. We develop an approach for using the lensing data to model how the FoG suppresses the power spectrum amplitudes and show that the current data imply a 30 per cent suppression at wavenumber k = 0.2 h Mpc-1. Our analysis implies that it is important to complement a spectroscopic survey with an imaging survey with sufficient depth and wide field coverage. Joint imaging and spectroscopic surveys allow a robust, unbiased use of the power spectrum amplitude information: it improves the marginalized error of growth rate fg≡ d ln D/d ln a by up to a factor of 2 over a wide range of redshifts z < 1.4. We also find that the dark energy equation-of-state parameter, w0, and the neutrino mass, fν, can be unbiasedly constrained by combining the lensing information, with an improvement of 10-25 per cent compared to a spectroscopic survey without lensing calibration.

  16. Linear response theory for symmetry improved two particle irreducible effective actions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Michael J.; Whittingham, Ian B.; Kosov, Daniel S.

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the linear response of an O (N ) scalar quantum field theory subject to external perturbations using the symmetry-improved two-particle irreducible effective action (SI-2PIEA) formalism [A. Pilaftsis and D. Teresi, Nucl. Phys. B874, 594 (2013)]. Despite satisfactory equilibrium behavior, we find a number of unphysical effects at the linear response level. Goldstone boson field fluctuations are overdetermined, with the only consistent solution being to set the fluctuations and their driving sources to zero, except for momentum modes where the Higgs and Goldstone self-energies obey a particular relationship. Also Higgs field fluctuations propagate masslessly, despite the Higgs propagator having the correct mass. These pathologies are independent of any truncation of the effective action and still exist even if we relax the overdetermining Ward identities, so long as the constraint is formulated O (N ) covariantly. We discuss possible reasons for the apparent incompatibility of the constraints and linear response approximation and possible ways forward.

  17. Use of borated polyethylene to improve low energy response of a prompt gamma based neutron dosimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priyada, P.; Ashwini, U.; Sarkar, P. K.

    2016-05-01

    The feasibility of using a combined sample of borated polyethylene and normal polyethylene to estimate neutron ambient dose equivalent from measured prompt gamma emissions is investigated theoretically to demonstrate improvements in low energy neutron dose response compared to only polyethylene. Monte Carlo simulations have been carried out using the FLUKA code to calculate the response of boron, hydrogen and carbon prompt gamma emissions to mono energetic neutrons. The weighted least square method is employed to arrive at the best linear combination of these responses that approximates the ICRP fluence to dose conversion coefficients well in the energy range of 10-8 MeV to 14 MeV. The configuration of the combined system is optimized through FLUKA simulations. The proposed method is validated theoretically with five different workplace neutron spectra with satisfactory outcome.

  18. Improving image contrast and material discrimination with nonlinear response in bimodal atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Forchheimer, Daniel; Forchheimer, Robert; Haviland, David B

    2015-02-10

    Atomic force microscopy has recently been extented to bimodal operation, where increased image contrast is achieved through excitation and measurement of two cantilever eigenmodes. This enhanced material contrast is advantageous in analysis of complex heterogeneous materials with phase separation on the micro or nanometre scale. Here we show that much greater image contrast results from analysis of nonlinear response to the bimodal drive, at harmonics and mixing frequencies. The amplitude and phase of up to 17 frequencies are simultaneously measured in a single scan. Using a machine-learning algorithm we demonstrate almost threefold improvement in the ability to separate material components of a polymer blend when including this nonlinear response. Beyond the statistical analysis performed here, analysis of nonlinear response could be used to obtain quantitative material properties at high speeds and with enhanced resolution.

  19. Improving image contrast and material discrimination with nonlinear response in bimodal atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Forchheimer, Daniel; Forchheimer, Robert; Haviland, David B.

    2015-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy has recently been extented to bimodal operation, where increased image contrast is achieved through excitation and measurement of two cantilever eigenmodes. This enhanced material contrast is advantageous in analysis of complex heterogeneous materials with phase separation on the micro or nanometre scale. Here we show that much greater image contrast results from analysis of nonlinear response to the bimodal drive, at harmonics and mixing frequencies. The amplitude and phase of up to 17 frequencies are simultaneously measured in a single scan. Using a machine-learning algorithm we demonstrate almost threefold improvement in the ability to separate material components of a polymer blend when including this nonlinear response. Beyond the statistical analysis performed here, analysis of nonlinear response could be used to obtain quantitative material properties at high speeds and with enhanced resolution. PMID:25665933

  20. Improving image contrast and material discrimination with nonlinear response in bimodal atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forchheimer, Daniel; Forchheimer, Robert; Haviland, David B.

    2015-02-01

    Atomic force microscopy has recently been extented to bimodal operation, where increased image contrast is achieved through excitation and measurement of two cantilever eigenmodes. This enhanced material contrast is advantageous in analysis of complex heterogeneous materials with phase separation on the micro or nanometre scale. Here we show that much greater image contrast results from analysis of nonlinear response to the bimodal drive, at harmonics and mixing frequencies. The amplitude and phase of up to 17 frequencies are simultaneously measured in a single scan. Using a machine-learning algorithm we demonstrate almost threefold improvement in the ability to separate material components of a polymer blend when including this nonlinear response. Beyond the statistical analysis performed here, analysis of nonlinear response could be used to obtain quantitative material properties at high speeds and with enhanced resolution.

  1. Sexual dimorphism in immunity: improving our understanding of vaccine immune responses in men.

    PubMed

    Furman, David

    2015-03-01

    Weaker immune responses are often observed in males compared to females. Since female hormones have proinflammatory properties and androgens have potent immunomodulatory effects, this sexual dimorphism in the immune response seems to be hormone dependent. Despite our current knowledge about the effect of sex hormones on immune cells, definition of the factors driving the sex differences in immunoclinical outcomes, such as the diminished response to infection and vaccination observed in men or the higher rates of autoimmunity observed in females, remains elusive. Recently, systems approaches to immune function have started to suggest a way toward establishing this connection. Such studies promise to improve our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the sexual dimorphism observed in the human immune system.

  2. Use of Lean Response to Improve Pandemic Influenza Surge in Public Health Laboratories

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yin; Prystajecky, Natalie; Petric, Martin; Mak, Annie; Abbott, Brendan; Paris, Benjamin; Decker, K.C.; Pittenger, Lauren; Guercio, Steven; Stott, Jeff; Miller, Joseph D.

    2012-01-01

    A novel influenza A (H1N1) virus detected in April 2009 rapidly spread around the world. North American provincial and state laboratories have well-defined roles and responsibilities, including providing accurate, timely test results for patients and information for regional public health and other decision makers. We used the multidisciplinary response and rapid implementation of process changes based on Lean methods at the provincial public health laboratory in British Columbia, Canada, to improve laboratory surge capacity in the 2009 influenza pandemic. Observed and computer simulating evaluation results from rapid processes changes showed that use of Lean tools successfully expanded surge capacity, which enabled response to the 10-fold increase in testing demands. PMID:22257385

  3. Proprietary tomato extract improves metabolic response to high-fat meal in healthy normal weight subjects

    PubMed Central

    Deplanque, Xavier; Muscente-Paque, Delphine; Chappuis, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Background Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation is a risk factor for atherosclerosis. Lycopene and tomato-based products have been described as potent inhibitors of LDL oxidation. Objectives To evaluate the effect of a 2-week supplementation with a carotenoid-rich tomato extract (CRTE) standardized for a 1:1 ratio of lycopene and phytosterols, on post-prandial LDL oxidation after a high-fat meal. Design In a randomized, double-blind, parallel-groups, placebo-controlled study, 146 healthy normal weight individuals were randomly assigned to a daily dose of CRTE standardized for tomato phytonutrients or placebo during 2 weeks. Oxidized LDL (OxLDL), glucose, insulin, and triglyceride (TG) responses were measured for 8 h after ingestion of a high-fat meal before and at the end of intervention. Results Plasma lycopene, phytofluene, and phytoene were increased throughout the study period in the CRTE group compared to placebo. CRTE ingestion significantly improved changes in OxLDL response to high-fat meal compared to placebo after 2 weeks (p<0.0001). Changes observed in glucose, insulin, and TG responses were not statistically significant after 2 weeks of supplementation, although together they may suggest a trend of favorable effect on metabolic outcomes after a high-fat meal. Conclusions Two-week supplementation with CRTE increased carotenoids levels in plasma and improved oxidized LDL response to a high-fat meal in healthy normal weight individuals. PMID:27707453

  4. Relationships between God and people in the Bible, part III: When the other is an outsider.

    PubMed

    Popp, Carol; Luborsky, Lester; Descôteaux, Jean; Diguer, Louis; Andrusyna, Tomasz P; Kirk, Dan; Cotsonis, George

    2004-01-01

    This study considers intergroup attitudes in the Bible and compares relationships between God or Jesus and (a) Torah non-Israelites; (b) New Testament people who were not followers of Jesus; and (c) New Testament people who were not Jewish. Torah non-Israelites belonged to an out-group with respect to the Hebrew Torah, New Testament people who were not followers of Jesus belonged to an out-group with respect to the Christian New Testament, and New Testament people who were not Jewish were an in-group with respect to Christians. Results were that God or Jesus' relationships were very negative with people in the Torah who were non-Israelites and with people in the New Testament who were not followers, while relationships were positive with people in the New Testament who were not Jewish. Thus, in conclusion, results indicate that both the New Testament and the Torah portray negative relationships between God or Jesus and members of out-groups. Relationships portrayed in New Testament narratives about God and people who were not followers were sometimes more negative than observed for other groups in the New Testament and the Torah; for people who were viewed as outsiders, the New Testament could sometimes be more negative than the Torah. An aim of this study was to identify patterns of relationships between God or Jesus and different types of people in narratives of the Torah and in the New Testament. One of the characteristics of different types of people, including people described in biblical narratives, is whether they are members of in-groups or out-groups. Our focus in this report is on biblical narratives about people who are members of out-groups. The results contribute a clinical-quantitative assessment of out-groups in the Torah and New Testament that is focused on relationship with God, a central issue in the psychology of religion and the Bible.

  5. Mine Improvement and New Emergency Response Act of 2006. Public Law 109-236, S2803

    SciTech Connect

    2006-06-15

    This Act may be cited as the 'Mine Improvement and New Emergency Response Act of 2006' or the 'MINER Act'. It amends the Federal Mine Safety and Health Act of 1977 to improve the safety of mines and mining. The Act requires operators of underground coal mines to improve accident preparedness. The legislation requires mining companies to develop an emergency response plan specific to each mine they operate, and requires that every mine has at least two rescue teams located within one hour. S. 2803 also limits the legal liability of rescue team members and the companies that employ them. The act increases both civil and criminal penalties for violations of federal mining safety standards and gives the Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) the ability to temporarily close a mine that fails to pay the penalties or fines. In addition, the act calls for several studies into ways to enhance mine safety, as well as the establishment of a new office within the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health devoted to improving mine safety. Finally, the legislation establishes new scholarship and grant programs devoted to training individuals with respect to mine safety.

  6. Attachment and God Representations among Lay Catholics, Priests, and Religious: A Matched Comparison Study Based on the Adult Attachment Interview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassibba, Rosalinda; Granqvist, Pehr; Costantini, Alessandro; Gatto, Sergio

    2008-01-01

    Based on the idea that believers' perceived relationships with God develop from their attachment-related experiences with primary caregivers, the authors explored the quality of such experiences and their representations among individuals who differed in likelihood of experiencing a principal attachment to God. Using the Adult Attachment Interview…

  7. Assessing the Role of Attachment to God, Meaning, and Religious Coping as Mediators in the Grief Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelley, Melissa M.; Chan, Keith T.

    2012-01-01

    Research has examined the relationship of styles of attachment to others and meaning with grief and the stress-related growth process. Less has been written on styles of attachment to God and patterns of religious coping and how these constructs may impact adjustment in persons dealing with loss. This study examines the roles of attachment to God,…

  8. Conscientizacion of the Oppressed Language and the Politics of Humor in Ana Castillo's "So Far from God"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thananopavarn, Susan

    2012-01-01

    This essay explores the relationship between Ana Castillo's novel "So Far from God" (1993) and her development of an activist poetics inspired by Paulo Freire's influential 1970 treatise "Pedagogy of the Oppressed." "So Far from God" may be understood as the practical application of Castillo's theory of "conscienticized poetics"; that is, the…

  9. [Pharmacotherapeutical efficiency of the dry extract "Ce-god-5" in liver injury induced by CCl4 in white rats].

    PubMed

    Dashinamzhilov, Zh B; Turtuev, C D

    2014-01-01

    It has been established that the complex plant remedy "Ce-god-5" possesses the marked hepatoprotective effect in liver injury induced by CCl4 in white rats. The ability to inhibit the processes of lipid peroxidation and stimulate antioxidant system of the body is a basic mechanism of hepatoprotective activity of "Ce-god-5".

  10. What's God Got to Do with It? How Religiosity Predicts Atheists' Health.

    PubMed

    Speed, David; Fowler, Ken

    2016-02-01

    The relationship between atheism and health is poorly understood within the Religion/Spirituality-health literature. While the extant literature promotes the idea that Attendance, Prayer, and Religiosity are connected to positive health outcomes, these relationships have not been established when controlling for whether a person is an atheist. Data from the 2008-2012 American General Social Survey (n = 3210) were used to investigate this relationship. Results indicated that atheists experienced Religiosity more negatively than non-atheists. Additionally, results demonstrated that non-belief in God was not related to better or worse perceived global health, suggesting that belief in God is not inherently linked to better reported health.

  11. Perceived relationship with God fosters positive body image in college women.

    PubMed

    Homan, Kristin J; Cavanaugh, Brianna N

    2013-12-01

    Positive body image is defined as healthy body-related attitudes that go beyond the absence of distressful symptoms. A warm and secure relationship with an important other person has been linked with attitudes of acceptance and appreciation toward one's body as well as adaptive eating patterns. This study tested whether a warm and secure relationship with God was similarly related to positive body image. Undergraduate women completed self-report measures of religiosity, life satisfaction, body appreciation, body acceptance by others, functional orientation, and intuitive eating. Multiple regression analyses showed that relationship with God contributed variance to most of the well-being variables.

  12. Experimental findings on God as an attachment figure: normative processes and moderating effects of internal working models.

    PubMed

    Granqvist, Pehr; Mikulincer, Mario; Gewirtz, Vered; Shaver, Phillip R

    2012-11-01

    Four studies examined implications of attachment theory for psychological aspects of religion among Israeli Jews. Study 1 replicated previous correlational findings indicating correspondence among interpersonal attachment orientations, attachment to God, and image of God. Studies 2-4 were subliminal priming experiments, which documented both normative and individual-difference effects. Regarding normative effects, findings indicated that threat priming heightened cognitive access to God-related concepts in a lexical decision task (Study 2); priming with "God" heightened cognitive access to positive, secure base-related concepts in the same task (Study 3); and priming with a religious symbol caused neutral material to be better liked (Study 4). Regarding individual differences, interpersonal attachment-related avoidance reduced the normative effects (i.e., avoidant participants had lower implicit access to God as a safe haven and secure base). Findings were mostly independent of level of religiousness. The present experiments considerably extend the psychological literature on connections between attachment constructs and aspects of religion.

  13. Further improvements to the photoelectric method for measuring motile responses of chromatophores.

    PubMed

    Fujii, R; Yamada, T; Oshima, N

    2000-01-01

    With the intention of simplifying construction and operation, improvements have now been made to a photoelectric system for measuring the motile responses of chromatophores. Introduction of chop-per-stabilized operational amplifiers with a complimentary metal-oxide semiconductor (C-MOS) input has brought about a much improved stability of the electronics. Such a feature has been found to be especially suitable for measurements requiring higher amplification and longer periods of time, e.g., the detection of the effects of various factors on bright-colored chromatophores. The use of appropriate color filters that limit the spectral range of light used for measurement has also proven to be important. By installing a small filter close to the photosensor, we can now record the responses of particular types of chromatophores more selectively, while visually monitoring the states of all kinds of chromatophores in natural color. To minimize the influence of motile activities of xanthophores and/or erythrophores, the use of an orange-to-red long-pass filter is appropriate to optimize recording the melanophore responses. By contrast, the responses of xanthophores or erythrophores can be recorded more easily by employing a violet-to-blue band-pass filter, because that increases the contrast of images of these cells against the background. Using an orange-red variety of the medaka Oryzias, we have also recorded photometrically the responses of leucophores, whose organelles are light-scattering. A long-pass filter was efficient in excluding the influences of co-existing xanthophores.

  14. Improving Follow-up Response Rate at Brevard Community College. Final Report from September 24, 1984 to August 31, 1985.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawton, Robert E.

    A plan was developed to improve followup study response rates by refining techniques for data collection and improving student motivation to respond to daily requests. Factors affecting response rate to followup surveys were investigated, and alternative approaches were recommended. Findings indicated that current procedures--two mailouts of…

  15. Difficult Airway Response Team: A Novel Quality Improvement Program for Managing Hospital-Wide Airway Emergencies

    PubMed Central

    Mark, Lynette J.; Herzer, Kurt R.; Cover, Renee; Pandian, Vinciya; Bhatti, Nasir I.; Berkow, Lauren C.; Haut, Elliott R.; Hillel, Alexander T.; Miller, Christina R.; Feller-Kopman, David J.; Schiavi, Adam J.; Xie, Yanjun J.; Lim, Christine; Holzmueller, Christine; Ahmad, Mueen; Thomas, Pradeep; Flint, Paul W.; Mirski, Marek A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Difficult airway cases can quickly become emergencies, increasing the risk of life-threatening complications or death. Emergency airway management outside the operating room is particularly challenging. Methods We developed a quality improvement program—the Difficult Airway Response Team (DART)—to improve emergency airway management outside the operating room. DART was implemented by a team of anesthesiologists, otolaryngologists, trauma surgeons, emergency medicine physicians, and risk managers in 2005 at The Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, Maryland. The DART program had three core components: operations, safety, and education. The operations component focused on developing a multidisciplinary difficult airway response team, standardizing the emergency response process, and deploying difficult airway equipment carts throughout the hospital. The safety component focused on real-time monitoring of DART activations and learning from past DART events to continuously improve system-level performance. This objective entailed monitoring the paging system, reporting difficult airway events and DART activations to a web-based registry, and using in situ simulations to identify and mitigate defects in the emergency airway management process. The educational component included development of a multispecialty difficult airway curriculum encompassing case-based lectures, simulation, and team building/communication to ensure consistency of care. Educational materials were also developed for non-DART staff and patients to inform them about the needs of patients with difficult airways and ensure continuity of care with other providers after discharge. Results Between July 2008 and June 2013, DART managed 360 adult difficult airway events comprising 8% of all code activations. Predisposing patient factors included body mass index > 40, history of head and neck tumor, prior difficult intubation, cervical spine injury, airway edema, airway bleeding, and previous

  16. Exercise improves mitochondrial and redox-regulated stress responses in the elderly: better late than never!

    PubMed

    Cobley, James N; Moult, Peter R; Burniston, Jatin G; Morton, James P; Close, Graeme L

    2015-04-01

    Ageing is associated with several physiological declines to both the cardiovascular (e.g. reduced aerobic capacity) and musculoskeletal system (muscle function and mass). Ageing may also impair the adaptive response of skeletal muscle mitochondria and redox-regulated stress responses to an acute exercise bout, at least in mice and rodents. This is a functionally important phenomenon, since (1) aberrant mitochondrial and redox homeostasis are implicated in the pathophysiology of musculoskeletal ageing and (2) the response to repeated exercise bouts promotes exercise adaptations and some of these adaptations (e.g. improved aerobic capacity and exercise-induced mitochondrial remodelling) offset age-related physiological decline. Exercise-induced mitochondrial remodelling is mediated by upstream signalling events that converge on downstream transcriptional co-factors and factors that orchestrate a co-ordinated nuclear and mitochondrial transcriptional response associated with mitochondrial remodelling. Recent translational human investigations have demonstrated similar exercise-induced mitochondrial signalling responses in older compared with younger skeletal muscle, regardless of training status. This is consistent with data indicating normative mitochondrial remodelling responses to long-term exercise training in the elderly. Thus, human ageing is not accompanied by diminished mitochondrial plasticity to acute and chronic exercise stimuli, at least for the signalling pathways measured to date. Exercise-induced increases in reactive oxygen and nitrogen species promote an acute redox-regulated stress response that manifests as increased heat shock protein and antioxidant enzyme content. In accordance with previous reports in rodents and mice, it appears that sedentary ageing is associated with a severely attenuated exercise-induced redox stress response that might be related to an absent redox signal. In this regard, regular exercise training affords some protection

  17. Pre-Sleep Protein Ingestion to Improve the Skeletal Muscle Adaptive Response to Exercise Training.

    PubMed

    Trommelen, Jorn; van Loon, Luc J C

    2016-11-28

    Protein ingestion following resistance-type exercise stimulates muscle protein synthesis rates, and enhances the skeletal muscle adaptive response to prolonged resistance-type exercise training. As the adaptive response to a single bout of resistance exercise extends well beyond the first couple of hours of post-exercise recovery, recent studies have begun to investigate the impact of the timing and distribution of protein ingestion during more prolonged recovery periods. Recent work has shown that overnight muscle protein synthesis rates are restricted by the level of amino acid availability. Protein ingested prior to sleep is effectively digested and absorbed, and thereby stimulates muscle protein synthesis rates during overnight recovery. When applied during a prolonged period of resistance-type exercise training, protein supplementation prior to sleep can further augment gains in muscle mass and strength. Recent studies investigating the impact of pre-sleep protein ingestion suggest that at least 40 g of protein is required to display a robust increase in muscle protein synthesis rates throughout overnight sleep. Furthermore, prior exercise allows more of the pre-sleep protein-derived amino acids to be utilized for de novo muscle protein synthesis during sleep. In short, pre-sleep protein ingestion represents an effective dietary strategy to improve overnight muscle protein synthesis, thereby improving the skeletal muscle adaptive response to exercise training.

  18. Algorithms to Improve the Prediction of Postprandial Insulinaemia in Response to Common Foods

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Kirstine J.; Petocz, Peter; Colagiuri, Stephen; Brand-Miller, Jennie C.

    2016-01-01

    Dietary patterns that induce excessive insulin secretion may contribute to worsening insulin resistance and beta-cell dysfunction. Our aim was to generate mathematical algorithms to improve the prediction of postprandial glycaemia and insulinaemia for foods of known nutrient composition, glycemic index (GI) and glycemic load (GL). We used an expanded database of food insulin index (FII) values generated by testing 1000 kJ portions of 147 common foods relative to a reference food in lean, young, healthy volunteers. Simple and multiple linear regression analyses were applied to validate previously generated equations for predicting insulinaemia, and develop improved predictive models. Large differences in insulinaemic responses within and between food groups were evident. GL, GI and available carbohydrate content were the strongest predictors of the FII, explaining 55%, 51% and 47% of variation respectively. Fat, protein and sugar were significant but relatively weak predictors, accounting for only 31%, 7% and 13% of the variation respectively. Nutritional composition alone explained only 50% of variability. The best algorithm included a measure of glycemic response, sugar and protein content and explained 78% of variation. Knowledge of the GI or glycaemic response to 1000 kJ portions together with nutrient composition therefore provides a good approximation for ranking of foods according to their “insulin demand”. PMID:27070641

  19. Pre-Sleep Protein Ingestion to Improve the Skeletal Muscle Adaptive Response to Exercise Training

    PubMed Central

    Trommelen, Jorn; van Loon, Luc J. C.

    2016-01-01

    Protein ingestion following resistance-type exercise stimulates muscle protein synthesis rates, and enhances the skeletal muscle adaptive response to prolonged resistance-type exercise training. As the adaptive response to a single bout of resistance exercise extends well beyond the first couple of hours of post-exercise recovery, recent studies have begun to investigate the impact of the timing and distribution of protein ingestion during more prolonged recovery periods. Recent work has shown that overnight muscle protein synthesis rates are restricted by the level of amino acid availability. Protein ingested prior to sleep is effectively digested and absorbed, and thereby stimulates muscle protein synthesis rates during overnight recovery. When applied during a prolonged period of resistance-type exercise training, protein supplementation prior to sleep can further augment gains in muscle mass and strength. Recent studies investigating the impact of pre-sleep protein ingestion suggest that at least 40 g of protein is required to display a robust increase in muscle protein synthesis rates throughout overnight sleep. Furthermore, prior exercise allows more of the pre-sleep protein-derived amino acids to be utilized for de novo muscle protein synthesis during sleep. In short, pre-sleep protein ingestion represents an effective dietary strategy to improve overnight muscle protein synthesis, thereby improving the skeletal muscle adaptive response to exercise training. PMID:27916799

  20. Surveying Rubisco Diversity and Temperature Response to Improve Crop Photosynthetic Efficiency.

    PubMed

    Orr, Douglas J; Alcântara, André; Kapralov, Maxim V; Andralojc, P John; Carmo-Silva, Elizabete; Parry, Martin A J

    2016-10-01

    The threat to global food security of stagnating yields and population growth makes increasing crop productivity a critical goal over the coming decades. One key target for improving crop productivity and yields is increasing the efficiency of photosynthesis. Central to photosynthesis is Rubisco, which is a critical but often rate-limiting component. Here, we present full Rubisco catalytic properties measured at three temperatures for 75 plants species representing both crops and undomesticated plants from diverse climates. Some newly characterized Rubiscos were naturally "better" compared to crop enzymes and have the potential to improve crop photosynthetic efficiency. The temperature response of the various catalytic parameters was largely consistent across the diverse range of species, though absolute values showed significant variation in Rubisco catalysis, even between closely related species. An analysis of residue differences among the species characterized identified a number of candidate amino acid substitutions that will aid in advancing engineering of improved Rubisco in crop systems. This study provides new insights on the range of Rubisco catalysis and temperature response present in nature, and provides new information to include in models from leaf to canopy and ecosystem scale.

  1. Optimization of a novel improver gel formulation for Barbari flat bread using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Pourfarzad, Amir; Haddad Khodaparast, Mohammad Hossein; Karimi, Mehdi; Mortazavi, Seyed Ali

    2014-10-01

    Nowadays, the use of bread improvers has become an essential part of improving the production methods and quality of bakery products. In the present study, the Response Surface Methodology (RSM) was used to determine the optimum improver gel formulation which gave the best quality, shelf life, sensory and image properties for Barbari flat bread. Sodium stearoyl-2-lactylate (SSL), diacetyl tartaric acid esters of monoglyceride (DATEM) and propylene glycol (PG) were constituents of the gel and considered in this study. A second-order polynomial model was fitted to each response and the regression coefficients were determined using least square method. The optimum gel formulation was found to be 0.49 % of SSL, 0.36 % of DATEM and 0.5 % of PG when desirability function method was applied. There was a good agreement between the experimental data and their predicted counterparts. Results showed that the RSM, image processing and texture analysis are useful tools to investigate, approximate and predict a large number of bread properties.

  2. A stochastic model updating strategy-based improved response surface model and advanced Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Xue; Fei, Cheng-Wei; Choy, Yat-Sze; Wang, Jian-Jun

    2017-01-01

    To improve the accuracy and efficiency of computation model for complex structures, the stochastic model updating (SMU) strategy was proposed by combining the improved response surface model (IRSM) and the advanced Monte Carlo (MC) method based on experimental static test, prior information and uncertainties. Firstly, the IRSM and its mathematical model were developed with the emphasis on moving least-square method, and the advanced MC simulation method is studied based on Latin hypercube sampling method as well. And then the SMU procedure was presented with experimental static test for complex structure. The SMUs of simply-supported beam and aeroengine stator system (casings) were implemented to validate the proposed IRSM and advanced MC simulation method. The results show that (1) the SMU strategy hold high computational precision and efficiency for the SMUs of complex structural system; (2) the IRSM is demonstrated to be an effective model due to its SMU time is far less than that of traditional response surface method, which is promising to improve the computational speed and accuracy of SMU; (3) the advanced MC method observably decrease the samples from finite element simulations and the elapsed time of SMU. The efforts of this paper provide a promising SMU strategy for complex structure and enrich the theory of model updating.

  3. Surveying Rubisco Diversity and Temperature Response to Improve Crop Photosynthetic Efficiency1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Andralojc, P. John

    2016-01-01

    The threat to global food security of stagnating yields and population growth makes increasing crop productivity a critical goal over the coming decades. One key target for improving crop productivity and yields is increasing the efficiency of photosynthesis. Central to photosynthesis is Rubisco, which is a critical but often rate-limiting component. Here, we present full Rubisco catalytic properties measured at three temperatures for 75 plants species representing both crops and undomesticated plants from diverse climates. Some newly characterized Rubiscos were naturally “better” compared to crop enzymes and have the potential to improve crop photosynthetic efficiency. The temperature response of the various catalytic parameters was largely consistent across the diverse range of species, though absolute values showed significant variation in Rubisco catalysis, even between closely related species. An analysis of residue differences among the species characterized identified a number of candidate amino acid substitutions that will aid in advancing engineering of improved Rubisco in crop systems. This study provides new insights on the range of Rubisco catalysis and temperature response present in nature, and provides new information to include in models from leaf to canopy and ecosystem scale. PMID:27342312

  4. Dynamic response improvement of doubly fed induction generator-based wind farm using fuzzy logic controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasanien, Hany M.; Al-Ammar, Essam A.

