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Sample records for gradient tracer test

  1. Evaluation of longitudinal dispersivity estimates from forced-gradient tracer tests in heterogeneous aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tiedeman, C.R.; Hsieh, P.A.

    2002-01-01

    Converging radial-flow and two-well tracer tests are simulated in two-dimensional aquifers to investigate the effects of heterogeneity and forced-gradient test configuration on longitudinal dispersivity (??L) estimates, and to compare ??L estimates from forced-gradient tests with ??L values that characterize solute spreading under natural-gradient flow. Results indicate that in mildly heterogeneous aquifers, for tests with relatively large tracer transport distances, ??L estimates from the two test types are generally similar, and are also similar to ??L values determined from natural-gradient tracer simulations. In highly heterogeneous aquifers, ??L estimates from two-well tests are generally larger than those from radial-flow tests, and the ??L estimates from both test types are typically smaller than the ??L values determined from natural-gradient simulations.

  2. Evaluation of longitudinal dispersivity estimates from forced-gradient tracer tests in heterogeneous aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tiedeman, C.R.; Hsieh, P.A.

    2002-01-01

    Converging radial-flow and two-well tracer tests are simulated in two-dimensional aquifers to investigate the effects of heterogeneity and forced-gradient test configuration on longitudinal dispersivity (??L) estimates, and to compare ??L estimates from forced-gradient tests with ??L values that characterize solute spreading under natural-gradient flow. Results indicate that in both mildly and highly heterogeneous aquifers, ??L estimates from two-well tests are generally larger than those from radial-flow tests. In mildly heterogeneous aquifers, ??L estimates from two-well tests with relatively large tracer transport distances are similar to ??L values from natural-gradient simulations. In highly heterogeneous aquifers, ??L estimates from two-well tests at all tracer transport distances are typically smaller than ??L values from natural-gradient simulations.

  3. Forced and natural gradient tracer tests in a highly heterogeneous porous aquifer: instrumentation and measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ptak, T.; Teutsch, G.

    1994-07-01

    At the Horkheimer Insel experimental field site, several short to intermediate distance forced and natural gradient tracer tests with depth-integrated and multilevel sampling were conducted to characterize the aquifer transport properties. Compared with other test sites, the aquifer at the Horkheimer Insel is highly heterogeneous and highly conductive. Hence, new tracer measurement techniques had to be developed. This paper presents some of the instrumentation developed together with measurements and their initial interpretation. The results demonstrate that for contaminant transport predictions in highly heterogeneous and highly conductive aquifers, investigation techniques with a high resolution in time and space are needed. The aquifer heterogeneity is evident from the spatial variability of peak concentration, transport velocity and longitudinal macrodispersivity values obtained from the tracer tests. Furthermore, the tracer test results indicate that at the observation scale investigated, a complex numerical flow and transport model is needed to describe adequately mass transport within the heterogeneous aquifer.

  4. Combined use of heat and saline tracer to estimate aquifer properties in a forced gradient test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colombani, N.; Giambastiani, B. M. S.; Mastrocicco, M.

    2015-06-01

    Usually electrolytic tracers are employed for subsurface characterization, but the interpretation of tracer test data collected by low cost techniques, such as electrical conductivity logging, can be biased by cation exchange reactions. To characterize the aquifer transport properties a saline and heat forced gradient test was employed. The field site, located near Ferrara (Northern Italy), is a well characterized site, which covers an area of 200 m2 and is equipped with a grid of 13 monitoring wells. A two-well (injection and pumping) system was employed to perform the forced gradient test and a straddle packer was installed in the injection well to avoid in-well artificial mixing. The contemporary continuous monitor of hydraulic head, electrical conductivity and temperature within the wells permitted to obtain a robust dataset, which was then used to accurately simulate injection conditions, to calibrate a 3D transient flow and transport model and to obtain aquifer properties at small scale. The transient groundwater flow and solute-heat transport model was built using SEAWAT. The result significance was further investigated by comparing the results with already published column experiments and a natural gradient tracer test performed in the same field. The test procedure shown here can provide a fast and low cost technique to characterize coarse grain aquifer properties, although some limitations can be highlighted, such as the small value of the dispersion coefficient compared to values obtained by natural gradient tracer test, or the fast depletion of heat signal due to high thermal diffusivity.

  5. In situ measurement of methane oxidation in groundwater by using natural-gradient tracer tests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, R.L.; Howes, B.L.; Garabedian, S.P.

    1991-01-01

    Methane oxidation was measured in an unconfined sand and gravel aquifer (Cape Cod, Mass.) by using in situ natural-gradient tracer tests at both a pristine, oxygenated site and an anoxic, sewage-contaminated site. The tracer sites were equipped with multilevel sampling devices to create target grids of sampling points; the injectate was prepared with groundwater from the tracer site to maintain the same geochemical conditions. Methane oxidation was calculated from breakthrough curves of methane relative to halide and inert gas (hexafluoroethane) tracers and was confirmed by the appearance of 13C-enriched carbon dioxide in experiments in which 13C-enriched methane was used as the tracer. A V(max) for methane oxidation could be calculated when the methane concentration was sufficiently high to result in zero-order kinetics throughout the entire transport interval. Methane breakthrough curves could be simulated by modifying a one-dimensional advection-dispersion transport model to include a Michaelis-Menten-based consumption term for methane oxidation. The K(m) values for methane oxidation that gave the best match for the breakthrough curve peaks were 6.0 and 9.0 ??M for the uncontaminated and contaminated sites, respectively. Natural-gradient tracer tests are a promising approach for assessing microbial processes and for testing in situ bioremediation potential in groundwater systems.

  6. Evaluation of longitudinal dispersivity estimates from simulated forced- and natural-gradient tracer tests in heterogeneous aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tiedeman, C.R.; Hsieh, P.A.

    2004-01-01

    We simulate three types of forced-gradient tracer tests (converging radial flow, unequal strength two well, and equal strength two well) and natural-gradient tracer tests in multiple realizations of heterogeneous two-dimensional aquifers with a hydraulic conductivity distribution characterized by a spherical variogram. We determine longitudinal dispersivities (??L) by analysis of forced-gradient test breakthrough curves at the pumped well and by spatial moment analysis of tracer concentrations during the natural-gradient tests. Results show that among the forced-gradient tests, a converging radial-flow test tends to yield the smallest ??L, an equal strength two-well test tends to yield the largest ??L, and an unequal strength two-well test tends to yield an intermediate value. This finding is qualitatively explained by considering the aquifer area sampled by a particular test. A converging radial-flow test samples a small area, and thus the tracer undergoes a low degree of spreading and mixing. An equal strength two-well test samples a much larger area, so the tracer is spread and mixed to a greater degree. Results also suggest that if the distance between the tracer source well and the pumped well is short relative to the lengths over which velocity is correlated, then the ??L estimate can be highly dependent on local heterogeneities in the vicinity of the wells. Finally, results indicate that ??L estimated from forced-gradient tracer tests can significantly underestimate the ??L needed to characterize solute dispersion under natural-gradient flow. Only a two-well tracer test with a large well separation in an aquifer with a low degree of heterogeneity can yield a value of ??L that characterizes natural-gradient tracer spreading. This suggests that a two-well test with a large well separation is the preferred forced-gradient test for characterizing solute dispersion under natural-gradient flow.

  7. A note on the recent natural gradient tracer test at the Borden site

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naff, R.L.; Yeh, T.-C.J.; Kemblowski, M.W.

    1988-01-01

    The variance in particle position, a measure of dispersion, is reviewed in the context of certain models of flow in random porous media. Asymptotic results for a highly stratified medium and an isotropic medium are particularly highlighted. Results of the natural gradient tracer test at the Borden site are reviewed in light of these models. This review suggests that the moments obtained for the conservative tracers could as well be explained by a model that more explicitly represents the three-dimensional nature of the flow field. -Authors

  8. Comparison of denitrification activity measurements in groundwater using cores and natural-gradient tracer tests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, R.L.; Garabedian, S.P.; Brooks, M.H.

    1996-01-01

    The transport of many solutes in groundwater is dependent upon the relative rates of physical flow and microbial metabolism. Quantifying rates of microbial processes under subsurface conditions is difficult and is most commonly approximated using laboratory studies with aquifer materials. In this study, we measured in situ rates of denitrification in a nitrate- contaminated aquifer using small-scale, natural-gradient tracer tests and compared the results with rates obtained from laboratory incubations with aquifer core material. Activity was measured using the acetylene block technique. For the tracer tests, co-injection of acetylene and bromide into the aquifer produced a 30 ??M increase in nitrous oxide after 10 m of transport (23-30 days). An advection-dispersion transport model was modified to include an acetylene-dependent nitrous oxide production term and used to simulate the tracer breakthrough curves. The model required a 4-day lag period and a relatively low sensitivity to acetylene to match the narrow nitrous oxide breakthrough curves. Estimates of in situ denitrification rates were 0.60 and 1.51 nmol of N2O produced cm-3 aquifer day-1 for two successive tests. Aquifer core material collected from the tracer test site and incubated as mixed slurries in flasks and as intact cores yielded rates that were 1.2-26 times higher than the tracer test rate estimates. Results with the coring-dependent techniques were variable and subject to the small- scale heterogeneity within the aquifer, while the tracer tests integrated the heterogeneity along a flow path, giving a rate estimate that is more applicable to transport at the scale of the aquifer.

  9. Evaluation of Heat as a Tracer in a Forced-Gradient Test at the MADE Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, A.; Tick, G. R.; Keasberry, A.; Zheng, C.

    2011-12-01

    Tracer tests conducted at the Macrodispersion Experiment (MADE) site in Columbus Air Force Base in Mississippi have contributed significantly to the understanding of contaminant transport processes in highly-heterogeneous media. Previous experiments have revealed a network of interconnected preferential flow paths within the underlying aquifer. Only solute tracers including bromide and tritium have been used in previous experiments. In this new study, a forced-gradient experiment based on heated water injection was conducted to evaluate the feasibility of heat as a substitute for a solute tracer to study aquifer heterogeneity at the MADE site. We injected a pulse of heated water, recorded the breakthrough curves, and used numerical modeling to characterize the heat transport behavior and its relationship to subsurface heterogeneity. The results were compared with those from a previous experiment based on the bromide tracer. This research suggests heat can be a cheaper and environmentally-friendly alternative to traditional solute tracers, and improves our understanding of contaminant transport processes in highly-heterogeneous systems.

  10. Large-scale natural gradient tracer test in sand and gravel, Cape Cod, Massachusetts: 2. Analysis of spatial moments for a nonreactive tracer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garabedian, Stephen P.; LeBlanc, Dennis R.; Gelhar, Lynn W.; Celia, Michael A.

    1991-01-01

    A large-scale natural gradient tracer test was conducted to examine the transport of reactive and nonreactive tracers in a sand and gravel aquifer on Cape Cod, Massachusetts. As part of this test the transport of bromide, a nonreactive tracer, was monitored for about 280 m and quantified using spatial moments. The calculated mass of bromide for each sampling date varied between 85% and 105% of the injected mass using an estimated porosity of 0.39, and the center of mass moved at a nearly constant horizontal velocity of 0.42 m per day. A nonlinear change in the bromide longitudinal variance was observed during the first 26 m of travel distance, but afterward the variance followed a linear trend, indicating the longitudinal dispersivity had reached a constant value of 0.96 m. The transverse dispersivities were much smaller; transverse horizontal dispersivity was 1.8 cm, and transverse vertical dispersivity was about 1.5 mm.

  11. LARGE-SCALE NATURAL GRADIENT TRACER TEST IN SAND AND GRAVEL, CAPE COD, MASSACHUSETTS - 1. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN AND OBSERVED TRACER MOVEMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    A large-scale natural gradient tracer experiment was conducted on Cape Cod, Massachusetts, to examine the transport and dispersion of solutes in a sand and gravel aquifer. The nonreactive tracer, bromide, and the reactive tracers, lithium and molybdate, were injected as a pulse i...

  12. LARGE-SCALE NATURAL GRADIENT TRACER TEST IN SAND AND GRAVEL, CAPE COD, MASSACHUSETTS - 1. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN AND OBSERVED TRACER MOVEMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    A large-scale natural gradient tracer experiment was conducted on Cape Cod, Massachusetts, to examine the transport and dispersion of solutes in a sand and gravel aquifer. The nonreactive tracer, bromide, and the reactive tracers, lithium and molybdate, were injected as a pulse i...

  13. Investigation of small-scale preferential flow with a forced-gradient tracer test.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Marco; Zheng, Chunmiao; Tick, Geoffrey R; Gorelick, Steven M

    2011-01-01

    A new tracer experiment (referred to as MADE-5) was conducted at the well-known Macrodispersion Experiment (MADE) site to investigate the influence of small-scale mass-transfer and dispersion processes on well-to-well transport. The test was performed under dipole forced-gradient flow conditions and concentrations were monitored in an extraction well and in two multilevel sampler (MLS) wells located at 6, 1.5, and 3.75 m from the source, respectively. The shape of the breakthrough curve (BTC) measured at the extraction well is strongly asymmetric showing a rapidly arriving peak and an extensive late-time tail. The BTCs measured at seven different depths in the two MLSs are radically different from one another in terms of shape, arrival times, and magnitude of the concentration peaks. All of these characteristics indicate the presence of a complex network of preferential flow pathways controlling solute transport at the test site. Field-experimental data were also used to evaluate two transport models: a stochastic advection-dispersion model (ADM) based on conditional multivariate Gaussian realizations of the hydraulic conductivity field and a dual-domain single-rate (DDSR) mass-transfer model based on a deterministic reconstruction of the aquifer heterogeneity. Unlike the stochastic ADM realizations, the DDSR accurately predicted the magnitude of the concentration peak and its arrival time (within a 1.5% error). For the multilevel BTCs between the injection and extraction wells, neither model reproduced the observed values, indicating that a high-resolution characterization of the aquifer heterogeneity at the subdecimeter scale would be needed to fully capture 3D transport details. Copyright © 2010 The Author(s). Journal compilation © 2010 National Ground Water Association.

  14. Large-scale natural gradient tracer test in sand and gravel, Cape Cod, Massachusetts: 1. Experimental design and observed tracer movement

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    LeBlanc, Denis R.; Garabedian, Stephen P.; Hess, Kathryn M.; Gelhar, Lynn W.; Quadri, Richard D.; Stollenwerk, Kenneth G.; Wood, Warren W.

    1991-01-01

    A large-scale natural gradient tracer experiment was conducted on Cape Cod, Massachusetts, to examine the transport and dispersion of solutes in a sand and gravel aquifer. The nonreactive tracer, bromide, and the reactive tracers, lithium and molybdate, were injected as a pulse in July 1985 and monitored in three dimensions as they moved as far as 280 m down-gradient through an array of multilevel samplers. The bromide cloud moved horizontally at a rate of 0.42 m per day. It also moved downward about 4 m because of density-induced sinking early in the test and accretion of areal recharge from precipitation. After 200 m of transport, the bromide cloud had spread more than 80 m in the direction of flow, but was only 14 m wide and 4–6 m thick. The lithium and molybdate clouds followed the same path as the bromide cloud, but their rates of movement were retarded about 50% relative to bromide movement because of sorption onto the sediments.

  15. Assessing denitrification in groundwater using natural gradient tracer tests with 15N: In situ measurement of a sequential multistep reaction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, R.L.; Böhlke, J.K.; Garabedian, S.P.; Revesz, K.M.; Yoshinari, T.

    2004-01-01

    Denitrification was measured within a nitrate-contaminated aquifer on Cape Cod, Massachusetts, using natural gradient tracer tests with 15N nitrate. The aquifer contained zones of relatively high concentrations of nitrite (up to 77 ??M) and nitrous oxide (up to 143 ??M) and has been the site of previous studies examining ground water denitrification using the acetylene block technique. Small-scale (15-24 m travel distance) tracer tests were conducted by injecting 15N nitrate and bromide as tracers into a depth interval that contained nitrate, nitrite, nitrous oxide, and excess nitrogen gas. The timing of the bromide breakthrough curves at down-gradient wells matched peaks in 15N abundance above background for nitrate, nitrite, nitrous oxide, and nitrogen gas after more than 40 days of travel. Results were simulated with a one-dimensional transport model using linked reaction kinetics for the individual steps of the denitrification reaction pathway. It was necessary to include within the model spatial variations in background concentrations of all nitrogen oxide species. The model indicated that nitrite production (0.036-0.047 ??mol N (L aquifer)-1 d -1) was faster than the subsequent denitrification steps (0.013-0.016 ??mol N (L aquifer)-1 d-1 for nitrous oxide and 0.013-0.020 ??mol N (L aquifer)-1 d-1 for nitrogen gas) and that the total rate of reaction was slower than indicated by both acetylene block tracer tests and laboratory incubations. The rate of nitrate removal by denitrification was much slower than the rate of transport, indicating that nitrate would migrate several kilometers down-gradient before being completely consumed.

  16. Fate and transport of linear alkylbenzenesulfonate in a sewage- contaminated aquifer: A comparison of natural-gradient pulsed tracer tests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krueger, C.J.; Barber, L.B.; Metge, D.W.; Field, J.A.

    1998-01-01

    Two natural-gradient tracer tests were conducted to determine the transport and biodegradation behavior of linear alkylbenzenesulfonate (LAS) surfactant under in situ conditions in a sewage-contaminated aquifer. The tests were conducted in two biogeochemically distinct zones of the aquifer: (1) an aerobic uncontaminated zone (oxic zone) and (2) a moderately aerobic, sewage-contaminated zone (transition zone). Chromatographic separation of the surfactant mixture was observed in both zones and attributed to the retardation of the longer alkyl chain homologues during transport. No significant loss of IAS mass was observed for the oxic zone while 20% of the LAS mass injected into the transition zone was removed due to biodegradation. Biodegradation preferentially removed the longer alkyl chain homologues and the external isomers (i.e., 2- and 3-phenyl). The removal of LAS mass coincided with a decrease in dissolved oxygen concentrations, the appearance of LAS metabolites, and an increase in the number of free-living bacteria with a concomitant change in bacteria morphology. The formation of LAS metabolites accounted for 86% of the LAS mass removed in the transition zone. Over the duration of the test, sorption and biodegradation enriched the LAS mixture in the more water-soluble and biologically resistant components.Two natural-gradient tracer tests were conducted to determine the transport and biodegradation behavior of linear alkylbenzenesulfonate (LAS) surfactant under in situ conditions in a sewage-contaminated aquifer. The tests were conducted in two biogeochemically distinct zones of the aquifer: (1) an aerobic uncontaminated zone (oxic zone) and (2) a moderately aerobic, sewage-contaminated zone (transition zone). Chromatographic separation of the surfactant mixture was observed in both zones and attributed to the retardation of the longer alkyl chain homologues during transport. No significant loss of LAS mass was observed for the oxic zone while 20% of the LAS

  17. Design and analysis of a natural-gradient ground-water tracer test in a freshwater tidal wetland, West Branch Canal Creek, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olsen, Lisa D.; Tenbus, Frederick J.

    2005-01-01

    A natural-gradient ground-water tracer test was designed and conducted in a tidal freshwater wetland at West Branch Canal Creek, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. The objectives of the test were to characterize solute transport at the site, obtain data to more accurately determine the ground-water velocity in the upper wetland sediments, and to compare a conservative, ionic tracer (bromide) to a volatile tracer (sulfur hexafluoride) to ascertain whether volatilization could be an important process in attenuating volatile organic compounds in the ground water. The tracer test was conducted within the upper peat unit of a layer of wetland sediments that also includes a lower clayey unit; the combined layer overlies an aquifer. The area selected for the test was thought to have an above-average rate of ground-water discharge based on ground-water head distributions and near-surface detections of volatile organic compounds measured in previous studies. Because ground-water velocities in the wetland sediments were expected to be slow compared to the underlying aquifer, the test was designed to be conducted on a small scale. Ninety-seven ?-inch-diameter inverted-screen stainless-steel piezometers were installed in a cylindrical array within approximately 25 cubic feet (2.3 cubic meters) of wetland sediments, in an area with a vertically upward hydraulic gradient. Fluorescein dye was used to qualitatively evaluate the hydrologic integrity of the tracer array before the start of the tracer test, including verifying the absence of hydraulic short-circuiting due to nonnatural vertical conduits potentially created during piezometer installation. Bromide and sulfur hexafluoride tracers (0.139 liter of solution containing 100,000 milligrams per liter of bromide ion and 23.3 milligrams per liter of sulfur hexafluoride) were co-injected and monitored to generate a dataset that could be used to evaluate solute transport in three dimensions. Piezometers were sampled 2 to 15 times

  18. Merging single-well and inter-well tracer tests into one forced-gradient dipole test, at the Heletz site within the MUSTANG project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrens, Horst; Ghergut, Julia; Bensabat, Jac; Niemi, Auli; Licha, Tobias; Ptak, Thomas; Sauter, Martin

    2014-05-01

    The Heletz site[1] in Israel was chosen for conducting a CO2 transport experiment within the MUSTANG project[2], whose aim is to demonstrate and validate leading-edge techniques for CCS site characterization, process monitoring and risk assessment. The major CO2 injection experiment at Heletz was supposed to be preceded and accompanied by a sequence of single-well 'push-then-pull' (SW) and inter-well (IW) tracer tests, aimed at characterizing transport properties of the storage formation, in accordance to a number of general and specific principles[3],[4]. - Instead of the rather luxurious {SW1, IW1, SW2, IW2} test sequence described in our previous work[5], we now propose a drastically economized tracer test concept, which lets the sampling stages of SW and IW tests merge into a single fluid production stage, and relies on a forced-gradient dipole flow field at any time of the overall test. Besides cost reduction, this economized design also improves on operational aspects, as well as on issues of parameter ambiguity and of scale disparity between SW and IW flow fields: (i) the new design renders SW test results more representative for the aquifer sector ('angle') actually interrogated by the IW dipole test; (ii) the new design saves time and costs on the SW test (fluid sampling for SW 'pull' now being conducted simultaneously with IW-related sampling and monitoring), while allowing for a considerably longer duration of SW 'pull' signals than had originally been intended, whose late-time tailings help improve the quantification of non-advective processes and parameters, which are of great relevance to mid- and long-term trapping mechanisms ('residual trapping', 'mineral trapping'); (iii) the quasi-simultaneous execution of fluid injection/production for the IW and SW tests considerably reduces the overall hydraulic imbalance that was originally associated with the SW test, thus preventing formation damage and supporting hydrogeomechanical stability; (iv) the new

  19. Identification of small-scale low and high permeability layers using single well forced-gradient tracer tests: fluorescent dye imaging and modelling at the laboratory-scale.

    PubMed

    Barns, Gareth L; Thornton, Steven F; Wilson, Ryan D

    2015-01-01

    Heterogeneity in aquifer permeability, which creates paths of varying mass flux and spatially complex contaminant plumes, can complicate the interpretation of contaminant fate and transport in groundwater. Identifying the location of high mass flux paths is critical for the reliable estimation of solute transport parameters and design of groundwater remediation schemes. Dipole flow tracer tests (DFTTs) and push-pull tests (PPTs) are single well forced-gradient tests which have been used at field-scale to estimate aquifer hydraulic and transport properties. In this study, the potential for PPTs and DFTTs to resolve the location of layered high- and low-permeability layers in granular porous media was investigated with a pseudo 2-D bench-scale aquifer model. Finite element fate and transport modelling was also undertaken to identify appropriate set-ups for in situ tests to determine the type, magnitude, location and extent of such layered permeability contrasts at the field-scale. The characteristics of flow patterns created during experiments were evaluated using fluorescent dye imaging and compared with the breakthrough behaviour of an inorganic conservative tracer. The experimental results show that tracer breakthrough during PPTs is not sensitive to minor permeability contrasts for conditions where there is no hydraulic gradient. In contrast, DFTTs are sensitive to the type and location of permeability contrasts in the host media and could potentially be used to establish the presence and location of high or low mass flux paths. Numerical modelling shows that the tracer peak breakthrough time and concentration in a DFTT is sensitive to the magnitude of the permeability contrast (defined as the permeability of the layer over the permeability of the bulk media) between values of 0.01-20. DFTTs are shown to be more sensitive to deducing variations in the contrast, location and size of aquifer layered permeability contrasts when a shorter central packer is used

  20. Differences in the scale dependence of dispersivity and retardation factors estimated from forced-gradient and uniform flow tracer tests in three-dimensional physically and chemically heterogeneous porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernàndez-Garcia, Daniel; Illangasekare, Tissa H.; Rajaram, Harihar

    2005-03-01

    Parameters estimated from forced-gradient tracer tests are often used to simulate the transport of large contaminant plumes under natural gradients, yet the difference in the flow system and the plume size is important. Recent intermediate-scale experiments and numerical simulations in two dimensions have suggested that dispersivities from forced-gradient tracer tests involving a small source may not be adequate to simulate the migration of a large plume under natural-gradient conditions. The differences in the scale dependence of effective dispersivities Aeff (for conservative and linearly sorbing solutes) and retardation factors Reff due to changes in the flow configuration and source size are investigated here on the basis of numerical simulations in three-dimensional physically and chemically heterogeneous porous media. It is shown that discrepancies observed in two dimensions due to small-source size and nonuniform flow conditions are not so dramatic in typical field settings because a small vertical correlation scale permits a tracer source to sample the medium heterogeneity more effectively. We further analyzed the benefit of using multiple injections in tracer tests by evaluating (1) the reduction in dispersivity due to the small-source size and (2) the uncertainty in dispersivity estimates (coefficient of variation). The distance scales at which Aeff and Reff from single and multiple injection convergent flow tracer tests approach constant values are significantly greater than analogous values for natural gradients. When dispersivities are estimated from convergent flow tracer tests involving multiple injections, asymptotic Aeff values are the same as those obtained from large-source natural-gradient tests. In both convergent flows and natural-gradient systems, in the case of a negative correlation between lnK and lnKd random fields, Reff estimated from temporal moments of breakthrough curves decrease with distance, while Reff estimated from the center of

  1. Assessing the effect of natural attenuation on oxygen consumption processes in a sewage-contaminated aquifer by use of a natural-gradient tracer test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathisen, P. P.; Kent, D. B.; Smith, R. L.; Barber, L. B.; Harvey, R. W.; Metge, D. W.; Hess, K. M.; Leblanc, D. R.; Koch, J. C.

    2003-12-01

    Processes associated with aquifer restoration subsequent to cessation of treated-sewage loading in a sand and gravel aquifer are being investigated at the USGS Toxic Substances Hydrology Site on Cape Cod, MA. Restoration has been slow because of significant oxygen depletion resulting from biogeochemical processes associated with residual sorbed pools of organic carbon, ammonium, and reduced metals in the aquifer. The in situ interaction of the physical, chemical, and biological processes governing oxygen consumption was examined by using a natural-gradient tracer test in fall 2001, 6 years after sewage disposal had been discontinued. Ground water with a high dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration was withdrawn from an uncontaminated zone of the aquifer and re-injected with a conservative tracer, bromide, into an anoxic zone directly below a former sewage-effluent disposal bed where Fe and sulfide concentrations were below detection and the DO was less than 5 uM. An injection with negligible ammonium, a nitrate concentration of 22 uM, and DO of approximately 260 uM was maintained at approximately 15 L/hr for a period of 75 days. An array of multi-level samplers (MLS), placed at distances ranging from 1 to 7 m down-gradient from the injection well, was sampled prior to and throughout the 75-day injection, and during a 25-day period after the injection. Water samples from the MLS were analyzed for DO and a variety of aqueous constituents. The DO decreased from approximately 260 uM to 210 uM over 7 m of transport, indicating the presence of rate-limited oxygen consumption. An increase in nitrate from 22 to approximately 36 uM indicated the presence of rate-limited ammonium oxidation. However, this ammonium oxidation was not sufficient to account for all of the DO consumption. Further characterization of these processes was accomplished by use of PHREEQC, a one-dimensional, geochemical reactive transport model. The 1D model is based on an ion association model for aqueous

  2. Journal: Efficient Hydrologic Tracer-Test Design for Tracer ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Hydrological tracer testing is the most reliable diagnostic technique available for the determination of basic hydraulic and geometric parameters necessary for establishing operative solute-transport processes. Tracer-test design can be difficult because of a lack of prior knowledge of the basic hydraulic and geometric parameters desired and the appropriate tracer mass to release. A new efficient hydrologic tracer-test design (EHTD) methodology has been developed to facilitate the design of tracer tests by root determination of the one-dimensional advection-dispersion equation (ADE) using a preset average tracer concentration which provides a theoretical basis for an estimate of necessary tracer mass. The method uses basic measured field parameters (e.g., discharge, distance, cross-sectional area) that are combined in functional relatipnships that descrive solute-transport processes related to flow velocity and time of travel. These initial estimates for time of travel and velocity are then applied to a hypothetical continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) as an analog for the hydrological-flow system to develop initial estimates for tracer concentration, tracer mass, and axial dispersion. Application of the predicted tracer mass with the hydraulic and geometric parameters in the ADE allows for an approximation of initial sample-collection time and subsequent sample-collection frequency where a maximum of 65 samples were determined to be necessary for descri

  3. Tracer-Test Planning Using the Efficient Hydrologic Tracer ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Hydrological tracer testing is the most reliable diagnostic technique available for establishing flow trajectories and hydrologic connections and for determining basic hydraulic and geometric parameters necessary for establishing operative solute-transport processes. Tracer-test design can be difficult because of a lack of prior knowledge of the basic hydraulic and geometric parameters desired and the appropriate tracer mass to release. A new efficient hydrologic tracer-test design (EHTD) methodology has been developed that combines basic measured field parameters (e.g., discharge, distance, cross-sectional area) in functional relationships that describe solute-transport processes related to flow velocity and time of travel. The new method applies these initial estimates for time of travel and velocity to a hypothetical continuously stirred tank reactor as an analog for the hydrologic flow system to develop initial estimates for tracer concentration and axial dispersion, based on a preset average tracer concentration. Root determination of the one-dimensional advection-dispersion equation (ADE) using the preset average tracer concentration then provides a theoretical basis for an estimate of necessary tracer mass.Application of the predicted tracer mass with the hydraulic and geometric parameters in the ADE allows for an approximation of initial sample-collection time and subsequent sample-collection frequency where a maximum of 65 samples were determined to be

  4. Tracers and Tracer Testing: Design, Implementation, Tracer Selection, and Interpretation Methods

    SciTech Connect

    G. Michael Shook; Shannon L.; Allan Wylie

    2004-01-01

    Conducting a successful tracer test requires adhering to a set of steps. The steps include identifying appropriate and achievable test goals, identifying tracers with the appropriate properties, and implementing the test as designed. When these steps are taken correctly, a host of tracer test analysis methods are available to the practitioner. This report discusses the individual steps required for a successful tracer test and presents methods for analysis. The report is an overview of tracer technology; the Suggested Reading section offers references to the specifics of test design and interpretation.

  5. Tracer tests in geothermal resource management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Axelsson, G.

    2013-05-01

    Geothermal reinjection involves injecting energy-depleted fluid back into geothermal systems, providing an effective mode of waste-water disposal as well as supplementary fluid recharge. Cooling of production boreholes is one of the main disadvantages associated with reinjection, however. Tracer testing is an important tool for reinjection studies because tracer tests actually have a predictive power since tracer transport is orders of magnitude faster than cold-front advancement around reinjection boreholes. A simple and efficient method of tracer test interpretation, assuming specific flow channels connecting reinjection and production boreholes, is available. It simulates tracer return profiles and estimates properties of the flow channels, which are consequently used for predicting the production borehole cooling. Numerous examples are available worldwide on the successful application of tracer tests in geothermal management, many involving the application of this interpretation technique. Tracer tests are also used for general subsurface hydrological studies in geothermal systems and for flow rate measurements in two-phase geothermal pipelines. The tracers most commonly used in geothermal applications are fluorescent dyes, chemical substances and radioactive isotopes. New temperature-resistant tracers have also been introduced and high-tech tracers are being considered.

  6. Tracer-Test Planning Using the Efficient Hydrologic Tracer-Test Design (Ehtd) Program (2003)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydrological tracer testing is the most reliable diagnostic technique available for establishing flow trajectories and hydrologic connections and for determining basic hydraulic and geometric parameters necessary for establishing operative solute-transport processes. Tracer-test ...

  7. Tracer-Test Planning Using the Efficient Hydrologic Tracer-Test Design (Ehtd) Program (2003)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydrological tracer testing is the most reliable diagnostic technique available for establishing flow trajectories and hydrologic connections and for determining basic hydraulic and geometric parameters necessary for establishing operative solute-transport processes. Tracer-test ...

  8. EFFICIENT HYDROLOGICAL TRACER-TEST DESIGN (EHTD ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Hydrological tracer testing is the most reliable diagnostic technique available for establishing flow trajectories and hydrologic connections and for determining basic hydraulic and geometric parameters necessary for establishing operative solute-transport processes. Tracer-test design can be difficult because of a lack of prior knowledge of the basic hydraulic and geometric parameters desired and the appropriate tracer mass to release. A new efficient hydrologic tracer-test design (EHTD) methodology has been developed that combines basic measured field parameters (e.g., discharge, distance, cross-sectional area) in functional relationships that describe solute-transport processes related to flow velocity and time of travel. The new method applies these initial estimates for time of travel and velocity to a hypothetical continuously stirred tank reactor as an analog for the hydrologic flow system to develop initial estimates for tracer concentration and axial dispersion, based on a preset average tracer concentration. Root determination of the one-dimensional advection-dispersion equation (ADE) using the preset average tracer concentration then provides a theoretical basis for an estimate of necessary tracer mass.Application of the predicted tracer mass with the hydraulic and geometric parameters in the ADE allows for an approximation of initial sample-collection time and subsequent sample-collection frequency where a maximum of 65 samples were determined to

  9. Doublet Tracer Testing in Klamath Falls, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Gudmundsson, J.S.; Johnson, S.E.; Horne, R.N.; Jackson, P.B.; Culver, G.G.

    1983-12-15

    A tracer test was carried out in a geothermal doublet system to study the injection behavior of a developed reservoir known to be fractured. The doublet produces about 320 gpm of 160 F water that is used for space heating and then injected; the wells are spaced 250 ft apart. Tracer breakthrough was observed in 2 hours and 45 minutes in the production well, indicating fracture flow. However, the tracer concentrations were low and indicated porous media flow; the tracers mixed with a reservoir volume much larger than a fracture.

  10. The Art of Tomographic Tracer Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirpka, O. A.; Leven, C.; Doro, K. O.; Sanchez-Leon, E. E.

    2015-12-01

    In tracer tomography several tracer tests are performed within an aquifer and breakthrough curves are observed at multiple observation points. In the analysis, hydraulic conductivity is estimated as spatially variable, 3-D field subject to some smoothness constraint. Coupled flow and transport models using this conductivity fields are requested to meet observed tracer data. The approach can be combined with hydraulic tomography.We have performed hydraulic-tomography and tracer-tomography tests using heat and fluorescein as tracers at a field site close to Tübingen, Germany. The aquifer consists of 8-9m alluvials sands and gravels overlain by 1-2m alluvial fines. The hydraulic setup consists of a forced flow field between an injection/extraction well couple, embedded in the forced flow field of another well couple. By turning injection to extraction wells, and vice versa, two different flow fields were considered. Injection wells were separated into several sections by packers, and water was injected into each section proportional to its transmissivity. The water injected into one of the sections contained the tracer. Multi-level observation wells were equiped with thermometers (for heat-tracer tests), on-line fluoremeters (for teh dye tracers), and pressure transducers. Processing of the breakthrough curves included data cleaning, non-parametric deconvolution, and calculation of temperal moments of the estimated transfer functions.The joint inversion of hydraulic-head measurements and temporal moments of heat-tracer transfer functions was done by the quasi-linear geostatistical approach on a computing cluster. As alternative, we directly invert the time series (without temporal moments) by Ensemble-Kalman filtering.The high diffusion coefficient of temperature diminishes the penetration of the heat-tracer into the aquifer, which can partially be compensated by reverting the flow field and repeating the tracer tests. In tests with fluorscent tracers the signal

  11. Analysis of tracer responses in the BULLION Forced-Gradient Experiment at Pahute Mesa, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Paul W. Reimus; Marc J. Haga

    1999-10-01

    This report presents an analysis of the tracer data from the BULLION forced-gradient experiment (FGE) conducted on Pahute Mesa at the Nevada Test Site from June 2, 1997 through August 28, 1997, for the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Program. It also serves to document the polystyrene microsphere data from the FGE. The FGE involved the injection of solute and colloid tracers into wells ER-20-6 No. 1 and ER-20-6 No. 2 while ER-20-6 No. 3 was pumped at approximately 116 gallons per minute (gpm). The experimental configuration and test design are described briefly in this report; more details are provided elsewhere (IT, 1996, 1997, 1998). The tracer responses in the various wells yielded valuable information about transport processes such as longitudinal dispersion, matrix diffusion and colloid transport in the hydrogeologic system in the vicinity of the BULLION nuclear test cavity. Parameter values describing these processes are derived from the semi-analytical model interpretations presented in this report. A companion report (IT, 1998) presents more detailed numerical modeling interpretations of the solute tracer responses.

  12. Long residence times - bad tracer tests?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghergut, Julia; Behrens, Horst; Sauter, Martin

    2015-04-01

    Tracer tests conducted at geothermal well doublets or triplets in the Upper Rhine Rift Valley [1] all face, with very few exceptions so far, one common issue: lack of conclusive tracer test results, or tracer signals still undetectable for longer than one or two years after tracer injection. While the reasons for this surely differ from site to site (Riehen, Landau, Insheim, Bruchsal, ...), its effects on how the usefulness of tracer tests is perceived by the non-tracer community are pretty much the same. The 'poor-signal' frustration keeps nourishing two major 'alternative' endeavours : (I) design and execute tracer tests in single-well injection-withdrawal (push-pull), 'instead of' inter-well flow-path tracing configurations; (II) use 'novel' tracer substances instead of the 'old' ones which have 'obviously failed'. Frustration experienced with most inter-well tracer tests in the Upper Rhine Rift Valley has also made them be regarded as 'maybe useful for EGS' ('enhanced', or 'engineered' geothermal systems, whose fluid RTD typically include a major share of values below one year), but 'no longer worthwhile a follow-up sampling' in natural, large-scale hydrothermal reservoirs. We illustrate some of these arguments with the ongoing Bruchsal case [2]. The inter-well tracer test conducted at Bruchsal was (and still is!) aimed at assessing inter-well connectivity, fluid residence times, and characterizing the reservoir structure [3]. Fluid samples taken at the geothermal production well after reaching a fluid turnover of about 700,000 m3 showed tracer concentrations in the range of 10-8 Minj per m3, in the liquid phase of each sample (Minj being the total quantity of tracer injected as a short pulse at the geothermal re-injection well). Tracer signals might actually be higher, owing to tracer amounts co-precipitated and/or adsorbed onto the solid phase whose accumulation in the samples was unavoidable (due to pressure relief and degassing during the very sampling

  13. LARGE-SCALE NATURAL GRADIENT TRACER TEST IN SAND AND GRAVEL, CAPE CODE, MASSACHUSETTS 3. HYDRAULIC CONDUCTI- VITY AND CALCULATED MACRODISPERSIVITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydraulic conductivity (K) variability in a sand and gravel aquifer on Cape Cod, Massachusetts, was measured and subsequently used in stochastic transport theories to estimate macrodispersivities. Nearly 1500 K measurements were obtained by borehole flowmeter tests ...

  14. LARGE-SCALE NATURAL GRADIENT TRACER TEST IN SAND AND GRAVEL, CAPE CODE, MASSACHUSETTS 3. HYDRAULIC CONDUCTI- VITY AND CALCULATED MACRODISPERSIVITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydraulic conductivity (K) variability in a sand and gravel aquifer on Cape Cod, Massachusetts, was measured and subsequently used in stochastic transport theories to estimate macrodispersivities. Nearly 1500 K measurements were obtained by borehole flowmeter tests ...

  15. MULTISPECIES REACTIVE TRACER TEST IN A SAND AND GRAVEL AQUIFER, CAPE COD, MASSACHUSETTS: PART 2: TRANSPORT OF CHROMIUM (VI) AND LEAD-, COPPER-, AND ZINC-EDTA TRACERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report discusses the transport of a group of reactive tracers over the course of a large-scale, natural gradient tracer test conducted at the USGS Cape Cod Toxic Substances Hydrology Research site, near Falmouth, Massachusetts. The overall objectives of the experiment were ...

  16. MULTISPECIES REACTIVE TRACER TEST IN A SAND AND GRAVEL AQUIFER, CAPE COD, MASSACHUSETTS: PART 2: TRANSPORT OF CHROMIUM (VI) AND LEAD-, COPPER-, AND ZINC-EDTA TRACERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report discusses the transport of a group of reactive tracers over the course of a large-scale, natural gradient tracer test conducted at the USGS Cape Cod Toxic Substances Hydrology Research site, near Falmouth, Massachusetts. The overall objectives of the experiment were ...

  17. Synchrotron Intensity Gradients as Tracers of Interstellar Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarian, A.; Yuen, Ka Ho; Lee, Hyeseung; Cho, J.

    2017-06-01

    On the basis of the modern understanding of MHD turbulence, we propose a new way of using synchrotron radiation: using synchrotron intensity gradients (SIGs) for tracing astrophysical magnetic fields. We successfully test the new technique using synthetic data obtained with 3D MHD simulations and provide the demonstration of the practical utility of the technique by comparing the directions of magnetic fields that are obtained with PLANCK synchrotron intensity data to the directions obtained with PLANCK synchrotron polarization data. We demonstrate that the SIGs can reliably trace magnetic fields in the presence of noise and can provide detailed maps of magnetic field directions. We also show that the SIGs are relatively robust for tracing magnetic fields while the low spatial frequencies of the synchrotron image are removed. This makes the SIGs applicable to the tracing of magnetic fields using interferometric data with single-dish measurement absent. We discuss the synergy of using the SIGs together with synchrotron polarization in order to find the actual direction of the magnetic fields and quantify the effects of Faraday rotation as well as with other ways of studying astrophysical magnetic fields. We test our method in the presence of noise and the resolution effects. We stress the complementary nature of the studies using the SIG technique and those employing the recently introduced velocity gradient techniques that trace magnetic fields using spectroscopic data.

  18. Tracer Particle Response in High-Gradient Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzog, Joshua; Rothamer, David

    2016-11-01

    Many laser-based fluid velocity measurements depend on the motion of tracer particles seeded into the flow. In most cases, the tracers are assumed to follow the flow exactly. However, this is not always the case. The actual motion of a tracer particle is dependent on the properties of both the particle and the fluid surrounding it. Previous analysis for spherical particles in the Stokes regime (assumes Re << 1) shows that the absolute difference between the particle and fluid velocity exponentially decays in time, with the relaxation time constant dependent on particle diameter, free stream velocity, Reynolds number, and both particle and fluid mass density. For all cases, it is necessary to accurately describe the physics of the tracer particle motion to perform rigorous quantitative studies with particle-based techniques. This study aims to measure and describe particle response to a step change in velocity in a uniform flow. Velocity profiles of solid tracer particles ranging from 300 to 3800 nm in diameter, with initial particle Reynolds numbers up to 100, were measured in a shock tube using particle image velocimetry. The goal of this study is to assess velocity relaxation estimates and assumptions for particle-based velocimetry techniques.

  19. Transport of microspheres and indigenous bacteria through a sandy aquifer: Results of natural- and forced-gradient tracer experiments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harvey, R.W.; George, L.H.; Smith, R.L.; LeBlanc, D.R.

    1989-01-01

    Transport of indigenous bacteria through sandy aquifer sediments was investigated in forced- and natural-gradient tracer teste. A diverse population of bacteria was collected and concentrated from groundwater at the site, stained with a DNA-specific fluorochrome, and injected back into the aquifer. Included with the injectate were a conservative tracer (Br- or Cl-) and bacteria-sized (0.2-1.3-??m) microspheres having carboxylated, carbonyl, or neutral surfaces. Transport of stained bacteria and all types and size classes of microspheres was evident. In the natural-gradient test, both surface characteristics and size of microspheres affected attenuation. Surface characteristics had the greatest effect upon retardation. Peak break-through of DAPI-stained bacteria (forced-gradient experiment) occurred well in advance of bromide at the more distal sampler. Transport behavior of bacteria was substantially different from that of carboxylated microspheres of comparable size. ?? 1988 American Chemical Society.

  20. Analysing the capabilities and limitations of tracer tests in stream-aquifer systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wagner, B.J.; Harvey, J.W.

    2001-01-01

    The goal of this study was to identify the limitations that apply when we couple conservative-tracer injection with reactive solute sampling to identify the transport and reaction processes active in a stream. Our methodology applies Monte Carlo uncertainty analysis to assess the ability of the tracer approach to identify the governing transport and reaction processes for a wide range of stream-solute transport and reaction scenarios likely to be encountered in high-gradient streams. Our analyses identified dimensionless factors that define the capabilities and limitations of the tracer approach. These factors provide a framework for comparing and contrasting alternative tracer test designs.

  1. Tracer mass recovery in fractured aquifers estimated from multiple well tests.

    PubMed

    Sanford, William E; Cook, Peter G; Robinson, Neville I; Weatherill, Douglas

    2006-01-01

    Forced-gradient tracer tests in fractured aquifers often report low mass recoveries. In fractured aquifers, fractures intersected by one borehole may not be intersected by another. As a result (1) injected tracer can follow pathways away from the withdrawal well causing low mass recovery and (2) recovered water can follow pathways not connected to the injection well causing significant tracer dilution. These two effects occur along with other forms of apparent mass loss. If the strength of the connection between wells and the amount of dilution can be predicted ahead of time, tracer tests can be designed to optimize mass recovery and dilution. A technique is developed to use hydraulic tests in fractured aquifers to calculate the conductance (strength of connection) between well pairs and to predict mass recovery and amount of dilution during forced gradient tracer tests. Flow is considered to take place through conduits, which connect the wells to each other and to distant sources or sinks. Mass recovery is related to the proportion of flow leaving the injection well and arriving at the withdrawal well, and dilution is related to the proportion of the flow from the withdrawal well that is derived from the injection well. The technique can be used to choose well pairs for tracer tests, what injection and withdrawal rates to use, and which direction to establish the hydraulic gradient to maximize mass recovery and/or minimize dilution. The method is applied to several tracer tests in fractured aquifers in the Clare Valley, South Australia.

  2. Interpreting tracer breakthrough tailing from different forced-gradient tracer experiment configurations in fractured bedrock

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Becker, M.W.; Shapiro, A.M.

    2003-01-01

    Conceptual and mathematical models are presented that explain tracer breakthrough tailing in the absence of significant matrix diffusion. Model predictions are compared to field results from radially convergent, weak-dipole, and push-pull tracer experiments conducted in a saturated crystalline bedrock. The models are based upon the assumption that flow is highly channelized, that the mass of tracer in a channel is proportional to the cube of the mean channel aperture, and the mean transport time in the channel is related to the square of the mean channel aperture. These models predict the consistent -2 straight line power law slope observed in breakthrough from radially convergent and weak-dipole tracer experiments and the variable straight line power law slope observed in push-pull tracer experiments with varying injection volumes. The power law breakthrough slope is predicted in the absence of matrix diffusion. A comparison of tracer experiments in which the flow field was reversed to those in which it was not indicates that the apparent dispersion in the breakthrough curve is partially reversible. We hypothesize that the observed breakthrough tailing is due to a combination of local hydrodynamic dispersion, which always increases in the direction of fluid velocity, and heterogeneous advection, which is partially reversed when the flow field is reversed. In spite of our attempt to account for heterogeneous advection using a multipath approach, a much smaller estimate of hydrodynamic dispersivity was obtained from push-pull experiments than from radially convergent or weak dipole experiments. These results suggest that although we can explain breakthrough tailing as an advective phenomenon, we cannot ignore the relationship between hydrodynamic dispersion and flow field geometry at this site. The design of the tracer experiment can severely impact the estimation of hydrodynamic dispersion and matrix diffusion in highly heterogeneous geologic media.

  3. Dense nonaqueous phase liquid tracer tests: experimental results.

    PubMed

    Burt, R A; Christians, G L; Williams, S P; Wilson, D J

    2001-12-01

    Two dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) tracer tests were carried out in a shallow aquifer north of Fort Worth, TX. i-Propanol was used as the nonpartitioning tracer: n-hexanol and n-octanol were the partitioning tracers. Field data, mathematical modeling, the results of column tests, and field tracer tests with NaCl were used in designing the DNAPL tracer tests. The results indicated the presence of DNAPL at both sites tested; semi-quantitative estimates of the amounts of DNAPL present were obtained by mathematical modeling. Interpretation was complicated by heterogeneity of the aquifer and mass transport effects.

  4. A line source tracer test - a better method for assessing high groundwater velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magal, E.; Weisbrod, N.; Yakirevich, A.; Kurtzman, D.; Yechieli, Y.

    2009-12-01

    A line source injection is suggested as an effective method for assessing groundwater velocities and flow directions in subsurface characterized by high water fluxes. Modifying the common techniques of injecting a tracer into a well was necessary after frequently-used methods of natural and forced gradient tracer tests ended with no reliable information on the local groundwater flow. In a field experiment, tracers were injected into 8-m long line injection system constructed below the water table almost perpendicular to the assumed flow direction. The injection system was divided to four separate segments (each 2 m long) enabling the injection of four different tracers along the line source. An array of five boreholes located in an area of 10x10 m downstream was used for monitoring the tracers' transport. Two dye tracers (Uranine and Na Naphthionate) were injected in a long pulse of several hours into two of the injection pipe segments and two tracers (Rhenium oxide and Gd-DTPA) were instantaneously injected to the other two segments. The tracers were detected 0.7 to 2.3 hours after injection in four of the five observation wells, located 2.3 to 10 m from the injection system, respectively. Groundwater velocities were calculated directly from the tracers' arrival times and by fitting the observed breakthrough curves to simulations with one and two dimensions analytical solutions for conservative tracer transport. The groundwater velocity was determined to be ~100 m/d. The longitudinal dispersivity value, generated from fitting the tracer breakthrough curves, was in a range of 0.2-3m. The groundwater flow direction was derived based on the arrival of the tracers and was found to be consistent with the apparent direction of the hydraulic gradient. The hydraulic conductivity derived from the groundwater velocity was ~1200 m/d, which is in the upper range of gravel sediment.

  5. Journal: A Review of Some Tracer-Test Design Equations for Tracer-Mass Estimation and Sample Collection Frequency

    EPA Science Inventory

    Determination of necessary tracer mass, initial sample-collection time, and subsequent sample-collection frequency are the three most difficult aspects to estimate for a proposed tracer test prior to conducting the tracer test. To facilitate tracer-mass estimation, 33 mass-estima...

  6. Journal: A Review of Some Tracer-Test Design Equations for Tracer-Mass Estimation and Sample Collection Frequency

    EPA Science Inventory

    Determination of necessary tracer mass, initial sample-collection time, and subsequent sample-collection frequency are the three most difficult aspects to estimate for a proposed tracer test prior to conducting the tracer test. To facilitate tracer-mass estimation, 33 mass-estima...

  7. Lidar Tracking of Multiple Fluorescent Tracers: Method and Field Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberhard, Wynn L.; Willis, Ron J.

    1992-01-01

    Past research and applications have demonstrated the advantages and usefulness of lidar detection of a single fluorescent tracer to track air motions. Earlier researchers performed an analytical study that showed good potential for lidar discrimination and tracking of two or three different fluorescent tracers at the same time. The present paper summarizes the multiple fluorescent tracer method, discusses its expected advantages and problems, and describes our field test of this new technique.

  8. Analysis of partitioning interwell tracer tests

    SciTech Connect

    Dwarakanath, V.; Deeds, N.; Pope, G.A.

    1999-11-01

    Partitioning interwell tracer tests (PITTs) have emerged as a useful tool in characterizing the volume of nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) in contaminated aquifers. More than 40 PITTs have been conducted in various NAPL-contaminated sites for both initial estimation of NAPL volume and postremediation performance assessment of various cleanup technologies. An effective interpretation of PITT results requires an accurate determination of the confidence limits of the volume of NAPL estimated from PITT data. This necessitates a description of the various errors, both systematic and random, associated with the measurement and analysis of PITT data. In this paper, an approach for performing this error analysis for both vadose-zone and saturated-zone PITTs is presented. This approach is based upon identifying the various sources of errors in both the measurement of PITT data and the errors from the data analysis using the method of temporal moments. Results are illustrated using the data from several soil column studies and two field PITTs, one saturated and one unsaturated.

  9. Three-Dimensional Bayesian Geostatistical Aquifer Characterization at the Hanford 300 Area using Tracer Test Data

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xingyuan; Murakami, Haruko; Hahn, Melanie S.; Hammond, Glenn E.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Zachara, John M.; Rubin, Yoram

    2012-06-01

    Tracer testing under natural or forced gradient flow holds the potential to provide useful information for characterizing subsurface properties, through monitoring, modeling and interpretation of the tracer plume migration in an aquifer. Non-reactive tracer experiments were conducted at the Hanford 300 Area, along with constant-rate injection tests and electromagnetic borehole flowmeter (EBF) profiling. A Bayesian data assimilation technique, the method of anchored distributions (MAD) [Rubin et al., 2010], was applied to assimilate the experimental tracer test data with the other types of data and to infer the three-dimensional heterogeneous structure of the hydraulic conductivity in the saturated zone of the Hanford formation. In this study, the Bayesian prior information on the underlying random hydraulic conductivity field was obtained from previous field characterization efforts using the constant-rate injection tests and the EBF data. The posterior distribution of the conductivity field was obtained by further conditioning the field on the temporal moments of tracer breakthrough curves at various observation wells. MAD was implemented with the massively-parallel three-dimensional flow and transport code PFLOTRAN to cope with the highly transient flow boundary conditions at the site and to meet the computational demands of MAD. A synthetic study proved that the proposed method could effectively invert tracer test data to capture the essential spatial heterogeneity of the three-dimensional hydraulic conductivity field. Application of MAD to actual field data shows that the hydrogeological model, when conditioned on the tracer test data, can reproduce the tracer transport behavior better than the field characterized without the tracer test data. This study successfully demonstrates that MAD can sequentially assimilate multi-scale multi-type field data through a consistent Bayesian framework.

  10. Combining 3D Hydraulic Tomography with Tracer Tests for Improved Transport Characterization.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-León, E; Leven, C; Haslauer, C P; Cirpka, O A

    2016-07-01

    Hydraulic tomography (HT) is a method for resolving the spatial distribution of hydraulic parameters to some extent, but many details important for solute transport usually remain unresolved. We present a methodology to improve solute transport predictions by combining data from HT with the breakthrough curve (BTC) of a single forced-gradient tracer test. We estimated the three dimensional (3D) hydraulic-conductivity field in an alluvial aquifer by inverting tomographic pumping tests performed at the Hydrogeological Research Site Lauswiesen close to Tübingen, Germany, using a regularized pilot-point method. We compared the estimated parameter field to available profiles of hydraulic-conductivity variations from direct-push injection logging (DPIL), and validated the hydraulic-conductivity field with hydraulic-head measurements of tests not used in the inversion. After validation, spatially uniform parameters for dual-domain transport were estimated by fitting tracer data collected during a forced-gradient tracer test. The dual-domain assumption was used to parameterize effects of the unresolved heterogeneity of the aquifer and deemed necessary to fit the shape of the BTC using reasonable parameter values. The estimated hydraulic-conductivity field and transport parameters were subsequently used to successfully predict a second independent tracer test. Our work provides an efficient and practical approach to predict solute transport in heterogeneous aquifers without performing elaborate field tracer tests with a tomographic layout.

  11. Nitrate-enhanced bioremediation of BTEX-contaminated groundwater: parameter estimation from natural-gradient tracer experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiber, M. E.; Bahr, J. M.

    2002-03-01

    Two natural-gradient pulse tracer tests were conducted in a petroleum-contaminated aquifer to evaluate the potential for benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX) biodegradation under enhanced nitrate-reducing conditions. Addition of nitrate resulted in loss of toluene, ethylbenzene, and m, p-xylenes (TEX) after an initial lag period of approximately 9 days. Losses of benzene were not observed over the 60-day monitoring period. Tracer breakthrough curves (BTCs) were analyzed to derive transport and biodegradation parameters, including advective velocities, retardation factors, dispersion coefficients, biodegradation rate constants, and nitrate utilization ratios. Using the parameters derived from the BTC analysis, numerical simulations of one of the tracer experiments were conducted using BIONAPL/3D [Molson, J., BIONAPL/3D User Guide, A 3D Coupled Flow and Multi-Component Reactive transport model. University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada]. Simulations using the BTC-derived transport and biodegradation parameters successfully reproduced benzene, TEX, and nitrate concentrations measured during the tracer experiment. Comparisons of observed and simulated nitrate concentrations indicate that the mass ratio of nitrate-N utilized to TEX degraded increased over time during the experiment, reaching values many times that expected based on stoichiometry of TEX oxidation coupled to nitrate reduction. Excess nitrate loss is likely due to oxidation of other organics in addition to TEX.

  12. ANALYTICAL METHOD DEVELOPMENTS TO SUPPORT PARTITIONING INTERWELL TRACER TESTING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Partitioning Interwell Tracer Testing (PITT) uses alcohol tracer compounds in estimating subsurface contamination from non-polar pollutants. PITT uses the analysis of water samples for various alcohols as part of the overall measurement process. The water samples may contain many...

  13. ANALYTICAL METHOD DEVELOPMENTS TO SUPPORT PARTITIONING INTERWELL TRACER TESTING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Partitioning Interwell Tracer Testing (PITT) uses alcohol tracer compounds in estimating subsurface contamination from non-polar pollutants. PITT uses the analysis of water samples for various alcohols as part of the overall measurement process. The water samples may contain many...

  14. Direct Quantification of Microbial Community Respiration along a Contamination Gradient using a novel Hydrologic Smart Tracer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanaway, D. J.; Haggerty, R.; Feris, K. P.

    2010-12-01

    Heavy metal contamination in lotic ecosystems is a major health and environmental concern worldwide. The Resazurin Resorufin (Raz Rru) Smart Tracer system (Haggerty et al., 2008) provides a novel approach to test current models of microbial ecosystem response to chronic stressors such as heavy metals. These models predict that functional redundancy of metabolic capabilities of community members (e.g. respiration rate and enzyme activity) will compensate for decreases in species diversity until a stress threshold is reached. At this point, species diversity and function are expected to decline rapidly. Contrary to this model, microbial communities of the Clark Fork River (CF), Montana, demonstrate high levels of species diversity along the contamination gradient, whereas community function is inversely proportional to the level of contamination. The Raz Rru tool, a metabolically reactive hydrologic tracer, allows for direct quantification of in-situ microbial respiration rates. Therefore, this tool provides an opportunity to build upon studies of ecosystem response to contamination previously limited to extrapolation of point scale measurements to reach scale processes. The Raz Rru tool is used here to quantify the magnitude of metal induced limits on heterotrophic microbial respiration in communities that have evolved to different levels of chronic metal exposure. In this way we propose to be able to test a novel hypothesis concerning the nature of evolution of community processes to chronic stress and persistent environmental pollutants. Specifically, we hypothesize that metal contamination produces a measureable metabolic cost to both tolerant and intolerant communities. To test this hypothesis, rates of respiration associated with hyporheic sediments, supporting intact microbial communities, were quantified in the presence and absence of an acute Cd exposure in column experiments. Hyporheic sediment was collected from differently contaminated locations within

  15. Some design considerations for the proposed Dixie Valley tracer test

    SciTech Connect

    Doughty, C.; Bodvarsson, G.S.

    1988-06-01

    A tracer test for the Dixie Valley, Nevada, geothermal resource is planned for the summer of 1988, in order to study the fluid flow paths that will develop under typical operating conditions. During the test six production wells will provide the power plant with steam sufficient for generation of 60 MWe, requiring fluid production at a rate of approximately 600 kg/sec. Up to 75% by mass of the extracted fluid will be reinjected into the reservoir, using four injection wells. Tracer will be added to the injected fluid for a twenty-minute period, and subsequently the produced fluid will be monitored for the tracer. 5 refs., 9 figs., 5 tabs.

  16. Results of Repeat Tracer Tests at Ohaaki, NZ

    SciTech Connect

    McCabe, W.J.; Clotworthy, A.W.; Morris, C.

    1995-01-01

    During 20 years of tracer testing at Ohaaki a number of wells have been used more than once as tracer injection sites. In studying the various responses obtained it has been necessary to consider variations in the experimental test conditions before making comparisons which relate to field conditions. Some very significant changes have occurred in the field hydrology in recent years and water flow speeds as high as those encountered at Wairakei have been demonstrated.

  17. Three-dimensional Bayesian geostatistical aquifer characterization at the Hanford 300 Area using tracer test data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xingyuan; Murakami, Haruko; Hahn, Melanie S.; Hammond, Glenn E.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Zachara, John M.; Rubin, Yoram

    2012-06-01

    Tracer tests performed under natural or forced gradient flow conditions can provide useful information for characterizing subsurface properties, through monitoring, modeling, and interpretation of the tracer plume migration in an aquifer. Nonreactive tracer experiments were conducted at the Hanford 300 Area, along with constant-rate injection tests and electromagnetic borehole flowmeter tests. A Bayesian data assimilation technique, the method of anchored distributions (MAD) (Rubin et al., 2010), was applied to assimilate the experimental tracer test data with the other types of data and to infer the three-dimensional heterogeneous structure of the hydraulic conductivity in the saturated zone of the Hanford formation.In this study, the Bayesian prior information on the underlying random hydraulic conductivity field was obtained from previous field characterization efforts using constant-rate injection and borehole flowmeter test data. The posterior distribution of the conductivity field was obtained by further conditioning the field on the temporal moments of tracer breakthrough curves at various observation wells. MAD was implemented with the massively parallel three-dimensional flow and transport code PFLOTRAN to cope with the highly transient flow boundary conditions at the site and to meet the computational demands of MAD. A synthetic study proved that the proposed method could effectively invert tracer test data to capture the essential spatial heterogeneity of the three-dimensional hydraulic conductivity field. Application of MAD to actual field tracer data at the Hanford 300 Area demonstrates that inverting for spatial heterogeneity of hydraulic conductivity under transient flow conditions is challenging and more work is needed.

  18. How to chase a tracer - combining conventional salt tracer testing and direct push electrical conductivity profiling for enhanced aquifer characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vienken, Thomas; Huber, Emanuel; Kreck, Manuel; Huggenberger, Peter; Dietrich, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Tracer testing is a well-established technique in hydrogeological site characterization. However, certain a priori knowledge of the hydraulic regime is required beforehand to avoid test failure, e.g. miss of tracer. In this study, we propose a novel tracer test concept for the hydraulic characterization of shallow unconsolidated sedimentary deposits when only scarce a priori information on the hydraulic regime is available. Therefore, we combine conventional salt tracer testing with direct push vertical high resolution electrical conductivity logging. The proposed tracer test concept was successfully tested on coarse, braided river deposits of the Tagliamento River, Italy. With limited a priori information available two tracer tests were performed in three days to reliably determine ground water flow direction and velocity allowing on-site decision-making to adaptively install observation wells for reliable breakthrough curve measurements. Furthermore, direct push vertical electrical profiling provided essential information about the plume characteristics with outstanding measurement resolution and efficiency.

  19. Unraveling complex hydrogeologic systems using field tracer tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dam, William A.; Nicholson, Thomas

    Tracking the movement of underground contaminants is vital to protecting public health and the environment worldwide. Scientific efforts using field tracer techniques to solve contaminant migration problems are rapidly evolving to fill critical information gaps and provide confirmation of laboratory data and numerical models. Various chemical tracers are being used to formulate and evaluate alternative conceptual hydrogeologic modelssemi; namely, to constrain hydraulic properties of geologic systems, identify sources of groundwater, flow paths, and rates, and determine mechanisms that affect contaminant transport. Naturally occurring elements and environmental isotopes from atmospheric and underground nuclear testing can make excellent tracers. In addition, characterizing sites of future waste disposal, such as the potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, requires new and innovative techniques like injecting surrogate tracers that simulate potential contaminants and shed light on mechanisms that could control future contaminant migration.

  20. 76 FR 71610 - Market Test of First-Class Tracer

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-18

    ... Market Test of First-Class Tracer AGENCY: Postal Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Commission is noticing a recently-field Postal Service proposal to conduct a market test of a market dominant... a market test beginning on or about December 7, 2011, of an experimental market dominant product...

  1. Heat tracer test in an alluvial aquifer: Field experiment and inverse modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klepikova, Maria; Wildemeersch, Samuel; Hermans, Thomas; Jamin, Pierre; Orban, Philippe; Nguyen, Frédéric; Brouyère, Serge; Dassargues, Alain

    2016-09-01

    Using heat as an active tracer for aquifer characterization is a topic of increasing interest. In this study, we investigate the potential of using heat tracer tests for characterization of a shallow alluvial aquifer. A thermal tracer test was conducted in the alluvial aquifer of the Meuse River, Belgium. The tracing experiment consisted in simultaneously injecting heated water and a dye tracer in an injection well and monitoring the evolution of groundwater temperature and tracer concentration in the pumping well and in measurement intervals. To get insights in the 3D characteristics of the heat transport mechanisms, temperature data from a large number of observation wells closely spaced along three transects were used. Temperature breakthrough curves in observation wells are contrasted with what would be expected in an ideal layered aquifer. They reveal strongly unequal lateral and vertical components of the transport mechanisms. The observed complex behavior of the heat plume is explained by the groundwater flow gradient on the site and heterogeneities in the hydraulic conductivity field. Moreover, due to high injection temperatures during the field experiment a temperature-induced fluid density effect on heat transport occurred. By using a flow and heat transport numerical model with variable density coupled with a pilot point approach for inversion of the hydraulic conductivity field, the main preferential flow paths were delineated. The successful application of a field heat tracer test at this site suggests that heat tracer tests is a promising approach to image hydraulic conductivity field. This methodology could be applied in aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) projects for assessing future efficiency that is strongly linked to the hydraulic conductivity variability in the considered aquifer.

  2. Heat tracer test in an alluvial aquifer: field experiment and inverse modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klepikova, Maria; Wildemeersch, Samuel; Jamin, Pierre; Orban, Philippe; Hermans, Thomas; Nguyen, Frederic; Brouyère, Serge; Dassargues, Alain

    2016-04-01

    Using heat as an active tracer for aquifer characterization is a topic of increasing interest. In this study, we investigate the potential of using heat tracer tests for characterization of a shallow alluvial aquifer. A thermal tracer test was conducted in the alluvial aquifer of the Meuse River, Belgium. The tracing experiment consisted in simultaneously injecting heated water and a dye tracer in a piezometer and monitoring the evolution of groundwater temperature and tracer concentration in the recovery well and in monitoring wells. To get insights in the 3D characteristics of the heat transport mechanisms, temperature data from a large number of observation wells distributed throughout the field site (space-filling arrangement) were used. Temperature breakthrough curves in observation wells are contrasted with what would be expected in an ideal layered aquifer. They reveal strongly unequal lateral and vertical components of the transport mechanisms. The observed complex behavior of the heat plume was explained by the groundwater flow gradient on the site and heterogeneity of hydraulic conductivity field. Moreover, due to high injection temperatures during the field experiment a temperature-induced fluid density effect on heat transport occurred. By using a flow and heat transport numerical model with variable density coupled with the pilot point inverse approach, main preferential flow paths were delineated.

  3. Simple Spreadsheet Models For Interpretation Of Fractured Media Tracer Tests

    EPA Science Inventory

    An analysis of a gas-phase partitioning tracer test conducted through fractured media is discussed within this paper. The analysis employed matching eight simple mathematical models to the experimental data to determine transport parameters. All of the models tested; two porous...

  4. Simple Spreadsheet Models For Interpretation Of Fractured Media Tracer Tests

    EPA Science Inventory

    An analysis of a gas-phase partitioning tracer test conducted through fractured media is discussed within this paper. The analysis employed matching eight simple mathematical models to the experimental data to determine transport parameters. All of the models tested; two porous...

