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Sample records for graded forebrain ischemia

  1. Regional glucose utilization and blood flow following graded forebrain ischemia in the rat: correlation with neuropathology

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsberg, M.D.; Graham, D.I.; Busto, R.

    1985-10-01

    Regional patterns of cerebral glucose utilization (rCMRglc) and blood flow (rCBF) were examined in the early recovery period following transient forebrain ischemia in order to correlate early postischemic physiological events with regionally selective patterns of ischemic neuropathology. Wistar rats were subjected to 30 or 60 minutes of graded forebrain ischemia by a method combining unilateral occlusion of the common carotid artery with moderate elevation of intracranial pressure and mild hypotension; this procedure results in a high-grade ischemic deficit affecting chiefly the lateral neocortex, striatum, and hippocampus ipsilateral to the carotid occlusion. Simultaneous measurements of rCMRglc and rCBF made in regional tissue samples after 2 and 4 hours of postischemic recirculation using a double-tracer radioisotopic strategy revealed a disproportionately high level of glucose metabolism relative to blood flow in the early postischemic striatum, owing to the resumption of nearly normal rCMRglc in the face of depressed flow. In contrast, the neocortex, which had been equally ischemic, showed parallel depressions of both metabolism and blood flow during early recovery. Light microscopy at 4 and 8 hours after recovery revealed the striatum to be the predominant locus of ischemic neuronal alterations, whereas neocortical lesions were much less prominent in extent and severity at this time. The resumption of normal levels of metabolism in the setting of a disproportionate depression of rCBF in the early postischemic period may accentuate the process of neuronal injury initiated by ischemia and may contribute to the genesis of neuronal necrosis in selectively vulnerable areas of the forebrain.

  2. Time course of ischemia/reperfusion-induced oxidative modification of neural proteins in rat forebrain.

    PubMed

    Lehotský, J; Murín, R; Strapková, A; Uríková, A; Tatarková, Z; Kaplán, P

    2004-12-01

    Time course of oxidative modification of forebrain neural proteins was investigated in the rat model of global and partial cerebral ischemia/reperfusion. Animals were subjected to 4-vessel occlusion for 15 min (global ischemia). After the end of ischemia and at different reperfusion times (2, 24 and 48 h), lipoperoxidation-dependent and direct oxidative modification neural protein markers were measured in the forebrain total membrane fraction (tissue homogenate). Ischemia itself causes significant changes only in levels of tryptophan and bityrosine fluorescence when compared to controls. All tested parameters of protein modification altered significantly and were maximal at later reperfusion stage. Content of carbonyl group in re-flow period steadily increased and culminated at 48 h of reperfusion. The highest increase in the fluorescence of bityrosines was detected after 24 h of reperfusion and was statistically significant to both sham operated and ischemic groups. The changes in fluorescence intensity of tryptophan decreased during a reperfusion time dependent manner. Formation of lysine conjugates with lipoperoxidation end-products significantly increased only at later stages of reperfusion. Total forebrain membranes from animals subjected to 3-vessel occlusion model to 15 min (partial ischemia) show no altered content of oxidatively modified proteins compared to controls. Restoration of blood flow for 24 h significantly decreased only fluorescence of aromatic tryptophan. Partial forebrain ischemia/reperfusion resulted in no detectable significant changes in oxidative products formation in extracerebral tissues (liver and kidney) homogenates. Our results suggest that global ischemia/reperfusion initiates both the lipoperoxidation-dependent and direct oxidative modifications of neural proteins. The findings support the view that spatial and temporal injury at later stages of ischemic insult at least partially involves oxidative stress-induced amino acid

  3. The neuroprotective mechanism of ampicillin in a mouse model of transient forebrain ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyung-Eon; Cho, Kyung-Ok; Choi, Yun-Sik

    2016-01-01

    Ampicillin, a β-lactam antibiotic, dose-dependently protects neurons against ischemic brain injury. The present study was performed to investigate the neuroprotective mechanism of ampicillin in a mouse model of transient global forebrain ischemia. Male C57BL/6 mice were anesthetized with halothane and subjected to bilateral common carotid artery occlusion for 40 min. Before transient forebrain ischemia, ampicillin (200 mg/kg, intraperitoneally [i.p.]) or penicillin G (6,000 U/kg or 20,000 U/kg, i.p.) was administered daily for 5 days. The pretreatment with ampicillin but not with penicillin G signifi cantly attenuated neuronal damage in the hippocampal CA1 subfield. Mechanistically, the increased activity of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) following forebrain ischemia was also attenuated by ampicillin treatment. In addition, the ampicillin treatment reversed increased immunoreactivities to glial fibrillary acidic protein and isolectin B4, markers of astrocytes and microglia, respectively. Furthermore, the ampicillin treatment significantly increased the level of glutamate transporter-1, and dihydrokainic acid (DHK, 10 mg/kg, i.p.), an inhibitor of glutamate transporter-1 (GLT-1), reversed the neuroprotective effect of ampicillin. Taken together, these data indicate that ampicillin provides neuroprotection against ischemia-reperfusion brain injury, possibly through inducing the GLT-1 protein and inhibiting the activity of MMP in the mouse hippocampus. PMID:26937215

  4. Glucose metabolism and neurogenesis in the gerbil hippocampus after transient forebrain ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Dae Young; Lee, Kwon Young; Park, Joon Ha; Jung, Hyo Young; Kim, Jong Whi; Yoon, Yeo Sung; Won, Moo-Ho; Choi, Jung Hoon; Hwang, In Koo

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence exists that glucose transporter 3 (GLUT3) plays an important role in the energy metabolism in the brain. Most previous studies have been conducted using focal or hypoxic ischemia models and have focused on changes in GLUT3 expression based on protein and mRNA levels rather than tissue levels. In the present study, we observed change in GLUT3 immunoreactivity in the adult gerbil hippocampus at various time points after 5 minutes of transient forebrain ischemia. In the sham-operated group, GLUT3 immunoreactivity in the hippocampal CA1 region was weak, in the pyramidal cells of the CA1 region increased in a time-dependent fashion 24 hours after ischemia, and in the hippocampal CA1 region decreased significantly between 2 and 5 days after ischemia, with high level of GLUT3 immunoreactivity observed in the CA1 region 10 days after ischemia. In a double immunofluorescence study using GLUT3 and glial-fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), we observed strong GLUT3 immunoreactivity in the astrocytes. GLUT3 immunoreactivity increased after ischemia and peaked 7 days in the dentate gyrus after ischemia/reperfusion. In a double immunofluorescence study using GLUT3 and doublecortin (DCX), we observed low level of GLUT3 immunoreactivity in the differentiated neuroblasts of the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus after ischemia. GLUT3 immunoreactivity in the sham-operated group was mainly detected in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus. These results suggest that the increase in GLUT3 immunoreactivity may be a compensatory mechanism to modulate glucose level in the hippocampal CA1 region and to promote adult neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus. PMID:27651772

  5. Hyperglycemia enhances excessive superoxide anion radical generation, oxidative stress, early inflammation, and endothelial injury in forebrain ischemia/reperfusion rats.

    PubMed

    Tsuruta, Ryosuke; Fujita, Motoki; Ono, Takeru; Koda, Yoichi; Koga, Yasutaka; Yamamoto, Takahiro; Nanba, Masahiro; Shitara, Masaki; Kasaoka, Shunji; Maruyama, Ikuro; Yuasa, Makoto; Maekawa, Tsuyoshi

    2010-01-14

    The aim of this study was to confirm the effect of acute hyperglycemia on the superoxide anion radical (O(2)(-)) generation, using a novel electrochemical O(2)(-) sensor in forebrain ischemia/reperfusion rats. Fourteen male Wistar rats were allocated to a normoglycemia group (n= 7) and a hyperglycemia group (n=7). Hyperglycemia was induced by intravenous infusion of glucose solution. Forebrain ischemia was induced by bilateral common carotid arteries occlusion with hemorrhagic hypotension for 10 min and then was reperfused. The generated O(2)(-) was measured as the current produced, which was integrated as a quantified partial value of electricity (Q), in the jugular vein using the O(2)(-) sensor. The reacted O(2)(-) current and the Q began to increase gradually during the forebrain ischemia in both groups. These values increased remarkably just after reperfusion in the normoglycemia group and were further increased significantly in the hyperglycemia group after the reperfusion. Concentrations of malondialdehyde (MDA) and high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) in the brain and plasma, and soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) in the plasma in the hyperglycemia group were significantly higher than those in the normoglycemia group. Brain and plasma MDA, HMGB1, and ICAM-1 were correlated with a sum of Q during ischemia and after reperfusion. In conclusion, acute transient hyperglycemia enhanced the O(2)(-) generation in blood and exacerbated oxidative stress, early inflammation, and endothelial injury after the forebrain ischemia/reperfusion in the rats.

  6. Vulnerability of mossy fiber targets in the rat hippocampus to forebrain ischemia.

    PubMed

    Hsu, M; Buzsáki, G

    1993-09-01

    Much of the work on forebrain ischemia in the hippocampus has focused on the phenomenon of delayed neuronal death in CA1. It is established that dentate granule cells and CA3 pyramidal cells are resistant to ischemia. However, much less is known about interneuronal involvement in CA3 or ischemic injury in the dentate hilus other than the fact that somatostatin neurons in the latter lose their immunoreactivity. We combined two sensitive methods--heat-shock protein (HSP72) immunocytochemistry and a newly developed Gallyas silver stain for demonstrating impaired cytoskeletal elements--to investigate the extent of ischemic damage to CA3 and the dentate hilus using the four-vessel-occlusion model for inducing forebrain ischemia. HSP72-like immunoreactivity was induced in neuronal populations previously shown to be vulnerable to ischemia. In addition, a distinct subset of interneurons in CA3 was also extremely sensitive to ischemia, even more so than the CA1 pyramidal cells. These neurons are located in the stratum lucidum of CA3 and possess a very high density of dendritic spines. In silver preparations, they were among the first to be impregnated as "dark" neurons, before CA1 pyramidal cells; microglial reaction was also initiated first in the stratum lucidum of CA3. Whereas CA1 damage was most prominent in the septal half of the hippocampus, hilar and CA3 interneuronal damage had a more extensive dorsoventral distribution. Our results also show a far greater extent of damage in hilar neurons than previously reported. At least four hilar cell types were consistently compromised: mossy cells, spiny fusiform cells, sparsely spiny fusiform cells, and long-spined multipolar cells. A common denominator of the injured neurons in CA3 and the hilus was the presence of spines on their dendrites, which in large part accounted for the far greater number of mossy fiber terminals they receive than their non-spiny neighbors. We suggest that the differential vulnerability of neuronal

  7. Delayed neuronal death in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons after forebrain ischemia in hyperglycemic gerbils: amelioration by indomethacin.

    PubMed

    Kondo, F; Kondo, Y; Makino, H; Ogawa, N

    2000-01-17

    Hyperglycemia worsens ischemic-induced neuronal damage. Many reports argue the delayed neuronal cell death (DND) after forebrain ischemia in gerbils is due to apoptosis. We examined the effects of hyperglycemia and indomethacin on DND after forebrain ischemia in gerbils. Complete occlusion of both common carotid arteries was performed for 3.5 min followed by declamping and reperfusion. Blood glucose levels were maintained at 25-30 mmol/1 for 24 h after reperfusion in the hyperglycemic groups. We examined morphological changes consistent with DND using Nissel-stained sections and DNA fragmentation using TUNEL staining, at 12, 24, 36, 48, 60, 72, 84, 96, 108, 120 h, and 7 days after reperfusion. DND was noted 96-120 h after ischemia in normoglycemic group. Hyperglycemia enhanced the development of DND at an earlier stage (48-84 h after ischemia). TUNEL positive neurons were detected 72-108 h after reperfusion in normoglycemic group, but very few TUNEL positive neurons were detected in hyperglycemic group at 36-48 h. Indomethacin reduced the number of TUNEL-positive cells in normoglycemia and completely inhibited the appearance of TUNEL-positive cells under hyperglycemia. The number of viable neurons at 7 days after ischemia was markedly higher in indomethacin-treated groups than vehicle-treated group. Our results indicate that hyperglycemia worsens DND after forebrain ischemia in gerbils but such process is not associated with DNA fragmentation. Our results also showed that indomethacin provides a neuroprotective effect in normo- and hyperglycemic conditions.

  8. Effect of ischemic preconditioning on antioxidant status in the gerbil hippocampal CA1 region after transient forebrain ischemia.

    PubMed

    Park, Seung Min; Park, Chan Woo; Lee, Tae-Kyeong; Cho, Jeong Hwi; Park, Joon Ha; Lee, Jae-Chul; Chen, Bai Hui; Shin, Bich-Na; Ahn, Ji Hyeon; Tae, Hyun-Jin; Shin, Myoung Cheol; Ohk, Taek Geun; Cho, Jun Hwi; Won, Moo-Ho; Choi, Soo Young; Kim, In Hye

    2016-07-01

    Ischemic preconditioning (IPC) is a condition of sublethal transient global ischemia and exhibits neuroprotective effects against subsequent lethal ischemic insult. We, in this study, examined the neuroprotective effects of IPC and its effects on immunoreactive changes of antioxidant enzymes including superoxide dismutase (SOD) 1 and SOD2, catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPX) in the gerbil hippocampal CA1 region after transient forebrain ischemia. Pyramidal neurons of the stratum pyramidale (SP) in the hippocampal CA1 region of animals died 5 days after lethal transient ischemia without IPC (8.6% (ratio of remanent neurons) of the sham-operated group); however, IPC prevented the pyramidal neurons from subsequent lethal ischemic injury (92.3% (ratio of remanent neurons) of the sham-operated group). SOD1, SOD2, CAT and GPX immunoreactivities in the sham-operated animals were easily detected in pyramidal neurons in the stratum pyramidale (SP) of the hippocampal CA1 region, while all of these immunoreactivities were rarely detected in the stratum pyramidale at 5 days after lethal transient ischemia without IPC. Meanwhile, their immunoreactivities in the sham-operated animals with IPC were similar to (SOD1, SOD2 and CAT) or higher (GPX) than those in the sham-operated animals without IPC. Furthermore, their immunoreactivities in the stratum pyramidale of the ischemia-operated animals with IPC were steadily maintained after lethal ischemia/reperfusion. Results of western blot analysis for SOD1, SOD2, CAT and GPX were similar to immunohistochemical data. In conclusion, IPC maintained or increased the expression of antioxidant enzymes in the stratum pyramidale of the hippocampal CA1 region after subsequent lethal transient forebrain ischemia and IPC exhibited neuroprotective effects in the hippocampal CA1 region against transient forebrain ischemia.

  9. Effect of ischemic preconditioning on antioxidant status in the gerbil hippocampal CA1 region after transient forebrain ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seung Min; Park, Chan Woo; Lee, Tae-Kyeong; Cho, Jeong Hwi; Park, Joon Ha; Lee, Jae-Chul; Chen, Bai Hui; Shin, Bich-Na; Ahn, Ji Hyeon; Tae, Hyun-Jin; Shin, Myoung Cheol; Ohk, Taek Geun; Cho, Jun Hwi; Won, Moo-Ho; Choi, Soo Young; Kim, In Hye

    2016-01-01

    Ischemic preconditioning (IPC) is a condition of sublethal transient global ischemia and exhibits neuroprotective effects against subsequent lethal ischemic insult. We, in this study, examined the neuroprotective effects of IPC and its effects on immunoreactive changes of antioxidant enzymes including superoxide dismutase (SOD) 1 and SOD2, catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPX) in the gerbil hippocampal CA1 region after transient forebrain ischemia. Pyramidal neurons of the stratum pyramidale (SP) in the hippocampal CA1 region of animals died 5 days after lethal transient ischemia without IPC (8.6% (ratio of remanent neurons) of the sham-operated group); however, IPC prevented the pyramidal neurons from subsequent lethal ischemic injury (92.3% (ratio of remanent neurons) of the sham-operated group). SOD1, SOD2, CAT and GPX immunoreactivities in the sham-operated animals were easily detected in pyramidal neurons in the stratum pyramidale (SP) of the hippocampal CA1 region, while all of these immunoreactivities were rarely detected in the stratum pyramidale at 5 days after lethal transient ischemia without IPC. Meanwhile, their immunoreactivities in the sham-operated animals with IPC were similar to (SOD1, SOD2 and CAT) or higher (GPX) than those in the sham-operated animals without IPC. Furthermore, their immunoreactivities in the stratum pyramidale of the ischemia-operated animals with IPC were steadily maintained after lethal ischemia/reperfusion. Results of western blot analysis for SOD1, SOD2, CAT and GPX were similar to immunohistochemical data. In conclusion, IPC maintained or increased the expression of antioxidant enzymes in the stratum pyramidale of the hippocampal CA1 region after subsequent lethal transient forebrain ischemia and IPC exhibited neuroprotective effects in the hippocampal CA1 region against transient forebrain ischemia. PMID:27630689

  10. MK-801 is neuroprotective but does not improve survival in severe forebrain ischemia.

    PubMed

    Von Lubitz, D K; McKenzie, R J; Lin, R C; Devlin, T M; Skolnick, P

    1993-03-16

    The effects of MK-801 on postischemic recovery, survival and neuronal preservation in the cortex, hippocampus and striatum were studied in Mongolian gerbils. The drug was administered 30 min prior to 20 of min forebrain ischemia induced by bilateral ligation of the carotids. Neurological recovery and survival were monitored for 7 days. At the end of the monitoring period neuronal damage was analyzed in the brains of the survivors in both groups. Treatment with MK-801 did not improve either neurological recovery or end-point survival. However, significant (P < 0.01) neuronal protection was observed in the hippocampi and striata of the drug treated animals while cortical neurons were not significantly protected. These findings demonstrate that protection against ischemic neuronal damage can be observed without concomitant improvement in either postischemic neurological recovery or survival. Protection of selectively vulnerable brain regions, often used as the predictor of the therapeutic potential of an agent, does not appear to correlate well with postischemic survival in this animal model of ischemia.

  11. Effects of one-day reperfusion after transient forebrain ischemia on circulatory system in the rat.

    PubMed

    Kravcukova, Petra; Danielisova, Viera; Nemethova, Miroslava; Burda, Jozef; Gottlieb, Miroslav

    2010-06-01

    Although ischemia/reperfusion injury remains incompletely understood, it appears that reactive oxygen species produced mainly during postischemic recirculation play a critical role. The present study examined the impact of forebrain ischemia and subsequent one-day reperfusion on several blood parameters. We determined glutamate concentration in whole blood, measured Cu/Zn- and Mn-SOD (superoxide dismutase) activity in blood cells as well as plasma, and investigated the prevalence of single and double strand breaks of lymphocyte DNA. The results of our experiment showed that the concentration of glutamic acid in whole blood was increased by about 25%. Antioxidant activity of total SOD and Cu/Zn-SOD was reduced in blood cells and plasma. Mn-SOD activity in blood cells was not affected by ischemic insult and one-day reperfusion, but we detected its significantly lower activity in samples of plasma. We observed a weakly reduced level of double and a significantly elevated level of single strand breaks of lymphocyte DNA. In conclusion, one day of recovery after the ischemic attack failed to return peripheral circulatory system to physiological conditions. Reduced antioxidant capacity in the blood and an elevated level of excitotoxic amino acid glutamate may cause lymphocyte DNA damage, and probably contribute to insufficient postischemic recovery of brain tissue.

  12. Hyperglycemia and hypercapnia suppress BDNF gene expression in vulnerable regions after transient forebrain ischemia in the rat.

    PubMed

    Uchino, H; Lindvall, O; Siesjö, B K; Kokaia, Z

    1997-12-01

    Preischemic hyperglycemia or superimposed hypercapnia exaggerates brain damage caused by transient forebrain ischemia. Because high regional levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) protein correlate with resistance to ischemic damage, we studied the expression of BDNF mRNA using in situ hybridization in rats subjected to 10 minutes of forebrain ischemia under normoglycemic, hyperglycemic, or hypercapnic conditions. Compared with normoglycemic animals, the increase of BDNF mRNA using in situ hybridization in rats subjected to 10 minutes of forebrain ischemia under normoglycemic, or hypercapnic conditions. Compared with normoglycemic animals, the increase of BDNF mRNA in dentate granule cells was attenuated and that in CA3 pyramidal neurons completely prevented in hyperglycemic rats. No ischemia-induced increases of BDNF mRNA levels in the hippocampal formation were detected in hypercapnic animals. Hyperglycemic and hypercapnic rats showed transiently decreased expression of BDNF mRNA levels in the cingulate cortex, which was not observed in normoglycemic animals. The results suggest that suppression of the BDNF gene might contribute to the increased vulnerability of the CA3 region and cingulate cortex in hyperglycemic and hypercapnic animals.

  13. Immediate and delayed treatments with curcumin prevents forebrain ischemia-induced neuronal damage and oxidative insult in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Al-Omar, Fadhel A; Nagi, Mahmoud N; Abdulgadir, Mustafa M; Al Joni, Khalda S; Al-Majed, Abdulhakeem A

    2006-05-01

    Oxidative stress is believed to contribute to neurodegeneration following ischemic injury. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the possible antioxidant neuroprotective effect of curcumin (Cur) on neuronal death of hippocampal CA1 neurons following transient forebrain ischemia in rat. Treatment of Cur (200 mg/kg/day, i.p.) at three different times (immediately, 3 h and 24 h after ischemia) significantly (P<0.01) reduced neuronal damage 7 days after ischemia. Also, treatment of ischemic rats with Cur decreased the elevated levels of MDA and increased GSH contents, catalase and SOD activities to normal levels. In the in vitro, Cur was as potent as antioxidant (IC(50) = 1 microM) as butylated hydroxytoluene. The present study demonstrates that curcumin treatment attenuates forebrain ischemia-induced neuronal injury and oxidative stress in hippocampal tissue. Thus treatment with curcumin immediately or even delayed until 24 h may have the potential to be used as a protective agent in forebrain ischemic insult in human.

  14. Chronological alterations of neurofilament 150 immunoreactivity in the gerbil hippocampus and dentate gyrus after transient forebrain ischemia.

    PubMed

    Hwang, In Koo; Do, Seon-Gil; Yoo, Ki-Yeon; Kim, Duk Soo; Cho, Jun Hwi; Kwon, Young-Guen; Lee, Jae-Yong; Oh, Yang-Seok; Kang, Tae-Cheon; Won, Moo Ho

    2004-07-30

    In this study, we observed the chronological alterations of neurofilament 150 (NF-150) immunoreactivity in the gerbil hippocampus and dentate gyrus after 5 min transient forebrain ischemia. NF-150 immunoreactivity in the sham-operated group was mainly detected in mossy fibers and in the hilar region of the dentate gyrus. NF-150 immunoreactivity and protein contents of NF-150 and RT 97 (polyphosphorylation epitopes of neurofilament) were significantly decreased at 15 min after ischemic insult. Between 30 min and 12 h after ischemic insult, NF-150 immunoreactivity and protein content were significantly increased as compared with the sham-operated group. Thereafter, NF-150 immunoreactivity and protein content started to decrease. At 12 h after ischemic insult, unlike dentate gyrus, NF-150 immunoreactivity increased in pyramidal cells of the CA1 region. Thereafter, NF-150 immunoreactivity in the CA1 region started to decrease, and 4 days after ischemic insult, NF-150 immunoreactivity nearly was similar to that of the sham-operated group. These biphasic patterns of NF-150 immunoreactivity in the hippocampus and dentate gyrus are reverse correlated with that of the intracellular calcium influx. For calcium detection in the CA1 region, we also conducted alizarin red staining. Alizarin red positive neurons were detected in some neurons at 15-30 min after ischemic insult. At 12 h after ischemia, alizarin red positive neurons were decreased. Thereafter, alizarin red positive neurons started to decrease, but alizarin positive neurons were significantly increased in dying neurons 4 days after ischemia. These results suggest that ischemia-related changes of NF-150 expression may be caused by the calcium following transient forebrain ischemia.

  15. Inhibition of mTOR Pathway by Rapamycin Reduces Brain Damage in Rats Subjected to Transient Forebrain Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiao; Hei, Changhun; Liu, Ping; Song, Yaozu; Thomas, Taylor; Tshimanga, Sylvie; Wang, Feng; Niu, Jianguo; Sun, Tao; Li, P. Andy

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study are to clarify the role of mTOR in mediating cerebral ischemic brain damage and the effects of rapamycin on ischemic outcomes. Ten minutes of forebrain ischemia was induced in rats, and their brains were sampled after 3 h, 16 h, and 7 days reperfusion for histology, immunohistochemistry and biochemical analysis. Our data demonstrated that cerebral ischemia resulted in both apoptotic and necrotic neuronal death; cerebral ischemia and reperfusion led to significant increases of mRNA and protein levels of p-mTOR and its downstream p-P70S6K and p-S6; elevation of LC3-II, and release of cytochrome c into the cytoplasm in both the cortex and hippocampus. Inhibition of mTOR by rapamycin markedly reduced ischemia-induced damage; suppressed p-Akt, p-mTOR, p-P70S6K and p-S6 protein levels; decreased LC3-II and Beclin-1; and prevented cytochrome c release in the two structures. All together, these data provide evidence that cerebral ischemia activates mTOR and autophagy pathways. Inhibition of mTOR deactivates the mTOR pathway, suppresses autophagy, prevents cytochrome c release and reduces ischemic brain damage. PMID:26681922

  16. Evidence for neuroprotective effects of endogenous brain-derived neurotrophic factor after global forebrain ischemia in rats.

    PubMed

    Larsson, E; Nanobashvili, A; Kokaia, Z; Lindvall, O

    1999-11-01

    The levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) vary between different forebrain areas and show region-specific changes after cerebral ischemia. The present study explores the possibility that the levels of endogenous BDNF determine the susceptibility to ischemic neuronal death. To block BDNF activity the authors used the TrkB-Fc fusion protein, which was infused intraventricularly in rats during 1 week before and 1 week after 5 or 30 minutes of global forebrain ischemia. Ischemic damage was quantified in the striatum and hippocampal formation after 1 week of reperfusion using immunocytochemistry and stereological procedures. After the 30-minute insult, there was a significantly lower number of surviving CA4 pyramidal neurons, neuropeptide Y-immunoreactive dentate hilar neurons, and choline acetyltransferase- and TrkA-positive, cholinergic striatal interneurons in the TrkB-Fc-infused rats as compared to controls. In contrast, the TrkB-Fc treatment did not influence survival of CA1 or CA3 pyramidal neurons or striatal projection neurons. Also, after the mild ischemic insult (5 minutes), neuronal death in the CA1 region was similar in the TrkB-Fc-treated and control groups. These results indicate that endogenous BDNF can protect certain neuronal populations against ischemic damage. It is conceivable, though, that efficient neuroprotection after brain insults is dependent not only on this factor but on the concerted action of a large number of neurotrophic molecules.

  17. Sustained Expression of Osteopontin Is Closely Associated with Calcium Deposits in the Rat Hippocampus After Transient Forebrain Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jang-Mi; Shin, Yoo-Jin; Kim, Hong Lim; Cho, Jeong Min

    2012-01-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the extent and topography of osteopontin (OPN) protein expression in the rat hippocampus 4 to 12 weeks following transient forebrain ischemia, and to compare OPN expression patterns with those of calcium deposits and astroglial and microglial reactions. Two patterns of OPN staining were recognized by light microscopy: 1) a diffuse pattern of tiny granular deposits throughout the CA1 region at 4 weeks after ischemia and 2) non-diffuse ovoid to round deposits, which formed conglomerates in the CA1 pyramidal cell layer over the chronic interval of 8 to 12 weeks. Immunogold-silver electron microscopy and electron probe microanalysis demonstrated that OPN deposits were indeed diverse types of calcium deposits, which were clearly delineated by profuse silver grains indicative of OPN expression. Intracellular OPN deposits were frequently observed within reactive astrocytes and neurons 4 weeks after ischemia but rarely at later times. By contrast, extracellular OPN deposits progressively increased in size and appeared to be gradually phagocytized by microglia or brain macrophages and some astrocytes over 8 to 12 weeks. These data indicate an interaction between OPN and calcium in the hippocampus in the chronic period after ischemia, suggesting that OPN binding to calcium deposits may be involved in scavenging mechanisms. PMID:22496158

  18. The N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonist, MK-801, fails to protect against neuronal damage caused by transient, severe forebrain ischemia in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Buchan, A; Li, H; Pulsinelli, W A

    1991-04-01

    The neuroprotective effects of dizocilipine maleate (MK-801), a noncompetitive antagonist of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor/channel, were tested in the 4-vessel occlusion rat model of forebrain ischemia. Adult Wistar rats, treated intraperitoneally with MK-801 or saline using several different treatment paradigms were subjected to 5 (n = 208) or 15 (n = 62) min of severe, transient forebrain ischemia. In saline-treated animals, 15 min of ischemia (n = 13) produced extensive and consistent loss of pyramidal neurons in the CA1 zone of hippocampus. The degree and distribution of cell loss were not reduced by single dose preischemic administration of MK-801 at 1 (n = 7), 2.5 (n = 4), or 5 mg/kg (n = 8). In other animals subjected to 15 min of forebrain ischemia, multiple doses of MK-801 (5, 2.5, and 2.5 mg/kg) given immediately and at approximately 8 and 20 hr after cerebral reperfusion (n = 5) did not alter CA1 injury compared to saline-treated controls (n = 5). Five minutes of forebrain ischemia in saline-treated animals, (n = 82) resulted in significantly fewer (p less than 0.001) dead CA1 pyramidal cells and a greater variance compared to animals subjected to 15 min of ischemia. Power analysis of the preliminary saline-treated animals subjected to 5 min of ischemia (n = 22) indicated that 60 animals per group were necessary to detect a 15% difference between MK-801 and vehicle-treated groups. Multidose treatment with MK-801 (1 mg/kg) given 1 hr prior to 5 min of ischemia (n = 60) and again at approximately 8 and 16 hr after recirculation failed to attenuate hippocampal injury.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Xanthine oxidase is one of the major sources of superoxide anion radicals in blood after reperfusion in rats with forebrain ischemia/reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Ono, Takeru; Tsuruta, Ryosuke; Fujita, Motoki; Aki, Hiromi Shinagawa; Kutsuna, Satoshi; Kawamura, Yoshikatsu; Wakatsuki, Jun; Aoki, Tetsuya; Kobayashi, Chihiro; Kasaoka, Shunji; Maruyama, Ikuro; Yuasa, Makoto; Maekawa, Tsuyoshi

    2009-12-11

    We recently reported that excessive superoxide anion radical (O(2)(-)) was generated in the jugular vein during reperfusion in rats with forebrain ischemia/reperfusion using a novel electrochemical sensor and excessive O(2)(-) generation was associated with oxidative stress, early inflammation, and endothelial injury. However, the source of O(2)(-) was still unclear. Therefore, we used allopurinol, a potent inhibitor of xanthine oxidase (XO), to clarify the source of O(2)(-) generated in rats with forebrain ischemia/reperfusion. The increased O(2)(-) current and the quantified partial value of electricity (Q), which was calculated by the integration of the current, were significantly attenuated after reperfusion by pretreatment with allopurinol. Malondialdehyde (MDA) in the brain and plasma, high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) in plasma, and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) in the brain and plasma were significantly attenuated in rats pretreated with allopurinol with dose-dependency in comparison to those in control rats. There were significant correlations between total Q and MDA, HMGB, or ICAM-1 in the brain and plasma. Allopurinol pretreatment suppressed O(2)(-) generation in the brain-perfused blood in the jugular vein, and oxidative stress, early inflammation, and endothelial injury in the acute phase of forebrain ischemia/reperfusion. Thus, XO is one of the major sources of O(2)(-)- in blood after reperfusion in rats with forebrain ischemia/reperfusion.

  20. Galectin-3 expression in hippocampal CA2 following transient forebrain ischemia and its inhibition by hypothermia or antiapoptotic agents

    PubMed Central

    Hisamatsu, Kenji; Kobayashi, Kazuhiro; Miyazaki, Tatsuhiko; Hirata, Akihiro; Hatano, Yuichiro; Tomita, Hiroyuki; Hara, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence has suggested that the hippocampal CA2 region plays an important role in the recognition process. We have reported that ischemic damage in the hippocampal CA2 region following transient ischemia is caused by apoptosis, but the underlying mechanisms are still not clear. Galectin-3 is a β-galactosidase-binding lectin that is important in cell proliferation and apoptotic regulation. We have also reported that galectin-3 was expressed in activated microglia in the CA1 region 96 h after transient ischemia. The aim of this study is to determine the localization and time course of galectin-3 expression in the CA2 region following transient forebrain ischemia. Galectin-3 immunostaining was observed in both interior side of CA1 region and CA2 region in hippocampus 60 h after ischemic insult. At 66 h, galectin-3 was observed in the whole CA1 region adjacent to the CA2 region in the hippocampus. Both galectin-3 expression and neuronal cell death in the CA2 region were significantly inhibited by hypothermia and by apoptosis-inhibiting reagents. These results suggest that galectin-3 in the CA2 region is expressed independent of that in the CA1 region. Protection of the expression of galectin-3 in the CA2 region might contribute toward the survival of CA2 pyramidal neurons. PMID:26848998

  1. Galectin-3 expression in hippocampal CA2 following transient forebrain ischemia and its inhibition by hypothermia or antiapoptotic agents.

    PubMed

    Hisamatsu, Kenji; Niwa, Masayuki; Kobayashi, Kazuhiro; Miyazaki, Tatsuhiko; Hirata, Akihiro; Hatano, Yuichiro; Tomita, Hiroyuki; Hara, Akira

    2016-03-23

    Recent evidence has suggested that the hippocampal CA2 region plays an important role in the recognition process. We have reported that ischemic damage in the hippocampal CA2 region following transient ischemia is caused by apoptosis, but the underlying mechanisms are still not clear. Galectin-3 is a β-galactosidase-binding lectin that is important in cell proliferation and apoptotic regulation. We have also reported that galectin-3 was expressed in activated microglia in the CA1 region 96 h after transient ischemia. The aim of this study is to determine the localization and time course of galectin-3 expression in the CA2 region following transient forebrain ischemia. Galectin-3 immunostaining was observed in both interior side of CA1 region and CA2 region in hippocampus 60 h after ischemic insult. At 66 h, galectin-3 was observed in the whole CA1 region adjacent to the CA2 region in the hippocampus. Both galectin-3 expression and neuronal cell death in the CA2 region were significantly inhibited by hypothermia and by apoptosis-inhibiting reagents. These results suggest that galectin-3 in the CA2 region is expressed independent of that in the CA1 region. Protection of the expression of galectin-3 in the CA2 region might contribute toward the survival of CA2 pyramidal neurons.

  2. Survival of parvalbumin-immunoreactive neurons in the gerbil hippocampus following transient forebrain ischemia does not depend on HSP-70 protein induction.

    PubMed

    Ferrer, I; Soriano, M A; Vidal, A; Planas, A M

    1995-09-18

    HSP-70 was induced in the gerbil following 20 min of forebrain ischemia. The induction, as revealed with immunohistochemistry, is stronger and longer-lasting in CA3 and dentate gyrus than in CA1. Most neurons in this region, except GABAergic interneurons containing the calcium-binding protein parvalbumin, eventually cease to live as a result of delayed cell death. Double-labeling of inducible HSP-70 and parvalbumin has shown that no co-localization occurs in the hippocampus and neocortex of the gerbil in this model of transient forebrain ischemia. These results show that different thresholds of sensitivity and vulnerability exist for different subpopulations of neurons in the ischemic hippocampus, and suggest that HSP-70 protein induction is probably not essential for the survival of particular neuronal subpopulations subjected to transient ischemia.

  3. BDNF up-regulates TrkB protein and prevents the death of CA1 neurons following transient forebrain ischemia.

    PubMed

    Ferrer, I; Ballabriga, J; Martí, E; Pérez, E; Alberch, J; Arenas, E

    1998-04-01

    The neurotrophin family of growth factors, which includes Nerve Growth Factor (NGF), Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF), Neurotrophin-3 (NT3) and Neurotrophin-4/5 (NT4/5) bind and activate specific tyrosine kinase (Trk) receptors to promote cell survival and growth of different cell populations. For these reasons, growing attention has been paid to the use of neurotrophins as therapeutic agents in neurodegeneration, and to the regulation of the expression of their specific receptors by the ligands. BDNF expression, as revealed by immunohistochemistry, is found in the pre-subiculum, CA1, CA3, and dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. Strong TrkB immunoreactivity is present in most CA3 neurons but only in scattered neurons of the CA1 area. Weak TrkB immunoreactivity is found in the granule cell layer of the dentate gyrus. Unilateral grafting of BDNF-transfected fibroblasts into the hippocampus resulted in a marked increase in the intensity of the immunoreaction and in the number of TrkB-immunoreactive neurons in the granule cell layer of the dentate gyrus, pre-subiculum and CA1 area in the vicinity of the graft. No similar effects were produced after the injection of control mock-transfected fibroblasts. Delayed cell death in the CA1 area was produced following 5 min of forebrain ischemia in the gerbil. The majority of living cells in the CA1 area at the fourth day were BDNF/TrkB immunoreactive. Unilateral grafting of control mock-transfected or BDNF fibroblasts two days before ischemia resulted in a moderate non-specific protection of TrkB-negative, but not TrkB-positive cells, in the CA1 area of the grafted side. This finding is in line with a vascular and glial reaction, as revealed, by immunohistochemistry using astroglial and microglial cell markers. This astroglial response was higher in the grafted side than in the contralateral side in ischemic gerbils, but no differences were seen between BDNF-producing and non-BDNF-producing grafts. However, grafting of

  4. Long-term inhibition of Rho-kinase restores the LTP impaired in chronic forebrain ischemia rats by regulating GABAA and GABAB receptors.

    PubMed

    Huang, L; Zhao, L B; Yu, Z Y; He, X J; Ma, L P; Li, N; Guo, L J; Feng, W Y

    2014-09-26

    We previously demonstrated that inactivation of Rho-kinase by hydroxyfasudil could impact N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) excitatory interneurons in the hippocampus and attenuate the spatial learning and memory dysfunction of rats caused by chronic forebrain hypoperfusion ischemia. Complementary interactions between the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate and the inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA form the molecular basis of synaptic plasticity and cognitive performance. However, whether the GABAergic inhibitory interneurons are involved in the mechanisms underlying these processes remains unclear. Here, we further examined the role of GABAergic interneurons in the neuroprotective effect of the Rho-kinase inhibitor. Chronic forebrain ischemia was induced in Wistar rats by bilateral common carotid artery occlusion (BCAO). The general synaptic transmission and long-term potentiation (LTP) of hippocampal CA3 neurons were evaluated at 30 days after sham surgery or BCAO. Real-time PCR and Western blot analyses were conducted to determine the effect of the Rho-kinase inhibitor hydroxyfasudil on GABAergic inhibitory interneuron expression and function after ischemia. Hydroxyfasudil showed no significant effect on general synaptic transmission, but it could abolish the inhibition of LTP induced by chronic forebrain ischemia. Moreover, the mRNA and protein levels of GABAA and GABAB in three brain regions after ischemia were markedly decreased, and hydroxyfasudil could up-regulate all mRNA and protein expression levels in these areas except for GABAA mRNA in the cerebral cortex and striatum. Using phosphorylation antibodies against specific sites on the GABAA and GABAB receptors, we further demonstrated that hydroxyfasudil could inhibit GABAergic interneuron phosphorylation triggered by the theta burst stimulation. In summary, our results indicated that the inactivation of Rho-kinase could enhance GABAA and GABAB expressions by different mechanisms to guarantee the induction of

  5. Elevation of jugular venous superoxide anion radical is associated with early inflammation, oxidative stress, and endothelial injury in forebrain ischemia-reperfusion rats.

    PubMed

    Aki, Hiromi Shinagawa; Fujita, Motoki; Yamashita, Susumu; Fujimoto, Kenji; Kumagai, Kazumi; Tsuruta, Ryosuke; Kasaoka, Shunji; Aoki, Tetsuya; Nanba, Masahiro; Murata, Hidenori; Yuasa, Makoto; Maruyama, Ikuro; Maekawa, Tsuyoshi

    2009-10-06

    A novel electrochemical sensor was used in this study to determine the correlations between jugular venous O(2)(-) and HMGB1, malondialdehyde (MDA), and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) in rats with forebrain ischemia/reperfusion (FBI/R). Twenty-one male rats were divided into a Sham group, a hemorrhagic shock/reperfusion (HS/R) group, and a forebrain ischemia/reperfusion (FBI/R) group. The O(2)(-) sensor in the jugular vein detected the current derived from O(2)(-) generation (abbreviated as "O(2)(-) current"), which was integrated as the partial value of quantified electricity during ischemia (Q(I)) and after reperfusion (Q(R)). The plasma O(2)(-) current showed a gradual increase during forebrain ischemia in the HS/R and the FBI/R groups. The current showed a marked increase immediately after reperfusion and continued for more than 60 min in the FBI/R group. In the HS/R group, the current was gradually attenuated to the baseline level. Brain and plasma HMGB1 increased significantly in the FBI/R group compared with those in the Sham and the HS/R groups, and both brain and plasma HMGB1 correlated significantly with the sum of Q(I) and Q(R) (total Q). Brain and plasma MDA and plasma soluble ICAM-1 also correlated significantly with total Q. Here, we report the correlation between O(2)(-) and HMGB1, MDA, and sICAM-1 in rats with cerebral ischemia-reperfusion, using a novel electrochemical sensor. These data indicated that excessive production of O(2)(-) after ischemia-reperfusion was associated with early inflammation, oxidative stress, and endothelial activation in the brain and plasma, which might enhance the ischemia-reperfusion injury.

  6. Subchronic metformin pretreatment enhances novel object recognition memory task in forebrain ischemia: behavioural, molecular, and electrophysiological studies.

    PubMed

    Ashabi, Ghorbangol; Sarkaki, Alireza; Khodagholi, Fariba; Zareh Shahamati, Shima; Goudarzvand, Mahdi; Farbood, Yaghoob; Badavi, Mohammad; Khalaj, Leila

    2017-04-01

    Metformin exerts its effect via AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), which is a key sensor for energy homeostasis that regulates different intracellular pathways. Metformin attenuates oxidative stress and cognitive impairment. In our experiment, rats were divided into 8 groups; some were pretreated with metformin (Met, 200 mg/kg) and (or) the AMPK inhibitor Compound C (CC) for 14 days. On day 14, rats underwent transient forebrain global ischemia. Data indicated that pretreatment of ischemic rats with metformin reduced working memory deficits in a novel object recognition test compared to group with ischemia-reperfusion (I-R) (P < 0.01). Pretreatment of the I-R animals with metformin increased phosphorylated cyclic-AMP response element-binding protein (pCREB) and c-fos levels compared to the I-R group (P < 0.001 for both). The level of CREB and c-fos was significantly lower in ischemic rats pretreated with Met + CC compared to the Met + I-R group. Field excitatory postsynaptic potential (fEPSP) amplitude and slope was significantly lower in the I-R group compared to the sham operation group (P < 0.001). Data showed that fEPSP amplitude and slope was significantly higher in the Met + I-R group compared to the I-R group (P < 0.001). Treatment of ischemic animals with Met + CC increased fEPSP amplitude and slope compared to the Met + I-R group (P < 0.01). We unravelled new aspects of the protective role of AMPK activation by metformin, further emphasizing the potency of metformin pretreatment against cerebral ischemia.

  7. Galectin-3 expression in delayed neuronal death of hippocampal CA1 following transient forebrain ischemia, and its inhibition by hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Kunio; Niwa, Masayuki; Goda, Wael; Binh, Nguyen Huy; Nakashima, Masaya; Takamatsu, Manabu; Hara, Akira

    2011-03-25

    The ischemic damage in the hippocampal CA1 sector following transient ischemia, delayed neuronal death, is a typical apoptosis, but the mechanism underlying the delayed neuronal death is still far from fully understood. Galectin-3 is a β-galactosidase-binding lectin which is important in cell proliferation and apoptotic regulation. Galectin-3 is expressed by microglial cells in experimental models of adult stroke. It has been reported that activated microglial cells are widely observed in the brain, including in the hippocampal CA1 region after transient ischemic insult. In the present study, time course expression of galectin-3 following transient forebrain ischemia in gerbils was examined by immunohistochemistry, combined with Iba-1 immunostaining (a specific microglial cell marker), hematoxylin and eosin staining (for morphological observation), and in situ terminal dUTP-biotin nick end labeling of DNA fragments method (for determination of cell death). Following transient ischemia, we observed a transient increase of galectin-3 expression in CA1 region, which was maximal 96h after reperfusion. Galectin-3 expression was predominately localized within CA1 region and observed only in cells which expressed Iba-1. The galectin-3-positive microglial cells emerge after the onset of neuronal cell damage. Expressions of galectin-3 and Iba-1 were strongly reduced by hypothermia during ischemic insult. Prevention of galectin-3 and Iba-1 expression in microglia by hypothermia has led us to propose that hypothermia either inhibits microglial activation or prevents delayed neuronal death itself. Our results indicate that galectin-3 might exert its effect by modulating the neuronal damage in delayed neuronal death.

  8. Posttreatment but not pretreatment with selective beta-adrenoreceptor 1 antagonists provides neuroprotection in the hippocampus in rats subjected to transient forebrain ischemia.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Masato; Inoue, Satoki; Kawaguchi, Masahiko; Nakamura, Mitsutoshi; Konishi, Noboru; Furuya, Hitoshi

    2010-04-01

    beta-Adrenoreceptor antagonists provide neuroprotection against focal cerebral ischemia, but the effects of these antagonists on experimental global cerebral ischemia are unknown. That is, the effect of beta-adrenoreceptor antagonism in vulnerable brain regions after ischemic insult has not been examined. Therefore, we investigated the neuroprotective effects of preischemic or postischemic administration of propranolol (a nonselective beta-adrenoreceptor antagonist), esmolol, and landiolol (selective beta-adrenoreceptor 1 antagonists) against forebrain ischemia in rats. IV administration of saline 10 microL . h(-1), propranolol 100 microg . kg(-1) . min(-1), esmolol 200 microg . kg(-1) . min(-1), or landiolol 50 microg . kg(-1) . min(-1) in male Sprague-Dawley rats was started 30 minutes before or 60 minutes after 8-minute bilateral carotid artery occlusion combined with hypotension (35 mm Hg) under isoflurane (1.5%) anesthesia. All drugs were administered continuously until 5 days after reperfusion, and the animals were evaluated neurologically and histologically after this 5-day period. Preischemic treatment with propranolol, esmolol, or landiolol failed to provide neuroprotection against forebrain ischemia in the hippocampus. Rats treated with propranolol tended to have a worse score for motor activity and a higher mortality rate (up to 64%), but the differences with other groups were not statistically significant. Postischemic treatment with esmolol and landiolol, but not with propranolol, reduced neuronal injury after forebrain ischemia. However, motor activity did not differ among rats treated postischemically with any of the beta-adrenoreceptor antagonists or saline. Postischemic treatment with esmolol and landiolol provided neuroprotection in the hippocampus in rats subjected to bilateral carotid artery occlusion combined with hemorrhagic shock, whereas treatment with propranolol failed to show neuroprotection. We suggest that concomitant beta-blockade and

  9. Evaluation of Neuroprotection and Behavioral Recovery by the Kappa- Opioid, PD 117302 Following Transient Forebrain Ischemia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    recover at least 50% of baseline most rats, performance degradation was characterized by a com- values was caiculated. Quarter-life measures were...histological changes induced by transient global ce- 34:190-194; 1991. rebral ischemia in rats: Effects of cinnarizine and flunarizine. J. 17. Hall, E. D

  10. Ischemic preconditioning inhibits expression of Na(+)/H(+) exchanger 1 (NHE1) in the gerbil hippocampal CA1 region after transient forebrain ischemia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Chul; Cho, Jeong-Hwi; Kim, In Hye; Ahn, Ji Hyeon; Park, Joon Ha; Cho, Geum-Sil; Chen, Bai Hui; Shin, Bich Na; Tae, Hyun-Jin; Park, Seung Min; Ahn, Ji Yun; Kim, Dong Won; Cho, Jun Hwi; Bae, Eun Joo; Yong, Jun-Hwan; Kim, Young-Myeong; Won, Moo-Ho; Lee, Yun Lyul

    2015-04-15

    The participation of Na(+)/H(+) exchanger (NHE) in neuronal damage/death in the hippocampal CA1 region (CA1) induced by transient forebrain ischemia has not been well established, although acidosis may be involved in neuronal damage/death. In the present study, we examined the effect of ischemic preconditioning (IPC) on NHE1 immunoreactivity following a 5min of transient forebrain ischemia in gerbils. The animals used in the study were randomly assigned to four groups (sham-operated-group, ischemia-operated-group, IPC plus (+) sham-operated-group and IPC+ischemia-operated-group). IPC was induced by subjecting animals to 2min of ischemia followed by 1day of recovery. A significant neuronal loss was found in the stratum pyramidale (SP) of the CA1, not the CA2/3, of the ischemia-operated-group at 5days post-ischemia. However, in the IPC+ischemia-operated-group, neurons in the SP of the CA1 were well protected. NHE1 immunoreactivity was not detected in any regions of the CA1-3 of the sham- and IPC+sham-operated-groups. However, the immunoreactivity was apparently expressed in the SP of the CA1-3 after ischemia, and the NHE1immunoreactivity was very weak 5days after ischemia; however, at this point in time, strong NHE1immunoreactivity was found in astrocytes in the CA1. In the CA2/3, NHE1immunoreactivity was slightly changed, although NHE1immunoreactivity was expressed in the SP. In the IPC+ischemia-operated-groups, NHE1 immunoreactivity was also expressed in the SP of the CA1-3; however, the immunoreactivity was more slightly changed than that in the ischemia-operated-groups. In brief, our findings show that IPC dramatically protected CA1 pyramidal neurons and strongly inhibited NHE1 expression in the SP of the CA1 after ischemia-reperfusion. These findings suggest that the inhibition of NHE1 expression may be necessary for neuronal survival from transient ischemic damage.

  11. Moderate hypothermia suppresses jugular venous superoxide anion radical, oxidative stress, early inflammation, and endothelial injury in forebrain ischemia/reperfusion rats.

    PubMed

    Koda, Yoichi; Tsuruta, Ryosuke; Fujita, Motoki; Miyauchi, Takashi; Kaneda, Kotaro; Todani, Masaki; Aoki, Tetsuya; Shitara, Masaki; Izumi, Tomonori; Kasaoka, Shunji; Yuasa, Makoto; Maekawa, Tsuyoshi

    2010-01-22

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of moderate hypothermia (MH) on generation of jugular venous superoxide radical (O2-.), oxidative stress, early inflammation, and endothelial injury in forebrain ischemia/reperfusion (FBI/R) rats. Twenty-one Wistar rats were allocated to a control group (n=7, 37 degrees C), a pre-MH group (n=7, 32 degrees C before ischemia), and a post-MH group (n=7, 32 degrees C after reperfusion). MH was induced before induction of ischemia in the pre-MH group and just after reperfusion in the post-MH group. Forebrain ischemia was induced by occlusion of bilateral common carotid arteries with hemorrhagic hypotension for 10 min, followed by reperfusion. O(2)(-)(.) in the jugular vein was measured from the produced current using a novel O2-. sensor. The O2-. current showed a gradual increase during forebrain ischemia in the control and post-MH groups but was attenuated in the pre-MH group. Following reperfusion, the current showed a marked increase in the control group but was strongly attenuated in the pre- and post-MH groups. Concentrations of malondialdehyde, high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein, and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) in the brain and plasma 120 min after reperfusion in the pre- and post-MH groups were significantly lower than those in the control group, except for plasma HMGB1 in the post-MH group. In conclusion, MH suppressed O2-. measured in the jugular vein, oxidative stress, early inflammation, and endothelial injury in FBI/R rats.

  12. Increase of galectin-3 expression in microglia by hyperthermia in delayed neuronal death of hippocampal CA1 following transient forebrain ischemia.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Kunio; Niwa, Masayuki; Binh, Nguyen Huy; Nakashima, Masaya; Kobayashi, Kazuhiro; Takamatsu, Manabu; Hara, Akira

    2011-10-31

    The ischemic damage in the hippocampal CA1 region following transient forebrain ischemia, delayed neuronal death, is a typical apoptotic response, but the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. We have reported that mild hyperthermia (38 °C) accelerates DNA fragmentation of the gerbil CA1 pyramidal neurons following transient forebrain ischemia. Recently, we reported that galectin-3, a β-galactosidase-binding lectin, is spatio-temporally expressed only by activated microglial cells located within CA1 region following transient forebrain ischemia in gerbils. Furthermore, expression of galectin-3 and Iba-1 (a specific microglial cell marker) are strongly reduced by hypothermia during ischemic insult. To further elucidate the effect of hyperthermia on the expression of galectin-3 by micloglia in delayed neuronal death, we examined immunohistochemical expression of galectin-3 and Iba-1, in situ terminal dUTP-biotin nick end labeling of DNA fragmentation (for determination of cell death) and hematoxylin and eosin staining (for morphological observation). We observed that between 37 °C and 39 °C, there was a temperature-dependent enhancement of galectin-3 expression in microglial cells in the CA1 region following transient ischemia. Apoptotic DNA fragmentation, detected by TUNEL staining, was observed in CA1 region in normothermia. This TUNEL staining was enhanced by hyperthermia at 37.5 °C and 38 °C, but not at 39 °C. Ischemia-induced neuronal degeneration in CA1 region in gerbil hippocampus subjected to hyperthermia (37.5 °C, 38 °C and 39 °C) observed by HE staining is similar to that in normothermic gerbils. These findings imply that galectin-3 expression in microglia may influence the survival of CA1 pyramidal neurons in cases such as hyperthermia-related neuronal injury.

  13. Regional brain-derived neurotrophic factor mRNA and protein levels following transient forebrain ischemia in the rat.

    PubMed

    Kokaia, Z; Nawa, H; Uchino, H; Elmér, E; Kokaia, M; Carnahan, J; Smith, M L; Siesjö, B K; Lindvall, O

    1996-05-01

    Levels of BDNF mRNA and protein were measured in the rat brain using in situ hybridization and a two-site enzyme immunoassay. Under basal conditions, the highest BDNF concentration was found in the dentate gyrus (88 ng/g), while the levels in CA3 (50 ng/g), CA1 (18 ng/g) and parietal cortex (8 ng/g) were markedly lower. Following 10 min of forebrain ischemia, BDNF protein increased transiently in the dentate gyrus (to 124% of control at 6 h after the insult) and CA3 region (to 131% of control, at 1 week after the insult). In CA1 and parietal cortex, BDNF protein decreased to 73-75% of control at 24 h. In contrast, BDNF mRNA expression in dentate granule cells and CA3 pyramidal layer was transiently elevated to 287 and 293% of control, respectively, at 2 h, whereas no change was detected in CA1 or neocortex. The regional BDNF protein levels shown here correlate at least partly with regional differences in cellular resistance to ischemic damage, which is consistent with the hypothesis of a neuroprotective role of BDNF.

  14. Increases in levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor mRNA and its promoters after transient forebrain ischemia in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Tsukahara, T; Iihara, K; Hashimoto, N; Nishijima, T; Taniguchi, T

    1998-08-01

    Expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) may play a role in the mechanism of neuronal cell death after cerebral ischemia. We investigated the changes in levels of mRNAs encoding BDNF and its promoters in the rat brain after transient forebrain ischemia. Transient forebrain ischemia was induced by occlusion of bilateral common carotid arteries and systemic hypotension for 8 min. The alterations in BDNF gene expression in the hippocampus and in the cerebral cortex were examined by in situ hybridization using a mouse BDNF cDNA probe and cDNA probes including exon-specific promoters. BDNF transcripts were rapidly enhanced after the ischemic insult, both in the hippocampus and the cerebral cortex. NBQX suppressed the enhanced gene expression of BDNF markedly in the dentate gyrus (DG). In contrast, MK-801 had little effect on BDNF expression. In the piriform cortex, MK-801 or NBQX reduced the expression only moderately. After the ischemic insult, promoter specific BDNF 5'-exon I and exon III were increased remarkably in the DG. The increase in exon I in DG was suppressed partially by MK-801 and NBQX, while the increase in exon III in CA3 was suppressed by MK-801 but that in DG was not suppressed by either antagonist. In the piriform cortex, exon III was increased remarkably and this increase was not influenced by either agonist. These results suggest that the gene expression of BDNF was enhanced by transient ischemia both in the hippocampus and the cerebral cortex and that the cerebral ischemia stimulated at least two different promoter- and neuron type-specific pathways regulating expression of the BDNF gene mediated by glutamate receptors of non-NMDA type and NMDA type.

  15. Hyperbaric oxygen and hyperbaric air treatment result in comparable neuronal death reduction and improved behavioral outcome after transient forebrain ischemia in the gerbil.

    PubMed

    Malek, Michal; Duszczyk, Malgorzata; Zyszkowski, Marcin; Ziembowicz, Apolonia; Salinska, Elzbieta

    2013-01-01

    Anoxic brain injury resulting from cardiac arrest is responsible for approximately two-thirds of deaths. Recent evidence suggests that increased oxygen delivered to the brain after cardiac arrest may be an important factor in preventing neuronal damage, resulting in an interest in hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) therapy. Interestingly, increased oxygen supply may be also reached by application of normobaric oxygen (NBO) or hyperbaric air (HBA). However, previous research also showed that the beneficial effect of hyperbaric treatment may not directly result from increased oxygen supply, leading to the conclusion that the mechanism of hyperbaric prevention of brain damage is not well understood. The aim of our study was to compare the effects of HBO, HBA and NBO treatment on gerbil brain condition after transient forebrain ischemia, serving as a model of cardiac arrest. Thereby, we investigated the effects of repetitive HBO, HBA and NBO treatment on hippocampal CA1 neuronal survival, brain temperature and gerbils behavior (the nest building), depending on the time of initiation of the therapy (1, 3 and 6 h after ischemia). HBO and HBA applied 1, 3 and 6 h after ischemia significantly increased neuronal survival and behavioral performance and abolished the ischemia-evoked brain temperature increase. NBO treatment was most effective when applied 1 h after ischemia; later application had a weak or no protective effect. The results show that HBO and HBA applied between 1 and 6 h after ischemia prevent ischemia-evoked neuronal damage, which may be due to the inhibition of brain temperature increase, as a result of the applied rise in ambient pressure, and just not due to the oxygen per se. This perspective is supported by the finding that NBO treatment was less effective than HBO or HBA therapy. The results presented in this paper may pave the way for future experimental studies dealing with pressure and temperature regulation.

  16. Influence of ischemic preconditioning on levels of nerve growth factor, brain-derived neurotrophic factor and their high-affinity receptors in hippocampus following forebrain ischemia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tsong-Hai; Yang, Jen-Tsung; Ko, Yu-Shien; Kato, Hiroyuki; Itoyama, Yasuto; Kogure, Kyuya

    2008-01-02

    Preconditioning of gerbil brain with a sublethal forebrain ischemia is known to protect hippocampal CA1 neurons following a subsequent lethal ischemia (the second ischemia) which usually damages neurons (ischemic tolerance). Present report using a confocal laser scanning microscope demonstrated that the hippocampal cells of sham operation gerbils contained immunofluorescent NGF and BDNF and their high-affinity receptors (TrkA and TrkB). A 2-min ischemia caused little change of these proteins (ANOVA test, P<0.05). After the second lethal ischemia, in the CA1 area with ischemic preconditioning (2-min ischemia), only BDNF but not NGF and their high-affinity receptors showed a transient reduction at 4 h (ANOVA test, P<0.01) and improved from 1 day (ANOVA test, P<0.05). In the CA1 area without ischemic preconditioning (sham operation), NGF and its high-affinity TrkA receptor showed a consistent reduction from 4 h to 7 days (ANOVA test, P<0.05); BDNF and TrkB decreased transiently from 4 h to 1 day (ANOVA test, P<0.05) but were recovered in the surviving neurons from 3 days. At 3 and 7 days after the second lethal ischemia, apoptotic cell injury could be seen in the CA1 area without ischemic preconditioning but was sparsely noted in the CA1 area with ischemic preconditioning. In the ischemia-resistant CA3 and dentate gyrus areas, only BDNF decreased significantly at 7 days in the CA3 area without ischemic preconditioning (ANOVA test, P<0.01). However, no significant change occurred in NGF, TrkA and TrkB immunofluorescence from 4 h to 7 days after the second lethal ischemia in the CA3 and dentate gyrus areas with and without ischemic preconditioning. Western blot study showed that in the hippocampal formation with ischemic preconditioning, preconditioning prevented the decline of these protein levels from 1 day to 7 days after the second lethal ischemia (ANOVA test, P>0.05). Results of this study demonstrate that ischemic preconditioning recovers the initial decline in

  17. Changes in excitatory and inhibitory circuits of the rat hippocampus 12-14 months after complete forebrain ischemia.

    PubMed

    Arabadzisz, D; Freund, T F

    1999-01-01

    Changes in interneuron distribution and excitatory connectivity have been investigated in animals which had survived 12-14 months after complete forebrain ischemia, induced by four-vessel occlusion. Anterograde tracing with Phaseolus vulgaris leucoagglutinin revealed massive Schaffer collateral input even to those regions of the CA1 subfield where hardly any surviving pyramidal cells were found. Boutons of these Schaffer collaterals formed conventional synaptic contacts on dendritic spines and shafts, many of which likely belong to interneurons. Mossy fibres survived the ischemic challenge, however, large mossy terminals showed altered morphology, namely, the number of filopodiae on these terminals decreased significantly. The entorhinal input to the hippocampus did not show any morphological alterations. The distribution of interneurons was investigated by neurochemical markers known to label functionally distinct GABAergic cell populations. In the hilus, spiny interneurons showed a profound decrease in number. This phenomenon was not as obvious in CA3, but the spiny metabotropic glutamate receptor 1alpha-positive non-pyramidal cells, some of which contain calretinin or substance P receptor, disappeared from stratum lucidum of this area. In the CA1 region, somatostatin immunoreactivity disappeared from stratum oriens/lacunosum-moleculare-associated cells, while in metabotropic glutamate receptor 1alpha-stained sections these cells seemed unaffected in number. Other interneurons did not show an obvious decrease in number. In stratum radiatum of the CA1 subfield, some interneuron types had altered morphology: the substance P receptor-positive dendrites lost their characteristic radial orientation, and the metabotropic glutamate receptor 1alpha-expressing cells became extremely spiny. The loss of inhibitory interneurons at the first two stages of the trisynaptic loop coupled with a well-preserved excitatory connectivity among the subfields suggests that

  18. Effects of Choto-san and hooks and stems of Uncaria sinensis on antioxidant enzyme activities in the gerbil brain after transient forebrain ischemia.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Koichi; Shimada, Yutaka; Hori, Etsuro; Nakagawa, Takako; Takagi, Shinobu; Sekiya, Nobuyasu; Kouta, Kazufumi; Nishijo, Hisao; Yokozawa, Takako; Terasawa, Katsutoshi

    2004-12-01

    Previously, we revealed that oral administrations of Choto-san, a Kampo formula, and the hooks and stems of Uncaria sinensis Haviland (Rubiaceae), a medicinal plant comprising Choto-san, enhanced superoxide anion and hydroxyl radical scavenging activities in the hippocampus, and prevented delayed neuronal death of pyramidal cells in the hippocampal CA1 region in a transient forebrain ischemia gerbil model. In the present study, for the purpose of clarifying whether the endogenous antioxidant enzymes contribute to these mechanisms, we investigated the effects of Choto-san extract (CSE) and Uncaria sinensis extract (USE) on superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activities in the brain by using the same experimental model. 1.0% CSE or 3.0% USE were dissolved in water and provided to gerbils ad libitum from 7 days prior to ischemia/reperfusion (i/rp). Seven days of continuous administrations of CSE or USE without i/rp procedure enhanced CAT activity but not SOD and GSH-Px activities in both the hippocampus and cortex. CSE elevated CAT activity in the hippocampus at 7 days and in the cortex at 3h after i/rp. USE raised CAT activity in both the hippocampus and cortex at 3 h and 7 days after i/rp. These results suggest that one of the mechanisms of the protective effects of CSE and USE against transient brain ischemia-induced neuronal damage may be their enhancing effect on CAT activity in the brain.

  19. Availability of a baseline Electrocardiogram changes the application of the Sclarovsky-Birnbaum Myocardial Ischemia Grade.

    PubMed

    Carlsen, Esben A; Bang, Lia E; Køber, Lars; Strauss, David G; Amaral, Matias; Barbagelata, Alejandro; Warren, Stafford; Wagner, Galen S

    2014-01-01

    The electrocardiogram (ECG) based Sclarovsky-Birnbaum Ischemia Grade may be used to determine the prognosis of patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). However, application of the method is based on assumption of the baseline QRS morphology. Thus, the aims of this study were to determine if the baseline QRS morphology was correctly assumed based on an ECG recorded during induced ischemia, and if reference to the baseline ECG altered the designated Ischemia Grade. Sixty-three patients with chronic ischemic heart disease that underwent elective percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty were included. Baseline ECG and ECG during the procedure were recorded. In the latter, Ischemia Grade was classified according to assumed baseline QRS morphology. Then the baseline ECG was used as reference and Ischemia Grade was determined based on change from the baseline ECG. In 66.6% (42/63) of patients the criteria for STEMI were fulfilled; the incidence was similar between left anterior descending (LAD) and right coronary artery (RCA) occlusion. In LAD patients who fulfilled STEMI criteria, assumption of baseline QRS morphology in involved leads was accurate in only 35% (7/20) and this altered the Ischemia Grade in 10% (2/20) of patients. In RCA patients who fulfilled STEMI criteria, assumption of baseline QRS morphology in involved leads was accurate in 77.3% (17/22) and this altered the Ischemia Grade in 9.1% (2/22) of patients. Application of the Sclarovsky-Birnbaum Ischemia Grade with reference to a baseline ECG altered Ischemia Grade in approximately 10% of patients. All patients that were reclassified were assigned a higher Ischemia Grade. Future research is needed to determine the impact of availability of the baseline ECG on the clinical diagnostic and prognostic performances of the Sclarovsky-Birnbaum Ischemia Grade. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Antioxidant-like protein 1 is altered in non-pyramidal cells and expressed in astrocytes in the gerbil hippocampal CA1 region after transient forebrain ischemia.

    PubMed

    Hwang, In Koo; Hua, Li; Yoo, Ki-Yeon; Kim, Dae Won; Kang, Tae-Cheon; Choi, Soo Young; Won, Moo Ho; Kim, Do-Hoon

    2005-11-16

    In the present study, we observed chronological changes of antioxidant-like protein 1 (AOP-1) in the gerbil hippocampal CA1 region after 5 min of transient forebrain ischemia using immunohistochemistry and western blot. AOP-1 was significantly altered in the CA1 region after transient ischemia. In the sham-operated group, AOP-1 immunoreactivity was detected in pyramidal and non-pyramidal cells of the CA1 region. At 30 min after ischemic insult, AOP-1 immunoreactivity and protein level was decreased in the CA1 region. At 12 h after ischemic insult, AOP-1 immunoreactivity and protein level was highest in this region. At this time, after ischemia, AOP-1 immunoreactivity in non-pyramidal cells was high compared to the sham-operated group. Based on double immunofluorescence study, AOP-1-immunoreactive neurons were identified as GABAergic, which were stained with GAD or parvalbumin. Thereafter, AOP-1 immunoreactivity and protein levels were decreased time-dependently. From 4 days after ischemic insult, AOP 1 immunoreactivity was generally expressed in astrocytes. Five days after ischemic insult, AOP-1 immunoreactivity and protein level was increased again to 1.4 folds compared to that of the sham-operated group. In brief, AOP-1 immunoreactivity was increased in GABAergic non-pyramidal cells in the hippocampal CA1 region at early time after ischemic insult and was expressed in astrocytes at late time after ischemia. This result suggests that AOP-1 may be important role in homeostasis of GABAergic neurons because these neurons are resistant to ischemic damage.

  1. In vivo study of myocardial elastography under graded ischemia conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wei-Ning; Provost, Jean; Fujikura, Kana; Wang, Jie; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2011-02-01

    The capability of currently available echocardiography-based strain estimation techniques to fully map myocardial abnormality at early stages of myocardial ischemia is yet to be investigated. In this study, myocardial elastography (ME), a radio-frequency (RF)-based strain imaging technique that maps the full 2D transmural angle-independent strain tensor in standard echocardiographic views at both high spatial and temporal resolution is presented. The objectives were to (1) evaluate the performance of ME on mapping the onset, extent and progression of myocardial ischemia at graded coronary constriction levels (from partial to complete coronary flow reduction), and (2) validate the accuracy of the strain estimates against sonomicrometry (SM) measurements. A non-survival canine ischemic model (n = 5) was performed by gradually constricting the left anterior descending (LAD) coronary blood flow from 0% (baseline blood flow) to 100% (zero blood flow) at 20% increments. An open-architecture ultrasound system was used to acquire RF echocardiograms in a standard full short-axis view at the frame rate of 211 fps, at least twice higher than what is typically used in conventional echocardiographic systems, using a previously developed, fully automated composite technique. Myocardial deformation was estimated by ME and validated against sonomicrometry. ME estimates and maps transmural (1) 2D displacements using RF cross-correlation and recorrelation; and (2) 2D polar (radial and circumferential) strains, derived from 2D (i.e. both lateral and axial) displacement components, at high accuracy. Full-view strain images were shown and found to reliably depict decreased myocardial function in the region at risk at increased levels of coronary flow reduction. The ME radial strain was deemed to be a more sensitive, quantitative, regional measure of myocardial ischemia as a result of coronary flow reduction when compared to the conventional wall motion score index and ejection fraction

  2. Neuroprotective effects of Z-ajoene, an organosulfur compound derived from oil-macerated garlic, in the gerbil hippocampal CA1 region after transient forebrain ischemia.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Dae Young; Kim, Woosuk; Nam, Sung Min; Yoo, Miyoung; Lee, Sanghee; Yoon, Yeo Sung; Won, Moo-Ho; Hwang, In Koo; Choi, Jung Hoon

    2014-10-01

    The neuroprotective effects of two isomers (Z- and E-) of ajoene, a major compound in oil-macerated garlic products, against ischemic damage were investigated in the gerbil hippocampus. Vehicle (corn oil), Z- or E-ajoenes (25 mg/kg) was orally administered 30 min prior to the induction of transient forebrain ischemia by occlusion of the common carotid arteries for 5 min. One day after ischemia/reperfusion (I/R), I/R-induced hyperactivity significantly reduced in the E- and Z-ajoene-treated groups, compared to that in the vehicle-treated group 5 days after I/R, the number of cresyl violet-positive neurons in the E- and Z-ajoene-treated groups increased, compared to that in the vehicle-treated group. Reactive gliosis in the CA1 region of E- and Z-ajoene-treated groups reduced, compared to that in the vehicle-treated group. These neuroprotective effects were more prominent in animals treated with Z-ajoene, than in those treated with E-ajoene. In addition, Z-ajoene significantly decreased lipid peroxidation, as indicated by 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal levels in hippocampal homogenates, compared to that observed in the vehicle-treated group at a range of time points after I/R. These results suggested that Z-ajoene protected against I/R-induced delayed neuronal death and gliosis by reducing lipid peroxidation in the gerbil hippocampal CA1 region. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Protective effects of Choto-san and hooks and stems of Uncaria sinensis against delayed neuronal death after transient forebrain ischemia in gerbil.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Koichi; Shimada, Yutaka; Hori, Etsuro; Sekiya, Nobuyasu; Goto, Hirozo; Sakakibara, Iwao; Nishijo, Hisao; Terasawa, Katsutoshi

    2004-09-01

    Previously, we revealed that Choto-san (Diao-teng-san in Chinese), a Kampo formula, is effective on vascular dementia clinically, and the hooks and stems of Uncaria sinensis (Oliv.) Havil., a medicinal plant comprising Chotosan, has a neuroprotective effect in vitro. In the present study, for the purpose of clarifying their effects in vivo, we investigated whether the oral administration of Choto-san extract (CSE) or U. sinensis extract (USE) reduces delayed neuronal death following ischemia/reperfusion (i/rp) in gerbils. Transient forebrain ischemia was induced by bilateral carotid artery occlusion for 4 min, and two doses (1.0% and 3.0%) of CSE or USE were dissolved in drinking water and provided to the gerbils ad libitum from 7 days prior to i/rp until 7 days after i/rp. It was found that 1.0% and 3.0% CSE treatments significantly reduced pyramidal cell death in the hippocampal CA1 region at 7 days post i/rp. Three percent USE treatment also inhibited pyramidal cell death significantly at 7 days after i/rp. Superoxide anion and hydroxyl radical scavenging activities of the homogenized hippocampus at 7 days after i/rp in the 1.0% CSE- and 3.0% USE-treated groups were significantly enhanced compared to those of control. Further, lipid peroxide and NO2-/NO3- levels of the homogenized hippocampus at 48h after i/rp in the 1.0% CSE- and 3.0% USE-treated groups were significantly lower than those of control. These results suggest that the oral administration of CSE or USE provides a protective effect against transient ischemia-induced delayed neuronal death by reducing oxidative damage to neurons.

  4. Effects of RS-8359 on reduced local cerebral glucose utilization in the rat subjected to transient forebrain ischemia.

    PubMed

    Kozuka, M; Kobayashi, K; Iwata, N

    1994-04-01

    Changes in local cerebral glucose utilization (LCGU) of the postischemic rat brain were investigated using the rat four-vessel occlusion model. Following 20 or 30 min of ischemia, LCGUs of the cerebral cortices, striatum and hippocampus were decreased at 1 and 3 days postischemia, but were recovered at 7 days postischemia. Effects of repeated administration of RS-8359, (+-)-4-(4-cyanoanilino)-7-hydroxycyclopenta(3,2-e)pyrimidin e, (30 mg/kg x 2/day, p.o., 4 days) were examined at 3 days postischemia following 20 min of ischemia. Compared with the sham-operated group, the LCGUs of 22 out of 34 structures examined in the ischemic-control group were significantly reduced. In the RS-8359-treated group, however, significant reduction was observed in only 9 structures. Compared with the ischemic-control group, RS-8359 significantly ameliorated the reduction of LCGU in 12 structures. These results suggest that RS-8359 has beneficial effects on reduced glucose metabolism in the postischemic brain.

  5. Myocutaneous revascularization following graded ischemia in lean and obese mice

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Ross M; Coffman, Brittany; McGuire, Paul G; Howdieshell, Thomas R

    2016-01-01

    Background Murine models of diabetes and obesity have provided insight into the pathogenesis of impaired epithelialization of excisional skin wounds. However, knowledge of postischemic myocutaneous revascularization in these models is limited. Materials and methods A myocutaneous flap was created on the dorsum of wild type (C57BL/6), genetically obese and diabetic (ob/ob, db/db), complementary heterozygous (ob+/ob−, db+/db−), and diet-induced obese (DIO) mice (n=48 total; five operative mice per strain and three unoperated mice per strain as controls). Flap perfusion was documented by laser speckle contrast imaging. Local gene expression in control and postoperative flap tissue specimens was determined by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Image analysis of immunochemically stained histologic sections confirmed microvascular density and macrophage presence. Results Day 10 planimetric analysis revealed mean flap surface area necrosis values of 10.8%, 12.9%, 9.9%, 0.4%, 1.4%, and 23.0% for wild type, db+/db−, ob+/ob−, db/db, ob/ob, and DIO flaps, respectively. Over 10 days, laser speckle imaging documented increased perfusion at all time points with revascularization to supranormal perfusion in db/db and ob/ob flaps. In contrast, wild type, heterozygous, and DIO flaps displayed expected graded ischemia with failure of perfusion to return to baseline values. RT-PCR demonstrated statistically significant differences in angiogenic gene expression between lean and obese mice at baseline (unoperated) and at day 10. Conclusion Unexpected increased baseline skin perfusion and augmented myocutaneous revascularization accompanied by a control proangiogenic transcriptional signature in genetically obese mice compared to DIO and lean mice are reported. In future research, laser speckle imaging has been planned to be utilized in order to correlate spatiotemporal wound reperfusion with changes in cell recruitment and gene expression to

  6. Time profile of calcium accumulation in hippocampus, striatum and frontoparietal cortex after transient forebrain ischemia in the gerbil.

    PubMed

    Bonnekoh, P; Kuroiwa, T; Kloiber, O; Hossmann, K

    1992-01-01

    The topical and temporal relationship between neuronal injury and calcium loading was investigated in gerbils following bilateral carotid artery occlusion for 5 or 10 min and recirculation times from 15 min to 7 days. The association of histochemically visible calcium deposits with neuronal death was assessed by combining two calcium stains, alizarin red and arsenazo III, with conventional histological techniques. Neuronal calcium accumulation was evaluated morphometrically in the striatum, the frontoparietal cortex and the CA1 and CA4 sectors of the hippocampus. After 5-min ischemia and 1-2 days of recirculation numerous calcium-containing neurons appeared in the CA4 sector but only a few were present in the CA1 sector. After 4 days of recirculation calcium accumulation was visible in the whole CA1 sector and the dorso-lateral part of striate nucleus. After 10-min ischemia calcium accumulation started in these regions, as well as in the cortex, already after 1 day. In the CA1 sector calcium accumulation followed a typical time course: on day 2 only the lateral parts were affected, while on day 4 the whole CA1 neuronal band was calcium positive. The regional distribution of histological lesions matched that of calcium loading and, furthermore, the lesions appeared after a corresponding delay in the respective regions. Morphometric evaluations of calcium staining and histological lesions in the CA1 sector revealed a high correlation, indicating that calcium accumulation and neuronal death are closely associated both topically and temporally. This suggests that disturbances of calcium homeostasis such as those measured by this histochemical technique are the consequence of and not the reason for ischemic cell death.

  7. Increased expression of Slit2 and its receptors Robo1 and Robo4 in reactive astrocytes of the rat hippocampus after transient forebrain ischemia.

    PubMed

    Park, Joo-Hee; Pak, Ha-Jin; Riew, Tae-Ryong; Shin, Yoo-Jin; Lee, Mun-Yong

    2016-03-01

    Slit2 is a secreted glycoprotein that was originally identified as a chemorepulsive factor in the developing brain; however, it was recently reported that Slit2 is associated with adult neuronal function including a variety of pathophysiological processes. To elucidate whether Slit2 is implicated in the pathophysiology of ischemic injury, we investigated the temporal changes and cellular localization of Slit2 and its predominant receptors, Robo1 and Robo4, for 28 days after transient forebrain ischemia. Slit2 and its receptors had similar overall expression patterns in the control and ischemic hippocampi. The ligand and receptors were constitutively expressed in hippocampal neurons in control animals; however, in animals with ischemic injury, their upregulation was detected in reactive astrocytes, but not in neurons or activated microglia, in the CA1 region. Astroglial induction of Slit2 and its receptors occurred by day 3 after reperfusion, and appeared to increase progressively until the final time point on day 28. Their temporal expression patterns overlapped with the time period in which reactive astrocytes undergo dynamic structural changes and appear hypertrophic in the ischemic hippocampus. The immunohistochemical data were consistent with the results of the immunoblot analyses, indicating that the expression of Slit2 and Robo increased progressively over the relatively long period of 28 days examined here. Collectively, these results suggest that Slit2/Robo signaling may be involved in regulating the astroglial reaction via autocrine or paracrine mechanisms in post-ischemic processes. Moreover, this may contribute to the dynamic morphological changes that occur in astrocytes in response to ischemic injury.

