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Sample records for governs virulence expression

  1. Chromosomal “Stress-Response” Domains Govern the Spatiotemporal Expression of the Bacterial Virulence Program

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xuejiao; Sobetzko, Patrick; Reverchon, Sylvie; Muskhelishvili, Georgi

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Recent studies strongly suggest that the gene expression sustaining both normal and pathogenic bacterial growth is governed by the structural dynamics of the chromosome. However, the mechanistic device coordinating the chromosomal configuration with selective expression of the adaptive traits remains largely unknown. We used a holistic approach exploring the inherent relationships between the physicochemical properties of the DNA and the expression of adaptive traits, including virulence factors, in the pathogen Dickeya dadantii (formerly Erwinia chrysanthemi). In the transcriptomes obtained under adverse conditions encountered during bacterial infection, we explored the patterns of chromosomal DNA sequence organization, supercoil dynamics, and gene expression densities, together with the long-range regulatory impacts of the abundant DNA architectural proteins implicated in pathogenicity control. By integrating these data, we identified transient chromosomal domains of coherent gene expression featuring distinct couplings between DNA thermodynamic stability, supercoil dynamics, and virulence traits. PMID:25922390

  2. Regulatory principles governing Salmonella and Yersinia virulence

    PubMed Central

    Erhardt, Marc; Dersch, Petra

    2015-01-01

    Enteric pathogens such as Salmonella and Yersinia evolved numerous strategies to survive and proliferate in different environmental reservoirs and mammalian hosts. Deciphering common and pathogen-specific principles for how these bacteria adjust and coordinate spatiotemporal expression of virulence determinants, stress adaptation, and metabolic functions is fundamental to understand microbial pathogenesis. In order to manage sudden environmental changes, attacks by the host immune systems and microbial competition, the pathogens employ a plethora of transcriptional and post-transcriptional control elements, including transcription factors, sensory and regulatory RNAs, RNAses, and proteases, to fine-tune and control complex gene regulatory networks. Many of the contributing global regulators and the molecular mechanisms of regulation are frequently conserved between Yersinia and Salmonella. However, the interplay, arrangement, and composition of the control elements vary between these closely related enteric pathogens, which generate phenotypic differences leading to distinct pathogenic properties. In this overview we present common and different regulatory networks used by Salmonella and Yersinia to coordinate the expression of crucial motility, cell adhesion and invasion determinants, immune defense strategies, and metabolic adaptation processes. We highlight evolutionary changes of the gene regulatory circuits that result in different properties of the regulatory elements and how this influences the overall outcome of the infection process. PMID:26441883

  3. Carbohydrate Availability Regulates Virulence Gene Expression in Streptococcus suis

    PubMed Central

    Ferrando, M. Laura; van Baarlen, Peter; Orrù, Germano; Piga, Rosaria; Bongers, Roger S.; Wels, Michiel; De Greeff, Astrid; Smith, Hilde E.; Wells, Jerry M.

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus suis is a major bacterial pathogen of young pigs causing worldwide economic problems for the pig industry. S. suis is also an emerging pathogen of humans. Colonization of porcine oropharynx by S. suis is considered to be a high risk factor for invasive disease. In the oropharyngeal cavity, where glucose is rapidly absorbed but dietary α-glucans persist, there is a profound effect of carbohydrate availability on the expression of virulence genes. Nineteen predicted or confirmed S. suis virulence genes that promote adhesion to and invasion of epithelial cells were expressed at higher levels when S. suis was supplied with the α-glucan starch/pullulan compared to glucose as the single carbon source. Additionally the production of suilysin, a toxin that damages epithelial cells, was increased more than ten-fold when glucose levels were low and S. suis was growing on pullulan. Based on biochemical, bioinformatics and in vitro and in vivo gene expression studies, we developed a biological model that postulates the effect of carbon catabolite repression on expression of virulence genes in the mucosa, organs and blood. This research increases our understanding of S. suis virulence mechanisms and has important implications for the design of future control strategies including the development of anti-infective strategies by modulating animal feed composition. PMID:24642967

  4. Calcineurin governs thermotolerance and virulence of Cryptococcus gattii.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying-Lien; Lehman, Virginia N; Lewit, Yonathan; Averette, Anna F; Heitman, Joseph

    2013-03-01

    The pathogenic yeast Cryptococcus gattii, which is causing an outbreak in the Pacific Northwest region of North America, causes life-threatening pulmonary infections and meningoencephalitis in healthy individuals, unlike Cryptococcus neoformans, which commonly infects immunocompromised patients. In addition to a greater predilection for C. gattii to infect healthy hosts, the C. gattii genome sequence project revealed extensive chromosomal rearrangements compared with C. neoformans, showing genomic differences between the two Cryptococcus species. We investigated the roles of C. gattii calcineurin in three molecular types: VGIIa (R265), VGIIb (R272), and VGI (WM276). We found that calcineurin exhibits a differential requirement for growth on solid medium at 37°, as calcineurin mutants generated from R265 were more thermotolerant than mutants from R272 and WM276. We demonstrated that tolerance to calcineurin inhibitors (FK506, CsA) at 37° is linked with the VGIIa molecular type. The calcineurin mutants from the R272 background showed the most extensive growth and morphological defects (multivesicle and larger ring-like cells), as well as increased fluconazole susceptibility. Our cellular architecture examination showed that C. gattii and C. neoformans calcineurin mutants exhibit plasma membrane disruptions. Calcineurin in the C. gattii VGII molecular type plays a greater role in controlling cation homeostasis compared with that in C. gattii VGI and C. neoformans H99. Importantly, we demonstrate that C. gattii calcineurin is essential for virulence in a murine inhalation model, supporting C. gattii calcineurin as an attractive antifungal drug target.

  5. Regulation of virulence gene expression in pathogenic Listeria.

    PubMed

    Brehm, K; Kreft, J; Ripio, M T; Vázquez-Boland, J A

    1996-06-01

    Dynamic interactions between host and pathogen are characteristic of infections caused by intracellular bacteria. This has favoured the evolution of highly effective control systems by which these pathogens regulate the expression of different virulence factors during sequential steps of the infection process. In the case of the facultative intracellular bacterium Listeria monocytogenes, these steps involve internalization by eukaryotic cells, lysis of the resulting phagosome, replication as well as movement within the host cytoplasm, direct cell-to-cell spread, and subsequent lysis of a double-membrane vacuole when entering neighbouring cells. Virulence factors which are involved in each of these steps have been identified and the expression of these factors is subject to a co-ordinate and differential control exerted by the major listerial virulence regulator PrfA. This protein belongs to the Crp/Fnr-family of transcriptional activators and recognizes specific target sequences in promoter regions of several listerial virulence genes. Differential expression of these genes during sequential steps of the infection seems to be at least partially mediated by different binding affinities of PrfA to its target sequences. Activity of PrfA-dependent genes and of prfA itself is under the control of several environmental variables which are used by the pathogen to recognize its transition from the free environment into a eukaryotic host.

  6. L-glutamine Induces Expression of Listeria monocytogenes Virulence Genes

    PubMed Central

    Lobel, Lior; Burg-Golani, Tamar; Sigal, Nadejda; Rose, Jessica; Livnat-Levanon, Nurit; Lewinson, Oded; Herskovits, Anat A.

    2017-01-01

    The high environmental adaptability of bacteria is contingent upon their ability to sense changes in their surroundings. Bacterial pathogen entry into host poses an abrupt and dramatic environmental change, during which successful pathogens gauge multiple parameters that signal host localization. The facultative human pathogen Listeria monocytogenes flourishes in soil, water and food, and in ~50 different animals, and serves as a model for intracellular infection. L. monocytogenes identifies host entry by sensing both physical (e.g., temperature) and chemical (e.g., metabolite concentrations) factors. We report here that L-glutamine, an abundant nitrogen source in host serum and cells, serves as an environmental indicator and inducer of virulence gene expression. In contrast, ammonia, which is the most abundant nitrogen source in soil and water, fully supports growth, but fails to activate virulence gene transcription. We demonstrate that induction of virulence genes only occurs when the Listerial intracellular concentration of L-glutamine crosses a certain threshold, acting as an on/off switch: off when L-glutamine concentrations are below the threshold, and fully on when the threshold is crossed. To turn on the switch, L-glutamine must be present, and the L-glutamine high affinity ABC transporter, GlnPQ, must be active. Inactivation of GlnPQ led to complete arrest of L-glutamine uptake, reduced type I interferon response in infected macrophages, dramatic reduction in expression of virulence genes, and attenuated virulence in a mouse infection model. These results may explain observations made with other pathogens correlating nitrogen metabolism and virulence, and suggest that gauging of L-glutamine as a means of ascertaining host localization may be a general mechanism. PMID:28114430

  7. Differential activation of virulence gene expression by PrfA, the Listeria monocytogenes virulence regulator.

    PubMed Central

    Sheehan, B; Klarsfeld, A; Msadek, T; Cossart, P

    1995-01-01

    PrfA is a pleiotropic activator of virulence gene expression in the pathogenic bacterium Listeria monocytogenes. Several lines of evidence have suggested that a hierarchy of virulence gene activation by PrfA exists. This hypothesis was investigated by assessing the ability of PrfA to activate the expression of virulence gene fusions to lacZ in Bacillus subtilis. Expression of PrfA in this heterologous host was sufficient for activation of transcription at the hly, plcA, mpl, and actA promoters. Activation was most efficient at the divergently transcribed hly and plcA promoters. The putative PrfA binding site shared by these promoters is perfectly symmetrical and appears to represent the optimum sequence for target gene activation by PrfA. The activation of actA and mpl expression was considerably weaker and occurred more slowly than that observed at the hly and plcA promoters, suggesting that greater quantities of PrfA are required for productive interaction at these promoters. Interestingly, expression of an inlA-lacZ transcriptional fusion was very poorly activated by PrfA in B. subtilis, suggesting that other Listeria factors, in addition to PrfA, are required for PrfA-mediated activation at this promoter. Further support for the involvement of such factors was obtained by constructing and analyzing a prfA deletion mutant of L. monocytogenes. We observed that, in contrast to that of the other genes of the PrfA regulon, expression of inlA is only partially dependent on PrfA. PMID:7592422

  8. The Aspergillus fumigatus Transcription Factor Ace2 Governs Pigment Production, Conidiation and Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Ejzykowicz, Daniele E.; Cunha, Marcel M.; Rozental, Sonia; Solis, Norma V.; Gravelat, Fabrice N.; Sheppard, Donald C.; Filler, Scott G.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Aspergillus fumigatus causes serious and frequently fatal infections in immunocompromised patients. To investigate the regulation of virulence of this fungus, we constructed and analyzed an A. fumigatus mutant that lacked the transcription factor Ace2, which influences virulence in other fungi. The Δace2 mutant had dysmorphic conidiophores, reduced conidia production, and abnormal conidial cell wall architecture. This mutant produced an orange pigment when grown on solid media, although its conidia had normal pigmentation. Conidia of the Δace2 mutant were larger and had accelerated germination. The resulting germlings were resistant to hydrogen peroxide, but not other stressors. Non-neutropenic mice that were immunosuppressed with cortisone acetate and infected with the Δace2 mutant had accelerated mortality, greater pulmonary fungal burden, and increased pulmonary inflammatory responses compared to mice infected with the wild-type or Δace2∷ace2 complemented strains. The Δace2 mutant had reduced ppoC, ecm33, and ags3 mRNA expression. It is known that A. fumigatus mutants with absent or reduced expression of these genes have increased virulence in mice, as well as other phenotypic similarities to the Δace2 mutant. Therefore, reduced expression of these genes likely contributes to the increased virulence of the Δace2 mutant. PMID:19220748

  9. Malonate inhibits virulence gene expression in Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Minato, Yusuke; Fassio, Sara R; Häse, Claudia C

    2013-01-01

    We previously found that inhibition of the TCA cycle, either through mutations or chemical inhibition, increased toxT transcription in Vibrio cholerae. In this study, we found that the addition of malonate, an inhibitor of succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), decreased toxT transcription in V. cholerae, an observation inconsistent with the previous pattern observed. Unlike another SDH inhibitor, 2-thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTFA), which increased toxT transcription and slightly inhibited V. cholerae growth, malonate inhibited toxT transcription in both the wild-type strain and TCA cycle mutants, suggesting malonate-mediated inhibition of virulence gene expression is independent to TCA cycle activity. Addition of malonate also inhibited ctxB and tcpA expressions but did not affect aphA, aphB, tcpP and toxR expressions. Malonate inhibited cholera toxin (CT) production in both V. cholerae classical biotype strains O395N1 and CA401, and El Tor biotype strain, N16961. Consistent with previous reports, we confirmed that these strains of V. cholerae did not utilize malonate as a primary carbon source. However, we found that the addition of malonate to the growth medium stimulated V. cholerae growth. All together, these results suggest that metabolizing malonate as a nutrient source negatively affects virulence gene expression in V. cholerae.

  10. Role of feedback and network architecture in controlling virulence gene expression in Bordetella.

    PubMed

    Prajapat, Mahendra Kumar; Saini, Supreet

    2013-11-01

    Bordetella is a Gram-negative bacterium responsible for causing whooping cough in a broad range of host organisms. For successful infection, Bordetella controls expression of four distinct classes of genes (referred to as class 1, 2, 3, and 4 genes) at distinct times in the infection cycle. This control is executed by a single two-component system, BvgAS. Interestingly, the transmembrane component of the two-component system, BvgS, consists of three phospho-transfer domains leading to phosphorylation of the response regulator, BvgA. Phosphorylated BvgA then controls expression of virulence genes and also controls bvgAS transcription. In this work, we perform simulations to characterize the role of the network architecture in governing gene expression in Bordetella. Our results show that the wild-type network is locally optimal for controlling the timing of expression of the different classes of genes involved in infection. In addition, the interplay between environmental signals and positive feedback aids the bacterium identify precise conditions for and control expression of virulence genes.

  11. Erythritol triggers expression of virulence traits in Brucella melitensis.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Erik; Rajashekara, Gireesh; Sanakkayala, Neelima; Eskra, Linda; Harms, Jerome; Splitter, Gary

    2013-06-01

    Erythritol is a four-carbon sugar preferentially utilized by Brucella spp. The presence of erythritol in the placentas of goats, cows, and pigs has been used to explain the localization of Brucella to these sites and the subsequent accumulation of large amounts of bacteria, eventually leading to abortion. Here we show that Brucella melitensis will also localize to an artificial site of erythritol within a mouse, providing a potential model system to study the pathogenesis of Brucella abortion. Immunohistological staining of the sites of erythritol within infected mice indicated a higher than expected proportion of extracellular bacteria. Ensuing experiments suggested intracellular B. melitensis was unable to replicate within macrophages in the presence of erythritol and that erythritol was able to reach the site of intracellular bacteria. The intracellular inhibition of growth was found to encourage the bacteria to replicate extracellularly rather than intracellularly, a particularly interesting development in Brucella pathogenesis. To determine the effect of erythritol on expression of B. melitensis genes, bacteria grown either with or without erythritol were analyzed by microarray. Two major virulence pathways were up-regulated in response to exposure to erythritol (the type IV secretion system VirB and flagellar proteins), suggesting a role for erythritol in virulence.

  12. Burkholderia cepacia Complex Regulation of Virulence Gene Expression: A Review.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Sílvia A; Feliciano, Joana R; Pita, Tiago; Guerreiro, Soraia I; Leitão, Jorge H

    2017-01-19

    Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) bacteria emerged as opportunistic pathogens in cystic fibrosis and immunocompromised patients. Their eradication is very difficult due to the high level of intrinsic resistance to clinically relevant antibiotics. Bcc bacteria have large and complex genomes, composed of two to four replicons, with variable numbers of insertion sequences. The complexity of Bcc genomes confers a high genomic plasticity to these bacteria, allowing their adaptation and survival to diverse habitats, including the human host. In this work, we review results from recent studies using omics approaches to elucidate in vivo adaptive strategies and virulence gene regulation expression of Bcc bacteria when infecting the human host or subject to conditions mimicking the stressful environment of the cystic fibrosis lung.

  13. Burkholderia cepacia Complex Regulation of Virulence Gene Expression: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Sílvia A.; Feliciano, Joana R.; Pita, Tiago; Guerreiro, Soraia I.; Leitão, Jorge H.

    2017-01-01

    Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) bacteria emerged as opportunistic pathogens in cystic fibrosis and immunocompromised patients. Their eradication is very difficult due to the high level of intrinsic resistance to clinically relevant antibiotics. Bcc bacteria have large and complex genomes, composed of two to four replicons, with variable numbers of insertion sequences. The complexity of Bcc genomes confers a high genomic plasticity to these bacteria, allowing their adaptation and survival to diverse habitats, including the human host. In this work, we review results from recent studies using omics approaches to elucidate in vivo adaptive strategies and virulence gene regulation expression of Bcc bacteria when infecting the human host or subject to conditions mimicking the stressful environment of the cystic fibrosis lung. PMID:28106859

  14. Differential expression of microRNAs of Litopenaeus vannamei in response to different virulence WSSV infection.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xinying; Liu, Qing-Hui; Yang, Bing; Huang, Jie

    2016-11-01

    WSSV is one of the most harmful pathogeny in the pacific white shrimp, and genetic variations caused the strains of different virulence. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) involved in the regulation of virus defense. To understand the different virulence of WSSV on miRNA expression in Litopeneaus vannamei, the deep sequencing was performed to compare two small RNA libraries prepared from hepatopancreas of Litopeneaus vannamei infected with normal-virulence or low-virulence WSSV. Approximately 29,398,623 raw reads from normal-virulence library and 35,291,803 raw reads from low-virulence library were obtained. There were about 37 miRNAs homologs identified. Sixteen miRNAs were significantly up-regulated and twenty-one miRNAs were significantly down-regulated in normal-virulence infection library compared with low-virulence infection library. Of these, Igi-miR-1175-3p was the most significant different miRNA, followed by bmo-miR-1175-3p and ipu-miR-26b, respectively. The putative target genes for differentially expressed miRNAs were concerned with biological processes, signal meditated, cell differentiation and apoptosis, immune recognition and other more functions. The results will help to understand the miRNAs response to different virulence WSSV infection.

  15. Temperature control of molecular circuit switch responsible for virulent phenotype expression in uropathogenic Escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samoilov, Michael

    2010-03-01

    The behavior and fate of biological organisms are to a large extent dictated by their environment, which can be often viewed as a collection of features and constraints governed by physics laws. Since biological systems comprise networks of molecular interactions, one such key physical property is temperature, whose variations directly affect the rates of biochemical reactions involved. For instance, temperature is known to control many gene regulatory circuits responsible for pathogenicity in bacteria. One such example is type 1 fimbriae (T1F) -- the foremost virulence factor in uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC), which accounts for 80-90% of all community-acquired urinary tract infections (UTIs). The expression of T1F is randomly `phase variable', i.e. individual cells switch between virulent/fimbriate and avirulent/afimbriate phenotypes, with rates regulated by temperature. Our computational investigation of this process, which is based on FimB/FimE recombinase-mediated inversion of fimS DNA element, offers new insights into its discrete-stochastic kinetics. In particular, it elucidates the logic of T1F control optimization to the host temperature and contributes further understanding toward the development of novel therapeutic approaches to UPEC-caused UTIs.

  16. Vibrio cholerae anaerobic induction of virulence gene expression is controlled by thiol-based switches of virulence regulator AphB

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhi; Yang, Menghua; Peterfreund, Gregory L.; Tsou, Amy M.; Selamoglu, Nur; Daldal, Fevzi; Zhong, Zengtao; Kan, Biao; Zhu, Jun

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens have evolved sophisticated signal transduction systems to coordinately control the expression of virulence determinants. For example, the human pathogen Vibrio cholerae is able to respond to host environmental signals by activating transcriptional regulatory cascades. The host signals that stimulate V. cholerae virulence gene expression, however, are still poorly understood. Previous proteomic studies indicated that the ambient oxygen concentration plays a role in V. cholerae virulence gene expression. In this study, we found that under oxygen-limiting conditions, an environment similar to the intestines, V. cholerae virulence genes are highly expressed. We show that anaerobiosis enhances dimerization and activity of AphB, a transcriptional activator that is required for the expression of the key virulence regulator TcpP, which leads to the activation of virulence factor production. We further show that one of the three cysteine residues in AphB, C235, is critical for oxygen responsiveness, as the AphBC235S mutant can activate virulence genes under aerobic conditions in vivo and can bind to tcpP promoters in the absence of reducing agents in vitro. Mass spectrometry analysis suggests that under aerobic conditions, AphB is modified at the C235 residue. This modification is reversible between oxygen-rich aquatic environments and oxygen-limited human hosts, suggesting that V. cholerae may use a thiol-based switch mechanism to sense intestinal signals and activate virulence. PMID:21187377

  17. Regulation of bacterial virulence gene expression by cell envelope stress responses

    PubMed Central

    Flores-Kim, Josué; Darwin, Andrew J

    2014-01-01

    The bacterial cytoplasm lies within a multilayered envelope that must be protected from internal and external hazards. This protection is provided by cell envelope stress responses (ESRs), which detect threats and reprogram gene expression to ensure survival. Pathogens frequently need these ESRs to survive inside the host, where their envelopes face dangerous environmental changes and attack from antimicrobial molecules. In addition, some virulence genes have become integrated into ESR regulons. This might be because these genes can protect the cell envelope from damage by host molecules, or it might help ESRs to reduce stress by moderating the assembly of virulence factors within the envelope. Alternatively, it could simply be a mechanism to coordinate the induction of virulence gene expression with entry into the host. Here, we briefly describe some of the bacterial ESRs, followed by examples where they control virulence gene expression in both Gram-negative and Gram-positive pathogens. PMID:25603429

  18. Golden Pigment Production and Virulence Gene Expression Are Affected by Metabolisms in Staphylococcus aureus▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Lefu; Cheng, Alice; Dunman, Paul M.; Missiakas, Dominique; He, Chuan

    2010-01-01

    The pathogenesis of staphylococcal infections is multifactorial. Golden pigment is an eponymous feature of the human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus that shields the microbe from oxidation-based clearance, an innate host immune response to infection. Here, we screened a collection of S. aureus transposon mutants for pigment production variants. A total of 15 previously unidentified genes were discovered. Notably, disrupting metabolic pathways such as the tricarboxylic acid cycle, purine biosynthesis, and oxidative phosphorylation yields mutants with enhanced pigmentation. The dramatic effect on pigment production seems to correlate with altered expression of virulence determinants. Microarray analysis further indicates that purine biosynthesis impacts the expression of ∼400 genes involved in a broad spectrum of functions including virulence. The purine biosynthesis mutant and oxidative phosphorylation mutant strains exhibit significantly attenuated virulence in a murine abscess model of infection. Inhibition of purine biosynthesis with a known small-molecule inhibitor results in altered virulence gene expression and virulence attenuation during infection. Taken together, these results suggest an intimate link between metabolic processes and virulence gene expression in S. aureus. This study also establishes the importance of purine biosynthesis and oxidative phosphorylation for in vivo survival. PMID:20400547

  19. Virulence genes in clinical and environmental Stenotrophomas maltophilia isolates: a genome sequencing and gene expression approach.

    PubMed

    Adamek, Martina; Linke, Burkhard; Schwartz, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The rate of nosocomial infections with the opportunistic pathogen Stenotrophomonas maltophilia has remarkably increased in the last decade. To determine S. maltophilia virulence genes, the complete genome sequences of two S. maltophilia isolates were compared. The clinical strain SKK35 was proved virulent in an amoeba host-pathogen model, and wastewater strain RA8 was determined as non-virulent in the amoeba model. The genome sequences of three additional S. maltophilia strains, K279a (clinical, non-virulent against amoeba), R511-3 and SKA14 (both environmental, non-virulent against amoeba) were taken into account as reference strains. We were able to show that all clinical and environmental S. maltophilia strains presented comparable distribution of so far identified potential virulence genes, regardless to their virulence potential against amoebae. Aside from that, strain SKK35 was found harboring a putative, strain specific pathogenicity island, encoding two proteins from the RTX (repeats-in-toxin) family. The actual expression of the RTX genes was verified in growth experiments in different culture media containing blood or blood components and in co-cultures with amoeba.

  20. Temperature-dependent expression of virulence genes in fish-pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Guijarro, José A; Cascales, Desirée; García-Torrico, Ana I; García-Domínguez, Mario; Méndez, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    Virulence gene expression in pathogenic bacteria is modulated by environmental parameters. A key factor in this expression is temperature. Its effect on virulence gene expression in bacteria infecting warm-blooded hosts is well documented. Transcription of virulence genes in these bacteria is induced upon a shift from low environmental to a higher host temperature (37°C). Interestingly, host temperatures usually correspond to the optimum for growth of these pathogenic bacteria. On the contrary, in ectothermic hosts such as fish, molluscs, and amphibians, infection processes generally occur at a temperature lower than that for the optimal growth of the bacteria. Therefore, regulation of virulence gene expression in response to temperature shift has to be modulated in a different way to that which is found in bacteria infecting warm-blooded hosts. The current understanding of virulence gene expression and its regulation in response to temperature in fish-pathogenic bacteria is limited, but constant extension of our knowledge base is essential to enable a rational approach to the problem of the bacterial fish diseases affecting the aquaculture industry. This is an interesting issue and progress needs to be made in order to diminish the economic losses caused by these diseases. The intention of this review is, for the first time, to compile the scattered results existing in the field in order to lay the groundwork for future research. This article is an overview of those relevant virulence genes that are expressed at temperatures lower than that for optimal bacterial growth in different fish-pathogenic bacteria as well as the principal mechanisms that could be involved in their regulation.

  1. Temperature-dependent expression of virulence genes in fish-pathogenic bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Guijarro, José A.; Cascales, Desirée; García-Torrico, Ana I.; García-Domínguez, Mario; Méndez, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    Virulence gene expression in pathogenic bacteria is modulated by environmental parameters. A key factor in this expression is temperature. Its effect on virulence gene expression in bacteria infecting warm-blooded hosts is well documented. Transcription of virulence genes in these bacteria is induced upon a shift from low environmental to a higher host temperature (37°C). Interestingly, host temperatures usually correspond to the optimum for growth of these pathogenic bacteria. On the contrary, in ectothermic hosts such as fish, molluscs, and amphibians, infection processes generally occur at a temperature lower than that for the optimal growth of the bacteria. Therefore, regulation of virulence gene expression in response to temperature shift has to be modulated in a different way to that which is found in bacteria infecting warm-blooded hosts. The current understanding of virulence gene expression and its regulation in response to temperature in fish-pathogenic bacteria is limited, but constant extension of our knowledge base is essential to enable a rational approach to the problem of the bacterial fish diseases affecting the aquaculture industry. This is an interesting issue and progress needs to be made in order to diminish the economic losses caused by these diseases. The intention of this review is, for the first time, to compile the scattered results existing in the field in order to lay the groundwork for future research. This article is an overview of those relevant virulence genes that are expressed at temperatures lower than that for optimal bacterial growth in different fish-pathogenic bacteria as well as the principal mechanisms that could be involved in their regulation. PMID:26217329

  2. A Bistable Switch and Anatomical Site Control Vibrio cholerae Virulence Gene Expression in the Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Alex T.; Dolganov, Nadia A.; Rasmussen, Thomas; Otto, Glen; Miller, Michael C.; Felt, Stephen A.; Torreilles, Stéphanie; Schoolnik, Gary K.

    2010-01-01

    A fundamental, but unanswered question in host-pathogen interactions is the timing, localization and population distribution of virulence gene expression during infection. Here, microarray and in situ single cell expression methods were used to study Vibrio cholerae growth and virulence gene expression during infection of the rabbit ligated ileal loop model of cholera. Genes encoding the toxin-coregulated pilus (TCP) and cholera toxin (CT) were powerfully expressed early in the infectious process in bacteria adjacent to epithelial surfaces. Increased growth was found to co-localize with virulence gene expression. Significant heterogeneity in the expression of tcpA, the repeating subunit of TCP, was observed late in the infectious process. The expression of tcpA, studied in single cells in a homogeneous medium, demonstrated unimodal induction of tcpA after addition of bicarbonate, a chemical inducer of virulence gene expression. Striking bifurcation of the population occurred during entry into stationary phase: one subpopulation continued to express tcpA, whereas the expression declined in the other subpopulation. ctxA, encoding the A subunit of CT, and toxT, encoding the proximal master regulator of virulence gene expression also exhibited the bifurcation phenotype. The bifurcation phenotype was found to be reversible, epigenetic and to persist after removal of bicarbonate, features consistent with bistable switches. The bistable switch requires the positive-feedback circuit controlling ToxT expression and formation of the CRP-cAMP complex during entry into stationary phase. Key features of this bistable switch also were demonstrated in vivo, where striking heterogeneity in tcpA expression was observed in luminal fluid in later stages of the infection. When this fluid was diluted into artificial seawater, bacterial aggregates continued to express tcpA for prolonged periods of time. The bistable control of virulence gene expression points to a mechanism that could

  3. Role of IS1 in the Conversion of Virulence (Vi) Antigen Expression in Enterobacteriaceae,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-01

    into viaB to presumably a virulence factor for Salmonella typhi . Its occur, the host bacterium must carry IS/ or an IS1-like expression is controlled...Noon KF, Baron LS (1985) Development National Science Council Grant NSC80-0418-BI82-01 of Exec- of a DNA probe to detect Salmonella typhi . J Clin

  4. Low-shear modelled microgravity alters expression of virulence determinants of Staphylococcus aureus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosado, Helena; Doyle, Marie; Hinds, Jason; Taylor, Peter W.

    2010-02-01

    Microbiological monitoring of air and surfaces within the ISS indicate that bacteria of the genus Staphylococcus are found with high frequency. Staphylococcus aureus, an opportunistic pathogen with the capacity to cause severe debilitating infection, constitutes a significant proportion of these isolates. Experiments conducted during short-term flight suggest that growth in microgravity leads to increases in bacterial antibiotic resistance and to cell wall changes. Growth under low-shear modelled microgravity (LSMMG) indicated that a reduced gravitational field acts as an environmental signal for expression of enhanced bacterial virulence in gram-negative pathogens. We therefore examined the effect of simulated microgravity on parameters of antibiotic susceptibility and virulence in methicillin-susceptible S. aureus isolates RF1, RF6 and RF11; these strains were grown in a high aspect ratio vessel under LSMMG and compared with cells grown under normal gravity (NG). There were no significant differences in antibiotic susceptibility of staphylococci grown under LSMMG compared to NG. LSMMG-induced reductions in synthesis of the pigment staphyloxanthin and the major virulence determinant α-toxin were noted. Significant changes in global gene expression were identified by DNA microarray analysis; with isolate RF6, the expression of hla and genes of the regulatory system saeR/saeS were reduced approximately two-fold. These data provide strong evidence that growth of S. aureus under modelled microgravity leads to a reduction in expression of virulence determinants.

  5. Expression of interferon gamma by a highly virulent Newcastle disease virus decreases its pathogenicity in chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infection of chickens with highly virulent NDV results in rapid death, which is preceded by increased expression of interferon gamma (IFN-g) in target tissues. IFN-g is a cytokine that has pleiotropic biological effects including intrinsic antiviral activity and immunomodulatory effects. Here we a...

  6. The two CcdA proteins of Bacillus anthracis differentially affect virulence gene expression and sporulation.

    PubMed

    Han, Hesong; Wilson, Adam C

    2013-12-01

    The cytochrome c maturation system influences the expression of virulence factors in Bacillus anthracis. B. anthracis carries two copies of the ccdA gene, encoding predicted thiol-disulfide oxidoreductases that contribute to cytochrome c maturation, while the closely related organism Bacillus subtilis carries only one copy of ccdA. To investigate the roles of the two ccdA gene copies in B. anthracis, strains were constructed without each ccdA gene, and one strain was constructed without both copies simultaneously. Loss of both ccdA genes results in a reduction of cytochrome c production, an increase in virulence factor expression, and a reduction in sporulation efficiency. Complementation and expression analyses indicate that ccdA2 encodes the primary CcdA in B. anthracis, active in all three pathways. While CcdA1 retains activity in cytochrome c maturation and virulence control, it has completely lost its activity in the sporulation pathway. In support of this finding, expression of ccdA1 is strongly reduced when cells are grown under sporulation-inducing conditions. When the activities of CcdA1 and CcdA2 were analyzed in B. subtilis, neither protein retained activity in cytochrome c maturation, but CcdA2 could still function in sporulation. These observations reveal the complexities of thiol-disulfide oxidoreductase function in pathways relevant to virulence and physiology.

  7. Effect of Negative Pressure on Proliferation, Virulence Factor Secretion, Biofilm Formation, and Virulence-Regulated Gene Expression of Pseudomonas aeruginosa In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guo-Qi; Li, Tong-Tong; Li, Zhi-Rui; Zhang, Li-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the effect of negative pressure conditions induced by NPWT on P. aeruginosa. Methods. P. aeruginosa was cultured in a Luria–Bertani medium at negative pressure of −125 mmHg for 24 h in the experimental group and at atmospheric pressure in the control group. The diameters of the colonies of P. aeruginosa were measured after 24 h. ELISA kit, orcinol method, and elastin-Congo red assay were used to quantify the virulence factors. Biofilm formation was observed by staining with Alexa Fluor® 647 conjugate of concanavalin A (Con A). Virulence-regulated genes were determined by quantitative RT-PCR. Results. As compared with the control group, growth of P. aeruginosa was inhibited by negative pressure. The colony size under negative pressure was significantly smaller in the experimental group than that in the controls (p < 0.01). Besides, reductions in the total amount of virulence factors were observed in the negative pressure group, including exotoxin A, rhamnolipid, and elastase. RT-PCR results revealed a significant inhibition in the expression level of virulence-regulated genes. Conclusion. Negative pressure could significantly inhibit the growth of P. aeruginosa. It led to a decrease in the virulence factor secretion, biofilm formation, and a reduction in the expression level of virulence-regulated genes. PMID:28074188

  8. Aerococcus viridans expression of Cpn60 is associated with virulence during infection of the American lobster, Homarus americanus Milne Edwards.

    PubMed

    Clark, K F; Greenwood, S J

    2011-11-01

    The Gram-positive bacterium Aerococcus viridans var. homari is a well-documented causative agent of the lethal systemic disease gaffkemia in both the American lobster, Homarus americanus, and the European lobster, Homarus gammarus. Previous phenotypic characterization has been unsuccessful at differentiating avirulent from virulent strains without performing lethal animal infection trials. Recent genetic characterization of A. viridans strains through 16S rRNA sequencing and random amplification of polymorphic DNA fingerprinting has revealed the presence of two subtypes. However, subtype 1 contains both virulent and avirulent strains which are genetically identical. The purpose of this study was to determine the proteomic mediators of virulence in A. viridans. Quantitative proteomic mapping of these two strains has revealed 29 differentially expressed protein spots, seven of which are only expressed in the virulent strain and could act as virulence factors. One protein, chaperonin 60 (Cpn60), is uniquely expressed in the virulent strain and has been shown to act as a virulence factor in many other bacteria. The proteomic mapping strategy employed in this study is the first to show phenotypic differences between virulent and avirulent strains. Cpn60 expression represents a potentially useful tool for identifying the virulent strains of A. viridans in epidemiological studies.

  9. Expression of the Salmonella virulence plasmid gene spvB in cultured macrophages and nonphagocytic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Fierer, J; Eckmann, L; Fang, F; Pfeifer, C; Finlay, B B; Guiney, D

    1993-01-01

    Certain serotypes of salmonellae carry virulence plasmids that greatly enhance the pathogenicity of these bacteria in experimentally infected mice. This phenotype is largely attributable to the 8-kb spv regulon. However, spv genes are not expressed while bacteria grow in vitro. We now show that spvB, which is required for virulence, is expressed rapidly after Salmonella dublin is ingested by cultured J774 and murine peritoneal macrophages and that expression is not affected by the alkalinization of intracellular vesicles. The level of induction of spvB is reduced when macrophages are pretreated with gamma interferon. spvB is also expressed in human and canine epithelial cell lines and a human hepatoma cell line. In all cases, spvB expression is dependent on the spvR gene, just as it is in stationary-phase cultures in vitro. These data suggest that spv virulence genes are expressed by intracellular salmonellae in vivo in response to a signal that is common to the intracellular compartments of cells that are invaded by salmonellae. PMID:8225598

  10. Gene expression patterns and dynamics of the colonization of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) by highly virulent and weakly virulent strains of Fusarium oxysporum

    PubMed Central

    Niño-Sánchez, Jonathan; Tello, Vega; Casado-del Castillo, Virginia; Thon, Michael R.; Benito, Ernesto P.; Díaz-Mínguez, José María

    2015-01-01

    The dynamics of root and hypocotyl colonization, and the gene expression patterns of several fungal virulence factors and plant defense factors have been analyzed and compared in the interaction of two Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. phaseoli strains displaying clear differences in virulence, with a susceptible common bean cultivar. The growth of the two strains on the root surface and the colonization of the root was quantitatively similar although the highly virulent (HV) strain was more efficient reaching the central root cylinder. The main differences between both strains were found in the temporal and spatial dynamics of crown root and hypocotyl colonization. The increase of fungal biomass in the crown root was considerably larger for the HV strain, which, after an initial stage of global colonization of both the vascular cylinder and the parenchymal cells, restricted its growth to the newly differentiated xylem vessels. The weakly virulent (WV) strain was a much slower and less efficient colonizer of the xylem vessels, showing also growth in the intercellular spaces of the parenchyma. Most of the virulence genes analyzed showed similar expression patterns in both strains, except SIX1, SIX6 and the gene encoding the transcription factor FTF1, which were highly upregulated in root crown and hypocotyl. The response induced in the infected plant showed interesting differences for both strains. The WV strain induced an early and strong transcription of the PR1 gene, involved in SAR response, while the HV strain preferentially induced the early expression of the ethylene responsive factor ERF2. PMID:25883592

  11. The highly virulent variola and monkeypox viruses express secreted inhibitors of type I interferon.

    PubMed

    Fernández de Marco, María del Mar; Alejo, Alí; Hudson, Paul; Damon, Inger K; Alcami, Antonio

    2010-05-01

    Variola virus (VARV) caused smallpox, one of the most devastating human diseases and the first to be eradicated, but its deliberate release represents a dangerous threat. Virulent orthopoxviruses infecting humans, such as monkeypox virus (MPXV), could fill the niche left by smallpox eradication and the cessation of vaccination. However, immunomodulatory activities and virulence determinants of VARV and MPXV remain largely unexplored. We report the molecular characterization of the VARV- and MPXV-secreted type I interferon-binding proteins, which interact with the cell surface after secretion and prevent type I interferon responses. The proteins expressed in the baculovirus system have been purified, and their interferon-binding properties characterized by surface plasmon resonance. The ability of these proteins to inhibit a broad range of interferons was investigated to identify potential adaptation to the human immune system. Furthermore, we demonstrate by Western blot and activity assays the expression of the type I interferon inhibitor during VARV and MPXV infections. These findings are relevant for the design of new vaccines and therapeutics to smallpox and emergent virulent orthopoxviruses because the type I interferon-binding protein is a major virulence factor in animal models, vaccination with this protein induces protective immunity, and its neutralization prevents disease progression.

  12. Differentially expressed genes of virulent and nonvirulent Entamoeba histolytica strains identified by suppression subtractive hybridization.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Michelle A R; Alvarenga, Ângela C; Fernandes, Helen C; Gil, Frederico F; Melo, Maria N; Pesquero, Jorge L; Gomes, Maria A

    2014-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is a parasite which presents capacity to degrade tissues and therefore has a pathogenic behavior. As this behavior is not shown by all strains, there have been several studies investigating molecular basis of the cytotoxicity process. Using the suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) technique, differential gene expressions of two E. histolytica strains, one virulent (EGG) and one nonvirulent (452), have been analyzed with the purpose of isolating genes which may be involved with amoebic virulence. Nine cDNA fragments presenting high homology with E. histolytica previously sequenced genes were subtracted. Of these, four genes were confirmed by RT-PCR. Two coding for hypothetical proteins, one for a cysteine-rich protein, expressed only in the virulent strain, EGG and another one, coding for grainin 2 protein, exclusive from 452 strain. This study provided new insight into the proteins differences in the virulent and nonvirulent E. histolytica strains. We believe that further studies with these proteins may prove association of them with tissue damage, providing new perceptions to improve treatment or diagnosis of the invasive disease.

  13. Chemical Inhibition of Kynureninase Reduces Pseudomonas aeruginosa Quorum Sensing and Virulence Factor Expression.

    PubMed

    Kasper, Stephen H; Bonocora, Richard P; Wade, Joseph T; Musah, Rabi Ann; Cady, Nathaniel C

    2016-04-15

    The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa utilizes multiple quorum sensing (QS) pathways to coordinate an arsenal of virulence factors. We previously identified several cysteine-based compounds inspired by natural products from the plant Petiveria alliacea which are capable of antagonizing multiple QS circuits as well as reducing P. aeruginosa biofilm formation. To understand the global effects of such compounds on virulence factor production and elucidate their mechanism of action, RNA-seq transcriptomic analysis was performed on P. aeruginosa PAO1 exposed to S-phenyl-l-cysteine sulfoxide, the most potent inhibitor from the prior study. Exposure to this inhibitor down-regulated expression of several QS-regulated virulence operons (e.g., phenazine biosynthesis, type VI secretion systems). Interestingly, many genes that were differentially regulated pertain to the related metabolic pathways that yield precursors of pyochelin, tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates, phenazines, and Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS). Activation of the MexT-regulon was also indicated, including the multidrug efflux pump encoded by mexEF-oprN, which has previously been shown to inhibit QS and pathogenicity. Deeper investigation of the metabolites involved in these systems revealed that S-phenyl-l-cysteine sulfoxide has structural similarity to kynurenine, a precursor of anthranilate, which is critical for P. aeruginosa virulence. By supplementing exogenous anthranilate, the QS-inhibitory effect was reversed. Finally, it was shown that S-phenyl-l-cysteine sulfoxide competitively inhibits P. aeruginosa kynureninase (KynU) activity in vitro and reduces PQS production in vivo. The kynurenine pathway has been implicated in P. aeruginosa QS and virulence factor expression; however, this is the first study to show that targeted inhibition of KynU affects P. aeruginosa gene expression and QS, suggesting a potential antivirulence strategy.

  14. Expression of hygromycin phosphotransferase alters virulence of Histoplasma capsulatum.

    PubMed

    Smulian, A George; Gibbons, Reta S; Demland, Jeffery A; Spaulding, Deborah T; Deepe, George S

    2007-11-01

    The Escherichia coli hygromycin phosphotransferase (hph) gene, which confers hygromycin resistance, is commonly used as a dominant selectable marker in genetically modified bacteria, fungi, plants, insects, and mammalian cells. Expression of the hph gene has rarely been reported to induce effects other than those expected. Hygromycin B is the most common dominant selectable marker used in the molecular manipulation of Histoplasma capsulatum in the generation of knockout strains of H. capsulatum or as a marker in mutant strains. hph-expressing organisms appear to have no defect in long-term in vitro growth and survival and have been successfully used to exploit host-parasite interaction in short-term cell culture systems and animal experiments. We introduced the hph gene as a selectable marker together with the gene encoding green fluorescent protein into wild-type strains of H. capsulatum. Infection of mice with hph-expressing H. capsulatum yeast cells at sublethal doses resulted in lethality. The lethality was not attributable to the site of integration of the hph construct into the genomes or to the method of integration and was not H. capsulatum strain related. Death of mice was not caused by altered cytokine profiles or an overwhelming fungal burden. The lethality was dependent on the kinase activity of hygromycin phosphotransferase. These results should raise awareness of the potential detrimental effects of the hph gene.

  15. Differences in virulence gene expression between atypical enteropathogenic Escherichia coli strains isolated from diarrheic and healthy ruminants.

    PubMed

    Horcajo, Pilar; Domínguez-Bernal, Gustavo; Carrión, Javier; De La Fuente, Ricardo; Ruiz-Santa-Quiteria, José A; Orden, José A

    2013-04-01

    Differences in the pathogenicity of atypical enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) strains may be due, at least partially, to different expression patterns of some virulence genes. To investigate this hypothesis, the virulence gene expression patterns of 6 atypical EPEC strains isolated from healthy and diarrheic ruminants were compared using quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction after growing the bacteria in culture medium alone or after binding it to HeLa epithelial cells. Some virulence genes in strains from diarrheic animals were upregulated relative to their expression in strains from healthy animals. When bacteria were cultured in the presence of HeLa cells, the ehxA and efa1/lifA genes, previously associated with the production of diarrhea, were expressed at higher levels in strains from diarrheic animals than in strains from healthy animals. Thus, the expression levels of some virulence genes may help determine which atypical EPEC strains cause diarrhea in ruminants.

  16. Differences in virulence gene expression between atypical enteropathogenic Escherichia coli strains isolated from diarrheic and healthy ruminants

    PubMed Central

    Horcajo, Pilar; Domínguez-Bernal, Gustavo; Carrión, Javier; De La Fuente, Ricardo; Ruiz-Santa-Quiteria, José A.; Orden, José A.

    2013-01-01

    Differences in the pathogenicity of atypical enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) strains may be due, at least partially, to different expression patterns of some virulence genes. To investigate this hypothesis, the virulence gene expression patterns of 6 atypical EPEC strains isolated from healthy and diarrheic ruminants were compared using quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction after growing the bacteria in culture medium alone or after binding it to HeLa epithelial cells. Some virulence genes in strains from diarrheic animals were upregulated relative to their expression in strains from healthy animals. When bacteria were cultured in the presence of HeLa cells, the ehxA and efa1/lifA genes, previously associated with the production of diarrhea, were expressed at higher levels in strains from diarrheic animals than in strains from healthy animals. Thus, the expression levels of some virulence genes may help determine which atypical EPEC strains cause diarrhea in ruminants. PMID:24082409

  17. Siderophore Biosynthesis Governs the Virulence of Uropathogenic Escherichia coli by Coordinately Modulating the Differential Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Su, Qiao; Guan, Tianbing; He, Yan; Lv, Haitao

    2016-04-01

    Urinary tract infections impose substantial health burdens on women worldwide. Urinary tract infections often incur a high risk of recurrence and antibiotic resistance, and uropathogenic E. coli accounts for approximately 80% of clinically acquired cases. The diagnosis of, treatment of, and drug development for urinary tract infections remain substantial challenges due to the complex pathogenesis of this condition. The clinically isolated UPEC 83972 strain was found to produce four siderophores: yersiniabactin, aerobactin, salmochelin, and enterobactin. The biosyntheses of some of these siderophores implies that the virulence of UPEC is mediated via the targeting of primary metabolism. However, the differential modulatory roles of siderophore biosyntheses on the differential metabolomes of UPEC and non-UPEC strains remain incompletely understood. In the present study, we sought to investigate how the differential metabolomes can be used to distinguish UPEC from non-UPEC strains and to determine the associated regulatory roles of siderophore biosynthesis. Our results are the first to demonstrate that the identified differential metabolomes strongly differentiated UPEC from non-UPEC strains. Furthermore, we performed metabolome assays of mutants with different patterns of siderophore deletions; the data revealed that the mutations of all four siderophores exerted a stronger modulatory role on the differential metabolomes of the UPEC and non-UPEC strains relative to the mutation of any single siderophore and that this modulatory role primarily involved amino acid metabolism, oxidative phosphorylation in the carbon fixation pathway, and purine and pyrimidine metabolism. Surprisingly, the modulatory roles were strongly dependent on the type and number of mutated siderophores. Taken together, these results demonstrated that siderophore biosynthesis coordinately modulated the differential metabolomes and thus may indicate novel targets for virulence-based diagnosis

  18. Construction of a Multiplex Promoter Reporter Platform to Monitor Staphylococcus aureus Virulence Gene Expression and the Identification of Usnic Acid as a Potent Suppressor of psm Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Gao, Peng; Wang, Yanli; Villanueva, Iván; Ho, Pak Leung; Davies, Julian; Kao, Richard Yi Tsun

    2016-01-01

    As antibiotic resistance becomes phenomenal, alternative therapeutic strategies for bacterial infections such as anti-virulence treatments have been advocated. We have constructed a total of 20 gfp-luxABCDE dual-reporter plasmids with selected promoters from S. aureus virulence-associated genes. The plasmids were introduced into various S. aureus strains to establish a gfp-lux based multiplex promoter reporter platform for monitoring S. aureus virulence gene expressions in real time to identify factors or compounds that may perturb virulence of S. aureus. The gene expression profiles monitored by luminescence correlated well with qRT-PCR results and extrinsic factors including carbon dioxide and some antibiotics were shown to suppress or induce the expression of virulence factors in this platform. Using this platform, sub-inhibitory ampicillin was shown to be a potent inducer for the expression of many virulence factors in S. aureus. Bacterial adherence and invasion assays using mammalian cells were employed to measure S. aureus virulence induced by ampicillin. The platform was used for screening of natural extracts that perturb the virulence of S. aureus and usnic acid was identified to be a potent repressor for the expression of psm.

  19. Construction of a Multiplex Promoter Reporter Platform to Monitor Staphylococcus aureus Virulence Gene Expression and the Identification of Usnic Acid as a Potent Suppressor of psm Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Peng; Wang, Yanli; Villanueva, Iván; Ho, Pak Leung; Davies, Julian; Kao, Richard Yi Tsun

    2016-01-01

    As antibiotic resistance becomes phenomenal, alternative therapeutic strategies for bacterial infections such as anti-virulence treatments have been advocated. We have constructed a total of 20 gfp-luxABCDE dual-reporter plasmids with selected promoters from S. aureus virulence-associated genes. The plasmids were introduced into various S. aureus strains to establish a gfp-lux based multiplex promoter reporter platform for monitoring S. aureus virulence gene expressions in real time to identify factors or compounds that may perturb virulence of S. aureus. The gene expression profiles monitored by luminescence correlated well with qRT-PCR results and extrinsic factors including carbon dioxide and some antibiotics were shown to suppress or induce the expression of virulence factors in this platform. Using this platform, sub-inhibitory ampicillin was shown to be a potent inducer for the expression of many virulence factors in S. aureus. Bacterial adherence and invasion assays using mammalian cells were employed to measure S. aureus virulence induced by ampicillin. The platform was used for screening of natural extracts that perturb the virulence of S. aureus and usnic acid was identified to be a potent repressor for the expression of psm. PMID:27625639

  20. Differential expression of the virulence-associated protein p57 and characterization of its duplicated gene rosa in virulent and attenuated strains of Renibacterium salmoninarum

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Farrell, C. L.; Strom, M.S.

    1999-01-01

    Virulence mechanisms utilized by the salmonid fish pathogen Renibacterium salmoninarum are poorly understood. One potential virulence factor is p57 (also designated MSA for major soluble antigen), an abundant 57 kDa soluble protein that is predominately localized on the bacterial cell surface with significant levels released into the extracellular milieu. Previous studies of an attenuated strain, MT 239, indicated that it differs from virulent strains in the amount of surface-associated p57. In this report, we show overall expression of p57 in R. salmoninarum MT 239 is considerably reduced as compared to a virulent strain, ATCC 33209. The amount of cell-associated p57 is decreased while the level of p57 in the culture supernatant is nearly equivalent between the strains. To determine if lowered amount of cell-associated p57 was due to a sequence defect in p57, a genetic comparison was performed. Two copies of the gene encoding p57 (msa1 and msa2) were found in 33209 and MT 239, as well as in several other virulent isolates. Both copies from 33209 and MT 239 were cloned and sequenced and found to be identical to each other, and identical between the 2 strains. A comparison of msa1 and msa2 within each strain showed that their sequences diverge 40 base pairs 5, to the open reading frame, while sequences 3' to the open reading frame are essentially identical for at least 225 base pairs. Northern blot analysis showed no difference in steady state levels of rosa mRNA between the 2 strains. These data suggest that while cell-surface localization of p57 may be important for R. salmoninarum virulence, the differences in localization, and total p57 expression between 33209 anti MT 239 are not due to differences in rosa sequence or differences in steady state transcript levels.

  1. Reversible expression of motility and flagella in Clostridium chauvoei and their relationship to virulence.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Y; Kijima-Tanaka, M; Aoki, A; Ogikubo, Y; Takahashi, T

    1995-03-01

    Clostridium chauvoei strain Okinawa produced spontaneous non-motile variants at an unusually high rate (approx. 10(-4) per generation) under normal conditions without mutagen. Revertants of non-motile variants were detected at a rate of approximately 10(-3). Biochemically, every variant corresponded well with the parental strain. By transmission electron microscopy, three of nine non-motile variants of strain Okinawa were found to be flagellate, while the other six were found to be aflagellate. These phenotypes were confirmed by Western blot analysis using monoclonal antibodies directed against the flagella of C. chauvoei. Moreover, the parental flagellate strain and non-motile flagellate variants were significantly more virulent in mice than non-motile, aflagellate variants. Our results demonstrated that phase variation in motility and flagellation occurs in C. chauvoei, and that the flagella are associated with the full expression of virulence.

  2. Spatial Segregation of Virulence Gene Expression during Acute Enteric Infection with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Laughlin, Richard C.; Knodler, Leigh A.; Barhoumi, Roula; Payne, H. Ross; Wu, Jing; Gomez, Gabriel; Pugh, Roberta; Lawhon, Sara D.; Bäumler, Andreas J.; Steele-Mortimer, Olivia; Adams, L. Garry

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT To establish a replicative niche during its infectious cycle between the intestinal lumen and tissue, the enteric pathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium requires numerous virulence genes, including genes for two type III secretion systems (T3SS) and their cognate effectors. To better understand the host-pathogen relationship, including early infection dynamics and induction kinetics of the bacterial virulence program in the context of a natural host, we monitored the subcellular localization and temporal expression of T3SS-1 and T3SS-2 using fluorescent single-cell reporters in a bovine, ligated ileal loop model of infection. We observed that the majority of bacteria at 2 h postinfection are flagellated, express T3SS-1 but not T3SS-2, and are associated with the epithelium or with extruding enterocytes. In epithelial cells, S. Typhimurium cells were surrounded by intact vacuolar membranes or present within membrane-compromised vacuoles that typically contained numerous vesicular structures. By 8 h postinfection, T3SS-2-expressing bacteria were detected in the lamina propria and in the underlying mucosa, while T3SS-1-expressing bacteria were in the lumen. Our work identifies for the first time the temporal and spatial regulation of T3SS-1 and -2 expression during an enteric infection in a natural host and provides further support for the concept of cytosolic S. Typhimurium in extruding epithelium as a mechanism for reseeding the lumen. PMID:24496791

  3. Emodin affects biofilm formation and expression of virulence factors in Streptococcus suis ATCC700794.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yan-Bei; Wang, Shuai; Wang, Chang; Huang, Quan-Yong; Bai, Jing-Wen; Chen, Jian-Qing; Chen, Xue-Ying; Li, Yan-Hua

    2015-12-01

    Streptococcus suis (S. suis) is a swine pathogen and also a zoonotic agent. In this study, the effects of subinhibitory concentrations (sub-MICs) of emodin on biofilm formation by S. suis ATCC700794 were evaluated. As quantified by crystal violet staining, biofilm formation by S. suis ATCC700794 was dose-dependently decreased after growth with 1/2 MIC, 1/4 MIC, or 1/8 MIC of emodin. By scanning electron microscopy, the structural architecture of the S. suis ATCC700794 biofilms was examined following growth in culture medium supplemented with 1/2 MIC, 1/4 MIC, 1/8 MIC, or 1/16 MIC of emodin. Scanning electron microscopy analysis revealed the potential effect of emodin on biofilm formation by S. suis ATCC700794. The expression of luxS gene and virulence genes in S. suis ATCC700794 was investigated by quantitative RT-PCR. It was found that sub-MICs of emodin significantly decreased the expression of gapdh, sly, fbps, ef, and luxS. However, it was found that sub-MICs of emodin significantly increased the expression of cps2J, mrp, and gdh. These findings showed that sub-MICs of emodin could cause the difference in the expression level of the virulence genes.

  4. Salmonella Modulates Metabolism During Growth under Conditions that Induce Expression of Virulence Genes

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Young-Mo; Schmidt, Brian; Kidwai, Afshan S.; Jones, Marcus B.; Deatherage, Brooke L.; Brewer, Heather M.; Mitchell, Hugh D.; Palsson, Bernhard O.; McDermott, Jason E.; Heffron, Fred; Smith, Richard D.; Peterson, Scott N.; Ansong, Charles; Hyduke, Daniel R.; Metz, Thomas O.; Adkins, Joshua N.

    2013-04-05

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) is a facultative pathogen that uses complex mechanisms to invade and proliferate within mammalian host cells. To investigate possible contributions of metabolic processes in S. Typhimurium grown under conditions known to induce expression of virulence genes, we used a metabolomics-driven systems biology approach coupled with genome scale modeling. First, we identified distinct metabolite profiles associated with bacteria grown in either rich or virulence-inducing media and report the most comprehensive coverage of the S. Typhimurium metabolome to date. Second, we applied an omics-informed genome scale modeling analysis of the functional consequences of adaptive alterations in S. Typhimurium metabolism during growth under our conditions. Excitingly, we observed possible sequestration of metabolites recently suggested to have immune modulating roles. Modeling efforts highlighted a decreased cellular capability to both produce and utilize intracellular amino acids during stationary phase culture in virulence conditions, despite significant abundance increases for these molecules as observed by our metabolomics measurements. Model-guided analysis suggested that alterations in metabolism prioritized other activities necessary for pathogenesis instead, such as lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis.

  5. The expression of virulence for a mixed-mode transmitted parasite in a diapausing host.

    PubMed

    Sheikh-Jabbari, Elham; Hall, Matthew D; Ben-Ami, Frida; Ebert, Dieter

    2014-07-01

    Many parasites survive harsh periods together with their hosts. Without the possibility of horizontal transmission during host diapause, parasite persistence depends entirely on host survival. We therefore hypothesize that a parasite should be avirulent during its host's diapausing stage. In contrast, the parasite may express higher virulence, i.e. parasite-induced fitness reduction of the host, during host life stages with good opportunities for horizontal transmission. Here we study the effects of a vertically and horizontally transmitted microsporidium parasite, Hamiltosporidium tvaerminnensis, on the quantity and survival of resting eggs of its host Daphnia magna. We find that the parasite did not affect egg volume, hatching success and time to hatching of the Daphnia's resting eggs, although it did strongly reduce the number of resting eggs produced by infected females, revealing high virulence during the non-diapause phase of the host's life cycle. These results also explain another aspect of this system - namely the strong decline in natural population prevalence across diapause. This decline is not caused by mortality in infected resting stages, as was previously hypothesized, but because infected female hosts produce lower rates of resting eggs. Together, these results help explain the epidemiological dynamics of a microsporidian disease and highlight the adaptive nature of life stage-dependent parasite virulence.

  6. Growth of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis in human plasma: impacts on virulence and metabolic gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Rosso, Marie-Laure; Chauvaux, Sylvie; Dessein, Rodrigue; Laurans, Caroline; Frangeul, Lionel; Lacroix, Céline; Schiavo, Angèle; Dillies, Marie-Agnès; Foulon, Jeannine; Coppée, Jean-Yves; Médigue, Claudine; Carniel, Elisabeth; Simonet, Michel; Marceau, Michaël

    2008-01-01

    Background In man, infection by the Gram-negative enteropathogen Yersinia pseudotuberculosis is usually limited to the terminal ileum. However, in immunocompromised patients, the microorganism may disseminate from the digestive tract and thus cause a systemic infection with septicemia. Results To gain insight into the metabolic pathways and virulence factors expressed by the bacterium at the blood stage of pseudotuberculosis, we compared the overall gene transcription patterns (the transcriptome) of bacterial cells cultured in either human plasma or Luria-Bertani medium. The most marked plasma-triggered metabolic consequence in Y. pseudotuberculosis was the switch to high glucose consumption, which is reminiscent of the acetogenic pathway (known as "glucose overflow") in Escherichia coli. However, upregulation of the glyoxylate shunt enzymes suggests that (in contrast to E. coli) acetate may be further metabolized in Y. pseudotuberculosis. Our data also indicate that the bloodstream environment can regulate major virulence genes (positively or negatively); the yadA adhesin gene and most of the transcriptional units of the pYV-encoded type III secretion apparatus were found to be upregulated, whereas transcription of the pH6 antigen locus was strongly repressed. Conclusion Our results suggest that plasma growth of Y. pseudotuberculosis is responsible for major transcriptional regulatory events and prompts key metabolic reorientations within the bacterium, which may in turn have an impact on virulence. PMID:19055764

  7. Iron is a signal for Stenotrophomonas maltophilia biofilm formation, oxidative stress response, OMPs expression, and virulence

    PubMed Central

    García, Carlos A.; Alcaraz, Eliana S.; Franco, Mirta A.; Passerini de Rossi, Beatriz N.

    2015-01-01

    Stenotrophomonas maltophilia is an emerging nosocomial pathogen. In many bacteria iron availability regulates, through the Fur system, not only iron homeostasis but also virulence. The aim of this work was to assess the role of iron on S. maltophilia biofilm formation, EPS production, oxidative stress response, OMPs regulation, quorum sensing (QS), and virulence. Studies were done on K279a and its isogenic fur mutant F60 cultured in the presence or absence of dipyridyl. This is the first report of spontaneous fur mutants obtained in S. maltophilia. F60 produced higher amounts of biofilms than K279a and CLSM analysis demonstrated improved adherence and biofilm organization. Under iron restricted conditions, K279a produced biofilms with more biomass and enhanced thickness. In addition, F60 produced higher amounts of EPS than K279a but with a similar composition, as revealed by ATR-FTIR spectroscopy. With respect to the oxidative stress response, MnSOD was the only SOD isoenzyme detected in K279a. F60 presented higher SOD activity than the wt strain in planktonic and biofilm cultures, and iron deprivation increased K279a SOD activity. Under iron starvation, SDS-PAGE profile from K279a presented two iron-repressed proteins. Mass spectrometry analysis revealed homology with FepA and another putative TonB-dependent siderophore receptor of K279a. In silico analysis allowed the detection of potential Fur boxes in the respective coding genes. K279a encodes the QS diffusible signal factor (DSF). Under iron restriction K279a produced higher amounts of DSF than under iron rich condition. Finally, F60 was more virulent than K279a in the Galleria mellonella killing assay. These results put in evidence that iron levels regulate, likely through the Fur system, S. maltophilia biofilm formation, oxidative stress response, OMPs expression, DSF production and virulence. PMID:26388863

  8. Involvement of the Haemophilus ducreyi gmhA Gene Product in Lipooligosaccharide Expression and Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Beth A.; Stevens, Marla K.; Hansen, Eric J.

    1998-01-01

    The lipooligosaccharide (LOS) present in the outer membrane of Haemophilus ducreyi is likely a virulence factor for this sexually transmitted pathogen. An open reading frame in H. ducreyi 35000 was found to encode a predicted protein that had 87% identity with the protein product of the gmhA (isn) gene of Haemophilus influenzae. In H. influenzae type b, inactivation of the gmhA gene caused the synthesis of a significantly truncated LOS which possessed only lipid A and a single 2-keto-3-deoxyoctulosonic acid molecule (A. Preston, D. J. Maskell, A. Johnson, and E. R. Moxon, J. Bacteriol. 178:396–402, 1996). The H. ducreyi gmhA gene was able to complement a gmhA-deficient Escherichia coli strain, a result which confirmed the identity of this gene. When the gmhA gene of H. ducreyi was inactivated by insertion of a cat cartridge, the resultant H. ducreyi gmhA mutant, 35000.252, expressed a LOS that migrated much faster than wild-type LOS in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. When the wild-type H. ducreyi strain and its isogenic gmhA mutant were used in the temperature-dependent rabbit model for dermal lesion production by H. ducreyi, the gmhA mutant was found to be substantially less virulent than the wild-type parent strain. The H. ducreyi gmhA gene was amplified by PCR from the H. ducreyi chromosome and cloned into the pLS88 vector. When the H. ducreyi gmhA gene was present in trans in gmhA mutant 35000.252, expression of the gmhA gene product restored the virulence of this mutant to wild-type levels. These results indicate that the gmhA gene product of H. ducreyi is essential for the expression of wild-type LOS by this pathogen. PMID:9712780

  9. In Vivo Expression Technology Identifies a Novel Virulence Factor Critical for Borrelia burgdorferi Persistence in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Tisha Choudhury; Jain, Sunny; Linowski, Angelika K.; Rike, Kelli; Bestor, Aaron; Rosa, Patricia A.; Halpern, Micah; Kurhanewicz, Stephanie; Jewett, Mollie W.

    2013-01-01

    Analysis of the transcriptome of Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease, during infection has proven difficult due to the low spirochete loads in the mammalian tissues. To overcome this challenge, we have developed an In Vivo Expression Technology (IVET) system for identification of B. burgdorferi genes expressed during an active murine infection. Spirochetes lacking linear plasmid (lp) 25 are non-infectious yet highly transformable. Mouse infection can be restored to these spirochetes by expression of the essential lp25-encoded pncA gene alone. Therefore, this IVET-based approach selects for in vivo-expressed promoters that drive expression of pncA resulting in the recovery of infectious spirochetes lacking lp25 following a three week infection in mice. Screening of approximately 15,000 clones in mice identified 289 unique in vivo-expressed DNA fragments from across all 22 replicons of the B. burgdorferi B31 genome. The in vivo-expressed candidate genes putatively encode proteins in various functional categories including antigenicity, metabolism, motility, nutrient transport and unknown functions. Candidate gene bbk46 on essential virulence plasmid lp36 was found to be highly induced in vivo and to be RpoS-independent. Immunocompetent mice inoculated with spirochetes lacking bbk46 seroconverted but no spirochetes were recovered from mouse tissues three weeks post inoculation. However, the bbk46 gene was not required for B. burgdorferi infection of immunodeficient mice. Therefore, through an initial IVET screen in B. burgdorferi we have identified a novel in vivo-induced virulence factor critical for the ability of the spirochete to evade the humoral immune response and persistently infect mice. PMID:24009501

  10. Transcriptional regulation of bacterial virulence gene expression by molecular oxygen and nitric oxide

    PubMed Central

    Green, Jeffrey; Rolfe, Matthew D; Smith, Laura J

    2014-01-01

    Molecular oxygen (O2) and nitric oxide (NO) are diatomic gases that play major roles in infection. The host innate immune system generates reactive oxygen species and NO as bacteriocidal agents and both require O2 for their production. Furthermore, the ability to adapt to changes in O2 availability is crucial for many bacterial pathogens, as many niches within a host are hypoxic. Pathogenic bacteria have evolved transcriptional regulatory systems that perceive these gases and respond by reprogramming gene expression. Direct sensors possess iron-containing co-factors (iron–sulfur clusters, mononuclear iron, heme) or reactive cysteine thiols that react with O2 and/or NO. Indirect sensors perceive the physiological effects of O2 starvation. Thus, O2 and NO act as environmental cues that trigger the coordinated expression of virulence genes and metabolic adaptations necessary for survival within a host. Here, the mechanisms of signal perception by key O2- and NO-responsive bacterial transcription factors and the effects on virulence gene expression are reviewed, followed by consideration of these aspects of gene regulation in two major pathogens, Staphylococcus aureus and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. PMID:25603427

  11. Identification of Genes Preferentially Expressed by Highly Virulent Piscine Streptococcus agalactiae upon Interaction with Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Chang-Ming; Chen, Rong-Rong; Kalhoro, Dildar Hussain; Wang, Zhao-Fei; Liu, Guang-Jin; Lu, Cheng-Ping; Liu, Yong-Jie

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae, long recognized as a mammalian pathogen, is an emerging concern with regard to fish. In this study, we used a mouse model and in vitro cell infection to evaluate the pathogenetic characteristics of S. agalactiae GD201008-001, isolated from tilapia in China. This bacterium was found to be highly virulent and capable of inducing brain damage by migrating into the brain by crossing the blood–brain barrier (BBB). The phagocytosis assays indicated that this bacterium could be internalized by murine macrophages and survive intracellularly for more than 24 h, inducing injury to macrophages. Further, selective capture of transcribed sequences (SCOTS) was used to investigate microbial gene expression associated with intracellular survival. This positive cDNA selection technique identified 60 distinct genes that could be characterized into 6 functional categories. More than 50% of the differentially expressed genes were involved in metabolic adaptation. Some genes have previously been described as associated with virulence in other bacteria, and four showed no significant similarities to any other previously described genes. This study constitutes the first step in further gene expression analyses that will lead to a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms used by S. agalactiae to survive in macrophages and to cross the BBB. PMID:24498419

  12. The Virulence Regulator Rns Activates the Expression of CS14 Pili

    PubMed Central

    Bodero, Maria Del Rocio; Munson, George Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Although many viral and bacterial pathogens cause diarrhea, enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) is one of the most frequently encountered in impoverished regions where it is estimated to kill between 300,000 and 700,000 children and infants annually. Critical ETEC virulence factors include pili which mediate the attachment of the pathogen to receptors in the intestinal lumen. In this study we show that the ETEC virulence regulator Rns positively regulates the expression of CS14 pili. Three Rns binding sites were identified upstream of the CS14 pilus promoter centered at −34.5, −80.5, and −155.5 relative to the Rns-dependent transcription start site. Mutagenesis of the promoter proximal site significantly decreased expression from the CS14 promoter. In contrast, the contribution of Rns bound at the promoter distal site was negligible and largely masked by occupancy of the promoter proximal site. Unexpectedly, Rns bound at the site centered at −80.5 had a slight but statistically significant inhibitory effect upon the pilin promoter. Nevertheless, this weak inhibitory effect was not sufficient to overcome the substantial promoter activation from Rns bound to the promoter proximal site. Thus, CS14 pili belong to a group of pili that depend upon Rns for their expression. PMID:27941642

  13. Inhibition of Virulence Gene Expression in Staphylococcus aureus by Novel Depsipeptides from a Marine Photobacterium

    PubMed Central

    Mansson, Maria; Nielsen, Anita; Kjærulff, Louise; Gotfredsen, Charlotte H.; Wietz, Matthias; Ingmer, Hanne; Gram, Lone; Larsen, Thomas O.

    2011-01-01

    During a global research expedition, more than five hundred marine bacterial strains capable of inhibiting the growth of pathogenic bacteria were collected. The purpose of the present study was to determine if these marine bacteria are also a source of compounds that interfere with the agr quorum sensing system that controls virulence gene expression in Staphylococcus aureus. Using a gene reporter fusion bioassay, we recorded agr interference as enhanced expression of spa, encoding Protein A, concomitantly with reduced expression of hla, encoding α-hemolysin, and rnaIII encoding RNAIII, the effector molecule of agr. A marine Photobacterium produced compounds interfering with agr in S. aureus strain 8325-4, and bioassay-guided fractionation of crude extracts led to the isolation of two novel cyclodepsipeptides, designated solonamide A and B. Northern blot analysis confirmed the agr interfering activity of pure solonamides in both S. aureus strain 8325-4 and the highly virulent, community-acquired strain USA300 (CA-MRSA). To our knowledge, this is the first report of inhibitors of the agr system by a marine bacterium. PMID:22363239

  14. Evaluation of Approaches to Monitor Staphylococcus aureus Virulence Factor Expression during Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rozemeijer, Wouter; Fink, Pamela; Rojas, Eduardo; Jones, C. Hal; Pavliakova, Danka; Giardina, Peter; Murphy, Ellen; Liberator, Paul; Jiang, Qin; Girgenti, Douglas; Peters, Remco P. H.; Savelkoul, Paul H. M.; Jansen, Kathrin U.; Anderson, Annaliesa S.; Kluytmans, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a versatile pathogen of medical significance, using multiple virulence factors to cause disease. A prophylactic S. aureus 4-antigen (SA4Ag) vaccine comprising capsular polysaccharide (types 5 and 8) conjugates, clumping factor A (ClfA) and manganese transporter C (MntC) is under development. This study was designed to characterize S. aureus isolates recovered from infected patients and also to investigate approaches for examining expression of S. aureus vaccine candidates and the host response during human infection. Confirmation of antigen expression in different disease states is important to support the inclusion of these antigens in a prophylactic vaccine. Hospitalized patients with diagnosed S. aureus wound (27) or bloodstream (24) infections were enrolled. Invasive and nasal carriage S. aureus isolates were recovered and characterized for genotypic diversity. S. aureus antigen expression was evaluated directly by real-time, quantitative, reverse-transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis and indirectly by serology using a competitive Luminex immunoassay. Study isolates were genotypically diverse and all had the genes encoding the antigens present in the SA4Ag vaccine. S. aureus nasal carriage was detected in 55% of patients, and in those subjects 64% of the carriage isolates matched the invasive strain. In swab samples with detectable S. aureus triosephosphate isomerase housekeeping gene expression, RNA transcripts encoding the S. aureus virulence factors ClfA, MntC, and capsule polysaccharide were detected by qRT-PCR. Antigen expression was indirectly confirmed by increases in antibody titer during the course of infection from acute to convalescent phase. Demonstration of bacterial transcript expression together with immunological response to the SA4Ag antigens in a clinically relevant patient population provides support for inclusion of these antigens in a prophylactic vaccine. PMID:25719409

  15. Current European Labyrinthula zosterae Are Not Virulent and Modulate Seagrass (Zostera marina) Defense Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Brakel, Janina; Werner, Franziska Julie; Tams, Verena; Reusch, Thorsten B. H.; Bockelmann, Anna-Christina

    2014-01-01

    Pro- and eukaryotic microbes associated with multi-cellular organisms are receiving increasing attention as a driving factor in ecosystems. Endophytes in plants can change host performance by altering nutrient uptake, secondary metabolite production or defense mechanisms. Recent studies detected widespread prevalence of Labyrinthula zosterae in European Zostera marina meadows, a protist that allegedly caused a massive amphi-Atlantic seagrass die-off event in the 1930's, while showing only limited virulence today. As a limiting factor for pathogenicity, we investigated genotype×genotype interactions of host and pathogen from different regions (10–100 km-scale) through reciprocal infection. Although the endophyte rapidly infected Z. marina, we found little evidence that Z. marina was negatively impacted by L. zosterae. Instead Z. marina showed enhanced leaf growth and kept endophyte abundance low. Moreover, we found almost no interaction of protist×eelgrass-origin on different parameters of L. zosterae virulence/Z. marina performance, and also no increase in mortality after experimental infection. In a target gene approach, we identified a significant down-regulation in the expression of 6/11 genes from the defense cascade of Z. marina after real-time quantitative PCR, revealing strong immune modulation of the host's defense by a potential parasite for the first time in a marine plant. Nevertheless, one gene involved in phenol synthesis was strongly up-regulated, indicating that Z. marina plants were probably able to control the level of infection. There was no change in expression in a general stress indicator gene (HSP70). Mean L. zosterae abundances decreased below 10% after 16 days of experimental runtime. We conclude that under non-stress conditions L. zosterae infection in the study region is not associated with substantial virulence. PMID:24691450

  16. Heterologous expression of Streptococcus mutans Cnm in Lactococcus lactis promotes intracellular invasion, adhesion to human cardiac tissues and virulence.

    PubMed

    Freires, Irlan A; Avilés-Reyes, Alejandro; Kitten, Todd; Simpson-Haidaris, P J; Swartz, Michael; Knight, Peter A; Rosalen, Pedro L; Lemos, José A; Abranches, Jacqueline

    2017-01-02

    In S. mutans, the expression of the surface glycoprotein Cnm mediates binding to extracellular matrix proteins, endothelial cell invasion and virulence in the Galleria mellonella invertebrate model. To further characterize Cnm as a virulence factor, the cnm gene from S. mutans strain OMZ175 was expressed in the non-pathogenic Lactococcus lactis NZ9800 using a nisin-inducible system. Despite the absence of the machinery necessary for Cnm glycosylation, Western blot and immunofluorescence microscopy analyses demonstrated that Cnm was effectively expressed and translocated to the cell wall of L. lactis. Similar to S. mutans, expression of Cnm in L. lactis enabled robust binding to collagen and laminin, invasion of human coronary artery endothelial cells and increased virulence in G. mellonella. Using an ex vivo human heart tissue colonization model, we showed that Cnm-positive strains of either S. mutans or L. lactis outcompete their Cnm-negative counterparts for tissue colonization. Finally, Cnm expression facilitated L. lactis adhesion and colonization in a rabbit model of infective endocarditis. Collectively, our results provide unequivocal evidence that binding to extracellular matrices mediated by Cnm is an important virulence attribute of S. mutans and confirm the usefulness of the L. lactis heterologous system for further characterization of bacterial virulence factors.

