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Sample records for gold fiducial insertion

  1. Microscopic Gold Particle-Based Fiducial Markers for Proton Therapy of Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Young Kyung; Kwak, Jungwon; Kim, Dong Wook; Shin, Dongho; Yoon, Myonggeun; Park, Soah; Kim, Jin Sung; Ahn, Sung Hwan; Shin, Jungwook; Lee, Se Byeong Park, Sung Yong; Pyo, Hong Ryeol; Kim, Dae Yong M.D.; Cho, Kwan Ho

    2009-08-01

    Purpose: We examined the feasibility of using fiducial markers composed of microscopic gold particles and human-compatible polymers as a means to overcome current problems with conventional macroscopic gold fiducial markers, such as dose reduction and artifact generation, in proton therapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We examined two types of gold particle fiducial marker interactions: that with diagnostic X-rays and with a therapeutic proton beam. That is, we qualitatively and quantitatively compared the radiographic visibility of conventional gold and gold particle fiducial markers and the CT artifacts and dose reduction associated with their use. Results: The gold particle fiducials could be easily distinguished from high-density structures, such as the pelvic bone, in diagnostic X-rays but were nearly transparent to a proton beam. The proton dose distribution was distorted <5% by the gold particle fiducials with a 4.9% normalized gold density; this was the case even in the worst configuration (i.e., parallel alignment with a single-direction proton beam). In addition, CT artifacts were dramatically reduced for the gold particle mixture. Conclusion: Mixtures of microscopic gold particles and human-compatible polymers have excellent potential as fiducial markers for proton therapy for prostate cancer. These include good radiographic visibility, low distortion of the depth-dose distribution, and few CT artifacts.

  2. Therapeutic usability of two different fiducial gold markers for robotic stereotactic radiosurgery of liver malignancies: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Marsico, Maria; Gabbani, Tommaso; Livi, Lorenzo; Biagini, Maria Rosa; Galli, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To assess how the application of different types of markers affects the tracking accuracy of CyberKnife’s. METHODS: Fifteen patients were recruited and subjected to the ultrasound-guided placement of markers. Two different type of needles 25 gauge (G) and 17 G containing two different fiducial marker, gold notched flexible anchor wire 0.28 mm × 10 mm (25 G needle) and gold cylindrical grain 1 mm × 4 mm (17 G), were used. Seven days after the procedure, a CyberKnife planning computed tomography (CT) for the simulation of radiation treatment was performed on all patients. A binary CT score was assigned to the fiducial markers visualization. Also, the CT number was calculated for each fiducial and the values compared with a specific threshold. RESULTS: For each patient from 1 to 5, intra-hepatic markers were placed (one in 2 patients, three in 8 patients, four in 3 patients, and five in 2 patients). A total of 48 needles were used (thirty-two 17 G and sixteen 25 G) and 48 gold markers were placed (32 Grain shaped markers and 16 Gold Anchor). The result showed that the CT visualization of the grain markers was better than the anchor markers (P = 5 × 10-9). Furthermore, the grain markers were shown to present minor late complications (P = 3 × 10-6), and the best CT threshold number (P = 0.0005). CONCLUSION: The study revealed that the Gold Anchor fiducial marker is correlated with a greater number of late minor complications and low visualization by the CT. PMID:27330682

  3. Radiosensitizer-eluting nanocoatings on gold fiducials for biological in-situ image-guided radio therapy (BIS-IGRT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagesha, D. K.; Tada, D. B.; Stambaugh, C. K. K.; Gultepe, E.; Jost, E.; Levy, C. O.; Cormack, R.; Makrigiorgos, G. M.; Sridhar, S.

    2010-10-01

    Image-guided radiation treatments (IGRT) routinely utilize radio-opaque implantable devices, such as fiducials or brachytherapy spacers, for improved spatial accuracy. The therapeutic efficiency of IGRT can be further enhanced by biological in situ dose painting (BIS-IGRT) of radiosensitizers through localized delivery within the tumor using gold fiducial markers that have been coated with nanoporous polymer matrices loaded with nanoparticles (NPs). In this work, two approaches were studied: (i) a free drug release system consisting of Doxorubicin (Dox), a hydrophilic drug, loaded into a non-degradable polymer poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) coating and (ii) poly(d,l-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) NPs loaded with fluorescent Coumarin-6, serving as a model for a hydrophobic drug, in a biodegradable chitosan matrix. Temporal release kinetics measurements in buffer were carried out using fluorescence spectroscopy. In the first case of free Dox release, an initial release within the first few hours was followed by a sustained release over the course of the next 3 months. In the second platform, release of NPs and the free drug was controlled by the degradation rate of the chitosan matrix and PLGA. The results show that dosage and rate of release of these radiosensitizers coated on gold fiducials for IGRT can be precisely tailored to achieve the desired release profile for radiation therapy of cancer.

  4. Dose reduction in LDR brachytherapy by implanted prostate gold fiducial markers

    SciTech Connect

    Landry, Guillaume; Reniers, Brigitte; Lutgens, Ludy; Murrer, Lars; Afsharpour, Hossein; Haas-Kock, Danielle de; Visser, Peter; Gils, Francis van; Verhaegen, Frank

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: The dosimetric impact of gold fiducial markers (FM) implanted prior to external beam radiotherapy of prostate cancer on low dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy seed implants performed in the context of combined therapy was investigated. Methods: A virtual water phantom was designed containing a single FM. Single and multi source scenarios were investigated by performing Monte Carlo dose calculations, along with the influence of varying orientation and distance of the FM with respect to the sources. Three prostate cancer patients treated with LDR brachytherapy for a recurrence following external beam radiotherapy with implanted FM were studied as surrogate cases to combined therapy. FM and brachytherapy seeds were identified on post implant CT scans and Monte Carlo dose calculations were performed with and without FM. The dosimetric impact of the FM was evaluated by quantifying the amplitude of dose shadows and the volume of cold spots. D{sub 90} was reported based on the post implant CT prostate contour. Results: Large shadows are observed in the single source-FM scenarios. As expected from geometric considerations, the shadows are dependent on source-FM distance and orientation. Large dose reductions are observed at the distal side of FM, while at the proximal side a dose enhancement is observed. In multisource scenarios, the importance of shadows appears mitigated, although FM at the periphery of the seed distribution caused underdosage (

  5. Quantification and comparison of visibility and image artifacts of a new liquid fiducial marker in a lung phantom for image-guided radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Scherman Rydhög, Jonas Munck af Rosenschöld, Per; Irming Jølck, Rasmus; Andresen, Thomas Lars

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: A new biodegradable liquid fiducial marker was devised to allow for easy insertion in lung tumors using thin needles. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the visibility of the liquid fiducial markers for image-guided radiation therapy and compare to existing solid fiducial markers and to one existing liquid fiducial marker currently commercially available. Methods: Fiducial marker visibility was quantified in terms of contrast to noise ratio (CNR) on planar kilovoltage x-ray images in a thorax phantom for different concentrations of the radio-opaque component of the new liquid fiducial marker, four solid fiducial markers, and one existing liquid fiducial marker. Additionally, the image artifacts produced on computer tomography (CT) and cone-beam CT (CBCT) of all fiducial markers were quantified. Results: The authors found that the new liquid fiducial marker with the highest concentration of the radio-opaque component had a CNR > 2.05 for 62/63 exposures, which compared favorably to the existing solid fiducial markers and to the existing liquid fiducial marker evaluated. On CT and CBCT, the new liquid fiducial marker with the highest concentration produced lower streaking index artifact (30 and 14, respectively) than the solid gold markers (113 and 20, respectively) and the existing liquid fiducial marker (39 and 20, respectively). The size of the image artifact was larger for all of the liquid fiducial markers compared to the solid fiducial markers because of their larger physical size. Conclusions: The visibility and the image artifacts produced by the new liquid fiducial markers were comparable to existing solid fiducial markers and the existing liquid fiducial marker. The authors conclude that the new liquid fiducial marker represents an alternative to the fiducial markers tested.

  6. Improving Positioning in High-Dose Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer: Safety and Visibility of Frequently Used Gold Fiducial Markers

    SciTech Connect

    Fonteyne, Valerie; Ost, Piet; Villeirs, Geert; Oosterlinck, Willem; Impens, Aline; De Gersem, Werner; De Wagter, Carlos; De Meerleer, Gert

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: The use of gold fiducial markers (GFMs) for prostate positioning in high-dose radiotherapy is gaining interest. The purpose of this study was to compare five GFMs regarding feasibility of ultrasound-based implantation in the prostate and intraprostatic lesion (IPL); toxicity; visibility on transabdominal ultrasound (TU) and cone-beam CT (CBCT); reliability of automatic, soft tissue, and GFM-based CBCT patient positioning by comparing manual and automatic fusion CBCT. Methods and Materials: Twenty-five patients were included. Pain and toxicity were scored after implantation and high-dose radiotherapy. Fisher exact test was used to evaluate the correlation of patients' characteristics and prostatitis. Positioning was evaluated on TU and kilovoltage CBCT images. CBCT fusion was performed automatically (Elekta XVI technology, release 3.5.1 b27, based on grey values) and manually on soft tissue and GFMs. Pearson correlation statistics and Bland-Altman evaluation were used. Five GFMs were compared. Results: Twenty percent of the patients developed prostatitis despite antibiotic prophylaxis. Cigarette smoking was significantly correlated with prostatitis. The visualization of all GFMs on TU was disappointing. Consequently we cannot recommend the use of these GFMs for TU-based prostate positioning. For all GFMs, there was only fair to poor linear correlation between automatic and manual CBCT images, indicating that even when GFMs are used, an operator evaluation is imperative. However, when GFMs were analyzed individually, a moderate to very strong correlation between automatic and manual positioning was found for larger GFMs in all directions. Conclusion: The incidence of prostatitis in our series was high. Further research is imperative to define the ideal preparation protocol preimplantation and to select patients. Automatic fusion is more reliable with larger GFMs at the cost of more scatter. The stability of all GFMs was proven.

  7. Visibility and artifacts of gold fiducial markers used for image guided radiation therapy of pancreatic cancer on MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Gurney-Champion, Oliver J.; Lens, Eelco; Horst, Astrid van der; Houweling, Antonetta C.; Tienhoven, Geertjan van; Bel, Arjan; Klaassen, Remy; Hooft, Jeanin E. van; Stoker, Jaap; Nederveen, Aart J.

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: In radiation therapy of pancreatic cancer, tumor alignment prior to each treatment fraction is improved when intratumoral gold fiducial markers (from here onwards: markers), which are visible on computed tomography (CT) and cone beam CT, are used. Visibility of these markers on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) might improve image registration between CT and magnetic resonance (MR) images for tumor delineation purposes. However, concomitant image artifacts induced by markers are undesirable. The extent of visibility and artifact size depend on MRI-sequence parameters. The authors’ goal was to determine for various markers their potential to be visible and to generate artifacts, using measures that are independent of the MRI-sequence parameters. Methods: The authors selected ten different markers suitable for endoscopic placement in the pancreas and placed them into a phantom. The markers varied in diameter (0.28–0.6 mm), shape, and iron content (0%–0.5%). For each marker, the authors calculated T{sub 2}{sup ∗}-maps and ΔB{sub 0}-maps using MRI measurements. A decrease in relaxation time T{sub 2}{sup ∗} can cause signal voids, associated with visibility, while a change in the magnetic field B{sub 0} can cause signal shifts, which are associated with artifacts. These shifts inhibit accurate tumor delineation. As a measure for potential visibility, the authors used the volume of low T{sub 2}{sup ∗}, i.e., the volume for which T{sub 2}{sup ∗} differed from the background by >15 ms. As a measure for potential artifacts, the authors used the volume for which |ΔB{sub 0}| > 9.4 × 10{sup −8} T (4 Hz). To test whether there is a correlation between visibility and artifact size, the authors calculated the Spearman’s correlation coefficient (R{sub s}) between the volume of low T{sub 2}{sup ∗} and the volume of high |ΔB{sub 0}|. The authors compared the maps with images obtained using a clinical MR-sequence. Finally, for the best visible marker

  8. Endoscopic Gold Fiducial Marker Placement into the Bladder Wall to Optimize Radiotherapy Targeting for Bladder-Preserving Management of Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer: Feasibility and Initial Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Maurice M.; Gottschalk, Alexander R.; Brajtbord, Jonathan; Konety, Badrinath R.; Meng, Maxwell V.; Roach, Mack; Carroll, Peter R.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Bladder radiotherapy is a management option for carefully selected patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer. However, the inability to visualize the tumor site during treatment and normal bladder movement limits targeting accuracy and increases collateral radiation. A means to accurately and reliably target the bladder during radiotherapy is needed. Materials and Methods Eighteen consecutive patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer (T1–T4) elected bladder-preserving treatment with maximal transurethral resection (TUR), radiation and concurrent chemotherapy. All underwent endoscopic placement of 24-K gold fiducial markers modified with micro-tines (70 [2.9×0.9 mm.]; 19 [2.1×0.7 mm.) into healthy submucosa 5-10 mm. from the resection margin, using custom-made coaxial needles. Marker migration was assessed for with intra-op bladder-filling cystogram and measurement of distance between markers. Set-up error and marker retention through completion of radiotherapy was confirmed by on-table portal imaging. Results Between 1/2007 and 7/2012, a total of 89 markers (3–5 per tumor site) were placed into 18 patients of mean age 73.6 years. Two patients elected cystectomy before starting treatment; 16/18 completed chemo-radiotherapy. All (100%) markers were visible with all on-table (portal, cone-beam CT), fluoroscopy, plain-film, and CT-scan imaging. In two patients, 1 of 4 markers placed at the tumor site fell-out (voided) during the second half of radiotherapy. All other markers (80/82, 98%) were present through the end of radio-therapy. No intraoperative (e.g. uncontrolled bleeding, collateral injury) or post-operative complications (e.g. stone formation, urinary tract infection, post-TUR hematuria >48 hours) occurred. Use of micro-tined fiducial tumor-site markers afforded a 2 to 6-fold reduction in bladder-area targeted with high-dose radiation. Discussion Placement of the micro-tined fiducial markers into the bladder was feasible and

  9. LCLS Undulator Fiducialization Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Zachary

    2010-11-24

    This note presents the LCLS undulator fiducialization plan. The undulators will be fiducialized in the Magnetic Measurement Facility at SLAC. The note begins by summarizing the requirements for the fiducialization. A brief discussion of the measurement equipment is presented, followed by the methods used to perform the fiducialization and check the results. This is followed by the detailed fiducialization plan in which each step is enumerated. Finally, the measurement results and data storage format are presented.

  10. Superior long-term stability of a glucose biosensor based on inserted barrel plating gold electrodes.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Cheng-Teng; Hsiao, Hung-Chan; Fang, Mei-Yen; Zen, Jyh-Myng

    2009-10-15

    Disposable one shot usage blood glucose strips are routinely used in the diagnosis and management of diabetes mellitus and their performance can vary greatly. In this paper we critically evaluated the long-term stability of glucose strips made of barrel plating gold electrodes. Compared to other glucose biosensing platforms of vapor deposited palladium and screen printed carbon electrodes, the proposed glucose biosensor was found to show the best stability among the three biosensing platforms in thermal acceleration experiments at 40 degrees C for 6 months with an average bias of 3.4% at glucose concentrations of 5-20 mM. The precision test of this barrel plating gold glucose biosensor also showed the best performance (coefficients of variation in the range of 1.4-2.4%) in thermal acceleration experiments at 40 degrees C, 50 degrees C and 70 degrees C for 27 days. Error grid analysis revealed that all measurements fell in zone A and zone B. Regression analysis showed no significant difference between the proposed biosensor and the reference method at 99% confidence level. The amperometric glucose biosensor fabricated by inserting two barrel plating gold electrodes onto an injection-molding plastic base followed by immobilizing with a bio-reagent layer and membrane was very impressive with a long-term stability up to 2.5 years at 25 degrees C. Overall, these results indicated that the glucose oxidase/barrel plating gold biosensing platform is ideal for long-term accurate glycemic control.

  11. Fiducial Marker Placement

    MedlinePlus

    ... Media Computed Tomography (CT) - Body General Ultrasound Ultrasound - Prostate Introduction to Cancer Therapy (Radiation Oncology) Proton Therapy Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS) and Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT) Images related to Fiducial Marker Placement Sponsored by ...

  12. Fabrication of a glucose biosensor based on inserted barrel plating gold electrodes.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Cheng-Teng; Chung, Hsieh-Hsun; Tsai, Dong-Mung; Fang, Mei-Yen; Hsiao, Hung-Chan; Zen, Jyh-Myng

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate here the application of barrel plating gold electrodes for fabricating a new type of disposable amperometric glucose biosensor. It is prepared by inserting two barrel plating gold electrodes onto an injection molding plastic base followed by immobilizing with a bioreagent layer and membrane on the electrode surface. The primary function of barrel plating is to provide an economical way to electroplate manufactured parts. The manufacture procedure is simple and can increase the fabrication precision for automation in mass production. At the two-electrode system, the detection of glucose is linear up to 800 mg/dL (i.e., 44.5 mM, r(2) > 0.99) in pH 7.4 PBS with a sensitivity of 0.71 microA/mM. Excellent sensor-to-sensor reproducibility shows coefficients of variation of only 0.8-1.4% for the detection of 56.5-561.0 mg/dL glucose. In laboratory trials 176 capillary blood samples with a range of 30-572 mg/dL glucose are used to evaluate the clinical application of the biosensor. A good linear correlation is observed between the measured values of the proposed biosensor and laboratory reference. Error grid analysis verifies that the proposed technique is promising in fabricating biosensor strips on a mass scale. As successfully demonstrated by using whole blood glucose as a model analyte, the fabrication technique can extend into other barrel plating noble metal electrodes for various applications.

  13. Embedded fiducials in optical surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Sommargren, Gary E.

    2000-01-01

    Embedded fiducials are provided in optical surfaces and a method for embedding the fiducials. Fiducials, or marks on a surface, are important for optical fabrication and alignment, particularly when individual optical elements are aspheres. Fiducials are used during the course of the polishing process to connect interferometric data, and the equation describing the asphere, to physical points on the optic. By embedding fiducials below the surface of the optic and slightly outside the clear aperture of the optic, the fiducials are not removed by polishing, do not interfere with the polishing process, and do not affect the performance of the finished optic.

  14. Electroencephalographic evaluation of gold wire implants inserted in acupuncture points in dogs with epileptic seizures.

    PubMed

    Goiz-Marquez, G; Caballero, S; Solis, H; Rodriguez, C; Sumano, H

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate both, clinically and with electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings, the effect of gold wire implants in acupuncture points in dogs with uncontrolled idiopathic epileptic seizures. Fifteen dogs with such diagnosis were enrolled in the study. A first EEG recording was performed in all dogs under anaesthesia with xylazine (1mg/kg) and propofol (6 mg/kg) before the treatment protocol, and a second EEG was performed 15 weeks later. Relative frequency power, intrahemispheric coherence available through EEG, number of seizures and seizure severity were compared before and after treatment using a Wilcoxon signed-rank test. There were no significant statistical differences before and after treatment in relative power or in intrahemispheric coherence in the EEG recording. However, there was a significant mean difference in seizure frequency and seizure severity between control and treatment periods. After treatment, nine of the 15 dogs (60%) had at least a 50% reduction in seizures frequency during the 15 weeks established as follow-up of this treatment.

  15. Validating Fiducial Markers for Image-Guided Radiation Therapy for Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation in Early-Stage Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Catherine K.; Pritz, Jakub; Zhang, Geoffrey G.; Forster, Kenneth M.; Harris, Eleanor E.R.

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: Image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) may be beneficial for accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). The goal was to validate the use of intraparenchymal textured gold fiducials in patients receiving APBI. Methods and Materials: Twenty-six patients were enrolled on this prospective study that had three or four textured gold intraparenchymal fiducials placed at the periphery of the lumpectomy cavity and were treated with three-dimensional (3D) conformal APBI. Free-breathing four-dimensional computed tomography image sets were obtained pre- and posttreatment, as were daily online megavoltage (MV) orthogonal images. Intrafraction motion, variations in respiratory motion, and fiducial marker migration were calculated using the 3D coordinates of individual fiducials and a calculated center of mass (COM) of the fiducials. We also compared the relative position of the fiducial COM with the geometric center of the seroma. Results: There was less than 1 mm of intrafraction respiratory motion, variation in respiratory motion, or fiducial marker migration. The change in seroma position relative to the fiducial COM was 1 mm {+-} 1 mm. The average position of the geometric seroma relative to the fiducial COM pretreatment compared with posttreatment was 1 mm {+-} 1 mm. The largest daily variation in displacement when using bony landmark was in the anteroposterior direction and two standard deviations (SD) of this variation was 10 mm. The average variation in daily separation between the fiducial pairs from daily MV images was 3 mm {+-} 3 mm therefore 2 SD is 6 mm. Conclusion: Fiducial markers are stable throughout the course of APBI. Planning target volume margins when using bony landmarks should be 10 mm and can be reduced to 6 mm if using fiducials.

  16. Fiducial migration following small peripheral lung tumor image-guided CyberKnife stereotactic radiosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strulik, Konrad L.; Cho, Min H.; Collins, Brian T.; Khan, Noureen; Banovac, Filip; Slack, Rebecca; Cleary, Kevin

    2008-03-01

    To track respiratory motion during CyberKnife stereotactic radiosurgery in the lung, several (three to five) cylindrical gold fiducials are implanted near the planned target volume (PTV). Since these fiducials remain in the human body after treatment, we hypothesize that tracking fiducial movement over time may correlate with the tumor response to treatment and pulmonary fibrosis, thereby serving as an indicator of treatment success. In this paper, we investigate fiducial migration in 24 patients through examination of computed tomography (CT) volume images at four time points: pre-treatment, three, six, and twelve month post-treatment. We developed a MATLAB based GUI environment to display the images, identify the fiducials, and compute our performance measure. After we semi-automatically segmented and detected fiducial locations in CT images of the same patient over time, we identified them according to their configuration and introduced a relative performance measure (ACD: average center distance) to detect their migration. We found that the migration tended to result in a movement towards the fiducial center of the radiated tissue area (indicating tumor regression) and may potentially be linked to the patient prognosis.

  17. Intramolecular Insertions into Unactivated C(sp³)-H Bonds by Oxidatively Generated β-Diketone-α-Gold Carbenes: Synthesis of Cyclopentanones.

    PubMed

    Wang, Youliang; Zheng, Zhitong; Zhang, Liming

    2015-04-29

    Generation of reactive α-oxo gold carbene intermediates via gold-catalyzed oxidation of alkynes has become an increasing versatile strategy of replacing hazardous diazo carbonyl compounds with benign and readily available alkynes in the development of efficient synthetic methods. However, one of the hallmarks of metal carbene/carbenoid chemistry, i.e., insertion into an unactivated C(sp(3))-H bond, has not be realized. This study reveals for the first time that this highly valuable transformation can be readily realized intramolecularly by oxidatively generated β-diketone-α-gold carbenes using ynones as substrates. Substrate conformation control via the Thorpe-Ingold effect is the key design feature that enables generally good to excellent efficiencies, and synthetically versatile cyclopentanones including spiro-, bridged, and fused bicyclic ones can be readily accessed.

  18. Gold

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kirkemo, Harold; Newman, William L.; Ashley, Roger P.

    1998-01-01

    Through the ages, men and women have cherished gold, and many have had a compelling desire to amass great quantities of it -- so compelling a desire, in fact, that the frantic need to seek and hoard gold has been aptly named "gold fever." Gold was among the first metals to be mined because it commonly occurs in its native form -- that is, not combined with other elements -- because it is beautiful and imperishable, and because exquisite objects can be made from it.

  19. Fiducial marker for correlating images

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Lisa Marie; Smith, Randy J.; Warren, John B.; Elliott, Donald

    2011-06-21

    The invention relates to a fiducial marker having a marking grid that is used to correlate and view images produced by different imaging modalities or different imaging and viewing modalities. More specifically, the invention relates to the fiducial marking grid that has a grid pattern for producing either a viewing image and/or a first analytical image that can be overlaid with at least one other second analytical image in order to view a light path or to image different imaging modalities. Depending on the analysis, the grid pattern has a single layer of a certain thickness or at least two layers of certain thicknesses. In either case, the grid pattern is imageable by each imaging or viewing modality used in the analysis. Further, when viewing a light path, the light path of the analytical modality cannot be visualized by viewing modality (e.g., a light microscope objective). By correlating these images, the ability to analyze a thin sample that is, for example, biological in nature but yet contains trace metal ions is enhanced. Specifically, it is desired to analyze both the organic matter of the biological sample and the trace metal ions contained within the biological sample without adding or using extrinsic labels or stains.

  20. Dose perturbations and image artifacts caused by carbon-coated ceramic and stainless steel fiducials used in proton therapy for prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Joey; Kudchadker, Rajat J.; Zhu, X. Ronald; Lee, Andrew K.; Newhauser, Wayne D.

    2010-12-01

    Image-guided radiation therapy using implanted fiducial markers is a common solution for prostate localization to improve targeting accuracy. However, fiducials that are typically used for conventional photon radiotherapy cause large dose perturbations in patients who receive proton radiotherapy. A proposed solution has been to use fiducials of lower atomic number (Z) materials to minimize this effect in tissue, but the effects of these fiducials on dose distributions have not been quantified. The objective of this study was to analyze the magnitude of the dose perturbations caused by select lower-Z fiducials (a carbon-coated zirconium dioxide fiducial and a plastic-coated stainless steel fiducial) and compare them to perturbations caused by conventional gold fiducials. Sets of phantoms were used to assess select components of the effects on dose. First, the fiducials were assessed for radiographic visibility using both conventional computed tomography (CT) and an on-board kilovoltage imaging device at our proton therapy center. CT streak artifacts from the fiducials were also measured in a separate phantom. Second, dose perturbations were measured downstream of the fiducials using radiochromic film. The magnitude of dose perturbation was characterized as a function of marker material, implantation depth and orientation with respect to the beam axis. The radiographic visibility of the markers was deemed to be acceptable for clinical use. The dose measurements showed that the perpendicularly oriented zirconium dioxide and stainless steel fiducials located near the center of modulation of the proton beam perturbed the dose by less than 10%, but that the same fiducials in a parallel orientation near the end of the range of the beam could perturb the dose by as much as 38%. This suggests that carbon-coated and stainless steel fiducials could be used in proton therapy if they are located far from the end of the range of the beam and if they are oriented perpendicular to

  1. Dose perturbations and image artifacts caused by carbon-coated ceramic and stainless steel fiducials used in proton therapy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Joey; Kudchadker, Rajat J; Zhu, X Ronald; Lee, Andrew K; Newhauser, Wayne D

    2010-12-07

    Image-guided radiation therapy using implanted fiducial markers is a common solution for prostate localization to improve targeting accuracy. However, fiducials that are typically used for conventional photon radiotherapy cause large dose perturbations in patients who receive proton radiotherapy. A proposed solution has been to use fiducials of lower atomic number (Z) materials to minimize this effect in tissue, but the effects of these fiducials on dose distributions have not been quantified. The objective of this study was to analyze the magnitude of the dose perturbations caused by select lower-Z fiducials (a carbon-coated zirconium dioxide fiducial and a plastic-coated stainless steel fiducial) and compare them to perturbations caused by conventional gold fiducials. Sets of phantoms were used to assess select components of the effects on dose. First, the fiducials were assessed for radiographic visibility using both conventional computed tomography (CT) and an on-board kilovoltage imaging device at our proton therapy center. CT streak artifacts from the fiducials were also measured in a separate phantom. Second, dose perturbations were measured downstream of the fiducials using radiochromic film. The magnitude of dose perturbation was characterized as a function of marker material, implantation depth and orientation with respect to the beam axis. The radiographic visibility of the markers was deemed to be acceptable for clinical use. The dose measurements showed that the perpendicularly oriented zirconium dioxide and stainless steel fiducials located near the center of modulation of the proton beam perturbed the dose by less than 10%, but that the same fiducials in a parallel orientation near the end of the range of the beam could perturb the dose by as much as 38%. This suggests that carbon-coated and stainless steel fiducials could be used in proton therapy if they are located far from the end of the range of the beam and if they are oriented perpendicular to

  2. RANDOM PULSE GENERATOR PRODUCING FIDUCIAL MARKS

    DOEpatents

    Nielsen, W.F.

    1960-02-01

    The apparatus for automatically applying a fiducial marking, having a nonrepetitive pattern, to a plurality of simultaneously made records comprises, in series, a bypass filter, a trigger circuit, and a pulse generator, with printing means connected to and controlled by the pulse generator for simultaneously making the visible fiducial marks on a plurality of simultaneously produced records.

  3. CT-Guided Fiducial Placement for CyberKnife Stereotactic Radiosurgery: An Initial Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Sotiropoulou, Evangelia; Stathochristopoulou, Irene; Stathopoulos, Konstantinos; Verigos, Kosmas; Salvaras, Nikolaos; Thanos, Loukas

    2010-06-15

    CyberKnife frameless image-guided radiosurgery has become a widely used system for parenchymal extracranial lesions. Gold fiducials are required for the planning and aiming of CyberKnife therapy. We report our initial experience and describe the technique of positioning tumor markers, under CT guidance. We conducted a retrospective review of 105 patients who were referred for CyberKnife stereotactic radiosurgery at Iatropolis CyberKnife Center in Athens. All patients underwent percutaneous fiducial placement via CT guidance. At the desired location, the 18-G needle was advanced into or near the tumor. Data collected included number and locations of fiducials placed and complications experienced to date. One hundred five patients underwent fiducial placement under CT guidance and a total number of 319 gold seeds were implanted. We experienced one episode of pneumothorax that required drainage, one mild pneumothorax, and three episodes of perifocal pulmonary hemorrhage. In conclusion, fiducial implantation under CT guidance appears to be a safe and efficient procedure, as long as it is performed by an experienced interventional radiologist.

  4. Gold-Catalyzed Intermolecular Formal Insertion of Aryldiazo Esters into Cp-H Bonds of Iron and Ruthenium Metallocenes.

    PubMed

    López, Enol; Borge, Javier; López, Luis A

    2017-03-02

    The reaction of ferrocene and ruthenocene with aryldiazo acetates in the presence of gold catalysts produced new functionalized metallocenes resulting from a C-H bond functionalization process. This process is believed to proceed through initial decomposition of the diazo component and formation of an electrophilic gold-carbene intermediate, which is subsequently involved in an electrophilic aromatic substitution. The gold-catalyzed functionalization of ruthenocene exhibited a broad scope and a notable functional-group tolerance. Interestingly, the functionalized ferrocene derivatives were found to react with molecular oxygen to yield α-aryl-α-ferrocenyl-α-hydroxyacetates. Adsorption on silica gel was found to be essential for this dioxygen activation/C(sp(3) )-H bond functionalization sequence. The methodologies reported herein provide a simple and efficient approach to functionalized metallocene derivatives that are difficult to access through conventional organic functional group transformations.

  5. SU-E-J-38: Improved DRR Image Quality Using Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) Fiducial in Image Guided Radiotherapy (IGRT)

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, S; Jacob, R; Popple, R; Duan, J; Wu, X; Cardan, R; Brezovich, I

    2015-06-15

    Purpose Fiducial-based imaging is often used in IGRT. Traditional gold fiducial marker often has substantial reconstruction artifacts. These artifacts Result in poor image quality of DRR for online kV-to-DRR matching. This study evaluated the image quality of PEEK in DRR in static and moving phantom. Methods CT scan of the Gold and PEEK fiducial (both 1×3 mm) was acquired in a 22 cm cylindrical phantom filled with water. Image artifacts was evaluated with maximum CT value deviated from water due to artifacts; volume of artifacts in 10×10 cm in the center slice; maximum length of streak artifacts from the fiducial. DRR resolution were measured using FWHM and FWTM. 4DCT of PEEK fiducial was acquired with the phantom moving sinusoidally in superior-inferior direction. Motion artifacts were assessed for various 4D phase angles. Results The maximum CT value deviation was −174 for Gold and −24 for PEEK. The volume of artifacts in a 10x10 cm 3 mm slice was 0.369 for Gold and 0.074 cm3 for PEEK. The maximum length of streak artifact was 80mm for Gold and 7 mm for PEEK. PEEK in DRR, FWHM was close to actual (1.0 mm for Gold and 1.1 mm for PEEK). FWTM was 1.8 mm for Gold and 1.3 mm for PEEK in DRR. Barrel motion artifact of PEEK fiducial was noticeable for free-breathing scan. The apparent PEEK length due to residual motion was in close agreement with the calculated length (13 mm for 30–70 phase, 10 mm in 40–60 phase). Conclusion Streak artifacts on planning CT associated with use of gold fiducial can be significantly reduced by PEEK fiducial, while having adequate kV image contrast. DRR image resolution at FWTM was improved from 1.8 mm to 1.3 mm. Because of this improvement, we have been routinely use PEEK for liver IGRT.

  6. Are β-H eliminations or alkene insertions feasible elementary steps in catalytic cycles involving gold(I) alkyl species or gold(I) hydrides?

    PubMed

    Klatt, Günter; Xu, Rong; Pernpointner, Markus; Molinari, Lise; Quang Hung, Tran; Rominger, Frank; Hashmi, A Stephen K; Köppel, Horst

    2013-03-18

    The β-H-elimination in the (iPr)AuEt complex and its microscopic reverse, the insertion of ethene into (iPr)AuH, were investigated in a combined experimental and computational study. Our DFT-D3 calculations predict free-energy barriers of 49.7 and 36.4 kcal mol(-1) for the elimination and insertion process, respectively, which permit an estimation of the rate constants for these reactions according to classical transition-state theory. The elimination/insertion pathway is found to involve a high-energy ethene hydride species and is not significantly affected by continuum solvent effects. The high barriers found in the theoretical study were then confirmed experimentally by measuring decomposition temperatures for several different (iPr)Au(I) -alkyl complexes which, with a slow decomposition at 180 °C, are significantly higher than those of other transition-metal alkyl complexes. In addition, at the same temperature, the decomposition of (iPr)AuPh and (iPr)AuMe, both of which cannot undergo β-H-elimination, indicates that the pathway for the observed decomposition at 180 °C is not a β-H-elimination. According to the calculations, the latter should not occur at temperatures below 200 °C. The microscopic reverse of the β-H-elimination, the insertion of ethene into the (iPr)AuH could neither be observed at pressures up to 8 bar at RT nor at 1 bar at 80 °C. The same is true for the strain-activated norbornene.

  7. Novel Technique for Hepatic Fiducial Marker Placement for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Jarraya, Hajer; Chalayer, Chloé; Tresch, Emmanuelle; Bonodeau, Francois; Lacornerie, Thomas; Mirabel, Xavier; Boulanger, Thomas; Taieb, Sophie; Kramar, Andrew; Lartigau, Eric; Ceugnart, Luc

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: To report experience with fiducial marker insertion and describe an advantageous, novel technique for fiducial placement in the liver for stereotactic body radiation therapy with respiratory tracking. Methods and Materials: We implanted 1444 fiducials (single: 834; linked: 610) in 328 patients with 424 hepatic lesions. Two methods of implantation were compared: the standard method (631 single fiducials) performed on 153 patients from May 2007 to May 2010, and the cube method (813 fiducials: 610 linked/203 single) applied to 175 patients from April 2010 to March 2013. The standard method involved implanting a single marker at a time. The novel technique entailed implanting 2 pairs of linked markers when possible in a way to occupy the perpendicular edges of a cube containing the tumor inside. Results: Mean duration of the cube method was shorter than the standard method (46 vs 61 minutes; P<.0001). Median numbers of skin and subcapsular entries were significantly smaller with the cube method (2 vs 4, P<.0001, and 2 vs 4, P<.0001, respectively). The rate of overall complications (total, major, and minor) was significantly lower in the cube method group compared with the standard method group (5.7% vs 13.7%; P=.013). Major complications occurred while using single markers only. The success rate was 98.9% for the cube method and 99.3% for the standard method. Conclusions: We propose a new technique of hepatic fiducial implantation that makes use of linked fiducials and involves fewer skin entries and shorter time of implantation. The technique is less complication-prone and is migration-resistant.

  8. Automatic coregistration of volumetric images based on implanted fiducial markers.

    PubMed

    Koch, Martin; Maltz, Jonathan S; Belongie, Serge J; Gangadharan, Bijumon; Bose, Supratik; Shukla, Himanshu; Bani-Hashemi, Ali R

    2008-10-01

    The accurate delivery of external beam radiation therapy is often facilitated through the implantation of radio-opaque fiducial markers (gold seeds). Before the delivery of each treatment fraction, seed positions can be determined via low dose volumetric imaging. By registering these seed locations with the corresponding locations in the previously acquired treatment planning computed tomographic (CT) scan, it is possible to adjust the patient position so that seed displacement is accommodated. The authors present an unsupervised automatic algorithm that identifies seeds in both planning and pretreatment images and subsequently determines a rigid geometric transformation between the two sets. The algorithm is applied to the imaging series of ten prostate cancer patients. Each test series is comprised of a single multislice planning CT and multiple megavoltage conebeam (MVCB) images. Each MVCB dataset is obtained immediately prior to a subsequent treatment session. Seed locations were determined to within 1 mm with an accuracy of 97 +/- 6.1% for datasets obtained by application of a mean imaging dose of 3.5 cGy per study. False positives occurred in three separate instances, but only when datasets were obtained at imaging doses too low to enable fiducial resolution by a human operator, or when the prostate gland had undergone large displacement or significant deformation. The registration procedure requires under nine seconds of computation time on a typical contemporary computer workstation.

  9. Nonhemorrhagic Cord Contusion After Percutaneous Fiducial Placement: Case Report and Surgical Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Qualls E; Dickerman, Rob D; Kattner, Keith A; Stroink, Ann R

    2006-01-01

    Study Design: Single case report and extensive literature review. Objectives: To present the first such report of cervical cord contusion after the percutaneous placement of gold-seed fiducials. The pathomechanics and surgical recommendations are reviewed. Background: Spinal cord injuries are well documented in the medical literature. These injuries range from cord contusion to transection and result primarily from trauma. A single case report of a patient who was found to have a nonhemorrhagic cervical spinal cord contusion after percutaneous fiducial implantation is presented. Methods: Single case report. Results: The patient underwent percutaneous placement of fiducials for stereotactic radiosurgery for a nerve sheath tumor. Postoperatively she had primarily sensory complaints; no motor deficits were detected on neurological examination. Neuroimaging studies demonstrated nonhemorrhagic cervical cord contusion. She was treated conservatively and had complete resolution of her symptoms. Conclusions: The likely mechanism for the contusion was neck hyperextension during thrusting maneuvers during fiducial implantation. This is yet another report of normal intraoperative-evoked potentials with postoperative neurological sequelae. A dedicated team approach involving ancillary staff, anesthesiologists, and surgeons should be utilized to avert this potentially devastating complication. PMID:17044394

  10. A Vibrating Wire System For Quadrupole Fiducialization

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Zachary

    2010-12-13

    A vibrating wire system is being developed to fiducialize the quadrupoles between undulator segments in the LCLS. This note provides a detailed analysis of the system. The LCLS will have quadrupoles between the undulator segments to keep the electron beam focused. If the quadrupoles are not centered on the beam axis, the beam will receive transverse kicks, causing it to deviate from the undulator axis. Beam based alignment will be used to move the quadrupoles onto a straight line, but an initial, conventional alignment must place the quadrupole centers on a straight line to 100 {micro}m. In the fiducialization step of the initial alignment, the position of the center of the quadrupole is measured relative to tooling balls on the outside of the quadrupole. The alignment crews then use the tooling balls to place the magnet in the tunnel. The required error on the location of the quadrupole center relative to the tooling balls must be less than 25 {micro}m. In this note, we analyze a system under construction for the quadrupole fiducialization. The system uses the vibrating wire technique to position a wire onto the quadrupole magnetic axis. The wire position is then related to tooling balls using wire position detectors. The tooling balls on the wire position detectors are finally related to tooling balls on the quadrupole to perform the fiducialization. The total 25 {micro}m fiducialization error must be divided between these three steps. The wire must be positioned onto the quadrupole magnetic axis to within 10 {micro}m, the wire position must be measured relative to tooling balls on the wire position detectors to within 15 {micro}m, and tooling balls on the wire position detectors must be related to tooling balls on the quadrupole to within 10 {micro}m. The techniques used in these three steps will be discussed. The note begins by discussing various quadrupole fiducialization techniques used in the past and discusses why the vibrating wire technique is our method

  11. SU-E-J-37: Feasibility of Utilizing Carbon Fiducials to Increase Localization Accuracy of Lumpectomy Cavity for Partial Breast Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y; Hieken, T; Mutter, R; Park, S; Yan, E; Brinkmann, D; Pafundi, D

    2015-06-15

    Purpose To investigate the feasibility of utilizing carbon fiducials to increase localization accuracy of lumpectomy cavity for partial breast irradiation (PBI). Methods Carbon fiducials were placed intraoperatively in the lumpectomy cavity following resection of breast cancer in 11 patients. The patients were scheduled to receive whole breast irradiation (WBI) with a boost or 3D-conformal PBI. WBI patients were initially setup to skin tattoos using lasers, followed by orthogonal kV on-board-imaging (OBI) matching to bone per clinical practice. Cone beam CT (CBCT) was acquired weekly for offline review. For the boost component of WBI and PBI, patients were setup with lasers, followed by OBI matching to fiducials, with final alignment by CBCT matching to fiducials. Using carbon fiducials as a surrogate for the lumpectomy cavity and CBCT matching to fiducials as the gold standard, setup uncertainties to lasers, OBI bone, OBI fiducials, and CBCT breast were compared. Results Minimal imaging artifacts were introduced by fiducials on the planning CT and CBCT. The fiducials were sufficiently visible on OBI for online localization. The mean magnitude and standard deviation of setup errors were 8.4mm ± 5.3 mm (n=84), 7.3mm ± 3.7mm (n=87), 2.2mm ± 1.6mm (n=40) and 4.8mm ± 2.6mm (n=87), for lasers, OBI bone, OBI fiducials and CBCT breast tissue, respectively. Significant migration occurred in one of 39 implanted fiducials in a patient with a large postoperative seroma. Conclusion OBI carbon fiducial-based setup can improve localization accuracy with minimal imaging artifacts. With increased localization accuracy, setup uncertainties can be reduced from 8mm using OBI bone matching to 3mm using OBI fiducial matching for PBI treatment. This work demonstrates the feasibility of utilizing carbon fiducials to increase localization accuracy to the lumpectomy cavity for PBI. This may be particularly attractive for localization in the setting of proton therapy and other scenarios

  12. Alternative fiducial markers for Vero real-time tumor tracking radiotherapy: A phantom study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Shin-Hyung; Kim, Jae-Chul; Kim, Sung Joon

    2016-12-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the feasibility of potential fiducial markers consisting of various materials in a Vero real-time tumor-tracking (RTTT) system. In order to determine the applicability of fiducial markers for the Vero RTTT system, we tested various markers consisting of 8 kinds of material (titanium, stainless steel, high-carbon steel, pure steel, copper, silver, tantalum, and gold) with various diameters ranging from 0.3 mm to 1.6 mm and a length of 5 mm. Additionally, a commercial gold coil marker (Visicoil™, IBA dosimetry, Schwarzenbruck, Germany) of diameter 0.5 mm and length 1 cm was included for evaluation. The radiologic visibility on kV fluoroscopy/kV CT scan images of the fiducial markers was evaluated. The detectability on the RTTT system was tested using a two-dimensional moving phantom (Brainlab AG, Feldkirchen, Germany), producing sinusoidal motion. The target center's accuracy was evaluated by calculating the deviation of the position of a metal sphere from the center on the dose profile. Dose profiles were measured using Gafchromic EBT2 films (International Specialty Products, NJ, USA). All markers were visible on kV fluoroscopy/kV CT while markers with atomic number ≥ 25.7 were detectable on the Vero RTTT system. All the detected markers showed excellent geometric accuracy.

  13. Global Geodesy Using GPS Without Fiducial Sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heflin, Michael B.; Blewitt, Geoffrey

    1994-01-01

    Global Positioning System, GPS, used to make global geodetic measurements without use of fiducial site coordinates. Baseline lengths and geocentric radii for each site determined without having to fix any site coordinates. Given n globally distributed sites, n baseline lengths and n geocentric radii form polyhedron with each site at vertex and with geocenter at intersection of all radii. Geodetic information derived from structure of polyhedron and its change with time. Approach applied to any global geodetic technique.

  14. Transrectal Prostate Biopsy and Fiducial Marker Placement in a Standard 1.5T Magnetic Resonance Imaging Scanner

    PubMed Central

    Susil, Robert C.; Ménard, Cynthia; Krieger, Axel; Coleman, Jonathan A.; Camphausen, Kevin; Choyke, Peter; Fichtinger, Gabor; Whitcomb, Louis L.; Coleman, C. Norman; Atalar, Ergin

    2012-01-01

    Purpose We investigated the accuracy and feasibility of a system that provides transrectal needle access to the prostate concurrent with 1.5 Tesla MRI which previously has not been possible. Materials and Methods In 5 patients with previously diagnosed prostate cancer, MRI guided intraprostatic placement of gold fiducial markers (4 procedures) and/or prostate biopsy (3 procedures) was performed using local anesthesia. Results Mean procedure duration was 76 minutes and all patients tolerated the intervention well. Procedure related adverse events included self-limited hematuria and hematochezia following 3 of 8 procedures (all resolved in less than 1 week). Mean needle placement accuracy was 1.9 mm for the fiducial marker placement studies and 1.8 mm for the biopsy procedures. Mean fiducial marker placement accuracy was 4.8 mm and the mean fiducial marker placement accuracy transverse to the needle direction was 2.6 mm. All patients who underwent the procedure were able to complete their course of radiotherapy without delay or complication. Conclusions While studies of clinical usefulness are warranted, transrectal 1.5 T MRI guided prostate biopsy and fiducial marker placement is feasible using this system, providing new opportunities for image guided diagnostic and therapeutic prostate interventions. PMID:16406885

  15. SU-E-J-229: Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Small Fiducial Markers for Proton Beam Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Y; James, J; Panda, A; Vargas, C; Silva, A; Liu, W; Shen, J; Ding, X; Paden, R; Hanson, J; Wong, W; Schild, S; Bues, M

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: For proton beam therapy, small fiducial markers are preferred for patient alignment due to less interference with the proton beam. Visualizing small fiducial markers can be challenging in MRI. This study intends to investigate MRI imaging protocols for better visualization of small fiducial markers. Methods: Two carbon and two coil-shaped gold markers were placed into a gel phantom. Both carbon markers had a diameter of 1mm and a length of 3mm. Both gold markers had a length of 5mm. One gold marker had a diameter of 0.5mm and the other had a diameter of 0.75mm. T1 VIBE, T2 SPACE, TrueFISP and susceptibility weighted (SW) images were acquired. To improve marker contrast, high spatial resolution was used to reduce partial volume effect. Slice thickness was 1.5mm for all four sequences and in-plane resolution was 0.6mm for TrueFISP, 0.7mm for T1 VIBE, and 0.8mm for T2 SPACE and SW. For comparison purpose, a 3D T1 VIBE image set at 3mm slice thickness and 1.2mm in-plane resolution was also acquired. Results: All markers were visible in all high-resolution image sets. In each image set, marker-induced signal void was the smallest (in diameter) for carbon markers, followed by the 0.5mm gold marker and the largest for the 0.75mm gold marker. The SW images had the largest marker-induced signal void. However, those might be confused by susceptibility-gradient-induced signal voids. T1 VIBE had good visualization of markers with nicely defined edges. T2 SPACE had reasonable visualization of markers but edges were slightly blurred. TrueFISP had good visualization of markers only if they were not masked by banding artifacts. As a comparison, all markers were hardly visible in the standard resolution T1 VIBE images. Conclusion: 3D high-resolution T1 VIBE and SW have great potential in providing good visualization of small fiducial markers for proton beam therapy.

  16. Global geodesy using GPS without fiducial sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heflin, Michael; Bertiger, Willy; Blewitt, Geoff; Freedman, Adam; Hurst, Ken; Lichten, Steve; Lindqwister, Ulf; Vigue, Yvonne; Webb, Frank; Yunck, Tom

    1992-01-01

    Baseline lengths and geocentric radii have been determined from GPS data without the use of fiducial sites. Data from the first GPS experiment for the IERS and Geodynamics (GIG '91) have been analyzed with a no-fiducial strategy. A baseline length daily repeatability of 2 mm + 4 parts per billion was obtained for baselines in the Northern Hemisphere. Comparison of baseline lengths from GPS and the global VLBI solution GLB659 (Caprette et al. 1990) show rms agreement of 2.1 parts per billion. The geocentric radius mean daily repeatability for all sites was 15 cm. Comparison of geocentric radii from GPS and SV5 (Murray et al. 1990) show rms agreement of 3.8 cm. Given n globally distributed stations, the n(n - 1)/2 baseline lengths and n geocentric radii uniquely define a rigid closed polyhedron with a well-defined center of mass. Geodetic information can be obtained by examining the structure of the polyhedron and its change with time.

  17. A Fiducial Approach to Extremes and Multiple Comparisons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wandler, Damian V.

    2010-01-01

    Generalized fiducial inference is a powerful tool for many difficult problems. Based on an extension of R. A. Fisher's work, we used generalized fiducial inference for two extreme value problems and a multiple comparison procedure. The first extreme value problem is dealing with the generalized Pareto distribution. The generalized Pareto…

  18. Comparison between skin-mounted fiducials and bone-implanted fiducials for image-guided neurosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rost, Jennifer; Harris, Steven S.; Stefansic, James D.; Sillay, Karl; Galloway, Robert L., Jr.

    2004-05-01

    Point-based registration for image-guided neurosurgery has become the industry standard. While the use of intrinsic points is appealing because of its retrospective nature, affixing extrinsic objects to the head prior to scanning has been demonstrated to provide much more accurate registrations. Points of reference between image space and physical space are called fiducials. The extrinsic objects which generate those points are fiducial markers. The markers can be broken down into two classifications: skin-mounted and bone-implanted. Each has distinct advantages and disadvantages. Skin-mounted fiducials require simply sticking them on the patient in locations suggested by the manufacturer, however, they can move with tractions placed on the skin, fall off and perhaps the most dangerous problem, they can be replaced by the patient. Bone implanted markers being rigidly affixed to the skull do not present such problems. However, a minor surgical intervention (analogous to dental work) must be performed to implant the markers prior to surgery. Therefore marker type and use has become a decision point for image-guided surgery. We have performed a series of experiments in an attempt to better quantify aspects of the two types of markers so that better informed decisions can be made. We have created a phantom composed of a full-size plastic skull [Wards Scientific Supply] with a 500 ml bag of saline placed in the brain cavity. The skull was then sealed. A skin mimicking material, DragonSkinTM [SmoothOn Company] was painted onto the surface and allowed to dry. Skin mounted fiducials [Medtronic-SNT] and bone-implanted markers [Z-Kat]were placed on the phantom. In addition, three additional bone-implanted markers were placed (two on the base of the skull and one in the eye socket for use as targets). The markers were imaged in CT and 4 MRI sequences (T1-weighted, T2 weighted, SPGR, and a functional series.) The markers were also located in physical space using an Optotrak

  19. Fiducial marker guided prostate radiotherapy: a review.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Angela G M; Jain, Suneil; Hounsell, Alan R; O'Sullivan, Joe M

    2016-12-01

    Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) is an essential tool in the accurate delivery of modern radiotherapy techniques. Prostate radiotherapy positioned using skin marks or bony anatomy may be adequate for delivering a relatively homogeneous whole-pelvic radiotherapy dose, but these surrogates are not reliable when using reduced margins, dose escalation or hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy. Fiducial markers (FMs) for prostate IGRT have been in use since the 1990s. They require surgical implantation and provide a surrogate for the position of the prostate gland. A variety of FMs are available and they can be used in a number of ways. This review aimed to establish the evidence for using prostate FMs in terms of feasibility, implantation procedures, types of FMs used, FM migration, imaging modalities used and the clinical impact of FMs. A search strategy was defined and a literature search was carried out in Medline. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were applied, which resulted in 50 articles being included in this review. The evidence demonstrates that FMs provide a more accurate surrogate for the position of the prostate than either external skin marks or bony anatomy. A combination of FM alignment and soft-tissue analysis is currently the most effective and widely available approach to ensuring accuracy in prostate IGRT. FM implantation is safe and well tolerated. FM migration is possible but minimal. Standardization of all techniques and procedures in relation to the use of prostate FMs is required. Finally, a clinical trial investigating a non-surgical alternative to prostate FMs is introduced.

  20. Geometry and treatment of fiducial networks - Effects on GPS baseline precision in South America

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freymueller, Jeffrey T.; Golombek, Matthew P.

    1988-01-01

    A covariance analysis indicates that GPS baseline precision in northern South America is substantially improved when fiducial stations in North America are supplemented by stations in Hawaii, Australia, and New Zealand. The formal errors for a variety of fiducial networks are calculated. It is found that the systematic error of fiducial stations is dependent on the fiducial network geometry. Sensitivity analysis indicates that the baselines of northern South America are very sensitive to uncertainties in the locations of the closest fiducial stations.

  1. Commissioning a Vibrating Wire System for Quadrupole Fiducialization

    SciTech Connect

    Levashov, Michael Y

    2010-12-03

    Quadrupoles will be placed between the undulator segments in LCLS to keep the electron beam focused as it passes through. The quadrupoles will be assembled with their respective undulator segments prior to being placed into the tunnel. Beam alignment will be used to center the quadrupoles, along with the corresponding undulators, on the beam. If there is any displacement between the undulator and the quadrupole axes in the assemblies, the beam will deviate from the undulator axis. If it deviates by more than 80{micro}m in vertical or 140{micro}m in horizontal directions, the undulator will not perform as required by LCLS. This error is divided between three sources: undulator axis fiducialization, quadrupole magnetic axis fiducialization, and assembly of the two parts. In particular, it was calculated that the quadrupole needs to be fiducialized to within 25{micro}m in both vertical and horizontal directions. A previous study suggested using a vibrating wire system for finding the magnetic axis of the quadrupoles. The study showed that the method has high sensitivity (up to 1{micro}m) and laid out guidelines for constructing such a system. There are 3 steps in fiducializing the quadrupole with the vibrating wire system. They are positioning the wire at the magnet center (step 1), finding the wire with position detectors (step 2), and finding the quadrupole tooling ball positions relative to the position detector tooling balls (step 3). A previous study investigated the error associated with each step by using a permanent quadrupole magnet on an optical mover system. The study reported an error of 11{micro}m for step 1 and a repeatability of 4{micro}m for step 2. However, the set up used a FARO arm to measure tooling balls and didn't allow to accurately check step 2 for errors; an uncertainty of 100{micro}m was reported. Therefore, even though the repeatability was good, there was no way to check that the error in step 2 was small. Following the recommendations of

  2. Bulk gold catalyzed oxidation reactions of amines and isocyanides and iron porphyrin catalyzed N-H and O-H bond insertion/cyclization reactions of diamines and aminoalcohols

    SciTech Connect

    Klobukowski, Erik

    2011-01-01

    conditions, it was found that the oxidative dehydrogenation of dibenzylamine to Nbenzylidenebenzylamine, with N-methylmorpholine N-oxide (NMMO), was nearly quantitative (96%) within 24 h. However, the reaction with oxygen was much slower, with only a 52% yield of imine product over the same time period. Moreover, the rate of reaction was found to be influenced by the nature of the amine N-oxide. For example, the use of the weakly basic pyridine N-oxide (PyNO) led to an imine yield of only 6% after 24 h. A comparison of amine N-oxide and O2 was also examined in the oxidation of PhCH{sub 2}OH to PhCHO catalyzed by bulk gold. In this reaction, a 52% yield of the aldehyde was achieved when NMMO was used, while only a 7% product yield was afforded when O{sub 2} was the oxidant after 48 h. The bulk gold-catalyzed oxidative dehydrogenation of cyclic amines generates amidines, which upon treatment with Aerosil and water were found to undergo hydrolysis to produce lactams. Moreover, 5-, 6-, and 7-membered lactams could be prepared through a one-pot reaction of cyclic amines by treatment with oxygen, water, bulk gold, and Aerosil. This method is much more atom economical than industrial processes, does not require corrosive acids, and does not generate undesired byproducts. Additionally, the gold and Aerosil catalysts can be readily separated from the reaction mixture. The second project involved studying iron(III) tetraphenylporphyrin chloride, Fe(TPP)Cl, as a homogeneous catalyst for the generation of carbenes from diazo reagents and their reaction with heteroatom compounds. Fe(TPP)Cl, efficiently catalyzed the insertion of carbenes derived from methyl 2-phenyldiazoacetates into O-H bonds of aliphatic and aromatic alcohols. Fe(TPP)Cl was also found to be an effective catalyst for tandem N-H and O-H insertion/cyclization reactions when 1,2-diamines and 1,2-alcoholamines were treated with diazo reagents. This approach provides a one-pot process for synthesizing piperazinones and

  3. International global network of fiducial stations: Scientific and implementation issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    In this report, an ad hoc panel of the National Research Council's Committee on Geodesy, Board of Earth Sciences and Resources (1) evaluates the scientific importance of a global network of fiducial sites, monitored very precisely, using a combination of surface- and space-geodetic techniques; (2) examines strategies for implementing and operating such a network; and (3) assesses whether such a network would provide a suitable global infrastructure for geodetic and other geophysical systems of the next century. The panel concludes that a global network of fiducial sites would be a valuable tool for addressing global change issues and play a critical role in providing a reference frame for scientific Earth missions. The panel suggests that existing global networks be integrated and anticipates that such a network would grow from about 30 to the ultimate size of about 200 fiducial sites. It is noted that such a global network will provide a long-term infrastructure for geodetic and geophysical studies. The panel expects that these fiducial sites would evolve into terrestrial observatories or laboratories that would permit more comprehensive studies of the Earth than those now possible.

  4. Recognition of fiducial surfaces in lidar surveys of coastal topography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brock, J.C.; Sallenger, A.H.; Krabill, W.B.; Swift, R.N.; Wright, C.W.

    2001-01-01

    A new method for the recognition and mapping of surfaces in coastal landscapes that provide accurate and low variability topographic measurements with respect to airborne lidar surveys is described and demonstrated in this paper. Such surfaces are herein termed "fiducial" because they can represent reference baseline morphology in Studies of coastal change due to natural or anthropogenic causes. Non-fiducial surfaces may also be identified in each separate lidar survey to be used in a given geomorphic change analysis. Sites that are non-fiducial in either or both lidar surveys that bracket the time period under investigation may be excluded from consideration in subsequent calculations of survey-to-survey elevation differences to eliminate spurious indications of landscape change. This new analysis method, or lidar fiducial surface recognition (LFSR) algorithm, is intended to more fully enable the non-ambiguous Use of topographic lidar in a range of coastal investigations. The LFSR algorithm may be widely applied, because it is based solely on the information inherent in the USGS/NASA/NOAA airborne topographic lidar coverage that exists for most of the contiguous U.S. coastline.

  5. Feeding tube insertion - gastrostomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... tube insertion; G-tube insertion; PEG tube insertion; Stomach tube insertion; Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube insertion ... and down the esophagus, which leads to the stomach. After the endoscopy tube is inserted, the skin ...

  6. Limited Role for Biliary Stent as Surrogate Fiducial Marker in Pancreatic Cancer: Stent and Intratumoral Fiducials Compared

    SciTech Connect

    Horst, Astrid van der; Lens, Eelco; Wognum, Silvia; Jong, Rianne de; Hooft, Jeanin E. van; Tienhoven, Geertjan van; Bel, Arjan

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: Because of low soft-tissue contrast of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT), fiducial markers are often used for radiation therapy patient setup verification. For pancreatic cancer patients, biliary stents have been suggested as surrogate fiducials. Using intratumoral fiducials as standard for tumor position, this study aims to quantify the suitability of biliary stents for measuring interfractional and respiratory-induced position variations of pancreatic tumors. Methods and Materials: Eleven pancreatic cancer patients with intratumoral fiducials and a biliary stent were included in this study. Daily CBCT scans (243 in total) were registered with a reference CT scan, based on bony anatomy, on fiducial markers, and on the biliary stent, respectively. We analyzed the differences in tumor position (ie, markers center-of-mass position) among these 3 registrations. In addition, we measured for 9 patients the magnitude of respiratory-induced motion (MM) of the markers and of the stent on 4-dimensional CT (4DCT) and determined the difference between these 2 magnitudes (ΔMM). Results: The stent indicated tumor position better than bony anatomy in 67% of fractions; the absolute difference between the markers and stent registration was >5 mm in 46% of fractions and >10 mm in 20% of fractions. Large PTV margins (superior-inferior direction, >19 mm) would be needed to account for this interfractional position variability. On 4DCT, we found in superior-inferior direction a mean ΔMM of 0.5 mm (range, –2.6 to 4.2 mm). Conclusions: For respiratory-induced motion, the mean ΔMM is small, but for individual patients the absolute difference can be >4 mm. For interfractional position variations, a stent is, on average, a better surrogate fiducial than bony anatomy, but large PTV margins would still be required. Therefore, intratumoral fiducials are recommended for online setup verification for all pancreatic patients scheduled for radiation therapy, including

  7. Monte Carlo simulations of the dosimetric impact of radiopaque fiducial markers for proton radiotherapy of the prostate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newhauser, Wayne; Fontenot, Jonas; Koch, Nicholas; Dong, Lei; Lee, Andrew; Zheng, Yuanshui; Waters, Laurie; Mohan, Radhe

    2007-06-01

    Many clinical studies have demonstrated that implanted radiopaque fiducial markers improve targeting accuracy in external-beam radiotherapy, but little is known about the dose perturbations these markers may cause in patients receiving proton radiotherapy. The objective of this study was to determine what types of implantable markers are visible in setup radiographs and, at the same time, perturb the therapeutic proton dose to the prostate by less than 10%. The radiographic visibility of the markers was assessed by visual inspection of lateral setup radiographs of a pelvic phantom using a kilovoltage x-ray imaging system. The fiducial-induced perturbations in the proton dose were estimated with Monte Carlo simulations. The influence of marker material, size, placement depth and orientation within the pelvis was examined. The radiographic tests confirmed that gold and stainless steel markers were clearly visible and that titanium markers were not. The Monte Carlo simulations revealed that titanium and stainless steel markers minimally perturbed the proton beam, but gold markers cast unacceptably large dose shadows. A 0.9 mm diameter, 3.1 mm long cylindrical stainless steel marker provides good radiographic visibility yet perturbs the proton dose distribution in the prostate by less than 8% when using a parallel opposed lateral beam arrangement.

  8. Recognition of fiducial marks applied to robotic systems. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Georges, Wayne D.

    1991-01-01

    The objective was to devise a method to determine the position and orientation of the links of a PUMA 560 using fiducial marks. As a result, it is necessary to design fiducial marks and a corresponding feature extraction algorithm. The marks used are composites of three basic shapes, a circle, an equilateral triangle and a square. Once a mark is imaged, it is thresholded and the borders of each shape are extracted. These borders are subsequently used in a feature extraction algorithm. Two feature extraction algorithms are used to determine which one produces the most reliable results. The first algorithm is based on moment invariants and the second is based on the discrete version of the psi-s curve of the boundary. The latter algorithm is clearly superior for this application.

  9. Specimen coordinate automated measuring machine/fiducial automated measuring machine

    SciTech Connect

    Hedglen, Robert E.; Jacket, Howard S.; Schwartz, Allan I.

    1991-01-01

    The Specimen coordinate Automated Measuring Machine (SCAMM) and the Fiducial Automated Measuring Machine (FAMM) is a computer controlled metrology system capable of measuring length, width, and thickness, and of locating fiducial marks. SCAMM and FAMM have many similarities in their designs, and they can be converted from one to the other without taking them out of the hot cell. Both have means for: supporting a plurality of samples and a standard; controlling the movement of the samples in the +/- X and Y directions; determining the coordinates of the sample; compensating for temperature effects; and verifying the accuracy of the measurements and repeating as necessary. SCAMM and FAMM are designed to be used in hot cells.

  10. Using cone-beam CT projection images to estimate the average and complete trajectory of a fiducial marker moving with respiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, N.; Smith, W. L.; Quirk, S.; Kay, I.

    2010-12-01

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy of lung cancer often makes use of a static cone-beam CT (CBCT) image to localize a tumor that moves during the respiratory cycle. In this work, we developed an algorithm to estimate the average and complete trajectory of an implanted fiducial marker from the raw CBCT projection data. After labeling the CBCT projection images based on the breathing phase of the fiducial marker, the average trajectory was determined by backprojecting the fiducial position from images of similar phase. To approximate the complete trajectory, a 3D fiducial position is estimated from its position in each CBCT project image as the point on the source-image ray closest to the average position at the same phase. The algorithm was tested with computer simulations as well as phantom experiments using a gold seed implanted in a programmable phantom capable of variable motion. Simulation testing was done on 120 realistic breathing patterns, half of which contained hysteresis. The average trajectory was reconstructed with an average root mean square (rms) error of less than 0.1 mm in all three directions, and a maximum error of 0.5 mm. The complete trajectory reconstruction had a mean rms error of less than 0.2 mm, with a maximum error of 4.07 mm. The phantom study was conducted using five different respiratory patterns with the amplitudes of 1.3 and 2.6 cm programmed into the motion phantom. These complete trajectories were reconstructed with an average rms error of 0.4 mm. There is motion information present in the raw CBCT dataset that can be exploited with the use of an implanted fiducial marker to sub-millimeter accuracy. This algorithm could ultimately supply the internal motion of a lung tumor at the treatment unit from the same dataset currently used for patient setup.

  11. Comparison of Localization Performance with Implanted Fiducial Markers and Cone-Beam Computed Tomography for On-line Image-Guided Radiotherapy of the Prostate

    PubMed Central

    Moseley, Douglas J; White, Elizabeth A; Wiltshire, Kirsty L; Rosewall, Tara; Sharpe, Michael B; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H; Bissonnette, Jean-Pierre; Gospodarowicz, Mary; Warde, Padraig; Catton, Charles N; Jaffray, David A

    2007-01-01

    Purpose To assess the accuracy of kV cone-beam CT (CBCT) based setup corrections as compared to orthogonal MV portal image-based corrections for patients undergoing external-beam radiotherapy of the prostate. Method and Materials Daily cone-beam CT volumetric images were acquired after setup for patients with three intra-prostatic fiducial markers. The estimated couch shifts were compared retrospectively to patient adjustments based on two orthogonal MV portal images (the current clinical standard of care in our institution). The CBCT soft-tissue based shifts were also estimated by digitally removing the gold markers in each projection to suppress the artifacts in the reconstructed volumes. A total of 256 volumetric images for 15 patients were analyzed. Results The Pearson coefficient of correlation for the patient position shifts using fiducial markers in MV vs kV was (R2 = 0.95, 0.84, 0.81) in the L/R, A/P and S/I directions respectively. The correlation using soft-tissue matching was ((R2 = 0.90, 0.49, 0.51) in the L/R, A/P and S/I directions. A Bland-Altman analysis showed no significant trends in the data. The percentage of shifts within a +/−3mm tolerance (the clinical action level) was (99.7, 95.5, 91.3) for fiducial marker matching and (99.5, 70.3, 78.4) for soft-tissue matching. Conclusions Cone-beam CT is an accurate and precise tool for image-guidance. It provides an equivalent means of patient setup correction for prostate patients with implanted gold fiducial markers. Use of the additional information provided by the visualization of soft-tissue structures is an active area of research. PMID:17293243

  12. Comparison of localization performance with implanted fiducial markers and cone-beam computed tomography for on-line image-guided radiotherapy of the prostate

    SciTech Connect

    Moseley, Douglas J. . E-mail: douglas.moseley@rmp.uhn.on.ca; White, Elizabeth A.; Wiltshire, Kirsty L.; Rosewall, Tara; Sharpe, Michael B.; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.; Bissonnette, Jean-Pierre; Gospodarowicz, Mary; Warde, Padraig; Catton, Charles N.; Jaffray, David A.

