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Sample records for grade medical students

  1. "Making the grade:" noncognitive predictors of medical students' clinical clerkship grades.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Katherine B.; Vaishnavi, Sanjeev N.; Lau, Steven K. M.; Andriole, Dorothy A.; Jeffe, Donna B.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Because clinical clerkship grades are associated with resident selection and performance and are largely based on residents'/attendings' subjective ratings, it is important to identify variables associated with clinical clerkship grades. METHODS: U.S. medical students who completed > or =1 of the following required clinical clerkships--internal medicine, surgery, obstetrics/gynecology, pediatrics, neurology and psychiatry--were invited to participate in an anonymous online survey, which inquired about demographics, degree program, perceived quality of clerkship experiences, assertiveness, reticence and clerkship grades. RESULTS: A total of 2395 medical students (55% women; 57% whites) from 105 schools responded. Multivariable logistic regression models identified factors independently associated with receiving lower clerkship grades (high pass/pass or B/C) compared with the highest grade (honors or A). Students reporting higher quality of clerkship experiences were less likely to report lower grades in all clerkships. Older students more likely reported lower grades in internal medicine (P = 0.02) and neurology (P < 0.001). Underrepresented minorities more likely reported lower grades in all clerkships (P < 0.001); Asians more likely reported lower grades in obstetrics/gynecology (P = 0.007), pediatrics (P = 0.01) and neurology (P = 0.01). Men more likely reported lower grades in obstetrics/gynecology (P < 0.001) and psychiatry (P = 0.004). Students reporting greater reticence more likely reported lower grades in internal medicine (P = 0.02), pediatrics (P = 0.02) and psychiatry (P < 0.05). Students reporting greater assertiveness less likely reported lower grades in all clerkships (P < 0.03) except IM. CONCLUSIONS: The independent associations between lower clerkship grades and nonwhite race, male gender, older age, lower quality of clerkship experiences, and being less assertive and more reticent are concerning and merit further investigation. PMID

  2. The benefits of pass-fail grading on stress, mood, and group cohesion in medical students.

    PubMed

    Rohe, Daniel E; Barrier, Patricia A; Clark, Matthew M; Cook, David A; Vickers, Kristin S; Decker, Paul A

    2006-11-01

    To objectively measure the effect of a pass-fail grading system on stress, mood, group cohesion, and test anxiety in medical students. Beginning with the class of 2006, the Mayo Medical School, Rochester, Minn, changed the grading system for first-year courses from a 5-interval grading system to a pass-fail grading system. Students in the previous class of 2005, who were graded using a 5-interval system during their first year of medical school, were compared with students in the class of 2006. Using a prospective study design, the 2 groups were compared at the end of both the first year and the second year of medical school on the Perceived Stress Scale, Profile of Mood States, Perceived Cohesion Scale, Test Anxiety Inventory, and (after year 2) the United States Medical Licensing Examination Step 1. Data collection occurred in 2002 and 2003 with the class of 2005 and in 2003 and 2004 with the class of 2006. Students graded with the pass-fail system had less perceived stress (median, 15.0 vs 21.0; P-.01) and greater group cohesion (median, 34.5 vs 30.0; P=.02) at the end of their second year of coursework than their 5-interval graded peers. The pass-fail group had better mood (median, 46.5) than the graded group (median, 64.0), but this difference was not statistically significant (P=.07). No significant differences were found between the 2 groups in test-taking anxiety or in United States Medical Licensing Examination Step 1 board scores. Pass-fail grading may reduce stress and increase group cohesion in medical students compared with traditional 5-interval grading.

  3. Grade Inflation in Medical Student Radiation Oncology Clerkships: Missed Opportunities for Feedback?

    SciTech Connect

    Grover, Surbhi; Swisher-McClure, Samuel; Sosnowicz, Stasha; Li, Jiaqi; Mitra, Nandita; Berman, Abigail T.; Baffic, Cordelia; Vapiwala, Neha; Freedman, Gary M.

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that medical student radiation oncology elective rotation grades are inflated and cannot be used to distinguish residency applicants. Methods and Materials: The records of 196 applicants to a single radiation oncology residency program in 2011 and 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. The grades for each rotation in radiation oncology were collected and converted to a standardized 4-point grading scale (honors, high pass, pass, fail). Pass/fail grades were scored as not applicable. The primary study endpoint was to compare the distribution of applicants' grades in radiation oncology with their grades in medicine, surgery, pediatrics, and obstetrics/gynecology core clerkships. Results: The mean United States Medical Licensing Examination Step 1 score of the applicants was 237 (range, 188-269), 43% had additional Masters or PhD degrees, and 74% had at least 1 publication. Twenty-nine applicants were graded for radiation oncology rotations on a pass/fail basis and were excluded from the final analysis. Of the remaining applicants (n=167), 80% received the highest possible grade for their radiation oncology rotations. Grades in radiation oncology were significantly higher than each of the other 4 clerkships studied (P<.001). Of all applicants, 195 of 196 matched into a radiation oncology residency. Higher grades in radiation oncology were associated with significantly higher grades in the pediatrics core clerkship (P=.002). However, other medical school performance metrics were not significantly associated with higher grades in radiation oncology. Conclusions: Although our study group consists of a selected group of radiation oncology applicants, their grades in radiation oncology clerkships were highly skewed toward the highest grades when compared with grades in other core clerkships. Student grading in radiation oncology clerkships should be re-evaluated to incorporate more objective and detailed performance metrics to allow for

  4. The effect of two grading systems on the performance of medical students during oral examinations.

    PubMed

    Ba-Ali, Shakoor; Jemec, Gregor B E; Sander, Birgit; Toft, Peter B; Homøe, Preben; Lund-Andersen, Henrik

    2017-03-01

    Either a pass/fail approach or a seven-point grading scale are used to evaluate students at the Danish universities. The aim of this study was to explore any effect of the assessment methods on student performances during oral exams. In a prospective study including 1,037 examinations in three medical subjects, we investigated the difference in the test scores between the spring- and autumn semester. In the spring semester, the students could either pass or fail the subject (pass/fail) while in the following autumn semester, the students were assessed by tiered grading (seven-point grading scale). Unknown to the students, the examiners assessed the students by the seven-point grading scale also in the spring semester. Students at the international classes who were officially assessed by the seven-point grading scale during both semesters served as control group. The grading scores were significantly higher among students who were aware of being evaluated with the seven-point grading scores compared with the pass/fail group (p < 0.0001). In comparison, no significant difference between the exam results was observed from the spring- to the autumn semester for the control group (p = 0.45). Moreover, the average mark was higher among the international students (mean = 10.3, on the seven-point grading scale) than in the Danish speaking classes (mean = 9.1). The seven-point grading scale seems to motivate students to yield a better performance; hence tiered-grading should probably be preferred to a simple pass/fail approach. none. not relevant.

  5. Use of Medical Students in a Flipped Classroom Programme in Nutrition Education for Fourth-Grade School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McEvoy, Christian S.; Cantore, Kathryn M.; Denlinger, LeAnn N.; Schleich, Michele A.; Stevens, Nicole M.; Swavely, Steven C.; Odom, Anne A.; Novick, Marsha B.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of a flipped classroom progamme, designed and implemented by medical students, in communicating nutrition education to fourth-grade school students aged 9-10 years and to characterise teachers' assessments of the progamme, which was designed to minimise the burden placed on…

  6. Use of Medical Students in a Flipped Classroom Programme in Nutrition Education for Fourth-Grade School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McEvoy, Christian S.; Cantore, Kathryn M.; Denlinger, LeAnn N.; Schleich, Michele A.; Stevens, Nicole M.; Swavely, Steven C.; Odom, Anne A.; Novick, Marsha B.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of a flipped classroom progamme, designed and implemented by medical students, in communicating nutrition education to fourth-grade school students aged 9-10 years and to characterise teachers' assessments of the progamme, which was designed to minimise the burden placed on…

  7. A study exploring the autism awareness of first grade nursing and medical students in Istanbul, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Luleci, Nimet Emel; Hidiroglu, Seyhan; Karavus, Melda; Celik, Suzan; Cetiner, Dicle; Koc, Emre; Kasikci, Tevhid Gazi; Sadirvan, Yagmur Hazal; Karavus, Ahmet; Topuzoglu, Ahmet

    2016-08-01

    To assess the level of awareness about childhood autism among first-grade nursing and medical students. The descriptive study was conducted at Marmara University, Istanbul, Turkey, in December 2012, and comprised first-grade nursing and medical students. Data was collected using a self-administered questionnaire. Association between categorical variables was determined and p<0.05 was considered statistically significant. Of the 175 students, 138(78.9%) were aware of autism, 14(8%) of them being highly aware and 124(70.9%) moderately aware, whereas 37(21.1%) were not aware. There was a significant difference in the awareness level as far as gender was concerned as 102(82.9%) females and 36(69.2%) males were aware (p=0.043). Moreover, 104(59.4%) participants were aware that autism was a neurodevelopmental disorder, 62(67.4%) of them being nursing and 42(50.6%) being medical students (p<0.05). First-grade medical and nursing students could be considered relatively well aware of autism as their awareness level was in between that of the general public and healthcare professionals.

  8. Are the last grade medical students aware of the danger of synthetic cannabinoids?

    PubMed

    Beyhun, Nazim Ercument; Can, Gamze; Topbas, Murat; Cankaya, Sertac; Ketenci, Huseyin Cetin

    2016-02-01

    Synthetic cannabinoids are drugs which are increasingly used by especially adolescents and young people. In recent years hospital admissions even concluding with deaths have been observed. Therefore, the awareness of medical students, who will be in challenge with this new drug abuse, is an important issue. The aim of this study is to figure out the awareness of the last grade medical students and its correlates. This is a questionnaire based descriptive study with the participation of 148 students at Karadeniz Technical University Medical Faculty, Turkey. An awareness score was produced to measure awareness (cronbach alpha = 0.67). The 17.6% (26/148) of students who reported not knowing what synthetic cannabinoids were and hearing the name for the first time in this study. The 16.4% of students assumed that synthetic cannabinoid use was legal, and 16.2% assumed that synthetic cannabinoids are not drugs. The internet (including social media) (48.6%) and pharmacology lectures (40.5%) were identified as the most stated sources of information. The students who have synthetic cannabinoid user friends and social media account have significantly higher awareness scores (p < 0.05 for both). Last grade medical students have a lack of awareness towards synthetic cannabinoids which is an increasing threat that they have to challenge. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  9. Pressures and interventions imposed on medical school teachers regarding students' examination grades.

    PubMed

    Babic, Andrija; Brekalo, Marko; Juric, Slavica; Puljak, Livia

    2013-08-01

    This study was designed to investigate the pressures and interventions experienced by medical school teachers in relation to grades awarded in assessments of students' knowledge. Of 124 tenured teachers at the University of Split School of Medicine, 91 (73%) participated in the study through the anonymous completion of a questionnaire administered during the 2011-2012 academic year. A total of 42 (46%) teachers reported having experienced some kind of pressure or intervention imposed by students, students' parents or colleagues that was intended to ensure the student obtained a pass or a better grade on an examination. The most common forms of pressure imposed by students were persistent pleading, 'friendly' requests and crying. Students' parents and staff colleagues mostly used 'friendly' requests or indicated that they would like to discuss a student's results. Colleagues who contacted teachers about students' examination results included doctors who did not work at the school and other teachers at the School of Medicine. As a method of preventing the imposition of such pressures and interventions in relation to examination results, teachers suggested that students should be warned against these practices before their courses started and that appropriate policies should be initiated. Some of the teachers rated some specific pressures or interventions as fully or partially acceptable; these included the making of 'friendly' requests, persistent pleading, crying and yelling. Most of the teachers stated that they would report some instances of such interventions to the school management, but 15 (17%) teachers stated that they would not report any type of pressure. It is necessary to raise awareness of the unacceptability of such pressures and interventions in relation to examination results, and to change the current professional culture in which the imposition of such pressures by students, their parents and staff colleagues is considered acceptable and common.

  10. Medical and pharmacy students' perceptions of the grading and assessment practices

    PubMed Central

    Kasanda, C. D.; Mitonga, K. H.; Veii, K.; Zimba, R. F.

    2013-01-01

    Many students at the University of Namibia have frequently complained about ineffective assessment practices used at the institution. On many occasions, these complaints have not been substantiated with evidence of any kind. The purpose of this study was to obtain some empirical evidence that would ascertain undergraduate students' perceptions of the University of Namibia's grading and assessment practices. Using a structured scaled questionnaire, data were obtained from a representative sample of the University's undergraduate students studying for Medical and Pharmacy degrees. The questionnaire items covered matters related to students' experiences of assessment practices, feedback on assessment tasks, reliability and validity of assessment tools used by lecturers, efficacy of processes of administering examinations, perceptions of irregular and unfair assessment practices, impact of assessment regimes on students' cost of studies, motivation, morale, rate of progression in studies and graduation, the degree of compliance with assessment ethics and on academic quality assurance. According to the data reported in this article, the majority of the respondents perceived that the Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy at the University of Namibia applied assessment practices that yielded reliable and valid results. This was the case because most lecturers in the two schools used appropriate assessment tools and provided their students with prompt and informative feedback on the results of assignments, tests and examinations. In addition, most respondents reported that whereas examination procedures used in the two schools were efficient and effective, lecturers graded examination scripts fairly. These and other results are discussed in the article to communicate the message that the assessment procedures used in the Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy at the University of Namibia would promote effective learning and understanding amongst students as they were of high quality

  11. The Perceptions of Professionalism by 1st and 5th Grade Medical Students

    PubMed Central

    Klemenc-Ketis, Zalika; Vrecko, Helena

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Professionalism is essential for the development of mature physicians but not much education is devoted to that theme. Aim: We aimed to determine the views of undergraduate medical students on medical professionalism. Methods: This was a qualitative study, based on focus groups of the first and fifth-year undergraduate medical students. Transcripts of the focus groups were independently evaluated by two researches. Segments of transcripts, identified as important, were marked as verbatims. A grounded theory method with open coding was applied. A list of codes was developed and reviewed by both researchers until the consensus was reached. Then, the codes were reviewed and put into the categories and dimensions. Results: Students recognized 10 main medical professionalism dimensions (empathy, respect, responsibility, autonomy, trust, communication, difference between professional and private life, team work, partnership) and two dimensions associated with it (physician's characteristics, external factors). Slight change of the attitudes towards a more self-centred future physicians’ figure was observed in the fifth-year medical students. Conclusion: The students have an appropriate picture of the physicians’ figure even at the beginning of their medical studies but still needs an education in professionalism. It seems that the fifth-year students perceive physicians as more self-centred when compared to their first-year colleagues. PMID:25568575

  12. Pre-Admission Grades and Student Performance: The Malaysian Medical School Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abidin, Basir; Suliman, Noor A.; Din, Salwa M.; Manan, Norhafizah A.

    2012-01-01

    Prior academic achievement is often considered the best predictor and therefore the preadmission criteria for highly competitive medical schools. Most studies that advocate this viewpoint analyzed cohorts based on results of a central examination taken by students who come from various pre-university setups and backgrounds. Far less is known about…

  13. Student Grade History System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Stephen R.

    This document describes the computerized procedures developed and utilized by Montgomery College (Maryland) to maintain records related to student academic progress. The new system was fully operable by fall 1972. Systems development included: (1) the conversion of past student records to a permanent grade history file; (2) the development of a…

  14. Relationship of pass/fail grading and curriculum structure with well-being among preclinical medical students: a multi-institutional study.

    PubMed

    Reed, Darcy A; Shanafelt, Tait D; Satele, Daniel W; Power, David V; Eacker, Anne; Harper, William; Moutier, Christine; Durning, Steven; Massie, F Stanford; Thomas, Matthew R; Sloan, Jeff A; Dyrbye, Liselotte N

    2011-11-01

    Psychological distress is common among medical students. Curriculum structure and grading scales are modifiable learning environment factors that may influence student well-being. The authors sought to examine relationships among curriculum structures, grading scales, and student well-being. The authors surveyed 2,056 first- and second-year medical students at seven U.S. medical schools in 2007. They used the Perceived Stress Scale, Maslach Burnout Inventory, and Medical Outcomes Study Short Form (SF-8) to measure stress, burnout, and quality of life, respectively. They measured curriculum structure using hours spent in didactic, clinical, and testing experiences. Grading scales were categorized as two categories (pass/fail) versus three or more categories (e.g., honors/pass/fail). Of the 2,056 students, 1,192 (58%) responded. In multivariate analyses, students in schools using grading scales with three or more categories had higher levels of stress (beta 2.65; 95% CI 1.54-3.76, P<.0001), emotional exhaustion (beta 5.35; 95% CI 3.34-7.37, P<.0001), and depersonalization (beta 1.36; 95% CI 0.53-2.19, P=.001) and were more likely to have burnout (OR 2.17; 95% CI 1.41-3.35, P=.0005) and to have seriously considered dropping out of school (OR 2.24; 95% CI 1.54-3.27, P<.0001) compared with students in schools using pass/fail grading. There were no relationships between time spent in didactic and clinical experiences and well-being. How students are evaluated has a greater impact than other aspects of curriculum structure on their well-being. Curricular reform intended to enhance student well-being should incorporate pass/fail grading.

  15. [Medical education for students in compulsory education: the conception of the preparation of three graded textbooks and preliminary evaluation of lectures using these textbooks].

    PubMed

    Saito, M; Yamagishi, Y; Saito, S; Edo, K

    2001-03-01

    The school pharmacist in our hospital pharmacy used three graded textbooks about medicine for students at the Sukagawa School for the Health-Impaired (Fukushima Medical University Hospital Branch (H. I. school)). A revised textbook for 4th-6th grade elementary school students containing 12 important items of information about medicine, a new picture textbook for 1st-3rd grade elementary school students, and a new textbook containing practical data for junior high school students were prepared by supplementing original information with illustrations, simplified expression and large type face. Additionally, the pronunciation of Chinese characters was included in the textbook for the 1st-3rd grade elementary school students. In this study, 9 students from H. I. school and 37 students from Koyase junior high school took part in a questionnaire and an examination evaluating the usefulness of the lectures, and these textbooks, in regard to the student's recognition and understanding of medicine. Most students answered that the lectures and textbooks helped them to understand medicine. Furthermore, the results of the examination indicated that the students had a general understanding of medicine. In conclusion, we suggest that it is important for students in compulsory education to learn about medicine, and that according to the preliminary result of questionnaires and examinations, both the lectures and textbooks were useful to help the students to understand more about medicine.

  16. Grading Medical Students in a Psychiatry Clerkship: Correlation with the NBME Subject Examination Scores and Its Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramchandani, Dilip

    2011-01-01

    Background/Objective: The author analyzed and compared various assessment methods for assessment of medical students; these methods included clinical assessment and the standardized National Board of Medical Education (NBME) subject examination. Method: Students were evaluated on their 6-week clerkship in psychiatry by both their clinical…

  17. Grading Medical Students in a Psychiatry Clerkship: Correlation with the NBME Subject Examination Scores and Its Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramchandani, Dilip

    2011-01-01

    Background/Objective: The author analyzed and compared various assessment methods for assessment of medical students; these methods included clinical assessment and the standardized National Board of Medical Education (NBME) subject examination. Method: Students were evaluated on their 6-week clerkship in psychiatry by both their clinical…

  18. Impact of alcohol and alcohol mixed with energy drinks on non-medical prescription stimulant use in a nationally representative sample of 12th-grade students.

    PubMed

    Housman, Jeff M; Williams, Ronald D; Woolsey, Conrad L

    2016-08-01

    Approximately 30% of high school students use energy drinks. Alcohol use and alcohol mixed with energy drink use (AmED) is associated with risky behavior, including non-medical prescription stimulant use. We assessed alcohol-only, AmED and non-medical prescription stimulant use among 12th grade students in the U.S. using a nationally representative secondary data from the 2012 Monitoring the Future Study. Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney tests and logistic regression analyses were used to determine differences in non-medical prescription stimulant use by students who used alcohol-only versus AmED and to identify covariates of non-medical prescription stimulant use. Pearson-product moment coefficients were used to determine strength of variable relationships. Significant differences were found in frequency of Ritalin (p < .001, Cohen's d = .23) and Adderall (p < .001, Cohen's d = .32) use between alcohol-only students and AmED students. Greater frequency of AmED use was also associated with greater frequency of Ritalin use (r = .293, p < .001) and Adderall use (r = .353, p < .001). Males (b = .138, OR = 1.148) were more likely to use prescription stimulants non-medically than females. This study highlights the need to better understand influences on non-medical prescription stimulant, energy drink and AmED use, as the combined effects of stimulants contained in energy drinks and the depressant effects of alcohol appear to be associated with increased non-medical prescription stimulant use. Research on the influential factors related to energy drinks, alcohol, and non-medical prescription stimulants will help practitioners to more appropriately design prevention and intervention strategies addressing these high-risk behaviors. (Am J Addict 2016;25:378-384). © 2016 American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry.

  19. Academic Performance of Students with the Highest and Mediocre School-leaving Grades: Does the Aptitude Test for Medical Studies (TMS) Balance Their Prognoses?

    PubMed Central

    Kadmon, Guni; Kadmon, Martina

    2016-01-01

    Background: Admission to undergraduate medical training in Germany occurs by central and local pathways. Central admission includes two distinct groups: Students with top school-leaving grades (best-SLG group) and students with inferior school-leaving grades who are admitted with a delay of up to seven years (delayed admission group). Students with academic difficulties and early dropouts are present in both groups. Local admission at our university involves the German Test for Medical Studies (TMS) and allows the admission by merit of students with a wide range of school-leaving grades. Aims: To examine the justification of a TMS-based strategy to reduce the admission of potentially weak best school-leavers and enhance the admission of potentially able candidates with mediocre school-leaving grades. Method: The prognostic contribution of the school-leaving (SL) GPA and the TMS to academic performance and to continuity in the pre-clinical part of the undergraduate medical program was examined in two study groups: best school leavers (SL grade 1.0, SL-GPA 823-900 points) and mediocre school leavers (SL grades 2.0-2.3, SL-GPA 689-660 points). The outcomes in both groups were compared in relation to their TMS results. The prospective study included four consecutive cohorts. Results: In each study group the TMS predicted the academic performance (β=0.442-0.446) and the continuity of studies (OR=0.890-0.853) better than the SL-GPA (β=0.238-0.047; OR=1.009-0.998). Attrition was most strongly associated with failing to take the TMS (OR=0.230-0.380). Mediocre school leavers with TMS scores ≥125 performed as well as the best school leavers. Mediocre school leavers with TMS scores between 110-124 performed on average less well but within the required standards. Best school leavers with mediocre TMS scores and 30% of the best school leavers who hadn't taken the TMS performed less well than most mediocre school leavers with high TMS scores. Discussion: The TMS appears to

  20. Academic Performance of Students with the Highest and Mediocre School-leaving Grades: Does the Aptitude Test for Medical Studies (TMS) Balance Their Prognoses?

    PubMed

    Kadmon, Guni; Kadmon, Martina

    2016-01-01

    Admission to undergraduate medical training in Germany occurs by central and local pathways. Central admission includes two distinct groups: Students with top school-leaving grades (best-SLG group) and students with inferior school-leaving grades who are admitted with a delay of up to seven years (delayed admission group). Students with academic difficulties and early dropouts are present in both groups. Local admission at our university involves the German Test for Medical Studies (TMS) and allows the admission by merit of students with a wide range of school-leaving grades. To examine the justification of a TMS-based strategy to reduce the admission of potentially weak best school-leavers and enhance the admission of potentially able candidates with mediocre school-leaving grades. The prognostic contribution of the school-leaving (SL) GPA and the TMS to academic performance and to continuity in the pre-clinical part of the undergraduate medical program was examined in two study groups: best school leavers (SL grade 1.0, SL-GPA 823-900 points) and mediocre school leavers (SL grades 2.0-2.3, SL-GPA 689-660 points). The outcomes in both groups were compared in relation to their TMS results. The prospective study included four consecutive cohorts. In each study group the TMS predicted the academic performance (β=0.442-0.446) and the continuity of studies (OR=0.890-0.853) better than the SL-GPA (β=0.238-0.047; OR=1.009-0.998). Attrition was most strongly associated with failing to take the TMS (OR=0.230-0.380). Mediocre school leavers with TMS scores ≥125 performed as well as the best school leavers. Mediocre school leavers with TMS scores between 110-124 performed on average less well but within the required standards. Best school leavers with mediocre TMS scores and 30% of the best school leavers who hadn't taken the TMS performed less well than most mediocre school leavers with high TMS scores. The TMS appears to differentiate between potentially successful and

  1. Grading System and Student Effort

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paredes, Valentina

    2017-01-01

    Several papers have proposed that the grading system affects students' incentives to exert effort. In particular, the previous literature has compared student effort under relative and absolute grading systems, but the results are mixed and the implications of the models have not been empirically tested. In this paper, I build a model where…

  2. Grading System and Student Effort

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paredes, Valentina

    2017-01-01

    Several papers have proposed that the grading system affects students' incentives to exert effort. In particular, the previous literature has compared student effort under relative and absolute grading systems, but the results are mixed and the implications of the models have not been empirically tested. In this paper, I build a model where…

  3. Grading Leniency, Grade Discrepancy, and Student Ratings of Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffin, Bryan W.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine how grading leniency and grade discrepancy (the difference between expected grades and deserved grades) were associated with various dimensions of student ratings of instruction. A sample of 754 undergraduate college students completed a student ratings of instruction instrument and provided responses to a…

  4. Alternatives to Grading Student Writing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tchudi, Stephen, Ed.

    The result of an investigation into the grading writing by the National Council of Teachers of English Committee on Alternatives to Grading Student Writing, this collection of essays offers the writing teacher several innovative and interesting options. Following an introduction by the editor (chair of the Committee), in which he delineates the…

  5. Student Perspectives of Grading in Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhu, Xihe

    2015-01-01

    Recent state and federal legislations on educational accountability push evaluation and grading to the frontline. This study examined students' perspectives of grading in physical education. The participants included students (N = 39) from two middle schools. Data were collected through observation, student profile grading sheets and interviews.…

  6. Cynicism among medical students.

    PubMed

    Kopelman, L

    1983-10-21

    The thesis that medical students become more cynical than students of other professions seems justified in light of psychological studies and reports from medical students. This article explores whether this might be due, in part, to disappointment about how important ideals are followed. Psychological tests themselves offer an opportunity to examine this, because the medical profession espouses the goals of gaining proper consent from all subjects, including students, and of giving appropriate attention to excellence of research design and method. When studies used to evaluate medical students' attitudes are viewed from this perspective, however, weaknesses on both scores seem apparent. Students seem well aware of some of these flaws. Although such testing is a small part of medical education, it confirms students' views that there is cause for disillusionment about how certain goals are realized. It also suggests a way to cure some students' cynicism. Students should be taught consistently, both by example as well as by precept of their profession's sincere commitment to professed goals. In practical terms this means, for example, that studies using students as subjects should have a proper review by the institutional review board, with adequate attention given to excellence of design, confidentiality, and methods of gaining informed and unpressured consent. Such studies could then serve as paradigms to students. Other goals of the profession should also be applied to students, and applied for students.

  7. Recognition of Outstanding Performance in Medical Schools with Nontraditional Grading Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, M. J.; Finch, W. Tyree

    1984-01-01

    A survey to review practices for reporting student performance with nontraditional grading systems, to investigate the methods used to recognize outstanding student performance, and to survey the attitudes of medical school administrators concerning the recognition of excellence is described. (MLW)

  8. Medical student-mothers.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Julie; Macnamara, Marina; Groskin, Anna; Petras, Laura

    2013-03-01

    Medical training is challenging and parenting is a full-time responsibility. Balancing a family with the significant demands of medical school is a daunting endeavor. Yet there is little research available to guide students, faculty, or administrators. Using one U.S. medical school as a case study, this article provides a comprehensive overview of the common personal and professional challenges that medical students who are also mothers face during their undergraduate medical education, and practical strategies and resources useful in navigating such challenges. This article is also a resource guide for the faculty and administrators who teach, advise, and mentor medical-student parents. For leaders in medical education, the article concludes with suggestions to better support the health and educational experience of medical student-parents: 1) a systematic network of career advisors, 2) scheduling flexibility, 3) formal breastfeeding policies and workplace support, 4) institutionally supported childcare, and 5) how student-parents may foster the educational health mission of medical schools.

  9. Can Business Students Forecast Their Own Grade?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hossain, Belayet; Tsigaris, Panagiotis

    2013-01-01

    This study examines grade expectations of two groups of business students for their final course mark. We separate students that are on average "better" forecasters on the basis of them not making significant forecast errors during the semester from those students that are poor forecasters of their final grade. We find that the better…

  10. An intensive medical education elective for senior medical students.

    PubMed

    Gainor, Jamie; Patel, Nilay K; George, Paul F; MacNamara, Marina M C; Dollase, Richard; Taylor, Julie Scott

    2014-07-01

    Peer teaching by medical students is increasingly consid- ered an effective and efficient instructional modality with value for both teachers and learners. In 2012, twelve senior medical students participated in an inaugural, four-week Medical Education Elective at The Alpert Medical School of Brown University. The first week emphasized education theory and skills. During the remaining three weeks, participants served as a core group of instructors in a Clinical Skills Clerkship (CSC), a three-week required course transitioning rising third-year students to clinical clerkships. Senior near-peer instructors (NPIs) gained substantive experience in developing curriculum, facilitating small group sessions, teaching clinical skills, mentoring, providing feedback, and grading an Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE). Based on direct observation by faculty and written anonymous evaluations by learners (n=98), NPIs demonstrated a high degree of teaching competence. This innovative, by-invitation-only, annual elective is the most substantive medical education experience for medical students described in the literature.

  11. [Medical schools: students today].

    PubMed

    Kunakov, Natasha

    2011-04-01

    Physicians that are faculty members in medical schools receive new students every year, and they are expected to prepare those students to become professionals. They usually appeal to their experience to meet that challenge. However, newer generations of students are different, and experience, with no formal training for teaching them, can be insufficient. New characteristics of students can be related to their early contact in life with information technology. Their brain has been somehow modified by stimuli offered by this technology, and the way they learn has also been modified. This paper is a reflection about how students have changed and it analyzes how their learning experience needs to be modified accordingly. Teaching based only on experience might be insufficient to fulfill the expectations of young students that have chosen the medical profession for their future.

  12. Misconduct in medical students.

    PubMed

    Vengoechea, Jaime; Moreno, Socorro; Ruiz, Alvaro

    2008-12-01

    Medical students, subject to unique challenges and stressors, frequently engage in misconduct. In this observational study, carried out in a medical school in Colombia, we developed a survey to explore the association between misconduct and stress, potential stressors and other possible contributing factors, such as sex, age and academic year. Of the 433 students that responded to our survey, 97.9% did not fully disagree with at least one of the mentioned misconducts and 99.8% admitted to at least one transgression. Based on a scale we developed, 61.4% of the students consistently agreed with misconduct and 44.9% frequently engaged in misconduct. A logistic regression model suggests that being male (OR 1.90, CI 95% 1.27-2.84) and stress (OR 1.04, CI 95% 1.01-1.06) may increase the likelihood of misconduct. In a subgroup of students, excluding those in their last year of studies, higher academic semester (OR 1.25, CI 95%: 1.10-1.42) may also be a risk factor for misconduct. Most of the observed variation in the data, however, is not explained by these factors. Other modifiers, such as student personality and sub-culture, may play a greater role in determining misconduct. The proportion of medical students that engage in misconduct is very high and warrants the attention of the medical education community.

  13. Fifth Grade Elementary Students' Conceptions of Earthquakes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savasci, Funda; Uluduz, Hatice

    2013-01-01

    This study intends to investigate the fifth grade students' conceptions of earthquakes. Twenty two grade 5 students (11-12 years old) from five different elementary schools in Istanbul voluntarily participated in the study. Data were collected from semi-structured interviews with each participant. Six interview questions were designed by…

  14. Student Self-Grading in Social Statistics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Nelta M.

    2007-01-01

    This article analyzes a social statistics class that engaged in self-grading. Students liked self-grading because they identified their own mistakes, it reinforced what they learned, and they received immediate feedback. Some students worried that others would cheat, but this assertion was not confirmed in the data and the possibility of cheating…

  15. Visualizing Gender with Fifth Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W., Jr.; Albers, Peggy

    2014-01-01

    How do fifth-grade students in a gifted class construct understandings of the opposite sex? In what ways do these constructions manifest in the visual texts created in literacy and language arts classrooms? This qualitative study integrated visual arts to understand how fifth-grade gifted students represented and perceived gender roles. Using…

  16. Fifth Grade Elementary Students' Conceptions of Earthquakes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savasci, Funda; Uluduz, Hatice

    2013-01-01

    This study intends to investigate the fifth grade students' conceptions of earthquakes. Twenty two grade 5 students (11-12 years old) from five different elementary schools in Istanbul voluntarily participated in the study. Data were collected from semi-structured interviews with each participant. Six interview questions were designed by…

  17. Wiki Technology for Middle Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harper, Debra Ann

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative exploratory case study was to determine the pedagogical value of Wiki technology-enhanced instruction for middle grade students. The sample consisted of three Wiki projects representative of work from 6th, 7th, and 8th grade middle school students. The examination of the data collected from the three samples of Wiki…

  18. Elementary Grades Students' Capacity for Functional Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanton, Maria L.; Kaput, James J.

    2004-01-01

    This is a study of how urban elementary grades students develop and express functions. Data were analyzed according to the forms of representations students used, the progression in students' mathematical language and the operations they employed, and how they attended to one or more varying quantities. Findings indicate that students are capable…

  19. Student Perceptions of Middle Grades Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolsey, Thomas DeVere; Uline, Cynthia L.

    2010-01-01

    Researchers used student-generated photographs to mediate interviews with middle grades students about their school environment. Findings suggest that school leaders and facilities planners should be responsive to students' needs for both personal and social spaces and be aware of ways the built environment may shape the perceptions students hold…

  20. College Course Grades for Dual Enrollment Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crouse, Jill D.; Allen, Jeff

    2014-01-01

    This study compared college course grade outcomes, both during and after high school, of dual-enrollment students to those of traditional students. The study was based on a large, multiyear sample of Iowa high school and community college students. The results showed that while in high school, dual-enrollment students consistently outperformed…

  1. Variation and imprecision of clerkship grading in U.S. medical schools.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Erik K; Osman, Nora Y; Walling, Jessica L; Mitchell, Vivian G

    2012-08-01

    Despite standardized curricula and mandated accreditation, concern exists regarding the variability and imprecision of medical student evaluation. The authors set out to perform a complete review of clerkship evaluation in U.S. medical schools. Clerkship evaluation data were obtained from all Association of American Medical Colleges-affiliated medical schools reporting enrollment during 2009-2010. Deidentified reports were analyzed to define the grading system and the percentage of each class within each grading tier. Inter- and intraschool grading variation was assessed in part by comparing the proportion of students receiving the top grade. Data were analyzed from 119 of 123 accredited medical schools. Dramatic variation was detected. Specifically, the authors documented eight different grading systems using 27 unique sets of descriptive terminology. Imprecision of grading was apparent. Institutions frequently used the same wording (e.g., "honors") to imply different meanings. The percentage of students awarded the top grade in any clerkship exhibited extreme variability (range 2%-93%) from school to school, as well as from clerkship to clerkship within the same school (range 18%-81%). Ninety-seven percent of all U.S. clerkship students were awarded one of the top three grades regardless of the number of grading tiers. Nationally, less than 1% of students failed any required clerkship. There exists great heterogeneity of grading systems and imprecision of grade meaning throughout the U.S. medical education system. Systematic changes seeking to increase consistency, transparency, and reliability of grade meaning are needed to improve the student evaluation process at the national level.

  2. Capturing medical students' idealism.

    PubMed

    Smith, Janice K; Weaver, Donna B

    2006-01-01

    Students' idealism and desire to work with underserved populations decline as they progress from preclinical training through clerkships and residency. With an increasingly diverse population and increasing health disparities, academic health centers need to incorporate changes in their curricula to train socially responsible and idealistic physicians. International electives can provide valuable learning experiences to help achieve these goals. Sixty-six preclinical medical students at the University of Texas Medical Branch participated in an international elective from 1997 to 2005. After 1 week of didactics, they spent 3 weeks as part of a multidisciplinary medical team in rural Nicaragua. Postelective questionnaires were administered. From students' responses, we identified common learning themes and grouped them under the categories of attitudes, awareness, and skills. Limitations included a self-selection bias, lack of a control group, and limited follow-up. After the elective, students had an increased interest in volunteerism, humanitarian efforts, and working with underserved populations both in the United States and abroad, as well as more compassion toward the underserved. Students also reported a heightened awareness of social determinants of health and public health, and a broadened global perspective, as well as increased self-awareness. Our findings illustrate that a well-structured, mentored experience in international health can have a positive impact on preclinical students' attitudes, including their compassion, volunteerism, and interest in serving under-served populations, all measures of idealism.

  3. Prematriculation Program Grades as Predictors of Black and Other Nontraditional Students' First-Year Academic Performances.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hesser, Al; Lewis, Lloyd

    1992-01-01

    A study explored predictors of African-American and other nontraditional medical students' first-year academic performance at the Medical College of Georgia. Variables included undergraduate grades and grades in a summer prematriculation program (SPP) featuring biochemistry, anatomy, and immunology courses. SPP grades were found useful in…

  4. Prematriculation Program Grades as Predictors of Black and Other Nontraditional Students' First-Year Academic Performances.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hesser, Al; Lewis, Lloyd

    1992-01-01

    A study explored predictors of African-American and other nontraditional medical students' first-year academic performance at the Medical College of Georgia. Variables included undergraduate grades and grades in a summer prematriculation program (SPP) featuring biochemistry, anatomy, and immunology courses. SPP grades were found useful in…

  5. My Medicated Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Lee Burdette

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author, director of Watauga College and residential learning communities at Appalachian State University in Boone, North Carolina, shares her experience dealing with first year college students who are taking medication to manage depression, anxiety, or attention deficit and hyperactivity disorders. She stresses that this is a…

  6. Denying Medical Students' Emotions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    USA Today, 1984

    1984-01-01

    Medical educators nationwide are questioning the process that leads to the denial of the emotional side of medicine by its practitioners. Emotional dilemmas are often verbally suppressed by most students, but they surface in many ways, such as depression, insomnia, loss of appetite, and anxiety. (RM)

  7. Denying Medical Students' Emotions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    USA Today, 1984

    1984-01-01

    Medical educators nationwide are questioning the process that leads to the denial of the emotional side of medicine by its practitioners. Emotional dilemmas are often verbally suppressed by most students, but they surface in many ways, such as depression, insomnia, loss of appetite, and anxiety. (RM)

  8. Medical Student Appraisal

    PubMed Central

    Sampognaro, P.J.; Mitchell, S.L.; Weeks, S.R.; Khalifian, S.; Markman, T.M.; Uebel, L.W.; Dattilo, J.R.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background Pre-rounding is essential to preparing for morning rounds. Despite its importance, pre-rounding is rarely formally taught within the medical school curriculum and more often informally learned by modeling residents. The evolution of mobile applications provides opportunities to optimize this process. Objectives To evaluate three options available to medical students while pre-rounding and promote adoption of mobile resources in clinical care. Methods Six medical students formed the evaluation cohort. Students were surveyed to assess pre-rounding practices. Participants utilized paper-based pre-rounding templates for two weeks followed by two weeks of the electronic note-taking service EvernoteTM. A review of mobile applications on the iTunesTM and Google PlayTM stores was performed, with each application informally reviewed by a single student. The application ScutsheetTM was selected for formal review by all students. Data was collected from narrative responses supplied by students throughout the evaluation periods and aggregated to assess strengths and limitations of each application. Results Pre-study responses demonstrated two consistent processes: verbal sign-out of overnight events and template use to organize patient information. The paper-based template was praised for its organization and familiarity amongst residents, but perceived as limited by the requirement of re-copying data into the hospital’s electronic medical record (EMR). EvernoteTM excelled due to compatibility across multiple operating systems, including accessibility from clinical workstations and ability to copy notes into the hospital’s EMR. ScutsheetTM allowed for retention of data across multiple hospital days, but was limited by inability to export data or modify the electronic template. Aggregated user feedback identified the abilities to customize templates and copy information into the EMR as two prevailing characteristics that enhanced the efficiency of pre

  9. Summer Credit Recovery and Middle Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharp, James Christopher

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the difference in student success by retained students who participate in the Hamblen County (Tennessee) Credit Recovery Program [HCCRP] in the year prior and following their participation. HCCRP is an alternative intervention for students who have been retained in the middle grades of Hamblen County School…

  10. Summer Credit Recovery and Middle Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharp, James Christopher

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the difference in student success by retained students who participate in the Hamblen County (Tennessee) Credit Recovery Program [HCCRP] in the year prior and following their participation. HCCRP is an alternative intervention for students who have been retained in the middle grades of Hamblen County School…

  11. Reading Aloud to Fourth Grade Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forte, Frances

    A study determined if regular listening to oral reading by the teacher affected fourth-grade students' level of comprehension. Subjects were 47 students from an elementary school in central New Jersey. Twenty-five students were read to for 30 minutes daily for 8 weeks in addition to their regular classroom reading instruction. The remaining 22…

  12. Stress in medical students.

    PubMed

    Gaughran, F; Dineen, S; Dineen, M; Cole, M; Daly, R J

    1997-01-01

    The object of this study was to examine the main stressors experienced by students in an Irish medical school and their effects on the attitude of the students towards their training. It also determined the students' knowledge of how they could receive help and their attitudes towards seeking such help. Data was collected by an anonymous self-report questionnaire distributed to a fifth year medical school class in the Hilary Term of the academic year. These 63 students had chosen medicine as a career mainly because of vocational and academic factors and almost two thirds of them had always wanted to do medicine. However four were no longer happy with that choice. Fifty-four percent of them had felt like making a complaint on at least one occasion, but did not do so. The perceived problems were mainly verbal in nature. 41% said that this had affected their attendance. The main source of perceived mistreatment was consultant staff. Rates of perceived racial and sexual discrimination were low. Other stressors included examinations, financial issues and family issues. 52% of students did not know the process by which they could make a complaint and 30% felt that seeking help or advice from staff would be damaging to their future career. This study analyses these issues and suggests ways of addressing them.

  13. Assessing and Grading Student Achievement. ERS Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Glen E.; Craver, James M.

    The primary purpose of this report is to describe the practices and procedures used by school districts to assess and grade student achievement. In April of 1988, the Educational Research Service conducted a nationwide survey of the grading and reporting practices and procedures using a stratified random sample of public school districts. The…

  14. Exploring Grade 1 Students' Textual Connections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pantaleo, Sylvia

    2004-01-01

    This article focuses specifically on an aspect of Grade 1 children's literary understanding--the textual associations made by the students as they discussed nine picture books. This work extends the small body of research that has examined the responses of Grade 1 children (e.g., Kiefer, 1993; McGee, 1992; Sipe, 2000a), and also contributes to…

  15. Correlates of College Students' Attitudes toward Grades.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bahn, Changhwan; And Others

    This study describes the development of the Attitude Toward Grades (ATG) survey instrument, a brief internally consistent measure of college student attitude toward grades and reports on selected behavioral correlates of that attitude. An initial item pool of approximately 50 attitude statements was created and the Thurstone equal appearing…

  16. Training medical students.

    PubMed

    Brieger, W R; Ramakrishna, J

    1987-09-01

    Nigerian 4th year medical students from University of Ibadan spend 8 weeks training in primary health care and public health in the rural Ibarapa Community Health Programme in Oyo State, with ORT as part of the training. Their course of study there includes epidemiological projects, collecting data on diarrhea prevalence, cultural and behavioral practices, assessment and treating children with diarrhea, and teaching ORT to the community. Students worked on the ORT unit on a rotating basis, preparing ORS, monitoring children and talking to mothers. They learned that most mothers recognized diarrhea symptoms, 2/3 had heard about ORS, but less than 1/5 considered it a first step in managing diarrhea. Most would eliminate beans from the child's diet, substituting bland maize porridge. Talking with mothers made them realize that teething children put dirty objects into their mouths and that presence of visible children's feces is associated with diarrhea. Use of soap for hand washing, and availability of clean tap water, rather than well water, decreased incidence of diarrhea. After their training, medical students knew how to prepare ORS correctly, and understand its efficacy. This should increase the acceptance by the medical professionals of ORT as a desirable part of diarrhea control.

  17. The Perils of Prescribed Grade Distributions: What Every Medical Educator Should Know

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Royal, Kenneth D.; Guskey, Thomas R.

    2014-01-01

    A common practice in medical education is to create a prescribed distribution of grades, or ratings, so that only a certain percentage of students receive the highest marks. This approach typically is employed to curb grade inflation and as a means to help faculty distinguish outstanding performers. Despite the well-intentioned reasoning for using…

  18. Medical Laboratory Assistant. Student's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnett, Sara

    This student's manual for the medical laboratory student is one of a series of self-contained, individualized instructional materials for students enrolled in training within the allied health field. It is intended to provide study materials and learning activities that are general enough for all medical laboratory students to use to enhance their…

  19. Medical Laboratory Assistant. Student's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnett, Sara

    This student's manual for the medical laboratory student is one of a series of self-contained, individualized instructional materials for students enrolled in training within the allied health field. It is intended to provide study materials and learning activities that are general enough for all medical laboratory students to use to enhance their…

  20. An empirical study of the predictive validity of number grades in medical school using 3 decades of longitudinal data: implications for a grading system.

    PubMed

    Gonnella, Joseph S; Erdmann, James B; Hojat, Mohammadreza

    2004-04-01

    Context It is important to establish the predictive validity of medical school grades. The strength of predictive validity and the ability to identify at-risk students in medical schools depends upon assessment systems such as number grades, pass/fail (P/F) or honours/pass/fail (H/P/F) systems. Objective This study was designed to examine the predictive validity of number grades in medical school, and to determine whether any important information is lost in a shift from number to P/F and H/P/F grading systems. Subjects The participants in this prospective, longitudinal study were 6656 medical students who studied at Jefferson Medical College over 3 decades. They were grouped into 10 deciles based on their number grades in Year 1 of medical school. Methods Participants were compared on academic accomplishments in Years 2 and 3 of medical school, medical school class rank, delayed graduation and attrition, performance on medical licensing examinations and clinical competence ratings in the first postgraduate year. Results Results supported the short- and longterm predictive validity of the number grades. Ratings of clinical competence beyond medical school were predicted by number grades in medical school. We demonstrated that small differences in number grades are statistically meaningful, and that important information for identifying students in need of remedial education is lost when students who narrowly meet faculty's expectations are included with the rest of the class in a broad 'pass' category. Conclusions The findings refute the argument that knowledge of sciences basic to medicine is not critical to subsequent performance in medical school and beyond if an appropriate evaluation system is used. Furthermore, the results of this study raise questions about abandoning number grades in favour of a pass/fail system. Consideration of these findings in policy decisions regarding assessment systems of medical students is recommended.