  17. DNA Adenine Methylation Regulates Virulence Gene Expression in Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium▿

    PubMed Central

    Balbontín, Roberto; Rowley, Gary; Pucciarelli, M. Graciela; López-Garrido, Javier; Wormstone, Yvette; Lucchini, Sacha; García-del Portillo, Francisco; Hinton, Jay C. D.; Casadesús, Josep

    2006-01-01

    Transcriptomic analyses during growth in Luria-Bertani medium were performed in strain SL1344 of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and in two isogenic derivatives lacking Dam methylase. More genes were repressed than were activated by Dam methylation (139 versus 37). Key genes that were differentially regulated by Dam methylation were verified independently. The largest classes of Dam-repressed genes included genes belonging to the SOS regulon, as previously described in Escherichia coli, and genes of the SOS-inducible Salmonella prophages ST64B, Gifsy-1, and Fels-2. Dam-dependent virulence-related genes were also identified. Invasion genes in pathogenicity island SPI-1 were activated by Dam methylation, while the fimbrial operon std was repressed by Dam methylation. Certain flagellar genes were repressed by Dam methylation, and Dam− mutants of S. enterica showed reduced motility. Altered expression patterns in the absence of Dam methylation were also found for the chemotaxis genes cheR (repressed by Dam) and STM3216 (activated by Dam) and for the Braun lipoprotein gene, lppB (activated by Dam). The requirement for DNA adenine methylation in the regulation of specific virulence genes suggests that certain defects of Salmonella Dam− mutants in the mouse model may be caused by altered patterns of gene expression. PMID:16997949

  18. Decreased cruzipain and gp85/trans-sialidase family protein expression contributes to loss of Trypanosoma cruzi trypomastigote virulence.

    PubMed

    San Francisco, Juan; Barría, Iván; Gutiérrez, Bessy; Neira, Iván; Muñoz, Christian; Sagua, Hernán; Araya, Jorge E; Andrade, Juan Carlos; Zailberger, Anibal; Catalán, Alejandro; Remonsellez, Francisco; Vega, José Luis; González, Jorge

    2017-01-01

    Two cell lines derived from a single Trypanosoma cruzi clone by long-term passaging generated a highly virulent (C8C3hvir) and a low virulent (C8C3lvir) cell line. The C8C3hvir cell line was highly infective and lethal to Balb/c mice, and the C8C3lvir cell line was three- to five-fold less infective to mouse cardiomyocytes than C8C3hvir. The highly virulent T. cruzi cell line abundantly expressed the major cysteine proteinase cruzipain (Czp), complement regulatory protein (CRP) and trans-sialidase (TS), all of which are known to act as virulence factors in this parasite. The in vitro invasion capacity and in vivo Balb/c mouse infectiveness of the highly virulent strain was strongly reduced by pre-treatment with antisense oligonucleotides targeting TS or CRP or with E64d. Based on these results, we conclude that decreased levels of TS, CRP and Czp expression could contribute to loss of T. cruzi trypomastigote virulence.

  19. Norlichexanthone Reduces Virulence Gene Expression and Biofilm Formation in Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Bojer, Martin S.; Zhao, Yu; Friberg, Cathrine; Ifrah, Dan; Glasser Heede, Nina; Larsen, Thomas O.; Frøkiær, Hanne; Frees, Dorte; Zhang, Lixin; Dai, Huanqin

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a serious human pathogen and antibiotic resistant, community-associated strains, such as the methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strain USA300, continue to spread. To avoid resistance, anti-virulence therapy has been proposed where toxicity is targeted rather than viability. Previously we have shown that norlichexanthone, a small non-reduced tricyclic polyketide produced by fungi and lichens, reduces expression of hla encoding α-hemolysin as well as the regulatory RNAIII of the agr quorum sensing system in S. aureus 8325–4. The aim of the present study was to further characterise the mode of action of norlichexanthone and its effect on biofilm formation. We find that norlichexanthone reduces expression of both hla and RNAIII also in strain USA300. Structurally, norlichexanthone resembles ω-hydroxyemodin that recently was shown to bind the agr two component response regulator, AgrA, which controls expression of RNAIII and the phenol soluble modulins responsible for human neutrophil killing. We show that norlichexanthone reduces S. aureus toxicity towards human neutrophils and interferes directly with AgrA binding to its DNA target. In contrast to ω-hydroxyemodin however, norlichexanthone reduces staphylococcal biofilm formation. Transcriptomic analysis revealed that genes regulated by the SaeRS two-component system are repressed by norlichexanthone when compared to untreated cells, an effect that was mitigated in strain Newman carrying a partially constitutive SaeRS system. Our data show that norlichexanthone treatment reduces expression of key virulence factors in CA-MRSA strain USA300 via AgrA binding and represses biofilm formation. PMID:28005941

  20. Activation of CpxRA in Haemophilus ducreyi primarily inhibits the expression of its targets, including major virulence determinants.

    PubMed

    Gangaiah, Dharanesh; Zhang, Xinjun; Fortney, Kate R; Baker, Beth; Liu, Yunlong; Munson, Robert S; Spinola, Stanley M

    2013-08-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi causes chancroid, a genital ulcer disease that facilitates the transmission of human immunodeficiency virus type 1. In humans, H. ducreyi is surrounded by phagocytes and must adapt to a hostile environment to survive. To sense and respond to environmental cues, bacteria frequently use two-component signal transduction (2CST) systems. The only obvious 2CST system in H. ducreyi is CpxRA; CpxR is a response regulator, and CpxA is a sensor kinase. Previous studies by Hansen and coworkers showed that CpxR directly represses the expression of dsrA, the lspB-lspA2 operon, and the flp operon, which are required for virulence in humans. They further showed that CpxA functions predominantly as a phosphatase in vitro to maintain the expression of virulence determinants. Since a cpxA mutant is avirulent while a cpxR mutant is fully virulent in humans, CpxA also likely functions predominantly as a phosphatase in vivo. To better understand the role of H. ducreyi CpxRA in controlling virulence determinants, here we defined genes potentially regulated by CpxRA by using RNA-Seq. Activation of CpxR by deletion of cpxA repressed nearly 70% of its targets, including seven established virulence determinants. Inactivation of CpxR by deletion of cpxR differentially regulated few genes and increased the expression of one virulence determinant. We identified a CpxR binding motif that was enriched in downregulated but not upregulated targets. These data reinforce the hypothesis that CpxA phosphatase activity plays a critical role in controlling H. ducreyi virulence in vivo. Characterization of the downregulated genes may offer new insights into pathogenesis.

  1. Allele-Dependent Differences in Quorum-Sensing Dynamics Result in Variant Expression of Virulence Genes in Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Geisinger, Edward; Chen, John

    2012-01-01

    Agr is an autoinducing, quorum-sensing system that functions in many Gram-positive species and is best characterized in the pathogen Staphylococcus aureus, in which it is a global regulator of virulence gene expression. Allelic variations in the agr genes have resulted in the emergence of four quorum-sensing specificity groups in S. aureus, which correlate with different strain pathotypes. The basis for these predilections is unclear but is hypothesized to involve the phenomenon of quorum-sensing interference between strains of different agr groups, which may drive S. aureus strain isolation and divergence. Whether properties intrinsic to each agr allele directly influence virulence phenotypes within S. aureus is unknown. In this study, we examined group-specific differences in agr autoinduction and virulence gene regulation by utilizing congenic strains, each harboring a unique S. aureus agr allele, enabling a dissection of agr locus-dependent versus genotype-dependent effects on quorum-sensing dynamics and virulence factor production. Employing a reporter fusion to the principal agr promoter, P3, we observed allele-dependent differences in the timing and magnitude of agr activation. These differences were mediated by polymorphisms within the agrBDCA genes and translated to significant variations in the expression of a key transcriptional regulator, Rot, and of several important exoproteins and surface factors involved in pathogenesis. This work uncovers the contribution of divergent quorum-sensing alleles to variant expression of virulence determinants within a bacterial species. PMID:22467783

  2. Differences in cell morphometry, cell wall topography and gp70 expression correlate with the virulence of Sporothrix brasiliensis clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Castro, Rafaela A; Kubitschek-Barreira, Paula H; Teixeira, Pedro A C; Sanches, Glenda F; Teixeira, Marcus M; Quintella, Leonardo P; Almeida, Sandro R; Costa, Rosane O; Camargo, Zoilo P; Felipe, Maria S S; de Souza, Wanderley; Lopes-Bezerra, Leila M

    2013-01-01

    Sporotrichosis is a chronic infectious disease affecting both humans and animals. For many years, this subcutaneous mycosis had been attributed to a single etiological agent; however, it is now known that this taxon consists of a complex of at least four pathogenic species, including Sporothrix schenckii and Sporothrix brasiliensis. Gp70 was previously shown to be an important antigen and adhesin expressed on the fungal cell surface and may have a key role in immunomodulation and host response. The aim of this work was to study the virulence, morphometry, cell surface topology and gp70 expression of clinical isolates of S. brasiliensis compared with two reference strains of S. schenckii. Several clinical isolates related to severe human cases or associated with the Brazilian zoonotic outbreak of sporotrichosis were genotyped and clustered as S. brasiliensis. Interestingly, in a murine subcutaneous model of sporotrichosis, these isolates showed a higher virulence profile compared with S. schenckii. A single S. brasiliensis isolate from an HIV-positive patient not only showed lower virulence but also presented differences in cell morphometry, cell wall topography and abundant gp70 expression compared with the virulent isolates. In contrast, the highly virulent S. brasiliensis isolates showed reduced levels of cell wall gp70. These observations were confirmed by the topographical location of the gp70 antigen using immunoelectromicroscopy in both species. In addition, the gp70 molecule was sequenced and identified using mass spectrometry, and the sequenced peptides were aligned into predicted proteins using Blastp with the S. schenckii and S. brasiliensis genomes.

  3. Differential expression pattern of Vago in bumblebee (Bombus terrestris), induced by virulent and avirulent virus infections

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Jinzhi; Meeus, Ivan; Smagghe, Guy

    2016-01-01

    Viruses are one of the main drivers of the decline of domesticated and wild bees but the mechanisms of antiviral immunity in pollinators are poorly understood. Recent work has suggested that next to the small interfering RNA (siRNA) pathway other immune-related pathways play a role in the defense of the bee hosts against viral infection. In addition, Vago plays a role in the cross-talk between the innate immune pathways in Culex mosquito cells. Here we describe the Vago orthologue in bumblebees of Bombus terrestris, and investigated its role upon the infection of two different bee viruses, the virulent Israeli acute paralysis virus (IAPV) and the avirulent slow bee paralysis virus (SBPV). Our results showed that BtVago was downregulated upon the infection of IAPV that killed all bumblebees, but not with SBPV where the workers survived the virus infection. Thus, for the first time, Vago/Vago-like expression appears to be associated with the virulence of virus and may act as a modulator of antiviral immunity. PMID:27680717

  4. Differential expression pattern of Vago in bumblebee (Bombus terrestris), induced by virulent and avirulent virus infections.

    PubMed

    Niu, Jinzhi; Meeus, Ivan; Smagghe, Guy

    2016-09-29

    Viruses are one of the main drivers of the decline of domesticated and wild bees but the mechanisms of antiviral immunity in pollinators are poorly understood. Recent work has suggested that next to the small interfering RNA (siRNA) pathway other immune-related pathways play a role in the defense of the bee hosts against viral infection. In addition, Vago plays a role in the cross-talk between the innate immune pathways in Culex mosquito cells. Here we describe the Vago orthologue in bumblebees of Bombus terrestris, and investigated its role upon the infection of two different bee viruses, the virulent Israeli acute paralysis virus (IAPV) and the avirulent slow bee paralysis virus (SBPV). Our results showed that BtVago was downregulated upon the infection of IAPV that killed all bumblebees, but not with SBPV where the workers survived the virus infection. Thus, for the first time, Vago/Vago-like expression appears to be associated with the virulence of virus and may act as a modulator of antiviral immunity.

  5. Subinhibitory concentrations of punicalagin reduces expression of virulence-related exoproteins by Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Mun, Su-Hyun; Kong, Ryong; Seo, Yun-Soo; Zhou, Tian; Kang, Ok-Hwa; Shin, Dong-Won; Kwon, Dong-Yeul

    2016-11-01

    Staphylococcus aureus produces a number of virulence factors. The major virulence factors exhibited by S aureus include various antigens, enzymes, cytotoxins and exotoxins (e.g. hemolysins, enterotoxins and toxic shock syndrome toxin). In this report, we show the influence of punicalagin on the secretion of exoprotein from S aureus by western blotting, tumor necrosis factor (TNF) release assay and quantitative RT-PCR. When added to S aureus cultures at an OD600 of 0.9, graded subinhibitory concentrations of punicalagin reduced the production of α-toxin, SEA and SEB in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a dose-dependent manner. Consistently, punicalagin reduced TNF-inducing activity by S aureus culture supernatants. Here, the transcriptional level of agr (accessory gene regulator) in S aureus was inhibited by punicalagin, suggesting that the reduced transcription may affect the secretion of exotoxins. These findings suggest that the expression of α-toxin and enterotoxins in S aureus is sensitive to the action of punicalagin, which may be an advantageous candidate in the treatment of toxigenic staphylococcal disease.

  6. Expression of a Toll Signaling Regulator Serpin in a Mycoinsecticide for Increased Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Linzhi; Keyhani, Nemat O.; Tang, Guirong; Tian, Chuang; Lu, Ruipeng; Wang, Xin; Pei, Yan

    2014-01-01

    Serpins are ubiquitously distributed serine protease inhibitors that covalently bind to target proteases to exert their activities. Serpins regulate a wide range of activities, particularly those in which protease-mediated cascades are active. The Drosophila melanogaster serpin Spn43Ac negatively controls the Toll pathway that is activated in response to fungal infection. The entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana offers an environmentally friendly alternative to chemical pesticides for insect control. However, the use of mycoinsecticides remains limited in part due to issues of efficacy (low virulence) and the recalcitrance of the targets (due to strong immune responses). Since Spn43Ac acts to inhibit Toll-mediated activation of defense responses, we explored the feasibility of a new strategy to engineer entomopathogenic fungi with increased virulence by expression of Spn43Ac in the fungus. Compared to the 50% lethal dose (LD50) for the wild-type parent, the LD50 of B. bassiana expressing Spn43Ac (strain Bb::S43Ac-1) was reduced ∼3-fold, and the median lethal time against the greater wax moth (Galleria mellonella) was decreased by ∼24%, with the more rapid proliferation of hyphal bodies being seen in the host hemolymph. In vitro and in vivo assays showed inhibition of phenoloxidase (PO) activation in the presence of Spn43Ac, with Spn43Ac-mediated suppression of activation by chymotrypsin, trypsin, laminarin, and lipopolysaccharide occurring in the following order: chymotrypsin and trypsin > laminarin > lipopolysaccharide. Expression of Spn43Ac had no effect on the activity of the endogenous B. bassiana-derived cuticle-degrading protease (CDEP-1). These results expand our understanding of Spn43Ac function and confirm that suppression of insect immune system defenses represents a feasible approach to engineering entomopathogenic fungi for greater efficacy. PMID:24837378

  7. Leucine metabolism regulates TRI6 expression and affects deoxynivalenol production and virulence in Fusarium graminearum.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Rajagopal; Narayanan, Swara; Walkowiak, Sean; Wang, Li; Joshi, Manisha; Rocheleau, Hélène; Ouellet, Thérèse; Harris, Linda J

    2015-11-01

    TRI6 is a positive regulator of the trichothecene gene cluster and the production of trichothecene mycotoxins [deoxynivalenol (DON)] and acetylated forms such as 15-Acetyl-DON) in the cereal pathogen Fusarium graminearum. As a global transcriptional regulator, TRI6 expression is modulated by nitrogen-limiting conditions, sources of nitrogen and carbon, pH and light. However, the mechanism by which these diverse environmental factors affect TRI6 expression remains underexplored. In our effort to understand how nutrients affect TRI6 regulation, comparative digital expression profiling was performed with a wild-type F. graminearum and a Δtri6 mutant strain, grown in nutrient-rich conditions. Analysis showed that TRI6 negatively regulates genes of the branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) metabolic pathway. Feeding studies with deletion mutants of MCC, encoding methylcrotonyl-CoA-carboxylase, one of the key enzymes of leucine metabolism, showed that addition of leucine specifically down-regulated TRI6 expression and reduced 15-ADON accumulation. Constitutive expression of TRI6 in the Δmcc mutant strain restored 15-ADON production. A combination of cellophane breach assays and pathogenicity experiments on wheat demonstrated that disrupting the leucine metabolic pathway significantly reduced disease. These findings suggest a complex interaction between one of the primary metabolic pathways with a global regulator of mycotoxin biosynthesis and virulence in F. graminearum.

  8. Expression of Vibrio cholerae virulence genes in response to environmental signals.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Kenneth M

    2002-09-01

    Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of Asiatic cholera, is a gram-negative motile bacterial species acquired via oral ingestion of contaminated food or water sources. The O1 serogroup of V. cholerae is responsible for pandemic cholera and is divided into two biotypes, classical and El Tor (Butterton and Calderwood, 1995; Mekalanos, 1985). The El Tor biotype is responsible for the current cholera pandemic. In the absence of disease, the vibrio life cycle consists of a free-swimming phase in marine and estuarine environments in association with zooplankton, crustaceans, insects, and water plants. Vibrios interact with various surfaces found in the environment to generate biofilms which may promote survival (Watnick etaL, 1999). Within the host the motile vibrios must evade the innate host defense mechanisms, penetrate the mucus layer covering the intestinal villi, adhere to and colonize the epithelial surface of the small intestine, assume a non-motile phase, replicate and cause disease by secreting numerous exoproteins at the site of infection (Oliver and Kaper, 1997). The voluminous diarrhea associated with cholera infection leads to the dissemination of the vibrios back into a watery environment and thus a continuation of the environmental phase of the life cycle. The host phase of the vibrio life cycle is only possible through the action of a group of virulence genes (ToxR-regulon) controlled by a complex and incompletely understood regulatory cascade. The ToxR regulon colonization and toxin genes are coordinately expressed in response to specific host signals that have yet to be completely defined (Skorupsky and Taylor 1997). Although little is known regarding the host signals that impact the ToxR regulatory cascade, it is clear that these intraintestinal signals play an important role in maximizing the ability of the vibrios to survive and multiply within the host. Key to understanding the complex events involved in the pathogenesis of V. cholerae will be

  9. Entamoeba histolytica: expression and localization of Gal/GalNAc lectin in virulent and non-virulent variants from HM1:IMSS strain.

    PubMed

    López-Vancell, R; Arreguín Espinosa, R; González-Canto, A; Néquiz Avendaño, M; García de León, M C; Olivos-García, A; López-Vancell, D; Pérez-Tamayo, R

    2010-07-01

    We have purified Gal/GalNAc lectin from Entamoeba histolytica by electroelution. The purified protein was used to immunize rabbits and obtain polyclonal IgG's anti-lectin. These antibodies were used as tools to analyze the expression and localization of the amoebic lectin in both virulent (vEh) and non-virulent (nvEh) variants of axenically cultured HM1:IMSS strain. vEh is able to induce liver abscesses in hamsters, whereas nvEh has lost this ability. In vitro, amoebic trophozoites from both variants equally express this protein as shown by densitometric analysis of the corresponding band in Western blots from lysates. In both types of trophozoites, the pattern of distribution of the lectin was mainly on the surface. We have also compared by immunohistochemistry the presence and distribution of lectin in the in vivo liver lesions produced in hamsters. In order to prolong the survival of nvEh to analyze both variants in an in vivo model, hamsters inoculated with nvEh were treated with methyl prednisolone. Our results suggest that the Gal/GalNAc lectin is equally expressed in both nvEh and vEh.

  10. Spaceflight Alters Bacterial Gene Expression and Virulence and Reveals Role for Global Regulator Hfq

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Ott, C. M.; zuBentrup, K. Honer; Ramamurthy R.; Quick, L.; Porwollik, S.; Cheng, P.; McClellan, M.; Tsaprailis, G.; Radabaugh, T.; Hunt, A.; Fernandez, D.; Richter, E.; Shah, M.; Kilcoyne, M.; Joshi, L.; Nelman-Gonzalez, M.; Hing, S.; Parra, M.; Dumaras, P.; Norwood, K.; Nickerson, C. A.; Bober, R.; Devich, J.; Ruggles, A.

    2007-01-01

    A comprehensive analysis of both the molecular genetic and phenotypic responses of any organism to the spaceflight environment has never been accomplished due to significant technological and logistical hurdles. Moreover, the effects of spaceflight on microbial pathogenicity and associated infectious disease risks have not been studied. The bacterial pathogen Salmonella typhimurium was grown aboard Space Shuttle mission STS-115 and compared to identical ground control cultures. Global microarray and proteomic analyses revealed 167 transcripts and 73 proteins changed expression with the conserved RNA-binding protein Hfq identified as a likely global regulator involved in the response to this environment. Hfq involvement was confirmed with a ground based microgravity culture model. Spaceflight samples exhibited enhanced virulence in a murine infection model and extracellular matrix accumulation consistent with a biofilm. Strategies to target Hfq and related regulators could potentially decrease infectious disease risks during spaceflight missions and provide novel therapeutic options on Earth.

  11. Real-Time Characterization of Virulence Factor Expression in Yersinia pestis Using a Green Fluorescent Protein Reporter System

    SciTech Connect

    Forde, C; Rocco, J; Fitch, J P; McCutchen-Maloney, S

    2004-06-09

    A real-time reporter system was developed to monitor the thermal induction of virulence factors in Yersinia pestis. The reporter system consists of a plasmid in Y. pestis in which the expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) is under the control of the promoters for six virulence factors, yopE, sycE, yopK, yopT, yscN, and lcrE/yopN, which are all components of the Type III secretion virulence mechanism of Y. pestis. Induction of the expression of these genes in vivo was determined by the increase in fluorescence intensity of GFP in real time. Basal expression levels observed for the Y. pestis promoters, expressed as percentages of the positive control with GFP under the control of the lac promoter, were: yopE (15%), sycE (15%), yopK (13%), yopT (4%), lcrE (3.3%) and yscN (0.8%). The yopE reporter showed the strongest gene induction following temperature transition from 26 C to 37 C. The induction levels of the other virulence factors, expressed as percentages of yopE induction, were: yopK (57%), sycE (9%), yscN (3%), lcrE (3%), and yopT (2%). The thermal induction of each of these promoter fusions was repressed by calcium, and the ratios of the initial rates of thermal induction without calcium supplementation compared to the rate with calcium supplementation were: yopE (11 fold), yscN (7 fold), yopK (6 fold), lcrE (3 fold), yopT (2 fold), and sycE (2 fold). This work demonstrates a novel approach to quantify gene induction and provides a method to rapidly determine the effects of external stimuli on expression of Y. pestis virulence factors in real time, in living cells.

  12. Iron concentration limits growth rate and the expression of virulence factors in hrp-inducing minimal medium with Pseudomonas syringae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although chemically-defined media have been developed and widely used to study the expression of virulence factors in the model plant pathogen, Pseudomonas syringae, it has been difficult to link specific medium components to the induction response. Using a chemostat system, we found that iron is th...

  13. Unfolded Protein Response (UPR) Regulator Cib1 Controls Expression of Genes Encoding Secreted Virulence Factors in Ustilago maydis

    PubMed Central

    Hampel, Martin; Jakobi, Mareike; Schmitz, Lara; Meyer, Ute; Finkernagel, Florian; Doehlemann, Gunther; Heimel, Kai

    2016-01-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR), a conserved eukaryotic signaling pathway to ensure protein homeostasis in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), coordinates biotrophic development in the corn smut fungus Ustilago maydis. Exact timing of UPR activation is required for virulence and presumably connected to the elevated expression of secreted effector proteins during infection of the host plant Zea mays. In the baker’s yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, expression of UPR target genes is induced upon binding of the central regulator Hac1 to unfolded protein response elements (UPREs) in their promoters. While a role of the UPR in effector secretion has been described previously, we investigated a potential UPR-dependent regulation of genes encoding secreted effector proteins. In silico prediction of UPREs in promoter regions identified the previously characterized effector genes pit2 and tin1-1, as bona fide UPR target genes. Furthermore, direct binding of the Hac1-homolog Cib1 to the UPRE containing promoter fragments of both genes was confirmed by quantitative chromatin immunoprecipitation (qChIP) analysis. Targeted deletion of the UPRE abolished Cib1-dependent expression of pit2 and significantly affected virulence. Furthermore, ER stress strongly increased Pit2 expression and secretion. This study expands the role of the UPR as a signal hub in fungal virulence and illustrates, how biotrophic fungi can coordinate cellular physiology, development and regulation of secreted virulence factors. PMID:27093436

  14. Canine distemper viruses expressing a hemagglutinin without N-glycans lose virulence but retain immunosuppression.

    PubMed

    Sawatsky, Bevan; von Messling, Veronika

    2010-03-01

    Paramyxovirus glycoproteins are posttranslationally modified by the addition of N-linked glycans, which are often necessary for correct folding, processing, and cell surface expression. To establish the contribution of N glycosylation to morbillivirus attachment (H) protein function and overall virulence, we first determined the use of the potential N-glycosylation sites in the canine distemper virus (CDV) H proteins. Biochemical characterization revealed that the three sites conserved in all strains were N glycosylated, whereas only two of the up to five additional sites present in wild-type strains are used. A wild-type virus with an H protein reproducing the vaccine strain N-glycosylation pattern remained lethal in ferrets but with a prolonged course of disease. In contrast, introduction of the vaccine H protein in the wild-type context resulted in complete attenuation. To further characterize the role of N glycosylation in CDV pathogenesis, the N-glycosylation sites of wild-type H proteins were successively deleted, including a nonstandard site, to ultimately generate a nonglycosylated H protein. Despite reduced expression levels, this protein remained fully functional. Recombinant viruses expressing N-glycan-deficient H proteins no longer caused disease, even though their immunosuppressive capacities were retained, indicating that reduced N glycosylation contributes to attenuation without affecting immunosuppression.

  15. Artemisia princeps Inhibits Biofilm Formation and Virulence-Factor Expression of Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Na-Young; Kang, Sun-Young; Kim, Kang-Ju

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we used ethanol extract of A. princeps and investigated its antibacterial effects against MRSA. Ethanol extract of A. princeps significantly inhibited MRSA growth and organic acid production during glucose metabolism at concentrations greater than 1 mg/mL (P < 0.05). MRSA biofilm formation was observed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and safranin staining. A. princeps extract was found to inhibit MRSA biofilm formation at concentrations higher than 2 mg/mL significantly (P < 0.05). Bactericidal effects of the A. princeps were observed using confocal laser microscopy, which showed that A. princeps was bactericidal in a dose-dependent manner. Using real-time PCR, expression of mecA, an antibiotic-resistance gene of MRSA, was observed, along with that of sea, agrA, and sarA. A. princeps significantly inhibited mecA, sea, agrA, and sarA, mRNA expression at the concentrations greater than 1 mg/mL (P < 0.05). The phytochemical analysis of A. princeps showed a relatively high content of organic acids and glycosides. The results of this study suggest that the ethanol extract of A. princeps may inhibit proliferation, acid production, biofilm formation, and virulence gene expressions of MRSA, which may be related to organic acids and glycosides, the major components in the extract. PMID:26247012

  16. Cloning and expression of Staphylococcus saprophyticus urease gene sequences in Staphylococcus carnosus and contribution of the enzyme to virulence.

    PubMed Central

    Gatermann, S; Marre, R

    1989-01-01

    The urease gene of Staphylococcus saprophyticus CCM883 was cloned and expressed in Staphylococcus carnosus TM300. In vitro translation of the cloned DNA sequences revealed six polypeptides (of 70, 47, 29, 27, 20, and 17 kilodaltons) that were associated with enzyme activity. Introduction of the cloned genes into a urease-negative mutant of S. saprophyticus restored the virulence of this strain, confirming our previous suggestion (S. Gatermann, J. John, and R. Marre, Infect. Immun. 57:110-116, 1989) that this enzyme is a major virulence factor of the organism and contributes mainly to cystopathogenicity. Images PMID:2777370

  17. Virulence genes of the phytopathogen Rhodococcus fascians show specific spatial and temporal expression patterns during plant infection.

    PubMed

    Cornelis, Karen; Maes, Tania; Jaziri, Mondher; Holsters, Marcelle; Goethals, Koen

    2002-04-01

    The phytopathogenic bacterium Rhodococcus fascians provokes shoot meristem formation and malformations on aerial plant parts, mainly at the axils. The interaction is accompanied by bacterial colonization of the plant surface and tissues. Upon infection, the two bacterial loci required for full virulence, fas and att, were expressed only at the sites of symptom development, although their expression profiles differed both spatially and temporally. The att locus was expressed principally in bacteria located on the plant surface at early stages of infection. Expression of the fas locus occurred throughout infection, mainly in bacteria that were penetrating, or had penetrated, the plant tissues and coincided with sites of meristem initiation and proliferation. The implications for the regulation of virulence genes of R. fascians during plant infection are discussed.

  18. CodY orchestrates the expression of virulence determinants in emetic Bacillus cereus by impacting key regulatory circuits.

    PubMed

    Frenzel, Elrike; Doll, Viktoria; Pauthner, Matthias; Lücking, Genia; Scherer, Siegfried; Ehling-Schulz, Monika

    2012-07-01

    Bacillus cereus causes gastrointestinal diseases and local and systemic infections elicited by the depsipeptide cereulide, enterotoxins, phospholipases, cytolysins and proteases. The PlcR-PapR quorum sensing system activates the expression of several virulence factors, whereas the Spo0A-AbrB regulatory circuit partially controls the plasmid-borne cereulide synthetase (ces) operon. Here, we show that CodY, a nutrient-responsive regulator of Gram-positive bacteria, has a profound effect on both regulatory systems, which have been assumed to operate independently of each other. Deletion of codY resulted in downregulation of virulence genes belonging to the PlcR regulon and a concomitant upregulation of the ces genes. CodY was found to be a repressor of the ces operon, but did not interact with the promoter regions of PlcR-dependent virulence genes in vitro, suggesting an indirect regulation of the latter. Furthermore, CodY binds to the promoter of the immune inhibitor metalloprotease InhA1, demonstrating that CodY directly links B. cereus metabolism to virulence. In vivo studies using a Galleria mellonella infection model, showed that the codY mutant was substantially attenuated, highlighting the importance of CodY as a key regulator of pathogenicity. Our results demonstrate that CodY profoundly modulates the virulence of B. cereus, possibly controlling the development of pathogenic traits in suitable host environments.

  19. Expression of interferon gamma by a highly virulent strain of Newcastle disease virus decreases its pathogenicity in chickens.

    PubMed

    Susta, Leonardo; Cornax, Ingrid; Diel, Diego G; Garcia, Stivalis Cardenas; Miller, Patti J; Liu, Xiufan; Hu, Shunlin; Brown, Corrie C; Afonso, Claudio L

    2013-01-01

    The role of interferon gamma (IFN-γ) expression during Newcastle disease virus (NDV) infection in chickens is unknown. Infection of chickens with highly virulent NDV results in rapid death, which is preceded by increased expression of IFN-γ in target tissues. IFN-γ is a cytokine that has pleiotropic biological effects including intrinsic antiviral activity and immunomodulatory effects that may increase morbidity and mortality during infections. To better understand how IFN-γ contributes to NDV pathogenesis, the coding sequence of the chicken IFN-γ gene was inserted in the genome of the virulent NDV strain ZJ1 (rZJ1-IFNγ), and the effects of high levels of IFN-γ expression during infection were determined in vivo and in vitro. IFN-γ expression did not significantly affect NDV replication in fibroblast or in macrophage cell lines. However, it affected the pathogenesis of rZJ1-IFNγ in vivo. Relative to the virus expressing the green fluorescent protein (rZJ1-GFP) or lacking the IFN-γ insert (rZJ1-rev), expression of IFN-γ by rZJ1-IFNγ produced a marked decrease of pathogenicity in 4-week-old chickens, as evidenced by lack of mortality, decreased disease severity, virus shedding, and antigen distribution. These results suggest that early expression of IFN-γ had a significant protective role against the effects of highly virulent NDV infection in chickens, and further suggests that the level and timing of expression of this cytokine may be critical for the disease outcome. This is the first description of an in vivo attenuation of a highly virulent NDV by avian cytokines, and shows the feasibility to use NDV for cytokine delivery in chicken organs. This approach may facilitate the study of the role of other avian cytokines on the pathogenesis of NDV.

  20. Increased expression of virulence attributes in oral Candida albicans isolates from human immunodeficiency virus-positive individuals.

    PubMed

    Mane, Arati; Gaikwad, Shraddha; Bembalkar, Shilpa; Risbud, Arun

    2012-02-01

    Oral candidiasis caused by Candida albicans is recognized as one of the most frequent opportunistic infections in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals. The overall severity and chronicity of oral candidiasis has been attributed exclusively to the HIV-induced immune deficiency of the affected individuals but not to the virulence factors of the pathogen, i.e. C. albicans. However, genotypic and phenotypic studies have suggested that HIV infection might be associated with preferential selection of C. albicans strains with altered virulence determinants, leading to colonization with Candida populations that are better able to cause disease in these immunologically compromised hosts. If this process of selection is indeed related to pathogenicity, it may be possible to measure alterations in different virulence factors produced by C. albicans in HIV-infected patients. To evaluate this hypothesis, the present work was undertaken to determine simultaneously the expression of five virulence factors in oral C. albicans isolates colonizing and infecting HIV-positive and -negative individuals. The significance of genotypes in the pathogenesis of oral candidiasis was also elucidated. Oral swabs were collected from 335 consecutive individuals (210 HIV-positive and 125 HIV-negative). Virulence factors and genotypes were determined for all the C. albicans strains isolated. The results showed significantly increased expression of proteinase, phospholipase and haemolytic activities, as well as a greater ability to adhere, in isolates from HIV-positive compared with HIV-negative individuals (P<0.05). However, no significant differences in virulence factor expression in isolates colonizing or infecting HIV-positive individuals were seen. Genotype A was the predominant type (71.3 %); however, a relationship could not be established between the genotypes and the virulence factors, or with clinical infection. These data support the concept of preferential C. albicans

  1. The effect of γ radiation on the expression of the virulence genes of Salmonella typhimurium and Vibrio spp.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Sangyong; Jung, Jinwoo; Kim, Dongho

    2007-11-01

    The principle benefit of food irradiation is the reduction of food-borne bacteria in food products. However, the microbiological safety with respect to increased virulence of surviving pathogens after irradiation remains an important issue with regard to the effectiveness of food irradiation. In this study, the transcriptional changes of virulence genes of Salmonella and Vibrio spp. after γ radiation were investigated by real-time PCR (RT-PCR). Samonella typhimurium is dependent upon the products of a large number of genes located within Salmonella pathogenicity islands (SPI) on the chromosome. The expressions of seven genes including four SPI genes, hilD, ssrB, pipB, and sopD, were measured at 1 h after 1 kGy irradiation. Compared with non-irradiated controls, the expression of hilD encoded within SPI1 and sopD encoding SPI1-related effector proteins was reduced about 4- and 16-fold, respectively. The expressions of Vibrio toxin genes, vvhA, ctxA, and tdh, were also monitored during the course of a growth cycle after re-inoculation of irradiated Vibrio spp. (0.5 and 1.0 kGy). The expressions of Vibrio toxin genes tested did not increase compared with non-irradiated counterparts. Results from this study indicate that γ radiation is much more likely to reduce the virulence gene expression of surviving pathogens.

  2. Differences in Cell Morphometry, Cell Wall Topography and Gp70 Expression Correlate with the Virulence of Sporothrix brasiliensis Clinical Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Rafaela A.; Kubitschek-Barreira, Paula H.; Teixeira, Pedro A. C.; Sanches, Glenda F.; Teixeira, Marcus M.; Quintella, Leonardo P.; Almeida, Sandro R.; Costa, Rosane O.; Camargo, Zoilo P.; Felipe, Maria S. S.; de Souza, Wanderley; Lopes-Bezerra, Leila M.

    2013-01-01

    Sporotrichosis is a chronic infectious disease affecting both humans and animals. For many years, this subcutaneous mycosis had been attributed to a single etiological agent; however, it is now known that this taxon consists of a complex of at least four pathogenic species, including Sporothrix schenckii and Sporothrix brasiliensis. Gp70 was previously shown to be an important antigen and adhesin expressed on the fungal cell surface and may have a key role in immunomodulation and host response. The aim of this work was to study the virulence, morphometry, cell surface topology and gp70 expression of clinical isolates of S. brasiliensis compared with two reference strains of S. schenckii. Several clinical isolates related to severe human cases or associated with the Brazilian zoonotic outbreak of sporotrichosis were genotyped and clustered as S. brasiliensis. Interestingly, in a murine subcutaneous model of sporotrichosis, these isolates showed a higher virulence profile compared with S. schenckii. A single S. brasiliensis isolate from an HIV-positive patient not only showed lower virulence but also presented differences in cell morphometry, cell wall topography and abundant gp70 expression compared with the virulent isolates. In contrast, the highly virulent S. brasiliensis isolates showed reduced levels of cell wall gp70. These observations were confirmed by the topographical location of the gp70 antigen using immunoelectromicroscopy in both species. In addition, the gp70 molecule was sequenced and identified using mass spectrometry, and the sequenced peptides were aligned into predicted proteins using Blastp with the S. schenckii and S. brasiliensis genomes. PMID:24116065

  3. Helicobacter pylori virulence factors affecting gastric proton pump expression and acid secretion.

    PubMed

    Hammond, Charles E; Beeson, Craig; Suarez, Giovanni; Peek, Richard M; Backert, Steffen; Smolka, Adam J

    2015-08-01

    Acute Helicobacter pylori infection of gastric epithelial cells and human gastric biopsies represses H,K-ATPase α subunit (HKα) gene expression and inhibits acid secretion, causing transient hypochlorhydria and supporting gastric H. pylori colonization. Infection by H. pylori strains deficient in the cag pathogenicity island (cag PAI) genes cagL, cagE, or cagM, which do not transfer CagA into host cells or induce interleukin-8 secretion, does not inhibit HKα expression, nor does a cagA-deficient strain that induces IL-8. To test the hypothesis that virulence factors other than those mediating CagA translocation or IL-8 induction participate in HKα repression by activating NF-κB, AGS cells transfected with HKα promoter-Luc reporter constructs containing an intact or mutated NF-κB binding site were infected with wild-type H. pylori strain 7.13, isogenic mutants lacking cag PAI genes responsible for CagA translocation and/or IL-8 induction (cagA, cagζ, cagε, cagZ, and cagβ), or deficient in genes encoding two peptidoglycan hydrolases (slt and cagγ). H. pylori-induced AGS cell HKα promoter activities, translocated CagA, and IL-8 secretion were measured by luminometry, immunoblotting, and ELISA, respectively. Human gastric biopsy acid secretion was measured by microphysiometry. Taken together, the data showed that HKα repression is independent of IL-8 expression, and that CagA translocation together with H. pylori transglycosylases encoded by slt and cagγ participate in NF-κB-dependent HKα repression and acid inhibition. The findings are significant because H. pylori factors other than CagA and IL-8 secretion are now implicated in transient hypochlorhydria which facilitates gastric colonization and potential triggering of epithelial progression to neoplasia.

  4. H-NS plays a role in expression of Acinetobacter baumannii virulence features.

    PubMed

    Eijkelkamp, Bart A; Stroeher, Uwe H; Hassan, Karl A; Elbourne, Liam D H; Paulsen, Ian T; Brown, Melissa H

    2013-07-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii has become a major problem in the clinical setting with the prevalence of infections caused by multidrug-resistant strains on the increase. Nevertheless, only a limited number of molecular mechanisms involved in the success of A. baumannii as a human pathogen have been described. In this study, we examined the virulence features of a hypermotile derivative of A. baumannii strain ATCC 17978, which was found to display enhanced adherence to human pneumocytes and elevated levels of lethality toward Caenorhabditis elegans nematodes. Analysis of cellular lipids revealed modifications to the fatty acid composition, providing a possible explanation for the observed changes in hydrophobicity and subsequent alteration in adherence and motility. Comparison of the genome sequences of the hypermotile variant and parental strain revealed that an insertion sequence had disrupted an hns-like gene in the variant. This gene encodes a homologue of the histone-like nucleoid structuring (H-NS) protein, a known global transcriptional repressor. Transcriptome analysis identified the global effects of this mutation on gene expression, with major changes seen in the autotransporter Ata, a type VI secretion system, and a type I pilus cluster. Interestingly, isolation and analysis of a second independent hypermotile ATCC 17978 variant revealed a mutation to a residue within the DNA binding region of H-NS. Taken together, these mutants indicate that the phenotypic and transcriptomic differences seen are due to loss of regulatory control effected by H-NS.

  5. Phase-variable Expression of Lipopolysaccharide Contributes to the Virulence of Legionella pneumophila

    PubMed Central

    Lüneberg, Edeltraud; Zähringer, Ulrich; Knirel, Yuriy A.; Steinmann, Dorothee; Hartmann, Maike; Steinmetz, Ivo; Rohde, Manfred; Köhl, Jörg; Frosch, Matthias

    1998-01-01

    With the aid of monoclonal antibody (mAb) 2625, raised against the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1, subgroup OLDA, we isolated mutant 811 from the virulent wild-type strain RC1. This mutant was not reactive with mAb 2625 and exhibited an unstable phenotype, since we observed an in vitro and in vivo switch of mutant 811 to the mAb 2625–positive phenotype, thus restoring the wild-type LPS. Bactericidal assays revealed that mutant 811 was lysed by serum complement components, whereas the parental strain RC1 was almost serum resistant. Moreover, mutant 811 was not able to replicate intracellularly in macrophage-like cell line HL-60. In the guinea pig animal model, mutant 811 exhibited significantly reduced ability to replicate. Among recovered bacteria, mAb 2625–positive revertants were increased by fourfold. The relevance of LPS phase switch for pathogenesis of Legionella infection was further corroborated by the observation that 5% of the bacteria recovered from the lungs of guinea pigs infected with the wild-type strain RC1 were negative for mAb 2625 binding. These findings strongly indicate that under in vivo conditions switching between two LPS phenotypes occurs and may promote adaptation and replication of L. pneumophila. This is the first description of phase-variable expression of Legionella LPS. PMID:9653083

  6. Pallial mucus of the oyster Crassostrea virginica regulates the expression of putative virulence genes of its pathogen Perkinsus marinus.

    PubMed

    Pales Espinosa, Emmanuelle; Corre, Erwan; Allam, Bassem

    2014-04-01

    Perkinsus marinus is a pathogen responsible for severe mortalities of the eastern oyster Crassostrea virginica along the East and Gulf coasts of the United States. When cultivated, the pathogenicity of this microorganism decreases significantly, hampering the study of its virulence factors. Recent investigations have shown a significant increase of the in vivo virulence of P. marinus exposed to oyster pallial mucus. In the current study, we investigated the effect of pallial mucus on P. marinus gene expression compared with cultures supplemented with oyster digestive extracts or with un-supplemented cultures. In parallel, parasite cells cultured under these three conditions were used to challenge oysters and to assess virulence in vivo. Perkinsus marinus mRNA sequencing was performed on an Illumina GAIIX sequencer and data were analysed using the Tuxedo RNAseq suite for mapping against the draft P. marinus genome and for differential expression analysis. Results showed that exposure of P. marinus to mucus induces significant regulation of nearly 3,600 transcripts, many of which are considered as putative virulence factors. Pallial mucus is suspected to mimic internal host conditions, thereby preparing the pathogen to overcome defense factors before invasion. This hypothesis is supported by significant regulation in several antioxidant proteins, heat shock proteins, protease inhibitors and proteasome subunits. In addition, mucus exposure induced the modulation of several genes known to affect immunity and apoptosis in vertebrates and invertebrates. Several proteases (proteolysis) and merozoite surface proteins (cell recognition) were also modulated. Overall, these results provide a baseline for targeted, in depth analysis of candidate virulence factors in P. marinus.

  7. Epigenetic Control of Virulence Gene Expression in Pseudomonas aeruginosa by a LysR-Type Transcription Regulator

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Keith H.; Vallet-Gely, Isabelle; Dove, Simon L.

    2009-01-01

    Phenotypic variation within an isogenic bacterial population is thought to ensure the survival of a subset of cells in adverse conditions. The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa variably expresses several phenotypes, including antibiotic resistance, biofilm formation, and the production of CupA fimbriae. Here we describe a previously unidentified bistable switch in P. aeruginosa. This switch controls the expression of a diverse set of genes, including aprA, which encodes the secreted virulence factor alkaline protease. We present evidence that bistable expression of PA2432, herein named bexR (bistable expression regulator), which encodes a LysR-type transcription regulator, controls this switch. In particular, using DNA microarrays, quantitative RT–PCR analysis, chromatin immunoprecipitation, and reporter gene fusions, we identify genes directly under the control of BexR and show that these genes are bistably expressed. Furthermore, we show that bexR is itself bistably expressed and positively autoregulated. Finally, using single-cell analyses of a GFP reporter fusion, we present evidence that positive autoregulation of bexR is necessary for bistable expression of the BexR regulon. Our findings suggest that a positive feedback loop involving a LysR-type transcription regulator serves as the basis for an epigenetic switch that controls virulence gene expression in P. aeruginosa. PMID:20041030

  8. Exposure to Synthetic Gray Water Inhibits Amoeba Encystation and Alters Expression of Legionella pneumophila Virulence Genes

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jingrang; Ashbolt, Nicholas J.

    2014-01-01

    Water conservation efforts have focused on gray water (GW) usage, especially for applications that do not require potable water quality. However, there is a need to better understand environmental pathogens and their free-living amoeba (FLA) hosts within GW, given their growth potential in stored gray water. Using synthetic gray water (sGW) we examined three strains of the water-based pathogen Legionella pneumophila and its FLA hosts Acanthamoeba polyphaga, A. castellanii, and Vermamoeba vermiformis. Exposure to sGW for 72 h resulted in significant inhibition (P < 0.0001) of amoebal encystation versus control-treated cells, with the following percentages of cysts in sGW versus controls: A. polyphaga (0.6 versus 6%), A. castellanii (2 versus 62%), and V. vermiformis (1 versus 92%), suggesting sGW induced maintenance of the actively feeding trophozoite form. During sGW exposure, L. pneumophila culturability decreased as early as 5 h (1.3 to 2.9 log10 CFU, P < 0.001) compared to controls (Δ0 to 0.1 log10 CFU) with flow cytometric analysis revealing immediate changes in membrane permeability. Furthermore, reverse transcription-quantitative PCR was performed on total RNA isolated from L. pneumophila cells at 0 to 48 h after sGW incubation, and genes associated with virulence (gacA, lirR, csrA, pla, and sidF), the type IV secretion system (lvrB and lvrE), and metabolism (ccmF and lolA) were all shown to be differentially expressed. These results suggest that conditions within GW may promote interactions between water-based pathogens and FLA hosts, through amoebal encystment inhibition and alteration of bacterial gene expression, thus warranting further exploration into FLA and L. pneumophila behavior in GW systems. PMID:25381242

  9. Exposure to synthetic gray water inhibits amoeba encystation and alters expression of Legionella pneumophila virulence genes.

    PubMed

    Buse, Helen Y; Lu, Jingrang; Ashbolt, Nicholas J

    2015-01-01

    Water conservation efforts have focused on gray water (GW) usage, especially for applications that do not require potable water quality. However, there is a need to better understand environmental pathogens and their free-living amoeba (FLA) hosts within GW, given their growth potential in stored gray water. Using synthetic gray water (sGW) we examined three strains of the water-based pathogen Legionella pneumophila and its FLA hosts Acanthamoeba polyphaga, A. castellanii, and Vermamoeba vermiformis. Exposure to sGW for 72 h resulted in significant inhibition (P < 0.0001) of amoebal encystation versus control-treated cells, with the following percentages of cysts in sGW versus controls: A. polyphaga (0.6 versus 6%), A. castellanii (2 versus 62%), and V. vermiformis (1 versus 92%), suggesting sGW induced maintenance of the actively feeding trophozoite form. During sGW exposure, L. pneumophila culturability decreased as early as 5 h (1.3 to 2.9 log10 CFU, P < 0.001) compared to controls (Δ0 to 0.1 log10 CFU) with flow cytometric analysis revealing immediate changes in membrane permeability. Furthermore, reverse transcription-quantitative PCR was performed on total RNA isolated from L. pneumophila cells at 0 to 48 h after sGW incubation, and genes associated with virulence (gacA, lirR, csrA, pla, and sidF), the type IV secretion system (lvrB and lvrE), and metabolism (ccmF and lolA) were all shown to be differentially expressed. These results suggest that conditions within GW may promote interactions between water-based pathogens and FLA hosts, through amoebal encystment inhibition and alteration of bacterial gene expression, thus warranting further exploration into FLA and L. pneumophila behavior in GW systems.

  10. Effects of the ERES pathogenicity region regulator Ralp3 on Streptococcus pyogenes serotype M49 virulence factor expression.

    PubMed

    Siemens, Nikolai; Fiedler, Tomas; Normann, Jana; Klein, Johannes; Münch, Richard; Patenge, Nadja; Kreikemeyer, Bernd

    2012-07-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococcus [GAS]) is a highly virulent Gram-positive bacterium. For successful infection, GAS expresses many virulence factors, which are clustered together with transcriptional regulators in distinct genomic regions. Ralp3 is a central regulator of the ERES region. In this study, we investigated the role of Ralp3 in GAS M49 pathogenesis. The inactivation of Ralp3 resulted in reduced attachment to and internalization into human keratinocytes. The Δralp3 mutant failed to survive in human blood and serum, and the hyaluronic acid capsule was slightly decreased. In addition, the mutant showed a lower binding capacity to human plasminogen, and the SpeB activity was significantly decreased. Complementation of the Δralp3 mutant restored the wild-type phenotype. The transcriptome and quantitative reverse transcription-PCR analysis of the serotype M49 GAS strain and its isogenic Δralp3 mutant identified 16 genes as upregulated, and 43 genes were found to be downregulated. Among the downregulated genes, there were open reading frames encoding proteins involved in metabolism (e.g., both lac operons and the fru operon), genes encoding lantibiotics (e.g., the putative salivaricin operon), and ORFs encoding virulence factors (such as the whole Mga core regulon and further genes under Mga control). In summary, the ERES region regulator Ralp3 is an important serotype-specific transcriptional regulator for virulence and metabolic control.

  11. The alternative sigma factor B modulates virulence gene expression in a murine Staphylococcus aureus infection model but does not influence kidney gene expression pattern of the host.

    PubMed

    Depke, Maren; Burian, Marc; Schäfer, Tina; Bröker, Barbara M; Ohlsen, Knut; Völker, Uwe

    2012-01-01

    Infections caused by Staphylococcus aureus are associated with significant morbidity and mortality and are an increasing threat not only in hospital settings. The expression of the staphylococcal virulence factor repertoire is known to be affected by the alternative sigma factor B (SigB). However, its impact during infection still is a matter of debate. Kidney tissues of controls or mice infected with S. aureus HG001 or its isogenic sigB mutant were analyzed by transcriptome profiling to monitor the host response, and additionally expression of selected S. aureus genes was monitored by RT-qPCR. Direct transcript analysis by RT-qPCR revealed significant SigB activity in all mice infected with the wild-type strain, but not in its isogenic sigB mutant (p<0.0001). Despite a clear-cut difference in the SigB-dependent transcription pattern of virulence genes (clfA, aur, and hla), the host reaction to infection (either wild type or sigB mutant) was almost identical. Despite its significant activity in vivo, loss of SigB did neither have an effect on the outcome of infection nor on murine kidney gene expression pattern. Thus, these data support the role of SigB as virulence modulator rather than being a virulence determinant by itself.

  12. Biological variation among african trypanosomes: I. Clonal expression of virulence is not linked to the variant surface glycoprotein or the variant surface glycoprotein gene telomeric expression site.

    PubMed

    Inverso, Jill A; Uphoff, Timothy S; Johnson, Scott C; Paulnock, Donna M; Mansfield, John M

    2010-05-01

    The potential association of variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) gene expression with clonal expression of virulence in African trypanosomes was addressed. Two populations of clonally related trypanosomes, which differ dramatically in virulence for the infected host, but display the same apparent VSG surface coat phenotype, were characterized with respect to the VSG genes expressed as well as the chromosome telomeric expression sites (ES) utilized for VSG gene transcription. The VSG gene sequences expressed by clones LouTat 1 and LouTat 1A of Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense were identical, and gene expression in both clones occurred precisely by the same gene conversion events (duplication and transposition), which generated an expression-linked copy (ELC) of the VSG gene. The ELC was present on the same genomic restriction fragments in both populations and resided in the telomere of a 330-kb chromosome; a single basic copy of the LouTat 1/1A VSG gene, present in all variants of the LouTat 1 serodeme, was located at an internal site of a 1.5-Mb chromosome. Restriction endonuclease mapping of the ES telomere revealed that the VSG ELC of clones LouTat 1 and 1A resides in the same site. Therefore, these findings provide evidence that the VSG gene ES and, potentially, any cotranscribed ES-associated genes do not play a role in the clonal regulation of virulence because trypanosome clones LouTat 1 and 1A, which differ markedly in their virulence properties, both express identical VSG genes from the same chromosome telomeric ES.

  13. Selected Lactic Acid-Producing Bacterial Isolates with the Capacity to Reduce Salmonella Translocation and Virulence Gene Expression in Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaojian; Brisbin, Jennifer; Yu, Hai; Wang, Qi; Yin, Fugui; Zhang, Yonggang; Sabour, Parviz; Sharif, Shayan; Gong, Joshua

    2014-01-01

    Background Probiotics have been used to control Salmonella colonization/infection in chickens. Yet the mechanisms of probiotic effects are not fully understood. This study has characterized our previously-selected lactic acid-producing bacterial (LAB) isolates for controlling Salmonella infection in chickens, particularly the mechanism underlying the control. Methodology/Principal Findings In vitro studies were conducted to characterize 14 LAB isolates for their tolerance to low pH (2.0) and high bile salt (0.3–1.5%) and susceptibility to antibiotics. Three chicken infection trials were subsequently carried out to evaluate four of the isolates for reducing the burden of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in the broiler cecum. Chicks were gavaged with LAB cultures (106–7 CFU/chick) or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) at 1 day of age followed by Salmonella challenge (104 CFU/chick) next day. Samples of cecal digesta, spleen, and liver were examined for Salmonella counts on days 1, 3, or 4 post-challenge. Salmonella in the cecum from Trial 3 was also assessed for the expression of ten virulence genes located in its pathogenicity island-1 (SPI-1). These genes play a role in Salmonella intestinal invasion. Tested LAB isolates (individuals or mixed cultures) were unable to lower Salmonella burden in the chicken cecum, but able to attenuate Salmonella infection in the spleen and liver. The LAB treatments also reduced almost all SPI-1 virulence gene expression (9 out of 10) in the chicken cecum, particularly at the low dose. In vitro treatment with the extracellular culture fluid from a LAB culture also down-regulated most SPI-1 virulence gene expression. Conclusions/Significance The possible correlation between attenuation of Salmonella infection in the chicken spleen and liver and reduction of Salmonella SPI-1 virulence gene expression in the chicken cecum by LAB isolates is a new observation. Suppression of Salmonella virulence gene expression in vivo can be one

  14. Expressed sequence tags reveal genetic diversity and putative virulence factors of the pathogenic oomycete Pythium insidiosum.

    PubMed

    Krajaejun, Theerapong; Khositnithikul, Rommanee; Lerksuthirat, Tassanee; Lowhnoo, Tassanee; Rujirawat, Thidarat; Petchthong, Thanom; Yingyong, Wanta; Suriyaphol, Prapat; Smittipat, Nat; Juthayothin, Tada; Phuntumart, Vipaporn; Sullivan, Thomas D

    2011-07-01

    Oomycetes are unique eukaryotic microorganisms that share a mycelial morphology with fungi. Many oomycetes are pathogenic to plants, and a more limited number are pathogenic to animals. Pythium insidiosum is the only oomycete that is capable of infecting both humans and animals, and causes a life-threatening infectious disease, called "pythiosis". In the majority of pythiosis patients life-long handicaps result from the inevitable radical excision of infected organs, and many die from advanced infection. Better understanding P. insidiosum pathogenesis at molecular levels could lead to new forms of treatment. Genetic and genomic information is lacking for P. insidiosum, so we have undertaken an expressed sequence tag (EST) study, and report on the first dataset of 486 ESTs, assembled into 217 unigenes. Of these, 144 had significant sequence similarity with known genes, including 47 with ribosomal protein homology. Potential virulence factors included genes involved in antioxidation, thermal adaptation, immunomodulation, and iron and sterol binding. Effectors resembling pathogenicity factors of plant-pathogenic oomycetes were also discovered, such as, a CBEL-like protein (possible involvement in host cell adhesion and hemagglutination), a putative RXLR effector (possibly involved in host cell modulation) and elicitin-like (ELL) proteins. Phylogenetic analysis mapped P. insidiosum ELLs to several novel clades of oomycete elicitins (ELIs), and homology modeling predicted that P. insidiosum ELLs should bind sterols. Most of the P. insidiosum ESTs showed homology to sequences in the genome or EST databases of other oomycetes, but one putative gene, with unknown function, was found to be unique to P. insidiosum. The EST dataset reported here represents the first steps in identifying genes of P. insidiosum and beginning transcriptome analysis. This genetic information will facilitate understanding of pathogenic mechanisms of this devastating pathogen.

  15. Medicinal plants extracts affect virulence factors expression and biofilm formation by the uropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Wojnicz, Dorota; Kucharska, Alicja Z; Sokół-Łętowska, Anna; Kicia, Marta; Tichaczek-Goska, Dorota

    2012-12-01

    Medicinal plants are an important source for the therapeutic remedies of various diseases including urinary tract infections. This prompted us to perform research in this area. We decided to focus on medicinal plants species used in urinary tract infections prevention. The aim of our study was to determine the influence of Betula pendula, Equisetum arvense, Herniaria glabra, Galium odoratum, Urtica dioica, and Vaccinium vitis-idaea extracts on bacterial survival and virulence factors involved in tissue colonization and biofilm formation of the uropathogenic Escherichia coli rods. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of plant extracts were performed. Antimicrobial assay relied on the estimation of the colony forming unit number. Hydrophobicity of cells was established by salt aggregation test. Using motility agar, the ability of bacteria to move was examined. The erythrocyte hemagglutination test was used for fimbriae P screening. Curli expression was determined using YESCA agar supplemented with congo red. Quantification of biofilm formation was carried out using a microtiter plate assay and a spectrophotometric method. The results of the study indicate significant differences between investigated extracts in their antimicrobial activities. The extracts of H. glabra and V. vitis-idaea showed the highest growth-inhibitory effects (p < 0.05). Surface hydrophobicity of autoaggregating E. coli strain changed after exposure to all plant extracts, except V. vitis-idaea (p > 0.05). The B. pendula and U. dioica extracts significantly reduced the motility of the E. coli rods (p < 0.05). All the extracts exhibited the anti-biofilm activity.

  16. Virulent Shigella flexneri Affects Secretion, Expression, and Glycosylation of Gel-Forming Mucins in Mucus-Producing Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sperandio, Brice; Fischer, Natalie; Chevalier-Curt, Marie Joncquel; Rossez, Yannick; Roux, Pascal; Robbe Masselot, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Mucin glycoproteins are secreted in large amounts by the intestinal epithelium and constitute an efficient component of innate immune defenses to promote homeostasis and protect against enteric pathogens. In this study, our objective was to investigate how the bacterial enteropathogen Shigella flexneri, which causes bacillary dysentery, copes with the mucin defense barrier. We report that upon in vitro infection of mucin-producing polarized human intestinal epithelial cells, virulent S. flexneri manipulates the secretion of gel-forming mucins. This phenomenon, which is triggered only by virulent strains, results in accumulation of mucins at the cell apical surface, leading to the appearance of a gel-like structure that favors access of bacteria to the cell surface and the subsequent invasion process. We identify MUC5AC, a gel-forming mucin, as a component of this structure. Formation of this gel does not depend on modifications of electrolyte concentrations, induction of trefoil factor expression, endoplasmic reticulum stress, or response to unfolded proteins. In addition, transcriptional and biochemical analyses of infected cells reveal modulations of mucin gene expression and modifications of mucin glycosylation patterns, both of which are induced by virulent bacteria in a type III secretion system-dependent manner. Thus, S. flexneri has developed a dedicated strategy to alter the mucus barrier by targeting key elements of the gel-forming capacity of mucins: gene transcription, protein glycosylation, and secretion. PMID:23876800

  17. A subdose of fluconazole alters the virulence of Cryptococcus gattii during murine cryptococcosis and modulates type I interferon expression.

    PubMed

    Fontes, Alide Caroline Lima; Bretas Oliveira, Danilo; Santos, Juliana Ribeiro Alves; Carneiro, Hellem Cristina Silva; Ribeiro, Noelly de Queiroz; Oliveira, Lorena Vívien Neves de; Barcellos, Vanessa Abreu; Paixão, Tatiane Alves; Abrahão, Jonatas Santos; Resende-Stoianoff, Maria Aparecida; Vainstein, Marilene Henning; Santos, Daniel Assis

    2017-02-01

    Cryptococcosis is an invasive infection caused by yeast-like fungus of the genera Cryptococcus spp. The antifungal therapy for this disease provides some toxicity and the incidence of infections caused by resistant strains increased. Thus, we aimed to assess the consequences of fluconazole subdoses during the treatment of cryptococcosis in the murine inflammatory response and in the virulence factors of Cryptococcus gattii. Mice infected with Cryptococcus gattii were treated with subdoses of fluconazole. We determined the behavior of mice and type 1 interferon expression during the treatment; we also studied the virulence factors and susceptibility to fluconazole for the colonies recovered from the animals. A subdose of fluconazole prolonged the survival of mice, but the morbidity of cryptococcosis was higher in treated animals. These data were linked to the increase in: (i) fluconazole minimum inhibitory concentration, (ii) capsule size and (iii) melanization of C. gattii, which probably led to the increased expression of type I interferons in the brains of mice but not in the lungs. In conclusion, a subdose of fluconazole altered fungal virulence factors and susceptibility to this azole, leading to an altered inflammatory host response and increased morbidity.

  18. Trichothecenes and aspinolides produced by Trichoderma arundinaceum regulate expression of Botrytis cinerea genes involved in virulence and growth.

    PubMed

    Malmierca, Mónica G; Izquierdo-Bueno, Inmaculada; McCormick, Susan P; Cardoza, Rosa E; Alexander, Nancy J; Barua, Javier; Lindo, Laura; Casquero, Pedro A; Collado, Isidro G; Monte, Enrique; Gutiérrez, Santiago

    2016-11-01

    Trichoderma arundinaceum (Ta37) and Botrytis cinerea (B05.10) produce the sesquiterpenoids harzianum A (HA) and botrydial (BOT), respectively. TaΔTri5, an HA non-producer mutant, produces high levels of the polyketide compounds aspinolides (Asp) B and C. We analyzed the role of HA and Asp in the B. cinerea-T. arundinaceum interaction, including changes in BOT production as well as transcriptomic changes of BcBOT genes involved in BOT biosynthesis, and also of genes associated with virulence and ergosterol biosynthesis. We found that exogenously added HA up-regulated the expression of the BcBOT and all the virulence genes analyzed when B. cinerea was grown alone. However, a decrease in the amount of BOT and a down-regulation of BcBOT gene expression was observed in the interaction zone of B05.10-Ta37 dual cultures, compared to TaΔTri5. Thus, the confrontation with T. arundinaceum results in an up-regulation of most of the B. cinerea genes involved in virulence yet the presence of T. arundinaceum secondary metabolites, HA and AspC, act separately and together to down-regulate the B. cinerea genes analyzed. The present work emphasizes the existence of a chemical cross-regulation between B. cinerea and T. arundinaceum and contributes to understanding how a biocontrol fungus and its prey interact with each other.

  19. Effect of salt and acidic pH on the stability of virulence plasmid (pYV) in Yersinia enterocolitica and expression of virulence-associated characteristics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The stability of the Yersinia enterocolitica virulence plasmid (pYV) under different NaCl concentrations and under acidic pH conditions was investigated. Exposure of five strains representing five serotypes of pYV-bearing virulent Y. enterocolitica to 0.5, 2 and 5% NaCl and under conditions of pH 4...

  20. Gene expression profiling of the plant pathogenic basidiomycetous fungus Rhizoctonia solani AG 4 reveals putative virulence factors.

    PubMed

    Lakshman, Dilip K; Alkharouf, Nadim; Roberts, Daniel P; Natarajan, Savithiry S; Mitra, Amitava

    2012-01-01

    Rhizoctonia solani is a ubiquitous basidiomycetous soilborne fungal pathogen causing damping-off of seedlings, aerial blights and postharvest diseases. To gain insight into the molecular mechanisms of pathogenesis a global approach based on analysis of expressed sequence tags (ESTs) was undertaken. To get broad gene-expression coverage, two normalized EST libraries were developed from mycelia grown under high nitrogen-induced virulent and low nitrogen/methylglucose-induced hypovirulent conditions. A pilot-scale assessment of gene diversity was made from the sequence analyses of the two libraries. A total of 2280 cDNA clones was sequenced that corresponded to 220 unique sequence sets or clusters (contigs) and 805 singlets, making up a total of 1025 unique genes identified from the two virulence-differentiated cDNA libraries. From the total sequences, 295 genes (38.7%) exhibited strong similarities with genes in public databases and were categorized into 11 functional groups. Approximately 61.3% of the R. solani ESTs have no apparent homologs in publicly available fungal genome databases and are considered unique genes. We have identified several cDNAs with potential roles in fungal pathogenicity, virulence, signal transduction, vegetative incompatibility and mating, drug resistance, lignin degradation, bioremediation and morphological differentiation. A codon-usage table has been formulated based on 14694 R. solani EST codons. Further analysis of ESTs might provide insights into virulence mechanisms of R. solani AG 4 as well as roles of these genes in development, saprophytic colonization and ecological adaptation of this important fungal plant pathogen.

  1. Predicted highly expressed genes in Nocardia farcinica and the implication to its primary metabolism and nocardial virulence

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Gang; Nie, Lei; Zhang, Weiwen

    2006-02-23

    Nocardia farcinica is a gram positive, filamentous bacterium, and is considered an opportunistic pathogen. In this study, the highly expressed genes in N. farcinica were predicted using the codon adaptation index (CAI) as a numerical estimator of gene expressivity. Using ribosomal protein (RP) genes as references, the top {approx}10% of the genes were predicted to be the predicted highly expressed (PHX) genes in N. farcinica using a CAI cutoff of greater than 0.73. Consistent with early analysis in Streptomyces genomes, most of the PHX genes in N. farcinica were involved in various ''house-keeping'' functions important for cell growth. However, fifteen genes putatively involved in no cardial virulence were predicted as PHX in N. farcinica, which included genes encoding four Mce virulence proteins, cyclopropane fatty acid synthase which is involved in the modification of cell wall important for nocardia virulence, polyketide synthase PKS13 for mycolic acid synthesis and non-ribosomal peptide synthetase involved in biosynthesis of a mycobactin-related siderophore. In addition, multiple genes involved in defense against reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by the phagocyte were predicted with high expressivity, which included alkylhydroperoxide reductase (ahpC), catalase (katG), superoxide dismutase (sodF), thioredoxin, thioredoxin reductase, glutathione peroxidase, and peptide methionine sulfoxide reductase, suggesting that combating against ROS was essential for survival of N. farcinica in host cells. The study also showed that the distribution of PHX genes in the N. farcinica circular chromosome was uneven, with more PHX genes located in the regions close to replication initiation site. The results provided the first approximates of global gene expression patterns in N. farcinica, which will be useful in guiding experimental design for further investigation.

  2. Growth temperature alters Salmonella Enteritidis heat/acid resistance, membrane lipid composition and stress/virulence related gene expression.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yishan; Khoo, Wei Jie; Zheng, Qianwang; Chung, Hyun-Jung; Yuk, Hyun-Gyun

    2014-02-17

    The influence of growth temperature (10, 25, 37, and 42 °C) on the survival of Salmonella Enteritidis in simulated gastric fluid (SGF; pH=2.0) and during heat treatment (54, 56, 58, and 60 °C), on the membrane fatty acid composition, as well as on stress-/virulence-related gene expression was studied. Cells incubated at temperatures lower or higher than 37 °C did not increase their acid resistance, with the maximum D-value of 3.07 min in cells grown at 37 °C; while those incubated at higher temperature increased their heat resistance, with the maximum D60 °C-values of 1.4 min in cells grown at 42 °C. A decrease in the ratio of unsaturated to saturated fatty acids was observed as the growth temperature increased. Compared to the control cells grown at 37 °C, the expression of rpoS was 16.5- and 14.4-fold higher in cells cultivated at 10 and 25 °C, respectively; while the expression of rpoH was 2.9-fold higher in those cultivated at 42 °C. The increased expression of stress response gene rpoH and the decreased ratio of unsaturated to saturated fatty acids correlated with the greater heat resistance of bacteria grown at 42 °C; while the decreased expression of stress response gene rpoS at 42 °C might contribute to the decrease in acid resistance. Virulence related genes-spvR, hilA, avrA-were induced in cells cultivated at 42 °C, except sefA which was induced in the control cells. This study indicates that environmental temperature may affect the virulence potential of S. Enteritidis, thus temperature should be well controlled during food storage.

  3. Erwinia amylovora Expresses Fast and Simultaneously hrp/dsp Virulence Genes during Flower Infection on Apple Trees

    PubMed Central

    Pester, Doris; Milčevičová, Renáta; Schaffer, Johann; Wilhelm, Eva; Blümel, Sylvia

    2012-01-01

    Background Pathogen entry through host blossoms is the predominant infection pathway of the Gram-negative bacterium Erwinia amylovora leading to manifestation of the disease fire blight. Like in other economically important plant pathogens, E. amylovora pathogenicity depends on a type III secretion system encoded by hrp genes. However, timing and transcriptional order of hrp gene expression during flower infections are unknown. Methodology/Principal Findings Using quantitative real-time PCR analyses, we addressed the questions of how fast, strong and uniform key hrp virulence genes and the effector dspA/E are expressed when bacteria enter flowers provided with the full defense mechanism of the apple plant. In non-invasive bacterial inoculations of apple flowers still attached to the tree, E. amylovora activated expression of key type III secretion genes in a narrow time window, mounting in a single expression peak of all investigated hrp/dspA/E genes around 24–48 h post inoculation (hpi). This single expression peak coincided with a single depression in the plant PR-1 expression at 24 hpi indicating transient manipulation of the salicylic acid pathway as one target of E. amylovora type III effectors. Expression of hrp/dspA/E genes was highly correlated to expression of the regulator hrpL and relative transcript abundances followed the ratio: hrpA>hrpN>hrpL>dspA/E. Acidic conditions (pH 4) in flower infections led to reduced virulence/effector gene expression without the typical expression peak observed under natural conditions (pH 7). Conclusion/Significance The simultaneous expression of hrpL, hrpA, hrpN, and the effector dspA/E during early floral infection indicates that speed and immediate effector transmission is important for successful plant invasion. When this delicate balance is disturbed, e.g., by acidic pH during infection, virulence gene expression is reduced, thus partly explaining the efficacy of acidification in fire blight control on a molecular

  4. Identification of novel secreted virulence factors from Xylella fastidiosa using a TRV expression system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Xylella fastidiosa is a bacterium that causes leaf scorch diseases of agriculturally important crops including grapevines and almonds. Little is known about virulence factors that are necessary for X. fastidiosa to grow and cause disease in the xylem vessels of a plant host. Any protein secreted by ...

  5. Virulence plasmid (pYV)-associated expression of phenotypic virulent determinants in pathogenic Yersinia species: a convenient method for monitoring the presence of pYV under culture conditions and its application for....food

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In Yersinia pestis, Y. pseudotuberculosis, and Y, enterocolitica, phenotypic expression of several virulence plasmid (pYV: 70-kb)-associated genetic determinants may include low calcium response (Lcr, pin point colony, size = 0.36 mm), colony morphology (size = 1.13 mm), crystal violet (CV) binding...

  6. Virulence plasmid (pYV)-associated expression of phenotypic virulent determinants in pathogenic Yersinia species: a convenient method for monitoring the presence of pYV under culture conditions and its application for...food

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In Yersinia pestis, Y. pseudotuberculosis, and Y, enterocolitica, phenotypic expression of virulence plasmid (pYV: 70-kb)-associated genetic determinants may include low calcium response (Lcr, pin point colony, size = 0.36 mm), colony morphology (size = 1.13 mm), crystal violet (CV) binding (dark-v...

  7. Phosphorylation Events in the Multiple Gene Regulator of Group A Streptococcus Significantly Influence Global Gene Expression and Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Sanson, Misu; Makthal, Nishanth; Gavagan, Maire; Cantu, Concepcion; Olsen, Randall J.; Musser, James M.

    2015-01-01

    Whole-genome sequencing analysis of ∼800 strains of group A Streptococcus (GAS) found that the gene encoding the multiple virulence gene regulator of GAS (mga) is highly polymorphic in serotype M59 strains but not in strains of other serotypes. To help understand the molecular mechanism of gene regulation by Mga and its contribution to GAS pathogenesis in serotype M59 GAS, we constructed an isogenic mga mutant strain. Transcriptome studies indicated a significant regulatory influence of Mga and altered metabolic capabilities conferred by Mga-regulated genes. We assessed the phosphorylation status of Mga in GAS cell lysates with Phos-tag gels. The results revealed that Mga is phosphorylated at histidines in vivo. Using phosphomimetic and nonphosphomimetic substitutions at conserved phosphoenolpyruvate:carbohydrate phosphotransferase regulation domain (PRD) histidines of Mga, we demonstrated that phosphorylation-mimicking aspartate replacements at H207 and H273 of PRD-1 and at H327 of PRD-2 are inhibitory to Mga-dependent gene expression. Conversely, non-phosphorylation-mimicking alanine substitutions at H273 and H327 relieved inhibition, and the mutant strains exhibited a wild-type phenotype. The opposing regulatory profiles observed for phosphorylation- and non-phosphorylation-mimicking substitutions at H273 extended to global gene regulation by Mga. Consistent with these observations, the H273D mutant strain attenuated GAS virulence, whereas the H273A strain exhibited a wild-type virulence phenotype in a mouse model of necrotizing fasciitis. Together, our results demonstrate phosphoregulation of Mga and its direct link to virulence in M59 GAS strains. These data also lay a foundation toward understanding how naturally occurring gain-of-function variations in mga, such as H201R, may confer an advantage to the pathogen and contribute to M59 GAS pathogenesis. PMID:25824840

  8. The two-component system CpxR/A represses the expression of Salmonella virulence genes by affecting the stability of the transcriptional regulator HilD

    PubMed Central

    De la Cruz, Miguel A.; Pérez-Morales, Deyanira; Palacios, Irene J.; Fernández-Mora, Marcos; Calva, Edmundo; Bustamante, Víctor H.