    2007-03-01

    Purpose: The aim of this work was to assess the accuracy of kilovoltage (kV) cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT)-based setup corrections as compared with orthogonal megavoltage (MV) portal image-based corrections for patients undergoing external-beam radiotherapy of the prostate. Methods and Materials: Daily cone-beam CT volumetric images were acquired after setup for patients with three intraprostatic fiducial markers. The estimated couch shifts were compared retrospectively to patient adjustments based on two orthogonal MV portal images (the current clinical standard of care in our institution). The CBCT soft-tissue based shifts were also estimated by digitally removing the gold markers in each projection to suppress the artifacts in the reconstructed volumes. A total of 256 volumetric images for 15 patients were analyzed. Results: The Pearson coefficient of correlation for the patient position shifts using fiducial markers in MV vs. kV was (R{sup 2} = 0.95, 0.84, 0.81) in the left-right (LR), anterior-posterior (AP), and superior-inferior (SI) directions, respectively. The correlation using soft-tissue matching was as follows: R{sup 2} = 0.90, 0.49, 0.51 in the LR, AP and SI directions. A Bland-Altman analysis showed no significant trends in the data. The percentage of shifts within a {+-}3-mm tolerance (the clinical action level) was 99.7%, 95.5%, 91.3% for fiducial marker matching and 99.5%, 70.3%, 78.4% for soft-tissue matching. Conclusions: Cone-beam CT is an accurate and precise tool for image guidance. It provides an equivalent means of patient setup correction for prostate patients with implanted gold fiducial markers. Use of the additional information provided by the visualization of soft-tissue structures is an active area of research.

  13. Feasibility of fully automated detection of fiducial markers implanted into the prostate using electronic portal imaging: A comparison of methods

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, Emma J. . E-mail: eharris@icr.ac.uk; McNair, Helen A.; Evans, Phillip M.

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of fully automated detection of fiducial markers implanted into the prostate using portal images acquired with an electronic portal imaging device. Methods and Materials: We have made a direct comparison of 4 different methods (2 template matching-based methods, a method incorporating attenuation and constellation analyses and a cross correlation method) that have been published in the literature for the automatic detection of fiducial markers. The cross-correlation technique requires a-priory information from the portal images, therefore the technique is not fully automated for the first treatment fraction. Images of 7 patients implanted with gold fiducial markers (8 mm in length and 1 mm in diameter) were acquired before treatment (set-up images) and during treatment (movie images) using 1MU and 15MU per image respectively. Images included: 75 anterior (AP) and 69 lateral (LAT) set-up images and 51 AP and 83 LAT movie images. Using the different methods described in the literature, marker positions were automatically identified. Results: The method based upon cross correlation techniques gave the highest percentage detection success rate of 99% (AP) and 83% (LAT) set-up (1MU) images. The methods gave detection success rates of less than 91% (AP) and 42% (LAT) set-up images. The amount of a-priory information used and how it affects the way the techniques are implemented, is discussed. Conclusions: Fully automated marker detection in set-up images for the first treatment fraction is unachievable using these methods and that using cross-correlation is the best technique for automatic detection on subsequent radiotherapy treatment fractions.

  14. WE-AB-303-05: Breathing Motion of Liver Segments From Fiducial Tracking During Robotic Radiosurgery and Comparison with 4D-CT-Derived Fiducial Motion

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, J; Pantarotto, J; Nair, V; Cook, G; Plourde, M; Vandervoort, E

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To quantify respiratory-induced motion of liver segments using the positions of implanted fiducials during robotic radiosurgery. This study also compared fiducial motion derived from four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) maximum intensity projections (MIP) with motion derived from imaging during treatment. Methods: Forty-two consecutive liver patients treated with liver ablative radiotherapy were accrued to an ethics approved retrospective study. The liver segment in which each fiducial resided was identified. Fiducial positions throughout each treatment fraction were determined using orthogonal kilovoltage images. Any data due to patient repositioning or motion was removed. Mean fiducial positions were calculated. Fiducial positions beyond two standard deviations of the mean were discarded and remaining positions were fit to a line segment using least squares minimization (LSM). For eight patients, fiducial motion was derived from 4D-CT MIPs by calculating the CT number weighted mean position of the fiducial on each slice and fitting a line segment to these points using LSM. Treatment derived fiducial trajectories were corrected for patient rotation and compared to MIP derived trajectories. Results: The mean total magnitude of fiducial motion across all liver segments in left-right, anteroposterior, and superoinferior (SI) directions were 3.0 ± 0.2 mm, 9.3 ± 0.4 mm, and 20.5 ± 0.5 mm, respectively. Differences in per-segment mean fiducial motion were found with SI motion ranging from 12.6 ± 0.8 mm to 22.6 ± 0.9 mm for segments 3 and 8, respectively. Large, varied differences between treatment and MIP derived motion at simulation were found with the mean difference for SI motion being 2.6 mm (10.8 mm standard deviation). Conclusion: The magnitude of liver fiducial motion was found to differ by liver segment. MIP derived liver fiducial motion differed from motion observed during treatment, implying that 4D-CTs may not accurately capture the

  15. Insertion Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Mahillon, Jacques; Chandler, Michael

    1998-01-01

    Insertion sequences (ISs) constitute an important component of most bacterial genomes. Over 500 individual ISs have been described in the literature to date, and many more are being discovered in the ongoing prokaryotic and eukaryotic genome-sequencing projects. The last 10 years have also seen some striking advances in our understanding of the transposition process itself. Not least of these has been the development of various in vitro transposition systems for both prokaryotic and eukaryotic elements and, for several of these, a detailed understanding of the transposition process at the chemical level. This review presents a general overview of the organization and function of insertion sequences of eubacterial, archaebacterial, and eukaryotic origins with particular emphasis on bacterial elements and on different aspects of the transposition mechanism. It also attempts to provide a framework for classification of these elements by assigning them to various families or groups. A total of 443 members of the collection have been grouped in 17 families based on combinations of the following criteria: (i) similarities in genetic organization (arrangement of open reading frames); (ii) marked identities or similarities in the enzymes which mediate the transposition reactions, the recombinases/transposases (Tpases); (iii) similar features of their ends (terminal IRs); and (iv) fate of the nucleotide sequence of their target sites (generation of a direct target duplication of determined length). A brief description of the mechanism(s) involved in the mobility of individual ISs in each family and of the structure-function relationships of the individual Tpases is included where available. PMID:9729608

  16. Robust Fluoroscopic Tracking of Fiducial Markers: Exploiting the Spatial Constraints

    PubMed Central

    Li, Rui; Sharp, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    Two new fluoroscopic fiducial tracking methods that exploit the spatial relationship among the multiple implanted fiducial to achieve fast, accurate and robust tracking are proposed in this paper. The spatial relationship between multiple implanted markers are modeled as Gaussian distributions of their pairwise distances over time. The means and standard deviations of these distances are learned from training sequences, and pairwise distances that deviate from these learned distributions are assigned a low spatial matching score. The spatial constraints are incorporated in two different algorithms: a stochastic tracking method and a detection based method. In the stochastic method, hypotheses of the “true” fiducial position are sampled from a pre-trained respiration motion model. Each hypothesis is assigned an importance value based on image matching score and spatial matching score. Learning the parameters of the motion model is needed in addition to the learning the distribution parameters of the pairwise distances in the proposed stochastic tracking approach. In the detection based method, a set of possible marker locations are identified by using a template matching based fiducial detector. The best location is obtained by optimizing the image matching score and spatial matching score through non-serial dynamic programming. In this detection based approach, there is no need to learn the respiration motion model. The two proposed algorithms are compared with a recent work using multiple hypothesis tracking algorithm which is denoted by MHT[19]. Phantom experiments were performed using fluoroscopic videos captured with known motion relative to an anthropomorphic phantom. The patient experiments were performed using a retrospective study of 16 fluoroscopic videos of liver cancer patients with implanted fiducials. For the motion phantom data sets, the detection based approach has the smallest tracking error (μerr: 0.78 – 1.74 mm, σerr: 0.39 – 1.16 mm) for

  17. Line fiducial material and thickness considerations for ultrasound calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ameri, Golafsoun; McLeod, A. J.; Baxter, John S. H.; Chen, Elvis C. S.; Peters, Terry M.

    2015-03-01

    Ultrasound calibration is a necessary procedure in many image-guided interventions, relating the position of tools and anatomical structures in the ultrasound image to a common coordinate system. This is a necessary component of augmented reality environments in image-guided interventions as it allows for a 3D visualization where other surgical tools outside the imaging plane can be found. Accuracy of ultrasound calibration fundamentally affects the total accuracy of this interventional guidance system. Many ultrasound calibration procedures have been proposed based on a variety of phantom materials and geometries. These differences lead to differences in representation of the phantom on the ultrasound image which subsequently affect the ability to accurately and automatically segment the phantom. For example, taut wires are commonly used as line fiducials in ultrasound calibration. However, at large depths or oblique angles, the fiducials appear blurred and smeared in ultrasound images making it hard to localize their cross-section with the ultrasound image plane. Intuitively, larger diameter phantoms with lower echogenicity are more accurately segmented in ultrasound images in comparison to highly reflective thin phantoms. In this work, an evaluation of a variety of calibration phantoms with different geometrical and material properties for the phantomless calibration procedure was performed. The phantoms used in this study include braided wire, plastic straws, and polyvinyl alcohol cryogel tubes with different diameters. Conventional B-mode and synthetic aperture images of the phantoms at different positions were obtained. The phantoms were automatically segmented from the ultrasound images using an ellipse fitting algorithm, the centroid of which is subsequently used as a fiducial for calibration. Calibration accuracy was evaluated for these procedures based on the leave-one-out target registration error. It was shown that larger diameter phantoms with lower

  18. Evaluation of an infrared camera and X-ray system using implanted fiducials in patients with lung tumors for gated radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Willoughby, Twyla R. . E-mail: twyla.willoughby@orhs.org; Forbes, Alan R.; Buchholz, Daniel; Langen, Katja M.; Wagner, Thomas H.; Zeidan, Omar A.; Kupelian, Patrick A.; Meeks, Sanford L.

    2006-10-01

    Purpose: To report on the initial clinical use of a commercially available system to deliver gated treatment using implanted fiducials, in-room kV X-rays, and an infrared camera tracking system. Methods and Materials: ExacTrac Adaptive Gating from BrainLab is a localization system using infrared cameras and X-rays. Gating signals are the patient's breathing pattern obtained from infrared reflectors on the patient. kV X-rays of an implanted fiducial are synchronized to the breathing pattern. After localization and shift of the patient to isocenter, the breathing pattern is used to gate Radiation. Feasibility tests included localization accuracy, radiation output constancy, and dose distributions with gating. Clinical experience is reported on treatment of patients with small lung lesions. Results: Localization accuracy of a moving target with gating was 1.7 mm. Dose constancy measurements showed insignificant change in output with gating. Improvements of dose distributions on moving targets improved with gating. Eleven patients with lung lesions were implanted with 20 mm x 0.7 mm gold coil (Visicoil). The implanted fiducial was used to localize and treat the patients with gating. Treatment planning and repeat computed tomographic scans showed that the change in center of gross target volume (GTV) to implanted marker averaged 2.47 mm due in part to asymmetric tumor shrinkage. Conclusion: ExacTrac Adaptive Gating has been used to treat lung lesions. Initial system evaluation verified its accuracy and usability. Implanted fiducials are visible in X-rays and did not migrate.

  19. The International Global Network of Geodetic Fiducial Stations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaBrecque, John

    2004-01-01

    Scientific need and technological opportunity require that we move toward implementing a global network of geodetic fiducial stations which feature co-located SLR, VLBI, GNSS, and DORIS instrumentation. Earth science of the next decade will require more accurate global change measurements of sea level topography, sea level change, polar ice mass balance, hydrological and atmospheric mass flux. and topographic deformation, real time mm scale navigation and precision time transfer on a global scale. These scientific requirements have been translated into a goal of mm scale annual stability for the terrestrial reference frame, earth orientation parameters, as well as the orbit and clock determinations tbr the GNSS systems. To meet these challenges, the four geodetic observing systems must be more tightly integrated in technology, location, and analysis. NASA strongly supports the objectives of the IGGOS initiative vis NASA's National Geodetic Observatory and INDIGO programs. The Global networks of GNSS, SLR. and VLBI observatories are for the most part poorly suited for these new demands. These important geodetic networks have evolved with little planning yet these systems are providing essential measurements to a wide swath of society. New signal structures in the GPS and the developing Galileo GNSS will soon require replacement of the GNSS receivers. The SLR network is poorly distributed globally, requires labor intensive observations and analysis, and for the most part relies upon antiquated technology. The VLBI observatories utilize large radio telescopes in remote regions that are poorly distributed globally. Co-location of these networks is sparse and co-location errors contribute significantly to the observing error spectrum. Increasing use of the S and X band by commercial and other government services will also contribute to increased observational errors. The time is upon us for an international effort to develop an optimized global geodetic fiducial network

  20. Integrated fiducial sample mount and software for correlated microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Timothy R McJunkin; Jill R. Scott; Tammy L. Trowbridge; Karen E. Wright

    2014-02-01

    A novel design sample mount with integrated fiducials and software for assisting operators in easily and efficiently locating points of interest established in previous analytical sessions is described. The sample holder and software were evaluated with experiments to demonstrate the utility and ease of finding the same points of interest in two different microscopy instruments. Also, numerical analysis of expected errors in determining the same position with errors unbiased by a human operator was performed. Based on the results, issues related to acquiring reproducibility and best practices for using the sample mount and software were identified. Overall, the sample mount methodology allows data to be efficiently and easily collected on different instruments for the same sample location.

  1. Method comparison of ultrasound and kilovoltage x-ray fiducial marker imaging for prostate radiotherapy targeting.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Clifton David; Thomas, Charles R; Schwartz, Scott; Golden, Nanalei; Ting, Joe; Wong, Adrian; Erdogmus, Deniz; Scarbrough, Todd J

    2006-10-07

    Several measurement techniques have been developed to address the capability for target volume reduction via target localization in image-guided radiotherapy; among these have been ultrasound (US) and fiducial marker (FM) software-assisted localization. In order to assess interchangeability between methods, US and FM localization were compared using established techniques for determination of agreement between measurement methods when a 'gold-standard' comparator does not exist, after performing both techniques daily on a sequential series of patients. At least 3 days prior to CT simulation, four gold seeds were placed within the prostate. FM software-assisted localization utilized the ExacTrac X-Ray 6D (BrainLab AG, Germany) kVp x-ray image acquisition system to determine prostate position; US prostate targeting was performed on each patient using the SonArray (Varian, Palo Alto, CA). Patients were aligned daily using laser alignment of skin marks. Directional shifts were then calculated by each respective system in the X, Y and Z dimensions before each daily treatment fraction, previous to any treatment or couch adjustment, as well as a composite vector of displacement. Directional shift agreement in each axis was compared using Altman-Bland limits of agreement, Lin's concordance coefficient with Partik's grading schema, and Deming orthogonal bias-weighted correlation methodology. 1,019 software-assisted shifts were suggested by US and FM in 39 patients. The 95% limits of agreement in X, Y and Z axes were +/-9.4 mm, +/-11.3 mm and +/-13.4, respectively. Three-dimensionally, measurements agreed within 13.4 mm in 95% of all paired measures. In all axes, concordance was graded as 'poor' or 'unacceptable'. Deming regression detected proportional bias in both directional axes and three-dimensional vectors. Our data suggest substantial differences between US and FM image-guided measures and subsequent suggested directional shifts. Analysis reveals that the vast

  2. Dihalocarbene Insertion Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goh, S. H.

    1975-01-01

    Describes the insertion reaction using the insertion of carbenes into carbon-hydrogen bonds as an example. Outlines an experiment that will illustrate dihalocarbene insertions into diisopropyl ether. (GS)

  3. Chest tube insertion

    MedlinePlus

    Chest drainage tube insertion; Insertion of tube into chest; Tube thoracostomy; Pericardial drain ... When your chest tube is inserted, you will lie on your side or sit partly upright, with one arm over your head. Sometimes, ...

  4. Alignment of fiducial marks in a tomographic tilt series with an unknown rotation axis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levine, Zachary H.; Volkovitsky, Alex; Hung, Howard K.

    2007-06-01

    Alignment for tomography using a transmission electron microscopy frequently uses colloidal gold particles as fiducial reference marks. Typically, there is an implicit assumption that the tilt axis of the tomographic series is orthogonal to the beam direction. However, this may not be true, either intentionally, if a tilt-rotate stage is used, or unintentionally, because of mechanical errors in the rotation stage or the sample fixture. Here, we provide a computer code which takes as input a set of two-dimensional (2D) observations of fiducial reference marks at various tilt angles and the values of those tilt angles. It produces as output a three-dimensional model of the observations, 2D shifts for each view, and the tilt axis direction. Program summaryTitle of program: particleTilt Catalogue identifier: ADYW_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADYW_v1_0 Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Computers: IBM compatible desktop PC; SGI Octane Operating system: Red Hat WS 3 Linux (with 2.4.21-40.EL kernel); IRIX 6.5 IP30 Program language used: Fortran 90 No. of bits in a word: 32 No. of processors used: one Has the code been vectorized: no No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 2397 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 47 017 Distribution format: tar.gz Peripherals used: one Typical running time: 350 ms (larger included example, on 2.8 GHz 32-bit PC) Nature of problem: The program is used to assist the alignment step in tomography. The samples should be prepared with spherical particles (typically gold beads) which are observed in several views. (Not every particle need be observed in every view.) The program reports coordinates of a 3D model of the particles as well as the direction of the tilt axis as a point on the unit sphere. Method of solution: Our package minimizes an objective function whose free variables are a set of 3D model points and

  5. Gold Rush!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brahier, Daniel J.

    1997-01-01

    Describes a mathematical investigation of gold--how it is weighed, stored, used, and valued. For grades 3-4, children estimate the value of treasure chests filled with gold coins and explore the size and weight of gold bars. Children in grades 5-6 explore how gold is mined and used, and how the value of gold changes over time. (PVD)

  6. Critical assessment of intramodality 3D ultrasound imaging for prostate IGRT compared to fiducial markers

    SciTech Connect

    Meer, Skadi van der; Bloemen-van Gurp, Esther; Hermans, Jolanda; Voncken, Robert; Heuvelmans, Denys; Gubbels, Carol; Fontanarosa, Davide; Visser, Peter; Lutgens, Ludy; Gils, Francis van; Verhaegen, Frank

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: A quantitative 3D intramodality ultrasound (US) imaging system was verified for daily in-room prostate localization, and compared to prostate localization based on implanted fiducial markers (FMs).Methods: Thirteen prostate patients underwent multiple US scans during treatment. A total of 376 US-scans and 817 matches were used to determine the intra- and interoperator variability. Additionally, eight other patients underwent daily prostate localization using both US and electronic portal imaging (EPI) with FMs resulting in 244 combined US-EPI scans. Scanning was performed with minimal probe pressure and a correction for the speed of sound aberration was performed. Uncertainties of both US and FM methods were assessed. User variability of the US method was assessed.Results: The overall US user variability is 2.6 mm. The mean differences between US and FM are: 2.5 {+-} 4.0 mm (LR), 0.6 {+-} 4.9 mm (SI), and -2.3 {+-} 3.6 mm (AP). The intramodality character of this US system mitigates potential errors due to transducer pressure and speed of sound aberrations.Conclusions: The overall accuracy of US (3.0 mm) is comparable to our FM workflow (2.2 mm). Since neither US nor FM can be considered a gold standard no conclusions can be drawn on the superiority of either method. Because US imaging captures the prostate itself instead of surrogates no invasive procedure is required. It requires more effort to standardize US imaging than FM detection. Since US imaging does not involve a radiation burden, US prostate imaging offers an alternative for FM EPI positioning.

  7. Impact of Concurrent Androgen Deprivation on Fiducial Marker Migration in External-beam Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Tiberi, David A.; Carrier, Jean-Francois; Beauchemin, Marie-Claude; Nguyen, Thu Van; Beliveau-Nadeau, Dominic; Taussky, Daniel

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To determine the extent of gold fiducial marker (FM) migration in patients treated for prostate cancer with concurrent androgen deprivation and external-beam radiation therapy (EBRT). Methods and Materials: Three or 4 gold FMs were implanted in 37 patients with prostate adenocarcinoma receiving androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) in conjunction with 70-78 Gy. Androgen deprivation therapy was started a median of 3.9 months before EBRT (range, 0.3-12.5 months). To establish the extent of FM migration, the distance between each FM was calculated for 5-8 treatments once per week throughout the EBRT course. For each treatment, the distance between FMs was compared with the distance from the digitally reconstructed radiographs generated from the planning CT. A total of 281 treatments were analyzed. Results: The average daily migration was 0.8 {+-} 0.3 mm, with distances ranging from 0.2 mm-2.6 mm. Two of the 281 assessed treatments (0.7%) showed migrations >2 mm. No correlation between FM migration and patient weight or time delay between ADT and start of EBRT was found. There was no correlation between the extent of FM migration and prostate volume. Conclusion: This is the largest report of implanted FM migration in patients receiving concomitant ADT. Only 0.7% of the 281 treatments studied had significant marker migrations (>2 mm) throughout the course of EBRT. Consequently, the use of implanted FMs in these patients enables accurate monitoring of prostate gland position during treatment.

  8. Robust automatic detection and removal of fiducial projections in fluoroscopy images: an integrated solution.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuan; Zheng, Guoyan

    2008-01-01

    Automatic detection and removal of fiducial projections in fluoroscopy images is an essential prerequisite for fluoroscopy-based navigation and image-based 3D-2D registration. This paper presents an integrated solution to fulfill this task. A custom-designed calibration cage with a two-plane pattern of fiducials is utilized in our solution. The cage is attached to the C-arm image intensifier and the projections of the fiducials are automatically detected and removed by an on-line algorithm consisting of following 6 steps: image binarization, connected-component labeling, region classification, adaptive template matching, shape analysis, and fiducial projection removal. A similarity measure which is proposed previously for image-based 3D-2D registration is employed in the adaptive template matching to improve the accuracy of the detection. Shape analysis based on the geometrical constraints satisfied by those fiducials in the calibration cage is used to further improve the robustness of the detection. An image inpainting technique based on the fast marching method for level set applications is used to remove the detected fiducial projections. Our in vitro experiments show on average 4 seconds execution time on a Pentium IV machine, a zero false-detection rate, a miss-detection rate of 1.6+/-2.3%, and a sub-pixel localization error.

  9. Imaging of moving fiducial markers during radiotherapy using a fast, efficient active pixel sensor based EPID

    SciTech Connect

    Osmond, John P. F.; Zin, Hafiz M.; Harris, Emma J.; Lupica, Giovanni; Allinson, Nigel M.; Evans, Philip M.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to investigate the use of an experimental complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) active pixel sensor (APS) for tracking of moving fiducial markers during radiotherapy. Methods: The APS has an active area of 5.4 x 5.4 cm and maximum full frame read-out rate of 20 frame s{sup -1}, with the option to read out a region-of-interest (ROI) at an increased rate. It was coupled to a 4 mm thick ZnWO4 scintillator which provided a quantum efficiency (QE) of 8% for a 6 MV x-ray treatment beam. The APS was compared with a standard iViewGT flat panel amorphous Silicon (a-Si) electronic portal imaging device (EPID), with a QE of 0.34% and a frame-rate of 2.5 frame s{sup -1}. To investigate the ability of the two systems to image markers, four gold cylinders of length 8 mm and diameter 0.8, 1.2, 1.6, and 2 mm were placed on a motion-platform. Images of the stationary markers were acquired using the APS at a frame-rate of 20 frame s{sup -1}, and a dose-rate of 143 MU min{sup -1} to avoid saturation. EPID images were acquired at the maximum frame-rate of 2.5 frame s{sup -1}, and a reduced dose-rate of 19 MU min{sup -1} to provide a similar dose per frame to the APS. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the background signal and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of the marker signal relative to the background were evaluated for both imagers at doses of 0.125 to 2 MU. Results: Image quality and marker visibility was found to be greater in the APS with SNR {approx}5 times greater than in the EPID and CNR up to an order of magnitude greater for all four markers. To investigate the ability to image and track moving markers the motion-platform was moved to simulate a breathing cycle with period 6 s, amplitude 20 mm and maximum speed 13.2 mm s{sup -1}. At the minimum integration time of 50 ms a tracking algorithm applied to the APS data found all four markers with a success rate of {>=}92% and positional error {<=}90 {mu}m. At an integration time of 400

  10. Implementation of Fiducial-Based Image Registration in the Cyberknife Robotic System

    SciTech Connect

    Saw, Cheng B. Chen Hungcheng; Wagner, Henry

    2008-07-01

    Fiducial-based image registration methodology as implemented in the Cyberknife system is explored. The Cyberknife is a radiosurgery system that uses image guidance technology and computer-controlled robotics to determine target positions and adjust beam directions accordingly during the dose delivery. The image guidance system consists of 2 x-ray sources mounted on the ceiling and a detection system mounted on both sides of the treatment couch. Two orthogonal live radiographs are taken prior to and during patient treatment. Fiducial markers are identified on these radiographs and compared to a library of digital reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) using the fiducial extraction software. The fiducial extraction software initially sets an intensity threshold on the live radiographs to generate white areas on black images referred to as 'blobs.' Different threshold values are being used and blobs at the same location are assumed to originate from the same object. The number of blobs is then reduced by examining each blob against a predefined set of properties such as shape and exposure levels. The remaining blobs are further reduced by examining the location of the blobs in the inferior-superior patient axis. Those blobs that have the corresponding positions are assumed to originate from the same object. The remaining blobs are used to create fiducial configurations and are compared to the reference configuration from the computed tomography (CT) image dataset for treatment planning. The best-fit configuration is considered to have the appropriate fiducial markers. The patient position is determined based on these fiducial markers. During the treatment, the radiation beam is turned off when the Cyberknife changes nodes. This allows a time window to acquire live radiographs for the determination of the patient target position and to update the robotic manipulator to change beam orientations accordingly.

  11. Transarterial Fiducial Marker Placement for Image-guided Proton Therapy for Malignant Liver Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Ohta, Kengo Shimohira, Masashi; Sasaki, Shigeru Iwata, Hiromitsu Nishikawa, Hiroko Ogino, Hiroyuki Hara, Masaki; Hashizume, Takuya Shibamoto, Yuta

    2015-10-15

    PurposeThe aim of this study is to analyze the technical and clinical success rates and safety of transarterial fiducial marker placement for image-guided proton therapy for malignant liver tumors.Methods and MaterialsFifty-five patients underwent this procedure as an interventional treatment. Five patients had 2 tumors, and 4 tumors required 2 markers each, so the total number of procedures was 64. The 60 tumors consisted of 46 hepatocellular carcinomas and 14 liver metastases. Five-mm-long straight microcoils of 0.018 inches in diameter were used as fiducial markers and placed in appropriate positions for each tumor. We assessed the technical and clinical success rates of transarterial fiducial marker placement, as well as the complications associated with it. Technical success was defined as the successful delivery and placement of the fiducial coil, and clinical success was defined as the completion of proton therapy.ResultsAll 64 fiducial coils were successfully installed, so the technical success rate was 100 % (64/64). Fifty-four patients underwent proton therapy without coil migration. In one patient, proton therapy was not performed because of obstructive jaundice due to bile duct invasion by hepatocellular carcinoma. Thus, the clinical success rate was 98 % (54/55). Slight bleeding was observed in one case, but it was stopped immediately and then observed. None of the patients developed hepatic infarctions due to fiducial marker migration.ConclusionTransarterial fiducial marker placement appears to be a useful and safe procedure for proton therapy for malignant liver tumors.

  12. Investigation of dose perturbations and the radiographic visibility of potential fiducials for proton radiation therapy of the prostate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jessie Y.; Newhauser, Wayne D.; Zhu, X. Ronald; Lee, Andrew K.; Kudchadker, Rajat J.

    2011-08-01

    Image guidance using implanted fiducial markers is commonly used to ensure accurate and reproducible target positioning in radiation therapy for prostate cancer. The ideal fiducial marker is clearly visible in kV imaging, does not perturb the therapeutic dose in the target volume and does not cause any artifacts on the CT images used for treatment planning. As yet, ideal markers that fully meet all three of these criteria have not been reported. In this study, 12 fiducial markers were evaluated for their potential clinical utility in proton radiation therapy for prostate cancer. In order to identify the good candidates, each fiducial was imaged using a CT scanner as well as a kV imaging system. Additionally, the dose perturbation caused by each fiducial was quantified using radiochromic film and a clinical proton beam. Based on the results, three fiducials were identified as good candidates for use in proton radiotherapy of prostate cancer.

  13. Investigation of dose perturbations and the radiographic visibility of potential fiducials for proton radiation therapy of the prostate.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jessie Y; Newhauser, Wayne D; Zhu, X Ronald; Lee, Andrew K; Kudchadker, Rajat J

    2011-08-21

    Image guidance using implanted fiducial markers is commonly used to ensure accurate and reproducible target positioning in radiation therapy for prostate cancer. The ideal fiducial marker is clearly visible in kV imaging, does not perturb the therapeutic dose in the target volume and does not cause any artifacts on the CT images used for treatment planning. As yet, ideal markers that fully meet all three of these criteria have not been reported. In this study, 12 fiducial markers were evaluated for their potential clinical utility in proton radiation therapy for prostate cancer. In order to identify the good candidates, each fiducial was imaged using a CT scanner as well as a kV imaging system. Additionally, the dose perturbation caused by each fiducial was quantified using radiochromic film and a clinical proton beam. Based on the results, three fiducials were identified as good candidates for use in proton radiotherapy of prostate cancer.

  14. Method comparison of ultrasound and kilovoltage x-ray fiducial marker imaging for prostate radiotherapy targeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller, Clifton David; Thomas, Charles R., Jr.; Schwartz, Scott; Golden, Nanalei; Ting, Joe; Wong, Adrian; Erdogmus, Deniz; Scarbrough, Todd J.

    2006-10-01

    Several measurement techniques have been developed to address the capability for target volume reduction via target localization in image-guided radiotherapy; among these have been ultrasound (US) and fiducial marker (FM) software-assisted localization. In order to assess interchangeability between methods, US and FM localization were compared using established techniques for determination of agreement between measurement methods when a 'gold-standard' comparator does not exist, after performing both techniques daily on a sequential series of patients. At least 3 days prior to CT simulation, four gold seeds were placed within the prostate. FM software-assisted localization utilized the ExacTrac X-Ray 6D (BrainLab AG, Germany) kVp x-ray image acquisition system to determine prostate position; US prostate targeting was performed on each patient using the SonArray (Varian, Palo Alto, CA). Patients were aligned daily using laser alignment of skin marks. Directional shifts were then calculated by each respective system in the X, Y and Z dimensions before each daily treatment fraction, previous to any treatment or couch adjustment, as well as a composite vector of displacement. Directional shift agreement in each axis was compared using Altman-Bland limits of agreement, Lin's concordance coefficient with Partik's grading schema, and Deming orthogonal bias-weighted correlation methodology. 1019 software-assisted shifts were suggested by US and FM in 39 patients. The 95% limits of agreement in X, Y and Z axes were ±9.4 mm, ±11.3 mm and ±13.4, respectively. Three-dimensionally, measurements agreed within 13.4 mm in 95% of all paired measures. In all axes, concordance was graded as 'poor' or 'unacceptable'. Deming regression detected proportional bias in both directional axes and three-dimensional vectors. Our data suggest substantial differences between US and FM image-guided measures and subsequent suggested directional shifts. Analysis reveals that the vast majority of

  15. Surgical fiducial segmentation and tracking for pose estimation based on ultrasound B-mode images.

    PubMed

    Lei Chen; Kuo, Nathanael; Aalamifar, Fereshteh; Narrow, David; Coon, Devin; Prince, Jerry; Boctor, Emad M

    2016-08-01

    Doppler ultrasound is a non-invasive diagnostic tool for the quantitative measurement of blood flow. However, given that it provides velocity data that is dependent on the location and angle of measurement, repeat measurements to detect problems over time may require an expert to return to the same location. We therefore developed an image-guidance system based on ultrasound B-mode images that enables an inexperienced user to position the ultrasound probe at the same site repeatedly in order to acquire a comparable time series of Doppler readings. The system utilizes a bioresorbable fiducial and complementing software composed of the fiducial detection, key points tracking, probe pose estimation, and graphical user interface (GUI) modules. The fiducial is an echogenic marker that is implanted at the surgical site and can be detected and tracked during ultrasound B-mode screening. The key points on the marker can next be used to determine the pose of the ultrasound probe with respect to the marker. The 3D representation of the probe with its position and orientation are then displayed in the GUI for the user guidance. The fiducial detection has been tested on the data sets collected from three animal studies. The pose estimation algorithm was validated by five data sets collected by a UR5 robot. We tested the system on a plastisol phantom and showed that it can detect and track the fiducial marker while displaying the probe pose in real-time.

  16. A statistical model for point-based target registration error with anisotropic fiducial localizer error.

    PubMed

    Wiles, Andrew D; Likholyot, Alexander; Frantz, Donald D; Peters, Terry M

    2008-03-01

    Error models associated with point-based medical image registration problems were first introduced in the late 1990s. The concepts of fiducial localizer error, fiducial registration error, and target registration error are commonly used in the literature. The model for estimating the target registration error at a position r in a coordinate frame defined by a set of fiducial markers rigidly fixed relative to one another is ubiquitous in the medical imaging literature. The model has also been extended to simulate the target registration error at the point of interest in optically tracked tools. However, the model is limited to describing the error in situations where the fiducial localizer error is assumed to have an isotropic normal distribution in R3. In this work, the model is generalized to include a fiducial localizer error that has an anisotropic normal distribution. Similar to the previous models, the root mean square statistic rms tre is provided along with an extension that provides the covariance Sigma tre. The new model is verified using a Monte Carlo simulation and a set of statistical hypothesis tests. Finally, the differences between the two assumptions, isotropic and anisotropic, are discussed within the context of their use in 1) optical tool tracking simulation and 2) image registration.

  17. Sample positioning in neutron diffraction experiments using a multi-material fiducial marker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marais, D.; Venter, A. M.; Markgraaff, J.; James, J.

    2017-01-01

    An alternative sample positioning method is reported for use in conjunction with sample positioning and experiment planning software systems deployed on some neutron diffraction strain scanners. In this approach, the spherical fiducial markers and location trackers used with optical metrology hardware are replaced with a specifically designed multi-material fiducial marker that requires one diffraction measurement. In a blind setting, the marker position can be determined within an accuracy of ±164 μm with respect to the instrument gauge volume. The scheme is based on a pre-determined relationship that links the diffracted peak intensity to the absolute positioning of the fiducial marker with respect to the instrument gauge volume. Two methods for establishing the linking relationship are presented, respectively based on fitting multi-dimensional quadratic functions and a cross-correlation artificial neural network.

  18. Set Up and Test Results for a Vibrating Wire System for Quadrupole Fiducialization

    SciTech Connect

    Levashov, Michael Y.

    2010-12-01

    Quadrupoles will be placed between the undulator segments in LCLS to keep the electron beam focused as it passes through. The quadrupoles will be assembled with their respective undulator segments prior to being placed into the tunnel. Beam alignment will be used to center the quadrupoles, along with the corresponding undulators, on the beam. If there is any displacement between the undulator and the quadrupole axes in the assemblies, the beam will deviate from the undulator axis. If it deviates by more than 80{micro}m in vertical or 140{micro}m in horizontal directions, the undulator will not perform as required by LCLS. This error is divided between three sources: undulator axis fiducialization, quadrupole magnetic axis fiducialization, and assembly of the two parts. In particular, it was calculated that the quadrupole needs to be fiducialized to within 25{micro}m in both vertical and horizontal directions. A previous study suggested using a vibrating wire system for finding the magnetic axis of a quadrupole. The study showed that the method has high sensitivity (up to 1{micro}m) and laid out guidelines for constructing it. There are 3 steps in fiducializing the quadrupole with the vibrating wire system. They are positioning the wire at the magnet center (step 1), finding the wire with position detectors (step 2), and finding the quadrupole tooling ball positions relative to the position detector tooling balls (step 3). The following break up of error was suggested for the fiducialization steps: 10{micro}m for step 1 (finding the center), 20{micro}m for step 2 (finding the wire), and 10{micro}m for step 3 (tooling ball measurements). The purpose of this study is to investigate whether the vibrating wire system meets the requirements for LCLS. In particular, if it can reliably fiducialize a quadrupole magnetic center to within 25{micro}m in both vertical and horizontal directions. The behavior of individual system components is compared to the expected performance

  19. Set Up and Test Results for a Vibrating Wire System for Quadrupole Fiducialization

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-11-29

    Quadrupoles will be placed between the undulator segments in LCLS to keep the electron beam focused as it passes through. The quadrupoles will be assembled with their respective undulator segments prior to being placed into the tunnel. Beam alignment will be used to center the quadrupoles, along with the corresponding undulators, on the beam. If there is any displacement between the undulator and the quadrupole axes in the assemblies, the beam will deviate from the undulator axis. If it deviates by more than 80{micro}m in vertical or 140{micro}m in horizontal directions, the undulator will not perform as required by LCLS. This error is divided between three sources: undulator axis fiducialization, quadrupole magnetic axis fiducialization, and assembly of the two parts. In particular, it was calculated that the quadrupole needs to be fiducialized to within 25{micro}m in both vertical and horizontal directions. A previous study suggested using a vibrating wire system for finding the magnetic axis of a quadrupole. The study showed that the method has high sensitivity (up to 1{micro}m) and laid out guidelines for constructing it. There are 3 steps in fiducializing the quadrupole with the vibrating wire system. They are positioning the wire at the magnet center (step 1), finding the wire with position detectors (step 2), and finding the quadrupole tooling ball positions relative to the position detector tooling balls (step 3). The following break up of error was suggested for the fiducialization steps: 10{micro}m for step 1 (finding the center), 20{micro}m for step 2 (finding the wire), and 10{micro}m for step 3 (tooling ball measurements). The purpose of this study is to investigate whether the vibrating wire system meets the requirements for LCLS. In particular, if it can reliably fiducialize a quadrupole magnetic center to within 25{micro}m in both vertical and horizontal directions. The behavior of individual system components is compared to the expected performance

  20. Three-dimensional conformal setup (3D-CSU) of patients using the coordinate system provided by three internal fiducial markers and two orthogonal diagnostic X-ray systems in the treatment room

    SciTech Connect

    Shirato, Hiroki . E-mail: hshirato@radi.med.hokudai.ac.jp; Oita, Masataka; Fujita, Katsuhisa; Shimizu, Shinichi; Onimaru, Rikiya; Uegaki, Shinji; Watanabe, Yoshiharu; Kato, Norio; Miyasaka, Kazuo

    2004-10-01

    Purpose: To test the accuracy of a system for correcting for the rotational error of the clinical target volume (CTV) without having to reposition the patient using three fiducial markers and two orthogonal fluoroscopic images. We call this system 'three-dimensional conformal setup' (3D-CSU). Methods and materials: Three 2.0-mm gold markers are inserted into or adjacent to the CTV. On the treatment couch, the actual positions of the three markers are calculated based on two orthogonal fluoroscopies crossing at the isocenter of the linear accelerator. Discrepancy of the actual coordinates of gravity center of three markers from its planned coordinates is calculated. Translational setup error is corrected by adjustment of the treatment couch. The rotation angles ({alpha}, {beta}, {gamma}) of the coordinates of the actual CTV relative to the planned CTV are calculated around the lateral (x), craniocaudal (y), and anteroposterior (z) axes of the planned CTV. The angles of the gantry head, collimator, and treatment couch of the linear accelerator are adjusted according to the rotation of the actual coordinates of the tumor in relation to the planned coordinates. We have measured the accuracy of 3D-CSU using a static cubic phantom. Results: The gravity center of the phantom was corrected within 0.9 {+-} 0.3 mm (mean {+-} SD), 0.4 {+-} 0.2 mm, and 0.6 {+-} 0.2 mm for the rotation of the phantom from 0-30 degrees around the x, y, and z axes, respectively, every 5 degrees. Dose distribution was shown to be consistent with the planned dose distribution every 10 degrees of the rotation from 0-30 degrees. The mean rotational error after 3D-CSU was -0.4 {+-} 0.4 (mean {+-} SD), -0.2 {+-} 0.4, and 0.0 {+-} 0.5 degrees around the x, y, and z axis, respectively, for the rotation from 0-90 degrees. Conclusions: Phantom studies showed that 3D-CSU is useful for performing rotational correction of the target volume without correcting the position of the patient on the treatment couch

  1. Automatic segmentation of radiographic fiducial and seeds from X-ray images in prostate brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Nathanael; Deguet, Anton; Song, Danny Y; Burdette, Everette C; Prince, Jerry L; Lee, Junghoon

    2012-01-01

    Prostate brachytherapy guided by transrectal ultrasound is a common treatment option for early stage prostate cancer. Prostate cancer accounts for 28% of cancer cases and 11% of cancer deaths in men with 217,730 estimated new cases and 32,050 estimated deaths in 2010 in the United States alone. The major current limitation is the inability to reliably localize implanted radiation seeds spatially in relation to the prostate. Multimodality approaches that incorporate X-ray for seed localization have been proposed, but they require both accurate tracking of the imaging device and segmentation of the seeds. Some use image-based radiographic fiducials to track the X-ray device, but manual intervention is needed to select proper regions of interest for segmenting both the tracking fiducial and the seeds, to evaluate the segmentation results, and to correct the segmentations in the case of segmentation failure, thus requiring a significant amount of extra time in the operating room. In this paper, we present an automatic segmentation algorithm that simultaneously segments the tracking fiducial and brachytherapy seeds, thereby minimizing the need for manual intervention. In addition, through the innovative use of image processing techniques such as mathematical morphology, Hough transforms, and RANSAC, our method can detect and separate overlapping seeds that are common in brachytherapy implant images. Our algorithm was validated on 55 phantom and 206 patient images, successfully segmenting both the fiducial and seeds with a mean seed segmentation rate of 96% and sub-millimeter accuracy.

  2. Using short helically wrapped single-mode fibers as illuminated fiducials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Yuzo; Edelstein, Jerry; Silber, Joseph H.; Poppett, Claire

    2016-09-01

    The Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI) is a Stage IV ground-based dark energy experiment to map the large-scale structure of the universe and to probe the nature of dark energy. DESI is a massively multiplexed fiber-fed spectrograph, using a 5000-ffber-positioner focal plane assembly to image millions of galaxies. Since these fiber positioners must be positioned to 10-um accuracy, the focal plane must be mapped to micron level precision. We intend to use illuminated fiducials as point sources to accurately calibrate the focal plane surface. In this study we explored using short single-mode fibers as illuminated fiducials. However, despite the advantages of using single-mode fibers, as a near point source, optical fibers have length-dependence behavior: as shorter tend to guide core light into the cladding, which is not ideal for fiducial centroid-measurements. In this paper, we demonstrate that adding tight helical bends to the fibers eliminates unwanted flux in the cladding, improving centroid measurements by more than 50%. This technique has proven with fibers as short as 2-inches, obtaining centroid with at least 0.5-micron precision. This experiment eliminates fiber-length dependence, thus proving the viability of using short single-mode fibers as illuminated fiducials or similar applications

  3. Slit-mounted LED fiducial system for rotating mirror streak cameras

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, L.L.; Muelder, S.A.; Rivera, A.T.

    1991-01-01

    We have developed a fiducial system for rotating mirror streak cameras that utilizes light emitting diodes mounted at the slit position of the camera. The diodes are driven to the required high brightness by a unique pulse power circuit designed to provide high voltage, high current pulses 18 nanoseconds in length at a frequency of up to 2.5 megahertz. The availability of super bright light emitting diodes with a wavelength of 630 to 640 nanometers allows us to record fiducial pulses, at streaking speeds in excess of 20mm per microsecond, on all the black and white films commonly used in high speed photography. The time marks on the film record are referenced to the real time of the experiment from a clock-driver that controls the start and frequency of the fiducial pulse train and by three adjustable and discreet blanked fiducials. This paper discusses the development of this system and describes the full setup as used at LLNL. 6 refs., 4 figs.

  4. Automatic segmentation of radiographic fiducial and seeds from X-ray images in prostate brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Nathanael; Deguet, Anton; Song, Danny Y.; Burdette, Everette C.; Prince, Jerry L.; Lee, Junghoon

    2011-01-01

    Prostate brachytherapy guided by transrectal ultrasound is a common treatment option for early stage prostate cancer. Prostate cancer accounts for 28% of cancer cases and 11% of cancer deaths in men with 217,730 estimated new cases and 32,050 estimated deaths in 2010 in the United States alone. The major current limitation is the inability to reliably localize implanted radiation seeds spatially in relation to the prostate. Multimodality approaches that incorporate X-ray for seed localization have been proposed, but they require both accurate tracking of the imaging device and segmentation of the seeds. Some use image-based radiographic fiducials to track the X-ray device, but manual intervention is needed to select proper regions of interest for segmenting both the tracking fiducial and the seeds, to evaluate the segmentation results, and to correct the segmentations in the case of segmentation failure, thus requiring a significant amount of extra time in the operating room. In this paper, we present an automatic segmentation algorithm that simultaneously segments the tracking fiducial and brachytherapy seeds, thereby minimizing the need for manual intervention. In addition, through the innovative use of image processing techniques such as mathematical morphology, Hough transforms, and RANSAC, our method can detect and separate overlapping seeds that are common in brachytherapy implant images. Our algorithm was validated on 55 phantom and 206 patient images, successfully segmenting both the fiducial and seeds with a mean seed segmentation rate of 96% and sub-millimeter accuracy. PMID:21802975

  5. Optical fiducial timing system for X-ray streak cameras with aluminum coated optical fiber ends

    DOEpatents

    Nilson, David G.; Campbell, E. Michael; MacGowan, Brian J.; Medecki, Hector

    1988-01-01

    An optical fiducial timing system is provided for use with interdependent groups of X-ray streak cameras (18). The aluminum coated (80) ends of optical fibers (78) are positioned with the photocathodes (20, 60, 70) of the X-ray streak cameras (18). The other ends of the optical fibers (78) are placed together in a bundled array (90). A fiducial optical signal (96), that is comprised of 2.omega. or 1.omega. laser light, after introduction to the bundled array (90), travels to the aluminum coated (82) optical fiber ends and ejects quantities of electrons (84) that are recorded on the data recording media (52) of the X-ray streak cameras (18). Since both 2.omega. and 1.omega. laser light can travel long distances in optical fiber with only a slight attenuation, the initial arial power density of the fiducial optical signal (96) is well below the damage threshold of the fused silica or other material that comprises the optical fibers (78, 90). Thus the fiducial timing system can be repeatably used over long durations of time.

  6. Phase-space representations of symmetric informationally complete positive-operator-valued-measure fiducial states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saraceno, Marcos; Ermann, Leonardo; Cormick, Cecilia

    2017-03-01

    The problem of finding symmetric informationally complete positive-operator-valued-measures (SIC-POVMs) has been solved numerically for all dimensions d up to 67 [A. J. Scott and M. Grassl, J. Math. Phys. 51, 042203 (2010), 10.1063/1.3374022], but a general proof of existence is still lacking. For each dimension, it was shown that it is possible to find a SIC-POVM that is generated from a fiducial state upon application of the operators of the Heisenberg-Weyl group. We draw on the numerically determined fiducial states to study their phase-space features, as displayed by the characteristic function and the Wigner, Bargmann, and Husimi representations, adapted to a Hilbert space of finite dimension. We analyze the phase-space localization of fiducial states, and observe that the SIC-POVM condition is equivalent to a maximal delocalization property. Finally, we explore the consequences in phase space of the conjectured Zauner symmetry. In particular, we construct a Hermitian operator commuting with this symmetry that leads to a representation of fiducial states in terms of eigenfunctions with definite semiclassical features.

  7. Anatomic Landmarks Versus Fiducials for Volume-Staged Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for Large Arteriovenous Malformations

    SciTech Connect

    Petti, Paula L. . E-mail: ppetti@radonc.ucsf.edu; Coleman, Joy; McDermott, Michael; Smith, Vernon; Larson, David A.

    2007-04-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this investigation was to compare the accuracy of using internal anatomic landmarks instead of surgically implanted fiducials in the image registration process for volume-staged gamma knife (GK) radiosurgery for large arteriovenous malformations. Methods and Materials: We studied 9 patients who had undergone 10 staged GK sessions for large arteriovenous malformations. Each patient had fiducials surgically implanted in the outer table of the skull at the first GK treatment. These markers were imaged on orthogonal radiographs, which were scanned into the GK planning system. For the same patients, 8-10 pairs of internal landmarks were retrospectively identified on the three-dimensional time-of-flight magnetic resonance imaging studies that had been obtained for treatment. The coordinate transformation between the stereotactic frame space for subsequent treatment sessions was then determined by point matching, using four surgically embedded fiducials and then using four pairs of internal anatomic landmarks. In both cases, the transformation was ascertained by minimizing the chi-square difference between the actual and the transformed coordinates. Both transformations were then evaluated using the remaining four to six pairs of internal landmarks as the test points. Results: Averaged over all treatment sessions, the root mean square discrepancy between the coordinates of the transformed and actual test points was 1.2 {+-} 0.2 mm using internal landmarks and 1.7 {+-} 0.4 mm using the surgically implanted fiducials. Conclusion: The results of this study have shown that using internal landmarks to determine the coordinate transformation between subsequent magnetic resonance imaging scans for volume-staged GK arteriovenous malformation treatment sessions is as accurate as using surgically implanted fiducials and avoids an invasive procedure.

  8. Grommet Having Metal Insert

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-09-28

    axially with respect to the body. The 1 means for releasably securing a tool to the insert comprises 2 female threads formed on an inner surface of the...below 10 the flange 32. These surfaces 34, 36 are threaded ( female 11 threads) so that the end of a tool 38 having male threads can 12 engage the...further includes a rigid insert secured to the body in the 12 centrally located aperture. The insert has female threads formed 13 therein for releasably

  9. Plastic pipe insertion

    SciTech Connect

    Diskin, J.

    1987-05-01

    In March 1987 KPL changed all that when the utility inserted 1,000 ft of 16-in. SDR 15.5 Phillips Driscopipe 8000 pipe with a wall thickness of 1.032-in., into an abandoned 24-in. cast-iron line in downtown Kansas City. This is believed to be the largest diameter insert removal job ever done for gas distribution in the U.S. For KPL it was a natural progression from the smaller sizes used earlier. The procedure is the same, and the operation was quick and comparatively simple. Lower construction costs were the bottom line because with insert renewal there is no need to cut up the streets, a major expense in any urban pipeline work. There are other significant costs savings as well because the insert renewal construction process is faster than other techniques.

  10. Ear tube insertion - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100045.htm Ear tube insertion - series—Normal anatomy To use the ... 4 Overview The eardrum (tympanic membrane) separates the ear canal from the middle ear. Review Date 8/ ...

  11. A fiducial detection algorithm for real-time image guided IMRT based on simultaneous MV and kV imaging

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Weihua; Riaz, Nadeem; Lee, Louis; Wiersma, Rodney; Xing, Lei

    2008-01-01

    The advantage of highly conformal dose techniques such as 3DCRT and IMRT is limited by intrafraction organ motion. A new approach to gain near real-time 3D positions of internally implanted fiducial markers is to analyze simultaneous onboard kV beam and treatment MV beam images (from fluoroscopic or electronic portal image devices). Before we can use this real-time image guidance for clinical 3DCRT and IMRT treatments, four outstanding issues need to be addressed. (1) How will fiducial motion blur the image and hinder tracking fiducials? kV and MV images are acquired while the tumor is moving at various speeds. We find that a fiducial can be successfully detected at a maximum linear speed of 1.6 cm∕s. (2) How does MV beam scattering affect kV imaging? We investigate this by varying MV field size and kV source to imager distance, and find that common treatment MV beams do not hinder fiducial detection in simultaneous kV images. (3) How can one detect fiducials on images from 3DCRT and IMRT treatment beams when the MV fields are modified by a multileaf collimator (MLC)? The presented analysis is capable of segmenting a MV field from the blocking MLC and detecting visible fiducials. This enables the calculation of nearly real-time 3D positions of markers during a real treatment. (4) Is the analysis fast enough to track fiducials in nearly real time? Multiple methods are adopted to predict marker positions and reduce search regions. The average detection time per frame for three markers in a 1024×768 image was reduced to 0.1 s or less. Solving these four issues paves the way to tracking moving fiducial markers throughout a 3DCRT or IMRT treatment. Altogether, these four studies demonstrate that our algorithm can track fiducials in real time, on degraded kV images (MV scatter), in rapidly moving tumors (fiducial blurring), and even provide useful information in the case when some fiducials are blocked from view by the MLC. This technique can provide a gating signal

  12. Preclinical investigation for developing injectable fiducial markers using a mixture of BaSO{sub 4} and biodegradable polymer for proton therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, Sang Hee; Gil, Moon Soo; Lee, Doo Sung; Han, Youngyih E-mail: Hee.ro.Park@samsung.com; Park, Hee Chul E-mail: Hee.ro.Park@samsung.com; Yu, Jeong Il; Noh, Jae Myoung; Cho, Jun Sang; Ahn, Sung Hwan; Choi, Doo Ho; Sohn, Jason W.; Kim, Hye Yeong; Shin, Eun Hyuk

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to investigate the use of mixture of BaSO{sub 4} and biodegradable polymer as an injectable nonmetallic fiducial marker to reduce artifacts in x-ray images, decrease the absorbed dose distortion in proton therapy, and replace permanent metal markers. Methods: Two samples were made with 90 wt. % polymer phosphate buffer saline (PBS) and 10 wt. % BaSO{sub 4} (B1) or 20 wt. % BaSO{sub 4} (B2). Two animal models (mice and rats) were used. To test the injectability and in vivo gelation, a volume of 200 μl at a pH 5.8 were injected into the Sprague-Dawley rats. After sacrificing the rats over time, the authors checked the gel morphology. Detectability of the markers in the x-ray images was tested for two sizes (diameters of 1 and 2 mm) for B1 and B2. Four samples were injected into BALB/C mice. The polymer mixed with BaSO{sub 4} transform from SOL at 20 °C with a pH of 6.0 to GEL in the living body at 37 °C with a pH of 7.4, so the size of the fiducial marker could be controlled by adjusting the injected volume. The detectability of the BaSO{sub 4} marker was measured in x-ray images of cone beam CT (CBCT), on-board imager [anterior–posterior (AP), lateral], and fluoroscopy (AP, lateral) using a Novalis-TX (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) repeatedly over 4 months. The volume, HU, and artifacts for the markers were measured in the CBCT images. Artifacts were compared to those of gold marker by analyzing the HU distribution. The dose distortion in proton therapy was computed by using a Monte Carlo (MC) code. A cylindrical shaped marker (diameter: 1 or 2 mm, length: 3 mm) made of gold, stainless-steel [304], titanium, and 20 wt. % BaSO{sub 4} was positioned at the center of the spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) in parallel or perpendicular to the beam entrance. The dose distortion was measured on the depth dose profile across the markers. Results: Transformation to GEL and the biodegradation were verified. All BaSO{sub 4} markers

  13. 4D cone-beam CT imaging for guidance in radiation therapy: setup verification by use of implanted fiducial markers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Peng; van Wieringen, Niek; Hulshof, Maarten C. C. M.; Bel, Arjan; Alderliesten, Tanja

    2016-03-01

    The use of 4D cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and fiducial markers for guidance during radiation therapy of mobile tumors is challenging due to the trade-off between image quality, imaging dose, and scanning time. We aimed to investigate the visibility of markers and the feasibility of marker-based 4D registration and manual respiration-induced marker motion quantification for different CBCT acquisition settings. A dynamic thorax phantom and a patient with implanted gold markers were included. For both the phantom and patient, the peak-to-peak amplitude of marker motion in the cranial-caudal direction ranged from 5.3 to 14.0 mm, which did not affect the marker visibility and the associated marker-based registration feasibility. While using a medium field of view (FOV) and the same total imaging dose as is applied for 3D CBCT scanning in our clinic, it was feasible to attain an improved marker visibility by reducing the imaging dose per projection and increasing the number of projection images. For a small FOV with a shorter rotation arc but similar total imaging dose, streak artifacts were reduced due to using a smaller sampling angle. Additionally, the use of a small FOV allowed reducing total imaging dose and scanning time (~2.5 min) without losing the marker visibility. In conclusion, by using 4D CBCT with identical or lower imaging dose and a reduced gantry speed, it is feasible to attain sufficient marker visibility for marker-based 4D setup verification. Moreover, regardless of the settings, manual marker motion quantification can achieve a high accuracy with the error <1.2 mm.

  14. Hawking, fiducial, and free-fall temperature of black hole on gravity's rainbow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gim, Yongwan; Kim, Wontae

    2016-03-01

    On gravity's rainbow, the energy of test particles deforms the geometry of a black hole in such a way that the corresponding Hawking temperature is expected to be modified. It means that the fiducial and free-fall temperatures on the black hole background should also be modified according to deformation of the geometry. In this work, the probing energy of test particles is assumed as the average energy of the Hawking particle in order to study the particle back reaction of the geometry by using the advantage of gravity's rainbow. We shall obtain the modified fiducial and free-fall temperatures, respectively. The behaviors of these two temperatures on the horizon tell us that black hole complementarity is still well defined on gravity's rainbow.

  15. Multi-Modality fiducial marker for validation of registration of medical images with histology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shojaii, Rushin; Martel, Anne L.

    2010-03-01

    A multi-modality fiducial marker is presented in this work, which can be used for validating the correlation of histology images with medical images. This marker can also be used for landmark-based image registration. Seven different fiducial markers including a catheter, spaghetti, black spaghetti, cuttlefish ink, and liquid iron are implanted in a mouse specimen and then investigated based on visibility, localization, size, and stability. The black spaghetti and the mixture of cuttlefish ink and flour are shown to be the most suitable markers. Based on the size of the markers, black spaghetti is more suitable for big specimens and the mixture of the cuttlefish ink, flour, and water injected in a catheter is more suitable for small specimens such as mouse tumours. These markers are visible on medical images and also detectable on histology and optical images of the tissue blocks. The main component in these agents which enhances the contrast is iron.

  16. Jitter reduction using native fiducials in rotating mirror ultra-fast microphotography.

    PubMed

    Goh, B H T; Khoo, B C; Mclean, W H I; Campbell, P A

    2014-06-30

    Rotating mirror cameras represent a workhorse technology for high speed imaging in the MHz framing regime. The technique requires that the target image be swept across a series of juxtaposed CCD sensors, via reflection from a rapidly rotating mirror. Employing multiple sensors in this fashion can lead to spatial jitter in the resultant video file, due to component misalignments along the individual optical paths to each CCD. Here, we highlight that static and dynamic fiducials can be exploited as an effective software-borne countermeasure to jitter, suppressing the standard deviation of the corrected file relative to the raw data by up to 88.5% maximally, and 66.5% on average over the available range of framing rates. Direct comparison with industry-standard algorithms demonstrated that our fiducial-based strategy is as effective at jitter reduction, but typically also leads to an aesthetically superior final form in the post-processed video files.

  17. SU-E-T-528: Robustness Evaluation for Fiducial-Based Accelerated Partial Breast Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, L; Rana, S; Zheng, Y

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the robustness of the proton treatment plans in the presence of rotational setup error when patient is aligned with implanted fiducials. Methods: Five Stage I invasive breast cancer patients treated with the APBP protocol (PCG BRE007-12) were studied. The rotational setup errors were simulated by rotating the original CT images around the body center clockwise and counterclockwise 5 degrees (5CW and 5CCW). Manual translational registration was then performed to match the implanted fiducials on the rotated images to the original dataset. Patient contours were copied to the newly created CT set. The original treatment plan was applied to the new CT dataset with the beam isocenter placed at the geometrical center of PTV. The dose distribution was recalculated for dosimetric parameters comparison. Results: CTV and PTV (D95 and V95) coverages were not significantly different between the two simulated plans (5CW and 5CCW) and the original plan. PTV D95 and CTV D95 absolute difference among the three plans were relatively small, with maximum changes of 0.28 CGE and 0.15 CGE, respectively. PTV V95 and CTV V95 absolute differences were 0.79% and 0.48%. The dosage to the thyroid, heart, contralateral breast and lung remained zero for all three plans. The Dmax and Dmean to the volume of ipsilateral breast excluding CTV were compared, with maximum difference values of 1.02 CGE for Dmax and 3.56 CGE for Dmean. Ipsilateral lung Dmean maintained no significant changes through the three plan comparison, with the largest value 0.32 CGE. Ipsilateral lung Dmax was the most sensitive parameter to this simulation study, with a maximum difference at 20.2 CGE. Conclusion: Our study suggests that fiducial-based Accelerated Partial Breast Proton Therapy is robust with respect to +/− 5 degree patient setup rotational errors, as long as the internal fiducial markers are used for patient alignment.

  18. Research of time fiducial and imaging VISAR laser for Shenguang-III laser facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rui; Wang, Zhenguo; Tian, Xiaocheng; Zhou, Dandan; Zhu, Na; Wang, Jianjun; Li, Mingzhong; Xu, Dangpeng; Dang, Zhao; Hu, Dongxia; Zhu, Qihua; Zheng, Wanguo; Wang, Feng

    2015-10-01

    Time fiducial laser is an important tool for the precise measurement in high energy density physics experiments. The VISAR probe laser is also vital for shock wave diagnostics in ICF experiments. Here, time fiducial laser and VISAR light were generated from one source on SG-III laser facility. After generated from a 1064-nm DFB laser, the laser is modulated by an amplitude modulator driven by 10 GS/s arbitrary waveform generator. Using time division multiplexing technology, the ten-pulse time fiducial laser and the 20-ns VISAR pulse were split by a 1×2 multiplexer and then chosen by two acoustic optic modulators. Using the technique, cost of the system was reduced. The technologies adopted in the system also include pulse polarization stabilization, high precision fiber coupling and energy transmission. The time fiducial laser generated synchronized 12-beam 2ω and 4-beam 3ω laser, providing important reference marks for different detectors and making it convenient for the analysis of diagnostic data. After being amplified by fiber amplifiers and Nd:YAG rod amplifiers, the VISAR laser pulse was frequency-converted to 532-nm pulse by a thermally controlled LBO crystal with final output energy larger than 20 mJ. Finally, the green light was coupled into a 1-mm core diameter, multimode fused silica optical fiber and propagated to the imaging VISAR. The VISAR laser has been used in the VISAR diagnostic physics experiments. Shock wave loading and slowdown processes were measured. Function to measure velocity history of shock wave front movement in different kinds of materials was added to the SG-III laser facility.

  19. The Speulderbos Fiducial Reference Site for Continuous Monitoring of Forest Biophysical Variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brede, Benjamin; Bartholomeus, Harm; Suomalainen, Juha; Clevers, Jan; Verbesselt, Jan; Herold, Martin; Culvenor, Darius; Gascon, Ferran

    2016-08-01

    This contribution describes the Speulderbos fiducial reference site for biophysical variables with a focus on foliage variables and Leaf Area Index (LAI). The site implements Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV)- and ground-based sensing systems that aim at high temporal resolution observations to capture fast canopy changes like spring leaf flush. It aims at validating decametre resolution satellite observations. The sensor systems and their respective sampling design are described. Opportunities and restrictions of the set up are discussed.

  20. Development and clinical evaluation of automatic fiducial detection for tumor tracking in cine megavoltage images during volumetric modulated arc therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Azcona, Juan Diego; Li Ruijiang; Mok, Edward; Hancock, Steven; Xing Lei

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: Real-time tracking of implanted fiducials in cine megavoltage (MV) imaging during volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) delivery is complicated due to the inherent low contrast of MV images and potential blockage of dynamic leaves configurations. The purpose of this work is to develop a clinically practical autodetection algorithm for motion management during VMAT. Methods: The expected field-specific segments and the planned fiducial position from the Eclipse (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) treatment planning system were projected onto the MV images. The fiducials were enhanced by applying a Laplacian of Gaussian filter in the spatial domain for each image, with a blob-shaped object as the impulse response. The search of implanted fiducials was then performed on a region of interest centered on the projection of the fiducial when it was within an open field including the case when it was close to the field edge or partially occluded by the leaves. A universal template formula was proposed for template matching and normalized cross correlation was employed for its simplicity and computational efficiency. The search region for every image was adaptively updated through a prediction model that employed the 3D position of the fiducial estimated from the localized positions in previous images. This prediction model allowed the actual fiducial position to be tracked dynamically and was used to initialize the search region. The artifacts caused by electronic interference during the acquisition were effectively removed. A score map was computed by combining both morphological information and image intensity. The pixel location with the highest score was selected as the detected fiducial position. The sets of cine MV images taken during treatment were analyzed with in-house developed software written in MATLAB (The Mathworks, Inc., Natick, MA). Five prostate patients were analyzed to assess the algorithm performance by measuring their positioning

  1. ALS insertion devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyer, E.; Chin, J.; Halbach, K.; Hassenzahl, W. V.; Humphries, D.; Kincaid, B.; Lancaster, H.; Plate, D.

    1991-08-01

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS), the first US third generation synchrotron radiation source, is currently under construction at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The low-emittance, 1.5 GeV electron storage ring and the insertion devices are specifically designed to produce high brightness beams in the UV to soft X-Ray range. The planned initial complement of insertion devices includes four 4.6 m long undulators, with period lengths of 3.9 cm, 5.0 cm (2) and 8.0 cm, and a 2.9 m long wiggler of 16 cm period length. Undulator design is well advanced and fabrication has begun on the 5.0 cm and 8.0 cm period length undulators. This paper discusses ALS insertion device requirements; general design philosophy; and design of the magnetic structure, support structure/drive systems, control system and vacuum system.

  2. Interfraction rotation of the prostate as evaluated by kilovoltage X-ray fiducial marker imaging in intensity-modulated radiotherapy of localized prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Graf, Reinhold; Boehmer, Dirk; Budach, Volker; Wust, Peter

    2012-01-01

    To quantify the daily rotation of the prostate during a radiotherapy course using stereoscopic kilovoltage (kV) x-ray imaging and intraprostatic fiducials for localization and positioning correction. From 2005 to 2009, radio-opaque fiducial markers were inserted into 38 patients via perineum into the prostate. The ExacTrac/Novalis Body X-ray 6-day image acquisition system (ET/NB; BrainLab AG, Feldkirchen, Germany) was used to determine and correct the target position. During the first period in 10 patients we recorded all rotation errors but used only Y (table) for correction. For the next 28 patients we used for correction all rotational coordinates, i.e., in addition Z (superior-inferior [SI] or roll) and X (left-right [LR] or tilt/pitch) according to the fiducial marker position by use of the Robotic Tilt Module and Varian Exact Couch. Rotation correction was applied above a threshold of 1° displacement. The systematic and random errors were specified. Overall, 993 software-assisted rotational corrections were performed. The interfraction rotation errors of the prostate as assessed from the radiodense surrogate markers around the three axes Y, Z, and X were on average 0.09, -0.52, and -0.01° with standard deviations of 2.01, 2.30, and 3.95°, respectively. The systematic uncertainty per patient for prostate rotation was estimated with 2.30, 1.56, and 4.13° and the mean random components with 1.81, 2.02, and 3.09°. The largest rotational errors occurred around the X-axis (pitch), but without preferring a certain orientation. Although the error around Z (roll) can be compensated on average by a transformation with 4 coordinates, a significant error around X remains and advocates the full correction with 6 coordinates. Rotational errors as assessed via daily stereoscopic online imaging are significant and dominate around X. Rotation possibly degrades the dosimetric coverage of the target volume and may require suitable strategies for correction.

