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Sample records for grade medical students

  1. "Making the grade:" noncognitive predictors of medical students' clinical clerkship grades.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Katherine B.; Vaishnavi, Sanjeev N.; Lau, Steven K. M.; Andriole, Dorothy A.; Jeffe, Donna B.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Because clinical clerkship grades are associated with resident selection and performance and are largely based on residents'/attendings' subjective ratings, it is important to identify variables associated with clinical clerkship grades. METHODS: U.S. medical students who completed > or =1 of the following required clinical clerkships--internal medicine, surgery, obstetrics/gynecology, pediatrics, neurology and psychiatry--were invited to participate in an anonymous online survey, which inquired about demographics, degree program, perceived quality of clerkship experiences, assertiveness, reticence and clerkship grades. RESULTS: A total of 2395 medical students (55% women; 57% whites) from 105 schools responded. Multivariable logistic regression models identified factors independently associated with receiving lower clerkship grades (high pass/pass or B/C) compared with the highest grade (honors or A). Students reporting higher quality of clerkship experiences were less likely to report lower grades in all clerkships. Older students more likely reported lower grades in internal medicine (P = 0.02) and neurology (P < 0.001). Underrepresented minorities more likely reported lower grades in all clerkships (P < 0.001); Asians more likely reported lower grades in obstetrics/gynecology (P = 0.007), pediatrics (P = 0.01) and neurology (P = 0.01). Men more likely reported lower grades in obstetrics/gynecology (P < 0.001) and psychiatry (P = 0.004). Students reporting greater reticence more likely reported lower grades in internal medicine (P = 0.02), pediatrics (P = 0.02) and psychiatry (P < 0.05). Students reporting greater assertiveness less likely reported lower grades in all clerkships (P < 0.03) except IM. CONCLUSIONS: The independent associations between lower clerkship grades and nonwhite race, male gender, older age, lower quality of clerkship experiences, and being less assertive and more reticent are concerning and merit further investigation. PMID

  2. Grade Inflation in Medical Student Radiation Oncology Clerkships: Missed Opportunities for Feedback?

    SciTech Connect

    Grover, Surbhi; Swisher-McClure, Samuel; Sosnowicz, Stasha; Li, Jiaqi; Mitra, Nandita; Berman, Abigail T.; Baffic, Cordelia; Vapiwala, Neha; Freedman, Gary M.

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that medical student radiation oncology elective rotation grades are inflated and cannot be used to distinguish residency applicants. Methods and Materials: The records of 196 applicants to a single radiation oncology residency program in 2011 and 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. The grades for each rotation in radiation oncology were collected and converted to a standardized 4-point grading scale (honors, high pass, pass, fail). Pass/fail grades were scored as not applicable. The primary study endpoint was to compare the distribution of applicants' grades in radiation oncology with their grades in medicine, surgery, pediatrics, and obstetrics/gynecology core clerkships. Results: The mean United States Medical Licensing Examination Step 1 score of the applicants was 237 (range, 188-269), 43% had additional Masters or PhD degrees, and 74% had at least 1 publication. Twenty-nine applicants were graded for radiation oncology rotations on a pass/fail basis and were excluded from the final analysis. Of the remaining applicants (n=167), 80% received the highest possible grade for their radiation oncology rotations. Grades in radiation oncology were significantly higher than each of the other 4 clerkships studied (P<.001). Of all applicants, 195 of 196 matched into a radiation oncology residency. Higher grades in radiation oncology were associated with significantly higher grades in the pediatrics core clerkship (P=.002). However, other medical school performance metrics were not significantly associated with higher grades in radiation oncology. Conclusions: Although our study group consists of a selected group of radiation oncology applicants, their grades in radiation oncology clerkships were highly skewed toward the highest grades when compared with grades in other core clerkships. Student grading in radiation oncology clerkships should be re-evaluated to incorporate more objective and detailed performance metrics to allow for

  3. Use of Medical Students in a Flipped Classroom Programme in Nutrition Education for Fourth-Grade School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McEvoy, Christian S.; Cantore, Kathryn M.; Denlinger, LeAnn N.; Schleich, Michele A.; Stevens, Nicole M.; Swavely, Steven C.; Odom, Anne A.; Novick, Marsha B.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of a flipped classroom progamme, designed and implemented by medical students, in communicating nutrition education to fourth-grade school students aged 9-10 years and to characterise teachers' assessments of the progamme, which was designed to minimise the burden placed on…

  4. Medical and pharmacy students' perceptions of the grading and assessment practices

    PubMed Central

    Kasanda, C. D.; Mitonga, K. H.; Veii, K.; Zimba, R. F.

    2013-01-01

    Many students at the University of Namibia have frequently complained about ineffective assessment practices used at the institution. On many occasions, these complaints have not been substantiated with evidence of any kind. The purpose of this study was to obtain some empirical evidence that would ascertain undergraduate students' perceptions of the University of Namibia's grading and assessment practices. Using a structured scaled questionnaire, data were obtained from a representative sample of the University's undergraduate students studying for Medical and Pharmacy degrees. The questionnaire items covered matters related to students' experiences of assessment practices, feedback on assessment tasks, reliability and validity of assessment tools used by lecturers, efficacy of processes of administering examinations, perceptions of irregular and unfair assessment practices, impact of assessment regimes on students' cost of studies, motivation, morale, rate of progression in studies and graduation, the degree of compliance with assessment ethics and on academic quality assurance. According to the data reported in this article, the majority of the respondents perceived that the Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy at the University of Namibia applied assessment practices that yielded reliable and valid results. This was the case because most lecturers in the two schools used appropriate assessment tools and provided their students with prompt and informative feedback on the results of assignments, tests and examinations. In addition, most respondents reported that whereas examination procedures used in the two schools were efficient and effective, lecturers graded examination scripts fairly. These and other results are discussed in the article to communicate the message that the assessment procedures used in the Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy at the University of Namibia would promote effective learning and understanding amongst students as they were of high quality

  5. The Perceptions of Professionalism by 1st and 5th Grade Medical Students

    PubMed Central

    Klemenc-Ketis, Zalika; Vrecko, Helena

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Professionalism is essential for the development of mature physicians but not much education is devoted to that theme. Aim: We aimed to determine the views of undergraduate medical students on medical professionalism. Methods: This was a qualitative study, based on focus groups of the first and fifth-year undergraduate medical students. Transcripts of the focus groups were independently evaluated by two researches. Segments of transcripts, identified as important, were marked as verbatims. A grounded theory method with open coding was applied. A list of codes was developed and reviewed by both researchers until the consensus was reached. Then, the codes were reviewed and put into the categories and dimensions. Results: Students recognized 10 main medical professionalism dimensions (empathy, respect, responsibility, autonomy, trust, communication, difference between professional and private life, team work, partnership) and two dimensions associated with it (physician's characteristics, external factors). Slight change of the attitudes towards a more self-centred future physicians’ figure was observed in the fifth-year medical students. Conclusion: The students have an appropriate picture of the physicians’ figure even at the beginning of their medical studies but still needs an education in professionalism. It seems that the fifth-year students perceive physicians as more self-centred when compared to their first-year colleagues. PMID:25568575

  6. Pre-Admission Grades and Student Performance: The Malaysian Medical School Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abidin, Basir; Suliman, Noor A.; Din, Salwa M.; Manan, Norhafizah A.

    2012-01-01

    Prior academic achievement is often considered the best predictor and therefore the preadmission criteria for highly competitive medical schools. Most studies that advocate this viewpoint analyzed cohorts based on results of a central examination taken by students who come from various pre-university setups and backgrounds. Far less is known about…

  7. [Medical education for students in compulsory education: the conception of the preparation of three graded textbooks and preliminary evaluation of lectures using these textbooks].

    PubMed

    Saito, M; Yamagishi, Y; Saito, S; Edo, K

    2001-03-01

    The school pharmacist in our hospital pharmacy used three graded textbooks about medicine for students at the Sukagawa School for the Health-Impaired (Fukushima Medical University Hospital Branch (H. I. school)). A revised textbook for 4th-6th grade elementary school students containing 12 important items of information about medicine, a new picture textbook for 1st-3rd grade elementary school students, and a new textbook containing practical data for junior high school students were prepared by supplementing original information with illustrations, simplified expression and large type face. Additionally, the pronunciation of Chinese characters was included in the textbook for the 1st-3rd grade elementary school students. In this study, 9 students from H. I. school and 37 students from Koyase junior high school took part in a questionnaire and an examination evaluating the usefulness of the lectures, and these textbooks, in regard to the student's recognition and understanding of medicine. Most students answered that the lectures and textbooks helped them to understand medicine. Furthermore, the results of the examination indicated that the students had a general understanding of medicine. In conclusion, we suggest that it is important for students in compulsory education to learn about medicine, and that according to the preliminary result of questionnaires and examinations, both the lectures and textbooks were useful to help the students to understand more about medicine.

  8. Grading Medical Students in a Psychiatry Clerkship: Correlation with the NBME Subject Examination Scores and Its Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramchandani, Dilip

    2011-01-01

    Background/Objective: The author analyzed and compared various assessment methods for assessment of medical students; these methods included clinical assessment and the standardized National Board of Medical Education (NBME) subject examination. Method: Students were evaluated on their 6-week clerkship in psychiatry by both their clinical…

  9. Academic Performance of Students with the Highest and Mediocre School-leaving Grades: Does the Aptitude Test for Medical Studies (TMS) Balance Their Prognoses?

    PubMed Central

    Kadmon, Guni; Kadmon, Martina

    2016-01-01

    Background: Admission to undergraduate medical training in Germany occurs by central and local pathways. Central admission includes two distinct groups: Students with top school-leaving grades (best-SLG group) and students with inferior school-leaving grades who are admitted with a delay of up to seven years (delayed admission group). Students with academic difficulties and early dropouts are present in both groups. Local admission at our university involves the German Test for Medical Studies (TMS) and allows the admission by merit of students with a wide range of school-leaving grades. Aims: To examine the justification of a TMS-based strategy to reduce the admission of potentially weak best school-leavers and enhance the admission of potentially able candidates with mediocre school-leaving grades. Method: The prognostic contribution of the school-leaving (SL) GPA and the TMS to academic performance and to continuity in the pre-clinical part of the undergraduate medical program was examined in two study groups: best school leavers (SL grade 1.0, SL-GPA 823-900 points) and mediocre school leavers (SL grades 2.0-2.3, SL-GPA 689-660 points). The outcomes in both groups were compared in relation to their TMS results. The prospective study included four consecutive cohorts. Results: In each study group the TMS predicted the academic performance (β=0.442-0.446) and the continuity of studies (OR=0.890-0.853) better than the SL-GPA (β=0.238-0.047; OR=1.009-0.998). Attrition was most strongly associated with failing to take the TMS (OR=0.230-0.380). Mediocre school leavers with TMS scores ≥125 performed as well as the best school leavers. Mediocre school leavers with TMS scores between 110-124 performed on average less well but within the required standards. Best school leavers with mediocre TMS scores and 30% of the best school leavers who hadn't taken the TMS performed less well than most mediocre school leavers with high TMS scores. Discussion: The TMS appears to

  10. Grading System and Student Effort

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paredes, Valentina

    2017-01-01

    Several papers have proposed that the grading system affects students' incentives to exert effort. In particular, the previous literature has compared student effort under relative and absolute grading systems, but the results are mixed and the implications of the models have not been empirically tested. In this paper, I build a model where…

  11. Alternatives to Grading Student Writing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tchudi, Stephen, Ed.

    The result of an investigation into the grading writing by the National Council of Teachers of English Committee on Alternatives to Grading Student Writing, this collection of essays offers the writing teacher several innovative and interesting options. Following an introduction by the editor (chair of the Committee), in which he delineates the…

  12. Cynicism among medical students.

    PubMed

    Kopelman, L

    1983-10-21

    The thesis that medical students become more cynical than students of other professions seems justified in light of psychological studies and reports from medical students. This article explores whether this might be due, in part, to disappointment about how important ideals are followed. Psychological tests themselves offer an opportunity to examine this, because the medical profession espouses the goals of gaining proper consent from all subjects, including students, and of giving appropriate attention to excellence of research design and method. When studies used to evaluate medical students' attitudes are viewed from this perspective, however, weaknesses on both scores seem apparent. Students seem well aware of some of these flaws. Although such testing is a small part of medical education, it confirms students' views that there is cause for disillusionment about how certain goals are realized. It also suggests a way to cure some students' cynicism. Students should be taught consistently, both by example as well as by precept of their profession's sincere commitment to professed goals. In practical terms this means, for example, that studies using students as subjects should have a proper review by the institutional review board, with adequate attention given to excellence of design, confidentiality, and methods of gaining informed and unpressured consent. Such studies could then serve as paradigms to students. Other goals of the profession should also be applied to students, and applied for students.

  13. Student Perspectives of Grading in Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhu, Xihe

    2015-01-01

    Recent state and federal legislations on educational accountability push evaluation and grading to the frontline. This study examined students' perspectives of grading in physical education. The participants included students (N = 39) from two middle schools. Data were collected through observation, student profile grading sheets and interviews.…

  14. An intensive medical education elective for senior medical students.

    PubMed

    Gainor, Jamie; Patel, Nilay K; George, Paul F; MacNamara, Marina M C; Dollase, Richard; Taylor, Julie Scott

    2014-07-01

    Peer teaching by medical students is increasingly consid- ered an effective and efficient instructional modality with value for both teachers and learners. In 2012, twelve senior medical students participated in an inaugural, four-week Medical Education Elective at The Alpert Medical School of Brown University. The first week emphasized education theory and skills. During the remaining three weeks, participants served as a core group of instructors in a Clinical Skills Clerkship (CSC), a three-week required course transitioning rising third-year students to clinical clerkships. Senior near-peer instructors (NPIs) gained substantive experience in developing curriculum, facilitating small group sessions, teaching clinical skills, mentoring, providing feedback, and grading an Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE). Based on direct observation by faculty and written anonymous evaluations by learners (n=98), NPIs demonstrated a high degree of teaching competence. This innovative, by-invitation-only, annual elective is the most substantive medical education experience for medical students described in the literature.

  15. [Medical schools: students today].

    PubMed

    Kunakov, Natasha

    2011-04-01

    Physicians that are faculty members in medical schools receive new students every year, and they are expected to prepare those students to become professionals. They usually appeal to their experience to meet that challenge. However, newer generations of students are different, and experience, with no formal training for teaching them, can be insufficient. New characteristics of students can be related to their early contact in life with information technology. Their brain has been somehow modified by stimuli offered by this technology, and the way they learn has also been modified. This paper is a reflection about how students have changed and it analyzes how their learning experience needs to be modified accordingly. Teaching based only on experience might be insufficient to fulfill the expectations of young students that have chosen the medical profession for their future.

  16. Misconduct in medical students.

    PubMed

    Vengoechea, Jaime; Moreno, Socorro; Ruiz, Alvaro

    2008-12-01

    Medical students, subject to unique challenges and stressors, frequently engage in misconduct. In this observational study, carried out in a medical school in Colombia, we developed a survey to explore the association between misconduct and stress, potential stressors and other possible contributing factors, such as sex, age and academic year. Of the 433 students that responded to our survey, 97.9% did not fully disagree with at least one of the mentioned misconducts and 99.8% admitted to at least one transgression. Based on a scale we developed, 61.4% of the students consistently agreed with misconduct and 44.9% frequently engaged in misconduct. A logistic regression model suggests that being male (OR 1.90, CI 95% 1.27-2.84) and stress (OR 1.04, CI 95% 1.01-1.06) may increase the likelihood of misconduct. In a subgroup of students, excluding those in their last year of studies, higher academic semester (OR 1.25, CI 95%: 1.10-1.42) may also be a risk factor for misconduct. Most of the observed variation in the data, however, is not explained by these factors. Other modifiers, such as student personality and sub-culture, may play a greater role in determining misconduct. The proportion of medical students that engage in misconduct is very high and warrants the attention of the medical education community.

  17. Can Business Students Forecast Their Own Grade?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hossain, Belayet; Tsigaris, Panagiotis

    2013-01-01

    This study examines grade expectations of two groups of business students for their final course mark. We separate students that are on average "better" forecasters on the basis of them not making significant forecast errors during the semester from those students that are poor forecasters of their final grade. We find that the better…

  18. My Medicated Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Lee Burdette

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author, director of Watauga College and residential learning communities at Appalachian State University in Boone, North Carolina, shares her experience dealing with first year college students who are taking medication to manage depression, anxiety, or attention deficit and hyperactivity disorders. She stresses that this is a…

  19. Denying Medical Students' Emotions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    USA Today, 1984

    1984-01-01

    Medical educators nationwide are questioning the process that leads to the denial of the emotional side of medicine by its practitioners. Emotional dilemmas are often verbally suppressed by most students, but they surface in many ways, such as depression, insomnia, loss of appetite, and anxiety. (RM)

  20. Prematriculation Program Grades as Predictors of Black and Other Nontraditional Students' First-Year Academic Performances.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hesser, Al; Lewis, Lloyd

    1992-01-01

    A study explored predictors of African-American and other nontraditional medical students' first-year academic performance at the Medical College of Georgia. Variables included undergraduate grades and grades in a summer prematriculation program (SPP) featuring biochemistry, anatomy, and immunology courses. SPP grades were found useful in…

  1. Student Self-Grading in Social Statistics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Nelta M.

    2007-01-01

    This article analyzes a social statistics class that engaged in self-grading. Students liked self-grading because they identified their own mistakes, it reinforced what they learned, and they received immediate feedback. Some students worried that others would cheat, but this assertion was not confirmed in the data and the possibility of cheating…

  2. Fifth Grade Elementary Students' Conceptions of Earthquakes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savasci, Funda; Uluduz, Hatice

    2013-01-01

    This study intends to investigate the fifth grade students' conceptions of earthquakes. Twenty two grade 5 students (11-12 years old) from five different elementary schools in Istanbul voluntarily participated in the study. Data were collected from semi-structured interviews with each participant. Six interview questions were designed by…

  3. Wiki Technology for Middle Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harper, Debra Ann

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative exploratory case study was to determine the pedagogical value of Wiki technology-enhanced instruction for middle grade students. The sample consisted of three Wiki projects representative of work from 6th, 7th, and 8th grade middle school students. The examination of the data collected from the three samples of Wiki…

  4. Medical Student Appraisal

    PubMed Central

    Sampognaro, P.J.; Mitchell, S.L.; Weeks, S.R.; Khalifian, S.; Markman, T.M.; Uebel, L.W.; Dattilo, J.R.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background Pre-rounding is essential to preparing for morning rounds. Despite its importance, pre-rounding is rarely formally taught within the medical school curriculum and more often informally learned by modeling residents. The evolution of mobile applications provides opportunities to optimize this process. Objectives To evaluate three options available to medical students while pre-rounding and promote adoption of mobile resources in clinical care. Methods Six medical students formed the evaluation cohort. Students were surveyed to assess pre-rounding practices. Participants utilized paper-based pre-rounding templates for two weeks followed by two weeks of the electronic note-taking service EvernoteTM. A review of mobile applications on the iTunesTM and Google PlayTM stores was performed, with each application informally reviewed by a single student. The application ScutsheetTM was selected for formal review by all students. Data was collected from narrative responses supplied by students throughout the evaluation periods and aggregated to assess strengths and limitations of each application. Results Pre-study responses demonstrated two consistent processes: verbal sign-out of overnight events and template use to organize patient information. The paper-based template was praised for its organization and familiarity amongst residents, but perceived as limited by the requirement of re-copying data into the hospital’s electronic medical record (EMR). EvernoteTM excelled due to compatibility across multiple operating systems, including accessibility from clinical workstations and ability to copy notes into the hospital’s EMR. ScutsheetTM allowed for retention of data across multiple hospital days, but was limited by inability to export data or modify the electronic template. Aggregated user feedback identified the abilities to customize templates and copy information into the EMR as two prevailing characteristics that enhanced the efficiency of pre

  5. Elementary Grades Students' Capacity for Functional Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanton, Maria L.; Kaput, James J.

    2004-01-01

    This is a study of how urban elementary grades students develop and express functions. Data were analyzed according to the forms of representations students used, the progression in students' mathematical language and the operations they employed, and how they attended to one or more varying quantities. Findings indicate that students are capable…

  6. Student Perceptions of Middle Grades Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolsey, Thomas DeVere; Uline, Cynthia L.

    2010-01-01

    Researchers used student-generated photographs to mediate interviews with middle grades students about their school environment. Findings suggest that school leaders and facilities planners should be responsive to students' needs for both personal and social spaces and be aware of ways the built environment may shape the perceptions students hold…

  7. College Course Grades for Dual Enrollment Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crouse, Jill D.; Allen, Jeff

    2014-01-01

    This study compared college course grade outcomes, both during and after high school, of dual-enrollment students to those of traditional students. The study was based on a large, multiyear sample of Iowa high school and community college students. The results showed that while in high school, dual-enrollment students consistently outperformed…

  8. Stress in medical students.

    PubMed

    Gaughran, F; Dineen, S; Dineen, M; Cole, M; Daly, R J

    1997-01-01

    The object of this study was to examine the main stressors experienced by students in an Irish medical school and their effects on the attitude of the students towards their training. It also determined the students' knowledge of how they could receive help and their attitudes towards seeking such help. Data was collected by an anonymous self-report questionnaire distributed to a fifth year medical school class in the Hilary Term of the academic year. These 63 students had chosen medicine as a career mainly because of vocational and academic factors and almost two thirds of them had always wanted to do medicine. However four were no longer happy with that choice. Fifty-four percent of them had felt like making a complaint on at least one occasion, but did not do so. The perceived problems were mainly verbal in nature. 41% said that this had affected their attendance. The main source of perceived mistreatment was consultant staff. Rates of perceived racial and sexual discrimination were low. Other stressors included examinations, financial issues and family issues. 52% of students did not know the process by which they could make a complaint and 30% felt that seeking help or advice from staff would be damaging to their future career. This study analyses these issues and suggests ways of addressing them.

  9. Medical Laboratory Assistant. Student's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnett, Sara

    This student's manual for the medical laboratory student is one of a series of self-contained, individualized instructional materials for students enrolled in training within the allied health field. It is intended to provide study materials and learning activities that are general enough for all medical laboratory students to use to enhance their…

  10. Reading Aloud to Fourth Grade Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forte, Frances

    A study determined if regular listening to oral reading by the teacher affected fourth-grade students' level of comprehension. Subjects were 47 students from an elementary school in central New Jersey. Twenty-five students were read to for 30 minutes daily for 8 weeks in addition to their regular classroom reading instruction. The remaining 22…

  11. Summer Credit Recovery and Middle Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharp, James Christopher

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the difference in student success by retained students who participate in the Hamblen County (Tennessee) Credit Recovery Program [HCCRP] in the year prior and following their participation. HCCRP is an alternative intervention for students who have been retained in the middle grades of Hamblen County School…

  12. Medical Student Appraisal

    PubMed Central

    Markman, T.M.; Sampognaro, P.J.; Mitchell, S.L.; Weeks, S.R.; Khalifian, S.; Dattilo, J.R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Medical students are often afforded the privilege of counselling patients. In the past resources were limited to pen and paper or anatomic models. The evolution of mobile applications allows for limitless access to resources that facilitate bedside patient education. Objectives To evaluate the utility of six applications in patient education and promote awareness of implementing mobile resources in clinical care. Methods Six medical students rotating on various clerkships evaluated a total of six mobile applications. Strengths, limitations, and suggested uses in clinical care were identified. Applications included MeditoonsTM, VisiblePatientTM, DrawMDTM, CardioTeachTM, Visual AnatomyTM, and 360° Patient Education SuiteTM. Data was generated from narrative responses supplied by each student during their evaluation period. Results Bedside teaching was enhanced by professional illustrations and animations depicting anatomy and pathophysiology. Impromptu teaching was facilitated, as resources were conveniently available on a student’s smartphone or tablet. The ability to annotate and modify images and subsequently email to patients was an extraordinary improvement in provider-patient communication. Universal limitations included small smartphone screens and the novelty of new technology. Discussion Mobile applications have the potential to greatly enhance patient education and simultaneously build rapport. Endless opportunities exist for their integration in clinical practice, particularly for new diagnoses, consent for procedures, and at time of discharge. Providers should be encouraged to try new applications and utilize them with patients. PMID:23874358

  13. Exploring Grade 1 Students' Textual Connections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pantaleo, Sylvia

    2004-01-01

    This article focuses specifically on an aspect of Grade 1 children's literary understanding--the textual associations made by the students as they discussed nine picture books. This work extends the small body of research that has examined the responses of Grade 1 children (e.g., Kiefer, 1993; McGee, 1992; Sipe, 2000a), and also contributes to…

  14. The Perils of Prescribed Grade Distributions: What Every Medical Educator Should Know

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Royal, Kenneth D.; Guskey, Thomas R.

    2014-01-01

    A common practice in medical education is to create a prescribed distribution of grades, or ratings, so that only a certain percentage of students receive the highest marks. This approach typically is employed to curb grade inflation and as a means to help faculty distinguish outstanding performers. Despite the well-intentioned reasoning for using…

  15. Exploring first grade medical students’ professional identity using metaphors: implications for medical curricula

    PubMed Central

    Korkmaz, Hunkar; Senol, Yesim Y.

    2014-01-01

    Background Although professional identity development is an important concept in medical education, the process has not been well-investigated from a student perspective. Purpose This study examines the metaphorical images formulated by first grade medical students in Turkey to describe physicians in the context of establishing a professional identity, along with its limitations. Method Participants (N=148) completed the prompt: A physician is like _____ because _____ to indicate their conceptualizations of physician. The data were analyzed both qualitatively and quantitatively. Results Altogether, 71 well-articulated metaphorical images were identified – comprising six conceptual themes. Conclusions While subject to some limitations, the use of metaphors to formulate and describe professional identities can be helpful in reflecting the personal beliefs and values of matriculants to medical school, as well as providing some guidance and feedback to curriculum development efforts. PMID:24559504

  16. Should You Allow Your Students to Grade Their Own Homework?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simkin, Mark G.

    2015-01-01

    Allowing students to grade their own homework promises several advantages to both students and instructors. But does such a policy make sense? This paper reports the results of an experiment in which eight separate assignments completed by approximately 80 students were first graded by the students using a grading rubric, and then re-graded by a…

  17. Is Medical Student Writing Wrong?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frisof, Kenneth B.; Moseley, James L.

    The prevalence of writing errors made by third-year medical students from the class of 1981 at a large midwestern medical school was studied. The papers of 253 students taking family medicine were evaluated for spelling, grammar, and punctuation errors. Four types of grammar errors and seven punctuation errors were analyzed, and each word…

  18. Do Low Grades Cause College Students to Give up?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thayer, Robert E.

    The thesis that low grades cause college students to give up receives some support from early psychological research and from current reinforcement theories. This study investigates the effects on subsequent grades of low, average, and high first-exam grades for 192 students in a traditional grading system and 52 students in a pass-fail grading…

  19. Self-medication among school students.

    PubMed

    ALBashtawy, Mohammed; Batiha, Abdul-Monim; Tawalbeh, Loai; Tubaishat, Ahmad; AlAzzam, Manar

    2015-04-01

    Self-medication, usually with over-the-counter (OTC) medication, is reported as a community health problem that affects many people worldwide. Most self-medication practice usually begins with the onset of adolescence. A school-based cross-sectional study was conducted in Mafraq Governorate, Jordan, using a simple random sampling method to select 6 public schools from a total of 34 schools. The total sample consisted of 422 school students from Grades 7 through 12. Measures of central tendency and χ(2) were used to compare the difference between the categorical variables. The prevalence of self-medication among the participants was 87.0%. Nearly 75% of self-medication was used for pain relief. The prevalence of self-medication among school students is very high and increases with age. School nurses and other local health-care workers must coordinate with school principals to disseminate health education campaigns about safe use of medication to provide awareness and education to school students, parents, and families.

  20. Supporting medical students with learning disabilities in Asian medical schools

    PubMed Central

    Majumder, Md. Anwarul Azim; Rahman, Sayeeda; D’Souza, Urban JA; Elbeheri, Gad; Abdulrahman, Khalid Bin; Huq, M Muzaherul

    2010-01-01

    Learning disabilities (LDs) represent the largest group of disabilities in higher education (HE) institutes, including medical schools, and the numbers are continuing to rise. The worrying concern is that two-thirds to half of these students with LDs remain undiagnosed when they start their undergraduate education and may even graduate without having their disabilities diagnosed. These students struggle with their academic abilities, receive poor grades and, as a result, develop lower perceptions of their intellectual abilities than do those students without LDs. All these ultimately hamper their professional practice, employment, and career progression. Appropriate and adequate educational policies, provisions, and practices help students to progress satisfactorily. In Asian countries, public and professional awareness about LDs is low, supportive provisions are limited, legislations are inadequate, data are scarce, and equal-opportunity/widening-participation policies are not implemented effectively in the HE sector. This article discusses the issues related to LDs in medical education and draws policy, provision, and practice implications to identify, assess, and support students with LDs in medical schools, particularly in an Asian context. PMID:23745060

  1. Osteoporosis Risk Factors in Eighth Grade Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lysen, Victoria C.; Walker, Robert

    1997-01-01

    Presents findings from food frequency questionnaires and surveys of 138 Midwestern eighth-grade student-parent pairs. The study examined the incidence of modifiable and nonmodifiable osteoporosis risk factors and compared gender differences. Data analysis indicated that many adolescents possessed several modifiable and nonmodifiable risk factors…

  2. Civics for ESOL Students, Grade 9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, John S.

    The curriculum guide for grade 9 civics instruction for students of English as a second language (ESOL) contains, in outline form, civics behavioral objectives and instructional units. Units of instruction cover American symbols, politicians, colonial Americans, principles of government, the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution,…

  3. Grading Standards, Student Ability and Errors in College Admission

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moen, Jarle; Tjelta, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Grades are important for admission of students in most higher education programs. Analyzing admission and student performance data at a major Norwegian business school, we find that the grading practice of teachers at regional colleges sending students to the school is affected by the average performance of the students being graded. Teachers at…

  4. Sharp Injuries Among Medical Students

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemzadeh, Iman; Kazerooni, Mitra; Davoodian, Parivash; Hamedi, Yaghoob; Sadeghi, Payam

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Sharp injuries threaten the health of healthcare employees. They cause the transmission of many diseases such as hepatitis B and C, AIDS, etc., which can increase the associated costs associated with them. The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency of sharp injuries among the students of Hormozgan University of Medical Sciences. Method: This cross-sectional study was conducted during 2012-2013 in Hormozgan University of Medical Sciences, IR Iran. The target population consisted of the medical, nursing, midwifery, operating room technician, and medical laboratory students in the 2012-2013 academic year. Census sampling was conducted, and accordingly, 500 students participated in the study Data was collected using modified questionnaire of the University of San Diego’s injury report form. The collected data were entered into SPSS V.19 and analyzed using descriptive statistical tests. Findings: Finally 377 students (75.4%) returned the questionnaire. Among the studied students, 184 students (39.3%) had had sharp injuries. The frequency of damaging Vein puncture was the most common mechanism of injury Discussion and Conclusion: The prevalence of sharp injuries is high among students which can increase the risk of disease and its subsequent risks, and thus, increase the cost and stress among students. It seems that holding workshops and increasing students’ awareness and skills to face these risks can be effective in mitigating them. PMID:26156935

  5. Radiology research and medical students.

    PubMed

    Whitworth, Pat W; Agarwal, Ankit; Colucci, Andrew; Sherry, Steven J; Subramaniam, Rathan M

    2013-12-01

    Fostering radiology research among medical students can enhance a student's interest and understanding of radiology and research. It increases the academic productivity of the mentor and the department. Radiology faculty and departments should actively seek to recruit and engage students in research. Once involved, students benefit greatly from being given clear responsibility, close supervision, timely feedback, and a degree of autonomy. At the heart of the student research process is the crucial mentor-mentee relationship, and mentors should be cognizant of their vital role and methods of encouraging and enhancing this relationship. Ultimately, the advancement of the field of radiology depends on constant innovation and improvement. Radiology research by medical students fuels both innovation and the development of future academic radiologists and physician-scientists, helping to secure future growth for our field.

  6. Grading Written Projects: What Approaches Do Students Find Most Helpful?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Lois J.

    2008-01-01

    Conscientious marketing faculty spend extensive hours grading student essays and projects. As instructors work on grading papers, they may wonder how effective their comments are. The author explored how students in a marketing principles class reported their use of various grading methods. Students generally preferred rubrics with ratings and…

  7. Retaining Students in Grade: Consequences for Florida. Policy Brief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Mary Lee

    2004-01-01

    Eliminating social promotion, retaining students in grade, and using proficiency standards to determine students' progress through grades was intended to make schools accountable and increase academic achievement. Research evidence demonstrates that grade retention does not improve achievement and may increase the chances of a student dropping out…

  8. Cross-Grade Comparison of Students' Understanding of Energy Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saglam-Arslan, Aysegul

    2010-01-01

    The aims of this cross-grade study were (1) to determine the level of understanding of energy concepts of students at different academic grades and the differences in understanding between these grades and (2) to analyse the conceptual development of these students. Two hundred and forty-three students at 3 different levels (high school,…

  9. Student Perception of Academic Grading: Personality, Academic Orientation, and Effort

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tippin, Gregory K.; Lafreniere, Kathryn D.; Page, Stewart

    2012-01-01

    Factors influencing student perceptions of academic grading were examined, with an emphasis on furthering understanding of the relevance of effort to students' conceptualization of grading. Students demonstrated a conceptualization of grading where effort should be weighted comparably to actual performance in importance to the composition of a…

  10. The continual assessment of medical students.

    PubMed

    Gosling, H; Nhonoli, A M

    1978-01-01

    At the new Medical Faculty at the University of Dar-es-Salaam (East Africa) a number of innovations were instituted. The most significant was continual assessment of students. During the first 3 years of the course, results of weekly testing may comprise three-fourths of each student's assessment. Later they are assessed on each rotation and clerkship; and these must be completed satisfactorily before Final Examinations are taken. These assessments never contribute less than one-half of the final results. Failures were reduced from 10 to 2% with no reduction in standards or performance levels. The method utilizes Reinforcement Theory techniques; specifically referred to are schedules of testing, grades as reinforcers, and frequent feed-back for students, self-shaping of study strategies and for constant surveilance of its teaching by the Faculty.

  11. Making the grade in a portfolio-based system: student performance and the student perspective.

    PubMed

    Nowacki, Amy S

    2013-01-01

    Assessment is such an integral part of the educational system that we rarely reflect on its value and impact. Portfolios have gained in popularity, but much attention has emphasized the end-user and portfolio assessment. Here we focus on the portfolio creator (the student) and examine whether their educational needs are met with such an assessment method. This study aims to investigate how assessment practices influence classroom performance and the learning experience of the student in a graduate education setting. Studied were 33 medical students at the Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve University, a program utilizing a portfolio-based system. The students may elect to simultaneously enroll in a Masters program; however, these programs employ traditional letter grades. Thus creating a unique opportunity to assess 25 portfolio only (P) students and 8 portfolio and grade (PG) students concurrently taking a course that counts for both programs. Classroom performance was measured via a comprehensive evaluation where the PG students scored modestly better (median total scores, 72% P vs. 76% PG). Additionally, a survey was conducted to gain insight into student's perspective on how assessment method impacts the learning experience. The students in the PG group (those receiving a grade) reported increased stress but greater affirmation and self-assurance regarding their knowledge and skill mastery. Incorporation of such affirmation remains a challenge for portfolio-based systems and an area for investigation and improvement.

  12. Medical School Research Pipeline: Medical Student Research Experience in Psychiatry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balon, Richard; Heninger, George; Belitsky, Richard

    2006-01-01

    Objective: The authors discuss the importance of introducing research training in psychiatry and neurosciences to medical students. Methods: A review of existing models of research training in psychiatry with focus on those providing research training to medical students is presented. Results: Two research-training models for medical students that…

  13. College Students' Evaluations of Teaching and Grade Inflation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eiszler, Charles F.

    2002-01-01

    Examined whether the use of student evaluations of teaching effectiveness has been a contributing factor to a trend of grade inflation in a mid-sized, public university in the Midwest. Found a predictive relationship between student ratings of teaching and expected grades and an encouragement over time of grade inflation. (EV)

  14. Third Grade Students' Ideas about the Lunar Phases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stahly, Laura L.; Krockover, Gerald H.; Shepardson, Daniel P.

    1999-01-01

    Examines third-grade students' ideas on the lunar phases prior to, and following, an instructional period designed to promote students' conceptual change. Demonstrates that students are capable of making conceptual changes. Contains 30 references. (DDR)

  15. A review of medical-grade honey in wound care.

    PubMed

    Belcher, Judy

    In the current healthcare environment, clinicians are increasingly under pressure to use wound care products that are cost effective. This includes products that can be used in a variety of wounds to achieve different outcomes, depending on the wound-bed requirements. Medical-grade honey has emerged as a product that can achieve a variety of outcomes within the wound and is safe and easy to use. This article reviews the use of a medical-grade honey, with a view to including it on the wound care formulary in both primary and secondary care. It featured in a poster presentation at the Wounds UK conference at Harrogate in 2011.

  16. Cognitive Dissonance or Revenge? Student Grades and Course Evaluations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maurer, Trent W.

    2006-01-01

    I tested 2 competing theories to explain the connection between students' expected grades and ratings of instructors: cognitive dissonance and revenge. Cognitive dissonance theory holds that students who expect poor grades rate instructors poorly to minimize ego threat whereas the revenge theory holds that students rate instructors poorly in an…

  17. Relationships Among Locus of Control, Grades, and Student Ratings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owen, Steven V.; Froman, Robin D.