  5. Thermal tracer tests for characterizing a shallow alluvial aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wildemeersch, Samuel; Klepikova, Maria; Jamin, Pierre; Orban, Philippe; Hermans, Thomas; Brouyère, Serge; Dassargues, Alain

    2014-05-01

    Using heat as an active tracer in different types of aquifers is a topic of increasing interest [e.g. Vandenbohede et al.; 2008, Wagner et al., 2013; Read et al., 2013]. In this study, we investigate the potential interest of coupling heat and solute tracer tests for characterization of a shallow alluvial aquifer. A thermal tracer test was conducted in the alluvial aquifer of the Meuse River, Belgium. The tracing experiment consisted in simultaneously injecting heated water and a dye tracer in a piezometer and monitoring the evolution of groundwater temperature and tracer concentration in the recovery well and in nine monitoring wells located according to three transects with regards to the main groundwater flow direction. The breakthrough curves measured in the recovery well showed that heat transfer in the alluvial aquifer is slower and more dispersive than solute transport. Recovery is very low for heat while in the same time it is measured as relatively high for the solute tracer. This is due to the fact that heat diffusion is larger than molecular diffusion, implying that exchange between groundwater and the porous medium matrix is far more significant for heat than for solute tracers. Temperature and concentrations in the recovery well are then used for estimating the specific heat capacity with the energy balance approach and the estimated value is found to be consistent with those found in the literature. Temperature breakthrough curves in other piezometers are contrasted with what would be expected in an ideal layered aquifer. They reveal strongly unequal lateral and vertical components of the transport mechanisms. By means of a numerical heat transport model, we provide a preliminary interpretation of these temperature breakthrough curves. Furthermore, these data could be included in the calibration of a complex heat transfer model for estimating the entire set of heat transfer parameters and their spatial distribution by inverse modeling.

  6. Multiple Tracer Tests in Porous Media During Clogging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Englert, A.; Banning, A.; Siegmund, J.; Freye, S.; Goekpinar, T.

    2015-12-01

    Transport processes are known to be governed by the physical and chemical heterogeneity of the subsurface. Clogging processes can alter this heterogeneity as function of time and thus can modify transport. To understand transport under clogging conditions and to unravel the potential of multiple tracer tests to characterize such transport process we perform column and sandbox experiments. Our recently developed column and sandbox experiments are used to perform multiple tracer tests during clogging. In a first set of experiments, a cubic cell of 0.1 m x 0.1 m x 0.1 m is used to experimentally estimate flow and transport characteristics of an unconsolidated sediment through Darcy and tracer experiments. The water streaming through the experiment is amended with ammonium sulfate permanently. Salt tracers are added to the streaming water repeatedly, to be detected at micro electrodes at the inflow and the outflow of the cubic cell. Through repeated syringe injections of a barium chloride solution into the center of the cubic cell clogging processes are forced to occur around the mixing zone of the injected and streaming water by precipitation of barium sulfate. In a second set of experiments, a sandbox model including a sediment body of 0.3 m x 0.3 m x 0.1 m is used. Tracer, streaming, and injection water chemistry is kept similar to the cubic cell experiments. However, tracer breakthrough is now detected at nine positions within the experiment and at the inflow and the outflow of the sandbox model. Injection of barium chloride solution is now at two locations around the center of the sandbox model. Flow and transport characteristics of the sediment body are estimated based on Darcy and tracer experiments, which are performed repeatedly. Combined analysis of local and ensemble breakthrough curves and integrated numerical modeling will be used to understand effective and local flow and transport in a in a porous medium during clogging.

  7. Testing fundamentals: The chemical state of geochemical tracers in biominerals.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branson, O.; Redfern, S. A. T.; Read, E.; Elderfield, H.

    2015-12-01

    The use of many carbonate-derived geochemical proxies is underpinned by the assumption that tracer elements are incorporated 'ideally' as impurities the mineral lattice, following relatively straightforward kinetic and thermodynamic drives. This allows comparison to inorganic precipitation experiments, and provides a systematic starting point from which to translate geochemical tracers to environmental records. Biomineral carbonates are a prominent source of geochemical proxy material, and are far from an ideal inorganic system. They are structurally and compositionally heterogeneous mineral-organic composites, produced in tightly controlled biological environments, possibly via non-classical crystal growth mechanisms. Biominerals offer numerous opportunities for tracers to be incorporated in a 'non-ideal' state. For instance, tracers could be hosted within the organic component of the structure, in interstitial micro-domains of a separate mineral phase, or in localized high-impurity clusters. If a proxy element is hosted in a non-ideal state, our understanding of its incorporation and preservation is flawed, and the theoretical basis behind the proxies derived from it must be reevaluated. Thus far, the assumption of ideal tracer incorporation has remained largely untested, owing to the spatial resolution and sensitivity limits of available techniques. Developments in high-resolution, high-sensitivity X-ray spectroscopy at Scanning Transmission X-Ray Microscopes (STXMs) have allowed us to measure trace element coordination in foraminiferal calcite, at length-scales relevant to biomineralisation processes and tracer incorporation. This instrument has allowed us to test the fundamental assumptions behind several geochemical proxy elements. We present a summary of four STXM studies, assessing the chemical state and distribution of Mg (Branson et al, 2014), B (Branson et al, 2015), S and Na (unpub.), and highlight the implications of these data for the use of these

  8. Journal: Efficient Hydrologic Tracer-Test Design for Tracer-Mass Estimation and Sample Collection Frequency, 1 Method Development

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydrological tracer testing is the most reliable diagnostic technique available for the determination of basic hydraulic and geometric parameters necessary for establishing operative solute-transport processes. Tracer-test design can be difficult because of a lack of prior knowl...

  9. Journal: Efficient Hydrologic Tracer-Test Design for Tracer-Mass Estimation and Sample Collection Frequency, 1 Method Development

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydrological tracer testing is the most reliable diagnostic technique available for the determination of basic hydraulic and geometric parameters necessary for establishing operative solute-transport processes. Tracer-test design can be difficult because of a lack of prior knowl...

  10. Numerical simulation of a natural gradient tracer experiment for the natural attenuation study: flow and physical transport.

    PubMed

    Julian, H E; Boggs, J M; Zheng, C; Feehley, C E

    2001-01-01

    Results are presented for numerical simulations of ground water flow and physical transport associated with a natural gradient tracer experiment conducted within a heterogeneous alluvial aquifer of the Natural Attenuation Study (NATS) site near Columbus, Mississippi. A principal goal of NATS is to evaluate biogeochemical models that predict the rate and extent of natural biodegradation under field conditions. This paper describes the initial phase in the model evaluation process, i.e., calibration of flow and physical transport models that simulate conservative bromide tracer plume evolution during NATS. An initial large-scale flow model (LSM) is developed encompassing the experimental site and surrounding region. This model is subsequently scaled down in telescopic fashion to an intermediate-scale ground water flow model (ISM) covering the tracer-monitoring network, followed by a small-scale transport model (SSM) focused on the small region of hydrocarbon plume migration observed during NATS. The LSM uses inferred depositional features of the site in conjunction with hydraulic conductivity (K) data from aquifer tests and borehole flowmeter tests to establish large-scale K and flow field trends in and around the experimental site. The subsequent ISM incorporates specified flux boundary conditions and large-scale K trends obtained from the calibrated LSM, while preserving small-scale K structure based on some 4000 flowmeter data for solute transport modeling. The configuration of the ISM-predicted potentiometric surface approximates that of the observed surface within a root mean squared error of 0.15 m. The SSM is based on the dual-domain mass-transfer approach. Despite the well-recognized difficulties in modeling solute transport in extremely heterogeneous media as found at the NATS site, the dual-domain model adequately reproduced the observed bromide concentration distributions. Differences in observed and predicted bromide concentration distributions are

  11. Absolute hydraulic conductivity estimates from aquifer pumping and tracer tests in a stratified aquifer

    SciTech Connect

    Thorbjarnarson, K.W.; Huntley, D.; McCarty, J.J.

    1998-01-01

    Independent estimates of absolute hydraulic conductivity were obtained by a standard aquifer pumping test and a forced-gradient tracer test in a highly heterogeneous aquifer. An aquifer hydraulic test was conducted to evaluate the average hydraulic conductivity (K), and to establish steady-state flow for the tracer test. An average K of 48 m/day was interpreted from the draw-down data in a fully screened well. Type-curve matching and simulation with MODFLOW of the hydraulic response in partially screened wells indicates K of 10 to 15 m/day for the upper section and 71 to 73 m/day for the deeper section. Iodide and fluorescent dye tracers were injected at low rates in wells located approximately 8 m upgradient of the production well. Tracer breakthrough was monitored in the production well and at ten depth intervals within the fully screened monitoring well. Interpretation of tracer response in the production well reveals tracer transport is limited to a 3.9 m thick section of the 20 m thick aquifer, with a hydraulic conductivity of 248 m/day. However, the depth distribution of these permeable strata cannot be determined from the production well tracer response. When sampled at 1.5 m depth intervals in the monitoring well, breakthrough was observed in only three intervals along the entire 18.2 m screened well. K estimates from tracer travel time within discrete high-permeability strata range from 31 to 317 m/day. Inclusion of permeameter K estimates for the lower permeability aquifer sands result in a range in relative K of 0.01 to 1.0. This field site has the highest absolute K estimate for a discrete stratum and the widest range in relative hydraulic conductivity among research field sites with K estimates for discrete strata. Within such a highly stratified aquifer, the use of an average K from an aquifer pumping test to predict solute transport results in great underestimation of transport distances for a given time period.

  12. Testing the limits of gradient sensing

    PubMed Central

    Lakhani, Vinal

    2017-01-01

    The ability to detect a chemical gradient is fundamental to many cellular processes. In multicellular organisms gradient sensing plays an important role in many physiological processes such as wound healing and development. Unicellular organisms use gradient sensing to move (chemotaxis) or grow (chemotropism) towards a favorable environment. Some cells are capable of detecting extremely shallow gradients, even in the presence of significant molecular-level noise. For example, yeast have been reported to detect pheromone gradients as shallow as 0.1 nM/μm. Noise reduction mechanisms, such as time-averaging and the internalization of pheromone molecules, have been proposed to explain how yeast cells filter fluctuations and detect shallow gradients. Here, we use a Particle-Based Reaction-Diffusion model of ligand-receptor dynamics to test the effectiveness of these mechanisms and to determine the limits of gradient sensing. In particular, we develop novel simulation methods for establishing chemical gradients that not only allow us to study gradient sensing under steady-state conditions, but also take into account transient effects as the gradient forms. Based on reported measurements of reaction rates, our results indicate neither time-averaging nor receptor endocytosis significantly improves the cell’s accuracy in detecting gradients over time scales associated with the initiation of polarized growth. Additionally, our results demonstrate the physical barrier of the cell membrane sharpens chemical gradients across the cell. While our studies are motivated by the mating response of yeast, we believe our results and simulation methods will find applications in many different contexts. PMID:28207738

  13. The gradient filter test to assess amblyopia.

    PubMed

    Keech, R V; Kutschke, P J

    1990-07-15

    A new technique, the gradient filter test, was developed for evaluating changes in the visual acuity of preverbal children undergoing treatment for amblyopia. The gradient filter test consists of a series of calibrated photographic fog filter and prism lenses. The combined prism-filter lenses are placed in front of the normal fixing eye. The greatest density (fogging value) filter that causes a switch in fixation from the amblyopic to the normal eye is noted. In both normal eyes of 20 nonamblyopic patients and the fellow (non-amblyopic) eyes of 20 amblyopic patients, visual acuity decreased as the density of the prism-filter lens increased. The gradient filter test accurately detected an improvement in visual acuity when compared with optotype measurements in eight patients undergoing occlusion therapy. The gradient filter test is a useful clinical tool that can assess changes in visual acuity in preverbal children who are being treated for amblyopia.

  14. Testing different tracers for stream flow monitoring with UAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortunato Dal Sasso, Silvano; Manfreda, Salvatore; Pizarro, Alonso; Mita, Leonardo

    2017-04-01

    In hydrological applications flow monitoring with high spatial and temporal resolution is crucial to understand the interactions between flow dynamics and infrastructures as well as to estimate streamflow discharges during extreme events. In this context, the use of Unmanned Aerial Systems (UASs) combined with particle tracking techniques provide one of the greatest potential for hydraulic monitoring allowing to measure surface 2D velocity fields based on video acquisitions. The measurement equipment consists of an action-cam installed on a low-cost quadrocopter and floating particle tracers. Particles have been distributed manually on the water surface in order to obtain an optimal spread able to cover the entire cross-section. In the present study, several experiments in laboratory and on natural streams have been carried out using different tracers in different hydraulic configurations. Thereafter, acquired videos have been processed with Particle Tracking Velocimetry (PTV) optical technique to derive free surface velocity fields. The image processing is very sensitive to the tracer characteristics, water color, river bed material, and flow velocity. The aim of the study is to describe the optimal tracer for stream flow monitoring and parameter setting for each configuration. The obtained results provide flow velocity fields with high resolution in time and space with relatively good accuracy in comparison with benchmark velocity values measured by conventional current meters and radar techniques. The tested methodology, allowing a non-intrusive monitoring of watercourses, have great potential applicability in monitoring any river system at large scale and also in difficult-to-access environments.

  15. Report on 10-ton retort tracer testing: tests S76 through S79

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, T.F.

    1985-07-01

    An oil shale retort with contrasting permeability regions has been studied using gas tracer techniques. The Western Research Institute's 10-ton retort was loaded with oil shale of various size ranges resulting in different void fractions. Four retorting and tracer runs were performed on the retort. For each run, tracer injections were made into the main air flow inlet and into taps near the top of the retort. Detection taps were located at four levels in the retort with five taps on each level in tests S76 through S78. There were six taps on each level in run S79. The oil shale rubble bed was configured with a cylindrical nonuniform region on the center line of the retort in tests S76 through S78. In run S79 two side-by-side regions with differing bed properties were tracer tested and retorted. Response times were calculated from the tracer response curves. The tracer response times from in-bed tracer tests correlate with oil yield and with bed properties. Response times from the inlet-to-outlet tracer tests correlate with total oil yield through a first-order relationship with sweep efficiencies. 8 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Active thermal tracer testing in a shallow aquifer of the Thur valley, Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweingruber, Mischa; Somogyvári, Márk; Bayer, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Tracer tests are one of the standard methods for investigating groundwater processes. Among the range of different test variants, using heat as a tracer has gained substantial interest during the last decade. Temperature measurements have become essential ingredients for example for characterization of river-aquifer interactions and in the field of geothermics. Much less attention than on natural temperature signals has been devoted to induced synthetic temperature signals, even though it is well known that temperature is an easy to measure, invisible but sensitive system property. Design, application and inversion of such active thermal tracer tests represent one focus of our work. We build up on the experience from related field experiments, where heated water was injected and the propagation of the generated thermal anomaly was monitored. In this presentation, we show the results from first field-testing in an alluvial aquifer at the Widen site in the Thur valley in Switzerland. The thermal evolution of groundwater was monitored in summer 2014 during and after several days of heated water injection. By this test, we want to derive insights into the prevailing hydraulic heterogeneity of the shallow aquifer at the site. The results are used for calibration of a two dimensional hydrogeological numerical model. With the calibrated hydraulic conductivity field, the experiment is simulated and the transient evolution of the heat plume is visualized. Hydraulic heterogeneity is identified as one main factor for lateral spreading of the heat plume. The most important result of the experiment is that the significance of the ambient flow field is very high and even with high pumping rates to establish forced gradient conditions its effect cannot be overridden. During the test, precious technical experience was gained, which will be beneficial for subsequent heat tracer applications. For example, the challenge of maintaining a constant injection rate and temperature could

  17. Chemical tracer test at the Dixie Valley geothermal field, Nevada. Geothermal Reservoir Technology research program

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, M.C.; Moore, J.N.; Benoit, W.R.; Doughty, C.; Bodvarsson, G.S.

    1993-10-01

    In the injection test described, chemical tracers established the fluid flow between one injection well and one production well. Measured tracer concentrations, calculated flow rates, sampling schedules, and the daily events of the tracer test are documented. This experiment was designed to test the application of organic tracers, to further refine the predictive capability of the reservoir model, and to improve the effectiveness of Oxbow`s injection strategy.

  18. Estimation of Fluorescent Dye Amount in Tracer Dye Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pekkan, Emrah; Balkan, Erman; Balkan, Emir

    2015-04-01

    Karstic groundwater is more influenced by human than the groundwater that disperse in pores. On the other hand karstic groundwater resources, in addition to providing agricultural needs, livestock breeding, drinking and domestic water in most of the months of the year, they also supply drinking water to the wild life at high altitudes. Therefore sustainability and hydrogeological investigation of karstic resources is critical. Tracing techniques are widely used in hydrologic and hydrogeologic studies to determine water storage, flow rate, direction and protection area of groundwater resources. Karanfil Mountain (2800 m), located in Adana, Turkey, is one of the karstic recharge areas of the natural springs spread around its periphery. During explorations of the caves of Karanfil mountain, a 600 m deep cave was found by the Turkish and Polish cavers. At the bottom of the cave there is an underground river with a flow rate of approximately 0.5 m3/s during August 2014. The main spring is located 8 km far from the cave's entrance and its mean flow rate changes between 3.4 m3/s and 0.21 m3/s in March and September respectively according to a flowrate observation station of Directorate of Water Works of Turkey. As such frequent storms, snowmelt and normal seasonal variations in rainfall have a significant and rapid effect on the volume of this main spring resource. The objective of our research is to determine and estimate dye amount before its application on the field inspired from the previously literature on the subject. This estimation is intended to provide a preliminary application of a tracer test of a karstic system. In this study dye injection, inlet point will be an underground river located inside the cave and the observation station will be the spring that is approximately 8 km far from the cave entrance. On the other hand there is 600 meter elevation difference between cave entrance and outlet spring. In this test Rodamin-WT will be used as tracer and the

  19. Results of ground-water tracer tests using tritiated water at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Webster, D.A.

    1996-01-01

    Ground-water tracer test were conducted at two sites in the radioactive-waste disposal area of Oak Ridge National Laboratory from 1977 to 1982. The purpose of the tests was to determine if the regolith beds had weathered sufficiently to permit the substantial flow of water across them. About 50 curies of tritium dissolved in water were used as the tracer in one site, and about 100 curies at the other. Results demonstrated that ground water is able to flow through joints in the weathered bedding and that the direction of the water-table gradient is the primary factor governint flow direction. Nevertheless, the substantial lateral spread of the plume as it developed showed that bedding-plane openings can still exert a significant secondary influence on flow direction in weathered rock. About 3,500 water samples from the injection and observation wells were analyzed for tritium during the test period. Concentrations detected spanned 11 orders of magnitude. Measurable concentrations were still present in the two injection wells and most observation wells 5 years after the tracer was introduced. Matrix diffusion may have played a significant role in these tests. The process would account for the sustained concentrations of tritium at many of the observation wells, the long-term residual concentrations at the injection and observation wells, and the apparent slow movement of the centers of mass across the two well fields. The process also would have implications regarding aquifer remediation. Other tracer tests have been conducted in the regolith of the Conasauga Group. Results differ from the results described in this report.

  20. Transport and attenuation of carboxylate-modified latex microspheres in fractured rock laboratory and field tracer tests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Becker, M.W.; Reimus, P.W.; Vilks, P.

    1999-01-01

    Understanding colloid transport in ground water is essential to assessing the migration of colloid-size contaminants, the facilitation of dissolved contaminant transport by colloids, in situ bioremediation, and the health risks of pathogen contamination in drinking water wells. Much has been learned through laboratory and field-scale colloid tracer tests, but progress has been hampered by a lack of consistent tracer testing methodology at different scales and fluid velocities. This paper presents laboratory and field tracer tests in fractured rock that use the same type of colloid tracer over an almost three orders-of-magnitude range in scale and fluid velocity. Fluorescently-dyed carboxylate-modified latex (CML) microspheres (0.19 to 0.98 ??m diameter) were used as tracers in (1) a naturally fractured tuff sample, (2) a large block of naturally fractured granite, (3) a fractured granite field site, and (4) another fractured granite/schist field site. In all cases, the mean transport time of the microspheres was shorter than the solutes, regardless of detection limit. In all but the smallest scale test, only a fraction of the injected microsphere mass was recovered, with the smaller microspheres being recovered to a greater extent than the larger microspheres. Using existing theory, we hypothesize that the observed microsphere early arrival was due to volume exclusion and attenuation was due to aggregation and/or settling during transport. In most tests, microspheres were detected using flow cytometry, which proved to be an excellent method of analysis. CML microspheres appear to be useful tracers for fractured rock in forced gradient and short-term natural gradient tests, but longer residence times may result in small microsphere recoveries.Understanding colloid transport in ground water is essential to assessing the migration of colloid-size contaminants, the facilitation of dissolved contaminant transport by colloids, in situ bioremediation, and the health risks

  1. Filtering a statistically exactly solvable test model for turbulent tracers from partial observations

    SciTech Connect

    Gershgorin, B.; Majda, A.J.

    2011-02-20

    A statistically exactly solvable model for passive tracers is introduced as a test model for the authors' Nonlinear Extended Kalman Filter (NEKF) as well as other filtering algorithms. The model involves a Gaussian velocity field and a passive tracer governed by the advection-diffusion equation with an imposed mean gradient. The model has direct relevance to engineering problems such as the spread of pollutants in the air or contaminants in the water as well as climate change problems concerning the transport of greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide with strongly intermittent probability distributions consistent with the actual observations of the atmosphere. One of the attractive properties of the model is the existence of the exact statistical solution. In particular, this unique feature of the model provides an opportunity to design and test fast and efficient algorithms for real-time data assimilation based on rigorous mathematical theory for a turbulence model problem with many active spatiotemporal scales. Here, we extensively study the performance of the NEKF which uses the exact first and second order nonlinear statistics without any approximations due to linearization. The role of partial and sparse observations, the frequency of observations and the observation noise strength in recovering the true signal, its spectrum, and fat tail probability distribution are the central issues discussed here. The results of our study provide useful guidelines for filtering realistic turbulent systems with passive tracers through partial observations.

  2. Transport and attenuation of carboxylate-modified latex microspheres in fractured rock laboratory and field tracer tests

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, M.W.; Reimus, P.W.; Vilks, P.

    1999-05-01

    Understanding colloid transport in ground water is essential to assessing the migration of colloid-size contaminants, the facilitation of dissolved contaminant transport by colloids, in situ bioremediation, and the health risks of pathogen contamination in drinking water wells. Much has been learned through laboratory and field-scale colloid tracer tests, but progress has been hampered by a lack of consistent tracer testing methodology at different scales and fluid velocities. This paper presents laboratory and field tracer tests in fractured rock that use the same type of colloid tracer over an almost three orders-of-magnitude range in scale and fluid velocity. Fluorescently-dyed carboxylate-modified latex (CML) microspheres were used as tracers in (1) a naturally fractured tuff sample, (2) a large block of naturally fractured granite, (3) a fractured granite field site, and (4) another fractured granite/schist field site. In all cases, the mean transport time of the microspheres was shorter than the solutes, regardless of detection limit. In all but the smallest scale test, only a fraction of the injected microsphere mass was recovered, with the smaller microspheres being recovered to a greater extent than the larger microspheres. Using existing theory, the authors hypothesize that the observed microsphere early arrival was due to volume exclusion and attenuation was due to aggregation and/or settling during transport. In most tests, microspheres were detected using flow cytometry, which proved to be an excellent method of analysis. CML microspheres appear to be useful tracers for fractured rock in forced gradient and short-term natural gradient tests, but longer residence times may result in small microsphere recoveries.

  3. Testing and comparison of four ionic tracers to measure stream flow loss by multiple tracer injection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zellweger, G.W.

    1994-01-01

    An injectate containing lithium, sodium, chloride and bromide was added continuously at five sites along a 507 m study reach of St Kevin Gulch, Lake County, Colorado to determine which sections of the stream were losing water to the stream bed and to ascertain how well the four tracers performed. The acidity of the stream (pH 3.6) made it possible for lithium and sodium, which are normally absorbed by ion exchange with stream bed sediment, to be used as conservative tracers. Net flow losses as low as 0.81 s-1, or 8% of flow, were calculated between measuring sites. By comparing the results of simultaneous injection it was determined whether subsections of the study reach were influent or effluent. Evaluation of tracer concentrations along 116 m of stream indicated that all four tracers behaved conservatively. Discharges measured by Parshall flumes were 4-18% greater than discharges measured by tracer dilution. -from Author

  4. Testing and parameterizing a conceptual solute transport model in saturated fractured tuff using sorbing and nonsorbing tracers in cross-hole tracer tests.

    PubMed

    Reimus, Paul W; Haga, Marc J; Adams, Andrew I; Callahan, Timothy J; Turin, H J; Counce, Dale A

    2003-01-01

    Two cross-hole tracer tests involving the simultaneous injection of two nonsorbing solute tracers with different diffusion coefficients (bromide and pentafluorobenzoate) and one weakly sorbing solute tracer (lithium ion) were conducted in two different intervals at the C-wells complex near the site of a potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, NV. The tests were conducted to (1) test a conceptual radionuclide transport model for saturated, fractured tuffs near Yucca Mountain and (2) obtain transport parameter estimates for predictive modeling of radionuclide transport. The differences between the responses of the two nonsorbing tracers and the sorbing tracer (when normalized to injection masses) were consistent with a dual-porosity transport system in which matrix diffusion was occurring. The concentration attenuation of the sorbing tracer relative to the nonsorbing tracers suggested that diffusion occurred primarily into matrix pores, not simply into stagnant water within the fractures. The K(d) values deduced from the lithium responses were generally larger than K(d) values measured in laboratory batch sorption tests using crushed C-wells cores. This result supports the use of laboratory-derived K(d) values for predicting sorbing species transport at the site, as the laboratory K(d) values would result in underprediction of sorption and hence conservative transport predictions. The tracer tests also provided estimates of effective flow porosity and longitudinal dispersivity at the site. The tests clearly demonstrated the advantages of using multiple tracers of different physical and chemical characteristics to distinguish between alternative conceptual transport models and to obtain transport parameter estimates that are better constrained than can be obtained using only a single tracer or using multiple nonsorbing tracers without a sorbing tracer.

  5. Landscape-gradient assessment of thermokarst lake hydrology using water isotope tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narancic, Biljana; Wolfe, Brent B.; Pienitz, Reinhard; Meyer, Hanno; Lamhonwah, Daniel

    2017-02-01

    Thermokarst lakes are widespread in arctic and subarctic regions. In subarctic Québec (Nunavik), they have grown in number and size since the mid-20th century. Recent studies have identified that these lakes are important sources of greenhouse gases. This is mainly due to the supply of catchment-derived dissolved organic carbon that generates anoxic conditions leading to methane production. To assess the potential role of climate-driven changes in hydrological processes to influence greenhouse-gas emissions, we utilized water isotope tracers to characterize the water balance of thermokarst lakes in Nunavik during three consecutive mid- to late summer sampling campaigns (2012-2014). Lake distribution stretches from shrub-tundra overlying discontinuous permafrost in the north to spruce-lichen woodland with sporadic permafrost in the south. Calculation of lake-specific input water isotope compositions (δI) and lake-specific evaporation-to-inflow (E/I) ratios based on an isotope-mass balance model reveal a narrow hydrological gradient regardless of diversity in regional landscape characteristics. Nearly all lakes sampled were predominantly fed by rainfall and/or permafrost meltwater, which suppressed the effects of evaporative loss. Only a few lakes in one of the southern sampling locations, which overly highly degraded sporadic permafrost terrain, appear to be susceptible to evaporative lake-level drawdown. We attribute this lake hydrological resiliency to the strong maritime climate in coastal regions of Nunavik. Predicted climate-driven increases in precipitation and permafrost degradation will likely contribute to persistence and expansion of thermokarst lakes throughout the region. If coupled with an increase in terrestrial carbon inputs to thermokarst lakes from surface runoff, conditions favorable for mineralization and emission of methane, these water bodies may become even more important sources of greenhouse gases.

  6. HYDROGEL TRACER BEADS: THE DEVELOPMENT, MODIFICATION, AND TESTING OF AN INNOVATIVE TRACER FOR BETTER UNDERSTANDING LNAPL TRANSPORT IN KARST AQUIFERS

    SciTech Connect

    Amanda Laskoskie, Harry M. Edenborn, and Dorothy J. Vesper

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this specific research task is to develop proxy tracers that mimic contaminant movement to better understand and predict contaminant fate and transport in karst aquifers. Hydrogel tracer beads are transported as a separate phase than water and can used as a proxy tracer to mimic the transport of non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPL). They can be constructed with different densities, sizes & chemical attributes. This poster describes the creation and optimization of the beads and the field testing of buoyant beads, including sampling, tracer analysis, and quantitative analysis. The buoyant beads are transported ahead of the dissolved solutes, suggesting that light NAPL (LNAPL) transport in karst may occur faster than predicted from traditional tracing techniques. The hydrogel beads were successful in illustrating this enhanced transport.

  7. A parameter identifiability study of two chalk tracer tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathias, S. A.; Butler, A. P.; Atkinson, T. C.; Kachi, S.; Ward, R. S.

    2006-08-01

    As with most fractured rock formations, Chalk is highly heterogeneous. Therefore, meaningful estimates of model parameters must be obtained at a scale comparable with the process of concern. These are frequently obtained by calibrating an appropriate model to observed concentration-time data from radially convergent tracer tests (RCTT). Arguably, an appropriate model should consider radially convergent dispersion (RCD) and Fickian matrix diffusion. Such a model requires the estimation of at least four parameters. A question arises as to whether or not this level of model complexity is supported by the information contained within the calibration data. Generally modellers have not answered this question due to the calibration techniques employed. A dual-porosity model with RCD was calibrated to two tracer test datasets from different UK Chalk aquifers. A multivariate sensitivity analysis, which assumed only a priori upper and lower bounds for each model parameter, was undertaken. Rather than looking at measures of uncertainty, the shape of the multivariate objective function surface was used to determine whether a parameter was identifiable. Non-identifiable parameters were then removed and the procedure was repeated until all remaining parameters were identifiable. It was found that the single fracture model (SFM) (which ignores mechanical dispersion) obtained the best mass recovery, excellent model performance and best parameter identifiability in both the tests studied. However, there was no objective evidence suggesting that mechanical dispersion was negligible. Moreover, the SFM (with just two parameters) was found to be good at approximating the Single Fracture Dispersion Model SFDM (with three parameters) when different, and potentially erroneous parameters, were used. Overall, this study emphasises the importance of adequate temporal sampling of breakthrough curve data prior to peak concentrations, to ensure adequate characterisation of mechanical dispersion

  8. Borehole flowmeter logging for the accurate design and analysis of tracer tests.

    PubMed

    Basiricò, Stefano; Crosta, Giovanni B; Frattini, Paolo; Villa, Alberto; Godio, Alberto

    2015-04-01

    Tracer tests often give ambiguous interpretations that may be due to the erroneous location of sampling points and/or the lack of flow rate measurements through the sampler. To obtain more reliable tracer test results, we propose a methodology that optimizes the design and analysis of tracer tests in a cross borehole mode by using vertical borehole flow rate measurements. Experiments using this approach, herein defined as the Bh-flow tracer test, have been performed by implementing three sequential steps: (1) single-hole flowmeter test, (2) cross-hole flowmeter test, and (3) tracer test. At the experimental site, core logging, pumping tests, and static water-level measurements were previously carried out to determine stratigraphy, fracture characteristics, and bulk hydraulic conductivity. Single-hole flowmeter testing makes it possible to detect the presence of vertical flows as well as inflow and outflow zones, whereas cross-hole flowmeter testing detects the presence of connections along sets of flow conduits or discontinuities intercepted by boreholes. Finally, the specific pathways and rates of groundwater flow through selected flowpaths are determined by tracer testing. We conclude that the combined use of single and cross-borehole flowmeter tests is fundamental to the formulation of the tracer test strategy and interpretation of the tracer test results.

  9. A Tracer Test at the Los Alamos Canyon Weir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levitt, D. G.; Stone, W. J.; Newell, D. L.; Wykoff, D. S.

    2002-12-01

    A low-head weir was constructed in the Los Alamos Canyon to reduce the transport of contaminant-bearing sediment caused by fire-enhanced runoff off Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) property towards the Rio Grande following the May 2000 Cerro Grande fire at Los Alamos, New Mexico. Fractured basalt was exposed in the channel by grading during construction of the weir, and water temporarily ponds behind the weir following periods of runoff. In order to monitor any downward transport of contaminants into fractured basalt, and potentially downward to the regional ground water, three boreholes (one vertical, one at 43 degrees, and one at 34 degrees from horizontal) were installed for environmental monitoring. The boreholes penetrate to depths ranging from approximately 9 to 82 m below the weir floor. The two angled boreholes are fitted with flexible FLUTe liners with resistance sensors to measure relative moisture content and absorbent sampling pads for contaminant and environmental tracer sampling within the vadose zone. The two angled boreholes are also monitored for relative changes in moisture content by neutron logging. The vertical borehole penetrates three perched water zones and is equipped with four screens and sampling ports. In April 2002, a tracer test was initiated with the application of a 0.2 M (16,000 ppm) solution of potassium bromide (KBr) onto the weir floor. The tracer experiment was intended to provide data on travel times through the complex hydrogeologic media of fractured basalt. A precipitation and runoff event in June 2002 resulted in approximately 0.61 m of standing water behind the weir. If the KBr and flood waters were well mixed, the concentration of KBr in the flood waters was approximately 24 ppm. Bromide was detected in the absorbent membrane in the 43 degree hole at concentrations up to 2 ppm. Resistance sensors in the 43 degree borehole detected moisture increases within 3 days at a depth of 27 m, indicating an average wetting

  10. Development of Models to Simulate Tracer Tests for Characterization of Enhanced Geothermal Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Mark D.; Reimus, Paul; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Rose, Peter; Dean, Cynthia A.; Watson, Tom B.; Newell, D.; Leecaster, Kevin; Brauser, Eric

    2013-05-01

    A recent report found that power and heat produced from enhanced (or engineered) geothermal systems (EGSs) could have a major impact on the U.S energy production capability while having a minimal impact on the environment. EGS resources differ from high-grade hydrothermal resources in that they lack sufficient temperature distribution, permeability/porosity, fluid saturation, or recharge of reservoir fluids. Therefore, quantitative characterization of temperature distributions and the surface area available for heat transfer in EGS is necessary for the design and commercial development of the geothermal energy of a potential EGS site. The goal of this project is to provide integrated tracer and tracer interpretation tools to facilitate this characterization. This project was initially focused on tracer development with the application of perfluorinated tracer (PFT) compounds, non-reactive tracers used in numerous applications from atmospheric transport to underground leak detection, to geothermal systems, and evaluation of encapsulated PFTs that would release tracers at targeted reservoir temperatures. After the 2011 midyear review and subsequent discussions with the U.S. Department of Energy Geothermal Technology Program (GTP), emphasis was shifted to interpretive tool development, testing, and validation. Subsurface modeling capabilities are an important component of this project for both the design of suitable tracers and the interpretation of data from in situ tracer tests, be they single- or multi-well tests. The purpose of this report is to describe the results of the tracer and model development for simulating and conducting tracer tests for characterizing EGS parameters.

  11. Journal: A Review of Some Tracer-Test Design Equations for ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Determination of necessary tracer mass, initial sample-collection time, and subsequent sample-collection frequency are the three most difficult aspects to estimate for a proposed tracer test prior to conducting the tracer test. To facilitate tracer-mass estimation, 33 mass-estimation equations are reviewed here, 32 of which were evaluated using previously published tracer-test design examination parameters. Comparison of the results produced a wide range of estimated tracer mass, but no means is available by which one equation may be reasonably selected over the others. Each equation produces a simple approximation for tracer mass. Most of the equations are based primarily on estimates or measurements of discharge, transport distance, and suspected transport times. Although the basic field parameters commonly employed are appropriate for estimating tracer mass, the 33 equations are problematic in that they were all probably based on the original developers' experience in a particular field area and not necessarily on measured hydraulic parameters or solute-transport theory. Suggested sampling frequencies are typically based primarily on probable transport distance, but with little regard to expected travel times. This too is problematic in that tends to result in false negatives or data aliasing. Simulations from the recently developed efficient hydrologic tracer-test design methodology (EHTD) were compared with those obtained from 32 of the 33 published tracer-

  12. COMPARISON OF THREE TRACER TESTS AT THE RAFT RIVER GEOTHERMAL SITE

    SciTech Connect

    Earl D Mattson; Mitchell Plummer; Carl Palmer; Larry Hull; Samantha Miller; Randy Nye

    2011-02-01

    Three conservative tracer tests have been conducted through the Bridge Fault fracture zone at the Raft River Geothermal (RRG) site. All three tests were conducted between injection well RRG-5 and production wells RRG-1 (790 m distance) and RRG-4 (740 m distance). The injection well is used during the summer months to provide pressure support to the production wells. The first test was conducted in 2008 using 136 kg of fluorescein tracer. Two additional tracers were injected in 2010. The first 2010 tracer injected was 100 kg fluorescein disodium hydrate salt on June, 21. The second tracer (100 kg 2,6-naphthalene disulfonic acid sodium salt) was injected one month later on July 21. Sampling of the two productions wells is still being performed to obtain the tail end of the second 2010 tracer test. Tracer concentrations were measured using HPLC with a fluorescence detector. Results for the 2008 test, suggest 80% tracer recover at the two production wells. Of the tracer recovered, 85% of tracer mass was recovered in well RRG-4 indicating a greater flow pathway connection between injection well and RRG-4 than RRG-1. Fluorescein tracer results appear to be similar between the 2008 and 2010 tests for well RRG-4 with peak concentrations arriving approximately 20 days after injection despite the differences between the injection rates for the two tests (~950 gpm to 475 gpm) between the 2008 and 2010. The two 2010 tracer tests will be compared to determine if the results support the hypothesis that rock contraction along the flow pathway due to the 55 oC cooler water injection alters the flow through the ~140 oC reservoir.

  13. High-resolution Electrical Resistivity Tomography monitoring of a tracer test in a confined aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, P. B.; Meldrum, P. I.; Kuras, O.; Chambers, J. E.; Holyoake, S. J.; Ogilvy, R. D.

    2010-04-01

    A permanent geoelectrical subsurface imaging system has been installed at a contaminated land site to monitor changes in groundwater quality after the completion of a remediation programme. Since the resistivities of earth materials are sensitive to the presence of contaminants and their break-down products, 4-dimensional resistivity imaging can act as a surrogate monitoring technology for tracking and visualising changes in contaminant concentrations at much higher spatial and temporal resolution than manual intrusive investigations. The test site, a municipal car park built on a former gasworks, had been polluted by a range of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and dissolved phase contaminants. It was designated statutory contaminated land under Part IIA of the UK Environmental Protection Act due to the risk of polluting an underlying minor aquifer. Resistivity monitoring zones were established on the boundaries of the site by installing vertical electrode arrays in purpose-drilled boreholes. After a year of monitoring data had been collected, a tracer test was performed to investigate groundwater flow velocity and to demonstrate rapid volumetric monitoring of natural attenuation processes. A saline tracer was injected into the confined aquifer, and its motion and evolution were visualised directly in high-resolution tomographic images in near real-time. Breakthrough curves were calculated from independent resistivity measurements, and the estimated seepage velocities from the monitoring images and the breakthrough curves were found to be in good agreement with each other and with estimates based on the piezometric gradient and assumed material parameters.

  14. Application of ground water tracer methods in straddle packer testing at the ICPP, INEL

    SciTech Connect

    Welhan, J. ); Fromm, J.; McCurry, M. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-01-01

    The State Oversight Program's straddle packer sampling system was tested at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory during July--September, 1992, in USGS monitoring well No. 44. The straddle packer was designed for the Oversight Program's ground water research program, to provide a means of characterizing the vertical hydraulic and water quality variations believed to exist in the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer beneath the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. During the field program, tracer introduction and recovery experiments were conducted to evaluate QA sampling objectives as well as to assess the feasibility of obtaining additional information on aquifer/borehole characteristics such as specific discharge through different aquifer zones, integrity of packer seals, etc. A total of twelve tracer tests were performed on six different intervals from 467 to 600 feet below land surface (ft bls). Lithium bromide powder dissolved in de-ionized water was used as a tracer. All tracer tests were conducted in two phases: Emplacement -- introduction of a slug of a known quantity of tracer, followed by continuous mixing within the test interval for periods ranging from 8 to 72 minutes (without pumping to surface), during which time the tracer was diluted by ground water advection through the test interval; and recovery - pumping of the test interval to withdraw tracer from the borehole interval and the adjacent aquifer. Once tracer recovery had been completed, water quality sampling could be initiated, with the degree of interval purging having been defined by the degree of tracer recovery.

  15. Attribution of Particulate Sulfur in the Grand Canyon to Specific Point Sources Using Tracer-Aerosol Gradient Interpretive Technique (TAGIT).

    PubMed

    Kuhns, Hampden; Green, Mark; Pitchford, Marc; Vasconcelos, Luis; White, Warren; Mirabella, Vince

    1999-08-01

    Since aerosol particulate sulfur is generally a secondary airborne pollutant, most source attribution techniques require many assumptions about the transport and chemistry of sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions. Uncertainties in our understanding of these processes impair our ability to generate reliable attribution information that is necessary for designing cost-effective pollution control policies. A new attribution technique using artificial tracer is presented in hopes of reducing the uncertainty of secondary aerosol source attribution. The Tracer-Aerosol Gradient Interpretive Technique (TAGIT) uses tracer data from a monitoring network to distinguish sites impacted by a source tagged with tracer from nonimpacted sites. Sites determined not to be influenced by the plume are considered to represent background particulate sulfur concentrations. The particulate sulfur attributable to the source at sites within the plume is calculated as the difference between observed and background particulate sulfur. TAGIT is applied to measurements made in the vicinity of the east and west ends of the Grand Canyon in order to attribute particulate sulfur to the sources within the Eastern Colorado River Valley (ECRV) and the Mohave Power Project (MPP), respectively. TAGIT results indicate that during the winter intensive field sampling experiment (January 15-February 13, 1992), an average of 59 + 12% of the particulate sulfur at Marble Canyon, AZ, was attributable to ECRV sources. Similarly, during the summer field sampling experiment (July 13-August 30, 1992), MPP is estimated to have contributed an average of 7 + 3% of the particulate sulfur at Meadview, AZ. Uncertainties associated with the assumptions of TAGIT are discussed and quantified. The attribution results suggest that SO2-to-sulfate conversion rates are highly variable from day to day in this region.

  16. USE OF PERFLUOROCARBON TRACER (PFT) TECHNOLOGY FOR SUBSURFACE BARRIER INTEGRITY VERIFICATION AT THE WALDO TEST SITE.

    SciTech Connect

    SULLIVAN,T.

    1999-06-01

    Testing of perfluorocarbon gas tracers (PFT) on a subsurface barrier with known flaws was conducted at the Waldo Test Site operated by Science and Engineering Associates, Inc (SEA). The tests involved the use of five unique PFTs with a different tracer injected along the interior of each wall of the barrier. A fifth tracer was injected exterior to the barrier to examine the validity of diffusion controlled transport of the PFTs. The PFTs were injected for three days at a nominal flow rate of 15 cm{sup 3}/min and concentrations in the range of a few hundred ppm. Approximately 65 liters of air laced with tracer was injected for each tracer. The tracers were able to accurately detect the presence of the engineered flaws. Two flaws were detected on the north and east walls, and one flaw was detected on the south and west walls. In addition, one non-engineered flaw at the seam between the north and east walls was also detected. The use of multiple tracers provided independent confirmation of the flaws and permitted a distinction between tracers arriving at a monitoring port after being released from a nearby flaw and non-engineered flaws. The PFTs detected the smallest flaw, 0.5 inches in diameter. Visual inspection of the data showed excellent agreement with the known flaw locations and the relative size of the flaws was accurately estimated. Simultaneous with the PFT tests, SEA conducted tests with another gas tracer sulfur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}).

  17. Contamination Tracer Testing With Seabed Rock Drills: IODP Expedition 357

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orcutt, B.; Bergenthal, M.; Freudenthal, T.; Smith, D. J.; Lilley, M. D.; Schneiders, L.; Fruh-Green, G. L.

    2016-12-01

    IODP Expedition 357 utilized seabed rock drills for the first time in the history of the ocean drilling program, with the aim of collecting intact core of shallow mantle sequences from the Atlantis Massif to examine serpentinization processes and the deep biosphere. This new drilling approach required the development of a new system for delivering synthetic tracers during drilling to assess for possible sample contamination. Here, we describe this new tracer delivery system, assess the performance of the system during the expedition, provide an overview of the quality of the core samples collected for deep biosphere investigations based on tracer concentrations, and make recommendations for future applications of the system.

  18. USE OF PERFLUOROCARBON TRACER (PFT) TECHNOLOGY FOR SUBSURFACE BARRIER INTEGRITY VERIFICATION AT THE WALDO TEST SITE

    SciTech Connect

    SULLIVAN,T.; HEISER,J.; SENUM,G.; MILLIAN,L.

    2000-02-27

    Researchers from Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) tested perfluorocarbon (PFT) gas tracers on a subsurface barrier with known flaws at the Waldo test facility [operated by Science and Engineering Associates, Inc (SEA)]. The tests involved the use of five unique PFT tracers with a different tracer injected along the interior of each wall of the barrier. A fifth tracer was injected exterior to the barrier to examine the validity of diffusion controlled transport of the PFTs. The PFTs were injected for three days at a nominal flow rate of 15 cm{sup 3}/min and a concentrations in the range of a few hundred ppm. Approximately 65 liters of air laced with tracer was injected for each tracer. The tracers were able to accurately detect the presence of the engineered flaws. Two flaws were detected on the north and east walls and lane flaw was detected on the south and west walls. In addition, one non-engineered flaw at the seam between the north and east walls was also detected. The use of multiple tracers provided independent confirmation of the flaws and permitted a distinction between tracers arriving at a monitoring port after being released from a nearby flaw and non-engineered flaws. The PFTs detected the smallest flaw, 0.5 inches in diameter. Visual inspection of the data showed excellent agreement with the known flaw locations and the relative size of the flaws was accurately estimated.

  19. A Systematic Method For Tracer Test Analysis: An Example Using Beowawe Tracer Data

    SciTech Connect

    G. Michael Shook

    2005-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of tracer data using moment analysis requires a strict adherence to a set of rules which include data normalization, correction for thermal decay, deconvolution, extrapolation, and integration. If done correctly, the method yields specific information on swept pore volume, flow geometry and fluid velocity, and an understanding of the nature of reservoir boundaries. All calculations required for the interpretation can be done in a spreadsheet. The steps required for moment analysis are reviewed in this paper. Data taken from the literature is used in an example calculation.

  20. Can one identify karst conduit networks geometry and properties from hydraulic and tracer test data?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borghi, Andrea; Renard, Philippe; Cornaton, Fabien

    2016-04-01

    Karst aquifers are characterized by extreme heterogeneity due to the presence of karst conduits embedded in a fractured matrix having a much lower hydraulic conductivity. The resulting contrast in the physical properties of the system implies that the system reacts very rapidly to some changes in the boundary conditions and that numerical models are extremely sensitive to small modifications in properties or positions of the conduits. Furthermore, one major issue in all those models is that the location and size of the conduits is generally unknown. For all those reasons, estimating karst network geometry and their properties by solving an inverse problem is a particularly difficult problem. In this paper, two numerical experiments are described. In the first one, 18,000 flow and transport simulations have been computed and used in a systematic manner to assess statistically if one can retrieve the parameters of a model (geometry and radius of the conduits, hydraulic conductivity of the conduits) from head and tracer data. When two tracer test data sets are available, the solution of the inverse problems indicate with high certainty that there are indeed two conduits and not more. The radius of the conduits are usually well identified but not the properties of the matrix. If more conduits are present in the system, but only two tracer test data sets are available, the inverse problem is still able to identify the true solution as the most probable but it also indicates that the data are insufficient to conclude with high certainty. In the second experiment, a more complex model (including non linear flow equations in conduits) is considered. In this example, gradient-based optimization techniques are proved to be efficient for estimating the radius of the conduits and the hydraulic conductivity of the matrix in a promising and efficient manner. These results suggest that, despite the numerical difficulties, inverse methods should be used to constrain numerical

  1. First Tracer Test After Circulation in Desert Peak 27-15

    DOE Data Explorer

    Rose, Peter

    2013-11-16

    Following the successful stimulation of Desert Peak target EGS well 27-15, a circulation test was initiated by injecting a conservative tracer (1,5-nds) in combination with a reactive tracer (7-amino-1,3-naphthalene disulfonate). The closest production well 74-21 was monitored over the subsequent several months.

  2. ANALYSIS OF A GAS-PHASE PARTITIONING TRACER TEST CONDUCTED THROUGH FRACTURED MEDIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The gas-phase partitioning tracer method was used to estimate non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL), water, and air saturations in the vadose zone at a chlorinated-solvent contaminated field site in Tucson, AZ. The tracer test was conducted in a fractured clay system that is the confin...

  3. ANALYSIS OF A GAS-PHASE PARTITIONING TRACER TEST CONDUCTED THROUGH FRACTURED MEDIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The gas-phase partitioning tracer method was used to estimate non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL), water, and air saturations in the vadose zone at a chlorinated-solvent contaminated field site in Tucson, AZ. The tracer test was conducted in a fractured clay system that is the confin...

  4. Numerical Modeling for Integrated Design of a DNAPL Partitioning Tracer Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCray, J. E.; Divine, C. E.; Dugan, P. J.; Wolf, L.; Boving, T.; Louth, M.; Brusseau, M. L.; Hayes, D.

    2002-12-01

    Partitioning tracer tests (PTTs) are commonly used to estimate the location and volume of nonaqueous-phase liquids (NAPLs) at contaminated groundwater sites. PTTs are completed before and after remediation efforts as one means to assess remediation effectiveness. PTT design is complex. Numerical models are invaluable tools for designing a PTT, particularly for designing flow rates and selecting tracers to ensure proper tracer breakthrough times, spatial design of injection-extraction wells and rates to maximize tracer capture, well-specific sampling density and frequency, and appropriate tracer-chemical masses. Generally, the design requires consideration of the following factors: type of contaminant; distribution of contaminant at the site, including location of hot spots; site hydraulic characteristics; measurement of the partitioning coefficients for the various tracers; the time allotted to conduct the PTT; evaluation of the magnitude and arrival time of the tracer breakthrough curves; duration of the tracer input pulse; maximum tracer concentrations; analytical detection limits for the tracers; estimation of the capture zone of the well field to tracer ensure mass balance and to limit residual tracer concentrations left in the subsurface; effect of chemical remediation agents on the PTT results, and disposal of the extracted tracer solution. These design principles are applied to a chemical-enhanced remediation effort for a chlorinated-solvent dense NAPL (DNAPL) site at Little Creek Naval Amphibious Base in Virginia Beach, Virginia. For this project, the hydrology and pre-PTT contaminant distribution were characterized using traditional methods (slug tests, groundwater and soil concentrations from monitoring wells, and geoprobe analysis), as well as membrane interface probe analysis. Additional wells were installed after these studies. Partitioning tracers were selected based on the primary DNAPL contaminants at the site, expected NAPL saturations

  5. An Analytical Solution for Slug-Tracer Tests in FracturedReservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Shan, Chao; Pruess, Karsten

    2005-03-02

    The transport of chemicals or heat in fractured reservoirs is strongly affected by the fracture-matrix interfacial area. In a vapor-dominated geothermal reservoir, this area can be estimated by inert gas tracer tests, where gas diffusion between the fracture and matrix causes the tracer breakthrough curve (BTC) to have a long tail determined by the interfacial area. For water-saturated conditions, recent studies suggest that sorbing solute tracers can also generate strong tails in BTCs that may allow a determination of the fracture-matrix interfacial area. To theoretically explore such a useful phenomenon, this paper develops an analytical solution for BTCs in slug-tracer tests in a water-saturated fractured reservoir. The solution shows that increased sorption should have the same effect on BTCs as an increase of the diffusion coefficient. The solution is useful for understanding transport mechanisms, verifying numerical codes, and for identifying appropriate chemicals as tracers for the characterization of fractured reservoirs.

  6. A Straightforward Random Walk Model for Fast Push-Pull Tracer Test Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Klotzsch, Stephan; Binder, Martin; Händel, Falk

    2017-01-01

    In this article, we present a straightforward random walk model for fast evaluation of push-pull tracer tests. By developing an adaptive algorithm, we overcome the problem of manually defining how many particles have to be used to simulate the transport problem. Beside this, we validate the random walk model by evaluating a push-pull tracer test with drift phase and confirm the results with MT3DMS. The random walk model took less than 1% of computational time of MT3DMS, thus allowing a remarkable faster evaluation of push-pull tracer tests. © 2016, National Ground Water Association.

  7. Partitioning tracers for measuring residual NAPL: Field-scale test results

    SciTech Connect

    Annable, M.D.; Rao, P.S.C.; Hatfield, K.; Graham, W.D.; Wood, A.L.; Enfield, C.G.

    1998-06-01

    The difficult task of locating and quantifying nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) present in the vadose and saturated zones has prompted the development of innovative, nondestructive characterization techniques. The use of the interwell partitioning tracer`s (IWPT) test, in which tracers that partition into the NAPL phase are displaced through the aquifer, is an attractive alternative to traditional coring and analysis. The first field test of IWPT was conducted in a hydraulically isolated test cell to quantify the total amount of a complex NAPL (a mixture of JP-4 jet fuel and chlorinated solvents) trapped within a 1.5-m smear zone in a shallow, unconfined sand and gravel aquifer at Hill Air Force Base (AFB), Utah. Tracer breakthrough curves (BTCs) were measured in three extraction wells (EWs) following a tracer pulse introduction through four injection wells (IWs). The measured retardation of the partitioning tracer (2,2-dimethyl-3-pentanol) relative to the nonreactive tracer (bromide) was used to quantify the NAPL present. The EW data were used to estimate an average NAPL saturation of 4.6--5.4% within the test cell. NAPL saturations estimated by using measured concentrations in soil cores of two significant compounds present in the NAPL were 3.0 and 4.6%.

  8. Conservative tracers for the C-well hydraulic testing

    SciTech Connect

    Dombrowski, T.; Coates, G.; Stetzenbach, K.J.

    1992-11-01

    This paper reports that work is being done to identify and characterize conservative organic tracers for use as groundwater tracers at the C-well complex. An evaluation of the chemical and biological stability of several compounds including fluorinated aliphatic and aromatic acids, fluorinated salicylic acids, and fluorinated cinnamic acids was carried out using tuff samples from the Yucca Mountain area and J13 or de-ionized water. Samples were monitored over a 60-day period for any decrease in concentration; the resulting data was evaluated for possible sorption or biological degradation of the candidate compound. The fluorinated benzoic acids show the greatest stability over the 60-day period. All analyses were carried out using an HPLC system, with either a fluorescence detector, a variable wavelength UV-VIS detector, or a quadrupole mass spectrometer.

  9. 100-NR-2 Apatite Treatability Test: Fall 2010 Tracer Infiltration Test (White Paper)

    SciTech Connect

    Vermeul, Vincent R.; Fritz, Brad G.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.; Greenwood, William J.; Johnson, Timothy C.; Horner, Jacob A.; Strickland, Christopher E.; Szecsody, James E.; Williams, Mark D.

    2011-04-14

    The primary objectives of the tracer infiltration test were to 1) determine whether field-scale hydraulic properties for the compacted roadbed materials and underlying Hanford fm. sediments comprising the zone of water table fluctuation beneath the site are consistent with estimates based laboratory-scale measurements on core samples and 2) characterize wetting front advancement and distribution of soil moisture achieved for the selected application rate. These primary objectives were met. The test successfully demonstrated that 1) the remaining 2 to 3 ft of compacted roadbed material below the infiltration gallery does not limit infiltration rates to levels that would be expected to eliminate near surface application as a viable amendment delivery approach and 2) the combined aqueous and geophysical monitoring approaches employed at this site, with some operational adjustments based on lessons learned, provides an effective means of assessing wetting front advancement and the distribution of soil moisture achieved for a given solution application. Reasonably good agreement between predicted and observed tracer and moisture front advancement rates was observed. During the first tracer infiltration test, which used a solution application rate of 0.7 cm/hr, tracer arrivals were observed at the water table (10 to 12 ft below the bottom of the infiltration gallery) after approximately 5 days, for an advancement rate of approximately 2 ft/day. This advancement rate is generally consistent with pre-test modeling results that predicted tracer arrival at the water table after approximately 5 days (see Figure 8, bottom left panel). This agreement indicates that hydraulic property values specified in the model for the compacted roadbed materials and underlying Hanford formation sediments, which were based on laboratory-scale measurements, are reasonable estimates of actual field-scale conditions. Additional work is needed to develop a working relationship between resistivity

  10. Ambiguity in measuring matrix diffusion with single-well injection/recovery tracer tests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lessoff, S.C.; Konikow, L.F.

    1997-01-01

    Single-well injection/recovery tracer tests are considered for use in characterizing and quantifying matrix diffusion in dual-porosity aquifers. Numerical modeling indicates that neither regional drift in homogeneous aquifers, nor heterogeneity in aquifers having no regional drift, nor hydrodynamic dispersion significantly affects these tests. However, when drift is coupled simultaneously with heterogeneity, they can have significant confounding effects on tracer return. This synergistic effect of drift and heterogeneity may help explain irreversible flow and inconsistent results sometimes encountered in previous single-well injection/recovery tracer tests. Numerical results indicate that in a hypothetical single-well injection/recovery tracer test designed to demonstrate and measure dual-porosity characteristics in a fractured dolomite, the simultaneous effects of drift and heterogeneity sometimes yields responses similar to those anticipated in a homogeneous dual-porosity formation. In these cases, tracer recovery could provide a false indication of the occurrence of matrix diffusion. Shortening the shut-in period between injection and recovery periods may make the test less sensitive to drift. Using multiple tracers having different diffusion characteristics, multiple tests having different pumping schedules, and testing the formation at more than one location would decrease the ambiguity in the interpretation of test data.

  11. Characterization of scale-dependent dispersivity in fractured formations through a divergent flow tracer test.

    PubMed

    Sharifi Haddad, Amin; Hassanzadeh, Hassan; Abedi, Jalal; Chen, Zhangxin; Ware, Antony

    2015-04-01

    Scale-dependency of dispersivity has been reported from field tracer tests. We present a simple methodology for characterization of dispersivity as a linear function of scale around an injection well using divergent flow tracer test data conducted in fractured formations. Results show that the slope of this linear dispersivity function can be estimated using tracer concentration measurements in a monitoring well. The characterized dispersivity function has applications in modeling of field-scale transport processes in fractured formations. © 2014, National Ground Water Association.

  12. Novel Application of Single-Well Tracer Tests to Evaluate Hydraulic Stimulation Effectiveness

    SciTech Connect

    G. M. Shook; Gopi Nalla

    2005-09-01

    This paper presents a graphical method by which one can identify the number of fractures and their permeability distribution in the near-well region from single-well tracer tests. The method is an extension of tracer analysis methods developed previously to estimate flow geometry and relies on caluclating the relative fluid velocity from F-__ plots. A number of numerical examples show that high flow zones (fractures) are readily identified from the derivatives of an F-___ curve. The method can be used in evaluating well stimulation efforts by conducting a tracer test before and after the stimulation and comparing the velocity distributions.

  13. PARTITIONING INTERWELL TRACER TEST FOR NAPL SOURCE CHARACTERIZATION: A GENERAL OVERVIEW

    EPA Science Inventory

    Innovative and nondestructive characterization techniques have been developed to locate and quantify nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) in the vadose and saturated zones in the subsurface environment. One such technique is the partitioning interwell tracer test (PITT). The PITT i...

  14. PARTITIONING TRACERS FOR MEASURING RESIDUAL NAPL: FIELD-SCALE TEST RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The difficult task of locating and quantifying nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) present in the vadose and saturated zones has prompted the development of innovative, nondestructive characterization techniques. The use of the interwell partitioning tracer's (IWPT) test, in which ...

  15. PARTITIONING TRACERS FOR MEASURING RESIDUAL NAPL: FIELD-SCALE TEST RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The difficult task of locating and quantifying nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) present in the vadose and saturated zones has prompted the development of innovative, nondestructive characterization techniques. The use of the interwell partitioning tracer's (IWPT) test, in which ...

  16. PARTITIONING INTERWELL TRACER TEST FOR NAPL SOURCE CHARACTERIZATION: A GENERAL OVERVIEW

    EPA Science Inventory

    Innovative and nondestructive characterization techniques have been developed to locate and quantify nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) in the vadose and saturated zones in the subsurface environment. One such technique is the partitioning interwell tracer test (PITT). The PITT i...

  17. Tracer Tests in the Fractured Rock to Investigate Preferential Groundwater Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, W.; Chung, L.; Lee, T.; Liu, C.; Chia, Y.; Teng, M.

    2012-12-01

    Hydraulic tests are often used to obtain hydraulic conductivity in the aquifer. Test results usually reflect the average hydraulic conductivity in the surrounding strat. However, in fractured rock, groundwater flows primarily through a few fractures. Saltwater tracer test can be used to detect the direction of groundwater flow, but it was difficult to know the hydraulic connectivity between fractures. In this study, we use a variety of field tests, including tracer test, hydraulic test, and heat-pulse flowmeter test, to locate the permeable fractures and detect the hydraulic connections between boreholes. There are eight test wells and two observation wells on field experimental site in central Taiwan. Geological survey results show that there are at least three sets of joint planes. In order to realize the location of the preferential pathway of groundwater flow, heat-pulse flowmeter measurement was adopted to identify the depth of permeable fractures. Multi-well pumping test was also performed to investigate the hydraulic connectivity between these wells. Tracer tests were then used to detect the hydraulic connectivity of permeable fractures between two wells. Injection of nano zero valent iron in one well and and collection of iron tracer with a magnet array in the other well can specifically locate the permeable fracture and determine the connectivity. Saltwater tracer test result can be used to support that of nano-iron tracer test, and verify the relationship between well water conductivity increases and rock fracture location. The results show that tracer test is a useful tool to investigate the preferential groundwater flow in the fractured rock, but it is essential to flush the mud in fractures prior to the test.

  18. Photoacoustic infrared spectroscopy for conducting gas tracer tests and measuring water saturations in landfills

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Yoojin; Han, Byunghyun; Mostafid, M. Erfan; Chiu, Pei; Yazdani, Ramin; Imhoff, Paul T.

    2012-02-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Photoacoustic infrared spectroscopy tested for measuring tracer gas in landfills. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Measurement errors for tracer gases were 1-3% in landfill gas. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Background signals from landfill gas result in elevated limits of detection. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Technique is much less expensive and easier to use than GC. - Abstract: Gas tracer tests can be used to determine gas flow patterns within landfills, quantify volatile contaminant residence time, and measure water within refuse. While gas chromatography (GC) has been traditionally used to analyze gas tracers in refuse, photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) might allow real-time measurements with reduced personnel costs and greater mobility and ease of use. Laboratory and field experiments were conducted to evaluate the efficacy of PAS for conducting gas tracer tests in landfills. Two tracer gases, difluoromethane (DFM) and sulfur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}), were measured with a commercial PAS instrument. Relative measurement errors were invariant with tracer concentration but influenced by background gas: errors were 1-3% in landfill gas but 4-5% in air. Two partitioning gas tracer tests were conducted in an aerobic landfill, and limits of detection (LODs) were 3-4 times larger for DFM with PAS versus GC due to temporal changes in background signals. While higher LODs can be compensated by injecting larger tracer mass, changes in background signals increased the uncertainty in measured water saturations by up to 25% over comparable GC methods. PAS has distinct advantages over GC with respect to personnel costs and ease of use, although for field applications GC analyses of select samples are recommended to quantify instrument interferences.

  19. The Dual Media Hypothesis as an Explanation for Differing Hydraulic Conductivity Values Resulting From Traditional Pumping Tests and Conservative Tracer Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molz, F. J.; Crisman, S. A.

    2001-05-01

    In a recent publication, Niemann and Rovey [Ground Water Monitoring and Remediation, Summer, 2000, pp. 122-128] published the results of hydraulic conductivity (K) measurements resulting from traditional pumping tests and from natural gradient tracer tests. The pumping test K values were based on a Cooper/Jacob analysis, while the natural gradient K values resulted from effective porosity, hydraulic gradient, and travel time measurements. All tests were performed in a glacio-fluvial aquifer, and results showed that the pumping test-derived K values were 10 to 20 times larger than the tracer test-derived values. Given the recent renewed interest in multi-media flow and transport modeling [Haggerty and Gorelick, WRR, 31(10), 2383, 1995; Zheng and Jiao, J. Environ. Eng (ASCE), 124(6), 510, 1998; Harvey and Gorelick, WRR, 36(3), 637, 2000; Feehley, Zhang and Molz, WRR, 36(9), 2501, 2000], we thought it would be interesting and informative to analyze the results of Niemann and Rovey [2000] using a mobile and immobile domain concept. Presumably, the pumping test results would reflect the relatively high K values in the mobile domain, while the tracer travel times would be diminished by movement of conservative solute into and out of the immobile domain, which would constitute a type of retardation different physically and chemically from reversible sorption. If such dual-media effects exist, and are ignored, the increased tracer travel times would be interpreted as lower apparent K values. Analysis is based on 1-D dispersion of a tracer in a 1-D flow-field through media having both mobile and immobile fractions. The resulting coupled system of equations are solved using a finite-difference method, with the resulting travel times used to calculate an apparent hydraulic conductivity value. Comparison of the theoretical results with the experimental results of Niemann and Rovey [2000] show good agreement for certain selected values of mobile/immobile porosity ratio and mass

  20. Single-well "push-pull" partitioning tracer test for NAPL detection in the subsurface.

    PubMed

    Istok, Jonathan D; Field, Jennifer A; Schroth, Martin H; Davis, Brian M; Dwarakanath, Varadarajan

    2002-06-15

    Previous environmental applications of partitioning tracer tests to detect and quantify nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL) contamination in the subsurface have been limited to well-to-well tests. However, theory and numerical modeling suggests that single-well injection-extraction ("push-pull") partitioning tracer tests can also potentially detect and quantify NAPL contamination. In this type of test, retardation factors for injected partitioning tracers are estimated from the increase in apparent dispersion observed in extraction-phase breakthrough curves in the presence of NAPL. A series of laboratory push-pull tests was conducted in physical aquifer models (PAMs) packed with natural aquifer sediment prepared with and without the presence of trichloroethene (TCE) NAPL. Field tests were conducted in an aquifer contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbon NAPL. Injected test solutions contained a suite of partitioning and conservative (nonpartitioning) alcohol tracers. Laboratory push-pull partitioning tracer tests were able to detect and quantify sorption of partitioning tracers to aquifer sediment (in the absence of NAPL) and to detect NAPL when it was present. NAPL saturations computed from estimated retardation factors bracketed those computed from known volumes of emplaced NAPL in the sediment pack. However, numerical modeling with assumed homogeneous NAPL distribution and linear equilibrium partitioning of tracers between aqueous and NAPL phases was unable to reproduce all features of observed breakthrough curves. Excavation of the sediment pack after all tests indicated that a portion of the emplaced NAPL had sunk to the bottom of the PAM invalidating the modeling assumption of homogeneous NAPL distribution. Moreover, the apparent dispersion in extraction-phase breakthrough curves decreased when the injection-extraction pumping rate was decreased, suggesting that mass transfer limitations existed during laboratory tests. Field push-pull partitioning tracer tests were

  1. Tracer tests and the structure of permeability in the Corallian limestone aquifer of northern England, UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foley, Aidan; Cachandt, Gerd; Franklin, Janine; Willmore, Fergus; Atkinson, Tim

    2012-05-01

    The Corallian limestone of northern England (UK) is widely exploited for water supplies and exhibits the karstic phenomena of sinking rivers, conduit development and groundwater velocities of several kilometres per day. To test a number of model-derived source protection zones and elucidate contaminant transport mechanisms in the aquifer, three tracer tests were conducted from a set of swallow-holes draining the River Derwent toward public water supply wells in the eastern part of the aquifer. Tracers used included: Enterobacter cloacae (bacteriophage), Photine C (optical brightener), sodium fluorescein (fluorescent dye) and sulphur hexafluoride (dissolved gas), the varying properties of which make them suitable analogues for different types of potential contaminant. Observed tracer transport times and arrival patterns indicate that tracer transport occurs through karstic channels embedded in a network of primary fissures which exert control over tracer concentrations once initial tracer plumes have passed. A dipole flow system is observed between the swallow-holes and the closest abstraction well, whilst previously modelled source protection zones do not accurately reflect either groundwater velocity or those areas of the aquifer supplying the wells. These findings imply that managing such aquifers for potential contamination should rely upon empirical tracer evidence for source-protection zone modelling.