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella enterica can cause intestinal or systemic infections in humans and animals mainly by the presence of pathogenicity islands SPI-1 and SPI-2, containing 39 and 44 genes, respectively. The AraC-like regulator HilD positively controls the expression of the SPI-1 genes, as well as many other Salmonella virulence genes including those located in SPI-2. A previous report indicates that the two-component system CpxR/A regulates the SPI-1 genes: the absence of the sensor kinase CpxA, but not the absence of its cognate response regulator CpxR, reduces their expression. The presence and absence of cell envelope stress activates kinase and phosphatase activities of CpxA, respectively, which in turn controls the level of phosphorylated CpxR (CpxR-P). In this work, we further define the mechanism for the CpxR/A-mediated regulation of SPI-1 genes. The negative effect exerted by the absence of CpxA on the expression of SPI-1 genes was counteracted by the absence of CpxR or by the absence of the two enzymes, AckA and Pta, which render acetyl-phosphate that phosphorylates CpxR. Furthermore, overexpression of the lipoprotein NlpE, which activates CpxA kinase activity on CpxR, or overexpression of CpxR, repressed the expression of SPI-1 genes. Thus, our results provide several lines of evidence strongly supporting that the absence of CpxA leads to the phosphorylation of CpxR via the AckA/Pta enzymes, which represses both the SPI-1 and SPI-2 genes. Additionally, we show that in the absence of the Lon protease, which degrades HilD, the CpxR-P-mediated repression of the SPI-1 genes is mostly lost; moreover, we demonstrate that CpxR-P negatively affects the stability of HilD and thus decreases the expression of HilD-target genes, such as hilD itself and hilA, located in SPI-1. Our data further expand the insight on the different regulatory pathways for gene expression involving CpxR/A and on the complex regulatory network governing virulence in Salmonella. PMID:26300871

  9. Coordination of Metabolism and Virulence Factors Expression of Extraintestinal Pathogenic Escherichia coli Purified from Blood Cultures of Patients with Sepsis *

    PubMed Central

    Pettersen, Veronika Kuchařová; Mosevoll, Knut Anders; Lindemann, Paul Christoffer; Wiker, Harald G.

    2016-01-01

    One of the trademarks of extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli is adaptation of metabolism and basic physiology to diverse host sites. However, little is known how this common human pathogen adapts to permit survival and growth in blood. We used label-free quantitative proteomics to characterize five E. coli strains purified from clinical blood cultures associated with sepsis and urinary tract infections. Further comparison of proteome profiles of the clinical strains and a reference uropathogenic E. coli strain 536 cultivated in blood culture and on two different solid media distinguished cellular features altered in response to the pathogenically relevant condition. The analysis covered nearly 60% of the strains predicted proteomes, and included quantitative description based on label-free intensity scores for 90% of the detected proteins. Statistical comparison of anaerobic and aerobic blood cultures revealed 32 differentially expressed proteins (1.5% of the shared proteins), mostly associated with acquisition and utilization of metal ions critical for anaerobic or aerobic respiration. Analysis of variance identified significantly altered amounts of 47 proteins shared by the strains (2.7%), including proteins involved in vitamin B6 metabolism and virulence. Although the proteomes derived from blood cultures were fairly similar for the investigated strains, quantitative proteomic comparison to the growth on solid media identified 200 proteins with substantially changed levels (11% of the shared proteins). Blood culture was characterized by up-regulation of anaerobic fermentative metabolism and multiple virulence traits, including cell motility and iron acquisition. In a response to the growth on solid media there were increased levels of proteins functional in aerobic respiration, catabolism of medium-specific carbon sources and protection against oxidative and osmotic stresses. These results demonstrate on the expressed proteome level that expression of

  10. Silver-coated carbon nanotubes downregulate the expression of Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence genes: a potential mechanism for their antimicrobial effect.

    PubMed

    Dosunmu, Ejovwoke; Chaudhari, Atul A; Singh, Shree R; Dennis, Vida A; Pillai, Shreekumar R

    2015-01-01

    The antimicrobial activity of silver-coated carbon nanotubes (AgCNTs) and their potential mode of action against mucoid and nonmucoid strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa was investigated in vitro. The results showed that AgCNTs exhibited antimicrobial activity against both strains with minimum inhibitory concentrations of approximately 8 µg/mL, indicating a high sensitivity of P. aeruginosa to AgCNTs. AgCNTs were also bactericidal against both strains at the same minimum inhibitory concentration. Scanning and transmission electron-microscopy studies further revealed that a majority of the cells treated with AgCNTs transformed from smooth rod-shape morphology to disintegrated cells with broken/damaged membranes, resulting in leakage of cytoplasmic contents to produce ghost cells. The molecular effects of AgCNTs on P. aeruginosa genes involved in virulence and pathogenicity, stress response, and efflux pumps were evaluated for changes in their expression. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) showed that after exposure to AgCNTs, the expression levels of the rpoS, rsmZ, and oprD genes were significantly downregulated in both strains of P. aeruginosa compared to the untreated samples. These results suggest that the mechanism of action of AgCNTs may be attributed to their effect on cell-membrane integrity, downregulation of virulence-gene expression, and induction of general and oxidative stress in P. aeruginosa.

  11. Role of Staphylococcus aureus global regulators sae and sigmaB in virulence gene expression during device-related infection.

    PubMed

    Goerke, Christiane; Fluckiger, Ursula; Steinhuber, Andrea; Bisanzio, Vittoria; Ulrich, Martina; Bischoff, Markus; Patti, Joseph M; Wolz, Christiane

    2005-06-01

    The ability of Staphylococcus aureus to adapt to different environments is due to a regulatory network comprising several loci. Here we present a detailed study of the interaction between the two global regulators sae and sigmaB of S. aureus and their influence on virulence gene expression in vitro, as well as during device-related infection. The expression of sae, asp23, hla, clfA, coa, and fnbA was determined in strain Newman and its isogenic saeS/R and sigB mutants by Northern analysis and LightCycler reverse transcription-PCR. There was no indication of direct cross talk between the two regulators. sae had a dominant effect on target gene expression during device-related infection. SigmaB seemed to be less active throughout the infection than under induced conditions in vitro.

  12. The Burkholderia pseudomallei BpeAB-OprB Efflux Pump: Expression and Impact on Quorum Sensing and Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Ying Ying; Chua, Kim Lee

    2005-01-01

    BpeAB-OprB is a multidrug efflux pump of the bacterial pathogen Burkholderia pseudomallei and is responsible for conferring antimicrobial resistance to aminoglycosides and macrolides. Expression of bpeAB-oprB is inducible by its substrate erythromycin and upon entry into stationary phase. BpeR, a member of the TetR family, functions as a repressor of the bpeAB-oprB operon. bpeR expression was similarly induced at stationary phase but lagged behind the induction of bpeAB-oprB expression. The induction of bpeAB-oprB expression could be advanced to the early exponential phase by exogenous addition of the B. pseudomallei autoinducers N-octanoyl-homoserine lactone (C8HSL) and N-decanoyl-homoserine lactone (C10HSL), suggesting that the bpeAB-oprB operon may be quorum regulated. On the other hand, acyl-homoserine lactone (acyl-HSL) production was undetectable in the bpeAB-null mutant and strains which overexpress bpeR. The failure of these strains to produce acyl-HSLs seemed to be at the level of synthesis of acyl-HSLs, as growth-phase-dependent expression of the autoinducer synthase BpsI was abolished in the bpeAB-null mutant. bpsI expression remained growth phase dependent in the bpeR mutant which had functional BpeAB-OprB. BpeAB-OprB function is likewise necessary for optimal production of quorum-sensing-controlled virulence factors such as siderophore and phospholipase C and for biofilm formation. Cell invasion and cytotoxicity towards human lung epithelial (A549) and human macrophage (THP-1) cells were also significantly attenuated in both the bpeAB mutant and bpeR-overexpressing strains, thus suggesting the possibility of attenuating B. pseudomallei virulence using inhibitors of the BpeAB-OprB efflux pump. PMID:15995185

  13. The Burkholderia pseudomallei BpeAB-OprB efflux pump: expression and impact on quorum sensing and virulence.

    PubMed

    Chan, Ying Ying; Chua, Kim Lee

    2005-07-01

    BpeAB-OprB is a multidrug efflux pump of the bacterial pathogen Burkholderia pseudomallei and is responsible for conferring antimicrobial resistance to aminoglycosides and macrolides. Expression of bpeAB-oprB is inducible by its substrate erythromycin and upon entry into stationary phase. BpeR, a member of the TetR family, functions as a repressor of the bpeAB-oprB operon. bpeR expression was similarly induced at stationary phase but lagged behind the induction of bpeAB-oprB expression. The induction of bpeAB-oprB expression could be advanced to the early exponential phase by exogenous addition of the B. pseudomallei autoinducers N-octanoyl-homoserine lactone (C8HSL) and N-decanoyl-homoserine lactone (C10HSL), suggesting that the bpeAB-oprB operon may be quorum regulated. On the other hand, acyl-homoserine lactone (acyl-HSL) production was undetectable in the bpeAB-null mutant and strains which overexpress bpeR. The failure of these strains to produce acyl-HSLs seemed to be at the level of synthesis of acyl-HSLs, as growth-phase-dependent expression of the autoinducer synthase BpsI was abolished in the bpeAB-null mutant. bpsI expression remained growth phase dependent in the bpeR mutant which had functional BpeAB-OprB. BpeAB-OprB function is likewise necessary for optimal production of quorum-sensing-controlled virulence factors such as siderophore and phospholipase C and for biofilm formation. Cell invasion and cytotoxicity towards human lung epithelial (A549) and human macrophage (THP-1) cells were also significantly attenuated in both the bpeAB mutant and bpeR-overexpressing strains, thus suggesting the possibility of attenuating B. pseudomallei virulence using inhibitors of the BpeAB-OprB efflux pump.

  14. Expression profiling of virulence and pathogenicity genes of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri.

    PubMed

    Astua-Monge, Gustavo; Freitas-Astua, Juliana; Bacocina, Gisele; Roncoletta, Juliana; Carvalho, Sérgio A; Machado, Marcos A

    2005-02-01

    DNA macroarrays of 279 genes of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri potentially associated with pathogenicity and virulence were used to compare the transcriptional alterations of this bacterium in response to two synthetic media. Data analysis indicated that 31 genes were up-regulated by synthetic medium XVM2, while only 7 genes were repressed. The results suggest that XVM2 could be used as an in vitro system to identify candidate genes involved in pathogenesis of X. axonopodis pv. citri.

  15. Effect Of Spaceflight On Microbial Gene Expression And Virulence: Preliminary Results From Microbe Payload Flown On-Board STS-115

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; HonerzuBentrup, K,; Schurr, M. J.; Buchanan, K.; Morici, L.; Hammond, T.; Allen, P.; Baker, C.; Ott, C. M.; Nelman-Gonzalez M.; Schurr, J. R.; Pierson, D. L.; Stodieck, L.; Hing, S.; Hammond, T.; Allen, P.; Baker, C.; Parra, M.; Dumars, P.; Stefanyshyn-Piper, H. M.; Nickerson, C. A.

    2007-01-01

    Human presence in space, whether permanent or temporary, is accompanied by the presence of microbes. However, the extent of microbial changes in response to spaceflight conditions and the corresponding changes to infectious disease risk is unclear. Previous studies have indicated that spaceflight weakens the immune system in humans and animals. In addition, preflight and in-flight monitoring of the International Space Station (ISS) and other spacecraft indicates the presence of opportunistic pathogens and the potential of obligate pathogens. Altered antibiotic resistance of microbes in flight has also been shown. As astronauts and cosmonauts live for longer periods in a closed environment, especially one using recycled water and air, there is an increased risk to crewmembers of infectious disease events occurring in-flight. Therefore, understanding how the space environment affects microorganisms and their disease potential is critically important for spaceflight missions and requires further study. The goal of this flight experiment, operationally called MICROBE, is to utilize three model microbial pathogens, Salmonella typhimurium, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Candida albicans to examine the global effects of spaceflight on microbial gene expression and virulence attributes. Specifically, the aims are (1) to perform microarray-mediated gene expression profiling of S. typhimurium, P. aeruginosa, and C. albicans, in response to spaceflight in comparison to ground controls and (2) to determine the effect of spaceflight on the virulence potential of these microorganisms immediately following their return from spaceflight using murine models. The model microorganisms were selected as they have been isolated from preflight or in-flight monitoring, represent different degrees of pathogenic behavior, are well characterized, and have sequenced genomes with available microarrays. In particular, extensive studies of S. typhimurium by the Principal Investigator, Dr. Nickerson

  16. Virulence gene expression, adhesion and invasion of Campylobacter jejuni exposed to oxidative stress (H2O2).

    PubMed

    Koolman, Leonard; Whyte, Paul; Burgess, Catherine; Bolton, Declan

    2016-03-02

    Studies were undertaken to investigate the effect of oxidative stress conditions (exposure to hydrogen peroxide, H2O2) on [1] the expression of 14 Campylobacter jejuni virulence-associated genes associated with motility and/or invasion (flaA, flaB, flhA, flhB, ciaB, iamA), adhesion (cadF), cytotoxin production (cdtA, cdtB, cdtC) as well as some of the regulators of these genes (rpoN, fliA, luxS, cj1000), in 10 C. jejuni strains (5 poultry and 5 human) and [2] the ability of these cells to adhere to and invade Caco-2 cells. Using 16S rRNA as the reference gene (preliminary research demonstrated that this gene was stably expressed), the expression of the 14 virulence associated genes was investigated under normal and oxidative stress conditions using reverse transcription PCR. A Caco-2 cell tissue culture assay was used to examine adhesion and invasion. The response to oxidative stress was strain-dependent. Two strains showed significant (p<0.05) up or down regulation in 7 of the 14 genes tested, while only 1-2 genes were affected in the remaining strains. Expression of cadF was significantly (p<0.05) changed in all strains, cdt B in 4 strains and cj1000 in 3 strains. Expression of the remaining genes was either unaffected or significantly altered in 1-2 strains. NCTC 11168 completely lost the ability to adhere to and invade Caco-2 cells. One other strain also demonstrated reduced adherence while two others were unable to invade Caco-2 cells after exposure to oxidative stress conditions. In contrast strain 7, a poultry isolate, showed increased invasion. It was concluded that oxidative stress affects expression of C. jejuni virulence genes in a strain-dependent manner, CadF may have a secondary survival function and the cdtB gene may have a different promoter than cdtA and cdtC.

  17. Expression of STM4467-encoded arginine deiminase controlled by the STM4463 regulator contributes to Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium virulence.

    PubMed

    Choi, Younho; Choi, Jeongjoon; Groisman, Eduardo A; Kang, Dong-Hyun; Shin, Dongwoo; Ryu, Sangryeol

    2012-12-01

    Arginine deiminase (ADI), carbamate kinase (CK), and ornithine transcarbamoylase (OTC) constitute the ADI system. In addition to metabolic functions, the ADI system has been implicated in the virulence of certain pathogens. The pathogenic intracellular bacterium Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium possesses the STM4467, STM4466, and STM4465 genes, which are predicted to encode ADI, CK, and OTC, respectively. Here we report that the STM4467 gene encodes an ADI and that ADI activity plays a role in the successful infection of a mammalian host by S. Typhimurium. An STM4467 deletion mutant was defective for replication inside murine macrophages and was attenuated for virulence in mice. We determined that a regulatory protein encoded by the STM4463 gene functions as an activator for STM4467 expression. The expression of the ADI pathway genes was enhanced inside macrophages in a process that required STM4463. Lack of STM4463 impaired the ability of S. Typhimurium to replicate within macrophages. A mutant defective in STM4467-encoded ADI displayed normal production of nitric oxide by macrophages.

  18. Antimicrobial Effects of Blueberry, Raspberry, and Strawberry Aqueous Extracts and their Effects on Virulence Gene Expression in Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Khalifa, Hazim O; Kamimoto, Maki; Shimamoto, Toshi; Shimamoto, Tadashi

    2015-11-01

    The antimicrobial effects of aqueous extracts of blueberry, raspberry, and strawberry on 13 pathogenic bacteria were evaluated. The minimum inhibitory concentrations and minimum bactericidal concentrations of the extracts were determined before and after neutralization to pH 7.03 ± 0.15. Both Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria were selectively inhibited by the non-neutralized berries. Blueberry was the best inhibitor, and Vibrio and Listeria were the most sensitive bacteria. After neutralization, blueberry affected only Vibrio and Listeria, whereas the antimicrobial activities of raspberry and strawberry were abolished. The total contents of phenolics, flavonoids, and proanthocyanidins in the extracts were measured with colorimetric methods and were highest in strawberry, followed by raspberry, and then blueberry. We also studied the effects of sub-bactericidal concentrations of the three berry extracts on virulence gene expression in Vibrio cholerae. Real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction revealed that the three berry extracts effectively repressed the transcription of the tcpA gene. Raspberry also repressed the transcription of the ctxA gene, whereas blueberry and strawberry did not. However, the three berry extracts did not affect the transcription of toxT. These results suggest that the three berry extracts exert potent antimicrobial effects and inhibit the expression of the virulence factors of V. cholerae.

  19. Expression of STM4467-Encoded Arginine Deiminase Controlled by the STM4463 Regulator Contributes to Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Younho; Choi, Jeongjoon; Groisman, Eduardo A.; Kang, Dong-Hyun

    2012-01-01

    Arginine deiminase (ADI), carbamate kinase (CK), and ornithine transcarbamoylase (OTC) constitute the ADI system. In addition to metabolic functions, the ADI system has been implicated in the virulence of certain pathogens. The pathogenic intracellular bacterium Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium possesses the STM4467, STM4466, and STM4465 genes, which are predicted to encode ADI, CK, and OTC, respectively. Here we report that the STM4467 gene encodes an ADI and that ADI activity plays a role in the successful infection of a mammalian host by S. Typhimurium. An STM4467 deletion mutant was defective for replication inside murine macrophages and was attenuated for virulence in mice. We determined that a regulatory protein encoded by the STM4463 gene functions as an activator for STM4467 expression. The expression of the ADI pathway genes was enhanced inside macrophages in a process that required STM4463. Lack of STM4463 impaired the ability of S. Typhimurium to replicate within macrophages. A mutant defective in STM4467-encoded ADI displayed normal production of nitric oxide by macrophages. PMID:23006851

  20. Regulation of Hemolysin Expression and Virulence of Staphylococcus aureus by a Serine/Threonine Kinase and Phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    Burnside, Kellie; Lembo, Annalisa; de los Reyes, Melissa; Iliuk, Anton; BinhTran, Nguyen-Thao; Connelly, James E.; Lin, Wan-Jung; Schmidt, Byron Z.; Richardson, Anthony R.; Fang, Ferric C.; Tao, Weiguo Andy; Rajagopal, Lakshmi

    2010-01-01

    Exotoxins, including the hemolysins known as the alpha (α) and beta (β) toxins, play an important role in the pathogenesis of Staphylococcus aureus infections. A random transposon library was screened for S. aureus mutants exhibiting altered hemolysin expression compared to wild type. Transposon insertions in 72 genes resulting in increased or decreased hemolysin expression were identified. Mutations inactivating a putative cyclic di-GMP synthetase and a serine/threonine phosphatase (Stp1) were found to reduce hemolysin expression, and mutations in genes encoding a two component regulator PhoR, LysR family transcriptional regulator, purine biosynthetic enzymes and a serine/threonine kinase (Stk1) increased expression. Transcription of the hla gene encoding α toxin was decreased in a Δstp1 mutant strain and increased in a Δstk1 strain. Microarray analysis of a Δstk1 mutant revealed increased transcription of additional exotoxins. A Δstp1 strain is severely attenuated for virulence in mice and elicits less inflammation and IL-6 production than the Δstk1 strain. In vivo phosphopeptide enrichment and mass spectrometric analysis revealed that threonine phosphorylated peptides corresponding to Stk1, DNA binding histone like protein (HU), serine-aspartate rich fibrinogen/bone sialoprotein binding protein (SdrE) and a hypothetical protein (NWMN_1123) were present in the wild type and not in the Δstk1 mutant. Collectively, these studies suggest that Stk1 mediated phosphorylation of HU, SrdE and NWMN_1123 affects S. aureus gene expression and virulence. PMID:20552019

  1. Quorum sensing transcriptional regulator QseA is essential for the expression of multiple virulence regulons of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction and Objectives: QseA is one of several transcriptional regulators that regulates the virulence gene expression in enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:H7 through quorum sensing. QseA has been shown to regulate the expression of the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE), non-LEE...

  2. Pyrokinin β-Neuropeptide Affects Necrophoretic Behavior in Fire Ants (S. invicta), and Expression of β-NP in a Mycoinsecticide Increases Its Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yanhua; Pereira, Roberto M.; Kilic, Engin; Casella, George; Keyhani, Nemat O.

    2012-01-01

    Fire ants are one of the world's most damaging invasive pests, with few means for their effective control. Although ecologically friendly alternatives to chemical pesticides such as the insecticidal fungus Beauveria bassiana have been suggested for the control of fire ant populations, their use has been limited due to the low virulence of the fungus and the length of time it takes to kill its target. We present a means of increasing the virulence of the fungal agent by expressing a fire ant neuropeptide. Expression of the fire ant (Solenopsis invicta) pyrokinin β -neuropeptide (β-NP) by B. bassiana increased fungal virulence six-fold towards fire ants, decreased the LT50, but did not affect virulence towards the lepidopteran, Galleria mellonella. Intriguingly, ants killed by the β-NP expressing fungus were disrupted in the removal of dead colony members, i.e. necrophoretic behavior. Furthermore, synthetic C-terminal amidated β-NP but not the non-amidated peptide had a dramatic effect on necrophoretic behavior. These data link chemical sensing of a specific peptide to a complex social behavior. Our results also confirm a new approach to insect control in which expression of host molecules in an insect pathogen can by exploited for target specific augmentation of virulence. The minimization of the development of potential insect resistance by our approach is discussed. PMID:22238569

  3. Influence of tigecycline on expression of virulence factors in biofilm-associated cells of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Smith, Karen; Gould, Katherine A; Ramage, Gordon; Gemmell, Curtis G; Hinds, Jason; Lang, Sue

    2010-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections are complicated by the ability of the organism to grow in surface-adhered biofilms on a multitude of abiotic and biological surfaces. These multicellular communities are notoriously difficult to eradicate with antimicrobial therapy. Cells within the biofilm may be exposed to a sublethal concentration of the antimicrobial due to the metabolic and phenotypic diversity of the biofilm-associated cells or the protection offered by the biofilm structure. In the present study, the influence of a sublethal concentration of tigecycline on biofilms formed by an epidemic MRSA-16 isolate was investigated by transcriptome analysis. In the presence of the drug, 309 genes were upregulated and 213 genes were downregulated by more than twofold in comparison to the levels of gene regulation detected for the controls not grown in the presence of the drug. Microarray data were validated by real-time reverse transcription-PCR and phenotypic assays. Tigecycline altered the expression of a number of genes encoding proteins considered to be crucial for the virulence of S. aureus. These included the reduced expression of icaC, which is involved in polysaccharide intercellular adhesin production and biofilm development; the upregulation of fnbA, clfB, and cna, which encode adhesins which attach to human proteins; and the downregulation of the cap genes, which mediate the synthesis of the capsule polysaccharide. The expression of tst, which encodes toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 (TSST-1), was also significantly reduced; and an assay performed to quantify TSST-1 showed that the level of toxin production by cells treated with tigecycline decreased by 10-fold (P < 0.001) compared to the level of production by untreated control cells. This study suggests that tigecycline may reduce the expression of important virulence factors in S. aureus and supports further investigation to determine whether it could be a useful adjunct to therapy

  4. Molecular architecture of the regulatory Locus sae of Staphylococcus aureus and its impact on expression of virulence factors.

    PubMed

    Steinhuber, Andrea; Goerke, Christiane; Bayer, Manfred G; Döring, Gerd; Wolz, Christiane

    2003-11-01

    We characterized the sae operon, a global regulator for virulence gene expression in Staphylococcus aureus. A Tn917 sae mutant was obtained by screening a Tn917 library of the agr mutant ISP479Mu for clones with altered hemolytic activity. Sequence analysis of the sae operon revealed two additional open reading frames (ORFs) (ORF3 and ORF4) upstream of the two-component regulatory genes saeR and saeS. Four overlapping sae-specific transcripts (T1 to T4) were detected by Northern blot analysis, and the transcriptional initiation points were mapped by primer extension analysis. The T1, T2, and T3 mRNAs are probably terminated at the same stem-loop sequence downstream of saeS. The T1 message (3.1 kb) initiates upstream of ORF4, T2 (2.4 kb) initiates upstream of ORF3, and T3 (2.0 kb) initiates in front of saeR. T4 (0.7 kb) represents a monocistronic mRNA encompassing ORF4 only. sae-specific transcripts were detectable in all of the 40 different clinical S. aureus isolates investigated. Transcript levels were at maximum during the post-exponential growth phase. The sae mutant showed a significantly reduced rate of invasion of human endothelial cells, consistent with diminished transcription and expression of fnbA. The expression of type 5 capsular polysaccharide is activated in the sae mutant of strain Newman, as shown by immunofluorescence and promoter-reporter fusion experiments. In summary, the sae operon constitutes a four-component regulator system which acts on virulence gene expression in S. aureus.

  5. Influence of Tigecycline on Expression of Virulence Factors in Biofilm-Associated Cells of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus▿

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Karen; Gould, Katherine A.; Ramage, Gordon; Gemmell, Curtis G.; Hinds, Jason; Lang, Sue

    2010-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections are complicated by the ability of the organism to grow in surface-adhered biofilms on a multitude of abiotic and biological surfaces. These multicellular communities are notoriously difficult to eradicate with antimicrobial therapy. Cells within the biofilm may be exposed to a sublethal concentration of the antimicrobial due to the metabolic and phenotypic diversity of the biofilm-associated cells or the protection offered by the biofilm structure. In the present study, the influence of a sublethal concentration of tigecycline on biofilms formed by an epidemic MRSA-16 isolate was investigated by transcriptome analysis. In the presence of the drug, 309 genes were upregulated and 213 genes were downregulated by more than twofold in comparison to the levels of gene regulation detected for the controls not grown in the presence of the drug. Microarray data were validated by real-time reverse transcription-PCR and phenotypic assays. Tigecycline altered the expression of a number of genes encoding proteins considered to be crucial for the virulence of S. aureus. These included the reduced expression of icaC, which is involved in polysaccharide intercellular adhesin production and biofilm development; the upregulation of fnbA, clfB, and cna, which encode adhesins which attach to human proteins; and the downregulation of the cap genes, which mediate the synthesis of the capsule polysaccharide. The expression of tst, which encodes toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 (TSST-1), was also significantly reduced; and an assay performed to quantify TSST-1 showed that the level of toxin production by cells treated with tigecycline decreased by 10-fold (P < 0.001) compared to the level of production by untreated control cells. This study suggests that tigecycline may reduce the expression of important virulence factors in S. aureus and supports further investigation to determine whether it could be a useful adjunct to therapy

  6. Expression of stress and virulence genes in Escherichia coli O157:H7 heat shocked in fresh dairy compost.

    PubMed

    Singh, Randhir; Jiang, Xiuping

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the gene expression of Escherichia coli O157:H7 heat shocked in dairy compost. A two-step real-time PCR assay was used to evaluate the expression of stress and virulence genes in E. coli O157:H7 heat shocked in compost at 47.5°C for 10 min. Heat-shocked E. coli O157:H7 in compost was isolated by using an immunomagnetic bead separation method, followed by total RNA extraction, which was then converted to cDNA by using a commercial kit. E. coli O157:H7 heat shocked in broth served as the media control. In compost, heat shock genes (clpB, dnaK, and groEL) and the alternative sigma factor (rpoH) of E. coli O157:H7 were upregulated (P < 0.05), whereas the expression of trehalose synthesis genes did not change. Virulence genes, such as stx1 and fliC, were upregulated, while genes stx2, eaeA, and hlyA were downregulated. In the toxin-antitoxin (TA) system, toxin genes, mazF, hipA, and yafQ were upregulated, whereas among antitoxin genes, only dinJ was upregulated (P < 0.05). In tryptic soy broth, all heat shock genes (rpoH, clpB, dnaK, and groEL) were upregulated (P < 0.05), and most virulence genes (stx1, stx2, hlyA, and fliC) and TA genes (mazF-mazE, hipA-hipB, and yafQ-dinJ and toxin gene chpS) were down-regulated. Our results revealed various gene expression patterns when E. coli O157:H7 inoculated in compost was exposed to a sublethal temperature. Clearly, induction of the heat shock response is one of the important protective mechanisms that prolongs the survival of pathogens during the composting process. In addition, other possible mechanisms (such as the TA system) operating along with heat shock response may be responsible for the extended survival of pathogens in compost.

  7. The Staphylococcus aureus Global Regulator MgrA Modulates Clumping and Virulence by Controlling Surface Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Crosby, Heidi A.; Schlievert, Patrick M.; Merriman, Joseph A.; King, Jessica M.; Salgado-Pabón, Wilmara; Horswill, Alexander R.

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a human commensal and opportunistic pathogen that causes devastating infections in a wide range of locations within the body. One of the defining characteristics of S. aureus is its ability to form clumps in the presence of soluble fibrinogen, which likely has a protective benefit and facilitates adhesion to host tissue. We have previously shown that the ArlRS two-component regulatory system controls clumping, in part by repressing production of the large surface protein Ebh. In this work we show that ArlRS does not directly regulate Ebh, but instead ArlRS activates expression of the global regulator MgrA. Strains lacking mgrA fail to clump in the presence of fibrinogen, and clumping can be restored to an arlRS mutant by overexpressing either arlRS or mgrA, indicating that ArlRS and MgrA constitute a regulatory pathway. We used RNA-seq to show that MgrA represses ebh, as well as seven cell wall-associated proteins (SraP, Spa, FnbB, SasG, SasC, FmtB, and SdrD). EMSA analysis showed that MgrA directly represses expression of ebh and sraP. Clumping can be restored to an mgrA mutant by deleting the genes for Ebh, SraP and SasG, suggesting that increased expression of these proteins blocks clumping by steric hindrance. We show that mgrA mutants are less virulent in a rabbit model of endocarditis, and virulence can be partially restored by deleting the genes for the surface proteins ebh, sraP, and sasG. While mgrA mutants are unable to clump, they are known to have enhanced biofilm capacity. We demonstrate that this increase in biofilm formation is partially due to up-regulation of SasG, a surface protein known to promote intercellular interactions. These results confirm that ArlRS and MgrA constitute a regulatory cascade, and that they control expression of a number of genes important for virulence, including those for eight large surface proteins. PMID:27144398

  8. Virulence of Meloidogyne incognita to expression of N gene in pepper.

    PubMed

    Thies, Judy A

    2011-06-01

    Four pepper genotypes classified as resistant and four pepper genotypes classified as susceptible to several avirulent populations of M. incognita were compared for their reactions against a population of Meloidogyne incognita (Chitwood) Kofoid and White which had been shown to be virulent to resistant bell pepper (Capsicum annuum) in preliminary tests. The virulent population of M. incognita originated from a commercial bell pepper field in California. The resistant pepper genotypes used in all experiments were the Capsicum annuum cultivars Charleston Belle, Carolina Wonder, and Carolina Cayenne, and the C. chinense cultigen PA-426. The susceptible pepper genotypes used in the experiments were the C. annuum cultivars Keystone Resistant Giant, Yolo Wonder B, California Wonder, and the C. chinense cultigen PA-350. Root gall indices (GI) were ≥ 3.0 for all genotypes in both tests except for PA-426 (GI=2.57) in test 1 and 'Carolina Cayenne' (GI=2.83) in test 2. Numbers of eggs per gram fresh root weight ranged from 20,635 to 141,319 and reproductive indices ranged from 1.20 to 27.2 for the pepper genotypes in both tests, indicating that all eight pepper genotypes tested were susceptible to the M. incognita population used in these tests. The M. incognita population used in these studies overcame resistance conferred by the N gene in all resistant genotypes of both C. annuum and C. chinense.

  9. CpsR, a GntR family regulator, transcriptionally regulates capsular polysaccharide biosynthesis and governs bacterial virulence in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Kaifeng; Xu, Hongmei; Zheng, Yuqiang; Wang, Libin; Zhang, Xuemei; Yin, Yibing

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptional regulation of capsule expression is critical for pneumococcal transition from carriage to infection, yet the underlying mechanism remains incompletely understood. Here, we describe the regulation of capsular polysaccharide, one of the most important pneumococcal virulence factor by a GntR family regulator, CpsR. Electrophoretic mobility-shift assays have shown the direct interaction between CpsR and the cps promoter (cpsp), and their interaction could be competitively interfered by glucose. DNase I footprinting assays localized the binding site to a region −146 to −114 base pairs relative to the transcriptional start site of the cps locus in S. pneumoniae D39. We found that CpsR negatively controlled the transcription of the cps locus and hence CPS production, which was confirmed by fine-tuning expression of CpsR in a ΔcpsR complemented strain. Increased expression of CpsR in complemented strain led to a decreased resistance to the whole-blood-mediated killing, suggesting a protective role for CpsR-cpsp interaction in the establishment of invasive infection. Finally, animal experiments showed that CpsR-cpsp interaction was necessary for both pneumococcal colonization and invasive infection. Taken together, our results provide a thorough insight into the regulation of capsule production mediated by CpsR and its important roles in pneumococcal pathogenesis. PMID:27386955

  10. The C-terminal extension of PrhG impairs its activation of hrp expression and virulence in Ralstonia solanacearum.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Luo, Feng; Hikichi, Yasufumi; Kiba, Akinori; Yasuo, Igarashi; Ohnishi, Kouhei

    2015-04-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum is the second most destructive bacterial plant pathogens worldwide and HrpG is the master regulator of its pathogenicity. PrhG is a close paralogue of HrpG and both belong to OmpR/PhoB family of two-component response regulators. Despite a high similarity (72% global identity and 96% similarity in helix-loop-helix domain), they display distinct roles in pathogenicity. HrpG is necessary for the bacterial growth in planta and pathogenicity, while PrhG is dispensable for bacterial growth in planta and contributes little to pathogenicity. The main difference between HrpG and PrhG is the 50-amino-acid-long C-terminal extension in PrhG (amino-acid residues 230-283), which is absent in HrpG. When this extension is deleted, truncated PrhGs (under the control of its native promoter) allowed complete recovery of bacterial growth in planta and wild-type virulence of hrpG mutant. This novel finding demonstrates that the extension region in PrhG is responsible for the functional difference between HrpG and PrhG, which may block the binding of PrhG to target promoters and result in impaired activation of hrp expression by PrhG and reduced virulence of R. solanacearum.

  11. Mycobacterium abscessus phospholipase C expression is induced during coculture within amoebae and enhances M. abscessus virulence in mice.

    PubMed

    Bakala N'Goma, Jean Claude; Le Moigne, Vincent; Soismier, Nathalie; Laencina, Laura; Le Chevalier, Fabien; Roux, Anne-Laure; Poncin, Isabelle; Serveau-Avesque, Carole; Rottman, Martin; Gaillard, Jean-Louis; Etienne, Gilles; Brosch, Roland; Herrmann, Jean-Louis; Canaan, Stéphane; Girard-Misguich, Fabienne

    2015-02-01

    Mycobacterium abscessus is a pathogenic, rapidly growing mycobacterium involved in pulmonary and cutaneo-mucous infections worldwide, to which cystic fibrosis patients are exquisitely susceptible. The analysis of the genome sequence of M. abscessus showed that this bacterium is endowed with the metabolic pathways typically found in environmental microorganisms that come into contact with soil, plants, and aquatic environments, where free-living amoebae are frequently present. M. abscessus also contains several genes that are characteristically found only in pathogenic bacteria. One of them is MAB_0555, encoding a putative phospholipase C (PLC) that is absent from most other rapidly growing mycobacteria, including Mycobacterium chelonae and Mycobacterium smegmatis. Here, we report that purified recombinant M. abscessus PLC is highly cytotoxic to mouse macrophages, presumably due to hydrolysis of membrane phospholipids. We further showed by constructing and using an M. abscessus PLC knockout mutant that loss of PLC activity is deleterious to M. abscessus intracellular survival in amoebae. The importance of PLC is further supported by the fact that M. abscessus PLC was found to be expressed only in amoebae. Aerosol challenge of mice with M. abscessus strains that were precultured in amoebae enhanced M. abscessus lung infectivity relative to M. abscessus grown in broth culture. Our study underlines the importance of PLC for the virulence of M. abscessus. Despite the difficulties of isolating M. abscessus from environmental sources, our findings suggest that M. abscessus has evolved in close contact with environmental protozoa, which supports the argument that amoebae may contribute to the virulence of opportunistic mycobacteria.

  12. Decreased in vivo virulence and altered gene expression by a Brucella melitensis light-sensing histidine kinase mutant.

    PubMed

    Gourley, Christopher R; Petersen, Erik; Harms, Jerome; Splitter, Gary

    2015-03-01

    Brucella species utilize diverse virulence factors. Previously, Brucella abortus light-sensing histidine kinase was identified as important for cellular infection. Here, we demonstrate that a Brucella melitensis LOV-HK (BM-LOV-HK) mutant strain has strikingly different gene expression than wild type. General stress response genes including the alternative sigma factor rpoE1 and its anti-anti-sigma factor phyR were downregulated, while flagellar, quorum sensing (QS), and type IV secretion system genes were upregulated in the ΔBM-LOV-HK strain vs. wild type. Contextually, expression results agree with other studies of transcriptional regulators involving ΔrpoE1, ΔphyR, ΔvjbR, and ΔblxR (ΔbabR) Brucella strains. Additionally, deletion of BM-LOV-HK decreases virulence in mice. During C57BL/6 mouse infection, the ΔBM-LOV-HK strain had 2 logs less CFUs in the spleen 3 days postinfection, but similar levels 6 days post infection compared to wild type. Infection of IRF-1(-/-) mice more specifically define ΔBM-LOV-HK strain attenuation with fewer bacteria in spleens and significantly increased survival of mutant vs. wild-type infected IRF-1(-/-) mice. Upregulation of flagella, QS, and VirB genes, along with downregulation of rpoE1 and related sigma factor, rpoH2 (BMEI0280) suggest that BM-LOV-HK modulates both QS and general stress response regulatory components to control Brucella gene expression on a global level.

  13. Effect of high-fructose corn syrup on Streptococcus mutans virulence gene expression and on tooth demineralization.

    PubMed

    Sun, Minmin; Kang, Qiongyi; Li, Tingting; Huang, Lili; Jiang, Yuntao; Xia, Wenwei

    2014-06-01

    High-fructose corn syrup-55 (HFCS-55) has been widely welcomed in recent years as a substitute for sucrose on the basis of its favourable properties and price. The objective of this study was to determine the influence of HFCS-55 on the expression of Streptococcus mutans UA159 virulence genes and on tooth demineralization. Real-time reverse-transcription PCR (real-time RT-PCR) and microhardness evaluations were performed to examine gene expression and enamel demineralization, respectively, after treatment with HFCS-55 and/or sucrose. Significant up-regulation of glucosyltransferase B (gtfB) by HFCS-55 was found. A mixture of HFCS-55 and sucrose could positively enhance expression of glucan-binding protein (gbp) genes. Regarding acidogenicity, expression of the lactate dehydrogenase (ldh) gene was unaffected by HFCS-55. A notable finding in this study was that 5% HFCS-55 significantly enhanced expression of the intracellular response gene of the two-component VicRK signal transduction system (vicR). Demineralization testing showed that the microhardness of teeth decreased by a greater extent in response to HFCS-55 than in response to sucrose. The results indicate that HFCS-55 can enhance S. mutans biofilm formation indirectly in the presence of sucrose and that HFCS-55 has a more acidogenic potential than does sucrose. Summing up the real-time PCR and demineralization results, HFCS-55 appears to be no less cariogenic than sucrose in vitro - at least, not under the conditions of our experiments.

  14. Governance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moran, K. D.

    The author notes that two trends appear to be developing in litigation over the governance of the public schools. One trend is increasing participation of organized groups in suits against the schools. The other is a greater volume of litigation dealing with open meeting laws and freedom of information acts. Reflecting the second trend, the…

  15. In silico clustering of Salmonella global gene expression data reveals novel genes co-regulated with the SPI-1 virulence genes through HilD

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Flores, Irma; Pérez-Morales, Deyanira; Sánchez-Pérez, Mishael; Paredes, Claudia C.; Collado-Vides, Julio; Salgado, Heladia; Bustamante, Víctor H.

    2016-01-01

    A wide variety of Salmonella enterica serovars cause intestinal and systemic infections to humans and animals. Salmonella Patogenicity Island 1 (SPI-1) is a chromosomal region containing 39 genes that have crucial virulence roles. The AraC-like transcriptional regulator HilD, encoded in SPI-1, positively controls the expression of the SPI-1 genes, as well as of several other virulence genes located outside SPI-1. In this study, we applied a clustering method to the global gene expression data of S. enterica serovar Typhimurium from the COLOMBOS database; thus genes that show an expression pattern similar to that of SPI-1 genes were selected. This analysis revealed nine novel genes that are co-expressed with SPI-1, which are located in different chromosomal regions. Expression analyses and protein-DNA interaction assays showed regulation by HilD for six of these genes: gtgE, phoH, sinR, SL1263 (lpxR) and SL4247 were regulated directly, whereas SL1896 was regulated indirectly. Interestingly, phoH is an ancestral gene conserved in most of bacteria, whereas the other genes show characteristics of genes acquired by Salmonella. A role in virulence has been previously demonstrated for gtgE, lpxR and sinR. Our results further expand the regulon of HilD and thus identify novel possible Salmonella virulence genes. PMID:27886269

  16. Subinhibitory Concentrations of Perilla Oil Affect the Expression of Secreted Virulence Factor Genes in Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Mingjing; Li, Hongen; Dong, Jing; Wang, Jianfeng; Leng, Bingfeng; Wang, Xiaoliang; Feng, Haihua; Ren, Wenzhi; Deng, Xuming

    2011-01-01

    Background The pathogenicity of staphylococcus aureus is dependent largely upon its ability to secrete a number of virulence factors, therefore, anti-virulence strategy to combat S. aureus-mediated infections is now gaining great interest. It is widely recognized that some plant essential oils could affect the production of staphylococcal exotoxins when used at subinhibitory concentrations. Perilla [Perilla frutescens (L.) Britton], a natural medicine found in eastern Asia, is primarily used as both a medicinal and culinary herb. Its essential oil (perilla oil) has been previously demonstrated to be active against S. aureus. However, there are no data on the influence of perilla oil on the production of S. aureus exotoxins. Methodology/Principal Findings A broth microdilution method was used to determine the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of perilla oil against S. aureus strains. Hemolysis, tumour necrosis factor (TNF) release, Western blot, and real-time RT-PCR assays were performed to evaluate the effects of subinhibitory concentrations of perilla oil on exotoxins production in S. aureus. The data presented here show that perilla oil dose-dependently decreased the production of α-toxin, enterotoxins A and B (the major staphylococcal enterotoxins), and toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 (TSST-1) in both methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Conclusions/Significance The production of α-toxin, SEA, SEB, and TSST-1 in S. aureus was decreased by perilla oil. These data suggest that perilla oil may be useful for the treatment of S. aureus infections when used in combination with β-lactam antibiotics, which can increase exotoxins production by S. aureus at subinhibitory concentrations. Furthermore, perilla oil could be rationally applied in food systems as a novel food preservative both to inhibit the growth of S. aureus and to repress the production of exotoxins, particularly staphylococcal enterotoxins. PMID:21283822

  17. A σE-Mediated Temperature Gauge Controls a Switch from LuxR-Mediated Virulence Gene Expression to Thermal Stress Adaptation in Vibrio alginolyticus

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Dan; Guo, Min; Yang, Minjun; Zhang, Yuanxing; Zhou, Xiaohui; Wang, Qiyao

    2016-01-01

    In vibrios, the expression of virulence factors is often controlled by LuxR, the master quorum-sensing regulator. Here, we investigate the interplay between LuxR and σE, an alternative sigma factor, during the control of virulence-related gene expression and adaptations to temperature elevations in the zoonotic pathogen Vibrio alginolyticus. An rpoE null V. alginolyticus mutant was unable to adapt to various stresses and was survival-deficient in fish. In wild type V. alginolyticus, the expression of LuxR-regulated virulence factors increased as the temperature was increased from 22°C to 37°C, but mutants lacking σE did not respond to temperature, indicating that σE is critical for the temperature-dependent upregulation of virulence genes. Further analyses revealed that σE binds directly to -10 and -35 elements in the luxR promoter that drive its transcription. ChIP assays showed that σE binds to the promoter regions of luxR, rpoH and rpoE at high temperatures (e.g., 30°C and 37°C). However, at higher temperatures (42°C) that induce thermal stress, σE binding to the luxR promoter decreased, while its binding to the rpoH and rpoE promoters was unchanged. Thus, the temperature-dependent binding of σE to distinct promoters appears to underlie a σE-controlled switch between the expression of virulence genes and adaptation to thermal stress. This study illustrates how a conserved temperature response mechanism integrates into quorum-sensing circuits to regulate both virulence and stress adaptation. PMID:27253371

  18. Molecular Cooperativity Governs Diverse and Monoallelic Olfactory Receptor Expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Jianhua; Tian, Xiaojun; Zhang, Hang; Sannerud, Jens

    Multiple-objective optimization is common in biological systems. In the mammalian olfactory system, each sensory neuron stochastically expresses only one out of up to thousands of olfactory receptor (OR) gene alleles; at organism level the types of expressed ORs need to be maximized. The molecular mechanism of this Nobel-Prize winning puzzle remains unresolved after decades of extensive studies. Existing models focus only on monoallele activation, and cannot explain recent observations in mutants, especially the reduced global diversity of expressed ORs in G9a/GLP knockouts. In this work we integrated existing information on OR expression, and proposed an evolutionarily optimized three-layer regulation mechanism, which includes zonal segregation, epigenetic and enhancer competition coupled to a negative feedback loop. This model not only recapitulates monoallelic OR expression, but also elucidates how the olfactory system maximizes and maintains the diversity of OR expression. The model is validated by several experimental results, and particularly underscores cooperativity and synergy as a general design principle of multi-objective optimization in biology. The work is supported by the NIGMS/DMS Mathematical Biology program.

  19. Regulated expression of virulence gene mviN provides protective immunity and colonization control of Salmonella in poultry.

    PubMed

    Rubinelli, Peter M; Lee, Sang In; Roto, Stephanie M; Park, Si Hong; Ricke, Steven C

    2015-10-05

    Current live attenuated vaccines for control of Salmonella in poultry persist in the ceca and may persist in the environment. In this paper we report the construction and characterization of the vaccine efficacy of a Salmonella mutant strain with inducible mviN expression and rapid clearance from the host. The mutant was effective in oral immunization of the broiler chicken host against a virulent Salmonella oral challenge strain, having a mean 7×10(6)CFU/g in the ceca of unvaccinated controls compared to a mean 2×10(3)CFU/g in the ceca of vaccinated chickens at 4 weeks post-challenge (6 weeks of age). The mutant strain also demonstrated immunogenicity, reduced organ colonization, and rapid clearance in broiler chickens within 3 weeks of inoculation.

  20. Differential expression of pathogenicity- and virulence-related genes of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri under copper stress.

    PubMed

    Palmieri, Ana Carolina Basílio; do Amaral, Alexandre Morais; Homem, Rafael Augusto; Machado, Marcos Antonio

    2010-04-01

    In this study, we used real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) to evaluate the expression of 32 genes of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri related to pathogenicity and virulence that are also involved in copper detoxification. Nearly all of the genes were up-regulated, including copA and copB. Two genes homologous to members of the type II secretion system (xcsH and xcsC) and two involved in the degradation of plant cell wall components (pglA and pel) were the most expressed in response to an elevated copper concentration. The type II secretion system (xcs operon) and a few homologues of proteins putatively secreted by this system showed enhanced expression when the bacteria were exposed to a high concentration of copper sulfate. The enhanced expression of the genes of secretion II system during copper stress suggests that this pathway may have an important role in the adaptative response of X. axonopodis pv. citri to toxic compounds. These findings highlight the potential role of these genes in attenuating the toxicity of certain metals and could represent an important means of bacterial resistance against chemicals used to control diseases.

  1. Region between the canine distemper virus M and F genes modulates virulence by controlling fusion protein expression.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Danielle E; von Messling, Veronika

    2008-11-01

    Morbilliviruses, including measles and canine distemper virus (CDV), are nonsegmented, negative-stranded RNA viruses that cause severe diseases in humans and animals. The transcriptional units in their genomes are separated by untranslated regions (UTRs), which contain essential transcription and translation signals. Due to its increased length, the region between the matrix (M) protein and fusion (F) protein open reading frames is of particular interest. In measles virus, the entire F 5' region is untranslated, while several start codons are found in most other morbilliviruses, resulting in a long F protein signal peptide (Fsp). To characterize the role of this region in morbillivirus pathogenesis, we constructed recombinant CDVs, in which either the M-F UTR was replaced with that between the nucleocapsid (N) and phosphoprotein (P) genes, or 106 Fsp residues were deleted. The Fsp deletion alone had no effect in vitro and in vivo. In contrast, substitution of the UTR was associated with a slight increase in F gene and protein expression. Animals infected with this virus either recovered completely or experienced prolonged disease and death due to neuroinvasion. The combination of both changes resulted in a virus with strongly increased F gene and protein expression and complete attenuation. Taken together, our results provide evidence that the region between the morbillivirus M and F genes modulates virulence through transcriptional control of the F gene expression.

  2. Expression of Xylella fastidiosa RpfF in citrus disrupts signaling in Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri and thereby its virulence.

    PubMed

    Caserta, R; Picchi, S C; Takita, M A; Tomaz, J P; Pereira, W E L; Machado, M A; Ionescu, M; Lindow, S; De Souza, A A

    2014-11-01

    Xylella fastidiosa and Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri, that cause citrus variegated chlorosis (CVC) and citrus canker diseases, respectively, utilize diffusible signal factor (DSF) for quorum sensing. DSF, produced by RpfF, are similar fatty acids in both organisms, although a different set of genes is regulated by DSF in each species. Because of this similarity, Xylella fastidiosa DSF might be recognized and affect the biology of Xanthomonas citri. Therefore, transgenic Citrus sinensis and Carrizo citrange plants overexpressing the Xylella fastidiosa rpfF were inoculated with Xanthomonas citri and changes in symptoms of citrus canker were observed. X. citri biofilms formed only at wound sites on transgenic leaves and were thicker; however, bacteria were unable to break through the tissue and form pustules elsewhere. Although abundant growth of X. citri occurred at wound sites on inoculated transgenic leaves, little growth was observed on unwounded tissue. Genes in the DFS-responsive core in X. citri were downregulated in bacteria isolated from transgenic leaves. DSF-dependent expression of engA was suppressed in cells exposed to xylem sap from transgenic plants. Thus, altered symptom development appears to be due to reduced expression of virulence genes because of the presence of antagonists of DSF signaling in X. citri in rpfF-expressing plants.

  3. Association Between Helicobacter pylori cagA, babA2 Virulence Factors and Gastric Mucosal Interleukin-33 mRNA Expression and Clinical Outcomes in Dyspeptic Patients.

    PubMed

    Shahi, Heshmat; Reiisi, Somayeh; Bahreini, Rasol; Bagheri, Nader; Salimzadeh, Loghman; Shirzad, Hedayatollah

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection has been reported in more than half of the world human population. It is associated with gastric inflammation and noticeable infiltration of the immune cells to the stomach mucosa by several cytokines secretion. IL-1β, IL-18 have been shown to contribute to H. pylori induced gastritis, but the details of inflammation and association of virulence factors remain unclear. IL-1 cytokine family has a new additional cytokine, Interleukin-33 (IL-33), which is contemplated to have an important role for host defense against microorganisms. H. pylori virulence factors important in gastritis risk are the cag pathogenicity island (cag-PAI) and babA. This study evaluated IL-33 mucosal mRNA expression levels in infected and uninfected patients and its relationship with bacterial virulence factors cagA, babA2 and type of gastritis. Total RNA was extracted from gastric biopsies of 79 H. pylori-infected patients and 51 H. pylori-negative patients. Mucosal IL-33 mRNA expression levels in gastric biopsies were assessed using real-time PCR. Existence of virulence factors were detected by PCR. IL-33 mRNA expression was significantly higher in biopsies of H. pylori-infected patients compared to H. pylori-uninfected patients (P<0.0001). Also there was a direct relationship between virulence factor bab-A2 and enhancement in IL-33 mRNA expression. Furthermore, IL-33 mRNA expression level was significantly lower in chronic gastritis patients compared with patients with active gastritis (P<0.001). IL-33 may play a crucial role in the inflammatory response and induction of the chronic gastritis and severity of inflammatory changes in the gastric mucosa.

  4. Association Between Helicobacter pylori cagA, babA2 Virulence Factors and Gastric Mucosal Interleukin-33 mRNA Expression and Clinical Outcomes in Dyspeptic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Shahi, Heshmat; Reiisi, Somayeh; Bahreini, Rasol; Bagheri, Nader; Salimzadeh, Loghman; Shirzad, Hedayatollah

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection has been reported in more than half of the world human population. It is associated with gastric inflammation and noticeable infiltration of the immune cells to the stomach mucosa by several cytokines secretion. IL-1β, IL-18 have been shown to contribute to H. pylori induced gastritis, but the details of inflammation and association of virulence factors remain unclear. IL-1 cytokine family has a new additional cytokine, Interleukin-33 (IL-33), which is contemplated to have an important role for host defense against microorganisms. H. pylori virulence factors important in gastritis risk are the cag pathogenicity island (cag-PAI) and babA. This study evaluated IL-33 mucosal mRNA expression levels in infected and uninfected patients and its relationship with bacterial virulence factors cagA, babA2 and type of gastritis. Total RNA was extracted from gastric biopsies of 79 H. pylori-infected patients and 51 H. pylori-negative patients. Mucosal IL-33 mRNA expression levels in gastric biopsies were assessed using real-time PCR. Existence of virulence factors were detected by PCR. IL-33 mRNA expression was significantly higher in biopsies of H. pylori-infected patients compared to H. pylori-uninfected patients (P<0.0001). Also there was a direct relationship between virulence factor bab-A2 and enhancement in IL-33 mRNA expression. Furthermore, IL-33 mRNA expression level was significantly lower in chronic gastritis patients compared with patients with active gastritis (P<0.001). IL-33 may play a crucial role in the inflammatory response and induction of the chronic gastritis and severity of inflammatory changes in the gastric mucosa. PMID:27014647

  5. Fur is required for the activation of virulence gene expression through the induction of the sae regulatory system in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Miranda; Sengupta, Mrittika; Purves, Joanne; Tarrant, Emma; Williams, Peter H; Cockayne, Alan; Muthaiyan, Arunachalam; Stephenson, Robert; Ledala, Nagender; Wilkinson, Brian J; Jayaswal, Radheshyam K; Morrissey, Julie A

    2011-01-01

    Our previous studies showed that both Sae and Fur are required for the induction of eap and emp expression in low iron. In this study, we show that expression of sae is also iron-regulated, as sae expression is activated by Fur in low iron. We also demonstrate that both Fur and Sae are required for full induction of the oxidative stress response and expression of non-covalently bound surface proteins in low-iron growth conditions. In addition, Sae is required for the induced expression of the important virulence factors isdA and isdB in low iron. Our studies also indicate that Fur is required for the induced expression of the global regulators Agr and Rot in low iron and a number of extracellular virulence factors such as the haemolysins which are also Sae- and Agr-regulated. Hence, we show that Fur is central to a complex regulatory network that is required for the induced expression of a number of important S. aureus virulence determinants in low iron.

  6. Vru (Sub0144) controls expression of proven and putative virulence determinants and alters the ability of Streptococcus uberis to cause disease in dairy cattle

    PubMed Central

    Egan, Sharon A.; Ward, Philip N.; Watson, Michael; Field, Terence R.

    2012-01-01

    The regulation and control of gene expression in response to differing environmental stimuli is crucial for successful pathogen adaptation and persistence. The regulatory gene vru of Streptococcus uberis encodes a stand-alone response regulator with similarity to the Mga of group A Streptococcus. Mga controls expression of a number of important virulence determinants. Experimental intramammary challenge of dairy cattle with a mutant of S. uberis carrying an inactivating lesion in vru showed reduced ability to colonize the mammary gland and an inability to induce clinical signs of mastitis compared with the wild-type strain. Analysis of transcriptional differences of gene expression in the mutant, determined by microarray analysis, identified a number of coding sequences with altered expression in the absence of Vru. These consisted of known and putative virulence determinants, including Lbp (Sub0145), SclB (Sub1095), PauA (Sub1785) and hasA (Sub1696). PMID:22383474

  7. Mycobacterium abscessus Phospholipase C Expression Is Induced during Coculture within Amoebae and Enhances M. abscessus Virulence in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bakala N'Goma, Jean Claude; Le Moigne, Vincent; Soismier, Nathalie; Laencina, Laura; Le Chevalier, Fabien; Roux, Anne-Laure; Poncin, Isabelle; Serveau-Avesque, Carole; Rottman, Martin; Gaillard, Jean-Louis; Etienne, Gilles; Brosch, Roland; Canaan, Stéphane

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium abscessus is a pathogenic, rapidly growing mycobacterium involved in pulmonary and cutaneo-mucous infections worldwide, to which cystic fibrosis patients are exquisitely susceptible. The analysis of the genome sequence of M. abscessus showed that this bacterium is endowed with the metabolic pathways typically found in environmental microorganisms that come into contact with soil, plants, and aquatic environments, where free-living amoebae are frequently present. M. abscessus also contains several genes that are characteristically found only in pathogenic bacteria. One of them is MAB_0555, encoding a putative phospholipase C (PLC) that is absent from most other rapidly growing mycobacteria, including Mycobacterium chelonae and Mycobacterium smegmatis. Here, we report that purified recombinant M. abscessus PLC is highly cytotoxic to mouse macrophages, presumably due to hydrolysis of membrane phospholipids. We further showed by constructing and using an M. abscessus PLC knockout mutant that loss of PLC activity is deleterious to M. abscessus intracellular survival in amoebae. The importance of PLC is further supported by the fact that M. abscessus PLC was found to be expressed only in amoebae. Aerosol challenge of mice with M. abscessus strains that were precultured in amoebae enhanced M. abscessus lung infectivity relative to M. abscessus grown in broth culture. Our study underlines the importance of PLC for the virulence of M. abscessus. Despite the difficulties of isolating M. abscessus from environmental sources, our findings suggest that M. abscessus has evolved in close contact with environmental protozoa, which supports the argument that amoebae may contribute to the virulence of opportunistic mycobacteria. PMID:25486995

  8. The hexA gene of Erwinia carotovora encodes a LysR homologue and regulates motility and the expression of multiple virulence determinants.

    PubMed

    Harris, S J; Shih, Y L; Bentley, S D; Salmond, G P

    1998-05-01

    We have identified a gene important for the regulation of exoenzyme virulence factor synthesis in the plant pathogen Erwinia carotovora ssp. carotovora (Ecc) and virulence and motility in Erwinia carotovora ssp. atroseptica (Eca). This gene, hexA (hyperproduction of exoenzymes), is a close relative of the Erwinia chrysanthemi (Echr) gene pecT and encodes a member of the LysR family of transcriptional regulators. hexA mutants in both Ecc and Eca produce abnormally high levels of the exoenzyme virulence factors pectate lyase, cellulase and protease. In addition, Eca hexA mutants show increased expression of the fliA and fliC genes and hypermotility. Consistent with a role as a global regulator, expression of hexA from even a low-copy plasmid can suppress exoenzyme production in Ecc and Eca and motility in Eca. Production of the quorum-sensing pheromone OHHL in Ecc hexA is higher throughout the growth curve compared with the wild-type strain. Overexpression of Ecc hexA also caused widespread effects in several strains of the opportunistic human pathogen, Serratia. Low-copy hexA expression resulted in repression of exoenzyme, pigment and antibiotic production and repression of the spreading phenotype. Finally, mutations in hexA were shown to increase Ecc or Eca virulence in planta.

  9. Relatedness of Streptococcus suis Isolates of Various Serotypes and Clinical Backgrounds as Evaluated by Macrorestriction Analysis and Expression of Potential Virulence Traits

    PubMed Central

    Allgaier, Achim; Goethe, Ralph; Wisselink, Henk J.; Smith, Hilde E.; Valentin-Weigand, Peter

    2001-01-01

    We evaluated the genetic diversity of Streptococcus suis isolates of different serotypes by macrorestriction analysis and elucidated possible relationships between the genetic background, expression of potential virulence traits, and source of isolation. Virulence traits included expression of serotype-specific polysaccharides, muramidase-released protein (MRP), extracellular protein factor (EF), hemolysin activity, and adherence to epithelial cells. Macrorestriction analysis of streptococcal DNA digested with restriction enzymes SmaI and ApaI allowed differentiation of single isolates that could be assigned to four major clusters, named A1, A2, B1, and B2. Comparison of the genotypic and phenotypic features of the isolates with their source of isolation showed that (i) the S. suis population examined, which originated mainly from German pigs, exhibited a genetic diversity and phenotypic patterns comparable to those found for isolates from other European countries; (ii) certain phenotypic features, such as the presence of capsular antigens of serotypes 2, 1, and 9, expression of MRP and EF, and hemolysin activity (and in particular, combinations of these features), were strongly associated with the clinical background of meningitis and septicemia; and (iii) isolates from pigs with meningitis and septicemia showed a significantly higher degree of genetic homogeneity compared to that for isolates from pigs with pneumonia and healthy pigs. Since the former isolates are considered highly virulent, this supports the theory of a clonal relationship among highly virulent strains. PMID:11158088

  10. AlgU controls expression of virulence genes in Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant pathogenic bacteria are able to integrate information about their environment and adjust gene expression to provide adaptive functions. AlgU, an ECF sigma factor encoded by Pseudomonas syringae, controls expression of genes for alginate biosynthesis and is active while the bacteria are associa...

  11. TcpP protein is a positive regulator of virulence gene expression in Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Häse, C C; Mekalanos, J J

    1998-01-20

    The production of several virulence factors in Vibrio cholerae O1, including cholera toxin and the pilus colonization factor TCP (toxin-coregulated pilus), is strongly influenced by environmental conditions. To specifically identify membrane proteins involved in these signal transduction events, we examined a transposon library of V. cholerae generated by Tnbla mutagenesis for cells that produce TCP when grown under various nonpermissive conditions. To select for TCP-producing cells we used the recently described bacteriophage CTX phi-Kan, which uses TCP as its receptor and carries a gene encoding resistance to kanamycin. Among the isolated mutants was a transposon insertion in a gene homologous to nqrB from Vibrio alginolyticus, which encodes a subunit of a Na(+)-translocating NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase, and tcpI, encoding a chemo-receptor previously implicated in the negative regulation of TCP production. A third transposon mutant had an insertion in tcpP, which is in an operon with tcpH, a known positive regulator of TCP production. However, TcpP was shown to be essential for TCP production in V. cholerae, as a tcpP-deletion strain was deficient in pili production. The amino-terminal region of TcpP shows sequence homology to the DNA-binding domains of several regulatory proteins, including ToxR from V. cholerae and PsaE from Yersinia pestis. Like ToxR, TcpP activates transcription of the toxT gene, an essential activator of tcp operon transcription. Furthermore, TcpH, with its large periplasmic domain and inner membrane anchor, has a structure similar to that of ToxS and was shown to enhance the activity of TcpP. We propose that TcpP/TcpH constitute a pair of regulatory proteins functionally similar to ToxR/ToxS and PsaE/PsaF that are required for toxT transcription in V. cholerae.

  12. An In Vivo Selection Identifies Listeria monocytogenes Genes Required to Sense the Intracellular Environment and Activate Virulence Factor Expression

    PubMed Central

    Portnoy, Daniel A.

    2016-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is an environmental saprophyte and facultative intracellular bacterial pathogen with a well-defined life-cycle that involves escape from a phagosome, rapid cytosolic growth, and ActA-dependent cell-to-cell spread, all of which are dependent on the master transcriptional regulator PrfA. The environmental cues that lead to temporal and spatial control of L. monocytogenes virulence gene expression are poorly understood. In this study, we took advantage of the robust up-regulation of ActA that occurs intracellularly and expressed Cre recombinase from the actA promoter and 5’ untranslated region in a strain in which loxP sites flanked essential genes, so that activation of actA led to bacterial death. Upon screening for transposon mutants that survived intracellularly, six genes were identified as necessary for ActA expression. Strikingly, most of the genes, including gshF, spxA1, yjbH, and ohrA, are predicted to play important roles in bacterial redox regulation. The mutants identified in the genetic selection fell into three broad categories: (1) those that failed to reach the cytosolic compartment; (2) mutants that entered the cytosol, but failed to activate the master virulence regulator PrfA; and (3) mutants that entered the cytosol and activated transcription of actA, but failed to synthesize it. The identification of mutants defective in vacuolar escape suggests that up-regulation of ActA occurs in the host cytosol and not the vacuole. Moreover, these results provide evidence for two non-redundant cytosolic cues; the first results in allosteric activation of PrfA via increased glutathione levels and transcriptional activation of actA while the second results in translational activation of actA and requires yjbH. Although the precise host cues have not yet been identified, we suggest that intracellular redox stress occurs as a consequence of both host and pathogen remodeling their metabolism upon infection. PMID:27414028

  13. The small regulatory RNA FasX enhances group A Streptococcus virulence and inhibits pilus expression via serotype-specific targets.

    PubMed

    Danger, Jessica L; Cao, Tram N; Cao, Tran H; Sarkar, Poulomee; Treviño, Jeanette; Pflughoeft, Kathryn J; Sumby, Paul

    2015-04-01

    Bacterial pathogens commonly show intra-species variation in virulence factor expression and often this correlates with pathogenic potential. The group A Streptococcus (GAS) produces a small regulatory RNA (sRNA), FasX, which regulates the expression of pili and the thrombolytic agent streptokinase. As GAS serotypes are polymorphic regarding (a) FasX abundance, (b) the fibronectin, collagen, T-antigen (FCT) region of the genome, which contains the pilus genes (nine different FCT-types), and (c) the streptokinase-encoding gene (ska) sequence (two different alleles), we sought to test whether FasX regulates pilus and streptokinase expression in a serotype-specific manner. Parental, fasX mutant and complemented derivatives of serotype M1 (ska-2, FCT-2), M2 (ska-1, FCT-6), M6 (ska-2, FCT-1) and M28 (ska-1, FCT-4) isolates were compared. While FasX reduced pilus expression in each serotype, the molecular basis differed, as FasX bound, and inhibited the translation of, different FCT-region mRNAs. FasX enhanced streptokinase expression in each serotype, although the degree of regulation varied. Finally, we established that the regulation afforded by FasX enhances GAS virulence, assessed by a model of bacteremia using human plasminogen-expressing mice. Our data are the first to identify and characterize serotype-specific regulation by an sRNA in GAS, and to show an sRNA directly contributes to GAS virulence.

  14. Transcriptome-Based Identification of Differently Expressed Genes from Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae Strains Exhibiting Different Virulence in Rice Varieties

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Tae-Hwan; Song, Eun-Sung; Kim, Hong-Il; Kang, Mi-Hyung; Park, Young-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) causes bacterial blight (BB) in rice (Oryza sativa L.). In this study, we investigated the genome-wide transcription patterns of two Xoo strains (KACC10331 and HB1009), which showed different virulence patterns against eight rice cultivars, including IRBB21 (carrying Xa21). In total, 743 genes showed a significant change (p-value < 0.001 in t-tests) in their mRNA expression levels in the HB1009 (K3a race) strain compared with the Xoo KACC10331 strain (K1 race). Among them, four remarkably enriched GO terms, DNA binding, transposition, cellular nitrogen compound metabolic process, and cellular macromolecule metabolic process, were identified in the upregulated genes. In addition, the expression of 44 genes was considerably higher (log2 fold changes > 2) in the HB1009 (K3a race) strain than in the Xoo KACC10331 (K1 race) strain. Furthermore, 13 and 12 genes involved in hypersensitive response and pathogenicity (hrp) and two-component regulatory systems (TCSs), respectively, were upregulated in the HB1009 (K3a race) strain compared with the Xoo KACC10331 (K1 race) strain, which we determined using either quantitative real-time PCR analysis or next-generation RNA sequencing. These results will be helpful to improve our understanding of Xoo and to gain a better insight into the Xoo–rice interactions. PMID:26907259

  15. Comparative proteome profiling of bovine and human Staphylococcus epidermidis strains for screening specifically expressed virulence and adaptation proteins.

    PubMed

    Siljamäki, Pia; Varmanen, Pekka; Kankainen, Matti; Pyörälä, Satu; Karonen, Taru; Iivanainen, Antti; Auvinen, Petri; Paulin, Lars; Laine, Pia K; Taponen, Suvi; Simojoki, Heli; Sukura, Antti; Nyman, Tuula A; Savijoki, Kirsi

    2014-08-01

    The present study reports a comparative proteome cataloging of a bovine mastitis and a human-associated Staphylococcus epidermidis strain with a specific focus on surfome (cell-wall bound and extracellular) proteins. Protein identification by 1DE coupled with LC-MS/MS analyses resulted in 1400 and 1287 proteins from the bovine (PM221) and human (ATCC12228) strains, respectively, covering over 50% of all predicted and more than 30% of all predicted surfome proteins in both strains. Comparison of the identification results suggests elevated levels of proteins involved in adherence, biofilm formation, signal transduction, house-keeping functions, and immune evasion in PM221, whereas ATCC12228 was more effective in expressing host defense evasion proteases, skin adaptation lipases, hemagglutination, and heavy-metal resistance proteins. Phenotypic analyses showed that only PM221 displays protein- and DNA-mediated adherent growth, and that PM221 was more efficient in cleaving tributyrin, a natural compound of milk fat under low CO2 conditions. These findings are in line with the identification data and suggest that distinct expression of lipases and adhesive surfome proteins could lead to the observed phenotypes. This study is the first extensive survey of S. epidermidis proteomes to date, providing several protein candidates to be examined for their roles in adaptation and virulence in vivo. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD000404 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD000404).

  16. Global selection of Plasmodium falciparum virulence antigen expression by host antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Abdi, Abdirahman I.; Warimwe, George M.; Muthui, Michelle K.; Kivisi, Cheryl A.; Kiragu, Esther W.; Fegan, Gregory W.; Bull, Peter C.

    2016-01-01

    Parasite proteins called PfEMP1 that are inserted on the surface of infected erythrocytes, play a key role in the severe pathology associated with infection by the Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasite. These proteins mediate binding of infected cells to the endothelial lining of blood vessels as a strategy to avoid clearance by the spleen and are major targets of naturally acquired immunity. PfEMP1 is encoded by a large multi-gene family called var. Mutually-exclusive transcriptional switching between var genes allows parasites to escape host antibodies. This study examined in detail the patterns of expression of var in a well-characterized sample of parasites from Kenyan Children. Instead of observing clear inverse relationships between the expression of broad sub-classes of PfEMP1, we found that expression of different PfEMP1 groups vary relatively independently. Parasite adaptation to host antibodies also appears to involve a general reduction in detectable var gene expression. We suggest that parasites switch both between different PfEMP1 variants and between high and low expression states. Such a strategy could provide a means of avoiding immunological detection and promoting survival under high levels of host immunity. PMID:26804201

  17. Natural plant products inhibits growth and alters the swarming motility, biofilm formation, and expression of virulence genes in enteroaggregative and enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    García-Heredia, Alam; García, Santos; Merino-Mascorro, José Ángel; Feng, Peter; Heredia, Norma

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of plant products on the growth, swarming motility, biofilm formation and virulence gene expression in enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 and enteroaggregative E. coli strain 042 and a strain of O104:H4 serotype. Extracts of Lippia graveolens and Haematoxylon brassiletto, and carvacrol, brazilin were tested by an antimicrobial microdilution method using citral and rifaximin as controls. All products showed bactericidal activity with minimal bactericidal concentrations ranging from 0.08 to 8.1 mg/ml. Swarming motility was determined in soft LB agar. Most compounds reduced swarming motility by 7%-100%; except carvacrol which promoted motility in two strains. Biofilm formation studies were done in microtiter plates. Rifaximin inhibited growth and reduced biofilm formation, but various concentrations of other compounds actually induced biofilm formation. Real time PCR showed that most compounds decreased stx2 expression. The expression of pic and rpoS in E. coli 042 were suppressed but in E. coli O104:H4 they varied depending on compounds. In conclusion, these extracts affect E. coli growth, swarming motility and virulence gene expression. Although these compounds were bactericidal for pathogenic E. coli, sublethal concentrations had varied effects on phenotypic and genotypic traits, and some increased virulence gene expression.

  18. Chamaecyparis obtusa Essential Oil Inhibits Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm Formation and Expression of Virulence Factors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-Sook; Kang, Sun-Young; Kim, Young-Hoi; Lee, Young-Eun; Choi, Na-Young; You, Yong-Ouk; Kim, Kang-Ju

    2015-07-01

    The emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria has caused difficulty in treating infectious diseases. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is one of the most commonly recognized antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Novel antibiotics are urgently required to treat these bacteria. Raw materials derived from natural sources can be used for the development of novel antibiotics, such as Chamaecyparis obtusa (C. obtusa), which has been traditionally used in treating asthmatic disease. In this study, the antibacterial activity of the essential oil (EO) extracted from C. obtusa leaves against MRSA was investigated. MRSA growth and acid production from glucose metabolism were inhibited at concentrations greater than 0.1 mg/mL C. obtusa EO. MRSA biofilm formation was observed using scanning electron microscopy and safranin staining. C. obtusa EO inhibited MRSA biofilm formation at concentrations greater than 0.1 mg/mL. Using real-time polymerase chain reaction, mRNA expression of virulence factor genes, sea, agrA, and sarA, was observed. agrA expression was inhibited with C. obtusa EO concentrations greater than 0.2 mg/mL, whereas inhibition of sea and sarA expression was also observed at a concentration of 0.3 mg/mL. C. obtusa EO was analyzed by gas chromatography (GC) and GC coupled for mass spectrometry, which identified 59 constituents, accounting to 98.99% of the total EO. These findings suggest that C. obtusa EO has antibacterial effects against MRSA, which might be associated with the major components of C. obtusa EO, such as sabinene (19.06%), α-terpinyl acetate (16.99%), bornyl acetate (10.48%), limonene (8.54%), elemol (7.47%), myrcene (5.86%), γ-terpinene (4.04%), and hibaene (3.01%).

  19. Virulent Diuraphis noxia Aphids Over-Express Calcium Signaling Proteins to Overcome Defenses of Aphid-Resistant Wheat Plants

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Deepak K.; Chandran, Predeesh; Timm, Alicia E.; Aguirre-Rojas, Lina; Smith, C. Michael

    2016-01-01

    The Russian wheat aphid, Diuraphis noxia, an invasive phytotoxic pest of wheat, Triticum aestivum, and barley, Hordeum vulgare, causes huge economic losses in Africa, South America, and North America. Most acceptable and ecologically beneficial aphid management strategies include selection and breeding of D. noxia-resistant varieties, and numerous D. noxia resistance genes have been identified in T. aestivum and H. vulgare. North American D. noxia biotype 1 is avirulent to T. aestivum varieties possessing Dn4 or Dn7 genes, while biotype 2 is virulent to Dn4 and avirulent to Dn7. The current investigation utilized next-generation RNAseq technology to reveal that biotype 2 over expresses proteins involved in calcium signaling, which activates phosphoinositide (PI) metabolism. Calcium signaling proteins comprised 36% of all transcripts identified in the two D. noxia biotypes. Depending on plant resistance gene-aphid biotype interaction, additional transcript groups included those involved in tissue growth; defense and stress response; zinc ion and related cofactor binding; and apoptosis. Activation of enzymes involved in PI metabolism by D. noxia biotype 2 aphids allows depletion of plant calcium that normally blocks aphid feeding sites in phloem sieve elements and enables successful, continuous feeding on plants resistant to avirulent biotype 1. Inhibition of the key enzyme phospholipase C significantly reduced biotype 2 salivation into phloem and phloem sap ingestion. PMID:26815857

  20. Identification and characterization of msa (SA1233), a gene involved in expression of SarA and several virulence factors in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Sambanthamoorthy, Karthik; Smeltzer, Mark S; Elasri, Mohamed O

    2006-09-01

    The staphylococcal accessory regulator (sarA) plays a central role in the regulation of virulence in Staphylococcus aureus. To date, studies involving sarA have focused on its activity as a global regulator that modulates transcription of a wide variety of genes (>100) and its role in virulence. However, there is also evidence to suggest the existence of accessory elements that modulate SarA production and/or function. A reporter system was developed to identify such elements, and a new gene, msa (SA1233), mutation of which results in reduced expression of SarA, was identified and characterized. Additionally, it was shown that mutation of msa resulted in altered transcription of the accessory gene regulator (agr) and the genes encoding several virulence factors including alpha toxin (hla) and protein A (spa). However, the impact of mutating msa was different in the laboratory strain RN6390 and the clinical isolate UAMS-1. For instance, mutation of msa caused a decrease in spa and hla transcription in RN6390 but had a different effect in UAMS-1. The strain-dependent effects of the msa mutation were similar to those observed previously, which suggests that msa may modulate the production of specific virulence factors through its impact on sarA. Interestingly, sequence analysis of Msa suggests that it is a putative membrane protein with three membrane-spanning regions, indicating that Msa might interact with the environment. The findings show that msa is involved in the expression of SarA and several virulence factors.