  8. Grade III ischemia on presentation with acute myocardial infarction predicts rapid progression of necrosis and less myocardial salvage with thrombolysis.

    PubMed

    Birnbaum, Yochai; Mahaffey, Kenneth W; Criger, Douglas A; Gates, Kathy B; Barbash, Gabriel I; Barbagelata, Alejandro; Clemmensen, Peter; Sgarbossa, Elena B; Gibbons, Raymond J; Rahman, M Atiar; Califf, Robert M; Granger, Chistopher B; Wagner, Galen S

    2002-01-01

    We assessed the relation between baseline electrocardiographic ischemia grades and initial myocardial area at risk (AR) and final infarct size (IS) in 49 patients who had undergone (99m)Tc sestamibi single-photon emission computed tomography before and 6 +/- 1 days after thrombolysis. Patients were classed as having grade III ischemia (ST segment elevation with terminal QRS distortion, n = 19) or grade II ischemia (ST elevation but no terminal QRS distortion, n = 30). We compared AR and IS by baseline ischemia grade and treatment (adenosine vs. placebo) and assessed relations of infarction index (IS/AR ratio x100) to time to thrombolysis, baseline ischemia grade, and adenosine therapy. Time to thrombolysis was similar for grade II and grade III. For placebo- treated patients, the median AR did not differ significantly between grade II (38%) and grade III patients (46%, p = 0.47), nor did median IS (16 vs. 40%, p = 0.096), but the median infarction index was 66 vs. 90% (p = 0.006). For adenosine-treated patients, median AR (21 vs. 26%, p = 0.44), median IS (5 vs. 17%, p = 0.15), and their ratio (31 vs. 67%, p = 0.23) did not differ significantly between grade II and grade III patients. The infarction index independently related to grade III ischemia (p = 0.0121) and adenosine therapy (p = 0.045). Infarct size related to baseline ischemia grade and was reduced by adenosine treatment. Necrosis progressed slowlier with baseline grade II versus III ischemia, which could offer more time for myocardial salvage with reperfusion. Copyright 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel

  9. Ischemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byeon, Suk Ho; Kim, Min; Kwon, Oh Woong

    "Ischemia" implies a tissue damage derived from perfusion insufficiency, not just an inadequate blood supply. Mild thickening and increased reflectivity of inner retina and prominent inner part of synaptic portion of outer plexiform layer are "acute retinal ischemic changes" visible on OCT. Over time, retina becomes thinner, especially in the inner portion. Choroidal perfusion supplies the outer portion of retina; thus, choroidal ischemia causes predominant change in the corresponding tissue.

  10. Extent and distribution of skeletal muscle necrosis after graded periods of complete ischemia

    SciTech Connect

    Labbe, R.; Lindsay, T.; Walker, P.M.

    1987-08-01

    The management of an acutely ischemic extremity requires knowledge of the response of skeletal muscle (the largest component of the lower limb) to prolonged periods of complete normothermic ischemia. We have used the canine gracilis muscle model to evaluate the extent and distribution of ischemic necrosis after 3 and 5 hours of ischemia and 48 hours of reperfusion. Each muscle was cut into six slices, and the extent and distribution of postischemic necrosis identified by means of nitroblue tetrazolium staining and 99mTc pyrophosphate uptake. After 3, 4, and 5 hours of ischemia the extent of necrosis was 2.0% +/- 0.9%, 30.3% +/- 6.0%, and 90.1% +/- 3.5% (mean +/- SEM), respectively. A statistically significant correlation exists between the extent of necrosis and the uptake of 99mTc pyrophosphate uptake per gram of tissue (y = 1574.9x - 8.4, r = 0.84, p less than 0.001). Most necrosis was centrally located and found in the thickest portion of the muscle. We conclude that there is a graded response in the extent of skeletal muscle necrosis related to the length of ischemic stress rather than an ''all-or-none'' phenomenon. This central distribution of necrosis makes the usual external evaluation of ischemic damage clinically unreliable. In addition, since there was no enveloping fascia in this model, a compartment release alone may not prevent the development of skeletal muscle necrosis. This knowledge of the response of skeletal muscle to ischemia may lead to an improved clinical approach to an extremity suffering a prolonged ischemic insult.

  11. 17beta-estradiol pretreatment reduces CA1 sector cell death and the spontaneous hyperthermia that follows forebrain ischemia in the gerbil.

    PubMed

    Plahta, W C; Clark, D L; Colbourne, F

    2004-01-01

    Pretreatment with 17beta-estradiol attenuates ischemia-induced hippocampal cornu ammonis 1 (CA1) neuronal death. We assessed whether this is mediated through prevention of hyperthermia that normally follows ischemia in gerbils. Male gerbils were given sustained-released 17beta-estradiol pellets or sham operation. Later, a guide cannula was implanted for brain temperature measurement and some were implanted with core temperature telemetry probes. Gerbils were subjected to either 5 min bilateral carotid artery occlusion or sham procedures 2 weeks after pellet surgery. Brain temperature was normothermic during surgery in all cases. In experiment 1, only core temperature was measured afterward in untreated and estrogen-treated gerbils. In experiment 2, postischemic core temperature was measured in untreated and two estrogen-treated ischemic groups, one of which had their postischemic temperature increased, via infrared lamp, to mimic the untreated group. Habituation was assessed on days 5 and 6. Hyperthermia, like that which occurs spontaneously, was forced on untreated and estrogen-treated ischemic animals in the third experiment, where brain temperature was measured. CA1 cell counts were assessed after a 7-day survival. A fourth experiment measured brain and core temperature simultaneously in normal gerbils during heating with an infrared lamp. Estrogen did not affect core temperature of non-ischemic gerbils whereas spontaneous postischemic hyperthermia was blocked. Estrogen reduced cell death and provided behavioral protection when gerbils regulated their own core temperature, but not when core hyperthermia was enforced. Conversely, estrogen reduced cell death in gerbils that had their brain temperature elevated. Experiment 4 showed that the brain becomes overheated (by approximately 1 degree C) when core temperature is elevated. Accordingly, estrogen likely failed to reduce CA1 injury in experiment 2, when core hyperthermia was enforced, because of overheating the

  12. An ultrastructural analysis of cellular death in the CA1 field in the rat hippocampus after transient forebrain ischemia followed by 2, 4 and 10 days of reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Winkelmann, Eliane Roseli; Charcansky, Alexandre; Faccioni-Heuser, M Cristina; Netto, Carlos Alexandre; Achaval, Matilde

    2006-10-01

    An ultrastructural study was performed to investigate the type of cellular death that occurs in hippocampal CA1 field pyramidal neurons after 10 and 20 min of transient cerebral ischemia in the male adult Wistar rats, followed by 2, 4 and 10 days of reperfusion. The four-vessel occlusion method was used to induce ischemic insult for either 10 or 20 min, following which the animals were submitted to either 2, 4 or 10 days of reperfusion. The animals were then anaesthetised, and their brains removed, dehydrated, embedded, sectioned and examined under a transmission electron microscope. After ischemic insult, neurons from the CA1 field presented alterations, corresponding to the initial, intermediate and final stages of the degenerative process. The only difference observed between the 10 and 20 min ischemic groups was the degree of damage; the reaction was stronger in 20 min groups than in the 10 min groups. While neurons were found in the different stages of oncotic necrosis in all groups, differences were found between the groups in relation to prevalent stages. In both ischemic groups, after 2 days of reperfusion, the initial stage of oncotic necrosis was prevalent and large numbers of neurons appeared normal. In both groups, after 4 days of reperfusion, most of the neurons showed more advanced alterations, typical of an intermediate stage. In both groups, after 10 days of reperfusion, alterations corresponding to the intermediate and final stages of oncotic necrosis were also predominant. However, few intact neurons were identified and the neuropile appeared more organised, with numerous glial cells. In summary, the pyramidal neurons of the CA1 field displayed selective vulnerability and exhibited a morphological death pattern corresponding exclusively to an oncotic necrotic pathway.

  13. The VASOGRADE: A Simple Grading Scale for Prediction of Delayed Cerebral Ischemia After Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira Manoel, Airton Leonardo; Jaja, Blessing N; Germans, Menno R; Yan, Han; Qian, Winnie; Kouzmina, Ekaterina; Marotta, Tom R; Turkel-Parrella, David; Schweizer, Tom A; Macdonald, R Loch

    2015-07-01

    Patients are classically at risk of delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. We validated a grading scale-the VASOGRADE-for prediction of DCI. We used data of 3 phase II randomized clinical trials and a single hospital series to assess the relationship between the VASOGRADE and DCI. The VASOGRADE derived from previously published risk charts and consists of 3 categories: VASOGRADE-Green (modified Fisher scale 1 or 2 and World Federation of Neurosurgical Societies scale [WFNS] 1 or 2); VASOGRADE-Yellow (modified Fisher 3 or 4 and WFNS 1-3); and VASOGRADE-Red (WFNS 4 or 5, irrespective of modified Fisher grade). The relation between the VASOGRADE and DCI was assessed by logistic regression models. The predictive accuracy of the VASOGRADE was assessed by receiver operating characteristics curve and calibration plots. In a cohort of 746 patients, the VASOGRADE significantly predicted DCI (P<0.001). The VASOGRADE-Yellow had a tendency for increased risk for DCI (odds ratio [OR], 1.31; 95% CI, 0.77-2.23) when compared with VASOGRADE-Green; those with VASOGRADE-Red had a 3-fold higher risk of DCI (OR, 3.19; 95% CI, 2.07-4.50). Studies were not a significant confounding factor between the VASOGRADE and DCI. The VASOGRADE had an adequate discrimination for prediction of DCI (area under the receiver operating characteristics curve=0.63) and good calibration. The VASOGRADE results validated previously published risk charts in a large and diverse sample of subarachnoid hemorrhage patients, which allows DCI risk stratification on presentation after subarachnoid hemorrhage. It could help to select patients at high risk of DCI, as well as standardize treatment protocols and research studies. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. Temperature dependency of bidirectional flux in the rat intestine subjected to graded ischemia.

    PubMed

    Wattanasirichaigoon, Somkiat

    2009-06-01

    This study examined the effect of temperature and ischemia on permeation of fluorescently-labeled dextran (M.W. = 4 kDa; FD4) across rat intestinal mucosa. Permeability was evaluated ex vivo using an everted gut sac technique in both the mucosal-to-serosal (M-->S) and serosal-to-mucosal (S-->M) directions. At baseline (B), 30-min of ischemia (I-30) and 60-min of ischemia (I-60), intestinal segments were prepared and incubated at 37 degrees C, 15 degrees C and 4 degrees C for 30 min. Clearance (nl/min/cm2) was calculated based on the accumulated amount of FD4 at 30 min. Both M-->S and S-->M fluxes increased with increasing temperature at B, I-30 and I-60. Ischemic gut (I-30 and I-60) had about a three-fold higher (M-->S)/(S-->M) flux ratio than that of normal gut (p < 0.001). At 4 degrees C, neither M-->S nor S-->M flux was different between B and I-30, but both M-->S and S-->M fluxes significantly increased at I-60, suggesting an increase in permeation via a passive mechanism. Increased bidirectional fluxes at 37 degrees C were obtained in the I-30 and I-60 gut sacs when compared to B. We conclude that FD4 is actively transported across the intestinal mucosa in the S-->M direction and that ischemic injury increases passive diffusion of the probe across the gut wall.

  15. Cell migration in the forebrain.

    PubMed

    Marín, Oscar; Rubenstein, John L R

    2003-01-01

    The forebrain comprises an intricate set of structures that are required for some of the most complex and evolved functions of the mammalian brain. As a reflection of its complexity, cell migration in the forebrain is extremely elaborated, with widespread dispersion of cells across multiple functionally distinct areas. Two general modes of migration are distinguished in the forebrain: radial migration, which establishes the general cytoarchitectonical framework of the different forebrain subdivisions; and tangential migration, which increases the cellular complexity of forebrain circuits by allowing the dispersion of multiple neuronal types. Here, we review the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying each of these types of migrations and discuss how emerging concepts in neuronal migration are reshaping our understanding of forebrain development in normal and pathological situations.

  16. Relationship between myocardial metabolites and contractile abnormalities during graded regional ischemia. Phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance studies of porcine myocardium in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, S; Schwartz, G G; Gober, J R; Wong, A K; Camacho, S A; Massie, B; Weiner, M W

    1990-01-01

    The mechanisms responsible for changes in myocardial contractility during regional ischemia are unknown. Since changes in high-energy phosphates during ischemia are sensitive to reductions in myocardial blood flow, it was hypothesized that myocardial function under steady-state conditions of graded regional ischemia is closely related to changes in myocardial high-energy phosphates. Therefore, phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was employed in an in vivo porcine model of graded coronary stenosis. Simultaneous measurements of regional subendocardial blood flow, high-energy phosphates, pH, and myocardial segment shortening were made during various degrees of regional ischemia in which subendocardial blood flow was reduced by 16-94%. During mild reductions in myocardial blood flow (subendocardial blood flow = 83% of nonischemic myocardium), only the ratio of phosphocreatine to inorganic phosphate (PCr/Pi), Pi, and [H+] were significantly changed from control. PCr, ATP, and PCr/ATP were not significantly reduced from control with mild reductions in blood flow. Changes in myocardial segment shortening were most closely associated with changes in PCr/Pi (r = 0.94). Pi and [H+] were negatively correlated with segment shortening (r = -0.64 and -0.58, respectively) and increased over twofold when blood flow was reduced by 62%. Thus, these data demonstrate that PCr/Pi is sensitive to reductions in myocardial blood flow and closely correlates with changes in myocardial function. These data are also consistent with a role for Pi or H+ as inhibitors of myocardial contractility during ischemia. Images PMID:2312722

  17. Noninvasive Measurement of Three-Dimensional Myocardial Deformation with Tagged Magnetic Resonance Imaging During Graded Local Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Christopher C.; McVeigh, Elliot R.; Zerhouni, Elias A.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between three-dimensional (3D) deformation patterns in the canine left ventricle and localized graded reductions in perfusion. Magnetic resonance (MR) tissue tagging in a clinical scanner was used to determine systolic 3D deformation throughout the left ventricle with 32-msec time resolution. Six dogs were studied at normal and reduced left anterior descending coronary artery flow levels, for a total of 14 studies. Deformation was calculated by fitting a 3D displacement field to tag displacement data from three orthogonal sets of tags and taking spatial derivatives. A novel index of 3D radial mechanical function, calculated from the 3D strain tensor components and the tissue incompressibility constraint, had a higher correlation (R = 0.94) with perfusion (colored microspheres) than any of the 3D Lagrangian finite strain tensor components or wall thickening. As a function of the fraction of baseline perfusion, it was well fit by a linear relationship for subnormal perfusion with a slope of 0.46 ± 0.05 and an intercept of −0.156 ± 0.026. Longitudinal strain was lost first with decreasing perfusion (48%), followed by circumferential (40%) and finally radial function (35%). The strain method detected perfusion drops as small as 20%, and early paradoxical strain transients lasting 100 msec were seen only with ischemia. 3D strain changes can be noninvasively measured throughout the left ventricle with MR tissue tagging. MR imaging-derived strain indices, unique to 3D analysis, correlate most sensitively with regional perfusion in the canine left ventricle. PMID:11550355

  18. Forebrain Pain Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Neugebauer, Volker; Galhardo, Vasco; Maione, Sabatino; Mackey, Sean C.

    2009-01-01

    Emotional-affective and cognitive dimensions of pain are less well understood than nociceptive and nocifensive components, but the forebrain is believed to play an important role. Recent evidence suggests subcortical and cortical brain areas outside the traditional pain processing network contribute critically to emotional-affective responses and cognitive deficits related to pain. These brain areas include different nuclei of the amygdala and certain prefrontal cortical areas. Their roles in various aspects of pain will be discussed. Biomarkers of cortical dysfunction are being identified that may evolve into therapeutic targets to modulate pain experience and improve pain-related cognitive impairment. Supporting data from preclinical studies in neuropathic pain models will be presented. Neuroimaging analysis provides evidence for plastic changes in the pain processing brain network. Results of clinical studies in neuropathic pain patients suggest that neuroimaging may help determine mechanisms of altered brain functions in pain as well as monitor the effects of pharmacologic interventions to optimize treatment in individual patients. Recent progress in the analysis of higher brain functions emphasizes the concept of pain as a multidimensional experience and the need for integrative approaches to determine the full spectrum of harmful or protective neurobiological changes in pain. PMID:19162070

  19. Consequential apoptosis in the cerebellum following injury to the developing rat forebrain.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Deanna L; Joashi, Umesh C; Sarraf, Catherine; Edwards, A David; Mehmet, Huseyin

    2006-07-01

    In focal brain lesions, alterations in blood flow and cerebral metabolism can be detected in brain areas remote from the primary injury. The cellular consequences of this phenomenon, originally termed diaschisis, are not fully understood. Here, we report that in two distinct models of forebrain injury, neuronal death in the cerebellum, a site distant to the primary injury, results as consequence of neuronal loss in the forebrain. Fourteen-day-old rats were subjected to unilateral forebrain injury, achieved by either hypoxia-ischemia (right carotid artery ligation and hypoxia) or direct needle injury to brain tissue. At defined times after injury, the presence of apoptosis was investigated by cell morphology, in situ end labeling, electron microscopy and poly-ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) cleavage. Injury to the rat forebrain following hypoxia-ischemia increased apoptosis in the internal granular and Purkinje cell layers of the cerebellum, a site distant to that of the primary injury. The number of apoptotic cells in the cerebellum was significantly related to cell death in the hippocampus. Similarly, direct needle injury to the forebrain resulted in extensive apoptotic cell death in the cerebellum. These results emphasize the intimate relationship between defined neuronal populations in relatively distant brain areas and suggest a cellular basis for diaschisis.

  20. The forebrain of the ferret.

    PubMed

    Lockard, B I

    1985-06-01

    The basic neuroanatomy of the forebrain, mainly of the telencephalon, of the adult ferret (Mustela furo), is reviewed and illustrated with special references to the features that distinguish this animal from other carnivores. References to the pertinent literature describing similar regions of other carnivores are cited.

  1. Crocodilian Forebrain: Evolution and Development

    PubMed Central

    Pritz, Michael B.

    2015-01-01

    Organization and development of the forebrain in crocodilians are reviewed. In juvenile Caiman crocodilus, the following features were examined: identification and classification of dorsal thalamic nuclei and their respective connections with the telencephalon, presence of local circuit neurons in the dorsal thalamic nuclei, telencephalic projections to the dorsal thalamus, and organization of the thalamic reticular nucleus. These results document many similarities between crocodilians and other reptiles and birds. While crocodilians, as well as other sauropsids, demonstrate several features of neural circuitry in common with mammals, certain striking differences in organization of the forebrain are present. These differences are the result of evolution. To explore a basis for these differences, embryos of Alligator misissippiensis were examined to address the following. First, very early development of the brain in Alligator is similar to that of other amniotes. Second, the developmental program for individual vesicles of the brain differs between the secondary prosencephalon, diencephalon, midbrain, and hindbrain in Alligator. This is likely to be the case for other amniotes. Third, initial development of the diencephalon in Alligator is similar to that in other amniotes. In Alligator, alar and basal parts likely follow a different developmental scheme. PMID:25829019

  2. Myocardial Ischemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... pectoris: Chest pain caused by myocardial ischemia. www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed June 1, 2015. Deedwania PC. Silent myocardial ischemia: Epidemiology and pathogenesis. www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed June 1, 2015. Mann DL, ...

  3. Basal Forebrain Cholinergic Modulation of Sleep Transitions

    PubMed Central

    Ozen Irmak, Simal; de Lecea, Luis

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The basal forebrain cholinergic system is involved in cognitive processes that require an attentive state, an increased level of arousal, and/or cortical activation associated with low amplitude fast EEG activity. The activity of most neurons in the basal forebrain cholinergic space is tightly correlated with the cortical EEG and the activity state. While most cholinergic neurons fire maximally during waking and REM sleep, the activity of other types of basal forebrain neurons vastly differs across different arousal and sleep states. Numerous studies have suggested a role for the basal forebrain cholinergic neurons in eliciting cortical activation and arousal. However, the intricate local connectivity within the region requires the use of cell-specific manipulation methods to demonstrate such a causal relationship. Design and Measurements: Here we have combined optogenetics with surface EEG recordings in freely moving mice in order to investigate the effects of acute cholinergic activation on the dynamics of sleep-to-wake transitions. We recorded from naturally sleeping animals and analyzed transitions from NREM sleep to REM sleep and/or wakefulness in response to photo-stimulation of cholinergic neurons in substantia innominata. Results and Conclusions: Our results show that optogenetic activation of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons during NREM sleep is sufficient to elicit cortical activation and facilitate state transitions, particularly transitions to wakefulness and arousal, at a time scale similar to the activation induced by other subcortical systems. Our results provide in vivo cell-specific demonstration for the role of basal forebrain cholinergic system in induction of wakefulness and arousal. Citation: Ozen Irmak S, de Lecea L. Basal forebrain cholinergic modulation of sleep transitions. SLEEP 2014;37(12):1941-1951. PMID:25325504

  4. Forebrain neurogenesis after focal Ischemic and traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Kernie, Steven G; Parent, Jack M

    2010-02-01

    Neural stem cells persist in the adult mammalian forebrain and are a potential source of neurons for repair after brain injury. The two main areas of persistent neurogenesis, the subventricular zone (SVZ)-olfactory bulb pathway and hippocampal dentate gyrus, are stimulated by brain insults such as stroke or trauma. Here we focus on the effects of focal cerebral ischemia on SVZ neural progenitor cells in experimental stroke, and the influence of mechanical injury on adult hippocampal neurogenesis in models of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Stroke potently stimulates forebrain SVZ cell proliferation and neurogenesis. SVZ neuroblasts are induced to migrate to the injured striatum, and to a lesser extent to the peri-infarct cortex. Controversy exists as to the types of neurons that are generated in the injured striatum, and whether adult-born neurons contribute to functional restoration remains uncertain. Advances in understanding the regulation of SVZ neurogenesis in general, and stroke-induced neurogenesis in particular, may lead to improved integration and survival of adult-born neurons at sites of injury. Dentate gyrus cell proliferation and neurogenesis similarly increase after experimental TBI. However, pre-existing neuroblasts in the dentate gyrus are vulnerable to traumatic insults, which appear to stimulate neural stem cells in the SGZ to proliferate and replace them, leading to increased numbers of new granule cells. Interventions that stimulate hippocampal neurogenesis appear to improve cognitive recovery after experimental TBI. Transgenic methods to conditionally label or ablate neural stem cells are beginning to further address critical questions regarding underlying mechanisms and functional significance of neurogenesis after stroke or TBI. Future therapies should be aimed at directing appropriate neuronal replacement after ischemic or traumatic injury while suppressing aberrant integration that may contribute to co-morbidities such as epilepsy or

  5. Basal Forebrain Cholinergic System and Memory.

    PubMed

    Blake, M G; Boccia, M M

    2017-02-18

    Basal forebrain cholinergic neurons constitute a way station for many ascending and descending pathways. These cholinergic neurons have a role in eliciting cortical activation and arousal. It is well established that they are mainly involved in cognitive processes requiring increased levels of arousal, attentive states and/or cortical activation with desynchronized activity in the EEG. These cholinergic neurons are modulated by several afferents of different neurotransmitter systems. Of particular importance within the cortical targets of basal forebrain neurons is the hippocampal cortex. The septohippocampal pathway is a bidirectional pathway constituting the main septal efferent system, which is widely known to be implicated in every memory process investigated. The present work aims to review the main neurotransmitter systems involved in modulating cognitive processes related to learning and memory through modulation of basal forebrain neurons.

  6. Neuroprotective role of Z-ligustilide against forebrain ischemic injury in ICR mice.

    PubMed

    Kuang, X; Yao, Y; Du, J R; Liu, Y X; Wang, C Y; Qian, Z M

    2006-08-02

    Radix Angelica sinensis, known as Danggui in Chinese, has been used to treat cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases in Traditional Chinese Medicine for a long time. Modern phytochemical studies showed that Z-ligustilide (LIG) is the main lipophilic component of Danggui. In this study, we examined whether LIG could protect ischemia/reperfusion-induced brain injury by minimizing oxidative stress and anti-apoptosis. Transient forebrain cerebral ischemia (FCI) was induced by the bilateral common carotid arteries occlusion for 30 min. LIG was intraperitoneally injected to ICR mice at the beginning of reperfusion. As determined via 2,3,5-triphenyl tetrazolium chloride (TTC) staining at 24 h following ischemia, the infarction volume in the FCI mice treated without LIG (22.1 +/- 2.6%) was significantly higher than that in the FCI mice treated with 5 mg/kg (11.8 +/- 5.2%) and 20 mg/kg (2.60 +/- 1.5%) LIG (P < 0.05 or P < 0.01). LIG treatment significantly decreased the level of malondialdehyde (MDA) and increased the activities of the antioxidant enzyme glutathione peroxidase (GSH-PX) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) in the ischemic brain tissues (P < 0.05 or P < 0.01 vs. FCI group). In addition, LIG provided a great increase in Bcl-2 expression as well as a significant decrease in Bax and caspase-3 immunoreactivities in the ischemic cortex. The findings demonstrated that LIG could significantly protect the brain from damage induced by transient forebrain cerebral ischemia. The antioxidant and anti-apoptotic properties of LIG may contribute to the neuroprotective potential of LIG in cerebral ischemic damage.

  7. Developmental specification of forebrain cholinergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Allaway, Kathryn C; Machold, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Striatal cholinergic interneurons and basal forebrain cholinergic projection neurons, which together comprise the forebrain cholinergic system, regulate attention, memory, reward pathways, and motor activity through the neuromodulation of multiple brain circuits. The importance of these neurons in the etiology of neurocognitive disorders has been well documented, but our understanding of their specification during embryogenesis is still incomplete. All forebrain cholinergic projection neurons and interneurons appear to share a common developmental origin in the embryonic ventral telencephalon, a region that also gives rise to GABAergic projection neurons and interneurons. Significant progress has been made in identifying the key intrinsic and extrinsic factors that promote a cholinergic fate in this precursor population. However, how cholinergic interneurons and projection neurons differentiate from one another during development, as well as how distinct developmental programs contribute to heterogeneity within those two classes, is not yet well understood. In this review we summarize the transcription factors and signaling molecules known to play a role in the specification and early development of striatal and basal forebrain cholinergic neurons. We also discuss the heterogeneity of these populations and its possible developmental origins. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Hepatic ischemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood or oxygen, causing injury to liver cells. Causes Low blood pressure from any condition can lead to hepatic ischemia. ... liver's blood vessels Treatment Treatment depends on the cause. Low blood pressure and blood clots must be treated right away. ...

  9. Intestinal Ischemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... and hormone medications, such as estrogen Cocaine or methamphetamine use Vigorous exercise, such as long-distance running ... anti-phospholipid syndrome. Illegal drug use. Cocaine and methamphetamine use have been linked to intestinal ischemia. Complications ...

  10. Silent Ischemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... can be used to diagnose silent ischemia: An exercise stress test can show blood flow through your coronary arteries in response to exercise. Holter monitoring records your heart rate and rhythm ...

  11. Forebrain neurogenesis: From embryo to adult

    PubMed Central

    Dennis, Daniel; Picketts, David; Slack, Ruth S.; Schuurmans, Carol

    2017-01-01

    A satellite symposium to the Canadian Developmental Biology Conference 2016 was held on March 16–17, 2016 in Banff, Alberta, Canada, entitled Forebrain Neurogenesis: From embryo to adult. The Forebrain Neurogenesis symposium was a focused, high-intensity meeting, bringing together the top Canadian and international researchers in the field. This symposium reported the latest breaking news, along with ‘state of the art’ techniques to answer fundamental questions in developmental neurobiology. Topics covered ranged from stem cell regulation to neurocircuitry development, culminating with a session focused on neuropsychiatric disorders. Understanding the underlying causes of neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is of great interest as diagnoses of these conditions are climbing at alarming rates. For instance, in 2012, the Centers for Disease Control reported that the prevalence rate of ASD in the U.S. was 1 in 88; while more recent data indicate that the number is as high as 1 in 68 (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention MMWR Surveillance Summaries. Vol. 63. No. 2). Similarly, the incidence of ASD is on the rise in Canada, increasing from 1 in 150 in 2000 to 1 in 63 in 2012 in southeastern Ontario (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention). Currently very little is known regarding the deficits underlying these neurodevelopmental conditions. Moreover, the development of effective therapies is further limited by major gaps in our understanding of the fundamental processes that regulate forebrain development and adult neurogenesis. The Forebrain Neurogenesis satellite symposium was thus timely, and it played a key role in advancing research in this important field, while also fostering collaborations between international leaders, and inspiring young researchers.

  12. Damage, Repair, and Mutagenesis in Nuclear Genes after Mouse Forebrain Ischemia–Reperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Philip K.; Hsu, Chung Y.; Dizdaroglu, Miral; Floyd, Robert A.; Kow, Yoke W.; Karakaya, Asuman; Rabow, Lois E.; Cui, Jian-K.

    2009-01-01

    To determine whether oxidative stress after cerebral ischemia–reperfusion affects genetic stability in the brain, we studied mutagenesis after forebrain ischemia–reperfusion in Big Blue transgenic mice (male C57BL/6 strain) containing a reporter lacI gene, which allows detection of mutation frequency. The frequency of mutation in this reporter lacI gene increased from 1.5 to 7.7 (per 100,000) in cortical DNA after 30 min of forebrain ischemia and 8 hr of reperfusion and remained elevated at 24 hr reperfusion. Eight DNA lesions that are characteristic of DNA damage mediated by free radicals were detected. Four mutagenic lesions (2,6-diamino-4-hydroxy-5-formamidopyrimidine, 8-hydroxyadenine, 5-hydroxycytosine, and 8-hydroxyguanine) examined by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and one corresponding 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine by a method of HPLC with electrochemical detection increased in cortical DNA two- to fourfold (p < 0.05) during 10–20 min of reperfusion. The damage to γ-actin and DNA polymerase-β genes was detected within 20 min of reperfusion based on the presence of formamidopyrimidine DNA N-glycosylase-sensitive sites. These genes became resistant to the glycosylase within 4–6 hr of reperfusion, suggesting a reduction in DNA damage and presence of DNA repair in nuclear genes. These results suggest that nuclear genes could be targets of free radicals. PMID:8824320

  13. Activation of p38MAPK in microglia after ischemia.

    PubMed

    Walton, K M; DiRocco, R; Bartlett, B A; Koury, E; Marcy, V R; Jarvis, B; Schaefer, E M; Bhat, R V

    1998-04-01

    p38MAPK has been implicated in the regulation of proinflammatory cytokines and apoptosis in vitro. To understand its role in neurodegeneration, we determined the time course and localization of the dually phosphorylated active form of p38MAPK in hippocampus after global forebrain ischemia. Phosphorylated p38MAPK and mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein 2 activity increased over 4 days after ischemia. Phosphorylated p38MAPK immunoreactivity was observed in microglia in regions adjacent to, but not in, the dying CA1 neurons. In contrast, neither c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1 nor p42/p44MAPK activity was altered after ischemia. These results provide the first evidence for localization of activated p38MAPK in the CNS and support a role for p38MAPK in the microglial response to stress.

  14. The bilaterian forebrain: an evolutionary chimaera.

    PubMed

    Tosches, Maria Antonietta; Arendt, Detlev

    2013-12-01

    The insect, annelid and vertebrate forebrains harbour two major centres of output control, a sensory-neurosecretory centre releasing hormones and a primordial locomotor centre that controls the initiation of muscular body movements. In vertebrates, both reside in the hypothalamus. Here, we review recent comparative neurodevelopmental evidence indicating that these centres evolved from separate condensations of neurons on opposite body sides ('apical nervous system' versus 'blastoporal nervous system') and that their developmental specification involved distinct regulatory networks (apical six3 and rx versus mediolateral nk and pax gene-dependent patterning). In bilaterian ancestors, both systems approached each other and became closely intermingled, physically, functionally and developmentally. Our 'chimeric brain hypothesis' sheds new light on the vast success and rapid diversification of bilaterian animals in the Cambrian and revises our understanding of brain architecture.

  15. [Differential effects of isoflurane and nitrous oxide on cerebral blood flow, metabolism and electrocorticogram after incomplete cerebral ischemia in the rat].

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, T; Maekawa, T; Shinohara, K; Sakabe, T; Takeshita, H

    1989-07-01

    Differential effects of isoflurane (ISOF) and N2O on cerebral blood flow, metabolism and electrocorticogram (ECoG) were examined in rats subjected to 15 min-incomplete cerebral ischemia. In the first study, regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and ECoG were measured during and after ischemia. In the second study, local cerebral blood flow (LCBF) and glucose utilization (LCGU) were determined at 60 min after reperfusion. In the N2O group, rCBF in both the cerebral cortex and hippocampus decreased significantly to less than 10% of the pre-ischemic value during ischemia, and it increased to 170% at 10 min after reperfusion. The ECoG became flat during ischemia and reappeared at 21 min after reperfusion. In the ISOF group, rCBF decreased significantly to 25% during ischemia and returned to the preischemic value after reperfusion. The ECoG became flat during ischemia and reappeared at 14 min. In the N2O group, LCBFs decreased significantly to 40-50% of the pre-ischemic values in the forebrain. LCGUs decreased significantly to 30-50% in all structures of the forebrain. In the ISOF group, LCBFs decreased significantly to 60-80% in the forebrain, but were not different in other structures. LCGUs did not differ from pre-ischemic values in all structures except for in the thalamus and habenula. These results may indicate cerebral protective effects of ISOF on incomplete cerebral ischemia in rats.

  16. Genomic Perspectives of Transcriptional Regulation in Forebrain Development

    PubMed Central

    Nord, Alex S.; Pattabiraman, Kartik; Visel, Axel; Rubenstein, John L. R.

    2015-01-01

    The forebrain is the seat of higher order brain functions, and many human neuropsychiatric disorders are due to genetic defects affecting forebrain development, making it imperative to understand the underlying genetic circuitry. Recent progress now makes it possible to begin fully elucidating the genomic regulatory mechanisms that control forebrain gene expression. Herein, we discuss the current knowledge of how transcription factors drive gene expression programs through their interactions with cis-acting genomic elements, such as enhancers; how analyses of chromatin and DNA modifications provide insights into gene expression states; and how these approaches yield insights into the evolution of the human brain. PMID:25569346

  17. Genomic perspectives of transcriptional regulation in forebrain development.

    PubMed

    Nord, Alex S; Pattabiraman, Kartik; Visel, Axel; Rubenstein, John L R

    2015-01-07

    The forebrain is the seat of higher-order brain functions, and many human neuropsychiatric disorders are due to genetic defects affecting forebrain development, making it imperative to understand the underlying genetic circuitry. Recent progress now makes it possible to begin fully elucidating the genomic regulatory mechanisms that control forebrain gene expression. Herein, we discuss the current knowledge of how transcription factors drive gene expression programs through their interactions with cis-acting genomic elements, such as enhancers; how analyses of chromatin and DNA modifications provide insights into gene expression states; and how these approaches yield insights into the evolution of the human brain. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Expression and role of Roundabout-1 in embryonic Xenopus forebrain.

    PubMed

    Connor, R M; Key, B

    2002-09-01

    The receptor Roundabout-1 (Robo1) and its ligand Slit are known to influence axon guidance and central nervous system (CNS) patterning in both vertebrate and nonvertebrate systems. Although Robo-Slit interactions mediate axon guidance in the Drosophila CNS, their role in establishing the early axon scaffold in the embryonic vertebrate brain remains unclear. We report here the identification and expression of a Xenopus Robo1 orthologue that is highly homologous to mammalian Robo1. By using overexpression studies and immunohistochemical and in situ hybridization techniques, we have investigated the role of Robo1 in the development of a subset of neurons and axon tracts in the Xenopus forebrain. Robo1 is expressed in forebrain nuclei and in neuroepithelial cells underlying the main axon tracts. Misexpression of Robo1 led to aberrant development of axon tracts as well as the ectopic differentiation of forebrain neurons. These results implicate Robo1 in both neuronal differentiation and axon guidance in embryonic vertebrate forebrain.

  19. Mosaic Subventricular Origins of Forebrain Oligodendrogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Azim, Kasum; Berninger, Benedikt; Raineteau, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    In the perinatal as well as the adult CNS, the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the forebrain is the largest and most active source of neural stem cells (NSCs) that generates neurons and oligodendrocytes (OLs), the myelin forming cells of the CNS. Recent advances in the field are beginning to shed light regarding SVZ heterogeneity, with the existence of spatially segregated microdomains that are intrinsically biased to generate phenotypically distinct neuronal populations. Although most research has focused on this regionalization in the context of neurogenesis, newer findings underline that this also applies for the genesis of OLs under the control of specific patterning molecules. In this mini review, we discuss the origins as well as the mechanisms that induce and maintain SVZ regionalization. These come in the flavor of specific signaling ligands and subsequent initiation of transcriptional networks that provide a basis for subdividing the SVZ into distinct lineage-specific microdomains. We further emphasize canonical Wnts and FGF2 as essential signaling pathways for the regional genesis of OL progenitors from NSCs of the dorsal SVZ. This aspect of NSC biology, which has so far received little attention, may unveil new avenues for appropriately recruiting NSCs in demyelinating diseases. PMID:27047329

  20. Early immature neuronal death initiates cerebral ischemia-induced neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus.

    PubMed

    Kim, D H; Lee, H E; Kwon, K J; Park, S J; Heo, H; Lee, Y; Choi, J W; Shin, C Y; Ryu, J H

    2015-01-22

    Throughout adulthood, neurons are continuously replaced by new cells in the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus, and this neurogenesis is increased by various neuronal injuries including ischemic stroke and seizure. While several mechanisms of this injury-induced neurogenesis have been elucidated, the initiation factor remains unclear. Here, we investigated which signal(s) trigger(s) ischemia-induced cell proliferation and neurogenesis in the hippocampal DG region. We found that early apoptotic cell death of the immature neurons occurred in the DG region following transient forebrain ischemia/reperfusion in mice. Moreover, early immature neuronal death in the DG initiated transient forebrain ischemia/reperfusion-induced neurogenesis through glycogen synthase kinase-3β/β-catenin signaling, which was mediated by microglia-derived insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1). Additionally, we observed that the blockade of immature neuronal cell death, early microglial activation, or IGF-1 signaling attenuated ischemia-induced neurogenesis. These results suggest that early immature neuronal cell death initiates ischemia-induced neurogenesis through microglial IGF-1 in mice.

  1. Evolution of vertebrate forebrain development: how many different mechanisms?

    PubMed Central

    FOLEY, ANN C.; STERN, CLAUDIO D.

    2001-01-01

    Over the past 50 years and more, many models have been proposed to explain how the nervous system is initially induced and how it becomes subdivided into gross regions such as forebrain, midbrain, hindbrain and spinal cord. Among these models is the 2-signal model of Nieuwkoop & Nigtevecht (1954), who suggested that an initial signal (‘activation’) from the organiser both neuralises and specifies the forebrain, while later signals (‘transformation’) from the same region progressively caudalise portions of this initial territory. An opposing idea emerged from the work of Otto Mangold (1933) and other members of the Spemann laboratory: 2 or more distinct organisers, emitting different signals, were proposed to be responsible for inducing the head, trunk and tail regions. Since then, evidence has accumulated that supports one or the other model, but it has been very difficult to distinguish between them. Recently, a considerable body of work from mouse embryos has been interpreted as favouring the latter model, and as suggesting that a ‘head organiser’, required for the induction of the forebrain, is spatially separate from the classic organiser (Hensen's node). An extraembryonic tissue, the ‘anterior visceral endoderm’ (AVE), was proposed to be the source of forebrain-inducing signals. It is difficult to find tissues that are directly equivalent embryologically or functionally to the AVE in other vertebrates, which led some (e.g. Kessel, 1998) to propose that mammals have evolved a new way of patterning the head. We will present evidence from the chick embryo showing that the hypoblast is embryologically and functionally equivalent to the mouse AVE. Like the latter, the hypoblast also plays a role in head development. However, it does not act like a true organiser. It induces pre-neural and pre-forebrain markers, but only transiently. Further development of neural and forebrain phenotypes requires additional signals not provided by the hypoblast. In

  2. Forebrain neuronal specific ablation of p53 gene provide protection in a cortical ischemic stroke model

    PubMed Central

    Filichia, Emily; Shen, Hui; Zhou, Xiaofei; Qi, Xin; Jin, Kevin; Greig, Nigel; Hoffer, Barry; Luo, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral ischemic injury involves death of multiple cell types at the ischemic sites. As a key regulator of cell death, the p53 gene has been implicated in the regulation of cell loss in stroke. Less focal damage is found in stroke animals pre-treated with a p53 inhibitor or in traditional p53 knockout (ko) mice. However, whether the p53 gene plays a direct role in regulating neuronal cell death is unknown. In this study, in contrast to the global inhibition of p53 function by pharmacological inhibitors and in traditional p53 ko mice, we utilized a neuronal specific conditional ko mouse line (CamcreTRP53 loxP/loxP) to achieve forebrain neuronal specific deletion of p53 and examined the role of the p53 gene in ischemia-induced cell death in neurons. Expression of p53 after stroke is examined using immunohistochemical method and outcome of stroke is examined by analysis of infarction size and behavioral deficits caused by stroke. Our data showed that p53 expression is upregulated in the ischemic region in neuronal cells in wildtype (wt) mice but not in CamcreTRP53 loxP/loxP ko mice. Deletion of the p53 gene in forebrain neurons results in a decreased infarction area in ko mice. Locomotor behavior, measured in automated activity chambers, showed that CamcreTRP53 loxP/loxP ko mice have less locomotor deficits compared to wt mice after MCAo. We conclude that manipulation of p53 expression in neurons may lead to unique therapeutic development in stroke. PMID:25779964

  3. Genomic Perspectives of Transcriptional Regulation in Forebrain Development

    DOE PAGES

    Nord, Alex S.; Pattabiraman, Kartik; Visel, Axel; ...

    2015-01-07

    The forebrain is the seat of higher-order brain functions, and many human neuropsychiatric disorders are due to genetic defects affecting forebrain development, making it imperative to understand the underlying genetic circuitry. We report that recent progress now makes it possible to begin fully elucidating the genomic regulatory mechanisms that control forebrain gene expression. Here, we discuss the current knowledge of how transcription factors drive gene expression programs through their interactions with cis-acting genomic elements, such as enhancers; how analyses of chromatin and DNA modifications provide insights into gene expression states; and how these approaches yield insights into the evolution ofmore » the human brain.« less

  4. Evaluation of cold ischemia for preservation of testicular function during partial orchiectomy in the rat model

    PubMed Central

    McNamara, Erin R.; Madden-Fuentes, Ramiro J.; Routh, Jonathan C.; Rouse, Douglas; Madden, John F.; Wiener, John S.; Rushton, Harry G.; Ross, Sherry S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective We hypothesized that cold ischemia during partial orchiectomy would lead to higher serum testosterone levels and preservation of testicular architecture than warm ischemia in a prepubescent rat model. Materials and methods Eighteen prepubescent male Sprague–Dawley rats were randomized to three different surgical groups: sham surgery, bilateral partial orchiectomy with 30 min of cord compression with cold ischemia, or bilateral partial orchiectomy with 30 min of cord compression with warm ischemia. Animals were killed at puberty, and serum, sperm, and testicles were collected. Histological tissue injury was graded by standardized methodology. Results Mean serum testosterone levels were 1445 ± 590 pg/mL for the sham group, 449 ± 268 pg/mL for the cold ischemia group and 879 ± 631 pg/mL for the warm ischemia group (p = 0.12). Mean sperm counts were 2.1 × 107 for sham, 4.4 × 106 for cold ischemia, and 9.9 × 106 for the warm ischemia groups (p = 0.48). Histological evaluation revealed significant difference in tissue injury grading with more injury in the cold ischemia than in the warm ischemia group (p = 0.01). Conclusions In our preclinical rat model, we found no benefit for cold ischemia over warm ischemia at 30 min. PMID:25128916

  5. The Potential Role of Metalloproteinases in Neurogenesis in the Gerbil Hippocampus Following Global Forebrain Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Wójcik-Stanaszek, Luiza; Sypecka, Joanna; Szymczak, Patrycja; Ziemka-Nalecz, Malgorzata; Khrestchatisky, Michel; Rivera, Santiago; Zalewska, Teresa

    2011-01-01

    Background Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) have recently been considered to be involved in the neurogenic response of adult neural stem/progenitor cells. However, there is a lack of information showing direct association between the activation of MMPs and the development of neuronal progenitor cells involving proliferation and/or further differentiation in vulnerable (Cornus Ammoni-CA1) and resistant (dentate gyrus-DG) to ischemic injury areas of the brain hippocampus. Principal Findings We showed that dynamics of MMPs activation in the dentate gyrus correlated closely with the rate of proliferation and differentiation of progenitor cells into mature neurons. In contrast, in the damaged CA1 pyramidal cells layer, despite the fact that some proliferating cells exhibited antigen specific characteristic of newborn neuronal cells, these did not attain maturity. This coincides with the low, near control-level, activity of MMPs. The above results are supported by our in vitro study showing that MMP inhibitors interfered with both the proliferation and differentiation of the human neural stem cell line derived from umbilical cord blood (HUCB-NSCs) toward the neuronal lineage. Conclusion Taken together, the spatial and temporal profiles of MMPs activity suggest that these proteinases could be an important component in neurogenesis-associated processes in post-ischemic brain hippocampus. PMID:21799862

  6. Dynamic expression of MEIS1 homeoprotein in E14.5 forebrain and differentiated forebrain-derived neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Barber, Benjamin A; Liyanage, Vichithra R B; Zachariah, Robby M; Olson, Carl O; Bailey, Melissa A G; Rastegar, Mojgan

    2013-10-01

    Central nervous system development is controlled by highly conserved homeoprotein transcription factors including HOX and TALE (Three Amino acid Loop Extension). TALE proteins are primarily known as HOX-cofactors and play key roles in cell proliferation, differentiation and organogenesis. MEIS1 is a TALE member with established expression in the developing central nervous system. MEIS1 is essential for embryonic development and Meis1 knockout mice dies at embryonic day (E) 14.5. However, Meis1/MEIS1 expression in the devolving forebrain, at this critical time-point has not been studied. Here, for the first time we characterize the region-specific expression of MEIS1 in E14.5 mouse forebrain, filling the gap of MEIS1 expression profile between E12.5 and E16.5. Previously, we reported MEIS1 transcriptional regulatory role in neuronal differentiation and established forebrain-derived neural stem cells (NSC) for gene therapy application of neuronal genes. Here, we show the dynamic expression of Meis1/MEIS1 during the differentiation of forebrain-derived NSC toward a glial lineage. Our results show that Meis1/MEIS1 expression is induced during NSC differentiation and is expressed in both differentiated neurons and astrocytes. Confirming these results, we detected MEIS1 expression in primary cultures of in vivo differentiated cortical neurons and astrocytes. We further demonstrate Meis1/MEIS1 expression relative to other TALE family members in the forebrain-derived NSC in the absence of Hox genes. Our data provide evidence that forebrain-derived NSC can be used as an accessible in vitro model to study the expression and function of TALE proteins, supporting their potential role in modulating NSC self-renewal and differentiation.

  7. The iron exporter ferroportin 1 is essential for development of the mouse embryo, forebrain patterning and neural tube closure

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Jinzhe; McKean, David M.; Warrier, Sunita; Corbin, Joshua G.; Niswander, Lee; Zohn, Irene E.

    2010-01-01

    Neural tube defects (NTDs) are some of the most common birth defects observed in humans. The incidence of NTDs can be reduced by peri-conceptional folic acid supplementation alone and reduced even further by supplementation with folic acid plus a multivitamin. Here, we present evidence that iron maybe an important nutrient necessary for normal development of the neural tube. Following implantation of the mouse embryo, ferroportin 1 (Fpn1) is essential for the transport of iron from the mother to the fetus and is expressed in the visceral endoderm, yolk sac and placenta. The flatiron (ffe) mutant mouse line harbors a hypomorphic mutation in Fpn1 and we have created an allelic series of Fpn1 mutations that result in graded developmental defects. A null mutation in the Fpn1 gene is embryonic lethal before gastrulation, hypomorphic Fpn1ffe/ffe mutants exhibit NTDs consisting of exencephaly, spina bifida and forebrain truncations, while Fpn1ffe/KI mutants exhibit even more severe NTDs. We show that Fpn1 is not required in the embryo proper but rather in the extra-embryonic visceral endoderm. Our data indicate that loss of Fpn1 results in abnormal morphogenesis of the anterior visceral endoderm (AVE). Defects in the development of the forebrain in Fpn1 mutants are compounded by defects in multiple signaling centers required for maintenance of the forebrain, including the anterior definitive endoderm (ADE), anterior mesendoderm (AME) and anterior neural ridge (ANR). Finally, we demonstrate that this loss of forebrain maintenance is due in part to the iron deficiency that results from the absence of fully functional Fpn1. PMID:20702562

  8. Enhanced autophagy signaling in diabetic rats with ischemia-induced seizures.

    PubMed

    Xia, Luoxing; Lei, Zhigang; Shi, Zhongshan; Guo, Dave; Su, Henry; Ruan, Yiwen; Xu, Zao C

    2016-07-15

    Seizures are among the most common neurological sequelae of stroke, and ischemic insult in diabetes notably increases the incidence of seizures. Recent studies indicated that autophagy influences the outcome of stroke and involved in epileptogenesis. However, the association of autophagy and post-ischemic seizures in diabetes remains unclear. The present study aimed to reveal the involvement of autophagy in the seizures following cerebral ischemia in diabetes. Diabetes was induced in adult male Wistar rats by intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ). The diabetic rats were subjected to transient forebrain ischemia. The neuronal damage was assessed using hematoxylin-eosin staining. Western blotting and immunohistochemistry were performed to investigate the alteration of autophagy marker microtubule-associated protein light chain 1B (LC3B). The results showed that all diabetic animals developed seizures after ischemia. However, no apparent cell death was observed in the hippocampus of seizure rats 12h after the insult. The expression of LC3B was significantly enhanced in naïve animals after ischemia and was further increased in diabetic animals after ischemia. Immunofluorescence double-labeling study indicated that LC3B was mainly increased in neurons. Our study demonstrated, for the first time, that autophagy activity is significantly increased in diabetic animals with ischemia-induced seizures. Further studies are needed to explore the role of autophagy in seizure generation after ischemia in diabetic conditions.

  9. Adopted cognitive tests for gerbils: validation by studying ageing and ischemia.

    PubMed

    Wappler, Edina A; Szilágyi, Géza; Gál, Anikó; Skopál, Judit; Nyakas, Csaba; Nagy, Zoltán; Felszeghy, Klára

    2009-04-20

    Transient occlusion of common carotid arteries in gerbils is a simple and widely used model for assessing histological and functional consequences of transient forebrain ischemia and neuroprotective action of pharmaceuticals. In the present study we aimed to introduce additional behavioural tests as novel object recognition and food-motivated hole-board learning in order to measure attention and learning capacity in gerbils. For validating these cognitive tests the effects of ageing (4, 9 and 18 months) and those of transient forebrain ischemia induced by bilateral carotid occlusion at 9 months of age were investigated. Neuronal cell death was estimated in the hippocampus using TUNEL and caspase-3 double fluorescence labelling and confocal microscopy. Ageing within the selected range although influenced ambulatory activity, did not considerably change attention and memory functions of gerbils. As a result of transient ischemia a selective neuronal damage in CA1 and CA2 regions of the hippocampus has been observed and tested 4 days after the insult. Ischemic gerbils became hyperactive, but showed decreased attention and impaired spatial memory functions as compared to sham-operated controls. According to our results the novel object recognition paradigm and the hole-board spatial learning test could reliably be added to the battery of conventional behavioural tests applied previously in this species. The novel tests can be performed within a wide interval of adult age and provide useful additional methods for assessing ischemia-induced cognitive impairment in gerbils.

  10. Adult forebrain NMDA receptors gate social motivation and social memory.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Stephanie; Tsien, Joe Z

    2017-02-01

    Motivation to engage in social interaction is critical to ensure normal social behaviors, whereas dysregulation in social motivation can contribute to psychiatric diseases such as schizophrenia, autism, social anxiety disorders and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). While dopamine is well known to regulate motivation, its downstream targets are poorly understood. Given the fact that the dopamine 1 (D1) receptors are often physically coupled with the NMDA receptors, we hypothesize that the NMDA receptor activity in the adult forebrain principal neurons are crucial not only for learning and memory, but also for the proper gating of social motivation. Here, we tested this hypothesis by examining sociability and social memory in inducible forebrain-specific NR1 knockout mice. These mice are ideal for exploring the role of the NR1 subunit in social behavior because the NR1 subunit can be selectively knocked out after the critical developmental period, in which NR1 is required for normal development. We found that the inducible deletion of the NMDA receptors prior to behavioral assays impaired, not only object and social recognition memory tests, but also resulted in profound deficits in social motivation. Mice with ablated NR1 subunits in the forebrain demonstrated significant decreases in sociability compared to their wild type counterparts. These results suggest that in addition to its crucial role in learning and memory, the NMDA receptors in the adult forebrain principal neurons gate social motivation, independent of neuronal development.

  11. Forebrain Mechanisms of Nociception and Pain: Analysis through Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casey, Kenneth L.

    1999-07-01

    Pain is a unified experience composed of interacting discriminative, affective-motivational, and cognitive components, each of which is mediated and modulated through forebrain mechanisms acting at spinal, brainstem, and cerebral levels. The size of the human forebrain in relation to the spinal cord gives anatomical emphasis to forebrain control over nociceptive processing. Human forebrain pathology can cause pain without the activation of nociceptors. Functional imaging of the normal human brain with positron emission tomography (PET) shows synaptically induced increases in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in several regions specifically during pain. We have examined the variables of gender, type of noxious stimulus, and the origin of nociceptive input as potential determinants of the pattern and intensity of rCBF responses. The structures most consistently activated across genders and during contact heat pain, cold pain, cutaneous laser pain or intramuscular pain were the contralateral insula and anterior cingulate cortex, the bilateral thalamus and premotor cortex, and the cerebellar vermis. These regions are commonly activated in PET studies of pain conducted by other investigators, and the intensity of the brain rCBF response correlates parametrically with perceived pain intensity. To complement the human studies, we developed an animal model for investigating stimulus-induced rCBF responses in the rat. In accord with behavioral measures and the results of human PET, there is a progressive and selective activation of somatosensory and limbic system structures in the brain and brainstem following the subcutaneous injection of formalin. The animal model and human PET studies should be mutually reinforcing and thus facilitate progress in understanding forebrain mechanisms of normal and pathological pain.

  12. VENTROMEDIAN FOREBRAIN DYSGENESIS FOLLOWS EARLY PRENATAL ETHANOL EXPOSURE IN MICE

    PubMed Central

    Godin, Elizabeth A.; Dehart, Deborah B.; Parnell, Scott E.; O'Leary-Moore, Shonagh K.; Sulik, Kathleen K.

    2010-01-01

    Ethanol exposure on gestational day (GD) 7 in the mouse has previously been shown to result in ventromedian forebrain deficits along with facial anomalies characteristic of fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS). To further explore ethanol's teratogenic effect on the ventromedian forebrain in this mouse model, scanning electron microscopic and histological analyses were conducted. For this, time mated C57Bl/6J mice were injected with 2.9 g/kg ethanol or saline twice, at a four hour interval, on their 7th day of pregnancy. On GD 12.5, 13 and 17, control and ethanol-exposed specimens were collected and processed for light and scanning electron microscopic analyses. Gross morphological changes present in the forebrains of ethanol-exposed embryos included cerebral hemispheres that were too close in proximity or rostrally united, enlarged foramina of Monro, enlarged or united lateral ventricles, and varying degrees of hippocampal and ventromedian forebrain deficiency. In GD 12.5 control and ethanol-exposed embryos, in situ hybridization employing probes for Nkx2.1 or Fzd8 to distinguish the preoptic area and medial ganglionic eminences (MGE) from the lateral ganglionic eminences, respectively, confirmed the selective loss of ventromedian tissues. Immunohistochemical labeling of oligodendrocyte progenitors with Olig2, a transcription factor necessary for their specification, and of GABA, an inhibitory neurotransmitter, showed ethanol-induced reductions in both. To investigate later consequences of ventromedian forebrain loss, MGE-derived somatostatin-expressing interneurons in the subpallial region of GD 17 fetal mice were examined, with results showing that the somatostatin-expressing interneurons that were present were dysmorphic in the ethanol-exposed fetuses. The potential functional consequences of this insult are discussed. PMID:21074610

  13. Volume of the human septal forebrain region is a predictor of source memory accuracy.

    PubMed

    Butler, Tracy; Blackmon, Karen; Zaborszky, Laszlo; Wang, Xiuyuan; DuBois, Jonathan; Carlson, Chad; Barr, William B; French, Jacqueline; Devinsky, Orrin; Kuzniecky, Ruben; Halgren, Eric; Thesen, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Septal nuclei, components of basal forebrain, are strongly and reciprocally connected with hippocampus, and have been shown in animals to play a critical role in memory. In humans, the septal forebrain has received little attention. To examine the role of human septal forebrain in memory, we acquired high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging scans from 25 healthy subjects and calculated septal forebrain volume using recently developed probabilistic cytoarchitectonic maps. We indexed memory with the California Verbal Learning Test-II. Linear regression showed that bilateral septal forebrain volume was a significant positive predictor of recognition memory accuracy. More specifically, larger septal forebrain volume was associated with the ability to recall item source/context accuracy. Results indicate specific involvement of septal forebrain in human source memory, and recall the need for additional research into the role of septal nuclei in memory and other impairments associated with human diseases.

  14. Transient Enhancement of Inhibitory Synaptic Transmission in Hippocampal CA1 Pyramidal Neurons after Cerebral Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Rui; Pang, Zhi-Ping; Deng, Ping; Xu, Zao C.

    2009-01-01

    Pyramidal neurons in hippocampal CA1 regions are highly sensitive to cerebral ischemia. Alterations of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic transmission may contribute to the ischemia-induced neuronal degeneration. However, little is known about the changes of GABAergic synaptic transmission in the hippocampus following reperfusion. We examined the GABAA receptor-mediated inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) in CA1 pyramidal neurons 12 hours and 24 hours after transient forebrain ischemia. The amplitudes of evoked IPSCs (eIPSCs) were increased significantly 12 hours after ischemia and returned to control levels 24 hours following reperfusion. The potentiation of eIPSCs was accompanied by an increase of miniature IPSCs (mIPSCs) amplitude, and an enhanced response to exogenous application of GABA, indicating the involvement of postsynaptic mechanisms. Furthermore, there was no obvious change of the paired-pulse ratio (PPR) of eIPSCs and the frequency of mIPSCs, suggesting that the potentiation of eIPSCs might not be due to the increased presynaptic release. Blockade of adenosine A1 receptors led to a decrease of eIPSCs amplitude in post-ischemic neurons but not in control neurons, without affecting the frequency of mIPSCs and the PPR of eIPSCs. Thus, tonic activation of adenosine A1 receptors might, at least in part, contribute to the enhancement of inhibitory synaptic transmission in CA1 neurons after forebrain ischemia. The transient enhancement of inhibitory neurotransmission might temporarily protect CA1 pyramidal neurons, and delay the process of neuronal death after cerebral ischemia. PMID:19258028

  15. Basal forebrain control of wakefulness and cortical rhythms

    PubMed Central

    Anaclet, Christelle; Pedersen, Nigel P.; Ferrari, Loris L.; Venner, Anne; Bass, Caroline E.; Arrigoni, Elda; Fuller, Patrick M.

    2015-01-01

    Wakefulness, along with fast cortical rhythms and associated cognition, depend on the basal forebrain (BF). BF cholinergic cell loss in dementia and the sedative effect of anti-cholinergic drugs have long implicated these neurons as important for cognition and wakefulness. The BF also contains intermingled inhibitory GABAergic and excitatory glutamatergic cell groups whose exact neurobiological roles are unclear. Here we show that genetically targeted chemogenetic activation of BF cholinergic or glutamatergic neurons in behaving mice produced significant effects on state consolidation and/or the electroencephalogram but had no effect on total wake. Similar activation of BF GABAergic neurons produced sustained wakefulness and high-frequency cortical rhythms, whereas chemogenetic inhibition increased sleep. Our findings reveal a major contribution of BF GABAergic neurons to wakefulness and the fast cortical rhythms associated with cognition. These findings may be clinically applicable to manipulations aimed at increasing forebrain activation in dementia and the minimally conscious state. PMID:26524973

  16. Developmentally defined forebrain circuits regulate appetitive and aversive olfactory learning

    PubMed Central

    Muthusamy, Nagendran; Zhang, Xuying; Johnson, Caroline A.; Yadav, Prem N.; Ghashghaei, H. Troy

    2016-01-01

    Postnatal and adult neurogenesis are region- and modality-specific, but the significance of developmentally distinct neuronal populations remains unclear. We demonstrate that chemogenetic inactivation of a subset of forebrain and olfactory neurons generated at birth disrupts responses to an aversive odor. In contrast, novel appetitive odor learning is sensitive to inactivation of adult born neurons, unveiling that developmentally defined sets of neurons may differentially participate in hedonic aspects of sensory learning. PMID:27918532

  17. Forebrain GABAergic projections to locus coeruleus in mouse.

    PubMed

    Dimitrov, Eugene L; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Usdin, Ted B

    2013-07-01

    The noradrenergic locus coeruleus (LC) regulates arousal, memory, sympathetic nervous system activity, and pain. Forebrain projections to LC have been characterized in rat, cat, and primates, but not systematically in mouse. We surveyed mouse forebrain LC-projecting neurons by examining retrogradely labeled cells following LC iontophoresis of Fluoro-Gold and anterograde LC labeling after forebrain injection of biotinylated dextran amine or viral tracer. Similar to other species, the central amygdalar nucleus (CAmy), anterior hypothalamus, paraventricular nucleus, and posterior lateral hypothalamic area (PLH) provide major LC inputs. By using mice expressing green fluorescent protein in γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic neurons, we found that more than one-third of LC-projecting CAmy and PLH neurons are GABAergic. LC colocalization of biotinylated dextran amine, following CAmy or PLH injection, with either green fluorescent protein or glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD)65/67 immunoreactivity confirmed these GABAergic projections. CAmy injection of adeno-associated virus encoding channelrhodopsin-2-Venus showed similar fiber labeling and association with GAD65/67-immunoreactive (ir) and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-ir neurons. CAmy and PLH projections were densest in a pericoerulear zone, but many fibers entered the LC proper. Close apposition between CAmy GABAergic projections and TH-ir processes suggests that CAmy GABAergic neurons may directly inhibit noradrenergic principal neurons. Direct LC neuron targeting was confirmed by anterograde transneuronal labeling of LC TH-ir neurons following CAmy or PLH injection of a herpes virus that expresses red fluorescent protein following activation by Cre recombinase in mice that express Cre recombinase in GABAergic neurons. This description of GABAergic projections from the CAmy and PLH to the LC clarifies important forebrain sources of inhibitory control of central nervous system noradrenergic activity.

  18. Thromboxane synthetase inhibitor ameliorates delayed neuronal death in the CA1 subfield of the hippocampus after transient global ischemia in gerbils.

    PubMed

    Iijima, T; Sawa, H; Shiokawa, Y; Saito, I; Ishii, H; Nakamura, Z; Sankawa, H

    1996-07-01

    Thromboxane A2 accumulates in the hippocampus after global ischemia and may play a key role in postischemic hypoperfusion. Thromboxane synthetase inhibitor (OKY-046) inhibits the accumulation of thromboxane A2 and promotes prostacycline production. Therefore, we set out to determine whether the inhibition of thromboxane synthesis would ameriolate postischemic neuronal death. Three groups of six Mongolian gerbils were subjected to different treatments: untreated control, untreated ischemia, and treated ischemia. Immediately after forebrain ischemia, OKY-046 (10 mg/kg) was injected intraperitoneally into the treated group. After 7 days of survival, the histopathology of the brain was examined. Pyramidal cell density in the CA1 sector in the treated group was 147 +/- 70 nuclei/mm (mean +/- SD), which was significantly (p < 0.05) higher than than in the untreated group (33 +/- 10 (nuclei/mm). The findings were 231 +/- 7 nuclei/mm for the control group. No significant difference was seen in the profile of temporal muscle temperature before and after ischemia between the groups. Ultrastructurally, the vessels in the CAI sector showed lumen patency in the treated group, whereas occluded vessels with an extended perivascular space were observed in the untreated group. Thromboxane synthetase inhibitor thus partly ameliorates the selective vulnerability of the hippocampus after forebrain ischemia, suggesting that thromboxane A2 is involved in the development of delayed neuronal death, independently of any thermal effect.

  19. Necdin promotes tangential migration of neocortical interneurons from basal forebrain.

    PubMed

    Kuwajima, Takaaki; Hasegawa, Koichi; Yoshikawa, Kazuaki

    2010-03-10

    Necdin is a pleiotropic protein that promotes neuronal differentiation and survival. In mammals, the necdin gene on the maternal chromosome is silenced by genomic imprinting, and only the paternal necdin gene is expressed in virtually all postmitotic neurons. Necdin forms a complex with the homeodomain protein Dlx2 to enhance its transcriptional activity. Dlx2 plays a major role in controlling tangential migration of GABAergic interneurons from the basal forebrain to the neocortex. Here, we examined whether Dlx2-expressing interneurons migrate properly in vivo in mutant mice lacking the paternal necdin gene. In necdin-deficient mice at birth, the population of Dlx2-expressing cells significantly decreased in the neocortex but increased in the preoptic area. DiI-labeled cell migration assay using organotypic forebrain slice cultures revealed that the number of cells migrating from the medial ganglionic eminence into the neocortex was significantly reduced in necdin-deficient embryos. Furthermore, necdin-deficient mice had a decreased population of neocortical GABA-containing neurons and were highly susceptible to pentylenetetrazole-induced seizures. These results suggest that necdin promotes tangential migration of neocortical GABAergic interneurons during mammalian forebrain development.

  20. Shh and forebrain evolution in the blind cavefish Astyanax mexicanus.

    PubMed

    Rétaux, Sylvie; Pottin, Karen; Alunni, Alessandro

    2008-03-01

    The blind cavefish and its surface counterpart of the teleost species Astyanax mexicanus constitute an excellent model to study the evolution of morphological features. During adaptation to their lives in perpetual darkness, the cave population has lost eyes (and pigmentation), but has gained several constructive traits. Recently, the demonstration that an increase in Shh (Sonic Hedgehog) midline signalling was indirectly responsible for the loss of eyes in cavefish led to new ways to search for possible modifications in the forebrain of these cavefish, as this anterior-most region of the vertebrate central nervous system develops under close control of the powerful Shh morphogen. In this review, we summarize the recent progress in the understanding of forebrain and eye modifications in cavefish. These include major changes in cell death, cell proliferation and cell migration in various parts of the forebrain when compared with their surface counterparts with eyes. The outcome of these modifications, in terms of neuronal circuitry, morphological and behavioral adaptations are discussed.

  1. Corelease of acetylcholine and GABA from cholinergic forebrain neurons

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, Arpiar; Granger, Adam J; Sabatini, Bernardo L

    2015-01-01

    Neurotransmitter corelease is emerging as a common theme of central neuromodulatory systems. Though corelease of glutamate or GABA with acetylcholine has been reported within the cholinergic system, the full extent is unknown. To explore synaptic signaling of cholinergic forebrain neurons, we activated choline acetyltransferase expressing neurons using channelrhodopsin while recording post-synaptic currents (PSCs) in layer 1 interneurons. Surprisingly, we observed PSCs mediated by GABAA receptors in addition to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Based on PSC latency and pharmacological sensitivity, our results suggest monosynaptic release of both GABA and ACh. Anatomical analysis showed that forebrain cholinergic neurons express the GABA synthetic enzyme Gad2 and the vesicular GABA transporter (Slc32a1). We confirmed the direct release of GABA by knocking out Slc32a1 from cholinergic neurons. Our results identify GABA as an overlooked fast neurotransmitter utilized throughout the forebrain cholinergic system. GABA/ACh corelease may have major implications for modulation of cortical function by cholinergic neurons. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06412.001 PMID:25723967

  2. Ascending connections to the forebrain in the Tegu lizard.

    PubMed

    Lohman, A H; van Woerden-Verkley, I

    1978-12-01

    The ascending connections to the striatum and the cortex of the Tegu lizard, Tupinambis nigropunctatus, were studied by means of anterograde fiber degeneration and retrograde axonal transport. The striatum receives projections by way of the dorsal peduncle of the lateral forebrain bundle from four dorsal thalamic nuclei: nucleus rotundus, nucleus reuniens, the posterior part of the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus and nucleus dorsomedialis. The former three nuclei project to circumscribed areas of the dorsal striatum, whereas nucleus dorsomedialis has a distribution to the whole dorsal striatum. Other sources of origin to the striatum are the mesencephalic reticular formation, substantia nigra and nucleus cerebelli lateralis. With the exception of the latter afferentation all these projections are ipsilateral. The ascending connections to the pallium originate for the major part from nucleus dorsolateralis anterior of the dorsal thalamus. The fibers course in both the medial forebrain bundle and the dorsal peduncle of the lateral forebrain bundle and terminate ipsilaterally in the middle of the molecular layer of the small-celled part of the mediodorsal cortex and bilaterally above the intermediate region of the dorsal cortex. The latter area is reached also by fibers from the septal area. The large-celled part of the mediodorsal cortex receives projections from nucleus raphes superior and the corpus mammillare.

  3. Basal forebrain degeneration precedes and predicts the cortical spread of Alzheimer's pathology

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, Taylor W.; Nathan Spreng, R.; Weiner, Michael W.; Aisen, Paul; Petersen, Ronald; Jack, Clifford R.; Jagust, William; Trojanowki, John Q.; Toga, Arthur W.; Beckett, Laurel; Green, Robert C.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Morris, John; Shaw, Leslie M.; Khachaturian, Zaven; Sorensen, Greg; Kuller, Lew; Raichle, Marc; Paul, Steven; Davies, Peter; Fillit, Howard; Hefti, Franz; Holtzman, Davie; Mesulam, M Marcel; Potter, William; Snyder, Peter; Schwartz, Adam; Montine, Tom; Thomas, Ronald G.; Donohue, Michael; Walter, Sarah; Gessert, Devon; Sather, Tamie; Jiminez, Gus; Harvey, Danielle; Bernstein, Matthew; Fox, Nick; Thompson, Paul; Schuff, Norbert; Borowski, Bret; Gunter, Jeff; Senjem, Matt; Vemuri, Prashanthi; Jones, David; Kantarci, Kejal; Ward, Chad; Koeppe, Robert A.; Foster, Norm; Reiman, Eric M.; Chen, Kewei; Mathis, Chet; Landau, Susan; Cairns, Nigel J.; Householder, Erin; Taylor-Reinwald, Lisa; Lee, Virginia; Korecka, Magdalena; Figurski, Michal; Crawford, Karen; Neu, Scott; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Potkin, Steven; Shen, Li; Faber, Kelley; Kim, Sungeun; Nho, Kwangsik; Thal, Leon; Buckholtz, Neil; Albert, Marylyn; Frank, Richard; Hsiao, John; Kaye, Jeffrey; Quinn, Joseph; Lind, Betty; Carter, Raina; Dolen, Sara; Schneider, Lon S.; Pawluczyk, Sonia; Beccera, Mauricio; Teodoro, Liberty; Spann, Bryan M.; Brewer, James; Vanderswag, Helen; Fleisher, Adam; Heidebrink, Judith L.; Lord, Joanne L.; Mason, Sara S.; Albers, Colleen S.; Knopman, David; Johnson, Kris; Doody, Rachelle S.; Villanueva-Meyer, Javier; Chowdhury, Munir; Rountree, Susan; Dang, Mimi; Stern, Yaakov; Honig, Lawrence S.; Bell, Karen L.; Ances, Beau; Carroll, Maria; Leon, Sue; Mintun, Mark A.; Schneider, Stacy; Oliver, Angela; Marson, Daniel; Griffith, Randall; Clark, David; Geldmacher, David; Brockington, John; Roberson, Erik; Grossman, Hillel; Mitsis, Effie; de Toledo-Morrell, Leyla; Shah, Raj C.; Duara, Ranjan; Varon, Daniel; Greig, Maria T.; Roberts, Peggy; Albert, Marilyn; Onyike, Chiadi; D'Agostino, Daniel; Kielb, Stephanie; Galvin, James E.; Cerbone, Brittany; Michel, Christina A.; Rusinek, Henry; de Leon, Mony J.; Glodzik, Lidia; De Santi, Susan; Doraiswamy, P. Murali; Petrella, Jeffrey R.; Wong, Terence Z.; Arnold, Steven E.; Karlawish, Jason H.; Wolk, David; Smith, Charles D.; Jicha, Greg; Hardy, Peter; Sinha, Partha; Oates, Elizabeth; Conrad, Gary; Lopez, Oscar L.; Oakley, MaryAnn; Simpson, Donna M.; Porsteinsson, Anton P.; Goldstein, Bonnie S.; Martin, Kim; Makino, Kelly M.; Ismail, M. Saleem; Brand, Connie; Mulnard, Ruth A.; Thai, Gaby; Mc-Adams-Ortiz, Catherine; Womack, Kyle; Mathews, Dana; Quiceno, Mary; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon; King, Richard; Weiner, Myron; Martin-Cook, Kristen; DeVous, Michael; Levey, Allan I.; Lah, James J.; Cellar, Janet S.; Burns, Jeffrey M.; Anderson, Heather S.; Swerdlow, Russell H.; Apostolova, Liana; Tingus, Kathleen; Woo, Ellen; Silverman, Daniel H. S.; Lu, Po H.; Bartzokis, George; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Parfitt, Francine; Kendall, Tracy; Johnson, Heather; Farlow, Martin R.; Hake, AnnMarie; Matthews, Brandy R.; Herring, Scott; Hunt, Cynthia; van Dyck, Christopher H.; Carson, Richard E.; MacAvoy, Martha G.; Chertkow, Howard; Bergman, Howard; Hosein, Chris; Black, Sandra; Stefanovic, Bojana; Caldwell, Curtis; Robin Hsiung, Ging-Yuek; Feldman, Howard; Mudge, Benita; Assaly, Michele; Kertesz, Andrew; Rogers, John; Bernick, Charles; Munic, Donna; Kerwin, Diana; Mesulam, Marek-Marsel; Lipowski, Kristine; Wu, Chuang-Kuo; Johnson, Nancy; Sadowsky, Carl; Martinez, Walter; Villena, Teresa; Turner, Raymond Scott; Johnson, Kathleen; Reynolds, Brigid; Sperling, Reisa A.; Johnson, Keith A.; Marshall, Gad; Frey, Meghan; Lane, Barton; Rosen, Allyson; Tinklenberg, Jared; Sabbagh, Marwan N.; Belden, Christine M.; Jacobson, Sandra A.; Sirrel, Sherye A.; Kowall, Neil; Killiany, Ronald; Budson, Andrew E.; Norbash, Alexander; Johnson, Patricia Lynn; Allard, Joanne; Lerner, Alan; Ogrocki, Paula; Hudson, Leon; Fletcher, Evan; Carmichael, Owen; Olichney, John; DeCarli, Charles; Kittur, Smita; Borrie, Michael; Lee, T.-Y.; Bartha, Rob; Johnson, Sterling; Asthana, Sanjay; Carlsson, Cynthia M.; Potkin, Steven G.; Preda, Adrian; Nguyen, Dana; Tariot, Pierre; Reeder, Stephanie; Bates, Vernice; Capote, Horacio; Rainka, Michelle; Scharre, Douglas W.; Kataki, Maria; Adeli, Anahita; Zimmerman, Earl A.; Celmins, Dzintra; Brown, Alice D.; Pearlson, Godfrey D.; Blank, Karen; Anderson, Karen; Santulli, Robert B.; Kitzmiller, Tamar J.; Schwartz, Eben S.; Sink, Kaycee M.; Williamson, Jeff D.; Garg, Pradeep; Watkins, Franklin; Ott, Brian R.; Querfurth, Henry; Tremont, Geoffrey; Salloway, Stephen; Malloy, Paul; Correia, Stephen; Rosen, Howard J.; Miller, Bruce L.; Mintzer, Jacobo; Spicer, Kenneth; Bachman, David; Finger, Elizabether; Pasternak, Stephen; Rachinsky, Irina; Drost, Dick; Pomara, Nunzio; Hernando, Raymundo; Sarrael, Antero; Schultz, Susan K.; Boles Ponto, Laura L.; Shim, Hyungsub; Smith, Karen Elizabeth; Relkin, Norman; Chaing, Gloria; Raudin, Lisa; Smith, Amanda; Fargher, Kristin; Raj, Balebail Ashok; Neylan, Thomas; Grafman, Jordan; Davis, Melissa; Morrison, Rosemary; Hayes, Jacqueline; Finley, Shannon; Friedl, Karl; Fleischman, Debra; Arfanakis, Konstantinos; James, Olga; Massoglia, Dino; Fruehling, J. Jay; Harding, Sandra; Peskind, Elaine R.; Petrie, Eric C.; Li, Gail; Yesavage, Jerome A.; Taylor, Joy L.; Furst, Ansgar J.

    2016-01-01

    There is considerable debate whether Alzheimer's disease (AD) originates in basal forebrain or entorhinal cortex. Here we examined whether longitudinal decreases in basal forebrain and entorhinal cortex grey matter volume were interdependent and sequential. In a large cohort of age-matched older adults ranging from cognitively normal to AD, we demonstrate that basal forebrain volume predicts longitudinal entorhinal degeneration. Models of parallel degeneration or entorhinal origin received negligible support. We then integrated volumetric measures with an amyloid biomarker sensitive to pre-symptomatic AD pathology. Comparison between cognitively matched normal adult subgroups, delineated according to the amyloid biomarker, revealed abnormal degeneration in basal forebrain, but not entorhinal cortex. Abnormal degeneration in both basal forebrain and entorhinal cortex was only observed among prodromal (mildly amnestic) individuals. We provide evidence that basal forebrain pathology precedes and predicts both entorhinal pathology and memory impairment, challenging the widely held belief that AD has a cortical origin. PMID:27811848

  4. Critical Limb Ischemia (CLI)

    MedlinePlus

    ... High blood pressure Family history of vascular disease Warning Signs You may have critical limb ischemia if ... blood flow to the limb. Other treatments include laser atherectomy, where small bits of plaque are vaporized ...

  5. Critical Limb Ischemia (CLI)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Get Involved Get Involved Resources Educational Flyers Video Library Types of Vascular Diseases Papers & Presentations News News Items Press Releases Newsletters Events Donate Donate Now Ways to Give Individual Donors Corporate Sponsors Donor Privacy Policy Critical Limb Ischemia (CLI) ...

  6. [Chronic mesenteric ischemia revisited].

    PubMed

    do Carmo, Germano; Rosa, António; Ministro, Augusto; Pestana, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    The authors report two clinical cases of rare and complex situations - an aortic dissection and an aortitis -, which had as a common denominator a chronic mesenteric ischemia. They discuss the indications and surgical strategies adopted.

  7. [Spinal cord ischemia].