  1. Medical Student Appraisal

    PubMed Central

    Markman, T.M.; Sampognaro, P.J.; Mitchell, S.L.; Weeks, S.R.; Khalifian, S.; Dattilo, J.R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Medical students are often afforded the privilege of counselling patients. In the past resources were limited to pen and paper or anatomic models. The evolution of mobile applications allows for limitless access to resources that facilitate bedside patient education. Objectives To evaluate the utility of six applications in patient education and promote awareness of implementing mobile resources in clinical care. Methods Six medical students rotating on various clerkships evaluated a total of six mobile applications. Strengths, limitations, and suggested uses in clinical care were identified. Applications included MeditoonsTM, VisiblePatientTM, DrawMDTM, CardioTeachTM, Visual AnatomyTM, and 360° Patient Education SuiteTM. Data was generated from narrative responses supplied by each student during their evaluation period. Results Bedside teaching was enhanced by professional illustrations and animations depicting anatomy and pathophysiology. Impromptu teaching was facilitated, as resources were conveniently available on a student’s smartphone or tablet. The ability to annotate and modify images and subsequently email to patients was an extraordinary improvement in provider-patient communication. Universal limitations included small smartphone screens and the novelty of new technology. Discussion Mobile applications have the potential to greatly enhance patient education and simultaneously build rapport. Endless opportunities exist for their integration in clinical practice, particularly for new diagnoses, consent for procedures, and at time of discharge. Providers should be encouraged to try new applications and utilize them with patients. PMID:23874358

  2. Developing Middle Grades Students' MP3

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tassell, Janet; Stobaugh, Rebecca; Sheffield, Linda

    2011-01-01

    Middle grades are a critical time for capturing the interest and imagination and developing the potential of mathematically promising students. This is a time for students to make sense of mathematics, build a solid foundation and enthusiasm, and set the course for the highest levels of mathematics in the future. This is a time to explore their…

  3. Should You Allow Your Students to Grade Their Own Homework?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simkin, Mark G.

    2015-01-01

    Allowing students to grade their own homework promises several advantages to both students and instructors. But does such a policy make sense? This paper reports the results of an experiment in which eight separate assignments completed by approximately 80 students were first graded by the students using a grading rubric, and then re-graded by a…

  4. Exploring first grade medical students’ professional identity using metaphors: implications for medical curricula

    PubMed Central

    Korkmaz, Hunkar; Senol, Yesim Y.

    2014-01-01

    Background Although professional identity development is an important concept in medical education, the process has not been well-investigated from a student perspective. Purpose This study examines the metaphorical images formulated by first grade medical students in Turkey to describe physicians in the context of establishing a professional identity, along with its limitations. Method Participants (N=148) completed the prompt: A physician is like _____ because _____ to indicate their conceptualizations of physician. The data were analyzed both qualitatively and quantitatively. Results Altogether, 71 well-articulated metaphorical images were identified – comprising six conceptual themes. Conclusions While subject to some limitations, the use of metaphors to formulate and describe professional identities can be helpful in reflecting the personal beliefs and values of matriculants to medical school, as well as providing some guidance and feedback to curriculum development efforts. PMID:24559504

  5. Prevalence of plagiarism among medical students.

    PubMed

    Bilić-Zulle, Lidija; Frković, Vedran; Turk, Tamara; Azman, Josip; Petrovecki, Mladen

    2005-02-01

    To determine the prevalence of plagiarism among medical students in writing essays. During two academic years, 198 second year medical students attending Medical Informatics course wrote an essay on one of four offered articles. Two of the source articles were available in an electronic form and two in printed form. Two (one electronic and one paper article) were considered less complex and the other two more complex. The essays were examined using plagiarism detection software "WCopyfind," which counted the number of matching phrases with six or more words. Plagiarism rate, expressed as the percentage of the plagiarized text, was calculated as a ratio of the absolute number of matching words and the total number of words in the essay. Only 17 (9%) of students did not plagiarize at all and 68 (34%) plagiarized less than 10% of the text. The average plagiarism rate (% of plagiarized text) was 19% (5-95% percentile=0-88). Students who were strictly warned not to plagiarize had a higher total word count in their essays than students who were not warned (P=0.002) but there was no difference between them in the rate of plagiarism. Students with higher grades in Medical Informatics exam plagiarized less than those with lower grades (P=0.015). Gender, subject source, and complexity had no influence on the plagiarism rate. Plagiarism in writing essays is common among medical students. An explicit warning is not enough to deter students from plagiarism. Detection software can be used to trace and evaluate the rate of plagiarism in written student assays.

  6. Do Low Grades Cause College Students to Give up?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thayer, Robert E.

    The thesis that low grades cause college students to give up receives some support from early psychological research and from current reinforcement theories. This study investigates the effects on subsequent grades of low, average, and high first-exam grades for 192 students in a traditional grading system and 52 students in a pass-fail grading…

  7. Differential Factor Structure of Seventh Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Very, Philip S.; Iacono, Carmine H.

    1970-01-01

    Analysis of the mental factors of seventh grade students indicates that numerical facility and perceptual speed are a single factor at this age level and that no purely verbal factor exists. Seven clearly differentiated factors are found for males and five for females. (Author/WY)

  8. Osteoporosis Risk Factors in Eighth Grade Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lysen, Victoria C.; Walker, Robert

    1997-01-01

    Presents findings from food frequency questionnaires and surveys of 138 Midwestern eighth-grade student-parent pairs. The study examined the incidence of modifiable and nonmodifiable osteoporosis risk factors and compared gender differences. Data analysis indicated that many adolescents possessed several modifiable and nonmodifiable risk factors…

  9. Osteoporosis Risk Factors in Eighth Grade Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lysen, Victoria C.; Walker, Robert

    1997-01-01

    Presents findings from food frequency questionnaires and surveys of 138 Midwestern eighth-grade student-parent pairs. The study examined the incidence of modifiable and nonmodifiable osteoporosis risk factors and compared gender differences. Data analysis indicated that many adolescents possessed several modifiable and nonmodifiable risk factors…

  10. Civics for ESOL Students, Grade 9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, John S.

    The curriculum guide for grade 9 civics instruction for students of English as a second language (ESOL) contains, in outline form, civics behavioral objectives and instructional units. Units of instruction cover American symbols, politicians, colonial Americans, principles of government, the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution,…

  11. Improving medical work experience for students.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Neil; Shah, Alexander; Bollina, Prasad; Bollina, Harsha

    2010-12-01

    This exploratory piece details the development of the programme Medic Insight, which was established in 2007 in Lothian. This is an aptly-named unique organisation that provides an insight into life as a doctor for school students. We believe that the provision of work experience needs to be improved for both students and doctors. Securing work experience in medicine has historically been biased: individuals that have family or friends who work as doctors are able to organise shadowing placements with greater ease. Shadowing experiences are of questionable value, and frequently offer exposure to only one field, and administrators struggle to match doctors' working schedules with those of students. Medic Insight has been developed to address these key problems. It provides a free, application-based shadowing experience for 15-16-year olds, in addition to interactive seminars for younger students. Over the course of the 5-day shadowing experience (Medic Insight Week), students rotate through a variety of specialties, meeting doctors of all grades. Doctors agree to act as mentors prior to the shadowing weeks and post their availability online. Data from our pilot in 2008 has been encouraging. All students who answered our questionnaire found the experience to be either useful or very useful, and ongoing data collection is proving this to be an enjoyable and effective programme. We are confident that Medic Insight will help all suitably enthusiastic and able school students make informed decisions to apply to study medicine. © Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2010.

  12. Grading Standards, Student Ability and Errors in College Admission

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moen, Jarle; Tjelta, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Grades are important for admission of students in most higher education programs. Analyzing admission and student performance data at a major Norwegian business school, we find that the grading practice of teachers at regional colleges sending students to the school is affected by the average performance of the students being graded. Teachers at…

  13. On-Demand Grades: The Effect of Online Grade Book Access on Student Mastery and Performance Goal Orientations, Grade Orientation, Academic Self Efficacy, and Grades

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seldow, Adam Lowell

    2010-01-01

    With the widespread growth of broadband Internet access, teachers, and in many cases, schools and school districts are transitioning from traditional paper-based grade books to student accessible online (Web-based) grade books. Online grade books offer students 24/7, on demand access to grades and various other student data, and have the potential…

  14. Association of Grade Configuration with School Climate for 7th and 8th Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malone, Marisa; Cornell, Dewey; Shukla, Kathan

    2017-01-01

    Educational authorities have questioned whether middle schools provide the best school climate for 7th and 8th grade students, and proposed that other grade configurations such as K-8th grade schools may provide a better learning environment. The purpose of this study was to compare 7th and 8th grade students' perceptions of 4 key features of…

  15. Is Medical Student Writing Wrong?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frisof, Kenneth B.; Moseley, James L.

    The prevalence of writing errors made by third-year medical students from the class of 1981 at a large midwestern medical school was studied. The papers of 253 students taking family medicine were evaluated for spelling, grammar, and punctuation errors. Four types of grammar errors and seven punctuation errors were analyzed, and each word…

  16. Self-medication among school students.

    PubMed

    ALBashtawy, Mohammed; Batiha, Abdul-Monim; Tawalbeh, Loai; Tubaishat, Ahmad; AlAzzam, Manar

    2015-04-01

    Self-medication, usually with over-the-counter (OTC) medication, is reported as a community health problem that affects many people worldwide. Most self-medication practice usually begins with the onset of adolescence. A school-based cross-sectional study was conducted in Mafraq Governorate, Jordan, using a simple random sampling method to select 6 public schools from a total of 34 schools. The total sample consisted of 422 school students from Grades 7 through 12. Measures of central tendency and χ(2) were used to compare the difference between the categorical variables. The prevalence of self-medication among the participants was 87.0%. Nearly 75% of self-medication was used for pain relief. The prevalence of self-medication among school students is very high and increases with age. School nurses and other local health-care workers must coordinate with school principals to disseminate health education campaigns about safe use of medication to provide awareness and education to school students, parents, and families. © The Author(s) 2014.

  17. Supporting medical students with learning disabilities in Asian medical schools

    PubMed Central

    Majumder, Md. Anwarul Azim; Rahman, Sayeeda; D’Souza, Urban JA; Elbeheri, Gad; Abdulrahman, Khalid Bin; Huq, M Muzaherul

    2010-01-01

    Learning disabilities (LDs) represent the largest group of disabilities in higher education (HE) institutes, including medical schools, and the numbers are continuing to rise. The worrying concern is that two-thirds to half of these students with LDs remain undiagnosed when they start their undergraduate education and may even graduate without having their disabilities diagnosed. These students struggle with their academic abilities, receive poor grades and, as a result, develop lower perceptions of their intellectual abilities than do those students without LDs. All these ultimately hamper their professional practice, employment, and career progression. Appropriate and adequate educational policies, provisions, and practices help students to progress satisfactorily. In Asian countries, public and professional awareness about LDs is low, supportive provisions are limited, legislations are inadequate, data are scarce, and equal-opportunity/widening-participation policies are not implemented effectively in the HE sector. This article discusses the issues related to LDs in medical education and draws policy, provision, and practice implications to identify, assess, and support students with LDs in medical schools, particularly in an Asian context. PMID:23745060

  18. Student Perception of Academic Grading: Personality, Academic Orientation, and Effort

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tippin, Gregory K.; Lafreniere, Kathryn D.; Page, Stewart

    2012-01-01

    Factors influencing student perceptions of academic grading were examined, with an emphasis on furthering understanding of the relevance of effort to students' conceptualization of grading. Students demonstrated a conceptualization of grading where effort should be weighted comparably to actual performance in importance to the composition of a…

  19. Grading Written Projects: What Approaches Do Students Find Most Helpful?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Lois J.

    2008-01-01

    Conscientious marketing faculty spend extensive hours grading student essays and projects. As instructors work on grading papers, they may wonder how effective their comments are. The author explored how students in a marketing principles class reported their use of various grading methods. Students generally preferred rubrics with ratings and…

  20. Retaining Students in Grade: Consequences for Florida. Policy Brief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Mary Lee

    2004-01-01

    Eliminating social promotion, retaining students in grade, and using proficiency standards to determine students' progress through grades was intended to make schools accountable and increase academic achievement. Research evidence demonstrates that grade retention does not improve achievement and may increase the chances of a student dropping out…

  1. Student Perception of Academic Grading: Personality, Academic Orientation, and Effort

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tippin, Gregory K.; Lafreniere, Kathryn D.; Page, Stewart

    2012-01-01

    Factors influencing student perceptions of academic grading were examined, with an emphasis on furthering understanding of the relevance of effort to students' conceptualization of grading. Students demonstrated a conceptualization of grading where effort should be weighted comparably to actual performance in importance to the composition of a…

  2. Grading Written Projects: What Approaches Do Students Find Most Helpful?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Lois J.

    2008-01-01

    Conscientious marketing faculty spend extensive hours grading student essays and projects. As instructors work on grading papers, they may wonder how effective their comments are. The author explored how students in a marketing principles class reported their use of various grading methods. Students generally preferred rubrics with ratings and…

  3. Cross-Grade Comparison of Students' Understanding of Energy Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saglam-Arslan, Aysegul

    2010-01-01

    The aims of this cross-grade study were (1) to determine the level of understanding of energy concepts of students at different academic grades and the differences in understanding between these grades and (2) to analyse the conceptual development of these students. Two hundred and forty-three students at 3 different levels (high school,…

  4. Cross-Grade Comparison of Students' Understanding of Energy Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saglam-Arslan, Aysegul

    2010-01-01

    The aims of this cross-grade study were (1) to determine the level of understanding of energy concepts of students at different academic grades and the differences in understanding between these grades and (2) to analyse the conceptual development of these students. Two hundred and forty-three students at 3 different levels (high school,…

  5. Medical students' perceptions of bedside teaching.

    PubMed

    Gray, David; Cozar, Octavian; Lefroy, Janet

    2017-06-01

    Bedside teaching is recognised as a valuable tool in medical education by both students and faculty members. Bedside teaching is frequently delivered by consultants; however, junior doctors are increasingly engaging in this form of clinical teaching, and their value in this respect is becoming more widely recognised. The aim of this study was to supplement work completed by previous authors who have begun to explore students' satisfaction with bedside teaching, and their perceptions of the relationship with the clinical teachers. Specifically, we aimed to identify how students perceive bedside teaching delivered by junior doctors compared with consultants. We aimed to identify how students perceived bedside teaching delivered by junior doctors compared with consultants METHODS: A questionnaire was distributed to all third-year medical students at Keele University via e-mail. Responses were submitted anonymously. Forty-six students responded (37.4%), 73.3 per cent of whom said that they felt more comfortable having bedside teaching delivered by junior doctors than by consultants. Consultants were perceived as more challenging by 60 per cent of respondents. Students appeared to value feedback on their performance, trust the validity of taught information, and to value the overall educational experience equally, regardless of the clinical grade of the teacher. Student preference does not equate to the value that they place on their bedside teaching. Junior doctors are perceived as being more in touch with students and the curriculum, whereas consultants are perceived as having higher expectations and as being both stricter and more knowledgeable. The clinical teacher's approachable manner and enthusiasm for teaching are more important than clinical grade, as is the ability to deliver well-structured constructive feedback. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Medical school dropout--testing at admission versus selection by highest grades as predictors.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Lotte; Hartvigsen, Jan; Wallstedt, Birgitta; Korsholm, Lars; Eika, Berit

    2011-11-01

    Very few studies have reported on the effect of admission tests on medical school dropout. The main aim of this study was to evaluate the predictive validity of non-grade-based admission testing versus grade-based admission relative to subsequent dropout. This prospective cohort study followed six cohorts of medical students admitted to the medical school at the University of Southern Denmark during 2002-2007 (n=1544). Half of the students were admitted based on their prior achievement of highest grades (Strategy 1) and the other half took a composite non-grade-based admission test (Strategy 2). Educational as well as social predictor variables (doctor-parent, origin, parenthood, parents living together, parent on benefit, university-educated parents) were also examined. The outcome of interest was students' dropout status at 2 years after admission. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to model dropout. Strategy 2 (admission test) students had a lower relative risk for dropping out of medical school within 2 years of admission (odds ratio 0.56, 95% confidence interval 0.39-0.80). Only the admission strategy, the type of qualifying examination and the priority given to the programme on the national application forms contributed significantly to the dropout model. Social variables did not predict dropout and neither did Strategy 2 admission test scores. Selection by admission testing appeared to have an independent, protective effect on dropout in this setting. © Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2011.

  7. Association of grade configuration with school climate for 7th and 8th grade students.

    PubMed

    Malone, Marisa; Cornell, Dewey; Shukla, Kathan

    2017-09-01

    Educational authorities have questioned whether middle schools provide the best school climate for 7th and 8th grade students, and proposed that other grade configurations such as K-8th grade schools may provide a better learning environment. The purpose of this study was to compare 7th and 8th grade students' perceptions of 4 key features of school climate (disciplinary structure, student support, student engagement, and prevalence of teasing and bullying) in middle schools versus elementary or high schools. Multilevel multivariate modeling in a statewide sample of 39,036 7th and 8th grade students attending 418 schools revealed that students attending middle schools had a more negative perception of school climate than students in schools with other grade configurations. Seventh grade students placed in middle schools reported lower disciplinary structure and a higher prevalence of teasing and bullying in comparison to those in elementary schools. Eighth grade students in middle schools reported poorer disciplinary structure, lower student engagement, and a higher prevalence of teasing and bullying compared to those in high schools. These findings can guide school psychologists in identifying aspects of school climate that may be troublesome for 7th and 8th grade students in schools with different grade configurations. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  8. Implications of the Effects of Grade Configurations on Fifth Grade Students' Science Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Delonda

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if grade level configuration and student achievement in science, specifically fifth grade Science TAKS scores are related. This study utilized a causal comparative (ex post facto) design to determine if a consistent relationship existed between fifth grade students' success on the science TAKS at the…

  9. Sharp Injuries Among Medical Students

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemzadeh, Iman; Kazerooni, Mitra; Davoodian, Parivash; Hamedi, Yaghoob; Sadeghi, Payam

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Sharp injuries threaten the health of healthcare employees. They cause the transmission of many diseases such as hepatitis B and C, AIDS, etc., which can increase the associated costs associated with them. The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency of sharp injuries among the students of Hormozgan University of Medical Sciences. Method: This cross-sectional study was conducted during 2012-2013 in Hormozgan University of Medical Sciences, IR Iran. The target population consisted of the medical, nursing, midwifery, operating room technician, and medical laboratory students in the 2012-2013 academic year. Census sampling was conducted, and accordingly, 500 students participated in the study Data was collected using modified questionnaire of the University of San Diego’s injury report form. The collected data were entered into SPSS V.19 and analyzed using descriptive statistical tests. Findings: Finally 377 students (75.4%) returned the questionnaire. Among the studied students, 184 students (39.3%) had had sharp injuries. The frequency of damaging Vein puncture was the most common mechanism of injury Discussion and Conclusion: The prevalence of sharp injuries is high among students which can increase the risk of disease and its subsequent risks, and thus, increase the cost and stress among students. It seems that holding workshops and increasing students’ awareness and skills to face these risks can be effective in mitigating them. PMID:26156935

  10. Radiology research and medical students.

    PubMed

    Whitworth, Pat W; Agarwal, Ankit; Colucci, Andrew; Sherry, Steven J; Subramaniam, Rathan M

    2013-12-01

    Fostering radiology research among medical students can enhance a student's interest and understanding of radiology and research. It increases the academic productivity of the mentor and the department. Radiology faculty and departments should actively seek to recruit and engage students in research. Once involved, students benefit greatly from being given clear responsibility, close supervision, timely feedback, and a degree of autonomy. At the heart of the student research process is the crucial mentor-mentee relationship, and mentors should be cognizant of their vital role and methods of encouraging and enhancing this relationship. Ultimately, the advancement of the field of radiology depends on constant innovation and improvement. Radiology research by medical students fuels both innovation and the development of future academic radiologists and physician-scientists, helping to secure future growth for our field.

  11. Making the grade in a portfolio-based system: student performance and the student perspective.

    PubMed

    Nowacki, Amy S

    2013-01-01

    Assessment is such an integral part of the educational system that we rarely reflect on its value and impact. Portfolios have gained in popularity, but much attention has emphasized the end-user and portfolio assessment. Here we focus on the portfolio creator (the student) and examine whether their educational needs are met with such an assessment method. This study aims to investigate how assessment practices influence classroom performance and the learning experience of the student in a graduate education setting. Studied were 33 medical students at the Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve University, a program utilizing a portfolio-based system. The students may elect to simultaneously enroll in a Masters program; however, these programs employ traditional letter grades. Thus creating a unique opportunity to assess 25 portfolio only (P) students and 8 portfolio and grade (PG) students concurrently taking a course that counts for both programs. Classroom performance was measured via a comprehensive evaluation where the PG students scored modestly better (median total scores, 72% P vs. 76% PG). Additionally, a survey was conducted to gain insight into student's perspective on how assessment method impacts the learning experience. The students in the PG group (those receiving a grade) reported increased stress but greater affirmation and self-assurance regarding their knowledge and skill mastery. Incorporation of such affirmation remains a challenge for portfolio-based systems and an area for investigation and improvement.

  12. Middle Grades: Quality Teaching Equals Higher Student Achievement. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bottoms, Gene; Hertl, Jordan; Mollette, Melinda; Patterson, Lenora

    2014-01-01

    The middles grades are critical to public school systems and our nation's economy. It's the make-or-break point in students' futures. Studies repeatedly show when students are not engaged and lose interest in the middle grades, they are likely to fall behind in ninth grade and later drop out of school. When this happens, the workforce suffers, and…

  13. College Students' Evaluations of Teaching and Grade Inflation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eiszler, Charles F.

    2002-01-01

    Examined whether the use of student evaluations of teaching effectiveness has been a contributing factor to a trend of grade inflation in a mid-sized, public university in the Midwest. Found a predictive relationship between student ratings of teaching and expected grades and an encouragement over time of grade inflation. (EV)

  14. Third Grade Students' Ideas about the Lunar Phases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stahly, Laura L.; Krockover, Gerald H.; Shepardson, Daniel P.

    1999-01-01

    Examines third-grade students' ideas on the lunar phases prior to, and following, an instructional period designed to promote students' conceptual change. Demonstrates that students are capable of making conceptual changes. Contains 30 references. (DDR)

  15. Making the Grade in a Portfolio-Based System: Student Performance and the Student Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Nowacki, Amy S.

    2013-01-01

    Assessment is such an integral part of the educational system that we rarely reflect on its value and impact. Portfolios have gained in popularity, but much attention has emphasized the end-user and portfolio assessment. Here we focus on the portfolio creator (the student) and examine whether their educational needs are met with such an assessment method. This study aims to investigate how assessment practices influence classroom performance and the learning experience of the student in a graduate education setting. Studied were 33 medical students at the Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve University, a program utilizing a portfolio-based system. The students may elect to simultaneously enroll in a Masters program; however, these programs employ traditional letter grades. Thus creating a unique opportunity to assess 25 portfolio only (P) students and 8 portfolio and grade (PG) students concurrently taking a course that counts for both programs. Classroom performance was measured via a comprehensive evaluation where the PG students scored modestly better (median total scores, 72% P vs. 76% PG). Additionally, a survey was conducted to gain insight into student’s perspective on how assessment method impacts the learning experience. The students in the PG group (those receiving a grade) reported increased stress but greater affirmation and self-assurance regarding their knowledge and skill mastery. Incorporation of such affirmation remains a challenge for portfolio-based systems and an area for investigation and improvement. PMID:23565103

  16. A review of medical-grade honey in wound care.

    PubMed

    Belcher, Judy

    In the current healthcare environment, clinicians are increasingly under pressure to use wound care products that are cost effective. This includes products that can be used in a variety of wounds to achieve different outcomes, depending on the wound-bed requirements. Medical-grade honey has emerged as a product that can achieve a variety of outcomes within the wound and is safe and easy to use. This article reviews the use of a medical-grade honey, with a view to including it on the wound care formulary in both primary and secondary care. It featured in a poster presentation at the Wounds UK conference at Harrogate in 2011.

  17. The continual assessment of medical students.

    PubMed

    Gosling, H; Nhonoli, A M

    1978-01-01

    At the new Medical Faculty at the University of Dar-es-Salaam (East Africa) a number of innovations were instituted. The most significant was continual assessment of students. During the first 3 years of the course, results of weekly testing may comprise three-fourths of each student's assessment. Later they are assessed on each rotation and clerkship; and these must be completed satisfactorily before Final Examinations are taken. These assessments never contribute less than one-half of the final results. Failures were reduced from 10 to 2% with no reduction in standards or performance levels. The method utilizes Reinforcement Theory techniques; specifically referred to are schedules of testing, grades as reinforcers, and frequent feed-back for students, self-shaping of study strategies and for constant surveilance of its teaching by the Faculty.

  18. Premedical anatomy experience and student performance in medical gross anatomy.

    PubMed

    Kondrashov, Peter; McDaniel, Dalton J; Jordan, Rebecca M

    2017-04-01

    Gross anatomy is considered one of the most important basic science courses in medical education, yet few medical schools require its completion prior to matriculation. The effect of taking anatomy courses before entering medical school on performance in medical gross anatomy has been previously studied with inconsistent results. The effect of premedical anatomy coursework on performance in medical gross anatomy, overall medical school grade point average (GPA), and Comprehensive Osteopathic Medical Licensing Examination Level 1 (COMLEX 1) score was evaluated in 456 first-year osteopathic medical students along with a survey on its perceived benefits on success in medical gross anatomy course. No significant differences were found in gross anatomy grade, GPA, or COMLEX 1 score between students with premedical anatomy coursework and those without. However, significant differences and higher scores were observed in students who had taken three or more undergraduate anatomy courses including at least one with cadaveric laboratory. There was significantly lower perceived benefit for academic success in the medical gross anatomy course (P<.001) from those students who had taken premedical anatomy courses (5.9 of 10) compared with those who had not (8.2 of 10). Results suggest that requiring any anatomy course as a prerequisite for medical school would not have significant effect on student performance in the medical gross anatomy course. However, requiring more specific anatomy coursework including taking three or more undergraduate anatomy courses, one with cadaveric laboratory component, may result in higher medical gross anatomy grades, medical school GPA, and COMLEX 1 scores. Clin. Anat. 30:303-311, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Teaching Medical Students to Reflect More Deeply.

    PubMed

    Hayton, Amy; Kang, Ilho; Wong, Raymond; Loo, Lawrence K

    2015-01-01

    Although many studies have examined the importance of reflective writing in medical education, there is a scarcity of evidence for any particular intervention to improve the quality of reflection among medical students. Historically, students on our Internal Medicine clerkship were given a written reflection assignment without explanation of critical reflection. To facilitate the development of deeper reflection, a new curriculum was introduced. A 90-minute workshop on critical reflection was introduced at the start of the Internal Medicine rotation. Key components included a video clip stimulating reflection, small- and large-group exercises, and a faculty member's personal reflection. Students were then asked to write two reflection papers. To minimize bias, the names and dates were removed from each reflection paper and combined with reflection papers from a historical control group. Four faculty used a previously validated tool, the REFLECT rubric, to independently grade the written reflection papers as nonreflective (as a 1), thoughtful action (2), reflection (3), or critical reflection (4). The final grade of each paper was determined by consensus among the graders. The 90-minute workshop was given once at the beginning of each 10-week requisite Internal Medicine clerkship to 3rd-year medical students. One hundred fifty-five papers written after the workshop were compared to 155 papers from a preworkshop historical control group. The primary analysis showed the number of students writing "critical reflection" papers increased after the educational intervention, from 14% to 47% (p = .0002). The effect size using Cohen's d was 0.62. The kappa statistic used to measure interrater reliability among the four graders was 0.37. Through a 90-minute reflection workshop more 3rd-year students were able to demonstrate the potential for "critical reflection" compared to previous students not exposed to this teaching. Strengths include the large sample size of written

  20. Empathy in Korean medical students: Findings from a nationwide survey.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyung Hye; Roh, Hyerin; Suh, Dae Hun; Hojat, Mohammadreza

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies on empathy in Korean medical students were conducted on small populations or with different scales of measurement, resulting in low representativeness and generalisability of the findings. To evaluate empathy in Korean medical students throughout the country and to make suggestions to improve empathy. The Jefferson Scale of Empathy (JSE) (Korean) was used, and the impact of sex, age, the medical school admission system, and grade of the respondents was investigated. We analyzed 5343 questionnaires and found a mean empathy score of 105.9 ± 12.8. Females and post-baccalaureate students had higher scores as compared with their counterparts. There was a significant difference between the admission systems after controlling for gender. Students from higher grade levels had lower scores than those from the lower grade levels. The JSE score of Korean medical students was lower than that of students in Western countries. The difference of gender and medical school admission system should be considered, and capability to apply empathy to clinical practice should be focused upon in medical training.

  1. Teaching recovery to medical students.

    PubMed

    Feeney, Larkin; Jordan, Iain; McCarron, Peter

    2013-03-01

    Community mental health services are evolving toward more holistic, patient-centered, recovery-based practices. This change necessitates an attitudinal shift from mental health workers, and training in recovery principles is helpful in achieving this change. Medical students often have narrow, doctor-centered concepts of mental health care. Traditional clinical placements in psychiatry do little to address this. We evaluated a recovery-focused teaching program for medical students in psychiatry. Medical students' knowledge of recovery from mental illness was assessed before and after either a 6-week traditional or recovery-focused clinical placement in psychiatry, using the Recovery Knowledge Inventory. A validated questionnaire was used to assess attitudes toward mental illness before and after the placements. Focus groups were conducted before and after the recovery teaching. One hundred nineteen medical students participated; 23 experienced the recovery teaching program while 96 had a traditional placement (23 in the same center as the recovery teaching program and 73 in other centers). There were no significant differences between groups at baseline. After recovery teaching, medical students significantly increased their recovery knowledge and had more positive attitudes toward mental illness and psychiatry when compared with those who had a traditional placement. The focus groups revealed greater optimism and more holistic concepts of recovery from mental illness. The recovery teaching program was associated with increased knowledge of recovery principles and more positive attitudes toward mental illness. Psychiatric clinical placements for medical students should include an explicit recovery focus. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved

  2. Cognitive Dissonance or Revenge? Student Grades and Course Evaluations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maurer, Trent W.

    2006-01-01

    I tested 2 competing theories to explain the connection between students' expected grades and ratings of instructors: cognitive dissonance and revenge. Cognitive dissonance theory holds that students who expect poor grades rate instructors poorly to minimize ego threat whereas the revenge theory holds that students rate instructors poorly in an…

  3. Relationships Among Locus of Control, Grades, and Student Ratings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owen, Steven V.; Froman, Robin D.

    This research examines the interaction between college students' control orientation and a discrepancy score of GPA minus expected grade in course, on the dependent measure of 13 student rating items. It was hypothesized that students with an external locus of control who also showed a discrepancy between expected and actual grades would distort…

  4. Teacher Effects on Minority and Disadvantaged Students' Grade 4 Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Konstantopoulos, Spyros; Chung, Vicki

    2011-01-01

    The authors examined the differential effects of teachers on female, minority, and low-socioeconomic status (SES) students' achievement in Grade 4. They used data from a randomized experiment (Project STAR) and its follow-up study (LBS). Student outcomes included Grade 4 SAT scores in mathematics, reading, and science and student demographics…

  5. Factors Relating to Student Grade Obsession: A Quantitative Correlational Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Jacqueline

    2011-01-01

    The intense focus of students on grades attained in academia reflects a contemporary issue in higher education. The internal pressure that students experience regarding academics fuels student grade obsession. Researchers suggest that in addition to internal pressure, financial anxiety, the need to receive academic recognition and parental…

  6. Cognitive Dissonance or Revenge? Student Grades and Course Evaluations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maurer, Trent W.

    2006-01-01

    I tested 2 competing theories to explain the connection between students' expected grades and ratings of instructors: cognitive dissonance and revenge. Cognitive dissonance theory holds that students who expect poor grades rate instructors poorly to minimize ego threat whereas the revenge theory holds that students rate instructors poorly in an…

  7. Factors Relating to Student Grade Obsession: A Quantitative Correlational Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Jacqueline

    2011-01-01

    The intense focus of students on grades attained in academia reflects a contemporary issue in higher education. The internal pressure that students experience regarding academics fuels student grade obsession. Researchers suggest that in addition to internal pressure, financial anxiety, the need to receive academic recognition and parental…

  8. Investigation of Fifth Grade Students' Mathematical Calibration Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozsoy, Gokhan

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a scale to measure fifth grade students' mathematical calibration skills. Besides, it aims to determine students' calibration skills through this scale. Results of the study revealed that fifth-grade students (n = 94) enrolling to study, have a medium-high level of (M = 55.12, SD = 21.76) mathematical…

  9. Science Teaching Methods Preferred by Grade 9 Students in Finland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Juuti, Kalle; Lavonen, Jari; Uitto, Anna; Byman, Reijo; Meisalo, Veijo

    2010-01-01

    Students find science relevant to society, but they do not find school science interesting. This survey study analyzes Finnish grade 9 students' actual experiences with science teaching methods and their preferences for how they would like to study science. The survey data were collected from 3,626 grade 9 students (1,772 girls and 1,832 boys)…

  10. Science Teaching Methods Preferred by Grade 9 Students in Finland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Juuti, Kalle; Lavonen, Jari; Uitto, Anna; Byman, Reijo; Meisalo, Veijo

    2010-01-01

    Students find science relevant to society, but they do not find school science interesting. This survey study analyzes Finnish grade 9 students' actual experiences with science teaching methods and their preferences for how they would like to study science. The survey data were collected from 3,626 grade 9 students (1,772 girls and 1,832 boys)…

  11. Just Chillin' on the Quad: Middle Grades Students in College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaefer, Mary Beth; Rivera, Lourdes M.

    2014-01-01

    The middle grades years has a profound and lasting impact on student achievement, including opportunities for college and career access and readiness. It is important that students at this age understand college and college life. Such understanding can help middle grades students focus on career goals and postsecondary planning, and this awareness…

  12. Teaching toolkit for medical students.

    PubMed

    Newton, Ashley; Wright, Lucie

    2011-12-01

    From teaching juniors and peers to educating patients, it is imperative for all doctors to have basic core teaching skills. The Junior Association for the Study of Medical Education (JASME) felt that a short course in the fundamentals of teaching would be well received by students. This article shares the lessons from a one-day teaching course aimed at senior medical students. Qualitative feedback helped decide which aspects of the course were most valued. The course was piloted in London. It combined interactive plenary sessions on teaching theory with practical teaching sessions. Each student taught a small group of others a basic clinical skill, and the student teacher then received extensive feedback from their peers and an experienced clinician with a special interest in medical education. There was an opportunity to re-teach part of the skill after having taken the feedback on board. Students completed questionnaires at the start and end of the day to ascertain their expectations of the course and what they found most useful. Expectations can be grouped into three main areas: students wanted to improve their teaching skills; gain teaching experience; and receive feedback on their teaching. The most valuable part of the course was being able to practise teaching and receive feedback. Keywords used to describe the feedback included 'individual', 'valuable', 'constructive', 'instant' and 'in depth'. By continuing to run similar workshops we hope that we can further encourage the teachers of tomorrow. © Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2011.

  13. Modifying the Medical Research Council grading system through Rasch analyses

    PubMed Central

    Vanhoutte, Els Karla; Faber, Catharina Gerritdina; van Nes, Sonja Ingrid; Jacobs, Bart Casper; van Doorn, Pieter Antoon; van Koningsveld, Rinske; Cornblath, David Reid; van der Kooi, Anneke Jelly; Cats, Elisabeth Aviva; van den Berg, Leonard Hendrik; Notermans, Nicolette Claudia; van der Pol, Willem Lodewijk; Hermans, Mieke Catharina Elisabeth; van der Beek, Nadine Anna Maria Elisabeth; Gorson, Kenneth Craig; Eurelings, Marijke; Engelsman, Jeroen; Boot, Hendrik; Meijer, Ronaldus Jacobus; Lauria, Giuseppe; Tennant, Alan

    2012-01-01

    The Medical Research Council grading system has served through decades for the evaluation of muscle strength and has been recognized as a cardinal feature of daily neurological, rehabilitation and general medicine examination of patients, despite being respectfully criticized due to the unequal width of its response options. No study has systematically examined, through modern psychometric approach, whether physicians are able to properly use the Medical Research Council grades. The objectives of this study were: (i) to investigate physicians’ ability to discriminate among the Medical Research Council categories in patients with different neuromuscular disorders and with various degrees of weakness through thresholds examination using Rasch analysis as a modern psychometric method; (ii) to examine possible factors influencing physicians’ ability to apply the Medical Research Council categories through differential item function analyses; and (iii) to examine whether the widely used Medical Research Council 12 muscles sum score in patients with Guillain–Barré syndrome and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy would meet Rasch model's expectations. A total of 1065 patients were included from nine cohorts with the following diseases: Guillain–Barré syndrome (n = 480); myotonic dystrophy type-1 (n = 169); chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (n = 139); limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (n = 105); multifocal motor neuropathy (n = 102); Pompe's disease (n = 62) and monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined related polyneuropathy (n = 8). Medical Research Council data of 72 muscles were collected. Rasch analyses were performed on Medical Research Council data for each cohort separately and after pooling data at the muscle level to increase category frequencies, and on the Medical Research Council sum score in patients with Guillain–Barré syndrome and chronic inflammatory demyelinating

  14. Medical School Research Pipeline: Medical Student Research Experience in Psychiatry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balon, Richard; Heninger, George; Belitsky, Richard

    2006-01-01

    Objective: The authors discuss the importance of introducing research training in psychiatry and neurosciences to medical students. Methods: A review of existing models of research training in psychiatry with focus on those providing research training to medical students is presented. Results: Two research-training models for medical students that…

  15. Medical School Research Pipeline: Medical Student Research Experience in Psychiatry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balon, Richard; Heninger, George; Belitsky, Richard

    2006-01-01

    Objective: The authors discuss the importance of introducing research training in psychiatry and neurosciences to medical students. Methods: A review of existing models of research training in psychiatry with focus on those providing research training to medical students is presented. Results: Two research-training models for medical students that…

  16. Factors influencing medical informatics examination grade--can biorhythm, astrological sign, seasonal aspect, or bad statistics predict outcome?

    PubMed

    Petrovecki, Mladen; Rahelić, Dario; Bilić-Zulle, Lidija; Jelec, Vjekoslav

    2003-02-01

    To investigate whether and to what extent various parameters, such as individual characteristics, computer habits, situational factors, and pseudoscientific variables, influence Medical Informatics examination grade, and how inadequate statistical analysis can lead to wrong conclusions. The study included a total of 382 second-year undergraduate students at the Rijeka University School of Medicine in the period from 1996/97 to 2000/01 academic year. After passing the Medical Informatics exam, students filled out an anonymous questionnaire about their attitude toward learning medical informatics. They were asked to grade the course organization and curriculum content, and provide their date of birth; sex; study year; high school grades; Medical Informatics examination grade, type, and term; and describe their computer habits. From these data, we determined their zodiac signs and biorhythm. Data were compared by the use of t-test, one-way ANOVA with Tukey's honest significance difference test, and randomized complete block design ANOVA. Out of 21 variables analyzed, only 10 correlated with the average grade. Students taking Medical Informatics examination in the 1998/99 academic year earned lower average grade than any other generation. Significantly higher Medical Informatics exam grade was earned by students who finished a grammar high school; owned and regularly used a computer, Internet, and e-mail (p< or =0.002 for all items); passed an oral exam without taking a written test (p=0.004), or did not repeat the exam (p<0.001). Better high-school students and students with better grades from high-school informatics course also scored significantly better (p=0.032 and p<0.001, respectively). Grade in high-school mathematics, student's sex, and time of year when the examination was taken were not related to the grade, and neither were pseudoscientific parameters, such as student zodiac sign, zodiac sign quality, or biorhythm cycles, except when intentionally

  17. Fostering research skills in undergraduate medical students through mentored students projects: example from an Indian medical school.

    PubMed

    Devi, V; Abraham, R R; Adiga, A; Ramnarayan, K; Kamath, A

    2010-01-01

    Healthcare decision-making is largely reliant on evidence-based medicine; building skills in scientific reasoning and thinking among medical students becomes an important part of medical education. Medical students in India have no formal path to becoming physicians, scientists or academicians. This study examines students' perceptions regarding research skills improvement after participating in the Mentored Student Project programme at Melaka Manipal Medical College, Manipal Campus, India. Additionally, this paper describes the initiatives taken for the continual improvement of the Mentored Student Project programme based on faculty and student perspectives. At Melaka Manipal Medical College, Mentored Student Project was implemented in the curriculum during second year of Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery programme with the intention of developing research skills essential to the career development of medical students. The study design was cross-sectional. To inculcate the spirit of team work students were grouped (n=3 to 5) and each group was asked to select a research project. The students' research projects were guided by their mentors. A questionnaire (Likert's five point scale) on students' perceptions regarding improvement in research skills after undertaking projects and guidance received from the mentor was administered to medical students after they had completed their Mentored Student Project. The responses of students were summarised using percentages. The median grade with inter-quartile range was reported for each item in the questionnaire. The median grade for all the items related to perceptions regarding improvement in research skills was 4 which reflected that the majority of the students felt that Mentored Student Project had improved their research skills. The problems encountered by the students during Mentored Student Project were related to time management for the Mentored Student Project and mentors. This study shows that students

  18. [Medical students and drug marketing].

    PubMed

    Calderón Larrañaga, Sara; Rabanaque Hernández, María José

    2014-03-01

    To determine the exposure of medical students to the marketing activities of the pharmaceutical industry, and identify their opinions and attitudes, and also the possible effects this exposure on their training and future professional practice. Descriptive cross-sectional. University of Zaragoza Faculty of Medicine. Third, fourth, fifth and sixth year medical students. The information was obtained using a previously adapted, self-report questionnaire on the exposure, attitudes and perceived suitability of drug marketing activities. Percentages were calculated for the categorical variables, applying the chi squared test for the comparison between the groups. A logistic regression was performed to determine the factors associated with their attitudes towards these activities. A total of 369 questionnaires were returned (93% of those attending classes). The exposure to marketing activities is high, particularly in the clinical stage (78.6% said to have received a gift non-educational gift). The students recognised the possible biases and repercussions in professional practice, although with ambiguity and contradictions. The most accepted activities are those associated with training, and the most critical attitudes appear in the clinical stage, particularly in the sixth year. Exposure to drug marketing by medical students and its possible training and professional effects is frequent and significant. The training environment is particularly open to promotional activities. The differences observed in the later years suggest the need for a specific curriculum subject and development of reflective attitudes by the students themselves. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  19. Sixth Grade Students Who Use Alcohol

    PubMed Central

    Pasch, Keryn E.; Perry, Cheryl L.; Stigler, Melissa H.; Komro, Kelli A.

    2008-01-01

    Young adolescent alcohol users drink at higher rates than their peers throughout adolescence and appear to be less amenable to intervention. This study compares those who reported alcohol use in the past year to those who reported no use in a multiethnic, urban sample of sixth graders in 61 schools in Chicago in 2002 (N = 4,150). Demographic, behavioral, intrapersonal, and socioenvironmental factors were identified based on behavioral theories and potential mediators of the Project Northland Chicago intervention. Single and multiple regression models were created for users and nonusers to determine associations between these factors and alcohol use behavior and intentions. The multiple regression models explained 35% and 56% of the variance in alcohol use behavior and intentions between students for nonusers and users, respectively. Results suggest that primary prevention programs for alcohol use should occur prior to sixth grade, particularly for the substantial group at high risk for early use. PMID:18303109

  20. Marijuana Use Among 10th Grade Students - Washington, 2014.

    PubMed

    Shah, Anar; Stahre, Mandy

    2016-12-30

    Some studies have suggested that long-term, regular use of marijuana starting in adolescence might impair brain development and lower intelligence quotient (1,2). Since 2012, purchase of recreational or retail marijuana has become legal for persons aged ≥21 years in the District of Columbia, Alaska, California, Colorado, Maine, Massachusetts, Nevada, Oregon, and Washington, raising concern about increased marijuana access by youths. The law taxing and regulating recreational or retail marijuana was approved by Washington voters in 2012 and the first retail licenses were issued in July 2014; medical marijuana use has been legal since 1998. To examine the prevalence, characteristics, and behaviors of current marijuana users among 10th grade students, the Washington State Department of Health analyzed data from the state's 2014 Healthy Youth Survey (HYS) regarding current marijuana use. In 2014, 18.1% of 10th grade students (usually aged 15-16 years) reported using marijuana during the preceding 30 days; of these students, 32% reported using it on ≥10 days. Among the marijuana users, 65% reported obtaining marijuana through their peer networks, which included friends, older siblings, or at a party. Identification of comprehensive and sustainable public health interventions are needed to prevent and reduce youth marijuana use. Establishment of state and jurisdiction surveillance of youth marijuana use could be useful to anticipate and monitor the effects of legalization and track trends in use before states consider legalizing recreational or retail marijuana.

  1. Making the Grade: Understanding Learning and Grade Orientations of First-Year Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purcell, Jennifer M.

    2009-01-01

    First-year undergraduate students enter college with varying expectations, motivations, and goals and are being bombarded with messages about the importance of grades, sometimes to the detriment of learning. This descriptive, cross-sectional study employs LOGO II to describe the learning and grade orientations of first-year students and identify…

  2. Making the Grade: Understanding Learning and Grade Orientations of First-Year Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purcell, Jennifer M.