  1. Expressing a fusion protein with protease and chitinase activities increases the virulence of the insect pathogen Beauveria bassiana.

    PubMed

    Fang, Weiguo; Feng, Jin; Fan, Yanhua; Zhang, Yongjun; Bidochka, Michael J; Leger, Raymond J St; Pei, Yan

    2009-10-01

    Entomopathogenic fungi, such as Beauveria bassiana and Metarhizium anisopliae are being developed as alternatives to chemical insecticides. They infect insects by direct penetration of the cuticle using a combination of physical pressure and extracellular hydrolytic enzymes such as proteases and chitinases. Previously we found that overexpression of a subtilisin-like protease (Pr1A) or a chitinase (Bbchit1) resulted in increased virulence of M. anisopliae and B. bassiana, respectively. In this study, we found that a mixture of the B. bassiana Pr1A homolog (CDEP1) and Bbchit1 degraded insect cuticle in vitro more efficiently than either CDEP1 or Bbchit1 alone. Based on this we produced three plasmid constructs; (1) Bbchit1, (2) CDEP1, and (3) a fusion gene of Bbchit1 linked to CDEP1 each under the control of the constitutive gpd promoter from Aspergillus nidulans. B. bassiana transformants secreting the fusion protein (CDEP1:Bbchit1) penetrated the cuticle significantly faster than the wild type or transformants overexpressing either Bbchit1 or CDEP1. Compared to the wild type, the transformant overexpressing CDEP1 showed a 12.5% reduction in LT(50), without a reduction in LC(50). The LT(50) of the transformant expressing CDEP1:Bbchit1 was reduced by 24.9%. Strikingly, expression of CDEP1:Bbchit1 resulted in a 60.5% reduction in LC(50), more than twice the reduction obtained by overexpression of Bbchit1 (28.5%). This work represents a significant step towards the development of hypervirulent insect pathogens for effective pest control.

  2. Serum influences the expression of Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum-sensing genes and QS-controlled virulence genes during early and late stages of growth

    PubMed Central

    Kruczek, Cassandra; Qaisar, Uzma; Colmer-Hamood, Jane A; Hamood, Abdul N

    2014-01-01

    In response to diverse environmental stimuli at different infection sites, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a serious nosocomial pathogen, coordinates the production of different virulence factors through a complicated network of the hierarchical quorum-sensing (QS) systems including the las, rhl, and the 2-alkyl-4-quinolone-related QS systems. We recently showed that at early stages of growth serum alters the expression of numerous P. aeruginosa genes. In this study, we utilized transcriptional analysis and enzyme assays to examine the effect of serum on the QS and QS-controlled virulence factors during early and late phases of growth of the P. aeruginosa strain PAO1. At early phase, serum repressed the transcription of lasI, rhlI, and pqsA but not lasR or rhlR. However, at late phase, serum enhanced the expression of all QS genes. Serum produced a similar effect on the synthesis of the autoinducers 3OC12-HSL, C4-HSL, and HHQ/PQS. Additionally, serum repressed the expression of several QS-controlled genes in the early phase, but enhanced them in the late phase. Furthermore, serum influenced the expression of different QS-positive (vqsR, gacA, and vfr) as well as QS-negative (rpoN, qscR, mvaT, and rsmA) regulatory genes at either early or late phases of growth. However, with the exception of PAOΔvfr, we detected comparable levels of lasI/lasR expression in PAO1 and PAO1 mutants defective in these regulatory genes. At late stationary phase, serum failed to enhance lasI/lasR expression in PAOΔvfr. These results suggest that depending on the phase of growth, serum differentially influenced the expression of P. aeruginosa QS and QS-controlled virulence genes. In late phase, serum enhanced the expression of las genes through vfr. PMID:24436158

  3. The global response regulator ExpA controls virulence gene expression through RsmA-mediated and RsmA-independent pathways in Pectobacterium wasabiae SCC3193.

    PubMed

    Broberg, M; Lee, G W; Nykyri, J; Lee, Y H; Pirhonen, M; Palva, E T

    2014-03-01

    ExpA (GacA) is a global response regulator that controls the expression of major virulence genes, such as those encoding plant cell wall-degrading enzymes (PCWDEs) in the model soft rot phytopathogen Pectobacterium wasabiae SCC3193. Several studies with pectobacteria as well as related phytopathogenic gammaproteobacteria, such as Dickeya and Pseudomonas, suggest that the control of virulence by ExpA and its homologues is executed partly by modulating the activity of RsmA, an RNA-binding posttranscriptional regulator. To elucidate the extent of the overlap between the ExpA and RsmA regulons in P. wasabiae, we characterized both regulons by microarray analysis. To do this, we compared the transcriptomes of the wild-type strain, an expA mutant, an rsmA mutant, and an expA rsmA double mutant. The microarray data for selected virulence-related genes were confirmed through quantitative reverse transcription (qRT-PCR). Subsequently, assays were performed to link the observed transcriptome differences to changes in bacterial phenotypes such as growth, motility, PCWDE production, and virulence in planta. An extensive overlap between the ExpA and RsmA regulons was observed, suggesting that a substantial portion of ExpA regulation appears to be mediated through RsmA. However, a number of genes involved in the electron transport chain and oligogalacturonide metabolism, among other processes, were identified as being regulated by ExpA independently of RsmA. These results suggest that ExpA may only partially impact fitness and virulence via RsmA.

  4. Increased expression of Candida albicans secretory proteinase, a putative virulence factor, in isolates from human immunodeficiency virus-positive patients.

    PubMed Central

    Ollert, M W; Wende, C; Görlich, M; McMullan-Vogel, C G; Borg-von Zepelin, M; Vogel, C W; Korting, H C

    1995-01-01

    The increased prevalence and the severity of oropharyngeal candidiasis in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients are attributed exclusively to the virus-induced immune deficiency of the host. The present study was aimed at answering the question of whether Candida albicans secretory proteinase, a putative virulence factor of the opportunistic C. albicans yeast, has any potential influence on the clinical manifestation of oropharyngeal candidiasis in HIV-positive patients. We measured the secretory proteinase activities of clinical C. albicans isolates from the oropharynges of either HIV-positive individuals (n = 100) or a control group (n = 122). The mean secretory proteinase activity of C. albicans isolates from the HIV-positive group (4,255 +/- 2,372 U/liter) was significantly higher compared with that of isolates from the control group (2,324 +/- 1,487 U/liter) (P < 0.05). The higher level of secretory proteinase activity in the culture supernatants of individual C. albicans isolates correlated with the increased level of proteinase expression on the cell surface, as revealed by cytofluorometry, and with higher levels of secretion of the immunodetectable protein, as shown by Western blotting (immunoblotting). Proteinase activity within the population of C. albicans isolates from HIV-positive individuals was independent of the patient's clinical disease stage and the CD4+/CD8+ cell numbers. Furthermore, no correlation of the proteinase activities with the C. albicans serotype was found, although C. albicans serotype B was significantly more frequent in the HIV-positive group (40%) compared with that in the control group (12%). However, a positive correlation of proteinase activity to antifungal susceptibility was evident.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8567880

  5. Virulence Determination

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This chapter reviews the in vitro and in vivo assays that are available for determination of pathogenic potential of Listeria monocytogenes bacteria, highlighting the value of using multiplex PCR for rapid and accurate assessment of listerial virulence....

  6. The Haemophilus ducreyi Fis protein is involved in controlling expression of the lspB-lspA2 operon and other virulence factors.

    PubMed

    Labandeira-Rey, Maria; Dodd, Dana A; Brautigam, Chad A; Fortney, Kate R; Spinola, Stanley M; Hansen, Eric J

    2013-11-01

    Expression of the lspB-lspA2 operon encoding a virulence-related two-partner secretion system in Haemophilus ducreyi 35000HP is directly regulated by the CpxRA regulatory system (M. Labandeira-Rey, J. R. Mock, and E. J. Hansen, Infect. Immun. 77:3402-3411, 2009). In the present study, we show that this secretion system is also regulated by the small nucleoid-associated protein Fis. Inactivation of the H. ducreyi fis gene resulted in a reduction in expression of both the H. ducreyi LspB and LspA2 proteins. DNA microarray experiments showed that a H. ducreyi fis deletion mutant exhibited altered expression levels of genes encoding other important H. ducreyi virulence factors, including DsrA and Flp1, suggesting a possible global role for Fis in the control of virulence in this obligate human pathogen. While the H. ducreyi Fis protein has a high degree of sequence and structural similarity to the Fis proteins of other bacteria, its temporal pattern of expression was very different from that of enterobacterial Fis proteins. The use of a lacZ-based transcriptional reporter provided evidence which indicated that the H. ducreyi Fis homolog is a positive regulator of gyrB, a gene that is negatively regulated by Fis in enteric bacteria. Taken together, the Fis protein expression data and the observed regulatory effects of Fis in H. ducreyi suggest that this small DNA binding protein has a regulatory role in H. ducreyi which may differ in substantial ways from that of other Fis proteins.

  7. Classification of e-government documents based on cooperative expression of word vectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Qianqian; Liu, Hao; Wei, Zhiqiang

    2017-03-01

    The effective document classification is a powerful technique to deal with the huge amount of e-government documents automatically instead of accomplishing them manually. The word-to-vector (word2vec) model, which converts semantic word into low-dimensional vectors, could be successfully employed to classify the e-government documents. In this paper, we propose the cooperative expressions of word vector (Co-word-vector), whose multi-granularity of integration explores the possibility of modeling documents in the semantic space. Meanwhile, we also aim to improve the weighted continuous bag of words model based on word2vec model and distributed representation of topic-words based on LDA model. Furthermore, combining the two levels of word representation, performance result shows that our proposed method on the e-government document classification outperform than the traditional method.

  8. Characterization of Pectobacterium carotovorum proteins differentially expressed during infection of Zantedeschia elliotiana in vivo and in vitro which are essential for virulence.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huan; Yang, Zhongling; Du, Shuo; Ma, Lin; Liao, Yao; Wang, Yujie; Toth, Ian; Fan, Jiaqin

    2016-09-27

    The identification of phytopathogen proteins that are differentially expressed during the course of the establishment of an infection is important to better understand the infection process. In vitro approaches, using plant extracts added to culture medium, have been used to identify such proteins, but the biological relevance of these findings for in planta infection are often uncertain until confirmed by in vivo studies. Here, we compared the proteins of Pectobacterium carotovorum ssp. carotovorum strain PccS1 differentially expressed in Luria-Bertani medium supplemented with extracts of the ornamental plant Zantedeschia elliotiana cultivar 'Black Magic' (in vitro) and in plant tissues (in vivo) by two-dimensional electrophoresis coupled with mass spectrometry. A total of 53 differentially expressed proteins (>1.5-fold) were identified (up-regulated or down-regulated in vitro, in vivo or both). Proteins that exhibited increased expression in vivo but not in vitro, or in both conditions, were identified, and deletions were made in a number of genes encoding these proteins, four of which (clpP, mreB, flgK and eda) led to a loss of virulence on Z. elliotiana, although clpP and mreB were later also shown to be reduced in growth in rich and minimal media. Although clpP, flgK and mreB have previously been reported as playing a role in virulence in plants, this is the first report of such a role for eda, which encodes 2-keto-3-deoxy-6-phosphogluconate (KDPG) aldolase, a key enzyme in Entner-Doudoroff metabolism. The results highlight the value of undertaking in vivo as well as in vitro approaches for the identification of new bacterial virulence factors.

  9. Differential Expression of Virulence and Stress Fitness Genes between Escherichia coli O157:H7 Strains with Clinical or Bovine-Biased Genotypes▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Vanaja, Sivapriya Kailasan; Springman, Amber C.; Besser, Thomas E.; Whittam, Thomas S.; Manning, Shannon D.

    2010-01-01

    Escherichia coli O157:H7 strains can be classified into different genotypes based on the presence of specific Shiga toxin-encoding bacteriophage insertion sites. Certain O157:H7 genotypes predominate among human clinical cases (clinical genotypes), while others are more frequently found in bovines (bovine-biased genotypes). To determine whether inherent differences in gene expression explain the variation in infectivity of these genotypes, we compared the expression patterns of clinical genotype 1 strains with those of bovine-biased genotype 5 strains using microarrays. Important O157:H7 virulence factors, including locus of enterocyte effacement genes, the enterohemolysin, and several pO157 genes, showed increased expression in the clinical versus bovine-biased genotypes. In contrast, genes essential for acid resistance (e.g., gadA, gadB, and gadC) and stress fitness were upregulated in bovine-biased genotype 5 strains. Increased expression of acid resistance genes was confirmed functionally using a model stomach assay, in which strains of bovine-biased genotype 5 had a 2-fold-higher survival rate than strains of clinical genotype 1. Overall, these results suggest that the increased prevalence of O157:H7 illness caused by clinical genotype 1 strains is due in part to the overexpression of key virulence genes. The bovine-biased genotype 5 strains, however, are more resistant to adverse environmental conditions, a characteristic that likely facilitates O157:H7 colonization of bovines. PMID:19880650

  10. The primary transcriptome of the Escherichia coli O104:H4 pAA plasmid and novel insights into its virulence gene expression and regulation

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Petya; Knödler, Michael; Förstner, Konrad U.; Berger, Michael; Bertling, Christian; Sharma, Cynthia M.; Vogel, Jörg; Karch, Helge; Dobrindt, Ulrich; Mellmann, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli O104:H4 (E. coli O104:H4), which caused a massive outbreak of acute gastroenteritis and hemolytic uremic syndrome in 2011, carries an aggregative adherence fimbriae I (AAF/I) encoding virulence plasmid, pAA. The importance of pAA in host-pathogen interaction and disease severity has been demonstrated, however, not much is known about its transcriptional organization and gene regulation. Here, we analyzed the pAA primary transcriptome using differential RNA sequencing, which allows for the high-throughput mapping of transcription start site (TSS) and non-coding RNA candidates. We identified 248 TSS candidates in the 74-kb pAA and only 21% of them could be assigned as TSS of annotated genes. We detected TSS for the majority of pAA-encoded virulence factors. Interestingly, we mapped TSS, which could allow for the transcriptional uncoupling of the AAF/I operon, and potentially regulatory antisense RNA candidates against the genes encoding dispersin and the serine protease SepA. Moreover, a computational search for transcription factor binding sites suggested for AggR-mediated activation of SepA expression, which was additionally experimentally validated. This work advances our understanding of the molecular basis of E. coli O104:H4 pathogenicity and provides a valuable resource for further characterization of pAA virulence gene regulation. PMID:27748404

  11. Patterns of Cellular Gene Expression in Swine Macrophages Infected with Highly Virulent Classical Swine Fever Virus Strain Brescia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Experimental exposure of swine to highly virulent Classical Swine Fever Virus (CSFV) strain Brescia causes an invariably fatal disease of all infected animals by 8 to 14 days post-infection. Host mechanisms involved in this severe outcome of infection have not been clearly established. To understa...

  12. Generation of Recombinant Viral Hemorrhagic Septicemia Virus (rVHSV) Expressing Two Foreign Proteins and Effect of Lengthened Viral Genome on Viral Growth and In Vivo Virulence.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Sun; Lee, Su Jin; Kim, Dong Soo; Kim, Ki Hong

    2016-04-01

    In this study, a new recombinant VHSV (rVHSV-Arfp-Bgfp) was generated by insertion of a red fluorescent protein (RFP) gene between N and P genes, a green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene between P and M genes of VHSV genome, the expression of each heterologous gene in infected cells, and effects of the lengthened recombinant VHSV's genome on the replication ability and in vivo virulence to olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) fingerlings were compared with previously generated rVHSVs (rVHSV-wild, rVHSV-Arfp, and rVHSV-Brfp). The expression of RFP and GFP in cells infected with rVHSV-Arfp-Bgfp was verified through fluorescent microscopy and FACS analysis. In the viral growth analysis, rVHSV-Arfp and rVHSV-Brfp showed significantly lower viral titers than rVHSV-wild, and the replication of rVHSV-Arfp-Bgfp was significantly decreased compared to that of even rVHSV-Arfp or rVHSV-Brfp. These results suggest that the genome length is a critical factor for the determination of rVHSVs replication efficiency. In the in vivo virulence experiment, the cumulative mortalities of olive flounder fingerlings infected with each rVHSV were inversely proportional to the length of the viral genome, suggesting that decreased viral growth rate due to the lengthened viral genome is accompanied with the decrease of in vivo virulence of rVHSVs. Recombinant viruses expressing multiple foreign antigens can be used for the development of combined vaccines. However, as the present rVHSV-Arfp-Bgfp still possesses an ability to kill hosts (although very weakened), researches on the producing more attenuated viruses or propagation-deficient replicon particles are needed to solve safety-related problems.

  13. Modulation of behaviour and virulence of a high alginate expressing Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain from cystic fibrosis by oral commensal bacterium Streptococcus anginosus

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Muhammad R.

    2017-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) airways harbour complex and dynamic polymicrobial communities that include many oral bacteria. Despite increased knowledge of CF airway microbiomes the interaction between established CF pathogens and other resident microbes and resulting impact on disease progression is poorly understood. Previous studies have demonstrated that oral commensal streptococci of the Anginosus group (AGS) can establish chronic pulmonary infections and become numerically dominant in CF sputa indicating that they play an important role in CF microbiome dynamics. In this study a strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (DWW2) of the mucoid alginate overproducing phenotype associated with chronic CF airway infection and a strain of the oral commensal AGS species Streptococcus anginosus (3a) from CF sputum were investigated for their ability to co-exist and their responses to biofilm co-culture. Bacteria in biofilms were quantified, pyocyanin expression by DWW2 was measured and the effect of AGS strain 3a on reversion of DWW2 to a non-mucoidal phenotype investigated. The virulence of DWW2, 3a and colony variant phenotypes of DWW2 in mono- and co-culture were compared in a Galleria mellonella infection model. Co-culture biofilms were formed in normoxic, hypercapnic (10% CO2) and anoxic atmospheres with the streptococcus increasing in number in co-culture, indicating that these bacteria would be able to co-exist and thrive within the heterogeneous microenvironments of the CF airway. The streptococcus caused increased pyocyanin expression by DWW2 and colony variants by stimulating reversion of the mucoid phenotype to the high pyocyanin expressing non-mucoid phenotype. The latter was highly virulent in the infection model with greater virulence when in co-culture with the streptococcus. The results of this study demonstrate that the oral commensal S. anginosus benefits from interaction with P. aeruginosa of the CF associated mucoid phenotype and modulates the behaviour of the

  14. Insights into Entamoeba histolytica virulence modulation.

    PubMed

    Padilla-Vaca, F; Anaya-Velázquez, F

    2010-08-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is able to invade human tissues by means of several molecules and biological properties related to the virulence. Pathogenic amebas use three major virulence factors, Gal/GalNAc lectin, amebapore and proteases, for lyse, phagocytose, kill and destroy a variety of cells and tissues in the host. Responses of the parasite to host components such as mucins and bacterial flora influence the behavior of pathogenic amebas altering their expression of virulence factors. The relative virulence of different strains of E. histolytica has been shown to vary as a consequence of changes in conditions of in vitro cultivation which implies substantial changes in basic metabolic aspects and factors directly and indirectly related to amebic virulence. Comparison of E. histolytica strains with different virulence phenotypes and under different conditions of growth will help to identify new virulence factor candidates and define the interplay between virulence factors and invasive phenotype. Virulence attenuate mutants of E. histolytica are useful also to uncover novel virulence determinants. The comparison of biological properties and virulence factors between E. histolytica and E. dispar, a non-pathogenic species, has been a useful approach to investigate the key factors involved in the experimental presentation of amebiasis and its complex regulation. The molecular mechanisms that regulate these variations in virulence are not yet known. Their elucidation will help us to better understand the gene expression plasticity that enables the effective adaptation of the ameba to changes in growth culture conditions and host factors.

  15. Avirulent K88 (F4)+ Escherichia coli strains constructed to express modified enterotoxins protect young piglets from challenge with a virulent enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli strain that expresses the same adhesion and enterotoxins.

    PubMed

    Santiago-Mateo, Kristina; Zhao, Mojun; Lin, Jun; Zhang, Weiping; Francis, David H

    2012-10-12

    Virulence of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is associated with fimbrial adhesins and enterotoxins such as heat-labile (LT) and/or heat-stable (ST) enterotoxins. Previous studies using a cell culture model suggest that exclusion of ETEC from attachment to epithelial cells requires expression of both an adhesin such as K88 (F4) fimbriae, and LT. To test the ability of non-pathogenic E. coli constructs to exclude virulent ETEC sufficiently to prevent clinical disease, we utilized a piglet ETEC challenge model. Thirty-nine 5-day-old piglets were inoculated with a placebo (control), or with either of the three K88(+)E. coli strains isogenic with regard to modified LT expression: 8017 (pBR322 plasmid vector control), non-toxigenic mutant 8221 (LT(R192G)) in pBR322, or 8488, with the LT gene fused to the STb gene in pBR322 (LT(R192G)-STb). Piglets were challenged with virulent ETEC Strain 3030-2 (K88(+)/LT/STb) 24h post-inoculation. K88ac receptor-positive piglets in the control group developed diarrhea and became dehydrated 12-24h post-challenge. Piglets inoculated with 8221 or 8488 did not exhibit clinical signs of ETEC disease; most piglets inoculated with 8017 showed diarrhea. Control pigs exhibited significant weight loss, increased blood total protein, and higher numbers of colony-forming units of 3030-2 E. coli in washed ileum and jejunum than treated pigs. This study shows for the first time that pre-inoculation with an avirulent strain expressing adhesive fimbriae and a non-toxic form of LT provides significant short term protection from challenge with a virulent ETEC strain that expresses the same fimbrial adhesion and enterotoxin.

  16. Surface-Associated Lipoproteins Link Enterococcus faecalis Virulence to Colitogenic Activity in IL-10-Deficient Mice Independent of Their Expression Levels.

    PubMed

    Ocvirk, Soeren; Sava, Irina G; Lengfelder, Isabella; Lagkouvardos, Ilias; Steck, Natalie; Roh, Jung H; Tchaptchet, Sandrine; Bao, Yinyin; Hansen, Jonathan J; Huebner, Johannes; Carroll, Ian M; Murray, Barbara E; Sartor, R Balfour; Haller, Dirk

    2015-06-01

    The commensal Enterococcus faecalis is among the most common causes of nosocomial infections. Recent findings regarding increased abundance of enterococci in the intestinal microbiota of patients with inflammatory bowel diseases and induction of colitis in IL-10-deficient (IL-10-/-) mice put a new perspective on the contribution of E. faecalis to chronic intestinal inflammation. Based on the expression of virulence-related genes in the inflammatory milieu of IL-10-/- mice using RNA-sequencing analysis, we characterized the colitogenic role of two bacterial structures that substantially impact on E. faecalis virulence by different mechanisms: the enterococcal polysaccharide antigen and cell surface-associated lipoproteins. Germ-free wild type and IL-10-/- mice were monoassociated with E. faecalis wild type OG1RF or the respective isogenic mutants for 16 weeks. Intestinal tissue and mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) were collected to characterize tissue pathology, loss of intestinal barrier function, bacterial adhesion to intestinal epithelium and immune cell activation. Bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDC) were stimulated with bacterial lysates and E. faecalis virulence was additionally investigated in three invertebrate models. Colitogenic activity of wild type E. faecalis (OG1RF score: 7.2±1.2) in monoassociated IL-10-/- mice was partially impaired in E. faecalis lacking enterococcal polysaccharide antigen (ΔepaB score: 4.7±2.3; p<0.05) and was almost completely abrogated in E. faecalis deficient for lipoproteins (Δlgt score: 2.3±2.3; p<0.0001). Consistently both E. faecalis mutants showed significantly impaired virulence in Galleria mellonella and Caenorhabditis elegans. Loss of E-cadherin in the epithelium was shown for all bacterial strains in inflamed IL-10-/- but not wild type mice. Inactivation of epaB in E. faecalis reduced microcolony and biofilm formation in vitro, altered bacterial adhesion to intestinal epithelium of germ-free Manduca sexta larvae

  17. Surface-Associated Lipoproteins Link Enterococcus faecalis Virulence to Colitogenic Activity in IL-10-Deficient Mice Independent of Their Expression Levels

    PubMed Central

    Lengfelder, Isabella; Lagkouvardos, Ilias; Steck, Natalie; Roh, Jung H.; Tchaptchet, Sandrine; Bao, Yinyin; Hansen, Jonathan J.; Huebner, Johannes; Carroll, Ian M.; Murray, Barbara E.; Sartor, R. Balfour; Haller, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    The commensal Enterococcus faecalis is among the most common causes of nosocomial infections. Recent findings regarding increased abundance of enterococci in the intestinal microbiota of patients with inflammatory bowel diseases and induction of colitis in IL-10-deficient (IL-10-/-) mice put a new perspective on the contribution of E. faecalis to chronic intestinal inflammation. Based on the expression of virulence-related genes in the inflammatory milieu of IL-10-/- mice using RNA-sequencing analysis, we characterized the colitogenic role of two bacterial structures that substantially impact on E. faecalis virulence by different mechanisms: the enterococcal polysaccharide antigen and cell surface-associated lipoproteins. Germ-free wild type and IL-10-/- mice were monoassociated with E. faecalis wild type OG1RF or the respective isogenic mutants for 16 weeks. Intestinal tissue and mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) were collected to characterize tissue pathology, loss of intestinal barrier function, bacterial adhesion to intestinal epithelium and immune cell activation. Bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDC) were stimulated with bacterial lysates and E. faecalis virulence was additionally investigated in three invertebrate models. Colitogenic activity of wild type E. faecalis (OG1RF score: 7.2±1.2) in monoassociated IL-10-/- mice was partially impaired in E. faecalis lacking enterococcal polysaccharide antigen (ΔepaB score: 4.7±2.3; p<0.05) and was almost completely abrogated in E. faecalis deficient for lipoproteins (Δlgt score: 2.3±2.3; p<0.0001). Consistently both E. faecalis mutants showed significantly impaired virulence in Galleria mellonella and Caenorhabditis elegans. Loss of E-cadherin in the epithelium was shown for all bacterial strains in inflamed IL-10-/- but not wild type mice. Inactivation of epaB in E. faecalis reduced microcolony and biofilm formation in vitro, altered bacterial adhesion to intestinal epithelium of germ-free Manduca sexta larvae

  18. Expression of scorpion toxin LqhIT2 increases the virulence of Metarhizium acridum towards Locusta migratoria manilensis.

    PubMed

    Peng, Guoxiong; Xia, Yuxian

    2014-11-01

    LqhIT2 is an insect-specific neurotoxin from the venom of scorpion. In this study, the LqhIT2 gene was introduced into the entomopathogenic fungus, Metarhizium acridum. The virulence of the genetically modified strain MaLqhIT2 was then evaluated against locusts (Locusta migratoria manilensis). Compared with the wild-type strain, the median lethal cell density (LC50) for MaLqhIT2 was a 22.6-fold lower, and the median times to death (LT50) for MaLqhIT2 were reduced by 30.3 and 29.6 %, respectively, after topical inoculation and injection. MaLqhIT2 also grew significantly faster in the hemolymph than wild-type strain. There were no significant differences in germination, appressorium formation and sporulation in locust carcasses between the MaLqhIT2 and wild-type strain. These results indicate that LqhIT2 increased the virulence of M. acridum towards locusts by shortening the in vivo infection period, without affecting cuticle penetration or conidia formation in the carcasses. LqhIT2 thus shows considerable potential for increasing fungal virulence against locusts.

  19. Transcriptome Analysis of the Intracellular Facultative Pathogen Piscirickettsia salmonis: Expression of Putative Groups of Genes Associated with Virulence and Iron Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Machuca, Alvaro; Martinez, Victor

    2016-01-01

    The intracellular facultative bacteria Piscirickettsia salmonis is one of the most important pathogens of the Chilean aquaculture. However, there is a lack of information regarding the whole genomic transcriptional response according to different extracellular environments. We used next generation sequencing (NGS) of RNA (RNA-seq) to study the whole transcriptome of an isolate of P. salmonis (FAVET-INBIOGEN) using a cell line culture and a modified cell-free liquid medium, with or without iron supplementation. This was done in order to obtain information about the factors there are involved in virulence and iron acquisition. First, the isolate was grown in the Sf21 cell line; then, the bacteria were cultured into a cell-free liquid medium supplemented or not with iron. We identified in the transcriptome, genes associated with type IV secretion systems, genes related to flagellar structure assembly, several proteases and sigma factors, and genes related to the development of drug resistance. Additionally, we identified for the first time several iron-metabolism associated genes including at least two iron uptake pathways (ferrous iron and ferric iron uptake) that are actually expressed in the different conditions analyzed. We further describe putative genes that are related with the use and storage of iron in the bacteria, which have not been previously described. Several sets of genes related to virulence were expressed in both the cell line and cell-free culture media (for example those related to flagellar structure; such as basal body, MS-ring, C-ring, proximal and distal rod, and filament), which may play roles in other basic processes rather than been restricted to virulence. PMID:28033422

  20. Gene expression changes governing extreme dehydration tolerance in an Antarctic insect.

    PubMed

    Teets, Nicholas M; Peyton, Justin T; Colinet, Herve; Renault, David; Kelley, Joanna L; Kawarasaki, Yuta; Lee, Richard E; Denlinger, David L

    2012-12-11

    Among terrestrial organisms, arthropods are especially susceptible to dehydration, given their small body size and high surface area to volume ratio. This challenge is particularly acute for polar arthropods that face near-constant desiccating conditions, as water is frozen and thus unavailable for much of the year. The molecular mechanisms that govern extreme dehydration tolerance in insects remain largely undefined. In this study, we used RNA sequencing to quantify transcriptional mechanisms of extreme dehydration tolerance in the Antarctic midge, Belgica antarctica, the world's southernmost insect and only insect endemic to Antarctica. Larvae of B. antarctica are remarkably tolerant of dehydration, surviving losses up to 70% of their body water. Gene expression changes in response to dehydration indicated up-regulation of cellular recycling pathways including the ubiquitin-mediated proteasome and autophagy, with concurrent down-regulation of genes involved in general metabolism and ATP production. Metabolomics results revealed shifts in metabolite pools that correlated closely with changes in gene expression, indicating that coordinated changes in gene expression and metabolism are a critical component of the dehydration response. Finally, using comparative genomics, we compared our gene expression results with a transcriptomic dataset for the Arctic collembolan, Megaphorura arctica. Although B. antarctica and M. arctica are adapted to similar environments, our analysis indicated very little overlap in expression profiles between these two arthropods. Whereas several orthologous genes showed similar expression patterns, transcriptional changes were largely species specific, indicating these polar arthropods have developed distinct transcriptional mechanisms to cope with similar desiccating conditions.

  1. Gene expression changes governing extreme dehydration tolerance in an Antarctic insect

    PubMed Central

    Teets, Nicholas M.; Peyton, Justin T.; Colinet, Herve; Renault, David; Kelley, Joanna L.; Kawarasaki, Yuta; Lee, Richard E.; Denlinger, David L.

    2012-01-01

    Among terrestrial organisms, arthropods are especially susceptible to dehydration, given their small body size and high surface area to volume ratio. This challenge is particularly acute for polar arthropods that face near-constant desiccating conditions, as water is frozen and thus unavailable for much of the year. The molecular mechanisms that govern extreme dehydration tolerance in insects remain largely undefined. In this study, we used RNA sequencing to quantify transcriptional mechanisms of extreme dehydration tolerance in the Antarctic midge, Belgica antarctica, the world’s southernmost insect and only insect endemic to Antarctica. Larvae of B. antarctica are remarkably tolerant of dehydration, surviving losses up to 70% of their body water. Gene expression changes in response to dehydration indicated up-regulation of cellular recycling pathways including the ubiquitin-mediated proteasome and autophagy, with concurrent down-regulation of genes involved in general metabolism and ATP production. Metabolomics results revealed shifts in metabolite pools that correlated closely with changes in gene expression, indicating that coordinated changes in gene expression and metabolism are a critical component of the dehydration response. Finally, using comparative genomics, we compared our gene expression results with a transcriptomic dataset for the Arctic collembolan, Megaphorura arctica. Although B. antarctica and M. arctica are adapted to similar environments, our analysis indicated very little overlap in expression profiles between these two arthropods. Whereas several orthologous genes showed similar expression patterns, transcriptional changes were largely species specific, indicating these polar arthropods have developed distinct transcriptional mechanisms to cope with similar desiccating conditions. PMID:23197828

  2. A Novel Antisense RNA from the Salmonella Virulence Plasmid pSLT Expressed by Non-Growing Bacteria inside Eukaryotic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rico-Pérez, Gadea; Pucciarelli, M. Graciela; García-del Portillo, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial small RNAs (sRNAs) are regulatory molecules playing relevant roles in response to environmental changes, stressful conditions and pathogenesis. The intracellular bacterial pathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) is known to regulate expression of some sRNAs during colonization of fibroblasts. Here, we characterize a previously unknown sRNA encoded in the S. Typhimurium pSLT virulence plasmid that is specifically up-regulated by non-growing dormant bacteria persisting inside fibroblasts. This sRNA was inferred in microarray expression analyses, which unraveled enhanced transcriptional activity in the PSLT047- PSLT046 (mig5) intergenic region. The sRNA transcript was further identified as a 597-nucleotide molecule, which we named IesR-1, for ‘Intracellular-expressed-sRNA-1′. IesR-1 expression is low in bacteria growing in axenic cultures across a variety of experimental conditions but displays a marked increase (∼200–300 fold) following bacterial entry into fibroblasts. Remarkably, induction of IesR-1 expression is not prominent in bacteria proliferating within epithelial cells. IesR-1 deletion affects the control of bacterial growth in defined fibroblast cell lines and impairs virulence in a mouse infection model. Expression analyses performed in the PSLT047-iesR-1-PSLT046 (mig5) region support a cis-acting regulatory mechanism of IesR-1 as antisense RNA over the PSLT047 transcript involving interaction at their respective 3′ ends and modulation of PSLT047 protein levels. This model is sustained by the scarce production of PSLT047 protein observed in non-growing intracellular bacteria and the high amount of PSLT047 protein produced by bacteria carrying a truncated IesR-1 version with separated 5′ and 3′ regions. Taken together, these data reveal that S. Typhimurium sRNAs encoded in the pSLT virulence plasmid respond to a state of persistence inside the host cell. As exemplified by IesR-1, some of these sRNAs may

  3. Two overlapping two-component systems in Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae contribute to full fitness in rice by regulating virulence factors expression

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Dehong; Yao, Xiaoyan; Duan, Meng; Luo, Yufeng; Liu, Biao; Qi, Pengyuan; Sun, Ming; Ruan, Lifang

    2016-01-01

    Two-component signal transduction systems (TCSs) are widely used by bacteria to adapt to the environment. In the present study, StoS (stress tolerance-related oxygen sensor) and SreKRS (salt response kinase, regulator, and sensor) were found to positively regulate extracellular polysaccharide (EPS) production and swarming in the rice pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo). Surprisingly, the absence of stoS or sreKRS did not attenuate virulence. To better understand the intrinsic functions of StoS and SreKRS, quantitative proteomics isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) was employed. Consistent with stoS and sreK mutants exhibiting a similar phenotype, the signalling circuits of StoS and SreKRS overlapped. Carbohydrate metabolism proteins and chemotaxis proteins, which could be responsible for EPS and swarming regulation, respectively, were reprogrammed in stoS and sreK mutants. Moreover, StoS and SreKRS demonstrated moderate expression of the major virulence factor, hypersensitive response and pathogenicity (Hrp) proteins through the HrpG-HrpX circuit. Most importantly, Xoo equipped with StoS and SreKRS outcompetes strains without StoS or SreKRS in co-infected rice and grows outside the host. Therefore, we propose that StoS and SreKRS adopt a novel strategy involving the moderation of Hrp protein expression and the promotion of EPS and motility to adapt to the environment. PMID:26957113

  4. flrA, flrB and flrC regulate adhesion by controlling the expression of critical virulence genes in Vibrio alginolyticus

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Gang; Huang, Lixing; Su, Yongquan; Qin, Yingxue; Xu, Xiaojin; Zhao, Lingmin; Yan, Qingpi

    2016-01-01

    Adhesion is an important virulence trait of Vibrio alginolyticus. Bacterial adhesion is influenced by environmental conditions; however, the molecular mechanism underlying this effect remains unknown. The expression levels of flrA, flrB and flrC were significantly downregulated in adhesion-deficient V. alginolyticus strains cultured under Cu2+, Pb2+, Hg2+ and low-pH stresses. Silencing these genes led to deficiencies in adhesion, motility, flagellar assembly, biofilm formation and exopolysaccharide (EPS) production. The expression levels of fliA, flgH, fliS, fliD, cheR, cheV and V12G01_22158 (Gene ID) were significantly downregulated in all of the RNAi groups, whereas the expression levels of toxT, ctxB, acfA, hlyA and tlh were upregulated in flrA- and flrC-silenced groups. These genes play a key role in the virulence mechanisms of most pathogenic Vibrio species. Furthermore, the expression of flrA, flrB and flrC was significantly influenced by temperature, salinity, starvation and pH. These results indicate that (1) flrA, flrB and flrC are important for V. alginolyticus adhesion; (2) flrA, flrB and flrC significantly influence bacterial adhesion, motility, biofilm formation and EPS production by controlling expression of key genes involved in those phenotypes; and (3) flrA, flrB and flrC regulate adhesion in the natural environment with different temperatures, pH levels, salinities and starvation time. PMID:27485498

  5. Effect of ethanol on differential protein production and expression of potential virulence functions in the opportunistic pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Nwugo, Chika C; Arivett, Brock A; Zimbler, Daniel L; Gaddy, Jennifer A; Richards, Ashley M; Actis, Luis A

    2012-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii persists in the medical environment and causes severe human nosocomial infections. Previous studies showed that low-level ethanol exposure increases the virulence of A. baumannii ATCC 17978. To better understand the mechanisms involved in this response, 2-D gel electrophoresis combined with mass spectrometry was used to investigate differential protein production in bacteria cultured in the presence or absence of ethanol. This approach showed that the presence of ethanol significantly induces and represses the production of 22 and 12 proteins, respectively. Although over 25% of the ethanol-induced proteins were stress-response related, the overall bacterial viability was uncompromised when cultured under these conditions. Production of proteins involved in lipid and carbohydrate anabolism was increased in the presence of ethanol, a response that correlates with increased carbohydrate biofilm content, enhanced biofilm formation on abiotic surfaces and decrease bacterial motility on semi-solid surfaces. The presence of ethanol also induced the acidification of bacterial cultures and the production of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), a ubiquitous plant hormone that signals bacterial stress-tolerance and promotes plant-bacteria interactions. These responses could be responsible for the significantly enhanced virulence of A. baumannii ATCC 17978 cells cultured in the presence of ethanol when tested with the Galleria mellonella experimental infection model. Taken together, these observations provide new insights into the effect of ethanol in bacterial virulence. This alcohol predisposes the human host to infections by A. baumannii and could favor the survival and adaptation of this pathogen to medical settings and adverse host environments.

  6. Effect of Ethanol on Differential Protein Production and Expression of Potential Virulence Functions in the Opportunistic Pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Nwugo, Chika C.; Arivett, Brock A.; Zimbler, Daniel L.; Gaddy, Jennifer A.; Richards, Ashley M.; Actis, Luis A.

    2012-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii persists in the medical environment and causes severe human nosocomial infections. Previous studies showed that low-level ethanol exposure increases the virulence of A. baumannii ATCC 17978. To better understand the mechanisms involved in this response, 2-D gel electrophoresis combined with mass spectrometry was used to investigate differential protein production in bacteria cultured in the presence or absence of ethanol. This approach showed that the presence of ethanol significantly induces and represses the production of 22 and 12 proteins, respectively. Although over 25% of the ethanol-induced proteins were stress-response related, the overall bacterial viability was uncompromised when cultured under these conditions. Production of proteins involved in lipid and carbohydrate anabolism was increased in the presence of ethanol, a response that correlates with increased carbohydrate biofilm content, enhanced biofilm formation on abiotic surfaces and decrease bacterial motility on semi-solid surfaces. The presence of ethanol also induced the acidification of bacterial cultures and the production of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), a ubiquitous plant hormone that signals bacterial stress-tolerance and promotes plant-bacteria interactions. These responses could be responsible for the significantly enhanced virulence of A. baumannii ATCC 17978 cells cultured in the presence of ethanol when tested with the Galleria mellonella experimental infection model. Taken together, these observations provide new insights into the effect of ethanol in bacterial virulence. This alcohol predisposes the human host to infections by A. baumannii and could favor the survival and adaptation of this pathogen to medical settings and adverse host environments. PMID:23284824

  7. Y14 governs p53 expression and modulates DNA damage sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Chia-Chen; Lee, Chi-Chieh; Tseng, Ching-Tzu; Tarn, Woan-Yuh

    2017-01-01

    Y14 is a core component of the exon junction complex (EJC), while it also exerts cellular functions independent of the EJC. Depletion of Y14 causes G2/M arrest, DNA damage and apoptosis. Here we show that knockdown of Y14 induces the expression of an alternative spliced isoform of p53, namely p53β, in human cells. Y14, in the context of the EJC, inhibited aberrant exon inclusion during the splicing of p53 pre-mRNA, and thus prevent p53β expression. The anti-cancer agent camptothecin specifically suppressed p53β induction. Intriguingly, both depletion and overexpression of Y14 increased overall p53 protein levels, suggesting that Y14 governs the quality and quantity control of p53. Moreover, Y14 depletion unexpectedly reduced p21 protein levels, which in conjunction with aberrant p53 expression accordingly increased cell sensitivity to genotoxic agents. This study establishes a direct link between Y14 and p53 expression and suggests a function for Y14 in DNA damage signaling. PMID:28361991

  8. Large Deletions in the pAtC58 Megaplasmid of Agrobacterium tumefaciens Can Confer Reduced Carriage Cost and Increased Expression of Virulence Genes

    PubMed Central

    Morton, Elise R.; Merritt, Peter M.; Bever, James D.; Fuqua, Clay

    2013-01-01

    The accessory plasmid pAtC58 of the common laboratory strain of Agrobacterium tumefaciens confers numerous catabolic functions and has been proposed to play a role in virulence. Genomic sequencing of evolved laboratory strains of A. tumefaciens revealed the presence of multiple deletion events in the At plasmid, with reductions in plasmid size ranging from 25% to 30% (115–194 kb). Flanking both ends of the sites of these deletions is a short-nucleotide repeat sequence that is in a single copy in the deleted plasmids, characteristic of a phage- or transposon-mediated deletion event. This repeat sequence is widespread throughout the C58 genome, but concentrated on the At plasmid, suggesting its frequency to be nonrandom. In this study, we assess the prevalence of the larger of these deletions in multiple C58 derivatives and characterize its functional significance. We find that in addition to elevating virulence gene expression, this deletion is associated with a significantly reduced carriage cost to the cell. These observations are a clear demonstration of the dynamic nature of the bacterial genome and suggest a mechanism for genetic plasticity of these costly but otherwise stable plasmids. Additionally, this phenomenon could be the basis for some of the dramatic recombination events so ubiquitous within and among megaplasmids. PMID:23783172

  9. Absence of YbeY RNase compromises the growth and enhances the virulence plasmid gene expression of Yersinia enterocolitica O:3.

    PubMed

    Leskinen, Katarzyna; Varjosalo, Markku; Skurnik, Mikael

    2015-02-01

    YbeY was recently recognized as an endoribonuclease playing a role in ribosome biosynthesis. In Escherichia coli it functions as a single-strand-specific RNase that processes the 3' end of the 16S rRNA and is crucial for the late-stage 70S ribosome quality control system. Here we report that YbeY is not essential in Yersinia enterocolitica serotype O:3, yet its absence strongly compromised the bacterium. The lack of YbeY resulted in misprocessing of 16S rRNA and a severe decrease of growth rate with complete growth arrest observed at elevated temperatures. Moreover, a ybeY mutation severely disturbed regulation of the Yersinia virulence plasmid (pYV) genes and affected the expression of regulatory small RNA species. Transcription of the pYV genes was upregulated in the ybeY mutant at 22 °C; the same genes were repressed in the wild-type bacterium. Furthermore, ybeY inactivation impaired many virulence-related features, such as resistance to elevated temperature and acid, and hindered utilization of different carbohydrates. In addition, the ybeY mutant strain showed decreased infectivity in a tissue culture infection model, especially at the stage of cell adhesion. Taken together, this study demonstrates the crucial role of YbeY in Y. enterocolitica O:3 physiology and pathogenicity.

  10. The effect of sub-inhibitory concentrations of rifaximin on urease production and on other virulence factors expressed by Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Annalisa; Coppo, Erika; Barbieri, Ramona; Debbia, Eugenio A; Marchese, Anna

    2017-04-01

    Rifaximin, a topical derivative of rifampin, inhibited urease production and other virulence factors at sub-MIC concentrations in strains involved in hepatic encephalopathy and the expression of methicillin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus. In particular, urease production was affected in all Proteus mirabilis and Klebsiella pneumoniae strains as well as in all tested Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates. Other exotoxins, synthesized by P. aeruginosa, such as protease, gelatinase, lipase, lecithinase and DNAse were also not metabolized in the presence of rifaximin. This antibiotic inhibited pigment production in both P. aeruginosa and Chromobacterium violaceum, a biosensor control strain. Lastly, rifaximin affected haemolysin production in S. aureus and was able to restore cefoxitin susceptibility when the strain was cultured in the presence of sub-MICs of the drug. The present findings confirm and extend previous observations about the beneficial effects of rifaximin for the treatment of gastrointestinal diseases, since in this anatomic site, it reaches a large array of concentrations which prevents enterobacteria from thriving and/or producing their major virulence factors.

  11. Benzaldehyde Schiff bases regulation to the metabolism, hemolysis, and virulence genes expression in vitro and their structure-microbicidal activity relationship.

    PubMed

    Xia, Lei; Xia, Yu-Fen; Huang, Li-Rong; Xiao, Xiao; Lou, Hua-Yong; Liu, Tang-Jingjun; Pan, Wei-Dong; Luo, Heng

    2015-06-05

    There is an urgent need to develop new antibacterial agents because of multidrug resistance by bacteria and fungi. Schiff bases (aldehyde or ketone-like compounds) exhibit intense antibacterial characteristics, and are therefore, promising candidates as antibacterial agents. To investigate the mechanism of action of newly designed benzaldehyde Schiff bases, a series of high-yielding benzaldehyde Schiff bases were synthesized, and their structures were determined by NMR and MS spectra data. The structure-microbicidal activity relationship of derivatives was investigated, and the antibacterial mechanisms were investigated by gene assays for the expression of functional genes in vitro using Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Bacillus subtilis. The active compounds were selective for certain active groups. The polar substitution of the R2 group of the amino acids in the Schiff bases, affected the antibacterial activity against E. coli and S. aureus; specific active group at the R3 or R4 groups of the acylhydrazone Schiff bases could improve their inhibitory activity against these three tested organisms. The antibacterial mechanism of the active benzaldehyde Schiff bases appeared to regulate the expression of metabolism-associated genes in E. coli, hemolysis-associated genes in B. subtilis, and key virulence genes in S. aureus. Some benzaldehyde Schiff bases were bactericidal to all the three strains and appeared to regulate gene expression associated with metabolism, hemolysis, and virulence, in vitro. The newly designed benzaldehyde Schiff bases possessed unique antibacterial activity and might be potentially useful for prophylactic or therapeutic intervention of bacterial infections.

  12. Transcriptional Profiling of the Iron Starvation Response in Bordetella pertussis Provides New Insights into Siderophore Utilization and Virulence Gene Expression ▿ §

    PubMed Central

    Brickman, Timothy J.; Cummings, Craig A.; Liew, Sin-Yee; Relman, David A.; Armstrong, Sandra K.

    2011-01-01

    Serological studies of patients with pertussis and the identification of antigenic Bordetella pertussis proteins support the hypothesis that B. pertussis perceives an iron starvation cue and expresses multiple iron source utilization systems in its natural human host environment. Furthermore, previous studies using a murine respiratory tract infection model showed that several of these B. pertussis iron systems are required for colonization and persistence and are differentially expressed over the course of infection. The present study examined genome-wide changes in B. pertussis gene transcript abundance in response to iron starvation in vitro. In addition to known iron source utilization genes, we identified a previously uncharacterized iron-repressed cytoplasmic membrane transporter system, fbpABC, that is required for the utilization of multiple structurally distinct siderophores including alcaligin, enterobactin, ferrichrome, and desferrioxamine B. Expression of type III secretion system genes was also found to be upregulated during iron starvation in both B. pertussis strain Tohama I and Bordetella bronchiseptica strain RB50. In a survey of type III secretion system protein production by an assortment of B. pertussis laboratory-adapted and low-passage clinical isolate strains, iron limitation increased the production and secretion of the type III secretion system-specific translocation apparatus tip protein Bsp22 in all Bvg-proficient strains. These results indicate that iron starvation in the infected host is an important environmental cue influencing not only Bordetella iron transport gene expression but also the expression of other important virulence-associated genes. PMID:21742863

  13. EVALUATING VIRULENCE OF WATERBORNE AND CLINCIAL AEROMONAS ISOLATES USING GENE EXPRESSION AND MORTALITY IN NEONATAL MICE FOLLOWED BY ASSESSING CELL CULTURE'S ABILITY TO PREDICT VIRULENCE BASED ON TRANSCRIPTIONAL RESPONSE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The virulence of multiple Aeromonas spp. were assessed using two models, a neonatal mouse assay and a mouse intestinal cell culture. Transcriptional responses to both infection models were assessed using microarrays. After artificial infection with a variety of Aeromonas spp., ...

  14. Patterns of virulence factor expression and antimicrobial resistance in Achromobacter xylosoxidans and Achromobacter ruhlandii isolates from patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Pereira, R H V; Leão, R S; Carvalho-Assef, A P; Albano, R M; Rodrigues, E R A; Firmida, M C; Folescu, T W; Plotkowski, M C; Bernardo, V G; Marques, E A

    2017-02-01

    Achromobacter spp. are opportunistic pathogens increasingly recovered from adult patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). We report the characterization of 122 Achromobacter spp. isolates recovered from 39 CF patients by multilocus sequence typing, virulence traits, and susceptibility to antimicrobials. Two species, A. xylosoxidans (77%) and A. ruhlandii (23%) were identified. All isolates showed a similar biofilm formation ability, and a positive swimming phenotype. By contrast, 4·3% and 44·4% of A. xylosoxidans and A. ruhlandii, respectively, exhibited a negative swarming phenotype, making the swimming and swarming abilities of A. xylosoxidans significantly higher than those of A. ruhlandii. A. xylosoxidans isolates from an outbreak clone also exhibited significantly higher motility. Both species were generally susceptible to ceftazidime, ciprofloxacin, imipenem and trimethoprim/sulphamethoxazole and there was no significant difference in susceptibility between isolates from chronic or sporadic infection. However, A. xylosoxidans isolates from chronic and sporadic cases were significantly more resistant to imipenem and ceftazidime than isolates of the outbreak clone.

  15. Expression at mRNA level of cytokines and A238L gene in porcine blood-derived macrophages infected in vitro with African swine fever virus (ASFV) isolates of different virulence.

    PubMed

    Gil, S; Spagnuolo-Weaver, M; Canals, A; Sepúlveda, N; Oliveira, J; Aleixo, A; Allan, G; Leitão, A; Martins, C L V

    2003-11-01

    Porcine macrophage cultures were infected with two ASFV isolates of variable virulence and mRNA levels of several relevant macrophage-derived cytokines were quantified by real time PCR. At six hours post infection, a clear enhancement of mRNA expression of TNFalpha, IL6, IL12 and IL15 was observed in macrophages infected with the low virulent ASFV/NH/P68 (NHV) when compared to those infected with the highly virulent ASFV/L60 (L60). The sequence of the A238L gene homologue to the cellular IkappaB was found identical in both viral isolates and its expression at mRNA level was higher in macrophages infected with NHV when compared to macrophages infected with L60. Furthermore our results suggest a negative correlation between the mRNA expression of A238L gene and the mRNA expression of the above mentioned cytokines (with the exception of IL10) in L60 infected macrophages in opposition to the positive correlation (with exception of the IL1) suggested in NHV infection. Overall, our data strongly emphasize that virulence of ASFV isolates may depend on their capacity to regulate the expression of macrophage-derived cytokines relevant for the development of host protective responses by yet unknown mechanisms triggered by the virus at early stages of the cellular infection.

  16. Deletion of AS87_03730 gene changed the bacterial virulence and gene expression of Riemerella anatipestifer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaolan; Yue, Jiaping; Ding, Chan; Wang, Shaohui; Liu, Beibei; Tian, Mingxing; Yu, Shengqing

    2016-01-01

    Riemerella anatipestifer is an important pathogen of waterfowl, which causes septicemia anserum exsudativa in ducks. In this study, an AS87_03730 gene deletion R. anatipestifer mutant Yb2ΔAS87_03730 was constructed to investigate the role of AS87_03730 on R. anatipestifer virulence and gene regulation. By deleting a 708-bp fragment from AS87_03730, the mutant Yb2ΔAS87_03730 showed a significant decreased growth rate in TSB and invasion capacity in Vero cells, compared to wild-type strain Yb2. Moreover, the median lethal dose (LD50) of Yb2ΔAS87_03730 was 1.24 × 107 colony forming units (CFU), which is about 80-fold attenuated than that of Yb2 (LD50 = 1.53 × 105 CFU). Furthermore, RNA-Seq analysis and Real-time PCR indicated 19 up-regulated and two down-regulated genes in Yb2ΔAS87_03730. Functional analysis revealed that 12 up-regulated genes were related to “Translation, ribosomal structure and biogenesis”, two were classified into “Cell envelope biogenesis, outer membrane”, one was involved in “Amino acid transport and metabolism”, and the other four had unknown functions. Polymerase chain reaction and sequence analysis indicated that the AS87_03730 gene is highly conserved among R. anatipestifer strains, as the percent sequence identity was over 93.5%. This study presents evidence that AS87_03730 gene is involved in bacterial virulence and gene regulation of R. anatipestifer. PMID:26928424

  17. Functional characterisation of cis-regulatory elements governing dynamic Eomes expression in the early mouse embryo.

    PubMed

    Simon, Claire S; Downes, Damien J; Gosden, Matthew E; Telenius, Jelena; Higgs, Douglas R; Hughes, Jim R; Costello, Ita; Bikoff, Elizabeth K; Robertson, Elizabeth J

    2017-02-07

    The T-box transcription factor (TF) Eomes is a key regulator of cell fate decisions during early mouse development. The cis-acting regulatory elements that direct expression in the anterior visceral endoderm (AVE), primitive streak (PS) and definitive endoderm (DE) have yet to be defined. Here, we identified three gene-proximal enhancer-like sequences (PSE_a, PSE_b and VPE) that faithfully activate tissue specific expression in transgenic embryos. However, targeted deletion experiments demonstrate that PSE_a and PSE_b are dispensable and only the VPE is required for optimal Eomes expression in vivo Embryos lacking this enhancer display variably penetrant defects in anterior-posterior axis orientation and DE formation. Chromosome conformation capture experiments reveal VPE-promoter interactions embryonic stem cells (ESC), prior to gene activation. The locus resides in a large (500kb) pre-formed compartment in ESC and activation during DE differentiation occurs in the absence of 3D structural changes. ATAC-seq analysis reveals that VPE, PSE_a, and four additional putative enhancers display increased chromatin accessibility in DE associated with Smad2/3 binding coincident with transcriptional activation. In contrast, activation of the Eomes target genes Foxa2 and Lhx1 is associated with higher order chromatin reorganisation. Thus diverse regulatory mechanisms govern activation of lineage specifying TFs during early development.

  18. Expression of Listeria monocytogenes key virulence genes during growth in liquid medium, on rocket and melon at 4, 10 and 30 °C.

    PubMed

    Hadjilouka, Agni; Molfeta, Christina; Panagiotopoulou, Olga; Paramithiotis, Spiros; Mataragas, Marios; Drosinos, Eleftherios H

    2016-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the expression of key virulence genes, during growth of a Listeria monocytogenes isolate in liquid medium, on melon and rocket at different temperatures and time. For that purpose, BHI broth, rocket and melon were inoculated at 7.0-7.5 log CFU mL(-1) or g(-1)and stored at 4, 10 and 30 °C. Sampling took place upon inoculation and after 0.5, 6 and 24 h of incubation. The RNA was stabilized and the expression of hly, plcA, plcB, sigB, inlA, inlB, inlC, inlJ, lmo2672 and lmo2470 was assessed by RT-qPCR. The results obtained were summarized into two observations; the first one referring to the interactive effect of incubation temperature and type of substrate and the second one to the effect of time on gene expression. Regarding the latter, nearly all genes were regulated upon inoculation and exhibited differential expression in the subsequent sampling times indicating the existence of additional regulatory mechanisms yet to be explored.

  19. ComE, an Essential Response Regulator, Negatively Regulates the Expression of the Capsular Polysaccharide Locus and Attenuates the Bacterial Virulence in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yuqiang; Zhang, Xuemei; Wang, Xiaofang; Wang, Libin; Zhang, Jinghui; Yin, Yibing

    2017-01-01

    The capsular polysaccharide (CPS) of Streptococcus pneumoniae is the main virulence factors required for effective colonization and invasive disease. The capacity to regulate CPS production at the transcriptional level is critical for the survival of S. pneumoniae in different host niches, but little is known about the transcription regulators of cps locus. In the present study, we isolated and identified the response regulator ComE, the master competence switch in transformation of S. pneumoniae, as a transcriptional regulator of cps locus by DNA affinity chromatography-pulldown, MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry (MS) and electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). Our results showed that phosphorylated mimetic of ComE (ComE(D58E)) bound specifically to the cps locus prompter in vitro, and phosphorylated ComE negatively impacted both cps locus transcription and CPS production attenuating the pneumococcal virulence in vivo. Compared with D39-WT strain, D39ΔcomE mutant exhibited much thicker capsule, attenuated nasopharyngeal colonization and enhanced virulence in both pneumonia and bacteremia models of Balb/c mice. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that CSP-ComD/E competence system involved in regulating negatively the CPS production during the progress of transformation in D39. Our CSP1 induction experiment results showed that the expression of ComE in D39-WT strain increased powerfully by 120% after 10 min of CSP1 induction, but the CPS production in D39-WT strain decreased sharply by 67.1% after 15 min of CSP1 induction. However, the CPS production in D39ΔcomE mutant was almost constant during the whole stage of induction. Additionally, we found that extracellular glucose concentration could affect both the expression of ComE and CPS production of D39 in vitro. Taken together, for the first time, we report that ComE, as a transcriptional regulator of cps locus, plays an important role in transcriptional regulation of cps locus and capsular production level.

  20. ComE, an Essential Response Regulator, Negatively Regulates the Expression of the Capsular Polysaccharide Locus and Attenuates the Bacterial Virulence in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yuqiang; Zhang, Xuemei; Wang, Xiaofang; Wang, Libin; Zhang, Jinghui; Yin, Yibing

    2017-01-01

    The capsular polysaccharide (CPS) of Streptococcus pneumoniae is the main virulence factors required for effective colonization and invasive disease. The capacity to regulate CPS production at the transcriptional level is critical for the survival of S. pneumoniae in different host niches, but little is known about the transcription regulators of cps locus. In the present study, we isolated and identified the response regulator ComE, the master competence switch in transformation of S. pneumoniae, as a transcriptional regulator of cps locus by DNA affinity chromatography-pulldown, MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry (MS) and electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). Our results showed that phosphorylated mimetic of ComE (ComED58E) bound specifically to the cps locus prompter in vitro, and phosphorylated ComE negatively impacted both cps locus transcription and CPS production attenuating the pneumococcal virulence in vivo. Compared with D39-WT strain, D39ΔcomE mutant exhibited much thicker capsule, attenuated nasopharyngeal colonization and enhanced virulence in both pneumonia and bacteremia models of Balb/c mice. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that CSP-ComD/E competence system involved in regulating negatively the CPS production during the progress of transformation in D39. Our CSP1 induction experiment results showed that the expression of ComE in D39-WT strain increased powerfully by 120% after 10 min of CSP1 induction, but the CPS production in D39-WT strain decreased sharply by 67.1% after 15 min of CSP1 induction. However, the CPS production in D39ΔcomE mutant was almost constant during the whole stage of induction. Additionally, we found that extracellular glucose concentration could affect both the expression of ComE and CPS production of D39 in vitro. Taken together, for the first time, we report that ComE, as a transcriptional regulator of cps locus, plays an important role in transcriptional regulation of cps locus and capsular production level. PMID

  1. In Vivo-Expressed Proteins of Virulent Leptospira interrogans Serovar Autumnalis N2 Elicit Strong IgM Responses of Value in Conclusive Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Raja, Veerapandian; Shanmughapriya, Santhanam; Kanagavel, Murugesan; Artiushin, Sergey C.; Velineni, Sridhar; Timoney, John F.

    2015-01-01

    Leptospirosis is a serious zoonosis that is underdiagnosed because of limited access to laboratory facilities in Southeast Asia, Central and South America, and Oceania. Timely diagnosis of locally distributed serovars of high virulence is crucial for successful care and outbreak management. Using pooled patient sera, an expression gene library of a virulent Leptospira interrogans serovar Autumnalis strain N2 isolated in South India was screened. The identified genes were characterized, and the purified recombinant proteins were used as antigens in IgM enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) either singly or in combination. Sera (n = 118) from cases of acute leptospirosis along with sera (n = 58) from healthy subjects were tested for reactivity with the identified proteins in an ELISA designed to detect specific IgM responses. We have identified nine immunoreactive proteins, ArgC, RecA, GlpF, FliD, TrmD, RplS, RnhB, Lp28.6, and Lrr44.9, which were found to be highly conserved among pathogenic leptospires. Apparently, the proteins ArgC, RecA, GlpF, FliD, TrmD, and Lrr44.9 are expressed during natural infection of the host and undetectable in in vitro cultures. Among all the recombinant proteins used as antigens in IgM ELISA, ArgC had the highest sensitivity and specificity, 89.8% and 95.5%, respectively, for the conclusive diagnosis of leptospirosis. The use of ArgC and RecA in combination for IgM ELISA increased the sensitivity and specificity to 95.7% and 94.9%, respectively. ArgC and RecA thus elicited specific IgM responses and were therefore effective in laboratory confirmation of Leptospira infection. PMID:26607308

  2. In vivo virulence of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss correlates inversely with in vitro Mx gene expression.

    PubMed

    Cano, Irene; Collet, Bertrand; Pereira, Clarissa; Paley, Richard; van Aerle, Ronny; Stone, David; Taylor, Nick G H

    2016-05-01

    The in vitro replication of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) isolates from each VHSV genotype and the associated cellular host Mx gene expression were analysed. All the isolates were able to infect RTG-2 cells and induce increased Mx gene expression (generic assay detecting isoforms 1 and 3 [Mx1/3]). A trout pathogenic, genotype Ia isolate (J167), showing high replication in RTG-2 cells (by infective titre and N gene expression) induced lower Mx1/3 gene expression than observed in VHSV isolates known to be non-pathogenic to rainbow trout: 96-43/8, 96-43/10 (Ib); 1p49, 1p53 (II); and MI03 (IVb). Paired co-inoculation assays were analysed using equal number of plaque forming units per ml (PFU) of J167 (Ia genotype) with other less pathogenic VHSV genotypes. In these co-inoculations, the Mx1/3 gene expression was significantly lower than for the non-pathogenic isolate alone. Of the three rainbow trout Mx isoforms, J167 did not induce Mx1 up-regulation in RTG-2 or RTgill-W1 cells. Co-inoculating isolates resulted in greater inhibition of Mx in both rainbow trout cell lines studied. Up-regulation of sea bream Mx in SAF-1 cells induced by 96-43/8 was also lower in co-inoculation assays with J167. The RTG-P1 cell line, expressing luciferase under the control of the interferon-induced Mx rainbow trout gene promoter, showed low luciferase activity when inoculated with pathogenic strains: J167, DK-5131 (Ic), NO-A-163/68 (Id), TR-206239-1, TR-22207111 (Ie), 99-292 (IVa), and CA-NB00-01 (IVc). Co-inoculation assays showed a J167-dose dependent inhibition of the luciferase activity. The data suggest that virulent VHSV isolates may interfere in the interferon pathways, potentially determining higher pathogenicity.

  3. The RNA chaperone Hfq is involved in stress response and virulence in Neisseria meningitidis and is a pleiotropic regulator of protein expression.

    PubMed

    Fantappiè, Laura; Metruccio, Matteo M E; Seib, Kate L; Oriente, Francesca; Cartocci, Elena; Ferlicca, Francesca; Giuliani, Marzia M; Scarlato, Vincenzo; Delany, Isabel

    2009-05-01

    The well-conserved protein Hfq has emerged as the key modulator of riboregulation in bacteria. This protein is thought to function as an RNA chaperone and to facilitate base pairing between small regulatory RNA (sRNA) and mRNA targets, and many sRNAs are dependent on the Hfq protein for their regulatory functions. To address the possible role of Hfq in riboregulated circuits in Neisseria meningitidis, we generated an Hfq mutant of the MC58 strain, and the knockout mutant has pleiotropic phenotypes; it has a general growth phenotype in vitro in culture media, and it is sensitive to a wide range of stresses, including those that it may encounter in the host. Furthermore, the expression profile of a vast number of proteins is clearly altered in the mutant, and we have identified 27 proteins by proteomics. All of the phenotypes tested to date are also restored by complementation of Hfq expression in the mutant strain. Importantly, in ex vivo and in vivo models of infection the Hfq mutant is attenuated. These data indicate that Hfq plays a key role in stress response and virulence, and we propose a major role for Hfq in regulation of gene expression. Moreover, this study suggests that in meningococcus there is a large Hfq-mediated sRNA network which so far is largely unexplored.

  4. Infections of virulent and avirulent viruses differentially influenced the expression of dicer-1, ago-1, and microRNAs in Bombus terrestris

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Jinzhi; Meeus, Ivan; De Coninck, Dieter IM; Deforce, Dieter; Etebari, Kayvan; Asgari, Sassan; Smagghe, Guy

    2017-01-01

    The microRNA (miRNA) pathway is well established to be involved in host-pathogen interactions. As key insect pollinators, bees are suffering from widely spreading viruses, especially honeybees and bumblebees. In order to better understand bee-virus interaction, we comparatively analyzed the involvement of the bumblebee miRNA pathway upon infection by two different viruses. In our setup, an avirulent infection is induced by slow bee paralysis virus (SBPV) and a virulent infection is induced by Israeli acute paralysis virus (IAPV). Our results showed the increased expressions of dicer-1 and ago-1 upon SBPV infection. There were 17 and 12 bumblebee miRNAs differentially expressed upon SBPV and IAPV infections, respectively. These results may indicate the involvement of the host miRNA pathway in bumblebee-virus interaction. However, silencing of dicer-1 did not influence the genome copy number of SBPV. Target prediction for these differentially expressed miRNAs showed their possible involvement in targeting viral genomic RNA and in the regulation of networks in bumblebee. Our study opens a new insight into bee-virus interaction meditated by host miRNAs. PMID:28374846

  5. Infections of virulent and avirulent viruses differentially influenced the expression of dicer-1, ago-1, and microRNAs in Bombus terrestris.

    PubMed

    Niu, Jinzhi; Meeus, Ivan; De Coninck, Dieter Im; Deforce, Dieter; Etebari, Kayvan; Asgari, Sassan; Smagghe, Guy

    2017-04-04

    The microRNA (miRNA) pathway is well established to be involved in host-pathogen interactions. As key insect pollinators, bees are suffering from widely spreading viruses, especially honeybees and bumblebees. In order to better understand bee-virus interaction, we comparatively analyzed the involvement of the bumblebee miRNA pathway upon infection by two different viruses. In our setup, an avirulent infection is induced by slow bee paralysis virus (SBPV) and a virulent infection is induced by Israeli acute paralysis virus (IAPV). Our results showed the increased expressions of dicer-1 and ago-1 upon SBPV infection. There were 17 and 12 bumblebee miRNAs differentially expressed upon SBPV and IAPV infections, respectively. These results may indicate the involvement of the host miRNA pathway in bumblebee-virus interaction. However, silencing of dicer-1 did not influence the genome copy number of SBPV. Target prediction for these differentially expressed miRNAs showed their possible involvement in targeting viral genomic RNA and in the regulation of networks in bumblebee. Our study opens a new insight into bee-virus interaction meditated by host miRNAs.

  6. Multiple promoter elements govern expression of the human ornithine decarboxylase gene in colon carcinoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Moshier, J A; Osborne, D L; Skunca, M; Dosescu, J; Gilbert, J D; Fitzgerald, M C; Polidori, G; Wagner, R L; Friezner Degen, S J; Luk, G D

    1992-01-01

    Overexpression of the ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) gene may be important to the development and maintenance of colonic neoplasms, as well as tumors in general. In this study, we examined the promoter elements governing constitutive expression of the human ODC gene in HCT 116 human colon carcinoma cells and, for comparison, K562 human erythro-leukemia cells. It was determined by functional analysis that the promoter elements responsible reside within the 378 bp immediately upstream from the transcription start site. Within this sequence, there are at least three regions that modulate the efficiency of the ODC promoter cooperatively. Both DNA bandshift and footprint assays demonstrated all three regions to be rich in sites that bind to nuclear proteins isolated from HCT 116 and K562 cells; the protein binding pattern of non-transformed, diploid fibroblasts was found to be much less complex. Several of the protein binding sequences have little or no homology to common regulatory elements. We suggest that the constitutive activity of the ODC gene in HCT 116 colon carcinoma cells, and perhaps transformed cells in general, involves a complex interaction of multiple regulatory sequences and their associated nuclear proteins. Finally, the saturation of the promoter in these transformed cell lines suggests that high levels of protein binding in the ODC promoter may contribute to elevated constitutive expression of this gene. Images PMID:1598217

  7. Regulation of Bacterial Virulence by Csr (Rsm) Systems

    PubMed Central

    Vakulskas, Christopher A.; Potts, Anastasia H.; Babitzke, Paul; Ahmer, Brian M. M.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Most bacterial pathogens have the remarkable ability to flourish in the external environment and in specialized host niches. This ability requires their metabolism, physiology, and virulence factors to be responsive to changes in their surroundings. It is no surprise that the underlying genetic circuitry that supports this adaptability is multilayered and exceedingly complex. Studies over the past 2 decades have established that the CsrA/RsmA proteins, global regulators of posttranscriptional gene expression, play important roles in the expression of virulence factors of numerous proteobacterial pathogens. To accomplish these tasks, CsrA binds to the 5′ untranslated and/or early coding regions of mRNAs and alters translation, mRNA turnover, and/or transcript elongation. CsrA activity is regulated by noncoding small RNAs (sRNAs) that contain multiple CsrA binding sites, which permit them to sequester multiple CsrA homodimers away from mRNA targets. Environmental cues sensed by two-component signal transduction systems and other regulatory factors govern the expression of the CsrA-binding sRNAs and, ultimately, the effects of CsrA on secretion systems, surface molecules and biofilm formation, quorum sensing, motility, pigmentation, siderophore production, and phagocytic avoidance. This review presents the workings of the Csr system, the paradigm shift that it generated for understanding posttranscriptional regulation, and its roles in virulence networks of animal and plant pathogens. PMID:25833324

  8. Regulation of bacterial virulence by Csr (Rsm) systems.

    PubMed

    Vakulskas, Christopher A; Potts, Anastasia H; Babitzke, Paul; Ahmer, Brian M M; Romeo, Tony

    2015-06-01

    Most bacterial pathogens have the remarkable ability to flourish in the external environment and in specialized host niches. This ability requires their metabolism, physiology, and virulence factors to be responsive to changes in their surroundings. It is no surprise that the underlying genetic circuitry that supports this adaptability is multilayered and exceedingly complex. Studies over the past 2 decades have established that the CsrA/RsmA proteins, global regulators of posttranscriptional gene expression, play important roles in the expression of virulence factors of numerous proteobacterial pathogens. To accomplish these tasks, CsrA binds to the 5' untranslated and/or early coding regions of mRNAs and alters translation, mRNA turnover, and/or transcript elongation. CsrA activity is regulated by noncoding small RNAs (sRNAs) that contain multiple CsrA binding sites, which permit them to sequester multiple CsrA homodimers away from mRNA targets. Environmental cues sensed by two-component signal transduction systems and other regulatory factors govern the expression of the CsrA-binding sRNAs and, ultimately, the effects of CsrA on secretion systems, surface molecules and biofilm formation, quorum sensing, motility, pigmentation, siderophore production, and phagocytic avoidance. This review presents the workings of the Csr system, the paradigm shift that it generated for understanding posttranscriptional regulation, and its roles in virulence networks of animal and plant pathogens.

  9. Fur negatively regulates hns and is required for the expression of HilA and virulence in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Troxell, Bryan; Sikes, Michael L; Fink, Ryan C; Vazquez-Torres, Andres; Jones-Carson, Jessica; Hassan, Hosni M

    2011-01-01

    Iron is an essential element for the survival of living cells. However, excess iron is toxic, and its uptake is exquisitely regulated by the ferric uptake regulator, Fur. In Salmonella, the Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 (SPI-1) encodes a type three secretion system, which is required for invasion of host epithelial cells in the small intestine. A major activator of SPI-1 is HilA, which is encoded within SPI-1. One known regulator of hilA is Fur. The mechanism of hilA regulation by Fur is unknown. We report here that Fur is required for virulence in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and that Fur is required for the activation of hilA, as well as of other HilA-dependent genes, invF and sipC. The Fur-dependent regulation of hilA was independent of PhoP, a known repressor of hilA. Instead, the expression of the gene coding for the histone-like protein, hns, was significantly derepressed in the fur mutant. Indeed, the activation of hilA by Fur was dependent on 28 nucleotides located upstream of hns. Moreover, we used chromatin immunoprecipitation to show that Fur bound, in vivo, to the upstream region of hns in a metal-dependent fashion. Finally, deletion of fur in an hns mutant resulted in Fur-independent activation of hilA. In conclusion, Fur activates hilA by repressing the expression of hns.

  10. The low-virulent African swine fever virus (ASFV/NH/P68) induces enhanced expression and production of relevant regulatory cytokines (IFNalpha, TNFalpha and IL12p40) on porcine macrophages in comparison to the highly virulent ASFV/L60.