    PubMed

    Masson, C; Leys, D; Meder, J F; Dousset, V; Pruvo, J P

    2004-01-01

    Traditional data and recent advances in the field of spinal cord ischemia are reviewed, with special attention to clinical and radiological features, as well as underlying etiology, outcome, and pathophysiology. Acute spinal cord ischemia includes arterial and venous infarction and global ischemia resulting from cardiac arrest or severe hypotension. MRI has become the technique of choice for the imaging diagnosis of spinal cord infarction. Correlation of clinical and MRI data has allowed diagnosis of clinical syndromes due to small infarcts in the central or peripheral arterial territory of the spinal cord. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging may increase the sensitivity and specificity for diagnosis of acute spinal cord infarction. Diagnosis of venous spinal cord infarction remains difficult. As for global ischemia, neuropathological studies demonstrated a great sensitivity of spinal cord to ischemia, with selective vulnerability of lumbosacral neurons. Chronic spinal cord ischemia results in a syndrome of progressive myelopathy. The cause is usually an arteriovenous malformation. Most often, diagnosis may be suspected on MRI, leading to diagnostic, and eventually therapeutic, spinal angiography.

  8. Cytoskeletal Regulation Dominates Temperature-Sensitive Proteomic Changes of Hibernation in Forebrain of 13-Lined Ground Squirrels

    PubMed Central

    Hindle, Allyson G.; Martin, Sandra L.

    2013-01-01

    13-lined ground squirrels, Ictidomys tridecemlineatus, are obligate hibernators that transition annually between summer homeothermy and winter heterothermy – wherein they exploit episodic torpor bouts. Despite cerebral ischemia during torpor and rapid reperfusion during arousal, hibernator brains resist damage and the animals emerge neurologically intact each spring. We hypothesized that protein changes in the brain underlie winter neuroprotection. To identify candidate proteins, we applied a sensitive 2D gel electrophoresis method to quantify protein differences among forebrain extracts prepared from ground squirrels in two summer, four winter and fall transition states. Proteins that differed among groups were identified using LC-MS/MS. Only 84 protein spots varied significantly among the defined states of hibernation. Protein changes in the forebrain proteome fell largely into two reciprocal patterns with a strong body temperature dependence. The importance of body temperature was tested in animals from the fall; these fall animals use torpor sporadically with body temperatures mirroring ambient temperatures between 4 and 21°C as they navigate the transition between summer homeothermy and winter heterothermy. Unlike cold-torpid fall ground squirrels, warm-torpid individuals strongly resembled the homeotherms, indicating that the changes observed in torpid hibernators are defined by body temperature, not torpor per se. Metabolic enzymes were largely unchanged despite varied metabolic activity across annual and torpor-arousal cycles. Instead, the majority of the observed changes were cytoskeletal proteins and their regulators. While cytoskeletal structural proteins tended to differ seasonally, i.e., between summer homeothermy and winter heterothermy, their regulatory proteins were more strongly affected by body temperature. Changes in the abundance of various isoforms of the microtubule assembly and disassembly regulatory proteins dihydropyrimidinase

  9. Cytoskeletal regulation dominates temperature-sensitive proteomic changes of hibernation in forebrain of 13-lined ground squirrels.

    PubMed

    Hindle, Allyson G; Martin, Sandra L

    2013-01-01

    13-lined ground squirrels, Ictidomys tridecemlineatus, are obligate hibernators that transition annually between summer homeothermy and winter heterothermy - wherein they exploit episodic torpor bouts. Despite cerebral ischemia during torpor and rapid reperfusion during arousal, hibernator brains resist damage and the animals emerge neurologically intact each spring. We hypothesized that protein changes in the brain underlie winter neuroprotection. To identify candidate proteins, we applied a sensitive 2D gel electrophoresis method to quantify protein differences among forebrain extracts prepared from ground squirrels in two summer, four winter and fall transition states. Proteins that differed among groups were identified using LC-MS/MS. Only 84 protein spots varied significantly among the defined states of hibernation. Protein changes in the forebrain proteome fell largely into two reciprocal patterns with a strong body temperature dependence. The importance of body temperature was tested in animals from the fall; these fall animals use torpor sporadically with body temperatures mirroring ambient temperatures between 4 and 21°C as they navigate the transition between summer homeothermy and winter heterothermy. Unlike cold-torpid fall ground squirrels, warm-torpid individuals strongly resembled the homeotherms, indicating that the changes observed in torpid hibernators are defined by body temperature, not torpor per se. Metabolic enzymes were largely unchanged despite varied metabolic activity across annual and torpor-arousal cycles. Instead, the majority of the observed changes were cytoskeletal proteins and their regulators. While cytoskeletal structural proteins tended to differ seasonally, i.e., between summer homeothermy and winter heterothermy, their regulatory proteins were more strongly affected by body temperature. Changes in the abundance of various isoforms of the microtubule assembly and disassembly regulatory proteins dihydropyrimidinase

  10. Discrete Forebrain Neuronal Networks Supporting Noradrenergic Regulation of Sensorimotor Gating

    PubMed Central

    Alsene, Karen M; Rajbhandari, Abha K; Ramaker, Marcia J; Bakshi, Vaishali P

    2011-01-01

    Prepulse inhibition (PPI) refers to the reduction in the startle response when a startling stimulus is preceded by a weak prestimulus, and is an endophenotype of deficient sensorimotor gating in several neuropsychiatric disorders. Emerging evidence suggests that norepinephrine (NE) regulates PPI, however, the circuitry involved is unknown. We found recently that stimulation of the locus coeruleus (LC), the primary source of NE to the forebrain, induces a PPI deficit that is a result of downstream NE release. Hence, this study sought to identify LC-innervated forebrain regions that mediate this effect. Separate groups of male Sprague–Dawley rats received a cocktail solution of the α1-NE receptor agonist phenylephrine plus the β-receptor agonist isoproterenol (equal parts of each; 0, 3, 10, and 30 μg) into subregions of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), nucleus accumbens (NAcc), extended amygdala, mediodorsal thalamus (MD-thalamus), or the dorsal hippocampus (DH) before PPI testing. NE agonist infusion into the posterior mPFC, NAcc shell, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, basolateral amygdala, and the MD-thalamus disrupted PPI, with particularly strong effects in MD-thalamus. Sites in which NE receptor stimulation did not disrupt PPI (anterior mPFC, NAcc core, central amygdala, and DH) did support PPI disruptions with the dopamine D2 receptor agonist quinpirole (0, 10 μg). This pattern reveals new pathways in the regulation of PPI, and suggests that NE transmission within distinct thalamocortical and ventral forebrain networks may subserve the sensorimotor gating deficits that are seen in disorders such as schizophrenia, Tourette syndrome, and post-traumatic stress disorder. PMID:21248721

  11. Basal Forebrain Cholinergic System and Orexin Neurons: Effects on Attention

    PubMed Central

    Villano, Ines; Messina, Antonietta; Valenzano, Anna; Moscatelli, Fiorenzo; Esposito, Teresa; Monda, Vincenzo; Esposito, Maria; Precenzano, Francesco; Carotenuto, Marco; Viggiano, Andrea; Chieffi, Sergio; Cibelli, Giuseppe; Monda, Marcellino; Messina, Giovanni

    2017-01-01

    The basal forebrain (BF) cholinergic system has an important role in attentive functions. The cholinergic system can be activated by different inputs, and in particular, by orexin neurons, whose cell bodies are located within the postero-lateral hypothalamus. Recently the orexin-producing neurons have been proved to promote arousal and attention through their projections to the BF. The aim of this review article is to summarize the evidence showing that the orexin system contributes to attentional processing by an increase in cortical acetylcholine release and in cortical neurons activity. PMID:28197081

  12. Blockade of calcium-permeable AMPA receptors protects hippocampal neurons against global ischemia-induced death

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Kyung-Min; Yokota, Hidenori; Mashiko, Toshihiro; Castillo, Pablo E.; Zukin, R. Suzanne; Bennett, Michael V. L.

    2005-01-01

    Transient global or forebrain ischemia induced experimentally in animals can cause selective, delayed neuronal death of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons. A striking feature is a delayed rise in intracellular free Zn2+ in CA1 neurons just before the onset of histologically detectable cell death. Here we show that α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA)-type glutamate receptors (AMPARs) at Schaffer collateral to CA1 synapses in postischemic hippocampus exhibit properties of Ca2+/Zn2+-permeable, Glu receptor 2 (GluR2)-lacking AMPARs before the rise in Zn2+ and cell death. At 42 h after ischemia, AMPA excitatory postsynaptic currents exhibited pronounced inward rectification and marked sensitivity to 1-naphthyl acetyl spermine (Naspm), a selective channel blocker of GluR2-lacking AMPARs. In control hippocampus, AMPA excitatory postsynaptic currents were electrically linear and relatively insensitive to Naspm. Naspm injected intrahippocampally at 9-40 h after insult greatly reduced the late rise in intracellular free Zn2+ in postischemic CA1 neurons and afforded partial protection against ischemia-induced cell death. These results implicate GluR2-lacking AMPA receptors in the ischemia-induced rise in free Zn2+ and death of CA1 neurons, although a direct action at the time of the rise in Zn2+ is unproven. This receptor subtype appears to be an important therapeutic target for intervention in ischemia-induced neuronal death in humans. PMID:16093311

  13. Combination of hyperhomocysteinemia and ischemic tolerance in experimental model of global ischemia in rats.

    PubMed

    Kovalska, M; Kovalska, L; Tothova, B; Mahmood, S; Adamkov, M; Lehotsky, J

    2015-12-01

    Epidemiological studies show positive relationship between mild-to-moderate hyperhomocysteinemia (hHcy) and the risk of cerebrovascular diseases. The study determines whether hyperhomocysteinemia (risk factor of brain ischemia) alone or in combination with the ischemic preconditioning (IPC) affects the ischemia-induced neurodegenerative changes and imbalance in MAPK/p-ERK1/2 and MAPK/p-p38 expression in the rat brains. hHcy was induced by subcutaneous administration of homocysteine (0.45 μmol/g body weight) twice a day at 8 h intervals for 14 days. Rats were preconditioned by 5 min ischemia and 2 days later, 15 min of global forebrain ischemia was induced by four vessel occlusion. We observed that hHcy alone significantly increased neurodegeneration by Fluoro-Jade C and TUNEL possitive cells in hippocampus as well as in cortex. We found elevated level of MAPK/p-ERK and decreased level of MAPK/p-p38 after pre-ischemic challenge by Western blot and fluorescent immunohistochemistry. In conclusion, preconditioning even if combined with hHcy could preserve the neuronal tissue from lethal ischemic effect. This study provides evidence for the interplay and tight integration between ERK and p38 MAPKs signalling mechanisms in response to the hHcy and also if in association with brain ischemia/IPC challenge in the rat brain.

  14. Spinal cord ischemia secondary to hypovolemic shock.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jacob Yl; Kapoor, Siddhant; Koh, Roy Km; Yang, Eugene Wr; Hee, Hwan-Tak

    2014-12-01

    A 44-year-old male presented with symptoms of spinal cord compression secondary to metastatic prostate cancer. An urgent decompression at the cervical-thoracic region was performed, and there were no complications intraoperatively. Three hours postoperatively, the patient developed acute bilateral lower-limb paralysis (motor grade 0). Clinically, he was in class 3 hypovolemic shock. An urgent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed, showing no epidural hematoma. He was managed aggressively with medical therapy to improve his spinal cord perfusion. The patient improved significantly, and after one week, he was able to regain most of his motor functions. Although not commonly reported, spinal cord ischemia post-surgery should be recognized early, especially in the presence of hypovolemic shock. MRI should be performed to exclude other potential causes of compression. Spinal cord ischemia needs to be managed aggressively with medical treatment to improve spinal cord perfusion. The prognosis depends on the severity of deficits, and is usually favorable.

  15. Pathophysiological relevance of forkhead transcription factors in brain ischemia.

    PubMed

    Fukunaga, Kohji; Shioda, Norifumi

    2009-01-01

    Forkhead box transcription factor, class 0 (FOXO) is a mammalian homologue of DAF-16, which is known to regulate the lifespan of Caenorhabditis elegans and includes subfamiies of forkhead transcription factors such as FOXO1 (FKHR). FOXO3 (FKHRL1), FOXO4 (AFX) and FOXO6. All these FOXO members are expressed in the brain with different spatial patterns. FOXO1 is phosphorylated on three sites (Thr-24, Ser-256 and Ser-319) in phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-K)/Akt-dependenr manner, thereby inhibiting apoptosis signals. We here documented dephosphorylation of FOXO1, FOXO3 and FOXO4 following transient forebrain ischemia with its concomitant translocation into the nucleus in neurons in the gerbil and mouse brains. The dephosphorylarion of FOXO1 following brain ischemia is in part mediated by constirutively active calcineurin in the mouse hippocampus. The activation of FOXOs preceded delayed neuronal death in the vulnerable hippocampal regions following ischemic brain injury. The FOXOl activation is accompanied by an increase in DNA binding activity for FOXO1-responsive element on the Fas ligand promoter. Thus, downstream targets induced by FOXOl include Fas ligand and Bcl-2-interacting mediator of cell death (Bim) in the brain ischemia. Accumulating evidence documented how FOXO activation is involved in the mechanisms of ischemic cell death. In this chapter, we document the activation mechanism of FOXO factors following brain ischemia and deline their downstream targets underlying neuronal death. The pathophysiological relevance of crosstalk between FOXOs and calcineurmn pathways is also discussed. Finally, we propose therapeutic perspectives to rescue neurons from delayed neuronal death by promoting the Akt signaling. Vanadium compounds, protein tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor, up-regulates Akt activity in the brain and thereby rescues neurons from delayed neuronal death by inhibiting FOXO-dependent and -independent death signals in neurons.

  16. Ecdysterone protects gerbil brain from temporal global cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury via preventing neuron apoptosis and deactivating astrocytes and microglia cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Wang, Tao; Feng, Wan-Yu; Wang, Zhan-You; Cheng, Mao-Sheng; Wang, Yun-Jie

    2014-01-01

    Ecdysterone (EDS), a common derivative of ecdysteroid, has shown its effects on alleviating cognitive impairment and improving the cognition and memory. However, the mechanisms remain unknown. Using temporal global forebrain ischemia and reperfusion-induced brain injury as a model system, we investigated the roles of EDS in improving cognitive impairment in gerbil. Our results demonstrated that intraperitoneal injection of EDS obviously increased the number of surviving neuron cells by Nissl and neuronal nuclei (NeuN) staining. Indeed, the protecting effects of EDS are because of its ability to prevent the apoptosis of neuron cells as evidenced by TUNEL staining and caspase-3 deactivation in the brain of temporal global forebrain ischemia/reperfusion-treated gerbil. Moreover, EDS administration suppressed the ischemia stimulated activity of astrocytes and microglia cells by inhibiting the production of tumor necrosis alpha (TNF-α) in the brain of gerbil. More importantly, these actions of neurons and astrocytes/microglia cells in response to EDS treatment played pivotal roles in ameliorating the cognitive impairment in the ischemia/reperfusion-injured gerbil. In view of these observations, we not only decipher the mechanisms of EDS in reducing the syndrome of ischemia, but also provide novel perspectives to combat ischemic stroke.

  17. [Cerebral ischemia and histamine].

    PubMed

    Adachi, Naoto

    2002-10-01

    Cerebral ischemia induces excess release of glutamate and an increase in the intracellular Ca2+ concentration, which provoke catastrophic enzymatic processes leading to irreversible neuronal injury. Histamine plays the role of neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, and histaminergic fibers are widely distributed in the brain. In cerebral ischemia, release of histamine from nerve endings has been shown to be enhanced by facilitation of its activity. An inhibition of the histaminergic activity in ischemia aggravates the histologic outcome. In contrast, intracerebroventricular administration of histamine improves the aggravation, whereas blockade of histamine H2 receptors aggravates ischemic injury. Furthermore, H2 blockade enhances ischemic release of glutamate and dopamine. These findings suggest that central histamine provides beneficial effects against ischemic neuronal damage by suppressing release of excitatory neurotransmitters. However, histaminergic H2 action facilitates the permeability of the blood-brain barrier and shows deleterious effects on cerebral edema.

  18. Dynamic variation in forebrain estradiol levels during song learning

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Andrew; Paon, Ashley; Remage-Healey, Luke

    2014-01-01

    Estrogens shape brain circuits during development, and the capacity to synthesize estrogens locally has consequences for both sexual differentiation and the acute modulation of circuits during early learning. A recently-optimized method to detect and quantify fluctuations in brain estrogens in vivo provides a direct means to explore how brain estrogen production contributes to both differentiation and neuromodulation during development. Here, we use this method to test the hypothesis that neuroestrogens are sexually-differentiated as well as dynamically responsive to song tutoring (via passive video/audio playback) during the period of song learning in juvenile zebra finches. Our results show that baseline neuroestradiol levels in the caudal forebrain do not differ between males and females during an early critical masculinization window. Instead, we observe a prominent difference between males and females in baseline neuroestradiol that emerges during the subadult stage as animals approach sexual maturity. Second, we observe that fluctuating neuroestradiol levels during periods of passive song tutoring exhibit a markedly different profile in juveniles as compared to adults. Specifically, neuroestrogens in the caudal forebrain are elevated following (rather than during) tutor song exposure in both juvenile males and females, suggesting an important role for the early consolidation of tutor song memories. These results further reveal a circadian influence on the fluctuations in local neuroestrogens during sensory/cognitive tasks. Taken together, these findings uncover several unexpected features of brain estrogen synthesis in juvenile animals that may have implications for secondary masculinization as well as the consolidation of recent sensory experiences. PMID:25205304

  19. Learning and the motivation to eat: Forebrain circuitry

    PubMed Central

    Petrovich, Gorica D.

    2011-01-01

    Appetite and eating are not only controlled by energy needs, but also by extrinsic factors that are not directly related to energy balance. Environmental signals that acquire motivational properties through associative learning—learned cues—can override homeostatic signals and stimulate eating in sated states, or inhibit eating in states of hunger. Such influences are important, as environmental factors are believed to contribute to the increased susceptibility to overeating and the rise in obesity in the developed world. Similarly, environmental and social factors contribute to the onset and maintenance of anorexia nervosa and other eating disorders through interactions with the individual genetic background. Nevertheless, how learning enables environmental signals to control feeding, and the underlying brain mechanisms are poorly understood. We developed two rodent models to study how learned cues are integrated with homeostatic signals within functional forebrain networks, and how these networks are modulated by experience. In one model, a cue previously paired with food when an animal was hungry induces eating in sated rats. In the other model, food-deprived rats inhibit feeding when presented with a cue that signals danger, a tone previously paired with footshocks. Here evidence will be reviewed that the forebrain network formed by the amygdala, lateral hypothalamus and medial prefrontal cortex mediates cue-driven feeding, while a parallel amygdalar circuitry mediates suppression of eating by the fear cue. Findings from the animal models may be relevant for understanding aspects of human appetite and eating, and maladaptive mechanisms that could lead to overeating and anorexia. PMID:21549730

  20. Learning and the motivation to eat: forebrain circuitry.

    PubMed

    Petrovich, Gorica D

    2011-09-26

    Appetite and eating are not only controlled by energy needs, but also by extrinsic factors that are not directly related to energy balance. Environmental signals that acquire motivational properties through associative learning-learned cues-can override homeostatic signals and stimulate eating in sated states, or inhibit eating in states of hunger. Such influences are important, as environmental factors are believed to contribute to the increased susceptibility to overeating and the rise in obesity in the developed world. Similarly, environmental and social factors contribute to the onset and maintenance of anorexia nervosa and other eating disorders through interactions with the individual genetic background. Nevertheless, how learning enables environmental signals to control feeding, and the underlying brain mechanisms are poorly understood. We developed two rodent models to study how learned cues are integrated with homeostatic signals within functional forebrain networks, and how these networks are modulated by experience. In one model, a cue previously paired with food when an animal was hungry induces eating in sated rats. In the other model, food-deprived rats inhibit feeding when presented with a cue that signals danger, a tone previously paired with footshocks. Here evidence will be reviewed that the forebrain network formed by the amygdala, lateral hypothalamus and medial prefrontal cortex mediates cue-driven feeding, while a parallel amygdalar circuitry mediates suppression of eating by the fear cue. Findings from the animal models may be relevant for understanding aspects of human appetite and eating, and maladaptive mechanisms that could lead to overeating and anorexia.

  1. A cholinergic basal forebrain feeding circuit modulates appetite suppression.

    PubMed

    Herman, Alexander M; Ortiz-Guzman, Joshua; Kochukov, Mikhail; Herman, Isabella; Quast, Kathleen B; Patel, Jay M; Tepe, Burak; Carlson, Jeffrey C; Ung, Kevin; Selever, Jennifer; Tong, Qingchun; Arenkiel, Benjamin R

    2016-10-13

    Atypical food intake is a primary cause of obesity and other eating and metabolic disorders. Insight into the neural control of feeding has previously focused mainly on signalling mechanisms associated with the hypothalamus, the major centre in the brain that regulates body weight homeostasis. However, roles of non-canonical central nervous system signalling mechanisms in regulating feeding behaviour have been largely uncharacterized. Acetylcholine has long been proposed to influence feeding owing in part to the functional similarity between acetylcholine and nicotine, a known appetite suppressant. Nicotine is an exogenous agonist for acetylcholine receptors, suggesting that endogenous cholinergic signalling may play a part in normal physiological regulation of feeding. However, it remains unclear how cholinergic neurons in the brain regulate food intake. Here we report that cholinergic neurons of the mouse basal forebrain potently influence food intake and body weight. Impairment of cholinergic signalling increases food intake and results in severe obesity, whereas enhanced cholinergic signalling decreases food consumption. We found that cholinergic circuits modulate appetite suppression on downstream targets in the hypothalamus. Together our data reveal the cholinergic basal forebrain as a major modulatory centre underlying feeding behaviour.

  2. Distribution of vasopressin in the forebrain of spotted hyenas.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Greta J; De Vries, Geert J; Villalba, Constanza; Weldele, Mary L; Place, Ned J; Coscia, Elizabeth M; Glickman, Steve E; Forger, Nancy G

    2006-09-01

    The extreme virilization of the female spotted hyena raises interesting questions with respect to sexual differentiation of the brain and behavior. Females are larger and more aggressive than adult, non-natal males and dominate them in social encounters; their external genitalia also are highly masculinized. In many vertebrates, the arginine vasopressin (VP) innervation of the forebrain, particularly that of the lateral septum, is associated with social behaviors such as aggression and dominance. Here, we used immunohistochemistry to examine the distribution of VP cells and fibers in the forebrains of adult spotted hyenas. We find the expected densely staining VP immunoreactive (VP-ir) neurons in the paraventricular and supraoptic nuclei, as well as an unusually extensive distribution of magnocelluar VP-ir neurons in accessory regions. A small number of VP-ir cell bodies are present in the suprachiasmatic nucleus and bed nucleus of the stria terminalis; however, there are extensive VP-ir fiber networks in presumed projection areas of these nuclei, for example, the subparaventricular zone and lateral septum, respectively. No significant sex differences were detected in the density of VP-ir fibers in any area examined. In the lateral septum, however, marked variability was observed. Intact females exhibited a dense fiber network, as did two of the four males examined; the two other males had almost no VP-ir septal fibers. This contrasts with findings in many other vertebrate species, in which VP innervation of the lateral septum is consistently greater in males than in females.

  3. Vascular-endothelial growth factor and its high affinity receptor VEGFR-2 in the normal versus destructive lesions human forebrain during development: an immuno-histochemical comparative study.

    PubMed

    Sentilhes, Loïc; Marret, Stéphane; Leroux, Philippe; Gonzalez, Bruno José; Laquerrière, Annie

    2011-04-18

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is an angiogenic inducer and neurotrophic factor both in adult and neonatal animal models. In the destructive lesions of the developing human brain, the role and expression of VEGF and of its mitogenic receptor VEGFR-2 have been hardly studied. The aim of the present work was to determine the immunohistochemical distribution of VEGF and VEGFR-2 in premature and full-term infants presenting with hypoxic/ischemic lesions, and to compare results with normal infant brains at similar developmental stages. Paraffin embedded brain tissue samples were assessed using anti-human VEGF and VEGFR-2 antibodies. In all undamaged forebrain areas, VEGF and VEGFR-2 displayed same expression patterns in control and pathologic brains, whatever the destructive lesion occurrence's time (before 25 weeks of gestation (WG), between 25 and 34WG, perinatal period and infancy). In the destructive lesions, VEGF was always expressed in neurons, astrocytes and in neovessel walls, contrary to VEGFR-2 which was only expressed in dispersed astrocytes. VEGF was expressed in oligodendrocytes of prenatally damaged brains, whereas VEGF was expressed in these cells in undamaged areas from birth only, similarly to control brains. These data suggest that VEGF plays specific roles and may not be mediated by VEGFR-2 in human forebrain structures exposed to ischemia.

  4. Exercise-induced Myocardial Ischemia Detected by Cardiopulmonary Exercise Testing

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhry, Sundeep; Arena, Ross; Wasserman, Karlman; Hansen, James E.; Lewis, Gregory D.; Myers, Jonathan; Chronos, Nicolas; Boden, William E.

    2010-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) is a well-accepted physiologic evaluation technique in patients diagnosed with heart failure and in individuals presenting with unexplained dyspnea on exertion. Several variables obtained during CPET, including oxygen consumption relative to heart rate (VO2/HR or O2-pulse) and work rate (VO2/Watt) provide consistent, quantitative patterns of abnormal physiologic responses to graded exercise when left ventricular dysfunction is caused by myocardial ischemia. This concept paper describes both the methodology and clinical application of CPET associated with myocardial ischemia. Initial evidence indicates left ventricular dysfunction induced by myocardial ischemia may be accurately detected by an abnormal CPET response. CPET testing may complement current non-invasive testing modalities that elicit inducible ischemia. It provides a physiologic quantification of the work rate, heart rate and O2 uptake at which myocardial ischemia develops. In conclusion, the potential value of adding CPET with gas exchange measurements is likely to be of great value in diagnosing and quantifying both overt and occult myocardial ischemia and its reversibility with treatment. PMID:19231322

  5. Breath hydrogen reflects canine intestinal ischemia.

    PubMed

    Perman, J A; Waters, L A; Harrison, M R; Yee, E S; Heldt, G P

    1981-09-01

    The relationship between breath hydrogen excretion and intestinal ischemia was investigated in nine mechanically ventilated dogs under pentobarbital anesthesia. An ileal segment was isolated in situ, ligated at each end, and insufflated with hydrogen. Expired air was collected at intervals. Blood volume was reduced 30% by three successive equivalent hemorrhages 10 min apart. Local bowel ischemia was produced by clamping the blood supply to the isolated segment for 10 min. Graded hemorrhage produced step-wise reductions in breath hydrogen concentration, to 77 +/- 13, 66 +/- 15, and 35 +/- 8% (mean +/- S.E.) of baseline after the first, second, and third hemorrhages, respectively. These reductions correlated highly (r = 0.84; P less than 0.01) with declines in mean aortic blood pressure. Occlusion of blood supply caused a significant (P less than 0.025) decrease in breath hydrogen concentration and excretion to 39 +/- 14% of baseline. Termination of occlusion was followed within 2 min by a 7-fold increase in breath H2 concentration above the original baseline, probably reflecting reactive hyperemia. Breath hydrogen measurements appear to reflect functional (hemorrhagic shock-induced) and mechanical (vascular occlusion induced) enteric ischemia in dogs.

  6. Dynamic behaviour of human neuroepithelial cells in the developing forebrain

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Lakshmi; Bershteyn, Marina; Paredes, Mercedes F.; Kriegstein, Arnold R.

    2017-01-01

    To understand how diverse progenitor cells contribute to human neocortex development, we examined forebrain progenitor behaviour using timelapse imaging. Here we find that cell cycle dynamics of human neuroepithelial (NE) cells differ from radial glial (RG) cells in both primary tissue and in stem cell-derived organoids. NE cells undergoing proliferative, symmetric divisions retract their basal processes, and both daughter cells regrow a new process following cytokinesis. The mitotic retraction of the basal process is recapitulated by NE cells in cerebral organoids generated from human-induced pluripotent stem cells. In contrast, RG cells undergoing vertical cleavage retain their basal fibres throughout mitosis, both in primary tissue and in older organoids. Our findings highlight developmentally regulated changes in mitotic behaviour that may relate to the role of RG cells to provide a stable scaffold for neuronal migration, and suggest that the transition in mitotic dynamics can be studied in organoid models. PMID:28139695

  7. The dopaminergic projection system, basal forebrain macrosystems, and conditioned stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Zahm, Daniel S.

    2011-01-01

    This review begins with a description of some problems that in recent years have beset an influential circuit model of fear-conditioning and goes on to look at neuroanatomy that might subserve conditioning viewed in a broader perspective, including not only fear, but also appetitive, conditioning. The paper then focuses on basal forebrain functional-anatomical systems, or macrosystems, as they have come to be called, which Lennart Heimer and colleagues described beginning in the 1970’s. Yet more specific attention is then given to the relationships of the dorsal and ventral striatopallidal systems and extended amygdala with the dopaminergic mesotelencephalic projection systems, culminating with the hypothesis that all macrosystems contribute to behavioral conditioning. PMID:18204412

  8. Basal Forebrain Atrophy Contributes to Allocentric Navigation Impairment in Alzheimer's Disease Patients.

    PubMed

    Kerbler, Georg M; Nedelska, Zuzana; Fripp, Jurgen; Laczó, Jan; Vyhnalek, Martin; Lisý, Jiří; Hamlin, Adam S; Rose, Stephen; Hort, Jakub; Coulson, Elizabeth J

    2015-01-01

    The basal forebrain degenerates in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and this process is believed to contribute to the cognitive decline observed in AD patients. Impairment in spatial navigation is an early feature of the disease but whether basal forebrain dysfunction in AD is responsible for the impaired navigation skills of AD patients is not known. Our objective was to investigate the relationship between basal forebrain volume and performance in real space as well as computer-based navigation paradigms in an elderly cohort comprising cognitively normal controls, subjects with amnestic mild cognitive impairment and those with AD. We also tested whether basal forebrain volume could predict the participants' ability to perform allocentric- vs. egocentric-based navigation tasks. The basal forebrain volume was calculated from 1.5 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans, and navigation skills were assessed using the human analog of the Morris water maze employing allocentric, egocentric, and mixed allo/egocentric real space as well as computerized tests. When considering the entire sample, we found that basal forebrain volume correlated with spatial accuracy in allocentric (cued) and mixed allo/egocentric navigation tasks but not the egocentric (uncued) task, demonstrating an important role of the basal forebrain in mediating cue-based spatial navigation capacity. Regression analysis revealed that, although hippocampal volume reflected navigation performance across the entire sample, basal forebrain volume contributed to mixed allo/egocentric navigation performance in the AD group, whereas hippocampal volume did not. This suggests that atrophy of the basal forebrain contributes to aspects of navigation impairment in AD that are independent of hippocampal atrophy.

  9. Dynamic variation in forebrain estradiol levels during song learning.

    PubMed

    Chao, Andrew; Paon, Ashley; Remage-Healey, Luke

    2015-03-01

    Estrogens shape brain circuits during development, and the capacity to synthesize estrogens locally has consequences for both sexual differentiation and the acute modulation of circuits during early learning. A recently optimized method to detect and quantify fluctuations in brain estrogens in vivo provides a direct means to explore how brain estrogen production contributes to both differentiation and neuromodulation during development. Here, we use this method to test the hypothesis that neuroestrogens are sexually differentiated as well as dynamically responsive to song tutoring (via passive video/audio playback) during the period of song learning in juvenile zebra finches. Our results show that baseline neuroestradiol levels in the caudal forebrain do not differ between males and females during an early critical masculinization window. Instead, we observe a prominent difference between males and females in baseline neuroestradiol that emerges during the subadult stage as animals approach sexual maturity. Second, we observe that fluctuating neuroestradiol levels during periods of passive song tutoring exhibit a markedly different profile in juveniles as compared to adults. Specifically, neuroestrogens in the caudal forebrain are elevated following (rather than during) tutor song exposure in both juvenile males and females, suggesting an important role for the early consolidation of tutor song memories. These results further reveal a circadian influence on the fluctuations in local neuroestrogens during sensory/cognitive tasks. Taken together, these findings uncover several unexpected features of brain estrogen synthesis in juvenile animals that may have implications for secondary masculinization as well as the consolidation of recent sensory experiences. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Patterns of cell death in the perinatal mouse forebrain.

    PubMed

    Mosley, Morgan; Shah, Charisma; Morse, Kiriana A; Miloro, Stephen A; Holmes, Melissa M; Ahern, Todd H; Forger, Nancy G

    2017-01-01

    The importance of cell death in brain development has long been appreciated, but many basic questions remain, such as what initiates or terminates the cell death period. One obstacle has been the lack of quantitative data defining exactly when cell death occurs. We recently created a "cell death atlas," using the detection of activated caspase-3 (AC3) to quantify apoptosis in the postnatal mouse ventral forebrain and hypothalamus, and found that the highest rates of cell death were seen at the earliest postnatal ages in most regions. Here we have extended these analyses to prenatal ages and additional brain regions. We quantified cell death in 16 forebrain regions across nine perinatal ages from embryonic day (E) 17 to postnatal day (P) 11 and found that cell death peaks just after birth in most regions. We found greater cell death in several regions in offspring delivered vaginally on the day of parturition compared with those of the same postconception age but still in utero at the time of collection. We also found massive cell death in the oriens layer of the hippocampus on P1 and in regions surrounding the anterior crossing of the corpus callosum on E18 as well as the persistence of large numbers of cells in those regions in adult mice lacking the pro-death Bax gene. Together these findings suggest that birth may be an important trigger of neuronal cell death and identify transient cell groups that may undergo wholesale elimination perinatally. J. Comp. Neurol. 525:47-64, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. The evolving concept of physiological ischemia training vs. ischemia preconditioning.

    PubMed

    Ni, Jun; Lu, Hongjian; Lu, Xiao; Jiang, Minghui; Peng, Qingyun; Ren, Caili; Xiang, Jie; Mei, Chengyao; Li, Jianan

    2015-11-01

    Ischemic heart diseases are the leading cause of death with increasing numbers of patients worldwide. Despite advances in revascularization techniques, angiogenic therapies remain highly attractive. Physiological ischemia training, which is first proposed in our laboratory, refers to reversible ischemia training of normal skeletal muscles by using a tourniquet or isometric contraction to cause physiologic ischemia for about 4 weeks for the sake of triggering molecular and cellular mechanisms to promote angiogenesis and formation of collateral vessels and protect remote ischemia areas. Physiological ischemia training therapy augments angiogenesis in the ischemic myocardium by inducing differential expression of proteins involved in energy metabolism, cell migration, protein folding, and generation. It upregulates the expressions of vascular endothelial growth factor, and induces angiogenesis, protects the myocardium when infarction occurs by increasing circulating endothelial progenitor cells and enhancing their migration, which is in accordance with physical training in heart disease rehabilitation. These findings may lead to a new approach of therapeutic angiogenesis for patients with ischemic heart diseases. On the basis of the promising results in animal studies, studies were also conducted in patients with coronary artery disease without any adverse effect in vivo, indicating that physiological ischemia training therapy is a safe, effective and non-invasive angiogenic approach for cardiovascular rehabilitation. Preconditioning is considered to be the most protective intervention against myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury to date. Physiological ischemia training is different from preconditioning. This review summarizes the preclinical and clinical data of physiological ischemia training and its difference from preconditioning.

  12. Neurodevelopment Genes in Lampreys Reveal Trends for Forebrain Evolution in Craniates

    PubMed Central

    Guérin, Adèle; d'Aubenton-Carafa, Yves; Marrakchi, Emna; Da Silva, Corinne; Wincker, Patrick; Mazan, Sylvie; Rétaux, Sylvie

    2009-01-01

    The forebrain is the brain region which has undergone the most dramatic changes through vertebrate evolution. Analyses conducted in lampreys are essential to gain insight into the broad ancestral characteristics of the forebrain at the dawn of vertebrates, and to understand the molecular basis for the diversifications that have taken place in cyclostomes and gnathostomes following their splitting. Here, we report the embryonic expression patterns of 43 lamprey genes, coding for transcription factors or signaling molecules known to be involved in cell proliferation, stemcellness, neurogenesis, patterning and regionalization in the developing forebrain. Systematic expression patterns comparisons with model organisms highlight conservations likely to reflect shared features present in the vertebrate ancestors. They also point to changes in signaling systems –pathways which control the growth and patterning of the neuroepithelium-, which may have been crucial in the evolution of forebrain anatomy at the origin of vertebrates. PMID:19399187

  13. Neurodevelopment genes in lampreys reveal trends for forebrain evolution in craniates.

    PubMed

    Guérin, Adèle; d'Aubenton-Carafa, Yves; Marrakchi, Emna; Da Silva, Corinne; Wincker, Patrick; Mazan, Sylvie; Rétaux, Sylvie

    2009-01-01

    The forebrain is the brain region which has undergone the most dramatic changes through vertebrate evolution. Analyses conducted in lampreys are essential to gain insight into the broad ancestral characteristics of the forebrain at the dawn of vertebrates, and to understand the molecular basis for the diversifications that have taken place in cyclostomes and gnathostomes following their splitting. Here, we report the embryonic expression patterns of 43 lamprey genes, coding for transcription factors or signaling molecules known to be involved in cell proliferation, stemcellness, neurogenesis, patterning and regionalization in the developing forebrain. Systematic expression patterns comparisons with model organisms highlight conservations likely to reflect shared features present in the vertebrate ancestors. They also point to changes in signaling systems -pathways which control the growth and patterning of the neuroepithelium-, which may have been crucial in the evolution of forebrain anatomy at the origin of vertebrates.

  14. Radiological Evaluation of Bowel Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Dhatt, Harpreet S.; Behr, Spencer C; Miracle, Aaron; Wang, Zhen Jane; Yeh, Benjamin M.

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal ischemia, which refers to insufficient blood flow to the bowel, is a potentially catastrophic entity that may require emergent intervention or surgery in the acute setting. Although the clinical signs and symptoms of intestinal ischemia are nonspecific, CT findings can be highly suggestive in the correct clinical setting. In this chapter we review the CT diagnosis of arterial, venous, and non-occlusive intestinal ischemia. We discuss the vascular anatomy, pathophysiology of intestinal ischemia, CT techniques for optimal imaging, key and ancillary radiological findings, and differential diagnosis. In the setting of an acute abdomen, rapid evaluation is necessary to identify intraabdominal processes that require emergent surgical intervention (1). While a wide-range of intraabdominal diseases may be present from trauma to inflammation, one of the most feared disorders is mesenteric ischemia, also known as intestinal ischemia, which refers to insufficient blood flow to the bowel (2). Initial imaging evaluation for intestinal ischemia is typically obtained with CT. Close attention to technique and search for key radiologic features with relation to the CT technique is required. Accurate diagnosis depends on understanding the vascular anatomy, epidemiology, and pathophysiology of various forms of mesenteric ischemia and their corresponding radiological findings on MDCT. At imaging, not only is inspection of the bowel itself important, but evaluation of the mesenteric fat, vasculature, and surrounding peritoneal cavity also helps improves accuracy in the diagnosis of bowel ischemia. PMID:26526436

  15. Midbrain and forebrain patterning delivers immunocytochemically and functionally similar populations of neuropeptide Y containing GABAergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Khaira, S K; Nefzger, C M; Beh, S J; Pouton, C W; Haynes, J M

    2011-09-01

    Neurons differentiated in vitro from embryonic stem cells (ESCs) have the potential to serve both as models of disease states and in drug discovery programs. In this study, we use sonic hedgehog (SHH) and fibroblast growth factor 8 (FGF-8) to enrich for forebrain and midbrain phenotypes from mouse ESCs. We then investigate, using Ca(2+) imaging and [(3)H]-GABA release studies, whether the GABAergic neurons produced exhibit distinct functional phenotypes. At day 24 of differentiation, reverse transcriptase-PCR showed the presence of both forebrain (Bf-1, Hesx1, Pgc-1α, Six3) and midbrain (GATA2, GATA3) selective mRNA markers in developing forebrain-enriched cultures. All markers were present in midbrain cultures except for Bf-1 and Pgc-1α. Irrespective of culture conditions all GABA immunoreactive neurons were also immunoreactive to neuropeptide Y (NPY) antibodies. Forebrain and midbrain GABAergic neurons responded to ATP (1 mM), L-glutamate (30 μM), noradrenaline (30 μM), acetylcholine (30 μM) and dopamine (30 μM), with similar elevations of intracellular Ca(2+)([Ca(2+)](i)). The presence of GABA(A) and GABA(B) antagonists, bicuculline (30 μM) and CGP55845 (1 μM), increased the elevation of [Ca(2+)](i) in response to dopamine (30 μM) in midbrain, but not forebrain GABAergic neurons. All agonists, except dopamine, elicited similar [(3)H]-GABA release from forebrain and midbrain cultures. Dopamine (30 μM) did not stimulate significant [(3)H]-GABA release in midbrain cultures, although it was effective in forebrain cultures. This study shows that differentiating neurons toward a midbrain fate restricts the expression of forebrain markers. Forebrain differentiation results in the expression of forebrain and midbrain markers. All GABA(+) neurons contain NPY, and show similar agonist-induced elevations of [Ca(2+)](i) and [(3)H]-GABA release. This study indicates that the pharmacological phenotype of these particular neurons may be independent of the addition of

  16. Forebrain glucocorticoid receptor gene deletion attenuates behavioral changes and antidepressant responsiveness during chronic stress.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Lauren

    2014-10-02

    Stress is an important risk factor for mood disorders. Stress also stimulates the secretion of glucocorticoids, which have been found to influence mood. To determine the role of forebrain glucocorticoid receptors (GR) in behavioral responses to chronic stress, the present experiments compared behavioral effects of repeated social defeat in mice with forebrain GR deletion and in floxed GR littermate controls. Repeated defeat produced alterations in forced swim and tail suspension immobility in floxed GR mice that did not occur in mice with forebrain GR deletion. Defeat-induced changes in immobility in floxed GR mice were prevented by chronic antidepressant treatment, indicating that these behaviors were dysphoria-related. In contrast, although mice with forebrain GR deletion exhibited antidepressant-induced decreases in tail suspension immobility in the absence of stress, this response did not occur in mice with forebrain GR deletion after defeat. There were no marked differences in plasma corticosterone between genotypes, suggesting that behavioral differences depended on forebrain GR rather than on abnormal glucocorticoid secretion. Defeat-induced gene expression of the neuronal activity marker c-fos in the ventral hippocampus, paraventricular thalamus and lateral septum correlated with genotype-related differences in behavioral effects of defeat, whereas c-fos induction in the nucleus accumbens and central and basolateral amygdala correlated with genotype-related differences in behavioral responses to antidepressant treatment. The dependence of both negative (dysphoria-related) and positive (antidepressant-induced) behaviors on forebrain GR is consistent with the contradictory effects of glucocorticoids on mood, and implicates these or other forebrain regions in these effects. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Forebrain glucocorticoid receptor gene deletion attenuates behavioral changes and antidepressant responsiveness during chronic stress

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Lauren

    2014-01-01

    Stress is an important risk factor for mood disorders. Stress also stimulates the secretion of glucocorticoids, which have been found to influence mood. To determine the role of forebrain glucocorticoid receptors (GR) in behavioral responses to chronic stress, the present experiments compared behavioral effects of repeated social defeat in mice with forebrain GR deletion and in floxed GR littermate controls. Repeated defeat produced alterations in forced swim and tail suspension immobility in floxed GR mice that did not occur in mice with forebrain GR deletion. Defeat-induced changes in immobility in floxed GR mice were prevented by chronic antidepressant treatment, indicating that these behaviors were dysphoria-related. In contrast, although mice with forebrain GR deletion exhibited antidepressant-induced decreases in tail suspension immobility in the absence of stress, this response did not occur in mice with forebrain GR deletion after defeat. There were no marked differences in plasma corticosterone between genotypes, suggesting that behavioral differences depended on forebrain GR rather than on abnormal glucocorticoid secretion. Defeat-induced gene expression of the neuronal activity marker c-fos in the ventral hippocampus, paraventricular thalamus and lateral septum correlated with genotype-related differences in behavioral effects of defeat, whereas c-fos induction in the nucleus accumbens and central and basolateral amygdala correlated with genotype-related differences in behavioral responses to antidepressant treatment. The dependence of both negative (dysphoria-related) and positive (antidepressant-induced) behaviors on forebrain GR is consistent with the contradictory effects of glucocorticoids on mood, and implicates these or other forebrain regions in these effects. PMID:25168761

  18. The effects of periaqueductally injected transmitter antagonists on forebrain-elicited vocalization in the squirrel monkey.

    PubMed

    Jürgens, U; Lu, C L

    1993-06-01

    In 15 squirrel monkeys, vocalization-eliciting electrodes were implanted into the following forebrain structures: anterior cingulate cortex, genu of the internal capsule, amygdala, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, hypothalamus, midline thalamus, inferior thalamic peduncle and periventricular grey. Then, injections of 29 transmitter antagonists were made into the midbrain periaqueductal grey (PAG) and their effects tested on the elicitability of vocalization from the forebrain. Vocalization could be blocked completely with glutamate antagonists. NMDA receptor antagonists as well as kainate/quisqualate receptor antagonists were effective. Facilitatory effects, i.e. a decrease in threshold of forebrain-elicited vocalization, was obtained with GABA-A receptor, glycine and opioid antagonists. The facilitatory effect of the opioid antagonist naloxone was limited to vocalizations expressing aversive emotional states. GABA-A receptor antagonists not only facilitated forebrain-induced vocalization but also produced vocalization themselves, i.e. without concomitant forebrain stimulation. No effects were obtained with antagonists of muscarinic and nicotinic receptors, with the GABA-B receptor antagonist phaclofen and antagonists of the monoamines dopamine, noradrenaline, adrenaline, serotonin and histamine. It is concluded that the PAG represents a crucial relay station of the vocalization-controlling system. In this station, transmission of vocalization-relevant information depends upon the activation of glutamatergic synapses. Inhibitory control is exerted by GABA, glycine and endogenous opioids. Acetylcholine, dopamine, noradrenaline, adrenaline, serotonin and histamine may play a transient modulatory role; forebrain-induced vocalization, however, does not depend upon the cholinergic or monoaminergic activation of PAG neurons.

  19. From pluripotency to forebrain patterning: an in vitro journey astride embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Lupo, Giuseppe; Bertacchi, Michele; Carucci, Nicoletta; Augusti-Tocco, Gabriella; Biagioni, Stefano; Cremisi, Federico

    2014-08-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) have been used extensively as in vitro models of neural development and disease, with special efforts towards their conversion into forebrain progenitors and neurons. The forebrain is the most complex brain region, giving rise to several fundamental structures, such as the cerebral cortex, the hypothalamus, and the retina. Due to the multiplicity of signaling pathways playing different roles at distinct times of embryonic development, the specification and patterning of forebrain has been difficult to study in vivo. Research performed on ESCs in vitro has provided a large body of evidence to complement work in model organisms, but these studies have often been focused more on cell type production than on cell fate regulation. In this review, we systematically reassess the current literature in the field of forebrain development in mouse and human ESCs with a focus on the molecular mechanisms of early cell fate decisions, taking into consideration the specific culture conditions, exogenous and endogenous molecular cues as described in the original studies. The resulting model of early forebrain induction and patterning provides a useful framework for further studies aimed at reconstructing forebrain development in vitro for basic research or therapy.

  20. Roof plate mediated morphogenesis of the forebrain: New players join the game.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sandeep; Sen, Jonaki

    2016-05-15

    The roof plate is a crucial signaling center located at the dorsal midline of the developing central nervous system (CNS) along its rostro-caudal axis. By virtue of secreting multiple signaling molecules, it regulates diverse processes such as specification of dorsal fate, proliferation and axon guidance. In the forebrain, the roof plate is not only involved in patterning but is also involved in the division of the single forebrain vesicle into the two cerebral hemispheres, the failure of which leads to certain forms of holoprosencephaly. Although several molecular players such as Fgfs, BMPs, Wnts and Shh have been identified as crucial regulators of development of the forebrain, little is known about how they interact to bring about the morphological changes associated with the division of the forebrain vesicle into the cerebral hemispheres. Recent studies have now identified the dorsal mesenchyme as an additional source of signaling cues, which is likely to influence the division of the forebrain vesicle into cerebral hemispheres. In this review, we discuss the current understanding about the molecular mechanisms of roof plate mediated patterning and morphogenesis of the forebrain including some recently identified factors that influence this process and also highlight the gaps in our knowledge that remain.

  1. Forebrain commissures and visual memory: a new approach.

    PubMed

    Doty, R W; Ringo, J L; Lewine, J D

    1988-08-01

    The primary purpose of these exploratory experiments was to determine: (1) whether the forebrain commissures can provide full accessibility of the mnemonic store to either hemisphere when the taks involves memory for 'events' (images) rather than, as in essentially all previous tests on split-brain animals, memory for 'rules' (discrimination habits); and (2) whether the anterior commissure (AC) alone is capable of such function. Macaques, with optic chiasm transected to allow limitation of direct visual input to one or the other hemisphere, were trained on tasks requiring recognition of previously viewed photographic slides. For one task, delayed-matching-to-sample (DMTS), the animal was presented with a 'sample' image, and then 0-15s later was required to choose that image in preference to a second image concurrently displayed. On the other task, running recognition (RR), a series of images was presented, some of which were repetitions of images previously seen in that session, and the animal was required to signal its recognition of these repetitions. For either task the initial presentation could be made to one eye and hemisphere, and subsequent recognition required of the other. In such circumstance, if all forebrain commissures were divided, such interhemispheric recognition was no longer possible. For the DMTS task if either the AC or 5 mm of the splenium of the corpus callosum were available, interhemispheric recognition was basically equivalent to that using the same eye and hemisphere. However, interhemispheric accuracy with the RR task, while well above chance levels, was consistently inferior to that achieved intrahemispherically when complex scenes or objects were viewed. This is probably a consequence mostly of the differing visual fields of the two eyes, since interhemispheric accuracy was greatly improved by use of images having approximately identical right and left halves. No consistent hemispheric specialization nor difference in direction of

  2. Vasospastic Limb Ischemia Presenting Acute and Chronic Limb Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Vasospastic limb ischemia might have been underappreciated compared to vasospasm in other territories such as heart and brain. However, an increasing awareness of this vascular disorder can be translated to an improved patients’ care. Herein, we report a case of vasospasm presenting acute and chronic limb ischemia in four extremities. PMID:24995065

  3. Contribution of downregulation of L-type calcium currents to delayed neuronal death in rat hippocampus after global cerebral ischemia and reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Ming; Yang, Jian-Ming; Hu, De-Hui; Hou, Feng-Qing; Zhao, Miao; Zhu, Xin-Hong; Wang, Ying; Li, Jian-Guo; Hu, Ping; Chen, Liang; Qin, Lu-Ning; Gao, Tian-Ming

    2007-05-09

    Transient forebrain ischemia induces delayed, selective neuronal death in the CA1 region of the hippocampus. The underlying molecular mechanisms are as yet unclear, but it is known that activation of L-type Ca2+ channels specifically increases the expression of a group of genes required for neuronal survival. Accordingly, we examined temporal changes in L-type calcium-channel activity in CA1 and CA3 pyramidal neurons of rat hippocampus after transient forebrain ischemia by patch-clamp techniques. In vulnerable CA1 neurons, L-type Ca2+-channel activity was persistently downregulated after ischemic insult, whereas in invulnerable CA3 neurons, no change occurred. Downregulation of L-type calcium channels was partially caused by oxidation modulation in postischemic channels. Furthermore, L-type but neither N-type nor P/Q-type Ca2+-channel antagonists alone significantly inhibited the survival of cultured hippocampal neurons. In contrast, specific L-type calcium-channel agonist remarkably reduced neuronal cell death and restored the inhibited channels induced by nitric oxide donor. More importantly, L-type calcium-channel agonist applied after reoxygenation or reperfusion significantly decreased neuronal injury in in vitro oxygen-glucose deprivation ischemic model and in animals subjected to forebrain ischemia-reperfusion. Together, the present results suggest that ischemia-induced inhibition of L-type calcium currents may give rise to delayed death of neurons in the CA1 region, possibly via oxidation mechanisms. Our findings may lead to a new perspective on neuronal death after ischemic insult and suggest that a novel therapeutic approach, activation of L-type calcium channels, could be tested at late stages of reperfusion for stroke treatment.

  4. Probing forebrain to hindbrain circuit functions in Xenopus.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Darcy B; Elliott, Taffeta M; Evans, Ben J; Hall, Ian C; Leininger, Elizabeth C; Rhodes, Heather J; Yamaguchi, Ayako; Zornik, Erik

    2017-01-01

    The vertebrate hindbrain includes neural circuits that govern essential functions including breathing, blood pressure and heart rate. Hindbrain circuits also participate in generating rhythmic motor patterns for vocalization. In most tetrapods, sound production is powered by expiration and the circuitry underlying vocalization and respiration must be linked. Perception and arousal are also linked; acoustic features of social communication sounds-for example, a baby's cry-can drive autonomic responses. The close links between autonomic functions that are essential for life and vocal expression have been a major in vivo experimental challenge. Xenopus provides an opportunity to address this challenge using an ex vivo preparation: an isolated brain that generates vocal and breathing patterns. The isolated brain allows identification and manipulation of hindbrain vocal circuits as well as their activation by forebrain circuits that receive sensory input, initiate motor patterns and control arousal. Advances in imaging technologies, coupled to the production of Xenopus lines expressing genetically encoded calcium sensors, provide powerful tools for imaging neuronal patterns in the entire fictively behaving brain, a goal of the BRAIN Initiative. Comparisons of neural circuit activity across species (comparative neuromics) with distinctive vocal patterns can identify conserved features, and thereby reveal essential functional components. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Basal forebrain dynamics during nonassociative and associative olfactory learning

    PubMed Central

    Devore, Sasha; Pender-Morris, Nathaniel; Dean, Owen; Smith, David

    2015-01-01

    Cholinergic and GABAergic projections from the horizontal diagonal band (HDB) and medial preoptic area (MCPO) of the basal forebrain to the olfactory system are associated with odor discrimination and odor learning, as well as modulation of neural responses in olfactory structures. Whereas pharmacological and lesion studies give insights into the functional role of these modulatory inputs on a slow timescale, the response dynamics of neurons in the HDB/MCPO during olfactory behaviors have not been investigated. In this study we examined how these neurons respond during two olfactory behaviors: spontaneous investigation of odorants and odor-reward association learning. We observe rich heterogeneity in the response dynamics of individual HDB/MCPO neurons, with a substantial fraction of neurons exhibiting task-related modulation. HDB/MCPO neurons show both rapid and transient responses during bouts of odor investigation and slow, long-lasting modulation of overall response rate based on behavioral demands. Specifically, baseline rates were higher during the acquisition phase of an odor-reward association than during spontaneous investigation or the recall phase of an odor reward association. Our results suggest that modulatory projections from the HDB/MCPO are poised to influence olfactory processing on multiple timescales, from hundreds of milliseconds to minutes, and are therefore capable of rapidly setting olfactory network dynamics during odor processing and learning. PMID:26561601

  6. Basal forebrain dynamics during nonassociative and associative olfactory learning.

    PubMed

    Devore, Sasha; Pender-Morris, Nathaniel; Dean, Owen; Smith, David; Linster, Christiane

    2016-01-01

    Cholinergic and GABAergic projections from the horizontal diagonal band (HDB) and medial preoptic area (MCPO) of the basal forebrain to the olfactory system are associated with odor discrimination and odor learning, as well as modulation of neural responses in olfactory structures. Whereas pharmacological and lesion studies give insights into the functional role of these modulatory inputs on a slow timescale, the response dynamics of neurons in the HDB/MCPO during olfactory behaviors have not been investigated. In this study we examined how these neurons respond during two olfactory behaviors: spontaneous investigation of odorants and odor-reward association learning. We observe rich heterogeneity in the response dynamics of individual HDB/MCPO neurons, with a substantial fraction of neurons exhibiting task-related modulation. HDB/MCPO neurons show both rapid and transient responses during bouts of odor investigation and slow, long-lasting modulation of overall response rate based on behavioral demands. Specifically, baseline rates were higher during the acquisition phase of an odor-reward association than during spontaneous investigation or the recall phase of an odor reward association. Our results suggest that modulatory projections from the HDB/MCPO are poised to influence olfactory processing on multiple timescales, from hundreds of milliseconds to minutes, and are therefore capable of rapidly setting olfactory network dynamics during odor processing and learning.

  7. Adherent neural stem (NS) cells from fetal and adult forebrain.

    PubMed

    Pollard, Steven M; Conti, Luciano; Sun, Yirui; Goffredo, Donato; Smith, Austin

    2006-07-01

    Stable in vitro propagation of central nervous system (CNS) stem cells would offer expanded opportunities to dissect basic molecular, cellular, and developmental processes and to model neurodegenerative disease. CNS stem cells could also provide a source of material for drug discovery assays and cell replacement therapies. We have recently reported the generation of adherent, symmetrically expandable, neural stem (NS) cell lines derived both from mouse and human embryonic stem cells and from fetal forebrain (Conti L, Pollard SM, Gorba T, Reitano E, Toselli M, Biella G, Sun Y, Sanzone S, Ying QL, Cattaneo E, Smith A. 2005. Niche-independent symmetrical self-renewal of a mammalian tissue stem cell. PLoS Biol 3(9):e283). These NS cells retain neuronal and glial differentiation potential after prolonged passaging and are transplantable. NS cells are likely to comprise the resident stem cell population within heterogeneous neurosphere cultures. Here we demonstrate that similar NS cell cultures can be established from the adult mouse brain. We also characterize the growth factor requirements for NS cell derivation and self-renewal. We discuss our current understanding of the relationship of NS cell lines to physiological progenitor cells of fetal and adult CNS.

  8. Unique spatiotemporal requirements for intraflagellar transport genes during forebrain development

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ching-Fang; Cionni, Megan; Brugmann, Samantha A.

    2017-01-01

    Primary cilia are organelles extended from virtually all cells and are required for the proper regulation of a number of canonical developmental pathways. The role in cortical development of proteins important for ciliary form and function is a relatively understudied area. Here we have taken a genetic approach to define the role in forebrain development of three intraflagellar transport proteins known to be important for primary cilia function. We have genetically ablated Kif3a, Ift88, and Ttc21b in a series of specific spatiotemporal domains. The resulting phenotypes allow us to draw several conclusions. First, we conclude that the Ttc21b cortical phenotype is not due to the activity of Ttc21b within the brain itself. Secondly, some of the most striking phenotypes are from ablations in the neural crest cells and the adjacent surface ectoderm indicating that cilia transduce critical tissue—tissue interactions in the developing embryonic head. Finally, we note striking differences in phenotypes from ablations only one embryonic day apart, indicating very discrete spatiotemporal requirements for these three genes in cortical development. PMID:28291836

  9. Basal forebrain circuit for sleep-wake control.

    PubMed

    Xu, Min; Chung, Shinjae; Zhang, Siyu; Zhong, Peng; Ma, Chenyan; Chang, Wei-Cheng; Weissbourd, Brandon; Sakai, Noriaki; Luo, Liqun; Nishino, Seiji; Dan, Yang

    2015-11-01

    The mammalian basal forebrain (BF) has important roles in controlling sleep and wakefulness, but the underlying neural circuit remains poorly understood. We examined the BF circuit by recording and optogenetically perturbing the activity of four genetically defined cell types across sleep-wake cycles and by comprehensively mapping their synaptic connections. Recordings from channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2)-tagged neurons revealed that three BF cell types, cholinergic, glutamatergic and parvalbumin-positive (PV+) GABAergic neurons, were more active during wakefulness and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep (wake/REM active) than during non-REM (NREM) sleep, and activation of each cell type rapidly induced wakefulness. By contrast, activation of somatostatin-positive (SOM+) GABAergic neurons promoted NREM sleep, although only some of them were NREM active. Synaptically, the wake-promoting neurons were organized hierarchically by glutamatergic→cholinergic→PV+ neuron excitatory connections, and they all received inhibition from SOM+ neurons. Together, these findings reveal the basic organization of the BF circuit for sleep-wake control.

  10. Evolution and development of interhemispheric connections in the vertebrate forebrain

    PubMed Central

    Suárez, Rodrigo; Gobius, Ilan; Richards, Linda J.

    2014-01-01

    Axonal connections between the left and right sides of the brain are crucial for bilateral integration of lateralized sensory, motor, and associative functions. Throughout vertebrate species, forebrain commissures share a conserved developmental plan, a similar position relative to each other within the brain and similar patterns of connectivity. However, major events in the evolution of the vertebrate brain, such as the expansion of the telencephalon in tetrapods and the origin of the six-layered isocortex in mammals, resulted in the emergence and diversification of new commissural routes. These new interhemispheric connections include the pallial commissure, which appeared in the ancestors of tetrapods and connects the left and right sides of the medial pallium (hippocampus in mammals), and the corpus callosum, which is exclusive to eutherian (placental) mammals and connects both isocortical hemispheres. A comparative analysis of commissural systems in vertebrates reveals that the emergence of new commissural routes may have involved co-option of developmental mechanisms and anatomical substrates of preexistent commissural pathways. One of the embryonic regions of interest for studying these processes is the commissural plate, a portion of the early telencephalic midline that provides molecular specification and a cellular scaffold for the development of commissural axons. Further investigations into these embryonic processes in carefully selected species will provide insights not only into the mechanisms driving commissural evolution, but also regarding more general biological problems such as the role of developmental plasticity in evolutionary change. PMID:25071525

  11. Forebrain neurocircuitry associated with human reflex cardiovascular control

    PubMed Central

    Shoemaker, J. Kevin; Goswami, Ruma

    2015-01-01

    Physiological homeostasis depends upon adequate integration and responsiveness of sensory information with the autonomic nervous system to affect rapid and effective adjustments in end organ control. Dysregulation of the autonomic nervous system leads to cardiovascular disability with consequences as severe as sudden death. The neural pathways involved in reflexive autonomic control are dependent upon brainstem nuclei but these receive modulatory inputs from higher centers in the midbrain and cortex. Neuroimaging technologies have allowed closer study of the cortical circuitry related to autonomic cardiovascular adjustments to many stressors in awake humans and have exposed many forebrain sites that associate strongly with cardiovascular arousal during stress including the medial prefrontal cortex, insula cortex, anterior cingulate, amygdala and hippocampus. Using a comparative approach, this review will consider the cortical autonomic circuitry in rodents and primates with a major emphasis on more recent neuroimaging studies in awake humans. A challenge with neuroimaging studies is their interpretation in view of multiple sensory, perceptual, emotive and/or reflexive components of autonomic responses. This review will focus on those responses related to non-volitional baroreflex control of blood pressure and also on the coordinated responses to non-fatiguing, non-painful volitional exercise with particular emphasis on the medial prefrontal cortex and the insula cortex. PMID:26388780

  12. Emergence of learned categorical representations within an auditory forebrain circuit

    PubMed Central

    Jeanne, James M.; Thompson, Jason V.; Sharpee, Tatyana O.; Gentner, Timothy Q.

    2011-01-01

    Many learned behaviors are thought to require the activity of high-level neurons that represent categories of complex signals, such as familiar faces or native speech sounds. How these complex, experience-dependent neural responses emerge within the brain’s circuitry is not well understood. The caudomedial mesopallium (CMM), a secondary auditory region in the songbird brain, contains neurons that respond to specific combinations of song components and respond preferentially to the songs that birds have learned to recognize. Here, we examine the transformation of these learned responses across a broader forebrain circuit that includes the caudolateral mesopallium (CLM), an auditory region that provides input to CMM. We recorded extracellular single-unit activity in CLM and CMM in European starlings trained to recognize sets of conspecific songs and compared multiple encoding properties of neurons between these regions. We find that the responses of CMM neurons are more selective between song components, convey more information about song components, and are more variable over repeated components than the responses of CLM neurons. While learning enhances neural encoding of song components in both regions, CMM neurons encode more information about the learned categories associated with songs than CLM neurons. Collectively, these data suggest that CLM and CMM are part of a functional sensory hierarchy that is modified by learning to yield representations of natural vocal signals that are increasingly informative with respect to behavior. PMID:21325527

  13. Basal Forebrain Thermoregulatory Mechanism Modulates Auto-Regulated Sleep

    PubMed Central

    Mallick, Hruda Nanda; Kumar, Velayudhan Mohan

    2012-01-01

    Regulation of body temperature and sleep are two physiological mechanisms that are vital for our survival. Interestingly neural structures implicated in both these functions are common. These areas include the medial preoptic area (POA), the lateral POA, the ventrolateral POA, the median preoptic nucleus, and the medial septum, which form part of the basal forebrain (BF). When given a choice, rats prefer to stay at an ambient temperature of 27°C, though the maximum sleep was observed when they were placed at 30°C. Ambient temperature around 27°C should be considered as the thermoneutral temperature for rats in all sleep studies. At this temperature the diurnal oscillations of sleep and body temperature are properly expressed. The warm sensitive neurons of the POA mediate the increase in sleep at 30°C. Promotion of sleep during the rise in ambient temperature from 27 to 30°C, serve a thermoregulatory function. Autonomous thermoregulatory changes in core body temperature and skin temperature could act as an input signal to modulate neuronal activity in sleep-promoting brain areas. The studies presented here show that the neurons of the BF play a key role in regulating sleep. BF thermoregulatory system is a part of the global homeostatic sleep regulatory mechanism, which is auto-regulated. PMID:22754548

  14. Dopamine receptor gene expression by enkephalin neurons in rat forebrain

    SciTech Connect

    Le Moine, C.; Normand, E.; Guitteny, A.F.; Fouque, B.; Teoule, R.; Bloch, B. )

    1990-01-01

    In situ hybridization experiments were performed with brain sections from normal, control and haloperidol-treated rats to identify and map the cells expressing the D2 dopamine receptor gene. D2 receptor mRNA was detected with radioactive or biotinylated oligonucleotide probes. D2 receptor mRNA was present in glandular cells of the pituitary intermediate lobe and in neurons of the substantia nigra, ventral tegmental area, and forebrain, especially in caudate putamen, nucleus accumbens, olfactory tubercle, and piriform cortex. Hybridization with D2 and preproenkephalin A probes in adjacent sections, as well as combined hybridization with the two probes in the same sections, demonstrated that all detectable enkephalin neurons in the striatum contained the D2 receptor mRNA. Large neurons in caudate putamen, which were unlabeled with the preproenkephalin A probe and which may have been cholinergic, also expressed the D2 receptor gene. Haloperidol treatment (14 or 21 days) provoked an increase in mRNA content for D2 receptor and preproenkephalin A in the striatum. This suggests that the increase in D2 receptor number observed after haloperidol treatment is due to increased activity of the D2 gene. These results indicate that in the striatum, the enkephalin neurons are direct targets for dopamine liberated from mesostriatal neurons.

  15. Habituation and extinction of fear recruit overlapping forebrain structures.

    PubMed

    Furlong, Teri M; Richardson, Rick; McNally, Gavan P

    2016-02-01

    Establishing the neurocircuitry involved in inhibiting fear is important for understanding and treating anxiety disorders. To date, extinction procedures have been predominately used to examine the inhibition of learned fear, where fear is reduced to a conditioned stimulus (CS) by presenting it in the absence of the unconditioned stimulus (US). However, learned fear can also be reduced by habituation procedures where the US is presented in the absence of the CS. Here we used expression of the activity marker c-Fos in rats to compare the recruitment of several forebrain structures following fear habituation and extinction. Following fear conditioning where a tone CS was paired with a loud noise US, fear was then reduced the following day by either presentation of the CS or US alone (i.e. CS extinction or US habituation, respectively). This extinction and habituation training recruited several common structures, including infralimbic cortex, basolateral amygdala, midline thalamus and medial hypothalamus (orexin neurons). Moreover, this overlap was shared when examining the neural correlates of the expression of habituation and extinction, with common recruitment of infralimbic cortex and midline thalamus. However, there were also important differences. Specifically, acquisition of habituation was associated with greater recruitment of prelimbic cortex whereas expression of habituation was associated with greater recruitment of paraventricular thalamus. There was also less recruitment of central amygdala for habituation compared to extinction in the retention phase. These findings indicate that largely overlapping neurocircuitries underlie habituation and fear extinction and imply common mechanisms for reducing fear across different inhibitory treatments.

  16. Ischemia causes muscle fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, G.; Hargens, A. R.; Lehman, S.; Rempel, D. M.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether ischemia, which reduces oxygenation in the extensor carpi radialis (ECR) muscle, causes a reduction in muscle force production. In eight subjects, muscle oxygenation (TO2) of the right ECR was measured noninvasively and continuously using near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) while muscle twitch force was elicited by transcutaneous electrical stimulation (1 Hz, 0.1 ms). Baseline measurements of blood volume, muscle oxygenation and twitch force were recorded continuously, then a tourniquet on the upper arm was inflated to one of five different pressure levels: 20, 40, 60 mm Hg (randomized order) and diastolic (69 +/- 9.8 mm Hg) and systolic (106 +/- 12.8 mm Hg) blood pressures. Each pressure level was maintained for 3-5 min, and was followed by a recovery period sufficient to allow measurements to return to baseline. For each respective tourniquet pressure level, mean TO2 decreased from resting baseline (100% TO2) to 99 +/- 1.2% (SEM), 96 +/- 1.9%, 93 +/- 2.8%, 90 +/- 2.5%, and 86 +/- 2.7%, and mean twitch force decreased from resting baseline (100% force) to 99 +/- 0.7% (SEM), 96 +/- 2.7%, 93 +/- 3.1%, 88 +/- 3.2%, and 86 +/- 2.6%. Muscle oxygenation and twitch force at 60 mm Hg tourniquet compression and above were significantly lower (P < 0.05) than baseline value. Reduced twitch force was correlated in a dose-dependent manner with reduced muscle oxygenation (r = 0.78, P < 0.001). Although the correlation does not prove causation, the results indicate that ischemia leading to a 7% or greater reduction in muscle oxygenation causes decreased muscle force production in the forearm extensor muscle. Thus, ischemia associated with a modest decline in TO2 causes muscle fatigue.

  17. Ischemia causes muscle fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, G.; Hargens, A. R.; Lehman, S.; Rempel, D. M.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether ischemia, which reduces oxygenation in the extensor carpi radialis (ECR) muscle, causes a reduction in muscle force production. In eight subjects, muscle oxygenation (TO2) of the right ECR was measured noninvasively and continuously using near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) while muscle twitch force was elicited by transcutaneous electrical stimulation (1 Hz, 0.1 ms). Baseline measurements of blood volume, muscle oxygenation and twitch force were recorded continuously, then a tourniquet on the upper arm was inflated to one of five different pressure levels: 20, 40, 60 mm Hg (randomized order) and diastolic (69 +/- 9.8 mm Hg) and systolic (106 +/- 12.8 mm Hg) blood pressures. Each pressure level was maintained for 3-5 min, and was followed by a recovery period sufficient to allow measurements to return to baseline. For each respective tourniquet pressure level, mean TO2 decreased from resting baseline (100% TO2) to 99 +/- 1.2% (SEM), 96 +/- 1.9%, 93 +/- 2.8%, 90 +/- 2.5%, and 86 +/- 2.7%, and mean twitch force decreased from resting baseline (100% force) to 99 +/- 0.7% (SEM), 96 +/- 2.7%, 93 +/- 3.1%, 88 +/- 3.2%, and 86 +/- 2.6%. Muscle oxygenation and twitch force at 60 mm Hg tourniquet compression and above were significantly lower (P < 0.05) than baseline value. Reduced twitch force was correlated in a dose-dependent manner with reduced muscle oxygenation (r = 0.78, P < 0.001). Although the correlation does not prove causation, the results indicate that ischemia leading to a 7% or greater reduction in muscle oxygenation causes decreased muscle force production in the forearm extensor muscle. Thus, ischemia associated with a modest decline in TO2 causes muscle fatigue.

  18. Oligodendrogenesis after cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ruilan; Chopp, Michael; Zhang, Zheng Gang

    2013-01-01

    Neural stem cells in the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the lateral ventricle of adult rodent brain generate oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) that disperse throughout the corpus callosum and striatum where some of OPCs differentiate into mature oligodendrocytes. Studies in animal models of stroke demonstrate that cerebral ischemia induces oligodendrogenesis during brain repair processes. This article will review evidence of stroke-induced proliferation and differentiation of OPCs that are either resident in white matter or are derived from SVZ neural progenitor cells and of therapies that amplify endogenous oligodendrogenesis in ischemic brain. PMID:24194700

  19. Stereological assessment of vulnerability of immunocytochemically identified striatal and hippocampal neurons after global cerebral ischemia in rats.

    PubMed

    Larsson, E; Lindvall, O; Kokaia, Z

    2001-09-21

    Detailed quantitative analysis of the vulnerability of different hippocampal and striatal neurons to global forebrain ischemia has not previously been performed. Here we have studied the survival of immunocytochemically identified neurons using an unbiased stereological method in rats subjected to global forebrain ischemia for 30 min and sacrificed 48 h, 1 week or 4 weeks thereafter. Within the hippocampal formation, there was extensive, progressive loss of CA1 pyramidal neurons and dentate hilar neuropeptide Y (NPY)-positive interneurons. In contrast, no reduction of the number of CA3 and CA4 pyramidal neurons or hilar parvalbumin-positive interneurons was detected. In the dorsolateral striatum, the insult caused a major loss of projection neurons immunoreactive to dopamine- and adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate-regulated phosphoprotein with a molecular weight of 32 kilodalton (DARPP-32). The number of parvalbumin-positive striatal interneurons was significantly reduced, while NPY-positive interneurons were resistant. All striatal cholinergic interneurons survived the ischemic insult. At 48 h following the ischemia, the cholinergic interneurons within the lesioned striatum transiently expressed the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75(NTR)), as shown by double-label immunocytochemistry. Furthermore, there was a significant increase in the number of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT)- and TrkA-immunoreactive interneurons at 4 weeks after the insult. Injections with the cell mitotic division marker BrdU provided no evidence that the elevated cholinergic cell number was due to neurogenesis. Probably, the higher number of ChAT- and TrkA-positive interneurons reflected increased intracellular levels of the corresponding proteins leading to more cells detectable with immunocytochemistry. This study gives the first quantitative description of the vulnerability of defined hippocampal and striatal neurons after global forebrain ischemia. The ischemia-induced increases of p75(NTR), Trk

  20. Grade Span.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Renchler, Ron

    2000-01-01

    This issue reviews grade span, or grade configuration. Catherine Paglin and Jennifer Fager's "Grade Configuration: Who Goes Where?" provides an overview of issues and concerns related to grade spans and supplies profiles of eight Northwest schools with varying grade spans. David F. Wihry, Theodore Coladarci, and Curtis Meadow's…

  1. Folic acid deficiency increases delayed neuronal death, DNA damage, platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 immunoreactivity, and gliosis in the hippocampus after transient cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Hwang, In Koo; Yoo, Ki-Yeon; Suh, Hong-Won; Kim, Young Sup; Kwon, Dae Young; Kwon, Young-Guen; Yoo, Jun-Hyun; Won, Moo-Ho

    2008-07-01

    Folic acid deficiency increases stroke risk. In the present study, we examined whether folic acid deficiency enhances neuronal damage and gliosis via oxidative stress in the gerbil hippocampus after transient forebrain ischemia. Animals were exposed to a folic acid-deficient diet (FAD) for 3 months and then subjected to occlusion of both common carotid arteries for 5 min. Exposure to an FAD increased plasma homocysteine levels by five- to eightfold compared with those of animals fed with a control diet (CD). In CD-treated animals, most neurons were dead in the hippocampal CA1 region 4 days after ischemia/reperfusion, whereas, in FAD-treated animals, this occurred 3 days after ischemia/reperfusion. Immunostaining for 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) was performed to examine DNA damage in CA1 neurons in both groups after ischemia, and it was found that 8-OHdG immunoreactivity in both FAD and CD groups peaked at 12 hr after reperfusion, although the immunoreactivity in the FAD group was much greater than that in the CD group. Platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1; a final mediator of neutrophil transendothelial migration) immunoreactivity in both groups increased with time after ischemia/reperfusion: Its immunoreactivity in the FAD group was much higher than that in the CD group 3 days after ischemia/reperfusion. In addition, reactive gliosis in the ischemic CA1 region increased with time after ischemia in both groups, but astrocytosis and microgliosis in the FAD group were more severe than in the CD group at all times after ischemia. Our results suggest that folic acid deficiency enhances neuronal damage induced by ischemia. 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Sexual dimorphism in BDNF signaling after neonatal hypoxia-ischemia and treatment with necrostatin-1.

    PubMed

    Chavez-Valdez, R; Martin, L J; Razdan, S; Gauda, E B; Northington, F J

    2014-02-28

    Brain injury due to neonatal hypoxia-ischemia (HI) is more homogenously severe in male than in female mice. Because, necrostatin-1 (nec-1) prevents injury progression only in male mice, we hypothesized that changes in brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling after HI and nec-1 are also sex-specific providing differential conditions to promote recovery of those more severely injured. The increased aromatization of testosterone in male mice during early development and the link between 17-β-estradiol (E2) levels and BDNF transcription substantiate this hypothesis. Hence, we aimed to investigate if sexual differences in BDNF signaling existed in forebrain and diencephalon after HI and HI/nec-1 and their correlation with estrogen receptors (ER). C57B6 mice (p7) received nec-1 (0.1μl [8μM]) or vehicle (veh) intracerebroventricularly after HI. At 24h after HI, BDNF levels increased in both sexes in forebrain without evidence of tropomyosin-receptor-kinase B (TrkB) activation. At 96h after HI, BDNF levels in forebrain decreased below those seen in control mice of both sexes. Additionally, only in female mice, truncated TrkB (Tc.TrkB) and p75 neurotrophic receptor (p75ntr) levels increased in forebrain and diencephalon. In both, forebrain and diencephalon, nec-1 treatment increased BDNF levels and TrkB activation in male mice while, nec-1 prevented Tc.TrkB and p75ntr increases in female mice. While E2 levels were unchanged by HI or HI/nec-1 in either sex or treatment, ERα:ERβ ratios were increased in diencephalon of nec-1-treated male mice and directly correlated with BDNF levels. Neonatal HI produces sex-specific signaling changes in the BDNF system, that are differentially modulated by nec-1. The regional differences in BDNF levels may be a consequence of injury severity after HI, but sexual differences in response to nec-1 after HI may represent a differential thalamo-cortical preservation or alternatively off-target regional effect of nec-1. The

  3. Sexual dimorphism in BDNF signaling after neonatal hypoxia-ischemia and treatment with necrostatin-1

    PubMed Central

    Chavez-Valdez, Raul; Martin, Lee J.; Razdan, Sheila; Gauda, Estelle B.; Northington, Frances J.