    2009-01-01

    First-year undergraduate students enter college with varying expectations, motivations, and goals and are being bombarded with messages about the importance of grades, sometimes to the detriment of learning. This descriptive, cross-sectional study employs LOGO II to describe the learning and grade orientations of first-year students and identify…

  3. The Gateway Grade: The Ninth Grade Academy Practice in Terms of Student Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starke, Adam Robert

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether the concept of the ninth grade academy structure in Texas high schools affects a variety of variables indicative of student achievement. Data representative of performance by students served in 30 schools with a separately structured ninth grade academy were compared to data representative of…

  4. Michigan Educational Assessment Program Student Assessment Booklets for Career Development. Test Number 31, Grade 4. Test Number 61, Grade 7. Test Number 62, Grade 7. Test Number 91, Grade 10. Test Number 92, Grade 10. Test Number 93, Grade 10.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan State Board of Education, Lansing.

    As part of the career development curriculum materials for Michigan schools, this packet contains six sample student assessment test booklets. One of the test booklets provided is for grade 4; two are for grade 7; three are for grade 10. The booklets assess students' progress in meeting the state's essential performance objectives for career…

  5. Use of iPod™ technology in medical-surgical nursing courses: effect on grades.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Robert; Hepworth, Joseph; Goldsmith, Melissa; Lacasse, Cheryl

    2010-01-01

    Advances in computer technology, such as the portable and affordable iPod™, allow students to view lectures anywhere at any time. iPods™ are of special interest for nurse educators who strive to meet demands posed by a critical nursing shortage. A mixed-methods pilot study was conducted to assess whether iPod™ could be an effective teaching tool for medical-surgical nursing lectures. In a randomized study with 35 participants, together with eight students having their own iPods™, grades of students given pre-recorded class lectures on iPods™ were compared with grades of those who attended lectures without iPods™. Learning styles, amount and use of students devoted to iPod™ lectures were considered as well as grades. Most results were not significant, but there was some evidence that the control groups who attended classroom lectures received better grades than iPod™ users, and individuals who used iPod™ more frequently before the final exam received lower grades. These somewhat surprising results suggest the need for further research in the use of this technology as a resource for nursing education delivery.

  6. The Effects of Framing Grades on Student Learning and Preferences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bies-Hernandez, Nicole J.

    2012-01-01

    Two experiments examined whether framing effects, in terms of losses and gains, can be extended to student learning and grading preferences. In Experiment 1, participants rated psychology course syllabi to investigate preferences for differently framed grading systems: a loss versus gain grading system. The results showed a clear framing effect…

  7. The Effects of Framing Grades on Student Learning and Preferences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bies-Hernandez, Nicole J.

    2012-01-01

    Two experiments examined whether framing effects, in terms of losses and gains, can be extended to student learning and grading preferences. In Experiment 1, participants rated psychology course syllabi to investigate preferences for differently framed grading systems: a loss versus gain grading system. The results showed a clear framing effect…

  8. Grading and Reporting Student Progress in an Age of Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trumbull, Elise, Ed.; Farr, Beverly, Ed.

    The essays in this collection offer a comprehensive analysis of the challenges of communicating effectively about student achievement. Discussions of concepts related to grading and reporting progress are mixed with practical advice. The chapters are: (1) "Grading Practices; An Overview of the Issues" (Beverly P. Farr); (2) "Why Do We Grade--and…

  9. Understanding Factors That Influence Academic Performance in Tenth Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Denise

    2011-01-01

    This study examines factors contributing to the poor academic performance of tenth grade high school students. Throughout my eight years teaching experience at this grade-level, the one constant from class to class and year-to year is the academic decline. This decline typically starts at the end of ninth grade, becomes obvious and serious in…

  10. Students online: learning medical genetics.

    PubMed Central

    Proud, V K; Johnson, E D; Mitchell, J A

    1993-01-01

    It is possible to focus medical genetics education by using a model that integrates the skills of end-user searching of the medical literature into the traditional course content. Since 1988, 313 first-year medical students were studied as they accessed MEDLINE to retrieve information about biochemical genetic disorders. Their search behavior was studied by analyzing data from the National Library of Medicine's traffic files. The skills that they initially learned were reinforced as they searched clinical genetics problem cases in the second-year pathology course, and these skills were consolidated in the third year when the students addressed specific patient-care questions in pediatrics. The students' perception of the value of this model was studied by analyzing questionnaires completed during the exercise. It was demonstrated that when students were taught the skills of accessing MEDLINE by computer, they could formulate a question, retrieve current information, critically review relevant articles, communicate effectively, and use these skills to contribute to patient care. PMID:8447329

  11. Characteristics of mentoring relationships formed by medical students and faculty.

    PubMed

    Dimitriadis, Konstantinos; von der Borch, Philip; Störmann, Sylvère; Meinel, Felix G; Moder, Stefan; Reincke, Martin; Fischer, Martin R

    2012-09-13

    Little is known about the characteristics of mentoring relationships formed between faculty and medical students. Individual mentoring relationships of clinical medical students at Munich Medical School were characterized quantitatively and qualitatively. All students signing up for the mentoring program responded to a questionnaire on their expectations (n = 534). Mentees were asked to give feedback after each of their one-on-one meetings (n = 203). A detailed analysis of the overall mentoring process and its characteristics was performed. For qualitative text analysis, free-text items were analyzed and categorized by two investigators. Quantitative analysis was performed using descriptive statistics and Wilcoxon-test to assess differences in grades between students with and without mentors. High-performing students were significantly more likely to participate in the mentoring program (p<0.001). Topics primarily discussed include the mentee's personal goals (65.5%), career planning (59.6%), and experiences abroad (57.6%). Mentees mostly perceived their mentors as counselors (88.9%), providers of ideas (85.0%), and role models (73.3%). Mentees emphasized the positive impact of the mentoring relationship on career planning (77.2%) and research (75.0%). Medical students with strong academic performance as defined by their grades are more likely to participate in formal mentoring programs. Mentoring relationships between faculty and medical students are perceived as a mutually satisfying and effective instrument for key issues in medical students' professional development. Mentoring relationships are a highly effective means of enhancing the bidirectional flow of information between faculty and medical students. A mentoring program can thus establish a feedback loop enabling the educational institution to swiftly identify and address issues of medical students.

  12. Teaching medical students rehabilitation medicine.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Jeremy; Lin, Xia; Clarke, Karen; Fish, Helen; Phillips, Margaret

    2010-01-01

    The principles of rehabilitation medicine will become ever more important across many medical and surgical specialties in view of the rising prevalence of chronic and disabling conditions. Yet rehabilitation medicine has traditionally been unpopular with medical students. This article aims to review the existing evidence of problems in teaching medical undergraduates in rehabilitation medicine and provide published recommendations and practical approaches from our own experience. A literature review was carried out to search for publications relating to teaching rehabilitation medicine to undergraduates in order to identify problems that potentially affect undergraduate education in rehabilitation medicine and its future as a medical speciality. The lack of consistent undergraduate curriculum, knowledge of rehabilitation medicine and academic opportunities contribute to the inadequate perception of the speciality to the undergraduates. The attitude of medical students towards rehabilitation medicine is important for its future development as a specialty. Further standardisation of teaching rehabilitation medicine at a national level, promoting research activity in this area and increasing the profile of rehabilitation medicine are warranted.

  13. Investigating Urban Eighth-Grade Students' Knowledge of Energy Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodzin, Alec

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated urban eighth-grade students' knowledge of energy resources and associated issues including energy acquisition, energy generation, storage and transport, and energy consumption and conservation. A 39 multiple-choice-item energy resources knowledge assessment was completed by 1043 eighth-grade students in urban schools in two…

  14. A Preliminary Study of Grade Forecasting by Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    This experiment enabled undergraduate business students to better assess their progress in a course by quantitatively forecasting their own end-of-course grades. This innovation provided them with predictive feedback in addition to the outcome feedback they were already receiving. A total of 144 students forecast their grades using an…

  15. Seventh Grade Students' Conceptions of Global Warming and Climate Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shepardson, Daniel P.; Niyogi, Dev; Choi, Soyoung; Charusombat, Umarporn

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate seventh grade students' conceptions of global warming and climate change. The study was descriptive in nature and involved the collection of qualitative data from 91 seventh grade students from three different schools in the Midwest, USA. An open response and draw and explain assessment instrument was…

  16. Students' Distress over Grades: Entitlement or a Coping Response?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baer, Judith C.

    2011-01-01

    Faculties across disciplines have noted an increasing number of students who are highly distressed over grades, and this distress is accompanied by pervasive demands on professors. The student behavior takes several forms, including demands for higher grades, expectations of special accommodations by faculty, and the predictions of dire outcomes…

  17. Students' Distress over Grades: Entitlement or a Coping Response?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baer, Judith C.

    2011-01-01

    Faculties across disciplines have noted an increasing number of students who are highly distressed over grades, and this distress is accompanied by pervasive demands on professors. The student behavior takes several forms, including demands for higher grades, expectations of special accommodations by faculty, and the predictions of dire outcomes…

  18. Solving Graphics Problems: Student Performance in Junior Grades

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowrie, Tom; Diezmann, Carmel M.

    2007-01-01

    The authors investigated the performance of 172 Grade 4 students (9 to 10 years) over 12 months on a 36-item test that comprised items from 6 distinct graphical languages (e.g., maps) commonly used to convey mathematical information. Results revealed (a) difficulties in Grade 4 students' capacity to decode a variety of graphics, (b) significant…

  19. Omani Twelfth Grade Students' Most Common Misconceptions in Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Balushi, Sulaiman M.; Ambusaidi, Abdullah K.; Al-Shuaili, Ali H.; Taylor, Neil

    2012-01-01

    The current study, undertaken in the Sultanate of Oman, explored twelfth grade students' common misconceptions in seven chemistry conceptual areas. The sample included 786 twelfth grade students in Oman while the instrument was a two-tier test called Chemistry Misconceptions Diagnostic Test (CMDT), consisting of 25 items with 12 items…

  20. Affix Meaning Knowledge in First through Third Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Apel, Kenn; Henbest, Victoria Suzanne

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: We examined grade-level differences in 1st- through 3rd-grade students' performance on an experimenter-developed affix meaning task (AMT) and determined whether AMT performance explained unique variance in word-level reading and reading comprehension, beyond other known contributors to reading development. Method: Forty students at each…

  1. A Preliminary Study of Grade Forecasting by Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    This experiment enabled undergraduate business students to better assess their progress in a course by quantitatively forecasting their own end-of-course grades. This innovation provided them with predictive feedback in addition to the outcome feedback they were already receiving. A total of 144 students forecast their grades using an…

  2. Newspapers in Science Education: A Study Involving Sixth Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lai, Ching-San; Wang, Yun-Fei

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the learning performance of sixth grade elementary school students using newspapers in science teaching. A quasi-experimental design with a single group was used in this study. Thirty-three sixth grade elementary school students participated in this study. The research instruments consisted of three…

  3. Affix Meaning Knowledge in First through Third Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Apel, Kenn; Henbest, Victoria Suzanne

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: We examined grade-level differences in 1st- through 3rd-grade students' performance on an experimenter-developed affix meaning task (AMT) and determined whether AMT performance explained unique variance in word-level reading and reading comprehension, beyond other known contributors to reading development. Method: Forty students at each…

  4. Case Study: What Supports Students to Improve Their Grades?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sieminski, Sandy; Messenger, Julie; Murphy, Sam

    2016-01-01

    This case study considers students who achieved "borderline" (40-45%) grades in their first assignment on a module, but went on to markedly improve their grades over the course of the module. The students were studying nursing and social work at the UK Open University, and they were all sponsored by employers. Semi-structured telephone…

  5. Effects of Student Characteristics on Grades in Compulsory School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lekholm, Alli Klapp; Cliffordson, Christina

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate how different student characteristics such as gender influence grades. In order to answer these questions, multivariate techniques were used. The data derive from The Gothenburg Educational Longitudinal Database (GOLD), and the subjects were 99,070 ninth-grade students born in 1987. The analyses were…

  6. Seventh Grade Students' Conceptions of Global Warming and Climate Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shepardson, Daniel P.; Niyogi, Dev; Choi, Soyoung; Charusombat, Umarporn

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate seventh grade students' conceptions of global warming and climate change. The study was descriptive in nature and involved the collection of qualitative data from 91 seventh grade students from three different schools in the Midwest, USA. An open response and draw and explain assessment instrument was…

  7. Case Study: What Supports Students to Improve Their Grades?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sieminski, Sandy; Messenger, Julie; Murphy, Sam

    2016-01-01

    This case study considers students who achieved "borderline" (40-45%) grades in their first assignment on a module, but went on to markedly improve their grades over the course of the module. The students were studying nursing and social work at the UK Open University, and they were all sponsored by employers. Semi-structured telephone…

  8. Investigating Urban Eighth-Grade Students' Knowledge of Energy Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodzin, Alec

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated urban eighth-grade students' knowledge of energy resources and associated issues including energy acquisition, energy generation, storage and transport, and energy consumption and conservation. A 39 multiple-choice-item energy resources knowledge assessment was completed by 1043 eighth-grade students in urban schools in two…

  9. Students Teaching Students: A Model for Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flax, Jim; Garrard, Judith

    1974-01-01

    At the University of Minnesota Medical School a course, Introduction to Clinical Medicine, introduces communication skills; develops interview skills consistent with students' personality, their role as medical students, and the patients' needs; assists students in becoming comfortable as medical students in the hospital setting; and teaches them…

  10. Teaching medical students the art of the 'write-up'.

    PubMed

    Bynum, Debra; Colford, Cristin; Royal, Kenneth

    2015-08-01

    The creation of a complete 'write-up' continues to be essential to the clinical learning experience for medical students. The ability to document a clinical encounter is a key communication skill and Core Entrustable Professional Activity for entering residency. We developed a guide to the comprehensive write-up, a grading rubric, and a videotaped encounter with a standardised doctor and patient. Second-year medical students created a write-up based upon this encounter, which was then peer-reviewed in a small group writer's workshop session. The students were later required to submit a write-up, based upon a real patient encounter, to the course directors for a grade. All write-ups (n = 185) were graded by the course director. Fifty-one were independently graded by a second course director. These grades were compared with the 175 student write-ups from the previous year. The ability to document a clinical encounter is a key communication skill … for entering residency The average grade for student write-ups was 86 with a standard deviation of 9, compared with an average of 75 with a standard deviation of 17 for the year prior to the introduction of this session (p < 0.001). The average score given by a second rater was 83 with a standard deviation of 11, indicating a high level of agreement and internal consistency. These tools were easy to use and well received by faculty members and students, and the quality of student write-ups significantly improved after the introduction of the session. The grading rubric demonstrated high inter-rater reliability, indicating that this can be adapted and used by others for instruction and assessment. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Scoring rubric for grading students' participation in online discussions.

    PubMed

    Lunney, Margaret; Sammarco, Angela

    2009-01-01

    Required discussions of course readings provide motivation for students to learn course content and can be used to validate students' comprehension of course content and processes. A tool for grading the students' weekly discussions of course work was tested to evaluate the interrater reliability of grading by two faculty members. The purpose of this article is to describe psychometric testing of the interrater reliability of this grading method. Using the grading tool, independent ratings of five students' online discussion postings were recorded by both faculty members over a 5-week period, which provided the data for this study. Data were analyzed using Spearman rho and Kendall tau-b statistics. The findings revealed that the overall correlations of rater scores were satisfactory and indicated that an acceptable level of interrater reliability was obtained through use of the grading tool. Reliable tools for evaluation of students' online discussions contribute to the knowledge needed for the implementation of online courses.

  12. Smartphone, the New Learning Aid amongst Medical Students.

    PubMed

    Gavali, Monika Y; Khismatrao, Deepak S; Gavali, Yogesh V; Patil, K B

    2017-05-01

    The use of smartphone is increasing day by day for personal as well as professional purpose. They are becoming a more suitable tool for advancing education in developing countries. Mobile access to information and many applications are successfully harnessed in health care. Smartphones are also becoming popular as an effective educational tool. The present study was conducted to evaluate the use of smartphones as an educational tool amongst the medical students. The study also aimed at identifying the common medical application used by the students. It was an observational cross-sectional study carried out amongst medical students of private medical institute in India. A validated 16 point, structured, open-ended, questionnaire regarding ownership and use of smart phones was self-administered to 446 medical students. Data were analysed using SPSS and open ended questions were analysed by summative content analysis. Among the study population, 96% owned a smartphone -Android based 72.4%, i phone 13.0%, Windows based Nokia phones 7% and Blackberry 3.6%. Common medical applications used by the students were Anatomy and Medical Dictionary in First MBBS; Medical Dictionary, Medscape and Google/Wikipedia in Second MBBS; and Medscape, Google/Wikipedia and Prognosis/Diagnosis in Third MBBS. More than 90% students, reported to have technological skills to use smartphones, for medical education, communication and instant access during bedside teaching. Advertently, 37.2% students felt if smartphones are used for clinical purposes, they will need to spend less time with patients. Almost 79.4% felt that smartphones should be introduced in MBBS course. Smartphone use amongst medical students as learning aid for various medical applications is rapidly advancing. But it will be worthwhile to study whether use of smartphones has any impact on the grades of the students before introducing them in medical schools.

  13. Smartphone, the New Learning Aid amongst Medical Students

    PubMed Central

    Khismatrao, Deepak S.; Gavali, Yogesh V; Patil, K.B.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The use of smartphone is increasing day by day for personal as well as professional purpose. They are becoming a more suitable tool for advancing education in developing countries. Mobile access to information and many applications are successfully harnessed in health care. Smartphones are also becoming popular as an effective educational tool. Aim The present study was conducted to evaluate the use of smartphones as an educational tool amongst the medical students. The study also aimed at identifying the common medical application used by the students. Materials and Methods It was an observational cross-sectional study carried out amongst medical students of private medical institute in India. A validated 16 point, structured, open-ended, questionnaire regarding ownership and use of smart phones was self-administered to 446 medical students. Data were analysed using SPSS and open ended questions were analysed by summative content analysis. Results Among the study population, 96% owned a smartphone -Android based 72.4%, i phone 13.0%, Windows based Nokia phones 7% and Blackberry 3.6%. Common medical applications used by the students were Anatomy and Medical Dictionary in First MBBS; Medical Dictionary, Medscape and Google/Wikipedia in Second MBBS; and Medscape, Google/Wikipedia and Prognosis/Diagnosis in Third MBBS. More than 90% students, reported to have technological skills to use smartphones, for medical education, communication and instant access during bedside teaching. Advertently, 37.2% students felt if smartphones are used for clinical purposes, they will need to spend less time with patients. Almost 79.4% felt that smartphones should be introduced in MBBS course. Conclusion Smartphone use amongst medical students as learning aid for various medical applications is rapidly advancing. But it will be worthwhile to study whether use of smartphones has any impact on the grades of the students before introducing them in medical schools. PMID

  14. Affix Meaning Knowledge in First Through Third Grade Students.

    PubMed

    Apel, Kenn; Henbest, Victoria Suzanne

    2016-04-01

    We examined grade-level differences in 1st- through 3rd-grade students' performance on an experimenter-developed affix meaning task (AMT) and determined whether AMT performance explained unique variance in word-level reading and reading comprehension, beyond other known contributors to reading development. Forty students at each grade level completed an assessment battery that included measures of phonological awareness, receptive vocabulary, word-level reading, reading comprehension, and affix meaning knowledge. On the AMT, 1st-grade students were significantly less accurate than 2nd- and 3rd-grade students; there was no significant difference in performance between the 2nd- and 3rd-grade students. Regression analyses revealed that the AMT accounted for 8% unique variance of students' performance on word-level reading measures and 6% unique variance of students' performance on the reading comprehension measure, after age, phonological awareness, and receptive vocabulary were explained. These results provide initial information on the development of affix meaning knowledge via an explicit measure in 1st- through 3rd-grade students and demonstrate that affix meaning knowledge uniquely contributes to the development of reading abilities above other known literacy predictors. These findings provide empirical support for how students might use morphological problem solving to read unknown multimorphemic words successfully.

  15. Continuous-Flow System Produces Medical-Grade Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akse, James R.; Dahl, Roger W.; Wheeler, Richard R.

    2009-01-01

    A continuous-flow system utilizes microwave heating to sterilize water and to thermally inactivate endotoxins produced in the sterilization process. The system is designed for use in converting potable water to medical-grade water. Systems like this one could be used for efficient, small-scale production of medical- grade water in laboratories, clinics, and hospitals. This system could be adapted to use in selective sterilization of connections in ultra-pure-water-producing equipment and other equipment into which intrusion by microorganisms cannot be tolerated. Lightweight, port - able systems based on the design of this system could be rapidly deployed to remote locations (e.g., military field hospitals) or in response to emergencies in which the normal infrastructure for providing medical-grade water is disrupted. Larger systems based on the design of this system could be useful for industrial production of medical-grade water. The basic microwave-heating principle of this system is the same as that of a microwave oven: An item to be heated, made of a lossy dielectric material (in this case, flowing water) is irradiated with microwaves in a multimode microwave cavity. The heating is rapid and efficient because it results from absorption of microwave power throughout the volume of the lossy dielectric material. In this system, a copper tube having a length of 49.5 cm and a diameter of 2.25 cm serves as both the microwave cavity and the sterilization chamber. Microwave power is fed via a coaxial cable to an antenna mounted inside the tube at mid-length (see figure). Efficient power transfer occurs due to the shift in wavelength associated with the high permittivity of water combined with the strong coupling of 2.45-GHz microwaves with rotational-vibrational transitions of the dipolar water molecule.

  16. Self-Perceived Levels of Responsibility in Seventh Grade Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martello, Chris

    This study, conducted at Churchill Junior High School in Royal Oak, Michigan, examined the effectiveness of the Student Responsibility Profile (SRP)and investigated the attitudes of eighth grade students and teachers toward the SRP. The profile allows staff members to evaluate student responsibility performance in 10 areas and allows students to…

  17. Eighth-Grade Students' Perceptions of Teacher Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sprague, Julie A.

    2013-01-01

    This quantitative study used a validated student survey instrument to collect 182 Midwestern eighth-grade students' perceptions of effective teachers. Balch's (2011) survey was used. The original intent of this survey was to have students rate the effectiveness of one teacher. In this study, students were asked to rate teacher effectiveness and…

  18. Benefits of Personality Characteristics and Self-Efficacy in the Perceived Academic Achievement of Medical Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guntern, Sabine; Korpershoek, Hanke; van der Werf, Greetje

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates the joint impact of personality characteristics and self-efficacy on the perceived academic achievement of medical students on top of their prior high school performance. The sample consisted of medical students in their pre-clinical years. The students' grade point average scores at high school were included as control…

  19. Characteristics of mentoring relationships formed by medical students and faculty

    PubMed Central

    Dimitriadis, Konstantinos; von der Borch, Philip; Störmann, Sylvère; Meinel, Felix G.; Moder, Stefan; Reincke, Martin; Fischer, Martin R.

    2012-01-01

    Background Little is known about the characteristics of mentoring relationships formed between faculty and medical students. Individual mentoring relationships of clinical medical students at Munich Medical School were characterized quantitatively and qualitatively. Methods All students signing up for the mentoring program responded to a questionnaire on their expectations (n = 534). Mentees were asked to give feedback after each of their one-on-one meetings (n = 203). A detailed analysis of the overall mentoring process and its characteristics was performed. For qualitative text analysis, free-text items were analyzed and categorized by two investigators. Quantitative analysis was performed using descriptive statistics and Wilcoxon-test to assess differences in grades between students with and without mentors. Results High-performing students were significantly more likely to participate in the mentoring program (p<0.001). Topics primarily discussed include the mentee's personal goals (65.5%), career planning (59.6%), and experiences abroad (57.6%). Mentees mostly perceived their mentors as counselors (88.9%), providers of ideas (85.0%), and role models (73.3%). Mentees emphasized the positive impact of the mentoring relationship on career planning (77.2%) and research (75.0%). Conclusions Medical students with strong academic performance as defined by their grades are more likely to participate in formal mentoring programs. Mentoring relationships between faculty and medical students are perceived as a mutually satisfying and effective instrument for key issues in medical students’ professional development. Practical implications Mentoring relationships are a highly effective means of enhancing the bidirectional flow of information between faculty and medical students. A mentoring program can thus establish a feedback loop enabling the educational institution to swiftly identify and address issues of medical students. PMID:22989620

  20. Relationship between student selection criteria and learner success for medical dosimetry students.

    PubMed

    Baker, Jamie; Tucker, Debra; Raynes, Edilberto; Aitken, Florence; Allen, Pamela

    2016-01-01

    Medical dosimetry education occupies a specialized branch of allied health higher education. Noted international shortages of health care workers, reduced university funding, limitations on faculty staffing, trends in learner attrition, and increased enrollment of nontraditional students force medical dosimetry educational leadership to reevaluate current admission practices. Program officials wish to select medical dosimetry students with the best chances of successful graduation. The purpose of the quantitative ex post facto correlation study was to investigate the relationship between applicant characteristics (cumulative undergraduate grade point average (GPA), science grade point average (SGPA), prior experience as a radiation therapist, and previous academic degrees) and the successful completion of a medical dosimetry program, as measured by graduation. A key finding from the quantitative study was the statistically significant positive correlation between a student׳s previous degree and his or her successful graduation from the medical dosimetry program. Future research investigations could include a larger research sample, representative of more medical dosimetry student populations, and additional studies concerning the relationship of previous work as a radiation therapist and the effect on success as a medical dosimetry student. Based on the quantitative correlation analysis, medical dosimetry leadership on admissions committees could revise student selection rubrics to place less emphasis on an applicant׳s undergraduate cumulative GPA and increase the weight assigned to previous degrees.

  1. A Couples Group of Medical Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Kenneth; And Others

    1976-01-01

    An experiment at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine with a short-term medical student couples' workshop designed to foster increased sensitivity between medical students and their partners resulted in recommendation that such workshops be offered to medical students. (JT)

  2. A Couples Group of Medical Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Kenneth; And Others

    1976-01-01

    An experiment at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine with a short-term medical student couples' workshop designed to foster increased sensitivity between medical students and their partners resulted in recommendation that such workshops be offered to medical students. (JT)

  3. Second-year medical students' motivational beliefs, emotions, and achievement.

    PubMed

    Artino, Anthony R; La Rochelle, Jeffery S; Durning, Steven J

    2010-12-01

    A challenge for medical educators is to better understand the personal factors that lead to individual success in medical school and beyond. Recently, educational researchers in fields outside medicine have acknowledged the importance of motivation and emotion in students' learning and performance. These affective factors have received less emphasis in the medical education literature. This longitudinal study examined the relations between medical students' motivational beliefs (task value and self-efficacy), achievement emotions (enjoyment, anxiety and boredom) and academic achievement. Second-year medical students (n=136) completed motivational beliefs and achievement emotions surveys following their first and second trimesters, respectively. Academic achievement was operationalised as students' average course examination grades and national board shelf examination scores. The results largely confirmed the hypothesised relations between beliefs, emotions and achievement. Structural equation modelling revealed that task value beliefs were positively associated with course-related enjoyment (standardised regression coefficient [β] = 0.59) and were negatively related to boredom (β= -0.25), whereas self-efficacy beliefs were negatively associated with course-related anxiety only (β = -0.47). Furthermore, student enjoyment was positively associated with national board shelf examination score (β = 0.31), whereas anxiety and boredom were both negatively related to course examination grade (β= -0.36 and -0.27, respectively). The overall structural model accounted for considerable variance in each of the achievement outcomes: R(2) = 0.20 and 0.14 for the course examination grade and national board shelf examination score, respectively. This study suggests that medical students' motivational beliefs and achievement emotions are important contributors to their academic achievement. These results have implications for medical educators striving to understand the

  4. The medical schools outcomes database project: Australian medical student characteristics.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Baldeep; Carberry, Angela; Hogan, Nathaniel; Roberton, Don; Beilby, Justin

    2014-08-29

    Global medical workforce requirements highlight the need for effective workforce planning, with the overall aims being to alleviate doctor shortages and prevent maldistribution. The Medical Schools Outcomes Database and Longitudinal Tracking (MSOD) Project provides a foundation for evaluating outcomes of medical education programs against specified workforce objectives (including rural and areas of workforce needs), assisting in medical workforce planning, and provision of a national research resource. This paper describes the methodology and baseline results for the MSOD project. The MSOD Project is a prospective longitudinal multiple-cohort study. The project invites all commencing and completing Australian medical students to complete short questionnaires. Participants are then asked to participate in four follow-up surveys at 1, 3, 5 and 8 years after graduation. Since 2005, 30,635 responses for medical students (22,126 commencing students and 8,509 completing students) in Australia have been collected. To date, overall eligible cohort response rates are 91% for commencing students, and 83% for completing students. Eighty three percent of completing medical student respondents had also completed a commencing questionnaire.Approximately 80% of medical students at Australian medical schools are Australian citizens. Australian medical schools have only small proportions of Indigenous students. One third of medical students speak a language other than English at home.The top three vocational choices for commencing medical students were surgery, paediatrics and child health and general practice. The top three vocational choices for completing students were surgery, adult medicine/ physician, and general practice. Overall, 75.7% of medical students changed their first career preference from commencement to exit from medical school.Most commencing and completing medical students wish to have their future medical practice in capital cities or in major urban centers

  5. Student Performance in Grade 3 Reading (English and Spanish), Grade 4 Reading and Writing (English and Spanish), Grade 5 Reading and Mathematics, Grade 6 Reading, Grade 7 Reading and Writing, Grade 8 Reading, Mathematics and Science, Grade 9 Reading, and Grade 10 Reading, Writing and Mathematics, School Year 2000-2001. Annual Report to the Colorado General Assembly.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado State Dept. of Education, Denver.

    This report, the fifth of a series of annual reports on the Colorado Student Assessment Program (CSAP), presents a review of students' performances in spring 2001 in Grade 3 Reading Comprehension (English and Spanish); Grade 4 Reading and Writing (English and Spanish); Grade 5 Reading and Mathematics; Grade 6 Reading; Grade 7 Reading and Writing;…

  6. Students' Psychosocial Characteristics as Predictors of Academic Performance in Medical School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hojat, Mahammadreza; And Others

    1993-01-01

    A study of 175 Jefferson Medical College (Pennsylvania) students compared psychosocial characteristics with basic science examination grades, clinical examination grades, and ratings of clinical competence as performance measures. Results indicate the noncognitive psychosocial measures are significant and unique predictors of medical school…

  7. Teaching Medical Ethics to Medical Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loewy, Erich H.

    1986-01-01

    The evolution and goals of teaching medical ethics, the nature of medical ethics, and integrating such teaching into the curriculum are examined. Because moral considerations are as much a part of medical decisions as technical considerations, teaching is best done in the context of real cases. (Author/MLW)

  8. Teaching Medical Ethics to Medical Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loewy, Erich H.

    1986-01-01

    The evolution and goals of teaching medical ethics, the nature of medical ethics, and integrating such teaching into the curriculum are examined. Because moral considerations are as much a part of medical decisions as technical considerations, teaching is best done in the context of real cases. (Author/MLW)

  9. Clinical Performance Evaluations of Third-Year Medical Students and Association With Student and Evaluator Gender.

    PubMed

    Riese, Alison; Rappaport, Leah; Alverson, Brian; Park, Sangshin; Rockney, Randal M

    2017-06-01

    Clinical performance evaluations are major components of medical school clerkship grades. But are they sufficiently objective? This study aimed to determine whether student and evaluator gender is associated with assessment of overall clinical performance. This was a retrospective analysis of 4,272 core clerkship clinical performance evaluations by 829 evaluators of 155 third-year students, within the Alpert Medical School grading database for the 2013-2014 academic year. Overall clinical performance, assessed on a three-point scale (meets expectations, above expectations, exceptional), was extracted from each evaluation, as well as evaluator gender, age, training level, department, student gender and age, and length of observation time. Hierarchical ordinal regression modeling was conducted to account for clustering of evaluations. Female students were more likely to receive a better grade than males (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 1.30, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.13-1.50), and female evaluators awarded lower grades than males (AOR 0.72, 95% CI 0.55-0.93), adjusting for department, observation time, and student and evaluator age. The interaction between student and evaluator gender was significant (P = .03), with female evaluators assigning higher grades to female students, while male evaluators' grading did not differ by student gender. Students who spent a short time with evaluators were also more likely to get a lower grade. A one-year examination of all third-year clerkship clinical performance evaluations at a single institution revealed that male and female evaluators rated male and female students differently, even when accounting for other measured variables.

  10. Relationship between student selection criteria and learner success for medical dosimetry students

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Jamie; Tucker, Debra; Raynes, Edilberto; Aitken, Florence; Allen, Pamela

    2016-04-01

    Medical dosimetry education occupies a specialized branch of allied health higher education. Noted international shortages of health care workers, reduced university funding, limitations on faculty staffing, trends in learner attrition, and increased enrollment of nontraditional students force medical dosimetry educational leadership to reevaluate current admission practices. Program officials wish to select medical dosimetry students with the best chances of successful graduation. The purpose of the quantitative ex post facto correlation study was to investigate the relationship between applicant characteristics (cumulative undergraduate grade point average (GPA), science grade point average (SGPA), prior experience as a radiation therapist, and previous academic degrees) and the successful completion of a medical dosimetry program, as measured by graduation. A key finding from the quantitative study was the statistically significant positive correlation between a student's previous degree and his or her successful graduation from the medical dosimetry program. Future research investigations could include a larger research sample, representative of more medical dosimetry student populations, and additional studies concerning the relationship of previous work as a radiation therapist and the effect on success as a medical dosimetry student. Based on the quantitative correlation analysis, medical dosimetry leadership on admissions committees could revise student selection rubrics to place less emphasis on an applicant's undergraduate cumulative GPA and increase the weight assigned to previous degrees.

  11. Student characteristics, professional preferences, and admission to medical school.

    PubMed

    Kesternich, Iris; Schumacher, Heiner; Winter, Joachim; Fischer, Martin R; Holzer, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: A potential new avenue to address the shortage of country doctors is to change the rules for admission to medical school. We therefore study the link between high-school grade point average and prospective physicians' choice to work in rural areas. To further inform the discussion about rules for admission, we also study the effects of other predictors: a measure of students' attitudes towards risk; whether they waited for their place of study (Wartesemester); whether their parents worked as medical doctors; and whether they have some practical experience in the medical sector. Methods: We conducted two internet surveys in 2012 and 2014. In the first survey, the sample comprised 701 students and in the second, 474 students. In both surveys, we asked students for their regional preferences; in the 2014 survey, we additionally asked students for their first, second, and third preferences among a comprehensive set of specializations, including becoming a general practitioner. In both surveys, we asked students for basic demographic information (age and gender), their parents' occupation, a measure of subjective income expectations, a measure of risk attitudes, and their high-school grade point average (Abiturnote), and First National Boards Examination grade (Physikum). In 2014, we additionally asked for waiting periods (Wartesemester) as well as for prior professional experience in the health-care sector. Results: We find that three factors increase the probability of having a preference for working in a rural area significantly, holding constant all other influences: having a medical doctor among the parents, having worse grades in the high-school grade point average, and being more risk averse. Moreover, we find that those willing to work in the countryside have significantly more experience in the medical sector before admission to medical school. Discussion: Our results suggest that a change in the selection process for medical school may increase the

  12. How do medical student journals fare? A global survey of journals run by medical students.

    PubMed

    Alamri, Yassar

    2016-01-01

    Medical students have made significant contributions to the medical and scientific fields in the past. Today, medical students still contribute to biomedical research; however, they often face disappointment from journals when trying to publish their findings. This led to the development of medical student journals, which take a more "student-friendly" approach. This article reviews the current medical student journals published in English and sheds light on current trends and challenges.

  13. Self-medication for Acne among Undergraduate Medical Students

    PubMed Central

    Karamata, Varshaben Vejabhai; Gandhi, A M; Patel, P P; Desai, M K

    2017-01-01

    Aims: This study aims to evaluate the knowledge and pattern of self-medication for acne among undergraduate medical students at a tertiary care teaching hospital. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in II MBBS (Group A), III MBBS Part I (Group B), and III MBBS Part II (Group C) students. Prevalidated questionnaire about knowledge, attitude, and practice of self-medication were administered to participants. Data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance and Chi-square test. Results: Out of 582 students who responded to questionnaire, 518 suffered from acne. Self-medication practice was observed in 59.2% students. Significantly higher number of female students practiced self-medication (P < 0.0001). Most common source of information was seniors/friends/family members (34.2%). The mildness of illness (42.3%) was the most common reason of self-medication. A total mean score of knowledge was significantly higher in Group C as compared to Group A (P < 0.001) and Group B (P < 0.05). Allopathic medication was preferred by 69.8% students. Seventy-five percentage students read leaflet/package insert/label instruction and expiry date of the medicines. Conclusions: The participating students lack the knowledge about self-medication for acne. Adequate knowledge and awareness about the appropriate use of medication will reduce the practice of self-medication and improve rational prescribing. PMID:28400638

  14. Attitudes Toward Medical Cannabis Legalization Among Serbian Medical Students.

    PubMed

    Vujcic, Isidora; Pavlovic, Aleksandar; Dubljanin, Eleonora; Maksimovic, Jadranka; Nikolic, Aleksandra; Sipetic-Grujicic, Sandra

    2017-07-29

    Currently, medical cannabis polices are experiencing rapid changes, and an increasing number of nations around the world legalize medical cannabis for certain groups of patients, including those in Serbia. To determine medical students' attitudes toward medical cannabis legalization and to examine the factors influencing their attitudes. Fourth-year medical students at the Faculty of Medicine, University of Belgrade, had participated in a cross-sectional study. Data were collected by an anonymous questionnaire. Overall, 63.4% students supported medical cannabis legalization, and only 20.8% supported its legalization for recreational use. Students who previously used marijuana (p <.001) and alcohol (p =.004) were significantly more in favor of medical cannabis legalization compared with students who never used them. Support for marijuana recreational use was also related to prior marijuana (p <.001) and alcohol consumption (p =.006). Only cancer (90.4%) and chronic pain (74.2%) were correctly reported approved medical indications by more than half the students. Students who supported medical cannabis legalization showed better knowledge about indications, in contrast to opponents for legalization who showed better knowledge about side effects. Beliefs that using medical cannabis is safe and has health benefits were correlated with support for legalization, and previous marijuana and alcohol use, while beliefs that medical cannabis poses health risks correlated most strongly with previous marijuana use. Conclusions/Importance: The medical students' attitudes toward medical cannabis legalization were significantly correlated with previous use of marijuana and alcohol, knowledge about medical indications and side effects, and their beliefs regarding medical cannabis health benefits and risks.

  15. Selecting the right medical student

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Medical student selection is an important but difficult task. Three recent papers by McManus et al. in BMC Medicine have re-examined the role of tests of attainment of learning (A’ levels, GCSEs, SQA) and of aptitude (AH5, UKCAT), but on a much larger scale than previously attempted. They conclude that A’ levels are still the best predictor of future success at medical school and beyond. However, A’ levels account for only 65% of the variance in performance that is found. Therefore, more work is needed to establish relevant assessment of the other 35%. Please see related research articles http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7015/11/242, http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7015/11/243 and http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7015/11/244. PMID:24229397

  16. Selecting the right medical student.

    PubMed

    Leinster, Sam

    2013-11-14

    Medical student selection is an important but difficult task. Three recent papers by McManus et al. in BMC Medicine have re-examined the role of tests of attainment of learning (A' levels, GCSEs, SQA) and of aptitude (AH5, UKCAT), but on a much larger scale than previously attempted. They conclude that A' levels are still the best predictor of future success at medical school and beyond. However, A' levels account for only 65% of the variance in performance that is found. Therefore, more work is needed to establish relevant assessment of the other 35%. Please see related research articles http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7015/11/242, http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7015/11/243 and http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7015/11/244.

  17. Assessment of Birmingham medical students.

    PubMed

    Trethowan, W H

    1970-10-10

    At Birmingham University since 1966 the major medical examinations began to be replaced by a process of continuous assessment. This is based on fairly frequent tests, usually at the end of each course, including short essay questions, multiple-choice questions, and tests of ability in wards and laboratory. At the end of the first final-year course 96 students underwent assessment. Of these 77 passed; 19 were referred for re-examination, of whom a further 12 passed subsequently. The scheme was found suitable by both teachers and external examiners.

  18. Sleep paralysis among medical students.

    PubMed

    Penn, N E; Kripke, D F; Scharff, J

    1981-03-01

    Sleep paralysis is a sensation of an inability to speak or move other muscles when falling asleep or awakening. Sleep paralysis by itself has been reported as occurring infrequently and many clinicians are uncertain of its significance. In contrast, sleep paralysis in conjunction with sleep attacks has been reported as a concomitant of narcolepsy. To further examine the incidence of sleep paralysis, the responses of 80 first-year medical students, 16.25% had experienced predormital, postdormital, or both types of sleep paralysis. These episodes occurred infrequently--only once or twice for most of these students. Reports of sleep paralysis were not associated with sleep attacks or cataplexy. These results support two previous studies which found that sleep paralysis alone occurs frequently among normals.

  19. Grade 1 to 6 Thai Students' Existing Ideas about Energy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yuenyong, Chokchai; Yuenyong, Jirakarn

    2007-01-01

    This study explored 30 Grade 1 to 6 (6-12 years old) Thai students' existing ideas about energy. The study employed the Interview about Event (IAE) approach. During IAE, the cards of an event or things were showed to students in order to probe their views of energy concepts. Findings indicated that young students held various alternative…

  20. Creating Sacred Places for Students in Grades 7&8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Sandra J.

    This guide attempts to help teachers of American Indian students in grades 7-8 provide a culturally relevant education that takes place in the regular classroom, includes content related to Indian students' lives, makes students proud, expands to other experiences, and enhances learning. Creating sacred places means responding appropriately to…

  1. What Makes the Grade? Faculty and Student Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Jeffrey B.

    2005-01-01

    This study extended the work of White and Dunlap (1999) by quantifying faculty views regarding the relative effects performance and effort should have on final grades and by comparing faculty views with student views to assess their similarity. Survey results of 159 students and 59 faculty indicated that students believed effort should influence…

  2. Seventh Grade Students' Mental Models of the Greenhouse Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shepardson, Daniel P.; Choi, Soyoung; Niyogi, Dev; Charusombat, Umarporn

    2011-01-01

    This constructivist study investigates 225 student drawings and explanations from three different schools in the midwest in the US, to identify seventh grade students' mental models of the greenhouse effect. Five distinct mental models were derived from an inductive analysis of the content of the students' drawings and explanations: Model 1, a…

  3. Investigation into How 8th Grade Students Define Fractals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karakus, Fatih

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of 8th grade students' concept definitions and concept images can provide information about their mental schema of fractals. There is limited research on students' understanding and definitions of fractals. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the elementary students' definitions of fractals based on concept image and concept…

  4. Predicting Eighth-Grade Algebra Students with Individualized Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faulkner, Valerie N.; Crossland, Cathy L.; Stiff, Lee V.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the extent to which student performance and teacher perception of student performance affect placement in eighth-grade mathematics classes for students with disabilities. Authors used the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study--Kindergarten dataset to investigate how each of the following factors predicted placement in…

  5. Minicourses for Deaf Students in the Intermediate Grades

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Peter E.; Shepard, Charlotte H.

    1977-01-01

    A minicourse program with students from grades four through eight at the Oregon State School for the Deaf has been rewarding for teachers and students by serving to develop skills in immediate practical areas of the student's experience as well as in developing recreational skills and interests in such activities as chess, mime, and karate, and…

  6. Environmental Problem Perception of 6th Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Genc, Murat; Genc, Tulin; Ergenc, Mustafa; Erkuz, Neslihan

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to examine and compare the 6th grade students' perception of environmental issues through different techniques. For this purpose, we have tried to establish the students' perception of environmental issues by studying the pictures they drew and the written texts they wrote. In this study, where we have conducted with 62 students in…

  7. Improving Grade One Students' Reading Motivation with Online Electronic Storybooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ciampa, Katia

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative study stemmed from a concern of the perceived decline in students' reading motivation after the early years of schooling. The current research explored eight grade 1 students' experiences with online electronic storybooks (eBooks). Eight students were given ten 25-minute sessions with the software programs over 15 weeks.…

  8. Exploring Student Understanding of Grades and Report Cards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gwidt, Kathleen M.

    2010-01-01

    This qualitative study was designed to identify how students from a single high school in the rural Midwest perceive grades and report cards. Stratified purposeful random sampling resulted in the inclusion of 14 students who provided journal entries and participated in one-on-one interviews for the purpose of exploring student understanding of…

  9. Minicourses for Deaf Students in the Intermediate Grades

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Peter E.; Shepard, Charlotte H.

    1977-01-01

    A minicourse program with students from grades four through eight at the Oregon State School for the Deaf has been rewarding for teachers and students by serving to develop skills in immediate practical areas of the student's experience as well as in developing recreational skills and interests in such activities as chess, mime, and karate, and…

  10. Creating Sacred Places for Students in Grades 9-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Sandra J.

    This guide attempts to help teachers of American Indian students in grades 9-12 provide a culturally relevant education that takes place in the regular classroom, includes content related to Indian students' lives, makes students proud, expands to other experiences, and enhances learning. Creating sacred places means responding appropriately to…

  11. Seventh Grade Students' Mental Models of the Greenhouse Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shepardson, Daniel P.; Choi, Soyoung; Niyogi, Dev; Charusombat, Umarporn

    2011-01-01

    This constructivist study investigates 225 student drawings and explanations from three different schools in the midwest in the US, to identify seventh grade students' mental models of the greenhouse effect. Five distinct mental models were derived from an inductive analysis of the content of the students' drawings and explanations: Model 1, a…

  12. Improving Grade One Students' Reading Motivation with Online Electronic Storybooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ciampa, Katia

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative study stemmed from a concern of the perceived decline in students' reading motivation after the early years of schooling. The current research explored eight grade 1 students' experiences with online electronic storybooks (eBooks). Eight students were given ten 25-minute sessions with the software programs over 15 weeks.…

  13. Grades That Show What Students Know

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marzano, Robert J.; Heflebower, Tammy

    2011-01-01

    In an effort to cure the ills of current grading and reporting systems, many schools and districts across the United States have attempted to implement a standards-based system. The authors recommend four best practices in this area: (1) Get rid of the omnibus grade, which tells teachers little about the content measured or the difficulty level of…

  14. Medical students' agenda-setting abilities during medical interviews.

    PubMed

    Roh, HyeRin; Park, Kyung Hye; Jeon, Young-Jee; Park, Seung Guk; Lee, Jungsun

    2015-06-01

    Identifying patients' agendas is important; however, the extent of Korean medical students' agenda-setting abilities is unknown. The study aim was to investigate the patterns of Korean medical students' agenda solicitation. A total of 94 third-year medical students participated. One scenario involving a female patient with abdominal pain was created. Students were video-recorded as they interviewed the patient. To analyze whether students identify patients' reasons for visiting, a checklist was developed based on a modified version of the Calgary-Cambridge Guide to the Medical Interview: Communication Process checklist. The duration of the patient's initial statement of concerns was measured in seconds. The total number of patient concerns expressed before interruption and the types of interruption effected by the medical students were determined. The medical students did not explore the patients' concerns and did not negotiate an agenda. Interruption of the patient's opening statement occurred in 4.62±2.20 seconds. The most common type of initial interruption was a recompleter (79.8%). Closed-ended questions were the most common question type in the second and third interruptions. Agenda setting should be emphasized in the communication skills curriculum of medical students. The Korean Clinical Skills Exam must assess medical students' ability to set an agenda.

