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Sample records for graft model autograft

  1. Amniotic membrane graft for primary pterygium: comparison with conjunctival autograft and topical mitomycin C treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ma, D. H.; See, L.; Liau, S.; Tsai, R. J.

    2000-01-01

    AIM—To study the efficacy and safety of amniotic membrane graft as an adjunctive therapy after removal of primary pterygium, and to compare the clinical outcome with conjunctival autograft and topical mitomycin C.
METHODS—80 eyes of 71 patients with primary pterygia were treated with excision followed by amniotic membrane graft. The result was compared retrospectively with 56 eyes of 50 patients receiving conjunctival autograft, and 54 eyes of 46 patients receiving topical mitomycin C. Patients were followed for at least 6 months, and the averaged follow up periods for the three groups were 13.8, 22.8, and 18.4 months, respectively.
RESULTS—There were three recurrences (3.8%) in the amniotic membrane graft group, three recurrences (5.4%) in the conjunctival autograft group, and two recurrences (3.7%) in the topical mitomycin C group. There was no significant difference in recurrence rate among the three groups (p = 0.879). No major complications occurred in the amniotic membrane graft group or the conjunctival autograft group. One case of infectious scleritis due to scleral ischaemia occurred in the topical mitomycin C group.
CONCLUSION—This study showed that amniotic membrane graft was as effective as conjunctival autograft and mitomycin C in preventing pterygium recurrence, and can be considered as a preferred grafting procedure for primary pterygium.

 PMID:10966947

  2. Iliac Crest Bone Graft versus Local Autograft or Allograft for Lumbar Spinal Fusion: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Tuchman, Alexander; Brodke, Darrel S.; Youssef, Jim A.; Meisel, Hans-Jörg; Dettori, Joseph R.; Park, Jong-Beom; Yoon, S. Tim; Wang, Jeffrey C.

    2016-01-01

    Study Design  Systematic review. Objective  To compare the effectiveness and safety between iliac crest bone graft (ICBG) and local autologous bone and allograft in the lumbar spine. Methods  A systematic search of multiple major medical reference databases identified studies evaluating spinal fusion in patients with degenerative joint disease using ICBG, local autograft, or allograft in the thoracolumbar spine. Results  Six comparative studies met our inclusion criteria. A “low” strength of the overall body of evidence suggested no difference in fusion percentages in the lumbar spine between local autograft and ICBG. We found no difference in fusion percentages based on low evidence comparing allograft with ICBG autograft. There were no differences in pain or functional results comparing local autograft or allograft with ICBG autograft. Donor site pain and hematoma/seroma occurred more frequently in ICBG autograft group for lumbar fusion procedures. There was low evidence around the estimate of patients with donor site pain following ICBG harvesting, ranging from 16.7 to 20%. With respect to revision, low evidence demonstrated no difference between allograft and ICBG autograft. There was no evidence comparing patients receiving allograft with local autograft for fusion, pain, functional, and safety outcomes. Conclusion  In the lumbar spine, ICBG, local autograft, and allograft have similar effectiveness in terms of fusion rates, pain scores, and functional outcomes. However, ICBG is associated with an increased risk for donor site-related complications. Significant limitations exist in the available literature when comparing ICBG, local autograft, and allograft for lumbar fusion, and thus ICBG versus other fusion methods necessitates further investigation. PMID:27556001

  3. Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) autograft versus graft substitutes: what do patients prefer?—A clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Maharaj, Monish M.; Phan, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Background Patient dissatisfaction with donor site morbidity has led to the search for alternative grafting options and techniques. This report compares patient satisfaction rates between autograft and graft substitutes for anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). Methods This study was performed with the approval of the local area health network ethics committee. Over a 9-year period, the author performed 574 ACDF procedures (697 levels). Of these, 22 patients had previous surgery with autograft, with a subsequent ACDF procedure performed using a graft substitute. Patients rated their satisfaction with pain, recovery, and preference of autograft versus a bone graft substitute. Graft substitutes used include: tricalcium phosphate/hydroxyapatite (TCP/HA) composite and iFactor placed within a polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cage. Results Results demonstrated that 21/22 patients achieved a solid fusion with the graft substitute. A total of 20/22 patients rated the autograft incision more painful than the anterior cervical incision, and 21/22 preferred the graft substitute. Three patients had adjacent segment disc replacement performed after autograft/ACDF. All patients reported preference for the total disc replacement (TDR) procedure in terms of recovery and postoperative pain. Conclusions Patient satisfaction with bone graft substitutes is very high compared with autograft with all but one (21/22) preferring the graft substitute option. The author questions the traditional recommendation that autograft is the “gold standard” for ACDF. In modern age of graft substitutes, autograft should not be considered the gold standard, but an index option between other options for comparison. PMID:27683706

  4. Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) autograft versus graft substitutes: what do patients prefer?—A clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Maharaj, Monish M.; Phan, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Background Patient dissatisfaction with donor site morbidity has led to the search for alternative grafting options and techniques. This report compares patient satisfaction rates between autograft and graft substitutes for anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). Methods This study was performed with the approval of the local area health network ethics committee. Over a 9-year period, the author performed 574 ACDF procedures (697 levels). Of these, 22 patients had previous surgery with autograft, with a subsequent ACDF procedure performed using a graft substitute. Patients rated their satisfaction with pain, recovery, and preference of autograft versus a bone graft substitute. Graft substitutes used include: tricalcium phosphate/hydroxyapatite (TCP/HA) composite and iFactor placed within a polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cage. Results Results demonstrated that 21/22 patients achieved a solid fusion with the graft substitute. A total of 20/22 patients rated the autograft incision more painful than the anterior cervical incision, and 21/22 preferred the graft substitute. Three patients had adjacent segment disc replacement performed after autograft/ACDF. All patients reported preference for the total disc replacement (TDR) procedure in terms of recovery and postoperative pain. Conclusions Patient satisfaction with bone graft substitutes is very high compared with autograft with all but one (21/22) preferring the graft substitute option. The author questions the traditional recommendation that autograft is the “gold standard” for ACDF. In modern age of graft substitutes, autograft should not be considered the gold standard, but an index option between other options for comparison.

  5. Heterografting with nonself rootstocks induces genes involved in stress responses at the graft interface when compared with autografted controls

    PubMed Central

    Cookson, S. J.

    2014-01-01

    Although grafting is widely used in the agriculture of fruit-bearing crops, little is known about graft union formation in particular when two different species are grafted together. It is fascinating that two different plant species brought together can develop harmoniously as one organism for many decades. The objective of this study was to determine whether grafting two different grapevine genotypes alters gene expression at the graft interface in comparison to the presumably wound-like gene expression changes induced in autografts. Gene expression at the graft interface was studied 3, 7, 14, and 28 d after grafting in hetero- and autografts of grapevine (Vitis spp.). Genes differentially expressed between the hetero- and autografts during graft union formation were identified. These genes were clustered according to their expression profile over the time course. MapMan and Gene Ontology enrichment analysis revealed the coordinated upregulation of genes from numerous functional categories related to stress responses in the hetero- compared to the autografts. This indicates that heterografting with nonself rootstocks upregulates stress responses at the graft interface, potentially suggesting that the cells of the graft interface can detect the presence of a nonself grafting partner. PMID:24692649

  6. Grafting of burns with widely meshed autograft split skin and Langerhans cell-depressed allograft split skin overlay

    SciTech Connect

    Alsbjoern, B.F.S.; Sorensen, B.

    1986-12-01

    Extensively burned patients suffer from lack of sufficient autologous donor skin. Meshing and wide expansion of the obtained split skin has met the requirement to a large degree. However, the wider the expansion, the less chance of a proper take. By covering widely expanded autografts with viable cadaver split skin, the take has been improved. If the epidermal Langerhans cells in the cadaver split skin are depressed by ultraviolet B light and glucocorticosteroids before grafting, a prolonged allograft take can be achieved and the healing of the underlying autografts is ensured for an extended period. Grafting results in 6 patients with extensive burns are reported.

  7. Periumbilical fat auto-graft associated to a porous orbital implant for socket reconstruction after enucleation.

    PubMed

    Medel, Ramon; Alonso, Tirso; Pelaez, Francisco; Vasquez, LuzMaria

    2016-08-01

    Having to remove the sclera, fat and the optic nerve in patients undergoing an enucleation, translates in a larger volume that needs to be replaced to achieve good motility and aesthetic results. Using a 20 or 22 mm implant can only partially replace the removed volume. We report the results of our enucleation technique, which includes the use of a porous orbital implant combined with a primary fat graft to replace a higher percentage of the removed volume to achieve a better cosmetic outcome and to avoid implant related complications in high risk patients. Prospective, non-randomized study of enucleated patients for whom porous orbital implantation was performed with anterior placement of a fat auto-graft. The development of implant extrusion or exposure was recorded as well as the presence of conjunctival wound dehiscence and infection. Orbital volume was clinically and radiologically evaluated as well. Twenty-eight patients were included, with a postop follow-up of at least 6 months (6-79 months). No cases of migration or extrusion were found. One case of a large exposure resolved completely. All MRI demonstrated proper implant-graft integration and vascularisation. The aesthetic result and the symmetry were very adequate, with Hertel differences of less than 2 mm in all cases and good motility range. The fat graft is well tolerated, showing low incidence of implant-related complications whilst maintaining good volume and motility.

  8. Carbon dioxide laser ablation with immediate autografting in a full-thickness porcine burn model.

    PubMed Central

    Glatter, R D; Goldberg, J S; Schomacker, K T; Compton, C C; Flotte, T J; Bua, D P; Greaves, K W; Nishioka, N S; Sheridan, R L

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the long-term clinical and histologic outcome of immediate autografting of full-thickness burn wounds ablated with a high-power continuous-wave CO2 laser to sharply débrided wounds in a porcine model. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Continuous-wave CO2 lasers have performed poorly as tools for burn excision because the large amount of thermal damage to viable subeschar tissues precluded successful autografting. However, a new technique, in which a high-power laser is rapidly scanned over the eschar, results in eschar vaporization without significant damage to underlying viable tissues, allowing successful immediate autografting. METHODS: Full-thickness paravertebral burn wounds measuring 36 cm2 were created on 11 farm swine. Wounds were ablated to adipose tissue 48 hours later using either a surgical blade or a 150-Watt continuous-wave CO2 laser deflected by an x-y galvanometric scanner that translated the beam over the tissue surface, removing 200 microm of tissue per scan. Both sites were immediately autografted and serially evaluated clinically and histologically for 180 days. RESULTS: The laser-treated sites were nearly bloodless. The mean residual thermal damage was 0.18+/-0.05 mm. The mean graft take was 96+/-11% in manual sites and 93+/-8% in laser sites. On postoperative day 7, the thickness of granulation tissue at the graft-wound bed interface was greater in laser-debrided sites. By postoperative day 180, the manual and laser sites were histologically identical. Vancouver scar assessment revealed no differences in scarring at postoperative day 180. CONCLUSIONS: Long-term scarring, based on Vancouver scar assessments and histologic evaluation, was equivalent at 6 months in laser-ablated and sharply excised sites. Should this technology become practical, the potential clinical implications include a reduction in surgical blood loss without sacrifice of immediate engraftment rates or long-term outcome. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3

  9. Posterolateral spinal fusion in a rabbit model using a collagen–mineral composite bone graft substitute

    PubMed Central

    Vizesi, F.; Cornwall, G. B.; Bell, D.; Oliver, R.; Yu, Y.