    This research examines the interaction between college students' control orientation and a discrepancy score of GPA minus expected grade in course, on the dependent measure of 13 student rating items. It was hypothesized that students with an external locus of control who also showed a discrepancy between expected and actual grades would distort…

  18. Investigation of Fifth Grade Students' Mathematical Calibration Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozsoy, Gokhan

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a scale to measure fifth grade students' mathematical calibration skills. Besides, it aims to determine students' calibration skills through this scale. Results of the study revealed that fifth-grade students (n = 94) enrolling to study, have a medium-high level of (M = 55.12, SD = 21.76) mathematical…

  19. Factors Relating to Student Grade Obsession: A Quantitative Correlational Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Jacqueline

    2011-01-01

    The intense focus of students on grades attained in academia reflects a contemporary issue in higher education. The internal pressure that students experience regarding academics fuels student grade obsession. Researchers suggest that in addition to internal pressure, financial anxiety, the need to receive academic recognition and parental…

  20. Science Teaching Methods Preferred by Grade 9 Students in Finland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Juuti, Kalle; Lavonen, Jari; Uitto, Anna; Byman, Reijo; Meisalo, Veijo

    2010-01-01

    Students find science relevant to society, but they do not find school science interesting. This survey study analyzes Finnish grade 9 students' actual experiences with science teaching methods and their preferences for how they would like to study science. The survey data were collected from 3,626 grade 9 students (1,772 girls and 1,832 boys)…

  1. Students online: learning medical genetics.

    PubMed Central

    Proud, V K; Johnson, E D; Mitchell, J A

    1993-01-01

    It is possible to focus medical genetics education by using a model that integrates the skills of end-user searching of the medical literature into the traditional course content. Since 1988, 313 first-year medical students were studied as they accessed MEDLINE to retrieve information about biochemical genetic disorders. Their search behavior was studied by analyzing data from the National Library of Medicine's traffic files. The skills that they initially learned were reinforced as they searched clinical genetics problem cases in the second-year pathology course, and these skills were consolidated in the third year when the students addressed specific patient-care questions in pediatrics. The students' perception of the value of this model was studied by analyzing questionnaires completed during the exercise. It was demonstrated that when students were taught the skills of accessing MEDLINE by computer, they could formulate a question, retrieve current information, critically review relevant articles, communicate effectively, and use these skills to contribute to patient care. PMID:8447329

  2. Students Teaching Students: A Model for Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flax, Jim; Garrard, Judith

    1974-01-01

    At the University of Minnesota Medical School a course, Introduction to Clinical Medicine, introduces communication skills; develops interview skills consistent with students' personality, their role as medical students, and the patients' needs; assists students in becoming comfortable as medical students in the hospital setting; and teaches them…

  3. Relationship between student selection criteria and learner success for medical dosimetry students.

    PubMed

    Baker, Jamie; Tucker, Debra; Raynes, Edilberto; Aitken, Florence; Allen, Pamela

    2016-01-01

    Medical dosimetry education occupies a specialized branch of allied health higher education. Noted international shortages of health care workers, reduced university funding, limitations on faculty staffing, trends in learner attrition, and increased enrollment of nontraditional students force medical dosimetry educational leadership to reevaluate current admission practices. Program officials wish to select medical dosimetry students with the best chances of successful graduation. The purpose of the quantitative ex post facto correlation study was to investigate the relationship between applicant characteristics (cumulative undergraduate grade point average (GPA), science grade point average (SGPA), prior experience as a radiation therapist, and previous academic degrees) and the successful completion of a medical dosimetry program, as measured by graduation. A key finding from the quantitative study was the statistically significant positive correlation between a student׳s previous degree and his or her successful graduation from the medical dosimetry program. Future research investigations could include a larger research sample, representative of more medical dosimetry student populations, and additional studies concerning the relationship of previous work as a radiation therapist and the effect on success as a medical dosimetry student. Based on the quantitative correlation analysis, medical dosimetry leadership on admissions committees could revise student selection rubrics to place less emphasis on an applicant׳s undergraduate cumulative GPA and increase the weight assigned to previous degrees.

  4. Use of iPod™ technology in medical-surgical nursing courses: effect on grades.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Robert; Hepworth, Joseph; Goldsmith, Melissa; Lacasse, Cheryl

    2010-01-01

    Advances in computer technology, such as the portable and affordable iPod™, allow students to view lectures anywhere at any time. iPods™ are of special interest for nurse educators who strive to meet demands posed by a critical nursing shortage. A mixed-methods pilot study was conducted to assess whether iPod™ could be an effective teaching tool for medical-surgical nursing lectures. In a randomized study with 35 participants, together with eight students having their own iPods™, grades of students given pre-recorded class lectures on iPods™ were compared with grades of those who attended lectures without iPods™. Learning styles, amount and use of students devoted to iPod™ lectures were considered as well as grades. Most results were not significant, but there was some evidence that the control groups who attended classroom lectures received better grades than iPod™ users, and individuals who used iPod™ more frequently before the final exam received lower grades. These somewhat surprising results suggest the need for further research in the use of this technology as a resource for nursing education delivery.

  5. A Couples Group of Medical Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Kenneth; And Others

    1976-01-01

    An experiment at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine with a short-term medical student couples' workshop designed to foster increased sensitivity between medical students and their partners resulted in recommendation that such workshops be offered to medical students. (JT)

  6. Marijuana Use Among 10th Grade Students - Washington, 2014.

    PubMed

    Shah, Anar; Stahre, Mandy

    2016-12-30

    Some studies have suggested that long-term, regular use of marijuana starting in adolescence might impair brain development and lower intelligence quotient (1,2). Since 2012, purchase of recreational or retail marijuana has become legal for persons aged ≥21 years in the District of Columbia, Alaska, California, Colorado, Maine, Massachusetts, Nevada, Oregon, and Washington, raising concern about increased marijuana access by youths. The law taxing and regulating recreational or retail marijuana was approved by Washington voters in 2012 and the first retail licenses were issued in July 2014; medical marijuana use has been legal since 1998. To examine the prevalence, characteristics, and behaviors of current marijuana users among 10th grade students, the Washington State Department of Health analyzed data from the state's 2014 Healthy Youth Survey (HYS) regarding current marijuana use. In 2014, 18.1% of 10th grade students (usually aged 15-16 years) reported using marijuana during the preceding 30 days; of these students, 32% reported using it on ≥10 days. Among the marijuana users, 65% reported obtaining marijuana through their peer networks, which included friends, older siblings, or at a party. Identification of comprehensive and sustainable public health interventions are needed to prevent and reduce youth marijuana use. Establishment of state and jurisdiction surveillance of youth marijuana use could be useful to anticipate and monitor the effects of legalization and track trends in use before states consider legalizing recreational or retail marijuana.

  7. Sixth Grade Students Who Use Alcohol

    PubMed Central

    Pasch, Keryn E.; Perry, Cheryl L.; Stigler, Melissa H.; Komro, Kelli A.

    2008-01-01

    Young adolescent alcohol users drink at higher rates than their peers throughout adolescence and appear to be less amenable to intervention. This study compares those who reported alcohol use in the past year to those who reported no use in a multiethnic, urban sample of sixth graders in 61 schools in Chicago in 2002 (N = 4,150). Demographic, behavioral, intrapersonal, and socioenvironmental factors were identified based on behavioral theories and potential mediators of the Project Northland Chicago intervention. Single and multiple regression models were created for users and nonusers to determine associations between these factors and alcohol use behavior and intentions. The multiple regression models explained 35% and 56% of the variance in alcohol use behavior and intentions between students for nonusers and users, respectively. Results suggest that primary prevention programs for alcohol use should occur prior to sixth grade, particularly for the substantial group at high risk for early use. PMID:18303109

  8. The Gateway Grade: The Ninth Grade Academy Practice in Terms of Student Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starke, Adam Robert

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether the concept of the ninth grade academy structure in Texas high schools affects a variety of variables indicative of student achievement. Data representative of performance by students served in 30 schools with a separately structured ninth grade academy were compared to data representative of…

  9. Making the Grade: Understanding Learning and Grade Orientations of First-Year Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purcell, Jennifer M.

    2009-01-01

    First-year undergraduate students enter college with varying expectations, motivations, and goals and are being bombarded with messages about the importance of grades, sometimes to the detriment of learning. This descriptive, cross-sectional study employs LOGO II to describe the learning and grade orientations of first-year students and identify…

  10. The Effects of Framing Grades on Student Learning and Preferences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bies-Hernandez, Nicole J.

    2012-01-01

    Two experiments examined whether framing effects, in terms of losses and gains, can be extended to student learning and grading preferences. In Experiment 1, participants rated psychology course syllabi to investigate preferences for differently framed grading systems: a loss versus gain grading system. The results showed a clear framing effect…

  11. Teaching Medical Ethics to Medical Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loewy, Erich H.

    1986-01-01

    The evolution and goals of teaching medical ethics, the nature of medical ethics, and integrating such teaching into the curriculum are examined. Because moral considerations are as much a part of medical decisions as technical considerations, teaching is best done in the context of real cases. (Author/MLW)

  12. Relationship between student selection criteria and learner success for medical dosimetry students

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Jamie; Tucker, Debra; Raynes, Edilberto; Aitken, Florence; Allen, Pamela

    2016-04-01

    Medical dosimetry education occupies a specialized branch of allied health higher education. Noted international shortages of health care workers, reduced university funding, limitations on faculty staffing, trends in learner attrition, and increased enrollment of nontraditional students force medical dosimetry educational leadership to reevaluate current admission practices. Program officials wish to select medical dosimetry students with the best chances of successful graduation. The purpose of the quantitative ex post facto correlation study was to investigate the relationship between applicant characteristics (cumulative undergraduate grade point average (GPA), science grade point average (SGPA), prior experience as a radiation therapist, and previous academic degrees) and the successful completion of a medical dosimetry program, as measured by graduation. A key finding from the quantitative study was the statistically significant positive correlation between a student's previous degree and his or her successful graduation from the medical dosimetry program. Future research investigations could include a larger research sample, representative of more medical dosimetry student populations, and additional studies concerning the relationship of previous work as a radiation therapist and the effect on success as a medical dosimetry student. Based on the quantitative correlation analysis, medical dosimetry leadership on admissions committees could revise student selection rubrics to place less emphasis on an applicant's undergraduate cumulative GPA and increase the weight assigned to previous degrees.

  13. Self-medication for Acne among Undergraduate Medical Students

    PubMed Central

    Karamata, Varshaben Vejabhai; Gandhi, A M; Patel, P P; Desai, M K

    2017-01-01

    Aims: This study aims to evaluate the knowledge and pattern of self-medication for acne among undergraduate medical students at a tertiary care teaching hospital. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in II MBBS (Group A), III MBBS Part I (Group B), and III MBBS Part II (Group C) students. Prevalidated questionnaire about knowledge, attitude, and practice of self-medication were administered to participants. Data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance and Chi-square test. Results: Out of 582 students who responded to questionnaire, 518 suffered from acne. Self-medication practice was observed in 59.2% students. Significantly higher number of female students practiced self-medication (P < 0.0001). Most common source of information was seniors/friends/family members (34.2%). The mildness of illness (42.3%) was the most common reason of self-medication. A total mean score of knowledge was significantly higher in Group C as compared to Group A (P < 0.001) and Group B (P < 0.05). Allopathic medication was preferred by 69.8% students. Seventy-five percentage students read leaflet/package insert/label instruction and expiry date of the medicines. Conclusions: The participating students lack the knowledge about self-medication for acne. Adequate knowledge and awareness about the appropriate use of medication will reduce the practice of self-medication and improve rational prescribing.

  14. Student characteristics, professional preferences, and admission to medical school.

    PubMed

    Kesternich, Iris; Schumacher, Heiner; Winter, Joachim; Fischer, Martin R; Holzer, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: A potential new avenue to address the shortage of country doctors is to change the rules for admission to medical school. We therefore study the link between high-school grade point average and prospective physicians' choice to work in rural areas. To further inform the discussion about rules for admission, we also study the effects of other predictors: a measure of students' attitudes towards risk; whether they waited for their place of study (Wartesemester); whether their parents worked as medical doctors; and whether they have some practical experience in the medical sector. Methods: We conducted two internet surveys in 2012 and 2014. In the first survey, the sample comprised 701 students and in the second, 474 students. In both surveys, we asked students for their regional preferences; in the 2014 survey, we additionally asked students for their first, second, and third preferences among a comprehensive set of specializations, including becoming a general practitioner. In both surveys, we asked students for basic demographic information (age and gender), their parents' occupation, a measure of subjective income expectations, a measure of risk attitudes, and their high-school grade point average (Abiturnote), and First National Boards Examination grade (Physikum). In 2014, we additionally asked for waiting periods (Wartesemester) as well as for prior professional experience in the health-care sector. Results: We find that three factors increase the probability of having a preference for working in a rural area significantly, holding constant all other influences: having a medical doctor among the parents, having worse grades in the high-school grade point average, and being more risk averse. Moreover, we find that those willing to work in the countryside have significantly more experience in the medical sector before admission to medical school. Discussion: Our results suggest that a change in the selection process for medical school may increase the

  15. Investigating Urban Eighth-Grade Students' Knowledge of Energy Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodzin, Alec

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated urban eighth-grade students' knowledge of energy resources and associated issues including energy acquisition, energy generation, storage and transport, and energy consumption and conservation. A 39 multiple-choice-item energy resources knowledge assessment was completed by 1043 eighth-grade students in urban schools in two…

  16. Effects of Student Characteristics on Grades in Compulsory School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lekholm, Alli Klapp; Cliffordson, Christina

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate how different student characteristics such as gender influence grades. In order to answer these questions, multivariate techniques were used. The data derive from The Gothenburg Educational Longitudinal Database (GOLD), and the subjects were 99,070 ninth-grade students born in 1987. The analyses were…

  17. Newspapers in Science Education: A Study Involving Sixth Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lai, Ching-San; Wang, Yun-Fei

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the learning performance of sixth grade elementary school students using newspapers in science teaching. A quasi-experimental design with a single group was used in this study. Thirty-three sixth grade elementary school students participated in this study. The research instruments consisted of three…

  18. A Preliminary Study of Grade Forecasting by Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    This experiment enabled undergraduate business students to better assess their progress in a course by quantitatively forecasting their own end-of-course grades. This innovation provided them with predictive feedback in addition to the outcome feedback they were already receiving. A total of 144 students forecast their grades using an…

  19. Students' Distress over Grades: Entitlement or a Coping Response?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baer, Judith C.

    2011-01-01

    Faculties across disciplines have noted an increasing number of students who are highly distressed over grades, and this distress is accompanied by pervasive demands on professors. The student behavior takes several forms, including demands for higher grades, expectations of special accommodations by faculty, and the predictions of dire outcomes…

  20. Omani Twelfth Grade Students' Most Common Misconceptions in Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Balushi, Sulaiman M.; Ambusaidi, Abdullah K.; Al-Shuaili, Ali H.; Taylor, Neil

    2012-01-01

    The current study, undertaken in the Sultanate of Oman, explored twelfth grade students' common misconceptions in seven chemistry conceptual areas. The sample included 786 twelfth grade students in Oman while the instrument was a two-tier test called Chemistry Misconceptions Diagnostic Test (CMDT), consisting of 25 items with 12 items…

  1. Seventh Grade Students' Conceptions of Global Warming and Climate Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shepardson, Daniel P.; Niyogi, Dev; Choi, Soyoung; Charusombat, Umarporn

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate seventh grade students' conceptions of global warming and climate change. The study was descriptive in nature and involved the collection of qualitative data from 91 seventh grade students from three different schools in the Midwest, USA. An open response and draw and explain assessment instrument was…

  2. Case Study: What Supports Students to Improve Their Grades?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sieminski, Sandy; Messenger, Julie; Murphy, Sam

    2016-01-01

    This case study considers students who achieved "borderline" (40-45%) grades in their first assignment on a module, but went on to markedly improve their grades over the course of the module. The students were studying nursing and social work at the UK Open University, and they were all sponsored by employers. Semi-structured telephone…

  3. Affix Meaning Knowledge in First through Third Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Apel, Kenn; Henbest, Victoria Suzanne

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: We examined grade-level differences in 1st- through 3rd-grade students' performance on an experimenter-developed affix meaning task (AMT) and determined whether AMT performance explained unique variance in word-level reading and reading comprehension, beyond other known contributors to reading development. Method: Forty students at each…

  4. Continuous-Flow System Produces Medical-Grade Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akse, James R.; Dahl, Roger W.; Wheeler, Richard R.

    2009-01-01

    A continuous-flow system utilizes microwave heating to sterilize water and to thermally inactivate endotoxins produced in the sterilization process. The system is designed for use in converting potable water to medical-grade water. Systems like this one could be used for efficient, small-scale production of medical- grade water in laboratories, clinics, and hospitals. This system could be adapted to use in selective sterilization of connections in ultra-pure-water-producing equipment and other equipment into which intrusion by microorganisms cannot be tolerated. Lightweight, port - able systems based on the design of this system could be rapidly deployed to remote locations (e.g., military field hospitals) or in response to emergencies in which the normal infrastructure for providing medical-grade water is disrupted. Larger systems based on the design of this system could be useful for industrial production of medical-grade water. The basic microwave-heating principle of this system is the same as that of a microwave oven: An item to be heated, made of a lossy dielectric material (in this case, flowing water) is irradiated with microwaves in a multimode microwave cavity. The heating is rapid and efficient because it results from absorption of microwave power throughout the volume of the lossy dielectric material. In this system, a copper tube having a length of 49.5 cm and a diameter of 2.25 cm serves as both the microwave cavity and the sterilization chamber. Microwave power is fed via a coaxial cable to an antenna mounted inside the tube at mid-length (see figure). Efficient power transfer occurs due to the shift in wavelength associated with the high permittivity of water combined with the strong coupling of 2.45-GHz microwaves with rotational-vibrational transitions of the dipolar water molecule.

  5. Self-Perceived Levels of Responsibility in Seventh Grade Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martello, Chris

    This study, conducted at Churchill Junior High School in Royal Oak, Michigan, examined the effectiveness of the Student Responsibility Profile (SRP)and investigated the attitudes of eighth grade students and teachers toward the SRP. The profile allows staff members to evaluate student responsibility performance in 10 areas and allows students to…

  6. Eighth-Grade Students' Perceptions of Teacher Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sprague, Julie A.

    2013-01-01

    This quantitative study used a validated student survey instrument to collect 182 Midwestern eighth-grade students' perceptions of effective teachers. Balch's (2011) survey was used. The original intent of this survey was to have students rate the effectiveness of one teacher. In this study, students were asked to rate teacher effectiveness and…

  7. Sleep paralysis among medical students.

    PubMed

    Penn, N E; Kripke, D F; Scharff, J

    1981-03-01

    Sleep paralysis is a sensation of an inability to speak or move other muscles when falling asleep or awakening. Sleep paralysis by itself has been reported as occurring infrequently and many clinicians are uncertain of its significance. In contrast, sleep paralysis in conjunction with sleep attacks has been reported as a concomitant of narcolepsy. To further examine the incidence of sleep paralysis, the responses of 80 first-year medical students, 16.25% had experienced predormital, postdormital, or both types of sleep paralysis. These episodes occurred infrequently--only once or twice for most of these students. Reports of sleep paralysis were not associated with sleep attacks or cataplexy. These results support two previous studies which found that sleep paralysis alone occurs frequently among normals.

  8. Stress and Depression among Veterinary Medical Students.

    PubMed

    Killinger, Stacy L; Flanagan, Sean; Castine, Eleanor; Howard, Kimberly A S

    2017-01-01

    While existing literature suggests that professional students (e.g., medical, dental, law, nursing, etc.) experience high levels of stress and depression, the experiences of veterinary medical students have been less well examined. The purpose of this study was to explore the levels of stress and depression among veterinary medical students and to examine the relationship between these variables. Study participants were 1,245 veterinary medical students from North America. The findings provide support for the assertion that veterinary medical students experience high levels of stress and depression. Results also indicated that there is a correlation between stress and depression for veterinary medical students and that female students experience higher levels of stress and depression than their male counterparts.

  9. Promoting medical student research productivity: the student perspective.

    PubMed

    Young, Benjamin K; Cai, Fei; Tandon, Vickram J; George, Paul; Greenberg, Paul B

    2014-06-02

    One-third of medical students complete medical school without significant exposure to research. This gap in their medical education is significant: research not only exposes medical students to scientific methodology and academic writing, but also encourages them to multi-task, communicate, and critically analyze the scientific literature - valuable skills that will serve them well in their future medical careers. We report herein the proceedings from a student-led symposium that aimed to promote student involvement in research at the Alpert Medical School of Brown University by providing practical information on how to successfully complete a research project.

  10. Medical Students' Affirmation of Ethics Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehrmann, Jon A.; Hoop, Jinger; Hammond, Katherine Green; Roberts, Laura Weiss

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Despite the acknowledged importance of ethics education in medical school, little empirical work has been done to assess the needs and preferences of medical students regarding ethics curricula. Methods: Eighty-three medical students at the University of New Mexico participated in a self-administered written survey including 41 scaled…

  11. A Dissecting Competition for Medical Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samalia, Latika; Stringer, Mark D.

    2012-01-01

    After repeated requests from medical students for more cadaver dissection opportunities, a voluntary dissecting "competition" was initiated for the third year medical students in 2006. This has been held annually on five occasions since, offering up to 30 dissection stations and accommodating an average of 53 students (range 40-66) per year,…

  12. Student characteristics, professional preferences, and admission to medical school

    PubMed Central

    Kesternich, Iris; Schumacher, Heiner; Winter, Joachim; Fischer, Martin R.; Holzer, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: A potential new avenue to address the shortage of country doctors is to change the rules for admission to medical school. We therefore study the link between high-school grade point average and prospective physicians’ choice to work in rural areas. To further inform the discussion about rules for admission, we also study the effects of other predictors: a measure of students’ attitudes towards risk; whether they waited for their place of study (Wartesemester); whether their parents worked as medical doctors; and whether they have some practical experience in the medical sector. Methods: We conducted two internet surveys in 2012 and 2014. In the first survey, the sample comprised 701 students and in the second, 474 students. In both surveys, we asked students for their regional preferences; in the 2014 survey, we additionally asked students for their first, second, and third preferences among a comprehensive set of specializations, including becoming a general practitioner. In both surveys, we asked students for basic demographic information (age and gender), their parents’ occupation, a measure of subjective income expectations, a measure of risk attitudes, and their high-school grade point average (Abiturnote), and First National Boards Examination grade (Physikum). In 2014, we additionally asked for waiting periods (Wartesemester) as well as for prior professional experience in the health-care sector. Results: We find that three factors increase the probability of having a preference for working in a rural area significantly, holding constant all other influences: having a medical doctor among the parents, having worse grades in the high-school grade point average, and being more risk averse. Moreover, we find that those willing to work in the countryside have significantly more experience in the medical sector before admission to medical school. Discussion: Our results suggest that a change in the selection process for medical school may

  13. The teaching of medical ethics to medical students.

    PubMed

    Glick, S M

    1994-12-01

    Teaching medical ethics to medical students in a pluralistic society is a challenging task. Teachers of ethics have obligations not just to teach the subject matter but to help create an academic environment in which well motivated students have reinforcement of their inherent good qualities. Emphasis should be placed on the ethical aspects of daily medical practice and not just on the dramatic dilemmas raised by modern technology. Interdisciplinary teaching should be encouraged and teaching should span the entire duration of medical studies. Attention should be paid particularly to ethical problems faced by the students themselves, preferably at the time when the problems are most on the students' minds. A high level of academic demands, including critical examination of students' progress is recommended. Finally, personal humility on the part of teachers can help set a good example for students to follow.

  14. Longitudinal trajectories of non-medical use of prescription medication among middle and high school students

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, Carol J.; Cranford, James A.; McCabe, Sean Esteban

    2016-01-01

    The non-medical use of prescription medications has been identified as a major public health problem among youth, although few longitudinal studies have examined non-medical use of prescription medications in the context of other drug use. Previous cross-sectional studies have shown gender and race differences in non-medical use of prescription medications. It was hypothesized that (1) non-medical use of prescription medications increases with age, and (2) these increases will be stronger in magnitude among female and Caucasian adolescents. Changes in non-medical use of prescription medications across 4 years were examined and compared with changes in other drug use (e.g., alcohol and marijuana). Middle and high school students enrolled in 5 schools in southeastern Michigan completed web-based surveys at 4 annual time points. The cumulative sample size was 5,217. The sample ranged from 12 to 18 years, 61% were Caucasian, 34% were African American, and 50% were female. Using a series of repeated measures latent class analyses, the trajectories of non-medical use of prescription medications were examined, demonstrating a 2-class solution: (1) the no/low non-medical use of prescription medications group had low probabilities of any non-medical use of prescription medications across all grades, and (2) the any non-medical use of prescription medications group showed a roughly linear increase in the probability of non-medical use of prescription medications over time. The probability of any non-medical use of prescription medications increased during the transition from middle school to high school. Results from this longitudinal study yielded several noteworthy findings: Participants who were classified in the any/high non-medical use of prescription medications group showed a discontinuous pattern of non-medical use of prescription medications over time, indicating that non-medical use of prescription medications is a relatively sporadic behavior that does not persist

  15. Conceptual Representations of Flu and Microbial Illness Held by Students, Teachers, and Medical Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, M. Gail; Rua, Melissa J.

    2008-01-01

    This study describes 5th, 8th, and 11th-grade students', teachers', and medical professionals' conceptions of flu and microbial illness. Participants constructed a concept map on "flu" and participated in a semi-structured interview. The results showed that these groups of students, teachers and medical professionals held and structured their…

  16. Investigation into How 8th Grade Students Define Fractals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karakus, Fatih

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of 8th grade students' concept definitions and concept images can provide information about their mental schema of fractals. There is limited research on students' understanding and definitions of fractals. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the elementary students' definitions of fractals based on concept image and concept…

  17. Improving Grade One Students' Reading Motivation with Online Electronic Storybooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ciampa, Katia

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative study stemmed from a concern of the perceived decline in students' reading motivation after the early years of schooling. The current research explored eight grade 1 students' experiences with online electronic storybooks (eBooks). Eight students were given ten 25-minute sessions with the software programs over 15 weeks.…

  18. Environmental Problem Perception of 6th Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Genc, Murat; Genc, Tulin; Ergenc, Mustafa; Erkuz, Neslihan

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to examine and compare the 6th grade students' perception of environmental issues through different techniques. For this purpose, we have tried to establish the students' perception of environmental issues by studying the pictures they drew and the written texts they wrote. In this study, where we have conducted with 62 students in…

  19. Seventh Grade Students' Mental Models of the Greenhouse Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shepardson, Daniel P.; Choi, Soyoung; Niyogi, Dev; Charusombat, Umarporn

    2011-01-01

    This constructivist study investigates 225 student drawings and explanations from three different schools in the midwest in the US, to identify seventh grade students' mental models of the greenhouse effect. Five distinct mental models were derived from an inductive analysis of the content of the students' drawings and explanations: Model 1, a…

  20. Grade 1 to 6 Thai Students' Existing Ideas about Energy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yuenyong, Chokchai; Yuenyong, Jirakarn

    2007-01-01

    This study explored 30 Grade 1 to 6 (6-12 years old) Thai students' existing ideas about energy. The study employed the Interview about Event (IAE) approach. During IAE, the cards of an event or things were showed to students in order to probe their views of energy concepts. Findings indicated that young students held various alternative…

  1. Creating Sacred Places for Students in Grades 7&8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Sandra J.

    This guide attempts to help teachers of American Indian students in grades 7-8 provide a culturally relevant education that takes place in the regular classroom, includes content related to Indian students' lives, makes students proud, expands to other experiences, and enhances learning. Creating sacred places means responding appropriately to…

  2. Creating Sacred Places for Students in Grades 9-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Sandra J.

    This guide attempts to help teachers of American Indian students in grades 9-12 provide a culturally relevant education that takes place in the regular classroom, includes content related to Indian students' lives, makes students proud, expands to other experiences, and enhances learning. Creating sacred places means responding appropriately to…

  3. Minicourses for Deaf Students in the Intermediate Grades

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Peter E.; Shepard, Charlotte H.

    1977-01-01

    A minicourse program with students from grades four through eight at the Oregon State School for the Deaf has been rewarding for teachers and students by serving to develop skills in immediate practical areas of the student's experience as well as in developing recreational skills and interests in such activities as chess, mime, and karate, and…

  4. Predicting Eighth-Grade Algebra Students with Individualized Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faulkner, Valerie N.; Crossland, Cathy L.; Stiff, Lee V.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the extent to which student performance and teacher perception of student performance affect placement in eighth-grade mathematics classes for students with disabilities. Authors used the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study--Kindergarten dataset to investigate how each of the following factors predicted placement in…

  5. Medical school entrance and career plans of Malaysian medical students.

    PubMed

    Razali, S M

    1996-11-01

    This study investigates the reasons for entry to medicine and the career perspectives of phase III medical students of the Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM). The majority of the students were Malays from low socio-economic backgrounds who entered medical school after completing a 2-year matriculation course. An interest in medicine and helping people were the two main stated reasons for entry to medical school. A group of students wishing to work in private practice was identified. In comparison to the rest of the study body, students in the group were: not well prepared to enter medical school; dissatisfied with the course; and subject to family influences. A desire for monetary gain motivated their choice of medicine as a career. Overall, 13% of the students wished to change career because they were dissatisfied with their experience of medicine as undergraduates. The study did not find a significant difference in career intentions between female and male medical students. However, women were less likely to seek entrance into private practice or pursue formal postgraduate education. The choice of surgery as a career was confined to men. About 90% of the students had already decided on their future specialty. Four well-established specialties were their most popular choices. The gender of the students had no significant influences of the decision to continue into postgraduate education. The proportion of female students who wished to marry doctors was significantly higher than for male students.

  6. Japanese medical students' interest in basic sciences: a questionnaire survey of a medical school in Japan.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Yuka; Uka, Takanori; Shimizu, Haruhiko; Miyahira, Akira; Sakai, Tatsuo; Marui, Eiji

    2013-01-01

    The number of physicians engaged in basic sciences and teaching is sharply decreasing in Japan. To alleviate this shortage, central government has increased the quota of medical students entering the field. This study investigated medical students' interest in basic sciences in efforts to recruit talent. A questionnaire distributed to 501 medical students in years 2 to 6 of Juntendo University School of Medicine inquired about sex, grade, interest in basic sciences, interest in research, career path as a basic science physician, faculties' efforts to encourage students to conduct research, increases in the number of lectures, and practical training sessions on research. Associations between interest in basic sciences and other variables were examined using χ(2) tests. From among the 269 medical students (171 female) who returned the questionnaire (response rate 53.7%), 24.5% of respondents were interested in basic sciences and half of them considered basic sciences as their future career. Obstacles to this career were their original aim to become a clinician and concerns about salary. Medical students who were likely to be interested in basic sciences were fifth- and sixth-year students, were interested in research, considered basic sciences as their future career, considered faculties were making efforts to encourage medical students to conduct research, and wanted more research-related lectures. Improving physicians' salaries in basic sciences is important for securing talent. Moreover, offering continuous opportunities for medical students to experience research and encouraging advanced-year students during and after bedside learning to engage in basic sciences are important for recruiting talent.

  7. Grades, Coursework, and Student Characteristics in High School Economics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rebeck, Ken; Walstad, William B.

    2015-01-01

    The authors use U.S. public and private high school transcripts to analyze grade distribution patterns in economics courses across student and school characteristics, and compare these grades to those earned in other selected high school courses. Results are reported for the 53 percent of 2009 high school graduates who took a basic economics…

  8. Grade Inflation and the Myth of Student Consumerism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boretz, Elizabeth

    2004-01-01

    The widespread acceptance of the phrase "grade inflation" poses a potentially damaging overstatement in reference to higher education. Grades are at an all-time high, but a review of the literature demonstrates that the improvement is not incongruous with a rise in faculty development programs and increased varieties of student support services.…

  9. Student Test Grades in College: A Study of Possible Predictors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammonds, Frank; Mariano, Gina

    2015-01-01

    Research on variables related to test performance has produced mixed results. Typically, research of this type involves only a few variables. In an attempt to obtain a more complete picture, we investigated how test grades might be related to variables such as classification, student seating location, test completion time, predicted grade, time…

  10. Comparison between teacher grading and student self-grading in different modules of agronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Méndez, A.; Paz-Ferreiro, J.; Guerrero, F.; Gascó, J. M.; Saá, A.; Tarquis, A. M.; Gascó, G.

    2012-04-01

    The adaptation of the Universities to European Higher Education Area (EHEA) involves changes in the learning system. Students must obtain specific capabilities in the different degrees or masters. For example, in the degree of Agronomy at the Universidad Politécnica de Madrid (Spain), they must command mathematics, English informatics or crop production. Moreover, students must attain personal skills such as leadership, team work, a critical spirit and a social, environmental and ethical commitment with the environment and the society. A way to evaluate the critical spirit of the students is to compare the grade obtained in a specific module with the grade that the students think he should get. The aim of this work is to evaluate the differences between teacher and student grading in different subjects related to soil science in different degrees and masters courses at the Universidad Politécnica de Madrid.

  11. Analyzing Medical Students' Definitions of Sex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talley, Heather; Cho, Janice; Strassberg, Donald S.; Rullo, Jordan E.

    2016-01-01

    An inaccurate definition of what constitutes sex can negatively impact the sexual health and wellbeing of patients. This study aimed to determine which behaviors medical students consider to be sex. Survey questions about various sexual behaviors were administered to medical students. All participants agreed that penile-vaginal penetration is sex.…

  12. Pedagogical Implications on Medical Students' Linguistic Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Yanling

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, an extended teaching implication is performed based on the study of medical students' linguistic needs in Tawian (Hwang, Lin, 2010). The aims of previous study were to provide a description of the linguistic needs and perceptions of medical students and faculty members in Taiwan. However, this paper put more thoughts on the…

  13. Factors potentially influencing academic performance among medical students

    PubMed Central

    Al Shawwa, Lana; Abulaban, Ahmad A; Abulaban, Abdulrhman A; Merdad, Anas; Baghlaf, Sara; Algethami, Ahmed; Abu-shanab, Joullanar; Balkhoyor, Abdulrahman

    2015-01-01

    Background Studies are needed to examine predictors of success in medical school. The aim of this work is to explore factors that potentially influence excellence of medical students. Methods The study was conducted in the Medical Faculty of King Abdulaziz University during October 2012. A self-administered questionnaire was used. Medical students with a grade point average (GPA) ≥4.5 (out of 5) were included and compared to randomly selected medical students with a GPA <4.5, who were available at the time of the study. Results A total of 359 undergraduate students participated in the study. 50.4% of the sample was students with a GPA ≥4.5. No statistically significant difference regarding the time spent on outings and social events was found. However, 60.7% of high GPA students spend less than 2 hours on social networking per day as compared to 42.6% of the lower GPA students (P<0.01). In addition, 79% of high GPA students prefer to study alone (P=0.02), 68.0% required silence and no interruptions during studying time (P=0.013), and 47% revise their material at least once before an exam (P=0.02). Conclusion Excellent medical students have many different characteristics. For example, they do not use social networking for prolonged periods of time, and they have strong motivation and study enjoyment. Further studies are needed to examine whether these differences have a real impact on GPA or not. PMID:25674033

  14. Psychological defenses of Danish medical students.

    PubMed

    la Cour, Peter

    2002-01-01

    Patterns in the psychological defenses of medical students may have implications for the way they handle and respond to the pressures and developmental issues they encounter in medical school and beyond. Using the Defense Style Questionnaire (DSQ40) to assess psychological defenses, a sample of first-year Danish medical students was compared with a sample of students at a short-term boarding school for general education. The medical students scored significantly higher on items connected with pseudo-altruism, denial, and undoing. Trends in the data furthermore suggest a greater use of sublimation, rationalization, and dissociation among medical students. When defense mechanisms were labeled into mature, neurotic, and immature categories, there were no differences between the groups or in the total defense scores.

  15. Life experience of sixth-grade students in analog domains of sixth-grade science textbooks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagamon, Barbara J.

    This study was conducted to determine if analog domains in sixth grade science textbooks were common to the life experience of sixth grade students and if experience differed according to moderating variables. The researcher reviewed three sixth grade general science textbooks and selected analogies that were unsupported by extended text, photos, or diagrams. Analogies were limited to ones which were unsupported because the intent was to identify students who were ready by virtue of life experience to confront analogies unaided by contextual clues. The researcher designed the Life Experiences in Analog Domains (LEAD) Questionnaire to survey students in 50 analog domains. Subjects of the study were 331 sixth grade students from an urban school district. Thirty were tested with the instrument one year later. Data on age, gender, ethnicity and income were analyzed for variance. Standardized achievement test scores were correlated to the LEAD Questionnaire. Results revealed sharp contrasts of experience by analog domain. Experience in analog domains was indicated 52% of the time overall. There were significant differences in the experience of students grouped by moderating variables. Younger students reported more experience than older students. The higher income group reported more experience than the lower income group. Caucasian students reported more experience overall than African American students. Chi-square tests revealed that differences in scores by ethnicity were not controlled by income. of three skills, reading comprehension, mathematics, and science, reading comprehension was most closely correlated to questionnaire score. Results suggest that many of the sixth grade students in the study may be without experience in analog domains when they encounter analogies in a textbook. Assuming subsequent implementations of the Questionnaire confirm these results, teachers should survey life experience of students and help them develop experiences that complement

  16. The Effects of Grading and Teaching Practices on Students' Perceptions of Grading Fairness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Michael E.; Fay, Charles H.

    2010-01-01

    To examine the antecedents of perceptions of grading fairness, approximately 600 college students were surveyed about the prevalence and desirability of 1) teaching practices that assisted students to prepare for examinations, and 2) common test scoring manipulations used to transform poor scores into acceptable ones (e.g., curving low scores…

  17. Relationship between High School Mathematics Grade and Number of Attempts Required to Pass the Medication Calculation Test in Nurse Education: An Explorative Study.

    PubMed

    Alteren, Johanne; Nerdal, Lisbeth

    2015-05-27

    In Norwegian nurse education, students are required to achieve a perfect score in a medication calculation test before undertaking their first practice period during the second semester. Passing the test is a challenge, and students often require several attempts. Adverse events in medication administration can be related to poor mathematical skills. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between high school mathematics grade and the number of attempts required to pass the medication calculation test in nurse education. The study used an exploratory design. The participants were 90 students enrolled in a bachelor's nursing program. They completed a self-report questionnaire, and statistical analysis was performed. The results provided no basis for the conclusion that a statistical relationship existed between high school mathematics grade and number of attempts required to pass the medication calculation test. Regardless of their grades in mathematics, 43% of the students passed the medication calculation test on the first attempt. All of the students who had achieved grade 5 had passed by the third attempt. High grades in mathematics were not crucial to passing the medication calculation test. Nonetheless, the grade may be important in ensuring a pass within fewer attempts.

  18. Caffeine consumption among medical students.

    PubMed

    Mino, Y; Yasuda, N; Fujimura, T; Ohara, H

    1990-12-01

    Recently, caffeine consumption in Japan is thought to have increased. Although caffeine had been considered to be harmless, there have been studies which suggests an association between caffeine and health and give rise to vigorous discussion. However, in Japan, there have been few epidemiological studies on caffeine consumption among a general population. A questionnaire survey was conducted among medical students and the results were as follows: 1) High dose users (estimated daily caffeine use is 250 mg or more) were observed in 15.2% and the proportion was higher in males than in females. 2) The respondents gave sleepiness, dry mouth and so on, as reasons for taking caffeine beverages, and gave, as the effects of caffeine, becoming clear-headed, shaking off sleepiness, and epigastric discomfort or pain. 3) A third of respondents have experienced taking caffeine tablets and ampules to shake off sleepiness and, in males, the more caffeine they had daily, the more who reported the experience. 4) Caffeine consumption has an association with alcohol use and smoking habit among males.

  19. The medical student and the suicidal patient.

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, N A

    1997-01-01

    Today's medical students are being confronted with ethical situations of far greater complexity than were their predecessors and yet the medical education system does little to prepare students for the ethical dilemmas which they inevitably face when entering the hospital environment. The following article addresses the issues surrounding a case where a patient has told a student in confidence of his plans to commit suicide. What should the student do? The only way for the student to prevent death is by breaking confidentiality because the student has insufficient clinical experience to provide adequate guidance. However, this requires ignoring the patient's right to autonomy, a right enshrined in both case law and medical ethics. Clearly the student's ethical, moral and legal position must be carefully evaluated. PMID:9358346

  20. Preparing Aboriginal Students for Medical School

    PubMed Central

    Krause, R.G.; Stephens, M.C.C.