  15. Medical Student Perspectives of Active Learning: A Focus Group Study.

    PubMed

    Walling, Anne; Istas, Kathryn; Bonaminio, Giulia A; Paolo, Anthony M; Fontes, Joseph D; Davis, Nancy; Berardo, Benito A

    2017-01-01

    Phenomenon: Medical student perspectives were sought about active learning, including concerns, challenges, perceived advantages and disadvantages, and appropriate role in the educational process. Focus groups were conducted with students from all years and campuses of a large U.S. state medical school. Students had considerable experience with active learning prior to medical school and conveyed accurate understanding of the concept and its major strategies. They appreciated the potential of active learning to deepen and broaden learning and its value for long-term professional development but had significant concerns about the efficiency of the process, the clarity of expectations provided, and the importance of receiving preparatory materials. Most significantly, active learning experiences were perceived as disconnected from grading and even as impeding preparation for school and national examinations. Insights: Medical students understand the concepts of active learning and have considerable experience in several formats prior to medical school. They are generally supportive of active learning concepts but frustrated by perceived inefficiencies and lack of contribution to the urgencies of achieving optimal grades and passing United States Medical Licensing Examinations, especially Step 1.

  16. Stress and Depression among Veterinary Medical Students.

    PubMed

    Killinger, Stacy L; Flanagan, Sean; Castine, Eleanor; Howard, Kimberly A S

    While existing literature suggests that professional students (e.g., medical, dental, law, nursing, etc.) experience high levels of stress and depression, the experiences of veterinary medical students have been less well examined. The purpose of this study was to explore the levels of stress and depression among veterinary medical students and to examine the relationship between these variables. Study participants were 1,245 veterinary medical students from North America. The findings provide support for the assertion that veterinary medical students experience high levels of stress and depression. Results also indicated that there is a correlation between stress and depression for veterinary medical students and that female students experience higher levels of stress and depression than their male counterparts.

  17. Comparison between teacher grading and student self-grading in different modules of agronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Méndez, A.; Paz-Ferreiro, J.; Guerrero, F.; Gascó, J. M.; Saá, A.; Tarquis, A. M.; Gascó, G.

    2012-04-01

    The adaptation of the Universities to European Higher Education Area (EHEA) involves changes in the learning system. Students must obtain specific capabilities in the different degrees or masters. For example, in the degree of Agronomy at the Universidad Politécnica de Madrid (Spain), they must command mathematics, English informatics or crop production. Moreover, students must attain personal skills such as leadership, team work, a critical spirit and a social, environmental and ethical commitment with the environment and the society. A way to evaluate the critical spirit of the students is to compare the grade obtained in a specific module with the grade that the students think he should get. The aim of this work is to evaluate the differences between teacher and student grading in different subjects related to soil science in different degrees and masters courses at the Universidad Politécnica de Madrid.

  18. Promoting medical student research productivity: the student perspective.

    PubMed

    Young, Benjamin K; Cai, Fei; Tandon, Vickram J; George, Paul; Greenberg, Paul B

    2014-06-02

    One-third of medical students complete medical school without significant exposure to research. This gap in their medical education is significant: research not only exposes medical students to scientific methodology and academic writing, but also encourages them to multi-task, communicate, and critically analyze the scientific literature - valuable skills that will serve them well in their future medical careers. We report herein the proceedings from a student-led symposium that aimed to promote student involvement in research at the Alpert Medical School of Brown University by providing practical information on how to successfully complete a research project.

  19. Medical Students' Affirmation of Ethics Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehrmann, Jon A.; Hoop, Jinger; Hammond, Katherine Green; Roberts, Laura Weiss

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Despite the acknowledged importance of ethics education in medical school, little empirical work has been done to assess the needs and preferences of medical students regarding ethics curricula. Methods: Eighty-three medical students at the University of New Mexico participated in a self-administered written survey including 41 scaled…

  20. Psychological Characteristics of Medical Students and Residents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burstein, Alvin G.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    A total of 116 medical students entering the University of Texas Medical School at San Antonio in 1975 were given the Jackson Personality Research Form (PRF) during their medical school orientation period. Mean scores are shown and differences between student group and resident group are noted. (LBH)

  1. Medical Students' Affirmation of Ethics Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehrmann, Jon A.; Hoop, Jinger; Hammond, Katherine Green; Roberts, Laura Weiss

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Despite the acknowledged importance of ethics education in medical school, little empirical work has been done to assess the needs and preferences of medical students regarding ethics curricula. Methods: Eighty-three medical students at the University of New Mexico participated in a self-administered written survey including 41 scaled…

  2. Grade Inflation and the Myth of Student Consumerism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boretz, Elizabeth

    2004-01-01

    The widespread acceptance of the phrase "grade inflation" poses a potentially damaging overstatement in reference to higher education. Grades are at an all-time high, but a review of the literature demonstrates that the improvement is not incongruous with a rise in faculty development programs and increased varieties of student support services.…

  3. Grades, Coursework, and Student Characteristics in High School Economics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rebeck, Ken; Walstad, William B.

    2015-01-01

    The authors use U.S. public and private high school transcripts to analyze grade distribution patterns in economics courses across student and school characteristics, and compare these grades to those earned in other selected high school courses. Results are reported for the 53 percent of 2009 high school graduates who took a basic economics…

  4. Student Test Grades in College: A Study of Possible Predictors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammonds, Frank; Mariano, Gina

    2015-01-01

    Research on variables related to test performance has produced mixed results. Typically, research of this type involves only a few variables. In an attempt to obtain a more complete picture, we investigated how test grades might be related to variables such as classification, student seating location, test completion time, predicted grade, time…

  5. Improving Student Writing Skills in the Primary Grades.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia, Lori; Meyer, Jodi; Walsh, Leah

    This report describes a program for improving writing in the primary grades through the use of guided mini-lessons, conferencing, and portfolios. The target population consists of first and second grade students in a growing, low to middle class community. The problems of poor writing skills were documented through teacher observations and student…

  6. Grades, Coursework, and Student Characteristics in High School Economics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rebeck, Ken; Walstad, William B.

    2015-01-01

    The authors use U.S. public and private high school transcripts to analyze grade distribution patterns in economics courses across student and school characteristics, and compare these grades to those earned in other selected high school courses. Results are reported for the 53 percent of 2009 high school graduates who took a basic economics…

  7. Blogging Medical Students: A Qualitative Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pinilla, Severin; Weckbach, Ludwig T.; Alig, Stefan K.; Bauer, Helen; Noerenberg, Daniel; Singer, Katharina; Tiedt, Steffen

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Blogging is an increasingly popular method of sharing and reflecting on experiences of medical students in the World Wide Web with a potentially global learning community. The authors are not aware of studies that specifically examined blogs by medical students and thus for the first time investigated the type of experiences and impressions that emerged from these blogs with relevance for medical students and medical educators. Method: This was a qualitative study. Initially 75 blogs were identified. 33 blogs with a total of 1228 English and 337 German blog entries met the inclusion criteria and were analyzed. We started with line-by-line coding and switched to focused coding using constant comparative analysis to create a categorical framework for blogs. Results: Medical students use blogs to write and reflect about a large variety of issues related to medical school. Major emerging themes included the preparation for written and oral high-stakes exams, experiences during clinical rotations, dealing with distressing situations during medical school, and social life of students beyond medical school. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that blogs are a potentially useful tool for medical students to reflect on their experiences during medical school as well as for medical educators to better understand how students perceive their time in medical school. The educational benefit of blogging might even be increased if trained medical educators would help to facilitate meaningful and targeted discussions emerging from blog entries and comment on students’ learning challenges with the chance to reach a large community of learners. PMID:23467720

  8. Effect of Medical Education on Empathy in Osteopathic Medical Students.

    PubMed

    McTighe, Adam J; DiTomasso, Robert A; Felgoise, Stephanie; Hojat, Mohammadreza

    2016-10-01

    Empathy is an integral component of the patient-physician relationship and involves a cognitive ability to connect with others in a meaningful fashion. Multiple longitudinal studies have shown that self-reported allopathic medical student empathy declines significantly during year 3. However, to date, only 4 cross-sectional studies have been published on osteopathic medical students' empathy. Whereas studies of allopathic medical students reported a decline in empathy, similar results were not found in osteopathic studies. To investigate (1) self-reported empathy through years 1 to 3 of osteopathic medical students and (2) whether empathy declines during year 3. Design included cross-sectional and test-retest data collection. Private osteopathic medical school in the Northeast region of the United States. Osteopathic medical students. The Jefferson Scale of Empathy medical student version. Respondents (N=717) included 383 women (53%) and 334 men (47%). When empathy levels were examined by demographics, the only significant finding was that women reported significantly higher empathy levels than men (112.3 vs 109.3; P<.001). Cross-sectional results indicate that mean empathy levels were significantly lower for third-year students at the end of the year (108.7) compared with first- and second-year students at the beginning of the year (111.3 and 112.4, respectively; P<.05). Test-retest analyses of year 3 indicated significantly lower empathy levels from the beginning to the end of the academic year (111.2 and 108.7, respectively; P<.05). Osteopathic medical students' empathy declined significantly during year 3, which is consistent with the findings from allopathic samples but differs from findings from osteopathic samples. More research is needed to build the data on osteopathic medical student samples and to achieve a better understanding of changes in empathy in osteopathic and allopathic medical students.

  9. A Dissecting Competition for Medical Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samalia, Latika; Stringer, Mark D.

    2012-01-01

    After repeated requests from medical students for more cadaver dissection opportunities, a voluntary dissecting "competition" was initiated for the third year medical students in 2006. This has been held annually on five occasions since, offering up to 30 dissection stations and accommodating an average of 53 students (range 40-66) per year,…

  10. A Dissecting Competition for Medical Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samalia, Latika; Stringer, Mark D.

    2012-01-01

    After repeated requests from medical students for more cadaver dissection opportunities, a voluntary dissecting "competition" was initiated for the third year medical students in 2006. This has been held annually on five occasions since, offering up to 30 dissection stations and accommodating an average of 53 students (range 40-66) per year,…

  11. Medical student fitness to practise committees at UK medical schools

    PubMed Central

    Aldridge, Jocelyne; Bray, Sally A; David, Timothy J

    2009-01-01

    Background The aim was to explore the structures for managing student fitness to practise hearings in medical schools in the UK. We surveyed by email the named fitness to practise leads of all full members of the UK Medical Schools Council with a medical undergraduate programme. We asked whether student fitness to practise cases were considered by a committee/panel dedicated to medicine, or by one which also considered other undergraduate health and social care students. Findings All 31 medical schools responded. 19 medical schools had a fitness to practise committee dealing with medical students only. Three had a committee that dealt with students of medicine and dentistry. One had a committee that dealt with students of medicine and veterinary medicine. Eight had a committee that dealt with students of medicine and two or more other programmes, such as dentistry, nursing, midwifery, physiotherapy, dietetics, social work, pharmacy, psychology, audiology, speech therapy, operating department practice, veterinary medicine and education. Conclusion All 31 UK medical schools with undergraduate programmes have a fitness to practise committee to deal with students whose behaviour has given rise to concern about their fitness to practise. The variation in governance structures for student fitness to practise committees/panels can in part be explained by variations in University structures and the extent to which Universities co-manage undergraduate medicine with other courses. PMID:19500404

  12. [What happens when medical students set their own exam papers?].

    PubMed

    Baerheim, A; Meland, E

    2001-10-20

    In the section for general practice at the University of Bergen, Norway, we want to emphasise learning more than control in our work with students. As a step in this direction we invited students to come up with proposals for exam papers, papers that usually include six to nine multiple steps for clinical reasoning. We guaranteed that one out of three proposals would be included as a paper in the written examination, possibly slightly modified. This article is an evaluation of the consequences of letting medical students set some of their own exam papers. The process was evaluated using 1) grades given, 2) students' assessment of whether this mode of setting papers influenced their exam preparations, and 3) students' free-text comments on the process. 57 out of 64 students (89%) took part in the evaluation. All knew that their fellow students had set one of the exam papers, but only 34 (60%) reported that this knowledge had changed the way they prepared for the exam. The mean grade was 9.9 (range 5-12, on a scale from 1 to 12, 6 being the lowest pass grade) for the paper set by students, and 9.5 (range 5-11) for all papers combined. Mean difference in score was 0.32 (95% confidence interval 0.08-0.64). Students' free-text comments showed that they specifically prepared for the three known paper topics. They drew comfort from knowing at least one of the papers set, and the student-set papers were found relevant for general practice. Letting medical students set one of the exam papers makes them feel more confident. Student-set papers were seen as relevant for clinical practice. The control function of the exam seemed to have been preserved.

  13. Student characteristics, professional preferences, and admission to medical school

    PubMed Central

    Kesternich, Iris; Schumacher, Heiner; Winter, Joachim; Fischer, Martin R.; Holzer, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: A potential new avenue to address the shortage of country doctors is to change the rules for admission to medical school. We therefore study the link between high-school grade point average and prospective physicians’ choice to work in rural areas. To further inform the discussion about rules for admission, we also study the effects of other predictors: a measure of students’ attitudes towards risk; whether they waited for their place of study (Wartesemester); whether their parents worked as medical doctors; and whether they have some practical experience in the medical sector. Methods: We conducted two internet surveys in 2012 and 2014. In the first survey, the sample comprised 701 students and in the second, 474 students. In both surveys, we asked students for their regional preferences; in the 2014 survey, we additionally asked students for their first, second, and third preferences among a comprehensive set of specializations, including becoming a general practitioner. In both surveys, we asked students for basic demographic information (age and gender), their parents’ occupation, a measure of subjective income expectations, a measure of risk attitudes, and their high-school grade point average (Abiturnote), and First National Boards Examination grade (Physikum). In 2014, we additionally asked for waiting periods (Wartesemester) as well as for prior professional experience in the health-care sector. Results: We find that three factors increase the probability of having a preference for working in a rural area significantly, holding constant all other influences: having a medical doctor among the parents, having worse grades in the high-school grade point average, and being more risk averse. Moreover, we find that those willing to work in the countryside have significantly more experience in the medical sector before admission to medical school. Discussion: Our results suggest that a change in the selection process for medical school may

  14. The teaching of medical ethics to medical students.

    PubMed

    Glick, S M

    1994-12-01

    Teaching medical ethics to medical students in a pluralistic society is a challenging task. Teachers of ethics have obligations not just to teach the subject matter but to help create an academic environment in which well motivated students have reinforcement of their inherent good qualities. Emphasis should be placed on the ethical aspects of daily medical practice and not just on the dramatic dilemmas raised by modern technology. Interdisciplinary teaching should be encouraged and teaching should span the entire duration of medical studies. Attention should be paid particularly to ethical problems faced by the students themselves, preferably at the time when the problems are most on the students' minds. A high level of academic demands, including critical examination of students' progress is recommended. Finally, personal humility on the part of teachers can help set a good example for students to follow.

  15. The teaching of medical ethics to medical students.

    PubMed Central

    Glick, S M

    1994-01-01

    Teaching medical ethics to medical students in a pluralistic society is a challenging task. Teachers of ethics have obligations not just to teach the subject matter but to help create an academic environment in which well motivated students have reinforcement of their inherent good qualities. Emphasis should be placed on the ethical aspects of daily medical practice and not just on the dramatic dilemmas raised by modern technology. Interdisciplinary teaching should be encouraged and teaching should span the entire duration of medical studies. Attention should be paid particularly to ethical problems faced by the students themselves, preferably at the time when the problems are most on the students' minds. A high level of academic demands, including critical examination of students' progress is recommended. Finally, personal humility on the part of teachers can help set a good example for students to follow. PMID:7861430

  16. Life experience of sixth-grade students in analog domains of sixth-grade science textbooks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagamon, Barbara J.

    This study was conducted to determine if analog domains in sixth grade science textbooks were common to the life experience of sixth grade students and if experience differed according to moderating variables. The researcher reviewed three sixth grade general science textbooks and selected analogies that were unsupported by extended text, photos, or diagrams. Analogies were limited to ones which were unsupported because the intent was to identify students who were ready by virtue of life experience to confront analogies unaided by contextual clues. The researcher designed the Life Experiences in Analog Domains (LEAD) Questionnaire to survey students in 50 analog domains. Subjects of the study were 331 sixth grade students from an urban school district. Thirty were tested with the instrument one year later. Data on age, gender, ethnicity and income were analyzed for variance. Standardized achievement test scores were correlated to the LEAD Questionnaire. Results revealed sharp contrasts of experience by analog domain. Experience in analog domains was indicated 52% of the time overall. There were significant differences in the experience of students grouped by moderating variables. Younger students reported more experience than older students. The higher income group reported more experience than the lower income group. Caucasian students reported more experience overall than African American students. Chi-square tests revealed that differences in scores by ethnicity were not controlled by income. of three skills, reading comprehension, mathematics, and science, reading comprehension was most closely correlated to questionnaire score. Results suggest that many of the sixth grade students in the study may be without experience in analog domains when they encounter analogies in a textbook. Assuming subsequent implementations of the Questionnaire confirm these results, teachers should survey life experience of students and help them develop experiences that complement

  17. The Effects of Grading and Teaching Practices on Students' Perceptions of Grading Fairness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Michael E.; Fay, Charles H.

    2010-01-01

    To examine the antecedents of perceptions of grading fairness, approximately 600 college students were surveyed about the prevalence and desirability of 1) teaching practices that assisted students to prepare for examinations, and 2) common test scoring manipulations used to transform poor scores into acceptable ones (e.g., curving low scores…

  18. The Effects of Grading and Teaching Practices on Students' Perceptions of Grading Fairness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Michael E.; Fay, Charles H.

    2010-01-01

    To examine the antecedents of perceptions of grading fairness, approximately 600 college students were surveyed about the prevalence and desirability of 1) teaching practices that assisted students to prepare for examinations, and 2) common test scoring manipulations used to transform poor scores into acceptable ones (e.g., curving low scores…

  19. Conceptual Representations of Flu and Microbial Illness Held by Students, Teachers, and Medical Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, M. Gail; Rua, Melissa J.

    2008-01-01

    This study describes 5th, 8th, and 11th-grade students', teachers', and medical professionals' conceptions of flu and microbial illness. Participants constructed a concept map on "flu" and participated in a semi-structured interview. The results showed that these groups of students, teachers and medical professionals held and structured their…

  20. Conceptual Representations of Flu and Microbial Illness Held by Students, Teachers, and Medical Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, M. Gail; Rua, Melissa J.

    2008-01-01

    This study describes 5th, 8th, and 11th-grade students', teachers', and medical professionals' conceptions of flu and microbial illness. Participants constructed a concept map on "flu" and participated in a semi-structured interview. The results showed that these groups of students, teachers and medical professionals held and structured their…

  1. Identifying Students Who Will Be in Academic Difficulty in Medical School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, John C.; Blain, Beryl B.

    1977-01-01

    To identify accurately students who might get into academic trouble, the authors began in 1971 to administer a battery of tests to incoming medical students each year. The tests were selected to measure traits and skills not necessarily related to grade point average yet logically important to success in medical school. (LBH)

  2. Indigenous Australian medical students' perceptions of their medical school training.

    PubMed

    Garvey, Gail; Rolfe, Isobel E; Pearson, Sallie-Anne; Treloar, Carla

    2009-11-01

    The Australian Medical Council requires all accredited Australian medical schools to have specific admission and recruitment policies for Indigenous Australian students. However, there is no clear evidence about how these students can be retained through to graduation. This study aimed to explore the training experiences of Indigenous undergraduate medical students and their perceptions of the factors influencing their progression through training. Methods We used a qualitative methodology involving focus groups. All participants had successfully completed at least 1 year of the Bachelor of Medicine programme at the University of Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia. Sixteen of 18 eligible students participated in the study. The factors that influence an Indigenous student's progress through medical training are multi-faceted and inter-related and are associated with student support, course content and styles of learning, personal qualities (such as confidence and coping skills), discrimination and distinctive cultural issues pertinent to Indigenous students. Both academic and non-academic factors affect the progression through training of Indigenous medical students. A number of individual and systemic interventions which actively encourage a range of support networks, increase confidence and coping skills, and reduce cultural clash by assertively addressing discrimination and stereotyping need to be introduced. The outcomes of this work may provide some guidance to medical schools engaged in implementing strategies to enroll and support Indigenous students.

  3. Grading leniency is a removable contaminant of student ratings.

    PubMed

    Greenwald, A G; Gillmore, G M

    1997-11-01

    It is well established that students' evaluative ratings of instruction correlate positively with expected course grades. The authors identify 4 additional data patterns that, collectively, discriminate among 5 theories of the grades--ratings correlation. The presence of all 4 of these markers in student ratings data (obtained at University of Washington) was most consistent with the theory that the grades--ratings correlation is due to an unwanted influence of instructors' grading leniency on ratings. This conclusion justifies use of a statistical correction--illustrated here with actual ratings data--to remove the unwanted inflation of ratings produced by lenient grading. Additional research can profitably seek other inappropriate influences on ratings to identify more opportunities for validity-enhancing adjustments.

  4. Longitudinal trajectories of non-medical use of prescription medication among middle and high school students

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, Carol J.; Cranford, James A.; McCabe, Sean Esteban

    2016-01-01

    The non-medical use of prescription medications has been identified as a major public health problem among youth, although few longitudinal studies have examined non-medical use of prescription medications in the context of other drug use. Previous cross-sectional studies have shown gender and race differences in non-medical use of prescription medications. It was hypothesized that (1) non-medical use of prescription medications increases with age, and (2) these increases will be stronger in magnitude among female and Caucasian adolescents. Changes in non-medical use of prescription medications across 4 years were examined and compared with changes in other drug use (e.g., alcohol and marijuana). Middle and high school students enrolled in 5 schools in southeastern Michigan completed web-based surveys at 4 annual time points. The cumulative sample size was 5,217. The sample ranged from 12 to 18 years, 61% were Caucasian, 34% were African American, and 50% were female. Using a series of repeated measures latent class analyses, the trajectories of non-medical use of prescription medications were examined, demonstrating a 2-class solution: (1) the no/low non-medical use of prescription medications group had low probabilities of any non-medical use of prescription medications across all grades, and (2) the any non-medical use of prescription medications group showed a roughly linear increase in the probability of non-medical use of prescription medications over time. The probability of any non-medical use of prescription medications increased during the transition from middle school to high school. Results from this longitudinal study yielded several noteworthy findings: Participants who were classified in the any/high non-medical use of prescription medications group showed a discontinuous pattern of non-medical use of prescription medications over time, indicating that non-medical use of prescription medications is a relatively sporadic behavior that does not persist

  5. Depressive symptoms in medical students: prevalence and related factors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bomi; Roh, Hyerin

    2014-03-01

    This study was designed to estimate the prevalence of depression and the factors that influence it in Korean medical students. We evaluated depression in 122 first- and second-year medical students in December 2011 using the Korean Beck Depression Inventory (K-BDI). Sixteen potential factors were considered: gender, class year, grade point average, breakfast habits, residence type, leisure activity, sleep satisfaction, relationship status, a close friend or a significant other, finances, present health status, history of mood disorders, family history of mood disorders, religion, and self-esteem. The average BDI score was 8.9. There were 80 (65.6%), 16 (13.1%), 15 (12.3%), and 11 (9.0%) students with minimal, mild, moderate, and severe depression, respectively. The group with depressive symptoms comprised males with a total BDI score > or =24 and females with total BDI > or =25 and constituted 9.0% of students. Students in the depressive symptom group had lower self-esteem and lower grade point averages and were more frequently ill, less likely to be in a relationship, and more likely to have a history of mood disorders (p<0.05 for all). In particular, low self-esteem score was an independent factor. The BDI scores in our study were similar to those that have been reported in other countries but slightly higher than in other Korean medical and university students. Self-esteem, grade point average, health status, history of mood disorders, family history of mood disorders, and presence of a significant other correlated significantly with depression in medical students.

  6. (How) do medical students regulate their emotions?

    PubMed

    Doulougeri, Karolina; Panagopoulou, Efharis; Montgomery, Anthony

    2016-12-12

    Medical training can be a challenging and emotionally intense period for medical students. However the emotions experienced by medical students in the face of challenging situations and the emotion regulation strategies they use remains relatively unexplored. The aim of the present study was to explore the emotions elicited by memorable incidents reported by medical students and the associated emotion regulation strategies. Peer interviewing was used to collect medical students' memorable incidents. Medical students at both preclinical and clinical stage of medical school were eligible to participate. In total 104 medical students provided memorable incidents. Only 54 narratives included references to emotions and emotion regulation and thus were further analyzed. The narratives of 47 clinical and 7 preclinical students were further analyzed for their references to emotions and emotion regulation strategies. Forty seven out of 54 incidents described a negative incident associated with negative emotions. The most frequently mentioned emotion was shock and surprise followed by feelings of embarrassment, sadness, anger and tension or anxiety. The most frequent reaction was inaction often associated with emotion regulation strategies such as distraction, focusing on a task, suppression of emotions and reappraisal. When students witnessed mistreatment or disrespect exhibited towards patients, the regulation strategy used involved focusing and comforting the patient. The present study sheds light on the strategies medical students use to deal with intense negative emotions. The vast majority reported inaction in the face of a challenging situation and the use of more subtle strategies to deal with the emotional impact of the incident.

  7. Medical school entrance and career plans of Malaysian medical students.

    PubMed

    Razali, S M

    1996-11-01

    This study investigates the reasons for entry to medicine and the career perspectives of phase III medical students of the Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM). The majority of the students were Malays from low socio-economic backgrounds who entered medical school after completing a 2-year matriculation course. An interest in medicine and helping people were the two main stated reasons for entry to medical school. A group of students wishing to work in private practice was identified. In comparison to the rest of the study body, students in the group were: not well prepared to enter medical school; dissatisfied with the course; and subject to family influences. A desire for monetary gain motivated their choice of medicine as a career. Overall, 13% of the students wished to change career because they were dissatisfied with their experience of medicine as undergraduates. The study did not find a significant difference in career intentions between female and male medical students. However, women were less likely to seek entrance into private practice or pursue formal postgraduate education. The choice of surgery as a career was confined to men. About 90% of the students had already decided on their future specialty. Four well-established specialties were their most popular choices. The gender of the students had no significant influences of the decision to continue into postgraduate education. The proportion of female students who wished to marry doctors was significantly higher than for male students.

  8. Sleep disorder among medical students: relationship to their academic performance.

    PubMed

    Abdulghani, Hamza M; Alrowais, Norah A; Bin-Saad, Norah S; Al-Subaie, Nourah M; Haji, Alhan M A; Alhaqwi, Ali I

    2012-01-01

    Medical students are exposed to a significant level of pressure due to academic demands. Their sleep pattern is characterized by insufficient sleep duration, delayed sleep onset, and occurrence of napping episodes during the day. To examine the prevalence of sleep disorder among medical students and investigate any relationship between sleep disorder and academic performance. This is a cross-sectional self-administered questionnaire-based study. The participants were medical students of the first, second, and third academic years. The Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) was also included to identify sleep disorder and grade point average was recorded for academic performance. There were 491 responses with a response rate of 55%. The ESS score demonstrated that 36.6% of participants were considered to have abnormal sleep habits, with a statistically significant increase in female students (p = 0.000). Sleeping between 6-10 h per day was associated with normal ESS scores (p = 0.019) as well as the academic grades ≥ 3.75. Abnormal ESS scores were associated with lower academic achievement (p = 0.002). A high prevalence of sleep disorder was found in this group of students, specifically female students. Analysis of the relationship between sleep disorder and academic performance indicates a significant relationship between abnormal ESS scores, total sleeping hours, and academic performance.

  9. Japanese medical students' interest in basic sciences: a questionnaire survey of a medical school in Japan.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Yuka; Uka, Takanori; Shimizu, Haruhiko; Miyahira, Akira; Sakai, Tatsuo; Marui, Eiji

    2013-02-01

    The number of physicians engaged in basic sciences and teaching is sharply decreasing in Japan. To alleviate this shortage, central government has increased the quota of medical students entering the field. This study investigated medical students' interest in basic sciences in efforts to recruit talent. A questionnaire distributed to 501 medical students in years 2 to 6 of Juntendo University School of Medicine inquired about sex, grade, interest in basic sciences, interest in research, career path as a basic science physician, faculties' efforts to encourage students to conduct research, increases in the number of lectures, and practical training sessions on research. Associations between interest in basic sciences and other variables were examined using χ(2) tests. From among the 269 medical students (171 female) who returned the questionnaire (response rate 53.7%), 24.5% of respondents were interested in basic sciences and half of them considered basic sciences as their future career. Obstacles to this career were their original aim to become a clinician and concerns about salary. Medical students who were likely to be interested in basic sciences were fifth- and sixth-year students, were interested in research, considered basic sciences as their future career, considered faculties were making efforts to encourage medical students to conduct research, and wanted more research-related lectures. Improving physicians' salaries in basic sciences is important for securing talent. Moreover, offering continuous opportunities for medical students to experience research and encouraging advanced-year students during and after bedside learning to engage in basic sciences are important for recruiting talent.

  10. Medical school ranking and medical student vocational identity.

    PubMed

    Ravella, Krishna C; Curlin, Farr A; Yoon, John D

    2015-01-01

    PHENOMENON: Vocational identity may play an important role in physicians' healthy professional development. Allopathic medical students' vocational identity may bear a relationship to the level of emphasis placed on research versus service at their medical school. Social mission score (SMS) and the US News and World Report (USNWR) research ranking (year 2011) were used as schools' national rankings for service and research, respectively. A questionnaire was sent to 960 3rd-year medical students from 24 allopathic medical schools between January and April 2011. The scale for vocational identity was created using the responses from the Vocational Identity Scale (9 items), and we used an established cutoff from a previous study to categorize those students who had "strong" vocational identity. After categorizing allopathic medical schools into four groups based on SMS rankings, we found that medical students who attended allopathic medical schools from the two highest SMS ranking groups were more likely to report scores reflecting strong vocational identities-odds ratio [OR] = 2.9, 95% confidence interval (CI) [1.8, 4.7] and OR = 2.5, 95% CI [1.6, 4.0], respectively. In contrast, we did not find any associations between students from allopathic medical schools with high USNWR rankings and likelihood of reporting scores reflecting strong vocational identities. Insights: Social mission scores for allopathic medical schools may potentially serve as predictors of professional and vocational identity development. Further research is needed to better understand these findings, as this is one of the first studies both to examine allopathic medical students' sense of vocational identity and to explore the use of SMS rankings as predictors of medical students' professional development.

  11. Grade One Peer and Teacher Feedback on Student Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Shelley Stagg; Portier, Christine

    2014-01-01

    This article examines a grade one teacher's support for her students' writing development through formal peer and teacher feedback. The teacher modelled and provided examples of effective feedback and good writing in whole-class and small-group lessons and in her own one-on-one verbal feedback on student writing. She allocated time for the…

  12. Using Separate Answer Sheets with Grade 3 Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Thomas; O'Malley, Kimberly; Ragland, Shelley; Young, Michael; Kirkpatrick, Rob

    2014-01-01

    The authors compared the performance of third-grade students testing on answer sheets with those testing on machine-scored test booklets. The 1,832 students in the nationally representative sample were assigned at the campus level to complete the Stanford Achievement Test Series, Tenth Edition in 1 of 4 conditions: (a) Form A answer sheet, (b)…

  13. Supporting Fourth-Grade Students' Word Identification Using Application Software

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moser, Gary P.; Morrison, Timothy G.; Wilcox, Brad

    2017-01-01

    A quasi-experimental study examined effects of a 10-week word structure intervention with fourth-grade students. During daily 10-15-minute practice periods, students worked individually with mobile apps focused on specific aspects of word identification. Pre- and post-treatment assessments showed no differences in rate and accuracy of oral reading…

  14. A CURRICULUM FOR ENGLISH, STUDENT PACKET, GRADE 12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nebraska Univ., Lincoln. Curriculum Development Center.

    THE LITERATURE PROGRAM OF THE GRADE 12 STUDENT PACKET OF THE NEBRASKA ENGLISH CURRICULUM CONSISTS OF A SELECTIVE SURVEY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE FROM THE RENAISSANCE TO THE 20TH CENTURY. IT BEGINS WITH A UNIT ON SHAKESPEAREAN TRAGEDY IN WHICH STUDENTS READ REVENGE TRAGEDIES--SENECA'S "THYESTES" AND KYD'S "THE SPANISH TRAGEDY"--AS…

  15. Implementing Guided Reading Strategies with Kindergarten and First Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abbott, Lindsey; Dornbush, Abby; Giddings, Anne; Thomas, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    In the action research project report, the teacher researchers found that many kindergarten and first-grade students did not have the reading readiness skills to be reading at their benchmark target. The purpose of the project was to improve the students overall reading ability. The dates of the project began on September 8 through December 20,…

  16. A CURRICULUM FOR ENGLISH, STUDENT PACKET, GRADE 10.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nebraska Univ., Lincoln. Curriculum Development Center.

    THE STUDENT PACKET FOR GRADE 10 OF THE NEBRASKA ENGLISH CURRICULUM BEGINS WITH FOUR UNITS ON LITERATURE, EACH STRESSING AN ASPECT OF MAN'S CONCEPTION OF THE WORLD. THROUGH A STUDY OF THE LITERATURE OF SEVERAL CULTURES, WRITTEN AT VARIOUS TIMES, STUDENTS FIRST CONSIDER "MAN AND NATURE, MAN'S PICTURE OF NATURE." THE SECOND UNIT, "MAN…

  17. Student Perceptions of Interactive Whiteboards in a Third Grade Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Genesi, Deanna Joy

    2009-01-01

    This qualitative project presents students' perceptions of interactive whiteboard (IWB) usage in a third grade elementary classroom. The use of the IWB was alternated with the overhead/chalkboard on an ABAB design. The study was based on semistructured interviews of 19 rural, elementary school students. The interview questions focused on the…

  18. A Pilot Mathematics Assessment of Arizona Sixth-Grade Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona State Dept. of Education, Phoenix.

    Student achievement in mathematics at the sixth-grade level was assessed in this study. A sample of 4,047 students under 160 teachers in 114 schools, 26 school districts, and 10 counties are given a criterion-referenced mathematics test. The McGraw-Hill Prescriptive Mathematics Inventory (PMI-Aqua Level) was selected for use in this pilot program.…

  19. Improving Reading and Communication Skills of Ninth Grade Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Walter J., III

    A program was developed to improve the reading scores and communication skills of ninth-grade students from multicultural backgrounds. The students' socioeconomic status ranges from below the poverty level to upper middle class. The population of the high school in suburban Chicago (Illinois) is multiethnic, the English is not always the primary…

  20. Warning: A Grade 7 Student Disrupts Narrative Boundaries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pantaleo, Sylvia

    2011-01-01

    This article features a case study of the written and illustrative text produced by one Grade 7 student, Stefinia, and discusses the metaleptic transgressions evident in the book she created as the culminating activity of a research project. Stefinia was a participant in a classroom-based study that explored how developing students' knowledge of…

  1. Using Separate Answer Sheets with Grade 3 Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Thomas; O'Malley, Kimberly; Ragland, Shelley; Young, Michael; Kirkpatrick, Rob

    2014-01-01

    The authors compared the performance of third-grade students testing on answer sheets with those testing on machine-scored test booklets. The 1,832 students in the nationally representative sample were assigned at the campus level to complete the Stanford Achievement Test Series, Tenth Edition in 1 of 4 conditions: (a) Form A answer sheet, (b)…

  2. Different Grade Students' Use and Interpretation of Literal Symbols

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Celik, Derya; Gunes, Gonul

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine and compare 7th, 8th, and 9th grades students' level of use and interpret the literal symbols. In addition, students' responses to questions that require use of different roles of literal symbol were examined to identify the errors. For this purpose, Chelsea Diagnostics Algebra test developed by The Concepts…

  3. Oral Reading Rates of Second-Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Chuang; Algozzine, Bob; Ma, Wen; Porfeli, Erik

    2011-01-01

    The importance of reading fluently is widely recognized in school effectiveness, reform, and improvement efforts of the educational community, yet there are few large-scale, structured assessments of the progression of students' reading rates over time. This study documented 2nd-grade students' oral reading rates on the basis of fall, winter, and…

  4. Fifth-Grade Bilingual Students and Precursors to "Subtractive Schooling."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worthy, Jo; Rodriguez-Galindo, Alejandra; Assaf, Lori Czop; Martinez, Leticia; Cuero, Kimberley

    2003-01-01

    A study examined Spanish-speaking children's attitudes about being and staying bilingual. Classroom observations and interviews with 15 fifth-grade students, 12 parents, and 2 teachers at a Texas elementary school indicated that despite being in a supportive bilingual environment, students believed they would have to struggle to maintain their…

  5. Improving Music Reading Skills among Second Grade Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinate, Joanna

    This project describes a program designed to improve the music reading abilities of second grade children. The intention is to discover the best possible method of teaching students basic rhythmic and melodic skills. When combined, these skills will not only increase students' understanding of the language of music, but will also increase…

  6. Gender Differences in Inference Generation by Fourth-Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clinton, Virginia; Seipel, Ben; Broek, Paul; McMaster, Kristen L.; Kendeou, Panayiota; Carlson, Sarah E.; Rapp, David N.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if there are gender differences among elementary school-aged students in regard to the inferences they generate during reading. Fourth-grade students (130 females; 126 males) completed think-aloud tasks while reading one practice and one experimental narrative text. Females generated a larger number and a…

  7. Oral Reading Rates of Second-Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Chuang; Algozzine, Bob; Ma, Wen; Porfeli, Erik

    2011-01-01

    The importance of reading fluently is widely recognized in school effectiveness, reform, and improvement efforts of the educational community, yet there are few large-scale, structured assessments of the progression of students' reading rates over time. This study documented 2nd-grade students' oral reading rates on the basis of fall, winter, and…

  8. Improving Reading Comprehension of Third and Fourth Grade Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salch, Kim; And Others

    A project developed processes for improving the reading comprehension of third- and fourth-grade students in two progressive suburban communities in northern Illinois. Analysis of probable cause data revealed that students lacked knowledge of reading strategies and a review of the district's general curriculum and textbooks revealed systematic…

  9. The Association between Students' Evaluation of Teaching and Grades

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoefer, Peter; Yurkiewicz, Jack; Byrne, John C.

    2012-01-01

    The results of a student evaluation of teaching instrument are analyzed for a semester of classes at a large collegiate business school, at both the graduate and undergraduate academic level. In particular, we concentrate on the relationship between responses to the instrument and student grades. The results show interesting differences,…

  10. Gender Differences in Inference Generation by Fourth-Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clinton, Virginia; Seipel, Ben; Broek, Paul; McMaster, Kristen L.; Kendeou, Panayiota; Carlson, Sarah E.; Rapp, David N.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if there are gender differences among elementary school-aged students in regard to the inferences they generate during reading. Fourth-grade students (130 females; 126 males) completed think-aloud tasks while reading one practice and one experimental narrative text. Females generated a larger number and a…

  11. A CURRICULUM FOR ENGLISH, STUDENT PACKET, GRADE 9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nebraska Univ., Lincoln. Curriculum Development Center.

    THE FIRST UNIT OF THE STUDENT PACKET FOR GRADE NINE OF THE NEBRASKA ENGLISH CURRICULUM IS A STUDY OF THE RELATIONSHIPS WHICH EXIST BETWEEN AUTHOR AND AUDIENCE, AND AN EXAMINATION OF THE EPIGRAM, LIMERICK, PARABLE, FABLE, AND ODE. WITH THIS BACKGROUND, STUDENTS CONSIDER "ON AVARICE" AND "ANIMAL FARM" AS EXAMPLES OF FORMAL AND…

  12. Achievement of Serbian Eighth Grade Students in Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antonijevic, Radovan

    2006-01-01

    The paper considers the main results and some educational implications of the TIMSS 2003 assessment conducted in Serbia in the fields of the science achievement of Serbian eighth grade students and the science curriculum context of their achievement. There were 4264 students in the sample. It was confirmed that Serbian eighth graders had made…

  13. Teaching Primary Grade Students Perfectionism through Cartoons Compared to Bibliotherapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zousel, Miranda L.; Rule, Audrey C.; Logan, Stephanie R.

    2013-01-01

    This experimental study compared concept acquisition and enjoyment of learning about perfectionism under two conditions: bibliotherapy (control) and analysis and construction of cartoons (experimental) in first, second and third grade students (N = 46). Posttest results showed students learned significantly more content in the experimental…

  14. Elementary and Middle Grade Students' Constructions of Typicality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leavy, Aisling M.; Middleton, James A.

    2011-01-01

    This study addresses the measures chosen by students when selecting or constructing indices to properties of distributions of data. A series of individual teaching experiments were conducted to provide insight into the development of five 4th to 8th grade students' conceptualizations of distribution over the course of 8 weeks of instruction.…

  15. A CURRICULUM FOR ENGLISH, STUDENT PACKET, GRADE 11.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nebraska Univ., Lincoln. Curriculum Development Center.

    THE 11TH-GRADE COURSE OF STUDY IN AMERICAN LITERATURE PRESENTED IN THE STUDENT PACKET FOR THE NEBRASKA ENGLISH CURRICULUM BEGINS WITH A UNIT ENTITLED "INDIVIDUALISM AND IDEALISM" IN WHICH STUDENTS ANALYZE SPIRITUAL AUTOBIOGRAPHIES BY EMERSON, THOREAU, WHITMAN, AND DICKINSON. NEXT, THE THEME OF SIN AND LONELINESS AS IT LIMITS…

  16. Factors Affecting Students' Grades in Principles of Economics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kara, Orhan; Bagheri, Fathollah; Tolin, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Factors affecting students' grades in principles of microeconomics and macroeconomics students are analyzed from the data collected in two public universities. Results indicate that gender, number of hours worked, SAT scores, number of missed classes, recommending the course to a friend, instructors, being a junior, number of economics courses…

  17. A CURRICULUM FOR ENGLISH, STUDENT PACKET, GRADE 8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nebraska Univ., Lincoln. Curriculum Development Center.

    THE EIGHTH-GRADE STUDENT PACKET OF THE NEBRASKA ENGLISH CURRICULUM BEGINS WITH A UNIT ON "THE MAKING OF HEROES, THE NOBLEMAN IN WESTERN LITERATURE" WHICH LEADS STUDENTS TO QUESTION WHAT MAKES A HERO, WHAT HE IS LIKE, AND HOW HE EXISTS IN LITERATURE. AFTER READING A NUMBER OF BRIEF SELECTIONS FROM SUCH WORKS AS "THE…

  18. The Grade Trap: Students' Perspectives on Doing School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pope, Denise Clark

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the results of a study of high school students that was conducted to convey their attitudes and experiences to parents, administrators, and teachers. Topics include the stress that students are under to produce good grades and meet expectations; and feeling that showing achievement is more important than learning. (LRW)

  19. Fifth-Grade Bilingual Students and Precursors to "Subtractive Schooling."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worthy, Jo; Rodriguez-Galindo, Alejandra; Assaf, Lori Czop; Martinez, Leticia; Cuero, Kimberley

    2003-01-01

    A study examined Spanish-speaking children's attitudes about being and staying bilingual. Classroom observations and interviews with 15 fifth-grade students, 12 parents, and 2 teachers at a Texas elementary school indicated that despite being in a supportive bilingual environment, students believed they would have to struggle to maintain their…

  20. Acquired Levels of Geographical Concepts among 5th Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balci, Ali

    2010-01-01

    In this research, the geographical concepts that are recommended to be taught for primary school fifth grade students are analyzed. Three of these concepts are in developmental level whereas eight of them are in consolidation level. Of the three geographical concepts which it is recommended the students acquire at a developmental level, it was…

  1. Reading Interests of Tenth, Eleventh and Twelfth Grade Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Beth; Simone, Nancy

    The reading interests of 300 tenth, eleventh, and twelfth grade students were surveyed and compared to those revealed in previous research. The results indicated that the amount of time students reported reading outside of school per day has decreased slightly since a 1961 study by P. Witty, with females still reading more than males. As in the…

  2. The Personal Financial Literacy of Fourth Grade Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucey, Thomas Andrew

    The purpose of the study was to measure personal financial literacy levels of fourth grade students in Memphis, Tennessee and to explore the relationships between seven personal and social characteristics and the students' personal financial literacy. The sample produced low scores on five measure dimensions. Caucasian populations performed better…

  3. A CURRICULUM FOR ENGLISH, STUDENT PACKET, GRADE 7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nebraska Univ., Lincoln. Curriculum Development Center.