    2012-11-01

    Doubly fed induction generator (DFIG) based wind farm is today the most widely used concept. This paper presents dynamic response enhancement of DFIG based wind farm under remote fault conditions using the fuzzy logic controller. The goal of the work is to improve the dynamic response of DFIG based wind farm during and after the clearance of fault using the proposed controller. The stability of wind farm during and after the clearance of fault is investigated. The effectiveness of the fuzzy logic controller is then compared with that of a PI controller. The validity of the controllers in restoring the wind farms normal operation after the clearance of fault is illustrated by the simulation results which are carried out using MATLAB/SIMULINK. Simulation results are analyzed under different fault conditions.

  5. An improved sample loading technique for cellular metabolic response monitoring under pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gikunda, Millicent Nkirote

    To monitor cellular metabolism under pressure, a pressure chamber designed around a simple-to-construct capillary-based spectroscopic chamber coupled to a microliter-flow perfusion system is used in the laboratory. Although cyanide-induced metabolic responses from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (baker's yeast) could be controllably induced and monitored under pressure, previously used sample loading technique was not well controlled. An improved cell-loading technique which is based on use of a secondary inner capillary into which the sample is loaded then inserted into the capillary pressure chamber, has been developed. As validation, we demonstrate the ability to measure the chemically-induced metabolic responses at pressures of up to 500 bars. This technique is shown to be less prone to sample loss due to perfusive flow than the previous techniques used.

  6. Improved method of measuring pressure coupled response for composite solid propellants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Wanxing; Wang, Ningfei; Li, Junwei; Zhao, Yandong; Yan, Mi

    2014-04-01

    Pressure coupled response is one of the main causes of combustion instability in the solid rocket motor. It is also a characteristic parameter for predicting the stability. The pressure coupled response function is usually measured by different methods to evaluate the performance of new propellant. Based on T-burner and "burning surface doubled and secondary attenuation", an improved method for measuring the pressure coupled response of composite propellant is introduced in this article. A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) study has also been conducted to validate the method and to understand the pressure oscillation phenomenon in T-burner. Three rounds of tests were carried out on the same batch of aluminized AP/HTPB composite solid propellant. The experimental results show that the sample propellant had a high response function under the conditions of high pressure (~11.5 MPa) and low frequency (~140 Hz). The numerically predicted oscillation frequency and amplitude are consistent with the experimental results. One practical solid rocket motor using this sample propellant was found to experience pressure oscillation at the end of burning. This confirms that the sample propellant is prone to combustion instability. Finally, acoustic pressure distribution and phase difference in T-burner were analyzed. Both the experimental and numerical results are found to be associated with similar acoustic pressure distribution. And the phase difference analysis showed that the pressure oscillations at the head end of the T-burner are 180° out of phase from those in the aft end of the T-burner.

  7. Roots Withstanding their Environment: Exploiting Root System Architecture Responses to Abiotic Stress to Improve Crop Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Koevoets, Iko T.; Venema, Jan Henk; Elzenga, J. Theo. M.; Testerink, Christa

    2016-01-01

    To face future challenges in crop production dictated by global climate changes, breeders and plant researchers collaborate to develop productive crops that are able to withstand a wide range of biotic and abiotic stresses. However, crop selection is often focused on shoot performance alone, as observation of root properties is more complex and asks for artificial and extensive phenotyping platforms. In addition, most root research focuses on development, while a direct link to the functionality of plasticity in root development for tolerance is often lacking. In this paper we review the currently known root system architecture (RSA) responses in Arabidopsis and a number of crop species to a range of abiotic stresses, including nutrient limitation, drought, salinity, flooding, and extreme temperatures. For each of these stresses, the key molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying the RSA response are highlighted. To explore the relevance for crop selection, we especially review and discuss studies linking root architectural responses to stress tolerance. This will provide a first step toward understanding the relevance of adaptive root development for a plant’s response to its environment. We suggest that functional evidence on the role of root plasticity will support breeders in their efforts to include root properties in their current selection pipeline for abiotic stress tolerance, aimed to improve the robustness of crops. PMID:27630659

  8. Improvement influenza HA2 DNA vaccine cellular and humoral immune responses with Mx bio adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Soleimani, Sina; Shahsavandi, Shahla; Maddadgar, Omid

    2017-03-01

    Immunization with DNA vaccines as a novel alternative to conventional vaccination strategy requires adjuvant for improving vaccine efficacy. The conserved immunogenic HA2 subunit, which harbors neutralizing epitopes is a promising vaccine candidate against influenza viruses. In this study, for the first time we explore the idea of using host interferon inducible Mx protein to increase the immunogenicity of HA2 H9N2 influenza DNA vaccine. The potency and safety of the Mx adjuvanted-HA2 vaccine was evaluated in BALB/c mice by different prime-boost strategies. To assess the effect of the vaccination on the virus clearance rate, mice were challenged with homologous influenza virus. Administration of the adjuvanted vaccine and boosting with the same regimen could effectively enhance both humoral and cellular immune responses in treated mice. These data demonstrated that Mx as host defense peptide can be potentiated for improving influenza vaccine efficacy.

  9. Benefits of the Nephros Dual Stage Ultrafilter in Chronic Hemodialysis Patients: Evidence for Improved ESA Responsiveness

    PubMed Central

    Valeri, Anthony; Lee, Bobby; Duffy, John; Ferrer, Robin; Vilotta, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    Installation of the Nephros Dual Stage Ultrafilter (DSU) added to a conventional hemodialysis unit to achieve ultrapure dialysate was tested in a group of 23 stable outpatients on chronic hemodialysis. Comparing the 6-month period prior to the installation of the filters (as baseline) to the 6-month period after the installation of the filters, we found a significant 40% reduction in the darbepoetin dose needed to maintain a stable hemoglobin level (p < 0.001). In addition, surrogate inflammatory markers, WBC count and serum albumin level, showed small but statistically significant improvements (p = 0.008 and p = 0.042, respectively). In conclusion, the use of the Nephros DSU to further reduce endotoxin exposure in chronic hemodialysis patients can result in improved erythropoiesis-stimulating agent (ESA) responsiveness and a lower ESA dose. PMID:26889475

  10. Improving the Material Response for Slow Heat of Energetic Materials (U)

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, A L

    2010-12-15

    The goal of modern high explosive slow heat cookoff modeling is to understand the level of mechanical violence. This requires understanding the coupled thermal-mechanical-chemical system that such an environment creates. Recent advances have improved our ability to predict the time to event, and we have been making progress on predicting the mechanical response. By adding surface tension to the product gas pores in the high explosive, we have been able to reduce the current model's tendency to over-pressurize confinement vessels. We describe the model and demonstrate how it affects a LX-10 STEX experiment. Issues associated with current product gas equations of state are described and examined.

  11. Recombinant probiotics with antimicrobial peptides: a dual strategy to improve immune response in immunocompromised patients.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Santi M; Silva, Osmar N; Franco, Octavio L

    2014-08-01

    Bacterial infectious diseases are currently a serious health problem, especially in patients compromised by illness or those receiving immune-suppressant drugs. In this context, it is not only essential to improve the understanding of infectious mechanisms and host response but also to discover novel therapies with extreme urgency. Probiotics and antimicrobial peptides are also favorably viewed as novel strategies in the control of resistant bacteria. The present review will shed some light on the use of probiotic microorganisms expressing antimicrobial peptides as a dual therapy to control bacterial infectious diseases.

  12. Teaching Religion in Public Schools: Review of Warren A. Nord, "Does God Make a Difference?"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feinberg, Walter

    2013-01-01

    In this review of Warren Nord's "Does God Make a Difference? Taking Religion Seriously in Our Schools and Universities," Walter Feinberg provides a detailed analysis of Nord's argument that the study of religion should be constitutionally mandated as a corrective to the overwhelmingly secular course of study offered in…

  13. Felix beyond the Closet: Sexuality, Masculinity, and Relations of Power in Arturo Islas's "The Rain God"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Padilla, Yolanda

    2009-01-01

    This essay examines the uneasy relationship that Arturo Islas's "The Rain God" has had with narratives of identity, focusing on how the representation of Felix's sexuality makes him a problematic figure for certain strains of Chicana/o and queer studies. In other writings, Islas criticizes Quinto Sol, the chief publishing house of Chicano…

  14. The Impact of Child Sexual Abuse on Attitudes toward God and the Catholic Church.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossetti, Stephen J.

    1995-01-01

    This study explored effects of child sexual abuse by priests and other perpetrators on victims' trust in the Catholic Church, priesthood, and their relationship with God. Subjects were adult Catholics who had been sexually abused but not by a priest (n=307) or sexually abused by a priest (n=40) and 1,376 nonabused controls. Results highlight the…

  15. Perceptions of the character of God as narrated by East African women living with HIV.

    PubMed

    Mkandawire-Valhmu, Lucy; Kako, Peninnah M; Kibicho, Jennifer W

    2012-01-01

    Two qualitative research studies conducted with women living with HIV in Malawi (N = 72) and Kenya (N = 54) separately revealed personal faith as a primary coping mechanism that mitigates the effects of stigma and promotes spiritual, physical, and mental health. Fourth characteristics of God emerged that sustain the women in daily life.

  16. Experimenting with Spirituality: Analyzing "The God Gene" in a Nonmajors Laboratory Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silveira, Linda A.

    2008-01-01

    References linking genes to complex human traits, such as personality type or disease susceptibility, abound in the news media and popular culture. In his book "The God Gene: How Faith is Hardwired into Our Genes", Dean Hamer argues that a variation in the "VMAT2" gene plays a role in one's openness to spiritual experiences. In a nonmajors class,…

  17. Folklore in Zora Neale Hurston's "Their Eyes Were Watching God." [Lesson Plan].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    Zora Neale Hurston's work is lively, lyrical, funny, and poignant, but this consummate literary craftsperson was also a first-rate ethnographer, conducting field work for Franz Boas and for the Works Progress Administration (WPA). "Their Eyes Were Watching God," often acclaimed as Hurston's masterpiece, is perhaps the richest beneficiary…

  18. What's in a Worldview? On Trevor Cooling's "Doing God in Education"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hand, Michael

    2012-01-01

    In "Doing God in education", Trevor Cooling aims to defeat what might be called the "marginalising" view of the place of religion in education. I am sympathetic to this aim; but I think Cooling conflates two different arguments, predicated on two different concepts marked by the term "world-view", and that only one of the arguments is plausible.…

  19. God on the Gallows: Reading the Holocaust through Narratives of Redemption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spector, Karen

    2007-01-01

    "Where is God now?" is a question from the Holocaust memoir "Night" by Elie Wiesel and an underlying narrative dilemma for the teachers and most student participants in this qualitative study of three Holocaust units in secondary English classrooms in the Midwestern United States. Using a narrative theory framework, this study explores how…

  20. "Under God" and the Pledge of Allegiance: Examining a 1954 Sermon and Its Meaning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groce, Eric C.; Heafner, Tina; Bellows, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    A lesson exploring the Pledge of Allegiance, its history, and the addition of the phrase "under God," can serve as a jumping off point into major themes of U.S. history and First Amendment freedoms. Although the Pledge is ubiquitous in contemporary America, educators and students are often uninformed about the history and meaning of the…

  1. Attachment to God/Higher Power and Bulimic Symptoms among College Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buser, Juleen K.; Gibson, Sandy

    2016-01-01

    The authors examined the relationship between avoidant and anxious attachment to God/Higher Power and bulimia symptoms among 599 female college student participants. After controlling for body mass index, the authors found a positive association between both attachment variables and bulimia. When entered together in a regression, anxious…

  2. Investigating the Importance of Relating with God for School Students' Spiritual Well-Being

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, John W.

    2010-01-01

    Fisher's spiritual well-being (SWB) questionnaires assessed students' levels of relationship in four domains, namely with themselves, others, the environment and with a Transcendent Other (commonly called God). Students also reported the extent to which different entities helped them develop relationships in the four domains of SWB. However,…

  3. Stress and Depression among Older Residents in Religious Monasteries: Do Friends and God Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bishop, Bishop J.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to explore how friendship and attachment to God provide protective benefits against stress and depression. Participants included 235 men and women, age 64 and older, residing in religious monasteries affiliated with the Order of St. Benedict. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses were completed to assess…

  4. Nihilism and Education in Heidegger's Essay: "Nietzsche's Word: "God Is Dead"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehrmantraut, Michael

    2016-01-01

    In the "Rectoral Address", of 1933, Martin Heidegger indicates that the crisis of the West, articulated by Nietzsche as the "death of God", was a central concern in his attempt to rethink and reform higher education in 1933-1934. While Heidegger soon thereafter appears to have abandoned serious efforts at any practical…

  5. The NO stimulator, Catestatin, improves the Frank-Starling response in normotensive and hypertensive rat hearts.

    PubMed

    Angelone, T; Quintieri, A M; Pasqua, T; Filice, E; Cantafio, P; Scavello, F; Rocca, C; Mahata, S K; Gattuso, A; Cerra, M C

    2015-08-01

    The myocardial response to mechanical stretch (Frank-Starling law) is an important physiological cardiac determinant. Modulated by many endogenous substances, it is impaired in the presence of cardiovascular pathologies and during senescence. Catestatin (CST:hCgA352-372), a 21-amino-acid derivate of Chromogranin A (CgA), displays hypotensive/vasodilatory properties and counteracts excessive systemic and/or intra-cardiac excitatory stimuli (e.g., catecholamines and endothelin-1). CST, produced also by the myocardium, affects the heart by modulating inotropy, lusitropy and the coronary tone through a Nitric Oxide (NO)-dependent mechanism. This study evaluated the putative influence elicited by CST on the Frank-Starling response of normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) and hypertensive (SHR) hearts by using isolated and Langendorff perfused cardiac preparations. Functional changes were evaluated on aged (18-month-old) WKY rats and SHR which mimic human chronic heart failure (HF). Comparison to WKY rats, SHR showed a reduced Frank-Starling response. In both rat strains, CST administration improved myocardial mechanical response to increased end-diastolic pressures. This effect was mediated by EE/IP3K/NOS/NO/cGMP/PKG, as revealed by specific inhibitors. CST-dependent positive Frank-Starling response is paralleled by an increment in protein S-Nitrosylation. Our data suggested CST as a NO-dependent physiological modulator of the stretch-induced intrinsic regulation of the heart. This may be of particular importance in the aged hypertrophic heart, whose function is impaired because of a reduced systolic performance accompanied by delayed relaxation and increased diastolic stiffness.

  6. Improving linear accelerator service response with a real-time electronic event reporting system.

    PubMed

    Hoisak, Jeremy D P; Pawlicki, Todd; Kim, Gwe-Ya; Fletcher, Richard; Moore, Kevin L

    2014-09-01

    To track linear accelerator performance issues, an online event recording system was developed in-house for use by therapists and physicists to log the details of technical problems arising on our institution's four linear accelerators. In use since October 2010, the system was designed so that all clinical physicists would receive email notification when an event was logged. Starting in October 2012, we initiated a pilot project in collaboration with our linear accelerator vendor to explore a new model of service and support, in which event notifications were also sent electronically directly to dedicated engineers at the vendor's technical help desk, who then initiated a response to technical issues. Previously, technical issues were reported by telephone to the vendor's call center, which then disseminated information and coordinated a response with the Technical Support help desk and local service engineers. The purpose of this work was to investigate the improvements to clinical operations resulting from this new service model. The new and old service models were quantitatively compared by reviewing event logs and the oncology information system database in the nine months prior to and after initiation of the project. Here, we focus on events that resulted in an inoperative linear accelerator ("down" machine). Machine downtime, vendor response time, treatment cancellations, and event resolution were evaluated and compared over two equivalent time periods. In 389 clinical days, there were 119 machine-down events: 59 events before and 60 after introduction of the new model. In the new model, median time to service response decreased from 45 to 8 min, service engineer dispatch time decreased 44%, downtime per event decreased from 45 to 20 min, and treatment cancellations decreased 68%. The decreased vendor response time and reduced number of on-site visits by a service engineer resulted in decreased downtime and decreased patient treatment cancellations. PACS

  7. Improving linear accelerator service response with a real- time electronic event reporting system.

    PubMed

    Hoisak, Jeremy D P; Pawlicki, Todd; Kim, Gwe-Ya; Fletcher, Richard; Moore, Kevin L

    2014-09-08

    To track linear accelerator performance issues, an online event recording system was developed in-house for use by therapists and physicists to log the details of technical problems arising on our institution's four linear accelerators. In use since October 2010, the system was designed so that all clinical physicists would receive email notification when an event was logged. Starting in October 2012, we initiated a pilot project in collaboration with our linear accelerator vendor to explore a new model of service and support, in which event notifications were also sent electronically directly to dedicated engineers at the vendor's technical help desk, who then initiated a response to technical issues. Previously, technical issues were reported by telephone to the vendor's call center, which then disseminated information and coordinated a response with the Technical Support help desk and local service engineers. The purpose of this work was to investigate the improvements to clinical operations resulting from this new service model. The new and old service models were quantitatively compared by reviewing event logs and the oncology information system database in the nine months prior to and after initiation of the project. Here, we focus on events that resulted in an inoperative linear accelerator ("down" machine). Machine downtime, vendor response time, treatment cancellations, and event resolution were evaluated and compared over two equivalent time periods. In 389 clinical days, there were 119 machine-down events: 59 events before and 60 after introduction of the new model. In the new model, median time to service response decreased from 45 to 8 min, service engineer dispatch time decreased 44%, downtime per event decreased from 45 to 20 min, and treatment cancellations decreased 68%. The decreased vendor response time and reduced number of on-site visits by a service engineer resulted in decreased downtime and decreased patient treatment cancellations.

  8. The Mediational Role of Psychological Basic Needs in the Relation Between Conception of God and Psychological Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Costa, Sebastiano; Gugliandolo, Maria C; Barberis, Nadia; Larcan, Rosalba

    2016-02-01

    Relatively few studies have examined the relationship between conception of God and psychological outcomes in a self-determination theory (SDT) framework. The aim of this study was to examine the role of basic psychological needs as a mediator of the association between conception of God and psychological outcomes. In a sample of 210 religious young adults, we found that the concept of a controlling God was positively associated with feelings of need frustration and depression, whilst the concept of an autonomy-supporting God was positively associated with feelings of need satisfaction and vitality. In turn, need satisfaction promoted feelings of vitality, whereas need frustration led to feelings of depression. The satisfaction of needs was a full mediator of the relationship between autonomy-supporting God and vitality, whilst the frustration of needs was a full mediator of the relationship between controlling God and depression. These findings are discussed in terms of SDT. We also discuss how future research may further increase our understanding of the dynamics involved in concepts of God and psychological outcomes.

  9. How to Improve Adolescent Stress Responses: Insights From Integrating Implicit Theories of Personality and Biopsychosocial Models.

    PubMed

    Yeager, David S; Lee, Hae Yeon; Jamieson, Jeremy P

    2016-08-01

    This research integrated implicit theories of personality and the biopsychosocial model of challenge and threat, hypothesizing that adolescents would be more likely to conclude that they can meet the demands of an evaluative social situation when they were taught that people have the potential to change their socially relevant traits. In Study 1 (N = 60), high school students were assigned to an incremental-theory-of-personality or a control condition and then given a social-stress task. Relative to control participants, incremental-theory participants exhibited improved stress appraisals, more adaptive neuroendocrine and cardiovascular responses, and better performance outcomes. In Study 2 (N = 205), we used a daily-diary intervention to test high school students' stress reactivity outside the laboratory. Threat appraisals (Days 5-9 after intervention) and neuroendocrine responses (Days 8 and 9 after intervention only) were unrelated to the intensity of daily stressors when adolescents received the incremental-theory intervention. Students who received the intervention also had better grades over freshman year than those who did not. These findings offer new avenues for improving theories of adolescent stress and coping.

  10. Characterization of physiological responses of two alfalfa half-sib families with improved salt tolerance.

    PubMed

    Anower, M Rokebul; Mott, Ivan W; Peel, Michael D; Wu, Yajun

    2013-10-01

    Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) is a major forage crop worldwide that is relatively sensitive to soil salinity. Improved cultivars with high production on saline soil will benefit many producers and land managers. This study reports the characterization of physiological responses of two unrelated experimental alfalfa half-sib families, HS-A and HS-B, selected for their improved survival under saline conditions (up to EC 18). Six-week-old plants were subjected to NaCl-nutrient solution treatment for three weeks starting at an electrical conductivity (EC) of 3 dS m(-1) with incremental increases of 3 dS m(-1) every week, reaching 9 dS m(-1) in the third week. HS-B showed greater leaf number (72%) and stem length (44%) while HS-A showed better leaf production (84%) under salt treatment compared to the initial genetic backgrounds from which they were developed. This improved growth is associated with 208% and 78% greater accumulation of chlorophyll content in HS-B and HS-A, respectively. Both HS-A and HS-B also showed improved capability to maintain water content (RWC) under salt stress compared to the initial populations. Differing from its initial populations (P-B), HS-B did not accumulate Na in shoots after salt treatment. HS-B also maintained K(+)/Na(+) and Ca(2+)/Na(+) ratios, while P-B showed 59% and 69% decrease in these ion ratios, respectively. Na(+) content in HS-A was not different from its initial populations (P-A) after salt treatment. However, HS-A showed an enhanced accumulation of Ca(2+) and maintained the levels of Mg(2+) and K(+) in shoots compared to the P-A populations. This study provides physiological support of improved salt tolerance in HS-A and HS-B and suggests that these plants maintain ion homeostasis but have different mechanisms of coping with high salinity.

  11. The climate responses of tropical and boreal ecosystems with an improved land surface model (JULES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harper, Anna; Friedlingstein, Pierre; Cox, Peter; Wiltshire, Andy; Jones, Chris

    2016-04-01

    The Joint UK Land Environment Simulator (JULES) is the land surface of the next generation UK Earth System Model (UKESM1). Recently, JULES was updated with new plant functional types and physiology based on a global plant trait database. These developments improved the simulation of terrestrial gross and net primary productivity on local and global scales, and enabled a more realistic representation of the global distribution of vegetation. In this study, we explore the present-day distribution of ecosystems and their vulnerability to climate change in JULES with these improvements, focusing on tropical and boreal ecosystems. Changes to these ecosystems will have implications for biogeophysical and biogeochemical feedbacks to climate change and need to be understood. First, we examine the simulated and observed rainforest-savannah boundary, which is strongly related to annual precipitation and the maximum climatological water deficit. Second, we assess the length of growing season and biomass stored in boreal ecosystems, where 20th century warming has likely extended the growing season. In each case, we first evaluate the ability of JULES to capture observed climate-vegetation relationships and trends. Finally, we run JULES to 2100 using climate data from 3 models and 2 RCP scenarios, and examine potential 21st century changes to these ecosystems. For example, do the tropical forests shrink in response to changes in tropical rainfall seasonality? And, how does the composition of boreal ecosystems change in response to climate warming? Given the potential for climate feedbacks and the inherent value in these ecosystems, it is essential to assess their responses to a range of climate change scenarios.

  12. Fucoidan from sea cucumber may improve hepatic inflammatory response and insulin resistance in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinhui; Hu, Shiwei; Jiang, Wei; Song, Wendong; Cai, Lu; Wang, Jingfeng

    2016-02-01

    Nutrition excess-induced inflammation positively contributed to insulin resistance. Fucoidan from sea cucumber can increase glucose translocation in skeletal muscle. However, its effects on inflammation-associated insulin resistance are not understood. We investigated fucoidan from Isostichopus badionotus (Ib-FUC)-alleviated inflammatory response and signaling as well as -improved insulin resistance in the liver of obesity mice. The results showed that Ib-FUC reduced body weight and glucose levels, increased insulin sensitivity, and inhibited serum lipid concentrations. Meanwhile, Hepatic glycogen synthesis was promoted by Ib-FUC via activation of the PI3K/PKB/GSK-3β signaling and regulation of glucose metabolism-related enzymatic activities. Ib-FUC regulated serum inflammatory cytokines and their mRNA expression in the liver. Ib-FUC-induced inactivation of the JNK and IKKβ/NFκB pathways was involved in the activation of insulin signal cascade and inflammatory factor production. These findings suggested that Ib-FUC supplementary-induced alleviation of inflammatory response could be a mechanism responsible for its beneficial effects against hepatic insulin resistance.

  13. Application of nanotechnologies for improved immune response against infectious diseases in the developing world

    PubMed Central

    Look, Michael; Bandyopadhyay, Arunima; Blum, Jeremy S.; Fahmy, Tarek M.

    2010-01-01

    There is an urgent need for new strategies to combat infectious diseases in developing countries. Many pathogens have evolved to elude immunity and this has limited the utility of current therapies. Additionally, the emergence of co-infections and drug resistant pathogens has increased the need for advanced therapeutic and diagnostic strategies. These challenges can be addressed with therapies that boost the quality and magnitude of an immune response in a predictable, designable fashion that can be applied for wide-spread use. Here, we discuss how biomaterials and specifically nanoscale delivery vehicles can be used to modify and improve the immune system response against infectious diseases. Immunotherapy of infectious disease is the enhancement or modulation of the immune system response to more effectively prevent or clear pathogen infection. Nanoscale vehicles are particularly adept at facilitating immunotherapeutic approaches because they can be engineered to have different physical properties, encapsulated agents, and surface ligands. Additionally, nanoscaled point-of-care diagnostics offer new alternatives for portable and sensitive health monitoring that can guide the use of nanoscale immunotherapies. By exploiting the unique tunability of nanoscale biomaterials to activate, shape, and detect immune system effector function, it may be possible in the near future to generate practical strategies for the prevention and treatment of infectious diseases in the developing world. PMID:19922750

  14. Improved Dynamic Response of Magnetic Feedback in DIII-D with AC Compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piron, Lidia; Marrelli, Lionello; Martin, Piero; Piovesan, Paolo; Soppelsa, Anton; Hanson, Jeremy; Reimerdes, Holger; in, Yongkyoon; Okabayashi, Michio

    2010-11-01

    High-β tokamaks need robust magnetic feedback to cope with various MHD modes. A new algorithm was tested to improve the DIII-D feedback dynamic response. Magnetic sensor signals include contributions from vacuum sources, such as active coils. In the present algorithm, the plasma response to an applied field is computed by subtracting from the sensor signals the dc component of couplings to the coils. But, when the coil currents vary on fast enough time scales, wall eddy currents modify the contributions to the sensor field with respect to its dc value [1]. Such ac effects can be non-negligible. Transfer functions between coils and sensors were measured and an ac compensation scheme accounting for them was developed. Significant coil current was saved likely due to a better estimate of the plasma response. Ac effects may be more important at high-β, where uncorrected error fields are strongly amplified. [1] E.J. Strait et al. 2003 Nucl. Fusion 43 430. *Work supported in part by US DOE under by DE-FG02-04ER54761, DE-FG02-06ER84442, & DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  15. Hybrid quantum dot-tin disulfide field-effect transistors with improved photocurrent and spectral responsivity

    SciTech Connect

    Cotlet, Mircea; Huang, Yuan Zang; Chen, Jia -Shiang; Huidong Zang; Sutter, Eli A.; Sutter, Peter W.; Nam, Chang -Yong

    2016-03-24

    We report an improved photosensitivity in few-layer tin disulfide (SnS2) field-effect transistors(FETs) following doping with CdSe/ZnS core/shell quantum dots(QDs). The hybrid QD-SnS2 FET devices achieve more than 500% increase in the photocurrent response compared with the starting SnS2-only FET device and a spectral responsivity reaching over 650 A/W at 400 nm wavelength. The negligible electrical conductance in a control QD-only FET device suggests that the energy transfer between QDs and SnS2 is the main mechanism responsible for the sensitization effect, which is consistent with the strong spectral overlap between QDphotoluminescence and SnS2 optical absorption as well as the large nominal donor-acceptor interspacing between QD core and SnS2. Furthermore, we also find enhanced charge carrier mobility in hybrid QD-SnS2 FETs which we attribute to a reduced contact Schottky barrier width due to an elevated background charge carrier density.

  16. Hybrid quantum dot-tin disulfide field-effect transistors with improved photocurrent and spectral responsivity

    DOE PAGES

    Cotlet, Mircea; Huang, Yuan Zang; Chen, Jia -Shiang; ...