  3. Interfraction rotation of the prostate as evaluated by kilovoltage X-ray fiducial marker imaging in intensity-modulated radiotherapy of localized prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Graf, Reinhold; Boehmer, Dirk; Budach, Volker; Wust, Peter

    2012-01-01

    To quantify the daily rotation of the prostate during a radiotherapy course using stereoscopic kilovoltage (kV) x-ray imaging and intraprostatic fiducials for localization and positioning correction. From 2005 to 2009, radio-opaque fiducial markers were inserted into 38 patients via perineum into the prostate. The ExacTrac/Novalis Body X-ray 6-day image acquisition system (ET/NB; BrainLab AG, Feldkirchen, Germany) was used to determine and correct the target position. During the first period in 10 patients we recorded all rotation errors but used only Y (table) for correction. For the next 28 patients we used for correction all rotational coordinates, i.e., in addition Z (superior-inferior [SI] or roll) and X (left-right [LR] or tilt/pitch) according to the fiducial marker position by use of the Robotic Tilt Module and Varian Exact Couch. Rotation correction was applied above a threshold of 1 Degree-Sign displacement. The systematic and random errors were specified. Overall, 993 software-assisted rotational corrections were performed. The interfraction rotation errors of the prostate as assessed from the radiodense surrogate markers around the three axes Y, Z, and X were on average 0.09, -0.52, and -0.01 Degree-Sign with standard deviations of 2.01, 2.30, and 3.95 Degree-Sign , respectively. The systematic uncertainty per patient for prostate rotation was estimated with 2.30, 1.56, and 4.13 Degree-Sign and the mean random components with 1.81, 2.02, and 3.09 Degree-Sign . The largest rotational errors occurred around the X-axis (pitch), but without preferring a certain orientation. Although the error around Z (roll) can be compensated on average by a transformation with 4 coordinates, a significant error around X remains and advocates the full correction with 6 coordinates. Rotational errors as assessed via daily stereoscopic online imaging are significant and dominate around X. Rotation possibly degrades the dosimetric coverage of the target volume and may require

  4. Robust and efficient fiducial tracking for augmented reality in HD-laparoscopic video streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, M.; Groch, A.; Baumhauer, M.; Maier-Hein, L.; Teber, D.; Rassweiler, J.; Meinzer, H.-P.; Wegner, In.

    2012-02-01

    Augmented Reality (AR) is a convenient way of porting information from medical images into the surgical field of view and can deliver valuable assistance to the surgeon, especially in laparoscopic procedures. In addition, high definition (HD) laparoscopic video devices are a great improvement over the previously used low resolution equipment. However, in AR applications that rely on real-time detection of fiducials from video streams, the demand for efficient image processing has increased due to the introduction of HD devices. We present an algorithm based on the well-known Conditional Density Propagation (CONDENSATION) algorithm which can satisfy these new demands. By incorporating a prediction around an already existing and robust segmentation algorithm, we can speed up the whole procedure while leaving the robustness of the fiducial segmentation untouched. For evaluation purposes we tested the algorithm on recordings from real interventions, allowing for a meaningful interpretation of the results. Our results show that we can accelerate the segmentation by a factor of 3.5 on average. Moreover, the prediction information can be used to compensate for fiducials that are temporarily occluded or out of scope, providing greater stability.

  5. Measurement of Muon Neutrino Disappearance with Non-Fiducial Interactions in the NOnuA Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raddatz, Nicholas Jacob

    The NuMI1 Off-Axis nue Appearance (NOnuA) experiment is a long baseline neutrino oscillation experiment. The experiment measures the oscillations of a primarily muon neutrino beam using two functionally identical liquid scintillator tracking calorimeters detectors placed 810 km apart and 14 milliradians off-axis to the NuMI beam. The oscillation parameters sin2theta23 and |Deltam 322| are measured from the disappearance of muon neutrinos as they propagate between the two detectors using the first data collected in 2014 and 2015. The primary NOnuA analysis uses charged current events only in the fiducial volume of the far detector. This analysis also includes a non-fiducial sample of interactions that originate in the fiducial volume of the far detector but escape the detector. This analysis measures the oscillation parameters as sin2theta23 = 0.3--0.71 and |Deltam32 2| = 2.15--2.91x10-3 eV2 at 90% confidence limits. 1 Neutrinos at the Main Injector.

  6. Preoperative or preembolization lesion targeting using rotational angiographic fiducial marking in the neuroendovascular suite.

    PubMed

    Lim, Siok Ping; Lesiuk, Howard; Sinclair, John; Lum, Cheemun

    2011-01-01

    Three-dimensional rotational digital subtraction (DS) angiography and DynaCT allow precise localization of intracranial arteriovenous fistulas (AVFs) with fiducial markers that have helped in surgical planning. These techniques are particularly useful when the AVF is not evident on cross-sectional imaging. The authors demonstrate the utility of 3D DS angiography and DynaCT in the localization of intracranial AVFs in 3 cases. Their first case was a dural AVF with multiple arterial feeders from the left occipital artery that drained into the left transverse sinus. Blood flow to the left transverse sinus was first decreased by embolizing the branch arterial feeders with polyvinyl alcohol particles. Thereafter, 3D DS angiography enabled precise localization of the site for the bur hole creation with a fiducial to allow access for the transverse sinus in the second part of the procedure where definitive transvenous sinus embolization of the dural AVF with coils was performed. They also used 3D DS angiography and DynaCT with fiducials for precise localization of a superficial pial AVF (Case 2) and a tentorial AVF (Case 3) not visible on cross-sectional angiography. With the precise localization of the target lesion, the neurosurgeons were able to perform relatively small craniotomies, minimizing the cranial opening yet allowing the opening for full access to the lesion. By correlating 3D DS angiography/DynaCT with CT images, the neurosurgeon could use neuronavigation in cases of AVF not appreciated on cross-sectional imaging.

  7. W + W - production at the LHC: fiducial cross sections and distributions in NNLO QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grazzini, Massimiliano; Kallweit, Stefan; Pozzorini, Stefano; Rathlev, Dirk; Wiesemann, Marius

    2016-08-01

    We consider QCD radiative corrections to W + W - production at the LHC and present the first fully differential predictions for this process at next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) in perturbation theory. Our computation consistently includes the leptonic decays of the W bosons, taking into account spin correlations, off-shell effects and non-resonant contributions. Detailed predictions are presented for the different-flavour channel ppto {μ}+{e}-{ν}_{μ }{overline{ν}}_e+X at √{s}=8 and 13 TeV. In particular, we discuss fiducial cross sections and distributions in the presence of standard selection cuts used in experimental W + W - and H → W + W - analyses at the LHC. The inclusive W + W - cross section receives large NNLO corrections, and, due to the presence of a jet veto, typical fiducial cuts have a sizeable influence on the behaviour of the perturbative expansion. The availability of differential NNLO predictions, both for inclusive and fiducial observables, will play an important role in the rich physics programme that is based on precision studies of W + W - signatures at the LHC.

  8. SU-E-J-219: Quantitative Evaluation of Motion Effects On Accuracy of Image-Guided Radiotherapy with Fiducial Markers Using CT Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, I; Oyewale, S; Ahmad, S; Algan, O; Alsbou, N

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate quantitatively patient motion effects on the localization accuracy of image-guided radiation with fiducial markers using axial CT (ACT), helical CT (HCT) and cone-beam CT (CBCT) using modeling and experimental phantom studies. Methods: Markers with different lengths (2.5 mm, 5 mm, 10 mm, and 20 mm) were inserted in a mobile thorax phantom which was imaged using ACT, HCT and CBCT. The phantom moved with sinusoidal motion with amplitudes ranging 0–20 mm and a frequency of 15 cycles-per-minute. Three parameters that include: apparent marker lengths, center position and distance between the centers of the markers were measured in the different CT images of the mobile phantom. A motion mathematical model was derived to predict the variations in the previous three parameters and their dependence on the motion in the different imaging modalities. Results: In CBCT, the measured marker lengths increased linearly with increase in motion amplitude. For example, the apparent length of the 10 mm marker was about 20 mm when phantom moved with amplitude of 5 mm. Although the markers have elongated, the center position and the distance between markers remained at the same position for different motion amplitudes in CBCT. These parameters were not affected by motion frequency and phase in CBCT. In HCT and ACT, the measured marker length, center and distance between markers varied irregularly with motion parameters. The apparent lengths of the markers varied with inverse of the phantom velocity which depends on motion frequency and phase. Similarly the center position and distance between markers varied inversely with phantom speed. Conclusion: Motion may lead to variations in maker length, center position and distance between markers using CT imaging. These effects should be considered in patient setup using image-guided radiation therapy based on fiducial markers matching using 2D-radiographs or volumetric CT imaging.

  9. Motion correction of in vivo three-dimensional optical coherence tomography of human skin using a fiducial marker

    PubMed Central

    Liew, Yih Miin; McLaughlin, Robert A.; Wood, Fiona M.; Sampson, David D.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a novel method based on a fiducial marker for correction of motion artifacts in 3D, in vivo, optical coherence tomography (OCT) scans of human skin and skin scars. The efficacy of this method was compared against a standard cross-correlation intensity-based registration method. With a fiducial marker adhered to the skin, OCT scans were acquired using two imaging protocols: direct imaging from air into tissue; and imaging through ultrasound gel into tissue, which minimized the refractive index mismatch at the tissue surface. The registration methods were assessed with data from both imaging protocols and showed reduced distortion of skin features due to motion. The fiducial-based method was found to be more accurate and robust, with an average RMS error below 20 µm and success rate above 90%. In contrast, the intensity-based method had an average RMS error ranging from 36 to 45 µm, and a success rate from 50% to 86%. The intensity-based algorithm was found to be particularly confounded by corrugations in the skin. By contrast, tissue features did not affect the fiducial-based method, as the motion correction was based on delineation of the flat fiducial marker. The average computation time for the fiducial-based algorithm was approximately 21 times less than for the intensity-based algorithm. PMID:22876343

  10. Effect of Gold Marker Seeds on Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of the Prostate

    SciTech Connect

    Hossain, Murshed; Schirmer, Timo; Richardson, Theresa; Chen, Lili; Buyyounouski, Mark K.; Ma Changming

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: Magnetic resonance stereoscopic imaging (MRSI) of the prostate is an emerging technique that may enhance targeting and assessment in radiotherapy. Current practices in radiotherapy invariably involve image guidance. Gold seed fiducial markers are often used to perform daily prostate localization. If MRSI is to be used in targeting prostate cancer and therapy assessment, the impact of gold seeds on MRSI must be investigated. The purpose of this study was to quantify the effects of gold seeds on the quality of MRSI data acquired in phantom experiments. Methods and Materials: A cylindrical plastic phantom with a spherical cavity 10 centimeters in diameter wss filled with water solution containing choline, creatine, and citrate. A gold seed fiducial marker was put near the center of the phantom mounted on a plastic stem. Spectra were acquired at 1.5 Tesla by use of a clinical MRSI sequence. The ratios of choline + creatine to citrate (CC/Ci) were compared in the presence and absence of gold seeds. Spectra in the vicinity of the gold seed were analyzed. Results: The maximum coefficient of variation of CC/Ci induced by the gold seed was found to be 10% in phantom experiments at 1.5 T. Conclusion: MRSI can be used in prostate radiotherapy in the presence of gold seed markers. Gold seeds cause small effects (in the order of the standard deviation) on the ratio of the metabolite's CC/Ci in the phantom study done on a 1.5-T scanner. It is expected that gold seed markers will have similar negligible effect on spectra from prostate patients. The maximum of 10% of variation in CC/Ci found in the phantom study also sets a limit on the threshold accuracy of CC/Ci values for deciding whether the tissue characterized by a local spectrum is considered malignant and whether it is a candidate for local boost in radiotherapy dose.

  11. SU-E-T-507: Interfractional Variation of Fiducial Marker Position During HDR Brachytherapy with Cervical Interstitial Needle Template

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, S; Kim, R; Benhabib, S; Araujo, J; Burnett, L; Duan, J; Popple, R; Wu, X; Cardan, R; Brezovich, I

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: HDR brachytherapy using interstitial needle template for cervical cancer is commonly delivered in 4-5 fractions. Routine verification of needle positions before each fraction is often based on radiographic imaging of implanted fiducial markers. The current study evaluated interfractional displacement of implanted fiducial markers using CT images. Methods: 9 sequential patients with cervical interstitial needle implants were evaluated. The superior and inferior borders of the target volumes were defined by fiducial markers in planning CT. The implant position was verified with kV orthogonal images before each fraction. A second CT was acquired prior 3rd fraction (one or 2 days post planning CT). Distances from inferior and superior fiducial markers to pubic symphysis plane (perpendicular to vaginal obtulator)were measured. Distance from needle tip of a reference needle (next to the inferior marker) to the pubic symphysis plane was also determined. The difference in fiducial marker distance or needle tip distance between planning CT and CT prior 3rd fraction were measured to assess markers migration and needle displacement. Results: The mean inferior marker displacement was 4.5 mm and ranged 0.9 to 11.3 mm. The mean superior marker displacement was 2.7 mm and ranged 0 to 10.4 mm. There was a good association between inferior and superior marker displacement (r=0.95). Mean averaged inferior and superior marker displacement was 3.3 mm and ranged from 0.1 to 10.9 mm, with a standard deviation of 3.2 mm. The mean needle displacement was 5.6 mm and ranged 0.2 to 15.6 mm. Needle displacements were reduced (p<0.05) after adjusting according to needle-to-fiducials distance. Conclusion: There were small fiducial marker displacements between HDR fractions. Our study suggests a target margin of 9.7 mm to cover interfractional marker displacements (in 95% cases) for pretreatment verification based on radiographic imaging.

  12. Thought Insertion Clarified

    PubMed Central

    Ratcliffe, Matthew; Wilkinson, Sam

    2016-01-01

    ‘Thought insertion’ in schizophrenia involves somehow experiencing one’s own thoughts as someone else’s. Some philosophers try to make sense of this by distinguishing between ownership and agency: one still experiences oneself as the owner of an inserted thought but attributes it to another agency. In this paper, we propose that thought insertion involves experiencing thought contents as alien, rather than episodes of thinking. To make our case, we compare thought insertion to certain experiences of ‘verbal hallucination’ and show that they amount to different descriptions of the same phenomenon: a quasi-perceptual experience of thought content. We add that the agency/ownership distinction is unhelpful here. What requires explanation is not why a person experiences a type of intentional state without the usual sense of agency, but why she experiences herself as the agent of one type of intentional state rather than another. We conclude by sketching an account of how this might happen. PMID:28123340

  13. SU-E-T-27: A Dosimetric Evaluation of Boney Anatomy Versus Fiducial Marker Alignment for the Treatment of Prostate Cancer Using Scanned Beam Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Freund, D; Ding, X; Zhang, J; Rosen, L; Wu, H

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In prostate proton radiotherapy, three fiducial markers are used for patient daily alignment. However fiducial alignment can change beamline heterogeneity in proton therapy. The purpose of this study is to determine the difference in fiducial and boney anatomy alignment for patient treatment. Methods and materials: Prostate cancer patients who received proton treatment were included in this study. 3 fiducial markers were implanted before the initial CT. All the patients were re-CT’d every 2 weeks to check the fiducial marker position reproducibility as well as dosimetric consistence of target coverage. In geometry study, re-CT were fused to the initial CT base on the boney anatomy and the average fiducial marker displacement was measured the centers of the fiducials. Dosimetrically, the initial plan was recalculated directly to re-CT image set based on the boney alignment and fiducial alignment to determine the difference from daily treatment. Prostate coverage and hotspots were evaluated using the dose to 98% of the CTV (D98) and dose to 2% (D2), respectively. Results: The shift from the initial 6 patient CT image sets resulted in an average change in the fiducial location of 5.70 +/− 3 mm. Dosimetric comparison from a single patient revealed that differences from the planned dose resulted from both boney and fiducial alignment. Planned clinical treatment volume coverage resulted in a D98 of 70.44Gy and D2 of 70.84Gy compared to a D98 of 70.13Gy and D2 70.94Gy for boney alignment and a D98 of 70.08Gy and D2 71.18Gy for fiducial alignment respectively. Conclusion: This study demonstrates that with boney anatomy alignment there is little change to CTV coverage and only slightly worse CTV coverage and hotspot production with fiducial alignment. An increase patient cohort and further investigation is necessary to determine the whether boney alignment can help better control dose heterogeneity.

  14. Measurement of Neutrino Oscillation Parameters Using Anti-fiducial Charged Current Events in MINOS

    SciTech Connect

    Strait, Matthew Levy

    2010-09-01

    Abstract The Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search (MINOS) obse rves the disappearance of muon neutrinos as they propagate in the long baseline Neutri nos at the Main Injector (NuMI) beam. MINOS consists of two detectors. The near detector sam ples the initial composition of the beam. The far detector, 735 km away, looks for an energy-d ependent deficit in the neutrino spectrum. This energy-dependent deficit is interpreted as q uantum mechanical oscillations be- tween neutrino flavors. A measurement is made of the effective two-neutrino mixing parameters Δ m 2 ≈ Δ m 2 23 and sin 2 2 θ ≈ sin 2 2 θ 23 . The primary MINOS analysis uses charged current events in the fiducial volume of the far detector. This analysis uses the roughly equal-sized sample of events that fails the fiducial cut, consisting of interact ions outside the fiducial region of the detector and in the surrounding rock. These events provide a n independent and complementary measurement, albeit weaker due to incomplete reconstructi on of the events. This analysis reports on an exposure of 7 . 25 × 10 20 protons-on-target. Due to poor energy resolution, the meas urement of sin 2 2 θ is much weaker than established results, but the measuremen t of sin 2 2 θ > 0 . 56 at 90% confidence is consistent with the accepted value. The measur ement of Δ m 2 is much stronger. Assuming sin 2 2 θ = 1 , Δ m 2 = (2 . 20 ± 0 . 18[stat] ± 0 . 14[syst]) × 10 - -3 eV 2 .

  15. Intraoperative image-based multiview 2D/3D registration for image-guided orthopaedic surgery: incorporation of fiducial-based C-arm tracking and GPU-acceleration.

    PubMed

    Otake, Yoshito; Armand, Mehran; Armiger, Robert S; Kutzer, Michael D; Basafa, Ehsan; Kazanzides, Peter; Taylor, Russell H

    2012-04-01

    Intraoperative patient registration may significantly affect the outcome of image-guided surgery (IGS). Image-based registration approaches have several advantages over the currently dominant point-based direct contact methods and are used in some industry solutions in image-guided radiation therapy with fixed X-ray gantries. However, technical challenges including geometric calibration and computational cost have precluded their use with mobile C-arms for IGS. We propose a 2D/3D registration framework for intraoperative patient registration using a conventional mobile X-ray imager combining fiducial-based C-arm tracking and graphics processing unit (GPU)-acceleration. The two-stage framework 1) acquires X-ray images and estimates relative pose between the images using a custom-made in-image fiducial, and 2) estimates the patient pose using intensity-based 2D/3D registration. Experimental validations using a publicly available gold standard dataset, a plastic bone phantom and cadaveric specimens have been conducted. The mean target registration error (mTRE) was 0.34 ± 0.04 mm (success rate: 100%, registration time: 14.2 s) for the phantom with two images 90° apart, and 0.99 ± 0.41 mm (81%, 16.3 s) for the cadaveric specimen with images 58.5° apart. The experimental results showed the feasibility of the proposed registration framework as a practical alternative for IGS routines.

  16. Intraoperative Image-based Multiview 2D/3D Registration for Image-Guided Orthopaedic Surgery: Incorporation of Fiducial-Based C-Arm Tracking and GPU-Acceleration

    PubMed Central

    Armand, Mehran; Armiger, Robert S.; Kutzer, Michael D.; Basafa, Ehsan; Kazanzides, Peter; Taylor, Russell H.

    2012-01-01

    Intraoperative patient registration may significantly affect the outcome of image-guided surgery (IGS). Image-based registration approaches have several advantages over the currently dominant point-based direct contact methods and are used in some industry solutions in image-guided radiation therapy with fixed X-ray gantries. However, technical challenges including geometric calibration and computational cost have precluded their use with mobile C-arms for IGS. We propose a 2D/3D registration framework for intraoperative patient registration using a conventional mobile X-ray imager combining fiducial-based C-arm tracking and graphics processing unit (GPU)-acceleration. The two-stage framework 1) acquires X-ray images and estimates relative pose between the images using a custom-made in-image fiducial, and 2) estimates the patient pose using intensity-based 2D/3D registration. Experimental validations using a publicly available gold standard dataset, a plastic bone phantom and cadaveric specimens have been conducted. The mean target registration error (mTRE) was 0.34 ± 0.04 mm (success rate: 100%, registration time: 14.2 s) for the phantom with two images 90° apart, and 0.99 ± 0.41 mm (81%, 16.3 s) for the cadaveric specimen with images 58.5° apart. The experimental results showed the feasibility of the proposed registration framework as a practical alternative for IGS routines. PMID:22113773

  17. Demonstration of the fiducial concept using data from the March 1985 GPS field test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, J. M.; Thornton, C. L.; Stephens, S. A.; Wu, S. C.; Lichten, S. M.; Border, J. S.; Sovers, O. J.; Dixon, T. H.; Williams, B. G.

    1986-01-01

    The first field test of NASA's Global Positioning System (GPS) Geodetic Program took place in March of 1985. The principal objective of this test was the demonstration of the feasibility of the fiducial station approach to precise GPS-based geodesy and orbit determination. Other objectives included an assessment of the performance of the several GPS receiver types involved in these field tests and the testing of the GIPSY software for GPS data analysis. In this article, the GIPSY (GPS Inferred Positioning System) software system is described and baseline solutions are examined for consistency with independent measurements made using very long baseline interferometry.

  18. Gold Coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Epner Technology Inc. responded to a need from Goddard Space Flight Center for the ultimate in electroplated reflectivity needed for the Mars Global Surveyor Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA). Made of beryllium, the MOLA mirror was coated by Epner Technology Laser Gold process, specially improved for the project. Improved Laser Gold- coated reflectors have found use in an epitaxial reactor built for a large semiconductor manufacturer as well as the waveguide in Braun-Thermoscan tympanic thermometer and lasing cavities in various surgical instruments.

  19. Neutron reflectometry of supported hybrid bilayers with inserted peptide

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Matthew B.; McGillivray, Duncan J.; Genzer, Jan; Lösche, Mathias; Kilpatrick, Peter K.

    2011-01-01

    The insertion of a synthetic amphiphilic, α-helical peptide into a supported hybrid bilayer membrane (HBM) was studied by neutron reflectometry to elucidate the resulting nanostructure. The HBM consisted of a self-assembled monolayer of perdeuterated octadecanethiol on gold and an overlying leaflet of acyl-deuterated phosphatidylcholine (d-DMPC). Using contrast variation, several reflectivity spectra were recorded for each step of film fabrication, and simultaneously modeled. This analysis indicated that peptide insertion into the DMPC lipid leaflet is the likeliest mode of incorporation. PMID:21274414

  20. Inserts Automatically Lubricate Ball Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hager, J. A.

    1983-01-01

    Inserts on ball-separator ring of ball bearings provide continuous film of lubricant on ball surfaces. Inserts are machined or molded. Small inserts in ball pockets provide steady supply of lubricant. Technique is utilized on equipment for which maintenance is often poor and lubrication interval is uncertain, such as household appliances, automobiles, and marine engines.

  1. Gold Nanoantennas

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-01

    An array of gold nanoantennas laced into an artificial membrane enhances the fluorescence intensity of three different molecules when they pass through plasmonic hot spots in the array. Watch for the blue, green and red flashes. The photobleaching at the end of each fluorescence event (white flashes) is indicative of single molecule observations.

  2. Influence of the number of elongated fiducial markers on the localization accuracy of the prostate.

    PubMed

    de Boer, Johan; de Bois, Josien; van Herk, Marcel; Sonke, Jan-Jakob

    2012-10-07

    Implanting fiducial markers for localization purposes has become an accepted practice in radiotherapy for prostate cancer. While many correction strategies correct for translations only, advanced correction protocols also require knowledge of the rotation of the prostate. For this purpose, typically, three or more markers are implanted. Elongated fiducial markers provide more information about their orientation than traditional round or cylindrical markers. Potentially, fewer markers are required. In this study, we evaluate the effect of the number of elongated markers on the localization accuracy of the prostate. To quantify the localization error, we developed a model that estimates, at arbitrary locations in the prostate, the registration error caused by translational and rotational uncertainties of the marker registration. Every combination of one, two and three markers was analysed for a group of 24 patients. The average registration errors at the prostate surface were 0.3-0.8 mm and 0.4-1 mm for registrations on, respectively, three markers and two markers located on different sides of the prostate. Substantial registration errors (2.0-2.2 mm) occurred at the prostate surface contralateral to the markers when two markers were implanted on the same side of the prostate or only one marker was used. In conclusion, there is no benefit in using three elongated markers: two markers accurately localize the prostate if they are implanted at some distance from each other.

  3. Position estimation for fiducial marks based on high intensity retroreflective tape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trushkina, Anna; Serikova, Mariya; Pantyushin, Anton

    2016-04-01

    3D position estimation of an object usually involve computer vision techniques, which require fiducial markers attached to the objects surface. Modern technology provides a high intensity retroreflective material in the form of a tape which is easy to mount to the object and can be used as a base for fiducial marks. But inevitable drawback of the tapes with the highest retroreflective intensity is the presence of technological pattern which affects spatial distribution of retroreflected light and deforms border of any print on tape's surface. In this work we compare various shapes of metrological pattern and examine Fourier descriptors based image processing to obtain estimation of accuracy of mark image position. To verify results we developed a setup consisting of a camera based on Sony ICX274 CCD, 25 mm lens, 800 nm LED lightning and high intensity microprismatic tape. The experiment showed that there is no significant difference between proposed mark shapes as well as between direct and indirect contrast when proposed image processing is used. The experiments confirmed that the image processing implemented without elimination of non-reflective netting pattern can only provide an accuracy of coordinates extraction close to 1 pix.

  4. Consequences of fiducial marker error on three-dimensional computer animation of the temporomandibular joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leader, J. Ken, III; Boston, J. Robert; Rudy, Thomas E.; Greco, Carol M.; Zaki, Hussein S.

    2001-05-01

    Jaw motion has been used to diagnose jaw pain patients, and we have developed a 3D computer animation technique to study jaw motion. A customized dental clutch was worn during motion, and its consistent and rigid placement was a concern. The experimental protocol involved mandibular movements (vertical opening) and MR imaging. The clutch contained three motion markers used to collect kinematic data and four MR markers used as fiducial markers in the MR images. Fiducial marker misplacement was mimicked by analytically perturbing the position of the MR markers +/- 2, +/- 4, and +/- 6 degrees in the three anatomical planes. The percent difference between the original and perturbed MR marker position was calculated for kinematic parameters. The maximum difference across all perturbations for axial rotation, coronal rotation, sagittal rotation, axial translation, coronal translation, and sagittal translation were 176.85%, 191.84%, 0.64%, 9.76%, 80.75%, and 8.30%, respectively, for perturbing all MR markers, and 86.47%, 93.44%, 0.23%, 7.08%, 42.64%, and 13.64%, respectively, for perturbing one MR marker. The parameters representing movement in the sagittal plane, the dominant plane in vertical opening, were determined to be reasonably robust, while secondary movements in the axial and coronal planes were not considered robust.

  5. Shape-controlled Synthesis of Gold Nanoparticles from Gold(III)-chelates of β-diketones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, Subrata; Pal, Anjali; Ghosh, Sujit Kumar; Nath, Sudip; Panigrahi, Sudipa; Praharaj, Snigdhamayee; Basu, Soumen; Pal, Tarasankar

    2005-12-01

    Chelating ligands with β-diketone skeleton have been employed for the first time as reductant to produce ligand stabilized gold nanoparticles of different shapes out of aqueous HAuCl4 solutions. Evolution of stable gold nanoparticles happens to be first order with respect to gold particles having rate constants ˜ ˜10-2 min-1 and subsequent chlorine insertion in the β-diketone skeleton is reported as a general feature. Spherical or triangular or hexagonal particle evolution goes selectively under the influence of different β-diketones in terms of capping and reducing capabilities of the reductants.

  6. Biomineralization of gold: biofilms on bacterioform gold.

    PubMed

    Reith, Frank; Rogers, Stephen L; McPhail, D C; Webb, Daryl

    2006-07-14

    Bacterial biofilms are associated with secondary gold grains from two sites in Australia. 16S ribosomal DNA clones of the genus Ralstonia that bear 99% similarity to the bacterium Ralstonia metallidurans-shown to precipitate gold from aqueous gold(III) tetrachloride-were present on all DNA-positive gold grains but were not detected in the surrounding soils. These results provide evidence for the bacterial contribution to the authigenic formation of secondary bacterioform gold grains and nuggets.

  7. SU-C-210-04: Considerable Pancreatic Tumor Motion During Breath-Hold Measured Using Intratumoral Fiducials On Fluoroscopic Movies

    SciTech Connect

    Lens, E; Horst, A van der; Versteijne, E; Tienhoven, G van; Bel, A

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Using a breath hold (BH) technique during radiotherapy of pancreatic tumors is expected to reduce intra-fractional motion. The aim of this study was to evaluate the tumor motion during BH. Methods: In this pilot study, we included 8 consecutive pancreatic cancer patients. All had 2– 4 intratumoral gold fiducials. Patients were asked to perform 3 consecutive 30-second end-inhale BHs on day 5, 10 and 15 of their three-week treatment. During BH, airflow through a mouthpiece was measured using a spirometer. Any inadvertent flow of air during BH was monitored for all patients. We measured tumor motion on lateral fluoroscopic movies (57 in total) made during BH. In each movie the fiducials as a group were tracked over time in superior-inferior (SI) and anterior-posterior (AP) direction using 2-D image correlation between consecutive frames. We determined for each patient the range of intra-BH motion over all movies; we also determined the absolute means and standard deviations (SDs) for the entire patient group. Additionally, we investigated the relation between inadvertent airflow during BH and the intra-BH motion. Results: We found intra-BH tumor motion of up to 12.5 mm (range, 1.0–12.5 mm) in SI direction and up to 8.0 mm (range, 1.0–8.0 mm) in AP direction. The absolute mean motion over the patient population was 4.7 (SD: 3.0) mm and 2.8 (SD: 1.2) mm in the SI and AP direction, respectively. Patients were able to perform stable consecutive BHs; during only 20% of the movies we found very small airflows (≤ 65 ml). These were mostly stepwise in nature and could not explain the continuous tumor motions we observed. Conclusion: We found substantial (up to 12.5 mm) pancreatic tumor motion during BHs. We found minimal inadvertent airflow, seen only during a minority of BHs, and this did not explain the obtained results. This work was supported by the foundation Bergh in het Zadel through the Dutch Cancer Society (KWF Kankerbestrijding) project No. UVA 2011-5271.

  8. Is It Real Gold?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Harold H.

    1999-01-01

    Features acid tests for determining whether jewelry is "real" gold or simply gold-plated. Describes the carat system of denoting gold content and explains how alloys are used to create various shades of gold jewelry. Addresses the question of whether gold jewelry can turn a wearer's skin green by considering various oxidation reactions.…

  9. Facility target insert shielding assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Mocko, Michal

    2015-10-06

    Main objective of this report is to assess the basic shielding requirements for the vertical target insert and retrieval port. We used the baseline design for the vertical target insert in our calculations. The insert sits in the 12”-diameter cylindrical shaft extending from the service alley in the top floor of the facility all the way down to the target location. The target retrieval mechanism is a long rod with the target assembly attached and running the entire length of the vertical shaft. The insert also houses the helium cooling supply and return lines each with 2” diameter. In the present study we focused on calculating the neutron and photon dose rate fields on top of the target insert/retrieval mechanism in the service alley. Additionally, we studied a few prototypical configurations of the shielding layers in the vertical insert as well as on the top.

  10. Impedance calculation for ferrite inserts

    SciTech Connect

    Breitzmann, S.C.; Lee, S.Y.; Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

    2005-01-01

    Passive ferrite inserts were used to compensate the space charge impedance in high intensity space charge dominated accelerators. They study the narrowband longitudinal impedance of these ferrite inserts. they find that the shunt impedance and the quality factor for ferrite inserts are inversely proportional to the imaginary part of the permeability of ferrite materials. They also provide a recipe for attaining a truly passive space charge impedance compensation and avoiding narrowband microwave instabilities.

  11. Closed-form fiducial confidence intervals for some functions of independent binomial parameters with comparisons.

    PubMed

    Krishnamoorthy, K; Lee, Meesook; Zhang, Dan

    2017-02-01

    Approximate closed-form confidence intervals (CIs) for estimating the difference, relative risk, odds ratio, and linear combination of proportions are proposed. These CIs are developed using the fiducial approach and the modified normal-based approximation to the percentiles of a linear combination of independent random variables. These confidence intervals are easy to calculate as the computation requires only the percentiles of beta distributions. The proposed confidence intervals are compared with the popular score confidence intervals with respect to coverage probabilities and expected widths. Comparison studies indicate that the proposed confidence intervals are comparable with the corresponding score confidence intervals, and better in some cases, for all the problems considered. The methods are illustrated using several examples.

  12. Measuring geocentric radial coordinates with a non-fiducial GPS network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rius, A.; Juan, J. M.; Hernández-Pajares, M.; Madrigal, A. M.

    1995-12-01

    In this paper we address the problem of estimating the short term precision of the geocentric radial coordinate of a GPS receiver placed on the Earth crust using a non-fiducial approach. The network used in our analysis contains 35 receivers distributed globally. We have analyzed the data with two different strategies: global and regional. In the global strategy the results obtained, which are compatible with those of Heflin et al. (1992) and Blewitt et al. (1992), provide a weighted root mean square of the residuals ( wrms) one order of magnitude larger than the formal errors of the individual estimates. Our regional strategy is based on the assumption that errors in the orbit determination induce errors in the receiver positions, correlated up to large scales. This approach allows us to obtain a significant agreement between the wrms and the formal errors.

  13. Indoor localization using pedestrian dead reckoning updated with RFID-based fiducials.

    PubMed

    House, Samuel; Connell, Sean; Milligan, Ian; Austin, Daniel; Hayes, Tamara L; Chiang, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    We describe a low-cost wearable system that tracks the location of individuals indoors using commonly available inertial navigation sensors fused with radio frequency identification (RFID) tags placed around the smart environment. While conventional pedestrian dead reckoning (PDR) calculated with an inertial measurement unit (IMU) is susceptible to sensor drift inaccuracies, the proposed wearable prototype fuses the drift-sensitive IMU with a RFID tag reader. Passive RFID tags placed throughout the smart-building then act as fiducial markers that update the physical locations of each user, thereby correcting positional errors and sensor inaccuracy. Experimental measurements taken for a 55 m × 20 m 2D floor space indicate an over 1200% improvement in average error rate of the proposed RFID-fused system over dead reckoning alone.

  14. Accurate measurement of relative tilt and azimuth angles in electron tomography: A comparison of fiducial marker method with electron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashida, Misa; Malac, Marek; Egerton, Ray F.; Bergen, Michael; Li, Peng

    2014-08-15

    Electron tomography is a method whereby a three-dimensional reconstruction of a nanoscale object is obtained from a series of projected images measured in a transmission electron microscope. We developed an electron-diffraction method to measure the tilt and azimuth angles, with Kikuchi lines used to align a series of diffraction patterns obtained with each image of the tilt series. Since it is based on electron diffraction, the method is not affected by sample drift and is not sensitive to sample thickness, whereas tilt angle measurement and alignment using fiducial-marker methods are affected by both sample drift and thickness. The accuracy of the diffraction method benefits reconstructions with a large number of voxels, where both high spatial resolution and a large field of view are desired. The diffraction method allows both the tilt and azimuth angle to be measured, while fiducial marker methods typically treat the tilt and azimuth angle as an unknown parameter. The diffraction method can be also used to estimate the accuracy of the fiducial marker method, and the sample-stage accuracy. A nano-dot fiducial marker measurement differs from a diffraction measurement by no more than ±1°.

  15. Accurate measurement of relative tilt and azimuth angles in electron tomography: a comparison of fiducial marker method with electron diffraction.

    PubMed

    Hayashida, Misa; Malac, Marek; Bergen, Michael; Egerton, Ray F; Li, Peng

    2014-08-01

    Electron tomography is a method whereby a three-dimensional reconstruction of a nanoscale object is obtained from a series of projected images measured in a transmission electron microscope. We developed an electron-diffraction method to measure the tilt and azimuth angles, with Kikuchi lines used to align a series of diffraction patterns obtained with each image of the tilt series. Since it is based on electron diffraction, the method is not affected by sample drift and is not sensitive to sample thickness, whereas tilt angle measurement and alignment using fiducial-marker methods are affected by both sample drift and thickness. The accuracy of the diffraction method benefits reconstructions with a large number of voxels, where both high spatial resolution and a large field of view are desired. The diffraction method allows both the tilt and azimuth angle to be measured, while fiducial marker methods typically treat the tilt and azimuth angle as an unknown parameter. The diffraction method can be also used to estimate the accuracy of the fiducial marker method, and the sample-stage accuracy. A nano-dot fiducial marker measurement differs from a diffraction measurement by no more than ±1°.

  16. Mechanisms for Complex Chromosomal Insertions

    PubMed Central

    Szafranski, Przemyslaw; Akdemir, Zeynep Coban; Yuan, Bo; Cooper, Mitchell L.; Magriñá, Maria A.; Bacino, Carlos A.; Lalani, Seema R.; Patel, Ankita; Song, Rodger H.; Bi, Weimin; Cheung, Sau Wai; Carvalho, Claudia M. B.; Lupski, James R.

    2016-01-01

    Chromosomal insertions are genomic rearrangements with a chromosome segment inserted into a non-homologous chromosome or a non-adjacent locus on the same chromosome or the other homologue, constituting ~2% of nonrecurrent copy-number gains. Little is known about the molecular mechanisms of their formation. We identified 16 individuals with complex insertions among 56,000 individuals tested at Baylor Genetics using clinical array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Custom high-density aCGH was performed on 10 individuals with available DNA, and breakpoint junctions were fine-mapped at nucleotide resolution by long-range PCR and DNA sequencing in 6 individuals to glean insights into potential mechanisms of formation. We observed microhomologies and templated insertions at the breakpoint junctions, resembling the breakpoint junction signatures found in complex genomic rearrangements generated by replication-based mechanism(s) with iterative template switches. In addition, we analyzed 5 families with apparently balanced insertion in one parent detected by FISH analysis and found that 3 parents had additional small copy-number variants (CNVs) at one or both sides of the inserting fragments as well as at the inserted sites. We propose that replicative repair can result in interchromosomal complex insertions generated through chromothripsis-like chromoanasynthesis involving two or three chromosomes, and cause a significant fraction of apparently balanced insertions harboring small flanking CNVs. PMID:27880765

  17. Automatic tracking of implanted fiducial markers in cone beam CT projection images

    SciTech Connect

    Marchant, T. E.; Skalski, A.; Matuszewski, B. J.

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: This paper describes a novel method for simultaneous intrafraction tracking of multiple fiducial markers. Although the proposed method is generic and can be adopted for a number of applications including fluoroscopy based patient position monitoring and gated radiotherapy, the tracking results presented in this paper are specific to tracking fiducial markers in a sequence of cone beam CT projection images. Methods: The proposed method is accurate and robust thanks to utilizing the mean shift and random sampling principles, respectively. The performance of the proposed method was evaluated with qualitative and quantitative methods, using data from two pancreatic and one prostate cancer patients and a moving phantom. The ground truth, for quantitative evaluation, was calculated based on manual tracking preformed by three observers. Results: The average dispersion of marker position error calculated from the tracking results for pancreas data (six markers tracked over 640 frames, 3840 marker identifications) was 0.25 mm (at iscoenter), compared with an average dispersion for the manual ground truth estimated at 0.22 mm. For prostate data (three markers tracked over 366 frames, 1098 marker identifications), the average error was 0.34 mm. The estimated tracking error in the pancreas data was < 1 mm (2 pixels) in 97.6% of cases where nearby image clutter was detected and in 100.0% of cases with no nearby image clutter. Conclusions: The proposed method has accuracy comparable to that of manual tracking and, in combination with the proposed batch postprocessing, superior robustness. Marker tracking in cone beam CT (CBCT) projections is useful for a variety of purposes, such as providing data for assessment of intrafraction motion, target tracking during rotational treatment delivery, motion correction of CBCT, and phase sorting for 4D CBCT.

  18. Global Fiducials Library Support for Essential Climate Variables Thomas P. DiNardo, US Geological Survey, Denver Co. 80225

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinardo, T. P.

    2012-12-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is the steward of one of the most comprehensive records of the contemporary global landmass ever assembled. The Landsat archive going back to 1972 and continuing into the future provides an unprecedented record of the status of the Earth's natural resources and human activity. In 2010, the USGS embarked on a program to develop science-quality, applications-ready, time-series of key terrestrial variables using historical and current Landsat data. The terrestrial variables will follow the guidelines established through the Global Climate Observing System (GCOS) and include Fundamental Climate Data Records (FCDR's) that represent geophysical transformations of Landsat data (e.g., surface reflectance and surface temperature), and Essential Climate Variables (ECV's) that represent specific geo-and biophysical land properties. Currently, 45 ECVs are identified by the Global Climate Observing System (GCOS) as necessary to support global climate monitoring and assessment, and technically and economically feasible for systematic observation. A given ECV may be defined as a suite of products, the specifications for which are driven by the spatial, spectral, and temporal resolution of available data, as well as the measurement uncertainties. A number of the 14 terrestrial ECVs are fully and uniquely within the scope of the USGS science mission, with Land Cover, Fire Disturbance, Leaf Area Index, Surface Water Extent, and biomass being appropriate targets for systematic observation by the USGS. The Global Fiducials Library (GFL) is a historical archive of images from U.S. National Imagery Systems which represents a long-term periodic record for selected scientifically important sites. The GFL was created to be the collection, archive and data management component of the Global Fiducials Program. Since the 1990s, the Global Fiducials Program has been periodically collecting images of environmentally significant sites around the world. A

  19. Sink Inserts for Flood Prevention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleming, Fraser F.; Bodnar, Daniel J.; Hardesty, David L.

    2004-09-01

    A simple, inexpensive insert is described for preventing flooding in lab sinks. The insert is essentially a tube with slots cut into the side that fits snugly into the drain outlet, preventing water buildup and providing additional drainage sites to avoid constriction by small lab items and paper towels.

  20. Fluoroscopic tracking of multiple implanted fiducial markers using multiple object tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xiaoli; Sharp, Greg C.; Jiang, Steve B.

    2007-07-01

    When treating mobile tumors using techniques such as beam gating or beam tracking, precise localization of tumor position is required, which is often realized by fluoroscopically tracking implanted fiducial markers. Multiple markers placed inside or near a tumor are often preferred to a single marker for the sake of accuracy. In this work, we propose a marker tracking system that can track multiple markers simultaneously, without confusing them, and that is also robust enough to continue tracking even when the markers are moving behind bony anatomy. The integrated radiotherapy imaging system (IRIS), developed at the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), was used to take fluoroscopy videos for marker tracking. The tracking system integrates marker detection with a multiple object tracking process, inspired by the multiple hypothesis marker tracking (MHT) process. It also utilizes breathing pattern information to help tracking. Four criteria are used to identify tracking failure, and when tracking failure occurs, the system can immediately inform the user. (In the clinical environment, the system would immediately disable the treatment beam.) In this paper, two liver patients with implanted fiducial markers were studied, and the studies were performed retrospectively to assess the effectiveness of the new tracking system. For both patients, LAT and AP fluoroscopic videos were studied. In order to better test the proposed tracking system, artificial markers were added around the real markers to disturb the tracking of the real markers. The performance of the proposed system was compared to that of a conventional tracking system (one that did not use multiple object tracking). The performance of the new system was also investigated with and without consideration of the breathing pattern information. We found that the conventional tracking system can easily miss tracking markers in the presence of artificial markers, and it cannot detect the tracking failures. On the

  1. Percutaneously inserted central catheter - infants

    MedlinePlus

    PICC - infants; PQC - infants; Pic line - infants; Per-Q cath - infants ... A percutaneously inserted central catheter (PICC) is a long, very thin, soft plastic tube that is put into a small blood vessel. This article addresses PICCs in ...

  2. Validation for 2D/3D registration I: A new gold standard data set

    SciTech Connect

    Pawiro, S. A.; Markelj, P.; Pernus, F.; Gendrin, C.; Figl, M.; Weber, C.; Kainberger, F.; Noebauer-Huhmann, I.; Bergmeister, H.; Stock, M.; Georg, D.; Bergmann, H.; Birkfellner, W.

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: In this article, the authors propose a new gold standard data set for the validation of two-dimensional/three-dimensional (2D/3D) and 3D/3D image registration algorithms. Methods: A gold standard data set was produced using a fresh cadaver pig head with attached fiducial markers. The authors used several imaging modalities common in diagnostic imaging or radiotherapy, which include 64-slice computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging using Tl, T2, and proton density sequences, and cone beam CT imaging data. Radiographic data were acquired using kilovoltage and megavoltage imaging techniques. The image information reflects both anatomy and reliable fiducial marker information and improves over existing data sets by the level of anatomical detail, image data quality, and soft-tissue content. The markers on the 3D and 2D image data were segmented using ANALYZE 10.0 (AnalyzeDirect, Inc., Kansas City, KN) and an in-house software. Results: The projection distance errors and the expected target registration errors over all the image data sets were found to be less than 2.71 and 1.88 mm, respectively. Conclusions: The gold standard data set, obtained with state-of-the-art imaging technology, has the potential to improve the validation of 2D/3D and 3D/3D registration algorithms for image guided therapy.

  3. Tool Removes Coil-Spring Thread Inserts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Gerald J., Jr.; Swenson, Gary J.; Mcclellan, J. Scott

    1991-01-01

    Tool removes coil-spring thread inserts from threaded holes. Threads into hole, pries insert loose, grips insert, then pulls insert to thread it out of hole. Effects essentially reverse of insertion process to ease removal and avoid further damage to threaded inner surface of hole.

  4. Precision instrument placement using a 4-DOF robot with integrated fiducials for minimally invasive interventions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenzel, Roland; Lin, Ralph; Cheng, Peng; Kronreif, Gernot; Kornfeld, Martin; Lindisch, David; Wood, Bradford J.; Viswanathan, Anand; Cleary, Kevin

    2007-03-01

    Minimally invasive procedures are increasingly attractive to patients and medical personnel because they can reduce operative trauma, recovery times, and overall costs. However, during these procedures, the physician has a very limited view of the interventional field and the exact position of surgical instruments. We present an image-guided platform for precision placement of surgical instruments based upon a small four degree-of-freedom robot (B-RobII; ARC Seibersdorf Research GmbH, Vienna, Austria). This platform includes a custom instrument guide with an integrated spiral fiducial pattern as the robot's end-effector, and it uses intra-operative computed tomography (CT) to register the robot to the patient directly before the intervention. The physician can then use a graphical user interface (GUI) to select a path for percutaneous access, and the robot will automatically align the instrument guide along this path. Potential anatomical targets include the liver, kidney, prostate, and spine. This paper describes the robotic platform, workflow, software, and algorithms used by the system. To demonstrate the algorithmic accuracy and suitability of the custom instrument guide, we also present results from experiments as well as estimates of the maximum error between target and instrument tip.

  5. Fake Magnets, Real Physics: Using touch tables with fiducials to create interactive experiences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harold, J. B.; Dusenbery, P.

    2011-12-01

    The National Center for Interactive Learning at the Space Science Institute has been producing space weather related activities for both museums and online for over a decade (see, for instance, www.spaceweathercenter.org). Recently we have begun exploring the possibilities of augmented reality as a mechanism for letting visitors explore magnetic fields, charged particle motion, and related space weather topics. Using a Microsoft Surface touch table, NCIL@SSI has developed several activities that incorporate magnet "fiducials"... objects shaped like recognizable magnets (bar, horseshoe, etc.) that when placed on the table are recognized by the computer. In this way visitors can place a magnet, then see the associated magnetic field drawn out on the table. And given a magnet (which could be the Earth) and a field, they can touch the screen to launch charged particles in to the field. We believe that this combination of physical objects and simulated physics provides a compelling new opportunity for topics such as space weather, where the necessary prior knowledge (e.g., the behavior of magnetic fields and charged particles) are not well understood, or even easily accessible, for the average visitor. We will be reporting both on the software and educational strategies reflected in it, as well as testing which is being performed at the NCAR visitor center in Boulder Colorado and the Hatfield Visitor Center in Oregon by NCIL's Director of Learning Research and Evaluation. This work is funded by the National Science Foundation.

  6. The March 1985 demonstration of the fiducial network concept for GPS geodesy: A preliminary report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, J. M.; Thornton, C. L.; Dixon, T. H.; Vegos, C. J.; Young, L. E.; Yunck, T. P.

    1986-01-01

    The first field tests in preparation for the NASA Global Positioning System (GPS) Caribbean Initiative were conducted in late March and Early April of 1985. The GPS receivers were located at the POLARIS Very Long Base Interferometry (VLBI) stations at Westford, Massachusetts; Richmond, Florida; and Ft. Davis, Texas; and at the Mojave, Owens Valley, and Hat Creek VLBI stations in California. Other mobile receivers were placed near Mammoth Lakes, California; Pt. Mugu, California; Austin, Texas; and Dahlgren, Virginia. These sites were equipped with a combination of GPS receiver types, including SERIES-X, TI-4100 and AFGL dual frequency receivers. The principal objectives of these tests were the demonstration of the fiducial network concept for precise GPS geodesy, the performance assessment of the participating GPS receiver types, and to conduct the first in a series of experiments to monitor ground deformation in the Mammoth Lakes-Long Valley caldera region in California. Other objectives included the testing of the water vapor radiometers for the calibration of GPS data, the development of efficient procedures for planning and coordinating GPS field exercise, the establishment of institutional interfaces for future cooperating ventures, the testing of the GPS Data Analysis Software (GIPSY, for GPS Inferred Positioning SYstem), and the establishment of a set of calibration baselines in California. Preliminary reports of the success of the field tests, including receiver performance and data quality, and on the status of the data analysis software are given.

  7. Strong gold atom strands formed by incorporation of carbon atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshima, Yoshifumi; Kurui, Yoshihiko; Nguyen, Huy Duy; Ono, Tomoya; Takayanagi, Kunio

    2011-07-01

    Single metal atom strands have attracted significant interest because of their unique properties, such as quantization effects and a high degree of strength. Recently it was suggested that the strength of a gold atom strand can be enhanced by the insertion of an impurity atom, but it has not been experimentally investigated. Using a transmission electron microscope under ultrahigh vacuum conditions, we observed that gold atoms were pulled out one by one from a carbon-contaminated gold (111) surface to form a long atom strand. The strand was so strong that it did not break even upon bending. Supported by first-principles calculations, the strand was found to have two carbon atoms at each gold atom interval. Our observations suggest that the carbon atoms act as a glue to form a long gold atom strand.

  8. Gene Insertion Patterns and Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vain, Philippe; Thole, Vera

    During the past 25 years, the molecular analysis of transgene insertion patterns and sites in plants has greatly contributed to our understanding of the mechanisms underlying transgene integration, expression, and stability in the nuclear genome. Molecular characterization is also an essential step in the safety assessment of genetically modified crops. This chapter describes the standard experimental procedures used to analyze transgene insertion patterns and loci in cereals and grasses transformed using Agrobacterium tumefaciens or direct transfer of DNA. Methods and protocols enabling the determination of the number and configuration of transgenic loci via a combination of inheritance studies, polymerase chain reaction, and Southern analyses are presented. The complete characterization of transgenic inserts in plants is, however, a holistic process relying on a wide variety of experimental approaches. In this chapter, these additional approaches are not detailed but references to relevant bibliographic records are provided.

  9. Forming Disk Galaxies in Wet Major Mergers. I. Three Fiducial Examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Athanassoula, E.; Rodionov, S. A.; Peschken, N.; Lambert, J. C.

    2016-04-01

    Using three fiducial N-body+SPH simulations, we follow the merging of two disk galaxies that each have a hot gaseous halo component, and examine whether the merger remnant can be a spiral galaxy. The stellar progenitor disks are destroyed by violent relaxation during the merging and most of their stars form a classical bulge, while the remaining stars, as well as stars born during the merging times, form a thick disk and its bar. A new stellar disk forms subsequently and gradually in the remnant from the gas accreted mainly from the halo. It is vertically thin and well extended in its equatorial plane. A bar starts forming before the disk is fully in place, which is contrary to what is assumed in idealized simulations of isolated bar-forming galaxies, and has morphological features such as ansae and boxy/peanut bulges. Stars of different ages populate different parts of the box/peanut. A disky pseudobulge also forms, so that by the end of the simulation all three types of bulges coexist. The oldest stars are found in the classical bulge, followed by those of the thick disk, then by those in the thin disk. The youngest stars are in the spiral arms and the disky pseudobulge. The disk surface density profiles are of type II (exponential with downbending); the circular velocity curves are flat and show that the disks are submaximum in these examples: two clearly so and one near-borderline between maximum and submaximum. On average, only roughly between 10% and 20% of the stellar mass is in the classical bulge of the final models, i.e., much less than in previous simulations.

  10. Relationship Between Diseased Lung Tissues on Computed Tomography and Motion of Fiducial Marker Near Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Onodera, Yuya; Nishioka, Noriko; Yasuda, Koichi; Fujima, Noriyuki; Torres, Mylin; Kamishima, Tamotsu; Ooyama, Noriko; Onimaru, Rikiya; Terae, Satoshi; Ooizumi, Satoshi; Nishimura, Masaharu; Shirato, Hiroki

    2011-04-01

    Purpose: For lung cancer patients with poor pulmonary function because of emphysema or fibrosis, it is important to predict the amplitude of internal tumor motion to minimize the irradiation of the functioning lung tissue before undergoing stereotactic body radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Two board-certified diagnostic radiologists independently assessed the degree of pulmonary emphysema and fibrosis on computed tomography scans in 71 patients with peripheral lung tumors before real-time tumor-tracking radiotherapy. The relationships between the computed tomography findings of the lung parenchyma and the motion of the fiducial marker near the lung tumor were investigated. Of the 71 patients, 30 had normal pulmonary function, and 29 had obstructive pulmonary dysfunction (forced expiratory volume in 1 s/forced vital capacity ratio of <70%), 6 patients had constrictive dysfunction (percentage of vital capacity <80%), and 16 had mixed dysfunction. Results: The upper region was associated with smaller tumor motion, as expected (p = .0004), and the presence of fibrosis (p = .088) and pleural tumor contact (p = .086) were weakly associated with tumor motion. The presence of fibrotic changes in the lung tissue was associated with smaller tumor motion in the upper region (p <.05) but not in the lower region. The findings of emphysema and pulmonary function tests were not associated with tumor motion. Conclusion: Tumors in the upper lung region with fibrotic changes have smaller motion than those in the upper region of the lungs without fibrotic changes. The tumor motion in the lower lung region was not significantly different between patients with and without lung fibrosis. Emphysema was not associated with the amplitude of tumor motion.

  11. Fully automatic segmentation of arbitrarily shaped fiducial markers in cone-beam CT projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertholet, J.; Wan, H.; Toftegaard, J.; Schmidt, M. L.; Chotard, F.; Parikh, P. J.; Poulsen, P. R.

    2017-02-01

    Radio-opaque fiducial markers of different shapes are often implanted in or near abdominal or thoracic tumors to act as surrogates for the tumor position during radiotherapy. They can be used for real-time treatment adaptation, but this requires a robust, automatic segmentation method able to handle arbitrarily shaped markers in a rotational imaging geometry such as cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) projection images and intra-treatment images. In this study, we propose a fully automatic dynamic programming (DP) assisted template-based (TB) segmentation method. Based on an initial DP segmentation, the DPTB algorithm generates and uses a 3D marker model to create 2D templates at any projection angle. The 2D templates are used to segment the marker position as the position with highest normalized cross-correlation in a search area centered at the DP segmented position. The accuracy of the DP algorithm and the new DPTB algorithm was quantified as the 2D segmentation error (pixels) compared to a manual ground truth segmentation for 97 markers in the projection images of CBCT scans of 40 patients. Also the fraction of wrong segmentations, defined as 2D errors larger than 5 pixels, was calculated. The mean 2D segmentation error of DP was reduced from 4.1 pixels to 3.0 pixels by DPTB, while the fraction of wrong segmentations was reduced from 17.4% to 6.8%. DPTB allowed rejection of uncertain segmentations as deemed by a low normalized cross-correlation coefficient and contrast-to-noise ratio. For a rejection rate of 9.97%, the sensitivity in detecting wrong segmentations was 67% and the specificity was 94%. The accepted segmentations had a mean segmentation error of 1.8 pixels and 2.5% wrong segmentations.

  12. Gold-catalyzed naphthalene functionalization

    PubMed Central

    Rivilla, Iván

    2011-01-01

    Summary The complexes IPrMCl (IPr = 1,3-bis(diisopropylphenyl)imidazol-2-ylidene, M = Cu, 1a; M = Au, 1b), in the presence of one equiv of NaBAr'4 (Ar' = 3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)phenyl), catalyze the transfer of carbene groups: C(R)CO2Et (R = H, Me) from N2C(R)CO2Et to afford products that depend on the nature of the metal center. The copper-based catalyst yields exclusively a cycloheptatriene derivative from the Buchner reaction, whereas the gold analog affords a mixture of products derived either from the formal insertion of the carbene unit into the aromatic C–H bond or from its addition to a double bond. In addition, no byproducts derived from carbene coupling were observed. PMID:21647320

  13. Full automatic fiducial marker detection on coil arrays for accurate instrumentation placement during MRI guided breast interventions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippatos, Konstantinos; Boehler, Tobias; Geisler, Benjamin; Zachmann, Harald; Twellmann, Thorsten

    2010-02-01

    With its high sensitivity, dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging (DCE-MRI) of the breast is today one of the first-line tools for early detection and diagnosis of breast cancer, particularly in the dense breast of young women. However, many relevant findings are very small or occult on targeted ultrasound images or mammography, so that MRI guided biopsy is the only option for a precise histological work-up [1]. State-of-the-art software tools for computer-aided diagnosis of breast cancer in DCE-MRI data offer also means for image-based planning of biopsy interventions. One step in the MRI guided biopsy workflow is the alignment of the patient position with the preoperative MR images. In these images, the location and orientation of the coil localization unit can be inferred from a number of fiducial markers, which for this purpose have to be manually or semi-automatically detected by the user. In this study, we propose a method for precise, full-automatic localization of fiducial markers, on which basis a virtual localization unit can be subsequently placed in the image volume for the purpose of determining the parameters for needle navigation. The method is based on adaptive thresholding for separating breast tissue from background followed by rigid registration of marker templates. In an evaluation of 25 clinical cases comprising 4 different commercial coil array models and 3 different MR imaging protocols, the method yielded a sensitivity of 0.96 at a false positive rate of 0.44 markers per case. The mean distance deviation between detected fiducial centers and ground truth information that was appointed from a radiologist was 0.94mm.

  14. Monitoring Changes in Channel Morphology in Las Vegas Wash with Global Fiducials Program Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, D. J.

    2012-12-01

    To borrow from a popular adage, "What happens in Las Vegas [Wash], stays in Las Vegas [Wash]"—but only with a lot of help. This past decade has seen a concerted effort to curb erosion and sediment transport along the 12 mile long channel between East Las Vegas and Lake Mead. Las Vegas Wash is prototypical of an urban river in an arid environment that is being impacted by increasing urban development and impervious surface runoff within its drainage area. Rapid urbanization since the 1970s has increased the flow of water into Las Vegas Wash, causing severe channel destabilization. Within two decades millions of cubic yards of rocks and sediment were scoured out of the wash and transported downstream to Lake Mead. The wetlands that once covered over 2,000 acres within Las Vegas Wash dwindled to 200 acres in the 1990s as the channel became as much as 40 feet deeper and 300 feet wider at some points. In 1999 the Las Vegas Wash Coordination Committee (LVWCC) initiated a 20-year plan to construct erosion control structures (weirs) for channel stabilization and rock riprap for stream bank protection. The hope is to design structures that will slow down the water flow, trap sediments, and to eventually restore much of the wetland environment. Using high-resolution satellite imagery from the Global Fiducials Program Library housed at the U. S. Geological Survey, this transition is being tracked from 1999 to the present. From November 1999 to July 2008 new residential and commercial development has claimed an additional 12 square kilometers (3000 acres) of land in Henderson, NV, along the south side of Las Vegas Wash. Even with the increased volume of surface and groundwater runoff entering the wash, current sediment yields are much lower than the 1999 totals. The imagery documents the construction of 14 of the 22 LVWCC planned weirs by the year 2011. It also shows many miles of stream bank stabilization by riprap, planting of riparian vegetation and placing of

  15. Real-time automatic fiducial marker tracking in low contrast cine-MV images

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Wei-Yang; Lin, Shu-Fang; Yang, Sheng-Chang; Liou, Shu-Cheng; Nath, Ravinder; Liu Wu

    2013-01-15

    standard deviations of the results from the 6 researchers are 2.3 and 2.6 pixels. The proposed framework takes about 128 ms to detect four markers in the first MV images and about 23 ms to track these markers in each of the subsequent images. Conclusions: The unified framework for tracking of multiple markers presented here can achieve marker detection accuracy similar to manual detection even in low-contrast cine-MV images. It can cope with shape deformations of fiducial markers at different gantry angles. The fast processing speed reduces the image processing portion of the system latency, therefore can improve the performance of real-time motion compensation.

  16. Feasibility of hydrogel fiducial markers for in vivo proton range verification using PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Jongmin; Campbell, Patrick; Wang, Min; Alqathami, Mamdooh; Mawlawi, Osama; Kerr, Matthew; Cho, Sang Hyun

    2016-03-01

    Biocompatible/biodegradable hydrogel polymers were immersed in 18O-enriched water and 16O-water to create 18O-water hydrogels and 16O-water hydrogels. In both cases, the hydrogels were made of ~91 wt% water and ~9 wt% polymer. In addition, 5-8 μm Zn powder was suspended in 16O-water and 18O-enriched water and cross-linked with hydrogel polymers to create Zn/16O-water hydrogels (30/70 wt%, ~9 wt% polymer) and Zn/18O-water hydrogels (10/90 wt%), respectively. A block of extra-firm ‘wet’ tofu (12.3  ×  8.8  ×  4.9 cm, ρ  ≈  1.05 g cm-3) immersed in water was injected with Zn/16O-water hydrogels (0.9 ml each) at four different depths using an 18-gauge needle. Similarly, Zn/18O-water hydrogels (0.9 ml) were injected into a second tofu phantom. As a reference, both 16O-water hydrogels (1.8 ml) and 18O-water hydrogels (0.9 ml) in Petri dishes were irradiated in a ‘dry’ environment. The hydrogels in the wet tofu phantoms and dry Petri dishes were scanned via CT and images were used for treatment planning. Then, they were positioned at the proton distal dose fall-off region and irradiated (2 Gy) followed by PET/CT imaging. Notably high PET signals were observed only in 18O-water hydrogels in the dry environment. The visibility of the Zn/16O-water hydrogels injected into the tofu phantom was outstanding in CT images, but these hydrogels provided no noticeable PET signals. The visibility of the Zn/18O-water hydrogels in the wet tofu were excellent on CT and moderate on PET; however, the PET signals were weaker than those in the dry environment, possibly owing to 18O-water leaching out. The hydrogel markers studied here could be used to develop universal PET/CT fiducial markers. Their PET visibility (attributed more to activated 18O-water than Zn) after proton irradiation can be used for proton therapy/range verification. More investigation is needed to slow down the leaching of 18O-water.

  17. Global Fiducials Program Imagery: New Opportunities for Geospatial Research, Outreach, and Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, S. D.

    2012-12-01

    MOLNIA, Bruce F., PRICE, Susan D. and, KING, Stephen E., U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), 562 National Center, Reston, VA 20192, sprice@usgs.gov The Civil Applications Committee (CAC), operated by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), is the Federal interagency committee that facilitates Federal civil agency access to U.S. National Systems space-based electro-optical (EO) imagery for natural disaster response; global change investigations; ecosystem monitoring; mapping, charting, and geodesy; and related topics. The CAC's Global Fiducials Program (GFP) has overseen the systematic collection of high-resolution imagery to provide geospatial data time series spanning a decade or more at carefully selected sites to study and monitor changes, and to facilitate a comprehensive understanding of dynamic and sensitive areas of our planet. Since 2008, more than 4,500 one-meter resolution EO images which comprise time series from 85 GFP sites have been released for unrestricted public use. Initial site selections were made by Federal and academic scientists based on each site's unique history, susceptibility, or environmental value. For each site, collection strategies were carefully defined to maximize information extraction capabilities. This consistency enhances our ability to understand Earth's dynamic processes and long-term trends. Individual time series focus on Arctic sea ice change; temperate glacier behavior; mid-continent wetland dynamics; barrier island response to hurricanes; coastline evolution; wildland fire recovery; Long-Term Ecological Resource (LTER) site processes; and many other topics. The images are available from a USGS website at no cost, in an orthorectified GeoTIFF format with supporting metadata, making them ideal for use in Earth science education and GIS projects. New on-line tools provide enhanced analysis of these time-series imagery. For additional information go to http://gfp.usgs.gov or http://gfl.usgs.gov.Bering Glacier is the largest and

  18. The atmospheric neutrino flavor ratio from a 3.9 fiducial kiloton-year exposure of Soudan 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, W. W. M.; Alner, G. J.; Ayres, D. S.; Barr, G.; Barrett, W. L.; Bode, C.; Border, P. M.; Brooks, C. B.; Cobb, J. H.; Cotton, R. J.; Courant, H.; Demuth, D. M.; Fields, T. H.; Gallagher, H. R.; Garcia-Garcia, C.; Goodman, M. C.; Gran, R.; Joffe-Minor, T.; Kafka, T.; Kasahara, S. M. S.; Leeson, W.; Litchfield, P. J.; Longley, N. P.; Mann, W. A.; Marshak, M. L.; Milburn, R. H.; Miller, W. H.; Mualem, L.; Napier, A.; Oliver, W. P.; Pearce, G. F.; Peterson, E. A.; Petyt, D. A.; Price, L. E.; Ruddick, K.; Sanchez, M.; Schneps, J.; Schub, M. H.; Seidlein, R.; Stassinakis, A.; Thron, J. L.; Vassiliev, V.; Villaume, G.; Wakely, S.; Wall, D.; West, N.; Wielgosz, U. M.

    1999-03-01

    We report a measurement of the atmospheric neutrino flavor ratio, R, using a sample of quasi-elastic neutrino interactions occurring in an iron medium. The flavor ratio (tracks/showers) of atmospheric neutrinos in a 3.9 fiducial kiloton-year exposure of Soudan 2 is 0.64+/-0.11(stat.)+/-0.06(syst.) of that expected. Important aspects of our main analysis have been checked by carrying out two independent, alternative analyses; one is based upon automated scanning, the other uses a multivariate approach for background subtraction. Similar results are found by all three approaches.

  19. "Gold standard" data for evaluation and comparison of 3D/2D registration methods.

    PubMed

    Tomazevic, Dejan; Likar, Bostjan; Pernus, Franjo

    2004-01-01

    Evaluation and comparison of registration techniques for image-guided surgery is an important problem that has received little attention in the literature. In this paper we address the challenging problem of generating reliable "gold standard" data for use in evaluating the accuracy of 3D/2D registrations. We have devised a cadaveric lumbar spine phantom with fiducial markers and established highly accurate correspondences between 3D CT and MR images and 18 2D X-ray images. The expected target registration errors for target points on the pedicles are less than 0.26 mm for CT-to-X-ray registration and less than 0.42 mm for MR-to-X-ray registration. As such, the "gold standard" data, which has been made publicly available on the Internet (http://lit.fe.uni-lj.si/Downloads/downloads.asp), is useful for evaluation and comparison of 3D/2D image registration methods.

  20. Dose perturbations from implanted helical gold markers in proton therapy of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Giebeler, Annelise; Fontenot, Jonas; Balter, Peter; Ciangaru, George; Zhu, Ronald; Newhauser, Wayne

    2009-01-27

    Implanted gold fiducial markers are widely used in radiation therapy to improve targeting accuracy. Recent investigations have revealed that metallic fiducial markers can cause severe perturbations in dose distributions for proton therapy, suggesting smaller markers should be considered. The objective of this study was to estimate the dosimetric impact of small gold markers in patients receiving proton therapy for prostate cancer. Small, medium, and large helical wire markers with lengths of 10 mm and helix diameters of 0.35 mm, 0.75 mm, and 1.15 mm, respectively, were implanted in an anthropomorphic phantom. Radiographic visibility was confirmed using a kilovoltage x-ray imaging system, and dose perturbations were predicted from Monte Carlo simulations and confirmed by measurements. Monte Carlo simulations indicated that size of dose perturbation depended on marker size, orientation, and distance from the beam's end of range. Specifically, the perturbation of proton dose for the lateral-opposed-pair treatment technique was 31% for large markers and 23% for medium markers in a typical oblique orientation. Results for perpendicular and parallel orientations were respectively lower and higher. Consequently, these markers are not well suited for use in patients receiving proton therapy for prostate cancer. Dose perturbation was not observed for the small markers, but these markers were deemed too fragile for transrectal implantation in the prostate.