    2014-01-01

    Brain injury due to neonatal hypoxia-ischemia (HI) is more homogenously severe in male than in female mice. Because, necrostatin-1 (nec-1) prevents injury progression only in male mice, we hypothesized that changes in BDNF signaling after HI and nec-1 are also sex-specific providing differential conditions to promote recovery of those more severely injured. The increased aromatization of testosterone in male mice during early development and the link between 17-β-estradiol (E2) levels and BDNF transcription substantiate this hypothesis. Hence, we aimed to investigate if sexual differences in BDNF signaling existed in forebrain and diencephalon after HI and HI/ nec-1 and their correlation with estrogen receptors (ER). C57B6 mice (p7) received nec-1(0.1 μL[8μM]) or vehicle (veh) intracerebroventricularly after HI. At 24h after HI, BDNF levels increased in both sexes in forebrain without evidence of TrkB activation. At 96h after HI, BDNF levels in forebrain decreased below those seen in control mice of both sexes. Additionally, only in female mice, truncated TrkB (Tc.TrkB) and p75ntr levels increased in forebrain and diencephalon. In both, forebrain and diencephalon, nec-1 treatment increased BDNF levels and TrkB activation in male mice while, prevented Tc.TrkB and p75ntr increases in female mice. While E2 levels were unchanged by HI or HI/ nec-1 in either sex or treatment, ERα: ERβ ratios were increased in diencephalon of nec-1 treated male mice and directly correlated with BDNF levels. Neonatal HI produces sex-specific signaling changes in the BDNF system, that are differentially modulated by nec-1. The regional differences in BDNF levels may be a consequence of injury severity after HI, but sexual differences in response to nec-1 after HI may represent a differential thalamo-cortical preservation or alternatively off-target regional effect of nec-1. The biological significance of ERα predominance and its correlation with BDNF levels is still unclear. PMID

  4. Association of basal forebrain volumes and cognition in normal aging.

    PubMed

    Wolf, D; Grothe, M; Fischer, F U; Heinsen, H; Kilimann, I; Teipel, S; Fellgiebel, A

    2014-01-01

    The basal forebrain cholinergic system (BFCS) is known to undergo moderate neurodegenerative alterations during normal aging and severe atrophy in Alzheimer's disease (AD). It has been suggested that functional and structural alterations of the BFCS mediate cognitive performance in normal aging and AD. But, it is still unclear to what extend age-associated cognitive decline can be related to BFCS in normal aging. We analyzed the relationship between BFCS volume and cognition using MRI and a comprehensive neuropsychological test battery in a cohort of 43 healthy elderly subjects spanning the age range from 60 to 85 years. Most notably, we found significant associations between general intelligence and BFCS volumes, specifically within areas corresponding to posterior nuclei of the nucleus basalis of Meynert (Ch4p) and the nucleus subputaminalis (NSP). Associations between specific cognitive domains and BFCS volumes were less pronounced. Supplementary analyses demonstrated that especially the volume of NSP but also the volume of Ch4p was related to the volume of widespread temporal, frontal, and parietal gray and white matter regions. Volumes of these gray and white matter regions were also related to general intelligence. Higher volumes of Ch4p and NSP may enhance the effectiveness of acetylcholine supply in related gray and white matter regions underlying general intelligence and hence explain the observed association between the volume of Ch4p as well as NSP and general intelligence. Since general intelligence is known to attenuate the degree of age-associated cognitive decline and the risk of developing late-onset AD, the BFCS might, besides the specific contribution to the pathophysiology in AD, constitute a mechanism of brain resilience in normal aging.

  5. Visualization of the medial forebrain bundle using diffusion tensor imaging

    PubMed Central

    Hana, Ardian; Hana, Anisa; Dooms, Georges; Boecher-Schwarz, Hans; Hertel, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging is a technique that enables physicians the portrayal of white matter tracts in vivo. We used this technique in order to depict the medial forebrain bundle (MFB) in 15 consecutive patients between 2012 and 2015. Men and women of all ages were included. There were six women and nine men. The mean age was 58.6 years (39–77). Nine patients were candidates for an eventual deep brain stimulation. Eight of them suffered from Parkinson‘s disease and one had multiple sclerosis. The remaining six patients suffered from different lesions which were situated in the frontal lobe. These were 2 metastasis, 2 meningiomas, 1 cerebral bleeding, and 1 glioblastoma. We used a 3DT1-sequence for the navigation. Furthermore T2- and DTI- sequences were performed. The FOV was 200 × 200 mm2, slice thickness 2 mm, and an acquisition matrix of 96 × 96 yielding nearly isotropic voxels of 2 × 2 × 2 mm. 3-Tesla-MRI was carried out strictly axial using 32 gradient directions and one b0-image. We used Echo-Planar-Imaging (EPI) and ASSET parallel imaging with an acceleration factor of 2. b-value was 800 s/mm2. The maximal angle was 50°. Additional scanning time was < 9 min. We were able to visualize the MFB in 12 of our patients bilaterally and in the remaining three patients we depicted the MFB on one side. It was the contralateral side of the lesion. These were 2 meningiomas and one metastasis. Portrayal of the MFB is possible for everyday routine for neurosurgical interventions. As part of the reward circuitry it might be of substantial importance for neurosurgeons during deep brain stimulation in patients with psychiatric disorders. Surgery in this part of the brain should always take the preservation of this white matter tract into account. PMID:26581828

  6. Cholinergic Neurons Excite Cortically Projecting Basal Forebrain GABAergic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chun; McKenna, James T.; Zant, Janneke C.; Winston, Stuart; Basheer, Radhika

    2014-01-01

    The basal forebrain (BF) plays an important role in the control of cortical activation and attention. Understanding the modulation of BF neuronal activity is a prerequisite to treat disorders of cortical activation involving BF dysfunction, such as Alzheimer's disease. Here we reveal the interaction between cholinergic neurons and cortically projecting BF GABAergic neurons using immunohistochemistry and whole-cell recordings in vitro. In GAD67-GFP knock-in mice, BF cholinergic (choline acetyltransferase-positive) neurons were intermingled with GABAergic (GFP+) neurons. Immunohistochemistry for the vesicular acetylcholine transporter showed that cholinergic fibers apposed putative cortically projecting GABAergic neurons containing parvalbumin (PV). In coronal BF slices from GAD67-GFP knock-in or PV-tdTomato mice, pharmacological activation of cholinergic receptors with bath application of carbachol increased the firing rate of large (>20 μm diameter) BF GFP+ and PV (tdTomato+) neurons, which exhibited the intrinsic membrane properties of cortically projecting neurons. The excitatory effect of carbachol was blocked by antagonists of M1 and M3 muscarinic receptors in two subpopulations of BF GABAergic neurons [large hyperpolarization-activated cation current (Ih) and small Ih, respectively]. Ion substitution experiments and reversal potential measurements suggested that the carbachol-induced inward current was mediated mainly by sodium-permeable cation channels. Carbachol also increased the frequency of spontaneous excitatory and inhibitory synaptic currents. Furthermore, optogenetic stimulation of cholinergic neurons/fibers caused a mecamylamine- and atropine-sensitive inward current in putative GABAergic neurons. Thus, cortically projecting, BF GABAergic/PV neurons are excited by neighboring BF and/or brainstem cholinergic neurons. Loss of cholinergic neurons in Alzheimer's disease may impair cortical activation, in part, through disfacilitation of BF cortically

  7. Basal forebrain projections to the lateral habenula modulate aggression reward

    PubMed Central

    Golden, Sam A.; Heshmati, Mitra; Flanigan, Meghan; Christoffel, Dan J.; Guise, Kevin; Pfau, Madeline L.; Aleyasin, Hossein; Menard, Caroline; Zhang, Hongxing; Hodes, Georgia E.; Bregman, Dana; Khibnik, Lena; Tai, Jonathan; Rebusi, Nicole; Krawitz, Brian; Chaudhury, Dipesh; Walsh, Jessica J.; Han, Ming-Hu; Shapiro, Matt L.; Russo, Scott J.

    2016-01-01

    Maladaptive aggressive behavior is associated with a number of neuropsychiatric disorders1 and is thought to partly result from inappropriate activation of brain reward systems in response to aggressive or violent social stimuli2. Nuclei within the ventromedial hypothalamus3–5, extended amygdala6 and limbic7 circuits are known to encode initiation of aggression; however, little is known about the neural mechanisms that directly modulate the motivational component of aggressive behavior8. To address this, we established a mouse model to measure the valence of aggressive inter-male social interaction with a smaller subordinate intruder as reinforcement for the development of conditioned place preference (CPP). Aggressors (AGG) develop a CPP, while non-aggressors (NON) develop a conditioned place aversion (CPA), to the intruder-paired context. Further, we identify a functional GABAergic projection from the basal forebrain (BF) to the lateral habenula (lHb) that bi-directionally controls the valence of aggressive interactions. Circuit-specific silencing of GABAergic BF-lHb terminals of AGG with halorhodopsin (NpHR3.0) increases lHb neuronal firing and abolishes CPP to the intruder-paired context. Activation of GABAergic BF-lHb terminals of NON with channelrhodopsin (ChR2) decreases lHb neuronal firing and promotes CPP to the intruder-paired context. Lastly, we show that altering inhibitory transmission at BF-lHb terminals does not control the initiation of aggressive behavior. These results demonstrate that the BF-lHb circuit plays a critical role in regulating the valence of inter-male aggressive behavior and provide novel mechanistic insight into the neural circuits modulating aggression reward processing. PMID:27357796

  8. Visualization of the medial forebrain bundle using diffusion tensor imaging.

    PubMed

    Hana, Ardian; Hana, Anisa; Dooms, Georges; Boecher-Schwarz, Hans; Hertel, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging is a technique that enables physicians the portrayal of white matter tracts in vivo. We used this technique in order to depict the medial forebrain bundle (MFB) in 15 consecutive patients between 2012 and 2015. Men and women of all ages were included. There were six women and nine men. The mean age was 58.6 years (39-77). Nine patients were candidates for an eventual deep brain stimulation. Eight of them suffered from Parkinson's disease and one had multiple sclerosis. The remaining six patients suffered from different lesions which were situated in the frontal lobe. These were 2 metastasis, 2 meningiomas, 1 cerebral bleeding, and 1 glioblastoma. We used a 3DT1-sequence for the navigation. Furthermore T2- and DTI- sequences were performed. The FOV was 200 × 200 mm(2), slice thickness 2 mm, and an acquisition matrix of 96 × 96 yielding nearly isotropic voxels of 2 × 2 × 2 mm. 3-Tesla-MRI was carried out strictly axial using 32 gradient directions and one b0-image. We used Echo-Planar-Imaging (EPI) and ASSET parallel imaging with an acceleration factor of 2. b-value was 800 s/mm(2). The maximal angle was 50°. Additional scanning time was < 9 min. We were able to visualize the MFB in 12 of our patients bilaterally and in the remaining three patients we depicted the MFB on one side. It was the contralateral side of the lesion. These were 2 meningiomas and one metastasis. Portrayal of the MFB is possible for everyday routine for neurosurgical interventions. As part of the reward circuitry it might be of substantial importance for neurosurgeons during deep brain stimulation in patients with psychiatric disorders. Surgery in this part of the brain should always take the preservation of this white matter tract into account.

  9. Mechanisms of action of CHF3381 in the forebrain

    PubMed Central

    Barbieri, Mario; Bregola, Gianni; Buzzi, Andrea; Marino, Silvia; Zucchini, Silvia; Stables, James P; Bergamaschi, Marco; Pietra, Claudio; Villetti, Gino; Simonato, Michele

    2003-01-01

    Aim of this study was to gain insight into the mechanism of action of CHF3381, a novel putative antiepileptic and neuroprotective drug. CHF3381 blocked NMDA currents in primary cultures of cortical neurons: maximal effect was nearly −80% of the NMDA-evoked current, with EC50 of approximately 5 μM. This effect was selective, reversible, use-dependent and elicited at the concentrations reached in the rodent brain after peripheral administration of therapeutic doses. CHF3381 also inhibited voltage-gated Na+ currents in an apparently voltage-dependent manner. However, this effect could be obtained only at relatively high concentrations (100 μM). Consistent with the mild effects on voltage-gated Na+ channels, CHF3381 (100 μM) failed to affect electrical stimulation-evoked glutamate overflow in hippocampal slices. In contrast, the anti-convulsant agent and Na+ channel blocker lamotrigine (100 μM) inhibited stimulation-evoked glutamate overflow by approximately 50%. CHF3381 reduced kindled seizure-induced c-fos mRNA levels within the same brain regions, and to a similar level, as the selective NMDA receptor antagonist MK801, providing circumstantial evidence to the idea that CHF3381 blocks NMDA receptors in vivo. The present mechanistic studies suggest that the primary mechanism of action of CHF3381 in the forebrain is blockade of NMDA receptors. On this basis, this compound may have a potential use in other diseases caused by or associated with a pathologically high level of NMDA receptor activation. PMID:12890713

  10. Orexin A-induced enhancement of attentional processing in rats: role of basal forebrain neurons

    PubMed Central

    Zajo, Kristin N.; Fadel, Jim R.; Burk, Joshua A.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Orexins are neuropeptides released in multiple brain regions from neurons that originate within the lateral hypothalamus and contiguous perfornical area. The basal forebrain, a structure implicated in attentional processing, receives orexinergic inputs. Our previous work demonstrated that administration of an orexin-1 receptor antagonist, SB-334867, systemically or via infusion directly into the basal forebrain, can disrupt performance in a task that places explicit demands on attentional processing. Objectives Given that the orexin-1 receptor binds orexin A with high affinity, we tested whether orexin A could enhance attention in rats. Methods Attentional performance was assessed using a task that required discrimination of variable duration visual signals from trials when no signal was presented. We also tested whether infusions of orexin A into the lateral ventricle could attenuate deficits following lesions of medial prefrontal cortical cholinergic projections that arise from the basal forebrain. Results Infusions of orexin A into the basal forebrain attenuated distracter-induced decreases in attentional performance. Orexin A attenuated deficits in lesioned animals when a visual distracter was presented. Conclusion The present results support the view that orexin A can enhance attentional performance via actions in the basal forebrain and may be beneficial for some conditions characterized by attentional dysfunction due to disruption of cortical cholinergic inputs. PMID:26534765

  11. Brain atrophy in primary progressive aphasia involves the cholinergic basal forebrain and Ayala’s nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Teipel, Stefan J.; Flatz, Wilhelm; Ackl, Nibal; Grothe, Michel; Kilimann, Ingo; Bokde, Arun L.W.; Grinberg, Lea; Amaro, Edson; Kljajevic, Vanja; Alho, Eduardo; Knels, Christina; Ebert, Anne; Heinsen, Helmut; Danek, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    Primary progressive aphasia (PPA) is characterized by left hemispheric frontotemporal cortical atrophy. Evidence from anatomical studies suggests that the nucleus subputaminalis (NSP), a subnucleus of the cholinergic basal forebrain, may be involved in the pathological process of PPA. Therefore, we studied the pattern of cortical and basal forebrain atrophy in 10 patients with a clinical diagnosis of PPA and 18 healthy age-matched controls using high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We determined the cholinergic basal forebrain nuclei according to Mesulam’s nomenclature and the NSP in MRI reference space based on histological sections and the MRI scan of a post-mortem brain in cranio. Using voxel-based analysis, we found left hemispheric cortical atrophy in PPA patients compared with controls, including prefrontal, lateral temporal and medial temporal lobe areas. We detected cholinergic basal forebrain atrophy in left predominant localizations of Ch4p, Ch4am, Ch4al, Ch3 and NSP. For the first time, we have described the pattern of basal forebrain atrophy in PPA and confirmed the involvement of NSP that had been predicted based on theoretical considerations. Our findings may enhance understanding of the role of cholinergic degeneration for the regional specificity of the cortical destruction leading to the syndrome of PPA. PMID:24434193

  12. Prosomeric map of the lamprey forebrain based on calretinin immunocytochemistry, Nissl stain, and ancillary markers.

    PubMed

    Pombal, M A; Puelles, L

    1999-11-22

    The structural organization of the lamprey extratelencephalic forebrain is re-examined from the perspective of the prosomeric segmental paradigm. The question asked was whether the prosomeric forebrain model used for gnathostomes is of material advantage for interpreting subdivisions in the lamprey forebrain. To this aim, the main longitudinal and transverse landmarks recognized by the prosomeric model in other vertebrates were identified in Nissl-stained lamprey material. Lines of cytoarchitectural discontinuity and contours of migrated neuronal groups were mapped in a two-dimensional sagittal representation and were also classified according to their radial position. Immunocytochemical mapping of calretinin expression in adjacent sections served to define particular structural units better, in particular, the dorsal thalamus. These data were complemented by numerous other chemoarchitectonic observations obtained with ancillary markers, which identified additional specific formations, subdivisions, or boundaries. Emphasis was placed on studying whether such chemically defined neuronal groups showed boundaries aligned with the postulated inter- or intraprosomeric boundaries. The course of diverse axonal tracts was studied also with regard to their prosomeric topography. This analysis showed that the full prosomeric model applies straightforwardly to the lamprey forebrain. This finding implies that a common segmental and longitudinal organization of the neural tube may be primitive for all vertebrates. Interesting novel aspects appear in the interpretation of the lamprey pretectum, the dorsal and ventral thalami, and the hypothalamus. The topologic continuity of the prosomeric forebrain regions with evaginated or non-evaginated portions of the telencephalon was also examined.

  13. Opposing regulation of dopaminergic activity and exploratory motor behavior by forebrain and brainstem cholinergic circuits.

    PubMed

    Patel, Jyoti C; Rossignol, Elsa; Rice, Margaret E; Machold, Robert P

    2012-01-01

    Dopamine transmission is critical for exploratory motor behaviour. A key regulator is acetylcholine; forebrain acetylcholine regulates striatal dopamine release, whereas brainstem cholinergic inputs regulate the transition of dopamine neurons from tonic to burst firing modes. How these sources of cholinergic activity combine to control dopamine efflux and exploratory motor behaviour is unclear. Here we show that mice lacking total forebrain acetylcholine exhibit enhanced frequency-dependent striatal dopamine release and are hyperactive in a novel environment, whereas mice lacking rostral brainstem acetylcholine are hypoactive. Exploratory motor behaviour is normalized by the removal of both cholinergic sources. Involvement of dopamine in the exploratory motor phenotypes observed in these mutants is indicated by their altered sensitivity to the dopamine D2 receptor antagonist raclopride. These results support a model in which forebrain and brainstem cholinergic systems act in tandem to regulate striatal dopamine signalling for proper control of motor activity.

  14. Regulation of fear responses by striatal and extrastriatal adenosine A2A receptors in forebrain.

    PubMed

    Wei, Catherine J; Augusto, Elisabete; Gomes, Catarina A; Singer, Philipp; Wang, Yumei; Boison, Detlev; Cunha, Rodrigo A; Yee, Benjamin K; Chen, Jiang-Fan

    2014-06-01

    Adenosine A2A receptors (A2ARs) are enriched in the striatum but are also present at lower levels in the extrastriatal forebrain (i.e., hippocampus, cortex), integrating dopamine, glutamate, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling, and are thus essential for striatal neuroplasticity and fear and anxiety behavior. We tested two brain region-specific A2AR knockout lines with A2ARs selectively deleted either in the striatum (st-A2AR KO) or the entire forebrain (striatum, hippocampus, and cortex [fb-A2AR KO]) on fear and anxiety-related responses. We also examined the effect of hippocampus-specific A2AR deletion by local injection of adeno-associated virus type 5 (AAV5)-Cre into floxed-A2AR knockout mice. Selectively deleting A2ARs in the striatum increased Pavlovian fear conditioning (both context and tone) in st-A2AR KO mice, but extending the deletion to the rest of the forebrain apparently spared context fear conditioning and attenuated tone fear conditioning in fb-A2AR KO mice. Moreover, focal deletion of hippocampal A2ARs by AAV5-Cre injection selectively attenuated context (but not tone) fear conditioning. Deletion of A2ARs in the entire forebrain in fb-A2AR KO mice also produced an anxiolytic phenotype in both the elevated plus maze and open field tests, and increased the startle response. These extrastriatal forebrain A2AR behavioral effects were associated with reduced BDNF levels in the fb-A2AR KO hippocampus. This study provides evidence that inactivation of striatal A2ARs facilitates Pavlovian fear conditioning, while inactivation of extrastriatal A2ARs in the forebrain inhibits fear conditioning and also affects anxiety-related behavior. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Effects of hypocretin (orexin) neuronal loss on sleep and extracellular adenosine levels in the basal forebrain

    PubMed Central

    Murillo-Rodriguez, Eric; Liu, Meng; Blanco-Centurion, Carlos; Shiromani, Priyattam J.

    2009-01-01

    Neurons containing the neuropeptide hypocretin (orexin) are localized only in the lateral hypothalamus from where they innervate multiple regions implicated in arousal, including the basal forebrain. HCRT activation of downstream arousal neurons is likely to stimulate release of endogenous factors. One such factor is adenosine (AD), which in the basal forebrain increases with waking and decreases with sleep, and is hypothesized to regulate the waxing and waning of sleep drive. Does loss of HCRT neurons affect AD levels in the basal forebrain? Is the increased sleep that accompanies HCRT loss a consequence of higher AD levels in the basal forebrain? In the present study, we investigate these questions by lesioning the HCRT neurons (hypocretin-2-saporin) and measuring sleep and extracellular levels of AD in the basal forebrain. In separate groups of rats, the neurotoxin HCRT2-SAP or saline were administered locally to the lateral hypothalamus and 80 days later AD and sleep were assessed. Rats given the neurotoxin had a 94% loss of the HCRT neurons. These rats awake less at night, and had more REM sleep, which is consistent with a HCRT hypofunction. These rats also had more sleep after brief periods of sleep deprivation. However, in the lesioned rats, AD levels did not increase with 6h sleep deprivation, whereas such an increase in AD occurred in rats without lesion of the HCRT neurons. These findings indicate that AD levels do not increase with waking in rats with a HCRT lesion, and that the increased sleep in these rats occurs independently of AD levels in the basal forebrain. PMID:18783368

  16. Organization of the avian basal forebrain: chemical anatomy in the parrot (Melopsittacus undulatus).

    PubMed

    Roberts, Todd Freeman; Hall, William Sterling; Brauth, Steven Earle

    2002-12-23

    Hodological, electrophysiological, and ablation studies indicate a role for the basal forebrain in telencephalic vocal control; however, to date the organization of the basal forebrain has not been extensively studied in any nonmammal or nonhuman vocal learning species. To this end the chemical anatomy of the avian basal forebrain was investigated in a vocal learning parrot, the budgerigar (Melopsittacus undulatus). Immunological and histological stains, including choline acetyltransferase, acetylcholinesterase, tyrosine hydroxylase, dopamine and cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein (DARPP)-32, the calcium binding proteins calbindin D-28k and parvalbumin, calcitonin gene-related peptide, iron, substance P, methionine enkephalin, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphotase diaphorase, and arginine vasotocin were used in the present study. We conclude that the ventral paleostriatum (cf. Kitt and Brauth [1981] Neuroscience 6:1551-1566) and adjacent archistriatal regions can be subdivided into several distinct subareas that are chemically comparable to mammalian basal forebrain structures. The nucleus accumbens is histochemically separable into core and shell regions. The nucleus taeniae (TN) is theorized to be homologous to the medial amygdaloid nucleus. The archistriatum pars ventrolateralis (Avl; comparable to the pigeon archistriatum pars dorsalis) is theorized to be a possible homologue of the central amygdaloid nucleus. The TN and Avl are histochemically continuous with the medial aspects of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis and the ventromedial striatum, forming an avian analogue of the extended amygdala. The apparent counterpart in budgerigars of the mammalian nucleus basalis of Meynert consists of a field of cholinergic neurons spanning the basal forebrain. The budgerigar septal region is theorized to be homologous as a field to the mammalian septum. Our results are discussed with regard to both the evolution of the basal forebrain and its role in vocal

  17. Intestinal ischemia in neonates and children.

    PubMed

    Jeican, Ionuţ Isaia; Ichim, Gabriela; Gheban, Dan

    2016-01-01

    The article reviews the intestinal ischemia theme on newborn and children. The intestinal ischemia may be either acute - intestinal infarction (by vascular obstruction or by reduced mesenteric blood flow besides the occlusive mechanism), either chronic. In neonates, acute intestinal ischemia may be caused by aortic thrombosis, volvulus or hypoplastic left heart syndrome. In children, acute intestinal ischemia may be caused by fibromuscular dysplasia, volvulus, abdominal compartment syndrome, Burkitt lymphoma, dermatomyositis (by vascular obstruction) or familial dysautonomia, Addison's disease, situs inversus abdominus (intraoperative), burns, chemotherapy administration (by nonocclusive mesenteric ischemia). Chronic intestinal ischemia is a rare condition in pediatrics and can be seen in abdominal aortic coarctation or hypoplasia, idiopathic infantile arterial calcinosis.

  18. [Retinal ischemia and nitric oxide].

    PubMed

    Neroev, V V; Arkhipova, M M

    2003-01-01

    Retinal ischemia is the main chain in the pathogenesis of vascular diseases of the eye. It was established that nitric oxide (NO) plays the key role in the development of ischemia. Recent understanding of the NO role, as a universal regulator of the cellular and tissue metabolism, is presented. The authors' and published data were used to design a scheme of pathogenesis of retinal ischemia with regard for the NO role. NO can produce both positive and negative effects depending on a stage of the process, NO concentration and on a number of other factors if they are present. Initial stages of hypoxia/ischemia are accompanied by an activation of all forms of NO-synthases (NOS) caused by the influence of biologically active substances (cytokines, prostaglandins, serotonin, bradykinin, glycolisis suboxide products etc.). The activation of inducible NOS, which synthesize a bigger quantity of NO possessing a direct cytotoxic action and contributing to the production of highly toxic radical of peroxinitrit, is in the focus of attention. The damage of cellular structures due to free-radical processes leads to the development of endothelial, macrophage and thrombocyte malfunctions, which manifest itself through a reduced activity of endothelial NOS and through disruption of NO-dependent processes (vasospasm, an increased aggregation of platelets and a reduced fibrinolytic activity). A sharp reduction of NO synthesis substrate (L-arginine) is observed in patients with retinal ischemia. The aggravation of ischemia causes a decrease of NO synthesis due to an exhaustion of L-arginine and its intensified consumption in the course of free-radical processes. The use of NO-inhibitors and of NO-donors at different stages of retinal ischemia prevents the development of neovascularization and proliferation.

  19. Polyethylene glygol conjugated superoxide dismutase (PEG-SOD) improves recovery of hypercapnia cerebral blood flow (CBF) reactivity following transient global ischemia in piglets

    SciTech Connect

    Traystman, R.J.; Kirsch, J.R.; Helfaer, M.A.; Haun, S.E. )

    1991-03-15

    This study tested the hypothesis that alteration in hypercapnic cerebral blood flow (CBF) reactivity is due to oxygen-derived free radical mediated vascular damage and therefore could be inhibited by treatment with PEG-SOD. Pentobarbital anesthetized piglets were mechanically ventilated and hemodynamically monitored. CBF was measured at PaCO{sub 2} of approximately 25, 40 and 55 mmHg. Reactivity was tested in all piglets prior to and 2 hours following reperfusion from global ischemia. Control piglets received PEG prior to ischemia and at reperfusion. Experimental piglets received either PEG-SOD prior to ischemia and PEG at reperfusion or PEG prior to ischemia and PEG-SOD at reperfusion. During reperfusion cerebral perfusion pressure was maintained constant between groups by intravenous infusion of epinephrine. Pre-ischemic hypercapnic reactivity was not different between groups. At 2 hr reperfusion hypercapnic CBF reactivity in control piglets was diminished to forebrain and brainstem but hypercapnic reactivity was not different than preischemic values in either group receiving PEG-SOD. The authors conclude that administration of PEG-SOD, either prior to or following transient global ischemia, improves recovery of post-ischemic hypercapnic reactivity in piglets. This implicates oxygen-derived free radicals as important mediators of reperfusion injury in brain.

  20. Assessment at the single-cell level identifies neuronal glutathione depletion as both a cause and effect of ischemia-reperfusion oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Won, Seok Joon; Kim, Ji-Eun; Cittolin-Santos, Giordano Fabricio; Swanson, Raymond A

    2015-05-06

    Oxidative stress contributes to neuronal death in brain ischemia-reperfusion. Tissue levels of the endogenous antioxidant glutathione (GSH) are depleted during ischemia-reperfusion, but it is unknown whether this depletion is a cause or an effect of oxidative stress, and whether it occurs in neurons or other cell types. We used immunohistochemical methods to evaluate glutathione, superoxide, and oxidative stress in mouse hippocampal neurons after transient forebrain ischemia. GSH levels in CA1 pyramidal neurons were normally high relative to surrounding neuropil, and exhibited a time-dependent decrease during the first few hours of reperfusion. Colabeling for superoxide in the neurons showed a concurrent increase in detectable superoxide over this interval. To identify cause-effect relationships between these changes, we independently manipulated superoxide production and GSH metabolism during reperfusion. Mice in which NADPH oxidase activity was blocked to prevent superoxide production showed preservation of neuronal GSH content, thus demonstrating that neuronal GSH depletion is result of oxidative stress. Conversely, mice in which neuronal GSH levels were maintained by N-acetyl cysteine treatment during reperfusion showed less neuronal superoxide signal, oxidative stress, and neuronal death. At 3 d following ischemia, GSH content in reactive astrocytes and microglia was increased in the hippocampal CA1 relative to surviving neurons. Results of these studies demonstrate that neuronal GSH depletion is both a result and a cause of neuronal oxidative stress after ischemia-reperfusion, and that postischemic restoration of neuronal GSH levels can be neuroprotective.

  1. Eph/Ephrin signalling maintains eye field segregation from adjacent neural plate territories during forebrain morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Cavodeassi, Florencia; Ivanovitch, Kenzo; Wilson, Stephen W.

    2013-01-01

    During forebrain morphogenesis, there is extensive reorganisation of the cells destined to form the eyes, telencephalon and diencephalon. Little is known about the molecular mechanisms that regulate region-specific behaviours and that maintain the coherence of cell populations undergoing specific morphogenetic processes. In this study, we show that the activity of the Eph/Ephrin signalling pathway maintains segregation between the prospective eyes and adjacent regions of the anterior neural plate during the early stages of forebrain morphogenesis in zebrafish. Several Ephrins and Ephs are expressed in complementary domains in the prospective forebrain and combinatorial abrogation of their activity results in incomplete segregation of the eyes and telencephalon and in defective evagination of the optic vesicles. Conversely, expression of exogenous Ephs or Ephrins in regions of the prospective forebrain where they are not usually expressed changes the adhesion properties of the cells, resulting in segregation to the wrong domain without changing their regional fate. The failure of eye morphogenesis in rx3 mutants is accompanied by a loss of complementary expression of Ephs and Ephrins, suggesting that this pathway is activated downstream of the regional fate specification machinery to establish boundaries between domains undergoing different programmes of morphogenesis. PMID:24026122

  2. Basal forebrain moderates the magnitude of task-dependent amygdala functional connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Knodt, Annchen R.; Hariri, Ahmad R.

    2015-01-01

    Animal studies reveal that the amygdala promotes attention and emotional memory, in part, by driving activity in downstream target regions including the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and hippocampus. Prior work has demonstrated that the amygdala influences these regions directly through monosynaptic glutamatergic signaling, and indirectly by driving activity of the cholinergic basal forebrain and subsequent downstream acetylcholine release. Yet to date, no work has addressed the functional relevance of the cholinergic basal forebrain in facilitating signaling from the amygdala in humans. We set out to determine how blood oxygen level-dependent signal within the amygdala and cholinergic basal forebrain interact to predict neural responses within downstream targets. Here, we use functional connectivity analyses to demonstrate that the cholinergic basal forebrain moderates increased amygdala connectivity with both the PFC and the hippocampus during the processing of biologically salient stimuli in humans. We further demonstrate that functional variation within the choline transporter gene predicts the magnitude of this modulatory effect. Collectively, our results provide novel evidence for the importance of cholinergic signaling in modulating neural pathways supporting arousal, attention and memory in humans. Further, our results may shed light on prior association studies linking functional variation within the choline transporter gene and diagnoses of major depression and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. PMID:24847112

  3. Identification of the optic recess region as a morphogenetic entity in the zebrafish forebrain.

    PubMed

    Affaticati, Pierre; Yamamoto, Kei; Rizzi, Barbara; Bureau, Charlotte; Peyriéras, Nadine; Pasqualini, Catherine; Demarque, Michaël; Vernier, Philippe

    2015-03-04

    Regionalization is a critical, highly conserved step in the development of the vertebrate brain. Discrepancies exist in how regionalization of the anterior vertebrate forebrain is conceived since the "preoptic area" is proposed to be a part of the telencephalon in tetrapods but not in teleost fish. To gain insight into this complex morphogenesis, formation of the anterior forebrain was analyzed in 3D over time in zebrafish embryos, combining visualization of proliferation and differentiation markers, with that of developmental genes. We found that the region containing the preoptic area behaves as a coherent morphogenetic entity, organized around the optic recess and located between telencephalon and hypothalamus. This optic recess region (ORR) makes clear borders with its neighbor areas and expresses a specific set of genes (dlx2a, sim1a and otpb). We thus propose that the anterior forebrain (secondary prosencephalon) in teleosts contains three morphogenetic entities (telencephalon, ORR and hypothalamus), instead of two (telencephalon and hypothalamus). The ORR in teleosts could correspond to "telencephalic stalk area" and "alar hypothalamus" in tetrapods, resolving current inconsistencies in the comparison of basal forebrain among vertebrates.

  4. TrkA Gene Ablation in Basal Forebrain Results in Dysfunction of the Cholinergic Circuitry

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Ortiz, Efrain; Yui, Daishi; Song, Dongli; Li, Yun; Rubenstein, John L.; Reichardt, Louis F.; Parada, Luis F.

    2012-01-01

    Dysfunction of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons (BFCNs) is an early pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Numerous studies have indicated that nerve growth factor (NGF) supports survival and phenotypic differentiation of BFCNs. Consistent with a potential link to AD pathogenesis, TrkA, a NGF receptor, is expressed in cholinergic forebrain neuronal populations including those in basal forebrain (BF) and striatum, and is markedly reduced in individuals with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) without dementia and early-stage AD. To investigate the role of TrkA in the development, connectivity, and function of the BF cholinergic system and its contribution to AD pathology, we have generated a forebrain-specific conditional TrkA knockout mouse line. Our findings show a key role for TrkA signaling in establishing the BF cholinergic circuitry through the ERK pathway, and demonstrate that the normal developmental increase of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) expression becomes critically dependent on TrkA signaling before neuronal connections are established. Moreover, the anatomical and physiological deficits caused by lack of TrkA signaling in BFCNs have selective impact on cognitive activity. These data demonstrate that TrkA loss results in cholinergic BF dysfunction and cognitive decline that is reminiscent of MCI and early AD. PMID:22442072

  5. Loss of the tailless gene affects forebrain development and emotional behavior

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Kristine; Thiels, Edda; Monaghan, A. Paula

    2009-01-01

    We are studying the role of the evolutionarily conserved tlx gene in forebrain development in mice. Tlx is expressed in the ventricular zone that gives rise to neurons and glia of the forebrain. We have shown by mutating the tlx gene in mice, that in the absence of this transcription factor, mutant animals survive, but suffer specific anatomical defects in the limbic system. Because of these developmentally induced structural changes, mice with a mutation in the tlx gene can function, but exhibit extreme behavioral pathology. Mice show heightened aggressiveness, excitability, and poor cognition. In this article, we present a summary of our findings on the cellular and behavioral changes in the forebrain of mutant animals. We show that absence of the tlx gene leads to abnormal proliferation and differentiation of progenitor cells (PCs) in the forebrain from embryonic day 9 (E9). These abnormalities lead to hypoplasia of superficial cortical layers and subsets of GABAergic interneurons in the neocortex. We examined the behavior of mutant animals in three tests for anxiety/fear: the open field, the elevated plus maze, and fear conditioning. Mutant animals are less anxious and less fearful when assessed in the elevated plus and open-field paradigm. In addition, mutant animals do not condition to either the tone or the context in the fear-conditioning paradigm. These animals, therefore, provide a genetic tool to delineate structure/function relationships in defined regions of the brain and decipher how their disruption leads to behavioral abnormalities. PMID:12527005

  6. Fgf19 regulated by Hh signaling is required for zebrafish forebrain development.

    PubMed

    Miyake, Ayumi; Nakayama, Yoshiaki; Konishi, Morichika; Itoh, Nobuyuki

    2005-12-01

    Fibroblast growth factor (Fgf) signaling plays important roles in brain development. Fgf3 and Fgf8 are crucial for the formation of the forebrain and hindbrain. Fgf8 is also required for the midbrain to form. Here, we identified zebrafish Fgf19 and examined its roles in brain development by knocking down Fgf19 function. We found that Fgf19 expressed in the forebrain, midbrain and hindbrain was involved in cell proliferation and cell survival during embryonic brain development. Fgf19 was also essential for development of the ventral telencephalon and diencephalon. Regional specification is linked to cell type specification. Fgf19 was also essential for the specification of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic interneurons and oligodendrocytes generated in the ventral telencephalon and diencephalon. The cross talk between Fgf and Hh signaling is critical for brain development. In the forebrain, Fgf19 expression was down-regulated on inhibition of Hh but not of Fgf3/Fgf8, and overexpression of Fgf19 rescued partially the phenotype on inhibition of Hh. The present findings indicate that Fgf19 signaling is crucial for forebrain development by interacting with Hh and provide new insights into the roles of Fgf signaling in brain development.

  7. GABAergic terminals are a source of galanin to modulate cholinergic neuron development in the neonatal forebrain.

    PubMed

    Keimpema, Erik; Zheng, Kang; Barde, Swapnali Shantaram; Berghuis, Paul; Dobszay, Márton B; Schnell, Robert; Mulder, Jan; Luiten, Paul G M; Xu, Zhiqing David; Runesson, Johan; Langel, Ülo; Lu, Bai; Hökfelt, Tomas; Harkany, Tibor

    2014-12-01

    The distribution and (patho-)physiological role of neuropeptides in the adult and aging brain have been extensively studied. Galanin is an inhibitory neuropeptide that can coexist with γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the adult forebrain. However, galanin's expression sites, mode of signaling, impact on neuronal morphology, and colocalization with amino acid neurotransmitters during brain development are less well understood. Here, we show that galaninergic innervation of cholinergic projection neurons, which preferentially express galanin receptor 2 (GalR2) in the neonatal mouse basal forebrain, develops by birth. Nerve growth factor (NGF), known to modulate cholinergic morphogenesis, increases GalR2 expression. GalR2 antagonism (M871) in neonates reduces the in vivo expression and axonal targeting of the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT), indispensable for cholinergic neurotransmission. During cholinergic neuritogenesis in vitro, GalR2 can recruit Rho-family GTPases to induce the extension of a VAChT-containing primary neurite, the prospective axon. In doing so, GalR2 signaling dose-dependently modulates directional filopodial growth and antagonizes NGF-induced growth cone differentiation. Galanin accumulates in GABA-containing nerve terminals in the neonatal basal forebrain, suggesting its contribution to activity-driven cholinergic development during the perinatal period. Overall, our data define the cellular specificity and molecular complexity of galanin action in the developing basal forebrain. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Extensive Lesions of Cholinergic Basal Forebrain Neurons Do Not Impair Spatial Working Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vuckovich, Joseph A.; Semel, Mara E.; Baxter, Mark G.

    2004-01-01

    A recent study suggests that lesions to all major areas of the cholinergic basal forebrain in the rat (medial septum, horizontal limb of the diagonal band of Broca, and nucleus basalis magnocellularis) impair a spatial working memory task. However, this experiment used a surgical technique that may have damaged cerebellar Purkinje cells. The…

  9. Forebrain metabolic activation induced by the repetition of audiogenic seizures in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Pereira de Vasconcelos, A; Vergnes, M; Boyet, S; Marescaux, C; Nehlig, A

    1997-07-11

    In Wistar rats susceptible to audiogenic seizures (Wistar AS) inbred in our laboratory, the exposure to an intense sound induces an epileptic seizure characterized by a running episode followed by a tonic phase showing the major involvement of brainstem structures. After 10-20 sound-induced seizures, development of facial and forelimb clonus and/or tonic-clonic seizures characterize the generalization from brainstem to the forebrain as a result of seizure repetition. In order to specify the anatomical substrates of repeated audiogenic seizures in Wistar AS, we used the 2-deoxyglucose (2DG) technique over a 5 min period to map the midbrain and forebrain structures activated by audiogenic seizures before and after seizure repetition. In naive Wistar AS, six of the 22 structures showed a significant 20-56% increase in relative optical densities compared to non-epileptic controls; these were central and medial amygdala nuclei, perirhinal cortex, medial septum, subthalamic and caudate nuclei. In kindled Wistar AS, 12 additional structures showed a significant 16-121% increase in 2DG labeling. These structures were the substantia nigra, all layers of the hippocampus, the basolateral amygdala, three thalamic nuclei, the frontal motor and prefrontal cortices. In conclusion, the metabolic activation of midbrain and forebrain areas in kindled versus naive Wistar AS rats reflects the changes in the nature of the seizures and the involvement of these structures in the spread of seizure activity from the brainstem to the forebrain during seizure repetition.

  10. Extensive Lesions of Cholinergic Basal Forebrain Neurons Do Not Impair Spatial Working Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vuckovich, Joseph A.; Semel, Mara E.; Baxter, Mark G.

    2004-01-01

    A recent study suggests that lesions to all major areas of the cholinergic basal forebrain in the rat (medial septum, horizontal limb of the diagonal band of Broca, and nucleus basalis magnocellularis) impair a spatial working memory task. However, this experiment used a surgical technique that may have damaged cerebellar Purkinje cells. The…

  11. TASK Channels on Basal Forebrain Cholinergic Neurons Modulate Electrocortical Signatures of Arousal by Histamine

    PubMed Central

    Vu, Michael T.; Du, Guizhi; Bayliss, Douglas A.

    2015-01-01

    Basal forebrain cholinergic neurons are the main source of cortical acetylcholine, and their activation by histamine elicits cortical arousal. TWIK-like acid-sensitive K+ (TASK) channels modulate neuronal excitability and are expressed on basal forebrain cholinergic neurons, but the role of TASK channels in the histamine-basal forebrain cholinergic arousal circuit is unknown. We first expressed TASK channel subunits and histamine Type 1 receptors in HEK cells. Application of histamine in vitro inhibited the acid-sensitive K+ current, indicating a functionally coupled signaling mechanism. We then studied the role of TASK channels in modulating electrocortical activity in vivo using freely behaving wild-type (n = 12) and ChAT-Cre:TASKf/f mice (n = 12), the latter lacking TASK-1/3 channels on cholinergic neurons. TASK channel deletion on cholinergic neurons significantly altered endogenous electroencephalogram oscillations in multiple frequency bands. We then identified the effect of TASK channel deletion during microperfusion of histamine into the basal forebrain. In non-rapid eye movement sleep, TASK channel deletion on cholinergic neurons significantly attenuated the histamine-induced increase in 30–50 Hz activity, consistent with TASK channels contributing to histamine action on basal forebrain cholinergic neurons. In contrast, during active wakefulness, histamine significantly increased 30–50 Hz activity in ChAT-Cre:TASKf/f mice but not wild-type mice, showing that the histamine response depended upon the prevailing cortical arousal state. In summary, we identify TASK channel modulation in response to histamine receptor activation in vitro, as well as a role of TASK channels on cholinergic neurons in modulating endogenous oscillations in the electroencephalogram and the electrocortical response to histamine at the basal forebrain in vivo. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Attentive states and cognitive function are associated with the generation of γ EEG activity

  12. [Recurrent intestinal ischemia due to factor VIII].

    PubMed

    Castellanos Monedero, Jesús Javier; Legaz Huidobro, María Luisa; Galindo Andugar, María Angeles; Rodríguez Pérez, Alvaro; Mantrana del Valle, José María

    2008-01-01

    Intestinal ischemia is difficult to diagnose and can be caused by several etiologic processes. We report the case of a female patient with recurrent bowel ischemia due to small vessel thrombosis, which is caused by factor VIII, a procoagulant factor.

  13. ACR Appropriateness Criteria(®) Radiologic Management of Mesenteric Ischemia.

    PubMed

    Fidelman, Nicholas; AbuRahma, Ali F; Cash, Brooks D; Kapoor, Baljendra S; Knuttinen, M-Grace; Minocha, Jeet; Rochon, Paul J; Shaw, Colette M; Ray, Charles E; Lorenz, Jonathan M

    2017-05-01

    Mesenteric vascular insufficiency is a serious medical condition that may lead to bowel infarction, morbidity, and mortality that may approach 50%. Recommended therapy for acute mesenteric ischemia includes aspiration embolectomy, transcatheter thrombolysis, and angioplasty with or without stenting for the treatment of underlying arterial stenosis. Nonocclusive mesenteric ischemia may respond to transarterial infusion of vasodilators such as nitroglycerin, papaverine, glucagon, and prostaglandin E1. Recommended therapy for chronic mesenteric ischemia includes angioplasty with or without stent placement and, if an endovascular approach is not possible, surgical bypass or endarterectomy. The diagnosis of median arcuate ligament syndrome is controversial, but surgical release may be appropriate depending on the clinical situation. Venous mesenteric ischemia may respond to systemic anticoagulation alone. Transhepatic or transjugular superior mesenteric vein catheterization and thrombolytic infusion can be offered depending on the severity of symptoms, condition of the patient, and response to systemic anticoagulation. Adjunct transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt creation can be considered for outflow improvement. The American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed annually by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and revision include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer-reviewed journals and the application of well-established methodologies (RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method and Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation or GRADE) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures for specific clinical scenarios. In those instances where evidence is lacking or equivocal, expert opinion may supplement the available evidence to recommend imaging or treatment. Copyright © 2017 American College

  14. Optogenetic Dissection of the Basal Forebrain Neuromodulatory Control of Cortical Activation, Plasticity, and Cognition.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shih-Chieh; Brown, Ritchie E; Hussain Shuler, Marshall G; Petersen, Carl C H; Kepecs, Adam

    2015-10-14

    The basal forebrain (BF) houses major ascending projections to the entire neocortex that have long been implicated in arousal, learning, and attention. The disruption of the BF has been linked with major neurological disorders, such as coma and Alzheimer's disease, as well as in normal cognitive aging. Although it is best known for its cholinergic neurons, the BF is in fact an anatomically and neurochemically complex structure. Recent studies using transgenic mouse lines to target specific BF cell types have led to a renaissance in the study of the BF and are beginning to yield new insights about cell-type-specific circuit mechanisms during behavior. These approaches enable us to determine the behavioral conditions under which cholinergic and noncholinergic BF neurons are activated and how they control cortical processing to influence behavior. Here we discuss recent advances that have expanded our knowledge about this poorly understood brain region and laid the foundation for future cell-type-specific manipulations to modulate arousal, attention, and cortical plasticity in neurological disorders. Although the basal forebrain is best known for, and often equated with, acetylcholine-containing neurons that provide most of the cholinergic innervation of the neocortex, it is in fact an anatomically and neurochemically complex structure. Recent studies using transgenic mouse lines to target specific cell types in the basal forebrain have led to a renaissance in this field and are beginning to dissect circuit mechanisms in the basal forebrain during behavior. This review discusses recent advances in the roles of basal forebrain cholinergic and noncholinergic neurons in cognition via their dynamic modulation of cortical activity. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/3513896-08$15.00/0.

  15. Optogenetic Dissection of the Basal Forebrain Neuromodulatory Control of Cortical Activation, Plasticity, and Cognition

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Ritchie E.; Hussain Shuler, Marshall G.; Petersen, Carl C.H.; Kepecs, Adam

    2015-01-01

    The basal forebrain (BF) houses major ascending projections to the entire neocortex that have long been implicated in arousal, learning, and attention. The disruption of the BF has been linked with major neurological disorders, such as coma and Alzheimer's disease, as well as in normal cognitive aging. Although it is best known for its cholinergic neurons, the BF is in fact an anatomically and neurochemically complex structure. Recent studies using transgenic mouse lines to target specific BF cell types have led to a renaissance in the study of the BF and are beginning to yield new insights about cell-type-specific circuit mechanisms during behavior. These approaches enable us to determine the behavioral conditions under which cholinergic and noncholinergic BF neurons are activated and how they control cortical processing to influence behavior. Here we discuss recent advances that have expanded our knowledge about this poorly understood brain region and laid the foundation for future cell-type-specific manipulations to modulate arousal, attention, and cortical plasticity in neurological disorders. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Although the basal forebrain is best known for, and often equated with, acetylcholine-containing neurons that provide most of the cholinergic innervation of the neocortex, it is in fact an anatomically and neurochemically complex structure. Recent studies using transgenic mouse lines to target specific cell types in the basal forebrain have led to a renaissance in this field and are beginning to dissect circuit mechanisms in the basal forebrain during behavior. This review discusses recent advances in the roles of basal forebrain cholinergic and noncholinergic neurons in cognition via their dynamic modulation of cortical activity. PMID:26468190

  16. TDP-43 pathology in the basal forebrain and hypothalamus of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Cykowski, Matthew D; Takei, Hidehiro; Schulz, Paul E; Appel, Stanley H; Powell, Suzanne Z

    2014-12-24

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is a neurodegenerative disease characterized clinically by motor symptoms including limb weakness, dysarthria, dysphagia, and respiratory compromise, and pathologically by inclusions of transactive response DNA-binding protein 43 kDa (TDP-43). Patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis also may demonstrate non-motor symptoms and signs of autonomic and energy dysfunction as hypermetabolism and weight loss that suggest the possibility of pathology in the forebrain, including hypothalamus. However, this region has received little investigation in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. In this study, the frequency, topography, and clinical associations of TDP-43 inclusion pathology in the basal forebrain and hypothalamus were examined in 33 patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: 25 men and 8 women; mean age at death of 62.7 years, median disease duration of 3.1 years (range of 1.3 to 9.8 years). TDP-43 pathology was present in 11 patients (33.3%), including components in both basal forebrain (n=10) and hypothalamus (n=7). This pathology was associated with non-motor system TDP-43 pathology (Χ2=17.5, p=0.00003) and bulbar symptoms at onset (Χ2=4.04, p=0.044), but not age or disease duration. Furthermore, TDP-43 pathology in the lateral hypothalamic area was associated with reduced body mass index (W=11, p=0.023). This is the first systematic demonstration of pathologic involvement of the basal forebrain and hypothalamus in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Furthermore, the findings suggest that involvement of the basal forebrain and hypothalamus has significant phenotypic associations in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, including site of symptom onset, as well as deficits in energy metabolism with loss of body mass index.

  17. Rodent models of cerebral ischemia

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsberg, M.D.; Busto, R. )

    1989-12-01

    The use of physiologically regulated, reproducible animal models is crucial to the study of ischemic brain injury--both the mechanisms governing its occurrence and potential therapeutic strategies. Several laboratory rodent species (notably rats and gerbils), which are readily available at relatively low cost, are highly suitable for the investigation of cerebral ischemia and have been widely employed for this purpose. We critically examine and summarize several rodent models of transient global ischemia, resulting in selective neuronal injury within vulnerable brain regions, and focal ischemia, typically giving rise to localized brain infarction. We explore the utility of individual models and emphasize the necessity for meticulous experimental control of those variables that modulate the severity of ischemic brain injury.169 references.

  18. Animal models of cerebral ischemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodanovich, M. Yu.; Kisel, A. A.

    2015-11-01

    Cerebral ischemia remains one of the most frequent causes of death and disability worldwide. Animal models are necessary to understand complex molecular mechanisms of brain damage as well as for the development of new therapies for stroke. This review considers a certain range of animal models of cerebral ischemia, including several types of focal and global ischemia. Since animal models vary in specificity for the human disease which they reproduce, the complexity of surgery, infarct size, reliability of reproduction for statistical analysis, and adequate models need to be chosen according to the aim of a study. The reproduction of a particular animal model needs to be evaluated using appropriate tools, including the behavioral assessment of injury and non-invasive and post-mortem control of brain damage. These problems also have been summarized in the review.

  19. Iloprost reduces myocardial edema in a rat model of myocardial ischemia reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Caliskan, A; Yavuz, C; Karahan, O; Yazici, S; Guclu, O; Demirtas, S; Mavitas, B

    2014-05-01

    Myocardial ischemia severely reduces myocyte longevity and function. Extensive interstitial edema and cell damage occur as a result of myocardial reperfusion injury. Current therapies are directed at prevention of ischemia-induced damage to cardiac tissue. Iloprost is a novel pharmaceutical agent for the treatment of ischemia. Twenty rats were segregated into four experimental groups. The procedure control group consisted of four rats undergoing a sham operation. The remaining 16 rats were divided into two equal groups. The first group (control group) received a continuous intravenous infusion of physiological serum immediately prior to the procedure. Iloprost was administered by a continuous intravenous infusion into the right jugular vein at an infusion rate of 100 ng/kg/min for 30 minutes prior to reperfusion in the experimental group (study group). Following the infusion treatments, ligation of the left coronary artery was conducted for 30 minutes to induce myocardial ischemia. The rats were euthanized 24 hours after reperfusion and cardiac tissue was harvested from all specimens for analysis. Histological examination revealed three myocardial tissue specimens with grade II damage and five myocardial tissue specimens with grade III reperfusion injury in the control group. However, the study group consisted of two grade III myocardial tissue specimens, five grade II myocardial tissue specimens and one grade I myocardial tissue specimen. Moreover, a statistically significant reduction in myocardial edema was observed in the study group (p=0.022). Our results support the hypothesis that iloprost enhances protection against cardiac ischemia reperfusion injury. This protective effect may be associated with vasodilation, antioxidant or anti-edema mechanisms.

  20. Controversies in cardiovascular care: silent myocardial ischemia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollenberg, N. K.

    1987-01-01

    The objective evidence of silent myocardial ischemia--ischemia in the absence of classical chest pain--includes ST-segment shifts (usually depression), momentary left ventricular failure, and perfusion defects on scintigraphic studies. Assessment of angina patients with 24-hour ambulatory monitoring may uncover episodes of silent ischemia, the existence of which may give important information regarding prognosis and may help structure a more effective therapeutic regimen. The emerging recognition of silent ischemia as a significant clinical entity may eventually result in an expansion of current therapy--not only to ameliorate chest pain, but to minimize or eliminate ischemia in the absence of chest pain.

  1. Controversies in cardiovascular care: silent myocardial ischemia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollenberg, N. K.

    1987-01-01

    The objective evidence of silent myocardial ischemia--ischemia in the absence of classical chest pain--includes ST-segment shifts (usually depression), momentary left ventricular failure, and perfusion defects on scintigraphic studies. Assessment of angina patients with 24-hour ambulatory monitoring may uncover episodes of silent ischemia, the existence of which may give important information regarding prognosis and may help structure a more effective therapeutic regimen. The emerging recognition of silent ischemia as a significant clinical entity may eventually result in an expansion of current therapy--not only to ameliorate chest pain, but to minimize or eliminate ischemia in the absence of chest pain.

  2. Neuronal amyloid-β accumulation within cholinergic basal forebrain in ageing and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Baker-Nigh, Alaina; Vahedi, Shahrooz; Davis, Elena Goetz; Weintraub, Sandra; Bigio, Eileen H; Klein, William L; Geula, Changiz

    2015-06-01

    The mechanisms that contribute to selective vulnerability of the magnocellular basal forebrain cholinergic neurons in neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease, are not fully understood. Because age is the primary risk factor for Alzheimer's disease, mechanisms of interest must include age-related alterations in protein expression, cell type-specific markers and pathology. The present study explored the extent and characteristics of intraneuronal amyloid-β accumulation, particularly of the fibrillogenic 42-amino acid isoform, within basal forebrain cholinergic neurons in normal young, normal aged and Alzheimer's disease brains as a potential contributor to the selective vulnerability of these neurons using immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis. Amyloid-β1-42 immunoreactivity was observed in the entire cholinergic neuronal population regardless of age or Alzheimer's disease diagnosis. The magnitude of this accumulation as revealed by optical density measures was significantly greater than that in cortical pyramidal neurons, and magnocellular neurons in the globus pallidus did not demonstrate a similar extent of amyloid immunoreactivity. Immunoblot analysis with a panel of amyloid-β antibodies confirmed accumulation of high concentration of amyloid-β in basal forebrain early in adult life. There was no age- or Alzheimer-related alteration in total amyloid-β content within this region. In contrast, an increase in the large molecular weight soluble oligomer species was observed with a highly oligomer-specific antibody in aged and Alzheimer brains when compared with the young. Similarly, intermediate molecular weight oligomeric species displayed an increase in aged and Alzheimer brains when compared with the young using two amyloid-β42 antibodies. Compared to cortical homogenates, small molecular weight oligomeric species were lower and intermediate species were enriched in basal forebrain in ageing and Alzheimer's disease. Regional and age

  3. Sirt1 in cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Koronowski, Kevin B.; Perez-Pinzon, Miguel A.

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral ischemia is among the leading causes of death worldwide. It is characterized by a lack of blood flow to the brain that results in cell death and damage, ultimately causing motor, sensory, and cognitive impairments. Today, clinical treatment of cerebral ischemia, mostly stroke and cardiac arrest, is limited and new neuroprotective therapies are desperately needed. The Sirtuin family of oxidized nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+)-dependent deacylases has been shown to govern several processes within the central nervous system as well as to possess neuroprotective properties in a variety of pathological conditions such as Alzheimer’s Disease, Parkinson’s Disease, and Huntington’s Disease, among others. Recently, Sirt1 in particular has been identified as a mediator of cerebral ischemia, with potential as a possible therapeutic target. To gather studies relevant to this topic, we used PubMed and previous reviews to locate, select, and resynthesize the lines of evidence presented here. In this review, we will first describe some functions of Sirt1 in the brain, mainly neurodevelopment, learning and memory, and metabolic regulation. Second, we will discuss the experimental evidence that has implicated Sirt1 as a key protein in the regulation of cerebral ischemia as well as a potential target for the induction of ischemic tolerance. PMID:26819971

  4. Hypothermia-induced ischemic tolerance is associated with Drp1 inhibition in cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury of mice.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yingying; Liu, Xiaojie; Zhao, Jie; Tan, Xueying; Liu, Bing; Zhang, Gaofeng; Sun, Lixin; Han, Dengyang; Chen, Huailong; Wang, Mingshan

    2016-09-01

    Excessive mitochondrial fission activation has been implicated in cerebral ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury. Hypothermia is effective in preventing cerebral ischemic damage. However, effects of hypothermia on ischemia-induced mitochondrial fission activation is not well known. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate whether hypothermia protect the brain by inhibiting mitochondrial fission-related proteins activation following cerebral IR injury. Adult male C57BL/6 mice were subjected to transient forebrain ischemia induced by 15min of bilateral common carotid artery occlusion (BCCAO). Mice were divided into three groups (n=48 each): Hypothermia (HT) group, with mild hypothermia (32-34°C) for 4h; Normothermia (NT) group, similarly as HT group except for cooling; Sham group, with vessels exposed but without occlusion or cooling. Hematoxylin and eosin (HE), Nissl staining, Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining and behavioral testing (n=6 each) demonstrated that hypothermia significantly decreased ischemia-induced neuronal injury. The expressions of Dynamin related protein 1 (Drp1) and Cytochrome C (Cyto C) (n=6 each) in mice hippocampus were measured at 3, 6, 24, and 72h of reperfusion. IR injury significantly increased expressions of total Drp1, phosphorylated Drp1 (P-Drp1 S616) and Cyto C under normothermia. However, mild hypothermia inhibited Drp1 activation and Cyto C cytosolic release, preserved neural cells integrity and reduced neuronal necrosis and apoptosis. These findings indicated that mild hypothermia-induced neuroprotective effects against ischemia-reperfusion injury is associated with suppressing mitochondrial fission-related proteins activation and apoptosis execution.

  5. Oxidative stress in brain ischemia.

    PubMed

    Love, S

    1999-01-01

    Brain ischemia initiates a complex cascade of metabolic events, several of which involve the generation of nitrogen and oxygen free radicals. These free radicals and related reactive chemical species mediate much of damage that occurs after transient brain ischemia, and in the penumbral region of infarcts caused by permanent ischemia. Nitric oxide, a water- and lipid-soluble free radical, is generated by the action of nitric oxide synthases. Ischemia causes a surge in nitric oxide synthase 1 (NOS 1) activity in neurons and, possibly, glia, increased NOS 3 activity in vascular endothelium, and later an increase in NOS 2 activity in a range of cells including infiltrating neutrophils and macrophages, activated microglia and astrocytes. The effects of ischemia on the activity of NOS 1, a Ca2+-dependent enzyme, are thought to be secondary to reversal of glutamate reuptake at synapses, activation of NMDA receptors, and resulting elevation of intracellular Ca2+. The up-regulation of NOS 2 activity is mediated by transcriptional inducers. In the context of brain ischemia, the activity of NOS 1 and NOS 2 is broadly deleterious, and their inhibition or inactivation is neuroprotective. However, the production of nitric oxide in blood vessels by NOS 3, which, like NOS 1, is Ca2+-dependent, causes vasodilatation and improves blood flow in the penumbral region of brain infarcts. In addition to causing the synthesis of nitric oxide, brain ischemia leads to the generation of superoxide, through the action of nitric oxide synthases, xanthine oxidase, leakage from the mitochondrial electron transport chain, and other mechanisms. Nitric oxide and superoxide are themselves highly reactive but can also combine to form a highly toxic anion, peroxynitrite. The toxicity of the free radicals and peroxynitrite results from their modification of macromolecules, especially DNA, and from the resulting induction of apoptotic and necrotic pathways. The mode of cell death that prevails probably

  6. Development of glucocorticoid receptor regulation in the rat forebrain: Implications for adverse effects of glucocorticoids in preterm infants

    EPA Science Inventory

    Glucocorticoids are the consensus treatment to avoid respiratory distress in preterm infants but there is accumulating evidence that these agents evoke long-term neurobehavioral deficits. Earlier, we showed that the developing rat forebrain is far more sensitive to glucocorticoi...

  7. Lack of the murine homeobox gene Hesx1 leads to a posterior transformation of the anterior forebrain

    PubMed Central

    Andoniadou, Cynthia L.; Signore, Massimo; Sajedi, Ezat; Gaston-Massuet, Carles; Kelberman, Daniel; Burns, Alan J.; Itasaki, Nobue; Dattani, Mehul; Martinez-Barbera, Juan Pedro

    2008-01-01

    The homeobox gene Hesx1 is an essential repressor that is required within the anterior neural plate for normal forebrain development in mouse and humans. Combining genetic cell labelling and marker analyses, we demonstrate that the absence of Hesx1 leads to a posterior transformation of the anterior forebrain (AFB) during mouse development. Our data suggest that the mechanism underlying this transformation is the ectopic activation of Wnt/β-catenin signalling within the Hesx1 expression domain in the AFB. When ectopically expressed in the developing mouse embryo, Hesx1 alone cannot alter the normal fate of posterior neural tissue. However, conditional expression of Hesx1 within the AFB can rescue the forebrain defects observed in the Hesx1 mutants. The results presented here provide new insights into the function of Hesx1 in forebrain formation. PMID:17360769

  8. Differential effects of light and feeding on circadian organization of peripheral clocks in a forebrain Bmal1 mutant.

    PubMed

    Izumo, Mariko; Pejchal, Martina; Schook, Andrew C; Lange, Ryan P; Walisser, Jacqueline A; Sato, Takashi R; Wang, Xiaozhong; Bradfield, Christopher A; Takahashi, Joseph S

    2014-12-19

    In order to assess the contribution of a central clock in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) to circadian behavior and the organization of peripheral clocks, we generated forebrain/SCN-specific Bmal1 knockout mice by using floxed Bmal1 and pan-neuronal Cre lines. The forebrain knockout mice showed >90% deletion of BMAL1 in the SCN and exhibited an immediate and complete loss of circadian behavior in constant conditions. Circadian rhythms in peripheral tissues persisted but became desynchronized and damped in constant darkness. The loss of synchrony was rescued by light/dark cycles and partially by restricted feeding (only in the liver and kidney but not in the other tissues) in a distinct manner. These results suggest that the forebrain/SCN is essential for internal temporal order of robust circadian programs in peripheral clocks, and that individual peripheral clocks are affected differently by light and feeding in the absence of a functional oscillator in the forebrain.

  9. Development of glucocorticoid receptor regulation in the rat forebrain: Implications for adverse effects of glucocorticoids in preterm infants

    EPA Science Inventory

    Glucocorticoids are the consensus treatment to avoid respiratory distress in preterm infants but there is accumulating evidence that these agents evoke long-term neurobehavioral deficits. Earlier, we showed that the developing rat forebrain is far more sensitive to glucocorticoi...

  10. Distribution of glutamine synthetase in the chick forebrain: implications for passive avoidance memory formation.

    PubMed

    O'Dowd, B S; Ng, K T; Robinson, S R

    1997-01-01

    The glial enzyme glutamine synthetase (GS) converts glutamate to glutamine; the latter is used by neurons for the resynthesis of glutamate and GABA. We have used a monoclonal antibody to GS to examine the regional distribution of this enzyme in the forebrains of day-old chicks. GS was detected in glia throughout the rostral and caudal regions of the forebrain and was particularly intense in the hippocampus, area parahippocampus and parts of the hyperstriatal and paleostriatal complex, regions widely considered to be involved in memory formation. Thus, our data provide an anatomical framework for the conclusion that neurons require the support of glia in order to restock their glutamate and/or GABA transmitter supplies during memory processing.

  11. Clonally Related Forebrain Interneurons Disperse Broadly across Both Functional Areas and Structural Boundaries.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Christian; Jaglin, Xavier H; Cobbs, Lucy V; Bandler, Rachel C; Streicher, Carmen; Cepko, Constance L; Hippenmeyer, Simon; Fishell, Gord

    2015-09-02

    The medial ganglionic eminence (MGE) gives rise to the majority of mouse forebrain interneurons. Here, we examine the lineage relationship among MGE-derived interneurons using a replication-defective retroviral library containing a highly diverse set of DNA barcodes. Recovering the barcodes from the mature progeny of infected progenitor cells enabled us to unambiguously determine their respective lineal relationship. We found that clonal dispersion occurs across large areas of the brain and is not restricted by anatomical divisions. As such, sibling interneurons can populate the cortex, hippocampus striatum, and globus pallidus. The majority of interneurons appeared to be generated from asymmetric divisions of MGE progenitor cells, followed by symmetric divisions within the subventricular zone. Altogether, our findings uncover that lineage relationships do not appear to determine interneuron allocation to particular regions. As such, it is likely that clonally related interneurons have considerable flexibility as to the particular forebrain circuits to which they can contribute.

  12. The ancestral role of nodal signalling in breaking L/R symmetry in the vertebrate forebrain.

    PubMed

    Lagadec, Ronan; Laguerre, Laurent; Menuet, Arnaud; Amara, Anis; Rocancourt, Claire; Péricard, Pierre; Godard, Benoît G; Rodicio, Maria Celina; Rodriguez-Moldes, Isabel; Mayeur, Hélène; Rougemont, Quentin; Mazan, Sylvie; Boutet, Agnès

    2015-03-30

    Left-right asymmetries in the epithalamic region of the brain are widespread across vertebrates, but their magnitude and laterality varies among species. Whether these differences reflect independent origins of forebrain asymmetries or taxa-specific diversifications of an ancient vertebrate feature remains unknown. Here we show that the catshark Scyliorhinus canicula and the lampreys Petromyzon marinus and Lampetra planeri exhibit conserved molecular asymmetries between the left and right developing habenulae. Long-term pharmacological treatments in these species show that nodal signalling is essential to their generation, rather than their directionality as in teleosts. Moreover, in contrast to zebrafish, habenular left-right differences are observed in the absence of overt asymmetry of the adjacent pineal field. These data support an ancient origin of epithalamic asymmetry, and suggest that a nodal-dependent asymmetry programme operated in the forebrain of ancestral vertebrates before evolving into a variable trait in bony fish.

  13. Molecular taxonomy of major neuronal classes in the adult mouse forebrain.

    PubMed

    Sugino, Ken; Hempel, Chris M; Miller, Mark N; Hattox, Alexis M; Shapiro, Peter; Wu, Caizi; Huang, Z Josh; Nelson, Sacha B

    2006-01-01

    Identifying the neuronal cell types that comprise the mammalian forebrain is a central unsolved problem in neuroscience. Global gene expression profiles offer a potentially unbiased way to assess functional relationships between neurons. Here, we carried out microarray analysis of 12 populations of neurons in the adult mouse forebrain. Five of these populations were chosen from cingulate cortex and included several subtypes of GABAergic interneurons and pyramidal neurons. The remaining seven were derived from the somatosensory cortex, hippocampus, amygdala and thalamus. Using these expression profiles, we were able to construct a taxonomic tree that reflected the expected major relationships between these populations, such as the distinction between cortical interneurons and projection neurons. The taxonomic tree indicated highly heterogeneous gene expression even within a single region. This dataset should be useful for the classification of unknown neuronal subtypes, the investigation of specifically expressed genes and the genetic manipulation of specific neuronal circuit elements.

  14. Enriched environment influences brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels in rat forebrain after focal stroke.

    PubMed

    Zhao, L R; Risedal, A; Wojcik, A; Hejzlar, J; Johansson, B B; Kokaia, Z

    2001-06-15

    Tissue levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) protein were studied using enzyme immunoassay in different forebrain regions in the ipsi- and contralateral hemispheres of rats housed under enriched or standard conditions after the middle cerebral artery ligation. BDNF levels in the ipsilateral to ligation side was significantly higher only in the frontal cortex of standard as compared to enriched rats. However, BDNF overall was more abundant in standard than in enriched group. In addition, BDNF levels detected in the hippocampus and frontal cortex on the ischemic side of standard rats was higher as compared to contralateral side. The present study shows that housing conditions after permanent middle cerebral artery ligation leads to differential regulation of BDNF protein levels in forebrain regions which might have important implication for post-ischemic recovery.

  15. Nerve growth factor corrects developmental impairments of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons in the trisomy 16 mouse.

    PubMed Central

    Corsi, P; Coyle, J T

    1991-01-01

    The trisomy 16 (Ts16) mouse, which shares genetic and phenotypic homologies with Down syndrome, exhibits impaired development of the basal forebrain cholinergic system. Basal forebrains obtained from Ts16 and euploid littermate fetuses at 15 days of gestation were dissociated and cultured in completely defined medium, with cholinergic neurons identified by choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) immunoreactivity. The Ts16 cultures exhibited fewer ChAT-immunoreactive neurons, which were smaller and emitted shorter, smoother, and more simplified neurites than those from euploid littermates. Whereas the addition of beta-nerve growth factor (100 ng/ml) augmented the specific activity of ChAT and neuritic extension for both Ts16 and euploid cholinergic neurons, only Ts16 cultures exhibited an increase in the number and size of ChAT-immunoreactive neurons. Furthermore, Ts16 ChAT-immunoreactive neurites formed varicosities only in the presence of beta-nerve growth factor. Images PMID:2000385

  16. Receptors for GRP/bombesin-like peptides in the rat forebrain

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, S.S.; Moody, T.W.

    1985-01-01

    Binding sites in the rat forebrain were characterized using ( SVI-Tyr4)bombesin as a receptor probe. Pharmacology experiments indicate that gastrin releasing peptide (GRP) and the GRP fragments GRP as well as Ac-GRP inhibited radiolabeled (Tyr4)bombesin binding with high affinity. Biochemistry experiments indicated that heat, N-ethyl maleimide or trypsin greatly reduced radiolabeled (Tyr4)bombesin binding. Also, autoradiographic studies indicated that highest grain densities were present in the stria terminalis, periventricular and suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus, dorsomedial and rhomboid thalamus, dentate gyrus, hippocampus and medial amygdaloid nucleus. The data suggest that CNS protein receptors, which are discretely distributed in the rat forebrain, may mediate the action of endogenous GRP/bombesin-like peptides.

  17. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) overexpression in the forebrain results in learning and memory impairments.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Carla; Angelucci, Andrea; D'Antoni, Angela; Dobrossy, Mate D; Dunnett, Stephen B; Berardi, Nicoletta; Brambilla, Riccardo

    2009-03-01

    In this study we analyzed the effect on behavior of a chronic exposure to brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), by analysing a mouse line overexpressing BDNF under the alphaCaMKII promoter, which drives the transgene expression exclusively to principal neurons of the forebrain. BDNF transgenic mice and their WT littermates were examined with a battery of behavioral tests, in order to evaluate motor coordination, learning, short and long-term memory formation. Our results demonstrate that chronic BDNF overexpression in the central nervous system (CNS) causes learning deficits and short-term memory impairments, both in spatial and instrumental learning tasks. This observation suggests that a widespread increase in BDNF in forebrain networks may result in adverse effects on learning and memory formation.

  18. Overexpression of the Type 1 Adenylyl Cyclase in the Forebrain Leads to Deficits of Behavioral Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Hong; Saraf, Amit; Zweifel, Larry S.

    2015-01-01

    The type 1 adenylyl cyclase (AC1) is an activity-dependent, calcium-stimulated adenylyl cyclase expressed in the nervous system that is implicated in memory formation. We examined the locomotor activity, and impulsive and social behaviors of AC1+ mice, a transgenic mouse strain overexpressing AC1 in the forebrain. Here we report that AC1+ mice exhibit hyperactive behaviors and demonstrate increased impulsivity and reduced sociability. In contrast, AC1 and AC8 double knock-out mice are hypoactive, and exhibit increased sociability and reduced impulsivity. Interestingly, the hyperactivity of AC1+ mice can be corrected by valproate, a mood-stabilizing drug. These data indicate that increased expression of AC1 in the forebrain leads to deficits in behavioral inhibition. PMID:25568126

  19. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor signaling is altered in the forebrain of Engrailed-2 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Zunino, G; Messina, A; Sgadò, P; Baj, G; Casarosa, S; Bozzi, Y

    2016-06-02

    Engrailed-2 (En2), a homeodomain transcription factor involved in regionalization and patterning of the midbrain and hindbrain regions has been associated to autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). En2 knockout (En2(-/-)) mice show ASD-like features accompanied by a significant loss of GABAergic subpopulations in the hippocampus and neocortex. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a crucial factor for the postnatal development of forebrain GABAergic neurons, and altered GABA signaling has been hypothesized to underlie the symptoms of ASD. Here we sought to determine whether interneuron loss in the En2(-/-) forebrain might be related to altered expression of BDNF and its signaling receptors. We first evaluated the expression of different BDNF mRNA isoforms in the neocortex and hippocampus of wild-type (WT) and En2(-/-) mice. Quantitative RT-PCR showed a marked down-regulation of several splicing variants of BDNF mRNA in the neocortex but not hippocampus of adult En2(-/-) mice, as compared to WT controls. Accordingly, levels of mature BDNF protein were lower in the neocortex but not hippocampus of En2(-/-) mice, as compared to WT. Increased levels of phosphorylated TrkB and decreased levels of p75 receptor were also detected in the neocortex of mutant mice. Accordingly, the expression of low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) and RhoA, two genes regulated via p75 was significantly altered in forebrain areas of mutant mice. These data indicate that BDNF signaling alterations might be involved in the anatomical changes observed in the En2(-/-) forebrain and suggest a pathogenic role of altered BDNF signaling in this mouse model of ASD.

  20. Ablation of ferroptosis regulator glutathione peroxidase 4 in forebrain neurons promotes cognitive impairment and neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Hambright, William Sealy; Fonseca, Rene Solano; Chen, Liuji; Na, Ren; Ran, Qitao

    2017-02-01

    Synaptic loss and neuron death are the underlying cause of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD); however, the modalities of cell death in those diseases remain unclear. Ferroptosis, a newly identified oxidative cell death mechanism triggered by massive lipid peroxidation, is implicated in the degeneration of neurons populations such as spinal motor neurons and midbrain neurons. Here, we investigated whether neurons in forebrain regions (cerebral cortex and hippocampus) that are severely afflicted in AD patients might be vulnerable to ferroptosis. To this end, we generated Gpx4BIKO mouse, a mouse model with conditional deletion in forebrain neurons of glutathione peroxidase 4 (Gpx4), a key regulator of ferroptosis, and showed that treatment with tamoxifen led to deletion of Gpx4 primarily in forebrain neurons of adult Gpx4BIKO mice. Starting at 12 weeks after tamoxifen treatment, Gpx4BIKO mice exhibited significant deficits in spatial learning and memory function versus Control mice as determined by the Morris water maze task. Further examinations revealed that the cognitively impaired Gpx4BIKO mice exhibited hippocampal neurodegeneration. Notably, markers associated with ferroptosis, such as elevated lipid peroxidation, ERK activation and augmented neuroinflammation, were observed in Gpx4BIKO mice. We also showed that Gpx4BIKO mice fed a diet deficient in vitamin E, a lipid soluble antioxidant with anti-ferroptosis activity, had an expedited rate of hippocampal neurodegeneration and behavior dysfunction, and that treatment with a small-molecule ferroptosis inhibitor ameliorated neurodegeneration in those mice. Taken together, our results indicate that forebrain neurons are susceptible to ferroptosis, suggesting that ferroptosis may be an important neurodegenerative mechanism in diseases such as AD.

  1. Increase in cortical endocannabinoid signaling in a rat model of basal forebrain cholinergic dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Llorente-Ovejero, Alberto; Manuel, Iván; Giralt, Maria Teresa; Rodríguez-Puertas, Rafael

    2017-08-18

    The basal forebrain cholinergic pathways progressively degenerate during the progression of Alzheimer's disease, leading to an irreversible impairment of memory and thinking skills. The stereotaxic lesion with 192IgG-saporin in the rat brain has been used to eliminate basal forebrain cholinergic neurons and is aimed at emulating the cognitive damage described in this disease in order to explore its effects on behavior and on neurotransmission. Learning and memory processes that are controlled by cholinergic neurotransmission are also modulated by the endocannabinoid (eCB) system. The objective of the present study is to evaluate the eCB signaling in relation to the memory impairment induced in adult rats following a specific cholinergic lesion of the basal forebrain. Therefore, CB1 receptor-mediated signaling was analyzed using receptor and functional autoradiography, and cellular distribution by immunofluorescence. The passive avoidance test and histochemical data revealed a relationship between impaired behavioral responses and a loss of approximately 75% of cholinergic neurons in the nucleus basalis magnocellularis (NBM), accompanied by cortical cholinergic denervation. The decrease in CB1 receptor density observed in the hippocampus, together with hyperactivity of eCB signaling in the NBM and cortex, suggest an interaction between the eCB and cholinergic systems. Moreover, following basal forebrain cholinergic denervation, the presynaptic GABAergic immunoreactivity was reduced in cortical areas. In conclusion, CB1 receptors present in presynaptic GABAergic terminals in the hippocampus are down regulated, but not those in cortical glutamatergic synapses. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Cholinergic Inputs from Basal Forebrain Add an Excitatory Bias to Odor Coding in the Olfactory Bulb

    PubMed Central

    Rothermel, Markus; Carey, Ryan M.; Puche, Adam; Shipley, Michael T.