    2009-01-01

    Choosing the appropriate graft material to participate in the healing process in posterolateral spinal fusion continues to be a challenge. Combining synthetic graft materials with bone marrow aspirate (BMA) and autograft is a reasonable treatment option for surgeons to potentially reduce or replace the need for autograft. FormaGraft, a bone graft material comprising 12% bovine-derived collagen and 88% ceramic in the form of hydroxyapatite (HAp) and beta tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) was evaluated in three possible treatment modalities for posterior spinal fusion in a standard rabbit model. These three treatment groups were FormaGraft alone, FormaGraft soaked in autogenous BMA, and FormaGraft with BMA and iliac crest autograft. No statistically demonstrable benefits or adverse effects of the addition of BMA were found in the current study based on macroscopic, radiology or mechanical data. This may reflect, in part, the good to excellent results of the collagen HA/TCP composite material alone in a well healing bony bed. Histology did, however, reveal a benefit with the use of BMA. Combining FormaGraft with autograft and BMA achieved results equivalent to autograft alone. The mineral and organic nature of the material provided a material that facilitated fusion between the transverse processes in a standard preclinical posterolateral fusion model. PMID:19475437

  10. A polycaprolactone-tricalcium phosphate composite scaffold as an autograft-free spinal fusion cage in a sheep model.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Wu, Zhi-gang; Li, Xiao-kang; Guo, Zheng; Wu, Su-hua; Zhang, Yong-quan; Shi, Lei; Teoh, Swee-hin; Liu, Yu-chun; Zhang, Zhi-yong

    2014-07-01

    Titanium (Ti) based spinal fusion cages are frequently used in the clinics for the treatment of spinal degeneration and related diseases, however, their further clinical application is generally harassed by several drawbacks such as stress shielding, non-biodegradability and additional bone grafting procedure. Our earlier work has demonstrated the efficacy of a biodegradable macro-porous polycaprolactone-tricalcium phosphate (PCL-TCP) composite scaffold in promoting bony tissue ingrowth as well as its ability to sustain mechanical loads upon implantation into an orthotopic defect site. In this study, we investigated the use of PCL-TCP scaffold as an autograft-free spinal fusion cage in a preclinical sheep model over 12 months, and compared the fusion efficacy against Ti cages incorporated with autografts. Results showed that despite PCL-TCP scaffold as an autograft-free cage attaining a slower fusion rate at early stage (6 month), it achieved similar degree of spinal fusion efficacy as Ti cages aided with autograft at 12 month post-operation as evidenced by the radiographic and histological evaluation. PCL-TCP cages alone demonstrated better bone ingrowth with 2.6 fold higher bone/interspace ratio (B/I) and more homogeneous bone tissue distribution compared with that of the Ti cages (88.10  ±  3.63% vs. 33.74  ±  2.78%, p < 0.05) as seen from the histological and micro-CT analysis. Moreover, besides the bone tissue ingrowth, a quantitative approach was illustrated to accurately evaluate the osteointegration of fusion cage with surrounding bone tissue, and showed a 1.36 fold higher degree of osteointegration occurred in PCL-TCP cage group than Ti cage group (CS/PC: 79.31  ±  3.15% vs 58.44  ±  2.43%, p < 0.05). Furthermore, biomechanical analysis showed comparable mechanical strength of fused segments in both groups in terms of the range of motion and stiffness at 12 month (p > 0.05). The degradation profile of the PCL-TCP cages was noted

  11. Skin regenerated from cultured epithelial autografts on full-thickness burn wounds from 6 days to 5 years after grafting. A light, electron microscopic and immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Compton, C C; Gill, J M; Bradford, D A; Regauer, S; Gallico, G G; O'Connor, N E

    1989-05-01

    Regeneration of skin from cultured keratinocyte autografts used in the treatment of full-thickness burn wounds was studied in 21 pediatric patients from 6 days to 5 years after grafting. Findings were compared both to controls of age- and site-matched normal skin and to controls for epithelial wound-healing, re-epithelialized interstices of meshed split-thickness skin grafts of comparable postgrafting age. Six days after transplantation, a mildly hypertrophic, flat epidermis with all normal strata had regenerated, and the process of de novo dermal-epidermal junction formation had begun. Hemidesmosomes, basal lamina, and anchoring fibrils reformed conjointly in punctate fashion along the attachment face of the grafts. Within 3 to 4 weeks, the dermal-epidermal junction was complete, but full maturation of anchoring fibrils required more than a year. The process was comparable to that observed in meshed graft interstices. Rete ridges regenerated from 6 weeks to 1 year after grafting. The subjacent connective tissue initially healed to form normal scar, but it remodeled dramatically, regenerated elastin, and resembled a true dermis within 4 to 5 years. Meshed-graft interstice controls showed no rete ridge regeneration, subepithelial connective tissue remodeling, or elastin production up to 5 years after grafting. Langerhans cells repopulated grafts within 1 week, and normal population densities were reached within 2 to 6 months. After 1 year, Langerhans cell densities were increased compared with normal skin but were lower than those in age-matched meshed graft controls. Melanocytes were present in cultures at the time of transplantation, but functional epidermal melanin units were not seen in groin- or axilla-derived grafts for 6 to 8 weeks or in sole-derived epidermis until a year or more after transplantation. Normal histologic features were maintained for years after grafting. Transitory pathologic changes including parakeratosis, dyskeratosis, and intraepithelial

  12. Transplantation of Tissue-Engineered Cartilage in an Animal Model (Xenograft and Autograft): Construct Validation.

    PubMed

    Nemoto, Hitoshi; Watson, Deborah; Masuda, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    Tissue engineering holds great promise for cartilage repair with minimal donor-site morbidity. The in vivo maturation of a tissue-engineered construct can be tested in the subcutaneous tissues of the same species for autografts or of immunocompromised animals for allografts or xenografts. This section describes detailed protocols for the surgical transplantation of a tissue-engineered construct into an animal model to assess construct validity.

  13. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction in a Rabbit Model Using Silk-Collagen Scaffold and Comparison with Autograft

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Fanggang; Shi, Zhongli; Liu, An; Guo, Peng; Yan, Shigui

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to perform an in vivo assessment of a novel silk-collagen scaffold for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. First, a silk-collagen scaffold was fabricated by combining sericin-extracted knitted silk fibroin mesh and type I collagen to mimic the components of the ligament. Scaffolds were electron-beam sterilized and rolled up to replace the ACL in 20 rabbits in the scaffold group, and autologous semitendinosus tendons were used to reconstruct the ACL in the autograft control group. At 4 and 16 weeks after surgery, grafts were retrieved and analyzed for neoligament regeneration and tendon-bone healing. To evaluate neoligament regeneration, H&E and immunohistochemical staining was performed, and to assess tendon-bone healing, micro-CT, biomechanical test, H&E and Russell-Movat pentachrome staining were performed. Cell infiltration increased over time in the scaffold group, and abundant fibroblast-like cells were found in the core of the scaffold graft at 16 weeks postoperatively. Tenascin-C was strongly positive in newly regenerated tissue at 4 and 16 weeks postoperatively in the scaffold group, similar to observations in the autograft group. Compared with the autograft group, tendon-bone healing was better in the scaffold group with trabecular bone growth into the scaffold. The results indicate that the silk-collagen scaffold has considerable potential for clinical application. PMID:25938408

  14. Multiscale Mechanobiology of De Novo Bone Generation and Remodeling & Adaptation of Autograft in a Common Ovine Femur Model

    PubMed Central

    Knothe Tate, Melissa L.; Dolejs, Scott; McBride, Sarah; Miller, R. Matthew; Knothe, Ulf

    2013-01-01

    The link between mechanics and biology in generation and adaptation of bone has been studied for more than a century in the context of skeletal development and fracture healing. However, the interplay between mechanics and biology in de novo generation of bone in postnatal defects as well as healing of morcellized bone graft or massive cortical bone autografts is less well understood. To address this, here we integrate insights from our previously published studies describing the mechanobiology on both de novo bone generation and graft healing in a common ovine femoral defect model. Studying these effects in a common experimental model provides a unique opportunity to elucidate factors conducive to harnessing the regenerative power of the periosteum and ultimately to provide mechanistic insights into the multiscale mechanobiology of bone generation, remodeling and adaptation. Taken together, the studies indicate that, as long as adequate, directional transport of cells and molecules can be insured (e.g. with peristeum in situ or a delivery device), biological factors intrinsic to the periosteum suffice to bridge critical sized bone defects, even in the absence of a patent blood supply. Furthermore, mechanical stimuli are crucial for the success of periosteal bone generation and bone graft healing. Interestingly, areas of highest periosteal strain around defects correlate with highest areas albeit less mineralized areas of new bone. This may indicate a role for convection enhanced transport of cells and molecules in modulation of tissue generation by pluripotent cells that ingress into the defect center, away from the peristeum and toward the surface of the intramedullary nail that fills the medullary cavity. These insights bring us much closer to understanding the mechanobiological environment and stimuli that stimulate the proliferation and differentiation of periosteum derived progenitor cells and ultimately drive the generation of new bone tissue. Furthermore

  15. Anatomic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with quadriceps tendon autograft.

    PubMed

    Rabuck, Stephen J; Musahl, Volker; Fu, Freddie H; West, Robin V

    2013-01-01

    A multitude of graft options exist including both allograft and autograft sources for reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament. With recent concerns regarding the early graft failure and cost-effectiveness of allograft sources, more attention has been directed toward autograft options. However, autograft harvest has been associated with specific morbidity that can result in suboptimal outcomes. The quadriceps tendon is an excellent biomechanical and biologic option.

  16. Comparison of different autografts for aural cartilage in aesthetic rhinoplasty: is the tragal cartilage graft a viable alternative?

    PubMed

    Zinser, Max J; Siessegger, Mathias; Thamm, Oliver; Theodorou, Panangiotis; Maegele, Mark; Ritter, Lutz; Kreppel, Matthias; Sailer, Martin H; Zöller, Joachim E; Mischkowski, Robert A

    2013-12-01

    Auricular cartilage is an important source of grafts for various reconstructive procedures such as aesthetic rhinoplasty. The purpose of this investigation was to compare tragal cartilage with auricular cartilage harvested from the concha and scapha, and describe its clinical viability, indications, and morbidity in rhinoplasty. A total of 150 augmentation rhinoplasties with a total of 170 grafts were included. The donor sites were tragus (n=136), concha (n=26), and scapha (n=8). The time needed to harvest the grafts, the donor site morbidity, and the indications for operation were recorded. The anthropometric changes to 4 auricular variables after the cartilage had been harvested were analysed and compared with those on the opposite side in 48 patients using Student's paired t-test. Intraobserver reliability was assessed using Pearson's intraclass correlation. The mean (SD) harvesting time was 27 (8) min for the concha, 4.5 (1.4) min for the tragus, and 5.7 (1.6) min for the scapha. The largest graft was taken from the concha (28×19 mm), followed by the tragus (20×12 mm), and the scapha (18×6 mm). The grafts were placed at the following sites: tip grafts (n=123), columella struts (n=80), shield (n=20), rim (n=17), and dorsal onlay (n=15). Harvesting tragal cartilage is safe, simple, fast, and has a low morbidity, but it can affect the patient's ability to wear earphones. Tragal cartilage is a good alternative for nasal reconstruction if a graft of no longer than 20 mm is required.

  17. Acellular allogeneic nerve grafting combined with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation for the repair of long-segment sciatic nerve defects: biomechanics and validation of mathematical models

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ya-jun; Zhao, Bao-lin; Lv, Hao-ze; Qin, Zhi-gang; Luo, Min

    2016-01-01

    We hypothesized that a chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft used in combination with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation would be an effective treatment for long-segment sciatic nerve defects. To test this, we established rabbit models of 30 mm sciatic nerve defects, and treated them using either an autograft or a chemically decellularized allogeneic nerve graft with or without simultaneous transplantation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. We compared the tensile properties, electrophysiological function and morphology of the damaged nerve in each group. Sciatic nerves repaired by the allogeneic nerve graft combined with stem cell transplantation showed better recovery than those repaired by the acellular allogeneic nerve graft alone, and produced similar results to those observed with the autograft. These findings confirm that a chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft combined with transplantation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells is an effective method of repairing long-segment sciatic nerve defects. PMID:27651781

  18. Acellular allogeneic nerve grafting combined with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation for the repair of long-segment sciatic nerve defects: biomechanics and validation of mathematical models

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ya-jun; Zhao, Bao-lin; Lv, Hao-ze; Qin, Zhi-gang; Luo, Min

    2016-01-01

    We hypothesized that a chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft used in combination with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation would be an effective treatment for long-segment sciatic nerve defects. To test this, we established rabbit models of 30 mm sciatic nerve defects, and treated them using either an autograft or a chemically decellularized allogeneic nerve graft with or without simultaneous transplantation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. We compared the tensile properties, electrophysiological function and morphology of the damaged nerve in each group. Sciatic nerves repaired by the allogeneic nerve graft combined with stem cell transplantation showed better recovery than those repaired by the acellular allogeneic nerve graft alone, and produced similar results to those observed with the autograft. These findings confirm that a chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft combined with transplantation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells is an effective method of repairing long-segment sciatic nerve defects.

  19. Irradiated mandibular autografts

    SciTech Connect

    Hamaker, R.C.; Singer, M.I.; Shockley, W.W.; Pugh, N.; Shidnia, H.

    1983-09-15

    The cosmetic and functional disability associated with mandibular resection has been a major problem to the patient with direct invasion of the mandible by oral cancer. Marginal resections with combined postoperative radiation therapy have frequently been substituted for the more preferred segmental resections and resultant deformities. Presented are 15 cases of oral cavity cancer involving resection of the mandible, immediate radiation to 10,000 rad, and primary reconstruction as irradiated mandibular autografts. The longest following is 4 years and 3 months, with a success rate of 66%. Morbidity is minimal as compared to autogenous bone grafting. Tumor size, previous radiation, or use of regional flaps have not been a factor in the success of this method in reconstruction of the mandible primarily.