  1. Ultrasound guided spine needle insertion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Elvis C. S.; Mousavi, Parvin; Gill, Sean; Fichtinger, Gabor; Abolmaesumi, Purang

    2010-02-01

    An ultrasound (US) guided, CT augmented, spine needle insertion navigational system is introduced. The system consists of an electromagnetic (EM) sensor, an US machine, and a preoperative CT volume of the patient anatomy. Three-dimensional (3D) US volume is reconstructed intraoperatively from a set of two-dimensional (2D) freehand US slices, and is coregistered with the preoperative CT. This allows the preoperative CT volume to be used in the intraoperative clinical coordinate. The spatial relationship between the patient anatomy, surgical tools, and the US transducer are tracked using the EM sensor, and are displayed with respect to the CT volume. The pose of the US transducer is used to interpolate the CT volume, providing the physician with a 2D "x-ray vision" to guide the needle insertion. Many of the system software components are GPU-accelerated, allowing real-time performance of the guidance system in a clinical setting.

  2. Insertion device calculations with mathematica

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, R.; Lidia, S.

    1995-02-01

    The design of accelerator insertion devices such as wigglers and undulators has usually been aided by numerical modeling on digital computers, using code in high level languages like Fortran. In the present era, there are higher level programming environments like IDL{reg_sign}, MatLab{reg_sign}, and Mathematica{reg_sign} in which these calculations may be performed by writing much less code, and in which standard mathematical techniques are very easily used. The authors present a suite of standard insertion device modeling routines in Mathematica to illustrate the new techniques. These routines include a simple way to generate magnetic fields using blocks of CSEM materials, trajectory solutions from the Lorentz force equations for given magnetic fields, Bessel function calculations of radiation for wigglers and undulators and general radiation calculations for undulators.

  3. Inserting Agility in System Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    Agile IT Acquisition, IT Box, Scrum Inserting Agility in System Development Matthew R. Kennedy and Lt Col Dan Ward, USAF With the fast-paced nature...1,700 individuals and 71 countries, found Scrum and eXtreme Programming to be the most widely followed method- ologies (VersionOne, 2007). Other...University http://www.dau.mil 259 Defense ARJ, July 2012, Vol. 19 No. 3 : 249–264 Scrum Scrum is a framework used for project management, which is

  4. Device and methods for "gold standard" registration of clinical 3D and 2D cerebral angiograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madan, Hennadii; Likar, Boštjan; Pernuš, Franjo; Å piclin, Žiga

    2015-03-01

    Translation of any novel and existing 3D-2D image registration methods into clinical image-guidance systems is limited due to lack of their objective validation on clinical image datasets. The main reason is that, besides the calibration of the 2D imaging system, a reference or "gold standard" registration is very difficult to obtain on clinical image datasets. In the context of cerebral endovascular image-guided interventions (EIGIs), we present a calibration device in the form of a headband with integrated fiducial markers and, secondly, propose an automated pipeline comprising 3D and 2D image processing, analysis and annotation steps, the result of which is a retrospective calibration of the 2D imaging system and an optimal, i.e., "gold standard" registration of 3D and 2D images. The device and methods were used to create the "gold standard" on 15 datasets of 3D and 2D cerebral angiograms, whereas each dataset was acquired on a patient undergoing EIGI for either aneurysm coiling or embolization of arteriovenous malformation. The use of the device integrated seamlessly in the clinical workflow of EIGI. While the automated pipeline eliminated all manual input or interactive image processing, analysis or annotation. In this way, the time to obtain the "gold standard" was reduced from 30 to less than one minute and the "gold standard" of 3D-2D registration on all 15 datasets of cerebral angiograms was obtained with a sub-0.1 mm accuracy.

  5. Sea Temperature Fiducial Reference Measurements for the Validation and Data Gap Bridging of Satellite SST Data Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wimmer, Werenfrid

    2016-08-01

    The Infrared Sea surface temperature Autonomous Radiometer (ISAR) was developed to provide reference data for the validation of satellite Sea Surface Temperature at the Skin interface (SSTskin) temperature data products, particularly the Advanced Along Track Scanning Radiometer (AATSR). Since March 2004 ISAR instruments have been deployed nearly continuously on ferries crossing the English Channel and the Bay of Biscay, between Portsmouth (UK) and Bilbao/Santander (Spain). The resulting twelve years of ISAR data, including an individual uncertainty estimate for each SST record, are calibrated with traceability to national standards (National Institute of Standards and Technology, USA (NIST) and National Physical Laboratory, Teddigton, UK (NPL), Fiducial Reference Measurements for satellite derived surface temperature product validation (FRM4STS)). They provide a unique independent in situ reference dataset against which to validate satellite derived products. We present results of the AATSR validation, and show the use of ISAR fiducial reference measurements as a common traceable validation data source for both AATSR and Sea and Land Surface Temperature Radiometer (SLSTR). ISAR data were also used to review performance of the Operational Sea Surface Temperature and Sea Ice Analysis (OSTIA) Sea Surface Temperature (SST) analysis before and after the demise of ESA Environmental Satellite (Envisat) when AATSR inputs ceased This demonstrates use of the ISAR reference data set for validating the SST climatologies that will bridge the data gap between AATSR and SLSTR.

  6. Transfer of the magnetic axis of an undulator to mechanical fiducial marks of a laser tracker system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ketenoğlu, Bora; Englisch, Uwe; Li, Yuhui; Wolff-Fabris, Frederik; Benecke, Wolf; Noak, Martin; Prenting, Johannes; Schloesser, Markus; Pflueger, Joachim

    2016-02-01

    The exact geometric location of the magnetic centers of sensors or sensor systems using Hall probes or pick-up coils is usually not known with high precision. In order to transfer the high spatial accuracy of magnetic measurements to external mechanic fiducials a device called "Magnetic Landmark" was developed and is described in this report. Its purpose is to establish the exact relation between "magnetic" coordinates used on magnetic measurement systems and "mechanic" coordinates used for alignment. The landmark consists of a permanent magnet configuration, which generates a field distribution with well-defined zero crossings in two orthogonal directions, which can be exactly localized with micrometer precision using magnetic measurement systems. For the "mechanic" measurements several redundant monuments for laser fiducials can be used. Using flip tests for the magnetic as well as mechanic measurements the center positions are determined in magnetic and mechanic coordinates. Using them the relation between the magnetic and surveying coordinates can be established with high accuracy. This report concentrates on the description of the landmark. A thorough analysis on achievable accuracy is presented. The method was developed for the alignment of the 91 undulator segments needed for the European XFEL but can be applied to other magnet systems as well.

  7. Daily patient setup error in prostate image guided radiation therapy with fiducial-based kilovoltage onboard imaging and conebeam computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Muhammad M.; Clancy, Pauline; Dise, Lauren N.; Willins, John; Hirsch, Ariel E.

    2015-01-01

    Background This study examined the interfraction setup error in patients undergoing prostate radiotherapy using fiducial markers and on-board imaging. Methods Patients (n=53) were aligned to the treatment isocenter by laser followed by orthogonal kilovoltage (kV) radiographs to visualize bony anatomy and implanted fiducial markers. The magnitude and direction of couch shifts for isocenter correction required was determined by image registration for bony anatomy and fiducial markers. Twice weekly, 25 of the 53 patients also underwent conebeam computed tomography (CBCT) to measure any residual error in patient positioning. Based on individual coordinate shifts from CBCT, a net three-dimensional (3D) residual shift magnitude vector R was calculated. Results The average couch shifts were 0.26 and 0.40 cm in inferior direction and 0.25 and 0.33 cm in superior direction for alignments made with bony anatomy and fiducial markers, respectively (P<0.0001). There were no significant differences noted in the vertical or lateral planes between the two image registration methods. In subset of 25 patients, no residual shift from fiducial plain film set up was required with CBCT matching in 66.5%, 52.4% and 57.9% of fractions for longitudinal, vertical and lateral planes, respectively, with majority (79%) of patients having a net residual 3D shifts of <0.3 cm. The use of CBCT increased average treatment time by approximately 6 min compared to kV radiographs alone. Conclusions The residual setup errors following daily kV image guided localization, as determined by CBCT, were small, which demonstrates high accuracy of kV localization when fiducial markers are present. PMID:26682136

  8. Meltwater Origin of the 2005 Mount Steller Landslide Confirmed by Analysis of Global Fiducials Program Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molnia, B. F.; Angeli, K.

    2012-12-01

    Alaska's Mt. Steller, a 3,236 m Chugach Mountains peak, is one of the target areas of the Bering Glacier Global Fiducials Program (GFP) site. On September 14, 2005, a large mass of rock, glacier ice, and snow, with a volume of ~50 million cubic meters, fell from just below Mt. Steller's south-facing summit and landed on the surface of a tributary to Bering Glacier, nearly 2,500 m below. The slide, which extended ~8 km down-glacier, was actually an ice-rock avalanche. The impact generated a seismic signal recorded with a magnitude of up to 5.2. Oblique aerial photography of the mountain, the head scarp, and the slide mass was collected for the U.S. Geological Survey's Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) on September 15, 2005. The photography delineated the morphology of the failed south-facing slope of the mountain and showed details of the sheared, near-summit hanging glacier and snow mass. Based on the photography, the AVO calculated the slide volume and length. Several weeks later, the AVO provided the first author with digital copies of the September 15 photography. These images were enhanced and examined in order to determine properties of the slide and to evaluate if the cause of the event could be determined. A number of features observed led to the conclusion that meltwater was probably responsible for destabilizing the glacier ice-bedrock contact and triggering the landslide. Specifically, a 10-15 m diameter englacial stream channel was seen in the truncated glacier ice that comprised the east wall of the landslide scarp and a water-polished channel opening was noted on the west wall scarp. Additionally, several depressions were noted that might have temporarily stored water. To confirm these observations, new cloud-free GFP imagery was obtained on October 24 and 28, 2005. Analysis of both sets of imagery documented that: (1) more than a month after the event, meltwater was exiting the east wall scarp channel and flowing down the face of the mountain; (2) the

  9. Single stars in the Hyades open cluster. Fiducial sequence for testing stellar and atmospheric models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopytova, Taisiya G.; Brandner, Wolfgang; Tognelli, Emanuele; Prada Moroni, Pier Giorgio; Da Rio, Nicola; Röser, Siegfried; Schilbach, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Context. Age and mass determinations for isolated stellar objects remain model-dependent. While stellar interior and atmospheric theoretical models are rapidly evolving, we need a powerful tool to test them. Open clusters are good candidates for this role. Aims: We aim to create a fiducial sequence of stellar objects for testing stellar and atmospheric models. Methods: We complement previous studies on the Hyades multiplicity by Lucky Imaging observations with the AstraLux Norte camera. This allows us to exclude possible binary and multiple systems with companions outside a 2-7 AU separation and to create a single-star sequence for the Hyades. The sequence encompasses 250 main-sequence stars ranging from A5V to M6V. Using the Tool for Astrophysical Data Analysis (TA-DA), we create various theoretical isochrones applying different combinations of interior and atmospheric models. We compare the isochrones with the observed Hyades single-star sequence on J vs. J-Ks, J vs. J-H, and Ks vs. H-Ks color-magnitude diagrams. As a reference we also compute absolute fluxes and magnitudes for all stars from X-ray to mid-infrared based on photometric measurements available in the literature(ROSAT X-ray, GALEX UV, APASS gri, 2MASS JHKs, and WISE W1 to W4). Results: We find that combinations of both PISA and DARTMOUTH stellar interior models with BT-Settl 2010 atmospheric models describe the observed sequence well. We use PISA in combination with BT-Settl 2010 models to derive theoretical predictions for physical parameters (Teff, mass, log g) of 250 single stars in the Hyades. The full sequence covers the mass range of 0.13-2.30 M⊙, and effective temperatures between 3060 K and 8200 K. Conclusions: Within the measurement uncertainties, the current generation of models agree well with the single-star sequence. The primary limitations are the uncertainties in the measurement of the distances to individual Hyades members, and uncertainties in the photometry. Gaia parallaxes

  10. Field errors in hybrid insertion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Schlueter, R.D.

    1995-02-01

    Hybrid magnet theory as applied to the error analyses used in the design of Advanced Light Source (ALS) insertion devices is reviewed. Sources of field errors in hybrid insertion devices are discussed.

  11. Atomic Diffusion within Individual Gold Nanocrystal

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Gang; Clark, Jesse N.; Nicklin, Chris; Rawle, Jonathan; Robinson, Ian K.

    2014-01-01

    Due to their excess surface free energy and structural instabilities, nanoparticles exhibit interesting physical and chemical properties. There has been an ever-growing interest in investigating these properties, driven by the desire to further miniaturize electronic devices, develop new functional materials and catalysts. Here, the intriguing question of how diffusion evolves in a single nanoparticle is investigated by measuring the spatial and temporal variations of the diffracted coherent X-ray intensity during copper diffusion into a gold nanocrystal. Dislocation loops formed from the insertion of single layer of extra atoms between neighbouring gold host lattice planes are detected. Au-Cu alloy channels are found to penetrate the nanocrystal due to the differential diffusion rate along different directions. With the advent of higher brilliance sources and free-electron-lasers, Bragg Coherent X-ray Diffraction Imaging can play an important role in unveiling atomic behaviours in three dimensions for nanomaterials during various fundamental processes. PMID:25341377

  12. GOLD PLATING PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Seegmiller, R.

    1957-08-01

    An improved bath is reported for plating gold on other metals. The composition of the plating bath is as follows: Gold cyanide from about 15 to about 50 grams, potassium cyanide from about 70 to about 125 grams, and sulfonated castor oil from about 0.1 to about 10 cc. The gold plate produced from this bath is smooth, semi-hard, and nonporous.

  13. Insert metering plates for gas turbine nozzles

    DOEpatents

    Burdgick, Steven S.; Itzel, Gary; Chopra, Sanjay; Abuaf, Nesim; Correia, Victor H.

    2004-05-11

    The invention comprises a metering plate which is assembled to an impingement insert for use in the nozzle of a gas turbine. The metering plate can have one or more metering holes and is used to balance the cooling flow within the nozzle. A metering plate with multiple holes reduces static pressure variations which result from the cooling airflow through the metering plate. The metering plate can be assembled to the insert before or after the insert is inserted into the nozzle.

  14. JT/LJT connector insert material evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Baca, J.R.F.

    1991-10-01

    Different insert (insulator) materials are undergoing evaluation to replace the Fiberite E-3938 BE96 material currently used. Also being evaluated is the reconfiguration of the insert and metal shell-edge geometries for the purpose of reducing the alleged interference principally responsible for insert damage.

  15. Gold(I) Fluorohalides: Theory and Experiment.

    PubMed

    Baya, Miguel; Pérez-Bitrián, Alberto; Martínez-Salvador, Sonia; Casas, José M; Menjón, Babil; Orduna, Jesús

    2017-01-31

    The anionic trifluoromethylgold(I) derivatives [CF3 AuX](-) , which have been prepared and isolated as their [PPh4 ](+) salts in good yield, undergo thermally induced difluorocarbene extrusion in the gas phase, giving rise to the mixed gold(I) fluorohalide complexes [F-Au-X](-) (X=Cl, Br, I). These triatomic species have been detected by tandem mass spectrometry (MS2) experiments and their properties have been analyzed by DFT methods. The CF2 extrusion mechanism from the Au-CF3 moiety serves as a model for the CF2 insertion into the Au-F bond, since both reactivity channels are connected by the microreversibility principle.

  16. SU-E-J-144: MRI Visualization of a Metallic Fiducial Marker Used for Image Guided Prostate Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yee, S; Krauss, D; Yan, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Unlike on the daily CBCT used for the image-guided radiation therapy, the visualization of an implantable metallic fiducial marker on the planning MRI images has been a challenge due to the inherent insensitivity of metal in MRI, and very thin (∼ 1 mm or less) diameter. Here, an MRI technique to visualize a marker used for prostate cancer radiotherapy is reported. Methods: During the MRI acquisitions, a multi-shot turbo spin echo (TSE) technique (TR=3500 ms, TE=8.6 ms, ETL=17, recon voxel=0.42x0.42x3.5 mm3) was acquired in Philips 3T Ingenia together with a T2-weighted multi-shot TSE (TR=5381 ms, TE=110 ms, ETL=17, recon voxel=0.47×0.47×3 mm3) and a balanced turbo field echo (bTFE, flip angle 60, TR=2.76 ms, TE=1.3 ms, 0.85×0.85×3 mm3, NSA=4). In acquiring the MRI to visualize the fiducial marker, a particular emphasis was made to improve the spatial resolution and visibility in the generally dark, inhomogeneous prostate area by adjusting the slice profile ordering and TE values of TSE acquisition (in general, the lower value of TE in TSE acquisition generates a brighter signal but at the cost of high spatial resolution since the k-space, responsible for high spatial resolution, is filled with noisier data). Results: While clearly visible in CT, the marker was not visible in either T2-weighted TSE or bTFE, although the image qualities of both images were superior. In the new TSE acquisition (∼ a proton-density weighted image) adjusted by changing the profile ordering and the TE value, the marker was visible as a negative (but clear) contrast in the magnitude MRI, and as a positive contrast in the imaginary image of the phase-sensitive MRI. Conclusion: A metallic fiducial marker used for image guidance before prostate cancer radiotherapy can be made visible in MRI, which may facilitate more use of MRI in planning and guiding such radiation therapy.

  17. Interfractional Position Variation of Pancreatic Tumors Quantified Using Intratumoral Fiducial Markers and Daily Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Horst, Astrid van der; Wognum, Silvia; Dávila Fajardo, Raquel; Jong, Rianne de; Hooft, Jeanin E. van; Fockens, Paul; Tienhoven, Geertjan van; Bel, Arjan

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to quantify interfractional pancreatic position variation using fiducial markers visible on daily cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans. In addition, we analyzed possible migration of the markers to investigate their suitability for tumor localization. Methods and Materials: For 13 pancreatic cancer patients with implanted Visicoil markers, CBCT scans were obtained before 17 to 25 fractions (300 CBCTs in total). Image registration with the reference CT was used to determine the displacement of the 2 to 3 markers relative to bony anatomy and to each other. We analyzed the distance between marker pairs as a function of time to identify marker registration error (SD of linear fit residuals) and possible marker migration. For each patient, we determined the mean displacement of markers relative to the reference CT (systematic position error) and the spread in displacements (random position error). From this, we calculated the group systematic error, Σ, and group random error, σ. Results: Marker pair distances showed slight trends with time (range, −0.14 to 0.14 mm/day), possibly due to tissue deformation, but no shifts that would indicate marker migration. The mean SD of the fit residuals was 0.8 mm. We found large interfractional position variations, with for 116 of 300 (39%) fractions a 3-dimensional vector displacement of >10 mm. The spread in displacement varied significantly (P<.01) between patients, from a vector range of 9.1 mm to one of 24.6 mm. For the patient group, Σ was 3.8, 6.6, and 3.5 mm; and σ was 3.6, 4.7 and 2.5 mm, in left–right, superior–inferior, and anterior–posterior directions, respectively. Conclusions: We found large systematic displacements of the fiducial markers relative to bony anatomy, in addition to wide distributions of displacement. These results for interfractional position variation confirm the potential benefit of using fiducial markers rather than bony anatomy for daily online

  18. Enhancement of radiation effect on cancer cells by gold-pHLIP.

    PubMed

    Antosh, Michael P; Wijesinghe, Dayanjali D; Shrestha, Samana; Lanou, Robert; Huang, Yun Hu; Hasselbacher, Thomas; Fox, David; Neretti, Nicola; Sun, Shouheng; Katenka, Natallia; Cooper, Leon N; Andreev, Oleg A; Reshetnyak, Yana K

    2015-04-28

    Previous research has shown that gold nanoparticles can increase the effectiveness of radiation on cancer cells. Improved radiation effectiveness would allow lower radiation doses given to patients, reducing adverse effects; alternatively, it would provide more cancer killing at current radiation doses. Damage from radiation and gold nanoparticles depends in part on the Auger effect, which is very localized; thus, it is important to place the gold nanoparticles on or in the cancer cells. In this work, we use the pH-sensitive, tumor-targeting agent, pH Low-Insertion Peptide (pHLIP), to tether 1.4-nm gold nanoparticles to cancer cells. We find that the conjugation of pHLIP to gold nanoparticles increases gold uptake in cells compared with gold nanoparticles without pHLIP, with the nanoparticles distributed mostly on the cellular membranes. We further find that gold nanoparticles conjugated to pHLIP produce a statistically significant decrease in cell survival with radiation compared with cells without gold nanoparticles and cells with gold alone. In the context of our previous findings demonstrating efficient pHLIP-mediated delivery of gold nanoparticles to tumors, the obtained results serve as a foundation for further preclinical evaluation of dose enhancement.

  19. Enhancement of radiation effect on cancer cells by gold-pHLIP

    PubMed Central

    Antosh, Michael P.; Wijesinghe, Dayanjali D.; Shrestha, Samana; Lanou, Robert; Huang, Yun Hu; Hasselbacher, Thomas; Fox, David; Neretti, Nicola; Sun, Shouheng; Katenka, Natallia; Cooper, Leon N; Andreev, Oleg A.; Reshetnyak, Yana K.

    2015-01-01

    Previous research has shown that gold nanoparticles can increase the effectiveness of radiation on cancer cells. Improved radiation effectiveness would allow lower radiation doses given to patients, reducing adverse effects; alternatively, it would provide more cancer killing at current radiation doses. Damage from radiation and gold nanoparticles depends in part on the Auger effect, which is very localized; thus, it is important to place the gold nanoparticles on or in the cancer cells. In this work, we use the pH-sensitive, tumor-targeting agent, pH Low-Insertion Peptide (pHLIP), to tether 1.4-nm gold nanoparticles to cancer cells. We find that the conjugation of pHLIP to gold nanoparticles increases gold uptake in cells compared with gold nanoparticles without pHLIP, with the nanoparticles distributed mostly on the cellular membranes. We further find that gold nanoparticles conjugated to pHLIP produce a statistically significant decrease in cell survival with radiation compared with cells without gold nanoparticles and cells with gold alone. In the context of our previous findings demonstrating efficient pHLIP-mediated delivery of gold nanoparticles to tumors, the obtained results serve as a foundation for further preclinical evaluation of dose enhancement. PMID:25870296

  20. Quench Module Insert (QMI) and the Diffusion Module Insert (DMI) Furnace Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crouch, Myscha; Carswell, William; Farmer, Jeff; Rose, Fred; Tidwell, Paul

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents, in viewgraph form, QMI (Quench Module Insert) and DMI (Diffusion Module Insert) furnace development. The topics include: 1) Furnace Module in Rack; 2) Quench Module Insert; 3) QMI in MSL Core; 4) Diffusion Module Insert; 5) QMI; and 6) QMI Development and Testing.

  1. Simple approach for improving gold deposition inside nanoporous alumina template on Si substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Van Hoang; Hoshi, Yusuke; Usami, Noritaka

    2014-06-01

    We report on a simple approach for enhancing gold plating deposition inside the nanochannels of anodic Al oxide (AAO) on a Si substrate. The key to the approach is to insert an Al thin film deposited at a low deposition rate before further thickening the film by sputtering deposition. The deposition of only a 10 nm-thick Al film at a low deposition rate was found to be sufficient to improve the gold deposition with a given gold-plating solution. This was evidenced by the increase in the plating current during gold plating as well as the increase in the surface coverage of deposited gold to as high as 80%. The resultant AAO with plated gold segments is expected to be useful for vapor-liquid-solid techniques of fabricating nanowires guided by pores.

  2. How does adding anatomical landmarks as fiducial points in the point-matching registration of neuronavigation influence registration accuracy?

    PubMed

    Wang, Manning; Song, Zhijian

    2016-12-01

    Skin markers (SMs) are usually used as fiducial points in registration of neuronavigation, but the areas in which they can be adhered to are restricted, which usually results in poor distribution of the SMs and a large registration error. In this research, we studied whether the registration accuracy can be improved by adding anatomical landmarks (ALs), which are thought to have a larger localization error than SMs. A series of random SM configurations were generated, and for each SM configuration, we generated a corresponding SM-AL configuration by adding several ALs. We then compared the accuracy of the point-matching registration of the SM configurations with that of the corresponding SM-AL configurations. Experiment results indicated that adding ALs always made the mean target registration error of the whole head fall into a lower and narrower range, which meant that the registration became more accurate and more stable. In addition, adding more ALs resulted in a better performance.

  3. Accurate and high-performance 3D position measurement of fiducial marks by stereoscopic system for railway track inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbachev, Alexey A.; Serikova, Mariya G.; Pantyushina, Ekaterina N.; Volkova, Daria A.

    2016-04-01

    Modern demands for railway track measurements require high accuracy (about 2-5 mm) of rails placement along the track to ensure smooth, safe and fast transportation. As a mean for railways geometry measurements we suggest a stereoscopic system which measures 3D position of fiducial marks arranged along the track by image processing algorithms. The system accuracy was verified during laboratory tests by comparison with precise laser tracker indications. The accuracy of +/-1.5 mm within a measurement volume 150×400×5000 mm was achieved during the tests. This confirmed that the stereoscopic system demonstrates good measurement accuracy and can be potentially used as fully automated mean for railway track inspection.

  4. Optimization of multi-image pose recovery of fluoroscope tracking (FTRAC) fiducial in an image-guided femoroplasty system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wen P.; Armand, Mehran; Otake, Yoshito; Taylor, Russell H.

    2011-03-01

    Percutaneous femoroplasty [1], or femoral bone augmentation, is a prospective alternative treatment for reducing the risk of fracture in patients with severe osteoporosis. We are developing a surgical robotics system that will assist orthopaedic surgeons in planning and performing a patient-specific, augmentation of the femur with bone cement. This collaborative project, sponsored by the National Institutes of Health (NIH), has been the topic of previous publications [2],[3] from our group. This paper presents modifications to the pose recovery of a fluoroscope tracking (FTRAC) fiducial during our process of 2D/3D registration of X-ray intraoperative images to preoperative CT data. We show improved automata of the initial pose estimation as well as lower projection errors with the advent of a multiimage pose optimization step.

  5. Mars Observer Orbit Insertion Briefing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Steve Wall is the host of this video entitled, "Return to the Red Planet". Live animation of the Mars Observer orbiting Mars is presented. Steve Wall explains the spacecraft insertion maneuver and also explains the purpose for the Mars Observer launch. Live coverage of the Cape Canaveral launch of the Mars Observer is also presented. Suzanne Dodd, Chief of the Mission Planning team describes the burn start and how the spacecraft will be captured by Mars' gravity. Glenn Cunningham, Mars Observer Project Manager, gives background information on the Mars Observer and describes the organizations behind the Mars Observer Spacecraft, such as the Deep Space Network, the Mission Operation Support Office, Science Investigators, the Flight Engineering Office, Operations Office, and the Ground Data System Office. Dr. William Piotrowski, Acting Director, Solar System Exploration Division, NASA, talks about the purpose of the Mars Pathfinder which is to develop the technology and systems for landing small science packages on Mars. Mr. Roger Gibbs, Former Mars Observer Spacecraft Systems Engineer, tells us how the Mars Observer was built and describes the structural elements on the Mars Observer. The 11-month cruise period for the spacecraft is given by Joseph Beerer, Manager of the Engineering office. The thrust for the Mars Orbit Insertion is described by Ronald Klemetson, Technical Manager, Propulsion Subsystem Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). George Chen, Lead Engineer Attitude and Articulation Subsystem Spacecraft Team, explains the importance of the attitude control engines on the Spacecraft. Marvin Traxler, Manager of Tracking and Data Acquisition, describes how searching for a signal from the Mars Observer works. See NONP-NASA-VT-2000081555 for a continuation of this discussion with Marvin Traxler.

  6. ECG denoising and fiducial point extraction using an extended Kalman filtering framework with linear and nonlinear phase observations.

    PubMed

    Akhbari, Mahsa; Shamsollahi, Mohammad B; Jutten, Christian; Armoundas, Antonis A; Sayadi, Omid

    2016-02-01

    In this paper we propose an efficient method for denoising and extracting fiducial point (FP) of ECG signals. The method is based on a nonlinear dynamic model which uses Gaussian functions to model ECG waveforms. For estimating the model parameters, we use an extended Kalman filter (EKF). In this framework called EKF25, all the parameters of Gaussian functions as well as the ECG waveforms (P-wave, QRS complex and T-wave) in the ECG dynamical model, are considered as state variables. In this paper, the dynamic time warping method is used to estimate the nonlinear ECG phase observation. We compare this new approach with linear phase observation models. Using linear and nonlinear EKF25 for ECG denoising and nonlinear EKF25 for fiducial point extraction and ECG interval analysis are the main contributions of this paper. Performance comparison with other EKF-based techniques shows that the proposed method results in higher output SNR with an average SNR improvement of 12 dB for an input SNR of -8 dB. To evaluate the FP extraction performance, we compare the proposed method with a method based on partially collapsed Gibbs sampler and an established EKF-based method. The mean absolute error and the root mean square error of all FPs, across all databases are 14 ms and 22 ms, respectively, for our proposed method, with an advantage when using a nonlinear phase observation. These errors are significantly smaller than errors obtained with other methods. For ECG interval analysis, with an absolute mean error and a root mean square error of about 22 ms and 29 ms, the proposed method achieves better accuracy and smaller variability with respect to other methods.

  7. SU-E-J-64: Feasibility Study of Surgical Clips for Fiducial Tracking in CyberKnife System

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, H; Yoon, J; Lee, E; Cho, S; Park, K; Choi, W; Baek, J; Keum, K; Koom, W

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the ability of CyberKnife to track surgical clips used as fiducial markers. Methods: The Octavius 1000SRS detector and solid water (RW3) slab phantom were used with motion platform to evaluate the study. The RW3 slab phantom was set up to measure the dose distribution from coronal plane. It consists of 9 plates and the thickness of each plate is 10mm. Among them, one plate was attached with 3 surgical clips, which are orthogonally positioned on outer region of array. The length of attached clip was represented as 1cm on planning CT. The clip plate was placed on the 1000SRS detector and 3 slabs were stacked up on the plate to build the measuring depth. Below the detector, 5 slabs were set. The two-axis motion platform was programmed with 1D sinusoidal movement (20mm peak-to-peak, 3s period) toward superior/inferior and left/right directions to simulate target motion. During delivery, two clips were extracted by two X-ray imagers, which led to translational error correction only. Synchrony was also used for dynamic tracking. After the irradiation, the measured dose distribution of coronal plane was compared with the planar dose distribution calculated by the CyberKnife treatment planning system (Multiplan) for cross verification. The results were assessed by comparing the absolute Gamma (γ) index. Results: The dose distributions measured by the 1000SRS detector were in good agreements with those calculated by Multiplan. In the dosimetric comparison using γ-function criteria based on the distance-to-agreement of 3mm and the local dose difference of 3%, the passing rate with γ- parameter ≤1 was 91% in coronal plane. Conclusion: The surgical clips can be considered as new fiducials for robotic radiosurgery delivery by considering the target margin with less than 5mm.

  8. Patient Motion and Targeting Accuracy in Robotic Spinal Radiosurgery: 260 Single-Fraction Fiducial-Free Cases

    SciTech Connect

    Fuerweger, Christoph; Drexler, Christian; Kufeld, Markus; Muacevic, Alexander; Wowra, Berndt; Schlaefer, Alexander

    2010-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate clinical targeting precision and assess patient movement data during fiducial-free, single-fraction spinal radiosurgery with the Cyberknife (CK). Methods and Materials: Image-guided spine tracking accuracy was tested using two phantoms. Movement patterns (three translations, roll, pitch and yaw) were obtained from log files of 260 patient treatments (47 cervical, 89 thoracic, 90 lumbar, and 34 pelvic/sacral). For two treatments (average and maximum motion scenario), we added offsets to all beams according to recorded patient movements and recalculated the delivered dose distribution to simulate the dosimetric impact of intrafraction motion. Results: Phantom spine position was registered with an accuracy of <0.2 mm for translational and <0.3{sup o} for rotational directions. Residual patient motion yielded mean targeting errors per beam of 0.28 {+-} 0.13 mm (X), 0.25 {+-} 0.15 mm (Y), 0.19 {+-} 0.11 mm (Z) and 0.40 {+-} 0.20{sup o} (roll), 0.20 {+-} 0.08{sup o} (pitch), and 0.19 {+-} 0.08{sup o} (yaw). Spine region had little influence on overall targeting error, which was <1 mm for more than 95% of treatments (median, 0.48 mm). In the maximum motion case, target coverage decreased by 1.7% (from 92.1% to 90.4%) for the 20-Gy prescription isodose. Spinal cord volume receiving more than 8 Gy increased slightly, from 2.41 to 2.46 cm{sup 3}. Conclusions: Submillimeter targeting precision was obtained for fiducial-free spinal radiosurgery despite patient motion. Patient motion has little effect on the delivered dose distribution when image-guided correction of beam aiming is employed.

  9. Dosimetric implications of residual seminal vesicle motion in fiducial-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Stenmark, Matthew H.; Vineberg, Karen; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Hamstra, Daniel A.; Feng, Mary

    2012-10-01

    To determine whether residual interfraction seminal vesicle (SV) displacement necessitates specific planning target volume (PTV) margins during fiducial-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) of the prostate. A planning computed tomography (CT) scan and 2 subsequent CT scans were prospectively obtained for 20 prostate cancer patients with intraprostatic fiducial markers. After CT registration, SV displacement relative to the prostate was quantified as a function of margin size for both the proximal (1 cm) SV (PSV) and the full SV (FSV). Two IMRT plans were simulated for each patient (prostate + PSV and prostate + FSV) both with a uniform 5-mm PTV margin. Minimum clinical target volume (CTV) dose (D{sub min}) and the volume of SV receiving 95% of the prescription dose (V{sub 95%}) were assessed during treatment and compared with the initial plan. In all cases, SV displacement with respect to the prostate was greater for the FSV compared with the PSV. To ensure at least 95% geometrical coverage of the CTV for 90% of patients, margins of 5 and 8 mm were required for the PSV and FSV, respectively. Dosimetrically, residual SV displacement had minimal impact on PSV coverage compared with FSV coverage. For the PSV D{sub min} was {>=}95% of the prescribed dose in 90% of patients with an overall mean V{sub 95%} of 99.6 {+-} 0.8%; for the FSV D{sub min} was {>=}95% of the prescribed dose in only 45% of patients with a mean V{sub 95%} of 97.9 {+-} 2.4%. The SVs move differentially from the prostate and exhibit greater variation with increasing distance from the prostate. For plans targeting just the prostate and PSVs, 5-mm PTV expansions are adequate. However, despite daily localization of the prostate, larger PTV margins are required for cases where the intent is to completely cover the FSV.

  10. Improvement of registration accuracy in accelerated partial breast irradiation using the point-based rigid-body registration algorithm for patients with implanted fiducial markers

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Minoru; Yoshimura, Michio Sato, Sayaka; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Yamada, Masahiro; Hirata, Kimiko; Ogura, Masakazu; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Sasaki, Makoto; Fujimoto, Takahiro

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: To investigate image-registration errors when using fiducial markers with a manual method and the point-based rigid-body registration (PRBR) algorithm in accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) patients, with accompanying fiducial deviations. Methods: Twenty-two consecutive patients were enrolled in a prospective trial examining 10-fraction APBI. Titanium clips were implanted intraoperatively around the seroma in all patients. For image-registration, the positions of the clips in daily kV x-ray images were matched to those in the planning digitally reconstructed radiographs. Fiducial and gravity registration errors (FREs and GREs, respectively), representing resulting misalignments of the edge and center of the target, respectively, were compared between the manual and algorithm-based methods. Results: In total, 218 fractions were evaluated. Although the mean FRE/GRE values for the manual and algorithm-based methods were within 3 mm (2.3/1.7 and 1.3/0.4 mm, respectively), the percentages of fractions where FRE/GRE exceeded 3 mm using the manual and algorithm-based methods were 18.8%/7.3% and 0%/0%, respectively. Manual registration resulted in 18.6% of patients with fractions of FRE/GRE exceeding 5 mm. The patients with larger clip deviation had significantly more fractions showing large FRE/GRE using manual registration. Conclusions: For image-registration using fiducial markers in APBI, the manual registration results in more fractions with considerable registration error due to loss of fiducial objectivity resulting from their deviation. The authors recommend the PRBR algorithm as a safe and effective strategy for accurate, image-guided registration and PTV margin reduction.

  11. Chalcogenide centred gold complexes.

    PubMed

    Gimeno, M Concepción; Laguna, Antonio

    2008-09-01

    Chalcogenide-centred gold complexes are an important class of compounds in which a central chalcogen is surrounded by several gold atoms or gold and other metals. They have special characteristics such as unusual geometries, electron deficiency and properties such as luminescence or non-linear optical properties. The best known species are the trinuclear [E(AuPR3)3]+, 'oxonium' type species, that have high synthetic applicability, not only in other chalcogen-centred species, but in many other organometallic derivatives. The aurophilic interactions play an important role in the stability, preference for a particular geometry and luminescence properties in this type of derivatives (critical review, 117 references).

  12. Using size-selected gold clusters on graphene oxide films to aid cryo-transmission electron tomography alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkill, Kenton P.; Mantell, Judith M.; Plant, Simon R.; Verkade, Paul; Palmer, Richard E.

    2015-03-01

    A three-dimensional reconstruction of a nano-scale aqueous object can be achieved by taking a series of transmission electron micrographs tilted at different angles in vitreous ice: cryo-Transmission Electron Tomography. Presented here is a novel method of fine alignment for the tilt series. Size-selected gold clusters of ~2.7 nm (Au561 +/- 14), ~3.2 nm (Au923 +/- 22), and ~4.3 nm (Au2057 +/- 45) in diameter were deposited onto separate graphene oxide films overlaying holes on amorphous carbon grids. After plunge freezing and subsequent transfer to cryo-Transmission Electron Tomography, the resulting tomograms have excellent (de-)focus and alignment properties during automatic acquisition. Fine alignment is accurate when the evenly distributed 3.2 nm gold particles are used as fiducial markers, demonstrated with a reconstruction of a tobacco mosaic virus. Using a graphene oxide film means the fiducial markers are not interfering with the ice bound sample and that automated collection is consistent. The use of pre-deposited size-selected clusters means there is no aggregation and a user defined concentration. The size-selected clusters are mono-dispersed and can be produced in a wide size range including 2-5 nm in diameter. The use of size-selected clusters on a graphene oxide films represents a significant technical advance for 3D cryo-electron microscopy.

  13. Using size-selected gold clusters on graphene oxide films to aid cryo-transmission electron tomography alignment

    PubMed Central

    Arkill, Kenton P.; Mantell, Judith M.; Plant, Simon R.; Verkade, Paul; Palmer, Richard E.

    2015-01-01

    A three-dimensional reconstruction of a nano-scale aqueous object can be achieved by taking a series of transmission electron micrographs tilted at different angles in vitreous ice: cryo-Transmission Electron Tomography. Presented here is a novel method of fine alignment for the tilt series. Size-selected gold clusters of ~2.7 nm (Au561 ± 14), ~3.2 nm (Au923 ± 22), and ~4.3 nm (Au2057 ± 45) in diameter were deposited onto separate graphene oxide films overlaying holes on amorphous carbon grids. After plunge freezing and subsequent transfer to cryo-Transmission Electron Tomography, the resulting tomograms have excellent (de-)focus and alignment properties during automatic acquisition. Fine alignment is accurate when the evenly distributed 3.2 nm gold particles are used as fiducial markers, demonstrated with a reconstruction of a tobacco mosaic virus. Using a graphene oxide film means the fiducial markers are not interfering with the ice bound sample and that automated collection is consistent. The use of pre-deposited size-selected clusters means there is no aggregation and a user defined concentration. The size-selected clusters are mono-dispersed and can be produced in a wide size range including 2–5 nm in diameter. The use of size-selected clusters on a graphene oxide films represents a significant technical advance for 3D cryo-electron microscopy. PMID:25783049

  14. Insertion devices at the advanced photon source

    SciTech Connect

    Moog, E.R.

    1996-07-01

    The insertion devices being installed at the Advanced Photon Source cause the stored particle beam to wiggle, emitting x-rays with each wiggle. These x-rays combine to make an intense beam of radiation. Both wiggler and undulator types of insertion devices are being installed; the characteristics of the radiation produced by these two types of insertion devices are discussed, along with the reasons for those characteristics.

  15. [Apical root pins of high-karat gold alloys for resected roots].

    PubMed

    Handtmann, S; Lindemann, W; Sculte, W

    1989-02-01

    Following earlier studies on corrosion of silver pins in the root canal experience will be presented with the use of high-karat gold pins for apical closure of root amputations. The commercially available standardized Ackermann silver pins were replaced by high-karat gold pins of similar Vicker hardness and inserted in 218 patients with 264 root amputations since 1986. A clinical and radiological follow-up demonstrated a success rate of over 90%.

  16. Nozzle insert for mixed mode fuel injector

    DOEpatents

    Lawrence, Keith E.

    2006-11-21

    A fuel injector includes a homogenous charge nozzle outlet set and a conventional nozzle outlet set controlled respectively, by first and second needle valve members. The homogeneous charged nozzle outlet set is defined by a nozzle insert that is attached to an injector body, which defines the conventional nozzle outlet set. The nozzle insert is a one piece metallic component with a large diameter segment separated from a small diameter segment by an annular engagement surface. One of the needle valve members is guided on an outer surface of the nozzle insert, and the nozzle insert has an interference fit attachment to the injector body.

  17. Properties of a symmetric RHIC insertion

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.Y.

    1991-07-01

    This report evaluates the lattice functions of the symmetric insertion proposed by A.G. Ruggiero for the RHIC insertion. The crossing geometry, Inner and Outer matching sections, and chromatic properties are studied in detail. Some properties of the missing dipole dispersion correction scheme are also discussed. We found that the chromatic properties of the symmetric insertion is not better than the antisymmetric insertion. The problem is that the four family sextupole correction scheme seems not able to improve the chromatic distortion. Analytic understanding of the failure of the four family sextupole correction scheme will be very useful. 9 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Multipurpose Transposon-Insertion Libraries in Yeast.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anuj

    2016-06-01

    Libraries of transposon-insertion alleles constitute powerful and versatile tools for large-scale analysis of yeast gene function. Transposon-insertion libraries are constructed most simply through mutagenesis of a plasmid-based genomic DNA library; modification of the mutagenizing transposon by incorporation of yeast selectable markers, recombination sites, and an epitope tag enables the application of insertion alleles for phenotypic screening and protein localization. In particular, yeast genomic DNA libraries have been mutagenized with modified bacterial transposons carrying the URA3 marker, lox recombination sites, and sequence encoding multiple copies of the hemagglutinin (HA) epitope. Mutagenesis with these transposons has yielded a large resource of insertion alleles affecting nearly 4000 yeast genes in total. Through well-established protocols, these insertion libraries can be introduced into the desired strain backgrounds and the resulting insertional mutants can be screened or systematically analyzed. Relative to alternative methods of UV irradiation or chemical mutagenesis, transposon-insertion alleles can be easily identified by PCR-based approaches or high-throughput sequencing. Transposon-insertion libraries also provide a cost-effective alternative to targeted deletion approaches, although, in contrast to start-codon to stop-codon deletions, insertion alleles might not represent true null-mutants. For protein-localization studies, transposon-insertion alleles can provide encoded epitope tags in-frame with internal codons; in many cases, these transposon-encoded epitope tags can provide a more accurate localization for proteins in which terminal sequences are crucial for intracellular targeting. Thus, overall, transposon-insertion libraries can be used quickly and economically and have a particular utility in screening for desired phenotypes and localization patterns in nonstandard genetic backgrounds.

  19. Gold nanoprobes for theranostics

    PubMed Central

    Panchapakesan, Balaji; Book-Newell, Brittany; Sethu, Palaniappan; Rao, Madhusudhana; Irudayaraj, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Gold nanoprobes have become attractive diagnostic and therapeutic agents in medicine and life sciences research owing to their reproducible synthesis with atomic level precision, unique physical and chemical properties, versatility of their morphologies, flexibility in functionalization, ease of targeting, efficiency in drug delivery and opportunities for multimodal therapy. This review highlights some of the recent advances and the potential for gold nanoprobes in theranostics. PMID:22122586

  20. Gold-bearing skarns

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Theodore, Ted G.; Orris, Greta J.; Hammerstrom, Jane M.; Bliss, James D.

    1991-01-01

    In recent years, a significant proportion of the mining industry's interest has been centered on discovery of gold deposits; this includes discovery of additional deposits where gold occurs in skarn, such as at Fortitude, Nevada, and at Red Dome, Australia. Under the classification of Au-bearing skarns, we have modeled these and similar gold-rich deposits that have a gold grade of at least 1 g/t and exhibit distinctive skarn mineralogy. Two subtypes, Au-skarns and byproduct Au-skarns, can be recognized on the basis of gold, silver, and base-metal grades, although many other geological factors apparently are still undistinguishable largely because of a lack of detailed studies of the Au-skarns. Median grades and tonnage for 40 Au-skarn deposits are 8.6 g/t Au, 5.0 g/t Ag, and 213,000 t. Median grades and tonnage for 50 byproduct and Au-skarn deposits are 3.7 g/t Au, 37 g/t Ag, and 330,000 t. Gold-bearing skarns are generally calcic exoskarns associated with intense retrograde hydrosilicate alteration. These skarns may contain economic amounts of numerous other commodities (Cu, Fe, Pb, Zn, As, Bi, W, Sb, Co, Cd, and S) as well as gold and silver. Most Au-bearing skarns are found in Paleozoic and Cenozoic orogenic-belt and island-arc settings and are associated with felsic to intermediate intrusive rocks of Paleozoic to Tertiary age. Native gold, electru, pyrite, pyrrhotite, chalcopyrite, arsenopyrite, sphalerite, galena, bismuth minerals, and magnetite or hematite are the most common opaque minerals. Gangue minerals typically include garnet (andradite-grossular), pyroxene (diopside-hedenbergite), wollastonite, chlorite, epidote, quartz, actinolite-tremolite, and (or) calcite.

  1. Getting the Gold Treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Epner Technology, Inc., worked with Goddard Space Center to apply gold coating to the Vegetation Canopy Lidar (VCL) mirror. This partnership resulted in new commercial applications for Epner's LaserGold(R) process in the automotive industry. Previously, the company did not have equipment large enough to handle the plating of the stainless steel panels cost effectively. Seeing a chance to renew this effort, Epner Technology and Goddard entered into an agreement by which NASA would fund the facility needed to do the gold-plating, and Epner Technology would cover all other costs as part of their internal research and development. The VCL mirror project proceeded successfully, fulfilling Goddard's needs and leaving Epner Technology with a new facility to provide LaserGold for the automotive industry. The new capability means increased power savings and improvements in both quality and production time for BMW Manufacturing Corporation of Spartanburg, South Carolina, and Cadillac of Detroit, Michigan, as well as other manufacturers who have implemented Epner Technology's LaserGold process. LaserGold(R) is a registered trademark of Epner Technology, Inc.

  2. Gold in minerals and the composition of native gold

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, Robert Sprague; Fleischer, Michael

    1969-01-01

    Gold occurs in nature mainly as the metal and as various alloys. It forms complete series of solid solutions with silver, copper, nickel, palladium, and platinum. In association with the platinum metals, gold occurs as free gold as well as in solid solution. The native elements contain the most gold, followed by the sulfide minerals. Several gold tellurides are known, but no gold selenides have been reported, and only one sulfide, the telluride-sulfide mineral nagyagite, is known. The nonmetallic minerals carry the least gold, and the light-colored minerals generally contain less gold than the dark minerals. Some conclusions in the literature are conflicting in regard to the relation of fineness of native gold to its position laterally and vertically within a lode, the nature of the country rocks, and the location and size of nuggets in a streambed, as well as to the variation of fineness within an individual nugget.

  3. Image-Guided Radiotherapy (IGRT) for Prostate Cancer Comparing kV Imaging of Fiducial Markers With Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT)

    SciTech Connect

    Barney, Brandon M.; Lee, R. Jeffrey; Handrahan, Diana; Welsh, Keith T.; Cook, J. Taylor; Sause, William T.

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: To present our single-institution experience with image-guided radiotherapy comparing fiducial markers and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) for daily localization of prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: From April 2007 to October 2008, 36 patients with prostate cancer received intensity-modulated radiotherapy with daily localization by use of implanted fiducials. Orthogonal kilovoltage (kV) portal imaging preceded all 1244 treatments. Cone-beam computed tomography images were also obtained before 286 treatments (23%). Shifts in the anterior-posterior (AP), superior-inferior (SI), and left-right (LR) dimensions were made from kV fiducial imaging. Cone-beam computed tomography shifts based on soft tissues were recorded. Shifts were compared by use of Bland-Altman limits of agreement. Mean and standard deviation of absolute differences were also compared. A difference of 5 mm or less was acceptable. Subsets including start date, body mass index, and prostate size were analyzed. Results: Of 286 treatments, 81 (28%) resulted in a greater than 5.0-mm difference in one or more dimensions. Mean differences in the AP, SI, and LR dimensions were 3.4 {+-} 2.6 mm, 3.1 {+-} 2.7 mm, and 1.3 {+-} 1.6 mm, respectively. Most deviations occurred in the posterior (fiducials, 78%; CBCT, 59%), superior (79%, 61%), and left (57%, 63%) directions. Bland-Altman 95% confidence intervals were -4.0 to 9.3 mm for AP, -9.0 to 5.3 mm for SI, and -4.1 to 3.9 mm for LR. The percentages of shift agreements within {+-}5 mm were 72.4% for AP, 72.7% for SI, and 97.2% for LR. Correlation between imaging techniques was not altered by time, body mass index, or prostate size. Conclusions: Cone-beam computed tomography and kV fiducial imaging are similar; however, more than one-fourth of CBCT and kV shifts differed enough to affect target coverage. This was even more pronounced with smaller margins (3 mm). Fiducial imaging requires less daily physician input, is less time-consuming, and is

  4. Validation of deformable image registration algorithms on CT images of ex vivo porcine bladders with fiducial markers

    SciTech Connect

    Wognum, S. Heethuis, S. E.; Bel, A.; Rosario, T.; Hoogeman, M. S.

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: The spatial accuracy of deformable image registration (DIR) is important in the implementation of image guided adaptive radiotherapy techniques for cancer in the pelvic region. Validation of algorithms is best performed on phantoms with fiducial markers undergoing controlled large deformations. Excised porcine bladders, exhibiting similar filling and voiding behavior as human bladders, provide such an environment. The aim of this study was to determine the spatial accuracy of different DIR algorithms on CT images ofex vivo porcine bladders with radiopaque fiducial markers applied to the outer surface, for a range of bladder volumes, using various accuracy metrics. Methods: Five excised porcine bladders with a grid of 30–40 radiopaque fiducial markers attached to the outer wall were suspended inside a water-filled phantom. The bladder was filled with a controlled amount of water with added contrast medium for a range of filling volumes (100–400 ml in steps of 50 ml) using a luer lock syringe, and CT scans were acquired at each filling volume. DIR was performed for each data set, with the 100 ml bladder as the reference image. Six intensity-based algorithms (optical flow or demons-based) implemented in theMATLAB platform DIRART, a b-spline algorithm implemented in the commercial software package VelocityAI, and a structure-based algorithm (Symmetric Thin Plate Spline Robust Point Matching) were validated, using adequate parameter settings according to values previously published. The resulting deformation vector field from each registration was applied to the contoured bladder structures and to the marker coordinates for spatial error calculation. The quality of the algorithms was assessed by comparing the different error metrics across the different algorithms, and by comparing the effect of deformation magnitude (bladder volume difference) per algorithm, using the Independent Samples Kruskal-Wallis test. Results: The authors found good structure

  5. Turbine vane segment and impingement insert configuration for fail-safe impingement insert retention

    DOEpatents

    Burdgick, Steven Sebastian; Kellock, Iain Robertson

    2003-05-13

    An impingement insert sleeve is provided that is adapted to be disposed in a coolant cavity defined through a stator vane. The insert has a generally open inlet end and first and second pairs of diametrically opposed side walls, and at least one fail-safe tab defined at a longitudinal end of the insert for limiting radial displacement of the insert with respect to the stator vane.

  6. Central Solenoid Insert Technical Specification

    SciTech Connect

    Martovetsky, Nicolai N; Smirnov, Alexandre

    2011-09-01

    The US ITER Project Office (USIPO) is responsible for the ITER central solenoid (CS) contribution to the ITER project. The Central Solenoid Insert (CSI) project will allow ITER validation the appropriate lengths of the conductors to be used in the full-scale CS coils under relevant conditions. The ITER Program plans to build and test a CSI to verify the performance of the CS conductor. The CSI is a one-layer solenoid with an inner diameter of 1.48 m and a height of 4.45 m between electric terminal ends. The coil weight with the terminals is approximately 820 kg without insulation. The major goal of the CSI is to measure the temperature margin of the CS under the ITER direct current (DC) operating conditions, including determining sensitivity to load cycles. Performance of the joints, ramp rate sensitivity, and stability against thermal or electromagnetic disturbances, electrical insulation, losses, and instrumentation are addressed separately and therefore are not major goals in this project. However, losses and joint performance will be tested during the CSI testing campaign. The USIPO will build the CSI that will be tested at the Central Solenoid Model Coil (CSMC) Test Facility at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Naka, Japan. The industrial vendors (the Suppliers) will report to the USIPO (the Company). All approvals to proceed will be issued by the Company, which in some cases, as specified in this document, will also require the approval of the ITER Organization. Responsibilities and obligations will be covered by respective contracts between the USIPO, called Company interchangeably, and the industrial Prime Contractors, called Suppliers. Different stages of work may be performed by more than one Prime Contractor, as described in this specification. Technical requirements of the contract between the Company and the Prime Contractor will be covered by the Fabrication Specifications developed by the Prime Contractor based on this document and approved by

  7. Propagation and stability characteristics of a 500-m-long laser-based fiducial line for high-precision alignment of long-distance linear accelerators.

    PubMed

    Suwada, Tsuyoshi; Satoh, Masanori; Telada, Souichi; Minoshima, Kaoru

    2013-09-01

    A laser-based alignment system with a He-Ne laser has been newly developed in order to precisely align accelerator units at the KEKB injector linac. The laser beam was first implemented as a 500-m-long fiducial straight line for alignment measurements. We experimentally investigated the propagation and stability characteristics of the laser beam passing through laser pipes in vacuum. The pointing stability at the last fiducial point was successfully obtained with the transverse displacements of ±40 μm level in one standard deviation by applying a feedback control. This pointing stability corresponds to an angle of ±0.08 μrad. This report contains a detailed description of the experimental investigation for the propagation and stability characteristics of the laser beam in the laser-based alignment system for long-distance linear accelerators.

  8. Tracking Accuracy of a Real-Time Fiducial Tracking System for Patient Positioning and Monitoring in Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Shchory, Tal; Schifter, Dan; Lichtman, Rinat; Neustadter, David; Corn, Benjamin W.

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: In radiation therapy there is a need to accurately know the location of the target in real time. A novel radioactive tracking technology has been developed to answer this need. The technology consists of a radioactive implanted fiducial marker designed to minimize migration and a linac mounted tracking device. This study measured the static and dynamic accuracy of the new tracking technology in a clinical radiation therapy environment. Methods and Materials: The tracking device was installed on the linac gantry. The radioactive marker was located in a tissue equivalent phantom. Marker location was measured simultaneously by the radioactive tracking system and by a Microscribe G2 coordinate measuring machine (certified spatial accuracy of 0.38 mm). Localization consistency throughout a volume and absolute accuracy in the Fixed coordinate system were measured at multiple gantry angles over volumes of at least 10 cm in diameter centered at isocenter. Dynamic accuracy was measured with the marker located inside a breathing phantom. Results: The mean consistency for the static source was 0.58 mm throughout the tested region at all measured gantry angles. The mean absolute position error in the Fixed coordinate system for all gantry angles was 0.97 mm. The mean real-time tracking error for the dynamic source within the breathing phantom was less than 1 mm. Conclusions: This novel radioactive tracking technology has the potential to be useful in accurate target localization and real-time monitoring for radiation therapy.

  9. Insertion sequence elements in Lactococcus garvieae.

    PubMed

    Eraclio, Giovanni; Ricci, Giovanni; Fortina, Maria Grazia

    2015-01-25

    Insertion sequences are the simplest intracellular Mobile Genetic Elements which can occur in very high numbers in prokaryotic genomes, where they play an important evolutionary role by promoting genome plasticity. As such, the studies on the diversity and distribution of insertion sequences in genomes not yet investigated can contribute to improve the knowledge on a bacterial species and to identify new transposable elements. The present work describes the occurrence of insertion sequences in Lactococcus garvieae, an opportunistic emerging zoonotic and human pathogen, also associated with different food matrices. To date, no insertion elements have been described for L. garvieae in the IS element database. The analysis of the twelve published L. garvieae genomes identified 15 distinct insertion sequences that are members of the IS3, IS982, IS6, IS21 and IS256 families, including five new elements. Most of the insertion sequences in L. garvieae show substantial homology to the Lactococcus lactis elements, suggesting the movement of IS between these two species phylogenetically closely related. ISLL6 elements belonging to IS3 family were most abundant, with several copies distributed in 9 of the 12 genomes analyzed. An alignment analysis of two complete genomes carrying multi-copies of this insertion sequence indicates a possible involvement of ISLL6 in chromosomal rearrangement.

  10. In vivo liberation of gold ions from gold implants. Autometallographic tracing of gold in cells adjacent to metallic gold.

    PubMed

    Danscher, Gorm

    2002-05-01

    For some years, the implantation of small pieces of gold has been used as an unauthorised remedy for osteoarthritis and pain. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether gold ions are released from gold implants. Pieces of pure gold were placed in the connective tissue of skin, bone and brains of anaesthetised animals. Ten days to several months later the animals were anaesthetised and killed by transcardial perfusion. Tissue blocks containing the gold pieces were cut, and the sections were silver-enhanced by autometallography. It was found that gold ions are released from the implanted gold and diffuse out into the surrounding tissue. The gold-containing cells in connective tissues were macrophages, mast cells and fibroblasts. In the brain, gold accumulated in astrocytes and neurons. Proton-induced X-ray emission spectroscopy analysis of the tissue surrounding gold implants confirmed that gold ions are liberated. The findings suggest that the gold implant technique, on a local scale, mimics systemic treatment with a gold-containing drug.

  11. Sequential cooling insert for turbine stator vane

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Russell B; Krueger, Judson J; Plank, William L

    2014-04-01

    A sequential impingement cooling insert for a turbine stator vane that forms a double impingement for the pressure and suction sides of the vane or a triple impingement. The insert is formed from a sheet metal formed in a zigzag shape that forms a series of alternating impingement cooling channels with return air channels, where pressure side and suction side impingement cooling plates are secured over the zigzag shaped main piece. Another embodiment includes the insert formed from one or two blocks of material in which the impingement channels and return air channels are machined into each block.

  12. Elliptically polarizing adjustable phase insertion device

    DOEpatents

    Carr, Roger

    1995-01-01

    An insertion device for extracting polarized electromagnetic energy from a beam of particles is disclosed. The insertion device includes four linear arrays of magnets which are aligned with the particle beam. The magnetic field strength to which the particles are subjected is adjusted by altering the relative alignment of the arrays in a direction parallel to that of the particle beam. Both the energy and polarization of the extracted energy may be varied by moving the relevant arrays parallel to the beam direction. The present invention requires a substantially simpler and more economical superstructure than insertion devices in which the magnetic field strength is altered by changing the gap between arrays of magnets.

  13. Insertion Profiles of 4 Headless Compression Screws

    PubMed Central

    Hart, Adam; Harvey, Edward J.; Lefebvre, Louis-Philippe; Barthelat, Francois; Rabiei, Reza; Martineau, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose In practice, the surgeon must rely on screw position (insertion depth) and tactile feedback from the screwdriver (insertion torque) to gauge compression. In this study, we identified the relationship between interfragmentary compression and these 2 factors. Methods The Acutrak Standard, Acutrak Mini, Synthes 3.0, and Herbert-Whipple implants were tested using a polyurethane foam scaphoid model. A specialized testing jig simultaneously measured compression force, insertion torque, and insertion depth at half-screw-turn intervals until failure occurred. Results The peak compression occurs at an insertion depth of −3.1 mm, −2.8 mm, 0.9 mm, and 1.5 mm for the Acutrak Mini, Acutrak Standard, Herbert-Whipple, and Synthes screws respectively (insertion depth is positive when the screw is proud above the bone and negative when buried). The compression and insertion torque at a depth of −2 mm were found to be 113 ± 18 N and 0.348 ± 0.052 Nm for the Acutrak Standard, 104 ± 15 N and 0.175 ± 0.008 Nm for the Acutrak Mini, 78 ± 9 N and 0.245 ± 0.006 Nm for the Herbert-Whipple, and 67 ± 2N, 0.233 ± 0.010 Nm for the Synthes headless compression screws. Conclusions All 4 screws generated a sizable amount of compression (> 60 N) over a wide range of insertion depths. The compression at the commonly recommended insertion depth of −2 mm was not significantly different between screws; thus, implant selection should not be based on compression profile alone. Conically shaped screws (Acutrak) generated their peak compression when they were fully buried in the foam whereas the shanked screws (Synthes and Herbert-Whipple) reached peak compression before they were fully inserted. Because insertion torque correlated poorly with compression, surgeons should avoid using tactile judgment of torque as a proxy for compression. Clinical relevance Knowledge of the insertion profile may improve our understanding of the implants, provide a better basis for comparing screws

  14. Sequential cooling insert for turbine stator vane

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Russel B; Krueger, Judson J; Plank, William L

    2014-11-04

    A sequential impingement cooling insert for a turbine stator vane that forms a double impingement for the pressure and suction sides of the vane or a triple impingement. The insert is formed from a sheet metal formed in a zigzag shape that forms a series of alternating impingement cooling channels with return air channels, where pressure side and suction side impingement cooling plates are secured over the zigzag shaped main piece. Another embodiment includes the insert formed from one or two blocks of material in which the impingement channels and return air channels are machined into each block.

  15. A non-diazo approach to α-oxo gold carbenes via gold-catalyzed alkyne oxidation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liming

    2014-03-18

    For the past dozen years, homogeneous gold catalysis has evolved from a little known topic in organic synthesis to a fully blown research field of significant importance to synthetic practitioners, due to its novel reactivities and reaction modes. Cationic gold(I) complexes are powerful soft Lewis acids that can activate alkynes and allenes toward efficient attack by nucleophiles, leading to the generation of alkenyl gold intermediates. Some of the most versatile aspects of gold catalysis involve the generation of gold carbene intermediates, which occurs through the approach of an electrophile to the distal end of the alkenyl gold moiety, and their diverse transformations thereafter. On the other hand, α-oxo metal carbene/carbenoids are highly versatile intermediates in organic synthesis and can undergo various synthetically challenging yet highly valuable transformations such as C-H insertion, ylide formation, and cyclopropanation reactions. Metal-catalyzed dediazotizations of diazo carbonyl compounds are the principle and most reliable strategy to access them. Unfortunately, the substrates contain a highly energetic diazo moiety and are potentially explosive. Moreover, chemists need to use energetic reagents to prepare them, putting further constrains on operational safety. In this Account, we show that the unique access to the gold carbene species in homogeneous gold catalysis offers an opportunity to generate α-oxo gold carbenes if both nucleophile and electrophile are oxygen. Hence, this approach would enable readily available and safer alkynes to replace hazardous α-diazo carbonyl compounds as precursors in the realm of gold carbene chemistry. For the past several years, we have demonstrated that alkynes can indeed effectively serve as precursors to versatile α-oxo gold carbenes. In our initial study, we showed that a tethered sulfoxide can be a suitable oxidant, which in some cases leads to the formation of α-oxo gold carbene intermediates. The

  16. A Non-Diazo Approach to α-Oxo Gold Carbenes via Gold-Catalyzed Alkyne Oxidation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    For the past dozen years, homogeneous gold catalysis has evolved from a little known topic in organic synthesis to a fully blown research field of significant importance to synthetic practitioners, due to its novel reactivities and reaction modes. Cationic gold(I) complexes are powerful soft Lewis acids that can activate alkynes and allenes toward efficient attack by nucleophiles, leading to the generation of alkenyl gold intermediates. Some of the most versatile aspects of gold catalysis involve the generation of gold carbene intermediates, which occurs through the approach of an electrophile to the distal end of the alkenyl gold moiety, and their diverse transformations thereafter. On the other hand, α-oxo metal carbene/carbenoids are highly versatile intermediates in organic synthesis and can undergo various synthetically challenging yet highly valuable transformations such as C–H insertion, ylide formation, and cyclopropanation reactions. Metal-catalyzed dediazotizations of diazo carbonyl compounds are the principle and most reliable strategy to access them. Unfortunately, the substrates contain a highly energetic diazo moiety and are potentially explosive. Moreover, chemists need to use energetic reagents to prepare them, putting further constrains on operational safety. In this Account, we show that the unique access to the gold carbene species in homogeneous gold catalysis offers an opportunity to generate α-oxo gold carbenes if both nucleophile and electrophile are oxygen. Hence, this approach would enable readily available and safer alkynes to replace hazardous α-diazo carbonyl compounds as precursors in the realm of gold carbene chemistry. For the past several years, we have demonstrated that alkynes can indeed effectively serve as precursors to versatile α-oxo gold carbenes. In our initial study, we showed that a tethered sulfoxide can be a suitable oxidant, which in some cases leads to the formation of α-oxo gold carbene intermediates. The

  17. MO-FG-BRA-05: Next Generation Radiotherapy Biomaterials Loaded With Gold Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Cifter, G; Ngwa, W; Sajo, E; Korideck, H; Cormack, R; Makrigiorgos, G; Kumar, R; Sridhar, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: It has been proposed that routinely used inert radiotherapy (RT) biomaterials (e.g. fiducials, spacers) can be upgraded to smarter ones by coating/loading them with radiosensitizing gold nanoparticles (GNPs), for sustained in-situ release after implantation to enhance RT. In this work, we developed prototypes of such RT biomaterials and investigated the sustained release of GNPs from the biomaterials as a function of design parameters. Methods: Prototype smart biomaterials were produced by incorporating the GNPs in poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) polymer millirods during the gel phase of production. For comparison, commercially available spacers were also coated with a polymer film loaded with fluorescent GNP. Optical/spectroscopy methods were used to monitor in vitro release of GNPs over time as a function of different design parameters: polymer weighting, type, and initial (loading) GNP concentrations. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry was employed to verify GNP release. Results: Results showed that gold nanoparticles could be successfully loaded in the new RT biomaterial prototypes. Burst release of GNPs could be achieved within 1 to 25 days depending on the preparation approach. Burst release was followed by sustained release profile over time. The amount of released GNP increased with increasing loading concentration as expected. The release profiles could also be customized as a function of polymer weighting, or preparation approaches. Conclusion: Considered together, our results highlight potential for the development of next generation RT biomaterials loaded with GNPs customizable to different RT schedules. Such biomaterials could be employed as needed instead of currently used inert spacers/fiducials at no additional inconvenience to patients, to enhance RT.

  18. Biorecovery of gold

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eisler, R.

    2003-01-01

    Recovery of ionic and metallic gold (Au) from a wide variety of solutions by selected species of bacteria, yeasts, fungi, algae, and higher plants is documented. Gold accumulations were up to 7.0 g/kg dry weight (DW) in various species of bacteria, 25.0 g/kg DW in freshwater algae, 84.0 g/kg DW in peat, and 100.0 g/kg DW in dried fungus mixed with keratinous material. Mechanisms of accumulation include oxidation, dissolution, reduction, leaching, and sorption. Uptake patterns are significantly modified by the physicochemical milieu. Crab exoskeletons accumulate up to 4.9 g Au/kg DW; however, gold accumulations in various tissues of living teleosts, decapod crustaceans, and bivalve molluscs are negligible.