  2. A Bayesian geostatistical transfer function approach to tracer test analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fienen, Michael N.; Luo, Jian; Kitanidis, Peter K.

    2006-07-01

    Reactive transport modeling is often used in support of bioremediation and chemical treatment planning and design. There remains a pressing need for practical and efficient models that do not require (or assume attainable) the high level of characterization needed by complex numerical models. We focus on a linear systems or transfer function approach to the problem of reactive tracer transport in a heterogeneous saprolite aquifer. Transfer functions are obtained through the Bayesian geostatistical inverse method applied to tracer injection histories and breakthrough curves. We employ nonparametric transfer functions, which require minimal assumptions about shape and structure. The resulting flexibility empowers the data to determine the nature of the transfer function with minimal prior assumptions. Nonnegativity is enforced through a reflected Brownian motion stochastic model. The inverse method enables us to quantify uncertainty and to generate conditional realizations of the transfer function. Complex information about a hydrogeologic system is distilled into a relatively simple but rigorously obtained function that describes the transport behavior of the system between two wells. The resulting transfer functions are valuable in reactive transport models based on traveltime and streamline methods. The information contained in the data, particularly in the case of strong heterogeneity, is not overextended but is fully used. This is the first application of Bayesian geostatistical inversion to transfer functions in hydrogeology but the methodology can be extended to any linear system.

  3. IMAGE Project: Results of Laboratory Tests on Tracers for Supercritical Conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandvoll, Øyvind; Opsahl Viig, Sissel; Nardini, Isabella; Muller, Jiri

    2016-04-01

    The use of tracers is a well-established technique for monitoring dynamic behaviour of water and gas through a reservoir. In geothermal reservoirs special challenges are encountered due to high temperatures and pressures. In this work, tracer candidates for monitoring water at supercritical conditions (temperature > 374°C, pressure ca 218 bar), are tested in laboratory experiments. Testing of tracers at supercritical water conditions requires experimental set-ups which tolerate harsh conditions with respect to high temperature and pressure. In addition stringent HES (health, environment and safety) factors have to be taken into consideration when designing and performing the experiments. The setup constructed in this project consists of a pressure vessel, high pressure pump, instrumentation for pressure and temperature control and instrumentation required for accurate sampling of tracers. In order to achieve accurate results, a special focus has been paid to the development of the tracer sampling technique. Perfluorinated cyclic hydrocarbons (PFCs) have been selected as tracer candidates. This group of compounds is today commonly used as gas tracers in oil reservoirs. According to the literature they are stable at temperatures up to 400°C. To start with, five PFCs have been tested for thermal stability in static experiments at 375°C and 108 bar in the experimental setup described above. The tracer candidates will be further tested for several months at the relevant conditions. Preliminary results indicate that some of the PFC compounds show stability after three months. However, in order to arrive at conclusive results, the experiments have to be repeated over a longer period and paying special attention to more accurate sampling procedures.

  4. Distinctive stable isotope ratios in important zooplankton species in relation to estuarine salinity gradients: Potential tracer of fish migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Keita W.; Kasai, Akihide; Isoda, Takane; Nakayama, Kouji; Tanaka, Masaru

    2008-07-01

    To assess the potential of stable isotope ratios as an indicator of fish migration within estuaries, stable isotope ratios in important zooplankton species were analyzed in relation to estuarine salinity gradients. Gut contents from migratory juveniles of the euryhaline marine fish Lateolabrax japonicus were examined along the Chikugo River estuary of the Ariake Sea, which has the most developed estuarine turbidity maximum (ETM) in Japan. Early juveniles in March and April preyed primarily on two copepod species; Sinocalanus sinensis at lower salinities and Acartia omorii at higher salinities. Late juveniles (standard length > 40 mm) at lower salinities preyed exclusively on the mysid Acanthomysis longirostris until July and complementarily on the decapod Acetes japonicus in August. These prey species were collected along the estuary during the spring-summer seasons of 2003 and 2004, and their carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios ( δ13C and δ15N) were evaluated. The δ13C values of prey species were distinct from each other and were primarily depleted within and in close proximity to the ETM (salinity < 10); S. sinensis (-26.6‰) < Acanthomysis longirostris (-23.3‰) < Acartia omorii (-21.1‰) < Acetes japonicus (-18.5‰). The overall gradient of δ13C with salinity occurred for all prey species and showed minor temporal fluctuations, while it was not directly influenced by the δ13C values in particulate organic matter along the estuary. In contrast to δ13C, the δ15N values of prey species did not exhibit any clear relationship with salinity. The present study demonstrated that δ13C has the potential for application as a tracer of fish migration into lower salinity areas including the ETM.

  5. Tracer test analysis of the Klamath Falls geothermal resource: a comparison of models

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, S.E.

    1984-06-01

    Two tracer tests on doublet systems in a fractured geothermal system were carried out in Klamath Falls, Oregon. The purpose of the tests were to obtain data which would lead to information about the reservoir and to test the applicability of current tracer flow models. The results show rapid breakthrough times and indicate fracture flow with vigorous mixing of injector fluid before production of same. This leads to the idea that thermal breakthrough is not directly related to tracer breakthrough in the Klamath Union doublet system. There has been no long-term enthalpy loss from exploiting the resource for 40 years. In order to reduce the data, models were developed to analyze the results. Along with a porous media flow model two mathematical models developed to analyze fractured geothermal systems are used to help decipher the various tracer return curves. The flow of tracers in doublet systems was investigated. A mathematical description is used for tracer flow through fractures as a function of time and various nonlinear parameters which can be found using a curve fitting technique. This allows the reservoir to be qualitatively defined. These models fit the data well, but point to the fact that future improvement needs to be considered for a clearer and more quantitative understanding of fractured geothermal systems. 22 refs., 32 figs., 11 tabs.

  6. Application of multiple-point geostatistics on modelling pumping tests and tracer tests in heterogeneous environments with complex geological structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huysmans, Marijke; Dassargues, Alain

    2014-05-01

    In heterogeneous environments with complex geological structures, analysis of pumping and tracer tests is often problematic. Standard interpretation methods do not account for heterogeneity or simulate this heterogeneity introducing empirical zonation of the calibrated parameters or using variogram-based geostatistical techniques that are often not able to describe realistic heterogeneity in complex geological environments where e.g. sedimentary structures, multi-facies deposits, structures with large connectivity or curvi-linear structures can be present. Multiple-point geostatistics aims to overcome the limitations of the variogram and can be applied in different research domains to simulate heterogeneity in complex environments. In this project, multiple-point geostatistics is applied to the interpretation of pumping tests and a tracer test in an actual case of a sandy heterogeneous aquifer. This study allows to deduce the main advantages and disadvantages of this technique compared to variogram-based techniques for interpretation of pumping tests and tracer tests. A pumping test and a tracer test were performed in the same sandbar deposit consisting of cross-bedded units composed of materials with different grain sizes and hydraulic conductivities. The pumping test and the tracer test are analyzed with a local 3D groundwater model in which fine-scale sedimentary heterogeneity is modelled using multiple-point geostatistics. To reduce CPU and RAM requirements of the multiple-point geostatistical simulation steps, edge properties indicating the presence of irregularly-shaped surfaces are directly simulated. Results show that for the pumping test as well as for the tracer test, incorporating heterogeneity results in a better fit between observed and calculated drawdowns/concentrations. The improvement of the fit is however not as large as expected. In this paper, the reasons for these somewhat unsatisfactory results are explored and recommendations for future

  7. Preferential flow paths in fractured rock detected by cross-borehole nano-iron tracer test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chia, Yeeping; Chuang, Po-Yu

    2017-04-01

    Characterization of the preferential flow paths and their hydraulic properties is desirable for developing a hydrogeological conceptual model in fractured rock. However, the heterogeneity and anisotropy of the hydraulic property often make it difficult to understand groundwater flow paths through fractures. In this study, we adopted nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) as a tracer to characterize fracture connectivity and hydraulic properties. A magnet array was placed in an observation well to attract arriving nZVI particles for identifying the location of incoming tracer. This novel approach was developed for the investigation of fracture flow at a hydrogeological research station in central Taiwan. A heat-pulse flowmeter test was performed to delineate the vertical distribution of permeable fractures in two boreholes, making it possible to design a field tracer test. The nZVI slurry was released in the sealed injection well. The arrival of the slurry in the observation well was evidenced by a breakthrough curve recorded by the fluid conductivity sensor as well as the nZVI particles attracted to the magnets. The iron nanoparticles attracted to the magnets provide the quantitative criteria for locating the position of tracer inlet in the observation well. The position of the magnet attracting the maximum weight of iron nanoparticles agrees well with the depth of a permeable fracture zone delineated by the flowmeter. Besides, a conventional saline tracer test was conducted in the field, producing a similar outcome as the nZVI tracer test. Our study results indicate that the nano-iron tracer test could be a promising method for the characterization of the preferential flow paths in fractured rock.

  8. Estimation of Fracture Porosity in an Unsaturated Fractured Welded Tuff Using Gas Tracer Testing

    SciTech Connect

    B.M. Freifeild

    2001-10-18

    Kinematic fracture porosity is an important hydrologic transport parameter for predicting the potential of rapid contaminant migration through fractured rock. The transport velocity of a solute moving within a fracture network is inversely related to the fracture porosity. Since fracture porosity is often one or two orders of magnitude smaller than matrix porosity, and fracture permeability is often orders of magnitude greater than matrix permeability, solutes may travel significantly faster in the fracture network than in the surrounding matrix. This dissertation introduces a new methodology for conducting gas tracer tests using a field portable mass spectrometer along with analytical tools for estimating fracture porosity using the measured tracer concentration breakthrough curves. Field experiments were conducted at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, consisting of air-permeability transient testing and gas-tracer-transport tests. The experiments were conducted from boreholes drilled within an underground tunnel as part of an investigation of rock mass hydrological behavior. Air-permeability pressure transients, recorded during constant mass flux injections, have been analyzed using a numerical inversion procedure to identify fracture permeability and porosity. Dipole gas tracer tests have also been conducted from the same boreholes used for air-permeability testing. Mass breakthrough data has been analyzed using a random walk particle-tracking model, with a dispersivity that is a function of the advective velocity. The estimated fracture porosity using the tracer test and air-injection test data ranges from .001 to .015. These values are an order of magnitude greater than the values estimated by others using hydraulically estimated fracture apertures. The estimates of porosity made using air-permeability test data are shown to be highly sensitive to formation heterogeneity. Uncertainty analyses performed on the gas tracer test results show high confidence in the parameter

  9. Estimation of fracture porosity in an unsaturated fractured welded tuff using gas tracer testing

    SciTech Connect

    Freifeld, Barry Mark

    2001-12-01

    Kinematic fracture porosity is an important hydrologic transport parameter for predicting the potential of rapid contaminant migration through fractured rock. The transport velocity of a solute moving within a fracture network is inversely related to the fracture porosity. Since fracture porosity is often one or two orders of magnitude smaller than matrix porosity, and fracture permeability is often orders of magnitude greater than matrix permeability, solutes may travel significantly faster in the fracture network than in the surrounding matrix. This dissertation introduces a new methodology for conducting gas tracer tests using a field portable mass spectrometer along with analytical tools for estimating fracture porosity using the measured tracer concentration breakthrough curves. Field experiments were conducted at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, consisting of air-permeability transient testing and gas-tracer-transport tests. The experiments were conducted from boreholes drilled within an underground tunnel as part of an investigation of rock mass hydrological behavior. Air-permeability pressure transients, recorded during constant mass flux injections, have been analyzed using a numerical inversion procedure to identify fracture permeability and porosity. Dipole gas tracer tests have also been conducted from the same boreholes used for air-permeability testing. Mass breakthrough data has been analyzed using a random walk particle-tracking model, with a dispersivity that is a function of the advective velocity. The estimated fracture porosity using the tracer test and air-injection test data ranges from .001 to .015. These values are an order of magnitude greater than the values estimated by others using hydraulically estimated fracture apertures. The estimates of porosity made using air-permeability test data are shown to be highly sensitive to formation heterogeneity. Uncertainty analyses performed on the gas tracer test results show high confidence in the parameter

  10. Characterization of shallow geothermal efficiency in fractured media through thermal tracer tests and numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de La Bernardie, Jérôme; Bour, Olivier; de Dreuzy, Jean-Raynald; Guihéneuf, Nicolas; Chatton, Eliot; Labasque, Thierry; Le Borgne, Tanguy

    2017-04-01

    Geothermal energy is a renewable energy source particularly attractive due to associated low greenhouse gas emission rates. Crystalline rocks are in general considered of poor interest for geothermal applications at shallow depths (< 100m), because of the low permeability of the medium. In some cases, fractures may enhance permeability, but thermal energy storage at these shallow depths is still remaining very challenging because of the low storativity of the medium. Within this framework, the purpose of this study is to test the possibility of efficient thermal energy storage in shallow fractured rocks. For doing so, several heat tracer tests have been carried on in a single well between two connected fractures. We completed this experimental work with numerical modeling of thermal transport in fractures embedded in an impermeable conductive matrix. The thermal tracer tests were achieved in a crystalline rock aquifer at the experimental site of Ploemeur (H+ observatory network). The experimental setup consists in injecting hot water in a fracture isolated by a double straddle packer in the borehole while pumping and monitoring the temperature in a fracture crossing the same borehole at greater elevation. Several tracer tests were achieved at different pumping and injection rates. This experimental set up allowed to estimate temperature breakthrough for different tracer test durations and hydraulic configurations from fully convergent to perfect dipole tracer tests. Thanks to those tests and numerical modeling of heat transport in fractures, we demonstrate that temperature recovery is highly dependent on flow rate and streamlines shape. Thus, thermal storage rate is inversely proportional to flow and is maximized in perfect dipole configuration. These thermal tracer tests and numerical modeling allow to define the most efficient configuration for optimizing shallow geothermal storage in fractured rock.

  11. Doublet tracer tests to determine the contaminant flushing properties of a municipal solid waste landfill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodman, N. D.; Rees-White, T. C.; Beaven, R. P.; Stringfellow, A. M.; Barker, J. A.

    2017-08-01

    This paper describes a programme of research investigating horizontal fluid flow and solute transport through saturated municipal solid waste (MSW) landfill. The purpose is to inform engineering strategies for future contaminant flushing. Solute transport between injection/abstraction well pairs (doublets) is investigated using three tracers over five separate tests at well separations between 5 m and 20 m. Two inorganic tracers (lithium and bromide) were used, plus the fluorescent dye tracer, rhodamine-WT. There was no evidence for persistent preferential horizons or pathways at the inter-well scale. The time for tracer movement to the abstraction wells varied with well spacing as predicted for a homogeneous isotropic continuum. The time for tracer movement to remote observation wells was also as expected. Mobile porosity was estimated as 0.02 ( 4% of total porosity). Good fits to the tracer breakthrough data were achieved using a dual-porosity model, with immobile regions characterised by block diffusion timescales in the range of about one to ten years. This implies that diffusional exchanges are likely to be very significant for engineering of whole-site contaminant flushing and possibly rate-limiting.

  12. Laboratory testing and modeling to evaluate perfluorocarbon compounds as tracers in geothermal systems

    SciTech Connect

    Reimus, Paul W

    2011-01-21

    The thermal stability and adsorption characteristics of three perfluorinated hydrocarbon compounds were evaluated under geothermal conditions to determine the potential to use these compounds as conservative or thermally-degrading tracers in Engineered (or Enhanced) Geothermal Systems (EGS). The three compounds tested were perfluorodimethyl-cyclobutane (PDCB), perfluoromethylcyclohexane (PMCH), and perfluorotrimethylcyclohexane (PTCH), which are collectively referred to as perfluorinated tracers, or PFTs. Two sets of duplicate tests were conducted in batch mode in gold-bag reactors, with one pair of reactors charged with a synthetic geothermal brine containing the PFTs and a second pair was charged with the brine-PFT mixture plus a mineral assemblage chosen to be representative of activated fractures in an EGS reservoir. A fifth reactor was charged with deionized water containing the three PFTs. The experiments were conducted at {approx}100 bar, with temperatures ranging from 230 C to 300 C. Semi-analytical and numerical modeling was also conducted to show how the PFTs could be used in conjunction with other tracers to interrogate surface area to volume ratios and temperature profiles in EGS reservoirs. Both single-well and cross-hole tracer tests are simulated to illustrate how different suites of tracers could be used to accomplish these objectives. The single-well tests are especially attractive for EGS applications because they allow the effectiveness of a stimulation to be evaluated without drilling a second well.

  13. Mapping fracture flow paths with a nanoscale zero-valent iron tracer test and a flowmeter test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Po-Yu; Chia, Yeeping; Chiu, Yung-Chia; Teng, Mao-Hua; Liou, Sofia Ya Hsuan

    2017-08-01

    The detection of preferential flow paths and the characterization of their hydraulic properties are important for the development of hydrogeological conceptual models in fractured-rock aquifers. In this study, nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) particles were used as tracers to characterize fracture connectivity between two boreholes in fractured rock. A magnet array was installed vertically in the observation well to attract arriving nZVI particles and identify the location of the incoming tracer. Heat-pulse flowmeter tests were conducted to delineate the permeable fractures in the two wells for the design of the tracer test. The nZVI slurry was released in the screened injection well. The arrival of the slurry in the observation well was detected by an increase in electrical conductivity, while the depth of the connected fracture was identified by the distribution of nZVI particles attracted to the magnet array. The position where the maximum weight of attracted nZVI particles was observed coincides with the depth of a permeable fracture zone delineated by the heat-pulse flowmeter. In addition, a saline tracer test produced comparable results with the nZVI tracer test. Numerical simulation was performed using MODFLOW with MT3DMS to estimate the hydraulic properties of the connected fracture zones between the two wells. The study results indicate that the nZVI particle could be a promising tracer for the characterization of flow paths in fractured rock.

  14. Semi-analytic approach to analyze single well tracer tests TR-44

    SciTech Connect

    Antunez, E.U.

    1984-08-01

    Residual oil saturation is one of the most important parameters to be considered when analyzing a prospective field for enhanced oil recovery. Traditionally, residual oil saturation has been estimated from cores or well logs. These methods have a small radius of investigation, evaluating saturations in a region close to the wellbore. This region is often affected by injection or production operations. Single well tracer tests have proven to be a better alternative to estimate residual oil saturation since they cover a substantially larger volume of the reservoir, and thus measure a more representative residual oil saturation of the target formation. The method consists of the injection of a reactive tracer that is soluble in oil and water. This tracer slowly hydrolyzes forming a secondary tracer as a product of an irreversible chemical reaction. After injection, the well is shut in to allow the formation of a detectable amount of secondary tracer, which is soluble only in water. When the well is open to production, each tracer arrives to the well at different times. From the separation between the concentration peaks, residual oil saturation is estimated. However, the determination of the residual oil saturation through the analysis of single well tracer test production data, in the past, has required: 1) the use of finite difference simulators, 2) five fitting parameters and 3) considerable man-computer interaction time. In addition finite difference simulators give results that are affected by numerical dispersion. This, and the fitting parameters, add uncertainty to the uniqueness of the solution. In this work, a new approach is presented. The test is analyzed. 28 references, 70 figures, 7 tables.

  15. Tracer SWIW tests in propped and un-propped fractures: parameter sensitivity issues, revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghergut, Julia; Behrens, Horst; Sauter, Martin

    2017-04-01

    Single-well injection-withdrawal (SWIW) or 'push-then-pull' tracer methods appear attractive for a number of reasons: less uncertainty on design and dimensioning, and lower tracer quantities required than for inter-well tests; stronger tracer signals, enabling easier and cheaper metering, and shorter metering duration required, reaching higher tracer mass recovery than in inter-well tests; last not least: no need for a second well. However, SWIW tracer signal inversion faces a major issue: the 'push-then-pull' design weakens the correlation between tracer residence times and georeservoir transport parameters, inducing insensitivity or ambiguity of tracer signal inversion w. r. to some of those georeservoir parameters that are supposed to be the target of tracer tests par excellence: pore velocity, transport-effective porosity, fracture or fissure aperture and spacing or density (where applicable), fluid/solid or fluid/fluid phase interface density. Hydraulic methods cannot measure the transport-effective values of such parameters, because pressure signals correlate neither with fluid motion, nor with material fluxes through (fluid-rock, or fluid-fluid) phase interfaces. The notorious ambiguity impeding parameter inversion from SWIW test signals has nourished several 'modeling attitudes': (i) regard dispersion as the key process encompassing whatever superposition of underlying transport phenomena, and seek a statistical description of flow-path collectives enabling to characterize dispersion independently of any other transport parameter, as proposed by Gouze et al. (2008), with Hansen et al. (2016) offering a comprehensive analysis of the various ways dispersion model assumptions interfere with parameter inversion from SWIW tests; (ii) regard diffusion as the key process, and seek for a large-time, asymptotically advection-independent regime in the measured tracer signals (Haggerty et al. 2001), enabling a dispersion-independent characterization of multiple

  16. Interpretations of Tracer Tests Performed in the Culebra Dolomite at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Site

    SciTech Connect

    MEIGS,LUCY C.; BEAUHEIM,RICHARD L.; JONES,TOYA L.

    2000-08-01

    This report provides (1) an overview of all tracer testing conducted in the Culebra Dolomite Member of the Rustler Formation at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WPP) site, (2) a detailed description of the important information about the 1995-96 tracer tests and the current interpretations of the data, and (3) a summary of the knowledge gained to date through tracer testing in the Culebra. Tracer tests have been used to identify transport processes occurring within the Culebra and quantify relevant parameters for use in performance assessment of the WIPP. The data, especially those from the tests performed in 1995-96, provide valuable insight into transport processes within the Culebra. Interpretations of the tracer tests in combination with geologic information, hydraulic-test information, and laboratory studies have resulted in a greatly improved conceptual model of transport processes within the Culebra. At locations where the transmissivity of the Culebra is low (< 4 x 10{sup -6} m{sup 2}/s), we conceptualize the Culebra as a single-porosity medium in which advection occurs largely through the primary porosity of the dolomite matrix. At locations where the transmissivity of the Culebra is high (> 4 x 10{sup -6} m{sup 2}/s), we conceptualize the Culebra as a heterogeneous, layered, fractured medium in which advection occurs largely through fractures and solutes diffuse between fractures and matrix at multiple rates. The variations in diffusion rate can be attributed to both variations in fracture spacing (or the spacing of advective pathways) and matrix heterogeneity. Flow and transport appear to be concentrated in the lower Culebra. At all locations, diffusion is the dominant transport process in the portions of the matrix that tracer does not access by flow.

  17. Bounding flow and transport analysis of proposed 105A mock-up tank tracer test

    SciTech Connect

    Piepho, M.G.

    1994-08-01

    The purpose of this bounding analysis was to determine bounding estimates of salt concentrations in the aquifer below the salt-tracer plume test at the 105A mockup-tank site near the inactive Semi-Works Plant in the 200 East Area. The objective was to calculate the bounding salt concentrations and compare them to the appropriate maximum contamination level (MCL) allowed by state law, which for sodium chloride is 415 mg/l as a secondary standard. The tracer test is part of the Electrical-Resistance Tomography (ERT) demonstration, which will provide an effective method of detecting tank leaks if it is shown to be successful. The basic idea of ERT method is that the electrical resistance in the soils will change enough to be detected when water with salts infiltrate the soils, even if a high-conductance metal tank is just above the leak. The 105A mockup tank did not have an impermeable bottom and was open at the top until the time of the test. It was assumed, at the time of the tracer test or shortly afterwards, that an impermeable bottom (concrete) would be placed at the bottom of the tank, but still remain open at the top. Hence, in this analysis, no artificial recharge is produced due to water running off a tank top, since no top is assumed. The conceptual model is discussed in Section 2.0 with the mathematical and numerical models briefly discussed in Section 3.0. The main results are given in Section 4.0 with the conclusions drawn in Section 5.0. These calculations were made before the tracer test. A similar set of calculations will be performed after the tracer test assuming more details concerning leak location and soil properties are available. The tracer test could be used to validate or confirm the modeling methodology/capability of plumes in the vadose zone at the Hanford site.

  18. Diffusive partitioning tracer test for nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL) detection in the vadose zone.

    PubMed

    Werner, David; Höhener, Patrick

    2002-04-01

    This paper proposes the theory and practical application of a new partitioning tracer test for nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL) detection in the vadose zone, which is based on diffusion. A mixture of chlorofluorocarbons as gaseous tracers is injected into the vadose zone to form a point source at the injection point. While the tracers diffuse away, small volumes of gas are withdrawn from the injection point. The quantitative determination of the NAPL saturation is based on a comparison of the concentration decline of tracers with different air-NAPL partitioning coefficients. The test has been evaluated in laboratory sand columns contaminated with dodecane. NAPL in saturations of 0.8-4% of the total porosity have been quantified in a wide range of different water contents. Actual and measured NAPL saturations calculated as an average from four different tracer pairs agreed within +/-30%. The new method was successfully used for repeated NAPL quantification in a large-scale field lysimeter contaminated with artificial kerosene. This rapid and inexpensive test is potentially of value for site investigations especially in combination with soil gas measurements, because it requires similar equipment. Possible applications are source delineation and repeated NAPL quantification in situ during a remediation.

  19. Analytical solutions for efficient interpretation of single-well push-pull tracer tests

    EPA Science Inventory

    Single-well push-pull tracer tests have been used to characterize the extent, fate, and transport of subsurface contamination. Analytical solutions provide one alternative for interpreting test results. In this work, an exact analytical solution to two-dimensional equations descr...

  20. Analytical solutions for efficient interpretation of single-well push-pull tracer tests

    EPA Science Inventory

    Single-well push-pull tracer tests have been used to characterize the extent, fate, and transport of subsurface contamination. Analytical solutions provide one alternative for interpreting test results. In this work, an exact analytical solution to two-dimensional equations descr...

  1. Single-well tracer push-pull test sensitivity w. r. to fracture aperture and spacing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghergut, I.; Behrens, H.; Karmakar, S.; Sauter, M.

    2012-04-01

    Dealing with a parallel-fracture system of infinite lateral extension, four characteristic regimes of tracer signal sensitivity w. r. to fracture aperture and w. r. to fracture spacing s (whose reciprocal defines fracture density, or the fluid-rock interface area per volume) can be identified during the pull phase of a single-well push-pull test, also depending upon the ratio between push-phase duration Tpush and a characteristic time scale Ts (defined by s2 / D = Ts , with D denoting the tracer's effective diffusion coefficient): early-time regime: tracer signals are sensitive w. r. to fracture aperture, but insensitive w. r. to fracture spacing; sensitivity w. r. to fracture aperture first increases, then decreases with Tpush / Ts (thus there will be an optimum in terms of to Tpush / Ts , at early pull times); mid-time regime: tracer signals are sensitive w. r. to fracture spacing, but insensitive w. r. to fracture aperture; sensitivity w. r. to fracture spacing increases with Tpush / Ts ; late-time regime: with increasing pull duration, tracer signals become increasingly insensitive w. r. to fracture spacing, while regaining sensitivity w. r. to fracture aperture; 'very late'-time regime: sensitivity w. r. to fracture aperture becomes independent upon Tpush / Ts . From these different regimes, some recommendations can be derived regarding the design and dimensioning of dual-tracer single-well push-pull tests for the specific purposes of geothermal reservoir characterization, using conservative solutes and heat as tracers. Acknowledgement: This study is funded by MWK Niedersachsen (Lower-Saxony's Science and Culture Ministry) and by Baker Hughes (Celle) within task unit 'G6' of the Collaborative Research Project 'gebo' (Geothermal Energy and High-Performance Drilling).

  2. Multiple-tracer tests for contaminant transport process identification in saturated municipal solid waste

    SciTech Connect

    Woodman, N.D. Rees-White, T.C.; Stringfellow, A.M.; Beaven, R.P.; Hudson, A.P.

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • Multiple tracers were applied to saturated MSW to test dual-porosity properties. • Lithium demonstrated to be non-conservative as a tracer. • 260 mm diameter column too small to test transport properties of MSW. • The classical advection-dispersion mode was rejected due to high dispersivity. • Characteristic diffusion times did not vary with the tracer. - Abstract: Two column tests were performed in conditions emulating vertical flow beneath the leachate table in a biologically active landfill to determine dominant transport mechanisms occurring in landfills. An improved understanding of contaminant transport process in wastes is required for developing better predictions about potential length of the long term aftercare of landfills, currently measured in timescales of centuries. Three tracers (lithium, bromide and deuterium) were used. Lithium did not behave conservatively. Given that lithium has been used extensively for tracing in landfill wastes, the tracer itself and the findings of previous tests which assume that it has behaved conservatively may need revisiting. The smaller column test could not be fitted with continuum models, probably because the volume of waste was below a representative elemental volume. Modelling compared advection-dispersion (AD), dual porosity (DP) and hybrid AD–DP models. Of these models, the DP model was found to be the most suitable. Although there is good evidence to suggest that diffusion is an important transport mechanism, the breakthrough curves of the different tracers did not differ from each other as would be predicted based on the free-water diffusion coefficients. This suggested that solute diffusion in wastes requires further study.

  3. Single well surfactant test to evaluate surfactant floods using multi tracer method

    DOEpatents

    Sheely, Clyde Q.

    1979-01-01

    Data useful for evaluating the effectiveness of or designing an enhanced recovery process said process involving mobilizing and moving hydrocarbons through a hydrocarbon bearing subterranean formation from an injection well to a production well by injecting a mobilizing fluid into the injection well, comprising (a) determining hydrocarbon saturation in a volume in the formation near a well bore penetrating formation, (b) injecting sufficient mobilizing fluid to mobilize and move hydrocarbons from a volume in the formation near the well bore, and (c) determining the hydrocarbon saturation in a volume including at least a part of the volume of (b) by an improved single well surfactant method comprising injecting 2 or more slugs of water containing the primary tracer separated by water slugs containing no primary tracer. Alternatively, the plurality of ester tracers can be injected in a single slug said tracers penetrating varying distances into the formation wherein the esters have different partition coefficients and essentially equal reaction times. The single well tracer method employed is disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 3,623,842. This method designated the single well surfactant test (SWST) is useful for evaluating the effect of surfactant floods, polymer floods, carbon dioxide floods, micellar floods, caustic floods and the like in subterranean formations in much less time and at much reduced cost compared to conventional multiwell pilot tests.

  4. Results of injection and tracer tests in Olkaria north east field in Kenya

    SciTech Connect

    Karingithi, C.W.

    1995-12-31

    Tracer and injection tests were performed in the Olkaria North East Field with the objective to reduce uncertainty in the engineering design and to determine the suitability of well OW-704 as a re-injection well for the waste brine from the steam field during production. An organic dye (sodium fluorescein) was injected into well OW-704 as a slug. The tracer returns were observed in well OW-M2 which is 580 m deep, 620 m from well OW-704 and well OW-716 which is 900 m from well OW-704. The other wells on discharge, OW-714, and OW-725 did not show any tracer returns. However, other chemical constituents suggested., that well OW-716 experienced a chemical breakthrough earlier than OW-M2. Tracer return velocities of 0.31 m/hr and 1.3 m/hr were observed. Results of the tracer and injection tests indicate that OW-704 may be used as a re-injection well provided a close monitoring program is put in place.

  5. Leak testing of bubble-tight dampers using tracer gas techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Lagus, P.L.; DuBois, L.J.; Fleming, K.M.

    1995-02-01

    Recently tracer gas techniques have been applied to the problem of measuring the leakage across an installed bubble-tight damper. A significant advantage of using a tracer gas technique is that quantitative leakage data are obtained under actual operating differential pressure conditions. Another advantage is that leakage data can be obtained using relatively simple test setups that utilize inexpensive materials without the need to tear ducts apart, fabricate expensive blank-off plates, and install test connections. Also, a tracer gas technique can be used to provide an accurate field evaluation of the performance of installed bubble-tight dampers on a periodic basis. Actual leakage flowrates were obtained at Zion Generating Station on four installed bubble-tight dampers using a tracer gas technique. Measured leakage rates ranged from 0.01 CFM to 21 CFM. After adjustment and subsequent retesting, the 21 CFM damper leakage was reduced to a leakage of 3.8 CFM. In light of the current regulatory climate and the interest in Control Room Habitability issues, imprecise estimates of critical air boundary leakage rates--such as through bubble-tight dampers--are not acceptable. These imprecise estimates can skew radioactive dose assessments as well as chemical contaminant exposure calculations. Using a tracer gas technique, the actual leakage rate can be determined. This knowledge eliminates a significant source of uncertainty in both radioactive dose and/or chemical exposure assessments.

  6. Investigation of tracer tests on the Western Research Institute 10-ton retort

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, T.F.; Moore, D.F.

    1984-05-01

    An oil shale rubble bed with contrasting permeability regions is investigated using a gas tracer in conjunction with a two-dimensional flow and tracer model and with a one-dimensional dispersion model. Six runs on the retort are discussed. Tracer injections are made into the main flow inlet and into five taps near the top of the retort. Detection taps are located at four levels in the retort with five taps on each level. The one-dimensional dispersion model is fit to the tracer response curves producing estimates of dispersion and space time in the retort. The dispersion model produces reasonable estimates where the fluid flow deviates only slightly from vertical. The two-dimensional flow model developed by Travis at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is compared to tracer velocities. The correlation between the model and the data is good in the last of the six tests. The correlation is not as good in the earlier tests and possible reasons for this are discussed.

  7. Sampling design for groundwater solute transport: Tests of methods and analysis of Cape Cod tracer test data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knopman, Debra S.; Voss, Clifford I.; Garabedian, Stephen P.

    1991-01-01

    Tests of a one-dimensional sampling design methodology on measurements of bromide concentration collected during the natural gradient tracer test conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey on Cape Cod, Massachusetts, demonstrate its efficacy for field studies of solute transport in groundwater and the utility of one-dimensional analysis. The methodology was applied to design of sparse two-dimensional networks of fully screened wells typical of those often used in engineering practice. In one-dimensional analysis, designs consist of the downstream distances to rows of wells oriented perpendicular to the groundwater flow direction and the timing of sampling to be carried out on each row. The power of a sampling design is measured by its effectiveness in simultaneously meeting objectives of model discrimination, parameter estimation, and cost minimization. One-dimensional models of solute transport, differing in processes affecting the solute and assumptions about the structure of the flow field, were considered for description of tracer cloud migration. When fitting each model using nonlinear regression, additive and multiplicative error forms were allowed for the residuals which consist of both random and model errors. The one-dimensional single-layer model of a nonreactive solute with multiplicative error was judged to be the best of those tested. Results show the efficacy of the methodology in designing sparse but powerful sampling networks. Designs that sample five rows of wells at five or fewer times in any given row performed as well for model discrimination as the full set of samples taken up to eight times in a given row from as many as 89 rows. Also, designs for parameter estimation judged to be good by the methodology were as effective in reducing the variance of parameter estimates as arbitrary designs with many more samples. Results further showed that estimates of velocity and longitudinal dispersivity in one-dimensional models based on data from only five

  8. Stochastic Integration of Crosshole Resistivity and Tracer Test Data for Improving Hydrological Predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irving, J.; Singha, K.; Holliger, K.

    2008-12-01

    Quantifying the local configuration of hydraulic conductivity (K) in heterogeneous environments is essential for accurate predictions of subsurface contaminant transport. Although concentration data from tracer tests can be useful for providing estimates of K in a region, such data have too small a support scale to determine continuous K distributions that are required for reliable future predictions. We address this issue by introducing dynamic geophysical data, collected during tracer testing, into the subsurface characterization problem. Specifically, we investigate the use electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) measurements, collected in time during the course of a saline tracer experiment, to help map permeable pathways and reduce the non-uniqueness associated with estimating K from tracer measurements alone. Rather than invert the resistivity measurements independently from the tracer test data to create a deterministic map of subsurface properties as has been done in previous studies, we examine the use of Markov-chain Monte Carlo (McMC) methods to jointly invert these data within a stochastic framework. The benefits of this methodology are that (i) we skip the intermediate step found in uncoupled inversion strategies of trying to estimate the spatial distribution of geophysical properties in time, and (ii) multiple realizations of K are generated, according to the posterior probability distribution consistent with all measured data, which allows us to explore statistically the potential benefits of including the geophysical measurements. In this work, we consider a relatively simple, heterogeneous, binary distribution of K values in a saturated zone setting as the 'true model'. We simulate groundwater flow and tracer transport through this K field, and also electrical resistivity measurements during the tracer experiment, to produce the 'measured data'. We then set out to determine, using the coupled McMC inversion strategy, distributions of K that are

  9. Impact of uncertainty of grain size distributions and associated attributes on interpretations of tracer tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guadagnini, Laura; Riva, Monica; Guadagnini, Alberto

    2010-05-01

    We assess the importance of selecting two different methodologies for the determination of hydraulic conductivity from available grain-size distributions on the stochastic modeling of the depth-averaged breakthrough curve observed during a forced-gradient tracer test experiment, which was performed in the Lauswiesen alluvial aquifer, located near the city of Tübingen, Germany. In the absence of direct measurements of porosity, we consider: (a) the model used by Riva et al. (2006, 2008), which relates the natural logarithms of effective porosity and conductivity through an empirical, experimentally-based, linear relationship derived for a nearby experimental site; and (b) a model based on a commonly used relationship linking the total porosity to the coefficient of uniformity of grain size distributions. Transport is described in terms of a purely advective process and/or by including mass exchange processes between mobile and immobile regions. Modeling of flow and transport is performed within a Monte Carlo framework. Our results indicate that the model adopted to describe the correlation between conductivity and porosity and the way grain-sieve information are assimilated to describe the spatial variability of hydraulic conductivity can have relevant effects in the interpretation of the data at the site. All the conceptual models employed to describe the structural heterogeneity of the system and transport features can reasonably reproduce the global characteristics of the experimental depth-averaged breakthrough curve. The best prediction of the late-time behavior of the measured breakthrough curves, in terms of the observed heavy tailing, is offered by directly linking porosity distribution to the spatial variability of particle size information.

  10. A Tracer Test to Characterize Treatment of TCE in a Permeable Reactive Barrier

    EPA Science Inventory

    A tracer test was conducted to characterize the flow of ground water surrounding a permeable reactive barrier constructed with plant mulch (a biowall) at the OU-1 site on Altus Air Force Base, Oklahoma. This biowall is intended to intercept and treat ground water contaminated by ...

  11. A Tracer Test to Characterize Treatment of TCE in a Permeable Reactive Barrier

    EPA Science Inventory

    A tracer test was conducted to characterize the flow of ground water surrounding a permeable reactive barrier constructed with plant mulch (a biowall) at the OU-1 site on Altus Air Force Base, Oklahoma. This biowall is intended to intercept and treat ground water contaminated by ...

  12. Characterization of thermal tracer tests and heat exchanges in fractured media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de La Bernardie, Jérôme; Bour, Olivier; Guihéneuf, Nicolas; Chatton, Eliot; Labasque, Thierry; Longuevergne, Laurent; Le Lay, Hugo; Koch, Florian; Gerard, Marie-Françoise; Lavenant, Nicolas; Le Borgne, Tanguy

    2016-04-01

    Geothermal energy is a renewable energy source particularly attractive due to associated low greenhouse gas emission rates. Crystalline rocks are in general considered of poor interest for geothermal applications at shallow depths (< 100m), because of the low permeability of the medium. In some cases, fractures may enhance permeability, but thermal energy storage at these shallow depths is still remaining very challenging because of the low storativity of the medium. Within this framework, the purpose of this study is to test the possibility of efficient thermal energy storage in shallow fractured rocks with a single well semi open loop heat exchanger (standing column well). For doing so, several heat tracer tests have been achieved along a borehole between two connected fractures. The heat tracer tests have been achieved at the experimental site of Ploemeur (H+ observatory network). The tracer tests consist in monitoring the temperature in the upper fracture while injecting hot water in the deeper one thanks to a field boiler. For such an experimental setup, the main difficulty to interpret the data comes from the requirement for separating the temperature advective signal of the tracer test (temperature recovery) from the heat increase due to injection of hot water through the borehole which induces heat losses all along the injection tube in the water column. For doing so, in addition to a double straddle packer used for isolating the injection chamber, the particularity of the experimental set up is the use of fiber optic distributed temperature sensing (FO-DTS); an innovative technology which allows spatial and temporal monitoring of the temperature all along the well. Thanks to this tool, we were able to estimate heat increases coming from diffusion along the injection tube which is found much lower than localized temperature increases resulting from tracer test recovery. With local temperatures probes, separating both effects would not have been feasible. We

  13. Multispecies reactive tracer test in an aquifer with spatially variable chemical conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, J.A.; Kent, D.B.; Coston, J.A.; Hess, K.M.; Joye, J.L.

    2000-01-01

    A field investigation of multispecies reactive transport was conducted in a well-characterized, sand and gravel aquifer on Cape Cod, Massachusetts. The aquifer is characterized by regions of differing chemical conditions caused by the disposal of secondary sewage effluent. Ten thousand liters of groundwater with added tracers (Br, Cr(VI), and BDTA complexed with Pb, Zn, Cu, and Ni) were injected into the aquifer and distributions of the tracers were monitored for 15 months. Most of the tracers were transported more than 200 m; transport was quantified using spatial moments computed from the results of a series of synoptic samplings. Cr(VI) transport was retarded relative to Br; the retardation factor varied from 1.1 to 2.4 and was dependent on chemical conditions. At 314 days after the injection, dissolved Cr(VI) mass in the tracer cloud had decreased 85%, with the likely cause being reduction to Cr(III) in a suboxic region of the aquifer. Transport of the metal-EDTA complexes was affected by aqueous complexation, adsorption, and dissolution-precipitation reactions of Fe oxyhydroxide minerals in the aquifer sediments. Dissolved Pb-EDTA complexes disappeared from the tracer cloud within 85 days, probably due to metal exchange reactions with Fe and adsorbed Zn (present prior to the injection from contamination by the sewage effluent). About 30% of the Cu-EDTA complexes remained within the tracer cloud 314 days after injection, even though the thermodynamic stability of the Pb-EDTA complex is greater than Cu-EDTA. It is hypothesized that stronger adsorption of Pb2+ to the aquifer sediments causes the Pb-EDTA complex to disassociate to a greater degree than the Cu-EDTA complex. The mass of dissolved Zn-EDTA increased during the first 175 days of the tracer test to 140% of the mass injected, with the increase due to desorption of sewage-derived Zn. Dissolved Ni-EDTA mass remained nearly constant throughout the tracer test, apparently only participating in reversible

  14. Study of alternative tracer tests in characterizing transport in fractured rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, Y.W.

    1995-06-01

    Flow and transport calculations are carried out by numerical simulation for different tracer designs: single-well radially diverging/converging (huff-puff), single well radially converging, and two-well injection-withdrawal (doublet) in a 2D fracture zone. The fractured rocks are conceptualized as a dual-continuum: the well-connected fractures forming a heterogeneous continuum for advective transport, and the less permeable matrix forming a second continuum for tracer diffusion. Results show that the huff-puff design is a good diagnostic test for matrix diffusion. The two-well doublet design averages over a large volume and corrects for the extreme sensitivity to spatial heterogeneities of the single well converging test, but requires prior knowledge of presence or absence of matrix diffusion to give reliable estimate of transport parameters. Results of this study demonstrate that using a suite of different tracer designs is important to reduce the uncertainty in association with solving the inverse problem of tracer test interpretation to characterize transport in fracture rocks. 10 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Study of alternative tracer tests in characterizing transport in fractured rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang, Y. W.

    Flow and transport calculations are carried out by numerical simulation for different tracer designs: single-well radially diverging /converging (huff-puff), single well radially converging, and two-well injection-withdrawal (doublet) in a 2D fracture zone. The fractured rocks are conceptualized as a dual-continuum: the well-connected fractures forming a heterogeneous continuum for advective transport, and the less permeable matrix forming a second continuum for tracer diffusion. Results show that the huff-puff design is a good diagnostic test for matrix diffusion. The two-well doublet design averages over a large volume and corrects for the extreme sensitivity to spatial heterogeneities of the single well converging test, but requires prior knowledge of presence or absence of matrix diffusion to give reliable estimate of transport parameters. Results of this study demonstrate that using a suite of different tracer designs is important to reduce the uncertainty in association with solving the inverse problem of tracer test interpretation to characterize transport in fracture rocks.

  16. Laboratory tracer tests on three-dimensional reconstructed heterogeneous porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danquigny, C.; Ackerer, P.; Carlier, J. P.

    2004-07-01

    Tracer tests have been performed on a 3D tank of dimensions 560×100×100 cm 3. These experiments at laboratory scale are used to define effective hydraulic conductivity and macrodispersivity. The tracer tests have been performed on two kinds of heterogeneous porous material: a channel structured medium, with channels crossing the whole tank, and a statistically correlated random structure. The statistically correlated field was first established by a sequential type generator with a prescribed exponential covariance. The theoretical random field is then modified according to the available sand hydraulic conductivities. The obtained LnK variance is 1.03 and the integral scale 23.1 cm. Results obtained concerning the channel structured media show that it behaves like a stratified medium from an hydrodynamical and mass transfer point of view. The effective hydraulic conductivity is equal to the arithmetic mean and the variance of the concentration is proportional to t2, t being the mean travel time of the tracer displacement.. For the correlated random field, the effective hydraulic conductivity falls between by the geometric and the arithmetic mean. No match with theoretical values have been found because the boundary conditions effects cannot be neglected due to the dimension of the tank compared to the integral scale. Similar conclusions have been obtained for macrodispersivity. The tracer tests could be simulated by a 1D advection-dispersion equation but with a significant higher macrodispersivity than predicted by stochastic theories for infinite media.

  17. Modeling a tracer test at the Grimsel Test Site (GTS) using a lattice Boltzmann method and transmissivity field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J. W.; Lanyon, G. W.; Baik, M. H.; Blechschmidt, I.

    2015-12-01

    A series of tracer tests have been conducted in the Migration (MI) Shear Zone at the Grimsel Test Site (GTS) for the Colloid Formation and Migration Project (CFM). As a part of the series, a dipole test (Tracer Test Run 13-05) using radionuclides, colloids and conservative tracers was performed to determine the breakthrough between CRR99.002-i2 and BOMI87.010-i2. To date, the breakthrough data of only the conservative dye tracer (Amino-G acid) are available. In the preceding project, the Colloid and Radionuclide Retardation Project (CRR), a transmissivity field for the MI shear zone was obtained by the geostatistical inverse modeling approach. In this study, the breakthrough of the tracer was computed by a gray lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). The transmissivity field with finite elements grid was transformed to the effective fracture aperture or flow porosity according to the cubic law, and the grid was uniformalized by the interpolation. The uniform mesh of the effective aperture was utilized as the model domain of the gray LBM. In the gray LBM, the heterogeneity of the aperture was dealt with a partial-bounceback scheme. The profiles of hydraulic heads monitored at the boreholes nearby were used as the reference values in the calculation of the pressure distribution in the model domain. The modeling results could reveal a dominant pathway of tracers in the dipole test. The developed model can be utilized in the calculation of the reactive transports of radionuclides and colloids by coupling with a geochemical model, such as Phreeqc, the Geochemist's Workbench, etc.

  18. Unsaturated flow and solute transport through the Chalk: Tracer test and dual permeability modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van den Daele, Gerd F. A.; Barker, John A.; Connell, Luke D.; Atkinson, Tim C.; Darling, W. G.; Cooper, J. D.

    2007-08-01

    SummaryA tracer test was carried out in the unsaturated Chalk at the Fleam Dyke research site in Cambridgeshire, UK, to investigate the role of the Chalk fractures and matrix in unsaturated flow and solute transport. The experiment, under natural rainfall conditions, involved distributing deuterated water on a grass-covered lysimeter (a cube of volume 125 m 3) and on an adjacent 4 m × 4 m field plot. Tracer migration was monitored through regular core sampling and collection of lysimeter drainage water. The presence of occasional secondary peaks in sampling of the vertical tracer profile suggested the occurrence of fracture flow, allowing some tracer to bypass the Chalk matrix. However, in the 15 months following application, none of the tracer was detected in the lysimeter drainage at 5 m depth. Modelling of the tracer results was undertaken with the 1-D numerical transient dual permeability model MACRO 5.0, initially developed for macroporous soils. Modelling results showed that MACRO 5.0 could reliably simulate transient recharge through the Chalk. The simulations suggested that fracture flow is important at the site, but that it is only initiated at 1 m depth or deeper. The extent of fracture flow appeared to be highly variable in different layers of the profile, varying between 40% and 85% of the cumulative flux, mainly depending on the saturated hydraulic conductivity of the matrix. Diffusion between the fractures and the matrix tended to equalize solute concentrations in both flow domains, although solute bypass through the fractures occurred in some Chalk strata. Besides diffusive exchange, the modelling stressed the importance of advective exchange of solutes. The results suggest that the Chalk aquifer at the Fleam Dyke site is only moderately vulnerable to pollution, even though for moderate rainfall conditions some bypass flow was possible.

  19. Solute transport characterization in karst aquifers by tracer injection tests for a sustainable water resource management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, T.; Angulo, B.; Uriarte, J. A.; Olazar, M.; Arandes, J. M.; Antiguedad, I.

    2017-04-01

    Protection of water resources is a major challenge today, given that territory occupation and land use are continuously increasing. In the case of karst aquifers, its dynamic complexity requires the use of specific methodologies that allow establishing local and regional flow and transport patterns. This information is particularly necessary when springs and wells harnessed for water supply are concerned. In view of the present state of the art, this work shows a new approach based on the use of a LiCl based tracer injection test through a borehole for transport characterization from a local to a regional scale. Thus a long term tracer injection test was conducted in a particularly sensitive sector of the Egino karst massif (Basque Country, Spain). The initial displacement of tracer in the vicinity of the injection was monitored in a second borehole at a radial distance of 10.24 m. This first information, assessed by a radial divergent model, allows obtaining transport characteristic parameters in this immediate vicinity during injection. At a larger (regional) scale, the tracer reaches a highly transmissive network with mean traveling velocities to the main springs being from 4.3 to 13.7 m/h. The responses obtained, particularly clear in the main spring used for water supply, and the persistence of part of the tracer in the injection zone, pose reconsidering the need for their protection. Thus, although the test allows establishing the 24-h isochrone, which is the ceiling value in present European vulnerability approaches, the results obtained advise widening the zone to protect in order to guarantee water quality in the springs. Overall, this stimulus-response test allows furthering the knowledge on the dynamics of solute transport in karst aquifers and is a particularly useful tool in studies related to source vulnerability and protection in such a complex medium.

  20. Using predictive uncertainty analysis to optimise tracer test design and data acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallis, Ilka; Moore, Catherine; Post, Vincent; Wolf, Leif; Martens, Evelien; Prommer, Henning

    2014-07-01

    Tracer injection tests are regularly-used tools to identify and characterise flow and transport mechanisms in aquifers. Examples of practical applications are manifold and include, among others, managed aquifer recharge schemes, aquifer thermal energy storage systems and, increasingly important, the disposal of produced water from oil and shale gas wells. The hydrogeological and geochemical data collected during the injection tests are often employed to assess the potential impacts of injection on receptors such as drinking water wells and regularly serve as a basis for the development of conceptual and numerical models that underpin the prediction of potential impacts. As all field tracer injection tests impose substantial logistical and financial efforts, it is crucial to develop a solid a-priori understanding of the value of the various monitoring data to select monitoring strategies which provide the greatest return on investment. In this study, we demonstrate the ability of linear predictive uncertainty analysis (i.e. “data worth analysis”) to quantify the usefulness of different tracer types (bromide, temperature, methane and chloride as examples) and head measurements in the context of a field-scale aquifer injection trial of coal seam gas (CSG) co-produced water. Data worth was evaluated in terms of tracer type, in terms of tracer test design (e.g., injection rate, duration of test and the applied measurement frequency) and monitoring disposition to increase the reliability of injection impact assessments. This was followed by an uncertainty targeted Pareto analysis, which allowed the interdependencies of cost and predictive reliability for alternative monitoring campaigns to be compared directly. For the evaluated injection test, the data worth analysis assessed bromide as superior to head data and all other tracers during early sampling times. However, with time, chloride became a more suitable tracer to constrain simulations of physical transport

  1. The effects of mass transfer rate limitations and NAPL access heterogeneity on nonaqueous phase liquid tracer tests -- A field example

    SciTech Connect

    Burt, R.A.; Wilson, D.J.; Christians, G.L.; Williams, S.P.

    1999-07-01

    Nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL) tracer tests using combinations of nonpartitioning and partitioning tracers have proven to be an effective means of confirming, delineating, and, under appropriate conditions, quantifying the presence of nonaqueous phase liquids in the subsurface. Some factors that can confound the interpretation of these tests include heterogeneous porosity and permeability distributions, heterogeneous NAPL distributions, diffusion of the tracers into and from low-permeability materials, heterogeneous access to the NAPL by the tracers, and deviations from local equilibrium with respect to mass transfer of the tracers between the aqueous phase and the NAPL phase. NAPL tracer tests conducted with separate injection and extraction wells in an alluvial aquifer at a site near Fort Worth, Texas were affected by these factors with the most notable departures from ideal responses evidently attributable to rate limitations on mass transfer. Positive identification of NAPL presence was achieved by clear separation of the breakthrough curves for partitioning tracers from those of nonpartitioning tracers. A two-dimensional model was used to simulate the observed responses. The model is similar to earlier models of tracer tests of this sort, but includes two significant innovations. First, the model takes into account the kinetics of transport by diffusion of partitioning tracers into and from the NAPL. Second, the model permits the inclusion of porous lenses of low permeability into and from which both partitioning and nonpartitioning tracers can move by diffusion. Visual matching of simulated breakthrough curves to the field data was used to semi-quantitatively estimate the mass of NAPL present. Reasonable but imperfect matches of the simulated breakthrough curves to the field data illustrated the significant effect of a heterogeneous distribution of access to the NAPL by the tracers.

  2. Adjoint Sensitivity Analysis of Push-Pull Partitioning Tracer Test Data for DNAPL Saturation Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, T.; Boroumand, A.; Abriola, L. M.; Miller, E. L.

    2013-12-01

    Characterization of dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) source zones is a critical component for successful remediation of sites contaminated by chlorinated solvents. Although Push-Pull Tracer Tests (PPTTs) offer a promising approach for local in situ source zone characterization, non-equilibrium mass transfer effects and the spatial variability of saturation make their interpretation difficult. To better understand the dependence of well test data on these factors and as the basis for the estimation of the spatial DNAPL distribution, here we develop numerical methods based on the use of adjoint sensitivity mehtods to explore the sensitivity of PPTT observations to the distribution of DNAPL saturation. We examine the utility of the developed approach using three-dimensional hypothetical source zones containing heterogeneous DNAPL distributions. For model applications the flow fields are generated with MODFLOW and non-equilibrium tracer mass transfer is described by a linear driving force expression. Comprehensive modeling of partitioning tracer tests requires the solution of tracer mass balance equations in the aqueous and DNAPL phases. Consistent with this process coupling, the developed adjoint method introduces a vector of adjoint variables to formulate the coupled adjoint states equations for tracer concentrations in both the aqueous and NAPL phases. For the sensitivity analysis, we investigate how the tracer concentration in the well changes with perturbations of the saturation within the interrogated zone. Using the calculated sensitivity functions, coupled with the observed tracer breakthrough curve, we develop a nonlinear least-squares inverse method to determine three metrics related to the spatial distribution of DNAPL in the source zone: average DNAPL saturation, total mass of DNAPL and distance of the DNAPL from the test well. These results have utility for local source zone characterization and can provide an initial quantitative understanding of

  3. Interpretation of Colloid-Homologue Tracer Test 10-03, Including Comparisons to Test 10-01

    SciTech Connect

    Reimus, Paul W.

    2012-06-26

    This presentation covers the interpretations of colloid-homologue tracer test 10-03 conducted at the Grimsel Test Site, Switzerland, in 2010. It also provides a comparison of the interpreted test results with those of tracer test 10-01, which was conducted in the same fracture flow system and using the same tracers than test 10-03, but at a higher extraction flow rate. A method of correcting for apparent uranine degradation in test 10-03 is presented. Conclusions are: (1) Uranine degradation occurred in test 10-03, but not in 10-01; (2) Uranine correction based on apparent degradation rate in injection loop in test 11-02 seems reasonable when applied to data from test 10-03; (3) Colloid breakthrough curves quite similar in the two tests with similar recoveries relative to uranine (after correction); and (4) Much slower apparent desorption of homologues in test 10-03 than in 10-01 (any effect of residual homologues from test 10-01 in test 10-03?).

  4. Influence of Mass Transfer Kinetics on Interpretation of Push-Pull Partitioning Tracer Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ervin, R. E.; Boroumand, A.; Abriola, L. M.; Ramsburg, C. A.

    2012-12-01

    There is now considerable interest in predicting plume response to various levels of treatment applied within a DNAPL source zone. An important component to the development of this predictive capability is the ability to characterize the distribution of DNAPL within the source zone. Metrics developed for description of source zone architecture are frequently based upon some combination of downgradient contaminant concentrations and in source testing. One option for in source testing is the use of partition tracers in either interwell or push-pull test configurations. Push-pull tracer tests are advantageous for obtaining more localized information that can be integrated with other observations to reduce the uncertainty related the links between the architecture of a source and its associated plume. Here we examined push-pull tracer tests in a series of aquifer cell experiments to evaluate the potential of this type of test to quantify metrics of the DNAPL distribution at the local-scale (i.e., 1 m flow path). Three DNAPL architectures were characterized by conducting push-pull tracer tests using a solution which comprised three partitioning tracers (1-pentanol, 1-hexanol, and 2-octanol) and one non-partitioning tracer (bromide). Each architecture was characterized using three flow regimes that employed combinations of fast (~30 cm/hr) and slow (~2 cm/hr) velocities. Production curves (i.e., tracer concentrations during the pull phase of the test) for the partitioning tracers were found to be asymmetric. This asymmetry severely degraded the ability of an analytical solution employing the local equilibrium assumption to predict the overall saturations. Saturation estimates from the analytical solution were found to be improved when the application of the model was restricted to later time data (Vext/Vinj >1). This observation suggests it is important to better understand the factors influencing the early time data. Experiments were also simulated using a numerical

  5. Measuring air-water interfacial areas with X-ray microtomography and interfacial partitioning tracer tests.

    PubMed

    Brusseau, Mark L; Peng, Sheng; Schnaar, Gregory; Murao, Asami

    2007-03-15

    Air-water interfacial areas as a function of water saturation were measured for a sandy, natural porous medium using two methods, aqueous-phase interfacial partitioning tracer tests and synchrotron X-ray microtomography. In addition, interfacial areas measured in a prior study with the gas-phase interfacial partitioning tracer-test method for the same porous medium were included for comparison. For all three methods, total air-water interfacial areas increased with decreasing water saturation. The interfacial areas measured with the tracer-test methods were generally larger than those obtained from microtomography, and the disparity increased as water saturation decreased. The interfacial areas measured by microtomography extrapolated to a value (147 cm(-1)) very similar to the specific solid surface area (151 cm(-1)) calculated using the smooth-sphere assumption, indicating that the method does not characterize the area associated with microscopic surface heterogeneity (surface roughness, microporosity). This is consistent with the method resolution of approximately 12 microm. In contrast, the interfacial areas measured with the gas-phase tracer tests approached the N2/BET measured specific solid surface area (56000 cm(-1)), indicating that this method does characterize the interfacial area associated with microscopic surface heterogeneity. The largest interfacial area measured with the aqueous-phase tracer tests was 224 cm(-1), while the extrapolated maximum interfacial area was approximately 1100 cm(-1). Both of these values are larger than the smooth-sphere specific solid surface area but much smaller than the N2/BET specific solid surface area, which suggests that the method measures a limited portion of the interfacial area associated with microscopic surface heterogeneity. All three methods provide measures of total (capillary + film) interfacial area, a primary difference being that the film-associated area is a smooth-surface equivalent for the

  6. Capability of EnKF to assimilate tracer test data at the lower detection limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruckmann, Johanna; Vogt, Christian; Clauser, Christoph

    2014-05-01

    We model water flow and estimate permeability distribution to improve regional groundwater management for a tectonically limited hard-rock aquifer. Management of groundwater resources for drinking water supply requires understanding and quantifying of the regional groundwater flow and groundwater budget which depends largely on the petrophysical transport properties (e. g., porosity and permeability) of the underground. We study a structurally complex and thus highly heterogeneous area on a regional scale: the Hastenrather Graben 15 km northeast of Aachen, Germany. Here, groundwater is produced from a carbonate aquifer for drinking water supply. However, direct data on the geometry and petrophysical properties of the underground are sparse and most data are only one-dimensional. For overcoming this limitation and coping with the heterogeneity of the underground we use the Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF) for stochastic parameter estimation and statistical ensemble analysis. Assimilating time-dependent tracer test data will help estimating permeability. The fact that the aquifer is used for drinking water supply prevents using of any artificial tracer such as radioactive or fluorescent tracer. Instead, drinking water with a lower salinity compared to the groundwater (e.g., dam water) will be used. The detection limit will be relatively low due to the low salinity contrast between reservoir water and tracer. It might even be in the range of measuring error. For studying the sensitivity of EnKF at the limit of detection we set up a synthetic scenario based on the conditions in our study area. Performing EnKF assimilation runs based on perturbed observations characterized by different measurement error levels yields information on the acceptable signal-to-noise-ratio required by EnKF for successful estimates of the given synthetic permeability distribution. This, in turn, provides information on the limits of the real-world's tracer test at low salinity contrast.

  7. MULTISPECIES REACTIVE TRACER TEST IN A SAND AND GRAVEL AQUIFER, CAPE COD, MASSACHUSETTS: PART 1: EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN AND TRANSPORT OF BROMIDE AND NICKEL-EDTA TRACERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this report, we summarize a portion of the results of a large-scale tracer test conducted at the U. S. Geological Survey research site on Cape Cod, Massachusetts. The site is located on a large sand and gravel glacial outwash plain in an unconfined aquifer. In April 1993, ab...

  8. MULTISPECIES REACTIVE TRACER TEST IN A SAND AND GRAVEL AQUIFER, CAPE COD, MASSACHUSETTS: PART 1: EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN AND TRANSPORT OF BROMIDE AND NICKEL-EDTA TRACERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this report, we summarize a portion of the results of a large-scale tracer test conducted at the U. S. Geological Survey research site on Cape Cod, Massachusetts. The site is located on a large sand and gravel glacial outwash plain in an unconfined aquifer. In April 1993, ab...

  9. Unsaturated Zone Tracer Test at the Bemidji, Minnesota Crude Oil Spill Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herkelrath, W. N.; Delin, G. N.

    2003-12-01

    As a part of a study of the subsurface transport and natural attenuation of petroleum hydrocarbon contaminants at the Bemidji, Minnesota crude-oil spill research site, we used aqueous tracers to investigate solute transport from the soil surface through the crude oil-contaminated unsaturated zone to the water table. We applied tracer solution to the soil surface within a 5 by 12 meter tracer test plot that ran from a heavily oil-contaminated area to an oil-free zone. The depth to the water table was about 6 meters. The tracer test plot was instrumented with soil moisture probes, tensiometers, suction lysimeters, and drive-point sampling wells. Sixty liters of solution containing about 6.0E03 mg/l rhodamine WT and 1.0E04 mg/l bromide was uniformly sprayed on the soil surface in October 2001. We monitored subsequent tracer movement in response to precipitation by obtaining water samples weekly using the suction lysimeters in the unsaturated zone and the drive point wells in the saturated zone. Rhodamine concentrations were measured in the field using a fluorometer, and bromide concentrations were measured in the lab using ion chromatography. The time required for rhodamine tracer to reach the water table was 340 +/- 26 days. Travel times for bromide were about the same as for rhodamine, but the bromide data were less useful because the maximum bromide concentrations observed in the wells were close to background values. Rhodamine travel times through the oily unsaturated zone were not significantly different from the travel times through the oil-free unsaturated zone. However, the peak rhodamine concentrations found in ground-water samples obtained below the oil zone were an average of 3 times larger than the peak rhodamine values beneath the oil-free zone. We hypothesize that the rhodamine was adsorbed less in the oil-contaminated zone than in the oil-free zone because iron-containing minerals that absorb rhodamine have been largely removed from the oily sediments

  10. ANALYSIS OF A GAS-PHASE PARTITIONING TRACER TEST CONDUCTED IN AN UNSATURATED FRACTURED-CLAY FORMATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The gas-phase partitioning tracer method was used to estimate non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL), water, and air saturations in the vadose zone at a chlorinated-solvent contaminated field site in Tucson, AZ. The tracer test was conducted in a fractured-clay system that is the confin...

  11. ANALYSIS OF A GAS-PHASE PARTITIONING TRACER TEST CONDUCTED IN AN UNSATURATED FRACTURED-CLAY FORMATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The gas-phase partitioning tracer method was used to estimate non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL), water, and air saturations in the vadose zone at a chlorinated-solvent contaminated field site in Tucson, AZ. The tracer test was conducted in a fractured-clay system that is the confin...

  12. Fractional flow in fractured chalk; a flow and tracer test revisited.

    PubMed

    Odling, N E; West, L J; Hartmann, S; Kilpatrick, A

    2013-04-01

    A multi-borehole pumping and tracer test in fractured chalk is revisited and reinterpreted in the light of fractional flow. Pumping test data analyzed using a fractional flow model gives sub-spherical flow dimensions of 2.2-2.4 which are interpreted as due to the partially penetrating nature of the pumped borehole. The fractional flow model offers greater versatility than classical methods for interpreting pumping tests in fractured aquifers but its use has been hampered because the hydraulic parameters derived are hard to interpret. A method is developed to convert apparent transmissivity and storativity (L(4-n)/T and S(2-n)) to conventional transmissivity and storativity (L2/T and dimensionless) for the case where flow dimension, 2tracer test using an analytical dual porosity model of solute transport incorporating matrix diffusion and modified for fractional flow. Model results show smaller fracture apertures, spacings and dispersivities than those when 2D flow is assumed. The pumping and tracer test results and modeling presented illustrate the importance of recognizing the potential fractional nature of flow generated by partially penetrating boreholes in fractured aquifers in estimating aquifer properties and interpreting tracer breakthrough curves. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. An in-well heat-tracer-test method for evaluating borehole flow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellwood, Stephen M.; Hart, David J.; Bahr, Jean M.

    2015-12-01

    An improved method is presented for characterizing vertical borehole flow conditions in open boreholes using in-well heat tracer tests monitored by a distributed temperature sensing (DTS) system. This flow logging method uses an electrical resistance heater to warm slugs of water within bedrock boreholes and DTS monitoring of subsequent heat migration to measure borehole flow characteristics. Use of an electrical resistance heater allows for controlled test initiation, while the DTS allows for detailed monitoring of heat movement within the borehole. The method was evaluated in bedrock boreholes open to Cambrian sandstone formations in south-central Wisconsin (USA). The method was successfully used to measure upward flow, downward flow, and zero flow, and to identify changes in borehole flow rates associated with fracture flow and porous media flow. The main benefits of the DTS-monitored in-well heat tracer test method of borehole flow logging are (1) borehole flow direction and changes in borehole fluid velocity are readily apparent from a simple plot of the field data, (2) the case of zero vertical borehole flow is easily and confidently identified, and (3) the ability to monitor temperatures over the full borehole length simultaneously and in rapid succession provides detailed flow data with minimal disturbance of the borehole flow. The results of this study indicate that DTS-monitored in-well heat tracer tests are an effective method of characterizing borehole flow conditions.

  14. Nondestructive testing by ESPI and quasi phase shift gradient technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Linyong; Wu, Xiaoping

    1996-09-01

    A new nondestructive testing (NDT) technique, which is based on Electronic Speckle Pattern Interferometry (ESPI) and digital image processing with quasi phase shift and gradient technique, is presented. A simple phase reduction algorithm is developed, which replaced an accurate phase shifter. Compared with other phase shift techniques, this method is insensitive to environmental vibration and air disturbance, has visible procedures and results allows the object to move slowly during the inspection procedure, does not need phase unwrapping, and has a quick image processing speed. As an application, this NDT technique is used to detect defects in composite materials and the resulting deformation phase gradient image shows a better visual effect than normal ESPI.