  20. Autologous Graft Thickness Affects Scar Contraction and Quality in a Porcine Excisional Wound Model

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Lloyd F.; Wu, Jesse C.; Tucker, David I.; Chan, Maren M.; Christy, Robert J.; Hale, Robert G.; Leung, Kai P.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Texture, color, and durability are important characteristics to consider for skin replacement in conspicuous and/or mobile regions of the body such as the face, neck, and hands. Although autograft thickness is a known determinant of skin quality, few studies have correlated the subjective and objective characters of skin graft healing with their associated morphologic and cellular profiles. Defining these relationships may help guide development and evaluation of future skin replacement strategies. Methods: Six-centimeter-diameter full-thickness wounds were created on the back of female Yorkshire pigs and covered by autografts of variable thicknesses. Skin quality was assessed on day 120 using an observer scar assessment score and objective determinations for scar contraction, erythema, pigmentation, and surface irregularities. Histological, histochemical, and immunohistochemical assessments were performed. Results: Thick grafts demonstrated lower observer scar assessment score (better quality) and decreased erythema, pigmentation, and surface irregularities. Histologically, thin grafts resulted in scar-like collagen proliferation while thick grafts preserves the dermal architecture. Increased vascularity and prolonged and increased cellular infiltration were observed among thin grafts. In addition, thin grafts contained predominately dense collagen fibers, whereas thick grafts had loosely arranged collagen. α-Smooth muscle actin staining for myofibroblasts was observed earlier and persisted longer among thinner grafts. Conclusions: Graft thickness is an important determinant of skin quality. High-quality skin replacements are associated with preserved collagen architecture, decreased neovascularization, and decreased inflammatory cellular infiltration. This model, using autologous skin as a metric of quality, may give a more informative analysis of emerging skin replacement strategies. PMID:26301157

  1. Increased Risk of Revision after ACL Reconstruction with Soft Tissue Allograft Compared to Autograft

    PubMed Central

    Maletis, Gregory; Chen, Jason; Inacio, Maria Carolina Secorun; Love, Rebecca; Funahashi, Tadashi Ted

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The use of allograft tissue for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) remains controversial. Numerous meta-analysis and systematic reviews of small clinical studies have not found differences between autograft and allograft outcomes but large registry studies have shown an increased risk of revision with allografts. The purpose of this study was to compare the risk of aseptic revision between bone-patellar tendon-bone (BPTB) autografts, hamstring tendon autografts and soft tissue allografts. Methods: A retrospective cohort study of prospectively collected data was conducted using an US ACLR Registry. A cohort of primary unilateral ACLR cases reconstructed with BPTB autografts, hamstring autografts and soft tissue allografts (from any site) was identified. Aseptic revision was the end point of the study. Type of graft and allograft processing methods (non-processed, <1.8Mrads with and without chemical processing (Allowash or AlloTrue methods), >1.8 Mrads irradiation with and without chemical processing, and chemical processing alone (BioCleanse)) were the exposures of interest evaluated. Time from surgery was evaluated as an effect modifier. All analyses were adjusted for age, gender, and race. Kaplan-Meier curves and Cox proportional hazard models were employed. Hazard ratios (HR), 95% confidence intervals (CI) are provided. Results: The cohort had 14015 cases, 8924 (63.7%) were male, 6397 (45.6%) were White, 4557 (32.5%) cases used BPTB autograft, 3751 (26.8%) cases used soft tissue allograft and 5707 (40.7%) cases used hamstring autograft. The median age was 34.6 years-old (IQR 24.1-43.2) for allograft cases and 24.3 years-old (IQR 17.7-33.8) for hamstring autograft cases, and 22.0 years-old (IQR 17.6-30.0) for BPTB autograft cases. Compared to hamstring tendon autografts, an increased risk of revision was found in allografts processed with >1.8Mrads without chemical processing after 2.5 years (HR: 3.88 95%CI 1.48-10.12), and >1.8Mrads with

  2. Athymic rat model for evaluation of engineered anterior cruciate ligament grafts.

    PubMed

    Leong, Natalie L; Kabir, Nima; Arshi, Armin; Nazemi, Azadeh; Wu, Ben M; McAllister, David R; Petrigliano, Frank A

    2015-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture is a common ligamentous injury that often requires surgery because the ACL does not heal well without intervention. Current treatment strategies include ligament reconstruction with either autograft or allograft, which each have their associated limitations. Thus, there is interest in designing a tissue-engineered graft for use in ACL reconstruction. We describe the fabrication of an electrospun polymer graft for use in ACL tissue engineering. This polycaprolactone graft is biocompatible, biodegradable, porous, and is comprised of aligned fibers. Because an animal model is necessary to evaluate such a graft, this paper describes an intra-articular athymic rat model of ACL reconstruction that can be used to evaluate engineered grafts, including those seeded with xenogeneic cells. Representative histology and biomechanical testing results at 16 weeks postoperatively are presented, with grafts tested immediately post-implantation and contralateral native ACLs serving as controls. The present study provides a reproducible animal model with which to evaluate tissue engineered ACL grafts, and demonstrates the potential of a regenerative medicine approach to treatment of ACL rupture. PMID:25867958

  3. Non-Invasive Monitoring of Temporal and Spatial Blood Flow during Bone Graft Healing Using Diffuse Correlation Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Han, Songfeng; Hoffman, Michael D.; Proctor, Ashley R.; Vella, Joseph B.; Mannoh, Emmanuel A.; Barber, Nathaniel E.; Kim, Hyun Jin; Jung, Ki Won; Benoit, Danielle S. W.; Choe, Regine

    2015-01-01

    Vascular infiltration and associated alterations in microvascular blood flow are critical for complete bone graft healing. Therefore, real-time, longitudinal measurement of blood flow has the potential to successfully predict graft healing outcomes. Herein, we non-invasively measure longitudinal blood flow changes in bone autografts and allografts using diffuse correlation spectroscopy in a murine femoral segmental defect model. Blood flow was measured at several positions proximal and distal to the graft site before implantation and every week post-implantation for a total of 9 weeks (autograft n = 7 and allograft n = 10). Measurements of the ipsilateral leg with the graft were compared with those of the intact contralateral control leg. Both autografts and allografts exhibited an initial increase in blood flow followed by a gradual return to baseline levels. Blood flow elevation lasted up to 2 weeks in autografts, but this duration varied from 2 to 6 weeks in allografts depending on the spatial location of the measurement. Intact contralateral control leg blood flow remained at baseline levels throughout the 9 weeks in the autograft group; however, in the allograft group, blood flow followed a similar trend to the graft leg. Blood flow difference between the graft and contralateral legs (ΔrBF), a parameter defined to estimate graft-specific changes, was elevated at 1–2 weeks for the autograft group, and at 2–4 weeks for the allograft group at the proximal and the central locations. However, distal to the graft, the allograft group exhibited significantly greater ΔrBF than the autograft group at 3 weeks post-surgery (p < 0.05). These spatial and temporal differences in blood flow supports established trends of delayed healing in allografts versus autografts. PMID:26625352

  4. Reengineering autologous bone grafts with the stem cell activator WNT3A.

    PubMed

    Jing, Wei; Smith, Andrew A; Liu, Bo; Li, Jingtao; Hunter, Daniel J; Dhamdhere, Girija; Salmon, Benjamin; Jiang, Jie; Cheng, Du; Johnson, Chelsey A; Chen, Serafine; Lee, Katherine; Singh, Gurpreet; Helms, Jill A

    2015-04-01

    Autologous bone grafting represents the standard of care for treating bone defects but this biomaterial is unreliable in older patients. The efficacy of an autograft can be traced back to multipotent stem cells residing within the bone graft. Aging attenuates the viability and function of these stem cells, leading to inconsistent rates of bony union. We show that age-related changes in autograft efficacy are caused by a loss in endogenous Wnt signaling. Blocking this endogenous Wnt signal using Dkk1 abrogates autograft efficacy whereas providing a Wnt signal in the form of liposome-reconstituted WNT3A protein (L-WNT3A) restores bone forming potential to autografts from aged animals. The bioengineered autograft exhibits significantly better survival in the hosting site. Mesenchymal and skeletal stem cell populations in the autograft are activated by L-WNT3A and mitotic activity and osteogenic differentiation are significantly enhanced. In a spinal fusion model, aged autografts treated with L-WNT3A demonstrate superior bone forming capacity compared to the standard of care. Thus, a brief incubation in L-WNT3A reliably improves autologous bone grafting efficacy, which has the potential to significantly improve patient care in the elderly.

  5. Reengineering autologous bone grafts with the stem cell activator WNT3A.

    PubMed

    Jing, Wei; Smith, Andrew A; Liu, Bo; Li, Jingtao; Hunter, Daniel J; Dhamdhere, Girija; Salmon, Benjamin; Jiang, Jie; Cheng, Du; Johnson, Chelsey A; Chen, Serafine; Lee, Katherine; Singh, Gurpreet; Helms, Jill A

    2015-04-01

    Autologous bone grafting represents the standard of care for treating bone defects but this biomaterial is unreliable in older patients. The efficacy of an autograft can be traced back to multipotent stem cells residing within the bone graft. Aging attenuates the viability and function of these stem cells, leading to inconsistent rates of bony union. We show that age-related changes in autograft efficacy are caused by a loss in endogenous Wnt signaling. Blocking this endogenous Wnt signal using Dkk1 abrogates autograft efficacy whereas providing a Wnt signal in the form of liposome-reconstituted WNT3A protein (L-WNT3A) restores bone forming potential to autografts from aged animals. The bioengineered autograft exhibits significantly better survival in the hosting site. Mesenchymal and skeletal stem cell populations in the autograft are activated by L-WNT3A and mitotic activity and osteogenic differentiation are significantly enhanced. In a spinal fusion model, aged autografts treated with L-WNT3A demonstrate superior bone forming capacity compared to the standard of care. Thus, a brief incubation in L-WNT3A reliably improves autologous bone grafting efficacy, which has the potential to significantly improve patient care in the elderly. PMID:25682158

  6. Role of anthropometric data in the prediction of 4-stranded hamstring graft size in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Ho, Sean Wei Loong; Tan, Teong Jin Lester; Lee, Keng Thiam

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate whether pre-operative anthropometric data can predict the optimal diameter and length of hamstring tendon autograft for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. This was a cohort study that involved 169 patients who underwent single-bundle ACL reconstruction (single surgeon) with 4-stranded MM Gracilis and MM Semi-Tendinosus autografts. Height, weight, body mass index (BMI), gender, race, age and -smoking status were recorded pre-operatively. Intra-operatively, the diameter and functional length of the 4-stranded autograft was recorded. Multiple regression analysis was used to determine the relationship between the anthropometric measurements and the length and diameter of the implanted autografts. The strongest correlation between 4-stranded hamstring autograft diameter was height and weight. This correlation was stronger in females than males. BMI had a moderate correlation with the diameter of the graft in females. Females had a significantly smaller graft both in diameter and length when compared with males. Linear regression models did not show any significant correlation between hamstring autograft length with height and weight (p>0.05). Simple regression analysis demonstrated that height and weight can be used to predict hamstring graft diameter. The following regression equation was obtained for females: Graft diameter=0.012+0.034*Height+0.026*Weight (R2=0.358, p=0.004) The following regression equation was obtained for males: Graft diameter=5.130+0.012*Height+0.007*Weight (R2=0.086, p=0.002). Pre-operative anthropometric data has a positive correlation with the diameter of 4 stranded hamstring autografts but no significant correlation with the length. This data can be utilised to predict the autograft diameter and may be useful for pre-operative planning and patient counseling for graft selection.

  7. Autograft Versus Nonirradiated Allograft Tissue for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Mariscalco, Michael W.; Magnussen, Robert A.; Mehta, Divyesh; Hewett, Timothy E.; Flanigan, David C.; Kaeding, Christopher C.

    2014-01-01

    Background An autograft has traditionally been the gold standard for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR), but the use of allograft tissue has increased in recent years. While numerous studies have demonstrated that irradiated allografts are associated with increased failure rates, some report excellent results after ACLR with nonirradiated allografts. The purpose of this systematic review was to determine whether the use of nonirradiated allograft tissue is associated with poorer outcomes when compared with autografts. Hypothesis Patients undergoing ACLR with autografts versus nonirradiated allografts will demonstrate no significant differences in graft failure risk, laxity on postoperative physical examination, or differences in patient-oriented outcome scores. Study Design Systematic review. Methods A systematic review was performed to identify prospective or retrospective comparative studies (evidence level 1, 2, or 3) of autografts versus nonirradiated allografts for ACLR. Outcome data included graft failure based on clinical findings and instrumented laxity, postoperative laxity on physical examination, and patient-reported outcome scores. Studies were excluded if they did not specify whether the allograft had been irradiated. Quality assessment and data extraction were performed by 2 examiners. Results Nine studies comparing autografts and nonirradiated allografts were included. Six of the 9 studies compared bone– patellar tendon–bone (BPTB) autografts with BPTB allografts. Two studies compared hamstring tendon autografts to hamstring tendon allografts, and 1 study compared hamstring tendon autografts to tibialis anterior allografts. The mean patient age in 7 of 9 studies ranged from 24.5 to 32 years, with 1 study including only patients older than 40 years and another not reporting patient age. The mean follow-up duration was 24 to 94 months. Six of 9 studies reported clinical graft failure rates, 8 of 9 reported postoperative instrumented

  8. Early histologic, metabolic, and vascular assessment of anterior cruciate ligament autografts

    SciTech Connect

    Kleiner, J.B.; Amiel, D.; Harwood, F.L.; Akeson, W.H.