    2016-03-24

    We report an improved photosensitivity in few-layer tin disulfide (SnS2) field-effect transistors(FETs) following doping with CdSe/ZnS core/shell quantum dots(QDs). The hybrid QD-SnS2 FET devices achieve more than 500% increase in the photocurrent response compared with the starting SnS2-only FET device and a spectral responsivity reaching over 650 A/W at 400 nm wavelength. The negligible electrical conductance in a control QD-only FET device suggests that the energy transfer between QDs and SnS2 is the main mechanism responsible for the sensitization effect, which is consistent with the strong spectral overlap between QDphotoluminescence and SnS2 optical absorption as well as the large nominalmore » donor-acceptor interspacing between QD core and SnS2. Furthermore, we also find enhanced charge carrier mobility in hybrid QD-SnS2 FETs which we attribute to a reduced contact Schottky barrier width due to an elevated background charge carrier density.« less

  17. Mild Hyperthermia Enhances Transport of Liposomal Gemcitabine and Improves in vivo Therapeutic Response

    PubMed Central

    Kirui, Dickson K; Celia, Christian; Molinaro, Roberto; Bansal, Shyam S.; Cosco, Donato; Fresta, Massimo; Shen, Haifa; Ferrari, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive biological barriers limit the transport and efficacy of cancer nanotherapeutics. Creative manipulation of tumor microenvironment provides promising avenues towards improving chemotherapeutic response. Such strategies include the use of mechanical stimuli to overcome barriers, and increase drug delivery and therapeutic efficacy. The rational use of gold nanorod-mediated mild hyperthermia treatment (MHT) alters tumor transport properties, increases liposomal gemcitabine (Gem Lip) delivery and anti-tumor efficacy in pancreatic cancer CAPAN-1 tumor model. MHT treatment led to a 3-fold increase in accumulation of 80-nm liposomes and enhanced spatial interstitial distribution. I.v. injection of Gem Lip and MHT treatment led to a 3-fold increase in intratumor gemcitabine concentration compared to chemotherapeutic infusion alone. Furthermore, combination of MHT treatment with infusion of 12 mg/kg Gem Lip led to a 2-fold increase in therapeutic efficacy and inhibition of CAPAN-1 tumor growth when compared to equimolar chemotherapeutic treatment alone. Enhanced therapeutic effect was confirmed by reduction in tumor size and increase in apoptotic index where MHT treatment combined with 12 mg/kg Gem Lip achieved similar therapeutic efficacy as the use of 60 mg/kg free gemcitabine. In conclusion, we demonstrated improvements in vivo efficacy resulting from MHT treatment that overcome transport barriers, promote delivery, improve efficacy of nanomedicines. PMID:25721343

  18. Mild hyperthermia enhances transport of liposomal gemcitabine and improves in vivo therapeutic response.

    PubMed

    Kirui, Dickson K; Celia, Christian; Molinaro, Roberto; Bansal, Shyam S; Cosco, Donato; Fresta, Massimo; Shen, Haifa; Ferrari, Mauro

    2015-05-01

    Obstructive biological barriers limit the transport and efficacy of cancer nanotherapeutics. Creative manipulation of tumor microenvironment provides promising avenues towards improving chemotherapeutic response. Such strategies include the use of mechanical stimuli to overcome barriers, and increase drug delivery and therapeutic efficacy. The rational use of gold nanorod-mediated mild hyperthermia treatment (MHT) alters tumor transport properties, increases liposomal gemcitabine (Gem Lip) delivery, and antitumor efficacy in pancreatic cancer CAPAN-1 tumor model. MHT treatment leads to a threefold increase in accumulation of 80-nm liposomes and enhances spatial interstitial distribution. I.v. injection of Gem Lip and MHT treatment lead to a threefold increase in intratumor gemcitabine concentration compared to chemotherapeutic infusion alone. Furthermore, combination of MHT treatment with infusion of 12 mg kg(-1) Gem Lip leads to a twofold increase in therapeutic efficacy and inhibition of CAPAN-1 tumor growth when compared to equimolar chemotherapeutic treatment alone. Enhanced therapeutic effect is confirmed by reduction in tumor size and increase in apoptotic index where MHT treatment combined with 12 mg kg(-1) Gem Lip achieves similar therapeutic efficacy as the use of 60 mg kg(-1) free gemcitabine. In conclusion, improvements in vivo efficacy are demonstrated resulting from MHT treatment that overcome transport barriers, promote delivery, improve efficacy of nanomedicines.

  19. Structural Equation Model Approach to the Use of Response Times for Improving Estimation in Item Response Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sen, Rohini

    2012-01-01

    In the last five decades, research on the uses of response time has extended into the field of psychometrics (Schnikpe & Scrams, 1999; van der Linden, 2006; van der Linden, 2007), where interest has centered around the usefulness of response time information in item calibration and person measurement within an item response theory. framework.…

  20. Triangle and concave pentagon electrodes for an improved broadband frequency response of stripline beam position monitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shobuda, Yoshihiro; Chin, Yong Ho; Takata, Koji; Toyama, Takeshi; Nakamura, Keigo

    2016-02-01

    The frequency domain performance of a stripline beam position monitor depends largely on the longitudinal shape of its electrode. Some shapes other than a conventional rectangle have been proposed and tested. To attain a good impedance matching along the electrode, they need to be precisely bent down toward their downstream in proportion to their width. This is a considerable task, and a failure to comply with it will result in a large distortion of the frequency-domain transfer function from the ideal one due to unwanted signal reflections. In this report, we first propose a triangle electrode for easy fabrication and setup: it only requires that a triangularly cut flat electrode will be placed in a chamber while being obliquely inclined toward the downstream port. Theoretical and simulation results show that the simple triangle electrode has a remarkably flatter frequency response than the rectangle one. The frequency response, in particular at high frequencies, can be further improved by attaching an "apron" plate, perpendicular to the upstream edge of the electrode. The overshooting of the frequency response at low frequency can be eliminated by replacing the straight sidelines of the triangle by three-point polylines (with a result that the triangle is transformed to a concave pentagon). The concave pentagon electrode needs to be bent only once at the middle point of the polylines for a good impedance matching and thus its fabrication and setup remain to be easy. Rf measurements for the various electrode shapes have been carried out. We found that the concave pentagon electrode achieves a wide and flat frequency response up to about 4 GHz for the J-PARC Main Ring (MR).

  1. Is transcranial direct current stimulation a potential method for improving response inhibition?

    PubMed

    Kwon, Yong Hyun; Kwon, Jung Won

    2013-04-15

    Inhibitory control of movement in motor learning requires the ability to suppress an inappropriate action, a skill needed to stop a planned or ongoing motor response in response to changes in a variety of environments. This study used a stop-signal task to determine whether transcranial direct-current stimulation over the pre-supplementary motor area alters the reaction time in motor inhibition. Forty healthy subjects were recruited for this study and were randomly assigned to either the transcranial direct-current stimulation condition or a sham-transcranial direct-current stimulation condition. All subjects consecutively performed the stop-signal task before, during, and after the delivery of anodal transcranial direct-current stimulation over the pre-supplementary motor area (pre-transcranial direct-current stimulation phase, transcranial direct-current stimulation phase, and post-transcranial direct-current stimulation phase). Compared to the sham condition, there were significant reductions in the stop-signal processing times during and after transcranial direct-current stimulation, and change times were significantly greater in the transcranial direct-current stimulation condition. There was no significant change in go processing-times during or after transcranial direct-current stimulation in either condition. Anodal transcranial direct-current stimulation was feasibly coupled to an interactive improvement in inhibitory control. This coupling led to a decrease in the stop-signal process time required for the appropriate responses between motor execution and inhibition. However, there was no transcranial direct-current stimulation effect on the no-signal reaction time during the stop-signal task. Transcranial direct-current stimulation can adjust certain behaviors, and it could be a useful clinical intervention for patients who have difficulties with response inhibition.

  2. Adjunctive Phosphodiesterase-4 Inhibitor Therapy Improves Antibiotic Response to Pulmonary Tuberculosis in a Rabbit Model

    PubMed Central

    Subbian, Selvakumar; Tsenova, Liana; Holloway, Jennifer; Peixoto, Blas; O'Brien, Paul; Dartois, Véronique; Khetani, Vikram; Zeldis, Jerome B.; Kaplan, Gilla

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Adjunctive host-directed therapy is emerging as a new potential approach to improve the outcome of conventional antimicrobial treatment for tuberculosis (TB). We tested the ability of a phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitor (PDE4i) CC-11050, co-administered with the first-line anti-TB drug isoniazid (INH), to accelerate bacillary killing and reduce chronic inflammation in the lungs of rabbits with experimental Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection. Methods A rabbit model of pulmonary TB that recapitulates the pathologic manifestations seen in humans was used. Rabbits were infected with virulent Mtb by aerosol exposure and treated for eight weeks with INH with or without CC-11050, starting at four weeks post infection. The effect of CC-11050 treatment on disease severity, pathology, bacillary load, T cell proliferation and global lung transcriptome profiles were analyzed. Results Significant improvement in bacillary clearance and reduced lung pathology and fibrosis were noted in the rabbits treated for eight weeks with INH + CC-11050, compared to those treated with INH or CC-11050 only. In addition, expression of host genes associated with tissue remodeling, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) regulation, macrophage activation and lung inflammation networks was dampened in CC-11050-treated, compared to the untreated rabbits. Conclusions Adjunctive CC-11050 therapy significantly improves the response of rabbits with experimental pulmonary TB to INH treatment. We propose that CC-11050 may be a promising candidate for host directed therapy of patients with pulmonary TB, reducing the duration and improving clinical outcome of antibiotic treatment. PMID:26981575

  3. Improvement of the Response Time of Super Thin Film Transistor Liquid Crystal Displays by Using a Backlight System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirakata, Jun-ichi; Shingai, Akira; Ono, Kikuo; Kawabe, Kazuyoshi; Furuhashi, Tsutomu

    2003-04-01

    To enable application to full moving images, the response time of liquid crystal displays (LCDs) must be improved. In this paper, we will discuss our results of improving the response time using the blink backlight system. When the display image changes from black to white, the lamp turns on after the rise of the LCD response. On the other hand, when the display image changes from white to black, the lamp turns off before the LCD response falls. The total response time of the super thin film transistor (TFT)-LCD was improved from 25 ms to 8 ms, which corresponded to the lamp response time. Moreover, the response time was dependent on the fluorescence wavelength of the lamp material. The blue fluorescent lamp (CFL) material has the fastest response time, 2 ms. If the response time of green and red fluorescent materials can be improved similarly to the blue one, it will be possible to obtain a moving picture quality comparable to that of a cathode-ray tube.

  4. A method of improving the dynamic response of 3D force/torque sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osypiuk, Rafał; Piskorowski, Jacek; Kubus, Daniel

    2016-02-01

    In the paper attention is drawn to adverse dynamic properties of filters implemented in commercial measurement systems, force/torque sensors, which are increasingly used in industrial robotics. To remedy the problem, it has been proposed to employ a time-variant filter with appropriately modulated parameters, owing to which it is possible to suppress the amplitude of the transient response and, at the same time, to increase the pulsation of damped oscillations; this results in the improvement of dynamic properties in terms of reducing the duration of transients. This property plays a key role in force control and in the fundamental problem of the robot establishing contact with rigid environment. The parametric filters have been verified experimentally and compared with filters available for force/torque sensors manufactured by JR3. The obtained results clearly indicate the advantages of the proposed solution, which may be an interesting alternative to the classic methods of filtration.

  5. Improving Question-Asking Initiations in Young Children with Autism Using Pivotal Response Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Koegel, Robert; Bradshaw, Jessica; Ashbaugh, Kristen; Koegel, Lynn Kern

    2013-01-01

    Social initiations make up a core deficit for children with autism spectrum disorder. In particular, initiated questions during social interactions are often minimal or absent in this population. In the context of a multiple baseline design, the efficacy of using the motivational procedures of Pivotal Response Treatment to increase social question asking for three young children with autism was assessed. Results indicated that participants initiated a greater number of targeted questions following intervention. Additionally, all children exhibited increases in initiation of untargeted questions during social interaction in novel settings. Furthermore, post intervention data revealed collateral gains in communication and adaptive behavior. Theoretical implications of incorporating motivational strategies into intervention to improve social initiations in young children with ASD are discussed. PMID:24014174

  6. Using Medicare Data to Identify Individuals Who Are Electricity Dependent to Improve Disaster Preparedness and Response

    PubMed Central

    DeSalvo, Karen; Finne, Kristen; Worrall, Chris; Bogdanov, Alina; Dinkler, Ayame; Babcock, Sarah; Kelman, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    During a disaster or prolonged power outage, individuals who use electricity-dependent medical equipment are often unable to operate it and seek care in acute care settings or local shelters. Public health officials often report that they do not have proactive and systematic ways to rapidly identify and assist these individuals. In June 2013, we piloted a first-in-the-nation emergency preparedness drill in which we used Medicare claims data to identify individuals with electricity-dependent durable medical equipment during a disaster and securely disclosed it to a local health department. We found that Medicare claims data were 93% accurate in identifying individuals using a home oxygen concentrator or ventilator. The drill findings suggest that claims data can be useful in improving preparedness and response for electricity-dependent populations. PMID:24832404

  7. Improving the health status of aboriginal people in Canada: new directions, new responsibilities.

    PubMed Central

    Tookenay, V F

    1996-01-01

    The study findings reported in this issue by Dr. Harriet L. MacMillan and associates (see pages 1569 to 1578) demonstrate that aboriginal people in Canada bear a disproportionate burden of illness compared with the general population. In this editorial the author examines some of the factors that have contributed to this situation, such as poverty, cultural barriers and jurisdictional problems. The way forward lies in supporting the aspirations of aboriginal people for self-determination. Aboriginal people in Canada need to recognize and use their own professional human resources and to adopt more responsibility for improving the health status of their communities. At the same time, there is a need for greater acceptance by aboriginal people of existing initiatives for health promotion and disease prevention. PMID:8956835

  8. Using Medicare data to identify individuals who are electricity dependent to improve disaster preparedness and response.

    PubMed

    DeSalvo, Karen; Lurie, Nicole; Finne, Kristen; Worrall, Chris; Bogdanov, Alina; Dinkler, Ayame; Babcock, Sarah; Kelman, Jeffrey

    2014-07-01

    During a disaster or prolonged power outage, individuals who use electricity-dependent medical equipment are often unable to operate it and seek care in acute care settings or local shelters. Public health officials often report that they do not have proactive and systematic ways to rapidly identify and assist these individuals. In June 2013, we piloted a first-in-the-nation emergency preparedness drill in which we used Medicare claims data to identify individuals with electricity-dependent durable medical equipment during a disaster and securely disclosed it to a local health department. We found that Medicare claims data were 93% accurate in identifying individuals using a home oxygen concentrator or ventilator. The drill findings suggest that claims data can be useful in improving preparedness and response for electricity-dependent populations.

  9. Sensitivity and response time improvements in a millimeter-wave spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolbe, W. F.; Leskovar, B.

    1982-06-01

    An improved microwave spectrometer for the detection of gaseous pollutants and other atmospheric constituents is described. The spectrometer, which operates in the vicinity of 70 GHz, employs a Fabry-Perot resonator as a sample cell and uses superheterodyne detection for high sensitivity. The instrument has been modified to incorporate a frequency doubler modulated at 30 MHz to permit operation with a single Gunn oscillator source. As a result, faster response time and somewhat greater sensitivity are obtained. The spectrometer is capable of detecting a minimum concentration of 1 ppm of SO2 diluted in air with a 1-s time constant. For OCS diluted in air, the minimum detectable concentration is 800 ppb and with a 10-s time constant 300 ppb.

  10. Larval starvation improves metabolic response to adult starvation in honey bees (Apis mellifera L.).

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Campbell, Jacob B; Kaftanoglu, Osman; Page, Robert E; Amdam, Gro V; Harrison, Jon F

    2016-04-01

    Environmental changes during development have long-term effects on adult phenotypes in diverse organisms. Some of the effects play important roles in helping organisms adapt to different environments, such as insect polymorphism. Others, especially those resulting from an adverse developmental environment, have a negative effect on adult health and fitness. However, recent studies have shown that those phenotypes influenced by early environmental adversity have adaptive value under certain (anticipatory) conditions that are similar to the developmental environment, though evidence is mostly from morphological and behavioral observations and it is still rare at physiological and molecular levels. In the companion study, we applied a short-term starvation treatment to fifth instar honey bee larvae and measured changes in adult morphology, starvation resistance, hormonal and metabolic physiology and gene expression. Our results suggest that honey bees can adaptively respond to the predicted nutritional stress. In the present study, we further hypothesized that developmental starvation specifically improves the metabolic response of adult bees to starvation instead of globally affecting metabolism under well-fed conditions. Here, we produced adult honey bees that had experienced a short-term larval starvation, then we starved them for 12 h and monitored metabolic rate, blood sugar concentrations and metabolic reserves. We found that the bees that experienced larval starvation were able to shift to other fuels faster and better maintain stable blood sugar levels during starvation. However, developmental nutritional stress did not change metabolic rates or blood sugar levels in adult bees under normal conditions. Overall, our study provides further evidence that early larval starvation specifically improves the metabolic responses to adult starvation in honey bees.

  11. Homeopathic Doses of Gelsemium sempervirens Improve the Behavior of Mice in Response to Novel Environments

    PubMed Central

    Bellavite, Paolo; Magnani, Paolo; Zanolin, Elisabetta; Conforti, Anita

    2011-01-01

    Gelsemium sempervirens is used in homeopathy for treating patients with anxiety related symptoms, however there have been few experimental studies evaluating its pharmacological activity. We have investigated the effects of homeopathic doses of G. sempervirens on mice, using validated behavioral models. Centesimal (CH) dilutions/dynamizations of G. sempervirens, the reference drug diazepam (1 mg/kg body weight) or a placebo (solvent vehicle) were intraperitoneally delivered to groups of mice of CD1 strain during 8 days, then the effects were assessed by the Light-Dark (LD) choice test and by the Open-Field (OF) exploration test, in a fully blind manner. In the LD test, the mean time spent in the illuminated area by control and placebo-treated animals was 15.98%, for mice treated with diazepam it increased to 19.91% (P = .047), while with G. sempervirens 5 CH it was 18.11% (P = .341, non-significant). The number of transitions between the two compartments increased with diazepam from 6.19 to 9.64 (P < .001) but not with G. Sempervirens. In the OF test, G. sempervirens 5 CH significantly increased the time spent and the distance traveled in the central zone (P = .009 and P = .003, resp.), while diazepam had no effect on these OF test parameters. In a subsequent series of experiments, G. sempervirens 7 and 30 CH also significantly improved the behavioral responses of mice in the OF test (P < .01 for all tested variables). Neither dilutions of G. sempervirens affected the total distance traveled, indicating that the behavioral effect was not due to unspecific changes in locomotor activity. In conclusion, homeopathic doses of G. sempervirens influence the emotional responses of mice to novel environments, suggesting an improvement in exploratory behavior and a diminution of thigmotaxis or neophobia. PMID:19752165

  12. Antiparasitic Treatment Induces an Improved CD8(+) T Cell Response in Chronic Chagasic Patients.

    PubMed

    Mateus, Jose; Pérez-Antón, Elena; Lasso, Paola; Egui, Adriana; Roa, Nubia; Carrilero, Bartolomé; González, John M; Thomas, M Carmen; Puerta, Concepción J; López, Manuel C; Cuéllar, Adriana

    2017-04-15

    Chagas disease is a chronic infection caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, an intracellular protozoan parasite. Chronic chagasic patients (CCPs) have dysfunctional CD8(+) T cells that are characterized by impaired cytokine production, high coexpression of inhibitory receptors, and advanced cellular differentiation. Most patients diagnosed in the chronic phase of Chagas disease already exhibit heart involvement, and there is no vaccination that protects against the disease. Antiparasitic treatment is controversial as to its indication for this stage of the disease. There is a lack of biological markers to evaluate the effectiveness of antiparasitic treatment, and little is known about the effect of the treatment on CD8(+) T cells. Thus, the aim of the current study was to analyze the early effects of antiparasitic treatment on CD8(+) T cells from CCPs with asymptomatic clinical forms of disease. To evaluate the CD8(+) T cell subsets, expression of inhibitory receptors, and functionality of T cells in CCPs, PBMCs were isolated. The results showed that treatment of CCPs with the asymptomatic form of the disease induces an increase in the frequency of CD8(+) central memory T cells and terminal effector T cells, a decrease in the coexpression of inhibitory receptors, an improved Ag-specific CD8(+) T cell response exhibited by the individual production of IFN-γ or IL-2, and a multifunctional CD8(+) T cell profile of up to four functions (IFN-γ(+)IL-2(+)Perforin(+)Granzyme B(+)). These findings suggest that, in CCPs, antiparasitic treatment improved the quality of Ag-specific CD8(+) T cell responses associated with a decrease in inhibitory receptor coexpression, which could serve as biomarkers for monitoring the effectiveness of antiparasitic treatment.

  13. Pre-PCR processing in bioterrorism preparedness: improved diagnostic capabilities for laboratory response networks.

    PubMed

    Hedman, Johannes; Knutsson, Rickard; Ansell, Ricky; Rådström, Peter; Rasmusson, Birgitta

    2013-09-01

    Diagnostic DNA analysis using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has become a valuable tool for rapid detection of biothreat agents. However, analysis is often challenging because of the limited size, quality, and purity of the biological target. Pre-PCR processing is an integrated concept in which the issues of analytical limit of detection and simplicity for automation are addressed in all steps leading up to PCR amplification--that is, sampling, sample treatment, and the chemical composition of PCR. The sampling method should maximize target uptake and minimize uptake of extraneous substances that could impair the analysis--so-called PCR inhibitors. In sample treatment, there is a trade-off between yield and purity, as extensive purification leads to DNA loss. A cornerstone of pre-PCR processing is to apply DNA polymerase-buffer systems that are tolerant to specific sample impurities, thereby lowering the need for expensive purification steps and maximizing DNA recovery. Improved awareness among Laboratory Response Networks (LRNs) regarding pre-PCR processing is important, as ineffective sample processing leads to increased cost and possibly false-negative or ambiguous results, hindering the decision-making process in a bioterrorism crisis. This article covers the nature and mechanisms of PCR-inhibitory substances relevant for agroterrorism and bioterrorism preparedness, methods for quality control of PCR reactions, and applications of pre-PCR processing to optimize and simplify the analysis of various biothreat agents. Knowledge about pre-PCR processing will improve diagnostic capabilities of LRNs involved in the response to bioterrorism incidents.

  14. Model Constrained by Visual Hierarchy Improves Prediction of Neural Responses to Natural Scenes

    PubMed Central

    Antolík, Ján; Hofer, Sonja B.; Bednar, James A.; Mrsic-Flogel, Thomas D.

    2016-01-01

    Accurate estimation of neuronal receptive fields is essential for understanding sensory processing in the early visual system. Yet a full characterization of receptive fields is still incomplete, especially with regard to natural visual stimuli and in complete populations of cortical neurons. While previous work has incorporated known structural properties of the early visual system, such as lateral connectivity, or imposing simple-cell-like receptive field structure, no study has exploited the fact that nearby V1 neurons share common feed-forward input from thalamus and other upstream cortical neurons. We introduce a new method for estimating receptive fields simultaneously for a population of V1 neurons, using a model-based analysis incorporating knowledge of the feed-forward visual hierarchy. We assume that a population of V1 neurons shares a common pool of thalamic inputs, and consists of two layers of simple and complex-like V1 neurons. When fit to recordings of a local population of mouse layer 2/3 V1 neurons, our model offers an accurate description of their response to natural images and significant improvement of prediction power over the current state-of-the-art methods. We show that the responses of a large local population of V1 neurons with locally diverse receptive fields can be described with surprisingly limited number of thalamic inputs, consistent with recent experimental findings. Our structural model not only offers an improved functional characterization of V1 neurons, but also provides a framework for studying the relationship between connectivity and function in visual cortical areas. PMID:27348548

  15. Placing Bounds on Extreme Temperature Response of Maize to Improve Crop Model Intercomparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, C.; Babcock, B.; Peng, Y.; Gassman, P. W.; Campbell, T.

    2015-12-01

    We propose the development of community-based estimates for bounds on maize sensitivity to extreme temperature. We use model-based, observation-driven soil moisture climatology in a high maize production region in the United States to develop bounds on high temperature sensitivity through its dependence on available water. For the portion of the region with relatively long growing season, yield reduction per degree-C is 10% for high water availability and 32.5% for low water availability. Where the growing season is shorter, yield reduction per degree-C is 6% for high water availability and 27% for low water availability. High temperature sensitivity is indeterminate where extreme temperature yield effect does not yet exceed excessive water yield effect. We suggest new soil moisture climatology from reanalysis datasets could be used to develop community-based estimates of high temperature sensitivity that would significantly improve the accuracy of maize temperature sensitivity bounds, their regional variability, and their importance relative to other weather yield shocks. A community-based estimate would substantially improve evaluation of crop system simulation models and provide baseline information for evaluation of adaptation options. For instance, since process models are needed for evaluation of crop system adaptation response under climate projections, a community-developed estimate would provide a clear target for process model evaluation. Furthermore, the range of extreme temperature sensitivity from empirical models would provide a lower bound on variability that could be achieved from process models. If the process models achieved this bound, it would mean the uncertainty among their simulations would be primarily from observational limitations than differences in model response. While we demonstrate the potential in the context of maize, the concept could be implemented within any crop production system.

  16. rTMS neuromodulation improves electrocortical functional measures of information processing and behavioral responses in autism

    PubMed Central

    Sokhadze, Estate M.; El-Baz, Ayman S.; Sears, Lonnie L.; Opris, Ioan; Casanova, Manuel F.

    2014-01-01

    changes along with increased centro-parietal P100 and P300 (P3b) to targets are indicative of more efficient processing of information post-TMS treatment. Another important finding was decrease of the latency and increase of negativity of error-related negativity (ERN) during commission errors that may reflect improvement in error monitoring and correction function. Enhanced information processing was also manifested in lower error rate. In addition we calculated normative post-error treaction time (RT) slowing response in both groups and found that rTMS treatment was accompanied by post-error RT slowing and higher accuracy of responses, whereas the WTL group kept on showing typical for ASD post-error RT speeding and higher commission and omission error rates. Conclusion: Results from our study indicate that rTMS improves executive functioning in ASD as evidenced by normalization of ERP responses and behavioral reactions (RT, accuracy) during executive function test, and also by improvements in clinical evaluations. PMID:25147508

  17. Improved performance and immunological responses as the result of dietary genistein supplementation of broiler chicks.

    PubMed

    Rasouli, E; Jahanian, R

    2015-09-01

    levels seen by control and antibiotics chicks. Dietary inclusion of genistein increased (P<0.05) lymphocytes and subsequently reduced (P<0.01) heterophil to lymphocyte ratio. The present findings indicate that dietary genistein supplementation at the levels of 20 to 80 mg/kg not only improves growth performance, but also could beneficially affect immunological responses in broiler chicks.

  18. An improved non-contact thermometer and hygrometer with rapid response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Underwood, R.; Gardiner, T.; Finlayson, A.; Bell, S.; de Podesta, M.

    2017-02-01

    Previously (Underwood et al 2015 Meteorol. Appl. 22 830) we reported first tests of a device capable of simultaneous, non-contact, temperature and humidity (NCTAH) measurements in air. The device used an acoustic thermometer and a tuneable diode laser absorption spectrometer (TDLAS), a combination which should be capable of an extremely rapid response to changes in humidity as it does not require moisture in a solid-state matrix to equilibrate with the surrounding air. In this paper we report recent developments of the instrument focussed on reducing its response time so that it can be used as a reference instrument for assessing the response time of conventional humidity sensors. In addition, the interdependence of the temperature and humidity estimates is now accounted for in real-time using an iterative procedure, which eliminates the need for data post-processing. The TDLAS measures water molecule number density based on the transmission of an infrared beam (approximate wavelength 1360 nm) through a 0.6 m path length. The acoustic thermometer is based around a fixed-path acoustic interferometer. The improved NCTAH device now produces estimates of the water molecule number density every 20 ms and the temperature output displays an RC filter-like response, with a time constant of approximately 30 ms. The instrument has been tested in a climatic chamber through a temperature range of  ‑40 °C to  +40 °C and a dew point range of  ‑43 °C to  +38 °C, at atmospheric pressure, comparing the instrument readings with those from a calibrated hygrometer and four platinum resistance thermometers. In steady-state conditions, the instrument readings are in good agreement with the conventional sensors, with temperature differences less than 1 °C (repeatability 0.1 °C), and humidity differences mostly within 5% of mixing ratio. Under transient conditions, we demonstrate how the instrument can be used to evaluate the response times of conventional

  19. Exploiting a geometrically sampled grid in the steered response power algorithm for localization improvement.

    PubMed

    Salvati, D; Drioli, C; Foresti, G L

    2017-01-01

    The steered response power phase transform (SRP-PHAT) is a beamformer method very attractive in acoustic localization applications due to its robustness in reverberant environments. This paper presents a spatial grid design procedure, called the geometrically sampled grid (GSG), which aims at computing the spatial grid by taking into account the discrete sampling of time difference of arrival (TDOA) functions and the desired spatial resolution. A SRP-PHAT localization algorithm based on the GSG method is also introduced. The proposed method exploits the intersections of the discrete hyperboloids representing the TDOA information domain of the sensor array, and projects the whole TDOA information on the space search grid. The GSG method thus allows one to design the sampled spatial grid which represents the best search grid for a given sensor array, it allows one to perform a sensitivity analysis of the array and to characterize its spatial localization accuracy, and it may assist the system designer in the reconfiguration of the array. Experimental results using both simulated data and real recordings show that the localization accuracy is substantially improved both for high and for low spatial resolution, and that it is closely related to the proposed power response sensitivity measure.

  20. Improvements in the star-based monitoring of GOES Imager visible-channel responsivities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, I.-Lok; Dean, Charles; Han, Dejiang; Crosby, David; Weinreb, Michael; Baucom, Jeanette; Baltimore, Perry; Wu, Xiangqian

    2005-08-01

    Stars are regularly observed in the visible channels of the GOES Imagers for real-time navigation operations. However, we have been also using star observations off-line to deduce the rate of degradation of the responsivity of the visible channels. We estimate degradation rates from the time series of the intensities of the Imagers' output signals, available in the GOES Orbit and Attitude Tracking System (OATS). We begin by showing our latest results in monitoring the responsivities of the visible channels on GOES-8, GOES-10 and GOES-12. Unfortunately, the OATS computes the intensities of the star signals with approximations suitable for navigation, not for estimating accurate signal strengths, and thus we had to develop objective criteria for screening out unsuitable data. With several layers of screening, our most recent trending method yields smoother time series of star signals, but the time series are supported by a smaller pool of stars. With the goal of simplifying the task of data selection and to retrieve stars that have been rejected in the screening, we tested a technique that accessed the raw star measurements before they were processed by the OATS. We developed formulations that produced star signals in a manner more suitable for monitoring the conditions of the visible channels. We present specifics of this process together with sample results. We discuss improvements in the quality of the time series that allow for more reliable inferences on the characteristics of the visible channels.