    2014-01-01

    Cholinergic modulation of central circuits is associated with active sensation, attention, and learning, yet the neural circuits and temporal dynamics underlying cholinergic effects on sensory processing remain unclear. Understanding the effects of cholinergic modulation on particular circuits is complicated by the widespread projections of cholinergic neurons to telencephalic structures that themselves are highly interconnected. Here we examined how cholinergic projections from basal forebrain to the olfactory bulb (OB) modulate output from the first stage of sensory processing in the mouse olfactory system. By optogenetically activating their axons directly in the OB, we found that cholinergic projections from basal forebrain regulate OB output by increasing the spike output of presumptive mitral/tufted cells. Cholinergic stimulation increased mitral/tufted cell spiking in the absence of inhalation-driven sensory input and further increased spiking responses to inhalation of odorless air and to odorants. This modulation was rapid and transient, was dependent on local cholinergic signaling in the OB, and differed from modulation by optogenetic activation of cholinergic neurons in basal forebrain, which led to a mixture of mitral/tufted cell excitation and suppression. Finally, bulbar cholinergic enhancement of mitral/tufted cell odorant responses was robust and occurred independent of the strength or even polarity of the odorant-evoked response, indicating that cholinergic modulation adds an excitatory bias to mitral/tufted cells as opposed to increasing response gain or sharpening response spectra. These results are consistent with a role for the basal forebrain cholinergic system in dynamically regulating the sensitivity to or salience of odors during active sensing of the olfactory environment. PMID:24672011

  3. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation in forebrain neurones contributes to osmoregulatory mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Dine, Julien; Ducourneau, Vincent R R; Fénelon, Valérie S; Fossat, Pascal; Amadio, Aurélie; Eder, Matthias; Israel, Jean-Marc; Oliet, Stéphane H R; Voisin, Daniel L

    2014-04-01

    Vasopressin secretion from the magnocellular neurosecretory cells (MNCs) is crucial for body fluid homeostasis. Osmotic regulation of MNC activity involves the concerted modulation of intrinsic mechanosensitive ion channels, taurine release from local astrocytes as well as excitatory inputs derived from osmosensitive forebrain regions. Extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases (ERK) are mitogen-activated protein kinases that transduce extracellular stimuli into intracellular post-translational and transcriptional responses, leading to changes in intrinsic neuronal properties and synaptic function. Here, we investigated whether ERK activation (i.e. phosphorylation) plays a role in the functioning of forebrain osmoregulatory networks. We found that within 10 min after intraperitoneal injections of hypertonic saline (3 m, 6 m) in rats, many phosphoERK-immunopositive neurones were observed in osmosensitive forebrain regions, including the MNC containing supraoptic nuclei. The intensity of ERK labelling was dose-dependent. Reciprocally, slow intragastric infusions of water that lower osmolality reduced basal ERK phosphorylation. In the supraoptic nucleus, ERK phosphorylation predominated in vasopressin neurones vs. oxytocin neurones and was absent from astrocytes. Western blot experiments confirmed that phosphoERK expression in the supraoptic nucleus was dose dependent. Intracerebroventricular administration of the ERK phosphorylation inhibitor U 0126 before a hyperosmotic challenge reduced the number of both phosphoERK-immunopositive neurones and Fos expressing neurones in osmosensitive forebrain regions. Blockade of ERK phosphorylation also reduced hypertonically induced depolarization and an increase in firing of the supraoptic MNCs recorded in vitro. It finally reduced hypertonically induced vasopressin release in the bloodstream. Altogether, these findings identify ERK phosphorylation as a new element contributing to the osmoregulatory mechanisms of

  4. Stereotaxic probabilistic maps of the magnocellular cell groups in human basal forebrain

    PubMed Central

    Zaborszky, L.; Hoemke, L.; Mohlberg, H.; Schleicher, A.; Amunts, K.; Zilles, K.

    2008-01-01

    The basal forebrain contains several interdigitating anatomical structures, including the diagonal band of Broca, the basal nucleus of Meynert, the ventral striatum, and also cell groups underneath the globus pallidus that bridge the centromedial amygdala to the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis. Among the cell populations, the magnocellular, cholinergic corticopetal projection neurons have received particular attention due to their loss in Alzheimer’s disease. In MRI images, the precise delineation of these structures is difficult due to limited spatial resolution and contrast. Here, using microscopic delineations in ten human postmortem brains, we present stereotaxic probabilistic maps of the basal forebrain areas containing the magnocellular cell groups. Cytoarchitectonic mapping was performed in silver stained histological serial sections. The positions and the extent of the magnocellular cell groups within the septum (Ch1-2), the horizontal limb of the diagonal band (Ch3), and in the sublenticular part of the basal forebrain (Ch4) were traced in high-resolution digitized histological sections, 3D reconstructed, and warped to the reference space of the MNI single subject brain. The superposition of the cytoarchitectonic maps in the MNI brain shows the intersubject variability of the various Ch compartments and their stereotaxic position relative to other brain structures. Both the right and left Ch4 regions showed significantly smaller volumes when age was considered as a covariate. Probabilistic maps of compartments of the basal forebrain magnocellular system are now available as an open source reference for correlation with fMRI, PET, and structural MRI data of the living human brain. PMID:18585468

  5. Forebrain CRHR1 deficiency attenuates chronic stress-induced cognitive deficits and dendritic remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao-Dong; Chen, Yuncai; Wolf, Miriam; Wagner, Klaus V.; Liebl, Claudia; Scharf, Sebastian H.; Harbich, Daniela; Mayer, Bianca; Wurst, Wolfgang; Holsboer, Florian; Deussing, Jan M.; Baram, Tallie Z.; Müller, Marianne B.; Schmidt, Mathias V.

    2011-01-01

    Chronic stress evokes profound structural and molecular changes in the hippocampus, which may underlie spatial memory deficits. Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and CRH receptor 1 (CRHR1) mediate some of the rapid effects of stress on dendritic spine morphology and modulate learning and memory, thus providing a potential molecular basis for impaired synaptic plasticity and spatial memory by repeated stress exposure. Using adult male mice with CRHR1 conditionally inactivated in the forebrain regions, we investigated the role of CRH-CRHR1 signaling in the effects of chronic social defeat stress on spatial memory, the dendritic morphology of hippocampal CA3 pyramidal neurons, and the hippocampal expression of nectin-3, a synaptic cell adhesion molecule important in synaptic remodeling. In chronically stressed wild-type mice, spatial memory was disrupted, and the complexity of apical dendrites of CA3 neurons reduced. In contrast, stressed mice with forebrain CRHR1 deficiency exhibited normal dendritic morphology of CA3 neurons and mild impairments in spatial memory. Additionally, we showed that the expression of nectin-3 in the CA3 area was regulated by chronic stress in a CRHR1-dependent fashion and associated with spatial memory and dendritic complexity. Moreover, forebrain CRHR1 deficiency prevented the down-regulation of hippocampal glucocorticoid receptor expression by chronic stress but induced increased body weight gain during persistent stress exposure. These findings underscore the important role of forebrain CRH-CRHR1 signaling in modulating chronic stress-induced cognitive, structural and molecular adaptations, with implications for stress-related psychiatric disorders. PMID:21296667

  6. Tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive neurons in the forebrain of the trout: organization, cellular features and innervation.

    PubMed

    Anadón, Ramón; Rodríguez-Moldes, Isabel; González, Agustín

    We studied the segmental distribution and cellular features of tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive (TH-ir) neurons in the forebrain of trout. Large differences in cell size, general morphology, and complexity of cell processes were observed between TH-ir nuclei of different regions, and a new type of complex spiny TH-ir neurons in the ventral telencephalon is described for the first time. The distribution of TH-ir fibers was also analyzed and discussed.

  7. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation in forebrain neurones contributes to osmoregulatory mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Dine, Julien; Ducourneau, Vincent R R; Fénelon, Valérie S; Fossat, Pascal; Amadio, Aurélie; Eder, Matthias; Israel, Jean-Marc; Oliet, Stéphane H R; Voisin, Daniel L

    2014-01-01

    Vasopressin secretion from the magnocellular neurosecretory cells (MNCs) is crucial for body fluid homeostasis. Osmotic regulation of MNC activity involves the concerted modulation of intrinsic mechanosensitive ion channels, taurine release from local astrocytes as well as excitatory inputs derived from osmosensitive forebrain regions. Extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases (ERK) are mitogen-activated protein kinases that transduce extracellular stimuli into intracellular post-translational and transcriptional responses, leading to changes in intrinsic neuronal properties and synaptic function. Here, we investigated whether ERK activation (i.e. phosphorylation) plays a role in the functioning of forebrain osmoregulatory networks. We found that within 10 min after intraperitoneal injections of hypertonic saline (3 m, 6 m) in rats, many phosphoERK-immunopositive neurones were observed in osmosensitive forebrain regions, including the MNC containing supraoptic nuclei. The intensity of ERK labelling was dose-dependent. Reciprocally, slow intragastric infusions of water that lower osmolality reduced basal ERK phosphorylation. In the supraoptic nucleus, ERK phosphorylation predominated in vasopressin neurones vs. oxytocin neurones and was absent from astrocytes. Western blot experiments confirmed that phosphoERK expression in the supraoptic nucleus was dose dependent. Intracerebroventricular administration of the ERK phosphorylation inhibitor U 0126 before a hyperosmotic challenge reduced the number of both phosphoERK-immunopositive neurones and Fos expressing neurones in osmosensitive forebrain regions. Blockade of ERK phosphorylation also reduced hypertonically induced depolarization and an increase in firing of the supraoptic MNCs recorded in vitro. It finally reduced hypertonically induced vasopressin release in the bloodstream. Altogether, these findings identify ERK phosphorylation as a new element contributing to the osmoregulatory mechanisms of

  8. Forebrain neuropeptide regulation of pair association and behavior in cooperating cleaner fish.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Sónia C; Grutter, Alexandra S; Paula, José R; André, Gonçalo I; Messias, João P; Gozdowska, Magdalena; Kulczykowska, Ewa; Soares, Marta C

    2015-06-01

    Animals establish privileged relationships with specific partners, which are treated differently from other conspecifics, and contribute to behavioral variation. However, there is limited information on the underlying physiological mechanisms involved in the establishment of these privileged ties and their relationship to individual cooperation levels. The Indo-Pacific bluestreak cleaner wrasse Labroides dimidiatus often forages in mixed-sex pairs when cleaning fish clients. Intra-couple conflicts often arise during a joint client inspection, which may alter the overall quality of cleaning service provided. Here we tested two hypotheses: a) whether intra-pair association (i.e. association index), measured with joint interspecific cleaning and intraspecific behavior, is correlated with neuroendocrine mechanisms involving forebrain neuropeptides arginine vasotocin (AVT) and isotocin (IT) and b) whether these neuropeptide level shifts relate to an individual's interspecific service quality. We found that partner support (number of cleaning interactions and tactile stimulation) received by male cleaners increased with association index. When cleaners inspected clients alone, cleaners' cheating decreased with association index for females but not males. AVT levels did not differ according to sex or association level. Forebrain IT levels increased with association index for males, whereas no relationship was found for females. Finally, cleaner cheating varied between sex and forebrain IT levels. Findings indicate that variation in pairs' relationships influences male and female cleaner fish differently and contributes to the variation of brain neuropeptide levels, which is linked to distinct cooperative outcomes.

  9. CBP regulates the differentiation of interneurons from ventral forebrain neural precursors during murine development.

    PubMed

    Tsui, David; Voronova, Anastassia; Gallagher, Denis; Kaplan, David R; Miller, Freda D; Wang, Jing

    2014-01-15

    The mechanisms that regulate appropriate genesis and differentiation of interneurons in the developing mammalian brain are of significant interest not only because interneurons play key roles in the establishment of neural circuitry, but also because when they are deficient, this can cause epilepsy. In this regard, one genetic syndrome that is associated with deficits in neural development and epilepsy is Rubinstein-Taybi Syndrome (RTS), where the transcriptional activator and histone acetyltransferase CBP is mutated and haploinsufficient. Here, we have asked whether CBP is necessary for the appropriate genesis and differentiation of interneurons in the murine forebrain, since this could provide an explanation for the epilepsy that is associated with RTS. We show that CBP is expressed in neural precursors within the embryonic medial ganglionic eminence (MGE), an area that generates the vast majority of interneurons for the cortex. Using primary cultures of MGE precursors, we show that knockdown of CBP causes deficits in differentiation of these precursors into interneurons and oligodendrocytes, and that overexpression of CBP is by itself sufficient to enhance interneuron genesis. Moreover, we show that levels of the neurotransmitter synthesis enzyme GAD67, which is expressed in inhibitory interneurons, are decreased in the dorsal and ventral forebrain of neonatal CBP(+/-) mice, indicating that CBP plays a role in regulating interneuron development in vivo. Thus, CBP normally acts to ensure the differentiation of appropriate numbers of forebrain interneurons, and when its levels are decreased, this causes deficits in interneuron development, providing a potential explanation for the epilepsy seen in individuals with RTS.

  10. Forebrain neuroanatomy of the neonatal and juvenile dolphin (T. truncatus and S. coeruloalba).

    PubMed

    Parolisi, Roberta; Peruffo, Antonella; Messina, Silvia; Panin, Mattia; Montelli, Stefano; Giurisato, Maristella; Cozzi, Bruno; Bonfanti, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of dolphin functional neuroanatomy mostly derives from post-mortem studies and non-invasive approaches (i.e., magnetic resonance imaging), due to limitations in experimentation on cetaceans. As a consequence the availability of well-preserved tissues for histology is scarce, and detailed histological analyses are referred mainly to adults. Here we studied the neonatal/juvenile brain in two species of dolphins, the bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) and the striped dolphin (Stenella coeruleoalba), with special reference to forebrain regions. We analyzed cell density in subcortical nuclei, white/gray matter ratio, and myelination in selected regions at different anterior-posterior levels of the whole dolphin brain at different ages, to better define forebrain neuroanatomy and the developmental stage of the dolphin brain around birth. The analyses were extended to the periventricular germinal layer and the cerebellum, whose delayed genesis of the granule cell layer is a hallmark of postnatal development in the mammalian nervous system. Our results establish an atlas of the young dolphin forebrain and, on the basis of occurrence/absence of delayed neurogenic layers, confirm the stage of advanced brain maturation in these animals with respect to most terrestrial mammals.

  11. Forebrain neuroanatomy of the neonatal and juvenile dolphin (T. truncatus and S. coeruloalba)

    PubMed Central

    Parolisi, Roberta; Peruffo, Antonella; Messina, Silvia; Panin, Mattia; Montelli, Stefano; Giurisato, Maristella; Cozzi, Bruno; Bonfanti, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of dolphin functional neuroanatomy mostly derives from post-mortem studies and non-invasive approaches (i.e., magnetic resonance imaging), due to limitations in experimentation on cetaceans. As a consequence the availability of well-preserved tissues for histology is scarce, and detailed histological analyses are referred mainly to adults. Here we studied the neonatal/juvenile brain in two species of dolphins, the bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) and the striped dolphin (Stenella coeruleoalba), with special reference to forebrain regions. We analyzed cell density in subcortical nuclei, white/gray matter ratio, and myelination in selected regions at different anterior–posterior levels of the whole dolphin brain at different ages, to better define forebrain neuroanatomy and the developmental stage of the dolphin brain around birth. The analyses were extended to the periventricular germinal layer and the cerebellum, whose delayed genesis of the granule cell layer is a hallmark of postnatal development in the mammalian nervous system. Our results establish an atlas of the young dolphin forebrain and, on the basis of occurrence/absence of delayed neurogenic layers, confirm the stage of advanced brain maturation in these animals with respect to most terrestrial mammals. PMID:26594155

  12. Dietary protein, energy and arginine affect LAT1 expression in forebrain white matter differently.

    PubMed

    Wu, X; Yin, Y L; Li, T J; Wang, L; Ruan, Z; Liu, Z Q; Hou, Y Q

    2010-09-01

    L-type amino acid transporter-1 (LAT1) transports large, branched-chain, aromatic and neutral amino acids. About 64 Duroc × Landrace × Yorkshire pigs were used to study the effects of dietary crude protein (CP), energy and arginine on LAT1 expression in forebrain. The results showed that LAT1 expression in forebrain was sensitive to different levels of CP, energy and arginine. On the basis of Western blot analysis, a lower level of LAT1 presented in the brain tissues of pigs fed the low dietary CP diet (P < 0.05), a higher level were found in pigs fed the higher CP diet, with moderate to intense staining seen in pigs fed the diet plus 1% arginine. In contrast, pigs fed the control-energy diet had weak LAT1 expression, and those fed the diet supplemented with 1% arginine showed lowest LAT1 expression (P < 0.05). These results showed that LAT1 was highly expressed in the forebrain, and expression of LAT1 was affected by dietary protein, energy and arginine differently.

  13. Characterization of forebrain neurons derived from late-onset Huntington's disease human embryonic stem cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Niclis, Jonathan C.; Pinar, Anita; Haynes, John M.; Alsanie, Walaa; Jenny, Robert; Dottori, Mirella; Cram, David S.

    2012-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an incurable neurodegenerative disorder caused by a CAG repeat expansion in exon 1 of the Huntingtin (HTT) gene. Recently, induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) lines carrying atypical and aggressive (CAG60+) HD variants have been generated and exhibit disparate molecular pathologies. Here we investigate two human embryonic stem cell (hESC) lines carrying CAG37 and CAG51 typical late-onset repeat expansions in comparison to wildtype control lines during undifferentiated states and throughout forebrain neuronal differentiation. Pluripotent HD lines demonstrate growth, viability, pluripotent gene expression, mitochondrial activity and forebrain specification that is indistinguishable from control lines. Expression profiles of crucial genes known to be dysregulated in HD remain unperturbed in the presence of mutant protein and throughout differentiation; however, elevated glutamate-evoked responses were observed in HD CAG51 neurons. These findings suggest typical late-onset HD mutations do not alter pluripotent parameters or the capacity to generate forebrain neurons, but that such progeny may recapitulate hallmarks observed in established HD model systems. Such HD models will help further our understanding of the cascade of pathological events leading to disease onset and progression, while simultaneously facilitating the identification of candidate HD therapeutics. PMID:23576953

  14. The integrity of cholinergic basal forebrain neurons depends on expression of Nkx2-1

    PubMed Central

    Magno, Lorenza; Kretz, Oliver; Bert, Bettina; Ersözlü, Sara; Vogt, Johannes; Fink, Heidrun; Kimura, Shioko; Vogt, Angelika; Monyer, Hannah; Nitsch, Robert; Naumann, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The transcription factor Nkx2-1 belongs to the homeobox-encoding family of proteins that have essential functions in prenatal brain development. Nkx2-1 is required for the specification of cortical interneurons and several neuronal subtypes of the ventral forebrain. Moreover, this transcription factor is involved in migratory processes by regulating the expression of guidance molecules. Interestingly, Nkx2-1 expression was recently detected in the mouse brain at postnatal stages. Using two transgenic mouse lines that allow prenatal or postnatal cell type-specific deletion of Nkx2-1, we show that continuous expression of the transcription factor is essential for the maturation and maintenance of cholinergic basal forebrain neurons in mice. Notably, prenatal deletion of Nkx2-1 in GAD67-expressing neurons leads to a nearly complete loss of cholinergic neurons and parvalbumin-containing GABAergic neurons in the basal forebrain. We also show that postnatal mutation of Nkx2-1 in choline acetyltransferase-expressing cells causes a striking reduction in their number. These degenerative changes are accompanied by partial denervation of their target structures and results in a discrete impairment of spatial memory. PMID:22098391

  15. Time-lapse live imaging of clonally related neural progenitor cells in the developing zebrafish forebrain.

    PubMed

    Dong, Zhiqiang; Wagle, Mahendra; Guo, Su

    2011-04-06

    Precise patterns of division, migration and differentiation of neural progenitor cells are crucial for proper brain development and function. To understand the behavior of neural progenitor cells in the complex in vivo environment, time-lapse live imaging of neural progenitor cells in an intact brain is critically required. In this video, we exploit the unique features of zebrafish embryos to visualize the development of forebrain neural progenitor cells in vivo. We use electroporation to genetically and sparsely label individual neural progenitor cells. Briefly, DNA constructs coding for fluorescent markers were injected into the forebrain ventricle of 22 hours post fertilization (hpf) zebrafish embryos and electric pulses were delivered immediately. Six hours later, the electroporated zebrafish embryos were mounted with low melting point agarose in glass bottom culture dishes. Fluorescently labeled neural progenitor cells were then imaged for 36 hours with fixed intervals under a confocal microscope using water dipping objective lens. The present method provides a way to gain insights into the in vivo development of forebrain neural progenitor cells and can be applied to other parts of the central nervous system of the zebrafish embryo.

  16. [Prothrombotic states and cerebral ischemia].

    PubMed

    Barinagarrementeria, F; González-Duarte, A; Cantú-Brito, C

    1998-01-01

    Hematological disorders per se represent unusual causes of cerebral ischemia, explaining in young people 4% of strokes. Hematological disorders that induce a thrombotic tendency contribute to overall ischemic stroke risk and may directly cause cerebral ischemia in patients without other risk factors. The frequency of cerebral infarctions caused by prothrombotic states is not known. This review will focus on disorders such as prothrombotic coagulopaties, including resistance to activated protein C and antiphospholipid syndrome as cause of cerebral infarction. Cerebral venous thrombosis and cerebral infarction from arterial origin are the most common form of neurological involvement. Pathophysiological mechanism of stroke in these patients are multiple and can include as in antiphospholipid syndrome embolism from valves abnormalities related to hematological disturbance, as well as thrombosis of extracranial or intracranial vessels. Is clear, however, that prothrombotic states could explains a high percentage of cases of those so called cryptogenic cerebral infarction in young people.

  17. Experimental myocardial ischemia. Pt. 2

    SciTech Connect

    Serur, J.R.; Als, A.V.; Paulin, S.

    1982-01-01

    The comparative effects of meglumine sodium diatrizoate (MSD), sodium meglumine calcium metrizoate (SMCM), and metrizamide (M) were studied in an isolated canine heart preparation. The parameters observed were coronary blood flow (CBF), myocardial contractile force (MCF), positive and negative dF/dt, and perfusion pressure during normal and ischemic perfusion conditions. MSD had an initial negative inotropic effect but baseline MCF returned in 1 min during normal perfusion and 2 min under ischemic conditions. SMCM and M had only a positive inotropic effect under normal perfusion. However, during ischemia, the positive effect of SMCM was followed by a decrease in contractile force. M showed only a positive effect on force during ischemia. Our results indicate that calcium additive may increase the risk of coronary arteriography in patients with severe coronary artery disease.

  18. Functional Connectome Analysis of Dopamine Neuron Glutamatergic Connections in Forebrain Regions

    PubMed Central

    Mingote, Susana; Chuhma, Nao; Kusnoor, Sheila V.; Field, Bianca; Deutch, Ariel Y.

    2015-01-01

    In the ventral tegmental area (VTA), a subpopulation of dopamine neurons express vesicular glutamate transporter 2 and make glutamatergic connections to nucleus accumbens (NAc) and olfactory tubercle (OT) neurons. However, their glutamatergic connections across the forebrain have not been explored systematically. To visualize dopamine neuron forebrain projections and to enable photostimulation of their axons independent of transmitter status, we virally transfected VTA neurons with channelrhodopsin-2 fused to enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (ChR2-EYFP) and used DATIREScre mice to restrict expression to dopamine neurons. ChR2-EYFP-expressing neurons almost invariably stained for tyrosine hydroxylase, identifying them as dopaminergic. Dopamine neuron axons visualized by ChR2-EYFP fluorescence projected most densely to the striatum, moderately to the amygdala and entorhinal cortex (ERC), sparsely to prefrontal and cingulate cortices, and rarely to the hippocampus. Guided by ChR2-EYFP fluorescence, we recorded systematically from putative principal neurons in target areas and determined the incidence and strength of glutamatergic connections by activating all dopamine neuron terminals impinging on recorded neurons with wide-field photostimulation. This revealed strong glutamatergic connections in the NAc, OT, and ERC; moderate strength connections in the central amygdala; and weak connections in the cingulate cortex. No glutamatergic connections were found in the dorsal striatum, hippocampus, basolateral amygdala, or prefrontal cortex. These results indicate that VTA dopamine neurons elicit widespread, but regionally distinct, glutamatergic signals in the forebrain and begin to define the dopamine neuron excitatory functional connectome. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Dopamine neurons are important for the control of motivated behavior and are involved in the pathophysiology of several major neuropsychiatric disorders. Recent studies have shown that some ventral midbrain

  19. Intracellular Signalling in Retinal Ischemia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-07-01

    36) However, vascularization of the RPE is not known to occur in human diseases of photoreceptor degeneration, such as retinitis pigmentosa ...A.C. (1986) Retinitis pigmentosa and retinal neovascularization. Ophthalmology 91, 1599- 1603. Figure la: Control rat retina, 8 weeks of age, central...TITLE (Include Security Classification) Intracellular Signalling in Retinal Ischemia 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Burns, Margaret Sue; Bellhorn, Roy William

  20. Functional tests for myocardial ischemia

    SciTech Connect

    Levinson, J.R.; Guiney, T.E.; Boucher, C.A. )

    1991-01-01

    Functional tests for myocardial ischemia are numerous. Most depend upon a combination of either exercise or pharmacologic intervention with analysis of the electrocardiogram, of regional perfusion with radionuclide imaging, or of regional wall motion with radionuclide imaging or echocardiography. While each test has unique features, especially at the research level, they are generally quite similar in clinical practice, so the clinician is advised to concentrate on one or two in which local expertise is high.22 references.

  1. Predictive Modeling of Cardiac Ischemia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Gary T.

    1996-01-01

    The goal of the Contextual Alarms Management System (CALMS) project is to develop sophisticated models to predict the onset of clinical cardiac ischemia before it occurs. The system will continuously monitor cardiac patients and set off an alarm when they appear about to suffer an ischemic episode. The models take as inputs information from patient history and combine it with continuously updated information extracted from blood pressure, oxygen saturation and ECG lines. Expert system, statistical, neural network and rough set methodologies are then used to forecast the onset of clinical ischemia before it transpires, thus allowing early intervention aimed at preventing morbid complications from occurring. The models will differ from previous attempts by including combinations of continuous and discrete inputs. A commercial medical instrumentation and software company has invested funds in the project with a goal of commercialization of the technology. The end product will be a system that analyzes physiologic parameters and produces an alarm when myocardial ischemia is present. If proven feasible, a CALMS-based system will be added to existing heart monitoring hardware.

  2. Severe Hypokalemia Masquerading Myocardial Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Petrov, Daniel Bogdanov; Sardovski, Svetlozar Ivanov; Milanova, Maria Hristova

    2012-01-01

    An advanced degree of body potassium deficit may produce striking changes in the electrocardiogram (ECG). These changes can result in incidental findings on the 12-lead ECG or precipitate potentially life-threatening dysrhythmias. Although usually readily recognized, at times these abnormalities may be confused with myocardial ischemia. The object was to report a case of severe hypokalemia mimicking myocardial ischemia. A 33-year-old, previously healthy man, presented to the Emergency Department (ED) with a progressive weakness and chest discomfort. The electrocardiogram showed a marked ST-segment depression in leads II, III, aVF, V1-V6. The initial diagnosis was non ST-elevation myocardial infarction. Echocardiography was normal and troponin levels were within normal limits. A more detailed history revealed that the patient had an episode of acute gastroenteritis with diarrhea and vomiting. Serum chemistries were notable for a potassium concentration of 1,8 mmol per liter. With aggressive electrolyte correction, the ECG abnormalities reverted as potassium levels normalized. Hypokalemia induced ST-segment depression may simulate myocardial ischemia. The differential diagnosis might be difficult, especially in the cases when ST changes are accompanied with chest discomfort.

  3. Chronic Gastric Ischemia Leading to Gastric Perforation

    PubMed Central

    Lundsmith, Emma; Zheng, Matthew; McCue, Peter

    2016-01-01

    A 69-year-old man with diabetes, peripheral vascular disease, and hypertension presented with 3 months of diffuse abdominal pain that worsened with meals, weight loss, and dysphagia. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy and computed tomography revealed findings consistent with chronic gastric ischemia secondary to atherosclerosis. Gastric ischemia eventually led to perforation. We discuss causes, symptoms, diagnosis, and management of gastric ischemia, an underdiagnosed and potentially fatal condition that requires urgent diagnosis and treatment. PMID:28119945

  4. An ultrastructural study of cell death in the CA1 pyramidal field of the hippocapmus in rats submitted to transient global ischemia followed by reperfusion

    PubMed Central

    de Souza Pagnussat, Aline; Faccioni-Heuser, Maria Cristina; Netto, Carlos Alexandre; Achaval, Matilde

    2007-01-01

    In the course of ischemia and reperfusion a disruption of release and uptake of excitatory neurotransmitters occurs. This excitotoxicity triggers delayed cell death, a process closely related to mitochondrial physiology and one that shows both apoptotic and necrotic features. The aim of the present study was to use electron microscopy to characterize the cell death of pyramidal cells from the CA1 field of the hippocampus after 10 min of transient global ischemia followed by short reperfusion periods. For this study 25 adult male Wistar rats were used, divided into six groups: 10 min of ischemia, 3, 6, 12 and 24 h of reperfusion and an untouched group. Transient forebrain ischemia was produced using the 4-vessel occlusion method. The pyramidal cells of the CA1 field from rat hippocampus submitted to ischemia exhibited intracellular alterations consistent with a process of degeneration, with varied intensities according to the reperfusion period and bearing both apoptotic and necrotic features. Gradual neuronal and glial modifications allowed for the classification of the degenerative process into three stages: initial, intermediate and final were found. With 3 and 6 h of reperfusion, slight and moderate morphological alterations were seen, such as organelle and cytoplasm edema. Within 12 h of reperfusion, there was an apparent recovery and more ‘intact’ cells could be identified, while 24 h after the event neuronal damage was more severe and cells with disrupted membranes and cell debris were identified. Necrotic-like neurons were found together with some apoptotic bodies with 24 h of reperfusion. Present results support the view that cell death in the CA1 field of rat hippocampus submitted to 10 min of global transient ischemia and early reperfusion times includes both apoptotic and necrotic features, a process referred to as parapoptosis. PMID:17784936

  5. Protein-energy malnutrition developing after global brain ischemia induces an atypical acute-phase response and hinders expression of GAP-43.

    PubMed

    Smith, Shari E; Figley, Sarah A; Schreyer, David J; Paterson, Phyllis G

    2014-01-01

    Protein-energy malnutrition (PEM) is a common post-stroke problem. PEM can independently induce a systemic acute-phase response, and pre-existing malnutrition can exacerbate neuroinflammation induced by brain ischemia. In contrast, the effects of PEM developing in the post-ischemic period have not been studied. Since excessive inflammation can impede brain remodeling, we investigated the effects of post-ischemic malnutrition on neuroinflammation, the acute-phase reaction, and neuroplasticity-related proteins. Male, Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to global forebrain ischemia using the 2-vessel occlusion model or sham surgery. The sham rats were assigned to control diet (18% protein) on day 3 after surgery, whereas the rats exposed to global ischemia were assigned to either control diet or a low protein (PEM, 2% protein) diet. Post-ischemic PEM decreased growth associated protein-43, synaptophysin and synaptosomal-associated protein-25 immunofluorescence within the hippocampal CA3 mossy fiber terminals on day 21, whereas the glial response in the hippocampal CA1 and CA3 subregions was unaltered by PEM. No systemic acute-phase reaction attributable to global ischemia was detected in control diet-fed rats, as reflected by serum concentrations of alpha-2-macroglobulin, alpha-1-acid glycoprotein, haptoglobin, and albumin. Acute exposure to the PEM regimen after global brain ischemia caused an atypical acute-phase response. PEM decreased the serum concentrations of albumin and haptoglobin on day 5, with the decreases sustained to day 21. Serum alpha-2-macroglobulin concentrations were significantly higher in malnourished rats on day 21. This provides the first direct evidence that PEM developing after brain ischemia exerts wide-ranging effects on mechanisms important to stroke recovery.

  6. Protein-Energy Malnutrition Developing after Global Brain Ischemia Induces an Atypical Acute-Phase Response and Hinders Expression of GAP-43

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Shari E.; Figley, Sarah A.; Schreyer, David J.; Paterson, Phyllis G.

    2014-01-01

    Protein-energy malnutrition (PEM) is a common post-stroke problem. PEM can independently induce a systemic acute-phase response, and pre-existing malnutrition can exacerbate neuroinflammation induced by brain ischemia. In contrast, the effects of PEM developing in the post-ischemic period have not been studied. Since excessive inflammation can impede brain remodeling, we investigated the effects of post-ischemic malnutrition on neuroinflammation, the acute-phase reaction, and neuroplasticity-related proteins. Male, Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to global forebrain ischemia using the 2-vessel occlusion model or sham surgery. The sham rats were assigned to control diet (18% protein) on day 3 after surgery, whereas the rats exposed to global ischemia were assigned to either control diet or a low protein (PEM, 2% protein) diet. Post-ischemic PEM decreased growth associated protein-43, synaptophysin and synaptosomal-associated protein-25 immunofluorescence within the hippocampal CA3 mossy fiber terminals on day 21, whereas the glial response in the hippocampal CA1 and CA3 subregions was unaltered by PEM. No systemic acute-phase reaction attributable to global ischemia was detected in control diet-fed rats, as reflected by serum concentrations of alpha-2-macroglobulin, alpha-1-acid glycoprotein, haptoglobin, and albumin. Acute exposure to the PEM regimen after global brain ischemia caused an atypical acute-phase response. PEM decreased the serum concentrations of albumin and haptoglobin on day 5, with the decreases sustained to day 21. Serum alpha-2-macroglobulin concentrations were significantly higher in malnourished rats on day 21. This provides the first direct evidence that PEM developing after brain ischemia exerts wide-ranging effects on mechanisms important to stroke recovery. PMID:25259609

  7. Purkinje fibers after myocardial ischemia-reperfusion.

    PubMed

    García Gómez-Heras, Soledad; Álvarez-Ayuso, Lourdes; Torralba Arranz, Amalia; Fernández-García, Héctor

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of ischemia-reperfusion on Purkinje fibers, comparing them with the adjacent cardiomyocytes. In a model of heterotopic heart transplantation in pigs, the donor heart was subjected to 2 hours of ischemia (n=9), preserved in cold saline, and subjected to 24 hours of ischemia with preservation in Wisconsin solution, alone (n=6), or with an additive consisting of calcium (n=4), Nicorandil (n=6) or Trolox (n=7). After 2 hours of reperfusion, we evaluated the recovery of cardiac electrical activity and took samples of ventricular myocardium for morphological study. The prolonged ischemia significantly affected atrial automaticity and A-V conduction in all the groups subjected to 24 hours of ischemia, as compared to 2 hours. There were no significant differences among the groups that underwent prolonged ischemia. Changes in the electrical activity did not correlate with the morphological changes. In the Purkinje fibers, ischemia-reperfusion produced a marked decrease in the glycogen content in all the groups. In the gap junctions the immunolabeling of connexin-43 decreased significantly, adopting a dispersed distribution, and staining the sarcolemma adjacent to the connective tissue. These changes were less marked in the group preserved exclusively with Wisconsin solution, despite the prolonged ischemia. The addition of other substances did not improve the altered morphology. In all the groups, the injury appeared to be more prominent in the Purkinje fibers than in the neighboring cardiomyocytes, indicating the greater susceptibility of the former to ischemia-reperfusion injury.

  8. Modulation of learning and memory by the targeted deletion of the circadian clock gene Bmal1 in forebrain circuits.

    PubMed

    Snider, Kaitlin H; Dziema, Heather; Aten, Sydney; Loeser, Jacob; Norona, Frances E; Hoyt, Kari; Obrietan, Karl

    2016-07-15

    A large body of literature has shown that the disruption of circadian clock timing has profound effects on mood, memory and complex thinking. Central to this time keeping process is the master circadian pacemaker located within the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). Of note, within the central nervous system, clock timing is not exclusive to the SCN, but rather, ancillary oscillatory capacity has been detected in a wide range of cell types and brain regions, including forebrain circuits that underlie complex cognitive processes. These observations raise questions about the hierarchical and functional relationship between the SCN and forebrain oscillators, and, relatedly, about the underlying clock-gated synaptic circuitry that modulates cognition. Here, we utilized a clock knockout strategy in which the essential circadian timing gene Bmal1 was selectively deleted from excitatory forebrain neurons, whilst the SCN clock remained intact, to test the role of forebrain clock timing in learning, memory, anxiety, and behavioral despair. With this model system, we observed numerous effects on hippocampus-dependent measures of cognition. Mice lacking forebrain Bmal1 exhibited deficits in both acquisition and recall on the Barnes maze. Notably, loss of forebrain Bmal1 abrogated time-of-day dependent novel object location memory. However, the loss of Bmal1 did not alter performance on the elevated plus maze, open field assay, and tail suspension test, indicating that this phenotype specifically impairs cognition but not affect. Together, these data suggest that forebrain clock timing plays a critical role in shaping the efficiency of learning and memory retrieval over the circadian day.

  9. Ischemia/reperfusion-induced Kidney Injury in Heterozygous PACAP-deficient Mice.

    PubMed

    Laszlo, E; Varga, A; Kovacs, K; Jancso, G; Kiss, P; Tamas, A; Szakaly, P; Fulop, B; Reglodi, D

    2015-09-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) is a neuropeptide with very diverse distribution and functions. Among others, PACAP is a potent cytoprotective peptide due to its antiapoptotic, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidant actions. This also has been shown in different kidney pathologies, including ischemia/reperfusion-induced kidney injury. Similar protective effects of the endogenous PACAP are confirmed by the increased vulnerability of PACAP-deficient mice to different harmful stimuli. Kidneys of homozygous PACAP-deficient mice have more severe damages in renal ischemia/reperfusion and kidney cell cultures isolated from these mice show increased sensitivity to renal oxidative stress. In our present study we raised the question of whether the partial lack of the PACAP gene is also deleterious, i.e. whether heterozygous PACAP-deficient mice also display more severe damage after renal ischemia/reperfusion. Mice underwent 45 or 60 minutes of ischemia followed by 2 weeks reperfusion. Histological evaluation of the kidneys was performed and individual histopathological parameters were graded. Furthermore, we investigated apoptotic markers, cytokine expression, and the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) enzyme 24 hours after 60 minutes of renal ischemia/reperfusion. We found no difference between the intact kidneys of wild-type and heterozygous mice, but marked differences could be observed following ischemia/reperfusion. Heterozygous PACAP-deficient mice had more severe histological alterations, with significantly higher histopathological scores for most of the tested parameters. Higher level of the proapoptotic pp38 MAPK and of some proinflammatory cytokines, as well as lower activity of the antioxidant SOD could be found in these mice. In conclusion, the partial lack of the PACAP gene results in worse outcomes in cases of renal ischemia/reperfusion, confirming that PACAP functions as an endogenous protective factor in the kidney.

  10. Tumor Grade

    MedlinePlus

    ... Other Funding Find NCI funding for small business innovation, technology transfer, and contracts Training Cancer Training at ... much of the tumor tissue has normal breast (milk) duct structures Nuclear grade : an evaluation of the ...

  11. Grading Meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Okuchi, Sachi; Okada, Tomohisa; Yamamoto, Akira; Kanagaki, Mitsunori; Fushimi, Yasutaka; Okada, Tsutomu; Yamauchi, Moritaka; Kataoka, Masako; Arakawa, Yoshiki; Takahashi, Jun C.; Minamiguchi, Sachiko; Miyamoto, Susumu; Togashi, Kaori

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The purpose was to compare capability of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET and thallium-201 (Tl)-SPECT for grading meningioma. This retrospective study was conducted as a case-control study under approval by the institutional review board. In the hospital information system, 67 patients (22 men and 45 women) who had both FDG-PET and Tl-SPECT preoperative examinations were found with histopathologic diagnosis of meningioma. The maximum FDG uptake values of the tumors were measured, and they were standardized to the whole body (SUVmax) and normalized as gray matter ratio (SUVRmax). Mean and maximum Tl uptake ratios (TURmean and TURmax, respectively) of the tumors were measured and normalized as ratios to those of the contralateral normal brain. Receiver-operating characteristic curve analyses of the 4 indexes were conducted for differentiation between low- and high-grade meningiomas, and areas under the curves (AUCs) were compared. Correlation coefficients were calculated between these indexes and Ki-67. Fifty-six meningiomas were classified as grade I (low grade), and 11 were grade II or III (high grade). In all 4 indexes, a significant difference was observed between low- and high-grade meningiomas (P < 0.05). AUCs were 0.817 (SUVmax), 0.781 (SUVRmax), 0.810 (TURmean), and 0.831 (TURmax), and no significant difference was observed among the indexes. Their sensitivity and specificity were 72.7% to 90.9% and 71.4% to 87.5%, respectively. Correlation of the 4 indexes to Ki-67 was statistically significant, but coefficients were relatively low (0.273–0.355). Tl-SPECT, which can be used at hospitals without a cyclotron or an FDG distribution network, has high diagnostic capability of meningioma grades comparable to FDG-PET. PMID:25674763

  12. Fluorescence spectroscopy in renal ischemia and reperfusion: noninvasive evaluation of organ viability.

    PubMed

    Cassini, M F; da Costa, M M; Bagnato, V S; Tirapelli, L F; Silva, G E B; Molina, C A F; Martins, A C P; Tucci, S

    2013-06-01

    Damage provoked by ischemia in renal transplants is difficult to quantify. To determine whether a donated organ is fit for transplantation. We sought to correlate the findings of fluorescence spectroscopy (FS) with histologic evidence of ischemic injury and organ viability. Kidneys of 33 rats were submitted to FS of the upper and lower poles as well as the middle third. Excitation was generated by the laser's wavelengths of 408, 442, and 532 nm. Rats were randomized into groups with the 30, 60, and 120 minutes warm ischemia before analysis by FS, that was repeated at 5 minutes after reperfusion. FS results in the reperfusion phase correlated with ischemia time and degree of histologic injury. After 60 or 120 minutes of ischemia, the excitation lasers of 532 and 442 nm resented a significant negative correlation coefficient with the histological grade (r = -0.61 and r = -0.73, respectively). There was a strong correlation between FS and histologic changes only in the reperfusion phase after renal ischemia. The method was thus unable to assess the viability of organs before transplantation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Vocal matching and intensity of begging calls are associated with a forebrain song circuit in a generalist brood parasite.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wan-Chun; Rivers, James W; White, David J

    2016-06-01

    Vocalizations produced by developing young early in life have simple acoustic features and are thought to be innate. Complex forms of early vocal learning are less likely to evolve in young altricial songbirds because the forebrain vocal-learning circuit is underdeveloped during the period when early vocalizations are produced. However, selective pressure experienced in early postnatal life may lead to early vocal learning that is likely controlled by a simpler brain circuit. We found the food begging calls produced by fledglings of the brown-headed cowbird (Molothrus ater), a generalist avian brood parasite, induced the expression of several immediate early genes and early circuit innervation in a forebrain vocal-motor pathway that is later used for vocal imitation. The forebrain neural activity was correlated with vocal intensity and variability of begging calls that appears to allow cowbirds to vocally match host nestmates. The begging-induced forebrain circuits we observed in fledgling cowbirds were not detected in nonparasitic passerines, including species that are close relatives to the cowbird. The involvement of forebrain vocal circuits during fledgling begging and its association with vocal learning plasticity may be an adaptation that provides young generalist brood parasites with a flexible signaling strategy to procure food from a wide range of heterospecific host parents.

  14. Recipient twin limb ischemia with postnatal onset.

    PubMed

    Broadbent, Roland Spencer

    2007-02-01

    After the occurrence of 3 local cases of limb ischemia in newborn twins, we reviewed the literature to investigate this combination systematically. This review reveals a distinct condition: postnatal onset limb ischemia affecting recipient twins in twin-twin transfusion syndrome.

  15. Importance of postprocedural Wound, Ischemia, and foot Infection (WIfI) restaging in predicting limb salvage.

    PubMed

    Leithead, Charles; Novak, Zdenek; Spangler, Emily; Passman, Marc A; Witcher, Adam; Patterson, Mark A; Beck, Adam W; Pearce, Benjamin J

    2017-09-21

    The Wound, Ischemia, and foot Infection (WIfI) classification system was created to encompass demographic changes and expanding techniques of revascularization to perform meaningful analyses of outcomes in the treatment of the threatened limb. The WIfI index is intended to be analogous to the TNM staging system for cancer, with restaging to be done after control of infection and after revascularization. Our goal was to evaluate the effectiveness of WIfI restaging after therapy in the prediction of limb outcomes. Preoperative WIfI scoring was performed prospectively for all critical limb ischemia patients who underwent revascularization from January 2014 to June 2015. WIfI restaging and assessment of outcomes were performed retrospectively through August 2016. WIfI classification was determined at the following intervals: preoperatively, immediately postoperatively, and 1 month and 6 months after intervention. Amputation-free survival (AFS) was the primary end point. Kaplan-Meier plot analysis and comparisons of preoperative grades with respective postoperative grades were performed using paired t-test, χ(2) test, and correlation analyses. A total of 180 limbs and 172 critical limb ischemia patients underwent revascularization, of which 29 limbs had major amputations (16%). Wound grades generally improved after surgery across the entire cohort. Major amputation was associated with preoperative wound grade and remained associated with wound grade at postoperative restaging at 1 month and beyond on the basis of amputation frequency analysis (preoperatively, 1 month, and 6 months, P = .03, < .001, and < .001, respectively). Wound grade was significantly associated with AFS at 1 month and 6 months after intervention (log-rank, P < .001 for restaging intervals). Ischemia grades improved initially with a slight decline across the cohort at 6 months. Ischemia grade at 1 month postoperatively was associated with AFS (log-rank, P = .03). Foot infection

  16. Evidence that leptin-induced weight loss requires activation of both forebrain and hindbrain receptors

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Ruth B.S.

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies with chronic decerebrate rats and rats infused with leptin into the 4th ventricle suggest that hindbrain leptin receptors attenuate the catabolic effect of forebrain leptin receptor activation. To test this further rats were fitted with both 3rd and 4th ventricle cannulae. They were infused for 12 days with different combinations of saline, low dose leptin or leptin receptor antagonist (leptin mutein protein). Infusion of 0.1 μg leptin/day into the 3rd ventricle or 0.6 μg leptin/day into the 4th ventricle had no significant effect on food intake, energy expenditure or body composition. Infusion of 2 μg mutein/day into either ventricle caused a small, but significant weight gain. When mutein was infused into one ventricle and leptin into the other, then rats lost weight irrespective of which combination was applied. Surprisingly, rats that received leptin infusions into both ventricles showed an initial hypophagia, no change in energy expenditure, but a 75% loss of carcass fat after 12 days. These data suggest that neuronal pathways activated by leptin receptors in either the forebrain or hindbrain modulate each other’s effects. In normal conditions hindbrain leptin may attenuate the catabolic effect of forebrain leptin, but if activity in one area is blocked with mutein, then the catabolic response to leptin in the other ventricle is exaggerated. When receptors in both areas are activated there is an integration of response to produce negative energy balance. This may ensure that leptin causes a loss of fat only when leptin is elevated in both the CSF and periphery. PMID:23911693

  17. Neurotrophic Factors Rescue Basal Forebrain Cholinergic Neurons and Improve Performance on a Spatial Learning Test

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yu-Shang; Danandeh, Andalib; Baratta, Janie; Lin, Ching-Yi; Yu, Jen; Robertson, Richard T.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated whether animals sustaining experimental damage to the basal forebrain cholinergic system would benefit from treatment with exogenous neurotrophic factors. Specifically, we set out to determine whether neurotrophic factors would rescue damaged cholinergic neurons and improve behavioral performance on a spatial learning and memory task. Adult rats received bilateral injections of either saline (controls) or 192 IgG-saporin to damage basal forebrain cholinergic neurons (BFCNs). Two weeks later, animals received implants of an Alzet mini-pump connected to cannulae implanted bilaterally in the lateral ventricles. Animals received infusions of nerve growth factor (NGF), neurotrophin 3 (NT3), a combination of NGF and NT3, or a saline control over a 4-week period. Compared to saline-treated controls, animals sustaining saporin-induced damage to BFCNs took significantly more trials to learn a delayed match to position task and also performed more poorly on subsequent tests, with increasing delays between test runs. In contrast, animals infused with neurotrophins after saporin treatment performed significantly better than animals receiving saline infusions; no differences were detected for performance scores among animals infused with NGF, NT3, or a combination of NGF and NT3. Studies of ChAT immunnocytochemical labeling of BFCNs revealed a reduction in the numbers of ChAT-positive neurons in septum, nucleus of diagonal band, and nucleus basalis in animals treated with saporin followed by saline infusions, whereas animals treated with infusions of NGF, NT3 or a combination of NGF and NT3 showed only modest reductions in ChAT-positive neurons. Together, these data support the notion that administration of neurotrophic factors can rescue basal forebrain cholinergic neurons and improve learning and memory performance in rats. PMID:24017996

  18. Neurotrophic factors rescue basal forebrain cholinergic neurons and improve performance on a spatial learning test.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yu-Shang; Danandeh, Andalib; Baratta, Janie; Lin, Ching-Yi; Yu, Jen; Robertson, Richard T

    2013-11-01

    This study investigated whether animals sustaining experimental damage to the basal forebrain cholinergic system would benefit from treatment with exogenous neurotrophic factors. Specifically, we set out to determine whether neurotrophic factors would rescue damaged cholinergic neurons and improve behavioral performance on a spatial learning and memory task. Adult rats received bilateral injections of either saline (controls) or 192 IgG-saporin to damage basal forebrain cholinergic neurons (BFCNs). Two weeks later, animals received implants of an Alzet mini-pump connected to cannulae implanted bilaterally in the lateral ventricles. Animals received infusions of nerve growth factor (NGF), neurotrophin 3 (NT3), a combination of NGF and NT3, or a saline control over a 4-week period. Compared to saline-treated controls, animals sustaining saporin-induced damage to BFCNs took significantly more trials to learn a delayed match to position task and also performed more poorly on subsequent tests, with increasing delays between test runs. In contrast, animals infused with neurotrophins after saporin treatment performed significantly better than animals receiving saline infusions; no differences were detected for performance scores among animals infused with NGF, NT3, or a combination of NGF and NT3. Studies of ChAT immunnocytochemical labeling of BFCNs revealed a reduction in the numbers of ChAT-positive neurons in septum, nucleus of diagonal band, and nucleus basalis in animals treated with saporin followed by saline infusions, whereas animals treated with infusions of NGF, NT3 or a combination of NGF and NT3 showed only modest reductions in ChAT-positive neurons. Together, these data support the notion that administration of neurotrophic factors can rescue basal forebrain cholinergic neurons and improve learning and memory performance in rats.

  19. Conditional corticotropin-releasing hormone overexpression in the mouse forebrain enhances rapid eye movement sleep

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, M; Müller-Preuss, P; Lu, A; Wiesner, E; Flachskamm, C; Wurst, W; Holsboer, F; Deussing, J M

    2009-01-01

    Impaired sleep and enhanced stress hormone secretion are the hallmarks of stress-related disorders, including major depression. The central neuropeptide, corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), is a key hormone that regulates humoral and behavioral adaptation to stress. Its prolonged hypersecretion is believed to play a key role in the development and course of depressive symptoms, and is associated with sleep impairment. To investigate the specific effects of central CRH overexpression on sleep, we used conditional mouse mutants that overexpress CRH in the entire central nervous system (CRH-COE-Nes) or only in the forebrain, including limbic structures (CRH-COE-Cam). Compared with wild-type or control mice during baseline, both homozygous CRH-COE-Nes and -Cam mice showed constantly increased rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, whereas slightly suppressed non-REM sleep was detected only in CRH-COE-Nes mice during the light period. In response to 6-h sleep deprivation, elevated levels of REM sleep also became evident in heterozygous CRH-COE-Nes and -Cam mice during recovery, which was reversed by treatment with a CRH receptor type 1 (CRHR1) antagonist in heterozygous and homozygous CRH-COE-Nes mice. The peripheral stress hormone levels were not elevated at baseline, and even after sleep deprivation they were indistinguishable across genotypes. As the stress axis was not altered, sleep changes, in particular enhanced REM sleep, occurring in these models are most likely induced by the forebrain CRH through the activation of CRHR1. CRH hypersecretion in the forebrain seems to drive REM sleep, supporting the notion that enhanced REM sleep may serve as biomarker for clinical conditions associated with enhanced CRH secretion. PMID:19455148

  20. Conditional corticotropin-releasing hormone overexpression in the mouse forebrain enhances rapid eye movement sleep.

    PubMed

    Kimura, M; Müller-Preuss, P; Lu, A; Wiesner, E; Flachskamm, C; Wurst, W; Holsboer, F; Deussing, J M

    2010-02-01

    Impaired sleep and enhanced stress hormone secretion are the hallmarks of stress-related disorders, including major depression. The central neuropeptide, corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), is a key hormone that regulates humoral and behavioral adaptation to stress. Its prolonged hypersecretion is believed to play a key role in the development and course of depressive symptoms, and is associated with sleep impairment. To investigate the specific effects of central CRH overexpression on sleep, we used conditional mouse mutants that overexpress CRH in the entire central nervous system (CRH-COE-Nes) or only in the forebrain, including limbic structures (CRH-COE-Cam). Compared with wild-type or control mice during baseline, both homozygous CRH-COE-Nes and -Cam mice showed constantly increased rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, whereas slightly suppressed non-REM sleep was detected only in CRH-COE-Nes mice during the light period. In response to 6-h sleep deprivation, elevated levels of REM sleep also became evident in heterozygous CRH-COE-Nes and -Cam mice during recovery, which was reversed by treatment with a CRH receptor type 1 (CRHR1) antagonist in heterozygous and homozygous CRH-COE-Nes mice. The peripheral stress hormone levels were not elevated at baseline, and even after sleep deprivation they were indistinguishable across genotypes. As the stress axis was not altered, sleep changes, in particular enhanced REM sleep, occurring in these models are most likely induced by the forebrain CRH through the activation of CRHR1. CRH hypersecretion in the forebrain seems to drive REM sleep, supporting the notion that enhanced REM sleep may serve as biomarker for clinical conditions associated with enhanced CRH secretion.

  1. POSTSYNAPTIC TARGETS OF GABAERGIC BASAL FOREBRAIN PROJECTIONS TO THE BASOLATERAL AMYGDALA

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, A. J.; Muller, J. F.; Mascagni, F.

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that the basolateral amygdala, like the neocortex and hippocampus, receives GABAergic inputs from the basal forebrain in addition to the well-established cholinergic inputs. Since the neuronal targets of these inputs have yet to be determined, it is difficult to predict the functional significance of this innervation. The present study addressed this question in the rat by employing anterograde tract tracing combined with immunohistochemistry at the light and electron microscopic levels of analysis. Amygdalopetal axons from the basal forebrain mainly targeted the basolateral nucleus (BL) of the amygdala. The morphology of these axons was heterogeneous and included GABAergic axons that contained vesicular GABA transporter protein (VGAT). These axons, designated type 1, exhibited distinctive large axonal varicosities that were typically clustered along the length of the axon. Type 1 axons formed multiple contacts with the cell bodies and dendrites of parvalbumin-containing (PV+) interneurons, but relatively few contacts with calretinin-containing and somatostatin-containing interneurons. At the ultrastructural level of analysis, the large terminals of type 1 axons exhibited numerous mitochondria and were densely packed with synaptic vesicles. Individual terminals formed broad symmetrical synapses with BL PV+ interneurons, and often formed additional symmetrical synapses with BL pyramidal cells. Some solitary type 1 terminals formed symmetrical synapses solely with BL pyramidal cells. These results suggest that GABAergic neurons of the basal forebrain provide indirect disinhibition, as well as direct inhibition, of BL pyramidal neurons. The possible involvement of these circuits in rhythmic oscillations related to emotional learning, attention, and arousal is discussed. PMID:21435381

  2. Regulatory interactions of stress and reward on rat forebrain opioidergic and GABAergic circuitry.

    PubMed

    Christiansen, A M; Herman, J P; Ulrich-Lai, Y M

    2011-03-01

    Palatable food intake reduces stress responses, suggesting that individuals may consume such ?comfort? food as self-medication for stress relief. The mechanism by which palatable foods provide stress relief is not known, but likely lies at the intersection of forebrain reward and stress regulatory circuits. Forebrain opioidergic and gamma-aminobutyric acid ergic signaling is critical for both reward and stress regulation, suggesting that these systems are prime candidates for mediating stress relief by palatable foods. Thus, the present study (1) determines how palatable ?comfort? food alters stress-induced changes in the mRNA expression of inhibitory neurotransmitters in reward and stress neurocircuitry and (2) identifies candidate brain regions that may underlie comfort food-mediated stress reduction. We used a model of palatable ?snacking? in combination with a model of chronic variable stress followed by in situ hybridization to determine forebrain levels of pro-opioid and glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) mRNA. The data identify regions within the extended amygdala, striatum, and hypothalamus as potential regions for mediating hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis buffering following palatable snacking. Specifically, palatable snacking alone decreased pro-enkephalin-A (ENK) mRNA expression in the anterior bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BST) and the nucleus accumbens, and decreased GAD65 mRNA in the posterior BST. Chronic stress alone increased ENK mRNA in the hypothalamus, nucleus accumbens, amygdala, and hippocampus; increased dynorphin mRNA in the nucleus accumbens; increased GAD65 mRNA in the anterior hypothalamus and BST; and decreased GAD65 mRNA in the dorsal hypothalamus. Importantly, palatable food intake prevented stress-induced gene expression changes in subregions of the hypothalamus, BST, and nucleus accumbens. Overall, these data suggest that complex interactions exist between brain reward and stress pathways and that palatable snacking can

  3. Forebrain development in fetal MRI: evaluation of anatomical landmarks before gestational week 27.

    PubMed

    Schmook, Maria T; Brugger, Peter C; Weber, Michael; Kasprian, Gregor; Nemec, Stefan; Krampl-Bettelheim, Elisabeth; Prayer, Daniela

    2010-06-01

    Forebrain malformations include some of the most severe developmental anomalies and require early diagnosis. The proof of normal or abnormal prosencephalic development may have an influence on further management in the event of a suspected fetal malformation. The purpose of this retrospective study was to evaluate the detectability of anatomical landmarks of forebrain development using in vivo fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) before gestational week (gw) 27. MRI studies of 83 singleton fetuses (gw 16-26, average +/- sd: gw 22 +/- 2) performed at 1.5 Tesla were assessed. T2-weighted (w) fast spin echo, T1w gradient-echo and diffusion-weighted sequences were screened for the detectability of anatomical landmarks as listed below. The interhemispheric fissure, ocular bulbs, corpus callosum, infundibulum, chiasm, septum pellucidum (SP), profile, and palate were detectable in 95%, 95%, 89%, 87%, 82%, 81%, 78%, 78% of cases. Olfactory tracts were more easily delineated than bulbs and sulci (37% versus 18% and 8%), with significantly higher detection rates in the coronal plane. The pituitary gland could be detected on T1w images in 60% with an increasing diameter with gestational age (p = 0.041). The delineation of olfactory tracts (coronal plane), chiasm, SP and pituitary gland were significantly increased after week 21 (p < 0.05). Pathologies were found in 28% of cases. This study provides detection rates for anatomical landmarks of forebrain development with fetal MRI before gw 27. Several anatomical structures are readily detectable with routine fetal MRI sequences; thus, if these landmarks are not delineable, it should raise the suspicion of a pathology. Recommendations regarding favorable sequences/planes are provided.

  4. Cell death atlas of the postnatal mouse ventral forebrain and hypothalamus: effects of age and sex.

    PubMed

    Ahern, Todd H; Krug, Stefanie; Carr, Audrey V; Murray, Elaine K; Fitzpatrick, Emmett; Bengston, Lynn; McCutcheon, Jill; De Vries, Geert J; Forger, Nancy G

    2013-08-01

    Naturally occurring cell death is essential to the development of the mammalian nervous system. Although the importance of developmental cell death has been appreciated for decades, there is no comprehensive account of cell death across brain areas in the mouse. Moreover, several regional sex differences in cell death have been described for the ventral forebrain and hypothalamus, but it is not known how widespread the phenomenon is. We used immunohistochemical detection of activated caspase-3 to identify dying cells in the brains of male and female mice from postnatal day (P) 1 to P11. Cell death density, total number of dying cells, and regional volume were determined in 16 regions of the hypothalamus and ventral forebrain (the anterior hypothalamus, arcuate nucleus, anteroventral periventricular nucleus, medial preoptic nucleus, paraventricular nucleus, suprachiasmatic nucleus, and ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus; the basolateral, central, and medial amygdala; the lateral and principal nuclei of the bed nuclei of the stria terminalis; the caudate-putamen; the globus pallidus; the lateral septum; and the islands of Calleja). All regions showed a significant effect of age on cell death. The timing of peak cell death varied between P1 to P7, and the average rate of cell death varied tenfold among regions. Several significant sex differences in cell death and/or regional volume were detected. These data address large gaps in the developmental literature and suggest interesting region-specific differences in the prevalence and timing of cell death in the hypothalamus and ventral forebrain. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Effects of lithium and aripiprazole on brain stimulation reward and neuroplasticity markers in the limbic forebrain.

    PubMed

    Mavrikaki, Maria; Schintu, Nicoletta; Kastellakis, Andreas; Nomikos, George G; Svenningsson, Per; Panagis, George

    2014-04-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a severe pathological condition with impaired reward-related processing. The present study was designed to assess the effects of two commonly used BD medications, the mood stabilizer lithium chloride (LiCl) and the atypical antipsychotic and antimanic agent aripiprazole, in an animal model of reward and motivation and on markers of neuroplasticity in the limbic forebrain in rats. We utilized intracranial self-simulation (ICSS) to assess the effects of acute and chronic administration of LiCl and aripiprazole on brain stimulation reward, and phosphorylation studies to determine their effects on specific cellular neuroplasticity markers, i.e., the phosphorylation of CREB and crucial phosphorylation sites on the GluA1 subunit of AMPA receptors and the NA1 and NA2B subunits of NMDA receptors, in the limbic forebrain. Chronic LiCl induced tolerance to the anhedonic effect of the drug observed after acute administration, while chronic aripiprazole induced a sustained anhedonic effect. These distinct behavioral responses might be related to differences in molecular markers of neuroplasticity. Accordingly, we demonstrated that chronic LiCl, but not aripiprazole, decreased phosphorylation of CREB at the Ser133 site and NA1 at the Ser896 site in the prefrontal cortex and GluA1 at the Ser831 site and NA2B at the Ser1303 site in the ventral striatum. The present study provides evidence for BD medication-evoked changes in reward and motivation processes and in specific markers of neuronal plasticity in the limbic forebrain, promoting the notion that these drugs may blunt dysregulated reward processes in BD by counteracting neuronal plasticity deficits.

  6. Functional conservation of a forebrain enhancer from the elephant shark (Callorhinchus milii ) in zebrafish and mice

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The phylogenetic position of the elephant shark (Callorhinchus milii ) is particularly relevant to study the evolution of genes and gene regulation in vertebrates. Here we examine the evolution of Dlx homeobox gene regulation during vertebrate embryonic development with a particular focus on the forebrain. We first identified the elephant shark sequence orthologous to the URE2 cis -regulatory element of the mouse Dlx1/Dlx2 locus (herein named CmURE2). We then conducted a comparative study of the sequence and enhancer activity of CmURE2 with that of orthologous regulatory sequences from zebrafish and mouse. Results The CmURE2 sequence shows a high percentage of identity with its mouse and zebrafish counterparts but is overall more similar to mouse URE2 (MmURE2) than to zebrafish URE2 (DrURE2). In transgenic zebrafish and mouse embryos, CmURE2 displayed enhancer activity in the forebrain that overlapped with that of DrURE2 and MmURE2. However, we detected notable differences in the activity of the three sequences in the diencephalon. Outside of the forebrain, CmURE2 shows enhancer activity in areas such as the pharyngeal arches and dorsal root ganglia where its' counterparts are also active. Conclusions Our transgenic assays show that part of the URE2 enhancer activity is conserved throughout jawed vertebrates but also that new characteristics have evolved in the different groups. Our study demonstrates that the elephant shark is a useful outgroup to study the evolution of regulatory mechanisms in vertebrates and to address how changes in the sequence of cis -regulatory elements translate into changes in their regulatory activity. PMID:20504318

  7. HVC lesions modify immediate early gene expression in auditory forebrain regions of female songbirds.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Kathleen S; Kleitz-Nelson, Hayley K; Ball, Gregory F

    2013-04-01

    It is well established that auditory forebrain regions of oscine birds are essential for the encoding of species-typical songs and are, therefore, vital for recognition of song during sociosexual interactions. Regions such as the caudal medial nidopallium (NCM) and the caudal medial mesopallium (CMM) are involved in perceptual processing of song and the formation of auditory memories. There is an additional telencephalic nucleus, however, that has also been implicated in species recognition. This nucleus is HVC, a prominent nucleus that sits at the apex of the song system, and is well known for its critical role in song learning and song production in male songbirds. Here, we explore the functional relationship between auditory forebrain regions (i.e., NCM and CMM) and HVC in female canaries (Serinus canaria). We lesion HVC and examine immediate early gene responses to conspecific song presentation within CMM and NCM to explore whether HVC can modulate auditory responses within these forebrain regions. Our results reveal robust deficits in ZENK-ir in CMM and NCM of HVC-lesioned females when compared with control- and sham-lesioned females, indicating that functional connections exists between HVC and NCM/CMM. Although these connected regions have been implicated in song learning and production in males, they likely serve distinct functions in female songbirds that face the task of song recognition rather than song production. Identifying functional connections between HVC and auditory regions involved in song perception is an essential step toward developing a comprehensive understanding of the neural basis of song recognition.

  8. Chick Embryo Partial Ischemia Model: A New Approach to Study Ischemia Ex Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Majumder, Syamantak; Ilayaraja, M.; Seerapu, Himabindu Reddy; Sinha, Swaraj; Siamwala, Jamila H.; Chatterjee, Suvro

    2010-01-01

    Background Ischemia is a pathophysiological condition due to blockade in blood supply to a specific tissue thus damaging the physiological activity of the tissue. Different in vivo models are presently available to study ischemia in heart and other tissues. However, no ex vivo ischemia model has been available to date for routine ischemia research and for faster screening of anti-ischemia drugs. In the present study, we took the opportunity to develop an ex vivo model of partial ischemia using the vascular bed of 4th day incubated chick embryo. Methodology/Principal Findings Ischemia was created in chick embryo by ligating the right vitelline artery using sterile surgical suture. Hypoxia inducible factor- 1 alpha (HIF-1α), creatine phospho kinase-MB and reactive oxygen species in animal tissues and cells were measured to confirm ischemia in chick embryo. Additionally, ranolazine, N-acetyl cysteine and trimetazidine were administered as an anti-ischemic drug to validate the present model. Results from the present study depicted that blocking blood flow elevates HIF-1α, lipid peroxidation, peroxynitrite level in ischemic vessels while ranolazine administration partially attenuates ischemia driven HIF-1α expression. Endothelial cell incubated on ischemic blood vessels elucidated a higher level of HIF-1α expression with time while ranolazine treatment reduced HIF-1α in ischemic cells. Incubation of caprine heart strip on chick embryo ischemia model depicted an elevated creatine phospho kinase-MB activity under ischemic condition while histology of the treated heart sections evoked edema and disruption of myofibril structures. Conclusions/Significance The present study concluded that chick embryo partial ischemia model can be used as a novel ex vivo model of ischemia. Therefore, the present model can be used parallel with the known in vivo ischemia models in understanding the mechanistic insight of ischemia development and in evaluating the activity of anti

  9. Song exposure regulates known and novel microRNAs in the zebra finch auditory forebrain

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In an important model for neuroscience, songbirds learn to discriminate songs they hear during tape-recorded playbacks, as demonstrated by song-specific habituation of both behavioral and neurogenomic responses in the auditory forebrain. We hypothesized that microRNAs (miRNAs or miRs) may participate in the changing pattern of gene expression induced by song exposure. To test this, we used massively parallel Illumina sequencing to analyse small RNAs from auditory forebrain of adult zebra finches exposed to tape-recorded birdsong or silence. Results In the auditory forebrain, we identified 121 known miRNAs conserved in other vertebrates. We also identified 34 novel miRNAs that do not align to human or chicken genomes. Five conserved miRNAs showed significant and consistent changes in copy number after song exposure across three biological replications of the song-silence comparison, with two increasing (tgu-miR-25, tgu-miR-192) and three decreasing (tgu-miR-92, tgu-miR-124, tgu-miR-129-5p). We also detected a locus on the Z sex chromosome that produces three different novel miRNAs, with supporting evidence from Northern blot and TaqMan qPCR assays for differential expression in males and females and in response to song playbacks. One of these, tgu-miR-2954-3p, is predicted (by TargetScan) to regulate eight song-responsive mRNAs that all have functions in cellular proliferation and neuronal differentiation. Conclusions The experience of hearing another bird singing alters the profile of miRNAs in the auditory forebrain of zebra finches. The response involves both known conserved miRNAs and novel miRNAs described so far only in the zebra finch, including a novel sex-linked, song-responsive miRNA. These results indicate that miRNAs are likely to contribute to the unique behavioural biology of learned song communication in songbirds. PMID:21627805

  10. Overexpression of Forebrain CRH During Early Life Increases Trauma Susceptibility in Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Toth, Mate; Flandreau, Elizabeth I; Deslauriers, Jessica; Geyer, Mark A; Mansuy, Isabelle M; Merlo Pich, Emilio; Risbrough, Victoria B

    2016-01-01

    Although early-life stress is a significant risk factor for developing anxiety disorders, including posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), the underlying mechanisms are unclear. Corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) is disrupted in individuals with PTSD and early-life stress and hence may mediate the effects of early-life stress on PTSD risk. We hypothesized that CRH hyper-signaling in the forebrain during early development is sufficient to increase response to trauma in adulthood. To test this hypothesis, we induced transient, forebrain-specific, CRH overexpression during early-life (pre-puberty, CRHOEdev) in double-mutant mice (Camk2a-rtta2 × tetO-Crh) and tested their behavioral and gene expression responses to the predator stress model of PTSD in adulthood. In one cohort of CRHOEdev exposed and unexposed mice, avoidance and arousal behaviors were examined 7–15 days after exposure to predator stress. In another cohort, gene expression changes in Crhr1, Crhr2, and Fkbp51 in forebrain of CRHOEdev exposed and unexposed mice were examined 7 days after predator stress. CRHOEdev induced robust increases in startle reactivity and reductions in startle inhibition independently of predator stress in both male and female mice. Avoidance behaviors after predator stress were highly dependent on sex and CRHOEdev exposure. Whereas stressed females exhibited robust avoidance responses that were not altered by CRHOEdev, males developed significant avoidance only when exposed to both CRHOEdev and stress. Quantitative real-time-PCR analysis indicated that CRHOEdev unexposed males exhibit significant changes in Crhr2 expression in the amygdala and bed nucleus stria terminalis in response to stress, whereas males exposed to CRHOEdev did not. Similar to CRHOEdev males, females exhibited no significant Crhr2 gene expression changes in response to stress. Cortical Fkbp51 expression was also significantly reduced by stress and CRHOEdev exposure in males, but not in females. These

  11. [Ischemia-reperfusion injury after lung transplantation].

    PubMed

    Gennai, Stéphane; Pison, Christophe; Briot, Raphaël

    2014-09-01

    Lung ischemia-reperfusion is characterized by diffuse alveolar damage arising from the first hours after transplantation. The first etiology of the primary graft dysfunction in lung is ischemia-reperfusion. It is burdened by an important morbi-mortality. Lung ischemia-reperfusion increases the oxidative stress, inactivates the sodium pump, increases the intracellular calcium, leads to cellular death and the liberation of pro-inflammatory mediators. Researches relative to the reduction of the lung ischemia-reperfusion injuries are numerous but few of them found a place in common clinical practice, because of an insufficient level of proofs. Ex vivolung evaluation is a suitable technique in order to evaluate therapeutics supposed to limit lung ischemia-reperfusion injuries.

  12. Management of delayed cerebral ischemia after subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Francoeur, Charles L; Mayer, Stephan A

    2016-10-14

    For patients who survive the initial bleeding event of a ruptured brain aneurysm, delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) is one of the most important causes of mortality and poor neurological outcome. New insights in the last decade have led to an important paradigm shift in the understanding of DCI pathogenesis. Large-vessel cerebral vasospasm has been challenged as the sole causal mechanism; new hypotheses now focus on the early brain injury, microcirculatory dysfunction, impaired autoregulation, and spreading depolarization. Prevention of DCI primarily relies on nimodipine administration and optimization of blood volume and cardiac performance. Neurological monitoring is essential for early DCI detection and intervention. Serial clinical examination combined with intermittent transcranial Doppler ultrasonography and CT angiography (with or without perfusion) is the most commonly used monitoring paradigm, and usually suffices in good grade patients. By contrast, poor grade patients (WFNS grades 4 and 5) require more advanced monitoring because stupor and coma reduce sensitivity to the effects of ischemia. Greater reliance on CT perfusion imaging, continuous electroencephalography, and invasive brain multimodality monitoring are potential strategies to improve situational awareness as it relates to detecting DCI. Pharmacologically-induced hypertension combined with volume is the established first-line therapy for DCI; a good clinical response with reversal of the presenting deficit occurs in 70 % of patients. Medically refractory DCI, defined as failure to respond adequately to these measures, should trigger step-wise escalation of rescue therapy. Level 1 rescue therapy consists of cardiac output optimization, hemoglobin optimization, and endovascular intervention, including angioplasty and intra-arterial vasodilator infusion. In highly refractory cases, level 2 rescue therapies are also considered, none of which have been validated. This review provides an overview of

  13. Intestinal Ischemia: US-CT findings correlations

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Intestinal ischemia is an abdominal emergency that accounts for approximately 2% of gastrointestinal illnesses. It represents a complex of diseases caused by impaired blood perfusion to the small and/or large bowel including acute arterial mesenteric ischemia (AAMI), acute venous mesenteric ischemia (AVMI), non occlusive mesenteric ischemia (NOMI), ischemia/reperfusion injury (I/R), ischemic colitis (IC). In this study different study methods (US, CT) will be correlated in the detection of mesenteric ischemia imaging findings due to various etiologies. Methods Basing on experience of our institutions, over 200 cases of mesenteric ischemia/infarction investigated with both US and CT were evaluated considering, in particular, the following findings: presence/absence of arterial/venous obstruction, bowel wall thickness and enhancement, presence/absence of spastic reflex ileus, hypotonic reflex ileus or paralitic ileus, mural and/or portal/mesenteric pneumatosis, abdominal free fluid, parenchymal ischemia/infarction (liver, kidney, spleen). Results To make an early diagnosis useful to ensure a correct therapeutic approach, it is very important to differentiate between occlusive (arterial,venous) and nonocclusive causes (NOMI). The typical findings of each forms of mesenteric ischemia are explained in the text. Conclusion At present, the reference diagnostic modality for intestinal ischaemia is contrast-enhanced CT. However, there are some disadvantages associated with these techniques, such as radiation exposure, potential nephrotoxicity and the risk of an allergic reaction to the contrast agents. Thus, not all patients with suspected bowel ischaemia can be subjected to these examinations. Despite its limitations, US could constitutes a good imaging method as first examination in acute settings of suspected mesenteric ischemia. PMID:23902826

  14. Distinct Correlation Structure Supporting a Rate-Code for Sound Localization in the Owl’s Auditory Forebrain

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Abstract While a topographic map of auditory space exists in the vertebrate midbrain, it is absent in the forebrain. Yet, both brain regions are implicated in sound localization. The heterogeneous spatial tuning of adjacent sites in the forebrain compared to the midbrain reflects different underlying circuitries, which is expected to affect the correlation structure, i.e., signal (similarity of tuning) and noise (trial-by-trial variability) correlations. Recent studies have drawn attention to the impact of response correlations on the information readout from a neural population. We thus analyzed the correlation structure in midbrain and forebrain regions of the barn owl’s auditory system. Tetrodes were used to record in the midbrain and two forebrain regions, Field L and the downstream auditory arcopallium (AAr), in anesthetized owls. Nearby neurons in the midbrain showed high signal and noise correlations (RNCs), consistent with shared inputs. As previously reported, Field L was arranged in random clusters of similarly tuned neurons. Interestingly, AAr neurons displayed homogeneous monotonic azimuth tuning, while response variability of nearby neurons was significantly less correlated than the midbrain. Using a decoding approach, we demonstrate that low RNC in AAr restricts the potentially detrimental effect it can have on information, assuming a rate code proposed for mammalian sound localization. This study harnesses the power of correlation structure analysis to investigate the coding of auditory space. Our findings demonstrate distinct correlation structures in the auditory midbrain and forebrain, which would be beneficial for a rate-code framework for sound localization in the nontopographic forebrain representation of auditory space. PMID:28674698

  15. Metabolic Adaptation to Muscle Ischemia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabrera, Marco E.; Coon, Jennifer E.; Kalhan, Satish C.; Radhakrishnan, Krishnan; Saidel, Gerald M.; Stanley, William C.

    2000-01-01

    Although all tissues in the body can adapt to varying physiological/pathological conditions, muscle is the most adaptable. To understand the significance of cellular events and their role in controlling metabolic adaptations in complex physiological systems, it is necessary to link cellular and system levels by means of mechanistic computational models. The main objective of this work is to improve understanding of the regulation of energy metabolism during skeletal/cardiac muscle ischemia by combining in vivo experiments and quantitative models of metabolism. Our main focus is to investigate factors affecting lactate metabolism (e.g., NADH/NAD) and the inter-regulation between carbohydrate and fatty acid metabolism during a reduction in regional blood flow. A mechanistic mathematical model of energy metabolism has been developed to link cellular metabolic processes and their control mechanisms to tissue (skeletal muscle) and organ (heart) physiological responses. We applied this model to simulate the relationship between tissue oxygenation, redox state, and lactate metabolism in skeletal muscle. The model was validated using human data from published occlusion studies. Currently, we are investigating the difference in the responses to sudden vs. gradual onset ischemia in swine by combining in vivo experimental studies with computational models of myocardial energy metabolism during normal and ischemic conditions.

  16. [Tonic pupil caused by ischemia].

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, H

    1989-01-01

    Tonic pupil is usually an idiopathic condition. In some cases, the cause of the ciliary ganglion lesion leading to tonic pupils is obvious. Rarely ischemia causes a lesion of the ciliary ganglion or the short ciliary nerves due to the good blood supply of the ciliary ganglion. Only two cases of tonic pupils in the course of giant cell arteritis are mentioned in the literature, but tonic pupils are probably much more common with this disease. Five cases are demonstrated here. All had associated ischemic optic neuropathy, and stagnation of the blood flow in the supratrochlear artery could be demonstrated in two cases by Doppler sonography. Tonic pupils may also occur when an oclusion of the internal carotid artery resolves, probably because of transient stasis of the orbital blood flow. In another case, tonic pupils were associated with choroidal ischemia (proved by video fluorescent angiography) of unknown origin. The diagnosis of tonic pupils was made by pharmacological testing for cholinergic hypersensitivity with 0.1% pilocarpine.

  17. Inflammatory Responses in Brain Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Kawabori, Masahito; Yenari, Midori A.

    2017-01-01

    Brain infarction causes tissue death by ischemia due to occlusion of the cerebral vessels and recent work has shown that post stroke inflammation contributes significantly to the development of ischemic pathology. Because secondary damage by brain inflammation may have a longer therapeutic time window compared to the rescue of primary damage following arterial occlusion, controlling inflammation would be an obvious therapeutic target. A substantial amount of experimentall progress in this area has been made in recent years. However, it is difficult to elucidate the precise mechanisms of the inflammatory responses following ischemic stroke because inflammation is a complex series of interactions between inflammatory cells and molecules, all of which could be either detrimental or beneficial. We review recent advances in neuroinflammation and the modulation of inflammatory signaling pathways in brain ischemia. Potential targets for treatment of ischemic stroke will also be covered. The roles of the immune system and brain damage versus repair will help to clarify how immune modulation may treat stroke. PMID:25666795

  18. Metabolic Adaptation to Muscle Ischemia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabrera, Marco E.; Coon, Jennifer E.; Kalhan, Satish C.; Radhakrishnan, Krishnan; Saidel, Gerald M.; Stanley, William C.