  19. Gold-bismuth clusters.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Ana

    2014-08-07

    Metal clusters have interesting characteristics, such as the relationship between properties and size of the cluster. This is not always apparent, so theoretical studies can provide relevant information. In this report, optimized structures and electron donor-acceptor properties of AunBim clusters are reported (n + m = 2-7, 20). Density functional theory calculations were performed to obtain optimized structures. The ground states of gold clusters formed with up to seven atoms are planar. The presence of Bi modifies the structure, and the clusters become 3-D. Several optimized geometries have at least one Bi atom bonded to gold or bismuth atoms and form structures similar to NH3. This fragment is also present in clusters with 20 atoms, where the formation of Au3Bi stabilizes the structures. Bismuth clusters are better electron donors and worse electron acceptors than gold clusters. Mixed clusters fall in between these two extremes. The presence of Bi atoms in gold clusters modifies the electron donor-acceptor properties of the clusters, but there is no correlation between the number of Bi atoms present in the cluster and the capacity for donating electrons. The effect of planarity in Au19Bi clusters is the same as that in Au20 clusters. The properties of pure gold clusters are certainly interesting, but clusters formed by Bi and Au are more important because the introduction of different atoms modifies the geometry, the stability, and consequently the physical and chemical properties. Apparently, the presence of Bi may increase the reactivity of gold clusters, but further studies are necessary to corroborate this hypothesis.

  20. Insertable fluid flow passage bridgepiece and method

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Daniel O.

    2000-01-01

    A fluid flow passage bridgepiece for insertion into an open-face fluid flow channel of a fluid flow plate is provided. The bridgepiece provides a sealed passage from a columnar fluid flow manifold to the flow channel, thereby preventing undesirable leakage into and out of the columnar fluid flow manifold. When deployed in the various fluid flow plates that are used in a Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cell, bridgepieces of this invention prevent mixing of reactant gases, leakage of coolant or humidification water, and occlusion of the fluid flow channel by gasket material. The invention also provides a fluid flow plate assembly including an insertable bridgepiece, a fluid flow plate adapted for use with an insertable bridgepiece, and a method of manufacturing a fluid flow plate with an insertable fluid flow passage bridgepiece.

  1. Utility Bill Insert for Wastewater Services

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Intended for use by wastewater and water supply utilities, one side of the utility bill insert has information for customers that discharge to sanitary sewer systems; the other side is for customers with septic systems.

  2. Peripherally inserted central catheter - dressing change

    MedlinePlus

    PICC - dressing change ... You have a peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC). This is a tube that goes into a vein in your arm. It carries nutrients and medicines into your body. It may also ...

  3. Chemistry for oncotheranostic gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Trouiller, Anne Juliette; Hebié, Seydou; El Bahhaj, Fatima; Napporn, Teko W; Bertrand, Philippe

    2015-06-24

    This review presents in a comprehensive ways the chemical methods used to functionalize gold nanoparticles with focus on anti-cancer applications. The review covers the parameters required for the synthesis gold nanoparticles with defined shapes and sizes, method for targeted delivery in tumours, and selected examples of anti-cancers compounds delivered with gold nanoparticles. A short survey of bioassays for oncology based on gold nanoparticles is also presented.

  4. Small Unit Space Transport and Insertion (SUSTAIN)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    Small Unit Space Transport and Insertion ( SUSTAIN ) Study prepared for: LTC Paul E. Damphousse, USMC National Security Space Office Chief of...failing to comply with a collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE 2009 2. REPORT TYPE N/A...3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Small Unit Space Transport and Insertion ( SUSTAIN ) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM

  5. Efficient instruction sequencing with Inline Target Insertion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwu, Wen-Mei W.; Chang, Pohua P.

    1992-01-01

    Inline target insertion, a specific compiler and pipeline implementation method for delayed branches with squashing, is defined. The method is shown to offer two important features not discovered in previous studies. First, branches inserted into branch slots are correctly executed. Second, the execution returns correctly from interrupts or exceptions with only one program counter. These two features result in better performance and less software/hardware complexity than conventional delayed branching mechanisms.

  6. Shrink-Fit Solderable Inserts Seal Hermetically

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Croucher, William C.

    1992-01-01

    Shrink-fit stainless-steel insert in aluminum equipment housing allows electrical connectors to be replaced by soldering, without degrading hermeticity of housing or connector. Welding could destroy electrostatic-sensitive components and harm housing and internal cables. Steel insert avoids problems because connector soldered directly to it rather than welded to housing. Seals between flange and housing, and between connector and flange resistant to leaks, even after mechanical overloading and thermal shocking.

  7. Z-2 Threaded Insert Design and Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Amy; Rhodes, Richard; Jones, Robert J.; Graziosi, David; Ferl, Jinny; Sweeny, Mitch; Scarborough, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    NASA's Z-2 prototype space suit contains several components fabricated from an advanced hybrid composite laminate consisting of IM10 carbon fiber and fiber glass. One requirement was to have removable, replaceable helicoil inserts to which other suit components would be fastened. An approach utilizing bonded in inserts with helicoils inside of them was implemented. During initial assembly, cracking sounds were heard followed by the lifting of one of the blind inserts out of its hole when the screws were torqued. A failure investigation was initiated to understand the mechanism of the failure. Ultimately, it was determined that the pre-tension caused by torqueing the fasteners is a much larger force than induced from the pressure loads of the suit which was not considered in the insert design. Bolt tension is determined by dividing the torque on the screw by a k value multiplied by the thread diameter of the bolt. The k value is a factor that accounts for friction in the system. A common value used for k for a non-lubricated screw is 0.2. The k value can go down by as much as 0.1 if the screw is lubricated which means for the same torque, a much larger tension could be placed on the bolt and insert. This paper summarizes the failure investigation that was performed to identify the root cause of the suit failure and details how the insert design was modified to resist a higher pull out tension.

  8. Strength of inserts in titanium alloy machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, V.; Huang, Z.; Zhang, J.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, a stressed state of a non-worn cutting wedge in a machined titanium alloy (Ti6Al2Mo2Cr) is analyzed. The distribution of contact loads on the face of a cutting tool was obtained experimentally with the use of a ‘split cutting tool’. Calculation of internal stresses in the indexable insert made from cemented carbide (WC8Co) was carried out with the help of ANSYS 14.0 software. Investigations showed that a small thickness of the cutting insert leads to extremely high compressive stresses near the cutting edge, stresses that exceed the ultimate compressive strength of cemented carbide. The face and the base of the insert experience high tensile stresses, which approach the ultimate tensile strength of cemented carbide and increase a probability of cutting insert destruction. If the thickness of the cutting insert is bigger than 5 mm, compressive stresses near the cutting edge decrease, and tensile stresses on the face and base decrease to zero. The dependences of the greatest normal and tangential stresses on thickness of the cutting insert were found. Abbreviation and symbols: m/s - meter per second (cutting speed v); mm/r - millimeter per revolution (feed rate f); MPa - mega Pascal (dimension of specific contact loads and stresses); γ - rake angle of the cutting tool [°] α - clearance angle of the sharp cutting tool [°].

  9. Rectal suppository: commonsense and mode of insertion.

    PubMed

    Abd-el-Maeboud, K H; el-Naggar, T; el-Hawi, E M; Mahmoud, S A; Abd-el-Hay, S

    1991-09-28

    Rectal suppository is a well-known form of medication and its use is increasing. The commonest shape is one with an apex (pointed end) tapering to a base (blunt end). Because of a general lack of information about mode of insertion, we asked 360 lay subjects (Egyptians and non-Egyptians) and 260 medical personnel (physicians, pharmacists, and nurses) by questionnaire which end they inserted foremost. Apart from 2 individuals, all subjects suggested insertion with the apex foremost. Commonsense was the most frequent basis for this practice (86.9% of lay subjects and 84.6% of medical personnel) followed by information from a relative, a friend, or medical personnel, or from study at medical school. Suppository insertion with the base or apex foremost was compared in 100 subjects (60 adults, 40 infants and children). Retention with the former method was more easily achieved in 98% of the cases, with no need to introduce a finger in the anal canal (1% vs 83%), and lower expulsion rate (0% vs 3%). The designer of the "torpedo-shaped" suppository suggested its insertion with apex foremost. Our data suggest that a suppository is better inserted with the base foremost. Reversed vermicular contractions or pressure gradient of the anal canal might press it inwards.

  10. Derivatized gold clusters and antibody-gold cluster conjugates

    DOEpatents

    Hainfeld, James F.; Furuya, Frederic R.

    1994-11-01

    Antibody- or antibody fragment-gold cluster conjugates are shown wherein the conjugate size can be as small as 5.0 nm. Methods and reagents are disclosed in which antibodies, Fab' or F(ab').sub.2 fragments thereof are covalently bound to a stable cluster of gold atoms. The gold clusters may contain 6, 8, 9, 11, 13, 55 or 67 gold atoms in their inner core. The clusters may also contain radioactive gold. The antibody-cluster conjugates are useful in electron microscopy applications as well as in clinical applications that include imaging, diagnosis and therapy.

  11. Derivatized gold clusters and antibody-gold cluster conjugates

    DOEpatents

    Hainfeld, J.F.; Furuya, F.R.

    1994-11-01

    Antibody- or antibody fragment-gold cluster conjugates are shown wherein the conjugate size can be as small as 5.0 nm. Methods and reagents are disclosed in which antibodies, Fab' or F(ab')[sub 2] fragments are covalently bound to a stable cluster of gold atoms. The gold clusters may contain 6, 8, 9, 11, 13, 55 or 67 gold atoms in their inner core. The clusters may also contain radioactive gold. The antibody-cluster conjugates are useful in electron microscopy applications as well as in clinical applications that include imaging, diagnosis and therapy. 7 figs.

  12. Earth's continental crustal gold endowment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frimmel, H. E.

    2008-03-01

    The analysis of the temporal distribution of gold deposits, combined with gold production data as well as reserve and resource estimates for different genetic types of gold deposit, revealed that the bulk of the gold known to be concentrated in ore bodies was added to the continental crust during a giant Mesoarchaean gold event at a time (3 Ga) when the mantle temperature reached a maximum and the dominant style of tectonic movement changed from vertical, plume-related to subhorizontal plate tectonic. A magmatic derivation of the first generation of crustal gold from a relatively hot mantle that was characterized by a high degree of partial melting is inferred from the gold chemistry, specifically high Os contents. While a large proportion of that gold is still present in only marginally modified palaeoplacer deposits of the Mesoarchaean Witwatersrand Basin in South Africa, accounting for about 40% of all known gold, the remainder has been recycled repeatedly on a lithospheric scale, predominantly by plate-tectonically induced magmatic and hydrothermal fluid circulation, to produce the current variety of gold deposit types. Post-Archaean juvenile gold addition to the continental crust has been limited, but a mantle contribution to some of the largest orogenic or intrusion-related gold deposits is indicated, notably for the Late Palaeozoic Tien Shan gold province. Magmatic fluids in active plate margins seem to be the most effective transport medium for gold mobilization, giving rise to a large proportion of volcanic-arc related gold deposits. Due to their generally shallow crustal level of formation, they have a low preservation potential. In contrast, those gold deposits that form at greater depth are more widespread also in older rocks. This explains the high proportion of orogenic (including intrusion-related) gold (32%) amongst all known gold deposits. The overall proportion of gold concentrated in known ore bodies is only 7 × 10- 7 of the estimated total

  13. Gold and gold working in Late Bronze Age Northern Greece.

    PubMed

    Vavelidis, M; Andreou, S

    2008-04-01

    Numerous objects of gold displaying an impressive variety of types and manufacturing techniques are known from the Late Bronze Age (LBA) contexts of Mycenaean Greece, but very little is known about the origin and processing of gold during the second millennium B.C: . Ancient literature and recent research indicate that northern Greece is probably the richest gold-bearing region in Greece, and yet, very little evidence exists regarding the exploitation of its deposits and the production as well as use of gold in the area during prehistory. The unusual find of a group of small stone crucibles at the prehistoric settlement of Thessaloniki Toumba, one with visible traces of gold melting, proves local production and offers a rare opportunity to examine the process of on-site gold working. Furthermore, the comparison of the chemical composition of prehistoric artefacts from two settlements with those of gold deposits in their immediate areas supports the local extraction of gold and opens up the prospect for some of the Mycenaean gold to have originated in northern Greece. The scarcity of gold items in northern Greek LBA contexts may not represent the actual amount of gold produced and consumed, but could be a result of the local social attitudes towards the circulation and deposition of artefacts from precious metals.

  14. Robust automatic rigid registration of MRI and X-ray using external fiducial markers for XFM-guided interventional procedures

    PubMed Central

    George, Ashvin K.; Sonmez, Merdim; Lederman, Robert J.; Faranesh, Anthony Z.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: In X-ray fused with MRI, previously gathered roadmap MRI volume images are overlaid on live X-ray fluoroscopy images to help guide the clinician during an interventional procedure. The incorporation of MRI data allows for the visualization of soft tissue that is poorly visualized under X-ray. The widespread clinical use of this technique will require fully automating as many components as possible. While previous use of this method has required time-consuming manual intervention to register the two modalities, in this article, the authors present a fully automatic rigid-body registration method. Methods: External fiducial markers that are visible under these two complimentary imaging modalities were used to register the X-ray images with the roadmap MR images. The method has three components: (a) The identification of the 3D locations of the markers from a full 3D MR volume, (b) the identification of the 3D locations of the markers from a small number of 2D X-ray fluoroscopy images, and (c) finding the rigid-body transformation that registers the two point sets in the two modalities. For part (a), the localization of the markers from MR data, the MR volume image was thresholded, connected voxels were segmented and labeled, and the centroids of the connected components were computed. For part (b), the X-ray projection images, produced by an image intensifier, were first corrected for distortions. Binary mask images of the markers were created from the distortion-corrected X-ray projection images by applying edge detection, pattern recognition, and image morphological operations. The markers were localized in the X-ray frame using an iterative backprojection-based method which segments voxels in the volume of interest, discards false positives based on the previously computed edge-detected projections, and calculates the locations of the true markers as the centroids of the clusters of voxels that remain. For part (c), a variant of the iterative closest

  15. Robust automatic rigid registration of MRI and X-ray using external fiducial markers for XFM-guided interventional procedures

    SciTech Connect

    George, Ashvin K.; Sonmez, Merdim; Lederman, Robert J.; Faranesh, Anthony Z.

    2011-01-15

    Purpose: In X-ray fused with MRI, previously gathered roadmap MRI volume images are overlaid on live X-ray fluoroscopy images to help guide the clinician during an interventional procedure. The incorporation of MRI data allows for the visualization of soft tissue that is poorly visualized under X-ray. The widespread clinical use of this technique will require fully automating as many components as possible. While previous use of this method has required time-consuming manual intervention to register the two modalities, in this article, the authors present a fully automatic rigid-body registration method. Methods: External fiducial markers that are visible under these two complimentary imaging modalities were used to register the X-ray images with the roadmap MR images. The method has three components: (a) The identification of the 3D locations of the markers from a full 3D MR volume, (b) the identification of the 3D locations of the markers from a small number of 2D X-ray fluoroscopy images, and (c) finding the rigid-body transformation that registers the two point sets in the two modalities. For part (a), the localization of the markers from MR data, the MR volume image was thresholded, connected voxels were segmented and labeled, and the centroids of the connected components were computed. For part (b), the X-ray projection images, produced by an image intensifier, were first corrected for distortions. Binary mask images of the markers were created from the distortion-corrected X-ray projection images by applying edge detection, pattern recognition, and image morphological operations. The markers were localized in the X-ray frame using an iterative backprojection-based method which segments voxels in the volume of interest, discards false positives based on the previously computed edge-detected projections, and calculates the locations of the true markers as the centroids of the clusters of voxels that remain. For part (c), a variant of the iterative closest

  16. GOLD PRESSURE VESSEL SEAL

    DOEpatents

    Smith, A.E.

    1963-11-26

    An improved seal between the piston and die member of a piston-cylinder type pressure vessel is presented. A layer of gold, of sufficient thickness to provide an interference fit between the piston and die member, is plated on the contacting surface of at least one of the members. (AEC)

  17. Digging for Gold

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waters, John K.

    2012-01-01

    In the case of higher education, the hills are more like mountains of data that "we're accumulating at a ferocious rate," according to Gerry McCartney, CIO of Purdue University (Indiana). "Every higher education institution has this data, but it just sits there like gold in the ground," complains McCartney. Big Data and the new tools people are…

  18. 'Cascade Gold' raspberry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ‘Cascade Gold’ is a new gold fruited, floricane fruiting raspberry cultivar (Rubus idaeus L.) jointly released by Washington State University (WSU), Oregon State University (OSU) and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). It has been evaluated at Puyallup, Wash. in plantings from 1988 to 2008. ...

  19. Gold Nanoparticle Microwave Synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Krantz, Kelsie E.; Christian, Jonathan H.; Coopersmith, Kaitlin; Washington, II, Aaron L.; Murph, Simona H.

    2016-07-27

    At the nanometer scale, numerous compounds display different properties than those found in bulk material that can prove useful in areas such as medicinal chemistry. Gold nanoparticles, for example, display promise in newly developed hyperthermia therapies for cancer treatment. Currently, gold nanoparticle synthesis is performed via the hot injection technique which has large variability in final particle size and a longer reaction time. One underdeveloped area by which these particles could be produced is through microwave synthesis. To initiate heating, microwaves agitate polar molecules creating a vibration that gives off the heat energy needed. Previous studies have used microwaves for gold nanoparticle synthesis; however, polar solvents were used that partially absorbed incident microwaves, leading to partial thermal heating of the sample rather than taking full advantage of the microwave to solely heat the gold nanoparticle precursors in a non-polar solution. Through this project, microwaves were utilized as the sole heat source, and non-polar solvents were used to explore the effects of microwave heating only as pertains to the precursor material. Our findings show that the use of non-polar solvents allows for more rapid heating as compared to polar solvents, and a reduction in reaction time from 10 minutes to 1 minute; this maximizes the efficiency of the reaction, and allows for reproducibility in the size/shape of the fabricated nanoparticles.

  20. Comparison of CT on Rails With Electronic Portal Imaging for Positioning of Prostate Cancer Patients With Implanted Fiducial Markers

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, Rebecca Kron, Tomas; Foroudi, Farshad; Milner, Alvin; Cox, Jennifer; Duchesne, Gillian; Cleeve, Laurence; Zhu Li; Cramb, Jim; Sparks, Laura; Laferlita, Marcus

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: The objective of this investigation was to measure the agreement between in-room computed tomography (CT) on rails and electronic portal image (EPI) radiography. Methods and Materials: Agreement between the location of the center of gravity (COG) of fiducial markers (FMs) on CT and EPI images was determined in phantom studies and a patient cohort. A secondary analysis between the center of volume (COV) of the prostate on CT and the COG of FMs on CT and EPI was performed. Agreement was defined as the 95% probability of a difference of {<=}3.0 mm between images. Systematic and random errors from CT and EPI are reported. Results: From 8 patients, 254 CT and EPI pairs were analyzed. FMs were localized to within 3 mm on CT and EPI images 96.9% of the time in the left-right (LR) plane, 85.8% superior-inferior (SI), and 89% anterior-posterior (AP). The differences between the COV on CT and the COG on EPI were not within 3 mm in any plane: 87.8% (LR), 64.2% (SI), and 70.9% (AP). The systematic error varied from 1.2 to 2.9 mm (SI) and 1.8-2.9 mm (AP) between the COG on EPI and COV on CT. Conclusions: Considerable differences between in-room CT and EPI exist. The phantom measurements showed slice thickness affected the accuracy of localization in the SI plane, and couch sag that occurs at the CT on rails gantry could not be totally corrected for in the AP plane. Other confounding factors are the action of rotating the couch and associated time lag between image acquisitions (prostate motion), EPI image quality, and outlining uncertainties.

  1. Lipid tail protrusions mediate the insertion of nanoparticles into model cell membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Lehn, Reid C.; Ricci, Maria; Silva, Paulo H. J.; Andreozzi, Patrizia; Reguera, Javier; Voïtchovsky, Kislon; Stellacci, Francesco; Alexander-Katz, Alfredo

    2014-07-01

    Recent work has demonstrated that charged gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) protected by an amphiphilic organic monolayer can spontaneously insert into the core of lipid bilayers to minimize the exposure of hydrophobic surface area to water. However, the kinetic pathway to reach the thermodynamically stable transmembrane configuration is unknown. Here, we use unbiased atomistic simulations to show the pathway by which AuNPs spontaneously insert into bilayers and confirm the results experimentally on supported lipid bilayers. The critical step during this process is hydrophobic-hydrophobic contact between the core of the bilayer and the monolayer of the AuNP that requires the stochastic protrusion of an aliphatic lipid tail into solution. This last phenomenon is enhanced in the presence of high bilayer curvature and closely resembles the putative pre-stalk transition state for vesicle fusion. To the best of our knowledge, this work provides the first demonstration of vesicle fusion-like behaviour in an amphiphilic nanoparticle system.

  2. MO-FG-204-06: A New Algorithm for Gold Nano-Particle Concentration Identification in Dual Energy CT

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, L; Shen, C; Ng, M; Zeng, T; Lou, Y; Jia, X

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Gold nano-particle (GNP) has recently attracted a lot of attentions due to its potential as an imaging contrast agent and radiotherapy sensitiser. Imaging the GNP at its low contraction is a challenging problem. We propose a new algorithm to improve the identification of GNP based on dual energy CT (DECT). Methods: We consider three base materials: water, bone, and gold. Determining three density images from two images in DECT is an under-determined problem. We propose to solve this problem by exploring image domain sparsity via an optimization approach. The objective function contains four terms. A data-fidelity term ensures the fidelity between the identified material densities and the DECT images, while the other three terms enforces the sparsity in the gradient domain of the three images corresponding to the density of the base materials by using total variation (TV) regularization. A primal-dual algorithm is applied to solve the proposed optimization problem. We have performed simulation studies to test this model. Results: Our digital phantom in the tests contains water, bone regions and gold inserts of different sizes and densities. The gold inserts contain mixed material consisting of water with 1g/cm3 and gold at a certain density. At a low gold density of 0.0008 g/cm3, the insert is hardly visible in DECT images, especially for those with small sizes. Our algorithm is able to decompose the DECT into three density images. Those gold inserts at a low density can be clearly visualized in the density image. Conclusion: We have developed a new algorithm to decompose DECT images into three different material density images, in particular, to retrieve density of gold. Numerical studies showed promising results.

  3. Surgical management of female SUI: is there a gold standard?

    PubMed

    Cox, Ashley; Herschorn, Sender; Lee, Livia

    2013-02-01

    Many surgical options exist for women with stress urinary incontinence (SUI). The traditional gold standards of Burch retropubic colposuspension and pubovaginal slings are still appropriate treatment options for some patients, but randomized controlled trials have demonstrated that synthetic midurethral slings are just as effective as these traditional procedures but with less associated morbidity. Thus, midurethral slings--inserted via a retropubic or transobturator approach--have become the new gold standard first-line surgical treatment for women with uncomplicated SUI. Retropubic midurethral slings are associated with slightly higher success rates than transobturator slings, but at the cost of more postoperative complications. Pubovaginal slings remain an effective option for women with SUI who have failed other procedures, have had mesh complications, or who require concomitant urethral surgery. Single-incision slings have a number of benefits, including decreased operative times and early return to regular activities, but they are yet to be shown to be as effective as midurethral slings. Both retropubic and transobturator midurethral slings are effective for patients with mixed urinary incontinence, but the overall cure rate is lower than for patients with pure SUI. Based on the literature a new gold standard first-line surgical treatment for women with SUI is the synthetic midurethral sling inserted through a retropubic or transobturator approach [corrected].

  4. Peptide partitioning properties from direct insertion studies

    SciTech Connect

    Ulmschneider, Martin; Smith, Jeremy C; Ulmschneider, Jakob

    2010-06-01

    Partitioning properties of polypeptides are at the heart of biological membrane phenomena and their precise quantification is vital for ab-initio structure prediction and the accurate simulation of membrane protein folding and function. Recently the cellular translocon machinery has been employed to determine membrane insertion propensities and transfer energetics for a series of polyleucine segments embedded in a carrier sequence. We show here that the insertion propensity, pathway, and transfer energetics into synthetic POPC bilayers can be fully described by direct atomistic peptide partitioning simulations. The insertion probability as a function of peptide length follows two-state Boltzmann statistics, in agreement with the experiments. The simulations expose a systematic offset between translocon-mediated and direct insertion free energies. Compared to the experiment the insertion threshold is shifted toward shorter peptides by 2 leucine residues. The simulations reveal many hitherto unknown atomic-resolution details about the partitioning process and promise to provide a powerful tool for urgently needed calibration of lipid parameters to match experimentally observed peptide transfer energies.

  5. Nozzle cavity impingement/area reduction insert

    DOEpatents

    Yu, Yufeng Phillip; Itzel, Gary Michael; Osgood, Sarah Jane

    2002-01-01

    A turbine vane segment is provided that has inner and outer walls spaced from one another, a vane extending between the inner and outer walls and having leading and trailing edges and pressure and suction sides, the vane including discrete leading edge, intermediate, aft and trailing edge cavities between the leading and trailing edges and extending lengthwise of the vane for flowing a cooling medium; and an insert sleeve within at least one of the cavities and spaced from interior wall surfaces thereof. The insert sleeve has an inlet for flowing the cooling medium into the insert sleeve and has impingement holes defined in first and second walls thereof that respectively face the pressure and suction sides of the vane. The impingement holes of at least one of those first and second walls are defined along substantially only a first, upstream portion thereof, whereby the cooling flow is predominantly impingement cooling along a first region of the insert wall corresponding to the first, upstream portion and the cooling flow is predominantly convective cooling along a second region corresponding to a second, downstream portion of the at least one wall of the insert sleeve.

  6. Reactivity of methacrylates in insertion polymerization.

    PubMed

    Rünzi, Thomas; Guironnet, Damien; Göttker-Schnetmann, Inigo; Mecking, Stefan

    2010-11-24

    Polymerization of ethylene by complexes [{(P^O)PdMe(L)}] (P^O = κ(2)-(P,O)-2-(2-MeOC(6)H(4))(2)PC(6)H(4)SO(3))) affords homopolyethylene free of any methyl methacrylate (MMA)-derived units, even in the presence of substantial concentrations of MMA. In stoichiometric studies, reactive {(P^O)Pd(Me)L} fragments generated by halide abstraction from [({(P^O)Pd(Me)Cl}μ-Na)(2)] insert MMA in a 1,2- as well as 2,1-mode. The 1,2-insertion product forms a stable five-membered chelate by coordination of the carbonyl group. Thermodynamic parameters for MMA insertion are ΔH(++) = 69.0(3.1) kJ mol(-1) and ΔS(++) = -103(10) J mol(-1) K(-1) (total average for 1,2- and 2,1-insertion), in comparison to ΔH(++) = 48.5(3.0) kJ mol(-1) and ΔS(++) = -138(7) J mol(-1) K(-1) for methyl acrylate (MA) insertion. These data agree with an observed at least 10(2)-fold preference for MA incorporation vs MMA incorporation (not detected) under polymerization conditions. Copolymerization of ethylene with a bifunctional acrylate-methacrylate monomer yields linear polyethylenes with intact methacrylate substituents. Post-polymerization modification of the latter was exemplified by free-radical thiol addition and by cross-metathesis.

  7. The LORE1 insertion mutant resource.

    PubMed

    Małolepszy, Anna; Mun, Terry; Sandal, Niels; Gupta, Vikas; Dubin, Manu; Urbański, Dorian; Shah, Niraj; Bachmann, Asger; Fukai, Eigo; Hirakawa, Hideki; Tabata, Satoshi; Nadzieja, Marcin; Markmann, Katharina; Su, Junyi; Umehara, Yosuke; Soyano, Takashi; Miyahara, Akira; Sato, Shusei; Hayashi, Makoto; Stougaard, Jens; Andersen, Stig U

    2016-10-01

    Long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposons are closely related to retroviruses, and their activities shape eukaryotic genomes. Here, we present a complete Lotus japonicus insertion mutant collection generated by identification of 640 653 new insertion events following de novo activation of the LTR element Lotus retrotransposon 1 (LORE1) (http://lotus.au.dk). Insertion preferences are critical for effective gene targeting, and we exploit our large dataset to analyse LTR element characteristics in this context. We infer the mechanism that generates the consensus palindromes typical of retroviral and LTR retrotransposon insertion sites, identify a short relaxed insertion site motif, and demonstrate selective integration into CHG-hypomethylated genes. These characteristics result in a steep increase in deleterious mutation rate following activation, and allow LORE1 active gene targeting to approach saturation within a population of 134 682 L. japonicus lines. We suggest that saturation mutagenesis using endogenous LTR retrotransposons with germinal activity can be used as a general and cost-efficient strategy for generation of non-transgenic mutant collections for unrestricted use in plant research.

  8. Treatment precision of image-guided liver SBRT using implanted fiducial markers depends on marker-tumour distance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seppenwoolde, Y.; Wunderink, W.; Wunderink-van Veen, S. R.; Storchi, P.; Méndez Romero, A.; Heijmen, B. J. M.

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the accuracy of day-to-day predictions of liver tumour position using implanted gold markers as surrogates and to compare the method with alternative set-up strategies, i.e. no correction, vertebrae and 3D diaphragm-based set-up. Twenty patients undergoing stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) with abdominal compression for primary or metastatic liver cancer were analysed. We determined the day-to-day correlation between gold marker and tumour positions in contrast-enhanced CT scans acquired at treatment preparation and before each treatment session. The influence of marker-tumour distance on the accuracy of prediction was estimated by introducing a method extension of the set-up error paradigm. The distance between gold markers and the centre of the tumour varied between 5 and 96 mm. Marker-guidance was superior to guiding treatment using other surrogates, although both the random and systematic components of the prediction error SD depended on the tumour-marker distance. For a marker-tumour distance of 4 cm, we observed σ = 1.3 mm and Σ = 1.6 mm. The 3D position of the diaphragm dome was the second best predictor. In conclusion, the tumour position can be predicted accurately using implanted markers, but marker-guided set-up accuracy decreases with increasing distance between implanted markers and the tumour.

  9. Uncertainty in treatment of head-and-neck tumors by use of intraoral mouthpiece and embedded fiducials

    SciTech Connect

    Oita, Masataka . E-mail: oita@medsci.tokushima-u.ac.jp; Ohmori, Keiichi; Obinata, Kenichi; Kinoshita, Rumiko; Onimaru, Rikiya; Tsuchiya, Kazuhiko; Suzuki, Keishirou; Nishioka, Takeshi; Ohsaka, Hiroyasu; Fujita, Katsuhisa; Shimamura, Teppei; Shirato, Hiroki; Miyasaka, Kazuo

    2006-04-01

    Purpose: To reduce setup error and intrafractional movement in head-and-neck treatment, a real-time tumor tracking radiotherapy (RTRT) system was used with the aid of gold markers implanted in a mouthpiece. Methods and Materials: Three 2-mm gold markers were implanted into a mouthpiece that had been custom made for each patient before the treatment planning process. Setup errors in the conventional immobilization system using the shell (manual setup) and in the RTRT system (RTRT setup) were compared. Eight patients with pharyngeal tumors were enrolled. Results: The systematic setup errors were 1.8, 1.6, and 1.1 mm in the manual setup and 0.2, 0.3, and 0.3 mm in the RTRT setup in right-left, craniocaudal, and AP directions, respectively. Statistically significant differences were observed with respect to the variances in setup error (p <0.001). The systematic and random intrafractional errors were maintained within the ranges of 0.2-0.6 mm and 1.0-2.0 mm, respectively. The rotational systematic and random intrafractional errors were estimated to be 2.2-3.2{sup o} and 1.5-1.6{sup o}, respectively. Conclusions: The setup error and planning target volume margin can be significantly reduced using an RTRT system with a mouthpiece and three gold markers.

  10. Gold Nanoparticles Cytotoxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mironava, Tatsiana

    Over the last two decades gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have been used for many scientific applications and have attracted attention due to the specific chemical, electronic and optical size dependent properties that make them very promising agents in many fields such as medicine, imagine techniques and electronics. More specifically, biocompatible gold nanoparticles have a huge potential for use as the contrast augmentation agent in X-ray Computed Tomography and Photo Acoustic Tomography for early tumor diagnostic as well these nanoparticles are extensively researched for enhancing the targeted cancer treatment effectiveness such as photo-thermal and radiotherapy. In most biomedical applications biocompatible gold nanoparticles are labeled with specific tumor or other pathology targeting antibodies and used for site specific drug delivery. However, even though gold nanoparticles poses very high level of anti cancer properties, the question of their cytotoxicity ones they are released in normal tissue has to be researched. Moreover, the huge amount of industrially produced gold nanoparticles raises the question of these particles being a health hazard, since the penetration is fairly easy for the "nano" size substances. This study focuses on the effect of AuNPs on a human skin tissue, since it is fall in both categories -- the side effects for biomedical applications and industrial workers and users' exposure during production and handling. Therefore, in the present project, gold nanoparticles stabilized with the biocompatible agent citric acid were generated and characterized by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The cytotoxic effect of AuNPs release to healthy skin tissue was modeled on 3 different cell types: human keratinocytes, human dermal fibroblasts, and human adipose derived stromal (ADS) cells. The AuNPs localization inside the cell was found to be cell type dependent. Overall cytotoxicity was found to be dependent

  11. Interactive simulation of needle insertion models.

    PubMed

    DiMaio, Simon P; Salcudean, Septimiu E

    2005-07-01

    A novel interactive virtual needle insertion simulation is presented. The simulation models are based on measured planar tissue deformations and needle insertion forces. Since the force-displacement relationship is only of interest along the needle shaft, a condensation technique is shown to reduce the computational complexity of linear simulation models significantly. As the needle penetrates or is withdrawn from the tissue model, the boundary conditions that determine the tissue and needle motion change. Boundary condition and local material coordinate changes are facilitated by fast low-rank matrix updates. A large-strain elastic needle model is coupled to the tissue models to account for needle deflection and bending during simulated insertion. A haptic environment, based on these novel interactive simulation techniques, allows users to manipulate a three-degree-of-freedom virtual needle as it penetrates virtual tissue models, while experiencing steering torques and lateral needle forces through a planar haptic interface.

  12. Rack Insertion End Effector (RIEE) automation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malladi, Narasimha

    1993-01-01

    NASA is developing a mechanism to manipulate and insert Racks into the Space Station Logistic modules. The mechanism consists of the following: a base with three motorized degrees of freedom, a 3 section motorized boom that goes from 15 to 44 feet in length, and a Rack Insertion End Effector (RIEE) with 5 hand wheels for precise alignment. The robotics section was tasked with the automation of the RIEE unit. In this report, for the automation of the RIEE unit, application of the Perceptics Vision System was conceptually developed to determine the position and orientation of the RIEE relative to the logistic module, and a MathCad program is written to display the needed displacements for precise alignment and final insertion of the Rack. The uniqueness of this report is that the whole report is in fact a MathCad program including text, derivations, and executable equations with example inputs and outputs.

  13. Elliptically polarizing adjustable phase insertion device

    DOEpatents

    Carr, R.

    1995-01-17

    An insertion device for extracting polarized electromagnetic energy from a beam of particles is disclosed. The insertion device includes four linear arrays of magnets which are aligned with the particle beam. The magnetic field strength to which the particles are subjected is adjusted by altering the relative alignment of the arrays in a direction parallel to that of the particle beam. Both the energy and polarization of the extracted energy may be varied by moving the relevant arrays parallel to the beam direction. The present invention requires a substantially simpler and more economical superstructure than insertion devices in which the magnetic field strength is altered by changing the gap between arrays of magnets. 3 figures.

  14. Study of Uranium Oxide Insertion Compounds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-01

    band gap (AE) for U0 3 polymorphs is in the range 2.52 - 2.68 eV (20,325 - • 21,616 cm-1) and the activation energy (Es) for U30 8 is 1.10 eV (8,872...with uranium ions and move by a phonon- activated 0 hopping mechanism. Electrons introduced into the uranium oxide during insertion A - Aj" + e’u (1.7...insertion into a-U 30 8 at - 25"C in 1M LiBF4 in propylene carbonate /1,2- dimethoxyethane Lithium insertion into a-U 30 8 causes very little change in

  15. Mosaic retroposon insertion patterns in placental mammals.

    PubMed

    Churakov, Gennady; Kriegs, Jan Ole; Baertsch, Robert; Zemann, Anja; Brosius, Jürgen; Schmitz, Jürgen

    2009-05-01

    One and a half centuries after Charles Darwin and Alfred Russel Wallace outlined our current understanding of evolution, a new scientific era is dawning that enables direct observations of genetic variation. However, pure sequence-based molecular attempts to resolve the basal origin of placental mammals have so far resulted only in apparently conflicting hypotheses. By contrast, in the mammalian genomes where they were highly active, the insertion of retroelements and their comparative insertion patterns constitute a neutral, virtually homoplasy-free archive of evolutionary histories. The "presence" of a retroelement at an orthologous genomic position in two species indicates their common ancestry in contrast to its "absence" in more distant species. To resolve the placental origin controversy we extracted approximately 2 million potentially phylogenetically informative, retroposon-containing loci from representatives of the major placental mammalian lineages and found highly significant evidence challenging all current single hypotheses of their basal origin. The Exafroplacentalia hypothesis (Afrotheria as the sister group to all remaining placentals) is significantly supported by five retroposon insertions, the Epitheria hypothesis (Xenarthra as the sister group to all remaining placentals) by nine insertion patterns, and the Atlantogenata hypothesis (a monophyletic clade comprising Xenarthra and Afrotheria as the sister group to Boreotheria comprising all remaining placentals) by eight insertion patterns. These findings provide significant support for a "soft" polytomy of the major mammalian clades. Ancestral successive hybridization events and/or incomplete lineage sorting associated with short speciation intervals are viable explanations for the mosaic retroposon insertion patterns of recent placental mammals and for the futile search for a clear root dichotomy.

  16. Mosaic retroposon insertion patterns in placental mammals

    PubMed Central

    Churakov, Gennady; Kriegs, Jan Ole; Baertsch, Robert; Zemann, Anja; Brosius, Jürgen; Schmitz, Jürgen

    2009-01-01

    One and a half centuries after Charles Darwin and Alfred Russel Wallace outlined our current understanding of evolution, a new scientific era is dawning that enables direct observations of genetic variation. However, pure sequence-based molecular attempts to resolve the basal origin of placental mammals have so far resulted only in apparently conflicting hypotheses. By contrast, in the mammalian genomes where they were highly active, the insertion of retroelements and their comparative insertion patterns constitute a neutral, virtually homoplasy-free archive of evolutionary histories. The “presence” of a retroelement at an orthologous genomic position in two species indicates their common ancestry in contrast to its “absence” in more distant species. To resolve the placental origin controversy we extracted ∼2 million potentially phylogenetically informative, retroposon-containing loci from representatives of the major placental mammalian lineages and found highly significant evidence challenging all current single hypotheses of their basal origin. The Exafroplacentalia hypothesis (Afrotheria as the sister group to all remaining placentals) is significantly supported by five retroposon insertions, the Epitheria hypothesis (Xenarthra as the sister group to all remaining placentals) by nine insertion patterns, and the Atlantogenata hypothesis (a monophyletic clade comprising Xenarthra and Afrotheria as the sister group to Boreotheria comprising all remaining placentals) by eight insertion patterns. These findings provide significant support for a “soft” polytomy of the major mammalian clades. Ancestral successive hybridization events and/or incomplete lineage sorting associated with short speciation intervals are viable explanations for the mosaic retroposon insertion patterns of recent placental mammals and for the futile search for a clear root dichotomy. PMID:19261842

  17. True anteroposterior view pedicle screw insertion technique

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Jia-yue; Zhang, Wei; An, Ji-long; Sun, Ya-peng; Ding, Wen-yuan; Shen, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Background The wide use of minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS-TLIF) surgery in the treatment of degenerative disc disease of lumbar spine in spinal surgery highlights the gradual decrease in the use of traditional pedicle screw insertion technology. This study aims to analyze the accuracy of the true anteroposterior view pedicle screw insertion technique in MIS-TLIF surgery, compare it with conventional pedicle screw insertion technology, and discuss its clinical application value. Methods Fifty-two patients undergoing true anteroposterior view (group A) and 87 patients undergoing conventional pedicle screw insertion (group B) were diagnosed with lumbar disc herniation or lumbar spinal stenosis. Time for screw placement, intraoperative irradiation exposure, accuracy rate of pedicle screw insertion, and incidence of neurovascular injury were compared between the two groups. Results The time for screw placement and intraoperative irradiation exposure was significantly less in group A. Penetration rates of the paries lateralis of vertebral pedicle, medial wall of vertebral pedicle, and anterior vertebral wall were 1.44%, 0%, and 2.40%, respectively, all of which were significantly lower than that in group B. No additional serious complications caused by the placement of screw were observed during the follow-up period in patients in group A, but two patients with medial penetration underwent revision for unbearable radicular pain. Conclusion The application of true anteroposterior view pedicle screw insertion technique in MIS-TLIF surgery shortens time for screw placement and reduces the intraoperative irradiation exposure along with a higher accuracy rate of screw placement, which makes it a safe, accurate, and efficient technique. PMID:27418828

  18. Spiky gold nanoshells.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Gaytan, Brenda L; Park, So-Jung

    2010-12-21

    We report a high-yield synthetic method for a new type of metal nanostructure, spiky gold nanoshells, which combine the morphological characteristics of hollow metal nanoshells and nanorods. Our method utilizes block copolymer assemblies and polymer beads as templates for the growth of spiky nanoshells. Various shapes of spiky metal nanoshells were prepared in addition to spherical nanoshells by using block copolymer assemblies such as rod-like micelles, vesicles, and bilayers as templates. Furthermore, spiky gold shells encapsulating magnetic nanoparticles or quantum dots were prepared based on the ability of block copolymers to self-assemble with various types of nanoparticles and molecules. The capability to encapsulate other materials in the core, the shape tunability, and the highly structured surface of spiky nanoshells should benefit a range of imaging, sensing, and medical applications of metal nanostructures.

  19. Circular permutant GFP insertion folding reporters

    SciTech Connect

    Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Cabantous, Stephanie

    2013-04-16

    Provided are methods of assaying and improving protein folding using circular permutants of fluorescent proteins, including circular permutants of GFP variants and combinations thereof. The invention further provides various nucleic acid molecules and vectors incorporating such nucleic acid molecules, comprising polynucleotides encoding fluorescent protein circular permutants derived from superfolder GFP, which polynucleotides include an internal cloning site into which a heterologous polynucleotide may be inserted in-frame with the circular permutant coding sequence, and which when expressed are capable of reporting on the degree to which a polypeptide encoded by such an inserted heterologous polynucleotide is correctly folded by correlation with the degree of fluorescence exhibited.

  20. Circular permutant GFP insertion folding reporters

    DOEpatents

    Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Cabantous, Stephanie

    2008-06-24

    Provided are methods of assaying and improving protein folding using circular permutants of fluorescent proteins, including circular permutants of GFP variants and combinations thereof. The invention further provides various nucleic acid molecules and vectors incorporating such nucleic acid molecules, comprising polynucleotides encoding fluorescent protein circular permutants derived from superfolder GFP, which polynucleotides include an internal cloning site into which a heterologous polynucleotide may be inserted in-frame with the circular permutant coding sequence, and which when expressed are capable of reporting on the degree to which a polypeptide encoded by such an inserted heterologous polynucleotide is correctly folded by correlation with the degree of fluorescence exhibited.

  1. Circular permutant GFP insertion folding reporters

    DOEpatents

    Waldo, Geoffrey S; Cabantous, Stephanie

    2013-02-12

    Provided are methods of assaying and improving protein folding using circular permutants of fluorescent proteins, including circular permutants of GFP variants and combinations thereof. The invention further provides various nucleic acid molecules and vectors incorporating such nucleic acid molecules, comprising polynucleotides encoding fluorescent protein circular permutants derived from superfolder GFP, which polynucleotides include an internal cloning site into which a heterologous polynucleotide may be inserted in-frame with the circular permutant coding sequence, and which when expressed are capable of reporting on the degree to which a polypeptide encoded by such an inserted heterologous polynucleotide is correctly folded by correlation with the degree of fluorescence exhibited.

  2. Circular permutant GFP insertion folding reporters

    DOEpatents

    Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Cabantous, Stephanie

    2011-06-14

    Provided are methods of assaying and improving protein folding using circular permutants of fluorescent proteins, including circular permutants of GFP variants and combinations thereof. The invention further provides various nucleic acid molecules and vectors incorporating such nucleic acid molecules, comprising polynucleotides encoding fluorescent protein circular permutants derived from superfolder GFP, which polynucleotides include an internal cloning site into which a heterologous polynucleotide may be inserted in-frame with the circular permutant coding sequence, and which when expressed are capable of reporting on the degree to which a polypeptide encoded by such an inserted heterologous polynucleotide is correctly folded by correlation with the degree of fluorescence exhibited.

  3. Radioactive gold ring dermatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.A.; Aldrich, J.E. )

    1990-08-01

    A superficial squamous cell carcinoma developed in a woman who wore a radioactive gold ring for more than 30 years. Only part of the ring was radioactive. Radiation dose measurements indicated that the dose to basal skin layer was 2.4 Gy (240 rad) per week. If it is assumed that the woman continually wore her wedding ring for 37 years since purchase, she would have received a maximum dose of approximately 4600 Gy.

  4. 'Pot of Gold'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This false-color image taken by the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit shows the rock dubbed 'Pot of Gold' (upper left), located near the base of the 'Columbia Hills' in Gusev Crater. The rock's nodules and layered appearance have inspired rover team members to investigate the rock's detailed chemistry in coming sols. This picture was taken on sol 158 (June 13, 2004).

  5. Measurements of fiducial and differential cross sections for Higgs boson production in the diphoton decay channel at TeV with ATLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Agustoni, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allison, L. J.; Allport, P. P.; Almond, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Anduaga, X. S.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Apolle, R.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Auerbach, B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Azuelos, G.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Backus Mayes, J.; Badescu, E.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Balek, P.; Balli, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Bansal, V.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Baranov, S. P.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Bartsch, V.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Battistin, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bedikian, S.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Benslama, K.; Bentvelsen, S.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernat, P.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieniek, S. P.; Bierwagen, K.; Biesiada, J.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boddy, C. R.; Boehler, M.; Boek, T. T.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bogouch, A.; Bohm, C.; Bohm, J.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. 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C.; Stoebe, M.; Stoicea, G.; Stolte, P.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Stramaglia, M. E.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, E.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Stroynowski, R.; Struebig, A.; Stucci, S. A.; Stugu, B.; Styles, N. A.; Su, D.; Su, J.; Subramaniam, R.; Succurro, A.; Sugaya, Y.; Suhr, C.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, S.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, Y.; Svatos, M.; Swedish, S.; Swiatlowski, M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Taccini, C.; Tackmann, K.; Taenzer, J.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tam, J. Y. C.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tanaka, S.; Tanasijczuk, A. J.; Tannenwald, B. B.; Tannoury, N.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, W.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, M.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Teoh, J. J.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Therhaag, J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas-Wilsker, J.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, R. J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Thong, W. M.; Thun, R. P.; Tian, F.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tiouchichine, E.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Toggerson, B.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Topilin, N. D.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Tran, H. L.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; True, P.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C.-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Turk Cakir, I.; Turra, R.; Tuts, P. M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Uchida, K.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ughetto, M.; Ugland, M.; Uhlenbrock, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urbaniec, D.; Urquijo, P.; Usai, G.; Usanova, A.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Den Wollenberg, W.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; Van Der Leeuw, R.; van der Ster, D.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vannucci, F.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veloso, F.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigne, R.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Virzi, J.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, A.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vu Anh, T.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wall, R.; Waller, P.; Walsh, B.; Wang, C.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Warsinsky, M.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weigell, P.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wendland, D.; Weng, Z.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wijeratne, P. A.; Wildauer, A.; Wildt, M. A.; Wilkens, H. G.; Will, J. Z.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, A.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittig, T.; Wittkowski, J.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wright, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wulf, E.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xiao, M.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yakabe, R.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, H.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamamura, T.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y.; Yanush, S.; Yao, L.; Yao, W.-M.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yilmaz, M.; Yoosoofmiya, R.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zevi della Porta, G.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, R.; Zimmermann, S.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zutshi, V.; Zwalinski, L.

    2014-09-01

    Measurements of fiducial and differential cross sections are presented for Higgs boson production in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of TeV. The analysis is performed in the H → γγ decay channel using 20.3 fb-1 of data recorded by the ATLAS experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. The signal is extracted using a fit to the diphoton invariant mass spectrum assuming that the width of the resonance is much smaller than the experimental resolution. The signal yields are corrected for the effects of detector inefficiency and resolution. The pp → H → γγ fiducial cross section is measured to be 43.2 ±9.4(stat.) {-/2.9 + 3.2} (syst.) ±1.2(lumi)fb for a Higgs boson of mass 125.4GeV decaying to two isolated photons that have transverse momentum greater than 35% and 25% of the diphoton invariant mass and each with absolute pseudorapidity less than 2.37. Four additional fiducial cross sections and two cross-section limits are presented in phase space regions that test the theoretical modelling of different Higgs boson production mechanisms, or are sensitive to physics beyond the Standard Model. Differential cross sections are also presented, as a function of variables related to the diphoton kinematics and the jet activity produced in the Higgs boson events. The observed spectra are statistically limited but broadly in line with the theoretical expectations. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  6. Fiducial Marker Placement

    MedlinePlus

    ... conditions, allergies and medications you’re taking, including herbal supplements and aspirin. You may be advised to stop ... doctor all medications that you are taking, including herbal supplements, and if you have any allergies, especially to ...

  7. Alignment without Magnet Fiducials

    SciTech Connect

    Ruland, Robert; Mulhaupt, Gottfried; Rohrer, Martin; Wiegand, Peter; /PSI, Villigen

    2005-08-17

    Presently, the demand for high quality synchrotron radiation is increasing all over the world. One of the fascinating aspects of this novel tool is the broad range of scientific users interested in synchrotron radiation. They come from physics, chemistry, biology, and medicine, to name just a few. Third generation storage which recently became available for users will by far not be able to satisfy all the beam-time requests. In addition, it is also recognized that long-term scientific efficiency and technological success is heavily dependent on ease of access to a home based facility nearby and continuing fine-tuning of all components of a beam line. Based on the high quality user community in Switzerland and their prospective research activities, the Paul Scherrer Institute, in close collaboration with interested research groups from the Swiss universities and the Swiss Federal Institutes of Technology, has worked out a proposal to build an advanced synchrotron light source in Switzerland, which will come into operation in the year 2001. It has been named SLS as acronym for Swiss Light Source.

  8. Effectively Communicating Information about Dynamically Changing Arctic Sea Ice to the Public through the Global Fiducials Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molnia, B. F.; Friesen, B.; Wilson, E.; Noble, S.

    2015-12-01

    On July 15, 2009, the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) released a report, Scientific Value of Arctic Sea Ice Imagery Derived Products, advocating public release of Arctic images derived from classified data. In the NAS press release that announced the release, report lead Stephanie Pfirman states "To prepare for a possibly ice-free Arctic and its subsequent effects on the environment, economy, and national security, it is critical to have accurate projections of changes over the next several decades." In the same release NAS President Ralph Cicerone states "We hope that these images are the first of many that could help scientists learn how the changing climate could impact the environment and our society." The same day, Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar announced that the requested images had been released and were available to the public on a US Geological Survey Global Fiducials Program (GFP) Library website (http://gfl.usgs.gov). The website was developed by the USGS to provide public access to the images and to support environmental analysis of global climate-related science. In the statement describing the release titled, Information Derived from Classified Materials Will Aid Understanding of Changing Climate, Secretary Salazar states "We need the best data from all places if we are to meet the challenges that rising carbon emissions are creating. This information will be invaluable to scientists, researchers, and the public as we tackle climate change." Initially about 700 Arctic sea ice images were released. Six years later, the number exceeds 1,500. The GFP continues to facilitate the acquisition of new Arctic sea ice imagery from US National Imagery Systems. This example demonstrates how information about dynamically changing Arctic sea ice continues to be effectively communicated to the public by the GFP. In addition to Arctic sea ice imagery, the GFP has publicly released imagery time series of more than 125 other environmentally important

  9. Mammographic calcification cluster detection and threshold gold thickness measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, L. M.; Mackenzie, A.; Cooke, J.; Given-Wilson, R.; Wallis, M. G.; Chakraborty, D. P.; Dance, D. R.; Young, K. C.

    2012-03-01

    European Guidelines for quality control in digital mammography specify acceptable and achievable standards of image quality (IQ) in terms of threshold gold thickness using the CDMAM test object. However, there is little evidence relating such measurements to cancer detection. This work investigated the relationship between calcification detection and threshold gold thickness. An observer study was performed using a set of 162 amorphous selenium direct digital (DR) detector images (81 no cancer and 81 with 1-3 inserted calcification clusters). From these images four additional IQs were simulated: different digital detectors (computed radiography (CR) and DR) and dose levels. Seven observers marked and rated the locations of suspicious regions. DBM analysis of variances was performed on the JAFROC figure of merit (FoM) yielding 95% confidence intervals for IQ pairs. Automated threshold gold thickness (Tg) analysis was performed for the 0.25mm gold disc diameter on CDMAM images at the same IQs (16 images per IQ). Tg was plotted against FoM and a power law fitted to the data. There was a significant reduction in FoM for calcification detection for CR images compared with DR; FoM decreased from 0.83 to 0.63 (p<=0.0001). Detection was also sensitive to dose. There was a good correlation between FoM and Tg (R2=0.80, p<0.05), consequently threshold gold thickness was a good predictor of calcification detection at the same IQ. Since the majority of threshold gold thicknesses for the various IQs were above the acceptable standard despite large variations in calcification detection by radiologists, current EU guidelines may need revising.

  10. Gold-gold junction electrodes:the disconnection method.

    PubMed

    Dale, Sara E C; Vuorema, Anne; Ashmore, Ellen M Y; Kasprzyk-Horden, Barbara; Sillanpää, Mika; Denuault, Guy; Marken, Frank

    2012-02-01

    The formation of gold-gold junction electrodes for application in electroanalysis is described here based on electro-deposition from a non-cyanide gold plating bath. Converging growth of two hemispherical gold deposits on two adjacent platinum microelectrodes (both 100 µm diameter in glass, ca. 45 µm gap) followed by careful etching in aqueous chloride solution was employed. During growth both gold hemispheres "connect" and during etching "disconnection" is evident in a drop in current. Gold-gold junctions with sub-micron gaps are formed and applied for the electroanalytical detection of sub-micromolar concentrations of hydroquinone in 0.1 M phosphate buffer pH 7 (E(rev) = 0.04 V vs. SCE) and sub-micromolar concentration of dopamine in 0.1 M phosphate buffer pH 7 (E(rev) = 0.14 V vs. SCE). The potential future uses in analysis and limitations of gold-gold junction electrodes are discussed.

  11. 21 CFR 886.5420 - Contact lens inserter/remover.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Contact lens inserter/remover. 886.5420 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 886.5420 Contact lens inserter/remover. (a) Identification. A contact lens inserter/remover is a handheld device intended to insert or...

  12. 21 CFR 886.5420 - Contact lens inserter/remover.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Contact lens inserter/remover. 886.5420 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 886.5420 Contact lens inserter/remover. (a) Identification. A contact lens inserter/remover is a handheld device intended to insert or...

  13. 21 CFR 886.5420 - Contact lens inserter/remover.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Contact lens inserter/remover. 886.5420 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 886.5420 Contact lens inserter/remover. (a) Identification. A contact lens inserter/remover is a handheld device intended to insert or...

  14. 21 CFR 886.5420 - Contact lens inserter/remover.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Contact lens inserter/remover. 886.5420 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 886.5420 Contact lens inserter/remover. (a) Identification. A contact lens inserter/remover is a handheld device intended to insert or...

  15. 21 CFR 886.5420 - Contact lens inserter/remover.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Contact lens inserter/remover. 886.5420 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 886.5420 Contact lens inserter/remover. (a) Identification. A contact lens inserter/remover is a handheld device intended to insert or...

  16. Patients' experiences of the PICC insertion procedure.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Jackie; Davies, Louise

    Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) are a type of central venous access device used to deliver a variety of intravenous therapies, including chemotherapy. PICCs may be placed by interventional radiologists, anaesthetists or, as is increasingly common, by specialist nurses in the hospital setting. However, little is known about how patients feel regarding the PICC insertion procedure. The aim of this study was to interview patients who had undergone a recent PICC insertion in the chemotherapy day unit to identify their experiences. On analysis of the qualitative data obtained from the semi-structured interview, five themes emerged: the context of cancer; expectations; levels of pain and anxiety; coping strategies; and explanation. The findings of this study support some previously described elements of procedural experiences; however, new understanding has provided implications for practice in the areas of expectations, allaying anxiety levels, supporting individual coping strategies and providing explanation. The major limitation of the study was the homogenous sample of oncology patients with a clear link between the patient experience of the PICC insertion and the context of cancer. The main recommendation for further research would be to repeat this study with a broader patient population.

  17. Thermal Performance of the XRS Helium Insert

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breon, Susan R.; DiPirro, Michael J.; Tuttle, James G.; Shirron, Peter J.; Warner, Brent A.; Boyle, Robert F.; Canavan, Edgar R.

    1999-01-01

    The X-Ray Spectrometer (XRS) is an instrument on the Japanese Astro-E satellite, scheduled for launch early in the year 2000. The XRS Helium Insert comprises a superfluid helium cryostat, an Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerator (ADR), and the XRS calorimeters with their cold electronics. The calorimeters are capable of detecting X-rays over the energy range 0.1 to 10 keV with a resolution of 12 eV. The Helium Insert completed its performance and verification testing at Goddard in January 1999. It was shipped to Japan, where it has been integrated with the neon dewar built by Sumitomo Heavy Industries. The Helium Insert was given a challenging lifetime requirement of 2.0 years with a goal of 2.5 years. Based on the results of the thermal performance tests, the predicted on-orbit lifetime is 2.6 years with a margin of 30%. This is the result of both higher efficiency in the ADR cycle and the low temperature top-off, more than compensating for an increase in the parasitic heat load. This paper presents a summary of the key design features and the results of the thermal testing of the XRS Helium Insert.

  18. Insertion Loss of Personal Protective Clothing

    SciTech Connect

    Shull D.J.; Biesel, V.B.; Cunefare, K.A.

    1999-05-13

    'The use of personal protective clothing that covers the head is a common practice in many industries. Such personal protective clothing will impact the sound pressure level and the frequency content of sounds to which the wearer will be exposed. The use of such clothing, then, may impact speech and alarm audibility. A measure of the impact of such clothing is its insertion loss. Insertion loss measurements were performed on four types of personal protective clothing in use by Westinghouse Savannah River Company personnel which utilize cloth and plastic hood configurations to protect the head. All clothing configurations tested at least partially cover the ears. The measurements revealed that insertion loss of the items tested was notable at frequencies above 1000 Hz only and was a function of material stiffness and acoustic flanking paths to the ear. Further, an estimate of the clothing''s noise reduction rating reveals poor performance in that regard, even though the insertion loss of the test articles was significant at frequencies at and above 1000 Hz.'

  19. A design for vertical crossing insertions

    SciTech Connect

    Garren, A.

    1985-10-01

    A crossing insertion designed for an SSC with vertically separated 1-in-1 beam lines is presented in this note. The author supposes that the beam lines consist of separate magnets in separate cryostats separated by about 70 cm. He then describes the design, where vertical separation is done with four vertical dipoles producing a steplike beam line.

  20. Frequency, Gradience, and Variation in Consonant Insertion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    An, Young-ran

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation addresses the extent to which linguistic behavior can be described in terms of the projection of patterns from existing lexical items, through an investigation of Korean reduplication. Korean has a productive pattern of reduplication in which a consonant is inserted in a vowel-initial base, illustrated by forms such as "alok"--"t…

  1. Peripherally inserted central catheters. Intravenous Nurses Society.

    PubMed

    1997-01-01

    The Intravenous Nurses Society (INS) recognizes the need for uniform terminology for peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) to encourage standardization for indications, care, and maintenance strategies for these devices. It also recognizes the need for recommendations regarding the choice, use, management, and discontinuation of PICCs to promote positive patient outcomes and enhance patient comfort, safety, and satisfaction.

  2. Lymphatic Leak Complicating Central Venous Catheter Insertion

    SciTech Connect

    Barnacle, Alex M. Kleidon, Tricia M.

    2005-12-15

    Many of the risks associated with central venous access are well recognized. We report a case of inadvertent lymphatic disruption during the insertion of a tunneled central venous catheter in a patient with raised left and right atrial pressures and severe pulmonary hypertension, which led to significant hemodynamic instability. To our knowledge, this rare complication is previously unreported.

  3. Embedded Multiprocessor Technology for VHSIC Insertion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayes, Paul J.

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on embedded multiprocessor technology for VHSIC insertion are presented. The objective was to develop multiprocessor system technology providing user-selectable fault tolerance, increased throughput, and ease of application representation for concurrent operation. The approach was to develop graph management mapping theory for proper performance, model multiprocessor performance, and demonstrate performance in selected hardware systems.

  4. Inserting new technology into small missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deutsch, L. J.

    2001-01-01

    Part of what makes small missions small is that they have less money. Executing missions at low cost implies extensive use of cost sharing with other missions or use of existing solutions. Luckily, there are methods for creating new technology and inserting it into faster-better-cheaper missions.

  5. Industry Forum Navy Gold Coast

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-13

    NAVFAC Southwest Lora E. Morrow Deputy for Small Business NAVFAC Southwest NAVFAC Southwest Industry Forum Navy Gold Coast August...REPORT DATE 13 AUG 2014 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2014 to 00-00-2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Industry Forum Navy Gold Coast 5a...S) 12. DISTRIBUTION/AVAILABILITY STATEMENT Approved for public release; distribution unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES NDIA 27th Navy Gold Coast

  6. 31 CFR 100.4 - Gold coin and gold certificates in general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Gold coin and gold certificates in... MONETARY OFFICES, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY EXCHANGE OF PAPER CURRENCY AND COIN In General § 100.4 Gold coin and gold certificates in general. Gold coins, and gold certificates of the type issued...

  7. 31 CFR 100.4 - Gold coin and gold certificates in general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Gold coin and gold certificates in... MONETARY OFFICES, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY EXCHANGE OF PAPER CURRENCY AND COIN In General § 100.4 Gold coin and gold certificates in general. Gold coins, and gold certificates of the type issued...

  8. 31 CFR 100.4 - Gold coin and gold certificates in general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Gold coin and gold certificates in... EXCHANGE OF PAPER CURRENCY AND COIN In General § 100.4 Gold coin and gold certificates in general. Gold coins, and gold certificates of the type issued before January 30, 1934, are exchangeable, as...

  9. 31 CFR 100.4 - Gold coin and gold certificates in general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Gold coin and gold certificates in... MONETARY OFFICES, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY EXCHANGE OF PAPER CURRENCY AND COIN In General § 100.4 Gold coin and gold certificates in general. Gold coins, and gold certificates of the type issued...

  10. 31 CFR 100.4 - Gold coin and gold certificates in general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Gold coin and gold certificates in... MONETARY OFFICES, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY EXCHANGE OF PAPER CURRENCY AND COIN In General § 100.4 Gold coin and gold certificates in general. Gold coins, and gold certificates of the type issued...

  11. Consolidation and disposal of PWR fuel inserts

    SciTech Connect

    Wakeman, B.H. )

    1992-08-01

    Design and licensing of the Surry Power Station Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation was initiated in 1982 by Virginia Power as part of a comprehensive strategy to increase spent fuel storage capacity at the Station. Designed to use large, metal dry storage casks, the Surry Installation will accommodate 84 such casks with a total storage capacity of 811 MTU of spent pressurized water reactor fuel assemblies. Virginia Power provided three storage casks for testing at the Idaho National Engineerinq Laboratory's Test Area North and the testing results have been published by the Electric Power Research Institute. Sixty-nine spent fuel assemblies were transported in truck casks from the Surry Power Station to Test Area North for testing in the three casks. Because of restrictions imposed by the cask testing equipment at Test Area North, the irradiated insert components stored in these fuel assemblies at Surry were removed prior to transport of the fuel assemblies. Retaining these insert components proved to be a problem because of a shortage of spent fuel assemblies in the spent fuel storage pool that did not already contain insert components. In 1987 Virginia Power contracted with Chem-Nuclear Systems, Inc. to process and dispose of 136 irradiated insert components consisting of 125 burnable poison rod assemblies, 10 thimble plugging devices and 1 part-length rod cluster control assembly. This work was completed in August and September 1987, culminating in the disposal at the Barnwell, SC low-level radioactive waste facility of two CNS 3-55 liners containing the consolidated insert components.

  12. Surface-stabilized gold nanocatalysts

    DOEpatents

    Dai, Sheng [Knoxville, TN; Yan, Wenfu [Oak Ridge, TN

    2009-12-08

    A surface-stabilized gold nanocatalyst includes a solid support having stabilizing surfaces for supporting gold nanoparticles, and a plurality of gold nanoparticles having an average particle size of less than 8 nm disposed on the stabilizing surfaces. The surface-stabilized gold nanocatalyst provides enhanced stability, such as at high temperature under oxygen containing environments. In one embodiment, the solid support is a multi-layer support comprising at least a first layer having a second layer providing the stabilizing surfaces disposed thereon, the first and second layer being chemically distinct.

  13. Stereo‐ and Regioselective Alkyne Hydrometallation with Gold(III) Hydrides

    PubMed Central

    Pintus, Anna; Rocchigiani, Luca; Fernandez‐Cestau, Julio

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The hydroauration of internal and terminal alkynes by gold(III) hydride complexes [(C^N^C)AuH] was found to be mediated by radicals and proceeds by an unexpected binuclear outer‐sphere mechanism to cleanly form trans‐insertion products. Radical precursors such as azobisisobutyronitrile lead to a drastic rate enhancement. DFT calculations support the proposed radical mechanism, with very low activation barriers, and rule out mononuclear mechanistic alternatives. These alkyne hydroaurations are highly regio‐ and stereospecific for the formation of Z‐vinyl isomers, with Z/E ratios of >99:1 in most cases. PMID:27592697

  14. Distal Insertions of the Biceps Femoris

    PubMed Central

    Branch, Eric A.; Anz, Adam W.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Avulsion of the biceps femoris from the fibula and proximal tibia is encountered in clinical practice. While the anatomy of the primary posterolateral corner structures has been qualitatively and quantitatively described, a quantitative analysis regarding the insertions of the biceps femoris on the fibula and proximal tibia is lacking. Purpose: To quantitatively assess the insertions of the biceps femoris, fibular collateral ligament (FCL), and anterolateral ligament (ALL) on the fibula and proximal tibia as well as establish relationships among these structures and to pertinent surgical anatomy. Study Design: Descriptive laboratory study. Methods: Dissections were performed on 12 nonpaired, fresh-frozen cadaveric specimens identifying the biceps femoris, FCL, and ALL, and their insertions on the proximal tibia and fibula. The footprint areas, orientations, and distances from relevant osseous landmarks were measured using a 3-dimensional coordinate measurement device. Results: Dissection produced 6 easily identifiable and reproducible anatomic footprints. Tibial footprints included the insertion of the ALL and an insertion of the biceps femoris (TBF). Fibular footprints included the insertion of the FCL, a distal insertion of the biceps femoris (DBF), a medial footprint of the biceps femoris (MBF), and a proximal footprint of the biceps femoris (PBF). The mean area of these footprints (95% CI) was as follows: ALL, 53.0 mm2 (38.4-67.6); TBF, 93.9 mm2 (72.0-115.8); FCL, 86.8 mm2 (72.3-101.2); DBF, 119 mm2 (91.1-146.9); MBF, 46.8 mm2 (29.0-64.5); and PBF, 215 mm2 (192.4-237.5). The mean distance (95% CI) from the Gerdy tubercle to the center of the ALL footprint was 24.3 mm (21.6-27.0) and to the center of the TBF was 22.5 mm (21.0-24.0). The center of the DBF was 8.68 mm (7.0-10.3) from the anterior border of the fibula, the center of the FCL was 14.6 mm (12.5-16.7) from the anterior border of the fibula and 20.7 mm (19.0-22.4) from the tip of the fibular

  15. Experimental abrasion of detrital gold

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yeend, Warren E.