    PubMed

    Gil, S; Sepúlveda, N; Albina, E; Leitão, A; Martins, C

    2008-01-01

    The impact of infection by the low-virulent ASFV/NH/P68 (NHV) and the highly virulent ASFV/L60 (L60) isolates on porcine macrophages was assessed through the quantification of IFNalpha, TNFalpha, IL12p40, TGFbeta and ASFV genes by real-time PCR at 2, 4 and 6 h post-infection. Increased IFNalpha, TNFalpha and IL12p40 expression was found in infection with NHV, in which expression of TGFbeta was lower than in infection with L60. Principal component analysis showed a positive interaction of cytokines involved in cellular immune mechanisms, namely IFNalpha and IL12p40 in the NHV infection. Quantification by ELISA confirmed higher production of IFNalpha, TNFalpha and IL12p40 in the NHV-infected macrophages. Overall, our studies reinforce and clarify the effect of the NHV infection by targeting cellular and cellular-based immune responses relevant for pig survival against ASFV infection.

  11. Characterization of a Legionella pneumophila relA Insertion Mutant and Roles of RelA and RpoS in Virulence Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Zusman, Tal; Gal-Mor, Ohad; Segal, Gil

    2002-01-01

    To investigate the involvement of RelA in the regulation of Legionella pneumophila virulence, a deletion substitution was constructed in the relA gene. The relA knockout resulted in an undetectable level of ppGpp in the cells during the stationary phase, but the original level was restored when the relA gene product was supplied on a plasmid. The effect of the relA mutation was examined with two systems that are known to be expressed during the stationary phase in L. pneumophila. Pigment production was found to be dependent on the relA gene product, and only one-half as much pigment was produced by the relA mutant as by the wild-type strain. Flagellum gene expression was also found to be dependent on the relA gene product, as determined with a flaA::lacZ fusion. However, the relA gene product was found to be dispensable for intracellular growth both in HL-60-derived human macrophages and in the protozoan host Acanthamoeba castellanii. To determine the involvement of the relA gene product in expression of L. pneumophila genes required for intracellular growth (icm/dot genes), nine icm::lacZ fusions were constructed, and expression of these fusions in the wild-type strain was compared with their expression in relA mutant strains. Expression of only one of the icm::lacZ fusions was moderately reduced in the relA mutant strain. Expression of the nine icm::lacZ fusions was also examined in a strain containing an insertion in the gene that codes for the stationary-phase sigma factor RpoS, and similar results were obtained. We concluded that RelA is dispensable for intracellular growth of L. pneumophila in the two hosts examined and that both RelA and RpoS play minor roles in L. pneumophila icm/dot gene expression. PMID:11741845

  12. Analysis of Expressed Genes of the Bacterium ‘Candidatus Phytoplasma Mali’ Highlights Key Features of Virulence and Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Siewert, Christin; Luge, Toni; Duduk, Bojan; Seemüller, Erich; Büttner, Carmen; Sauer, Sascha; Kube, Michael

    2014-01-01

    ‘Candidatus Phytoplasma mali’ is a phytopathogenic bacterium of the family Acholeplasmataceae assigned to the class Mollicutes. This causative agent of the apple proliferation colonizes in Malus domestica the sieve tubes of the plant phloem resulting in a range of symptoms such as witches’- broom formation, reduced vigor and affecting size and quality of the crop. The disease is responsible for strong economical losses in Europe. Although the genome sequence of the pathogen is available, there is only limited information on expression of selected genes and metabolic key features that have not been examined on the transcriptomic or proteomic level so far. This situation is similar to many other phytoplasmas. In the work presented here, RNA-Seq and mass spectrometry shotgun techniques were applied on tissue samples from Nicotiana occidentalis infected by ‘Ca. P. mali’ strain AT providing insights into transcriptome and proteome of the pathogen. Data analysis highlights expression of 208 genes including 14 proteins located in the terminal inverted repeats of the linear chromosome. Beside a high portion of house keeping genes, the recently discussed chaperone GroES/GroEL is expressed. Furthermore, gene expression involved in formation of a type IVB and of the Sec-dependent secretion system was identified as well as the highly expressed putative pathogenicity–related SAP11-like effector protein. Metabolism of phytoplasmas depends on the uptake of spermidine/putescine, amino acids, co-factors, carbohydrates and in particular malate/citrate. The expression of these transporters was confirmed and the analysis of the carbohydrate cycle supports the suggested alternative energy-providing pathway for phytoplasmas releasing acetate and providing ATP. The phylogenetic analyses of malate dehydrogenase and acetate kinase in phytoplasmas show a closer relatedness to the Firmicutes in comparison to Mycoplasma species indicating an early divergence of the

  13. Proteomic Characterization of Yersinia pestis Virulence

    SciTech Connect

    Chromy, B; Murphy, G; Gonzales, A; Fitch, J P; McCutchen-Maloney, S L

    2005-01-05

    Yersinia pestis, the etiological agent of plague, functions via the Type III secretion mechanism whereby virulence factors are induced upon interactions with a mammalian host. Here, the Y. pestis proteome was studied by two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis (2-D DIGE) under physiologically relevant growth conditions mimicking the calcium concentrations and temperatures that the pathogen would encounter in the flea vector and upon interaction with the mammalian host. Over 4100 individual protein spots were detected of which hundreds were differentially expressed in the entire comparative experiment. A total of 43 proteins that were differentially expressed between the vector and host growth conditions were identified by mass spectrometry. Expected differences in expression were observed for several known virulence factors including catalase-peroxidase (KatY), murine toxin (Ymt), plasminogen activator (Pla), and F1 capsule antigen (Caf1), as well as putative virulence factors. Chaperone proteins and signaling molecules hypothesized to be involved in virulence due to their role in Type III secretion were also identified. Other differentially expressed proteins not previously reported to contribute to virulence are candidates for more detailed mechanistic studies, representing potential new virulence determinants. For example, several sugar metabolism proteins were differentially regulated in response to lower calcium and higher temperature, suggesting these proteins, while not directly connected to virulence, either represent a metabolic switch for survival in the host environment or may facilitate production of virulence factors. Results presented here contribute to a more thorough understanding of the virulence mechanism of Y. pestis through proteomic characterization of the pathogen under induced virulence.

  14. Molecular insight into the activity of LasR protein from Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the regulation of virulence gene expression by this organism.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Nilkanta; Bagchi, Angshuman

    2016-04-10

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen. This organism attacks human patients suffering from diseases like AIDS, cancer, cystic fibrosis, etc. One of the important virulent factors produced by this organism is Hydrogen Cyanide. This is expressed from the genes encoded by the hcnABC operon. The expressions of the genes encoded by hcnABC operon are mediated mainly by the interactions of LasR protein with the corresponding promoter region of the hcnABC operon. The LasR protein acts as a dimer and binds to the promoter DNA with the help of an autoinducer ligand. However, till date the detailed molecular mechanism of how the LasR protein interacts with the promoter DNA is not clearly known. Therefore, in this work, an attempt has been made to analyze the mode of interactions of the LasR protein with the promoter DNA region of the hcnABC operon. We analyzed the three dimensional structure of the LasR protein from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and docked the protein with the autoinducer ligand. We then docked the ligand-bound-LasR-protein as well the LasR-protein-without-the-autoinducer-ligand on to the promoter DNA region of hcnABC operon. We analyzed the details of the interaction profiles of LasR protein with the autoinducer ligand. We also deciphered the details of the LasR promoter-DNA interactions. We compared the modes of DNA bindings by the LasR protein in presence and absence of the autoinducer ligand and tried to analyze the molecular details of the binding of LasR protein with the promoter DNA region of hcnABC operon during hcnABC gene expression. This study may therefore pave the pathway for future experiments to determine the relative effects of the amino acid residues of LasR protein in DNA binding during the transcription of hcnABC operon.

  15. Involvement of Agrobacterium tumefaciens Galacturonate Tripartite ATP-Independent Periplasmic (TRAP) Transporter GaaPQM in Virulence Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jinlei

    2015-01-01

    Monosaccharides capable of serving as nutrients for the soil bacterium Agrobacterium tumefaciens are also inducers of the vir regulon present in the tumor-inducing (Ti) plasmid of this plant pathogen. One such monosaccharide is galacturonate, the predominant monomer of pectin found in plant cell walls. This ligand is recognized by the periplasmic sugar binding protein ChvE, which interacts with the VirA histidine kinase that controls vir gene expression. Although ChvE is also a member of the ChvE-MmsAB ABC transporter involved in the utilization of many neutral sugars, it is not involved in galacturonate utilization. In this study, a putative tripartite ATP-independent periplasmic (TRAP) transporter, GaaPQM, is shown to be essential for the utilization of galacturonic acid; we show that residue R169 in the predicted sugar binding site of the GaaP is required for activity. The gene upstream of gaaPQM (gaaR) encodes a member of the GntR family of regulators. GaaR is shown to repress the expression of gaaPQM, and the repression is relieved in the presence of the substrate for GaaPQM. Moreover, GaaR is shown to bind putative promoter regions in the sequences required for galacturonic acid utilization. Finally, A. tumefaciens strains carrying a deletion of gaaPQM are more sensitive to galacturonate as an inducer of vir gene expression, while the overexpression of gaaPQM results in strains being less sensitive to this vir inducer. This supports a model in which transporter activity is crucial in ensuring that vir gene expression occurs only at sites of high ligand concentration, such as those at a plant wound site. PMID:26637603

  16. The Type Three Secretion System 2-Encoded Regulator EtrB Modulates Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli Virulence Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Luzader, Deborah H.; Willsey, Graham G.; Wargo, Matthew J.

    2016-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 (EHEC) is a foodborne pathogen that causes bloody diarrhea and hemolytic uremic syndrome throughout the world. A defining feature of EHEC pathogenesis is the formation of attaching and effacing (AE) lesions on colonic epithelial cells. Most of the genes that code for AE lesion formation, including a type three secretion system (T3SS) and effectors, are carried within a chromosomal pathogenicity island called the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE). In this study, we report that a putative regulator, which is encoded in the cryptic E. coli type three secretion system 2 (ETT2) locus and herein renamed EtrB, plays an important role in EHEC pathogenesis. The etrB gene is expressed as a monocistronic transcript, and EtrB autoregulates expression. We provide evidence that EtrB directly interacts with the ler regulatory region to activate LEE expression and promote AE lesion formation. Additionally, we mapped the EtrB regulatory circuit in EHEC to determine a global role for EtrB. EtrB is regulated by the transcription factor QseA, suggesting that these proteins comprise a regulatory circuit important for EHEC colonization of the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:27324484

  17. Expression of parasite genetic variation changes over the course of infection: implications of within-host dynamics for the evolution of virulence

    PubMed Central

    Clerc, Melanie; Ebert, Dieter; Hall, Matthew D.

    2015-01-01

    How infectious disease agents interact with their host changes during the course of infection and can alter the expression of disease-related traits. Yet by measuring parasite life-history traits at one or few moments during infection, studies have overlooked the impact of variable parasite growth trajectories on disease evolution. Here we show that infection-age-specific estimates of host and parasite fitness components can reveal new insight into the evolution of parasites. We do so by characterizing the within-host dynamics over an entire infection period for five genotypes of the castrating bacterial parasite Pasteuria ramosa infecting the crustacean Daphnia magna. Our results reveal that genetic variation for parasite-induced gigantism, host castration and parasite spore loads increases with the age of infection. Driving these patterns appears to be variation in how well the parasite maintains control of host reproduction late in the infection process. We discuss the evolutionary consequences of this finding with regard to natural selection acting on different ages of infection and the mechanism underlying the maintenance of castration efficiency. Our results highlight how elucidating within-host dynamics can shed light on the selective forces that shape infection strategies and the evolution of virulence. PMID:25761710

  18. DotU expression is highly induced during in vivo infection and responsible for virulence and Hcp1 secretion in avian pathogenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shaohui; Dai, Jianjun; Meng, Qingmei; Han, Xiangan; Han, Yue; Zhao, Yichao; Yang, Denghui; Ding, Chan; Yu, Shengqing

    2014-01-01

    Type VI secretion systems (T6SSs) contribute to pathogenicity in many pathogenic bacteria. Three distinguishable T6SS loci have been discovered in avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC). The sequence of APEC T6SS2 locus is highly similar to the sequence of the newborn meningitis Escherichia coli (NMEC) RS218 T6SS locus, which might contribute to meningitis pathogenesis. However, little is known about the function of APEC T6SS2. We showed that the APEC T6SS2 component organelle trafficking protein (DotU) could elicit antibodies in infected ducks, suggesting that DotU might be involved in APEC pathogenicity. To investigate DotU in APEC pathogenesis, mutant and complemented strains were constructed and characterized. Inactivation of the APEC dotU gene attenuated virulence in ducks, diminished resistance to normal duck serum, and reduced survival in macrophage cells and ducks. Furthermore, deletion of the dotU gene abolished hemolysin-coregulated protein (Hcp) 1 secretion, leading to decreased interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8 gene expression in HD-11 chicken macrophages. These functions were restored for the complementation strain. Our results demonstrated that DotU plays key roles in the APEC pathogenesis, Hcp1 secretion, and intracellular host response modulation. PMID:25426107

  19. Genome-Wide Gene Expression Analysis Identifies the Proto-oncogene Tyrosine-Protein Kinase Src as a Crucial Virulence Determinant of Infectious Laryngotracheitis Virus in Chicken Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hai; Wang, Fengjie; Han, Zongxi; Gao, Qi; Li, Huixin; Shao, Yuhao; Sun, Nana

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Given the side effects of vaccination against infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT), novel strategies for ILT control and therapy are urgently needed. The modulation of host-virus interactions is a promising strategy to combat the virus; however, the interactions between the host and avian ILT herpesvirus (ILTV) are unclear. Using genome-wide transcriptome studies in combination with a bioinformatic analysis, we identified proto-oncogene tyrosine-protein kinase Src (Src) to be an important modulator of ILTV infection. Src controls the virulence of ILTV and is phosphorylated upon ILTV infection. Functional studies revealed that Src prolongs the survival of host cells by increasing the threshold of virus-induced cell death. Therefore, Src is essential for viral replication in vitro and in ovo but is not required for ILTV-induced cell death. Furthermore, our results identify a positive-feedback loop between Src and the tyrosine kinase focal adhesion kinase (FAK), which is necessary for the phosphorylation of either Src or FAK and is required for Src to modulate ILTV infection. To the best of our knowledge, we are the first to identify a key host regulator controlling host-ILTV interactions. We believe that our findings have revealed a new potential therapeutic target for ILT control and therapy. IMPORTANCE Despite the extensive administration of live attenuated vaccines starting from the mid-20th century and the administration of recombinant vaccines in recent years, infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT) outbreaks due to avian ILT herpesvirus (ILTV) occur worldwide annually. Presently, there are no drugs or control strategies that effectively treat ILT. Targeting of host-virus interactions is considered to be a promising strategy for controlling ILTV infections. However, little is known about the mechanisms governing host-ILTV interactions. The results from our study advance our understanding of host-ILTV interactions on a molecular level and provide experimental

  20. Global Regulator of Virulence A (GrvA) Coordinates Expression of Discrete Pathogenic Mechanisms in Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli through Interactions with GadW-GadE

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Jason K.; Harro, Carly M.; Vendura, Khoury W.; Shaw, Lindsey N.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Global regulator of virulence A (GrvA) is a ToxR-family transcriptional regulator that activates locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE)-dependent adherence in enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC). LEE activation by GrvA requires the Rcs phosphorelay response regulator RcsB and is sensitive to physiologically relevant concentrations of bicarbonate, a known stimulant of virulence systems in intestinal pathogens. This study determines the genomic scale of GrvA-dependent regulation and uncovers details of the molecular mechanism underlying GrvA-dependent regulation of pathogenic mechanisms in EHEC. In a grvA-null background of EHEC strain TW14359, RNA sequencing analysis revealed the altered expression of over 700 genes, including the downregulation of LEE- and non-LEE-encoded effectors and the upregulation of genes for glutamate-dependent acid resistance (GDAR). Upregulation of GDAR genes corresponded with a marked increase in acid resistance. GrvA-dependent regulation of GDAR and the LEE required gadE, the central activator of GDAR genes and a direct repressor of the LEE. Control of gadE by GrvA was further determined to occur through downregulation of the gadE activator GadW. This interaction of GrvA with GadW-GadE represses the acid resistance phenotype, while it concomitantly activates the LEE-dependent adherence and secretion of immune subversion effectors. The results of this study significantly broaden the scope of GrvA-dependent regulation and its role in EHEC pathogenesis. IMPORTANCE Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) is an intestinal human pathogen causing acute hemorrhagic colitis and life-threatening hemolytic-uremic syndrome. For successful transmission and gut colonization, EHEC relies on the glutamate-dependent acid resistance (GDAR) system and a type III secretion apparatus, encoded on the LEE pathogenicity island. This study investigates the mechanism whereby the DNA-binding regulator GrvA coordinates activation of the LEE with

  1. The use of quaternised chitosan-loaded PMMA to inhibit biofilm formation and downregulate the virulence-associated gene expression of antibiotic-resistant staphylococcus.

    PubMed

    Tan, Honglue; Peng, Zhaoxiang; Li, Qingtian; Xu, Xiaofen; Guo, Shengrong; Tang, Tingting

    2012-01-01

    also downregulated the expression of MecA, which encodes membrane-bound enzymes known to be penicillin-binding proteins. Our study indicates that 26%HACC-loaded PMMA prevents biofilm formation of Staphylococcus, including antibiotic-resistant strains, on the surface of bone cement, and downregulates the virulence-associated gene expression of antibiotic-resistant staphylococcus, thus providing a promising new strategy for combating implant infections and osteomyelitis.

  2. Alteration of the Microbiota and Virulence Gene Expression in E. coli O157:H7 in Pig Ligated Intestine with and without AE Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hai; Feng, Yanni; Ying, Xin; Gong, Joshua; Gyles, Carlton L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Previously we found that E. coli O157:H7 inoculated into ligated pig intestine formed attaching and effacing (AE) lesions in some pigs but not in others. The present study evaluated changes in the microbial community and in virulence gene expression in E. coli O157:H7 in ligated pig intestine in which the bacteria formed AE lesions or failed to form AE lesions. Methodology/Principal Findings The intestinal microbiota was assessed by RNA-based denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis. The DGGE banding patterns showed distinct differences involving two bands which had increased intensity specifically in AE-negative pigs (AE- bands) and several bands which were more abundant in AE-positive pigs. Sequence analysis revealed that the two AE- bands belonged to Veillonella caviae, a species with probiotic properties, and Bacteroides sp. Concurrent with the differences in microbiota, gene expression analysis by quantitative PCR showed that, compared with AE negative pigs, E. coli O157:H7 in AE positive pigs had upregulated genes for putative adhesins, non-LEE encoded nleA and quorum sensing qseF, acid resistance gene ureD, and genes from the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE). Conclusions/Significance The present study demonstrated that AE-positive pigs had reduced activities or populations of Veillonella caviae and Bacterioides sp. compared with AE-negative pigs. Further studies are required to understand how the microbiota was changed and the role of these organisms in the control of E. coli O157:H7. PMID:26090813

  3. Expression of the LspA1 and LspA2 proteins by Haemophilus ducreyi is required for virulence in human volunteers.

    PubMed

    Janowicz, Diane M; Fortney, Kate R; Katz, Barry P; Latimer, Jo L; Deng, Kaiping; Hansen, Eric J; Spinola, Stanley M

    2004-08-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi colocalizes with polymorphonuclear leukocytes and macrophages and evades phagocytosis during experimental infection of human volunteers. H. ducreyi contains two genes, lspA1 and lspA2, which encode predicted proteins of 456 and 543 kDa, respectively. Compared to its wild-type parent, an lspA1 lspA2 double mutant does not inhibit phagocytosis by macrophage and myelocytic cell lines in vitro and is attenuated in an experimental rabbit model of chancroid. To test whether expression of LspA1 and LspA2 was necessary for virulence in humans, six volunteers were experimentally infected. Each volunteer was inoculated with three doses (ranging from 85 to 112 CFU) of the parent (35000HP) in one arm and three doses (ranging from 60 to 822 CFU) of the mutant (35000HP Omega 12) in the other arm. The papule formation rates were 88% (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 76.8 to 99.9%) at 18 parent sites and 72% (95% CI, 44.4 to 99.9%) at 18 mutant sites (P = 0.19). However, papules were significantly smaller at mutant sites (mean size, 24.8 mm(2)) than at parent sites (mean size, 39.1 mm(2)) 24 h after inoculation (P = 0.0002). The pustule formation rates were 44% (95% CI, 5.8 to 77.6%) at parent sites and 0% (95% CI, 0 to 39.4%) at mutant sites (P = 0.009). With the caveat that biosafety regulations preclude testing of a complemented mutant in human subjects, these results indicate that expression of LspA1 and LspA2 facilitates the ability of H. ducreyi to initiate disease and to progress to pustule formation in humans.

  4. Phosphate Limitation Induces Drastic Physiological Changes, Virulence-Related Gene Expression, and Secondary Metabolite Production in Pseudovibrio sp. Strain FO-BEG1

    PubMed Central

    González, José M.; Bondarev, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Phosphorus is a vital nutrient for living organisms and is obtained by bacteria primarily via phosphate uptake. However, phosphate is often scarcely accessible in nature, and there is evidence that in many areas of the ocean, its concentration limits bacterial growth. Surprisingly, the phosphate starvation response has been extensively investigated in different model organisms (e.g., Escherichia coli), but there is a dearth of studies on heterotrophic marine bacteria. In this work, we describe the response of Pseudovibrio sp. strain FO-BEG1, a metabolically versatile alphaproteobacterium and potential symbiont of marine sponges, to phosphate limitation. We compared the physiology, protein expression, and secondary metabolite production under phosphate-limited conditions to those under phosphate surplus conditions. We observed that phosphate limitation had a pleiotropic effect on the physiology of the strain, triggering cell elongation, the accumulation of polyhydroxyalkanoate, the degradation of polyphosphate, and the exchange of membrane lipids in favor of phosphorus-free lipids such as sulfoquinovosyl diacylglycerols. Many proteins involved in the uptake and degradation of phospho-organic compounds were upregulated, together with subunits of the ABC transport system for phosphate. Under conditions of phosphate limitation, FO-BEG1 secreted compounds into the medium that conferred an intense yellow coloration to the cultures. Among these compounds, we identified the potent antibiotic tropodithietic acid. Finally, toxin-like proteins and other proteins likely involved in the interaction with the eukaryotic host were also upregulated. Altogether, our data suggest that phosphate limitation leads to a pronounced reorganization of FO-BEG1 physiology, involving phosphorus, carbon, and sulfur metabolism; cell morphology; secondary metabolite production; and the expression of virulence-related genes. PMID:25769826

  5. Implementation of a novel in vitro model of infection of reconstituted human epithelium for expression of virulence genes in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from catheter-related infections in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) are clinically relevant pathogens that cause severe catheter-related nosocomial infections driven by several virulence factors. Methods We implemented a novel model of infection in vitro of reconstituted human epithelium (RHE) to analyze the expression patterns of virulence genes in 21 MRSA strains isolated from catheter-related infections in Mexican patients undergoing haemodialysis. We also determined the phenotypic and genotypic co-occurrence of antibiotic- and disinfectant-resistance traits in the S. aureus strains, which were also analysed by pulsed-field-gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Results In this study, MRSA strains isolated from haemodialysis catheter-related infections expressed virulence markers that mediate adhesion to, and invasion of, RHE. The most frequent pattern of expression (present in 47.6% of the strains) was as follows: fnbA, fnbB, spa, clfA, clfB, cna, bbp, ebps, eap, sdrC, sdrD, sdrE, efb, icaA, and agr. Seventy-one percent of the strains harboured the antibiotic- and disinfectant-resistance genes ermA, ermB, tet(M), tet(K), blaZ, qacA, qacB, and qacC. PFGE of the isolated MRSA revealed three identical strains and two pairs of identical strains. The strains with identical PFGE patterns showed the same phenotypes and genotypes, including the same spa type (t895), suggesting hospital personnel manipulating the haemodialysis equipment could be the source of catheter contamination. Conclusion These findings help define the prevalence of MRSA virulence factors in catheter-related infections. Some of the products of the expressed genes that we detected in this work may serve as potential antigens for inclusion in a vaccine for the prevention of MRSA-catheter-related infections. PMID:24405688

  6. Cloning, Expression, and Functional Characterization of Serine Protease Aprv2 from Virulent Isolate Dichelobacter nodosus of Indian Origin.

    PubMed

    Wani, Aasim Habib; Sharma, Mandeep; Salwan, Richa; Singh, Geetanjali; Chahota, Rajesh; Verma, Subhash

    2016-10-01

    A gene encoding an extracellular protease from Dichelobacter nodosus was characterized and expressed in E. coli rosetta-gami (DE3). The nucleotide sequence analysis revealed an ORF of 1427 bp ecoding 475 amino acids long protein of calculated molecular weight 50.6 kDa and pI value 6.09. The phylogenetic analysis showed relatedness to subtilisin-like serine proteases of peptidase S8 family. The amino acid sequence analysis showed presence of N-terminal pre-peptide (1-23 aa), pro-peptide (24-160 aa), peptidase S8 domain (161-457 aa), and a C-terminal extension (458-475 aa). The gene harboring native signal peptide was expressed in pET-22b(+) for production of AprV2 recombinant protein. SDS-PAGE revealed the highest production of IPTG induced recombinant protein ∼37 kDa at 16 °C after 16 h. The purified protein after Ni-NTA affinity chromatography showed single protein band of ∼37 kDa which was also confirmed by the detection of blue coloured band of same size in Western blotting. The recombinant protein showed activity over broad temperature and pH range with optimum at 35 °C and pH 7.0. Similarly, the enzyme was stable over broad range 15-65 °C and 4-10 pH with maximum stability at 25 °C and pH 6. The activity of purified enzyme was also stimulated in the presence of Ca(2+). The purified enzyme showed highest activity towards casein as compared to gelatin and BSA. These findings suggest AprV2 as an important candidate for industrial applications such as pharmaceuticals.

  7. Bacterial proteases and virulence.

    PubMed

    Frees, Dorte; Brøndsted, Lone; Ingmer, Hanne

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens rely on proteolysis for variety of purposes during the infection process. In the cytosol, the main proteolytic players are the conserved Clp and Lon proteases that directly contribute to virulence through the timely degradation of virulence regulators and indirectly by providing tolerance to adverse conditions such as those experienced in the host. In the membrane, HtrA performs similar functions whereas the extracellular proteases, in close contact with host components, pave the way for spreading infections by degrading host matrix components or interfering with host cell signalling to short-circuit host cell processes. Common to both intra- and extracellular proteases is the tight control of their proteolytic activities. In general, substrate recognition by the intracellular proteases is highly selective which is, in part, attributed to the chaperone activity associated with the proteases either encoded within the same polypeptide or on separate subunits. In contrast, substrate recognition by extracellular proteases is less selective and therefore these enzymes are generally expressed as zymogens to prevent premature proteolytic activity that would be detrimental to the cell. These extracellular proteases are activated in complex cascades involving auto-processing and proteolytic maturation. Thus, proteolysis has been adopted by bacterial pathogens at multiple levels to ensure the success of the pathogen in contact with the human host.

  8. Regulation and secretion of Xanthomonas virulence factors.

    PubMed

    Büttner, Daniela; Bonas, Ulla

    2010-03-01

    Plant pathogenic bacteria of the genus Xanthomonas cause a variety of diseases in economically important monocotyledonous and dicotyledonous crop plants worldwide. Successful infection and bacterial multiplication in the host tissue often depend on the virulence factors secreted including adhesins, polysaccharides, LPS and degradative enzymes. One of the key pathogenicity factors is the type III secretion system, which injects effector proteins into the host cell cytosol to manipulate plant cellular processes such as basal defense to the benefit of the pathogen. The coordinated expression of bacterial virulence factors is orchestrated by quorum-sensing pathways, multiple two-component systems and transcriptional regulators such as Clp, Zur, FhrR, HrpX and HpaR. Furthermore, virulence gene expression is post-transcriptionally controlled by the RNA-binding protein RsmA. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on the infection strategies and regulatory networks controlling secreted virulence factors from Xanthomonas species.

  9. Microbiology: EHEC downregulates virulence in response to intestinal fucose.

    PubMed

    Keeney, Kristie M; Finlay, B Brett

    2013-02-04

    Recent work has revealed that enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli encodes a two-component system, termed FusKR, which responds to fucose and represses expression of virulence genes. Furthermore, a representative member of the microbiota appears to cleave fucose from host glycans, indicating that the microbiota and EHEC may act in concert to suppress virulence gene expression.

  10. ProNodal acts via FGFR3 to govern duration of Shh expression in the prechordal mesoderm

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Pamela S.; Burbridge, Sarah; Soubes, Sandrine; Ohyama, Kyoji; Ben-Haim, Nadav; Chen, Canhe; Dale, Kim; Shen, Michael M.; Constam, Daniel; Placzek, Marysia

    2015-01-01

    The secreted glycoprotein sonic hedgehog (Shh) is expressed in the prechordal mesoderm, where it plays a crucial role in induction and patterning of the ventral forebrain. Currently little is known about how Shh is regulated in prechordal tissue. Here we show that in the embryonic chick, Shh is expressed transiently in prechordal mesoderm, and is governed by unprocessed Nodal. Exposure of prechordal mesoderm microcultures to Nodal-conditioned medium, the Nodal inhibitor CerS, or to an ALK4/5/7 inhibitor reveals that Nodal is required to maintain both Shh and Gsc expression, but whereas Gsc is largely maintained through canonical signalling, Nodal signals through a non-canonical route to maintain Shh. Further, Shh expression can be maintained by a recombinant Nodal cleavage mutant, proNodal, but not by purified mature Nodal. A number of lines of evidence suggest that proNodal acts via FGFR3. ProNodal and FGFR3 co-immunoprecipitate and proNodal increases FGFR3 tyrosine phosphorylation. In microcultures, soluble FGFR3 abolishes Shh without affecting Gsc expression. Further, prechordal mesoderm cells in which Fgfr3 expression is reduced by Fgfr3 siRNA fail to bind to proNodal. Finally, targeted electroporation of Fgfr3 siRNA to prechordal mesoderm in vivo results in premature Shh downregulation without affecting Gsc. We report an inverse correlation between proNodal-FGFR3 signalling and pSmad1/5/8, and show that proNodal-FGFR3 signalling antagonises BMP-mediated pSmad1/5/8 signalling, which is poised to downregulate Shh. Our studies suggest that proNodal/FGFR3 signalling governs Shh duration by repressing canonical BMP signalling, and that local BMPs rapidly silence Shh once endogenous Nodal-FGFR3 signalling is downregulated. PMID:26417042

  11. Gene duplication, silencing and expression alteration govern the molecular evolution of PRC2 genes in plants.

    PubMed

    Furihata, Hazuka Y; Suenaga, Kazuya; Kawanabe, Takahiro; Yoshida, Takanori; Kawabe, Akira

    2016-10-13

    PRC2 genes were analyzed for their number of gene duplications, dN/dS ratios and expression patterns among Brassicaceae and Gramineae species. Although both amino acid sequences and copy number of the PRC2 genes were generally well conserved in both Brassicaceae and Gramineae species, we observed that some rapidly evolving genes experienced duplications and expression pattern changes. After multiple duplication events, all but one or two of the duplicated copies tend to be silenced. Silenced copies were reactivated in the endosperm and showed ectopic expression in developing seeds. The results indicated that rapid evolution of some PRC2 genes is initially caused by a relaxation of selective constraint following the gene duplication events. Several loci could become maternally expressed imprinted genes and acquired functional roles in the endosperm.

  12. Epigenetic reprogramming governs EcSOD expression during human mammary epithelial cell differentiation, tumorigenesis and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Teoh-Fitzgerald, ML; Fitzgerald, MP; Zhong, W; Askeland, RW; Domann, FE

    2013-01-01

    Expression of the antioxidant enzyme EcSOD in normal human mammary epithelial cells was not recognized until recently. Although expression of EcSOD was not detectable in non-malignant human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) cultured in conventional two-dimensional (2D) culture conditions, EcSOD protein expression was observed in normal human breast tissues, suggesting that the 2D-cultured condition induces a repressive status of EcSOD gene expression in HMEC. With the use of laminin-enriched extracellular matrix (lrECM), we were able to detect expression of EcSOD when HMEC formed polarized acinar structures in a 3D-culture condition. Repression of the EcSOD-gene expression was again seen when the HMEC acini were sub-cultured as a monolayer, implying that lrECM-induced acinar morphogenesis is essential in EcSOD-gene activation. We have further shown the involvement of DNA methylation in regulating EcSOD expression in HMEC under these cell culture conditions. EcSOD mRNA expression was strongly induced in the 2D-cultured HMEC after treatment with a DNA methyltransferase inhibitor. In addition, epigenetic analyses showed a decrease in the degree of CpG methylation in the EcSOD promoter in the 3D versus 2D-cultured HMEC. More importantly, >80% of clinical mammary adenocarcinoma samples showed significantly decreased EcSOD mRNA and protein expression levels compared with normal mammary tissues and there is an inverse correlation between the expression levels of EcSOD and the clinical stages of breast cancer. Combined bisulfite restriction analysis analysis of some of the tumors also revealed an association of DNA methylation with the loss of EcSOD expression in vivo. Furthermore, overexpression of EcSOD inhibited breast cancer metastasis in both the experimental lung metastasis model and the syngeneic mouse model. This study suggests that epigenetic silencing of EcSOD may contribute to mammary tumorigenesis and that restoring the extracellular superoxide scavenging

  13. Epigenetic reprogramming governs EcSOD expression during human mammary epithelial cell differentiation, tumorigenesis and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Teoh-Fitzgerald, M L; Fitzgerald, M P; Zhong, W; Askeland, R W; Domann, F E

    2014-01-16

    Expression of the antioxidant enzyme EcSOD in normal human mammary epithelial cells was not recognized until recently. Although expression of EcSOD was not detectable in non-malignant human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) cultured in conventional two-dimensional (2D) culture conditions, EcSOD protein expression was observed in normal human breast tissues, suggesting that the 2D-cultured condition induces a repressive status of EcSOD gene expression in HMEC. With the use of laminin-enriched extracellular matrix (lrECM), we were able to detect expression of EcSOD when HMEC formed polarized acinar structures in a 3D-culture condition. Repression of the EcSOD-gene expression was again seen when the HMEC acini were sub-cultured as a monolayer, implying that lrECM-induced acinar morphogenesis is essential in EcSOD-gene activation. We have further shown the involvement of DNA methylation in regulating EcSOD expression in HMEC under these cell culture conditions. EcSOD mRNA expression was strongly induced in the 2D-cultured HMEC after treatment with a DNA methyltransferase inhibitor. In addition, epigenetic analyses showed a decrease in the degree of CpG methylation in the EcSOD promoter in the 3D versus 2D-cultured HMEC. More importantly, >80% of clinical mammary adenocarcinoma samples showed significantly decreased EcSOD mRNA and protein expression levels compared with normal mammary tissues and there is an inverse correlation between the expression levels of EcSOD and the clinical stages of breast cancer. Combined bisulfite restriction analysis analysis of some of the tumors also revealed an association of DNA methylation with the loss of EcSOD expression in vivo. Furthermore, overexpression of EcSOD inhibited breast cancer metastasis in both the experimental lung metastasis model and the syngeneic mouse model. This study suggests that epigenetic silencing of EcSOD may contribute to mammary tumorigenesis and that restoring the extracellular superoxide scavenging

  14. The RNA-Binding Chaperone Hfq Is an Important Global Regulator of Gene Expression in Pasteurella multocida and Plays a Crucial Role in Production of a Number of Virulence Factors, Including Hyaluronic Acid Capsule

    PubMed Central

    Mégroz, Marianne; Kleifeld, Oded; Wright, Amy; Powell, David; Harrison, Paul; Adler, Ben; Harper, Marina

    2016-01-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Pasteurella multocida is the causative agent of a number of economically important animal diseases, including avian fowl cholera. Numerous P. multocida virulence factors have been identified, including capsule, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and filamentous hemagglutinin, but little is known about how the expression of these virulence factors is regulated. Hfq is an RNA-binding protein that facilitates riboregulation via interaction with small noncoding RNA (sRNA) molecules and their mRNA targets. Here, we show that a P. multocida hfq mutant produces significantly less hyaluronic acid capsule during all growth phases and displays reduced in vivo fitness. Transcriptional and proteomic analyses of the hfq mutant during mid-exponential-phase growth revealed altered transcript levels for 128 genes and altered protein levels for 78 proteins. Further proteomic analyses of the hfq mutant during the early exponential growth phase identified 106 proteins that were produced at altered levels. Both the transcript and protein levels for genes/proteins involved in capsule biosynthesis were reduced in the hfq mutant, as were the levels of the filamentous hemagglutinin protein PfhB2 and its secretion partner LspB2. In contrast, there were increased expression levels of three LPS biosynthesis genes, encoding proteins involved in phosphocholine and phosphoethanolamine addition to LPS, suggesting that these genes are negatively regulated by Hfq-dependent mechanisms. Taken together, these data provide the first evidence that Hfq plays a crucial role in regulating the global expression of P. multocida genes, including the regulation of key P. multocida virulence factors, capsule, LPS, and filamentous hemagglutinin. PMID:26883595

  15. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Virulence and Pathogenesis Issues

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Regulation of gene expression can occur through cell-cell communication or quorum sensing (QS) via the production of small molecules called autoinducers. QS is known to control expression of a number of virulence factors. Another form of gene regulation which allows the bacteria to rapidly adapt t...

  16. Evolution of virulence when transmission occurs before disease.

    PubMed

    Osnas, Erik E; Dobson, Andrew P

    2010-08-23

    Most models of virulence evolution assume that transmission and virulence are constant during an infection. In many viral (HIV and influenza), bacterial (TB) and prion (BSE and CWD) systems, disease-induced mortality occurs long after the host becomes infectious. Therefore, we constructed a model with two infected classes that differ in transmission rate and virulence in order to understand how the evolutionarily stable strategy (ESS) depends on the relative difference in transmission and virulence between classes, on the transition rate between classes and on the recovery rate from the second class. We find that ESS virulence decreases when expressed early in the infection or when transmission occurs late in an infection. When virulence occurred relatively equally in each class and there was disease recovery, ESS virulence increased with increased transition rate. In contrast, ESS virulence first increased and then decreased with transition rate when there was little virulence early in the infection and a rapid recovery rate. This model predicts that ESS virulence is highly dependent on the timing of transmission and pathology after infection; thus, pathogen evolution may either increase or decrease virulence after emergence in a new host.

  17. Virulence reaction norms across a food gradient.

    PubMed Central

    Bedhomme, Stephanie; Agnew, Philip; Sidobre, Christine; Michalakis, Yannis

    2004-01-01

    Host-parasite interactions involve competition for nutritional resources between hosts and the parasites growing within them. Consuming part of a host's resources is one cause of a parasite's virulence, i.e. part of the fitness cost imposed on the host by the parasite. The influence of a host's nutritional conditions on the virulence of a parasite was experimentally tested using the mosquito Aedes aegypti and the microsporidian parasite Vavraia culicis. A condition-dependent expression of virulence was found and a positive relation between virulence and transmissibility was established. Spore production was positively influenced by host food availability, indicating that the parasite's within-host growth is limited by host condition. We also investigated how the fitness of each partner varied across the nutritional gradient and demonstrated that the sign of the correlation between host fitness and parasite fitness depended on the amount of nutritional resources available to the host. PMID:15209108

  18. Exopolyphosphatase of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is essential for the production of virulence factors, and its expression is controlled by NtrC and PhoB acting at two interspaced promoters.

    PubMed

    Gallarato, Lucas A; Sánchez, Diego G; Olvera, Leticia; Primo, Emiliano D; Garrido, Mónica N; Beassoni, Paola R; Morett, Enrique; Lisa, Angela T

    2014-02-01

    The exopolyphosphatase (Ppx) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is encoded by the PA5241 gene (ppx). Ppx catalyses the hydrolysis of inorganic polyphosphates to orthophosphate (Pi). In the present work, we identified and characterized the promoter region of ppx and its regulation under environmental stress conditions. The role of Ppx in the production of several virulence factors was demonstrated through studies performed on a ppx null mutant. We found that ppx is under the control of two interspaced promoters, dually regulated by nitrogen and phosphate limitation. Under nitrogen-limiting conditions, its expression was controlled from a σ(54)-dependent promoter activated by the response regulator NtrC. However, under Pi limitation, the expression was controlled from a σ(70) promoter, activated by PhoB. Results obtained from the ppx null mutant demonstrated that Ppx is involved in the production of virulence factors associated with both acute infection (e.g. motility-promoting factors, blue/green pigment production, C6-C12 quorum-sensing homoserine lactones) and chronic infection (e.g. rhamnolipids, biofilm formation). Molecular and physiological approaches used in this study indicated that P. aeruginosa maintains consistently proper levels of Ppx regardless of environmental conditions. The precise control of ppx expression appeared to be essential for the survival of P. aeruginosa and the occurrence of either acute or chronic infection in the host.

  19. Cloning, expression, purification and crystallization of a pair of novel virulence factors, SghA and SghR, from Agrobacterium tumefaciens

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Fuzhou; Wang, Chao; Fu, Qinqin; Zhang, Lian-hui; Gao, Yong-gui

    2015-08-25

    The crystallization of the novel virulence factors SghA and SghR is reported. Two proteins, SghA and SghR, which were recently identified and characterized as novel bacterial virulence factors regulating the infection of plant hosts by Agrobacterium, were cloned, overexpressed and purified with high yield. Both SghA and SghR form dimers in solution. The purified SghA and SghR were crystallized and the crystals diffracted to 1.9 and 2.1 Å resolution, respectively. Data were collected and processed, and the crystallographic parameters were within acceptable ranges. These results will help in the determination of their structures in order to uncover the molecular mechanism of how these two proteins together control the release of plant defence signals against agrobacteria during pathogen–host interaction.

  20. Apoglobin Stability Is the Major Factor Governing both Cell-free and in Vivo Expression of Holomyoglobin*♦

    PubMed Central

    Samuel, Premila P.; Smith, Lucian P.; Phillips, George N.; Olson, John S.

    2015-01-01

    Expression levels in animal muscle tissues and in Escherichia coli vary widely for naturally occurring mammalian myoglobins (Mb). To explore this variation, we developed an in vitro transcription and wheat germ extract-based translation assay to examine quantitatively the factors that govern expression of holoMb. We constructed a library of naturally occurring Mbs from two terrestrial and four deep-diving aquatic mammals and three distal histidine mutants designed to enhance apoglobin stability but decrease hemin affinity. A strong linear correlation is observed between cell-free expression levels of holo-metMb variants and their corresponding apoglobin stabilities, which were measured independently by guanidine HCl-induced unfolding titrations using purified proteins. In contrast, there is little dependence of expression on hemin affinity. Our results confirm quantitatively that deep diving mammals have highly stable Mbs that express to higher levels in animal myocytes, E. coli, and the wheat germ cell-free system than Mbs from terrestrial mammals. Our theoretical analyses show that the rate of aggregation of unfolded apoMb is very large, and as a result, the key factor for high level expression of holoMb, and presumably other heme proteins, is an ultra high fraction of folded, native apoglobin that is capable of rapidly binding hemin. This fraction is determined by the overall equilibrium folding constant and not hemin affinity. These results also demonstrate that the cell-free transcription/translation system can be used as a high throughput platform to screen for apoglobin stability without the need to generate large amounts of protein for in vitro unfolding measurements. PMID:26205820

  1. Antimicrobial decapeptide KSL-W attenuates Candida albicans virulence by modulating its effects on Toll-like receptor, human β-defensin, and cytokine expression by engineered human oral mucosa.

    PubMed

    Semlali, A; Leung, K P; Curt, S; Rouabhia, M

    2011-05-01

    We investigated the toxicity of synthetic antimicrobial decapeptide KSL-W on normal human gingival epithelial cell cultures, its effect on Candida albicans adhesion and growth, and the activation of epithelial cell innate immunity. Our results indicate that KSL-W had no toxic effect on cell adhesion or growth, suggesting its safe use with human cells. Pre-treating C. albicans with KSL-W attenuated the yeast's virulence as demonstrated by its reduced adhesion and growth on engineered human oral mucosa epithelium and the subsequent decreased expression of some innate defense molecules by targeted epithelial cells. Indeed, the expression of Toll-like receptors and human β-defensins was reduced in tissues infected with KSL-W-treated Candida. Proinflammatory cytokine secretion (IL-1β and IL-6) by the epithelial cells was also regulated by KSL-W in a manner similar to that of antifungal molecule amphotericin B. These findings therefore show that KSL-W is safe for use with human cells and is able to attenuate Candida virulence by modulating its effects on host innate immunity. This study proposes the potential application of KSL-W peptide as an alternative antifungal agent.

  2. Spaceflight Effects on Virulence of Pseudomonas Aeruginosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broadway, S.; Goins, T.; Crandell, C.; Richards, C.; Patel, M.; Pyle, B.

    2008-06-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen found in the environment. It is known to infect the immunocompromised. The organism has about 25 virulence genes that play different roles in disease processes. Several exotoxin proteins may be produced, including ExoA, ExoS, ExoT and ExoY, and other virulence factors. In spaceflight, possible increased expression of P. aeruginosa virulence proteins could increase health risks for spaceflight crews who experience decreased immunity. Cultures of P. aeruginosa strains PA01 and PA103 grown on orbit on Shuttle Endeavour flight STS-123 vs. static ground controls were used for analysis. The production of ETA was quantitated using an ELISA procedure. Results showed that while flight cultures of PA103 produced slightly more ETA than corresponding ground controls, the opposite was found for PA01. While it appears that spaceflight has little effect on ETA, stimulation of other virulence factors could cause increased virulence of this organism in space flight. Similar increased virulence in spaceflight has been observed for other bacteria. This is important because astronauts may be more susceptible to opportunistic pathogens including P. aeruginosa.

  3. Mechanism Governing Human Kappa-Opioid Receptor Expression under Desferrioxamine-Induced Hypoxic Mimic Condition in Neuronal NMB Cells

    PubMed Central

    Babcock, Jennifer; Herrera, Alberto; Coricor, George; Karch, Christopher; Liu, Alexander H.; Rivera-Gines, Aida; Ko, Jane L.

    2017-01-01

    Cellular adaptation to hypoxia is a protective mechanism for neurons and relevant to cancer. Treatment with desferrioxamine (DFO) to induce hypoxia reduced the viability of human neuronal NMB cells. Surviving/attached cells exhibited profound increases of expression of the human kappa-opioid receptor (hKOR) and hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α). The functional relationship between hKOR and HIF-1α was investigated using RT-PCR, Western blot, luciferase reporter, mutagenesis, siRNA and receptor-ligand binding assays. In surviving neurons, DFO increased HIF-1α expression and its amount in the nucleus. DFO also dramatically increased hKOR expression. Two (designated as HIFC and D) out of four potential HIF response elements of the hKOR gene (HIFA–D) synergistically mediated the DFO response. Mutation of both elements completely abolished the DFO-induced effect. The CD11 plasmid (containing HIFC and D with an 11 bp spacing) produced greater augmentation than that of the CD17 plasmid (HIFC and D with a 17 bp-spacing), suggesting that a proper topological interaction of these elements synergistically enhanced the promoter activity. HIF-1α siRNA knocked down the increase of endogenous HIF-1α messages and diminished the DFO-induced increase of hKOR expression. Increased hKOR expression resulted in the up-regulation of hKOR protein. In conclusion, the adaptation of neuronal hKOR under hypoxia was governed by HIF-1, revealing a new mechanism of hKOR regulation. PMID:28117678

  4. A functionally conserved Zn2 Cys6 binuclear cluster transcription factor class regulates necrotrophic effector gene expression and host-specific virulence of two major Pleosporales fungal pathogens of wheat.

    PubMed

    Rybak, Kasia; See, Pao Theen; Phan, Huyen T T; Syme, Robert A; Moffat, Caroline S; Oliver, Richard P; Tan, Kar-Chun

    2017-04-01

    The fungus Parastagonospora nodorum is the causal agent of Septoria nodorum blotch of wheat (Triticum aestivum). The interaction is mediated by multiple fungal necrotrophic effector-dominant host sensitivity gene interactions. The three best-characterized effector-sensitivity gene systems are SnToxA-Tsn1, SnTox1-Snn1 and SnTox3-Snn3. These effector genes are highly expressed during early infection, but expression decreases as the infection progresses to tissue necrosis and sporulation. However, the mechanism of regulation is unknown. We have identified and functionally characterized a gene, referred to as PnPf2, which encodes a putative zinc finger transcription factor. PnPf2 deletion resulted in the down-regulation of SnToxA and SnTox3 expression. Virulence on Tsn1 and Snn3 wheat cultivars was strongly reduced. The SnTox1-Snn1 interaction remained unaffected. Furthermore, we have also identified and deleted an orthologous PtrPf2 from the tan spot fungus Pyrenophora tritici-repentis which possesses a near-identical ToxA that was acquired from P. nodorum via horizontal gene transfer. PtrPf2 deletion also resulted in the down-regulation of PtrToxA expression and a near-complete loss of virulence on Tsn1 wheat. We have demonstrated, for the first time, evidence for a functionally conserved signalling component that plays a role in the regulation of a common/horizontally transferred effector found in two major fungal pathogens of wheat.

  5. Extent of flow recirculation governs expression of atherosclerotic and thrombotic biomarkers in arterial bifurcations

    PubMed Central

    Martorell, Jordi; Santomá, Pablo; Kolandaivelu, Kumaran; Kolachalama, Vijaya B.; Melgar-Lesmes, Pedro; Molins, José J.; Garcia, Lawrence; Edelman, Elazer R.; Balcells, Mercedes

    2014-01-01

    Aims Atherogenesis, evolution of plaque, and outcomes following endovascular intervention depend heavily on the unique vascular architecture of each individual. Patient-specific, multiscale models able to correlate changes in microscopic cellular responses with relevant macroscopic flow, and structural conditions may help understand the progression of occlusive arterial disease, providing insights into how to mitigate adverse responses in specific settings and individuals. Methods and results Vascular architectures mimicking coronary and carotid bifurcations were derived from clinical imaging and used to generate conjoint computational meshes for in silico analysis and biocompatible scaffolds for in vitro models. In parallel with three-dimensional flow simulations, geometrically realistic scaffolds were seeded with human smooth muscle cells (SMC) or endothelial cells and exposed to relevant, physiological flows. In vitro surrogates of endothelial health, atherosclerotic progression, and thrombosis were locally quantified and correlated best with an quantified extent of flow recirculation occurring within the bifurcation models. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein uptake, monocyte adhesion, and tissue factor expression locally rose up to three-fold, and phosphorylated endothelial nitric oxide synthase and Krüppel-like factor 2 decreased up to two-fold in recirculation areas. Isolated testing in straight-tube idealized constructs subject to static, oscillatory, and pulsatile conditions, indicative of different recirculant conditions corroborated these flow-mediated dependencies. Conclusions Flow drives variations in vascular reactivity and vascular beds. Endothelial health was preserved by arterial flow but jeopardized in regions of flow recirculation in a quasi-linear manner. Similarly, SMC exposed to flow were more thrombogenic in large recirculating regions. Health, thrombosis, and atherosclerosis biomarkers correlate with the extent of recirculation in vascular

  6. Virulence factors in Escherichia coli urinary tract infection.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, J R

    1991-01-01

    Uropathogenic strains of Escherichia coli are characterized by the expression of distinctive bacterial properties, products, or structures referred to as virulence factors because they help the organism overcome host defenses and colonize or invade the urinary tract. Virulence factors of recognized importance in the pathogenesis of urinary tract infection (UTI) include adhesins (P fimbriae, certain other mannose-resistant adhesins, and type 1 fimbriae), the aerobactin system, hemolysin, K capsule, and resistance to serum killing. This review summarizes the virtual explosion of information regarding the epidemiology, biochemistry, mechanisms of action, and genetic basis of these urovirulence factors that has occurred in the past decade and identifies areas in need of further study. Virulence factor expression is more common among certain genetically related groups of E. coli which constitute virulent clones within the larger E. coli population. In general, the more virulence factors a strain expresses, the more severe an infection it is able to cause. Certain virulence factors specifically favor the development of pyelonephritis, others favor cystitis, and others favor asymptomatic bacteriuria. The currently defined virulence factors clearly contribute to the virulence of wild-type strains but are usually insufficient in themselves to transform an avirulent organism into a pathogen, demonstrating that other as-yet-undefined virulence properties await discovery. Virulence factor testing is a useful epidemiological and research tool but as yet has no defined clinical role. Immunological and biochemical anti-virulence factor interventions are effective in animal models of UTI and hold promise for the prevention of UTI in humans. Images PMID:1672263

  7. Regulation of virulence: The rise and fall of gastrointestinal pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Kitamoto, Sho; Nagao-Kitamoto, Hiroko; Kuffa, Peter; Kamada, Nobuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Colonization resistance by the commensal microbiota is a key defense against infectious pathogens in the gastrointestinal tract. The microbiota directly competes with incoming pathogens by occupying the colonization niche, depleting nutrients in the gut lumen as well as indirectly inhibiting the growth of pathogens through activation of host immunity. Enteric pathogens have evolved strategies to cope with microbiota-mediated colonization resistance. Pathogens utilize a wide array of virulence factors to outcompete their commensal rivals in the gut. However, since the expression of virulence factors is costly to maintain and reduces bacterial fitness, pathogens need to regulate their virulence properly in order to maximize their fitness. To this end, most pathogens use environmental cues to regulate their virulence gene expression. Thus, a dynamic regulation of virulence factor expression is a key invasion strategy utilized by enteric pathogens. On the other hand, host immunity selectively targets virulent pathogens in order to counter infection in the gut. The host immune system is generally tolerant of harmless microorganisms, such as the commensal microbiota. Moreover, the host relies on its commensal microbiota to contribute, in concert with its immune system, to the elimination of pathogens. Collectively, regulation of virulence determines the fate of enteric pathogens, from the establishment of infection to the eventual elimination. Here, we will review the dynamics of virulence and its role in infection. PMID:26553054

  8. Rapid Identification of Bacterial Virulence Factors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-15

    important to glutamate metabolism, which may be a crucial determinant of M tuberculosis survival and growth within infected cells. M tuberculosis GDH...never be expressed in laboratory-grown cultures or identified in host infected tissue investigations would be available for investigation. The... infected tissue investigations would be available for investigation. The ultimate objective of this project is to identify potential virulence

  9. Virulence Plasmid (pYV)-Associated Expression of Phenotypic Virulent Determinants in Pathogenic Yersinia Species: A Convenient Method for Monitoring the Presence of pYV under Culture Conditions and Its Application for Isolation/Detection of Yersinia pestis in Food

    PubMed Central

    Bhaduri, Saumya; Smith, James L.

    2011-01-01

    In Yersinia pestis, Y. pseudotuberculosis, and Y. enterocolitica, phenotypic expression of virulence plasmid (pYV: 70-kb)-associated genetic determinants may include low-calcium response (Lcr, pinpoint colony, size = 0.36 mm), colony morphology (size = 1.13 mm), crystal violet (CV) binding (dark-violet colony), Congo Red (CR) uptake (red pinpoint colony, size = 0.36 mm), autoagglutination (AA = cells agglutinate), and hydrophobicity (HP = clumping of cells). Y. pseudotuberculosis is chromosomally closely related to Y. pestis; whereas, Y. enterocolitica is chromosomally more distantly related to Y. pestis and Y. pseudotuberculosis. All three species demonstrate Lcr, CV binding, and CR uptake. The colony morphology/size, AA, and HP characteristics are expressed in both Y. pseudotuberculosis and Y. enterocolitica but not in Y. pestis. Congo red uptake in Y. pestis was demonstrated only on calcium-deficient CR magnesium oxalate tryptic soy agar (CR-MOX), whereas this phenotype was expressed on both CR-MOX and low-calcium agarose media in Y. pseudotuberculosis and Y. enterocolitica. These phenotypes were detectable at 37°C within 24 h in Y. enterocolitica and Y. pseudotuberculosis but did not appear until 48 h in Y. pestis due to its slower growth rate at 37°C. The pYV is unstable (i.e., easily lost under a variety of culture conditions) in all three species but is more unstable in Y. pestis. The specific CR uptake by Y. pestis in CR-MOX and the delayed time interval to express Lcr and CR uptake provide a means to differentiate Y. pestis from Y. enterocolitica and Y. pseudotuberculosis. These differences in pYV expression in Y. pestis can be used for its isolation and detection in food. PMID:22567340

  10. Cryptosporidium Pathogenicity and Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Bouzid, Maha; Chalmers, Rachel M.; Tyler, Kevin M.

    2013-01-01

    Cryptosporidium is a protozoan parasite of medical and veterinary importance that causes gastroenteritis in a variety of vertebrate hosts. Several studies have reported different degrees of pathogenicity and virulence among Cryptosporidium species and isolates of the same species as well as evidence of variation in host susceptibility to infection. The identification and validation of Cryptosporidium virulence factors have been hindered by the renowned difficulties pertaining to the in vitro culture and genetic manipulation of this parasite. Nevertheless, substantial progress has been made in identifying putative virulence factors for Cryptosporidium. This progress has been accelerated since the publication of the Cryptosporidium parvum and C. hominis genomes, with the characterization of over 25 putative virulence factors identified by using a variety of immunological and molecular techniques and which are proposed to be involved in aspects of host-pathogen interactions from adhesion and locomotion to invasion and proliferation. Progress has also been made in the contribution of host factors that are associated with variations in both the severity and risk of infection. Here we provide a review comprised of the current state of knowledge on Cryptosporidium infectivity, pathogenesis, and transmissibility in light of our contemporary understanding of microbial virulence. PMID:23297262

  11. Genetically manipulated virulence of Yersinia enterocolitica.

    PubMed Central

    Heesemann, J; Algermissen, B; Laufs, R

    1984-01-01

    Mobilizable virulence plasmids of Yersinia enterocolitica of serotypes O:3 and O:9 were constructed by cointegration of a mobilizable vector into the virulence plasmids. The obtained cointegrates were mobilized into plasmidless Y. enterocolitica strains of serotypes O:3, O:5, O:8, and O:9. The transfer experiments revealed the existence of two different subgroups of plasmid-associated traits. (i) Animal virulence functions (mouse lethality and conjuctivitis provocation) were only transferable to plasmid-cured derivatives of virulent parent strains (serotypes O:3, O:8, and O:9), but they were not transferable to Y. enterocolitica antigen reference strains (serotypes O:3 and O:8) or to a plasmidless clinical isolate of serotype O:5. A further striking result was that a serotype O:8 strain regained the mouse lethality trait after receipt of a plasmid from a strain not lethal to mice. These results demonstrate that plasmid-mediated animal virulence functions are not uniformly expressed within Y. enterocolitica. (ii) The second subgroup of plasmid-mediated traits (calcium dependency, surface agglutinogens, HEp-2 cell adherence, and protein release) were transferable to all Y. enterocolitica recipient strains tested (serotypes O:3, O:5, O:8, and O:9 of different origin). For the first time HEp-2 cell adherence and temperature-induced release of five major protein species are described as transferable traits. Images PMID:6480101

  12. Integration of a complex regulatory cascade involving the SirA/BarA and Csr global regulatory systems that controls expression of the Salmonella SPI-1 and SPI-2 virulence regulons through HilD.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Luary C; Yakhnin, Helen; Camacho, Martha I; Georgellis, Dimitris; Babitzke, Paul; Puente, José L; Bustamante, Víctor H

    2011-06-01

    Salmonella pathogenicity islands 1 and 2 (SPI-1 and SPI-2) play key roles in the pathogenesis of Salmonella enterica. Previously, we showed that when Salmonella grows in Luria-Bertani medium, HilD, encoded in SPI-1, first induces the expression of hilA, located in SPI-1, and subsequently of the ssrAB operon, located in SPI-2. These genes code for HilA and the SsrA/B two-component system, the positive regulators of the SPI-1 and SPI-2 regulons respectively. In this study, we demonstrate that CsrA, a global regulatory RNA binding protein, post-transcriptionally regulates hilD expression by directly binding near the Shine-Dalgarno and translation initiation codon sequences of the hilD mRNA, preventing its translation and leading to its accelerated turnover. Negative regulation is counteracted by the global SirA/BarA two-component system, which directly activates the expression of CsrB and CsrC, two non-coding regulatory RNAs that sequester CsrA, thereby preventing it from binding to its target mRNAs. Our results illustrate the integration of global and specific regulators into a multifactorial regulatory cascade controlling the expression of virulence genes acquired by horizontal transfer events.

  13. Identification of gyrB and rpoB gene mutations and differentially expressed proteins between a novobiocin-resistant Aeromonas hydrophila catfish vaccine strain and its virulent parent strain.

    PubMed

    Pridgeon, J W; Yildirim-Aksoy, M; Klesius, P H; Kojima, K; Mobley, J A; Srivastava, K K; Reddy, P G

    2013-10-25

    A total of 10 and 13 missense mutations were found in the deduced gyrB and rpoB proteins, respectively, between avirulent AH11NOVO vaccine strain and its virulent parent strain AH11P. SDS-PAGE revealed that six proteins bands were significantly over-expressed in AH11NOVO whereas five bands were significantly over-expressed in AH11P. Mass spectrometry identified seven proteins from the over-expressed AH11NOVO gel bands and five proteins from the over-expressed AH11P gel bands. QPCR confirmed that all 12 genes corresponding to the proteins identified by mass spectrometry were significantly over-expressed in AH11NOVO or AH11P. When AH11NOVO proteins were subjected to Western blot analysis, 13 protein bands exhibited significantly stronger reactivity with hyper-immune catfish sera. Fifteen proteins were identified from immunogenic protein bands, including six (formate acetyltransferase, chaperone htpG, transketolase, ATP synthase subunit alpha, asparagine-tRNA ligase, and serine hydroxymethyltransferase) that were over-expressed in AH11NOVO proteins and three (elongation factor G, class II fructose-bisphosphate aldolase, and a putative uncharacterized 23 kDa protein) that were over-expressed in AH11P. In addition, the following six proteins were also identified from the immunogenic protein bands: pyruvate dehydrogenase E1 component, ATP synthase subunit beta, ribose-phosphate pyrophosphokinase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, 50S ribosomal L10, and 50S ribosomal L15. Our results might provide insights on how to develop novel efficacious vaccine against Aeromonas hydrophila infection.

  14. Systemic Approach to Virulence Gene Network Analysis for Gaining New Insight into Cryptococcal Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Malachowski, Antoni N.; Yosri, Mohamed; Park, Goun; Bahn, Yong-Sun; He, Yongqun; Olszewski, Michal A.

    2016-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is pathogenic yeast, responsible for highly lethal infections in compromised patients around the globe. C. neoformans typically initiates infections in mammalian lung tissue and subsequently disseminates to the central nervous system where it causes significant pathologies. Virulence genes of C. neoformans are being characterized at an increasing rate, however, we are far from a comprehensive understanding of their roles and genetic interactions. Some of these reported virulence genes are scattered throughout different databases, while others are not yet included. This study gathered and analyzed 150 reported virulence associated factors (VAFs) of C. neoformans. Using the web resource STRING database, our study identified different interactions between the total VAFs and those involved specifically in lung and brain infections and identified a new strain specific virulence gene, SHO1, involved in the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway. As predicted by our analysis, SHO1 expression enhanced C. neoformans virulence in a mouse model of pulmonary infection, contributing to enhanced non-protective immune Th2 bias and progressively enhancing fungal growth in the infected lungs. Sequence analysis indicated 77.4% (116) of total studied VAFs are soluble proteins, and 22.7% (34) are transmembrane proteins. Motifs involved in regulation and signaling such as protein kinases and transcription factors are highly enriched in Cryptococcus VAFs. Altogether, this study represents a pioneering effort in analysis of the virulence composite network of C. neoformans using a systems biology approach. PMID:27833589

  15. Sample collection of virulent and non-virulent B. anthracis and Y. pestis for bioforensics analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hong-geller, Elizabeth; Valdez, Yolanda E; Shou, Yulin; Yoshida, Thomas M; Marrone, Babetta L; Dunbar, John

    2009-01-01

    Validated sample collection methods are needed for recovery of microbial evidence in the event of accidental or intentional release of biological agents into the environment. To address this need, we evaluated the sample recovery efficiencies of two collection methods -- swabs and wipes -- for both non-virulent and virulent strains of B. anthracis and Y. pestis from four types of non-porous surfaces: two hydrophilic surfaces, stainless steel and glass, and two hydrophobic surfaces, vinyl and plastic. Sample recovery was quantified using Real-time qPCR to assay for intact DNA signatures. We found no consistent difference in collection efficiency between swabs or wipes. Furthermore, collection efficiency was more surface-dependent for virulent strains than non-virulent strains. For the two non-virulent strains, B. anthracis Sterne and Y. pestis A1122, collection efficiency was approximately 100% and 1 %, respectively, from all four surfaces. In contrast, recovery of B. anthracis Ames spores and Y. pestis C092 from vinyl and plastic was generally lower compared to collection from glass or stainless steel, suggesting that surface hydrophobicity may playa role in the strength of pathogen adhesion. The surface-dependent collection efficiencies observed with the virulent strains may arise from strain-specific expression of capsular material or other cell surface receptors that alter cell adhesion to specific surfaces. These findings contribute to validation of standard bioforensics procedures and emphasize the importance of specific strain and surface interactions in pathogen detection.

  16. Analysis of mRNA expression for genes associated with regulatory T lymphocytes (CD25, FoxP3, CTLA4, and IDO) after experimental infection with bovine viral diarrhea virus of low or high virulence in beef calves.

    PubMed

    Palomares, Roberto A; Hurley, David J; Woolums, Amelia R; Parrish, Jacqueline E; Brock, Kenny V

    2014-12-01

    Immunosuppression caused by bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) has been associated with lymphocyte depletion, leukopenia and impairment of leukocyte function; however, no work has been done on the relationship between BVDV and regulatory T lymphocytes (Tregs). The objective of this study was to compare the mRNA expression of genes associated with Tregs (CD25, FoxP3, CTLA4, and IDO), after experimental infection of beef calves with low (LV) or high (HV) virulence BVDV. Thirty BVDV-naïve calves were randomly assigned to three groups. Calves were intra-nasally inoculated with LV (n=10, strain SD-1) or HV (n=10, strain 1373) BVDV or BVDV-free cell culture medium (control, n=10). Quantitative RT-PCR was used to determine the expression of target genes in tracheo-bronchial lymph nodes and spleen on day 5 post-infection. The mRNA expression of CD25 was up-regulated in tracheo-bronchial lymph nodes of LV (P<0.05), but not in HV compared to the control group. The expression of FoxP3 and CTLA4 was not increased in tracheo-bronchial lymph nodes of either of the BVDV-inoculated groups. A dramatic up-regulation of IDO mRNA was observed in tracheo-bronchial lymph nodes of LV (P<0.05), but not HV compared to the control calves. In conclusion, experimental infection with BVDV did not provide evidence of Treg activation based on expression of FoxP3 and CTL4. Differential expression of CD25 and IDO mRNA on day 5 post-infection with HV or LV BVDV might reflect temporal differences in transcription occurring during the immune response elicited by these viral strains, or differences in viral infectivity of the host cells.

  17. Membrane lipid composition and stress/virulence related gene expression of Salmonella Enteritidis cells adapted to lactic acid and trisodium phosphate and their resistance to lethal heat and acid stress.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yishan; Kadim, Mellissa Irlianti; Khoo, Wei Jie; Zheng, Qianwang; Setyawati, Magdiel Inggrid; Shin, Yu-Jin; Lee, Seung-Cheol; Yuk, Hyun-Gyun

    2014-11-17

    This study evaluated the acid and heat resistance of Salmonella Enteritidis in simulated gastric fluid (pH 2.0) and during thermal treatment (54-60 °C), respectively, after adaptation to lactic acid (LA) or trisodium phosphate (TSP) at various pHs (pH 5.3-9.0). The changes in membrane lipid composition and expression levels of RpoS and RpoH were examined to elucidate their roles in bacterial stress resistance. Transcriptional profile of several virulence-related genes was also analyzed. Results showed that LA-adapted cells at pH 5.3 and 6.3 had higher acid and heat resistance than control cells and cells adapted to TSP at pH 8.3 and 9.0. LA-adapted cells had the lowest ratio of unsaturated to saturated fatty acids, indicating that they might possess a less fluid membrane. It was observed that the expression levels of RpoH and RpoS were upregulated in TSP-adapted cells but not in LA-adapted cells. Thus, these results indicate that the increased acid and heat resistance of LA-adapted S. Enteritidis was possibly due to the decreased membrane fluidity instead of the upregulation of RpoS and RpoH. About 6.0, 2.1, and 2.46-fold upregulation of spvR, avrA, and hilA were observed in cells adapted to TSP at pH 9.0, except sefA that had its highest expression level in the control cells, indicating that the expression of these virulence genes highly depends on environmental conditions. This is the first study to show that the alteration in the cytoplasmic membrane rather than RpoS and RpoH plays a more crucial role in conferring greater acid and heat resistance on LA-adapted S. Enteritidis, thus providing a better understanding on the bacterial stress response to acidic conditions.

  18. Virulence evolution at the front line of spreading epidemics.

    PubMed

    Griette, Quentin; Raoul, Gaël; Gandon, Sylvain

    2015-11-01

    Understanding and predicting the spatial spread of emerging pathogens is a major challenge for the public health management of infectious diseases. Theoretical epidemiology shows that the speed of an epidemic is governed by the life-history characteristics of the pathogen and its ability to disperse. Rapid evolution of these traits during the invasion may thus affect the speed of epidemics. Here we study the influence of virulence evolution on the spatial spread of an epidemic. At the edge of the invasion front, we show that more virulent and transmissible genotypes are expected to win the competition with other pathogens. Behind the front line, however, more prudent exploitation strategies outcompete virulent pathogens. Crucially, even when the presence of the virulent mutant is limited to the edge of the front, the invasion speed can be dramatically altered by pathogen evolution. We support our analysis with individual-based simulations and we discuss the additional effects of demographic stochasticity taking place at the front line on virulence evolution. We confirm that an increase of virulence can occur at the front, but only if the carrying capacity of the invading pathogen is large enough. These results are discussed in the light of recent empirical studies examining virulence evolution at the edge of spreading epidemics.

  19. Regulation of virulence of Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Marie, Chelsea; Petri, William A

    2014-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is the third-leading cause of parasitic mortality globally. E. histolytica infection generally does not cause symptoms, but the parasite has potent pathogenic potential. The origins, benefits, and triggers of amoebic virulence are complex. Amoebic pathogenesis entails depletion of the host mucosal barrier, adherence to the colonic lumen, cytotoxicity, and invasion of the colonic epithelium. Parasite damage results in colitis and, in some cases, disseminated disease. Both host and parasite genotypes influence the development of disease, as do the regulatory responses they govern at the host-pathogen interface. Host environmental factors determine parasite transmission and shape the colonic microenvironment E. histolytica infects. Here we highlight research that illuminates novel links between host, parasite, and environmental factors in the regulation of E. histolytica virulence.

  20. Cell-Free Spent Media Obtained from Bifidobacterium bifidum and Bifidobacterium crudilactis Grown in Media Supplemented with 3′-Sialyllactose Modulate Virulence Gene Expression in Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Bondue, Pauline; Crèvecoeur, Sébastien; Brose, François; Daube, Georges; Seghaye, Marie-Christine; Griffiths, Mansel W.; LaPointe, Gisèle; Delcenserie, Véronique

    2016-01-01

    Complex oligosaccharides from human milk (HMO) possess an antimicrobial activity and can promote the growth of bifidobacteria such as Bifidobacterium bifidum and Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis. In addition, fermentation of carbohydrates by bifidobacteria can result in the production of metabolites presenting an antivirulence effect on several pathogenic bacteria. Whey is rich in complex bovine milk oligosaccharides (BMO) structurally similar to HMO and B. crudilactis, a species of bovine origin, is able to metabolize some of those complex carbohydrates. This study focused on the ability of B. bifidum and B. crudilactis to grow in a culture medium supplemented in 3′-sialyllactose (3′SL) as the main source of carbon, a major BMO encountered in cow milk. Next, the effects of cell-free spent media (CFSM) were tested against virulence expression of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. Both strains were able to grow in presence of 3′SL, but B. crudilactis showed the best growth (7.92 ± 0.3 log cfu/ml) compared to B. bifidum (6.84 ± 0.9 log cfu/ml). Then, CFSM were tested for their effects on virulence gene expression by ler and hilA promoter activity of luminescent mutants of E. coli and S. Typhimurium, respectively, and on wild type strains of E. coli O157:H7 and S. Typhimurium using RT-qPCR. All CFSM resulted in significant under expression of the ler and hilA genes for the luminescent mutants and ler (ratios of −15.4 and −8.1 respectively) and qseA (ratios of −2.1 and −3.1) for the wild type strain of E. coli O157:H7. The 3′SL, a major BMO, combined with some bifidobacteria strains of bovine or human origin could therefore be an interesting synbiotic to maintain or restore the intestinal health of young children. These effects observed in vitro will be further investigated regarding the overall phenotype of pathogenic agents and the exact nature of the active molecules. PMID:27713728

  1. Transient virulence of emerging pathogens.

    PubMed

    Bolker, Benjamin M; Nanda, Arjun; Shah, Dharmini

    2010-05-06

    Should emerging pathogens be unusually virulent? If so, why? Existing theories of virulence evolution based on a tradeoff between high transmission rates and long infectious periods imply that epidemic growth conditions will select for higher virulence, possibly leading to a transient peak in virulence near the beginning of an epidemic. This transient selection could lead to high virulence in emerging pathogens. Using a simple model of the epidemiological and evolutionary dynamics of emerging pathogens, along with rough estimates of parameters for pathogens such as severe acute respiratory syndrome, West Nile virus and myxomatosis, we estimated the potential magnitude and timing of such transient virulence peaks. Pathogens that are moderately evolvable, highly transmissible, and highly virulent at equilibrium could briefly double their virulence during an epidemic; thus, epidemic-phase selection could contribute significantly to the virulence of emerging pathogens. In order to further assess the potential significance of this mechanism, we bring together data from the literature for the shapes of tradeoff curves for several pathogens (myxomatosis, HIV, and a parasite of Daphnia) and the level of genetic variation for virulence for one (myxomatosis). We discuss the need for better data on tradeoff curves and genetic variance in order to evaluate the plausibility of various scenarios of virulence evolution.

  2. Novel Strategies to Combat Bacterial Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, S.V.; Wiener-Kronish, J.P.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of review Incidences of antimicrobial resistant infections have increased dramatically over the past several decades and are associated with adverse patient outcomes. Alternative approaches to combat infection are critical, and have led to the development of more specific drugs targeted at particular bacterial virulence systems or essential regulatory pathways. The purpose of this review is to highlight the recent developments in anti-bacterial therapy and the novel approaches toward increasing our therapeutic armory against bacterial infection. Recent findings Although classic antibiotic development is not occurring rapidly, alternative therapeutics that target specific bacterial virulence systems are progressing from the discovery stage through the FDA approval process. Here we review novel antibodies that target specific virulence systems as well as a variety of newly discovered small molecules that block bacterial attachment, communication systems (quorum sensing) or important regulatory processes associated with virulence gene expression. Summary The success of novel therapeutics could significantly change clinical practice. Furthermore, the complications of collateral damage due to antibiotic administration e.g. suprainfections or decreased host immunity due to loss of synergistic bacterial communities, may be minimized using therapeutics that specifically target pathogenic behavior. PMID:18787455

  3. Polyamines Are Required for Virulence in Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Jelsbak, Lotte; Thomsen, Line Elnif; Wallrodt, Inke; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal; Olsen, John Elmerdahl

    2012-01-01

    Sensing and responding to environmental cues is a fundamental characteristic of bacterial physiology and virulence. Here we identify polyamines as novel environmental signals essential for virulence of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, a major intracellular pathogen and a model organism for studying typhoid fever. Central to its virulence are two major virulence loci Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 1 and 2 (SPI1 and SPI2). SPI1 promotes invasion of epithelial cells, whereas SPI2 enables S. Typhimurium to survive and proliferate within specialized compartments inside host cells. In this study, we show that an S. Typhimurium polyamine mutant is defective for invasion, intracellular survival, killing of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and systemic infection of the mouse model of typhoid fever. Virulence of the mutant could be restored by genetic complementation, and invasion and intracellular survival could, as well, be complemented by the addition of exogenous putrescine and spermidine to the bacterial cultures prior to infection. Interestingly, intracellular survival of the polyamine mutant was significantly enhanced above the wild type level by the addition of exogenous putrescine and spermidine to the bacterial cultures prior to infection, indicating that these polyamines function as an environmental signal that primes S. Typhimurium for intracellular survival. Accordingly, experiments addressed at elucidating the roles of these polyamines in infection revealed that expression of genes from both of the major virulence loci SPI1 and SPI2 responded to exogenous polyamines and was reduced in the polyamine mutant. Together our data demonstrate that putrescine and spermidine play a critical role in controlling virulence in S. Typhimurium most likely through stimulation of expression of essential virulence loci. Moreover, our data implicate these polyamines as key signals in S. Typhimurium virulence. PMID:22558361

  4. Comparative analysis of the virulence characteristics of epidemic methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains isolated from Chinese children: ST59 MRSA highly expresses core gene-encoded toxin.