    THE SEVENTH-GRADE STUDENT PACKET, PRODUCED BY THE NEBRASKA CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT CENTER, BEGINS WITH THE UNIT ENTITLED "THE MAKING OF STORIES" IN WHICH STUDENTS CONSIDER WRITERS' AUDIENCES AND METHODS OF COMPOSITION AND PRESENTATION. SUCH MATERIAL AS "A CHRISTMAS CAROL" AND SELECTIONS FROM "THE…

  4. Reading Interests of Tenth, Eleventh and Twelfth Grade Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Beth; Simone, Nancy

    The reading interests of 300 tenth, eleventh, and twelfth grade students were surveyed and compared to those revealed in previous research. The results indicated that the amount of time students reported reading outside of school per day has decreased slightly since a 1961 study by P. Witty, with females still reading more than males. As in the…

  5. College Students' Categorical Perceptions of Grades: It's Simply "Good" vs. "Bad"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boatright-Horowitz, Su L.; Arruda, Chris

    2013-01-01

    College students' categorical perceptions of numeric and alphabetic grades were examined by assigning participants to one of four conditions: numeric grades alphabetic grades, numeric non-grades and alphabetic non-grades. They were then asked to give ratings for each possible grade or non-grade, using a 10-point scale. Factor analysis revealed…

  6. Data Modelling with First-Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    English, Lyn D.

    2012-01-01

    This paper argues for a renewed focus on statistical reasoning in the beginning school years, with opportunities for children to engage in data modelling. Results are reported from the first year of a 3-year longitudinal study in which three classes of first-grade children (6-year-olds) and their teachers engaged in data modelling activities. The…

  7. Data Modelling with First-Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    English, Lyn D.

    2012-01-01

    This paper argues for a renewed focus on statistical reasoning in the beginning school years, with opportunities for children to engage in data modelling. Results are reported from the first year of a 3-year longitudinal study in which three classes of first-grade children (6-year-olds) and their teachers engaged in data modelling activities. The…

  8. First-Grade Students and Their Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avraamova, E. M.

    2014-01-01

    Recent changes to the budgetary basis of schools in Russia has received a mixed response from parents, with a variety of views on whether the quality of education is being improved. Reductions in state support for preschool education raises questions about the ability of less affluent parents to prepare their children for first grade. Perhaps more…

  9. First-Grade Students and Their Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avraamova, E. M.

    2014-01-01

    Recent changes to the budgetary basis of schools in Russia has received a mixed response from parents, with a variety of views on whether the quality of education is being improved. Reductions in state support for preschool education raises questions about the ability of less affluent parents to prepare their children for first grade. Perhaps more…

  10. Values grading among nursing students - differences between the ethnic groups.

    PubMed

    Michal Rassin, R N

    2010-07-01

    This study was aimed at measuring professional and personal values among nursing students. The participants were 180 students tested according to 36 personal values and 20 professional values. The findings indicated that passing time has not harmed the fundamental values on which the nursing profession is based: human dignity, the prevention of suffering, reliability, and faithful relationships. Devaluation was observed in the values of equality among patients, and altruism, which were graded only in fifth and sixth place, respectively. It is necessary to consider the regression in the values: imagination, ambition, and cleanliness, which were graded among the bottom values on the list. Significant differences were found in the grading of several personal and professional values, as a function of ethnic origin. Results may help understand motives of nursing students and assist in promoting bachelor of nursing programmes while taking into consideration the unique characteristics of the student group.

  11. Eighth Grade Algebra Course Placement and Student Motivation for Mathematics.

    PubMed

    Simzar, Rahila M; Domina, Thurston; Tran, Cathy

    2016-01-01

    This study uses student panel data to examine the association between Algebra placement and student motivation for mathematics. Changes in achievement goals, expectancy, and task value for students in eighth grade Algebra are compared with those of peers placed in lower-level mathematics courses (N = 3,306). In our sample, students placed in Algebra reported an increase in performance-avoidance goals as well as decreases in academic self-efficacy and task value. These relations were attenuated for students who had high mathematics achievement prior to Algebra placement. Whereas all students reported an overall decline in performance-approach goals over the course of eighth grade, previously high-achieving students reported an increase in these goals. Lastly, previously high-achieving students reported an increase in mastery goals. These findings suggest that while previously high-achieving students may benefit motivationally from eighth grade Algebra placement, placing previously average- and low-performing students in Algebra can potentially undermine their motivation for mathematics.

  12. Eighth Grade Algebra Course Placement and Student Motivation for Mathematics

    PubMed Central

    Simzar, Rahila M.; Domina, Thurston; Tran, Cathy

    2016-01-01

    This study uses student panel data to examine the association between Algebra placement and student motivation for mathematics. Changes in achievement goals, expectancy, and task value for students in eighth grade Algebra are compared with those of peers placed in lower-level mathematics courses (N = 3,306). In our sample, students placed in Algebra reported an increase in performance-avoidance goals as well as decreases in academic self-efficacy and task value. These relations were attenuated for students who had high mathematics achievement prior to Algebra placement. Whereas all students reported an overall decline in performance-approach goals over the course of eighth grade, previously high-achieving students reported an increase in these goals. Lastly, previously high-achieving students reported an increase in mastery goals. These findings suggest that while previously high-achieving students may benefit motivationally from eighth grade Algebra placement, placing previously average- and low-performing students in Algebra can potentially undermine their motivation for mathematics. PMID:26942210

  13. Relationship between High School Mathematics Grade and Number of Attempts Required to Pass the Medication Calculation Test in Nurse Education: An Explorative Study.

    PubMed

    Alteren, Johanne; Nerdal, Lisbeth

    2015-05-27

    In Norwegian nurse education, students are required to achieve a perfect score in a medication calculation test before undertaking their first practice period during the second semester. Passing the test is a challenge, and students often require several attempts. Adverse events in medication administration can be related to poor mathematical skills. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between high school mathematics grade and the number of attempts required to pass the medication calculation test in nurse education. The study used an exploratory design. The participants were 90 students enrolled in a bachelor's nursing program. They completed a self-report questionnaire, and statistical analysis was performed. The results provided no basis for the conclusion that a statistical relationship existed between high school mathematics grade and number of attempts required to pass the medication calculation test. Regardless of their grades in mathematics, 43% of the students passed the medication calculation test on the first attempt. All of the students who had achieved grade 5 had passed by the third attempt. High grades in mathematics were not crucial to passing the medication calculation test. Nonetheless, the grade may be important in ensuring a pass within fewer attempts.

  14. Breakfast eating habits among medical students.

    PubMed

    Ackuaku-Dogbe, E M; Abaidoo, B

    2014-06-01

    Breakfast is often thought to be the most important meal of the day as it is known to provide energy for the brain and improve learning. It is also known to contribute significantly to the total daily energy and nutrient intake. Skipping breakfast may affect performance during the rest of the day. To determine the level of breakfast skipping among medical students and its effect on their attention span and level of fatigue during clinical sessions. A descriptive cross-sectional study of breakfast eating habits among medical students at the University of Ghana Medical School, Korle Bu-Accra. The University of Ghana Medical School, Korle Bu-Accra. Questionnaires were distributed to second year (pre-clinical) medical students studying the basic sciences and clinical students in ophthalmology to be self-administered. Interview data was captured and analyzed using SPSS version 17.0. The total number of pre-clinical students recruited was 154 and clinical students 163 bringing to a total of 317 students made up of 203 males and 114 females (M: F=1.8:1). The overall breakfast skipping among the students was 71.92%. The prevalence among the pre-clinical students was 76.62% and clinical students 67.48%. Generally, breakfast skipping was significantly related to fatigue and poor attention during clinical sessions. This study suggests that the medical students, both pre-clinical and clinical, skip breakfast and this may affect their studies adversely.

  15. How Faculty can Affect Student Texting, Distraction, Grades, and Attitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, Douglas K.; Hoekstra, A.; Wilcox, B.

    2014-01-01

    There is considerable pressure on faculty members to use technology in teaching. Students also bring technology into class in the form of laptop computers, smart phones, and iPads. Does this technology increase or decrease learning? We report two years of data studying 14 different classes with a total of approximately 1200 students. We find that, on the average, approximately 70% of students use their own digital devices during class and 30% do not. The grades earned by the former group average nearly half a grade point average lower than the non-use group. Faculty policies are found to dramatically influence student behavior. Extensive student interview data will be reported that shows that students expect faculty members to set technology policies and summarizes their attitudes about technology use.

  16. Unskilled and unaware in the classroom: College students' desired grades predict their biased grade predictions.

    PubMed

    Serra, Michael J; DeMarree, Kenneth G

    2016-10-01

    People tend to be overconfident when predicting their performance on a variety of physical and mental tasks (i.e., they predict they will perform better than they actually do). Such a pattern is commonly found in educational settings, in which many students greatly overestimate how well they will perform on exams. In particular, the lowest-performing students tend to show the greatest overconfidence (i.e., the "unskilled-and-unaware" effect). Such overconfidence can have deleterious effects on the efficacy of students' short-term study behaviors (i.e., underpreparing for exams) and long-term academic decisions (i.e., changing one's academic major to an "easier" topic or dropping out of school completely). To help understand why students' grade predictions are often overconfident, we examined the hypothesis that students' grade predictions are biased by their desired levels of performance, which are often much higher than their actual levels of performance. Across three studies in which actual students made predictions about their exam performance in their courses, we demonstrated that students' grade predictions are highly biased by their desired grades on those exams. We obtained this result when students predicted their exam grades over a week before the exam (Study 1), immediately after taking the exam (Study 2), and across the four course exams in a single semester (Study 3). These results are informative for understanding why the "unskilled-and-unaware" pattern of performance predictions occurs, and why people in general tend to be overconfident when making both physical and mental performance predictions.

  17. Fs-laser processing of medical grade polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atanasov, P. A.; Stankova, N. E.; Nedyalkov, N. N.; Fukata, N.; Hirsch, D.; Rauschenbach, B.; Amoruso, S.; Wang, X.; Kolev, K. N.; Valova, E. I.; Georgieva, J. S.; Armyanov, St. A.

    2016-06-01

    Medical grade polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) elastomer is a biomaterial widely used in medicine and high-tech devices, e.g. MEMS and NEMS. In this work, we report an experimental investigation on femtosecond laser processing of PDMS-elastomer with near infrared (NIR), visible (VIS) and ultraviolet (UV) pulses. High definition trenches are produced by varying processing parameters as laser wavelength, pulse duration, fluence, scanning speed and overlap of the subsequent pulses. The sample surface morphology and chemical composition are investigated by Laser Microscopy, SEM and Raman spectroscopy, addressing the effects of the various processing parameters through comparison with the native materials characteristics. For all the laser pulse wavelengths used, the produced tracks are successfully metalized with Ni via electro-less plating method. We observe a negligible influence of the time interval elapsed between laser treatment and metallization process. Our experimental findings suggest promising perspectives of femtosecond laser pulses in micro- and nano-fabrication of hi-tech PDMS devices.

  18. Course Grades, Quality of Student Engagement, and Students' Evaluation of Instructor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Culver, Steven

    2010-01-01

    Students' evaluation of faculty and courses continue to be the most often used gauge in higher education of how well courses are taught. Faculty are particularly concerned that student ratings are highly associated with the grades students expect to receive. However, newer research on student engagement suggests that it is students' own…

  19. Effects of Class Drop Policy Changes on Student Attrition and Final Grades (Graded Classes), Pasadena City College, 1965-1973.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pasadena City Coll., CA.

    An investigation was made of the effects of drop policy changes at Pasadena City College on student attrition and final-grade distributions. Data on student attrition were obtained from data processing printouts for the years 1965-1973, and final-grade distribution data were obtained from Departmental Grade Distribution Reports produced annually.…

  20. The Entrepreneur Fair: Fifth Grade Student Businesses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Teresa

    2010-01-01

    In twenty years of teaching, the author has never been involved in a project that sparked as much enthusiasm from students, parents, the administration, and other teachers as the Entrepreneur Fair. In an effort to challenge students to become entrepreneurs, the author developed a one-day market called the Entrepreneur Fair at Stonewall Elementary…

  1. The Entrepreneur Fair: Fifth Grade Student Businesses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Teresa

    2010-01-01

    In twenty years of teaching, the author has never been involved in a project that sparked as much enthusiasm from students, parents, the administration, and other teachers as the Entrepreneur Fair. In an effort to challenge students to become entrepreneurs, the author developed a one-day market called the Entrepreneur Fair at Stonewall Elementary…

  2. [Outplacement of medical students in local hospitals].

    PubMed

    Lindsetmo, R O; Fosse, L; Evensen, S A; Wyller, V B; Nylehn, P; Ogreid, D

    1998-02-28

    The organisation and content of the training of medical students in practical and clinical skills at Norwegian universities is presented and discussed. Based on experience from Tromsø University, an increased use of local hospitals for training medical students in practical and clinical skills is planned for all universities in Norway.

  3. Analyzing Medical Students' Definitions of Sex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talley, Heather; Cho, Janice; Strassberg, Donald S.; Rullo, Jordan E.

    2016-01-01

    An inaccurate definition of what constitutes sex can negatively impact the sexual health and wellbeing of patients. This study aimed to determine which behaviors medical students consider to be sex. Survey questions about various sexual behaviors were administered to medical students. All participants agreed that penile-vaginal penetration is sex.…

  4. Mental health of dubai medical college students.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, Jamshid; Galal Ahmed, Mohammed; Ali Bayoumi, Fatehia; Abdul Moneenum, Abeer; Alshawa, Haya

    2012-01-01

    Considering the association between medical school dropout and psychiatric distress, we aimed to assess the prevalence of psychiatric distress among medical students at Dubai Medical College. One hundred and three medical students were chosen randomly and were assessed by the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ). The mean age for the students was 18.85 year (Minimum: 17, Maximum: 22), and 90.3% were between 18 and 20 years old. The mean of GHQ score was 16.46. Of the participants, 47 (45.6%) were found to be in normal range (GHQ mean < 16). A total of 33 (32.1%) of the students reported evidence of psychiatric distress. Only 23 (22.3%) were found to have severe psychiatric distress. Early detection of psychiatric distress is important to prevent psychiatric morbidity and its unwanted effects on medical students and young doctors. Our results reveals that although a low percentage of Dubai Medical College students reported a significant level of psychiatric distress, however, it should not be underestimated, and actions should be taken to encourage Dubai Medical College students to get help from for psychiatric services for their emotional problems. The risk factors as well as the protective factors must be identified in nation-wide studies to promote mental health of medical students.

  5. Analyzing Medical Students' Definitions of Sex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talley, Heather; Cho, Janice; Strassberg, Donald S.; Rullo, Jordan E.

    2016-01-01

    An inaccurate definition of what constitutes sex can negatively impact the sexual health and wellbeing of patients. This study aimed to determine which behaviors medical students consider to be sex. Survey questions about various sexual behaviors were administered to medical students. All participants agreed that penile-vaginal penetration is sex.…

  6. What Happens to Creative Medical Students?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gough, Harrison G.

    1976-01-01

    A psychometric index of creative potential was devised for use in comparing ratings of creativity in samples of architects, engineers, mathematicians, psychologists, research scientists, and first year medical students. Medical students had the highest scores with psychiatrists ranking first and internists second among the specialty groups. (JT)

  7. Pedagogical Implications on Medical Students' Linguistic Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Yanling

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, an extended teaching implication is performed based on the study of medical students' linguistic needs in Tawian (Hwang, Lin, 2010). The aims of previous study were to provide a description of the linguistic needs and perceptions of medical students and faculty members in Taiwan. However, this paper put more thoughts on the…

  8. Working Longer Makes Students Stronger? The Effects of Ninth Grade Classroom Hours on Ninth Grade Student Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, Vibeke Myrup

    2013-01-01

    Background: Despite much discussion on the role of education policy on school and student performance, we know little about the effects of school spending at the margin on student cognitive achievement beyond the effects of class size. Purpose: The paper examines the effects of annual ninth grade classroom hours in literacy and maths on ninth…

  9. Teaching Medical Students, what do Consultants think?

    PubMed

    Darragh, Lynn; Baker, Robin; Kirk, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    The approach to and delivery of medical student education has undergone significant change within the last decade. There has been a shift away from didactic lectures to small group tutorials, facilitated by clinicians. Anecdotally there is an impression that enthusiasm for teaching is waning. The aim of this qualitative study is to assess the current attitudes of consultants, across all specialities, to teaching medical students in small group settings. A Likert scale questionnaire, relating to teaching medical students in small group tutorials, was distributed via email to all consultants working in one region. Questions considered the categories: attitudes to teaching, financial considerations, time constraints and attitudes to students. 367 responses were received. 72% of responders were actively involved in teaching. 72% of respondents indicated that medical students should be taught by consultants and 80% felt that teaching medical students was enjoyable. 60% felt they were not financially remunerated for teaching and 50% indicated teaching was not included in job plans; despite this a significant proportion of these respondents remain involved in teaching (68%). Non-teachers were more likely to indicate that teaching was not paid for (p=0.003). 78% indicated consultants do not have adequate time to teach medical students. 82% felt that medical students appreciate consultant led teaching but only 55% felt students had an appropriate level of enthusiasm for learning. Consultants in this Deanery are actively involved in medical student teaching and enjoy it. Consultants perceive that they are not adequately financially rewarded but for the most part this is not a deterrent. Time constraints are an issue and there is a desire to have teaching included in job plans to counteract this. Most consultants are complimentary about student attitudes but there is a perception that medical students need to contribute more to their own learning.

  10. Factors potentially influencing academic performance among medical students

    PubMed Central

    Al Shawwa, Lana; Abulaban, Ahmad A; Abulaban, Abdulrhman A; Merdad, Anas; Baghlaf, Sara; Algethami, Ahmed; Abu-shanab, Joullanar; Balkhoyor, Abdulrahman

    2015-01-01

    Background Studies are needed to examine predictors of success in medical school. The aim of this work is to explore factors that potentially influence excellence of medical students. Methods The study was conducted in the Medical Faculty of King Abdulaziz University during October 2012. A self-administered questionnaire was used. Medical students with a grade point average (GPA) ≥4.5 (out of 5) were included and compared to randomly selected medical students with a GPA <4.5, who were available at the time of the study. Results A total of 359 undergraduate students participated in the study. 50.4% of the sample was students with a GPA ≥4.5. No statistically significant difference regarding the time spent on outings and social events was found. However, 60.7% of high GPA students spend less than 2 hours on social networking per day as compared to 42.6% of the lower GPA students (P<0.01). In addition, 79% of high GPA students prefer to study alone (P=0.02), 68.0% required silence and no interruptions during studying time (P=0.013), and 47% revise their material at least once before an exam (P=0.02). Conclusion Excellent medical students have many different characteristics. For example, they do not use social networking for prolonged periods of time, and they have strong motivation and study enjoyment. Further studies are needed to examine whether these differences have a real impact on GPA or not. PMID:25674033

  11. Failing underperforming students: the role of grading in practice assessment.

    PubMed

    Heaslip, Vanessa; Scammell, Janet M E

    2012-03-01

    Nursing is essentially a practice discipline, informed by a theoretical base. It is crucial that students have a rigorous preparation in both theoretical and practical elements during their pre-registration programme. The aim of educationalists is to produce students fit for purpose and practice, but concerns have been raised internationally regarding students competence at the point of registration. There is evidence that some practice based assessors experience difficulties in failing incompetent students. Assessment of practice is often judged on a pass/fail rather than a graded basis in a number of health professional programmes. It could be argued that pass or fail provides limited feedback to students concerning exactly how well or poorly they have performed. This paper will explore these issues through focusing on selected findings from a service evaluation of a practice assessment tool incorporating grading of practice of pre-registration nursing students from one university in the United Kingdom (UK). Using convenience sampling, a questionnaire survey was completed by 107 adult, mental health and child health nursing students (51% response) and 112 mentors (practice-based assessors) (86% response) from all nursing fields. Amongst other issues, the evaluation identified that whilst mentors valued the opportunity to grade practice and perceived that the tool enabled them to be more discerning in the allocation of pass grades, some lacked confidence in failing students. The findings are discussed in the context of the wider debate around clinical competence in new nurse registrants and it is concluded that whilst assessing 'borderline' students will always be a testing experience, grading systems may help the assessor to be more discriminatory.

  12. Psychological defenses of Danish medical students.

    PubMed

    la Cour, Peter

    2002-01-01

    Patterns in the psychological defenses of medical students may have implications for the way they handle and respond to the pressures and developmental issues they encounter in medical school and beyond. Using the Defense Style Questionnaire (DSQ40) to assess psychological defenses, a sample of first-year Danish medical students was compared with a sample of students at a short-term boarding school for general education. The medical students scored significantly higher on items connected with pseudo-altruism, denial, and undoing. Trends in the data furthermore suggest a greater use of sublimation, rationalization, and dissociation among medical students. When defense mechanisms were labeled into mature, neurotic, and immature categories, there were no differences between the groups or in the total defense scores.

  13. [Undergraduate medical education. Students' perspective and medical school policy].

    PubMed

    Vinceneux, P; Carbon, C; Pouchot, J; Crickx, B; Maillard, D; Regnier, B; Desmonts, J M; Fontaine, A

    2000-10-14

    Student attendance to lectures in French medical schools is often poor. We surveyed undergraduate medical students in our medical school, repeating a similar survey conducted ten years earlier. The results are presented with the conclusions of the faculty seminar that followed this survey. A closed item questionnaire was distributed in June, 1998, through the hospital wards where the students were posted. After two reminders, the final response rate was 71% (247/348). Overall, 71% of the students declared that they never, or only occasionally, attended lectures in the medical school. Reasons included lack of time (75%), the curriculum diverging from the program of the selective examination that gives access to graduate specialization programs (59%), or insufficient practical clinical content (36%); 46% believed that this teaching prepared them to practice family medicine (11% some specially), and 92% that the way it was organized was not compatible with preparing for the selective examination. On the other hand, 75% of the students in the final two years of the curriculum declared that attending regularly special preparation seminars for the selective examination, to succeed at this test (91%), but also to prepare for family practice (25%). Respectively, 75%, 68% and 66% declared that undergraduate medical courses should, ideally, prepare them for the selective examination, but also for the practice of family medicine, and for graduate medical education. These results echoed the difficulties of the faculty of the medical school to reconcile preparing students both for their future medical practice and for the selective examination. Two working groups were asked to identify independently appropriate educational objectives according to each perspective: their conclusions appeared to be quite compatible. Based on these conclusions, institutional objectives were ratified to guide the educational policy of our medical school, including the following: to reinforce the

  14. [How medical students perform academically by admission types?].

    PubMed

    Kim, Se-Hoon; Lee, Keumho; Hur, Yera; Kim, Ji-Ha

    2013-09-01

    Despite the importance of selecting students whom are capable for medical education and to become a good doctor, not enough studies have been done in the category. This study focused on analysing the medical students' academic performance (grade point average, GPA) differences, flunk and dropout rates by admission types. From 2004 to 2010, we gathered 369 Konyang University College of Medicine's students admission data and analyzed the differences between admission method and academic achievement, differences in failure and dropout rates. Analysis of variance (ANOVA), ordinary least square, and logistic regression were used. The rolling students showed higher academic achievement from year 1 to 3 than regular students (p < 0.01). Using admission type variable as control variable in multiple regression model similar results were shown. But unlike the results of ANOVA, GPA differences by admission types were shown not only in lower academic years but also in year 6 (p < 0.01). From the regression analysis of flunk and dropout rate by admission types, regular admission type students showed higher drop out rate than the rolling ones which demonstrates admission types gives significant effect on flunk or dropout rates in medical students (p < 0.01). The rolling admissions type students tend to show lower flunk rate and dropout rates and perform better academically. This implies selecting students primarily by Korean College Scholastic Ability Test does not guarantee their academic success in medical education. Thus we suggest a more in-depth comprehensive method of selecting students that are appropriate to individual medical school's educational goal.

  15. A medical-grade wireless architecture for remote electrocardiography.

    PubMed

    Kang, Kyungtae; Park, Kyung-Joon; Song, Jae-Jin; Yoon, Chang-Hwan; Sha, Lui

    2011-03-01

    In telecardiology, electrocardiogram (ECG) signals from a patient are acquired by sensors and transmitted in real time to medical personnel across a wireless network. The use of IEEE 802.11 wireless LANs (WLANs), which are already deployed in many hospitals, can provide ubiquitous connectivity and thus allow cardiology patients greater mobility. However, engineering issues, including the error-prone nature of wireless channels and the unpredictable delay and jitter due to the nondeterministic nature of access to the wireless medium, need to be addressed before telecardiology can be safely realized. We propose a medical-grade WLAN architecture for remote ECG monitoring, which employs the point-coordination function (PCF) for medium access control and Reed-Solomon coding for error control. Realistic simulations with uncompressed two-lead ECG data from the MIT-BIH arrhythmia database demonstrate reliable wireless ECG monitoring; the reliability of ECG transmission exceeds 99.99% with the initial buffering delay of only 2.4 s.

  16. Investigating Urban Eighth-Grade Students' Knowledge of Energy Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodzin, Alec

    2012-05-01

    This study investigated urban eighth-grade students' knowledge of energy resources and associated issues including energy acquisition, energy generation, storage and transport, and energy consumption and conservation. A 39 multiple-choice-item energy resources knowledge assessment was completed by 1043 eighth-grade students in urban schools in two cities in Pennsylvania, USA. Mean scores for the entire assessment measure indicated low conceptual energy knowledge of the eighth-grade students. Subscale means revealed that student understandings of energy resource acquisition, energy generation, storage and transport, and energy consumption and conservation are not satisfactory. Distractor analysis identified many misunderstandings that eighth-grade students hold with regard to energy resources. Findings revealed that students did not have a sound knowledge and understanding of basic scientific energy resources facts, issues related to energy sources and resources, general trends in the US energy resource supply and use, and the impact energy resource development and use can have on society and the environment. Implications for teacher enactment of energy resources curriculum activities are discussed.

  17. Caffeine consumption among medical students.

    PubMed

    Mino, Y; Yasuda, N; Fujimura, T; Ohara, H

    1990-12-01

    Recently, caffeine consumption in Japan is thought to have increased. Although caffeine had been considered to be harmless, there have been studies which suggests an association between caffeine and health and give rise to vigorous discussion. However, in Japan, there have been few epidemiological studies on caffeine consumption among a general population. A questionnaire survey was conducted among medical students and the results were as follows: 1) High dose users (estimated daily caffeine use is 250 mg or more) were observed in 15.2% and the proportion was higher in males than in females. 2) The respondents gave sleepiness, dry mouth and so on, as reasons for taking caffeine beverages, and gave, as the effects of caffeine, becoming clear-headed, shaking off sleepiness, and epigastric discomfort or pain. 3) A third of respondents have experienced taking caffeine tablets and ampules to shake off sleepiness and, in males, the more caffeine they had daily, the more who reported the experience. 4) Caffeine consumption has an association with alcohol use and smoking habit among males.

  18. Medical students' online learning technology needs.

    PubMed

    Han, Heeyoung; Nelson, Erica; Wetter, Nathan

    2014-02-01

    This study investigated medical students' online learning technology needs at a medical school. The study aimed to provide evidence-based guidance for technology selection and online learning design in medical education. The authors developed a 120-item survey in collaboration with the New Technology in Medical Education (NTIME) committee at the Southern Illinois University School of Medicine (SIUSOM). Overall, 123 of 290 medical students (42%) at the medical school participated in the survey. The survey focused on five major areas: students' hardware and software use; perception of educational technology (ET) in general; online behaviours; perception of ET use at the school; and demographic information. Students perceived multimedia tools, scheduling tools, communication tools, collaborative authoring tools, learning management systems and electronic health records useful educational technologies for their learning. They did not consider social networking tools useful for their learning, despite their frequent use. Third-year students were less satisfied with current technology integration in the curriculum, information sharing and collaborative learning than other years. Students in clerkships perceived mobile devices as useful for their learning. Students using a mobile device (i.e. a smartphone) go online, text message, visit social networking sites and are online during classes more frequently than non-users. Medical students' ET needs differ between preclinical and clinical years. Technology supporting ubiquitous mobile learning and health information technology (HIT) systems at hospitals and out-patient clinics can be integrated into clerkship curricula. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Recruiting medical students to rural practice

    PubMed Central

    Jutzi, Leah; Vogt, Kelly; Drever, Erin; Nisker, Jeff

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To explore the strategies used by rural recruitment programs and their perceived influence on medical students. DESIGN Two original questionnaires delivered electronically, one to medical students and the other to recruiters in rural Ontario communities. SETTING Ontario, Canada. PARTICIPANTS All 525 medical students enrolled in the Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry at the University of Western Ontario in London and physician recruiters in 71 rural communities in Ontario were invited to participate in the study. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES The factors that influence medical students to consider rural practice, strategies used by recruiters, and student perceptions of the ethical appropriateness of both. RESULTS The questionnaire was completed by 42.1% of medical students. Lifestyle considerations were an important influence for 93.1% of students. Themes from the qualitative analysis included the ethical appropriateness of financial considerations, economic forces, perceived disadvantages of rural practice, competition between communities, and lack of altruism. Responses were received from recruiters in 43.7% of communities; of those, 92.9% offered financial incentives to attract prospective physicians. CONCLUSION Financial and lifestyle considerations are important influences on medical students’ choice to practise in rural communities. Most medical students felt incentive programs offered by rural communities were ethically appropriate. PMID:19155375

  20. Comparison of medical-grade and calibrated consumer-grade displays for diagnosis of subtle bone fissures.

    PubMed

    Pinto Dos Santos, Daniel; Welter, Jonas; Emrich, Tilman; Jungmann, Florian; Dappa, Evelyn; Mildenberger, Peter; Kloeckner, Roman

    2017-06-28

    To compare the diagnostic accuracy of medical-grade and calibrated consumer-grade digital displays for the detection of subtle bone fissures. Three experienced radiologists assessed 96 digital radiographs, 40 without and 56 with subtle bone fissures, for the presence or absence of fissures in various bones using one consumer-grade and two medical-grade displays calibrated according to the DICOM-Grayscale Standard Display Function. The reference standard was consensus reading. Subjective image quality was also assessed by the three readers. Statistical analysis was performed using receiver operating characteristic analysis and by calculating the sensitivity, specificity, and Youden's J for each combination of reader and display. Cohen's unweighted kappa was calculated to assess inter-rater agreement. Subjective image quality was compared using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. No significant differences were found for the assessment of subjective image quality. Diagnostic performance was similar across all readers and displays, with Youden's J ranging from 0.443 to 0.661. The differences were influenced more by the reader than by the display used for the assessment. No significant differences were found between medical-grade and calibrated consumer-grade displays with regard to their diagnostic performance in assessing subtle bone fissures. Calibrated consumer-grade displays may be sufficient for most radiological examinations. • Diagnostic performance of calibrated consumer-grade displays is comparable to medical-grade displays. • There is no significant difference with regard to subjective image quality. • Use of calibrated consumer-grade displays could cut display costs by 60-80%.

  1. The medical student and the suicidal patient.

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, N A

    1997-01-01

    Today's medical students are being confronted with ethical situations of far greater complexity than were their predecessors and yet the medical education system does little to prepare students for the ethical dilemmas which they inevitably face when entering the hospital environment. The following article addresses the issues surrounding a case where a patient has told a student in confidence of his plans to commit suicide. What should the student do? The only way for the student to prevent death is by breaking confidentiality because the student has insufficient clinical experience to provide adequate guidance. However, this requires ignoring the patient's right to autonomy, a right enshrined in both case law and medical ethics. Clearly the student's ethical, moral and legal position must be carefully evaluated. PMID:9358346

  2. Career planning of medical laboratory science students.

    PubMed

    Zufall, D L

    1976-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the most influential people in the career choices of medical laboratory science students. Methods of investigation used by these students were also explored. A questionnaire survey indicated that students were influenced more by professionals in the field, and that high-school guidance counselors were unable to furnish current and accurate information for decision making. Results of the study have implications for improvements in all areas of guidance. Based on the findings, the best interests of the students are served when both guidance counselors and professionals in the medical laboratory science field provide students with understanding, encouragement, and factual information.

  3. Fifty-two medical student suicides.

    PubMed

    Pepitone-Arreola-Rockwell, F; Rockwell, D; Core, N

    1981-02-01

    The authors surveyed all U.S. medical schools to ascertain the frequency with which medical students attempt suicide, complete suicide, and seek psychiatric treatment. In the classes of 1974-1981 the annual suicide rate for male students was 15.6 per 100,000, which is comparable to their agemates in the national population. The rate for female students equaled that of the male students but was three to four times that of their agemates. Seventy-six percent of the suicides were committed by sophomore and junior students, and 50% were committed in November, December, or January. The authors discuss four steps schools can take in suicidal prevention.

  4. Preparing Aboriginal Students for Medical School

    PubMed Central

    Krause, R.G.; Stephens, M.C.C.

    1992-01-01

    This article describes the Special Premedical Studies Program at the University of Manitoba and results of interviews with its graduates. This program prepares aboriginal students for admission to medical school. Six physicians and several other health professionals have graduated from the program. Respondents noted similarities in the needs of rural students and those of aboriginal students. PMID:21221337

  5. Learning Styles in First Year Medical Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chessell, Gwen

    1986-01-01

    Reports on a study done at Aberdeen University (England) which assessed the learning styles of first-year medical students. Results indicated that these students scored higher than other students in achievement (including study methods and competitiveness) and prediction for success. Includes the instrument used. (TW)

  6. Student body diversity: relationship to medical students' experiences and attitudes.

    PubMed

    Guiton, Gretchen; Chang, Mitchell J; Wilkerson, LuAnn

    2007-10-01

    Multiple studies of undergraduate college students have demonstrated the effects of cross-cultural interaction and exposure to diverse ideas on a variety of educational outcomes. The current study was designed to extend this work into medical education, examining student body diversity and school-supported cross-cultural experiences on students' attitudes about diversity. Four-hundred forty-one rising fourth-year medical students from three schools with differing levels of student body diversity completed a 55-item questionnaire on their background, experiences, and attitudes related to cross-cultural diversity. Medical students' attitudes about culture and health and their perspectives on societal issues related to diversity were influenced by their medical school experiences. Informal instructional interactions seem to have been most influential in shaping these beliefs. The opportunity for students from diverse backgrounds to interact as part of the curriculum is an important means of promoting positive attitudes toward diversity in educational and social environments.

  7. The Relationship between Student Performance on the Missouri Assessment Program and Students' Final Numerical Grades

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pratt, Anne-Marie

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the predictive relationship of fifth-, sixth-, seventh-, and eighth-grade students' final numerical grades for mathematics and communication arts (e.g., English or language arts) and their standardized scores on the Missouri Assessment Program (MAP). It examined the relationship between students' performance on the MAP in the…

  8. The Relationship between Student Performance on the Missouri Assessment Program and Students' Final Numerical Grades

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pratt, Anne-Marie

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the predictive relationship of fifth-, sixth-, seventh-, and eighth-grade students' final numerical grades for mathematics and communication arts (e.g., English or language arts) and their standardized scores on the Missouri Assessment Program (MAP). It examined the relationship between students' performance on the MAP in the…

  9. Student Career Development in Grade 9 and Grade 12: Can Growth Be Assumed?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, Paul E.

    This paper identifies and compares the level of career maturity as measured by the Career Maturity Inventory (CMI) for students (N=221) in grades 9 and 12 in 1 suburban district in Nebraska. The participating school district was preparing for the implementation of a developmental, comprehensive, and competency-based guidance program. Specific…

  10. The Effect of Scheduling Models for Introductory Algebra on 9th-Grade Students, Test Scores and Grades

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Hanlon, Angela L.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the effect of pacing and scheduling of algebra coursework on assigned 9th-grade students who traditionally would qualify for pre-algebra instruction and same course 9th-grade students who traditionally would qualify for standard algebra instruction. Students were selected based on completion of first-year…

  11. [LECTURE ATTENDANCE BY MEDICAL STUDENTS - IS IT A COMPELLING ISSUE?].

    PubMed

    Luder, Anthony

    2016-04-01

    Lecture attendance by medical students may be affected by various factors. Evidence for compulsory attendance and its effects is scant. To examine the effect of the introduction of a compulsory attendance regulation on students' grades and behaviour. Lecture attendance by students was evaluated and monitored, and the marks gained by attenders and non-attenders compared. The setting was a new medical faculty with a 4-year graduate entry program. The participants were medical students in the 1st year of a 4-year graduate entry program. In the first year, 5 courses were offered in which attendance was not compulsory, followed by 2 courses in which it was made compulsory. Attendance rose markedly in the 2 compulsory courses. No clear effect on attainment was seen even among students with high absentee rates. Discussion and summary: In this preliminary study, compulsory attendance improved attendance rates but the range and mean marks of absentee students was similar to the class as a whole. Some students may learn as well or better outside the classroom than in it, although this places an extra burden of responsibility on staff. More research is needed on this important topic.

  12. Patterns of distress in US medical students.

    PubMed

    Dyrbye, Liselotte N; Harper, William; Durning, Steven J; Moutier, Christine; Thomas, Matthew R; Massie, F Stanford; Eacker, Anne; Power, David V; Szydlo, Daniel W; Sloan, Jeff A; Shanafelt, Tait D

    2011-01-01

    How multiple forms of psychological distress coexist in individual medical students has not been formally studied. To explore the prevalence of various forms of distress in medical students and their relationship to recent suicidal ideation or serious thoughts of dropping out of school. All medical students at seven US schools were surveyed with standardized instruments to evaluate burnout, depression, stress, mental quality of life (QOL), physical QOL, and fatigue. Additional items explored recent suicidal ideation and serious thoughts of dropping out of medical school. Nearly all (1846/2246, 82%) of medical students had at least one form of distress with 1066 (58%) having ≥3 forms of distress. A dose-response relationship was found between the number of manifestations of distress and recent suicidal ideation or serious thoughts of dropping out. For example, students with 2, 4, or 6 forms of distress were 5, 15, and 24 fold, respectively, more likely to have suicidal ideation than students with no forms of distress assessed. All forms of distress were independently associated with suicidal ideation or serious thoughts of dropping out on multivariable analysis. Most medical students experience ≥1 manifestation of distress with many experiencing multiple forms of distress simultaneously. The more forms of distress experienced the greater the risk for suicidal ideation and thoughts of dropping out of medical school.

  13. What medical students value from their teachers.

    PubMed

    Ho, Maria Theresa; Tani, Massimiliano

    2007-08-01

    As Australian medical educators become more accustomed to the increasing pressures imposed upon them, there is a risk that the traditional educational relationship between a student and his or her teacher is replaced by a pure transactional relationship between a customer and his or her supplier. A large sample of medical students surveyed revealed that medical students seem to value directed rather than independent learning. New approaches to teaching, such as being innovative or entertaining, as well as facilitating participation, do not appear to be very important to medical students. Medical students do not seem to have strong preferences when it comes to assessment, contradicting some of the fundamental suggestions of the recent educational literature, in which assessment is often viewed as a key element in the formation and the direction of learning. The fact that medical students seem to reject many of the paradigms of the psychology-based educational literature, at least based on the large sample surveyed at the University of New South Wales, suggests that caution should be used in the development of training programs for teachers in medical faculties, and that learning and teaching should ensure that students' expectations and teachers' training do not mismatch.

  14. Increasing Middle Grade Students' Motivation To Read Independently through Reading, Writing, and Data Base Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witry, Susan M.

    A practicum addressed the problem of a lack of reading motivation among middle grade students. An activity based program for middle grade students which integrated reading, book reports, book presentations, computer programs, and a library skills program was developed. Subjects, 32 fifth grade and 33 sixth grade students enrolled in a computer…

  15. Middle Grades and High Schools Use Effective Strategies to Prepare Students for Challenging High School Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board (SREB), 2011

    2011-01-01

    Middle grades schools have their hands full in working with elementary schools and high schools to improve the likelihood of success for middle grades students--accelerating learning, helping elementary students move seamlessly into the middle grades, preparing middle grades students for rigorous high school courses, changing organization and…

  16. Adult Hispanic ESL Students and Graded Readers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, Liza E.

    2013-01-01

    Adult Hispanic ESL students in rural San Luis, Arizona, face a challenging situation. Since San Luis lies on the southwestern tip of Arizona and borders with Mexico, Spanish is the predominant language. English, on the other hand, is mostly heard in classrooms. This can be a predicament for adult Hispanics who need to be proficient in English in…

  17. Adult Hispanic ESL Students and Graded Readers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, Liza E.

    2013-01-01

    Adult Hispanic ESL students in rural San Luis, Arizona, face a challenging situation. Since San Luis lies on the southwestern tip of Arizona and borders with Mexico, Spanish is the predominant language. English, on the other hand, is mostly heard in classrooms. This can be a predicament for adult Hispanics who need to be proficient in English in…

  18. Undergraduate medical research: the student perspective

    PubMed Central

    Burgoyne, Louise N.; O'Flynn, Siun; Boylan, Geraldine B.

    2010-01-01

    Background Research training is essential in a modern undergraduate medical curriculum. Our evaluation aimed to (a) gauge students' awareness of research activities, (b) compare students' perceptions of their transferable and research-specific skills competencies, (c) determine students' motivation for research and (d) obtain students' personal views on doing research. Methods Undergraduate medical students (N=317) completed a research skills questionnaire developed by the Centre for Excellence in Teaching and Learning in Applied Undergraduate Research Skills (CETL-AURS) at Reading University. The questionnaire assessed students' transferable skills, research-specific skills (e.g., study design, data collection and data analysis), research experience and attitude and motivation towards doing research. Results The majority of students are motivated to pursue research. Graduate entrants and male students appear to be the most confident regarding their research skills competencies. Although all students recognise the role of research in medical practice, many are unaware of the medical research activities or successes within their university. Of those who report no interest in a career incorporating research, a common perception was that researchers are isolated from patients and clinical practice. Discussion Students have a narrow definition of research and what it entails. An explanation for why research competence does not align more closely with research motivation is derived from students' lack of understanding of the concept of translational research, as well as a lack of awareness of the research activity being undertaken by their teachers and mentors. We plan to address this with specific research awareness initiatives. PMID:20844608

  19. Near-peer medical student simulation training.

    PubMed

    Cash, Thomas; Brand, Eleanor; Wong, Emma; Richardson, Jay; Athorn, Sam; Chowdhury, Faiza

    2017-06-01

    There is growing concern that medical students are inadequately prepared for life as a junior doctor. A lack of confidence managing acutely unwell patients is often cited as a barrier to good clinical care. With medical schools investing heavily in simulation equipment, we set out to explore if near-peer simulation training is an effective teaching format. Medical students in their third year of study and above were invited to attend a 90-minute simulation teaching session. The sessions were designed and delivered by final-year medical students using clinical scenarios mapped to the Sheffield MBChB curriculum. Candidates were required to assess, investigate and manage an acutely unwell simulated patient. Pre- and post-simulation training Likert scale questionnaires were completed relating to self-reported confidence levels. There is growing concern that medical students are inadequately prepared for life as a junior doctor RESULTS: Questionnaires were completed by 25 students (100% response rate); 52 per cent of students had no prior simulation experience. There were statistically significant improvements in self-reported confidence levels in each of the six areas assessed (p < 0.005). Thematic analysis of free-text comments indicated that candidates enjoyed the practical format of the sessions and found the experience useful. Our results suggest that near-peer medical student simulation training benefits both teacher and learner and that this simplistic model could easily be replicated at other medical schools. As the most junior members of the team, medical students are often confined to observer status. Simulation empowers students to practise independently in a safe and protected environment. Furthermore, it may help to alleviate anxiety about starting work as a junior doctor and improve future patient care. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and The Association for the Study of Medical Education.

  20. [Medical students' interest in general practitioners career].

    PubMed

    Mrduljas-Dujić, Natasa; Vrdoljak, Davorka; Kuzmanić, Marion; Rumboldt, Mirjana; Petric, Dragomir

    2007-02-01

    To assess the reasons for entering medical school, to explore the attitudes and opinions of final year students regarding medical education and their future career preferences, including family medicine. METHODS. During four years period, 111 (73%) final year students of Split Medical School were surveyed [31 (96,8%) of them in academic year 1996/7, 23 (62%) in 2001/2, 30 (62,5%) in 2003/4 and 27 (77%) in 2004/5]. Semi-structured questionnaire about motivations and expectations was used and answered during the family medicine course. . Most of the students 59/111 (53%) entered medical school by their own wish, 34 (31%) were not sure about their choice at the entry and in 17 (16%) students, it was a result of circumstances. The main motivations were interest in medical knowledge (35.6%) and (24.8%) desire to work with patients and to help people. Clinical specialization was the future career of first choice in 62%, family medicine in 16.2% of them, while 16.2% were still undecided. In rating social esteem and reputation (scale 1-6), the students rated surgeons on average: surgeon 5.48, cardiologist 4.85, gynaecologist 4.6, psychiatrist 2.70, family physician 2.30 and specialist in preventive medicine 1.27. The essential reasons to enter a medical school are humanistic and not socioeconomic. Students prefer clinical specializations to family medicine. Final year medical students from Split Medical School suggest more practical work and field practice in order to improve the study quality. Although the majority of the polled students stated to have chosen medicine for humanistic reasons, more than half of them prefer to work in a hospital, and less than quarter as family physician in a city. Substantial changes in curriculum including an early contact with family physicians could motivate medical students to select family medicine as their future career more often.

  1. The birth order and personalities of medical students.

    PubMed

    Chan-Ob, Tinnakorn; Boonyanaruthee, Vudhichai; Pinyopornpanich, Manee; Intaprasert, Suthi; Kuntawongse, Nahathai

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine how birth position i.e. first-born, middle-born, lastborn, and only child, correlates with personality. One hundred and eighty from 186 (97%) 1st year medical students of Chiang Mai Medical School were asked to complete a questionnaire and take a personality test. The data obtained included age, sex, Grade Point Average (GPA), and family background i.e. birth order and the students' personality profiles, which were assessed by the California Psychological Inventory (CPI). The results showed that only children and lastborn had more positive personality factors than other groups. They had more ambition, breadth of interests, versatility, self confidence, clear-thinking, intelligence, and independence than first-born and middle-born (Cs and Ai scale on CPI). In addition, the students whose parents had died, separated, or divorced had some personality profiles that differed from the others. The findings both supported and contradicted other papers.

  2. E-mail communication between medical students and schoolchildren: A model for medical education.

    PubMed

    Bernhardt, A M; Dalton, M A; Sargent, J D; Stevens, M M

    2000-12-01

    To examine e-mail communication between student physicians and schoolchildren, in the context of a school-based tobacco prevention program, as a way to teach communication skills and model physician-patient interactions. Twenty medical students and pediatric residents were partnered with groups of children as part of HealthQuest, a tobacco prevention program implemented in 2 kindergarten through grade 12 Vermont schools. Medical students and residents acted as mentors for their group and provided support to the schoolchildren through e-mail and occasional site visits. E-mail messages were transmitted and stored in a Web server and monitored by preceptors. Content analysis of the messages was performed to identify emerging themes. During the 2-year intervention period, 1187 messages were exchanged between children, teachers, and the student physicians. Thirty-two percent (n = 383) of the messages involved tobacco, of which 54% addressed health effects; 23% were related to social influences of tobacco use, 15% to cessation by parents and others, and 7% to cessation by students. Other categories included nontobacco health issues (n = 135), personal questions (n = 294), and classroom information (n = 735). Many inquiries required medical students and residents to research their answers, and several required collaboration with preceptors, because the questions raised serious medical or psychosocial issues. With feedback, medical students and residents adjusted their responses so that they were appropriate for the developmental level of the children. The e-mail component of this program provided important learning opportunities for student physicians in tobacco control, child development, communication skills, and developing a physician-patient relationship. This model also offers potential benefits for medically underserved pediatric populations. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2000;154:1258-1262.