    1989-01-01

    A rabbit model for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction using autogenous patellar tendon was utilized to study the early events of autograft cellular dynamics. Biochemical, autoradiographic, histological, and vascular injection techniques demonstrated that the native autograft cell population rapidly necroses. This repopulation occurs without a vascular contribution; cells entering the autograft are reliant upon synovial fluid nutrition.

  9. Medial collateral ligament autografts have increased creep response for at least two years and early immobilization makes this worse.

    PubMed

    Thornton, G M; Boorman, R S; Shrive, N G; Frank, C B

    2002-03-01

    Recent evidence has shown that 10-40% of knee joints reconstructed with soft-tissue autografts have a recurrence of abnormal joint laxity over time. One possible explanation is the "stretching out" (or unrecovered creep) of the graft tissue. To test in vitro creep and creep recovery of fresh anatomic ligament autografts in an extra-articular environment, 16 rabbits underwent an orthotopic medial collateral ligament (MCL) autograft procedure to one hindlimb. Three subgroups of animals had either unrestricted cage activity for 1 year (n = 5) or 2 years (n = 5) or pin-immobilization for the first 6 weeks followed by cage activity for the remainder of 1 year (n = 6). Following laxity measurements, to test their creep response, isolated MCL grafts were cyclically and then statically creep tested in vitro at 4.1 MPa, allowed to recover at zero load for 20 min, and finally elongated to failure. Due to differences in cross-sectional area between the grafts and normal MCLs, two normal control groups were tested: stress-matched tested at 4.1 MPa (16.2 N; n = 7) and force-matched tested at 29.1 N (7.1 MPa; n = 6). Ligament grafts had normal laxity but significantly increased creep and decreased creep recovery compared to normal MCLs after I and 2 years of healing (p < 0.0004). Graft failure stress was also significantly less than normal (p < 0.0001). Immobilized grafts had significantly greater creep compared to non-immobilized grafts at 1 year of healing (p < 0.05). These results support previous observations concerning material inferiority of fresh anatomic rabbit MCL autografts, but add the concept that such grafts also have increased potential to creep with either slower or incomplete recovery when subjected to low stresses in vitro. Joint and ligament laxities in situ were normal in this model, however, suggesting either that in vivo MCL graft stresses are lower than those used here in vitro or that these tissues have other mechanisms by which they can recover their

  10. Changes in the Dermal Structure during Cultured Epidermal Autograft Engraftment Process

    PubMed Central

    Muramatsu, Hideyuki; Nakano, Minoru; Yamamoto, Naoto; Tokunaka, Ryohei; Umezawa, Kazuya; Hamajima, Akito; Araki, Natsue; Yoshimoto, Shinya

    2016-01-01

    Background: The use of cultured epithelial autografts for the treatment of extensive burn wounds has become popular in recent years. We examined extensive burn wounds in 14 patients by using a combination of autograft and cultured epithelial autografts developed in Japan (JACE). Methods: We undertook a skin biopsy at 2, 4, and 6 weeks after transplantation with JACE. By using electron microscopy we observed the engraftment process. Results: In transmission electron microscope findings, we recognized the engraftment process of JACE. Keratinocytes matured gradually. Collagen fibers formed thick bundles in the dermis layer. In scanning electron microscope findings, we observed papillary dermis development on the artificial dermis. Conclusions: After managing wound bed preparation by using artificial dermis, we were able to recognize the good result of grafting JACE on meshed 6:1 split thickness autografts. This is because the auto dermis from autograft extended under the JACE, binding between JACE, and the dermis became strong. PMID:27757335

  11. Autograft versus allograft in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Kan, Shun-Li; Yuan, Zhi-Fang; Ning, Guang-Zhi; Yang, Bo; Li, Hai-Liang; Sun, Jing-Cheng; Feng, Shi-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is considered as the standard surgical procedure for the treatment of ACL tear. However, there is a crucial controversy in terms of whether to use autograft or allograft in ACL reconstruction. The purpose of this meta-analysis is to compare autograft with allograft for patients undergoing ACL reconstruction. Methods: PubMed, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library were searched for randomized controlled trials that compared autograft with allograft in ACL reconstruction up to January 31, 2016. The relative risk or mean difference with 95% confidence interval was calculated using either a fixed- or random-effects model. The risk of bias for individual studies according to the Cochrane Handbook. The trial sequential analysis was used to test the robustness of our findings and get more conservative estimates. Results: Thirteen trials were included, involving 1636 participants. The results of this meta-analysis indicated that autograft brought about lower clinical failure, better overall International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) level, better pivot-shift test, better Lachman test, greater Tegner score, and better instrumented laxity test (P < 0.05) than allograft. Autograft was not statistically different from allograft in Lysholm score, subjective IKDC score, and Daniel 1-leg hop test (P > 0.05). Subgroup analyses demonstrated that autograft was superior to irradiated allograft for patients undergoing ACL reconstruction in clinical failure, Lysholm score, pivot-shift test, Lachman test, Tegner score, instrumented laxity test, and subjective IKDC score (P < 0.05). Moreover, there were no significant differences between autograft and nonirradiated allograft. Conclusions: Autograft is superior to irradiated allograft for patients undergoing ACL reconstruction concerning knee function and laxity, but there are no significant differences between autograft and nonirradiated allograft. However

  12. Comparison of Two Synthetic Bone Graft Products in a Rabbit Posterolateral Fusion Model

    PubMed Central

    Fredericks, Douglas; Petersen, Emily B.; Watson, Nicole; Grosland, Nicole; Gibson-Corley, Katherine; Smucker, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Background The drawbacks of iliac crest autograft as graft material for spine fusion are well reported. Despite continued modifications to improve bone healing capacity, the efficacy of synthetic graft materials as stand-alone replacements remains uncertain. The rabbit posterolateral fusion model is an established environment for testing of fusion concepts. It offers the opportunity to obtain radiographic, biomechanical and histological data on novel fusion materials. The objective of this study was to compare the spine fusion capability of two synthetic bone graft products in an established rabbit posterolateral spine fusion (PLF) model: Signafuse® Bioactive Bone Graft Putty and Actifuse® ABX. Methods Bilateral intertransverse spine fusion was performed at the L5-L6 transverse processes (TPs) of New Zealand White rabbits using either Signafuse or Actifuse ABX as the bone graft material. Bone remodeling and spine fusion were assessed at 6 and 12 weeks using radiographic, biomechanical and histological endpoints. Results Fusion rate by manual palpation at 6 weeks was greater for Signafuse (33%) compared to Actifuse ABX (0%), and equivalent in both groups at 12 weeks (50%). Biomechanical fusion rate based on flexion-extension data was 80% in Signafuse group and 44% for Actifuse ABX. Histology revealed a normal healing response in both groups. MicroCT and histomorphometric data at 6 weeks showed greater new bone formation in the Signafuse group compared to Actifuse ABX (p <0.05), with no differences detected at 12 weeks. Histological fusion scores were greater in the Signafuse group at 6 and 12 weeks, indicated by higher degree structural remodeling and tendency towards complete bridging of the fusion bed compared to the Actifuse ABX group. Conclusion Confirmed by several metrics, Signafuse outperformed Actifuse ABX as a standalone synthetic bone graft in an established PLF model, demonstrating greater rates of bone remodeling and spine fusion. The combination of 45

  13. Application of Resorbable Poly(Lactide-co-Glycolide) with Entangled Hyaluronic Acid as an Autograft Extender for Posterolateral Intertransverse Lumbar Fusion in Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, Rema A.; Gage, Gary; Yu, Yan; Bell, David; Bellemore, Jeremy; Adkisson, Huston Davis

    2011-01-01

    Facilitating fusion between bony segments in a reliable and reproducible manner using a synthetic bone graft material has a number of benefits for the surgeon as well as the patient. Although autograft remains the gold standard, associated comorbidities continue to drive the development of new biomaterials for use in spinal fusion. The ability of autograft alone and autograft combined with a radiolucent biomaterial composed of resorbable osteoconductive poly(lactide-co-glycolide) with entangled hyaluronic acid to facilitate fusion was examined in a single-level noninstrumented posterolateral intertransverse lumbar fusion model in New Zealand White rabbits. Progressive bone formation was demonstrated radiographically for the extender group (synthetic biomaterial plus autograft) between 3 and 6 months. Computed tomography revealed a new cortical shell in the fusion mass at 3 and 6 months for both study groups. Tensile testing at 6 months demonstrated that the quality of bone formed between the intertransverse space was equivalent for both study groups. Histologic evaluation of the fusion mass revealed new bone on and adjacent to the transverse processes with the synthetic biomaterial group that extended laterally, supporting the osteoconductive nature of the material. Histological evidence of endochondral bone growth in the intertransverse space was observed for the autograft plus synthetic biomaterial group. Bone remodeling, new marrow spaces, and peripheral cortices were observed for each study group at 3 months that matured by 6 months. These findings support the use of a radiolucent biosynthetic material comprising poly(lactide-co-glycolide) with integrated hyaluronic acid as an autograft extender for lumbar intertransverse fusion. PMID:20712417

  14. Clinical outcomes of allograft versus autograft in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Baer, Geoffrey S; Harner, Christopher D

    2007-10-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries are the most common complete ligamentous injury to the knee. The optimal graft should be able to reproduce the anatomy and biomechanics of the ACL, be incorporated rapidly with strong initial fixation, and cause low graft-site morbidity. This article reviews the literature comparing the clinical outcomes following allograft and autograft ACL reconstruction and examines current issues regarding graft choice.

  15. Clinical outcomes of allograft versus autograft in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Baer, Geoffrey S; Harner, Christopher D

    2007-10-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries are the most common complete ligamentous injury to the knee. The optimal graft should be able to reproduce the anatomy and biomechanics of the ACL, be incorporated rapidly with strong initial fixation, and cause low graft-site morbidity. This article reviews the literature comparing the clinical outcomes following allograft and autograft ACL reconstruction and examines current issues regarding graft choice. PMID:17920959

  16. ACL Reconstruction With Autografts Weighing Performance Considerations and Postoperative Care.

    PubMed

    Grant, John A; Mohtadi, Nicholas G

    2003-04-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is the treatment of choice for patients who experience episodes of instability and a decreased quality of life after ACL rupture. The bone-patellar tendon-bone and hamstring autografts are the current standards for ACL reconstruction. Primary care physicians, especially sports medicine clinicians, are the first-line providers of nonoperative care for patients who have ACL injuries. Care providers need to know the biologic and biomechanic properties of these grafts, clinical indications for each graft, and rehabilitation considerations to appropriately counsel their patients. PMID:20086463

  17. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Using a Combination of Autograft and Allograft Tendon

    PubMed Central

    Darnley, James E.; Léger-St-Jean, Benjamin; Pedroza, Angela D.; Flanigan, David C.; Kaeding, Christopher C.; Magnussen, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction with hamstring autografts less than 8.5 mm in diameter is associated with worse patient-reported outcome scores and increased risk of revision surgery compared with reconstructions performed with larger grafts. One proposed solution to small autograft harvest is to create a hybrid graft by augmenting autografts with allograft tissue to increase graft diameter. Purpose: To compare hybrid autograft/allograft ACL reconstruction to autograft ACL reconstruction, specifically analyzing the patient-reported outcome scores and the risk of revision surgery at 2 years postoperative. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: From the years 2002 to 2009, a total of 34 patients were identified from a prospectively collected database as having undergone hybrid ACL reconstruction. Twenty-seven of 34 (79.4%) patients had a 2-year follow-up. These 27 patients were matched by age (within 1 year) and sex to 27 patients who underwent hamstring autograft ACL reconstruction during the same period. At the 2-year mark, revision surgery risk and patient-reported outcome scores were compared between the 2 groups. Results: The mean age for the hybrid and matched groups (±SD) was 20.9 ± 7.0 years. Both the hybrid and control groups had 17 males and 10 females. There was no significant difference in preoperative patient-reported outcome scores, meniscus tears, or cartilage lesions between the 2 groups. Graft size was larger in the hybrid group (9.5 ± 0.6 mm) than in the autograft group (8.4 ± 0.9 mm) (P < .001). At 2 years postoperative, patient-reported outcome scores were similar between the hybrid and autograft groups. Revision surgery was required in 5 (18.5%) patients who underwent hybrid reconstruction compared with 2 (7.4%) of those who underwent autograft reconstruction (P = .26). Conclusion: Patients who undergo ACL reconstruction with hybrid hamstring grafts and hamstring autografts report similar