    PubMed

    Li, Shipeng; Sun, Jing; Zhang, Jianzhong; Li, Xiangmei; Tao, Xiaoxia; Wang, Lijuan; Sun, Mingjiao; Liu, Yingchao; Li, Juan; Qiao, Yanhong; Yu, Sangjie; Yao, Kaihu; Yang, Yonghong; Shen, Xuzhuang

    2014-02-01

    This study aims to investigate the prevalence of a novel cell wall-anchored protein gene, sasX, and to obtain information on the genetic basis for the pathogenic potential of the MRSA strains isolated from Chinese children. The molecular and virulence characteristics of the clinical strains were analyzed. Twenty-two sequence types (STs) were obtained, with six epidemic clones ST59, ST239, ST1, ST910, ST88, and ST338 accounting for 35.8, 22, 6.6, 6.6, 5.3, and 4.1% respectively. The expression levels of hla, psmα, and RNAIII were higher in ST59 than in other STs (p < 0.05). The sasX gene was detected in 26 (10.7%) MRSA isolates. ST239-MRSA-SCCmecIII-t037 (61.5%) was the predominant sasX-positive MRSA clone. The expressions of PSMα and RNAIII were higher in sasX-positive ST239 isolates than in sasX-negative ST239 ones (p < 0.01). Notably, the percentage of invasive infection in infections caused by sasX-positive ST239 MRSA was higher than that by sasX-negative ST239 MRSA (p = 0.008). This study indicated that ST59 was the predominant clone in the MRSA isolates obtained from Chinese children and might have stronger pathogenic potential. The prevalence of the sasX gene in the MRSA isolates from children was relatively low. Furthermore, the sasX gene might be related to the expressions of PSMα and RNAIII and infection invasiveness.

  5. The Acyl-Homoserine Lactone Synthase YenI from Yersinia enterocolitica Modulates Virulence Gene Expression in Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Y N.; Sheng, Haiqing; Dakarapu, Rambabu; Falck, John R.; Hovde, Carolyn J.

    2013-01-01

    The human pathogen enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:H7 colonizes the rectoanal junction (RAJ) in cattle, its natural reservoir. Colonization at the RAJ poses a serious risk for fecal shedding and contamination of the environment. We previously demonstrated that EHEC senses acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs) produced by the microbiota in the rumen to activate the gad acid resistance genes necessary for survival through the acidic stomachs in cattle and to repress the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE) genes important for colonization of the RAJ, but unnecessary in the rumen. Devoid of AHLs, the RAJ is the prominent site of colonization of EHEC in cattle. To determine if the presence of AHLs in the RAJ could repress colonization at this site, we engineered EHEC to express the Yersinia enterocolitica AHL synthase gene yenI, which constitutively produces AHLs, to mimic a constant exposure of AHLs in the environment. The yenI+ EHEC produces oxo-C6-homoserine lactone (oxo-C6-HSL) and had a significant reduction in LEE expression, effector protein secretion, and attaching and effacing (A/E) lesion formation in vitro compared to the wild type (WT). The yenI+ EHEC also activated expression of the gad genes. To assess whether AHL production, which decreases LEE expression, would decrease RAJ colonization by EHEC, cattle were challenged at the RAJ with WT or yenI+ EHEC. Although the yenI+ EHEC colonized the RAJ with efficiency equal to that of the WT, there was a trend for the cattle to shed the WT strain longer than the yenI+ EHEC. PMID:23980115

  6. GABA (γ-Aminobutyric Acid) Uptake Via the GABA Permease GabP Represses Virulence Gene Expression in Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000.

    PubMed

    McCraw, S L; Park, D H; Jones, R; Bentley, M A; Rico, A; Ratcliffe, R G; Kruger, N J; Collmer, A; Preston, G M

    2016-12-01

    The nonprotein amino acid γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the most abundant amino acid in the tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) leaf apoplast and is synthesized by Arabidopsis thaliana in response to infection by the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (hereafter called DC3000). High levels of exogenous GABA have previously been shown to repress the expression of the type III secretion system (T3SS) in DC3000, resulting in reduced elicitation of the hypersensitive response (HR) in the nonhost plant tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum). This study demonstrates that the GABA permease GabP provides the primary mechanism for GABA uptake by DC3000 and that the gabP deletion mutant ΔgabP is insensitive to GABA-mediated repression of T3SS expression. ΔgabP displayed an enhanced ability to elicit the HR in young tobacco leaves and in tobacco plants engineered to produce increased levels of GABA, which supports the hypothesis that GABA uptake via GabP acts to regulate T3SS expression in planta. The observation that P. syringae can be rendered insensitive to GABA through loss of gabP but that gabP is retained by this bacterium suggests that GabP is important for DC3000 in a natural setting, either for nutrition or as a mechanism for regulating gene expression. [Formula: see text] Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). This is an open access article distributed under the CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 International license .

  7. Candida albicans Secreted Aspartyl Proteinases in Virulence and Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Naglik, Julian R.; Challacombe, Stephen J.; Hube, Bernhard

    2003-01-01

    Candida albicans is the most common fungal pathogen of humans and has developed an extensive repertoire of putative virulence mechanisms that allows successful colonization and infection of the host under suitable predisposing conditions. Extracellular proteolytic activity plays a central role in Candida pathogenicity and is produced by a family of 10 secreted aspartyl proteinases (Sap proteins). Although the consequences of proteinase secretion during human infections is not precisely known, in vitro, animal, and human studies have implicated the proteinases in C. albicans virulence in one of the following seven ways: (i) correlation between Sap production in vitro and Candida virulence, (ii) degradation of human proteins and structural analysis in determining Sap substrate specificity, (iii) association of Sap production with other virulence processes of C. albicans, (iv) Sap protein production and Sap immune responses in animal and human infections, (v) SAP gene expression during Candida infections, (vi) modulation of C. albicans virulence by aspartyl proteinase inhibitors, and (vii) the use of SAP-disrupted mutants to analyze C. albicans virulence. Sap proteins fulfill a number of specialized functions during the infective process, which include the simple role of digesting molecules for nutrient acquisition, digesting or distorting host cell membranes to facilitate adhesion and tissue invasion, and digesting cells and molecules of the host immune system to avoid or resist antimicrobial attack by the host. We have critically discussed the data relevant to each of these seven criteria, with specific emphasis on how this proteinase family could contribute to Candida virulence and pathogenesis. PMID:12966142

  8. Definition of a consensus DNA-binding site for PecS, a global regulator of virulence gene expression in Erwinia chrysanthemi and identification of new members of the PecS regulon.

    PubMed

    Rouanet, Carine; Reverchon, Sylvie; Rodionov, Dmitry A; Nasser, William

    2004-07-16

    In Erwinia chrysanthemi, production of pectic enzymes is modulated by a complex network involving several regulators. One of them, PecS, which belongs to the MarR family, also controls the synthesis of various other virulence factors, such as cellulases and indigoidine. Here, the PecS consensus-binding site is defined by combining a systematic evolution of ligands by an exponential enrichment approach and mutational analyses. The consensus consists of a 23-base pair palindromic-like sequence (C(-11)G(-10)A(-9)N(-8)W(-7)T(-6)C(-5)G(-4)T(-3)A(-2))T(-1)A(0)T(1)(T(2)A(3)C(4)G(5)A(6)N(7)N(8)N(9)C(10)G(11)). Mutational experiments revealed that (i) the palindromic organization is required for the binding of PecS, (ii) the very conserved part of the consensus (-6 to 6) allows for a specific interaction with PecS, but the presence of the relatively degenerated bases located apart significantly increases PecS affinity, (iii) the four bases G, A, T, and C are required for efficient binding of PecS, and (iv) the presence of several binding sites on the same promoter increases the affinity of PecS. This consensus is detected in the regions involved in PecS binding on the previously characterized target genes. This variable consensus is in agreement with the observation that the members of the MarR family are able to bind various DNA targets as dimers by means of a winged helix DNA-binding motif. Binding of PecS on a promoter region containing the defined consensus results in a repression of gene transcription in vitro. Preliminary scanning of the E. chrysanthemi genome sequence with the consensus revealed the presence of strong PecS-binding sites in the intergenic region between fliE and fliFGHIJKLMNOPQR which encode proteins involved in the biogenesis of flagellum. Accordingly, PecS directly represses fliE expression. Thus, PecS seems to control the synthesis of virulence factors required for the key steps of plant infection.

  9. The CtsR regulator controls the expression of clpC, clpE and clpP and is required for the virulence of Enterococcus faecalis in an invertebrate model.

    PubMed

    Cassenego, Ana Paula Vaz; de Oliveira, Naira Elane Moreira; Laport, Marinella Silva; Abranches, Jaqueline; Lemos, José A; Giambiagi-deMarval, Marcia

    2016-09-01

    The intrinsic ruggedness of Enterococcus faecalis is responsible for its widespread distribution in nature and is often viewed as an important virulence determinant. Previously, we showed that the ClpB ATPase is negatively regulated by CtsR and is required for thermotolerance and virulence in a Galleria mellonella invertebrate model. Here, we used in silico, Northern blot and quantitative real-time PCR analyses to identify additional members of the CtsR regulon, namely the clpP peptidase and the clpC and clpE ATPases. When compared to the parent strain, virulence of the ΔctsR strain in G. mellonella was significantly attenuated.

  10. The two-component system BvrR/BvrS essential for Brucella abortus virulence regulates the expression of outer membrane proteins with counterparts in members of the Rhizobiaceae

    PubMed Central

    Guzmán-Verri, C.; Manterola, L.; Sola-Landa, A.; Parra, A.; Cloeckaert, A.; Garin, J.; Gorvel, J.-P.; Moriyón, I.; Moreno, E.; López-Goñi, I.

    2002-01-01

    The Brucella BvrR/BvrS two-component regulatory system is homologous to the ChvI/ChvG systems of Sinorhizobium meliloti and Agrobacterium tumefaciens necessary for endosymbiosis and pathogenicity in plants. BvrR/BvrS controls cell invasion and intracellular survival. Probing the surface of bvrR and bvrS transposon mutants with monoclonal antibodies showed all described major outer membrane proteins (Omps) but Omp25, a protein known to be involved in Brucella virulence. Absence of Omp25 expression was confirmed by two-dimensional electrophoresis of envelope fractions and by gene reporter studies. The electrophoretic analysis also revealed reduction or absence in the mutants of a second set of protein spots that by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization MS and peptide mass mapping were identified as a non-previously described Omp (Omp3b). Because bvrR and bvrS mutants are also altered in cell-surface hydrophobicity, permeability, and sensitivity to surface-targeted bactericidal peptides, it is proposed that BvrR/BvrS controls cell envelope changes necessary to transit between extracellular and intracellular environments. A genomic search revealed that Omp25 (Omp3a) and Omp3b belong to a family of Omps of plant and animal cell-associated α-Proteobacteria, which includes Rhizobium leguminosarum RopB and A. tumefaciens AopB. Previous work has shown that RopB is not expressed in bacteroids, that AopB is involved in tumorigenesis, and that dysfunction of A. tumefaciens ChvI/ChvG alters surface properties. It is thus proposed that the BvrR/BvrS and Omp3 homologues of the cell-associated α-Proteobacteria play a role in bacterial surface control and host cell interactions. PMID:12218183

  11. Thermal control of virulence factors in bacteria: A hot topic

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Oliver; Wheeler, Jun; Tang, Christoph M

    2014-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria sense environmental cues, including the local temperature, to control the production of key virulence factors. Thermal regulation can be achieved at the level of DNA, RNA or protein and although many virulence factors are subject to thermal regulation, the exact mechanisms of control are yet to be elucidated in many instances. Understanding how virulence factors are regulated by temperature presents a significant challenge, as gene expression and protein production are often influenced by complex regulatory networks involving multiple transcription factors in bacteria. Here we highlight some recent insights into thermal regulation of virulence in pathogenic bacteria. We focus on bacteria which cause disease in mammalian hosts, which are at a significantly higher temperature than the outside environment. We outline the mechanisms of thermal regulation and how understanding this fundamental aspect of the biology of bacteria has implications for pathogenesis and human health. PMID:25494856

  12. Riboregulators: Fine-Tuning Virulence in Shigella.

    PubMed

    Fris, Megan E; Murphy, Erin R

    2016-01-01

    Within the past several years, RNA-mediated regulation (ribo-regulation) has become increasingly recognized for its importance in controlling critical bacterial processes. Regulatory RNA molecules, or riboregulators, are perpetually responsive to changes within the micro-environment of a bacterium. Notably, several characterized riboregulators control virulence in pathogenic bacteria, as is the case for each riboregulator characterized to date in Shigella. The timing of virulence gene expression and the ability of the pathogen to adapt to rapidly changing environmental conditions is critical to the establishment and progression of infection by Shigella species; ribo-regulators mediate each of these important processes. This mini review will present the current state of knowledge regarding RNA-mediated regulation in Shigella by detailing the characterization and function of each identified riboregulator in these pathogens.

  13. Virulence of enterococci.

    PubMed Central

    Jett, B D; Huycke, M M; Gilmore, M S

    1994-01-01

    Enterococci are commensal organisms well suited to survival in intestinal and vaginal tracts and the oral cavity. However, as for most bacteria described as causing human disease, enterococci also possess properties that can be ascribed roles in pathogenesis. The natural ability of enterococci to readily acquire, accumulate, and share extrachromosomal elements encoding virulence traits or antibiotic resistance genes lends advantages to their survival under unusual environmental stresses and in part explains their increasing importance as nosocomial pathogens. This review discusses the current understanding of enterococcal virulence relating to (i) adherence to host tissues, (ii) invasion and abscess formation, (iii) factors potentially relevant to modulation of host inflammatory responses, and (iv) potentially toxic secreted products. Aggregation substance, surface carbohydrates, or fibronectin-binding moieties may facilitate adherence to host tissues. Enterococcus faecalis appears to have the capacity to translocate across intact intestinal mucosa in models of antibiotic-induced superinfection. Extracellular toxins such as cytolysin can induce tissue damage as shown in an endophthalmitis model, increase mortality in combination with aggregation substance in an endocarditis model, and cause systemic toxicity in a murine peritonitis model. Finally, lipoteichoic acid, superoxide production, or pheromones and corresponding peptide inhibitors each may modulate local inflammatory reactions. Images PMID:7834601

  14. Brucella, nitrogen and virulence.

    PubMed

    Ronneau, Severin; Moussa, Simon; Barbier, Thibault; Conde-Álvarez, Raquel; Zuniga-Ripa, Amaia; Moriyon, Ignacio; Letesson, Jean-Jacques

    2016-08-01

    The brucellae are α-Proteobacteria causing brucellosis, an important zoonosis. Although multiplying in endoplasmic reticulum-derived vacuoles, they cause no cell death, suggesting subtle but efficient use of host resources. Brucellae are amino-acid prototrophs able to grow with ammonium or use glutamate as the sole carbon-nitrogen source in vitro. They contain more than twice amino acid/peptide/polyamine uptake genes than the amino-acid auxotroph Legionella pneumophila, which multiplies in a similar vacuole, suggesting a different nutritional strategy. During these two last decades, many mutants of key actors in nitrogen metabolism (transporters, enzymes, regulators, etc.) have been described to be essential for full virulence of brucellae. Here, we review the genomic and experimental data on Brucella nitrogen metabolism and its connection with virulence. An analysis of various aspects of this metabolism (transport, assimilation, biosynthesis, catabolism, respiration and regulation) has highlighted differences and similarities in nitrogen metabolism with other α-Proteobacteria. Together, these data suggest that, during their intracellular life cycle, the brucellae use various nitrogen sources for biosynthesis, catabolism and respiration following a strategy that requires prototrophy and a tight regulation of nitrogen use.

  15. Testis hormone-sensitive lipase expression in spermatids is governed by a short promoter in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Blaise, R; Guillaudeux, T; Tavernier, G; Daegelen, D; Evrard, B; Mairal, A; Holm, C; Jégou, B; Langin, D

    2001-02-16

    A testicular form of hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL(tes)), a triacylglycerol lipase, and cholesterol esterase, is expressed in male germ cells. Northern blot analysis showed HSL(tes) mRNA expression in early spermatids. Immunolocalization of the protein in human and rodent seminiferous tubules indicated that the highest level of expression occurred in elongated spermatids. We have previously shown that 0.5 kilobase pairs of the human HSL(tes) promoter directs testis-specific expression of a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter gene in transgenic mice and determined regions binding nuclear proteins expressed in testis but not in liver (Blaise, R., Grober, J., Rouet, P., Tavernier, G., Daegelen, D., and Langin, D. (1999) J. Biol. Chem. 274, 9327-9334). Mutation of a SRY/Sox-binding site in one of the regions did not impair in vivo testis-specific expression of the reporter gene. Further transgenic analyses established that 95 base pairs upstream of the transcription start site were sufficient for correct testis expression. In gel retardation assays using early spermatid nuclear extracts, a germ cell-specific DNA-protein interaction was mapped between -46 and -29 base pairs. The DNA binding nuclear protein showed properties of zinc finger transcription factors. Mutation of the region abolished reporter gene activity in transgenic mice, showing that it is necessary for testis expression of HSL(tes).

  16. Characterization of Neisseria meningitidis Isolates That Do Not Express the Virulence Factor and Vaccine Antigen Factor H Binding Protein ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Lucidarme, Jay; Tan, Lionel; Exley, Rachel M.; Findlow, Jamie; Borrow, Ray; Tang, Christoph M.

    2011-01-01

    Neisseria meningitidis remains a leading cause of bacterial sepsis and meningitis. Complement is a key component of natural immunity against this important human pathogen, which has evolved multiple mechanisms to evade complement-mediated lysis. One approach adopted by the meningococcus is to recruit a human negative regulator of the complement system, factor H (fH), to its surface via a lipoprotein, factor H binding protein (fHbp). Additionally, fHbp is a key antigen in vaccines currently being evaluated in clinical trials. Here we characterize strains of N. meningitidis from several distinct clonal complexes which do not express fHbp; all strains were recovered from patients with disseminated meningococcal disease. We demonstrate that these strains have either a frameshift mutation in the fHbp open reading frame or have entirely lost fHbp and some flanking sequences. No fH binding was detected to other ligands among the fHbp-negative strains. The implications of these findings for meningococcal pathogenesis and prevention are discussed. PMID:21508163

  17. Government Publications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitlatch, Jo Bell

    1979-01-01

    Reviews recent federal publications on government information, particularly in the area of general informational services, public access to government information and privacy issues, coordination of government information systems, and congressional information needs. (Author)

  18. Characterization of two virulence proteins secreted by rabbit enteropathogenic Escherichia coli, EspA and EspB, whose maximal expression is sensitive to host body temperature.

    PubMed Central

    Abe, A; Kenny, B; Stein, M; Finlay, B B

    1997-01-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) and rabbit EPEC (RDEC-1) cause unique histopathological features on intestinal mucosa, including attaching/effacing (A/E) lesions. Due to the human specificity of EPEC, RDEC-1 has been used as an animal model to study EPEC pathogenesis. At least two of the previously identified EPEC-secreted proteins, EspA and EspB, are required for triggering host epithelial signal transduction pathways, intimate adherence, and A/E lesions. However, the functions of these secreted proteins and their roles in pathogenesis have not been characterized. To investigate the function of EspA and EspB in RDEC-1, the espA and espB genes were cloned and their sequences were compared to that of EPEC O127. The EspA proteins showed high similarity (88.5% identity), while EspB was heterogeneous in internal regions (69.8% identity). However, RDEC-1 EspB was identical to that of enterohemorrhagic E. coli serotype O26. Mutations in RDEC-1 espA and espB revealed that the corresponding RDEC-1 gene products are essential for triggering of host signal transduction pathways and invasion into HeLa cells. Complementation with plasmids containing EPEC espA or/and espB genes into RDEC-1 mutant strains demonstrated that they were functionally interchangeable, although the EPEC proteins mediated higher levels of invasion. Furthermore, maximal expression of RDEC-1 and EPEC-secreted proteins occurred at their respective host body temperatures, which may contribute to the lack of EPEC infectivity in rabbits. PMID:9284118

  19. Expression of Haemophilus ducreyi collagen binding outer membrane protein NcaA is required for virulence in swine and human challenge models of chancroid.

    PubMed

    Fulcher, Robert A; Cole, Leah E; Janowicz, Diane M; Toffer, Kristen L; Fortney, Kate R; Katz, Barry P; Orndorff, Paul E; Spinola, Stanley M; Kawula, Thomas H

    2006-05-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi, the etiologic agent of the sexually transmitted genital ulcer disease chancroid, has been shown to associate with dermal collagen fibers within infected skin lesions. Here we describe NcaA, a previously uncharacterized outer membrane protein that is important for H. ducreyi collagen binding and host colonization. An H. ducreyi strain lacking the ncaA gene was impaired in adherence to type I collagen but not fibronectin (plasma or cellular form) or heparin. The mutation had no effect on serum resistance or binding to HaCaT keratinocytes or human foreskin fibroblasts in vitro. Escherichia coli expressing H. ducreyi NcaA bound to type I collagen, demonstrating that NcaA is sufficient to confer collagen attachment. The importance of NcaA in H. ducreyi pathogenesis was assessed using both swine and human experimental models of chancroid. In the swine model, 20% of lesions from sites inoculated with the ncaA mutant were culture positive for H. ducreyi 7 days after inoculation, compared to 73% of wild-type-inoculated sites. The average number of CFU recovered from mutant-inoculated lesions was also significantly reduced compared to that recovered from wild-type-inoculated sites at both 2 and 7 days after inoculation. In the human challenge model, 8 of 30 sites inoculated with wild-type H. ducreyi progressed to the pustular stage, compared to 0 of 30 sites inoculated with the ncaA mutant. Together these results demonstrate that the collagen binding protein NcaA is required for H. ducreyi infection.

  20. Peritoneal culture alters Streptococcus pneumoniae protein profiles and virulence properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orihuela, C. J.; Janssen, R.; Robb, C. W.; Watson, D. A.; Niesel, D. W.

    2000-01-01

    We have examined the properties of Streptococcus pneumoniae cultured in the murine peritoneal cavity and compared its virulence-associated characteristics to those of cultures grown in vitro. Analysis of mRNA levels for specific virulence factors demonstrated a 2.8-fold increase in ply expression and a 2.2-fold increase in capA3 expression during murine peritoneal culture (MPC). Two-dimensional gels and immunoblots using convalescent-phase patient sera and murine sera revealed distinct differences in protein production in vivo (MPC). MPC-grown pneumococci adhered to A549 epithelial cell lines at levels 10-fold greater than those cultured in vitro.

  1. The Staphylococcus aureus RNome and Its Commitment to Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Felden, Brice; Vandenesch, François; Bouloc, Philippe; Romby, Pascale

    2011-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major human pathogen causing a wide spectrum of nosocomial and community-associated infections with high morbidity and mortality. S. aureus generates a large number of virulence factors whose timing and expression levels are precisely tuned by regulatory proteins and RNAs. The aptitude of bacteria to use RNAs to rapidly modify gene expression, including virulence factors in response to stress or environmental changes, and to survive in a host is an evolving concept. Here, we focus on the recently inventoried S. aureus regulatory RNAs, with emphasis on those with identified functions, two of which are directly involved in pathogenicity. PMID:21423670

  2. Metabolic Control of Virulence Genes in Brucella abortus: HutC Coordinates virB Expression and the Histidine Utilization Pathway by Direct Binding to Both Promoters ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Sieira, Rodrigo; Arocena, Gastón M.; Bukata, Lucas; Comerci, Diego J.; Ugalde, Rodolfo A.

    2010-01-01

    Type IV secretion systems (T4SS) are multicomponent machineries involved in the translocation of effector molecules across the bacterial cell envelope. The virB operon of Brucella abortus codes for a T4SS that is essential for virulence and intracellular multiplication of the bacterium in the host. Previous studies showed that the virB operon of B. abortus is tightly regulated within the host cells. In order to identify factors implicated in the control of virB expression, we searched for proteins of Brucella that directly bind to the virB promoter (PvirB). Using different procedures, we isolated a 27-kDa protein that binds specifically to PvirB. This protein was identified as HutC, the transcriptional repressor of the histidine utilization (hut) genes. Analyses of virB and hut promoter activity revealed that HutC exerts two different roles: it acts as a coactivator of transcription of the virB operon, whereas it represses the hut genes. Such activities were observed both intracellularly and in bacteria incubated under conditions that resemble the intracellular environment. Electrophoresis mobility shift assays (EMSA) and DNase I footprinting experiments revealed the structure, affinity, and localization of the HutC-binding sites and supported the regulatory role of HutC in both hut and virB promoters. Taken together, these results indicate that Brucella coopted the function of HutC to coordinate the Hut pathway with transcriptional regulation of the virB genes, probably as a way to sense its own metabolic state and develop adaptive responses to overcome intracellular host defenses. PMID:19854911

  3. Individual letters of the RNA polymerase II CTD code govern distinct gene expression programs in fission yeast

    PubMed Central

    Schwer, Beate; Bitton, Danny Asher; Sanchez, Ana M.; Bähler, Jürg; Shuman, Stewart

    2014-01-01

    The primary structure and phosphorylation pattern of the tandem Y1S2P3T4S5P6S7 repeats of the RNA polymerase II carboxyl-terminal domain (CTD) comprise an informational code that coordinates transcription, chromatin modification, and RNA processing. To gauge the contributions of individual CTD coding “letters” to gene expression, we analyzed the poly(A)+ transcriptomes of fission yeast mutants that lack each of the four inessential CTD phosphoacceptors: Tyr1, Ser2, Thr4, and Ser7. There was a hierarchy of CTD mutational effects with respect to the number of dysregulated protein-coding RNAs, with S2A (n = 227) >> Y1F (n = 71) > S7A (n = 58) >> T4A (n = 7). The majority of the protein-coding RNAs affected in Y1F cells were coordinately affected by S2A, suggesting that Tyr1-Ser2 constitutes a two-letter code “word.” Y1F and S2A elicited increased expression of genes encoding proteins involved in iron uptake (Frp1, Fip1, Fio1, Str3, Str1, Sib1), without affecting the expression of the genes that repress the iron regulon, implying that Tyr1-Ser2 transduces a repressive signal. Y1F and S2A cells had increased levels of ferric reductase activity and were hypersensitive to phleomycin, indicative of elevated intracellular iron. The T4A and S7A mutations had opposing effects on the phosphate response pathway. T4A reduced the expression of two genes encoding proteins involved in phosphate acquisition (the Pho1 acid phosphatase and the phosphate transporter SPBC8E4.01c), without affecting the expression of known genes that regulate the phosphate response pathway, whereas S7A increased pho1+ expression. These results highlight specific cellular gene expression programs that are responsive to distinct CTD cues. PMID:24591591

  4. Tracking bacterial virulence: global modulators as indicators

    PubMed Central

    Prieto, Alejandro; Urcola, Imanol; Blanco, Jorge; Dahbi, Ghizlane; Muniesa, Maite; Quirós, Pablo; Falgenhauer, Linda; Chakraborty, Trinad; Hüttener, Mário; Juárez, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The genomes of Gram-negative bacteria encode paralogues and/or orthologues of global modulators. The nucleoid-associated H-NS and Hha proteins are an example: several enterobacteria such as Escherichia coli or Salmonella harbor H-NS, Hha and their corresponding paralogues, StpA and YdgT proteins, respectively. Remarkably, the genome of the pathogenic enteroaggregative E. coli strain 042 encodes, in addition to the hha and ydgT genes, two additional hha paralogues, hha2 and hha3. We show in this report that there exists a strong correlation between the presence of these paralogues and the virulence phenotype of several E. coli strains. hha2 and hha3 predominate in some groups of intestinal pathogenic E. coli strains (enteroaggregative and shiga toxin-producing isolates), as well as in the widely distributed extraintestinal ST131 isolates. Because of the relationship between the presence of hha2/hha3 and some virulence factors, we have been able to provide evidence for Hha2/Hha3 modulating the expression of the antigen 43 pathogenic determinants. We show that tracking global modulators or their paralogues/orthologues can be a new strategy to identify bacterial pathogenic clones and propose PCR amplification of hha2 and hha3 as a virulence indicator in environmental and clinical E. coli isolates. PMID:27169404

  5. INHIBITION OF VIRULENCE FACTORS OF PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA BY DICLOFENAC SODIUM.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Hisham A

    2015-01-01

    Resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to antibiotics is a major problem. Targeting virulence factors is an alternative option to avoid the emergence of resistance to antibiotics. The effect of sub-inhibitory concentration of diclofenac sodium on the production of virulence factors of P. aeruginosa was investigated. The virulence factors included protease, haemolysin, pyocyanin and pyoverdin, in addition to pathogenic behaviors such as swimming and twitching motilities and biofilm formation. Diclofenac sodium showed significant inhibition of virulence factors as compared to the control. Diclofenac sodium decreased twitching and swimming motilities by 29.27% and 45.36%, respectively. The percentage of inhibition of pyocyanin by diclofenac sodium was 42.32%. On the other hand, pyoverdin was inhibited to a lesser extent (36.72%). Diclofenac sodium reduced protease by 52.58% and biofilm formation by 58.37%. Moreover, haemolytic activity in the presence of diclofenac sodium was 15.64% as compared to the control (100% haemolytic activity). The inhibitory activities may be due to inhibition of quorum sensing that regulates the expression of virulence factors. This study suggests the potential for the use of diclofenac sodium as an anti-virulence agent in the treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections.

  6. The evolution and maintenance of virulence in microparasites.

    PubMed Central

    Levin, B. R.

    1996-01-01

    In recent years, population and evolutionary biologists have questioned the traditional view that parasite-mediated morbidity and mortality¿virulence¿is a primitive character and an artifact of recent associations between parasites and their hosts. A number of hypotheses have been proposed that favor virulence and suggest that it will be maintained by natural selection. According to some of these hypotheses, the pathogenicity of HIV, Vibrio cholerae, Mycobacterium tuberculosis,theShigella,as well as Plasmodium falciparum,and many other microparasites, are not only maintained by natural selection, but their virulence increases or decreases as an evolutionary response to changes in environmental conditions or the density and/or behavior of the human population. Other hypotheses propose that the virulence of microparasites is not directly favored by natural selection; rather, microparasite-mediated morbidity and mortality are either coincidental to parasite-expressed characters (virulence determinants that evolved for other functions) or the product of short-sighted evolution in infected hosts. These hypotheses for the evolution and maintenance of microparasite virulence are critically reviewed, and suggestions are made for testing them experimentally. PMID:8903208

  7. Genetic Modulation of c-di-GMP Turnover Affects Multiple Virulence Traits and Bacterial Virulence in Rice Pathogen Dickeya zeae

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yufan; Lv, Mingfa; Liao, Lisheng; Gu, Yanfang; Liang, Zhibin; Shi, Zurong; Liu, Shiyin; Zhou, Jianuan; Zhang, Lianhui

    2016-01-01

    The frequent outbreaks of rice foot rot disease caused by Dickeya zeae have become a significant concern in rice planting regions and countries, but the regulatory mechanisms that govern the virulence of this important pathogen remain vague. Given that the second messenger cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) is associated with modulation of various virulence-related traits in various microorganisms, here we set to investigate the role of the genes encoding c-di-GMP metabolism in the regulation of the bacterial physiology and virulence by construction all in-frame deletion mutants targeting the annotated c-di-GMP turnover genes in D. zeae strain EC1. Phenotype analyses identified individual mutants showing altered production of exoenzymes and phytotoxins, biofilm formation and bacterial motilities. The results provide useful clues and a valuable toolkit for further characterization and dissection of the regulatory complex that modulates the pathogenesis and persistence of this important bacterial pathogen. PMID:27855163

  8. REST-Governed Gene Expression Profiling in a Neuronal Cell Model Reveals Novel Direct and Indirect Processes of Repression and Up-Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Manteiga, Jose M.; Bonfiglio, Silvia; Folladori, Lucrezia; Malosio, Maria L.; Lazarevic, Dejan; Stupka, Elia; Cittaro, Davide; Meldolesi, Jacopo

    2015-01-01

    The role of REST changes in neurons, including the rapid decrease of its level during differentiation and its fluctuations during many mature functions and diseases, is well established. However, identification of many thousand possible REST-target genes, mostly based on indirect criteria, and demonstration of their operative dependence on the repressor have been established for only a relatively small fraction. In the present study, starting from our recently published work, we have expanded the identification of REST-dependent genes, investigated in two clones of the PC12 line, a recognized neuronal cell model, spontaneously expressing different levels of REST: very low as in neurons and much higher as in most non-neural cells. The molecular, structural and functional differences of the two PC12 clones were shown to depend largely on their different REST level and the ensuing variable expression of some dependent genes. Comprehensive RNA-Seq analyses of the 13,700 genes expressed, validated by parallel RT-PCR and western analyses of mRNAs and encoded proteins, identified in the high-REST clone two groups of almost 900 repressed and up-regulated genes. Repression is often due to direct binding of REST to target genes; up-regulation to indirect mechanism(s) mostly mediated by REST repression of repressive transcription factors. Most, but not all, genes governing neurosecretion, excitability, and receptor channel signaling were repressed in the high REST clone. The genes governing expression of non-channel receptors (G protein-coupled and others), although variably affected, were often up-regulated together with the genes of intracellular kinases, small G proteins, cytoskeleton, cell adhesion, and extracellular matrix proteins. Expression of REST-dependent genes governing functions other than those mentioned so far were also identified. The results obtained by the parallel investigation of the two PC12 clones revealed the complexity of the REST molecular and

  9. REST-Governed Gene Expression Profiling in a Neuronal Cell Model Reveals Novel Direct and Indirect Processes of Repression and Up-Regulation.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Manteiga, Jose M; Bonfiglio, Silvia; Folladori, Lucrezia; Malosio, Maria L; Lazarevic, Dejan; Stupka, Elia; Cittaro, Davide; Meldolesi, Jacopo

    2015-01-01

    The role of REST changes in neurons, including the rapid decrease of its level during differentiation and its fluctuations during many mature functions and diseases, is well established. However, identification of many thousand possible REST-target genes, mostly based on indirect criteria, and demonstration of their operative dependence on the repressor have been established for only a relatively small fraction. In the present study, starting from our recently published work, we have expanded the identification of REST-dependent genes, investigated in two clones of the PC12 line, a recognized neuronal cell model, spontaneously expressing different levels of REST: very low as in neurons and much higher as in most non-neural cells. The molecular, structural and functional differences of the two PC12 clones were shown to depend largely on their different REST level and the ensuing variable expression of some dependent genes. Comprehensive RNA-Seq analyses of the 13,700 genes expressed, validated by parallel RT-PCR and western analyses of mRNAs and encoded proteins, identified in the high-REST clone two groups of almost 900 repressed and up-regulated genes. Repression is often due to direct binding of REST to target genes; up-regulation to indirect mechanism(s) mostly mediated by REST repression of repressive transcription factors. Most, but not all, genes governing neurosecretion, excitability, and receptor channel signaling were repressed in the high REST clone. The genes governing expression of non-channel receptors (G protein-coupled and others), although variably affected, were often up-regulated together with the genes of intracellular kinases, small G proteins, cytoskeleton, cell adhesion, and extracellular matrix proteins. Expression of REST-dependent genes governing functions other than those mentioned so far were also identified. The results obtained by the parallel investigation of the two PC12 clones revealed the complexity of the REST molecular and

  10. Virulence Factors of Erwinia amylovora: A Review.

    PubMed

    Piqué, Núria; Miñana-Galbis, David; Merino, Susana; Tomás, Juan M

    2015-06-05

    Erwinia amylovora, a Gram negative bacteria of the Enterobacteriaceae family, is the causal agent of fire blight, a devastating plant disease affecting a wide range of host species within Rosaceae and a major global threat to commercial apple and pear production. Among the limited number of control options currently available, prophylactic application of antibiotics during the bloom period appears the most effective. Pathogen cells enter plants through the nectarthodes of flowers and other natural openings, such as wounds, and are capable of rapid movement within plants and the establishment of systemic infections. Many virulence determinants of E. amylovora have been characterized, including the Type III secretion system (T3SS), the exopolysaccharide (EPS) amylovoran, biofilm formation, and motility. To successfully establish an infection, E. amylovora uses a complex regulatory network to sense the relevant environmental signals and coordinate the expression of early and late stage virulence factors involving two component signal transduction systems, bis-(3'-5')-cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) and quorum sensing. The LPS biosynthetic gene cluster is one of the relatively few genetic differences observed between Rubus- and Spiraeoideae-infecting genotypes of E. amylovora. Other differential factors, such as the presence and composition of an integrative conjugative element associated with the Hrp T3SS (hrp genes encoding the T3SS apparatus), have been recently described. In the present review, we present the recent findings on virulence factors research, focusing on their role in bacterial pathogenesis and indicating other virulence factors that deserve future research to characterize them.

  11. Microevolution During Serial Mouse Passage Demonstrates FRE3 as a Virulence Adaptation Gene in Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Guowu; Chen, Shu Hui; Qiu, Jin; Bennett, John E.; Myers, Timothy G.; Williamson, Peter R.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Passage in mice of opportunistic pathogens such as Cryptococcus neoformans is known to increase virulence, but little is known about the molecular mechanisms involved in virulence adaptation. Serial mouse passage of nine environmental strains of serotype A C. neoformans identified two highly adapted virulent strains that showed a 4-fold reduction in time to death after four passages. Transcriptome sequencing expression studies demonstrated increased expression of a FRE3-encoded iron reductase in the two strains but not in a control strain that did not demonstrate increased virulence during mouse passage. FRE3 was shown to express an iron reductase activity and to play a role in iron-dependent growth of C. neoformans. Overexpression of FRE3 in the two original environmental strains increased growth in the macrophage cell line J774.16 and increased virulence. These data demonstrate a role for FRE3 in the virulence of C. neoformans and demonstrate how the increased expression of such a “virulence acquisition gene” during the environment-to-mammal transition, can optimize the virulence of environmental strains in mammalian hosts. PMID:24692633

  12. Virulence Markers of Dengue Viruses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-06-10

    AD VIRULENCE MARKERS OF DENGUE VIRUSES 00 ANNUAL REPORT 0 James L. Hardy and Srisakul C. Kliks June 10, 1988 Supported by U.S. ARMY MEDICAL RESEARCH...Virulence Markers of Dengue Viruses (U) 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) James L. Hardy ind Sriqakul.C. Klik,,q 13a. TYPE OF REPORT 13b. TIME COVERED 14. DATE OF...TERMS (Continue on reverse it necessary and identify by block number) FIELD GROUP SUB-GROUP Dengue viruses, dengue hemorrhagic fever, virulence, U3

  13. Variation in virulence of Beauveria bassiana and B. pseudobassiana to the pine weevil Pissodes nemorensis in relation to mycelium characteristics and virulence genes.

    PubMed

    Romón, Pedro; Hatting, Hardus; Goldarazena, Arturo; Iturrondobeitia, Juan Carlos

    2017-02-01

    Entomopathogenic fungi such as Beauveria spp. have potential applications in the biocontrol of insect pests but little is known regarding their infectivity to the pine weevil Pissodes nemorensis. In this study, five isolates of Beauveria pseudobassiana and five isolates of Beauveria bassiana were tested for characteristics correlating with virulence on P. nemorensis. Isolate UAMH301 had the lowest mean lethal concentration value whereas the highest value was obtained with isolate LRC137. Growth rate was negatively correlated with virulence in B. bassiana, because isolate LRC137, the least virulent isolate, grew much more rapidly than the other B. bassiana isolates on SDYA. In contrast, its growth on a hyperosmotic medium was the slowest. Sporulation rate and conidial area were not correlated with virulence. Mycelial cell density was positively correlated with virulence in both species, and the four tested genes appear to be one-copy genes. Bbchit1 and Bbhog1, genes respectively encoding a chitinase and a protein kinase, induced relative expression levels were positively correlated with virulence in B. pseudobassiana. We discuss in terms of previous morphological, physiological and genetic parameters related to virulence in Beauveria and the importance of testing the expression of putative virulence genes in comparison with their basal transcript levels.

  14. Identification of regions affecting virulence, RNA processing and infectivity in the virulent satellite of turnip crinkle virus.

    PubMed Central

    Simon, A E; Engel, H; Johnson, R P; Howell, S H

    1988-01-01

    Turnip crinkle virus (TCV) supports a small family of satellite RNAs (RNAs C, D and F). RNA C is a virulent satellite, producing severe symptoms in host plants, while RNAs D and F are avirulent satellites. The virulent satellite (RNA C) has two major domains--a 5'-domain similar to the avirulent satellites and a 3'-domain similar to the 3'-end of the TCV genome. To demonstrate that the 3'-domain of RNA C determines virulence, a chimeric satellite was constructed composed mostly of the 5'-domain of the avirulent satellite (RNA F) and the 3'-domain of the virulent satellite (RNA C). To locate other functional regions, small DNA fragments were inserted or deleted at various sites in the cDNA of virulent satellite (RNA C). Most small internal deletions and insertions in the midsection of the molecule had no detectable effects while those near the 3'-end of RNA C destroyed infectivity. Modifications in a small region centering on an AGCAGC repeat in the domain of satellite homology blocked the accumulation of monomers and presumably the processing of RNA C. Other modifications in this region produced more intense symptoms. Hence, these experiments reveal regions of the satellite which determine virulence, are essential for infectivity, affect monomer accumulation (RNA processing) and modulate symptom expression. Images PMID:3181135

  15. PrfA regulation offsets the cost of L isteria virulence outside the host

    PubMed Central

    Vasanthakrishnan, Radhakrishnan B.; de las Heras, Aitor; Scortti, Mariela; Deshayes, Caroline; Colegrave, Nick

    2015-01-01

    Summary Virulence traits are essential for pathogen fitness, but whether they affect microbial performance in the environment, where they are not needed, remains experimentally unconfirmed. We investigated this question with the facultative pathogen L isteria monocytogenes and its PrfA virulence regulon. PrfA‐regulated genes are activated intracellularly (PrfA ‘ON’) but shut down outside the host (PrfA ‘OFF’). Using a mutant PrfA regulator locked ON (PrfA*) and thus causing PrfA‐controlled genes to be constitutively activated, we show that virulence gene expression significantly impairs the listerial growth rate (μ) and maximum growth (A) in rich medium. Deletion analysis of the PrfA regulon and complementation of a L. monocytogenes mutant lacking all PrfA‐regulated genes with PrfA* indicated that the growth reduction was specifically due to the unneeded virulence determinants and not to pleiotropic regulatory effects of PrfA ON. No PrfA*‐associated fitness disadvantage was observed in infected eukaryotic cells, where PrfA‐regulated virulence gene expression is critical for survival. Microcosm experiments demonstrated that the constitutively virulent state strongly impaired L . monocytogenes performance in soil, the natural habitat of these bacteria. Our findings provide empirical proof that virulence carries a significant cost to the pathogen. They also experimentally substantiate the assumed, although not proven, key role of virulence gene regulation systems in suppressing the cost of bacterial virulence outside the host. PMID:26178789

  16. Genetic basis of virulence in Shigella species.

    PubMed Central

    Hale, T L

    1991-01-01

    Shigella species and enteroinvasive strains of Escherichia coli cause disease by invasion of the colonic epithelium, and this invasive phenotype is mediated by genes carried on 180- to 240-kb plasmids. In addition, at least eight loci on the Shigella chromosome are necessary for full expression of virulence. The products of these genes can be classified as (i) virulence determinants that directly affect the ability of shigellae to survive in the intestinal tissues, e.g., the aerobactin siderophore (iucABCD and iutA), superoxide dismutase (sodB), and somatic antigen expression (rfa and rfb); (ii) cytotoxins that contribute to the severity of disease, e.g., the Shiga toxin (stx) and a putative analog of this toxin (flu); and (iii) regulatory loci that affect the expression of plasmid genes, e.g., ompR-envZ, which mediates response to changes in osmolarity, virR (osmZ), which mediates response to changes in temperature, and kcpA, which affects the translation of the plasmid virG (icsA) gene which is associated with intracellular bacterial mobility and intracellular bacterial spread. A single plasmid regulatory gene (virF) controls a virulence-associated plasmid regulon including virG (icsA) and two invasion-related loci, i.e., (i) ipaABCD, encoding invasion plasmid antigens that may be structural components of the Shigella invasion determinant; and (ii) invAKJH (mxi), which is necessary for insertion of invasion plasmid antigens into the outer membrane. Images PMID:1886518

  17. Antibiotic treatment selects for cooperative virulence of Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Diard, Médéric; Sellin, Mikael E; Dolowschiak, Tamas; Arnoldini, Markus; Ackermann, Martin; Hardt, Wolf-Dietrich

    2014-09-08

    Antibiotics are powerful therapeutics but are not equally effective against all cells in bacterial populations. Bacteria that express an antibiotic-tolerant phenotype ("persisters") can evade treatment [1]. Persisters can cause relapses of the infection after the end of the therapy [2]. It is still poorly understood whether persistence affects the evolution of bacterial virulence. During infections, persisters have been found preferentially at particular sites within the host [3, 4]. If bacterial virulence factors are required to reach such sites, treatment with antibiotics could impose selection on the expression of virulence genes, in addition to their well-established effects on bacterial resistance. Here, we report that treatment with antibiotics selects for virulence and fosters transmissibility of Salmonella Typhimurium. In a mouse model for Salmonella diarrhea, treatment with the broad-spectrum antibiotic ciprofloxacin reverses the outcome of competition between wild-type bacteria and avirulent mutants that can spontaneously arise during within-host evolution [5]. While avirulent mutants take over the gut lumen and abolish disease transmission in untreated mice, ciprofloxacin tilts the balance in favor of virulent, wild-type bacteria. This is explained by the need for virulence factors to invade gut tissues and form a persistent reservoir. Avirulent mutants remain in the gut lumen and are eradicated. Upon cessation of antibiotic treatment, tissue-lodged wild-type pathogens reseed the gut lumen and thereby facilitate disease transmissibility to new hosts. Our results suggest a general principle by which antibiotic treatment can promote cooperative virulence during within-host evolution, increase duration of transmissibility, and thereby enhance the spread of an infectious disease.

  18. The minute virus of canines (MVC) NP1 protein governs the expression of a subset of essential NS proteins via its role in RNA processing.

    PubMed

    Fasina, Olufemi O; Stupps, Stephanie; Figueroa-Cuilan, Wanda; Pintel, David J

    2017-03-29

    Parvoviruses use a variety of means to control the expression of their compact genomes. The Bocaparvovirus Minute Virus of Canines (MVC) encodes a small, genus-specific protein, NP1, which governs access to the viral capsid gene via its role in alternative polyadenylation and alternative splicing of the single MVC pre-mRNA. In addition to NP1, MVC encodes five additional non-structural proteins (NS) that share an initiation codon at the left end of the genome and which are individually encoded by alternative multiply-spliced mRNAs. We found that three of these proteins were encoded by mRNAs that excise the NP1-regulated MVC intron immediately upstream of the internal polyadenylation site (pA)p, and that generation of these proteins was thus regulated by NP1. Splicing of their progenitor mRNAs joined the amino terminus of these proteins into the NP1 open reading frame, and splice-site mutations that prevented their expression inhibited virus replication in a host-cell dependent manner. Thus, in addition to controlling capsid gene access, NP1 also controls expression of three of the five identified NS proteins via its role in governing MVC pre-mRNA splicing.IMPORTANCE The Parvovirinae are small non-enveloped icosahedral viruses that are important pathogens in many animal species including humans. Minute virus of canine (MVC) is an autonomous parvovirus in the Bocaparvovirus genus. It has a single promoter that generates a single pre-mRNA. NP1, a small genus-specific MVC protein, participates in the processing of this pre-mRNA and so controls capsid gene access via its role in alternative internal polyadenylation and splicing. We show here that NP1 also controls expression of three of the five identified NS proteins via its role in governing MVC pre-mRNA splicing. These NS proteins are together required for virus replication in a host-cell dependent manner.

  19. An antimicrobial peptide-resistant minor subpopulation of Photorhabdus luminescens is responsible for virulence

    PubMed Central

    Mouammine, Annabelle; Pages, Sylvie; Lanois, Anne; Gaudriault, Sophie; Jubelin, Gregory; Bonabaud, Maurine; Cruveiller, Stéphane; Dubois, Emeric; Roche, David; Legrand, Ludovic; Brillard, Julien; Givaudan, Alain

    2017-01-01

    Some of the bacterial cells in isogenic populations behave differently from others. We describe here how a new type of phenotypic heterogeneity relating to resistance to cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMPs) is determinant for the pathogenic infection process of the entomopathogenic bacterium Photorhabdus luminescens. We demonstrate that the resistant subpopulation, which accounts for only 0.5% of the wild-type population, causes septicemia in insects. Bacterial heterogeneity is driven by the PhoPQ two-component regulatory system and expression of pbgPE, an operon encoding proteins involved in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) modifications. We also report the characterization of a core regulon controlled by the DNA-binding PhoP protein, which governs virulence in P. luminescens. Comparative RNAseq analysis revealed an upregulation of marker genes for resistance, virulence and bacterial antagonism in the pre-existing resistant subpopulation, suggesting a greater ability to infect insect prey and to survive in cadavers. Finally, we suggest that the infection process of P. luminescens is based on a bet-hedging strategy to cope with the diverse environmental conditions experienced during the lifecycle. PMID:28252016

  20. A long-term epigenetic memory switch controls bacterial virulence bimodality.

    PubMed

    Ronin, Irine; Katsowich, Naama; Rosenshine, Ilan; Balaban, Nathalie Q

    2017-02-07

    When pathogens enter the host, sensing of environmental cues activates the expression of virulence genes. Opposite transition of pathogens from activating to non-activating conditions is poorly understood. Interestingly, variability in the expression of virulence genes upon infection enhances colonization. In order to systematically detect the role of phenotypic variability in enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC), an important human pathogen, both in virulence activating and non-activating conditions, we employed the ScanLag methodology. The analysis revealed a bimodal growth rate. Mathematical modeling combined with experimental analysis showed that this bimodality is mediated by a hysteretic memory-switch that results in the stable co-existence of non-virulent and hyper-virulent subpopulations, even after many generations of growth in non-activating conditions. We identified the per operon as the key component of the hysteretic switch. This unique hysteretic memory switch may result in persistent infection and enhanced host-to-host spreading.

  1. Identification of gyrB and rpoB gene mutations and differentially expressed proteins between a novobiocin-resistant Aeromonas hydrophila catfish vaccine strain and its virulent parent strain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sequence comparison between the full-length 2412 bp DNA gyrase subunit B (gyrB) gene of a novobiocin resistant Aeromonas hydrophila AH11NOVO vaccine strain and that of its virulent parent strain AH11P revealed 10 missense mutations. Similarly, sequence comparison between the full-length 4092 bp RNA ...

  2. Correlation between virulence of various strains of mycobacteria and their susceptibility to ethanolic extract of propolis (EEP).

    PubMed

    Scheller, S; Kawalski, H; Oklek, K; Dworniczak, S; Matsuno, T; Waldemar-Klimmek, K; Rajca, M; Shani, J

    1998-01-01

    Ethanol extract of propolis (EEP) has antibacterial, antiviral, antiprotozoal and antifungal properties, in addition to many biological effects. Our laboratory has demonstrated a synergistic effect of EEP and antibiotics on the growth of Staphylococcus aureus, and suggested that the bactericidal effect of EEP was expressed mainly on virulent mycobacteria rather than on non-virulent (attenuated) ones. The present study was designed to reconfirm the latter finding, by subjecting 17 different mycobacteria strains to EEP, and evaluating whether there is a correlation between the virulence of the mycobacteria strains studied and their susceptibility to EEP. Our findings demonstrate that while the four non-virulent strains studied are not susceptible to EEP, out of the 13 virulent strains studied seven are susceptible and six are resistant to it. These results suggest that while there is no full correlation between virulence of the mycobacteria tested and their susceptibility to EEP, the few strains that were resistant to EEP were non-virulent.

  3. Government Agencies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-05-01

    manufacturers. The Navy has a major in- house design capability for ships; the government does not possess such a capability for aircraft or other weapon systems...the Coast Guard, government agencies acquire a wide variety of ships, ranging from sophisticated submarines and nuclear aircraft carriers to much...the initial phase a review was made of written material relating to government procedures in U.S. Government agencies for acquiring vessels, aircraft

  4. Military Government

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1949-07-01

    CGSC MG MILITARY GOVERNMENT LIBHARY ARI\\’IY WAR COLLEGE CJ\\RLISLE BARRACKS, PAa This text is approved for resident and extension-course...and functions · of ’ military government . It conforms ·substantially to the subject matter , of Field Manual 27-5, Civil Affairs/ Military Government ...Teaching experience at the Command and General Staff College has ···--·demonstrated the need for a military government text which brings to- gether

  5. The evolution of sex-specific virulence in infectious diseases

    PubMed Central

    Úbeda, Francisco; Jansen, Vincent A. A.

    2016-01-01

    Fatality rates of infectious diseases are often higher in men than women. Although this difference is often attributed to a stronger immune response in women, we show that differences in the transmission routes that the sexes provide can result in evolution favouring pathogens with sex-specific virulence. Because women can transmit pathogens during pregnancy, birth or breast-feeding, pathogens adapt, evolving lower virulence in women. This can resolve the long-standing puzzle on progression from Human T-cell Lymphotropic Virus Type 1 (HTLV-1) infection to lethal Adult T-cell Leukaemia (ATL); a progression that is more likely in Japanese men than women, while it is equally likely in Caribbean women and men. We argue that breastfeeding, being more prolonged in Japan than in the Caribbean, may have driven the difference in virulence between the two populations. Our finding signifies the importance of investigating the differences in genetic expression profile of pathogens in males and females. PMID:27959327

  6. Comparative virulence studies and transcriptome analysis of Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from animals

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Zahid; Seleem, Mohamed N.; Hussain, Hafiz Iftikhar; Huang, Lingli; Hao, Haihong; Yuan, Zonghui

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have been conducted to check the prevalence of methicillin-resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in animals and animal-derived food products but limited data are available regarding their virulence and associated gene expression profile. In the present study, antibiotic resistance and virulence of MRSA and methicillin-sensitive S. aureus animal isolates were determined in vitro by agar dilution, biofilm formation, adhesion, invasion and intracellular survivability assays. In addition, the pathogenicity of these isolates was examined in a murine model of S. aureus sepsis. MRSA1679a, a strain isolated from chicken, was observed to be highly virulent, in cell culture and in mouse model, and exhibited extensive resistant profile. Comparative gene expression profile of MRSA1679a and the reference human MRSA strain (ATCC 29213) was performed using Illumina-based transcriptome and RT-qPCR analyses. Several virulence elements including 22 toxin genes were detected in MRSA animal-isolate. In addition, we observed enhanced expression of crucial virulence regulators, such as sarA and KdpDE in MRSA animal-isolate compared to the human isolate. Collectively, gene expression profile including several virulence and drug-resistance factors confirmed the unique and highly virulent determinants of the MRSA strain of poultry origin which warrants further attention due to significant threat to public health. PMID:27739497

  7. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Virulence and Therapy: Evolving Translational Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Veesenmeyer, Jeffrey L.; Lisboa, Thiago; Rello, Jordi

    2009-01-01

    Structured abstract Objective Although most reviews of Pseudomonas aeruginosa therapeutics focus on antibiotics currently in use or in the pipeline, we review evolving translational strategies aimed at using virulence factor antagonists as adjuvant therapies. Data Source Current literature regarding P. aeruginosa virulence determinants and approaches that target them, with an emphasis on type III secretion, quorum-sensing, biofilms, and flagella. Data Extraction and Synthesis P. aeruginosa remains one of the most important pathogens in nosocomial infections, with high associated morbidity and mortality. Its predilection to develop resistance to antibiotics and expression of multiple virulence factors contributes to the frequent ineffectiveness of current therapies. Among the many P. aeruginosa virulence determinants that impact infections, type III secretion, quorum sensing, biofilm formation, and flagella have been the focus of much recent investigation. Here we review how increased understanding of these important bacterial structures and processes has enabled the development of novel approaches to inhibit each. These promising translational strategies may lead to the development of adjuvant therapies capable of improving outcomes. Conclusions Adjuvant therapies directed against virulence factors have the potential to improve outcomes in P. aeruginosa infections. PMID:19325463

  8. Host plant species affects virulence in monarch butterfly parasites.

    PubMed

    de Roode, Jacobus C; Pedersen, Amy B; Hunter, Mark D; Altizer, Sonia

    2008-01-01

    1. Studies have considered how intrinsic host and parasite properties determine parasite virulence, but have largely ignored the role of extrinsic ecological factors in its expression. 2. We studied how parasite genotype and host plant species interact to determine virulence of the protozoan parasite Ophryocystis elektroscirrha (McLaughlin & Myers 1970) in the monarch butterfly Danaus plexippus L. We infected monarch larvae with one of four parasite genotypes and reared them on two milkweed species that differed in their levels of cardenolides: toxic chemicals involved in predator defence. 3. Parasite infection, replication and virulence were affected strongly by host plant species. While uninfected monarchs lived equally long on both plant species, infected monarchs suffered a greater reduction in their life spans (55% vs. 30%) on the low-cardenolide vs. the high-cardenolide host plant. These life span differences resulted from different levels of parasite replication in monarchs reared on the two plant species. 4. The virulence rank order of parasite genotypes was unaffected by host plant species, suggesting that host plant species affected parasite genotypes similarly, rather than through complex plant species-parasite genotype interactions. 5. Our results demonstrate that host ecology importantly affects parasite virulence, with implications for host-parasite dynamics in natural populations.

  9. Full Virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Requires OprF▿

    PubMed Central

    Fito-Boncompte, Laurène; Chapalain, Annelise; Bouffartigues, Emeline; Chaker, Hichem; Lesouhaitier, Olivier; Gicquel, Gwendoline; Bazire, Alexis; Madi, Amar; Connil, Nathalie; Véron, Wilfried; Taupin, Laure; Toussaint, Bertrand; Cornelis, Pierre; Wei, Qing; Shioya, Koki; Déziel, Eric; Feuilloley, Marc G. J.; Orange, Nicole; Dufour, Alain; Chevalier, Sylvie

    2011-01-01

    OprF is a general outer membrane porin of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a well-known human opportunistic pathogen associated with severe hospital-acquired sepsis and chronic lung infections of cystic fibrosis patients. A multiphenotypic approach, based on the comparative study of a wild-type strain of P. aeruginosa, its isogenic oprF mutant, and an oprF-complemented strain, showed that OprF is required for P. aeruginosa virulence. The absence of OprF results in impaired adhesion to animal cells, secretion of ExoT and ExoS toxins through the type III secretion system (T3SS), and production of the quorum-sensing-dependent virulence factors pyocyanin, elastase, lectin PA-1L, and exotoxin A. Accordingly, in the oprF mutant, production of the signal molecules N-(3-oxododecanoyl)-l-homoserine lactone and N-butanoyl-l-homoserine lactone was found to be reduced and delayed, respectively. Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS) production was decreased, while its precursor, 4-hydroxy-2-heptylquinoline (HHQ), accumulated in the cells. Taken together, these results show the involvement of OprF in P. aeruginosa virulence, at least partly through modulation of the quorum-sensing network. This is the first study showing a link between OprF, PQS synthesis, T3SS, and virulence factor production, providing novel insights into virulence expression. PMID:21189321

  10. The Complex Relationship between Virulence and Antibiotic Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Meredith; Brooks, Benjamin D.; Brooks, Amanda E.

    2017-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance, prompted by the overuse of antimicrobial agents, may arise from a variety of mechanisms, particularly horizontal gene transfer of virulence and antibiotic resistance genes, which is often facilitated by biofilm formation. The importance of phenotypic changes seen in a biofilm, which lead to genotypic alterations, cannot be overstated. Irrespective of if the biofilm is single microbe or polymicrobial, bacteria, protected within a biofilm from the external environment, communicate through signal transduction pathways (e.g., quorum sensing or two-component systems), leading to global changes in gene expression, enhancing virulence, and expediting the acquisition of antibiotic resistance. Thus, one must examine a genetic change in virulence and resistance not only in the context of the biofilm but also as inextricably linked pathologies. Observationally, it is clear that increased virulence and the advent of antibiotic resistance often arise almost simultaneously; however, their genetic connection has been relatively ignored. Although the complexities of genetic regulation in a multispecies community may obscure a causative relationship, uncovering key genetic interactions between virulence and resistance in biofilm bacteria is essential to identifying new druggable targets, ultimately providing a drug discovery and development pathway to improve treatment options for chronic and recurring infection. PMID:28106797

  11. Genetic Regulation of Virulence and Antibiotic Resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Kröger, Carsten; Kary, Stefani C.; Schauer, Kristina; Cameron, Andrew D. S.

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug resistant microorganisms are forecast to become the single biggest challenge to medical care in the 21st century. Over the last decades, members of the genus Acinetobacter have emerged as bacterial opportunistic pathogens, in particular as challenging nosocomial pathogens because of the rapid evolution of antimicrobial resistances. Although we lack fundamental biological insight into virulence mechanisms, an increasing number of researchers are working to identify virulence factors and to study antibiotic resistance. Here, we review current knowledge regarding the regulation of virulence genes and antibiotic resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii. A survey of the two-component systems AdeRS, BaeSR, GacSA and PmrAB explains how each contributes to antibiotic resistance and virulence gene expression, while BfmRS regulates cell envelope structures important for pathogen persistence. A. baumannii uses the transcription factors Fur and Zur to sense iron or zinc depletion and upregulate genes for metal scavenging as a critical survival tool in an animal host. Quorum sensing, nucleoid-associated proteins, and non-classical transcription factors such as AtfA and small regulatory RNAs are discussed in the context of virulence and antibiotic resistance. PMID:28036056

  12. Virulence-Associated Enzymes of Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Fausto; Wolf, Julie M.

    2015-01-01

    Enzymes play key roles in fungal pathogenesis. Manipulation of enzyme expression or activity can significantly alter the infection process, and enzyme expression profiles can be a hallmark of disease. Hence, enzymes are worthy targets for better understanding pathogenesis and identifying new options for combatting fungal infections. Advances in genomics, proteomics, transcriptomics, and mass spectrometry have enabled the identification and characterization of new fungal enzymes. This review focuses on recent developments in the virulence-associated enzymes from Cryptococcus neoformans. The enzymatic suite of C. neoformans has evolved for environmental survival, but several of these enzymes play a dual role in colonizing the mammalian host. We also discuss new therapeutic and diagnostic strategies that could be based on the underlying enzymology. PMID:26453651

  13. Survival, injury, and virulence of freeze-stressed plasmid-bearing virulent Yersinia enterocolitica in ground pork.

    PubMed

    Bhaduri, Saumya

    2005-01-01

    The effect of freezing at -20 degrees C on survival, injury, stability of the virulence plasmid, and expression of virulence-associated determinants of Yersinia enterocolitica (YEP(+)) in ground pork was assessed. The viable counts on nonselective and selective media after 12 weeks of freezing were similar to counts obtained before freezing, indicating that the YEP(+) strain survived the freezing process. There was no evidence of freeze-stress injury. Results of a PCR assay targeting plasmid-associated virF gene and virulence determinants indicate that YEP(+) subjected to freezing are potentially capable of causing food-borne illness and freezing is not a substitute for safe handling and proper cooking of pork.

  14. Virulence Markers of Dengue Viruses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-02-20

    Soawy Ca saoouj Virulence Markers of Dengue Viruses (U) 12. PCIRSONAL AUTHORS) James L. Hardy, Ph.D. and Srisakul C. Kliks, Ph.D. 13a. TYPE Of REPORT...17. COSATI COOLS I& S UBiJECT TERMS0,G ’-mPJ!’ iwin.. - fl OV nu0a mef) FIELD I GROUP SUS-GROUIP Dengue viruses, dengue hemorrhagic fever, virulence...serotypes of dengue virus vary from mild forms i.e. pyrexia of unknown origin (PUO) and dengue fever (DF) to severe forms i.e. dengue hemorrhagic fever and

  15. Campylobacter virulence and survival factors.

    PubMed

    Bolton, Declan J

    2015-06-01

    Despite over 30 years of research, campylobacteriosis is the most prevalent foodborne bacterial infection in many countries including in the European Union and the United States of America. However, relatively little is known about the virulence factors in Campylobacter or how an apparently fragile organism can survive in the food chain, often with enhanced pathogenicity. This review collates information on the virulence and survival determinants including motility, chemotaxis, adhesion, invasion, multidrug resistance, bile resistance and stress response factors. It discusses their function in transition through the food processing environment and human infection. In doing so it provides a fundamental understanding of Campylobacter, critical for improved diagnosis, surveillance and control.

  16. Loss of virulence of the phytopathogen Ralstonia solanacearum through infection by φRSM filamentous phages.

    PubMed

    Addy, Hardian S; Askora, Ahmed; Kawasaki, Takeru; Fujie, Makoto; Yamada, Takashi

    2012-05-01

    φRSM1 and φRSM3 (φRSM phages) are filamentous phages (inoviruses) that infect Ralstonia solanacearum, the causative agent of bacterial wilt. Infection by φRSM phages causes several cultural and physiological changes to host cells, especially loss of virulence. In this study, we characterized changes related to the virulence in φRSM3-infected cells, including (i) reduced twitching motility and reduced amounts of type IV pili (Tfp), (ii) lower levels of β-1,4-endoglucanase (Egl) activity and extracellular polysaccharides (EPS) production, and (iii) reduced expression of certain genes (egl, pehC, phcA, phcB, pilT, and hrpB). The significantly lower levels of phcA and phcB expression in φRSM3-infected cells suggested that functional PhcA was insufficient to activate many virulence genes. Tomato plants injected with φRSM3-infected cells of different R. solanacearum strains did not show wilting symptoms. The virulence and virulence factors were restored when φRSM3-encoded orf15, the gene for a putative repressor-like protein, was disrupted. Expression levels of phcA as well as other virulence-related genes in φRSM3-ΔORF15-infected cells were comparable with those in wild-type cells, suggesting that orf15 of φRSM3 may repress phcA and, consequently, result in loss of virulence.

  17. Virulence of Bordetella bronchiseptica: role of adenylate cyclase-hemolysin.

    PubMed Central

    Gueirard, P; Guiso, N

    1993-01-01

    Bordetella bronchiseptica is a pathogen of laboratory, domestic, and wild animals and sometimes of humans. In the present study some characteristics of the virulence of B. bronchiseptica isolates of different origin were studied. All isolates had similar phenotypes, similar bacteriological characters, and synthesized adenylate cyclase-hemolysin, filamentous hemagglutinin and pertactin but not pertussis toxin. These isolates, however, differed in their ability to express dermonecrotic toxin and to cause a lethal infection, but no correlation was found with the human or animal origin of the isolates. The fact that the most virulent isolate did not express dermonecrotic toxin suggests that this toxin does not play an important role in the virulence of the bacteria in the murine model. After infection with virulent B. bronchiseptica a very early synthesis and a persistence of anti-adenylate cyclase-hemolysin and anti-filamentous hemagglutinin antibodies were observed in the sera of infected mice, suggesting a persistence of the bacteria or of its antigens. B. bronchiseptica adenylate cyclase-hemolysin was purified and was shown to be a major protective antigen against B. bronchiseptica infection. Furthermore, we showed that its immunological and protective properties were different from that of B. pertussis adenylate cyclase-hemolysin, confirming that Bordetella species are immunologically different. Images PMID:8406794

  18. Virulence Mechanisms of Enteroinvasive Pathogens

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-01

    of Plasmid Gene Products otactic response facilitates the establishment of in Virulence a Salmonella infection (47). The action of pan- Anucleate...1967. Electron microscope studies of 36:615-620. experimental salmonella infection . 1. Penetration into 35. Rout, W. R., S. B. Formal, G. J. Dammin

  19. Catabolite and Oxygen Regulation of Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Carlson-Banning, Kimberly M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The biogeography of the gut is diverse in its longitudinal axis, as well as within specific microenvironments. Differential oxygenation and nutrient composition drive the membership of microbial communities in these habitats. Moreover, enteric pathogens can orchestrate further modifications to gain a competitive advantage toward host colonization. These pathogens are versatile and adept when exploiting the human colon. They expertly navigate complex environmental cues and interkingdom signaling to colonize and infect their hosts. Here we demonstrate how enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) uses three sugar-sensing transcription factors, Cra, KdpE, and FusR, to exquisitely regulate the expression of virulence factors associated with its type III secretion system (T3SS) when exposed to various oxygen concentrations. We also explored the effect of mucin-derived nonpreferred carbon sources on EHEC growth and expression of virulence genes. Taken together, the results show that EHEC represses the expression of its T3SS when oxygen is absent, mimicking the largely anaerobic lumen, and activates its T3SS when oxygen is available through Cra. In addition, when EHEC senses mucin-derived sugars heavily present in the O-linked and N-linked glycans of the large intestine, virulence gene expression is initiated. Sugars derived from pectin, a complex plant polysaccharide digested in the large intestine, also increased virulence gene expression. Not only does EHEC sense host- and microbiota-derived interkingdom signals, it also uses oxygen availability and mucin-derived sugars liberated by the microbiota to stimulate expression of the T3SS. This precision in gene regulation allows EHEC to be an efficient pathogen with an extremely low infectious dose. PMID:27879335

  20. Bacterial Human Virulence Genes across Diverse Habitats As Assessed by In silico Analysis of Environmental Metagenomes

    PubMed Central

    Søborg, Ditte A.; Hendriksen, Niels B.; Kilian, Mogens; Christensen, Jan H.; Kroer, Niels

    2016-01-01

    The occurrence and distribution of clinically relevant bacterial virulence genes across natural (non-human) environments is not well understood. We aimed to investigate the occurrence of homologs to bacterial human virulence genes in a variety of ecological niches to better understand the role of natural environments in the evolution of bacterial virulence. Twenty four bacterial virulence genes were analyzed in 46 diverse environmental metagenomic datasets, representing various soils, seawater, freshwater, marine sediments, hot springs, the deep-sea, hypersaline mats, microbialites, gutless worms and glacial ice. Homologs to 16 bacterial human virulence genes, involved in urinary tract infections, gastrointestinal diseases, skin diseases, and wound and systemic infections, showed global ubiquity. A principal component analysis did not demonstrate clear trends across the metagenomes with respect to occurrence and frequency of observed gene homologs. Full-length (>95%) homologs of several virulence genes were identified, and translated sequences of the environmental and clinical genes were up to 50–100% identical. Furthermore, phylogenetic analyses indicated deep branching positions of some of the environmental gene homologs, suggesting that they represent ancient lineages in the phylogeny of the clinical genes. Fifteen virulence gene homologs were detected in metatranscriptomes, providing evidence of environmental expression. The ubiquitous presence and transcription of the virulence gene homologs in non-human environments point to an important ecological role of the genes for the activity and survival of environmental bacteria. Furthermore, the high degree of sequence conservation between several of the environmental and clinical genes suggests common ancestral origins. PMID:27857707

  1. Deciphering the Molecular Variations of Pine Wood Nematode Bursaphelenchus xylophilus with Different Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Xiaolei; Ye, Jianren; Lin, Sixi; Wu, Xiaoqin; Li, Dewei; Nian, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Bursaphelenchus xylophilus is the causative agent of pine wilt disease which has caused huge economic losses in many countries. It has been reported that two forms of pine wood nematodes existed in its native region, i.e., with strong virulence and weak virulence. However, little is known about the molecular differences between the two forms. To better understand their molecular variations, transcriptome and genome sequences of three strongly virulent and one weakly virulent strains were analyzed. We found 238 transcripts and 84 exons which showed notable changes between the two virulent forms. Functional analyses of both differentially expressed transcripts and exons indicated that different virulence strains showed dissimilar nematode growth, reproduction, and oxidoreductase activities. In addition, we also detected a small number of exon-skipping events in B. xylophilus. Meanwhile, 117 SNPs were identified as potential genetic markers in distinguishing the two forms. Four of them were further proved to have undergone allele specific expressions and possibly interrupted the target site of evolutionary conserved B. xylophilus miR-47. These particular SNPs were experimentally verified by including eight additional strains to ensure the validity of our sequencing results. These results could help researchers to better diagnose nematode species with different virulence and facilitate the control of pine wilt disease. PMID:27224277

  2. [Virulence determinant of Chromobacterium violaceum].

    PubMed

    Miki, Tsuyoshi

    2014-01-01

    Chromobacterium violaceum is a Gram-negative bacterium that infects humans and animals with fatal sepsis. The infection with C. violaceum is rare in case of those who are healthy, but once established, C. violaceum causes sever disease accompanied by abscess formation in the lungs, liver and spleen. Furthermore, C. violaceum is resistant to a broad range of antibiotics, which in some cases renders the antimicrobial therapy for this infection difficult. Thus, the infection with C. violaceum displays high mortality rates unless initial proper antimicrobial therapy. In contrast, the infection mechanism had completely remained unknown. To this end, we have tried to identify virulence factors-associated with C. violaceum infection. Two distinct type III secretion systems (TTSSs) were thought to be one of the most important virulence factors, which are encoded by Chromobacterium pathogenicity island 1/1a and 2 (Cpi-1/-1a and -2) respectively. Our results have shown that Cpi-1/-1a-encoded TTSS, but not Cpi-2, is indispensable for the virulence in a mouse infection model. C. violaceum caused fulminant hepatitis in a Cpi-1/-1a-encoded TTSS-dependent manner. We next have identified 16 novel effectors secreted from Cpi-1/-1a-encoded TTS machinery. From these effectors, we found that CopE (Chromobacterium outer protein E) has similarities to a guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) for Rho GTPases. CopE acts as GEF for Rac1 and Cdc42, leading to induction of actin cytoskeletal rearrangement. Interestingly, C. violaceum invades cultured human epithelial cells in a CopE-dependent manner. Finally, an inactivation of CopE by disruption of copE gene or amino acid point mutation leading to loss of GEF activity attenuates significantly the mouse virulence of C. violaceum. These results suggest that Cpi-1/-1a-encoded TTSS is a major virulence determinant for C. violaceum infection, and that CopE contributes to the virulence in part of this pathogen.

  3. Biotypes and virulence factors of Gardnerella vaginalis isolated from cases of bacterial vaginosis.

    PubMed

    Udayalaxmi, J; Bhat, G K; Kotigadde, S

    2011-01-01

    The present study was conducted to correlate the biotypes of Gardnerella vaginalis strains isolated from cases of bacterial vaginosis and their virulence factors. Thirty-two strains of G. vaginalis isolated from cases of bacterial vaginosis were biotyped. Adherence to vaginal epithelial cells, biofilm production, surface hydrophobicity, phospholipase C and protease activity were tested on these isolates. Biotype 1 was the most prevalent (8; 25%), followed by biotype 2 (7; 21.9%) and biotypes 5 and 8 (5; 15.6%). We did not find any statistical correlation between G. vaginalis biotypes and its virulence factors. Virulence factors expressed by G. vaginalis were not associated with a single biotype.