    1992-01-01

    This article describes the Special Premedical Studies Program at the University of Manitoba and results of interviews with its graduates. This program prepares aboriginal students for admission to medical school. Six physicians and several other health professionals have graduated from the program. Respondents noted similarities in the needs of rural students and those of aboriginal students. PMID:21221337

  1. Learning Styles in First Year Medical Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chessell, Gwen

    1986-01-01

    Reports on a study done at Aberdeen University (England) which assessed the learning styles of first-year medical students. Results indicated that these students scored higher than other students in achievement (including study methods and competitiveness) and prediction for success. Includes the instrument used. (TW)

  2. Oral Reading Rates of Second-Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Chuang; Algozzine, Bob; Ma, Wen; Porfeli, Erik

    2011-01-01

    The importance of reading fluently is widely recognized in school effectiveness, reform, and improvement efforts of the educational community, yet there are few large-scale, structured assessments of the progression of students' reading rates over time. This study documented 2nd-grade students' oral reading rates on the basis of fall, winter, and…

  3. Teaching Primary Grade Students Perfectionism through Cartoons Compared to Bibliotherapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zousel, Miranda L.; Rule, Audrey C.; Logan, Stephanie R.

    2013-01-01

    This experimental study compared concept acquisition and enjoyment of learning about perfectionism under two conditions: bibliotherapy (control) and analysis and construction of cartoons (experimental) in first, second and third grade students (N = 46). Posttest results showed students learned significantly more content in the experimental…

  4. The Grade Trap: Students' Perspectives on Doing School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pope, Denise Clark

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the results of a study of high school students that was conducted to convey their attitudes and experiences to parents, administrators, and teachers. Topics include the stress that students are under to produce good grades and meet expectations; and feeling that showing achievement is more important than learning. (LRW)

  5. Fifth-Grade Bilingual Students and Precursors to "Subtractive Schooling."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worthy, Jo; Rodriguez-Galindo, Alejandra; Assaf, Lori Czop; Martinez, Leticia; Cuero, Kimberley

    2003-01-01

    A study examined Spanish-speaking children's attitudes about being and staying bilingual. Classroom observations and interviews with 15 fifth-grade students, 12 parents, and 2 teachers at a Texas elementary school indicated that despite being in a supportive bilingual environment, students believed they would have to struggle to maintain their…

  6. Gender Differences in Inference Generation by Fourth-Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clinton, Virginia; Seipel, Ben; Broek, Paul; McMaster, Kristen L.; Kendeou, Panayiota; Carlson, Sarah E.; Rapp, David N.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if there are gender differences among elementary school-aged students in regard to the inferences they generate during reading. Fourth-grade students (130 females; 126 males) completed think-aloud tasks while reading one practice and one experimental narrative text. Females generated a larger number and a…

  7. The Association between Students' Evaluation of Teaching and Grades

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoefer, Peter; Yurkiewicz, Jack; Byrne, John C.

    2012-01-01

    The results of a student evaluation of teaching instrument are analyzed for a semester of classes at a large collegiate business school, at both the graduate and undergraduate academic level. In particular, we concentrate on the relationship between responses to the instrument and student grades. The results show interesting differences,…

  8. A CURRICULUM FOR ENGLISH, STUDENT PACKET, GRADE 8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nebraska Univ., Lincoln. Curriculum Development Center.

    THE EIGHTH-GRADE STUDENT PACKET OF THE NEBRASKA ENGLISH CURRICULUM BEGINS WITH A UNIT ON "THE MAKING OF HEROES, THE NOBLEMAN IN WESTERN LITERATURE" WHICH LEADS STUDENTS TO QUESTION WHAT MAKES A HERO, WHAT HE IS LIKE, AND HOW HE EXISTS IN LITERATURE. AFTER READING A NUMBER OF BRIEF SELECTIONS FROM SUCH WORKS AS "THE…

  9. Improving Music Reading Skills among Second Grade Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinate, Joanna

    This project describes a program designed to improve the music reading abilities of second grade children. The intention is to discover the best possible method of teaching students basic rhythmic and melodic skills. When combined, these skills will not only increase students' understanding of the language of music, but will also increase…

  10. A CURRICULUM FOR ENGLISH, STUDENT PACKET, GRADE 7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nebraska Univ., Lincoln. Curriculum Development Center.

    THE SEVENTH-GRADE STUDENT PACKET, PRODUCED BY THE NEBRASKA CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT CENTER, BEGINS WITH THE UNIT ENTITLED "THE MAKING OF STORIES" IN WHICH STUDENTS CONSIDER WRITERS' AUDIENCES AND METHODS OF COMPOSITION AND PRESENTATION. SUCH MATERIAL AS "A CHRISTMAS CAROL" AND SELECTIONS FROM "THE…

  11. A CURRICULUM FOR ENGLISH, STUDENT PACKET, GRADE 12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nebraska Univ., Lincoln. Curriculum Development Center.

    THE LITERATURE PROGRAM OF THE GRADE 12 STUDENT PACKET OF THE NEBRASKA ENGLISH CURRICULUM CONSISTS OF A SELECTIVE SURVEY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE FROM THE RENAISSANCE TO THE 20TH CENTURY. IT BEGINS WITH A UNIT ON SHAKESPEAREAN TRAGEDY IN WHICH STUDENTS READ REVENGE TRAGEDIES--SENECA'S "THYESTES" AND KYD'S "THE SPANISH TRAGEDY"--AS…

  12. Achievement of Serbian Eighth Grade Students in Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antonijevic, Radovan

    2006-01-01

    The paper considers the main results and some educational implications of the TIMSS 2003 assessment conducted in Serbia in the fields of the science achievement of Serbian eighth grade students and the science curriculum context of their achievement. There were 4264 students in the sample. It was confirmed that Serbian eighth graders had made…

  13. Factors Affecting Students' Grades in Principles of Economics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kara, Orhan; Bagheri, Fathollah; Tolin, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Factors affecting students' grades in principles of microeconomics and macroeconomics students are analyzed from the data collected in two public universities. Results indicate that gender, number of hours worked, SAT scores, number of missed classes, recommending the course to a friend, instructors, being a junior, number of economics courses…

  14. A CURRICULUM FOR ENGLISH, STUDENT PACKET, GRADE 11.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nebraska Univ., Lincoln. Curriculum Development Center.

    THE 11TH-GRADE COURSE OF STUDY IN AMERICAN LITERATURE PRESENTED IN THE STUDENT PACKET FOR THE NEBRASKA ENGLISH CURRICULUM BEGINS WITH A UNIT ENTITLED "INDIVIDUALISM AND IDEALISM" IN WHICH STUDENTS ANALYZE SPIRITUAL AUTOBIOGRAPHIES BY EMERSON, THOREAU, WHITMAN, AND DICKINSON. NEXT, THE THEME OF SIN AND LONELINESS AS IT LIMITS…

  15. Student Perceptions of Interactive Whiteboards in a Third Grade Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Genesi, Deanna Joy

    2009-01-01

    This qualitative project presents students' perceptions of interactive whiteboard (IWB) usage in a third grade elementary classroom. The use of the IWB was alternated with the overhead/chalkboard on an ABAB design. The study was based on semistructured interviews of 19 rural, elementary school students. The interview questions focused on the…

  16. A CURRICULUM FOR ENGLISH, STUDENT PACKET, GRADE 9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nebraska Univ., Lincoln. Curriculum Development Center.

    THE FIRST UNIT OF THE STUDENT PACKET FOR GRADE NINE OF THE NEBRASKA ENGLISH CURRICULUM IS A STUDY OF THE RELATIONSHIPS WHICH EXIST BETWEEN AUTHOR AND AUDIENCE, AND AN EXAMINATION OF THE EPIGRAM, LIMERICK, PARABLE, FABLE, AND ODE. WITH THIS BACKGROUND, STUDENTS CONSIDER "ON AVARICE" AND "ANIMAL FARM" AS EXAMPLES OF FORMAL AND…

  17. Improving Reading Comprehension of Third and Fourth Grade Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salch, Kim; And Others

    A project developed processes for improving the reading comprehension of third- and fourth-grade students in two progressive suburban communities in northern Illinois. Analysis of probable cause data revealed that students lacked knowledge of reading strategies and a review of the district's general curriculum and textbooks revealed systematic…

  18. Using Separate Answer Sheets with Grade 3 Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Thomas; O'Malley, Kimberly; Ragland, Shelley; Young, Michael; Kirkpatrick, Rob

    2014-01-01

    The authors compared the performance of third-grade students testing on answer sheets with those testing on machine-scored test booklets. The 1,832 students in the nationally representative sample were assigned at the campus level to complete the Stanford Achievement Test Series, Tenth Edition in 1 of 4 conditions: (a) Form A answer sheet, (b)…

  19. Improving Reading and Communication Skills of Ninth Grade Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Walter J., III

    A program was developed to improve the reading scores and communication skills of ninth-grade students from multicultural backgrounds. The students' socioeconomic status ranges from below the poverty level to upper middle class. The population of the high school in suburban Chicago (Illinois) is multiethnic, the English is not always the primary…

  20. Implementing Guided Reading Strategies with Kindergarten and First Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abbott, Lindsey; Dornbush, Abby; Giddings, Anne; Thomas, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    In the action research project report, the teacher researchers found that many kindergarten and first-grade students did not have the reading readiness skills to be reading at their benchmark target. The purpose of the project was to improve the students overall reading ability. The dates of the project began on September 8 through December 20,…

  1. Grade One Peer and Teacher Feedback on Student Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Shelley Stagg; Portier, Christine

    2014-01-01

    This article examines a grade one teacher's support for her students' writing development through formal peer and teacher feedback. The teacher modelled and provided examples of effective feedback and good writing in whole-class and small-group lessons and in her own one-on-one verbal feedback on student writing. She allocated time for the…

  2. A CURRICULUM FOR ENGLISH, STUDENT PACKET, GRADE 10.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nebraska Univ., Lincoln. Curriculum Development Center.

    THE STUDENT PACKET FOR GRADE 10 OF THE NEBRASKA ENGLISH CURRICULUM BEGINS WITH FOUR UNITS ON LITERATURE, EACH STRESSING AN ASPECT OF MAN'S CONCEPTION OF THE WORLD. THROUGH A STUDY OF THE LITERATURE OF SEVERAL CULTURES, WRITTEN AT VARIOUS TIMES, STUDENTS FIRST CONSIDER "MAN AND NATURE, MAN'S PICTURE OF NATURE." THE SECOND UNIT, "MAN…

  3. The Personal Financial Literacy of Fourth Grade Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucey, Thomas Andrew

    The purpose of the study was to measure personal financial literacy levels of fourth grade students in Memphis, Tennessee and to explore the relationships between seven personal and social characteristics and the students' personal financial literacy. The sample produced low scores on five measure dimensions. Caucasian populations performed better…

  4. Reading Interests of Tenth, Eleventh and Twelfth Grade Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Beth; Simone, Nancy

    The reading interests of 300 tenth, eleventh, and twelfth grade students were surveyed and compared to those revealed in previous research. The results indicated that the amount of time students reported reading outside of school per day has decreased slightly since a 1961 study by P. Witty, with females still reading more than males. As in the…

  5. Values grading among nursing students - differences between the ethnic groups.

    PubMed

    Michal Rassin, R N

    2010-07-01

    This study was aimed at measuring professional and personal values among nursing students. The participants were 180 students tested according to 36 personal values and 20 professional values. The findings indicated that passing time has not harmed the fundamental values on which the nursing profession is based: human dignity, the prevention of suffering, reliability, and faithful relationships. Devaluation was observed in the values of equality among patients, and altruism, which were graded only in fifth and sixth place, respectively. It is necessary to consider the regression in the values: imagination, ambition, and cleanliness, which were graded among the bottom values on the list. Significant differences were found in the grading of several personal and professional values, as a function of ethnic origin. Results may help understand motives of nursing students and assist in promoting bachelor of nursing programmes while taking into consideration the unique characteristics of the student group.

  6. What medical students value from their teachers.

    PubMed

    Ho, Maria Theresa; Tani, Massimiliano

    2007-08-01

    As Australian medical educators become more accustomed to the increasing pressures imposed upon them, there is a risk that the traditional educational relationship between a student and his or her teacher is replaced by a pure transactional relationship between a customer and his or her supplier. A large sample of medical students surveyed revealed that medical students seem to value directed rather than independent learning. New approaches to teaching, such as being innovative or entertaining, as well as facilitating participation, do not appear to be very important to medical students. Medical students do not seem to have strong preferences when it comes to assessment, contradicting some of the fundamental suggestions of the recent educational literature, in which assessment is often viewed as a key element in the formation and the direction of learning. The fact that medical students seem to reject many of the paradigms of the psychology-based educational literature, at least based on the large sample surveyed at the University of New South Wales, suggests that caution should be used in the development of training programs for teachers in medical faculties, and that learning and teaching should ensure that students' expectations and teachers' training do not mismatch.

  7. Data Modelling with First-Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    English, Lyn D.

    2012-01-01

    This paper argues for a renewed focus on statistical reasoning in the beginning school years, with opportunities for children to engage in data modelling. Results are reported from the first year of a 3-year longitudinal study in which three classes of first-grade children (6-year-olds) and their teachers engaged in data modelling activities. The…

  8. First-Grade Students and Their Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avraamova, E. M.

    2014-01-01

    Recent changes to the budgetary basis of schools in Russia has received a mixed response from parents, with a variety of views on whether the quality of education is being improved. Reductions in state support for preschool education raises questions about the ability of less affluent parents to prepare their children for first grade. Perhaps more…

  9. Eighth Grade Algebra Course Placement and Student Motivation for Mathematics

    PubMed Central

    Simzar, Rahila M.; Domina, Thurston; Tran, Cathy

    2016-01-01

    This study uses student panel data to examine the association between Algebra placement and student motivation for mathematics. Changes in achievement goals, expectancy, and task value for students in eighth grade Algebra are compared with those of peers placed in lower-level mathematics courses (N = 3,306). In our sample, students placed in Algebra reported an increase in performance-avoidance goals as well as decreases in academic self-efficacy and task value. These relations were attenuated for students who had high mathematics achievement prior to Algebra placement. Whereas all students reported an overall decline in performance-approach goals over the course of eighth grade, previously high-achieving students reported an increase in these goals. Lastly, previously high-achieving students reported an increase in mastery goals. These findings suggest that while previously high-achieving students may benefit motivationally from eighth grade Algebra placement, placing previously average- and low-performing students in Algebra can potentially undermine their motivation for mathematics. PMID:26942210

  10. Eighth Grade Algebra Course Placement and Student Motivation for Mathematics.

    PubMed

    Simzar, Rahila M; Domina, Thurston; Tran, Cathy

    2016-01-01

    This study uses student panel data to examine the association between Algebra placement and student motivation for mathematics. Changes in achievement goals, expectancy, and task value for students in eighth grade Algebra are compared with those of peers placed in lower-level mathematics courses (N = 3,306). In our sample, students placed in Algebra reported an increase in performance-avoidance goals as well as decreases in academic self-efficacy and task value. These relations were attenuated for students who had high mathematics achievement prior to Algebra placement. Whereas all students reported an overall decline in performance-approach goals over the course of eighth grade, previously high-achieving students reported an increase in these goals. Lastly, previously high-achieving students reported an increase in mastery goals. These findings suggest that while previously high-achieving students may benefit motivationally from eighth grade Algebra placement, placing previously average- and low-performing students in Algebra can potentially undermine their motivation for mathematics.

  11. Fs-laser processing of medical grade polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atanasov, P. A.; Stankova, N. E.; Nedyalkov, N. N.; Fukata, N.; Hirsch, D.; Rauschenbach, B.; Amoruso, S.; Wang, X.; Kolev, K. N.; Valova, E. I.; Georgieva, J. S.; Armyanov, St. A.

    2016-06-01

    Medical grade polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) elastomer is a biomaterial widely used in medicine and high-tech devices, e.g. MEMS and NEMS. In this work, we report an experimental investigation on femtosecond laser processing of PDMS-elastomer with near infrared (NIR), visible (VIS) and ultraviolet (UV) pulses. High definition trenches are produced by varying processing parameters as laser wavelength, pulse duration, fluence, scanning speed and overlap of the subsequent pulses. The sample surface morphology and chemical composition are investigated by Laser Microscopy, SEM and Raman spectroscopy, addressing the effects of the various processing parameters through comparison with the native materials characteristics. For all the laser pulse wavelengths used, the produced tracks are successfully metalized with Ni via electro-less plating method. We observe a negligible influence of the time interval elapsed between laser treatment and metallization process. Our experimental findings suggest promising perspectives of femtosecond laser pulses in micro- and nano-fabrication of hi-tech PDMS devices.

  12. Unskilled and unaware in the classroom: College students' desired grades predict their biased grade predictions.

    PubMed

    Serra, Michael J; DeMarree, Kenneth G

    2016-10-01

    People tend to be overconfident when predicting their performance on a variety of physical and mental tasks (i.e., they predict they will perform better than they actually do). Such a pattern is commonly found in educational settings, in which many students greatly overestimate how well they will perform on exams. In particular, the lowest-performing students tend to show the greatest overconfidence (i.e., the "unskilled-and-unaware" effect). Such overconfidence can have deleterious effects on the efficacy of students' short-term study behaviors (i.e., underpreparing for exams) and long-term academic decisions (i.e., changing one's academic major to an "easier" topic or dropping out of school completely). To help understand why students' grade predictions are often overconfident, we examined the hypothesis that students' grade predictions are biased by their desired levels of performance, which are often much higher than their actual levels of performance. Across three studies in which actual students made predictions about their exam performance in their courses, we demonstrated that students' grade predictions are highly biased by their desired grades on those exams. We obtained this result when students predicted their exam grades over a week before the exam (Study 1), immediately after taking the exam (Study 2), and across the four course exams in a single semester (Study 3). These results are informative for understanding why the "unskilled-and-unaware" pattern of performance predictions occurs, and why people in general tend to be overconfident when making both physical and mental performance predictions.

  13. Debt crisis ahead for Irish medical students.

    PubMed

    Haugh, C; Doyle, B; O'Flynn, S

    2014-06-01

    Internationally medical student debt is a cause of concern. A survey of medical students in UCC (response rate of 191 representing 35% of the EU student cohort) reveals that 34 (26%) of direct entry medicine (DEM) students and 36 (61%) graduate entrants (GEM) have a loan with an anticipated average debt of Euro17,300 and Euro80,000 on graduation respectively. Fifty-three (90%) graduate entrants and 75 (57%) direct entrants revealed that they often worry about their current financial situation. Fifty-three (28%) of students have a part-time job and many were concerned about the degree to which this conflicted with their academic workload. 118 (89%) of school leavers and 48 (81%) graduates received financial assistance from their families to fund their college expenses. Student responses recommended the introduction of a government supported low interest rate loan and other incentives to help service high levels of debt associated with medical education.

  14. The Entrepreneur Fair: Fifth Grade Student Businesses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Teresa

    2010-01-01

    In twenty years of teaching, the author has never been involved in a project that sparked as much enthusiasm from students, parents, the administration, and other teachers as the Entrepreneur Fair. In an effort to challenge students to become entrepreneurs, the author developed a one-day market called the Entrepreneur Fair at Stonewall Elementary…

  15. Failing underperforming students: the role of grading in practice assessment.

    PubMed

    Heaslip, Vanessa; Scammell, Janet M E

    2012-03-01

    Nursing is essentially a practice discipline, informed by a theoretical base. It is crucial that students have a rigorous preparation in both theoretical and practical elements during their pre-registration programme. The aim of educationalists is to produce students fit for purpose and practice, but concerns have been raised internationally regarding students competence at the point of registration. There is evidence that some practice based assessors experience difficulties in failing incompetent students. Assessment of practice is often judged on a pass/fail rather than a graded basis in a number of health professional programmes. It could be argued that pass or fail provides limited feedback to students concerning exactly how well or poorly they have performed. This paper will explore these issues through focusing on selected findings from a service evaluation of a practice assessment tool incorporating grading of practice of pre-registration nursing students from one university in the United Kingdom (UK). Using convenience sampling, a questionnaire survey was completed by 107 adult, mental health and child health nursing students (51% response) and 112 mentors (practice-based assessors) (86% response) from all nursing fields. Amongst other issues, the evaluation identified that whilst mentors valued the opportunity to grade practice and perceived that the tool enabled them to be more discerning in the allocation of pass grades, some lacked confidence in failing students. The findings are discussed in the context of the wider debate around clinical competence in new nurse registrants and it is concluded that whilst assessing 'borderline' students will always be a testing experience, grading systems may help the assessor to be more discriminatory.

  16. Investigating Urban Eighth-Grade Students' Knowledge of Energy Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodzin, Alec

    2012-05-01

    This study investigated urban eighth-grade students' knowledge of energy resources and associated issues including energy acquisition, energy generation, storage and transport, and energy consumption and conservation. A 39 multiple-choice-item energy resources knowledge assessment was completed by 1043 eighth-grade students in urban schools in two cities in Pennsylvania, USA. Mean scores for the entire assessment measure indicated low conceptual energy knowledge of the eighth-grade students. Subscale means revealed that student understandings of energy resource acquisition, energy generation, storage and transport, and energy consumption and conservation are not satisfactory. Distractor analysis identified many misunderstandings that eighth-grade students hold with regard to energy resources. Findings revealed that students did not have a sound knowledge and understanding of basic scientific energy resources facts, issues related to energy sources and resources, general trends in the US energy resource supply and use, and the impact energy resource development and use can have on society and the environment. Implications for teacher enactment of energy resources curriculum activities are discussed.

  17. The Relationship between Student Performance on the Missouri Assessment Program and Students' Final Numerical Grades

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pratt, Anne-Marie

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the predictive relationship of fifth-, sixth-, seventh-, and eighth-grade students' final numerical grades for mathematics and communication arts (e.g., English or language arts) and their standardized scores on the Missouri Assessment Program (MAP). It examined the relationship between students' performance on the MAP in the…

  18. Clinical Oncology Assistantship Program for Medical Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neilan, Barbara A.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    The Clinical Oncology Assistantship Program at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences is described, along with student reactions to the program. The summer elective program involves cancer lectures (one week) and clinical exposure (nine weeks) in medical, surgical, and pediatric oncology services, as well as self-directed learning…

  19. Keeping Dissection Alive for Medical Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chambers, James; Emlyn-Jones, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Traditional dissection teaching is being reduced in a number of medical schools, particularly in the United Kingdom. In response to this, 12 medical students from Warwick University, UK, traveled to the Island of Grenada for an intensive extracurricular dissection course at St. George's University. This course not only benefited the host…

  20. Training Medical Students in Empathic Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bayne, Hannah Barnhill

    2011-01-01

    Empathy is an important component of the doctor-patient relationship, yet previous studies point to its steady decline in medical students as they progress through medical school and residency programs. Empathy training has thus been identified as a goal of instruction, yet it is unclear how this training can best be implemented within the medical…

  1. Medical Student Empathy: Interpersonal Distinctions and Correlates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Kevin D.; Foster, Penni Smith

    2016-01-01

    Attention to interpersonal behaviors, communication, and relational factors is taking on increasing importance in medical education. Medical student empathy is one aspect of the physician-patient relationship that is often involved in beneficial interactions leading to improved clinical outcomes and patient satisfaction. As an interpersonal…

  2. Increasing Middle Grade Students' Motivation To Read Independently through Reading, Writing, and Data Base Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witry, Susan M.

    A practicum addressed the problem of a lack of reading motivation among middle grade students. An activity based program for middle grade students which integrated reading, book reports, book presentations, computer programs, and a library skills program was developed. Subjects, 32 fifth grade and 33 sixth grade students enrolled in a computer…

  3. The Effect of Scheduling Models for Introductory Algebra on 9th-Grade Students, Test Scores and Grades

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Hanlon, Angela L.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the effect of pacing and scheduling of algebra coursework on assigned 9th-grade students who traditionally would qualify for pre-algebra instruction and same course 9th-grade students who traditionally would qualify for standard algebra instruction. Students were selected based on completion of first-year…

  4. Medical Student Mental Health 3.0: Improving Student Wellness Through Curricular Changes

    PubMed Central

    Schindler, Debra L.; Chibnall, John T.

    2014-01-01

    Medical education can have significant negative effects on the well-being of medical students. To date, efforts to improve student mental health have focused largely on improving access to mental health providers, reducing the stigma and other barriers to mental health treatment, and implementing ancillary wellness programs. Still, new and innovative models that build on these efforts by directly addressing the root causes of stress that lie within the curriculum itself are needed to properly promote student wellness. In this article, the authors present a new paradigm for improving medical student mental health, by describing an integrated, multifaceted, preclinical curricular change program implemented through the Office of Curricular Affairs at the Saint Louis University School of Medicine starting in the 2009–2010 academic year. The authors found that significant but efficient changes to course content, contact hours, scheduling, grading, electives, learning communities, and required resilience/mindfulness experiences were associated with significantly lower levels of depression symptoms, anxiety symptoms, and stress, and significantly higher levels of community cohesion, in medical students who participated in the expanded wellness program compared with those who preceded its implementation. The authors discuss the utility and relevance of such curricular changes as an overlooked component of change models for improving medical student mental health. PMID:24556765

  5. Medical student mental health 3.0: improving student wellness through curricular changes.

    PubMed

    Slavin, Stuart J; Schindler, Debra L; Chibnall, John T

    2014-04-01

    Medical education can have significant negative effects on the well-being of medical students. To date, efforts to improve student mental health have focused largely on improving access to mental health providers, reducing the stigma and other barriers to mental health treatment, and implementing ancillary wellness programs. Still, new and innovative models that build on these efforts by directly addressing the root causes of stress that lie within the curriculum itself are needed to properly promote student wellness. In this article, the authors present a new paradigm for improving medical student mental health, by describing an integrated, multifaceted, preclinical curricular change program implemented through the Office of Curricular Affairs at the Saint Louis University School of Medicine starting in the 2009-2010 academic year. The authors found that significant but efficient changes to course content, contact hours, scheduling, grading, electives, learning communities, and required resilience/mindfulness experiences were associated with significantly lower levels of depression symptoms, anxiety symptoms, and stress, and significantly higher levels of community cohesion, in medical students who participated in the expanded wellness program compared with those who preceded its implementation. The authors discuss the utility and relevance of such curricular changes as an overlooked component of change models for improving medical student mental health.

  6. National ultrasound curriculum for medical students.

    PubMed

    Baltarowich, Oksana H; Di Salvo, Donald N; Scoutt, Leslie M; Brown, Douglas L; Cox, Christian W; DiPietro, Michael A; Glazer, Daniel I; Hamper, Ulrike M; Manning, Maria A; Nazarian, Levon N; Neutze, Janet A; Romero, Miriam; Stephenson, Jason W; Dubinsky, Theodore J

    2014-03-01

    Ultrasound (US) is an extremely useful diagnostic imaging modality because of its real-time capability, noninvasiveness, portability, and relatively low cost. It carries none of the potential risks of ionizing radiation exposure or intravenous contrast administration. For these reasons, numerous medical specialties now rely on US not only for diagnosis and guidance for procedures, but also as an extension of the physical examination. In addition, many medical school educators recognize the usefulness of this technique as an aid to teaching anatomy, physiology, pathology, and physical diagnosis. Radiologists are especially interested in teaching medical students the appropriate use of US in clinical practice. Educators who recognize the power of this tool have sought to incorporate it into the medical school curriculum. The basic question that educators should ask themselves is: "What should a student graduating from medical school know about US?" To aid them in answering this question, US specialists from the Society of Radiologists in Ultrasound and the Alliance of Medical School Educators in Radiology have collaborated in the design of a US curriculum for medical students. The implementation of such a curriculum will vary from institution to institution, depending on the resources of the medical school and space in the overall curriculum. Two different examples of how US can be incorporated vertically or horizontally into a curriculum are described, along with an explanation as to how this curriculum satisfies the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education competencies, modified for the education of our future physicians.

  7. Student Career Development in Grade 9 and Grade 12: Can Growth Be Assumed?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, Paul E.

    This paper identifies and compares the level of career maturity as measured by the Career Maturity Inventory (CMI) for students (N=221) in grades 9 and 12 in 1 suburban district in Nebraska. The participating school district was preparing for the implementation of a developmental, comprehensive, and competency-based guidance program. Specific…

  8. Quality of Life in Medical Students With Internet Addiction.

    PubMed

    Fatehi, Farzad; Monajemi, Alireza; Sadeghi, Anahita; Mojtahedzadeh, Rita; Mirzazadeh, Azim

    2016-10-01

    The widespread use of internet has caused new psychological, social, and educational problems for the students. The aim of this study was to examine the quality of life in medical students who suffer from internet addiction. This cross-sectional survey was carried out in Tehran University of Medical Sciences, and a total of 174 fourth-to seventh-year undergraduate medical students were enrolled. The quality of life was assessed by WHOQOL-BREF questionnaire which covers four domains of physical health, psychological, social relationships, and the environment. For assessing internet addiction, we used Internet Addiction Test (IAT) of Young. The students with IAT score higher than 50 were considered as addicted. For evaluating academic performance, the students were requested to report their grade point average (GPA). The mean IA score (±SD) was 34.13±12.76. Twenty-eight students (16.90%) had IAT score above 50. The mean quality of life score in internet addicted group was 54.97±11.38 versus 61.65±11.21 in normal group (P=0.005). Furthermore, there was a negative correlation between IA score and physical domain (r=-0.18, P=0.02); psychological domain (r=-0.35, P=0.000); and social relation domain (r=-0.26, P=0.001). Mean GPA was significantly lower in the addicted group. It seems that quality of life is lower in the internet addicted medical students; moreover, such students academically perform poorer in comparison with non-addicts. Since internet addiction is increasing at a rapid pace which may provoke considerable academic, psychological and social implications; as a result, it may require screening programs to the immediate finding of such problem to give consultations to prevent unwanted complications.

  9. A Medical Student Workshop in Mechanical Ventilation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    And Others; Kushins, Lawrence G.

    1980-01-01

    In order to teach applied respiratory physiology to medical students, the anesthesiology faculty at the University of Florida College of Medicine has designed and implemented a course that includes a laboratory workshop in mechanical ventilation of an animal model that allows students to apply and expand their knowledge. (JMD)

  10. Critical Review: Medical Students' Motivation after Failure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holland, Chris

    2016-01-01

    About 10% of students in each years' entrants to medical school will encounter academic failure at some stage in their programme. The usual approach to supporting these students is to offer them short term remedial study programmes that often enhance approaches to study that are orientated towards avoiding failure. In this critical review I will…

  11. The learning-disabled medical student.

    PubMed

    Accardo, P; Haake, C; Whitman, B

    1989-10-01

    Developmental pediatricians are being consulted by medical school promotion committees with regard to the course of action to be taken with learning-disabled medical students experiencing academic difficulties. Faculty attitude, a difficulty understanding the nature of learning disabilities, appears to be a major contributor to poor medical school performance on the part of learning-disabled adults. Utilizing the sequential-simultaneous information processing model as a simplified introduction to learning disability patterns, the authors argue that recommending intensive remediation of rote spelling and writing skills in students engaged in graduate education represents both a waste of time and a further emotional trauma to these young professionals.

  12. Psychological Type and Undergraduate Student Achievement in Pharmacy Course in Military Medical University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shi, Ru; Shan, Shou-qin; Tian, Jian-quan

    2007-01-01

    The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) was given to 264 students in an undergraduate Pharmacy course at a military medical university. Selected MBTI personality types were compared for achievement in the course using a t-test to compare total points earned. High grades were earned by students stronger in the traits of introversion (I) and judgment…

  13. The Performance of Female Medical Students in an Obstetrics and Gynecology Clerkship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Joseph M.; Smith, Imogene K.

    1982-01-01

    A study showed that although female medical students had slightly lower National Board examination scores on part one and lower grade point averages, they performed significantly better in the obstetrics and gynecology clerkship. Possible factors include women students' interest in women's health care and female representation on the house staff.…

  14. Adult Hispanic ESL Students and Graded Readers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, Liza E.

    2013-01-01

    Adult Hispanic ESL students in rural San Luis, Arizona, face a challenging situation. Since San Luis lies on the southwestern tip of Arizona and borders with Mexico, Spanish is the predominant language. English, on the other hand, is mostly heard in classrooms. This can be a predicament for adult Hispanics who need to be proficient in English in…

  15. Reflections: Improving Medical Students' Presentation Skills.

    PubMed

    Tarkowski, Radoslaw

    2016-02-26

    Both good communication and presentation skills on the part of an academic teacher are crucial when trying to generate students' interest in the subject of a lecture. More generally, our task is to share knowledge in the most effective way possible. It is also worth teaching students presentation skills, as today's students are tomorrow's teachers. An engaging presentation is a powerful tool. There are some rules for presenting which I consider worthy of being discussed and taught at a medical university.

  16. Teaching Skills in Medical Information Retrieval to Medical Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolner, Stuart J.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    A project that attempts to overcome the principal obstacles and to provide an efficient and effective method of teaching information retrieval skills to second-year medical students is described. The method includes a pretest, a diagnosis of deficiencies in information skills, a self-paced learning module, and a posttest. (Author/MLW)

  17. Competency in ECG Interpretation Among Medical Students

    PubMed Central

    Kopeć, Grzegorz; Magoń, Wojciech; Hołda, Mateusz; Podolec, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Background Electrocardiogram (ECG) is commonly used in diagnosis of heart diseases, including many life-threatening disorders. We aimed to assess skills in ECG interpretation among Polish medical students and to analyze the determinants of these skills. Material/Methods Undergraduates from all Polish medical schools were asked to complete a web-based survey containing 18 ECG strips. Questions concerned primary ECG parameters (rate, rhythm, and axis), emergencies, and common ECG abnormalities. Analysis was restricted to students in their clinical years (4th–6th), and students in their preclinical years (1st–3rd) were used as controls. Results We enrolled 536 medical students (females: n=299; 55.8%), aged 19 to 31 (23±1.6) years from all Polish medical schools. Most (72%) were in their clinical years. The overall rate of good response was better in students in years 4th–5th than those in years 1st–3rd (66% vs. 56%; p<0.0001). Competency in ECG interpretation was higher in students who reported ECG self-learning (69% vs. 62%; p<0.0001) but no difference was found between students who attended or did not attend regular ECG classes (66% vs. 66%; p=0.99). On multivariable analysis (p<0.0001), being in clinical years (OR: 2.45 [1.35–4.46] and self-learning (OR: 2.44 [1.46–4.08]) determined competency in ECG interpretation. Conclusions Polish medical students in their clinical years have a good level of competency in interpreting the primary ECG parameters, but their ability to recognize ECG signs of emergencies and common heart abnormalities is low. ECG interpretation skills are determined by self-education but not by attendance at regular ECG classes. Our results indicate qualitative and quantitative deficiencies in teaching ECG interpretation at medical schools. PMID:26541993

  18. Math Manipulatives to Increase 4th Grade Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Couture, Katie

    2012-01-01

    This research project was completed with twenty-nine fourth grade students from Shawnee Elementary, a school in the Chippewa Valley School District. It began in April 2012 and the data collection was completed by June 2012. The purpose of this project was to see if utilizing math manipulatives in an elementary classroom will increase student…

  19. Curriculum Development for Enhancing Grade Nine Students' Systems Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hernthaisong, Preeyanan; Sitti, Somsong; Sonsupap, Kanyarat

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this research were to study the development of a curriculum for enhancing grade 9 students' cognitive skills using a curriculum based on Systems Thinking Process. There were 3 phases: 1) studying of the problem; 2) development of tentative curriculum; and 3) implementation of the curriculum in a pilot study. The samples were 32…

  20. Differential Teacher Grading Behavior toward Female Students of Mathematics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duval, Concetta M.

    1980-01-01

    This study attempted to determine if teachers discriminate against female learners of mathematics. More than 1000 secondary mathematics teachers were asked to grade four geometry proofs. Student sex and ability were the independent variables. Analysis yielded no significant F ratios for either of the main effects or their interaction. (Author/MK)

  1. Teaching Gifted Students Social Sciences in Grades Seven Through Nine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento. Office of Curriculum Services.

    Intended for use by teachers, consultants and administrators, the booklet discusses social science instruction for gifted students in grades 7-9. An introductory section provides an overview of goals and parameters of the social sciences (psychology, sociology, and anthropology). The scientific research process is described in terms of five steps,…

  2. My Point of View: More Writing from Grade 9 Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northwest Territories Dept. of Education, Yellowknife.

    This booklet is a collection of writing by ninth-grade students taken from the 1987 and 1988 Canadian Territorial Achievement Tests. The booklet's 70 pieces of writing include essays on education in the Northwest Territory, narratives on how the best laid plans can go wrong, humorous treatments on uses for chewing gum and the best ways to keep…

  3. A Science Assessment Program for Kindergarten and First Grade Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greening, Gary A.

    Presented are science units for kindergarten and first-grade classes which include one or more non-verbal test items constructed to determine whether the student has learned the material presented in the unit. Units include: light, senses, gerbils, beans and peas, animal activities, and hatching chicks. (SL)

  4. Beginning Eleventh Grade Student Profile, Mathematics Standards, Citrus County, Florida.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Citrus County Board of Public Instruction, Inverness, FL.

    This collection of booklets deals with minumum standards in mathematics for beginning eleventh grade students. There is a statement of the standards with related skills, a test to assess competency with accompanying answer sheet and answer key, and eight booklets presenting problems covered by six of the standards. The booklets cover: percentages;…

  5. Teaching Gifted Students Literature in Grades Seven through Nine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Covey, Barbara L.

    Prepared for use by teachers of mentally gifted students in grades 7 through 9, the booklet offers a curriculum design for the teaching of literature. Considered is the difficult developmental stage in late childhood and early adolescence when children begin to assert their roles as individuals and often have no adult model other than the friendly…

  6. Developing Visual Literacy among Academically Able Fifth-Grade Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casey, Heidi Van Ert; Wolf, Joan S.

    1989-01-01

    The study with 34 gifted fifth-grade students found that a concrete sequential approach to developing visual literacy was more effective than an abstract visualization approach. Subjects either received guided visualization or direct instruction on such art concepts as shape, form, line, color, perspective, variety, and unity. (DB)

  7. What Upper-Grade Students Think about School Government

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sobkin, V. S.; Nikolashina, E. V.

    2008-01-01

    An adolescent's attitude toward school government clearly reflects certain negative aspects that have to do with his/her alienation from the social life of the school. This article has been based on materials of a 2005 sociological survey of students in the ninth and eleventh grades of schools in the city of Moscow (n = 2,105). The aim of the…

  8. Stop Tobacco in Restaurants: Fifth Grade Students STIR City Hall

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Ronald Vaughan

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses a campaign called STIR: Stop Tobacco in Restaurants, that was started by fourth and fifth grade students. The goal was to end smoking in public places, including restaurants, bowling alleys, sports bars, and pool halls. For two years they motivated their peers, coordinated an information campaign to urge kids and adults to…

  9. Enhancing Eighth Grade Student Presentations of Scientific Research with Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shreiner, Berdella H.