    1975-01-01

    The physical breakdown and abrasion rates of gold were studied using a tumbler to simulate natural high-energy environments. The gold fragments were tumbled for periods ranging from 30 to 240 h with different combinations of sand, cobbles, and water at velocities of 0.5 and 2.0 mi/h (0.85 and 3.22 km/h). With sand and gravel, the common bedload of the rivers that deposited the gold-bearing Tertiary sedimentary rocks of the Sierra Nevada, gold is abraded at rates of 0.015 to 0.007 percent (by weight) per hour of travel (at 0.5 mi/h or 0.845 km/h). Cobbles, rather than sand, are responsible for most of the physical changes and abrasion of the gold. Ten gold fragments tumbled for 120 h with cobbles and water (no sand) were broken down to 68 recoverable fragments and lost about 25 percent of their weight to particles smaller than could be recovered using conventional panning techniques. Gold tumbled for 120 h with sand and water lost less than 1 percent of its weight. Gold was abraded faster by wet sand than by dry sand. Velocity appears to be more important as a factor in abrasion of gold than travel distance a fourfold increase in velocity produced a tenfold increase in hourly abrasion rates of gold. Scanning electron microscope examination of the gold fragments after the tumbling experiments revealed differences in surface texture between fragments tumbled with (1) sand, (2) sand and cobbles, and (3) cobbles only.

  16. Computer-aided insertion of endosteal implants in the zygoma: a pilot study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birkfellner, Wolfgang; Watzinger, Franz; Wanschitz, Felix; Ziya, F.; Kremser, J.; Potyka, A.; Mayr, R.; Huber, Klaus; Kainberger, F.; Ewers, Rolf; Bergmann, Helmar

    2000-04-01

    Endosteal implants facilitate obturator prosthesis fixation in tumor patients after maxillectomy. Previous clinical studies shown however, that survival of implants placed into available bone after maxillectomy is generally poor. Implants positioned optimally in residual zygomatic bone provide superior stability form a biomechanical point of view as well as improved survival. In a pilot study, we have assessed the precision of VISIT, a surgical navigation system developed for research purposes at our institution. VISIT is based on the AVW-library and a number of in-house developed algorithms for communication with an optical tracker and patient-to-CT-registration. The final platform independent application was assembled within 6 man-months using ANSI-C and Tcl/Tk. Five cadaver specimens underwent hemimaxillectomy. The cadaver head was matched to a preoperative high resolution CT by using implanted surgical microscrews as fiducial markers. The position of a surgical drill relative to the cadaver head was determined with an optical tracking system. Implants were placed into the zygomatic arch where maximum bone volume was available. The results were assessed using test for allocation accuracy and postoperative CT-scans of the cadaver specimens. The average allocation accuracy of landmarks on the bony skull was 0.6 +/- 0.3 mm determined with a 5 degree-of-freedom pointer probe. The allocation accuracy of the tip of the implant burr was 1.7 +/- 0.4 mm. The accuracy of the implant position compared to the planned position was 1.5 +/- 1.1 mm. 8 out of 10 implants were inserted with maximum contact to surrounding bone, two implants were located unfavorably. However, reliable placement of implants in this region is difficult to achieve. The techqni3u described in this paper may be very helpful in the management of patients after maxillary resection without sufficient retention for obturator prostheses.

  17. Design and dosimetric considerations of a modified COMS plaque: The reusable 'seed-guide' insert

    SciTech Connect

    Astrahan, Melvin A.; Szechter, Andrzej; Finger, Paul T.

    2005-08-15

    The Collaborative Ocular Melanoma Study (COMS) developed a standardized set of eye plaques that consist of a 0.5 mm thick bowl-like gold alloy backing with a cylindrical collimating lip. A Silastic seed carrier into which {sup 125}I seeds are loaded was designed to fit within the backing. The carrier provides a standardized seed pattern and functions to offset the seeds by 1.0 mm from the concave (front) surface of the carrier. These Silastic carriers have been found to be difficult to load, preclude flash sterilization, and are a source of dosimetric uncertainty because the effective atomic number of Silastic is significantly higher than that of water. The main dosimetric effect of the Silastic carrier is a dose-reduction (compared to homogeneous water) of approximately 10%-15% for {sup 125}I radiation. The dose reduction is expected to be even greater for {sup 103}Pd radiation. In an attempt to improve upon, yet retain as much of the familiar COMS design as possible, we have developed a thin 'seed-guide' insert made of gold alloy. This new insert has cutouts which match the seed pattern of the Silastic carrier, but allows the seeds to be glued directly to the inner surface of the gold backing using either dental acrylic or a cyanoacrylate adhesive. When glued directly to the gold backing the seeds are offset a few tenths of a millimeter further away from the scleral surface compared to using the Silastic carrier. From a dosimetric perspective, the space formerly occupied by the Silastic carrier is now assumed to be water equivalent. Water equivalency is a desirable attribute for this space because it eliminates the dosimetric uncertainties related to the atomic composition of Silastic and thereby facilitates the use of either {sup 125}I and/or {sup 103}Pd seeds. The caveat is that a new source of dosimetric uncertainty would be introduced were an air bubble to become trapped in this space during or after the surgical insertion. The presence of air in this space

  18. Effect of Off-Axis Screw Insertion, Insertion Torque, and Plate Contouring on Locked Screw Strength

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, Bethany; Silva, Matthew J.; Ricci, William M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study quantifies the effects of insertion torque, off-axis screw angulation, and plate contouring on the strength of locking plate constructs. Methods Groups of locking screws (n = 6–11 screws) were inserted at 50%, 100%, 150%, and 200% of the manufacturer-recommended torque (3.2 Nm) into locking compression plates at various angles: orthogonal (control), 5-degree angle off-axis, and 10-degree angle off-axis. Screws were loaded to failure by a transverse force (parallel to the plate) either in the same (“+”) or opposite direction (“−”) of the initial screw angulation. Separately, locking plates were bent to 5 and 10-degree angles, with the bend apex at a screw hole. Locking screws inserted orthogonally into the apex hole at 100% torque were loaded to failure. Results Orthogonal insertion resulted in the highest average load to failure, 2577 ± 141 N (range, 2413–2778 N), whereas any off-axis insertion significantly weakened constructs (165–1285 N, at 100% torque) (P < 0.05). For “+” loading, torque beyond 100% did not increase strength, but 50% torque reduced screw strength (P < 0.05). Loading in the “−” direction consistently resulted in higher strengths than “+” loading (P < 0.05). Plate contouring of 5-degree angle did not significantly change screw strength compared with straight plates but contouring of 10-degree angle significantly reduced load to failure (P < 0.05). Conclusions To maximize the screw plate interface strength, locking screws should be inserted without cross-threading. The mechanical stability of locked screws is significantly compromised by loose insertion, off-axis insertion, or severe distortion of the locking mechanism. PMID:24343255

  19. When cyclopropenes meet gold catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Miege, Frédéric

    2011-01-01

    Summary Cyclopropenes as substrates entered the field of gold catalysis in 2008 and have proven to be valuable partners in a variety of gold-catalyzed reactions. The different contributions in this growing research area are summarized in this review. PMID:21804867

  20. Antibody-gold cluster conjugates

    DOEpatents

    Hainfeld, J.F.

    1988-06-28

    Antibody- or antibody fragment-gold cluster conjugates are shown wherein the conjugate size can be about 5.0 nm. Methods and reagents are disclosed in which antibodies or Fab' fragments thereof are covalently bound to a stable cluster of gold atoms. 2 figs.

  1. Descemet's Stripping Automated Endothelial Keratoplasty Tissue Insertion Devices

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Salman Nasir; Shiakolas, Panos S.; Mootha, Venkateswara Vinod

    2015-01-01

    This review study provides information regarding the construction, design, and use of six commercially available endothelial allograft insertion devices applied for Descemet's stripping automated endothelial keratoplasty (DSAEK). We also highlight issues being faced in DSAEK and discuss the methods through which medical devices such as corneal inserters may alleviate these issues. Inserter selection is of high importance in the DSAEK procedure since overcoming the learning curve associated with the use of an insertion device is a time and energy consuming process. In the present review, allograft insertion devices were compared in terms of design, construction material, insertion technique, dimensions, incision requirements and endothelial cell loss to show their relative merits and capabilities based on available data in the literature. Moreover, the advantages/disadvantages of various insertion devices used for allograft insertion in DSAEK are reviewed and compared. The information presented in this review can be utilized for better selection of an insertion device for DSAEK. PMID:27051492

  2. Perception and Action in Teleoperated Needle Insertion

    PubMed Central

    Nisky, Ilana; Pressman, Assaf; Pugh, Carla M.; Mussa-Ivaldi, Ferdinando A.; Karniel, Amir

    2015-01-01

    We studied the effect of delay on perception and action in contact with a force field that emulates elastic soft tissue with a rigid nonlinear boundary. Such field is similar to forces exerted on a needle during teleoperated needle insertion. We found that delay causes motor underestimation of the stiffness of this nonlinear soft tissue, without perceptual change. These experimental results are supported by simulation of a simplified mechanical model of the arm and neural controller, and a model for perception of stiffness, which is based on regression in the force-position space. In addition, we show that changing the gain of the teleoperation channel cancels the motor effect of delay without adding perceptual distortion. We conclude that it is possible to achieve perceptual and motor transparency in virtual one-dimensional remote needle insertion task. PMID:26379813

  3. A small, insertable oven for boronization

    SciTech Connect

    Brouchous, D.A.; Diebold, D.A.; Doczy, M.L.

    1996-04-01

    A small insertable oven for benchmarking the boronizing characteristics of solid compounds, such as decaborane and carborane, has been developed for the Phaedrus-T tokamak. Assembly and installation of the oven are relatively easy as the oven design utilizes a Langmuir probe drive assembly, which is standard equipment on most tokamaks and allows the oven to be inserted into the tokamak without requiring a vent. Films deposited by heating carborane into the vapor state with the oven are found to be spatially nonuniform in both thickness and in the ratio of boron to carbon as compared to films deposited with trimethylboron, a gaseous compound. Overall plasma performance is not found to be greatly affected by whether decaborane, carborane or trimethylboron is used for boronization in Phaedrus-T. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.} {lt}ii;010512{gt}

  4. INSERTION DEVICE ACTIVITIES FOR NSLS-II.

    SciTech Connect

    TANABE,T.; HARDER, D.A.; HULBERT, S.; RAKOWSKI, G.; SKARITKA, J.

    2007-06-25

    National Synchrotron Light Source-II (NSLS-II) will be a medium energy storage ring of 3GeV electron beam energy with sub-nm.rad horizontal emittance and top-off capability at 500mA. Damping wigglers will be used not only to reduce the beam emittance but also used as broadband sources for users. Cryo-Permanent Magnet Undulators (CPMUs) are considered for hard X-ray linear device, and permanent magnet based elliptically polarized undulators (EPUs) for variable polarization devices for soft X-ray. 6T superconducting wiggler with minimal fan angle will be installed in the second phase as well as quasi-periodic EPU for VUV and possibly high-temperature superconducting undulator. R&D plans have been established to pursue the performance enhancement of the baseline devices and to design new types of insertion devices. A new insertion device development laboratory will also be established.

  5. Umbilical cord insertion: normal location in neonates.

    PubMed

    Salgado, L; Paz, J E

    1992-12-01

    The distances between the xyphoid appendix and the insertion point of the umbilical cord (XU) and between the xyphoid appendix and upper edge of the pubic symphysis (XP) were measured in 201 newborn infants. The mean ratio XU/XP was 0.62 (S.D. 0.044) with no differences between sexes nor correlations with weight or length. Ratios lying between 0.53 and 0.71 can be considered as within the normal range.

  6. J85 Rejuvenation Through Technology Insertion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-10-01

    and Sabre 75 business addition to military production, the J85 was jets . Number Model Produced Aircraft Type(s) Engine Type Thrust (lbs) J85-GE-4 740...REJUVENATION THROUGH TECHNOLOGY INSERTION T.A. Brisken, P.N. Howell, A.C. Ewing Military Engines Operation GE Aircraft Engines 1 Neumann Way Cincinnati...OH 45215, USA Summary thrust to weight ratio turbojet engines with potential application to early cruise missiles and drones. The history of the

  7. Thermally Activated Retainers For Insertion In Gaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grimaldi, Margaret E.; Hartz, Leslie S.

    1992-01-01

    Mechanical retainers of new type for use with gap filler easy to install and to attach themselves securely. Concept based on shape-memory properties of metal alloy Nitinol, alloy of nickel and titanium. Retainers conceived for use with Space Shuttle insulating tiles but used on other assemblies of blocks or tiles configured similarly. Tabs bent outward made flush by cooling below memory transition temperature. After insertion in gap and reheating, tabs spring outward.

  8. Anionic phospholipids modulate peptide insertion into membranes.

    PubMed

    Liu, L P; Deber, C M

    1997-05-06

    While the insertion of a hydrophobic peptide or membrane protein segment into the bilayer can be spontaneous and driven mainly by the hydrophobic effect, anionic lipids, which comprise ca. 20% of biological membranes, provide a source of electrostatic attractions for binding of proteins/peptides into membranes. To unravel the interplay of hydrophobicity and electrostatics in the binding of peptides into membranes, we designed peptides de novo which possess the typical sequence Lys-Lys-Ala-Ala-Ala-X-Ala-Ala-Ala-Ala-Ala-X-Ala-Ala-Trp-Ala-Ala-X-Ala-Al a-Ala-Lys-Lys-Lys-Lys-amide, where X residues correspond to "guest" residues which encompass a range of hydrophobicity (Leu, Ile, Gly, and Ser). Circular dichroism spectra demonstrated that peptides were partially (40-90%) random in aqueous buffer but were promoted to form 100% alpha-helical structures by anionic lipid micelles. In neutral lipid micelles, only the relatively hydrophobic peptides (X = L and I) spontaneously adopted the alpha-helical conformation, but when 25% of negatively charged lipids were mixed in to mimic the content of anionic lipids in biomembranes, the less hydrophobic (X = S and G) peptides then formed alpha-helical conformations. Consistent with these findings, fluorescence quenching by the aqueous-phase quencher iodide indicated that in anionic (dimyristoylphosphatidylglycerol) vesicles, the peptide Trp residue was buried in the lipid vesicle hydrophobic core, while in neutral (dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine) vesicles, only hydrophobic (X = L and I) peptides were shielded from the aqueous solution. Trp emission spectra of peptides in the presence of phospholipids doxyl-labeled at the 5-, 7-, 10-, 12-, and 16-fatty acid positions implied not only a transbilayer orientation for inserted peptides but also that mixed peptide populations (transbilayer + surface-associated) may arise. Overall results suggest that for hydrophobic peptides with segmental threshold hydrophobicity below that which

  9. Probe Insertion Apparatus with Inflatable Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trimarchi, Paul A.

    1991-01-01

    A sealing apparatus for inserting a probe into a pressure vessel having an elongated opening includes Ii pair of resiliently defQrmable seals opposingly disposed in sealing engagement with each other. A retainer is connected to the pressure vessel around the elongated opening and holds the pair of seals rigidly to the pressure vessel. A wedge is engageable with the pair of seals and carries the probe, for longitudinally translating the probe in the pressure vessel.

  10. Inserting new technology into small missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deutsch, L. J.

    2001-01-01

    Part of what makes small missions small is that they have less money. Executing missions at low cost implies extensive use of cost sharing with other missions or use of existing solutions. However, in order to create many small missions, new technology must be developed, applied, and assimilated. Luckily, there are methods for creating new technology and inserting it into faster-better-cheaper (FBC) missions.

  11. Beamline Insertions Manager at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Michael C.

    2015-09-01

    The beam viewer system at Jefferson Lab provides operators and beam physicists with qualitative and quantitative information on the transverse electron beam properties. There are over 140 beam viewers installed on the 12 GeV CEBAF accelerator. This paper describes an upgrade consisting of replacing the EPICS-based system tasked with managing all viewers with a mixed system utilizing EPICS and high-level software. Most devices, particularly the beam viewers, cannot be safely inserted into the beam line during high-current beam operations. Software is partly responsible for protecting the machine from untimely insertions. The multiplicity of beam-blocking and beam-vulnerable devices motivates us to try a data-driven approach. The beamline insertions application components are centrally managed and configured through an object-oriented software framework created for this purpose. A rules-based engine tracks the configuration and status of every device, along with the beam status of the machine segment containing the device. The application uses this information to decide on which device actions are allowed at any given time.

  12. Rack Insertion End Effector (RIEE) guidance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malladi, Narasimha S.

    1994-01-01

    NASA-KSC has developed a mechanism to handle and insert Racks into the Space Station Logistic Modules. This mechanism consists of a Base with 3 motorized degrees of freedom, a 3 section motorized Boom that goes from 15 to 44 feet in length, and a Rack Insertion End Effector (RIEE) with 5 hand wheels for precise alignment. During the 1993 NASA-ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program at KSC, I designed an Active Vision (Camera) Arrangement and developed an algorithm to determine (1) the displacements required by the Room for its initial positioning and (2) the rotations required at the five hand-wheels of the RIEE, for the insertion of the Rack, using the centroids fo the Camera Images of the Location Targets in the Logistic Module. Presently, during the summer of '94, I completed the preliminary design of an easily portable measuring instrument using encoders to obtain the 3-Dimensional Coordinates of Location Targets in the Logistics Module relative to the RIEE mechanism frame. The algorithm developed in '93 can use the output of this instrument also. Simplification of the '93 work and suggestions for the future work are discussed.

  13. App-assisted external ventricular drain insertion.

    PubMed

    Eftekhar, Behzad

    2016-09-01

    The freehand technique for insertion of an external ventricular drain (EVD) is based on fixed anatomical landmarks and does not take individual variations into consideration. A patient-tailored approach based on augmented-reality techniques using devices such as smartphones can address this shortcoming. The Sina neurosurgical assist (Sina) is an Android mobile device application (app) that was designed and developed to be used as a simple intraoperative neurosurgical planning aid. It overlaps the patient's images from previously performed CT or MRI studies on the image seen through the device camera. The device is held by an assistant who aligns the images and provides information about the relative position of the target and EVD to the surgeon who is performing EVD insertion. This app can be used to provide guidance and continuous monitoring during EVD placement. The author describes the technique of Sina-assisted EVD insertion into the frontal horn of the lateral ventricle and reports on its clinical application in 5 cases as well as the results of ex vivo studies of ease of use and precision. The technique has potential for further development and use with other augmented-reality devices.

  14. DEVICE FOR CONTROLLING INSERTION OF ROD

    DOEpatents

    Beaty, B.J.

    1958-10-14

    A device for rapidly inserting a safety rod into a nuclear reactor upon a given signal or in the event of a power failure in order to prevent the possibility of extensive damage caused by a power excursion is described. A piston is slidably mounted within a vertical cylinder with provision for an electromagnetic latch at the top of the cylinder. This assembly, with a safety rod attached to the piston, is mounted over an access port to the core region of the reactor. The piston is normally latched at the top of the cylinder with the safety rod clear of the core area, however, when the latch is released, the piston and rod drop by their own weight to insert the rod. Vents along the side of the cylinder permit the escape of the air entrapped under the piston over the greater part of the distance, however, at the end of the fall the entrapped air is compressed thereby bringing the safety rod gently to rest, thus providing for a rapid automatic insertion of the rod with a minimum of structural shock.

  15. UV-visible absorption spectroscopy for the detection of differences in oligonucleotide influenced aggregation of colloidal gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdury, Mustafa H.; Julian, Andrea M.; Coates, Craig J.; Cote, Gerard L.

    2005-04-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) or transposons are mobile segments of DNA that are capable of being excised and moved from one chromosomal location to another by a process known as transposition. This process requires an enzyme called the transposase that performs the excision reaction, recognizes specific target site sequences and then promotes insertion of the TE at the target site (transposition). This study provides new clues towards unraveling the causes behind the preferential affinity of the Hermes transposable element for certain insertion sites compared to other sequences which also contain recognizable target sites. The technique consists of a rapid, simple and reproducible assay that can be used to detect differences in the ability of various oligonucleotides to influence the aggregation of colloidal gold nanoparticles. The aggregation of the gold nanoparticles is monitored through UV-Visible absorption spectroscopy. Single isolated colloidal gold particles have a surface plasmon resonance manifested as a single absorbance peak at approximately 520 nm and aggregated gold complexes develop new red-shifted peaks/shoulders depending on the nature and extent of the aggregated complex. A simple ratiometric study of the area under the single and aggregated plasmon resonance peaks gives information about the extent of the aggregation. It is postulated that differences in dynamic flexibility of the oligonucleotides affect their influence on the aggregation state of the gold nanoparticles. Therefore such differences in dynamic flexibility between various insertion sites could directly or indirectly contribute to the observed target site preferences of the Hermes transposable element.

  16. Force measurement of insertion of cochlear implant electrode arrays in-vitro: Comparison of surgeon to automated insertion tool

    PubMed Central

    Majdani, O; Hussong, A; Rau, TS; Wittkopf, J; Lenarz, T; Labadie, RF

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions We have demonstrated that an automated insertion tool (a.k.a. robot) can be used to duplicate a complex surgical motion in inserting cochlear implant electrode arrays via the “advance-off-stylet” technique (AOS). As compared to human operators, the forces generated by the robot were slightly larger but the robot was more reliable (i.e. less force maxima). Objectives We present force data collected during cochlear implant electrode insertion by human operators and by an automated insertion tool (a.k.a. robot). Methods Using a three-dimensional, anatomically-correct, translucent model of the scala tympani chamber of the cochlea, cochlear implant electrodes were inserted either by one of three surgeons (26 insertions) or by the robotic insertion tool (8 insertions). Force was recorded using a load beam cell calibrated for expected forces of less than 0.1 Newtons. The insertions were also videotaped to allow correlation of force with depth of penetration into the cochlea and speed of insertion. Results Average insertion force by the surgeons was 0.004±0.001N and for the insertion tool 0.005±0.014N (p < 0.00001, Student’s t-test). While the average insertion force of the automated tool was larger than that of the surgeons, the surgeons did have intermittent peaks during the AOS component of the insertion (between 120° and 200°). PMID:19484593

  17. Epidural insertion simulator of higher insertion resistance & drop rate after puncture.

    PubMed

    Naemura, K; Sakai, A; Hayashi, T; Saito, H

    2008-01-01

    Accidents such as dural puncture remain one of the problems of epidural anesthesia, and unskilled doctors can repeat such accidents. The purpose of the current research was to provide a new simulator for epidural insertion training. No reference data regarding the resistance force used when inserting a needle into patients have been reported. A comparative study was conducted to aid in the development of a new simulator. Pork loin (n=5) were employed as a substitute for patients. Thickness was set at 2 cm so as to improve the reproducibility. The authors took the conventional simulator apart, and picked a block as an analogue of muscle and ligamentum flavum. A new simulator was made of a melamine foam resin block and a latex rubber sheet. An epidural needle fixed on a motorized stage was inserted at the speed of 2 mm per second. The reaction force was measured while the needle was inserted into each specimen. Waveform of the pork loin exhibited two slopes of different inclines up to peaks and then falls after puncture. The conventional simulator showed a simple increase up to peak and a slow fall after puncture. In contrast, the new simulator showed two slopes up to peak and then a sudden fall after puncture. The insertion resistances were 2.5 N/s for the porcine, 0.8 N/s for the conventional and 2.1 N/s for the new simulator. The drop rates were 5 N/s for the porcine, 0.6 N/s for the conventional and 24 N/s for the new simulator. The higher insertion resistance and drop rate for the new simulator than the conventional simulator will be suitable for epidural insertion training.

  18. 4D ultrasound speckle tracking of intra-fraction prostate motion: a phantom-based comparison with x-ray fiducial tracking using CyberKnife

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Shea, Tuathan P.; Garcia, Leo J.; Rosser, Karen E.; Harris, Emma J.; Evans, Philip M.; Bamber, Jeffrey C.

    2014-04-01

    This study investigates the use of a mechanically-swept 3D ultrasound (3D-US) probe for soft-tissue displacement monitoring during prostate irradiation, with emphasis on quantifying the accuracy relative to CyberKnife® x-ray fiducial tracking. An US phantom, implanted with x-ray fiducial markers was placed on a motion platform and translated in 3D using five real prostate motion traces acquired using the Calypso system. Motion traces were representative of all types of motion as classified by studying Calypso data for 22 patients. The phantom was imaged using a 3D swept linear-array probe (to mimic trans-perineal imaging) and, subsequently, the kV x-ray imaging system on CyberKnife. A 3D cross-correlation block-matching algorithm was used to track speckle in the ultrasound data. Fiducial and US data were each compared with known phantom displacement. Trans-perineal 3D-US imaging could track superior-inferior (SI) and anterior-posterior (AP) motion to ≤0.81 mm root-mean-square error (RMSE) at a 1.7 Hz volume rate. The maximum kV x-ray tracking RMSE was 0.74 mm, however the prostate motion was sampled at a significantly lower imaging rate (mean: 0.04 Hz). Initial elevational (right-left RL) US displacement estimates showed reduced accuracy but could be improved (RMSE <2.0 mm) using a correlation threshold in the ultrasound tracking code to remove erroneous inter-volume displacement estimates. Mechanically-swept 3D-US can track the major components of intra-fraction prostate motion accurately but exhibits some limitations. The largest US RMSE was for elevational (RL) motion. For the AP and SI axes, accuracy was sub-millimetre. It may be feasible to track prostate motion in 2D only. 3D-US also has the potential to improve high tracking accuracy for all motion types. It would be advisable to use US in conjunction with a small (˜2.0 mm) centre-of-mass displacement threshold in which case it would be possible to take full advantage of the accuracy and high imaging

  19. 4D ultrasound speckle tracking of intra-fraction prostate motion: a phantom-based comparison with x-ray fiducial tracking using CyberKnife.

    PubMed

    O'Shea, Tuathan P; Garcia, Leo J; Rosser, Karen E; Harris, Emma J; Evans, Philip M; Bamber, Jeffrey C

    2014-04-07

    This study investigates the use of a mechanically-swept 3D ultrasound (3D-US) probe for soft-tissue displacement monitoring during prostate irradiation, with emphasis on quantifying the accuracy relative to CyberKnife® x-ray fiducial tracking. An US phantom, implanted with x-ray fiducial markers was placed on a motion platform and translated in 3D using five real prostate motion traces acquired using the Calypso system. Motion traces were representative of all types of motion as classified by studying Calypso data for 22 patients. The phantom was imaged using a 3D swept linear-array probe (to mimic trans-perineal imaging) and, subsequently, the kV x-ray imaging system on CyberKnife. A 3D cross-correlation block-matching algorithm was used to track speckle in the ultrasound data. Fiducial and US data were each compared with known phantom displacement. Trans-perineal 3D-US imaging could track superior-inferior (SI) and anterior-posterior (AP) motion to ≤0.81 mm root-mean-square error (RMSE) at a 1.7 Hz volume rate. The maximum kV x-ray tracking RMSE was 0.74 mm, however the prostate motion was sampled at a significantly lower imaging rate (mean: 0.04 Hz). Initial elevational (right-left; RL) US displacement estimates showed reduced accuracy but could be improved (RMSE <2.0 mm) using a correlation threshold in the ultrasound tracking code to remove erroneous inter-volume displacement estimates. Mechanically-swept 3D-US can track the major components of intra-fraction prostate motion accurately but exhibits some limitations. The largest US RMSE was for elevational (RL) motion. For the AP and SI axes, accuracy was sub-millimetre. It may be feasible to track prostate motion in 2D only. 3D-US also has the potential to improve high tracking accuracy for all motion types. It would be advisable to use US in conjunction with a small (∼2.0 mm) centre-of-mass displacement threshold in which case it would be possible to take full advantage of the accuracy and high

  20. Domain boundary formation in helical multishell gold nanowire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshi, Takeo; Fujiwara, Takeo

    2009-03-01

    Helical multishell gold nanowire (Y. Kondo and K. Takayanagi, Science 289, 606 (2000)) is studied by molecular dynamics simulation with electronic structure (``ELSES'' http://www.elses.jp/), so as to explore formation mechanism of helical domain boundary. We have proposed a model for the formation of helical multishell gold nanowires with molecular dynamics simulation with electronic structure (Y. Iguchi, T. Hoshi, T. Fujiwara PRL 99, 125507 (2007)). In this paper, we show simulation results with lager samples, of which the rod length is more than 10 nm and the number of rod atoms is more than one thousand. Unlike the results of shorter rods in the previous paper, a well-defined domain boundary between helical and (non-)helical regions appears, when an atom moves from a inner shell into rod surface. The inserted atoms on the rod surface causes a surface reconstruction on rod surface and introduces a helical region with a domain boundary. Such an inserted atom is a possible candidate of mechanism for forming a helical rod from an ideal (non-helical) one.

  1. Synthesis of gold structures by gold-binding peptide governed by concentration of gold ion and peptide.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jungok; Kim, Dong-Hun; Lee, Sylvia J; Rheem, Youngwoo; Myung, Nosang V; Hur, Hor-Gil

    2016-08-01

    Although biological synthesis methods for the production of gold structures by microorganisms, plant extracts, proteins, and peptide have recently been introduced, there have been few reports pertaining to controlling their size and morphology. The gold ion and peptide concentrations affected on the size and uniformity of gold plates by a gold-binding peptide Midas-11. The higher concentration of gold ions produced a larger size of gold structures reached 125.5 μm, but an increased amount of Midas-11 produced a smaller size of gold platelets and increased the yield percentage of polygonal gold particles rather than platelets. The mechanisms governing factors controlling the production of gold structures were primarily related to nucleation and growth. These results indicate that the synthesis of gold architectures can be controlled by newly isolated and substituted peptides under different reaction conditions.

  2. Estimation of insertion depth angle based on cochlea diameter and linear insertion depth: a prediction tool for the CI422.

    PubMed

    Franke-Trieger, Annett; Mürbe, Dirk

    2015-11-01

    Beside the cochlear size, the linear insertion depth (LID) influences the insertion depth angle of cochlear implant electrode arrays. For the specific implant CI422 the recommended LID is not fixed but can vary continuously between 20 and 25 mm. In the current study, the influence of cochlea size and LID on the final insertion depth angle was investigated to develop a prediction tool for the insertion depth angle by means of cochlea diameter and LID. Preoperative estimation of insertion depth angles might help surgeons avoid exceeding an intended insertion depth, especially with respect to low-frequency residual hearing preservation. Postoperative, high-resolution 3D-radiographs provided by Flat Panel Computed Volume Tomography (FPCT) were used to investigate the insertion depth angle in 37 CI422 recipients. Furthermore, the FPCT images were used to measure linear insertion depth and diameter of the basal turn of the cochlea. A considerable variation of measured insertion depth angles ranging from 306° to 579° was identified. The measured linear insertion depth ranged from -18.6 to 26.2 mm and correlated positively with the insertion depth angle. The cochlea diameter ranged from 8.11 to 10.42 mm and correlated negatively with the insertion depth angle. The results suggest that preoperatively measured cochlea diameter combined with the option of different array positions by means of LID may act as predictors for the final insertion depth angle.

  3. 20th-Century Gold Rush.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wargo, Joseph G.

    1992-01-01

    Presents Nevada's gold rush activities spurred by technological advancements in search methods. Describes the events that led to the twentieth-century gold rush, the techniques for finding deposits and the geological formation process of disseminated gold deposits. Vignettes present the gold extraction process, cross-section, and profile of a…

  4. 41 CFR 101-45.002 - Gold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2014-07-01 2012-07-01 true Gold. 101-45.002 Section... PERSONAL PROPERTY § 101-45.002 Gold. (a) Gold will be sold in accordance with this section and part 102-38 of the Federal Management Regulation. (b) Sales of gold shall be processed to— (1) Use the sealed...

  5. 41 CFR 101-45.002 - Gold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Gold. 101-45.002 Section... PERSONAL PROPERTY § 101-45.002 Gold. (a) Gold will be sold in accordance with this section and part 102-38 of the Federal Management Regulation. (b) Sales of gold shall be processed to— (1) Use the sealed...

  6. 41 CFR 101-45.002 - Gold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Gold. 101-45.002 Section... PERSONAL PROPERTY § 101-45.002 Gold. (a) Gold will be sold in accordance with this section and part 102-38 of the Federal Management Regulation. (b) Sales of gold shall be processed to— (1) Use the sealed...

  7. 41 CFR 101-45.002 - Gold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2011-07-01 2007-07-01 true Gold. 101-45.002 Section... PERSONAL PROPERTY § 101-45.002 Gold. (a) Gold will be sold in accordance with this section and part 102-38 of the Federal Management Regulation. (b) Sales of gold shall be processed to— (1) Use the sealed...

  8. 41 CFR 101-45.002 - Gold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Gold. 101-45.002 Section... PERSONAL PROPERTY § 101-45.002 Gold. (a) Gold will be sold in accordance with this section and part 102-38 of the Federal Management Regulation. (b) Sales of gold shall be processed to— (1) Use the sealed...

  9. Commercial Generic Bioprocessing Apparatus Science Insert - 03

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moreno, Nancy; Stodieck, Louis; Cushing, Paula; Stowe, Mark; Hamilton, Mary Ann; Werner, Ken

    2008-01-01

    Commercial Generic Bioprocessing Apparatus Science Insert - 03 (CSI-03) is the third set of investigations in the CSI program series. The CSI program provides the K-12 community opportunities to utilize the unique microgravity environment of the International Space Station as part of the regular classroom to encourage learning and interest in science, technology, engineering and math. CSI-03 will examine the complete life cycle of the painted lady butterfly and the ability of an orb weaving spider to spin a web, eat and remain healthy in space.

  10. Phoenix's Probe Inserted in Martian Soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The Phoenix Mars lander's robotic-arm camera took this image of the spacecraft's thermal and electrical-conductivity probe (TECP) inserted into Martian soil on day 149 of the mission. Phoenix landed on Mars' northern plains on May 25, 2008, landing.

    The robotic-arm camera acquired this image at 16:02:41 local solar time. The camera pointing was elevation -72.6986 degrees and azimuth 2.1093 degrees.

    The Phoenix mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  11. Compiler-assisted static checkpoint insertion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, Junsheng; Fuchs, W. K.; Abraham, Jacob A.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes a compiler-assisted approach for static checkpoint insertion. Instead of fixing the checkpoint location before program execution, a compiler enhanced polling mechanism is utilized to maintain both the desired checkpoint intervals and reproducible checkpoint 1ocations. The technique has been implemented in a GNU CC compiler for Sun 3 and Sun 4 (Sparc) processors. Experiments demonstrate that the approach provides for stable checkpoint intervals and reproducible checkpoint placements with performance overhead comparable to a previously presented compiler assisted dynamic scheme (CATCH) utilizing the system clock.

  12. Enhancement of gold recovery using bioleaching from gold concentrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, S. H.; Cho, K. H.; Kim, B. J.; Choi, N. C.; Park, C. Y.

    2012-04-01

    The gold in refractory ores is encapsulated as fine particles (sometimes at a molecular level) in the crystal structure of the sulfide (typically pyrite with or without arsenopyrite) matrix. This makes it impossible to extract a significant amount of refractory gold by cyanidation since the cyanide solution cannot penetrate the pyrite/arsenopyrite crystals and dissolve gold particles, even after fine grinding. To effectively extract gold from these ores, an oxidative pretreatment is necessary to break down the sulfide matrix. The most popular methods of pretreatment include nitric acid oxidation, roasting, pressure oxidation and biological oxidation by microorganisms. This study investigated the bioleaching efficiency of Au concentrate under batch experimental conditions (adaptation cycles and chemical composition adaptation) using the indigenous acidophilic bacteria collected from gold mine leachate in Sunsin gold mine, Korea. We conducted the batch experiments at two different chemical composition (CuSO4 and ZnSO4), two different adaptation cycles 1'st (3 weeks) and 2'nd (6 weeks). The results showed that the pH in the bacteria inoculating sample decreased than initial condition and Eh increased. In the chemical composition adaptation case, the leached accumulation content of Fe and Pb was exhibited in CuSO4 adaptation bacteria sample more than in ZnSO4 adaptation bacteria samples, possibly due to pre-adaptation effect on chalcopyrite (CuFeS2) in gold concentrate. And after 21 days on the CuSO4 adaptation cycles case, content of Fe and Pb was appeared at 1'st adaptation bacteria sample(Fe - 1.82 and Pb - 25.81 times per control sample) lower than at 2'nd adaptation bacteria sample(Fe - 2.87 and Pb - 62.05 times per control sample). This study indicates that adaptation chemical composition and adaptation cycles can play an important role in bioleaching of gold concentrate in eco-/economic metallurgy process.

  13. Measurement of fiducial and total cross section for Higgs boson production in the four-lepton decay channel in pp collisions at √{ s} = 13 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herde, Hannah; Atlas Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Fully characterizing the Higgs boson provides a key portal to stringently examine the Standard Model and search for tantalizing hints of new physics. We will present the measurement of the cross section for Higgs boson production in the four lepton (electron or muon) decay channel in a fiducial region within the detector acceptance, defined in terms of lepton traverse momenta and pseudo-rapidity. The extrapolation to the total cross section, covering the full phase-space, is also presented. The measurements are performed using 2015-2016 pp collision data at √{ s} = 13 TeV collected with the ATLAS detector. We will also present the measurements of the fiducial cross section as a function of the final state as well as a confrontation of the cross section for same flavor and opposite flavor final states. The inclusive fiducial cross section is compared with the Next-to-Next-to-Next to Leading Order theoretical calculation for the gluon-gluon fusion production mode, and Next-to-Next-to Leading Order calculations for production via vector boson fusion and associated production modes in the fiducial phase-space.

  14. Quench Module Insert (QMI) and the Diffusion Module Insert (DMI) Furnace Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crouch, Myscha R.; Carswell, William E.; Farmer, Jeff; Rose, Fred; Tidwell, Paul H., II

    2000-01-01

    The Quench Module Insert (QMI) and the Diffusion Module Insert (DMI) are microgravity furnaces under development at Marshall Space Flight Center. The furnaces are being developed for the first Materials Science Research Rack (MSRR-1) of the Materials Science Research Facility (MSRF), one of the first International Space Station (ISS) scientific payloads. QMI is a Bridgman furnace with quench capability for studying interface behavior during directional solidification of metallic and alloy materials. DMI will be a Bridgman-Stockbarger furnace to study diffusion processes in semiconductors. The design for each insert, both QMI and DMI, is driven by specific science, operations and safety requirements, as well as by constraints arising from resource limitations, such as volume, mass and power. Preliminary QMI analysis and testing indicates that the design meets these requirements.

  15. Intrafraction motion of the prostate during an IMRT session: a fiducial-based 3D measurement with Cone-beam CT

    PubMed Central

    Boda-Heggemann, Judit; Köhler, Frederick Marc; Wertz, Hansjörg; Ehmann, Michael; Hermann, Brigitte; Riesenacker, Nadja; Küpper, Beate; Lohr, Frank; Wenz, Frederik

    2008-01-01

    Background Image-guidance systems allow accurate interfractional repositioning of IMRT treatments, however, these may require up to 15 minutes. Therefore intrafraction motion might have an impact on treatment precision. 3D geometric data regarding intrafraction prostate motion are rare; we therefore assessed its magnitude with pre- and post-treatment fiducial-based imaging with cone-beam-CT (CBCT). Methods 39 IMRT fractions in 5 prostate cancer patients after 125I-seed implantation were evaluated. Patient position was corrected based on the 125I-seeds after pre-treatment CBCT. Immediately after treatment delivery, a second CBCT was performed. Differences in bone- and fiducial position were measured by seed-based grey-value matching. Results Fraction time was 13.6 ± 1.6 minutes. Median overall displacement vector length of 125I-seeds was 3 mm (M = 3 mm, Σ = 0.9 mm, σ = 1.7 mm; M: group systematic error, Σ: SD of systematic error, σ: SD of random error). Median displacement vector of bony structures was 1.84 mm (M = 2.9 mm, Σ = 1 mm, σ = 3.2 mm). Median displacement vector length of the prostate relative to bony structures was 1.9 mm (M = 3 mm, Σ = 1.3 mm, σ = 2.6 mm). Conclusion a) Overall displacement vector length during an IMRT session is < 3 mm. b) Positioning devices reducing intrafraction bony displacements can further reduce overall intrafraction motion. c) Intrafraction prostate motion relative to bony structures is < 2 mm and may be further reduced by institutional protocols and reduction of IMRT duration. PMID:18986517

  16. Analysis of dose to patient, spouse/caretaker, and staff, from an implanted trackable radioactive fiducial for use in the radiation treatment of prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Neustadter, David; Barnea, Gideon; Stokar, Saul; Corn, Ben

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: A fiducial tracking system based on a novel radioactive tracking technology is being developed for real-time target tracking in radiation therapy. In this study, the authors calculate the radiation dose to the patient, the spouse/caretaker, and the medical staff that would result from a 100 {mu}Ci Ir192 radioactive fiducial marker permanently implanted in the prostate of a radiation therapy patient. Methods: Local tissue dose was calculated by Monte Carlo simulation. The patient's whole body effective dose equivalent was calculated by summing the doses to the sensitive organs. Exposure of the spouse/caretaker was calculated from the NRC guidelines. Exposure of the medical staff was based on estimates of proximity to and time spent with the patient. Results: The local dose is below 40 Gy at 5 mm from the marker and below 10 Gy at 10 mm from the marker. The whole body effective dose equivalent to the patient is 64 mSv. The dose to the spouse/caretaker is 0.25 mSv. The annual exposures of the medical staff are 0.2 mSv for a doctor performing implantations and 0.34 mSv for a radiation therapist positioning patients for therapy. Conclusions: The local dose is not expected to have any clinically significant effect on the surrounding tissue which is irradiated during therapy. The dose to the patient is small in comparison to the whole body dose received from the therapy itself. The exposure of all other people is well below the recommended limits. The authors conclude that there is no radiation exposure related contraindication for use of this technology in the radiation treatment of prostate cancer.

  17. Detection of Esophageal Fiducial Marker Displacement During Radiation Therapy With a 2-dimensional On-board Imager: Analysis of Internal Margin for Esophageal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Fukada, Junichi; Hanada, Takashi; Kawaguchi, Osamu; Ohashi, Toshio; Takeuchi, Hiroya; Kitagawa, Yuko; Seki, Satoshi; Shiraishi, Yutaka; Ogata, Haruhiko; Shigematsu, Naoyuki

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To quantify the interfraction displacement of esophageal fiducial markers for primary esophageal cancer radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Orthogonal 2-dimensional (2D) matching records fused to vertebrae were analyzed in clinically staged T1/2N0 esophageal cancer patients undergoing endoscopic clipping as fiducial metal markers. Displacement of the markers between the digitally reconstructed radiographs and on-board kilovoltage images during radiation therapy was analyzed according to direction and esophageal site. Results: Forty-four patients, with 81 markers (10 proximal, 42 middle, and 29 distal), underwent 367 2D matching sessions during radiation therapy. The mean (SD) absolute marker displacement was 0.26 (0.30) cm in the right–left (RL), 0.50 (0.39) cm in the superior–inferior (SI), and 0.24 (0.21) cm in the anterior–posterior (AP) direction. Displacement was significantly larger in the SI than in the RL and AP directions (P<.0001). In the SI direction, mean absolute displacements of the distal, middle, and proximal esophagus were 0.67 (0.45) cm, 0.42 (0.32) cm, and 0.36 (0.30) cm, respectively. Distal esophagus displacement was significantly larger than those of the middle and proximal esophagus (P<.0001). The estimated internal margin to cover 95% of the cases was 0.75 cm in the RL and AP directions. In the SI direction, the margin was 1.25 cm for the proximal and middle esophagus and 1.75 cm for the distal esophagus. Conclusions: The magnitude of interfraction displacement of esophageal clips was larger in the SI direction, particularly in the distal esophagus, but substantial displacement was observed in other directions and at other esophageal sites. It is practical to take estimated movements into account with internal margins, even if vertebrae-based 2D matching is performed.

  18. Insertion torque versus mechanical resistance of mini-implants inserted in different cortical thickness

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Renata de Faria; Ruellas, Antonio Carlos de Oliveira; Fernandes, Daniel Jogaib; Elias, Carlos Nelson

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to measure insertion torque, tip mechanical resistance to fracture and transmucosal neck of mini-implants (MI) (Conexão Sistemas de PróteseT), as well as to analyze surface morphology. Methods Mechanical tests were carried out to measure the insertion torque of MIs in different cortical thicknesses, and tip mechanical resistance to fracture as well as transmucosal neck of MIs. Surface morphology was assessed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) before and after the mechanical tests. Results Values of mechanical resistance to fracture (22.14 N.cm and 54.95 N.cm) were higher and statistically different (P < 0.05) from values of insertion torque for 1-mm (7.60 N.cm) and 2-mm (13.27 N.cm) cortical thicknesses. Insertion torque was statistically similar (P > 0.05) to torsional fracture in the tip of MI (22.14 N.cm) when 3 mm cortical thickness (16.11 N.cm) and dense bone (23.95 N.cm) were used. Torsional fracture of the transmucosal neck (54.95 N.cm) was higher and statistically different (P < 0.05) from insertion torsional strength in all tested situations. SEM analysis showed that the MIs had the same smooth surface when received from the manufacturer and after the mechanical tests were performed. Additionally, no significant marks resulting from the manufacturing process were observed. Conclusion All mini-implants tested presented adequate surface morphology. The resistance of mini-implants to fracture safely allows placement in 1 and 2-mm cortical thickness. However, in 3-mm cortical thickness and dense bones, pre-drilling with a bur is recommended before insertion. PMID:25162571

  19. Cell line fingerprinting using retroelement insertion polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Ustyugova, Svetlana V; Amosova, Anna L; Lebedev, Yuri B; Sverdlov, Eugene D

    2005-04-01

    Human cell lines are an indispensable tool for functional studies of living entities in their numerous manifestations starting with integral complex systems such as signal pathways and networks, regulation of gene ensembles, epigenetic factors, and finishing with pathological changes and impact of artificially introduced elements, such as various transgenes, on the behavior of the cell. Therefore, it is highly desirable to have reliable cell line identification techniques to make sure that the cell lines to be used in experiments are exactly what is expected. To this end, we developed a set of informative markers based on insertion polymorphism of human retroelements (REs). The set includes 47 pairs of PCR primers corresponding to introns of the human genes with dimorphic LINE1 (L1) and Alu insertions. Using locus-specific PCR assays, we have genotyped 10 human cell lines of various origins. For each of these cell lines, characteristic fingerprints were obtained. An estimated probability that two different cell lines possess the same marker genotype is about 10-18. Therefore, the proposed set of markers provides a reliable tool for cell line identification.

  20. Horizontally separated 1-in-1 crossing insertions

    SciTech Connect

    Syphers, M.J.

    1985-10-01

    Previous to this workshop, realistic lattices have been developed for vertically separated l-in-l (e.g., D.E. Johnson, A.A. Garren) and 2-in-1 (e.g., S. Heifets) magnets as well as for horizontally separated 2-in-l magnets (e.g., SSC RDS). Bringing together the widely separated ({approximately}60-70 cm) beams in a reasonable length of tunnel and keeping the dispersion zero at the interaction point has been difficult in the vertical l-in-l case. Most designs have required spacial 2-in-1 quadrupoles near the interaction point where the beams are separated by 15 cm or less. It is not clear that such magnets, as dictated by some of these lattice designs, can easily be built. The purpose of this exercise is to provide a crossing insertion for a realistic lattice which involves horizontally separated l-in-l magnets. The following horizontal crossing insertions, which incorporate the dispersion suppressors and phase trombones into the major arcs, need no special 2-in-1 magnets near the interaction point. The dispersion at the IP created by the horizontal crossing can be cancelled by the dispersion suppressor and one set of triplets.

  1. Radiological Insertion and Management of Peritoneovenous Shunt

    SciTech Connect

    Bratby, M. J.; Hussain, F. F. Lopez, A. J.

    2007-06-15

    The purpose of the study was to report our experience of the management of complications following the insertion of a peritoneovenous shunt for intractable malignant ascites. From June 1999 to January 2006, 26 patients underwent insertion of a peritoneovenous shunt for ascites by interventional radiologists. We have used ultrasound and shuntography to assist in the diagnosis of the cause of shunt blockage. Successful techniques for the restoration of the shunt function include port- pumping, stripping of any fibrin sheath, and revision of either the venous or peritoneal catheter. The procedure was initially successful in all patients with continued patency until death in 17. A further four patients are still alive with a functioning shunt. There was one rapid postprocedure death resulting from pulmonary edema. Two patients developed pneumothorax, managed successfully with either a chest drain or aspiration. Shunt dysfunction occurred eight times in seven patients. There were five successful revisions in four patients. Overall, shunt patency has been maintained in 80.1% of patients. Shunt dysfunction is seen in a significant number of patients, but successful revision of the shunt can be achieved in the majority.

  2. Model of a Hollow Cathode Insert Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Goebel, Dan M.; Polk, James E.

    2004-01-01

    A 2-D axisymmetric fluid model of the plasma in the insert region of a hollow cathode is presented. The level of sophistication included in the model is motivated in part by the need to determine quantitatively plasma fluxes to the emitter surface. The ultimate goal is to assess whether plasma effects can degrade the life of impregnated inserts beyond those documented throughout the 30-50 year history of vacuum cathode technologies. Results from simulations of a 1.2-cm diameter cathode operating at a discharge current of 25 A, and a gas flow rate of 5 sccm, suggest that approximately 10 A of electron current, and 3.5 A of ion current return to the emitter surface. The total emitted electron current computed by the model is about 35 A. Comparisons with plasma measurements suggest that anomalous heating of the plasma due to two-stream instabilities is possible near the orifice region. Solution to the heavy species energy equation, with classical transport and no viscous effects, predicts heavy species temperatures as high as 2640 K.

  3. Insertional mutagenesis and illegitimate recombination in mycobacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Kalpana, G V; Bloom, B R; Jacobs, W R

    1991-01-01

    Mycobacteria, particularly Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Mycobacterium leprae, and Mycobacterium avium, are major pathogens of man. Although insertional mutagenesis has been an invaluable genetic tool for analyzing the mechanisms of microbial pathogenesis, it has not yet been possible to apply it to the mycobacteria. To overcome intrinsic difficulties in directly manipulating the genetics of slow-growing mycobacteria, including M. tuberculosis and bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine strains, we developed a system for random shuttle mutagenesis. A genomic library of Mycobacterium smegmatis was subjected to transposon mutagenesis with Tn5 seq1, a derivative of Tn5, in Escherichia coli and these transposon-containing recombinant plasmids were reintroduced into mycobacterial chromosomes by homologous recombination. This system has allowed us to isolate several random auxotrophic mutants of M. smegmatis. To extend this strategy to M. tuberculosis and BCG, targeted mutagenesis was performed using a cloned BCG methionine gene that was subjected to Tn5 seq1 mutagenesis in E. coli and reintroduced into the mycobacteria. Surprisingly for prokaryotes, both BCG and M. tuberculosis were found to incorporate linear DNA fragments into illegitimate sites throughout the mycobacterial genomes at a frequency of 10(-5) to 10(-4) relative to the number of transformants obtained with autonomously replicating vectors. Thus the efficient illegitimate recombination of linear DNA fragments provides the basis for an insertional mutagenesis system for M. tuberculosis and BCG. Images PMID:2052623

  4. Lithium Insertion Chemistry of Some Iron Vanadates

    SciTech Connect

    Patoux, Sebastien; Richardson, Thomas J.

    2007-02-02

    Lithium insertion into various iron vanadates has been investigated. Fe{sub 2}V{sub 4}O{sub 13} and Fe{sub 4}(V{sub 2}O{sub 7}){sub 3} {center_dot} 3H{sub 2}O have discharge capacities approaching 200 mAh/g above 2.0 V vs. Li{sup +}/Li. Although the potential profiles change significantly between the first and subsequent discharges, capacity retention is unexpectedly good. Other phases, structurally related to FeVO{sub 4}, containing copper and/or sodium ions were also studied. One of these, {beta}-Cu{sub 3}Fe{sub 4}(VO{sub 4}){sub 6}, reversibly consumes almost 10 moles of electrons per formula unit (ca. 240 mAh g{sup -1}) between 3.6 and 2.0 V vs. Li{sup +}/Li, in a non-classical insertion process. It is proposed that both copper and vanadium are electrochemically active, whereas iron(III) reacts to form LiFe{sup III}O{sub 2}. The capacity of the Cu{sub 3}Fe{sub 4}(VO{sub 4}){sub 6}/Li system is nearly independent of cycling rate, stabilizing after a few cycles at 120-140 mAh g{sup -1}. Iron vanadates exhibit better capacities than their phosphate analogues, whereas the latter display more constant discharge potentials.

  5. Colloidal Synthesis of Gold Semishells

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Fernández, Denis; Pérez-Juste, Jorge; Pastoriza-Santos, Isabel; Liz-Marzán, Luis M

    2012-01-01

    This work describes a novel and scalable colloid chemistry strategy to fabricate gold semishells based on the selective growth of gold on Janus silica particles (500 nm in diameter) partly functionalized with amino groups. The modulation of the geometry of the Janus silica particles allows us to tune the final morphology of the gold semishells. This method also provides a route to fabricating hollow gold semishells through etching of the silica cores with hydrofluoric acid. The optical properties were characterized by visible near-infrared (vis-NIR) spectroscopy and compared with simulations performed using the boundary element method (BEM). These revealed that the main optical features are located beyond the NIR region because of the large core size. PMID:24551496

  6. Gold, currencies and market efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristoufek, Ladislav; Vosvrda, Miloslav

    2016-05-01

    Gold and currency markets form a unique pair with specific interactions and dynamics. We focus on the efficiency ranking of gold markets with respect to the currency of purchase. By utilizing the Efficiency Index (EI) based on fractal dimension, approximate entropy and long-term memory on a wide portfolio of 142 gold price series for different currencies, we construct the efficiency ranking based on the extended EI methodology we provide. Rather unexpected results are uncovered as the gold prices in major currencies lay among the least efficient ones whereas very minor currencies are among the most efficient ones. We argue that such counterintuitive results can be partly attributed to a unique period of examination (2011-2014) characteristic by quantitative easing and rather unorthodox monetary policies together with the investigated illegal collusion of major foreign exchange market participants, as well as some other factors discussed in some detail.

  7. GOLD: The Genomes Online Database

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kyrpides, Nikos; Liolios, Dinos; Chen, Amy; Tavernarakis, Nektarios; Hugenholtz, Philip; Markowitz, Victor; Bernal, Alex

    Since its inception in 1997, GOLD has continuously monitored genome sequencing projects worldwide and has provided the community with a unique centralized resource that integrates diverse information related to Archaea, Bacteria, Eukaryotic and more recently Metagenomic sequencing projects. As of September 2007, GOLD recorded 639 completed genome projects. These projects have their complete sequence deposited into the public archival sequence databases such as GenBank EMBL,and DDBJ. From the total of 639 complete and published genome projects as of 9/2007, 527 were bacterial, 47 were archaeal and 65 were eukaryotic. In addition to the complete projects, there were 2158 ongoing sequencing projects. 1328 of those were bacterial, 59 archaeal and 771 eukaryotic projects. Two types of metadata are provided by GOLD: (i) project metadata and (ii) organism/environment metadata. GOLD CARD pages for every project are available from the link of every GOLD_STAMP ID. The information in every one of these pages is organized into three tables: (a) Organism information, (b) Genome project information and (c) External links. [The Genomes On Line Database (GOLD) in 2007: Status of genomic and metagenomic projects and their associated metadata, Konstantinos Liolios, Konstantinos Mavromatis, Nektarios Tavernarakis and Nikos C. Kyrpides, Nucleic Acids Research Advance Access published online on November 2, 2007, Nucleic Acids Research, doi:10.1093/nar/gkm884]

    The basic tables in the GOLD database that can be browsed or searched include the following information:

    • Gold Stamp ID
    • Organism name
    • Domain
    • Links to information sources
    • Size and link to a map, when available
    • Chromosome number, Plas number, and GC content
    • A link for downloading the actual genome data
    • Institution that did the sequencing
    • Funding source
    • Database where information resides
    • Publication status and information

    • Gold, coal and oil.

      PubMed

      Dani, Sergio U

      2010-03-01

      Jared Diamond has hypothesized that guns, germs and steel account for the fate of human societies. Here I propose an extension of Diamond's hypothesis and put it in other terms and dimensions: gold, coal and oil account not only for the fate of human societies but also for the fate of mankind through the bodily accumulation of anthropogenic arsenic, an invisible weapon of mass extinction and evolutionary change. The background is clear; arsenic species fulfill seven criteria for a weapon of mass extinction and evolutionary change: (i) bioavailability to all living organisms; (ii) imperceptibility; (iii) acute toxicity; (iv) bioaccumulation and chronic toxicity; (v) adverse impact on reproductive fitness and reproductive outcomes and early-age development and growth in a wide range of microbial, plant and animal species including man; (vi) widespread geographical distribution, mobility and ecological persistence on a centennial to millennial basis and (vii) availability in necessary and sufficient amounts to exert evolutionarily meaningful effects. The proof is becoming increasingly feasible as human exploitation of gold, coal and oil deposits cause sustainable rises of arsenic concentrations in the biosphere. Paradoxically, humans are among the least arsenic-resistant organisms because humans are long-lived, encephalized and complex social metazoans. An arsenic accumulation model is presented here to describe how arsenic accumulates in the human body with increasing age and at different provisionally safe exposure levels. Arsenic accumulates in the human body even at daily exposure levels which are within the lowest possible WHO provisional tolerance limits, yielding bodily arsenic concentrations which are above WHO provisional limits. Ongoing consequences of global scale arsenic poisoning of mankind include age-specific rises in morbidity and mortality followed by adaptive changes. The potential rise of successful forms of inborn resistance to arsenic in humans

    • Recessed impingement insert metering plate for gas turbine nozzles

      DOEpatents

      Itzel, Gary Michael; Burdgick, Steven Sebastian

      2002-01-01

      An impingement insert sleeve is provided that is adapted to be disposed in a coolant cavity defined through a stator vane. The insert has a generally open inlet end and first and second diametrically opposed, perforated side walls. A metering plate having at least one opening defined therethrough for coolant flow is mounted to the side walls to generally transverse a longitudinal axis of the insert, and is disposed downstream from said inlet end. The metering plate improves flow distribution while reducing ballooning stresses within the insert and allowing for a more flexible insert attachment.

    • Insertion of coherence requests for debugging a multiprocessor

      DOEpatents

      Blumrich, Matthias A.; Salapura, Valentina

      2010-02-23

      A method and system are disclosed to insert coherence events in a multiprocessor computer system, and to present those coherence events to the processors of the multiprocessor computer system for analysis and debugging purposes. The coherence events are inserted in the computer system by adding one or more special insert registers. By writing into the insert registers, coherence events are inserted in the multiprocessor system as if they were generated by the normal coherence protocol. Once these coherence events are processed, the processing of coherence events can continue in the normal operation mode.

    • Method Of Wire Insertion For Electric Machine Stators

      DOEpatents

      Brown, David L; Stabel, Gerald R; Lawrence, Robert Anthony

      2005-02-08

      A method of inserting coils in slots of a stator is provided. The method includes interleaving a first set of first phase windings and a first set of second phase windings on an insertion tool. The method also includes activating the insertion tool to radially insert the first set of first phase windings and the first set of second phase windings in the slots of the stator. In one embodiment, interleaving the first set of first phase windings and the first set of second phase windings on the insertion tool includes forming the first set of first phase windings in first phase openings defined in the insertion tool, and forming the first set of second phase windings in second phase openings defined in the insertion tool.

    • Intermetallic insertion anodes for lithium batteries.

      SciTech Connect

      Thackeray, M. M.; Vaughey, J.; Johnson, C. S.; Kepler, K. D.

      1999-11-12

      Binary intermetallic compounds containing lithium, or lithium alloys, such as Li{sub x}Al, Li{sub x}Si and Li{sub x}Sn have been investigated in detail in the past as negative electrode materials for rechargeable lithium batteries. It is generally acknowledged that the major limitation of these systems is the large volumetric expansion that occurs when lithium reacts with the host metal. Such large increases in volume limit the practical use of lithium-tin electrodes in electrochemical cells. It is generally recognized that metal oxide electrodes, MO{sub y}, in lithium-ion cells operate during charge and discharge by means of a reversible lithium insertion/extraction process, and that the cells offer excellent cycling behavior when the crystallographic changes to the unit cell parameters and unit cell volume of the Li{sub x}MO{sub y} electrode are kept to a minimum. An excellent example of such an electrode is the spinel Li{sub 4}Ti{sub 5}O{sub 12}, which maintains its cubic symmetry without any significant change to the lattice parameter (and hence unit cell volume) during lithium insertion to the rock-salt composition Li{sub 7}Ti{sub 5}O{sub 12}. This spinel electrode is an example of a ternary Li{sub x}MO{sub y} system in which a binary MO{sub y} framework provides a stable host structure for lithium. With this approach, the authors have turned their attention to exploring ternary intermetallic systems Li{sub x}MM{prime} in the hope of finding a system that is not subject to the high volumetric expansion that typifies many binary systems. In this paper, the authors present recent data of their investigations of lithium-copper-tin and lithium-indium-antimonide electrodes in lithium cells. The data show that lithium can be inserted reversibly into selected intermetallic compounds with relatively small expansion of the lithiated intermetallic structures.

    • Gold nanoparticle (AuNPs) and gold nanopore (AuNPore) catalysts in organic synthesis.

      PubMed

      Takale, Balaram S; Bao, Ming; Yamamoto, Yoshinori

      2014-04-07

      Organic synthesis using gold has gained tremendous attention in last few years, especially heterogeneous gold catalysis based on gold nanoparticles has made its place in almost all organic reactions, because of the robust and green nature of gold catalysts. In this context, gold nanopore (AuNPore) with a 3D metal framework is giving a new dimension to heterogeneous gold catalysts. Interestingly, AuNPore chemistry is proving better than gold nanoparticles based chemistry. In this review, along with recent advances, major discoveries in heterogeneous gold catalysis are discussed.

    • Modeling of gold production in Malaysia

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Muda, Nora; Ainuddeen, Nasihah Rasyiqah; Ismail, Hamizun; Umor, Mohd Rozi

      2013-04-01

      This study was conducted to identify the main factors that contribute to the gold production and hence determine the factors that affect to the development of the mining industry in Malaysia. An econometric approach was used by performing the cointegration analysis among the factors to determine the existence of long term relationship between the gold prices, the number of gold mines, the number of workers in gold mines and the gold production. The study continued with the Granger analysis to determine the relationship between factors and gold production. Results have found that there are long term relationship between price, gold production and number of employees. Granger causality analysis shows that there is only one way relationship between the number of employees with gold production in Malaysia and the number of gold mines in Malaysia.

    • Impact of Orthodontic Decompensation on Bone Insertion

      PubMed Central

      Guedes, Fabio Pinto; Capelozza Filho, Leopoldino; Garib, Daniela Gamba; Nary Filho, Hugo; Borgo, Evandro José; Cardoso, Mauricio de Almeida

      2014-01-01

      There has always been concern in determining the relationship between orthodontic tooth movement and the consequent biological costs to the periodontium and tooth root. The possibility of evaluating the tooth and bone morphology by CBCT allows more accurate analysis of qualitative and quantitative aspects of these processes. This paper presents a case report of a 20-year-old male patient with Class III malocclusion and hyperdivergent facial pattern, who was surgically treated. A significant amount of labial movement of mandibular incisors was performed during orthodontic treatment before surgery. CBCT was used for evaluation of buccal and lingual bone plates before and after tooth decompensation. The changes in the bone insertion level of maxillary and mandibular incisors in the present case encourage a reflection on the treatment protocol in individuals with dentoskeletal discrepancies. PMID:25436157

    • Polymorphic Alu insertions among Mayan populations.

      PubMed

      Herrera, R J; Rojas, D P; Terreros, M C

      2007-01-01

      The Mayan homeland within Mesoamerica spans five countries: Belize, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and Mexico. There are indications that the people we call the Maya migrated from the north to the highlands of Guatemala as early as 4000 B.C. Their existence was village-based and agricultural. The culture of these Preclassic Mayans owes much to the earlier Olmec civilization, which flourished in the southern portion of North America. In this study, four different Mayan groups were examined to assess their genetic variability. Ten polymorphic Alu insertion (PAI) loci were employed to ascertain the genetic affinities among these Mayan groups. North American, African, European and Asian populations were also examined as reference populations. Our results suggest that the Mayan groups examined in this study are not genetically homogeneous.

    • INSERTION DEVICE UPGRADE PLANS AT THE NSLS.

      SciTech Connect

      TANABE, T.; BLEDNYKH, A.; HARDER, D.; LEHECKA, M.; RAKOWSKY, G.; SKARITKA, J.

      2005-05-16

      This paper describes plans to upgrade insertion devices (IDs) at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), Brookhaven National Laboratory, U.S.A. The aging wiggler (W120) at X25 is being replaced by a 1 m long in-vacuum mini-gap undulator (MGU-X25) optimized for a dedicated macromolecular crystallography program. A new, 1/3 m long, undulator (MGU or SCU-X9), will be installed between a pair of RF cavities at X9, and will serve a new beamline dedicated for small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS). Both IDs will have provision for cryocooling the NdFeB hybrid arrays to 150K to raise the field and K-value and to obtain better spectral coverage. Design issues of the devices and other considerations, especially magnetic measurement at low temperature, will be discussed.

    • Regulatory perspective on incomplete control rod insertions

      SciTech Connect

      Chatterton, M.

      1997-01-01

      The incomplete control rod insertions experienced at South Texas Unit 1 and Wolf Creek are of safety concern to the NRC staff because they represent potential precursors to loss of shutdown margin. Even before it was determined if these events were caused by the control rods or by the fuel there was an apparent correlation of the problem with high burnup fuel. It was determined that there was also a correlation between high burnup and high drag forces as well as with rod drop time histories and lack of rod recoil. The NRC staff initial actions were aimed at getting a perspective on the magnitude of the problem as far as the number of plants and the amount of fuel that could be involved, as well as the safety significance in terms of shutdown margin. As tests have been performed and data has been analyzed the focus has shifted more toward understanding the problem and the ways to eliminate it. At this time the staff`s understanding of the phenomena is that it was a combination of factors including burnup, power history and temperature. The problem appears to be very sensitive to these factors, the interaction of which is not clearly understood. The model developed by Westinghouse provides a possible explanation but there is not sufficient data to establish confidence levels and sensitivity studies involving the key parameters have not been done. While several fixes to the problem have been discussed, no definitive fixes have been proposed. Without complete understanding of the phenomena, or fixes that clearly eliminate the problem the safety concern remains. The safety significance depends on the amount of shutdown margin lost due to incomplete insertion of the control rods. Were the control rods to stick high in the core, the reactor could not be shutdown by the control rods and other means such as emergency boration would be required.

    • Monoclonal antibody "gold rush".

      PubMed

      Maggon, Krishan

      2007-01-01

      The market, sales and regulatory approval of new human medicines, during the past few years, indicates increasing number and share of new biologics and emergence of new multibillion dollar molecules. The global sale of monoclonal antibodies in 2006 were $20.6 billion. Remicade had annual sales gain of $1 billion during the past 3 years and five brands had similar increase in 2006. Rituxan with 2006 sales of $4.7 billion was the best selling monoclonal antibody and biological product and the 6th among the top selling medicinal brand. It may be the first biologic and monoclonal antibody to reach $10 billion annual sales in the near future. The strong demand from cancer and arthritis patients has surpassed almost all commercial market research reports and sales forecast. Seven monoclonal antibody brands in 2006 had sales exceeding $1 billion. Humanized or fully human monoclonal antibodies with low immunogenicity, enhanced antigen binding and reduced cellular toxicity provide better clinical efficacy. The higher technical and clinical success rate, overcoming of technical hurdles in large scale manufacturing, low cost of market entry and IND filing, use of fully human and humanized monoclonal antibodies has attracted funds and resources towards R&D. Review of industry research pipeline and sales data during the past 3 years indicate a real paradigm shift in industrial R&D from pharmaceutical to biologics and monoclonal antibodies. The antibody bandwagon has been joined by 200 companies with hundreds of new projects and targets and has attracted billions of dollars in R&D investment, acquisitions and licensing deals leading to the current Monoclonal Antibody Gold Rush.

    • Goldschlager allergy in a gold allergic patient.

      PubMed

      Guenthner, T; Stork, C M; Cantor, R M

      1999-08-01

      We describe the case of gold allergy after ingestion of GOLDSCHLAGER, a gold-containing liquor, in a patient with a previous allergy to gold jewelry. The patient was not aware that genuine gold particles were contained in the schnapps liquor and that ingestion could result in a reaction similar to that experienced by individuals sensitive to gold jewelry. Clinicians should be familiar with the presence of gold particles in GOLDSCHLAGER liquor and the potential for allergic reactions to occur in those so predisposed.