  15. TRAVELLING WAVE AND STANDING WAVE SINGLE CELL HIGH GRADIENT TESTS

    SciTech Connect

    Dolgashev, V

    2004-08-24

    Accelerating gradient is one of the crucial parameters affecting design, construction and cost of next-generation linear accelerators. Operating accelerating gradient in normal conducting accelerating structures is limited by rf breakdown. In this paper we describe an experimental setup for study of these limits for 11.4 GHz travelingwave and standing-wave accelerating structures. The setup uses matched mode converters that launch the circular TM01 mode into short test structures. The test structures are designed so that the electromagnetic fields in one cell mimic the fields in prototype structures for the Next Linear Collider. Fields elsewhere in the test structures and in the mode converters are significantly lower than in this single cell. This setup allows economic testing of different cell geometries, cell materials and preparation techniques with short turn around time. Here we present design considerations and describe planned experiments.

  16. Analysis of a gas-phase partitioning tracer test conducted in an unsaturated fractured-clay formation.

    PubMed

    Simon, Michelle A; Brusseau, Mark L

    2007-03-20

    The gas-phase partitioning tracer method was used to estimate non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL), water, and air saturations in the vadose zone at a chlorinated-solvent contaminated field site in Tucson, AZ. The tracer test was conducted in a fractured-clay system that is the confining layer for the underlying regional aquifer. Three suites of three tracers were injected into wells located 14, 24, and 24 m from a single, central extraction well. The tracers comprised noble gases (traditionally thought to be nonsorbing), alkanes (primarily water partitioning), perfluorides (primarily NAPL partitioning), and halons (both NAPL and water partitioning). Observations of vacuum response were consistent with flow in a fractured system. The halon tracers exhibited the greatest amount of retardation, and helium and the perfluoride tracers the least. The alkane tracers were unexpectedly more retarded than the perfluoride tracers, indicating low NAPL saturations and high water saturations. An NAPL saturation of 0.01, water saturation of 0.215, and gas saturation of 0.775 was estimated based on analysis of the suite of tracers comprising helium, perfluoromethylcyclohexane and dibromodifluoromethane, which was considered to be the most robust set. The estimated saturations compare reasonably well to independently determined values.

  17. Analysis of two-well tracer tests with a pulse input

    SciTech Connect

    Gelhar, L.W.; Leonhart, L.S.

    1982-04-01

    Dispersion of a conservative solute which is introduced as a pulse in the recharge well of a two-well flow system is analyzed using the general theory for longitudinal dispersion in nonuniform flow a long streamlines. Results for the concentration variation at the pumping well are developed using numerical integration and are presented in the form of dimensionless type-curves which can be used to design and analyze tracer tests. 6 refs., 10 figs.

  18. In-situ characterization of soil-water content using gas-phase partitioning tracer tests: field-scale evaluation.

    PubMed

    Keller, Jason M; Brusseau, Mark L

    2003-07-15

    Field-scale tests were performed to evaluate the effectiveness of the gas-phase partitioning tracer method for in-situ measurement of soil-water content. The tracer tests were conducted before and after a controlled infiltration event to evaluate performance at two water contents. Nonpartitioning (sulfur hexafluoride) and water-partitioning (difluoromethane) tracers were injected into the test zone, and their effluent breakthrough curves were analyzed using the method of moments to calculate retardation factors for difluoromethane. Soil-water contents estimated using the tracer data were compared to soil-water contents obtained independently using gravimetric core analysis, neutron scattering, and bore-hole ground penetrating radar. For the test conducted under drier soil conditions, the soil-water content estimated from the tracer test was identical to the independently measured values of 8.6% (equivalent to water saturation of 23%). For the test conducted under wetter soil conditions, the tracer test derived soil-water content was 81% of the independently measured values of 12.2% (equivalent to water saturation of 32%). The reduced efficacy at the higher soil-water content may reflectthe impact of advective and/ or diffusive mass transfer constraints on gas-phase transport. The results presented herein indicate that the partitioning tracer method is an effective technique to measure soil-water content at the field scale, especially for sites with moderate to low soil-water contents.

  19. Evaluation of the radionuclide tracer test conducted at the project Gnome Underground Nuclear Test Site, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Pohll, G.; Pohlmann, K.

    1996-08-01

    A radionuclide tracer test was conducted in 1963 by the U.S. Geological Survey at the Project Gnome underground nuclear test site, approximately 40 km southeast of Carlsbad, New Mexico. The tracer study was carried out under the auspices of the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) to study the transport behavior of radionuclides in fractured rock aquifers. The Culebra Dolomite was chosen for the test because it was considered to be a reasonable analogue of the fractured carbonate aquifer at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), the principal location of U.S. underground nuclear tests. Project Gnome was one of a small number of underground nuclear tests conducted by the AEC at sites distant from the NTS. The Gnome device was detonated on December 10, 1961 in an evaporate unit at a depth of 360 m below ground surface. Recently, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) implemented an environmental restoration program to characterize, remediate, and close these offsite nuclear test areas. An early step in this process is performance of a preliminary risk analysis of the hazard posed by each site. The Desert Research Institute has performed preliminary hydrologic risk evaluations for the groundwater transport pathway at Gnome. That evaluation included the radioactive tracer test as a possible source because the test introduced radionuclides directly into the Culebra Dolomite, which is the only aquifer at the site. This report presents a preliminary evaluation of the radionuclide tracer test as a source for radionuclide migration in the Culebra Dolomite. The results of this study will assist in planning site characterization activities and refining estimates of the radionuclide source for comprehensive models of groundwater transport st the Gnome site.

  20. Interpretation of the return profile of a tracer test in the Thelamork geothermal field, Iceland

    SciTech Connect

    Kocabas, I.; Axelsson, G.; Bjornsson, G.

    1996-12-31

    As a part of a full scale production test, a long term tracer test was performed in the Thelamork low temperature geothermal system, in N-Iceland. The tracer test was aimed at recovering the transport properties of fractures connecting the injection and production wells. Hence, the estimated parameters might be used in determining the performance of the system under various injection schemes. A qualitative evaluation the tracer return profile showed the presence of strong recirculation effects. In addition, the return profile indicated that the medium appears to be highly dispersive. Earlier modelling studies employed a one-dimensional two path model to match the return profile and substituted the properties of the major path in the Lauwerier model to estimate the thermal breakthrough time. However, the two path model estimates a very large dispersive transport almost equal to the convective transport. This large dispersivity necessitates adding a dispersive heat transport term in the Lauwerier model and as a result reduces the Lauwerier thermal breakthrough time almost to half. Considering the injection and production rates, we used a more accurate one-dimensional five-path model in this work. This model infers a smaller dispersivity and leads to a greater breakthrough time than the two path model, owing to both increased heat transfer area with increasing number of fractures and less dispersive transport of heat.

  1. Evaluation of Partitioning Gas Tracer Tests for Measuring Water in Landfills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imhoff, P. T.; Han, B.; Jafarpour, Y.; Gallagher, V. N.; Chiu, P. C.; Fluman, D. A.; Vasuki, N. C.; Yazdani, R.; Augenstein, D.; Cohen, K. K.

    2003-12-01

    Methane is an important greenhouse gas, and landfills are the largest anthropogenic source in many developed countries. Bioreactor landfills have been proposed as one means of abating greenhouse gas emissions from landfills. Here, the decomposition of organic wastes is enhanced by the controlled addition of water or leachate to maintain optimal conditions for waste decomposition. Greenhouse gas abatement is accomplished by sequestration of photosynthetically derived carbon in wastes, CO2 offsets from energy use of waste derived gas, and mitigation of methane emission from the wastes. An important issue in the operation of bioreactor landfills is knowing how much water to add and where to add it. Accurate methods for measuring the amount of water in landfills would be valuable aids for implementing leachate recirculation systems. Current methods for measuring water are inadequate, though, since they provide point measurements and are frequently affected by heterogeneity of the solid waste composition and solid waste compaction. The value of point measurements is significantly reduced in systems where water flows preferentially, such as in landfills. Here, spatially integrated measurements might be of greater value. We are evaluating a promising technology, the partitioning gas tracer test, to measure the water saturation within landfills, the amount of free water in solid waste divided by the volume of the voids. The partitioning gas tracer test was recently developed by researchers working in the vadose zone. We report the results from laboratory and field tests designed to evaluate the partitioning gas tracer test within an anaerobic landfill operated by the Delaware Solid Waste Authority. Vertical wells were installed within the landfill to inject and extract tracer gases. Gas flow and tracer gas movement in the solid waste were controlled by the landfill's existing gas collection system, which included vertical wells installed throughout the landfill through

  2. Numerical model of a tracer test on the Santa Clara River, Ventura County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nishikawa, T.; Paybins, K.S.; Izbicki, J.A.; Reichard, E.G.

    1999-01-01

    To better understand the flow processes, solute-transport processes, and ground-water/surface-water interactions on the Santa Clara River in Ventura County, California, a 24-hour fluorescent-dye tracer study was performed under steady-state flow conditions on a 45-km reach of the river. The study reach includes perennial (uppermost and lowermost) subreaches and ephemeral subreaches of the lower Piru Creek and the middle Santa Clara River. The tracer-test data were used to calibrate a one-dimensional flow model (DAFLOW) and a solute-transport model (BLTM). The dye-arrival times at each sample location were simulated by calibrating the velocity parameters in DAFLOW. The simulations of dye transport indicated that (1) ground-water recharge explains the loss of mass in the ephemeral middle subreaches, and (2) groundwater recharge does not explain the loss of mass in the perennial uppermost and lowermost subreaches. The observed tracer curves in the perennial subreaches were indicative of sorptive dye losses, transient storage, and (or) photodecay - these phenomena were simulated using a linear decay term. However, analysis of the linear decay terms indicated that photodecay was not a dominant source of dye loss.To better understand the flow processes, solute-transport processes, and ground-water/surface-water interactions on the Santa Clara River in Ventura County, California, a 24-hour fluorescent-dye tracer study was performed under steady-state flow conditions on a 45-km reach of the river. The study reach includes perennial (uppermost and lowermost) subreaches and ephemeral subreaches of the lower Piru Creek and the middle Santa Clara River. The tracer-test data were used to calibrate a one-dimension-al flow model (DAFLOW) and a solute-transport model (BLTM). The dye-arrival times at each sample location were simulated by calibrating the velocity parameters in DAFLOW. The simulations of dye transport indicated that (1) ground-water recharge explains the loss of

  3. Are single-well "push-pull" tests suitable tracer methods for aquifer characterization?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hebig, Klaus; Zeilfelder, Sarah; Ito, Narimitsu; Machida, Isao; Scheytt, Traugott; Marui, Atsunao

    2013-04-01

    Recently, investigations were conducted for geological and hydrogeological characterisation of the sedimentary coastal basin of Horonobe (Hokkaido, Japan). Coastal areas are typical geological settings in Japan, which are less tectonically active than the mountain ranges. In Asia, and especially in Japan, these areas are often densely populated. Therefore, it is important to investigate the behaviour of solutes in such unconsolidated aquifers. In such settings sometimes only single boreholes or groundwater monitoring wells are available for aquifer testing for various reasons, e.g. depths of more than 100 m below ground level and slow groundwater velocities due to density driven flow. A standard tracer test with several involved groundwater monitoring wells is generally very difficult or even not possible at these depths. One of the most important questions in our project was how we can obtain information about chemical and hydraulic properties in such aquifers. Is it possible to characterize solute transport behaviour parameters with only one available groundwater monitoring well or borehole? A so-called "push-pull" test may be one suitable method for aquifer testing with only one available access point. In a push-pull test a known amount of several solutes including a conservative tracer is injected into the aquifer ("push") and afterwards extracted ("pull"). The measured breakthrough curve during the pumping back phase can then be analysed. This method has already been used previously with various aims, also in the recent project (e.g. Hebig et al. 2011, Zeilfelder et al. 2012). However, different test setups produced different tracer breakthrough curves. As no systematic evaluation of this aquifer tracer test method was done so far, nothing is known about its repeatability. Does the injection and extraction rate influence the shape of the breakthrough curve? Which role plays the often applied "chaser", which is used to push the test solution out from the

  4. Preliminary Interpretation of a Radionuclide and Colloid Tracer Test in a Granodiorite Shear Zone at the Grimsel Test Site, Switzerland

    SciTech Connect

    Reimus, Paul W.

    2012-08-30

    In February and March 2012, a tracer test involving the injection of a radionuclide-colloid cocktail was conducted in the MI shear zone at the Grimsel Test Site, Switzerland, as part of the Colloids Formation and Migration (CFM) project. The colloids were derived from FEBEX bentonite, which is mined in Spain and is being considered as a potential waste package backfill in a Spanish nuclear waste repository. The tracer test, designated test 12-02 (second test in 2012), involved the injection of the tracer cocktail into borehole CFM 06.002i2 and extraction from the Pinkel surface packer at the main access tunnel wall approximately 6.1 m from the injection interval. The test configuration is depicted in Figure 1. This configuration has been used in several conservative tracer tests and two colloid-homologue tracer tests since 2007, and it is will be employed in an upcoming test involving the emplacement of a radionuclide-doped bentonite plug into CFM 06.002i2 to evaluate the swelling and erosion of the bentonite and the transport of bentonite colloids and radionuclides from the source to the extraction point at the tunnel wall. Interpretive analyses of several of the previous tracer tests, from 09-01 through 12-02 were provided in two previous Used Fuel Disposition Program milestone reports (Arnold et al., 2011; Kersting et al., 2012). However, only the data for the conservative tracer Amino-G Acid was previously analyzed from test 12-02 because the other tracer data from this test were not available at the time. This report documents the first attempt to quantitatively analyze the radionuclide and colloid breakthrough curves from CFM test 12-02. This report was originally intended to also include an experimental assessment of colloid-facilitated transport of uranium by bentonite colloids in the Grimsel system, but this assessment was not conducted because it was reported by German collaborators at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) that neither uranium nor

  5. CO2CRC's Otway Residual Saturation and Dissolution Test: Using Reactive Ester Tracers to Determine Residual CO2 Saturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, M.; Stalker, L.; LaForce, T.; Pejcic, B.; Dyt, C.; Ho, K.; Ennis-King, J.

    2013-12-01

    Residual trapping, that is CO2 held in the rock pore space due to capillarity, is an important storage mechanism in geo-sequestration of over the short to medium term (up to 1000 years). As such residual CO2 saturation is a critical reservoir parameter for assessing the storage capacity and security of carbon capture and storage (CCS). As a component of the CO2CRC's Residual Gas Saturation and Dissolution Test at the CO2CRC Otway Project site in Victoria (Australia), we have recently tested a suite of reactive esters (triacetin, tripropionin and propylene glycol diacetate) in a single well chemical tracer test to determine residual CO2 saturation. The goal of this project was to assess and validate a suite of possible tests that could be implemented to determine residual CO2 saturation. For this test, the chemical tracers were injected with a saturated CO2/water mixture into the formation (that is already at residual CO2 saturation) where they were allowed to 'soak' for approximately 10 days allowing for the partial hydrolysis of the esters to their corresponding carboxylic acids and alcohols. Water containing the tracers was then produced from the well resulting in over 600 tracer samples over a period of 12 hours. A selection of these samples were analysed for tracer content and to establish tracer breakthrough curves. To understand the behaviour of these chemical tracers in the downhole environment containing residually trapped supercritical CO2 and formation water, it is necessary to determine the supercritical CO2/water partition coefficients. We have previously determined these in the laboratory (Myers et al., 2012) and they are used here to model the tracer behaviour and provide an estimate of the residual CO2 saturation. Two different computational simulators were used to analyse the tracer breakthrough profiles. The first is based on simple chromatographic retardation and has been used extensively in single well chemical tracer tests to determine residual

  6. SYNCHROTRON X-RAY MICROTOMOGRAPHY AND INTERFACIAL PARTITIONING TRACER TEST MEASUREMENTS OF NAPL-WATER INTERFACIAL AREAS

    PubMed Central

    Brusseau, Mark L.; Janousek, Hilary; Murao, Asami; Schnaar, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    Interfacial areas between an immiscible organic liquid (NAPL) and water were measured for two natural porous media using two methods, aqueous-phase interfacial partitioning tracer tests and synchrotron X-ray microtomography. The interfacial areas measured with the tracer tests were similar to previously reported values obtained with the method. The values were, however, significantly larger than those obtained from microtomography. Analysis of microtomography data collected before and after introduction of the interfacial tracer solution indicated that the surfactant tracer had minimal impact on fluid-phase configuration and interfacial areas under conditions associated with typical laboratory application. The disparity between the tracer-test and microtomography values is attributed primarily to the inability of the microtomography method to resolve interfacial area associated with microscopic surface heterogeneity. This hypothesis is consistent with results recently reported for a comparison of microtomographic analysis and interfacial tracer tests conducted for an air-water system. The tracer-test method provides a measure of effective, total (capillary and film) interfacial area, whereas microtomography can be used to determine separately both capillary-associated and film-associated interfacial areas. Both methods appear to provide useful information for given applications. A key to their effective use is recognizing the specific nature of the information provided by each, as well as associated limitations. PMID:23678204

  7. Synchrotron X-ray microtomography and interfacial partitioning tracer test measurements of NAPL-water interfacial areas

    SciTech Connect

    Brusseau, Mark L.; Janousek, Hilary; Murao, Asami; Schnaar, Gregory

    2008-04-02

    Interfacial areas between an immiscible organic liquid (NAPL), and water were measured for two natural porous media using two methods, aqueous-phase interfacial partitioning tracer tests and synchrotron X-ray microtomography. The interfacial areas measured with the tracer tests were similar to previously reported values obtained with the method. The values were, however, significantly larger than those obtained from microtomography. Analysis of microtomography data collected before and after introduction of the interfacial tracer solution indicated that the surfactant tracer had minimal impact on fluid-phase configuration and interfacial areas under conditions associated with typical laboratory application. The disparity between the tracer test and microtomography values is attributed primarily to the inability of the microtomography method to resolve interfacial area associated with microscopic surface heterogeneity. This hypothesis is consistent with results recently reported for a comparison of microtomographic analysis and interfacial tracer tests conducted for an air-water system. The tracer test method provides a measure of effective, total (capillary and film) interfacial area, whereas microtomography can be used to determine separately both capillary-associated and film-associated interfacial areas. Both methods appear to provide useful information for given applications. A key to their effective use is recognizing the specific nature of the information provided by each, as well as associated limitations.

  8. SYNCHROTRON X-RAY MICROTOMOGRAPHY AND INTERFACIAL PARTITIONING TRACER TEST MEASUREMENTS OF NAPL-WATER INTERFACIAL AREAS.

    PubMed

    Brusseau, Mark L; Janousek, Hilary; Murao, Asami; Schnaar, Gregory

    2008-01-01

    Interfacial areas between an immiscible organic liquid (NAPL) and water were measured for two natural porous media using two methods, aqueous-phase interfacial partitioning tracer tests and synchrotron X-ray microtomography. The interfacial areas measured with the tracer tests were similar to previously reported values obtained with the method. The values were, however, significantly larger than those obtained from microtomography. Analysis of microtomography data collected before and after introduction of the interfacial tracer solution indicated that the surfactant tracer had minimal impact on fluid-phase configuration and interfacial areas under conditions associated with typical laboratory application. The disparity between the tracer-test and microtomography values is attributed primarily to the inability of the microtomography method to resolve interfacial area associated with microscopic surface heterogeneity. This hypothesis is consistent with results recently reported for a comparison of microtomographic analysis and interfacial tracer tests conducted for an air-water system. The tracer-test method provides a measure of effective, total (capillary and film) interfacial area, whereas microtomography can be used to determine separately both capillary-associated and film-associated interfacial areas. Both methods appear to provide useful information for given applications. A key to their effective use is recognizing the specific nature of the information provided by each, as well as associated limitations.

  9. Application of tracer tests using SF6 and chloride for hydrogeological characterization of a CCS site, Eumseong, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H. H.; Lee, S. S.; Kim, T. W.; Lee, K.; Kim, M.; Lee, K. K.

    2015-12-01

    Push-pull tracer test was conducted to acquire precise site information and characteristics on a Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS)-site at Eumseong, Korea. Push-pull test is very simple to design, and perform. The test is also convenient to set a duration of experiment period based on the background ground-water velocity. In this study, SF6 and Chloride were used as tracers known as non-reactive tracers. The performed push-pull tests were consisted of 3 phases: 1) solution injection phase; 2) rest phase; and 3) pumping phase. We used a portable multi-level packer to isolate the injection interval. Samples were obtained during pumping phase at every 2 minutes. LTC level-logger was installed to record real-time water level, temperature, and electric conductivity before and during the experiment. A breakthrough curve was obtained by analyzing LTC level-logger data and tracer concentration of water samples. The values of ground water velocity and effective porosity from two tracers came out similar values. SF6 and chloride did not show intervening effect and display similar transport behavior. It seems that both tracers can be applied independently or together to perform tracer tests for estimation of transport behaviors of dissolved volatile components. Acknowledgement: Financial support was provided by the "R&D Project on Environmental Management of Geologic CO2 Storage" from the KEITI (Project Number: 2014001810003) and Korea Ministry of Environment as "The GAIA project(2014000540010)"

  10. Using seismic reflection to locate a tracer testing complex south of Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kryder, Levi

    Tracer testing in the fractured volcanic aquifer near Yucca Mountain, and in the alluvial aquifer south of Yucca Mountain, Nevada has been conducted in the past to determine the flow and transport properties of groundwater in those geologic units. However, no tracer testing has been conducted across the alluvium/volcanic interface. This thesis documents the investigative process and subsequent analysis and interpretations used to identify a location suitable for installation of a tracer testing complex, near existing Nye County wells south of Yucca Mountain. The work involved evaluation of existing geologic data, collection of wellbore seismic data, and a detailed surface seismic reflection survey. Borehole seismic data yielded useful information on alluvial P-wave velocities. Seismic reflection data were collected over a line of 4.5-km length, with a 10-m receiver and shot spacing. Reflection data were extensively processed to image the alluvium/volcanic interface. A location for installation of an alluvial/volcanic tracer testing complex was identified based on one of the reflectors imaged in the reflection survey; this site is located between existing Nye County monitoring wells, near an outcrop of Paintbrush Tuff. Noise in the reflection data (due to some combination of seismic source signal attenuation, poor receiver-to-ground coupling, and anthropogenic sources) were sources of error that affected the final processed data set. In addition, in some areas low impedance contrast between geologic units caused an absence of reflections in the data, complicating the processing and interpretation. Forward seismic modeling was conducted using Seismic Un*x; however, geometry considerations prevented direct comparison of the modeled and processed data sets. Recommendations for additional work to address uncertainties identified during the course of this thesis work include: drilling additional boreholes to collect borehole seismic and geologic data; reprocessing a

  11. Characterization of retention processes and their effect on the analysis of tracer tests in fractured reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Walkup, G.W. Jr.

    1984-06-01

    Retention processes such as adsorption and diffusion into an immobile region can effect tracer movement through a fractured reservoir. This study has conducted experimental work and has developed a two-dimensional model to characterize retention processes. A method to directly determine some important flow parameters, such as the fracture aperture, from the analysis of tracer tests has been developed as a result of the new two-dimensional model. The experimental work consisted of batch experiments designed to both reproduce earlier work and to determine the magnitude of the retention effects. Negligible retention was observed from which it was concluded that the batch experiments were not sensitive enough and that more sensitive flowing tests were needed. A two-dimensional model that represents a fractured medium by a mobile region, in which convention, diffusion, and adsorption are allowed, and an immobile region in which only diffusion and adsorption are allowed has been developed. It was possible to demonstrate how each of the mass-transfer processes included in the model affect tracer return curves by producing return curves for any set of the defining variables. Field data from the New Zealand was numerically fit with the model. The optimum values of the parameters determined from curve fitting provided a direct estimate of the fracture width and could be used to estimate other important flow parameters if experimentally determinable values were known. 25 refs., 22 figs., 6 tabs.

  12. The Influence of Surface Tension Gradients on Surfactant Tracer Measurement of Air-Water Interfacial Area in Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costanza-Robinson, M. S.; Estabrook, B. D.; Henry, E. J.

    2009-12-01

    Air-water interfacial area (AI) in porous media is an important factor governing equilibrium contaminant retention, as well as the kinetics of interphase mass transfer, such as delivery of oxygen to roots and volatilization of methane from landfills. Despite this importance, significant method-dependence is observed among techniques used to determine AI in porous media. In this work, possible low bias in conventional aqueous interfacial-partitioning tracer methodology (IPT) was examined by comparison of IPT-AI estimates with more direct estimates obtained using synchrotron X-ray microtomographic (µCT) imaging. Sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate and pentafluorobenzoate were used as interfacial and nonreactive tracers, respectively, to measure AI at three water saturations (Sw) in a natural fine sand. IPT-AI exhibited expected trends, with higher areas associated with drier conditions, but the magnitude of AI was as much as 50% lower than those measured by µCT. IPT-AI values for the driest system agreed most closely with microtomography data. Real-time system mass measurements revealed that upon introduction of the surfactant tracer, system Sw decreased by 15-30%; the driest system exhibited the least drainage. This drainage is consistent with a reduction in capillarity caused by the lower surface tension of the surfactant solution as compared to the surfactant-free resident fluid. Drainage in the direction of flow would lead to earlier breakthrough of the surfactant tracer and a lower AI-estimate. In fact, the magnitude of drainage and magnitude of AI-underestimation relative to µCT were qualitatively correlated. Although this effect was expected, its magnitude and potential influence on AI was previously unknown and was larger than anticipated.

  13. Test of synthetic DNA tracers in a periodic hydrodynamic system for time-variable transit time distribution assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahlke, H. E.; Wang, C.; McNew, C.; McLaughlin, S.; Lyon, S. W.

    2016-12-01

    Recent research on time-varying transport through hydrologic systems proposed using decomposed over-printed tracer breakthrough curves to directly observe transport through complex flow systems. This method, also known as the PERTH (Periodic Tracer Hierarchy) method requires periodic flow and multiple tracer injections to reveal changes in flow pathways and transport behavior. Time-variable transit time distributions (TTD) estimated from tracer breakthrough curves often vary with the storage state of the system, which in turn is influenced by internal and external variabilities, such as the arrangement of flow pathways and fluctuations in system inputs. Deciphering internal from external variabilities in TTDs might help to advance the use of TTDs for estimating the physical state of a system; however, thus far the finite number of unique conservative tracers available for tracing has limited deeper insights. Synthetic DNA tracers consisting of short strands of synthetic DNA encapsulated by polylactic acid (PLA) microspheres could potentially provide multiple unique tracers with identical transport properties needed to explore time varying transport through hydrologic systems in more detail. An experiment was conducted on the miniLeo hillslope, a 1 m3 sloping lysimeter, within the Biosphere 2 Landscape Evolution Observatory near Tucson, AZ to investigate transit time variability. The goal of the experiment was to 1) test the suitability of using synthetic DNA tracers for estimating TTDs in a hydrologic system and 2) to determine the TTDs of individual tracer pulses under periodic steady-state conditions. Five DNA tracers, consisting of four unique, encapsulated DNA sequences and one free/non-encapsulated DNA sequence, were applied as reference and probe tracers together with deuterium, using the PERTH method. The lysimeter received three 2-hour pulses of rainfall at a rate of 30 mm/hr for 10 days. Initial results show that both the encapsulated and free DNA tracers

  14. Evaluating Microbial Purification during Soil Treatment of Wastewater with Multicomponent Tracer and Surrogate Tests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Cuyk, S.; Siegrist, R.L.; Lowe, K.; Harvey, R.W.

    2004-01-01

    Soil treatment of wastewater has the potential to achieve high purification efficiency, yet the understanding and predictability of purification with respect to removal of viruses and other pathogens is limited. Research has been completed to quantify the removal of virus and bacteria through the use of microbial surrogates and conservative tracers during controlled experiments with three-dimensional pilot-scale soil treatment systems in the laboratory and during the testing of full-scale systems under field conditions. The surrogates and tracers employed included two viruses (MS-2 and PRID-1 bacteriophages), one bacterium (ice-nucleating active Pseudomonas), and one conservative tracer (bromide ion). Efforts have also been made to determine the relationship between viruses and fecal coliform bacteria in soil samples below the wastewater infiltrative surface, and the correlation between Escherichia coil concentrations measured in percolating soil solution as compared with those estimated from analyses of soil solids. The results suggest episodic breakthrough of virus and bacteria during soil treatment of wastewater and a 2 to 3 log (99-99.9%) removal of virus and near complete removal of fecal coliform bacteria during unsaturated flow through 60 to 90 cm of sandy medium. Results also suggest that the fate of fecal coliform bacteria may be indicative of that of viruses in soil media near the infiltrative surface receiving wastewater effluent. Concentrations of fecal coliform in percolating soil solution may be conservatively estimated from analysis of extracted soil solids.

  15. Quantification of conservative and reactive transport using a single groundwater tracer test in a fractured media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatton, Eliot; Labasque, Thierry; Guillou, Aurélie; Béthencourt, Lorine; de La Bernardie, Jérôme; Boisson, Alexandre; Koch, Florian; Aquilina, Luc

    2017-04-01

    Identification of biogeochemical reactions in aquifers and determining kinetics is important for the prediction of contaminant transport in aquifers and groundwater management. Therefore, experiments accounting for both conservative and reactive transport are essential to understand the biogeochemical reactivity at field scale. This study presents the results of a groundwater tracer test using the combined injection of dissolved conservative and reactive tracers (He, Xe, Ar, Br-, O2 and NO3-) in order to evaluate the transport properties of a fractured media in Brittany, France. Dissolved gas concentrations were continuously monitored in situ with a CF-MIMS (Chatton et al, 2016) allowing a high frequency (1 gas every 2 seconds) multi-tracer analysis (N2, O2, CO2, CH4, N2O, H2, He, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe) over a large resolution (6 orders of magnitude). Along with dissolved gases, groundwater biogeochemistry was monitored through the sampling of major anions and cations, trace elements and microbiological diversity. The results show breakthrough curves allowing the combined quantification of conservative and reactive transport properties. This ongoing work is an original approach investigating the link between heterogeneity of porous media and biogeochemical reactions at field scale. Eliot Chatton, Thierry Labasque, Jérôme de La Bernardie, Nicolas Guihéneuf, Olivier Bour and Luc Aquilina; Field Continuous Measurement of Dissolved Gases with a CF-MIMS: Applications to the Physics and Biogeochemistry of Groundwater Flow; Environmental Science & Technology, in press, 2016.

  16. Application of a NAPL partitioning interwell tracer test (PITT) to support DNAPL remediation at the Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico chemical waste landfill

    SciTech Connect

    Studer, J.E.; Mariner, P.; Jin, M.

    1996-05-01

    Chlorinated solvents as dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) are present at a large number of hazardous waste sites across the U.S. and world. DNAPL is difficult to detect in the subsurface, much less characterize to any degree of accuracy. Without proper site characterization, remedial decisions are often difficult to make and technically effective, cost-efficient remediations are even more difficult to obtain. A new non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) characterization technology that is superior to conventional technologies has been developed and applied at full-scale. This technology, referred to as the Partitioning Interwell Tracer Test (PITT), has been adopted from oil-field practices and tailored to environmental application in the vadose and saturated zones. A PITT has been applied for the first time at full-scale to characterize DNAPL in the vadose zone. The PITT was applied in December 1995 beneath two side-by-side organic disposal pits at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) RCRA Interim Status Chemical Waste Landfill (CWL), located in Albuquerque, New Mexico. DNAPL, consisting of a mixture of chlorinated solvents, aromatic hydrocarbons, and PCE oils, is known to exist in at least one of the two buried pits. The vadose zone PITT was conducted by injecting a slug of non-partitioning and NAPL-partitioning tracers into and through a zone of interest under a controlled forced gradient. The forced gradient was created by a balanced extraction of soil gas at a location 55 feet from the injector. The extracted gas stream was sampled over time to define tracer break-through curves. Soil gas sampling ports from multilevel monitoring installations were sampled to define break-through curves at specific locations and depths. Analytical instrumentation such as gas chromatographs and a photoacoustical analyzers operated autonomously, were used for tracer detection.

  17. Tidal Volume Single Breath Washout of Two Tracer Gases - A Practical and Promising Lung Function Test

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Florian; Stern, Georgette; Thamrin, Cindy; Fuchs, Oliver; Riedel, Thomas; Gustafsson, Per; Frey, Urs; Latzin, Philipp

    2011-01-01

    Background Small airway disease frequently occurs in chronic lung diseases and may cause ventilation inhomogeneity (VI), which can be assessed by washout tests of inert tracer gas. Using two tracer gases with unequal molar mass (MM) and diffusivity increases specificity for VI in different lung zones. Currently washout tests are underutilised due to the time and effort required for measurements. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a simple technique for a new tidal single breath washout test (SBW) of sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) and helium (He) using an ultrasonic flowmeter (USFM). Methods The tracer gas mixture contained 5% SF6 and 26.3% He, had similar total MM as air, and was applied for a single tidal breath in 13 healthy adults. The USFM measured MM, which was then plotted against expired volume. USFM and mass spectrometer signals were compared in six subjects performing three SBW. Repeatability and reproducibility of SBW, i.e., area under the MM curve (AUC), were determined in seven subjects performing three SBW 24 hours apart. Results USFM reliably measured MM during all SBW tests (n = 60). MM from USFM reflected SF6 and He washout patterns measured by mass spectrometer. USFM signals were highly associated with mass spectrometer signals, e.g., for MM, linear regression r-squared was 0.98. Intra-subject coefficient of variation of AUC was 6.8%, and coefficient of repeatability was 11.8%. Conclusion The USFM accurately measured relative changes in SF6 and He washout. SBW tests were repeatable and reproducible in healthy adults. We have developed a fast, reliable, and straightforward USFM based SBW method, which provides valid information on SF6 and He washout patterns during tidal breathing. PMID:21423739

  18. Ultra-Gradient Test Cavity for Testing SRF Wafer Samples

    SciTech Connect

    N.J. Pogue, P.M. McIntyre, A.I. Sattarov, C. Reece

    2010-11-01

    A 1.3 GHz test cavity has been designed to test wafer samples of superconducting materials. This mushroom shaped cavity, operating in TE01 mode, creates a unique distribution of surface fields. The surface magnetic field on the sample wafer is 3.75 times greater than elsewhere on the Niobium cavity surface. This field design is made possible through dielectrically loading the cavity by locating a hemisphere of ultra-pure sapphire just above the sample wafer. The sapphire pulls the fields away from the walls so the maximum field the Nb surface sees is 25% of the surface field on the sample. In this manner, it should be possible to drive the sample wafer well beyond the BCS limit for Niobium while still maintaining a respectable Q. The sapphire's purity must be tested for its loss tangent and dielectric constant to finalize the design of the mushroom test cavity. A sapphire loaded CEBAF cavity has been constructed and tested. The results on the dielectric constant and loss tangent will be presented

  19. Measurement of the Tracer Gradient and Sampling System Bias of the Hot Fuel Examination Facility Stack Air Monitoring System

    SciTech Connect

    Glissmeyer, John A.; Flaherty, Julia E.

    2011-07-20

    This report describes tracer gas uniformity and bias measurements made in the exhaust air discharge of the Hot Fuel Examination Facility at Idaho National Laboratory. The measurements were a follow-up on earlier measurements which indicated a lack of mixing of the two ventilation streams being discharged via a common stack. The lack of mixing is detrimental to the accuracy of air emission measurements. The lack of mixing was confirmed in these new measurements. The air sampling probe was found to be out of alignment and that was corrected. The suspected sampling bias in the air sample stream was disproved.

  20. Well ER-6-1 Tracer Test Analysis: Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    SciTech Connect

    Greg Ruskauff

    2006-09-01

    The ER-6-1 multiple-well aquifer test-tracer test (MWAT-TT) investigated groundwater flow and transport processes relevant to the transport of radionuclides from sources on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) through the lower carbonate aquifer (LCA) hydrostratigraphic unit (HSU). The LCA, which is present beneath much of the NTS, is the principal aquifer for much of southern Nevada. This aquifer consists mostly of limestone and dolomite, and is pervasively fractured. Groundwater flow in this aquifer is primarily in the fractures, and the hydraulic properties are primarily related to fracture frequency and fracture characteristics (e.g., mineral coatings, aperture, connectivity). The objective of the multiple-well aquifer test (MWAT) was to determine flow and hydraulic characteristics for the LCA in Yucca Flat. The data were used to derive representative flow model and parameter values for the LCA. The items of specific interest are: Hydraulic conductivity; Storage parameters; Dual-porosity behavior; and Fracture flow characteristics. The objective of the tracer transport experiment was to evaluate the transport properties and processes of the LCA and to derive representative transport parameter values for the LCA. The properties of specific interest are: Effective porosity; Matrix diffusion; Longitudinal dispersivity; Adsorption characteristics; and Colloid transport characteristics. These properties substantially control the rate of transport of contaminants in the groundwater system and concentration distributions. To best support modeling at the scale of the corrective action unit (CAU), these properties must be investigated at the field scale. The processes represented by these parameters are affected by in-situ factors that are either difficult to investigate at the laboratory scale or operate at a much larger scale than can be reproduced in the laboratory. Measurements at the field scale provide a better understanding of the effective average parameter values. The

  1. Nano-iron Tracer Test for Characterizing Preferential Flow Path in Fractured Rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chia, Y.; Chuang, P. Y.

    2015-12-01

    Deterministic description of the discrete features interpreted from site characterization is desirable for developing a discrete fracture network conceptual model. It is often difficult, however, to delineate preferential flow path through a network of discrete fractures in the field. A preliminary cross-borehole nano-iron tracer test was conducted to characterize the preferential flow path in fractured shale bedrock at a hydrogeological research station. Prior to the test, heat-pulse flowmeter measurements were performed to detect permeable fracture zones at both the injection well and the observation well. While a few fracture zones are found permeable, most are not really permeable. Chemical reduction method was used to synthesize nano zero-valent iron particles with a diameter of 50~150 nm. The conductivity of nano-iron solution is about 3100 μs/cm. The recorded fluid conductivity shows the arrival of nano-iron solution in the observation well 11.5 minutes after it was released from the injection well. The magnetism of zero-valent iron enables it to be absorbed on magnet array designed to locate the depth of incoming tracer. We found nearly all of absorbed iron on the magnet array in the observation well were distributed near the most permeable fracture zone. The test results revealed a preferential flow path through a permeable fracture zone between the injection well and the observation well. The estimated hydraulic conductivity of the connected fracture is 2.2 × 10-3 m/s. This preliminary study indicated that nano-iron tracer test has the potential to characterize preferential flow path in fractured rock.

  2. High gradient tests of metallic mm-wave accelerating structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dal Forno, Massimo; Dolgashev, Valery; Bowden, Gordon; Clarke, Christine; Hogan, Mark; McCormick, Doug; Novokhatski, Alexander; O'Shea, Brendan; Spataro, Bruno; Weathersby, Stephen; Tantawi, Sami G.

    2017-08-01

    This paper explores the physics of vacuum rf breakdowns in high gradient mm-wave accelerating structures. We performed a series of experiments with 100 GHz and 200 GHz metallic accelerating structures, at the Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests (FACET) at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. This paper presents the experimental results of rf tests of 100 GHz travelling-wave accelerating structures, made of hard copper-silver alloy. The results are compared with pure hard copper structures. The rf fields were excited by the FACET ultra-relativistic electron beam. The accelerating structures have open geometries, 10 cm long, composed of two halves separated by a variable gap. The rf frequency of the fundamental accelerating mode depends on the gap size and can be changed from 90 GHz to 140 GHz. The measured frequency and pulse length are consistent with our simulations. When the beam travels off-axis, a deflecting field is induced in addition to the decelerating longitudinal field. We measured the deflecting forces by observing the displacement of the electron bunch and used this measurement to verify the expected accelerating gradient. We present the first quantitative measurement of rf breakdown rates in 100 GHz copper-silver accelerating structure, which was 10-3 per pulse, with peak electric field of 0.42 GV/m, an accelerating gradient of 127 MV/m, at a pulse length of 2.3 ns. The goal of our studies is to understand the physics of gradient limitations in order to increase the energy reach of future accelerators.

  3. High gradient tests of metallic mm-wave accelerating structures

    DOE PAGES

    Dal Forno, Massimo; Dolgashev, Valery; Bowden, Gordon; ...

    2017-05-10

    This study explores the physics of vacuum rf breakdowns in high gradient mm-wave accelerating structures. We performed a series of experiments with 100 GHz and 200 GHz metallic accelerating structures, at the Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests (FACET) at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. This paper presents the experimental results of rf tests of 100 GHz travelling-wave accelerating structures, made of hard copper-silver alloy. The results are compared with pure hard copper structures. The rf fields were excited by the FACET ultra-relativistic electron beam. The accelerating structures have open geometries, 10 cm long, composed of two halves separated bymore » a variable gap. The rf frequency of the fundamental accelerating mode depends on the gap size and can be changed from 90 GHz to 140 GHz. The measured frequency and pulse length are consistent with our simulations. When the beam travels off-axis, a deflecting field is induced in addition to the decelerating longitudinal field. We measured the deflecting forces by observing the displacement of the electron bunch and used this measurement to verify the expected accelerating gradient. We present the first quantitative measurement of rf breakdown rates in 100 GHz copper-silver accelerating structure, which was 10–3 per pulse, with peak electric field of 0.42 GV/m, an accelerating gradient of 127 MV/m, at a pulse length of 2.3 ns. The goal of our studies is to understand the physics of gradient limitations in order to increase the energy reach of future accelerators.« less

  4. Tracer experiment results during the Long-Term Flow Test of the Fenton Hill reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Rodrigues, N.E.V.; Robinson, B.A.; Counce, D.A.

    1993-02-01

    Three chemical tracer experiments and one extended injection of fluid low in concentration of dissolved species have been carried out during the Long Term Flow Test (LTFT) of the Fenton Hill Hot Dry Rock (HDR) reservoir. The tracer tests,results illustrate the dynamic nature of the flow system, with more fluid traveling through longer residence time paths as heat is extracted. The total fracture volumes calculated from these tests allow us to determine the fate of unrecovered injection fluid, examine the pressure-dependence of fracture volume, and, through a comparison to the hydraulic performance, postulate a model for the nature of the pressure drops through the system. The Fresh Water Flush (FWF) test showed that while no dissolved specie behavior is truly conservative (no sources or sinks), several breakthrough curves are well explained with a pore fluid displacement model. Other dissolved components are clearly influenced by dissolution or precipitation reactions. Finally, the transient response of the chemistry during the FWF to an increase in production well pressure showed that some fractures connected to the production well preferentially open when pressure is raised.

  5. Results of injection and tracer tests in Olkaria East Geothermal Field

    SciTech Connect

    Ambusso, Willis J.

    1994-01-20

    This paper presents results of a six month Injection and Tracer test done in Olkaria East Geothermal Field The Injection tests show that commencement of injection prior to onset of large drawdown in the reservoir leads to greater sustenance of well production and can reduce well cycling which is a common feature of wells in Olkaria East Field. For cases where injection is started after some drawdown has occurred in the reservoir, injection while leading to improvement of well output can also lead to increase in well cycling which is a non desirable side effect. Tracer tests reveal slow rate of fluid migration (< 5 m/hr). However estimates of the cumulative tracer returns over the period of injection is at least 31% which is large and reveals the danger of late time thermal drawdown and possible loss of production. It is shown in the discussion that the two sets of results are consistent with a reservoir where high permeability occurs along contact surfaces which act as horizontal "fractures" while the formations between the "fractures" have low permeability. This type of fracture system will lead to channeled flow of injected fluid and therefore greater thermal depletion along the fractures while formations further from the fracture would still be at higher temperature. In an attempt to try and achieve a more uniform thermal depletion in the reservoir, it is proposed that continuous injection be done for short periods (~2 years) and this be followed by recovery periods of the nearly the same length of time before resumption of injection again.

  6. A tracer test at the Beowawe geothermal field, Nevada, using fluorescein and tinopal CBS

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, P.E.; Adams, M.C.; Benoit, D.

    1995-12-31

    An interwell tracer test using fluorescein and tinopal CBS was performed at the Beowawe geothermal field in north-central Nevada in order to assess the effects of recent changes to the injection strategy. Fluorescein return curves established injection-production flow patterns and verified that produced water is being reinjected into a region of the reservoir that is in excellent communication with the production wells. An analysis of the tinopal CBS return curves indicated that tinopal CBS was apparently strongly adsorbed onto the reservoir rock. The fluorescein return curves were used to estimate the overall (fractures and matrix) reservoir volume.

  7. Rate-limited U(VI) desorption during a small-scale tracer test in a heterogeneous uranium-contaminated aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Patricia M.; Davis, James A.; Hay, Michael B.; Conrad, Mark E.; Campbell, Kate M.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Long, Philip E.

    2012-05-01

    A tracer test was performed at the Rifle Integrated Field Research Challenge site to assess the effect of addition of bicarbonate on U(VI) desorption from contaminated sediments in the aquifer and to compare equilibrium and rate-limited reactive transport model descriptions of mass transfer limitations on desorption. The tracer test consisted of injection of a 37 mM NaHCO3solution containing conservative tracers followed by down-gradient sampling of groundwater at various elevations and distances from the point of injection. Breakthrough curves show that dissolved U(VI) concentrations increased 1.2-2.6-fold above background levels, resulting from increases in bicarbonate alkalinity (from injectate solution) and Ca concentrations (from cation exchange). In general, more U(VI) was mobilized in shallower zones of the aquifer, where finer-grained sediments and higher solid phase U content were found compared to deeper zones. An equilibrium-based reactive transport model incorporating a laboratory-based surface complexation model derived from the same location predicted the general trends in dissolved U(VI) during the tracer test but greatly overpredicted the concentrations of U(VI), indicating that the system was not at equilibrium. Inclusion of a multirate mass transfer model successfully simulated the nonequilibrium desorption behavior of U(VI). Local sediment properties such as sediment texture (weight percent <2 mm), surface area, cation exchange capacity, and adsorbed U(VI) were heterogeneous at the meter scale, and it was important to incorporate these values into model parameters in order to produce accurate simulations.

  8. Insight from simulations of single-well injection-withdrawal tracer tests on simple and complex fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, C.-F.; Doughty, C.

    2009-08-06

    The single-well injection withdrawal (SWIW) test, a tracer test utilizing only one well, is proposed as a useful contribution to site characterization of fractured rock, as well as providing parameters relevant to tracer diffusion and sorption. The usual conceptual model of flow and solute transport through fractured rock with low matrix permeability involves solute advection and dispersion through a fracture network coupled with diffusion and sorption into the surrounding rock matrix. Unlike two-well tracer tests, results of SWIW tests are ideally independent of advective heterogeneity, channeling and flow dimension, and, instead, focus on diffusive and sorptive characteristics of tracer (solute) transport. Thus, they can be used specifically to study such characteristics and evaluate the diffusive parameters associated with tracer transport through fractured media. We conduct simulations of SWIW tests on simple and complex fracture models, the latter being defined as having two subfractures with altered rock blocks in between and gouge material in their apertures. Using parameters from the Aspo site in Sweden, we calculate and study SWIW tracer breakthrough curves (BTCs) from a test involving four days of injection and then withdrawal. By examining the peak concentration C{sub pk} of the SWIW BTCs for a variety of parameters, we confirm that C{sub pk} is largely insensitive to the fracture advective flow properties, in particular to permeability heterogeneity over the fracture plane or to subdividing the flow into two subfractures in the third dimension orthogonal to the fracture plane. The peak arrival time t{sub pk} is not a function of fracture or rock properties, but is controlled by the time schedule of the SWIW test. The study shows that the SWIW test is useful for the study of tracer diffusion-sorption processes, including the effect of the so-called flow-wetted surface (FWS) of the fracture. Calculations with schematic models with different FWS values are

  9. Errors in NAPL volume estimates due to systematic measurement errors during partitioning tracer tests.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Michael C; Wise, William R

    2005-09-15

    During moment-based analyses of partitioning tracer tests, systematic errors in volume and concentration measurements propagate to yield errors in the saturation and volume estimates for nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL). Derived expressions could be applied to help practitioners bracket their estimates of NAPL saturation and volume obtained from such tests. In practice, many of these effects may be overshadowed by other complications experienced in the field. Errors are propagated for systematic constant (offset) volume, proportional volume, and constant (offset) concentration errors. Previous efforts to quantify the impact of these errors were predicated upon the specific assumption that nonpartitioning and partitioning masses were equal. The current work relaxes that assumption and is therefore more general in scope. Through the use of nondimensional concentration, systematic proportional concentration errors do not affect the accuracy of the method. Specific consideration needs to be given to accurate flow measurements and minimizing baseline concentration errors when performing partitioning tracer tests in order to prevent the propagation of systematic errors.

  10. Boundary conditions for convergent radial tracer tests and effect of well bore mixing volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zlotnik, Vitaly A.; David Logan, J.

    Convergent radial flow tracer tests have a complex spatial nonaxial transport structure caused by the flow in the vicinity of the injection well and its finite mixing volume. The formulation of the boundary value problem, and especially the treatment of the boundary conditions at the injection well, is nontrivial. Hodgkinson and Lever [1983], Moench [1989, 1991], and Welty and Gelhar [1994] have developed different models and methods for the analysis of breakthrough curves in the extraction well. To extend interpretation techniques to breakthrough curves in the zone between injection and extraction wells, an analysis of conventional transport models is given, and improved boundary conditions are formulated for a convergent radial tracer test problem. The formulation of the boundary conditions is based upon a more detailed analysis of the kinematic flow structure and tracer mass balance in the neighborhood of the injection well. Two practical applications of revised boundary conditions for field data analysis are given. First, the note explains anomalous high well bore mixing volumes of injection wells found by Cady et al. [1993] and allows one to establish the role of mixing versus other processes (retardation, matrix diffusion, etc.). Second, it is shown that the improper use of Moench's [1989] model can produce bias in the characteristics of breakthrough curves in the extraction well under conditions that involve a significant mixing factor in the injection well. A numerical example indicates an error in peak concentrations on a breakthrough curve by as much as 70% and in peak arrival time by 10% for Peclet numbers Pe=102. The effect becomes slightly less significant for Pe=1.

  11. Dual-porosity analysis of conservative tracer testing in saturated volcanic rocks at Yucca Mountain in Nye County, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fahy, M.F.

    1997-01-01

    A radially convergent conservative tracer injection test was conducted between boreholes UE-25 #2 and UE-25 c #3 of the C-hole complex at Yucca Mountain to determine effective porosity and longitudinal dispersivity. Approximately 47% of the tracer mass was recovered and a dual-porosity analytical model replicates the breakthrough curve. Fractured-rock analyses focus on the fracture-porosity and geometry as the controlling factors in transport.

  12. TRACER STABILITY AND CHEMICAL CHANGES IN AN INJECTED GEOTHERMAL FLUID DURING INJECTION-BACKFLOW TESTING AT THE EAST MESA GEOTHERMAL FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, M.C.

    1985-01-22

    The stabilities of several tracers were tested under geothermal conditions while injection-backflow tests were conducted at East Mesa. The tracers I and Br were injected continuously while SCN (thiocyanate), B, and disodium fluorescein were each injected as a point source (slug). The tracers were shown to be stable, except where the high concentrations used during slug injection induced adsorption of the slug tracers. However, adsorption of the slug tracers appeared to ''armor'' the formation against adsorption during subsequent tests. Precipitation behavior of calcite and silica as well as Na/K shifts during injection are also discussed.

  13. Testing Method for Heat Resistance Under Temperature Gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, K.; Kawasaki, A.; Itoh, Y.; Harada, Y.; Ono, F.

    2007-12-01

    Testing Method for Heat Resistance under Temperature Gradient” is a Japanese Industrial Standard (JIS) newly established by the Minister of Economy, Trade and Industry, after deliberations by the Japanese Industrial Standards Committee, in accordance with the Industrial Standardization Law. This standard specified the testing method for heat resistance under temperature gradient of materials and coated members of equipment exposed to high temperature, such as aircraft engines, gas turbines, and so on. This paper introduces the principle and overview of the established standard. In addition, taking the heat cycle test using the burner rig for instance, we specifically illustrate the acquirable data and their analysis in the standard. Monitoring of the effective thermal conductivity and acoustic emission particularly enables to the non-destructive evaluation of failure cycle.

  14. Final report on the use of gaseous tracers in WRI's 10-ton nonuniform oil shale retorting tests

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, T.F.; Moore, D.F.

    1985-12-01

    For tests on nonuniform oil shale retorting, Western Research Institute's 10-ton retort was loaded with shale rubble in zones of different permeability. The permeability of any given zone was determined by the particle size range loaded into that zone. The retort was studied using gas tracer techniques and flow model simulations. Results of these tracer studies are discussed in this report. Nine retorting and tracer runs were made on the retort. For each run, tracer injections were made into the main air flow inlet and into taps near the top of the retort. Detection taps were located at four levels in the retort with five taps on each level in tests S71 through S78 and six taps on each level in run S79. The oil shale rubble bed was configured with a cylindrical core in tests S71 through S78 and with two side-by-side regions with differing bed properties in test S79. Relationships are shown between the tracer response and sweep efficiency, oil yield, and local yield. Model simulations are compared with tracer responses and indicate fair agreement between model-estimated and measured response times but poor agreement on the shapes of the response curves. Although the data are scattered, there is suggestive evidence that the sweep efficiency of a retort can be determined using simple inlet-to-outlet tracer tests. Oil yield can also be predicted for the operating conditions used for the nonuniform retorting tests. More tests on retorts with intermediate degrees of nonuniformity must be made to confirm the correlations developed in this study. 15 refs., 9 figs.

  15. A Spreadsheet Program for Two-Well Tracer Test Data Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Guoping; Watson, David B.; Parker, Jack C.; Brooks, Scott C.

    2011-07-28

    Two-well tracer tests are often conducted to investigate subsurface solute transport in the field. Analyzing breakthrough curves in extraction and monitoring wells using numerical methods is nontrivial due to highly nonuniform flow conditions. Here, we extended approximate analytical solutions for the advection-dispersion equation for an injection-extraction well doublet in a homogeneous confined aquifer under steady-state flow conditions for equal injection and extraction rates with no transverse dispersion and negligible ambient flow, and implemented the solutions in Microsoft Excel using Visual Basic for Application (VBA). Functions were implemented to calculate concentrations in extraction and monitoring wells at any location due to a step or pulse injection. Type curves for a step injection were compared with those calculated by numerically integrating the solution for a pulse injection. The results from the two approaches are similar when the dispersivity is small. As the dispersivity increases, the latter was found to be more accurate but requires more computing time. The code was verified by comparing the results with published-type curves and applied to analyze data from the literature. In conclusion, the method can be used as a first approximation for two-well tracer test design and data analysis, and to check accuracy of numerical solutions. The code and example files are publicly available.

  16. A spreadsheet program for two-well tracer test data analysis.

    PubMed

    Tang, Guoping; Watson, David B; Parker, Jack C; Brooks, Scott C

    2012-01-01

    Two-well tracer tests are often conducted to investigate subsurface solute transport in the field. Analyzing breakthrough curves in extraction and monitoring wells using numerical methods is nontrivial due to highly nonuniform flow conditions. We extended approximate analytical solutions for the advection-dispersion equation for an injection-extraction well doublet in a homogeneous confined aquifer under steady-state flow conditions for equal injection and extraction rates with no transverse dispersion and negligible ambient flow, and implemented the solutions in Microsoft Excel using Visual Basic for Application (VBA). Functions were implemented to calculate concentrations in extraction and monitoring wells at any location due to a step or pulse injection. Type curves for a step injection were compared with those calculated by numerically integrating the solution for a pulse injection. The results from the two approaches are similar when the dispersivity is small. As the dispersivity increases, the latter was found to be more accurate but requires more computing time. The code was verified by comparing the results with published-type curves and applied to analyze data from the literature. The method can be used as a first approximation for two-well tracer test design and data analysis, and to check accuracy of numerical solutions. The code and example files are publicly available. Ground Water © 2011, National Ground Water Association. Published 2011. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  17. A Microsoft Excel Program for Two-Well Tracer Test Data Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Guoping; Watson, David B; Parker, Jack C.; Brooks, Scott C

    2012-01-01

    Two-well tracer tests are often conducted to investigate subsurface solute transport in the field. Analyzing breakthrough curves in the extraction and monitoring wells using numerical methods is nontrivial due to highly nonuniform flow conditions. We extended, and implemented analytical solutions for the convection-dispersion equation for an injection-extraction well-duplet in a homogeneous confined aquifer under steady state conditions. Functions were provided to calculate the concentrations in the extraction and monitoring wells at any location due to a step or pulse injection. Type curves for a step injection were compared with those calculated by numerically integrating the solution for a pulse injection. The results from the two approaches are similar when the dispersivity is small. As the dispersivity increases, the latter was found to be more accurate but requires more computing time. The code was verified by comparing the results with published type curves and applied to analyze data from the literature. It can be used as a first approximation for two-well tracer test data analysis, and to check accuracy of numerical solutions. The code and example files are publically-available.

  18. Measuring seasonal variations of moisture in a landfill with the partitioning gas tracer test

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Byunghyun; Jafarpour, Behnam; Gallagher, Victoria N.; Imhoff, Paul T. . E-mail: imhoff@udel.edu; Chiu, Pei C.; Fluman, Daniel A.

    2006-07-01

    Seven pilot-scale partitioning gas tracer tests (PGTTs) were conducted to assess the accuracy and reproducibility of this method for measuring water in municipal solid waste landfills. Tests were conducted in the same location over a 12-month period, and measured moisture conditions ranged from possible dry waste to refuse with a moisture content of 24.7%. The final moisture content of 24.7% was in reasonable agreement with gravimetric measurements of excavated refuse, where the moisture content was 26.5 {+-} 6.0CI%. Laboratory tests were used to assess the utility of the PGTT for measuring water in small pores, water sorbed to solid surfaces, and the influence of dry waste on PGTTs. These experiments indicated that when refuse surfaces are not completely solvated with water, PGTTs may produce misleading results (negative estimates) of water saturation and moisture content.

  19. Vadose Zone Tracer Testing in the UK Sherwood Sandstone: Hydrogeophysical Data Report

    SciTech Connect

    Binley, A

    2003-10-08

    In 1998 a joint project between the universities of Lancaster and Leeds, funded by the UK Natural Environment Research Council and the UK Environment Agency, was initiated to examine, using geophysical methods, unsaturated flow and transport processes at two purposely developed field sites in the UK Sherwood Sandstone. More recently work by Lancaster university funded by a UK Natural Environment Research Council PhD studentship (awarded to Peter Winship) has continued the investigation at the two sites. This work, so far, has demonstrated: how cross-borehole (borehole to borehole) radar tomography can be used to monitor changes in moisture content in the unsaturated zone due to natural and forced (tracer) inputs (Binley et al., 2001); the evaluation of seasonal variation of moisture content profiles using high-resolution borehole resistivity and radar profiling (Binley et al., 2002a); initial attempts to utilize the geophysical data to develop numerical predictive models of unsaturated flow (Binley et al., 2002b; Binley et al, 2003; Binley and Beven, 2003). In addition, petrophysical models relating geophysical data to hydrological properties have been developed (West et al., 2003). Here we provide a data report on two tracer experiments conducted at one of the field sites. Within the report we describe the site layout and present summary results from the two tracer tests. In the appendix a file map is provided to allow identification of relevant files in the dataset accompanying this report. The two techniques used here are three-dimensional time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) and lime-lapse cross-borehole radar tomography and profiling. They provide geophysical measurements that can be related to the moisture content of the subsurface, and subsequently to the conductivity of that moisture content. They also yield data on a scale that is appropriate for numerical simulations of water movement in the subsurface. The two methods have been applied at a

  20. Heat Transfer Characterization Using Heat and Solute Tracer Tests in a Shallow Alluvial Aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dassargues, A.

    2013-12-01

    Very low enthalpy geothermal systems are increasingly considered for heating or cooling using groundwater energy combined with heat pumps. The design and the impact of shallow geothermal systems are often assessed in a semi-empirical way. It is accepted by most of the private partners but not by environmental authorities deploring a lack of rigorous evaluation of the mid- to long-term impact on groundwater. In view of a more rigorous methodology, heat and dye tracers are used for estimating simultaneously heat transfer and solute transport parameters in an alluvial aquifer. The experimental field site, is equipped with 21 piezometers drilled in alluvial deposits composed of a loam layer overlying a sand and gravel layer constituting the alluvial aquifer. The tracing experiment consisted in injecting simultaneously heated water and a dye tracer in a piezometer and monitoring evolution of groundwater temperature and tracer concentration in 3 control panels set perpendicularly to the main groundwater flow. Results showed drastic differences between heat transfer and solute transport due to the main influence of thermal capacity of the saturated porous medium. The tracing experiment was then simulated using a numerical model and the best estimation of heat transfer and solute transport parameters is obtained by calibrating this numerical model using inversion tools. The developed concepts and tests may lead to real projects of various extents that can be now optimized by the use of a rigorous and efficient methodology at the field scale. On the field: view from the injection well in direction of the pumping well through the three monitoring panels Temperature monitoring in the pumping well and in the piezometers of the three panels: heat transfer is faster in the lower part of the aquifer (blue curves) than in the upper part (red curves). Breakthrough curves are also more dispersed in the upper part with longer tailings.

  1. Tracer test for the measurement of gas diffusion and non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) saturation in soil.

    PubMed

    Van De Steene, Joke; Höhener, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    During soil bioremediation, the diffusion of oxygen into the soil is an important prerequisite for aerobic biodegradation, and the decrease of petroleum products is the ultimate goal. Both processes need to be monitored. The aim of this work was to develop a gas tracer test that yields information on both, gas diffusion and residual saturation with non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) in unsaturated soil heaps. One conservative tracer (methane) and 4 partitioning gas tracers (diethylether, methyl tert-butyl ether, chloroform and n-heptane) were injected as vapors into laboratory columns filled with unsaturated sand with increasing NAPL saturation. Breakthrough curves of gaseous compounds were measured at two points and compared to analytical solutions of an analytical diffusive-reactive transport equation. By fitting of methane data, robust results for effective diffusivity (tortuosity) were obtained. NAPL saturation was most accurately measured by the moderately water soluble tracers (ethers and chloroform). The hydrophobic tracer n-heptane did not partition into water-immersed NAPL. An easy and accurate way to assess air-NAPL partitioning constants from gas chromatography retention times is furthermore reported. It is concluded that gas tracer tests have the potential for measuring two important properties in soil bioremediation systems easily and quickly.

  2. Gas-partitioning tracer test to qualify trapped gas during recharge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heilweil, Victor M.; Kip, Solomon D.; Perkins, Kim S.; Ellett, Kevin M.

    2004-01-01

    Dissolved helium and bromide tracers were used to evaluate trapped gas during an infiltration pond experiment. Dissolved helium preferentially partitioned into trapped gas bubbles, or other pore air, because of its low solubility in water. This produced observed helium retardation factors of as much as 12 relative to bromide. Numerical simulations of helium breakthrough with both equilibrium and kinetically limited advection/dispersion/retardation did not match observed helium concentrations. However, better fits were obtained by including a decay term representing the diffusive loss of helium through interconnected, gas-filled pores. Calculations indicate that 7% to more than 26% of the porosity beneath the pond was filled with gas. Measurements of laboratory hydraulic properties indicate that a 10% decrease in saturation would reduce the hydraulic conductivity by at least one order of magnitude in the well-sorted sandstone, but less in the overlying soils. This is consistent with in situ measurements during the experiment, which show steeper hydraulic gradients in sandstone than in soil. Intrinsic permeability of the soil doubled during the first six months of the experiment, likely caused by a combination of dissolution and thermal contraction of trapped gas. Managers of artificial recharge basins may consider minimizing the amount of trapped gas by using wet, rather than dry, tilling to optimize infiltration rates, particularly in well-sorted porous media in which reintroduced trapped gas may cause substantial reductions in permeability. Trapped gas may also inhibit the amount of focused infiltration that occurs naturally during ephemeral flood events along washes and playas.

  3. Gas-partitioning tracer test to quantify trapped gas during recharge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heilweil, V.M.; Solomon, D.K.; Perkins, K.S.; Ellett, K.M.

    2004-01-01

    Dissolved helium and bromide tracers were used to evaluate trapped gas during an infiltration pond experiment. Dissolved helium preferentially partitioned into trapped gas bubbles, or other pore air, because of its low solubility in water. This produced observed helium retardation factors of as much as 12 relative to bromide. Numerical simulations of helium breakthrough with both equilibrium and kinetically limited advection/dispersion/retardation did not match observed helium concentrations. However, better fits were obtained by including a decay term representing the diffusive loss of helium through interconnected, gas-filled pores. Calculations indicate that 7% to more than 26% of the porosity beneath the pond was filled with gas. Measurements of laboratory hydraulic properties indicate that a 10% decrease in saturation would reduce the hydraulic conductivity by at least one order of magnitude in the well-sorted sandstone, but less in the overlying soils. This is consistent with in situ measurements during the experiment, which show steeper hydraulic gradients in sandstone than in soil. Intrinsic permeability of the soil doubled during the first six months of the experiment, likely caused by a combination of dissolution and thermal contraction of trapped gas. Managers of artificial recharge basins may consider minimizing the amount of trapped gas by using wet, rather than dry, tilling to optimize infiltration rates, particularly in well-sorted porous media in which reintroduced trapped gas may cause substantial reductions in permeability. Trapped gas may also inhibit the amount of focused infiltration that occurs naturally during ephemeral flood events along washes and playas.

  4. Using sequential self-calibration method to identify conductivity distribution: Conditioning on tracer test data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hu, B.X.; He, C.

    2008-01-01

    An iterative inverse method, the sequential self-calibration method, is developed for mapping spatial distribution of a hydraulic conductivity field by conditioning on nonreactive tracer breakthrough curves. A streamline-based, semi-analytical simulator is adopted to simulate solute transport in a heterogeneous aquifer. The simulation is used as the forward modeling step. In this study, the hydraulic conductivity is assumed to be a deterministic or random variable. Within the framework of the streamline-based simulator, the efficient semi-analytical method is used to calculate sensitivity coefficients of the solute concentration with respect to the hydraulic conductivity variation. The calculated sensitivities account for spatial correlations between the solute concentration and parameters. The performance of the inverse method is assessed by two synthetic tracer tests conducted in an aquifer with a distinct spatial pattern of heterogeneity. The study results indicate that the developed iterative inverse method is able to identify and reproduce the large-scale heterogeneity pattern of the aquifer given appropriate observation wells in these synthetic cases. ?? International Association for Mathematical Geology 2008.

  5. Solvent-refined-coal (SRC) process: axial dispersion in tall bubble columns - tracer tests

    SciTech Connect

    Parimi, K.; Pitchford, M.D.

    1982-01-01

    The degree of backmixing is an important consideration in the design and scale-up of SRC-II reactors. Several qualitative tests were conducted on the 25 ft plexiglass bubble column in order to visually observe the axial dispersion or backmixing characteristics of a column of this size. A concentrated solution of Methyl-Orange was injected, and the dispersion of the dye throughout the column was observed and photographed. These observations indicated that the backmixing level was not as extensive as existing correlations would predict. Since backmixing plays an important role in the design and scale-up of SRC II reactors, it was decided to follow up with additional quantitative tests for further elucidation of this aspect of bubble column performance. The required test apparatus was assembled and tracer tests using an electrolytic tracer in the form of a 10 N NaOH solution were conducted. The results confirmed the visual observations; that the degree of backmixing was less than existing literature correlations predicted. Part of the reason for the discrepancy may be due to the large extrapolation involved, but more importantly, there is the question of adequacy of the model to describe the complex mixing patterns present in the column. Implicit in using any of the existing correlations to predict backmixing is the assumption that a simple dispersion model can adequately describe the complex mixing patterns observed. This is not a valid assumption when the column operates well beyond the quiescent bubble flow regime. There is, therefore, a real need to identify models which would represent more closely the fluid dynamic behavior of large columns and which can be used confidently for design and scale-up.