  18. Separate limbal-conjunctival autograft transplantation using the inferior conjunctiva for primary pterygium

    PubMed Central

    Kawano, Hiroki; Kawano, Koji; Sakamoto, Taiji

    2011-01-01

    Background: Inferior limbal-conjunctival autograft transplantation has been described as a safe and effective treatment for primary pterygium. However, despite its multiple advantages, routine performance of this technique is difficult because the inferior conjunctiva is often too small to provide enough autograft material. To resolve this issue, we modified a technique, inferior separate limbal-conjunctival autograft transplantation, and evaluated its efficacy and safety Materials and Methods: A total of 50 eyes of 47 patients were retrospectively studied. Our surgery consisted of a thorough pterygium excision followed by 0.02% mitomycin C application. Next, we performed inferior conjunctival autografting, in which limbal and bulbar conjunctival autografts were independently harvested and secured to the denuded limbus and the most posterior conjunctival defect at the pterygium excision site to ensure stem-cell restoration and deep fornix reconstruction, respectively; the bare sclera between the two grafts was exposed. The outcome was assessed with a three-point grading scale at the patient's last visit. Results: The success and recurrence rates were 96.0% (48 of 50) and 0%, respectively, assessed at follow-ups occurring at a mean of 19.2 ± 5.6 months after surgery. Only minimal complications were encountered. Conclusion: A combination of inferior separate limbal-conjunctival autograft transplantation with intraoperative 0.02% mitomycin C application is a safe and effective technique enabling the routine use of under-sized autografts harvested from the inferior conjunctiva after thorough pterygium excision. PMID:22279399

  19. Quadriceps tendon-patellar bone autograft for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a technical note.

    PubMed

    Franceschi, Francesco; Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Ruzzini, Laura; Papalia, Rocco; Maffulli, Nicola; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2008-01-01

    The quadriceps tendon autograft can be used for primary and revision anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Despite several successful clinical reports, graft fixation issues remain, and the ideal technique for fixation continues to be controversial. We present a technique of ACL reconstruction with quadriceps tendon autograft (QTA) using a patellar bone block. The tendon end is fixed in the femoral tunnel and the bone plug in the tibial tunnel using reabsorbable interference screws. The advantages of this technique are related to the increase in stiffness of the graft, the achievement of a more anatomic fixation, and a reduction in synovial fluid leakage.

  20. Mechanoreceptor Reinnervation of Autografts Versus Allografts After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Young, Simon W.; Valladares, Roberto D.; Loi, Florence; Dragoo, Jason L.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Loss of proprioceptive function occurs after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture. Clinical, motor, and proprioceptive function is known to improve after ACL reconstruction but does not return to normal. While histological studies of human ACL allografts have been unable to demonstrate mechanoreceptor reinnervation, animal data suggest that reinnervation may occur when an autograft is used. Purpose: To compare the presence or absence of mechanoreceptors between allograft versus autograft after ACL reconstruction in humans. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: Ten patients with previous ACL reconstruction presenting for either revision ACL surgery or knee arthroscopy for other reasons were enrolled in a prospective, comparative study. Five patients had a previous autograft ACL and 5 patients had an allograft. Biopsies, either from intact or ruptured grafts, were taken from identical locations as close to the femoral and tibial insertions as possible. Specimens were stained with hematoxylin-eosin (H-E) and monoclonal antibodies against neurofilament protein (NFP), known to be present in mechanoreceptor tissue. Immunohistochemical examination was carried out, and the number of NFP+ neural tissue analogs was counted and compared with that of native ACL tissue. Results: The mean time between original graft and biopsy was 6.9 years (range, 0.5-15 years). Histological examination showed significantly less NFP+ neural analogs in allograft and autograft patients than control tissue (mean number of NFP+ analogs per high-power field, 0.7 ± 0.9 [allograft] and 0.5 ± 0.8 [autograft] vs 4.7 ± 0.9 [controls]; P < .0001). There was no significant difference in NFP analogs between autograft and allograft tissue. Conclusion: We found a reduced concentration of NFP+ neural analogs in ACL grafts compared with native ACL tissue. This deficit exists irrespective of whether allograft or autograft is used. These findings may explain the continued

  1. Natural history of intrahepatic canine islet cell autografts.

    PubMed Central

    Alejandro, R; Cutfield, R G; Shienvold, F L; Polonsky, K S; Noel, J; Olson, L; Dillberger, J; Miller, J; Mintz, D H

    1986-01-01

    We have serially followed the function of intrahepatic canine islet autografts in 15 beagle dogs for up to 24 mo. Of these, only 20% sustained normal levels of fasting blood glucose for greater than 15 mo posttransplant. Failure of autograft function was accompanied by a preferential loss of well-granulated beta cells in the engrafted islets. The chronic stimulation of an initially marginal intrahepatic beta-cell mass ultimately resulted in metabolic deterioration and loss of beta cells below the minimal threshold required to maintain normal fasting blood glucose levels. It is possible that transplantation of a larger mass of islets would result in indefinite graft function in dogs. However, it remains to be demonstrated in larger mammals, including humans, whether an islet cell mass that is initially adequate in a heterotropic site such as the liver can remain functionally competent over a prolonged period. Images PMID:3095376

  2. Anatomic All-Inside Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Using Quadriceps Tendon Autograft.

    PubMed

    Crall, Timothy S; Gilmer, Brian B

    2015-12-01

    All-inside anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction has recently gained popularity, in part because of its bone-sparing socket preparation and reported lower pain levels after surgery. However, because this technique uses suture loops and cortical suspension buttons for graft fixation, it has mostly been limited to looped graft constructs (e.g., hamstring autograft, peroneus longus allograft). Quadriceps tendon autograft offers several advantages in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction but, until recently, has not been compatible with suture-loop and cortical suspensory fixation. We describe a technique that allows a relatively short (<75 mm) quadriceps tendon autograft (without bone block) to be used with established all-inside anatomic techniques. PMID:27284521

  3. [Subcutaneous autograft with newly synthesized cartilage using ethisorb polymer in rabbits].

    PubMed

    Capitán Guarnizo, A; Viviente Rodríguez, E; Osete Albaladejo, J M; Torregrosa Carrasquer, C; Díaz Manzano, J A; Pérez-Mateos Cachá, J A; Sprekelsen Gassó, C

    2002-11-01

    We perform a subcutaneous autograft, in animals with preserved immunity (24 rabbits), of cartilage taken from the auricle, treated with tissue engineering thecnics and embeded in a reabsorbable polimer (Ethisorb) that acts as base. We observed a good quality cartilage with the expression of collagen type II and without graft rejection phenomenon.

  4. Modeling heterogeneous polymer-grafted nanoparticle networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tao; Mbanga, Badel; Yashin, Victor; Balazs, Anna

    Via a dynamic 3D computational approach, we simulate the heterogeneous polymer-grafted nanoparticle networks. The nanoparticles rigid cores are decorated with a corona of grafted polymers, which contain reactive functional groups at the chain ends. With the overlap of grafted polymers, these reactive groups can form weak labile bonds, which can reform after breakage, or stronger bonds, which rupture irreversibly and thus, the nanoparticles are interconnected by dual cross-links. Previous work has been done on homogeneous networks, while we introduce the heterogeneity by considering two types of particles having different reactive functional groups, so that the labile bond energy varies depending on types of the two end reactive groups. We study the effect of tensile and rotational deformations on the network morphology, and observe, in particular, the phase separation of two types of particles. Our results will provide guidelines for designing transformable material that can controllably change structure under mechanical action.

  5. Clinical and Radiological Outcomes of Segmental Spinal Fusion in Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion with Spinous Process Tricortical Autograft

    PubMed Central

    Tangviriyapaiboon, Teera

    2014-01-01

    Study Design A retrospective study. Purpose To investigate clinical and radiological outcomes when using spinous process as a tricortical autograft for segmental spinal fusion in transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF). Overview of Literature Interbody spinal fusion is one of the important procedures in spinal surgery. Many types of autografts are harvested at the expense of complications. Clinical and radiographic results of patients who underwent TLIF with intraoperative harvested spinous process autograft in Prasat Neurological Institue, Bangkok, Thailand, were assessed as new technical innovation. Methods Between October 2005 to July 2009, 30 cases of patients who underwent TLIF with spinous process tricortical autograft were included. Clinical evaluations were assessed by visual analog scales (VAS) and Prolo functional and economic scores at the preoperation and postoperation and at 2 years postoperation. Static and dynamic plain radiograph of lumbar spine were reviewed for achievement of fusion. Results Initial successful fusion time in lumbar interbody fusion with spinous process tricortical autograft was 4.72 months (range, 3.8-6.1 months) postoperation and 100% fusion rate was reported at 2 years. Our initial successful fusion time in lumbar interbody fusion was compared to the other types of grafts in previous literatures. Conclusions The use of intraoperative harvested spinous process tricortical autograft has overcome many disadvantages of harvesting autograft with better initial successful fusion time (4.72 months). VAS and Prolo scores showed some improvement in the outcomes between the preoperative and postoperative periods. PMID:24761199

  6. Imaging characteristics of bone graft materials.

    PubMed

    Beaman, Francesca D; Bancroft, Laura W; Peterson, Jeffrey J; Kransdorf, Mark J; Menke, David M; DeOrio, James K

    2006-01-01

    Bone graft materials are widely used in reconstructive orthopedic procedures to promote new bone formation and bone healing, provide a substrate and scaffolding for development of bone structure, and function as a means for direct antibiotic delivery. Bone graft materials include autografts, allografts, and synthetic substitutes. An autograft (from the patient's own bone) supplies both bone volume and osteogenic cells capable of new bone formation. The imaging appearance of an autograft depends on its type, composition, and age. Autografts often appear as osseous fragments at radiography. At computed tomography (CT), autografts appear similar to the adjacent cortical bone. At magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, however, autografts have a variable appearance as a consequence of the viable marrow inside them, a feature not present in other graft materials. An allograft (from cadaveric bone) has an appearance similar to that of cortical bone on radiographs and CT images. An allograft in the form of bone chips or morsels does not show those features on radiographs and CT images, but instead appears as a conglomerate with medium to high opacity and attenuation within the bone defect. In the immediate postoperative period, allografts appear hypointense on both T1- and T2-weighted MR images. Hematopoietic tissue replaces the normal fatty marrow in the later phases of graft incorporation. Synthetic bone substitutes are much more variable in imaging appearance. As the use of bone allografts and synthetic substitutes increases, familiarity with postoperative imaging features is essential for differentiation between grafts and residual or recurrent disease.

  7. Autograft Transfer from the Ipsilateral Femoral Condyle in Depressed Tibial Plateau Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Sferopoulos, N.K

    2014-01-01

    Introduction : The rationale for operative treatment of depressed tibial plateau fractures is anatomic reduction, stable fixation and grafting. Grafting options include autogenous bone graft or bone substitutes. Methods : The autograft group included 18 patients with depressed tibial plateau fractures treated with autogenous bone grafting from the ipsilateral femoral condyle following open reduction and internal fixation. According to Schatzker classification, there were 9 type II, 4 type III, 2 type IV and 3 type V lesions. The average time to union and the hospital charges were compared with the bone substitute group. The latter included 17 patients who had an excellent outcome following treatment of split and/or depressed lateral plateau fractures, using a similar surgical technique but grafting with bone substitutes (allografts). Results : Excellent clinical and radiological results were detected in the autograft group after an average follow-up of 28 months (range 12-37). The average time to union in the autograft group was 14 weeks (range 12-16), while in the bone substitute group it was 18 weeks (range 16-20). The mean total cost was 1276 Euros for the autograft group and 2978 Euros for the bone substitute group. Discussion : The use of autogenous graft from the ipsilateral femoral condyle following open reduction and internal fixation of depressed tibial plateau fractures provided enough bone to maintain the height of the tibial plateau and was not associated with any donor site morbidity. Using this method, the surgical time was not significantly elongated and the rehabilitation was not affected. It also exhibited faster fracture healing without postoperative loss of reduction and it was less expensive than the use of bone substitutes. PMID:25317215

  8. Iliac crest autograft versus alternative constructs for anterior cervical spine surgery: Pros, cons, and costs

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Nancy E.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Grafting choices available for performing anterior cervical diskectomy/fusion (ACDF) procedures have become a major concern for spinal surgeons, and their institutions. The “gold standard”, iliac crest autograft, may still be the best and least expensive grafting option; it deserves to be reassessed along with the pros, cons, and costs for alternative grafts/spacers. Methods: Although single or multilevel ACDF have utilized iliac crest autograft for decades, the implant industry now offers multiple alternative grafting and spacer devices; (allografts, cages, polyether-etherketone (PEEK) amongst others). While most studies have focused on fusion rates and clinical outcomes following ACDF, few have analyzed the “value-added” of these various constructs (e.g. safety/efficacy, risks/complications, costs). Results: The majority of studies document 95%-100% fusion rates when iliac crest autograft is utilized to perform single level ACDF (X-ray or CT confirmed at 6-12 postoperative months). Although many allograft studies similarly quote 90%-100% fusion rates (X-ray alone confirmed at 6-12 postoperative months), a recent “post hoc analysis of data from a prospective multicenter trial” (Riew KD et. al., CSRS Abstract Dec. 2011; unpublished) revealed a much higher delayed fusion rate using allografts at one year 55.7%, 2 years 87%, and four years 92%. Conclusion: Iliac crest autograft utilized for single or multilevel ACDF is associated with the highest fusion, lowest complication rates, and significantly lower costs compared with allograft, cages, PEEK, or other grafts. As spinal surgeons and institutions become more cost conscious, we will have to account for the “value added” of these increasingly expensive graft constructs. PMID:22905321