    This practicum was designed to improve the research and communication skills of eighth-grade students with the integration of technology, mathematics, and science when doing real-experience problem solving. Four units were developed that related the use of technology to skills that are also used in gathering, organizing, and manipulating research…

  10. Environmental Knowledge and Beliefs among Grade 10 Students in Australia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eyers, Vivian George

    To develop environmental education in Australia, a survey of tenth-grade students was undertaken. Thirty knowledge items and ten belief items were constructed. A panel of environmentalists and educators identified best responses for the knowledge items, and a common reference point, preservation of homo sapiens, for the belief items, so a…

  11. Perceived Effects of Standards-Based Grading on Student Assessments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoernke, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    This study explored how the implementation of a district-wide standards-based grading system affected the ways in which high school teachers assessed students' academic achievement. The researcher used a bounded case study to observe and interview three participating secondary teachers in a rural Wisconsin high school that used standards-based…

  12. Dental Students' Grades and Their Relationship to Classroom Attendance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Sheldon; And Others

    1981-01-01

    A study to examine the assumption that absenteeism affects student performance is described. Strict attendance records were kept for a course in dental materials at the University of Tennessee College of Dentistry. All of the tests indicate a significant negative correlation between grades and absenteeism. (MLW)

  13. First Grade Teachers' Perceptions of and Expectations for ELL Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Couch, Marsha

    2010-01-01

    Educational disparities exist between English language learners (ELLs) and native English-speaking students. Evidence suggests that, by fourth grade, 35% of ELLs, compared to their native English-speaking peers, are behind in math, and 47% are behind in reading. There is also evidence to suggest that these lower achievement scores are impacted by…

  14. Exploring Beginning Inference with Novice Grade 7 Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Jane M.

    2008-01-01

    This study documented efforts to facilitate ideas of beginning inference in novice grade 7 students. A design experiment allowed modified teaching opportunities in light of observation of components of a framework adapted from that developed by Pfannkuch for teaching informal inference with box plots. Box plots were replaced by hat plots, a…

  15. Reading Attitudes and Reading Interests of Urban Intermediate Grade Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hummel, Jeffrey W.; Fisher, Peter J. L.

    1985-01-01

    Administered Survey of Reading Attitudes and Bundy Reading Preference Survey to 130 fourth- and fifth-grade students. Significant moderate correlation between total score of Bundy Reading Preference Survey and the Reading as Enjoyment Dimension of the Survey of Reading Attitudes contributes to construct validity of both measures. (Author)

  16. Diagnostic Appraisal of Grade 12 Students' Understanding of Reaction Kinetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yan, Yaw Kai; Subramaniam, R.

    2016-01-01

    The study explored grade 12 students' understanding of reaction kinetics, a topic which has not been extensively explored in the chemistry education literature at this level. A 3-tier diagnostic instrument with 11 questions was developed--this format is of very recent origin and has been the subject of only a handful of studies. The findings…

  17. An Exploratory Study of Spelling Errors of Grade Three Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varnhagen, Stanley J.; Varnhagen, Connie K.

    Noting that while the number of errors gives a general indication of spelling ability, it may represent an oversimplification of the spelling process, a study examined the spelling ability of 40 Canadian third grade students of average ability. Subjects were divided into low and high spelling ability groups on the basis of the Edmonton (Alberta)…

  18. Discrimination Evidence for Examining Fourth Grade Students' Learning Disability Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hassan, Abdulhameed S.; Al-Harthy, Ibrahim S.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the ability of discriminate variables (perceptual-motor, hyperactivity disorder, neurological and psychological skills) to distinguish between normal (n = 68) and students with learning disabilities (n = 72) in fourth grade. Three instruments were developed: perceptual-motor scale, hyperactivity disorder scale, skills test…

  19. Second and Third Grade Students in the Hunters Point-Bayview SEED Project: A Diagnostic Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Counelis, James Steve

    This report supplements the first South East Education Development project (SEED) on first grade children. Full and partial records of 624 second grade students and 591 third grade students are the basis of this diagnostic review. The empirical data obtained for the SEED project students included: each student's sex and number of full days in…

  20. Student and Faculty Perceptions of Plus/Minus Grading and Its Effect on Course Grade Point Averages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edgar, Leslie D.; Johnson, Donald M.; Graham, Donna L.; Dixon, Bruce L.

    2014-01-01

    In fall 2005, the Dale Bumpers College of Agricultural, Food and Life Sciences at the University of Arkansas authorized the optional use of a plus/minus grading system. Since 2005, approximately one-half of courses have been graded using plus/minus and one-half using the straight letter grade system. This study examined student (n = 338) and…

  1. Longitudinal Investigation of Elementary Students' Science Academic Achievement in 4-8th Grades: Grade Level and Gender Differences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bursal, Murat

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the change of the science academic achievement by grade level and gender where 222 elementary students' science and technology course scores between the 4th and 8th grades and science success percentages in 6th and 8th grades Level Determination Exam were longitudinally analyzed. Based on the findings of this study,…

  2. Medical Student Service Learning Program Teaches Secondary Students about Career Opportunities in Health and Medical Fields

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karpa, Kelly; Vakharia, Kavita; Caruso, Catherine A.; Vechery, Colin; Sipple, Lanette; Wang, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    Engagement of academic medical centers in community outreach provides the public with a better understanding of basic terms and concepts used in biomedical sciences and increases awareness of important health information. Medical students at one academic medical center initiated an educational outreach program, called PULSE, that targets secondary…

  3. Mentoring medical students in academic emergency medicine.

    PubMed

    Garmel, Gus M

    2004-12-01

    Mentoring is an important aspect of career development for medical students, residents, and junior faculty. It is vital to the professional growth and maturation of individuals early in each phase of their careers. Additionally, mentoring has a critical role throughout all career stages, because the mentor-mentee relationship provides mutual benefit to both participants. This article will describe the role of the mentor, suggest ways to increase the likelihood of successful mentoring, and identify pitfalls in the mentoring process predominantly related to medical students. In contrast to role models, mentors play an active part in the development of a young physician's career. This difference will be discussed. Finally, this article will describe the responsibilities of career guidance and recommendation letter authorship that mentors assume for medical students.

  4. Using medical drama to teach biomedical ethics to medical students.

    PubMed

    Arawi, Thalia

    2010-01-01

    Nowadays, clinicians are faced with multifaceted ethical concerns, and it is often argued that students of medicine should be well trained in clinical ethics and have a minimum level of ethical sensitivity and critical analysis. Consequently, most medical colleges have introduced programs in biomedical ethics. It is often pointed out that there is a gap separating ethical theories from concrete moral dilemmas. This problem became less pervasive as case-studies started being used. Nevertheless, vignettes are mostly presented as an addendum to a unit and often engage the students only "temporarily." It is my contention that this can be remedied if students were given a venue that will allow them to appreciate as many particulars of the situation as possible, to engage in the case not merely as inactive spectators, rather to get entangled in the case just enough to be involved yet remain sufficiently detached to be able to exercise critical analysis. This is possible through medical drama which, I will argue, is a narrative genre that enhances emotional engagement, cognitive development, and moral imagination allowing for a more ethically sensitive student in training. To do that, reference will be made to the medical drama "House MD."

  5. Leadership training for undergraduate medical students.

    PubMed

    Maddalena, Victor

    2016-07-04

    Purpose Physicians play an important leadership role in the management and governance of the healthcare system. Yet, many physicians lack formal management and leadership training to prepare them for this challenging role. This Viewpoint article argues that leadership concepts need to be introduced to undergraduate medical students early and throughout their medical education. Design/methodology/approach Leadership is an integral part of medical practice. The recent inclusion of "Leader" competency in the CanMEDS 2015 represents a subtle but important shift from the previous "manager" competency. Providing medical students with the basics of leadership concepts early in their medical education allows them to integrate leadership principles into their professional practice. Findings The Faculty of Medicine at the Memorial University of Newfoundland (MUN) has developed an eight-module, fully online Physician Leadership Certificate for their undergraduate medical education program. This program is cited as an example of an undergraduate medical curriculum that offers leadership training throughout the 4 years of the MD program. Originality/value There are a number of continuing professional development opportunities for physicians in the area of management and leadership. This Viewpoint article challenges undergraduate medical education programs to develop and integrate leadership training in their curricula.

  6. Nursing student medication errors: a retrospective review.

    PubMed

    Harding, Lorill; Petrick, Teresa

    2008-01-01

    This article presents the findings of a retrospective review of medication errors made and reported by nursing students in a 4-year baccalaureate program. Data were examined in relation to the semester of the program, kind of error according to the rights of medication administration, and contributing factors. Three categories of contributing factors were identified: rights violations, system factors, and knowledge and understanding. It became apparent that system factors, or the context in which medication administration takes place, are not fully considered when students are taught about medication administration. Teaching strategies need to account for the dynamic complexity of this process and incorporate experiential knowledge. This review raised several important questions about how this information guides our practice as educators in the clinical and classroom settings and how we can work collaboratively with practice partners to influence change and increase patient safety.

  7. Teaching with comics: a course for fourth-year medical students.

    PubMed

    Green, Michael J

    2013-12-01

    Though graphic narratives (or comics) now permeate popular culture, address every conceivable topic including illness and dying, and are used in educational settings from grade school through university, they have not typically been integrated into the medical school curriculum. This paper describes a popular and innovative course on comics and medicine for 4th-year medical students. In this course, students learn to critically read book length comics as well as create their own stories using the comics format. The rationale for the course, its general content and format, and methods for teaching are described. Finally, the author offers some reflections on why this medium resonates so powerfully with medical student learners.

  8. Change and Continuity in Student Achievement from Grades 3 to 5: A Policy Dilemma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCaslin, Mary; Burross, Heidi Legg; Good, Thomas L.

    2005-01-01

    In this article we examine student performance on mandated tests in grades 3, 4, and 5 in one state. We focus on this interval, which w e term "the fourth grade window," based on our hypothesis that students in grade four are particularly vulnerable to decrements in achievement. The national focus on the third grade as the critical…

  9. Do Grades Shape Students' School Engagement? The Psychological Consequences of Report Card Grades at the Beginning of Secondary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poorthuis, Astrid M. G.; Juvonen, Jaana; Thomaes, Sander; Denissen, Jaap J. A.; de Castro, Bram Orobio; van Aken, Marcel A. G.

    2015-01-01

    Receiving report card grades is psychologically salient to most students and can elicit a range of affective reactions. A 3-wave longitudinal study examined how grades shape students' (N = 375; M age at Wave 1 = 12.6 years) school engagement through the affective reactions they elicit. Emotional and behavioral engagement were measured at the start…

  10. The Relationship between Grade Configuration and Standardized Science Test Scores of Fifth-Grade Students: What School Administrators Should Know

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Delonda; Jones, Lisa; Simieou, Felix; Matthew, Kathryn; Morgan, Bryan

    2013-01-01

    This study utilized a causal comparative (ex post facto) design to determine if a consistent relationship existed between fifth-grade students' success on the Science Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) at the elementary (K-5) level in comparison to fifth-grade students' success on the science TAKS at the intermediate (5-6) level. The…

  11. The relation between student motivation and student grades in physical education: A 3-year investigation.

    PubMed

    Barkoukis, V; Taylor, I; Chanal, J; Ntoumanis, N

    2014-10-01

    Enhancing students' academic engagement is the key element of the educational process; hence, research in this area has focused on understanding the mechanisms that can lead to increased academic engagement. The present study investigated the relation between motivation and grades in physical education (PE) employing a 3-year longitudinal design. Three hundred fifty-four Greek high school students participated in the study. Students completed measures of motivation to participate in PE on six occasions; namely, at the start and the end of the school year in the first, second, and third year of junior high school. Students' PE grades were also recorded at these time points. The results of the multilevel growth models indicated that students' PE grades increased over the 3 years and students had better PE grades at the end of each year than at the beginning of the subsequent year. In general, students and classes with higher levels of controlling motivation achieved lower PE grades, whereas higher levels of autonomous motivation were associated with higher PE grades. These findings provide new insight on the associations between class- and individual-level motivation with objectively assessed achievement in PE.

  12. Medical Student Oncology Congress: Designed and Implemented by Brazilian Medical Students.

    PubMed

    de Camargo, Celeste Rodovalho Soares; Schoueri, Jean Henri Maselli; Neto, Felippe Lazar; Segalla, Paola Boaro; Del Giglio, Auro; Cubero, Daniel I G

    2017-03-30

    Oncology is an essential field of medicine; however, its teaching is occasionally underemphasized and uncoordinated during medical school. An alternative method of providing additional oncological information to medical students is through extracurricular activities, such as congresses and medical student associations. The aim of this paper is to describe a Medical Student Oncology Congress entirely designed and organized by medical students. Three medical students from oncology study and research groups identified the gap in oncology training at universities and decided to organize a congress for students. They selected representatives from 26 universities in Brazil for onsite registration and created a website for online registration and promotion of the congress. To determine the topics of the lectures, they searched the medical literature for the most commonly occurring cancers in adults and children. Extrapolating the academic content of oncology, they organized lectures by non-governmental organizations (NGOs), talks on career guidance and research in this field as well as a role-playing workshop to train future doctors on how to deliver news to patients. There were a total of 609 attendees, with 590 students from 26 different universities in Brazil. Approximately 82% were medical students, and among the participants there were also 15 medical educators. A total of 80.75% of the participants were extremely satisfied with the congress, and 99.17% would recommend it to a colleague. Most of the overall cost of the congress, 96%, was covered by registration fees. There was a 6% positive net balance, which was donated to the NGOs participating in the congress. This successful experience proves that it is possible to have a congress fully designed, organized and managed by students. It demonstrates how students can be active participants in their own education, as opposed to a classic approach through which only professors are responsible for instruction.

  13. Medical-themed film and literature course for premedical students.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young-Mee; Ahn, Duck-Sun

    2004-09-01

    The authors introduced a "Medicine and Literature" course into the premedical curriculum to help students develop clearer expectations regarding their lives as future physicians, and also to gain insight into the humanistic and social aspects of medicine. The course was developed for the entire class of second-grade premedical students (n = 126) and consisted of one three-hour session per week over six weeks. The course was composed of two main themes: (1) medicine and film; and (2) medicine and literature. Students' responses showed that this course helped them to gain perspectives on both a physician's life and medical practice, and also enhanced their understanding of the humanistic and social aspects of medicine itself. Students reported that they also valued the advantages of collaborative learning, which holds the potential for improving their skills in presentation, discussion, communication and teamwork. In Korea, introducing arts- and humanities-related courses into the medical curriculum is a recent trend, and is still in a very early stage. Although our study has several limitations, we conclude that by studying literature and films during the premedical period, students can grasp a sense of the many different issues that physicians are faced with.

  14. How Second-Grade Students Internalize Rules during Teacher-Student Transactions: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meard, Jacques; Bertone, Stefano; Flavier, Eric

    2008-01-01

    Background: Vygotsky's theory of the internalization of signs provided the basis for this study. Aims: This study tried to analyse the processes by which second-grade students internalize school rules. Sample: Ethnographic data were collected on 102 lessons in a second-grade class (6-8 years) during 1 year. This study focused on three lessons…

  15. Grade six students' understanding of the nature of science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cochrane, Donald Brian

    The goal of scientific literacy requires that students develop an understanding of the nature of science to assist them in the reasoned acquisition of science concepts and in their future role as citizens in a participatory democracy. The purpose of this study was to investigate and describe the range of positions that grade six students hold with respect to the nature of science and to investigate whether gender or prior science education was related to students' views of the nature of science. Two grade six classes participated in this study. One class was from a school involved in a long-term elementary science curriculum project. The science curriculum at this school involved constructivist epistemology and pedagogy and a realist ontology. The curriculum stressed hands-on, open-ended activities and the development of science process skills. Students were frequently involved in creating and testing explanations for physical phenomena. The second class was from a matched school that had a traditional science program. Results of the study indicated that students hold a wider range of views of the nature of science than previously documented. Student positions ranged from having almost no understanding of the nature of science to those expressing positions regarding the nature of science that were more developed than previous studies had documented. Despite the range of views documented, all subjects held realist views of scientific knowledge. Contrary to the literature, some students were able to evaluate a scientific theory in light of empirical evidence that they had generated. Results also indicated that students from the project school displayed more advanced views of the nature of science than their matched peers. However, not all students benefited equally from their experiences. No gender differences were found with respect to students' understanding of the nature of science.

  16. K-8th Grade Korean Students' Conceptions of 'Changes of State' and 'Conditions for Changes of State'. Research Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paik, Seoung-Hey; Kim, Hyo-Nam; Cho, Boo-Kyoung; Park, Jae-Won

    2004-01-01

    This study investigates the various conceptions held by K-8th Korean grade students regarding the 'changes of state' and the 'conditions for changes of state'. The study used a sample of five kindergarteners, five secondgrade students, five fourth-grade students, five sixth-grade students, and five eighth-grade students. The 25 students attend…

  17. Relationships between Drug Company Representatives and Medical Students: Medical School Policies and Attitudes of Student Affairs Deans and Third-Year Medical Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sierles, Frederick; Brodkey, Amy; Cleary, Lynn; McCurdy, Frederick A.; Mintz, Matthew; Frank, Julia; Lynn, Deborah Joanne; Chao, Jason; Morgenstern, Bruce; Shore, William; Woodard, John

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: The authors sought to ascertain the details of medical school policies about relationships between drug companies and medical students as well as student affairs deans' attitudes about these interactions. Methods: In 2005, the authors surveyed deans and student affairs deans at all U.S. medical schools and asked whether their schools…

  18. Sleep medicine education and knowledge among medical students in selected Saudi Medical Schools

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Limited information is available regarding sleep medicine education worldwide. Nevertheless, medical education has been blamed for the under-recognition of sleep disorders among physicians. This study was designed to assess the knowledge of Saudi undergraduate medical students about sleep and sleep disorders and the prevalence of education on sleep medicine in medical schools as well as to identify the obstacles to providing such education. Methods We surveyed medical schools that were established more than 10 years ago, asking fourth- and fifth-year medical students (men and women) to participate. Seven medical schools were selected. To assess knowledge on sleep and sleep disorders, we used the Assessment of Sleep Knowledge in Medical Education (ASKME) Survey, which is a validated 30-item questionnaire. The participants were separated into two groups: those who scored ≥60% and those who scored <60%. To assess the number of teaching hours dedicated to sleep medicine in the undergraduate curricula, the organizers of the major courses on sleep disorders were contacted to obtain the curricula for those courses and to determine the obstacles to education. Results A total of 348 students completed the survey (54.9% male). Among the participants, 27.7% had a specific interest in sleep medicine. More than 80% of the study sample had rated their knowledge in sleep medicine as below average. Only 4.6% of the respondents correctly answered ≥60% of the questions. There was no difference in the scores of the respondents with regard to university, gender, grade-point average (GPA) or student academic levels. Only five universities provided data on sleep medicine education. The time spent teaching sleep medicine in the surveyed medical schools ranged from 0-8 hours with a mean of 2.6 ±2.6 hours. Identified obstacles included the following: (1) sleep medicine has a lower priority in the curriculum (53%) and (2) time constraints do not allow the incorporation of

  19. Medical students-as-teachers: a systematic review of peer-assisted teaching during medical school

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Tzu-Chieh; Wilson, Nichola C; Singh, Primal P; Lemanu, Daniel P; Hawken, Susan J; Hill, Andrew G

    2011-01-01

    Introduction International interest in peer-teaching and peer-assisted learning (PAL) during undergraduate medical programs has grown in recent years, reflected both in literature and in practice. There, remains however, a distinct lack of objective clarity and consensus on the true effectiveness of peer-teaching and its short- and long-term impacts on learning outcomes and clinical practice. Objective To summarize and critically appraise evidence presented on peer-teaching effectiveness and its impact on objective learning outcomes of medical students. Method A literature search was conducted in four electronic databases. Titles and abstracts were screened and selection was based on strict eligibility criteria after examining full-texts. Two reviewers used a standard review and analysis framework to independently extract data from each study. Discrepancies in opinions were resolved by discussion in consultation with other reviewers. Adapted models of “Kirkpatrick’s Levels of Learning” were used to grade the impact size of study outcomes. Results From 127 potential titles, 41 were obtained as full-texts, and 19 selected after close examination and group deliberation. Fifteen studies focused on student-learner outcomes and four on student-teacher learning outcomes. Ten studies utilized randomized allocation and the majority of study participants were self-selected volunteers. Written examinations and observed clinical evaluations were common study outcome assessments. Eleven studies provided student-teachers with formal teacher training. Overall, results suggest that peer-teaching, in highly selective contexts, achieves short-term learner outcomes that are comparable with those produced by faculty-based teaching. Furthermore, peer-teaching has beneficial effects on student-teacher learning outcomes. Conclusions Peer-teaching in undergraduate medical programs is comparable to conventional teaching when utilized in selected contexts. There is evidence to suggest

  20. Undergraduate medical students' empathy: current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Quince, Thelma; Thiemann, Pia; Benson, John; Hyde, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Empathy is important to patient care. It enhances patients' satisfaction, comfort, self-efficacy, and trust which in turn may facilitate better diagnosis, shared decision making, and therapy adherence. Empathetic doctors experience greater job satisfaction and psychological well-being. Understanding the development of empathy of tomorrow's health care professionals is important. However, clinical empathy is poorly defined and difficult to measure, while ways to enhance it remain unclear. This review examines empathy among undergraduate medical students, focusing upon three main questions: How is empathy measured? This section discusses the problems of assessing empathy and outlines the utility of the Jefferson Scale of Empathy - Student Version and Davis's Interpersonal Reactivity Index. Both have been used widely to assess medical students' empathy. Does empathy change during undergraduate medical education? The trajectory of empathy during undergraduate medical education has been and continues to be debated. Potential reasons for contrasting results of studies are outlined. What factors may influence the development of empathy? Although the influence of sex is widely recognized, the impact of culture, psychological well-being, and aspects of undergraduate curricula are less well understood. This review identifies three interrelated issues for future research into undergraduate medical students' empathy. First, the need for greater clarity of definition, recognizing that empathy is multidimensional. Second, the need to develop meaningful ways of measuring empathy which include its component dimensions and which are relevant to patients' experiences. Medical education research has generally relied upon single, self-report instruments, which have utility across large populations but are limited. Finally, there is a need for greater methodological rigor in investigating the possible determinants of clinical empathy in medical education. Greater specificity of context

  1. Extracurricular Activities and Their Effect on the Student's Grade Point Average: Statistical Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakoban, R. A.; Aljarallah, S. A.

    2015-01-01

    Extracurricular activities (ECA) are part of students' everyday life; they play important roles in students' lives. Few studies have addressed the question of how student engagements to ECA affect student's grade point average (GPA). This research was conducted to know whether the students' grade point average in King Abdulaziz University,…

  2. Self-Reflective Grading: Getting Students to Learn from Their Mistakes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cherepinsky, Vera

    2011-01-01

    Students rarely use their graded exams to study. An alternative method of grading exams, based on self-reflection, encourages students to use their mistakes as a learning resource. In this grading method, the test is returned with each question simply marked as "right" or 'wrong." Students can then go over their exams and resubmit them with…

  3. Relationship between attachment styles and happiness in medical students

    PubMed Central

    Moghadam, Marzyeh; Rezaei, Farzin; Ghaderi, Ebrahim; Rostamian, Negar

    2016-01-01

    Background: Attachment theory is one of the most important achievements of contemporary psychology. Role of medical students in the community health is important, so we need to know about the situation of happiness and attachment style in these students. Objectives: This study was aimed to assess the relationship between medical students’ attachment styles and demographic characteristics. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on randomly selected students of Medical Sciences in Kurdistan University, in 2012. To collect data, Hazan and Shaver's attachment style measure and the Oxford Happiness Questionnaire were used. The results were analyzed using the SPSS software version 16 (IBM, Chicago IL, USA) and statistical analysis was performed via t-test, Chi-square test, and multiple regression tests. Results: Secure attachment style was the most common attachment style and the least common was ambivalent attachment style. Avoidant attachment style was more common among single persons than married people (P = 0.03). No significant relationship was observed between attachment style and gender and grade point average of the studied people. The mean happiness score of students was 62.71. In multivariate analysis, the variables of secure attachment style (P = 0.001), male gender (P = 0.005), and scholar achievement (P = 0.047) were associated with higher happiness score. Conclusion: The most common attachment style was secure attachment style, which can be a positive prognostic factor in medical students, helping them to manage stress. Higher frequency of avoidant attachment style among single persons, compared with married people, is mainly due to their negative attitude toward others and failure to establish and maintain relationships with others. PMID:28217589

  4. The Relationship between Middle Grade Student Belonging and Middle Grade Student Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faust, Phyllis B.; Ennis, Leslie S.; Hodge, William M.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between a middle school initiative to develop student voice, interpersonal relationships, and intrapersonal relationships and students' sense of belonging. The literature indicated a strong connection between students' sense of belonging in school and positive outcomes in and out of the classroom (Deci &…

  5. Integrative Virology for Senior Medical Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koment, Roger W.

    1991-01-01

    The article describes a senior elective in virology developed at the University of South Dakota School of Medicine. Students work independently through a series of course units, selecting 12 study topics from a catalog of 35 topics in medical virology and discussing their reading daily with the professor. (DB)

  6. Changing Medical Students' Attitudes toward Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzales, Ernest; Morrow-Howell, Nancy; Gilbert, Pat

    2010-01-01

    Given the growth in the number of older adults and the ageist attitudes many in the health care profession hold, interventions aimed at improving health professionals' attitudes toward older adults are imperative. Vital Visionaries is an intergenerational art program designed to improve medical students' attitudes toward older adults. Participants…

  7. Infuriating Tensions: Science and the Medical Student.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bishop, J. Michael

    1984-01-01

    Contemporary medical students, it is suggested, view science in particular and the intellect in general as difficult allies at best. What emerges are physicians without inquiring minds, physicians who bring to the bedside not curiosity and a desire to understand but a set of reflexes. (MLW)

  8. Psychosocial Characteristics of Female Medical Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blumberg, Phyllis; And Others

    Self-perceptions of male and female medical students on various psychosocial characteristics were compared in 1980. The questionnaire consisted of: the Social Support Networks questions, the Social Readjustment Rating Scale (Holmes and Rahe, 1967), the General Well Being Scale (Gurin, Veroff, and Felds, 1960), the Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale…

  9. Transfer of Student Learning in Medical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patel, Vimla L.; Cranton, Patricia A.

    1983-01-01

    Transfer of learning among the cognitive, psychomotor, and affective domains and among three clinical disciplines (medicine, pediatrics, and surgery) was examined in the final year of a medical student clerkship program. A model based on ethnographic analysis followed by performance measurement was used. (Author/MLW)

  10. Career Choices Among Saudi Medical Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Faris, Eiad; And Others

    1997-01-01

    A survey of 253 final-year students at the four Saudi medical schools found the most frequently-chosen specialties were internal medicine, surgery, pediatrics, and obstetrics/gynecology. Over one-fourth were unsure of career choice. Gender differences were found. Most common locations for postgraduate training were Saudi Arabia and Canada, and a…

  11. Coping Styles of Women Medical Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidson, Virginia M.

    1978-01-01

    Role strain is discussed as it occurs in the context of presenting complaint and treatment, and issues of feminine sexuality and role adjustment are examined. It is suggested that medical schools can increase their awareness of how sex bias and institutional sexism affect the mental health and well-being of women students and can make appropriate…

  12. Informed Consent and the "Medical Student Psychiatrist."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Daniel L.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Responses to a 1986 questionnaire by 91 departments of clinical psychiatry in U.S. medical schools revealed that a substantial proportion (29.3 percent) were not fully compliant with established guidelines requiring informed consent from patients before allowing students to participate in their psychiatric assessment and care. (Author/DB)

  13. Evaluation of information literacy status among medical students at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences

    PubMed Central

    BAZRAFKAN, LEILA; HAYAT, ALI ASGHAR; ABBASI, KARIM; BAZRAFKAN, AGHDAS; ROHALAMINI, AZADEH; FARDID, MOZHGAN

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: The information literacy status and the use of information technology among students in the globalization age of course plans are very momentous. This study aimed to evaluate the information literacy status and use of information technology among medical students of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences in 2013. Methods: This was a descriptive-analytical study with cross-sectional method. The study population consisted of all medical students (physiopathology, externship and internship) studying at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. The sample size (n=310) was selected by systematic random sampling. The tool of data gathering was LASSI questionnaire (assigned by America research association) with 48 closed items in five-point LIKERT scale. The questionnaire included two distinct parts of demographic questions and the information literacy skills based on the standards of information literacy capacities for academic education. The content validity was acquired by professors’ and experts’ comments. The reliability was also calculated by Cronbach’salpha (0.85). Data were analyzed in both descriptive (frequency- mean) and analytical level (t-test, analysis of variance) using SPSS 14 software. Results: 60.3% of the participants were females, and the remaining (29.7%) were males. The mean score of information literacy and its five subgroups among the students weren’t at a desirable level. The mean scores of information literacy for educational grades from the highest to lowest belonged to the internship, physiopathology and externship. The results showed that the highest average was related to the effective access ability to information among interns (9.27±3.57) and the lowest one was related to the ability of understanding legal and economical cases related with using information among externs (3.11±1.32).The results of ANOVA showed that there wasn’t a significant difference between educational grades and information literacy. Finally, the

  14. Assessing deaf cultural competency of physicians and medical students.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Lisa; LaHousse, Sheila F; Nakaji, Melanie C; Sadler, Georgia Robins

    2011-03-01

    The Medical Students, Cancer Control, and the Deaf Community Training program (DCT) intended to create physicians who were culturally competent to care for deaf patients were evaluated. DCT medical students (n = 22), UCSD medical faculty (n = 131), and non-DCT medical students (n = 211) were anonymously surveyed about their perceptions related to deaf patients, deaf cultural competency, and interpreter use. The faculty and non-DCT medical students displayed less knowledge than the DCT students. These findings suggest that training medical students in deaf cultural competency can significantly increase their capacity to care for community members and reduce the health disparities experienced by this community.

  15. Introducing medical students to careers in medical education: the student track at an annual medical education conference.

    PubMed

    Blatt, Benjamin; Plack, Margaret; Suzuki, Mari; Arepalli, Sruthi; Schroth, Scott; Stagnaro-Green, Alex

    2013-08-01

    Few avenues exist to familiarize medical students with careers as clinician-educators, and the clinician-educator career pathway has not been well defined. In this article, the authors describe how they integrated a career-oriented student track into the 2011 Northeast Group on Educational Affairs (NEGEA) annual retreat to introduce students to careers in medical education. Annual education conferences are principal sources of educational scholarship, networking, collaboration, and information sharing; as such, they represent attractive venues for early exposure to the culture of medical education. The authors' goal in creating the NEGEA conference student track was to excite students about careers in medical education by providing them with an array of opportunities for active involvement in both student-specific and general conference activities.The authors draw from their experience to provide a guide for recruiting student participants to career-building student tracks. They also offer a guide for developing future student tracks, based on their experience and grounded in social cognitive career theory. Although their focus is on medical education, they believe these guides will be useful for educators planning a conference-based student track in any field.

  16. The impact of a longitudinal curriculum on medical student obstetrics and gynecology clinical training.

    PubMed

    Melo, Juliana; Kaneshiro, Bliss; Kellett, Lisa; Hiraoka, Mark

    2014-05-01

    Clinical training in most medical schools consists of separate rotations, based out of tertiary-care facilities, across the core medical disciplines. In addition to a traditional clinical curriculum, the University of Hawai'i offers a longitudinal clinical curriculum as an option to medical students. The longitudinal curriculum provides students with an innovative, alternative educational track to achieve their educational goals in clinical medicine. The objective of this study was to describe the obstetrics and gynecology procedural experiences of third-year medical students who participated in a longitudinal curriculum versus a traditional block clerkship. The number of procedures reported by third-year medical students who participated in a non-traditional, longitudinal clerkship was compared with the number of procedures reported by students who participated in the traditional block third-year curriculum between July 2007 and June 2009. National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) subject scores, clerkship grade and chosen residency specialty were also compared. The mean number of pelvic exams (longitudinally-trained 36 [SD 33] versus block-trained 8 [SD 6], [t=4.3, P<.01]) and pap smears (longitudinally-trained 28 [SD 26] versus block-trained 7 [SD 3] [t=4.4, P<.01]) was significantly higher for longitudinally-trained students compared to block-trained students. No significant differences in overall clerkship grades or NBME shelf scores emerged.

  17. A comprehensive medical student career development program improves medical student satisfaction with career planning.

    PubMed

    Zink, Brian J; Hammoud, Maya M; Middleton, Eric; Moroney, Donney; Schigelone, Amy

    2007-01-01

    In 1999, the University of Michigan Medical School (UMMS) initiated a new career development program (CDP). The CDP incorporates the 4-phase career development model described by the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) Careers in Medicine (CiM). The CDP offers self-assessment exercises with guidance from trained counselors for 1st- and 2nd-year medical students. Career exploration experiences include Career Seminar Series luncheons, shadow experiences with faculty, and a shadow program with second-year (M2) and fourth-year (M4) medical students. During the decision-making phase, students work with trained faculty career advisors (FCA). Mandatory sessions are held on career selection, preparing the residency application, interviewing, and program evaluation. During the implementation phase, students meet with deans or counselors to discuss residency application and matching. An "at-risk plan" assists students who may have difficulty matching. The CiM Web site is extensively used during the 4 stages. Data from the AAMC and UMMS Graduation Questionnaires (GQ) show significant improvements for UMMS students in overall satisfaction with career planning services and with faculty mentoring, career assessment activities, career information, and personnel availability. By 2003, UMMS students had significantly higher satisfaction in all measured areas of career planning services when compared with all other U.S. medical students.

  18. Colorado Student Assessment Program: 2001 Released Passages, Items, and Prompts. Grade 4 Reading and Writing, Grade 4 Lectura y Escritura, Grade 5 Mathematics and Reading, Grade 6 Reading, Grade 7 Reading and Writing, Grade 8 Mathematics, Reading and Science, Grade 9 Reading, and Grade 10 Mathematics and Reading and Writing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado State Dept. of Education, Denver.

    This document contains released reading comprehension passages, test items, and writing prompts from the Colorado Student Assessment Program for 2001. The sample questions and prompts are included without answers or examples of student responses. Test materials are included for: (1) Grade 4 Reading and Writing; (2) Grade 4 Lectura y Escritura…

  19. [Kolb's learning styles in medical students].

    PubMed

    Borracci, Raúl A; Arribalzaga, Eduardo B

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this work was to study the relationship of Kolb's learning styles in academic success or failure in medical students. A prospective cohort study in 116 medical students of a private Argentine university was performed between March 2005 and March 2011. The follow-up included two cut-offs; during 2005-2006 the students' learning styles were determined and five years later, when individuals had to end their career, they were grouped into graduated, delayed or dropped status. At the end of the period, 50% of the students ended successfully, 24.1% abandoned and 25.9% was delayed. Learning styles were assimilator in 60.3% of cases, divergent in 14.7%, accommodator in 6.9%, convergent in 6.0% and undefined in 12.1%. In conclusion, the follow-up during the career demonstrated that convergent or undefined styles had a tendency to abandon the career, while delayed students had a more theoretical and reflexive style than successful individuals. The results observed in convergent students differed from other reports. This difference would be explained by a particular characteristic of the sample or by the teaching and evaluation profile of the university.

  20. Exploring scientific creativity of eleventh-grade students in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Jia-Chi

    2002-04-01

    Although most researchers focus on scientists' creativity, students' scientific creativity should be considered, especially for high school and college students. It is generally assumed that most professional creators in science emerge from amateur creators. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between students' scientific creativity and selected variables including creativity, problem finding, formulating hypotheses, science achievement, the nature of science, and attitudes toward science for finding significant predictors of eleventh grade students' scientific creativity. A total of 130 male eleventh-grade students in three biology classes participated in this study. The main instruments included the Test of Divergent Thinking (TDT) for creativity measurement, the Creativity Rating Scale (CRS) and the Creative Activities and Accomplishments Check Lists (CAACL ) for measurement of scientific creativity, the Nature of Scientific Knowledge Scale (NSKS) for measurement of the nature of science, and the Science Attitude Inventory II (SAI II) for measurement of attitudes toward science. In addition, two instruments on measuring students' abilities of problem finding and abilities of formulating hypotheses were developed by the researcher in this study. Data analysis involved descriptive statistics, Pearson product-moment correlations, and stepwise multiple regressions. The major findings suggested the following: (1) students' scientific creativity significantly correlated with some of selected variables such as attitudes toward science, problem finding, formulating hypotheses, the nature of science, resistance to closure, originality, and elaboration; (2) four significant predictors including attitudes toward science, problem finding, resistance to closure, and originality accounted for 48% of the variance of students' scientific creativity; (3) there were big differences between students with a higher and a lower degree of scientific

  1. Medical student empathy: interpersonal distinctions and correlates.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Kevin D; Foster, Penni Smith

    2016-12-01

    Attention to interpersonal behaviors, communication, and relational factors is taking on increasing importance in medical education. Medical student empathy is one aspect of the physician-patient relationship that is often involved in beneficial interactions leading to improved clinical outcomes and patient satisfaction. As an interpersonal quality, empathy is a social behavior well-suited to be examined from an interpersonal perspective. The present study used the interpersonal theory of clinical, personality, and social psychology to examine the construct of empathy and theorize about likely interpersonal correlates. One hundred and sixty-three students from an academic health center in the southeastern United States participated in this study. The medical student version of the Jefferson Scale of Empathy was used to assess empathy and its factors: Perspective taking, compassionate care, and walking in the patient's shoes. Interpersonal assessments included the International Personality Item Pool-Interpersonal Circumplex, the Interpersonal Support Evaluation List, and the UCLA Loneliness Scale. Distinct interpersonal styles and correlates emerged among empathy and its factors. While all factors of empathy were related to interpersonal warmth, perspective taking and compassionate care were also associated with submissiveness. Of note, only walking in the patient's shoes was correlated with both social support and less loneliness. These findings are discussed in light of interpersonal theory with particular attention paid to the implications for medical education and professional development.

  2. Exposing medical students to expanding populations.

    PubMed

    Lindenthal, J J; DeLisa, J A; Heinrich, G F; Calderón Gerstein, W S

    2015-01-01

    Physicians are required to advocate for and counsel patients based on the best science and the interests of the individual while avoiding discrimination, ensuring equal access to health and mental services. Nonetheless, the communication gap between physician and patients has long been observed. To this end, the Institute for the Public Understanding of Health and Medicine of the Rutgers University New Jersey Medical School has expanded its efforts. This report describes two new programs: a legacy lecture series for medical students and an international "experience", in Huancayo, Peru, for medical students and faculty. The MiniMed outreach program, now in its ninth year and first described in this journal in 2012, was designed to empower the powerless to communicate more effectively with clinicians, thus improving both the effectiveness of the physician-patient relationship and health care outcomes. The approach of the two new programs and their effects on patients, particularly the underserved, and medical students and faculty, are outlined in the following article.