  1. Temperature responses of Rubisco from Paniceae grasses provide opportunities for improving C3 photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Sharwood, Robert E; Ghannoum, Oula; Kapralov, Maxim V; Gunn, Laura H; Whitney, Spencer M

    2016-11-28

    Enhancing the catalytic properties of the CO2-fixing enzyme Rubisco is a target for improving agricultural crop productivity. Here, we reveal extensive diversity in the kinetic response between 10 and 37 °C by Rubisco from C3 and C4 species within the grass tribe Paniceae. The CO2 fixation rate (kcatc) for Rubisco from the C4 grasses with nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) phosphate malic enzyme (NADP-ME) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PCK) photosynthetic pathways was twofold greater than the kcatc of Rubisco from NAD-ME species across all temperatures. The declining response of CO2/O2 specificity with increasing temperature was less pronounced for PCK and NADP-ME Rubisco, which would be advantageous in warmer climates relative to the NAD-ME grasses. Modelled variation in the temperature kinetics of Paniceae C3 Rubisco and PCK Rubisco differentially stimulated C3 photosynthesis relative to tobacco above and below 25 °C under current and elevated CO2. Amino acid substitutions in the large subunit that could account for the catalytic variation among Paniceae Rubisco are identified; however, incompatibilities with Paniceae Rubisco biogenesis in tobacco hindered their mutagenic testing by chloroplast transformation. Circumventing these bioengineering limitations is critical to tailoring the properties of crop Rubisco to suit future climates.

  2. Improved growth response of antibody/receptor chimera attained by the engineering of transmembrane domain.

    PubMed

    Kawahara, Masahiro; Ogo, Yuko; Ueda, Hiroshi; Nagamune, Teruyuki

    2004-10-01

    Structure-based design of antibody/cytokine receptor chimeras has permitted a growth signal transduction in response to non-natural ligands such as fluorescein-conjugated BSA as mimicry of cytokine-cytokine receptor systems. However, while tight on/off regulation is observed in the natural cytokine receptor systems, many chimeras constructed to date showed residual growth-promoting activity in the absence of ligands. Here we tried to reduce the basal growth signal intensity from a chimera by engineering the transmembrane domain (TM) that is thought to be involved in the interchain interaction of natural cytokine receptors. When the retroviral vectors encoding the chimeras with either the wild-type erythropoietin receptor (EpoR) TM or the one bearing two mutations in the leucine zipper motif were transduced to non-strictly interleukin-6-dependent 7TD1 cells, a tight antigen-dependent on/off regulation was attained, also demonstrating the first antigen-mediated genetically modified cell amplification of non-strictly factor-dependent cells. The results clearly indicate that the TM mutation is an effective means to improve the growth response of the antibody/receptor chimera.

  3. Fast Odor Learning Improves Reliability of Odor Responses in the Locust Antennal Lobe

    PubMed Central

    Bazhenov, Maxim; Stopfer, Mark; Sejnowski, Terrence J.; Laurent, Gilles

    2010-01-01

    Summary Recordings in the locust antennal lobe (AL) reveal activity-dependent, stimulus-specific changes in projection neuron (PN) and local neuron response patterns over repeated odor trials. During the first few trials, PN response intensity decreases, while spike time precision increases, and coherent oscillations, absent at first, quickly emerge. We examined this “fast odor learning” with a realistic computational model of the AL. Activity-dependent facilitation of AL inhibitory synapses was sufficient to simulate physiological recordings of fast learning. In addition, in experiments with noisy inputs, a network including synaptic facilitation of both inhibition and excitation responded with reliable spatiotemporal patterns from trial to trial despite the noise. A network lacking fast plasticity, however, responded with patterns that varied across trials, reflecting the input variability. Thus, our study suggests that fast olfactory learning results from stimulus-specific, activity-dependent synaptic facilitation and may improve the signal-to-noise ratio for repeatedly encountered odor stimuli. PMID:15882647

  4. pH-Responsive Isoniazid-Loaded Nanoparticles Markedly Improve Tuberculosis Treatment in Mice.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Angela A; Lee, Bai-Yu; Clemens, Daniel L; Dillon, Barbara Jane; Zink, Jeffrey I; Horwitz, Marcus A

    2015-10-01

    Tuberculosis is a major global health problem for which improved therapeutics are needed to shorten the course of treatment and combat emergence of drug resistance. Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the etiologic agent of tuberculosis, is an intracellular pathogen of mononuclear phagocytes. As such, it is an ideal pathogen for nanotherapeutics because macrophages avidly ingest nanoparticles even without specific targeting molecules. Hence, a nanoparticle drug delivery system has the potential to target and deliver high concentrations of drug directly into M. tuberculosis-infected cells-greatly enhancing efficacy while avoiding off-target toxicities. Stimulus-responsive mesoporous silica nanoparticles of two different sizes, 100 and 50 nm, are developed as carriers for the major anti-tuberculosis drug isoniazid in a prodrug configuration. The drug is captured by the aldehyde-functionalized nanoparticle via hydrazone bond formation and coated with poly(ethylene imine)-poly(ethylene glycol) (PEI-PEG). The drug is released from the nanoparticles in response to acidic pH at levels that naturally occur within acidified endolysosomes. It is demonstrated that isoniazid-loaded PEI-PEG-coated nanoparticles are avidly ingested by M. tuberculosis-infected human macrophages and kill the intracellular bacteria in a dose-dependent manner. It is further demonstrated in a mouse model of pulmonary tuberculosis that the nanoparticles are well tolerated and much more efficacious than an equivalent amount of free drug.

  5. Adding Postal Follow-Up to a Web-Based Survey of Primary Care and Gastroenterology Clinic Physician Chiefs Improved Response Rates but not Response Quality or Representativeness.

    PubMed

    Partin, Melissa R; Powell, Adam A; Burgess, Diana J; Haggstrom, David A; Gravely, Amy A; Halek, Krysten; Bangerter, Ann; Shaukat, Aasma; Nelson, David B

    2015-09-01

    This study assessed whether postal follow-up to a web-based physician survey improves response rates, response quality, and representativeness. We recruited primary care and gastroenterology chiefs at 125 Veterans Affairs medical facilities to complete a 10-min web-based survey on colorectal cancer screening and diagnostic practices in 2010. We compared response rates, response errors, and representativeness in the primary care and gastroenterology samples before and after adding postal follow-up. Adding postal follow-up increased response rates by 20-25 percentage points; markedly greater increases than predicted from a third e-mail reminder. In the gastroenterology sample, the mean number of response errors made by web responders (0.25) was significantly smaller than the mean number made by postal responders (2.18), and web responders provided significantly longer responses to open-ended questions. There were no significant differences in these outcomes in the primary care sample. Adequate representativeness was achieved before postal follow-up in both samples, as indicated by the lack of significant differences between web responders and the recruitment population on facility characteristics. We conclude adding postal follow-up to this web-based physician leader survey improved response rates but not response quality or representativeness.

  6. Improved SPECT quantitation using fully three-dimensional iterative spatially variant scatter response compensation.

    PubMed

    Beekman, F J; Kamphuis, C; Viergever, M A

    1996-01-01

    The quality and quantitative accuracy of iteratively reconstructed SPECT images improves when better point spread function (PSF) models of the gamma camera are used during reconstruction. Here, inclusion in the PSF model of photon crosstalk between different slices caused by limited gamma camera resolution and scatter is examined. A three-dimensional (3-D) projector back-projector (proback) has been developed which models both the distance dependent detector point spread function and the object shape-dependent scatter point spread function of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). A table occupying only a few megabytes of memory is sufficient to represent this scatter model. The contents of this table are obtained by evaluating an analytical expression for object shape-dependent scatter. The proposed approach avoids the huge memory requirements of storing the full transition matrix needed for 3-D reconstruction including object shape-dependent scatter. In addition, the method avoids the need for lengthy Monte Carlo simulations to generate such a matrix. In order to assess the quantitative accuracy of the method, reconstructions of a water filled cylinder containing regions of different activity levels and of simulated 3-D brain projection data have been evaluated for technetium-99m. It is shown that fully 3-D reconstruction including complete detector response and object shape-dependent scatter modeling clearly outperforms simpler methods that lack a complete detector response and/or a complete scatter response model. Fully 3-D scatter correction yields the best quantitation of volumes of interest and the best contrast-to-noise curves.

  7. Fitting a Mixture Item Response Theory Model to Personality Questionnaire Data: Characterizing Latent Classes and Investigating Possibilities for Improving Prediction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maij-de Meij, Annette M.; Kelderman, Henk; van der Flier, Henk

    2008-01-01

    Mixture item response theory (IRT) models aid the interpretation of response behavior on personality tests and may provide possibilities for improving prediction. Heterogeneity in the population is modeled by identifying homogeneous subgroups that conform to different measurement models. In this study, mixture IRT models were applied to the…

  8. Intravenous Immunoglobulin with Enhanced Polyspecificity Improves Survival in Experimental Sepsis and Aseptic Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Djoumerska-Alexieva, Iglika; Roumenina, Lubka; Pashov, Anastas; Dimitrov, Jordan; Hadzhieva, Maya; Lindig, Sandro; Voynova, Elisaveta; Dimitrova, Petya; Ivanovska, Nina; Bockmeyer, Clemens; Stefanova, Zvetanka; Fitting, Catherine; Bläss, Markus; Claus, Ralf; von Gunten, Stephan; Kaveri, Srini; Cavaillon, Jean-Marc; Bauer, Michael; Vassilev, Tchavdar

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis is a major cause for death worldwide. Numerous interventional trials with agents neutralizing single proinflammatory mediators have failed to improve survival in sepsis and aseptic systemic inflammatory response syndromes. This failure could be explained by the widespread gene expression dysregulation known as “genomic storm” in these patients. A multifunctional polyspecific therapeutic agent might be needed to thwart the effects of this storm. Licensed pooled intravenous immunoglobulin preparations seemed to be a promising candidate, but they have also failed in their present form to prevent sepsis-related death. We report here the protective effect of a single dose of intravenous immunoglobulin preparations with additionally enhanced polyspecificity in three models of sepsis and aseptic systemic inflammation. The modification of the pooled immunoglobulin G molecules by exposure to ferrous ions resulted in their newly acquired ability to bind some proinflammatory molecules, complement components and endogenous “danger” signals. The improved survival in endotoxemia was associated with serum levels of proinflammatory cytokines, diminished complement consumption and normalization of the coagulation time. We suggest that intravenous immunoglobulin preparations with additionally enhanced polyspecificity have a clinical potential in sepsis and related systemic inflammatory syndromes. PMID:26701312

  9. Improved Chemotherapeutic Activity by Morus alba Fruits through Immune Response of Toll-Like Receptor 4

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Bo Yoon; Kim, Seon Beom; Lee, Mi Kyeong; Park, Hyun; Kim, Sung Yeon

    2015-01-01

    Morus alba L. fruits have long been used in traditional medicine by many cultures. Their medicinal attributes include cardiovascular, hepatoprotective, neuroprotective and immunomodulatory actions. However, their mechanism of macrophage activation and anti-cancer effects remain unclear. The present study investigated the molecular mechanisms of immune stimulation and improved chemotherapeutic effect of M. alba L. fruit extract (MFE). MFE stimulated the production of cytokines, nitric oxide (NO) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and tumoricidal properties of macrophages. MFE activated macrophages through the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPKinase) and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling pathways downstream from toll-like receptor (TLR) 4. MFE was shown to exhibit cytotoxicity of CT26 cells via the activated macrophages, even though MFE did not directly affect CT26 cells. In a xenograft mouse model, MFE significantly enhanced anti-cancer activity combined with 5-fluorouracil and markedly promoted splenocyte proliferation, natural killer (NK) cell activity, cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) activity and IFN-γ production. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody levels were significantly increased. These results indicate the indirect anti-cancer activity of MFE through improved immune response mediated by TLR4 signaling. M. alba L. fruit extract might be a potential anti-tumor immunomodulatory candidate chemotherapy agent. PMID:26473845

  10. Improved Progressive Polynomial Algorithm for Self-Adjustment and Optimal Response in Intelligent Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, José; Herrera, Gilberto; Chacón, Mario; Acosta, Pedro; Carrillo, Mariano

    2008-01-01

    The development of intelligent sensors involves the design of reconfigurable systems capable of working with different input sensors signals. Reconfigurable systems should expend the least possible amount of time readjusting. A self-adjustment algorithm for intelligent sensors should be able to fix major problems such as offset, variation of gain and lack of linearity with good accuracy. This paper shows the performance of a progressive polynomial algorithm utilizing different grades of relative nonlinearity of an output sensor signal. It also presents an improvement to this algorithm which obtains an optimal response with minimum nonlinearity error, based on the number and selection sequence of the readjust points. In order to verify the potential of this proposed criterion, a temperature measurement system was designed. The system is based on a thermistor which presents one of the worst nonlinearity behaviors. The application of the proposed improved method in this system showed that an adequate sequence of the adjustment points yields to the minimum nonlinearity error. In realistic applications, by knowing the grade of relative nonlinearity of a sensor, the number of readjustment points can be determined using the proposed method in order to obtain the desired nonlinearity error. This will impact on readjustment methodologies and their associated factors like time and cost. PMID:27873936

  11. Improved nutrient removal using in situ continuous on-line sensors with short response time.

    PubMed

    Ingildsen, P; Wendelboe, H

    2003-01-01

    Nutrient sensors that can be located directly in the activated sludge processes are gaining in number at wastewater treatment plants. The in situ location of the sensors means that they can be located close to the processes that they aim to control and hence are perfectly suited for automatic process control. Compared to the location of automatic analysers in the effluent from the sedimentation reactors the in situ location means a large reduction in the response time. The settlers typically work as a first-order delay on the signal with a retention time in the range of 4-12 hours depending on the size of the settlers. Automatic process control of the nitrogen and phosphorus removal processes means that considerable improvements in the performance of aeration, internal recirculation, carbon dosage and phosphate precipitation dosage can be reached by using a simple control structure as well as simple PID controllers. The performance improvements can be seen in decreased energy and chemicals consumption and less variation in effluent concentrations of ammonium, total nitrogen and phosphate. Simple control schemes are demonstrated for the pre-denitrification and the post precipitation system by means of full-scale plant experiments and model simulations.

  12. Improved Angiogenesis in Response to Localized Delivery of Macrophage-Recruiting Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Saik, Jennifer E.; Ali, Saniya; Wang, Shang; Yosef, Nejla; Calderon, Gisele A.; Scott, Larry; Vadakkan, Tegy J.; Larina, Irina V.; West, Jennifer L.; Dickinson, Mary E.

    2015-01-01

    Successful engineering of complex organs requires improved methods to promote rapid and stable vascularization of artificial tissue scaffolds. Toward this goal, tissue engineering strategies utilize the release of pro-angiogenic growth factors, alone or in combination, from biomaterials to induce angiogenesis. In this study we have used intravital microscopy to define key, dynamic cellular changes induced by the release of pro-angiogenic factors from polyethylene glycol diacrylate hydrogels transplanted in vivo. Our data show robust macrophage recruitment when the potent and synergistic angiogenic factors, PDGFBB and FGF2 were used as compared with VEGF alone and intravital imaging suggested roles for macrophages in endothelial tip cell migration and anastomosis, as well as pericyte-like behavior. Further data from in vivo experiments show that delivery of CSF1 with VEGF can dramatically improve the poor angiogenic response seen with VEGF alone. These studies show that incorporating macrophage-recruiting factors into the design of pro-angiogenic biomaterial scaffolds is a key strategy likely to be necessary for stable vascularization and survival of implanted artificial tissues. PMID:26132702

  13. An Experience Oriented-Convergence Improved Gravitational Search Algorithm for Minimum Variance Distortionless Response Beamforming Optimum

    PubMed Central

    Darzi, Soodabeh; Tiong, Sieh Kiong; Tariqul Islam, Mohammad; Rezai Soleymanpour, Hassan; Kibria, Salehin

    2016-01-01

    An experience oriented-convergence improved gravitational search algorithm (ECGSA) based on two new modifications, searching through the best experiments and using of a dynamic gravitational damping coefficient (α), is introduced in this paper. ECGSA saves its best fitness function evaluations and uses those as the agents’ positions in searching process. In this way, the optimal found trajectories are retained and the search starts from these trajectories, which allow the algorithm to avoid the local optimums. Also, the agents can move faster in search space to obtain better exploration during the first stage of the searching process and they can converge rapidly to the optimal solution at the final stage of the search process by means of the proposed dynamic gravitational damping coefficient. The performance of ECGSA has been evaluated by applying it to eight standard benchmark functions along with six complicated composite test functions. It is also applied to adaptive beamforming problem as a practical issue to improve the weight vectors computed by minimum variance distortionless response (MVDR) beamforming technique. The results of implementation of the proposed algorithm are compared with some well-known heuristic methods and verified the proposed method in both reaching to optimal solutions and robustness. PMID:27399904

  14. An Experience Oriented-Convergence Improved Gravitational Search Algorithm for Minimum Variance Distortionless Response Beamforming Optimum.

    PubMed

    Darzi, Soodabeh; Tiong, Sieh Kiong; Tariqul Islam, Mohammad; Rezai Soleymanpour, Hassan; Kibria, Salehin

    2016-01-01

    An experience oriented-convergence improved gravitational search algorithm (ECGSA) based on two new modifications, searching through the best experiments and using of a dynamic gravitational damping coefficient (α), is introduced in this paper. ECGSA saves its best fitness function evaluations and uses those as the agents' positions in searching process. In this way, the optimal found trajectories are retained and the search starts from these trajectories, which allow the algorithm to avoid the local optimums. Also, the agents can move faster in search space to obtain better exploration during the first stage of the searching process and they can converge rapidly to the optimal solution at the final stage of the search process by means of the proposed dynamic gravitational damping coefficient. The performance of ECGSA has been evaluated by applying it to eight standard benchmark functions along with six complicated composite test functions. It is also applied to adaptive beamforming problem as a practical issue to improve the weight vectors computed by minimum variance distortionless response (MVDR) beamforming technique. The results of implementation of the proposed algorithm are compared with some well-known heuristic methods and verified the proposed method in both reaching to optimal solutions and robustness.

  15. Improved cellular response on multiwalled carbon nanotube-incorporated electrospun polyvinyl alcohol/chitosan nanofibrous scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Liao, Huihui; Qi, Ruiling; Shen, Mingwu; Cao, Xueyan; Guo, Rui; Zhang, Yanzhong; Shi, Xiangyang

    2011-06-01

    We report the fabrication of multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT)-incorporated electrospun polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)/chitosan (CS) nanofibers with improved cellular response for potential tissue engineering applications. In this study, smooth and uniform PVA/CS and PVA/CS/MWCNTs nanofibers with water stability were formed by electrospinning, followed by crosslinking with glutaraldehyde vapor. The morphology, structure, and mechanical properties of the formed electrospun fibrous mats were characterized using scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and mechanical testing, respectively. We showed that the incorporation of MWCNTs did not appreciably affect the morphology of the PVA/CS nanofibers; importantly the protein adsorption ability of the nanofibers was significantly improved. In vitro cell culture of mouse fibroblasts (L929) seeded onto the electrospun scaffolds showed that the incorporation of MWCNTs into the PVA/CS nanofibers significantly promoted cell proliferation. Results from this study hence suggest that MWCNT-incorporated PVA/CS nanofibrous scaffolds with small diameters (around 160 nm) and high porosity can mimic the natural extracellular matrix well, and potentially provide many possibilities for applications in the fields of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

  16. Coping with drought: stress and adaptive responses in potato and perspectives for improvement

    PubMed Central

    Obidiegwu, Jude E.; Bryan, Glenn J.; Jones, Hamlyn G.; Prashar, Ankush

    2015-01-01

    Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) is often considered as a drought sensitive crop and its sustainable production is threatened due to frequent drought episodes. There has been much research aiming to understand the physiological, biochemical, and genetic basis of drought tolerance in potato as a basis for improving production under drought conditions. The complex phenotypic response of potato plants to drought is conditioned by the interactive effects of the plant's genotypic potential, developmental stage, and environment. Effective crop improvement for drought tolerance will require the pyramiding of many disparate characters, with different combinations being appropriate for different growing environments. An understanding of the interaction between below ground water uptake by the roots and above ground water loss from the shoot system is essential. The development of high throughput precision phenotyping platforms is providing an exciting new tool for precision screening, which, with the incorporation of innovative screening strategies, can aid the selection and pyramiding of drought-related genes appropriate for specific environments. Outcomes from genomics, proteomics, metabolomics, and bioengineering advances will undoubtedly compliment conventional breeding strategies and presents an alternative route toward development of drought tolerant potatoes. This review presents an overview of past research activity, highlighting recent advances with examples from other crops and suggesting future research directions. PMID:26257752

  17. Rapid response teams in hospitals: improving quality of care for patients and quality of the work environment for nursing staff.

    PubMed

    Kirk, Terry

    2006-01-01

    As the healthcare delivery system continues to evolve in the new millennium, initiatives such as the Institute for HealthCare Improvement's 100,000 Lives Campaign include the development of rapid response teams in hospitals. Introduction of rapid response teams provides nurses assistance in difficult clinical situations and provides early clinical intervention to mitigate negative patient outcomes and save lives. Development, implementation strategies, and benefits of rapid response teams are described.

  18. Randomized Trial of the Availability, Responsiveness and Continuity (ARC) Organizational Intervention for Improving Youth Outcomes in Community Mental Health Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glisson, Charles; Hemmelgarn, Anthony; Green, Philip; Williams, Nathaniel J.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The primary objective of the study was to assess whether the Availability, Responsiveness and Continuity (ARC) organizational intervention improved youth outcomes in community based mental health programs. The second objective was to assess whether programs with more improved organizational social contexts following the 18-month ARC…

  19. 34 CFR 200.85 - Responsibilities of SEAs and operating agencies for improving services to migratory children.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... school improvement requirements of section 1116 of the ESEA do not apply to the MEP, SEAs and local... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Responsibilities of SEAs and operating agencies for improving services to migratory children. 200.85 Section 200.85 Education Regulations of the Offices of...

  20. [On gods, snakes and staffs--the emblem of the medical profession].

    PubMed

    Rabinerson, David; Salzer, Liat; Gabbay-Benziv, Rinnat

    2014-10-01

    The commonly accepted emblems of the Medical Profession are the staff of the Greek god of medicine--Asklepios (or Asclepius], on which one serpent is entwined. Later, around the 16th century C.E., the wand of the herald of the Greek Gods, e.g., Hermes, on which two snakes are entwined and facing each other, became popular as the emblem of the medical profession. We elaborate on the history of the evolution of these emblems as symbols of medicine, including earlier influences from the times of the ancient Egyptians and Babylonians, which were followed by Judeo-Christian traditions and concepts. The relevance of the use of the wand of Hermes as an emblem of our profession is further discussed.

  1. Playing God or just unnatural? Religious beliefs and approval of synthetic biology.

    PubMed

    Dragojlovic, Nicolas; Einsiedel, Edna

    2013-10-01

    Using evidence from a 2010 survey of 32 European publics, this article argues that belief in God increases disapproval for synthetic biology through two different mechanisms, depending on the strength of the individual's belief. Among weak believers, belief in God appears to be associated with the increased availability and accessibility of the idea that genetic manipulation interferes with nature. Strong believers, in contrast, appear to also engage in an explicitly theological evaluation of synthetic biology, with opposition to synthetic biology resulting from the perception that the creation of new types of organisms encroaches on a domain of activity (creation) that has traditionally been considered to be a divine prerogative. Overall, our findings suggest that value predispositions can influence public attitudes towards synthetic biology even when individuals engage in explicit deliberation about the technology in question.

  2. Genomic Selection Improves Response to Selection in Resilience by Exploiting Genotype by Environment Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Mulder, Han A.

    2016-01-01

    Genotype by environment interactions (GxE) are very common in livestock and hamper genetic improvement. On the other hand, GxE is a source of genetic variation: genetic variation in response to environment, e.g., environmental perturbations such as heat stress or disease. In livestock breeding, there is tendency to ignore GxE because of increased complexity of models for genetic evaluations and lack of accuracy in extreme environments. GxE, however, creates opportunities to increase resilience of animals toward environmental perturbations. The main aim of the paper is to investigate to which extent GxE can be exploited with traditional and genomic selection methods. Furthermore, we investigated the benefit of reaction norm (RN) models compared to conventional methods ignoring GxE. The questions were addressed with selection index theory. GxE was modeled according to a linear RN model in which the environmental gradient is the contemporary group mean. Economic values were based on linear and non-linear profit equations. Accuracies of environment-specific (G)EBV were highest in intermediate environments and lowest in extreme environments. RN models had higher accuracies of (G)EBV in extreme environments than conventional models ignoring GxE. Genomic selection always resulted in higher response to selection in all environments than sib or progeny testing schemes. The increase in response was with genomic selection between 9 and 140% compared to sib testing and between 11 and 114% compared to progeny testing when the reference population consisted of 1 million animals across all environments. When the aim was to decrease environmental sensitivity, the response in slope of the RN model with genomic selection was between 1.09 and 319 times larger than with sib or progeny testing and in the right direction in contrast to sib and progeny testing that still increased environmental sensitivity. This shows that genomic selection with large reference populations offers great

  3. Characterizing driver-response relationships in marine pelagic ecosystems for improved ocean management.

    PubMed

    Hunsicker, Mary E; Kappel, Carrie V; Selkoe, Kimberly A; Halpern, Benjamin S; Scarborough, Courtney; Mease, Lindley; Amrhein, Alisan

    2016-04-01

    about threshold responses to guide how other stressors are managed and to adapt to new ocean conditions. As methods to detect and reduce uncertainty around threshold values improve, managers will be able to better understand and account for ubiquitous non-linear relationships.

  4. Is our brain hardwired to produce God, or is our brain hardwired to perceive God? A systematic review on the role of the brain in mediating religious experience.

    PubMed

    Fingelkurts, Alexander A; Fingelkurts, Andrew A

    2009-11-01

    To figure out whether the main empirical question "Is our brain hardwired to believe in and produce God, or is our brain hardwired to perceive and experience God?" is answered, this paper presents systematic critical review of the positions, arguments and controversies of each side of the neuroscientific-theological debate and puts forward an integral view where the human is seen as a psycho-somatic entity consisting of the multiple levels and dimensions of human existence (physical, biological, psychological, and spiritual reality), allowing consciousness/mind/spirit and brain/body/matter to be seen as different sides of the same phenomenon, neither reducible to each other. The emergence of a form of causation distinctive from physics where mental/conscious agency (a) is neither identical with nor reducible to brain processes and (b) does exert "downward" causal influence on brain plasticity and the various levels of brain functioning is discussed. This manuscript also discusses the role of cognitive processes in religious experience and outlines what can neuroscience offer for study of religious experience and what is the significance of this study for neuroscience, clinicians, theology and philosophy. A methodological shift from "explanation" to "description" of religious experience is suggested. This paper contributes to the ongoing discussion between theologians, cognitive psychologists and neuroscientists.

  5. Children's Attributions of Beliefs to Humans and God: Cross-Cultural Evidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, Nicola; Sousa, Paulo; Barrett, Justin L.; Atran, Scott

    2004-01-01

    The capacity to attribute beliefs to others in order to understand action is one of the mainstays of human cognition. Yet it is debatable whether children attribute beliefs in the same way to all agents. In this paper, we present the results of a false-belief task concerning humans and God run with a sample of Maya children aged 4-7, and place…

  6. Investigation for terminal reflection optical fiber SPR glucose sensor and glucose sensitive membrane with immobilized GODs.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yinquan; Yang, Xi; Gong, Dejing; Liu, Fang; Hu, Wenbin; Cai, Weiquan; Huang, Jun; Yang, Minghong

    2017-02-20

    Glucose sensitive membrane (GSM) consists of glucose oxidases (GODs) and matrix material (for example, polyacrylamide gel). In this paper, we have investigated the optical property and adsorption isotherms of a GSM based on a terminal reflection optical fiber SPR sensor. Firstly, we reported the fabrication of one kind of GSM which was made of immobilized GODs on SiO2 nanoparticles and PAM gel. Then, we investigated the effects of GSM thickness, GOD content, solution pH and ambient temperature on the reflected spectrum of sensor, and the optimum parameters of the sensor, such as, GSM thickness of 12 times pulling, 4 mg/mL of GOD content in GSM, 7.0 of solution pH and 40 °C of measuring temperature were obtained. Thirdly, we measured the wavelength shifts of the optimized SPR sensor in the solutions with different glucose concentrations. As the glucose concentration increases from 0 to 80 mg/dL, the resonance wavelength decreases approximately linearly and the corresponding sensitivity is about 0.14 nm/(mg/dL). Finally, we investigated the RI of the GSM, the concentration of glucose into GSM and the adsorption isotherm of GSM by the combination of SPR experiment data, theoretical simulation and Gladstone-Dale mixing rule. As the glucose concentration is in the region of [0, 80] mg/dL, the adsorption of GSM for glucose can be explained by the Freundlich isotherm model. As the glucose concentration is in the region of [120, 500] mg/dL, the Langmuir isotherm model is more suitable to describe the adsorption process of GSM for glucose.