  9. Bone-patellar tendon-bone autograft versus LARS artificial ligament for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xiaoyun; Wen, Hong; Wang, Lide; Ge, Tichi

    2013-10-01

    The optimized graft for use in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is still in controversy. The bone-patellar tendon-bone (BPTB) autograft has been accepted as the gold standard for ACL reconstruction. However, donor site morbidities cannot be avoided after this treatment. The artificial ligament of ligament advanced reinforcement system (LARS) has been recommended for ACL reconstruction. The purpose of this study is to compare the midterm outcome of ACL reconstruction using BPTB autografts or LARS ligaments. Between July 2004 and March 2006, the ACL reconstruction using BPTB autografts in 30 patients and LARS ligaments in 32 patients was performed. All patients were followed up for at least 4 years and evaluated using the Lysholm knee score, Tegner score, International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) score, and KT-1000 arthrometer test. There were no significant differences between the two groups with respect to the data of Lysholm scores, Tegner scores, IKDC scores, and KT-1000 arthrometer test at the latest follow-up. Our study demonstrates that the similarly good clinical results are obtained after ACL reconstruction using BPTB autografts or LARS ligaments at midterm follow-up. In addition to BPTB autografts, the LARS ligament may be a satisfactory treatment option for ACL rupture.

  10. Does Choosing Autograft Hamstring vs. Patellar Tendon by Gender, Sport, Level of Competition or Laxity in High School and College Aged Athletes Improve KOOS, IKDC or Marx?

    PubMed Central

    Huston, Laura J.; Reinke, Emily; Kattan, Michael W.; Chagin, Kevin; Spindler, Kurt P.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Physicians’ and patients’ decision-making process between autograft hamstring (HG) vs. patellar tendon (BTB) for ACL reconstruction (ACLR) may be influenced by patient gender, laxity level, sport played, and/or competition level in the young, active athlete. ACLR specific to high school and college-aged athletes with these aforementioned factors in mind has not been evaluated. Therefore, our objectives were twofold: first, to develop a simple web-based risk calculator as a decision-making aid to provide the best estimate of expected 2-year KOOS, IKDC, and Marx outcomes by gender, sport, level of competition, and knee laxity. Second, to identify whether autograft HG or BTB is the optimal graft choice given any combination of the aforementioned variables. Methods: Our inclusion criteria in the MOON cohort were patients aged 11-22 who were injured in sport (football, soccer, basketball, other), who were due to have a unilateral primary ACLR with either an autograft HG or BTB, and who had a contralateral normal knee. Excluded were revisions, allografts, those with a contralateral ACLR and concomitant MCL/LCL/PCL surgery. Laxity was graded as increased (Lachman > 10 mm or a pivot lock) or normal based on the EUA. Our modeling controlled for BMI, ethnicity, and baseline measures of patient-reported outcomes. Our two year outcomes were the KOOS knee related quality of life subscale, KOOS sports and recreation subscale, IKDC, and Marx activity level. Our multivariable modeling for risk online calculator and nomograms was generated in two ways. The performances for our models were measured using R squared, calibration curves, and bootstrapping. Results: 937 patients were eligible, 809 (86%) had 2 year follow-up data. The average age was 17, with 50% females, and the distribution of HG to BTB was 301/508 respectively. First, in evaluating our models for ACLR autograft choice, neither KOOS subscale models performed better than chance. The IKDC and Marx models

  11. Modeling Interfacial Adsorption of Polymer-Grafted Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yong, Xin

    2014-11-01

    Numerous natural and industrial processes demand advances in our fundamental understanding of colloidal adsorption at liquid interfaces. Using dissipative particle dynamics (DPD), we model the interfacial adsorption of core-shell nanoparticles at the water-oil interface. The solid core of the nanoparticle encompasses beads arranged in an fcc lattice structure and its surface is uniformly grafted with polymer chains. The nanoparticles bind to the interface from either phase to minimize total surface energy. With a single nanoparticle, we demonstrate detailed kinetics of different stages in the adsorption process. Prominent effect of grafted polymer chains is characterized by varying molecular weight and polydispersity of the chains. We also preload nanoparticles straddling the interface to reveal the influence of nanoparticle surface density on further adsorption. Importantly, these studies show how surface-grafted polymer chains can alter the interfacial behavior of colloidal particles and provide guidelines for designing on-demand Pickering emulsion.

  12. Computed Tomography and Optical Imaging of Osteogenesis-angiogenesis Coupling to Assess Integration of Cranial Bone Autografts and Allografts.

    PubMed

    Cohn Yakubovich, Doron; Tawackoli, Wafa; Sheyn, Dmitriy; Kallai, Ilan; Da, Xiaoyu; Pelled, Gadi; Gazit, Dan; Gazit, Zulma

    2015-01-01

    A major parameter determining the success of a bone-grafting procedure is vascularization of the area surrounding the graft. We hypothesized that implantation of a bone autograft would induce greater bone regeneration by abundant blood vessel formation. To investigate the effect of the graft on neovascularization at the defect site, we developed a micro-computed tomography (µCT) approach to characterize newly forming blood vessels, which involves systemic perfusion of the animal with a polymerizing contrast agent. This method enables detailed vascular analysis of an organ in its entirety. Additionally, blood perfusion was assessed using fluorescence imaging (FLI) of a blood-borne fluorescent agent. Bone formation was quantified by FLI using a hydroxyapatite-targeted probe and µCT analysis. Stem cell recruitment was monitored by bioluminescence imaging (BLI) of transgenic mice that express luciferase under the control of the osteocalcin promoter. Here we describe and demonstrate preparation of the allograft, calvarial defect surgery, µCT scanning protocols for the neovascularization study and bone formation analysis (including the in vivo perfusion of contrast agent), and the protocol for data analysis. The 3D high-resolution analysis of vasculature demonstrated significantly greater angiogenesis in animals with implanted autografts, especially with respect to arteriole formation. Accordingly, blood perfusion was significantly higher in the autograft group by the 7(th) day after surgery. We observed superior bone mineralization and measured greater bone formation in animals that received autografts. Autograft implantation induced resident stem cell recruitment to the graft-host bone suture, where the cells differentiated into bone-forming cells between the 7(th) and 10(th) postoperative day. This finding means that enhanced bone formation may be attributed to the augmented vascular feeding that characterizes autograft implantation. The methods depicted may serve

  13. The effect of tendon surface treatment on cell attachment for potential enhancement of tendon graft healing: an ex vivo model.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Takahiro; Sun, Yu-Long; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C; Zhao, Chunfeng

    2012-12-01

    For both tendon allografts and autografts, the surface, initially optimized for gliding, may not be ideal to facilitate tissue integration for graft healing to host tendon or bone. As a prelude to studying tendon-bone integration, we investigated the effect of surface treatments with trypsin or mechanical abrasion on cell attachment to the tendon surface in a canine ex vivo intrasynovial tendon tissue culture model. Intrasynovial tendon allograft surfaces were seeded with cells after the following treatments: (1) no treatment, (2) mechanical abrasion, (3) trypsin, and (4) abrasion and trypsin. The area covered by cells was determined using confocal laser microscopy at one and two weeks. Results were compared to untreated extrasynovial tendon. Additional tendons were characterized with scanning electron microscopy. Tendons with trypsin treatment had significantly more surface coverage with cells than the other groups, after both one and two weeks of culture. In terms of the cellular shape and size, cells on tendons with trypsin treatment spread more and were more polygonal in shape, whereas tendons with mechanical abrasion with/without trypsin treatment contained smaller, more spindle-like cells. Surface roughening can affect cell behavior with topographical stimulation. Trypsin surface digestion exposes a mesh-like structure on the tendon surface, which could enhance cell adherence and, possibly, tendon/bone healing.

  14. All-arthroscopic iliotibial band autograft harvesting and labral reconstruction technique.

    PubMed

    Deshmane, Prashant P; Kahlenberg, Cynthia A; Patel, Ronak M; Han, Brian; Terry, Michael A

    2013-02-01

    The labrum is essential for stability, movement, and prevention of arthritis in the hip. In cases of labral damage where repair of a labral tear is not possible, reconstruction can be a useful alternative. Several different autografts have been used, including the iliotibial band (ITB), the ligamentum teres capitis, and the gracilis tendon. Authors have reported both open and arthroscopic techniques for reconstruction with good preliminary results. However, an all-arthroscopic labral reconstruction technique including the graft harvest and reconstruction portions of a labral reconstruction procedure using an ITB autograft has not been previously described. We describe a technique for an all-arthroscopic labral reconstruction performed using a novel method for arthroscopic harvest of the ITB. The decreased invasiveness of our described technique for labral reconstruction may potentially minimize scarring, bodily disfigurement, infection, and postoperative pain associated with the graft harvesting incision.

  15. A mechanical argument for the differential performance of coronary artery grafts.

    PubMed

    Prim, David A; Zhou, Boran; Hartstone-Rose, Adam; Uline, Mark J; Shazly, Tarek; Eberth, John F

    2016-02-01

    Coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) acutely disturbs the homeostatic state of the transplanted vessel making retention of graft patency dependent on chronic remodeling processes. The time course and extent to which remodeling restores vessel homeostasis will depend, in part, on the nature and magnitude of the mechanical disturbances induced upon transplantation. In this investigation, biaxial mechanical testing and histology were performed on the porcine left anterior descending artery (LAD) and analogs of common autografts, including the internal thoracic artery (ITA), radial artery (RA), great saphenous vein (GSV) and lateral saphenous vein (LSV). Experimental data were used to quantify the parameters of a structure-based constitutive model enabling prediction of the acute vessel mechanical response pre-transplantation and under coronary loading conditions. A novel metric Ξ was developed to quantify mechanical differences between each graft vessel in situ and the LAD in situ, while a second metric Ω compares the graft vessels in situ to their state under coronary loading. The relative values of these metrics among candidate autograft sources are consistent with vessel-specific variations in CABG clinical success rates with the ITA as the superior and GSV the inferior graft choices based on mechanical performance. This approach can be used to evaluate other candidate tissues for grafting or to aid in the development of synthetic and tissue engineered alternatives.

  16. Microskin autografting in the treatment of burns over 70% of total body surface area: 14 years of clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xu-Lin; Liang, Xun; Sun, Li; Wang, Fei; Liu, Sheng; Wang, Yong-Jie

    2011-09-01

    Despite the fact that early excision and grafting have significantly improved burn outcomes, the management of severely burned patients whose burn size exceeds 70% total body surface area (TBSA) still represents a big challenge for burn surgeons all over the world. During the period of 1997-2010 at our centre, aggressive excision and microskin autografting were performed in 63 severely burned patients. Their burn sizes ranged from 70% to 98% TBSA with a mean of 84.9%. The average full-thickness burn was 66.3% (range, 29-94%). Thirty patients had concomitant inhalation injury. Two to 7 days after burn, these patients underwent aggressive excisions ranging from 25% to 60% TBSA and transplantation of microskin autograft overlaid with allograft. The ratios of donor-site to recipient-site surface area were between 1:6 and 1:18. Signs of epithelialization were shown within 35-55 days. The wound healing rate was 74.9% (176/235), with 51.1% of cases (120/235) healing completely and 23.8% (56/235) improving. Microskin autografting yielded an overall survival rate of 63.5%; only 23 patients died. Our clinical experience in using the microskin autografting for burn coverage suggests that the technique is very effective in covering extensive burns, and that it is particularly useful when graft donor sites are very limited due to its high utilization rate of donor site. The factors affecting the outcome of microskin autografting are discussed herein.