  3. Debt crisis ahead for Irish medical students.

    PubMed

    Haugh, C; Doyle, B; O'Flynn, S

    2014-06-01

    Internationally medical student debt is a cause of concern. A survey of medical students in UCC (response rate of 191 representing 35% of the EU student cohort) reveals that 34 (26%) of direct entry medicine (DEM) students and 36 (61%) graduate entrants (GEM) have a loan with an anticipated average debt of Euro17,300 and Euro80,000 on graduation respectively. Fifty-three (90%) graduate entrants and 75 (57%) direct entrants revealed that they often worry about their current financial situation. Fifty-three (28%) of students have a part-time job and many were concerned about the degree to which this conflicted with their academic workload. 118 (89%) of school leavers and 48 (81%) graduates received financial assistance from their families to fund their college expenses. Student responses recommended the introduction of a government supported low interest rate loan and other incentives to help service high levels of debt associated with medical education.

  4. Factors associated with stress among medical students.

    PubMed

    Qamar, Khadija; Khan, Najamus Saqib; Bashir Kiani, Muhammad Rizwan

    2015-07-01

    To determine the probable factors responsible for stress among undergraduate medical students. The qualitative descriptive study was conducted at a public-sector medical college in Islamabad, Pakistan, from January to April 2014. Self-administered open-ended questionnaires were used to collect data from first year medical students in order to study the factors associated with the new environment. There were 115 students in the study with a mean age of 19±6.76 years. Overall, 35(30.4%) students had mild to moderate physical problems, 20(17.4%) had severe physical problems and 60(52.2%) did not have any physical problem. Average stress score was 19.6±6.76. Major elements responsible for stress identified were environmental factors, new college environment, student abuse, tough study routines and personal factors. Majority of undergraduate students experienced stress due to both academic and emotional factors.

  5. Level of empathy among medical students in Kuwait University, Kuwait.

    PubMed

    Hasan, S; Al-Sharqawi, N; Dashti, F; AbdulAziz, M; Abdullah, A; Shukkur, M; Bouhaimed, M; Thalib, L

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the level of empathy among medical students in Kuwait University Medical School and its association with sociodemographic factors, stress levels and personality. A cross-sectional survey of 264 medical students was conducted in the Faculty of Medicine, Kuwait University. Empathy levels were measured using the Jefferson Scale, personality was assessed using the Zuckerman-Kuhlman Personality Scale and the Perceived Stress Scale was used to measure stress levels. Factors associated with empathy were evaluated using t test/ANOVA for categorical variables and correlation for continuous predictors. Mean empathy score was 104.6 ± 16.3. Empathy scores were significantly associated with gender, year of study, mother's level of education, household income, satisfactory relationship with the mother and stress levels. Male medical students in their clinical years also had significantly lower empathy levels. However, factors such as grade point average, desired specialty, marital status of parents, father's educational level and relationship with father were not significantly (p > 0.05) associated with levels of empathy. Stress scores were significantly and positively associated with empathy (r = 0.13; p = 0.041). Medical students in Kuwait University had low empathy level and this may be a cause for concern; as such we suggest a possible inclusion of emphasis on empathy in the curriculum. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. [The use of medical journals by medical students. Which medical journals are read?].

    PubMed

    Algra, Annemijn M; Dekker, Friedo W

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the role of scientific medical journals in Dutch medical curricula. Descriptive questionnaire study. In 2013, medical students (from year 3 onwards) at the Leiden University Medical Centre (LUMC), were invited to respond to an online questionnaire. They were presented with 28 multiple-choice questions and 11 statements about the use of scientific medical journals in the medical curriculum. We calculated the frequencies of the answers per question and analysed differences between medical students using two-by-two tables. The questionnaire was completed by 680 (53.0%) of 1277 invited medical students enrolled at the LUMC. Most of the respondents were those doing clinical rotations (56.6%) and 60.1% had research experience. More than half of the students read at least one scientific journal a few times per month; this percentage was 38.8% among third-year students, 49.3% among fourth-year students, 60.0% among those on clinical rotation, and was higher among students with research experience (63.3%) than among those without research experience (44.1%). Nearly 90% of students agreed with the statement that the development of academic and scientific education should take place in the bachelor's phase of medical school. Medical students start to read scientific medical journals at an early phase in the medical curriculum and this increases further when students start to undertake research projects or go on clinical rotation. Medical curricula should be constructed in such a way that medical students learn to select and interpret research findings adequately for themselves before they turn to articles from scientific medical journals.

  7. Are medical schools hesitant to teach undergraduate students teaching skills? A medical student's critical view

    PubMed Central

    Mileder, Lukas Peter

    2013-01-01

    Junior medical staff provides a large proportion of undergraduate student education. However, despite increasing numbers of resident-as-teacher training programs, junior doctors may still not be sufficiently prepared to teach medical students. Hence, medical schools should consider implementing formal teaching skills training into undergraduate curricula. PMID:24229730

  8. [Radiology as seen by medical students].

    PubMed

    Vidal, V; Jacquier, A; Giorgi, R; Pineau, S; Moulin, G; Petit, P; Girard, N; Bartoli, J-M; Gorincour, G

    2011-05-01

    To determine the impact of exposing medical students to medical imaging during the first year of the second cycle of medical school (DCEM1) on their perception of this medical specialty and the acquisition of its basic concepts. All students in the 2007-2008 graduation class entering into the first year of the second cycle of medical school were anonymously enrolled into this project that included pre-rotation and post-rotation questionnaires, theory classes followed by clinical rotations with clearly predetermined objectives. A total of 108 students were enrolled, with 70% being females. The parents of the students had a medical or paramedical profession in 46.3% of cases. Before the rotation, 61.6% of students perceived a difference between a hospital-based practice and private practice. Fifty-two percent of students had a clear idea of their professional future prior to the rotation. Five students (4.7%) believed prior to the rotation that it might have an impact on their professional future, versus 63% after the rotation (P<0.0001). The students whose parents work in the medical or paramedical field do not have a better defined idea of their professional future; on the other hand, they have more interest for radiology (73.6% with high or very high interest versus 52.8%, P=0.03). After the rotation, there was a significant increase in the number of students with high or very high interest for radiology (77.8% versus 66.7%, P=0.023). A student noted that he would redirect his career to radiology. There was also a significant increase in the number of students perceiving a difference between a hospital-based practice and private practice (82.2% versus 61.6%, P=0.003). With regards to radiology knowledge before and after the rotation, there was a significant increase of mean scores (P<0.001). Eighty-eight percent of students were satisfied or very satisfied with the radiology rotation. Overall, the students believe that 70% of the objectives were achieved. The only

  9. Psychiatric Diagnosis and Concomitant Medical Treatment for 1st and 2nd Grade Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornell-Swanson, La Vonne; Frankenberger, William; Ley, Katie; Bowman, Krista

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the proportion of children in 1st and 2nd grade classes who were currently prescribed medication for psychotropic disorders. The study also examined the attitudes of 1st and 2nd grade teachers toward diagnosis of psychiatric disorders and use of psychiatric medication to treat children. Results of the current study indicate…

  10. Dental Students' Grades and Their Relationship to Classroom Attendance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Sheldon; And Others

    1981-01-01

    A study to examine the assumption that absenteeism affects student performance is described. Strict attendance records were kept for a course in dental materials at the University of Tennessee College of Dentistry. All of the tests indicate a significant negative correlation between grades and absenteeism. (MLW)

  11. Reading Attitudes and Reading Interests of Urban Intermediate Grade Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hummel, Jeffrey W.; Fisher, Peter J. L.

    1985-01-01

    Administered Survey of Reading Attitudes and Bundy Reading Preference Survey to 130 fourth- and fifth-grade students. Significant moderate correlation between total score of Bundy Reading Preference Survey and the Reading as Enjoyment Dimension of the Survey of Reading Attitudes contributes to construct validity of both measures. (Author)

  12. Curriculum Development for Enhancing Grade Nine Students' Systems Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hernthaisong, Preeyanan; Sitti, Somsong; Sonsupap, Kanyarat

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this research were to study the development of a curriculum for enhancing grade 9 students' cognitive skills using a curriculum based on Systems Thinking Process. There were 3 phases: 1) studying of the problem; 2) development of tentative curriculum; and 3) implementation of the curriculum in a pilot study. The samples were 32…

  13. My Point of View: More Writing from Grade 9 Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northwest Territories Dept. of Education, Yellowknife.

    This booklet is a collection of writing by ninth-grade students taken from the 1987 and 1988 Canadian Territorial Achievement Tests. The booklet's 70 pieces of writing include essays on education in the Northwest Territory, narratives on how the best laid plans can go wrong, humorous treatments on uses for chewing gum and the best ways to keep…

  14. Classroom Activities for Able Students: In Fifth and Sixth Grades.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Economopoulos, Marjorie P.

    1981-01-01

    Challenging problems and project ideas for mathematically able students in grades 5 and 6 are reviewed. Number patterns are viewed as a good tool to introduce inductive and deductive thinking. Applications of mathematics in sales, the stock market, opinion polls, weather prediction, and other areas are discussed. (MP)

  15. What Upper-Grade Students Think about School Government

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sobkin, V. S.; Nikolashina, E. V.

    2008-01-01

    An adolescent's attitude toward school government clearly reflects certain negative aspects that have to do with his/her alienation from the social life of the school. This article has been based on materials of a 2005 sociological survey of students in the ninth and eleventh grades of schools in the city of Moscow (n = 2,105). The aim of the…

  16. Concepts of Career Fields Held by Eleventh Grade Students. 1968.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leton, Donald A.; Dodd, Carol J.

    Some 1,005 eleventh-grade students in three high schools were administered the Career Choice Questionnaire, the Occupational Orientation Inventory, and the Edwards Personality Preference Schedule. The responses to the questionnaire were tabulated and the distribution of scores on the occupational attitudes and personality needs inventory were…

  17. My Point of View: More Writing from Grade 9 Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northwest Territories Dept. of Education, Yellowknife.

    This booklet is a collection of writing by ninth-grade students taken from the 1987 and 1988 Canadian Territorial Achievement Tests. The booklet's 70 pieces of writing include essays on education in the Northwest Territory, narratives on how the best laid plans can go wrong, humorous treatments on uses for chewing gum and the best ways to keep…

  18. Bibliography of Spanish Materials for Students, Grades Seven through Twelve.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento.

    This annotated bibliography of Spanish materials for students in grades seven through twelve is divided into the following categories: (1) Art, Drama, Music, and Poetry; (2) Books in Series; (3) Culture; (4) Dictionaries and Encyclopedias; (5) Literature; (6) Mathematics; (7) Physical Education, Health, and Recreation; (8) Reading and Language…

  19. Diagnostic Appraisal of Grade 12 Students' Understanding of Reaction Kinetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yan, Yaw Kai; Subramaniam, R.

    2016-01-01

    The study explored grade 12 students' understanding of reaction kinetics, a topic which has not been extensively explored in the chemistry education literature at this level. A 3-tier diagnostic instrument with 11 questions was developed--this format is of very recent origin and has been the subject of only a handful of studies. The findings…

  20. Grading Students with Significant Disabilities in Inclusive Settings: Teacher Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurth, Jennifer; Gross, Megan; Lovinger, Stephanie; Catalano, Tammy

    2012-01-01

    The present study describes teacher (K-12) opinions and practices related to grading and providing modified instruction, assignments, and assessments for students with low-incidence disabilities in inclusive settings. One hundred and thirty nine teachers working in K-12 inclusive schools in Arizona and California completed an on-line survey…

  1. Diagnostic Appraisal of Grade 12 Students' Understanding of Reaction Kinetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yan, Yaw Kai; Subramaniam, R.

    2016-01-01

    The study explored grade 12 students' understanding of reaction kinetics, a topic which has not been extensively explored in the chemistry education literature at this level. A 3-tier diagnostic instrument with 11 questions was developed--this format is of very recent origin and has been the subject of only a handful of studies. The findings…

  2. Improving 4th Grade Primary School Students' Reading Comprehension Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bulut, Aydin

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to carry out action research to investigate reading comprehension skills when using the SQ3R reading comprehension strategy. To that end, this strategy was used for improving the reading comprehension skills of 7 primary school 4th grade students who had problems with these skills. An action plan was prepared for 3hours a…

  3. First Grade Teachers' Perceptions of and Expectations for ELL Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Couch, Marsha

    2010-01-01

    Educational disparities exist between English language learners (ELLs) and native English-speaking students. Evidence suggests that, by fourth grade, 35% of ELLs, compared to their native English-speaking peers, are behind in math, and 47% are behind in reading. There is also evidence to suggest that these lower achievement scores are impacted by…

  4. Enhancing Eighth Grade Student Presentations of Scientific Research with Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shreiner, Berdella H.

    This practicum was designed to improve the research and communication skills of eighth-grade students with the integration of technology, mathematics, and science when doing real-experience problem solving. Four units were developed that related the use of technology to skills that are also used in gathering, organizing, and manipulating research…

  5. Teaching Gifted Students Literature in Grades Seven through Nine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Covey, Barbara L.

    Prepared for use by teachers of mentally gifted students in grades 7 through 9, the booklet offers a curriculum design for the teaching of literature. Considered is the difficult developmental stage in late childhood and early adolescence when children begin to assert their roles as individuals and often have no adult model other than the friendly…

  6. Beginning Eleventh Grade Student Profile, Mathematics Standards, Citrus County, Florida.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Citrus County Board of Public Instruction, Inverness, FL.

    This collection of booklets deals with minumum standards in mathematics for beginning eleventh grade students. There is a statement of the standards with related skills, a test to assess competency with accompanying answer sheet and answer key, and eight booklets presenting problems covered by six of the standards. The booklets cover: percentages;…

  7. Curriculum Development for Enhancing Grade Nine Students' Systems Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hernthaisong, Preeyanan; Sitti, Somsong; Sonsupap, Kanyarat

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this research were to study the development of a curriculum for enhancing grade 9 students' cognitive skills using a curriculum based on Systems Thinking Process. There were 3 phases: 1) studying of the problem; 2) development of tentative curriculum; and 3) implementation of the curriculum in a pilot study. The samples were 32…

  8. Exploring Beginning Inference with Novice Grade 7 Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Jane M.

    2008-01-01

    This study documented efforts to facilitate ideas of beginning inference in novice grade 7 students. A design experiment allowed modified teaching opportunities in light of observation of components of a framework adapted from that developed by Pfannkuch for teaching informal inference with box plots. Box plots were replaced by hat plots, a…

  9. Teaching Gifted Students Social Sciences in Grades Seven through Nine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miles, Robert S.

    It is stated that the social science curriculum for gifted junior high school students can be enriched by drawing from psychology, sociology, and anthropology. An overview of instruction in the social sciences includes specification of subject matter emphases in grades 7-9, definition of major goals (process, personal, and situational goals) in…

  10. Stop Tobacco in Restaurants: Fifth Grade Students STIR City Hall

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Ronald Vaughan

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses a campaign called STIR: Stop Tobacco in Restaurants, that was started by fourth and fifth grade students. The goal was to end smoking in public places, including restaurants, bowling alleys, sports bars, and pool halls. For two years they motivated their peers, coordinated an information campaign to urge kids and adults to…

  11. Math Manipulatives to Increase 4th Grade Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Couture, Katie

    2012-01-01

    This research project was completed with twenty-nine fourth grade students from Shawnee Elementary, a school in the Chippewa Valley School District. It began in April 2012 and the data collection was completed by June 2012. The purpose of this project was to see if utilizing math manipulatives in an elementary classroom will increase student…

  12. Developing Visual Literacy among Academically Able Fifth-Grade Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casey, Heidi Van Ert; Wolf, Joan S.

    1989-01-01

    The study with 34 gifted fifth-grade students found that a concrete sequential approach to developing visual literacy was more effective than an abstract visualization approach. Subjects either received guided visualization or direct instruction on such art concepts as shape, form, line, color, perspective, variety, and unity. (DB)

  13. Perceived Effects of Standards-Based Grading on Student Assessments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoernke, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    This study explored how the implementation of a district-wide standards-based grading system affected the ways in which high school teachers assessed students' academic achievement. The researcher used a bounded case study to observe and interview three participating secondary teachers in a rural Wisconsin high school that used standards-based…

  14. Environmental Knowledge and Beliefs among Grade 10 Students in Australia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eyers, Vivian George

    To develop environmental education in Australia, a survey of tenth-grade students was undertaken. Thirty knowledge items and ten belief items were constructed. A panel of environmentalists and educators identified best responses for the knowledge items, and a common reference point, preservation of homo sapiens, for the belief items, so a…

  15. Dental Students' Grades and Their Relationship to Classroom Attendance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Sheldon; And Others

    1981-01-01

    A study to examine the assumption that absenteeism affects student performance is described. Strict attendance records were kept for a course in dental materials at the University of Tennessee College of Dentistry. All of the tests indicate a significant negative correlation between grades and absenteeism. (MLW)

  16. Teaching Gifted Students Social Sciences in Grades Seven Through Nine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento. Office of Curriculum Services.

    Intended for use by teachers, consultants and administrators, the booklet discusses social science instruction for gifted students in grades 7-9. An introductory section provides an overview of goals and parameters of the social sciences (psychology, sociology, and anthropology). The scientific research process is described in terms of five steps,…

  17. A Science Assessment Program for Kindergarten and First Grade Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greening, Gary A.

    Presented are science units for kindergarten and first-grade classes which include one or more non-verbal test items constructed to determine whether the student has learned the material presented in the unit. Units include: light, senses, gerbils, beans and peas, animal activities, and hatching chicks. (SL)

  18. Beginning Eleventh Grade Student Profile, Mathematics Standards, Citrus County, Florida.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Citrus County Board of Public Instruction, Inverness, FL.

    This collection of booklets deals with minumum standards in mathematics for beginning eleventh grade students. There is a statement of the standards with related skills, a test to assess competency with accompanying answer sheet and answer key, and eight booklets presenting problems covered by six of the standards. The booklets cover: percentages;…

  19. Differential Teacher Grading Behavior toward Female Students of Mathematics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duval, Concetta M.

    1980-01-01

    This study attempted to determine if teachers discriminate against female learners of mathematics. More than 1000 secondary mathematics teachers were asked to grade four geometry proofs. Student sex and ability were the independent variables. Analysis yielded no significant F ratios for either of the main effects or their interaction. (Author/MK)

  20. Grade 6 Social Studies Achievement Test: Provincial Report, Student Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Dept. of Education, Edmonton.

    Test components and results of the Grade 6 Social Studies Achievement Tests in Alberta, Canada administered to 28,566 students are described in this booklet. All questions were drawn from three prescribed topics: Topic A--"How People in Earlier Times Met Their Needs"; Topic B--"How People in Eastern Societies Meet Their Needs…

  1. An Exploratory Study of Spelling Errors of Grade Three Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varnhagen, Stanley J.; Varnhagen, Connie K.

    Noting that while the number of errors gives a general indication of spelling ability, it may represent an oversimplification of the spelling process, a study examined the spelling ability of 40 Canadian third grade students of average ability. Subjects were divided into low and high spelling ability groups on the basis of the Edmonton (Alberta)…

  2. Determinants of Grades in Maths for Students in Economics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cappellari, Lorenzo; Lucifora, Claudio; Pozzoli, Dario

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates the determinants of grades achieved in maths by first-year students in economics. We use individual administrative data from 1993 to 2005 to fit an educational production function. Our main findings suggest that good secondary school achievements and the type of school attended are significantly associated with maths…

  3. Exploring Beginning Inference with Novice Grade 7 Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Jane M.

    2008-01-01

    This study documented efforts to facilitate ideas of beginning inference in novice grade 7 students. A design experiment allowed modified teaching opportunities in light of observation of components of a framework adapted from that developed by Pfannkuch for teaching informal inference with box plots. Box plots were replaced by hat plots, a…

  4. Discrimination Evidence for Examining Fourth Grade Students' Learning Disability Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hassan, Abdulhameed S.; Al-Harthy, Ibrahim S.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the ability of discriminate variables (perceptual-motor, hyperactivity disorder, neurological and psychological skills) to distinguish between normal (n = 68) and students with learning disabilities (n = 72) in fourth grade. Three instruments were developed: perceptual-motor scale, hyperactivity disorder scale, skills test…

  5. Role of a medical student: patient perspectives.

    PubMed

    Evans, David; Owen, Stephanie; Green, John

    2017-08-01

    Medical students form an important part of the medical team; however, patients may not be fully aware of their role. Identifying students in the clinical setting is difficult because of their similar attire to other health care professionals. This parity may introduce unethical scenarios where patients may be speaking and consenting to individuals whom they do not recognise as students. A single-sided questionnaire was given to hospital in-patients during a 12-week period. Questions focused on the role of students. With their opinions, patients were given a list of clinical skills and asked whether or not they would allow a student to carry out these skills on themselves. The list included both required and non-required clinical skills by the General Medical Council (GMC). In total, 101 patients participated in the study: 34 males and 67 females. Age at admittance was 63.4 ± 18.0 years; 74.3 per cent of patients were able to identify a student, although 87.1 per cent believed that students should have a designated uniform. Patients were significantly more likely to allow a student to perform required skills on them, as opposed to non-required skills (p < 0.0001); however, previous contact with a medical student made no difference in the likelihood of consenting to a skill being performed. Identifying students in the clinical setting is difficult CONCLUSIONS: The apparent trade-off between patient safety and providing students with learning opportunities has been of long standing concern. Patients consider GMC-required skills as largely appropriate; however, patients feel that students should be more identifiable, and increasing the awareness of the role and capabilities of a student in patient care is important. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and The Association for the Study of Medical Education.

  6. Development and evaluation of a computer program to grade student performance on peripheral blood smears

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehman, Donald Clifford

    Today's medical laboratories are dealing with cost containment health care policies and unfilled laboratory positions. Because there may be fewer experienced clinical laboratory scientists, students graduating from clinical laboratory science (CLS) programs are expected by their employers to perform accurately in entry-level positions with minimal training. Information in the CLS field is increasing at a dramatic rate, and instructors are expected to teach more content in the same amount of time with the same resources. With this increase in teaching obligations, instructors could use a tool to facilitate grading. The research question was, "Can computer-assisted assessment evaluate students in an accurate and time efficient way?" A computer program was developed to assess CLS students' ability to evaluate peripheral blood smears. Automated grading permits students to get results quicker and allows the laboratory instructor to devote less time to grading. This computer program could improve instruction by providing more time to students and instructors for other activities. To be valuable, the program should provide the same quality of grading as the instructor. These benefits must outweigh potential problems such as the time necessary to develop and maintain the program, monitoring of student progress by the instructor, and the financial cost of the computer software and hardware. In this study, surveys of students and an interview with the laboratory instructor were performed to provide a formative evaluation of the computer program. In addition, the grading accuracy of the computer program was examined. These results will be used to improve the program for use in future courses.

  7. Ideal Personality Characteristics for Veterinary Medical Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birchard, S. J.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    An Adjective Check List was used to compare and contrast the desired personality traits for veterinarians. Data were collected from members of an admissions committee, the general public, and veterinary medical students. (LBH)

  8. Second and Third Grade Students in the Hunters Point-Bayview SEED Project: A Diagnostic Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Counelis, James Steve

    This report supplements the first South East Education Development project (SEED) on first grade children. Full and partial records of 624 second grade students and 591 third grade students are the basis of this diagnostic review. The empirical data obtained for the SEED project students included: each student's sex and number of full days in…

  9. Mentoring for first year medical students: humanising medical education.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Arati; Singh, Navjeevan; Dhaliwal, Upreet

    2013-01-01

    New entrants are vulnerable to the challenges of the medical course; mentoring programmes are known to offer support. This paper evaluated the experiences of students and faculty enrolled in a new mentoring programme. After needs analysis of students and faculty, a small-group mentoring programme for new medical students was initiated. Fifty-five volunteer faculty mentors were allocated two-three students each. At year-end, feedback using an open-ended questionnaire, revealed that there was no contact in one-third of the cases; the commonest reasons cited were lack of mentee initiative, time and commitment. Supportive mentors were appreciated. Over 95% of respondents believed that mentoring was a good idea; many believed the mentee benefitted; mentors also reported improved communication and affective skills; 60 (77.0%) mentees wanted to mentor new students the following year. Thus, mentoring of first-year students by faculty was effective, when contact occurred, in making the mentee feel supported. Mentoring may be a means of honing the affective domain and humanitarian instincts of medical faculty and students.

  10. Disabled graduate-entry medical student experience.

    PubMed

    Tso, Simon

    2017-04-24

    This study explored the experiences of graduate-entry medicine degree programme students who were disabled on the disclosure of their disability and the challenging disability issues they encountered during their degree programme. Eight student volunteers with a disability from the University of Warwick graduate-entry medicine degree programme took part in this study. Audio recordings of their semi-structured interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed thematically. Contributory factors to a reluctance or delay in disclosing disability to the medical school included confidentiality concerns, the potential impact of disclosure on their medical school application outcome and not perceiving their disability had an impact on their ability to function. They disclosed their disability for a range of professional and practical considerations. One participant was investigated and diagnosed with dyslexia following failure in a medical school examination. Disabled medical students encountered challenging issues such as having concerns about their future fitness to practice and employability, repeated disclosure of disability, confidentiality, abuse and difficulties in organising reasonable adjustments. Disabled medical students encounter challenging issues DISCUSSION: Medical school staff should keep an open mind about undiagnosed disability as a potential contributory factor to graduate students' academic underperformance. Participants expressed concerns about the management of their disability information that could potentially be addressed through regular dialogue between the students with a disability and medical school representatives, to define who, when and how other staff members could have access to the students' disability information. Despite the challenges students with a disability encountered during their degree programme, they viewed themselves as individuals who were in a good position to empathise with patients and understand their needs. © 2017 John

  11. Selected determinants may account for dropout risks among medical students.

    PubMed

    Mørcke, Anne Mette; O'Neill, Lotte; Kjeldsen, Inge Trads; Eika, Berit

    2012-09-01

    The dropout level from the Danish medical schools is high, but we have only little insight into this problem. The purpose of this study was to qualify the ongoing discussions concerning dropout. In this retrospective cohort study, relevant variables were extracted from the established database of Aarhus University for the 639 students initiating medicine studies between 1 January 1999 and 31 December 2000. A multivariate pre-admission and post-admission model was examined. Of the 639 medical students, 20% dropped out. Most students dropped out during their first year. The type of admission exam was a strong predictor of dropout in the pre-admission model, whereas previous higher education protected against dropout. Obtaining leave was a very strong predictor of dropout in the post-admission model, whereas high grades protected against dropout. The dropout rate has been decreasing during the past decade. Young people considering studying medicine could be advised to choose natural science subjects in high school, and a number of research questions concerning preparedness for medical school are worth pursuing. Leave or very low grades during the first and second study years might serve as red flags to supervisors. Study research was funded by Aarhus University. Not relevant, register-based research with no biological human material cannot be notified to the Danish Committee System. The Danish Data Protection Agency allows schools to conduct anonymized, non-sensitive, educational analyses without notification.

  12. Student and Faculty Perceptions of Plus/Minus Grading and Its Effect on Course Grade Point Averages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edgar, Leslie D.; Johnson, Donald M.; Graham, Donna L.; Dixon, Bruce L.

    2014-01-01

    In fall 2005, the Dale Bumpers College of Agricultural, Food and Life Sciences at the University of Arkansas authorized the optional use of a plus/minus grading system. Since 2005, approximately one-half of courses have been graded using plus/minus and one-half using the straight letter grade system. This study examined student (n = 338) and…

  13. Student and Faculty Perceptions of Plus/Minus Grading and Its Effect on Course Grade Point Averages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edgar, Leslie D.; Johnson, Donald M.; Graham, Donna L.; Dixon, Bruce L.

    2014-01-01

    In fall 2005, the Dale Bumpers College of Agricultural, Food and Life Sciences at the University of Arkansas authorized the optional use of a plus/minus grading system. Since 2005, approximately one-half of courses have been graded using plus/minus and one-half using the straight letter grade system. This study examined student (n = 338) and…

  14. Longitudinal Investigation of Elementary Students' Science Academic Achievement in 4-8th Grades: Grade Level and Gender Differences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bursal, Murat

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the change of the science academic achievement by grade level and gender where 222 elementary students' science and technology course scores between the 4th and 8th grades and science success percentages in 6th and 8th grades Level Determination Exam were longitudinally analyzed. Based on the findings of this study,…

  15. A change to pass/fail grading in the first two years at one medical school results in improved psychological well-being.

    PubMed

    Bloodgood, Robert A; Short, Jerry G; Jackson, John M; Martindale, James R

    2009-05-01

    To measure the impact of a change in grading system in the first two years of medical school, from graded (A, B, C, D, F) to pass/fail, on medical students' academic performance, attendance, residency match, satisfaction, and psychological well-being. For both the graded and pass/fail classes, objective data were collected on academic performance in the first- and second-year courses, the clerkships, United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) Steps 1 and 2 Clinical Knowledge (CK), and residency placement. Self-report data were collected using a Web survey (which included the Dupuy General Well-Being Schedule) administered each of the first four semesters of medical school. The study was conducted from 2002 to 2007 at the University of Virginia School of Medicine. The pass/fail class exhibited a significant increase in well-being during each of the first three semesters of medical school relative to the graded class, greater satisfaction with the quality of their medical education during the first four semesters of medical school, and greater satisfaction with their personal lives during the first three semesters of medical school. The graded and pass/fail classes showed no significant differences in performance in first- and second-year courses, grades in clerkships, scores on USMLE Step 1 and Step 2CK, success in residency placement, and attendance at academic activities. A change in grading from letter grades to pass/fail in the first two years of medical school conferred distinct advantages to medical students, in terms of improved psychological well-being and satisfaction, without any reduction in performance in courses or clerkships, USMLE test scores, success in residency placement, or level of attendance.

  16. Training Medical Students in Empathic Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bayne, Hannah Barnhill

    2011-01-01

    Empathy is an important component of the doctor-patient relationship, yet previous studies point to its steady decline in medical students as they progress through medical school and residency programs. Empathy training has thus been identified as a goal of instruction, yet it is unclear how this training can best be implemented within the medical…

  17. Clinical Oncology Assistantship Program for Medical Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neilan, Barbara A.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    The Clinical Oncology Assistantship Program at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences is described, along with student reactions to the program. The summer elective program involves cancer lectures (one week) and clinical exposure (nine weeks) in medical, surgical, and pediatric oncology services, as well as self-directed learning…

  18. Clinical Oncology Assistantship Program for Medical Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neilan, Barbara A.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    The Clinical Oncology Assistantship Program at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences is described, along with student reactions to the program. The summer elective program involves cancer lectures (one week) and clinical exposure (nine weeks) in medical, surgical, and pediatric oncology services, as well as self-directed learning…

  19. Medical Student Empathy: Interpersonal Distinctions and Correlates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Kevin D.; Foster, Penni Smith

    2016-01-01

    Attention to interpersonal behaviors, communication, and relational factors is taking on increasing importance in medical education. Medical student empathy is one aspect of the physician-patient relationship that is often involved in beneficial interactions leading to improved clinical outcomes and patient satisfaction. As an interpersonal…

  20. Keeping Dissection Alive for Medical Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chambers, James; Emlyn-Jones, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Traditional dissection teaching is being reduced in a number of medical schools, particularly in the United Kingdom. In response to this, 12 medical students from Warwick University, UK, traveled to the Island of Grenada for an intensive extracurricular dissection course at St. George's University. This course not only benefited the host…

  1. Medical Student Empathy: Interpersonal Distinctions and Correlates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Kevin D.; Foster, Penni Smith

    2016-01-01

    Attention to interpersonal behaviors, communication, and relational factors is taking on increasing importance in medical education. Medical student empathy is one aspect of the physician-patient relationship that is often involved in beneficial interactions leading to improved clinical outcomes and patient satisfaction. As an interpersonal…

  2. Keeping Dissection Alive for Medical Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chambers, James; Emlyn-Jones, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Traditional dissection teaching is being reduced in a number of medical schools, particularly in the United Kingdom. In response to this, 12 medical students from Warwick University, UK, traveled to the Island of Grenada for an intensive extracurricular dissection course at St. George's University. This course not only benefited the host…

  3. Physicians' and Medical Students' Knowledge of Nutrition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mlodinow, Steven G.; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth

    1989-01-01

    A study was conducted to assess the knowledge of nutrition of family practitioners and general internists and first- and second-year medical students before they had received medical school instruction in clinical nutrition. The physicians scored better on topics most heavily researched and worse on less heavily investigated topics. (Author/MLW)

  4. Drinking among medical students: a questionnaire survey.

    PubMed

    Collier, D J; Beales, I L

    1989-07-01

    To assess the prevalence of drinking among medical students a questionnaire on smoking, exercise, drinking, and weight was distributed among the students available. A total of 260 replies were received from an estimated available population of 350 students (134 men and 126 women). The mean alcohol consumption obtained by a quantity-frequency measure was 20.5 units/week for male students and 14.6 units/week for female students. Retrospective diary reports showed mean (SE) consumptions of 18 (2) units/week for men (n = 134) and 11 (1) units/week for women (n = 126). Consumption among the men closely matched consumption among men matched for age in the general population. Women, however, drank more than women matched for age. Male and female medical students exceeded the suggested maximum for their sex in equal proportions. Quantity-frequency data showed that 31 (23%) men drank over 35 units/week and 28 (22%) women drank over 21 units/week. Of the 59 students exceeding these limits, 51 responded positively to a standard screening questionnaire for alcohol abuse. Forty students reported that they might have a drinking problem, and 138 reported that alcohol had affected their academic performance at some time; 17 of these were affected frequently. The students suggested sensible maximum consumption figures for health education. Smoking was associated with heavy drinking, especially among the women. These results suggest that some medical students are compromising their future health and their academic performance through excessive drinking.

  5. How Medical Students Use Objectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mast, Terrill A.; And Others

    Two related studies were undertaken at Southern Illinois University on how students in the School of Medicine use the instructional objectives faculty prepare for them. Students in the classes of 1978 and 1979 were surveyed in their final month of training. The second survey was modified, based on responses from the first. The five research…

  6. Medical student mental health 3.0: improving student wellness through curricular changes.

    PubMed

    Slavin, Stuart J; Schindler, Debra L; Chibnall, John T

    2014-04-01

    Medical education can have significant negative effects on the well-being of medical students. To date, efforts to improve student mental health have focused largely on improving access to mental health providers, reducing the stigma and other barriers to mental health treatment, and implementing ancillary wellness programs. Still, new and innovative models that build on these efforts by directly addressing the root causes of stress that lie within the curriculum itself are needed to properly promote student wellness. In this article, the authors present a new paradigm for improving medical student mental health, by describing an integrated, multifaceted, preclinical curricular change program implemented through the Office of Curricular Affairs at the Saint Louis University School of Medicine starting in the 2009-2010 academic year. The authors found that significant but efficient changes to course content, contact hours, scheduling, grading, electives, learning communities, and required resilience/mindfulness experiences were associated with significantly lower levels of depression symptoms, anxiety symptoms, and stress, and significantly higher levels of community cohesion, in medical students who participated in the expanded wellness program compared with those who preceded its implementation. The authors discuss the utility and relevance of such curricular changes as an overlooked component of change models for improving medical student mental health.

  7. Medical Student Mental Health 3.0: Improving Student Wellness Through Curricular Changes

    PubMed Central

    Schindler, Debra L.; Chibnall, John T.

    2014-01-01

    Medical education can have significant negative effects on the well-being of medical students. To date, efforts to improve student mental health have focused largely on improving access to mental health providers, reducing the stigma and other barriers to mental health treatment, and implementing ancillary wellness programs. Still, new and innovative models that build on these efforts by directly addressing the root causes of stress that lie within the curriculum itself are needed to properly promote student wellness. In this article, the authors present a new paradigm for improving medical student mental health, by describing an integrated, multifaceted, preclinical curricular change program implemented through the Office of Curricular Affairs at the Saint Louis University School of Medicine starting in the 2009–2010 academic year. The authors found that significant but efficient changes to course content, contact hours, scheduling, grading, electives, learning communities, and required resilience/mindfulness experiences were associated with significantly lower levels of depression symptoms, anxiety symptoms, and stress, and significantly higher levels of community cohesion, in medical students who participated in the expanded wellness program compared with those who preceded its implementation. The authors discuss the utility and relevance of such curricular changes as an overlooked component of change models for improving medical student mental health. PMID:24556765

  8. Motivation, study habits, and expectations of medical students in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Amin, Zubair; Tani, Massimiliano; Eng, Khoo Hoon; Samarasekara, Dujeepa D; Huak, Chan Yiong

    2009-12-01

    To determine the motivation and incentives in education, learning experience and teaching techniques, and expectations about future careers among medical students from a multi-ethnic Asian country. Pre-validated questionnaire-based survey with stratified random sampling among medical students. The questionnaire combined qualitative responses with semi-quantitative measures of available alternatives. The response rate was 83.1%. The most important factor for pursuing university study was 'prospect of finding an interesting challenging job' (rank 1-75%). Family made a significant contribution in decision making. Given the chance, a majority (67.2%) of respondents would prefer to study overseas. The main deterring factors were cost (67.7%), distance from home (28%), and local opportunity for post-graduation (23.4%). Despite their inclination of study overseas, the majority (73.9%) of the respondents indicated they were either very satisfied or satisfied with their current choice of university study. Only 20% of students were comfortable in asking questions in classroom as asking questions was deemed 'too risky' and 'unnecessary to get better grades'. Students adopted strategies related to assessment and competition to monitor their study. Senior students reported university education as less relevant to their future careers as compared to junior students (p = 0.002). Students' learning behaviour is determined by complex factors such as educational incentives, learning support, assessment and competition. Among several external factors, family, job prospects and expectations about the future play a critical role in education.

  9. Patterns and trends of medical student research.

    PubMed

    Wickramasinghe, Dakshitha Praneeth; Perera, Chamila Sudarshi; Senarathna, Supun; Samarasekera, Dharmabandhu Nandadeva

    2013-12-28

    Our study describes the change in the research output, trends and content of published research involving medical students over the last century. Pubmed® and Scopus® were searched for keywords 'Medical Student' in the affiliation field. The search results were combined in Endnote® and duplicate entries removed and the multiple variables described below were assessed. The combined searches after excluding duplicates yielded 416 results and 66 articles were excluded. There was an exponential increase in medical student research from 1980-2010. Medical student was the first author in 170 (48.6%) studies and 55 studies were authored by a single medical student. The 3 most common areas of research in descending order were Psychiatry (n = 26, 7.4%), General Medicine (n = 24, 6.9%) and Medical Education (n = 21, 6%). The commonest type of articles, in descending order were review articles (n = 48, 13.7%), Cross sectional studies (n = 47, 13.4%) and Case reports (n = 43, 12.3. The majority of these articles (n = 207, 59.1%) have never been cited subsequently. The trend of increasing number of articles was seen equally among all article types, fields and countries. There is an exponential increase in articles by medical students but the majority of articles have not been cited. The numbers of medical student authors per publication have remained static while the total numbers of authors have increased. The proportions in the type of articles, fields of study and country of origin have largely remained static. Publishers and authors should strive to enhance the quality and quantity of data available in indexing services.

  10. Quality of Life in Medical Students With Internet Addiction.

    PubMed

    Fatehi, Farzad; Monajemi, Alireza; Sadeghi, Anahita; Mojtahedzadeh, Rita; Mirzazadeh, Azim

    2016-10-01

    The widespread use of internet has caused new psychological, social, and educational problems for the students. The aim of this study was to examine the quality of life in medical students who suffer from internet addiction. This cross-sectional survey was carried out in Tehran University of Medical Sciences, and a total of 174 fourth-to seventh-year undergraduate medical students were enrolled. The quality of life was assessed by WHOQOL-BREF questionnaire which covers four domains of physical health, psychological, social relationships, and the environment. For assessing internet addiction, we used Internet Addiction Test (IAT) of Young. The students with IAT score higher than 50 were considered as addicted. For evaluating academic performance, the students were requested to report their grade point average (GPA). The mean IA score (±SD) was 34.13±12.76. Twenty-eight students (16.90%) had IAT score above 50. The mean quality of life score in internet addicted group was 54.97±11.38 versus 61.65±11.21 in normal group (P=0.005). Furthermore, there was a negative correlation between IA score and physical domain (r=-0.18, P=0.02); psychological domain (r=-0.35, P=0.000); and social relation domain (r=-0.26, P=0.001). Mean GPA was significantly lower in the addicted group. It seems that quality of life is lower in the internet addicted medical students; moreover, such students academically perform poorer in comparison with non-addicts. Since internet addiction is increasing at a rapid pace which may provoke considerable academic, psychological and social implications; as a result, it may require screening programs to the immediate finding of such problem to give consultations to prevent unwanted complications.

  11. Concept mapping and science achievement of middle-grade students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snead, Donald

    2000-10-01

    This study was designed to examine the effects of concept mapping on science achievement of middle grade science students. Concept mapping is a graphic display of concepts and the relationships or links among them. A concept map represents the students' understanding of a body of knowledge. The subjects were one hundred eighty-two eighth grade students, distributed into eight intact earth science classes at Bowling Green Junior High School. Students were homogeneously grouped by above average and average ability levels. Therefore, the ability level variable was examined as a possible effect. Students were divided into four treatment groups (two per ability level) and four control groups (two per ability level). Two teachers were involved in teaching a unit on weather for nine weeks. The treatment groups constructed concept maps, while the control groups did not. Two testing instruments (a conventional weather test and six performance assessment items) were used to measure achievement. For this sample of students, analyses of covariance indicated no significant overall effects of treatment on science achievement. A weak but statistically students measured by combined performance assessment items. Similar to the literature reviewed, the results of this research are somewhat mixed. The results suggest that the effect of concept mapping on science achievement is not clear and science educators should be cautious as to its practical use in the classroom. Furthermore, the results suggest that researchers should continue to seek more data to either support or reject the effectiveness of concept mapping.

  12. Prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors in grade nine students.

    PubMed

    Prentice, Dawn; Kilty, Heather Lee; Stearne, Karen; Dobbin, Stafford W

    2008-01-01

    The Niagara Schools' Healthy Heart Program (NSHHP) is a health education and intervention program offered to students enrolled in a grade nine physical education course. The program involves completion of a family history and a self-report lifestyle survey, measurements of height, weight, blood pressure, and random total cholesterol levels, a heart education class, and CPR training. The purpose of this study was to report the prevalence of cardiovascular risk for adolescents enrolled in the program. A secondary analysis was conducted using data collected by the NSHHP staff to determine the prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors in grade nine students for the school year 2006. Specific risk factors studied were smoking, body mass index, total cholesterol level and blood pressure. A total of 3,639 students from 30 schools participated. Almost 14% of students had at least one cardiovascular risk factor. Body mass index was found to be the highest risk factor (13.7%) and total random cholesterol level (5%) was found to be the lowest risk factor in this sample. There were differences in prevalence rates between male and female students for all risk factors except elevated blood pressure. Five per cent of the students were referred to a family physician for follow-up, mostly for high cholesterol readings. The findings suggest that adolescents do have cardiovascular risk factors and prevention could be targeted to this population. These risk factors were already established by the time the students reached adolescence. The findings support conducting early prevention with younger children and adolescents.

  13. Critical Review: Medical Students' Motivation after Failure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holland, Chris

    2016-01-01

    About 10% of students in each years' entrants to medical school will encounter academic failure at some stage in their programme. The usual approach to supporting these students is to offer them short term remedial study programmes that often enhance approaches to study that are orientated towards avoiding failure. In this critical review I will…

  14. A Medical Student Workshop in Mechanical Ventilation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    And Others; Kushins, Lawrence G.

    1980-01-01

    In order to teach applied respiratory physiology to medical students, the anesthesiology faculty at the University of Florida College of Medicine has designed and implemented a course that includes a laboratory workshop in mechanical ventilation of an animal model that allows students to apply and expand their knowledge. (JMD)

  15. A Medical Student Workshop in Mechanical Ventilation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    And Others; Kushins, Lawrence G.

    1980-01-01

    In order to teach applied respiratory physiology to medical students, the anesthesiology faculty at the University of Florida College of Medicine has designed and implemented a course that includes a laboratory workshop in mechanical ventilation of an animal model that allows students to apply and expand their knowledge. (JMD)

  16. National ultrasound curriculum for medical students.

    PubMed

    Baltarowich, Oksana H; Di Salvo, Donald N; Scoutt, Leslie M; Brown, Douglas L; Cox, Christian W; DiPietro, Michael A; Glazer, Daniel I; Hamper, Ulrike M; Manning, Maria A; Nazarian, Levon N; Neutze, Janet A; Romero, Miriam; Stephenson, Jason W; Dubinsky, Theodore J

    2014-03-01

    Ultrasound (US) is an extremely useful diagnostic imaging modality because of its real-time capability, noninvasiveness, portability, and relatively low cost. It carries none of the potential risks of ionizing radiation exposure or intravenous contrast administration. For these reasons, numerous medical specialties now rely on US not only for diagnosis and guidance for procedures, but also as an extension of the physical examination. In addition, many medical school educators recognize the usefulness of this technique as an aid to teaching anatomy, physiology, pathology, and physical diagnosis. Radiologists are especially interested in teaching medical students the appropriate use of US in clinical practice. Educators who recognize the power of this tool have sought to incorporate it into the medical school curriculum. The basic question that educators should ask themselves is: "What should a student graduating from medical school know about US?" To aid them in answering this question, US specialists from the Society of Radiologists in Ultrasound and the Alliance of Medical School Educators in Radiology have collaborated in the design of a US curriculum for medical students. The implementation of such a curriculum will vary from institution to institution, depending on the resources of the medical school and space in the overall curriculum. Two different examples of how US can be incorporated vertically or horizontally into a curriculum are described, along with an explanation as to how this curriculum satisfies the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education competencies, modified for the education of our future physicians.

  17. Critical review: medical students' motivation after failure.

    PubMed

    Holland, Chris

    2016-08-01

    About 10 % of students in each years' entrants to medical school will encounter academic failure at some stage in their programme. The usual approach to supporting these students is to offer them short term remedial study programmes that often enhance approaches to study that are orientated towards avoiding failure. In this critical review I will summarise the current theories about student motivation that are most relevant to this group of students and describe how they are enhanced or not by various contextual factors that medical students experience during their programme. I will conclude by suggesting ways in which support programmes for students who have encountered academic failure might be better designed and researched in the future.