  7. God's Turnstile: The Work of John Wheeler and Stephen Hawking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Overbye, Dennis

    1991-01-01

    Presents an excerpt from the book entitled "Lonely Hearts of the Cosmos." Provides narration of behind-the-scenes events in the lives, the scientific debates, and the intellectual triumphs of the two physicists responsible for inventing the concept of the black hole. (JJK)

  8. Miracles In, Creationism Out: "The Geophysics of God."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matsumura, Molleen

    1997-01-01

    Clarifies media reports that suggest that flood geology should be taught as part of the biology curriculum to provide support for the teaching of creationist theory. Analyzes the reports and provides support for response on the local level to these claims. (DDR)

  9. A Puzzle Unsolved: Failure to Observe Different Effects of God and Religion Primes on Intergroup Attitudes

    PubMed Central

    Ramsay, Jonathan E.; Tong, Eddie M. W.; Pang, Joyce S.; Chowdhury, Avijit

    2016-01-01

    Religious priming has been found to have both positive and negative consequences, and recent research suggests that the activation of God-related and community-related religious cognitions may cause outgroup prosociality and outgroup derogation respectively. The present research sought to examine whether reminders of God and religion have different effects on attitudes towards ingroup and outgroup members. Over two studies, little evidence was found for different effects of these two types of religious primes. In study 1, individuals primed with the words “religion”, “God” and a neutral control word evaluated both ingroup and outgroup members similarly, although a marginal tendency towards more negative evaluations of outgroup members by females exposed to religion primes was observed. In study 2, no significant differences in attitudes towards an outgroup member were observed between the God, religion, and neutral priming conditions. Furthermore, the gender effect observed in study 1 did not replicate in this second study. Possible explanations for these null effects are discussed. PMID:26812526

  10. Dietary administration of laminarin improves the growth performance and immune responses in Epinephelus coioides.

    PubMed

    Yin, Guangwen; Li, Wenwu; Lin, Qian; Lin, Xi; Lin, Jianbin; Zhu, Qingguo; Jiang, Heji; Huang, Zhijian

    2014-12-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of laminarin on the growth performance, immunological and biochemical parameters, as well as immune related genes expression in the grouper, Epinephelus coioides. One hundred and eight fish were randomly divided into four groups (45 groupers/group). Blank control group was fed with the basal diet, while low, medium and high doses of laminarin groups were fed with the basal diet supplemented with 0.5%, 1.0%, and 1.5% laminarin, respectively, for 48 days. The immunological and biochemical parameters in blood were investigated. The mRNA levels of IL-1β, IL-8, and TLR2 in midgut were also evaluated by quantitative real-time PCR. Dietary laminarin supplementation significantly improved the specific growth rate and the feed efficiency ratio of the fish. The level of TP and the activity of LZM, CAT and SOD were higher than that of the control. The levels of UREA and CREA as well as the activity of ALP were lower than of the control. There was no significant difference in the levels of ALT and AST between control groups and treated groups. In addition, dietary laminarin supplementation decreased the levels of C3 and C4. The expression of immune response genes IL-1β, IL-8, and TLR2 showed significant increases (P < 0.05) in groupers fed low dose (0.5%) and medium dose (1.0%) of laminarin compared with the blank control. These results suggest that laminarin modulates the immune response and stimulates growth of the fish.

  11. Improving the time response of a gamma/neutron liquid detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malone, Robert M.; Buckles, Robert A.; DeYoung, Anemarie; Garza, Irene; Frayer, Daniel K.; Kaufman, Morris I.; Morgan, George L.; Obst, Andrew W.; Rundberg, Robert S.; Tinsley, Jim; Waltman, Tom B.; Yuan, Vincent W.

    2016-09-01

    A pulsed neutron source is used to interrogate a target, producing secondary gammas and neutrons. In order to make good use of the relatively small number of gamma rays that emerge from the system after the neutron flash, our detector system must be both efficient in converting gamma rays to a detectable electronic signal and reasonably large in volume. Isotropic gamma rays are emitted from the target. These signals are converted to light within a large chamber of a liquid scintillator. To provide adequate time-of-flight separation between the gamma and neutron signals, the liquid scintillator is placed meters away from the target under interrogation. An acrylic PMMA (polymethyl methacrylate) light guide directs the emission light from the chamber into a 5-inch-diameter photomultiplier tube. However, this PMMA light guide produces a time delay for much of the light. Illumination design programs count rays traced from the source to a receiver. By including the index of refraction of the different materials that the rays pass through, the optical power at the receiver is calculated. An illumination design program can be used to optimize the optical material geometries to maximize the ray count and/or the receiver power. A macro was written to collect the optical path lengths of the rays and import them into a spreadsheet, where histograms of the time histories of the rays are plotted. This method allows optimization on the time response of different optical detector systems. One liquid scintillator chamber has been filled with a grid of reflective plates to improve its time response. Cylindrical detector geometries are more efficient.

  12. Acute arginine supplementation fails to improve muscle endurance or affect blood pressure responses to resistance training.

    PubMed

    Greer, Beau K; Jones, Brett T

    2011-07-01

    Dietary supplement companies claim that arginine supplements acutely enhance skeletal muscular endurance. The purpose of this study was to determine whether acute arginine α-ketoglutarate supplementation (AAKG) will affect local muscle endurance of the arm and shoulder girdle or the blood pressure (BP) response to anaerobic exercise. Twelve trained college-aged men (22.6 ± 3.8 years) performed 2 trials of exercise separated by at least 1 week. At 4 hours before, and 30 minutes before exercise, a serving of an AAKG supplement (3,700 mg arginine alpha-ketoglutarate per serving) or placebo was administered. Resting BP was assessed pre-exercise after 16 minutes of seated rest, and 5 and 10 minutes postexercise. Three sets each of chin-ups, reverse chin-ups, and push-ups were performed to exhaustion with 3 minutes of rest between each set. Data were analyzed using repeated-measures analysis of variance and paired t-tests. The AAKG supplementation did not improve muscle endurance or significantly affect the BP response to anaerobic work. Subjects performed fewer total chin-ups (23.75 ± 6.38 vs. 25.58 ± 7.18) and total trial repetitions (137.92 ± 28.18 vs. 141.08 ± 28.57) in the supplement trial (p ≤ 0.05). Subjects executed fewer reverse chin-ups (5.83 ± 1.85 vs. 6.75 ± 2.09) during set 2 after receiving the supplement as compared to the placebo (p < 0.05). Because AAKG supplementation may hinder muscular endurance, the use of these supplements before resistance training should be questioned.

  13. Enhanced Immune Response in Immunodeficient Mice Improves Peripheral Nerve Regeneration Following Axotomy

    PubMed Central

    Bombeiro, André L.; Santini, Júlio C.; Thomé, Rodolfo; Ferreira, Elisângela R. L.; Nunes, Sérgio L. O.; Moreira, Bárbara M.; Bonet, Ivan J. M.; Sartori, Cesar R.; Verinaud, Liana; Oliveira, Alexandre L. R.

    2016-01-01

    Injuries to peripheral nerves cause loss of motor and sensory function, greatly affecting life quality. Successful repair of the lesioned nerve requires efficient cell debris removal, followed by axon regeneration and reinnervation of target organs. Such process is orchestrated by several cellular and molecular events in which glial and immune cells actively participate. It is known that tissue clearance is largely improved by macrophages, which activation is potentiated by cells and molecules of the acquired immune system, such as T helper lymphocytes and antibodies, respectively. In the present work, we evaluated the contribution of lymphocytes in the regenerative process of crushed sciatic nerves of immunocompetent (wild-type, WT) and T and B-deficient (RAG-KO) mice. In Knockout animals, we found increased amount of macrophages under basal conditions and during the initial phase of the regenerative process, that was evaluated at 2, 4, and 8 weeks after lesion (wal). That parallels with faster axonal regeneration evidenced by the quantification of neurofilament and a growth associated protein immunolabeling. The motor function, evaluated by the sciatic function index, was fully recovered in both mouse strains within 4 wal, either in a progressive fashion, as observed for RAG-KO mice, or presenting a subtle regression, as seen in WT mice between 2 and 3 wal. Interestingly, boosting the immune response by early adoptive transference of activated WT lymphocytes at 3 days after lesion improved motor recovery in WT and RAG-KO mice, which was not ameliorated when cells were transferred at 2 wal. When monitoring lymphocytes by in vivo imaging, in both mouse strains, cells migrated to the lesion site shortly after transference, remaining in the injured limb up to its complete motor recovery. Moreover, a first peak of hyperalgesia, determined by von-Frey test, was coincident with increased lymphocyte infiltration in the damaged paw. Overall, the present results suggest

  14. Improved osteoblast response to UV-irradiated PMMA/TiO2 nanocomposites with controllable wettability.

    PubMed

    Shayan, Mahdis; Jung, Youngsoo; Huang, Po-Shun; Moradi, Marzyeh; Plakseychuk, Anton Y; Lee, Jung-Kun; Shankar, Ravi; Chun, Youngjae

    2014-12-01

    Osteoblast response was evaluated with polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA)/titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanocomposite thin films that exhibit the controllable wettability with ultraviolet (UV) treatment. In this study, three samples of PMMA/TiO2 were fabricated with three different compositional volume ratios (i.e., 25/75, 50/50, and 75/25) followed by UV treatment for 0, 4, and 8 h. All samples showed the increased hydrophilicity after UV irradiation. The films fabricated with the greater amount of TiO2 and treated with the longer UV irradiation time increased the hydrophilicity more. The partial elimination of PMMA on the surface after UV irradiation created a durable hydrophilic surface by (1) exposing higher amount of TiO2 on the surface, (2) increasing the hydroxyl groups on the TiO2 surface, and (3) producing a mesoporous structure that helps to hold the water molecules on the surface longer. The partial elimination of PMMA on the surface was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Surface profiler and atomic force microscopy demonstrated the increased surface roughness after UV irradiation. Both scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy demonstrated that particles containing calcium and phosphate elements appeared on the 8 h UV-treated surface of PMMA/TiO2 25/75 samples after 4 days soaking in Dulbecco's Modified Eagle Medium. UV treatment showed the osteoblast adhesion improved on all the surfaces. While all UV-treated hydrophilic samples demonstrated the improvement of osteoblast cell adhesion, the PMMA/TiO2 25/75 sample after 8 h UV irradiation (n = 5, P value = 0.000) represented the best cellular response as compared to other samples. UV-treated PMMA/TiO2 nanocomposite thin films with controllable surface properties represent a high potential for the biomaterials used in both orthopedic and dental applications.

  15. pH-Responsive Reversible PEGylation Improves Performance of Antineoplastic Agent.

    PubMed

    Sun, Diankui; Ding, Jianxun; Xiao, Chunsheng; Chen, Jinjin; Zhuang, Xiuli; Chen, Xuesi

    2015-04-22

    The reversible PEGylation endows antitumor drugs with various fascinating advantages, including prolonged circulation time in blood, enhanced accumulation in tumor tissue, increased cellular uptake, and promoted intracellular drug release, to improve the therapeutic efficacy and security. Here, the obtained succinic anhydride (SA)-functionalized DOX (SAD) (i.e., insensitive succinic anhydride-functionalized doxorubicin (DOX)) and aconitic anhydride (CA)-modified DOX (CAD) (i.e., acid-sensitive cis-aconitic anhydride-modified DOX) are conjugated to the terminal of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) yielding the unresponsive SAD-PEG-SAD and pH-responsive CAD-PEG-CAD prodrugs, respectively. The prepared prodrugs can self-assemble into micelles in aqueous solution. Both micelles are sufficiently stable at normal physiological pH (i.e., 7.4), while CAD-PEG-CAD micelle gradually swells and finally disassembles at intratumoral (i.e., 6.8) and especially endosomal pHs (i.e., 5.5). DOX release from CAD-PEG-CAD at pH 7.4 is efficiently inhibited, whereas it is significantly accelerated by the rapid cleavage of amide bond at pH 5.5. In addition, CAD-PEG-CAD exhibits more efficient cellular uptake and potent cytotoxicity in vitro, as well as improved tissue distribution and superior tumor suppression in vivo than free DOX and SAD-PEG-SAD. More importantly, the PEGylated DOX exhibits favorable security in vivo. In brief, the smart CAD-PEG-CAD with enhanced antitumor efficacy and decreased side effects shows as a promising powerful platform for the clinical chemotherapy of malignancy.

  16. Studying the glial cell response to biomaterials and surface topography for improving the neural electrode interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ereifej, Evon S.

    grown on PMMA resembled closely to that of cells grown on the control surface, thus confirming the biocompatibility of PMMA. Additionally, the astrocyte GFAP gene expressions of cells grown on PMMA were lower than the control, signifying a lack of astrocyte reactivity. Based on the findings from the biomaterials study, it was decided to optimize PMMA by changing the surface characteristic of the material. Through the process of hot embossing, nanopatterns were placed on the surface in order to test the hypothesis that nanopatterning can improve the cellular response to the material. Results of this study agreed with current literature showing that topography effects protein and cell behavior. It was concluded that for the use in neural electrode fabrication and design, the 3600mm/gratings pattern feature sizes were optimal. The 3600 mm/gratings pattern depicted cell alignment along the nanopattern, less protein adsorption, less cell adhesion, proliferation and viability, inhibition of GFAP and MAP2k1 compared to all other substrates tested. Results from the initial biomaterials study also indicated platinum was negatively affected the cells and may not be a suitable material for neural electrodes. This lead to pursuing studies with iridium oxide and platinum alloy wires for the glial scar assay. Iridium oxide advantages of lower impedance and higher charge injection capacity would appear to make iridium oxide more favorable for neural electrode fabrication. However, results of this study demonstrate iridium oxide wires exhibited a more significant reactive response as compared to platinum alloy wires. Astrocytes cultured with platinum alloy wires had less GFAP gene expression, lower average GFAP intensity, and smaller glial scar thickness. Results from the nanopatterning PMMA study prompted a more thorough investigation of the nanopatterning effects using an organotypic brain slice model. PDMS was utilized as the substrate due to its optimal physical properties

  17. Cilostazol improves the response to ischemia in diabetic mice by a mechanism dependent on PPARγ.

    PubMed

    Biscetti, Federico; Pecorini, Giovanni; Arena, Vincenzo; Stigliano, Egidio; Angelini, Flavia; Ghirlanda, Giovanni; Ferraccioli, Gianfranco; Flex, Andrea

    2013-12-05

    Cilostazol is effective for the treatment of peripheral ischemia. This compound has several beneficial effects on platelet aggregation, serum lipids and endothelial cells, and we recently found that it enhances collateral blood flow in the ischemic hind limbs of mice. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)γ, a receptor for thiazolidinediones, plays a role in angiogenesis. The aim of this work was to investigate the underlying molecular mechanisms and effects of cilostazol in a model of peripheral ischemia in diabetic mice. We induced diabetes in mice by streptozotocin (STZ) administration and studied ischemia-induced angiogenesis in the ischemic hind limbs of cilostazol-treated and untreated control mice. We found that perfusion recovery was significantly improved in treated compared with control diabetic mice. Interestingly, we found that the expression of PPARγ is reduced in ischemic tissues of diabetic mice. Furthermore, we discovered that local inhibition of the activity of this nuclear receptor decreased the angiogenic response to cilostazol treatment. Finally, we noted that this phenomenon is dependent on VEGF and modulated by PPARγ. Cilostazol administration enhances collateral blood flow in the ischemic hind limbs of STZ-induced diabetic mice through a PPARγ-dependent mechanism.

  18. Wound administration of M2-polarized macrophages does not improve murine cutaneous healing responses.

    PubMed

    Jetten, Nadine; Roumans, Nadia; Gijbels, Marion J; Romano, Andrea; Post, Mark J; de Winther, Menno P J; van der Hulst, Rene R W J; Xanthoulea, Sofia

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages play a crucial role in all stages of cutaneous wound healing responses and dysregulation of macrophage function can result in derailed wound repair. The phenotype of macrophages is influenced by the wound microenvironment and evolves during healing from a more pro-inflammatory (M1) profile in early stages, to a less inflammatory pro-healing (M2) phenotype in later stages of repair. The aim of the current study was to investigate the potential of exogenous administration of M2 macrophages to promote wound healing in an experimental mouse model of cutaneous injury. Bone marrow derived macrophages were stimulated in-vitro with IL-4 or IL-10 to obtain two different subsets of M2-polarized cells, M2a or M2c respectively. Polarized macrophages were injected into full-thickness excisional skin wounds of either C57BL/6 or diabetic db/db mice. Control groups were injected with non-polarized (M0) macrophages or saline. Our data indicate that despite M2 macrophages exhibit an anti-inflammatory phenotype in-vitro, they do not improve wound closure in wild type mice while they delay healing in diabetic mice. Examination of wounds on day 15 post-injury indicated delayed re-epithelialization and persistence of neutrophils in M2 macrophage treated diabetic wounds. Therefore, topical application of ex-vivo generated M2 macrophages is not beneficial and contraindicated for cell therapy of skin wounds.

  19. An isothermal flowmeter with improved frequency response for measuring tissue blood flow.

    PubMed

    Olshausen, K; Gross, R; Kirchheim, H

    1976-11-30

    An isothermal flowmeter with improved frequency response for measuring tissue blood flow was developed using thermistors. Direct heating of the thermistors allows a simple construction of small (0.5 mm outer diameter) capillary probes which do not require any additional heating coil. The changes of a feedback current necessary to keep the thermistor at a constant increment above tissue temperature indicate tissue blood flow; a second thermistor compensates variations of tissue temperature. The dynamic performance of the device shows a low-pass characteristic with a cut-off frequency higher than 5 Hz. For low flow rates the output signal was found to be proportional to the flow; for higher flow rates a linearization was necessary. Since tissue temperature can be recorded continuously, intermittent quantitative in-vivo calibration seems possibly by evaluation of "heater off" curves in the perfused and non-perfused tissue. As the flowmeter is insensitive to tissue temperature, it can be used for long-term recordings.

  20. Molecular and physiological responses to abiotic stress in forest trees and their relevance to tree improvement.

    PubMed

    Harfouche, Antoine; Meilan, Richard; Altman, Arie

    2014-11-01

    Abiotic stresses, such as drought, salinity and cold, are the major environmental stresses that adversely affect tree growth and, thus, forest productivity, and play a major role in determining the geographic distribution of tree species. Tree responses and tolerance to abiotic stress are complex biological processes that are best analyzed at a systems level using genetic, genomic, metabolomic and phenomic approaches. This will expedite the dissection of stress-sensing and signaling networks to further support efficient genetic improvement programs. Enormous genetic diversity for stress tolerance exists within some forest-tree species, and due to advances in sequencing technologies the molecular genetic basis for this diversity has been rapidly unfolding in recent years. In addition, the use of emerging phenotyping technologies extends the suite of traits that can be measured and will provide us with a better understanding of stress tolerance. The elucidation of abiotic stress-tolerance mechanisms will allow for effective pyramiding of multiple tolerances in a single tree through genetic engineering. Here we review recent progress in the dissection of the molecular basis of abiotic stress tolerance in forest trees, with special emphasis on Populus, Pinus, Picea, Eucalyptus and Quercus spp. We also outline practices that will enable the deployment of trees engineered for abiotic stress tolerance to land owners. Finally, recommendations for future work are discussed.

  1. Improvement of Bacillus thuringiensis bioinsecticide production by sporeless and sporulating strains using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Ben Khedher, Saoussen; Kamoun, Amel; Jaoua, Samir; Zouari, Nabil

    2011-10-01

    Statistical experimental designs, involving a Plackett-Burman design followed by a rotatable central composite design were used to optimize the culture medium constituents for Bacillus thuringiensis bioinsecticide production. This was carried out by using firstly an asporogenic strain and extrapolated to some sporeless and sporulating strains. Initial screening of production parameters was performed and the variables with statistically significant effects on delta-endotoxin production were identified: glucose, glycerol, yeast extract and MnSO(4). These variables were selected for further optimization by response surface methodology. The obtained results revealed that the optimum culture medium for delta-endotoxin production consists of 22.5 g/l of glucose, 4.8g/l of glycerol, 5.8 g/l of yeast extract and 0.008 g/l of MnSO(4). Under these conditions, delta-endotoxin production was 2,130 and 2,260 mg/l into 250 and 1,000 ml flask respectively, which represent more than 38% improvement in toxin production over the basal medium (1,636 mg/l). Such medium composition was shown to be suitable for overproducing delta-endotoxins by sporeless and sporulating strains.

  2. Response of Dark Matter Halos to Condensation of Baryons: Cosmological Simulations and Improved Adiabatic Contraction Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnedin, Oleg Y.; Kravtsov, Andrey V.; Klypin, Anatoly A.; Nagai, Daisuke

    2004-11-01

    The cooling of gas in the centers of dark matter halos is expected to lead to a more concentrated dark matter distribution. The response of dark matter to the condensation of baryons is usually calculated using the model of adiabatic contraction, which assumes spherical symmetry and circular orbits. In contrast, halos in the hierarchical structure formation scenarios grow via multiple violent mergers and accretion along filaments, and particle orbits in the halos are highly eccentric. We study the effects of the cooling of gas in the inner regions of halos using high-resolution cosmological simulations that include gas dynamics, radiative cooling, and star formation. We find that the dissipation of gas indeed increases the density of dark matter and steepens its radial profile in the inner regions of halos compared to the case without cooling. For the first time, we test the adiabatic contraction model in cosmological simulations and find that the standard model systematically overpredicts the increase of dark matter density in the inner 5% of the virial radius. We show that the model can be improved by a simple modification of the assumed invariant from M(r)r to M(r)r, where r and r are the current and orbit-averaged particle positions. This modification approximately accounts for orbital eccentricities of particles and reproduces simulation profiles to within 10%-20%. We present analytical fitting functions that accurately describe the transformation of the dark matter profile in the modified model and can be used for interpretation of observations.

  3. An Empirical Correction Method for Improving off-Axes Response Prediction in Component Type Flight Mechanics Helicopter Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mansur, M. Hossein; Tischler, Mark B.

    1997-01-01

    Historically, component-type flight mechanics simulation models of helicopters have been unable to satisfactorily predict the roll response to pitch stick input and the pitch response to roll stick input off-axes responses. In the study presented here, simple first-order low-pass filtering of the elemental lift and drag forces was considered as a means of improving the correlation. The method was applied to a blade-element model of the AH-64 APache, and responses of the modified model were compared with flight data in hover and forward flight. Results indicate that significant improvement in the off-axes responses can be achieved in hover. In forward flight, however, the best correlation in the longitudinal and lateral off-axes responses required different values of the filter time constant for each axis. A compromise value was selected and was shown to result in good overall improvement in the off-axes responses. The paper describes both the method and the model used for its implementation, and presents results obtained at hover and in forward flight.

  4. Does an understanding of ecosystems responses to rainfall pulses improve predictions of responses of drylands to climate change?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Drylands will experience more intense and frequent droughts and floods. Ten-year field experiments manipulating the amount and variability of precipitation suggest that we cannot predict responses of drylands to climate change based on pulse experimentation. Long-term drought experiments showed no e...

  5. Improvement in transdermal drug delivery performance by graphite oxide/temperature-responsive hydrogel composites with micro heater.

    PubMed

    Yun, Jumi; Lee, Dae Hoon; Im, Ji Sun; Kim, Hyung-Il

    2012-08-01

    Transdermal drug delivery system (TDDS) was prepared with temperature-responsive hydrogel. The graphite was oxidized and incorporated into hydrogel matrix to improve the thermal response of hydrogel. The micro heater was fabricated to control the temperature precisely by adopting a joule heating method. The drug in hydrogel was delivered through a hairless mouse skin by controlling temperature. The efficiency of drug delivery was improved obviously by incorporation of graphite oxide due to the excellent thermal conductivity and the increased interfacial affinity between graphite oxide and hydrogel matrix. The fabricated micro heater was effective in controlling the temperature over lower critical solution temperature of hydrogel precisely with a small voltage less than 1 V. The cell viability test on graphite oxide composite hydrogel showed enough safety for using as a transdermal drug delivery patch. The performance of TDDS could be improved noticeably based on temperature-responsive hydrogel, thermally conductive graphite oxide, and efficient micro heater.

  6. Neutrophils and Granulocytic MDSC: The Janus God of Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Zilio, Serena; Serafini, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils are the most abundant circulating blood cell type in humans, and are the first white blood cells recruited at the inflammation site where they orchestrate the initial immune response. Although their presence at the tumor site was recognized in the 1970s, until recently these cells have been neglected and considered to play just a neutral role in tumor progression. Indeed, in recent years neutrophils have been recognized to play a dual role in tumor development by either assisting the growth, angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis or by exerting tumoricidal action directly via the secretion of antitumoral compounds, or indirectly via the orchestration of antitumor immunity. Understanding the biology of these cells and influencing their polarization in the tumor micro- and macro-environment may be the key for the development of new therapeutic strategies, which may finally hold the promise of an effective immunotherapy for cancer. PMID:27618112

  7. Improving measurement in health education and health behavior research using item response modeling: introducing item response modeling.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Mark; Allen, Diane D; Li, Jun Corser

    2006-12-01

    This paper is the first of several papers designed to demonstrate how the application of item response models in the behavioral sciences can be used to enhance the conceptual and technical toolkit of researchers and developers and to understand better the psychometric properties of psychosocial measures. The papers all use baseline data from the Behavior Change Consortium data archive. This paper begins with an introduction to item response models, including both dichotomous and polytomous versions. The concepts of respondent and item location, model interpretation, standard errors and testing model fit are introduced and described. A sample analysis based on data from the self-efficacy scale is used to illustrate the concepts and techniques.

  8. Improving in-kennel presentation of shelter dogs through response-dependent and response-independent treat delivery.

    PubMed

    Protopopova, Alexandra; Wynne, Clive D L

    2015-09-01

    In a sequence of studies, we evaluated 2 behavioral interventions designed to decrease undesirable in-kennel behaviors of shelter dogs. In Experiment 1, we compared the efficacy of a simple pairing of person with food (response-independent treat delivery) to an increasing interval differential-reinforcement-of-other-behavior (DRO) procedure and a control condition. Both procedures decreased the median percentage of undesirable behavior from baseline (88.13%, interquartile range [IQR] = 52.78% and 66.43%, IQR = 89.06% respectively), and the control condition increased behavior by 15.13% (IQR = 32.08%), H(2) = 6.49, p = .039. In Experiment 2, we assessed the efficacy of a response-independent procedure on the whole shelter population. We found a 68% decrease from baseline in the number of dogs that behaved undesirably (U = -4.16, p < .001). Our results suggest that a response-independent procedure is equivalent in efficacy to a DRO procedure to decrease undesirable in-kennel behavior of shelter dogs.

  9. Diacerein Improves Left Ventricular Remodeling and Cardiac Function by Reducing the Inflammatory Response after Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Torina, Anali Galluce; Reichert, Karla; Lima, Fany; de Souza Vilarinho, Karlos Alexandre; de Oliveira, Pedro Paulo Martins; do Carmo, Helison Rafael Pereira; de Carvalho, Daniela Diógenes; Saad, Mário José Abdalla; Sposito, Andrei Carvalho; Petrucci, Orlando

    2015-01-01

    Background The inflammatory response has been implicated in the pathogenesis of left ventricular (LV) remodeling after myocardial infarction (MI). An anthraquinone compound with anti-inflammatory properties, diacerein inhibits the synthesis and activity of pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor and interleukins 1 and 6. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of diacerein on ventricular remodeling in vivo. Methods and Results Ligation of the left anterior descending artery was used to induce MI in an experimental rat model. Rats were divided into two groups: a control group that received saline solution (n = 16) and a group that received diacerein (80 mg/kg) daily (n = 10). After 4 weeks, the LV volume, cellular signaling, caspase 3 activity, and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) transcription were compared between the two groups. After 4 weeks, end-diastolic and end-systolic LV volumes were reduced in the treatment group compared to the control group (p < .01 and p < .01, respectively). Compared to control rats, diacerein-treated rats exhibited less fibrosis in the LV (14.65%± 7.27% vs. 22.57%± 8.94%; p < .01), lower levels of caspase-3 activity, and lower levels of NF-κB p65 transcription. Conclusions Treatment with diacerein once a day for 4 weeks after MI improved ventricular remodeling by promoting lower end-systolic and end-diastolic LV volumes. Diacerein also reduced fibrosis in the LV. These effects might be associated with partial blockage of the NF-κB pathway. PMID:25816098

  10. Chronic overexpression of cerebral Epo improves the ventilatory response to acute hypoxia during the postnatal development.