  6. Using Tracer Tests to Estimate Vertical Recharge and Evaluate Influencing Factors for Irrigated Agricultural Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, D.; Jin, M.; Brusseau, M.; Ma, B.; Liu, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Accurate estimation of vertical groundwater recharge is critical for (semi) arid regions, especially in places such as the North China Plain where vertical recharge comprises the largest portion of recharge. Tracer tests were used to estimate vertical recharge beneath agricultural systems irrigated by groundwater, and to help delineate factors that influence recharge. Bromide solution was applied to trace infiltration in the vadose zone beneath irrigated agricultural fields (rotated winter wheat and summer maize, orchards, and cotton) and non-irrigated woodlands at both piedmont plain (Shijiazhaung) and alluvial and lacustrine plains (Hengshui) in the North China Plain. The tracer tests lasted for more than two years, and were conducted at a total of 37 sites. Tracer solution was injected into the subsurface at a depth of 1.2 m before the rainy season. Soil samples were then collected periodically to observe bromide transport and estimate recharge rates at the point-scale. For these experiments, the only irrigation the fields received was that applied by the landowners. In addition to these tests, a controlled irrigation experiment was conducted at a single wheat and maize site. The results showed that recharge rates were lower for the alluvial and lacustrine plains sites, which comprise finer-textured soils than those present in the piedmont plain. Specifically, the recharge rate ranged between 56-466 mm/a beneath wheat-maize, 110-564 mm/a beneath orchard, and 0-21 mm/a beneath woodlands with an average recharge coefficient of 0.17 for the piedmont plain sites, while the recharge rate ranged between 26-165 mm/a beneath wheat-maize, 6-40 mm/a beneath orchard, 87-319 mm/a beneath cotton, and 0-32 mm/a beneath woodlands with an average recharge coefficient of 0.10 for the alluvial and lacustrine plain sites. Irrigation provided the primary contribution to recharge, with precipitation providing a minor contribution. The results of both the uncontrolled and controlled

  7. Hydraulic Conductivity Estimate via Tracer Test and Ensemble Kalman Filter Data Assimilation: Theoretical and Numerical Fundamentals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crestani, E.; Camporese, M.; Salandin, P.

    2011-12-01

    Hydraulic properties of natural aquifers, such as porosity, hydraulic conductivity, and storativity, exhibit an erratic spatial variability at different scales that is difficult to recognize without expensive in situ sampling campaigns, laboratory analyses, and, when available, spatially distributed pumping tests. Nevertheless, the importance of the heterogeneous structure of natural formations on solute transport is well recognized, being the non-Fickian evolution of contaminant plumes and the relevant dispersive phenomena controlled by the variability of the hydraulic conductivity K at the local scale. Tracer test analyses have been widely adopted to identify the complex distribution of in situ hydraulic properties. In particular, the use of geophysical methods like the borehole Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) have been in rapid increase, due to their potential to accurately describe the spatio-temporal evolution of the injected solute. Under the assumptions that the solute spreads as a passive tracer and with high values of the Peclet number, the plume evolution is controlled by the porosity and the spatial distribution of hydraulic conductivity. Combining the Lagrangian formulation of transport and the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) data assimilation technique, the purpose of this study is to infer the spatial distribution of K at the local scale from a sequence of time-lapse concentration imaging. The capabilities of the proposed approach are investigated simulating various assimilation experiments via synthetic tracer tests in a three-dimensional finite domain reproducing a heterogeneous aquifer. In a first scenario, all the available concentration measurements are assimilated and the entire hydraulic conductivity field is updated, while in the remaining scenarios the K values are updated only in a limited number of nodes by assimilating the concentrations in these same nodes, the hydraulic conductivity in the rest of the domain being the result of a

  8. Single well thermal tracer test, a new experimental set up for characterizing thermal transport in fractured media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de La Bernardie, Jérôme; Bour, Olivier; Guihéneuf, Nicolas; Chatton, Eliot; Labasque, Thierry; Longuevergne, Laurent; Le Lay, Hugo; Koch, Floriant; Gerard, Marie-Françoise; Le Borgne, Tanguy

    2017-04-01

    Thermal transport in fractured media depends on the hydrological properties of fractures and thermal characteristics of rock. Tracer tests using heat as tracer can thus be a good alternative to characterize fractured media for shallow geothermal needs. This study investigates the possibility of implementing a new thermal tracer test set up, the single well thermal tracer test, to characterize hydraulic and thermal transport properties of fractured crystalline rock. The experimental setup is based on injecting hot water in a fracture isolated by a double straddle packer in the borehole while pumping and monitoring the temperature in a fracture crossing the same borehole at greater elevation. One difficulty comes from the fact that injection and withdrawal are achieved in the same borehole involving thermal losses along the injection tube that may disturb the heat recovery signal. To be able to well localize the heat influx, we implemented a Fiber-Optic Distributed Temperature Sensing (FO-DTS) which allows the temperature monitoring with high spatial and temporal resolution (29 centimeters and 30 seconds respectively). Several tests, at different pumping and injection rates, were performed in a crystalline rock aquifer at the experimental site of Ploemeur (H+ observatory network). We show through signal processing how the thermal breakthrough may be extracted thanks to Fiber-Optic distributed temperature measurements. In particular, we demonstrate how detailed distributed temperature measurements were useful to identify different inflows and to estimate how much heat was transported and stored within the fractures network. Thermal breakthrough curves of single well thermal tracer tests were then interpreted with a simple analytical model to characterize hydraulic and thermal characteristics of the fractured media. We finally discuss the advantages of these tests compared to cross-borehole thermal tracer tests.

  9. The Effect of Variable Geochemical Conditions on the Reactive Transport of U(VI) in Small Scale Tracer Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtis, G. P.; Fox, P.; Kohler, M.; Davis, J. A.

    2005-12-01

    Small-scale tracer tests were conducted to evaluate the effect of variable geochemical conditions on the reactive transport of U(VI). The tracer tests were conducted in a shallow alluvial aquifer downgradient from a former uranium mill and a tailings disposal area near Naturita, CO. The U(VI) concentration in the groundwater at the tracer test site was approximately 5 μM, the alkalinity was 8.5 meq/L and the pH was approximately 7.1. Previous studies at the site demonstrated the U(VI) was most sensitive to the alkalinity and least sensitive to the pH values relative to the range of measured values. Uranium migration tests were conducted on a scale of 1-2.5 m and considered variable U(VI) and alkalinity and included Br as an inert tracer. The tracer tests demonstrated that the sediment readily released U(VI) even after many years of contact with the contaminated groundwater suggesting the U(VI) migration is controlled by adsorption reactions. Reactive transport simulations used a surface complexation model developed independently from laboratory bench scale studies to simulate adsorption. The reactive transport simulations gave good predictions of the observed breakthrough of U(VI) when the advection and dispersion parameters were fitted to Br breakthrough. Field studies also included several single well push-pull tests that were conducted at increased and decreased U(VI) and alkalinity values. Reactive transport simulations of these experiments will be presented and compared with the tracer tests simulations.

  10. Estimation of Transport Parameters Using Forced Gradient Tracer Tests in Heterogeneous Aquifers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    model assuming that the solute undergoes Langmuir or Freundlich adsorption at the fracture wall. In the Langmuir adsorption case, the average...concentration approaches the effective concentration described by an effective model for linear adsorption. In the Freundlich adsorption case, the average...groundwater remains one of the major challenges to Army. Numerical models that are designed to simulate the flow of water and transport behavior of

  11. In-situ tracer tests and models developed to understand flow paths in a shear zone at the Grimsel Test Site, Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blechschmidt, I.; Martin, A. J.

    2012-12-01

    The Grimsel Test Site (www.grimsel.com) is an international underground research laboratory excavated at a depth of 450m below the surface in the crystalline Aare Massif of southern Switzerland in 1984. It is operated and owned by the National Cooperative for the Disposal of Radioactive Waste of Switzerland (NAGRA) which is the organization responsible for managing and researching the geological disposal of all types of radioactive wastes originating in Switzerland. One experiment, the Colloid Formation and Migration test (CFM*), is an ongoing in-situ migration test started in 2004 to study colloid facilitated transport behavior of radionuclides through a shear zone. The importance of colloid transport in the context of a radioactive waste repository is that it provides a mechanism for potentially enhancing the advective transport of radionuclides. The montmorillonite clays that are planned to be used as an engineered barrier around the radioactive waste in many repository concepts may be a source of such colloids under specific hydraulic and/or chemical boundary conditions. The CFM project includes an integrated programme of field testing, laboratory studies and modelling/interpretation. The field tests are performed in a shear zone where the natural outflow has been controlled by a tunnel packer system and flow is monitored with an array of boreholes drilled for CFM and previous experiments at the site. The flow field is controlled by a low-rate extraction from a surface packer. The controlled low-rate extraction creates a region of low hydraulic gradients and fluid velocity within the shear zone, suitable for study under repository-relevant or other geo-resource relevant conditions. Here we present a summary of the migration tracer tests carried out so far to understand the hydraulic properties and transport characteristics of the shear zone using both stable and radioactive (Na-22, Cs-137, Ba-133, Th-232, Np-237, Am-243, Pu-242) tracers as well as colloids, and

  12. INL Tracer Interpretation

    SciTech Connect

    2007-03-27

    This spreadsheet application is for tracer test analysis. The analyses are based on the first temporal moment of a tracer. The governing equations are briefly discussed, and the individual steps required of the user are outlined. A series of Excel macros written in Visual Basic calculate mean residence time, swept pore volume, and flow-storage geometry from a tracer history.

  13. Diffusive partitioning tracer test for the quantification of nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL) in the vadose zone: performance evaluation for heterogeneous NAPL distribution.

    PubMed

    Werner, David; Karapanagioti, Hrissi K; Höhener, Patrick

    2009-08-11

    A partitioning tracer test based on gas-phase diffusion in the vadose zone yields estimates of the residual nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL) saturation. The present paper investigates this technique further by studying diffusive tracer breakthrough curves in the vadose zone for a heterogeneous NAPL distribution. Tracer experiments were performed in a lysimeter with a horizontal layer of artificial kerosene embedded in unsaturated sand. Tracer disappearance curves at the injection point and tracer breakthrough curves at some distance from the injection point were measured inside and outside of the NAPL layer. A numerical code was used to generate independent model predictions based on the physicochemical sand, NAPL, and tracer properties. The measured and modeled tracer breakthrough curves were in good agreement confirming the validity of important modeling assumptions such as negligible sorption of chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) tracers to the uncontaminated sand and their fast reversible partitioning between the soil air and the NAPL phase. Subsequently, the model was used to investigate different configurations of NAPL contamination. The experimental and model results show that the tracer disappearance curves of a single-well diffusive partitioning tracer test (DPTT) are dominated by the near-field presence of NAPL around the tip of the soil gas probe. In contrast, breakthrough curves of inter-well tracer tests reflect the NAPL saturation in between the probes, although there is no unique interpretation of the tracer signals if the NAPL distribution is heterogeneous. Numerical modeling is useful for the planning of a DPTT application. Simulations suggest that several cubic meters of soil can be investigated with a single inter-well partitioning tracer test of 24-hour duration by placing the injection point in the center of the investigated soil volume and probes at up to 1 m distance for the monitoring of gaseous tracers.

  14. Diffusive partitioning tracer test for the quantification of nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL) in the vadose zone: Performance evaluation for heterogeneous NAPL distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, David; Karapanagioti, Hrissi K.; Höhener, Patrick

    2009-08-01

    A partitioning tracer test based on gas-phase diffusion in the vadose zone yields estimates of the residual nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL) saturation. The present paper investigates this technique further by studying diffusive tracer breakthrough curves in the vadose zone for a heterogeneous NAPL distribution. Tracer experiments were performed in a lysimeter with a horizontal layer of artificial kerosene embedded in unsaturated sand. Tracer disappearance curves at the injection point and tracer breakthrough curves at some distance from the injection point were measured inside and outside of the NAPL layer. A numerical code was used to generate independent model predictions based on the physicochemical sand, NAPL, and tracer properties. The measured and modeled tracer breakthrough curves were in good agreement confirming the validity of important modeling assumptions such as negligible sorption of chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) tracers to the uncontaminated sand and their fast reversible partitioning between the soil air and the NAPL phase. Subsequently, the model was used to investigate different configurations of NAPL contamination. The experimental and model results show that the tracer disappearance curves of a single-well diffusive partitioning tracer test (DPTT) are dominated by the near-field presence of NAPL around the tip of the soil gas probe. In contrast, breakthrough curves of inter-well tracer tests reflect the NAPL saturation in between the probes, although there is no unique interpretation of the tracer signals if the NAPL distribution is heterogeneous. Numerical modeling is useful for the planning of a DPTT application. Simulations suggest that several cubic meters of soil can be investigated with a single inter-well partitioning tracer test of 24-hour duration by placing the injection point in the center of the investigated soil volume and probes at up to 1 m distance for the monitoring of gaseous tracers.

  15. Testing the 234U/238U weathering tracer in a tropical granitoid watershed, Luquillo, Puerto Rico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pett-Ridge, J. C.; Derry, L. A.

    2006-12-01

    Recent studies have employed U-series disequilibria as a tracer of both weathering profile development and of timescale of erosion for whole watersheds. We have undertaken a detailed analysis of the behavior of the U- series isotopes in a previously well-characterized watershed in order to test this approach. In the Rio Icacos watershed in the Luquillo Mountains of Puerto Rico, previous studies have determined both the rate of propagation of the chemical weathering front by regolith mass balance analysis, and the surface denudation rate using the cosmogenic 10Be tracer. Our study aims to determine whether the U-series approach provides regolith development and erosion rates in agreement with those previously determined. In order to better constrain interpretations based on U-series data, we have coupled the U-series analysis with analyses of trace element concentrations, δ^{30}Si, Ge/Si, and 87Sr/86Sr ratios. Used together, these geochemical tracers provide a powerful tool for understanding weathering reactions, chemical transfers within and out of the weathering profile, and the timing of these chemical transfers. Analyses of soil, saprolite and pore water samples reveal a complex history of U and Th transformations including mobilization of both U and Th in the soil followed by re-adsorption deeper in the profile. 234U/238U activity ratios in soil and saprolite show significant variability both with depth, and also among individual mineral phases at any particular depth. This variation among mineral phases, combined with the likely physical sorting of these phases during erosional transport, results in an additional isotopic fractionation unrelated to that imparted by the weathering process. This implies that suspended sediment samples taken from streamwater are unlikely to accurately reflect the average disequilibria carried by the secondary minerals phases in the soil and saprolite. Our analyses also reveal a significant contribution of atmospheric mineral

  16. Delineation of Groundwater Flow Pathway in Fractured Bedrock Using Nano-Iron Tracer Test in the Sealed Well

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Po-Yu; Chia, Yeeping; Chiu, Yung-Chia; Liou, Ya-Hsuan; Teng, Mao-Hua; Liu, Ching-Yi; Lee, Tsai-Ping

    2016-04-01

    Deterministic delineation of the preferential flow paths and their hydraulic properties are desirable for developing hydrogeological conceptual models in bedrock aquifers. In this study, we proposed using nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) as a tracer to characterize the fractured connectivity and hydraulic properties. Since nZVI particles are magnetic, we designed a magnet array to attract the arriving nZVI particles in the observation well for identifying the location of incoming tracer. This novel approach was examined at two experiment wells with well hydraulic connectivity in a hydrogeological research station in the fractured aquifer. Heat-pulse flowmeter test was used to detect the vertical distribution of permeable zones in the borehole, providing the design basis of tracer test. Then, the less permeable zones in the injection well were sealed by casing to prevent the injected nZVI particles from being stagnated at the bottom hole. Afterwards, hydraulic test was implemented to examine the hydraulic connectivity between two wells. When nZVI slurry was released in the injection well, they could migrate through connected permeable fractures to the observation well. A breakthrough curve was obtained by the fluid conductivity sensor in the observation well, indicating the arrival of nZVI slurry. The iron nanoparticles that were attracted to the magnets in the observation well provide the quantitative information to locate the position of tracer inlet, which corroborates well with the depth of a permeable zone delineated by the flowmeter. Finally, the numerical method was utilized to simulate the process of tracer migration. This article demonstrates that nano-iron tracer test can be a promising approach for characterizing connectivity patterns and transmissivities of the flow paths in the fractured rock.

  17. From Stochastic toward Deterministic Characterization of Discrete Fracture Network via Thermal Tracer Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somogyvari, M.; Jalali, M.; Bayer, P.; Jiménez Parras, S.

    2015-12-01

    The presence of fractures play an essential role in different disciplines, including hydrogeology, geothermal and hydrocarbon industries, as fractures introduce new pathways for flow and transport in the host rocks. Understanding the physical properties of these planar features would reduce the uncertainty of the numerical models and enhance the reliability of their results. Among the fracture properties, orientation and spacing are relatively easily estimated via borehole logs, core images, and outcrops, whereas the fracture geometry (i.e. length, width, and height) is more difficult to investigate. As the fracture geometry controls the hydraulic and thermal behavior of the fracture network through the strong dependency of the fracture conductivity with fracture aperture, it is possible to estimate these geometrical properties indirectly through hydraulic and thermal tomography investigations. To reach this goal, an innovative approach is introduced for discrete fracture network (DFN) characterization of heterogeneous fractured media via active thermal tracer testing. A synthetic DFN model is constructed based on the geological properties of an arbitrary fracture medium such as fracture orientation, length, spacing and persistency. Different realization are then constructed by considering all the above mentioned fracture properties except the length of fracture segments. Pressure and temperature fields are estimated inside the fracture network by means of an implicit upwind finite difference method, which is used to compute heat tracer travel times between injection and observation points and record the full temperature breakthrough curves at the monitoring points. A trans-dimensional inversion is then adopted to update the lengths fracture segment (add or remove) of the DFN model by comparison between proposed and observed travel times (Figure 1). The resulting assemble of the models can be used as an input geometry for deterministic simulations of fracture

  18. Methodology, results, and significance of an unsaturated-zone tracer test at an artificial-recharge facility, Tucson, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Graham, D.D.

    1989-01-01

    A tracer test conducted in 1987 at an artificial-recharge facility in Tucson, Arizona, indicates that solute movement through the poorly sorted stratified alluvial sediments in the unsaturated zone beneath a recharge basin takes place along preferential-flow paths. Movement of a tracer-laced pulse of reclaimed wastewater was monitored using pressure-vacuum lysimeters installed at depths that range from 11 to 45 ft below the bottom of the recharge basin. Tracer-breakthrough curves do not indicate a consistent relation between maximum tracer concentration and depth or between time of tracer breakthrough and depth. Apparent dispersion, as indicated by the slope of the rising leg of the tracer-breakthrough curve, shows no apparent relation with depth. In some cases, the tracer arrived earlier at deep sampling locations than at shallow ones. Velocity of solute flow ranged from 1.9 to 9.0 ft/day. Less interaction between recharge water and solid-phase materials in the unsaturated zone occurs under preferential-flow conditions than if flow occurred as a uniform wetting front. Flow of water through the unsaturated zone is concentrated into fingers or channels under preferential-flow conditions, and the renovating capability of soil is reduced because of the reduced surface area and reduced contact time in the biologically active part of the unsaturated profile. Chemical substances that normally would be decomposed by microbial activity or sorbed by sediment particles can move through the unsaturated zone and cause groundwater contamination under preferential-flow conditions. (USGS)

  19. High-resolution cross-borehole thermal tracer testing in granite: preliminary field results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brixel, Bernard; Klepikova, Maria; Jalali, Mohammadreza; Amann, Florian; Loew, Simon

    2017-04-01

    Understanding how heat is transported, stored and exchanged across fractured media is becoming increasingly relevant in our society, as manifested from the growing popularity of modern technologies relying on the subsurface to either source or store heat. One good example is the utilization of heat from deep hydrothermal or petrothermal systems to generate electricity for base load power generation, a technology also known as deep geothermal energy (DGE). While very attractive in principle, the number of geothermal fields producing economical levels of electricity to this day is still very limited - largely due to the difficulty of either locating deep reservoirs that are both sufficiently hot and permeable or, in the absence of the latter, creating them. In this context, the Swiss Competence Center for Energy Research - Supply of Electricity (SCCER - SoE) is carrying out an in situ stimulation and circulation (ISC) experiment at the Grimsel Test Site (GTS), an underground rock lab located in the Aar massif, in the Swiss Alps. The circulation experiment planned for the post-stimulation phase represents one of the key components of this experimental research program, and the outcome of this test is expected to ultimately provide key insights in the factors controlling the performance of enhanced geothermal reservoirs. Therefore, to support the design of this experiment, short-term thermal tracer tests (TTT) were conducted with the objective to (i) assess the feasibility of conducting TTTs in a relatively intact granite (where fluid flow is controlled by a limited number of discrete fractures); (ii) determine optimal experimental setups; and to ultimately (iii) monitor thermal breakthroughs at high spatial and temporal resolution, providing insights on heat transport and complementing the characterization of hydrogeological conditions carried out through conventional means (e.g. hydraulic and/or solute tracer tests). Presented herein are the results of a 10-day

  20. Phenols and hydroxy-PAHs (arylphenols) as tracers for coal smoke particulate matter: source tests and ambient aerosol assessments

    SciTech Connect

    Bernd R.T. Simoneit; Xinhui Bi; Daniel R. Oros; Patricia M. Medeiros; Guoying Sheng; Jiamo Fu

    2007-11-01

    Source tests were conducted to analyze and characterize diagnostic key tracers for emissions from burning of coals with various ranks. Coal samples included lignite from Germany, semibituminous coal from Arizona, USA, bituminous coal from Wales, UK and sample from briquettes of semibituminous coal, bituminous coal and anthracite from China. Ambient aerosol particulate matter was also collected in three areas of China and a background area in Corvallis, OR (U.S.) to confirm the presence of tracers specific for coal smoke. The results showed a series of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons and phenolic compounds, including PAHs and hydroxy-PAHs as the major tracers, as well as a significant unresolved complex mixture (UCM) of compounds. The tracers that were found characteristic of coal combustion processes included hydroxy-PAHs and PAHs. Atmospheric ambient samples from Beijing and Taiyuan, cities where coal is burned in northern China, revealed that the hydroxy-PAH tracers were present during the wintertime, but not in cities where coal is not commonly used (e.g., Guangzhou, South China). Thus, the mass of hydroxy-PAHs can be apportioned to coal smoke and the source strength modeled by summing the proportional contents of EC (elemental carbon), PAHs, UCM and alkanes with the hydroxy-PAHs. 36 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Estimation of local scale dispersion from local breakthrough curves during a tracer test in a heterogeneous aquifer: the Lagrangian approach.

    PubMed

    Vanderborght, Jan; Vereecken, Harry

    2002-01-01

    The local scale dispersion tensor, Dd, is a controlling parameter for the dilution of concentrations in a solute plume that is displaced by groundwater flow in a heterogeneous aquifer. In this paper, we estimate the local scale dispersion from time series or breakthrough curves, BTCs, of Br concentrations that were measured at several points in a fluvial aquifer during a natural gradient tracer test at Krauthausen. Locally measured BTCs were characterized by equivalent convection dispersion parameters: equivalent velocity, v(eq)(x) and expected equivalent dispersivity, [lambda(eq)(x)]. A Lagrangian framework was used to approximately predict these equivalent parameters in terms of the spatial covariance of log(e) transformed conductivity and the local scale dispersion coefficient. The approximate Lagrangian theory illustrates that [lambda(eq)(x)] increases with increasing travel distance and is much larger than the local scale dispersivity, lambda(d). A sensitivity analysis indicates that [lambda(eq)(x)] is predominantly determined by the transverse component of the local scale dispersion and by the correlation scale of the hydraulic conductivity in the transverse to flow direction whereas it is relatively insensitive to the longitudinal component of the local scale dispersion. By comparing predicted [lambda(eq)(x)] for a range of Dd values with [lambda(eq)(x)] obtained from locally measured BTCs, the transverse component of Dd, DdT, was estimated. The estimated transverse local scale dispersivity, lambda(dT) = DdT/U1 (U1 = mean advection velocity) is in the order of 10(1)-10(2) mm, which is relatively large but realistic for the fluvial gravel sediments at Krauthausen.

  2. Characterisation of virus transport and attenuation in epikarst using short pulse and prolonged injection multi-tracer testing.

    PubMed

    Flynn, Raymond M; Sinreich, Michael

    2010-02-01

    Attenuation processes controlling virus fate and transport in the vadose zone of karstified systems can strongly influence groundwater quality. This research compares the breakthrough of two bacteriophage tracers (H40/1 and T7), with contrasting properties, at subsurface monitoring points following application onto an overlying composite sequence of thin organic soil and weathered limestone (epikarst). Short pulse multi-tracer test results revealed that T7 (Source concentration, Co=1.8x10(6)pfu/mL) and H40/1 (Co=5.9x10(6)pfu/mL) could reach sampling points 10 m below ground less than 30 min after tracer application. Contrasting deposition rates, determined from simulated tracer responses, reflected the potential of the ground to differentially attenuate viruses. Prolonged application of both T7 (Co=2.3x10(4)pfu/mL) and H40/1 (Co=1.3x10(5)pfu/mL) over a five hour period during a subsequent test, in which ionic strength levels observed at monitoring points rose consistently, corresponded to a rapid rise in T7 levels, followed by a gradual decline before the end of tracer injection; this reflected reaction-limited deposition in the system. T7's response contrasted with that of H40/1, whose concentration remained constant over a three hour period before declining dramatically prior to the end of tracer injection. Subsequent application of lower ionic strength tracer-free flush water generated a rapid rise in H40/1 levels and a more gradual release of T7. Results highlight the benefits of employing prolonged injection multi-tracer tests for identifying processes not apparent from conventional short pulse tests. Study findings demonstrate that despite rapid transport rates, the epikarst is capable of physicochemical filtration of viruses and their remobilization, depending on virus type and hydrochemical conditions. Crown Copyright 2009. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Gradient microfluidics enables rapid bacterial growth inhibition testing.

    PubMed

    Li, Bing; Qiu, Yong; Glidle, Andrew; McIlvenna, David; Luo, Qian; Cooper, Jon; Shi, Han-Chang; Yin, Huabing

    2014-03-18

    Bacterial growth inhibition tests have become a standard measure of the adverse effects of inhibitors for a wide range of applications, such as toxicity testing in the medical and environmental sciences. However, conventional well-plate formats for these tests are laborious and provide limited information (often being restricted to an end-point assay). In this study, we have developed a microfluidic system that enables fast quantification of the effect of an inhibitor on bacteria growth and survival, within a single experiment. This format offers a unique combination of advantages, including long-term continuous flow culture, generation of concentration gradients, and single cell morphology tracking. Using Escherichia coli and the inhibitor amoxicillin as one model system, we show excellent agreement between an on-chip single cell-based assay and conventional methods to obtain quantitative measures of antibiotic inhibition (for example, minimum inhibition concentration). Furthermore, we show that our methods can provide additional information, over and above that of the standard well-plate assay, including kinetic information on growth inhibition and measurements of bacterial morphological dynamics over a wide range of inhibitor concentrations. Finally, using a second model system, we show that this chip-based systems does not require the bacteria to be labeled and is well suited for the study of naturally occurring species. We illustrate this using Nitrosomonas europaea, an environmentally important bacteria, and show that the chip system can lead to a significant reduction in the period required for growth and inhibition measurements (<4 days, compared to weeks in a culture flask).

  4. Solute dilution at the Borden and Cape Cod groundwater tracer tests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thierrin, Joseph; Kitanidis, Peter K.

    1994-01-01

    This study presents an analysis of the rate of dilution of a conservative nonreactive tracer in two well-known field experiments: The Borden (Ontario, Canada) experiment and the Cape Cod (Massachusetts) experiment. In evaluating the dilution of injected sodium bromide, in addition to computing the second spatial moments, we have used the dilution index and the reactor ratio. The dilution index is a measure of the formation volume occupied by the solute plume, and the reactor ratio is a shape factor, which measures how stretched and deformed the plume is. Unlike the second moments, which may go up or down during an experiment, the dilution index should increase monotonically. The results for both plumes were quite similar. After an initial period the dilution index increased linearly with time, which is macroscopically equivalent to transport in two-dimensional uniform flow. The reactor ratio was relatively constant during the period of the experiments. Their values, about 0.72 for the Borden test and 0.63 for the Cape Cod test, indicate that the Cape Cod plume was more stretched and deformed than the Borden plume. The maximum concentration, which is an alternative to the dilution index for quantifying dilution, was found to be more erratic and more susceptible to sampling error.

  5. Dye Tracer Tests to Determine Time-of-Travel in Iowa Streams, 1990-2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Christiansen, Daniel E.

    2009-01-01

    Dye-tracing tests have been used by the U.S. Geological Survey, Iowa Water Science Center to determine the time-of-travel in selected Iowa streams from 1990-2006. Time-of-travel data are tabulated for 309 miles of stream reaches in four Iowa drainage basins: the Des Moines, Raccoon, Cedar, and Turkey Rivers. Time-of-travel was estimated in the Des Moines River, Fourmile Creek, North Raccoon River, Raccoon River, Cedar River, and Roberts Creek. Estimation of time-of-travel is important for environmental studies and in determining fate of agricultural constituents and chemical movement through a waterway. The stream reaches range in length from slightly more than 5 miles on Fourmile Creek, to more than 137 miles on the North Raccoon River. The travel times during the dye-tracer tests ranged from 7.5 hours on Fourmile Creek to as long as 200 hours on Roberts Creek; velocities ranged from less than 4.50 feet per minute on Roberts Creek to more than 113 feet per minute on the Cedar River.

  6. Preliminary characterization of binary karst aquifers with tracer tests and time series analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, J. A.; Calux, A. S.; Hiruma, S. T.; Armani, G.; Karmann, I.

    2016-12-01

    The studied site is a polygonal karst developed in a synclinal structure in the Atlantic Rainforest, southeastern Brazil. The carbonatic surface (10.4 km2) receives allogenic recharge from drainage basins (13.9 km2) formed in psammitic rocks. Two main springs drains the karst on the opposite flanks of the synclinal: Alambari (AL) and Ouro Grosso (OG). The karst is inserted in a conservation unit and the hydrological investigation supports its management. Qualitative dye tracer tests were performed to identify recharge areas of the two springs. Monitoring stations at springs measured the water discharge (Q) and the specific conductance, (SC) every hour. The rainfall (R) was measured by a pluviometer connected to an event logger. The time series (2014 to 2016) were analyzed with autocorrelation (ACF) and cross-correlation functions (CCF) to compare the flow dynamics of both systems. Tracer tests indicate that AL spring drains most of the area. Field observations show that the main volume of perennial sink waters is related with this spring. The average values of the parameters from the hydrologic monitoring are: AL - Q= 0.6 m3/s, SC = 137.7 µS cm-1; OG - Q= 0.1 m3/s, SC=158.2 µS cm-1. The mean annual rainfall in the region is 1250 mm. The global analysis of Q (daily average) with ACF shows that memory effect in OG is 3 times higher than the obtained for AL. The same analysis for SC shows that the memory is 1.5 times higher in AL. The CCF was also used to analyze the relations between R, Q and SC time series (in hour basis). When analyzing CCF for R x Q, the maximum value occurs after 4 h for AL (r= 0.31) and after 3 h for OG (r= 0.25). Contrasting results were observed when CCF was applied for R x SC. The CCF for AL shows the usual behavior with a "negative peak" (after 13 h) that represents the pulse of fresh infiltrated rainwater, whereas OG shows a "negative peak" (after 2 h), followed by a 50 h peak (peaks identified with 99% of confidence intervals). The

  7. Inference of the structure of karst conduits using quantitative tracer tests and geological information: example of the Swiss Jura

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrin, Jérôme; Luetscher, Marc

    2008-08-01

    Karst aquifers are known for being particularly heterogeneous with highly transmissive conduits embedded in low permeability volumes of rock matrix. Artificial tracer experiments have been carried out in a complex karst aquifer of the folded Jura Mountains in Switzerland with the aim of deciphering the conduit organisation. It is shown that tracer experiments with multiple injection points under different flow conditions can lead to useful information on the conduits’ structure. This information has been combined with data from structural geology, spring hydrology, and speleological observations. A conceptual model of the conduit network shows that a detailed inference of the conduit organisation can be reached: geology controls conduit location and orientation; spring hydrology, including temporary springs, constrains conduit elevations and relative hydraulic heads in the aquifer subsystems; and tracer tests identify major flow paths and outlets of the system and dilution caused by non-traced tributaries, as well as the presence of secondary flow routes. This understanding of the Aubonne aquifer structure has important implications for the future management of the groundwater resource. Similar approaches coupling geological information, spring hydrology, and multi-tracer tests under various flow conditions may help to characterise the structure of the conduit network in karst aquifers.

  8. Testing cosmic ray acceleration with radio relics: a high-resolution study using MHD and tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittor, D.; Vazza, F.; Brüggen, M.

    2017-02-01

    Weak shocks in the intracluster medium may accelerate cosmic-ray protons and cosmic-ray electrons differently depending on the angle between the upstream magnetic field and the shock normal. In this work, we investigate how shock obliquity affects the production of cosmic rays in high-resolution simulations of galaxy clusters. For this purpose, we performed a magnetohydrodynamical simulation of a galaxy cluster using the mesh refinement code ENZO. We use Lagrangian tracers to follow the properties of the thermal gas, the cosmic rays and the magnetic fields over time. We tested a number of different acceleration scenarios by varying the obliquity-dependent acceleration efficiencies of protons and electrons, and by examining the resulting hadronic γ-ray and radio emission. We find that the radio emission does not change significantly if only quasi-perpendicular shocks are able to accelerate cosmic-ray electrons. Our analysis suggests that radio-emitting electrons found in relics have been typically shocked many times before z = 0. On the other hand, the hadronic γ-ray emission from clusters is found to decrease significantly if only quasi-parallel shocks are allowed to accelerate cosmic ray protons. This might reduce the tension with the low upper limits on γ-ray emission from clusters set by the Fermi satellite.

  9. Biodegradation of the surfactant linear alkylbenzenesulfonate in sewage- contaminated groundwater: A comparison of column experiments and field tracer tests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krueger, C.J.; Radakovich, K.M.; Sawyer, T.E.; Barber, L.B.; Smith, R.L.; Field, J.A.

    1998-01-01

    Transport and biodegradation of linear alkylbenzenesulfonate (LAS) in sewage-contaminated groundwater were investigated for a range of dissolved oxygen concentrations. Both laboratory column and an 80-day continuous injection tracer test field experiments were conducted. The rates of LAS biodegradation increased with increasing dissolved oxygen concentrations and indicated the preferential biodegradation of the longer alkyl chain LAS homologues (i.e., C12 and C13) and external isomers (i.e., 2-and 3- phenyl). However, for similar dissolved oxygen concentrations, mass removal rates for LAS generally were 2-3 times greater in laboratory column experiments than in the field tracer test. Under low oxygen conditions (<1 mg/L) only a fraction of the LAS mixture biodegraded in both laboratory and field experiments. Biodegradation rate constants for the continuous injection field test (0.002-0.08 day-1) were comparable to those estimated for a 3-h injection (pulsed) tracer test conducted under similar biogeochemical conditions, indicating that increasing the exposure time of aquifer sediments to LAS did not increase biodegradation rates.Transport and biodegradation of linear alkylbenzenesulfonate (LAS) in sewage-contaminated groundwater were investigated for a range of dissolved oxygen concentrations. Both laboratory column and an 80-day continuous injection tracer test field experiments were conducted. The rates of LAS biodegradation increased with increasing dissolved oxygen concentrations and indicated the preferential biodegradation of the longer alkyl chain LAS homologues (i.e., C12 and C13) and external isomers (i.e., 2- and 3-phenyl). However, for similar dissolved oxygen concentrations, mass removal rates for LAS generally were 2-3 times greater in laboratory column experiments than in the field tracer test. Under low oxygen conditions (<1 mg/L) only a fraction of the LAS mixture biodegraded in both laboratory and field experiments. Biodegradation rate constants

  10. Characterization of preferential flow paths between boreholes in fractured rock using a nanoscale zero-valent iron tracer test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Po-Yu; Chia, Yeeping; Liou, Ya-Hsuan; Teng, Mao-Hua; Liu, Ching-Yi; Lee, Tsai-Ping

    2016-11-01

    Recent advances in borehole geophysical techniques have improved characterization of cross-hole fracture flow. The direct detection of preferential flow paths in fractured rock, however, remains to be resolved. In this study, a novel approach using nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI or `nano-iron') as a tracer was developed for detecting fracture flow paths directly. Generally, only a few rock fractures are permeable while most are much less permeable. A heat-pulse flowmeter can be used to detect changes in flow velocity for delineating permeable fracture zones in the borehole and providing the design basis for the tracer test. When nano-iron particles are released in an injection well, they can migrate through the connecting permeable fracture and be attracted to a magnet array when arriving in an observation well. Such an attraction of incoming iron nanoparticles by the magnet can provide quantitative information for locating the position of the tracer inlet. A series of field experiments were conducted in two wells in fractured rock at a hydrogeological research station in Taiwan, to test the cross-hole migration of the nano-iron tracer through permeable connected fractures. The fluid conductivity recorded in the observation well confirmed the arrival of the injected nano-iron slurry. All of the iron nanoparticles attracted to the magnet array in the observation well were found at the depth of a permeable fracture zone delineated by the flowmeter. This study has demonstrated that integrating the nano-iron tracer test with flowmeter measurement has the potential to characterize preferential flow paths in fractured rock.

  11. Assessment of local hydraulic properties from electrical resistivity tomography monitoring of a three-dimensional synthetic tracer test experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camporese, M.; Cassiani, G.; Deiana, R.; Salandin, P.

    2011-12-01

    In recent years geophysical methods have become increasingly popular for hydrological applications. Time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) represents a potentially powerful tool for subsurface solute transport characterization since a full picture of the spatiotemporal evolution of the process can be obtained. However, the quantitative interpretation of tracer tests is difficult because of the uncertainty related to the geoelectrical inversion, the constitutive models linking geophysical and hydrological quantities, and the a priori unknown heterogeneous properties of natural formations. Here an approach based on the Lagrangian formulation of transport and the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) data assimilation technique is applied to assess the spatial distribution of hydraulic conductivity K by incorporating time-lapse cross-hole ERT data. Electrical data consist of three-dimensional cross-hole ERT images generated for a synthetic tracer test in a heterogeneous aquifer. Under the assumption that the solute spreads as a passive tracer, for high Peclet numbers the spatial moments of the evolving plume are dominated by the spatial distribution of the hydraulic conductivity. The assimilation of the electrical conductivity 4D images allows updating of the hydrological state as well as the spatial distribution of K. Thus, delineation of the tracer plume and estimation of the local aquifer heterogeneity can be achieved at the same time by means of this interpretation of time-lapse electrical images from tracer tests. We assess the impact on the performance of the hydrological inversion of (i) the uncertainty inherently affecting ERT inversions in terms of tracer concentration and (ii) the choice of the prior statistics of K. Our findings show that realistic ERT images can be integrated into a hydrological model even within an uncoupled inverse modeling framework. The reconstruction of the hydraulic conductivity spatial distribution is satisfactory in the portion

  12. Complementary use of tracer and pumping tests to characterize a heterogeneous channelized aquifer system in New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dann, R. L.; Close, M. E.; Pang, L.; Flintoft, M. J.; Hector, R. P.

    2008-09-01

    The combined use of pumping and tracer test data enabled the derivation of equivalent average hydraulic conductivities ( K avg) for each test in a heterogeneous channelized alluvial aquifer, whereas K values of the preferential flow paths were two orders of magnitude higher. Greater and earlier drawdown was generally observed along preferential flow lines in a pumping test, within an array of 21 wells. The study aim was to characterize hydraulic properties of a channelized aquifer system in New Zealand by combining tracer and pumping test data. Estimates were able to be made of the percentage of highly permeable channels within the profile (˜1.2%), effective porosity that reflected the maximum fraction of highly permeable channels within the aquifer ( ϕ eff -pc ˜0.0038), and flows through highly permeable channels (˜98%) and the sandy gravel matrix material (˜2%). Using ϕ eff -pc, a tracer test K avg value (˜93 m/day) was estimated that was equivalent to pumping test values (˜100 m/day), but two orders of magnitude smaller than K calculated solely from transport through permeable channels ( K pc ˜8,400 m/day). Derived K values of permeable and matrix material were similar to values derived from grain size distribution using the Kozeny-Carman equation.

  13. An analytical model for solute transport in an infiltration tracer test in soil with a shallow groundwater table

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Ching-Ping; Hsu, Shao-Yiu; Chen, Jui-Sheng

    2016-09-01

    It is recommended that an in-situ infiltration tracer test is considered for simultaneously determining the longitudinal and transverse dispersion coefficients in soil. Analytical solutions have been derived for two-dimensional advective-dispersive transport in a radial geometry in the literature which can be used for interpreting the result of such a tracer test. However, these solutions were developed for a transport domain with an unbounded-radial extent and an infinite thickness of vadose zone which might not be realistically manifested in the actual solute transport during a field infiltration tracer test. Especially, the assumption of infinite thickness of vadose zone should be invalid for infiltration tracer tests conducted in soil with a shallow groundwater table. This paper describes an analytical model for interpreting the results of an infiltration tracer test based on improving the transport domain with a bounded-radial extent and a finite thickness of vadose zone. The analytical model is obtained with the successive application of appropriate integral transforms and their corresponding inverse transforms. A comparison of the newly derived analytical solution against the previous analytical solutions in which two distinct sets of radial extent and thickness of vadose zone are considered is conducted to determine the influence of the radial and exit boundary conditions on the solute transport. The results shows that both the radial and exit boundary conditions substantially affect the trailing segment of the breakthrough curves for a soil medium with large dispersion coefficients. Previous solutions derived for a transport domain with an unbounded-radial and an infinite thickness of vadose zone boundary conditions give lower concentration predictions compared with the proposed solution at late times. Moreover, the differences between two solutions are amplified when the observation positions are near the groundwater table. In addition, we compare our

  14. Constraining performance assessment models with tracer test results: a comparison between two conceptual models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenna, Sean A.; Selroos, Jan-Olof

    Tracer tests are conducted to ascertain solute transport parameters of a single rock feature over a 5-m transport pathway. Two different conceptualizations of double-porosity solute transport provide estimates of the tracer breakthrough curves. One of the conceptualizations (single-rate) employs a single effective diffusion coefficient in a matrix with infinite penetration depth. However, the tracer retention between different flow paths can vary as the ratio of flow-wetted surface to flow rate differs between the path lines. The other conceptualization (multirate) employs a continuous distribution of multiple diffusion rate coefficients in a matrix with variable, yet finite, capacity. Application of these two models with the parameters estimated on the tracer test breakthrough curves produces transport results that differ by orders of magnitude in peak concentration and time to peak concentration at the performance assessment (PA) time and length scales (100,000 years and 1,000 m). These differences are examined by calculating the time limits for the diffusive capacity to act as an infinite medium. These limits are compared across both conceptual models and also against characteristic times for diffusion at both the tracer test and PA scales. Additionally, the differences between the models are examined by re-estimating parameters for the multirate model from the traditional double-porosity model results at the PA scale. Results indicate that for each model the amount of the diffusive capacity that acts as an infinite medium over the specified time scale explains the differences between the model results and that tracer tests alone cannot provide reliable estimates of transport parameters for the PA scale. Results of Monte Carlo runs of the transport models with varying travel times and path lengths show consistent results between models and suggest that the variation in flow-wetted surface to flow rate along path lines is insignificant relative to variability in

  15. The anomaly in a breakthrough curve of a single well "push-pull" tracer test: A density driven effect?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeilfelder, Sarah; Hebig, Klaus; Ito, Narimitsu; Machida, Isao; Scheytt, Traugott; Marui, Atsunao

    2013-04-01

    What method is appropriate to investigate an aquifer when there is only one well available? A single well "push-pull" tracer test (PP Test) may be a suitable method in order to characterize an aquifer and to obtain information about the hydraulic and chemical properties when only one well is available for the investigations. In a PP test, a test solution that contains a known amount of solutes and a conservative tracer is injected into the aquifer ("push") and extracted afterwards ("pull"). Optionally, the test solution is flushed out of the well and the casing with untreated test solution with a so called "chaser" before being extracted. Also between the injection and the extraction phase a drifting time may be included. The breakthrough of the tracer during the extraction phase is measured and used for analyses and interpretation. In the last three years, several PP Test campaigns were conducted at two different test sites in Japan (Hebig et al. 2011, Zeilfelder et al. 2012). The aim was to investigate the applicability of the PP Test method in different geological settings and in different types of aquifers. The latest field campaign thus focussed on the question how variations of the setup are influencing the breakthrough curve of the PP Test in order to develop and enhance this method. Also the standardization of the PP Test was an aim of this study. During the campaign, a total of seven PP Tests were performed, while only single aspects of the setup were varied from test to test. The tests differed in injection and extraction rate, in the salinity of the injected test solution and in the use of a chaser solution. The general shapes of the breakthrough curves were similar and conclusions about the repeatability of the PP Test could be drawn. However, a sharp anomaly was observed in the breakthrough curve of one specific setup type. By repeating this PP test under the same boundary conditions, we were able to recreate the anomaly and could exclude any technical

  16. Testing Observational Tracers of Turbulence with Numerical Simulations: Measuring the Sonic Mach Number in Molecular Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkhart, B.; Lazarian, A.; Correia, C.; Ossenkopf, V.; Stutzki, J.; de Medeiros, J. R.

    2014-09-01

    Astrophysical simulations provide a unique opportunity to test and verify observational diagnostics of the physics of the interstellar medium. In these proceedings, we highlight how s imulations of MHD turbulence can increase the accuracy and understanding of observational tracers of important plasma parameters, such as the sonic Mach number, in molecular clouds. For this purpose we analyze MHD simulations which include post-processing to take radiative transfer effects of 13CO emission and absorption into account. We find very good agreement between the linewidth estimated sonic Mach number and the actual sonic Mach number of the simulations for optically thin 13CO. However, we find that opacity broadening causes Ms to be overestimated by a factor of ≈ 1.16-1.3 when calculated from optically thick 13CO lines. We also find that there is a dependency on the magnetic field: super-Alfvénic turbulence shows increased line broadening as compared with sub-Alfvénic turbulence for all values of optical depth for the line of sight perpendicular to an magnetic field. These results have implications for the observationally derived sonic Mach number-density standard deviation (σρ/<ρ>) relationship, σ2ρ/<ρ>=b2M s2, and the related column density standard deviation (σN/(N)) sonic Mach number relationship, which we briefly discuss. The turbulence sonic Mach number is an important parameter of star formation models and the results highlighted in these proceedings provide researchers with increased understanding of these parameters derived from observations.

  17. Database dictionary for the results of groundwater tracer tests using tritiated water, conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, B.K.; Huff, D.D.

    1997-05-01

    In 1977, the United States Geological Survey (USGS) conducted two tracer tests at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) using tritiated water to study the relative importance of bedding-plane openings on shallow groundwater flow. Through a cooperative agreement between the USGS and the US Department of Energy (DOE), the data were made available to researchers at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), who organized the data into a data management format. The results of these groundwater tracer tests have been compiled into a collection of four SAS data sets. This report documents these SAS data sets, including their structure, methodology, and content. The SAS data sets include information on precipitation, tritium, water levels, and well construction for wells at or near ORNL radioactive waste burial grounds 4, 5, and 6.

  18. Testing mixing models of old and young groundwater in a tropical lowland rain forest with environmental tracers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Solomon, D. Kip; Genereux, David P.; Plummer, L. Niel; Busenberg, Eurybiades

    2010-01-01

    We tested three models of mixing between old interbasin groundwater flow (IGF) and young, locally derived groundwater in a lowland rain forest in Costa Rica using a large suite of environmental tracers. We focus on the young fraction of water using the transient tracers CFC-11, CFC-12, CFC-113, SF6, 3H, and bomb 14C. We measured 3He, but 3H/3He dating is generally problematic due to the presence of mantle 3He. Because of their unique concentration histories in the atmosphere, combinations of transient tracers are sensitive not only to subsurface travel times but also to mixing between waters having different travel times. Samples fall into three distinct categories: (1) young waters that plot along a piston flow line, (2) old samples that have near-zero concentrations of the transient tracers, and (3) mixtures of 1 and 2. We have modeled the concentrations of the transient tracers using (1) a binary mixing model (BMM) of old and young water with the young fraction transported via piston flow, (2) an exponential mixing model (EMM) with a distribution of groundwater travel times characterized by a mean value, and (3) an exponential mixing model for the young fraction followed by binary mixing with an old fraction (EMM/BMM). In spite of the mathematical differences in the mixing models, they all lead to a similar conceptual model of young (0 to 10 year) groundwater that is locally derived mixing with old (>1000 years) groundwater that is recharged beyond the surface water boundary of the system.

  19. Testing mixing models of old and young groundwater in a tropical lowland rain forest with environmental tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, D. Kip; Genereux, David P.; Plummer, L. Niel; Busenberg, Eurybiades

    2010-04-01

    We tested three models of mixing between old interbasin groundwater flow (IGF) and young, locally derived groundwater in a lowland rain forest in Costa Rica using a large suite of environmental tracers. We focus on the young fraction of water using the transient tracers CFC-11, CFC-12, CFC-113, SF6, 3H, and bomb 14C. We measured 3He, but 3H/3He dating is generally problematic due to the presence of mantle 3He. Because of their unique concentration histories in the atmosphere, combinations of transient tracers are sensitive not only to subsurface travel times but also to mixing between waters having different travel times. Samples fall into three distinct categories: (1) young waters that plot along a piston flow line, (2) old samples that have near-zero concentrations of the transient tracers, and (3) mixtures of 1 and 2. We have modeled the concentrations of the transient tracers using (1) a binary mixing model (BMM) of old and young water with the young fraction transported via piston flow, (2) an exponential mixing model (EMM) with a distribution of groundwater travel times characterized by a mean value, and (3) an exponential mixing model for the young fraction followed by binary mixing with an old fraction (EMM/BMM). In spite of the mathematical differences in the mixing models, they all lead to a similar conceptual model of young (0 to 10 year) groundwater that is locally derived mixing with old (>1000 years) groundwater that is recharged beyond the surface water boundary of the system.

  20. Interpretation of tracer tests performed in fractured rock of the Lange Bramke basin, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maloszewski, Piotr; Herrmann, Andreas; Zuber, Andrzej

    Two multitracer tests performed in one of the major cross-fault zones of the Lange Bramke basin (Harz Mountains, Germany) confirm the dominant role of the fault zone in groundwater flow and solute transport. Tracers having different coefficients of molecular diffusion (deuterium, bromide, uranine, and eosine) yielded breakthrough curves that can only be explained by a model that couples the advective-dispersive transport in the fractures with the molecular diffusion exchange in the matrix. For the scale of the tests (maximum distance of 225m), an approximation was used in which the influence of adjacent fractures is neglected. That model yielded nearly the same rock and transport parameters for each tracer, which means that the single-fracture approximation is acceptable and that matrix diffusion plays an important role. The hydraulic conductivity of the fault zone obtained from the tracer tests is about 1.5×10-2m/s, whereas the regional hydraulic conductivity of the fractured rock mass is about 3×10-7m/s, as estimated from the tritium age and the matrix porosity of about 2%. These values show that the hydraulic conductivity along the fault is several orders of magnitude larger than that of the remaining fractured part of the aquifer, which confirms the dominant role of the fault zones as collectors of water and conductors of fast flow. Résumé Deux multitraçages ont été réalisés dans l'une des zones principales de failles du bassin de Lange Bramke (massif du Harz, Allemagne); les résultats confirment le rôle prédominant de la zone de failles pour l'écoulement souterrain et le transport de soluté. Les traceurs, possédant des coefficients de diffusion différents (deutérium, bromure, uranine et éosine), ont fourni des courbes de restitution qui ne peuvent être expliquées que par un modèle qui associe un transport advectif-dispersif dans les fractures à un échange par diffusion moléculaire dans la matrice. A l'échelle des expériences (distance

  1. Heat as a tracer for understanding transport processes in fractured media: Theory and field assessment from multiscale thermal push-pull tracer tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klepikova, Maria V.; Le Borgne, Tanguy; Bour, Olivier; Dentz, Marco; Hochreutener, Rebecca; Lavenant, Nicolas

    2016-07-01

    The characterization and modeling of heat transfer in fractured media is particularly challenging as the existence of fractures at multiple scales induces highly localized flow patterns. From a theoretical and numerical analysis of heat transfer in simple conceptual models of fractured media, we show that flow channeling has a significant effect on the scaling of heat recovery in both space and time. The late time tailing of heat recovery under channeled flow is shown to diverge from the T>(t>)∝t-1.5 behavior expected for the classical parallel plate model and follow the scaling T>(t>)∝1/t>(log⁡t>)2 for a simple channel modeled as a tube. This scaling, which differs significantly from known scalings in mobile-immobile systems, is of purely geometrical origin: late time heat transfer from the matrix to a channel corresponds dimensionally to a radial diffusion process, while heat transfer from the matrix to a plate may be considered as a one-dimensional process. This phenomenon is also manifested on the spatial scaling of heat recovery as flow channeling affects the decay of the thermal breakthrough peak amplitude and the increase of the peak time with scale. These findings are supported by the results of a field experimental campaign performed on the fractured rock site of Ploemeur. The scaling of heat recovery in time and space, measured from thermal breakthrough curves measured through a series of push-pull tests at different scales, shows a clear signature of flow channeling. The whole data set can thus be successfully represented by a multichannel model parametrized by the mean channel density and aperture. These findings, which bring new insights on the effect of flow channeling on heat transfer in fractured rocks, show how heat recovery in geothermal tests may be controlled by fracture geometry. In addition, this highlights the interest of thermal push-pull tests as a complement to solute tracers tests to infer fracture aperture and geometry.

  2. Characterization of Anomalous Contaminant Transport via Push-Pull Tracer Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, S. K.; Vesselinov, V. V.; Berkowitz, B.

    2015-12-01

    Push-pull (single-well-injection-withdrawal) tracer tests are widely used as an economical means of characterizing field-scale solute transport properties such as sorption and dispersion. Typically, these are analyzed by means of analytic solutions that assume transport obeys the radial advection-dispersion equation. We revisit this approach as: (1) Recognition of the ubiquity of anomalous transport and its impact on contaminant remediation necessitates the use of new methods to characterize it, and (2) Improved computational power and numerical methods have rendered reliance on analytical solutions obsolete. Here, we present a technique for characterizing diffusion-driven anomalous transport (i.e., anomalous transport driven by a "trapping" process whose trapping and release statistics are independent of the groundwater flow velocity). Examples include diffusion into low permeability zones, kinetic sorption, and matrix diffusion. Using field observations, we simultaneously calibrate an exponential probability distribution for time spent on a single sojourn in the mobile domain and a truncated power law probability distribution for time spent on a single sojourn in the immobile domain via a stochastic global optimization technique. The calibrated distributions, being independent of the flow regime, are applicable to the same domain under any flow conditions, including linear flow. In the context of the continuous time random walk (CTRW), one may simply define a transition to represent a single trap-and-release cycle, and directly compute the spatiotemporal transition distribution that defines the CTRW from the two calibrated distributions and the local seepage velocity (so that existing CTRW transport theory applies). A test of our methodology against a push-pull test from the MADE site demonstrated fitting performance comparable to that of a 3-D MODFLOW/MT3DMS model with a variety of hydraulic conductivity zones and explicit treatment of mobile-immobile mass

  3. Thermal single-well injection-withdrawal tracer tests for determining fracture-matrix heat transfer area

    SciTech Connect

    Pruess, K.; Doughty, C.

    2010-01-15

    Single-well injection-withdrawal (SWIW) tracer tests involve injection of traced fluid and subsequent tracer recovery from the same well, usually with some quiescent time between the injection and withdrawal periods. SWIW are insensitive to variations in advective processes that arise from formation heterogeneities, because upon withdrawal, fluid parcels tend to retrace the paths taken during injection. However, SWIW are sensitive to diffusive processes, such as diffusive exchange of conservative or reactive solutes between fractures and rock matrix. This paper focuses on SWIW tests in which temperature itself is used as a tracer. Numerical simulations demonstrate the sensitivity of temperature returns to fracture-matrix interaction. We consider thermal SWIW response to the two primary reservoir improvements targeted with stimulation, (1) making additional fractures accessible to injected fluids, and (2) increasing the aperture and permeability of pre-existing fractures. It is found that temperature returns in SWIW tests are insensitive to (2), while providing a strong signal of more rapid temperature recovery during the withdrawal phase for (1).

  4. Using noble gas tracers to estimate residual CO2 saturation in the field: results from the CO2CRC Otway residual saturation and dissolution test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaForce, T.; Ennis-King, J.; Paterson, L.

    2013-12-01

    Residual CO2 saturation is a critically important parameter in CO2 storage as it can have a large impact on the available secure storage volume and post-injection CO2 migration. A suite of single-well tests to measure residual trapping was conducted at the Otway test site in Victoria, Australia during 2011. One or more of these tests could be conducted at a prospective CO2 storage site before large-scale injection. The test involved injection of 150 tonnes of pure carbon dioxide followed by 454 tonnes of CO2-saturated formation water to drive the carbon dioxide to residual saturation. This work presents a brief overview of the full test sequence, followed by the analysis and interpretation of the tests using noble gas tracers. Prior to CO2 injection krypton (Kr) and xenon (Xe) tracers were injected and back-produced to characterise the aquifer under single-phase conditions. After CO2 had been driven to residual the two tracers were injected and produced again. The noble gases act as non-partitioning aqueous-phase tracers in the undisturbed aquifer and as partitioning tracers in the presence of residual CO2. To estimate residual saturation from the tracer test data a one-dimensional radial model of the near-well region is used. In the model there are only two independent parameters: the apparent dispersivity of each tracer and the residual CO2 saturation. Independent analysis of the Kr and Xe tracer production curves gives the same estimate of residual saturation to within the accuracy of the method. Furthermore the residual from the noble gas tracer tests is consistent with other measurements in the sequence of tests.

  5. Use of 222Rn as a natural tracer to evaluate the efficiency of flushing test at DNAPL contaminated area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S.; Joun, W.; Kim, H.; Kaown, D.; Lee, K.

    2013-12-01

    Flushing test was applied to remediate the depth-discrete residual dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) sources in an unsaturated zone at an industrial complex in Wonju, Korea. Remediation efficiency for flushing test was evaluated by comparing the natural tracer 222Rn concentration data in groundwater and the mass discharges of trichloroethylene (TCE) through a cross section before and during the test period. In the previous research performed at the study site, the location of residual DNAPL sources in the unsaturated zone was identified using the natural tracer 222Rn and contaminant concentrations based on the information for characteristics of radon which was partitioning into TCE. The natural injection method and pressurized injection method were applied for water injection. Uncontaminated groundwater around main source area was used as injection water. Temporal and spatial monitoring results show that a combined water injection (conducting both natural injection and pressurization injection) is an effective operation method. The 222Rn activities and TCE concentrations in groundwater fluctuated irregularly with water level increase at the main source area. The natural tracer 222Rn in groundwater originating from the underlying crystalline biotite granite, had a wide range from 15,000 to 183,000 Bq/m3 and total concentrations of TCE ranged from 0.03 to 1.79 mg/l. These temporal variations in 222Rn activities might be caused by not only the unknown quantities of residual TCE in the unsaturated zone but also the characteristics of radon partitioning into residual TCE with water level increase. From these results, the 222Rn activities could not be used directly as a natural tracer to evaluate the remediation efficiency due to the irregular production. Therefore, for more precise efficiency evaluation, the comparative analysis between 222Rn activities and relative contaminant concentrations data is required.

  6. Gravity-gradient suppression in spaceborne atomic tests of the equivalence principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiow, Sheng-wey; Williams, Jason; Yu, Nan; Müller, Holger

    2017-02-01

    The gravity gradient is one of the most serious systematic effects in atomic tests of the equivalence principle (EP). While differential acceleration measurements performed with different atomic species under free fall test the validity of the EP, minute displacements between the test masses in a gravity gradient produce a false EP-violating signal that limits the precision of the test. We show that gravity inversion and modulation using a gimbal mount can suppress the systematics due to gravity gradients caused by both moving and stationary parts of the instrument as well as the environment, strongly reducing the need to overlap two species.

  7. Monitoring an artificial tracer test within streambed sediments with time lapse underwater 3D ERT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clémence, Houzé; Marc, Pessel; Véronique, Durand; Toihir, Ali

    2017-04-01

    The stream-aquifer interface is considered a hotspot for environmental and ecological issues. Due to their complexity, the exchange mechanisms occurring between groundwater and surface water at this interface are not yet fully understood. Many studies have focused on the characterization of the two-dimensional distribution of an artificial tracer (generally injected into the stream) within and outside the streambed, but there is insufficient information about the 3D spatial distribution of the tracer fluxes and their temporal variations. We monitored the transport of an artificial solute tracer transport with 3D electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) in order to improve the 3D spatial resolution in the imaging of the first tens of centimeters of streambed sediments and propose an innovative approach of the three-dimensional and temporal observation of the water fluxes. The hydro-geophysical field measurements were made on a small stream located within the Orgeval watershed (Seine et Marne, France). Using a resistivimeter connected to 180 electrodes, 3D electrical resistivity tomograms were made on a riverbed section, as a brine tracer was injected directly into the hyporheic zone. Before the tracer monitoring, the static 3D resistivity tomograms were consistent with the lithological heterogeneities identified at the site. However, this study defines some prerequisites to high-resolution 3D underwater resistivity measurements: for instance, a precise knowledge of an eventual weak electrode contact and a spatial resolution identical in every spatial direction. First results show a rapid development and persistence of a conductive plume around the injection point which disappears progressively after the injection. Within the sediments top layer, preferential flowpaths were highlighted due to the highly heterogeneous medium and hydraulic conductivity. The riverbed topography showed some pool-riffle sequences which conduct the formation of local entering and exiting

  8. Push-pull partitioning tracer tests using radon-222 to quantify non-aqueous phase liquid contamination.

    PubMed

    Davis, B M; Istok, J D; Semprini, L

    2002-09-01

    Naturally occurring radon in groundwater can be used as an in situ partitioning tracer for locating and quantifying non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) contamination in the subsurface. When combined with the single-well, push-pull test, this methodology has the potential to provide a low-cost alternative to inter-well partitioning tracer tests. During a push-pull test, a known volume of test solution (radon-free water containing a conservative tracer) is first injected ("pushed") into a well; flow is then reversed and the test solution/groundwater mixture is extracted ("pulled") from the same well. In the presence of NAPL radon transport is retarded relative to the conservative tracer. Assuming linear equilibrium partitioning, retardation factors for radon can be used to estimate NAPL saturations. The utility of this methodology was evaluated in laboratory and field settings. Laboratory push-pull tests were conducted in both non-contaminated and trichloroethene NAPL (TCE)-contaminated sediment. The methodology was then applied in wells located in non-contaminated and light non-aqueous phase liquid (LNAPL)-contaminated portions of an aquifer at a former petroleum refinery. The method of temporal moments and an approximate analytical solution to the governing transport equations were used to interpret breakthrough curves and estimate radon retardation factors; estimated retardation factors were then used to calculate TCE saturations. Numerical simulations were used to further investigate the behavior of the breakthrough curves. The laboratory and field push-pull tests demonstrated that radon retardation does occur in the presence of TCE and LNAPL and that radon retardation can be used to calculate TCE saturations. Laboratory injection-phase test results in TCE-contaminated sediment yielded radon retardation factors ranging from 1.1 to 1.5, resulting in calculated TCE saturations ranging from 0.2 to 0.9%. Laboratory extraction-phase test results in the same sediment

  9. Variational test on the relationship between gradient expansion terms in the kinetic energy density functional

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glossman, M. Daniel; Castro, Eduardo A.

    1989-05-01

    By using an approximate analytical trial density and the consideration of an energy density functional which includes a modified gradient correction, the relationship between the zeroth-order and the first gradient correction is tested and the results compared with those obtained through the use of Hartree-Fock-Roothaan-Clementi densities.

  10. Convergent radial dispersion: a Laplace transform solution for aquifer tracer testing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moench, A.F.

    1989-01-01

    A Laplace transform solution was obtained for the injection of a tracer in a well situated in a homogeneous aquifer where steady, horizontal, radially convergent flow has been established due to pumping at a second well. The standard advection-dispersion equation for mass transfer was used as the controlling equation. For boundary conditions, mass balances that account for mixing of the tracer with the fluid residing in the injection and pumping wells were used. The derived solution, which can be adapted for either resident or flux-averaged concentration, is of practical use only for the pumped well. This problem is of interest because it is easily applied to field determination of aquifer dispersivity and effective porosity. Breakthrough curves were obtained by numerical inversion of the Laplace transform solution. -from Author

  11. Estimation of αL, velocity, Kd and confidence limits from tracer injection test data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Broermann, James; Bassett, R.L.; Weeks, Edwin P.; Borgstrom, Mark

    1997-01-01

    Bromide and boron were used as tracers during an injection experiment conducted at an artificial recharge facility near Stanton, Texas. The Ogallala aquifer at the Stanton site represents a heterogeneous alluvial environment and provides the opportunity to report scale dependent dispersivities at observation distances of 2 to 15 m in this setting. Values of longitudinal dispersivities are compared with other published values. Water samples were collected at selected depths both from piezometers and from fully screened observation wells at radii of 2, 5, 10 and 15 m. An exact analytical solution is used to simulate the concentration breakthrough curves and estimate longitudinal dispersivities and velocity parameters. Greater confidence can be placed on these data because the estimated parameters are error bounded using the bootstrap method. The non-conservative behavior of boron transport in clay rich sections of the aquifer were quantified with distribution coefficients by using bromide as a conservative reference tracer.

  12. Use of single-well tracer dilution tests to evaluate LNAPL flux at seven field sites.

    PubMed

    Mahler, Nicholas; Sale, Tom; Smith, Tim; Lyverse, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Petroleum liquids, referred to as light non-aqueous phase liquids (LNAPLs), are commonly found beneath petroleum facilities. Concerns with LNAPLs include migration into clean soils, migration beyond property boundaries, and discharges to surface water. Single-well tracer dilution techniques were used to measure LNAPL fluxes through 50 wells at 7 field sites. A hydrophobic tracer was mixed into LNAPL in a well. Intensities of fluorescence associated with the tracer were measured over time using a spectrometer and a fiber optic cable. LNAPL fluxes were estimated using observed changes in the tracer concentrations over time. Measured LNAPL fluxes range from 0.006 to 2.6 m/year with a mean and median of 0.15 and 0.064 m/year, respectively. Measured LNAPL fluxes are two to four orders of magnitude smaller than a common groundwater flux of 30 m/year. Relationships between LNAPL fluxes and possible governing parameters were evaluated. Observed LNAPL fluxes are largely independent of LNAPL thickness in wells. Natural losses of LNAPL through dissolution, evaporation, and subsequent biodegradation, were estimated using a simple mass balance, measured LNAPL fluxes in wells, and an assumed stable LNAPL extent. The mean and median of the calculated loss rates were found to be 24.0 and 5.0 m3/ha/year, respectively. Mean and median losses are similar to values reported by others. Coupling observed LNAPL fluxes to observed rates of natural LNAPL depletion suggests that natural losses of LNAPL may be an important parameter controlling the overall extent of LNAPL bodies.

  13. Uncertainty in NAPL volume estimates due to random measurement errors during partitioning tracer tests.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Michael C; Wise, William R

    2005-09-15

    The uncertainty in NAPL volume estimates obtained through partitioning tracers can be quantified as a function of random errors in volume and concentration measurements when moments are calculated from experimentally measured breakthrough curves using the trapezoidal rule for numerical integration. The methodology is based upon standard stochastic methods for random error propagation. Monte Carlo simulations using a synthetic data set derived from the one-dimensional solution of the advective-dispersive equation serve to verify the process. It is shown that the uncertainty in NAPL volume predictions nonlinearly increases as the retardation factor decreases. An important result of this observation is that there is a large degree of uncertainty in using partitioning tracers to conclude NAPL is absent from the swept zone. Under the conditions investigated, random errors in concentration measurements are shown to have a greater impact on NAPL volume uncertainty than random errors in volume measurements, and it is also shown that uncertainty in NAPL volume decreases as the resolution of the breakthrough curves increases. The impact of uncertainty in background retardation (i.e., sorption of partitioning tracers in the absence of NAPL) was also investigated, and it likewise indicated that the relative uncertainty in NAPL volume estimates increases as the retardation factor decreases.

  14. TESTING FOR AZIMUTHAL ABUNDANCE GRADIENTS IN M101

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yanxia; Bresolin, Fabio; Kennicutt, Robert C. Jr.