  17. Pterygium excision with conjunctival autografting: an effective and safe technique.

    PubMed Central

    Allan, B D; Short, P; Crawford, G J; Barrett, G D; Constable, I J

    1993-01-01

    The optimum mode of treatment for symptomatic pterygia would combine efficacy (a low recurrence rate) with safety (freedom from sight threatening complications), and would not affect visual acuity adversely. The efficacy of pterygium excision with conjunctival autografting in a sun exposed population in which pterygia are prevalent has previously been questioned. A cross sectional review of 93 eyes of 85 patients was carried out by slit-lamp examination a minimum of 6 months (range 6-76 months) after pterygium excision and free conjunctival autografting. Case notes were reviewed to obtain details of complications and visual acuity changes related to surgery. Of six recurrences (6.5%) four of these were asymptomatic with minor recurrences. Two patterns of recurrence were identified: cross graft recurrence (three cases) and outflanking (three cases). Complications (wound dehiscence, three cases; Tenon's granuloma one case; conjunctival cyst, one case) were all corrected by minor surgical revision without sequelae. Unaided acuities were unchanged or improved 3 months after surgery in 86 cases, with a minor diminution (1 Snellen line) in seven cases. This study demonstrates a low recurrence rate for a safe technique in an area in which ongoing ultraviolet light exposure levels are high and pterygia are prevalent. Images PMID:8280682

  18. Synthetic porous ceramic compared with autograft in scoliosis surgery. A prospective, randomized study of 341 patients.

    PubMed

    Ransford, A O; Morley, T; Edgar, M A; Webb, P; Passuti, N; Chopin, D; Morin, C; Michel, F; Garin, C; Pries, D

    1998-01-01

    We have evaluated the use of a synthetic porous ceramic (Triosite) as a substitute for bone graft in posterior spinal fusion for idiopathic scoliosis. In a prospective, randomised study 341 patients at five hospitals in the UK and France were randomly allocated either to autograft from the iliac crest or rib segments (171) or to receive Triosite blocks (170). All patients were assessed after operation and at 3, 6, 12 and 18 months. The two groups were similar with regard to all demographic and baseline variables, but the 184 treated in France (54%) had Cotrel-Dubouset instrumentation and the 157 treated in the UK usually had Harrington-Luque implants. In the Triosite group the average Cobb angle of the upper curve was 56 degrees, corrected to 24 degrees (57%). At 18 months, the average was 26 degrees (3% loss). In the autograft group the average preoperative upper curve of 53 degrees was corrected to 21 degrees (60%). At 18 months the mean curve was 25 degrees (8% loss). Pain levels after operation were similar in the two groups, being mild in most cases. In the Triosite group only three patients had problems of wound healing, but in the autograft group, 14 patients had delayed healing, infection or haematoma in the spinal wound. In addition, 15 autograft patients had pain at the donor site at three months. Seven had infections, two had haematoma and four had delayed healing. The haematological and serum biochemistry results showed no abnormal trends and no significant differences between the groups. There were no adverse events related to the graft material and no evidence of allergenicity. Our results suggest that Triosite synthetic porous ceramic is a safe and effective substitute for autograft in these patients. Histological findings on biopsy indicate that Triosite provides a favourable scaffolding for the formation of new bone and is gradually incorporated into the fusion mass.

  19. The 5-Strand Hamstring Graft in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Rushyuan Jay; Ganley, Theodore J.

    2014-01-01

    The use of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in the pediatric and adolescent population has been increasing in recent years. Autograft hamstring graft is favored in this population, but these patients often have smaller hamstring tendons that yield smaller final graft constructs. These smaller grafts are associated with an increased need for revision surgery. We describe a technique for obtaining a larger-diameter anterior cruciate ligament graft construct from autologous hamstring graft without allograft supplementation. PMID:25473619

  20. Donor-site morbidity after osteochondral autograft transfer procedures.

    PubMed

    LaPrade, Robert F; Botker, Jesse C

    2004-09-01

    We report on 2 patients who had donor-site morbidity after an autogenous osteochondral grafting was performed. Both patients had fibrocartilage hypertrophy at the donor sites that contributed to knee pain and occasional locking; the second patient also had a lack of fibrocartilaginous regrowth with symptomatic residual osteocartilaginous defects. Additional arthroscopic surgery was required in both cases to trim the fibrocartilage. In addition, for the second case, a fresh osteoarticular allograft was used to transfer osteocartilaginous plugs back into the original knee donor sites due to continued knee pain. When performing an osteochondral autograft transfer, the benefits provided at the recipient site must be weighed against the possible donor-site morbidity that may result.

  1. Bone graft substitute: allograft and xenograft.

    PubMed

    Shibuya, Naohiro; Jupiter, Daniel C

    2015-01-01

    Rapid bone graft incorporation for structural rigidity is essential. Early range of motion, exercise, and weight-bearing are keys to rehabilitation. Structural and nonstructural bone grafts add length, height, and volume to alter alignment, function, and appearance. Bone graft types include: corticocancellous autograft, allograft, xenograft, and synthetic graft. Autogenic grafts are harvested from the patient, less likely to be rejected, and more likely to be incorporated; however, harvesting adds a procedure and donor site complication is common. Allografts, xenografts, and synthetic grafts eliminate secondary procedures and donor site complications; however, rejection and slower incorporation can occur.

  2. Treatment of Midshaft Clavicle Fractures: Application of Local Autograft With Concurrent Plate Fixation.

    PubMed

    Slette, Erik L; Mikula, Jacob D; Turnbull, Travis Lee; Hackett, Thomas R

    2016-06-01

    Currently, open reduction-internal fixation using contoured plates or intramedullary nails is considered the standard operative treatment for midshaft clavicle fractures because of the immediate rigid stability provided by the fixation device. In addition, autologous iliac crest bone graft has proved to augment osteosynthesis during internal fixation of nonunion fractures through the release of osteogenic factors. The purpose of this article is to describe a surgical technique developed to reduce donor-site morbidity and improve functional and objective outcomes after open reduction-internal fixation with autologous bone graft placement through local autograft harvesting and concurrent plate fixation. PMID:27656378

  3. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Using Hamstring Tendon Autograft With Preserved Insertions.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Ravi; Bahadur, Raj; Malhotra, Anubhav; Masih, Gladson David; Gupta, Parmanand

    2016-04-01

    We present a technique for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction using hamstring tendon autograft with preserved tibial insertions. The tendons, harvested with an open-ended tendon stripper while their tibial insertions are preserved, are looped around to prepare a quadrupled graft. The femoral tunnel is drilled independently through a transportal technique, whereas the tibial tunnel is drilled in a standard manner. The length of the quadrupled graft and loop of the RetroButton is adjusted so that it matches the calculated length of both tunnels and the intra-articular part of the proposed ACL graft. After the RetroButton is flipped, the graft is manually tensioned with maximal stretch on the free end, which is then sutured to the other end with preserved insertions. We propose that preserving the insertions is more biological and may provide better proprioception. The technique eliminates the need for a tibial-side fixation device, thus reducing the cost of surgery. Furthermore, tibial-side fixation of the free graft is the weakest link in the overall stiffness of the reconstructed ACL, and this technique circumvents this problem. Postoperative mechanical stability and functional outcome with this technique need to be explored and compared with those of ACL reconstruction using free hamstring autograft. PMID:27354946

  4. A Novel Small Animal Model of Differential Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Graft Strain.

    PubMed

    Ma, Richard; Ju, Xiaodong; Deng, Xiang-Hua; Rodeo, Scott A

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the study was to establish a small animal research model of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction where ACL graft force can be predictably altered with knee motion. Cadaveric rat knees (n = 12) underwent ACL resection followed by reconstruction. Six knees received anterior (high-tension) femoral graft tunnels and six knees received posterior (isometric) graft tunnels. All the 12 knees and ACL grafts were pretensioned to 3 N at 15 or 45 degrees of knee flexion. ACL graft force (N) was recorded as the knee was ranged from extension to 90-degree flexion. Distinct ACL graft force patterns were generated for a high-tension and isometric femoral graft tunnels. For a high-tension femoral tunnel, the rat ACL graft remained relatively isometric at lower knee flexion angles but increased as the knee was flexed beyond 45 degrees. At 90 degrees, high-tension grafts had significantly greater mean graft tension for both pretensioning at 15 degrees (5.58 ± 1.34 N, p = 0.005) and 45 degrees (6.35 ± 1.24 N, p = 0.001). In contrast, the graft forces for isometric ACL grafts remained relatively constant with knee flexion. Compared with a high-tension ACL grafts, the graft force for grafts placed in an isometric tunnel had significantly lower ACL graft forces at 60, 75, and 90 degrees of knee flexion for both pretensioning at 15 and 45 degrees, respectively. We were able to demonstrate that ACL graft forces in our rat model of ACL reconstruction were sensitive to femoral tunnel position similar to human knees. We were also able to establish two reproducible femoral graft tunnel positions in this small animal model, which yielded significantly different ACL graft tension patterns with knee range of motion. This model would permit further research on how ACL graft tension may affect graft healing. PMID:25343473

  5. Application of molecular modeling to polymer grafted nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adiga, Shashishekar P.

    Polymer chains undergo conformational transitions in response to a change in solvent quality of their environment, making them strong candidates to be used in smart nanometer-scale devices. In the present work molecular modeling is used to explore grafted polymer structures with various functionalities. The first part of this research focuses on two examples of selective transport through nanopores modified with polymer brush structures. The first is the investigation of solvent flow through nanopores grafted with linear chains. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are used to demonstrate how a stretch-collapse transition in grafted polymer chains can be used to control solvent flow rate through a nanopore in response to environmental stimuli. A continuum fluid dynamics method based on porous layer model for describing flow through the smart nanopore is described and its accuracy is analyzed by comparing with the results from MD simulations. The continuum method is then applied to determine regulation of water permeation in response to pH through a poly(L-glutamic acid) grafted nanoporous membrane. A second example is use of a rod-coil transition in "bottle brush" molecules that are grafted to the inside of a nanopore to size select macromolecules as they diffuse through the functionalized nanopores. These stimuli-responsive nanopores have a variety of potential applications including molecular sorting, smart drug delivery, and ultrafiltration, as well as controlled chemical release. Tethered polymers play an important role in biological structures as well. In the second part of the research, application of atomistic simulations to characterize the effect of phosphorylation on neurofilament structure is presented. Neurofilaments are intermediate filaments that regulate axonal diameter through their long, flexible side arms extending from the central core. Their functionality is imparted by polymer brush like structure that causes steric repulsion between the

  6. Comparison of structural allograft and traditional autograft technique in occipitocervical fusion: radiological and clinical outcomes from a single institution.

    PubMed

    Godzik, Jakub; Ravindra, Vijay M; Ray, Wilson Z; Schmidt, Meic H; Bisson, Erica F; Dailey, Andrew T

    2015-08-01

    OBJECT The authors' objectives were to compare the rate of fusion after occipitoatlantoaxial arthrodesis using structural allograft with the fusion rate from using autograft, to evaluate correction of radiographic parameters, and to describe symptom relief with each graft technique. METHODS The authors assessed radiological fusion at 6 and 12 months after surgery and obtained radiographic measurements of C1-2 and C2-7 lordotic angles, C2-7 sagittal vertical alignments, and posterior occipitocervical angles at preoperative, postoperative, and final follow-up examinations. Demographic data, intraoperative details, adverse events, and functional outcomes were collected from hospitalization records. Radiological fusion was defined as the presence of bone trabeculation and no movement between the graft and the occiput or C-2 on routine flexion-extension cervical radiographs. Radiographic measurements were obtained from lateral standing radiographs with patients in the neutral position. RESULTS At the University of Utah, 28 adult patients underwent occipitoatlantoaxial arthrodesis between 2003 and 2010 using bicortical allograft, and 11 patients were treated using iliac crest autograft. Mean follow-up for all patients was 20 months (range 1-108 months). Of the 27 patients with a minimum of 12 months of follow-up, 18 (95%) of 19 in the allograft group and 8 (100%) of 8 in the autograft group demonstrated evidence of bony fusion shown by imaging. Patients in both groups demonstrated minimal deterioration of sagittal vertical alignment at final follow-up. Operative times were comparable, but patients undergoing occipitocervical fusion with autograft demonstrated greater blood loss (316 ml vs 195 ml). One (9%) of 11 patients suffered a significant complication related to autograft harvesting. CONCLUSIONS The use of allograft in occipitocervical fusion allows a high rate of successful arthrodesis yet avoids the potentially significant morbidity and pain associated with

  7. Factors Influencing Graft Choice in Revision Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction in the MARS Group.

    PubMed

    Group, Mars

    2016-08-01

    It has not been known what drives revision anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction graft choice in the past. We undertook this study to utilize the Multicenter ACL Revision Study (MARS) group and propensity score statistical analysis to determine the drivers of revision ACL reconstruction graft choice. We hypothesized that propensity analysis would demonstrate that individual surgeons still have significant impact on revision ACL reconstruction. Twelve hundred patients were enrolled in this longitudinal revision cohort by 83 surgeons at 52 sites. The median age was 26 years and 505 (42%) were females. One thousand forty-nine (87%) patients were undergoing their first ACL revision. Graft choice for revision ACL reconstruction for these patients was 48% autograft, 49% allograft, and 3% combination. The independent variables of this model included gender, age, ethnicity, body mass index, smoking status, sport, activity level, previous graft, revision number, surgeon, surgeon's opinion of failure, previous technical aspects, etc. Surgeons were defined as those who contributed more than 15 patients during the enrollment period. . We calculated a propensity score for graft type based on the predicted probability of receiving an allograft from a logistic regression model. Propensity scores demonstrated that surgeon, prior graft choice, and patient age each had significant influence on which graft type was chosen for the revision ACL reconstruction (p  < 0.0001). The revising surgeon had the largest impact upon graft choice: ∼ 5 times that of the second-most important factor (prior graft). If the prior graft type was an autograft, then an allograft was 3.6 times more likely to be chosen for the revision. This current study demonstrates that the individual surgeon is ultimately the most important factor in revision ACL reconstruction graft choice. Additional statistically significant influences of graft choice included age, gender, previous graft choice, ACL

  8. Factors Influencing Graft Choice in Revision Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction in the MARS Group.