    PubMed

    Caravagna, Céline; Gasser, Edith M Schneider; Ballot, Orlane; Joseph, Vincent; Soliz, Jorge

    2015-08-01

    Clinicians observed that the treatment of premature human newborns for anemia with erythropoietin (Epo) also improved their respiratory autonomy. This observation is in line with our previous in vitro studies showing that acute and chronic Epo stimulation enhances fictive breathing of brainstem-spinal cord preparations of postnatal day 3-4 mice during hypoxia. Furthermore, we recently reported that the antagonization of the cerebral Epo (by using the soluble Epo receptor; sEpoR) significantly reduced the basal ventilation and the hypoxic ventilatory response of 10 days old mice. In this study, we used transgenic (Tg21) mice to investigate the effect of the chronic cerebral Epo overexpression on the modulation of the normoxic and hypoxic ventilatory drive during the post-natal development. Ventilation was evaluated by whole body plethysmography at postnatal ages 3 (P3), 7 (P7), 15 (P15) and 21 (P21). In addition Epo quantification was performed by RIA and mRNA EpoR was evaluated by qRT-PCR. Our results showed that compared to control animals the chronic Epo overexpression stimulates the hypoxic (but not the normoxic) ventilation assessed as VE/VO2 at the ages of P3 and P21. More interestingly, we observed that at P7 and P15 the chronic Epo stimulation of ventilation was attenuated by the down regulation of the Epo receptor in brainstem areas. We conclude that Epo, by stimulating ventilation in brainstem areas crucially helps tolerating physiological (e.g., high altitude) and/or pathological (e.g., respiratory disorders, prematurity, etc.) oxygen deprivation at postnatal ages.

  11. c-Cbl Inhibition Improves Cardiac function and Survival in Response to Myocardial Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Rafiq, Khadija; Kolpakov, Mikhail A; Seqqat, Rachid; Guo, Jianfen; Guo, Xinji; Qi, Zhao; Yu, Daohai; Mohapatra, Bhopal; Zutshi, Neha; An, Wei; Band, Hamid; Sanjay, Archana; Houser, Steven R; Sabri, Abdelkarim

    2014-01-01

    Background The proto-oncogene Casitas b-lineage lymphoma (c-Cbl) is an adaptor protein with an intrinsic E3 ubiquitin ligase activity that targets receptor and non-receptor tyrosine kinases, resulting in their ubiquitination and down-regulation. However, the function of c-Cbl in the control of cardiac function is currently unknown. In this study, we examined the role of c-Cbl in myocyte death and cardiac function after myocardial ischemia. Methods and Results We show increased c-Cbl expression in human ischemic and dilated cardiomyopathy hearts and in response to pathological stress stimuli in mice. c-Cbl deficient mice demonstrated a more robust functional recovery after myocardial ischemia reperfusion injury, as well as significantly reduced myocyte apoptosis and improved cardiac function. Ubiquitination and downregulation of key survival c-Cbl targets, epidermal growth factor receptors and focal adhesion kinase, were significantly reduced in c-Cbl knockout mice. Inhibition of c-Cbl expression or its ubiquitin ligase activity in cardiac myocytes offered protection against H2O2 stress. Interestingly, c-Cbl deletion reduced the risk of death and increased cardiac functional recovery after chronic myocardial ischemia. This beneficial effect of c-Cbl deletion was associated with enhanced neoangiogenesis and increased expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-a and VEGF receptor type 2 in the infarcted region. Conclusions c-Cbl activation promotes myocyte apoptosis, inhibits angiogenesis and causes adverse cardiac remodeling after myocardial infarction. These findings point to c-Cbl as a potential therapeutic target for the maintenance of cardiac function and remodeling after myocardial ischemia. PMID:24583314

  12. Neuregulin improves response to glucose tolerance test in control and diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    López-Soldado, Iliana; Niisuke, Katrin; Veiga, Catarina; Adrover, Anna; Manzano, Anna; Martínez-Redondo, Vicente; Camps, Marta; Bartrons, Ramon; Zorzano, Antonio; Gumà, Anna

    2016-03-15

    Neuregulin (NRG) is an EGF-related growth factor that binds to the tyrosine kinase receptors ErbB3 and ErbB4, thus inducing tissue development and muscle glucose utilization during contraction. Here, we analyzed whether NRG has systemic effects regulating glycemia in control and type 2 diabetic rats. To this end, recombinant NRG (rNRG) was injected into Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats and their respective lean littermates 15 min before a glucose tolerance test (GTT) was performed. rNRG enhanced glucose tolerance without promoting the activation of the insulin receptor (IR) or insulin receptor substrates (IRS) in muscle and liver. However, in control rats, rNRG induced the phosphorylation of protein kinase B (PKB) and glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) in liver but not in muscle. In liver, rNRG increased ErbB3 tyrosine phosphorylation and its binding to phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), thus indicating that rNRG activates the ErbB3/PI3K/PKB signaling pathway. rNRG increased glycogen content in liver but not in muscle. rNRG also increased the content of fructose-2,6-bisphosphate (Fru-2,6-P2), an activator of hepatic glycolysis, and lactate in liver but not in muscle. Increases in lactate were abrogated by wortmannin, a PI3K inhibitor, in incubated hepatocytes. The liver of ZDF rats showed a reduced content of ErbB3 receptors, entailing a minor stimulation of the rNRG-induced PKB/GSK-3 cascade and resulting in unaltered hepatic glycogen content. Nonetheless, rNRG increased hepatic Fru-2,6-P2 and augmented lactate both in liver and in plasma of diabetic rats. As a whole, rNRG improved response to the GTT in both control and diabetic rats by enhancing hepatic glucose utilization.

  13. Selection of broilers with improved innate immune responsiveness to reduce on-farm infection by foodborne pathogens.

    PubMed

    Swaggerty, Christina L; Pevzner, Igal Y; He, Haiqi; Genovese, Kenneth J; Nisbet, David J; Kaiser, Pete; Kogut, Michael H

    2009-09-01

    Economic pressure on the modern poultry industry has directed the selection process towards fast-growing broilers that have a reduced feed conversion ratio. Selection based heavily on growth characteristics could adversely affect immune competence leaving chickens more susceptible to disease. Since the innate immune response directs the acquired immune response, efforts to select poultry with an efficient innate immune response would be beneficial. Our laboratories have been evaluating the innate immune system of two parental broiler lines to assess their capacity to protect against multiple infections. We have shown increased in vitro heterophil function corresponds with increased in vivo resistance to Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial infections. Additionally, there are increased mRNA expression levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines/chemokines in heterophils isolated from resistant lines compared to susceptible lines. Collectively, all data indicate there are measurable differences in innate responsiveness under genetic control. Recently, a small-scale selection trial was begun. We identified sires within a broiler population with higher and/or lower-than-average pro-inflammatory cytokine/chemokine mRNA expression levels and subsequently utilized small numbers of high-expressing and low-expressing sires to produce progeny with increased or decreased, respectively, pro-inflammatory cytokine/chemokine profiles. This novel approach should allow us to improve breeding stock by improving the overall immunological responsiveness. This will produce a line of chickens with an effective pro-inflammatory innate immune response that should improve resistance against diverse pathogens, improve responses to vaccines, and increase livability. Ongoing work from this project is providing fundamental information for the development of poultry lines that will be inherently resistant to colonization by pathogenic and food-poisoning microorganisms. Utilization of pathogen

  14. Attachment and God representations among lay Catholics, priests, and religious: a matched comparison study based on the Adult Attachment Interview.

    PubMed

    Cassibba, Rosalinda; Granqvist, Pehr; Costantini, Alessandro; Gatto, Sergio

    2008-11-01

    Based on the idea that believers' perceived relationships with God develop from their attachment-related experiences with primary caregivers, the authors explored the quality of such experiences and their representations among individuals who differed in likelihood of experiencing a principal attachment to God. Using the Adult Attachment Interview (AAI), they compared attachment-related experiences and representations in a group of 30 Catholic priests and religious with a matched group of lay Catholics and with the worldwide normal distribution of AAI classifications. They found an overrepresentation of secure-autonomous states regarding attachment among those more likely to experience a principal attachment to God (i.e., the priests and religious) compared with the other groups and an underrepresentation of unresolved-disorganized states in the two groups of Catholics compared with the worldwide normal distribution. Key findings also included links between secure-autonomous states regarding attachment and estimated experiences with loving or nonrejecting parents on the one hand and loving God imagery on the other. These results extend the literature on religion from an attachment perspective and support the idea that generalized working models derived from attachment experiences with parents are reflected in believers' perceptions of God.

  15. Assessing the role of attachment to God, meaning, and religious coping as mediators in the grief experience.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Melissa M; Chan, Keith T

    2012-03-01

    Research has examined the relationship of styles of attachment to others and meaning with grief and the stress-related growth process. Less has been written on styles of attachment to God and patterns of religious coping and how these constructs may impact adjustment in persons dealing with loss. This study examines the roles of attachment to God, meaning, and religious coping as mediators in the grief experience for a sample of 93 individuals who experienced a significant death in the prior year. Results suggest that a more secure style of attachment to God was directly and indirectly associated with lower depression and grief and increased stress-related growth for this sample. Meaning, defined as a sense of purpose and coherence, also emerged as an important construct in this process. Overall goodness-of fit statistics were examined for competing models using structural equation modeling. Secure attachment to God, meaning, and positive religious coping were found to have significant direct and indirect effects on grief and stress-related growth. For some individuals, attachment to God may be an important construct in the experience of meaning following a significant death and may have tremendous potential in its direct and indirect effects on overall outcomes.

  16. Improving Responses to Individual and Family Crises. Learning Guide 10. Project Connect. Linking Self-Family-Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emily Hall Tremaine Foundation, Inc., Hartford, CT.

    This learning guide on improving responses to individual and family crises is part of a series of learning guides developed for competency-based adult consumer and homemaking education programs in community colleges, adult education centers, community centers, and the workplace. Focus is on the connections among personal, family, and job…

  17. Multimodal treatment of unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma to achieve complete response results in improved survival

    PubMed Central

    Newell, Pippa H; Wu, YingXing; Hoen, Helena; Uppal, Richa; Thiesing, John Tyler; Sasadeusz, Kevin; Cassera, Maria A; Wolf, Ronald F; Hansen, Paul; Hammill, Chet W

    2015-01-01

    Introduction With technological advances, questions arise regarding how to best fit newer treatment modalities, such as transarterial therapies, into the treatment algorithm for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Methods Between 2005 and 2011, 128 patients initially treated with transarterial radioembolization or chemoembolization using drug-eluting beads were identified. The response was graded retrospectively. Toxicity was measured 1, 3, and 6 months after the first and last treatments. Results Sixty-five patients (53%) were advanced stage. Twenty patients (16%) had an initial complete response, but with additional treatments, this was increased to 46 (36%). Patients with a complete response as their best response to treatment had a median survival [95% confidence interval (CI)] of 5.77 (2.58, upper limit not yet reached) years, significantly longer than those whose best response was a partial response, 1.22 (0.84, 2.06) years and those with stable disease as their best response, 0.34 (0.29, 0.67) years. Repeated treatments did not increase toxicity. Discussion This retrospective review of patients treated for intermediate and advanced stage HCC revealed a significant survival advantage in patients who achieved a complete response. These data support use of a multi-modality approach to intermediate and advanced stage HCC, combining liver-directed treatments as necessary to achieve a complete response. PMID:25580988

  18. Interpreting 'dose-response' curves using homeodynamic data: with an improved explanation for hormesis.

    PubMed

    Stebbing, A R D

    2009-04-15

    A re-interpretation of the 'dose-response' curve is given that accommodates homeostasis. The outcome, or overall effect, of toxicity is the consequence of toxicity that is moderated by homeodynamic responses. Equilibrium is achieved by a balance of opposing forces of toxic inhibition countered by a stimulatory response. A graphical model is given consisting of two linked curves (response vs concentration and effect vs concentration), which provide the basis for a re-interpretation of the 'dose-response' curve. The model indicates that such relationships are non-linear with a threshold, which is due to homeodynamic responses. Subthreshold concentrations in 'dose-response' curves provide the sum of toxic inhibition minus the homeodynamic response; the response itself is unseen in serving its purpose of neutralizing perturbation. This interpretation suggests why the alpha- and beta-curves are non-linear. The beta-curve indicates adaptive overcorrection to toxicity that confers greater resistance to subsequent toxic exposure, with hormesis as an epiphenomenon.

  19. The Hague Recommendations: Improving Nonlegislative Responses to Trafficking in Human Beings for the Purpose of Organ Removal.

    PubMed

    Ambagtsheer, Frederike; Weimar, Willem

    2016-02-01

    Over the years, the trade in human organs has become an object of international concern. Since the 1980s, antiorgan trade initiatives have mainly involved the strengthening of legislative responses. Little attention however is given to nonlegislative responses by law enforcement authorities. The HOTT project is a European Union-funded research project titled "trafficking in human beings for the purpose of organ removal." Its objectives are to increase knowledge, raise awareness, and improve the nonlegislative response to the crime. Its consortium organized a "Writers' Conference" in The Hague, The Netherlands at Europol's Headquarters where a group of 40 experts, consisting of transplant professionals, law enforcement officials, and policy makers, formulated recommendations to improve nonlegislative responses. These recommendations, presented hereafter, address the ethical and legal obligations of health care providers, the protection of persons trafficked for the purpose of organ removal, strengthening cross-border collaboration in criminal cases, and stimulating partnerships between transplant professionals and law enforcement. These recommendations offer ways in which transplant professionals can contribute to improving the nonlegislative response to trafficking in human beings for the purpose of organ removal.

  20. The Hague Recommendations: Improving Nonlegislative Responses to Trafficking in Human Beings for the Purpose of Organ Removal

    PubMed Central

    Ambagtsheer, Frederike; Weimar, Willem

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Over the years, the trade in human organs has become an object of international concern. Since the 1980s, antiorgan trade initiatives have mainly involved the strengthening of legislative responses. Little attention however is given to nonlegislative responses by law enforcement authorities. The HOTT project is a European Union-funded research project titled “trafficking in human beings for the purpose of organ removal.” Its objectives are to increase knowledge, raise awareness, and improve the nonlegislative response to the crime. Its consortium organized a “Writers' Conference” in The Hague, The Netherlands at Europol's Headquarters where a group of 40 experts, consisting of transplant professionals, law enforcement officials, and policy makers, formulated recommendations to improve nonlegislative responses. These recommendations, presented hereafter, address the ethical and legal obligations of health care providers, the protection of persons trafficked for the purpose of organ removal, strengthening cross-border collaboration in criminal cases, and stimulating partnerships between transplant professionals and law enforcement. These recommendations offer ways in which transplant professionals can contribute to improving the nonlegislative response to trafficking in human beings for the purpose of organ removal. PMID:27500254

  1. Improvement of polypyrrole nanowire devices by plasmonic space charge generation: high photocurrent and wide spectral response by Ag nanoparticle decoration.

    PubMed

    Lee, S-H; Bae, J; Lee, S W; Jang, J-W

    2015-11-07

    In this study, improvement of the opto-electronic properties of non-single crystallized nanowire devices with space charges generated by localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) is demonstrated. The photocurrent and spectral response of single polypyrrole (PPy) nanowire (NW) devices are increased by electrostatically attached Ag nanoparticles (Ag NPs). To take advantage of plasmon-exciton coupling in the photocurrent of the device, 80 nm of Ag NPs (454 nm = λmax) were chosen for matching the maximum absorption with PPy NWs (442 nm = λmax). The photocurrent density is remarkably improved, up to 25.3 times (2530%), by the Ag NP decoration onto the PPy NW (PPyAgNPs NW) under blue light (λ = 425-475 nm) illumination. In addition, the PPyAgNPs NW shows a photocurrent decay time twice that of PPy NW, as well as an improved spectral response of the photocurrent. The improved photocurrent efficiency, decay time, and spectral response resulted from the space charges generated by the LSPR of Ag NPs. Furthermore, the increasing exponent (m) of the photocurrent (JPC ∼ V(m)) and finite-differential time domain (FDTD) simulation straightforwardly indicate relatively large plasmonic space charge generation under blue light illumination. These results prove that the performance of non-single crystallized polymer nanowire devices can also be improved by plasmonic enhancement.

  2. Conception, complicated pregnancy, and labour of gods and heroes in Greek mythology.

    PubMed

    Iavazzo, Christos; Trompoukis, Constantinos; Sardi, Thalia; Falagas, Matthew E

    2008-01-01

    Pregnancy and labour are holy moments in a woman's life. Even in Greek mythology we can find descriptions of them. We searched in the Greek myths to find descriptions of labours of ancient heroes and gods. We identified descriptions of extracorporeal fertilization, superfecundation, ectopic pregnancy, preterm labour, prolonged pregnancy and Caesarean section. The use of imagination could help the reader to find similarities in present or future developments in the field of obstetrics. It could be concluded that various aspects of modern obstetrical practice are described in Greek mythology.

  3. God's punishment and public goods : A test of the supernatural punishment hypothesis in 186 world cultures.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Dominic D P

    2005-12-01

    Cooperation towards public goods relies on credible threats of punishment to deter cheats. However, punishing is costly, so it remains unclear who incurred the costs of enforcement in our evolutionary past. Theoretical work suggests that human cooperation may be promoted if people believe in supernatural punishment for moral transgressions. This theory is supported by new work in cognitive psychology and by anecdotal ethnographic evidence, but formal quantitative tests remain to be done. Using data from 186 societies around the globe, I test whether the likelihood of supernatural punishment-indexed by the importance of moralizing "high gods"-is associated with cooperation.

  4. Proposed Hydrodynamic Model Improves Resolution of Species-Specific Responses to Drought and Disturbance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matheny, A. M.; Bohrer, G.; Fiorella, R.; Mirfenderesgi, G.

    2015-12-01

    Plant functional types in land surface models (LSMs) are broadly defined, and often represent species with different physiologies within the same category. For example, trees of opposing hydraulic strategies and traits are commonly grouped together, as is the case of red oak and red maple. As a result, LSMs generate typical patterns of errors in predictions of transpiration and production. We studied sap flux, stem water storage, stomatal conductance, photosynthesis, rooting depth, and bole growth of these species at disturbed and undisturbed field sites in Michigan. Species-specific differences significantly impact temporal patterns of stomatal conductance and overall transpiration responses to both drought and disturbance. During drought, maples relied heavily on stem-stored water, while oaks did not. After disturbance, oaks increased stomatal conductance while maple conductance declined. Isotopic analysis of xylem water revealed that oak roots can access a deep groundwater source, which maple roots cannot. This deep rooting strategy permits transpiration and growth to continue in oaks during periods of water limitation, even when maples cease transpiration. Using 16 years of bole growth data, we show that maple growth is strongly correlated with mean annual precipitation, yet oak growth is not. We propose a framework to incorporate these species-specific differences into LSMs using the Finite-Element Tree-Crown Hydrodynamics model version 2 (FETCH2) that resolves the fast dynamics and diurnal hysteresis of stomatal conductance at the tree level. FETCH2 uses atmospheric and biological forcings from the LSM, simulates water movement through trees as flow through a system of porous media conduits, and calculates realistic hydraulic restrictions to stomatal conductance. This model replaces the current, non-physical link which empirically connects soil moisture to stomatal conductance in LSMs. FETCH2 resolved transpiration is then easily scaled to the plot level

  5. Improved response of carbon-paste electrodes for electrochemical detection in flow systems by pretreatment with surfactants

    SciTech Connect

    Albahadily, F.N.; Mottola, H.A.

    1987-04-01

    The uncompensated cell resistance of six carbon paste compositions used in carbon paste electrodes was measured before and after treatment with a 0.10% (w/v) aqueous surfactant solution. The surfactant treatment considerably lowered the paste uncompensated resistance by removing (or decreasing) the oily, insulating layer produced during the process of smoothing the electrode surface. Electrochemical evaluation of the untreated and treated surfaces was accomplished, by cyclic voltametry, square wave voltametry, and chronocoulometry. The improved response (increase is current) is, with some species, partially due to adsorption, but a significant increase in current was observed with species exhibiting no adsorption behavior (e.g., the reduced form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, NADH). The improved response greatly enhances sensitivity in continuous-flow detection and the partial adsorption is not detrimental to response and quantitation under flow conditions.

  6. God and the Welfare State - Substitutes or Complements? An Experimental Test of the Effect of Belief in God's Control

    PubMed Central

    Be’ery, Gilad; Ben-Nun Bloom, Pazit

    2015-01-01

    Belief in God’s control of the world is common to many of the world’s religions, but there are conflicting predictions regarding its role in shaping attitudes toward the welfare state. While the devout are expected to support pro-social values like helping others, and thus might be supportive of the welfare state, the possibility of taking action is undermined by the belief in God’s absolute control over world affairs and in a morally perfect providence, who is responsible for the fates of individuals. As the literature provides mixed results on this question, this study examines the role of belief in God’s control on welfare attitudes using three priming experiments and two priming tasks, carried out with a design that is both cross-cultural (US vs. Israel) and cross-religious tradition (Judaism vs. Catholicism). We find evidence that, largely, belief in God’s control increases support for income redistribution among Israeli Jews (study 1), American Jews (study 2), and American Catholics (study 3). The findings suggest that the traditional and common political gap between the economic left and the religious, based on the evaluation that religious beliefs lead to conservative economic preferences, may be overstated. PMID:26061050

  7. Want a Better Criminal Justice Response to Rape? Improve Police Interviews With Complainants and Suspects.

    PubMed

    Westera, Nina J; Kebbell, Mark R; Milne, Becky

    2016-02-25

    Achieving just outcomes in rape cases is difficult, but there are ways we can improve the investigation and prosecution of these crimes, now. We outline how targeting variables, within control of the criminal justice system, can improve the quality of information police obtain from interviews with complainants and suspects. We explore how, by preserving these accounts on video, the criminal justice process can better use this information to improve effective decision making from investigation through to criminal trial through to prevention.

  8. Neural Mechanisms of Improvements in Social Motivation after Pivotal Response Treatment: Two Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voos, Avery C.; Pelphrey, Kevin A.; Tirrell, Jonathan; Bolling, Danielle Z.; Vander Wyk, Brent; Kaiser, Martha D.; McPartland, James C.; Volkmar, Fred R.; Ventola, Pamela

    2013-01-01

    Pivotal response treatment (PRT) is an empirically validated behavioral treatment that has widespread positive effects on communication, behavior, and social skills in young children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). For the first time, functional magnetic resonance imaging was used to identify the neural correlates of successful response to…

  9. Using Culturally Competent Responsive Services to Improve Student Achievement and Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schellenberg, Rita; Grothaus, Tim

    2011-01-01

    This article illustrates standards blending, the integration of core academic and school counseling standards, as a culturally alert responsive services strategy to assist in closing the achievement gap while also enhancing employability skills and culturally salient career competencies. The responsive services intervention described in this…

  10. Improved leucocyte migration inhibition response of leucocytes from lepromatous leprosy patients with hapten modified M. leprae.

    PubMed Central

    Fotedar, A; Mustafa, A S; Narang, B S; Talwar, G P

    1982-01-01

    Two acetoacetylated derivatives of Mycobacterium leprae with variable hapten groups and a conjugate with tetanus toxoid were prepared. These were tested as antigens along with unmodified M. leprae in the leucocyte migration inhibition response of leucocytes from clinically, bacteriologically and histopathologically confirmed cases of lepromatous leprosy. LMI response was poor with M. leprae, but was significantly enhanced with acetoacetylated M. leprae. PMID:6751637

  11. Learning impaired children exhibit timing deficits and training-related improvements in auditory cortical responses to speech in noise.

    PubMed

    Warrier, Catherine M; Johnson, Krista L; Hayes, Erin A; Nicol, Trent; Kraus, Nina

    2004-08-01

    The physiological mechanisms that contribute to abnormal encoding of speech in children with learning problems are yet to be well understood. Furthermore, speech perception problems appear to be particularly exacerbated by background noise in this population. This study compared speech-evoked cortical responses recorded in a noisy background to those recorded in quiet in normal children (NL) and children with learning problems (LP). Timing differences between responses recorded in quiet and in background noise were assessed by cross-correlating the responses with each other. Overall response magnitude was measured with root-mean-square (RMS) amplitude. Cross-correlation scores indicated that 23% of LP children exhibited cortical neural timing abnormalities such that their neurophysiological representation of speech sounds became distorted in the presence of background noise. The latency of the N2 response in noise was isolated as being the root of this distortion. RMS amplitudes in these children did not differ from NL children, indicating that this result was not due to a difference in response magnitude. LP children who participated in a commercial auditory training program and exhibited improved cortical timing also showed improvements in phonological perception. Consequently, auditory pathway timing deficits can be objectively observed in LP children, and auditory training can diminish these deficits.

  12. Do People Who Believe in God Report More Meaning in Their Lives? The Existential Effects of Belief

    PubMed Central

    Cranney, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    I conduct the first large-N study explicitly exploring the association between belief in God and sense of purpose in life. This relationship, while often discussed informally, has received little empirical attention. Here I use the General Social Survey to investigate how form of and confidence in belief in God is related to sense of purpose in life, as measured by a Likert item level of agreement with the statement “In my opinion, life does not serve any purpose.” Using logistic regression analysis, I find that those who indicate that they are confident in God's existence report a higher sense of purpose compared to nonbelievers, believers in a higher power, and those who believe but occasionally doubt. PMID:24729632

  13. Do People Who Believe in God Report More Meaning in Their Lives? The Existential Effects of Belief.

    PubMed

    Cranney, Stephen

    2013-09-01

    I conduct the first large-N study explicitly exploring the association between belief in God and sense of purpose in life. This relationship, while often discussed informally, has received little empirical attention. Here I use the General Social Survey to investigate how form of and confidence in belief in God is related to sense of purpose in life, as measured by a Likert item level of agreement with the statement "In my opinion, life does not serve any purpose." Using logistic regression analysis, I find that those who indicate that they are confident in God's existence report a higher sense of purpose compared to nonbelievers, believers in a higher power, and those who believe but occasionally doubt.

  14. An Urban School Leader's Approach to School Improvement: Toward Contextually Responsive Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Latish C.; Swaminathan, Raji

    2016-01-01

    This case study examines the leadership practices and actions of an urban high school principal who faced many challenges, but worked diligently to improve student achievement and school climate over a 3-year period. Significant improvements were made by using elements of Distributed Leadership, Professional Learning Communities, and Social…

  15. Effectiveness of instruction in rubric use in improving fourth-grade students' science open-response outcomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohlin, Sandra L.

    This study focused on the role of rubric instruction in assisting students to answer open-response science questions. The purpose sought to determine if rubric instruction could help students recognize levels of performance, thereby improving their open-response outcomes. Performance tasks and open-response questions regarding real-world problems are necessary to assess the skills of application of knowledge. Rubrics are appropriate for scoring open-response questions because they can assess how students solve problems, the accuracy of solutions, and also provide feedback to students about characteristics of different qualities of work. Rubrics have been used in studies involving assessment, but the effects of rubric use on student learning has not been directly investigated. The theoretical foundations and research related to the use of rubrics suggest that rubrics assist in helping students to recognize more or less adequate responses and thus provide a self-adjustment strategy to improve students' own performance. Previous research has shown that students are able to follow a model to learn strategies for performance, that cognitive strategies can be taught, and that self-regulation enhances academic learning. The effectiveness of six weeks of rubric instruction with practice and feedback was compared to practice only with no feedback, and with no treatment. Chi2 tests were used to compare high, medium, and low score categories from students' pre- and posttests. The first research question inquired as to the effects of rubric instruction on students' ability to identify various levels of response from science open-response answers. Students who received rubric instruction were more able to identify rubric levels on the posttest without the presence of the rubric because they were familiar with it from treatment while the other two groups were not. They did not improve their ability from pre- to posttest, however. The practice group's ability to identify response

  16. Engaging the dental workforce in disaster mitigation to improve recovery and response.

    PubMed

    Mosca, Nicholas G

    2007-10-01

    Natural disasters may strike quickly and without warning and cause long-term health consequences beyond the immediate loss of lives and property. Dental professionals have a social responsibility to participate in community emergency preparedness planning and response to mitigate prolonged recovery of the dental care infrastructure in the affected areas. Public health and emergency management agencies should plan for access to emergent dental care as part of a multidisciplinary local emergency response to mitigate the impact of devastation on the primary oral health needs of persons in the affected geographic areas. State dental associations should work with government agencies and emergency management groups to increase awareness of the importance for collaborative emergency response health services in the aftermath of natural disasters.

  17. Fusion of mobile in situ and satellite remote sensing observations of chemical release emissions to improve disaster response

    DOE PAGES

    Leifer, Ira; Melton, Christopher; Frash, Jason; ...