    2013-03-20

    New optical spectra of 28 H II regions in the M101 disk have been obtained, yielding 10 new detections of the [O III] {lambda}4363 auroral line. The oxygen abundance gradient measured from these data, combined with previous observations, displays a local scatter of 0.15 {+-} 0.03 dex along an arc in the west side of the galaxy, compared with a smaller scatter of 0.08 {+-} 0.01 dex in the rest of the disk. One of the H II regions in our sample (H27) has a significantly lower oxygen abundance than surrounding nebulae at a similar galactocentric distance, while an additional, relatively nearby one (H128) was already known to have a high oxygen abundance for its position in the galaxy. These results represent marginal evidence for the existence of moderate deviations from chemical abundance homogeneity in the interstellar medium of M101. Using a variety of strong-line abundance indicators, we find no evidence for significant large-scale azimuthal variations of the oxygen abundance across the whole disk of the galaxy.

  15. A field test of tracer transport and organic contaminant elution in a stratified aquifer at the Rocky Mountain Arsenal (Denver, Colorado, U.S.A.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorbjarnarson, Kathryn W.; Mackay, Douglas M.

    1997-01-01

    A tracer-elution experiment was conducted in a 9-m-thick alluvial sand aquifer at the Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Denver, Colorado, within an extensive 1,1,1-trichloroethene and trichloroethene plume. The forced-gradient flow field was controlled by an injection well and an extraction well separated by 8.4 m and aligned in the direction of the natural-gradient flow. Upon extraction, the contaminant-laden water was treated by air stripping and reinjected into the injection well. Iodide tracer was added to the injection flow during the initial 27.5 h of the experiment. Tracer transport and organic contaminant elution were monitored by four 0.15-m-screened drive points and a fully penetrating monitoring well. Relative permeabilities, dispersivities and retardation factors were estimated from tracer breakthrough and contaminant elution curves by the moment method and by curve-fitting with an advection-dispersion model. Tracer transport through the four strata sampled by the drive points indicated a permeability variation of three orders of magnitude. Contaminant elution was not observed in the lowest-permeability stratum monitored during the experiment. In all monitored strata, contaminant elution was controlled primarily by permeability effects on water flow and exhibited minimal retardation or desorption effects. The fully penetrating monitoring well exhibited a tracer response primarily from the more permeable strata with the addition of tracer from the less permeable strata producing an increased breakthrough spreading. This increased spreading or dispersion was reflected in a higher longitudinal dispersivity estimate (1.2 m assuming a homogeneous aquifer) than dispersivity estimates from the drive-point sampler tracer curves (ranging from 5 to 21 cm). Contaminant elution curves from the fully penetrating monitoring well exhibited an initial response primarily from the more permeable strata (rapid elution of contaminants) and provided no insight into the elution

  16. Application of separable parameter space techniques to multi-tracer PET compartment modeling

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jeff L; Morey, A Michael; Kadrmas, Dan J

    2016-01-01

    Multi-tracer positron emission tomography (PET) can image two or more tracers in a single scan, characterizing multiple aspects of biological functions to provide new insights into many diseases. The technique uses dynamic imaging, resulting in time-activity curves that contain contributions from each tracer present. The process of separating and recovering separate images and/or imaging measures for each tracer requires the application of kinetic constraints, which are most commonly applied by fitting parallel compartment models for all tracers. Such multi-tracer compartment modeling presents challenging nonlinear fits in multiple dimensions. This work extends separable parameter space kinetic modeling techniques, previously developed for fitting single-tracer compartment models, to fitting multi-tracer compartment models. The multi-tracer compartment model solution equations were reformulated to maximally separate the linear and nonlinear aspects of the fitting problem, and separable least-squares techniques were applied to effectively reduce the dimensionality of the nonlinear fit. The benefits of the approach are then explored through a number of illustrative examples, including characterization of separable parameter space multi-tracer objective functions and demonstration of exhaustive search fits which guarantee the true global minimum to within arbitrary search precision. Iterative gradient-descent algorithms using Levenberg–Marquardt were also tested, demonstrating improved fitting speed and robustness as compared to corresponding fits using conventional model formulations. The proposed technique overcomes many of the challenges in fitting simultaneous multi-tracer PET compartment models. PMID:26788888

  17. Using Noble Gas Tracers to Estimate CO2 Saturation in the Field: Results from the 2014 CO2CRC Otway Repeat Residual Saturation Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaForce, T.; Ennis-King, J.; Boreham, C.; Serno, S.; Cook, P. J.; Freifeld, B. M.; Gilfillan, S.; Jarrett, A.; Johnson, G.; Myers, M.; Paterson, L.

    2015-12-01

    Residual trapping efficiency is a critical parameter in the design of secure subsurface CO2 storage. Residual saturation is also a key parameter in oil and gas production when a field is under consideration for enhanced oil recovery. Tracers are an important tool that can be used to estimate saturation in field tests. A series of measurements of CO2 saturation in an aquifer were undertaken as part of the Otway stage 2B extension field project in Dec. 2014. These tests were a repeat of similar tests in the same well in 2011 with improvements to the data collection and handling method. Two single-well tracer tests using noble gas tracers were conducted. In the first test krypton and xenon are injected into the water-saturated formation to establish dispersivity of the tracers in single-phase flow. Near-residual CO2 saturation is then established near the well. In the second test krypton and xenon are injected with CO2-saturated water to measure the final CO2 saturation. The recovery rate of the tracers is similar to predicted rates using recently published partitioning coefficients. Due to technical difficulties, there was mobile CO2 in the reservoir throughout the second tracer test in 2014. As a consequence, it is necessary to use a variation of the previous simulation procedure to interpret the second tracer test. One-dimensional, radial simulations are used to estimate average saturation of CO2 near the well. Estimates of final average CO2 saturation are computed using two relative permeability models, thermal and isothermal simulations, and three sets of coefficients for the partitioning of the tracers between phases. Four of the partitioning coefficients used were not previously available in the literature. The noble gas tracer field test and analysis of the 2011 and 2014 data both give an average CO2 saturation that is consistent with other field measurements. This study has demonstrated the repeatability of the methodology for noble gas tracer tests in the

  18. Tracer tests, hydrochemical and microbiological investigations as a basis for groundwater protection in a remote tropical mountainous karst area, Vietnam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyet, Vu Thi Minh; Goldscheider, Nico

    2006-11-01

    The Tam Duong karst area in NW Vietnam is among the poorest and remotest regions in the country. The local population largely depends on water from two main karst springs. Due to agricultural activity and untreated domestic wastewaters, the spring water is often microbiologically contaminated. In order to provide a scientific basis for groundwater protection in the area, different field methods have been applied including hydrogeological framework investigations, tracer tests, and hydrochemical and microbiological sampling and analyses. All methods had to be adapted to the conditions of a poor and remote area. These adaptations included, amongst other measures, the use of a portable microbiological water_testing kit and the involvement of the local population in the sampling campaign. The tracer tests showed simple and direct connections between two important swallow holes and the two main springs, and made it possible to determine the linear groundwater flow velocities, which are extremely high (up to 875 m/h). The hydrochemical and microbiological data confirmed the strong impact of the streams sinking into the swallow holes on the spring water quality. Future groundwater source protection strategies should consequently focus on the reduction of polluting activities near the sinking streams and within their catchment areas.

  19. Assessment of hydraulic conductivity distributions through assimilation of travel time data from ERT-monitored tracer tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crestani, E.; Camporese, M.; Salandin, P.

    2015-10-01

    Assessing the spatial distribution of hydraulic conductivity (K) in natural aquifers is fundamental to predict the spatio-temporal evolution of solutes, a process that is mainly controlled by the heterogeneity of K. In sedimentary aquifers, the vertical variations of K are typically more relevant than the horizontal ones in controlling the plume evolution at the local scale; such K vertical distributions can be inferred by combining the Lagrangian formulation of transport with the assimilation of tracer test data via the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF). In this work, the data for the assimilation procedure are provided by monitoring tracer tests with electrical resistivity tomography (ERT). Our main objective is to show the possibility of directly using ERT data by assimilating the solute travel times, instead of the concentration values, thus avoiding the need for a petrophysical law. The methodology is applied to both a synthetic and a real test case and gives a satisfactory retrieval of the K field distribution, as well as of the solute evolution.

  20. Analysis of three sets of SWIW tracer-test data using a two-population complex fracture model for matrix diffusion and sorption

    SciTech Connect

    Doughty, C.; Tsang, C.F.

    2009-08-01

    A complex fracture model employing two populations for diffusion and sorption is proposed to analyze three representative single-well injection-withdrawal (SWIW) tracer tests from Forsmark and Laxemar, the two sites under investigation by the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB). One population represents the semi-infinite rock matrix and the other represents finite blocks that can become saturated, thereafter accepting no further diffusion or sorption. The diffusion and sorption parameters of the models are inferred by matching tracer breakthrough curves (BTCs). Three tracers are simultaneously injected, uranine (Ur), which is conservative, and rubidium (Rb) and cesium (Cs), which are non-conservative. For non-sorbing tracer uranine, the finite blocks become saturated with test duration of the order of 10 hours, and both the finite and the semi-infinite populations play a distinct role in controlling BTCs. For sorbing tracers Rb and Cs, finite blocks do not saturate, but act essentially as semi-infinite, and thus BTC behavior is comparable to that obtained for a model containing only a semi-infinite rock matrix. The ability to obtain good matches to BTCs for both sorbing and non-sorbing tracers for these three different SWIW data sets demonstrates that the two-population complex fracture model may be a useful conceptual model to analyze all SWIW tracer tests in fractured rock, and perhaps also usual multiwell tracer tests. One of the two populations should be semi-infinite rock matrix and the other finite blocks that can saturate. The latter can represent either rock blocks or gouge within the fracture, a fracture skin zone, or stagnation zones.

  1. Solute transport processes in a karst vadose zone characterized by long-term tracer tests (the cave system of Postojnska Jama, Slovenia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogovsek, Janja; Petric, Metka

    2014-11-01

    The processes influencing the solute transport in the karst vadose zone were studied by long-term tracer tests with artificial tracers. The results of three successive tracer tests with different modes of injection were compared. Tracer breakthrough curves were monitored at three drips of different hydrological types inside one of the cave galleries of the system of Postojnska Jama over several years. Comparison of the results indicates the highly significant influence of preceding hydrological conditions (dry vs wet), injection mode (artificial flushing vs natural infiltration by subsequent rainfall, and on a bare rock vs on an overlying layer) and geologic heterogeneities within the vadose zone on solute transport in the karst vadose zone. Injection with artificial flushing resulted in rapid infiltration and the tracer traversed almost one hundred meters of bedrock in hours. However, the majority of tracer can be stored within less permeable parts of the vadose zone and then gradually flushed out after additional abundant and intensive precipitation in the period of several years. Long-continued sampling in each of the tests proved to be important for reliable characterization of the long-term solute transport dynamics.

  2. Is macrodispersivity a meaningful parameter? - Applicability of simple ADE-equation for modeling of a tracer test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haendel, Falk; Liedl, Rudolf; Dietrich, Peter

    2015-04-01

    In the last decades, numerical modeling has been developed as the common method to investigate solute transport in groundwater. Thereby in science, various numerical procedures have been applied for understanding complex processes of transport in highly heterogeneous aquifers. Beside this, numerical modeling of transport is also standard practice in engineering and consulting. The numerical approaches differ due to factors such as scope of modeling, knowledge about site characterization and time and manpower constraints. In general, there is a lack of knowledge about the hydraulic properties of a site like information of lithology and deterministic subunits. Therefore, assumption have to be made and standard Advection-Dispersion-Equation (ADE) is used involving macrodispersion coefficients. In this study we analyze a tracer test in the Lauswiesen aquifer, Baden-Wuerttemberg, Germany, described in the literature by Ptak et al. (2004) and Riva et al. (2008) and use a straightforward numerical model to reproduce the integral and depth-dependent transport behavior. Depth-dependent tracer test data show a clear depth dependency including two different breakthrough behaviors. Previous model approaches for evaluation of the mentioned tracer test by Riva et al. (2008) included a large set of Monte-Carlo simulations by describing the aquifer heterogeneity by a double stochastic process. Information about the geostatistical parameters could be gained mainly by a large number of sieve analyses. Finally, stochastic modeling of Riva et al. (2008) created a large amount of breakthrough curves due to high uncertainty of the distribution of hydraulic conductivity. However, stochastic modeling and a precise reproduction of the variability of hydraulic properties in space help to better understand the transport processes driven by heterogeneity and to provide assessment of uncertainty at a site. In our straightforward modeling we include only two deterministic subunits, more

  3. Contaminant transfer and hydrodispersive parameters in basaltic lava flows: artificial tracer test and implications for long-term management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertrand, G.; Celle-Jeanton, H.; Huneau, F.; Baillieux, A.; Mauri, G.; Lavastre, V.; Undereiner, G.; Girolami, L.; Moquet, J. S.

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this paper is to evaluate the vulnerability after point source contamination and characterize water circulations in volcanic flows located in the Argnat basin volcanic system (Chaîne des Puys, French Massif Central) using a tracer test performed by injecting a iodide solution. The analysis of breakthrough curves allowed the hydrodispersive characteristics of the massive lava flows to be determined. Large Peclet numbers indicated a dominant advective transport. The multimodal feature of breakthrough curves combined with high values of mean velocity and low longitudinal dispersion coefficients indicated thatwater flows in an environment analogous to a fissure system, and only slightly interacts with a low porosity matrix (ne < 1%). Combining this information with lava flow stratigraphy provided by several drillings allowed a conceptual scheme of potential contaminant behaviour to be designed. Although lava flows are vulnerable to point source pollution due to the rapid transfer of water within fractures, the saturated scoriaceous layers located between massive rocks should suffice to strongly buffer the transit of pollution through dilution and longer transit times. This was consistent with the low recovery rate of the presented tracer test.

  4. Inverse modeling with HYSPLIT Lagrangian Dispersion Model - Tests and Evaluation using the Cross Appalachian Tracer Experiment (CAPTEX) data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, T.; Stein, A. F.; Ngan, F.; Draxler, R. R.

    2016-12-01

    HYSPLIT is a Lagrangian dispersion model that has been widely used in the atmospheric sciences community. A HYSPLIT inverse system based on 4D-Var data assimilation and a transfer coefficient matrix (TCM) has been developed and successfully applied to several implementations. In this study, the system is tested using the Cross Appalachian Tracer Experiment (CAPTEX) data. With well-quantified emission point sources for the six CAPTEX controlled releases, the tracer measurements have been extensively used to evaluate various transport and dispersion models. The known sources also provide a unique opportunity to evaluate the estimated emission sources through the top-down approach. In this inverse modeling setup, the CAPTEX measurements are first used to estimate the point source strengths assuming the source location and temporal release pattern are already known. Then the temporal release patterns are assumed to be unknown and the inverse system is used to recover the temporal variations of the releases. Identifying the release location is another task to be tested using the current HYSPLIT inverse system and the CAPTEX data. In addition, the model uncertainties obtained through HYSPLIT ensemble runs will be used to provide uncertainty analyses of the source estimation results.

  5. High-Gradient Tests of the Single-Cell SC Cavity with a Feedback Waveguide

    SciTech Connect

    Yakovlev, V.; Solyak, N.; Wu, G.; Ge, M.; Gonin, I.; Khabiboulline, T.; Ozelis, J.; Rowe, A.; Avrakhov, P.; Kanareykin, A.; Rathke, J.

    2010-11-04

    Use of a superconducting (SC) traveling-wave accelerating (STWA) structure with a small phase advance per cell, rather than a standing-wave structure, may provide a significant increase in the accelerating gradient in the ILC linac [1]. For the same surface electric and magnetic fields, the STWA achieves an accelerating gradient 1.2 larger than TESLA-like standing-wave cavities. In addition, the STWA allows longer acceleration cavities, reducing the number of gaps between them. However, the STWA structure requires a SC feedback waveguide to return the few hundreds of MW of circulating RF power from the structure output to the structure input. A test single-cell cavity with feedback was designed and manufactured to demonstrate the possibility of proper processing to achieve a high accelerating gradient. The first results of high-gradient tests of a prototype 1.3 GHz single-cell cavity with feedback waveguide will be presented.

  6. Comparison of spiral gradient and conventional agar dilution for susceptibility testing of anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Wexler, H M; Molitoris, E; Jashnian, F; Finegold, S M

    1991-01-01

    Antimicrobial susceptibility tests were performed on brucella laked blood agar with 340 isolates and 14 antimicrobial agents by the standard agar dilution technique and the spiral gradient technique in which antibiotic concentrations were established by diffusion from the agar surface. For comparison, spiral gradient MICs were determined by calculating antimicrobial concentrations at growth endpoints and rounding up to the next twofold incremental concentration. The cumulative percentage of strains susceptible at the breakpoint determined from spiral gradient data was within 10%, generally, of the percentage of strains susceptible at the breakpoint determined from agar dilution data. The overall agreement between the two techniques (within one doubling dilution) was 90.6%. The spiral gradient agar dilution technique is a reasonable alternative to the conventional agar dilution technique for susceptibility testing of anaerobic bacteria. Images PMID:1929262

  7. High-Gradient Tests of the Single-Cell SC Cavity with a Feedback Waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakovlev, V.; Solyak, N.; Wu, G.; Ge, M.; Gonin, I.; Khabiboulline, T.; Ozelis, J.; Rowe, A.; Avrakhov, P.; Kanareykin, A.; Rathke, J.

    2010-11-01

    Use of a superconducting (SC) traveling-wave accelerating (STWA) structure with a small phase advance per cell, rather than a standing-wave structure, may provide a significant increase in the accelerating gradient in the ILC linac [1]. For the same surface electric and magnetic fields, the STWA achieves an accelerating gradient 1.2 larger than TESLA-like standing-wave cavities. In addition, the STWA allows longer acceleration cavities, reducing the number of gaps between them. However, the STWA structure requires a SC feedback waveguide to return the few hundreds of MW of circulating RF power from the structure output to the structure input. A test single-cell cavity with feedback was designed and manufactured to demonstrate the possibility of proper processing to achieve a high accelerating gradient. The first results of high-gradient tests of a prototype 1.3 GHz single-cell cavity with feedback waveguide will be presented.

  8. Rare-earth isotopes as tracers of particulate emissions: An urban scale test. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ondov, J.M.; Kelly, W.R.; Holland, J.Z.; Lin, Z.C.; Wight, S.A.

    1991-01-01

    The particulate emissions of a 100 MW(e) coal-fired power plant were successfully tagged with enriched rare-earth isotopes on three occasions during the month of August, 1988. On 28 August, an 8-hour release was made using 94% isotopically pure 148Nd injected at a rate of 61 mg/hr and 14 ambient aerosol samples collected along a 72 degree arc 20-km distant from the plant were analyzed by pulse-counting thermal-ionization mass spectrometry for excess 148Nd and naturally-occurring (total) Nd background. The results were in good agreement with Gaussian plume model predictions. We conclude that the experiment and preliminary results successfully demonstrate the feasibility of using an enriched rare-earth isotopes as tracers of emissions from coal-fired power plants. The large signal-to-noise ratios achieved here are sufficient for tracing particles over much larger distances.

  9. Experimental study of the effect of test-well arrangement for partitioning interwell tracer test on the estimation of NAPL saturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, B.; Kim, Y.; Yeo, I.; Yongcheol Kim, In Wook Yeo

    2011-12-01

    Partitioning interwell tracer test (PITT) is a method to quantify and qualify a contaminated site with NAPLs through a degree of retardation of partitioning tracers compared to a conservative one. Although PITT is known to be a more effective method to measure the saturation of spatially-distributed NAPL contaminant than the point investigation method, the saturation estimation from PITT is reported to be underestimated due to various factors including heterogeneity of the media, adsorption, source zone NAPL architecture, and long tailing in breakthrough curves of partitioning tracers. Analytical description of PITT assumes that the injection-pumping well pair is on the line of ambient groundwater flow direction, but the test-well pair could easily be off the line in the field site, which could be another erroneous factor in analyzing PITT data. The purpose of this work is to study the influence of the angle of the test-well pair to ambient groundwater flow direction based on the result from PITT. The experiments were conducted in a small-scale 3D sandbox with dimensions of 0.5 m × 0.4 m × 0.15 m (LWH) of stainless steel. The surface is covered and sealed with a plexiglass plate to make the physical model a confined aquifer. Eight full-screened wells of Teflon material were installed along the perimeter of a 50 mm circle with 45 degree intervals in the middle of the physical model. Both ends of the sand box are connected to constant head reservoirs. The physical model was wet-packed with sieved and washed sand. Trichloroethylene (TCE) and bromide were used as the contaminant and the conservative tracer, respectively. Hexanol, 2,4-dimethyl-3-pentanol and 6-methyl-2-heptanol were used as partitioning tracers. Before the injection of TCE, a PITT was conducted to measure adsorption coefficient of partitioning tracers to the sand material. TCE of 4.5 mL, dyed with Sudan IV, was injected into the inner part of the circle of the wells. PITTs using the test-well pair

  10. Insights about fracture shape and aperture from push-pull thermal tracer tests achieved at different scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klepikova, Maria V.; Le Borgne, Tanguy; Bour, Olivier; Hochreutener, Rebecca; Lavenant, Nicolas

    2015-04-01

    The prediction of transport patterns in fractured media is a challenging task. Different transport mechanisms are generally contributing: dispersion at fracture scale related to aperture variability, dispersion at network scale due to transport in different flowpaths and matrix diffusion. It is however difficult to know which mechanism is dominant. In this study we test the interest of heat tracer tests for providing new constraints on transport in fractured media by interpreting three push-pull tests of different duration. A series of heat and solute push-pull tracer test with Dirac-type injection was conducted in fractured aquifer of Ploemeur, France. The comparison of solute and heat breakthrough curves shows that due to thermal loss to the rock matrix temperature recovery peak arrives earlier than concentration peak. Moreover, the peak is significantly smaller for temperature recovery while it exhibits a longest tailing. Finally, we found that the recovered peak temperature decreases with scale and has a power law slope of -1 on a log-log plot. By means of flow and heat numerical model, we investigate the relevance of different conceptual models: single 'plate', 'tube' and 'ellipse' homogeneous fracture models at different scales. For all tested fracture geometries temperature breakthrough curves were found to be sensitive to fracture aperture. An 'elliptical tube' fracture model was found to provide the best fit to the data and based on this model, we were able to estimate the aperture of the fracture in the present case. Moreover, the comparison of experimental breakthrough curves and modelling results also suggests that the effective fracture aperture may increase with scale. This work emphasizes that multiple-scale push-pull thermal tests can provide valuable insights on fracture geometry and fracture aperture.

  11. An ensemble Kalman filter approach to identify the hydraulic conductivity spatial distribution from electrical resistivity tomography time-lapse monitoring of three-dimensional tracer test experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camporese, M.; Cassiani, G.; Deiana, R.; Perri, M. T.; Salandin, P.

    2012-04-01

    An approach based on the Lagrangian formulation of transport and the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) is applied to assess the spatial distribution of hydraulic conductivity K by assimilating time-lapse cross-hole electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) images generated for a synthetic tracer test in a heterogeneous aquifer. Assuming that the solute spreads as a passive tracer, for high Peclet numbers the spatial moments of the evolving plume are dominated by the spatial distribution of the hydraulic conductivity. The assimilation of the electrical conductivity 4D images allows updating both the hydrological state in terms of solute concentration and the spatial distribution of K. Thus, delineation of the tracer plume and estimation of the aquifer heterogeneity at the local scale can be achieved at the same time by means of this interpretation of time-lapse electrical images from tracer tests. We assess the impact on the performance of the hydrological inversion of the uncertainty inherently affecting ERT inversions in terms of tracer concentration and the choice of the prior statistics of K. The results show that realistic ERT images can be integrated into a hydrological model even within an uncoupled inverse modeling framework, the reconstruction of the hydraulic conductivity spatial distribution being satisfactory in the portion of the domain directly covered by the passage of the tracer. Aside from the issues commonly affecting inverse models, the proposed approach is subject to the problem of the filter inbreeding and the retrieval performance is sensitive to the choice of K prior geostatistical parameters.

  12. Hydrodispersive characterization of a sandy porous medium by tracer tests carried out in laboratory on undisturbed soil samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrante, Aldo Pedro; Fallico, Carmine; Rios, Ana C.; Fernanda Rivera, Maria; Santillan, Patricio; Salazar, Mario

    2013-04-01

    The contamination of large areas and correspondent aquifers often imposes to implement some recovery operations which are generally complex and very expensive. Anyway, these interventions necessarily require the preventive characterization of the aquifers to be reclaimed and in particular the knowledge of the relevant hydrodispersive parameters. The determination of these parameters requires the implementation tracer tests for the specific site (Sauty JP, 1978). To reduce cost and time that such test requires tracer tests on undisturbed soil samples, representative of the whole aquifer, can be performed. These laboratory tests are much less expensive and require less time, but the results are certainly less reliable than those obtained by field tests for several reasons, including the particular scale of investigation. In any case the hydrodispersive parameters values, obtained by tests carried out in laboratory, can provide useful information on the considered aquifer, allowing to carry out initial verifications on the transmission and propagation of the pollutants in the aquifer considered. For this purpose, tracer tests with inlet of short time were carried out in the Soil Physics Laboratory of the Department of Soil Protection (University of Calabria), on a series of sandy soil samples with six different lengths, repeating each test with three different water flow velocities (5 m/d; 10 m/s and 15 m/d) (J. Feyen et al., 1998). The lengths of the samples taken into account are respectively 15 cm, 24 cm, 30 cm, 45 cm, 60 cm and 75 cm, while the solution used for each test was made of 100 ml of water and NaCl with a concentration of this substance corresponding to 10 g/L. For the porous medium taken into consideration a particle size analysis was carried out, resulting primarily made of sand, with total porosity equal to 0.33. Each soil sample was placed in a flow cell in which was inlet the tracer from the bottom upwards, measuring by a conductivimeter the

  13. SLAC High Gradient Testing of a KEK X-Band Accelerator Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Loewen, Rod

    2000-03-30

    The high accelerating gradients required for future linear colliders demands a better study of field emission and RF breakdown in accelerator structures. Changes in structure geometry, vacuum pumping, fabrication methods, and surface finish can all potentially impact the conditioning process, dark current emission, and peak RF power handling capability. Recent tests at SLAC of KEK's ``M2'' travelling wave x-band accelerator section provides an opportunity to investigate some of these effects by comparing its performance to previously high power tested structures at SLAC. In addition to studying ultimate power limitations, this test also demonstrates the use of computer automated conditioning to reach practical, achievable gradients.

  14. Estimates of ambient groundwater velocity in the alluvium south of Yucca Mountain from single-well tracer tests.

    SciTech Connect

    Reimus, P. W.; Umari M. J.; Roback, R.; Earle, John,; Darnell Jon; Farnham, Irene

    2002-01-01

    The saturated alluvium located south of Yucca Mountain, Nevada is expected to serve as the final barrier to radionuclide transport from the proposed high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. The alluvium will act as a barrier if radionuclides breach the engineered barriers in the repository, move through the unsaturated zone beneath the repository to the water table, and then migrate through saturated volcanic tuffs to the alluvium. Three single-well injection-withdrawal tracer tests were conducted between December 2000 and April 2001 in the saturated alluviuni at NC-EWDP-19D1, a Nye County-Early Warning Drilling Program well located about 18 km south of Yucca Mountain. The tests had the objectives of (1) distinguishing between a single- and a dual-porosity conceptual radionuclide transport model for the alluvium, and (2) obtaining estimates of ambient groundwater velocity in the alluvium.

  15. Stronger tests of mechanisms underlying geographic gradients of biodiversity: insights from the dimensionality of biodiversity.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Richard D; Tello, J Sebastián; Gavilanez, María Mercedes

    2013-01-01

    Inference involving diversity gradients typically is gathered by mechanistic tests involving single dimensions of biodiversity such as species richness. Nonetheless, because traits such as geographic range size, trophic status or phenotypic characteristics are tied to a particular species, mechanistic effects driving broad diversity patterns should manifest across numerous dimensions of biodiversity. We develop an approach of stronger inference based on numerous dimensions of biodiversity and apply it to evaluate one such putative mechanism: the mid-domain effect (MDE). Species composition of 10,000-km(2) grid cells was determined by overlaying geographic range maps of 133 noctilionoid bat taxa. We determined empirical diversity gradients in the Neotropics by calculating species richness and three indices each of phylogenetic, functional and phenetic diversity for each grid cell. We also created 1,000 simulated gradients of each examined metric of biodiversity based on a MDE model to estimate patterns expected if species distributions were randomly placed within the Neotropics. For each simulation run, we regressed the observed gradient onto the MDE-expected gradient. If a MDE drives empirical gradients, then coefficients of determination from such an analysis should be high, the intercept no different from zero and the slope no different than unity. Species richness gradients predicted by the MDE fit empirical patterns. The MDE produced strong spatially structured gradients of taxonomic, phylogenetic, functional and phenetic diversity. Nonetheless, expected values generated from the MDE for most dimensions of biodiversity exhibited poor fit to most empirical patterns. The MDE cannot account for most empirical patterns of biodiversity. Fuller understanding of latitudinal gradients will come from simultaneous examination of relative effects of random, environmental and historical mechanisms to better understand distribution and abundance of the current biota.

  16. Experimental high gradient testing of a 17.1 GHz photonic band-gap accelerator structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munroe, Brian J.; Zhang, JieXi; Xu, Haoran; Shapiro, Michael A.; Temkin, Richard J.

    2016-03-01

    We report the design, fabrication, and high gradient testing of a 17.1 GHz photonic band-gap (PBG) accelerator structure. Photonic band-gap (PBG) structures are promising candidates for electron accelerators capable of high-gradient operation because they have the inherent damping of high order modes required to avoid beam breakup instabilities. The 17.1 GHz PBG structure tested was a single cell structure composed of a triangular array of round copper rods of radius 1.45 mm spaced by 8.05 mm. The test assembly consisted of the test PBG cell located between conventional (pillbox) input and output cells, with input power of up to 4 MW from a klystron supplied via a TM01 mode launcher. Breakdown at high gradient was observed by diagnostics including reflected power, downstream and upstream current monitors and visible light emission. The testing procedure was first benchmarked with a conventional disc-loaded waveguide structure, which reached a gradient of 87 MV /m at a breakdown probability of 1.19 ×10-1 per pulse per meter. The PBG structure was tested with 100 ns pulses at gradient levels of less than 90 MV /m in order to limit the surface temperature rise to 120 K. The PBG structure reached up to 89 MV /m at a breakdown probability of 1.09 ×10-1 per pulse per meter. These test results show that a PBG structure can simultaneously operate at high gradients and low breakdown probability, while also providing wakefield damping.

  17. USE OF TRACER DATA FROM THE MADISON SQUARE GARDEN 2005 FIELD EXPERIMENT TO TEST A SIMPLE URBAN DISPERSION MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    Hanna, Steven R.; Baja, Emmanuel; Flaherty, Julia E.; Allwine, K Jerry

    2008-01-30

    A simple urban dispersion model is tested that is based on the Gaussian plume model and the Briggs’ urban dispersion curves. A key aspect of the model is that an initial dispersion coefficient (sigma) of 40 m is assumed to apply in the x, y, and z directions in built-up downtown areas. This initial sigma accounts for mixing in the local street canyon and/or building wakes. At short distances (i.e., when the release is in the same street canyon as the receptor and there are no obstructions in between), the initial lateral sigma is assumed to be less, 10 m. Observations from tracer experiments during the Madison Square Garden 2005 (MSG05) field study are used for model testing. MSG05 took place in a 1 km by 1 km area in Manhattan surrounding Madison Square Garden. Six different perfluorocarbon tracer (PFT) gases were released concurrently from five different locations around MSG, and concentrations in the air were observed by 20 samplers near the surface and seven samplers on building tops. There were two separate continuous 60 minute tracer release periods on each day, beginning at 9 am and at 11:30 am. Releases took place on two separate days (March 10 and 14). The samplers provided 30 minute averaged PFT concentrations from 9 am through 2 pm. This analysis focuses on the maximum 60-minute averaged PFT gas concentration at each sampler location for each PFT for each release period. Stability was assumed to be nearly neutral, because of the moderate winds and the mechanical mixing generated by the buildings. Input wind direction was the average observed building-top wind direction (285° on March 10 and 315° on March 14). Input wind speed was the average street-level observed wind speed (1.5 m/s for both days). To be considered in the evaluation, both the observed and predicted concentration had to exceed the threshold. Concentrations normalized by source release rate, C/Q, were tested. For all PFTs, samplers, and release times, the median observed and predicted

  18. Geology, hydrology, and results of tracer testing in the Galena-Platteville aquifer at a waste-disposal site near Byron, Illinois

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kay, Robert T.; Yeskis, Douglas J.; Prinos, Scott T.; Morrow, William S.; Vendl, Mark

    1999-01-01

    A study was conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency of the geohydrology of the dolomite bedrock at a waste-disposal site near Byron, Illinois. The study was designed to identify and characterize the flow pathways through the bedrock aquifer beneath the site. The geologic units of concern at the site are the Glenwood Formation of the Ancell Group, and the Platteville and Galena Groups. These deposits compose the Galena-Platteville aquifer and the underlying Harmony Hill Shale semiconfining unit. The Galena-Platteville aquifer is an unconfined aquifer. Geophysical logging, water levels, and aquifer-test data indicate the presence of interconnected, hydraulically active fractures in the middle of the Galena-Platteville aquifer (the upper flow pathway), and a second set of hydraulically active fractures (the lower flow pathway). The lower flow pathway may be present through much of the site. Few hydraulically active fractures are present in the upper part of the aquifer near the center of the site, but appear to be more numerous in the upper part of the aquifer in the western and northeastern parts of the site. Water-level data obtained during the tracer test indicate that pumping effects were present near the pumped wells. Pumping effects may have been present at several wells located along directions of identified fracture orientation from the pumped well. The upper part of the aquifer did not appear to be hydraulically well connected to the flow pathways supplying water to the pumped well. Large background changes in water levels obscured the effects of pumping and prevented calculation of aquifer properties. The velocity of the bromide tracer through the lower flow pathway under the hydraulic gradient resulting from the pumping was about 152 feet per day. Solution of the Darcy velocity equation results in a calculated effective porosity for this interval of 3.5 percent, indicating hydraulic interconnection between the

  19. Evaluation of multiple tracer methods to estimate low groundwater flow velocities.

    PubMed

    Reimus, Paul W; Arnold, Bill W

    2017-04-01

    Four different tracer methods were used to estimate groundwater flow velocity at a multiple-well site in the saturated alluvium south of Yucca Mountain, Nevada: (1) two single-well tracer tests with different rest or "shut-in" periods, (2) a cross-hole tracer test with an extended flow interruption, (3) a comparison of two tracer decay curves in an injection borehole with and without pumping of a downgradient well, and (4) a natural-gradient tracer test. Such tracer methods are potentially very useful for estimating groundwater velocities when hydraulic gradients are flat (and hence uncertain) and also when water level and hydraulic conductivity data are sparse, both of which were the case at this test location. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the first three methods for their ability to provide reasonable estimates of relatively low groundwater flow velocities in such low-hydraulic-gradient environments. The natural-gradient method is generally considered to be the most robust and direct method, so it was used to provide a "ground truth" velocity estimate. However, this method usually requires several wells, so it is often not practical in systems with large depths to groundwater and correspondingly high well installation costs. The fact that a successful natural gradient test was conducted at the test location offered a unique opportunity to compare the flow velocity estimates obtained by the more easily deployed and lower risk methods with the ground-truth natural-gradient method. The groundwater flow velocity estimates from the four methods agreed very well with each other, suggesting that the first three methods all provided reasonably good estimates of groundwater flow velocity at the site. The advantages and disadvantages of the different methods, as well as some of the uncertainties associated with them are discussed. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Evaluation of multiple tracer methods to estimate low groundwater flow velocities

    DOE PAGES

    Reimus, Paul W.; Arnold, Bill W.

    2017-02-20

    Here, four different tracer methods were used to estimate groundwater flow velocity at a multiple-well site in the saturated alluvium south of Yucca Mountain, Nevada: (1) two single-well tracer tests with different rest or “shut-in” periods, (2) a cross-hole tracer test with an extended flow interruption, (3) a comparison of two tracer decay curves in an injection borehole with and without pumping of a downgradient well, and (4) a natural-gradient tracer test. Such tracer methods are potentially very useful for estimating groundwater velocities when hydraulic gradients are flat (and hence uncertain) and also when water level and hydraulic conductivity datamore » are sparse, both of which were the case at this test location. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the first three methods for their ability to provide reasonable estimates of relatively low groundwater flow velocities in such low-hydraulic-gradient environments. The natural-gradient method is generally considered to be the most robust and direct method, so it was used to provide a “ground truth” velocity estimate. However, this method usually requires several wells, so it is often not practical in systems with large depths to groundwater and correspondingly high well installation costs. The fact that a successful natural gradient test was conducted at the test location offered a unique opportunity to compare the flow velocity estimates obtained by the more easily deployed and lower risk methods with the ground-truth natural-gradient method. The groundwater flow velocity estimates from the four methods agreed very well with each other, suggesting that the first three methods all provided reasonably good estimates of groundwater flow velocity at the site. We discuss the advantages and disadvantages of the different methods, as well as some of the uncertainties associated with them.« less

  1. Evaluation of multiple tracer methods to estimate low groundwater flow velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reimus, Paul W.; Arnold, Bill W.

    2017-04-01

    Four different tracer methods were used to estimate groundwater flow velocity at a multiple-well site in the saturated alluvium south of Yucca Mountain, Nevada: (1) two single-well tracer tests with different rest or ;shut-in; periods, (2) a cross-hole tracer test with an extended flow interruption, (3) a comparison of two tracer decay curves in an injection borehole with and without pumping of a downgradient well, and (4) a natural-gradient tracer test. Such tracer methods are potentially very useful for estimating groundwater velocities when hydraulic gradients are flat (and hence uncertain) and also when water level and hydraulic conductivity data are sparse, both of which were the case at this test location. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the first three methods for their ability to provide reasonable estimates of relatively low groundwater flow velocities in such low-hydraulic-gradient environments. The natural-gradient method is generally considered to be the most robust and direct method, so it was used to provide a ;ground truth; velocity estimate. However, this method usually requires several wells, so it is often not practical in systems with large depths to groundwater and correspondingly high well installation costs. The fact that a successful natural gradient test was conducted at the test location offered a unique opportunity to compare the flow velocity estimates obtained by the more easily deployed and lower risk methods with the ground-truth natural-gradient method. The groundwater flow velocity estimates from the four methods agreed very well with each other, suggesting that the first three methods all provided reasonably good estimates of groundwater flow velocity at the site. The advantages and disadvantages of the different methods, as well as some of the uncertainties associated with them are discussed.

  2. Nitrate removal rates change over time during tracer tests: towards zone specific reaction rates and watershed budgets.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubeneau, A. F.; Ghassani, A. F.; Avilar, C.; Xiong, X.; Wang, S.

    2016-12-01

    Fertilizer pollution leading to downstream eutrofication and hypoxia is a grand challenge affecting aquatic ecosystems and human activities. Here, we present numerical and experimental results showing that simple tracer tests can provide sufficient data to disentangle the contribution of the water column, the benthic zone and the hyporheic zone to total nitrate uptake at the reach scale. The processes that drive nitrate removal are very different in these three distinct environments and their relative contribution change along the river continuum. The dark, often hypoxic hyporheic zone is where denitrification takes place, while autotrophs temporarily store nitrogen in their biomass in the benthos or the water column. The contribution of pelagic uptake increases downstream as rivers are deeper and slower. Together, these findings can be gathered to empirically inform watershed models and arrive at better nutrient budgets and water quality predictions.

  3. Interfacial Partitioning Tracer Test Measurement of NAPL-Water Interfacial Areas in Porous Media under Two-Phase Flow Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, H.; El Ouni, A.; Lin, D.; Wang, B.; Brusseau, M. L.

    2013-12-01

    The NAPL-water interface is of critical importance for the transport, fate, and remediation of organic contaminants in the subsurface due to its influence on contaminant mass transfer, transport, and biotransformation. In this work, the interfacial areas between tetrachloroethene (PCE) liquid (non-wetting phase) and water (wetting phase) in porous media were measured under two-phase flow conditions using the interfacial partitioning tracer test (IPTT) method. Three wetting scenarios of primary drainage, secondary imbibition, and secondary drainage were investigated. Two porous media were used, a well-sorted 45/50 mesh quartz sand and a sandy soil. The theoretical maximum interfacial areas determined from the measured data are compared to the specific solid surface area determined in two ways, based on geometrical calculations for smooth spheres and as measured with the N2/BET method. The results obtained for the NAPL-water system are compared to measurements conducted for comparable air-water systems.

  4. Numerical simulations of radon as an in situ partitioning tracer for quantifying NAPL contamination using push-pull tests.

    PubMed

    Davis, B M; Istok, J D; Semprini, L

    2005-06-01

    Presented here is a reanalysis of results previously presented by [Davis, B.M., Istok, J.D., Semprini, L., 2002. Push-pull partitioning tracer tests using radon-222 to quantify non-aqueous phase liquid contamination. J. Contam. Hydrol. 58, 129-146] of push-pull tests using radon as a naturally occurring partitioning tracer for evaluating NAPL contamination. In a push-pull test where radon-free water and bromide are injected, the presence of NAPL is manifested in greater dispersion of the radon breakthrough curve (BTC) relative to the bromide BTC during the extraction phase as a result of radon partitioning into the NAPL. Laboratory push-pull tests in a dense or DNAPL-contaminated physical aquifer model (PAM) indicated that the previously used modeling approach resulted in an overestimation of the DNAPL (trichloroethene) saturation (S(n)). The numerical simulations presented here investigated the influence of (1) initial radon concentrations, which vary as a function of S(n), and (2) heterogeneity in S(n) distribution within the radius of influence of the push-pull test. The simulations showed that these factors influence radon BTCs and resulting estimates of S(n). A revised method of interpreting radon BTCs is presented here, which takes into account initial radon concentrations and uses non-normalized radon BTCs. This revised method produces greater radon BTC sensitivity at small values of S(n) and was used to re-analyze the results from the PAM push-pull tests reported by Davis et al. The re-analysis resulted in a more accurate estimate of S(n) (1.8%) compared with the previously estimated value (7.4%). The revised method was then applied to results from a push-pull test conducted in a light or LNAPL-contaminated aquifer at a field site, resulting in a more accurate estimate of S(n) (4.1%) compared with a previously estimated value (13.6%). The revised method improves upon the efficacy of the radon push-pull test to estimate NAPL saturations. A limitation of the

  5. Hydrological parameter estimations from a conservative tracer test with variable-density effects at the Boise Hydrogeophysical Research Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dafflon, B.; Barrash, W.; Cardiff, M.; Johnson, T. C.

    2011-12-01

    Reliable predictions of groundwater flow and solute transport require an estimation of the detailed distribution of the parameters (e.g., hydraulic conductivity, effective porosity) controlling these processes. However, such parameters are difficult to estimate because of the inaccessibility and complexity of the subsurface. In this regard, developments in parameter estimation techniques and investigations of field experiments are still challenging and necessary to improve our understanding and the prediction of hydrological processes. Here we analyze a conservative tracer test conducted at the Boise Hydrogeophysical Research Site in 2001 in a heterogeneous unconfined fluvial aquifer. Some relevant characteristics of this test include: variable-density (sinking) effects because of the injection concentration of the bromide tracer, the relatively small size of the experiment, and the availability of various sources of geophysical and hydrological information. The information contained in this experiment is evaluated through several parameter estimation approaches, including a grid-search-based strategy, stochastic simulation of hydrological property distributions, and deterministic inversion using regularization and pilot-point techniques. Doing this allows us to investigate hydraulic conductivity and effective porosity distributions and to compare the effects of assumptions from several methods and parameterizations. Our results provide new insights into the understanding of variable-density transport processes and the hydrological relevance of incorporating various sources of information in parameter estimation approaches. Among others, the variable-density effect and the effective porosity distribution, as well as their coupling with the hydraulic conductivity structure, are seen to be significant in the transport process. The results also show that assumed prior information can strongly influence the estimated distributions of hydrological properties.

  6. Hydrological parameter estimations from a conservative tracer test with variable-density effects at the Boise Hydrogeophysical Research Site

    SciTech Connect

    Dafflon, Baptisite; Barrash, Warren; Cardiff, Michael A.; Johnson, Timothy C.

    2011-12-15

    Reliable predictions of groundwater flow and solute transport require an estimation of the detailed distribution of the parameters (e.g., hydraulic conductivity, effective porosity) controlling these processes. However, such parameters are difficult to estimate because of the inaccessibility and complexity of the subsurface. In this regard, developments in parameter estimation techniques and investigations of field experiments are still challenging and necessary to improve our understanding and the prediction of hydrological processes. Here we analyze a conservative tracer test conducted at the Boise Hydrogeophysical Research Site in 2001 in a heterogeneous unconfined fluvial aquifer. Some relevant characteristics of this test include: variable-density (sinking) effects because of the injection concentration of the bromide tracer, the relatively small size of the experiment, and the availability of various sources of geophysical and hydrological information. The information contained in this experiment is evaluated through several parameter estimation approaches, including a grid-search-based strategy, stochastic simulation of hydrological property distributions, and deterministic inversion using regularization and pilot-point techniques. Doing this allows us to investigate hydraulic conductivity and effective porosity distributions and to compare the effects of assumptions from several methods and parameterizations. Our results provide new insights into the understanding of variabledensity transport processes and the hydrological relevance of incorporating various sources of information in parameter estimation approaches. Among others, the variable-density effect and the effective porosity distribution, as well as their coupling with the hydraulic conductivity structure, are seen to be significant in the transport process. The results also show that assumed prior information can strongly influence the estimated distributions of hydrological properties.

  7. Tracer test modeling for characterizing heterogeneity and local-scale residence time distribution in an artificial recharge site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valhondo, Cristina; Martínez-Landa, Lurdes; Carrera, Jesús; Hidalgo, Juan J.; Tubau, Isabel; De Pourcq, Katrien; Grau-Martínez, Alba; Ayora, Carlos

    2016-10-01

    Artificial recharge of aquifers is a technique for improving water quality and increasing groundwater resources. Understanding the fate of a potential contaminant requires knowledge of the residence time distribution (RTD) of the recharged water in the aquifer beneath. A simple way to obtain the RTDs is to perform a tracer test. We performed a pulse injection tracer test in an artificial recharge system through an infiltration basin to obtain the breakthrough curves, which directly yield the RTDs. The RTDs turned out to be very broad and we used a numerical model to interpret them, to characterize heterogeneity, and to extend the model to other flow conditions. The model comprised nine layers at the site scaled to emulate the layering of aquifer deposits. Two types of hypotheses were considered: homogeneous (all flow and transport parameters identical for every layer) and heterogeneous (diverse parameters for each layer). The parameters were calibrated against the head and concentration data in both model types, which were validated quite satisfactorily against 1,1,2-Trichloroethane and electrical conductivity data collected over a long period of time with highly varying flow conditions. We found that the broad RTDs can be attributed to the complex flow structure generated under the basin due to three-dimensionality and time fluctuations (the homogeneous model produced broad RTDs) and the heterogeneity of the media (the heterogeneous model yielded much better fits). We conclude that heterogeneity must be acknowledged to properly assess mixing and broad RTDs, which are required to explain the water quality improvement of artificial recharge basins.

  8. Innovative techniques for the description of reservoir heterogeneity using tracers

    SciTech Connect

    Pope, G.; Sepehrnoori, K.

    1991-09-01

    The objective of this research is to develop an advanced, innovative technique for the description of reservoir heterogeneity. This proposed method consists of using tracers in single-well backflow tests. The general idea is to make use of fluid drift in the reservoir either due to naturally occurring pressure gradients in the reservoir, or by deliberately imposed pressure gradients using adjacent injection and production wells in the same reservoir. The analytical tool that will be used to design and interpret these tests is a compositional reservoir simulator with special features added and tested specifically for this purpose. 2 refs., 5 figs.

  9. Solving large test-day models by iteration on data and preconditioned conjugate gradient.

    PubMed

    Lidauer, M; Strandén, I; Mäntysaari, E A; Pösö, J; Kettunen, A

    1999-12-01

    A preconditioned conjugate gradient method was implemented into an iteration on a program for data estimation of breeding values, and its convergence characteristics were studied. An algorithm was used as a reference in which one fixed effect was solved by Gauss-Seidel method, and other effects were solved by a second-order Jacobi method. Implementation of the preconditioned conjugate gradient required storing four vectors (size equal to number of unknowns in the mixed model equations) in random access memory and reading the data at each round of iteration. The preconditioner comprised diagonal blocks of the coefficient matrix. Comparison of algorithms was based on solutions of mixed model equations obtained by a single-trait animal model and a single-trait, random regression test-day model. Data sets for both models used milk yield records of primiparous Finnish dairy cows. Animal model data comprised 665,629 lactation milk yields and random regression test-day model data of 6,732,765 test-day milk yields. Both models included pedigree information of 1,099,622 animals. The animal model ¿random regression test-day model¿ required 122 ¿305¿ rounds of iteration to converge with the reference algorithm, but only 88 ¿149¿ were required with the preconditioned conjugate gradient. To solve the random regression test-day model with the preconditioned conjugate gradient required 237 megabytes of random access memory and took 14% of the computation time needed by the reference algorithm.

  10. Interpretation of Perfluorocarbon Tracer Data Collected During the Frio Carbon Dioxide Sequestration Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCallum, S. D.; Phelps, T. J.; Riestenberg, D. E.; Freifeld, B. M.; Trautz, R. C.

    2005-12-01

    In October of 2004 over 1600 tons of CO2 was injected into a brine-bearing sandstone unit within the Frio Formation. An injection well was used to introduce the CO2 into the Frio at a depth of 1540 meters below the surface. A monitoring well located 31 meters updip from the injection well was used to sample formation fluids and detect the breakthrough of the CO2 plume. Perfluorocarbon tracers (PFTs) were injected in three paired intervals at the beginning and middle of the CO2 injection. The four PFTs selected for injection were perfluoromethylcyclopentane (PMCP), perfluoromethylcyclohexane (PMCH), perfluorodimethylcyclohexane (PDCH), and perfluorotrimethylcyclohexane (PTCH). The PFTs were used as a means to monitor CO2 plume breakthroughs and aid in the interpretation of CO2 flow path development. Fluid samples were collected at the monitoring well during and after the CO2 and PFT injections. These samples were later analyzed in the laboratory to measure the concentration of PFTs. Laboratory analysis was performed using a gas chromatograph (GC) equipped with an electron capture detector (ECD). Standardization of the data set was achieved by dividing C by Cno (C/Cno), where C is the molar mass of PFT and CO2 recovered and Cno is the initial molar mass of PFT and CO2 injected. The C/Cno data showed the amount of PFT dilution that occurred between injection and collection. Analysis of the C/Cno data revealed three breakthrough peaks corresponding with the three PFT injections at 54, 157, and 173 hours after the start of CO2 injection, with an average travel time of 51 hours for each injection. With each subsequent PFT peak a greater amount of PFT dilution was observed along with a broadening of the breakthrough peak. The first PFT breakthrough spans 10 hours, the second spans 20 hours and the third spans 24 hours. The increase in peak broadness observed in each subsequent breakthrough may have been caused by increased CO2 saturation. Since PFTs are more soluble in CO

  11. Characterization of Min-K TE-1400 Thermal Insulation (Two-Year Gradient Stress Relaxation Testing Update)

    SciTech Connect

    Hemrick, James Gordon; Lara-Curzio, Edgar; King, James

    2009-09-01

    Min-K 1400TE insulation material was characterized at Oak Ridge National Laboratory for use in structural applications under gradient temperature conditions. A previous report (ORNL/TM-2008/089) discusses the testing and results from the original three year duration of the project. This testing included compression testing to determine the effect of sample size and test specimen geometry on the compressive strength of Min-K, subsequent compression testing on cylindrical specimens to determine loading rates for stress relaxation testing, isothermal stress relaxation testing, and gradient stress relaxation testing. This report presents the results from the continuation of the gradient temperature stress relaxation testing and the resulting updated modeling.

  12. TERA high gradient test program of RF cavities for medical linear accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degiovanni, A.; Amaldi, U.; Bonomi, R.; Garlasché, M.; Garonna, A.; Verdú-Andrés, S.; Wegner, R.

    2011-11-01

    The scientific community and the medical industries are putting a considerable effort into the design of compact, reliable and cheap accelerators for hadrontherapy. Up to now only circular accelerators are used to deliver beams with energies suitable for the treatment of deep seated tumors. The TERA Foundation has proposed and designed a hadrontherapy facility based on the cyclinac concept: a high gradient linear accelerator placed downstream of a cyclotron used as an injector. The overall length of the linac, and therefore its final cost, is almost inversely proportional to the average accelerating gradient achieved in the linac. TERA, in collaboration with the CLIC RF group, has started a high gradient test program. The main goal is to study the high gradient behavior of prototype cavities and to determine the appropriate linac operating frequency considering important issues such as machine reliability and availability of distributed power sources. A preliminary test of a 3 GHz cavity has been carried out at the beginning of 2010, giving encouraging results. Further investigations are planned before the end of 2011. A set of 5.7 GHz cavities is under production and will be tested in a near future. The construction and test of a multi-cell structure is also foreseen.

  13. Field-scale prediction of enhanced DNAPL dissolution based on partitioning tracers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fang; Annable, Michael D; Jawitz, James W

    2013-09-01

    The equilibrium streamtube model (EST) has demonstrated the ability to accurately predict dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) dissolution in laboratory experiments and numerical simulations. Here the model is applied to predict DNAPL dissolution at a tetrachloroethylene (PCE)-contaminated dry cleaner site, located in Jacksonville, Florida. The EST model is an analytical solution with field-measurable input parameters. Measured data from a field-scale partitioning tracer test were used to parameterize the EST model and the predicted PCE dissolution was compared to measured data from an in-situ ethanol flood. In addition, a simulated partitioning tracer test from a calibrated, three-dimensional, spatially explicit multiphase flow model (UTCHEM) was also used to parameterize the EST analytical solution. The EST ethanol prediction based on both the field partitioning tracer test and the simulation closely matched the total recovery well field ethanol data with Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency E=0.96 and 0.90, respectively. The EST PCE predictions showed a peak shift to earlier arrival times for models based on either field-measured or simulated partitioning tracer tests, resulting in poorer matches to the field PCE data in both cases. The peak shifts were concluded to be caused by well screen interval differences between the field tracer test and ethanol flood. Both the EST model and UTCHEM were also used to predict PCE aqueous dissolution under natural gradient conditions, which has a much less complex flow pattern than the forced-gradient double five spot used for the ethanol flood. The natural gradient EST predictions based on parameters determined from tracer tests conducted with a complex flow pattern underestimated the UTCHEM-simulated natural gradient total mass removal by 12% after 170 pore volumes of water flushing indicating that some mass was not detected by the tracers likely due to stagnation zones in the flow field. These findings highlight the important

  14. Southeast Geyers Cooperative Tracer Evaluation and Testing Program for the Purpose of Estimating The Efficiency of Injection

    SciTech Connect

    J.L. Smith

    2001-02-12

    The Southeast Geysers Cooperative Tracer Evaluation Program has been a joint project located in the SE part of the Geysers geothermal field, in Lake and Sonoma Counties, California. A new generation of environmentally benign vapor-phase tracers has been used to estimate the varying degrees to which injectate is being recovered following the significant increase of injected volumes within the Southeast Geysers.

  15. On the use of flow-storage repartitions derived from artificial tracer tests for geothermal reservoir characterization in the Malm-Molasse basin: a theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewi, Dina Silvia; Osaigbovo Enomayo, Augustine; Mohsin, Rizwan; Karmakar, Shyamal; Ghergut, Julia; Sauter, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Flow-storage repartition (FSR) analysis (Shook 2003) is a versatile tool for characterizing subsurface flow and transport systems. FSR can be derived from measured signals of inter-well tracer tests, if certain requirements are met - basically, the same as required for equivalence between fluid residence time distribution (RTD) and a measured inter-well tracer signal (pre-processed and de-convolved if necessary). Nominally, a FSR is derived from a RTD as a trajectory in normalized {1st, 0th}-order statistical moment space; more intuitively, as a parametric plot of 0th-order against 1st-order statistical moments of RTD truncated at time t, with t as a parameter running from the first tracer input to the latest available tracer sampling; 0th-order moments being normalized by the total tracer recovery, and 1st-order moments by the mean RT. Fracture-dominated systems plot in the upper left (high F , low S) region of FSR diagrams; a homogeneous single-continuum with no dispersion (infinite Peclet number) displays a straight line from {F ,S}={0,0} to {F ,S}={1,1}. This analysis tool appears particularly attractive for characterizing markedly-heterogeneous, porous-fissured-fractured (partly karstified) formations like those targeted by geothermal exploration in the Malm-Molasse basin in Southern Germany, and especially for quantifying flow and transport contributions from contrasting facies types ('reef' versus 'bedded'). However, tracer tests conducted in such systems with inter-well distances of some hundreds of metres (as required by economic considerations on geothermal reservoir sizing) face the problem of very long residence times - and thus the need to deal with incomplete (truncated) signals. For the geothermal well triplet at the Sauerlach site near Munich, tracer peak arrival times exceeding 2 years have been predicted, and signal tails decreasing by less than 50% over >10 years, which puts great uncertainty on the (extrapolation-based) normalizing factors

  16. Inferences about Shear Zone Flow Pathways between CFM 06.002i2 and Pinkel from Tracer Tests 10-01 to 12-02

    SciTech Connect

    Reimus, Paul W.

    2012-06-26

    This presentation provides an analysis of several tracer tests conducted at the Grimsel Test Site, Switzerland, between 2010 and early 2012, with the objective of testing a conceptual model of flow through the shear zone in which the tracer tests were conducted. The analysis includes predictions of tracer residence times in each of two flow pathways in the shear zone as a function of injection and extraction flow rates in the tracer tests. Conclusions are: (1) Separation of shear zone flow between CFM 06.002i2 and Pinkel into two predominant flow pathways seems reasonable; (2) Conceptual model is that travel time in pathway 1 is dependent on injection flow rate, and travel time in pathway 2 is dependent on extraction flow rate; (3) Predict residence time (in hours) in Pathway 1 equal to {approx}9.9/(Injection Flow Rate, ml/min), provided injection interval flow is greater than about 0.15 ml/min (which is not reliably achieved under natural flow/dilution conditions after installation of CFM 11.00X holes); and (4) Predict residence time of {approx}8 hrs in Pathway 2 with extraction flow rate of 25 ml/min.

  17. Functional linear models to test for differences in prairie wetland hydraulic gradients

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greenwood, Mark C.; Sojda, Richard S.; Preston, Todd M.; Swayne, David A.; Yang, Wanhong; Voinov, A.A.; Rizzoli, A.; Filatova, T.

    2010-01-01

    Functional data analysis provides a framework for analyzing multiple time series measured frequently in time, treating each series as a continuous function of time. Functional linear models are used to test for effects on hydraulic gradient functional responses collected from three types of land use in Northeastern Montana at fourteen locations. Penalized regression-splines are used to estimate the underlying continuous functions based on the discretely recorded (over time) gradient measurements. Permutation methods are used to assess the statistical significance of effects. A method for accommodating missing observations in each time series is described. Hydraulic gradients may be an initial and fundamental ecosystem process that responds to climate change. We suggest other potential uses of these methods for detecting evidence of climate change.

  18. Comparison of agar dilution and antibiotic gradient strip test with broth microdilution for susceptibility testing of swine Brachyspira species.

    PubMed

    Mirajkar, Nandita S; Gebhart, Connie J

    2016-03-01

    Production-limiting diseases in swine caused by Brachyspira are characterized by mucohemorrhagic diarrhea (B. hyodysenteriae and "B. hampsonii") or mild colitis (B. pilosicoli), while B. murdochii is often isolated from healthy pigs. Emergence of novel pathogenic Brachyspira species and strains with reduced susceptibility to commonly used antimicrobials has reinforced the need for standardized susceptibility testing. Two methods are currently used for Brachyspira susceptibility testing: agar dilution (AD) and broth microdilution (BMD). However, these tests have primarily been used for B. hyodysenteriae and rarely for B. pilosicoli. Information on the use of commercial susceptibility testing products such as antibiotic gradient strips is lacking. Our main objective was to validate and compare the susceptibility results, measured as the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), of 6 antimicrobials for 4 Brachyspira species (B. hyodysenteriae, "B. hampsonii", B. pilosicoli, and B. murdochii) by BMD and AD (tiamulin, valnemulin, lincomycin, tylosin, and carbadox) or antibiotic gradient strip (doxycycline) methods. In general, the results of a high percentage of all 4 Brachyspira species differed by ±1 log2 dilution or less by BMD and AD for tiamulin, valnemulin, lincomycin, and tylosin, and by BMD and antibiotic gradient strip for doxycycline. The carbadox MICs obtained by BMD were 1-5 doubling dilutions different than those obtained by AD. BMD for Brachyspira was quicker to perform with less ambiguous interpretation of results when compared with AD and antibiotic gradient strip methods, and the results confirm the utility of BMD in routine diagnostics.

  19. Predicting the denitrification capacity of sandy aquifers from in situ measurements using push-pull 15N tracer tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eschenbach, W.; Well, R.; Walther, W.

    2015-04-01

    Knowledge about the spatial variability of in situ denitrification rates (Dr(in situ)) and their relation to the denitrification capacity in nitrate-contaminated aquifers is crucial to predict the development of groundwater quality. Therefore, 28 push-pull 15N tracer tests for the measurement of in situ denitrification rates were conducted in two sandy Pleistocene aquifers in northern Germany. The 15N analysis of denitrification-derived 15N-labelled N2 and N2O dissolved in water samples collected during the push-pull 15N tracer tests was performed using isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) in the lab and additionally for some tracer tests online in the field with a quadrupole membrane inlet mass spectrometer (MIMS) in order to test the feasibility of on-site real-time 15N analysis. Aquifer material from the same locations and depths as the push-pull injection points was incubated, and the initial and cumulative denitrification after 1 year of incubation (Dcum(365)) as well as the stock of reduced compounds (SRC) was compared with in situ measurements of denitrification. This was done to derive transfer functions suitable to predict Dcum(365) and SRC from Dr(in situ). Dr(in situ) ranged from 0 to 51.5 μg N kg-1 d-1. Denitrification rates derived from on-site isotope analysis using MIMS satisfactorily coincided with laboratory analysis by conventional IRMS, thus proving the feasibility of in situ analysis. Dr(in situ) was significantly higher in the sulfidic zone of both aquifers compared to the zone of non-sulfidic aquifer material. Overall, regressions between the Dcum(365) and SRC of the tested aquifer material with Dr(in situ) exhibited only a modest linear correlation for the full data set. However, the predictability of Dcum(365) and SRC from Dr(in situ) data clearly increased for aquifer samples from the zone of NO3--bearing groundwater. In the NO3--free aquifer zone, a lag phase of denitrification after NO3- injections was observed, which confounded the

  20. Predicting the denitrification capacity of sandy aquifers from in situ measurements using push-pull 15N tracer tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eschenbach, W.; Well, R.; Walther, W.

    2014-12-01

    Knowledge about the spatial variability of in situ denitrification rates (Dr(in situ)) and their relation to the denitrification capacity in nitrate-contaminated aquifers is crucial to predict the development of groundwater quality. Therefore, 28 push-pull 15N tracer tests for the measurement of in situ denitrification rates were conducted in two sandy Pleistocene aquifers in Northern Germany. The 15N analysis of denitrification derived 15N labelled N2 and N2O dissolved in water samples collected during the push-pull 15N tracer tests was performed by isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) in the lab and additionally for some tracer tests online in the field with a quadrupole membrane inlet mass spectrometer (MIMS), in order to test the feasibility of on-site real-time 15N analysis. Aquifer material from the same locations and depths as the push-pull injection points was incubated and the initial and cumulative denitrification after one year of incubation (Dcum(365)) as well as the stock of reduced compounds (SRC) was compared with in situ measurements of denitrification. This was done to derive transfer functions suitable to predict Dcum(365) and SRC from Dr(in situ). Dr(in situ) ranged from 0 to 51.5 μg N kg-1 d-1. Denitrification rates derived from on-site isotope analysis using membrane-inlet mass spectrometry satisfactorily coincided with laboratory analysis by conventional isotope ratio mass spectrometry, thus proving the feasibility of in situ analysis. Dr(in situ) was significantly higher in the sulphidic zone of both aquifers compared to the zone of non-sulphidic aquifer material. Overall, regressions between the Dcum(365) and SRC of the tested aquifer material with Dr(in situ) exhibited only a modest linear correlation for the full data set. But the predictability of Dcum(365) and SRC from Dr(in situ) data clearly increased for aquifer samples from the zone of NO3--bearing groundwater. In the NO3--free aquifer zone a lag phase of denitrification after NO3

  1. Testing alternative hypotheses for evolutionary diversification in an African songbird: rainforest refugia versus ecological gradients.

    PubMed

    Kirschel, Alexander N G; Slabbekoorn, Hans; Blumstein, Daniel T; Cohen, Rachel E; de Kort, Selvino R; Buermann, Wolfgang; Smith, Thomas B

    2011-11-01

    Geographic isolation in rainforest refugia and local adaptation to ecological gradients may both be important drivers of evolutionary diversification. However, their relative importance and the underlying mechanisms of these processes remain poorly understood because few empirical studies address both putative processes in a single system. A key question is to what extent is divergence in signals that are important in mate and species recognition driven by isolation in rainforest refugia or by divergent selection across ecological gradients? We studied the little greenbul, Andropadus virens, an African songbird, in Cameroon and Uganda, to determine whether refugial isolation or ecological gradients better explain existing song variation. We then tested whether song variation attributable to refugial or ecological divergence was biologically meaningful using reciprocal playback experiments to territorial males. We found that much of the existing song variation can be explained by both geographic isolation and ecological gradients, but that divergence across the gradient, and not geographic isolation, affects male response levels. These data suggest that ecologically divergent traits, independent of historical isolation during glacial cycles, can promote reproductive isolation. Our study provides further support for the importance of ecology in explaining patterns of evolutionary diversification in ecologically diverse regions of the planet. © 2011 The Author(s). Evolution© 2011 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  2. Reactivity of Hontomín carbonate rocks to acidic solution injection: reactive "push-pull" tracer tests results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Gaspari, Francesca; Cabeza, Yoar; Luquot, Linda; Rötting, Tobias; Saaltink, Maarten W.; Carrera, Jesus

    2014-05-01

    Several field tests will be carried out in order to characterize the reservoir for CO2 injection in Hontomín (Burgos, Spain) as part of the Compostilla project of "Fundación Ciudad de la Energía" (CIUDEN). Once injected, the dissolution of the CO2 in the resident brine will increase the acidity of the water and lead to the dissolution of the rocks, constituted mainly by carbonates. This mechanism will cause changes in the aquifer properties such as porosity and permeability. To reproduce the effect of the CO2 injection, a reactive solution with 2% of acetic acid is going to be injected in the reservoir and extracted from the same well (reactive "push-pull" tracer tests) to identify and quantify the geochemical reactions occurring into the aquifer. The reactivity of the rock will allow us also to evaluate the changes of its properties. Previously, theoretical calculations of Damkhöler numbers were done to determine the acid concentrations and injection flow rates needed to generate ramified-wormholes patterns, during theses "push-pull" experiments. The aim of this work is to present the results and a preliminary interpretation of the field tests.