  1. Phage based green chemistry for gold ion reduction and gold retrieval.

    PubMed

    Setyawati, Magdiel I; Xie, Jianping; Leong, David T

    2014-01-22

    The gold mining industry has taken its toll on the environment, triggering the development of more environmentally benign processes to alleviate the waste load release. Here, we demonstrate the use of bacteriophages (phages) for biosorption and bioreduction of gold ions from aqueous solution, which potentially can be applied to remediate gold ions from gold mining waste effluent. Phage has shown a remarkably efficient sorption of gold ions with a maximum gold adsorption capacity of 571 mg gold/g dry weight phage. The product of this phage mediated process is gold nanocrystals with the size of 30-630 nm. Biosorption and bioreduction processes are mediated by the ionic and covalent interaction between gold ions and the reducing groups on the phage protein coat. The strategy offers a simple, ecofriendly and feasible option to recover of gold ions to form readily recoverable products of gold nanoparticles within 24 h.

  2. Neonatal peripherally inserted central catheters: recommendations for prevention of insertion and postinsertion complications.

    PubMed

    Paulson, Pamela R; Miller, Kellee M

    2008-01-01

    Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) continue to be necessary in neonatal care. They benefit many premature infants and those needing long-term intravenous access. An experienced inserter, early recognition of PICC candidates, early PICC placement, knowledge of anatomy, and correct choice of vein all increase placement success. As with any invasive procedure, there are risks. These include pain, difficulty advancing the catheter, damage to vessels, catheter malposition, and bleeding. Utilizing assessment skills, following the product manufacturer's instructions, and carefully placing the catheter should minimize most of these risks. Additional risks include postinsertion complications such as occlusions, thrombosis, catheter failure, infection, and catheter malposition. Proper nursing care--which includes controlling infection, properly securing the catheter, and changing the dressing as needed--is key to preventing complications and maintaining the PICC until treatment has been completed.

  3. Core Vessel Insert Handling Robot for the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Graves, Van B; Dayton, Michael J

    2011-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source provides the world's most intense pulsed neutron beams for scientific research and industrial development. Its eighteen neutron beam lines will eventually support up to twenty-four simultaneous experiments. Each beam line consists of various optical components which guide the neutrons to a particular instrument. The optical components nearest the neutron moderators are the core vessel inserts. Located approximately 9 m below the high bay floor, these inserts are bolted to the core vessel chamber and are part of the vacuum boundary. They are in a highly radioactive environment and must periodically be replaced. During initial SNS construction, four of the beam lines received Core Vessel Insert plugs rather than functional inserts. Remote replacement of the first Core Vessel Insert plug was recently completed using several pieces of custom-designed tooling, including a highly complicated Core Vessel Insert Robot. The design of this tool are discussed.

  4. Comparison of Postoperative Drain Insertion versus No Drain Insertion in Thyroidectomies

    PubMed Central

    Al-Habsi, Asma S.; Al-Sulaimani, Al-Anood K.; Taqi, Kadhim M.; Al-Qadhi, Hani A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives A thyroidectomy is a frequently performed surgical procedure which can result in life-threatening complications. The insertion of a drain after a thyroidectomy has been suggested to prevent such complications. This study aimed to evaluate the use of surgical drains following thyroidectomies in relation to postoperative complications and mass sizes. Methods This retrospective case-control study included all thyroidectomies conducted at the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital, Muscat, Oman, from January 2011 to December 2013. Length of hospital stay, readmission, postoperative complications and mass size were evaluated. Results During the study period, 250 surgeries were carried out on 241 patients. The majority of patients were female (87.2%). Drains were inserted postoperatively after 202 surgeries (80.8%) compared to 48 surgeries (19.2%) without drains. A total of 32 surgeries (12.8%) were conducted on patients with thyroid masses <1 cm, 138 (55.2%) on those with masses between 1–4 cm and 80 (32.0%) on those with masses >4 cm. The association between drain use and mass size was not significant (P = 0.439). Although postoperative complications were more prevalent in patients with drains, the relationship between these factors was not significant (P >0.050). Length of hospital stay was significantly longer among patients with postoperative drains (P <0.010). Conclusion The routine insertion of drains after thyroid surgeries was found to result in longer hospital stays and did not reduce rates of post-thyroidectomy complications. Thyroid mass size should not be used as an indicator for the insertion of a drain after thyroidectomy. PMID:28003893

  5. Large insert environmental genomic library production.

    PubMed

    Taupp, Marcus; Lee, Sangwon; Hawley, Alyse; Yang, Jinshu; Hallam, Steven J

    2009-09-23

    The vast majority of microbes in nature currently remain inaccessible to traditional cultivation methods. Over the past decade, culture-independent environmental genomic (i.e. metagenomic) approaches have emerged, enabling researchers to bridge this cultivation gap by capturing the genetic content of indigenous microbial communities directly from the environment. To this end, genomic DNA libraries are constructed using standard albeit artful laboratory cloning techniques. Here we describe the construction of a large insert environmental genomic fosmid library with DNA derived from the vertical depth continuum of a seasonally hypoxic fjord. This protocol is directly linked to a series of connected protocols including coastal marine water sampling [1], large volume filtration of microbial biomass [2] and a DNA extraction and purification protocol [3]. At the outset, high quality genomic DNA is end-repaired with the creation of 5 -phosphorylated blunt ends. End-repaired DNA is subjected to pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) for size selection and gel extraction is performed to recover DNA fragments between 30 and 60 thousand base pairs (Kb) in length. Size selected DNA is purified away from the PFGE gel matrix and ligated to the phosphatase-treated blunt-end fosmid CopyControl vector pCC1 (EPICENTRE http://www.epibio.com/item.asp?ID=385). Linear concatemers of pCC1 and insert DNA are subsequently headfull packaged into phage particles by lambda terminase, with subsequent infection of phage-resistant E. coli cells. Successfully transduced clones are recovered on LB agar plates under antibiotic selection and archived in 384-well plate format using an automated colony picking robot (Qpix2, GENETIX). The current protocol draws from various sources including the CopyControl Fosmid Library Production Kit from EPICENTRE and the published works of multiple research groups [4-7]. Each step is presented with best practice in mind. Whenever possible we highlight subtleties

  6. Fiducial-free CyberKnife stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for single vertebral body metastases: acceptable local control and normal tissue tolerance with 5 fraction approach.

    PubMed

    Gill, Beant; Oermann, Eric; Ju, Andrew; Suy, Simeng; Yu, Xia; Rabin, Jennifer; Kalhorn, Christopher; Nair, Mani N; Voyadzis, Jean-Marc; Unger, Keith; Collins, Sean P; Harter, K W; Collins, Brian T

    2012-01-01

    This retrospective analysis examines the local control and toxicity of five-fraction fiducial-free CyberKnife stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for single vertebral body (VB) metastases. All patients had favorable performance status (ECOG 0-1), oligometastatic disease, and no prior spine irradiation. A prescribed dose of 30-35 Gy was delivered in five fractions to the planning target volume (PTV) using the CyberKnife with X-sight spine tracking. Suggested maximum spinal cord and esophagus point doses were 30 and 40 Gy, respectively. A median 30 Gy (IQR, 30-35 Gy) dose was delivered to a median prescription isodose line of 70% (IQR, 65-77%) to 20 patients. At 34 months median follow-up (IQR, 25-40 months) for surviving patients, the 1- and 2-year Kaplan-Meier local control estimates were 80 and 73%, respectively. Two of the five local failures were infield in patients who had received irradiation to the gross tumor volume and three were paravertebral failures just outside the PTV in patients with prior corpectomy. No local failures occurred in patients who completed VB radiation alone. The 1- and 2-year Kaplan-Meier overall survival estimates were 80 and 57%, respectively. Most deaths were attributed to metastatic disease; one death was attributed to local recurrence. The mean maximum point doses were 26.4 Gy (SD, 5.1 Gy) to the spinal cord and 29.1 Gy (SD, 8.9 Gy) to the esophagus. Patients receiving maximum esophagus point doses greater than 35 Gy experienced acute dysphagia (Grade I/II). No spinal cord toxicity was documented. Five-fraction fiducial-free CyberKnife SBRT is an acceptable treatment option for newly diagnosed VB metastases with promising local control rates and minimal toxicity despite the close proximity of such tumors to the spinal cord and esophagus. A prospective study aimed at further enhancing local control by targeting the intact VB and escalating the total dose is planned.

  7. Gold nanoparticles for photoacoustic imaging

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wanwan; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2015-01-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) imaging is a biomedical imaging modality that provides functional information regarding the cellular and molecular signatures of tissue by using endogenous and exogenous contrast agents. There has been tremendous effort devoted to the development of PA imaging agents, and gold nanoparticles as exogenous contrast agents have great potential for PA imaging due to their inherent and geometrically induced optical properties. The gold-based nanoparticles that are most commonly employed for PA imaging include spheres, rods, shells, prisms, cages, stars and vesicles. This article provides an overview of the current state of research in utilizing these gold nanomaterials for PA imaging of cancer, atherosclerotic plaques, brain function and image-guided therapy. PMID:25600972

  8. Economic geology: Gold buried by oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaillard, Fabrice; Copard, Yoann

    2015-03-01

    The Witwatersrand Basin in South Africa contains extraordinary amounts of gold. Thermodynamic calculations suggest that the gold may have accumulated there in response to a perfect storm of conditions available only during the Archaean.

  9. Recent Developments in Australian Gold Extraction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thiele, Rodney B.

    1995-01-01

    Describes new technologies that have greatly improved the extraction efficiency of gold ore, including: altering plant layout to promote efficiency, engaging Filiblast forced oxidation and bioxidation systems, and updating the electrowinning procedure at the gold recovery stage. (JRH)

  10. Threaded insert for compact cryogenic-capable pressure vessels

    DOEpatents

    Espinosa-Loza, Francisco; Ross, Timothy O.; Switzer, Vernon A.; Aceves, Salvador M.; Killingsworth, Nicholas J.; Ledesma-Orozco, Elias

    2015-06-16

    An insert for a cryogenic capable pressure vessel for storage of hydrogen or other cryogenic gases at high pressure. The insert provides the interface between a tank and internal and external components of the tank system. The insert can be used with tanks with any or all combinations of cryogenic, high pressure, and highly diffusive fluids. The insert can be threaded into the neck of a tank with an inner liner. The threads withstand the majority of the stress when the fluid inside the tank that is under pressure.

  11. Noninfectious inflammatory reaction to a gold weight eyelid implant: A case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Iordanous, Yiannis; Evans, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Upper eyelid loading with a gold weight is a generally well-tolerated procedure that helps reduce corneal exposure in patients with lagophthalmos. Complications of this procedure are infrequent. The authors present a rare case of a noninfectious inflammatory response to an eyelid gold weight implant in a 48-year-old woman and summarize all previously published cases. This particular patient presented with incomplete left eyelid closure secondary to a trauma. After having a gold weight inserted into her eyelid to improve closure, she returned with edema and erythema of the eyelid. The inflammation did not respond to oral antibiotics; however, oral steroid therapy resulted in prompt resolution of her symptoms. Her symptoms recurred after discontinuing steroid use and she subsequently required removal of her gold weight implant for permanent resolution of her eyelid inflammation. Although rare, this reaction poses a serious management issue, because it does not respond to antibiotics or short-term steroid use and, in most cases, requires removal of the gold implant.

  12. Phoenix Conductivity Probe Inserted into Martian Soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander inserted the four needles of its thermal and conductivity probe into Martian soil during the 98th Martian day, or sol, of the mission and left it in place until Sol 99 (Sept. 4, 2008).

    The Robotic Arm Camera on Phoenix took this image on the morning of Sol 99 while the probe's needles were in the ground. The science team informally named this soil target 'Gandalf.'

    The thermal and conductivity probe measures how fast heat and electricity move from one needle to an adjacent one through the soil or air between the needles. Conductivity readings can be indicators about water vapor, water ice and liquid water.

    The probe is part of Phoenix's Microscopy, Electrochemistry and Conductivity suite of instruments.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  13. IYA2009 newspaper insert in your community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, J.

    2008-06-01

    The Gemini PIO (Public Information Officer) offers suggestions on how to approach your local newspaper about a newspaper insert for your community being published during IYA2009. Local government support, articles by astronomers, advertisers, and appointing someone within your organisation to manage the content will be discussed. We will explain the timeline required, the number of personnel hours required, developmental stages and income a local newspaper would have to generate to produce a quality, table-top supplement. In 2003, over 30,000 copies of Stars over Mauna Kea, a special supplement in tabloid format were produced and distributed in the local newspapers in Hilo, Hawaii. The publication, 48 pages in total, featured profiles of the observatories on Mauna Kea, stories about the geology and legends of Mauna Kea, and historical information about the evolution of astronomy in Hawaii. In additionthe publication included a series of essays titled In their own words. These articles were written by key members of the astronomy community. Sixty thousand copies of Stars over Mauna Kea II were printed as a follow-up to the first edition in 2005. This second edition included an article on the `Imiloa Astronomy Education Center, explanations about the types of telescopes on Mauna Kea and columns written by scientists about the fascinating and significant discoveries made on Hawaii. Personal stories about careers in astronomy were also highlighted. In Chile, a similar eight-page supplement, featuring Gemini, CTIO and SOAR telescopes, was published in 2005 and 5000 copies were distributed throughout the country.

  14. Insertion devices for DORIS III (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pflüger, J.

    1992-01-01

    Recently, a major reconstruction of the electron storage ring DORIS II, the DORIS III project, has been completed [W. Brefeld, H. Nesemann, and J. Rossbach, Proceedings of the European Particle Accelerator Conference, Rome (World Scientific, Singapore, 1988), p. 2389]. Figure 1 shows an overview of the new ring. Originally DORIS II had a twofold symmetry. In part C each of the two dipole magnets adjacing to the 65-m-long straight section was replaced by three corresponding weaker ones. In this way a total of seven straight sections for insertion devices are provided. Six of them are 4-m long and the one in the center is only 2.7-m long. After extensive discussions with the user groups involved, four x-ray wigglers, one asymmetric hybrid structure, one x-ray undulator, and one XUV multiple undulator of the revolver type have been proposed for six of the sections [J. Pflüger and P. Gurtler, Nucl. Instrum. Methods A 287, 628 (1990)]. One section is presently still free. All devices are either in construction or have already been completed and installed. In this contribution the mechanical and magnetic design of these devices will be described. Results of magnetic measurements of those devices which are already completed will be given in more detail.

  15. Replicative resolution of integron cassette insertion

    PubMed Central

    Loot, Céline; Ducos-Galand, Magaly; Escudero, José Antonio; Bouvier, Marie; Mazel, Didier

    2012-01-01

    Site-specific recombination catalyzed by tyrosine recombinases follows a common pathway consisting of two consecutive strand exchanges. The first strand exchange generates a Holliday junction (HJ), which is resolved by a second strand exchange. In integrons, attC sites recombine as folded single-stranded substrates. Only one of the two attC site strands, the bottom one, is efficiently bound and cleaved by the integrase during the insertion of gene cassettes at the double-stranded attI site. Due to the asymmetry of this complex, a second strand exchange on the attC bottom strand (bs) would form linearized abortive recombination products. We had proposed that HJ resolution would rely on an uncharacterized mechanism, probably replication. Using an attC site carried on a plasmid with each strand specifically tagged, we followed the destiny of each strand after recombination. We demonstrated that only one strand, the one carrying the attC bs, is exchanged. Furthermore, we show that the recombination products contain the attC site bs and its entire de novo synthesized complementary strand. Therefore, we demonstrate the replicative resolution of single-strand recombination in integrons and rule out the involvement of a second strand exchange of any kind in the attC × attI reaction. PMID:22740653

  16. Formation, structure, and orientation of gold silicide on gold surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, A. K.; Bauer, E.

    1976-01-01

    The formation of gold silicide on Au films evaporated onto Si(111) surfaces is studied by Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and low-energy electron diffraction (LEED). Surface condition, film thickness, deposition temperature, annealing temperature, and heating rate during annealing are varied. Several oriented crystalline silicide layers are observed.

  17. Single-crystalline gold nanoplates from a commercial gold plating solution.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhonghao; Lapeyre, Véronique; Ravaine, Valérie; Ravaine, Serge; Kuhn, Alexander

    2009-03-01

    A novel route was proposed to synthesize gold nanoplates using a commercial gold plating solution as the reactant. Single-crystalline gold nanoplates can be successfully synthesized by reacting gold plating solution with HCl. The as-prepared nanoplates are from several micrometers to tens of micrometers in size. The effects of reactant concentration and temperature on the morphology of the gold products were investigated. The size of the gold nanoplate increases with the decrease of the amount of gold plating solution, while irregular gold nanoparticles are formed as the HCl concentration becomes low. When the reaction temperature is as low as room temperature, nanoplates with a concavity form. Specifically, it is found that the Cl- plays an important role for the formation of these gold nanoplates. The formation mechanism of the gold nanoplates is studied in detail.

  18. Structural change from doping the gold cluster.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yiji; Wang, Shu-Guang; Li, Jia

    2011-05-01

    Doping gold clusters with a transition metal (M@Au(n)) causes structural change. To determine the mechanism by which these changes occur, the central gold atom of Au(5) was doped with its same row transition metals Pt, Ir, Os, Re, and W. Based on theoretical calculations, a similar trend was found in other gold clusters.

  19. Highly active thermally stable nanoporous gold catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Biener, Juergen; Wittstock, Arne; Biener, Monika M.; Bagge-Hansen, Michael; Baeumer, Marcus; Wichmann, Andre; Neuman, Bjoern

    2016-12-20

    In one embodiment, a system includes a nanoporous gold structure and a plurality of oxide particles deposited on the nanoporous gold structure; the oxide particles are characterized by a crystalline phase. In another embodiment, a method includes depositing oxide nanoparticles on a nanoporous gold support to form an active structure and functionalizing the deposited oxide nanoparticles.

  20. Roles of carboxyl groups in the transmembrane insertion of peptides

    PubMed Central

    Barrera, Francisco N.; Weerakkody, Dhammika; Anderson, Michael; Andreev, Oleg A.; Reshetnyak, Yana K.; Engelman, Donald M.

    2011-01-01

    We have used the pHLIP® peptide to study the roles of carboxyl groups in transmembrane peptide insertion. The pH (low) insertion peptide (pHLIP) binds to the surface of a lipid bilayer as a disordered peptide at neutral pH, and when the pH is lowered it inserts across the membrane to form a transmembrane helix. Peptide insertion is reversed when the pH is raised above the characteristic pKa (6.0). A key event facilitating the membrane insertion is the protonation of aspartic (Asp) and/or glutamic (Glu) acid residues, since at neutral pH their negatively charged side chains hinder membrane insertion. In order to gain mechanistic understanding, we studied the membrane insertion and exit of a series of pHLIP variants where the four Asp residues were sequentially mutated to nonacidic residues, including histidine (His). Our results show that the presence of His residues does not prevent the pH-dependent peptide membrane insertion at ~pH 4 driven by the protonation of carboxyl groups at the inserting end of the peptide. A further pH drop leads to the protonation of His residues in the TM part of peptide, which induces peptide exit from the bilayer. We also find that the number of ionizable residues that undergo a change in protonation during membrane insertion correlates with the pH-dependent insertion into and exit from the lipid bilayer, and that cooperativity increases with their number. We expect that our understanding will be used to improve the targeting of acidic diseased tissue by pHLIP peptides. PMID:21888917

  1. Stability, Visibility, and Histologic Analysis of a New Implanted Fiducial for Use as a Kilovoltage Radiographic or Radioactive Marker for Patient Positioning and Monitoring in Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Neustadter, David; Tune, Michal; Zaretsky, Asaph; Shofti, Rona; Kushnir, Arnon; Harel, Tami; Carmi-Yinon, Dafna; Corn, Ben M.S.

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: To analyze the stability, visibility, and histology of a novel implantable soft-tissue marker (nonradioactive and radioactive) implanted in dog prostate and rabbit liver. Methods and Materials: A total of 34 nonradioactive and 35 radioactive markers were implanted in 1 dog and 16 rabbits. Stability was assessed by measuring intermarker distance (IMD) variation relative to IMDs at implantation. The IMDs were measured weekly for 4 months in the dog and biweekly for 2-4 weeks in the rabbits. Ultrasound and X-ray imaging were performed on all subjects. Computed tomography and MRI were performed on the dog. Histologic analysis was performed on the rabbits after 2 or 4 months. Results: A total of 139 measurements had a mean ({+-} SD) absolute IMD variation of 1.1 {+-} 1.1 mm. These IMD variations are consistent with those reported in the literature as due to random organ deformation. The markers were visible, identifiable, and induced minimal or no image artifacts in all tested imaging modalities. Histologic analysis revealed that all pathologic changes were highly localized and not expected to be clinically significant. Conclusions: The markers were stable from the time of implantation. The markers were found to be compatible with all common medical imaging modalities. The markers caused no significant histologic effects. With respect to marker stability, visibility, and histologic analysis these implanted fiducials are appropriate for soft-tissue target positioning in radiotherapy.

  2. Direct comparison of the electronic coupling efficiency of sulfur and selenium anchoring groups for molecules adsorbed onto gold electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patrone, L.; Palacin, S.; Bourgoin, J. P.; Lagoute, J.; Zambelli, T.; Gauthier, S.

    2002-08-01

    We performed air and ultra-high vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy experiments in order to compare the electronic coupling provided by S and by Se used as alligator clips for bisthiol- and biselenol-terthiophene molecules adsorbed onto gold. The molecules were inserted in a dodecanethiol self-assembled monolayer. Their apparent height above the dodecanethiol matrix was used as a measure of the electronic coupling strength corresponding to S and Se, respectively. We show that the insertion behaviors of the two molecules are qualitatively the same, and that Se provides systematically a better coupling link than S whatever the tunneling conditions.

  3. Direct comparison of the electronic coupling efficiency of sulfur and selenium alligator clips for molecules adsorbed onto gold electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patrone, L.; Palacin, S.; Bourgoin, J. P.

    2003-05-01

    Scanning tunneling microscopy experiments have been performed to compare the electronic coupling provided by S and by Se used as alligator clips for bisthiol- and biselenol-terthiophene molecules adsorbed onto gold. The molecules were inserted in a dodecanethiol (DT) self-assembled monolayer. Their apparent height above the dodecanethiol matrix was used as a measure of the electronic coupling strength corresponding to S and Se, respectively. We show that the insertion behaviors of the two molecules are qualitatively the same, and that Se provides systematically a better coupling link than S, whatever the tunneling conditions.

  4. Gold, Silver and Bronze Citations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American School & University, 2003

    2003-01-01

    Presents the gold, silver, and bronze winners of a competition, which judged the most outstanding learning environments at educational institutions nationwide. Jurors spent two days reviewing projects, focusing on concepts and ideas that made them exceptional. For each citation, the article offers information on the firm, client, total area, total…

  5. Measurement of differential and integrated fiducial cross sections for Higgs boson production in the four-lepton decay channel in pp collisions at $ \\sqrt{s}=7 $ and 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2016-04-01

    Integrated fiducial cross sections for the production of four leptons via the H → 4ℓ decays (ℓ = e, μ) are measured in pp collisions at $ \\sqrt{s}=7 $ and 8TeV. Measurements are performed with data corresponding to integrated luminosities of 5.1 fb$^{–1}$ at 7TeV, and 19.7 fb$^{–1}$ at 8 TeV, collected with the CMS experiment at the LHC. Differential cross sections are measured using the 8 TeV data, and are determined as functions of the transverse momentum and rapidity of the four-lepton system, accompanying jet multiplicity, transverse momentum of the leading jet, and difference in rapidity between the Higgs boson candidate and the leading jet. A measurement of the Z → 4ℓ cross section, and its ratio to the H → 4ℓ cross section is also performed. All cross sections are measured within a fiducial phase space defined by the requirements on lepton kinematics and event topology. Here, the integrated H → 4ℓ fiducial cross section is measured to be 0.56$_{–0.44}^{+0.67}$ (stat)$_{–0.06}^{+0.21}$ (syst) fb at 7 TeV, and 1.11$_{–0.35}^{+0.41}$ (stat)$_{–0.10}^{+0.14}$ (syst) fb at 8 TeV. The measurements are found to be compatible with theoretical calculations based on the standard model.

  6. [Umbilical and peripherally inserted venous central catheterization of the newborn].

    PubMed

    Bouissou, A; Rakza, T; Storme, L; Lafarghe, A; Fily, A; Diependaele, J-F; Dalmas, S

    2008-09-01

    Umbilical venous and peripherally inserted venous central catheters are widely used to perfuse low-weight preterm and term newborns in intensive care units. This catheter must be inserted carefully and monitored rigorously to prevent complications. This paper develops today's knowledge on the use and complications in the newborn population.

  7. 21 CFR 310.515 - Patient package inserts for estrogens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Patient package inserts for estrogens. 310.515 Section 310.515 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE NEW DRUGS Requirements for Specific New Drugs or Devices § 310.515 Patient package inserts for estrogens....

  8. Interface study of insertion layers in organic semiconductor devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Huanjun; Irfan, "; So, Franky; Gao, Yongli

    2009-08-01

    Inserting an ultra-thin interlayer has been an important means in modifying the performance of organic semiconductor devices. Using photoemission and inverse photoemission spectroscopy (UPS, XPS and IPES), we have investigated the electronic structure of a number of insertion layers widely used in organic semiconductor devices. We found that inserting alkali metal compound thin layers such as LiF between the electron transport layer (ETL) and the cathode can induce energy level shift in the ETL that reduces the electron injection barrier. The reduction is attributed to the release of the alkali metal that n-doped the ETL, and as such it depends on the cathode material deposited on top of the insertion layer. For thin metal oxide insertion layers, such as MoO3, between the anode and the hole transport layer (HTL), reduction of the hole injection barrier is also observed. This reduction, however, is due to the large workfunction of the oxide that subsequently moves the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) toward the anode Fermi level. Effects of other insertion layers, such as metal insertion layer in organic bistable device (OBD) and organic insertion layer in bipolar organic thin film transistors (OTFT) will also be discussed.

  9. Combined plasma and thermal hollow cathode insert model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, Ira; Polk, James E.; Mikellides, Ionnis G.; Goebel, Dan m.; Hornbeck, Sarah E.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we present the first results from a Hollow Cathode Thermal (HCThermal) model that uses the spatially distributed plasma fluxes calculated by the InsertRegion of an Orificed Cathode (IROrCa2D) code as the heat source to predict the hollow cathode and insert temperatures.

  10. Piezo-Driven Vibrating Insertion Device for Microelectrode Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noda, Takahiro; Kanzaki, Ryohei; Takahashi, Hirokazu

    Microelectrode arrays are commonly used to measure neural activities in the brain, and arrays with some 100 electrodes are commercially available to date. However, insertion of a dense grid array deforms the brain, resulting in deterioration of the measurements. In order to overcome this problem, we propose a piezo-driven vibrating insertion device to reduce the insertion-induced deformation of the brain. We attempted under various conditions to insert the array into an agarose substrate, whose hardness was adjusted to that of the cerebral cortex of rats. Our experiments demonstrated that inverse-sawtooth vibration reduced the insertion-induced deformation of the substrate in proportion to the logarithm of an upstroke velocity when the velocity was higher than 10 mm/s, and vibrating insertion of the maximum velocity at 36.7 mm/s reduced the deformation by up to 40% as compared to insertion without vibration. In addition, we tested the vibrating insertion device in an electrophysiological experiment in the rat auditory cortex in vivo, and successfully measured tone-evoked neuronal activities.

  11. Load beam unit replaceable inserts for dry coal extrusion pumps

    DOEpatents

    Saunders, Timothy; Brady, John D.

    2012-11-13

    A track assembly for a particulate material extrusion pump according to an exemplary aspect of the present disclosure includes a link assembly with a roller bearing. An insert mounted to a load beam located such that the roller bearing contacts the insert.

  12. Cruciate retaining and cruciate substituting ultra-congruent insert

    PubMed Central

    Deledda, Davide; Rosso, Federica; Ratto, Nicola; Bruzzone, Matteo; Bonasia, Davide Edoardo; Rossi, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    The posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) conservation and the polyethylene insert constraint in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) are still debated. The PCL is one of the primary stabilizers of the joint, but cruciate retaining (CR) implants have the disadvantage of a difficult balancing of the PCL. Postero-stabilized (PS) implants were introduced to reduce this problem. However, also the PS implants have some disadvantages, due to the cam-mechanism, such as high risk of cam-mechanism polyethylene wear. To minimize the polyethylene wear of the cam-mechanism and the bone sacrifice due to the intercondylar box, different types of inserts were developed, trying to increase the implant conformity and to reduce stresses on the bone-implant interface. In this scenario ultra-congruent (UC) inserts were developed. Those inserts are characterized by a high anterior wall and a deep-dished plate. This conformation should guarantee a good stability without the posterior cam. Few studies on both kinematic and clinical outcomes of UC inserts are available. Clinical and radiological outcomes, as well as kinematic data are similar between UC mobile bearing (MB) and standard PS MB inserts at short to mid-term follow-up. In this manuscript biomechanics and clinical outcomes of UC inserts will be described, and they will be compared to standard PS or CR inserts. PMID:26855938

  13. Z-2 Threaded Insert Design and Testing Abstract

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, RIchard; Graziosi, Dave; Jones, Bobby; Ferl, Jinny; Scarborough, Steve; Sweeney, Mitch

    2016-01-01

    The Z-2 Prototype Planetary Extravehicular Space Suit Assembly is a continuation of NASA's Z series of spacesuits. The Z-2 is another step in the NASA's technology development roadmap leading to human exploration of the Martian surface. To meet a more challenging set of requirements than previous suit systems standard design features, such as threaded inserts, have been re-analyzed and improved. NASA's Z-2 prototype space suit contains several components fabricated from an advanced hybrid composite laminate consisting of IM10 carbon fiber and fiber glass. One requirement NASA levied on the suit composites was the ability to have removable, replaceable helicoil inserts to which other suit components would be fastened. An approach utilizing bonded in inserts with helicoils inside of them was implemented. The design of the interface flanges of the composites allowed some of the inserts to be a "T" style insert that was installed through the entire thickness of the laminate. The flange portion of the insert provides a mechanical lock as a redundancy to the adhesive aiding in the pullout load that the insert can withstand. In some locations it was not possible to utilize at "T" style insert and a blind insert was used instead. These inserts rely completely on the bond strength of the adhesive to resist pullout. It was determined during the design of the suit that the inserts did not need to withstand loads induced from pressure cycling but instead tension induced from torqueing the screws to bolt on hardware which creates a much higher stress on them. Bolt tension is determined by dividing the torque on the screw by a k value multiplied by the thread diameter of the bolt. The k value is a factor that accounts for friction in the system. A common value used for k for a non-lubricated screw is 0.2. The k value can go down by as much as 0.1 if the screw is lubricated which means for the same torque, a much larger tension could be placed on the bolt and insert. This paper

  14. Bimodal porous gold opals for molecular sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chae, Weon-Sik; Yu, Hyunung; Ham, Sung-Kyoung; Lee, Myung-Jin; Jung, Jin-Seung; Robinson, David B.

    2013-11-01

    We have fabricated bimodal porous gold skeletons by double-templating routes using poly(styrene) colloidal opals as templates. The fabricated gold skeletons show a bimodal pore-size distribution, with small pores within spheres and large pores between spheres. The templated bimodal porous gold skeletons were applied in Raman scattering experiments to study sensing efficiency for probe molecules. We found that the bimodal porous gold skeletons showed obvious enhancement of Raman scattering signals versus that of the unimodal porous gold which only has interstitial pores of several hundred nanometers.

  15. Gold nephropathy in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Husserl, F E; Shuler, S E

    1979-01-01

    A 2-year-old girl was treated with gold salts for juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. Treatment had to be discontinued when persistent proteinuria was detected. As this case report indicates, close monitoring of the urine is mandatory during treatment with gold salts to detect early signs of toxicity: hematuria followed by casts and then proteinuria as therapy is continued. Histologic examination with electron microscopy will help to differentiate the different forms of gold toxicity. When the findings are consistent with gold-induced renal involvement, therapy should be discontinued. The gold nephropathy usually resolves in time, with no permanent renal damage.

  16. Gold recycling; a materials flow study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amey, Earle B.

    2000-01-01

    This materials flow study includes a description of trends in consumption, loss, and recycling of gold-containing materials in the United States in 1998 in order to illustrate the extent to which gold is presently being recycled and to identify recycling trends. The quantity of gold recycled, as a percent of the apparent supply of gold, was estimated to be about 30 percent. Of the approximately 446 metric tons of gold refined in the United States in 1998, the fabricating and industrial use losses were 3 percent.

  17. Measurement of Vein Diameter for Peripherally Inserted Central Catheter (PICC) Insertion: An Observational Study.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Rebecca; Cummings, Melita; Childs, Jessie; Fielder, Andrea; Mikocka-Walus, Antonina; Grech, Carol; Esterman, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    Choosing an appropriately sized vein reduces the risk of venous thromboembolism associated with peripherally inserted central catheters. This observational study described the diameters of the brachial, basilic, and cephalic veins and determined the effect of patient factors on vein size. Ultrasound was used to measure the veins of 176 participants. Vein diameter was similar in both arms regardless of hand dominance and side. Patient factors-including greater age, height, and weight, as well as male gender-were associated with increased vein diameter. The basilic vein tended to have the largest diameter statistically. However, this was the case in only 55% of patients.

  18. Intraaortic balloon pump insertion through the subclavian artery. Subclavian artery insertion of IABP.

    PubMed

    Marcu, Constantin B; Donohue, Thomas J; Ferneini, Antoine; Ghantous, Andre E

    2006-04-01

    The intraaortic balloon pump (IABP) is frequently used in the management of cardiac failure in the setting of myocardial infarction or as a bridge for coronary revascularisation surgery. The IABP is usually inserted through the femoral artery. Occasionally severe aorto-iliac occlusive disease prevents the retrograde passage of the balloon, in which case an anterograde route, usually through the ascending aorta is used. We describe four patients in whom an IABP was placed through the subclavian artery by the joint efforts of cardiologists and vascular surgeons.

  19. Small genomic insertions form enhancers that misregulate oncogenes

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Brian J.; Hnisz, Denes; Weintraub, Abraham S.; Kwiatkowski, Nicholas; Li, Charles H.; Li, Zhaodong; Weichert-Leahey, Nina; Rahman, Sunniyat; Liu, Yu; Etchin, Julia; Li, Benshang; Shen, Shuhong; Lee, Tong Ihn; Zhang, Jinghui; Look, A. Thomas; Mansour, Marc R.; Young, Richard A.

    2017-01-01

    The non-coding regions of tumour cell genomes harbour a considerable fraction of total DNA sequence variation, but the functional contribution of these variants to tumorigenesis is ill-defined. Among these non-coding variants, somatic insertions are among the least well characterized due to challenges with interpreting short-read DNA sequences. Here, using a combination of Chip-seq to enrich enhancer DNA and a computational approach with multiple DNA alignment procedures, we identify enhancer-associated small insertion variants. Among the 102 tumour cell genomes we analyse, small insertions are frequently observed in enhancer DNA sequences near known oncogenes. Further study of one insertion, somatically acquired in primary leukaemia tumour genomes, reveals that it nucleates formation of an active enhancer that drives expression of the LMO2 oncogene. The approach described here to identify enhancer-associated small insertion variants provides a foundation for further study of these abnormalities across human cancers. PMID:28181482

  20. Gas turbine nozzle vane insert and methods of installation

    DOEpatents

    Miller, William John; Predmore, Daniel Ross; Placko, James Michael

    2002-01-01

    A pair of hollow elongated insert bodies are disposed in one or more of the nozzle vane cavities of a nozzle stage of a gas turbine. Each insert body has an outer wall portion with apertures for impingement-cooling of nozzle wall portions in registration with the outer wall portion. The insert bodies are installed into the cavity separately and spreaders flex the bodies toward and to engage standoffs against wall portions of the nozzle whereby the designed impingement gap between the outer wall portions of the insert bodies and the nozzle wall portions is achieved. The spreaders are secured to the inner wall portions of the insert bodies and the bodies are secured to one another and to the nozzle vane by welding or brazing.

  1. Smart structures for shock wave attenuation using ER inserts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jaehwan; Kim, Jung-Yup; Choi, Seung-Bok; Kim, Kyung-Su

    2001-08-01

    This Paper demonstrates the possibility of shock wave attenuation propagating through a smart structure that incorporates ER insert. The wave transmission of ER inserted beam is theoretically derived using Mead & Markus model and the theoretical results are compared with the finite element analysis results. To experimentally verify the shock wave attenuation, ER insert in an aluminum plate is made and two piezoceramic disks are used as transmitter and receiver of the wave. The transmitter sends a sine pulse signal such that a component of shock wave travels through the plate structure and the receiver gets the transmitted wave signal. Wave propagation of the ER insert can be adjusted by changing the applied electric field on the ER insert. Details of the experiment are addressed and the possibility of shock wave attenuation is experimentally verified. This kind of smart structure can be used for warship and submarine hull structures to protect fragile and important equipment.

  2. Method for improving the durability of ion insertion materials

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Se-Hee; Tracy, C. Edwin; Cheong, Hyeonsik M.

    2002-01-01

    The invention provides a method of protecting an ion insertion material from the degradative effects of a liquid or gel-type electrolyte material by disposing a protective, solid ion conducting, electrically insulating, layer between the ion insertion layer and the liquid or gel-type electrolyte material. The invention further provides liquid or gel-type electrochemical cells having improved durability having a pair of electrodes, a pair of ion insertion layers sandwiched between the pair of electrodes, a pair of solid ion conducting layers sandwiched between the ion insertion layers, and a liquid or gel-type electrolyte material disposed between the solid ion conducting layers, where the solid ion conducting layer minimizes or prevents degradation of the faces of the ion insertion materials facing the liquid or gel-type electrolyte material. Electrochemical cells of this invention having increased durability include secondary lithium batteries and electrochromic devices.

  3. Detection for processing history of seam insertion and contrast enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jianwei; Zhao, Yao; Ni, Rongrong

    2014-11-01

    With the development of manipulations techniques of digital images, digital image forensic technology is becoming more and more necessary. However, the determination of processing history of multi-operation is still a challenge problem. In this paper, we improve the traditional seam insertion algorithm, and propose corresponding detection method. Then an algorithm that focuses on detecting the processing history of seam insertion and contrast enhancement is proposed, which can be widely used in practical image forgery. Based on comprehensive analysis, we have discovered the inherent relationship between seam insertion and contrast enhancement. Different orders of processing make different impacts on images. By using the newly proposed algorithm, both contrast enhancement followed by seam insertion and seam insertion followed by contrast enhancement can be detected correctly. Plenty of experiments have been implemented to prove the accuracy.

  4. Dating native gold by noble gas analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niedermann, S.; Eugster, O.; Hofmann, B.; Thalmann, CH.; Reimold, W. U.

    1993-01-01

    Our recent work on He, Ne, and Ar in Alpine gold samples has demonstrated that gold is extremely retentive for He and could thus, in principle, be used for U/Th-He-4 dating. For vein-type gold from Brusson, Northern Italy, we derived a U/Th-He-4 age of 36 Ma, in agreement with the K-Ar formation age of associated muscovites and biotites. However, in placer gold from the Napf area, Central Switzerland, we observed large excesses of both He-4 and radiogenic Ar-40 (Ar-40 sub rad, defined as Ar-40-295.5-Ar-.36). The gas release systematics indicate two distinct noble gas components, one of which is released below about 800 C and the other one at the melting point of gold (1064 C). We now present results of He and Xe measurements in a 1 g placer gold sample from the river Kruempelgraben, as well as He and Ar data for Brusson vein-type gold and for gold from the Lily Gold Mine, South Africa. We calculate reasonable U/Th-He-4 as well as U-Xe ages based on those gases which are released at approximately 800 C. Probably the low-temperature components represent in-situ-produced radiogenic He and fission Xe, whereas the gases evolving when gold melts have been trapped during gold formation. Therefore, only the low-temperature components are relevant for dating purposes.

  5. Mammalian sensitivity to elemental gold (Au?)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eisler, R.

    2004-01-01

    There is increasing documentation of allergic contact dermatitis and other effects from gold jewelry, gold dental restorations, and gold implants. These effects were especially pronounced among females wearing body-piercing gold objects. One estimate of the prevalence of gold allergy worldwide is 13%, as judged by patch tests with monovalent organogold salts. Eczema of the head and neck was the most common response of individuals hypersensitive to gold, and sensitivity can last for at least several years. Ingestion of beverages containing flake gold can result in allergic-type reactions similar to those seen in gold-allergic individuals exposed to gold through dermal contact and other routes. Studies with small laboratory mammals and injected doses of colloidal gold showed increased body temperatures, accumulations in reticular cells, and dose enhancement in tumor therapy; gold implants were associated with tissue injuries. It is proposed that Au? toxicity to mammals is associated, in part, with formation of the more reactive Au+ and Au3+ species.

  6. Intramolecular cyclopropanation and C-H insertion reactions with metal carbenoids generated from cyclopropenes.

    PubMed

    Archambeau, Alexis; Miege, Frédéric; Meyer, Christophe; Cossy, Janine

    2015-04-21

    Activation of unsaturated carbon-carbon bonds by means of transition metal catalysts is an exceptionally active research field in organic synthesis. In this context, due to their high ring strain, cyclopropenes constitute an interesting class of substrates that displays a versatile reactivity in the presence of transition metal catalysts. Metal complexes of vinyl carbenes are involved as key intermediates in a wide variety of transition metal-catalyzed ring-opening reactions of cyclopropenes. Most of the reported transformations rely on intermolecular or intramolecular addition of nucleophiles to these latter reactive species. This Account focuses specifically on the reactivity of carbenoids resulting from the ring-opening of cyclopropenes in cyclopropanation and C-H insertion reactions, which are arguably two of the most representative transformations of metal complexes of carbenes. Compared with the more conventional α-diazo carbonyl compounds, the use of cyclopropenes as precursors of metal carbenoids in intramolecular cyclopropanation or C-H insertion reactions has been largely underexploited. One of the challenges is to devise appropriately substituted and readily available cyclopropenes that would not only undergo regioselective ring-opening under mild conditions but also trigger the subsequent desired transformations with a high level of chemoselectivity and stereoselectivity. These goals were met by considering several substrates derived from the readily available 3,3-dimethylcyclopropenylcarbinols or 3,3-dimethylcyclopropenylcarbinyl amines. In the case of 1,6-cyclopropene-enes, highly efficient and diastereoselective gold(I)-catalyzed ring-opening/intramolecular cyclopropanations were developed as a route to diversely substituted heterocycles and carbocycles possessing a bicyclo[4.1.0]heptane framework. The use of rhodium(II) catalysts enabled us to widen the scope of this transformation for the synthesis of medium-sized heterocyclic scaffolds

  7. Preparation and characterization of gold nanoparticles and nanowires loaded into rod-shaped silica by a one-step procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mnasri, Najib; Nyalosaso, Jeff L.; Kachbouri, Sana; Zajac, Jerzy; Elaloui, Elimame; Charnay, Clarence

    2017-01-01

    Rod-shaped mesoporous silica nanoparticles (RMSN) with built-in gold nanoparticles or thin gold nanowires in the pore channels were in situ synthesized via a one-step procedure. The insertion of a hydrophobic gold precursor into the mesopores of RMSN was reached through a micellar solubilization mechanism and gold nanoparticles were achieved through a thermal reduction. The resulting RMSN and Au-RMSN samples were characterized by using X-ray diffraction, transmission and scanning microscopies (TEM and SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), nitrogen physisorption and solid-state Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR). The interaction of Au precursor (a carbene complex) with the thiol group at the silica surface was identified and found to play a crucial role in the dispersion of the uniform metal nanoparticles at the internal surface of RMSN. Moreover, TEM micrographs revealed the absence of large gold particles outside the mesopore network. The shape of Au nanoparticles and their loading amount in the mesoporous silica could be easily tuned by altering the concentration of gold precursor.

  8. Method of joining a vane cavity insert to a nozzle segment of a gas turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Burdgick, Steven Sebastian

    2002-01-01

    An insert containing apertures for impingement cooling a nozzle vane of a nozzle segment in a gas turbine is inserted into one end of the vane. The leading end of the insert is positioned slightly past a rib adjacent the opposite end of the vane through which the insert is inserted. The end of the insert is formed or swaged into conformance with the inner margin of the rib. The insert is then brazed or welded to the rib.

  9. The genomic landscape of polymorphic human nuclear mitochondrial insertions

    PubMed Central

    Dayama, Gargi; Emery, Sarah B.; Kidd, Jeffrey M.; Mills, Ryan E.

    2014-01-01

    The transfer of mitochondrial genetic material into the nuclear genomes of eukaryotes is a well-established phenomenon that has been previously limited to the study of static reference genomes. The recent advancement of high throughput sequencing has enabled an expanded exploration into the diversity of polymorphic nuclear mitochondrial insertions (NumtS) within human populations. We have developed an approach to discover and genotype novel Numt insertions using whole genome, paired-end sequencing data. We have applied this method to a thousand individuals in 20 populations from the 1000 Genomes Project and other datasets and identified 141 new sites of Numt insertions, extending our current knowledge of existing NumtS by almost 20%. We find that recent Numt insertions are derived from throughout the mitochondrial genome, including the D-loop, and have integration biases that differ in some respects from previous studies on older, fixed NumtS in the reference genome. We determined the complete inserted sequence for a subset of these events and have identified a number of nearly full-length mitochondrial genome insertions into nuclear chromosomes. We further define their age and origin of insertion and present an analysis of their potential impact to ongoing studies of mitochondrial heteroplasmy and disease. PMID:25348406

  10. Toward automated cochlear implant insertion using tubular manipulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granna, Josephine; Rau, Thomas S.; Nguyen, Thien-Dang; Lenarz, Thomas; Majdani, Omid; Burgner-Kahrs, Jessica

    2016-03-01

    During manual cochlear implant electrode insertion the surgeon is at risk to damage the intracochlear fine-structure, as the electrode array is inserted through a small opening in the cochlea blindly with little force-feedback. This paper addresses a novel concept for cochlear electrode insertion using tubular manipulators to reduce risks of causing trauma during insertion and to automate the insertion process. We propose a tubular manipulator incorporated into the electrode array composed of an inner wire within a tube, both elastic and helically shaped. It is our vision to use this manipulator to actuate the initially straight electrode array during insertion into the cochlea by actuation of the wire and tube, i.e. translation and slight axial rotation. In this paper, we evaluate the geometry of the human cochlea in 22 patient datasets in order to derive design requirements for the manipulator. We propose an optimization algorithm to automatically determine the tube set parameters (curvature, torsion, diameter, length) for an ideal final position within the cochlea. To prove our concept, we demonstrate that insertion can be realized in a follow-the-leader fashion for 19 out of 22 cochleas. This is possible with only 4 different tube/wire sets.

  11. Isthmus-guided cortical bone trajectory for pedicle screw insertion.

    PubMed

    Iwatsuki, Koichi; Yoshimine, Toshiki; Ohnishi, Yu-ichiro; Ninomiya, Kosi; Ohkawa, Toshika

    2014-08-01

    Herein is described cortical bone trajectory (CBT), a new path for pedicle screw insertion for lumbar vertebral fusion. Because the points of insertion are under the end of the inferior articular process, and because the screws are inserted toward the lateral side, there is less soft tissue development than with the conventional technique; the CBT technique therefore enables less invasive surgery than the conventional technique. However, it has some drawbacks. For example, in the original CBT approach, the points of insertion are in the vicinity of the end of the inferior articular process. Because this joint has been destroyed in many patients who have indications for intervertebral fusion surgery, it is sometimes difficult to use it as a reference point for screw insertion location. With severe lateral slippage, the screw insertion site can become significantly dislocated sideways, with possible resultant damaging to the spinal canal and/or nerve root. The CBT technique here involved inserting the screws while keeping clear of the intervertebral foramen with the assistance of side view X-ray fluoroscopy and using the end of the inferior articular process and the isthmus as points of reference for screw location.

  12. Fiducial marker-based correction for involuntary motion in weight-bearing C-arm CT scanning of knees. Part I. Numerical model-based optimization

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jang-Hwan; Fahrig, Rebecca; Keil, Andreas; Besier, Thor F.; Pal, Saikat; McWalter, Emily J.; Beaupré, Gary S.; Maier, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Human subjects in standing positions are apt to show much more involuntary motion than in supine positions. The authors aimed to simulate a complicated realistic lower body movement using the four-dimensional (4D) digital extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) phantom. The authors also investigated fiducial marker-based motion compensation methods in two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) space. The level of involuntary movement-induced artifacts and image quality improvement were investigated after applying each method. Methods: An optical tracking system with eight cameras and seven retroreflective markers enabled us to track involuntary motion of the lower body of nine healthy subjects holding a squat position at 60° of flexion. The XCAT-based knee model was developed using the 4D XCAT phantom and the optical tracking data acquired at 120 Hz. The authors divided the lower body in the XCAT into six parts and applied unique affine transforms to each so that the motion (6 degrees of freedom) could be synchronized with the optical markers’ location at each time frame. The control points of the XCAT were tessellated into triangles and 248 projection images were created based on intersections of each ray and monochromatic absorption. The tracking data sets with the largest motion (Subject 2) and the smallest motion (Subject 5) among the nine data sets were used to animate the XCAT knee model. The authors defined eight skin control points well distributed around the knees as pseudo-fiducial markers which functioned as a reference in motion correction. Motion compensation was done in the following ways: (1) simple projection shifting in 2D, (2) deformable projection warping in 2D, and (3) rigid body warping in 3D. Graphics hardware accelerated filtered backprojection was implemented and combined with the three correction methods in order to speed up the simulation process. Correction fidelity was evaluated as a function of number of markers used (4–12) and

  13. Accuracy of an infrared marker-based patient positioning system (ExacTrac®) for stereotactic body radiotherapy in localizing the planned isocenter using fiducial markers

    SciTech Connect

    Montes-Rodríguez, María de los Ángeles Mitsoura, Eleni; Hernández-Bojórquez, Mariana; Martínez-Gómez, Alma Angélica; Contreras-Pérez, Agustín; Negrete-Hernández, Ingrid Mireya; Hernández-Oviedo, Jorge Omar; Santiago-Concha, Bernardino Gabriel

    2014-11-07

    Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) requires a controlled immobilization and position monitoring of patient and target. The purpose of this work is to analyze the performance of the imaging system ExacTrac® (ETX) using infrared and fiducial markers. Materials and methods: In order to assure the accuracy of isocenter localization, a Quality Assurance procedure was applied using an infrared marker-based positioning system. Scans were acquired of an inhouse-agar gel and solid water phantom with infrared spheres. In the inner part of the phantom, three reference markers were delineated as reference and one pellet was place internally; which was assigned as the isocenter. The iPlan® RT Dose treatment planning system. Images were exported to the ETX console. Images were acquired with the ETX to check the correctness of the isocenter placement. Adjustments were made in 6D the reference markers were used to fuse the images. Couch shifts were registered. The procedure was repeated for verification purposes. Results: The data recorded of the verifications in translational and rotational movements showed averaged 3D spatial uncertainties of 0.31 ± 0.42 mm respectively 0.82° ± 0.46° in the phantom and the first correction of these uncertainties were of 1.51 ± 1.14 mm respectively and 1.37° ± 0.61°. Conclusions: This study shows a high accuracy and repeatability in positioning the selected isocenter. The ETX-system for verifying the treatment isocenter position has the ability to monitor the tracing position of interest, making it possible to be used for SBRT positioning within uncertainty ≤1mm.

  14. Effective one step-iterative fiducial marker-based compensation for involuntary motion in weight-bearing C-arm cone-beam CT scanning of knees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jang-Hwan; Maier, Andreas; Berger, Martin; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2014-03-01

    We previously introduced three different fiducial marker-based correction methods (2D projection shifting, 2D projection warping, and 3D image warping) for patients' involuntary motion in the lower body during weight-bearing Carm CT scanning. The 3D warping method performed better than 2D methods since it could more accurately take into account the lower body motion in 3D. However, as the 3D warping method applies different rotational and translational movement to the reconstructed image for each projection frame, distance-related weightings were slightly twisted and thus result in overlaying background noise over the entire image. In order to suppress background noise and artifacts (e.g. metallic marker-caused streaks), the 3D warping method has been improved by incorporating bilateral filtering and a Landwebertype iteration in one step. A series of projection images of five healthy volunteers standing at various flexion angles were acquired using a C-arm cone-beam CT system with a flat panel. A horizontal scanning trajectory of the C-arm was calibrated to generate projection matrices. Using the projection matrices, the static reference marker coordinates in 3D were estimated and used for the improved 3D warping method. The improved 3D warping method effectively reduced background noise down below the noise level of 2D methods and also eliminated metal-generated streaks. Thus, improved visibility of soft tissue structures (e.g. fat and muscle) was achieved while maintaining sharp edges at bone-tissue interfaces. Any high resolution weight-bearing cone-beam CT system can apply this method for motion compensation.

  15. Accuracy of an infrared marker-based patient positioning system (ExacTrac®) for stereotactic body radiotherapy in localizing the planned isocenter using fiducial markers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montes-Rodríguez, María de los Ángeles; Hernández-Bojórquez, Mariana; Martínez-Gómez, Alma Angélica; Contreras-Pérez, Agustín; Negrete-Hernández, Ingrid Mireya; Hernández-Oviedo, Jorge Omar; Mitsoura, Eleni; Santiago-Concha, Bernardino Gabriel

    2014-11-01

    Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) requires a controlled immobilization and position monitoring of patient and target. The purpose of this work is to analyze the performance of the imaging system ExacTrac® (ETX) using infrared and fiducial markers. Materials and methods: In order to assure the accuracy of isocenter localization, a Quality Assurance procedure was applied using an infrared marker-based positioning system. Scans were acquired of an inhouse-agar gel and solid water phantom with infrared spheres. In the inner part of the phantom, three reference markers were delineated as reference and one pellet was place internally; which was assigned as the isocenter. The iPlan® RT Dose treatment planning system. Images were exported to the ETX console. Images were acquired with the ETX to check the correctness of the isocenter placement. Adjustments were made in 6D the reference markers were used to fuse the images. Couch shifts were registered. The procedure was repeated for verification purposes. Results: The data recorded of the verifications in translational and rotational movements showed averaged 3D spatial uncertainties of 0.31 ± 0.42 mm respectively 0.82° ± 0.46° in the phantom and the first correction of these uncertainties were of 1.51 ± 1.14 mm respectively and 1.37° ± 0.61°. Conclusions: This study shows a high accuracy and repeatability in positioning the selected isocenter. The ETX-system for verifying the treatment isocenter position has the ability to monitor the tracing position of interest, making it possible to be used for SBRT positioning within uncertainty ≤1mm.

  16. Treatment-Related Morbidity in Prostate Cancer: A Comparison of 3-Dimensional Conformal Radiation Therapy With and Without Image Guidance Using Implanted Fiducial Markers

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Jasmeet; Greer, Peter B.; White, Martin A.; Parker, Joel; Patterson, Jackie; Tang, Colin I.; Capp, Anne; Wratten, Christopher; Denham, James W.

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To estimate the prevalence of rectal and urinary dysfunctional symptoms using image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) with fiducials and magnetic resonance planning for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: During the implementation stages of IGRT between September 2008 and March 2010, 367 consecutive patients were treated with prostatic irradiation using 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy with and without IGRT (non-IGRT). In November 2010, these men were asked to report their bowel and bladder symptoms using a postal questionnaire. The proportions of patients with moderate to severe symptoms in these groups were compared using logistic regression models adjusted for tumor and treatment characteristic variables. Results: Of the 282 respondents, the 154 selected for IGRT had higher stage tumors, received higher prescribed doses, and had larger volumes of rectum receiving high dosage than did the 128 selected for non-IGRT. The follow-up duration was 8 to 26 months. Compared with the non-IGRT group, improvement was noted in all dysfunctional rectal symptoms using IGRT. In multivariable analyses, IGRT improved rectal pain (odds ratio [OR] 0.07 [0.009-0.7], P=.02), urgency (OR 0.27 [0.11-0.63], P=<.01), diarrhea (OR 0.009 [0.02-0.35], P<.01), and change in bowel habits (OR 0.18 [0.06-0.52], P<.010). No correlation was observed between rectal symptom levels and dose-volume histogram data. Urinary dysfunctional symptoms were similar in both treatment groups. Conclusions: In comparison with men selected for non-IGRT, a significant reduction of bowel dysfunctional symptoms was confirmed in men selected for IGRT, even though they had larger volumes of rectum treated to higher doses.

  17. Four-Dimensional Measurement of the Displacement of Internal Fiducial and Skin Markers During 320-Multislice Computed Tomography Scanning of Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yamashita, Hideomi; Okuma, Kae; Tada, Keiichiro; Shiraishi, Kenshiro; Takahashi, Wataru; Shibata-Mobayashi, Shino; Sakumi, Akira; Saotome, Naoya; Haga, Akihiro; Onoe, Tsuyoshi; Ino, Kenji; Akahane, Masaaki; Ohtomo, Kuni; Nakagawa, Keiichi

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To study the three-dimensional movement of internal tumor bed fiducial and breast skin markers, using 320-multislice computed tomography (CT); and to analyze intrafractional errors for breast cancer patients undergoing breast irradiation. Methods and Materials: This study examined 280 markers on the skin of the breast (200 markers) and on the primary tumor bed (80 markers) of 20 patients treated by external-beam photon radiotherapy. Motion assessment was analyzed in 41 respiratory phases during 20 s of cine CT in the radiotherapy position. To assess intrafractional errors resulting from respiratory motion, four-dimensional CT scans were acquired for 20 patients. Results: Motion in the anterior-posterior (A/P) and superior-inferior (S/I) directions showed a strong correlation (|r| > 0.7) with the respiratory curve for most markers (79% and 70%, respectively). The average marker displacements between maximum and minimum value during 20 s for the 200 breast skin metal markers were 1.1 {+-} 0.3 mm, 2.1 {+-} 0.6 mm, and 1.6 {+-} 0.4 mm in the left-right, A/P, and S/I directions, respectively. For the 80 tumor bed clips, displacements were 0.9 {+-} 0.2 mm in left-right, 1.7 {+-} 0.5 mm in A/P, and 1.1 {+-} 0.3 mm in S/I. There was no significant difference in the motion between breast quadrant regions or between the primary site and the other regions. Conclusions: Motion in primary breast tumors was evaluated with 320-multislice CT. Very little change was detected during individual radiation treatment fractions.

  18. Bending Gold Nanorods with Light.

    PubMed

    Babynina, Anastasia; Fedoruk, Michael; Kühler, Paul; Meledin, Alexander; Döblinger, Markus; Lohmüller, Theobald

    2016-10-12

    V-shaped gold nanoantennas are the functional components of plasmonic metasurfaces, which are capable of manipulating light in unprecedented ways. Designing a metasurface requires the custom arrangement of individual antennas with controlled shape and orientation. Here, we show how highly crystalline gold nanorods in solution can be bent, one-by-one, into a V-shaped geometry and printed to the surface of a solid support through a combination of plasmonic heating and optical force. Significantly, we demonstrate that both the bending angle and the orientation of each rod-antenna can be adjusted independent from each other by tuning the laser intensity and polarization. This approach is applicable for the patterning of V-shaped plasmonic antennas on almost any substrate, which holds great potential for the fabrication of ultrathin optical components and devices.

  19. Industrial stator vane with sequential impingement cooling inserts

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Russell B; Fedock, John A; Goebel, Gloria E; Krueger, Judson J; Rawlings, Christopher K; Memmen, Robert L

    2013-08-06

    A turbine stator vane for an industrial engine, the vane having two impingement cooling inserts that produce a series of impingement cooling from the pressure side to the suction side of the vane walls. Each insert includes a spar with a row of alternating impingement cooling channels and return air channels extending in a radial direction. Impingement cooling plates cover the two sides of the insert and having rows of impingement cooling holes aligned with the impingement cooling channels and return air openings aligned with the return air channel.

  20. CT fluoroscopic guided insertion of inferior vena cava filters.

    PubMed

    Ignotus, P; Wetton, C; Berry, J

    2006-03-01

    The value and use of inferior vena cava (IVC) filters is well documented and has been growing since the first reported filter placement in 1973 and the first percutaneous insertion in 1982. Access routes now include both jugular veins, both ante-cubital veins and both femoral veins. However, all insertions require some form of imaging, usually fluoroscopy, to identify the location of the filter with respect to the IVC and the renal veins. We describe two cases where the patients' weight was significantly greater than the weight limit of the angiography table, necessitating insertion under CT fluoroscopic guidance.

  1. A Multiple RCC Device for Polygonal Peg Insertion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Chi-Cheng; Chen, Gin-Shan

    This paper proposes a new passive compliant center device, the Multiple Remote Center Compliance (MRCC), for assembly tasks. The MRCC introduces a new azimuthal compliance over traditional passive compliance mechanisms that can effectively compensate the peg's orientation deviation for polygonal insertions. Besides, a special feature of the adjustable compliance provides capability to overcome the gravity effect. Non-vertical insertions therefore become possible. A spring-supported object in space is also adopted for stability analysis of this compliant device. Actual experimental assembly processes demonstrate promising results on polygonal insertions in both traditional top-down and horizontal directions.

  2. International Workshop on Magnetic Measurements of Insertion Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    The International Workshop on Magnetic Measurements of Insertion Devices was held at the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, on September 28--29, 1993. The workshop brought together scientists and engineers from Europe, Japan, and the United States to discuss the following topics: Special techniques for magnetic measurements of insertion devices, magnetic tolerances of the insertion devices for third generation synchrotron radiation sources, methods for and accuracy of the multipole moments measurements, magnetic sensors, among other topics. The workshop included thirteen presentations that are collected in this volume.

  3. Biomolecular Assembly of Gold Nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Micheel, Christine Marya

    2005-05-20

    Over the past ten years, methods have been developed to construct discrete nanostructures using nanocrystals and biomolecules. While these frequently consist of gold nanocrystals and DNA, semiconductor nanocrystals as well as antibodies and enzymes have also been used. One example of discrete nanostructures is dimers of gold nanocrystals linked together with complementary DNA. This type of nanostructure is also known as a nanocrystal molecule. Discrete nanostructures of this kind have a number of potential applications, from highly parallel self-assembly of electronics components and rapid read-out of DNA computations to biological imaging and a variety of bioassays. My research focused in three main areas. The first area, the refinement of electrophoresis as a purification and characterization method, included application of agarose gel electrophoresis to the purification of discrete gold nanocrystal/DNA conjugates and nanocrystal molecules, as well as development of a more detailed understanding of the hydrodynamic behavior of these materials in gels. The second area, the development of methods for quantitative analysis of transmission electron microscope data, used computer programs written to find pair correlations as well as higher order correlations. With these programs, it is possible to reliably locate and measure nanocrystal molecules in TEM images. The final area of research explored the use of DNA ligase in the formation of nanocrystal molecules. Synthesis of dimers of gold particles linked with a single strand of DNA possible through the use of DNA ligase opens the possibility for amplification of nanostructures in a manner similar to polymerase chain reaction. These three areas are discussed in the context of the work in the Alivisatos group, as well as the field as a whole.

  4. DNA-templated gold nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadzadegan, Reza; Mohabatkar, Hassan; Sheikhi, Mohammad Hossein; Safavi, Afsaneh; Khajouee, Mahmood Barati

    2008-10-01

    We have developed simple methods of reproducibly creating deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)-templated gold nanowires on silicon. First DNA nanowires were aligned on silicon surfaces. Briefly, modified silicon wafer was soaked in the DNA solution, and then the solution was removed using micropipettes; the surface tension at the moving air-solution interface is sufficient to align the DNA nanowires on the silicon wafer. In another attempt, an aqueous dispersion of sodium azide-stabilized gold nanoparticles was prepared. The nanoparticles aligned double-stranded λ-DNA to form a linear nanoparticle array. Continuous gold nanowires were obtained. The above nanowires were structurally characterized using scanning electron microscopy. The results of the characterizations show the wires to be 57-323 nm wide, to be continuous with a length of 2.8-9.5 μm. The use of DNA as a template for the self-assembly of conducting nanowires represents a potentially important approach in the fabrication of nanoscale interconnects.

  5. Effect of insertion speed on tissue response and insertion mechanics of a chronically implanted silicon-based neural probe.

    PubMed

    Welkenhuysen, M; Andrei, A; Ameye, L; Eberle, W; Nuttin, B

    2011-11-01

    In this study, the effect of insertion speed on long-term tissue response and insertion mechanics was investigated. A dummy silicon parylene-coated probe was used in this context and implanted in the rat brain at 10 μm/s (n = 6) or 100 μm/s (n = 6) to a depth of 9 mm. The insertion mechanics were assessed by the dimpling distance, and the force at the point of penetration, at the end of the insertion phase, and after a 3-min rest period in the brain. After 6 weeks, the tissue response was evaluated by estimating the amount of gliosis, inflammation, and neuronal cell loss with immunohistochemistry. No difference in dimpling, penetration force, or the force after a 3-min rest period in the brain was observed. However, the force at the end of the insertion phase was significantly higher when inserting the probes at 100 μm/s compared to 10 μm/s. Furthermore, an expected tissue response was seen with an increase of glial and microglial reactivity around the probe. This reaction was similar along the entire length of the probe. However, evidence for a neuronal kill zone was observed only in the most superficial part of the implant. In this region, the lesion size was also greatest. Comparison of the tissue response between insertion speeds showed no differences.

  6. Distinguishing Between Legally and Illegally Produced Gold in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Richard J; Dixon, Roger D; Merkle, Roland K W

    2016-01-01

    The identification of gold-bearing material is essential for combating the theft of gold in South Africa. Material seized in police operations is generally a mixture of gold from different mines, and as such cannot be traced back to a single location. ICP-OES analysis of material dissolved by acid dissolution provided a database of gold compositions comprising gold from South African mines, illegal gold stolen from the mines, and commercial gold alloys and jewelery. Discrimination between legal and illegal gold was possible due to the presence of Pb, As, Sb, Sn, Se, and Te in the stolen material, elements which are not present in legally produced gold. The presence of these elements is a quick and simple way to distinguish between gold alloys based on refined gold, such as in commercially manufactured jewelery, and gold alloys containing a proportion of unrefined and therefore illegally obtained gold.

  7. 33. Launch Control Center, close view of launch key inserted ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    33. Launch Control Center, close view of launch key inserted in the launch panel. Lyon - Whiteman Air Force Base, Oscar O-1 Minuteman Missile Alert Facility, Southeast corner of Twelfth & Vendenberg Avenues, Knob Noster, Johnson County, MO

  8. Interior, detail closeup shot of window with stained glass inserts ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior, detail closeup shot of window with stained glass inserts in top southeast room taken from ther west - J. Weingartner & Son Cigar Factory, 414 East Walnut Street, North Wales, Montgomery County, PA

  9. Membrane protein insertion: mixing eukaryotic and prokaryotic concepts.

    PubMed

    Schleiff, Enrico; Soll, Jürgen

    2005-11-01

    Proteins are translocated across or inserted into membranes by machines that are composed of soluble and membrane-anchored subunits. The molecular action of these machines and their evolutionary origin are at present the focus of intense research. For instance, our understanding of the mode of insertion of beta-barrel membrane proteins into the outer membrane of endosymbiotically derived organelles has increased rapidly during the past few years. In particular, the identification of the Omp85/YaeT-involving pathways in Neisseria meningitidis, Escherichia coli and cyanobacteria, and homologues of Omp85/YaeT in chloroplasts and mitochondria, has provided new clues about the ancestral beta-barrel protein insertion pathway. This review focuses on recent advances in the elucidation of the evolutionarily conserved concepts that underlie the translocation and insertion of beta-barrel membrane proteins.