  3. Exposing medical students to expanding populations

    PubMed Central

    Lindenthal, JJ; DeLisa, JA; Heinrich, GF; Calderón Gerstein, WS

    2015-01-01

    Physicians are required to advocate for and counsel patients based on the best science and the interests of the individual while avoiding discrimination, ensuring equal access to health and mental services. Nonetheless, the communication gap between physician and patients has long been observed. To this end, the Institute for the Public Understanding of Health and Medicine of the Rutgers University New Jersey Medical School has expanded its efforts. This report describes two new programs: a legacy lecture series for medical students and an international “experience”, in Huancayo, Peru, for medical students and faculty. The MiniMed outreach program, now in its ninth year and first described in this journal in 2012, was designed to empower the powerless to communicate more effectively with clinicians, thus improving both the effectiveness of the physician–patient relationship and health care outcomes. The approach of the two new programs and their effects on patients, particularly the underserved, and medical students and faculty, are outlined in the following article. PMID:25834472

  4. The Correlation between Student/Instructor Rapport, Student Perceptions of Instructor Effectiveness, and Course Grade Expectations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yezbick, Erin Lewis

    2016-01-01

    The researcher attempted to determine if a correlation exists between student/instructor rapport, student perceptions of instructor effectiveness, and course grade expectations for freshman general education courses at a career college in the Great Lakes Region of the United States. Previous studies have determined that rapport affects motivation…

  5. Medical student service learning program teaches secondary students about career opportunities in health and medical fields.

    PubMed

    Karpa, Kelly; Vakharia, Kavita; Caruso, Catherine A; Vechery, Colin; Sipple, Lanette; Wang, Adrian

    2015-12-01

    Engagement of academic medical centers in community outreach provides the public with a better understanding of basic terms and concepts used in biomedical sciences and increases awareness of important health information. Medical students at one academic medical center initiated an educational outreach program, called PULSE, that targets secondary students to foster their interest in healthcare and medicine. High school student participants are engaged in a semester-long course that relies on interactive lectures, problem-based learning sessions, mentoring relationships with medical students, and opportunities for shadowing healthcare providers. To date, the curriculum has been offered for 7 consecutive years. To determine the impact that participation in the curriculum has had on college/career choices and to identify areas for improvement, an electronic questionnaire was sent to former participants. Based on a 32% response rate, 81% of former participants indicated that participation in the course influenced their decision to pursue a medical/science-related career. More than half (67%) of respondents indicated intent to pursue a MD/PhD or other postgraduate degree. Based on responses obtained, additional opportunities to incorporate laboratory-based research and simulation sessions should be explored. In addition, a more formalized mentoring component has been added to the course to enhance communication between medical students and mentees. Health/medicine-related educational outreach programs targeting high school students may serve as a pipeline to introduce or reinforce career opportunities in healthcare and related sciences.

  6. Developing seventh grade students' systems thinking skills in the context of the human circulatory system.

    PubMed

    Raved, Lena; Yarden, Anat

    2014-01-01

    Developing systems thinking skills in school can provide useful tools to deal with a vast amount of medical and health information that may help learners in decision making in their future lives as citizen. Thus, there is a need to develop effective tools that will allow learners to analyze biological systems and organize their knowledge. Here, we examine junior high school students' systems thinking skills in the context of the human circulatory system. A model was formulated for developing teaching and learning materials and for characterizing students' systems thinking skills. Specifically, we asked whether seventh grade students, who studied about the human circulatory system, acquired systems thinking skills, and what are the characteristics of those skills? Concept maps were used to characterize students' systems thinking components and examine possible changes in the students' knowledge structure. These maps were composed by the students before and following the learning process. The study findings indicate a significant improvement in the students' ability to recognize the system components and the processes that occur within the system, as well as the relationships between different levels of organization of the system, following the learning process. Thus, following learning students were able to organize the systems' components and its processes within a framework of relationships, namely the students' systems thinking skills were improved in the course of learning using the teaching and learning materials.

  7. Changing medical students' attitudes toward older adults.

    PubMed

    Gonzales, Ernest; Morrow-Howell, Nancy; Gilbert, Pat

    2010-01-01

    Given the growth in the number of older adults and the ageist attitudes many in the health care profession hold, interventions aimed at improving health professionals' attitudes toward older adults are imperative. Vital Visionaries is an intergenerational art program designed to improve medical students' attitudes toward older adults. Participants met for four 2-hour sessions at local art museums to create and discuss art. Three hundred and twenty-eight individuals (112 treatment group, 96 comparison, 120 older adults) in eight cities participated in the program and evaluation. Participants completed pre-and postsurveys that captured their attitude toward older adults, perception of commonality with older adults, and career plans. Findings suggest that medical students' attitudes toward old adults were positive at pretest. However, Vital Visionary students became more positive in their attitudes toward older adults at posttest (p < .001), with a moderate effect size, G = .60, and they felt they had more in common with older adults at posttest (p < .001), with a moderate effect size, G = .64. The program did not influence their career plans (p = .35). Findings from this demonstration project suggest that socializing medical students with healthy older adults through art programs can foster positive attitudes and enhance their sense of commonality with older adults.

  8. Attitudes toward euthanasia among Swedish medical students.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Marit; Strang, Peter; Milberg, Anna

    2007-10-01

    Attitudes toward euthanasia differ between individuals and populations, and in many studies the medical profession is more reluctant than the general public. Our goal was to explore medical students' attitude toward euthanasia. A questionnaire containing open-ended questions was answered anonymously by 165 first- and fifth-year medical students. Data were analysed using qualitative content analysis with no predetermined categories. The students' arguments opposing euthanasia were based on opinions of 1. euthanasia being morally wrong, 2. fear of possible negative effects on society, 3. euthanasia causing strain on physicians and 4. doubts about the true meaning of requests of euthanasia from patients. Arguments supporting euthanasia were based on 1. patients' autonomy and 2. the relief of suffering, which could be caused by severe illnesses, reduced integrity, hopelessness, social factors and old age. There are several contradictions in the students' arguments and the results indicate a possible need for education focusing on the possibility of symptom control in palliative care and patients' perceived quality of life.

  9. Academic and personality correlates of career indecision in medical students entering training.

    PubMed

    Walters, G D

    1982-11-01

    The academic and personality correlates of medical career indecision were investigated in two separate studies. In the first, the effect of career indecision on academic performance was examined in a group of ninety-eight (eighty male, eighteen female) medical students entering Texas Tech University School of Medicine over a 2-year period. These medical students voluntarily completed the Medical Specialty Preference Inventory (MSPI) as part of a routine preadmission test battery. Subjects were assigned to one of three conditions-decided, high-interest undecided and low-interest undecided--based on results from the MSPI. As predicted, 'low-interest undecided' students achieved significantly lower initial medical school grades relative to 'decided' students, whereas 'high-interest undecided' students did not differ from the 'decided' students. The second study investigated the influence of career indecision upon personality. Subjects for this study were eighty-eight (sixty-six male, twenty-two female) medical students entering Texas Tech University School of Medicine over a 1-year period. These students voluntarily completed the MSPI and several personality measures as part of a pre-admission test battery. The results only partially supported the stated hypotheses. Although 'low-interest undecided' students demonstrated less personal integration compared with 'decided' students, they were no more anxious.

  10. Experiences Teaching Stoichiometry to Students in Grades 10 and 11

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridges, Cynthia Denise

    Many students have problems learning stoichiometry, a complex mathematical chemistry concept used to determine how much product will be produced or formed from a given quantity of reactants. The problem addressed in this study was teachers' lack of understanding of how to teach stoichiometry in a Midwestern urban school district. The conceptual framework of the study was based upon constructivist theory. A qualitative narrative approach was used to obtain the perceptions of 5 high school chemistry instructors related to their experiences, successful or unsuccessful, in teaching stoichiometry to students in Grades 10 and 11. Data were gathered through face-to-face interviews, which were analyzed via an inductive approach to reveal 6 themes: a difficult subject to teach, presentation of stoichiometry, relevancy, students' reactions, barriers, and gender differences. Findings suggested the need for teachers to be knowledgeable, creative, and resourceful in their subject areas to help their students to learn stoichiometry. Findings also revealed the need for teachers to adapt their instructional strategies and modes of delivery to reflect their students' individual learning styles. Understanding how the participating teachers explained stoichiometry to their students might help other chemistry teachers to examine and adapt their own instructional styles and delivery methods of the concept. This understanding might, in term, help to improve student achievement in stoichiometry in particular and chemistry in general.

  11. Medical Students Teaching Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation to Middle School Brazilian Students

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Lucas Gaspar; Germano, Rafael; Menezes, Pedro Lugarinho; Schmidt, André; Pazin-Filho, Antônio

    2013-01-01

    Background Diseases of the circulatory system are the most common cause of death in Brazil. Because the general population is often the first to identify problems related to the circulatory system, it is important that they are trained. However, training is challenging owing to the number of persons to be trained and the maintenance of training. Objectives To assess the delivery of a medical-student led cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training program and to assess prior knowledge of CPR as well as immediate and delayed retention of CPR training among middle school students. Methods Two public and two private schools were selected. CPR training consisted of a video class followed by practice on manikins that was supervised by medical students. Multiple choice questionnaires were provided before, immediately after, and at 6 months after CPR training. The questions were related to general knowledge, the sequence of procedures, and the method to administer each component (ventilation, chest compression, and automated external defibrillation). The instructors met in a focus group after the sessions to identify the potential problems faced. Results In total, 147 students completed the 6-month follow-up. The public school students had a lower prior knowledge, but this difference disappeared immediately after training. After the 6-month follow-up period, these public school students demonstrated lower retention. The main problem faced was teaching mouth-to-mouth resuscitation. Conclusions The method used by medical students to teach middle school students was based on the watch-and-practice technique. This method was effective in achieving both immediate and late retention of acquired knowledge. The greater retention of knowledge among private school students may reflect cultural factors. (Arq Bras Cardiol. 2013;101(4):328-335) PMID:23949324

  12. Reducing Test Anxiety among Third Grade Students through the Implementation of Relaxation Techniques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Heidi A.; El Ramahi, Mera K.; Conn, Steven R.; Estes, Lincoln A.; Ghibellini, Amanda B.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to reduce the negative effects that self-perceived levels of test anxiety have on third-grade students. The participants in this study consisted of 177 third-grade students at two Midwestern public elementary schools. Students at one school were taught relaxation techniques, while students at the second school served…

  13. Grade Inflation under the Threat of Students' Nuisance: Theory and Evidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iris Franz, Wan-Ju

    2010-01-01

    This study examines a channel, students' nuisance, to explain grade inflation. "Students' nuisance" is defined by "students' pestering the professors for better grades." This paper contains two parts: the game theoretic model and the empirical tests. The model shows that the potential threat of students' nuisance can induce the professors to…

  14. Producing a Documentary in the Third Grade: Reaching All Students through Movie Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fehn, Bruce; Heckart, Kimberly

    2013-01-01

    This article details the work of third grade teacher, co-author Kim Heckart, as she engaged her students in making historical documentaries: a project that succeeded in reaching all of her third-grade students. For the last five years, Kim has required students to make historical documentaries. As her students produced these works, Kim conversed…

  15. Effects of Information and Communication Technology on Engagement and Art Production for Eighth-Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lovin, Elizabeth; Lambeth, Dawn T.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to explore the impact of an online-learning component incorporating peer discussion groups on art achievement, digital literacy practice, student engagement, and student attitude of an eighth-grade visual arts classroom. Participants included 30 students in two 8th-grade art classes. Students in one class received…

  16. Middle Grades Students' Situation Definitions: Development of a Knowledge-Linking Inventory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuh, Kathy L.; Kuo, Yi-Lung; Knupp, Tawnya L.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop the Student Knowledge Linking Instrument (SKLI), an inventory for middle grades students that seeks to understand student knowledge construction processes. This study included 461 fifth and sixth grade students and follows from a series of qualitative studies that were used as a foundation for development…

  17. Ninth Grade Student Responses to Authentic Science Instruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellison, Michael Steven

    This mixed methods case study documents an effort to implement authentic science and engineering instruction in one teacher's ninth grade science classrooms in a science-focused public school. The research framework and methodology is a derivative of work developed and reported by Newmann and others (Newmann & Associates, 1996). Based on a working definition of authenticity, data were collected for eight months on the authenticity in the experienced teacher's pedagogy and in student performance. Authenticity was defined as the degree to which a classroom lesson, an assessment task, or an example of student performance demonstrates construction of knowledge through use of the meaning-making processes of science and engineering, and has some value to students beyond demonstrating success in school (Wehlage et al., 1996). Instruments adapted for this study produced a rich description of the authenticity of the teacher's instruction and student performance. The pedagogical practices of the classroom teacher were measured as moderately authentic on average. However, the authenticity model revealed the teacher's strategy of interspersing relatively low authenticity instructional units focused on building science knowledge with much higher authenticity tasks requiring students to apply these concepts and skills. The authenticity of the construction of knowledge and science meaning-making processes components of authentic pedagogy were found to be greater, than the authenticity of affordances for students to find value in classroom activities beyond demonstrating success in school. Instruction frequently included one aspect of value beyond school, connections to the world outside the classroom, but students were infrequently afforded the opportunity to present their classwork to audiences beyond the teacher. When the science instruction in the case was measured to afford a greater level of authentic intellectual work, a higher level of authentic student performance on

  18. Traditional Criteria as Predictors of Minority Student Success in Medical School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Doris A.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    A study of the relationship between the Medical College Admissions Test (MCAT), grade point average (GPA), the quality of undergraduate college attended (Austin index) and the preclinical performance of underrepresented minority students at Case Western Reserve University of Medicine showed all three to have predictive value, the Austin index…

  19. Evaluation of a Basic Science, Peer Tutorial Program for First- and Second-Year Medical Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trevino, Fernando M.; Eiland, D. C., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    A peer tutorial program in the basic sciences implemented at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston is evaluated. The grades of students receiving peer tutorials were analyzed and questionnaires were mailed to each participant soliciting their evaluation of services received. Future cost-benefit evaluations are planned. (Author/MLW)

  20. Do Students Who Get Low Grades Only in Research Methods Need the Same Help as Students Who Get Low Grades in All Topics in Psychology?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barry, John A.

    2012-01-01

    Some psychology students achieve high grades in all classes except for research methods (RM). Previous research has usually treated low levels of achievement in RM as a unitary phenomenon, without reference to the grades the student is achieving in other subjects. The present internet survey explored preferences for learning RM in 140 psychology…

  1. When Patients Decline Medical Student Participation: The Preceptors' Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tang, Tricia S.; Skye, Eric P.

    2009-01-01

    Patients' receptivity towards medical student participation has been examined predominantly from the patient and/or the medical student perspective. Few studies have investigated the preceptor's perspective. The study examined preceptors' experience with patients declining medical student participation in clinical care and identified…

  2. Promoting Medical Students' Ethical Development: A Resource Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bickel, Janet

    This guide compiles information reported by medical schools on their efforts to help students develop a sound code of professional ethics. The introduction opens with background information on an Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) 1992 survey of medical schools and on why it is imperative that schools assist medical students' ethical…

  3. Seventh-grade students at-risk for school failure.

    PubMed

    Stevens, R; Pihl, R O

    1987-01-01

    This study was designed to assess the effects of failure on the subsequent test performance in school of young adolescents. Fifty-one seventh-grade students, identified as at-risk for future school failure, were compared to 51 randomly selected classmates on individually administered measures of intelligence, self-concept, problem-solving ability, coping ability, attribution, and locus of control. Teachers' ratings, mathematics ability, and grades of the two groups were also compared. Students with a history of school failure, although of normal intelligence, were found to be significantly less intellectually, academically, and affectively competent than their more successful peers and were rated by their teachers as significantly less able to deal adaptively with normal school stress. A discriminant analysis separated the groups with 93% accuracy. On two equivalent mathematics tests, one given under relaxed conditions, and the other under normal school test-like conditions, approximately thirty percent of both the at-risk and the otherwise normal students got lower scores when they thought they were taking a test. Implications of these results for the understanding and remediation of stress-depressed school performance are discussed.

  4. An Investigation of the Sustained Effects of Reading Recovery ® on Economically Disadvantaged Fifth Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redding, Larry R.

    2012-01-01

    This study explored the long-term benefits of the Reading Recovery ® program for economically disadvantaged students who were successfully discontinued after the first grade. The hypothesis was tested that students exiting first grade with grade-level reading abilities and with similar low socio-economic status (economically disadvantaged), who…

  5. Discrimination against Students with Foreign Backgrounds: Evidence from Grading in Swedish Public High Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinnerich, Bjorn Tyrefors; Höglin, Erik; Johannesson, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    We rigorously test for discrimination against students with foreign backgrounds in high school grading in Sweden. We analyse a random sample of national tests in the Swedish language graded both non-blindly by the student's own teacher and blindly without any identifying information. The increase in the test score due to non-blind grading is…

  6. Profiles of Teacher Grading Practices: Integrating Teacher Beliefs, Course Criteria, and Student Characteristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiley, Caroline Rose Hummel

    2011-01-01

    The majority of the research on grading practices thus far examines teachers' perceived grading practices through Likert-type surveys and vignettes regarding generic students. This study is unique because it proposes a more systematic method of qualitative inquiry to examine how teachers perceive grading on an individual student basis by asking…

  7. Effects of Intensive Reading Intervention for Eighth-Grade Students with Persistently Inadequate Response to Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaughn, Sharon; Wexler, Jade; Leroux, Audrey; Roberts, Greg; Denton, Carolyn; Barth, Amy; Fletcher, Jack

    2012-01-01

    The authors report the effects of a yearlong, very small-group, intensive reading intervention for eighth-grade students with serious reading difficulties who had demonstrated low response to intervention (RTI) in both Grades 6 and 7. At the beginning of Grade 6, a cohort of students identified as having reading difficulties were randomized to…

  8. Positive and Negative Incentives in the Classroom: An Analysis of Grading Systems and Student Motivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Docan, Tony N.

    2006-01-01

    This study examined how particular grading systems motivate students. Since competency-based grading and point systems are most prevalent (Hendrickson and Gable, 1999), the current study is modeled around these systems. The grading systems used for this study were divided into two categories and defined as those students who earned their grades…

  9. Understanding intercultural transitions of medical students

    PubMed Central

    Mansour, Nasser; Fisher, Ros

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this research was to explore the transition of medical students to an international branch campus of a medical university established in Bahrain. Methods In order to gain insights into this transition, we explored two culturally diverse systems of learning of the university and the local schools in Bahrain, using Communities of Practice as a lens for understanding transitions. Focus groups were conducted with secondary school teachers and first year medical students. Additionally, semi-structured interviews were conducted with university lecturers.   Results The findings suggest that, while Communities of Practice have been influential in contextualising transitions to university, this model does not seem to help us to fully understand intercultural transitions to the case-study university. Conclusions The research emphasises that more attention should be given to learner individual agency within this theory as a framework for understanding transitions. It also challenges approaches within medical education that attempt to standardise systems of learning through acquisition of established practices. PMID:25725207

  10. Emotional intelligence scale for medical students

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Kalpana; Joshi, Saumya; Raichaudhuri, Arkojyoti; Ryali, VSSR; Bhat, P. S.; Shashikumar, R.; Prakash, J.; Basannar, D.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Emotional Intelligence has been associated with positive outcome process in varied professions. There is paucity of Indian literature on the subject; especially involving medical undergraduates; and presently there is no scale available to measure the same in the Indian scenario. Objective: To develop a scale to measure Emotional Intelligence among medical undergraduates. Materials and Methods: Four domains of Emotional intelligence were selected, viz. Self-Awareness, Self-Management, Social-Awareness & Social-Skills and these were included for the purpose of domains of the scale. On the basis of focused group discussions and in-depth deliberations with experts, undergraduate and postgraduate medical students a pool of 50 items was generated. The items were reduced to 27 based on expert consensus and on the basis of frequency of endorsement by expert reviews. It was followed by a pilot study of 50 undergraduates. This completed the preparation of the preliminary draft based on content analysis. The questionnaire was then administered in 480 students and the data was analyzed by appropriate statistical methods. For the purpose of concurrent validity, emotional intelligence scale developed by Dr. Ekta was used. Results: The Cronbach's Alpha for Internal Consistency Reliability was 0.68. The EIS had a significant correlation with social awareness domain of Emotional Intelligence Test (EIT) establishing Concurrent Validity. Conclusion: Emotional Intelligence Scale for medical undergraduates was constructed. Reliability and concurrent validity were also established for the same. PMID:22969179

  11. Clinical validation of a medical grade color monitor for chest radiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, J.; Zanca, F.; Verschakelen, J.; Marchal, G.; Bosmans, H.

    2009-02-01

    Until recently, the specifications of medical grade monochrome LCD monitors outperformed those of color LCD monitors. New generations of color LCD monitors, however, show specifications that are in many respects similar to those of monochrome monitors typically used in diagnostic workstations. The aim of present study was to evaluate the impact of different medical grade monitors in terms of detection of simulated lung nodules in chest x-ray images. Specifically, we wanted to compare a new medical grade color monitor (Barco Coronis 6MP color) to a medical grade grayscale monitor (Barco Coronis 3MP monochrome) and a consumer color monitor (Philips 200VW 1.7MP color) by means of an observer performance experiment. Using the free-response acquisition data paradigm, seven radiologists were asked to detect and locate lung nodules (170 in total), simulated in half of the 200 chest X-ray images used in the experiment. The jackknife free-response receiver operating characteristic (JAFROC) analysis of the data showed a statistically significant difference between at least two monitors, F-value=3.77 and p-value =0.0481. The different Figure of Merit values were 0.727, 0.723 and 0.697 for the new color LCD monitor, the medical grade monitor and the consumer color monitor respectively. There was no difference between the needed reading times but there was a difference between the mean calculated Euclidian distances between the position marked by the observers and the center of the simulated nodule, indicating a better accuracy with both medical grade monitors. Present data suggests that the new generation of medical grade color monitors could be used as diagnostic workstations.

  12. Exploring Health Literacy in Medical University Students of Chongqing, China: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Ping; Huang, Wenjie; Lu, Lu; Bai, Ruixue; Sharma, Manoj; Zhao, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Health literacy is important in public health and healthcare, particularly in effective communication between patients and health professionals. Although most medical students will eventually work as health professionals after graduation, research on health literacy of medical students is scarce. This study aimed to assess the health literacy level of medical students in Chongqing, China, and its influencing factors. A cross-sectional study was conducted and 1,275 participants (250 males and 1,022 females) who majored in five different disciplines were involved. The Health Literacy Questionnaire was used as the survey tool. The junior students obtained the highest scores, whereas the freshman students had the lowest scores on each scale. The average score of males was higher than that of females except in “feeling understood and supported by healthcare providers,” and the average score of students who reside in urban areas was higher than that of students in rural areas. Moreover, the average score of engineering students was higher than that of medical or health sciences students. Multiple linear regression models (Radj2 = 0.435, P = 0.000) showed that the grade, socioeconomic status, and parent’s highest level of education were positively correlated with health literacy. In conclusion, the health literacy levels of the medical students are insufficient and need improvement. PMID:27050169

  13. The Effects of Grade Level and Other Factors on the Achievement in Project Physics among High School Physics Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fletcher, Richard Kenard, Jr.

    This study was designed to determine experimentally the relationship between achievement and grade level for 64 tenth-grade students, 48 eleventh-grade students, and 95 twelfth-grade physics students. All students were enrolled in the Project Physics course in their respective schools. The Physics Achievement Test (PAT) and the algebra I and II…

  14. Attitudes of Medical Graduate and Undergraduate Students toward the Learning and Application of Medical Statistics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Yazhou; Zhang, Ling; Liu, Ling; Zhang, Yanqi; Liu, Xiaoyu; Yi, Dong

    2015-01-01

    It is clear that the teaching of medical statistics needs to be improved, yet areas for priority are unclear as medical students' learning and application of statistics at different levels is not well known. Our goal is to assess the attitudes of medical students toward the learning and application of medical statistics, and discover their…

  15. Medical Student Attitudes about Mental Illness: Does Medical-School Education Reduce Stigma?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korszun, Ania; Dinos, Sokratis; Ahmed, Kamran; Bhui, Kamaldeep

    2012-01-01

    Background: Reducing stigma associated with mental illness is an important aim of medical education, yet evidence indicates that medical students' attitudes toward patients with mental health problems deteriorate as they progress through medical school. Objectives: Authors examined medical students' attitudes to mental illness, as compared with…

  16. A student-initiated and student-facilitated international health elective for preclinical medical students

    PubMed Central

    Vora, Nirali; Chang, Mina; Pandya, Hemang; Hasham, Aliya; Lazarus, Cathy

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Global health education is becoming more important for developing well-rounded physicians and may encourage students toward a career in primary care. Many medical schools, however, lack adequate and structured opportunities for students beginning the curriculum. Methods Second-year medical students initiated, designed, and facilitated a pass–fail international health elective, providing a curricular framework for preclinical medical students wishing to gain exposure to the clinical and cultural practices of a developing country. Results All course participants (N=30) completed a post-travel questionnaire within one week of sharing their experiences. Screening reflection essays for common themes that fulfill university core competencies yielded specific global health learning outcomes, including analysis of health care determinants. Conclusion Medical students successfully implemented a sustainable global health curriculum for preclinical student peers. Financial constraints, language, and organizational burdens limit student participation. In future, long-term studies should analyze career impact and benefits to the host country. PMID:20186283

  17. Impact of a prior medical degree on students' dental school performance in Innsbruck, Austria.

    PubMed

    Beier, Ulrike Stephanie; Kapferer, Ines; Burtscher, Doris; Ulmer, Hanno; Dumfahrt, Herbert

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the performance differences between two groups of Austrian dental students (one with a prior medical degree and one without a medical degree) during their dental school training and final dental licensure examination. A specific aim was to determine if having a medical degree is a predictive factor for dental students' scores on the Austrian Dental Admission Test (Austrian DAT), performance in the dental clinic, and scores on final exam. The study consisted of a retrospective analysis of 122 students (thirty-nine with a medical degree and eighty-three without a medical degree) who were enrolled in the Dental Clinic at Innsbruck Medical University, Innsbruck, Austria, between 2001 and 2006. Three performance categories were considered: Austrian DAT results, clinical performance after the first clinical year in dental school, and performance on the final dental licensure examination. Information on students' age, gender, and previous medical degree was collected from official records. Analyses with student's t-test and Pearson's chi-square test revealed that the students with a medical degree had significantly higher Austrian DAT total test scores, grade point averages after the first clinical year, and scores on the final exam. Additionally, those students had significantly better performance on the final exam in prosthodontics and oral and maxillofacial surgery. The linear regression analysis showed that a medical degree had an independent effect on average scores on the final exam, age, and Austrian DAT test scores, while gender showed no statistically significant effect. Overall, the study found that dental students with a prior medical degree had significantly higher Austrian DAT total test scores and performed significantly better in the first clinical year and on the final exam than those without a prior medical degree.

  18. Causal Factors Influencing Adversity Quotient of Twelfth Grade and Third-Year Vocational Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pangma, Rachapoom; Tayraukham, Sombat; Nuangchalerm, Prasart

    2009-01-01

    Problem statement: The aim of this research was to study the causal factors influencing students' adversity between twelfth grade and third-year vocational students in Sisaket province, Thailand. Six hundred and seventy two of twelfth grade and 376 third-year vocational students were selected by multi-stage random sampling techniques. Approach:…

  19. Summer Activities of Students Enrolled in Grades 1-12. Indicator of the Month.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education Statistics (ED), Washington, DC.

    Students engage in a variety of activities during their summer vacations that provide them with educational opportunities. In the summer of 1996, 9% of students in grades 1 through 12 attended summer school, and 38% participated in other organized summer activities. Among the students who were enrolled in grades 8 through 12, 26% worked for pay…

  20. The Analysis of Reading Skills and Visual Perception Levels of First Grade Turkish Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Memis, Aysel; Sivri, Diler Ayvaz

    2016-01-01

    In this study, primary school first grade students' reading skills and visual perception levels were investigated. Sample of the study, which was designed with relational scanning model, consisted of 168 first grade students studying at three public primary schools in Kozlu, Zonguldak, in 2013-2014 education year. Students' reading level, reading…

  1. The Effects of Repeated Readings on Third Grade Students' Reading Achievement and Attitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheriff, Tennille Joie Natasha

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of a reading strategy, repeated readings, on third grade students' reading achievement and attitudes. One hundred sixteen third grade students as members of six classrooms in one elementary school participated in this 10 week study. Using a quasi-experimental pretest posttest design, students' mean…

  2. Relationship between Legible Handwriting and Level of Success of Third Grade Students in Written Expression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bayat, Seher; Küçükayar, Hasan

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to identify third-grade students' performance levels for written expression and handwriting and to find the relationship between these performances. The study is based on relational screening model. It is carried out with 110 third grade students. Students' levels of success in handwriting and in written expression are evaluated…

  3. The Effectiveness of the New 9th Grade Biology Curriculum on Students' Environmental Awareness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cetin, Gulcan; Nisanci, Seda Hilal

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effectiveness of a new 9th grade biology curriculum on students' environmental awareness. Participants included 91 ninth grade students in a high school in Balikesir during the spring semester of the 2008-2009 academic years. Two classrooms, including 22 and 24 students respectively, were randomly assigned…

  4. Technical Assistance Paper: Third-Grade Student Progression. DPS: 2013-56

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida Department of Education, 2013

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this Technical Assistance Paper (TAP) is to provide school districts with updates and changes relative to third-grade student progression policies, including information on alternative assessments, promotion criteria and resources. This paper provides: (1) General Information; (2) Student Portfolios for Third-Grade Students; (3)…

  5. The Impact of Computer-Assisted Instruction on Mathematics Achievement of Underachieving Fifth-Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruce-Simmons, Christine

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the impact of computer-assisted instruction on the mathematics performance of underachieving fifth-grade students in a rural school district in South Carolina. The instructional technology program ([IF) is South Carolina's response to addressing the needs of its young, struggling math students. The 449 fifth-grade students in…

  6. Effect of Pullout Lessons on the Academic Achievement of Eighth-Grade Band Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hash, Phillip M.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the effect of pullout instrumental lessons on the academic achievement of eighth-grade band students. Participants (N = 353) included 292 nonband students and 61 band students pulled once per week for music lessons in a single suburban K-8 school district in Midwestern United States. Data indicated that eighth-grade band…

  7. The Effects of Cooperative Learning Strategies on Vocabulary Skills of 4th Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bilen, Didem; Tavil, Zekiye Müge

    2015-01-01

    This study was carried out to investigate the effects of cooperative learning strategies on the vocabulary skills of 4th grade students. The study was also designed to ascertain the attitudes of the students in the experimental group towards cooperative learning. Out of 96 4th grade students enrolled in the private school where the study took…

  8. iPad Use in Seventh Grade Math: Parent and Student Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corbett, Robin

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative research study was to compare student and parental perceptions of mobile technology use, specifically iPads, in seventh grade math classrooms and at home. How students and parents perceive the use of iPads within the seventh grade math classroom and how students and parents perceive the influence of iPad use at home…

  9. Sensory Response Patterns of Academically Successful and Unsuccessful Ninth-grade Students of English.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaRocque, Geraldine E.

    Testing Marshall McLuhan's thesis that the educational system favors the visually oriented student and militates against the audile-tactile youngster, this pilot study attempted to discover whether or not academically successful ninth-grade English students have a different sensory response pattern than unsuccessful ninth-grade English students.…

  10. The effects of supplemental online learning aids on student performance and student engagement in Medical Microbiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Kimberly

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of online learning aids on student performance and engagement. The thirty-five participants of the current study were students enrolled in two sections of a junior level Medical Microbiology laboratory. The experimental section was required to spend ten minutes each week on an online learning aid. The online program, StudyMate(TM), was used to present text and images in the form of flash cards, multiple choice questions, matching, and crossword puzzles. Both groups completed the Index of Learning Style survey, an initial engagement survey at the start of the course, and a final engagement survey at the end of the course. Statistical analysis showed no significant differences between the groups at the start of the course or after the course was completed for learning style, science grade point average, overall grade point average, initial engagement or final engagement. A moderate correlation was found between microbiology course and laboratory grades and a reflective learning style.

  11. Influencing factors of mental health of medical students in China.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; Meng, Heng; Chen, Hui; Xu, Xin-hao; Liu, Zhuo; Luo, Ai; Feng, Zhan-chun

    2014-06-01

    This study investigated the mental health status of medical students in China, and analyzed the influencing factors in order to provide evidence for mental health education for medical students. A stratified cluster sampling method was used to recruit medical students from Huazhong University of Science and Technology, China. The questionnaire survey on general information and Symptom Checklist 90 (SCL-90) were used for investigation and analysis. The results showed among the 1137 valid questionnaires, 278 (24.45%) participants had SCL-90 score ≥ 160. The top three mental problems of medical students were obsessive-compulsive disorder, interpersonal sensitivity and depression in terms of the factor score ≥ 2.5 and the number of participants who reflected on the diseases. The third-year medical students had the worst mental health status, and fifth-year medical students had the best mental health status. Students from rural area had more psychological problems than those from urban area; furthermore, students with high professional satisfaction, those who were the single child of the family, non-poor students, and those whose parents had high education level had better mental health status. It was concluded that the mental health of medical students is not optimistic in China. Medical students have some mental health problems of different degrees. Factors that influence the mental health of medical students include academic pressure, professional satisfaction level and family environment.

  12. [A preliminary exploration into medical genetics teaching to international students].

    PubMed

    Chen, Cao-Yi; Zhao, Xiang-Qiang; Xie, Xiao-Ling; Tan, Xiang-Ling

    2008-12-01

    Medical education to international students has become an important part of higher education in China. Medical genetics is an essential and required course for international medical students. However, the internationalization of higher education in China has challenged the traditional teaching style of medical genetics. In this article, we discussed current situation and challenges in medical genetics teaching to international students, summarized special features and problems we encountered in teaching Indian students, and proposed some practical strategies to address these challenges and to improve the teaching.

  13. Evaluating and Grading Students in Large-Scale Image Processing Courses.

    PubMed

    Artner, Nicole M; Janusch, Ines; Kropatsch, Walter G

    2015-01-01

    In undergraduate practical courses, it is common to work with groups of 100 or more students. These large-scale courses bring their own challenges. For example, course problems are too small and lack "the big picture"; grading becomes burdensome and repetitive for the teaching staff; and it is difficult to detect cheating. Based on their experience with a traditional large-scale practical course in image processing, the authors developed a novel course approach to teaching "Introduction to Digital Image Processing" (or EDBV, from the German course title Einführung in die Digitale Bild-Verarbeitung) for all undergraduate students of media informatics and visual computing and medical informatics at the TU Wien.

  14. Attitudes of Dental and Medical Students toward Death and Dying.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sundin, Robert H.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Explores attitudes of dental and medical students toward death and dying. Attitudes toward death influencing choice between dental school and medical school are latent. Attitudes of dental and medical students toward death may be differentially affected by their professional experiences. (Author/BEF)

  15. Child Psychiatry: What Are We Teaching Medical Students?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dingle, Arden D.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The author describes child and adolescent psychiatry (CAP) undergraduate teaching in American and Canadian medical schools. Methods: A survey asking for information on CAP teaching, student interest in CAP, and opinions about the CAP importance was sent to the medical student psychiatry director at 142 accredited medical schools in the…

  16. Willingness of Medical Students for Hepatitis B & C Screening

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahmad, Iftikhar; Mahsud, Muhammad Amin Jan; Hussain, Javed; Khan, Muhammad Hussain; Khan, Habibullah; Noman, Nargis; Rabi, Fazle, Din, Siraj ud

    2010-01-01

    Background: Health care workers including medical students are vulnerable to hepatitis B & C virus infections. The objective of this study was to determine the level of willingness for screening among medical students. Methodology: This cross-sectional survey was carried out at Gomal Medical College, Dera Ismail Khan from 1st April 2010 to 15…

  17. Students' Views on Factors Affecting Empathy in Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winseman, Jeffrey; Malik, Abid; Morison, Julie; Balkoski, Victoria

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Empathy is a prominent goal of medical education that is too often underachieved. Using concept mapping, the authors constructed a student-generated conceptual model of factors viewed as affecting empathy during medical education. Methods: During the 2005-2006 academic year, 293 medical students and interns answered a brainstorming…

  18. Investigating the scientific creativity of fifth-grade students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, Ahmed

    Previous research on the scientific creativity of children has been limited. The most salient limitations of previous literature have been: (a) narrowness of theoretical frameworks, (b) limitedness in using a variety of science process skills, (c) ignorance of the gender differences in scientific creativity, and (d) ignorance of elementary school students. The purpose of this study was to develop and validate the Scientific Creativity Test for fifth-grade students to identify scientific creativity in those students. A related purpose was to investigate the gender differences in scientific creativity. The Scientific Creativity Test consisted of three subtests: Problems and Solutions, Grouping of Flowers, and Design an Experiment. The test was administered to 138 fifth-grade students from six different elementary schools. The reliability analysis showed that the Scientific Creativity Test had a .89 coefficient as a consistency of scores. The concurrent validity analysis indicated that the Scientific Creativity Test had medium correlations with Teachers' Ratings of students' Scientific Ability (r = .42), Science Content Knowledge (r = .42), and Scientific Creativity (r = .51). The interrater reliability of the three items rated by two independent raters [1C (designing a construction about a solution), 2D (drawing a diagram about the relationships among the groups of flowers), and 3B (drawing an experiment to develop a solution for the environmental problem)], using the Consensual Assessment Technique showed medium to high correlations. The General Linear Modeling (GLM) Repeated Measures Two-Way Analysis of Variance indicated no overall significant differences between males and females. An interaction effect, however, was found. Females performed better than males in Subtest II (Grouping of Flowers) and slightly better in Subtest III (Design an Experiment). The analysis using the independent-samples t test indicated no significant differences between females and males

  19. Enhancing Fourth Grade Students' Writing Achievement through Purposeful Experiential Learning: An Action Research Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McManus, Michael S.; Thiamwong, Ladda

    2015-01-01

    This study focuses on the effects of involving fourth grade students in an experiential learning task that improves the school and requires the students to call on community agency, area business, and high school student support. Data related to students' learning were collected by using evaluative writing surveys, student and parent conferences,…

  20. Survey of Montgomery County Public School Eleventh Grade High School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, William E.; Hemenway, David A.

    In spring 1984, a survey was conducted by Montgomery College (MC) to ascertain the postsecondary educational goals of Montgomery County Public School (MCPS) 11th grade students; to understand students' perceptions of MC; to identify the criteria students use in college selection; and to assess the needs of entering students. Students at 18 of the…

  1. Student Perceptions of the First Year of Veterinary Medical School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, Donald E.