  3. Migration of fission products at the Nevada Test Site: Detection with an isotopic tracer

    SciTech Connect

    Thompton, J.L.; Gilmore, J.S. )

    1989-01-01

    Researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory are studying the migration of fission products away from explosion cavities formed by underground nuclear tests at the Nevada Test Site. In some cases, the isotopic composition of the fission products or activation products associated with a particular test are distinctive and we may identify them many years after the event. In this paper we describe a case in which we used rhodium isotopes to identify the source of radioactive material that had moved some 350 m from the explosion site. 4 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. A servo controlled gradient loading triaxial model test system for deep-buried cavern.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xu-guang; Zhang, Qiang-yong; Li, Shu-cai

    2015-10-01

    A servo controlled gradient loading model test system is developed to simulate the gradient geostress in deep-buried cavern. This system consists of the gradient loading apparatus, the digital servo control device, and the measurement system. Among them, the gradient loading apparatus is the main component which is used for exerting load onto the model. This loading apparatus is placed inside the counterforce wall/beam and is divided to several different loading zones, with each loading zone independently controlled. This design enables the gradient loading. Hence, the "real" geostress field surrounding the deep-buried cavern can be simulated. The loading or unloading process can be controlled by the human-computer interaction machines, i.e., the digital servo control system. It realizes the automation and visualization of model loading/unloading. In addition, this digital servo could control and regulate hydraulic loading instantaneously, which stabilizes the geostress onto the model over a long term. During the loading procedure, the collision between two adjacent loading platens is also eliminated by developing a guide frame. This collision phenomenon is induced by the volume shrinkage of the model when compressed in true 3D state. In addition, several accurate measurements, including the optical and grating-based method, are adopted to monitor the small deformation of the model. Hence, the distortion of the model could be accurately measured. In order to validate the performance of this innovative model test system, a 3D geomechanical test was conducted on a simulated deep-buried underground reservoir. The result shows that the radial convergence increases rapidly with the release of the stress in the reservoir. Moreover, the deformation increases with the increase of the gas production rate. This observation is consistence with field observation in petroleum engineering. The system is therefore capable of testing deep-buried engineering structures.

  5. A servo controlled gradient loading triaxial model test system for deep-buried cavern

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xu-guang; Zhang, Qiang-yong; Li, Shu-cai

    2015-10-15

    A servo controlled gradient loading model test system is developed to simulate the gradient geostress in deep-buried cavern. This system consists of the gradient loading apparatus, the digital servo control device, and the measurement system. Among them, the gradient loading apparatus is the main component which is used for exerting load onto the model. This loading apparatus is placed inside the counterforce wall/beam and is divided to several different loading zones, with each loading zone independently controlled. This design enables the gradient loading. Hence, the “real” geostress field surrounding the deep-buried cavern can be simulated. The loading or unloading process can be controlled by the human-computer interaction machines, i.e., the digital servo control system. It realizes the automation and visualization of model loading/unloading. In addition, this digital servo could control and regulate hydraulic loading instantaneously, which stabilizes the geostress onto the model over a long term. During the loading procedure, the collision between two adjacent loading platens is also eliminated by developing a guide frame. This collision phenomenon is induced by the volume shrinkage of the model when compressed in true 3D state. In addition, several accurate measurements, including the optical and grating-based method, are adopted to monitor the small deformation of the model. Hence, the distortion of the model could be accurately measured. In order to validate the performance of this innovative model test system, a 3D geomechanical test was conducted on a simulated deep-buried underground reservoir. The result shows that the radial convergence increases rapidly with the release of the stress in the reservoir. Moreover, the deformation increases with the increase of the gas production rate. This observation is consistence with field observation in petroleum engineering. The system is therefore capable of testing deep-buried engineering structures.

  6. A servo controlled gradient loading triaxial model test system for deep-buried cavern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xu-guang; Zhang, Qiang-yong; Li, Shu-cai

    2015-10-01

    A servo controlled gradient loading model test system is developed to simulate the gradient geostress in deep-buried cavern. This system consists of the gradient loading apparatus, the digital servo control device, and the measurement system. Among them, the gradient loading apparatus is the main component which is used for exerting load onto the model. This loading apparatus is placed inside the counterforce wall/beam and is divided to several different loading zones, with each loading zone independently controlled. This design enables the gradient loading. Hence, the "real" geostress field surrounding the deep-buried cavern can be simulated. The loading or unloading process can be controlled by the human-computer interaction machines, i.e., the digital servo control system. It realizes the automation and visualization of model loading/unloading. In addition, this digital servo could control and regulate hydraulic loading instantaneously, which stabilizes the geostress onto the model over a long term. During the loading procedure, the collision between two adjacent loading platens is also eliminated by developing a guide frame. This collision phenomenon is induced by the volume shrinkage of the model when compressed in true 3D state. In addition, several accurate measurements, including the optical and grating-based method, are adopted to monitor the small deformation of the model. Hence, the distortion of the model could be accurately measured. In order to validate the performance of this innovative model test system, a 3D geomechanical test was conducted on a simulated deep-buried underground reservoir. The result shows that the radial convergence increases rapidly with the release of the stress in the reservoir. Moreover, the deformation increases with the increase of the gas production rate. This observation is consistence with field observation in petroleum engineering. The system is therefore capable of testing deep-buried engineering structures.

  7. Cosmological constraints from the redshift dependence of the Alcock-Paczynski test: galaxy density gradient field

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xiao-Dong; Park, Changbom; Forero-Romero, J. E.; Kim, Juhan E-mail: cbp@kias.re.kr E-mail: kjhan@kias.re.kr

    2014-12-01

    We propose a method based on the redshift dependence of the Alcock-Paczynski (AP) test to measure the expansion history of the universe. It uses the isotropy of the galaxy density gradient field to constrain cosmological parameters. If the density parameter Ω {sub m} or the dark energy equation of state w are incorrectly chosen, the gradient field appears to be anisotropic with the degree of anisotropy varying with redshift. We use this effect to constrain the cosmological parameters governing the expansion history of the universe. Although redshift-space distortions (RSD) induced by galaxy peculiar velocities also produce anisotropies in the gradient field, these effects are close to uniform in magnitude over a large range of redshift. This makes the redshift variation of the gradient field anisotropy relatively insensitive to the RSD. By testing the method on mock surveys drawn from the Horizon Run 3 cosmological N-body simulations, we demonstrate that the cosmological parameters can be estimated without bias. Our method is complementary to the baryon acoustic oscillation or topology methods as it depends on D{sub AH} , the product of the angular diameter distance and the Hubble parameter.

  8. Testing the facilitation–competition paradigm under the stress-gradient hypothesis: decoupling multiple stress factors

    PubMed Central

    Kawai, Takashi; Tokeshi, Mutsunori

    2007-01-01

    While the facilitation–competition paradigm under the stress-gradient hypothesis has received recent attention, its rigorous testing is yet to be explored. Most of the studies have considered a switch in the net interactions from competition to facilitation with increasing environmental stress as primary evidence supporting the hypothesis, though few studies examined changes in interaction along a full range of a stress gradient. Here, we have conceptualized possible variations in the patterns of change in interaction strength along such gradient. Based on this, we empirically evaluated the temporal shift in the interaction between two marine sessile animals, goose barnacles (Capitulum mitella) and mussels (Septifer virgatus), under multiple stress factors. The net effect of goose barnacles on mussel survivorship was positively related to the total stress gradient encompassing two stress factors, physical disturbance and thermal stress, while no negative value occurred even under mild conditions. When the two stress factors were treated separately, however, the net effect demonstrated apparently different patterns: monotonic increase with physical disturbance versus a quasi-asymptotic pattern (no change over a wide range) with thermal stress. These variable situations have not previously been recognized in this discipline, and the present study emphasizes the importance of an integrative and mechanistic approach to testing and deciphering the facilitation–competition paradigm. PMID:17686725

  9. Implications of a Multi-well Tracer Test in the Transport of Pathogens at a Riverbank Filtration Experiment Site.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langford, R. P.; Pillai, S.; Schulze-Makuch, D.; Widmer, K.; Abdel-Fattah, A.; Lerhner, T.

    2003-12-01

    This study tracks the transport of bromide and microspheres mimicking pathogens in an arid environment. The study site uses the Rio Grande that experiences significant annual fluctuations in both water quantity and quality. The pumping well is 17 m from the stream bank and the water table was 2 m below the stream surface. The aquifer is medium and fine-grained sand comprising two flow units. Observation wells are screened over 1 or 1.5 m intervals. The average hydraulic conductivity was about 2 x 10-3 m/s based on a test analysis, however, the responses indicated that sediment heterogeneities affected the hydraulic behavior. A 427 hour tracer test using bromide and fluorescent microspheres provides initial results that are relevant to the transport of pathogens through the subsurface under riverbank filtration conditions. Bromide was injected into an observation well at the channel margin. Differently colored fluorescent microspheres (0.25nm, 1?m, 6?m and 10?m) were injected into the stream bottom and into two observation wells. Conclusions from the tracer test are: 1) Both bromide and microspheres continued to be observed throughout the 18 days of the experiment. 2) The bromide recovery in the pumping well and in the deeper observation wells showed early and late peaks with a long tails indicating that the geological medium at the field site behaves like a double-porosity medium allowing the tracer to move relatively quickly through the higher conductivity units while being significantly retarded in the low hydraulic conductivity units. 3) Some wells showed consistently higher concentrations of bromide. 4) The 1? micospheres were abundant in the observation wells and allowed tracing of flowpaths. These showed multiple peaks similar to the bromide results. This indicates highly preferential transport paths in the sediment. 5) Microspheres from the three injection sites had distinctly different transport paths and rates. 6) Both bromide and microspheres appeared in

  10. A new tracer-density criterion for heterogeneous porous media

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barth, G.R.; Illangasekare, T.H.; Hill, M.C.; Rajaram, H.

    2001-01-01

    Tracerexperiments provide information about aquifer material properties vital for accurate site characterization. Unfortunately, density-induced sinking can distort tracer movement, leading to an inaccurate assessment of material properties. Yet existing criteria for selecting appropriate tracer concentrations are based on analysis of homogeneous media instead of media with heterogeneities typical of field sites. This work introduces a hydraulic-gradient correction for heterogeneous media and applies it to a criterion previously used to indicate density-induced instabilities in homogeneous media. The modified criterion was tested using a series of two-dimensional heterogeneous intermediate-scale tracer experiments and data from several detailed field tracer tests. The intermediate-scale experimental facility (10.0 ?? 1.2 ?? 0.06 m) included both homogeneous and heterogeneous (??2/In ?? = 1.22) zones. The field tracer tests were less heterogeneous (0.24 < ??2/ln ?? < 0.37), but measurements were sufficient to detect density-induced sinking. Evaluation of the modified criterion using the experiments and field tests demonstrates that the new criterion appears to account for the change in density-induced sinking due to heterogeneity. The criterion demonstrates the importance of accounting for heterogeneity to predict density-induced sinking and differences in the onset of density induced sinking in two-and three-dimensional systems.

  11. Modified Whole Effluent Toxicity Test to Assess and Decouple Wastewater Effects from Environmental Gradients

    PubMed Central

    Sauco, Sebastián; Gómez, Julio; Barboza, Francisco R.; Lercari, Diego; Defeo, Omar

    2013-01-01

    Environmental gradients and wastewater discharges produce aggregated effects on marine populations, obscuring the detection of human impact. Classical assessment methods do not include environmental effects in toxicity tests designs, which could lead to incorrect conclusions. We proposed a modified Whole Effluent Toxicity test (mWET) that includes environmental gradients in addition to effluent dilutions, together with the application of Generalized Linear Mixed Models (GLMM) to assess and decouple those effects. We tested this approach, analyzing the lethal effects of wastewater on a marine sandy beach bivalve affected by an artificial canal freshwater discharge used for rice crops irrigation. To this end, we compared bivalve mortality between canal water dilutions (CWd) and salinity controls (SC: without canal water). CWd were prepared by diluting the water effluent (sampled during the pesticide application period) with artificial marine water. The salinity gradient was included in the design by achieving the same final salinities in both CWd and SC, allowing us to account for the effects of salinity by including this variable as a random factor in the GLMM. Our approach detected significantly higher mortalities in CWd, indicating potential toxic effects of the effluent discharge. mWET represents an improvement over the internationally standardized WET tests, since it considers environmental variability and uses appropriate statistical analyses. PMID:23755304

  12. Effects of non-linear partitioning behavior on NAPL characterization via partitioning tracer tests. Master`s thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzpatrick, E.A.

    1996-08-22

    This report focuses on the non-linearities involved between tracer/non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) pairs and their subsequent effects on subsurface contaminant characterization. Two computer models were utilized; one model predicted the extent of the non-linear behavior between selected tracer/NAPL pairs. The second model utilized Freundlich and linear isotherm data fits to the non-linearities and predicted effluent response curves based on model conditions. Accepted methods for NAPL quantification in the subsurface were applied to the linear and non-linear effluent response curves and the differences were compared. The analyzed tracers include methanol, 2-methyl-2-hexanol, and 3-methyl-2 -hexanol. Trichloroethylene (TCE) served as the NAPL for the computer simulations. The simulation results show that NAPL saturation calculations are systematically underestimated when linear tracer partitioning is assumed. The NAPL saturation was underestimated by as much as forty percent for the specific interactions and model conditions used during this investigation.

  13. First high gradient test results of a dressed 325 MHz superconducting single spoke resonator at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Webber, R.C.; Khabiboulline, T.; Madrak, R.; Nicol, T.; Ristori, L.; Soyars, W.; Wagner, R.; /Fermilab

    2010-09-01

    A new superconducting RF cavity test facility has been commissioned at Fermilab in conjunction with first tests of a 325 MHz, {beta} = 0.22 superconducting single-spoke cavity dressed with a helium jacket and prototype tuner. The facility is described and results of full gradient, CW cavity tests with a high Q{sub ext} drive coupler are reported. Sensitivities to Q disease and externally applied magnetic fields were investigated. Results are compared to bare cavity results obtained prior to hydrogen degassing and welding into the helium jacket.

  14. Temporal Changes in Education Gradients of ‘Preventable’ Mortality: A Test of Fundamental Cause Theory

    PubMed Central

    Masters, Ryan K.; Link, Bruce G.; Phelan, Jo C.

    2015-01-01

    Fundamental cause theory explains persisting associations between socioeconomic status and mortality in terms of personal resources such as knowledge, money, power, prestige, and social connections, as well as disparate social contexts related to these resources. We review evidence concerning fundamental cause theory and test three central claims using the National Health Interview Survey Linked Mortality Files 1986-2004. We then examine cohort-based variation in the associations between a fundamental social cause of disease, educational attainment, and mortality rates from heart disease, other “preventable” causes of death, and less preventable causes of death. We further explore race/ethnic and gender variation in these associations. Overall, findings are consistent with nearly all features of fundamental cause theory. Results show, first, larger education gradients in mortality risk for causes of death that are under greater human control than for less preventable causes of death, and, second, that these gradients grew more rapidly across successive cohorts than gradients for less preventable causes. Results also show that relative sizes and cohort-based changes in the education gradients vary substantially by race/ethnicity and gender. PMID:25556675

  15. Trends in education gradients of 'preventable' mortality: a test of fundamental cause theory.

    PubMed

    Masters, Ryan K; Link, Bruce G; Phelan, Jo C

    2015-02-01

    Fundamental cause theory explains persisting associations between socioeconomic status and mortality in terms of personal resources such as knowledge, money, power, prestige, and social connections, as well as disparate social contexts related to these resources. We review evidence concerning fundamental cause theory and test three central claims using the National Health Interview Survey Linked Mortality Files 1986-2004. We then examine cohort-based variation in the associations between a fundamental social cause of disease, educational attainment, and mortality rates from heart disease, other "preventable" causes of death, and less preventable causes of death. We further explore race/ethnic and gender variation in these associations. Overall, findings are consistent with nearly all features of fundamental cause theory. Results show, first, larger education gradients in mortality risk for causes of death that are under greater human control than for less preventable causes of death, and, second, that these gradients grew more rapidly across successive cohorts than gradients for less preventable causes. Results also show that relative sizes and cohort-based changes in the education gradients vary substantially by race/ethnicity and gender.

  16. Technological Issues and High Gradient Test Results on X-Band Molybdenum Accelerating Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Spataro, B.; Alesini, D.; Chimenti, V.; Dolgashev, V.; Haase, A.; Tantawi, S.G.; Higashi, Y.; Marrelli, C.; Mostacci, A.; Parodi, R.; Yeremian, A.D.; /SLAC

    2012-04-24

    Two 11.424 GHz single cell standing wave accelerating structures have been fabricated for high gradient RF breakdown studies. Both are brazed structures: one made from copper and the other from sintered molybdenum bulk. The tests results are presented and compared to those of similar devices constructed at SLAC (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center) and KEK (Ko Enerugi Kasokuki Kenkyu Kiko). The technological issues to build both sections are discussed.

  17. Technological issues and high gradient test results on X-band molybdenum accelerating structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spataro, B.; Alesini, D.; Chimenti, V.; Dolgashev, V.; Haase, A.; Tantawi, S. G.; Higashi, Y.; Marrelli, C.; Mostacci, A.; Parodi, R.; Yeremian, A. D.

    2011-11-01

    Two 11.424 GHz single cell standing wave accelerating structures have been fabricated for high gradient RF breakdown studies. Both are brazed structures: one made from copper and the other from sintered molybdenum bulk. The tests results are presented and compared to those of similar devices constructed at SLAC ( Stanford Linear Accelerator Center) and KEK ( Kō Enerugī Kasokuki Kenkyū Kikō). The technological issues to build both sections are discussed.

  18. Design and Testing of a Generalized Reduced Gradient Code for Nonlinear Optimization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-03-01

    Case of Nonlinear Constraints" in Optimization , R. Fletcher, Ed., Academic Press, 1969, pp. 37-47 3. J. Abadie, "Application of the GRG Algorithm to...139130 DESIGN AND TESTING OF A GENE .WLIZED REDUCED GRADIENT CODE U IFOR NONLINEAR OPTIMIZATION ) :I I J by Leon S. Lasdon Allan D.Waren Arvind Jain...Methods are algorithms for solving nonlinear programs of general structure. An earlier paper 1--’ discussed the basic principles of GRG and

  19. Tracer test modeling for characterizing heterogeneity and local scale residence time distribution in an artificial recharge site.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valhondo, Cristina; Martinez-Landa, Lurdes; Carrera, Jesús; Hidalgo, Juan J.; Ayora, Carlos

    2017-04-01

    Artificial recharge of aquifers (AR) is a standard technique to replenish and enhance groundwater resources, that have widely been used due to the increasing demand of quality water. AR through infiltration basins consists on infiltrate surface water, that might be affected in more or less degree by treatment plant effluents, runoff and others undesirables water sources, into an aquifer. The water quality enhances during the passage through the soil and organic matter, nutrients, organic contaminants, and bacteria are reduced mainly due to biodegradation and adsorption. Therefore, one of the goals of AR is to ensure a good quality status of the aquifer even if lesser quality water is used for recharge. Understand the behavior and transport of the potential contaminants is essential for an appropriate management of the artificial recharge system. The knowledge of the flux distribution around the recharge system and the relationship between the recharge system and the aquifer (area affected by the recharge, mixing ratios of recharged and native groundwater, travel times) is essential to achieve this goal. Evaluate the flux distribution is not always simple because the complexity and heterogeneity of natural systems. Indeed, it is not so much regulate by hydraulic conductivity of the different geological units as by their continuity and inter-connectivity particularly in the vertical direction. In summary for an appropriate management of an artificial recharge system it is needed to acknowledge the heterogeneity of the media. Aiming at characterizing the residence time distribution (RTDs) of a pilot artificial recharge system and the extent to which heterogeneity affects RTDs, we performed and evaluated a pulse injection tracer test. The artificial recharge system was simulated as a multilayer model which was used to evaluate the measured breakthrough curves at six monitoring points. Flow and transport parameters were calibrated under two hypotheses. The first

  20. Using tracers to understand the hydrology of an abandoned underground coal mine

    SciTech Connect

    Canty, G.A.; Everett, J.W.

    1998-12-31

    Flooded underground mines pose a difficult problem for remediation efforts requiring hydrologic information. Mine environments are hydraulically complicated due to sinuous travel paths and variable hydraulic gradients. For an acidic mine remediation project, conducted by the University of Oklahoma in conjunction with the Oklahoma Conservation Commission, a tracer study was undertaken to identify basic hydrologic properties of a flooded coal mine. The study was conducted to investigate the possibility of in-situ remediation of acidic mine water with the use of alkaline coal combustion by-products. Information on the rate of flow and ``connectiveness`` of injection wells with the discharge point was needed to develop a treatment strategy. Fluorescent dyes are not typically used in mine tracer studies because of the low pH values associated with certain mines and a tendency to adsorb ferric iron precipitates. However, Rhodamine WT was used in one tracer test because it can be detected at low concentrations. Due to poor recovery, a second tracer test was undertaken using a more conservative tracer-chloride. Each tracer produced similar travel time results. Findings from this study suggest that Rhodamine WT can be used under slightly acidic conditions, with mixed results. The more conservative tracer provided somewhat better results, but recovery was still poor. Use of these tracers has provided some valuable information with regard to mine hydrology, but additional questions have been raised.

  1. Quality assurance of the oceanographic tracers Technetium-99 and Antimony-125: Intercomparisons and recovery tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahlgaard, H.; Herrmann, J.; van Weers, A. W.; Masson, M.; Ibbett, R. D.; Chen, Q.

    1995-11-01

    Five large seawater samples and two samples of dried seaweed ( Fucus sp.) powder have been analyzed radiometrically for low concentrations of 99Tc by five European institutions. Some of the water samples were analyzed further for 125Sb. The overall standard deviation (SD) for 99Tc in the two seaweed samples was 8% and 5%, respectively. The consistency of the seawater results was correlated to the concentration levels. For concentrations > 1 Bq 99Tc m -3, the SD was better than 20%, whereas for the 0.5 Bq m -3 level, 50% SD was observed utilizing all data. It is recommended for future collaborative programmes utilizing 99Tc — and other radionuclides requiring rigorous radioanalytical procedures — that a large, homogeneous sample is identified at an early stage and random sub-samples taken at frequent intervals for intercalibration purposes throughout the period of study. Recovery tests performed at all five laboratories showed no systematic bias in the analysis of 99Tc.

  2. Push-pull tracer tests: Their information content and use for characterizing non-Fickian, mobile-immobile behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Scott K.; Berkowitz, Brian; Vesselinov, Velimir V.; O'Malley, Daniel; Karra, Satish

    2016-12-01

    Path reversibility and radial symmetry are often assumed in push-pull tracer test analysis. In reality, heterogeneous flow fields mean that both assumptions are idealizations. To understand their impact, we perform a parametric study which quantifies the scattering effects of ambient flow, local-scale dispersion, and velocity field heterogeneity on push-pull breakthrough curves and compares them to the effects of mobile-immobile mass transfer (MIMT) processes including sorption and diffusion into secondary porosity. We identify specific circumstances in which MIMT overwhelmingly determines the breakthrough curve, which may then be considered uninformative about drift and local-scale dispersion. Assuming path reversibility, we develop a continuous-time-random-walk-based interpretation framework which is flow-field-agnostic and well suited to quantifying MIMT. Adopting this perspective, we show that the radial flow assumption is often harmless: to the extent that solute paths are reversible, the breakthrough curve is uninformative about velocity field heterogeneity. Our interpretation method determines a mapping function (i.e., subordinator) from travel time in the absence of MIMT to travel time in its presence. A mathematical theory allowing this function to be directly "plugged into" an existing Laplace-domain transport model to incorporate MIMT is presented and demonstrated. Algorithms implementing the calibration are presented and applied to interpretation of data from a push-pull test performed in a heterogeneous environment. A successful four-parameter fit is obtained, of comparable fidelity to one obtained using a million-node 3-D numerical model. Finally, we demonstrate analytically and numerically how push-pull tests quantifying MIMT are sensitive to remobilization, but not immobilization, kinetics.

  3. Effect of tracer buoyancy on tracer experiments conducted in fractured crystalline bedrock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Matthew W.

    2003-02-01

    Tracer buoyancy has been shown to influence breakthrough from two-well tracer experiments conducted in porous media. Two-well tracer experiments are presented from fractured crystalline bedrock, in which the specific gravity of the tracer injectate varied from 1.0002 to 1.0133. Under the forced hydraulic conditions imposed, no difference in breakthrough was noted for the three experiments. These results show that even relatively dense tracer injectate solutions may have an insignificant effect on breakthrough when imposed gradients are sufficiently large.

  4. Deuterium stable isotope ratios as tracers of water resource use: an experimental test with rock doves.

    PubMed

    McKechnie, Andrew E; Wolf, Blair O; Martínez del Rio, Carlos

    2004-07-01

    Naturally-occurring deuterium stable isotope ratios can potentially be used to trace water resource use by animals, but estimating the contribution of isotopically distinct water sources requires the accurate prediction of isotopic discrimination factors between water inputs and an animal's body water pool. We examined the feasibility of using estimates of water fluxes between a bird and its environment with a mass-balance model for the deuterium stable isotope ratio of avian body water (deltaDbody) to predict isotopic discrimination factors. Apparent fractionation and thus discrimination factors were predicted to vary with the proportion of an animal's total water losses than could be attributed to evaporative processes. To test our ability to predict isotopic discrimination, we manipulated water intake and evaporative water loss in rock doves (Columba livia) by providing them with fresh water or 0.15 M NaCl solution in thermoneutral or hot environments. After we switched the birds from drinking water with deltaD=-95 per thousand VSMOW (Vienna Standard Mean Ocean Water) to enriched drinking water with deltaD=+52 per thousand VSMOW, steady-state deltaDbody was approached asymptotically. The equilibrium deltaDbody was enriched by 10-50 per thousand relative to water inputs. After isotopic equilibrium was reached, the degree of enrichment was positively related (r2=0.34) to the fraction of total water loss that occurred by evaporation (revap/rH2O)supporting the major prediction of the model. The variation we observed in discrimination factors suggests that the apparent fractionation of deuterium will be difficult to predict accurately under natural conditions. Our results show that accurate estimates of the contribution of different water sources to a bird's body water pool require large deuterium isotopic differences between the sources.

  5. LONG-TERM GRADIENT TEMPERATURE STRESS RELAXATION TESTING AND MODELING OF CERAMIC INSULATION MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect

    Hemrick, James Gordon; Lara-Curzio, Edgar; King, James

    2010-01-01

    Testing was carried out to characterize and predict the long-term thermomechanical properties of Thermal Ceramics Min-K 1400TE thermal insulation material, hereafter referred to as Min-K. In particular, the high temperature compressive strength and stress relaxation behavior of Min-K up to 900 C was evaluated under various thermal gradients and a helium atmosphere for test times of up to over two years. Additionally, finite element and mathematical models were formulated to predict the mechanical behavior exhibited by Min-K out to 35,000 hours (4 years) based on this testing. This presentation will discuss the design and construction of unique test equipment to carry out this testing, along with the results of the testing and the subsequent modeling.

  6. Expected fluid residence times, thermal breakthrough, and tracer test design for characterizing a hydrothermal system in the Upper Rhine Rift Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghergut, I.; Meixner, J.; Rettenmaier, D.; Maier, F.; Nottebohm, M.; Ptak, T.; Sauter, M.

    2012-04-01

    Relying on the structural-hydrogeological model proposed by J. Meixner (2009) for a particular hydrothermal system in South-West Germany (on the East side of the Upper Rhine Rift, this reservoir being used to demonstrate electricity production by means of a well doublet), we set up a distributed-parameter model (using Feflow) enabling to numerically simulate fluid ages, temperature evolutions and tracer test signals for a number of contrasting assumptions w. r. to (a) the nature of boundary conditions and hydrogeological characteristics of remotely situated, large-scale natural faults, (b) the degree of permeability contrast between different system compartments, (c) the hydrogeological characteristics of a naturally-occurring fault, located between injection and production wells. It appears that a spike dimensioning allowing for tracer signals to become detectable during the first three years after tracer injection in all of the contrasting a/b/c scenarios is not feasible in practice. In some of the a/b/c cases considered, the system will act like a very large reservoir, with fluid residence times in the order of decades, and extreme dilution of injected tracers. Even using preparative-scale cleaning of samples, brine separation, sample enrichment by solid phase extraction, evaporative concentrating etc. followed by state-of-the-art chromatography techniques to separate between tracer and natural background, it will not be possible to lower tracer detection limits below a certain threshold, which is mainly dictated by the amount of certain naturally-occurring aromatics in the reservoir fluids. On practical reasons, the spike dimensioning will be limited to some hundred kilogram of one or two organic tracers. This implies that part of the above-mentioned, contrasting a/b/c scenarios will remain indistinguishable during the first three years after tracer injection. However, for this reservoir structure, there is not a bijective correspondence between early

  7. High gradient test of the HINS SSR1 single spoke resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Gonin, I.; Khabibouline, T.; Lanfranco, G.; Mukherjee, A.; Ozelis, JH.; Ristori, L.; Sergatskov, A.; Wagner, R.; Webber, R.; /Fermilab

    2008-09-01

    Eighteen {beta} = 0.21 superconducting single spoke resonators comprise the first state in the cold section of the 8-GeV H{sup -} Linac for Fermilab's proposed Project X. After Buffered Chemical Polishing and High Pressure Rinse, one resonator has undergone high gradient RF testing at 2.0-4.5 K in the Vertical Test Stand at Fermilab. They present measurements of the surface resistance as a function of temperature and the quality factor as a function of accelerating field. The resonator reached an accelerating field of 18.0 MV/m.

  8. Coupled and uncoupled hydrogeophysical inversions using ensemble Kalman filter assimilation of ERT-monitored tracer test data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camporese, Matteo; Cassiani, Giorgio; Deiana, Rita; Salandin, Paolo; Binley, Andrew

    2015-05-01

    Recent advances in geophysical methods have been increasingly exploited as inverse modeling tools in groundwater hydrology. In particular, several attempts to constrain the hydrogeophysical inverse problem to reduce inversion errors have been made using time-lapse geophysical measurements through both coupled and uncoupled (also known as sequential) inversion approaches. Despite the appeal and popularity of coupled inversion approaches, their superiority over uncoupled methods has not been proved conclusively; the goal of this work is to provide an objective comparison between the two approaches within a specific inversion modeling framework based on the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF). Using EnKF and a model of Lagrangian transport, we compare the performance of a fully coupled and uncoupled inversion method for the reconstruction of heterogeneous saturated hydraulic conductivity fields through the assimilation of ERT-monitored tracer test data. The two inversion approaches are tested in a number of different scenarios, including isotropic and anisotropic synthetic aquifers, where we change the geostatistical parameters used to generate the prior ensemble of hydraulic conductivity fields. Our results show that the coupled approach outperforms the uncoupled when the prior statistics are close to the ones used to generate the true field. Otherwise, the coupled approach is heavily affected by "filter inbreeding" (an undesired effect of variance underestimation typical of EnKF), while the uncoupled approach is more robust, being able to correct biased prior information, thanks to its capability of capturing the solute travel times even in presence of inversion artifacts such as the violation of mass balance. Furthermore, the coupled approach is more computationally intensive than the uncoupled, due to the much larger number of forward runs required by the electrical model. Overall, we conclude that the relative merit of the coupled versus the uncoupled approach cannot

  9. Fluoride tracer test for the performance analysis of a basin used as a lagooning pre-treatment facility in a WTP.

    PubMed

    Ruffino, Barbara

    2015-07-01

    The water treatment plant (WTP) of the city of Torino (NW Italy), which treats about 40 · 10(6) m(3)/year of raw water from Po river, has a 15-ha basin used as a lagooning pre-treatment facility. Since the efficiency of the lagooning process in the removal of pollutants from raw water depends on the internal hydrodynamics of the basin, the hydraulic performance of the basin was studied by combining the results of a stimulus-response tracer test with the monitoring of the tracer (fluoride) concentration throughout the basin at different times. The outcomes of the test demonstrated that the system was efficiently mixed and could be assimilated to a continuous stirred reactor presenting no flow anomalies, with an actual mean residence time (RT) of 12.7 days, compared with a nominal RT of 18 days. This assured that dissolved contaminants (such as fluoride) coming from the river were efficiently diluted before entering the WTP. The axial dispersion coefficient calculated from the RT distribution was approximately 47,300 m(2)/day. Three of the most popular formulae developed for the calculation of the axial dispersion coefficient provided results spreading over three orders of magnitude, thus showing their limitations. Finally, because of the width extent of the basin and the characteristics of its inflow, the 1-D advection-dispersion model failed in predicting the tracer concentration values in time at the outlet channel. On the contrary, the analytical solution of the 2-D advection-dispersion model proved to be suitable to fit the tracer concentration data over time at the outlet channel but it failed in describing the tracer distribution throughout the basin on the monitoring dates.

  10. Test of simultaneous synthetic DNA tracer injections for the estimation of the englacial and subglacial drainage system structure of Storglaciären, northern Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahlke, H. E.; Leung, S.; Lyon, S. W.; Sharma, A. N.; Walter, M. T.; Williamson, A.

    2013-12-01

    Storglaciären glacier, located in the sub-arctic Tarfala catchment, in northern Sweden is one of the world's longest continuously monitored glaciers which provides a unique research platform for the long-term assessment of glacier and ice sheet processes. For example, small mountain glacier hydrological knowledge of the subglacial water distribution at the ice-bed interface has been applied to ice sheets to predict basal sliding processes. Basal sliding promoted by hydraulic jacking is an important glacial-velocity control that is dependent on the subglacial flow pathways' morphology. Thus, understanding subglacial water distribution and drainage system structure and morphology is crucial for modeling ice masses' flow. In order to estimate subglacial drainage system structure and morphology dye tracing experiments are widely employed. Tracer experiments provide quantitative parameters for any input location including tracer transit velocity, dispersivity, recovery and storage. However, spatial data coverage is limited by the finite number of tracers available for simultaneous tracing. In the presented study we test the use of synthetic DNA tracers for the assessment of the englacial and subglacial drainage system structure of Storglaciären. The synthetic DNA tracer is composed of polylactic acid (PLA) microspheres into which short strands of synthetic DNA and paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles are incorporated (Sharma et al., 2012, Environmental Science & Technology). Because the DNA sequences can be randomly combined the synthetic DNA tracer provides an enormous number of unique tracers (approximately 1.61 x 1060). Thus, these synthetic tracers have the advantage that multiple (>10) experiments can be conducted simultaneously, allowing a greater information gain within a shorter measurement period. Quantities of a certain DNA strand can be detected using biotechnology tools such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and quantitative PCR (qPCR). During the 2013

  11. Evaluation of the heat-storage capability of shallow aquifers using active heat tracer tests and Fiber-Optics Distributed-Temperature-Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suibert Oskar Seibertz, Klodwig; Chirila, Marian Andrei; Bumberger, Jan; Dietrich, Peter; Vienken, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    In the course of the energy transition, geothermal energy storage and heat generation and cooling have proven to be environmental friendly alternatives to conventional energy. However, to ensure sustain usage, the heat transport behavior of aquifers and its distribution has to be studied. A tool to achieve this is the active heat tracer test, eg. Leaf et al. (2012). If active heat tracer tests are combined with in aquifer heat testing via electric heating-cables, eg. Liu et al. (2013), it is possible to observe heat transport and temperature signal decay without disturbing the original pressure field within the aquifer. In this field study a two channel High-Resolution-Fiber-Optic-Distributed-Temperature-Sensing and Pt100 were used to measure temperature signals within in two wells of 1.4 m distance, where the temperature difference was generated using a self regulating heating cable in the upstream well. High resolution Distributed-Temperature-Sensing measurements were achieved by coiling the fiber around screened plastic tubes. The upstream well was also used to observe heating (Δ Tmax approx. 24K) and temperature signal decay, while the downstream well was used to observe heat transport between both wells. The data was analyzed and compared to thermal conductivity of soil samples and Direct-Push (DP) Electrical-Conductivity-Logging and DP Hydraulic-Profiling results. The results show good agreement between DP data and temperature measurements proving the active heat tracer test is a suitable tool for providing reliable information on aquifer heat-storage capability. References Leaf, A.T., Hart, D.J., Bahr, J.M.: Active Thermal Tracer Tests for Improved Hydrostratigraphic Characterization. Ground Water, vol. 50, 2012 Liu, G., Knobbe, S., Butler, J.J.Jr.: Resolving centimeter-scale flows in aquifers and their hydrostratigraphic controls. Geophysical Research Letters, vol. 40, 2013

  12. Hydrogeology and results of tracer tests at the old Tampa well field in Hillsborough County, with implications for wellhead-protection strategies in west-central Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, J.L.

    1995-01-01

    Wellhead-protection strategies were evaluated for the Upper Floridan aquifer of west-central Florida using the old Tampa well field in northeastern Hillsborough County, Florida, as a test site. The upper 400 feet of the Upper Floridan aquifer responded to pumping as an equivalent, porous medium for a range of discharge rates from 450 to 1,000 gallons per minute. Transmissivity and storage coefficient values determined for the Upper Floridan aquifer were 23,000 feet squared per day and 0.0001, respectively. Rock cores from the Upper Floridan aquifer have effective porosity values from 21 to 46 percent. Tracer tests were conducted using a fluorescent dye. A bimodal distribution of tracer arrival times indicates ground-water flow through a dual porosity system. Analysis of tracer test results an effective porosity of 25 percent and a longitudinal dispersivity of 1.3 feet for the aquifer matrix. A numerical aquifer-simulation equivalent porous media model of the Upper Floridan aquifer was calibrated using results of aquifer tests. A particle-tracking program was used to simulate the matrix flow groundwater travel time measured with the fluorescent dye tracer test. An evaluation of wellhead-protection strategies was conducted using the particle-tracking program to simulate areas of contribution from the aquifer matrix. The results of this study demonstrate the heterogeneity of the Upper Floridan aquifer. Because of this heterogeneity, the use of uniform porosity models to delineate time-related areas of wellhead protection in the karst Upper Floridan aquifer is inappropriate; however, ground-water movement in the aquifer matrix can be simulated with uniform porosity models.

  13. Multispecies reactive tracer test in an aquifer with spatially variable chemical conditions, Cape Cod, Massachusetts: Dispersive transport of bromide and nickel

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hess, K.M.; Davis, J.A.; Kent, D.B.; Coston, J.A.

    2002-01-01

    Dispersive transport of groundwater solutes was investigated as part of a multispecies reactive tracer test conducted under spatially variable chemical conditions in an unconfined, sewage-contaminated sand and gravel aquifer on Cape Cod, Massachusetts. Transport of the nonreactive tracer bromide (Br) reflected physical and hydrologic processes. Transport of the reactive tracer nickel (Ni) complexed with an organic ligand (NiEDTA) varied in response to pH and other chemical conditions within the aquifer. A loss of about 14% of the Ni mass was calculated from the distribution of tracers through time. This loss is consistent with reversible adsorption of NiEDTA onto the iron and aluminum oxyhydroxide coatings on the aquifer sediments. The Ni consistently lagged behind Br with a calculated retardation coefficient of 1.2. Longitudinal dispersivities reached constant values of 2.2 and 1.1 m for Br and Ni, respectively, by at least 69 m of travel. The smaller dispersivity for Ni possibly was due to nonlinear or spatially variant adsorption of NiEDTA. In the upper, uncontaminated zone of the aquifer, longitudinal dispersion of Ni was greater than that of Br early in the test as a result of reversible adsorption of NiEDTA. In general, transverse dispersivities were much smaller (horizontal: 1.4-1.5 ?? 10-2 m; vertical: 0.5-3.8 ?? 10-3 m) than the longitudinal dispersivities. The Br results are similar to those from a test conducted eight years earlier, suggesting that transport parameters are spatially stationary within the aquifer at the scale of 300 m covered by the spatially overlapping tests. A significant difference between the two tests was the travel distance (69 and 26 m) needed to reach a constant longitudinal dispersivity.

  14. Multispecies reactive tracer test in an aquifer with spatially variable chemical conditions, Cape Cod, Massachusetts: Dispersive transport of bromide and nickel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, Kathryn M.; Davis, James A.; Kent, Douglas B.; Coston, Jennifer A.

    2002-08-01

    Dispersive transport of groundwater solutes was investigated as part of a multispecies reactive tracer test conducted under spatially variable chemical conditions in an unconfined, sewage-contaminated sand and gravel aquifer on Cape Cod, Massachusetts. Transport of the nonreactive tracer bromide (Br) reflected physical and hydrologic processes. Transport of the reactive tracer nickel (Ni) complexed with an organic ligand (NiEDTA) varied in response to pH and other chemical conditions within the aquifer. A loss of about 14% of the Ni mass was calculated from the distribution of tracers through time. This loss is consistent with reversible adsorption of NiEDTA onto the iron and aluminum oxyhydroxide coatings on the aquifer sediments. The Ni consistently lagged behind Br with a calculated retardation coefficient of 1.2. Longitudinal dispersivities reached constant values of 2.2 and 1.1 m for Br and Ni, respectively, by at least 69 m of travel. The smaller dispersivity for Ni possibly was due to nonlinear or spatially variant adsorption of NiEDTA. In the upper, uncontaminated zone of the aquifer, longitudinal dispersion of Ni was greater than that of Br early in the test as a result of reversible adsorption of NiEDTA. In general, transverse dispersivities were much smaller (horizontal: 1.4-1.5 × 10-2 m; vertical: 0.5-3.8 × 10-3 m) than the longitudinal dispersivities. The Br results are similar to those from a test conducted eight years earlier, suggesting that transport parameters are spatially stationary within the aquifer at the scale of 300 m covered by the spatially overlapping tests. A significant difference between the two tests was the travel distance (69 and 26 m) needed to reach a constant longitudinal dispersivity.

  15. Application of the re-circulating tracer well test method to determine nitrate reaction rates in shallow unconfined aquifers.

    PubMed

    Burbery, Lee F; Flintoft, Mark J; Close, Murray E

    2013-02-01

    Five re-circulating tracer well tests (RCTWTs) have been conducted in a variety of aquifer settings, at four sites across New Zealand. The tests constitute the first practical assessment of the two-well RCTWT methodology described by Burbery and Wang (Journal of Hydrology, 2010; 382:163-173) and were aimed at evaluating nitrate reaction rates in situ. The performance of the RCTWTs differed significantly at the different sites. The RCTWT method performed well when it was applied to determine potential nitrate reaction rates in anoxic, electro-chemically reductive, nitrate-free aquifers of volcanic lithology, on the North Island, New Zealand. Regional groundwater flow was not fast-flowing in this setting. An effective first-order nitrate reaction rate in the region of 0.09 d(-1) to 0.26 d(-1) was determined from two RCTWTs applied at one site where a reaction rate of 0.37 d(-1) had previously been estimated from a push-pull test. The RCTWT method performed poorly, however, in a fast-flowing, nitrate-impacted fluvio-glacial gravel aquifer that was examined on the South Island, New Zealand. This setting was more akin to the hypothetical physiochemical problem described by Burbery and Wang (2010). Although aerobic conditions were identified as the primary reason for failure to measure any nitrate reaction in the gravel aquifer, failure to establish significant interflow in the re-circulation cell due to the heterogeneous nature of the aquifer structure, and natural variability exhibited in nitrate contaminant levels of the ambient groundwater further contributed to the poor performance of the test. Our findings suggest that in practice, environmental conditions are more complex than assumed by the RCTWT methodology, which compromises the practicability of the method as one for determining attenuation rates in groundwater based on tracing ambient contaminant levels. Although limited, there appears to be a scope for RCTWTs to provide useful information on potential

  16. Cyclic Failure Mechanisms of Thermal and Environmental Barrier Coating Systems Under Thermal Gradient Test Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Lee, Kang N.; Miller, Robert A.

    2002-01-01

    Plasma-sprayed ZrO2-8wt%Y2O3 and mullite+BSAS/Si multilayer thermal and environmental barrier coating (TBC-EBC) systems on SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composite (CMC) substrates were thermally cyclic tested under high thermal gradients using a laser high-heat-flux rig in conjunction with furnace exposure in water-vapor environments. Coating sintering and interface damage were assessed by monitoring the real-time thermal conductivity changes during the laser heat-flux tests and by examining the microstructural changes after exposure. Sintering kinetics of the coating systems were also independently characterized using a dilatometer. It was found that the coating failure involved both the time-temperature dependent sintering and the cycle frequency dependent cyclic fatigue processes. The water vapor environments not only facilitated the initial coating conductivity increases due to enhanced sintering and interface reaction, but also promoted later conductivity reductions due to the accelerated coating cracking and delamination. The failure mechanisms of the coating systems are also discussed based on the cyclic test results and are correlated to the sintering and thermal stress behavior under the thermal gradient test conditions.

  17. Design of a tracer test experience and dynamic calibration of the hydraulic model for a full-scale wastewater treatment plant by use of AQUASIM.

    PubMed

    Fall, C; Loaiza-Navia, J L

    2007-08-01

    The setup of the hydraulic model structure of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) is an important step in the calibration of activated sludge models. The hydrodynamics of a full-scale municipal WWTP (Monterrey, Mexico) has been studied by means of the use of tracer tests and of a commercial simulator. A presimulation approach allowed the authors to quantify the appropriate rhodamine mass, set up a sampling plan, and evaluate the anticipated visual effect of the tracer test in the receiving river. The hydraulic behavior of the aeration tank for the first treatment line, a 7-cell plug-flow reactor, was shown to be best represented by 5 virtual mixed-tanks-in-series. The second treatment line, which included a vertical loop reactor (VLR), was best modeled as 3 tanks-in-series. The VLR, alone, was shown to be similar to a continuously stirred tank reactor, and not a circuit of tanks, as generally used to represent oxidation ditch reactors.

  18. Ellenberg's water table experiment put to the test: species optima along a hydrological gradient.

    PubMed

    Bartelheimer, Maik; Poschlod, Peter

    2016-08-01

    An important aspect of niche theory is the position of species' optima along ecological gradients. It is widely believed that a species' ecological optimum takes its shape only under competitive pressure. The ecological optimum, therefore, is thought to differ from the physiological optimum in the absence of interspecific competition. Ellenberg's Hohenheim water table experiment has been very influential in this context. However, the water table gradient in Ellenberg's experiment was produced by varying the soil thickness above the water table, which confounded the potentially disparate impacts of water table depth (WTD) and soil depth on species growth. Accordingly, here we have re-evaluated Ellenberg's work. Specifically, we tested the hypothesis that physiological and ecological optima are identical and unaffected by interspecific interaction. We used the same six grasses as in Ellenberg's experiments, but in our mesocosms, WTD was varied but soil depth kept constant. The design included both an additive component (with/without plant interaction) and a substitutive component (monocultures vs. species mixtures). The results show that the physiological optima along the hydrological gradient varied greatly between species, even in the absence of interspecific interaction. Within species, however, physiological and ecological optima appeared identical in most cases, irrespective of the competition treatment. We conclude that the 'physiological capacity' of species largely determines where they are able to persist and that any impact of interspecific interaction is only marginal. These findings are at variance with Ellenberg's rule, where competition is considered to shift the distribution of a species away from its physiological optimum.

  19. Tracer Tests in a Fractured Dolomite: 3. Analysis of Mass Transfer in Single-Well Injection-Withdrawal Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Haggerty, R.; Fleming, S.W.; Meigs, L.C.; McKenna, S.A.

    1999-03-04

    We investigated multiple-rate diffusion as a possible explanation for observed behavior in a suite of single-well injection-withdrawal (SWIW) tests conducted in a fractured dolomite. We first investigated the ability of a conventional double-porosity model and a multirate diffusion model to explain the data. This revealed that the multirate diffusion hypothesis/model is most consistent with all available data, and is the only model to date that is capable of matching each of the recovery curves entirely. Second, we studied the sensitivity of the SWIW recovery curves to the distribution of diffusion rate coefficients and other parameters. We concluded that the SWIW test is very sensitive to the distribution of rate coefficients, but is relatively insensitive to other flow and transport parameters such as advective porosity and dispersivity. Third, we examined the significance of the constant double-log late-time slopes ({minus}2. 1 to {minus}2.8), which are present in several data sets. The observed late-time slopes are significantly different than would be predicted by either conventional double-porosity or single-porosity media, and are found to be a distinctive feature of multirate diffusion under SWIW test conditions. Fourth, we found that the estimated distributions of diffusion rate coefficients are very broad, with the distributions spanning a range of at least 3.6 to 5.7 orders of magnitude.

  20. Impact of non-idealities in gas-tracer tests on the estimation of reaeration, respiration, and photosynthesis rates in streams.

    PubMed

    Knapp, Julia L A; Osenbrück, Karsten; Cirpka, Olaf A

    2015-10-15

    Estimating respiration and photosynthesis rates in streams usually requires good knowledge of reaeration at the given locations. For this purpose, gas-tracer tests can be conducted, and reaeration rate coefficients are determined from the decrease in gas concentration along the river stretch. The typical procedure for analysis of such tests is based on simplifying assumptions, as it neglects dispersion altogether and does not consider possible fluctuations and trends in the input signal. We mathematically derive the influence of these non-idealities on estimated reaeration rates and how they are propagated onto the evaluation of aerobic respiration and photosynthesis rates from oxygen monitoring. We apply the approach to field data obtained from a gas-tracer test using propane in a second-order stream in Southwest Germany. We calculate the reaeration rate coefficients accounting for dispersion as well as trends and uncertainty in the input signals and compare them to the standard approach. We show that neglecting dispersion significantly underestimates reaeration, and results between sections cannot be compared if trends in the input signal of the gas tracer are disregarded. Using time series of dissolved oxygen and the various estimates of reaeration, we infer respiration and photosynthesis rates for the same stream section, demonstrating that the bias and uncertainty of reaeration using the different approaches significantly affects the calculation of metabolic rates.

  1. Analysis of tracer and thermal transients during reinjection

    SciTech Connect

    Kocabas, I.

    1989-10-01

    This work studied tracer and thermal transients during reinjection in geothermal reserviors and developed a new technique which combines the results from interwell tracer tests and thermal injection-backflow tests to estimate the thermal breakthrough times. Tracer tests are essential to determine the degree of connectivity between the injection wells and the producing wells. To analyze the tracer return profiles quantitatively, we employed three mathematical models namely, the convection-dispersion (CD) model, matrix diffusion (MD) model, and the Avodnin (AD) model, which were developed to study tracer and heat transport in a single vertical fracture. We considered three types of tracer tests namely, interwell tracer tests without recirculation, interwell tracer tests with recirculation, and injection-backflow tracer tests. To estimate the model parameters, we used a nonlinear regression program to match tracer return profiles to the solutions.

  2. Single-well tracer test sensitivity w. r. to hydrofrac and matrix parameters (case study for the Horstberg site in the N-German Sedimentary Basin)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghergut, I.; Behrens, H.; Holzbecher, E.; Jung, R.; Sauter, M.; Tischner, T.

    2012-04-01

    At the geothermal pilot site Horstberg in the N-German Sedimentary Basin, a complex field experiment program was conducted (2003-2007) by the Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources (BGR) together with the Leibniz Institute for Applied Geosciences (GGA), aimed at evaluating the performance of innovative technologies for heat extraction, for direct use, from a single geothermal well[1],[2]. The envisaged single-well operation schemes comprised inter-layer circulation through a large-area hydrofrac (whose successful creation could thus be demonstrated), and single-screen 'huff-puff' in suitable (stimulated) layers, seated in sandstone-claystone formations in 3-4 km depth, with temperatures exceeding 160 ° C. Relying on Horstberg tracer-test data, we analyze heat and solute tracer transport in three characteristic hydraulic settings: (A) single-screen, multi-layer push-pull, with spiking and sampling at lower well-screen in low-permeability sandstone layer ('Detfurth'), from which hydrofrac propagation (through several adjacent layers) was initiated; (B) single-screen, single-layer push-pull, with spiking and sampling at upper well-screen within a more permeable sandstone layer ('Solling'); (C) inter-layer vertical push through above-mentioned hydrofrac, with spiking at well-screen of A, and sampling at well-screen of B. Owing to drill-hole deviation, the hydraulically-induced frac will, in its vertical propagation, reach the upper sandstone layer in a certain horizontal distance X from the upper well-screen, whose value turns out to be the major controlling parameter for the system's thermal lifetime under operation scheme C (values of X below ~8 m leading to premature thermal breakthrough, with the minimum-target rate of fluid turnover; however, the injection pressure required for maintaining the target outflow rate will also increase with X, which renders scheme C uneconomical, or technically-infeasible, when X exceeds ~15 m). Tracer signals in C

  3. Using a Gas-Phase Tracer Test to Characterize the Impact of Landfill Gas Generation on Advective-Dispersive Transport of VOCs in the Vadose Zone

    PubMed Central

    Monger, Gregg R.; Duncan, Candice Morrison; Brusseau, Mark L.

    2015-01-01

    A gas-phase tracer test (GTT) was conducted at a landfill in Tucson, AZ, to help elucidate the impact of landfill gas generation on the transport and fate of chlorinated aliphatic volatile organic contaminants (VOCs). Sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) was used as the non-reactive gas tracer. Gas samples were collected from a multiport monitoring well located 15.2 m from the injection well, and analyzed for SF6, CH4, CO2, and VOCs. The travel times determined for SF6 from the tracer test are approximately two to ten times smaller than estimated travel times that incorporate transport by only gas-phase diffusion. In addition, significant concentrations of CH4 and CO2 were measured, indicating production of landfill gas. Based on these results, it is hypothesized that the enhanced rates of transport observed for SF6 are caused by advective transport associated with landfill gas generation. The rates of transport varied vertically, which is attributed to multiple factors including spatial variability of water content, refuse mass, refuse permeability, and gas generation. PMID:26380532

  4. Using a Gas-Phase Tracer Test to Characterize the Impact of Landfill Gas Generation on Advective-Dispersive Transport of VOCs in the Vadose Zone.

    PubMed

    Monger, Gregg R; Duncan, Candice Morrison; Brusseau, Mark L

    2014-12-01

    A gas-phase tracer test (GTT) was conducted at a landfill in Tucson, AZ, to help elucidate the impact of landfill gas generation on the transport and fate of chlorinated aliphatic volatile organic contaminants (VOCs). Sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) was used as the non-reactive gas tracer. Gas samples were collected from a multiport monitoring well located 15.2 m from the injection well, and analyzed for SF6, CH4, CO2, and VOCs. The travel times determined for SF6 from the tracer test are approximately two to ten times smaller than estimated travel times that incorporate transport by only gas-phase diffusion. In addition, significant concentrations of CH4 and CO2 were measured, indicating production of landfill gas. Based on these results, it is hypothesized that the enhanced rates of transport observed for SF6 are caused by advective transport associated with landfill gas generation. The rates of transport varied vertically, which is attributed to multiple factors including spatial variability of water content, refuse mass, refuse permeability, and gas generation.

  5. Towards Truly Quiet MRI: animal MRI magnetic field gradients as a test platform for acoustic noise reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edelstein, William; El-Sharkawy, Abdel-Monem

    2013-03-01

    Clinical MRI acoustic noise, often substantially exceeding 100 dB, causes patient anxiety and discomfort and interferes with functional MRI (fMRI) and interventional MRI. MRI acoustic noise reduction is a long-standing and difficult technical challenge. The noise is basically caused by large Lorentz forces on gradient windings--surrounding the patient bore--situated in strong magnetic fields (1.5 T, 3 T or higher). Pulsed currents of 300 A or more are switched through the gradient windings in sub-milliseconds. Experimenting with hardware noise reduction on clinical scanners is difficult and expensive because of the large scale and weight of clinical scanner components (gradient windings ~ 1000 kg) that require special handling equipment in large engineering test facilities. Our approach is to produce a Truly Quiet (<70 dB) small-scale animal imager. Results serve as a test platform for acoustic noise reduction measures that can be implemented in clinical scanners. We have so far decreased noise in an animal scale imager from 108 dB to 71 dB, a 37 dB reduction. Our noise reduction measures include: a gradient container that can be evacuated; inflatable antivibration mounts to prevent transmission of vibrations from gradient winding to gradient container; vibration damping of wires going from gradient to the outside world via the gradient container; and a copper passive shield to prevent the generation of eddy currents in the metal cryostat inner bore, which in turn can vibrate and produce noise.

  6. Simulation of variable-density flow and transport of reactive and nonreactive solutes during a tracer test at Cape Cod, Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhang, H.; Schwartz, F.W.; Wood, W.W.; Garabedian, S.P.; LeBlanc, D.R.

    1998-01-01

    A multispecies numerical code was developed to simulate flow and mass transport with kinetic adsorption in variable-density flow systems. The two-dimensional code simulated the transport of bromide (Br-), a nonreactive tracer, and lithium (Li+), a reactive tracer, in a large-scale tracer test performed in a sand-and-gravel aquifer at Cape Cod, Massachusetts. A two-fraction kinetic adsorption model was implemented to simulate the interaction of Li+ with the aquifer solids. Initial estimates for some of the transport parameters were obtained from a nonlinear least squares curve-fitting procedure, where the breakthrough curves from column experiments were matched with one-dimensional theoretical models. The numerical code successfully simulated the basic characteristics of the two plumes in the tracer test. At early times the centers of mass of Br- and Li+ sank because the two plumes were closely coupled to the density-driven velocity field. At later times the rate of downward movement in the Br- plume due to gravity slowed significantly because of dilution by dispersion. The downward movement of the Li+ plume was negligible because the two plumes moved in locally different velocity regimes, where Li+ transport was retarded relative to Br-. The maximum extent of downward transport of the Li+ plume was less than that of the Br- plume. This study also found that at early times the downward movement of a plume created by a three-dimensional source could he much more extensive than the case with a two-dimensional source having the same cross-sectional area. The observed shape of the Br- plume at Cape Cod was simulated by adding two layers with different hydraulic conductivities at shallow depth across the region. The large dispersion and asymmetrical shape of the Li+ plume were simulated by including kinetic adsorption-desorption reactions.

  7. Simulation of variable-density flow and transport of reactive and nonreactive solutes during a tracer test at Cape Cod, Massachusetts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hubao; Schwartz, Frank W.; Wood, Warren W.; Garabedian, S. P.; LeBlanc, D. R.

    1998-01-01

    A multispecies numerical code was developed to simulate flow and mass transport with kinetic adsorption in variable-density flow systems. The two-dimensional code simulated the transport of bromide (Br-), a nonreactive tracer, and lithium (Li+), a reactive tracer, in a large-scale tracer test performed in a sand-and-gravel aquifer at Cape Cod, Massachusetts. A two-fraction kinetic adsorption model was implemented to simulate the interaction of Li+ with the aquifer solids. Initial estimates for some of the transport parameters were obtained from a nonlinear least squares curve-fitting procedure, where the breakthrough curves from column experiments were matched with one-dimensional theoretical models. The numerical code successfully simulated the basic characteristics of the two plumes in the tracer test. At early times the centers of mass of Br- and Li+ sank because the two plumes were closely coupled to the density-driven velocity field. At later times the rate of downward movement in the Br- plume due to gravity slowed significantly because of dilution by dispersion. The downward movement of the Li+ plume was negligible because the two plumes moved in locally different velocity regimes, where Li+ transport was retarded relative to Br-. The maximum extent of downward transport of the Li+ plume was less than that of the Br- plume. This study also found that at early times the downward movement of a plume created by a three-dimensional source could be much more extensive than the case with a two-dimensional source having the same cross-sectional area. The observed shape of the Br- plume at Cape Cod was simulated by adding two layers with different hydraulic conductivities at shallow depth across the region. The large dispersion and asymmetrical shape of the Li+ plume were simulated by including kinetic adsorption-desorption reactions.

  8. Lagrangian velocities evolution in steady Darcian flow, the impact on solute dispersion and an application to the MADE tracer test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakoun, Vivien; Comolli, Alessandro; Dentz, Marco

    2017-04-01

    parameterized in terms of the Eulerian velocity statistics and the conductivity distribution. The CTRW approach is then used for the intepretation of dispersion data of the MADE tracer test, based on a geostatistical characterization of the medium. Reference: Dentz, M., Kang, P. K., Comolli, A., Le Borgne, T., & Lester, D. R. (2016). Continuous time random walks for the evolution of Lagrangian velocities. Physical Review Fluids, 1(7), 074004.

  9. Analysis of Conservative Tracer Tests in the Bullfrog, Tram, and Prow Pass Tuffs, 1996 to 1998, Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Umari, Amjad; Fahy, Michael F.; Earle, John D.; Tucci, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the potential for transport of radionuclides in ground water from the proposed high-level nuclear-waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, conservative (nonsorbing) tracer tests were conducted among three boreholes, known as the C-hole Complex, and values for transport (or flow) porosity, storage (or matrix) porosity, longitudinal dispersivity, and the extent of matrix diffusion were obtained. The C-holes are completed in a sequence of Miocene tuffaceous rock, consisting of nonwelded to densely welded ash-flow tuff with intervals of ash-fall tuff and volcaniclastic rocks, covered by Quaternary alluvium. The lower part of the tuffaceous-rock sequence includes the Prow Pass, Bullfrog, and Tram Tuffs of the Crater Flat Group. The rocks are pervaded by tectonic and cooling fractures. Paleozoic limestone and dolomite underlie the tuffaceous rocks. Four radially convergent and one partially recirculating conservative (nonsorbing) tracer tests were conducted at the C-hole Complex from 1996 to 1998 to establish values for flow porosity, storage porosity, longitudinal dispersivity, and extent of matrix diffusion in the Bullfrog and Tram Tuffs and the Prow Pass Tuff. Tracer tests included (1) injection of iodide into the combined Bullfrog-Tram interval; (2) injection of 2,6 difluorobenzoic acid into the Lower Bullfrog interval; (3) injection of 3-carbamoyl-2-pyridone into the Lower Bullfrog interval; and (4) injection of iodide and 2,4,5 trifluorobenzoic acid, followed by 2,3,4,5 tetrafluorobenzoic acid, into the Prow Pass Tuff. All tracer tests were analyzed by the Moench single- and dual-porosity analytical solutions to the advection-dispersion equation or by superposition of these solutions. Nonlinear regression techniques were used to corroborate tracer solution results, to obtain optimal parameter values from the solutions, and to quantify parameter uncertainty resulting from analyzing two of the three radially convergent conservative tracer tests

  10. Testing the performance of a cryogenic visualization system on thermal counterflow by using hydrogen and deuterium solid tracers.

    PubMed

    La Mantia, M; Chagovets, T V; Rotter, M; Skrbek, L

    2012-05-01

    An experimental apparatus has been designed to analyze by visualization cryogenic flows of liquid (4)He and consequently address unresolved problems of quantum turbulence. The newly implemented flow visualization setup is described and its specific features discussed. Thermal counterflow experiments have been performed and the motion of solid hydrogen and deuterium tracers studied by using the particle tracking velocimetry technique in order to probe the system capabilities. It is shown that the obtained results are consistent with the two-fluid model describing the behavior of superfluid (4)He. A number of technical and fundamental issues, such as particles' aggregation, role of rotating particles in counterflow and evidence of non-Gaussian distribution of tracers' velocities, are also discussed. The apparatus appears to be well-suited to the task of analyzing cryogenic flows and potentially capable of obtaining new results stimulating further understanding of the underlying physics.

  11. Accounting for Dispersion and time-dependent Input Signals during Gas Tracer Tests and their Effect on the Estimation of Reaeration, Respiration and Photosynthesis in Streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapp, Julia; Osenbrück, Karsten; Olaf, Cirpka

    2015-04-01

    The variation of dissolved oxygen (DO) in streams, are caused by a number of processes, of which respiration and primary production are considered to be the most important ones (Odum, 1956; Staehr et al., 2012). Measuring respiration and photosynthesis rates in streams based on recorded time series of DO requires good knowledge on the reaeration fluxes at the given locations. For this, gas tracer tests can be conducted, and reaeration coefficients determined from the observed decrease in gas concentration along the stretch (Genereux and Hemond, 1990): ( ) --1- -cup- k2 = t2 - t1 ln Rcdown (1) with the gas concentrations measured at an upstream location, cup[ML-3], and a downstream location, cdown. t1[T] andt2 [T] denote the measurement times at the two locations and R [-] represents the recovery rate which can also be obtained from conservative tracer data. The typical procedure for analysis, however, contains a number of assumptions, as it neglects dispersion and does not take into account possible fluctuations of the input signal. We derive the influence of these aspects mathematically and illustrate them on the basis of field data obtained from a propane gas tracer test. For this, we compare the reaeration coefficients obtained from approaches with dispersion and/or a time-dependent input signals to the standard approach. Travel times and travel time distributions between the different measurement stations are obtained from a simultaneously performed conservative tracer test with fluorescein. In order to show the carry-over effect to metabolic rates, we furthermore estimate respiration and photosynthesis rates from the calculated reaeration coefficients and measured oxygen data. This way, we are able to show that neglecting dispersion significantly underestimates reaeration, and the impact of the time-dependent input concentration cannot be disregarded either. When estimated reaeration rates are used to calculate respiration and photosynthesis from measured

  12. Comparison of fluid-fluid interfacial areas measured with X-ray microtomography and interfacial partitioning tracer tests for the same samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Kieran; Carroll, Kenneth C.; Brusseau, Mark L.

    2016-07-01

    Two different methods are currently used for measuring interfacial areas between immiscible fluids within 3-D porous media, high-resolution microtomographic imaging and interfacial partitioning tracer tests (IPTT). Both methods were used in this study to measure nonwetting/wetting interfacial areas for a natural sand. The microtomographic imaging was conducted on the same packed columns that were used for the IPTTs. This is in contrast to prior studies comparing the two methods, for which in all cases different samples were used for the two methods. In addition, the columns were imaged before and after the IPTTs to evaluate the potential impacts of the tracer solution on fluid configuration and attendant interfacial area. The interfacial areas measured using IPTT are ˜5 times larger than the microtomographic-measured values, which is consistent with previous work. Analysis of the image data revealed no significant impact of the tracer solution on NAPL configuration or interfacial area. Other potential sources of error were evaluated, and all were demonstrated to be insignificant. The disparity in measured interfacial areas between the two methods is attributed to the limitation of the microtomography method to characterize interfacial area associated with microscopic surface roughness due to resolution constraints.

  13. Comparison of Fluid-Fluid Interfacial Areas Measured with X-ray Microtomography and Interfacial Partitioning Tracer Tests for the same Samples

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Kieran; Carroll, Kenneth C.; Brusseau, Mark L.

    2017-01-01

    Two different methods are currently used for measuring interfacial areas between immiscible fluids within 3-D porous media, high-resolution microtomographic imaging and interfacial partitioning tracer tests (IPTT). Both methods were used in this study to measure non-wetting/wetting interfacial areas for a natural sand. The microtomographic imaging was conducted on the same packed columns that were used for the IPTTs. This is in contrast to prior studies comparing the two methods, for which in all cases different samples were used for the two methods. In addition, the columns were imaged before and after the IPTTs to evaluate the potential impacts of the tracer solution on fluid configuration and attendant interfacial area. The interfacial areas measured using IPTT are ~5 times larger than the microtomographic-measured values, which is consistent with previous work. Analysis of the image data revealed no significant impact of the tracer solution on NAPL configuration or interfacial area. Other potential sources of error were evaluated, and all were demonstrated to be insignificant. The disparity in measured interfacial areas between the two methods is attributed to the limitation of the microtomography method to characterize interfacial area associated with microscopic surface roughness due to resolution constraints.

  14. Effect of Spatial Variations in Temperature, Permeability, and Water Saturation on Partitioning Gas Tracer Tests to Quantify Water in the Vadose Zone and in Landfills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L.; Imhoff, P. T.

    2006-12-01

    The measurement of water saturation is important in the vadose zone and in the unsaturated porous media (refuse) in bioreactor landfills. The partitioning gas tracer test (PGTT) has been successfully used to measure water saturations in soils and landfills. However, the effectiveness of the this technique for obtaining average water saturations may depend on spatial variations in temperature (landfills), which result in spatially varying Henry's law constants, as well as spatial variability in water saturations and gas permeability. Investigations of the performance of PGTTs in heterogeneous porous media are needed to assess the utility of this measurement technique in such systems. A two dimensional modeling approach was used to investigate PGTT performance in soils and landfills with spatially varying properties. Temperature, permeability and water saturations were varied spatially to examine their effect on the accuracy of water saturation measurements. The influence of tracer diffusion on PGTT results was also examined. These simulations provide guidelines for applying PGTTs in soils and landfills where spatial variability of properties is significant. Keywords: water saturation, gas tracers, spatial heterogeneity, landfills

  15. Push-pull tracer tests: Their information content and use for characterizing non-Fickian, mobile-immobile behavior: INFORMATION CONTENT OF PUSH-PULL TESTS

    DOE PAGES

    Hansen, Scott K.; Berkowitz, Brian; Vesselinov, Velimir V.; ...