    2016-09-22

    Chemical release disasters have serious consequences, disrupting ecosystems, society, and causing significant loss of life. Mitigating the destructive impacts relies on identification and mapping, monitoring, and trajectory forecasting. Improvements in sensor capabilities are enabling airborne and space-based remote sensing to support response activities. Key applications are improving transport models in complex terrain and improved disaster response. Understanding urban atmospheric transport in the Los Angeles Basin, where topographic influences on transport patterns are significant, was improved by leveraging the Aliso Canyon leak as an atmospheric tracer. Plume characterization data was collected by the AutoMObile trace Gas (AMOG) Surveyor, a commuter carmore » modified for science. Mobile surface in situ CH4 and winds were measured by AMOG Surveyor under Santa Ana conditions to estimate an emission rate of 365±30% Gg yr-1. Vertical profiles were collected by AMOG Surveyor by leveraging local topography for vertical profiling to identify the planetary boundary layer at ~700 m. Topography significantly constrained plume dispersion by up to a factor of two. The observed plume trajectory was used to validate satellite aerosol optical depth-inferred atmospheric transport, which suggested the plume first was driven offshore, but then veered back towards land. Numerical long-range transport model predictions confirm this interpretation. Lastly, this study demonstrated a novel application of satellite aerosol remote sensing for disaster response.« less

  18. Improvement of polypyrrole nanowire devices by plasmonic space charge generation: high photocurrent and wide spectral response by Ag nanoparticle decoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seung-Hoon; Lee, Seung Woo; Jang, Jaw-Won

    In this study, improvement of the opto-electronic properties of non-single crystallized nanowire devices with space charges generated by localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) is demonstrated. The photocurrent and spectral response of single polypyrrole (PPy) nanowire (NW) devices are increased by electrostatically attached Ag nanoparticles (Ag NPs). The photocurrent density is remarkably improved, up to 25.3 times, by the Ag NP decoration onto the PPy NW (PPyAgNPs NW) under blue light illumination. In addition, the PPyAgNPs NW shows a photocurrent decay time twice that of PPy NW, as well as an improved spectral response of the photocurrent. The improved photocurrent efficiency, decay time, and spectral response resulted from the space charges generated by the LSPR of Ag NPs. Furthermore, the increasing exponent (m) of the photocurrent (JPC ~Vm) and finite-differential time domain (FDTD) simulation straightforwardly indicate relatively large plasmonic space charge generation. Supported by Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology (no. 2013K1A3A1A32035429 and 2015R1A1A1A05027681).

  19. Splitting in-patient and out-patient responsibility does not improve patient care.

    PubMed

    Burns, Tom; Baggaley, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Over the past 15 years there has been a move away from consultants having responsibility for the care of patients both in the community and when in hospital towards a functional split in responsibility. In this article Tom Burns and Martin Baggaley debate the merits or otherwise of the split, identifying leadership, expertise and continuity of care as key issues; both recognise that this move is not evidence based.

  20. Thinking from God's perspective decreases biased valuation of the life of a nonbeliever.

    PubMed

    Ginges, Jeremy; Sheikh, Hammad; Atran, Scott; Argo, Nichole

    2016-01-12

    Religious belief is often thought to motivate violence because it is said to promote norms that encourage tribalism and the devaluing of the lives of nonbelievers. If true, this should be visible in the multigenerational violent conflict between Palestinians and Israelis which is marked by a religious divide. We conducted experiments with a representative sample of Muslim Palestinian youth (n = 555), examining whether thinking from the perspective of Allah (God), who is the ultimate arbitrator of religious belief, changes the relative value of Jewish Israelis' lives (compared with Palestinian lives). Participants were presented with variants of the classic "trolley dilemma," in the form of stories where a man can be killed to save the lives of five children who were either Jewish Israeli or Palestinian. They responded from their own perspective and from the perspective of Allah. We find that whereas a large proportion of participants were more likely to endorse saving Palestinian children than saving Jewish Israeli children, this proportion decreased when thinking from the perspective of Allah. This finding raises the possibility that beliefs about God can mitigate bias against other groups and reduce barriers to peace.

  1. Creator God Rules The Universe Because Hawking Built The Big Bang On A Foundation Of Quicksand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentry, Robert

    2014-03-01

    Hawking is the world's premier big bang cosmologist; his compatriots, vast in number, have repeatedly checked all he ever wrote. They would have discovered it earlier if he had blundered even slightly. Thus it's impossible that he built the big bang on a foundation of quicksand. So the final verdict must be that Hawking is the winner and the God of Genesis is the loser. Despite this cosmological unanimity, we will show that Hawking and all his compatriots are guilty of that blunder and hence are now destined to collectively reap the consequences of having made it. And further that neither they nor their many followers will understand this blunder until learning of it in our presentation. Only then will they realize that Hawking and others did build the big bang on a false gravitational redshift foundation, one that in one crucial respect so closely imitates the physics of the actual gravitational redshift that neither Hawking - nor any of the millions of his followers - ever suspected they were all being flummoxed into accepting the greatest scientific debacle of all time. Our presentation reveals how this false foundational assumption of in-flight wavelength expansion was identified, and why its discovery led to big bang's disproof and conclusion that God rules the Universe.

  2. Construction, assembling and application of a trehalase-GOD enzyme electrode system.

    PubMed

    Antonelli, M L; Arduini, F; Laganà, A; Moscone, D; Siliprandi, V

    2009-01-01

    Trehalose is a disaccharide important in foods, serving as a glucose source in many and also as an additive in the food preparation. Because of its peculiar physico-chemical properties it plays an important role as preservative in drying and deep-freezing treatments. A new biosensor for trehalose determination has been realized by means of a flow system, based on a reactor in which the trehalase enzyme catalyses its hydrolysis into two alpha,d-glucose molecules, and a GOD (glucose oxidase) amperometric biosensor is employed for the glucose determination. The optimum operative conditions have been laid out and a particular attention has been paid to the immobilization procedure of the two enzymes. The electrode used is of the SPE (screen-printed electrode) type and has been activated with the Prussian Blue (PB) and then assembled using GOD immobilized with Nafion. The reactor has been prepared with the trehalase enzyme chemically immobilized on an Immunodyne ABC membrane. As demonstration of its utility, the biosensor has been tested on a real sample of Boletus edulis mushroom.

  3. Preparation of PVA membrane for immobilization of GOD for glucose biosensor.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Jitendra; D'Souza, S F

    2008-03-15

    A membrane was prepared using polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) with low and high degree of polymerization (DOP), acetone, benzoic acid (BA) and was cross-linked by UV treatment. Membrane composition was optimized on the basis of swelling index. Membrane prepared with 12% low DOP and 8% high DOP of PVA, 2% BA, dissolved in buffer containing 20% acetone and cross-linked with UV treatment exhibited lower swelling index. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) study of the membranes showed appearance of a strong band at approximately 2337 cm(-1) when UV was used for cross-linking in the presence of benzoic acid. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) study revealed that membrane cross-linked with UV treatment was smoother. Glucose oxidase (GOD)-PVA membrane was associated with the dissolved oxygen (DO) probe for biosensor reading. Glucose was detected on the basis of depletion of oxygen, when immobilized GOD oxidizes glucose to gluconolactone. A wide detection range, 0.9-225 mg/dl was estimated from the linear range of calibration plot of biosensor reading. Membranes were reused for 32 reactions without significant loss of activity and stored for 30 days (approximately 90% activity) at 4 degrees C. Membranes were also used with real blood samples.

  4. On The Reality of Tooth Fairies: A Review of The God Delusion

    PubMed Central

    Zeiler, Michael D

    2007-01-01

    In The God Delusion, Richard Dawkins reviews the evidence for and against God. After considering arguments for a divine power, he says the main current one is that the characteristics of living creatures must be attributed to an all-powerful designer. Design is the only plausible account, because the excellent fit between each plant and animal and its environment could not possibly have appeared in one stroke by pure chance. Dawkins agrees that randomness could not have done the job, but he says that a designer is equally unlikely. The only viable explanation is evolution by natural selection, a process that operates without plan or design. He then turns to the adaptive value of religious belief. After failing to find any, he proposes that belief in divinities is the by-product of a powerful tendency to learn from others, an adaptive strategy produced by natural selection. Adults and other influential figures teach children many useful things, but they also train them to worship deities. Religious devotion is established through education, and it is maintained over generations by the social learning processes underlying all instances of cultural evolution. Dawkins' arguments together with other problems encountered in describing evolutionary processes highlight the importance of social learning. His discussion leads the reviewer to assert that only by knowing the mechanisms of social learning is it possible to understand how biological and cultural evolution interact to produce life as we find it.

  5. Cardiovascular exercise intervention improves the primary antibody response to keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) in previously sedentary older adults.

    PubMed

    Grant, R W; Mariani, R A; Vieira, V J; Fleshner, M; Smith, T P; Keylock, K T; Lowder, T W; McAuley, E; Hu, L; Chapman-Novakofski, K; Woods, J A

    2008-08-01

    Based upon a prior cross-sectional study, we hypothesized that an aerobic exercise intervention in sedentary older adults would improve a primary T cell-dependent immune response. Participants were a subset of older subjects from a large, ongoing exercise intervention study who were randomly assigned to either an aerobic exercise (Cardio, n=30, 68.9+0.8 years) or flexibility/balance (Flex, n=20, 69.9+1.2 years) intervention. The intervention consisted of either three aerobic sessions for 30-60 min at 55-70% VO(2 max) or two 60 min flexibility/balance sessions weekly for 10 months. Eight months into the intervention, samples were collected before intramuscular administration of KLH (125 microg), followed by sampling at 2, 3, and 6 weeks post-KLH. Serum anti-KLH IgM, IgG1, and IgG2 was measured by ELISA. Physiological and psychosocial measures were also assessed pre- and post-intervention. While there was no difference in the anti-KLH IgG2 response between groups, Cardio displayed significantly (p<0.05) higher anti-KLH IgG1 (at weeks 2, 3, and 6 post) and IgM responses when compared to Flex. Despite cardiovascular intervention-induced improvement in physical fitness (approximately 11% vs. 1% change in VO(2 peak) in Cardio vs. Flex, respectively), we found no relationship between improved fitness and enhanced anti-KLH antibody responses. Optimism, perceived stress, and affect were all associated with enhanced immune response. We have shown for the first time that cardiovascular training in previously sedentary elderly results in significantly higher primary IgG1 and IgM antibody responses, while having no effect on IgG2 production.

  6. Acute cocoa flavanol supplementation improves muscle macro- and microvascular but not anabolic responses to amino acids in older men.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Bethan E; Atherton, Philip J; Varadhan, Krishna; Limb, Marie C; Williams, John P; Smith, Kenneth

    2016-05-01

    The anabolic effects of nutrition on skeletal muscle may depend on adequate skeletal muscle perfusion, which is impaired in older people. Cocoa flavanols have been shown to improve flow-mediated dilation, an established measure of endothelial function. However, their effect on muscle microvascular blood flow is currently unknown. Therefore, the objective of this study was to explore links between the consumption of cocoa flavanols, muscle microvascular blood flow, and muscle protein synthesis (MPS) in response to nutrition in older men. To achieve this objective, leg blood flow (LBF), muscle microvascular blood volume (MBV), and MPS were measured under postabsorptive and postprandial (intravenous Glamin (Fresenius Kabi, Germany), dextrose to sustain glucose ∼7.5 mmol·L(-1)) conditions in 20 older men. Ten of these men were studied with no cocoa flavanol intervention and a further 10 were studied with the addition of 350 mg of cocoa flavanols at the same time that nutrition began. Leg (femoral artery) blood flow was measured by Doppler ultrasound, muscle MBV by contrast-enhanced ultrasound using Definity (Lantheus Medical Imaging, Mass., USA) perflutren contrast agent and MPS using [1, 2-(13)C2]leucine tracer techniques. Our results show that although older individuals do not show an increase in LBF or MBV in response to feeding, these absent responses are apparent when cocoa flavanols are given acutely with nutrition. However, this restoration in vascular responsiveness is not associated with improved MPS responses to nutrition. We conclude that acute cocoa flavanol supplementation improves muscle macro- and microvascular responses to nutrition, independently of modifying muscle protein anabolism.

  7. Sodium salicylate restores the impaired insulin response to glucose and improves glucose tolerance in heroin addicts.

    PubMed

    Giugliano, D; Quatraro, A; Consoli, G; Stante, A; Simeone, V; Ceriello, A; Paolisso, G; Torella, R

    1987-01-01

    Plasma glucose, insulin, C-peptide, glucagon and growth hormone responses to intravenous glucose were evaluated in 10 heroin addicts in the basal state and during an infusion of sodium salicylate, an inhibitor of endogenous prostaglandin synthesis. Ten normal subjects, matched for age, sex and weight served as controls. In the basal state, the heroin addicts had markedly reduced insulin responses to intravenous glucose and low glucose disappearance rates (p less than 0.01 vs controls). The infusion of sodium salicylate caused a striking increase of the acute insulin response to intravenous glucose (from 14.5 +/- 4 microU/ml to 88 +/- 11 microU/ml, p less than 0.001) and restored to normal the reduced glucose tolerance (KG from 1.10 +/- 0.1% min-1 to 2.04 +/- 0.19% min-1). Hypoglycemic values were found in all addicts at the end of the test during salicylate infusion. Indomethacin pretreatment in five additional addicts also caused normalization of the impaired insulin responses to the intravenous glucose challenge and restored to normal the reduced glucose disappearance rate. Plasma glucagon and growth hormone levels were normally suppressed by glucose in addicts in basal conditions; sodium salicylate infusion completely overturned these hormonal responses which became positive in the first 15 min following the glucose challenge. These results demonstrate that the two prostaglandin synthesis inhibitors can restore the impaired B-cell response to glucose in heroin addicts to normal, indicating that this response is not lost but is inhibited by heroin itself or by other substances, perhaps by the endogenous prostaglandins.

  8. Improvement in LPG sensing response by surface activation of ZnO thick films with Cr2O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hastir, Anita; Virpal, Kaur, Jasmeet; Singh, Gurpreet; Kohli, Nipin; Singh, Onkar; Singh, Ravi Chand

    2015-05-01

    Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG) sensing response of pure and Cr2O3 activated ZnO has been investigated in this study. Zinc oxide was synthesized by co-precipitation route and deposited as a thick film on an alumina substrate. The surface of ZnO sensor was activated by chromium oxide on surface oxidation by chromium chloride. The concentration of chromium chloride solution used to activate the ZnO sensor surface has been varied from 0 to 5 %. It is observed that response to LPG has improved as compared to pure ZnO.

  9. Pulse Responses of a Two-layered Printed Circuit with an Improved Line-Pad Connected Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Daisuke; Furukawa, Shinichi; Hinata, Takashi

    The peak value of transmitted pulse in printed circuit boards (PCB) is important for a pulse peak detection devices. When an input line and an output line are connected to each pad with the direction of right angle, the propagating pulses with the narrow time duration separate into some parts and decrease the peak value of pulse response. This paper presents an improved line-pad connected structure. The microstrip line is in contact with a pad from outside by considering the pulse propagation time passing through the via structure. We obtained the large peak value of the pulse response for which the time duration is larger than 0.2ps.

  10. Crop Model Improvement Reduces the Uncertainty of the Response to Temperature of Multi-Model Ensembles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maiorano, Andrea; Martre, Pierre; Asseng, Senthold; Ewert, Frank; Mueller, Christoph; Roetter, Reimund P.; Ruane, Alex C.; Semenov, Mikhail A.; Wallach, Daniel; Wang, Enli

    2016-01-01

    To improve climate change impact estimates and to quantify their uncertainty, multi-model ensembles (MMEs) have been suggested. Model improvements can improve the accuracy of simulations and reduce the uncertainty of climate change impact assessments. Furthermore, they can reduce the number of models needed in a MME. Herein, 15 wheat growth models of a larger MME were improved through re-parameterization and/or incorporating or modifying heat stress effects on phenology, leaf growth and senescence, biomass growth, and grain number and size using detailed field experimental data from the USDA Hot Serial Cereal experiment (calibration data set). Simulation results from before and after model improvement were then evaluated with independent field experiments from a CIMMYT worldwide field trial network (evaluation data set). Model improvements decreased the variation (10th to 90th model ensemble percentile range) of grain yields simulated by the MME on average by 39% in the calibration data set and by 26% in the independent evaluation data set for crops grown in mean seasonal temperatures greater than 24 C. MME mean squared error in simulating grain yield decreased by 37%. A reduction in MME uncertainty range by 27% increased MME prediction skills by 47%. Results suggest that the mean level of variation observed in field experiments and used as a benchmark can be reached with half the number of models in the MME. Improving crop models is therefore important to increase the certainty of model-based impact assessments and allow more practical, i.e. smaller MMEs to be used effectively.

  11. LysM receptor-like kinases to improve plant defense response against fungal pathogens

    DOEpatents

    Wan, Jinrong [Columbia, MO; Stacey, Gary [Columbia, MO; Stacey, Minviluz [Columbia, MO; Zhang, Xuecheng [Columbia, MO

    2012-01-17

    Perception of chitin fragments (chitooligosaccharides) is an important first step in plant defense response against fungal pathogen. LysM receptor-like kinases (LysM RLKs) are instrumental in this perception process. LysM RLKs also play a role in activating transcription of chitin-responsive genes (CRGs) in plants. Mutations in the LysM kinase receptor genes or the downstream CRGs may affect the fungal susceptibility of a plant. Mutations in LysM RLKs or transgenes carrying the same may be beneficial in imparting resistance against fungal pathogens.

  12. LysM receptor-like kinases to improve plant defense response against fungal pathogens

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, Jinrong; Stacey, Gary; Stacey, Minviluz; Zhang, Xuecheng

    2013-10-15

    Perception of chitin fragments (chitooligosaccharides) is an important first step in plant defense response against fungal pathogen. LysM receptor-like kinases (LysM RLKs) are instrumental in this perception process. LysM RLKs also play a role in activating transcription of chitin-responsive genes (CRGs) in plants. Mutations in the LysM kinase receptor genes or the downstream CRGs may affect the fungal susceptibility of a plant. Mutations in LysM RLKs or transgenes carrying the same may be beneficial in imparting resistance against fungal pathogens.

  13. Improvement of polypyrrole nanowire devices by plasmonic space charge generation: high photocurrent and wide spectral response by Ag nanoparticle decoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S.-H.; Bae, J.; Lee, S. W.; Jang, J.-W.

    2015-10-01

    In this study, improvement of the opto-electronic properties of non-single crystallized nanowire devices with space charges generated by localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) is demonstrated. The photocurrent and spectral response of single polypyrrole (PPy) nanowire (NW) devices are increased by electrostatically attached Ag nanoparticles (Ag NPs). To take advantage of plasmon-exciton coupling in the photocurrent of the device, 80 nm of Ag NPs (454 nm = λmax) were chosen for matching the maximum absorption with PPy NWs (442 nm = λmax). The photocurrent density is remarkably improved, up to 25.3 times (2530%), by the Ag NP decoration onto the PPy NW (PPyAgNPs NW) under blue light (λ = 425-475 nm) illumination. In addition, the PPyAgNPs NW shows a photocurrent decay time twice that of PPy NW, as well as an improved spectral response of the photocurrent. The improved photocurrent efficiency, decay time, and spectral response resulted from the space charges generated by the LSPR of Ag NPs. Furthermore, the increasing exponent (m) of the photocurrent (JPC ~ Vm) and finite-differential time domain (FDTD) simulation straightforwardly indicate relatively large plasmonic space charge generation under blue light illumination. These results prove that the performance of non-single crystallized polymer nanowire devices can also be improved by plasmonic enhancement.In this study, improvement of the opto-electronic properties of non-single crystallized nanowire devices with space charges generated by localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) is demonstrated. The photocurrent and spectral response of single polypyrrole (PPy) nanowire (NW) devices are increased by electrostatically attached Ag nanoparticles (Ag NPs). To take advantage of plasmon-exciton coupling in the photocurrent of the device, 80 nm of Ag NPs (454 nm = λmax) were chosen for matching the maximum absorption with PPy NWs (442 nm = λmax). The photocurrent density is remarkably improved, up to 25.3 times

  14. Advanced neuroblastoma: improved response rate using a multiagent regimen (OPEC) including sequential cisplatin and VM-26.

    PubMed

    Shafford, E A; Rogers, D W; Pritchard, J

    1984-07-01

    Forty-two children, all over one year of age, were given vincristine, cyclophosphamide, and sequentially timed cisplatin and VM-26 (OPEC) or OPEC and doxorubicin (OPEC-D) as initial treatment for newly diagnosed stage III or IV neuroblastoma. Good partial response was achieved in 31 patients (74%) overall and in 28 (78%) of 36 patients whose treatment adhered to the chemotherapy protocol, compared with a 65% response rate achieved in a previous series of children treated with pulsed cyclophosphamide and vincristine with or without doxorubicin. Only six patients, including two of the six children whose treatment did not adhere to protocol, failed to respond, but there were five early deaths from treatment-related complications. Tumor response to OPEC, which was the less toxic of the two regimens, was at least as good as tumor response to OPEC-D. Cisplatin-induced morbidity was clinically significant in only one patient and was avoided in others by careful monitoring of glomerular filtration rate and hearing. Other centers should test the efficacy of OPEC or equivalent regimens in the treatment of advanced neuroblastoma.

  15. The "Responsive Classroom" Approach and Its Implications for Improving Reading and Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McTigue, Erin M.; Rimm-Kaufman, Sara E.

    2011-01-01

    This article describes a social and emotional learning intervention, the "Responsive Classroom"[R] (RC) approach, which is designed to produce classroom environments conducive to learning. It summarizes a new body of research describing the efficacy of the RC approach. One component of the RC approach is the Morning Meeting. This article…

  16. Arginine and vitamin E improve the immune response after a Salmonella challenge in broiler chicks

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the effects of arginine (ARG), vitamin E (VE), and mannanoligosaccharide (MOS) on the immune response and clearance of Salmonella in broiler chickens. In each experiment, chicks were randomly distributed into 4 groups: antibiotic-free diet (negative contro...

  17. Novel Bioceramic Urethral Bulking Agents Elicit Improved Host Tissue Responses in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Mann-Gow, Travis K.; King, Benjamin J.; El-Ghannam, Ahmed; Knabe-Ducheyne, Christine; Kida, Masatoshi; Dall, Ole M.; Krhut, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To test the physical properties and host response to the bioceramic particles, silica-calcium phosphate (SCPC10) and Cristobalite, in a rat animal model and compare their biocompatibility to the current clinically utilized urethral bulking materials. Material and Methods. The novel bulking materials, SCPC10 and Cristobalite, were suspended in hyaluronic acid sodium salt and injected into the mid urethra of a rat. Additional animals were injected with bulking materials currently in clinical use. Physiological response was assessed using voiding trials, and host tissue response was evaluated using hard tissue histology and immunohistochemical analysis. Distant organs were evaluated for the presence of particles or their components. Results. Histological analysis of the urethral tissue five months after injection showed that both SCPC10 and Cristobalite induced a more robust fibroblastic and histiocytic reaction, promoting integration and encapsulation of the particle aggregates, leading to a larger bulking effect. Concentrations of Ca, Na, Si, and P ions in the experimental groups were comparable to control animals. Conclusions. This side-by-side examination of urethral bulking agents using a rat animal model and hard tissue histology techniques compared two newly developed bioactive ceramic particles to three of the currently used bulking agents. The local host tissue response and bulking effects of bioceramic particles were superior while also possessing a comparable safety profile. PMID:27688751

  18. Physician Responses to an Educational Intervention on Improving Their Long-Term Prescribing of Sedatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sleath, Betsy; Collins, Ted

    1997-01-01

    A Medicaid retrospective therapeutic intervention was designed to notify physicians about their patients' long-term use of sedatives and suggest to them that they reevaluate the patient's need for sedative hypnotic medication. Physicians' responses and follow-up actions are reported. Practice implications and the need for physician education are…

  19. A Team-Based Approach to Improving Core Instructional Reading Practices within Response to Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harlacher, Jason E.; Potter, Jon B.; Weber, Jill M.

    2015-01-01

    Core instruction is an important part of an effective response to intervention (RTI) model. To implement RTI effectively, school teams should regularly examine the effectiveness of their core instruction to determine if at least 80% of students meet the proficiency standard with core support alone. However, some educators may not have the skills…

  20. A Multidimensional Item Response Modeling Approach for Improving Subscale Proficiency Estimation and Classification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yao, Lihua; Boughton, Keith A.

    2007-01-01

    Several approaches to reporting subscale scores can be found in the literature. This research explores a multidimensional compensatory dichotomous and polytomous item response theory modeling approach for subscale score proficiency estimation, leading toward a more diagnostic solution. It also develops and explores the recovery of a Markov chain…

  1. Computer program provides improved longitudinal response analysis for axisymmetric launch vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, W. W.; Walton, W. C., Jr.

    1967-01-01

    Computer program calculates axisymmetric launch vehicle steady-state response to axisymmetric sinusoidal loads. A finite element technique is utilized to construct the total launch vehicle stiffness matrix and mass matrix by subdividing the prototype structure into a set of axisymmetric shell components, fluid components, and spring-mass components.

  2. Maximized PUFA measurements improve insight in changes in fatty acid composition in response to temperature.

    PubMed

    van Dooremalen, Coby; Pel, Roel; Ellers, Jacintha

    2009-10-01

    A general mechanism underlying the response of ectotherms to environmental changes often involves changes in fatty acid composition. Theory predicts that a decrease in temperature causes an increase in unsaturation of fatty acids, with an important role for long-chain poly-unsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). However, PUFAs are particularly unstable and susceptible to peroxidation, hence subtle differences in fatty acid composition can be challenging to detect. We determined the fatty acid composition in springtail (Collembola) in response to two temperatures (5 degrees C and 25 degrees C). First, we tested different sample preparation methods to maximize PUFAs. Treatments consisted of different solvents for primary lipid extraction, mixing with antioxidant, flushing with inert gas, and using different temperature exposures during saponification. Especially slow saponification at low temperature (90 min at 70 degrees C) in combination with replacement of headspace air with nitrogen during saponification and methylation maximized PUFAs for GC analysis. Applying these methods to measure thermal responses in fatty acid composition, the data showed that the (maximized) proportion of C(20) PUFAs increased at low acclimation temperature. However, C(18) PUFAs increased at high acclimation temperature, which is contrary to expectations. Our study illustrates that PUFA levels in lipids may often be underestimated and this may hamper a correct interpretation of differential responses of fatty acid composition.

  3. Topical insulin application improves healing by regulating the wound inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xuelian; Liu, Yan; Zhang, Xiong

    2012-01-01

    Inflammation, the initiating stage of wound healing, is characterized by increased endothelial permeability, infiltration of inflammatory cells, and secretion of numerous growth factors and chemokines. By controlling wound contamination and infection, as well as inducing the repairing process, inflammatory response plays an irreplaceable role during wound healing. We utilized a variety of approaches to observe the effect of insulin on wound inflammatory response, specifically the effect of insulin on the function of wound macrophages. We also investigated whether insulin-regulated inflammatory response contributed to insulin-induced healing. Mice excisional wounds treated with insulin showed advanced infiltration and resolution of macrophages, which correlated with the expression of monocyte chemotactic protein-1, a potent chemotactic factor for macrophages. Blockage of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 resulted in reduced macrophages infiltration and impaired wound healing despite the presence of insulin. In vitro studies showed insulin-facilitated monocytes/macrophages chemotaxis, pinocytosis/phagocytosis, and secretion of inflammatory mediators as well. Our study strongly suggests that insulin is a potent healing accelerant. Regulating wound inflammatory response, especially the quantity and function of macrophages, is one of the mechanisms explaining insulin-induced accelerated wound healing.

  4. Forum: Interpersonal Communication in Instructional Settings: Improving Situational Awareness for Instructional Communication Research: A Forum Response

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Titsworth, Scott

    2017-01-01

    In this response, Scott Titsworth analyzes similarities among the forum essays and then offers ideas for how instructional communication scholars might adopt greater situational awareness in research, theory, and application of their work. [Other essays in this forum include: (1) FORUM: Interpersonal Communication in Instructional Settings: The…

  5. Novel Bioceramic Urethral Bulking Agents Elicit Improved Host Tissue Responses in a Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Mann-Gow, Travis K; King, Benjamin J; El-Ghannam, Ahmed; Knabe-Ducheyne, Christine; Kida, Masatoshi; Dall, Ole M; Krhut, Jan; Zvara, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To test the physical properties and host response to the bioceramic particles, silica-calcium phosphate (SCPC10) and Cristobalite, in a rat animal model and compare their biocompatibility to the current clinically utilized urethral bulking materials. Material and Methods. The novel bulking materials, SCPC10 and Cristobalite, were suspended in hyaluronic acid sodium salt and injected into the mid urethra of a rat. Additional animals were injected with bulking materials currently in clinical use. Physiological response was assessed using voiding trials, and host tissue response was evaluated using hard tissue histology and immunohistochemical analysis. Distant organs were evaluated for the presence of particles or their components. Results. Histological analysis of the urethral tissue five months after injection showed that both SCPC10 and Cristobalite induced a more robust fibroblastic and histiocytic reaction, promoting integration and encapsulation of the particle aggregates, leading to a larger bulking effect. Concentrations of Ca, Na, Si, and P ions in the experimental groups were comparable to control animals. Conclusions. This side-by-side examination of urethral bulking agents using a rat animal model and hard tissue histology techniques compared two newly developed bioactive ceramic particles to three of the currently used bulking agents. The local host tissue response and bulking effects of bioceramic particles were superior while also possessing a comparable safety profile.

  6. Improving Question-Asking Initiations in Young Children with Autism Using Pivotal Response Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koegel, Robert L.; Bradshaw, Jessica L.; Ashbaugh, Kristen; Koegel, Lynn Kern

    2014-01-01

    Social initiations make up a core deficit for children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). In particular, initiated questions during social interactions are often minimal or absent in this population. In the context of a multiple baseline design, the efficacy of using the motivational procedures of Pivotal Response Treatment to increase social…

  7. Aviation and the Environment. A Selected, Annotated Bibliography Related to Aviation's Responses Toward Improving the Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, Jane

    This informal, brief bibliography attempts to stress the positive side of aviation, annotating documents that explain how the airlines, aircraft engine manufacturers, government agencies, military aviation, and general aviation are meeting their responsibilities in solving environmental problems. Topics arousing public concern are identified:…

  8. An Empirical Study of Personal Response Technology for Improving Attendance and Learning in a Large Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapiro, Amy

    2009-01-01

    Student evaluations of a large General Psychology course indicate that students enjoy the class a great deal, yet attendance is low. An experiment was conducted to evaluate a personal response system as a solution. Attendance rose by 30% as compared to extra credit as an inducement, but was equivalent to offering pop quizzes. Performance on test…

  9. Use of a visual guide to improve the quality of VOR responses evoked by high-velocity rotational stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Gianna-Poulin, C.C.; Peterka, R.J.