    2002-01-01

    A brief survey was conducted of nearly 900 first-year students in 14 U.S. veterinary medical schools in order to gather impressions of the first year of veterinary medical education. Although some students reported that conditions were stressful, the majority did not feel that they were inordinately so. Overall, most students were quite positive…

  2. The Effects of Training Medical Students in Motivational Interviewing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Opheim, Arild; Andreasson, Sven; Eklund, Astri Brandell; Prescott, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To explore the effects of brief training in Motivational interviewing (MI) for medical students. Design: Video recordings of consultations between 113 final-year medical students and simulated patients were scored blind by two independent raters with the Motivational Interviewing Skill Code (MISC). Half of the students participated in a…

  3. Student Attitudes toward a Medical School Honor Code.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, C. Michael; And Others

    1981-01-01

    A survey to determine medical student perceptions of an honor code and the attitudes of medical students toward personal adherence to the provisions of an honor code at the University of Alabama School of Medicine is presented. Support was compromised by the reluctance of students to report suspected violations. (MLW)

  4. Medical Student Response to a Class Lipid-Screening Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lum, Gifford; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Medical students at the State University of New York's Downstate Medical Center initiated and carried out a voluntary project to screen lipids (cholesterol) to identify known coronary risk factors. The incidence of coronary disease factors among these students and the response of students with high cholesterol levels are reported. (Authors/PP)

  5. Non-Medical Prescription Drug Use among University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vidourek, Rebecca A.; King, Keith A.; Knopf, Ellen E.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Non-medical prescription drug use is an increasing problem among university students. Purpose: The present study investigated university students' involvement in non-medical prescription drug (NMPD) use and associations between use and other risky behaviors. Methods: A sample of 363 university students completed a four page survey…

  6. Middle Grades and High Schools Use Effective Strategies to Prepare Students for Challenging High School Studies. High Schools That Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board (SREB), 2011

    2011-01-01

    Middle grades schools have their hands full in working with elementary schools and high schools to improve the likelihood of success for middle grades students--accelerating learning, helping elementary students move seamlessly into the middle grades, preparing middle grades students for rigorous high school courses, changing organization and…

  7. Compatibility of Medical-Grade Polymers with Dense CO2

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez, A; Thompson, G L; Matthews, M A; Davis, T A; Crocker, K; Lyons, J S; Trapotsis, A

    2009-01-01

    This study reports the effect of exposure to liquid carbon dioxide on the mechanical properties of selected medical polymers. The tensile strengths and moduli of fourteen polymers are reported. Materials were exposed to liquid CO2, or CO2 + trace amounts of aqueous H2O2, at 6.5 MPa and ambient temperature. Carbon dioxide uptake, swelling, and distortion were observed for the more amorphous polymers while polymers with higher crystallinity showed little effect from CO2 exposure. Changes in tensile strength were not statistically significant for most plastics, and most indicated good tolerance to liquid CO2. These results are relevant to evaluating the potential of liquid CO2-based sterilization technology. PMID:19756235

  8. 'Soft and fluffy': medical students' attitudes towards psychology in medical education.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Stephen; Wallace, Sarah; Nathan, Yoga; McGrath, Deirdre

    2015-01-01

    Psychology is viewed by medical students in a negative light. In order to understand this phenomenon, we interviewed 19 medical students about their experiences of psychology in medical education. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed using thematic analysis. Four main themes were generated: attitudes, teaching culture, curriculum factors and future career path; negative attitudes were transmitted by teachers to students and psychology was associated with students opting for a career in general practice. In summary, appreciation of psychology in medical education will only happen if all educators involved in medical education value and respect each other's speciality and expertise.

  9. Smoothing out transitions: how pedagogy influences medical students' achievement of self-regulated learning goals.

    PubMed

    White, Casey B

    2007-08-01

    Medical school is an academic and developmental path toward a professional life demanding self-regulation and self-education. Thus, many medical schools include in their goals for medical student education their graduates' ability to self-assess and self-regulate their education upon graduation and throughout their professional lives. This study explores links between medical students' use of self-regulated learning as it relates to motivation, autonomy, and control, and how these influenced their experiences in medical school. Subjects were medical students in two distinct medical school environments, "Problem-based learning" and "Traditional." PBL students described a rough transition into medical school, but once they felt comfortable with the autonomy and control PBL gave them, they embraced the independence and responsibility. They found themselves motivated to learning for learning's sake, and able to channel their motivation into effective transitions from the classrooms into the clerkships. Traditional students had a rougher transition from the classrooms to the clerkships. In the first two years they relied on faculty to direct and control learning, and they channeled their motivation toward achieving the highest grade. In the clerkships, they found faculty expected them to be more independent and self-directed than they felt prepared to be, and they struggled to assume responsibility for their learning. Self-regulated learning can help smooth out the transitions through medical school by preparing first and second year students for expectations in the third and fourth years, which can then maximize learning in the clinical milieu, and prepare medical students for a lifetime of learning.

  10. Sleep Disturbances among Medical Students: A Global Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Azad, Muhammad Chanchal; Fraser, Kristin; Rumana, Nahid; Abdullah, Ahmad Faris; Shahana, Nahid; Hanly, Patrick J.; Turin, Tanvir Chowdhury

    2015-01-01

    Medical students carry a large academic load which could potentially contribute to poor sleep quality above and beyond that already experienced by modern society. In this global literature review of the medical students' sleep experience, we find that poor sleep is not only common among medical students, but its prevalence is also higher than in non-medical students and the general population. Several factors including medical students' attitudes, knowledge of sleep, and academic demands have been identified as causative factors, but other potential mechanisms are incompletely understood. A better understanding about the etiology of sleep problems in medical trainees is essential if we hope to improve the overall quality of medical students' lives, including their academic performance. Sleep self-awareness and general knowledge appear insufficient in many studied cohorts, so increasing education for students might be one beneficial intervention. We conclude that there is ample evidence for a high prevalence of the problem, and research in this area should now expand towards initiatives to improve general sleep education for medical students, identify students at risk, and target them with programs to improve sleep. Citation: Azad MC, Fraser K, Rumana N, Abdullah AF, Shahana N, Hanly PJ, Turin TC. Sleep disturbances among medical students: a global perspective. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(1):69–74. PMID:25515274

  11. The Organization of Medical Disorders in the Memories of Medical Students and General Practitioners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bordage, Georges

    The applicability of Rosch and coworkers' concept of prototypes to the mental categorization of medical disorders, and the influence of clinical experience on those memory structures were studied with 100 preclinical medical students and 77 experienced physicians from Quebec, Canada. The third-year medical students were French-speaking and read…

  12. Reducing medication errors: Teaching strategies that increase nursing students' awareness of medication errors and their prevention.

    PubMed

    Latimer, Sharon; Hewitt, Jayne; Stanbrough, Rebecca; McAndrew, Ron

    2017-02-14

    Medication errors are a patient safety and quality of care issue. There is evidence to suggest many undergraduate nursing curricula do not adequately educate students about the factors that contribute to medication errors and possible strategies to prevent them. We designed and developed a suite of teaching strategies that raise students' awareness of medication error producing situations and their prevention.

  13. Vocabulary Learning Strategies of Medical Students at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seddigh, Fatemeh

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the use of vocabulary learning strategies among medical students at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences (SUMS) in Iran as an EFL context. A questionnaire was administered to 120 medical students (53 males, 67 females) to identify; 1) the effective types of vocabulary learning strategies used by the learners and 2)…

  14. The Effects of a Token Economy on First Grade Students Inappropriate Social Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shook, Suzan C.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Studies the effectiveness of a token economy on specific inappropriate social behaviors of three first grade students. Suggests that token economy systems can be very effective in decreasing disruptive behaviors of primary aged students. (MG)

  15. Medical Student Debt: What Perspective Should We Take?

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Since medical education is expensive, healthcare professional students in many countries must take out loans to pay for their studies. The resultant levels of debt have created concerns at both the beginning and the end of undergraduate education. How should medical educators respond to these concerns? If educators are to look at medical education from the perspective of their students who are most in need, then they should think about this. Educators should think about their response when current or prospective students ask them about mitigating the costs of medical education. This may include questions about working during undergraduate studies, the costs of living in different locations, and the availability of bursaries that offer financial aid to students. Medical students should be encouraged to "think like an investor" when making decisions related to their medical education. Senior medical educators should be well placed to advise them in this regard. PMID:26217478

  16. Grading Practice as Valid Measures of Academic Achievement of Secondary Schools Students for National Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiekem, Enwefa

    2015-01-01

    Assigning grades is probably the most important measurement decision that classroom teachers makes. When teachers are provided with some measurement instruction, they still use subjective value judgments when assigning grades to students. This paper therefore, examines the grading practice as valid measures of academic achievement in secondary…

  17. Reducing the Retention Rate among Kindergarten, First, and Second Grade Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turco, Angela

    An intervention project sought to lower the grade retention rates of kindergarten, first-, and second-grade students in one New Jersey school district. During three school years, 1987-1990, the retention rate was 7 percent of the total population of these grades. An exploration of causes identified several possible factors, including: (1) lack of…

  18. Estimating the Impact of Relative Expected Grade on Student Evaluations of Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ewing, Andrew M.

    2012-01-01

    Grade inflation over the past few decades has been a concern for many universities. Course evaluation scores are known to be positively correlated with students' expected grades, and this paper tests whether or not there is an incentive for the instructor to "buy" higher evaluation scores by inflating grades. To test this hypothesis, I…

  19. The Relationship between the Discourse Knowledge and the Writing Performance of Elementary-Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olinghouse, Natalie G.; Graham, Steve

    2009-01-01

    This study examined whether discourse knowledge about various forms of writing predicted young developing writers' (Grade 2 and Grade 4 students) story writing performance once 4 writing (handwriting fluency, spelling, attitude toward writing, advanced planning) and 3 nonwriting (grade, gender, basic reading skills) variables were controlled. It…

  20. Suicidality among medical students – A practical guide for staff members in medical schools

    PubMed Central

    Rau, Thea; Plener, Paul; Kliemann, Andrea; Fegert, Jörg M.; Allroggen, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Although suicidality in medical students is important, few studies dealt with this issue regarding German universities. Our aims were to describe the epidemiology as well as factors leading to suicidality in medical students. Furthermore we wanted to raise awareness for this topic among university employees and show options for handling suicidal crises in students. This manuscript especially aims to address university employees working in direct contact with students (such as student counselors or teachers). PMID:24282451

  1. Students' Conceptions of Underlying Principles in Medical Physiology: An Interview Study of Medical Students' Understanding in a PBL Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fyrenius, Anna; Silen, Charlotte; Wirell, Staffan

    2007-01-01

    Medical physiology is known to be a complex area where students develop significant errors in conceptual understanding. Students' knowledge is often bound to situational descriptions rather than underlying principles. This study explores how medical students discern and process underlying principles in physiology. Indepth interviews, where…

  2. Introduction of a virtual workstation into radiology medical student education.

    PubMed

    Strickland, Colin D; Lowry, Peter A; Petersen, Brian D; Jesse, Mary K

    2015-03-01

    OBJECTIVE. This article describes the creation of a virtual workstation for use by medical students and implementation of that workstation in the reading room. CONCLUSION. A radiology virtual workstation for medical students was created using OsiriX imaging software to authentically simulate the experience of interacting with cases selected to cover important musculoskeletal imaging diagnoses. A workstation that allows the manipulation and interpretation of complete anonymized DICOM images may enhance the educational experience of medical students.

  3. The Relationship between 8th-Grade Students' Parents' Education and Students' Mathematics Achievement: NAEP 2003 and 2013

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klecker, Beverly M.

    2015-01-01

    This study used a secondary analysis of the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) 2003 and 2013 8th grade mathematics scores to explore relationships between parents' education and their eighth-grade students' mathematics achievement. Information from the NAEP database identified parents' educational level and students' eligibility…

  4. Medical Student Attitudes Toward Older Patients: Predictors and Consequences

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-12-18

    Department of Medical Psychology The attitudes of medical students toward older patients were examined using an experimental, between-subjects design...Victoria Wilcox Dissertation submitted to the Faculty of the Department of Medical Psychology Graduate Program of the Uniformed Services...graduate students of the Department of Medical Psychology at USUHS who helped with subject recruitment, pilot testing and other aspects of the study

  5. Uncertainty and opposition of medical students toward assisted death practices.

    PubMed

    Warner, T D; Roberts, L W; Smithpeter, M; Rogers, M; Roberts, B; McCarty, T; Franchini, G; Geppert, C; Obenshain, S S

    2001-08-01

    To explore medical students' views of assisted death practices in patient cases that describe different degrees and types of physical and mental suffering, an anonymous survey was administered to all students at one medical school. Respondents were asked about the acceptability of assisted death activities in five patient vignettes and withdrawal of life support in a sixth vignette. In the vignettes, actions were performed by four possible agents: the medical student personally; a referral physician; physicians in general; or non-physicians. Of 306 medical students, 166 (54%) participated. Respondents expressed opposition or uncertainty about assisted death practices in the five patient cases that illustrated severe forms of suffering which were secondary to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, treatment-resistant depressive and somatoform disorders, antisocial and sexually violent behavior, or AIDS. Students supported the withdrawal of life support in the sixth vignette depicting exceptional futility secondary to AIDS. Students were especially opposed to their own involvement and to the participation of non-physicians in assisted death activities. Differences in views related to sex, religious beliefs, and personal philosophy were found. Medical students do not embrace assisted death practices, although they exhibit tolerance regarding the choices of medical colleagues. How these attributes of medical students will translate into future behaviors toward patients and peers remains uncertain. Medical educators must strive to understand the perspectives of physicians-in-training. Expanded, empirically informed education that is attuned to the attitudes of medical students may be helpful in fulfilling the responsibility of imparting optimal clinical care skills.

  6. Impact of a novel dental school admission test on student performance at Innsbruck Medical University, Austria.

    PubMed

    Beier, Ulrike Stephanie; Kapferer, Ines; Ostermann, Herwig; Staudinger, Roland; Dumfahrt, Herbert

    2010-05-01

    Since the year 2000, prospective dental students at Innsbruck Medical University, Innsbruck, Austria, have undergone both theoretical and practical preadmission exams, called the Dental Admission Test (DAT). The aim of this investigation was to assess the suitability and outcome of this selection practice. Five classes from 2001 to 2005 (N=97; forty-three female, fifty-four male) were retrospectively reviewed. DAT results were compared with student performance, gender, ability to graduate on time, and dropout rates. Furthermore, the influence of a previous medical degree was evaluated. The t-test was used to analyze correlations between the results of the DAT and the following: gender, students who graduated on time, and students who had previously completed a medical degree. Pearson's correlation coefficient (r) was applied to analyze correlations among test scores, age, and students' performance during the first clinical year. Students graduating on time were noted to have significantly better DAT results; students with a previous medical degree showed significantly better grades during their first clinical year. The difference between the performance of male and female applicants on the DAT was not significant. Correlation was found between DAT results and dental school performance (r=-0.462). We conclude that the DAT may reduce dropout rates by excluding applicants unlikely to be successful in practical courses and that DAT scores are a reliable tool to predict student performance during the first clinical year of dental school in Innsbruck.

  7. Middle School Students' Statistical Literacy: Role of Grade Level and Gender

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yolcu, Ayse

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the role of gender and grade level on middle school students' statistical literacy. The study was conducted in the spring semester of the 2012-2013 academic year with 598 middle-school students (grades 6-8) from three public schools in Turkey. The data were collected using the Statistical Literacy Test, developed based on…

  8. Extrinsic Motivators Affecting Fourth-Grade Students' Interest and Enrollment in an Instrumental Music Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vasil, Martina

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate fourth-grade students' extrinsic motivators for joining and continuing in a school instrumental music program. Three research questions were investigated: (a) What extrinsic motivators have influenced fourth-grade students' initial interest and continuing participation in an instrumental music program?…

  9. Investigation of Eighth-Grade Students' Understanding of the Slope of the Linear Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birgin, Osman

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate eighth-grade students' difficulties and misconceptions and their performance of translation between the different representation modes related to the slope of linear functions. The participants were 115 Turkish eighth-grade students in a city in the eastern part of the Black Sea region of Turkey. Data was collected…

  10. Grading New York: Accountability and Student Proficiency in America's Largest School District

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winters, Marcus A.; Cowen, Joshua M.

    2012-01-01

    This article uses a regression discontinuity approach to study the influence of New York City's school grading policy on student math and English language arts (ELA) achievement. We find evidence that students in schools receiving a failing grade realized positive effects in English in the 1st year of sanction, but we find no statistically…

  11. Effects of Story Mapping on Third-Grade Students with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chavez, Jaime N.; Martinez, James; Pienta, Rachel S.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of story mapping on the reading comprehension scores, on-task behaviors, and attitudes of third- -grade students (N = 6) with ADHD. Students' reading grade equivalencies were assessed before and after the study. The teacher-researcher compared two other achievement measures before and during…

  12. The Correlation between the Fourth Grade Students' Level of Functional Literacy and Metacognitive Awareness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Özenç, Emine Gül; Dikici, Hidayet

    2016-01-01

    The present study aims at presenting the relationship between the fourth grade primary school students' level of functional literacy and metacognitive awareness. The study group of the research is made up of 406 fourth grade students attending school during 2015-2016 academic year in Nigde. This study adopts survey model and its data collection…

  13. Determination of the Colour Preferences of 5th Grade Students in Relation to Gender

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uysal, Hüseyin

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to determine the colour preferences of 5th grade students in relation to the concept of gender. The study was conducted with the 19 5th grade students studying at Central District of Bartin Province in 2015 to 2016 academic year. Throughout the research, quantitative research method had been used while survey had…

  14. The Impact of Framing Effect on Student Preferences for University Grading Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Jeffrey K.; Smith, Lisa F.

    2009-01-01

    Kahneman and Tversky's (1979, 2000; Tversky & Kahneman, 1981) work in decision-making was applied to student preferences for grading practices. Undergraduate psychology students (n = 240) were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 framing conditions related to how a university course might be graded: a 100 point system, a percentage system, and an open…

  15. Determination of the Relationship between 8th Grade Students Learning Styles and TIMSS Mathematics Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yilmaz, Gül Kaleli; Koparan, Timur; Hanci, Alper

    2016-01-01

    In this study, it is aimed to determination of the relationship between learning styles and TIMSS mathematics achievements of eighth grade students. Correlational research design that is one of the quantitative research methods, was used in this study. The sample of the research consists of 652 8th grade students 347 are male and 305 are female…

  16. The Influence of Documentary Films on 8th Grade Students' Views about Nature of Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seckin Kapucu, Munise; Cakmakci, Gultekin; Aydogdu, Cemil

    2015-01-01

    This quasi-experimental study aims to investigate the documentary films' influence on 8th grade students' nature of science views. The study's participants were 113 8th grade students from two different schools taught by two different teachers. The study was completed over a 6-week period, during which topics related to "Cell Division and…

  17. Students' Attitudes toward School Chemistry: The Effect of Interaction between Gender and Grade Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belge Can, Hatice

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to investigate the effect of interaction between gender and grade level on secondary school students' attitudes toward chemistry as a school subject. The sample is composed of 197 students across Grades 9 to 11. The Attitude Scale Toward Chemistry, developed by Geban & Ertepinar (1994), is used to collect data.…

  18. Middle Grade Students' Responses to Canadian Realistic Fiction for Young Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latshaw, Jessica L. K.

    1991-01-01

    Student responses to Canadian realistic fiction for young adults were examined for four seventh grade girls and three seventh grade boys. Interview findings support the view that students should have a role in selecting what they read, should talk about reading informally, and should construct representations less influenced by teacher responses.…

  19. Incentives: The Effects on Reading Attitude and Reading Behaviors of Third-Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanfield, Gayle M.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether third grade literacy students who receive incentive rewards as part of their instruction will exhibit significantly higher reading habits and attitudes toward recreational reading than they did before the incentives were introduced. The study examined 19 third grade students with fairly high…

  20. Examination of the Relationship between Eighth Grade Students' Learning Styles and Attitudes towards Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aydin, Bünyamin

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this research is to determine eighth grade students' learning styles and attitudes toward math class and to show the relationship between their learning styles and attitudes toward math class. Sample of the research consists of 100 eighth grade students having education in a school in the Central Anatolia of our country. As data…

  1. A Situative Metaphor for Teacher Learning: The Case of University Tutors Learning to Grade Student Coursework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyd, Pete; Bloxham, Sue

    2014-01-01

    In the continuing concern about academic standards in the higher education sector a great deal of emphasis has been placed on quality assurance procedures rather than on considering how university tutors learn to grade the quality of work produced by students. As part of a larger research project focused on how tutors grade student coursework,…

  2. Grade Inflation and Student Individual Differences as Systematic Bias in Faculty Evaluations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Germain, Marie-Line; Scandura, Terri A.

    2005-01-01

    The media has recently exposed that grade inflation is a concern for higher education in North America. Grade inflation may be due to consumerism by universities that now compete for students. Keeping students happy (and paying) may have been emphasized more than learning. We review the literature on faculty evaluation and present a model that…

  3. Formative Assessment and Increased Student Involvement Increase Grades in an Upper Secondary School Biology Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Granbom, Martin

    2016-01-01

    This study shows that formative methods and increased student participation has a positive influence on learning measured as grades. The study was conducted during the course Biology A in a Swedish Upper Secondary School. The students constructed grade criteria and defined working methods and type of examination within a given topic, Gene…

  4. The Effect of Case-Based Instruction on 10th Grade Students' Understanding of Gas Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yalçinkaya, Eylem; Boz, Yezdan

    2015-01-01

    The main purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of case-based instruction on remedying 10th grade students' alternative conceptions related to gas concepts. 128 tenth grade students from two high schools participated in this study. In each school, one of the classes was randomly assigned as the experimental group and the other…

  5. Comparison of Writing Anxiety and Writing Dispositions of Sixth, Seventh and Eighth Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berk, Rifat Ramazan; Ünal, Emre

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine sixth, seventh and eighth grade students' writing anxiety and dispositions and to examine to what extent they predict each other. The basis of this study is to determine whether writing disposition is the significant predictor of writing anxiety or not and whether students' grade levels and genders are…

  6. Predicting Seventh Grade Students' Engagement in Science by Their Achievement Goals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hidiroglu, Melike; Sungur, Semra

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine how well seventh grade students' engagement in science can be predicted by their achievement goals. For the specified purpose, a correlational research design was utilized. Data were obtained from 153 seventh grade students through administration of Achievement Goal Questionnaire and Engagement Questionnaire.…

  7. Classroom Idea-Sparkers: Grading and Student Learning--Ideas for Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wegwert, Joseph C.

    2012-01-01

    Grading is often seen as a point of conflict with students and, in upper elementary and beyond, with parents. It is a chore that consumes time and saps critical levels of energy better used for creative planning and preparation and face-to-face interactions with students. Grading is sometimes referred to as a "necessary evil," yet many teachers…

  8. Grade Retention and Social Promotion in Texas, 1994-99: Academic Achievement among Elementary School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lorence, Jon; Dworkin, Anthony Gary.; Toenjes, Laurence A.; Hill, Antwanette N.

    2002-01-01

    Although considerable research examines the impact of grade retention on student academic achievement, various shortcomings exhibited across these studies make it difficult to derive any concrete generalizations about the effectiveness of requiring students to repeat a grade. By utilizing data based on a cohort of all low-achieving elementary…

  9. Impact of Leveled Reading Books on the Fluency and Comprehension Levels of First Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seals, Melissa Paige

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this nonequivalent, control group, pretest-posttest design study was to evaluate the effectiveness of leveled book programs on first-grade students' oral reading fluency rates and comprehension levels. This study was conducted over a 10-week time span with four first-grade classes. All of the students in each class were given a…

  10. Effects of Grade Level and Subject on Student Test Score Predictions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnett, Jerrold E.; Hixon, Jon E.

    1997-01-01

    Interviews with elementary students before and after tests in three subjects investigated how grade level and subject affected students' ability to predict test scores. Results found a significant grade-subject area interaction for predictions prior to testing. Posttest predictions differed only slightly from pretest. Prediction accuracy was…

  11. Teachers' Perceptions of Differentiated Learning for At-Risk Second-Grade Students in Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sabb-Cordes, Morelisa L.

    2016-01-01

    Students were performing below grade level in reading, fluency, and comprehension in a suburban school in South Carolina. The purpose of this study was to explore the perceptions of teachers about their preferred differentiated instruction approach (face-to-face vs. computer-based) to meet the needs of at-risk students in 2nd grade. The underlying…

  12. Evaluating Science Education Reform via Fourth-Grade Students' Image of Science Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yilmaz, Hulya; Turkmen, Hakan; Pedersen, Jon E.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate fourth-grade students image of current science teaching by using a Draw-A-Science-Teacher-Test Checklist (DASTT-C), and give a glance whether the new restructured science education reform in Turkey is implemented successfully or not. Fifty-five (34 girls and 21 boys) fourth-grade students from three…

  13. Families of Children with Disabilities: Findings from a National Sample of Eighth-Grade Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodapp, Robert M.; Krasner, Diane V.

    1995-01-01

    Family demographics of 8th-grade students with visual impairments (n=89), hearing impairments (n=105), deafness (n=29), and orthopedic impairments (n=60) were compared to those of 22,368 additional U.S. 8th-grade students. Analysis revealed that families of children with disabilities showed higher percentages of divorce or separation, lower family…

  14. A Comparison of the Functional Reading Levels of Selected Third Grade Students of Varying Reading Abilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodges, Elaine Joy

    The purpose of this study was to compare the results obtained from a cloze test with the results obtained from an informal reading inventory in establishing the functional reading levels of selected third grade students of varying reading abilities. The subjects consisted of 100 third grade students. The following tests are given: the…

  15. Seventh-Grade Students' Understanding of Chemical Reactions: Reflections from an Action Research Interview Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eilks, Ingo; Moellering, Jens; Valanides, Nicos

    2007-01-01

    This paper discusses seventh-grade students' explanations of dissolution and combustion and also identifies their understanding of the differences between physical and chemical changes. A teaching strategy was initially negotiated within an action research group and this strategy was then employed in teaching seventh-grade students. The teaching…

  16. Grade Retention: Elementary Teacher Perceptions for Students with and without Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Renaud, Gia

    2010-01-01

    In this era of education accountability, teachers are looking closely at grade level requirements and assessment of student performance. Grade retention is being considered for both students with and without disabilities if they are not meeting end of the year achievement benchmarks. Although research has shown that retention is not the best…

  17. Healthcare Students' Perceptions of Electronic Feedback through GradeMark®

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watkins, Diane; Dummer, Paul; Hawthorne, Kamila; Cousins, Judy; Emmett, Catherine; Johnson, Mike

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on the findings from a study undertaken to explore students' perceptions of the timeliness, accessibility, consistency, and quality of feedback and grading received electronically. The system used was GradeMark®, an electronic tool available through the plagiarism software provider, Turnitin®. 296 students from the Schools of…

  18. Seventh Grade Students' Problem Solving Success Rates on Proportional Reasoning Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pelen, Mustafa Serkan; Artut, Perihan Dinç

    2016-01-01

    This research was conducted to investigate 7th grade students' problem solving success rates on proportional reasoning problems and whether these success rates change with different problem types. 331 randomly selected students of grade seven participated in this study. A problem test which contains three different types of missing value (direct…

  19. Alcohol Use and the Grades of Middle and High School Students: Does School Choice Have Effects?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, Wesley; Heath, Cary

    2012-01-01

    This article addresses the question of whether youth drinking leads to lower grades for public and private school students. Instrumental variables (IV) regressions are used to investigate differences in the relationship between drinking and grades based on whether students attend a public or private school. The regressions reveal that drinking…

  20. Comparison of Self-Reported and Measured Height and Weight in Eighth-Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrissey, Susan L.; Whetstone, Lauren M.; Cummings, Doyle M.; Owen, Lynda J.

    2006-01-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the relationships between self-reported and measured height, weight, and body mass index (BMI) in a sample of eighth-grade students. The study population consisted of eighth-grade students in eastern North Carolina who completed a cross-sectional survey, self-reported their height and weight, and had their…

  1. Pumsy in Pursuit of Excellence and Self-Concept of Second Grade Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burkholder, Janiece

    This practicum evaluated the effects a self-esteem program, Pumsy in Pursuit of Excellence, which was implemented by the elementary school counselor with second grade students (N=65). Forty-five second grade students comprised the control group. The Pumsy in Pursuit of Excellence Units include: (1) Pumsy Decides; (2) If Only Things Were Different;…

  2. Assessing the Relation between Seventh-Grade Students' Engagement and Mathematical Problem Solving Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lein, Amy E.; Jitendra, Asha K.; Starosta, Kristin M.; Dupuis, Danielle N.; Hughes-Reid, Cheyenne L.; Star, Jon R.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the authors assessed the contribution of engagement (on-task behavior) to the mathematics problem-solving performance of seventh-grade students after accounting for prior mathematics achievement. A subsample of seventh-grade students in four mathematics classrooms (one high-, two average-, and one low-achieving) from a larger…

  3. Medical students as medical educators: opportunities for skill development in the absence of formal training programs.

    PubMed

    Peluso, Michael J; Hafler, Janet P

    2011-09-01

    All physicians, at some point in their career, are responsible for the education of their peers and junior colleagues. Although medical students are expected to develop clinical and research skills in preparation for residency, it is becoming clear that a student should also be expected to develop abilities as a teacher. A handful of institutions have student-as-teacher programs to train medical students in education, but most students graduate from medical school without formal training in this area. When such a program does not exist, medical students can gain experience in education through participation in peer teaching, course design, educational committees, and medical education scholarship. In doing so, they attain important skills in the development, implementation, and evaluation of educational programs. These skills will serve them in their capacity as medical educators as they advance in their careers and gain increasing teaching responsibility as residents, fellows, and attending physicians.

  4. Role of Religiosity in Psychological Well-Being Among Medical and Non-medical Students.

    PubMed

    Saleem, Shemaila; Saleem, Tamkeen

    2016-12-27

    Religion has been generally considered as a protective factor for the psychological health of the people. As many studies have publicized a high prevalence of psychological morbidities among the medical students during their academic stages of medical schools, it is significant to investigate whether religiosity functions as a protective factor, to explore religiosity as a predictor of psychological well-being in a sample of medical students, and to compare the results of medical students as well as non-medical students with respect to religiosity and psychological well-being. The study is carried out in Federal Medical and Dental College and International Islamic University, Islamabad. The present study examined a sample of 120 medical students from Federal Medical and Dental College and 120 non-medical students from International Islamic University, Islamabad. Purposive sampling was used. The respondents completed religious orientation scale and scale of psychological well-being scale along with a demographic data sheet. In order to measure the study variables, linear regression and t test were used. The findings revealed that religiosity is a strong predictor of psychological well-being. Extrinsic and intrinsic religiosity predicts psychological well-being among the students. The results indicated a significant difference in psychological well-being between medical and non-medical students. No significant difference was found in religiosity of medical and non-medical students. The gender differences in religiosity and psychological well-being were found to be insignificant. The results emphasize that psychological well-being is prophesied by religiosity. The present research suggests further investigations and also endows with trends for psychological evaluation, development of religious beliefs, and interventions for augmenting psychological well-being among the medical students.

  5. Research in Medical School: A Survey Evaluating Why Medical Students Take Research Years

    PubMed Central

    Taleghani, Noushafarin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: In recent years, an increasing number of medical students have taken time off during medical school in order to conduct research. Schools and students have invested millions of dollars and thousands of person-years on research projects, but little is known as to why students choose to take this time off. We aim to characterize why students take research years during medical school. Methods: The authors distributed an online survey about research in medical school to students at five medical schools that have highly regarded research programs. Results: 328 students responded to the survey. The most common reasons students take years off for research are: “increase competitiveness for residency application” (32%), “time to pursue other opportunities” (24%), and “academic interest” (23%). Students who would still take a research year even if they were already assured a position in a residency program of their choice were at 65%, while 35% would not take a research year. Responses varied based on whether students intended to go into a competitive specialty. Discussion: Medical students take research years for multiple reasons, although they frequently are not motivated by an interest in the research itself. Many student projects consume a substantial amount of time and money despite having little educational value. Medical schools, residency programs, and policymakers should rethink incentives to increase value and help students better pursue their academic interests. PMID:27672532

  6. Development of a career coaching model for medical students

    PubMed Central

    Hur, Yera

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Deciding on a future career path or choosing a career specialty is an important academic decision for medical students. The purpose of this study is to develop a career coaching model for medical students. Methods: This research was carried out in three steps. The first step was systematic review of previous studies. The second step was a need assessment of medical students. The third step was a career coaching model using the results acquired from the researched literature and the survey. Results: The career coaching stages were defined as three big phases: The career coaching stages were defined as the “crystallization” period (Pre-medical year 1 and 2), “specification” period (medical year 1 and 2), and “implementation” period (medical year 3 and 4). Conclusion: The career coaching model for medical students can be used in programming career coaching contents and also in identifying the outcomes of career coaching programs at an institutional level. PMID:26867586

  7. Medical Student Documentation in the Electronic Medical Record: Patterns of Use and Barriers

    PubMed Central

    Wittels, Kathleen; Wallenstein, Joshua; Patwari, Rahul; Patel, Sundip

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Electronic health records (EHR) have become ubiquitous in emergency departments. Medical students rotating on emergency medicine (EM) clerkships at these sites have constant exposure to EHRs as they learn essential skills. The Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC), the Liaison Committee on Medical Education (LCME), and the Alliance for Clinical Education (ACE) have determined that documentation of the patient encounter in the medical record is an essential skill that all medical students must learn. However, little is known about the current practices or perceived barriers to student documentation in EHRs on EM clerkships. Methods We performed a cross-sectional study of EM clerkship directors at United States medical schools between March and May 2016. A 13-question IRB-approved electronic survey on student documentation was sent to all EM clerkship directors. Only one response from each institution was permitted. Results We received survey responses from 100 institutions, yielding a response rate of 86%. Currently, 63% of EM clerkships allow medical students to document a patient encounter in the EHR. The most common reasons cited for not permitting students to document a patient encounter were hospital or medical school rule forbidding student documentation (80%), concern for medical liability (60%), and inability of student notes to support medical billing (53%). Almost 95% of respondents provided feedback on student documentation with supervising faculty being the most common group to deliver feedback (92%), followed by residents (64%). Conclusion Close to two-thirds of medical students are allowed to document in the EHR on EM clerkships. While this number is robust, many organizations such as the AAMC and ACE have issued statements and guidelines that would look to increase this number even further to ensure that students are prepared for residency as well as their future careers. Almost all EM clerkships provided feedback on student

  8. Pre-Veterinary Medical Grade Point Averages as Predictors of Academic Success in Veterinary College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Julius, Marcia F.; Kaiser, Herbert E.

    1978-01-01

    A five-year longitudinal study was designed to find the best predictors of academic success in veterinary school at Kansas State University and to set up a multiple regression formula to be used in selecting students. The preveterinary grade point average was found to be the best predictor. (JMD)

  9. The Effects of a Water Conservation Instructional Unit on the Values Held by Sixth Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aird, Andrew; Tomera, Audrey

    1977-01-01

    Sixth grade students were divided into two groups. Students in one group received instruction on water conservation using expository and discovery activities. The students in the control group received none. Results gave evidence that students' values could be changed by this mode of water conservation instruction. (MA)

  10. Modeling the Influence of Calculator Use and Teacher Effects on First Grade Students' Mathematics Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polly, Drew

    2008-01-01

    American students continue to struggle on measures of student achievement. This study employed Hierarchical Linear Modeling to estimate a two-level model and examine the influences of calculator use and teachers' instructional practices on student achievement in mathematics amongst first-grade students. The outcome variable was mathematics test…

  11. Modeling Oral Reading Fluency Development in Latino Students: A Longitudinal Study across Second and Third Grade

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al Otaiba, Stephanie; Petscher, Yaacov; Pappamihiel, N. Eleni; Williams, Rihana S.; Dyrlund, Allison K.; Connor, Carol

    2009-01-01

    This study examines growth in oral reading fluency across 2nd and 3rd grade for Latino students grouped in 3 English proficiency levels: students receiving English as a second language (ESL) services (n = 2,182), students exited from ESL services (n = 965), and students never designated as needing services (n = 1,857). An important focus was to…

  12. An Analysis of Writing Dispositions of 6th Grade Students in Terms of Different Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tabak, Gurkan; Topuzkanamis, Ersoy

    2014-01-01

    This research was conducted with an aim to analyze the writing dispositions of the 6th grade students in terms of different variables. The research was carried out based on the descriptive survey model. The participants of the research are composed of a total of 672 students as 342 male students and 330 female students from Ankara, Balikesir,…

  13. Using Student Success Skills to Address ASCA Behavior Standards in Grades K-3

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abel, Nicholas R.; Oliver, Brandie M.; Keller, Thomas J.; McAulay, Andrew; Piatek, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated relationships between a school counselor's implementation of the Student Success Skills (SSS) program with 203 students in grades K-3 and teacher ratings of student competency on five learning behaviors from the ASCA Mindsets & Behaviors for Student Success (American School Counselor Association, 2014). Using a paired…

  14. Learning Difficulties Experienced by Grade 12 South African Students in the Chemical Representation of Phenomena

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramnarain, Umesh; Joseph, Aleyamma

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the learning difficulties of grade 12 South African students in a national chemistry examination. A quantitative analysis of students' performance in the examination revealed there was a significant difference between student performance in questions where students needed to execute a transformation across levels of…

  15. Computer-Related Attitudes of First and Second Grade Students in the United States and Japan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knezek, Gerald A.; Miyashita, Keiko

    This paper reports on an exploratory cross-cultural study of the attitudes of first and second grade students toward the use of microcomputers in instruction. Questionnaire responses were compared among three groups: Japanese students in Tokyo, Japan; American students in Sanger, Texas; and Japanese students attending a special school for Japanese…

  16. Effectiveness of Blended Teaching Strategy on the Achievement of Third Grade Students in Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yaghmour, Kholoud Subhi

    2016-01-01

    The study aimed to investigate the Blended Education strategy in the achievement of the third grade students in mathematics. The study sample consisted of (97) male and female students distributed on four classes: (47) male and female students in the experimental group and (50) male and female students in the control group. To achieve the…

  17. Sleep disturbances among medical students: a global perspective.

    PubMed

    Azad, Muhammad Chanchal; Fraser, Kristin; Rumana, Nahid; Abdullah, Ahmad Faris; Shahana, Nahid; Hanly, Patrick J; Turin, Tanvir Chowdhury

    2015-01-15

    Medical students carry a large academic load which could potentially contribute to poor sleep quality above and beyond that already experienced by modern society. In this global literature review of the medical students' sleep experience, we find that poor sleep is not only common among medical students, but its prevalence is also higher than in non-medical students and the general population. Several factors including medical students' attitudes, knowledge of sleep, and academic demands have been identified as causative factors, but other potential mechanisms are incompletely understood. A better understanding about the etiology of sleep problems in medical trainees is essential if we hope to improve the overall quality of medical students' lives, including their academic performance. Sleep self-awareness and general knowledge appear insufficient in many studied cohorts, so increasing education for students might be one beneficial intervention. We conclude that there is ample evidence for a high prevalence of the problem, and research in this area should now expand towards initiatives to improve general sleep education for medical students, identify students at risk, and target them with programs to improve sleep.