    2000-01-01

    Although all tissues in the body can adapt to varying physiological/pathological conditions, muscle is the most adaptable. To understand the significance of cellular events and their role in controlling metabolic adaptations in complex physiological systems, it is necessary to link cellular and system levels by means of mechanistic computational models. The main objective of this work is to improve understanding of the regulation of energy metabolism during skeletal/cardiac muscle ischemia by combining in vivo experiments and quantitative models of metabolism. Our main focus is to investigate factors affecting lactate metabolism (e.g., NADH/NAD) and the inter-regulation between carbohydrate and fatty acid metabolism during a reduction in regional blood flow. A mechanistic mathematical model of energy metabolism has been developed to link cellular metabolic processes and their control mechanisms to tissue (skeletal muscle) and organ (heart) physiological responses. We applied this model to simulate the relationship between tissue oxygenation, redox state, and lactate metabolism in skeletal muscle. The model was validated using human data from published occlusion studies. Currently, we are investigating the difference in the responses to sudden vs. gradual onset ischemia in swine by combining in vivo experimental studies with computational models of myocardial energy metabolism during normal and ischemic conditions.

  19. Motherhood and nursing stimulate c-FOS expression in the rabbit forebrain.

    PubMed

    González-Mariscal, Gabriela; Jiménez, Angeles; Chirino, Rosario; Beyer, Carlos

    2009-08-01

    Mother rabbits nurse once daily with circadian periodicity. The authors investigated brain structures involved in regulating this activity by quantifying c-FOS-immunoreactive (IR) cells in the forebrain of: (1) mothers killed on postpartum Day 1 (PPD 1) after nursing (Group 1) or not given pups (Group 2); (2) mothers killed on PPD 7 after nursing (Group 3) or not given pups on such day (Group 4); (3) unmated virgins (Group 5). Groups 1 through 4 showed similar numbers of c-FOS-IR cells in the preoptic area, an amount around three to fourfold larger than that found in virgins. Nursing increased, on PPD 1 and 7, c-FOS-IR cell number in the lateral septum and paraventricular and supraoptic nuclei. No differences were seen among Groups 1 through 5 in the suprachiasmatic nucleus. In the ventromedial hypothalamus virgins had more c-FOS-IR cells compared with Groups 1 and 2. Results suggest that specific forebrain structures participate in regulating particular aspects of rabbit maternal behavior: the POA and LS seem associated with the establishment of motherhood and the magnocellular nuclei with the occurrence of milk letdown. 2009 APA, all rights reserved

  20. Quality of life: the bridge from the cholinergic basal forebrain to cognitive science and bioethics.

    PubMed

    Whitehouse, Peter J

    2006-01-01

    Our paper on loss of neurons in the Nucleus Basalis of Meynert (now considered part of the cholinergic basal forebrain) in Alzheimer disease (AD) stimulated scientific interest in this little studied brain region. Our subsequent studies associated pathology in the basal forebrain with other dementias, such as Parkinson's disease, and with neurotransmitter receptor changes, such as in nicotinic receptors. We and many others worked to develop medications to treat AD through cholinergic mechanisms and eventually four cholinesterase inhibitors were approved. However the effect sizes of currently available drugs are modest and ethical issues in conducting research in dementia are challenging. In Cleveland we came to focus on the goals of improving quality of life and the importance on non-pharmacological approaches to treatment. International efforts were organized to improve the efficiency of drug development and to focus on important cultural and pharmacoeconomic issues. Eventually I became concerned about the very way we conceive AD and related concepts like MCI (mild cognitive impairment). As the hundredth anniversary of the first case approaches I am helping to organize meetings to reflect deeply on what we have learned and how to imagine creating a more positive future for persons affected by what I used to call AD.

  1. [Demonstration of afferent connections of the forebrain in Emys orbicularis turtles by the peroxidase method].

    PubMed

    Belekhova, M G; Kosareva, A A; Veselkin, N N; Ermakova, T V

    1978-01-01

    The transport of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) out of the injection site in the dorsal ventricular ridge was studied in turtles Emys orbicularis. Labeled cells in the forebrain were observed in the paleostriatum among fibers of the lateral forebrain bundle. In the thalamus most of cells containing the granular HRP reaction product were located in the n. rotundus, n. reuniens and perirotundal nuclei (n. dorso-medialis anterior, n. magnocellularis thalami, n (centralis) lateralis, n. dorso-medialis). Fewer labeled cells were revealed in the n. anterior and n. ventralis. The density of labeled cells in the majority of all thalamic nuclei increased if the HRP was extended from the dorsal ventricular ridge into the neostriatum and the pallial thickening with adjacent general cortex. HRP positive cells in the pretectal area, nuclei of the posterior commissura and mesencephalic ventro-lateral tegmentum were observed only in cases when the enzyme was diffused from the injection site into the neostriatum, while the HRP retrograde transport to n. geniculatus lateralis, pars dorsalis was revealed only when HRP was extended into the pallial thickening and adjacent general cortex. Ascending connections of the paleostriatum, thalamic nuclei and mesencephalic tegmentum with telencephalic structures, mainly with the dorsal ventricular ridge, were discussed.

  2. Agmatine protection against chlorpromazine-induced forebrain cortex injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Stevanovic, Ivana; Ninkovic, Milica; Stojanovic, Ivana; Lavrnja, Irena; Radicevic, Tatjana; Pavlovic, Milos

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate whether agmatine (AGM) provides protection against oxidative stress induced by treatment with chlorpromazine (CPZ) in Wistar rats. In addition, the role of reactive oxygen species and efficiency of antioxidant protection in the brain homogenates of forebrain cortexes prepared 48 h after treatment were investigated. Chlorpromazine was applied intraperitoneally (i.p.) in single dose of 38.7 mg/kg body weight (BW) The second group was treated with both CPZ and AGM (75 mg/kg BW). The control group was treated with 0.9% saline solution in the same manner. All tested compounds were administered i.p. in a single dose. Rats were sacrificed by decapitation 48 h after treatment Treatment with AGM significantly attenuated the oxidative stress parameters and restored antioxidant capacity in the forebrain cortex. The data indicated that i.p. administered AGM exerted antioxidant action in CPZ-treated animals. Moreover, reactive astrocytes and microglia may contribute to secondary nerve-cell damage and participate in the balance of destructive vs. protective actions involved in the pathogenesis after poisoning. PMID:27051340

  3. Agmatine protection against chlorpromazine-induced forebrain cortex injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Dejanovic, Bratislav; Stevanovic, Ivana; Ninkovic, Milica; Stojanovic, Ivana; Lavrnja, Irena; Radicevic, Tatjana; Pavlovic, Milos

    2016-03-01

    This study was conducted to investigate whether agmatine (AGM) provides protection against oxidative stress induced by treatment with chlorpromazine (CPZ) in Wistar rats. In addition, the role of reactive oxygen species and efficiency of antioxidant protection in the brain homogenates of forebrain cortexes prepared 48 h after treatment were investigated. Chlorpromazine was applied intraperitoneally (i.p.) in single dose of 38.7 mg/kg body weight (BW) The second group was treated with both CPZ and AGM (75 mg/kg BW). The control group was treated with 0.9% saline solution in the same manner. All tested compounds were administered i.p. in a single dose. Rats were sacrificed by decapitation 48 h after treatment Treatment with AGM significantly attenuated the oxidative stress parameters and restored antioxidant capacity in the forebrain cortex. The data indicated that i.p. administered AGM exerted antioxidant action in CPZ-treated animals. Moreover, reactive astrocytes and microglia may contribute to secondary nerve-cell damage and participate in the balance of destructive vs. protective actions involved in the pathogenesis after poisoning.

  4. Loss of Lrp2 in zebrafish disrupts pronephric tubular clearance but not forebrain development

    PubMed Central

    Kur, Esther; Christa, Anna; Veth, Kerry N.; Gajera, Chandresh R.; Andrade-Navarro, Miguel A.; Zhang, Jingjing; Willer, Jason R.; Gregg, Ronald G.; Abdelilah-Seyfried, Salim; Bachmann, Sebastian; Link, Brian A.; Hammes, Annette; Willnow, Thomas E.

    2012-01-01

    Low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 2 (LRP2) is a multifunctional cell surface receptor conserved from nematodes to humans. In mammals, it acts as regulator of sonic hedgehog and bone morphogenetic protein pathways in patterning of the embryonic forebrain and as a clearance receptor in the adult kidney. Little is known about activities of this LRP in other phyla. Here, we extend the functional elucidation of LRP2 to zebrafish as model organism of receptor (dys)function. We demonstrate that expression of Lrp2 in embryonic and larval fish recapitulates the patterns seen in mammalian brain and kidney. Furthermore, we studied the consequence of receptor deficiencies in lrp2 and in lrp2b, a homologue unique to fish, using ENU mutagenesis or morpholino knockdown. While receptor-deficient zebrafish suffer from overt renal resorption deficiency, their brain development proceeds normally, suggesting evolutionary conservation of receptor functions in pronephric duct clearance but not in patterning of the teleost forebrain. PMID:21455927

  5. Interruption of a basal ganglia-forebrain circuit prevents plasticity of learned vocalizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brainard, Michael S.; Doupe, Allison J.

    2000-04-01

    Birdsong, like speech, is a learned vocal behaviour that relies greatly on hearing; in both songbirds and humans the removal of auditory feedback by deafening leads to a gradual deterioration of adult vocal production. Here we investigate the neural mechanisms that contribute to the processing of auditory feedback during the maintenance of song in adult zebra finches. We show that the deleterious effects on song production that normally follow deafening can be prevented by a second insult to the nervous system-the lesion of a basal ganglia-forebrain circuit. The results suggest that the removal of auditory feedback leads to the generation of an instructive signal that actively drives non-adaptive changes in song; they also suggest that this instructive signal is generated within (or conveyed through) the basal ganglia-forebrain pathway. Our findings provide evidence that cortical-basal ganglia circuits may participate in the evaluation of sensory feedback during calibration of motor performance, and demonstrate that damage to such circuits can have little effect on previously learned behaviour while conspicuously disrupting the capacity to adaptively modify that behaviour.

  6. Fine-Tuning Circadian Rhythms: The Importance of Bmal1 Expression in the Ventral Forebrain

    PubMed Central

    Mieda, Michihiro; Hasegawa, Emi; Kessaris, Nicoletta; Sakurai, Takeshi

    2017-01-01

    Although, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus acts as the central clock in mammals, the circadian expression of clock genes has been demonstrated not only in the SCN, but also in peripheral tissues and brain regions outside the SCN. However, the physiological roles of extra-SCN circadian clocks in the brain remain largely elusive. In response, we generated Nkx2.1-Bmal1−/− mice in which Bmal1, an essential clock component, was genetically deleted specifically in the ventral forebrain, including the preoptic area, nucleus of the diagonal band, and most of the hypothalamus except the SCN. In these mice, as expected, PER2::LUC oscillation was drastically attenuated in the explants of mediobasal hypothalamus, whereas it was maintained in those of the SCN. Although, Nkx2.1-Bmal1−/− mice were rhythmic and nocturnal, they showed altered patterns of locomotor activity during the night in a 12:12-h light:dark cycle and during subjective night in constant darkness. Control mice were more active during the first half than the second half of the dark phase or subjective night, whereas Nkx2.1-Bmal1−/− mice showed the opposite pattern of locomotor activity. Temporal patterns of sleep-wakefulness and feeding also changed accordingly. Such results suggest that along with mechanisms in the SCN, local Bmal1–dependent clocks in the ventral forebrain are critical for generating precise temporal patterns of circadian behaviors. PMID:28232786

  7. The Impact of Hippocampal Lesions on Trace Eyeblink Conditioning and Forebrain-Cerebellar Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Craig; Disterhoft, John F.

    2015-01-01

    Twenty-five years ago Behavioral Neuroscience published a pivotal paper by Moyer, Deyo and Disterhoft (1990) that described the impaired acquisition of trace eyeblink conditioning in rabbits with complete removal of the hippocampus. As part of the Behavioral Neuroscience celebration commemorating the 30th anniversary of the Journal, we reflect upon the impact of that study on understanding the role of the hippocampus, forebrain, and forebrain-cerebellar interactions that mediate acquisition and retention of trace conditioned responses, and of declarative memory more globally. We discuss the expansion of the conditioning paradigm to species other than the rabbit, the heterogeneity of responses among hippocampal neurons during trace conditioning, the responsivity of hippocampal neurons following consolidation of conditioning, the role of awareness in conditioning, how blink conditioning can be used as a translational tool by assaying potential therapeutics for cognitive enhancement, how trace and delay classical conditioning may be used to investigate neurological disorders including Alzheimer's Disease and schizophrenia, and how the two paradigms may be used to understand the relationship between declarative and nondeclarative memory systems. PMID:26214216

  8. Loss of MeCP2 From Forebrain Excitatory Neurons Leads to Cortical Hyperexcitation and Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wen; Peterson, Matthew; Beyer, Barbara; Frankel, Wayne N.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations of MECP2 cause Rett syndrome (RTT), a neurodevelopmental disorder leading to loss of motor and cognitive functions, impaired social interactions, and seizure at young ages. Defects of neuronal circuit development and function are thought to be responsible for the symptoms of RTT. The majority of RTT patients show recurrent seizures, indicating that neuronal hyperexcitation is a common feature of RTT. However, mechanisms underlying hyperexcitation in RTT are poorly understood. Here we show that deletion of Mecp2 from cortical excitatory neurons but not forebrain inhibitory neurons in the mouse leads to spontaneous seizures. Selective deletion of Mecp2 from excitatory but not inhibitory neurons in the forebrain reduces GABAergic transmission in layer 5 pyramidal neurons in the prefrontal and somatosensory cortices. Loss of MeCP2 from cortical excitatory neurons reduces the number of GABAergic synapses in the cortex, and enhances the excitability of layer 5 pyramidal neurons. Using single-cell deletion of Mecp2 in layer 2/3 pyramidal neurons, we show that GABAergic transmission is reduced in neurons without MeCP2, but is normal in neighboring neurons with MeCP2. Together, these results suggest that MeCP2 in cortical excitatory neurons plays a critical role in the regulation of GABAergic transmission and cortical excitability. PMID:24523563

  9. Song environment affects singing effort and vasotocin immunoreactivity in the forebrain of male Lincoln's sparrows.

    PubMed

    Sewall, Kendra B; Dankoski, Elyse C; Sockman, Keith W

    2010-08-01

    Male songbirds often establish territories and attract mates by singing, and some song features can reflect the singer's condition or quality. The quality of the song environment can change, so male songbirds should benefit from assessing the competitiveness of the song environment and appropriately adjusting their own singing behavior and the neural substrates by which song is controlled. In a wide range of taxa, social modulation of behavior is partly mediated by the arginine vasopressin or vasotocin (AVP/AVT) systems. To examine the modulation of singing behavior in response to the quality of the song environment, we compared the song output of laboratory-housed male Lincoln's sparrows (Melospiza lincolnii) exposed to 1 week of chronic playback of songs categorized as either high or low quality, based on song length, complexity, and trill performance. To explore the neural basis of any facultative shifts in behavior, we also quantified the subjects' AVT immunoreactivity (AVT-IR) in three forebrain regions that regulate sociosexual behavior: the medial bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BSTm), the lateral septum (LS), and the preoptic area. We found that high-quality songs increased singing effort and reduced AVT-IR in the BSTm and LS, relative to low-quality songs. The effect of the quality of the song environment on both singing effort and forebrain AVT-IR raises the hypothesis that AVT within these brain regions plays a role in the modulation of behavior in response to competition that individual males may assess from the prevailing song environment.

  10. Forebrain-selective AMPA-receptor antagonism guided by TARP γ-8 as an antiepileptic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Kato, Akihiko S; Burris, Kevin D; Gardinier, Kevin M; Gernert, Douglas L; Porter, Warren J; Reel, Jon; Ding, Chunjin; Tu, Yuan; Schober, Douglas A; Lee, Matthew R; Heinz, Beverly A; Fitch, Thomas E; Gleason, Scott D; Catlow, John T; Yu, Hong; Fitzjohn, Stephen M; Pasqui, Francesca; Wang, He; Qian, Yuewei; Sher, Emanuele; Zwart, Ruud; Wafford, Keith A; Rasmussen, Kurt; Ornstein, Paul L; Isaac, John T R; Nisenbaum, Eric S; Bredt, David S; Witkin, Jeffrey M

    2016-12-01

    Pharmacological manipulation of specific neural circuits to optimize therapeutic index is an unrealized goal in neurology and psychiatry. AMPA receptors are important for excitatory synaptic transmission, and their antagonists are antiepileptic. Although efficacious, AMPA-receptor antagonists, including perampanel (Fycompa), the only approved antagonist for epilepsy, induce dizziness and motor impairment. We hypothesized that blockade of forebrain AMPA receptors without blocking cerebellar AMPA receptors would be antiepileptic and devoid of motor impairment. Taking advantage of an AMPA receptor auxiliary protein, TARP γ-8, which is selectively expressed in the forebrain and modulates the pharmacological properties of AMPA receptors, we discovered that LY3130481 selectively antagonized recombinant and native AMPA receptors containing γ-8, but not γ-2 (cerebellum) or other TARP members. Two amino acid residues unique to γ-8 determined this selectivity. We also observed antagonism of AMPA receptors expressed in hippocampal, but not cerebellar, tissue from an patient with epilepsy. Corresponding to this selective activity, LY3130481 prevented multiple seizure types in rats and mice and without motor side effects. These findings demonstrate the first rationally discovered molecule targeting specific neural circuitries for therapeutic advantage.

  11. Acoustic imprinting leads to differential 2-deoxy-D-glucose uptake in the chick forebrain.

    PubMed Central

    Maier, V; Scheich, H

    1983-01-01

    This report describes experiments in which successful acoustic imprinting correlates with differential uptake of D-2-deoxy[14C]glucose in particular forebrain areas that are not considered primarily auditory. Newly hatched guinea chicks (Numida meleagris meleagris) were imprinted by playing 1.8-kHz or 2.5-kHz tone bursts for prolonged periods. Those chicks were considered to be imprinted who approached the imprinting stimulus (emitted from a loudspeaker) and preferred it over a new stimulus in a simultaneous discrimination test. In the 2-deoxy-D-glucose experiment all chicks, imprinted and naive, were exposed to 1.8-kHz tone bursts for 1 hr. As shown by the autoradiographic analysis of the brains, neurons in the 1.8-kHz isofrequency plane of the auditory "cortex" (field L) were activated in all chicks, whether imprinted or not. However, in the most rostral forebrain striking differences were found. Imprinted chicks showed an increased 2-deoxy-D-glucose uptake in three areas, as compared to naive chicks: (i) the lateral neostriatum and hyperstriatum ventrale, (ii) a medial magnocellular field (medial neostriatum/hyperstriatum ventrale), and (iii) the most dorsal layers of the hyperstriatum. Based on these findings we conclude that these areas are involved in the processing of auditory stimuli once they have become meaningful by experience. Images PMID:6574519

  12. Basal forebrain lesions in monkeys disrupt attention but not learning and memory.

    PubMed

    Voytko, M L; Olton, D S; Richardson, R T; Gorman, L K; Tobin, J R; Price, D L

    1994-01-01

    Cognitive impairments in humans and animals have been linked to dysfunction of neurons in the basal forebrain cholinergic system (BFCS). Degeneration of these cells may be, in part, responsible for some of the cognitive deficits observed in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Although memory deficits are associated with lesions of the BFCS in rats, impairments in memory have been more subtle following similar lesions in monkeys. To evaluate the effects of BFCS lesions on cognitive processes in monkeys, we have systematically investigated the behavioral effects of ibotenic acid injections in the medial septum, nucleus of the diagonal band of Broca, and nucleus basalis of Meynert in cynomolgus monkeys, using a large series of cognitive tasks that examined different mnemonic and attentional abilities. These lesions did not impair accuracy in delayed nonmatching-to-sample, delayed response, simple or concurrent visual discriminations, spatial discriminations, or discrimination reversals. However, these lesions disrupted attentional focusing. Similar impairments in attention have been noted in patients with AD. BFCS lesions increased sensitivity to injections of the cholinergic antagonist scopolamine in a delayed nonmatching-to-sample task, indicating that the central cholinergic system was compromised in these monkeys. In concert, the results of this study suggest that the primate basal forebrain may be more involved in attentional than mnemonic processes, and that degeneration of neurons in the BFCS in cases of AD may contribute to the attention deficits observed in these individuals.

  13. Transient impairment of recognition memory following ibotenic-acid lesions of the basal forebrain in macaques.

    PubMed

    Aigner, T G; Mitchell, S J; Aggleton, J P; DeLong, M R; Struble, R G; Price, D L; Wenk, G L; Pettigrew, K D; Mishkin, M

    1991-01-01

    To assess the contributions of the basal forebrain cholinergic nuclei to visual recognition memory in macaques, we compared the effects of lesions of (a) the nucleus basalis of Meynert, (b) the medial septal and diagonal band nuclei, and (c) all nuclei combined on performance of delayed nonmatching-to-sample with trial-unique stimuli. Whereas monkeys with the separate lesions did not differ from each other or from normal control animals, those with combined lesions showed a significant impairment. With time and extended practice, however, the performance of the animals with combined lesions recovered to normal levels. During the recovery period, these monkeys showed an initially increased sensitivity to scopolamine that later dissipated, at which time they also failed to show the improvement that follows physostigmine administration in normal animals. Postmortem assessment of cortical choline acetyltransferase activity revealed that only the group with combined lesions had significant depletion of this enzyme. The results suggest that (1) the basal forebrain cholinergic system participates in mnemonic processes in primates and that (2) extensive damage to this system is necessary before impairments in recognition memory, even transient ones, can be observed.

  14. Conservation of spatial memory function in the pallial forebrain of reptiles and ray-finned fishes.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Fernando; López, J Carlos; Vargas, J Pedro; Gómez, Yolanda; Broglio, Cristina; Salas, Cosme

    2002-04-01

    The hippocampus of mammals and birds is critical for spatial memory. Neuroanatomical evidence indicates that the medial cortex (MC) of reptiles and the lateral pallium (LP) of ray-finned fishes could be homologous to the hippocampus of mammals and birds. In this work, we studied the effects of lesions to the MC of turtles and to the LP of goldfish in spatial memory. Lesioned animals were trained in place, and cue maze tasks and crucial probe and transfer tests were performed. In experiment 1, MC-lesioned turtles in the place task failed to locate the goal during trials in which new start positions were used, whereas sham animals navigated directly to the goal independently of start location. In contrast, no deficit was observed in cue learning. In experiment 2, LP lesion produced a dramatic impairment in goldfish trained in the place task, whereas medial and dorsal pallium lesions did not decrease accuracy. In addition, none of these pallial lesions produced deficits in cue learning. These results indicate that lesions to the MC of turtles and to the LP of goldfish, like hippocampal lesions in mammals and birds, selectively impair map-like memory representations of the environmental space. Thus, the forebrain structures of reptiles and teleost fish neuroanatomically equivalent to the mammalian and avian hippocampus also share a central role in spatial cognition. Present results suggest that the presence of a hippocampus-dependent spatial memory system is a primitive feature of the vertebrate forebrain that has been conserved through evolution.

  15. Influence of AMPA/kainate receptors on extracellular 5-hydroxytryptamine in rat midbrain raphe and forebrain

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Rui; Ma, Zhiyuan; Auerbach, Sidney B

    1997-01-01

    The regulation of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) release by excitatory amino acid (EAA) receptors was examined by use of microdialysis in the CNS of freely behaving rats. Extracellular 5-HT was measured in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN), median raphe nucleus (MRN), nucleus accumbens, hypothalamus, frontal cortex, dorsal and ventral hippocampus. Local infusion of kainate produced increases in extracellular 5-HT in the DRN and MRN. Kainate infusion into forebrain sites had a less potent effect. In further studies of the DRN and nucleus accumbens, kainate-induced increases in extracellular 5-HT were blocked by the EAA receptor antagonists, kynurenate and 6,7-dinitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (DNQX). The effect of infusing kainate into the DRN or nucleus accumbens was attenuated or abolished by tetrodotoxin (TTX), suggesting that the increase in extracellular 5-HT is dependent on 5-HT neuronal activity. In contrast, ibotenate-induced lesion of intrinsic neurones did not attenuate the effect of infusing kainate into the nucleus accumbens. Thus, the effect of kainate in the nucleus accumbens does not depend on intrinsic neurones. Infusion of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolaproprionate (AMPA) into the DRN and nucleus accumbens induced nonsignificant changes in extracellular 5-HT. Cyclothiazide and diazoxide, which attenuate receptor desensitization, greatly enhanced the effect of AMPA on 5-HT in the DRN, but not in the nucleus accumbens. In conclusion, AMPA/kainate receptors regulate 5-HT in the raphe and in forebrain sites. PMID:9283707

  16. Generation and Behavioral Characterization of β-catenin Forebrain-Specific Conditional Knock-Out Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gould, Todd D.; O'Donnell, Kelley C.; Picchini, Alyssa M.; Dow, Eliot R.; Chen, Guang; Manji, Husseini K.

    2009-01-01

    The canonical Wnt pathway and β-catenin have been implicated in the pathophysiology of mood disorders. We generated forebrain-specific CRE-mediated conditional β-catenin knockout mice to begin exploring the behavioral implications of decreased Wnt pathway signaling in the central nervous system. In situ hybridization revealed a progressive knockout of β-catenin that began between 2 and 4 weeks of age, and by 12 weeks resulted in considerably decreased β-catenin expression in regions of the forebrain, including the frontal cortex, hippocampus, and striatum. A significant decrease in protein levels of β-catenin in these brain regions was observed by western blot. Behavioral characterization of these mice in several tests (including the forced swim test, tail suspension test (TST), learned helplessness, response and sensitization to stimulants, and light/dark box among other tests) revealed relatively circumscribed alterations. In the TST, knockout mice spent significantly less time struggling (a depression-like phenotype). However, knockout mice did not differ from their wild-type littermates in the other behavioral tests of mood-related or anxiety-related behaviors. These results suggest that a considerable β-catenin reserve exists, and that a 50-70% β-catenin reduction in circumscribed brain regions is only capable of inducing subtle behavioral changes. Alternatively, regulating β-catenin may modulate drug effects rather than being a model of mood disorder pathophysiology per se. PMID:18299155

  17. Protective approaches against myocardial ischemia reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xianchi; Liu, Min; Sun, Rongrong; Zeng, Yi; Chen, Shuang; Zhang, Peiying

    2016-01-01

    Myocardial ischemia-reperfusion is the leading cause for the events of cardiovascular disease, and is considered as a major contributor to the morbidity and mortality associated with coronary occlusion. The myocardial damage caused by ischemia-reperfusion injury constitutes the primary pathological manifestation of coronary artery disease. It results from the interaction between the substances that accumulate during ischemia and those that are delivered on reperfusion. The level of this damage can range from a small insult resulting in limited myocardial damage to a large injury culminating in myocyte death. Importantly, major ischemia-reperfusion injury to the heart can result in permanent disability or death. Given the worldwide prevalence of coronary artery disease, developing a strategy to provide cardioprotection against ischemia-reperfusion-induced damage is of great importance. Currently, the treatment of reperfusion injury following ischemia is primarily supportive, since no specific target-oriented therapy has been validated thus far. Nevertheless, therapeutic approaches to protect against myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury remain an active area of investigation given the detrimental effects of this phenomenon. PMID:28101167

  18. Acute mesenteric ischemia in young adults.

    PubMed

    Ozturk, Gurkan; Aydinli, Bulent; Atamanalp, S Selcuk; Yildirgan, M Ilhan; Ozoğul, Bünyami; Kısaoğlu, Abdullah

    2012-08-01

    Acute mesenteric ischemia is commonly seen in old patients. This study was undertaken to show that mesenteric ischemia might be seen in individuals under 40 years of age and that its diagnosis is challenging. Twenty-six patients with acute mesenteric ischemia under the age of 40 were studied. The main symptom on admission was abdominal pain. Symptom duration varied between 12 h and 5 days. The medical history of the patients revealed that 9 had no previous diseases. Other 17 had predisposing factors in the first evaluation. None of the patients had any history of narcotic or drug abuse. Ten patients presented with signs and symptoms of sepsis and septic shock. Preoperative diagnosis was acute intestinal ischemia only in 6 patients. Preoperatively, all the patients had intestinal or colonic ischemia and necrosis; one had additional ischemia of the liver, stomach, duodenum, and pancreas. Six patients had massive intestinal necrosis. The overall postoperative complication and overall mortality rates were 61.5 and 26.9 %, respectively. Complications and mortality were determined to be associated with previous pulmonary disease, acidosis, presence of septic shock, acute renal failure, extent of the ischemia and extent of resection, second look operations, previous cardiac events, and the kind of affected bowel (colon involvement).

  19. Extremely Low Frequency Magnetic Field (50 Hz, 0.5 mT) Reduces Oxidative Stress in the Brain of Gerbils Submitted to Global Cerebral Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Rauš Balind, Snežana; Selaković, Vesna; Radenović, Lidija; Prolić, Zlatko; Janać, Branka

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic field as ecological factor has influence on all living beings. The aim of this study was to determine if extremely low frequency magnetic field (ELF-MF, 50 Hz, 0.5 mT) affects oxidative stress in the brain of gerbils submitted to 10-min global cerebral ischemia. After occlusion of both carotid arteries, 3-month-old gerbils were continuously exposed to ELF-MF for 7 days. Nitric oxide and superoxide anion production, superoxide dismutase activity and index of lipid peroxidation were examined in the forebrain cortex, striatum and hippocampus on the 7th (immediate effect of ELF-MF) and 14th day after reperfusion (delayed effect of ELF-MF). Ischemia per se increased oxidative stress in the brain on the 7th and 14th day after reperfusion. ELF-MF also increased oxidative stress, but to a greater extent than ischemia, only immediately after cessation of exposure. Ischemic gerbils exposed to ELF-MF had increased oxidative stress parameters on the 7th day after reperfusion, but to a lesser extent than ischemic or ELF-MF-exposed animals. On the 14th day after reperfusion, oxidative stress parameters in the brain of these gerbils were mostly at the control levels. Applied ELF-MF decreases oxidative stress induced by global cerebral ischemia and thereby reduces possible negative consequences which free radical species could have in the brain. The results presented here indicate a beneficial effect of ELF-MF (50 Hz, 0.5 mT) in the model of global cerebral ischemia. PMID:24586442

  20. [Myocardial ischemia and ventricular arrhythmia].

    PubMed

    Vester, E G

    1998-01-01

    A relation between myocardial ischemia and induction of ventricular arrhythmias can be demonstrated in patients with coronary heart disease--in contrast to patients with primary non ischemic cardiac diseases--using a combined metabolic-electrophysiological investigation protocol consisting of programmed atrial and ventricular stimulation with simultaneous measurement of the arterio/coronary venous difference for lactate, pyruvate, free fatty acids and amino acids. There are significant metabolic distinctions between both ischemic and non ischemic heart disease under pacing stress conditions as well as at rest. Areas of "hibernating myocardium" resp. "mismatch" zones in the myocardium showing reduced or abolished perfusion and preserved metabolism during scintographic SPECT/PET studies, may be found more often in patients with ventricular tachycardias (VT) or ventricular fibrillation (VF) in the chronic post myocardial infarction state than in patients without VT/VF. The proof of such zones may be considered a possible risk factor for arrhythmic events and sudden cardiac death after myocardial infarction. Hereby the concept of an interaction between acute and chronic ischemia triggering the onset of polymorphic VT or VF gaines increasing acceptance. In contrast, monomorphic reentrant VT are usually generated in the border zone of scarred areas where islands of vital fibers are surrounded by fibrotic tissue. These arrhythmogenic origin regions are characterized by a "match" pattern presenting a comparably severe reduction of perfusion and metabolism. Under those circumstances a control resp. suppression of the VT focus can only be provided by interventional techniques like catheter ablation, antitachycardiac surgery or implantation of a cardioverter/defibrillator beyond antiarrhythmic drug therapy. An antiischemic causal treatment (bypass surgery or angioplasty) represents for maximal 40% of patients with ischemically induced ventricular arrhythmias an adequate and

  1. [Histopathologic comparison of dexmedetomidine's and thiopental's cerebral protective effects on focal cerebral ischemia in rats].

    PubMed

    Çanakçı, Ebru; Özmen, Sevilay Akalp; Çolak, Mustafa Ferhat; Kürşad, Hüsnü

    This study was designed to investigate whether dexmedetomidine and thiopental have cerebral protective effects after focal cerebral ischemia in rats. Thirty male Sprague Dawley rats were randomly assigned to three groups: control group (Group C, n=10), dexmedetomidine group (Group D, n=10), thiopental group (Group T, n=10). After all rats were anesthetized, they were intubated, then mechanically ventilated. A catheter was inserted into the right femoral artery for continuous mean arterial pressure, physiological parameters and blood sampling at baseline, 5min after occlusion and 20min after reperfusion. A catheter was inserted into the left femoral vein for intravenous (IV) medication administration. Right common carotid artery of each rat was isolated and clamped for 45min. At the end of the duration common carotid artery were unclamped and the brain reperfusion was achieved for 90min. Dexmedetomidine was administered for Group D IV infusion, and Group T received thiopental IV. According to histopathologic scores cerebral ischemia was documented in all rats in Group C, but no ischemia was found in three rats in Group T and in four rats in Group D. Grade 3 cerebral ischemia was documented in three rats in Group C, and in only one rat in both groups T and D. For histopathologic grades the difference between Group T and Group D was not significant (p>0.05). But the differences between Group C and Group T (p<0.05) and Group C and Group D (p<0.01) were statically significant. In conclusion, we demonstrated that dexmedetomidine and thiopental have experimental histopathologic cerebral protective effects on experimental focal cerebral ischemia in rats. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  2. Electroencephalographic Response to Sodium Nitrite May Predict Delayed Cerebral Ischemia After Severe Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Rowland, Matthew J.; Ezra, Martyn; Herigstad, Mari; Hayen, Anja; Sleigh, Jamie W.; Westbrook, Jon; Warnaby, Catherine E.; Pattinson, Kyle T. S.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage often leads to death and poor clinical outcome. Injury occurring during the first 72 hours is termed “early brain injury,” with disruption of the nitric oxide pathway playing an important pathophysiologic role in its development. Quantitative electroencephalographic variables, such as α/δ frequency ratio, are surrogate markers of cerebral ischemia. This study assessed the quantitative electroencephalographic response to a cerebral nitric oxide donor (intravenous sodium nitrite) to explore whether this correlates with the eventual development of delayed cerebral ischemia. Design: Unblinded pilot study testing response to drug intervention. Setting: Neuroscience ICU, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford, United Kingdom. Patients: Fourteen World Federation of Neurosurgeons grades 3, 4, and 5 patients (mean age, 52.8 yr [range, 41–69 yr]; 11 women). Interventions: IV sodium nitrite (10 μg/kg/min) for 1 hour. Measurements and Main Results: Continuous electroencephalographic recording for 2 hours. The alpha/delta frequency ratio was measured before and during IV sodium nitrite infusion. Seven of 14 patients developed delayed cerebral ischemia. There was a +30% to +118% (range) increase in the alpha/delta frequency ratio in patients who did not develop delayed cerebral ischemia (p < 0.0001) but an overall decrease in the alpha/delta frequency ratio in those patients who did develop delayed cerebral ischemia (range, +11% to –31%) (p = 0.006, multivariate analysis accounting for major confounds). Conclusions: Administration of sodium nitrite after severe subarachnoid hemorrhage differentially influences quantitative electroencephalographic variables depending on the patient’s susceptibility to development of delayed cerebral ischemia. With further validation in a larger sample size, this response may be developed as a tool for risk stratification after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. PMID:27441898

  3. Protective effects of glycine during hypothermic renal ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Mangino, M J; Murphy, M K; Grabau, G G; Anderson, C B

    1991-11-01

    The objective of this investigation was to test the effects of glycine, a cytoprotectant in normothermic in vitro models of renal ischemia, in a model of hypothermic renal preservation injury. This study also probes possible physiological mechanisms of glycine protection during renal hypothermic ischemia-reperfusion injury. Canine kidneys were subjected to 48 h of hypothermic ischemia (4 degrees C) after intravascular flush with cold conventional Collins solution (G. H. Collins, M. B. Bravo-Shugarman, and P. I. Terasaki, Lancet 2: 1219-1223, 1969) and were subsequently revascularized for 1 h. After 1 h of reperfusion, glomerular filtration rate, urine production, and electrolyte excretion were dramatically higher when the Collins flush contained 5 mM glycine, compared with the 0 mM glycine controls. Renal tissue adenine nucleotides and glutathione levels progressively declined with graded cold ischemia times, and glycine had no effect on these levels. However, renal tissue ATP levels (but not glutathione) were significantly higher when kidneys were flushed with glycine, stored for 48 h, and reoxygenated in vitro for 1 h at 37 degrees C, compared with kidneys flushed without glycine. Analysis of CoA esters from ischemic renal tissue indicated altered production of only butyryl CoA after 48 and 72 h of cold ischemia, but no differences were detected in glycine or control kidneys. In conclusion, this study reports dramatic functional preservation with glycine in kidneys subjected to hypothermic ischemia and in vivo reperfusion. The mechanisms of these effects appear not to be attributable to the maintenance of cellular adenine nucleotide or glutathione levels nor to the scavenging of accumulated amphipathic acyl CoA esters.

  4. Ischemia-induced degeneration of CA1 pyramidal cells decreases seizure severity in a subgroup of epileptic gerbils and affects parvalbumin immunoreactivity of CA1 interneurons.

    PubMed

    Winkler, D T; Scotti, A L; Nitsch, C

    2001-04-01

    Mongolian gerbils are epilepsy-prone animals. In adult gerbils two major groups can be differentiated according to their seizure behavior: Highly seizure-sensitive gerbils exhibit facial and forelimb clonus or generalized tonic-clonic seizures from the first test on, while kindled-like gerbils are seizure free for the first three to six consecutive tests, later develop forelimb myoclonus, and eventually progress to generalized tonic-clonic seizures. In the hippocampus, seizure history of the individual animal is mirrored in the intensity in which GABAergic neurons are immunostained for the calcium-binding protein parvalbumin: they lose parvalbumin with increasing seizure incidence. In a first step to clarify the influence of hippocampal projection neurons on spontaneous seizure behavior and related parvalbumin expression, we induced degeneration of the CA1 pyramidal cells by transient forebrain ischemia. This results in a decreased seizure sensitivity in highly seizure-sensitive gerbils. The kindling-like process, however, is not permanently blocked by the ischemic nerve cell loss, suggesting that an intact CA1 field is not a prerequisite for the development of seizure behavior. The seizure-induced loss of parvalbumin from the ischemia-resistant interneurons recovers after ischemia. Thus, changes in parvalbumin content brought about by repeated seizures are not permanent but can rather be modulated by novel stimuli.

  5. Ethanol-induced myocardial ischemia: close relation between blood acetaldehyde level and myocardial ischemia.

    PubMed

    Ando, H; Abe, H; Hisanou, R

    1993-05-01

    A patient with vasospastic angina who developed myocardial ischemia following ethanol ingestion but not after exercise was described. Myocardial ischemia was evidenced by electrocardiograms (ECGs) and thallium-201 scintigrams. The blood acetaldehyde level after ethanol ingestion was abnormally high. The time course and severity of myocardial ischemia coincided with those of the blood ethanol and acetaldehyde level. Coronary arteriography showed ergonovine maleate-induced coronary vasospasm at the left anterior descending coronary artery. ECG changes similar to those induced by ethanol ingestion were observed at the same time. These findings suggest that the high blood acetaldehyde level might be responsible for the development of coronary vasospasm and myocardial ischemia in this patient.

  6. Forebrain influences on brainstem and spinal mechanisms of copulatory behavior: a current perspective on Frank Beach's contribution.

    PubMed

    Rose, J D

    1990-01-01

    In a 1967 Physiological Reviews paper, Frank Beach put forth four propositions regarding forebrain and hormonal control of brainstem-spinal mechanisms of copulatory behavior. Simply stated, he proposed that: 1) the forebrain exerted an inhibitory control over species-typical copulatory reflexes through descending effects on brainstem-spinal mechanisms and 2) gonadal hormones influence these reflexes largely by actions on forebrain control processes rather than by direct effects on the brainstem or spinal cord. This theoretical scheme was of great heuristic significance during the subsequent two decades of research, which has largely supported and delineated in greater mechanistic detail the processes Beach hypothesized to exist. This subsequent research has also shown the central nervous system actions of gonadal hormones to be more widespread and complex than Beach proposed. Some of these recent research findings are presented, with emphasis on neurophysiological studies which have identified hormone-induced functional changes in forebrain and brainstem neurons. It is proposed that these functional changes may represent a mechanism for the behavior-controlling actions of hormones that were hypothesized by Beach.

  7. The LIM-homeobox gene Lhx8 is required for the development of many cholinergic neurons in the mouse forebrain

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yangu; Marín, Oscar; Hermesz, Edit; Powell, Aaron; Flames, Nuria; Palkovits, Miklós; Rubenstein, John L. R.; Westphal, Heiner

    2003-01-01

    Forebrain cholinergic neurons play important roles as striatal local circuit neurons and basal telencephalic projection neurons. The genetic mechanisms that control development of these neurons suggest that most of them are derived from the basal telencephalon where Lhx8, a LIM-homeobox gene, is expressed. Here we report that mice with a null mutation of Lhx8 are deficient in the development of forebrain cholinergic neurons. Lhx8 mutants lack the nucleus basalis, a major source of the cholinergic input to the cerebral cortex. In addition, the number of cholinergic neurons is reduced in several other areas of the subcortical forebrain in Lhx8 mutants, including the caudate-putamen, medial septal nucleus, nucleus of the diagonal band, and magnocellular preoptic nucleus. Although cholinergic neurons are not formed, initial steps in their specification appear to be preserved, as indicated by a presence of cells expressing a truncated Lhx8 mRNA and mRNA of the homeobox gene Gbx1. These results provide genetic evidence supporting an important role for Lhx8 in development of cholinergic neurons in the forebrain. PMID:12855770

  8. Differential effects of light and feeding on circadian organization of peripheral clocks in a forebrain Bmal1 mutant

    PubMed Central

    Izumo, Mariko; Pejchal, Martina; Schook, Andrew C; Lange, Ryan P; Walisser, Jacqueline A; Sato, Takashi R; Wang, Xiaozhong; Bradfield, Christopher A; Takahashi, Joseph S

    2014-01-01

    In order to assess the contribution of a central clock in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) to circadian behavior and the organization of peripheral clocks, we generated forebrain/SCN-specific Bmal1 knockout mice by using floxed Bmal1 and pan-neuronal Cre lines. The forebrain knockout mice showed >90% deletion of BMAL1 in the SCN and exhibited an immediate and complete loss of circadian behavior in constant conditions. Circadian rhythms in peripheral tissues persisted but became desynchronized and damped in constant darkness. The loss of synchrony was rescued by light/dark cycles and partially by restricted feeding (only in the liver and kidney but not in the other tissues) in a distinct manner. These results suggest that the forebrain/SCN is essential for internal temporal order of robust circadian programs in peripheral clocks, and that individual peripheral clocks are affected differently by light and feeding in the absence of a functional oscillator in the forebrain. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04617.001 PMID:25525750

  9. Bilateral changes after neonatal ischemia in the P7 rat brain.

    PubMed

    Spiegler, Maria; Villapol, Sonia; Biran, Valérie; Goyenvalle, Catherine; Mariani, Jean; Renolleau, Sylvain; Charriaut-Marlangue, Christiane

    2007-06-01

    Neurogenesis persists throughout life in the rodent subventricular zone (SVZ) and subgranular zone (SGZ) and increases in the adult after brain injury. In this study, postnatal day 7 rats underwent middle cerebral artery electrocoagulation and transient homolateral common carotid artery occlusion, a lesioning protocol that resulted in ipsilateral (IL) forebrain ischemic injury, leading to a cortical cavity 3 weeks later. The effects of neonatal ischemia on hemispheric damage, cell death, cell proliferation, and neurogenesis were examined 4 hours to 6 weeks later by the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labeling assay and immunohistochemistry of Ki-67 in proliferating cells and of doublecortin, a microtubule-associated protein expressed only by immature neurons. Neonatal ischemic injury resulted in persistent reduced IL and transient reduced contralateral (CL) hemispheric areas, a consequence of sustained and transient cell death in the IL and CL areas, respectively. Ki-67 immunostaining revealed 3 peaks of newly generated cells in the dorsal SVZ and SGZ in the IL side and also in the CL side at 48 hours and 7 and 28 days after ischemia. Double immunofluorescence revealed that most of the Ki-67-positive cells were astrocytes at 48 hours. Ischemic injury also stimulated SVZ neurogenesis, based on increased doublecortin immunostaining in both SVZs at 7 to 14 days after injury. Doublecortin-positive neurons remained visible around the lesion at 21 days but displayed an immature shape in discrete chains or clusters. Although unilateral ischemic damage was produced, results indicate successful regenerative changes in the CL hemisphere, allowing anatomical recovery.

  10. Acute limb ischemia due to ergotism.

    PubMed

    Naz, Iram; Sophie, Ziad

    2006-08-01

    Acute ischemia of an extremity potentially threatens limb loss and occasionally the life of the patient. We are reporting two cases of extremity ischemia secondary to ergot poisoning. The first patient was a 60 years old woman, who presented with a 15 days history of ischemia of the left arm with gangrene of the fingers and pain in the resting right hand for one day. Right brachial artery catheterization showed severe spasm of the artery which was resolved by passage of the inflated balloon catheter. She underwent amputation for gangrene of the left hand. The second patient presented with bilateral symmetrical ischemia of the lower extremities which improved upon withdrawal of the ergot containing medicine. She responded to nifedipine.

  11. Mitochondrial Targeted Antioxidant in Cerebral Ischemia.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Ejaz; Donovan, Tucker; Yujiao, Lu; Zhang, Quanguang

    There has been much evidence suggesting that reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated in mitochondria during cerebral ischemia play a major role in programming the senescence of organism. Antioxidants dealing with mitochondria slow down the appearance and progression of symptoms in cerebral ischemia and increase the life span of organisms. The mechanisms of mitochondrial targeted antioxidants, such as SKQ1, Coenzyme Q10, MitoQ, and Methylene blue, include increasing adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production, decreasing production of ROS and increasing antioxidant defenses, providing benefits in neuroprotection following cerebral ischemia. A number of studies have shown the neuroprotective role of these mitochondrial targeted antioxidants in cerebral ischemia. Here in this short review we have compiled the literature supporting consequences of mitochondrial dysfunction, and the protective role of mitochondrial targeted antioxidants.

  12. Midline signaling and evolution of the forebrain in chordates: a focus on the lamprey Hedgehog case.

    PubMed

    Rétaux, Sylvie; Kano, Shungo

    2010-07-01

    Lampreys are agnathans (vertebrates without jaws). They occupy a key phylogenetic position in the emergence of novelties and in the diversification of morphology at the dawn of vertebrates. We have used lampreys to investigate the possibility that embryonic midline signaling systems have been a driving force for the evolution of the forebrain in vertebrates. We have focused on Sonic Hedgehog/Hedgehog (Shh/Hh) signaling. In this article, we first review and summarize our recent work on the comparative analysis of embryonic expression patterns for Shh/Hh, together with Fgf8 (fibroblast growth factor 8) and Wnt (wingless-Int) pathway components, in the embryonic lamprey forebrain. Comparison with nonvertebrate chordates on one hand, and jawed vertebrates on the other hand, shows that these morphogens/growth factors acquired new expression domains in the most rostral part of the neural tube in lampreys compared to nonvertebrate chordates, and in jawed vertebrates compared to lampreys. These data are consistent with the idea that changes in Shh, Fgf8 or Wnt signaling in the course of evolution have been instrumental for the emergence and diversification of the telencephalon, a part of the forebrain that is unique to vertebrates. We have then used comparative genomics on Shh/Hh loci to identify commonalities and differences in noncoding regulatory sequences across species and phyla. Conserved noncoding elements (CNEs) can be detected in lamprey Hh introns, even though they display unique structural features and need adjustments of parameters used for in silico alignments to be detected, because of lamprey-specific properties of the genome. The data also show conservation of a ventral midline enhancer located in Shh/Hh intron 2 of all chordates, the very species which possess a notochord and a floor plate, but not in earlier emerged deuterostomes or protostomes. These findings exemplify how the Shh/Hh locus is one of the best loci to study genome evolution with regards to

  13. Cumulative Effect of Repeated Brief Cerebral Ischemia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-05-31

    KL, Pohost GM and Conger KA, Correlating EEG and Lactate Kinetics During Repeated Brief Cerebral Ischemia, Proceedings of the American Heart Association 1993...Cornelating EEG and Lactate Kinetics During Repeated Brief Cerebral Ischemia, Proceedings of the American Heart Association 1993. 4) HP Hetherington...thes Bernhard Foundation. ass- 134 󈧑&.1 n5. 9# American Heart Association 026085 66th Scientific Sessions Abstract Form Medical Research Nursing

  14. Acute Kidney Injury after Partial Nephrectomy: Role of Parenchymal Mass Reduction and Ischemia and Impact on Subsequent Functional Recovery.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhiling; Zhao, Juping; Dong, Wen; Remer, Eric; Li, Jianbo; Demirjian, Sevag; Zabell, Joseph; Campbell, Steven C

    2016-04-01

    Acute increase of serum creatinine (SCr) after partial nephrectomy (PN) is primarily due to parenchymal mass reduction or ischemia; however, only ischemia can impact subsequent functional recovery. We evaluate etiologies of acute kidney injury (AKI) after PN and their prognostic significance. From 2007-2014, 83 solitary kidneys managed with PN had necessary studies for detailed analysis of function and parenchymal mass before/after surgery. AKI was classified by Risk/Injury/Failure/Loss/Endstage classification and defined by either standard criteria (comparison to preoperative SCr) or proposed criteria (comparison to projected postoperative SCr based on parenchymal mass reduction). Subsequent recovery was defined as percent function preserved/percent mass saved. PN. Predictive factors for AKI were evaluated by logistic regression. Relationship between AKI grade and subsequent functional recovery was assessed by linear regression. Median duration warm ischemia (n=39) was 20 min and hypothermia (n=44) was 29 min. Median parenchymal mass reduction was 11%. AKI occurred in 45 patients based on standard criteria and 38 based on proposed criteria, and reflected injury/failure (grade = 2/3) in 23 and 16 patients, respectively. On multivariable analysis, only ischemia time associated with AKI occurrence (p=0.016). Based on the proposed criteria, median recovery from ischemia was 99% in patients without AKI and 95%/90%/88% for patients with grades 1/2/3 AKI, respectively. The coefficient for association between AKI grade based on proposed criteria and subsequent functional recovery was -4.168 (p=0.018). Main limitation is limited patient cohort. Parenchymal mass reduction and ischemia both contribute to acute changes in SCr after PN. Classification of AKI by proposed criteria significantly associates with subsequent functional recovery. However, more robust numbers will be needed to further assess the merits of the proposed criteria. While AKI is associated with suboptimal

  15. The ubiquitin proteasome system and myocardial ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Calise, Justine

    2013-01-01

    The ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) has been the subject of intensive research over the past 20 years to define its role in normal physiology and in pathophysiology. Many of these studies have focused in on the cardiovascular system and have determined that the UPS becomes dysfunctional in several pathologies such as familial and idiopathic cardiomyopathies, atherosclerosis, and myocardial ischemia. This review presents a synopsis of the literature as it relates to the role of the UPS in myocardial ischemia. Studies have shown that the UPS is dysfunctional during myocardial ischemia, and recent studies have shed some light on possible mechanisms. Other studies have defined a role for the UPS in ischemic preconditioning which is best associated with myocardial ischemia and is thus presented here. Very recent studies have started to define roles for specific proteasome subunits and components of the ubiquitination machinery in various aspects of myocardial ischemia. Lastly, despite the evidence linking myocardial ischemia and proteasome dysfunction, there are continuing suggestions that proteasome inhibitors may be useful to mitigate ischemic injury. This review presents the rationale behind this and discusses both supportive and nonsupportive studies and presents possible future directions that may help in clarifying this controversy. PMID:23220331

  16. Acute small bowel ischemia: CT imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Segatto, Enrica; Mortelé, Koenraad J; Ji, Hoon; Wiesner, Walter; Ros, Pablo R

    2003-10-01

    Small bowel ischemia is a disorder related to a variety of conditions resulting in interruption or reduction of the blood supply of the small intestine. It may present with various clinical and radiologic manifestations, and ranges pathologically from localized transient ischemia to catastrophic necrosis of the intestinal tract. The primary causes of insufficient blood flow to the small intestine are various and include thromboembolism (50% of cases), nonocclusive causes, bowel obstruction, neoplasms, vasculitis, abdominal inflammatory conditions, trauma, chemotherapy, radiation, and corrosive injury. Computed tomography (CT) can demonstrate changes because of ischemic bowel accurately, may be helpful in determining the primary cause of ischemia, and can demonstrate important coexistent findings or complications. However, common CT findings in acute small bowel ischemia are not specific and, therefore, it is often a combination of clinical, laboratory and radiologic signs that may lead to a correct diagnosis. Understanding the pathogenesis of various conditions leading to mesenteric ischemia and being familiar with the spectrum of diagnostic CT signs may help the radiologist recognize ischemic small bowel disease and avoid delayed diagnosis. The aim of this article is to provide a review of the pathogenesis and various causes of acute small bowel ischemia and to demonstrate the contribution of CT in the diagnosis of this complex disease.

  17. Role of Shp2 in forebrain neurons in regulating metabolic and cardiovascular functions and responses to leptin

    PubMed Central

    do Carmo, Jussara M.; da Silva, Alexandre A.; Sessums, Price O.; Ebaady, Sabira H.; Pace, Benjamin R.; Rushing, John S.; Davis, Mark T.; Hall, John E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective We examined whether deficiency of Shp2 signaling in forebrain neurons alters metabolic and cardiovascular regulation under various conditions and if it attenuates the anorexic and cardiovascular effects of leptin. We also tested whether forebrain Shp2 deficiency alters blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) responses to acute stress. Design Forebrain Shp2-/- mice were generated by crossing Shp2flox/flox mice with CamKIIα-cre mice. At 22 to 24 weeks of age, mice were instrumented for telemetry for measurement of BP, HR and body temperature (BT). Oxygen consumption (VO2), energy expenditure and motor activity were monitored by indirect calorimetry. Results Shp2/CamKIIα-cre mice were heavier (46±3 vs 32±1 g), hyperglycemic, hyperleptinemic, hyperinsulinemic, and hyperphagic compared to Shp2flox/flox control mice. Shp2/CamKIIα-cre mice exhibited reduced food intake responses to fasting/refeeding and impaired regulation of BT when exposed to 15°C and 30°C ambient temperatures. Despite being obese and having many features of metabolic syndrome, Shp2/CamKIIα-cre mice had similar daily average BP and HR compared to Shp2flox/flox mice (112±2 vs 113±1 mmHg and 595±34 vs 650±40 bpm), but exhibited increased BP and HR responses to cold exposure and acute air-jet stress test. Leptin's ability to reduce food intake and to raise BP were markedly attenuated in Shp2/CamKIIα-cre mice. Conclusion These results suggest that forebrain Shp2 signaling regulates food intake, appetite responses to caloric deprivation, and thermogenic control of body temperature during variations in ambient temperature. Deficiency of Shp2 signaling in the forebrain is associated with augmented cardiovascular responses to cold and acute stress but attenuated BP responses to leptin. PMID:24030516

  18. Glycine receptor α3 and α2 subunits mediate tonic and exogenous agonist-induced currents in forebrain.

    PubMed

    McCracken, Lindsay M; Lowes, Daniel C; Salling, Michael C; Carreau-Vollmer, Cyndel; Odean, Naomi N; Blednov, Yuri A; Betz, Heinrich; Harris, R Adron; Harrison, Neil L

    2017-08-22

    Neuronal inhibition can occur via synaptic mechanisms or through tonic activation of extrasynaptic receptors. In spinal cord, glycine mediates synaptic inhibition through the activation of heteromeric glycine receptors (GlyRs) composed primarily of α1 and β subunits. Inhibitory GlyRs are also found throughout the brain, where GlyR α2 and α3 subunit expression exceeds that of α1, particularly in forebrain structures, and coassembly of these α subunits with the β subunit appears to occur to a lesser extent than in spinal cord. Here, we analyzed GlyR currents in several regions of the adolescent mouse forebrain (striatum, prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, amygdala, and bed nucleus of the stria terminalis). Our results show ubiquitous expression of GlyRs that mediate large-amplitude currents in response to exogenously applied glycine in these forebrain structures. Additionally, tonic inward currents were also detected, but only in the striatum, hippocampus, and prefrontal cortex (PFC). These tonic currents were sensitive to both strychnine and picrotoxin, indicating that they are mediated by extrasynaptic homomeric GlyRs. Recordings from mice deficient in the GlyR α3 subunit (Glra3(-/-)) revealed a lack of tonic GlyR currents in the striatum and the PFC. In Glra2(-/Y) animals, GlyR tonic currents were preserved; however, the amplitudes of current responses to exogenous glycine were significantly reduced. We conclude that functional α2 and α3 GlyRs are present in various regions of the forebrain and that α3 GlyRs specifically participate in tonic inhibition in the striatum and PFC. Our findings suggest roles for glycine in regulating neuronal excitability in the forebrain.

  19. Hippocampal Sclerosis but Not Normal Aging or Alzheimer Disease Is Associated With TDP-43 Pathology in the Basal Forebrain of Aged Persons

    PubMed Central

    Takei, Hidehiro; Van Eldik, Linda J.; Schmitt, Frederick A.; Jicha, Gregory A.; Powell, Suzanne Z.; Nelson, Peter T.

    2016-01-01

    Transactivating responsive sequence (TAR) DNA-binding protein 43-kDa (TDP-43) pathology has been described in various brain diseases, but the full anatomical distribution and clinical and biological implications of that pathology are incompletely characterized. Here, we describe TDP-43 neuropathology in the basal forebrain, hypothalamus, and adjacent nuclei in 98 individuals (mean age, 86 years; median final mini-mental state examination score, 27). On examination blinded to clinical and pathologic diagnoses, we identified TDP-43 pathology that most frequently involved the ventromedial basal forebrain in 19 individuals (19.4%). As expected, many of these brains had comorbid pathologies including those of Alzheimer disease (AD), Lewy body disease (LBD), and/or hippocampal sclerosis of aging (HS-Aging). The basal forebrain TDP-43 pathology was strongly associated with comorbid HS-Aging (odds ratio = 6.8, p = 0.001), whereas there was no significant association between basal forebrain TDP-43 pathology and either AD or LBD neuropathology. In this sample, there were some cases with apparent preclinical TDP-43 pathology in the basal forebrain that may indicate that this is an early affected area in HS-Aging. We conclude that TDP-43 pathology in the basal forebrain is strongly associated with HS-Aging. These results raise questions about a specific pathogenetic relationship between basal forebrain TDP-43 and non-HS-Aging comorbid diseases (AD and LBD). PMID:26971127

  20. Hippocampal Sclerosis but Not Normal Aging or Alzheimer Disease Is Associated With TDP-43 Pathology in the Basal Forebrain of Aged Persons.

    PubMed

    Cykowski, Matthew D; Takei, Hidehiro; Van Eldik, Linda J; Schmitt, Frederick A; Jicha, Gregory A; Powell, Suzanne Z; Nelson, Peter T

    2016-05-01

    Transactivating responsive sequence (TAR) DNA-binding protein 43-kDa (TDP-43) pathology has been described in various brain diseases, but the full anatomical distribution and clinical and biological implications of that pathology are incompletely characterized. Here, we describe TDP-43 neuropathology in the basal forebrain, hypothalamus, and adjacent nuclei in 98 individuals (mean age, 86 years; median final mini-mental state examination score, 27). On examination blinded to clinical and pathologic diagnoses, we identified TDP-43 pathology that most frequently involved the ventromedial basal forebrain in 19 individuals (19.4%). As expected, many of these brains had comorbid pathologies including those of Alzheimer disease (AD), Lewy body disease (LBD), and/or hippocampal sclerosis of aging (HS-Aging). The basal forebrain TDP-43 pathology was strongly associated with comorbid HS-Aging (odds ratio = 6.8, p = 0.001), whereas there was no significant association between basal forebrain TDP-43 pathology and either AD or LBD neuropathology. In this sample, there were some cases with apparent preclinical TDP-43 pathology in the basal forebrain that may indicate that this is an early affected area in HS-Aging. We conclude that TDP-43 pathology in the basal forebrain is strongly associated with HS-Aging. These results raise questions about a specific pathogenetic relationship between basal forebrain TDP-43 and non-HS-Aging comorbid diseases (AD and LBD). © 2016 American Association of Neuropathologists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Induction of Fos immunoreactivity labeling in rat forebrain metabolic loci by caudal fourth ventricular infusion of the monocarboxylate transporter inhibitor, alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid.

    PubMed

    Briski, Karen P; Patil, Gopal D

    2005-01-01

    Caudal fourth ventricular (CV4) infusion of the monocarboxylate transporter inhibitor, alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (4CIN), causes hyperglycemia coincident with Fos expression in the hindbrain nucleus tractus solitarius, a rare central source of metabolic deficit signaling. The present studies examined the hypothesis that hindbrain lactoprivic signaling activates central autonomic pathways that regulate systemic glucostasis by examining the effects of this drug treatment paradigm on patterns of Fos expression in forebrain structures that integrate sensory input from metabolic sensors and coordinate motor responses to energy shortages. Two hours after CV4 infusion of graded doses of 4CIN or vehicle alone, adult female rats were sacrificed by transcardial perfusion and sections through the telencephalic and diencephalic metabolic loci were processed for Fos immunoreactivity (-ir). Fos labeling of the hypothalamic paraventricular (PVH), dorsomedial (DMH), and ventromedial (VMH) nuclei was significantly elevated, relative to the vehicle-treated controls, in response to the lowest dose of 4CIN, e.g. 10 microg/animal. Treatment with higher doses of 4CIN (25 or 50 microg) further augmented numbers of Fos-ir-positive neurons in these structures, and also elicited staining of the bed nuclei of the stria terminalis (BST), medial preoptic (MPN), arcuate (ARH), supraoptic (SO), and anterior hypothalamic nuclei (AHN), and lateral hypothalamic area (LHA). Mean numbers of Fos-immunolabeled neurons in the ARH, DMH, LHA, AHN, MPN, and SO were not different between animals infused with 25 versus 50 microg 4CIN, whereas neuronal labeling in the VMH, BST, and PVH was significantly greater in the high- versus the middle-dose groups. The present data show that pharmacological inhibition of lactate uptake within the caudal hindbrain results in dose-dependent neuronal Fos immunoexpression within characterized forebrain components of the central metabolic circuitry, and that these

  2. Behavioral activation by CRF: evidence for the involvement of the ventral forebrain.

    PubMed

    Tazi, A; Swerdlow, N R; LeMoal, M; Rivier, J; Vale, W; Koob, G F

    1987-07-06

    Rats injected intracerebroventricularly with corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) at the level of the lateral ventricle or cisterna magna showed a dose-dependent increase in locomotor activity. The increase in locomotor activity from injections of CRF into the cisterna magna was blocked by a cold cream plug in the cerebral aqueduct. An identical plug failed to block the increase in locomotor activity produced by CRF injected into the lateral ventricle. Intracerebral injections of CRF produced a site specific increase in locomotor activity with the largest increases observed from CRF injected into the substantia innominata/lateral preoptic area. Results suggest that the locomotor activating effects of CRF may be due to an activation of CRF receptors in the ventral forebrain, a region rich in CRF cell bodies and projections.

  3. Calcium Imaging of Basal Forebrain Activity during Innate and Learned Behaviors.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Thomas C; Pinto, Lucas; Brock, Julien R; Dan, Yang

    2016-01-01

    The basal forebrain (BF) plays crucial roles in arousal, attention, and memory, and its impairment is associated with a variety of cognitive deficits. The BF consists of cholinergic, GABAergic, and glutamatergic neurons. Electrical or optogenetic stimulation of BF cholinergic neurons enhances cortical processing and behavioral performance, but the natural activity of these cells during behavior is only beginning to be characterized. Even less is known about GABAergic and glutamatergic neurons. Here, we performed microendoscopic calcium imaging of BF neurons as mice engaged in spontaneous behaviors in their home cages (innate) or performed a go/no-go auditory discrimination task (learned). Cholinergic neurons were consistently excited during movement, including running and licking, but GABAergic and glutamatergic neurons exhibited diverse responses. All cell types were activated by overt punishment, either inside or outside of the discrimination task. These findings reveal functional similarities and distinctions between BF cell types during both spontaneous and task-related behaviors.

  4. Neuronal ensemble bursting in the basal forebrain encodes salience irrespective of valence.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shih-Chieh; Nicolelis, Miguel A L

    2008-07-10

    Both reward- and punishment-related stimuli are motivationally salient and attract the attention of animals. However, it remains unclear how motivational salience is processed in the brain. Here, we show that both reward- and punishment-predicting stimuli elicited robust bursting of many noncholinergic basal forebrain (BF) neurons in behaving rats. The same BF neurons also responded with similar bursting to primary reinforcement of both valences. Reinforcement responses were modulated by expectation, with surprising reinforcement eliciting stronger BF bursting. We further demonstrate that BF burst firing predicted successful detection of near-threshold stimuli. Together, our results point to the existence of a salience-encoding system independent of stimulus valence. We propose that the encoding of motivational salience by ensemble bursting of noncholinergic BF neurons may improve behavioral performance by affecting the activity of widespread cortical circuits and therefore represents a novel candidate mechanism for top-down attention.

  5. Calcium Imaging of Basal Forebrain Activity during Innate and Learned Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Thomas C.; Pinto, Lucas; Brock, Julien R.; Dan, Yang

    2016-01-01

    The basal forebrain (BF) plays crucial roles in arousal, attention, and memory, and its impairment is associated with a variety of cognitive deficits. The BF consists of cholinergic, GABAergic, and glutamatergic neurons. Electrical or optogenetic stimulation of BF cholinergic neurons enhances cortical processing and behavioral performance, but the natural activity of these cells during behavior is only beginning to be characterized. Even less is known about GABAergic and glutamatergic neurons. Here, we performed microendoscopic calcium imaging of BF neurons as mice engaged in spontaneous behaviors in their home cages (innate) or performed a go/no-go auditory discrimination task (learned). Cholinergic neurons were consistently excited during movement, including running and licking, but GABAergic and glutamatergic neurons exhibited diverse responses. All cell types were activated by overt punishment, either inside or outside of the discrimination task. These findings reveal functional similarities and distinctions between BF cell types during both spontaneous and task-related behaviors. PMID:27242444

  6. Whole-Brain Monosynaptic Afferent Inputs to Basal Forebrain Cholinergic System

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Rongfeng; Jin, Sen; He, Xiaobin; Xu, Fuqiang; Hu, Ji

    2016-01-01

    The basal forebrain cholinergic system (BFCS) robustly modulates many important behaviors, such as arousal, attention, learning and memory, through heavy projections to cortex and hippocampus. However, the presynaptic partners governing BFCS activity still remain poorly understood. Here, we utilized a recently developed rabies virus-based cell-type-specific retrograde tracing system to map the whole-brain afferent inputs of the BFCS. We found that the BFCS receives inputs from multiple cortical areas, such as orbital frontal cortex, motor cortex, and insular cortex, and that the BFCS also receives dense inputs from several subcortical nuclei related to motivation and stress, including lateral septum, central amygdala, paraventricular nucleus of hypothalamus, dorsal raphe, and parabrachial nucleus. Interestingly, we found that the BFCS receives inputs from the olfactory areas and the entorhinal–hippocampal system. These results greatly expand our knowledge about the connectivity of the mouse BFCS and provided important preliminary indications for future exploration of circuit function. PMID:27777554

  7. Neuronal ensemble bursting in the basal forebrain encodes salience irrespective of valence

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shih-Chieh; Nicolelis, Miguel A.L.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Both reward- and punishment-related stimuli are motivationally salient and attract the attention of animals. However, it remains unclear how motivational salience is processed in the brain. Here we show that both reward- and punishment-predicting stimuli elicited robust bursting of many non-cholinergic basal forebrain (BF) neurons in behaving rats. The same BF neurons also responded with similar bursting to primary reinforcement of both valences. Reinforcement responses were modulated by expectation, with surprising reinforcement eliciting stronger BF bursting. We further demonstrate that BF burst firing predicted successful detection of near-threshold stimuli. Together, our results point to the existence of a salience-encoding system independent of stimulus valence. We propose that the encoding of motivational salience by ensemble bursting of non-cholinergic BF neurons may improve behavioral performance by affecting the activity of widespread cortical circuits, and therefore represents a novel candidate mechanism for top-down attention. PMID:18614035

  8. Differential Emotional Experience Leads to Pruning of Dendritic Spines in the Forebrain of Domestic Chicks

    PubMed Central

    Bock, Jörg; Braun, Katharina

    1998-01-01

    Auditory filial imprinting induces quantitative changes of synaptic density in the forebrain area mediorostral neostriatum/hyperstriatum ventrale of the domestic chick. The aim of the present study was to examine the time window and the extent and quality of experience that is required for the induction of these synaptic changes. We found that a brief (30 min) experience with the imprinting situation (tone stimulus + mother surrogate) is sufficient to induce spine elimination, which is detectable on postnatal day 7, but not 80 min after the presentation of the imprinting stimuli. This synaptic reorganization requires the association of the acoustic imprinting tone with an emotional reward (mother surrogate); acoustic stimulation alone does not lead to detectable synaptic changes. The results of the present study provide further evidence that juvenile emotional learning events, such as filial imprinting, lead to a selective synaptic reorganization. PMID:9920679

  9. Birds have primate-like numbers of neurons in the forebrain.

    PubMed

    Olkowicz, Seweryn; Kocourek, Martin; Lučan, Radek K; Porteš, Michal; Fitch, W Tecumseh; Herculano-Houzel, Suzana; Němec, Pavel

    2016-06-28

    Some birds achieve primate-like levels of cognition, even though their brains tend to be much smaller in absolute size. This poses a fundamental problem in comparative and computational neuroscience, because small brains are expected to have a lower information-processing capacity. Using the isotropic fractionator to determine numbers of neurons in specific brain regions, here we show that the brains of parrots and songbirds contain on average twice as many neurons as primate brains of the same mass, indicating that avian brains have higher neuron packing densities than mammalian brains. Additionally, corvids and parrots have much higher proportions of brain neurons located in the pallial telencephalon compared with primates or other mammals and birds. Thus, large-brained parrots and corvids have forebrain neuron counts equal to or greater than primates with much larger brains. We suggest that the large numbers of neurons concentrated in high densities in the telencephalon substantially contribute to the neural basis of avian intelligence.

  10. Grhl2 is required in non-neural tissues for neural progenitor survival and forebrain development

    PubMed Central

    Menke, Chelsea; Cionni, Megan; Siggers, Trevor; Bulyk, Martha L.; Beier, David R.; Stottmann, Rolf W.

    2015-01-01

    Grainyhead-like genes are part of a highly conserved gene family that play a number of roles in ectoderm development and maintenance in mammals. Here we identify a novel allele of Grhl2, cleft-face 3 (clft3), in a mouse line recovered from an ENU mutagenesis screen for organogenesis defects. Homozygous clft3 mutants have a number of phenotypes in common with other alleles of Grhl2. We note a significant effect of genetic background on the clft3 phenotype. One of these is a reduction in size of the telencephalon where we find abnormal patterns of neural progenitor mitosis and apoptosis in mutant brains. Interestingly, Grhl2 is not expressed in the developing forebrain, suggesting this is a survival factor for neural progenitors exerting a paracrine effect on the neural tissue from the overlying ectoderm where Grhl2 is highly expressed. PMID:26177923

  11. Ca2+-permeable non-NMDA glutamate receptors in rat magnocellular basal forebrain neurones

    PubMed Central

    Waters, D Jack; Allen, Timothy G J

    1998-01-01

    Ionotropic glutamate receptor-mediated responses were recorded from rat magnocellular basal forebrain neurones under voltage clamp from a somatically located patch-clamp pipette. Currents were recorded from both acutely dissociated neurones and neurones maintained in culture for up to 6 weeks. Non-NMDA and NMDA receptor-mediated events could be distinguished pharmacologically using the selective agonists (S)-α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA), kainate and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), and antagonists 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX) and D(-)-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (AP5). Responses to rapid application of AMPA displayed pronounced and rapid desensitization. Responses to kainate showed no desensitization. Steady-state EC50 values for AMPA and kainate were 2.7 ± 0.4 μm (n = 5) and 138 ± 25 μm (n = 10), respectively. Cyclothiazide markedly increased current amplitude of responses to both agonists, whereas concanavalin A had no clear effect on either response. The selective AMPA receptor antagonist GYKI 53655 inhibited responses to kainate with an IC50 of 1.2 ± 0.08 μm (n = 5) at -70 mV. These data strongly suggest that AMPA receptors are the predominant non-NMDA receptors expressed by basal forebrain neurones. At -70 mV, approximately 6% of control current amplitude remained, at a maximally effective concentration of GYKI 53655. This residual response displayed desensitization, was insensitive to cyclothiazide and was potentiated by concanavalin A, suggesting that it was mediated by a kainate receptor. Current-voltage relationships for non-NMDA receptor-mediated currents were obtained from both nucleated patches pulled from neurones in culture and from acutely dissociated neurones. With 30 μm spermine in the recording pipette, currents frequently displayed double-rectification characteristic of non-NMDA receptors with high Ca2+ permeabilities. Ca2+ permeability, relative to Na+ and Cs+, was investigated using constant

  12. GRK5 Deficiency Leads to Selective Basal Forebrain Cholinergic Neuronal Vulnerability

    PubMed Central

    He, Minchao; Singh, Prabhakar; Cheng, Shaowu; Zhang, Qiang; Peng, Wei; Ding, XueFeng; Li, Longxuan; Liu, Jun; Premont, Richard T.; Morgan, Dave; Burns, Jeffery M.; Swerdlow, Russell H.; Suo, William Z.

    2016-01-01

    Why certain diseases primarily affect one specific neuronal subtype rather than another is a puzzle whose solution underlies the development of specific therapies. Selective basal forebrain cholinergic (BFC) neurodegeneration participates in cognitive impairment in Alzheimer’s disease (AD), yet the underlying mechanism remains elusive. Here, we report the first recapitulation of the selective BFC neuronal loss that is typical of human AD in a mouse model termed GAP. We created GAP mice by crossing Tg2576 mice that over-express the Swedish mutant human β-amyloid precursor protein gene with G protein-coupled receptor kinase-5 (GRK5) knockout mice. This doubly defective mouse displayed significant BFC neuronal loss at 18 months of age, which was not observed in either of the singly defective parent strains or in the wild type. Along with other supporting evidence, we propose that GRK5 deficiency selectively renders BFC neurons more vulnerable to degeneration. PMID:27193825

  13. Intestinal ischemia and reperfusion injury in growing rats: hypothermia and N-acetylcysteine modulation.

    PubMed

    Montero, Edna F S; Abrahão, Marcos S; Koike, Márcia K; Manna, Mônica C B; Ramalho, Carlos E B

    2003-01-01

    Our objective was to evaluate intestinal ischemia-reperfusion injury in growing rats, modulated by hypothermia (I/RH) and N-acetylcysteine (NAC). We used 30 EPM-1 Wistar male rats, aged around 35 days, weighing 90 g. Rats were randomized into 5 groups with 6 animals in each: I/RH group, intestinal ischemia under hypothermia for 40 min and reperfusion for 30 min; I/RH-NAC group, same procedure but adding NAC (150 mg x kg(-1)), previously with ischemia; S-H group, topic hypothermia for 40 min, and observation for 30 min; I/R H-Ve group; and S-NAC group, NAC administration and observation for 70 min. All animals were heparinized and anesthetized with ketamine (60 mg kg(-1)) and xylazine (10 mg kg(-1)) intramuscularly. Surgical procedures were done under microsurgical technique (augmentation, 10x). After laparotomy, the superior mesenteric artery was dissected and clamped to promote ischemia. Topic hypothermia was obtained by using plastic bags at 4 degrees C, changed every 10 min. Rats were sacrificed by exsanguination, and blood samples were utilized to measure D(-)lactate. Intestinal fragments were removed for morphological study. Statistical analysis was done with nonparametric tests (P ischemia and reperfusion were associated to hypothermia (I/RH = 36 mg/dl). NAC decreased ischemia-reperfusion injury (I/RH-NAC = 19 mg/dl). Morphologic tissue injuries, evaluated by hematoxylin-eosin staining, showed grades 4 and 5 for the I/RH and I/RH-Ve groups, respectively, in contrast with other groups (I/RH-NAC = 2, S-H = 1, and S-NAC = 1). Based on our data, we conclude that intestinal ischemia reperfusion injury occurred morphologically as well as functionally, even under hypothermia. However, NAC showed a protective effect on the small bowel from ischemia-reperfusion injury.

  14. Adolescent Intermittent Alcohol Exposure: Deficits in Object Recognition Memory and Forebrain Cholinergic Markers.

    PubMed

    Swartzwelder, H Scott; Acheson, Shawn K; Miller, Kelsey M; Sexton, Hannah G; Liu, Wen; Crews, Fulton T; Risher, Mary-Louise

    2015-01-01

    The long-term effects of intermittent ethanol exposure during adolescence (AIE) are of intensive interest and investigation. The effects of AIE on learning and memory and the neural functions that drive them are of particular interest as clinical findings suggest enduring deficits in those cognitive domains in humans after ethanol abuse during adolescence. Although studies of such deficits after AIE hold much promise for identifying mechanisms and therapeutic interventions, the findings are sparse and inconclusive. The present results identify a specific deficit in memory function after AIE and establish a possible neural mechanism of that deficit that may be of translational significance. Male rats (starting at PND-30) received exposure to AIE (5g/kg, i.g.) or vehicle and were allowed to mature into adulthood. At PND-71, one group of animals was assessed using the spatial-temporal object recognition (stOR) test to evaluate memory function. A separate group of animals was used to assess the density of cholinergic neurons in forebrain areas Ch1-4 using immunohistochemistry. AIE exposed animals manifested deficits in the temporal component of the stOR task relative to controls, and a significant decrease in the number of ChAT labeled neurons in forebrain areas Ch1-4. These findings add to the growing literature indicating long-lasting neural and behavioral effects of AIE that persist into adulthood and indicate that memory-related deficits after AIE depend upon the tasks employed, and possibly their degree of complexity. Finally, the parallel finding of diminished cholinergic neuron density suggests a possible mechanism underlying the effects of AIE on memory and hippocampal function as well as possible therapeutic or preventive strategies for AIE.

  15. Integrated Effects of Leptin in the Forebrain and Hindbrain of Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Ruth B. S.