  18. The Performance of Female Medical Students in an Obstetrics and Gynecology Clerkship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Joseph M.; Smith, Imogene K.

    1982-01-01

    A study showed that although female medical students had slightly lower National Board examination scores on part one and lower grade point averages, they performed significantly better in the obstetrics and gynecology clerkship. Possible factors include women students' interest in women's health care and female representation on the house staff.…

  19. The Performance of Female Medical Students in an Obstetrics and Gynecology Clerkship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Joseph M.; Smith, Imogene K.

    1982-01-01

    A study showed that although female medical students had slightly lower National Board examination scores on part one and lower grade point averages, they performed significantly better in the obstetrics and gynecology clerkship. Possible factors include women students' interest in women's health care and female representation on the house staff.…

  20. Psychological Type and Undergraduate Student Achievement in Pharmacy Course in Military Medical University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shi, Ru; Shan, Shou-qin; Tian, Jian-quan

    2007-01-01

    The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) was given to 264 students in an undergraduate Pharmacy course at a military medical university. Selected MBTI personality types were compared for achievement in the course using a t-test to compare total points earned. High grades were earned by students stronger in the traits of introversion (I) and judgment…

  1. Selected medical students achieve better than lottery-admitted students during clerkships.

    PubMed

    Urlings-Strop, Louise C; Themmen, Axel P N; Stijnen, Theo; Splinter, Ted A W

    2011-10-01

    A recent controlled study by our group showed that the dropout rate in the first 2 years of study of medical students selected for entry by the assessment of a combination of non-cognitive and cognitive abilities was 2.6 times lower than that of a control group of students admitted by lottery. The aim of the present study was to compare the performance of these two groups in the clinical phase. A prospective cohort study was performed to compare the performance of 389 medical students admitted by selection with that of 938 students admitted by weighted lottery between 2001 and 2004. Follow-up of these cohorts lasted 5.5-8.5 years. The main outcome measures were the mean grade obtained on the first five discipline-specific clerkships by all cohorts and the mean grade achieved on all 10 clerkships by the cohorts of 2001 and 2002. Selected students obtained a significantly higher mean grade during their first five clerkships than lottery-admitted students (mean ± standard error [SE] 7.95 ± 0.03, 95% confidence interval [CI] 7.90-8.00 versus mean ± SE 7.84 ± 0.02, 95% CI 7.81-7.87; p < 0.001). This difference reflected the fact that selected students achieved a grade of ≥ 8.0 1.5 times more often than lottery-admitted students. An analysis of all mean grades awarded on 10 clerkships revealed the same results. Moreover, the longer follow-up period over the clerkships showed that the relative risk for dropout was twice as low in the selected student group as in the lottery-admitted student group. The selected group received significantly higher mean grades on their first five clerkships, which could not be attributed to factors other than the selection procedure. Although the risk for dropout before the clinical phase increased somewhat in both groups, the actual dropout rate proved to be twice as low in the selected group. © Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2011.

  2. The association between medical students' lifestyles and their attitudes towards preventive counseling in different countries.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yan; Yang, Yuxuan; Li, Zhifang; Zhou, Bo; Zhao, Yi; Yuan, Shen; Zhang, Ruijuan; Sebranek, Matthew; Veerman, Lennert; Li, Mu; Gong, Enying; Chen, Shu; Ma, Wenjie; Huang, Liping; Cho, KaWing; Leeder, Stephen; Yan, Lijing

    2015-11-14

    Preventive counselling is an effective approach to reducing the prevalence of non-communicable diseases. Studies have shown that there is a positive association between healthy behaviors of Colombian medical students and favorable attitudes towards preventive counselling. However, there is limited research that explores this relationship in different countries. The current study aimed to determine how the health behaviors of medical students from China, U.S., and Australia, are associated with attitudes towards preventive counseling. Students from five Chinese medical schools, Duke University in the U.S., and the University of Queensland in Australia, completed a 32-item, self-reported online survey. The survey was used to examine the prevalence of healthy behaviors and their association with attitudes towards preventive counseling. The target sample size was 150 students from each grade, or 450 students in total from different medical universities. Logistic regression analyses were used to assess the association between health behaviors and attitudes towards preventive counseling, stratified by grade and adjusted by gender. A positive association was found between healthy behaviors and attitudes towards preventive counseling for all medical students. There are significant differences among medical students' self-reported health behaviors and their attitudes towards preventive counselling from three different countries (P < 0.05). Chinese medical students were more positive in stress control (OR > 1) and more passive in limiting their smoking and alcohol behaviors compared to medical students in Duke University. However, compared to medical students in University of Queensland, five Chinese medical students were more passive in stress control (OR < 1). Based on the finding that healthy behaviors are positively related to favorable attitudes towards preventative counselling, medical students should adopt targeted courses and training in preventive

  3. The learning-disabled medical student.

    PubMed

    Accardo, P; Haake, C; Whitman, B

    1989-10-01

    Developmental pediatricians are being consulted by medical school promotion committees with regard to the course of action to be taken with learning-disabled medical students experiencing academic difficulties. Faculty attitude, a difficulty understanding the nature of learning disabilities, appears to be a major contributor to poor medical school performance on the part of learning-disabled adults. Utilizing the sequential-simultaneous information processing model as a simplified introduction to learning disability patterns, the authors argue that recommending intensive remediation of rote spelling and writing skills in students engaged in graduate education represents both a waste of time and a further emotional trauma to these young professionals.

  4. Reflections: Improving Medical Students' Presentation Skills.

    PubMed

    Tarkowski, Radoslaw

    2016-02-26

    Both good communication and presentation skills on the part of an academic teacher are crucial when trying to generate students' interest in the subject of a lecture. More generally, our task is to share knowledge in the most effective way possible. It is also worth teaching students presentation skills, as today's students are tomorrow's teachers. An engaging presentation is a powerful tool. There are some rules for presenting which I consider worthy of being discussed and taught at a medical university.

  5. Personalized Grading Plans: A Systematic Approach to Making the Grades of Included Students More Accurate and Meaningful

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munk, Dennis D.; Bursuck, William D.

    2004-01-01

    Do seemingly motivated students with learning disabilities work hard in general education classes only to receive lower grades than their peers? Donahoe and Zigmond (1990) found that 60-70% of students with learning disabilities passed their mainstreaming classes but received a below-average (below a C-) grade. A similar finding was reported by…

  6. Do Grades Shape Students' School Engagement? The Psychological Consequences of Report Card Grades at the Beginning of Secondary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poorthuis, Astrid M. G.; Juvonen, Jaana; Thomaes, Sander; Denissen, Jaap J. A.; de Castro, Bram Orobio; van Aken, Marcel A. G.

    2015-01-01

    Receiving report card grades is psychologically salient to most students and can elicit a range of affective reactions. A 3-wave longitudinal study examined how grades shape students' (N = 375; M age at Wave 1 = 12.6 years) school engagement through the affective reactions they elicit. Emotional and behavioral engagement were measured at the start…

  7. The Relationship between Grade Configuration and Standardized Science Test Scores of Fifth-Grade Students: What School Administrators Should Know

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Delonda; Jones, Lisa; Simieou, Felix; Matthew, Kathryn; Morgan, Bryan

    2013-01-01

    This study utilized a causal comparative (ex post facto) design to determine if a consistent relationship existed between fifth-grade students' success on the Science Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) at the elementary (K-5) level in comparison to fifth-grade students' success on the science TAKS at the intermediate (5-6) level. The…

  8. Do Grades Shape Students' School Engagement? The Psychological Consequences of Report Card Grades at the Beginning of Secondary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poorthuis, Astrid M. G.; Juvonen, Jaana; Thomaes, Sander; Denissen, Jaap J. A.; de Castro, Bram Orobio; van Aken, Marcel A. G.

    2015-01-01

    Receiving report card grades is psychologically salient to most students and can elicit a range of affective reactions. A 3-wave longitudinal study examined how grades shape students' (N = 375; M age at Wave 1 = 12.6 years) school engagement through the affective reactions they elicit. Emotional and behavioral engagement were measured at the start…

  9. MEDICAL RECORD TECHNOLOGY, A COURSE OF STUDY DESIGNED FOR COOPERATIVE PART-TIME STUDENTS EMPLOYED IN MEDICAL RECORD LIBRARIES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    KARNES, JAMES B.

    DESIGNED FOR USE BY ELEVENTH GRADE COOPERATIVE PART-TIME STUDENTS EMPLOYED IN MEDICAL RECORD LIBRARIES, THIS GUIDE MAY ALSO BE USED IN AREA VOCATIONAL OR POST-HIGH SCHOOL SETTINGS. IT WAS DEVELOPED BY A CONSULTANT COMMITTEE, TEACHER EDUCATORS, AND RESEARCH ASSISTANTS AT THE STATE LEVEL AND REVISED AFTER USE IN THE FIELD. THE CONTENT OBJECTIVES ARE…

  10. The medical student as behavioural psychotherapist.

    PubMed Central

    Stern, R S

    1975-01-01

    A group of medical students were randomly selected from a larger group to carry out behaviour therapy under supervision. Ten patients with phobic disorders and two with obsessive-compulsive neurosis were treated, and the results, assessed by ratings of proved reliability, compared favourably with other studies in which psychiatrists or nurses acted as therapists. A questionnaire survey showed that students involved in therapy had a more favourable opinion about this kind of treatment than those receiving only theoretical instruction. The results suggested not only that medical students make good behavioural psychotherapists but also that the subject is a worthwhile training experience which warrants inclusion in the curriculum. PMID:1131555

  11. A national survey of medical student suicides.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jacklyn; Kumar, Shelley; Nelson, Elizabeth; Harris, Toi; Coverdale, John

    2014-10-01

    Because there is no current information on medical student suicides, the authors surveyed US medical schools about deaths by suicide of medical students from June 2006 to July 2011. In spring through summer of 2012, the authors sent electronic surveys to the 133 accredited US allopathic medical schools at the time, excluding Puerto Rican schools. The 15-item survey included questions about deaths by suicide and deaths by means other than suicide. In the case of a reported suicide, the survey obtained information regarding demographic characteristics and method of suicide. The 90 responding schools (response rate 69 %) reported a total of six suicides (four males, two females; five Caucasians, one Asian) from July 2006 to June 2011. Two deaths by suicide occurred in first year, two in second year, and two in third year. Two of the suicides occurred by gunshot, two by hanging, one by overdose, and for one, the cause of death was unknown. Three of the six students left a suicide note. Although the number and rate of suicides among medical students may be lower than a prior survey that was conducted more than 15 years ago, these data affirm the importance of suicide prevention programs for medical students.

  12. Lectures in medical educaton: what students think?

    PubMed

    Mustafa, Tajammal; Farooq, Zerwa; Asad, Zunaira; Amjad, Rabbia; Badar, Iffat; Chaudhry, Abdul Majeed; Khan, Mohammad Amer Zaman; Rafique, Farida

    2014-01-01

    The volume of medical knowledge has increased exponentially and so has the need to improve the efficiency of current teaching practices.With increasing emphasis on interactive and problem based learning, the place of lectures in modern medical education has become a questionable issue. Objectives were to assess the perspective of undergraduate medical students regarding the role and effectiveness of lectures as a mode of instruction as well as the ways and means that can be employed to enhance the effectiveness of lectures. A cross sectional study was carried out among 2nd to final year medical students from five medical colleges including both private and public sector institutions. A total of 347 students participated by completing a structured questionnaire. Data was analyzed using SPSS-17. Sixty seven percent students considered lectures as a useful mode of instruction (47% males and 77% females), whereas 83% of the students reported that clinical sessions were superior to lectures because of small number of students in clinical sessions, active student participation, enhanced clinical orientation, and interaction with patients. About 64% responded that lectures should be replaced by clinical sessions. Majority of the students (92%) reported not being able to concentrate during a lecture beyond 30 minutes, whereas 70% skipped lectures as they were boring. A significantly greater proportion of male respondents, students from clinical years, and those who skipped lectures, considered lectures to be boring, a poor utilization of time and resources, and could not concentrate for the full duration of a lecture compared to females, students from preclinical years, and those who do not skip lectures, respectively. Lecturing techniques need to be improvised. The traditional passive mode of instruction has to be replaced with active learning and inquiry based approach to adequately utilize the time and resources spent on lectures.

  13. Teaching clinical reasoning to medical students.

    PubMed

    Amey, Lisa; Donald, Kenneth J; Teodorczuk, Andrew

    2017-07-02

    Clinical reasoning is often not explicitly addressed in the early medical school curriculum. As a result, students observe the process while on clinical placements with little or no understanding of the complex processes underlying it. Clinical reasoning has significant implications for patient safety. Medical errors as a consequence of faulty reasoning contribute to patient morbidity and mortality. Educating medical students at an early stage about the processes of clinical reasoning and strategies to avoid associated errors can have positive impacts upon patient safety. The authors propose that clinical reasoning should be taught as early as the first year of medical school, using frameworks, anatomical knowledge and mnemonics. Using this approach with simulated cases during the pre-clinical years, students will be equipped with an understanding of the clinical reasoning process as it unfolds before them while on clinical placements, enhancing their overall learning experience.

  14. The Impact of Literacy Intervention on Academic Performance of Third Grade At-Risk Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Vernita

    2015-01-01

    Third grade at-risk students in Wilson County Schools, Wilson, NC continuously perform below the state average on the North Carolina Third Grade Reading End-of-Grade test. Leaders in the Wilson County Schools school district implemented a literacy pull-out intervention program for third grade at-risk students as a strategy to improve reading…

  15. Change and Continuity in Student Achievement from Grades 3 to 5: A Policy Dilemma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCaslin, Mary; Burross, Heidi Legg; Good, Thomas L.

    2005-01-01

    In this article we examine student performance on mandated tests in grades 3, 4, and 5 in one state. We focus on this interval, which w e term "the fourth grade window," based on our hypothesis that students in grade four are particularly vulnerable to decrements in achievement. The national focus on the third grade as the critical…

  16. Work Values of 5th, 8th, and 11th Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hales, Loyde W.; Fenner, Bradford

    1972-01-01

    Self Realization, Job Security, Money, and Altruism were found to be the most important work values, with 5th and 8th grade students differing from 11th grade students on Altruism and Self Realization. (Author)

  17. The relation between student motivation and student grades in physical education: A 3-year investigation.

    PubMed

    Barkoukis, V; Taylor, I; Chanal, J; Ntoumanis, N

    2014-10-01

    Enhancing students' academic engagement is the key element of the educational process; hence, research in this area has focused on understanding the mechanisms that can lead to increased academic engagement. The present study investigated the relation between motivation and grades in physical education (PE) employing a 3-year longitudinal design. Three hundred fifty-four Greek high school students participated in the study. Students completed measures of motivation to participate in PE on six occasions; namely, at the start and the end of the school year in the first, second, and third year of junior high school. Students' PE grades were also recorded at these time points. The results of the multilevel growth models indicated that students' PE grades increased over the 3 years and students had better PE grades at the end of each year than at the beginning of the subsequent year. In general, students and classes with higher levels of controlling motivation achieved lower PE grades, whereas higher levels of autonomous motivation were associated with higher PE grades. These findings provide new insight on the associations between class- and individual-level motivation with objectively assessed achievement in PE. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Grade six students' understanding of the nature of science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cochrane, Donald Brian

    The goal of scientific literacy requires that students develop an understanding of the nature of science to assist them in the reasoned acquisition of science concepts and in their future role as citizens in a participatory democracy. The purpose of this study was to investigate and describe the range of positions that grade six students hold with respect to the nature of science and to investigate whether gender or prior science education was related to students' views of the nature of science. Two grade six classes participated in this study. One class was from a school involved in a long-term elementary science curriculum project. The science curriculum at this school involved constructivist epistemology and pedagogy and a realist ontology. The curriculum stressed hands-on, open-ended activities and the development of science process skills. Students were frequently involved in creating and testing explanations for physical phenomena. The second class was from a matched school that had a traditional science program. Results of the study indicated that students hold a wider range of views of the nature of science than previously documented. Student positions ranged from having almost no understanding of the nature of science to those expressing positions regarding the nature of science that were more developed than previous studies had documented. Despite the range of views documented, all subjects held realist views of scientific knowledge. Contrary to the literature, some students were able to evaluate a scientific theory in light of empirical evidence that they had generated. Results also indicated that students from the project school displayed more advanced views of the nature of science than their matched peers. However, not all students benefited equally from their experiences. No gender differences were found with respect to students' understanding of the nature of science.

  19. Patterns and trends of medical student research

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Our study describes the change in the research output, trends and content of published research involving medical students over the last century. Methods Pubmed® and Scopus® were searched for keywords ‘Medical Student’ in the affiliation field. The search results were combined in Endnote® and duplicate entries removed and the multiple variables described below were assessed. Results The combined searches after excluding duplicates yielded 416 results and 66 articles were excluded. There was an exponential increase in medical student research from 1980–2010. Medical student was the first author in 170 (48.6%) studies and 55 studies were authored by a single medical student. The 3 most common areas of research in descending order were Psychiatry (n = 26, 7.4%), General Medicine (n = 24, 6.9%) and Medical Education (n = 21, 6%). The commonest type of articles, in descending order were review articles (n = 48, 13.7%), Cross sectional studies (n = 47, 13.4%) and Case reports (n = 43, 12.3. The majority of these articles (n = 207, 59.1%) have never been cited subsequently. The trend of increasing number of articles was seen equally among all article types, fields and countries. Conclusions There is an exponential increase in articles by medical students but the majority of articles have not been cited. The numbers of medical student authors per publication have remained static while the total numbers of authors have increased. The proportions in the type of articles, fields of study and country of origin have largely remained static. Publishers and authors should strive to enhance the quality and quantity of data available in indexing services. PMID:24373230

  20. Teaching Skills in Medical Information Retrieval to Medical Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolner, Stuart J.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    A project that attempts to overcome the principal obstacles and to provide an efficient and effective method of teaching information retrieval skills to second-year medical students is described. The method includes a pretest, a diagnosis of deficiencies in information skills, a self-paced learning module, and a posttest. (Author/MLW)

  1. Competency in ECG Interpretation Among Medical Students

    PubMed Central

    Kopeć, Grzegorz; Magoń, Wojciech; Hołda, Mateusz; Podolec, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Background Electrocardiogram (ECG) is commonly used in diagnosis of heart diseases, including many life-threatening disorders. We aimed to assess skills in ECG interpretation among Polish medical students and to analyze the determinants of these skills. Material/Methods Undergraduates from all Polish medical schools were asked to complete a web-based survey containing 18 ECG strips. Questions concerned primary ECG parameters (rate, rhythm, and axis), emergencies, and common ECG abnormalities. Analysis was restricted to students in their clinical years (4th–6th), and students in their preclinical years (1st–3rd) were used as controls. Results We enrolled 536 medical students (females: n=299; 55.8%), aged 19 to 31 (23±1.6) years from all Polish medical schools. Most (72%) were in their clinical years. The overall rate of good response was better in students in years 4th–5th than those in years 1st–3rd (66% vs. 56%; p<0.0001). Competency in ECG interpretation was higher in students who reported ECG self-learning (69% vs. 62%; p<0.0001) but no difference was found between students who attended or did not attend regular ECG classes (66% vs. 66%; p=0.99). On multivariable analysis (p<0.0001), being in clinical years (OR: 2.45 [1.35–4.46] and self-learning (OR: 2.44 [1.46–4.08]) determined competency in ECG interpretation. Conclusions Polish medical students in their clinical years have a good level of competency in interpreting the primary ECG parameters, but their ability to recognize ECG signs of emergencies and common heart abnormalities is low. ECG interpretation skills are determined by self-education but not by attendance at regular ECG classes. Our results indicate qualitative and quantitative deficiencies in teaching ECG interpretation at medical schools. PMID:26541993

  2. Competency in ECG Interpretation Among Medical Students.

    PubMed

    Kopeć, Grzegorz; Magoń, Wojciech; Hołda, Mateusz; Podolec, Piotr

    2015-11-06

    Electrocardiogram (ECG) is commonly used in diagnosis of heart diseases, including many life-threatening disorders. We aimed to assess skills in ECG interpretation among Polish medical students and to analyze the determinants of these skills. Undergraduates from all Polish medical schools were asked to complete a web-based survey containing 18 ECG strips. Questions concerned primary ECG parameters (rate, rhythm, and axis), emergencies, and common ECG abnormalities. Analysis was restricted to students in their clinical years (4th-6th), and students in their preclinical years (1st-3rd) were used as controls. We enrolled 536 medical students (females: n=299; 55.8%), aged 19 to 31 (23±1.6) years from all Polish medical schools. Most (72%) were in their clinical years. The overall rate of good response was better in students in years 4th-5th than those in years 1st-3rd (66% vs. 56%; p<0.0001). Competency in ECG interpretation was higher in students who reported ECG self-learning (69% vs. 62%; p<0.0001) but no difference was found between students who attended or did not attend regular ECG classes (66% vs. 66%; p=0.99). On multivariable analysis (p<0.0001), being in clinical years (OR: 2.45 [1.35-4.46] and self-learning (OR: 2.44 [1.46-4.08]) determined competency in ECG interpretation. Polish medical students in their clinical years have a good level of competency in interpreting the primary ECG parameters, but their ability to recognize ECG signs of emergencies and common heart abnormalities is low. ECG interpretation skills are determined by self-education but not by attendance at regular ECG classes. Our results indicate qualitative and quantitative deficiencies in teaching ECG interpretation at medical schools.

  3. How Second-Grade Students Internalize Rules during Teacher-Student Transactions: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meard, Jacques; Bertone, Stefano; Flavier, Eric

    2008-01-01

    Background: Vygotsky's theory of the internalization of signs provided the basis for this study. Aims: This study tried to analyse the processes by which second-grade students internalize school rules. Sample: Ethnographic data were collected on 102 lessons in a second-grade class (6-8 years) during 1 year. This study focused on three lessons…

  4. K-8th Grade Korean Students' Conceptions of 'Changes of State' and 'Conditions for Changes of State'. Research Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paik, Seoung-Hey; Kim, Hyo-Nam; Cho, Boo-Kyoung; Park, Jae-Won

    2004-01-01

    This study investigates the various conceptions held by K-8th Korean grade students regarding the 'changes of state' and the 'conditions for changes of state'. The study used a sample of five kindergarteners, five secondgrade students, five fourth-grade students, five sixth-grade students, and five eighth-grade students. The 25 students attend…

  5. K-8th Grade Korean Students' Conceptions of 'Changes of State' and 'Conditions for Changes of State'. Research Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paik, Seoung-Hey; Kim, Hyo-Nam; Cho, Boo-Kyoung; Park, Jae-Won

    2004-01-01

    This study investigates the various conceptions held by K-8th Korean grade students regarding the 'changes of state' and the 'conditions for changes of state'. The study used a sample of five kindergarteners, five secondgrade students, five fourth-grade students, five sixth-grade students, and five eighth-grade students. The 25 students attend…

  6. The Relationship between Middle Grade Student Belonging and Middle Grade Student Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faust, Phyllis B.; Ennis, Leslie S.; Hodge, William M.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between a middle school initiative to develop student voice, interpersonal relationships, and intrapersonal relationships and students' sense of belonging. The literature indicated a strong connection between students' sense of belonging in school and positive outcomes in and out of the classroom (Deci &…

  7. Extracurricular Activities and Their Effect on the Student's Grade Point Average: Statistical Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakoban, R. A.; Aljarallah, S. A.

    2015-01-01

    Extracurricular activities (ECA) are part of students' everyday life; they play important roles in students' lives. Few studies have addressed the question of how student engagements to ECA affect student's grade point average (GPA). This research was conducted to know whether the students' grade point average in King Abdulaziz University,…

  8. Self-Reflective Grading: Getting Students to Learn from Their Mistakes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cherepinsky, Vera

    2011-01-01

    Students rarely use their graded exams to study. An alternative method of grading exams, based on self-reflection, encourages students to use their mistakes as a learning resource. In this grading method, the test is returned with each question simply marked as "right" or 'wrong." Students can then go over their exams and resubmit them with…

  9. Lectures in medical education: students' views.

    PubMed

    Manzoor, Iram; Mumtaz, Aneeqa; Habib, Marriam; Tariq, Sana; Elahee, Mahreen; Javaid, Iram

    2011-01-01

    Lectures are considered most effective mode of information transfer amongst teachers and students in medical education, but in recent years there has been a noticeable decline in the attendance of lectures. Our objective was to assess the reasons of medical students' disinterest in lectures. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in Department of Community Medicine, Fatima Memorial College of Medicine and Dentistry from December 2010 to June 2011. A non-probability technique of consecutive sampling was used to collect 307 participants from all five years of MBBS. Reasons of disinterest of medical students were asked in the questionnaire. The data was analysed on SPSS-17. Chi square test was applied and p-value was fixed at < or = 0.05 as significant. Factors affecting the lecture attendance of these medical students include distance of residence from the college 215 (70%), strictness of teacher in marking attendance 227 (73.9%), interest in subject 216 (70.4%), subject is part of examination 257 (83.7%), and university requirement 249 (81.1%). The personality traits of teacher affecting attendance of medical students in lectures include good communication 216 (70.4%), command on subject 194 (63.2%), students' interaction in class 180 (58.6%), friendly attitude 202 (65.8%), good control on class 163 (53.1%), punctuality 100 (32.6%), sense of humour 160 (52.1%), and humane behaviour 135 (44%). The interest of medical students can be enhanced and better attendance achieved with slight modifications in identified reasons.

  10. Importance of the Emergency Medicine Application Components: The Medical Student Perception.

    PubMed

    McCann, Scott D; Nomura, Jason T; Terzian, W T Hillman; Breyer, Michael J; Davis, Barbara J

    2016-03-01

    The National Resident Matching Program (NRMP) application has several elements. With limited time and resources, students must prioritize the key application elements on which to focus. It is unclear if medical students applying to emergency medicine (EM) prioritize the same items as program directors. We sought to determine medical student perception of the importance of each factor of the NRMP application to an EM residency. This was a cross-sectional study approved by the Institutional Review Board at an academic tertiary care Level I trauma center. A pilot-tested and validated survey tool was given to all medical students rotating in EM during an 18-month period. The students ranked each application item on a 5-point scale (1 = not important and 5 = very important) with verbal anchors. Of 136 medical students, 85.3% responded. Excluded were 31% who were not planning to apply to EM, leaving 80 responses for analysis. Items ranked higher were EM rotation grade, interview, clinical rotation grades, and letters of recommendation. Less emphasis was placed on Alpha Omega Alpha (AOA) honor society status, publication in medical literature, and personal statement. Items most agreed upon and believed to be most important by the students were EM rotation grade, interviews, and clinical rotation grades. This is similar to previously reported rankings by program directors. Although medical students agreed on the importance of most aspects of the NRMP application, areas of discordance included emphasis on extracurricular activities and AOA. This can have implications for medical student mentoring and advising. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Colorado Student Assessment Program: 2001 Released Passages, Items, and Prompts. Grade 4 Reading and Writing, Grade 4 Lectura y Escritura, Grade 5 Mathematics and Reading, Grade 6 Reading, Grade 7 Reading and Writing, Grade 8 Mathematics, Reading and Science, Grade 9 Reading, and Grade 10 Mathematics and Reading and Writing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado State Dept. of Education, Denver.

    This document contains released reading comprehension passages, test items, and writing prompts from the Colorado Student Assessment Program for 2001. The sample questions and prompts are included without answers or examples of student responses. Test materials are included for: (1) Grade 4 Reading and Writing; (2) Grade 4 Lectura y Escritura…

  12. Reporting, grading, and the meaning of letter grades in Science 9: Perspectives of teachers, students, and parents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brigden, Susan Rae

    1998-12-01

    This study investigates the reporting and grading, as well as the meaning of letter grades, of students in Science 9 from the perspectives of teachers, students, and parents in five schools from two British Columbia school districts, one urban and one rural. To that end, four research questions guided the data collection and analyses: (1) What reporting methods do teachers use to communicate information about student learning in Science 9 to students and parents, and what are teachers', students', and parents' opinions of those reporting methods? (2) What grading components do teachers incorporate into Science 9 letter grades, and what grading components do students and parents believe teachers incorporate into Science 9 letter grades? (3) What meanings do teachers, students, and parents attribute to Science 9 letter grades? and (4) What are students' and parents' perceptions about some possible effects of student progress reports in Science 9? A mixed-methodology design was employed to collect the data. Quantitative data, collected via self-administered written questionnaires from the five Science 9 teachers, 43 students, and 21 parents who volunteered to participate in the study, were used to identify participants' practices and perceptions about grading and reporting. Qualitative data, collected via individual, audio-taped interviews conducted with a subset of the people who completed questionnaires (all five teachers, 16 students, and seven parents), were used to verify, clarify, and expand the questionnaire data. Observational notes and collected documents (e.g., report card forms) also served as data sources. The results of this study show that most of the participants in the study were generally satisfied with most aspects of the reporting of student progress in Science 9. However, individual teachers consider different kinds of assessment information when they assign Science 9 letter grades, teachers are not always clear and consistent about what they

  13. Silent cerebral infarction, income, and grade retention among students with sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    King, Allison A; Rodeghier, Mark J; Panepinto, Julie Ann; Strouse, John J; Casella, James F; Quinn, Charles T; Dowling, Michael M; Sarnaik, Sharada A; Thompson, Alexis A; Woods, Gerald M; Minniti, Caterina P; Redding-Lallinger, Rupa C; Kirby-Allen, Melanie; Kirkham, Fenella J; McKinstry, Robert; Noetzel, Michael J; White, Desiree A; Kwiatkowski, Janet K; Howard, Thomas H; Kalinyak, Karen A; Inusa, Baba; Rhodes, Melissa M; Heiny, Mark E; Fuh, Ben; Fixler, Jason M; Gordon, Mae O; DeBaun, Michael R

    2014-10-01

    Children with sickle cell anemia have a higher-than-expected prevalence of poor educational attainment. We test two key hypotheses about educational attainment among students with sickle cell anemia, as measured by grade retention and use of special education services: (1) lower household per capita income is associated with lower educational attainment; (2) the presence of a silent cerebral infarct is associated with lower educational attainment. We conducted a multicenter, cross-sectional study of cases from 22 U.S. sites included in the Silent Infarct Transfusion Trial. During screening, parents completed a questionnaire that included sociodemographic information and details of their child's academic status. Of 835 students, 670 were evaluable; 536 had data on all covariates and were used for analysis. The students' mean age was 9.4 years (range: 5-15) with 52.2% male; 17.5% of students were retained one grade level and 18.3% received special education services. A multiple variable logistic regression model identified that lower household per capita income (odds ratio [OR] of quartile 1 = 6.36, OR of quartile 2 = 4.7, OR of quartile 3 = 3.87; P = 0.001 for linear trend), age (OR = 1.3; P < 0.001), and male gender (OR, 2.2; P = 0.001) were associated with grade retention; silent cerebral infarct (P = 0.31) and painful episodes (P = 0.60) were not. Among students with sickle cell anemia, household per capita income is associated with grade retention, whereas the presence of a silent cerebral infarct is not. Future educational interventions will need to address both the medical and socioeconomic issues that affect students with sickle cell anemia. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Using medical drama to teach biomedical ethics to medical students.

    PubMed

    Arawi, Thalia

    2010-01-01

    Nowadays, clinicians are faced with multifaceted ethical concerns, and it is often argued that students of medicine should be well trained in clinical ethics and have a minimum level of ethical sensitivity and critical analysis. Consequently, most medical colleges have introduced programs in biomedical ethics. It is often pointed out that there is a gap separating ethical theories from concrete moral dilemmas. This problem became less pervasive as case-studies started being used. Nevertheless, vignettes are mostly presented as an addendum to a unit and often engage the students only "temporarily." It is my contention that this can be remedied if students were given a venue that will allow them to appreciate as many particulars of the situation as possible, to engage in the case not merely as inactive spectators, rather to get entangled in the case just enough to be involved yet remain sufficiently detached to be able to exercise critical analysis. This is possible through medical drama which, I will argue, is a narrative genre that enhances emotional engagement, cognitive development, and moral imagination allowing for a more ethically sensitive student in training. To do that, reference will be made to the medical drama "House MD."

  15. Sleep habits and patterns among medical students.

    PubMed

    Bahammam, Ahmed S; Al-Khairy, Omar K; Al-Taweel, Ahmed A

    2005-04-01

    This study was designed to assess sleep patterns among male medical students at different academic levels. Participants in this study were healthy male medical students in the first (L1), second (L2) and third (L3) academic levels of the College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. The study was conducted during November 2001. A self-administered questionnaire was distributed to students to assess age, academic level, registered credit hours, sleep-wake schedule, naps, quality of sleep, total sleep time at night, possible factors affecting bedtime, and daytime sleepiness using the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS). The final analysis included 129 students. Total sleep time at night + nap of the whole group was 5.9 +/- 1.6 hours. Twenty-nine students (22.4%) were defined to have excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) based on ESS score of >10. Also, 83.3% of students reported napping during the daytime more than twice per week. Analysis of the sleep pattern of male medical students revealed that this group is sleep deprived, which in turn may affect their academic performance.

  16. Prevalence of hyperhidrosis among medical students.

    PubMed

    Westphal, Fernando Luiz; de Carvalho, Maria Auxiliadora Neves; Lima, Luiz Carlos; de Carvalho, Bruna Cecília Neves; Padilla, Rodrigo; Araújo, Katiúscia Karla Lêdo

    2011-01-01

    To identify the prevalence of hyperhidrosis among medical students of Manaus, State of Amazonas, Brazil. We conducted an observational, transversal, survey which examined the prevalence of primary hyperhidrosis among medical students of the Federal University of Amazonas and its relation to body mass index (BMI) and stress. Students were weighed and interviewed. We used questionnaires with questions recommended by the International Hyperhidrosis Society to relate hyperhidrosis to the daily activities of each person. Results were given by calculating the prevalence ratios and confidence intervals. Among the 293 students examined, it was found that a total of 16 (5.5%) students had barely tolerable or intolerable excessive sweating, interfering with daily activities. None had known causes of hyperhidrosis and 50% had family history. In all suffering from the condition the disease was bilateral, the mainly affected locations being: hands (35.7%), legs (21.4%), axilla (17.9), face (10 7%), back (7.1%), chest (3.6%) and abdomen (3.6%). There was no predominance regarding gender, age or BMI. We found a positive relationship with BMI and observed a prevalence ratio of 2.48 higher in overweight students than in normal weight or underweight ones. The prevalence of primary hyperhidrosis among medical students of Manaus was 5.5%. There is a positive non-statistical relationship with overweight and obesity. It was further noted an observational relationship with stress.

  17. Full medical program fees and medical student career intention.

    PubMed

    Hays, Richard B; Lockhart, Kathleen R; Teo, Edward; Smith, Janie; Waynforth, David

    2015-01-19

    To explore the future career preferences of Commonwealth-supported place (CSP) and full-fee paying (FFP) medical students in Australia. Data from the Medical Schools Outcomes Database and Longitudinal Tracking (MSOD) Project exit questionnaire for CSP and FFP students who graduated between 2008 and 2011 were analysed using logistic regression. The influence of age, sex, marital status, rural background and fee-paying status on future career preference were explored. Future career preference (location and specialty) at graduation. Compared with CSP students, domestic FFP students were more likely to nominate as their first preference both urban locations (odds ratio [OR], 5.58; 95% CI, 2.04-15.26; P < 0.001) and higher-income specialties (OR, 1.37; 95% CI, 1.07-1.75; P < 0.05), and less likely to nominate as their first preference in-need specialties (OR, 0.72; 95% CI, 0.52-1.00; P < 0.05), specifically general practice (OR, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.52-0.99; P < 0.05). There was a significant domestic FFP student by marital status interaction effect, such that domestic FFP students who were married or partnered on exit from medical school were more likely to prefer a rural location (OR, 0.64; 95% CI, 0.44-0.95; P < 0.05). Also, students who were married or partnered were less likely to select a one of the higher-income specialties as their first preference (OR, 0.77; 95% CI, 0.64-0.92; P < 0.01). A rural background increased preferences for rural location (OR, 0.18; 95% CI, 0.15-0.22; P < 0.001) and in-need specialties (OR, 1.28; 95% CI, 1.04-1.57; P < 0.05), and being older on entry to medical school also increased preferences for rural location (OR, 0.96; 95% CI, 0.95-0.98; P < 0.001) and in-need specialties (OR, 1.03; 95% CI, 1.01-1.04; P < 0.01). International FFP students were more likely to prefer urban practice (OR, 1.79; 95% CI, 1.19-2.72; P < 0.01). Domestic FFP graduates are less likely to prefer careers in rural locations and in lower-paid and in-need specialties

  18. Medical Student Service Learning Program Teaches Secondary Students about Career Opportunities in Health and Medical Fields

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karpa, Kelly; Vakharia, Kavita; Caruso, Catherine A.; Vechery, Colin; Sipple, Lanette; Wang, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    Engagement of academic medical centers in community outreach provides the public with a better understanding of basic terms and concepts used in biomedical sciences and increases awareness of important health information. Medical students at one academic medical center initiated an educational outreach program, called PULSE, that targets secondary…

  19. Medical Student Service Learning Program Teaches Secondary Students about Career Opportunities in Health and Medical Fields

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karpa, Kelly; Vakharia, Kavita; Caruso, Catherine A.; Vechery, Colin; Sipple, Lanette; Wang, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    Engagement of academic medical centers in community outreach provides the public with a better understanding of basic terms and concepts used in biomedical sciences and increases awareness of important health information. Medical students at one academic medical center initiated an educational outreach program, called PULSE, that targets secondary…

  20. Knowledge and Attitudes of Medical and Non-Medical Turkish University Students about Cervical Cancer and HPV Vaccination.

    PubMed

    Borlu, Arda; Gunay, Osman; Balci, Elcin; Sagiroglu, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine knowledge, attitudes and practices about cervical cancer and HPV vaccination of students studying in various faculties of Erciyes University. The study was performed among the first and fourth grade students of Medicine, Theology, Education and Economics and Administrative Sciences (FEAS) faculties of Erciyes University. It was aimed to reach 1,073 students and 718 were evaluated. A questionnaire consisting of 48 questions related to the socio-demographic characteristics, knowledge, attitude and practices about cervical cancer and HPV vaccination was administered to the students. The chi-square test and logistic regression were used for the statistical analyses. Of the students, 78.3% were aware of cervical cancer, while 36.1% of them were aware of the HPV vaccine. The percentage hearing about cervical cancer and HPV vaccination was significantly higher among the students of the medical faculty than the others and among fourth grade students comparing with the first grade. The marital status and the presence of a health worker in the family had no significant impact on the knowledge level of the students. The acceptability of the HPV vaccination was low among all students. The knowledge levels of the university students about cervical cancer and HPV vaccination are inadequate. This deficiency is more pronounced among the non-medical students and there is no significant increase during the faculty years. Non-medical students must be provided with information about important public health issues by elective courses. HPV vaccination could provide many benefits for men and women by decreasing the morbidity and mortality of cervical, anal, and penile cancers.

  1. Antibiotic abuse: the testimony of medical students.

    PubMed Central

    Perry, T. L.

    1975-01-01

    Surveys of the use of antimicrobial drugs on students during antimicrobial drugs on students during their first 15 months in medical or dental school indicate that they have been treated with these agents at least three times as frequently as seems reasonable, and that the tetracyclines, ampicillin, penicillin G and erythromycin are the chief drugs overused. Antimicrobiol therapy is frequently instituted for probable viral respiratory tract infections and without any attempt to establish a bacteriologic diagnosis. It is likely that anitmicrobiol agents are used more widely in treating the general public in Canada than in treating medical students. Improvements in the rational use of this important group of drugs could increase the quality and probably reduced the cost of medical care. PMID:806341

  2. Mentoring medical students in academic emergency medicine.

    PubMed

    Garmel, Gus M

    2004-12-01

    Mentoring is an important aspect of career development for medical students, residents, and junior faculty. It is vital to the professional growth and maturation of individuals early in each phase of their careers. Additionally, mentoring has a critical role throughout all career stages, because the mentor-mentee relationship provides mutual benefit to both participants. This article will describe the role of the mentor, suggest ways to increase the likelihood of successful mentoring, and identify pitfalls in the mentoring process predominantly related to medical students. In contrast to role models, mentors play an active part in the development of a young physician's career. This difference will be discussed. Finally, this article will describe the responsibilities of career guidance and recommendation letter authorship that mentors assume for medical students.

  3. Leadership training for undergraduate medical students.

    PubMed

    Maddalena, Victor

    2016-07-04

    Purpose Physicians play an important leadership role in the management and governance of the healthcare system. Yet, many physicians lack formal management and leadership training to prepare them for this challenging role. This Viewpoint article argues that leadership concepts need to be introduced to undergraduate medical students early and throughout their medical education. Design/methodology/approach Leadership is an integral part of medical practice. The recent inclusion of "Leader" competency in the CanMEDS 2015 represents a subtle but important shift from the previous "manager" competency. Providing medical students with the basics of leadership concepts early in their medical education allows them to integrate leadership principles into their professional practice. Findings The Faculty of Medicine at the Memorial University of Newfoundland (MUN) has developed an eight-module, fully online Physician Leadership Certificate for their undergraduate medical education program. This program is cited as an example of an undergraduate medical curriculum that offers leadership training throughout the 4 years of the MD program. Originality/value There are a number of continuing professional development opportunities for physicians in the area of management and leadership. This Viewpoint article challenges undergraduate medical education programs to develop and integrate leadership training in their curricula.

  4. Voltaire's Candide, medical students, and mentoring.

    PubMed

    Papadimos, Thomas J

    2007-07-03

    In Voltaire's work, Candide, a young, naïve man, who has been taught that humans live in the best of all possible worlds, is thrust into the world only to find that this may not be so. He learns over time to balance his optimism with the skepticism he acquires through experience. While today's medical students are not naïve like the character Candide, they, nonetheless, carry an impression of the ideal medical practice, along with the expectation of a successful medical practice. Good mentors and role models are important to students in order to temper their optimism, control their skepticism, and to help them to be realistic, not only about their expectations of medical practice, but what society expects of them.

  5. Voltaire's Candide, medical students, and mentoring

    PubMed Central

    Papadimos, Thomas J

    2007-01-01

    In Voltaire's work, Candide, a young, naïve man, who has been taught that humans live in the best of all possible worlds, is thrust into the world only to find that this may not be so. He learns over time to balance his optimism with the skepticism he acquires through experience. While today's medical students are not naïve like the character Candide, they, nonetheless, carry an impression of the ideal medical practice, along with the expectation of a successful medical practice. Good mentors and role models are important to students in order to temper their optimism, control their skepticism, and to help them to be realistic, not only about their expectations of medical practice, but what society expects of them. PMID:17608936

  6. Understanding intercultural transitions of medical students.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Aneta L; Mansour, Nasser; Fisher, Ros

    2015-02-28

    The aim of this research was to explore the transition of medical students to an international branch campus of a medical university established in Bahrain. In order to gain insights into this transition, we explored two culturally diverse systems of learning of the university and the local schools in Bahrain, using Communities of Practice as a lens for understanding transitions. Focus groups were conducted with secondary school teachers and first year medical students. Additionally, semi-structured interviews were conducted with university lecturers. The findings suggest that, while Communities of Practice have been influential in contextualising transitions to university, this model does not seem to help us to fully understand intercultural transitions to the case-study university. The research emphasises that more attention should be given to learner individual agency within this theory as a framework for understanding transitions. It also challenges approaches within medical education that attempt to standardise systems of learning through acquisition of established practices.

  7. Nursing student medication errors: a retrospective review.

    PubMed

    Harding, Lorill; Petrick, Teresa

    2008-01-01

    This article presents the findings of a retrospective review of medication errors made and reported by nursing students in a 4-year baccalaureate program. Data were examined in relation to the semester of the program, kind of error according to the rights of medication administration, and contributing factors. Three categories of contributing factors were identified: rights violations, system factors, and knowledge and understanding. It became apparent that system factors, or the context in which medication administration takes place, are not fully considered when students are taught about medication administration. Teaching strategies need to account for the dynamic complexity of this process and incorporate experiential knowledge. This review raised several important questions about how this information guides our practice as educators in the clinical and classroom settings and how we can work collaboratively with practice partners to influence change and increase patient safety.

  8. Physicians' Migration: Perceptions of Pakistani Medical Students.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Nazli; Shah, Nusrat; Shah, Tahira; Lateef, Sidra Binte

    2016-08-01

    To study the perceptions of medical students about factors responsible for physicians'migration. Cross-sectional survey. Dow Medical College and Civil Hospital, Karachi, from April to May 2015. Aself-administered structured questionnaire was used including demographic details, attitudes about push and pull factors of migration, and reasons for migrating or not migrating abroad. Final year students and interns were included. Likert scale from 1 to 4 (1=strongly disagree to 4=strongly agree) was used to assess attitudes. Data was analyzed by SPSS version 16. Atotal of 240 medical students, mostly females (n=181, 75%) (60% final year and 40% interns), participated in the study. Majority wished to go abroad (n=127; 54%) with United States being the favourite destination (n=80; 66.1%) and internal medicine fields being the preferred choice for specialization (n=126; 54%). The major pull factors were better quality of postgraduate education abroad (n=110; 48.2%) and economic prospects (80; 35.2%); while the push factors were a weak healthcare system (n=219; 94.3%), inadequate salary structure (n=205; 88.3%), insecurity (n=219; 93.9%) and increasing religious intolerance in Pakistan (n=183; 78.5%). This survey highlights the continuing trend of physician migration from Pakistan owing to an interplay of various push and pull factors. Majority of our medical students wish to migrate, mainly due to low salaries, poor job structure, and insecurity. Urgent interventions are required to reverse this trend of medical brain-drain.

  9. Teaching medical students the subjective global assessment.

    PubMed

    Duerksen, Donald R

    2002-04-01

    Clinical nutrition assessment is a clinical skill not taught in many medical schools in North America. The purpose of this study is to determine whether second-year medical students can be taught to perform a nutritional Subjective Global Assessment (SGA). In this study, second-year medical students were given a didactic session and a bedside demonstration of the SGA. Subsequently, they performed an SGA on unknown patients and classified those patients into one of three categories: A) well nourished, B) moderately malnourished, or C) severely malnourished. This was compared with the assessments of clinical dietitians and a physician. After this instruction, medical students correctly identified malnourished individuals. They were less accurate in their subclassification between mildly and severely malnourished individuals. The degree of agreement with clinical dietitians and a physician was fair (kappa = 0.34). With a multidisciplinary team of physicians and clinical dietitians, medical students can be taught the SGA in a 3h format. This is an important clinical skill that emphasizes the importance of clinical nutrition and may help identify malnourished individuals early in the course of their hospitalization.