    2016-12-01

    Path reversibility and radial symmetry are often assumed in push-pull tracer test analysis. In reality, heterogeneous flow fields mean that both assumptions are idealizations. In this paper, to understand their impact, we perform a parametric study which quantifies the scattering effects of ambient flow, local-scale dispersion, and velocity field heterogeneity on push-pull breakthrough curves and compares them to the effects of mobile-immobile mass transfer (MIMT) processes including sorption and diffusion into secondary porosity. We identify specific circumstances in which MIMT overwhelmingly determines the breakthrough curve, which may then be considered uninformative about drift and local-scale dispersion. Assuming path reversibility, wemore » develop a continuous-time-random-walk-based interpretation framework which is flow-field-agnostic and well suited to quantifying MIMT. Adopting this perspective, we show that the radial flow assumption is often harmless: to the extent that solute paths are reversible, the breakthrough curve is uninformative about velocity field heterogeneity. Our interpretation method determines a mapping function (i.e., subordinator) from travel time in the absence of MIMT to travel time in its presence. A mathematical theory allowing this function to be directly “plugged into” an existing Laplace-domain transport model to incorporate MIMT is presented and demonstrated. Algorithms implementing the calibration are presented and applied to interpretation of data from a push-pull test performed in a heterogeneous environment. A successful four-parameter fit is obtained, of comparable fidelity to one obtained using a million-node 3-D numerical model. In conclusion, we demonstrate analytically and numerically how push-pull tests quantifying MIMT are sensitive to remobilization, but not immobilization, kinetics.« less

  16. Push-pull tracer tests: Their information content and use for characterizing non-Fickian, mobile-immobile behavior: INFORMATION CONTENT OF PUSH-PULL TESTS

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Scott K.; Berkowitz, Brian; Vesselinov, Velimir V.; O'Malley, Daniel; Karra, Satish

    2016-12-01

    Path reversibility and radial symmetry are often assumed in push-pull tracer test analysis. In reality, heterogeneous flow fields mean that both assumptions are idealizations. In this paper, to understand their impact, we perform a parametric study which quantifies the scattering effects of ambient flow, local-scale dispersion, and velocity field heterogeneity on push-pull breakthrough curves and compares them to the effects of mobile-immobile mass transfer (MIMT) processes including sorption and diffusion into secondary porosity. We identify specific circumstances in which MIMT overwhelmingly determines the breakthrough curve, which may then be considered uninformative about drift and local-scale dispersion. Assuming path reversibility, we develop a continuous-time-random-walk-based interpretation framework which is flow-field-agnostic and well suited to quantifying MIMT. Adopting this perspective, we show that the radial flow assumption is often harmless: to the extent that solute paths are reversible, the breakthrough curve is uninformative about velocity field heterogeneity. Our interpretation method determines a mapping function (i.e., subordinator) from travel time in the absence of MIMT to travel time in its presence. A mathematical theory allowing this function to be directly “plugged into” an existing Laplace-domain transport model to incorporate MIMT is presented and demonstrated. Algorithms implementing the calibration are presented and applied to interpretation of data from a push-pull test performed in a heterogeneous environment. A successful four-parameter fit is obtained, of comparable fidelity to one obtained using a million-node 3-D numerical model. In conclusion, we demonstrate analytically and numerically how push-pull tests quantifying MIMT are sensitive to remobilization, but not immobilization, kinetics.

  17. Long term culture of epithelia in a continuous fluid gradient for biomaterial testing and tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Minuth, W W; Strehl, R; Schumacher, K; de Vries, U

    2001-01-01

    Epithelia perform barrier functions being exposed to different fluids on the luminal and basal side. For long-term testing of new biomaterials as artificial basement membrane substitutes, it is important to simulate this fluid gradient. Individually-selected biomaterials can be placed in tissue carriers and in gradient containers, where different media are superfused. Epithelia growing on the tissue carriers form a physiological barrier during the whole culture period. Frequently however, pressure differences between the luminal and basal compartments occur. This is caused by a unilateral accumulation of gas bubbles in the container compartments resulting in tissue damage. Consequently, the occurence of gas bubbles has to be minimized. Air bubbles in the perfusion culture medium preferentially accumulate at sites where different materials come into contact. The first development is new screw caps for media bottles, specifically designed to allow fluid contact with only the tube and not the cap material. The second development is the separation of remaining gas bubbles from the liquid phase in the medium using newly-developed gas expander modules. By the application of these new tools, the yield of embryonic renal collecting duct epithelia with intact barrier function on a fragile natural support material can be significantly increased compared to earlier experiments.

  18. A high gradient test of a single-cell superconducting radio frequency cavity with a feedback waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostin, Roman; Avrakhov, Pavel; Kanareykin, Alexei; Solyak, Nikolay; Yakovlev, Vyacheslav; Kazakov, Sergey; Wu, Genfa; Khabiboulline, Timergali; Rowe, Allan; Rathke, John

    2015-09-01

    The most severe problem of the international linear collider (ILC-type) is its high cost, resulting in part from the enormous length of the collider. This length is determined mainly by the achievable accelerating gradient in the RF system of the collider. In current technology, the maximum acceleration gradient in superconducting (SC) structures is determined mainly by the value of the surface RF magnetic field. In order to increase the gradient, a superconducting traveling wave accelerating (STWA) structure is suggested. Utilization of STWA structure with small phase advance per cell for future high energy linear colliders such as ILCs may provide an accelerating gradient 1.2-1.4 times larger [1] than a standing wave structure. However, STWA structure requires a feedback waveguide for power redirecting from the end of the structure back to the front end of accelerating structure. Recent tests of a 1.3 GHz model of a single-cell cavity with waveguide feedback demonstrated an accelerating gradient comparable to the gradient of a single-cell ILC-type cavity from the same manufacturer [2]. In the present paper, high gradient test results are presented.

  19. Flow regime mapping: outcome, or pre-requisite of tracer tests? (from the standpoint of deep-georeservoir characterization, development, operation, and monitoring)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghergut, Julia; Behrens, Horst; Sauter, Martin

    2017-04-01

    Tracer tests in deep-subsurface flow usually yield fluid residence time distributions (RTD) for a sparse selection of fluid spiking and fluid sampling points. Such RTD can be explained more or less adequately assuming certain flow and transport boundary conditions, and a fractured-porous void-space structure in which advective-dispersive transport and possibly partitioning/reactions at interfaces take place. Yet RTD do not by themselves enable to tell 'where' a flow process is taking place. So to say, "to trace is not to track", and 'tracking' would require some complementary kind of mapping, imaging, or monitoring - additionally to the metering of tracer fluxes at the few accessible 'places' in the georeservoir (i. e., deep boreholes) at which fluids can be sampled. We do not feel the need for such 'tracking' capability, when tracer-based RTD are used to predict the thermal lifetime of, say, a geothermal well doublet. However, the ability to 'locate' flow and transport processes (in both space and time) may become critical when facing environmental impacts of deep-georeservoir operation, and liabilities associated with these. On the other hand, it can also be a primary task in reservoir diagnostics and engineering, for instance when facing the question of whether and where to re-frac (in unconventional reservoir development). The poster describes three paradigm settings where a complementary, non-fluid-borne mapping of flow regimes (or at least of flow regime contrasts) appears as a very sensible, if not indispensable counterpart to tracer-based RTD for predicting (or accounting for) deep-georeservoir behavior. These are illustrated with (a) inter-well tracings of geothermally exploited Malm aquifers beneath the Munich metropolitan area, in analogy to past work conducted by Seiler et al. (1989) in the Franconian Alb; (b) single-well spikings of petrothermal or aquifer-based EGS in the N-German sedimentary basin, with two major issues left unresolved by Ghergut et

  20. Site characterization methodology for aquifers in support of bioreclamation activities. Volume 2: Borehole flowmeter technique, tracer tests, geostatistics and geology. Final report, August 1987-September 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Young, S.C.

    1993-08-01

    This report discusses a field demonstration of a methodology for characterizing an aquifer's geohydrology in the detail required to design an optimum network of wells and/or infiltration galleries for bioreclamation systems. The project work was conducted on a 1-hectare test site at Columbus AFB, Mississippi. The technical report is divided into two volumes. Volume I describes the test site and the well network, the assumptions, and the application of equations that define groundwater flow to a well, the results of three large-scale aquifer tests, and the results of 160 single-pump tests. Volume II describes the bore hole flowmeter tests, the tracer tests, the geological investigations, the geostatistical analysis and the guidelines for using groundwater models to design bioreclamation systems. Site characterization, Hydraulic conductivity, Groundwater flow, Geostatistics, Geohydrology, Monitoring wells.

  1. Environmental tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornberger, George

    Several naturally occurring tracers of water in natural systems (for example, stable isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen) are being widely used to determine the flow paths that water takes through a catchment. These chart the course of water from when it lands on the soil surface as rain or snow until it flows out of the catchment as streamflow. Tracing of hydrological flow paths, in conjunction with geochemical studies of how water interacts with rocks and soils, has led to new understanding of the hydrochemistry of upland forested catchments. Although a large fraction of precipitation that reaches the forest floor infiltrates into the very permeable soils, studies have disproved the once-prevalent notion that water slowly percolates through soils and rocks. Instead, preferred flow paths along old root channels, dessication cracks, and other heterogeneities in the soils transmit water and solute rapidly both vertically and downslope. This rapid movement profoundly affects the chemical reactions in the soils, influencing, for example, how “acid rain” affects the chemical composition of soil and stream water. Major findings from recent work are that downslope transport occurs along preferred paths in the shallow, normally unsaturated portions of the soil; and that riparian areas (wetlands immediately adjacent to the stream channel) play an extraordinarily important role in catchment hydrochemistry.

  2. Miniaturized Antimicrobial Susceptibility Test by Combining Concentration Gradient Generation and Rapid Cell Culturing

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Samuel C.; Cestellos-Blanco, Stefano; Inoue, Keisuke; Zare, Richard N.

    2015-01-01

    Effective treatment of bacterial infection relies on timely diagnosis and proper prescription of antibiotic drugs. The antimicrobial susceptibility test (AST) is one of the most crucial experimental procedures, providing the baseline information for choosing effective antibiotic agents and their dosages. Conventional methods, however, require long incubation times or significant instrumentation costs to obtain test results. We propose a lab-on-a-chip approach to perform AST in a simple, economic, and rapid manner. Our assay platform miniaturizes the standard broth microdilution method on a microfluidic device (20 × 20 mm) that generates an antibiotic concentration gradient and delivers antibiotic-containing culture media to eight 30-nL chambers for cell culture. When tested with 20 μL samples of a model bacterial strain (E. coli ATCC 25922) treated with ampicillin or streptomycin, our method allows for the determination of minimum inhibitory concentrations consistent with the microdilution test in three hours, which is almost a factor of ten more rapid than the standard method. PMID:27025635

  3. A tracer test to determine subsurface outflow of a karst catchment along the Lauchert-Graben, Swabian Alb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knöll, Paul; Scheytt, Traugott

    2017-04-01

    During a severe flood event in 2013 it was hypothesised that a significant amount of flood water from the lower course of the Lauchert infiltrated into the karst system, flowing towards the Danube catchment. The Lauchert, a tributary of the river Danube is a perennial stream in the Swabian Alb, southern Germany. Its catchment is entirely comprised of Upper Jurassic karstified carbonate rocks, slightly dipping south-east. The river mainly flows in the so called Lauchert-Graben except for the lower course. An artificial dye tracer experiment was conducted in August 2016 to examine a connection of the Lauchert and Danube catchment. 4 kg of Uranine were injected into the unsaturated zone of the Lauchert surface catchment, approximately 200 m west of the eastern main fault of the Lauchert-Graben. Close to the injection point the Lauchert is crossing this fault. A total of 7 observation points were monitored, among those the river Lauchert and 6 springs in the Danube valley. 3 of the springs were monitored with field fluorimeters while the other observation points were monitored by regular sampling for 5 days. A tracer breakthrough was detected at 3 springs in the Danube valley, showing a southward flow direction with a maximum transport velocity of 81 m/h. Tracer breakthrough curves were analysed using the CXTFIT code implemented in Stanmod. This experiment proved a preferential hydraulic connection from the Lauchert valley to springs in the Danube valley in the vicinity of the Lauchert-Graben and revealed a flow towards the Danube catchment. The monitored springs in the Danube valley are at least partly fed by groundwater originating in the Lauchert catchment. Augmented flow of flood water through the karst system becomes very likely if an inundation reaches outcropping karst structures flanking the Lauchert flood plain.

  4. Damage Characterization of EBC-SiCSiC Ceramic Matrix Composites Under Imposed Thermal Gradient Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appleby, Matthew P.; Morscher, Gregory N.; Zhu, Dongming

    2014-01-01

    Due to their high temperature capabilities, Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) components are being developed for use in hot-section aerospace engine applications. Harsh engine environments have led to the development of Environmental Barrier Coatings (EBCs) for silicon-based CMCs to further increase thermal and environmental capabilities. This study aims at understanding the damage mechanisms associated with these materials under simulated operating conditions. A high heat-flux laser testing rig capable of imposing large through-thickness thermal gradients by means of controlled laser beam heating and back-side air cooling is used. Tests are performed on uncoated composites, as well as CMC substrates that have been coated with state-of-the-art ceramic EBC systems. Results show that the use of the EBCs may help increase temperature capability and creep resistance by reducing the effects of stressed oxidation and environmental degradation. Also, the ability of electrical resistance (ER) and acoustic emission (AE) measurements to monitor material condition and damage state during high temperature testing is shown; suggesting their usefulness as a valuable health monitoring technique. Micromechanics models are used to describe the localized stress state of the composite system, which is utilized along with ER modeling concepts to develop an electromechanical model capable of characterizing material behavior.

  5. Gradient limiting defects in 9-cell cavities EP processed and RF tested at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Geng, Rongli; Ciovati, Giovanni; Crawford, Anthony C.

    2009-11-01

    Several 9-cell cavities processed by electropolishing (EP) and RF tested at Jefferson Lab are found to be quench-limited. Pass-band mode excitation measurements provide the first clue of candidate cells responsible for the limit. A second RF test with thermometers attached to the equator region of candidate cells (typically only 2 candidates) reveals a hot spot caused by excessive heating of the operational defect and hence determines its location. High resolution optical tools inspect the RF surface corresponding to the hot spot to image and document the defect. All defects in cavities quench limited < 21 MV/m are sub-mm sized irregularities near but outside of the equator EBW. In contrast, no observable irregularities are found in some other cavities that are quench-limited ~ 30 MV/m. These two types of quench limited cavities have different response to a second EP processing. In this paper, we will give a summary of the test results and attempt to catalog the observed defects. An equation for quench gradient is given.

  6. Summary and interpretation of dye-tracer tests to investigate the hydraulic connection of fractures at a ridge-and-valley-wall site near Fishtrap Lake, Pike County, Kentucky

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taylor, C.J.

    1994-01-01

    decreasing-head conditions resulted in dye being trapped in hydraulically dead zones in water- depleted fractures. Residual dye was remobilized from storage and transported (over periods ranging from several months to about 2 years) by increased recharge to the hydrologic system. Subsequent fluctuations in hydraulic gradients, resulting from increases or decreases in recharge to the hydrologic system, acted to speed or slow the transport of dye along the fracture-controlled flow paths. The dye-tracer tests also demonstrated that mining-related disturbances significantly altered the natural fracture-controlled flow paths of the hydrologic system over time. An abandoned underground mine and subsidence-related surface cracks extend to within 250 ft of the principal dye- injection core hole. Results from two of the dye-tracer tests at the site indicate that the annular seal in the core hole was breached by subsurface propagation of the mining-induced fractures. This propagation of fractures resulted in hydraulic short-circuiting between the dye-injection zone in the core hole and two lower piezometer zones, and a partial disruption of the hydraulic connection between the injection core hole and downgradient piezometers on the ridge crest and valley wall. In addition, injected dye was detected in piezometers monitoring a flooded part of the abandoned underground mine. Dye was apparently transported into the mine through a hydraulic connection between the injection core hole and subsidence-related fractures.

  7. Dissolved gas dynamics in wetland soils: Root-mediated gas transfer kinetics determined via push-pull tracer tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, Matthew C.; Pal, David S.; Jaffé, Peter R.

    2015-09-01

    Gas transfer processes are fundamental to the biogeochemical and water quality functions of wetlands, yet there is limited knowledge of the rates and pathways of soil-atmosphere exchange for gases other than oxygen and methane (CH4). In this study, we use a novel push-pull technique with sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) and helium (He) as dissolved gas tracers to quantify the kinetics of root-mediated gas transfer, which is a critical efflux pathway for gases from wetland soils. This tracer approach disentangles the effects of physical transport from simultaneous reaction in saturated, vegetated wetland soils. We measured significant seasonal variation in first-order gas exchange rate constants, with smaller spatial variations between different soil depths and vegetation zones in a New Jersey tidal marsh. Gas transfer rates for most biogeochemical trace gases are expected to be bracketed by the rate constants for SF6 and He, which ranged from ˜10-2 to 2 × 10-1 h-1 at our site. A modified Damköhler number analysis is used to evaluate the balance between biochemical reaction and root-driven gas exchange in governing the fate of environmental trace gases in rooted, anaerobic soils. This approach confirmed the importance of plant gas transport for CH4, and showed that root-driven transport may affect nitrous oxide (N2O) balances in settings where N2O reduction rates are slow.

  8. Testing the Stability of Three-Dimensional Hoyle-Lyttleton Accretion with Large Upstream Gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raymer, Eric; Blondin, J. M.

    2013-04-01

    Supergiant Fast X-Ray Transients (SFXTs) are a subclass of high mass X-ray binaries exhibiting luminosities as high as 1037 erg/s, a dynamic range of 104 erg/s, and a duty cycle lasting only hours to days. The outburst mechanism responsible for SFXT flaring is currently unknown. Potential mechanisms include the accretion of a clumpy wind produced by wind instabilities in the donor star, accretion from an anisotropic wind such as a Be star disk wind, or hydrodynamic instabilities intrinsic to the accretion process. We seek to test these mechanisms through numerical simulations of Hoyle-Lyttleton accretion (HLA), which describes the gravitational accretion of a supersonic ideal gas onto a compact object. HLA has been shown to be dynamically unstable in two-dimensional planar simulations. By contrast, three-dimensional HLA is remarkably stable in the presence of a uniform upstream flow. It has yet to be determined what upstream conditions would be sufficient to disrupt this stability and produce bursts of mass accretion with magnitudes corresponding to those seen in SFXT flares. To probe the stability in the presence of large upstream density and velocity gradients, we extend the model of Blondin & Raymer (2012), which utilizes spherical overset grids to achieve previously unmatched spatial resolutions. For an ideal gas with an adiabatic index of 5/3, the presence of 20% and 100% gradients across the upstream accretion column can induce intermittent rotational flow that occurs behind a deformed bow shock. These transient vortices are frequently interrupted by brief periods of chaotic flow, during which slightly enhanced mass accretion can occur. The net effect of the rotational flow is to inhibit the mass accretion rate, which is less than the Hoyle-Lyttleton prediction by up to an order of magnitude.

  9. Experimental high gradient testing of a 17.1 GHz photonic band-gap accelerator structure

    DOE PAGES

    Munroe, Brian J.; Zhang, JieXi; Xu, Haoran; ...

    2016-03-29

    In this paper, we report the design, fabrication, and high gradient testing of a 17.1 GHz photonic band-gap (PBG) accelerator structure. Photonic band-gap (PBG) structures are promising candidates for electron accelerators capable of high-gradient operation because they have the inherent damping of high order modes required to avoid beam breakup instabilities. The 17.1 GHz PBG structure tested was a single cell structure composed of a triangular array of round copper rods of radius 1.45 mm spaced by 8.05 mm. The test assembly consisted of the test PBG cell located between conventional (pillbox) input and output cells, with input power ofmore » up to 4 MW from a klystron supplied via a TM01 mode launcher. Breakdown at high gradient was observed by diagnostics including reflected power, downstream and upstream current monitors and visible light emission. The testing procedure was first benchmarked with a conventional disc-loaded waveguide structure, which reached a gradient of 87 MV=m at a breakdown probability of 1.19 × 10–1 per pulse per meter. The PBG structure was tested with 100 ns pulses at gradient levels of less than 90 MV=m in order to limit the surface temperature rise to 120 K. The PBG structure reached up to 89 MV=m at a breakdown probability of 1.09 × 10–1 per pulse per meter. These test results show that a PBG structure can simultaneously operate at high gradients and low breakdown probability, while also providing wakefield damping.« less

  10. Comparison of results of two dye-tracer tests at the Chestnut Ridge Security Pits, Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstrand, P.M.; Haas, J.

    1994-01-01

    Personnel from Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems) manage a closed hazardous waste disposal unit the Chestnut Ridge Security Pits (CRSP), located on the crest of Chestnut Ridge near the Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. To investigate the discharge of groundwater from CRSP to springs and streams located along the flanks and base of Chestnut Ridge, an initial dye-tracer study was conducted during 1990. A hydraulic connection was inferred to exist between the injection well (GW-178) on Chestnut Ridge and several sites to the east-northeast, east, and southeast of CRSP. A second dye-tracer study was conducted in 1992 to verify the results of the initial test and identify additional discharge points that are active during wet-weather conditions. No definitive evidence for the presence of dye was identified at any of the 35 locations monitored during the second dye study. Although interpretations of the initial dye test suggest a hydraulic connection with several sites and CRSP, reevaluation of the spectrofluorescence data from this test suggests that dye may not have been detected during the initial test. A combination of relatively high analytical detection limits during the initial test, and high natural background interference spectral peaks observed during the second test, suggest that high natural background emission spectra near the wavelength of the dye used during the initial test may have caused the apparently high reported concentrations. The results of these two tests do not preclude that a hydraulic connection exists; dye may be present in concentrations below the analytical detection limits or has yet to emerge from the groundwater system. The dye injection well is not completed within any significant karst features. Dye migration therefore, may be within a diffuse, slow-flow portion of the aquifer, at least in the immediate vicinity of the source well.

  11. Tracer tomography (in) rocks!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somogyvári, Márk; Jalali, Mohammadreza; Jimenez Parras, Santos; Bayer, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Physical behavior of fractured aquifers is rigorously controlled by the presence of interconnected conductive fractures, as they represent the main pathways for flow and transport. Ideally, they are simulated as a discrete fracture network (DFN) in a model to capture the role of fracture system geometry, i.e. fracture length, height, and width (aperture/transmissivity). Such network may be constrained by prior geological information or direct data resources such as field mapping, borehole logging and geophysics. With the many geometric features, however, calibration of a DFN to measured data is challenging. This is especially the case when spatial properties of a fracture network need to be calibrated to flow and transport data. One way to increase the insight in a fractured rock is by combining the information from multiple field tests. In this study, a tomographic configuration that combines multiple tracer tests is suggested. These tests are conducted from a borehole with different injection levels that act as sources. In a downgradient borehole, the tracer is recorded at different levels or receivers, in order to maximize insight in the spatial heterogeneity of the rock. As tracer here we chose heat, and temperature breakthrough curves are recorded. The recorded tracer data is inverted using a novel stochastic trans-dimensional Markov Chain Monte Carlo procedure. An initial DFN solution is generated and sequentially modified given available geological information, such as expected fracture density, orientation, length distribution, spacing and persistency. During this sequential modification, the DFN evolves in a trans-dimensional inversion space through adding and/or deleting fracture segments. This stochastic inversion algorithm requires a large number of thousands of model runs to converge, and thus using a fast and robust forward model is essential to keep the calculation efficient. To reach this goal, an upwind coupled finite difference method is employed

  12. Evaluation of tracer tests completed in 1999 and 2000 on the upper Santa Clara River, Los Angeles and Ventura Counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cox, Marisa H.; Mendez, Gregory O.; Kratzer, Charles R.; Reichard, Eric G.

    2003-01-01

    The interaction of surface water and hyporheic water along the Santa Clara River in Los Angeles and Ventura Counties, California, was evaluated by conducting tracer tests and analyzing water-quality data under different flow conditions in October 1999 and May 2000. Tracer and water-quality samples were collected at multiple river and hyporheic sites as well as at the Los Angeles County Sanitation Districts Saugus and Valencia Water Reclamation Plants. These water reclamation plants provide the main source of base flow in the river. Rhodamine WT dye was injected into the river to determine river traveltimes and to indicate when Lagrangian water-quality sampling could be performed at each site. Sodium bromide was injected into the river at a constant rate at the water reclamation plants to evaluate the surface-water and shallow ground-water interactions in the hyporheic zone. In the upper reach of the study area, which extends 2.9 river miles downstream from the Saugus Water Reclamation Plant, traveltime was 3.2 hours during May 2000. In the lower reach, which extends 14.1 river miles downstream from the Valencia Water Reclamation Plant, traveltime was 9.6 hours during October 1999 and 7.1 hours during May 2000. The sodium bromide tracer was detected at both hyporheic locations sampled during October 1999, and at two of the three hyporheic locations sampled during May 2000. On the basis of Rhodamine dye tests, flow curves were constructed from the discharge measurements in the Valencia reach. Flow-curve results indicate net gains in flow throughout most, but not all, of the upper parts of the reach and net losses in flow at the lower part of the reach. Lagrangian water-quality sampling provides information on the changes in chemistry as the water flows downstream from the water reclamation plants. Along both reaches there is an increase in sulfate (40-60 mg/L in the Saugus reach and 160 mg/L in the Valencia reach) and a decrease in chloride (about 45 mg/L in the

  13. Testing thermal gradient driving force for grain boundary migration using molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, Xian-Ming; Zhang, Yongfeng; Tonks, Michael R.

    2015-02-01

    Strong thermal gradients in low-thermal-conductivity ceramics may drive extended defects, such as grain boundaries and voids, to migrate in preferential directions. In this work, molecular dynamics simulations are conducted to study thermal gradient driven grain boundary migration and to verify a previously proposed thermal gradient driving force equation, using uranium dioxide as a model system. It is found that a thermal gradient drives grain boundaries to migrate up the gradient and the migration velocity increases under a constant gradient owing to the increase in mobility with temperature. Different grain boundaries migrate at very different rates due to their different intrinsic mobilities. The extracted mobilities from the thermal gradient driven simulations are compared with those calculated from two other well-established methods and good agreement between the three different methods is found, demonstrating that the theoretical equation of the thermal gradient driving force is valid, although a correction of one input parameter should be made. The discrepancy in the grain boundary mobilities between modeling and experiments is also discussed.

  14. Tracer test with As(V) under variable redox conditions controlling arsenic transport in the presence of elevated ferrous iron concentrations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hohn, R.; Isenbeck-Schroter, M.; Kent, D.B.; Davis, J.A.; Jakobsen, R.; Jann, S.; Niedan, V.; Scholz, C.; Stadler, S.; Tretner, A.

    2006-01-01

    To study transport and reactions of arsenic under field conditions, a small-scale tracer test was performed in an anoxic, iron-reducing zone of a sandy aquifer at the USGS research site on Cape Cod, Massachusetts, USA. For four weeks, a stream of groundwater with added As(V) (6.7????M) and bromide (1.6??mM), was injected in order to observe the reduction of As(V) to As(III). Breakthrough of bromide (Br-), As(V), and As(III) as well as additional parameters characterizing the geochemical conditions was observed at various locations downstream of the injection well over a period of 104??days. After a short lag period, nitrate and dissolved oxygen from the injectate oxidized ferrous iron and As(V) became bound to the freshly formed hydrous iron oxides. Approximately one week after terminating the injection, anoxic conditions had been reestablished and increases in As(III) concentrations were observed within 1??m of the injection. During the observation period, As(III) and As(V) were transported to a distance of 4.5??m downgradient indicating significant retardation by sorption processes for both species. Sediment assays as well as elevated concentrations of hydrogen reflected the presence of As(V) reducing microorganisms. Thus, microbial As(V) reduction was thought to be one major process driving the release of As(III) during the tracer test in the Cape Cod aquifer. ?? 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Power-law behavior of transient storage residence time distributions from a multi-scale stream tracer test in Lookout Creek, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haggerty, R.; Ninnemann, J.; Gooseff, M. N.; Wondzell, S. M.

    2004-12-01

    We quantified the residence time distribution (RTD) of transient storage at increasing spatial scales in Lookout Creek at the HJ Andrews Experimental Forest, Oregon. A longitudinal tracer test was conducted with an in-stream injection of rhodamine WT over 78 hr, followed by monitoring at 7 locations (1-14 km downstream) for 5 months. Three additional tracer tests were carried out over shorter reaches, between each of the major stream confluences, to further quantify transient storage and to separate geomorphic variability from other possible scale-dependent factors. The results clearly show power-law RTDs (i.e., c ˜ t-k), but not a single, "universal" RTD or scaling relationship. The exponent, k, ranges from 1.35 to 2.0, and appears to decrease downstream. Observed changes in the power-law RTD may result from characteristic changes in channel morphology or the degree of geomorphic complexity, which are related to stream size. Downstream reaches exhibit a larger delay between the peak concentration and power-law tailing compared to upstream reaches, possibly indicating a smaller hyporheic zone relative to stream size.

  16. Field-scale migration of colloidal tracers in a fractured shale saprolite

    SciTech Connect

    McKay, L.D.; Sanford, W.E.; Strong, J.M.

    2000-02-01

    A field-scale tracer experiment carried out under natural gradient ground water flow conditions showed that colloids can be highly mobile in a fractured and highly weathered shale saprolite. Four colloidal tracers (0.100 {mu}m fluorescent latex microspheres, bacteriophage strains PRD-1 and MS-2, and INA, a dead strain of Pseudomonas syringae), were introduced to a 6.4 m deep well, and concentrations of the tracers were monitored in the source well and in downgradient monitoring wells as distances of 2 to 35 m. All of the colloidal tracers were detected to distances of at least 13.5 m and two of the tracers (microspheres and INA) were detected in all of the downgradient wells. In most wells the colloidal tracers appeared as a pulse, with rapid first arrival (corresponding to 5 to 200 m/d transport velocity), one to six days of high concentrations, and then a rapid decline to below the detection limit. The colloids were transported at velocities of up to 500 times faster than solute tracers (He, Ne, and rhodamine-WT) from previous tests at the site. This is believed to be largely due to greater diffusion of the solutes into the relatively immobile pore water of the fine-grained matrix between fractures. Peak colloid tracer concentrations in the monitoring wells varied substantially, with the microspheres exhibiting the highest relative concentrations and hence the least retention. Rates of concentration decline with distance also varied. indicating that retention is not a uniform process in this heterogeneous material. Two of the tracers, INA and PRD-1, reappeared in several monitoring wells one to five months after the initial pulse had passed, and the reappearance generally corresponds with increased seasonal precipitation. This is consistent with subsequent laboratory experiments that showed that colloid retention in these materials is sensitive to factors such as flow rate ad ionic strength, both of which are expected to vary with the amount of precipitation.

  17. The use of air as a natural tracer infractured hydrothermal systems, Los Azufres, Mexico, case study

    SciTech Connect

    Mario Cesar Sudrez Arriaga; Hector Gutierrez Puente, Josefina Moreno Ochoa

    1991-01-01

    Injection of atmospheric air mixed with cold water has been occurring since 1982 at the Los Azufres geothermal field. Several chemical and thermodynamical evidences show that air injection into this fractured hydrothermal system could be considered as a long term natural tracer test. Nitrogen and Argon separated from the air mixture migrate, under the action of the induced injection-extraction gradient, from reinjection sectors to production zones following preferential paths closely related to high permeability conduits. A coarse numerical estimation of the average permeability tensor existing at Tejamaniles, the southern sector, explains the unsuccessful recovery of the artificial tracer tests performed in past years: the anisotropic nature of the fractured volcanic rock would demand considerably quantities of tracer in order to be detected at the producing wells, especially when fluid extraction was low. At the same time concentrations of calcium, cesium, chloride, potassium, rubidium and sodium, are increasing in the liquid produced by the oldest wells of this field's sector.

  18. Testing Taxon Tenacity of Tortoises: evidence for a geographical selection gradient at a secondary contact zone

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Taylor; Berry, Kristin H; Inman, Richard D; Esque, Todd C; Nussear, Kenneth E; Jones, Cristina A; Culver, Melanie

    2015-01-01

    We examined a secondary contact zone between two species of desert tortoise, Gopherus agassizii and G. morafkai. The taxa were isolated from a common ancestor during the formation of the Colorado River (4–8 mya) and are a classic example of allopatric speciation. However, an anomalous population of G. agassizii comes into secondary contact with G. morafkai east of the Colorado River in the Black Mountains of Arizona and provides an opportunity to examine reinforcement of species' boundaries under natural conditions. We sampled 234 tortoises representing G. agassizii in California (n - 103), G. morafkai in Arizona (n - 78), and 53 individuals of undetermined assignment in the contact zone including and surrounding the Black Mountains. We genotyped individuals for 25 STR loci and determined maternal lineage using mtDNA sequence data. We performed multilocus genetic clustering analyses and used multiple statistical methods to detect levels of hybridization. We tested hypotheses about habitat use between G. agassizii and G. morafkai in the region where they co-occur using habitat suitability models. Gopherus agassizii and G. morafkai maintain independent taxonomic identities likely due to ecological niche partitioning, and the maintenance of the hybrid zone is best described by a geographical selection gradient model. PMID:26045959

  19. Testing taxon tenacity of tortoises: evidence for a geographical selection gradient at a secondary contact zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edwards, Taylor; Berry, Kristin H.; Inman, Richard D.; Esque, Todd C.; Nussear, Kenneth E.; Jones, Cristina A.; Culver, Melanie

    2015-01-01

    We examined a secondary contact zone between two species of desert tortoise, Gopherus agassizii and G. morafkai. The taxa were isolated from a common ancestor during the formation of the Colorado River (4-8 mya) and are a classic example of allopatric speciation. However, an anomalous population of G. agassizii comes into secondary contact with G. morafkai east of the Colorado River in the Black Mountains of Arizona and provides an opportunity to examine reinforcement of species' boundaries under natural conditions. We sampled 234 tortoises representing G. agassizii in California (n = 103), G. morafkai in Arizona (n = 78), and 53 individuals of undetermined assignment in the contact zone including and surrounding the Black Mountains. We genotyped individuals for 25 STR loci and determined maternal lineage using mtDNA sequence data. We performed multilocus genetic clustering analyses and used multiple statistical methods to detect levels of hybridization. We tested hypotheses about habitat use between G. agassizii and G. morafkai in the region where they co-occur using habitat suitability models. Gopherus agassizii and G. morafkai maintain independent taxonomic identities likely due to ecological niche partitioning, and the maintenance of the hybrid zone is best described by a geographical selection gradient model.

  20. Perturbations and gradients as fundamental tests for modeling the soil carbon cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bond-Lamberty, B. P.; Bailey, V. L.; Becker, K.; Fansler, S.; Hinkle, C.; Liu, C.

    2013-12-01

    An important step in matching process-level knowledge to larger-scale measurements and model results is to challenge those models with site-specific perturbations and/or changing environmental conditions. Here we subject modified versions of an ecosystem process model to two stringent tests: replicating a long-term climate change dryland experiment (Rattlesnake Mountain) and partitioning the carbon fluxes of a soil drainage gradient in the northern Everglades (Disney Wilderness Preserve). For both sites, on-site measurements were supplemented by laboratory incubations of soil columns. We used a parameter-space search algorithm to optimize, within observational limits, the model's influential inputs, so that the spun-up carbon stocks and fluxes matched observed values. Modeled carbon fluxes (net primary production and net ecosystem exchange) agreed with measured values, within observational error limits, but the model's partitioning of soil fluxes (autotrophic versus heterotrophic), did not match laboratory measurements from either site. Accounting for site heterogeneity at DWP, modeled carbon exchange was reasonably consistent with values from eddy covariance. We discuss the implications of this work for ecosystem- to global scale modeling of ecosystems in a changing climate.

  1. Assessment of thermal gradient tube results from the HI series of fission product release tests

    SciTech Connect

    Norwood, K.S.

    1985-03-01

    A thermal gradient tube was used to analyze fission product vapors released from fuel heated in the HI test series. Complete deposition profiles were obtained for Cs, I, Ag, and Sb. The cesium profiles were complex and probably were dominated by Cs-S-O compounds formed by release of sulfur from furnace ceramics. The iodine profiles were simple, indicating that more than 99.5% of the released iodine behaved as a single nonvolatile species, probably CsI. Mass transfer coefficients for this species onto platinum were estimated to be 1.9 to 5.8 cm/s. Silver was probably released in elemental form, condensed to an aerosol, and captured by filters. Antimony was released as the element and reacted rapidly with platinum (or gold) as it deposited. Antimony profiles were calculated a priori with some success. A method was developed for isolating tellurium from platinum and mixed fission products in a form suitable for neutron activation analysis. The platinum samples were completely dissolved in acid (HCl/HNO/sub 3/), and the tellurium was precipitated on selenium carrier by reduction. Finally, tellurium was loaded onto Dowex 1X-4 ion-exchange resin for activation and analysis. Tellurium recovery was approx. 88%, and the theoretical sensitivity was approx. 30 ng.

  2. Testing the stress-gradient hypothesis during the restoration of tropical degraded land using the shrub Rhodomyrtus tomentosa as a nurse plant

    Treesearch

    Nan Liu; Hai Ren; Sufen Yuan; Qinfeng Guo; Long Yang

    2013-01-01

    The relative importance of facilitation and competition between pairwise plants across abiotic stress gradients as predicted by the stress-gradient hypothesis has been confirmed in arid and temperate ecosystems, but the hypothesis has rarely been tested in tropical systems, particularly across nutrient gradients. The current research examines the interactions between a...

  3. Interfacial partitioning tracer test measurements of organic-liquid/water interfacial areas: application to soils and the influence of surface roughness.

    PubMed

    Brusseau, Mark L; Narter, Matt; Janousek, Hilary

    2010-10-01

    Interfacial areas between an organic immiscible liquid and water were measured for two natural soils using the aqueous-phase interfacial partitioning tracer test method. The measured values were compared to measured values for silica sands compiled from the literature. The data were compared using the maximum specific interfacial area as a system index, which is useful for cases wherein fluid saturations differ. The maximum specific interfacial areas measured for the soils were significantly larger than the values obtained for the sands. The disparity between the values was attributed to the impact of surface roughness on solid surface area and hence film-associated interfacial area. A good correlation was observed between maximum specific interfacial area and specific solid surface area measured with the N(2)/BET method. The correlation may serve as a means by which to estimate maximum specific organic-liquid/water interfacial areas. Interfacial areas measured with the interfacial partitioning tracer method were compared to interfacial areas measured with high-resolution microtomography. Values measured with the former method were consistently larger than those measured with the latter, consistent with the general inability of the microtomography method to characterize roughness-associated surface area.

  4. Determination of hyporheic travel time distributions and other parameters from concurrent conservative and reactive tracer tests by local-in-global optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapp, Julia L. A.; Cirpka, Olaf A.

    2017-06-01

    The complexity of hyporheic flow paths requires reach-scale models of solute transport in streams that are flexible in their representation of the hyporheic passage. We use a model that couples advective-dispersive in-stream transport to hyporheic exchange with a shape-free distribution of hyporheic travel times. The model also accounts for two-site sorption and transformation of reactive solutes. The coefficients of the model are determined by fitting concurrent stream-tracer tests of conservative (fluorescein) and reactive (resazurin/resorufin) compounds. The flexibility of the shape-free models give rise to multiple local minima of the objective function in parameter estimation, thus requiring global-search algorithms, which is hindered by the large number of parameter values to be estimated. We present a local-in-global optimization approach, in which we use a Markov-Chain Monte Carlo method as global-search method to estimate a set of in-stream and hyporheic parameters. Nested therein, we infer the shape-free distribution of hyporheic travel times by a local Gauss-Newton method. The overall approach is independent of the initial guess and provides the joint posterior distribution of all parameters. We apply the described local-in-global optimization method to recorded tracer breakthrough curves of three consecutive stream sections, and infer section-wise hydraulic parameter distributions to analyze how hyporheic exchange processes differ between the stream sections.

  5. Analysis of Single-Hole and Cross-Hole Tracer Tests Conducted at the Nye County Earl Warning Drilling Program Well Complex, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    A. Umari; J.D. Earle; M.F. Fahy

    2006-03-17

    As part of the effort to understand the flow and transport characteristics downgradient from the proposed high-level radioactive waste geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, single- and cross-hole tracer tests were conducted from December 2004 through October 2005 in boreholes at the Nye County 22 well complex. The results were analyzed for transport properties using both numerical and analytical solutions of the governing advection dispersion equation. Preliminary results indicate effective flow porosity values ranging from 1.0 x 10{sup -2} for an individual flow path to 2.0 x 10{sup -1} for composite flow paths, longitudinal dispersivity ranging from 0.3 to 3 m, and a transverse horizontal dispersivity of 0.03 m. Individual flow paths identified from the cross-hole testing indicate some solute diffusion into the stagnant portion of the alluvial aquifer.

  6. Analysis of single-hole and cross-hole tracer tests conducted at the Nye County early warning drilling program well complex, Nye County, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Umari, A.; Earle, J.D.; Fahy, M.F.

    2006-01-01

    As part of the effort to understand the flow and transport characteristics downgradient from the proposed high-level radioactive waste geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, single- and cross-hole tracer tests were conducted from December 2004 through October 2005 in boreholes at the Nye County 22 well complex. The results were analyzed for transport properties using both numerical and analytical solutions of the governing advection dispersion equation. Preliminary results indicate effective flow porosity values ranging from 1.0 ?? 10-2 for an individual flow path to 2.0 ?? 10 -1 for composite flow paths, longitudinal dispersivity ranging from 0.3 to 3 m, and a transverse horizontal dispersivity of 0.03 m. Individual flow paths identified from the cross-hole testing indicate some solute diffusion into the stagnant portion of the alluvial aquifer.

  7. Tracer Interpretation Using Temporal Moments on a Spreadsheet

    SciTech Connect

    G. Michael Shook; J. Hope Forsmann

    2005-06-01

    This report presents a method for interpreting geothermal tracer tests. The method is based on the first temporal moment (mean residence time) of the tracer in the subsurface. The individual steps required to interpret a tracer test are reviewed and discussed. And an example tracer test directs the user through the interpretation method. An Excel spreadsheet application of the interpretation method is a companion document to this report.

  8. Ecological impacts of invasive alien species along temperature gradients: testing the role of environmental matching.

    PubMed

    Iacarella, Josephine C; Dick, Jaimie T A; Alexander, Mhairi E; Ricciardi, Anthony

    2015-04-01

    Invasive alien species (IAS) can cause substantive ecological impacts, and the role of temperature in mediating these impacts may become increasingly significant in a changing climate. Habitat conditions and physiological optima offer predictive information for IAS impacts in novel environments. Here, using meta-analysis and laboratory experiments, we tested the hypothesis that the impacts of IAS in the field are inversely correlated with the difference in their ambient and optimal temperatures. A meta-analysis of 29 studies of consumptive impacts of IAS in inland waters revealed that the impacts of fishes and crustaceans are higher at temperatures that more closely match their thermal growth optima. In particular, the maximum impact potential was constrained by increased differences between ambient and optimal temperatures, as indicated by the steeper slope of a quantile regression on the upper 25th percentile of impact data compared to that of a weighted linear regression on all data with measured variances. We complemented this study with an experimental analysis of the functional response (the relationship between predation rate and prey supply) of two invasive predators (freshwater mysid shrimp, Hemimysis anomala and Mysis diluviana) across. relevant temperature gradients; both of these species have previously been found to exert strong community-level impacts that are corroborated by their functional responses to different prey items. The functional response experiments showed that maximum feeding rates of H. anomala and M. diluviana have distinct peaks near their respective thermal optima. Although variation in impacts may be caused by numerous abiotic or biotic habitat characteristics, both our analyses point to temperature as a key mediator of IAS impact levels in inland waters and suggest that IAS management should prioritize habitats in the invaded range that more closely match the thermal optima of targeted invaders.

  9. Development of a method for in situ measurement of denitrification in aquifers using 15N tracer tests and membrane inlet mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eschenbach, W.; Well, R.; Flessa, H.; Walther, W.; Duijnisveld, W. H. M.

    2009-04-01

    In NO3- contaminated aquifers containing reduced compounds like organic carbon or sulfides, denitrification is an intense process. Its characterization is of interest because NO3- consump-tion improves water quality and N2O production can cause emission of this greenhouse gas to the atmosphere. Spatial distribution of NO3- and N2 produced by denitrification in groundwa-ter (excess N2) reflects the NO3- input as well as cumulative denitrification during aquifer pas-sage. Reaction progress (RP) at a given location, i.e. the relative consumption by denitrifica-tion of the NO3- that had been leached to the aquifers, characterizes the stage of the denitrifi-cation process. RP can be derived from the ratio between accumulated gaseous denitrification products and initial NO3- concentrations. The amount and spatial distribution of reduced com-pounds within denitrifying aquifers is not well known. Recent findings from parallel investi-gations on in situ denitrification and reactive compounds suggests that single-well 15N tracer tests might be suitable to characterize the stock of reduced compounds in aquifers (Konrad 2007). The overall objective of our studies is measure the spatial dynamics of denitrification within two sandy aquifers in northern Germany. This includes measurement of the actually occurring denitrification process. Moreover we want to determine the long-term denitrification potential which is governed by the stock of reactive material. Here we present a new approach for in situ-measurement of denitrification at monitoring wells using a combination of 15N-tracer push-pull experiments with in situ analysis of 15N-labled N2 and N2O using membrane inlet mass spectrometry (MIMS). We will present first results from a laboratory test with aquifer mesocosms using the MIMS method. In this test we supplemented aquifer material of two depths (2 and 7 m below surface) of a drinking water catchment in Northwest Germany with K15NO3 solution. After tracer application we

  10. Statistical analysis and mathematical modeling of a tracer test on the Santa Clara River, Ventura County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paybins, Katherine S.; Nishikawa, Tracy; Izbicki, John A.; Reichard, Eric G.

    1998-01-01

    To better understand flow processes, solute-transport processes, and ground-water/surface-water interactions on the Santa Clara River in Ventura County, California, a 24-hour fluorescent-dye tracer study was performed under steady-state flow conditions on a 28-mile reach of the river. The study reach includes perennial (uppermost and lowermost) subreaches and ephemeral subreaches of the lower Piru Creek and the middle Santa Clara River. Dye was injected at a site on Piru Creek, and fluorescence of river water was measured continuously at four sites and intermittently at two sites. Discharge measurements were also made at the six sites. The time of travel of the dye, peak dye concentration, and time-variance of time-concentration curves were obtained at each site. The long tails of the time-concentration curves are indicative of sources/sinks within the river, such as riffles and pools, or transient bank storage. A statistical analysis of the data indicates that, in general, the transport characteristics follow Fickian theory. These data and previously collected discharge data were used to calibrate a one-dimensional flow model (DAFLOW) and a solute-transport model (BLTM). DAFLOW solves a simplified form of the diffusion-wave equation and uses empirical relations between flow rate and cross-sectional area, and flow rate and channel width. BLTM uses the velocity data from DAFLOW and solves the advection-dispersion transport equation, including first-order decay. The simulations of dye transport indicated that (1) ground-water recharge explains the loss of dye mass in the middle, ephemeral, subreaches, and (2) ground-water recharge does not explain the loss of dye mass in the uppermost and lowermost, perennial, subreaches. This loss of mass was simulated using a linear decay term. The loss of mass in the perennial subreaches may be caused by a combination of photodecay or adsorption/desorption.

  11. Field validation of thermal tracer tomography for reconstruction of aquifer heterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somogyvári, Márk; Bayer, Peter

    2017-06-01

    In the summer of 2015, a series of thermal tracer tests were conducted at the Widen field site in northeast Switzerland to validate travel time-based thermal tracer tomography for reconstruction of aquifer heterogeneity. Repeated thermal tracer tests and distributed temperature observations were used to obtain a multisource/multireceiver tomographic experimental setup. After creating forced hydraulic gradient conditions, heated water was injected as a pulse temperature signal via a double-packer system. With this solution, long temperature recovery periods were not required between the repeated injections at the expense of smaller observed temperatures. The recorded temperature breakthrough curves delivered a tomographic travel time data set that was inverted assuming advection-dominated condition. The obtained hydraulic conductivity tomogram for a small aquifer profile is validated with the results of the findings from previous field investigations at the same site. The reconstructed profile confirms the presence of a thin sand layer with low permeability and reveals a previously unknown low-permeable zone close to the bottom of the aquifer. The inverted hydraulic conductivity values also correspond with those from previous tracer tests. Thus, the results of this study demonstrate the potential of thermal tracer tomography for resolving structures and transport characteristics of heterogeneous aquifers.

  12. Comparison of Interfacial Partitioning Tracer Test and X-ray Microtomography Measurements of Immiscible Fluid-Fluid Interfacial Areas within the Identical System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, K. C.; McDonald, K.; Brusseau, M. L. L.

    2015-12-01

    The interfacial area between immiscible fluids in porous media has been demonstrated to be a critical entity for improved understanding, characterization, and simulation of multiphase flow and mass transport in the subsurface. Two general methods are available for measuring interfacial areas for 3-D porous-media systems, high-resolution microtomographic imaging and interfacial partitioning tracer tests (IPTT). Each method has their associated advantages and disadvantages. A few prior research efforts have conducted comparative analyses of the two methods, which have generally indicated disparities in measured values for natural geomedia. For these studies, however, interfacial areas were measured for separate samples with each method due to method restrictions. Thus, to date, there has been no comparative analysis conducted wherein the two measurement methods were applied to the exact same sample. To address this issue, trichloroethene-water interfacial areas were measured for a system comprising a well-sorted, natural sand (median grain diameter of 0.323 mm) using both X-ray microtomography and IPTTs. The microtomographic imaging was conducted on the same packed columns used to conduct the IPTTs. Columns were imaged before and after the IPTTs to evaluate potential impacts of the tracer tests on fluid configuration. The interfacial areas measured using IPTT were 4-6 times larger than the microtomography results, which is consistent with previous work. This disparity was attributed to the inability of the microtomography method to characterize interfacial area associated with microscopic surface roughness. The results indicate that both methods provide useful measures of interfacial area as long as their limitations are recognized.

  13. Final report of the second dye-tracer test at the Chesnut Ridge Security Pits, Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1992-11-01

    Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems) manages a closed hazardous waste disposal unit, Chestnut Ridge Security Pits (CRSP), in the form of two trenches and several auger-holes, located on top of the eastern portion of Chestnut Ridge at the Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant in Tennessee. The groundwater monitoring system for the unit presently consists of a network of upgradient and downgradient monitor wells. To investigate the discharge of groundwater to springs and streams, Energy Systems, through Geraghty and Miller, Inc., conducted an initial dye-tracer study during the driest part of 1990. The dye was detected at some of the monitoring sites, but verification was necessary due to the proximity of some sites to extraneous dye sources. Based on the results of the initial study, Energy Systems recommended to the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) in the 1990 Groundwater Quality Assessment Report (GWQAR) (HSW 1991) for the CRSP that a second dye-tracer study be conducted during the wet weather season. The procedures and materials were reviewed, and a field inspection of the monitoring sites was performed in the fall of 1991. The actual test commenced during the first week of February 1992 with a 4-week baseline monitoring period to determine the inherent variability of the emission spectra within the wavelength range characteristic of Rhodamine WT (RWT) and Fluorescent Brightener 28 (FB28) or similar naturally occuring compounds within in the aquifer. This is commonly referred as background in discussion of minimum detectable levels of dyes. On March 13, RWT and FB28 were injected; weekly monitoring began with the collection of the first set of detectors on March 19. The test was originally scheduled to conclude after 12 weeks but was extended to 18 weeks when no definitive results were obtained.

  14. Gradient Index Microlens Implanted in Prefrontal Cortex of Mouse Does Not Affect Behavioral Test Performance over Time

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seon A.; Holly, Kevin S.; Voziyanov, Vladislav; Villalba, Stephanie L.; Tong, Rudi; Grigsby, Holly E.; Glasscock, Edward; Szele, Francis G.; Vlachos, Ioannis; Murray, Teresa A.

    2016-01-01

    Implanted gradient index lenses have extended the reach of standard multiphoton microscopy from the upper layers of the mouse cortex to the lower cortical layers and even subcortical regions. These lenses have the clarity to visualize dynamic activities, such as calcium transients, with subcellular and millisecond resolution and the stability to facilitate repeated imaging over weeks and months. In addition, behavioral tests can be used to correlate performance with observed changes in network function and structure that occur over time. Yet, this raises the questions, does an implanted microlens have an effect on behavioral tests, and if so, what is the extent of the effect? To answer these questions, we compared the performance of three groups of mice in three common behavioral tests. A gradient index lens was implanted in the prefrontal cortex of experimental mice. We compared their performance with mice that had either a cranial window or a sham surgery. Three presurgical and five postsurgical sets of behavioral tests were performed over seven weeks. Behavioral tests included rotarod, foot fault, and Morris water maze. No significant differences were found between the three groups, suggesting that microlens implantation did not affect performance. The results for the current study clear the way for combining behavioral studies with gradient index lens imaging in the prefrontal cortex, and potentially other regions of the mouse brain, to study structural, functional, and behavioral relationships in the brain. PMID:26799938

  15. Combining Push Pull Tracer Tests and Microbial DNA and mRNA Analysis to Assess In-Situ Groundwater Nitrate Transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henson, W.; Graham, W. D.; Huang, L.; Ogram, A.

    2015-12-01

    Nitrogen transformation mechanisms in the Upper Floridan Aquifer (UFA) are still poorly understood because of karst aquifer complexity and spatiotemporal variability in nitrate and carbon loading. Transformation rates have not been directly measured in the aquifer. This study quantifies nitrate-nitrogen transformation potential in the UFA using single well push-pull tracer injection (PPT) experiments combined with microbial characterization of extracted water via qPCR and RT-qPCR of selected nitrate reduction genes. Tracer tests with chloride and nitrate ± carbon were executed in two wells representing anoxic and oxic geochemical end members in a spring groundwater contributing area. A significant increase in number of microbes with carbon addition suggests stimulated growth. Increases in the activities of denitrification genes (nirK and nirS) as measured by RT-qPCR were not observed. However, only microbes suspended in the tracer were obtained, ignoring effects of aquifer material biofilms. Increases in nrfA mRNA and ammonia concentrations were observed, supporting Dissimilatory Reduction of Nitrate to Ammonia (DNRA) as a reduction mechanism. In the oxic aquifer, zero order nitrate loss rates ranged from 32 to 89 nmol /L*hr with no added carbon and 90 to 240 nmol /L*hr with carbon. In the anoxic aquifer, rates ranged from 18 to 95 nmol /L*hr with no added carbon and 34 to 207 nmol /L*hr with carbon. These loss rates are low; 13 orders of magnitude less than the loads applied in the contributing area each year, however they do indicate that losses can occur in oxic and anoxic aquifers with and without carbon. These rates may include, ammonia adsorption, uptake, or denitrification in aquifer material biofilms. Rates with and without carbon addition for both aquifers were similar, suggesting aquifer redox state and carbon availability alone are insufficient to predict response to nutrient additions without characterization of microbial response. Surprisingly, these

  16. Generalization Gradients in Human Predictive Learning: Effects of Discrimination Training and within-Subjects Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vervliet, Bram; Iberico, Carlos; Vervoort, Ellen; Baeyens, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Generalization gradients have been investigated widely in animal conditioning experiments, but much less so in human predictive learning tasks. Here, we apply the experimental design of a recent study on conditioned fear generalization in humans (Lissek et al., 2008) to a predictive learning task, and examine the effects of a number of relevant…

  17. A test of alternative models of diversification in tropical rainforests: Ecological gradients vs. rainforest refugia

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Christopher J.; Smith, Thomas B.; Larison, Brenda; Moritz, Craig

    1999-01-01

    Comparison of mitochondrial and morphological divergence in eight populations of a widespread leaf-litter skink is used to determine the relative importance of geographic isolation and natural selection in generating phenotypic diversity in the Wet Tropics Rainforest region of Australia. The populations occur in two geographically isolated regions, and within each region, in two different habitats (closed rainforest and tall open forest) that span a well characterized ecological gradient. Morphological differences among ancient geographic isolates (separated for several million years, judging by their mitochondrial DNA sequence divergence) were slight, but morphological and life history differences among habitats were large and occurred despite moderate to high levels of mitochondrial gene flow. A field experiment identified avian predation as one potential agent of natural selection. These results indicate that natural selection operating across ecological gradients can be more important than geographic isolation in similar habitats in generating phenotypic diversity. In addition, our results indicate that selection is sufficiently strong to overcome the homogenizing effects of gene flow, a necessary first step toward speciation in continuously distributed populations. Because ecological gradients may be a source of evolutionary novelty, and perhaps new species, their conservation warrants greater attention. This is particularly true in tropical regions, where most reserves do not include ecological gradients and transitional habitats. PMID:10570165

  18. Generalization Gradients in Human Predictive Learning: Effects of Discrimination Training and within-Subjects Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vervliet, Bram; Iberico, Carlos; Vervoort, Ellen; Baeyens, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Generalization gradients have been investigated widely in animal conditioning experiments, but much less so in human predictive learning tasks. Here, we apply the experimental design of a recent study on conditioned fear generalization in humans (Lissek et al., 2008) to a predictive learning task, and examine the effects of a number of relevant…

  19. Analysis of a Multi-Well Tracer Test at a Bank Filtration Site in an Arid Environment of El Paso, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Fattah, A. N.; Langford, R.; Schulze-Makuch, D.; Sheng, Z.

    2005-12-01

    River bank filtered water is an important component of the drinking water production in many areas of the world. In riverbank filtration, the removal of pathogens is an important task for the production of good quality drinking water. The hydrogeological factors and spatial changes in the water's microbiology during the transport from the river to the aquifer have important implications on the quality of the produced water. The goal of this study was to investigate riverbank infiltration effectiveness in arid environments such as that of El Paso, Texas. The hydrostratigraphic units and hydrogeologic conditions were characterized with lithologic samples obtained from all boreholes collected during the construction of twelve observation wells and one production well in the site, which were constructed near the artificial stream to provide geologic and hydrologic information. The shallow aquifer is composed of three unites: high hydraulic conductivity layers on the top and bottom, and low conductivity layer in the middle. In this study advective transport of microspheres was compared with a conservative tracer such as bromide. Bromide was injected into an observation well at the channel margin. Simultaneously, 1, 6 and 10 micron-diameter fluorescent microspheres equivalent to Giardia, Cryptosporidium, and bacteria sizes were injected into the stream bottom and two observation wells to assess the suitability of microspheres as abiotic analogs in future investigations involving the physical aspects of bacteria and protozoa transport behavior. The 17.8 day-tracer test provided valuable results that are relevant to the transport of pathogens through the subsurface under riverbank filtration conditions. The 1 micron-size microspheres were abundant in the pumping and observation wells and showed multiple peaks similar to the bromide results. Microspheres from the three injection sites had distinctly different transport paths and rates. The 6 and 10 micron-size microspheres

  20. Tracers for Characterizing Enhanced Geothermal Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Karen Wright; George Redden; Carl D. Palmer; Harry Rollins; Mark Stone; Mason Harrup; Laurence C. Hull

    2010-02-01

    Information about the times of thermal breakthrough and subsequent rates of thermal drawdown in enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) is necessary for reservoir management, designing fracture stimulation and well drilling programs, and forecasting economic return. Thermal breakthrough in heterogeneous porous media can be estimated using conservative tracers and assumptions about heat transfer rates; however, tracers that undergo temperature-dependent changes can provide more detailed information about the thermal profile along the flow path through the reservoir. To be effectively applied, the thermal reaction rates of such temperature sensitive traces must be well characterized for the range of conditions that exist in geothermal systems. Reactive tracers proposed in the literature include benzoic and carboxylic acids (Adams) and organic esters and amides (Robinson et al.); however, the practical temperature range over which these tracers can be applied (100-275°C) is somewhat limited. Further, for organic esters and amides, little is known about their sorption to the reservoir matrix and how such reactions impact data interpretation. Another approach involves tracers where the reference condition is internal to the tracer itself. Two examples are: 1) racemization of polymeric amino acids, and 2) mineral thermoluminescence. In these cases internal ratios of states are measured rather than extents of degradation and mass loss. Racemization of poly-L-lactic acid (for example) is temperature sensitive and therefore can be used as a temperature-recording tracer depending on the rates of racemization and stability of the amino acids. Heat-induced quenching of thermoluminescence of pre-irradiated LiF can also be used. To protect the tracers from alterations (extraneous reactions, dissolution) in geothermal environments we are encapsulating the tracers in core-shell colloidal structures that will subsequently be tested for their ability to be transported and to protect the

  1. Characterisation of a DNAPL source zone in a porous aquifer using the Partitioning Interwell Tracer Test and an inverse modelling approach.

    PubMed

    Dridi, Lotfi; Pollet, Ingrid; Razakarisoa, Olivier; Schäfer, Gerhard

    2009-06-26

    In this paper, we discuss the results of a Partitioning Interwell Tracer Test (PITT) performed in a large scale experiment with a well-defined TCE spill, and present a novel combined analytical-numerical inverse modelling approach using measured concentration profiles within a TCE plume to predict the distribution of the DNAPL in a virtual vertical plane of the source. The proposed inverse modelling approach assumes local thermodynamic equilibrium of the distribution of TCE between the NAPL phase and the aqueous phase and no decay or sorption of the dissolved TCE concentrations downstream of the spill area. The analytical part of the inverse modelling approach contains two steps. As a first step, the location of the contaminant in a virtual vertical plane of a porous medium is fixed by using measured concentration profiles and considering the dissolution of the organic phase under equilibrium conditions. In the second step, the volume of contaminant entrapped in the source cells is estimated. A multiphase advective-dispersive transport model is used in the final step to adjust the volumes quantified in the second step. The predictions are highly dependent on the quantity and quality of the data in space and time. From the PITT-breakthrough curves measured at the pumping well, a mean TCE saturation in the sweep zone of 0.0004 was derived, which is very low compared to that determined at the local scale. In a second analysis, tracer breakthrough curves available at measuring points placed closely downstream and upstream of the presumed source zone, were used to explain why the globally obtained DNAPL saturation was very low compared to the "real", locally evaluated TCE saturations in the source zone. This was principally caused by the overall travel time compared to the short travel time of the tracers in the source zone. Another reason is that due to bypassing, only part of the volume of tracer injected had been in contact and had eventually interacted with the

  2. A study of microindentation hardness tests by mechanism-based strain gradient plasticity

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Y.; Xue, Z.; Gao, H.; Nix, W. D.; Xia, Z. C.

    2000-08-01

    We recently proposed a theory of mechanism-based strain gradient (MSG) plasticity to account for the size dependence of plastic deformation at micron- and submicron-length scales. The MSG plasticity theory connects micron-scale plasticity to dislocation theories via a multiscale, hierarchical framework linking Taylor's dislocation hardening model to strain gradient plasticity. Here we show that the theory of MSG plasticity, when used to study micro-indentation, indeed reproduces the linear dependence observed in experiments, thus providing an important self-consistent check of the theory. The effects of pileup, sink-in, and the radius of indenter tip have been taken into account in the indentation model. In accomplishing this objective, we have generalized the MSG plasticity theory to include the elastic deformation in the hierarchical framework. (c) 2000 Materials Research Society.

  3. Monitoring High Velocity Salt Tracer via 4D Electrical Resistivity Tomography - Possibility for Salt Tracer Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doro, K. O.; Cirpka, O. A.; Patzelt, A.; Leven, C.

    2014-12-01

    Hydrogeological testing in a tomographic sequence as shown by the use of hydraulic tomography, allows an improvement of the spatial resolution of subsurface parameters. In this regard, recent studies show increasing interest in tracer tomography which involves sequential and spatially separated tracer injections and the measurement of their corresponding tracer breakthrough at different locations and depths. Such concentration measurements however require large experimental efforts and can be simplified by geophysical tracer monitoring techniques such as electrical resistivity. In this study, we present the use of 4-D, cross-hole electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) for monitoring salt tracer experiments in high velocity flow fields. For our study, we utilized a set up that enables the conduction of salt tracer experiments with complete recovery within 84 hours over a transport distance of 16 m. This allows the repetition of the experiments with different injection depths for a tomographic salt tracer testing. For ERT monitoring, we designed modular borehole electrodes for repeated usage in a flexible manner. We also assess the use of a high speed resistivity data acquisition mode for field scale tracer monitoring ensuring high spatial and temporal resolution without sacrificing data accuracy. We applied our approach at the Lauswiesen test site, Tübingen, Germany. In our 10 m × 10 m tracer monitoring domain with 16 borehole electrodes, we acquired 4650 data points in less than 18 minutes for each monitoring cycle. Inversion results show that the tracer could be successfully imaged using this approach. The results show that repeated salt tracer tests can be efficiently monitored at a high resolution with ERT which gives the possibility for salt tracer tomography at field scale. Our results also provide a data base for extending current hydrogeophysical inversion approaches to field scale data.

  4. Results from air-injection and tracer testing in the upper Tiva Canyon, Bow Ridge Fault, and upper Paintbrush contact alcoves of the Exploratory Studies Facility, August 1994 through July 1996, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    LeCain, Gary D.

    1998-01-01

    Air-injection and tracer testing were conducted in the upper Tiva Canyon, Bow Ridge Fault, and upper Paintbrush contact alcoves in the Exploratory Studies Facility at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, from August 1994 to July 1991. The study was conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy.

  5. Biological tracer method

    DOEpatents

    Strong-Gunderson, Janet M.; Palumbo, Anthony V.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention is a biological tracer method for characterizing the movement of a material through a medium, comprising the steps of: introducing a biological tracer comprising a microorganism having ice nucleating activity into a medium; collecting at least one sample of the medium from a point removed from the introduction point; and analyzing the sample for the presence of the biological tracer. The present invention is also a method for using a biological tracer as a label for material identification by introducing a biological tracer having ice nucleating activity into a material, collecting a sample of a portion of the labelled material and analyzing the sample for the presence of the biological tracer.

  6. Biological tracer method

    DOEpatents

    Strong-Gunderson, J.M.; Palumbo, A.V.

    1998-09-15

    The present invention is a biological tracer method for characterizing the movement of a material through a medium, comprising the steps of: introducing a biological tracer comprising a microorganism having ice nucleating activity into a medium; collecting at least one sample of the medium from a point removed from the introduction point; and analyzing the sample for the presence of the biological tracer. The present invention is also a method for using a biological tracer as a label for material identification by introducing a biological tracer having ice nucleating activity into a material, collecting a sample of a portion of the labelled material and analyzing the sample for the presence of the biological tracer. 2 figs.

  7. Analysis of multicomopnent groundwater flow in karst aquifer by CFC, tritium, tracer test and modelling, case study at Skaistkalnes vicinity, Latvia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bikshe, Janis; Babre, Alise; Delina, Aija; Popovs, Konrads

    2014-05-01

    Groundwater in karst environments tends to have difficulties to distinguish multiple flows if several sources of water are present. Skaistkalne vicinity faces with such situation where old groundwater, fresh groundwater and inflow from river Iecava occurs. Attempts were made to distinguish groundwater residence time of multiple components of water applying CFC and tritium dating techniques supplied by tracer test and numerical model of study area. Study area covers territory between two rivers Iecava and Memele with water level difference of 7 meters and horizontal distance of 2.2 kilometres between both. Study area consists of karst affected Devonian gypsum and carbonaceous rocks covered by Quaternary low to high permeable deposits. Confined groundwater at depth of 10-25 meters where analysed by CFC's and tritium. At this depth groundwater exhibits anoxic reducing environment that has caused degradation of CFC's at similar degree in all samples. Taking it into account, mean residence time based on CFC piston flow model is 22 - 42 years and 28 - 34 years based on binary mixing model. Tritium results show signs of incensement of groundwater residence time towards discharge area. CFC combined with tritium proved increased vertical velocity in middle part between the rivers likely caused by hydrogeological window in Quaternary deposits created by karst processes. Numerical model (Delina et al. 2012) was applied and calculations yielded groundwater flow velocity rate at 0.3 - 1 m/day in area between the rivers. Investigation of CFC data resulted in possible groundwater flow rate of at a minimum of 0.2 m/day although it's not applicable to all sampled wells due to specific hydrogeological conditions. Tracer test was made between the rivers in order to distinguish main water flow paths and flow velocity. Results showed that very high permeable conduits connect rivers and karst lakes with velocity rates of 800 - 1300 m/day. Complex investigation leads to conclude that

  8. First Beam and High-Gradient Cryomodule Commissioning Results of the Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, Darren; et al.

    2015-06-01

    The advanced superconducting test accelerator at Fermilab has accelerated electrons to 20 MeV and, separately, the International Linear Collider (ILC) style 8-cavity cryomodule has achieved the ILC performance milestone of 31.5 MV/m per cavity. When fully completed, the accelerator will consist of a photoinjector, one ILC-type cryomodule, multiple acceler