    2013-01-01

    Leptin receptors (ObRs) in the forebrain and hindbrain have been independently recognized as important mediators of leptin responses. It is unclear how leptin activity in these areas is integrated. We tested whether both forebrain and hindbrain ObRs have to be activated simultaneously to change energy balance and to maintain metabolic homeostasis. Previous studies used acute leptin injections in either the third ventricle (1–5 μg) or the fourth ventricle (3–10 μg); here we used 12-day infusions of low doses of leptin in one or both ventricles (0.1 μg/24 h in third, 0.6 μg/24 h in fourth). Male Sprague Dawley rats were fitted with third and fourth ventricle cannulas, and saline or leptin was infused from Alzet pumps for 6 or 12 days. Rats that received leptin into only the third or the fourth ventricle were not different from controls that received saline in both ventricles. By contrast, rats with low-dose leptin infusions into both the third and fourth ventricle showed a dramatic 60% reduction in food intake that was reversed on day 6, a 20% weight loss that stabilized on day 6, and a 50% decrease in body fat at day 12 despite the correction of food intake. They displayed normal activity and maintained energy expenditure despite weight loss, indicating inappropriately high thermogenesis that coincided with increased signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) phosphorylation in the brainstem. Altogether, these findings show that with low doses of leptin, chronic activation of both hypothalamic and brainstem ObRs is required to reduce body fat. PMID:23698719

  16. Integrated effects of leptin in the forebrain and hindbrain of male rats.

    PubMed

    Desai, Bhavna N; Harris, Ruth B S

    2013-08-01

    Leptin receptors (ObRs) in the forebrain and hindbrain have been independently recognized as important mediators of leptin responses. It is unclear how leptin activity in these areas is integrated. We tested whether both forebrain and hindbrain ObRs have to be activated simultaneously to change energy balance and to maintain metabolic homeostasis. Previous studies used acute leptin injections in either the third ventricle (1-5 μg) or the fourth ventricle (3-10 μg); here we used 12-day infusions of low doses of leptin in one or both ventricles (0.1 μg/24 h in third, 0.6 μg/24 h in fourth). Male Sprague Dawley rats were fitted with third and fourth ventricle cannulas, and saline or leptin was infused from Alzet pumps for 6 or 12 days. Rats that received leptin into only the third or the fourth ventricle were not different from controls that received saline in both ventricles. By contrast, rats with low-dose leptin infusions into both the third and fourth ventricle showed a dramatic 60% reduction in food intake that was reversed on day 6, a 20% weight loss that stabilized on day 6, and a 50% decrease in body fat at day 12 despite the correction of food intake. They displayed normal activity and maintained energy expenditure despite weight loss, indicating inappropriately high thermogenesis that coincided with increased signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) phosphorylation in the brainstem. Altogether, these findings show that with low doses of leptin, chronic activation of both hypothalamic and brainstem ObRs is required to reduce body fat.

  17. Immunohistochemical organization of the forebrain in the white sturgeon, Acipenser transmontanus.

    PubMed

    Piñuela, Carmen; Northcutt, R Glenn

    2007-01-01

    The distribution of substance P (SP), leucine-enkephalin (LENK), serotonin (5HT), dopamine (DA), and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) was examined in the forebrain of the white sturgeon in order to evaluate several anatomical hypotheses based on cytoarchitectonics, and to gain a better understanding of the evolution of the forebrain in ray-finned fishes. The subpallium of the telencephalon has the highest concentration of the neuropeptides SP and LENK, allowing the pallial-subpallial border to be easily distinguished. The distribution of dopamine is similar to that of serotonin in the subpallium, fibers positive for these transmitters are particularly dense in the dorsal and ventral divisions of the subpallium. In addition, a small population of DA- and 5HT-positive cell bodies--which appear to be unique to sturgeons--was identified at the level of the anterior commissure. The internal granular layer of the olfactory bulbs had large numbers of TH-positive cell bodies and fibers, as did the rostral subpallium. The occurrence of cell bodies positive for LENK in the dorsal nucleus of the rostral subpallium supports the hypothesis that this nucleus is homologous to the striatum in other vertebrates. This is further reinforced by the apparent origin of an ascending dopaminergic pathway from cells in the posterior tubercle that are likely homologous to the ventral tegmental area/substantia nigra in land vertebrates. Finally, the differential distribution of SP and TH in the pallium supports the hypothesis that the pallium, or area dorsalis, can be divided medially into a rostral division (Dm), a caudal division (Dp) that is the main pallial target of secondary olfactory projections, and a narrow lateral division (Dd+Dl) immediately adjacent to the attachment of the tela choroidea along the entire rostrocaudal length of the telencephalic hemisphere.

  18. Principles of rat subcortical forebrain organization: a study using histological techniques and multiple fluorescence labeling.

    PubMed

    Riedel, A; Härtig, W; Seeger, G; Gärtner, U; Brauer, K; Arendt, Th

    2002-02-01

    In the present study, we introduce new views on neuro- and chemoarchitectonics of the rat forebrain subcortex deduced from traditional and current concepts of anatomical organization and from our own results. It is based on double and triple immunofluorescence of markers for transmitter-related enzymes, calcium-binding proteins, receptor proteins, myelin basic protein (MBP) and neuropeptides, and on histological cell/myelin stains. The main findings can be summarized as follows: (i) the dorsal striatum of rat and other myomorph rodents reveals a small caudate equivalent homotopic to the caudate nucleus (C) of other mammals, and a large putamen (Pu). (ii) Shell and core can be distinguished also in the 'rostral pole' of nucleus accumbens (ACC) with the calretinin/calbindin and neuropeptide Y (NPY) immunostaining. The shell reveals characteristics of a genuine striatal but not of an extended amygdala (EA) subunit. (iii) EA and lateral septum show striking similarities in structure and fiber connections and may therefore represent a separate parastriatal complex. (iv) The meandering dense layer (DL) of olfactory tubercle (OT) forms longitudinal gyrus- and sulcus-like structures converging in its rostral pole. (v) The core regions of the islands of Calleja that border the ventral pallidum (VP) sharing some of its features are invaded by myelinated fibers of the medial forebrain bundle (MFB). The island of Calleja magna is also apposed to an inconspicuous, slender dorsal appendage of VP. (vi) The VP is composed of a large dorsal reticulated part traversed by the myelinated GABAergic parvalbumin-immunoreactive axons of the MFB and a slender ventral non-reticulate part close to the islands of Calleja. (vii) Considering their close association to the limbic system, ventral striatum (VS) and VP may represent the oldest part of basal ganglia, whereas dorsal striatopallidal subunits were progressively developed in parallel to the growing neocortical influence on motor

  19. Multiple Mechanisms for Processing Reward Uncertainty in the Primate Basal Forebrain.

    PubMed

    Ledbetter, Noah M; Chen, Charles D; Monosov, Ilya E

    2016-07-27

    The ability to use information about the uncertainty of future outcomes is critical for adaptive behavior in an uncertain world. We show that the basal forebrain (BF) contains at least two distinct neural-coding strategies to support this capacity. The dorsal-lateral BF, including the ventral pallidum (VP), contains reward-sensitive neurons, some of which are selectively suppressed by uncertain-reward predictions (U(-)). In contrast, the medial BF (mBF) contains reward-sensitive neurons, some of which are selectively enhanced (U(+)) by uncertain-reward predictions. In a two-alternative choice-task, U(-) neurons were selectively suppressed while monkeys chose uncertain options over certain options. During the same choice-epoch, U(+) neurons signaled the subjective reward value of the choice options. Additionally, after the choice was reported, U(+) neurons signaled reward uncertainty until the choice outcome. We suggest that uncertainty-related suppression of VP may participate in the mediation of uncertainty-seeking actions, whereas uncertainty-related enhancement of the mBF may direct cognitive resources to monitor and learn from uncertain-outcomes. To survive in an uncertain world, we must approach uncertainty and learn from it. Here we provide evidence for two mostly distinct mechanisms for processing uncertainty about rewards within different subregions of the primate basal forebrain (BF). We found that uncertainty suppressed the representation of certain (or safe) reward values by some neurons in the dorsal-lateral BF, in regions occupied by the ventral pallidum. This uncertainty-related suppression was evident as monkeys made risky choices. We also found that uncertainty-enhanced the activity of many medial BF neurons, most prominently after the monkeys' choices were completed (as they awaited uncertain outcomes). Based on these findings, we propose that different subregions of the BF could support action and learning under uncertainty in distinct but

  20. Comparative characterization of the basic forebrain cortical zones in Emys orbicularis (Linnaeus) and Testudo horsfieldi (Gray).

    PubMed

    Davydova, T V; Goncharova, N V

    1979-01-01

    The neuronal and synaptic organization of forebrain basic cortical zones in Testudo horsfieldi and Emys orbicularis and their dendritic spines have been studied using Nissle, Golgi and electron microscopic methods. It has been shown by comparison of the results that the two spicies have marked differences in the structural organization of the forebrain cortical zones. The cortical formation in Testudo horsfieldi is different from that of Emys orbicularis in a greater diversity of neuronal types, smaller size of neurons, smaller cell density in each cortical zones, the presence of horizontal dendritic terminals in dorsomedial dorsal cortex, the absence of the large neurons in dorsomedial medial cortex, ect. Moreover, in both species the dorsomedial dorsal cortex in comparison with medial and lateral cortex is characterized by a marked complexity of the structural organization (diverse neuronal composition, the presence of the stellate cells, the highest cell density, the smallest neuronal size). The investigation of spines in the different dendritic levels (proximal, middle and distal) of neurons in three cortical basic zones has been shown that in both species it has been observed the tendency to increasing of the spine density from proximal to distal part of dendrite. at all dendritic levels noninvaginated forms of spines predominated. Invaginated spines were recorded at the proximal and middle levels of dendrites and contain more organelles and inclusions than noninvaginated spines. In Testudo horsfieldi and Emys orbicularis differences of spine thin structure and spine density in the cortical basic zones were revealed. Moreover, in both species the spines of dorsomedial dorsal cortex were more numerous, more variable in shape, more abundant in organelles. It was there that a bush-like distribution of spines was found which in evidently a special form of synaptic organization of cortical neurons. The above features of this cortical zone indicates a higher degree

  1. Forebrain and brain stem neural circuits contribute to altered sympathetic responses to heating in senescent rats.

    PubMed

    Kenney, Michael J; Fels, Richard J

    2003-11-01

    Acute heating in young rats increases visceral sympathetic nerve discharge (SND); however, renal and splanchnic SND responses to hyperthermia are attenuated in senescent compared with young Fischer 344 (F344) rats (Kenney MJ and Fels RJ. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 283: R513-R520, 2002). Central mechanisms by which aging alters visceral SND responses to heating are unknown. We tested the hypothesis that forebrain neural circuits are involved in suppressing sympathoexcitatory responses to heating in chloralose-anesthetized, senescent F344 rats. Renal and splanchnic SND responses to increased (38 degrees C-41 degrees C) internal temperature were determined in midbrain-transected (MT) and sham-MT young (3-mo-old), mature (12-mo-old), and senescent (24-mo-old) F344 rats and in cervical-transected (CT) and sham-CT senescent rats. Renal SND remained unchanged during heating in MT and sham-MT senescent rats but was increased in CT senescent rats. Splanchnic SND responses to heating were higher in MT vs. sham-MT senescent rats and in CT vs. MT senescent rats. SND responses to heating were similar in MT and sham-MT young and mature rats. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) was increased during heating in MT but not in sham-MT senescent rats, whereas heating-induced increases in MAP were higher in sham-MT vs. MT young rats. These data suggest that in senescent rats suppression of splanchnic SND to heating involves forebrain and brain stem neural circuits, whereas renal suppression is mediated solely by brain stem neural circuits. These results support the concept that aging alters the functional organization of pathways regulating SND and arterial blood pressure responses to acute heating.

  2. A novel anxiogenic role for the delta opioid receptor expressed in GABAergic forebrain neurons

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Paul Chu Sin; Keyworth, Helen L.; Martin-Garcia, Elena; Charbogne, Pauline; Darcq, Emmanuel; Bailey, Alexis; Filliol, Dominique; Matifas, Audrey; Ouagazzal, Abdel-Mouttalib; Gaveriaux-Ruff, Claire; Befort, Katia; Maldonado, Rafael; Kitchen, Ian; Kieffer, Brigitte L.

    2014-01-01

    Background The delta opioid receptor (DOR) is broadly expressed throughout the nervous system and regulates chronic pain, emotional responses, motivation and memory. Neural circuits underlying DOR activities have been poorly explored by genetic approaches. Here we used conditional mouse mutagenesis to elucidate receptor function in GABAergic neurons of the forebrain. Methods We characterized DOR distribution in the brain of Dlx5/6-CreXOprd1fl/fl (Dlx-DOR) mice, and tested main central DOR functions through behavioral testing. Results DORs proteins were strongly deleted in olfactory bulb and striatum, and remained intact in cortex and basolateral amygdala. Olfactory perception, circadian activity and despair-like behaviors were unchanged. In contrast, locomotor stimulant effects of SNC80 (DOR agonist) and SKF81297 (D1 agonist) were abolished and increased, respectively. Furthermore, Dlx-DOR mice showed lower levels of anxiety in the elevated plus-maze, opposing the known high anxiety in constitutive DOR knockout animals. Also Dlx-DOR mice reached the food more rapidly in a novelty suppressed feeding (NSF) task, despite their lower motivation for food reward observed in an operant paradigm. Finally, c-fos staining after NSF was strongly reduced in amygdala, concordant with the low anxiety phenotype of Dlx-DOR mice. Conclusion Here we demonstrate that DORs expressed in the forebrain mediate the described locomotor effect of SNC80 and inhibit D1-stimulated hyperactivity. Our data also reveal an unanticipated anxiogenic role for this particular DOR subpopulation, with a potential novel adaptive role. DORs therefore exert dual anxiolytic/anxiogenic roles in emotional responses, which may both have implications in the area of anxiety disorders. PMID:25444168

  3. Learning-related changes in Fos-like immunoreactivity in the chick forebrain after imprinting.

    PubMed Central

    McCabe, B J; Horn, G

    1994-01-01

    The intermediate and medial part of the hyperstriatum ventrale (IMHV) is a part of the chick forebrain that is critical for the learning process of imprinting and may be a site of information storage. Chicks were either trained on an imprinting stimulus or dark-reared. Trained chicks were classified as good or poor learners by their preference score (a measure of the strength of imprinting). A monoclonal antibody against the immediate early gene product Fos was applied to sections through IMHV and other forebrain regions. In the IMHV, significantly more immunopositive nuclei were counted in good learners than in poor learners or dark-reared chicks. There was a positive correlation between counts of labeled nuclei and preference score that was not attributable to sensory activity per se, locomotor activity during training, or a predisposition to learn well; rather, the results indicated that the change in Fos immunoreactivity in the IMHV was related to learning. In the hyperstriatum accessorium, significantly fewer immunopositive nuclei were counted in good learners than in poor learners or in dark-reared chicks. In the dorsolateral hippocampal region, more immunopositive nuclei were counted in trained than in dark-reared chicks. No significant effects of training were found in the anterior hyperstriatum ventrale, lobus parolfactorius, neostriatum, medial hippocampal region, or ventrolateral hippocampal region, but counts in this last region were positively correlated with training approach. The results for IMHV implicate Fos or Fos-related proteins in memory processes and pave the way for the identification of the cell types that show the learning-related increase in gene expression. Images PMID:7972076

  4. EXPRESSION OF COCAINE- AND AMPHETAMINE-REGULATED TRANSCRIPT IN THE RAT FOREBRAIN DURING POSTNATAL DEVELOPMENT

    PubMed Central

    RODRIGUES, B. C.; CAVALCANTE, J. C.; ELIAS, C. F.

    2014-01-01

    Cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) is widespread in the rodent brain. CART has been implicated in many different functions including reward, feeding, stress responses, sensory processing, learning and memory formation. Recent studies have suggested that CART may also play a role in neural development. Therefore, in the present study we compared the distribution pattern and levels of CART mRNA expression in the forebrain of male and female rats at different stages of postnatal development: P06, P26 and P66. At 6 days of age (P06), male and female rats showed increased CART expression in the somatosensory and piriform cortices, indusium griseum, dentate gyrus, nucleus accumbens, and ventral premammillary nucleus. Interestingly, we found a striking expression of CART mRNA in the ventral posteromedial and ventral posterolateral thalamic nuclei. This thalamic expression was absent at P26 and P66. Contrastingly, at P06 CART mRNA expression was decreased in the arcuate nucleus. Comparing sexes, we found increased CART mRNA expression in the anteroventral periventricular nucleus of adult females. In other regions including the CA1, the lateral hypothalamic area and the dorsomedial nucleus of the hypothalamus, CART expression was not different comparing postnatal ages and sexes. Our findings indicate that CART gene expression is induced in a distinct temporal and spatial manner in forebrain sites of male and female rats. They also suggest that CART peptide participate in the development of neural pathways related to selective functions including sensory processing, reward and memory formation. PMID:21903152

  5. Stress or no stress: mineralocorticoid receptors in the forebrain regulate behavioral adaptation.

    PubMed

    ter Horst, J P; van der Mark, M H; Arp, M; Berger, S; de Kloet, E R; Oitzl, M S

    2012-07-01

    Corticosteroid effects on cognitive abilities during behavioral adaptation to stress are mediated by two types of receptors. While the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) is mainly involved in the consolidation of memory, the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) mediates appraisal and initial responses to novelty. Recent findings in humans and mice suggest that under stress, the MR might be involved in the use of different learning strategies. Here, we used male mice lacking the MR in the forebrain (MR(CaMKCre)), which were subjected to 5-10 min acute restraint stress, followed 30 min later by training trials on the circular hole board. Mice had to locate an exit hole using extra- and intra-maze cues. We assessed performance and the use of spatial and stimulus-response strategies. Non-stressed MR(CaMKCre) mice showed delayed learning as compared to control littermates. Prior stress impaired performance in controls, but did not further deteriorate learning in MR(CaMKCre) mice. When stressed, 20-30% of both MR(CaMKCre) and control mice switched from a spatial to a stimulus-response strategy, which rescued performance in MR(CaMKCre) mice. Furthermore, MR(CaMKCre) mice showed increased GR mRNA expression in all CA areas of the hippocampus and an altered basal and stress-induced corticosterone secretion, which supports their role in the modulation of neuroendocrine activity. In conclusion, our data provide evidence for the critical role of MR in the fast formation of spatial memory. In the absence of forebrain MR spatial learning performance was under basal circumstances impaired, while after stress further deterioration of performance was rescued by switching behavior increasingly to a stimulus-response strategy.

  6. Digital Ischemia Associated With Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Le Besnerais, Maëlle; Miranda, Sébastien; Cailleux, Nicole; Girszyn, Nicolas; Marie, Isabelle; Lévesque, Hervé; Benhamou, Ygal

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Digital ischemia associated with cancer (DIAC) is increasing in frequency and recent reports have suggested the concept of paraneoplastic manifestation. The aims of this study were to characterize the clinical presentation of DIAC and identify clinical features that could lead physicians to diagnose underlying cancer. From January 2004 to December 2011, 100 patients were hospitalized in the Department of Internal Medicine at Rouen University Hospital, France for a first episode of DI. Fifteen (15%) exhibited symptomatic or asymptomatic cancer during the year preceding or following vascular episode and constituted the DIAC group. Other patients without cancer made up the digital ischemia (DI) group. Median time between diagnosis of cancer and episode of digital necrosis was 2 months [0.25–9]. Diagnosis of DI and concomitant cancer was made in 7 of the 15 patients, while DI preceded the malignant disorder in 2 cases and followed it in 6 cases. Histological types were adenocarcinoma for 7 (46.7%), squamous cell carcinoma for 4 (26.7%), and lymphoid neoplasia for 3 patients (20%). Six patients (40%) had extensive cancer. Three patients were lost to follow-up and 5 patients died <1 year after diagnosis of cancer. Cancer treatment improved vascular symptoms in 6 patients (40%). Patients with DIAC, compared to patients with DI, were significantly older (56 years [33–79] vs 46 [17–83] P =0.005), and had significantly lower hemoglobin and hematocrit levels (12.7 g/dl vs 13.9 g/dl; P =0.003 and 38% vs 42%; P =0.003, respectively). Patients with DIAC had a higher platelet rate (420 vs 300 G/L P =0.01), and 6 patients with DIAC (40%) had thrombocytosis. There was no difference between groups either in C-reactive protein level (12 mg/L vs 5 mg/L; P =0.08) or regarding cardiovascular risk factors, presence of autoimmunity, or monoclonal protein. This retrospective study suggests that DIAC may be more prevalent than previously reported. Outcomes

  7. Production of anterior segment ischemia.

    PubMed Central

    Hiatt, R L

    1977-01-01

    Anterior segment ischemic changes can occur without detachment of any muscles. The most common cause of such ischemic changes of the anterior segment is the removal of too many rectus muscles in one operation. Twenty dog eyes and eight monkey eyes were subjected to the disinsertion and detachment of various combinations of extraocular muscles. The dogs were sacrificed at intervals from 30 to 90 days. During the observation period, they were observed for gross and slit-lamp changes. The enucleated eyes were studied microscopically for signs of ischemic and necrotic changes. Two patients who were studied, observed, and treated for anterior segment ischemia following muscle surgery are described. The changes which occur after extraocular muscle surgery are extensive and include corneal edema, cataract, chemosis, corneal changes, decreases in intraocular pressure, decreases in outflow or glaucoma, and frank necrosis. The variables which lead to this reaction are described in detail. Also, some unanswered queries, such as the duration of the reaction and the time interval of the reaction after multiple muscle operations are discussed. Images FIGURE 1 A FIGURE 1 B FIGURE 1 C FIGURE 2 A FIGURE 2 B FIGURE 2 C FIGURE 2 D FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 PMID:418549

  8. [Critical limb ischemia--update].

    PubMed

    Melamed, Eitan; Kotyba, Baydousi; Galili, Offer; Karmeli, Ron

    2010-12-01

    Critical limb ischemia (CLI) is the most severe manifestation of peripheral artery occlusive disease. Without timely diagnosis and revascularization, patients with CLI are at risk of devastating complications including loss of limb and life. Therapeutic goals in treating patients with CLI include reducing cardiovascular risk factors, relieving ischemic pain, heating ulcers, preventing major amputation, improving quality of life and increasing survival. These aims may be achieved through medical therapy, revascularization or amputation. The past decade has seen substantial growth in endovascular therapies and options now exist for treating long segment occlusive disease, but surgical bypass may still yield more durable results. Patients who are younger, more active, and at low risk for surgery, may have better outcomes undergoing an operation. This is also indicated for endovascular failures, which may include technical failures or late occlusions after stents or other procedures. In contrast, frail patients with a limited life expectancy may experience better outcomes with endovascular therapy. For patients who are non-ambulatory, demented, or unfit to undergo revascularization, an amputation should be considered.

  9. Epigenetic mechanisms in cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Schweizer, Sophie; Meisel, Andreas; Märschenz, Stefanie

    2013-01-01

    Treatment efficacy for ischemic stroke represents a major challenge. Despite fundamental advances in the understanding of stroke etiology, therapeutic options to improve functional recovery remain limited. However, growing knowledge in the field of epigenetics has dramatically changed our understanding of gene regulation in the last few decades. According to the knowledge gained from animal models, the manipulation of epigenetic players emerges as a highly promising possibility to target diverse neurologic pathologies, including ischemia. By altering transcriptional regulation, epigenetic modifiers can exert influence on all known pathways involved in the complex course of ischemic disease development. Beneficial transcriptional effects range from attenuation of cell death, suppression of inflammatory processes, and enhanced blood flow, to the stimulation of repair mechanisms and increased plasticity. Most striking are the results obtained from pharmacological inhibition of histone deacetylation in animal models of stroke. Multiple studies suggest high remedial qualities even upon late administration of histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi). In this review, the role of epigenetic mechanisms, including histone modifications as well as DNA methylation, is discussed in the context of known ischemic pathways of damage, protection, and regeneration. PMID:23756691

  10. Non-occlusive mesenteric ischemia.

    PubMed

    Lock, G; Schölmerich, J

    1995-07-01

    Non-occlusive disease of the mesentery is still a rather underdiagnosed and underestimated condition. It is associated with circumstances that may compromise circulation or the intake of drugs that may lower mesenteric blood flow. Pathophysiologically, a "low flow syndrome" of mesenteric circulation is followed by vasoconstriction; a reperfusion injury may contribute to the ischemic injury. Histopathological changes vary between superficial localized lesions and transmural gangrene. Diagnosis within the initial 24 hours of the development of symptoms is crucial for prognosis but remains a difficult task. Clinical presentation, laboratory tests and ultrasound lack specificity; the role of duplex ultrasound, tonometry and reflectance spectophotometry is still under evaluation. Mesenteric angiography remains the only reliable diagnostic tool and should be applied early in all patients in whom acute mesenteric ischemia is a real possibility. Therapy is aimed at the rapid correction of predisposing and precipitating factors and an effective treatment of mesenteric vasoconstriction. Treatment of choice is a papaverine infusion into the superior mesenteric artery via an angiography catheter. Patients with peritoneal signs have to be treated surgically.

  11. Echocardiographic assessment of myocardial ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Dworrak, Birgit; Sanchis-Gomar, Fabian; Lucia, Alejandro; Buck, Thomas; Erbel, Raimund

    2016-01-01

    Over the last 60 years, echocardiography has emerged as a dominant and indispensable technique for the detection and assessment of coronary heart disease (CHD). In this review, we will describe and discuss this powerful tool of cardiology, especially in the hands of an experienced user, with a focus on myocardial ischemia. Technical development is still on-going, and various new ultrasound techniques have been established in the field of echocardiography in the last several years, including tissue Doppler imaging (TDI), contrast echocardiography, three-dimensional echocardiography (3DE), and speckle tracking echocardiography (i.e., strain/strain rate-echocardiography). High-end equipment with harmonic imaging, high frame rates and the opportunity to adjust mechanical indices has improved imaging quality. Like all new techniques, these techniques must first be subjected to comprehensive scientific assessment, and appropriate training that accounts for physical and physiological limits should be provided. These limits will constantly be redefined as echocardiographic techniques continue to change, which will present new challenges for the further development of ultrasound technology. PMID:27500160

  12. Sex differences in delayed cerebral ischemia after subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Germans, Menno R; Jaja, Blessing N R; de Oliviera Manoel, Airton Leonardo; Cohen, Ashley H; Macdonald, R Loch

    2017-09-01

    OBJECTIVE In this study the authors sought to investigate the sex differences in the risk of delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI), delayed cerebral infarction, and the role of hormonal status. METHODS Ten studies included in the SAHIT (SAH International Trialists) repository were analyzed using a fitting logistic regression model. Heterogeneity between the studies was tested using I(2) statistics, and the results were pooled using a random-effects model. Multivariable analysis was adjusted for the effects of neurological status and fixed effect of study. An additional model was examined in which women and men were split into groups according to an age cut point of 55 years, as a surrogate to define hormonal status. RESULTS A pooled cohort of 6713 patients was analyzed. The risk of DCI was statistically significantly higher in women than in men (OR 1.29, 95% CI 1.12-1.48); no difference was found with respect to cerebral infarction (OR 1.17, 95% CI 0.98-1.40). No difference was found in the risk of DCI when comparing women ≤ 55 and > 55 years (OR 0.87, 95% CI 0.74-1.02; p = 0.08) or when comparing men ≤ 55 and > 55 years (p = 0.38). Independent predictors of DCI were World Federation of Neurosurgical Societies (WFNS) grade, Fisher grade, age, and sex. Independent predictors of infarction included WFNS grade, Fisher grade, and aneurysm size. CONCLUSIONS Female sex is associated with a higher risk of DCI. Sex differences may play a role in the pathogenesis of DCI but are not associated with menopausal status. The predictors of DCI and cerebral infarction were identified in a very large cohort and reflect experience from multiple institutions.

  13. Improving Grading Consistency through Grade Lift Reporting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millet, Ido

    2010-01-01

    We define Grade Lift as the difference between average class grade and average cumulative class GPA. This metric provides an assessment of how lenient the grading was for a given course. In 2006, we started providing faculty members individualized Grade Lift reports reflecting their position relative to an anonymously plotted school-wide…

  14. Influence of Oxygen Tension on Dopaminergic Differentiation of Human Fetal Stem Cells of Midbrain and Forebrain Origin

    PubMed Central

    Krabbe, Christina; Bak, Sara Thornby; Jensen, Pia; von Linstow, Christian; Martínez Serrano, Alberto; Hansen, Claus; Meyer, Morten

    2014-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) constitute a promising source of cells for transplantation in Parkinson's disease (PD), but protocols for controlled dopaminergic differentiation are not yet available. Here we investigated the influence of oxygen on dopaminergic differentiation of human fetal NSCs derived from the midbrain and forebrain. Cells were differentiated for 10 days in vitro at low, physiological (3%) versus high, atmospheric (20%) oxygen tension. Low oxygen resulted in upregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor and increased the proportion of tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive (TH-ir) cells in both types of cultures (midbrain: 9.1±0.5 and 17.1±0.4 (P<0.001); forebrain: 1.9±0.4 and 3.9±0.6 (P<0.01) percent of total cells). Regardless of oxygen levels, the content of TH-ir cells with mature neuronal morphologies was higher for midbrain as compared to forebrain cultures. Proliferative Ki67-ir cells were found in both types of cultures, but the relative proportion of these cells was significantly higher for forebrain NSCs cultured at low, as compared to high, oxygen tension. No such difference was detected for midbrain-derived cells. Western blot analysis revealed that low oxygen enhanced β-tubulin III and GFAP expression in both cultures. Up-regulation of β-tubulin III was most pronounced for midbrain cells, whereas GFAP expression was higher in forebrain as compared to midbrain cells. NSCs from both brain regions displayed less cell death when cultured at low oxygen tension. Following mictrotransplantation into mouse striatal slice cultures predifferentiated midbrain NSCs were found to proliferate and differentiate into substantial numbers of TH-ir neurons with mature neuronal morphologies, particularly at low oxygen. In contrast, predifferentiated forebrain NSCs microtransplanted using identical conditions displayed little proliferation and contained few TH-ir cells, all of which had an immature appearance. Our data may reflect differences in

  15. Seasonal plasticity of song behavior relies on motor and syntactic variability induced by a basal ganglia-forebrain circuit.

    PubMed

    Alliende, Jorge; Giret, Nicolas; Pidoux, Ludivine; Del Negro, Catherine; Leblois, Arthur

    2017-09-17

    The plasticity of nervous systems allows animals to quickly adapt to a changing environment. In particular, seasonal plasticity of brain structure and behavior is often critical to survival or mating in seasonal climates. Songbirds provide striking examples of seasonal changes in neural circuits and vocal behavior and have emerged as a leading model for adult brain plasticity. While seasonal plasticity and the well-characterized process of juvenile song learning may share common neural mechanisms, the extent of their similarity remains unclear. Especially, it is unknown whether the basal ganglia (BG)-forebrain loop which implements song learning in juveniles by driving vocal exploration participates in seasonal plasticity. To address this issue, we performed bilateral lesions of the output structure of the song-related BG-forebrain circuit (the magnocellular nucleus of the anterior nidopallium) in canaries during the breeding season, when song is most stereotyped, and just after resuming singing in early fall, when canaries sing their most variable songs and may produce new syllable types. Lesions drastically reduced song acoustic variability, increased song and phrase duration, and decreased syntax variability in early fall, reverting at least partially seasonal changes observed between the breeding season and early fall. On the contrary, lesions did not affect singing behavior during the breeding season. Our results therefore indicate that the BG-forebrain pathway introduces acoustic and syntactic variability in song when canaries resume singing in early fall. We propose that BG-forebrain circuits actively participate in seasonal plasticity by injecting variability in behavior during non-breeding season. The study of seasonal plasticity in temperate songbirds has provided important insights into the mechanisms of structural and functional plasticity in the central nervous system. The precise function and mechanisms of seasonal song plasticity however remain

  16. Influence of oxygen tension on dopaminergic differentiation of human fetal stem cells of midbrain and forebrain origin.

    PubMed

    Krabbe, Christina; Bak, Sara Thornby; Jensen, Pia; von Linstow, Christian; Martínez Serrano, Alberto; Hansen, Claus; Meyer, Morten

    2014-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) constitute a promising source of cells for transplantation in Parkinson's disease (PD), but protocols for controlled dopaminergic differentiation are not yet available. Here we investigated the influence of oxygen on dopaminergic differentiation of human fetal NSCs derived from the midbrain and forebrain. Cells were differentiated for 10 days in vitro at low, physiological (3%) versus high, atmospheric (20%) oxygen tension. Low oxygen resulted in upregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor and increased the proportion of tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive (TH-ir) cells in both types of cultures (midbrain: 9.1 ± 0.5 and 17.1 ± 0.4 (P<0.001); forebrain: 1.9 ± 0.4 and 3.9 ± 0.6 (P<0.01) percent of total cells). Regardless of oxygen levels, the content of TH-ir cells with mature neuronal morphologies was higher for midbrain as compared to forebrain cultures. Proliferative Ki67-ir cells were found in both types of cultures, but the relative proportion of these cells was significantly higher for forebrain NSCs cultured at low, as compared to high, oxygen tension. No such difference was detected for midbrain-derived cells. Western blot analysis revealed that low oxygen enhanced β-tubulin III and GFAP expression in both cultures. Up-regulation of β-tubulin III was most pronounced for midbrain cells, whereas GFAP expression was higher in forebrain as compared to midbrain cells. NSCs from both brain regions displayed less cell death when cultured at low oxygen tension. Following mictrotransplantation into mouse striatal slice cultures predifferentiated midbrain NSCs were found to proliferate and differentiate into substantial numbers of TH-ir neurons with mature neuronal morphologies, particularly at low oxygen. In contrast, predifferentiated forebrain NSCs microtransplanted using identical conditions displayed little proliferation and contained few TH-ir cells, all of which had an immature appearance. Our data may reflect differences

  17. Grape seed proanthocyanidin extract reduces renal ischemia/reperfusion injuries in rats.

    PubMed

    Wei, Ribao; Ding, Rui; Wang, Yongxin; Tang, Li

    2012-06-01

    Activation of reactive oxygen species and inflammation are implicated in renal ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injuries. This study investigated whether grape seed proanthocyanidin extract (GSPE) protects against renal I/R injury by its effect on reactive oxygen species and the inflammation pathway. Wistar rats were administered GSPE before renal ischemia, followed by reperfusion for 24 hours. Plasma concentrations of urea, creatinine and cystatin C were measured for renal dysfunction. Serum and tissue superoxide dismutase activity and glutathione peroxidase and malondialdehyde levels were measured. Renal sections were analyzed for histological grading of renal injury, and nuclear factor-ĸB activity was determined. GSPE significantly reduced increases in urea, creatinine and cystatin C; increased kidney superoxide dismutase activity and glutathione peroxidase levels and reduced malondialdehyde levels. GSPE reduced histological renal damage and nuclear factor-ĸB activity. These results suggest that GSPE reduces renal dysfunction and injury caused by renal I/R.

  18. Assessment of Renal Ischemia By Optical Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzgerald, J T; Demos, S; Michalopoulou, A; Pierce, J L; Troppmann, C

    2004-01-07

    Introduction: No reliable method currently exists for quantifying the degree of warm ischemia in kidney grafts prior to transplantation. We describe a method for evaluating pretransplant warm ischemia time using optical spectroscopic methods. Methods: Lewis rat kidney vascular pedicles were clamped unilaterally in vivo for 0, 5, 10, 20, 30, 60, 90 or 120 minutes; 8 animals were studied at each time point. Injured and contra-lateral control kidneys were then flushed with Euro-Collins solution, resected and placed on ice. 335 nm excitation autofluorescence as well as cross polarized light scattering images were taken of each injured and control kidney using filters of various wavelengths. The intensity ratio of the injured to normal kidneys was compared to ischemia time. Results: Autofluorescence intensity ratios through a 450 nm filter and light scattering intensity ratios through an 800 nm filter both decreased significantly with increasing ischemia time (p < 0.0001 for each method, one-way ANOVA). All adjacent and non-adjacent time points between 0 and 90 minutes were distinguishable using one of these two modalities by Fisher's PLSD. Conclusions: Optical spectroscopic methods can accurately quantify warm ischemia time in kidneys that have been subsequently hypothermically preserved. Further studies are needed to correlate results with physiological damage and posttransplant performance.

  19. Assessment of renal ischemia by optical spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Jason T; Demos, Stavros; Michalopoulou, Andromachi; Pierce, Jonathan L; Troppmann, Christoph

    2004-11-01

    No reliable method currently exists for quantifying the degree of warm ischemia in kidney grafts before transplantation. We describe a method for evaluating pretransplant warm ischemia time using optical spectroscopic methods. Lewis rat kidney vascular pedicles were clamped unilaterally in vivo for 0, 5, 10, 20, 30, 60, 90, or 120 min; eight animals were studied at each time point. Injured and contralateral control kidneys were then flushed with Euro-Collins solution, resected, and placed on ice. 335 nm excitation autofluorescence as well as cross-polarized light scattering images were then taken of each injured and control kidney using filters of various wavelengths. The intensity ratio of the injured to normal kidneys was compared to ischemia time. Autofluorescence intensity ratios through a 450-nm filter and light scattering intensity ratios through an 800-nm filter both decreased significantly with increasing ischemia time (P < 0.0001 for each method, one-way analysis of variance). All adjacent and nonadjacent time points between 0 and 90 min were distinguishable using one of these two modalities by Fisher's protected least significant difference. Optical spectroscopic methods correlate with warm ischemia time in kidneys that have been subsequently hypothermically preserved. Further studies are needed to correlate results with physiological damage and posttransplant performance.

  20. Ischemia-induced endothelial cell dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Keep, R F; Andjelkovic, A V; Stamatovic, S M; Shakui, P; Ennis, S R

    2005-01-01

    Hemorrhagic transformation upon reperfusion therapy has focused attention on ischemia-induced endothelial dysfunction. This study examined whether hyperglycemia may induce hemorrhagic transformation by enhancing endothelial mitochondrial damage during ischemia and whether preconditioning (PC) stimuli may limit ischemia-induced endothelial damage. In vivo, rats received 2.8 M D-glucose or arabinose (1 ml/100 g; i.p.) prior to undergoing two hours of middle cerebral artery occlusion and transcardiac fixation for electron microscopy. In vitro, brain endothelial cells were exposed to a PC impulse (short-term oxygen glucose deprivation; OGD) prior to an injurious event (5 hours OGD). Endothelial injury was assessed by measuring lactate dehydrogenase release. Hyperglycemia during cerebral ischemia resulted in marked changes in endothelial morphology and mitochondrial swelling. Thus, in the ischemic hemisphere, there was no evidence of endothelial mitochondrial swelling in normoglycemic rats (mean profile width 0.22 +/- 0.04 vs. 0.17 +/- 0.01 microm in contralateral hemisphere) but there was marked swelling in hyperglycemic rats (0.44 +/- 0.02 microm). In vitro, cells preconditioned with one hour of OGD one day prior to 5 hours of OGD, showed reduced lactate dehydrogenase release (p < 0.05). In conclusion, hyperglycemia may have specific adverse effects on endothelial cell mitochondria during ischemia. Preventing those effects may help to ameliorate blood-brain barrier disruption on reperfusion. Insights into how to prevent endothelial injury may come from determining the mechanisms involved in endothelial preconditioning.

  1. Intermittent ischemia enhances the uptake of indocyanine green to livers subject to ischemia and reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Steenks, Mathilde; Peters, Jeroen; Rademacher, Willem; Nieuwenhuijs, Vincent B; Padbury, Robert T A; Barritt, Greg J

    2017-03-01

    Intermittent ischemia is known to promote post perfusion bile flow, and hence recovery of liver function following ischemia reperfusion of the liver. However, the mechanisms involved are not well understood. The aim of this study was to identify the step(s) in the bile acid transport pathway altered by intermittent ischemia. Arat model of segmental hepatic ischemia in which the bilateral median and left lateral lobes were made ischemic by clamping the blood vessels was used. Indocyanine green (ICG), infrared spectroscopy, and compartmental kinetic analysis, were used to indirectly monitor the movement of bile acids across hepatocytes in situ. Rates of bile flow were measured gravimetrically. In control livers (not subjected to ischemia), the movement of ICG from the blood to bile fluid could be described by a three compartment model comprising the blood, a rapidly-exchangeable compartment, and the hepatocyte cytoplasmic space. In livers subjected to continuous clamping, the rates of ICG uptake to the liver, and outflow from the liver, were greatly reduced compared with those in control livers. Intermittent clamping (three episodes of 15 min clamping) compared with continuous clamping substantially increased the rate of ICG uptake from the blood but had less effect on the rate of ICG outflow from hepatocytes. It is concluded that intermittent ischemia promotes post reperfusion bile flow in the early phase of ischemia reperfusion injury principally by enhancing the movement of bile acids from the blood to hepatocytes. © 2012 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  2. Temporal relationship of serum markers and tissue damage during acute intestinal ischemia/reperfusion

    PubMed Central

    la Garza, Francisco Javier Guzmán-de; Ibarra-Hernández, Juan Manuel; Cordero-Pérez, Paula; Villegas-Quintero, Pablo; Villarreal-Ovalle, Claudia Ivette; Torres-González, Liliana; Oliva-Sosa, Norma Edith; Alarcón-Galván, Gabriela; Fernández-Garza, Nancy Esthela; Muñoz-Espinosa, Linda Elsa; Cámara-Lemarroy, Carlos Rodrigo; Carrillo-Arriaga, José Gerardo

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: It is essential to identify a serological marker of injury in order to study the pathophysiology of intestinal ischemia reperfusion. In this work, we studied the evolution of several serological markers after intestinal ischemia reperfusion injury in rats. The markers of non-specific cell damage were aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransaminase, and lactic dehydrogenase, the markers of inflammation were tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-6, and interleukin-1 beta, and the markers of intestinal mucosal damage were intestinal fatty acid binding protein and D-lactate. We used Chiús classification to grade the histopathological damage. METHODS: We studied 35 Wistar rats divided into groups according to reperfusion time. The superior mesenteric artery was clamped for 30 minutes, and blood and biopsies were collected at 1, 3, 6, 12, 24, and 48 hours after reperfusion. We plotted the mean ± standard deviation and compared the baseline and maximum values for each marker using Student's t-test. RESULTS: The maximum values of interleukin-1 beta and lactic dehydrogenase were present before the maximal histopathological damage. The maximum tumor necrosis factor alpha and D-lactate expressions coincided with histopathological damage. Alanine aminotransaminase and aspartate aminotransferase had a maximum expression level that increased following the histopathological damage. The maximum expressions of interluken-6 and intestinal fatty acid binding protein were not significantly different from the Sham treated group. CONCLUSION: For the evaluation of injury secondary to acute intestinal ischemia reperfusion with a 30 minute ischemia period, we recommend performing histopathological grading, quantification of D-lactate, which is synthesized by intestinal bacteria and is considered an indicator of mucosal injury, and quantification of tumor necrosis factor alpha as indicators of acute inflammation three hours after reperfusion. PMID:23917671

  3. Functional Recovery From Extended Warm Ischemia Associated With Partial Nephrectomy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhiling; Zhao, Juping; Velet, Lily; Ercole, Cesar E; Remer, Erick M; Mir, Carme M; Li, Jianbo; Takagi, Toshio; Demirjian, Sevag; Campbell, Steven C

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of extended warm ischemia on incidence of acute kidney injury (AKI) and ultimate functional recovery after partial nephrectomy (PN), incorporating rigorous control for loss of parenchymal mass, and embedded within comparison to cohorts of patients managed with hypothermia or limited warm ischemia. From 2007 to 2014, 277 patients managed with PN had appropriate studies to evaluate changes in function/mass specifically within the operated kidney. Recovery from ischemia was defined as %function saved/%parenchymal mass saved. AKI was based on global renal function and defined as a ≥1.5-fold increase in serum creatinine above the preoperative level. Hypothermia was utilized in 112 patients (median = 27 minutes) and warm ischemia in 165 (median = 21 minutes). AKI strongly correlated with solitary kidney (P < .001) and duration (P < .001) but not type (P = .49) of ischemia. Median recovery from ischemia in the operated kidney was 100% (interquartile range [IQR] = 88%-109%) for cold ischemia, with 6 (5%) noted to have <80% recovery from ischemia. For the warm ischemia group, median recovery from ischemia was 91% (IQR = 82%-101%, P < .001 compared with hypothermia), and 34 (21%) had recovery from ischemia <80% (P < .001). For warm ischemia subgrouped by duration <25 minutes (n = 114), 25-35 minutes (n = 35), and >35 minutes (n = 16), median recovery from ischemia was 92% (IQR = 86%-100%), 90% (IQR = 78%-104%), and 91% (IQR = 80%-96%), respectively (P = .77). Our results suggest that AKI after PN correlates with duration but not with type of ischemia. However, subsequent recovery, which ultimately defines the new baseline glomerular filtration rate, is most reliable with hypothermia. However, most patients undergoing PN with warm ischemia still recover relatively strongly from ischemia, even if extended to 35-45 minutes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Management of Critical Limb Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Kinlay, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Critical limb ischemia (CLI) is a clinical syndrome of ischemic pain at rest or tissue loss, such as non-healing ulcers or gangrene, related to peripheral artery disease. CLI has a high short-term risk of limb loss and cardiovascular events. Non-invasive or invasive angiography help determine the feasibility and approach to arterial revascularization. An “endovascular-first” approach is often advocated based on a lower procedural risk, however, specific patterns of disease may be best treated by open surgical revascularization. Balloon angioplasty and stenting form the backbone of endovascular techniques, with drug-eluting stents and drug-coated balloons offering low rates of repeat revascularization. Combined antegrade and retrograde approaches can increase success in long total occlusions. Below the knee, angiosome-directed angioplasty may lead to greater wound healing, but failing this, any straight line flow into the foot is pursued. Hybrid surgical techniques such as iliac stenting and common femoral endarterectomy are commonly used to reduce operative risk. Lower extremity bypass grafting is most successful with a good quality, long, single-segment autogenous vein of at least 3.5mm diameter. Minor amputations are often required for tissue loss as part of the treatment strategy. Major amputations (at or above the ankle) limit functional independence and their prevention is a key goal of CLI therapy. Medical therapy after revascularization targets risk factors for atherosclerosis and assesses wound healing and new or recurrent flow limiting disease. The ongoing NIH sponsored BEST-CLI study is a randomized trial of the contemporary endovascular versus open surgical techniques in patients with CLI. PMID:26858079

  5. [Chronic cerebral ischemia associated with Raynaud's syndrome].

    PubMed

    Putilina, M V

    2015-01-01

    Over the last years, a number of patients with chronic cerebral ischemia has been increased significantly. Compensatory possibilities of the brain and cerebral circulatory system are so great that even serious disturbances of blood circulation could not cause clinical signs of brain dysfunction for a long time. At the same time, long-term ischemia can lead to peripheral local disturbances of microcirculation that is appears to be a first signal of the problems with homeostasis. Therefore, Raynaud's syndrome may be one of the predictors of standard symptoms of chronic cerebral ischemia (CCI). This phenomenon is explicitly considered as a sign of blood circulation impairment while the pathogenetic mechanism of vascular arterial bed instability is completely ignored. Detailed study of clinical correlations of Raynaud's syndrome in CCI would help to develop a common pharmacotherapeutic approach to its treatment.

  6. Control of cerebral ischemia with magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Jia, Jie-Min; Chowdary, Praveen D; Gao, Xiaofei; Ci, Bo; Li, Wenjun; Mulgaonkar, Aditi; Plautz, Erik J; Hassan, Gedaa; Kumar, Amit; Stowe, Ann M; Yang, Shao-Hua; Zhou, Wei; Sun, Xiankai; Cui, Bianxiao; Ge, Woo-Ping

    2017-02-01

    The precise manipulation of microcirculation in mice can facilitate mechanistic studies of brain injury and repair after ischemia, but this manipulation remains a technical challenge, particularly in conscious mice. We developed a technology that uses micromagnets to induce aggregation of magnetic nanoparticles to reversibly occlude blood flow in microvessels. This allowed induction of ischemia in a specific cortical region of conscious mice of any postnatal age, including perinatal and neonatal stages, with precise spatiotemporal control but without surgical intervention of the skull or artery. When combined with longitudinal live-imaging approaches, this technology facilitated the discovery of a feature of the ischemic cascade: selective loss of smooth muscle cells in juveniles but not adults shortly after onset of ischemia and during blood reperfusion.

  7. Infrared laser hemotherapy in cerebral ischemia modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musienko, Julia I.; Nechipurenko, Natalia I.

    2003-10-01

    Use of intravenous laser irradiation of blood (ILIB) is considered to be the most effective method of laser therapy and its application is expedient pathogenetically in the ischemic disturbances. The aim of this study is to investigate ILIB influence with infrared laser (IL) with 860 nm wavelength on hemostasis, acid-base status (ABS) of blood in normal rabbits and after modeling of local ischemia of brain (LIB). Experimental cerebral ischemia is characterized by development of hypercoagulation syndrom and metabolic acidosis. ILIB with infrared radiation of 2.0 mW power provokes hypocoagulation in intact animals. Application of ILIB in rabbits after LIB contributes for hemostasis and acid-base status normalizing compared to operated animals. IL radiation with 8,5 mW power results in marked hemostatic activation in all animals. Therefore, beneficial effect of low power laser radiation (LPLR) manifests in narrow power diapason in experimental brain ischemia.

  8. Myocardial Ischemia Caused by Subepicardial Hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Grieshaber, Philippe; Nef, Holger; Böning, Andreas; Niemann, Bernd

    2017-01-01

    Background Bleeding from bypass anastomosis leakage occurs early after coronary artery bypass grafting. Later, once the anastomosis is covered by intima, spontaneous bleeding is unlikely. Case Description A 63-year-old male patient developed a pseudoaneurysm-like, subepicardial late-term bleeding resulting in a hematoma that compromised coronary artery flow by increasing extracoronary pressure. This resulted in severe angina pectoris (Canadian Cardiovascular Society IV) and myocardial ischemia within the affected area. After surgical removal of the hematoma and repair of the anastomosis, the patient's symptoms disappeared and no signs of myocardial ischemia were present. Conclusion Surgical removal is an efficient therapy for subepicardial hematoma inducing myocardial ischemia. PMID:28352501

  9. Stem cell use in critical limb ischemia.

    PubMed

    Kolvenbach, R; Kreissig, C; Ludwig, E; Cagiannos, C

    2007-02-01

    The following paper gives an overview of the current status of stem cell use in vascular medicine. The role of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) is discussed. Different approaches to use cellular based concepts are outlined: among these are the treatment of patients with critical ischemia with bone marrow derived mononuclear cells as well as our own experience with purified and highly selected CD133 and CD34 cells. The pro and cons of these different treatment regimens are discussed. An outlook is given discussing a combination of gene therapy and stem cell injections. The clinical and laboratory results of 15 patients with end-stage critical ischemia are discussed with implications for future clinical trials. We conclude that, despite all open questions, the outlook for EPC-based therapies for tissue ischemia and blood vessel repair appears promising.

  10. Loss of forebrain MTCH2 decreases mitochondria motility and calcium handling and impairs hippocampal-dependent cognitive functions

    PubMed Central

    Ruggiero, Antonella; Aloni, Etay; Korkotian, Eduard; Zaltsman, Yehudit; Oni-Biton, Efrat; Kuperman, Yael; Tsoory, Michael; Shachnai, Liat; Levin-Zaidman, Smadar; Brenner, Ori; Segal, Menahem; Gross, Atan

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondrial Carrier Homolog 2 (MTCH2) is a novel regulator of mitochondria metabolism, which was recently associated with Alzheimer’s disease. Here we demonstrate that deletion of forebrain MTCH2 increases mitochondria and whole-body energy metabolism, increases locomotor activity, but impairs motor coordination and balance. Importantly, mice deficient in forebrain MTCH2 display a deficit in hippocampus-dependent cognitive functions, including spatial memory, long term potentiation (LTP) and rates of spontaneous excitatory synaptic currents. Moreover, MTCH2-deficient hippocampal neurons display a deficit in mitochondria motility and calcium handling. Thus, MTCH2 is a critical player in neuronal cell biology, controlling mitochondria metabolism, motility and calcium buffering to regulate hippocampal-dependent cognitive functions. PMID:28276496

  11. Effects of oral 5-hydroxytryptophan on a standardized planning task: insight into possible dopamine/serotonin interactions in the forebrain.

    PubMed

    Gendle, Mathew H; Young, Erica L; Romano, Alexandra C

    2013-05-01

    Several studies have suggested that exogenous administration of the serotonin precursor 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP) can result in the ectopic production of serotonin in dopaminergic neurons and a concomitant reduction in dopamine release. This study tested this hypothesis using the Tower of London (TOL), a test of planning and executive control that is sensitive to changes in forebrain dopamine activity, but insensitive to alterations in serotonin. A sample of 68 undergraduates participated, and each received either three 50-mg 5-HTP capsules or placebos, and completed the TOL following a set absorption period. 5-HTP significantly lengthened the average time needed to complete each of the 10 trials of the TOL. 5-HTP did not affect accuracy on this task. Oral exogenous 5-HTP disrupts dopaminergic function in the human forebrain. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. The neuropeptide Y (NPY) Y2 receptors are largely dimeric in the kidney, but monomeric in the forebrain.

    PubMed

    Parker, S L; Parker, M S; Estes, A M; Wong, Y Y; Sah, R; Sweatman, T; Park, E A; Balasubramaniam, A; Sallee, F R

    2008-01-01

    The neuropeptide Y(NPY) Y2 receptors are detected largely as dimers in the clonal expressions in CHO cells and in particulates from rabbit kidney cortex. However, in two areas of the forebrain (rat or rabbit piriform cortex and hypothalamus), these receptors are found mainly as monomers. Evidence is presented that this difference relates to large levels of G proteins containing the Gi alpha -subunit in the forebrain areas. The predominant monomeric status of these Y2 receptors should also be physiologically linked to large synaptic inputs of the agonist NPY. The rabbit kidney and the human CHO cell-expressed Y2 dimers are converted by agonists to monomers in vitro at a similar rate in the presence of divalent cations.

  13. Mitochondrial Dynamics Following Global Cerebral Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rita; Bukowski, Melissa J.; Wider, Joseph M.; Reynolds, Christian A.; Calo, Lesley; Lepore, Bradley; Tousignant, Renee; Jones, Michelle; Przyklenk, Karin; Sanderson, Thomas H.

    2016-01-01

    Global brain ischemia/reperfusion induces neuronal damage in vulnerable brain regions, leading to mitochondrial dysfunction and subsequent neuronal death. Induction of neuronal death is mediated by release of cytochrome c (cyt c) from the mitochondria though a well-characterized increase in outer mitochondrial membrane permeability. However, for cyt c to be released it is first necessary for cyt c to be liberated from the cristae junctions which are gated by Opa1 oligomers. Opa1 has two known functions: maintenance of the cristae junction and mitochondrial fusion. These roles suggest that Opa1 could play a central role in both controlling cyt c release and mitochondrial fusion/fission processes during ischemia/reperfusion. To investigate this concept, we first utilized in vitro real-time imaging to visualize dynamic changes in mitochondria. Oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) of neurons grown in culture induced a dual-phase mitochondrial fragmentation profile: (i) fragmentation during OGD with no apoptosis activation, followed by fusion of mitochondrial networks after reoxygenation and a (ii) subsequent extensive fragmentation and apoptosis activation that preceded cell death. We next evaluated changes in mitochondrial dynamic state during reperfusion in a rat model of global brain ischemia. Evaluation of mitochondrial morphology with confocal and electron microscopy revealed a similar induction of fragmentation following global brain ischemia. Mitochondrial fragmentation aligned temporally with specific apoptotic events, including cyt c release, caspase 3/7 activation, and interestingly, release of the fusion protein Opa1. Moreover, we uncovered evidence of loss of Opa1 complexes during the progression of reperfusion, and electron microscopy micrographs revealed a loss of cristae architecture following global brain ischemia. These data provide novel evidence implicating a temporal connection between Opa1 alterations and dysfunctional mitochondrial dynamics following

  14. Excitatory Hindbrain–Forebrain Communication Is Required for Cisplatin-Induced Anorexia and Weight Loss

    PubMed Central

    Alhadeff, Amber L.; Holland, Ruby A.; Zheng, Huiyuan; Rinaman, Linda; Grill, Harvey J.

    2017-01-01

    Cisplatin chemotherapy is commonly used to treat cancer despite severe energy balance side effects. In rats, cisplatin activates nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) projections to the lateral parabrachial nucleus (lPBN) and calcitonin-gene related peptide (CGRP) projections from the lPBN to the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA). We demonstrated previously that CeA glutamate receptor signaling mediates cisplatin-induced anorexia and body weight loss. Here, we used neuroanatomical tracing, immunofluorescence, and confocal imaging to demonstrate that virtually all NTS→lPBN and lPBN→CeA CGRP projections coexpress vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (VGLUT2), providing evidence that excitatory projections mediate cisplatin-induced energy balance dysregulation. To test whether lPBN→CeA projection neurons are required for cisplatin-induced anorexia and weight loss, we inhibited these neurons chemogenetically using a retrograde Cre-recombinase-expressing canine adenovirus-2 in combination with Cre-dependent inhibitory Designer Receptors Exclusive Activated by Designer Drugs (DREADDs) before cisplatin treatment. Inhibition of lPBN→CeA neurons attenuated cisplatin-induced anorexia and body weight loss significantly. Using a similar approach, we additionally demonstrated that inhibition of NTS→lPBN neurons attenuated cisplatin-induced anorexia and body weight loss significantly. Together, our data support the view that excitatory hindbrain–forebrain projections are necessary for cisplatin's untoward effects on energy intake, elucidating a key neuroanatomical circuit driving pathological anorexia and weight loss that accompanies chemotherapy treatment. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Chemotherapy treatments are commonly used to treat cancers despite accompanying anorexia and weight loss that may limit treatment adherence and reduce patient quality of life. Strikingly, we lack a neural understanding of, and effective treatments for, chemotherapy-induced anorexia and weight

  15. Excitatory Hindbrain-Forebrain Communication Is Required for Cisplatin-Induced Anorexia and Weight Loss.

    PubMed

    Alhadeff, Amber L; Holland, Ruby A; Zheng, Huiyuan; Rinaman, Linda; Grill, Harvey J; De Jonghe, Bart C

    2017-01-11

    Cisplatin chemotherapy is commonly used to treat cancer despite severe energy balance side effects. In rats, cisplatin activates nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) projections to the lateral parabrachial nucleus (lPBN) and calcitonin-gene related peptide (CGRP) projections from the lPBN to the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA). We demonstrated previously that CeA glutamate receptor signaling mediates cisplatin-induced anorexia and body weight loss. Here, we used neuroanatomical tracing, immunofluorescence, and confocal imaging to demonstrate that virtually all NTS→lPBN and lPBN→CeA CGRP projections coexpress vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (VGLUT2), providing evidence that excitatory projections mediate cisplatin-induced energy balance dysregulation. To test whether lPBN→CeA projection neurons are required for cisplatin-induced anorexia and weight loss, we inhibited these neurons chemogenetically using a retrograde Cre-recombinase-expressing canine adenovirus-2 in combination with Cre-dependent inhibitory Designer Receptors Exclusive Activated by Designer Drugs (DREADDs) before cisplatin treatment. Inhibition of lPBN→CeA neurons attenuated cisplatin-induced anorexia and body weight loss significantly. Using a similar approach, we additionally demonstrated that inhibition of NTS→lPBN neurons attenuated cisplatin-induced anorexia and body weight loss significantly. Together, our data support the view that excitatory hindbrain-forebrain projections are necessary for cisplatin's untoward effects on energy intake, elucidating a key neuroanatomical circuit driving pathological anorexia and weight loss that accompanies chemotherapy treatment. Chemotherapy treatments are commonly used to treat cancers despite accompanying anorexia and weight loss that may limit treatment adherence and reduce patient quality of life. Strikingly, we lack a neural understanding of, and effective treatments for, chemotherapy-induced anorexia and weight loss. The current data

  16. Engrailed-2 (En2) deletion produces multiple neurodevelopmental defects in monoamine systems, forebrain structures and neurogenesis and behavior

    PubMed Central

    Genestine, Matthieu; Lin, Lulu; Durens, Madel; Yan, Yan; Jiang, Yiqin; Prem, Smrithi; Bailoor, Kunal; Kelly, Brian; Sonsalla, Patricia K.; Matteson, Paul G.; Silverman, Jill; Crawley, Jacqueline N.; Millonig, James H.; DiCicco-Bloom, Emanuel

    2015-01-01

    Many genes involved in brain development have been associated with human neurodevelopmental disorders, but underlying pathophysiological mechanisms remain undefined. Human genetic and mouse behavioral analyses suggest that ENGRAILED-2 (EN2) contributes to neurodevelopmental disorders, especially autism spectrum disorder. In mouse, En2 exhibits dynamic spatiotemporal expression in embryonic mid-hindbrain regions where monoamine neurons emerge. Considering their importance in neuropsychiatric disorders, we characterized monoamine systems in relation to forebrain neurogenesis in En2-knockout (En2-KO) mice. Transmitter levels of serotonin, dopamine and norepinephrine (NE) were dysregulated from Postnatal day 7 (P7) to P21 in En2-KO, though NE exhibited the greatest abnormalities. While NE levels were reduced ∼35% in forebrain, they were increased 40–75% in hindbrain and cerebellum, and these patterns paralleled changes in locus coeruleus (LC) fiber innervation, respectively. Although En2 promoter was active in Embryonic day 14.5–15.5 LC neurons, expression diminished thereafter and gene deletion did not alter brainstem NE neuron numbers. Significantly, in parallel with reduced NE levels, En2-KO forebrain regions exhibited reduced growth, particularly hippocampus, where P21 dentate gyrus granule neurons were decreased 16%, suggesting abnormal neurogenesis. Indeed, hippocampal neurogenic regions showed increased cell death (+77%) and unexpectedly, increased proliferation. Excess proliferation was restricted to early Sox2/Tbr2 progenitors whereas increased apoptosis occurred in differentiating (Dcx) neuroblasts, accompanied by reduced newborn neuron survival. Abnormal neurogenesis may reflect NE deficits because intra-hippocampal injections of β-adrenergic agonists reversed cell death. These studies suggest that disruption of hindbrain patterning genes can alter monoamine system development and thereby produce forebrain defects that are relevant to human

  17. Absence of Prenatal Forebrain Defects in the Dp(16)1Yey/+ Mouse Model of Down Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Goodliffe, Joseph W.; Olmos-Serrano, Jose Luis; Aziz, Nadine M.; Pennings, Jeroen L.A.; Guedj, Faycal; Bianchi, Diana W.

    2016-01-01

    Studies in humans with Down syndrome (DS) show that alterations in fetal brain development are followed by postnatal deficits in neuronal numbers, synaptic plasticity, and cognitive and motor function. This same progression is replicated in several mouse models of DS. Dp(16)1Yey/+ (hereafter called Dp16) is a recently developed mouse model of DS in which the entire region of mouse chromosome 16 that is homologous to human chromosome 21 has been triplicated. As such, Dp16 mice may more closely reproduce neurodevelopmental changes occurring in humans with DS. Here, we present the first comprehensive cellular and behavioral study of the Dp16 forebrain from embryonic to adult stages. Unexpectedly, our results demonstrate that Dp16 mice do not have prenatal brain defects previously reported in human fetal neocortex and in the developing forebrains of other mouse models, including microcephaly, reduced neurogenesis, and abnormal cell proliferation. Nevertheless, we found impairments in postnatal developmental milestones, fewer inhibitory forebrain neurons, and deficits in motor and cognitive performance in Dp16 mice. Therefore, although this new model does not express prenatal morphological phenotypes associated with DS, abnormalities in the postnatal period appear sufficient to produce significant cognitive deficits in Dp16. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Down syndrome (DS) leads to intellectual disability. Several mouse models have increased our understanding of the neuropathology of DS and are currently being used to test therapeutic strategies. A new mouse model that contains an expanded number of DS-related genes, known as Dp(16)1Yey/+ (Dp16), has been generated recently. We sought to determine whether the extended triplication creates a better phenocopy of DS-related brain pathologies. We measured embryonic development, forebrain maturation, and perinatal/adult behavior and revealed an absence of prenatal phenotypes in Dp16 fetal brain, but specific cellular and behavioral

  18. Engrailed-2 (En2) deletion produces multiple neurodevelopmental defects in monoamine systems, forebrain structures and neurogenesis and behavior.

    PubMed

    Genestine, Matthieu; Lin, Lulu; Durens, Madel; Yan, Yan; Jiang, Yiqin; Prem, Smrithi; Bailoor, Kunal; Kelly, Brian; Sonsalla, Patricia K; Matteson, Paul G; Silverman, Jill; Crawley, Jacqueline N; Millonig, James H; DiCicco-Bloom, Emanuel

    2015-10-15

    Many genes involved in brain development have been associated with human neurodevelopmental disorders, but underlying pathophysiological mechanisms remain undefined. Human genetic and mouse behavioral analyses suggest that ENGRAILED-2 (EN2) contributes to neurodevelopmental disorders, especially autism spectrum disorder. In mouse, En2 exhibits dynamic spatiotemporal expression in embryonic mid-hindbrain regions where monoamine neurons emerge. Considering their importance in neuropsychiatric disorders, we characterized monoamine systems in relation to forebrain neurogenesis in En2-knockout (En2-KO) mice. Transmitter levels of serotonin, dopamine and norepinephrine (NE) were dysregulated from Postnatal day 7 (P7) to P21 in En2-KO, though NE exhibited the greatest abnormalities. While NE levels were reduced ∼35% in forebrain, they were increased 40 -: 75% in hindbrain and cerebellum, and these patterns paralleled changes in locus coeruleus (LC) fiber innervation, respectively. Although En2 promoter was active in Embryonic day 14.5 -: 15.5 LC neurons, expression diminished thereafter and gene deletion did not alter brainstem NE neuron numbers. Significantly, in parallel with reduced NE levels, En2-KO forebrain regions exhibited reduced growth, particularly hippocampus, where P21 dentate gyrus granule neurons were decreased 16%, suggesting abnormal neurogenesis. Indeed, hippocampal neurogenic regions showed increased cell death (+77%) and unexpectedly, increased proliferation. Excess proliferation was restricted to early Sox2/Tbr2 progenitors whereas increased apoptosis occurred in differentiating (Dcx) neuroblasts, accompanied by reduced newborn neuron survival. Abnormal neurogenesis may reflect NE deficits because intra-hippocampal injections of β-adrenergic agonists reversed cell death. These studies suggest that disruption of hindbrain patterning genes can alter monoamine system development and thereby produce forebrain defects that are relevant to human

  19. Rabbit forebrain cholinergic system: morphological characterization of nuclei and distribution of cholinergic terminals in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Varga, Csaba; Härtig, Wolfgang; Grosche, Jens; Keijser, Jan; Luiten, Paul G M; Seeger, Johannes; Brauer, Kurt; Harkany, Tibor

    2003-06-09

    Although the rabbit brain, in particular the basal forebrain cholinergic system, has become a common model for neuropathological changes associated with Alzheimer's disease, detailed neuroanatomical studies on the morphological organization of basal forebrain cholinergic nuclei and on their output pathways are still awaited. Therefore, we performed quantitative choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) immunocytochemistry to localize major cholinergic nuclei and to determine the number of respective cholinergic neurons in the rabbit forebrain. The density of ChAT-immunoreactive terminals in layer V of distinct neocortical territories and in hippocampal subfields was also measured. Another cholinergic marker, the low-affinity neurotrophin receptor (p75(NTR)), was also employed to identify subsets of cholinergic neurons. Double-immunofluorescence labeling of ChAT and p75(NTR), calbindin D-28k (CB), parvalbumin, calretinin, neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), tyrosine hydroxylase, or substance P was used to elucidate the neuroanatomical borders of cholinergic nuclei and to analyze the neurochemical complexity of cholinergic cell populations. Cholinergic projection neurons with heterogeneous densities were found in the medial septum, vertical and horizontal diagonal bands of Broca, ventral pallidum, and magnocellular nucleus basalis (MBN)/substantia innominata (SI) complex; cholinergic interneurons were observed in the caudate nucleus, putamen, accumbens nucleus, and olfactory tubercule, whereas the globus pallidus was devoid of cholinergic nerve cells. Cholinergic interneurons were frequently present in the hippocampus and to a lesser extent in cerebral cortex. Cholinergic projection neurons, except those localized in SI, abundantly expressed p75(NTR), and a subset of cholinergic neurons in posterior MBN was immunoreactive for CB and nNOS. A strict laminar distribution pattern of cholinergic terminals was recorded both in the cerebral cortex and in CA1-CA3 and dentate gyrus

  20. The Role of Basal Forebrain in Rat Somatosensory Cortex: Impact on Cholinergic Innervation, Sensory Information Processing, and Tactile Discrimination

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-05-28

    noradrenergic neurons, as well as from the cholinergic neurons of the brainstem tegmentum (Jones and Cuello , 1989). This suggests that final control over...Jones, B. E., & Cuello , A. C. (1989). Afferents to the basal forebrain cholinergic cell area from pontomesencephalic- catecholamine, serotonin, and...organization in mouse barrel cortex. Brain Research, 165, 327-332. 160 Sofroniew, M. V., Eckenstein, Fo, Thoenen, Ho, & Cuello , A. C. (1982

  1. Representation of the ipsilateral visual field by neurons in the macaque lateral intraparietal cortex depends on the forebrain commissures.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Catherine A; Colby, Carol L

    2010-11-01

    Our eyes are constantly moving, allowing us to attend to different visual objects in the environment. With each eye movement, a given object activates an entirely new set of visual neurons, yet we perceive a stable scene. One neural mechanism that may contribute to visual stability is remapping. Neurons in several brain regions respond to visual stimuli presented outside the receptive field when an eye movement brings the stimulated location into the receptive field. The stored representation of a visual stimulus is remapped, or updated, in conjunction with the saccade. Remapping depends on neurons being able to receive visual information from outside the classic receptive field. In previous studies, we asked whether remapping across hemifields depends on the forebrain commissures. We found that, when the forebrain commissures are transected, behavior dependent on accurate spatial updating is initially impaired but recovers over time. Moreover, neurons in lateral intraparietal cortex (LIP) continue to remap information across hemifields in the absence of the forebrain commissures. One possible explanation for the preserved across-hemifield remapping in split-brain animals is that neurons in a single hemisphere could represent visual information from both visual fields. In the present study, we measured receptive fields of LIP neurons in split-brain monkeys and compared them with receptive fields in intact monkeys. We found a small number of neurons with bilateral receptive fields in the intact monkeys. In contrast, we found no such neurons in the split-brain animals. We conclude that bilateral representations in area LIP following forebrain commissures transection cannot account for remapping across hemifields.

  2. Representation of the Ipsilateral Visual Field by Neurons in the Macaque Lateral Intraparietal Cortex Depends on the Forebrain Commissures

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Catherine A.

    2010-01-01

    Our eyes are constantly moving, allowing us to attend to different visual objects in the environment. With each eye movement, a given object activates an entirely new set of visual neurons, yet we perceive a stable scene. One neural mechanism that may contribute to visual stability is remapping. Neurons in several brain regions respond to visual stimuli presented outside the receptive field when an eye movement brings the stimulated location into the receptive field. The stored representation of a visual stimulus is remapped, or updated, in conjunction with the saccade. Remapping depends on neurons being able to receive visual information from outside the classic receptive field. In previous studies, we asked whether remapping across hemifields depends on the forebrain commissures. We found that, when the forebrain commissures are transected, behavior dependent on accurate spatial updating is initially impaired but recovers over time. Moreover, neurons in lateral intraparietal cortex (LIP) continue to remap information across hemifields in the absence of the forebrain commissures. One possible explanation for the preserved across-hemifield remapping in split-brain animals is that neurons in a single hemisphere could represent visual information from both visual fields. In the present study, we measured receptive fields of LIP neurons in split-brain monkeys and compared them with receptive fields in intact monkeys. We found a small number of neurons with bilateral receptive fields in the intact monkeys. In contrast, we found no such neurons in the split-brain animals. We conclude that bilateral representations in area LIP following forebrain commissures transection cannot account for remapping across hemifields. PMID:20660427

  3. Dynamic changes in murine forebrain miR-211 expression associate with cholinergic imbalances and epileptiform activity

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Nibha; Milikovsky, Dan Z.; Hanin, Geula; Zelig, Daniel; Sheintuch, Liron; Berson, Amit; Greenberg, David S.; Friedman, Alon

    2017-01-01

    Epilepsy is a common neurological disease, manifested in unprovoked recurrent seizures. Epileptogenesis may develop due to genetic or pharmacological origins or following injury, but it remains unclear how the unaffected brain escapes this susceptibility to seizures. Here, we report that dynamic changes in forebrain microRNA (miR)-211 in the mouse brain shift the threshold for spontaneous and pharmacologically induced seizures alongside changes in the cholinergic pathway genes, implicating this miR in the avoidance of seizures. We identified miR-211 as a putative attenuator of cholinergic-mediated seizures by intersecting forebrain miR profiles that were Argonaute precipitated, synaptic vesicle target enriched, or differentially expressed under pilocarpine-induced seizures, and validated TGFBR2 and the nicotinic antiinflammatory acetylcholine receptor nAChRa7 as murine and human miR-211 targets, respectively. To explore the link between miR-211 and epilepsy, we engineered dTg-211 mice with doxycycline-suppressible forebrain overexpression of miR-211. These mice reacted to doxycycline exposure by spontaneous electrocorticography-documented nonconvulsive seizures, accompanied by forebrain accumulation of the convulsive seizures mediating miR-134. RNA sequencing demonstrated in doxycycline-treated dTg-211 cortices overrepresentation of synaptic activity, Ca2+ transmembrane transport, TGFBR2 signaling, and cholinergic synapse pathways. Additionally, a cholinergic dysregulated mouse model overexpressing a miR refractory acetylcholinesterase-R splice variant showed a parallel propensity for convulsions, miR-211 decreases, and miR-134 elevation. Our findings demonstrate that in mice, dynamic miR-211 decreases induce hypersynchronization and nonconvulsive and convulsive seizures, accompanied by expression changes in cholinergic and TGFBR2 pathways as well as in miR-134. Realizing the importance of miR-211 dynamics opens new venues for translational diagnosis of and

  4. Forebrain patterns of c-Fos and FosB induction during cancer-associated anorexia-cachexia in rat.

    PubMed

    Konsman, Jan Pieter; Blomqvist, Anders

    2005-05-01

    Forebrain structures are necessary for the initiation of food intake and its coupling to energy expenditure. The cancer-related anorexia-cachexia syndrome is typified by a prolonged increase in metabolic rate resulting in body weight loss which, paradoxically, is accompanied by reduced food intake. The aim of the present work was to study the forebrain expression of Fos proteins as activation markers and thus to identify potential neurobiological mechanisms favouring catabolic processes or modulating food intake in rats suffering from cancer-related anorexia-cachexia. Neurons in forebrain structures showing most pronounced induction of Fos proteins were further identified neurochemically. To provoke anorexia-cachexia, cultured Morris hepatoma 7777 cells were injected subcutaneously in Buffalo rats. This resulted in a slowly growing tumour inducing approximately 7% body weight loss and a 20% reduction in food intake when the tumour represented 1-2% of body mass. Anorexia-cachexia in these animals was found to be accompanied by Fos induction in several hypothalamic nuclei including the paraventricular and ventromedial hypothalamus, in the parastrial nucleus, the amygdala, the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, ventral striatal structures and the piriform and somatosensory cortices. Neurochemical identification revealed that the vast majority of FosB-positive neurons in the nucleus accumbens, ventral caudate-putamen and other ventral striatal structures contained prodynorphin or proenkephalin mRNA. These findings indicate that forebrain structures that are part of neuronal networks modulating catabolic pathways and food ingestion are activated during tumour-associated anorexia-cachexia and may contribute to the lack of compensatory eating in response to weight loss characterizing this syndrome.

  5. Myocardial Ischemia Caused by a Coronary Anomaly

    PubMed Central

    Aydin, Mustafa; Ozeren, Ali; Peksoy, Irfan; Cabuk, Mehmet; Bilge, Mehmet; Dursun, Aydin; Elbey, Mehmet Ali

    2004-01-01

    We present the case of a patient in whom a previously undetected anomalous origin of the circumflex coronary artery caused myocardial ischemia and led to positive myocardial scintigraphic results. Subsequent coronary angiography showed that the left circumflex coronary artery arose from the right coronary ostium—an anomaly that has been associated with chest discomfort—without atherosclerotic lesions. The peripheral distribution of the left circumflex artery was normal. We describe the clinical and angiographic findings in our patient and discuss the relationship between coronary artery anomalies and ischemia. PMID:15562848

  6. A trans-Regulatory Code for the Forebrain Expression of Six3.2 in the Medaka Fish*

    PubMed Central

    Beccari, Leonardo; Marco-Ferreres, Raquel; Tabanera, Noemi; Manfredi, Anna; Souren, Marcel; Wittbrodt, Beate; Conte, Ivan; Wittbrodt, Jochen; Bovolenta, Paola

    2015-01-01

    A well integrated and hierarchically organized gene regulatory network is responsible for the progressive specification of the forebrain. The transcription factor Six3 is one of the central components of this network. As such, Six3 regulates several components of the network, but its upstream regulators are still poorly characterized. Here we have systematically identified such regulators, taking advantage of the detailed functional characterization of the regulatory region of the medaka fish Six3.2 ortholog and of a time/cost-effective trans-regulatory screening, which complemented and overcame the limitations of in silico prediction approaches. The candidates resulting from this search were validated with dose-response luciferase assays and expression pattern criteria. Reconfirmed candidates with a matching expression pattern were also tested with chromatin immunoprecipitation and functional studies. Our results confirm the previously proposed direct regulation of Pax6 and further demonstrate that Msx2 and Pbx1 are bona fide direct regulators of early Six3.2 distribution in distinct domains of the medaka fish forebrain. They also point to other transcription factors, including Tcf3, as additional regulators of different spatial-temporal domains of Six3.2 expression. The activity of these regulators is discussed in the context of the gene regulatory network proposed for the specification of the forebrain. PMID:26378230

  7. Astaxanthin limits fish oil-related oxidative insult in the anterior forebrain of Wistar rats: putative anxiolytic effects?

    PubMed

    Mattei, Rita; Polotow, Tatiana G; Vardaris, Cristina V; Guerra, Beatriz A; Leite, José Roberto; Otton, Rosemari; Barros, Marcelo P

    2011-09-01

    The habitual consumption of marine fish is largely associated to human mental health. Fish oil is particularly rich in n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids that are known to play a role in several neuronal and cognitive functions. In parallel, the orange-pinkish carotenoid astaxanthin (ASTA) is found in salmon and displays important antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Many neuronal dysfunctions and anomalous psychotic behavior (such as anxiety, depression, etc.) have been strongly related to the higher sensitivity of cathecolaminergic brain regions to oxidative stress. Thus, the aim of this work was to study the combined effect of ASTA and fish oil on the redox status in plasma and in the monoaminergic-rich anterior forebrain region of Wistar rats with possible correlations with the anxiolytic behavior. Upon fish oil supplementation, the downregulation of superoxide dismutase and catalase activities combined to increased "free" iron content resulted in higher levels of lipid and protein oxidation in the anterior forebrain of animals. Such harmful oxidative modifications were hindered by concomitant supplementation with ASTA despite ASTA-related antioxidant protection was mainly observed in plasma. Although it is clear that ASTA properly crosses the brain-blood barrier, our data also address a possible indirect role of ASTA in restoring basal oxidative conditions in anterior forebrain of animals: by improving GSH-based antioxidant capacity of plasma. Preliminary anxiolytic tests performed in the elevated plus maze are in alignment with our biochemical observations.