  10. Teaching with comics: a course for fourth-year medical students.

    PubMed

    Green, Michael J

    2013-12-01

    Though graphic narratives (or comics) now permeate popular culture, address every conceivable topic including illness and dying, and are used in educational settings from grade school through university, they have not typically been integrated into the medical school curriculum. This paper describes a popular and innovative course on comics and medicine for 4th-year medical students. In this course, students learn to critically read book length comics as well as create their own stories using the comics format. The rationale for the course, its general content and format, and methods for teaching are described. Finally, the author offers some reflections on why this medium resonates so powerfully with medical student learners.

  11. Mentoring medical students in your general practice.

    PubMed

    Fraser, John

    2016-05-01

    Mentoring medical students in general practices is becoming more common in Australia due to formalised scholarship programs and informal approaches by students. This paper defines mentoring in Australian general practice. Practical suggestions are made on how to structure a mentorship program in your practice. Mentoring differs from leadership and teaching. It is a long-term relationship between a student and an experienced general practitioner. Avoiding summative assessment in mentorship is important to its success. Mentoring is about forming a safe place to confidentially discuss personal and professional issues between a mentor and student. This is based on defining roles and mutual trust. At the same time, students crave formative feedback. Unfortunately, present feedback models are based on teaching principles that can blur the differences between assessor, teacher and mentor. Mentorship can provide students with orientation and learning experiences so that they are prepared for practice as an intern.

  12. Exploring scientific creativity of eleventh-grade students in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Jia-Chi

    2002-04-01

    Although most researchers focus on scientists' creativity, students' scientific creativity should be considered, especially for high school and college students. It is generally assumed that most professional creators in science emerge from amateur creators. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between students' scientific creativity and selected variables including creativity, problem finding, formulating hypotheses, science achievement, the nature of science, and attitudes toward science for finding significant predictors of eleventh grade students' scientific creativity. A total of 130 male eleventh-grade students in three biology classes participated in this study. The main instruments included the Test of Divergent Thinking (TDT) for creativity measurement, the Creativity Rating Scale (CRS) and the Creative Activities and Accomplishments Check Lists (CAACL ) for measurement of scientific creativity, the Nature of Scientific Knowledge Scale (NSKS) for measurement of the nature of science, and the Science Attitude Inventory II (SAI II) for measurement of attitudes toward science. In addition, two instruments on measuring students' abilities of problem finding and abilities of formulating hypotheses were developed by the researcher in this study. Data analysis involved descriptive statistics, Pearson product-moment correlations, and stepwise multiple regressions. The major findings suggested the following: (1) students' scientific creativity significantly correlated with some of selected variables such as attitudes toward science, problem finding, formulating hypotheses, the nature of science, resistance to closure, originality, and elaboration; (2) four significant predictors including attitudes toward science, problem finding, resistance to closure, and originality accounted for 48% of the variance of students' scientific creativity; (3) there were big differences between students with a higher and a lower degree of scientific

  13. Medical-themed film and literature course for premedical students.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young-Mee; Ahn, Duck-Sun

    2004-09-01

    The authors introduced a "Medicine and Literature" course into the premedical curriculum to help students develop clearer expectations regarding their lives as future physicians, and also to gain insight into the humanistic and social aspects of medicine. The course was developed for the entire class of second-grade premedical students (n = 126) and consisted of one three-hour session per week over six weeks. The course was composed of two main themes: (1) medicine and film; and (2) medicine and literature. Students' responses showed that this course helped them to gain perspectives on both a physician's life and medical practice, and also enhanced their understanding of the humanistic and social aspects of medicine itself. Students reported that they also valued the advantages of collaborative learning, which holds the potential for improving their skills in presentation, discussion, communication and teamwork. In Korea, introducing arts- and humanities-related courses into the medical curriculum is a recent trend, and is still in a very early stage. Although our study has several limitations, we conclude that by studying literature and films during the premedical period, students can grasp a sense of the many different issues that physicians are faced with.

  14. Medical Student Oncology Congress: Designed and Implemented by Brazilian Medical Students.

    PubMed

    de Camargo, Celeste Rodovalho Soares; Schoueri, Jean Henri Maselli; Neto, Felippe Lazar; Segalla, Paola Boaro; Del Giglio, Auro; Cubero, Daniel I G

    2017-03-30

    Oncology is an essential field of medicine; however, its teaching is occasionally underemphasized and uncoordinated during medical school. An alternative method of providing additional oncological information to medical students is through extracurricular activities, such as congresses and medical student associations. The aim of this paper is to describe a Medical Student Oncology Congress entirely designed and organized by medical students. Three medical students from oncology study and research groups identified the gap in oncology training at universities and decided to organize a congress for students. They selected representatives from 26 universities in Brazil for onsite registration and created a website for online registration and promotion of the congress. To determine the topics of the lectures, they searched the medical literature for the most commonly occurring cancers in adults and children. Extrapolating the academic content of oncology, they organized lectures by non-governmental organizations (NGOs), talks on career guidance and research in this field as well as a role-playing workshop to train future doctors on how to deliver news to patients. There were a total of 609 attendees, with 590 students from 26 different universities in Brazil. Approximately 82% were medical students, and among the participants there were also 15 medical educators. A total of 80.75% of the participants were extremely satisfied with the congress, and 99.17% would recommend it to a colleague. Most of the overall cost of the congress, 96%, was covered by registration fees. There was a 6% positive net balance, which was donated to the NGOs participating in the congress. This successful experience proves that it is possible to have a congress fully designed, organized and managed by students. It demonstrates how students can be active participants in their own education, as opposed to a classic approach through which only professors are responsible for instruction.

  15. Experiences Teaching Stoichiometry to Students in Grades 10 and 11

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridges, Cynthia Denise

    Many students have problems learning stoichiometry, a complex mathematical chemistry concept used to determine how much product will be produced or formed from a given quantity of reactants. The problem addressed in this study was teachers' lack of understanding of how to teach stoichiometry in a Midwestern urban school district. The conceptual framework of the study was based upon constructivist theory. A qualitative narrative approach was used to obtain the perceptions of 5 high school chemistry instructors related to their experiences, successful or unsuccessful, in teaching stoichiometry to students in Grades 10 and 11. Data were gathered through face-to-face interviews, which were analyzed via an inductive approach to reveal 6 themes: a difficult subject to teach, presentation of stoichiometry, relevancy, students' reactions, barriers, and gender differences. Findings suggested the need for teachers to be knowledgeable, creative, and resourceful in their subject areas to help their students to learn stoichiometry. Findings also revealed the need for teachers to adapt their instructional strategies and modes of delivery to reflect their students' individual learning styles. Understanding how the participating teachers explained stoichiometry to their students might help other chemistry teachers to examine and adapt their own instructional styles and delivery methods of the concept. This understanding might, in term, help to improve student achievement in stoichiometry in particular and chemistry in general.

  16. Personality and specialty interest in medical students.

    PubMed

    Hojat, Mohammadreza; Zuckerman, Marvin

    2008-01-01

    Research on the relationship between personality and specialty interest is important because of its implications in student career counseling and in forecasting future specialty distribution. This study was designed to test the following hypotheses: 1. Students interested in 'surgical' specialties would obtain higher scores on a measure of 'impulsive sensation seeking' and lower scores on a measure of 'neuroticism-anxiety'. 2. Students interested in 'hospital-based' specialties would score lower on a measure of 'sociability' whereas those interested in 'primary care' would score higher on this measure. In addition to these two hypotheses, gender differences on personality were also examined. Study participants were 1,076 students who matriculated at Jefferson Medical College between 2002 to 2006. A short version of the Zuckerman-Kuhlman personality questionnaire (ZKPQ) measuring five personality factors of 'impulsive sensation Seeking', 'neuroticism-anxiety', 'aggression-hostility', 'sociability', and 'activity' was completed by research participants at the beginning of medical school. Students were also asked to note their specialty interests. Multivariate statistical analyses confirmed the first and partially confirmed the second research hypotheses. Results also showed that men scored higher on 'impulsive sensation seeking,' and women outscored men in the 'neuroticism-Anxiety' and 'activity' scales. Findings suggest that information about the personalities of medical students can help to predict their career interests. Implications for career counseling are discussed.

  17. Headache among medical and psychology students.

    PubMed

    Ferri-de-Barros, João Eliezer; Alencar, Mauricio José de; Berchielli, Luis Felipe; Castelhano Junior, Luis Carlos

    2011-06-01

    Headaches occur frequently and thus are a key component of sociocentric medical education. To study headaches among students of medicine and psychology in a single university. This was a questionnaire-based survey of a cohort of students of medicine and psychology. The overall lifetime prevalence of headache was 98% and over the last year, 91%. Tensional headache accounted for 59% and migraine 22% in medicine; and 48.5% and 32% respectively in psychology. Forty-five percent reported that headaches had a variable sporadic impact on their productivity. The self-medication rate was 77%. Thirty-six percent reported worsening since admission to the university. The prevalence of headaches was very high. Tension-type headaches predominated in males and migraine in females. Tension-type was more frequent among medical students than among psychology students; migraine was more frequent in psychology (more females) than in medicine. Both kinds of students reported that headaches caused low interference with daily activities. The students reported that their symptoms had worsened since admission to the university.

  18. [Learning strategies of autonomous medical students].

    PubMed

    Márquez U, Carolina; Fasce H, Eduardo; Ortega B, Javiera; Bustamante D, Carolina; Pérez V, Cristhian; Ibáñez G, Pilar; Ortiz M, Liliana; Espinoza P, Camila; Bastías V, Nancy

    2015-12-01

    Understanding how autonomous students are capable of regulating their own learning process is essential to develop self-directed teaching methods. To understand how self-directed medical students approach learning in medical schools at University of Concepción, Chile. A qualitative and descriptive study, performed according to Grounded Theory guidelines, following Strauss & Corbin was performed. Twenty medical students were selected by the maximum variation sampling method. The data collection technique was carried out by a semi-structured thematic interview. Students were interviewed by researchers after an informed consent procedure. Data were analyzed by the open coding method using Atlas-ti 7.5.2 software. Self-directed learners were characterized by being good planners and managing their time correctly. Students performed a diligent selection of contents to study based on reliable literature sources, theoretical relevance and type of evaluation. They also emphasized the discussion of clinical cases, where theoretical contents can be applied. This modality allows them to gain a global view of theoretical contents, to verbalize knowledge and to obtain a learning feedback. The learning process of autonomous students is intentional and planned.

  19. The Correlation between Student/Instructor Rapport, Student Perceptions of Instructor Effectiveness, and Course Grade Expectations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yezbick, Erin Lewis

    2016-01-01

    The researcher attempted to determine if a correlation exists between student/instructor rapport, student perceptions of instructor effectiveness, and course grade expectations for freshman general education courses at a career college in the Great Lakes Region of the United States. Previous studies have determined that rapport affects motivation…

  20. The Correlation between Student/Instructor Rapport, Student Perceptions of Instructor Effectiveness, and Course Grade Expectations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yezbick, Erin Lewis

    2016-01-01

    The researcher attempted to determine if a correlation exists between student/instructor rapport, student perceptions of instructor effectiveness, and course grade expectations for freshman general education courses at a career college in the Great Lakes Region of the United States. Previous studies have determined that rapport affects motivation…

  1. Sleep medicine education and knowledge among medical students in selected Saudi Medical Schools.

    PubMed

    Almohaya, Abdulellah; Qrmli, Abdulaziz; Almagal, Naeif; Alamri, Khaled; Bahammam, Salman; Al-Enizi, Mashhour; Alanazi, Atif; Almeneessier, Aljohara S; Sharif, Munir M; Bahammam, Ahmed S

    2013-09-27

    Limited information is available regarding sleep medicine education worldwide. Nevertheless, medical education has been blamed for the under-recognition of sleep disorders among physicians. This study was designed to assess the knowledge of Saudi undergraduate medical students about sleep and sleep disorders and the prevalence of education on sleep medicine in medical schools as well as to identify the obstacles to providing such education. We surveyed medical schools that were established more than 10 years ago, asking fourth- and fifth-year medical students (men and women) to participate. Seven medical schools were selected. To assess knowledge on sleep and sleep disorders, we used the Assessment of Sleep Knowledge in Medical Education (ASKME) Survey, which is a validated 30-item questionnaire. The participants were separated into two groups: those who scored ≥60% and those who scored <60%. To assess the number of teaching hours dedicated to sleep medicine in the undergraduate curricula, the organizers of the major courses on sleep disorders were contacted to obtain the curricula for those courses and to determine the obstacles to education. A total of 348 students completed the survey (54.9% male). Among the participants, 27.7% had a specific interest in sleep medicine. More than 80% of the study sample had rated their knowledge in sleep medicine as below average. Only 4.6% of the respondents correctly answered ≥60% of the questions. There was no difference in the scores of the respondents with regard to university, gender, grade-point average (GPA) or student academic levels. Only five universities provided data on sleep medicine education. The time spent teaching sleep medicine in the surveyed medical schools ranged from 0-8 hours with a mean of 2.6 ±2.6 hours. Identified obstacles included the following: (1) sleep medicine has a lower priority in the curriculum (53%) and (2) time constraints do not allow the incorporation of sleep medicine topics in the

  2. Sleep medicine education and knowledge among medical students in selected Saudi Medical Schools

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Limited information is available regarding sleep medicine education worldwide. Nevertheless, medical education has been blamed for the under-recognition of sleep disorders among physicians. This study was designed to assess the knowledge of Saudi undergraduate medical students about sleep and sleep disorders and the prevalence of education on sleep medicine in medical schools as well as to identify the obstacles to providing such education. Methods We surveyed medical schools that were established more than 10 years ago, asking fourth- and fifth-year medical students (men and women) to participate. Seven medical schools were selected. To assess knowledge on sleep and sleep disorders, we used the Assessment of Sleep Knowledge in Medical Education (ASKME) Survey, which is a validated 30-item questionnaire. The participants were separated into two groups: those who scored ≥60% and those who scored <60%. To assess the number of teaching hours dedicated to sleep medicine in the undergraduate curricula, the organizers of the major courses on sleep disorders were contacted to obtain the curricula for those courses and to determine the obstacles to education. Results A total of 348 students completed the survey (54.9% male). Among the participants, 27.7% had a specific interest in sleep medicine. More than 80% of the study sample had rated their knowledge in sleep medicine as below average. Only 4.6% of the respondents correctly answered ≥60% of the questions. There was no difference in the scores of the respondents with regard to university, gender, grade-point average (GPA) or student academic levels. Only five universities provided data on sleep medicine education. The time spent teaching sleep medicine in the surveyed medical schools ranged from 0-8 hours with a mean of 2.6 ±2.6 hours. Identified obstacles included the following: (1) sleep medicine has a lower priority in the curriculum (53%) and (2) time constraints do not allow the incorporation of

  3. Relationships between Drug Company Representatives and Medical Students: Medical School Policies and Attitudes of Student Affairs Deans and Third-Year Medical Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sierles, Frederick; Brodkey, Amy; Cleary, Lynn; McCurdy, Frederick A.; Mintz, Matthew; Frank, Julia; Lynn, Deborah Joanne; Chao, Jason; Morgenstern, Bruce; Shore, William; Woodard, John

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: The authors sought to ascertain the details of medical school policies about relationships between drug companies and medical students as well as student affairs deans' attitudes about these interactions. Methods: In 2005, the authors surveyed deans and student affairs deans at all U.S. medical schools and asked whether their schools…

  4. Medical students-as-teachers: a systematic review of peer-assisted teaching during medical school

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Tzu-Chieh; Wilson, Nichola C; Singh, Primal P; Lemanu, Daniel P; Hawken, Susan J; Hill, Andrew G

    2011-01-01

    Introduction International interest in peer-teaching and peer-assisted learning (PAL) during undergraduate medical programs has grown in recent years, reflected both in literature and in practice. There, remains however, a distinct lack of objective clarity and consensus on the true effectiveness of peer-teaching and its short- and long-term impacts on learning outcomes and clinical practice. Objective To summarize and critically appraise evidence presented on peer-teaching effectiveness and its impact on objective learning outcomes of medical students. Method A literature search was conducted in four electronic databases. Titles and abstracts were screened and selection was based on strict eligibility criteria after examining full-texts. Two reviewers used a standard review and analysis framework to independently extract data from each study. Discrepancies in opinions were resolved by discussion in consultation with other reviewers. Adapted models of “Kirkpatrick’s Levels of Learning” were used to grade the impact size of study outcomes. Results From 127 potential titles, 41 were obtained as full-texts, and 19 selected after close examination and group deliberation. Fifteen studies focused on student-learner outcomes and four on student-teacher learning outcomes. Ten studies utilized randomized allocation and the majority of study participants were self-selected volunteers. Written examinations and observed clinical evaluations were common study outcome assessments. Eleven studies provided student-teachers with formal teacher training. Overall, results suggest that peer-teaching, in highly selective contexts, achieves short-term learner outcomes that are comparable with those produced by faculty-based teaching. Furthermore, peer-teaching has beneficial effects on student-teacher learning outcomes. Conclusions Peer-teaching in undergraduate medical programs is comparable to conventional teaching when utilized in selected contexts. There is evidence to suggest

  5. A social and academic enrichment program promotes medical school matriculation and graduation for disadvantaged students.

    PubMed

    Keith, L; Hollar, D

    2012-07-01

    This study assessed the impact of a pre-medical pipeline program on successful completion of medical school and the capacity of this program to address achievement gaps experienced by disadvantaged students. The University of North Carolina (USA) Medical Education Development (MED) program provides intensive academic and test skills preparation for admission to medical, dental, and other allied health professions schools. This retrospective study evaluated the academic progress of a longitudinal sample of 1738 disadvantaged college students who completed MED between 1974 and 2001. Data sources included MED participant data, medical school admissions data for the host school, aggregate data from the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC), and individual MED participant data from AAMC. Methods of analysis utilized Chi-square, independent samples t test, and logistic regression to examine associations between factors. Of the 935 students in MED from 1974 to 2001, who had indicated an interest in medical school, 887 (94.9%) successfully matriculated and 801 (85.7%) successfully earned the MD degree. Using logistic regression, factors that were significantly correlated with earning the medical degree included the student's race, college undergraduate total and science grade point averages, with Hispanic, African American, and Native American participants earning the medical degree at rates comparable to Caucasian participants. MED students successfully earned the MD degree despite having significantly lower Medical College Admissions Test (MCAT) scores and undergraduate grade point averages compared to all United States medical school applicants: MCAT scores had little relationship with student's success. These findings suggest that an intensive, nine-week, pre-medical academic enrichment program that incorporates confidence-building and small-group tutoring and peer support activities can build a foundation on which disadvantaged students can successfully earn

  6. Teaching leadership: the medical student society model.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Jacob H; Morley, Gabriella L; Crossley, Eleanor; Bhanderi, Shivam

    2017-05-05

    All health care professionals in the UK are expected to have the medical leadership and management (MLM) skills necessary for improving patient care, as stipulated by the UK General Medical Council (GMC). Newly graduated doctors reported insufficient knowledge about leadership and quality improvement skills, despite all UK medical schools reporting that MLM is taught within their curriculum. A medical student society organised a series of extracurricular educational events focusing on leadership topics. The society recognised that the events needed to be useful and interesting to attract audiences. Therefore, clinical leaders in exciting fields were invited to talk about their experiences and case studies of personal leadership challenges. The emphasis on personal stories, from respected leaders, was a deliberate strategy to attract students and enhance learning. Evaluation data were collected from the audiences to improve the quality of the events and to support a business case for an intercalated degree in MLM. When leadership and management concepts are taught through personal stories, students find it interesting and are prepared to give up their leisure time to engage with the subject. Students appear to recognise the importance of MLM knowledge to their future careers, and are able to organise their own, and their peers', learning and development. Organising these events and collecting feedback can provide students with opportunities to practise leadership, management and quality improvement skills. These extracurricular events, delivered through a student society, allow for subjects to be discussed in more depth and can complement an already crowded undergraduate curriculum. Newly graduated doctors reported insufficient knowledge about leadership and quality improvement skills. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and The Association for the Study of Medical Education.

  7. Undergraduate medical students' empathy: current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Quince, Thelma; Thiemann, Pia; Benson, John; Hyde, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Empathy is important to patient care. It enhances patients' satisfaction, comfort, self-efficacy, and trust which in turn may facilitate better diagnosis, shared decision making, and therapy adherence. Empathetic doctors experience greater job satisfaction and psychological well-being. Understanding the development of empathy of tomorrow's health care professionals is important. However, clinical empathy is poorly defined and difficult to measure, while ways to enhance it remain unclear. This review examines empathy among undergraduate medical students, focusing upon three main questions: How is empathy measured? This section discusses the problems of assessing empathy and outlines the utility of the Jefferson Scale of Empathy - Student Version and Davis's Interpersonal Reactivity Index. Both have been used widely to assess medical students' empathy. Does empathy change during undergraduate medical education? The trajectory of empathy during undergraduate medical education has been and continues to be debated. Potential reasons for contrasting results of studies are outlined. What factors may influence the development of empathy? Although the influence of sex is widely recognized, the impact of culture, psychological well-being, and aspects of undergraduate curricula are less well understood. This review identifies three interrelated issues for future research into undergraduate medical students' empathy. First, the need for greater clarity of definition, recognizing that empathy is multidimensional. Second, the need to develop meaningful ways of measuring empathy which include its component dimensions and which are relevant to patients' experiences. Medical education research has generally relied upon single, self-report instruments, which have utility across large populations but are limited. Finally, there is a need for greater methodological rigor in investigating the possible determinants of clinical empathy in medical education. Greater specificity of context

  8. Silent cerebral infarction, income, and grade retention among students with sickle cell anemia

    PubMed Central

    King, Allison A.; Rodeghier, Mark J.; Panepinto, Julie Ann; Strouse, John J.; Casella, James F.; Quinn, Charles T.; Dowling, Michael M.; Sarnaik, Sharada A.; Thompson, Alexis A.; Woods, Gerald M.; Minniti, Caterina P.; Redding-Lallinger, Rupa C.; Kirby-Allen, Melanie; Kirkham, Fenella J.; McKinstry, Robert; Noetzel, Michael J.; White, Desiree A.; Kwiatkowski, Janet K.; Howard, Thomas H.; Kalinyak, Karen A.; Inusa, Baba; Rhodes, Melissa M.; Heiny, Mark E.; Fuh, Ben; Fixler, Jason M.; Gordon, Mae O.; DeBaun, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Children with sickle cell anemia have a higher-than-expected prevalence of poor educational attainment. We test two key hypotheses about educational attainment among students with sickle cell anemia, as measured by grade retention and use of special education services: (1) lower household per capita income is associated with lower educational attainment; (2) the presence of a silent cerebral infarct is associated with lower educational attainment. We conducted a multicenter, cross-sectional study of cases from 22 U.S. sites included in the Silent Infarct Transfusion Trial. During screening, parents completed a questionnaire that included sociodemographic information and details of their child’s academic status. Of 835 students, 670 were evaluable; 536 had data on all covariates and were used for analysis. The students’ mean age was 9.4 years (range: 5–15) with 52.2% male; 17.5% of students were retained one grade level and 18.3% received special education services. A multiple variable logistic regression model identified that lower household per capita income (odds ratio [OR] of quartile 1 = 6.36, OR of quartile 2 = 4.7, OR of quartile 3 = 3.87; P = 0.001 for linear trend), age (OR = 1.3; P < 0.001), and male gender (OR, 2.2; P = 0.001) were associated with grade retention; silent cerebral infarct (P = 0.31) and painful episodes (P = 0.60) were not. Among students with sickle cell anemia, household per capita income is associated with grade retention, whereas the presence of a silent cerebral infarct is not. Future educational interventions will need to address both the medical and socioeconomic issues that affect students with sickle cell anemia. PMID:25042018

  9. The flipped classroom for medical students.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Helen; McLean, Karen; Chapman, Chris; Fitzgerald, James; Yousuf, Aisha; Hammoud, Maya

    2015-06-01

    The objectives of this curricular innovation project were to implement a flipped classroom curriculum for the gynaecologic oncology topics of the obstetrics and gynaecology medical student clerkship, and to evaluate student satisfaction with the change. Four short online videos on the topics of endometrial hyperplasia, cervical dysplasia, evaluation of an adnexal mass, and ovarian cancer were created, and students were instructed to view them prior to a class-time active learning session. The Learning Activity Management System (lams) open-source online platform was used to create an active learning class-time activity that consisted of a coached discussion of cases. Student satisfaction with the two aspects of the flipped curriculum was obtained. In addition, lecture assessment for the gynaecologic oncology topics and aggregate student performance on the gynaecological oncology questions of the US National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) Subject Examination were compared before and after implementation of the curriculum. Eighty-nine students rotated on the clerkship during the pilot period of analysis. Seventy-one students (80%) viewed the videos prior to the class session, and 84 (94%) attended the session. Student satisfaction was very high for both parts of the curriculum. There was no significant difference in aggregate student performance on the gynaecological oncology questions of the NBME Subject Examination. The flipped classroom curriculum demonstrates a promising platform for using technology to make better use of students' time Our implementation of the flipped classroom curriculum for the gynaecologic oncology topics successfully demonstrates a promising platform for using technology to make better use of our students' time, and for increasing their satisfaction with the necessary didactic learning of the clerkship. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Developing seventh grade students' systems thinking skills in the context of the human circulatory system.

    PubMed

    Raved, Lena; Yarden, Anat

    2014-01-01

    Developing systems thinking skills in school can provide useful tools to deal with a vast amount of medical and health information that may help learners in decision making in their future lives as citizen. Thus, there is a need to develop effective tools that will allow learners to analyze biological systems and organize their knowledge. Here, we examine junior high school students' systems thinking skills in the context of the human circulatory system. A model was formulated for developing teaching and learning materials and for characterizing students' systems thinking skills. Specifically, we asked whether seventh grade students, who studied about the human circulatory system, acquired systems thinking skills, and what are the characteristics of those skills? Concept maps were used to characterize students' systems thinking components and examine possible changes in the students' knowledge structure. These maps were composed by the students before and following the learning process. The study findings indicate a significant improvement in the students' ability to recognize the system components and the processes that occur within the system, as well as the relationships between different levels of organization of the system, following the learning process. Thus, following learning students were able to organize the systems' components and its processes within a framework of relationships, namely the students' systems thinking skills were improved in the course of learning using the teaching and learning materials.

  11. Relationship between attachment styles and happiness in medical students

    PubMed Central

    Moghadam, Marzyeh; Rezaei, Farzin; Ghaderi, Ebrahim; Rostamian, Negar

    2016-01-01

    Background: Attachment theory is one of the most important achievements of contemporary psychology. Role of medical students in the community health is important, so we need to know about the situation of happiness and attachment style in these students. Objectives: This study was aimed to assess the relationship between medical students’ attachment styles and demographic characteristics. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on randomly selected students of Medical Sciences in Kurdistan University, in 2012. To collect data, Hazan and Shaver's attachment style measure and the Oxford Happiness Questionnaire were used. The results were analyzed using the SPSS software version 16 (IBM, Chicago IL, USA) and statistical analysis was performed via t-test, Chi-square test, and multiple regression tests. Results: Secure attachment style was the most common attachment style and the least common was ambivalent attachment style. Avoidant attachment style was more common among single persons than married people (P = 0.03). No significant relationship was observed between attachment style and gender and grade point average of the studied people. The mean happiness score of students was 62.71. In multivariate analysis, the variables of secure attachment style (P = 0.001), male gender (P = 0.005), and scholar achievement (P = 0.047) were associated with higher happiness score. Conclusion: The most common attachment style was secure attachment style, which can be a positive prognostic factor in medical students, helping them to manage stress. Higher frequency of avoidant attachment style among single persons, compared with married people, is mainly due to their negative attitude toward others and failure to establish and maintain relationships with others. PMID:28217589

  12. Ninth Grade Student Responses to Authentic Science Instruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellison, Michael Steven

    This mixed methods case study documents an effort to implement authentic science and engineering instruction in one teacher's ninth grade science classrooms in a science-focused public school. The research framework and methodology is a derivative of work developed and reported by Newmann and others (Newmann & Associates, 1996). Based on a working definition of authenticity, data were collected for eight months on the authenticity in the experienced teacher's pedagogy and in student performance. Authenticity was defined as the degree to which a classroom lesson, an assessment task, or an example of student performance demonstrates construction of knowledge through use of the meaning-making processes of science and engineering, and has some value to students beyond demonstrating success in school (Wehlage et al., 1996). Instruments adapted for this study produced a rich description of the authenticity of the teacher's instruction and student performance. The pedagogical practices of the classroom teacher were measured as moderately authentic on average. However, the authenticity model revealed the teacher's strategy of interspersing relatively low authenticity instructional units focused on building science knowledge with much higher authenticity tasks requiring students to apply these concepts and skills. The authenticity of the construction of knowledge and science meaning-making processes components of authentic pedagogy were found to be greater, than the authenticity of affordances for students to find value in classroom activities beyond demonstrating success in school. Instruction frequently included one aspect of value beyond school, connections to the world outside the classroom, but students were infrequently afforded the opportunity to present their classwork to audiences beyond the teacher. When the science instruction in the case was measured to afford a greater level of authentic intellectual work, a higher level of authentic student performance on

  13. Reducing Test Anxiety among Third Grade Students through the Implementation of Relaxation Techniques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Heidi A.; El Ramahi, Mera K.; Conn, Steven R.; Estes, Lincoln A.; Ghibellini, Amanda B.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to reduce the negative effects that self-perceived levels of test anxiety have on third-grade students. The participants in this study consisted of 177 third-grade students at two Midwestern public elementary schools. Students at one school were taught relaxation techniques, while students at the second school served…

  14. Producing a Documentary in the Third Grade: Reaching All Students through Movie Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fehn, Bruce; Heckart, Kimberly

    2013-01-01

    This article details the work of third grade teacher, co-author Kim Heckart, as she engaged her students in making historical documentaries: a project that succeeded in reaching all of her third-grade students. For the last five years, Kim has required students to make historical documentaries. As her students produced these works, Kim conversed…

  15. Grade Inflation under the Threat of Students' Nuisance: Theory and Evidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iris Franz, Wan-Ju

    2010-01-01

    This study examines a channel, students' nuisance, to explain grade inflation. "Students' nuisance" is defined by "students' pestering the professors for better grades." This paper contains two parts: the game theoretic model and the empirical tests. The model shows that the potential threat of students' nuisance can induce the professors to…

  16. Effects of Information and Communication Technology on Engagement and Art Production for Eighth-Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lovin, Elizabeth; Lambeth, Dawn T.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to explore the impact of an online-learning component incorporating peer discussion groups on art achievement, digital literacy practice, student engagement, and student attitude of an eighth-grade visual arts classroom. Participants included 30 students in two 8th-grade art classes. Students in one class received…

  17. Producing a Documentary in the Third Grade: Reaching All Students through Movie Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fehn, Bruce; Heckart, Kimberly

    2013-01-01

    This article details the work of third grade teacher, co-author Kim Heckart, as she engaged her students in making historical documentaries: a project that succeeded in reaching all of her third-grade students. For the last five years, Kim has required students to make historical documentaries. As her students produced these works, Kim conversed…

  18. Middle Grades Students' Situation Definitions: Development of a Knowledge-Linking Inventory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuh, Kathy L.; Kuo, Yi-Lung; Knupp, Tawnya L.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop the Student Knowledge Linking Instrument (SKLI), an inventory for middle grades students that seeks to understand student knowledge construction processes. This study included 461 fifth and sixth grade students and follows from a series of qualitative studies that were used as a foundation for development…

  19. Career Choices Among Saudi Medical Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Faris, Eiad; And Others

    1997-01-01

    A survey of 253 final-year students at the four Saudi medical schools found the most frequently-chosen specialties were internal medicine, surgery, pediatrics, and obstetrics/gynecology. Over one-fourth were unsure of career choice. Gender differences were found. Most common locations for postgraduate training were Saudi Arabia and Canada, and a…

  20. Infuriating Tensions: Science and the Medical Student.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bishop, J. Michael

    1984-01-01

    Contemporary medical students, it is suggested, view science in particular and the intellect in general as difficult allies at best. What emerges are physicians without inquiring minds, physicians who bring to the bedside not curiosity and a desire to understand but a set of reflexes. (MLW)

  1. Changing Medical Students' Attitudes toward Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzales, Ernest; Morrow-Howell, Nancy; Gilbert, Pat

    2010-01-01

    Given the growth in the number of older adults and the ageist attitudes many in the health care profession hold, interventions aimed at improving health professionals' attitudes toward older adults are imperative. Vital Visionaries is an intergenerational art program designed to improve medical students' attitudes toward older adults. Participants…

  2. Infuriating Tensions: Science and the Medical Student.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bishop, J. Michael

    1984-01-01

    Contemporary medical students, it is suggested, view science in particular and the intellect in general as difficult allies at best. What emerges are physicians without inquiring minds, physicians who bring to the bedside not curiosity and a desire to understand but a set of reflexes. (MLW)

  3. Transfer of Student Learning in Medical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patel, Vimla L.; Cranton, Patricia A.

    1983-01-01

    Transfer of learning among the cognitive, psychomotor, and affective domains and among three clinical disciplines (medicine, pediatrics, and surgery) was examined in the final year of a medical student clerkship program. A model based on ethnographic analysis followed by performance measurement was used. (Author/MLW)

  4. Integrative Virology for Senior Medical Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koment, Roger W.

    1991-01-01

    The article describes a senior elective in virology developed at the University of South Dakota School of Medicine. Students work independently through a series of course units, selecting 12 study topics from a catalog of 35 topics in medical virology and discussing their reading daily with the professor. (DB)

  5. Psychosocial Characteristics of Female Medical Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blumberg, Phyllis; And Others

    Self-perceptions of male and female medical students on various psychosocial characteristics were compared in 1980. The questionnaire consisted of: the Social Support Networks questions, the Social Readjustment Rating Scale (Holmes and Rahe, 1967), the General Well Being Scale (Gurin, Veroff, and Felds, 1960), the Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale…

  6. Measurement of Psychosocial Attitudes in Medical Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dornbush, Rhea L.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    The effect of a behavioral sciences course on first-year medical students' attitudes toward social factors as determinants of health or illness, preventive medicine, paramedical cooperation, physician-patient relationships, government role in health care, and general liberalism was found to be minimal immediately after the course. (MSE)

  7. Integrative Virology for Senior Medical Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koment, Roger W.

    1991-01-01

    The article describes a senior elective in virology developed at the University of South Dakota School of Medicine. Students work independently through a series of course units, selecting 12 study topics from a catalog of 35 topics in medical virology and discussing their reading daily with the professor. (DB)

  8. Transfer of Student Learning in Medical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patel, Vimla L.; Cranton, Patricia A.

    1983-01-01

    Transfer of learning among the cognitive, psychomotor, and affective domains and among three clinical disciplines (medicine, pediatrics, and surgery) was examined in the final year of a medical student clerkship program. A model based on ethnographic analysis followed by performance measurement was used. (Author/MLW)

  9. Career Choices Among Saudi Medical Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Faris, Eiad; And Others

    1997-01-01

    A survey of 253 final-year students at the four Saudi medical schools found the most frequently-chosen specialties were internal medicine, surgery, pediatrics, and obstetrics/gynecology. Over one-fourth were unsure of career choice. Gender differences were found. Most common locations for postgraduate training were Saudi Arabia and Canada, and a…

  10. Informed Consent and the "Medical Student Psychiatrist."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Daniel L.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Responses to a 1986 questionnaire by 91 departments of clinical psychiatry in U.S. medical schools revealed that a substantial proportion (29.3 percent) were not fully compliant with established guidelines requiring informed consent from patients before allowing students to participate in their psychiatric assessment and care. (Author/DB)

  11. Coping Styles of Women Medical Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidson, Virginia M.

    1978-01-01

    Role strain is discussed as it occurs in the context of presenting complaint and treatment, and issues of feminine sexuality and role adjustment are examined. It is suggested that medical schools can increase their awareness of how sex bias and institutional sexism affect the mental health and well-being of women students and can make appropriate…

  12. Gender comparisons of medical students' psychosocial profiles.

    PubMed

    Hojat, M; Glaser, K; Xu, G; Veloski, J J; Christian, E B

    1999-05-01

    This study was designed to compare male and female medical students on selected personality attributes that could influence their academic attainment and personal success. Participants were 1157 medical students (743 men, 414 women) who completed a set of psychosocial questionnaires measuring intensity and chronicity of loneliness, general anxiety, test anxiety, neuroticism, depression, extraversion, self-esteem, locus of control, perceptions of parents, general health and appraisals of stressful life events. Data were analysed by employing multivariate and univariate analysis of variance and chi-square analysis. Jefferson Medical College. Medical students. Men scored significantly higher on the intensity of loneliness, and women scored higher on general anxiety, test anxiety and neuroticism scales, but the magnitudes of the effect size estimates were not large. No significant gender difference was observed on measures of chronicity of loneliness, depression, extraversion, self-esteem, external locus of control, perception of general health and perceptions of the mother and the father. Women who experienced stressful life events, such as death in the family or personal illness, appraised these events more negatively than did their male counterparts. Implications of the findings for medical education and practice are discussed.

  13. Evaluation of information literacy status among medical students at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences.

    PubMed

    Bazrafkan, Leila; Hayat, Ali Asghar; Abbasi, Karim; Bazrafkan, Aghdas; Rohalamini, Azadeh; Fardid, Mozhgan

    2017-01-01

    The information literacy status and the use of information technology among students in the globalization age of course plans are very momentous. This study aimed to evaluate the information literacy status and use of information technology among medical students of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences in 2013. This was a descriptive-analytical study with cross-sectional method. The study population consisted of all medical students (physiopathology, externship and internship) studying at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. The sample size (n=310) was selected by systematic random sampling. The tool of data gathering was LASSI questionnaire (assigned by America research association) with 48 closed items in five-point LIKERT scale. The questionnaire included two distinct parts of demographic questions and the information literacy skills based on the standards of information literacy capacities for academic education. The content validity was acquired by professors' and experts' comments. The reliability was also calculated by Cronbach'salpha (0.85). Data were analyzed in both descriptive (frequency- mean) and analytical level (t-test, analysis of variance) using SPSS 14 software. 60.3% of the participants were females, and the remaining (29.7%) were males. The mean score of information literacy and its five subgroups among the students weren't at a desirable level. The mean scores of information literacy for educational grades from the highest to lowest belonged to the internship, physiopathology and externship. The results showed that the highest average was related to the effective access ability to information among interns (9.27±3.57) and the lowest one was related to the ability of understanding legal and economical cases related with using information among externs (3.11±1.32).The results of ANOVA showed that there wasn't a significant difference between educational grades and information literacy. Finally, the result of independent t-test did not show a

  14. Evaluation of information literacy status among medical students at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences

    PubMed Central

    BAZRAFKAN, LEILA; HAYAT, ALI ASGHAR; ABBASI, KARIM; BAZRAFKAN, AGHDAS; ROHALAMINI, AZADEH; FARDID, MOZHGAN

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: The information literacy status and the use of information technology among students in the globalization age of course plans are very momentous. This study aimed to evaluate the information literacy status and use of information technology among medical students of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences in 2013. Methods: This was a descriptive-analytical study with cross-sectional method. The study population consisted of all medical students (physiopathology, externship and internship) studying at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. The sample size (n=310) was selected by systematic random sampling. The tool of data gathering was LASSI questionnaire (assigned by America research association) with 48 closed items in five-point LIKERT scale. The questionnaire included two distinct parts of demographic questions and the information literacy skills based on the standards of information literacy capacities for academic education. The content validity was acquired by professors’ and experts’ comments. The reliability was also calculated by Cronbach’salpha (0.85). Data were analyzed in both descriptive (frequency- mean) and analytical level (t-test, analysis of variance) using SPSS 14 software. Results: 60.3% of the participants were females, and the remaining (29.7%) were males. The mean score of information literacy and its five subgroups among the students weren’t at a desirable level. The mean scores of information literacy for educational grades from the highest to lowest belonged to the internship, physiopathology and externship. The results showed that the highest average was related to the effective access ability to information among interns (9.27±3.57) and the lowest one was related to the ability of understanding legal and economical cases related with using information among externs (3.11±1.32).The results of ANOVA showed that there wasn’t a significant difference between educational grades and information literacy. Finally, the

  15. Do Students Who Get Low Grades Only in Research Methods Need the Same Help as Students Who Get Low Grades in All Topics in Psychology?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barry, John A.

    2012-01-01

    Some psychology students achieve high grades in all classes except for research methods (RM). Previous research has usually treated low levels of achievement in RM as a unitary phenomenon, without reference to the grades the student is achieving in other subjects. The present internet survey explored preferences for learning RM in 140 psychology…

  16. Seventh-grade students at-risk for school failure.

    PubMed

    Stevens, R; Pihl, R O

    1987-01-01

    This study was designed to assess the effects of failure on the subsequent test performance in school of young adolescents. Fifty-one seventh-grade students, identified as at-risk for future school failure, were compared to 51 randomly selected classmates on individually administered measures of intelligence, self-concept, problem-solving ability, coping ability, attribution, and locus of control. Teachers' ratings, mathematics ability, and grades of the two groups were also compared. Students with a history of school failure, although of normal intelligence, were found to be significantly less intellectually, academically, and affectively competent than their more successful peers and were rated by their teachers as significantly less able to deal adaptively with normal school stress. A discriminant analysis separated the groups with 93% accuracy. On two equivalent mathematics tests, one given under relaxed conditions, and the other under normal school test-like conditions, approximately thirty percent of both the at-risk and the otherwise normal students got lower scores when they thought they were taking a test. Implications of these results for the understanding and remediation of stress-depressed school performance are discussed.

  17. Introducing medical students to careers in medical education: the student track at an annual medical education conference.

    PubMed

    Blatt, Benjamin; Plack, Margaret; Suzuki, Mari; Arepalli, Sruthi; Schroth, Scott; Stagnaro-Green, Alex

    2013-08-01

    Few avenues exist to familiarize medical students with careers as clinician-educators, and the clinician-educator career pathway has not been well defined. In this article, the authors describe how they integrated a career-oriented student track into the 2011 Northeast Group on Educational Affairs (NEGEA) annual retreat to introduce students to careers in medical education. Annual education conferences are principal sources of educational scholarship, networking, collaboration, and information sharing; as such, they represent attractive venues for early exposure to the culture of medical education. The authors' goal in creating the NEGEA conference student track was to excite students about careers in medical education by providing them with an array of opportunities for active involvement in both student-specific and general conference activities.The authors draw from their experience to provide a guide for recruiting student participants to career-building student tracks. They also offer a guide for developing future student tracks, based on their experience and grounded in social cognitive career theory. Although their focus is on medical education, they believe these guides will be useful for educators planning a conference-based student track in any field.

  18. Gender differences in learning styles and academic performance of medical students in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Nuzhat, Ayesha; Salem, Raneem Osama; Al Hamdan, Nasser; Ashour, Nada

    2013-01-01

    Teachers at medical school are often faced with challenges of improving student satisfaction with the learning environment. On the other hand, education in the medical field is very competitive and medical students are exposed to diverse methods of teaching. Students adapt specific learning styles to keep pace with the information delivered to them in their institutions. The aim of this study is to know the differences in learning styles between male and female students, and the effect it has on academic performance. The VARK Questionnaire version 7.0 (Visual, Aural, Read/Write and Kinesthetic) was administered to the fourth year and fifth year medical students at King Saud Bin Abdul Aziz University for Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine at King Fahad Medical City, Saudi Arabia for determining the preferred learning methods of students participating in this study. The learning styles were then compared to cumulative grade point average (GPA) obtained by the students. The dominant learning style preference of students was multimodal. Among students who preferred unimodal preference, aural and kinesthetic preference was predominant for males and females. Moreover, Females had more diverse preferences than male students. Multimodal learners have higher cumulative GPAs when compared with the unimodal learners. This study revealed variation in learning style preferences among genders, and its implications on academic performance of medical students.

  19. The Impact of a Longitudinal Curriculum on Medical Student Obstetrics and Gynecology Clinical Training

    PubMed Central

    Melo, Juliana; Kaneshiro, Bliss; Kellett, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Clinical training in most medical schools consists of separate rotations, based out of tertiary-care facilities, across the core medical disciplines. In addition to a traditional clinical curriculum, the University of Hawai‘i offers a longitudinal clinical curriculum as an option to medical students. The longitudinal curriculum provides students with an innovative, alternative educational track to achieve their educational goals in clinical medicine. The objective of this study was to describe the obstetrics and gynecology procedural experiences of third-year medical students who participated in a longitudinal curriculum versus a traditional block clerkship. The number of procedures reported by third-year medical students who participated in a non-traditional, longitudinal clerkship was compared with the number of procedures reported by students who participated in the traditional block third-year curriculum between July 2007 and June 2009. National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) subject scores, clerkship grade and chosen residency specialty were also compared. The mean number of pelvic exams (longitudinally-trained 36 [SD 33] versus block-trained 8 [SD 6], [t=4.3, P<.01]) and pap smears (longitudinally-trained 28 [SD 26] versus block-trained 7 [SD 3] [t=4.4, P<.01]) was significantly higher for longitudinally-trained students compared to block-trained students. No significant differences in overall clerkship grades or NBME shelf scores emerged. PMID:24843837

  20. Assessing deaf cultural competency of physicians and medical students.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Lisa; LaHousse, Sheila F; Nakaji, Melanie C; Sadler, Georgia Robins

    2011-03-01

    The Medical Students, Cancer Control, and the Deaf Community Training program (DCT) intended to create physicians who were culturally competent to care for deaf patients were evaluated. DCT medical students (n = 22), UCSD medical faculty (n = 131), and non-DCT medical students (n = 211) were anonymously surveyed about their perceptions related to deaf patients, deaf cultural competency, and interpreter use. The faculty and non-DCT medical students displayed less knowledge than the DCT students. These findings suggest that training medical students in deaf cultural competency can significantly increase their capacity to care for community members and reduce the health disparities experienced by this community.