  18. A Study of Core Humanistic Competency for Developing Humanism Education for Medical Students

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The authors conducted a survey on essential humanistic competency that medical students should have, and on teaching methods that will effectively develop such attributes. The participants consisted of 154 medical school professors, 589 medical students at Seoul National University College of Medicine, 228 parents, and 161 medical school and university hospital staff. They answered nine questions that the authors created. According to the results, all groups chose "morality and a sense of ethics," a "sense of accountability," "communication skills," and "empathic ability" were selected as essential qualities. According to the evaluation on the extent to which students possess each quality, participants believed students had a high "sense of accountability" and "morality," whereas they thought students had low "empathic ability," "communicate," or "collaborate with others". In terms of effective teaching methods, all sub-groups preferred extracurricular activities including small group activities, debates, and volunteer services. With regard to the speculated effect of humanism education and the awareness of the need for colleges to offer it, all sub-groups had a positive response. However the professors and students expressed a relatively passive stance on introducing humanism education as a credited course. Most participants responded that they preferred a grading method based on their rate of participation, not a relative evaluation. In order to reap more comprehensive and lasting effects of humanism education courses in medical school, it is necessary to conduct faculty training, and continuously strive to develop new teaching methods. PMID:27247489

  19. A Study of Core Humanistic Competency for Developing Humanism Education for Medical Students.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hee-Yeon; Kim, Jae-Won; Lee, Seunghee; Yoo, Seong Ho; Jeon, Ju-Hong; Kim, Tae-Woo; Park, Joong Shin; Jeong, Seung-Yong; Oh, Seo Jin; Kim, Eun Jung; Shin, Min-Sup

    2016-06-01

    The authors conducted a survey on essential humanistic competency that medical students should have, and on teaching methods that will effectively develop such attributes. The participants consisted of 154 medical school professors, 589 medical students at Seoul National University College of Medicine, 228 parents, and 161 medical school and university hospital staff. They answered nine questions that the authors created. According to the results, all groups chose "morality and a sense of ethics," a "sense of accountability," "communication skills," and "empathic ability" were selected as essential qualities. According to the evaluation on the extent to which students possess each quality, participants believed students had a high "sense of accountability" and "morality," whereas they thought students had low "empathic ability," "communicate," or "collaborate with others". In terms of effective teaching methods, all sub-groups preferred extracurricular activities including small group activities, debates, and volunteer services. With regard to the speculated effect of humanism education and the awareness of the need for colleges to offer it, all sub-groups had a positive response. However the professors and students expressed a relatively passive stance on introducing humanism education as a credited course. Most participants responded that they preferred a grading method based on their rate of participation, not a relative evaluation. In order to reap more comprehensive and lasting effects of humanism education courses in medical school, it is necessary to conduct faculty training, and continuously strive to develop new teaching methods.

  20. A Comparative Study of Obsessionality in Medical Students, Law Students, and Controls.

    PubMed

    Harries, Michael D; Kim, Suck Won; Grant, Jon E

    2016-11-03

    Understanding obsessive-compulsive behavior in medical students and law students is necessary for administrators and educators to properly work with students struggling with obsessionality. We aim to compare the differences in obsessive symptoms between medical students, law students and a control population. A total of 100 third-year medical students, 102 third-year law students and 103 control subjects drawn from the general population completed the Leyton Obsessional Inventory (LOI). Subjects were examined on all three sections (symptoms/traits, resistance and interference) of the LOI. Obsessional symptom scores for medical students (14.29 ± 7.33) and law students (13.65 ± 6.61) were significantly greater than for the control group (11.58 ± 7.45). Medical and law students were both more likely to report checking, order, routine and attention to detail as obsessive symptoms. Medical students were more likely than law students to possess the obsessive symptoms of cleanliness and conscientiousness, while law students were more likely than medical students to possess obsessive symptoms related to difficulty in making up their mind and doubting themselves. While medical students and law students are more obsessional than the control population, each group is more likely to report different obsessive symptoms.

  1. The relationship between promotions committees' identification of problem medical students and subsequent state medical board actions.

    PubMed

    Santen, Sally A; Petrusa, Emil; Gruppen, Larry D

    2015-05-01

    Studies have found unprofessional behavior in medical school was associated with disciplinary action by state medical boards. For medical schools, promotions committees are responsible for identifying which students do not demonstrate academic performance and professional behavior acceptable for promotion and graduation. The objective of this study was to determine if student identification by promotions committees during medical school was associated with disciplinary actions by state medical boards later in practice. We reviewed 20 years of promotions committees' records from a single institution and noted students identified by promotions committees for performance or behavioral issues. These were compared with disciplinary action reports from the Federation of State Medical Boards (FSMB) for graduates. Over the two decades, 2,131 students matriculated and 2,078 of these graduated. The promotions committees identified 140 students for poor academic performance or behavioral problems (140/2,078, 6.7 %). Of these, 108 students graduated. FSMB records showed 29 of the 2,078 graduates had sanctions by state boards (29/2,078, 1.4 %). Only four students that had actions by state medical boards were among the 108 graduated students identified by medical school promotions committees (4/108, 3.7 %). Of the students not identified by promotions committees, 25 eventually had disciplinary actions (25/1,970, 1.3 %). The odds of having state medical board action if identified by promotions committees was 3.0 (CI 1.02-8.8, p < 0.05). In conclusion, identification of students by medical school promotions committees was later associated with state medical board actions. However, most graduates with state medical board actions were not identified by medical school promotions committees.

  2. Perceptions on gender awareness and considerations in career choices of medical students in a medical school in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chung, Yueh-Chin; Lin, Ching-Yi; Huang, Chien-Ning; Yang, Jen-Hung

    2013-11-01

    The trend of medical career choice in the younger generation has resulted in deficiency of manpower in the four major disciplines of internal medicine, surgery, obstetrics/gynecology, and pediatrics, which will threaten people's health care in Taiwan. However, perceptions of gender awareness and factors affecting the career choices of medical students have not been investigated systemically in Taiwan. To explore the perceptions on gender awareness and considerations in career choices, we recruited 280 1(st)- and 7(th)-year male and female medical students at a Medical University for the study. A modified Nijmegen questionnaire using a 5-point Likert scale containing medical curricula (18 items), gender awareness (13 items), and career inclination (9 items) was adopted as the investigation tool in our study. The response rate was 75% (224/280). With regard to gender, the 1(st)-year male students had greater confidence in being a physician than the female students (p < 0.05), and female students subjectively suggested an advantage to communicate with patients or colleagues (p < 0.05). Faculty attitude in treating students differently by gender was more prominent in the 7(th)-year than in the 1(st)-year students (p < 0.001), and they felt male preceptors typically were more enthusiastic to teach and to rank higher grades to female than to male students; however, this was not observed among female preceptors. Both male and female students showed a low level of agreement that clinical skills and performance of a physician were significantly different by gender and "female physicians are more empathetic and provide more communications than male physicians". Factors influencing career choices of medical students, including "personal interests/talents" and "academic achievement of the specialty," were not significantly different by gender. Factors included "training and learning environments of the specialty", "risk of lawsuit", and "economic incentive" were more

  3. Does Objective Structured Clinical Examinations Score Reflect the Clinical Reasoning Ability of Medical Students?

    PubMed Central

    Park, Wan Beom; Kang, Seok Hoon; Lee, Yoon-Seong

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Background: Clinical reasoning ability is an important factor in a physician's competence and thus should be taught and tested in medical schools. Medical schools generally use objective structured clinical examinations (OSCE) to measure the clinical competency of medical students. However, it is unknown whether OSCE can also evaluate clinical reasoning ability. In this study, the authors investigated whether OSCE scores reflected students' clinical reasoning abilities. Methods: Sixty-five fourth-year medical students participated in this study. Medical students completed the OSCE with 4 cases using standardized patients. For assessment of clinical reasoning, students were asked to list differential diagnoses and the findings that were compatible or not compatible with each diagnosis. The OSCE score (score of patient encounter), diagnostic accuracy score, clinical reasoning score, clinical knowledge score and grade point average (GPA) were obtained for each student, and correlation analysis was performed. Results: Clinical reasoning score was significantly correlated with diagnostic accuracy and GPA (correlation coefficient = 0.258 and 0.380; P = 0.038 and 0.002, respectively) but not with OSCE score or clinical knowledge score (correlation coefficient = 0.137 and 0.242; P = 0.276 and 0.052, respectively). Total OSCE score was not significantly correlated with clinical knowledge test score, clinical reasoning score, diagnostic accuracy score or GPA. Conclusions: OSCE score from patient encounters did not reflect the clinical reasoning abilities of the medical students in this study. The evaluation of medical students' clinical reasoning abilities through OSCE should be strengthened. PMID:25647834

  4. Strategies to Affect Student Sensory Awareness of the Environment in a Rural Schools Setting: Grade Four through Grade Six.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Richard O.

    Describing the Union 58 Experimental Schools Program (ESP) in northern, rural New Hampshire, this curriculum guide presents the concept of "proximity congruency" as a means for developing elementary level (grades four through six) student sensory awareness of the environment in outdoor and/or environmental education procedures. Proximity…

  5. Growth of Compounding Awareness Predicts Reading Comprehension in Young Chinese Students: A Longitudinal Study from Grade 1 to Grade 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Yahua; Zhang, Jie; Li, Hong; Wu, Xinchun; Liu, Hongyun; Dong, Qiong; Li, Liping; Nguyen, Thi Phuong; Zheng, Minglu; Zhao, Ying; Sun, Peng

    2017-01-01

    Using a longitudinal sample of young Chinese students (fall and spring in grades 1 and 2: times 1-4, respectively) and growth curve analysis, this study examined whether the initial status and growth rates of compounding awareness from time 1 to time 4 uniquely contribute to reading comprehension at time 4 and whether word-reading efficiency at…

  6. The Dialysis Exercise: A Clinical Simulation for Preclinical Medical Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    And Others; Bernstein, Richard A.

    1980-01-01

    A clinical decision-making simulation that helps students understand the relationship between psychosocial factors and medical problem-solving is described. A group of medical students and one faculty member comprise a selection committee to agree on the order in which four patients will be selected for renal dialysis. (MLW)

  7. Are Medical Students Assigning Proper Global Assessment of Functioning Scores?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warsi, Mustafa K.; Sattar, S. Pirzada; Din, Amad U.; Petty, Frederick; Padala, Prasad R.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: This article seeks to determine whether medical students can estimate the appropriate score for the Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF) compared with psychiatry residents and staff psychiatrists. The authors hypothesized that medical students' estimations of GAF scores for patients in clinical vignettes would differ from those…

  8. Teaching Biotechnology to Medical Students: Is There an Easy Way?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steggles, Allen W.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the teaching of biotechnology to medical students, undergraduate students and high school seniors. Suggests changes in how the basic sciences are taught in medical schools. Reviews the effects of teaching biotechnology at Northeastern Ohio Universities College of Medicine (NEOUCOM). (CW)

  9. The Case Presentation: Teaching Medical Students Writing and Communication Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Larrie W.; Jewett, Leslie S.

    1987-01-01

    Described is a program at Childrens Hospital National Medical Center in which the focus is on improving medical students' writing and communication skills as part of a pediatric clerkship. Based on the quality of students' performance and their evaluation of the exercise, this has been a successful innovation. (Author/RH)

  10. Professionalism Deficits among Medical Students: Models of Identification and Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Aurora J.; Roman, Brenda; Arnold, Lesley M.; Kay, Jerald; Goldenhar, Linda M.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: This study compares the instruments and interventions utilized to identify and remediate unprofessional behaviors in medical students across U.S. psychiatry clerkships. Methods: A 20-item questionnaire was distributed to 120 psychiatry clerkship directors and directors of medical student education, in the U.S., inquiring into the…

  11. Using Ultrasound to Teach Medical Students Cardiac Physiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Floyd E., III; Wilson, L. Britt; Hoppmann, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound is being incorporated more into undergraduate medical education. Studies have shown that medical students have positive perceptions about the value of ultrasound in teaching courses like anatomy and physiology. The purpose of the present study was to provide objective evidence of whether ultrasound helps students learn cardiac…

  12. Training Medical Students about Hazardous Drinking Using Simple Assessment Techniques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hidalgo, Jesús López-Torres; Pretel, Fernando Andrés; Bravo, Beatriz Navarro; Rabadan, Francisco Escobar; Serrano Selva, Juan Pedro; Latorre Postigo, Jose Miguel; Martínez, Ignacio Párraga

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To examine the ability of medical students to identify hazardous drinkers using screening tools recommended in clinical practice. Design: Observational cross-sectional study. Setting: Faculty of Medicine of Castilla-La Mancha, Spain. Method: The medical students learnt to use Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT) and…

  13. Genetic Engineering of Animals for Medical Research: Students' Views.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Ruaraidh; Stanisstreet, Martin; O'Sullivan, Helen; Boyes, Edward

    1999-01-01

    Reports on the results of a survey meant to ascertain the views of 16- to 18-year-old students (n=778) on using animals in medical research. Suggests that students have no greater objection to the use of genetically engineered animals over naturally bred animals in medical research. Contains 16 references. (Author/WRM)

  14. Medical Students' Perceptions of Psychiatry as a Career Choice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cutler, Janis L.; Alspector, Sharon L.; Harding, Kelli J.; Wright, Leslie L.; Graham, Mark J.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: This study describes medical students' perceptions of the field of psychiatry and identifies the impact of those perceptions on their career choices in order to explore the questions: Are we as a field doing all that we can to enhance the educational experience of all medical students, regardless of their career preferences? What are…

  15. Medical Student Views of Substance Abuse Treatment, Policy and Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agrawal, Shantanu; Everett, Worth W.; Sharma, Sonali

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined the impact of medical education on students' views of substance abuse treatment, public policy options and training. Method: A longitudinal survey was conducted on a single-class cohort of 101 students in a major American, urban medical school. The survey was administered in the Spring semesters of the first to third…

  16. Anatomy Drawing Screencasts: Enabling Flexible Learning for Medical Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pickering, James D.

    2015-01-01

    The traditional lecture remains an essential method of disseminating information to medical students. However, due to the constant development of the modern medical curriculum many institutions are embracing novel means for delivering the core anatomy syllabus. Using mobile media devices is one such way, enabling students to access core material…

  17. Predictors of Nonmedical ADHD Medication Use by College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rabiner, David L.; Anastopoulos, Arthur D.; Costello, E. Jane; Hoyle, Rick H.; Swartzwelder, H. Scott

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To identify the predictors of nonmedical ADHD medication use by college students. Participants: A total of 843 undergraduates attending one public or one private university in southeastern United States. Method: Students completed a Web-based survey inquiring about ADHD medication use during the first semester freshman of their year and…

  18. Teaching Medical Students Basic Neurotransmitter Pharmacology Using Primary Research Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halliday, Amy C.; Devonshire, Ian M.; Greenfield, Susan A.; Dommett, Eleanor J.

    2010-01-01

    Teaching pharmacology to medical students has long been seen as a challenge, and one to which a number of innovative approaches have been taken. In this article, we describe and evaluate the use of primary research articles in teaching second-year medical students both in terms of the information learned and the use of the papers themselves. We…

  19. Teaching Medical Students about Health Literacy: 2 Chicago Initiatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harper, William; Cook, Sandy; Makoul, Gregory

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To develop medical students' skills in interacting with individuals who have limited health literacy. Methods: Described are 2 novel approaches to health literacy curriculum design. Efforts at both schools have been implemented to improve medical student awareness of health literacy, as well as specific skills in clear communication and…

  20. Therapy 101: A Psychotherapy Curriculum for Medical Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aboul-Fotouh, Frieda; Asghar-Ali, Ali Abbas

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This pilot project, designed and taught by a resident, created a curriculum to introduce medical students to the practice of psychotherapy. Medical students who are knowledgeable about psychotherapy can become physicians who are able to refer patients to psychotherapeutic treatments. A search of the literature did not identify a…

  1. Multi-Media Self-Instruction for Medical Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geyman, John P.; Guyton, Rick

    1978-01-01

    A study of 12 individual self-instructional programs comprising six types of media, used to supplement the learning of senior medical students taking elective family practice preceptorships in communities distant from the medical school, is described. These students showed a gain in knowledge from pretest to delayed retention test while a control…

  2. Perceptions of Mentoring from Fourth Year Medical Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charles, Stephen C.

    2014-01-01

    This mixed-methods research study investigated medical students' perspectives of professional mentoring through a web-based survey/needs assessment. The participants are fourth year medical students from three large urban research institutions and two regional branch campuses. The web-based survey/needs assessment was created, peer reviewed, and…

  3. Benefits of Student-Centered Tandem Teaching in Medical English.

    PubMed

    Antić, Zorica

    2015-01-01

    This paper addresses some of the key notions about English for special purposes with special regard to English for medical purposes. The content was determined by observations and based on authors' professional experience. The starting point of a medical English course is a thorough analysis of students' needs, which is then used in course design and definition of appropriate learning goals. The student is at the center of learning and it is necessary to establish a positive cooperation between students and teachers. As medical English course is highly context-based, the inclusion of medical teachers can offer many opportunities for a successful learning process.

  4. [Teaching the legal aspects of medical practice to medical students in Puerto Rico].

    PubMed

    Lugo Vélez, Luis J

    2014-01-01

    Challenges and changes facing modern medicine make it imperative that physicians acquire knowledge of the legal and regulatory framework of medical practice. Despite the importance of this issue, the curriculum in most medical schools do not include courses that offer medical students the necessary information about their legal duties to practice medicine. The trend should be to offer such courses in medical schools and medical residency programs.

  5. Medical Student Abuse During Clinical Clerkships in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Nagata-Kobayashi, Shizuko; Sekimoto, Miho; Koyama, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Wari; Goto, Eiji; Fukushima, Osamu; Ino, Teruo; Shimada, Tomoe; Shimbo, Takuro; Asai, Atsushi; Koizumi, Shunzo; Fukui, Tsuguya

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess the prevalence of medical student abuse during clinical clerkships in Japan. DESIGN A cross-sectional questionnaire survey. SETTING Six medical schools in Japan. PARTICIPANTS Final year (sixth-year) and fifth-year medical students in the period from September 2003 to January 2004. From a total of 559 students solicited, 304 (54.4%) returned the questionnaire, and 276 (49.4%: 178 male and 98 female) completed it. MEASUREMENTS Prevalence of medical student abuse in 5 categories: verbal abuse, physical abuse, academic abuse, sexual harassment, and gender discrimination; differences in abusive experience between male and female students; types of alleged abusers; reporting abusive experiences to authorities; and emotional effects of abusive experiences. RESULTS Medical student abuse was reported by 68.5% of the respondents. Verbal abuse was the most frequently experienced abuse (male students 52.8%, female students 63.3%). Sexual harassment was experienced significantly more often (P<.001) by female students (54.1%) than by male students (14.6%). Faculty members were most often reported as abusers (45.2% of cases). Abuse occurred most frequently during surgical rotations (42.0% of cases), followed by internal medicine (25.1%) and anesthesia rotations (21.8%). Very few abused students reported their abusive experiences to authorities (8.5%). The most frequent emotional response to abuse was anger (27.1% of cases). CONCLUSIONS Although experience of abuse during clinical clerkships is common among medical students in Japan, the concept of “medical student abuse” is not yet familiar to Japanese. To improve the learning environment, medical educators need to take action to resolve this serious issue. PMID:16390504

  6. Medical Students Learning Communication Skills in a Second Language

    PubMed Central

    Hashim, Muhammad J.; Major, Stella; Mirza, Deen M.; Prinsloo, Engela A. M.; Osman, Ossama; Amiri, Leena; McLean, Michelle

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Communications skills (CS) training for medical interviewing is increasingly being conducted in English at medical schools worldwide. In this study, we sought to identify whether Arabic-speaking medical students experienced difficulty with the different components of the CS training that were conducted in English. Methods: Individual third-year preclinical medical students (N = 45) were videotaped while interviewing simulated patients. Each student assessed his/her performance on a 13-item (5-point scale) assessment form, which was also completed by the tutor and other students in the group. Results: Of the 13 components of their CS training, tutors awarded the lowest marks for students’ abilities to express empathy, ask about patients’ feelings, use transition statements, ask about functional impact, and elicit patients’ expectations (P <0.001). Conclusion: The expression of empathy and the ability to elicit patients’ feelings and expectations are difficult to develop in medical students learning CS in a second language. PMID:23573389

  7. Continuing education for medical students: a library model

    PubMed Central

    Swanberg, Stephanie M.; Engwall, Keith; Mi, Misa

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The research assessed a three-year continuing medical education–style program for medical students in a Midwestern academic medical library. Methods A mixed methods approach of a survey and two focus groups comparing attendees versus non-attendees assessed the program. Results Eleven students participated in the focus groups. Attendance was driven by topic interest and lunch. Barriers included lack of interest, scheduling, location, and convenience. Conclusions Although attendance was a challenge, students valued opportunities to learn new skills. This study showcases a reproducible method to engage students outside the curriculum. PMID:26512222

  8. Research on cultivating medical students' self-learning ability using teaching system integrated with learning analysis technology.

    PubMed

    Luo, Hong; Wu, Cheng; He, Qian; Wang, Shi-Yong; Ma, Xiu-Qiang; Wang, Ri; Li, Bing; He, Jia

    2015-01-01

    Along with the advancement of information technology and the era of big data education, using learning process data to provide strategic decision-making in cultivating and improving medical students' self-learning ability has become a trend in educational research. Educator Abuwen Toffler said once, the illiterates in the future may not be the people not able to read and write, but not capable to know how to learn. Serving as educational institutions cultivating medical students' learning ability, colleges and universities should not only instruct specific professional knowledge and skills, but also develop medical students' self-learning ability. In this research, we built a teaching system which can help to restore medical students' self-learning processes and analyze their learning outcomes and behaviors. To evaluate the effectiveness of the system in supporting medical students' self-learning, an experiment was conducted in 116 medical students from two grades. The results indicated that problems in self-learning process through this system was consistent with problems raised from traditional classroom teaching. Moreover, the experimental group (using this system) acted better than control group (using traditional classroom teaching) to some extent. Thus, this system can not only help medical students to develop their self-learning ability, but also enhances the ability of teachers to target medical students' questions quickly, improving the efficiency of answering questions in class.

  9. Using Theater to Increase Empathy Training in Medical Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reilly, Jo Marie; Trial, Janet; Piver, Debra E.; Schaff, Pamela B.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: Developing and nurturing empathy in medical trainees has been recognized as an essential element of medical education. Theater may be a unique instructional modality to increase empathy training. Methods: A multi-disciplinary team developed a theater workshop for first year medical students. Through the use of theater games, art images…

  10. An Analysis of Student Choices in Medical Ethical Dilemmas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woloshin, Phyllis Lerman

    This report describes a study undertaken to assess student choices in medical ethical dilemmas. Medical ethical dilemmas are interpreted to include problems such as abortion, euthanasia, sterilization, experimentation on humans, allocation of scarce medical resources, and physician and health personnel training. The major purpose of the study was…

  11. Social Learning: Medical Student Perceptions of Geriatric House Calls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abbey, Linda; Willett, Rita; Selby-Penczak, Rachel; McKnight, Roberta

    2010-01-01

    Bandura's social learning theory provides a useful conceptual framework to understand medical students' perceptions of a house calls experience at Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine. Social learning and role modeling reflect Liaison Committee on Medical Education guidelines for "Medical schools (to) ensure that the learning…

  12. Medical students' attitudes toward abortion and other reproductive health services.

    PubMed

    Rosenblatt, R A; Robinson, K B; Larson, E H; Dobie, S A

    1999-03-01

    This paper investigated the attitude toward abortion and other reproductive health services of first- and second-year medical students at the Seattle campus of the University of Washington, a large regional primary care-oriented medical school, in 1996-97. A total of 219 (76.6%) students responded. The majority of the students support the availability of a broad range of reproductive health services including abortion; 58.1% felt that first-trimester abortions should be available to patients under most circumstances. Of the 43.4% of students who anticipated a career in family practice, most expected to provide abortions in their future practices. Moreover, older students and women were more likely to support the provision of abortion services. This study concludes that despite the continuing pressure on abortion providers, most first- and second-year medical students at a fairly state-supported medical school intend to incorporate this procedure into their future practices.

  13. Evaluation of medical student attitudes toward alcoholics anonymous.

    PubMed

    Fazzio, Lydia; Galanter, Marc; Dermatis, Helen; Levounis, Petros

    2003-09-01

    This is a two-phase study on attitudes of medical students toward Alcoholics Anonymous. The first phase compares views of addiction faculty to third-year medical students on the importance of spirituality in addiction treatment. We administered a questionnaire to assess attitudes toward spiritual, biological, and psychosocial approaches to addiction treatment. The faculty viewed spirituality as relatively more important in addiction treatment than did the students. The second phase was designed to assess whether medical student attitudes toward spiritually based treatments changed over the course of a psychiatry clerkship. At the beginning of the clerkship, students rated a spiritually oriented approach as important in addiction treatment as a biological approach, whereas, at the end of the clerkship, they rated the biological approach as more important. It may be important to educate medical students about the spiritual dimensions of recovery so they can integrate this into their treatment of addiction.

  14. Monitoring the Veterinary Medical Student Experience: An Institutional Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Miller, RoseAnn; Mavis, Brian E; Lloyd, James W; Grabill, Chandra M; Henry, Rebecca C; Patterson, Coretta C

    2015-01-01

    Veterinary medical school challenges students academically and personally, and some students report depression and anxiety at rates higher than the general population and other medical students. This study describes changes in veterinary medical student self-esteem (SE) over four years of professional education, attending to differences between high and low SE students and the characteristics specific to low SE veterinary medical students. The study population was students enrolled at the Michigan State University College of Veterinary Medicine from 2006 to 2012. We used data from the annual anonymous survey administered college-wide that is used to monitor the curriculum and learning environment. The survey asked respondents to rate their knowledge and skill development, learning environment, perceptions of stress, skill development, and SE. Participants also provided information on their academic performance and demographics. A contrasting groups design was used: high and low SE students were compared using logistic regression to identify factors associated with low SE. A total of 1,653 respondents met inclusion criteria: 789 low SE and 864 high SE students. The proportion of high and low SE students varied over time, with the greatest proportion of low SE students during the second-year of the program. Perceived stress was associated with low SE, whereas perceived supportive learning environment and skill development were associated with high SE. These data have provided impetus for curricular and learning environment changes to enhance student support. They also provide guidance for additional research to better understand various student academic trajectories and their implications for success.

  15. Fostering a culture of interprofessional education for radiation therapy and medical dosimetry students

    SciTech Connect

    Lavender, Charlotte Miller, Seth; Church, Jessica; Chen, Ronald C.; Muresan, Petronella A.; Adams, Robert D.

    2014-04-01

    A less-studied aspect of radiation therapy and medical dosimetry education is experiential learning through attendance at interprofessional conferences. University of North Carolina radiation therapy and medical dosimetry students regularly attended morning conferences and daily pretreatment peer review, including approximately 145 hours of direct interaction with medical attending physicians and residents, medical physicists, and other faculty. We herein assessed the effect of their participation in these interprofessional conferences on knowledge and communication. The students who graduated from our radiation therapy and medical dosimetry programs who were exposed to the interprofessional education initiative were compared with those who graduated in the previous years. The groups were compared with regard to their knowledge (as assessed by grades on end-of-training examinations) and team communication (assessed via survey). The results for the 2 groups were compared via exact tests. There was a trend for the examination scores for the 2012 cohort to be higher than for the 2007 to 2011 groups. Survey results suggested that students who attended the interprofessional education sessions were more comfortable speaking with attending physicians, residents, physicists, and faculty compared with earlier students who did not attend these educational sessions. Interprofessional education, particularly vertical integration, appears to provide an enhanced educational experience both in regard to knowledge (per the examination scores) and in building a sense of communication (via the survey results). Integration of interprofessional education into radiation therapy and medical dosimetry educational programs may represent an opportunity to enrich the learning experience in multiple ways and merits further study.

  16. Fostering a culture of interprofessional education for radiation therapy and medical dosimetry students.

    PubMed

    Lavender, Charlotte; Miller, Seth; Church, Jessica; Chen, Ronald C; Muresan, Petronella A; Adams, Robert D

    2014-01-01

    A less-studied aspect of radiation therapy and medical dosimetry education is experiential learning through attendance at interprofessional conferences. University of North Carolina radiation therapy and medical dosimetry students regularly attended morning conferences and daily pretreatment peer review, including approximately 145 hours of direct interaction with medical attending physicians and residents, medical physicists, and other faculty. We herein assessed the effect of their participation in these interprofessional conferences on knowledge and communication. The students who graduated from our radiation therapy and medical dosimetry programs who were exposed to the interprofessional education initiative were compared with those who graduated in the previous years. The groups were compared with regard to their knowledge (as assessed by grades on end-of-training examinations) and team communication (assessed via survey). The results for the 2 groups were compared via exact tests. There was a trend for the examination scores for the 2012 cohort to be higher than for the 2007 to 2011 groups. Survey results suggested that students who attended the interprofessional education sessions were more comfortable speaking with attending physicians, residents, physicists, and faculty compared with earlier students who did not attend these educational sessions. Interprofessional education, particularly vertical integration, appears to provide an enhanced educational experience both in regard to knowledge (per the examination scores) and in building a sense of communication (via the survey results). Integration of interprofessional education into radiation therapy and medical dosimetry educational programs may represent an opportunity to enrich the learning experience in multiple ways and merits further study.

  17. Psychometric properties of the Medical Student Well-Being Index among medical students in a Malaysian medical school.

    PubMed

    Yusoff, Muhamad Saiful Bahri; Yaacob, Mohd Jamil; Naing, Nyi Nyi; Esa, Ab Rahman

    2013-02-01

    This study evaluated the convergent, discriminant, construct, concurrent and discriminative validity of the Medical Student Wellbeing Index (MSWBI) as well as to evaluate its internal consistency and optimal cut-off total scores to detect at least moderate levels of general psychological distress, stress, anxiety and depression symptoms. A cross sectional study was done on 171 medical students. The MSWBI and DASS-21 were administered and returned immediately upon completion. Confirmatory factor analysis, reliability analysis, ROC analysis and Pearson correlation test were applied to assess psychometric properties of the MSWBI. A total of 168 (98.2%) medical students responded. The goodness of fit indices showed the MSWBI had a good construct (χ(2)=6.14, p=0.803, RMSEA<0.001, RMR=0.004, GFI=0.99, AGFI=0.97, CFI=1.00, IFI=1.02, TLI=1.04). The Cronbach's alpha value was 0.69 indicating an acceptable level of internal consistency. Pearson correlation coefficients and ROC analysis suggested each MSWBI's item showed adequate convergent and discriminant validity. Its optimal cut-off scores to detect at least moderate levels of general psychological distress, stress, anxiety, and depression were 1.5, 2.5, 1.5 and 2.5 respectively with sensitivity and specificity ranged from 62 to 80% and the areas under ROC curve ranged from 0.71 to 0.83. This study showed that the MSWBI had good level of psychometric properties. The MSWBI score more than 2 can be considered as having significant psychological distress. The MSWBI is a valid and reliable screening instrument to assess psychological distress of medical students.

  18. Corrosion properties of S-phase layers formed on medical grade austenitic stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Buhagiar, Joseph; Dong, Hanshan

    2012-02-01

    The corrosion properties of S-phase surface layers formed in AISI 316LVM (ASTM F138) and High-N (ASTM F1586) medical grade austenitic stainless steels by plasma surface alloying with nitrogen (at 430°C), carbon (at 500°C) and both carbon and nitrogen (at 430°C) has been investigated. The corrosion behaviour of the S-phase layers in Ringer's solutions was evaluated using potentiodynamic and immersion corrosion tests. The corrosion damage was evaluated using microscopy, hardness testing, inductive coupled plasma mass spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The experimental results have demonstrated that low-temperature nitriding, carburising and carbonitriding can improve the localised corrosion resistance of both industrial and medical grade austenitic stainless steels as long as the threshold sensitisation temperature is not reached. Carburising at 500°C has proved to be the best hardening treatment with the least effect on the corrosion resistance of the parent alloy.

  19. The Effect of a Class in Medical Ethics on First-Year Medical Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shorr, Andrew F.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    A study of 110 first-year University of Virginia medical students taking a required course in medical ethics found that the curriculum had little effect on student attitudes toward certain ethical questions or on their factual knowledge regarding particular ethical and legal issues. (Author/MSE)

  20. Medical Students and Abortion: Reconciling Personal Beliefs and Professional Roles at One Medical School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dans, Peter E.

    1992-01-01

    Surveys of first- and fourth-year Johns Hopkins University (Maryland) medical students found little change in attitudes about abortion over four years. Attitudes correlated most strongly with personal beliefs about when a fetus is considered human life and somewhat with student gender. Results are used in a medical ethics course to illuminate…

  1. Medical Student and Senior Participants' Perceptions of a Mentoring Program Designed to Enhance Geriatric Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corwin, Sara J.; Frahm, Kathryn; Ochs, Leslie A.; Rheaume, Carol E.; Roberts, Ellen; Eleazer, G. Paul

    2006-01-01

    In 2000, the Senior Mentor Program was implemented as an innovative, instructional method in the University of South Carolina's medical school curriculum designed to enhance and strengthen student training in geriatrics. This study qualitatively analyzed second-year medical students' and senior participants' perceptions of and attitudes towards…

  2. A history of medical student debt: observations and implications for the future of medical education.

    PubMed

    Greysen, S Ryan; Chen, Candice; Mullan, Fitzhugh

    2011-07-01

    Over the last 50 years, medical student debt has become a problem of national importance, and obtaining medical education in the United States has become a loan-dependent, individual investment. Although this phenomenon must be understood in the general context of U.S. higher education as well as economic and social trends in late-20th-century America, the historical problem of medical student debt requires specific attention for several reasons. First, current mechanisms for students' educational financing may not withstand debt levels above a certain ceiling which is rapidly approaching. Second, there are no standards for costs of medical school attendance, and these can vary dramatically between different schools even within a single city. Third, there is no consensus on the true cost of educating a medical student, which limits accountability to students and society for these costs. Fourth, policy efforts to improve physician workforce diversity and mitigate shortages in the primary care workforce are inhibited by rising levels of medical student indebtedness. Fortunately, the current effort to expand the U.S. physician workforce presents a unique opportunity to confront the unsustainable growth of medical student debt and explore new approaches to the financing of medical students' education.

  3. Development of a Multidimensional Thinking Styles Scale Based on Theory of Mental Self-Government for Sixth Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaiyapornpattana, Niorn; Wongwanich, Suwimon

    2013-01-01

    This study designed 1) to develop a multidimensional thinking styles scale based on theory of mental self-government for sixth grade student 2) to investigate quality of the developed scale 3) to study profile of styles of sixth grade student and a relation of profile of styles of student in each dimension and background of gender and grade with…

  4. Medical students' knowledge of indications for imaging modalities and cost analysis of incorrect requests, shiraz, iran 2011-2012.

    PubMed

    Islami Parkoohi, Parisa; Jalli, Reza; Danaei, Mina; Khajavian, Shiva; Askarian, Mehrdad

    2014-05-01

    Medical imaging has a remarkable role in the practice of clinical medicine. This study intends to evaluate the knowledge of indications of five common medical imaging modalities and estimation of the imposed cost of their non-indicated requests among medical students who attend Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran. We conducted across-sectional survey using a self-administered questionnaire to assess the knowledge of indications of a number of medical imaging modalities among 270 medical students during their externship or internship periods. Knowledge scoring was performed according to a descriptive international grade conversion (fail to excellent) using Iranian academic grading (0 to 20). In addition, we estimated the cost for incorrect selection of those modalities according to public and private tariffs in US dollars. The participation and response rate was 200/270 (74%). The mean knowledge score was fair for all modalities. Similar scores were excellent for X-ray, acceptable for Doppler ultrasonography, and fair for ultrasonography, CT scan and MRI. The total cost for non-indicated requests of those modalities equaled $104303 (public tariff) and $205581 (private tariff). Medical students at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences lacked favorable knowledge about indications for common medical imaging modalities. The results of this study have shown a significant cost for non-indicated requests of medical imaging. Of note, the present radiology curriculum is in need of a major revision with regards to evidence-based radiology and health economy concerns.

  5. Educational improvement in Medical English Practice: Questionnaire survey to sophomore medical students of Hokkaido University.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Manabu; Olga, Amengual; Iguchi, Kaori; Otaki, Junji

    2015-11-01

    In the past, we made several efforts making curriculum changes to Medical English Practice, however, these changes did not improve motivation effectively. We have completely modified the curriculum in 2012, and performed a questionnaire survey to 112 sophomore medical students. In the final exam, students answered a questionnaire assessing all classes of the course by scoring 3 points (no change required), 2 points (minor change required), and 1 point (major change required or discontinue). In addition, students could write free comments about potential contents they would like to add to the curriculum. Each class was assessed as more than or equal to 2.5 points on average (range: 2.50-2.96). Potential contents students want to add are: 1. Speaking (45 students [55%]), 2. Listening (30 students [37%]), 3. Reading (6 students [7%]), 4. Writing (1 student [1%]). The most frequent suggestion was to include group discussions in speaking (27 students [33%]), followed by listening on topics of healthcare systems (11 students [13%]). Many students suggested to include conversation classes in small groups, or classes in which international students introduce the structure of healthcare systems of their home countries to the curriculum. Increasing the participation of international faculty, staff and students in the Medical English Practice might contribute to the improvement of medical students' motivation.

  6. Predicting the Grades of Low-Income--Ethnic-Minority Students from Teacher-Student Discrepancies in Reported Motivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, Kristin Emilia; Suizzo, Marie-Anne; Jackson, Karen Moran

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate the effects of discrepancies between teachers' perceptions of students' motivation and students' reports of their motivation on math and English grades and to identify possible gender and ethnic differences. Participants included 215 low-income, ethnic-minority students and their teachers in academically…

  7. Testing the Efficacy of "INSIGHTS" on Student Disruptive Behavior, Classroom Management, and Student Competence in Inner City Primary Grades

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClowry, Sandra Graham; Snow, David L.; Tamis-LeMonda, Catherine S.; Rodriguez, Eileen T.