  8. Slit-Robo signals regulate pioneer axon pathfinding of the tract of the postoptic commissure in the mammalian forebrain.

    PubMed

    Ricaño-Cornejo, Itzel; Altick, Amy L; García-Peña, Claudia M; Nural, Hikmet Feyza; Echevarría, Diego; Miquelajáuregui, Amaya; Mastick, Grant S; Varela-Echavarría, Alfredo

    2011-10-01

    During early vertebrate forebrain development, pioneer axons establish a symmetrical scaffold descending longitudinally through the rostral forebrain, thus forming the tract of the postoptic commissure (TPOC). In mouse embryos, this tract begins to appear at embryonic day 9.5 (E9.5) as a bundle of axons tightly constrained at a specific dorsoventral level. We have characterized the participation of the Slit chemorepellants and their Robo receptors in the control of TPOC axon projection. In E9.5-E11.5 mouse embryos, Robo1 and Robo2 are expressed in the nucleus origin of the TPOC (nTPOC), and Slit expression domains flank the TPOC trajectory. These findings suggested that these proteins are important factors in the dorsoventral positioning of the TPOC axons. Consistently with this role, Slit2 inhibited TPOC axon growth in collagen gel cultures, and interfering with Robo function in cultured embryos induced projection errors in TPOC axons. Moreover, absence of both Slit1 and Slit2 or Robo1 and Robo2 in mutant mouse embryos revealed aberrant TPOC trajectories, resulting in abnormal spreading of the tract and misprojections into both ventral and dorsal tissues. These results reveal that Slit-Robo signaling regulates the dorsoventral position of this pioneer tract in the developing forebrain.

  9. Suppression of the late component of the carotid occlusion reflex by lesion of the medial forebrain bundle in the rat.

    PubMed

    Lopes, O U; Timo-Iaria, C; Leitão-Filho, H A

    1981-04-01

    1. The pressor response to a prolonged carotid occlusion in the rat has two components: an early, fast increase in blood pressure, and a late, slow and sustained hypertension. Since the second component can be blocked by a disconnecting lesion near the medial side of the medial forebrain bundle, the hypothesis that this complex structure is involved in the integration of the late pressor reflex was tested. 2. The medial forebrain bundle was partially or completely destroyed, or a disconnecting lesion was made to interrupt some of its medially running afferents and/or efferents. Incomplete lesion caused a transient suppression of the second component in 4 rats, whereas complete lesion in 5 rats or probable interruption of the medial efferent pathways in 3 rats led to suppression of the late component when the one-minute occlusion was performed within one hour after the lesion. 3. The data show that the medial forebrain bundle plays an important role in the integration of the late component of the pressor response to prolonged carotid occlusion.

  10. Chlordiazepoxide-induced released responding in extinction and punishment-conflict procedures is not altered by neonatal forebrain norepinephrine depletion.

    PubMed

    Bialik, R J; Pappas, B A; Pusztay, W

    1982-02-01

    The effects of chlordiazepoxide (CDZ) in extinction and punishment-conflict tasks were examined in rats after neonatal systemic administration of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) to deplete forebrain norepinephrine (NE). At about 70 days of age the rats were water deprived and trained for three days to drink in a novel apparatus. On the fourth day (test day) drinking was either extinguished by elimination of water from the drinking tube or punished by lick-contingent shock. Just prior to this test session half of the vehicle and half of the 6-OHDA treated rats were given an injection of CDZ (8 mg/kg IP). Both the injection of CDZ and forebrain NE depletion prolonged responding during extinction and reduced the suppressant effects of punishment in male rats, and these effects were of similar magnitude. Furthermore, CDZ was as effective in neonatal 6-OHDA treated male rats as in vehicle treated rats indicating that decreased transmission is ascending NE fibers caused by CDZ is not solely responsible for its behavioral effects in extinction and conflict tasks. Rather, these effects may involve cooperative mediation by both noradrenergic and serotonergic forebrain terminals. Unexpectedly, CDZ's anti-extinction effect was absent in female rats and its anti-conflict effect observed only in NE depleted females.

  11. Absence of Prenatal Forebrain Defects in the Dp(16)1Yey/+ Mouse Model of Down Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Goodliffe, Joseph W; Olmos-Serrano, Jose Luis; Aziz, Nadine M; Pennings, Jeroen L A; Guedj, Faycal; Bianchi, Diana W; Haydar, Tarik F

    2016-03-09

    Studies in humans with Down syndrome (DS) show that alterations in fetal brain development are followed by postnatal deficits in neuronal numbers, synaptic plasticity, and cognitive and motor function. This same progression is replicated in several mouse models of DS. Dp(16)1Yey/+ (hereafter called Dp16) is a recently developed mouse model of DS in which the entire region of mouse chromosome 16 that is homologous to human chromosome 21 has been triplicated. As such, Dp16 mice may more closely reproduce neurodevelopmental changes occurring in humans with DS. Here, we present the first comprehensive cellular and behavioral study of the Dp16 forebrain from embryonic to adult stages. Unexpectedly, our results demonstrate that Dp16 mice do not have prenatal brain defects previously reported in human fetal neocortex and in the developing forebrains of other mouse models, including microcephaly, reduced neurogenesis, and abnormal cell proliferation. Nevertheless, we found impairments in postnatal developmental milestones, fewer inhibitory forebrain neurons, and deficits in motor and cognitive performance in Dp16 mice. Therefore, although this new model does not express prenatal morphological phenotypes associated with DS, abnormalities in the postnatal period appear sufficient to produce significant cognitive deficits in Dp16.

  12. Layer- and cell type-selective co-transmission by a basal forebrain cholinergic projection to the olfactory bulb.

    PubMed

    Case, Daniel T; Burton, Shawn D; Gedeon, Jeremy Y; Williams, Sean-Paul G; Urban, Nathaniel N; Seal, Rebecca P

    2017-09-21

    Cholinergic neurons in the basal forebrain project heavily to the main olfactory bulb, the first processing station in the olfactory pathway. The projections innervate multiple layers of the main olfactory bulb and strongly influence odor discrimination, detection, and learning. The precise underlying circuitry of this cholinergic input to the main olfactory bulb remains unclear, however. Here, we identify a specific basal forebrain cholinergic projection that innervates select neurons concentrated in the internal plexiform layer of the main olfactory bulb. Optogenetic activation of this projection elicits monosynaptic nicotinic and GABAergic currents in glomerular layer-projecting interneurons. Additionally, we show that the projection co-expresses markers for GABAergic neurotransmission. The data thus implicate neurotransmitter co-transmission in the basal forebrain regulation of this inhibitory olfactory microcircuit.Cholinergic neurons innervate multiple layers in the main olfactory bulb but the precise circuitry of this input is not known. Here the authors show that VGLUT3(+) cholinergic neurons selectively innervate deep short axon cells in specific layers and elicit robust monosynaptic GABAergic and nicotinic postsynaptic currents.

  13. Slit-Robo Signals Regulate Pioneer Axon Pathfinding of the Tract of the Postoptic Commissure in the Mammalian Forebrain

    PubMed Central

    Ricaño-Cornejo, Itzel; Altick, Amy L.; García-Peña, Claudia M.; Nural, Hikmet Feyza; Echevarría, Diego; Miquelajáuregui, Amaya; Mastick, Grant S.; Varela-Echavarría, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    During early vertebrate forebrain development, pioneer axons establish a symmetrical scaffold descending longitudinally through the rostral forebrain, thus forming the tract of the postoptic commissure (TPOC). In mouse embryos, this tract begins to appear at embryonic day 9.5 (E9.5) as a bundle of axons tightly constrained at a specific dorsoventral level. We have characterized the participation of the Slit chemorepellants and their Robo receptors in the control of TPOC axon projection. In E9.5–E11.5 mouse embryos, Robo1 and Robo2 are expressed in the nucleus origin of the TPOC (nTPOC), and Slit expression domains flank the TPOC trajectory. These findings suggested that these proteins are important factors in the dorsoventral positioning of the TPOC axons. Consistently with this role, Slit2 inhibited TPOC axon growth in collagen gel cultures, and interfering with Robo function in cultured embryos induced projection errors in TPOC axons. Moreover, absence of both Slit1 and Slit2 or Robo1 and Robo2 in mutant mouse embryos revealed aberrant TPOC trajectories, resulting in abnormal spreading of the tract and misprojections into both ventral and dorsal tissues. These results reveal that Slit-Robo signaling regulates the dorsoventral position of this pioneer tract in the developing forebrain. PMID:21688288

  14. Otx2 expression in anterior neuroectoderm and forebrain/midbrain is directed by more than six enhancers.

    PubMed

    Kurokawa, Daisuke; Ohmura, Tomomi; Sakurai, Yusuke; Inoue, Kenichi; Suda, Yoko; Aizawa, Shinichi

    2014-03-15

    Otx2 plays essential roles in each site at each step of head development. We previously identified the AN1 enhancer at 91kb 5' upstream for the Otx2 expressions in anterior neuroectoderm (AN) at neural plate stage before E8.5, and the FM1 enhancer at 75kb 5' upstream and the FM2 enhancer at 122kb 3' downstream for the expression in forebrain/midbrain (FM) at brain vesicle stage after E8.5. The present study identified a second AN enhancer (AN2) at 88kb 5' upstream; the AN2 enhancer also recapitulates the endogenous Otx2 expression in choroid plexus, cortical hem and choroidal roof. However, the enhancer mutants indicated the presence of another AN enhancer. The study also identified a third FM enhancer (FM3) at 153kb 5' upstream. Thus, the Otx2 expressions in anterior neuroectoderm and forebrain/midbrain are regulated by more than six enhancers located far from the coding region. The enhancers identified are differentially conserved among vertebrates; none of the AN enhancers has activities in caudal forebrain and midbrain at brain vesicle stage after E8.5, nor do any of the FM enhancers in anterior neuroectoderm at neural plate stage before E8.5. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Teachers' Grading Decision Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isnawati, Ida; Saukah, Ali

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated teachers' grading decision making, focusing on their beliefs underlying their grading decision making, their grading practices and assessment types, and factors they considered in grading decision making. Two teachers from two junior high schools applying different curriculum policies in grade reporting in Indonesian…

  16. Increased innervation of forebrain targets by midbrain dopaminergic neurons in the absence of FGF-2.

    PubMed

    Rumpel, R; Baron, O; Ratzka, A; Schröder, M-L; Hohmann, M; Effenberg, A; Claus, P; Grothe, C

    2016-02-09

    Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) regulate development and maintenance, and reduce vulnerability of neurons. FGF-2 is essential for survival of midbrain dopaminergic (DA) neurons and is responsible for their dysplasia and disease-related degeneration. We previously reported that FGF-2 is involved in adequate forebrain (FB) target innervation by these neurons in an organotypic co-culture model. It remains unclear, how this ex-vivo phenotype relates to the in vivo situation, and which FGF-related signaling pathway is involved in this process. Here, we demonstrate that lack of FGF-2 results in an increased volume of the striatal target area in mice. We further add evidence that the low molecular weight (LMW) FGF-2 isoform is responsible for this phenotype, as this isoform is predominantly expressed in the embryonic ventral midbrain (VM) as well as in postnatal striatum (STR) and known to act via canonical transmembrane FGF receptor (FGFR) activation. Additionally, we confirm that the phenotype with an enlarged FB-target area by DA neurons can be mimicked in an ex-vivo explant model by inhibiting the canonical FGFR signaling, which resulted in decreased extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation, while AKT activation remained unchanged.

  17. A frontal cortex event-related potential driven by the basal forebrain

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, David P; Lin, Shih-Chieh

    2014-01-01

    Event-related potentials (ERPs) are widely used in both healthy and neuropsychiatric conditions as physiological indices of cognitive functions. Contrary to the common belief that cognitive ERPs are generated by local activity within the cerebral cortex, here we show that an attention-related ERP in the frontal cortex is correlated with, and likely generated by, subcortical inputs from the basal forebrain (BF). In rats performing an auditory oddball task, both the amplitude and timing of the frontal ERP were coupled with BF neuronal activity in single trials. The local field potentials (LFPs) associated with the frontal ERP, concentrated in deep cortical layers corresponding to the zone of BF input, were similarly coupled with BF activity and consistently triggered by BF electrical stimulation within 5–10 msec. These results highlight the important and previously unrecognized role of long-range subcortical inputs from the BF in the generation of cognitive ERPs. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02148.001 PMID:24714497

  18. Transcriptional Networks Controlled by NKX2-1 in the Development of Forebrain GABAergic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Sandberg, Magnus; Flandin, Pierre; Silberberg, Shanni; Su-Feher, Linda; Price, James D.; Hu, Jia Sheng; Kim, Carol; Visel, Axel; Nord, Alex S.; Rubenstein, John L.R.

    2017-01-01

    SUMMARY The embryonic basal ganglia generates multiple projection neurons and interneuron subtypes from distinct progenitor domains. Combinatorial interactions of transcription factors and chromatin are thought to regulate gene expression. In the medial ganglionic eminence, the NKX2-1 transcription factor controls regional identity and, with LHX6, is necessary to specify pallidal projection neurons and forebrain interneurons. Here, we dissected the molecular functions of NKX2-1 by defining its chromosomal binding, regulation of gene expression, and epigenetic state. NKX2-1 binding at distal regulatory elements led to a repressed epigenetic state and transcriptional repression in the ventricular zone. Conversely, NKX2-1 is required to establish a permissive chromatin state and transcriptional activation in the sub-ventricular and mantle zones. Moreover, combinatorial binding of NKX2-1 and LHX6 promotes transcriptionally permissive chromatin and activates genes expressed in cortical migrating interneurons. Our integrated approach provides a foundation for elucidating transcriptional networks guiding the development of the MGE and its descendants. PMID:27657450

  19. Birds have primate-like numbers of neurons in the forebrain

    PubMed Central

    Olkowicz, Seweryn; Kocourek, Martin; Lučan, Radek K.; Porteš, Michal; Fitch, W. Tecumseh; Herculano-Houzel, Suzana; Němec, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Some birds achieve primate-like levels of cognition, even though their brains tend to be much smaller in absolute size. This poses a fundamental problem in comparative and computational neuroscience, because small brains are expected to have a lower information-processing capacity. Using the isotropic fractionator to determine numbers of neurons in specific brain regions, here we show that the brains of parrots and songbirds contain on average twice as many neurons as primate brains of the same mass, indicating that avian brains have higher neuron packing densities than mammalian brains. Additionally, corvids and parrots have much higher proportions of brain neurons located in the pallial telencephalon compared with primates or other mammals and birds. Thus, large-brained parrots and corvids have forebrain neuron counts equal to or greater than primates with much larger brains. We suggest that the large numbers of neurons concentrated in high densities in the telencephalon substantially contribute to the neural basis of avian intelligence. PMID:27298365

  20. Biostimulation and nursing modify mating-induced c-FOS immunoreactivity in the female rabbit forebrain.

    PubMed

    González-Mariscal, Gabriela; García Dalmán, Cipatli; Jiménez, Angeles

    2015-05-22

    Mating in rabbits lasts only 3-5s but profoundly changes the female׳s physiology and behavior (e.g., inhibition of scent-marking and ambulation, changes in EEG, and release of GnRH). The behavioral responsiveness to copulation is reduced in lactating rabbits, relative to estrous does, but is enhanced after suppressing a single nursing bout ("biostimulation"). Little is known about the mechanisms mediating the differential responsiveness to mating among estrous, lactating, and biostimulated rabbits. To begin addressing this issue we quantified the number of c-FOS-immunoreactive (IR) cells in the preoptic area (POA), dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH), ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH), infundibular nucleus (INF), paraventricular nucleus (PVN), supraoptic nucleus (SON), and lateral septum (LS) in mated and unmated does from the above three reproductive conditions. Mating increased c-FOS-IR cells in the POA and PVN relative to unmated estrous does. Biostimulation increased c-FOS-IR cells in the PVN, relative to lactating does, regardless of mating. Lactation reduced the responsiveness of the LS and INF to copulation but increased it in the DMH. No differences were found in the VMH. a) copulation activates forebrain nuclei that regulate scent-marking (POA), ovulation (INF), and post-coital oxytocin release (PVN); b) lactation and suppression of one nursing bout modulate the magnitude of such changes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Silencing of Cholinergic Basal Forebrain Neurons Using Archaerhodopsin Prolongs Slow-Wave Sleep in Mice.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yu-Feng; Han, Yong; Su, Yun-Ting; Yang, Jun-Hua; Yu, Yan-Qin

    2015-01-01

    The basal forebrain (BF) plays a crucial role in cortical activation. Our previous study showed that activation of cholinergic BF neurons alone is sufficient to suppress slow-wave sleep (SWS) and promote wakefulness and rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep. However, the exact role of silencing cholinergic BF neurons in the sleep-wake cycle remains unclear. We inhibitied the cholinergic BF neurons genetically targeted with archaerhodopsin (Arch) with yellow light to clarify the role of cholinergic BF neurons in the sleep-wake cycle. Bilateral inactivation of cholinergic BF neurons genetically targeted with archaerhodopsin prolonged SWS and decreased the probability of awakening from SWS in mice. However, silencing these neurons changed neither the duration of wakefulness or REM sleep, nor the probability of transitions to other sleep-wake episodes from wakefulness or REM sleep. Furthermore, silencing these neurons for 6 h within the inactive or active period increased the duration of SWS at the expense of the duration of wakefulness, as well as increasing the number of prolonged SWS episodes (120-240 s). The lost wakefulness was compensated by a delayed increase of wakefulness, so the total duration of SWS and wakefulness during 24 h was kept stable. Our results indicate that the main effect of these neurons is to terminate SWS, whereas wakefulness or REM sleep may be determined by co-operation of the cholinergic BF neurons with other arousal-sleep control systems.

  2. Nicotine administration in the wake-promoting basal forebrain attenuates sleep-promoting effects of alcohol.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Rishi; Lodhi, Shafi; Sahota, Pradeep; Thakkar, Mahesh M

    2015-10-01

    Nicotine and alcohol co-abuse is highly prevalent, although the underlying causes are unclear. It has been suggested that nicotine enhances pleasurable effects of alcohol while reducing aversive effects. Recently, we reported that nicotine acts via the basal forebrain (BF) to activate nucleus accumbens and increase alcohol consumption. Does nicotine suppress alcohol-induced aversive effects via the BF? We hypothesized that nicotine may act via the BF to suppress sleep-promoting effects of alcohol. To test this hypothesis, adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were implanted with sleep-recording electrodes and bilateral guides targeted toward the BF. Nicotine (75 pmol/500 nL/side) or artificial cerebrospinal fluid (ACSF; 500 nL/side) was microinjected into the BF followed by intragastric alcohol (ACSF + EtOH and NiC + EtOH groups; 3 g/kg) or water (NiC + W and ACSF + W groups; 10 mL/kg) administration. On completion, rats were killed and processed to localize injection sites in the BF. The statistical analysis revealed a significant effect of treatment on sleep-wakefulness. While rats exposed to alcohol (ACSF + EtOH) displayed strong sleep promotion, nicotine pre-treatment in the BF (NiC + EtOH) attenuated alcohol-induced sleep and normalized sleep-wakefulness. These results suggest that nicotine acts via the BF to suppress the aversive, sleep-promoting effects of alcohol, further supporting the role of BF in alcohol-nicotine co-use.

  3. Cocaine self-administration in mice with forebrain knock-down of trpc5 ion channels.

    PubMed

    Pomrenze, Matthew B; Baratta, Michael V; Rasmus, Kristin C; Cadle, Brian A; Nakamura, Shinya; Birnbaumer, Lutz; Cooper, Donald C

    2013-01-01

    Canonical transient receptor potential (TRPC) channels are a family of non-selective cation channels that play a crucial role in modulating neuronal excitability due to their involvement in intracellular Ca2+ regulation and dendritic growth. TRPC5 channels a) are one of the two most prevalent TRPC channels in the adult rodent brain; b) are densely expressed in deep layer pyramidal neurons of the prefrontal cortex (PFC); and c) modulate neuronal persistent activity necessary for working memory and attention. In order to evaluate the causal role of TRPC5 in motivation/reward-related behaviors, conditional forebrain TRPC5 knock-down (trpc5-KD) mice were generated and trained to nose-poke for intravenous cocaine. Here we present a data set containing the first 6 days of saline or cocaine self-administration in wild type (WT) and trpc5-KD mice. In addition, we also present a data set showing the dose-response to cocaine after both groups had achieved similar levels of cocaine self-administration. Compared to WT mice, trpc5-KD mice exhibited an apparent increase in self-administration on the first day of cocaine testing without prior operant training. There were no apparent differences between WT and trpc5-KD mice for saline responding on the first day of training. Both groups showed similar dose-response sensitivity to cocaine after several days of achieving similar levels of cocaine intake.

  4. Cocaine self-administration in mice with forebrain knock-down of trpc5 ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Donald C

    2013-01-01

    Canonical transient receptor potential (TRPC) channels are a family of non-selective cation channels that play a crucial role in modulating neuronal excitability due to their involvement in intracellular Ca2+ regulation and dendritic growth. TRPC5 channels a) are one of the two most prevalent TRPC channels in the adult rodent brain; b) are densely expressed in deep layer pyramidal neurons of the prefrontal cortex (PFC); and c) modulate neuronal persistent activity necessary for working memory and attention. In order to evaluate the causal role of TRPC5 in motivation/reward-related behaviors, conditional forebrain TRPC5 knock-down (trpc5-KD) mice were generated and trained to nose-poke for intravenous cocaine. Here we present a data set containing the first 6 days of saline or cocaine self-administration in wild type (WT) and trpc5-KD mice. In addition, we also present a data set showing the dose-response to cocaine after both groups had achieved similar levels of cocaine self-administration. Compared to WT mice, trpc5-KD mice exhibited an apparent increase in self-administration on the first day of cocaine testing without prior operant training. There were no apparent differences between WT and trpc5-KD mice for saline responding on the first day of training. Both groups showed similar dose-response sensitivity to cocaine after several days of achieving similar levels of cocaine intake. PMID:24358869

  5. Interaction of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons with the glucocorticoid system in stress regulation and cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Paul, Saswati; Jeon, Won Kyung; Bizon, Jennifer L; Han, Jung-Soo

    2015-01-01

    A substantial number of studies on basal forebrain (BF) cholinergic neurons (BFCN) have provided compelling evidence for their role in the etiology of stress, cognitive aging, Alzheimer's disease (AD), and other neurodegenerative diseases. BFCN project to a broad range of cortical sites and limbic structures, including the hippocampus, and are involved in stress and cognition. In particular, the hippocampus, the primary target tissue of the glucocorticoid stress hormones, is associated with cognitive function in tandem with hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis modulation. The present review summarizes glucocorticoid and HPA axis research to date in an effort to establish the manner in which stress affects the release of acetylcholine (ACh), glucocorticoids, and their receptor in the context of cognitive processes. We attempt to provide the molecular interactive link between the glucocorticoids and cholinergic system that contributes to BFCN degeneration in stress-induced acceleration of cognitive decline in aging and AD. We also discuss the importance of animal models in facilitating such studies for pharmacological use, to which could help decipher disease states and propose leads for pharmacological intervention.

  6. Cell type-specific long-range connections of basal forebrain circuit

    PubMed Central

    Do, Johnny Phong; Xu, Min; Lee, Seung-Hee; Chang, Wei-Cheng; Zhang, Siyu; Chung, Shinjae; Yung, Tyler J; Fan, Jiang Lan; Miyamichi, Kazunari; Luo, Liqun; Dan, Yang

    2016-01-01

    The basal forebrain (BF) plays key roles in multiple brain functions, including sleep-wake regulation, attention, and learning/memory, but the long-range connections mediating these functions remain poorly characterized. Here we performed whole-brain mapping of both inputs and outputs of four BF cell types – cholinergic, glutamatergic, and parvalbumin-positive (PV+) and somatostatin-positive (SOM+) GABAergic neurons – in the mouse brain. Using rabies virus -mediated monosynaptic retrograde tracing to label the inputs and adeno-associated virus to trace axonal projections, we identified numerous brain areas connected to the BF. The inputs to different cell types were qualitatively similar, but the output projections showed marked differences. The connections to glutamatergic and SOM+ neurons were strongly reciprocal, while those to cholinergic and PV+ neurons were more unidirectional. These results reveal the long-range wiring diagram of the BF circuit with highly convergent inputs and divergent outputs and point to both functional commonality and specialization of different BF cell types. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13214.001 PMID:27642784

  7. Envelope contributions to the representation of interaural time difference in the forebrain of barn owls.

    PubMed

    Tellers, Philipp; Lehmann, Jessica; Führ, Hartmut; Wagner, Hermann

    2017-07-05

    Birds and mammals use the interaural time difference (ITD) for azimuthal sound localization. While barn owls can use the ITD of the stimulus carrier frequency over nearly their entire hearing range, mammals have to utilize the ITD of the stimulus envelope to extend the upper frequency limit of ITD-based sound localization. ITD is computed and processed in a dedicated neural circuit that consists of two pathways. In the barn owl, ITD representation is more complex in the forebrain than in the midbrain pathway due to the combination of two inputs that represent different ITDs. We speculated that one of the two inputs includes an envelope contribution. To estimate the envelope contribution, we recorded ITD response functions for correlated and anti-correlated noise stimuli in the barn owl's auditory arcopallium. Our findings indicate that barn owls, like mammals, represent both carrier and envelope ITD of overlapping frequency ranges, supporting the hypothesis that carrier and envelope ITD based localization are complementary beyond a mere extension of the upper frequency limit. Copyright © 2016, Journal of Neurophysiology.

  8. Discharge patterns of neurons in cholinergic regions of the basal forebrain during waking and sleep.

    PubMed

    Szymusiak, R; Alam, N; McGinty, D

    2000-11-01

    A subset of neurons recorded in the magnocellular basal forebrain (mBF) of cats and rats exhibit elevated discharge rates during waking and REM sleep, and diminished discharge during sleep with cortical EEG synchrony (nonREM sleep). This pattern is observed in mBF neurons in cats with identified ascending projections, and in neurons located in cholinergic regions of the rat mBF. However, the cholinergic versus noncholinergic nature of recorded cells could not be determined with the extracellular recording method employed. During waking, discharge of mBF neurons is strongly movement-related. Peak discharge rates occur during a variety of head and limb movements. Discharge rates during waking immobility are reduced by >50% compared to rates during waking movement. The absence of movement accounts for more of the variance in discharge across the sleep-wake cycle than does the presence of cortical EEG synchronization. Several factors participate in the regulation of mBF neuronal activity across arousal states. Tonic inhibition mediated by adenosine appears to be present during both waking and sleep. In some mBF neurons, increased GABAergic inhibition contributes to nonREM sleep-related reductions in discharge rate. Fluctuations in mBF cell activity during waking behaviors may reflect changing excitatory input from neurons in the pontine and midbrain tegmentum.

  9. Brainstem stimulation increases functional connectivity of basal forebrain-paralimbic network in isoflurane-anesthetized rats.

    PubMed

    Pillay, Siveshigan; Liu, Xiping; Baracskay, Péter; Hudetz, Anthony G

    2014-09-01

    Brain states and cognitive-behavioral functions are precisely controlled by subcortical neuromodulatory networks. Manipulating key components of the ascending arousal system (AAS), via deep-brain stimulation, may help facilitate global arousal in anesthetized animals. Here we test the hypothesis that electrical stimulation of the oral part of the pontine reticular nucleus (PnO) under light isoflurane anesthesia, associated with loss of consciousness, leads to cortical desynchronization and specific changes in blood-oxygenation-level-dependent (BOLD) functional connectivity (FC) of the brain. BOLD signals were acquired simultaneously with frontal epidural electroencephalogram before and after PnO stimulation. Whole-brain FC was mapped using correlation analysis with seeds in major centers of the AAS. PnO stimulation produced cortical desynchronization, a decrease in δ- and θ-band power, and an increase in approximate entropy. Significant increases in FC after PnO stimulation occurred between the left nucleus Basalis of Meynert (NBM) as seed and numerous regions of the paralimbic network. Smaller increases in FC were present between the central medial thalamic nucleus and retrosplenium seeds and the left caudate putamen and NBM. The results suggest that, during light anesthesia, PnO stimulation preferentially modulates basal forebrain-paralimbic networks. We speculate that this may be a reflection of disconnected awareness.

  10. Specification of Region-Specific Neurons Including Forebrain Glutamatergic Neurons from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Martins-Taylor, Kristen; Wang, Xiaofang; Zhang, Zheng; Park, Jung Woo; Zhan, Shuning; Kronenberg, Mark S.; Lichtler, Alexander; Liu, Hui-Xia; Chen, Fang-Ping; Yue, Lixia; Li, Xue-Jun; Xu, Ren-He

    2010-01-01

    Background Directed differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC) into functional, region-specific neural cells is a key step to realizing their therapeutic promise to treat various neural disorders, which awaits detailed elucidation. Methodology/Principal Findings We analyzed neural differentiation from various hiPSC lines generated by others and ourselves. Although heterogeneity in efficiency of neuroepithelial (NE) cell differentiation was observed among different hiPSC lines, the NE differentiation process resembles that from human embryonic stem cells (hESC) in morphology, timing, transcriptional profile, and requirement for FGF signaling. NE cells differentiated from hiPSC, like those from hESC, can also form rostral phenotypes by default, and form the midbrain or spinal progenitors upon caudalization by morphogens. The rostrocaudal neural progenitors can further mature to develop forebrain glutamatergic projection neurons, midbrain dopaminergic neurons, and spinal motor neurons, respectively. Typical ion channels and action potentials were recorded in the hiPSC-derived neurons. Conclusions/Significance Our results demonstrate that hiPSC, regardless of how they were derived, can differentiate into a spectrum of rostrocaudal neurons with functionality, which supports the considerable value of hiPSC for study and treatment of patient-specific neural disorders. PMID:20686615

  11. A ketogenic diet accelerates neurodegeneration in mice with induced mitochondrial DNA toxicity in the forebrain.

    PubMed

    Lauritzen, Knut H; Hasan-Olive, Md Mahdi; Regnell, Christine E; Kleppa, Liv; Scheibye-Knudsen, Morten; Gjedde, Albert; Klungland, Arne; Bohr, Vilhelm A; Storm-Mathisen, Jon; Bergersen, Linda H

    2016-12-01

    Mitochondrial genome maintenance plays a central role in preserving brain health. We previously demonstrated accumulation of mitochondrial DNA damage and severe neurodegeneration in transgenic mice inducibly expressing a mutated mitochondrial DNA repair enzyme (mutUNG1) selectively in forebrain neurons. Here, we examine whether severe neurodegeneration in mutUNG1-expressing mice could be rescued by feeding the mice a ketogenic diet, which is known to have beneficial effects in several neurological disorders. The diet increased the levels of superoxide dismutase 2, and mitochondrial mass, enzymes, and regulators such as SIRT1 and FIS1, and appeared to downregulate N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor subunits NR2A/B and upregulate γ-aminobutyric acid A (GABAA) receptor subunits α1. However, unexpectedly, the ketogenic diet aggravated neurodegeneration and mitochondrial deterioration. Electron microscopy showed structurally impaired mitochondria accumulating in neuronal perikarya. We propose that aggravation is caused by increased mitochondrial biogenesis of generally dysfunctional mitochondria. This study thereby questions the dogma that a ketogenic diet is unambiguously beneficial in mitochondrial disorders.

  12. Regulation of GABA and benzodiazepine receptors following neurotoxin-induced striatal and medial forebrain bundle lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, H.S.I.

    1985-01-01

    GABA, a major inhibitory transmitter, is used by many projection neurons of the striatum. To investigate the role of GABA in striatal function, the GABA receptor complex was studied after lesions of the striatum or the nigrostriatal neurons. Quantitative receptor autoradiography using thaw-mounted tissue slices was developed for the study of GABA and benzodiazepine (BDZ) receptors. With the technique established, binding to GABA and BDZ receptors after unilateral striatal kainate lesions was examined. Subsequently, changes in GABA and BDZ receptors were studied following the destruction of dopaminergic nigrostriatal cells by unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesion of the medial forebrain bundle. In summary, quantitative receptor autoradiography allowed the detection of GABA and BDZ receptor changes in multiple small areas in each lesioned brain. This technique made it feasible to carry out kinetic saturation, and competition studies using less than 1 mg of tissue. The data suggest that dopamine is functionally inhibitory on striatopallidal neurons but is functionally excitatory on striatoentopeduncular and striatonigral cells which in turn inhibit the thalamus. This quantitative autoradiographic technique can be generalized to study other transmitter receptors and can be combined with 2-deoxyglucose uptake studies.

  13. Quantitative autoradiography of muscarinic and benzodiazepine receptors in the forebrain of the turtle, Pseudemys scripta

    SciTech Connect

    Schlegel, J.R.; Kriegstein, A.R.

    1987-11-22

    The distribution of muscarinic and benzodiazepine receptors was investigated in the turtle forebrain by the technique of in vitro receptor autoradiography. Muscarinic binding sites were labeled with 1 nM /sup 3/H-quinuclidinyl benzilate (/sup 3/H-QNB), and benzodiazepine sites were demonstrated with the aid of 1 nM /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam (/sup 3/H-FLU). Autoradiograms generated on /sup 3/H-Ultrofilm apposed to tissue slices revealed regionally specific distributions of muscarinic and benzodiazepine binding sites that are comparable with those for mammalian brain. Dense benzodiazepine binding was found in the anterior olfactory nucleus, the lateral and dorsal cortices, and the dorsal ventricular ridge (DVR), a structure with no clear mammalian homologue. Muscarinic binding sites were most dense in the striatum, accumbens, DVR, lateral geniculate, and the anterior olfactory nucleus. Cortical binding sites were studied in greater detail by quantitative analysis of autoradiograms generated by using emulsion-coated coverslips. Laminar gradients of binding were observed that were specific for each radioligand; /sup 3/H-QNB sites were most dense in the inner molecular layer in all cortical regions, whereas /sup 3/H-FLU binding was generally most concentrated in the outer molecular layer and was least dense through all layers in the dorsomedial cortex. Because pyramidal cells are arranged in register in turtle cortex, the laminar patterns of receptor binding may reflect different receptor density gradients along pyramidal cell dendrites.

  14. Statistical learning of recurring sound patterns encodes auditory objects in songbird forebrain.

    PubMed

    Lu, Kai; Vicario, David S

    2014-10-07

    Auditory neurophysiology has demonstrated how basic acoustic features are mapped in the brain, but it is still not clear how multiple sound components are integrated over time and recognized as an object. We investigated the role of statistical learning in encoding the sequential features of complex sounds by recording neuronal responses bilaterally in the auditory forebrain of awake songbirds that were passively exposed to long sound streams. These streams contained sequential regularities, and were similar to streams used in human infants to demonstrate statistical learning for speech sounds. For stimulus patterns with contiguous transitions and with nonadjacent elements, single and multiunit responses reflected neuronal discrimination of the familiar patterns from novel patterns. In addition, discrimination of nonadjacent patterns was stronger in the right hemisphere than in the left, and may reflect an effect of top-down modulation that is lateralized. Responses to recurring patterns showed stimulus-specific adaptation, a sparsening of neural activity that may contribute to encoding invariants in the sound stream and that appears to increase coding efficiency for the familiar stimuli across the population of neurons recorded. As auditory information about the world must be received serially over time, recognition of complex auditory objects may depend on this type of mnemonic process to create and differentiate representations of recently heard sounds.

  15. NKCC1 controls GABAergic signaling and neuroblast migration in the postnatal forebrain

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    From an early postnatal period and throughout life there is a continuous production of olfactory bulb (OB) interneurons originating from neuronal precursors in the subventricular zone. To reach the OB circuits, immature neuroblasts migrate along the rostral migratory stream (RMS). In the present study, we employed cultured postnatal mouse forebrain slices and used lentiviral vectors to label neuronal precursors with GFP and to manipulate the expression levels of the Na-K-2Cl cotransporter NKCC1. We investigated the role of this Cl- transporter in different stages of postnatal neurogenesis, including neuroblast migration and integration in the OB networks once they have reached the granule cell layer (GCL). We report that NKCC1 activity is necessary for maintaining normal migratory speed. Both pharmacological and genetic manipulations revealed that NKCC1 maintains high [Cl-]i and regulates the resting membrane potential of migratory neuroblasts whilst its functional expression is strongly reduced at the time cells reach the GCL. As in other developing systems, NKCC1 shapes GABAA-dependent signaling in the RMS neuroblasts. Also, we show that NKCC1 controls the migration of neuroblasts in the RMS. The present study indeed indicates that the latter effect results from a novel action of NKCC1 on the resting membrane potential, which is independent of GABAA-dependent signaling. All in all, our findings show that early stages of the postnatal recruitment of OB interneurons rely on precise, orchestrated mechanisms that depend on multiple actions of NKCC1. PMID:21284844

  16. Mitochondrial DNA Toxicity in Forebrain Neurons Causes Apoptosis, Neurodegeneration, and Impaired Behavior ▿

    PubMed Central

    Lauritzen, Knut H.; Moldestad, Olve; Eide, Lars; Carlsen, Harald; Nesse, Gaute; Storm, Johan F.; Mansuy, Isabelle M.; Bergersen, Linda H.; Klungland, Arne

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction underlying changes in neurodegenerative diseases is often associated with apoptosis and a progressive loss of neurons, and damage to the mitochondrial genome is proposed to be involved in such pathologies. In the present study we designed a mouse model that allows us to specifically induce mitochondrial DNA toxicity in the forebrain neurons of adult mice. This is achieved by CaMKIIα-regulated inducible expression of a mutated version of the mitochondrial UNG DNA repair enzyme (mutUNG1). This enzyme is capable of removing thymine from the mitochondrial genome. We demonstrate that a continual generation of apyrimidinic sites causes apoptosis and neuronal death. These defects are associated with behavioral alterations characterized by increased locomotor activity, impaired cognitive abilities, and lack of anxietylike responses. In summary, whereas mitochondrial base substitution and deletions previously have been shown to correlate with premature and natural aging, respectively, we show that a high level of apyrimidinic sites lead to mitochondrial DNA cytotoxicity, which causes apoptosis, followed by neurodegeneration. PMID:20065039

  17. Analeptic activity produced by TRH microinjection into basal forebrain area of the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Horita, A.; Carino, M.A.; Lai, H.

    1986-03-05

    Earlier, Kalivas and Horita demonstrated that the analeptic effect of TRH was mediated in part by cholinergic neurons in the medial septum-diagonal band of Broca (MS-DBB). Since the MS-DBB constitutes part of the cholinergic basal forebrain system, the present study investigated whether the area designated as the n. basalis of Meynert (NBM) was also sensitive to TRH in producing an antipentobarbital effect. Saline or TRH (0.5 ..mu..l) was microinjected via bilateral stainless steel cannulae implanted stereotaxically into the NBM using the coordinates of Wenk et al. Accuracy of cannula placement was confirmed by histological examination. Rats treated with PB (40 mg/kg, i.p.) lost their righting reflex for 130 +/- 28 min. Intrabasalis injection of TRH (but not saline) in doses of 0.1-1.0 ..mu..g exerted analeptic activity as follows: 0.1 ..mu..g = 81 +/- 21 min; 0.5 ..mu..g = 65 +/- 19 min; 1.0 ..mu..g = 45 +/- 10 min. All of these doses exerted significant shortening of narcosis duration of pentobarbitalized rats. The analeptic effect of TRH was blocked by atropine pretreatment, indicating that it was mediated via cholinergic mechanisms. High affinity, sodium-dependent /sup 3/H-choline uptake by cortical synaptosomes prepared from these animals was also increased by TRH. These results suggest that the cholinergic neurons of NBM are highly sensitive to TRH and contributes to the analeptic effect of TRH.

  18. The amygdala and basal forebrain as a pathway for motivationally guided attention.

    PubMed

    Peck, Christopher J; Salzman, C Daniel

    2014-10-08

    Visual stimuli associated with rewards attract spatial attention. Neurophysiological mechanisms that mediate this process must register both the motivational significance and location of visual stimuli. Recent neurophysiological evidence indicates that the amygdala encodes information about both of these parameters. Furthermore, the firing rate of amygdala neurons predicts the allocation of spatial attention. One neural pathway through which the amygdala might influence attention involves the intimate and bidirectional connections between the amygdala and basal forebrain (BF), a brain area long implicated in attention. Neurons in the rhesus monkey amygdala and BF were therefore recorded simultaneously while subjects performed a detection task in which the stimulus-reward associations of visual stimuli modulated spatial attention. Neurons in BF were spatially selective for reward-predictive stimuli, much like the amygdala. The onset of reward-predictive signals in each brain area suggested different routes of processing for reward-predictive stimuli appearing in the ipsilateral and contralateral fields. Moreover, neurons in the amygdala, but not BF, tracked trial-to-trial fluctuations in spatial attention. These results suggest that the amygdala and BF could play distinct yet inter-related roles in influencing attention elicited by reward-predictive stimuli.

  19. INTACT AND INJURED ENDOTHELIAL CELLS DIFFERENTIALLY MODULATE POSTNATAL MURINE FOREBRAIN NEURAL STEM CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Plane, Jennifer M.; Andjelkovic, Anuska V.; Keep, Richard F.; Parent, Jack M.

    2010-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) persist in the forebrain subventricular zone (SVZ) within a niche containing endothelial cells. Evidence suggests that endothelial cells stimulate NSC expansion and neurogenesis. Experimental stroke increases neurogenesis and angiogenesis, but how endothelial cells influence stroke-induced neurogenesis is unknown. We hypothesized intact or oxygen-glucose deprived (OGD) endothelial cells secrete factors that enhance neurogenesis. We co-cultured mouse SVZ neurospheres (NS) with endothelial cells, or differentiated NS in endothelial cell-conditioned medium (ECCM). NS also were expanded in ECCM from OGD-exposed (OGD-ECCM) endothelial cells to assess injury effects. ECCM significantly increased NS production. NS co-cultured with endothelial cells or ECCM generated more immature-appearing neurons and oligodendrocytes, and astrocytes with radial glial-like/reactive morphology than controls. OGD-ECCM stimulated neuroblast migration and yielded neurons with longer processes and more branching. These data indicate that intact and injured endothelial cells exert differing effects on NSCs, and suggest targets for stimulating regeneration after brain insults. PMID:19837162

  20. Transcriptional Networks Controlled by NKX2-1 in the Development of Forebrain GABAergic Neurons.

    PubMed

    Sandberg, Magnus; Flandin, Pierre; Silberberg, Shanni; Su-Feher, Linda; Price, James D; Hu, Jia Sheng; Kim, Carol; Visel, Axel; Nord, Alex S; Rubenstein, John L R

    2016-09-21

    The embryonic basal ganglia generates multiple projection neurons and interneuron subtypes from distinct progenitor domains. Combinatorial interactions of transcription factors and chromatin are thought to regulate gene expression. In the medial ganglionic eminence, the NKX2-1 transcription factor controls regional identity and, with LHX6, is necessary to specify pallidal projection neurons and forebrain interneurons. Here, we dissected the molecular functions of NKX2-1 by defining its chromosomal binding, regulation of gene expression, and epigenetic state. NKX2-1 binding at distal regulatory elements led to a repressed epigenetic state and transcriptional repression in the ventricular zone. Conversely, NKX2-1 is required to establish a permissive chromatin state and transcriptional activation in the sub-ventricular and mantle zones. Moreover, combinatorial binding of NKX2-1 and LHX6 promotes transcriptionally permissive chromatin and activates genes expressed in cortical migrating interneurons. Our integrated approach provides a foundation for elucidating transcriptional networks guiding the development of the MGE and its descendants.

  1. Cognitive sequelae of head injury: involvement of basal forebrain and associated structures.

    PubMed

    Salmond, C H; Chatfield, D A; Menon, D K; Pickard, J D; Sahakian, B J

    2005-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury is the most common cause of death and disability in young people and survivors often suffer from chronic cognitive deficits. From animal, post-mortem and cognitive studies, there is now increased evidence that abnormalities in the cholinergic system may be underlying some of these deficits. This study investigated this hypothesis in a group of survivors of moderate-severe head injury (n = 31). Patients completed a comprehensive neuropsychological assessment and an MRI scan. Compared with a group of controls (matched on age, sex and premorbid intelligence quotient), the patients showed deficits in sustained attention, paired associate learning and reaction time, but comparative preservation of spatial working memory. Voxel-based morphometry revealed reduced grey matter density in the head injured group in the basal forebrain, the hippocampal formation and regions of the neocortex. These cognitive and structural results are consistent with cholinergic dysfunction. These preliminary findings suggest that cholinergic enhancers may be an effective treatment of cognitive deficits post head injury.

  2. Descending projections from the basal forebrain to the orexin neurons in mice.

    PubMed

    Agostinelli, Lindsay J; Ferrari, Loris L; Mahoney, Carrie E; Mochizuki, Takatoshi; Lowell, Bradford B; Arrigoni, Elda; Scammell, Thomas E

    2017-05-01

    The orexin (hypocretin) neurons play an essential role in promoting arousal, and loss of the orexin neurons results in narcolepsy, a condition characterized by chronic sleepiness and cataplexy. The orexin neurons excite wake-promoting neurons in the basal forebrain (BF), and a reciprocal projection from the BF back to the orexin neurons may help promote arousal and motivation. The BF contains at least three different cell types (cholinergic, glutamatergic, and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic neurons) across its different regions (medial septum, diagonal band, magnocellular preoptic area, and substantia innominata). Given the neurochemical and anatomical heterogeneity of the BF, we mapped the pattern of BF projections to the orexin neurons across multiple BF regions and neuronal types. We performed conditional anterograde tracing using mice that express Cre recombinase only in neurons producing acetylcholine, glutamate, or GABA. We found that the orexin neurons are heavily apposed by axon terminals of glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons of the substantia innominata (SI) and magnocellular preoptic area, but there was no innervation by the cholinergic neurons. Channelrhodopsin-assisted circuit mapping (CRACM) demonstrated that glutamatergic SI neurons frequently form functional synapses with the orexin neurons, but, surprisingly, functional synapses from SI GABAergic neurons were rare. Considering their strong reciprocal connections, BF and orexin neurons likely work in concert to promote arousal, motivation, and other behaviors. J. Comp. Neurol. 525:1668-1684, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Nitric oxide modulates the discharge rate of basal forebrain neurones: a study in freely moving rats.

    PubMed

    Kostin, Andrey; Stenberg, Dag; Porkka-Heiskanen, Tarja

    2009-12-01

    In urethane-anaesthetized rats the infusion of a nitric oxide (NO)-donor [NOC-18, 1 mM (DETA/NO); 2,2'-(hydroxynitrosohydrazino)bis-ethanamine)] into the basal forebrain (BF) inhibited the discharge rate of most neurones, suggesting that NO may promote sleep via inhibition of wake-promoting neurones in the BF. However, this hypothesis still needs to be confirmed in freely moving rats. The objective of this study was to examine whether NO modulates the discharge rate of BF neurones in freely moving rats in a similar manner to anaesthetized rats. We measured the discharge rates of BF neurones in freely moving rats during microdialysis infusion of a NO-donor (1 mm; NOC-18) in different vigilance states. Neurones were characterized as wake (W)-on (51.8%), W-off (28.6%) and W/non-rapid eye movement (REM)-independent (21.4%) based on their discharge profiles during wakefulness (W) and non-REM sleep. The NO-donor affected the discharge rate of most BF neurones during quiet wakefulness (QW; 55%) and non-REM sleep (64%). The most prominent response in all neuronal groups was a decrease in the discharge rate during QW and non-REM sleep. A small subpopulation of neurones increased the discharge rate. The increase in NO in the BF during prolonged wakefulness may facilitate sleep via inhibition of wake-promoting neurones.

  4. Intrinsic voltage dynamics govern the diversity of spontaneous firing profiles in basal forebrain noncholinergic neurons

    PubMed Central

    Dolly, J. Oliver; Zaborszky, Laszlo

    2012-01-01

    Spontaneous firing and behavior-related changes in discharge profiles of basal forebrain (BF) neurons are well documented, albeit the mechanisms underlying the variety of activity modes and intermodal transitions remain elusive. With the use of cell-attached recordings, this study identifies a range of spiking patterns in diagonal band Broca (DBB) noncholinergic cells of rats and tentatively categorizes them into low-rate random, tonic, and cluster firing activities. It demonstrates further that the multiplicity of discharge profiles is sustained intrinsically and persists after blockade of glutamate-, glycine/GABA-, and cholinergic synaptic inputs. Stimulation of muscarinic receptors, blockade of voltage-gated Ca2+-, and small conductance (SK) Ca2+-activated K+ currents as well as chelating of intracellular Ca2+ concentration accelerate low-rate random and tonic firing and favor transition of neurons into cluster firing mode. A similar trend towards higher discharge rates with switch of neurons into cluster firing has been revealed by activation of neuropeptide Y (NPY) receptors with the NPY or NPY1 receptor agonist [Leu31,Pro34]-NPY. Whole cell current-clamp analysis demonstrates that the variety of spiking modes and intermodal transitions could be induced within the same neuronal population by injection of bias depolarizing or hyperpolarizing currents. Taken together, these data demonstrate the intrinsic and highly variable character of regenerative firing in BF noncholinergic cells, subject to powerful modulation by classical neurotransmitters, NPY, and small membrane currents. PMID:22496531

  5. Forebrain-dominant deficit in cerebrovascular reactivity in Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yezhuvath, Uma S.; Uh, Jinsoo; Cheng, Yamei; Martin-Cook, Kristin; Weiner, Myron; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon; van Osch, Matthias; Lu, Hanzhang

    2010-01-01

    Epidemiologic evidence and postmortem studies of cerebral amyloid angiopathy suggest that vascular dysfunction may play an important role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s Disease (AD). However, alterations in vascular function under in vivo conditions are poorly understood. In this study, we assessed cerebrovascular-reactivity (CVR) in AD patients and age-matched controls using CO2-inhalation while simultaneously acquiring Blood-Oxygenation-Level-Dependent (BOLD) MR images. Compared to controls, AD patients had widespread reduction in CVR in the rostral brain including prefrontal, anterior cingulate, and insular cortex (p<0.01). The deficits could not be explained by cardiovascular risk factors. The spatial distribution of the CVR deficits differed drastically from the regions of cerebral blood flow (CBF) deficits, which were found in temporal and parietal cortices. Individuals with greater CVR deficit tended to have a greater volume of leukoaraiosis as seen on FLAIR MRI (p=0.004). Our data suggest that early AD subjects have evidence of significant forebrain vascular contractility deficits. The localization, while differing from CBF findings, appears to be spatially similar to PIB amyloid imaging findings. PMID:20359779

  6. Differential vascular permeability along the forebrain ventricular neurogenic niche in the adult murine brain.

    PubMed

    Colín-Castelán, Dannia; Ramírez-Santos, Jesús; Gutiérrez-Ospina, Gabriel

    2016-02-01

    Adult neurogenesis is influenced by blood-borne factors. In this context, greater or lesser vascular permeability along neurogenic niches would expose differentially neural stem cells (NSCs), transit amplifying cells (TACs), and neuroblasts to such factors. Here we evaluate endothelial cell morphology and vascular permeability along the forebrain neurogenic niche in the adult brain. Our results confirm that the subventricular zone (SVZ) contains highly permeable, discontinuous blood vessels, some of which allow the extravasation of molecules larger than those previously reported. In contrast, the rostral migratory stream (RMS) and the olfactory bulb core (OBc) display mostly impermeable, continuous blood vessels. These results imply that NSCs, TACs, and neuroblasts located within the SVZ are exposed more readily to blood-borne molecules, including those with very high molecular weights, than those positioned along the RMS and the OBc, subregions in which every stage of neurogenesis also takes place. These observations suggest that the existence of specialized vascular niches is not a precondition for neurogenesis to occur; specialized vascular beds might be essential for keeping high rates of proliferation and/or differential differentiation of neural precursors located at distinct domains. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Visualizing an emotional valence map in the limbic forebrain by TAI-FISH.

    PubMed

    Xiu, Jianbo; Zhang, Qi; Zhou, Tao; Zhou, Ting-ting; Chen, Yang; Hu, Hailan

    2014-11-01

    A fundamental problem in neuroscience is how emotional valences are represented in the brain. We know little about how appetitive and aversive systems interact and the extent to which information regarding these two opposite values segregate and converge. Here we used a new method, tyramide-amplified immunohistochemistry-fluorescence in situ hybridization, to simultaneously visualize the neural correlates of two stimuli of contrasting emotional valence across the limbic forebrain at single-cell resolution. We discovered characteristic patterns of interaction, segregated, convergent and intermingled, between the appetitive and aversive neural ensembles in mice. In nucleus accumbens, we identified a mosaic activation pattern by positive and negative emotional cues, and unraveled previously unappreciated functional heterogeneity in the D1- and D2-type medium-spiny neurons, which correspond to the Go and NoGo pathways. These results provide insights into the coding of emotional valence in the brain and act as a proof of principle of a powerful methodology for simultaneous functional mapping of two distinct behaviors.

  8. Interaction of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons with the glucocorticoid system in stress regulation and cognitive impairment

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Saswati; Jeon, Won Kyung; Bizon, Jennifer L.; Han, Jung-Soo

    2015-01-01

    A substantial number of studies on basal forebrain (BF) cholinergic neurons (BFCN) have provided compelling evidence for their role in the etiology of stress, cognitive aging, Alzheimer’s disease (AD), and other neurodegenerative diseases. BFCN project to a broad range of cortical sites and limbic structures, including the hippocampus, and are involved in stress and cognition. In particular, the hippocampus, the primary target tissue of the glucocorticoid stress hormones, is associated with cognitive function in tandem with hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis modulation. The present review summarizes glucocorticoid and HPA axis research to date in an effort to establish the manner in which stress affects the release of acetylcholine (ACh), glucocorticoids, and their receptor in the context of cognitive processes. We attempt to provide the molecular interactive link between the glucocorticoids and cholinergic system that contributes to BFCN degeneration in stress-induced acceleration of cognitive decline in aging and AD. We also discuss the importance of animal models in facilitating such studies for pharmacological use, to which could help decipher disease states and propose leads for pharmacological intervention. PMID:25883567

  9. Computational perspectives on forebrain microcircuits implicated in reinforcement learning, action selection, and cognitive control.

    PubMed

    Bullock, Daniel; Tan, Can Ozan; John, Yohan J

    2009-01-01

    Abundant new information about signaling pathways in forebrain microcircuits presents many challenges, and opportunities for discovery, to computational neuroscientists who strive to bridge from microcircuits to flexible cognition and action. Accurate treatment of microcircuit pathways is especially critical for creating models that correctly predict the outcomes of candidate neurological therapies. Recent models are trying to specify how cortical circuits that enable planning and voluntary actions interact with adaptive subcortical microcircuits in the basal ganglia. The basal ganglia are strongly implicated in reinforcement learning, and in all behavior and cognition over which the frontal lobes exert flexible control. The persisting role of the basal ganglia shows that ancient vertebrate designs for motivated action selection proved adaptable enough to support many "modern" behavioral innovations, including fluent generation of language and speech. This paper summarizes how recent models have incorporated realistic representations of microcircuit features, and have begun to trace their computational implications. Also summarized are recent empirical discoveries that provide guidance regarding how to formulate the rules for synaptic modification that govern learning in cortico-striatal pathways. Such efforts are contributing to an emerging synthesis based on an interlocking set of computational hypotheses regarding cortical interactions with basal ganglia and thalamic nuclei. These hypotheses specify how specialized microcircuits solve learning and control problems inherent to the brain's parallel design.

  10. Fos immunoreactivity in the rat forebrain induced by electrical stimulation of the dorsolateral periaqueductal gray matter.

    PubMed

    Lim, Lee Wei; Temel, Yasin; Visser-Vandewalle, Veerle; Blokland, Arjan; Steinbusch, Harry

    2009-10-01

    Electrical stimulation of the dorsolateral periaqueductal gray (dlPAG) matter induces panic- or fear-like responses with intense emotional distress and severe anxiety. In this study, we evoked panic-like behaviour by dlPAG stimulation and evaluated the effect on neuronal activation in different brain regions. The number of c-Fos immunoreactive (c-Fos-ir) cells was measured semi-quantitatively through series of stained rat brain sections. Our results demonstrate strong neural activation in the medial prefrontal cortex, orbital cortex, anterior olfactory nuclei, secondary motor cortex, and the somatosensory cortex. Moderate increases in the number of c-Fos-ir cells were detected in various regions, including the hypothalamus, amygdala, and striatum. Additionally, there was mild expression of c-Fos-ir cells in the hippocampus, thalamus, and habenula regions. In conclusion, we have shown that deep brain stimulation of the dlPAG produced a distinctive pattern of neuronal activation across forebrain regions as compared to the sham and control animals.

  11. Metabolic Mapping of Rat Forebrain and Midbrain During Delay and Trace Eyeblink Conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Plakke, Bethany; Freeman, John H.; Poremba, Amy

    2012-01-01

    While the essential neural circuitry for delay eyeblink conditioning has been largely identified, much of the neural circuitry for trace conditioning has yet to be determined. The major difference between delay and trace conditioning is a time gap between the presentation of the conditioned stimulus (CS) and the unconditioned stimulus (US) during trace conditioning. It is this time gap, which accounts for the additional memory component and may require extra neural structures, including hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. A metabolic marker of energy use, radioactively labeled glucose analog, was used to compare differences in glucose analog uptake between delay, trace, and unpaired experimental groups (rats, Long-Evans), to identify possible new areas of involvement within forebrain and midbrain. Here, we identify increased 2-DG uptake for the delay group compared to the unpaired group in various areas including: the medial geniculate nuclei (MGN), the amygdala, cingulate cortex, auditory cortex, medial dorsal thalamus, and frontal cortices. For the trace group, compared to the unpaired group, there was an increase in 2-DG uptake for the medial orbital frontal cortex and the medial MGN. The trace group also exhibited more increases lateralized to the right hemisphere, opposite to the side of US delivery, in various areas including: CA1, subiculum, presubiculum, perirhinal cortex, ventral and dorsal MGN, and the basolateral and central amygdala. While some of these areas have been identified as important for delay or trace conditioning, some new structures have been identified such as the orbital frontal cortex for both delay and trace groups. PMID:19376256

  12. Establishment of a Long-Term Chick Forebrain Neuronal Culture on a Microelectrode Array Platform

    PubMed Central

    Kuang, Serena Y.; Huang, Ting; Wang, Zhonghai; Lin, Yongliang; Kindy, Mark; Xi, Tingfei; Gao, Bruce Z.

    2016-01-01

    The biosensor system formed by culturing primary animal neurons on a microelectrode array (MEA) platform is drawing an increasing research interest for its power as a rapid, sensitive, functional neurotoxicity assessment, as well as for many other electrophysiological related research purposes. In this paper, we established a long-term chick forebrain neuron culture (C-FBN-C) on MEAs with a more than 5 month long lifespan and up to 5 month long stability in morphology and physiological function; characterized the C-FBN-C morphologically, functionally, and developmentally; partially compared its functional features with rodent counterpart; and discussed its pros and cons as a novel biosensor system in comparison to rodent counterpart and human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs). Our results show that C-FBN-C on MEA platform 1) can be used as a biosensor of its own type in a wide spectrum of basic biomedical research; 2) is of value in comparative physiology in cross-species studies; and 3) may have potential to be used as an alternative, cost-effective approach to rodent counterpart within shared common functional domains (such as specific types of ligand-gated ion channel receptors and subtypes expressed in the cortical tissues of both species) in large-scale environmental neurotoxicant screening that would otherwise require millions of animals. PMID:26989485

  13. Effects of neonatal handling on the basal forebrain cholinergic system of adult male and female rats.

    PubMed

    Pondiki, S; Stamatakis, A; Fragkouli, A; Philippidis, H; Stylianopoulou, F

    2006-10-13

    Neonatal handling is an early experience which results in improved function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, increased adaptability and coping as a response to stress, as well as better cognitive abilities. In the present study, we investigated the effect of neonatal handling on the basal forebrain cholinergic system, since this system is known to play an important role in cognitive processes. We report that neonatal handling results in increased number of choline-acetyl transferase immunopositive cells in the septum/diagonal band, in both sexes, while no such effect was observed in the other cholinergic nuclei, such as the magnocellular preoptic nucleus and the nucleus basalis of Meynert. In addition, neonatal handling resulted in increased M1 and M2 muscarinic receptor binding sites in the cingulate and piriform cortex of both male and female rats. A handling-induced increase in M1 muscarinic receptor binding sites was also observed in the CA3 and CA4 (fields 3 and 4 of Ammon's horn) areas of the hippocampus. Furthermore, a handling-induced increase in acetylcholinesterase staining was found only in the hippocampus of females. Our results thus show that neonatal handling acts in a sexually dimorphic manner on one of the cholinergic parameters, and has a beneficial effect on BFCS function, which could be related to the more efficient and adaptive stress response and the superior cognitive abilities of handled animals.

  14. Mitochondrial DNA toxicity in forebrain neurons causes apoptosis, neurodegeneration, and impaired behavior.

    PubMed

    Lauritzen, Knut H; Moldestad, Olve; Eide, Lars; Carlsen, Harald; Nesse, Gaute; Storm, Johan F; Mansuy, Isabelle M; Bergersen, Linda H; Klungland, Arne

    2010-03-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction underlying changes in neurodegenerative diseases is often associated with apoptosis and a progressive loss of neurons, and damage to the mitochondrial genome is proposed to be involved in such pathologies. In the present study we designed a mouse model that allows us to specifically induce mitochondrial DNA toxicity in the forebrain neurons of adult mice. This is achieved by CaMKIIalpha-regulated inducible expression of a mutated version of the mitochondrial UNG DNA repair enzyme (mutUNG1). This enzyme is capable of removing thymine from the mitochondrial genome. We demonstrate that a continual generation of apyrimidinic sites causes apoptosis and neuronal death. These defects are associated with behavioral alterations characterized by increased locomotor activity, impaired cognitive abilities, and lack of anxietylike responses. In summary, whereas mitochondrial base substitution and deletions previously have been shown to correlate with premature and natural aging, respectively, we show that a high level of apyrimidinic sites lead to mitochondrial DNA cytotoxicity, which causes apoptosis, followed by neurodegeneration.

  15. Local cholinergic-GABAergic circuitry within the basal forebrain is modulated by galanin.

    PubMed

    Damborsky, Joanne C; Smith, Kathleen G; Jensen, Patricia; Yakel, Jerrel L

    2017-04-01

    The basal forebrain (BF) is an important regulator of hippocampal and cortical activity. In Alzheimer's disease (AD), there is a significant loss and dysfunction of cholinergic neurons within the BF, and also a hypertrophy of fibers containing the neuropeptide galanin. Understanding how galanin interacts with BF circuitry is critical in determining what role galanin overexpression plays in the progression of AD. Here, we examined the location and function of galanin in the medial septum/diagonal band (MS/DBB) region of the BF. We show that galanin fibers are located throughout the MS/DBB and intermingled with both cholinergic and GABAergic neurons. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings from MS/DBB neurons in acute slices reveal that galanin decreases tetrodotoxin-sensitive spontaneous GABA release and dampens muscarinic receptor-mediated increases in GABA release in the MS/DBB. These effects are not blocked by pre-exposure to β-amyloid peptide (Aβ1-42). Optogenetic activation of cholinergic neurons in the MS/DBB increases GABA release back onto cholinergic neurons, forming a functional circuit within the MS/DBB. Galanin disrupts this cholinergic-GABAergic circuit by blocking the cholinergic-induced increase in GABA release. These data suggest that galanin works in the BF to reduce inhibitory input onto cholinergic neurons and to prevent cholinergic-induced increase in inhibitory tone. This disinhibition of cholinergic neurons could serve as a compensatory mechanism to counteract the loss of cholinergic signaling that occurs during the progression of AD.

  16. Establishment of a Long-Term Chick Forebrain Neuronal Culture on a Microelectrode Array Platform.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Serena Y; Huang, Ting; Wang, Zhonghai; Lin, Yongliang; Kindy, Mark; Xi, Tingfei; Gao, Bruce Z

    2015-01-01

    The biosensor system formed by culturing primary animal neurons on a microelectrode array (MEA) platform is drawing an increasing research interest for its power as a rapid, sensitive, functional neurotoxicity assessment, as well as for many other electrophysiological related research purposes. In this paper, we established a long-term chick forebrain neuron culture (C-FBN-C) on MEAs with a more than 5 month long lifespan and up to 5 month long stability in morphology and physiological function; characterized the C-FBN-C morphologically, functionally, and developmentally; partially compared its functional features with rodent counterpart; and discussed its pros and cons as a novel biosensor system in comparison to rodent counterpart and human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs). Our results show that C-FBN-C on MEA platform 1) can be used as a biosensor of its own type in a wide spectrum of basic biomedical research; 2) is of value in comparative physiology in cross-species studies; and 3) may have potential to be used as an alternative, cost-effective approach to rodent counterpart within shared common functional domains (such as specific types of ligand-gated ion channel receptors and subtypes expressed in the cortical tissues of both species) in large-scale environmental neurotoxicant screening that would otherwise require millions of animals.

  17. Comparison and Optimization of hiPSC Forebrain Cortical Differentiation Protocols

    PubMed Central

    Callahan, Dana G.; Young-Pearse, Tracy L.

    2014-01-01

    Several protocols have been developed for human induced pluripotent stem cell neuronal differentiation. We compare several methods for forebrain cortical neuronal differentiation by assessing cell morphology, immunostaining and gene expression. We evaluate embryoid aggregate vs. monolayer with dual SMAD inhibition differentiation protocols, manual vs. AggreWell aggregate formation, plating substrates, neural progenitor cell (NPC) isolation methods, NPC maintenance and expansion, and astrocyte co-culture. The embryoid aggregate protocol, using a Matrigel substrate, consistently generates a high yield and purity of neurons. NPC isolation by manual selection, enzymatic rosette selection, or FACS all are efficient, but exhibit some differences in resulting cell populations. Expansion of NPCs as neural aggregates yields higher cell purity than expansion in a monolayer. Finally, co-culture of iPSC-derived neurons with astrocytes increases neuronal maturity by day 40. This study directly compares commonly employed methods for neuronal differentiation of iPSCs, and can be used as a resource for choosing between various differentiation protocols. PMID:25165848

  18. BDNF +/− Mice Exhibit Deficits in Oligodendrocyte Lineage Cells of the Basal Forebrain

    PubMed Central

    VonDran, Melissa W.; Clinton-Luke, Patricia; Honeywell, Jean Z.; Dreyfus, Cheryl F.

    2009-01-01

    Previous work indicated that BDNF, through the trkB receptor, increases DNA synthesis in oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) and differentiation of post-mitotic oligodendrocytes (OLGs) of the basal forebrain (BF). In the present studies, BDNF knockout animals were used to investigate BDNF’s effects on OLG lineage cells (OLCs) in vivo. OLCs of the BF were found to express the trkB receptor, suggesting they are responsive to BDNF. Immunohistochemistry using NG2 and CC1 antibodies was utilized to examine numbers of NG2+ OPCs and CC1+ post-mitotic BF OLGs. In the embryo (E17), BDNF −/− animals display reduced NG2+ cells. This reduction was also observed in BDNF +/− mice at E17 and at postnatal day 1 (P1), P14 and adult, suggesting that BDNF plays a role in OPC development. BDNF +/− mice do not exhibit deficits in numbers of CC1+ OLGs. However, myelin basic protein (MBP), myelin associated glycoprotein (MAG), and proteolipid protein (PLP) are reduced in BDNF +/− mice, suggesting that BDNF plays a role in differentiation. These data indicate that progenitor cells and myelin proteins may be affected in vivo by a decrease in BDNF. PMID:20091777

  19. Longitudinal measures of cholinergic forebrain atrophy in the transition from healthy aging to Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Grothe, Michel; Heinsen, Helmut; Teipel, Stefan

    2013-04-01

    Recent evidence from cross-sectional in vivo imaging studies suggests that atrophy of the cholinergic basal forebrain (BF) in Alzheimer's disease (AD) can be distinguished from normal age-related degeneration even at predementia stages of the disease. Longitudinal study designs are needed to specify the dynamics of BF degeneration in the transition from normal aging to AD. We applied recently developed techniques for in vivo volumetry of the BF to serial magnetic resonance imaging scans of 82 initially healthy elderly individuals (60-93 years) and 50 patients with very mild AD (Clinical Dementia Rating score = 0.5) that were clinically followed over an average of 3 ± 1.5 years. BF atrophy rates were found to be significantly higher than rates of global brain shrinkage even in cognitively stable healthy elderly individuals. Compared with healthy control subjects, very mild AD patients showed reduced BF volumes at baseline and increased volume loss over time. Atrophy of the BF was more pronounced in progressive patients compared with those that remained stable. The cholinergic BF undergoes disproportionate degeneration in the aging process, which is further increased by the presence of AD.

  20. Propagated but Topologically Distributed Forebrain Neurons Expressing Alpha-Synuclein in Aged Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Katsuo; Inoue, Ken-ichi; Kuroiwa, Yoshiyuki; Tanaka, Fumiaki; Takada, Masahiko

    2016-01-01

    In neurodegenerative disorders, such as Parkinson's disease (PD), alpha-synuclein (α-syn) accumulates to induce cell death and/or form a cytoplasmic inclusion called Lewy body (LB). This α-syn-related pathology is termed synucleinopathy. It remains unclear how α-syn accumulation expands during the progress of synucleinopathy in the human brain. In our study, we investigated the patterns of distribution and propagation of forebrain neurons expressing α-syn in aged macaques. It was found that the occurrence of α-syn-positive neurons proceeded topologically based on the midbrain dopamine pathways arising from the substantia nigra and the ventral tegmental area where they were primarily observed. In the nigrostriatal or mesolimbic dopamine pathway, the age-dependent increase in α-syn-positive neurons was evident in the striatum or the nucleus accumbens, respectively. Concerning the nigrostriatal pathway, a mediolateral or rostrocaudal gradient was seen in the substantia nigra or the striatum, respectively, and a compensatory increase in dopamine transporter occurred in the striatum regardless of the decreased dopamine level. In the mesocortical dopamine pathway, α-syn-positive neurons appeared in the prefrontal and then motor areas of the frontal lobe. Given that neither LB formation nor clinical phenotype manifestation was detected in any of the monkeys examined in the present study, aged macaques may be useful as a potential presymptomatic model for PD and LB-related neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:27861638

  1. Effect of paternal exposure to gamma rays on juvenile rat forebrain.

    PubMed

    Bálentová, Sona; Raceková, Eniko; Misúrová, Eva

    2007-01-01

    We studied the transgenerational effect of the sublethal dose of gamma radiation on the proliferative activity of cells in the rostral migratory stream (RMS) in the brain of neonatal and young progeny of male rats exposed to the dose of 3 Gy 25 days before conception with intact control females. To label proliferating cells, the progeny received bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) injection before sacrifice. The number of BrdU-positive cells was counted in three parts of the forebrain RMS, i.e. in the vertical arm, elbow and horizontal arm, at the 3rd, 7th, 14th, 21st and 28th postnatal days (P3-P28). In the RMS of control rats' progeny, the number of BrdU(+) cells transiently decreased at the 7th-14th postnatal days. In the progeny of irradiated rats, the dynamics of the changes was similar to that in the corresponding control groups, however, the number of BrdU-positive cells was significantly higher along the whole RMS at all intervals of investigation. These results suggest that paternal exposure to ionizing radiation induced the genome instability, which manifested itself in the progeny by alteration in proliferative activity or slackening of cell migration in the RMS.

  2. BDNF Overexpression in the Forebrain Rescues Huntington’s Disease Phenotypes in YAC128 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yuxiang; Hayden, Michael R.; Xu, Baoji

    2010-01-01

    Huntington’s disease (HD) is caused by an expansion of the polyglutamine tract at the amino-terminus of huntingtin. This mutation reduces levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the striatum, likely by inhibiting cortical Bdnf gene expression and anterograde transport of BDNF from the cerebral cortex to the striatum. Substantial evidence suggests that this reduction of striatal BDNF plays a crucial role in HD pathogenesis. Here we report that overexpression of BDNF in the forebrain rescues many disease phenotypes in YAC128 mice that express a full-length human huntingtin mutant with a 128-glutamine tract. The Bdnf transgene, under the control of the promoter for α subunit of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, greatly increased BDNF levels in the cerebral cortex and striatum. BDNF overexpression in YAC128 mice prevented loss and atrophy of striatal neurons and motor dysfunction, normalized expression of the striatal dopamine receptor D2 and enkephalin, and improved procedural learning. Furthermore, quantitative analyses of Golgi-impregnated neurons revealed a decreased spine density and abnormal spine morphology in striatal neurons of YAC128 mice, which was also reversed by increasing BDNF levels in the striatum. These results demonstrate that reduced striatal BDNF plays a crucial role in the HD pathogenesis and suggest that attempts to restore striatal BDNF level may have therapeutic effects to the disease. PMID:21048129

  3. Overexpression of SIRT1 in Mouse Forebrain Impairs Lipid/Glucose Metabolism and Motor Function

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Dongmei; Qiu, Yifu; Gao, Xiang; Yuan, Xiao-Bing; Zhai, Qiwei

    2011-01-01

    SIRT1 plays crucial roles in glucose and lipid metabolism, and has various functions in different tissues including brain. The brain-specific SIRT1 knockout mice display defects in somatotropic signaling, memory and synaptic plasticity. And the female mice without SIRT1 in POMC neuron are more sensitive to diet-induced obesity. Here we created transgenic mice overexpressing SIRT1 in striatum and hippocampus under the control of CaMKIIα promoter. These mice, especially females, exhibited increased fat accumulation accompanied by significant upregulation of adipogenic genes in white adipose tissue. Glucose tolerance of the mice was also impaired with decreased Glut4 mRNA levels in muscle. Moreover, the SIRT1 overexpressing mice showed decreased energy expenditure, and concomitantly mitochondria-related genes were decreased in muscle. In addition, these mice showed unusual spontaneous physical activity pattern, decreased activity in open field and rotarod performance. Further studies demonstrated that SIRT1 deacetylated IRS-2, and upregulated phosphorylation level of IRS-2 and ERK1/2 in striatum. Meanwhile, the neurotransmitter signaling in striatum and the expression of endocrine hormones in hypothalamus and serum T3, T4 levels were altered. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that SIRT1 in forebrain regulates lipid/glucose metabolism and motor function. PMID:21738790

  4. Divergent lactate dehydrogenase isoenzyme profile in cellular compartments of primate forebrain structures.

    PubMed

    Duka, Tetyana; Collins, Zachary; Anderson, Sarah M; Raghanti, Mary Ann; Ely, John J; Hof, Patrick R; Wildman, Derek E; Goodman, Morris; Grossman, Lawrence I; Sherwood, Chet C

    2017-07-01

    The compartmentalization and association of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) with specific cellular structures (e.g., synaptosomal, sarcoplasmic or mitochondrial) may play an important role in brain energy metabolism. Our previous research revealed that LDH in the synaptosomal fraction shifts toward the aerobic isoforms (LDH-B) among the large-brained haplorhine primates compared to strepsirrhines. Here, we further analyzed the subcellular localization of LDH in primate forebrain structures using quantitative Western blotting and ELISA. We show that, in cytosolic and mitochondrial subfractions, LDH-B expression level was relatively elevated and LDH-A declined in haplorhines compared to strepsirrhines. LDH-B expression in mitochondrial fractions of the neocortex was preferentially increased, showing a particularly significant rise in the ratio of LDH-B to LDH-A in chimpanzees and humans. We also found a significant correlation between the protein levels of LDH-B in mitochondrial fractions from haplorhine neocortex and the synaptosomal LDH-B that suggests LDH isoforms shift from a predominance of A-subunits toward B-subunits as part of a system that spatially buffers dynamic energy requirements of brain cells. Our results indicate that there is differential subcellular compartmentalization of LDH isoenzymes that evolved among different primate lineages to meet the energy requirements in neocortical and striatal cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Effect of prenatal sound stimulation on medio-rostral neostriatum/hyperstriatum ventrale region of chick forebrain: a morphometric and immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Panicker, Harsha; Wadhwa, Shashi; Roy, Tara S

    2002-07-01

    The higher auditory association area in chick forebrain, i.e. medio-rostral neostriatum/hyperstriatum ventrale region (MNH), is involved in juvenile auditory filial imprinting. Studies show that neuronal size as well as expression of calcium-binding proteins, parvalbumin (PV) and calbindin D28K (CaBP) are regulated by neuronal activation. In the present study, we have determined the effect of extra auditory stimulation, given as a prenatal sound enrichment protocol, on MNH neurons of posthatch day 1 chicks. Patterned species-specific or musical (sitar) sounds were provided in a graded manner from embryonic day 10 through hatching. Thionin and immunohistochemically stained (PV and CaBP) neurons were evaluated by morphometric methods. The thionin-stained MNH neurons of both the auditory stimulated groups showed a significant increase in nuclear area compared to controls. The change in nuclear dimension was greater in the music-stimulated than in the species-specific sounds-stimulated group. These observations indicate a positive influence of prenatal sound stimulation on MNH neurons. The auditory stimulated groups also demonstrated an increase in the proportion of PV- and CaBP-neurons compared to controls, with the species-specific sounds-stimulated group showing a significantly higher percentage of immunostained cells than the music-stimulated group. However, immunostained cells of both the auditory stimulated groups did not show a significant change in size. These cytoplasmic proteins, by acting as intracellular buffers, enable neurons to display high electrical activity without calcium overload. The influx of Ca(2+) ions is essential for long-term potentiation, a phenomenon important for learning and memory. The increase in percentage of the neurons containing calcium-binding proteins may provide a morphological basis for enhancement of auditory imprinting and learning.

  6. Tenoxicam exerts a neuroprotective action after cerebral ischemia in rats.

    PubMed

    Galvão, Rita I M; Diógenes, João P L; Maia, Graziela C L; Filho, Emídio A S; Vasconcelos, Silvânia M M; de Menezes, Dalgimar B; Cunha, Geanne M A; Viana, Glauce S B

    2005-01-01

    In this study we investigated the effects of Tenoxicam, a type 2 cyclooxygenase (COX-2) inhibitor, on brain damage induced by ischemia-reperfusion. Male Wistar rats (18-month old average) were anesthetized and submitted to ischemia occlusion of both common carotid arteries (BCAO) for 45 min. After 24 h of reperfusion, rats were decapitated and hippocampi removed for further assays. Animals were divided into sham-operated, ischemia, ischemia + Tenoxicam 2.5 mg/kg, and ischemia + Tenoxicam 10 mg/kg groups. Tenoxicam was administered intraperitoneally immediately after BCAO. Histological analyses show that ischemia produced significant striatal as well as hippocampal lesions which were reversed by the Tenoxicam treatment. Tenoxicam also significantly reduced, to control levels, the increased myeloperoxidase activity in hippocampus homogenates observed after ischemia. However, nitrite concentrations showed only a tendency to decrease in the ischemia + Tenoxicam groups, as compared to that of ischemia alone. On the other hand, hippocampal glutamate and aspartate levels were not altered by Tenoxicam. In conclusion, we showed that ischemia is certainly related to inflammation and to increased free radical production, and selective COX-2 inhibitors might be neuroprotective agents of potential benefit in the treatment of cerebral brain ischemia.

  7. [Epidemiology of critical ischemia of the limbs].