  10. Spontaneous Radiation Emission from Short, High Field Strength Insertion Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Geoffrey Krafft

    2005-09-15

    Since the earliest papers on undulaters were published, it has been known how to calculate the spontaneous emission spectrum from ''short'' undulaters when the magnetic field strength parameter is small compared to unity, or in ''single'' frequency sinusoidal undulaters where the magnetic field strength parameter is comparable to or larger than unity, but where the magnetic field amplitude is constant throughout the undulater. Fewer general results have been obtained in the case where the insertion device is both short, i.e., the magnetic field strength parameter changes appreciably throughout the insertion device, and the magnetic field strength is high enough that ponderomotive effects, radiation retardation, and harmonic generation are important physical phenomena. In this paper a general method is presented for calculating the radiation spectrum for short, high-field insertion devices. It is used to calculate the emission from some insertion device designs of recent interest.

  11. Pressure molding of powdered materials improved by rubber mold insert

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    Pressure molding tungsten microspheres is accomplished by applying hydraulic pressure to a silicone rubber mold insert with several barrel shaped chambers which is placed in a steel die cavity. This technique eliminates castings containing shear fractures.

  12. Development of Magnet Technologies for HTS Insert Coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesche, Rainer; Uglietti, Davide; Bruzzone, Pierluigi; March, Stephen; Marinucci, Claudio; Stepanov, Boris; Glowa, Natalia

    An existing Nb3Sn laboratory magnet generating a magnetic field of 12 T is intended to be upgraded to 16 T by means of the use of a high temperature superconductor (HTS) insert coil. An outline design of the HTS insert coil is presented. In the design, the aspects of the maximum achievable operation current, the required copper cross-section to ensure a hot spot temperature below 200 K and the resulting forces and stresses have been considered. The length of the insert coil has been selected in such a way that the field uniformity will be better than 1% within a sphere of 3 cm diameter. The protection of the whole magnet system (LTS & HTS insert) is briefly described.

  13. The use of dimorphic Alu insertions in human DNA fingerprinting

    SciTech Connect

    Novick, G.E.; Gonzalez, T.; Garrison, J.; Novick, C.C.; Herrera, R.J.; Batzer, M.A.; Deininger, P.L.

    1992-12-04

    We have characterized certain Human Specific Alu Insertions as either dimorphic (TPA25, PV92, APO), sightly dimorphic (C2N4 and C4N4) or monomorphic (C3N1, C4N6, C4N2, C4N5, C4N8), based on studies of Caucasian, Asian, American Black and African Black populations. Our approach is based upon: (1) PCR amplification using primers directed to the sequences that flank the site of insertion of the different Alu elements studied; (2) gel electrophoresis and scoring according to the presence or absence of an Alu insertion in one or both homologous chromosomes; (3) allelic frequencies calculated and compared according to Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Our DNA fingerprinting procedure using PCR amplification of dimorphic Human Specific Alu insertions, is stable enough to be used not only as a tool for genetic mapping but also to characterize populations, study migrational patterns and track the inheritance of human genetic disorders.

  14. 21 CFR 529.1940 - Progesterone intravaginal inserts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... postpartum estrus in suckled beef cows; and for advancement of first pubertal estrus in replacement beef... postpartum. Do not use an insert more than once. To prevent the potential transmission of venereal...

  15. 21 CFR 529.1940 - Progesterone intravaginal inserts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... postpartum estrus in suckled beef cows; and for advancement of first pubertal estrus in replacement beef... postpartum. Do not use an insert more than once. To prevent the potential transmission of venereal...

  16. 21 CFR 529.1940 - Progesterone intravaginal inserts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... postpartum estrus in suckled beef cows; and for advancement of first pubertal estrus in replacement beef... postpartum. Do not use an insert more than once. To prevent the potential transmission of venereal...

  17. 21 CFR 529.1940 - Progesterone intravaginal inserts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... postpartum estrus in suckled beef cows; and for advancement of first pubertal estrus in replacement beef... genital tracts. Do not use in beef cows that are fewer than 20 days postpartum. Do not use an insert...

  18. Bougie insertion: A common practice with underestimated dangers

    PubMed Central

    Theodorou, D.; Doulami, G.; Larentzakis, A.; Almpanopoulos, K.; Stamou, K.; Zografos, G.; Menenakos, E.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Esophageal perforation after bariatric operations is rare. We report two cases of esophageal perforation after bariatric operations indicating the dangers of a common practice – like insertion of esophageal tubes – and we describe our management of that complication. Presentation of case A 56 year old woman who underwent laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy and a 41 year old woman who underwent laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding respectively. In both operations a bougie has been used and led to esophageal perforation. Discussion The insertion of bougie and especially of inflated bougie is a common practice. It is an invasive procedure that in most cases is performed by the anesthesiologist team. Conclusion Bougie insertion is an invasive procedure with risks and should always be attempted under direct supervision of surgical team or should be inserted by a surgeon. PMID:22288051

  19. Physiological investigation of gold nanorods toward watermelon.

    PubMed

    Wan, Yujie; Li, Junli; Ren, Hongxuan; Huang, Jin; Yuan, Hong

    2014-08-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the phytotoxicity and oxidant stress of the gold nanorods toward watermelon, and hence give a quantitative risk assessment of both seeds and plants phase. The seed germination, the activity of antioxidant enzymes, and the contents of soluble protein and malondialdehyde (MDA) have been measured while the plant roots were observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). It was found that the gold nanorods significantly promoted the root elongation. Furthermore, the results on the enzymes activities of plant indicated that oxidative stress happened in the plant treated with gold nanorods. However, the gold nanorods resulted in the phytotoxicity toward plant especially at high concentration. The TEM images of the plant roots with and without the treatment of gold nanorods showed the significant different size of starch granules. In conclusion, significant physiological changes of plant occurred after treatment with the gold nanorods.

  20. Template based synthesis of gold nanotubes using biologically synthesized gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ballabh, R; Nara, S

    2015-12-01

    Reliable experimental protocols using green technologies to synthesize metallic nanostructures widen their applications, both biological as well as biomedical. Here, we describe a method for synthesizing gold nanotubes using biologically synthesized gold nanoparticles in a template based approach. E. coli DH5α was used as bionanofactory to synthesize gold nanoparticles. These nanoparticles were then deposited on sodium sulfate (Na2SO4) nanowires which were employed as sacrificial template for gold nanotube (Au-NT) formation. The gold nanoparticles, sodium sulphate nanowires and gold nanotubes were appropriately characterized using transmission electron microscopy. The TEM results showed that the average diameter of gold nanotubes was 72 nm and length up to 4-7 μm. The method discussed herein is better than other reported conventional chemical synthesis approaches as it uses biologically synthesized gold nanoparticles, and does not employ any harsh conditions/solvents for template removal which makes it a clean and ecofriendly method.

  1. MTR MAIN FLOOR. MEN DEMONSTRATE INSERTION OF DUMMY PLUG INTO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MTR MAIN FLOOR. MEN DEMONSTRATE INSERTION OF DUMMY PLUG INTO AN MTR BEAM HOLE. ONE MAN CHECKS RADIATION LEVEL AT THE END OF THE UNIVERSAL COFFIN, WHILE ANOTHER USES TOOL TO INSERT PLUG INTO HOLE THROUGH COFFIN. MEN WEAR "ANTI-C" (ANTI-CONTAMINATION) CLOTHING. INL NEGATIVE NO. 6198. R.G. Larsen, Photographer, 6/27/1952 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  2. Impediments to rapid insertion of innovative displays and peripherals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, Gail

    2012-06-01

    In order to optimize system performance and minimize cost for a system to fill capability gaps, an improvement to rapid insertion of innovative display and peripheral technology is required to take advantage of human-machine intersections. Current approaches to testing and integration impedes successful rapid insertion of innovative technology for new systems and incremental upgrades. Considerations to innovative displays and peripherals must occur further to the left of the lifecycle to be successful and key integration areas must be address for success.

  3. Evaluation of preferable insertion routes for esophagogastroduodenoscopy using ultrathin endoscopes

    PubMed Central

    Ono, Satoshi; Niimi, Keiko; Fujishiro, Mitsuhiro; Takahashi, Yu; Sakaguchi, Yoshiki; Nakayama, Chiemi; Minatsuki, Chihiro; Matsuda, Rie; Hirayama-Asada, Itsuko; Tsuji, Yosuke; Mochizuki, Satoshi; Kodashima, Shinya; Yamamichi, Nobutake; Ozeki, Atsuko; Matsumoto, Lumine; Ohike, Yumiko; Yamazaki, Tsutomu; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the discomfort associated with esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) using an ultrathin endoscope through different insertion routes. METHODS: This study (January 2012-March 2013) included 1971 consecutive patients [male/female (M/F), 1158/813, 57.5 ± 11.9 years] who visited a single institute for annual health checkups. Transnasal EGD was performed in 1394 patients and transoral EGD in 577. EGD-associated discomfort was assessed using a visual analog scale score (VAS score: 0-10). RESULTS: Multivariate analysis revealed gender (M vs F: 4.02 ± 2.15 vs 5.06 ± 2.43) as the only independent predictor of the VAS score in 180 patients who underwent EGD for the first time; whereas it revealed gender (M vs F 3.60 ± 2.20 vs 4.84 ± 2.37), operator, age group (A: < 39 years; B: 40-49 years; C: 50-59 years; D: 60-69 years; E: > 70 years; A/B/C/D/E: 4.99 ± 2.32/4.34 ± 2.49/4.19 ± 2.31/3.99 ± 2.27/3.63 ± 2.31), and type of insertion as independent predictors in the remaining patients. Subanalysis for gender, age group, and insertion route revealed that the VAS score decreased with age regardless of gender and insertion route, was high in female patients regardless of age and insertion route, and was low in males aged over 60 years who underwent transoral insertion. CONCLUSION: Although comprehensive analysis revealed that the insertion route may not be an independent predictor of the VAS score, transoral insertion may reduce EGD-associated discomfort in elderly patients. PMID:24803817

  4. Mechanism for electrochemical hydrogen insertion in carbonaceous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Deyang

    The mechanism for safe and reversible storage of hydrogen in porous carbonaceous materials by electrochemical decomposition of water in alkaline electrolyte is proposed. Atomic H was found to be inserted into the microdomains of defective graphene layers. Hydrogen storage capacity increases with increasing interlayer distance between carbon sheets. Hydrogen insertion in carbonaceous materials occurs at ambient conditions. Static potential acts as an electrochemical valve which can retain the hydrogen in the carbon structure, thus preventing leakage during storage.

  5. Evolution models with base substitutions, insertions, deletions, and selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saakian, D. B.

    2008-12-01

    The evolution model with parallel mutation-selection scheme is solved for the case when selection is accompanied by base substitutions, insertions, and deletions. The fitness is assumed to be either a single-peak function (i.e., having one finite discontinuity) or a smooth function of the Hamming distance from the reference sequence. The mean fitness is calculated exactly in large-genome limit. In the case of insertions and deletions the evolution characteristics depend on the choice of reference sequence.

  6. Selective detection and recovery of gold at tannin-immobilized non-conducting electrode.

    PubMed

    Banu, Khaleda; Shimura, Takayoshi; Sadeghi, Saman

    2015-01-01

    A tannin-immobilized glassy carbon electrode (TIGC) was prepared via electrochemical oxidation of the naturally occurring polyphenolic mimosa tannin, which generated a non-conducting polymeric film (NCPF) on the electrode surface. The fouling of the electrode surface by the electropolymerized film was evaluated by monitoring the electrode response of ferricyanide ions as a redox marker. The NCPF was permselective to HAuCl4, and the electrochemical reduction of HAuCl4 to metallic gold at the TIGC electrode was evaluated by recording the reduction current during cyclic voltammetry measurement. In the mixed electrolyte containing HAuCl4 along with FeCl3 and/or CuCl2, the NCPF remained selective toward the electrochemical reduction of HAuCl4 into the metallic state. The chemical reduction of HAuCl4 into metallic gold was also observed when the NCPF was inserted into an acidic gold solution overnight. The adsorption capacity of Au(III) on tannin-immobilized carbon fiber was 29±1.45 mg g(-1) at 60°C. In the presence of excess Cu(II) and Fe(III), tannin-immobilized NCPF proved to be an excellent candidate for the selective detection and recovery of gold through both electrochemical and chemical processes.

  7. Electrochemical Assay of Gold-Plating Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiodo, R.

    1982-01-01

    Gold content of plating solution is assayed by simple method that required only ordinary electrochemical laboratory equipment and materials. Technique involves electrodeposition of gold from solution onto electrode, the weight gain of which is measured. Suitable fast assay methods are economically and practically necessary in electronics and decorative-plating industries. If gold content in plating bath is too low, poor plating may result, with consequent economic loss to user.

  8. Sensorless Motion Planning for Medical Needle Insertion in Deformable Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Alterovitz, Ron; Goldberg, Kenneth Y.; Pouliot, Jean; Hsu, I-Chow

    2009-01-01

    Minimally invasive medical procedures such as biopsies, anesthesia drug injections, and brachytherapy cancer treatments require inserting a needle to a specific target inside soft tissues. This is difficult because needle insertion displaces and deforms the surrounding soft tissues causing the target to move during the procedure. To facilitate physician training and preoperative planning for these procedures, we develop a needle insertion motion planning system based on an interactive simulation of needle insertion in deformable tissues and numerical optimization to reduce placement error. We describe a 2-D physically based, dynamic simulation of needle insertion that uses a finite-element model of deformable soft tissues and models needle cutting and frictional forces along the needle shaft. The simulation offers guarantees on simulation stability for mesh modications and achieves interactive, real-time performance on a standard PC. Using texture mapping, the simulation provides visualization comparable to ultrasound images that the physician would see during the procedure. We use the simulation as a component of a sensorless planning algorithm that uses numerical optimization to compute needle insertion offsets that compensate for tissue deformations. We apply the method to radioactive seed implantation during permanent seed prostate brachytherapy to minimize seed placement error. PMID:19126473

  9. Templated Sequence Insertion Polymorphisms in the Human Genome

    PubMed Central

    Onozawa, Masahiro; Aplan, Peter D.

    2016-01-01

    Templated Sequence Insertion Polymorphism (TSIP) is a recently described form of polymorphism recognized in the human genome, in which a sequence that is templated from a distant genomic region is inserted into the genome, seemingly at random. TSIPs can be grouped into two classes based on nucleotide sequence features at the insertion junctions; Class 1 TSIPs show features of insertions that are mediated via the LINE-1 ORF2 protein, including (1) target-site duplication (TSD), (2) polyadenylation 10–30 nucleotides downstream of a “cryptic” polyadenylation signal, and (3) preference for insertion at a 5′-TTTT/A-3′ sequence. In contrast, class 2 TSIPs show features consistent with repair of a DNA double-strand break (DSB) via insertion of a DNA “patch” that is derived from a distant genomic region. Survey of a large number of normal human volunteers demonstrates that most individuals have 25–30 TSIPs, and that these TSIPs track with specific geographic regions. Similar to other forms of human polymorphism, we suspect that these TSIPs may be important for the generation of human diversity and genetic diseases. PMID:27900318

  10. Retrotransposon insertions in the clonal evolution of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Rodić, Nemanja; Steranka, Jared P; Makohon-Moore, Alvin; Moyer, Allison; Shen, Peilin; Sharma, Reema; Kohutek, Zachary A; Huang, Cheng Ran; Ahn, Daniel; Mita, Paolo; Taylor, Martin S; Barker, Norman J; Hruban, Ralph H; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A; Boeke, Jef D; Burns, Kathleen H

    2015-09-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is typically diagnosed after the disease has metastasized; it is among the most lethal forms of cancer. We recently described aberrant expression of an open reading frame 1 protein, ORF1p, encoded by long interspersed element-1 (LINE-1; L1) retrotransposon, in PDAC. To test whether LINE-1 expression leads to somatic insertions of this mobile DNA, we used a targeted method to sequence LINE-1 insertion sites in matched PDAC and normal samples. We found evidence of 465 somatic LINE-1 insertions in 20 PDAC genomes, which were absent from corresponding normal samples. In cases in which matched normal tissue, primary PDAC and metastatic disease sites were available, insertions were found in primary and metastatic tissues in differing proportions. Two adenocarcinomas secondarily involving the pancreas, but originating in the stomach and duodenum, acquired insertions with a similar discordance between primary and metastatic sites. Together, our findings show that LINE-1 contributes to the genetic evolution of PDAC and suggest that somatic insertions are acquired discontinuously in gastrointestinal neoplasms.

  11. Polyubiquitin insertions and the phylogeny of Cercozoa and Rhizaria.

    PubMed

    Bass, David; Moreira, David; López-García, Purificación; Polet, Stephane; Chao, Ema E; von der Heyden, Sophie; Pawlowski, Jan; Cavalier-Smith, Thomas

    2005-08-01

    A single or double amino acid insertion at the monomer-monomer junction of the universal eukaryotic protein polyubiquitin is unique to Cercozoa and Foraminifera, closely related 'core' phyla in the protozoan infrakingdom Rhizaria. We screened 11 other candidate rhizarians for this insertion: Radiozoa (polycystine and acantharean radiolaria), a 'microheliozoan', and Apusozoa; all lack it, supporting suggestions that Foraminifera are more closely related to Cercozoa than either is to other eukaryotes. The insertion's size was ascertained for 12 additional Cercozoa to help resolve their basal branching order. The earliest branching Cercozoa generally have a single amino acid insertion, like all Foraminifera, but a large derived clade consisting of all Monadofilosa except Metopion, Helk-esimastix, and Cercobodo agilis has two amino acids, suggesting one doubling event and no reversions to a single amino acid. Metromonas and Sainouron, cercozoans of uncertain position, have a double insertion, suggesting that they belong in Monadofilosa. An alternative interpretation, suggested by the higher positions for Metopion and Cercobodo on Bayesian trees compared with most distance trees, cannot be ruled out, i.e. that the second insertion took place earlier, in the ancestral filosan, and was followed by three independent reversions to a single amino acid in Chlorarachnea, Metopion and Cercobodo.

  12. Sensorless motion planning for medical needle insertion in deformable tissues.

    PubMed

    Alterovitz, Ron; Goldberg, Kenneth Y; Pouliot, Jean; Hsu, I-Chow Joe

    2009-03-01

    Minimally invasive medical procedures such as biopsies, anesthesia drug injections, and brachytherapy cancer treatments require inserting a needle to a specific target inside soft tissues. This is difficult because needle insertion displaces and deforms the surrounding soft tissues causing the target to move during the procedure. To facilitate physician training and preoperative planning for these procedures, we develop a needle insertion motion planning system based on an interactive simulation of needle insertion in deformable tissues and numerical optimization to reduce placement error. We describe a 2-D physically based, dynamic simulation of needle insertion that uses a finite-element model of deformable soft tissues and models needle cutting and frictional forces along the needle shaft. The simulation offers guarantees on simulation stability for mesh modifications and achieves interactive, real-time performance on a standard PC. Using texture mapping, the simulation provides visualization comparable to ultrasound images that the physician would see during the procedure. We use the simulation as a component of a sensorless planning algorithm that uses numerical optimization to compute needle insertion offsets that compensate for tissue deformations. We apply the method to radioactive seed implantation during permanent seed prostate brachytherapy to minimize seed placement error.

  13. Templated sequence insertion polymorphisms in the human genome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onozawa, Masahiro; Aplan, Peter

    2016-11-01

    Templated Sequence Insertion Polymorphism (TSIP) is a recently described form of polymorphism recognized in the human genome, in which a sequence that is templated from a distant genomic region is inserted into the genome, seemingly at random. TSIPs can be grouped into two classes based on nucleotide sequence features at the insertion junctions; Class 1 TSIPs show features of insertions that are mediated via the LINE-1 ORF2 protein, including 1) target-site duplication (TSD), 2) polyadenylation 10-30 nucleotides downstream of a “cryptic” polyadenylation signal, and 3) preference for insertion at a 5’-TTTT/A-3’ sequence. In contrast, class 2 TSIPs show features consistent with repair of a DNA double-strand break via insertion of a DNA “patch” that is derived from a distant genomic region. Survey of a large number of normal human volunteers demonstrates that most individuals have 25-30 TSIPs, and that these TSIPs track with specific geographic regions. Similar to other forms of human polymorphism, we suspect that these TSIPs may be important for the generation of human diversity and genetic diseases.

  14. Embryonic Lethals and T-DNA Insertional Mutagenesis in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed Central

    Errampalli, D; Patton, D; Castle, L; Mickelson, L; Hansen, K; Schnall, J; Feldmann, K; Meinke, D

    1991-01-01

    T-DNA insertional mutagenesis represents a promising approach to the molecular isolation of genes with essential functions during plant embryo development. We describe in this report the isolation and characterization of 18 mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana defective in embryo development following seed transformation with Agrobacterium tumefaciens. Random T-DNA insertion was expected to result in a high frequency of recessive embryonic lethals because many target genes are required for embryogenesis. The cointegrate Ti plasmid used in these experiments contained the nopaline synthase and neomycin phosphotransferase gene markers. Nopaline assays and resistance to kanamycin were used to estimate the number of functional inserts present in segregating families. Nine families appeared to contain a T-DNA insert either within or adjacent to the mutant gene. Eight families were clearly not tagged with a functional insert and appeared instead to contain mutations induced during the transformation process. DNA gel blot hybridization with internal and right border probes revealed a variety of rearrangements associated with T-DNA insertion. A general strategy is presented to simplify the identification of tagged embryonic mutants and facilitate the molecular isolation of genes required for plant embryogenesis. PMID:12324593

  15. Evaluation of a high resolution silicon PET insert module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grkovski, Milan; Brzezinski, Karol; Cindro, Vladimir; Clinthorne, Neal H.; Kagan, Harris; Lacasta, Carlos; Mikuž, Marko; Solaz, Carles; Studen, Andrej; Weilhammer, Peter; Žontar, Dejan

    2015-07-01

    Conventional PET systems can be augmented with additional detectors placed in close proximity of the region of interest. We developed a high resolution PET insert module to evaluate the added benefit of such a combination. The insert module consists of two back-to-back 1 mm thick silicon sensors, each segmented into 1040 1 mm2 pads arranged in a 40 by 26 array. A set of 16 VATAGP7.1 ASICs and a custom assembled data acquisition board were used to read out the signal from the insert module. Data were acquired in slice (2D) geometry with a Jaszczak phantom (rod diameters of 1.2-4.8 mm) filled with 18F-FDG and the images were reconstructed with ML-EM method. Both data with full and limited angular coverage from the insert module were considered and three types of coincidence events were combined. The ratio of high-resolution data that substantially improves quality of the reconstructed image for the region near the surface of the insert module was estimated to be about 4%. Results from our previous studies suggest that such ratio could be achieved at a moderate technological expense by using an equivalent of two insert modules (an effective sensor thickness of 4 mm).

  16. [Duration and complications following grommet insertion in childhood].

    PubMed

    Fiebach, A; Matschke, R G

    1987-02-01

    We report 1000 insertions of ventilation tubes in 534 children for secretory otitis media (SOM) within a period of 6 years. In 77.5% of the cases, the air-bone gap was greater than 20 dB. The grommets are allowed to undergo spontaneous expulsion which happened in 319 ears, about 7 months after insertion. SOM recurred in 32.6% of the cases once, in 5.0% of the cases twice, and in 1.9% three times, requiring re-insertion of grommets. Recurrence appeared between 4 and 65 months after the first insertion. In three cases perforations of the tympanic membrane persisted and required tympanoplasty. Tympanometric examination and pure tone audiometry are necessary, in addition to pure tone audiometry to follow up successfully ventilated middle ears and to show recurrence as early as possible. Pre-existing but unsuspected sensorineural hearing loss was discovered in 10 cases. The deprivation of neural auditory pathways in early childhood and the possible retardation of speech development caused by SOM are mentioned. Normal hearing is the most important goal of therapy in children suffering from SOM, and insertion of ventilation tubes is the preferred method of achieving that goal safely. Adenoidectomy and treatment of upper airway infections are indispensable parts of the therapy of SOM. Regular follow up after insertion of grommets and even after their expulsion is necessary because of the high rate of late recurrence of SOM. Induction of cholesteatoma by grommets was not observed.

  17. Formation of Gold(III) Alkyls from Gold Alkoxide Complexes

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The gold(III) methoxide complex (C∧N∧C)AuOMe (1) reacts with tris(p-tolyl)phosphine in benzene at room temperature under O abstraction to give the methylgold product (C∧N∧C)AuMe (2) together with O=P(p-tol)3 ((C∧N∧C) = [2,6-(C6H3tBu-4)2pyridine]2–). Calculations show that this reaction is energetically favorable (ΔG = −32.3 kcal mol–1). The side products in this reaction, the Au(II) complex [Au(C∧N∧C)]2 (3) and the phosphorane (p-tol)3P(OMe)2, suggest that at least two reaction pathways may operate, including one involving (C∧N∧C)Au• radicals. Attempts to model the reaction by DFT methods showed that PPh3 can approach 1 to give a near-linear Au–O–P arrangement, without phosphine coordination to gold. The analogous reaction of (C∧N∧C)AuOEt, on the other hand, gives exclusively a mixture of 3 and (p-tol)3P(OEt)2. Whereas the reaction of (C∧N∧C)AuOR (R = But, p-C6H4F) with P(p-tol)3 proceeds over a period of hours, compounds with R = CH2CF3, CH(CF3)2 react almost instantaneously, to give 3 and O=P(p-tol)3. In chlorinated solvents, treatment of the alkoxides (C∧N∧C)AuOR with phosphines generates [(C∧N∧C)Au(PR3)]Cl, via Cl abstraction from the solvent. Attempts to extend the synthesis of gold(III) alkoxides to allyl alcohols were unsuccessful; the reaction of (C∧N∧C)AuOH with an excess of CH2=CHCH2OH in toluene led instead to allyl alcohol isomerization to give a mixture of gold alkyls, (C∧N∧C)AuR′ (R′ = −CH2CH2CHO (10), −CH2CH(CH2OH)OCH2CH=CH2 (11)), while 2-methallyl alcohol affords R′ = CH2CH(Me)CHO (12). The crystal structure of 11 was determined. The formation of Au–C instead of the expected Au–O products is in line with the trend in metal–ligand bond dissociation energies for Au(III): M–H > M–C > M–O.

  18. Native gold in Hawaiian alkalic magma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sisson, T.W.

    2003-01-01

    Native gold found in fresh basanite glass from the early submarine phase of Kilauea volcano, Hawaii, may be the first documented case of the transport of gold as a distinct precious metal phase in a mantle-derived magma. The gold-bearing glass is a grain in bedded volcanic glass sandstone (Japan Marine Science and Technology Center (JAMSTEC) sample S508-R3) collected by the submersible Shinkai 6500 at 3879 m depth off Kilauea's south flank. Extensive outcrops there expose debris-flow breccias and sandstones containing submarine-erupted alkalic rock fragments and glasses from early Kilauea. Precipitation of an immiscible gold liquid resulted from resorption of magmatic sulfides during crystallization-differentiation, with consequent liberation of sulfide-hosted gold. Elevated whole-rock gold concentrations (to 36 ppb) for fresh lavas and clasts from early Kilauea further show that some magmas erupted at the beginning stages of Hawaiian shield volcanoes were distinctly gold rich, most likely owing to limited residual sulfide in their mantle source. Alkalic magmas at other ocean islands may also be gold rich, and oceanic hot-spot provinces may contain underappreciated gold resources.

  19. Gold ink coating of thermocouple sheaths

    DOEpatents

    Ruhl, H. Kenneth

    1992-01-01

    A method is provided for applying a gold ink coating to a thermocouple sheath which includes the steps of electropolishing and oxidizing the surface of the thermocouple sheath, then dipping the sheath into liquid gold ink, and finally heat curing the coating. The gold coating applied in this manner is highly reflective and does not degrade when used for an extended period of time in an environment having a temperature over 1000.degree. F. Depending on the application, a portion of the gold coating covering the tip of the thermocouple sheath is removed by abrasion.

  20. Gold Fever! Seattle Outfits the Klondike Gold Rush. Teaching with Historic Places.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackburn, Marc K.

    This lesson is based on the National Register of Historic Places registration file, "Pioneer Square Historic District," and other sources about Seattle (Washington) and the Klondike Gold Rush. The lesson helps students understand how Seattle exemplified the prosperity of the Klondike Gold Rush after 1897 when news of a gold strike in…

  1. A low voltage programmable unipolar inverter with a gold nanoparticle monolayer on plastic.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ye; Han, Su-Ting; Huang, Long-Biao; Huang, Jing; Yan, Yan; Zhou, Li; Roy, V A L

    2013-05-24

    A programmable low voltage unipolar inverter with saturated-load configuration has been demonstrated on a plastic substrate. A self-assembled monolayer of gold (Au) nanoparticles was inserted into the dielectric layer acting as a charge trapping layer. The inverter operated well with supply voltages of < - 5 V and the switching voltage was tuned in a wide range under low program/erase bias. The retention and endurance test at ambient conditions confirmed the reliability of the inverter. Furthermore, the programmable behavior was maintained well at various bending states, demonstrating the adequate flexibility of our devices.

  2. ECG or X-ray as the 'gold standard' for establishing PICC-tip location?

    PubMed

    Oliver, Gemma; Jones, Matt

    2014-10-22

    Recently there has been an increase in evidence that the tip position of a peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) needs to be accurately placed in the lower third of the superior vena cava at the junction with the right atrium in order to minimise potential complications ( Royal College of Nursing, 2010 ; Infusion Nurses Society, 2011 ). The current 'gold standard' practice of performing a chest X-ray post-insertion of PICC can be fraught with complications with regard to accurately placing the PICC in this position. The purpose of this evaluation is to discuss how using an electrocardiogram-guided PICC placement system may be a preferable method with which to accurately measure the exact position of the PICC within the venous system.

  3. Measurement of differential and integrated fiducial cross sections for Higgs boson production in the four-lepton decay channel in pp collisions at $$ \\sqrt{s}=7 $$ and 8 TeV

    DOE PAGES

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2016-04-01

    Integrated fiducial cross sections for the production of four leptons via the H → 4ℓ decays (ℓ = e, μ) are measured in pp collisions atmore » $$ \\sqrt{s}=7 $$ and 8TeV. Measurements are performed with data corresponding to integrated luminosities of 5.1 fb$$^{–1}$$ at 7TeV, and 19.7 fb$$^{–1}$$ at 8 TeV, collected with the CMS experiment at the LHC. Differential cross sections are measured using the 8 TeV data, and are determined as functions of the transverse momentum and rapidity of the four-lepton system, accompanying jet multiplicity, transverse momentum of the leading jet, and difference in rapidity between the Higgs boson candidate and the leading jet. A measurement of the Z → 4ℓ cross section, and its ratio to the H → 4ℓ cross section is also performed. All cross sections are measured within a fiducial phase space defined by the requirements on lepton kinematics and event topology. Here, the integrated H → 4ℓ fiducial cross section is measured to be 0.56$$_{–0.44}^{+0.67}$$ (stat)$$_{–0.06}^{+0.21}$$ (syst) fb at 7 TeV, and 1.11$$_{–0.35}^{+0.41}$$ (stat)$$_{–0.10}^{+0.14}$$ (syst) fb at 8 TeV. The measurements are found to be compatible with theoretical calculations based on the standard model.« less

  4. Precision fiducialization of transport components

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, G.E.; Bressler, V.E.; Cobb, J.K.; Jensen, D.R.; Ruland, R.E.; Walz, H.V.; Williams, S.H.

    1992-03-01

    The Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) is a transport line designed to test both concept and advanced technology for application to future linear colliders. It is currently under construction at SLAC in the central beam line. Most of the quadrupoles of the FFTB have ab initio alignment tolerances of less than 30 microns, if the planned for beam based alignment tuning procedure is to converge. For such placement tolerances to have any meaning requires that the coordinates of the effective centers, seen by the beam particles, be tansferred to tooling (that can be reached by mechanical or optical alignment methods) located on the outside of the components to comparable or better values. We have constructed an apparatus that simultaneously locates to micron tolerances, the effective magnetic center of fussing lenses, as well as the electrical center of beam position monitors (BPM) imbedded therein, and once located, for transferring these coordinates to specially mounted tooling frames that supported the external retroreflectors used in a laser tracker based alignment of the beam line. Details of construction as well as experimental results from the method are presented.

  5. Development of PET/MRI with insertable PET for simultaneous PET and MR imaging of human brain

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Jin Ho; Choi, Yong Jung, Jiwoong; Kim, Sangsu; Lim, Hyun Keong; Im, Ki Chun; Oh, Chang Hyun; Park, Hyun-wook; Kim, Kyung Min; Kim, Jong Guk

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to develop a dual-modality positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with insertable PET for simultaneous PET and MR imaging of the human brain. Methods: The PET detector block was composed of a 4 × 4 matrix of detector modules, each consisting of a 4 × 4 array LYSO coupled to a 4 × 4 Geiger-mode avalanche photodiode (GAPD) array. The PET insert consisted of 18 detector blocks, circularly mounted on a custom-made plastic base to form a ring with an inner diameter of 390 mm and axial length of 60 mm. The PET gantry was shielded with gold-plated conductive fabric tapes with a thickness of 0.1 mm. The charge signals of PET detector transferred via 4 m long flat cables were fed into the position decoder circuit. The flat cables were shielded with a mesh-type aluminum sheet with a thickness of 0.24 mm. The position decoder circuit and field programmable gate array-embedded DAQ modules were enclosed in an aluminum box with a thickness of 10 mm and located at the rear of the MR bore inside the MRI room. A 3-T human MRI system with a Larmor frequency of 123.7 MHz and inner bore diameter of 60 cm was used as the PET/MRI hybrid system. A custom-made radio frequency (RF) coil with an inner diameter of 25 cm was fabricated. The PET was positioned between gradient and the RF coils. PET performance was measured outside and inside the MRI scanner using echo planar imaging, spin echo, turbo spin echo, and gradient echo sequences. MRI performance was also evaluated with and without the PET insert. The stability of the newly developed PET insert was evaluated and simultaneous PET and MR images of a brain phantom were acquired. Results: No significant degradation of the PET performance caused by MR was observed when the PET was operated using various MR imaging sequences. The signal-to-noise ratio of MR images was slightly degraded due to the PET insert installed inside the MR bore while the homogeneity was

  6. WE-EF-303-01: FEATURED PRESENTATION: Hydrogel Fiducial Markers for In-Vivo Proton Therapy and Range Verifications Using PET

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, J; Cho, S; Campbell, P; Wang, M; Zubarev, E; Alqathami, M; Mawlawi, O; Li, H; Sahoo, N; Kerr, M

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Currently there are no clinically used techniques for in-vivo proton treatment/range verification. Our aim was to develop patient implantable markers that can be visualized in CT/x-ray for treatment-planning/beam-positioning, and also in PET for proton treatment/range verification. Methods: Biocompatible/biodegradable hydrogel polymers were immersed in O18-enriched water and O16 water, respectively to create O18-water hydrogels (0.5 cm3) and O16-water hydrogels (1 cm3) (both >99% water and <1% polymer). Also, 5–8 µm Zn powder was suspended in O16 water and O18-enriched water and cross-linked with hydrogel polymers to create Zn/16O-water hydrogels (30%/70% mass ratio, <1% polymer) and Zn/18O-water hydrogels (10%/90%). A block of extra-firm “wet” tofu (12.3×8.8×4.9 cm, ρ{sup =}1) immersed in water was injected with Zn/O16-water hydrogels (0.9 cm3 each) at four different depths using an 18 gauge needle. Similarly, Zn/18O-water hydrogels (0.9 cm3) were injected in a different tofu phantom. As a reference, both 16O-water and O18-water hydrogels in petri-dishes were irradiated in a “dry” environment. The hydrogels in the “wet” tofu phantoms and “dry” petri-dishes were CT-scanned and treatment-planned. Then, they were positioned at the proton distal dose fall-off region and irradiated (2 Gy) followed by PET/CT imaging. Results: Significantly high PET signals were observed only at O18-water hydrogels in the “dry” environment. Zn/O16-water hydrogels injected in the tofu phantom showed outstanding CT visibility but provided no noticeable PET signals. Zn/O18-water hydrogels in the “wet” tofu showed excellent CT visibility and moderate PET visibility, however, weaker PET signals than the “dry” environment possibly due to O18-water leaching out. Conclusion: The developed hydrogel markers can be used as universal fiducial markers due to their CT/PET/MRI/US visibility. Their PET visibility (possibly contributed more by activated O18

  7. Predictive Parameters of CyberKnife Fiducial-less (XSight Lung) Applicability for Treatment of Early Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Single-Center Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Bahig, Houda; Campeau, Marie-Pierre; Vu, Toni; Doucet, Robert; Béliveau Nadeau, Dominic; Fortin, Bernard; Roberge, David; Lambert, Louise; Carrier, Jean-François; Filion, Edith

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: To determine which parameters allow for CyberKnife fiducial-less tumor tracking in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 133 lung SBRT patients were preselected for direct soft-tissue tracking based on manufacturer recommendations (peripherally located tumors ≥1.5 cm with a dense appearance) and staff experience. Patients underwent a tumor visualization test to verify adequate detection by the tracking system (orthogonal radiographs). An analysis of potential predictors of successful tumor tracking was conducted looking at: tumor stage, size, histology, tumor projection on the vertebral column or mediastinum, distance to the diaphragm, lung-to-soft tissue ratio, and patient body mass index. Results: Tumor visualization was satisfactory for 88 patients (66%) and unsatisfactory for 45 patients (34%). Median time to treatment start was 6 days in the success group (range, 2-18 days) and 15 days (range, 3-63 days) in the failure group. A stage T2 (P=.04), larger tumor size (volume of 15.3 cm{sup 3} vs 6.5 cm{sup 3} in success and failure group, respectively) (P<.0001), and higher tumor density (0.86 g/cm{sup 3} vs 0.79 g/cm{sup 3}) were predictive of adequate detection. There was a 63% decrease in failure risk with every 1-cm increase in maximum tumor dimension (relative risk for failure = 0.37, CI=0.23-0.60, P=.001). A diameter of 3.6 cm predicted a success probability of 80%. Histology, lung-to-soft tissue ratio, distance to diaphragm, patient's body mass index, and tumor projection on vertebral column and mediastinum were not found to be predictive of success. Conclusions: Tumor size, volume, and density were the most predictive factors of a successful XSight Lung tumor tracking. Tumors >3.5 cm have ≥80% chance of being adequately visualized and therefore should all be considered for direct tumor tracking.

  8. Gold nanorod plasmonic upconversion microlaser.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ce; Soltani, Soheil; Armani, Andrea M

    2013-01-01

    Plasmonic-photonic interactions have stimulated significant interdisciplinary interest, leading to rapid innovations in solar design and biosensors. However, the development of an optically pumped plasmonic laser has failed to keep pace due to the difficulty of integrating a plasmonic gain material with a suitable pump source. In the present work, we develop a method for coating high quality factor toroidal optical cavities with gold nanorods, forming a photonic-plasmonic laser. By leveraging the two-photon upconversion capability of the nanorods, lasing at 581 nm with a 20 μW threshold is demonstrated.

  9. Precision gold conductors for HMCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widmer, M. R.

    1994-08-01

    Ti/Pd/Au multiple code coded switch (MCCS) networks were built and compared to Cr/Au MCCS networks. The data showed no measurable difference between the two systems. Interface resistance of both types of networks was measured as a diagnostic aid to determine if hydrogen was affecting the Ti/Pd/Au MCCS networks. The data showed that although hydrogen does affect Ti/Pd/Au, the changes are not significant with respect to MCCS environments. An evaluation of several proprietary gold electroplating solutions for use in the production of Ti/Pd/Au conductors was performed. All the testing results were comparable to the current product requirements.

  10. Measurements of fiducial and differential cross sections for Higgs boson production in the diphoton decay channel in pp collisions at √{ s} = 13 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mistry, Khilesh; Atlas Experiment Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    This talk will present the preliminary measurements of the Higgs boson properties measured in the H -> γγ decay channel in pp collisions at √{ s} = 13 TeV with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. Fiducial cross sections in several phase space regions and differential cross sections as a function of several kinematic variables will be shown. Cross section results from gluon fusion, vector boson fusion, and Higgs boson production in association with a vector boson or a top-antitop pair will also be presented.

  11. SU-E-J-24: Can Fiducial Marker-Based Setup Using ExacTrac Be An Alternative to Soft Tissue-Based Setup Using Cone-Beam CT for Prostate IMRT?

    SciTech Connect

    Tanabe, S; Utsunomiya, S; Abe, E; Aoyama, H; Satou, H; Sakai, H; Yamada, T

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To assess an accuracy of fiducial maker-based setup using ExacTrac (ExT-based setup) as compared with soft tissue-based setup using Cone-beam CT (CBCT-based setup) for patients with prostate cancer receiving intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for the purpose of investigating whether ExT-based setup can be an alternative to CBCT-based setup. Methods: The setup accuracy was analyzed prospectively for 7 prostate cancer patients with implanted three fiducial markers received IMRT. All patients were treated after CBCT-based setup was performed and corresponding shifts were recorded. ExacTrac images were obtained before and after CBCT-based setup. The fiducial marker-based shifts were calculated based on those two images and recorded on the assumption that the setup correction was carried out by fiducial marker-based auto correction. Mean and standard deviation of absolute differences and the correlation between CBCT and ExT shifts were estimated. Results: A total of 178 image dataset were analyzed. On the differences between CBCT and ExT shifts, 133 (75%) of 178 image dataset resulted in smaller differences than 3 mm in all dimensions. Mean differences in the anterior-posterior (AP), superior-inferior (SI), and left-right (LR) dimensions were 1.8 ± 1.9 mm, 0.7 ± 1.9 mm, and 0.6 ± 0.8 mm, respectively. The percentages of shift agreements within ±3 mm were 76% for AP, 90% for SI, and 100% for LR. The Pearson coefficient of correlation for CBCT and ExT shifts were 0.80 for AP, 0.80 for SI, and 0.65 for LR. Conclusion: This work showed that the accuracy of ExT-based setup was correlated with that of CBCT-based setup, implying that ExT-based setup has a potential ability to be an alternative to CBCT-based setup. The further work is to specify the conditions that ExT-based setup can provide the accuracy comparable to CBCT-based setup.

  12. Comparison of large-insert, small-insert and pyrosequencing libraries for metagenomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Danhorn, Thomas; Young, Curtis R; DeLong, Edward F

    2012-11-01

    The development of DNA sequencing methods for characterizing microbial communities has evolved rapidly over the past decades. To evaluate more traditional, as well as newer methodologies for DNA library preparation and sequencing, we compared fosmid, short-insert shotgun and 454 pyrosequencing libraries prepared from the same metagenomic DNA samples. GC content was elevated in all fosmid libraries, compared with shotgun and 454 libraries. Taxonomic composition of the different libraries suggested that this was caused by a relative underrepresentation of dominant taxonomic groups with low GC content, notably Prochlorales and the SAR11 cluster, in fosmid libraries. While these abundant taxa had a large impact on library representation, we also observed a positive correlation between taxon GC content and fosmid library representation in other low-GC taxa, suggesting a general trend. Analysis of gene category representation in different libraries indicated that the functional composition of a library was largely a reflection of its taxonomic composition, and no additional systematic biases against particular functional categories were detected at the level of sequencing depth in our samples. Another important but less predictable factor influencing the apparent taxonomic and functional library composition was the read length afforded by the different sequencing technologies. Our comparisons and analyses provide a detailed perspective on the influence of library type on the recovery of microbial taxa in metagenomic libraries and underscore the different uses and utilities of more traditional, as well as contemporary 'next-generation' DNA library construction and sequencing technologies for exploring the genomics of the natural microbial world.

  13. 16 CFR Appendix to Part 23 - Exemptions Recognized in the Assay for Quality of Gold Alloy, Gold Filled, Gold Overlay, Rolled...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Quality of Gold Alloy, Gold Filled, Gold Overlay, Rolled Gold Plate, Silver, and Platinum Industry..., Silver, and Platinum Industry Products (a) Exemptions recognized in the industry and not to be considered... in any assay for quality of a silver industry product include screws, rivets, springs, spring...

  14. 16 CFR Appendix to Part 23 - Exemptions Recognized in the Assay for Quality of Gold Alloy, Gold Filled, Gold Overlay, Rolled...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Quality of Gold Alloy, Gold Filled, Gold Overlay, Rolled Gold Plate, Silver, and Platinum Industry..., Silver, and Platinum Industry Products (a) Exemptions recognized in the industry and not to be considered... in any assay for quality of a silver industry product include screws, rivets, springs, spring...

  15. Focus on peripherally inserted central catheters in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Cotogni, Paolo; Pittiruti, Mauro

    2014-01-01

    Venous access devices are of pivotal importance for an increasing number of critically ill patients in a variety of disease states and in a variety of clinical settings (emergency, intensive care, surgery) and for different purposes (fluids or drugs infusions, parenteral nutrition, antibiotic therapy, hemodynamic monitoring, procedures of dialysis/apheresis). However, healthcare professionals are commonly worried about the possible consequences that may result using a central venous access device (CVAD) (mainly, bloodstream infections and thrombosis), both peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) and centrally inserted central catheters (CICCs). This review aims to discuss indications, insertion techniques, and care of PICCs in critically ill patients. PICCs have many advantages over standard CICCs. First of all, their insertion is easy and safe -due to their placement into peripheral veins of the arm- and the advantage of a central location of catheter tip suitable for all osmolarity and pH solutions. Using the ultrasound-guidance for the PICC insertion, the risk of hemothorax and pneumothorax can be avoided, as well as the possibility of primary malposition is very low. PICC placement is also appropriate to avoid post-procedural hemorrhage in patients with an abnormal coagulative state who need a CVAD. Some limits previously ascribed to PICCs (i.e., low flow rates, difficult central venous pressure monitoring, lack of safety for radio-diagnostic procedures, single-lumen) have delayed their start up in the intensive care units as common practice. Though, the recent development of power-injectable PICCs overcomes these technical limitations and PICCs have started to spread in critical care settings. Two important take-home messages may be drawn from this review. First, the incidence of complications varies depending on venous accesses and healthcare professionals should be aware of the different clinical performance as well as of the different risks

  16. Patterns of Transposable Element Expression and Insertion in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Clayton, Evan A.; Wang, Lu; Rishishwar, Lavanya; Wang, Jianrong; McDonald, John F.; Jordan, I. King

    2016-01-01

    Human transposable element (TE) activity in somatic tissues causes mutations that can contribute to tumorigenesis. Indeed, TE insertion mutations have been implicated in the etiology of a number of different cancer types. Nevertheless, the full extent of somatic TE activity, along with its relationship to tumorigenesis, have yet to be fully explored. Recent developments in bioinformatics software make it possible to analyze TE expression levels and TE insertional activity directly from transcriptome (RNA-seq) and whole genome (DNA-seq) next-generation sequence data. We applied these new sequence analysis techniques to matched normal and primary tumor patient samples from the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) in order to analyze the patterns of TE expression and insertion for three cancer types: breast invasive carcinoma, head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, and lung adenocarcinoma. Our analysis focused on the three most abundant families of active human TEs: Alu, SVA, and L1. We found evidence for high levels of somatic TE activity for these three families in normal and cancer samples across diverse tissue types. Abundant transcripts for all three TE families were detected in both normal and cancer tissues along with an average of ~80 unique TE insertions per individual patient/tissue. We observed an increase in L1 transcript expression and L1 insertional activity in primary tumor samples for all three cancer types. Tumor-specific TE insertions are enriched for private mutations, consistent with a potentially causal role in tumorigenesis. We used genome feature analysis to investigate two specific cases of putative cancer-causing TE mutations in further detail. An Alu insertion in an upstream enhancer of the CBL tumor suppressor gene is associated with down-regulation of the gene in a single breast cancer patient, and an L1 insertion in the first exon of the BAALC gene also disrupts its expression in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Our results are consistent with

  17. A Placer-Gold Evaluation Exercise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tunley, A. Tom

    1984-01-01

    A laboratory exercise allowing students to use drillhole data to simulate the process of locating a placer gold paystreak is presented. As part of the activity students arithmetically compute the value of their gold, mining costs, and personal profits or losses, and decide on development plans for the claim. (BC)

  18. RF Sputtering of Gold Contacts On Niobium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barr, D. W.

    1983-01-01

    Reliable gold contacts are deposited on niobium by combination of RF sputtering and photolithography. Process results in structures having gold only where desired for electrical contact. Contacts are stable under repeated cycling from room temperature to 4.2 K and show room-temperature contact resistance as much as 40 percent below indium contacts made by thermalcompression bonding.

  19. Sesquicentennial: Gold Rush to Golden Statehood.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sabato, George

    1998-01-01

    Provides an annotated bibliography of educational resources that can be used to support instructional units on the Gold Rush or the sesquicentennial of California's statehood. The materials include workbooks, videos, teacher's guides, monographs, and magazines. Offers a brief history of the Gold Rush and a set of relevant discussion questions.…

  20. Gold-nickel-titanium brazing alloy

    DOEpatents

    Mizuhara, Howard

    1990-07-03

    A brazing alloy in accordance with this invention has the following composition, by weight: 91 to 99% gold, 0.5 to 7% nickel; 0.10 to 2% titanium. Alternatively, with palladium present, the composition is as follows, by weight: 83 to 96% gold; 3 to 10% palladium; 0.5 to 5% nickel; 0.10 to 2% titanium.

  1. The Gold Mining Camp: A Simulation Game.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoltman, Joseph P.; Keach, Everett T., Jr.

    This economics simulation game complements the third grade Gold Mining Unit developed by Project Social Studies at the University of Minnesota. The simulation is designed for three purposes: 1) to reinforce the prior learning which occurs in the gold mining camp unit; 2) to involve eight-year-olds in the process of solving simulated economic…

  2. Gold-nickel-titanium brazing alloy

    DOEpatents

    Mizuhara, Howard

    1995-01-03

    A brazing alloy in accordance with this invention has the following composition, by weight: 91 to 99 gold, 0.5 to 7% nickel; 0.10 to 2% titanium. Alternatively, with palladium present, the composition is as follows, by weight: 83 to 96% gold; 3 to 10% palladium; 0.5 to 5% nickel; 0.10 to 2% titanium.

  3. Gold-Collar Workers. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wonacott, Michael E.

    The gold-collar worker has problem-solving abilities, creativity, talent, and intelligence; performs non-repetitive and complex work difficult to evaluate; and prefers self management. Gold-collar information technology workers learn continually from experience; recognize the synergy of teams; can demonstrate leadership; and are strategic thinkers…

  4. LMA Supreme insertion by novices in manikins and patients.

    PubMed

    Howes, B W; Wharton, N M; Gibbison, B; Cook, T M

    2010-04-01

    The LMA Supreme has been suggested for use in emergency situations by medical personnel with no experience in endotracheal intubation. We evaluated the LMA Supreme when inserted by non-anaesthetists, firstly in a manikin and then in patients. Fifty airway novices inserted a LMA Supreme in a manikin without any complications so we proceeded to the patient phase. Fifty airway novices inserted the LMA Supreme in anaesthetised patients undergoing elective surgery. First time insertion success rate was 86% and overall insertion success rate was 100%. Mechanical ventilation was successful in all cases. Median (IQR [range]) time to establish an airway was 34 s (26-40 [18-145] s). Median (IQR [range]) pharyngeal seal pressure was 23 cmH(2)O (19-28 [13-40] cmH(2)O). There were no important complications. Results are consistent with previous studies of use of the LMA Supreme by airway experts. We conclude that the LMA supreme is suitable for use by airway novices. Further research is needed before it may be recommended for cardiopulmonary resuscitation and emergency airway use.

  5. Quantitative assessment of insertion sequence impact on bacterial genome architecture

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Brian; Wright, Meredith S.

    2016-01-01

    Insertion sequence (IS) elements are important mediators of genome plasticity and can lead to phenotypic changes with evolutionary significance. In multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii and Klebsiella pneumoniae, IS elements have contributed significantly to the mobilization of genes that encode resistance to antimicrobial drugs. A systematic analysis of IS elements is needed for a more comprehensive understanding of their evolutionary impact. We developed a computational approach (ISseeker) to annotate IS elements in draft genome assemblies and applied the method to analysis of IS elements in all publicly available A. baumannii(>1000) and K. pneumoniae(>800) genome sequences, in a phylogenetic context. Most IS elements in A. baumanniigenomes are species-specific ISAba elements, whereas K. pneumoniaegenomes contain significant numbers of both ISKpn elements and elements that are found throughout the Enterobacteriaceae. A. baumanniigenomes have a higher density of IS elements than K. pneumoniae, averaging ~33 vs ~27 copies per genome. In K. pneumoniae, several insertion sites are shared by most genomes in the ST258 clade, whereas in A. baumannii, different IS elements are abundant in different phylogenetic groups, even among closely related Global Clone 2 strains. IS elements differ in the distribution of insertion locations relative to genes, with some more likely to disrupt genes and others predominantly in intergenic regions. Several genes and intergenic regions had multiple independent insertion events, suggesting that those events may confer a selective advantage. Genome- and taxon-wide characterization of insertion locations revealed that IS elements have been active contributors to genome diversity in both species.

  6. Seamless lesion insertion in digital mammography: methodology and reader study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pezeshk, Aria; Petrick, Nicholas; Sahiner, Berkman

    2016-03-01

    Collection of large repositories of clinical images containing verified cancer locations is costly and time consuming due to difficulties associated with both the accumulation of data and establishment of the ground truth. This problem poses a significant challenge to the development of machine learning algorithms that require large amounts of data to properly train and avoid overfitting. In this paper we expand the methods in our previous publications by making several modifications that significantly increase the speed of our insertion algorithms, thereby allowing them to be used for inserting lesions that are much larger in size. These algorithms have been incorporated into an image composition tool that we have made publicly available. This tool allows users to modify or supplement existing datasets by seamlessly inserting a real breast mass or micro-calcification cluster extracted from a source digital mammogram into a different location on another mammogram. We demonstrate examples of the performance of this tool on clinical cases taken from the University of South Florida Digital Database for Screening Mammography (DDSM). Finally, we report the results of a reader study evaluating the realism of inserted lesions compared to clinical lesions. Analysis of the radiologist scores in the study using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) methodology indicates that inserted lesions cannot be reliably distinguished from clinical lesions.

  7. Some physical and chemical indices of clique-inserted lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zuhe

    2013-10-01

    The operation of replacing every vertex of an r-regular lattice H by a complete graph of order r is called clique-insertion, and the resulting lattice is called the clique-inserted lattice of H. For any given r-regular lattice, applying this operation iteratively, an infinite family of r-regular lattices is generated. Some interesting lattices including the 3-12-12 lattice can be constructed this way. In this paper, we recall the relationship between the spectra of an r-regular lattice and that of its clique-inserted lattice, and investigate the graph energy and resistance distance statistics. As an application, the asymptotic energy per vertex and average resistance distance of the 3-12-12 and 3-6-24 lattices are computed. We also give formulae expressing the numbers of spanning trees and dimer coverings of the kth iterated clique-inserted lattices in terms of those of the original one. Moreover, we show that new families of expander graphs can be constructed from the known ones by clique-insertion.

  8. Customizable engineered blood vessels using 3D printed inserts.

    PubMed

    Pinnock, Cameron B; Meier, Elizabeth M; Joshi, Neeraj N; Wu, Bin; Lam, Mai T

    2016-04-15

    Current techniques for tissue engineering blood vessels are not customizable for vascular size variation and vessel wall thickness. These critical parameters vary widely between the different arteries in the human body, and the ability to engineer vessels of varying sizes could increase capabilities for disease modeling and treatment options. We present an innovative method for producing customizable, tissue engineered, self-organizing vascular constructs by replicating a major structural component of blood vessels - the smooth muscle layer, or tunica media. We utilize a unique system combining 3D printed plate inserts to control construct size and shape, and cell sheets supported by a temporary fibrin hydrogel to encourage cellular self-organization into a tubular form resembling a natural artery. To form the vascular construct, 3D printed inserts are adhered to tissue culture plates, fibrin hydrogel is deposited around the inserts, and human aortic smooth muscle cells are then seeded atop the fibrin hydrogel. The gel, aided by the innate contractile properties of the smooth muscle cells, aggregates towards the center post insert, creating a tissue ring of smooth muscle cells. These rings are then stacked into the final tubular construct. Our methodology is robust, easily repeatable and allows for customization of cellular composition, vessel wall thickness, and length of the vessel construct merely by varying the size of the 3D printed inserts. This platform has potential for facilitating more accurate modeling of vascular pathology, serving as a drug discovery tool, or for vessel repair in disease treatment.

  9. EGFR exon 20 insertion mutation in Japanese lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Hidefumi; Endo, Katsuhiko; Takada, Minoru; Kawahara, Masaaki; Kitahara, Naoto; Tanaka, Hisaichi; Okumura, Meinoshin; Matsumura, Akihide; Iuchi, Keiji; Kawaguchi, Tomoya; Kawano, Osamu; Yukiue, Haruhiro; Yokoyama, Tomoki; Yano, Motoki; Fujii, Yoshitaka

    2007-12-01

    Mutations of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene have been reported in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), especially in female, never smoker patients with adenocarcinoma. Some common somatic mutations in EGFR, including deletion mutations in exon 19 and leucine to arginine substitution at amino acid position 858 (L858R) in exon 21, have been examined for their ability to predict sensitivity to gefitinib or erlotinib. On the other hand, previous report has shown that the insertion mutation at exon 20 is related to gefitinib resistance. We investigated the exon 20 EGFR mutation statuses in 322 surgically treated non-small cell lung cancer cases. Two hundred and five adenocarcinoma cases were included. The presence or absence of EGFR mutations of kinase domains was analyzed by direct sequences. EGFR insertion mutations at exon 20 were found from 7 of 322 (2.17%) lung cancer patients. We also detected the 18 deletion type mutations in exon 19, and 25 L858R type mutations in exon 21. There was a tendency towards higher exon 20 insertion ratio in never smoker (never smoker 4.4% versus smoker 1.3%, p=0.0996) and female (female 4.5% versus male 1.3%, p=0.0917). Two exon 20 insertion cases were treated with gefitinib and failed to response. EGFR insertion mutation in exon 20 could not be ignored from Japanese lung cancers.

  10. Recombination of an intrachromosomal paracentric insertion of chromosome 3

    SciTech Connect

    Best, R.G.; Burnett, W.J.; Brock, J.K.

    1994-09-01

    Cytogenetic studies were initiated on a newborn female due to multiple congenital anomalies including microcephaly, clinodactyly, abnormal positioning of hands, left facial palsy, heart defect, sacral dimple, and facial dysmorphic features. Facial features were described as low set rotated ears, nystagmus, and a small, flattened nose. A structural rearrangement of the long arm of chromosome 3 was observed with a complex banding pattern. Study of parental chromosomes revealed a normal male pattern for the father, and an intrachromosomal insertion on the long arm of chromosome 3 for the mother described as 46,XX,dir ins(3)(q21q23q26.2). Further characterization of the proband`s structurally abnormal chromosome 3 revealed a karyotype best described as: 46,XX,rec(3),dupq23{r_arrow}q26.2::q21{r_arrow}q23,dir ins(3)(q21q23q26.2), which is a partial duplication of both the inserted segment as well as the intervening segment between the inserted segment and the insertion site. This would appear to be the result of a three-strand double cross-over within the insertion loop. Molecular cytogenetic studies are presently underway to further elucidate chromosome structure of the proband and her mother.

  11. Direct insertion of metal ions into tetrasulfonated phthalocyanine

    SciTech Connect

    Linkous, C.A.; Shea, C.E.; Jaber, M.R.A. )

    1989-07-01

    A series of metal salts were reacted with aqueous solutions of the tetrasulfonated free base phthalocyanine (H{sub 2}TsPc) in an attempt to prepare the corresponding metal TsPc derivative by direct insertion instead of the usual template reaction in a urea melt. Spectrophotometric analysis showed that Ni{sup 2+}, Cu{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, Co{sup 2+}, Fe{sup 2+}, Mn{sup 2+}, Pd{sup 2+}, Cd{sup 2+}, and Sn{sup 2+} could be successfully inserted; higher oxidation states as well as Pb{sup 2+} caused precipitation. Reducing species such as Cr{sup 2+} and V{sup 2+} reduced H{sub 2}TsPc but did not insert; Sn{sup 2+} inserted with formation of an air-sensitive intermediate species. Mg{sup 2+}, VO{sup 2+}, Pt{sup 2+}, and Hg{sup 2+} were unreactive. It is recommended that insertion may be the preferable method for synthesis of the MTsPc's listed above when air sensitivity, reaction time, and microscale are important issues in an overall synthetic scheme. 24 refs., 4 figs.

  12. Gold of the Pharaohs 6000 years of gold mining in Egypt and Nubia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klemm, Dietrich; Klemm, Rosemarie; Murr, Andreas

    2001-08-01

    The legendary wealth in gold of ancient Egypt seems to correspond with an unexpected high number of gold production sites in the Eastern Desert of Egypt and Nubia. This contribution introduces briefly the general geology of these vast regions and discusses the geology of the different varieties of the primary gold occurrences (always related to auriferous quartz mineralization in veins or shear zones) as well as the variable physico-chemical genesis of the gold concentrations. The development of gold mining over time, from Predynastic (ca. 3000 BC) until the end of Arab gold production times (about 1350 AD), including the spectacular Pharaonic periods is outlined, with examples of its remaining artefacts, settlements and mining sites in remote regions of the Eastern Desert of Egypt and Nubia. Finally, some estimates on the scale of gold production are presented.

  13. Preparation of conductive gold nanowires in confined environment of gold-filled polymer nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Mitschang, Fabian; Langner, Markus; Vieker, Henning; Beyer, André; Greiner, Andreas

    2015-02-01

    Continuous conductive gold nanofibers are prepared via the "tubes by fiber templates" process. First, poly(l-lactide) (PLLA)-stabilized gold nanoparticles (AuNP) with over 60 wt% gold are synthesized and characterized, including gel permeation chromatography coupled with a diode array detector. Subsequent electrospinning of these AuNP with template PLLA results in composite nanofibers featuring a high gold content of 57 wt%. Highly homogeneous gold nanowires are obtained after chemical vapor deposition of 345 nm of poly(p-xylylene) (PPX) onto the composite fibers followed by pyrolysis of the polymers at 1050 °C. The corresponding heat-induced transition from continuous gold-loaded polymer tubes to smooth gold nanofibers is studied by transmission electron microscopy and helium ion microscopy using both secondary electrons and Rutherford backscattered ions.

  14. Gold emissivities for hydrocode applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowen, C.; Wagon, F.; Galmiche, D.; Loiseau, P.; Dattolo, E.; Babonneau, D.

    2004-10-01

    The Radiom model [M. Busquet, Phys Fluids B 5, 4191 (1993)] is designed to provide a radiative-hydrodynamic code with non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) data efficiently by using LTE tables. Comparison with benchmark data [M. Klapisch and A. Bar-Shalom, J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Transf. 58, 687 (1997)] has shown Radiom to be inaccurate far from LTE and for heavy ions. In particular, the emissivity was found to be strongly underestimated. A recent algorithm, Gondor [C. Bowen and P. Kaiser, J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Transf. 81, 85 (2003)], was introduced to improve the gold non-LTE ionization and corresponding opacity. It relies on fitting the collisional ionization rate to reproduce benchmark data given by the Averroès superconfiguration code [O. Peyrusse, J. Phys. B 33, 4303 (2000)]. Gondor is extended here to gold emissivity calculations, with two simple modifications of the two-level atom line source function used by Radiom: (a) a larger collisional excitation rate and (b) the addition of a Planckian source term, fitted to spectrally integrated Averroès emissivity data. This approach improves the agreement between experiments and hydrodynamic simulations.

  15. Switchable imbibition in nanoporous gold

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Yahui; Markmann, Jürgen; Duan, Huiling; Weissmüller, Jörg; Huber, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Spontaneous imbibition enables the elegant propelling of nano-flows because of the dominance of capillarity at small length scales. The imbibition kinetics are, however, solely determined by the static host geometry, the capillarity, and the fluidity of the imbibed liquid. This makes active control particularly challenging. Here we show for aqueous electrolyte imbibition in nanoporous gold that the fluid flow can be reversibly switched on and off through electric potential control of the solid–liquid interfacial tension, that is, we can accelerate the imbibition front, stop it, and have it proceed at will. Simultaneous measurements of the mass flux and the electrical current allow us to document simple scaling laws for the imbibition kinetics, and to explore the charge transport in the metallic nanopores. Our findings demonstrate that the high electric conductivity along with the pathways for fluid/ionic transport render nanoporous gold a versatile, accurately controllable electrocapillary pump and flow sensor for minute amounts of liquids with exceptionally low operating voltages. PMID:24980062

  16. The interaction of gold with gallium arsenide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weizer, Victor G.; Fatemi, Navid S.

    1988-01-01

    Gold and gold-based alloys, commonly used as solar-cell contact materials, are known to react readily with gallium arsenide. Experiments designed to identify the mechanisms involved in these GaAs-metal interactions have yielded several interesting results. It is shown that the reaction of GaAs with gold takes place via a dissociative diffusion process. It is shown further that the GaAs-metal reaction rate is controlled to a very great extent by the condition of the free surface of the contact metal, an interesting example of which is the previously unexplained increase in the reaction rate that has been observed for samples annealed in a vacuum environment as compared to those annealed in a gaseous ambient. A number of other hard-to-explain observations, such as the low-temperature formation of voids in the gold lattice and crystallite growth on the gold surface, are also explained by invoking this mechanism.

  17. Synthesis of camptothecin-loaded gold nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Zhimin; Liu, Zhiguo; Zu, Yuangang; Fu, Yujie; Zhao, Chunjian; Zhao, Xiuhua; Meng, Ronghua; Tan, Shengnan

    2010-04-01

    Camptothecin-loaded gold nanomaterials have been synthesized by the sodium borohydride reduction method under a strong basic condition. The obtained gold nanomaterials have been characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and UV-vis absorption spectroscopy. The camptothecin-loaded gold colloidal solution was very stable and can be stored for more than two months at room temperature without obvious changes. The color of the colloidal solution can change from wine red to purple and blue during the acidifying process. It was revealed that the release of camptothecin and the aggregation of gold nanoparticles can be controlled by tuning the solution pH. The present study implied that the gold nanomaterials can be used as the potential carrier for CPT delivery.

  18. Ordering Gold Nanoparticles with DNA Origami Nanoflowers.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Robert; Santiago, Ibon; Ardavan, Arzhang; Turberfield, Andrew J

    2016-08-23

    Nanostructured materials, including plasmonic metamaterials made from gold and silver nanoparticles, provide access to new materials properties. The assembly of nanoparticles into extended arrays can be controlled through surface functionalization and the use of increasingly sophisticated linkers. We present a versatile way to control the bonding symmetry of gold nanoparticles by wrapping them in flower-shaped DNA origami structures. These "nanoflowers" assemble into two-dimensonal gold nanoparticle lattices with symmetries that can be controlled through auxiliary DNA linker strands. Nanoflower lattices are true composites: interactions between the gold nanoparticles are mediated entirely by DNA, and the DNA origami will fold into its designed form only in the presence of the gold nanoparticles.

  19. Tailored nanoporous gold for ultrahigh fluorescence enhancement.

    PubMed

    Lang, X Y; Guan, P F; Fujita, T; Chen, M W

    2011-03-07

    We report molecular fluorescence enhancement of free-standing nanoporous gold in which the nanoporosity can be arbitrarily tailored by the combination of dealloying and electroless gold plating. The nanoporous gold fabricated by this facile method possesses unique porous structures with large gold ligaments and very small pores, and exhibits significant improvements in surface enhanced fluorescence as well as structure rigidity. It demonstrates that the confluence effect of improved quantum yield and excitation of fluorophores is responsible for the large fluorescence enhancement due to the near-field enhancement of nanoporous gold, which arises from the strong electromagnetic coupling between neighboring ligaments and the weakening of plasmon damping of the large ligaments because of the small pore size and large ligament size, respectively.

  20. Magnetically mediated vortexlike assembly of gold nanoshells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jianfei; Dong, Jian; Sun, Dongke; Guo, Zhirui; Gu, Ning

    2012-04-24

    Gold nanoshells currently attract increasing research interests due to the important role in many subjects. For practical applications, random arrangement of the nanoparticles is often unfavored so that the assembly of gold nanoshells is becoming a central issue. We here proposed to utilize time-variant magnetic field to direct the assembly of gold nanoshells. It was discovered that the alternating magnetic field can mediate the vortex-like assembly of gold nanoshells. The mechanism was explored and thought to be relative with the electric field of induction which caused the thermal gradient on the substrate and the electric force. The vortexlike structure as well as the assembly mechanism will play an important role in research and application of gold nanomaterials.