    2010-01-01

    A prevention trial tested the efficacy of "INSIGHTS into Children's Temperament" as compared to a Read Aloud attention control condition in reducing student disruptive behavior and enhancing student competence and teacher classroom management. Participants included 116 first and second grade students, their parents, and their 42 teachers…

  8. Hierarchical Effects of School-, Classroom-, and Student-Level Factors on the Science Performance of Eighth-Grade Taiwanese Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsai, Liang-Ting; Yang, Chih-Chien

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to understand the effect of student-, classroom-, and school-level factors on the science performance of 8th-grade Taiwanese students in the Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) 2011 by using multilevel analysis. A total of 5,042 students from 153 classrooms of 150 schools participated in the TIMSS…

  9. Emotional Intelligence: A Comparison between Medical and Non-Medical Students

    PubMed Central

    ABDOLLAHPOUR, Ibrahim; NEDJAT, Saharnaz; BESHARAT, Mohammad Ali; HOSSEINI, Bayan; SALIMI, Yahya

    2016-01-01

    Background: Emotional intelligence (EI) has recently been considered as one of the necessary elements for success and achievement in medical fields. The present study was conducted in Iran to compare the EI in medical and non-medical students adjusted for the other relevant factors. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted from October 2011 to January 2012 on 872 students of medicine, paramedical and non-medical groups in Tehran University and Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran selected by multi-stage weighted cluster sampling. The Farsi version of revised Schutte Emotional Intelligence (FEIS) was used to estimate emotional intelligence. Results: The mean of total EI was equal to 124.9 (SD=8.4) out of 205 and the means for its dimensions were as follows: regulation of emotions 39.3 (SD=5.1), utilization of emotions 26.7 (SD=3.6) and appraisal of emotions 33.5 (SD=5.3). While the paramedical and non-medical students’ total EI score was significantly higher than the medical students’, in the utilization of emotions dimension, the medical students scored significantly higher than the other two groups. Conclusion: The lower levels of the medical students’ total EI score in comparison with paramedical and non-medical students in this study demands the relevant authorities to pay even more attention to the selection and training of medical students. PMID:27114986

  10. Tobacco abuse and physical activity among medical students

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Objective This lifestyle is mainly determined during childhood and connected with poor public prophylactic health policy. The aim of this study was to estimate physical activity and level of tobacco abuse, as well as knowledge about health behaviours, among medical students. Methods Questionnaires were completed by Polish (243) and foreign medical students (80). Results It was stated that about 20% of the students smoked cigarettes. Female students from Norway took up smoking significantly more often than other participants, whereas there were more smokers among those from Poland. There was a significantly larger percentage of smoking males from Norway than among male Polish students. The same students presented a low level of physical activity. The smallest level of physical activity was characteristic of the Polish women. Conclusion This situation requires an intensification of activities aimed at supporting pro-health lifestyles and the elimination of unfavourable effects, especially among medical students. PMID:20156733

  11. Innovative learning: employing medical students to write formative assessments.

    PubMed

    Chamberlain, Suzanne; Freeman, Adrian; Oldham, James; Sanders, David; Hudson, Nicky; Ricketts, Chris

    2006-11-01

    Peninsula Medical School, UK, employed six students to write MCQ items for a formative applied medical knowledge item bank. The students successfully generated 260 quality MCQs in their six-week contracted period. Informal feedback from students and two staff mentors suggests that the exercise provided a very effective learning environment and that students felt they were 'being paid to learn'. Further research is under way to track the progress of the students involved in the exercise, and to formally evaluate the impact on learning.

  12. Increasing Medical Students' Awareness of Psychological Concomitants of Illness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Misiaszek, John

    1984-01-01

    A practical psychiatric experience for future nonpsychiatrists developed as part of a traditional medical student inpatient psychiatry clerkship is described. Weekly student conferences focus on the most complex cases encountered. The practical, interactional techniques used have helped reduce students' initial anxiety. (MSE)

  13. Undergraduate Medical Students' Reasoning with Regard to the Prescribing Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harries, C. S.; Botha, J.

    2007-01-01

    When final year medical students reporting poor prescribing confidence were tested, key prescribing weaknesses emerged. This study aimed to characterize student variability in both the experience of and cognitive levels displayed during prescribing. Blooms Taxonomy cognitive categories were assigned to each question of a student test measuring…

  14. Implications of the Hospitalist Model for Medical Students' Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hauer, Karen E.; Wachter, Robert M.

    2001-01-01

    Proposes a research agenda to investigate the educational impact for medical students of the hospitalist model, suggests strategies to mitigate the limitations in students' exposures to subspecialty faculty, and recommends professional development in teaching for hospitalists to ensure that student education thrives in this new environment of…

  15. The globalization of medical education: sending American medical students overseas.

    PubMed

    Glaser, Kelli

    2012-01-01

    The benefits of global health experiences on our students are vast and can be enhanced by our development of structured curricula and feedback systems that will maximize the benefits to students and to the populations they treat now and in the future.

  16. The Relationship between Promotions Committees' Identification of Problem Medical Students and Subsequent State Medical Board Actions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santen, Sally A.; Petrusa, Emil; Gruppen, Larry D.

    2015-01-01

    Studies have found unprofessional behavior in medical school was associated with disciplinary action by state medical boards. For medical schools, promotions committees are responsible for identifying which students do not demonstrate academic performance and professional behavior acceptable for promotion and graduation. The objective of this…

  17. Electronic Medical Records and Their Impact on Resident and Medical Student Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keenan, Craig R.; Nguyen, Hien H.; Srinivasan, Malathi

    2006-01-01

    Objective: Electronic medical records (EMRs) are becoming prevalent and integral tools for residents and medical students. EMRs can integrate point-of-service information delivery within the context of patient care. Though it may be an educational tool, little is known about how EMR technology is currently used for medical learners. Method: The…

  18. Medical Students' Knowledge about Alcohol and Drug Problems: Results of the Medical Council of Canada Examination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahan, Meldon; Midmer, Deana; Wilson, Lynn; Borsoi, Diane

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To determine knowledge of a national sample of medical students about substance withdrawal, screening and early intervention, medical and psychiatric complications of addiction, and treatment options. Methods: Based on learning objectives developed by medical faculty, twenty-two questions on addictions were included in the 1998 Canadian…

  19. Reform of the Method for Evaluating the Teaching of Medical Linguistics to Medical Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Hongkui; Wang, Bo; Zhang, Longlu

    2014-01-01

    Explorating reform of the teaching evaluation method for vocational competency-based education (CBE) curricula for medical students is a very important process in following international medical education standards, intensify ing education and teaching reforms, enhancing teaching management, and improving the quality of medical education. This…

  20. Perception of medical students about pharmacology and scope of improvement.

    PubMed

    Prasad, A; Datta, P P; Pattanayak, C; Panda, P

    2014-01-01

    Pharmacology is a subject taught in the medical curriculum in India over a period of one and half years along with pathology, microbiology and forensic medicine. The present study was planned to know the opinion of medical students regarding pharmacology and to assess the proposed teaching schedule and methods of teaching pharmacology. The study was conducted in a private medical college in eastern India among the medical undergraduate students in 5th semester. Total 74 students participated in the study. A pre-designed, pre-tested, semi-structured questionnaire was given to the students and data was collected after one hour. Collected data was compiled, tabulated and analyzed in SPSS (version 16.0). The subject was perceived as interesting and useful by majority of students and most of them were in opinion to integrate pharmacology with the clinical subjects. Lecture in whole class was the most preferred teaching method according to the students and teaching with chalk and board they preferred most. Rational use of medicine, clinical trial, pediatric and geriatric pharmacology are the important topics the students felt to be included in the curriculum. Regular assessment of teaching methods by the students and taking suggestions from the students about improving the teaching method and redesigning the curriculum can help a lot in improving the learning capacity of the medical students and that will give benefit for the society as a whole.

  1. Mission US and Historical Empathy: A Qualitative Case Study of Sixth-Grade Students' Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxlow, James Richard

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the potential development and use of historical empathy in sixth-grade students while using the colonial-era historical education game "Mission US" and its associated learning activities. A collective case study was developed to describe and interpret students' experiences. The gathered data included the students'…

  2. The Impact of Reading Recovery on the Reading Achievement of First Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Case, Marguerite

    2015-01-01

    There are so many different intervention programs for educators to use to increase the reading achievement of below grade level students, that it can often be difficult to choose the appropriate one for the students. Most programs are scripted and are used with small groups of students. Reading Recovery is not a scripted program and is taught in a…

  3. Promotion from Eighth to Ninth Grade without Meeting Minimum Requirements: The Effects on Student Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamon, John Russell

    2013-01-01

    Georgia law mandates that students who fail the state Criterion-Referenced Competency Tests (CRCT) twice in grades three, five, and eight be retained, unless a committee is convened including a subject-area teacher, an administrator, and the student's parent or guardian. If the committee unanimously decides the student may be successful in the…

  4. 11th Grade Students' Conceptual Understanding about Torque Concept: A Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bostan Sarioglan, Ayberk; Küçüközer, Hüseyin

    2014-01-01

    In this study, it is aimed to reveal the effect of instruction on students' ideas about torque before instruction, after instruction and fifteen weeks after instruction. The working group consists of twenty five high school eleventh grade students. To reveal these students' ideas about the concept of torque a concept test consisting of seven…

  5. First-Year Students' Employment, Engagement, and Academic Achievement: Untangling the Relationship between Work and Grades

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pike, Gary R.; Kuh, George D.; Massa-McKinley, Ryan C.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the relationships among first-year students' employment, engagement, and academic achievement using data from the 2004 National Survey of Student Engagement. A statistically significant negative relationship was found between working more than 20 hours per week and grades, even after controlling for students' characteristics…

  6. Correlation between the Physical Activity Level and Grade Point Averages of Faculty of Education Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Imdat, Yarim

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study is to find the correlation that exists between physical activity level and grade point averages of faculty of education students. The subjects consist of 359 (172 females and 187 males) under graduate students To determine the physical activity levels of the students in this research, International Physical Activity…

  7. Fourth Grade Students' Drawing Interpretations of a Sport Education Soccer Unit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mowling, Claire M.; Brock, Sheri J.; Hastie, Peter A.

    2006-01-01

    This study examined fourth grade students' representations of sport education through drawings in order to determine what students perceived as most important throughout their soccer season. The first objective was to determine whether student representations would follow the components of sport education (e.g., season, team affiliation, formal…

  8. Examining One Class of Third-Grade Spellers: The Diagnostic Potential of Students' Spelling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ness, Molly K.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to examine the developmental spelling levels of one class of 17 third-grade students. In analyzing over 600 student spelling samples, results indicate that these students spanned four spelling stages: (1) letter name, (2) within word pattern, (3) syllables and affixes, and (4) derivational relations (Bear,…

  9. Fifth-Grade Students' Knowledge about Writing Process and Writing Genres

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillespie, Amy; Olinghouse, Natalie G.; Graham, Steve

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine what students know about the process of writing and the characteristics of stories, persuasive arguments, and informational reports. Participants were 50 grade 5 students. Students responded to questions about writing process and the three different types of writing, and showed a nuanced but relatively…

  10. What Fifth-Grade Students Reveal about Their Literacies by Writing and Telling Narratives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Dennis S.

    2013-01-01

    Written and oral literacy narratives produced by seven fifth-grade students are examined to identify the literacy identities students construct when narrating their past and present experiences with reading and writing. The narrative analyses reveal four major findings: 1. The students who contributed to this study have experienced literacy in…

  11. Peer Contexts: Do Old for Grade and Retained Peers Influence Student Behavior in Middle School?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muschkin, Clara G.; Glennie, Elizabeth; Beck, Audrey N.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Many school systems have ended social promotion by implementing accountability systems where students who fail academic assessments are retained in grade. Additionally, some parents have delayed their children's entry into school, believing that older students have an advantage. While research has examined outcomes for students who…

  12. The Effect of Positive Verbal Reinforcement on the Study Behavior of Eighth Grade Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lake-Jones, Felicia

    This study was conducted in order to investigate the effect of verbal reinforcement on the study behavior of eighth grade students. Twelve middle school students participated. The target students were observed fifteen minutes a day, three days per week. Study behavior was noted with a check or a zero. If the subject was participating in class the…

  13. An Error Analysis of Form 2 (Grade 7) Students in Simplifying Algebraic Expressions: A Descriptive Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lim, Kok Seng

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: This study aimed to investigate the errors made by 265 Form 2 male students in simplifying algebraic expressions. Method: A total of 265 Form 2 (Grade 7) male students were selected for this study. 10 high, medium and low ability students in each group were selected for the interviews. 40 items were administered to the respondents to…

  14. ASSESSMENT OF RURAL MEXICAN-AMERICAN STUDENTS IN GRADES PRE-SCHOOL THROUGH TWELFTH.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    PALOMARES, UVALDO

    THE CALIFORNIA MEXICAN-AMERICAN EDUCATION RESEARCH PROJECT INITIATED AN ASSESSMENT PROPOSAL DIRECTED TOWARD MORE EFFECTIVE EDUCATION OF MEXICAN-AMERICAN STUDENTS IN WASCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS AND THROUGHOUT CALIFORNIA. A SAMPLE OF THIRTEEN STUDENTS FROM EACH GRADE, PRE-SCHOOL THROUGH TWELVE, WAS RANDOMLY SELECTED FROM STUDENTS WITH SPANISH SURNAMES…

  15. Relations among Grade 4 Students' Perceptions of Autonomy, Engagement in Science, and Reading Motivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taboada Barber, Ana; Buehl, Michelle M.

    2013-01-01

    The authors extend previous work on students' perceptions of teachers' autonomy-enhancing and autonomy-suppressing behaviors in relation to students' engagement to a more situated context (i.e., two Grade 4 science instructional conditions instead of school in general) and a linguistically diverse population (i.e., Hispanic students). They also…

  16. Elementary School Computer Access, Socioeconomic Status, Ethnicity, and Grade 5 Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett, Julie Ann

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe the current school computer access rates of elementary school students and to determine the extent to which school computer access relates to academic achievement among Grade 5 students in the state of Texas. Specifically, the relationship of school computer access to student passing rates on the…

  17. Early Numeracy Intervention Program for First-Grade Students with Mathematics Difficulties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryant, Diane Pedrotty; Bryant, Brian R.; Roberts, Greg; Vaughn, Sharon; Pfannenstiel, Kathleen Hughes; Porterfield, Jennifer; Gersten, Russell

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of an early numeracy preventative Tier 2 intervention on the mathematics performance of first-grade students with mathematics difficulties. Researchers used a pretest-posttest control group design with randomized assignment of 139 students to the Tier 2 treatment condition and 65 students to…

  18. Acids and Bases: The Appropriation of the Arrhenius Model by Tunisian Grade 10 Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ouertatani, Latifa; Dumon, Alain; Trabelsi, Malika Ayadi; Soudani, Mohamed

    2007-01-01

    In this work, we propose to identify the knowledge that Tunisian grade 10 students build up concerning acids and bases. Thus, after learning, we have proceeded by giving a paper and pencil task to students of two levels of teaching. The results obtained allow us to say that the assimilated knowledge is transitory; that the students have a worse…

  19. Third Grade Students' Mental Models of Blood Circulation Related to Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pasco, Denis; Ennis, Catherine D.

    2015-01-01

    Students' prior knowledge has been identified to play an important role in the learning process through conceptual change. In physical education, positive changes in students' lifestyles may come from changes in their conceptual understanding. In this study 45 third grade students (mean age = 8.54 years) were interviewed during their regular…

  20. Digital Natives: Fifth-Grade Students' Authentic and Ritualistic Engagement with Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dietrich, Trevor; Balli, Sandra J.

    2014-01-01

    Thirty four fifth-grade students were interviewed about classroom learning and technology. Interview data were considered through Schlechty's (2002) levels of engagement framework to explore students' authentic or ritualistic engagement during technology supported lessons. Student engagement is defined as interest in and commitment to learning.…

  1. 7th Grade Life Science Units Modified for ESOL Students--Middle School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernache, Carolyn; Jones, Jacqueline

    A set of supplemental materials for teaching grade 7 life sciences to beginning and intermediate students of English as a second language (ESL) includes an introductory section on teaching the ESL student and six instructional units. The introductory section discusses the special classroom needs and characteristics of the ESL student and provides…

  2. Samples of Students' Responses from the Grade 9 Science Performance-Based Assessment Tasks, June 1993.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Dept. of Education, Edmonton. Student Evaluation Branch.

    The purpose of this document is to provide teachers, administrators, students, and parents with samples of students' performances that exemplify standards in relation to the 1993 Grade 9 Science Performance-Based Assessment Tasks for the province of Alberta, Canada. A sample of 698 randomly selected students from 31 schools did the…

  3. Poetry Performances and Academic Identity Negotiations in the Literacy Experiences of Seventh Grade Language Arts Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Ann Marie

    2010-01-01

    This case study explores seventh grade students' experiences with writing and performing poetry. Teacher and student interviews along with class observations provide insight into how the teacher and students viewed spoken word poetry and identity. The researcher recommends practices for the teaching of critical literacy using spoken word and…

  4. Instructional Communication Predictors of Ninth-Grade Students' Affective Learning in Math and Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mottet, Timothy P.; Garza, Ruben; Beebe, Steven A.; Houser, Marian L.; Jurrells, Summer; Furler, Lisa

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine how students' perceptions of their teachers' instructional communication behaviors were related to their affective learning in math and science. A survey was used to collect perceptions from 497 ninth-grade students. The following conclusions were yielded from the data: (1) students' perceptions of their…

  5. How Do Third-Grade Students and Their Teachers Construe Each Other?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanberk, Ismail; Bagis, Semiha

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to identify teachers' personal constructs about students and students' personal constructs about teachers and to reveal to what extent they see each other as ideal. The study is descriptive and multiple-case in nature. In this regard, it was conducted with 6 third-grade students with different mean scores and 6 teachers who…

  6. Turning Points: A Transitional Story of Grade Seven Music Students' Participation in High School Band Programmes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gouzouasis, Peter; Henrey, Julia; Belliveau, George

    2008-01-01

    As a framework for our study, a broad set of themes related to the retention of students in music programmes are presented to enhance our understanding of how to retain band students. Data were collected from grade seven students comprising four focus groups. We used ethnodrama, an arts-based educational research approach, to represent results as…

  7. Teacher Knowledge of Reading and the Reading Development of Students in Grades Two through Four.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Darwin B.

    Relationships between teachers' knowledge of reading and students' achievement in reading were investigated in a sample of 1,058 students and 62 teachers in grades two, three, and four. Students were pre- and posttested with the Gates-MacGinitie Reading Tests and the Cognitive Abilities Test. Teachers' knowledge of reading was measured with the…

  8. Communities. Community Study Unit, Grade 1. Teacher Edition, Field Trip Guide for Teachers, and Student Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee County School District, Ft. Myers, FL. Dept. of Environmental Education and Instructional Development Services.

    This unit is designed to help first grade students understand the broad concept of community. The students experience a variety of in-class and field trip activities that will expose them to communities. The students observe and compare both natural and human-designed communities. Learning activities include pantomimes, listening activities,…

  9. Impact of Student Calculator Use on the 2013 NAEP Twelfth-Grade Mathematics Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klecker, Beverly M.; Klecker, Richard L.

    2014-01-01

    This descriptive research study examined 2013 NAEP 12th-grade mathematics scores by students' use of graphing calculators in math classes and the kind of calculator students used during NAEP assessment. NAEP Data Explorer analysis included two questions from Student Factors: How often do you use these different kinds of calculators in math class?…

  10. Loneliness among Students with Special Educational Needs in Mainstream Seventh Grade

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bossaert, Goele; Colpin, Hilde; Pijl, Sip Jan; Petry, Katja

    2012-01-01

    The goals of this study were twofold. The first aim was to explore loneliness prevalence in typically developing students, students with ASD and students with motor and/or sensory disabilities in mainstream 7th grade in Belgium. The second aim was to explore the relations between number of friends, friendship quality, social self-concept on the…

  11. The Benefits of Departmentalization in Upper Elementary Grades for Students and Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Malissa Lee

    2013-01-01

    This study addressed the benefits of departmentalization in upper elementary grades for students and teachers. The variables of gender and classroom structure (departmentalized versus self-contained) were considered for student participants (n = 125). Results for students were evaluated on pre-test and post-test data using the following measures:…

  12. Giving Their Best: Grading and Recognition Practices That Motivate Students to Work Hard.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mac Iver, Douglas J.; Reuman, David A.

    1994-01-01

    Traditional assessment, grading, and student-recognition practices are partly responsible for the low levels of student effort pervading American schools. Two improvement-focused systems for student accountability and recognition that have been field tested are presented: The Incentives for Improvement Program (Baltimore, Maryland) and the Windham…

  13. Effects of Computer-Based Programs on Mathematical Achievement Scores for Fourth-Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ravenel, Jessica; Lambeth, Dawn T.; Spires, Bob

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the research study was to identify the effects of computer-based programs on mathematical achievement, perceptions, and engagement of fourth-grade students. The 31 student participants were divided into two intervention groups, as a hands-on group and a computer-based group. Student achievement was measured by comparing the pretest…

  14. Risk-Category Transition Patterns for Students in Grades 2 to 4. Research Brief 7

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Bitnara Jasmine

    2013-01-01

    Early identification of students who are at-risk for reading difficulties (RD) is critical for successful and effective RTI implementation. A large group of students were followed for three years (grades 2 to 4) to investigate transition patterns of risk-categories across three years. Results indicated that although students identified at…

  15. Reading Development and Achievement of 4th-Grade Hmong Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahowald, Megan; Loughnane, Megan

    2016-01-01

    Researchers and practitioners alike have noted that Hmong students in the United States do not achieve as well as their monolingual peers and other bilingual students. The current mixed-methods study is designed to describe reading development and achievement of 4th-grade Hmong students in one large, urban school district. This study explores the…

  16. Food Insecurity among Community College Students: Prevalence and Association with Grade Point Average

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maroto, Maya E.; Snelling, Anastasia; Linck, Henry

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the prevalence of food insecurity among community college students (N = 301) and the relationship between food insecurity and student grade point average (GPA). It employed a cross-sectional intercept survey, utilizing the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Household Food Security Survey Module, student self-reported GPA, and…

  17. Teacher-Student Relationship Quality Type in Elementary Grades: Effects on Trajectories for Achievement and Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Jiun-Yu; Hughes, Jan N.; Kwok, Oi-Man

    2010-01-01

    Teacher, peer, and student reports of the quality of the teacher-student relationship were obtained for an ethnically diverse and academically at-risk sample of 706 second- and third-grade students. Cluster analysis identified four types of relationships based on the consistency of child reports of support and conflict in the relationship with…

  18. Reading Interventions for Students with Learning Disabilities in the Upper Elementary Grades

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wanzek, Jeanne; Kent, Shawn C.

    2012-01-01

    For students with learning disabilities, the upper elementary grades may represent a unique opportunity to provide successful remediation for lessening a reading difficulty and preventing students with learning disabilities from falling behind in other content areas. This article discusses effective reading interventions for students with learning…

  19. Interest Differences between Male and Female Students and Correlation to Their Academic Grades.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mena, Ileana F.

    A six week study in an urban district was conducted attempting to compare the academic interests between male and female students at the second and third grade levels, and correlate these with the students' academic performance, as put forth on the Record of Student Growth, or Report Card. The children completed teacher made interest inventories.…

  20. Are You Convinced? Middle-Grade Students' Evaluations of Mathematical Arguments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bieda, Kristen N.; Lepak, Jerilynn

    2014-01-01

    Students learn norms of proving by observing teachers generating proofs, engaging in proving, and generalizing features of proofs deemed convincing by an authority, such as a textbook. Students at all grade levels have difficulties generating valid proof; however, little research exists on students' understandings about what makes a…

  1. Strengthening Grade 3-5 Students' Foundational Knowledge of Rational Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Good, Thomas L.; Wood, Marcy B.; Sabers, Darrell; Olson, Amy M.; Lavigne, Alyson Leah; Sun, Huaping; Kalinec-Craig, Crystal

    2013-01-01

    Background: American students have done poorly in algebra and that has generated policy concerns about preparing students for STEM careers. There has been growing recognition that the algebra problem may begin in earlier grades when students do not adequately master rational numbers. Purpose: The study provided a series of workshops organized…

  2. Using Dynamic Geometry Software to Improve Eight Grade Students' Understanding of Transformation Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guven, Bulent

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the effect of dynamic geometry software (DGS) on students' learning of transformation geometry. A pre- and post-test quasi-experimental design was used. Participants in the study were 68 eighth grade students (36 in the experimental group and 32 in the control group). While the experimental group students were studying the…

  3. Students' Discourse When Working in Pairs with Etoys in an Eighth-Grade Mathematics Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeJarnette, Anna F.

    2016-01-01

    I examined students' discourse while working in pairs at the computer in an eighth-grade mathematics class to understand how students kept track of the people and things they discussed. I found that students most often referenced themselves and objects within the environment, through references to shared knowledge and the representations on the…

  4. The Influence of Circadian Type, Time of Day and Class Difficulty on Students' Grades

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McElroy, Todd; Mosteller, Lynn

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: In this paper we investigate how students' class grades are affected by individual differences in circadian rhythm, class time-of-day and class difficulty. Method: Using a sample of university students, we assessed morningness and eveningness personality type, and then obtained students recalled classes as well as their…

  5. Implementation of a Comprehensive MR Safety Course for Medical Students

    PubMed Central

    Sammet, Steffen; Sammet, Christina L.

    2015-01-01

    This article proposes the design of an educational MR safety module using an available comprehensive multiple-choice exam for instructing medical students about basic MR and patient related safety. The MR safety course material can be implemented as a traditional didactic or interactive lecture in combination with hands-on safety demonstrations. The goal of the course is to ensure that medical students receive a basic understanding of MR principles and safety considerations. This course should prepare medical students for consideration of patient screening and safety when ordering MR studies. A multiple-choice exam can be used to document the proficiency in MR safety of the medical students. The course can be used by various medical school programs and may help to ensure consistent quality of teaching materials and MR safety standards. PMID:26172156

  6. Medical students' use of Facebook for educational purposes.

    PubMed

    Ali, Anam

    2016-06-01

    Medical students use Facebook to interact with one another both socially and educationally. This study investigates how medical students in a UK medical school use Facebook to support their learning. In particular, it identifies the nature of their educational activities, and details their experiences of using an educational Facebook group. Twenty-four medical students who self-identified as being Facebook users were invited to focus groups to attain a general overview of Facebook use within an educational context. A textual analysis was then conducted on a small group of intercalating medical students who used a self-created Facebook group to supplement their learning. Five of these students participated in semi-structured interviews. Six common themes were generated. These included 'collaborative learning', 'strategic uses for the preparation for assessment', 'sharing experiences and providing support', 'creating and maintaining connections', 'personal planning and practical organization' and 'sharing and evaluating educational resources'. Evidence from this study shows that medical students are using Facebook informally to enhance their learning and undergraduate lives. Facebook has enabled students to create a supportive learning community amongst their peers. Medical educators wishing to capitalize on Facebook, as a platform for formal educational initiatives, should remain cautious of intruding on this peer online learning community.

  7. Medical professionalism on television: student perceptions and pedagogical implications.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Roslyn; Wilson, Ian; Langendyk, Vicki

    2014-11-01

    Previous research has pointed to the role television can play in informing health practices and beliefs. Within the academic setting in particular, some educators have raised concerns about the influence of medical dramas on students. Less research, however, draws on the perspectives of students, and this study therefore explores medical students' perceptions of medical practice and professionalism in popular medical television programmes. Qualitative data from surveys of Australian undergraduate medical students showed that students perceived professionalism in dichotomous ways, with three main themes: cure-care, where a doctor's skill is either technical or interpersonal; work-leisure, where a doctor is either dedicated to work or personal life; and clinical-administration, where work is either direct patient care or administration. There continue to be imagined divisions between curing and caring for students, who express concerns about balancing work and leisure, and expectations that doctors should have little administrative work. Given students were able to identify these important contemporary issues around professionalism on television, there is pedagogical value in using popular images of the medical world in medical education.

  8. The Effect of Mastery Learning Model with Reflective Thinking Activities on Medical Students' Academic Achievement: An Experimental Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elaldi, Senel

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the effect of mastery learning model supported with reflective thinking activities on the fifth grade medical students' academic achievement. Mixed methods approach was applied in two samples (n = 64 and n = 6). Quantitative part of the study was based on a pre-test-post-test control group design with an experiment…

  9. Preparing Medical Students as Agentic Learners through Enhancing Student Engagement in Clinical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Janet; Sweet, Linda; Billett, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Preparing medical students to be agentic learners is held to be increasingly important. This is because beyond sequencing, enhancing and varying of experiences across university and health care settings, medical students require epistemological agency to optimize their learning. The positioning of students in these settings, and their engagement…

  10. What Students Really Learn: Contrasting Medical and Nursing Students' Experiences of the Clinical Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liljedahl, Matilda; Boman, Lena Engqvist; Fält, Charlotte Porthén; Bolander Laksov, Klara

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores and contrasts undergraduate medical and nursing students' experiences of the clinical learning environment. Using a sociocultural perspective of learning and an interpretative approach, 15 in-depth interviews with medical and nursing students were analysed with content analysis. Students' experiences are described using a…

  11. Adverse Childhood Experiences among Veterinary Medical Students: A Multi-Site Study.

    PubMed

    Strand, Elizabeth B; Brandt, Jennifer; Rogers, Kenita; Fonken, Laurie; Chun, Ruthanne; Conlon, Peter; Lord, Linda

    2017-03-27

    This research explores Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) among veterinary medical students across six academic institutions of veterinary medicine, and their relationship with depression, stress, and desire to become a veterinarian. Between April 1, 2016 and May 23, 2016, 1,118 veterinary medical students in all 4 years of the curriculum (39% response rate) completed an anonymous web-based questionnaire about ACEs, depression using the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression scale (CESD), stress using the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS), and the age at which they wanted to become a veterinarian. Sixty-one percent (677) of respondents reported having at least one ACE. The most prevalent ACE reported was living with a household member with a mental illness (31%). Students who had experienced four or more ACEs had an approximately threefold increase in signs of clinical depression and higher than average stress when compared to students who had experienced no ACEs. The number of ACEs showed an overall graded relationship to signs of clinical depression and higher than average stress. There was no statistically significant relationship between age at which a student wanted to become a veterinarian and exposure to ACEs. Veterinary students report being exposed to ACEs before age 18 at a rate similar to that of other population-based studies. These findings do not suggest that veterinary students enter the veterinary medical education system more at risk for poor mental health due to ACEs than the general population.

  12. Computer laboratory in medical education for medical students.

    PubMed

    Hercigonja-Szekeres, Mira; Marinović, Darko; Kern, Josipa

    2009-01-01

    Five generations of second year students at the Zagreb University School of Medicine were interviewed through an anonymous questionnaire on their use of personal computers, Internet, computer laboratories and computer-assisted education in general. Results show an advance in students' usage of information and communication technology during the period from 1998/99 to 2002/03. However, their positive opinion about computer laboratory depends on installed capacities: the better the computer laboratory technology, the better the students' acceptance and use of it.

  13. Self-Medication among School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ALBashtawy, Mohammed; Batiha, Abdul-Monim; Tawalbeh, Loai; Tubaishat, Ahmad; AlAzzam, Manar

    2015-01-01

    Self-medication, usually with over-the-counter (OTC) medication, is reported as a community health problem that affects many people worldwide. Most self-medication practice usually begins with the onset of adolescence. A school-based cross-sectional study was conducted in Mafraq Governorate, Jordan, using a simple random sampling method to select…

  14. Students learning from patients: let's get real in medical education.

    PubMed

    Bleakley, Alan; Bligh, John

    2008-03-01

    Medical students must be prepared for working in inter-professional and multi-disciplinary clinical teams centred on a patient's care pathway. While there has been a good deal of rhetoric surrounding patient-centred medical education, there has been little attempt to conceptualise such a practice beyond the level of describing education of communication skills and empathy within a broad 'professionalism' framework. Paradoxically, while aiming to strengthen patient-student interactions, this approach tends to refocus on the role modelling of the physician, and opportunities for potentially deep collaborative working relationships between students and patients are missed. A radical overhaul of conventional doctor-led medical education may be necessary, that also challenges the orthodoxies of individualistic student-centred approaches, leading to an authentic patient-centred model that shifts the locus of learning from the relationship between doctor as educator and student to the relationship between patient and student, with expert doctor as resource. Drawing on contemporary poststructuralist theory of text and identity construction, and on innovative models of work-based learning, the potential quality of relationship between student and patient is articulated in terms of collaborative knowledge production, involving close reading with the patient as text, through dialogue. Here, a medical 'education' displaces traditional forms of medical 'training' that typically involve individual information reproduction. Students may, paradoxically, improve clinical acumen through consideration of silences, gaps, and contradictions in patients as texts, rather than treating communication as transparent. Such paradoxical effects have been systematically occluded or denied in traditional medical education.

  15. The training and expectations of medical students in Mozambique

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Fernando; Schwalbach, João; Adam, Yussuf; Gonçalves, Luzia; Ferrinho, Paulo

    2007-01-01

    Background This paper describes the socio-economic profile of medical students in the 1998/99 academic year at the Universidade Eduardo Mondlane (UEM) Medical Faculty in Maputo. It aims to identify their social and geographical origins in addition to their expectations and difficulties regarding their education and professional future. Methods The data were collected through a questionnaire administered to all medical students at the faculty. Results Although most medical students were from outside Maputo City and Maputo Province, expectations of getting into medical school were already associated with a migration from the periphery to the capital city, even before entering medical education. This lays the basis for the concentration of physicians in the capital city once their term of compulsory rural employment as junior doctors is completed. The decision to become a doctor was taken at an early age. Close relatives, or family friends seem to have been an especially important variable in encouraging, reinforcing and promoting the desire to be a doctor. The academic performance of medical students was dismal. This seems to be related to several difficulties such as lack of library facilities, inadequate financial support, as well as poor high school preparation. Only one fifth of the students reported receiving financial support from the Mozambican government to subsidize their medical studies. Conclusion Medical students seem to know that they will be needed in the public sector, and that this represents an opportunity to contribute to the public's welfare. Nevertheless, their expectations are, already as medical students, to combine their public sector practice with private medical work in order to improve their earnings. PMID:17445263

  16. Medical Student Perceptions of the Learning Environment in Medical School Change as Students Transition to Clinical Training in Undergraduate Medical School.

    PubMed

    Dunham, Lisette; Dekhtyar, Michael; Gruener, Gregory; CichoskiKelly, Eileen; Deitz, Jennifer; Elliott, Donna; Stuber, Margaret L; Skochelak, Susan E

    2017-03-20

    Phenomenon: The learning environment is the physical, social, and psychological context in which a student learns. A supportive learning environment contributes to student well-being and enhances student empathy, professionalism, and academic success, whereas an unsupportive learning environment may lead to burnout, exhaustion, and cynicism. Student perceptions of the medical school learning environment may change over time and be associated with students' year of training and may differ significantly depending on the student's gender or race/ethnicity. Understanding the changes in perceptions of the learning environment related to student characteristics and year of training could inform interventions that facilitate positive experiences in undergraduate medical education.

  17. Effects of the DICOM grayscale standard display function on the accuracy of medical-grade grayscale and consumer-grade color displays for telemammography screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salazar, Antonio J.; Romero, Javier; Bernal, Oscar; Moreno, Angela; Velasco, Sofía.; Díaz, Xavier

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the diagnostic accuracy of the consumer-grade and medical-grade monitors —with very different costs— in breast cancer detection, when using with and without Digital Imaging and Communication in Medicine (DICOM) standard calibration. This was a retrospective study with factorial design and repeated measures, using 70 digital mammograms (40 benign or normal cases and 30 malignant cases), four radiologists, and three displays, with and without display calibration. Film mammograms were also included. Readings were classified according to the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System. One medical-grade grayscale display and two consumer-grade displays were compared. Receiver operating characteristics curves were plotted for nodules, micro calcifications and the degree of malignancy. The diagnostic accuracy for each device was calculated as the area under these curves and accuracies were compared using analysis of variance.

  18. Effectiveness of a quality improvement curriculum for medical students.

    PubMed

    Tartaglia, Kimberly M; Walker, Curt

    2015-01-01

    Introduction As health systems find ways to improve quality of care, medical training programs are finding opportunities to prepare learners on principles of quality improvement (QI). The impact of QI curricula for medical students as measured by student learning is not well delineated. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of a QI curriculum for senior medical students as measured by student knowledge and skills. Methods This study was an observational study that involved a self-assessment and post-test Quality Improvement Knowledge Application Tool (QIKAT) for intervention and control students. A QI curriculum consisting of online modules, live discussions, independent readings and reflective writing, and participation in a mentored QI project was offered to fourth-year medical students completing an honor's elective (intervention group). Senior medical students who received the standard QI curriculum only were recruited as controls. Results A total of 22 intervention students and 12 control students completed the self-assessment and QIKAT. At baseline, there was no difference between groups in self-reported prior exposure to QI principles. Students in the intervention group reported more comfort with their skills in QI overall and in 9 of the 12 domains (p<0.05). Additionally, intervention students performed better in each of the three case scenarios (p<0.01). Discussion A brief QI curriculum for senior medical students results in improved comfort and knowledge with QI principles. The strengths of our curriculum include effective use of classroom time and faculty mentorship with reliance on pre-existing online modules and written resources. Additionally, the curriculum is easily expandable to larger groups of students and transferable to other institutions.

  19. Assessment of Medication Use among University Students in Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Background. The extent, nature, and determinants of medication use of individuals can be known from drug utilization studies. Objectives. This study intended to determine medication consumption, sharing, storage, and disposal practices of university students in Northwest Ethiopia. Methods. A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted on 404 university students selected through stratified random sampling technique. Data were collected using self-administered questionnaire and analyzed with SPSS version 20 statistical software. Pearson's Chi-square test of independence was conducted with P < 0.05 taken as statistically significant. Results. At 95.3% response rate, the prevalences of medication consumption and sharing were 35.3% (N = 136) and 38.2% (N = 147), respectively. One hundred (26%) respondents admitted that they often keep leftover medications for future use while the rest (N = 285, 74%) discard them primarily into toilets (N = 126, 44.2%). Evidence of association existed between medication taking and year of study (P = 0.048), medication sharing and sex (P = 0.003), and medication sharing and year of study (P = 0.015). Conclusion. There is a high prevalence of medication consumption, medication sharing, and inappropriate disposal practices which are influenced by sex and educational status of the university students. Thus medication use related educational interventions need to be given to students in general. PMID:28393101

  20. Relationship between medical student perceptions of mistreatment and mistreatment sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    BURSCH, BRENDA; FRIED, JOYCE M.; WIMMERS, PAUL F.; COOK, IAN A.; BAILLIE, SUSAN; ZACKSON, HANNAH; STUBER, MARGARET L.

    2015-01-01

    Background National statistics reveal that efforts to reduce medical student mistreatment have been largely ineffective. Some hypothesize that as supervisors gain skills in professionalism, medical students become more sensitive. Aims The purpose of this study was to determine if medical student perceptions of mistreatment are correlated with mistreatment sensitivity. Method At the end of their third year, 175 medical students completed an Abuse Sensitivity Questionnaire, focused on student assessment of hypothetical scenarios which might be perceived as abusive, and the annual Well-Being Survey, which includes measurement of incident rates of mistreatment. It was hypothesized that those students who identified the scenarios as abusive would also be more likely to perceive that they had been mistreated. Results Student perceptions of mistreatment were not statistically correlated with individual’s responses to the scenarios or to a statistically derived abuse sensitivity variable. There were no differences in abuse sensitivity by student age or ethnicity. Women were more likely than men to consider it “harsh” to be called incompetent during rounds (p <0.0005). Conclusion This study provides preliminary evidence that challenges the hypothesis that medical students who perceive mistreatment by their superiors are simply more sensitive. PMID:23102103