  4. Regulation and function of the Salmonella MgtC virulence protein.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jang-Woo; Lee, Eun-Jin

    2015-10-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium produces many virulence proteins to cause diseases. The Salmonella MgtC protein is one of such virulence proteins specially required for intracellular proliferation inside macrophages and mouse virulence. In this review, we will cover how the mgtC gene is turned on or off and what the signals required for mgtC expression are. Later in this review, we will discuss a recent understanding of MgtC function in Salmonella pathogenesis by identifying its target proteins.

  5. Model-driven mapping of transcriptional networks reveals the circuitry and dynamics of virulence regulation.

    PubMed

    Maier, Ezekiel J; Haynes, Brian C; Gish, Stacey R; Wang, Zhuo A; Skowyra, Michael L; Marulli, Alyssa L; Doering, Tamara L; Brent, Michael R

    2015-05-01

    Key steps in understanding a biological process include identifying genes that are involved and determining how they are regulated. We developed a novel method for identifying transcription factors (TFs) involved in a specific process and used it to map regulation of the key virulence factor of a deadly fungus-its capsule. The map, built from expression profiles of 41 TF mutants, includes 20 TFs not previously known to regulate virulence attributes. It also reveals a hierarchy comprising executive, midlevel, and "foreman" TFs. When grouped by temporal expression pattern, these TFs explain much of the transcriptional dynamics of capsule induction. Phenotypic analysis of TF deletion mutants revealed complex relationships among virulence factors and virulence in mice. These resources and analyses provide the first integrated, systems-level view of capsule regulation and biosynthesis. Our methods dramatically improve the efficiency with which transcriptional networks can be analyzed, making genomic approaches accessible to laboratories focused on specific physiological processes.

  6. Modulation of the enterohemorrhagic E. coli virulence program through the human gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Barnett Foster, Debora

    2013-01-01

    Enteric pathogens must not only survive passage through the gastrointestinal tract but must also coordinate expression of virulence determinants in response to localized microenvironments with the host. Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC), a serious food and waterborne human pathogen, is well equipped with an arsenal of molecular factors that allows it to survive passage through the gastrointestinal tract and successfully colonize the large intestine. This review will explore how EHEC responds to various environmental cues associated with particular microenvironments within the host and how it employs these cues to modulate virulence factor expression, with a view to developing a conceptual framework for understanding modulation of EHEC’s virulence program in response to the host. In vitro studies offer significant insights into the role of individual environmental cues but in vivo studies using animal models as well as data from natural infections will ultimately provide a more comprehensive picture of the highly regulated virulence program of this pathogen. PMID:23552827

  7. Membrane permeability, a pivotal function involved in antibiotic resistance and virulence in Enterobacter aerogenes clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Lavigne, J-P; Sotto, A; Nicolas-Chanoine, M-H; Bouziges, N; Bourg, G; Davin-Regli, A; Pagès, J-M

    2012-06-01

    Imipenem-susceptible E. aerogenes isolates exhibiting extended spectrum β-lactamases, target mutations and a basal efflux expression, were identified in five patients. After imipenem treatment, imipenem-intermediate susceptible (IMI-I) or resistant (IMI-R) isolates emerged in these patients. Alteration in porin synthesis and increase in efflux expression were observed in the IMI-I isolates whereas complete loss of the porins, LPS alteration and efflux overexpression were observed in the IMI-R isolates. Bacterial virulence of the strains was investigated by the Caenorhabditis elegans model. The IMI-R isolates were shown to be significantly less virulent than the IMI-susceptible or IMI-I isolates. The pleiotropic membrane alteration and its associated fitness burden exhibited by E. aerogenes isolates influence their antibiotic resistance and their virulence behaviour. These findings highlight the balance between the low permeability-related resistance and virulence and their relationships with the treatment of resistant pathogens.

  8. Cupric Yersiniabactin Is a Virulence-Associated Superoxide Dismutase Mimic

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Many Gram-negative bacteria interact with extracellular metal ions by expressing one or more siderophore types. Among these, the virulence-associated siderophore yersiniabactin (Ybt) is an avid copper chelator, forming stable cupric (Cu(II)-Ybt) complexes that are detectable in infected patients. Here we show that Ybt-expressing E. coli are protected from intracellular killing within copper-replete phagocytic cells. This survival advantage is highly dependent upon the phagocyte respiratory burst, during which superoxide is generated by the NADPH oxidase complex. Chemical fractionation links this phenotype to a previously unappreciated superoxide dismutase (SOD)-like activity of Cu(II)-Ybt. Unlike previously described synthetic copper-salicylate (Cu(II)-SA) SOD mimics, the salicylate-based natural product Cu(II)-Ybt retains catalytic activity at physiologically plausible protein concentrations. These results reveal a new virulence-associated adaptation based upon spontaneous assembly of a non-protein catalyst. PMID:24283977

  9. The evolution of tuberculosis virulence.

    PubMed

    Basu, Sanjay; Galvani, Alison P

    2009-07-01

    The evolution of Mycobacterium tuberculosis presents several challenges for public health. HIV and resistance to antimycobacterial medications have evolutionary implications for how Mycobacterium tuberculosis will evolve, as these factors influence the host environment and transmission dynamics of tuberculosis strains. We present an evolutionary invasion analysis of tuberculosis that characterizes the direction of tuberculosis evolution in the context of different natural and human-driven selective pressures, including changes in tuberculosis treatment and HIV prevalence. We find that the evolution of tuberculosis virulence can be affected by treatment success rates, the relative transmissibility of emerging strains, the rate of reactivation from latency among hosts, and the life expectancy of hosts. We find that the virulence of tuberculosis strains may also increase as a consequence of rising HIV prevalence, requiring faster case detection strategies in areas where the epidemics of HIV and tuberculosis collide.

  10. Manganese uptake and streptococcal virulence.

    PubMed

    Eijkelkamp, Bart A; McDevitt, Christopher A; Kitten, Todd

    2015-06-01

    Streptococcal solute-binding proteins (SBPs) associated with ATP-binding cassette transporters gained widespread attention first as ostensible adhesins, next as virulence determinants, and finally as metal ion transporters. In this mini-review, we will examine our current understanding of the cellular roles of these proteins, their contribution to metal ion homeostasis, and their crucial involvement in mediating streptococcal virulence. There are now more than 35 studies that have collected structural, biochemical and/or physiological data on the functions of SBPs across a broad range of bacteria. This offers a wealth of data to clarify the formerly puzzling and contentious findings regarding the metal specificity amongst this group of essential bacterial transporters. In particular we will focus on recent findings related to biological roles for manganese in streptococci. These advances will inform efforts aimed at exploiting the importance of manganese and manganese acquisition for the design of new approaches to combat serious streptococcal diseases.

  11. Engineering Attenuated Virulence of a Theileria annulata–Infected Macrophage

    PubMed Central

    Echebli, Nadia; Mhadhbi, Moez; Chaussepied, Marie; Vayssettes, Catherine; Di Santo, James P.; Darghouth, Mohamed Aziz; Langsley, Gordon

    2014-01-01

    Live attenuated vaccines are used to combat tropical theileriosis in North Africa, the Middle East, India, and China. The attenuation process is empirical and occurs only after many months, sometimes years, of in vitro culture of virulent clinical isolates. During this extensive culturing, attenuated lines lose their vaccine potential. To circumvent this we engineered the rapid ablation of the host cell transcription factor c-Jun, and within only 3 weeks the line engineered for loss of c-Jun activation displayed in vitro correlates of attenuation such as loss of adhesion, reduced MMP9 gelatinase activity, and diminished capacity to traverse Matrigel. Specific ablation of a single infected host cell virulence trait (c-Jun) induced a complete failure of Theileria annulata–transformed macrophages to disseminate, whereas virulent macrophages disseminated to the kidneys, spleen, and lungs of Rag2/γC mice. Thus, in this heterologous mouse model loss of c-Jun expression led to ablation of dissemination of T. annulata–infected and transformed macrophages. The generation of Theileria-infected macrophages genetically engineered for ablation of a specific host cell virulence trait now makes possible experimental vaccination of calves to address how loss of macrophage dissemination impacts the disease pathology of tropical theileriosis. PMID:25375322

  12. Gallium induces the production of virulence factors in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    García-Contreras, Rodolfo; Pérez-Eretza, Berenice; Lira-Silva, Elizabeth; Jasso-Chávez, Ricardo; Coria-Jiménez, Rafael; Rangel-Vega, Adrián; Maeda, Toshinari; Wood, Thomas K

    2014-02-01

    The novel antimicrobial gallium is a nonredox iron III analogue with bacteriostatic and bactericidal properties, effective for the treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in vitro and in vivo in mouse and rabbit infection models. It interferes with iron metabolism, transport, and presumably its homeostasis. As gallium exerts its antimicrobial effects by competing with iron, we hypothesized that it ultimately will lead cells to an iron deficiency status. As iron deficiency promotes the expression of virulence factors in vitro and promotes the pathogenicity of P. aeruginosa in animal models, it is anticipated that treatment with gallium will also promote the production of virulence factors. To test this hypothesis, the reference strain PA14 and two clinical isolates from patients with cystic fibrosis were exposed to gallium, and their production of pyocyanin, rhamnolipids, elastase, alkaline protease, alginate, pyoverdine, and biofilm was determined. Gallium treatment induced the production of all the virulence factors tested in the three strains except for pyoverdine. In addition, as the Ga-induced virulence factors are quorum sensing controlled, co-administration of Ga and the quorum quencher brominated furanone C-30 was assayed, and it was found that C-30 alleviated growth inhibition from gallium. Hence, adding both C-30 and gallium may be more effective in the treatment of P. aeruginosa infections.

  13. Salmonella-secreted Virulence Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Heffron, Fred; Niemann, George; Yoon, Hyunjin; Kidwai, Afshan S.; Brown, Roslyn N.; McDermott, Jason E.; Smith, Richard D.; Adkins, Joshua N.

    2011-05-01

    In this short review we discuss secreted virulence factors of Salmonella, which directly affect Salmonella interaction with its host. Salmonella secretes protein to subvert host defenses but also, as discussed, to reduce virulence thereby permitting the bacteria to persist longer and more successfully disperse. The type III secretion system (TTSS) is the best known and well studied of the mechanisms that enable secretion from the bacterial cytoplasm to the host cell cytoplasm. Other secretion systems include outer membrane vesicles, which are present in all Gram-negative bacteria examined to date, two-partner secretion, and type VI secretion will also be addressed. Excellent reviews of Salmonella secreted effectors have focused on themes such as actin rearrangements, vesicular trafficking, ubiquitination, and the activities of the virulence factors themselves. This short review is based on S. Typhimurium infection of mice because it is a model of typhoid like disease in humans. We have organized effectors in terms of events that happen during the infection cycle and how secreted effectors may be involved.

  14. Secretome profiling of highly virulent Mycobacterium bovis 04-303 strain reveals higher abundance of virulence-associated proteins.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Romero, Fernando; Mendoza-Hernández, Guillermo; Suárez-Güemes, Francisco; Hernández-Pando, Rogelio; Castañón-Arreola, Mauricio

    2016-11-01

    Mycobacterium bovis is the causative agent of tuberculosis in farms, wildlife and causes sporadic disease in humans. Despite the high similitude in genome sequence between M. bovis strains, some strains like the wild boar 04-303 isolate show a highly virulent phenotype in animal models. Comparative studies will contribute to link protein expression with the virulence phenotype. In vitro, the 04-303 strain was more phagocytized by J774A.1 macrophages in comparison with 444 strain (a cow isolate with the same genotype) and BCG. The secretome of these strains showed a significant proportion of shared proteins (368 spots). Among the proteins only visualized in the secretome of the 04-303 strain, we identify the nine most abundant proteins by LC-MS/MS. The most relevant were EsxA and EsxB proteins, which are encoded in the RD1 region, deleted in BCG strains. These proteins are the major virulence factor of M. tuberculosis. The other proteins identified belong to functional categories of virulence, detoxification, and adaptation; lipid metabolism; and cell wall and cell processes. The relatively high proportion of proteins involved in the cell wall and cell process is consistent with the previously described variation among M. bovis genomes.

  15. Polyphasic characterization and genetic relatedness of low-virulence and virulent Listeria monocytogenes isolates

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Currently, food regulatory authorities consider all Listeria monocytogenes isolates as equally virulent. However, an increasing number of studies demonstrate extensive variations in virulence and pathogenicity of L. monocytogenes strains. Up to now, there is no comprehensive overview of the population genetic structure of L. monocytogenes taking into account virulence level. We have previously demonstrated that different low-virulence strains exhibit the same mutations in virulence genes suggesting that they could have common evolutionary pathways. New low-virulence strains were identified and assigned to phenotypic and genotypic Groups using cluster analysis. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, virulence gene sequencing and multi-locus sequence typing analyses were performed to study the genetic relatedness and the population structure between the studied low-virulence isolates and virulent strains. Results These methods showed that low-virulence strains are widely distributed in the two major lineages, but some are also clustered according to their genetic mutations. These analyses showed that low-virulence strains initially grouped according to their lineage, then to their serotypes and after which, they lost their virulence suggesting a relatively recent emergence. Conclusions Loss of virulence in lineage II strains was related to point mutation in a few virulence genes (prfA, inlA, inlB, plcA). These strains thus form a tightly clustered, monophyletic group with limited diversity. In contrast, low-virulence strains of lineage I were more dispersed among the virulence strains and the origin of their loss of virulence has not been identified yet, even if some strains exhibited different mutations in prfA or inlA. PMID:23267677

  16. Helicobacter pylori virulence and cancer pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Yamaoka, Yoshio; Graham, David Y

    2014-06-01

    Helicobacter pylori is human gastric pathogen that causes chronic and progressive gastric mucosal inflammation and is responsible for the gastric inflammation-associated diseases, gastric cancer and peptic ulcer disease. Specific outcomes reflect the interplay between host-, environmental- and bacterial-specific factors. Progress in understanding putative virulence factors in disease pathogenesis has been limited and many false leads have consumed scarce resources. Few in vitro-in vivo correlations or translational applications have proved clinically relevant. Reported virulence factor-related outcomes reflect differences in relative risk of disease rather than specificity for any specific outcome. Studies of individual virulence factor associations have provided conflicting results. Since virulence factors are linked, studies of groups of putative virulence factors are needed to provide clinically useful information. Here, the authors discuss the progress made in understanding the role of H. pylori virulence factors CagA, vacuolating cytotoxin, OipA and DupA in disease pathogenesis and provide suggestions for future studies.

  17. ppGpp Conjures Bacterial Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Dalebroux, Zachary D.; Svensson, Sarah L.; Gaynor, Erin C.; Swanson, Michele S.

    2010-01-01

    Summary: Like for all microbes, the goal of every pathogen is to survive and replicate. However, to overcome the formidable defenses of their hosts, pathogens are also endowed with traits commonly associated with virulence, such as surface attachment, cell or tissue invasion, and transmission. Numerous pathogens couple their specific virulence pathways with more general adaptations, like stress resistance, by integrating dedicated regulators with global signaling networks. In particular, many of nature's most dreaded bacteria rely on nucleotide alarmones to cue metabolic disturbances and coordinate survival and virulence programs. Here we discuss how components of the stringent response contribute to the virulence of a wide variety of pathogenic bacteria. PMID:20508246

  18. PSM-Mec-A Virulence Determinant that Connects Transcriptional Regulation, Virulence, and Antibiotic Resistance in Staphylococci.

    PubMed

    Qin, Li; McCausland, Joshua W; Cheung, Gordon Y C; Otto, Michael

    2016-01-01

    PSM-mec is a secreted virulence factor that belongs to the phenol-soluble modulin (PSM) family of amphipathic, alpha-helical peptide toxins produced by Staphylococcus species. All known PSMs are core genome-encoded with the exception of PSM-mec, whose gene is found in specific sub-types of SCCmec methicillin resistance mobile genetic elements present in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococci. In addition to the cytolytic translational product, PSM-mec, the psm-mec locus encodes a regulatory RNA. In S. aureus, the psm-mec locus influences cytolytic capacity, methicillin resistance, biofilm formation, cell spreading, and the expression of other virulence factors, such as other PSMs, which results in a significant impact on immune evasion and disease. However, these effects are highly strain-dependent, which is possibly due to differences in PSM-mec peptide vs. psm-mec RNA-controlled effects. Here, we summarize the functional properties of PSM-mec and the psm-mec RNA molecule and their roles in staphylococcal pathogenesis and physiology.

  19. Salmonella plasmid virulence gene spvB enhances bacterial virulence by inhibiting autophagy in a zebrafish infection model.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuan-Yuan; Wang, Ting; Gao, Song; Xu, Guang-Mei; Niu, Hua; Huang, Rui; Wu, Shu-Yan

    2016-02-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium (S. typhimurium) is a facultative intracellular pathogen that can cause gastroenteritis and systemic infection in a wide range of hosts. Salmonella plasmid virulence gene spvB is closely related to bacterial virulence in different cells and animal models, and the encoded protein acts as an intracellular toxin required for ADP-ribosyl transferase activity. However, until now there is no report about the pathogenecity of spvB gene on zebrafish. Due to the outstanding advantages of zebrafish in analyzing bacteria-host interactions, a S. typhimurium infected zebrafish model was set up here to study the effect of spvB on autophagy and intestinal pathogenesis in vivo. We found that spvB gene could decrease the LD50 of S. typhimurium, and the strain carrying spvB promoted bacterial proliferation and aggravated the intestinal damage manifested by the narrowed intestines, fallen microvilli, blurred epithelium cell structure and infiltration of inflammatory cells. Results demonstrated the enhanced virulence induced by spvB in zebrafish. In spvB-mutant strain infected zebrafish, the levels of Lc3 turnover and Beclin1 expression increased, and the double-membraned autophagosome structures were observed, suggesting that spvB can inhibit autophagy activity. In summary, our results indicate that S. typhimurium strain containing spvB displays more virulence, triggering an increase in bacterial survival and intestine injuries by suppressing autophagy for the first time. This model provides novel insights into the role of Salmonella plasmid virulence gene in bacterial pathogenesis, and can help to further elucidate the relationship between bacteria and host immune response.

  20. Prevalence of Virulence Factors and Drug Resistance in Clinical Isolates of Enterococci: A Study from North India

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Tuhina; Anupurba, Shampa

    2015-01-01

    Along with emergence of multidrug resistance, presence of several virulence factors in enterococci is an emerging concept. This study was undertaken to determine the prevalence of various virulence factors phenotypically and genotypically in enterococci and study their association with multidrug resistance. A total of 310 enterococcal isolates were studied, comprising 155 E. faecium and 155 E. faecalis. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was done by disc diffusion and agar dilution method. Hemolysin, gelatinase, biofilm production, and haemagglutination were detected phenotypically and presence of virulence genes, namely, asa1, gelE, cylA, esp, and hyl, was detected by multiplex PCR. Of the total, 47.41% isolates were high level gentamicin resistant (HLGRE) and 7.09% were vancomycin resistant (VRE). All the virulence traits studied were found in varying proportions, with majority in E. faecalis (p > 0.05). Strong biofilm producers possessed either asa1 or gelE gene. gelE silent gene was detected in 41.37% (12/29). However, increase in resistance was associated with significant decrease in expression or acquisition of virulence genes. Further, acquisition of vancomycin resistance was the significant factor responsible for the loss of virulence traits. Though it is presumed that increased drug resistance correlates with increased virulence, acquisition of vancomycin resistance might be responsible for reduced expression of virulence traits to meet the “biological cost” relating to VRE. PMID:26366302

  1. Analysis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa growth and virulence in modelled microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guadarrama, Seratna; Pulcini, Elinor de L.; Broadaway, Susan C.; Pyle, Barry H.

    2005-08-01

    Stress, radiation and microgravity cause astronauts to experience secondary immunosuppression. Spaceflight conditions enhance bacterial growth and alter antimicrobial susceptibility. Clinostats are used to model microgravity effects at 1xg. In controls rotated on the vertical axis, the g-vector acts on cells as in static cultures. Salmonella enterica serovar T yphimurium virulence genes are up-regulated in modelled microgravity (MMG); a MMG regulon has been postulated. We hypothesize that the virulence of P. aeruginosa (PA) may be affected similarly by microgravity, which could be observed in MMG. This study focused on regulation of the ETA protein by PA during growth in MMG. PA103 was grown in an ETA production medium at 37°C. One series of media was inoculated with frozen cultures and grown using horizontal (MMG) or static incubation. Another series inoculated with refrigerated cultures included vertical rotating controls. Analyses included optical density (OD), agar plate counts (PC) on R2A, ETA ELISA, and protein expression by 2-D gel analyses. Growth and ETA results differed depending on inoculum, with minor effects of MMG. Proteomic analysis of 2-D gels indicate differences in protein expression with MMG. Growth and ETA results show that consistent methodology is critical when studying environmental effects. This study provides information on the relationships between environmental changes and virulence regulation, especially for flight experiments, when ground experiments are used to predict potential spaceflight effects.

  2. Analysis of Pdeudomonas aeruginosa Growth and Virulence in Modelled Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guadarrama, Seratna; deL. Pulcini, Elinor; Broadaway, Susan C.; Pyle, Barry H.

    2005-01-01

    Stress, radiation and microgravity cause astronauts to experience secondary immunosuppression. Spaceflight conditions enhance bacterial growth and alter antimicrobial susceptibility. Clinostats are used to model microgravity effects at lxg. In controls rotated on the vertical axis, the g-vector acts on cells as in static cultures. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium virulence genes are up-regulated in modelled microgravity (MMG); a MMG regulon has been postulated. We hypothesize that the virulence of P. aeruginosa (PA) may be affected similarly by microgravity, which could be observed in MMG. This study focused on regulation of the ETA protein by PA during growth in MMG. PA103 was grown in an ETA production medium at 37 C. One series of media was inoculated with frozen cultures and grown using horizontal (MMG) or static incubation. Another series inoculated with refrigerated cultures included vertical rotating controls. Analyses included optical density (OD), agar plate counts (PC) on R2A, ETA ELISA, and protein expression by 2-D gel analyses. Growth and ETA results differed depending on inoculum, with minor effects of MMG. Proteomic analysis of 2-D gels indicate differences in protein expression with MMG. Growth and ETA results show that consistent methodology is critical when studying environmental effects. This study provides information on the relationships between environmental changes and virulence regulation, especially for flight experiments, when ground experiments are used to predict potential spaceflight effects.

  3. Pro-inflammatory cytokines can act as intracellular modulators of commensal bacterial virulence

    PubMed Central

    Mahdavi, Jafar; Royer, Pierre-Joseph; Sjölinder, Hong S.; Azimi, Sheyda; Self, Tim; Stoof, Jeroen; Wheldon, Lee M.; Brännström, Kristoffer; Wilson, Raymond; Moreton, Joanna; Moir, James W. B.; Sihlbom, Carina; Borén, Thomas; Jonsson, Ann-Beth; Soultanas, Panos; Ala'Aldeen, Dlawer A. A.

    2013-01-01

    Interactions between commensal pathogens and hosts are critical for disease development but the underlying mechanisms for switching between the commensal and virulent states are unknown. We show that the human pathogen Neisseria meningitidis, the leading cause of pyogenic meningitis, can modulate gene expression via uptake of host pro-inflammatory cytokines leading to increased virulence. This uptake is mediated by type IV pili (Tfp) and reliant on the PilT ATPase activity. Two Tfp subunits, PilE and PilQ, are identified as the ligands for TNF-α and IL-8 in a glycan-dependent manner, and their deletion results in decreased virulence and increased survival in a mouse model. We propose a novel mechanism by which pathogens use the twitching motility mode of the Tfp machinery for sensing and importing host elicitors, aligning with the inflamed environment and switching to the virulent state. PMID:24107297

  4. Production of virulence factors in Candida strains isolated from patients with denture stomatitis and control individuals.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Cristiane Aparecida; Domingues, Nádia; Araújo, Maria Izabel Daniel Santos Alves; Junqueira, Juliana Campos; Back-Brito, Graziella Nuernberg; Jorge, Antonio Olavo Cardoso

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the production of virulence factors in Candida isolates from the oral cavities of 50 patients with different degrees of denture stomatitis (DS, type I, II and III) and 50 individuals without signs of DS. We evaluated the enzymatic and hemolytic activities, the biofilm formation, and the cell surface hydrophobicity (CSH) in all isolates. Germ tube (GT) production was also evaluated in Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis isolates. In C. albicans and C. dubliniensis the secretion of hemolysin and GT production was significantly different between isolates from patients with DS and individuals without DS. No significant difference was observed in the production of virulence factors by Candida glabrata isolates. Candida isolates expressed a wide range of virulence factors. However, in the majority of isolates from the type III lesions, the production of the virulence factors was higher than for the other groups.

  5. Cell Density Control of Staphylococcal Virulence Mediated by an Octapeptide Pheromone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Guangyong; Beavis, Ronald C.; Novick, Richard P.

    1995-12-01

    Some bacterial pathogens elaborate and secrete virulence factors in response to environmental signals, others in response to a specific host product, and still others in response to no discernible cue. In this study, we have demonstrated that the synthesis of Staphylococcus aureus virulence factors is controlled by a density-sensing system that utilizes an octapeptide produced by the organism itself. The octapeptide activates expression of the agr locus, a global regulator of the virulence response. This response involves the reciprocal regulation of genes encoding surface proteins and those encoding secreted virulence factors. As cells enter the postexponential phase, surface protein genes are repressed by agr and secretory protein genes are subsequently activated. The intracellular agr effector is a regulatory RNA, RNAIII, whose transcription is activated by an agr-encoded signal transduction system for which the octapeptide is the ligand.

  6. Phenol-soluble modulins – critical determinants of staphylococcal virulence

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Gordon Y. C.; Joo, Hwang-Soo; Chatterjee, Som S.; Otto, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Phenol-soluble modulins (PSMs) are a recently discovered family of amphipathic, alpha-helical peptides that have multiple roles in staphylococcal pathogenesis and contribute to a large extent to the pathogenic success of virulent staphylococci, such as Staphylococcus aureus. PSMs may cause lysis of many human cell types including leukocytes and erythrocytes, stimulate inflammatory responses, and contribute to biofilm development. PSMs appear to have an original role in the commensal lifestyle of staphylococci, where they facilitate growth and spreading on epithelial surfaces. Aggressive, cytolytic PSMs seem to have evolved from that original role and are mainly expressed in highly virulent S. aureus. Here we will review the biochemistry, genetics and role of PSMs in the commensal and pathogenic lifestyles of staphylococci, discuss how diversification of PSMs defines the aggressiveness of staphylococcal species, and evaluate potential avenues to target PSMs for drug development against staphylococcal infections. PMID:24372362

  7. Virus glycosylation: role in virulence and immune interactions.

    PubMed

    Vigerust, David J; Shepherd, Virginia L

    2007-05-01

    The study of N-linked glycosylation as it relates to virus biology has become an area of intense interest in recent years due to its ability to impart various advantages to virus survival and virulence. HIV and influenza, two clear threats to human health, have been shown to rely on expression of specific oligosaccharides to evade detection by the host immune system. Additionally, other viruses such as Hendra, SARS-CoV, influenza, hepatitis and West Nile rely on N-linked glycosylation for crucial functions such as entry into host cells, proteolytic processing and protein trafficking. This review focuses on recent findings on the importance of glycosylation to viral virulence and immune evasion for several prominent human pathogens.

  8. Inhibition of Cronobacter sakazakii Virulence Factors by Citral

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Chao; Sun, Yi; Liu, Zhiyuan; Guo, Du; Sun, Huihui; Sun, Zheng; Chen, Shan; Zhang, Wenting; Wen, Qiwu; Peng, Xiaoli; Xia, Xiaodong

    2017-01-01

    Cronobacter sakazakii is a foodborne pathogen associated with fatal forms of necrotizing enterocolitis, meningitis and sepsis in neonates and infants. The aim of this study was to determine whether citral, a major component of lemongrass oil, could suppress putative virulence factors of C. sakazakii that contribute to infection. Sub-inhibitory concentrations of citral significantly decreased motility, quorum sensing, biofilm formation and endotoxin production. Citral substantially reduced the adhesion and invasion of C. sakazakii to Caco-2 cells and decreased bacterial survival and replication within the RAW 264.7 macrophage cells. Citral also repressed the expression of eighteen genes involved in the virulence. These findings suggest that citral has potential to be developed as an alternative or supplemental agent to mitigate the infections caused by C. sakazakii. PMID:28233814

  9. Evolution of viral virulence: empirical studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kurath, Gael; Wargo, Andrew R.

    2016-01-01

    The concept of virulence as a pathogen trait that can evolve in response to selection has led to a large body of virulence evolution theory developed in the 1980-1990s. Various aspects of this theory predict increased or decreased virulence in response to a complex array of selection pressures including mode of transmission, changes in host, mixed infection, vector-borne transmission, environmental changes, host vaccination, host resistance, and co-evolution of virus and host. A fundamental concept is prediction of trade-offs between the costs and benefits associated with higher virulence, leading to selection of optimal virulence levels. Through a combination of observational and experimental studies, including experimental evolution of viruses during serial passage, many of these predictions have now been explored in systems ranging from bacteriophage to viruses of plants, invertebrates, and vertebrate hosts. This chapter summarizes empirical studies of viral virulence evolution in numerous diverse systems, including the classic models myxomavirus in rabbits, Marek's disease virus in chickens, and HIV in humans. Collectively these studies support some aspects of virulence evolution theory, suggest modifications for other aspects, and show that predictions may apply in some virus:host interactions but not in others. Finally, we consider how virulence evolution theory applies to disease management in the field.

  10. Virulence Evolution Within the Ug99 Lineage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Race TTKSK (syn. Ug99) of Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici, recognized for possessing virulence to the stem rust resistance gene Sr31, was first identified in Uganda in 1998. Since then, TTKSK has been identified in Kenya in 2005 and Yemen in 2006. In addition to virulence to Sr31, race TTKSK was ...

  11. Differences in the carriage and the ability to utilize the serotype associated virulence plasmid in strains of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium investigated by use of a self-transferable virulence plasmid, pOG669.

    PubMed

    Olsen, John E; Brown, Derek J; Thomsen, Line E; Platt, David J; Chadfield, Mark S

    2004-06-01

    Most strains of Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serotype typhimurium (S. typhimurium) naturally harbour a virulence plasmid which carries the salmonella plasmid virulence (spv) genes. However, isolates belonging to certain phage types are generally found without the plasmid. We have utilized a self-transferable virulence plasmid, pOG669 to investigate the effect of introduction of spv genes into strains of such phage types. The use of the co-integrate plasmid, pOG669, was validated on a diverse collection of strains. pOG669 was transferred into strains of serotypes that are normally associated with the possession of virulence plasmids. All strains maintained the wild type level of virulence in a mouse model, except that introduction of pOG669 restored normal virulence levels in an avirulent, plasmid free strain of S. dublin and resulted in a decrease in virulence in a strain of S. dublin from clonal line Du3. S. gallinarum did not become virulent in mice, but pOG669 was functionally interchangeable with the wild type plasmid when strains were tested in a chicken model. Strains of serotypes not normally associated with the carriage of a virulence plasmid did not increase in virulence upon the introduction of pOG669. An IncX plasmid pOG670 that was included as control was incompatible with the virulence plasmid in a strain of S. dublin, demonstrating that the common virulence plasmid of this serotype is of a different incompatibility group than other virulence plasmids. Strains of S. typhimurium from phage types that do not normally carry a virulence plasmid responded differently to attempts to introduce pOG669. No transconjugants were observed with the strains of DT5 and DT21. The introduction of pOG669 did not alter the virulence of JEO3942(DT10), DT35 and JEO3949(DT66) significantly, while DT1 and DT27 became more virulent. DT27 became as virulent as wild type C5, while logVC(10) of DT1 only increased from 4.1 to 5.7. The ability to express spv-genes was

  12. Productive steps toward an antimicrobial targeting virulence

    PubMed Central

    Barczak, Amy K.; Hung, Deborah T.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Targeting virulence factors has gained increasing attention as a potential approach to new antibiotics. Small molecule inhibitors of virulence have been shown to change the course of disease in whole organism infection models. Recently, key advances in the field include the identification of novel targets within cell signaling pathways, a new class of anti-virulence compounds that target bacterial defenses against host immunity, and a growing body of in vivo data to support the general approach of anti-virulence therapies. Additionally, there has been a distinct trend toward developing broader spectrum anti-virulence compounds, in particular agents with activity against diverse Gram-negative organisms. Herein we provide an update on the status of the field with a focus on recent advancements. PMID:19631578

  13. The Vibrio campbellii quorum sensing signals have a different impact on virulence of the bacterium towards different crustacean hosts.

    PubMed

    Pande, Gde Sasmita Julyantoro; Natrah, Fatin Mohd Ikhsan; Sorgeloos, Patrick; Bossier, Peter; Defoirdt, Tom

    2013-12-27

    Pathogenic bacteria communicate with small signal molecules in a process called quorum sensing, and they often use different signal molecules to regulate virulence gene expression. Vibrio campbellii, one of the major pathogens of aquatic organisms, regulates virulence gene expression by a three channel quorum sensing system. Here we show that although they use a common signal transduction cascade, the signal molecules have a different impact on the virulence of the bacterium towards different hosts, i.e. the brine shrimp Artemia franciscana and the commercially important giant freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii. These results suggest that the use of multiple types of signal molecules to regulate virulence gene expression is one of the features that allow bacteria to infect different hosts. Our findings emphasize that it is highly important to study the efficacy of quorum sensing inhibitors as novel biocontrol agents under conditions that are as close as possible to the clinical situation.

  14. Genomic Insights into a New Citrobacter koseri Strain Revealed Gene Exchanges with the Virulence-Associated Yersinia pestis pPCP1 Plasmid

    PubMed Central

    Armougom, Fabrice; Bitam, Idir; Croce, Olivier; Merhej, Vicky; Barassi, Lina; Nguyen, Ti-Thien; La Scola, Bernard; Raoult, Didier

    2016-01-01

    The history of infectious diseases raised the plague as one of the most devastating for human beings. Far too often considered an ancient disease, the frequent resurgence of the plague has led to consider it as a reemerging disease in Madagascar, Algeria, Libya, and Congo. The genetic factors associated with the pathogenicity of Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of the plague, involve the acquisition of the pPCP1 plasmid that promotes host invasion through the expression of the virulence factor Pla. The surveillance of plague foci after the 2003 outbreak in Algeria resulted in a positive detection of the specific pla gene of Y. pestis in rodents. However, the phenotypic characterization of the isolate identified a Citrobacter koseri. The comparative genomics of our sequenced C. koseri URMITE genome revealed a mosaic gene structure resulting from the lifestyle of our isolate and provided evidence for gene exchanges with different enteric bacteria. The most striking was the acquisition of a continuous 2 kb genomic fragment containing the virulence factor Pla of the Y. pestis pPCP1 plasmid; however, the subcutaneous injection of the CKU strain in mice did not produce any pathogenic effect. Our findings demonstrate that fast molecular detection of plague using solely the pla gene is unsuitable and should rather require Y. pestis gene marker combinations. We also suggest that the evolutionary force that might govern the expression of pathogenicity can occur through the acquisition of virulence genes but could also require the loss or the inactivation of resident genes such as antivirulence genes. PMID:27014253

  15. Genomic Insights into a New Citrobacter koseri Strain Revealed Gene Exchanges with the Virulence-Associated Yersinia pestis pPCP1 Plasmid.

    PubMed

    Armougom, Fabrice; Bitam, Idir; Croce, Olivier; Merhej, Vicky; Barassi, Lina; Nguyen, Ti-Thien; La Scola, Bernard; Raoult, Didier

    2016-01-01

    The history of infectious diseases raised the plague as one of the most devastating for human beings. Far too often considered an ancient disease, the frequent resurgence of the plague has led to consider it as a reemerging disease in Madagascar, Algeria, Libya, and Congo. The genetic factors associated with the pathogenicity of Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of the plague, involve the acquisition of the pPCP1 plasmid that promotes host invasion through the expression of the virulence factor Pla. The surveillance of plague foci after the 2003 outbreak in Algeria resulted in a positive detection of the specific pla gene of Y. pestis in rodents. However, the phenotypic characterization of the isolate identified a Citrobacter koseri. The comparative genomics of our sequenced C. koseri URMITE genome revealed a mosaic gene structure resulting from the lifestyle of our isolate and provided evidence for gene exchanges with different enteric bacteria. The most striking was the acquisition of a continuous 2 kb genomic fragment containing the virulence factor Pla of the Y. pestis pPCP1 plasmid; however, the subcutaneous injection of the CKU strain in mice did not produce any pathogenic effect. Our findings demonstrate that fast molecular detection of plague using solely the pla gene is unsuitable and should rather require Y. pestis gene marker combinations. We also suggest that the evolutionary force that might govern the expression of pathogenicity can occur through the acquisition of virulence genes but could also require the loss or the inactivation of resident genes such as antivirulence genes.

  16. Both msa genes in Renibacterium salmoninarum are needed for full virulence in bacterial kidney disease

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coady, A.M.; Murray, A.L.; Elliott, D.G.; Rhodes, L.D.

    2006-01-01

    Renibacterium salmoninarum, a gram-positive diplococcobacillus that causes bacterial kidney disease among salmon and trout, has two chromosomal loci encoding the major soluble antigen (msa) gene. Because the MSA protein is widely suspected to be an important virulence factor, we used insertion-duplication mutagenesis to generate disruptions of either the msa1 or msa2 gene. Surprisingly, expression of MSA protein in broth cultures appeared unaffected. However, the virulence of either mutant in juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) by intraperitoneal challenge was severely attenuated, suggesting that disruption of the msa1 or msa2 gene affected in vivo expression. Copyright ?? 2006, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  17. Virulence determinants and production of extracellular enzymes in Enterococcus spp. from surface water sources.

    PubMed

    Molale, Lesego Gertrude; Bezuidenhout, Cornelius Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Virulence factors in Enterococcus may be indicative of potential pathogenicity. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between the presence of clinically relevant virulence genes, in Enterococcus spp. from environmental water, and their in vitro expression. One hundred and twenty-four Enterococcus isolates (seven species), from five surface water systems in the North West Province, South Africa, were screened for the presence of asa1, cylA, esp, gelE and hyl using polymerase chain reaction. The expression of cylA, hyl and gelE was determined by phenotypic assessments. Sixty-five percent of the isolates were positive for one virulence gene and 13% for two or more. Most frequently detected genes were gelE (32%) and cylA (28%). Enterococcal surface protein was absent in all isolates screened. The presence of virulence genes was correlated with their extracellular enzyme production. The results show that a large percentage of these environmental Enterococcus spp. possess virulence factors that could be expressed in vitro. This is a cause for concern and could have implications for individuals using this water for recreational and cultural purposes. Further investigation is required into the sources of these potential pathogenic Enterococcus isolates and measures to minimize their presence in water sources.

  18. A gacS Deletion in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Cystic Fibrosis Isolate CHA Shapes Its Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Sall, Khady Mayebine; Casabona, Maria Guillermina; Bordi, Christophe; Huber, Philippe; de Bentzmann, Sophie; Attrée, Ina; Elsen, Sylvie

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a human opportunistic pathogen, is capable of provoking acute and chronic infections that are associated with defined sets of virulence factors. During chronic infections, the bacterium accumulates mutations that silence some and activate other genes. Here we show that the cystic fibrosis isolate CHA exhibits a unique virulence phenotype featuring a mucoid morphology, an active Type III Secretion System (T3SS, hallmark of acute infections), and no Type VI Secretion System (H1-T6SS). This virulence profile is due to a 426 bp deletion in the 3′ end of the gacS gene encoding an essential regulatory protein. The absence of GacS disturbs the Gac/Rsm pathway leading to depletion of the small regulatory RNAs RsmY/RsmZ and, in consequence, to expression of T3SS, while switching off the expression of H1-T6SS and Pel polysaccharides. The CHA isolate also exhibits full ability to swim and twitch, due to active flagellum and Type IVa pili. Thus, unlike the classical scheme of balance between virulence factors, clinical strains may adapt to a local niche by expressing both alginate exopolysaccharide, a hallmark of membrane stress that protects from antibiotic action, host defences and phagocytosis, and efficient T3S machinery that is considered as an aggressive virulence factor. PMID:24780952

  19. Calcineurin Targets Involved in Stress Survival and Fungal Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hee-Soo; Chow, Eve W. L.; Fu, Ci; Soderblom, Erik J.; Moseley, M. Arthur; Heitman, Joseph; Cardenas, Maria E.

    2016-01-01

    Calcineurin governs stress survival, sexual differentiation, and virulence of the human fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans. Calcineurin is activated by increased Ca2+ levels caused by stress, and transduces signals by dephosphorylating protein substrates. Herein, we identified and characterized calcineurin substrates in C. neoformans by employing phosphoproteomic TiO2 enrichment and quantitative mass spectrometry. The identified targets include the transactivator Crz1 as well as novel substrates whose functions are linked to P-bodies/stress granules (PBs/SGs) and mRNA translation and decay, such as Pbp1 and Puf4. We show that Crz1 is a bona fide calcineurin substrate, and Crz1 localization and transcriptional activity are controlled by calcineurin. We previously demonstrated that thermal and other stresses trigger calcineurin localization to PBs/SGs. Several calcineurin targets localized to PBs/SGs, including Puf4 and Pbp1, contribute to stress resistance and virulence individually or in conjunction with Crz1. Moreover, Pbp1 is also required for sexual development. Genetic epistasis analysis revealed that Crz1 and the novel targets Lhp1, Puf4, and Pbp1 function in a branched calcineurin pathway that orchestrates stress survival and virulence. These findings support a model whereby calcineurin controls stress and virulence, at the transcriptional level via Crz1, and post-transcriptionally by localizing to PBs/SGs and acting on targets involved in mRNA metabolism. The calcineurin targets identified in this study share little overlap with known calcineurin substrates, with the exception of Crz1. In particular, the mRNA binding proteins and PBs/SGs residents comprise a cohort of novel calcineurin targets that have not been previously linked to calcineurin in mammals or in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This study suggests either extensive evolutionary rewiring of the calcineurin pathway, or alternatively that these novel calcineurin targets have yet to be characterized

  20. Calcineurin Targets Involved in Stress Survival and Fungal Virulence.

    PubMed

    Park, Hee-Soo; Chow, Eve W L; Fu, Ci; Soderblom, Erik J; Moseley, M Arthur; Heitman, Joseph; Cardenas, Maria E

    2016-09-01

    Calcineurin governs stress survival, sexual differentiation, and virulence of the human fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans. Calcineurin is activated by increased Ca2+ levels caused by stress, and transduces signals by dephosphorylating protein substrates. Herein, we identified and characterized calcineurin substrates in C. neoformans by employing phosphoproteomic TiO2 enrichment and quantitative mass spectrometry. The identified targets include the transactivator Crz1 as well as novel substrates whose functions are linked to P-bodies/stress granules (PBs/SGs) and mRNA translation and decay, such as Pbp1 and Puf4. We show that Crz1 is a bona fide calcineurin substrate, and Crz1 localization and transcriptional activity are controlled by calcineurin. We previously demonstrated that thermal and other stresses trigger calcineurin localization to PBs/SGs. Several calcineurin targets localized to PBs/SGs, including Puf4 and Pbp1, contribute to stress resistance and virulence individually or in conjunction with Crz1. Moreover, Pbp1 is also required for sexual development. Genetic epistasis analysis revealed that Crz1 and the novel targets Lhp1, Puf4, and Pbp1 function in a branched calcineurin pathway that orchestrates stress survival and virulence. These findings support a model whereby calcineurin controls stress and virulence, at the transcriptional level via Crz1, and post-transcriptionally by localizing to PBs/SGs and acting on targets involved in mRNA metabolism. The calcineurin targets identified in this study share little overlap with known calcineurin substrates, with the exception of Crz1. In particular, the mRNA binding proteins and PBs/SGs residents comprise a cohort of novel calcineurin targets that have not been previously linked to calcineurin in mammals or in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This study suggests either extensive evolutionary rewiring of the calcineurin pathway, or alternatively that these novel calcineurin targets have yet to be characterized

  1. Subinhibitory bismuth-thiols reduce virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chieh-Liang; Domenico, Philip; Hassett, Daniel J; Beveridge, Terry J; Hauser, Alan R; Kazzaz, Jeffrey A

    2002-06-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a common pathogen in mechanically ventilated patients and produces a wide array of virulence factors. Bismuth-thiols (BTs) are active in vitro against all bacterial lung pathogens, including P. aeruginosa. The objective of these studies was to examine the biochemical and morphologic effects of sublethal BT concentrations on P. aeruginosa and to evaluate virulence in cell culture. Bismuth-dimercaprol, at a fraction of the minimal inhibitory concentration, reduced alginate expression by 67% in P. aeruginosa, whereas subinhibitory bismuth-ethanedithiol (BisEDT) reduced alginate by 92% in P. syringae. BisEDT effects on lipopolysaccharide content and type III secreted cytoxins were examined by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Subinhibitory BisEDT reduced cell-associated lipopolysaccharide, and inhibited processing of the secreted cytotoxic protein ExoU. BisEDT-induced outer membrane blebbing and aggregation of cytoplasmic material was noted in electron microscopy. Virulence of P. aeruginosa was assessed by adherence to epithelial cells and sensitivity to serum killing. BisEDT inhibited adherence of P. aeruginosa to 16HBE14o- cells by 28% and to a collagen matrix by 53%. BisEDT-treated bacteria were also 100-fold more sensitive to serum bactericidal activity. In summary, low BT concentrations affect P. aeruginosa in a variety of ways, the combination of which may help prevent or resolve respiratory tract infection.

  2. Role of enteroaggregative Escherichia coli virulence factors in uropathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Boll, Erik J; Struve, Carsten; Boisen, Nadia; Olesen, Bente; Stahlhut, Steen G; Krogfelt, Karen A

    2013-04-01

    A multiresistant clonal Escherichia coli O78:H10 strain qualifying molecularly as enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) was recently shown to be the cause of a community-acquired outbreak of urinary tract infection (UTI) in greater Copenhagen, Denmark, in 1991. This marks the first time EAEC has been associated with an extraintestinal disease outbreak. Importantly, the outbreak isolates were recovered from the urine of patients with symptomatic UTI, strongly implying urovirulence. Here, we sought to determine the uropathogenic properties of the Copenhagen outbreak strain and whether these properties are conferred by the EAEC-specific virulence factors. We demonstrated that through expression of aggregative adherence fimbriae, the principal adhesins of EAEC, the outbreak strain exhibited pronouncedly increased adherence to human bladder epithelial cells compared to prototype uropathogenic strains. Moreover, the strain was able to produce distinct biofilms on abiotic surfaces, including urethral catheters. These findings suggest that EAEC-specific virulence factors increase uropathogenicity and may have played a significant role in the ability of the strain to cause a community-acquired outbreak of UTI. Thus, inclusion of EAEC-specific virulence factors is warranted in future detection and characterization of uropathogenic E. coli.

  3. Introduction of virulence markers in PB2 of pandemic swine-origin influenza virus does not result in enhanced virulence or transmission.

    PubMed

    Herfst, Sander; Chutinimitkul, Salin; Ye, Jianqiang; de Wit, Emmie; Munster, Vincent J; Schrauwen, Eefje J A; Bestebroer, Theo M; Jonges, Marcel; Meijer, Adam; Koopmans, Marion; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Perez, Daniel R; Fouchier, Ron A M

    2010-04-01

    In the first 6 months of the H1N1 swine-origin influenza virus (S-OIV) pandemic, the vast majority of infections were relatively mild. It has been postulated that mutations in the viral genome could result in more virulent viruses, leading to a more severe pandemic. Mutations E627K and D701N in the PB2 protein have previously been identified as determinants of avian and pandemic influenza virus virulence in mammals. These mutations were absent in S-OIVs detected early in the 2009 pandemic. Here, using reverse genetics, mutations E627K, D701N, and E677G were introduced into the prototype S-OIV A/Netherlands/602/2009, and their effects on virus replication, virulence, and transmission were investigated. Mutations E627K and D701N caused increased reporter gene expression driven by the S-OIV polymerase complex. None of the three mutations affected virus replication in vitro. The mutations had no major impact on virus replication in the respiratory tracts of mice and ferrets or on pathogenesis. All three mutant viruses were transmitted via aerosols or respiratory droplets in ferrets. Thus, the impact of key known virulence markers in PB2 in the context of current S-OIVs was surprisingly small. This study does not exclude the possibility of emergence of S-OIVs with other virulence-associated mutations in the future. We conclude that surveillance studies aimed at detecting S-OIVs with increased virulence or transmission should not rely solely on virulence markers identified in the past but should include detailed characterization of virus phenotypes, guided by genetic signatures of viruses detected in severe cases of disease in humans.

  4. The aliphatic amidase AmiE is involved in regulation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence

    PubMed Central

    Clamens, Thomas; Rosay, Thibaut; Crépin, Alexandre; Grandjean, Teddy; Kentache, Takfarinas; Hardouin, Julie; Bortolotti, Perrine; Neidig, Anke; Mooij, Marlies; Hillion, Mélanie; Vieillard, Julien; Cosette, Pascal; Overhage, Joerg; O’Gara, Fergal; Bouffartigues, Emeline; Dufour, Alain; Chevalier, Sylvie; Guery, Benoit; Cornelis, Pierre; Feuilloley, Marc G. J.; Lesouhaitier, Olivier

    2017-01-01

    We have previously shown that the eukaryotic C-type natriuretic peptide hormone (CNP) regulates Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence and biofilm formation after binding on the AmiC sensor, triggering the amiE transcription. Herein, the involvement of the aliphatic amidase AmiE in P. aeruginosa virulence regulation has been investigated. The proteome analysis of an AmiE over-producing strain (AmiE+) revealed an expression change for 138 proteins, including some that are involved in motility, synthesis of quorum sensing compounds and virulence regulation. We observed that the AmiE+ strain produced less biofilm compared to the wild type, and over-produced rhamnolipids. In the same line, AmiE is involved in P. aeruginosa motilities (swarming and twitching) and production of the quorum sensing molecules N-acyl homoserine lactones and Pseudomonas Quinolone Signal (PQS). We observed that AmiE overproduction reduced levels of HCN and pyocyanin causing a decreased virulence in different hosts (i.e. Dictyostelium discoideum and Caenorhabditis elegans). This phenotype was further confirmed in a mouse model of acute lung infection, in which AmiE overproduction resulted in an almost fully virulence decrease. Taken together, our data suggest that, in addition to its role in bacterial secondary metabolism, AmiE is involved in P. aeruginosa virulence regulation by modulating pilus synthesis and cell-to-cell communication. PMID:28117457

  5. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli isolates with different virulence genes content exhibit similar pathologic influence on Vero cells.

    PubMed

    Obaid, Jamil M A S; Mansour, Samira R; Elshahedy, Mohammed S; Rabie, Tarik E; Azab, Adel M H

    2014-01-01

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli are the major causative agent of urinary tract infection--they may simultaneously express a number of virulence factors to cause disease. The aim of this study was to investigate the relation between virulence factors content of fifteen UPEC isolates and their pathogenic potential. The isolates belonged to the five serotypes O78:K80, O114:K90, O142:K86, O164 and O157. Nine of the virulence factors have been explored, ibeA, pap, sfa/foc, cnfl, hly, fyuA, pil, ompT and traT. Virulence factors profiling of the isolates revealed a different content ranging from 22% to 100% of the virulence genes explored. The pathogenic capacity of all fifteen isolates when tested on Vero cells showed that the cytotoxicity for all tested strains on Vero cells was approximately equal and enhanced after growth in syncase broth, leading mainly to cell lysis. The toxic effects reduced slightly after heat treatment of the toxin, and greatly after formalin detoxification, but not all the deleterious effect was abolished. Endotoxin also has cytotoxic effects on Vero cells, but longer time is needed for cytolysis which is greatly diminished with formalin treatment. In conclusion, our study revealed that pathogenic strains of UPEC can exert their pathogenic effect on live cells or system with limited virulence factors gene content.

  6. Use of Metarhizium anisopliae Chitinase Genes for Genotyping and Virulence Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Niassy, Saliou; Subramanian, Sevgan; Ekesi, Sunday; Bargul, Joel L.; Villinger, Jandouwe; Maniania, Nguya K.

    2013-01-01

    Virulence is the primary factor used for selection of entomopathogenic fungi (EPF) for development as biopesticides. To understand the genetic mechanisms underlying differences in virulence of fungal isolates on various arthropod pests, we compared the chitinase genes, chi2 and chi4, of 8 isolates of Metarhizium anisopliae. The clustering of the isolates showed various groups depending on their virulence. However, the analysis of their chitinase DNA sequences chi2 and chi4 did not reveal major divergences. Although their protein translates have been implicated in fungal virulence, the predicted protein structure of chi2 was identical for all isolates. Despite the critical role of chitin digestion in fungal infection, we conclude that chi2 and chi4 genes cannot serve as molecular markers to characterize observed variations in virulence among M. anisopliae isolates as previously suggested. Nevertheless, processes controlling the efficient upregulation of chitinase expression might be responsible for different virulence characteristics. Further studies using comparative “in vitro” chitin digestion techniques would be more appropriate to compare the quality and the quantity of chitinase production between fungal isolates. PMID:23936804

  7. Kin selection and the evolution of virulence.

    PubMed

    Buckling, A; Brockhurst, M A

    2008-05-01

    Social interactions between conspecific parasites are partly dependent on the relatedness of interacting parasites (kin selection), which, in turn, is predicted to affect the extent of damage they cause their hosts (virulence). High relatedness is generally assumed to favour less competitive interactions, but the relationship between relatedness and virulence is crucially dependent on the social behaviour in question. Here, we discuss the rather limited body of experimental work that addresses how kin-selected social behaviours affect virulence. First, if prudent use of host resources (a form of cooperation) maximizes the transmission success of the parasite population, decreased relatedness is predicted to result in increased host exploitation and virulence. Experimental support for this well-established theoretical result is surprisingly limited. Second, if parasite within-host growth rate is a positive function of cooperation (that is, when individuals need to donate public goods, such as extracellular enzymes), virulence is predicted to increase with increasing relatedness. The limited studies testing this hypothesis are broadly consistent with this prediction. Finally, there is some empirical evidence supporting theory that suggests that spiteful behaviours are maximized at intermediate degrees of relatedness, which, in turn, leads to minimal virulence because of the reduced growth rate of the infecting population. We highlight the need for further thorough experimentation on the role of kin selection in the evolution of virulence and identify additional biological complexities to these simple frameworks.

  8. Virulence in malaria: an evolutionary viewpoint.

    PubMed Central

    Mackinnon, Margaret J; Read, Andrew F

    2004-01-01

    Malaria parasites cause much morbidity and mortality to their human hosts. From our evolutionary perspective, this is because virulence is positively associated with parasite transmission rate. Natural selection therefore drives virulence upwards, but only to the point where the cost to transmission caused by host death begins to outweigh the transmission benefits. In this review, we summarize data from the laboratory rodent malaria model, Plasmodium chabaudi, and field data on the human malaria parasite, P. falciparum, in relation to this virulence trade-off hypothesis. The data from both species show strong positive correlations between asexual multiplication, transmission rate, infection length, morbidity and mortality, and therefore support the underlying assumptions of the hypothesis. Moreover, the P. falciparum data show that expected total lifetime transmission of the parasite is maximized in young children in whom the fitness cost of host mortality balances the fitness benefits of higher transmission rates and slower clearance rates, thus exhibiting the hypothesized virulence trade-off. This evolutionary explanation of virulence appears to accord well with the clinical and molecular explanations of pathogenesis that involve cytoadherence, red cell invasion and immune evasion, although direct evidence of the fitness advantages of these mechanisms is scarce. One implication of this evolutionary view of virulence is that parasite populations are expected to evolve new levels of virulence in response to medical interventions such as vaccines and drugs. PMID:15306410

  9. Role of Arf GTPases in fungal morphogenesis and virulence

    PubMed Central

    Labbaoui, Hayet; Bogliolo, Stéphanie; Ghugtyal, Vikram; Solis, Norma V.

    2017-01-01

    Virulence of the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans depends on the switch from budding to filamentous growth, which requires sustained membrane traffic and polarized growth. In many organisms, small GTPases of the Arf (ADP-ribosylation factor) family regulate membrane/protein trafficking, yet little is known about their role in fungal filamentous growth. To investigate these GTPases in C. albicans, we generated loss of function mutants in all 3 Arf proteins, Arf1-Arf3, and 2 Arf-like proteins, Arl1 and Arl3. Our results indicate that of these proteins, Arf2 is required for viability and sensitivity to antifungal drugs. Repressible ARF2 expression results in defects in filamentous growth, cell wall integrity and virulence, likely due to alteration of the Golgi. Arl1 is also required for invasive filamentous growth and, although arl1/arl1 cells can initiate hyphal growth, hyphae are substantially shorter than that of the wild-type, due to the inability of this mutant to maintain hyphal growth at a single site. We show that this defect does not result from an alteration of phospholipid distribution and is unlikely to result from the sole Golgin Imh1 mislocalization, as Imh1 is not required for invasive filamentous growth. Rather, our results suggest that the arl1/arl1 hyphal growth defect results from increased secretion in this mutant. Strikingly, the arl1/arl1 mutant is drastically reduced in virulence during oropharyngeal candidiasis. Together, our results highlight the importance of Arl1 and Arf2 as key regulators of hyphal growth and virulence in C. albicans and identify a unique function of Arl1 in secretion. PMID:28192532

  10. Systemic Acquired Tolerance to Virulent Bacterial Pathogens in Tomato1

    PubMed Central

    Block, Anna; Schmelz, Eric; O'Donnell, Phillip J.; Jones, Jeffrey B.; Klee, Harry J.

    2005-01-01

    Recent studies on the interactions between plants and pathogenic microorganisms indicate that the processes of disease symptom development and pathogen growth can be uncoupled. Thus, in many instances, the symptoms associated with disease represent an active host response to the presence of a pathogen. These host responses are frequently mediated by phytohormones. For example, ethylene and salicylic acid (SA) mediate symptom development but do not influence bacterial growth in the interaction between tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) and virulent Xanthomonas campestris pv vesicatoria (Xcv). It is not apparent why extensive tissue death is integral to a defense response if it does not have the effect of limiting pathogen proliferation. One possible function for this hormone-mediated response is to induce a systemic defense response. We therefore assessed the systemic responses of tomato to Xcv. SA- and ethylene-deficient transgenic lines were used to investigate the roles of these phytohormones in systemic signaling. Virulent and avirulent Xcv did induce a systemic response as evidenced by expression of defense-associated pathogenesis-related genes in an ethylene- and SA-dependent manner. This systemic response reduced cell death but not bacterial growth during subsequent challenge with virulent Xcv. This systemic acquired tolerance (SAT) consists of reduced tissue damage in response to secondary challenge with a virulent pathogen with no effect upon pathogen growth. SAT was associated with a rapid ethylene and pathogenesis-related gene induction upon challenge. SAT was also induced by infection with Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato. These data show that SAT resembles systemic acquired resistance without inhibition of pathogen growth. PMID:15937273

  11. Hyperexpression of α-hemolysin explains enhanced virulence of sequence type 93 community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA) ST93 clone is becoming dominant in Australia and is clinically highly virulent. In addition, sepsis and skin infection models demonstrate that ST93 CA-MRSA is the most virulent global clone of S. aureus tested to date. While the determinants of virulence have been studied in other clones of CA-MRSA, the basis for hypervirulence in ST93 CA-MRSA has not been defined. Results Here, using a geographically and temporally dispersed collection of ST93 isolates we demonstrate that the ST93 population hyperexpresses key CA-MRSA exotoxins, in particular α-hemolysin, in comparison to other global clones. Gene deletion and complementation studies, and virulence comparisons in a murine skin infection model, showed unequivocally that increased expression of α-hemolysin is the key staphylococcal virulence determinant for this clone. Genome sequencing and comparative genomics of strains with divergent exotoxin profiles demonstrated that, like other S. aureus clones, the quorum sensing agr system is the master regulator of toxin expression and virulence in ST93 CA-MRSA. However, we also identified a previously uncharacterized AraC/XylS family regulator (AryK) that potentiates toxin expression and virulence in S. aureus. Conclusions These data demonstrate that hyperexpression of α-hemolysin mediates enhanced virulence in ST93 CA-MRSA, and additional control of exotoxin production, in particular α-hemolysin, mediated by regulatory systems other than agr have the potential to fine-tune virulence in CA-MRSA. PMID:24512075

  12. Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Skills To Succeed in the Host: Virulence and Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Fàbrega, Anna

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is a primary enteric pathogen infecting both humans and animals. Infection begins with the ingestion of contaminated food or water so that salmonellae reach the intestinal epithelium and trigger gastrointestinal disease. In some patients the infection spreads upon invasion of the intestinal epithelium, internalization within phagocytes, and subsequent dissemination. In that case, antimicrobial therapy, based on fluoroquinolones and expanded-spectrum cephalosporins as the current drugs of choice, is indicated. To accomplish the pathogenic process, the Salmonella chromosome comprises several virulence mechanisms. The most important virulence genes are those located within the so-called Salmonella pathogenicity islands (SPIs). Thus far, five SPIs have been reported to have a major contribution to pathogenesis. Nonetheless, further virulence traits, such as the pSLT virulence plasmid, adhesins, flagella, and biofilm-related proteins, also contribute to success within the host. Several regulatory mechanisms which synchronize all these elements in order to guarantee bacterial survival have been described. These mechanisms govern the transitions from the different pathogenic stages and drive the pathogen to achieve maximal efficiency inside the host. This review focuses primarily on the virulence armamentarium of this pathogen and the extremely complicated regulatory network controlling its success. PMID:23554419

  13. Candida albicans Inhibits Pseudomonas aeruginosa Virulence through Suppression of Pyochelin and Pyoverdine Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Medina, Eduardo; Fan, Di; Coughlin, Laura A.; Ho, Evi X.; Lamont, Iain L.; Reimmann, Cornelia; Hooper, Lora V.; Koh, Andrew Y.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial-fungal interactions have important physiologic and medical ramifications, but the mechanisms of these interactions are poorly understood. The gut is host to trillions of microorganisms, and bacterial-fungal interactions are likely to be important. Using a neutropenic mouse model of microbial gastrointestinal colonization and dissemination, we show that the fungus Candida albicans inhibits the virulence of the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa by inhibiting P. aeruginosa pyochelin and pyoverdine gene expression, which plays a critical role in iron acquisition and virulence. Accordingly, deletion of both P. aeruginosa pyochelin and pyoverdine genes attenuates P. aeruginosa virulence. Heat-killed C. albicans has no effect on P. aeruginosa, whereas C. albicans secreted proteins directly suppress P. aeruginosa pyoverdine and pyochelin expression and inhibit P. aeruginosa virulence in mice. Interestingly, suppression or deletion of pyochelin and pyoverdine genes has no effect on P. aeruginosa’s ability to colonize the GI tract but does decrease P. aeruginosa’s cytotoxic effect on cultured colonocytes. Finally, oral iron supplementation restores P. aeruginosa virulence in P. aeruginosa and C. albicans colonized mice. Together, our findings provide insight into how a bacterial-fungal interaction can modulate bacterial virulence in the intestine. Previously described bacterial-fungal antagonistic interactions have focused on growth inhibition or colonization inhibition/modulation, yet here we describe a novel observation of fungal-inhibition of bacterial effectors critical for virulence but not important for colonization. These findings validate the use of a mammalian model system to explore the complexities of polymicrobial, polykingdom infections in order to identify new therapeutic targets for preventing microbial disease. PMID:26313907

  14. First Streptococcus pyogenes signature-tagged mutagenesis screen identifies novel virulence determinants.

    PubMed

    Kizy, Anne E; Neely, Melody N

    2009-05-01

    The virulence of bacterial pathogens is a complex process that requires the dynamic expression of many genes for the pathogens to invade and circumvent host defenses, as well as to proliferate in vivo. In this study, we employed a large-scale screen, signature-tagged mutagenesis (STM), to identify Streptococcus pyogenes virulence genes important for pathogenesis within the host. Approximately 1,200 STM mutants were created and screened using the zebrafish infectious disease model. The transposon insertion site was identified for 29 of the 150 mutants that were considered attenuated for virulence. Previously reported streptococcal virulence genes, such as mga, hasA, amrA, smeZ, and two genes in the sil locus, were identified, confirming the utility of the model for revealing genes important for virulence. Multiple genes not previously implicated in virulence were also identified, including genes encoding putative transporters, hypothetical cytosolic proteins, and macrolide efflux pumps. The STM mutant strains display various levels of attenuation, and multiple separate insertions were identified in either the same gene or the same locus, suggesting that these factors are important for this type of acute, invasive infection. We further examined two such genes, silB and silC of a putative quorum-sensing regulon, and determined that they are significant virulence factors in our model of necrotizing fasciitis. sil locus promoter expression was examined under various in vitro conditions, as well as in zebrafish tissues, and was found to be differentially induced. This study was a unique investigation of S. pyogenes factors required for successful invasive infection.

  15. Identification of Lipoprotein MslA as a Neoteric Virulence Factor of Mycoplasma gallisepticum▿

    PubMed Central

    Szczepanek, S. M.; Frasca, S.; Schumacher, V. L.; Liao, X.; Padula, M.; Djordjevic, S. P.; Geary, S. J.

    2010-01-01

    Many lipoproteins are expressed on the surfaces of mycoplasmas, and some have been implicated as playing roles in pathogenesis. Family 2 lipoproteins of Mycoplasma pneumoniae have a conserved “mycoplasma lipoprotein X” central domain and a “mycoplasma lipoprotein 10” C-terminal domain and are differentially expressed in response to environmental conditions. Homologues of family 2 lipoproteins are Mycoplasma specific and include the lipoprotein of Mycoplasma gallisepticum, encoded by the MGA0674 gene. Comparative transcriptomic analysis of the M. gallisepticum live attenuated vaccine strain F and the virulent strain Rlow, reported in this study, indicated that MGA0674 is one of several differentially expressed genes. The MGA0674-encoded lipoprotein is a proteolytically processed, immunogenic, TX-114 detergent-phase protein which appears to have antigenic divergence between field strains Rlow and S6. We examined the virulence of an Rlow ΔMGA0674 mutant (P1H9) in vivo and observed reduced recovery and attenuated virulence in the tracheas of experimentally infected chickens. The virulence of two additional Rlow ΔMGA0674 mutants, 2162 and 2204, was assessed in a second in vivo virulence experiment. These mutants exhibited partial to complete attenuation in vivo, but recovery was observed more frequently. Since only Mycoplasma species harbor homologues of MGA0674, the gene product has been renamed “Mycoplasma-specific lipoprotein A” (MslA). Collectively, these data indicate that MslA is an immunogenic lipoprotein exhibiting reduced expression in an attenuated strain and plays a role in M. gallisepticum virulence. PMID:20515935

  16. Restriction of Rift Valley Fever Virus Virulence in Mosquito Cells

    PubMed Central

    Vaughn, Valerie M.; Streeter, Cale C.; Miller, David J.; Gerrard, Sonja R.

    2010-01-01

    Arboviruses are maintained in a natural cycle that requires blood-sucking arthropod and vertebrate hosts. Arboviruses are believed to persistently infect their arthropod host without overt pathology and cause acute infection with viremia in their vertebrate host. We have focused on elucidating how a specific arbovirus, Rift Valley fever (RVF) virus, causes cytopathic effect in cells derived from vertebrates and non-cytopathic infection in cells derived from arthropods. We demonstrate that the vertebrate virulence factor, NSs, is functional in arthropod cells but is expressed at significantly lower levels in infected arthropod versus infected vertebrate cells. PMID:21994651

  17. Regulation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence factors by two novel RNA thermometers

    PubMed Central

    Grosso-Becerra, María Victoria; Croda-García, Gerardo; Merino, Enrique; Servín-González, Luis; Mojica-Espinosa, Raúl; Soberón-Chávez, Gloria

    2014-01-01

    In a number of bacterial pathogens, the production of virulence factors is induced at 37 °C; this effect is often regulated by mRNA structures formed in the 5′ untranslated region (UTR) that block translation initiation of genes at environmental temperatures. At 37 °C, the RNA structures become unstable and ribosomes gain access to their binding sites in the mRNAs. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important opportunistic pathogen and the expression of many of its virulence-associated traits is regulated by the quorum-sensing (QS) response, but the effect of temperature on virulence-factor expression is not well-understood. The aim of this work is the characterization of the molecular mechanism involved in thermoregulation of QS-dependent virulence-factor production. We demonstrate that traits that are dependent on the QS transcriptional regulator RhlR have a higher expression at 37 °C, correlating with a higher RhlR concentration as measured by Western blot. We also determined, using gene fusions and point mutations, that RhlR thermoregulation is a posttranscriptional effect dependent on an RNA thermometer of the ROSE (Repression Of heat-Shock gene Expression) family. This RNA element regulates the expression of the rhlAB operon, involved in rhamnolipid production, and of the downstream rhlR gene. We also identified a second functional thermometer in the 5′ UTR of the lasI gene. We confirmed that these RNA thermometers are the main mechanism of thermoregulation of QS-dependent gene expression in P. aeruginosa using quantitative real-time PCR. This is the first description, to our knowledge, of a ROSE element regulating the expression of virulence traits and of an RNA thermometer controlling multiple genes in an operon through a polar effect. PMID:25313031

  18. A novel adaptation of aldolase regulates virulence in Streptococcus pyogenes

    PubMed Central

    Loughman, Jennifer A; Caparon, Michael G

    2006-01-01

    Regulation of virulence factor expression is critical for pathogenic microorganisms that must sense and adapt to a dynamic host environment; yet, the signal transduction pathways that enable this process are generally poorly understood. Here, we identify LacD.1 as a global regulator of virulence factor expression in the versatile human pathogen, Streptococcus pyogenes. LacD.1 is derived from a class I tagatose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase homologous to those involved in lactose and galactose metabolism in related prokaryotes. However, regulation of transcription by LacD.1 is not dependent on this enzymatic activity or the canonical catabolite repression pathway, but likely does require substrate recognition. Our results suggest that LacD.1 has been adapted as a metabolic sensor, and raise the possibility that regulation of gene expression by metabolic enzymes may be a novel mechanism by which Gram-positive bacteria, including S. pyogenes, coordinate multiple environmental cues, allowing essential transcription programs to be coupled with perceived nutritional status. PMID:17066081

  19. Mechanisms and evolution of virulence in oomycetes.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Rays H Y; Tyler, Brett M

    2012-01-01

    Many destructive diseases of plants and animals are caused by oomycetes, a group of eukaryotic pathogens important to agricultural, ornamental, and natural ecosystems. Understanding the mechanisms underlying oomycete virulence and the genomic processes by which those mechanisms rapidly evolve is essential to developing effective long-term control measures for oomycete diseases. Several common mechanisms underlying oomycete virulence, including protein toxins and cell-entering effectors, have emerged from comparing oomycetes with different genome characteristics, parasitic lifestyles, and host ranges. Oomycete genomes display a strongly bipartite organization in which conserved housekeeping genes are concentrated in syntenic gene-rich blocks, whereas virulence genes are dispersed into highly dynamic, repeat-rich regions. There is also evidence that key virulence genes have been acquired by horizontal transfer from other eukaryotic and prokaryotic species.

  20. Plaque assay for virulent Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, R C; Lee, S H; Haldane, D; Sumarah, R; Rozee, K R

    1989-01-01

    Methods of assessing virulence of Legionella pneumophila, the etiologic agent of Legionnaires disease, include the infection of guinea pigs, fertile chicken eggs, and mammalian and protozoan cell cultures. Guinea pig assays, in particular, are expensive, laborious, or unsuitable for routine screening of Legionella isolates. We have developed a virulence assay that requires the enumeration of viruslike plaques which are the result of virulent L. pneumophila infecting mouse L929 cells. Each plaque is the consequence of the initial infection of an L cell with a single bacterium. A nonvirulent mutant derived from the serial passage of virulent L. pneumophila on Mueller-Hinton agar fails to survive within L cells and consequently fails to produce plaques. Images PMID:2674192

  1. Virulence characteristics accounting for fire blight disease severity in apple trees and seedlings.

    PubMed

    Lee, Steven A; Ngugi, Henry K; Halbrendt, Noemi O; O'Keefe, Grace; Lehman, Brian; Travis, James W; Sinn, Judith P; McNellis, Timothy W

    2010-06-01

    The gram-negative bacterium Erwinia amylovora is the causal agent of fire blight, the most destructive bacterial disease of rosaceous plants, including apple and pear. Here, we compared the virulence levels of six E. amylovora strains (Ea273, CFBP1367, Ea581a, E2002a, E4001a, and HKN06P1) on apple trees and seedlings. The strains produced a range of disease severity, with HKN06P1 producing the greatest disease severity in every assay. We then compared virulence characteristic expression among the six strains, including growth rates in immature apple fruit, amylovoran production, levansucrase activity, biofilm formation, carbohydrate utilization, hypersensitive cell death elicitation in tobacco leaves, and protein secretion profiles. Multiple regression analysis indicated that three of the virulence characteristics (amylovoran production, biofilm formation, and growth in immature apple fruit) accounted for >70% of the variation in disease severity on apple seedlings. Furthermore, in greenhouse-grown 'Gala' trees, >75% of the variation in disease severity was accounted for by five of the virulence characteristics: amylovoran production, biofilm formation, growth in immature apple fruit, hypersensitive cell death elicitation, and sorbitol utilization. This study demonstrates that virulence factor expression levels account for differences in disease severity caused by wild isolates of E. amylovora on apple trees.

  2. Connecting virulence pathways to cell-cycle progression in the fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Kelliher, Christina M; Haase, Steven B

    2017-03-06

    Proliferation and host evasion are critical processes to understand at a basic biological level for improving infectious disease treatment options. The human fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans causes fungal meningitis in immunocompromised individuals by proliferating in cerebrospinal fluid. Current antifungal drugs target "virulence factors" for disease, such as components of the cell wall and polysaccharide capsule in C. neoformans. However, mechanistic links between virulence pathways and the cell cycle are not as well studied. Recently, cell-cycle synchronized C. neoformans cells were profiled over time to identify gene expression dynamics (Kelliher et al., PLoS Genet 12(12):e1006453, 2016). Almost 20% of all genes in the C. neoformans genome were periodically activated during the cell cycle in rich media, including 40 genes that have previously been implicated in virulence pathways. Here, we review important findings about cell-cycle-regulated genes in C. neoformans and provide two examples of virulence pathways-chitin synthesis and G-protein coupled receptor signaling-with their putative connections to cell division. We propose that a "comparative functional genomics" approach, leveraging gene expression timing during the cell cycle, orthology to genes in other fungal species, and previous experimental findings, can lead to mechanistic hypotheses connecting the cell cycle to fungal virulence.

  3. A Haemophilus ducreyi CpxR deletion mutant is virulent in human volunteers.

    PubMed

    Labandeira-Rey, Maria; Dodd, Dana; Fortney, Kate R; Zwickl, Beth; Katz, Barry P; Janowicz, Diane M; Spinola, Stanley M; Hansen, Eric J

    2011-06-15

    Haemophilus ducreyi 35000HP contains a homolog of the CpxRA 2-component signal transduction system, which controls the cell envelope stress response system in other gram-negative bacteria and regulates some important H. ducreyi virulence factors. A H. ducreyi cpxR mutant was compared with its parent for virulence in the human challenge model of experimental chancroid. The pustule formation rate in 5 volunteers was 33% (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.3%-65.3%) at 15 parent sites and 40% (95% CI, 18.1%-61.9%) at 15 mutant sites (P = .35). Thus, the cpxR mutant was not attenuated for virulence. Inactivation of the H. ducreyi cpxR gene did not reduce the ability of this mutant to express certain proven virulence factors, including the DsrA serum resistance protein and the LspA2 protein, which inhibits phagocytosis. These results expand our understanding of the involvement of the CpxRA system in regulating virulence expression in H. ducreyi.