    2008-01-01

    High-velocity rotational stimuli have the potential to improve the diagnostic capabilities of clinical rotation testing by revealing nonlinear vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) responses that are indicative of asymmetric vestibular function. However, eye movements evoked by high-velocity rotations often are inconsistent over time and therefore do not yield reliable diagnostic measures. This study investigated whether use of a novel “visual guide” could improve the consistency and quality of VORs obtained during testing with pulse-step-sine (PSS) stimuli providing periodic high-velocity, horizontal-plane rotations with peak velocities up to 290 deg/s. The visual guide (narrow phosphorescent line spanning 180° field of view) was mounted horizontally on the rotation chair at the subject's eye level. Eight healthy human subjects were tested either in complete darkness while performing an alerting task, or while viewing the visual guide in an otherwise dark room. We found that the visual guide improved the quality of VOR responses as shown by an increased proportion of slow-phase velocity data segments retained for analysis, by a decreased variance of the processed eye velocity data, and by a reduction of outlying VOR response measures. We also found that the visual guide did not induce visual suppression because VOR gain measures were not diminished. PMID:18776595

  10. Early improvement with pregabalin predicts endpoint response in patients with generalized anxiety disorder: an integrated and predictive data analysis.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Stuart A; Lyndon, Gavin; Almas, Mary; Whalen, Ed; Prieto, Rita

    2017-01-01

    Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), a common mental disorder, has several treatment options including pregabalin. Not all patients respond to treatment; quickly determining which patients will respond is an important treatment goal. Patient-level data were pooled from nine phase II and III randomized, double-blind, short-term, placebo-controlled trials of pregabalin for the treatment of GAD. Efficacy outcomes included the change from baseline in the Hamilton Anxiety Scale (HAM-A) total score and psychic and somatic subscales. Predictive modelling assessed baseline characteristics and early clinical responses to determine those predictive of clinical improvement at endpoint. A total of 2155 patients were included in the analysis (1447 pregabalin, 708 placebo). Pregabalin significantly improved the HAM-A total score compared with the placebo at endpoint, treatment difference (95% confidence interval), -2.61 (-3.21 to -2.01), P<0.0001. Pregabalin significantly improved HAM-A psychic and somatic scores compared with placebo, -1.52 (-1.85 to -1.18), P<0.0001, and -1.10 (-1.41 to -0.80), P<0.0001, respectively. Response to pregabalin in the first 1-2 weeks (≥20 or ≥30% improvement in HAM-A total, psychic or somatic score) was predictive of an endpoint greater than or equal to 50% improvement in the HAM-A total score. Pregabalin is an effective treatment option for patients with GAD. Patients with early response to pregabalin are more likely to respond significantly at endpoint.

  11. Adjuvant Autologous Melanoma Vaccine for Macroscopic Stage III Disease: Survival, Biomarkers, and Improved Response to CTLA-4 Blockade

    PubMed Central

    Lotem, Michal; Merims, Sharon; Frank, Stephen; Hamburger, Tamar; Nissan, Aviram; Kadouri, Luna; Cohen, Jonathan; Straussman, Ravid; Eisenberg, Galit; Frankenburg, Shoshana; Carmon, Einat; Alaiyan, Bilal; Shneibaum, Shlomo; Ozge Ayyildiz, Zeynep; Isbilen, Murat; Mert Senses, Kerem; Ron, Ilan; Steinberg, Hanna; Smith, Yoav; Shiloni, Eitan; Gure, Ali Osmay; Peretz, Tamar

    2016-01-01

    Background. There is not yet an agreed adjuvant treatment for melanoma patients with American Joint Committee on Cancer stages III B and C. We report administration of an autologous melanoma vaccine to prevent disease recurrence. Patients and Methods. 126 patients received eight doses of irradiated autologous melanoma cells conjugated to dinitrophenyl and mixed with BCG. Delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) response to unmodified melanoma cells was determined on the vaccine days 5 and 8. Gene expression analysis was performed on 35 tumors from patients with good or poor survival. Results. Median overall survival was 88 months with a 5-year survival of 54%. Patients attaining a strong DTH response had a significantly better (p = 0.0001) 5-year overall survival of 75% compared with 44% in patients without a strong response. Gene expression array linked a 50-gene signature to prognosis, including a cluster of four cancer testis antigens: CTAG2 (NY-ESO-2), MAGEA1, SSX1, and SSX4. Thirty-five patients, who received an autologous vaccine, followed by ipilimumab for progressive disease, had a significantly improved 3-year survival of 46% compared with 19% in nonvaccinated patients treated with ipilimumab alone (p = 0.007). Conclusion. Improved survival in patients attaining a strong DTH and increased response rate with subsequent ipilimumab suggests that the autologous vaccine confers protective immunity. PMID:27294163

  12. Improving Reading Comprehension by Predicting, Monitoring Comprehension, Remediation, and Personal Response Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobucci, Leanne; Richert, Judy; Ronan, Susan; Tanis, Ariana

    This report describes a program for improving inconsistent reading comprehension. The targeted population consisted of first, third, and fifth grade classrooms in a diverse middle class community located in Illinois. The problems of low academic achievement were documented through teacher observation, reading comprehension test scores, and low…

  13. Improving College Access in the United States: Barriers and Policy Responses. NBER Working Paper No. 21781

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, Lindsay C.; Scott-Clayton, Judith

    2015-01-01

    Socioeconomic gaps in college enrollment and attainment have widened over time, despite increasing returns to postsecondary education and significant policy efforts to improve access. We describe the barriers that students face during the transition to college and review the evidence on potential policy solutions. We focus primarily on research…

  14. Crop model improvement reduces the uncertainty of the response to temperature of multi-model ensembles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To improve climate change impact estimates, multi-model ensembles (MMEs) have been suggested. MMEs enable quantifying model uncertainty, and their medians are more accurate than that of any single model when compared with observations. However, multi-model ensembles are costly to execute, so model i...

  15. Characterization of physiological responses of two alfalfa half-sib families with improved salt tolerance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Increasing soil salinity is a global issue that threatens crop production. Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) is a major forage crop worldwide that is relatively sensitive to soil salinity. Improved cultivars with high production on saline soil will benefit many producers and land managers. This study ...

  16. Ideation Training via Innovation Education to Improve Students' Ethical Maturation and Social Responsibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thorsteinsson, Gisli

    2013-01-01

    This paper will represent the pedagogy of Innovation Education in Iceland that is a new school policy within the Icelandic school system. In Innovation Education (IE) students are trained to identify needs and problems in their environment and to find solutions: this is referred to as the process of ideation. The main aim is to improve their…

  17. Mechanisms of efficacy of CBT for Cambodian refugees with PTSD: improvement in emotion regulation and orthostatic blood pressure response.

    PubMed

    Hinton, Devon E; Hofmann, Stefan G; Pollack, Mark H; Otto, Michael W

    2009-01-01

    Based on the results of a randomized controlled trial, we examined a model of the mechanisms of efficacy of culturally adapted cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT) for Cambodian refugees with pharmacology-resistant posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and comordid orthostatic panic attacks (PAs). Twelve patients were in the initial treatment condition, 12 in the delayed treatment condition. The patients randomized to CBT had much greater improvement than patients in the waitlist condition on all psychometric measures and on one physiological measure-the systolic blood pressure response to orthostasis (d = 1.31)-as evaluated by repeated-measures MANOVA and planned contrasts. After receiving CBT, the Delayed Treatment Group improved on all measures, including the systolic blood pressure response to orthostasis. The CBT treatment's reduction of PTSD severity was significantly mediated by improvement in orthostatic panic and emotion regulation ability. The current study supports our model of the generation of PTSD in the Cambodian population, and suggests a key role of decreased vagal tone in the generation of orthostatic panic and PTSD in this population. It also suggests that vagal tone is involved in emotion regulation, and that both vagal tone and emotion regulation improve across treatment.

  18. Living God or Cosmic Therapist? Implications of the National Survey of Youth and Religion for Christian Religious Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bachand, Sarah Caffrey

    2010-01-01

    This article responds to sociologist Christian Smith's claim that many teenagers today have lost traditional religious faith and instead espouse a new and erroneous faith in God the "Cosmic Therapist." The author challenges this claim by comparing two of Smith's chief complaints vis-a-vis teen faith to established portraits of adolescent faith.…

  19. Religious Diversity, Empathy, and God Images: Perspectives from the Psychology of Religion Shaping a Study among Adolescents in the UK

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Francis, Leslie J.; Croft, Jennifer S.; Pyke, Alice

    2012-01-01

    Major religious traditions agree in advocating and promoting love of neighbour as well as love of God. Love of neighbour is reflected in altruistic behaviour and empathy stands as a key motivational factor underpinning altruism. This study employs the empathy scale from the Junior Eysenck Impulsiveness Questionnaire to assess the association…

  20. Extension Education: Training Coordinators to Facilitate Distance Education through the Assemblies of God Bible Institute in Belize

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castleberry, Terry Lane

    2010-01-01

    The specific objective of this project was to train coordinators to open new extension classes and effectively facilitate existing extension classes offered by the Assemblies of God Bible Institute (AGBI) in Belize. Extensive biblical and literary research and a thorough evaluation of current extension classes led to the development of a…

  1. Literature as Tool for Sustainable Development: A Comparative Literary Analysis of Achebe's "Arrow of God" and Tahir's "The Last Imam"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sani, Abubakar Mohammed

    2014-01-01

    This paper aims at a theoretical comparative textual analysis of two novels; Chinua Achebe's "Arrow of God" (1964) and Ibrahim Tahir's "The Last Imam" (1984). The focus is on their similarities generally and roles played by the heroes in their different societies as political and religious leaders of the different societies and…

  2. God's Providence in Puritan New England: An Inquiry into the Nature of Ideas. Teacher and Student Manuals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, H. Mark

    To show how a central idea shapes a monolithic society, this social studies unit focuses on the idea of God's "providence" as the motivational force in Puritan thinking and analyzes the idea's sources, its truth, its impact, and its evolution through three generations of Puritan living. Sections of the unit discuss (1) the religious,…

  3. Response improvement of a mover device using hydrogen storage alloy powder by addition of catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Akira; Akazawa, Kaoru; Ogasawara, Takashi; Uchida, Haru-Hisa; Nishi, Yoshitake

    2007-01-01

    Recently we proposed a mechanical mover device in a unimorph structure with powder hydrogen storage alloy dispersed. A silicone rubber sheet with the alloy was piled up on another pure silicone rubber sheet, then mechanical movement was generated by hydrogen gas absorption and desorption. Because the response of the movement was slow, therefore, in this research we tested the additive effect of catalyst of Pd-Al IIO 3 powder into the hydrogen storage alloy powder before mixing with rubber. The mover device with the catalyst indicated drastically modified responses, such as higher initial moving rate and also larger displacement. The results suggested the possibility of the device for medical purpose such as catheter because of a powerful but tender characteristic of the device.

  4. Improved time response for large area microchannel plate photomultiplier tubes in fusion diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Milnes, J. S. Conneely, T. M.; Howorth, J.; Horsfield, C. J.

    2014-11-15

    Fusion diagnostics that utilise high speed scintillators often need to capture a large area of light with a high degree of time accuracy. Microchannel plate (MCP) photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) are recognised as the leading device for capturing fast optical signals. However, when manufactured in their traditional proximity focused construction, the time response performance is reduced as the active area increases. This is due to two main factors: the capacitance of a large anode and the difficulty of obtaining small pore MCPs with a large area. Collaboration between Photek and AWE has produced prototype devices that combine the excellent time response of small area MCP-PMTs with a large active area by replacing the traditional proximity-gap front section with an electro-optically focused photocathode to MCP. We present results from both single and double MCP devices with a 40 mm diameter active area and show simulations for the 100 mm device being built this year.

  5. Improved Controller Design of Grid Friendly™ Appliances for Primary Frequency Response

    SciTech Connect

    Lian, Jianming; Sun, Yannan; Marinovici, Laurentiu D.; Kalsi, Karanjit

    2015-09-01

    The Grid Friendly$^\\textrm{TM}$ Appliance~(GFA) controller, developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, can autonomously switch off the appliances by detecting the under-frequency events. In this paper, the impacts of curtailing frequency threshold on the performance of frequency responsive GFAs are carefully analyzed first. The current method of selecting curtailing frequency thresholds for GFAs is found to be insufficient to guarantee the desired performance especially when the frequency deviation is shallow. In addition, the power reduction of online GFAs could be so excessive that it can even impact the system response negatively. As a remedy to the deficiency of the current controller design, a different way of selecting curtailing frequency thresholds is proposed to ensure the effectiveness of GFAs in frequency protection. Moreover, it is also proposed to introduce a supervisor at each distribution feeder to monitor the curtailing frequency thresholds of online GFAs and take corrective actions if necessary.

  6. Photodynamic therapy-induced angiogenic signaling: consequences and solutions to improve therapeutic response

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher-Colombo, Shannon M.; Maas, Amanda L.; Yuan, Min; Busch, Theresa M.

    2015-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) can be a highly effective treatment for diseases ranging from actinic keratosis to cancer. While use of this therapy shows great promise in preclinical and clinical studies, understanding the molecular consequences of PDT is critical to designing better treatment protocols. A number of publications have documented alteration in angiogenic factors and growth factor receptors following PDT, which could abrogate treatment effect by inducing angiogenesis and re-establishment of the tumor vasculature. In response to these findings, work over the past decade has examined the efficacy of combining PDT with molecular targeting drugs, such as anti-angiogenic compounds, in an effort to combat these PDT-induced molecular changes. These combinatorial approaches increase rates of apoptosis, impair pro-tumorigenic signaling, and enhance tumor response. This report will examine the current understanding of PDT-induced angiogenic signaling and address molecular-based approaches to abrogate this signaling or its consequences thereby enhancing PDT efficacy. PMID:26109742

  7. Subverting the adaptive immune resistance mechanism to improve clinical responses to immune checkpoint blockade therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young J

    2015-01-01

    The correlation between tumor-infiltrating lymphocyte (TIL)-expression of programmed cell death ligand 1 (PD-L1) and clinical responsiveness to the PD-1 blocking antibody nivolumab implicates adaptive immune evasion mechanisms in cancer. We review our findings that tumor cell PD-L1 expression is induced by interferon γ (IFNγ) producing TILs. We provide a mechanistic rationale for combining IFNγ+ T helper type 1 (Th1)-inducing cancer vaccines with PD-1 immune checkpoint blockade. PMID:25964860

  8. Improving the Taiwan Military’s Disaster Relief Response to Typhoons

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    hazards per year” (Lin, 2008). Taiwan is situated upon a tectonic fault line that places the island at high risk of earthquakes and volcanic ...passed amendments to the Disaster Prevention and Response Act (DPRA) that enable Taiwan authorities to continue to work with the ROC Armed Forces to...actively prepare for disaster prevention and relief in the event of complex disaster. 3 CURRENT MILITARY EMERGENCY PLANNING Before the DPRA was

  9. Improving Systematic Response in the Face of Homicide: Family and Friends of Homicide Victims Service Needs.

    PubMed

    Metzger, Jed; Mastrocinque, Jeanna M; Navratil, Peter; Cerulli, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Homicide is a pressing issue in America. This study used qualitative data obtained from focus groups of family and friends of homicide victims (FFHV) to assess and better meet the needs of victims post homicide. The study results posit myriad changes to the systematic response to homicide. The article concludes with recommendations for training and resources, with specific attention to legal, law enforcement, medical, and behavioral health providers.

  10. Fundamental Investigation of the Microstructural Parameters to Improve Dynamic Response in Al-Cu Model System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-01

    better engineer and optimize the properties of aluminum alloys for high strain rate applications.The composition of these alloys are shown in Table 4...rate application aluminum alloys . In A. Bajaj, P. Zavattieri, M. Koslowski, & T. Siegmund (Eds.). Proceedings of the Society of Engineering Science...chemistry on deformation in a series of model aluminum alloy systems were investigated in an attempt to understand the dominant features responsible for the

  11. Improving the response of accelerometers for automotive applications by using LMS adaptive filters.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Wilmar; de Vicente, Jesús; Sergiyenko, Oleg; Fernández, Eduardo

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, the least-mean-squares (LMS) algorithm was used to eliminate noise corrupting the important information coming from a piezoresisitive accelerometer for automotive applications. This kind of accelerometer is designed to be easily mounted in hard to reach places on vehicles under test, and they usually feature ranges from 50 to 2,000 g (where is the gravitational acceleration, 9.81 m/s(2)) and frequency responses to 3,000 Hz or higher, with DC response, durable cables, reliable performance and relatively low cost. However, here we show that the response of the sensor under test had a lot of noise and we carried out the signal processing stage by using both conventional and optimal adaptive filtering. Usually, designers have to build their specific analog and digital signal processing circuits, and this fact increases considerably the cost of the entire sensor system and the results are not always satisfactory, because the relevant signal is sometimes buried in a broad-band noise background where the unwanted information and the relevant signal sometimes share a very similar frequency band. Thus, in order to deal with this problem, here we used the LMS adaptive filtering algorithm and compare it with others based on the kind of filters that are typically used for automotive applications. The experimental results are satisfactory.

  12. Increased biodiversity in the environment improves the humoral response of rats.

    PubMed

    Pi, Cinthia; Allott, Emma H; Ren, Daniel; Poulton, Susan; Lee, S Y Ryan; Perkins, Sarah; Everett, Mary Lou; Holzknecht, Zoie E; Lin, Shu S; Parker, William

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have compared the immune systems of wild and of laboratory rodents in an effort to determine how laboratory rodents differ from their naturally occurring relatives. This comparison serves as an indicator of what sorts of changes might exist between modern humans living in Western culture compared to our hunter-gatherer ancestors. However, immunological experiments on wild-caught animals are difficult and potentially confounded by increased levels of stress in the captive animals. In this study, the humoral immune responses of laboratory rats in a traditional laboratory environment and in an environment with enriched biodiversity were examined following immunization with a panel of antigens. Biodiversity enrichment included colonization of the laboratory animals with helminths and co-housing the laboratory animals with wild-caught rats. Increased biodiversity did not apparently affect the IgE response to peanut antigens following immunization with those antigens. However, animals housed in the enriched biodiversity setting demonstrated an increased mean humoral response to T-independent and T-dependent antigens and increased levels of "natural" antibodies directed at a xenogeneic protein and at an autologous tissue extract that were not used as immunogens.

  13. Increased Biodiversity in the Environment Improves the Humoral Response of Rats

    PubMed Central

    Pi, Cinthia; Allott, Emma H.; Ren, Daniel; Poulton, Susan; Lee, S. Y. Ryan; Perkins, Sarah; Everett, Mary Lou; Holzknecht, Zoie E.; Lin, Shu S.; Parker, William

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have compared the immune systems of wild and of laboratory rodents in an effort to determine how laboratory rodents differ from their naturally occurring relatives. This comparison serves as an indicator of what sorts of changes might exist between modern humans living in Western culture compared to our hunter-gatherer ancestors. However, immunological experiments on wild-caught animals are difficult and potentially confounded by increased levels of stress in the captive animals. In this study, the humoral immune responses of laboratory rats in a traditional laboratory environment and in an environment with enriched biodiversity were examined following immunization with a panel of antigens. Biodiversity enrichment included colonization of the laboratory animals with helminths and co-housing the laboratory animals with wild-caught rats. Increased biodiversity did not apparently affect the IgE response to peanut antigens following immunization with those antigens. However, animals housed in the enriched biodiversity setting demonstrated an increased mean humoral response to T-independent and T-dependent antigens and increased levels of “natural” antibodies directed at a xenogeneic protein and at an autologous tissue extract that were not used as immunogens. PMID:25853852

  14. Improving Prediction Skill of Imperfect Turbulent Models Through Statistical Response and Information Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majda, Andrew J.; Qi, Di

    2016-02-01

    Turbulent dynamical systems with a large phase space and a high degree of instabilities are ubiquitous in climate science and engineering applications. Statistical uncertainty quantification (UQ) to the response to the change in forcing or uncertain initial data in such complex turbulent systems requires the use of imperfect models due to the lack of both physical understanding and the overwhelming computational demands of Monte Carlo simulation with a large-dimensional phase space. Thus, the systematic development of reduced low-order imperfect statistical models for UQ in turbulent dynamical systems is a grand challenge. This paper applies a recent mathematical strategy for calibrating imperfect models in a training phase and accurately predicting the response by combining information theory and linear statistical response theory in a systematic fashion. A systematic hierarchy of simple statistical imperfect closure schemes for UQ for these problems is designed and tested which are built through new local and global statistical energy conservation principles combined with statistical equilibrium fidelity. The forty mode Lorenz 96 (L-96) model which mimics forced baroclinic turbulence is utilized as a test bed for the calibration and predicting phases for the hierarchy of computationally cheap imperfect closure models both in the full phase space and in a reduced three-dimensional subspace containing the most energetic modes. In all of phase spaces, the nonlinear response of the true model is captured accurately for the mean and variance by the systematic closure model, while alternative methods based on the fluctuation-dissipation theorem alone are much less accurate. For reduced-order model for UQ in the three-dimensional subspace for L-96, the systematic low-order imperfect closure models coupled with the training strategy provide the highest predictive skill over other existing methods for general forced response yet have simple design principles based on a

  15. Improvements to a Response Surface Thermal Model for Orion Mated to the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, StephenW.; Walker, William Q.

    2011-01-01

    This study is an extension of previous work to evaluate the applicability of Design of Experiments (DOE)/Response Surface Methodology to on-orbit thermal analysis. The goal was to determine if the methodology could produce a Response Surface Equation (RSE) that predicted the thermal model temperature results within +/-10 F. An RSE is a polynomial expression that can then be used to predict temperatures for a defined range of factor combinations. Based on suggestions received from the previous work, this study used a model with simpler geometry, considered polynomials up to fifth order, and evaluated orbital temperature variations to establish a minimum and maximum temperature for each component. A simplified Outer Mold Line (OML) thermal model of the Orion spacecraft was used in this study. The factors chosen were the vehicle's Yaw, Pitch, and Roll (defining the on-orbit attitude), the Beta angle (restricted to positive beta angles from 0 to 75), and the environmental constants (varying from cold to hot). All factors were normalized from their native ranges to a non-dimensional range from -1.0 to 1.0. Twenty-three components from the OML were chosen and the minimum and maximum orbital temperatures were calculated for each to produce forty-six responses for the DOE model. A customized DOE case matrix of 145 analysis cases was developed which used analysis points at the factor corners, mid-points, and center. From this data set, RSE s were developed which consisted of cubic, quartic, and fifth order polynomials. The results presented are for the fifth order RSE. The RSE results were then evaluated for agreement with the analytical model predictions to produce a +/-3(sigma) error band. Forty of the 46 responses had a +/-3(sigma) value of 10 F or less. Encouraged by this initial success, two additional sets of verification cases were selected. One contained 20 cases, the other 50 cases. These cases were evaluated both with the fifth order RSE and with the analytical

  16. Attention Diversion Improves Response Inhibition of Immediate Reward, But Only When it Is Beneficial: An fMRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Scalzo, Franco; O’Connor, David A.; Orr, Catherine; Murphy, Kevin; Hester, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Deficits of self-control are associated with a number of mental state disorders. The ability to direct attention away from an alluring stimulus appears to aid inhibition of an impulsive response. However, further functional imaging research is required to assess the impact of shifts in attention on self-regulating processes. We varied the level of attentional disengagement in an functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI)-based Go/No-go task to probe whether diversion of attention away from alluring stimuli facilitates response inhibition. We used the attention-grabbing characteristic of faces to exogenously direct attention away from stimuli and investigated the relative importance of attention and response inhibition mechanisms under different delayed reward scenarios [i.e., where forgoing an immediate reward ($1) led to a higher ($10) or no payoff in the future]. We found that diverting attention improved response inhibition performance, but only when resistance to an alluring stimulus led to delayed reward. Region of interest analyses indicated significant increased activity in posterior right inferior frontal gyrus during successful No-go trials for delayed reward trials compared to no delayed reward trials, and significant reduction in activity in the superior temporal gyri and left caudate in contexts of high attentional diversion. Our findings imply that strategies that increase the perceived benefits of response inhibition might assist individuals in abstaining from problematic impulsive behaviors. PMID:27616988

  17. Demand response to improved walking infrastructure: A study into the economics of walking and health behaviour change.

    PubMed

    Longo, Alberto; Hutchinson, W George; Hunter, Ruth F; Tully, Mark A; Kee, Frank

    2015-10-01

    Walking is the most common form of moderate-intensity physical activity among adults, is widely accessible and especially appealing to obese people. Most often policy makers are interested in valuing the effect on walking of changes in some characteristics of a neighbourhood, the demand response for walking, of infrastructure changes. A positive demand response to improvements in the walking environment could help meet the public health target of 150 min of at least moderate-intensity physical activity per week. We model walking in an individual's local neighbourhood as a 'weak complement' to the characteristics of the neighbourhood itself. Walking is affected by neighbourhood characteristics, substitutes, and individual's characteristics, including their opportunity cost of time. Using compensating variation, we assess the economic benefits of walking and how walking behaviour is affected by improvements to the neighbourhood. Using a sample of 1209 respondents surveyed over a 12 month period (Feb 2010-Jan 2011) in East Belfast, United Kingdom, we find that a policy that increased walkability and people's perception of access to shops and facilities would lead to an increase in walking of about 36 min/person/week, valued at £13.65/person/week. When focussing on inactive residents, a policy that improved the walkability of the area would lead to guidelines for physical activity being reached by only 12.8% of the population who are currently inactive. Additional interventions would therefore be needed to encourage inactive residents to achieve the recommended levels of physical activity, as it appears that interventions that improve the walkability of an area are particularly effective in increasing walking among already active citizens, and, among the inactive ones, the best response is found among healthier, younger and wealthier citizens.

  18. Current transformer model with hysteresis for improving the protection response in electrical transmission systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matussek, Robert; Dzienis, Cezary; Blumschein, Jörg; Schulte, Horst

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, a generic enhanced protection current transformer (CT) model with saturation effects and transient behavior is presented. The model is used for the purpose of analysis and design of power system protection algorithms. Three major classes of protection CT have been modeled which all take into account the nonlinear inductance with remanence effects. The transient short-circuit currents in power systems are simulated under CT saturation condition. The response of a common power system protection algorithm with respect to robustness to nominal parameter variations and sensitivity against maloperation is demonstrated by simulation studies.

  19. How long should pindolol be associated with paroxetine to improve the antidepressant response?

    PubMed

    Zanardi, R; Artigas, F; Franchini, L; Sforzini, L; Gasperini, M; Smeraldi, E; Perez, J

    1997-12-01

    A double-blind study was undertaken to investigate the period of treatment with the beta-adrenoreceptor/5-hydroxytryptamine 1A (5-HT1A) antagonist pindolol required to enhance the antidepressant effects of paroxetine. After 1 week of a placebo run-in period, 63 untreated major depressive inpatients were randomly assigned to three different groups. Group 1 received paroxetine (20 mg/day) plus placebo (4 weeks). Group 2 received paroxetine (20 mg/day) plus pindolol (7.5 mg/day) for 1 week and placebo for 3 weeks. Group 3 received both active treatments for the entire duration of the study (4 weeks). Clinical response was defined as a reduction of the score in the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D) to 8 or below. Also, to preliminarily examine whether beta-adrenoreceptor blockade was involved in the action of pindolol, another group of 10 inpatients was treated in an open-label manner with paroxetine (20 mg/day) plus 50 mg/day of the beta-adrenergic antagonist metoprolol, devoid of significant affinity for 5-HT1A receptors. At endpoint, the incidence of treatment-emergent side effects did not significantly differ among the three groups. After 1 and 2 weeks of treatment, the two groups treated with paroxetine plus pindolol displayed a significantly greater response rate than the group treated with paroxetine plus placebo. At study completion, only the patients treated with pindolol for the entire period showed a significantly greater response rate (p = 0.05). HAM-D score were also significantly lower at endpoint in patients treated with the combination for 4 weeks (p = 0.00003). The group of patients treated with paroxetine and metoprolol exhibited a side-effect profile comparable to that of paroxetine alone. Response rates were also comparable. These findings support the efficacy of pindolol, but not of metoprolol, in accelerating the antidepressant effect of paroxetine and suggest that the administration of pindolol for the entire period of the acute

  20. Some simple improvements to an emergency response model for use in complex coastal terrain

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, N.L.

    1992-06-01

    The MACHWIND model (Meyers 1989) is one of a group of models used to compute regional wind fields from tower wind data and/or vertical wind profiles. The wind fields are in turn used to calculate atmospheric diffusion, to guide emergency responses. MACHWIND has performed acceptably in uniform terrain under steady, well mixed conditions. However, extension of the model to more complex situations is problematic. In coastal, hilly terrain like that near Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB) in southern California, calculations of the wind field can be enhanced significantly by several modifications to the original code. This report highlights the structure of MACHWIND and details the enhancements that were implemented.