  4. A long-term epigenetic memory switch controls bacterial virulence bimodality

    PubMed Central

    Ronin, Irine; Katsowich, Naama; Rosenshine, Ilan; Balaban, Nathalie Q

    2017-01-01

    When pathogens enter the host, sensing of environmental cues activates the expression of virulence genes. Opposite transition of pathogens from activating to non-activating conditions is poorly understood. Interestingly, variability in the expression of virulence genes upon infection enhances colonization. In order to systematically detect the role of phenotypic variability in enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC), an important human pathogen, both in virulence activating and non-activating conditions, we employed the ScanLag methodology. The analysis revealed a bimodal growth rate. Mathematical modeling combined with experimental analysis showed that this bimodality is mediated by a hysteretic memory-switch that results in the stable co-existence of non-virulent and hyper-virulent subpopulations, even after many generations of growth in non-activating conditions. We identified the per operon as the key component of the hysteretic switch. This unique hysteretic memory switch may result in persistent infection and enhanced host-to-host spreading. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19599.001 PMID:28178445

  5. Is dolphin morbillivirus virulent for white-beaked dolphins (Lagenorhynchus albirostris)?

    PubMed

    van Elk, C E; van de Bildt, M W G; Jauniaux, T; Hiemstra, S; van Run, P R W A; Foster, G; Meerbeek, J; Osterhaus, A D M E; Kuiken, T

    2014-11-01

    The virulence of morbilliviruses for toothed whales (odontocetes) appears to differ according to host species. In 4 species of odontocetes, morbilliviruses are highly virulent, causing large-scale epizootics with high mortality. In 8 other species of odontocetes, including white-beaked dolphins (Lagenorhynchus albirostris), morbilliviruses have been found as an incidental infection. In these species, the virulence of morbilliviruses is not clear. Therefore, the admission of 2 white-beaked dolphins with morbillivirus infection into a rehabilitation center provided a unique opportunity to investigate the virulence of morbillivirus in this species. By phylogenetic analysis, the morbilliviruses in both animals were identified as a dolphin morbillivirus (DMV) most closely related to that detected in a white-beaked dolphin in Germany in 2007. Both animals were examined clinically and pathologically. Case No. 1 had a chronic neural DMV infection, characterized by polioencephalitis in the cerebrum and morbillivirus antigen expression limited to neurons and glial cells. Surprisingly, no nervous signs were observed in this animal during the 6 months before death. Case No. 2 had a subacute systemic DMV infection, characterized by interstitial pneumonia, leucopenia, lymphoid depletion, and DMV antigen expression in mononuclear cells and syncytia in the lung and in mononuclear cells in multiple lymphoid organs. Cause of death was not attributed to DMV infection in either animal. DMV was not detected in 2 contemporaneously stranded white-beaked dolphins. Stranding rate did not increase in the region. These results suggest that DMV is not highly virulent for white-beaked dolphins.

  6. Cranberry-derived proanthocyanidins impair virulence and inhibit quorum sensing of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Maisuria, Vimal B.; Los Santos, Yossef Lopez-de; Tufenkji, Nathalie; Déziel, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria have evolved multiple strategies for causing infections that include producing virulence factors, undertaking motility, developing biofilms, and invading host cells. N-acylhomoserine lactone (AHL)-mediated quorum sensing (QS) tightly regulates the expression of multiple virulence factors in the opportunistic pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Thus, inhibiting QS could lead to health benefits. In this study, we demonstrate an anti-virulence activity of a cranberry extract rich in proanthocyanidins (cerPAC) against P. aeruginosa in the model host Drosophila melanogaster and show this is mediated by QS interference. cerPAC reduced the production of QS-regulated virulence determinants and protected D. melanogaster from fatal infection by P. aeruginosa PA14. Quantification of AHL production using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry confirmed that cerPAC effectively reduced the level of AHLs produced by the bacteria. Furthermore, monitoring QS signaling gene expression revealed that AHL synthases LasI/RhlI and QS transcriptional regulators LasR/RhlR genes were inhibited and antagonized, respectively, by cerPAC. Molecular docking studies suggest that cranberry-derived proanthocyanidin binds to QS transcriptional regulators, mainly interacting with their ligand binding sites. These findings provide insights into the underlying mechanisms of action of a cerPAC to restrict the virulence of P. aeruginosa and can have implications in the development of alternative approaches to control infections. PMID:27503003

  7. [Proteus bacilli: features and virulence factors].

    PubMed

    Rózalski, Antoni; Kwil, Iwona; Torzewska, Agnieszka; Baranowska, Magdalena; Staczek, Paweł

    2007-01-01

    In this article, different aspects of virulence factors of Proteus bacilii (P. mirabilis, P. vulgaris, P. penneri i P. hauseri) are presented. These are opportunistic pathogens that cause different kinds of infections, most frequently of the urinary tract. These bacteria have developed several virulence factors, such as adherence due to the presence of fimbriae or afimbrial adhesins, invasiveness, swarming phenomenon, hemolytic activity, urea hydrolysis, proteolysis, and endotoxicity. Below we focus on data concerning the molecular basis of the pathogenicity of Proteus bacilli.

  8. Genetic relatedness and virulence properties of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli strains of serotype O119:H6 expressing localized adherence or localized and aggregative adherence-like patterns on HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Bruna G; Ooka, Tadasuke; Gotoh, Yasuhiro; Vieira, Mônica A M; Yamamoto, Denise; Ogura, Yoshitoshi; Girão, Dennys M; Sampaio, Suely C F; Melo, Alexis Bonfim; Irino, Kinue; Hayashi, Tetsuya; Gomes, Tânia A T

    2016-05-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) induce attaching and effacing (A/E) lesions in enterocytes and produce the bundle-forming pilus (BFP) contributing to the localized adherence (LA) pattern formation on HeLa cells. Enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC) produce aggregative adherence (AA) on HeLa cells and form prominent biofilms. The ability to produce LA or AA is an important hallmark to classify fecal E. coli isolates as EPEC or EAEC, respectively. E. coli strains of serotype O119:H6 exhibit an LA+ phenotype and have been considered as comprising a clonal group of EPEC strains. However, we have recently identified O119:H6 EPEC strains that produce LA and an AA-like pattern concurrently (LA/AA-like+). In this study, we evaluated the relatedness of three LA/AA-like+ and three LA+ O119:H6 strains by comparing their virulence and genotypic properties. We first found that the LA/AA-like+ strains induced actin accumulation in HeLa cells (indicative of A/E lesions formation) and formed biofilms on abiotic surfaces more efficiently than the LA+ strains. MLST analysis showed that the six strains all belong to the ST28 complex. All strains carried multiple plasmids, but as plasmid profiles were highly variable, this cannot be used to differentiate LA/AA-like+ and LA+ strains. We further obtained their draft genome sequences and the complete sequences of four plasmids harbored by one LA/AA-like+ strain. Analysis of these sequences and comparison with 37 fully sequenced E. coli genomes revealed that both O119:H6 groups belong to the E. coli phylogroup B2 and are very closely related with only 58-67 SNPs found between LA/AA-like+ and LA+ strains. Search of the draft sequences of the six strains for adhesion-related genes known in EAEC and other E. coli pathotypes detected no genes specifically present in LA/AA-like+ strains. Unexpectedly however, we found that a large plasmid distinct from pEAF is responsible for the AA-like phenotype of the LA/AA-like+ strains. Although we

  9. Express

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Express ; CASRN 101200 - 48 - 0 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effect

  10. Phenotypic Characteristics Associated with Virulence of Clinical Isolates from the Sporothrix Complex

    PubMed Central

    Almeida-Paes, Rodrigo; de Oliveira, Luã Cardoso; Oliveira, Manoel Marques Evangelista; Gutierrez-Galhardo, Maria Clara; Nosanchuk, Joshua Daniel; Zancopé-Oliveira, Rosely Maria

    2015-01-01

    The Sporothrix complex members cause sporotrichosis, a subcutaneous mycosis with a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations. Several specific phenotypic characteristics are associated with virulence in many fungi, but studies in this field involving the Sporothrix complex species are scarce. Melanization, thermotolerance, and production of proteases, catalase, and urease were investigated in 61 S. brasiliensis, one S. globosa, and 10 S. schenckii strains. The S. brasiliensis strains showed a higher expression of melanin and urease compared with S. schenckii. These two species, however, presented similar thermotolerances. Our S. globosa strain had low expression of all studied virulence factors. The relationship between these phenotypes and clinical aspects of sporotrichosis was also evaluated. Strains isolated from patients with spontaneous regression of infection were heavily melanized and produced high urease levels. Melanin was also related to dissemination of internal organs and protease production was associated with HIV-coinfection. A murine sporotrichosis model showed that a S. brasiliensis strain with high expression of virulence factors was able to disseminate and yield a high fungal burden in comparison with a control S. schenckii strain. Our results show that virulence-related phenotypes are variably expressed within the Sporothrix complex species and might be involved in clinical aspects of sporotrichosis. PMID:25961005

  11. Host responses in the bursa of Fabricius of chickens infected with virulent Marek's disease virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Host responses associated with very virulent Marek’s disease virus (MDV) infection in the bursa of Fabricius of chicken was investigated. The expression of MDV pp38 antigen and MDV gB transcripts were higher at 4 days post-infection (dpi) and then showed a declining trend. On the contrary, the expre...

  12. Antibiotic modulation of capsular exopolysaccharide and virulence in Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Geisinger, Edward; Isberg, Ralph R

    2015-02-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an opportunistic pathogen of increasing importance due to its propensity for intractable multidrug-resistant infections in hospitals. All clinical isolates examined contain a conserved gene cluster, the K locus, which determines the production of complex polysaccharides, including an exopolysaccharide capsule known to protect against killing by host serum and to increase virulence in animal models of infection. Whether the polysaccharides determined by the K locus contribute to intrinsic defenses against antibiotics is unknown. We demonstrate here that mutants deficient in the exopolysaccharide capsule have lowered intrinsic resistance to peptide antibiotics, while a mutation affecting sugar precursors involved in both capsule and lipopolysaccharide synthesis sensitizes the bacterium to multiple antibiotic classes. We observed that, when grown in the presence of certain antibiotics below their MIC, including the translation inhibitors chloramphenicol and erythromycin, A. baumannii increases production of the K locus exopolysaccharide. Hyperproduction of capsular exopolysaccharide is reversible and non-mutational, and occurs concomitantly with increased resistance to the inducing antibiotic that is independent of the presence of the K locus. Strikingly, antibiotic-enhanced capsular exopolysaccharide production confers increased resistance to killing by host complement and increases virulence in a mouse model of systemic infection. Finally, we show that augmented capsule production upon antibiotic exposure is facilitated by transcriptional increases in K locus gene expression that are dependent on a two-component regulatory system, bfmRS. These studies reveal that the synthesis of capsule, a major pathogenicity determinant, is regulated in response to antibiotic stress. Our data are consistent with a model in which gene expression changes triggered by ineffectual antibiotic treatment cause A. baumannii to transition between states of low

  13. Antibiotic Modulation of Capsular Exopolysaccharide and Virulence in Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Geisinger, Edward; Isberg, Ralph R.

    2015-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an opportunistic pathogen of increasing importance due to its propensity for intractable multidrug-resistant infections in hospitals. All clinical isolates examined contain a conserved gene cluster, the K locus, which determines the production of complex polysaccharides, including an exopolysaccharide capsule known to protect against killing by host serum and to increase virulence in animal models of infection. Whether the polysaccharides determined by the K locus contribute to intrinsic defenses against antibiotics is unknown. We demonstrate here that mutants deficient in the exopolysaccharide capsule have lowered intrinsic resistance to peptide antibiotics, while a mutation affecting sugar precursors involved in both capsule and lipopolysaccharide synthesis sensitizes the bacterium to multiple antibiotic classes. We observed that, when grown in the presence of certain antibiotics below their MIC, including the translation inhibitors chloramphenicol and erythromycin, A. baumannii increases production of the K locus exopolysaccharide. Hyperproduction of capsular exopolysaccharide is reversible and non-mutational, and occurs concomitantly with increased resistance to the inducing antibiotic that is independent of the presence of the K locus. Strikingly, antibiotic-enhanced capsular exopolysaccharide production confers increased resistance to killing by host complement and increases virulence in a mouse model of systemic infection. Finally, we show that augmented capsule production upon antibiotic exposure is facilitated by transcriptional increases in K locus gene expression that are dependent on a two-component regulatory system, bfmRS. These studies reveal that the synthesis of capsule, a major pathogenicity determinant, is regulated in response to antibiotic stress. Our data are consistent with a model in which gene expression changes triggered by ineffectual antibiotic treatment cause A. baumannii to transition between states of low

  14. Ocimum sanctum essential oil inhibits virulence attributes in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Khan, Amber; Ahmad, Aijaz; Xess, Immaculata; Khan, Luqman A; Manzoor, Nikhat

    2014-03-15

    Candida albicans is an opportunistic human fungal pathogen which causes disease mainly in immunocompromised patients. Activity of hydrolytic enzymes is essential for virulence of C. albicans and so is the capacity of these cells to undergo transition from yeast to mycelial form of growth. Ocimum sanctum is cultivated worldwide for its essential oil which exhibits medicinal properties. This work evaluates the anti-virulence activity of O. sanctum essential oil (OSEO) on 22 strains of C. albicans (including a standard strain ATCC 90028) isolated from both HIV positive and HIV negative patients. Candida isolates were exposed to sub-MICs of OSEO. In vitro secretion of proteinases and phospholipases was evaluated by plate assay containing BSA and egg yolk respectively. Morphological transition from yeast to filamentous form was monitored microscopically in LSM. For genetic analysis, respective genes associated with morphological transition (HWP1), proteinase (SAP1) and phospholipase (PLB2) were also investigated by Real Time PCR (qRT-PCR). Results were analyzed using Student's t-test. OSEO inhibits morphological transition in C. albicans and had a significant inhibitory effect on extracellular secretion of proteinases and phospholipases. Expression profile of respective selected genes associated with C. albicans virulence by qRT-PCR showed a reduced expression of HWP1, SAP1 and PLB2 genes in cells treated with sub-inhibitory concentrations of OSEO. This work suggests that OSEO inhibits morphological transition in C. albicans and decreases the secretion of hydrolytic enzymes involved in the early stage of infection as well as down regulates the associated genes. Further studies will assess the clinical application of OSEO and its constituents in the treatment of fungal infections.

  15. Altered expression of small heterodimer partner governs cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2D6 induction during pregnancy in CYP2D6-humanized mice.

    PubMed

    Koh, Kwi Hye; Pan, Xian; Shen, Hong-Wu; Arnold, Samuel L M; Yu, Ai-Ming; Gonzalez, Frank J; Isoherranen, Nina; Jeong, Hyunyoung

    2014-02-07

    Substrates of a major drug-metabolizing enzyme CYP2D6 display increased elimination during pregnancy, but the underlying mechanisms are unknown in part due to a lack of experimental models. Here, we introduce CYP2D6-humanized (Tg-CYP2D6) mice as an animal model where hepatic CYP2D6 expression is increased during pregnancy. In the mouse livers, expression of a known positive regulator of CYP2D6, hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF4α), did not change during pregnancy. However, HNF4α recruitment to CYP2D6 promoter increased at term pregnancy, accompanied by repressed expression of small heterodimer partner (SHP). In HepG2 cells, SHP repressed HNF4α transactivation of CYP2D6 promoter. In transgenic (Tg)-CYP2D6 mice, SHP knockdown led to a significant increase in CYP2D6 expression. Retinoic acid, an endogenous compound that induces SHP, exhibited decreased hepatic levels during pregnancy in Tg-CYP2D6 mice. Administration of all-trans-retinoic acid led to a significant decrease in the expression and activity of hepatic CYP2D6 in Tg-CYP2D6 mice. This study provides key insights into mechanisms underlying altered CYP2D6-mediated drug metabolism during pregnancy, laying a foundation for improved drug therapy in pregnant women.

  16. Identification of Secreted Exoproteome Fingerprints of Highly-Virulent and Non-Virulent Staphylococcus aureus Strains

    PubMed Central

    Bonar, Emilia; Wojcik, Iwona; Jankowska, Urszula; Kedracka-Krok, Sylwia; Bukowski, Michal; Polakowska, Klaudia; Lis, Marcin W.; Kosecka-Strojek, Maja; Sabat, Artur J.; Dubin, Grzegorz; Friedrich, Alexander W.; Miedzobrodzki, Jacek; Dubin, Adam; Wladyka, Benedykt

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a commensal inhabitant of skin and mucous membranes in nose vestibule but also an important opportunistic pathogen of humans and livestock. The extracellular proteome as a whole constitutes its major virulence determinant; however, the involvement of particular proteins is still relatively poorly understood. In this study, we compared the extracellular proteomes of poultry-derived S. aureus strains exhibiting a virulent (VIR) and non-virulent (NVIR) phenotype in a chicken embryo experimental infection model with the aim to identify proteomic signatures associated with the particular phenotypes. Despite significant heterogeneity within the analyzed proteomes, we identified alpha-haemolysin and bifunctional autolysin as indicators of virulence, whereas glutamylendopeptidase production was characteristic for non-virulent strains. Staphopain C (StpC) was identified in both the VIR and NVIR proteomes and the latter fact contradicted previous findings suggesting its involvement in virulence. By supplementing NVIR, StpC-negative strains with StpC, and comparing the virulence of parental and supplemented strains, we demonstrated that staphopain C alone does not affect staphylococcal virulence in a chicken embryo model. PMID:27242969

  17. Enrichment, isolation, and virulence of freeze-stressed plasmid-bearing virulent strains of Yersinia enterocolitica on pork.

    PubMed

    Bhaduri, Saumya

    2006-08-01

    The influence of freeze stress at -20 degrees C on the enrichment, isolation, detection, presence of virulence plasmid, and expression of virulence of plasmid-bearing Yersinia enterocolitica (YEP+) inoculated on pork chop medallions was assessed. Pork chop medallions (10 cm2) artificially contaminated with 10, 1, and 0.5 CFU/cm2 of YEP+ strains (serotype O:3) were placed in sterile petri dishes at -20 degrees C for 24 h. The medallions were swabbed when frozen, after thawing at room temperature for 1.5 h and after thawing at 4 degrees C for 18 h. Swabs were enriched and YEP+ were detected and isolated using the Congo red-binding and low-calcium-response assays. The YEP+ were isolated under all conditions on pork chop medallions inoculated with 10 CFU/cm2 and at a level of 1 CFU/cm2 when thawed at room temperature and at 4 degrees C but not from frozen pork chop medallions. The YEP+ were not isolated from pork chop medallions inoculated with 0.5 CFU/cm2 and then frozen, whereas YEP+ were recovered when inoculated at this level from pork chop medallions not subjected to freezing. Virulence of the strains isolated from frozen pork chop medallions was confirmed by PCR and the expression of plasmid-associated phenotypes. These results indicate that YEP+ subjected to freezing on pork are potentially capable of causing foodborne illness and that freezing is not a substitute for safe handling and proper cooking of pork.

  18. Decrease of Staphylococcus aureus Virulence by Helcococcus kunzii in a Caenorhabditis elegans Model

    PubMed Central

    Ngba Essebe, Christelle; Visvikis, Orane; Fines-Guyon, Marguerite; Vergne, Anne; Cattoir, Vincent; Lecoustumier, Alain; Lemichez, Emmanuel; Sotto, Albert; Lavigne, Jean-Philippe; Dunyach-Remy, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    Social bacterial interactions are considered essential in numerous infectious diseases, particularly in wounds. Foot ulcers are a common complication in diabetic patients and these ulcers become frequently infected. This infection is usually polymicrobial promoting cell-to-cell communications. Staphylococcus aureus is the most prevalent pathogen isolated. Its association with Helcococcus kunzii, commensal Gram-positive cocci, is frequently described. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of co-infection on virulence of both H. kunzii and S. aureus strains in a Caenorhabditis elegans model. To study the host response, qRT-PCRs targeting host defense genes were performed. We observed that H. kunzii strains harbored a very low (LT50: 5.7 days ± 0.4) or an absence of virulence (LT50: 6.9 days ± 0.5). In contrast, S. aureus strains (LT50: 2.9 days ± 0.4) were significantly more virulent than all H. kunzii (P < 0.001). When H. kunzii and S. aureus strains were associated, H. kunzii significantly reduced the virulence of the S. aureus strain in nematodes (LT50 between 4.4 and 5.2 days; P < 0.001). To evaluate the impact of these strains on host response, transcriptomic analysis showed that the ingestion of S. aureus led to a strong induction of defense genes (lys-5, sodh-1, and cyp-37B1) while H. kunzii did not. No statistical difference of host response genes expression was observed when C. elegans were infected with either S. aureus alone or with S. aureus + H. kunzii. Moreover, two well-characterized virulence factors (hla and agr) present in S. aureus were down-regulated when S. aureus were co-infected with H. kunzii. This study showed that H. kunzii decreased the virulence of S. aureus without modifying directly the host defense response. Factor(s) produced by this bacterium modulating the staphylococci virulence must be investigated. PMID:28361041

  19. Decrease of Staphylococcus aureus Virulence by Helcococcus kunzii in a Caenorhabditis elegans Model.

    PubMed

    Ngba Essebe, Christelle; Visvikis, Orane; Fines-Guyon, Marguerite; Vergne, Anne; Cattoir, Vincent; Lecoustumier, Alain; Lemichez, Emmanuel; Sotto, Albert; Lavigne, Jean-Philippe; Dunyach-Remy, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    Social bacterial interactions are considered essential in numerous infectious diseases, particularly in wounds. Foot ulcers are a common complication in diabetic patients and these ulcers become frequently infected. This infection is usually polymicrobial promoting cell-to-cell communications. Staphylococcus aureus is the most prevalent pathogen isolated. Its association with Helcococcus kunzii, commensal Gram-positive cocci, is frequently described. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of co-infection on virulence of both H. kunzii and S. aureus strains in a Caenorhabditis elegans model. To study the host response, qRT-PCRs targeting host defense genes were performed. We observed that H. kunzii strains harbored a very low (LT50: 5.7 days ± 0.4) or an absence of virulence (LT50: 6.9 days ± 0.5). In contrast, S. aureus strains (LT50: 2.9 days ± 0.4) were significantly more virulent than all H. kunzii (P < 0.001). When H. kunzii and S. aureus strains were associated, H. kunzii significantly reduced the virulence of the S. aureus strain in nematodes (LT50 between 4.4 and 5.2 days; P < 0.001). To evaluate the impact of these strains on host response, transcriptomic analysis showed that the ingestion of S. aureus led to a strong induction of defense genes (lys-5, sodh-1, and cyp-37B1) while H. kunzii did not. No statistical difference of host response genes expression was observed when C. elegans were infected with either S. aureus alone or with S. aureus + H. kunzii. Moreover, two well-characterized virulence factors (hla and agr) present in S. aureus were down-regulated when S. aureus were co-infected with H. kunzii. This study showed that H. kunzii decreased the virulence of S. aureus without modifying directly the host defense response. Factor(s) produced by this bacterium modulating the staphylococci virulence must be investigated.

  20. Effect of nicotine on cariogenic virulence of Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Li, Mingyun; Huang, Ruijie; Zhou, Xuedong; Qiu, Wei; Xu, Xin; Gregory, Richard L

    2016-11-01

    Nicotine has well-documented effects on the growth and colonization of Streptococcus mutans. This study attempts to investigate the effects of nicotine on pathogenic factors of S. mutans, such as the effect on biofilm formation and viability, expression of pathogenic genes, and metabolites of S. mutans. The results demonstrated that addition of nicotine did not significantly influence the viability of S. mutans cells. The biofilms became increasingly compact as the concentrations of nicotine increased. The expression of virulence genes, such as ldh and phosphotransferase system (PTS)-associated genes, was upregulated, and nlmC was upregulated significantly, while ftf was downregulated. The lactate concentration of S. mutans grown in 1 mg/mL of nicotine was increased up to twofold over either biofilm or planktonic cells grown without nicotine. Changes in the metabolites involved in central carbon metabolism from sucrose indicated that most selected metabolites were detectable and influenced by increased concentrations of nicotine. This study demonstrated that nicotine can influence the pathogenicity of S. mutans and may lead to increased dental caries through the production of more lactate and the upregulation of virulence genes.

  1. High Virulence and Antifungal Resistance in Clinical Strains of Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Monroy-Pérez, Eric; Paniagua-Contreras, Gloria Luz; Rodríguez-Purata, Pamela; Vaca-Paniagua, Felipe; Vázquez-Villaseñor, Marco; Díaz-Velásquez, Clara; Uribe-García, Alina

    2016-01-01

    Antifungal resistance and virulence properties of Candida albicans are a growing health problem worldwide. To study the expression of virulence and azole resistance genes in 39 clinical strains of C. albicans, we used a model of infection of human vaginal epithelial cells with C. albicans strains isolated from Mexican women with vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC). The strains were identified by PCR amplification of the ITS1 and ITS2 regions of rRNA. The detection and expression of virulence genes and azole resistance genes MDR1 and CDR1 were performed using PCR and RT-PCR, respectively. All strains were sensitive to nystatin and 38 (97.4%) and 37 (94.9%) were resistant to ketoconazole and fluconazole, respectively. ALS1, SAP4–SAP6, LIP1, LIP2, LIP4, LIP6, LIP7, LIP9, LIP10, and PLB1-PLB2 were present in all strains; SAP1 was identified in 37 (94.8%) isolates, HWP1 in 35 (89.7%), ALS3 in 14 (35.8%), and CDR1 in 26 (66.6%). In nearly all of the strains, ALS1, HWP1, SAP4–SAP6, LIP1–LIP10, PLB1, and PLB2 were expressed, whereas CDR1 was expressed in 20 (51.3%) and ALS3 in 14 (35.8%). In our in vitro model of infection with C. albicans, the clinical strains showed different expression profiles of virulence genes in association with the azole resistance gene CDR1. The results indicate that the strains that infect Mexican patients suffering from VVC are highly virulent and virtually all are insensitive to azoles. PMID:28058052

  2. The binary toxin CDT enhances Clostridium difficile virulence by suppressing protective colonic eosinophilia

    PubMed Central

    Cowardin, Carrie A.; Buonomo, Erica L.; Saleh, Mahmoud M.; Wilson, Madeline G.; Burgess, Stacey L.; Kuehne, Sarah A.; Schwan, Carsten; Eichhoff, Anna M.; Koch-Nolte, Friedrich; Lyras, Dena; Aktories, Klaus; Minton, Nigel P.; Petri, William A.

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is the most common hospital acquired pathogen in the United States, and infection is in many cases fatal. Toxins A and B are its major virulence factors, but increasingly a third toxin may be present, known as C. difficile transferase (CDT). An ADP-ribosyltransferase that causes actin cytoskeletal disruption, CDT is typically produced by the major, hypervirulent strains and has been associated with more severe disease. Here we show that CDT enhances the virulence of two PCR-ribotype 027 strains in mice. The toxin induces pathogenic host inflammation via a Toll-like Receptor 2 (TLR2) dependent pathway, resulting in the suppression of a protective host eosinophilic response. Finally, we show that restoration of TLR2 deficient eosinophils is sufficient for protection from a strain producing CDT. These findings offer an explanation for the enhanced virulence of CDT-expressing C. difficile and demonstrate a mechanism by which this binary toxin subverts the host immune response. PMID:27573114

  3. Role of Non-coding Regulatory RNA in the Virulence of Human Pathogenic Vibrios.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Reytor, Diliana; Plaza, Nicolás; Espejo, Romilio T; Navarrete, Paola; Bastías, Roberto; Garcia, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    In recent decades, the identification of small non-coding RNAs in bacteria has revealed an important regulatory mechanism of gene expression involved in the response to environmental signals and to the control of virulence. In the family Vibrionaceae, which includes several human and animal pathogens, small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs) are closely related to important processes including metabolism, quorum sensing, virulence, and fitness. Studies conducted in silico and experiments using microarrays and high-throughput RNA sequencing have led to the discovery of an unexpected number of sRNAs in Vibrios. The present review discusses the most relevant reports regarding the mechanisms of action of sRNAs and their implications in the virulence of the main human pathogens in the family Vibrionaceae: Vibrio parahaemolyticus, V. vulnificus and V. cholerae.

  4. Role of Non-coding Regulatory RNA in the Virulence of Human Pathogenic Vibrios

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Reytor, Diliana; Plaza, Nicolás; Espejo, Romilio T.; Navarrete, Paola; Bastías, Roberto; Garcia, Katherine

    2017-01-01

    In recent decades, the identification of small non-coding RNAs in bacteria has revealed an important regulatory mechanism of gene expression involved in the response to environmental signals and to the control of virulence. In the family Vibrionaceae, which includes several human and animal pathogens, small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs) are closely related to important processes including metabolism, quorum sensing, virulence, and fitness. Studies conducted in silico and experiments using microarrays and high-throughput RNA sequencing have led to the discovery of an unexpected number of sRNAs in Vibrios. The present review discusses the most relevant reports regarding the mechanisms of action of sRNAs and their implications in the virulence of the main human pathogens in the family Vibrionaceae: Vibrio parahaemolyticus, V. vulnificus and V. cholerae. PMID:28123382

  5. Virulence of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans serotypes and DGGE subtypes isolated from chronic adult periodontitis in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Pahumunto, Nuntiya; Ruangsri, Praphansri; Wongsuwanlert, Mutita; Piwat, Supatcharin; Dahlen, Gunnar; Teanpaisan, Rawee

    2015-12-01

    A high proportion of non-serotypeable isolates of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans among Thai periodontitis cases has been previously reported. The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of leukotoxin and toxicity, cytolethal distending toxin (Cdts), and internalization and the killing effect on fibroblasts by A. actinomycetemcomitans subtypes from Thai chronic periodontitis cases. A total of 96 A. actinomycetemcomitans strains from 37 periodontitis cases, previously serotyped with PCR and subtyped with DGGE, were examined for the presence of the ltx gene and cdt genes (cdtBC), and tested for leukotoxin expression, leukotoxicity, internalization, and apoptosis of fibroblast cells. The ltx gene was present in all isolates, while 84.4% showed the cdtBC gene. Two strains with a JP2-like ltx gene with a deletion of 530 bp in the promoter region, serotyped as c, showed virulence of similar magnitude to the JP2 strain. Furthermore, a higher virulence was found in the two non-serotypeable DGGE subtypes, NS1 and NS2, compared with the serotypeable strains (serotype a-f, serotype b and d were absent). Generally, the virulence of strains obtained from deep periodontal pockets was higher than those isolated from shallow non-bleeding pockets. A. actinomycetemcomitans subtypes isolated from adult Thais with chronic periodontitis showed a highly variable virulence, leukotoxin expression, leukotoxicity, internalization and apoptosis of fibroblast, and are regulated both genetically and environmentally.

  6. Stenotrophomonas maltophilia strains from cystic fibrosis patients: genomic variability and molecular characterization of some virulence determinants.

    PubMed

    Nicoletti, Mauro; Iacobino, Angelo; Prosseda, Gianni; Fiscarelli, Ersilia; Zarrilli, Raffaele; De Carolis, Elena; Petrucca, Andrea; Nencioni, Lucia; Colonna, Bianca; Casalino, Mariassunta

    2011-01-01

    The genetic relatedness of 52 Stenotrophomonas maltophilia strains, collected from various environmental and clinical sources, including cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, as well as the presence and the expression of some virulence-associated genes were studied. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis identified 47 profiles and three clusters of isolates with an identical PFGE pattern considered to be indistinguishable strains. Restriction fragment length polymorphism of the gyrB gene grouped the 52 strains into nine different profiles. Most CF clinical isolates (29 out of 41) showed profile 1, while the analysis of the hypervariable regions of the 16S rRNA gene revealed five distinct allelic variations, with the majority of CF isolates (23 out of 41) belonging to sequence group 1. Furthermore, the strains were characterized for motility and expression of virulence-associated genes, including genes encoding type-1 fimbriae, proteases (StmPr1 and StmPr2) and esterase. All S. maltophilia strains exhibited a very broad range of swimming and twitching motility, while none showed swarming motility. A complete smf-1 gene was PCR-amplified only from clinically derived S. maltophilia strains. Finally, the virulence of representative S. maltophilia strains impaired in the expression of proteases and esterase activities was evaluated by infecting larvae of the wax moth Galleria mellonella. The results obtained strongly indicate that the major extracellular protease StmPr1 may be a relevant virulence factor of S. maltophilia.

  7. Thiophenone Attenuates Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli O103:H2 Virulence by Interfering with AI-2 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Valen Rukke, Håkon; Benneche, Tore; Aamdal Scheie, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Interference with bacterial quorum sensing communication provides an anti-virulence strategy to control pathogenic bacteria. Here, using the Enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) O103:H2, we showed for the first time that thiophenone TF101 reduced expression of lsrB; the gene encoding the AI-2 receptor. Combined results of transcriptional and phenotypic analyses suggested that TF101 interfere with AI-2 signalling, possibly by competing with AI-2 for binding to LsrB. This is supported by in silico docking prediction of thiophenone TF101 in the LsrB pocket. Transcriptional analyses furthermore showed that thiophenone TF101 interfered with expression of the virulence genes eae and fimH. In addition, TF101 reduced AI-2 induced E. coli adhesion to colorectal adenocarcinoma cells. TF101, on the other hand, did not affect epinephrine or norepinephrine enhanced E. coli adhesion. Overall, our results showed that thiophenone TF101 interfered with virulence expression in E. coli O103:H2, suggestedly by interfering with AI-2 mediated quorum sensing. We thus conclude that thiophenone TF101 might represent a promising future anti-virulence agent in the fight against pathogenic E. coli. PMID:27309855

  8. Intracellularly induced cyclophilins play an important role in stress adaptation and virulence of Brucella abortus.

    PubMed

    Roset, Mara S; García Fernández, Lucía; DelVecchio, Vito G; Briones, Gabriel

    2013-02-01

    Brucella is an intracellular bacterial pathogen that causes the worldwide zoonotic disease brucellosis. Brucella virulence relies on its ability to transition to an intracellular lifestyle within host cells. Thus, this pathogen must sense its intracellular localization and then reprogram gene expression for survival within the host cell. A comparative proteomic investigation was performed to identify differentially expressed proteins potentially relevant for Brucella intracellular adaptation. Two proteins identified as cyclophilins (CypA and CypB) were overexpressed in the intracellular environment of the host cell in comparison to laboratory-grown Brucella. To define the potential role of cyclophilins in Brucella virulence, a double-deletion mutant was constructed and its resulting phenotype was characterized. The Brucella abortus ΔcypAB mutant displayed increased sensitivity to environmental stressors, such as oxidative stress, pH, and detergents. In addition, the B. abortus ΔcypAB mutant strain had a reduced growth rate at lower temperature, a phenotype associated with defective expression of cyclophilins in other microorganisms. The B. abortus ΔcypAB mutant also displays reduced virulence in BALB/c mice and defective intracellular survival in HeLa cells. These findings suggest that cyclophilins are important for Brucella virulence and survival in the host cells.

  9. Photodynamic inactivation of virulence factors of Candida strains isolated from patients with denture stomatitis.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Cristiane Aparecida; Domingues, Nádia; Silva, Michelle Peneluppi; Costa, Anna Carolina Borges Pereira; Junqueira, Juliana Campos; Jorge, Antonio Olavo Cardoso

    2015-12-01

    Candida species are major microorganisms isolated in denture stomatitis (DS), an inflammatory process of the mucosa underlying removable dental prostheses, and express a variety of virulence factors that can increase their pathogenicity. The potential of Photodynamic inactivation (PDI) in planktonic culture, biofilms and virulence factors of Candida strains was evaluated. A total of 48 clinical Candida isolates from individuals wearing removable maxillary prostheses with DS were included in the study. The effects of erythrosine (ER, 200 μM) and a green LED (λ 532 ± 10 nm, 237 mW/cm(2) and 42.63 J/cm(2)) in a planktonic culture were evaluated. The effect of the addition of ER at a concentration of 400 μM together with a green LED was evaluated in biofilms. The virulence factors of all of the Candida strains were evaluated before and after the PDI process in cells derived from biofilm and planktonic assays. All of the Candida species were susceptible to ER and green LED. However, the biofilm structures were more resistant to PDI than the planktonic cultures. PDI also promoted slight reductions in most of the virulence factors of C. albicans and some of the Candida tropicalis strains. These results suggest that the addition of PDI is effective for reducing yeasts and may also reduce the virulence of certain Candida species and decrease their pathogenicity.

  10. MspA-Mycobacterium tuberculosis-transformant with reduced virulence: the "unbirthday paradigm".

    PubMed

    Lamrabet, Otmane; Ghigo, Eric; Mège, Jean-Louis; Lepidi, Hubert; Nappez, Claude; Raoult, Didier; Drancourt, Michel

    2014-11-01

    Expressing mspA porin gene from Mycobacterium smegmatis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis attenuated this pathogen. Intracellular growth of the transformants into free-living amoeba and murine and human macrophages decreased. Furthermore, transformants decreased the microbicidal program of human monocyte-derived macrophages. BALB/c mice inoculated with transformants exhibited higher weights, lower histological lesions and lower M. tuberculosis inoculum in the liver, spleen and lungs than control mice challenged with wild-type M. tuberculosis. Preliminary evaluation indicated that mice inoculated with this transformant showed higher weights and lower numbers of lung nodules and tissular mycobacteria than control mice when challenged with wild-type M. tuberculosis. Similar to the paradoxical "unbirthday" gift coined by Lewis Carroll in Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, adding mspA gene reduced the virulence of M. tuberculosis and yielded a protective effect. Lost of non-virulence genes is a mechanism for virulence in mycobacteria. Engineering non-virulence genes in M. tuberculosis may yield strains with decreased virulence and increased immunogenicity.

  11. Catalases Induction in High Virulence Pinewood Nematode Bursaphelenchus xylophilus under Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Stress

    PubMed Central

    Vicente, Cláudia S. L.; Ikuyo, Yoriko; Shinya, Ryoji; Mota, Manuel; Hasegawa, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    Considered an EPPO A2 quarantine pest, Bursaphelenchus xylophilus is the causal agent of the pine wilt disease and the most devastating plant parasitic nematode attacking coniferous trees in the world. In the early stages of invasion, this nematode has to manage host defence mechanisms, such as strong oxidative stress. Only successful, virulent nematodes are able to tolerate the basal plant defences, and furthermore migrate and proliferate inside of the host tree. In this work, our main objective was to understand to what extent B. xylophilus catalases are involved in their tolerance to oxidative stress and virulence, using as oxidant agent the reactive oxygen species hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). After 24 hours of exposure, high virulence isolates of B. xylophilus could withstand higher H2O2 concentrations in comparison with low virulence B. xylophilus and B. mucronatus, corroborating our observation of Bxy-ctl-1 and Bxy-ctl-2 catalase up-regulation under the same experimental conditions. Both catalases are expressed throughout the nematode intestine. In addition, transgenic strains of Caenorhabditis elegans overexpressing B. xylophilus catalases were constructed and evaluated for survival under similar conditions as previously. Our results suggest that catalases of high virulence B. xylophilus were crucial for nematode survival under prolonged exposure to in vitro oxidative stress, highlighting their adaptive response, which could contribute to their success in host conditions. PMID:25894519

  12. Virulence factors in vancomycin-resistant and vancomycin- susceptible Enterococcus faecalis from Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Camargo, I. L. B. C.; Zanella, R. C.; Gilmore, M. S.; Darini, A. L. C.

    2008-01-01

    Enterococci are members of commensal flora of animals and insects, but are also important opportunistic pathogens. Our objective was to observe if there was any difference of virulence in several groups of E. faecalis, mainly between vancomycin-resistant E. faecalis (VREFS) of colonization and infection. VREFS and vancomycin-sensitive E. faecalis from Brazil were screened for the presence of virulence factor genes. Phenotypic assays were used to assess in vitro expression, to understand the pathogenic potential of these isolates and to determine whether a correlation exists between virulence and antibiotic resistance. Different virulence profiles were found suggesting that the disseminating clone may have generated several variations. However, our study showed that one constellation of traits appeared most commonly: gelatinase, aggregation substance and esp (GEA). These factors are important because they have been implicated in cell aggregation and biofilm formation. Biofilm formation may promote the conjugation of plasmids harboring resistance and virulence genes, enhancing the probability of entry of new resistance genes into species. Curiously, the profile GEA was not exclusive to VREFS, it was the second most observed in VSEFS isolates from colonization and infection in hospitalized patients and also from rectal swabs of healthy volunteers. Such strains appear to represent the entry gateway to new resistance genes into E. faecalis and may contribute to the spreading of E. faecalis mainly in hospitals. PMID:24031215

  13. Identification of Virulence Properties in Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 Using Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, Surasri N.; Anriany, Yuda; Grim, Christopher J.; Kim, Sungji; Chang, Zenas; Joseph, Sam W.; Cinar, Hediye N.

    2013-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serover Typhimurium definitive phage type DT104, resistant to multiple antibiotics, is one of the most widespread Salmonella species in human infection worldwide. Although several cohort studies indicate that DT104 carrying the multidrug resistance (MDR) locus on salmonella genomic island 1 is a possible hyper-virulent strain compared to DT104 strains without MDR, or other Salmonella enterica serotypes, existing experimental evidence regarding virulence properties associated with the MDR region is controversial. To address this question, we constructed an isogenic MDR deletion (∆MDR) mutant strain of DT104, SNS12, by allelic exchange and used Caenorhabditis elegans as a host model to assess differences in virulence between these two strains. SNS12 exhibited decreased virulence in C. elegans, and we observed increased colonization and proliferation of the intestine of C. elegans by DT104. The immune response against MDR-carrying DT104 appears to function through a non-canonical Unfolded Protein Response (UPR) pathway, namely prion-like-(QN-rich)-domain-bearing protein pathway (PQN), in a ced-1 dependent manner in C. elegans. Further, we also demonstrate that genes of the PQN pathway and antimicrobial peptide gene abf-2, are expressed at higher transcriptional levels in worms immediately following exposure to DT104, in comparison with worms exposed to SNS12. Altogether, our results suggest that the MDR region of Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 has a direct role in virulence against Caenorhabditis elegans. PMID:24124587

  14. Identification of virulence properties in Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 using Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Surasri N; Anriany, Yuda; Grim, Christopher J; Kim, Sungji; Chang, Zenas; Joseph, Sam W; Cinar, Hediye N

    2013-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serover Typhimurium definitive phage type DT104, resistant to multiple antibiotics, is one of the most widespread Salmonella species in human infection worldwide. Although several cohort studies indicate that DT104 carrying the multidrug resistance (MDR) locus on salmonella genomic island 1 is a possible hyper-virulent strain compared to DT104 strains without MDR, or other Salmonella enterica serotypes, existing experimental evidence regarding virulence properties associated with the MDR region is controversial. To address this question, we constructed an isogenic MDR deletion (∆MDR) mutant strain of DT104, SNS12, by allelic exchange and used Caenorhabditis elegans as a host model to assess differences in virulence between these two strains. SNS12 exhibited decreased virulence in C. elegans, and we observed increased colonization and proliferation of the intestine of C. elegans by DT104. The immune response against MDR-carrying DT104 appears to function through a non-canonical Unfolded Protein Response (UPR) pathway, namely prion-like-(QN-rich)-domain-bearing protein pathway (PQN), in a ced-1 dependent manner in C. elegans. Further, we also demonstrate that genes of the PQN pathway and antimicrobial peptide gene abf-2, are expressed at higher transcriptional levels in worms immediately following exposure to DT104, in comparison with worms exposed to SNS12. Altogether, our results suggest that the MDR region of Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 has a direct role in virulence against Caenorhabditis elegans.

  15. Bioinformatics annotation of the hypothetical proteins found by omics techniques can help to disclose additional virulence factors.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Sergio; Gómez, Antonio; Cedano, Juan; Querol, Enrique

    2009-10-01

    The advent of genomics should have facilitated the identification of microbial virulence factors, a key objective for vaccine design. When the bacterial pathogen infects the host it expresses a set of genes, a number of them being virulence factors. Among the genes identified by techniques as microarrays, in vivo expression technology, signature-tagged mutagenesis and differential fluorescence induction there are many related to cellular stress, basal metabolism, etc., which cannot be directly involved in virulence, or at least cannot be considered useful candidates to be deleted for designing a live attenuated vaccine. Among the genes disclosed by these methodologies there are a number of hypothetical or unknown proteins. As they can hide some true virulence factors, we have reannotated all of these hypothetical proteins from several respiratory pathogens by a careful and in-depth analysis of each one. Although some of the re-annotations match with functions that can be related to microbial virulence, the identification of virulence factors remains difficult.

  16. covR Mediated Antibiofilm Activity of 3-Furancarboxaldehyde Increases the Virulence of Group A Streptococcus

    PubMed Central

    Ashwinkumar Subramenium, Ganapathy; Viszwapriya, Dharmaprakash; Iyer, Prasanth Mani; Balamurugan, Krishnaswamy; Karutha Pandian, Shunmugiah

    2015-01-01

    Background Group A streptococcus (GAS, Streptococcus pyogenes), a multi-virulent, exclusive human pathogen responsible for various invasive and non-invasive diseases possesses biofilm forming phenomenon as one of its pathogenic armaments. Recently, antibiofilm agents have gained prime importance, since inhibiting the biofilm formation is expected to reduce development of antibiotic resistance and increase their susceptibility to the host immune cells. Principal Findings The current study demonstrates the antibiofilm activity of 3Furancarboxaldehyde (3FCA), a floral honey derived compound, against GAS biofilm, which was divulged using crystal violet assay, light microscopy, and confocal laser scanning microscopy. The report is extended to study its effect on various aspects of GAS (morphology, virulence, aggregation) at its minimal biofilm inhibitory concentration (132μg/ml). 3FCA was found to alter the growth pattern of GAS in solid and liquid medium and increased the rate of auto-aggregation. Electron microscopy unveiled the increase in extra polymeric substances around cell. Gene expression studies showed down-regulation of covR gene, which is speculated to be the prime target for the antibiofilm activity. Increased hyaluronic acid production and down regulation of srtB gene is attributed to the enhanced rate of auto-aggregation. The virulence genes (srv, mga, luxS and hasA) were also found to be over expressed, which was manifested with the increased susceptibility of the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans to 3FCA treated GAS. The toxicity of 3FCA was ruled out with no adverse effect on C. elegans. Significance Though 3FCA possess antibiofilm activity against GAS, it was also found to increase the virulence of GAS. This study demonstrates that, covR mediated antibiofilm activity may increase the virulence of GAS. This also emphasizes the importance to analyse the acclimatization response and virulence of the pathogen in the presence of antibiofilm compounds

  17. Antimicrobial resistance and virulence profile of enterococci isolated from poultry and cattle sources in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Ngbede, Emmanuel Ochefije; Raji, Mashood Abiola; Kwanashie, Clara Nna; Kwaga, Jacob Kwada Pajhi

    2017-03-01

    This study investigated the occurrence, antimicrobial resistance and virulence of Enterococcus from poultry and cattle farms. Three hundred and ninety samples: cloacal/rectal swabs (n = 260) and manure (n = 130] were processed for recovery of Enterococcus species. Standard bacteriological methods were used to isolate, identify and characterize Enterococcus species for antimicrobial susceptibility and expression of virulence traits. Detection of antibiotic resistance and virulence genes was carried out by polymerase chain reaction. Enterococcus was recovered from 167 (42.8%) of the 390 samples tested with a predominance of Enterococcus faecium (27.7%). Other species detected were Enterococcus gallinarum, Enterococcus faecalis, Enterococcus hirae, Enterococcus raffinosus, Enterococcus avium, Enterococcus casseliflavus, Enterococcus mundtii and Enterococcus durans. All the isolates tested were susceptible to vancomycin, but resistance to tetracycline, erythromycin, ampicillin and gentamicin was also observed among 61.0, 61.0, 45.1 and 32.7% of the isolates, respectively. Sixty (53.1%) of the isolates were multidrug resistant presenting as 24 different resistance patterns with resistance to gentamicin-erythromycin-streptomycin-tetracycline (CN-ERY-STR-TET) being the most common (n = 11) pattern. In addition to expression of virulence traits (haemolysin, gelatinase, biofilm production), antibiotic resistance (tetK, tetL, tetM, tetO and ermB) and virulence (asa1, gelE, cylA) genes were detected among the isolates. Also, in vitro transfer of resistance determinants was observed among 75% of the isolates tested. Our data revealed poultry, cattle and manure in this area are hosts to varying Enterococcus species harbouring virulence and resistance determinants that can be transferred to other organisms and also are important for causing nosocomial infection.

  18. The master regulator for biofilm formation in Bacillus subtilis governs the expression of an operon encoding secreted proteins required for the assembly of complex multicellular communities.

    SciTech Connect

    Branda, Steven S.; Losick, Richard; Kolter, Roberto; Kearns, Daniel B.; Chu, Frances

    2005-08-01

    Wild strains of Bacillus subtilis are capable of forming architecturally complex communities of cells known as biofilms. Critical to biofilm formation is the eps operon, which is believed to be responsible for the biosynthesis of an exopolysaccharide that binds chains of cells together in bundles. We report that transcription of eps is under the negative regulation of SinR, a repressor that was found to bind to multiple sites in the regulatory region of the operon. Mutations in sinR bypassed the requirement in biofilm formation of two genes of unknown function, ylbF and ymcA, and sinI, which is known to encode an antagonist of SinR. We propose that these genes are members of a pathway that is responsible for counteracting SinR-mediated repression. We further propose that SinR is a master regulator that governs the transition between a planktonic state in which the bacteria swim as single cells in liquid or swarm in small groups over surfaces, and a sessile state in which the bacteria adhere to each other to form bundled chains and assemble into multicellular communities.

  19. Virulence factors of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex

    PubMed Central

    Forrellad, Marina A.; Klepp, Laura I.; Gioffré, Andrea; Sabio y García, Julia; Morbidoni, Hector R.; Santangelo, María de la Paz; Cataldi, Angel A.; Bigi, Fabiana

    2013-01-01

    The Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) consists of closely related species that cause tuberculosis in both humans and animals. This illness, still today, remains to be one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality throughout the world. The mycobacteria enter the host by air, and, once in the lungs, are phagocytated by macrophages. This may lead to the rapid elimination of the bacillus or to the triggering of an active tuberculosis infection. A large number of different virulence factors have evolved in MTBC members as a response to the host immune reaction. The aim of this review is to describe the bacterial genes/proteins that are essential for the virulence of MTBC species, and that have been demonstrated in an in vivo model of infection. Knowledge of MTBC virulence factors is essential for the development of new vaccines and drugs to help manage the disease toward an increasingly more tuberculosis-free world. PMID:23076359

  20. Potential drivers of virulence evolution in aquaculture

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kennedy, David A.; Kurath, Gael; Brito, Ilana L.; Purcell, Maureen K.; Read, Andrew F.; Winton, James R.; Wargo, Andrew R.

    2016-01-01

    Infectious diseases are economically detrimental to aquaculture, and with continued expansion and intensification of aquaculture, the importance of managing infectious diseases will likely increase in the future. Here, we use evolution of virulence theory, along with examples, to identify aquaculture practices that might lead to the evolution of increased pathogen virulence. We identify eight practices common in aquaculture that theory predicts may favor evolution toward higher pathogen virulence. Four are related to intensive aquaculture operations, and four others are related specifically to infectious disease control. Our intention is to make aquaculture managers aware of these risks, such that with increased vigilance, they might be able to detect and prevent the emergence and spread of increasingly troublesome pathogen strains in the future.

  1. Virulence, immunopathology and transmissibility of selected strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in a murine model

    PubMed Central

    Marquina-Castillo, Brenda; García-García, Lourdes; Ponce-de-León, Alfredo; Jimenez-Corona, Maria-Eugenia; Bobadilla-del Valle, Miriam; Cano-Arellano, Bulmaro; Canizales-Quintero, Sergio; Martinez-Gamboa, Areli; Kato-Maeda, Midori; Robertson, Brian; Young, Douglas; Small, Peter; Schoolnik, Gary; Sifuentes-Osornio, Jose; Hernandez-Pando, Rogelio

    2009-01-01

    After encounter with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, a series of non-uniform immune responses are triggered that define the course of the infection. Eight M. tuberculosis strains were selected from a prospective population-based study of pulmonary tuberculosis patients (1995–2003) based on relevant clinical/epidemiological patterns and tested in a well-characterized BALB/c mouse model of progressive pulmonary tuberculosis. In addition, a new mouse model of transmissibility consisting of prolonged cohousing (up to 60 days) of infected and naïve animals was tested. Four phenotypes were defined based on strain virulence (mouse survival, lung bacillary load and tissue damage), immunology response (cytokine expression determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction) and transmissibility (lung bacillary loads and cutaneous delayed-type hypersensitivity in naïve animals).We identified four clearly defined strain phenotypes: (1) hypervirulent strain with non-protective immune response and highly transmissible; (2) virulent strain, associated with high expression of proinflammatory cytokines (tumour necrosis factor and interferon) and very low anti-inflammatory cytokine expression (interleukins 4 and 10), which induced accelerated death by immunopathology; (3) strain inducing efficient protective immunity with lower virulence, and (4) strain demonstrating strong and early macrophage activation (innate immunity) with delayed participation of acquired immunity (interferon expression). We were able to correlate virulent and transmissible phenotypes in the mouse model and markers of community transmission such as tuberculin reactivity among contacts, rapid progression to disease and cluster status. However, we were not able to find correlation with the other two phenotypes. Our new transmission model supported the hypothesis that among these strains increased virulence was linked to increased transmission. PMID:19191912

  2. A Precise Temperature-Responsive Bistable Switch Controlling Yersinia Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Johannes; Bücker, René; Herbst, Katharina; Heroven, Ann Kathrin; Pisano, Fabio; Wittmann, Christoph; Münch, Richard; Müller, Johannes; Jahn, Dieter

    2016-01-01

    Different biomolecules have been identified in bacterial pathogens that sense changes in temperature and trigger expression of virulence programs upon host entry. However, the dynamics and quantitative outcome of this response in individual cells of a population, and how this influences pathogenicity are unknown. Here, we address these questions using a thermosensing virulence regulator of an intestinal pathogen (RovA of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis) as a model. We reveal that this regulator is part of a novel thermoresponsive bistable switch, which leads to high- and low-invasive subpopulations within a narrow temperature range. The temperature range in which bistability is observed is defined by the degradation and synthesis rate of the regulator, and is further adjustable via a nutrient-responsive regulator. The thermoresponsive switch is also characterized by a hysteretic behavior in which activation and deactivation occurred on vastly different time scales. Mathematical modeling accurately mirrored the experimental behavior and predicted that the thermoresponsiveness of this sophisticated bistable switch is mainly determined by the thermo-triggered increase of RovA proteolysis. We further observed RovA ON and OFF subpopulations of Y. pseudotuberculosis in the Peyer’s patches and caecum of infected mice, and that changes in the RovA ON/OFF cell ratio reduce tissue colonization and overall virulence. This points to a bet-hedging strategy in which the thermoresponsive bistable switch plays a key role in adapting the bacteria to the fluctuating conditions encountered as they pass through the host’s intestinal epithelium and suggests novel strategies for the development of antimicrobial therapies. PMID:28006011

  3. Dietary supplementation with fish oil alters the expression levels of proteins governing mitochondrial dynamics and prevents high-fat diet-induced endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ruifang; Wang, Xiaoming; Liu, Yan; Xia, Min

    2014-07-28

    Diets supplemented with fish oil (FO), which is rich in n-3 PUFA, have been shown to modify several key risk factors for CVD. The purpose of the present study was to determine the effect of FO supplementation on mitochondrial dynamic protein expression in the endothelium and on endothelial cell function. Male apoE-deficient (apoE-/-) mice (8 weeks old, n 12 per group) were fed a high-fat diet containing 45% fat (HFD group) or a HFD with partial replacement of lard with 10% (w/w) FO (FO group) (total EPA and DHA content 64.1 g/kg) for 8 weeks. ApoE-/- mice in the FO group had a greater endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation response to acetylcholine (Ach) than those in the HFD group. The atherosclerotic lesion volume in the aortic sinus of mice in the FO group was 54% lower than that in the HFD group (P< 0.01). In addition, the aortas isolated from mice in the FO group had higher expression levels of Mfn2 and Opa1 but lower expression levels of Fis1 than those from the HFD group. Compared with mice fed the HFD, those fed the FO diet showed significantly lower levels of mitochondrial oxidative stress, cytochrome c release and caspase-3 activity (each P< 0.05). Furthermore, FO-fed mice displayed increased NO release and availability and enhanced endothelial NO synthase activity compared with HFD-fed mice. Taken together, these results reveal a novel mechanism by which FO protects against endothelial cell dysfunction, which may result in improved mitochondrial dynamics.

  4. BdlA, DipA and Induced Dispersion Contribute to Acute Virulence and Chronic Persistence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yi; Petrova, Olga E.; Su, Shengchang; Lau, Gee W.; Panmanee, Warunya; Na, Renuka; Hassett, Daniel J.; Davies, David G.; Sauer, Karin

    2014-01-01

    The human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa is capable of causing both acute and chronic infections. Differences in virulence are attributable to the mode of growth: bacteria growing planktonically cause acute infections, while bacteria growing in matrix-enclosed aggregates known as biofilms are associated with chronic, persistent infections. While the contribution of the planktonic and biofilm modes of growth to virulence is now widely accepted, little is known about the role of dispersion in virulence, the active process by which biofilm bacteria switch back to the planktonic mode of growth. Here, we demonstrate that P. aeruginosa dispersed cells display a virulence phenotype distinct from those of planktonic and biofilm cells. While the highest activity of cytotoxic and degradative enzymes capable of breaking down polymeric matrix components was detected in supernatants of planktonic cells, the enzymatic activity of dispersed cell supernatants was similar to that of biofilm supernatants. Supernatants of non-dispersing ΔbdlA biofilms were characterized by a lack of many of the degradative activities. Expression of genes contributing to the virulence of P. aeruginosa was nearly 30-fold reduced in biofilm cells relative to planktonic cells. Gene expression analysis indicated dispersed cells, while dispersing from a biofilm and returning to the single cell lifestyle, to be distinct from both biofilm and planktonic cells, with virulence transcript levels being reduced up to 150-fold compared to planktonic cells. In contrast, virulence gene transcript levels were significantly increased in non-dispersing ΔbdlA and ΔdipA biofilms compared to wild-type planktonic cells. Despite this, bdlA and dipA inactivation, resulting in an inability to disperse in vitro, correlated with reduced pathogenicity and competitiveness in cross-phylum acute virulence models. In contrast, bdlA inactivation rendered P. aeruginosa more persistent upon chronic colonization of the murine lung

  5. A Klebsiella pneumoniae antibiotic resistance mechanism that subdues host defences and promotes virulence.

    PubMed

    Kidd, Timothy J; Mills, Grant; Sá-Pessoa, Joana; Dumigan, Amy; Frank, Christian G; Insua, José L; Ingram, Rebecca; Hobley, Laura; Bengoechea, José A

    2017-04-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is an important cause of multidrug-resistant infections worldwide. Recent studies highlight the emergence of multidrug-resistant K. pneumoniae strains which show resistance to colistin, a last-line antibiotic, arising from mutational inactivation of the mgrB regulatory gene. However, the precise molecular resistance mechanisms of mgrB-associated colistin resistance and its impact on virulence remain unclear. Here, we constructed an mgrB gene K. pneumoniae mutant and performed characterisation of its lipid A structure, polymyxin and antimicrobial peptide resistance, virulence and inflammatory responses upon infection. Our data reveal that mgrB mutation induces PhoPQ-governed lipid A remodelling which confers not only resistance to polymyxins, but also enhances K. pneumoniae virulence by decreasing antimicrobial peptide susceptibility and attenuating early host defence response activation. Overall, our findings have important implications for patient management and antimicrobial stewardship, while also stressing antibiotic resistance development is not inexorably linked with subdued bacterial fitness and virulence.

  6. Evidence that PrfA, the pleiotropic activator of virulence genes in Listeria monocytogenes, can be present but inactive.

    PubMed Central

    Renzoni, A; Klarsfeld, A; Dramsi, S; Cossart, P

    1997-01-01

    All virulence genes of Listeria monocytogenes identified to date are positively regulated by PrfA, a transcriptional activator belonging to the Crp-Fnr family. Low temperature and cellobiose are two environmental signals known to repress expression of virulence genes in L. monocytogenes. In the present work, we analyzed the effect of temperature and cellobiose on the expression of the PrfA protein. At low temperature, PrfA was undetected, although prfA monocistronic transcripts are present. In contrast, PrfA was fully expressed in the presence of cellobiose. These results strongly suggest that virulence gene activation depends on both the presence of PrfA and additional regulatory pathways that either modify PrfA or act synergistically with PrfA. PMID:9119495

  7. Tolerance to caspofungin in Candida albicans is associated with at least three distinctive mechanisms that govern expression of FKS genes and cell wall remodeling.

    PubMed

    Yang, Feng; Zhang, Lulu; Wakabayashi, Hironao; Myers, Jason; Jiang, Yuanying; Cao, Yongbing; Jimenez-Ortigosa, Cristina; Perlin, David S; Rustchenko, Elena

    2017-02-21

    Expanding echinocandin use to prevent or treat invasive fungal infections has led to an increase in the number of breakthrough infections due to resistant Candida species. Although uncommon, echinocandin resistance is well documented for Candida albicans, which is among the most prevalent bloodstream organisms. A better understanding is needed to assess the cellular factors that promote tolerance and predispose infecting cells for clinical breakthrough. We have previously showed that some mutants adapted to growth in the presence of toxic sorbose due to loss of one chromosome 5 (Ch5) also became more tolerant to caspofungin. We find now that, following direct selection on caspofungin, tolerance can be conferred by at least three mechanisms: 1) monosomy of Ch5; 2) combined monosomy of left arm and trisomy of right arm of Ch5, and 3) an aneuploidy-independent mechanism. Tolerant mutants possessed cell walls with elevated chitin and showed downregulation of genes involved in cell wall biosynthesis, FKS outside Ch5 and CHT2 on Ch5, irrespective of Ch5 ploidy. Also, irrespective of Ch5 ploidy, CNB1 and MID1 genes on Ch5 that are involved in calcineurin signaling pathway were expressed at the diploid level. Thus, multiple mechanisms can impact the relative expression of the aforementioned genes controlling them in a similar manner. Although breakthrough mutations in two specific regions of FKS1 have previously been associated with caspofungin resistance, we find mechanisms of caspofungin tolerance that are independent of FKS1, thus, representing an earlier event in resistance development.

  8. Regulation of Yersina pestis Virulence by AI-2 Mediated Quorum Sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Segelke, B; Hok, S; Lao, V; Corzett, M; Garcia, E

    2010-03-29

    The proposed research was motivated by an interest in understanding Y. pestis virulence mechanisms and bacteria cell-cell communication. It is expected that a greater understanding of virulence mechanisms will ultimately lead to biothreat countermeasures and novel therapeutics. Y. pestis is the etiological agent of plague, the most devastating disease in human history. Y. pestis infection has a high mortality rate and a short incubation before mortality. There is no widely available and effective vaccine for Y. pestis and multi-drug resistant strains are emerging. Y. pestis is a recognized biothreat agent based on the wide distribution of the bacteria in research laboratories around the world and on the knowledge that methods exist to produce and aerosolize large amounts of bacteria. We hypothesized that cell-cell communication via signaling molecules, or quorum sensing, by Y. pestis is important for the regulation of virulence factor gene expression during host invasion, though a causative link had never been established. Quorum sensing is a mode of intercellular communication which enables orchestration of gene expression for many bacteria as a function of population density and available evidence suggests there may be a link between quorum sensing and regulation of Y. pesits virulence. Several pathogenic bacteria have been shown to regulate expression of virulence factor genes, including genes encoding type III secretion, via quorum sensing. The Y. pestis genome encodes several cell-cell signaling pathways and the interaction of at least three of these are thought to be involved in one or more modes of host invasion. Furthermore, Y. pestis gene expression array studies carried out at LLNL have established a correlation between expression of known virulence factors and genes involved in processing of the AI-2 quorum sensing signal. This was a basic research project that was intended to provide new insights into bacterial intercellular communication and how it is

  9. Reducing Virulence and Biofilm of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by Potential Quorum Sensing Inhibitor Carotenoid: Zeaxanthin.

    PubMed

    Gökalsın, Barış; Aksoydan, Busecan; Erman, Burak; Sesal, Nüzhet Cenk

    2017-03-02

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa can regulate its virulence gene expressions by using a signal system called quorum sensing. It is known that inhibition of quorum sensing can block biofilm formation and leave the bacteria defenseless. Therefore, it is necessary to determine natural sources to obtain potential quorum sensing inhibitors. This study aims to investigate an alternative treatment approach by utilizing the carotenoid zeaxanthin to reduce the expressions of P. aeruginosa virulence factors through quorum sensing inhibition. The inhibition potential of zeaxanthin was determined by in silico screening from a library of 638 lichen metabolites. Fluorescent monitor strains were utilized for quorum sensing inhibitor screens, and quantitative reverse-transcriptase PCR assay was performed for evaluating gene expression. Results indicate that zeaxanthin is a better inhibitor than the lichen secondary metabolite evernic acid, which was previously shown to be capable of inhibiting P. aeruginosa quorum sensing systems.

  10. DNA Adenine Methyltransferase Influences the Virulence of Aeromonas hydrophila

    PubMed Central

    Erova, Tatiana E.; Pillai, Lakshmi; Fadl, Amin A.; Sha, Jian; Wang, Shaofei; Galindo, Cristi L.; Chopra, Ashok K.

    2006-01-01

    Among the various virulence factors produced by Aeromonas hydrophila, a type II secretion system (T2SS)-secreted cytotoxic enterotoxin (Act) and the T3SS are crucial in the pathogenesis of Aeromonas-associated infections. Our laboratory molecularly characterized both Act and the T3SS from a diarrheal isolate, SSU of A. hydrophila, and defined the role of some regulatory genes in modulating the biological effects of Act. In this study, we cloned, sequenced, and expressed the DNA adenine methyltransferase gene of A. hydrophila SSU (damAhSSU) in a T7 promoter-based vector system using Escherichia coli ER2566 as a host strain, which could alter the virulence potential of A. hydrophila. Recombinant Dam, designated as M.AhySSUDam, was produced as a histidine-tagged fusion protein and purified from an E. coli cell lysate using nickel affinity chromatography. The purified Dam had methyltransferase activity, based on its ability to transfer a methyl group from S-adenosyl-l-methionine to N6-methyladenine-free lambda DNA and to protect methylated lambda DNA from digestion with DpnII but not against the DpnI restriction enzyme. The dam gene was essential for the viability of the bacterium, and overproduction of Dam in A. hydrophila SSU, using an arabinose-inducible, PBAD promoter-based system, reduced the virulence of this pathogen. Specifically, overproduction of M.AhySSUDam decreased the motility of the bacterium by 58%. Likewise, the T3SS-associated cytotoxicity, as measured by the release of lactate dehydrogenase enzyme in murine macrophages infected with the Dam-overproducing strain, was diminished by 55% compared to that of a control A. hydrophila SSU strain harboring the pBAD vector alone. On the contrary, cytotoxic and hemolytic activities associated with Act as well as the protease activity in the culture supernatant of a Dam-overproducing strain were increased by 10-, 3-, and 2.4-fold, respectively, compared to those of the control A. hydrophila SSU strain. The Dam

  11. Klebsiella pneumoniae FimK Promotes Virulence in Murine Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Rosen, David A; Hilliard, Julia K; Tiemann, Kristin M; Todd, Elizabeth M; Morley, S Celeste; Hunstad, David A

    2016-02-15

    Klebsiella pneumoniae, a chief cause of nosocomial pneumonia, is a versatile and commonly multidrug-resistant human pathogen for which further insight into pathogenesis is needed. We show that the pilus regulatory gene fimK promotes the virulence of K. pneumoniae strain TOP52 in murine pneumonia. This contrasts with the attenuating effect of fimK on urinary tract virulence, illustrating that a single factor may exert opposing effects on pathogenesis in distinct host niches. Loss of fimK in TOP52 pneumonia was associated with diminished lung bacterial burden, limited innate responses within the lung, and improved host survival. FimK expression was shown to promote serum resistance, capsule production, and protection from phagocytosis by host immune cells. Finally, while the widely used K. pneumoniae model strain 43816 produces rapid dissemination and death in mice, TOP52 caused largely localized pneumonia with limited lethality, thereby providing an alternative tool for studying K. pneumoniae pathogenesis and control within the lung.

  12. Histone deacetylases inhibitors effects on Cryptococcus neoformans major virulence phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Brandão, Fabiana As; Derengowski, Lorena S; Albuquerque, Patrícia; Nicola, André M; Silva-Pereira, Ildinete; Poças-Fonseca, Marcio J

    2015-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans undergoes phenotypical changes during host infection in order to promote persistence and survival. Studies have demonstrated that such adaptations require alterations in gene transcription networks by distinct mechanisms. Drugs such as the histone deacetylases inhibitors (HDACi) Sodium Butyrate (NaBut) and Trichostatin A (TSA) can alter the chromatin conformation and have been used to modulate epigenetic states in the treatment of diseases such as cancer. In this work, we have studied the effect of NaBut and TSA on the expression of C. neoformans major virulence phenotypes and on the survival rate of an animal model infected with drugs-treated yeasts. Both drugs affected fungal growth at 37°C more intensely than at 30°C; nonetheless, drugs did not affect cell viability at the concentrations we studied. HDACi also provoked the reduction of the fungal capsule expansion. Phospholipases enzyme activity decreased; mating process and melanin synthesis were also affected by both inhibitors. NaBut led to an increase in the population of cells in G2/M. Treated yeast cells, which were washed in order to remove the drugs from the culture medium prior to the inoculation in the Galleria mellonela infection model, did not cause significant difference at the host survival curve when compared to non-treated cells. Overall, NaBut effects on the impairment of C. neoformans main virulence factors were more intense and stable than the TSA effects.

  13. Type IV pili mechanochemically regulate virulence factors in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Persat, Alexandre; Inclan, Yuki F.; Engel, Joanne N.; Stone, Howard A.; Gitai, Zemer

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria have evolved a wide range of sensing systems to appropriately respond to environmental signals. Here we demonstrate that the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa detects contact with surfaces on short timescales using the mechanical activity of its type IV pili, a major surface adhesin. This signal transduction mechanism requires attachment of type IV pili to a solid surface, followed by pilus retraction and signal transduction through the Chp chemosensory system, a chemotaxis-like sensory system that regulates cAMP production and transcription of hundreds of genes, including key virulence factors. Like other chemotaxis pathways, pili-mediated surface sensing results in a transient response amplified by a positive feedback that increases type IV pili activity, thereby promoting long-term surface attachment that can stimulate additional virulence and biofilm-inducing pathways. The methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein-like chemosensor PilJ directly interacts with the major pilin subunit PilA. Our results thus support a mechanochemical model where a chemosensory system measures the mechanically induced conformational changes in stretched type IV pili. These findings demonstrate that P. aeruginosa not only uses type IV pili for surface-specific twitching motility, but also as a sensor regulating surface-induced gene expression and pathogenicity. PMID:26041805

  14. Citrate uptake into Pectobacterium atrosepticum is critical for bacterial virulence.

    PubMed

    Urbany, Claude; Neuhaus, H Ekkehard

    2008-05-01

    To analyze whether metabolite import into Pectobacterium atrosepticum cells affects bacterial virulence, we investigated the function of a carrier which exhibits significant structural homology to characterized carboxylic-acid transport proteins. The corresponding gene, ECA3984, previously annotated as coding for a Na(+)/sulphate carrier, in fact encodes a highly specific citrate transporter (Cit1) which is energized by the proton-motive force. Expression of the cit1 gene is stimulated by the presence of citrate in the growth medium and is substantial during growth of P. atrosepticum on potato tuber tissue. Infection of tuber tissue with P. atrosepticum leads to reduced citrate levels. P. atrosepticum insertion mutants, lacking the functional Cit1 protein, did not grow in medium containing citrate as the sole carbon source, showed a substantially reduced ability to macerate potato tuber tissue, and did not provoke reduced citrate levels in the plant tissue upon infection. We propose that citrate uptake into P. atrosepticum is critical for full bacterial virulence.

  15. Indole and 7‐hydroxyindole diminish Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jintae; Attila, Can; Cirillo, Suat L. G.; Cirillo, Jeffrey D.; Wood, Thomas K.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Indole is an extracellular biofilm signal for Escherichia coli, and many bacterial oxygenases readily convert indole to various oxidized compounds including 7‐hydroxyindole (7HI). Here we investigate the impact of indole and 7HI on Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 virulence and quorum sensing (QS)‐regulated phenotypes; this strain does not synthesize these compounds but degrades them rapidly. Indole and 7HI both altered extensively gene expression in a manner opposite that of acylhomoserine lactones; the most repressed genes encode the mexGHI‐opmD multidrug efflux pump and genes involved in the synthesis of QS‐regulated virulence factors including pyocyanin (phz operon), 2‐heptyl‐3‐hydroxy‐4(1H)‐quinolone (PQS) signal (pqs operon), pyochelin (pch operon) and pyoverdine (pvd operon). Corroborating these microarray results, indole and 7HI decreased production of pyocyanin, rhamnolipid, PQS and pyoverdine and enhanced antibiotic resistance. In addition, indole affected the utilization of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus, and 7HI abolished swarming motility. Furthermore, 7HI reduced pulmonary colonization of P. aeruginosa in guinea pigs and increased clearance in lungs. Hence, indole‐related compounds have potential as a novel antivirulence approach for the recalcitrant pathogen P. aeruginosa. PMID:21261883

  16. Indole and 7-hydroxyindole diminish Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jintae; Attila, Can; Cirillo, Suat L G; Cirillo, Jeffrey D; Wood, Thomas K

    2009-01-01

    Indole is an extracellular biofilm signal for Escherichia coli, and many bacterial oxygenases readily convert indole to various oxidized compounds including 7-hydroxyindole (7HI). Here we investigate the impact of indole and 7HI on Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 virulence and quorum sensing (QS)-regulated phenotypes; this strain does not synthesize these compounds but degrades them rapidly. Indole and 7HI both altered extensively gene expression in a manner opposite that of acylhomoserine lactones; the most repressed genes encode the mexGHI-opmD multidrug efflux pump and genes involved in the synthesis of QS-regulated virulence factors including pyocyanin (phz operon), 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolone (PQS) signal (pqs operon), pyochelin (pch operon) and pyoverdine (pvd operon). Corroborating these microarray results, indole and 7HI decreased production of pyocyanin, rhamnolipid, PQS and pyoverdine and enhanced antibiotic resistance. In addition, indole affected the utilization of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus, and 7HI abolished swarming motility. Furthermore, 7HI reduced pulmonary colonization of P. aeruginosa in guinea pigs and increased clearance in lungs. Hence, indole-related compounds have potential as a novel antivirulence approach for the recalcitrant pathogen P. aeruginosa.

  17. Virulence factors and bacteriocins in faecal enterococci of wild boars.

    PubMed

    Poeta, Patricia; Igrejas, Gilberto; Costa, Daniela; Sargo, Roberto; Rodrigues, Jorge; Torres, Carmen

    2008-10-01

    The production of antimicrobial, haemolytic and gelatinase activities was tested in 67 enterococci (39 E. faecium, 24 E. hirae, 2 E. faecalis, and 2 Enterococcus spp.), recovered from faecal samples of wild boars. In addition, the presence of genes encoding bacteriocin and virulence factors was also analysed by PCR and sequencing. Production of antimicrobial activity was checked in all enterococci against 9 indicator bacteria and it was detected in 11 E. faecium isolates (16.5%); eight and two of them harboured the genes encoding enterocin A + enterocin B and enterocin L50A/B, respectively. Sixty-seven per cent of our enterococci harboured different combinations of genes of the cyl operon, but none of them contained the complete cyl L(L)L(S)ABM operon, necessary for cytolysin