    PubMed

    Group, Mars

    2016-08-01

    It has not been known what drives revision anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction graft choice in the past. We undertook this study to utilize the Multicenter ACL Revision Study (MARS) group and propensity score statistical analysis to determine the drivers of revision ACL reconstruction graft choice. We hypothesized that propensity analysis would demonstrate that individual surgeons still have significant impact on revision ACL reconstruction. Twelve hundred patients were enrolled in this longitudinal revision cohort by 83 surgeons at 52 sites. The median age was 26 years and 505 (42%) were females. One thousand forty-nine (87%) patients were undergoing their first ACL revision. Graft choice for revision ACL reconstruction for these patients was 48% autograft, 49% allograft, and 3% combination. The independent variables of this model included gender, age, ethnicity, body mass index, smoking status, sport, activity level, previous graft, revision number, surgeon, surgeon's opinion of failure, previous technical aspects, etc. Surgeons were defined as those who contributed more than 15 patients during the enrollment period. . We calculated a propensity score for graft type based on the predicted probability of receiving an allograft from a logistic regression model. Propensity scores demonstrated that surgeon, prior graft choice, and patient age each had significant influence on which graft type was chosen for the revision ACL reconstruction (p  < 0.0001). The revising surgeon had the largest impact upon graft choice: ∼ 5 times that of the second-most important factor (prior graft). If the prior graft type was an autograft, then an allograft was 3.6 times more likely to be chosen for the revision. This current study demonstrates that the individual surgeon is ultimately the most important factor in revision ACL reconstruction graft choice. Additional statistically significant influences of graft choice included age, gender, previous graft choice, ACL

  9. Osteochondral autograft transplantation for osteochondritis dissecans of the capitellum in nonthrowing athletes.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, Eiichi; Ishibashi, Yasuyuki; Sato, Hideki; Yamamoto, Yuji; Toh, Satoshi

    2005-10-01

    In this report, we present the cases of 3 nonthrowing athletes with osteochondritis dissecans of the capitellum. Preoperatively, they complained of elbow pain during rhythmic gymnastics, table tennis, and basketball, respectively. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a completely separated osteochondral fragment or a full-thickness cartilage defect. All 3 patients were treated with transplantation of an osteochondral autograft harvested from the lateral femoral condyle. They returned fully to their sports activities within 6 months of surgery. The continuity of the cartilage layer between the osteochondral graft and the capitellum was shown on magnetic resonance images taken at 12 months postoperatively. We believe that osteochondral autograft transplantation provides successful results for nonthrowing athletes with end-stage osteochondritis dissecans of the capitellum.

  10. Traveling waves in the modelling of aerosolised skin grafts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ai, Shangbing

    2008-11-01

    Denman et al. [P.K. Denman, D.L.S. McElwain, J. Norbury, Analysis of travelling waves associated with the modelling of aerosolised skin grafts, Bull. Math. Biol. 69 (2007) 495-523] proposed a novel model on the growth pattern of keratinocyte cell colonies that were sprayed on to a severe burn site to facilitate the healing process. They studied traveling wave solutions of the model by asymptotic analysis and obtained several qualitative properties. In this paper we establish the following result on the traveling waves: there exists a minimal speed c such that the model has a unique biologically meaningful travelling wave solution for each speed c≥c and has no such a solution for any c

  11. Development and assessment of a biodegradable solvent cast polyester fabric small-diameter vascular graft

    PubMed Central

    Brandes, Zachary R; Jonas, Richard A.; Fisher, John P.

    2014-01-01

    Adjusting the mechanical properties of polyester-based vascular grafts is crucial to achieving long-term success in vivo. While previous studies using a fabric-based approach have achieved some success, a central issue with pure poly(lactic acid) (PLA) or poly(glycolic acid) (PGA) grafts sealed with poly(DL-caprolactone-co-lactic acid) (P(CL/LA)) has been stenosis. Intimal hyperplasia, a leading cause of stenosis, can be caused by the mechanical incompatibility of synthetic vascular grafts. Investigating the performance of poly(glycolic-co-lactic acid) grafts (PGLA) could lead to insight into whether graft stenosis stems from mechanical issues such as non-compliance and unfavorable degradation times. This could be achieved by examining grafts with tunable mechanical properties between the ranges of such properties in pure PGA and PLA based grafts. In this study, we examined PGLA-based grafts sealed with different P(CL/LA) solutions to determine the PGLA-P(CL/LA) grafts' mechanical properties and tissue functionality. Cell attachment and proliferation on graft surfaces were also observed. For in vivo assessment, grafts were implanted in a mouse model. Mechanical properties and degradation times appeared adequate compared to recorded values of vessels used in autograft procedures. Initial neotissue formation was observed in the grafts and patency maintained during the pilot study. This study presents a ~1mm diameter degradable graft demonstrating suitable mechanical properties and in vivo pilot study success, enabling further investigation into the tuning of mechanical properties to reduce complications in degradable polyester fabric-based vascular grafts. PMID:23852776

  12. Development and assessment of a biodegradable solvent cast polyester fabric small-diameter vascular graft.

    PubMed

    Melchiorri, Anthony J; Hibino, Narutoshi; Brandes, Zachary R; Jonas, Richard A; Fisher, John P

    2014-06-01

    Adjusting the mechanical properties of polyester-based vascular grafts is crucial to achieving long-term success in vivo. Although previous studies using a fabric-based approach have achieved some success, a central issue with pure poly(lactic acid) (PLA) or poly(glycolic acid) (PGA) grafts sealed with poly(DL-caprolactone-co-lactic acid) (P(CL/LA)) has been stenosis. Intimal hyperplasia, a leading cause of stenosis, can be caused by the mechanical incompatibility of synthetic vascular grafts. Investigating the performance of poly(glycolic-co-lactic acid) (PGLA) grafts could lead to insight into whether graft stenosis stems from mechanical issues such as noncompliance and unfavorable degradation times. This could be achieved by examining grafts with tunable mechanical properties between the ranges of such properties in pure PGA and PLA-based grafts. In this study, we examined PGLA-based grafts sealed with different P(CL/LA) solutions to determine the PGLA-P(CL/LA) grafts' mechanical properties and tissue functionality. Cell attachment and proliferation on graft surfaces were also observed. For in vivo assessment, grafts were implanted in a mouse model. Mechanical properties and degradation times appeared adequate compared to recorded values of vessels used in autograft procedures. Initial neotissue formation was observed in the grafts and patency maintained during the pilot study. This study presents a ∼1-mm diameter degradable graft demonstrating suitable mechanical properties and in vivo pilot study success, enabling further investigation into the tuning of mechanical properties to reduce complications in degradable polyester fabric-based vascular grafts.

  13. Effect of graft choice on the outcome of revision anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in the Multicenter ACL Revision Study (MARS) Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Rick W.; Huston, Laura J.; Haas, Amanda K.; Spindler, Kurt P.; Nwosu, Sam K.; Allen, Christina R.; Anderson, Allen F.; Cooper, Daniel E.; DeBerardino, Thomas M.; Dunn, Warren R.; Lantz, Brett (Brick) A.; Stuart, Michael J.; Garofoli, Elizabeth A.; Albright, John P.; Amendola, Annunziato (Ned); Andrish, Jack T.; Annunziata, Christopher C.; Arciero, Robert A.; Bach, Bernard R.; Baker, Champ L.; Bartolozzi, Arthur R.; Baumgarten, Keith M.; Bechler, Jeffery R.; Berg, Jeffrey H.; Bernas, Geoffrey A.; Brockmeier, Stephen F.; Brophy, Robert H.; Bush-Joseph, Charles A.; Butler, J. Brad; Campbell, John D.; Carey, James L.; Carpenter, James E.; Cole, Brian J.; Cooper, Jonathan M.; Cox, Charles L.; Creighton, R. Alexander; Dahm, Diane L.; David, Tal S.; Flanigan, David C.; Frederick, Robert W.; Ganley, Theodore J.; Gatt, Charles J.; Gecha, Steven R.; Giffin, James Robert; Hame, Sharon L.; Hannafin, Jo A.; Harner, Christopher D.; Harris, Norman Lindsay; Hechtman, Keith S.; Hershman, Elliott B.; Hoellrich, Rudolf G.; Hosea, Timothy M.; Johnson, David C.; Johnson, Timothy S.; Jones, Morgan H.; Kaeding, Christopher C.; Kamath, Ganesh V.; Klootwyk, Thomas E.; Levy, Bruce A.; Ma, C. Benjamin; Maiers, G. Peter; Marx, Robert G.; Matava, Matthew J.; Mathien, Gregory M.; McAllister, David R.; McCarty, Eric C.; McCormack, Robert G.; Miller, Bruce S.; Nissen, Carl W.; O'Neill, Daniel F.; Owens, Brett D.; Parker, Richard D.; Purnell, Mark L.; Ramappa, Arun J.; Rauh, Michael A.; Rettig, Arthur C.; Sekiya, Jon K.; Shea, Kevin G.; Sherman, Orrin H.; Slauterbeck, James R.; Smith, Matthew V.; Spang, Jeffrey T.; Svoboda, Steven J.; Taft, Timothy N.; Tenuta, Joachim J.; Tingstad, Edwin M.; Vidal, Armando F.; Viskontas, Darius G.; White, Richard A.; Williams, James S.; Wolcott, Michelle L.; Wolf, Brian R.; York, James J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Most surgeons believe that graft choice for ACL reconstruction is an important factor related to outcome. Although graft choice may be limited in the revision setting based on previously used grafts, it is still felt to be important. Hypothesis The purpose of this study was to determine if revision ACL graft choice predicts outcomes related to sports function, activity level, OA symptoms, graft re-rupture, and reoperation at two years following revision reconstruction. We hypothesized that autograft use would result in increased sports function, increased activity level, and decreased OA symptoms (as measured by validated patient reported outcome instruments). Additionally, we hypothesized that autograft use would result in decreased graft failure and reoperation rate 2 years following revision ACL reconstruction. Study Design Prospective cohort study; Level of evidence, 2. Methods Revision ACL reconstruction patients were identified and prospectively enrolled by 83 surgeons over 52 sites. Data collected included baseline demographics, surgical technique and pathology, and a series of validated patient reported outcome instruments (IKDC, KOOS, WOMAC, and Marx activity rating score). Patients were followed up at 2 years, and asked to complete the identical set of outcome instruments. Incidence of additional surgery and reoperation due to graft failure were also recorded. Multivariate regression models were used to determine the predictors (risk factors) of IKDC, KOOS, WOMAC, Marx scores, graft re-rupture, and reoperation rate at 2 years following revision surgery. Results 1205 patients were successfully enrolled with 697 (58%) males. Median age was 26. In 88% this was their first revision. 341 (28%) were undergoing revision by the surgeon that had performed the previous reconstruction. 583 (48%) underwent revision reconstruction utilizing an autograft, 590 (49%) allograft, and 32 (3%) both autograft and allograft. Median time since their last ACL

  14. A Systematic Review of Failed Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction With Autograft Compared With Allograft in Young Patients

    PubMed Central

    Wasserstein, David; Sheth, Ujash; Cabrera, Alison; Spindler, Kurt P.

    2015-01-01

    Context: The advantages of allograft anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR), which include shorter surgical time, less postoperative pain, and no donor site morbidity, may be offset by a higher risk of failure. Previous systematic reviews have inconsistently shown a difference in failure prevalence by graft type; however, such reviews have never been stratified for younger or more active patients. Objective: To determine whether there is a different ACLR failure prevalence of autograft compared with allograft in young, active patients. Data Sources: EMBASE, MEDLINE, Cochrane trials registry. Study Selection: Comparative studies of allograft versus autograft primary ACL reconstruction in patients <25 years of age or of high-activity level (military, Marx activity score >12 points, collegiate or semiprofessional athletes). Study Design: Systematic review with meta-analysis. Level of Evidence: Level 3. Data Extraction: Manual extraction of available data from eligible studies. Quantitative synthesis of failure prevalence and Lysholm score (outcomes in ≥3 studies) and I2 test for heterogeneity. Assessment of study quality using CLEAR NPT and Newcastle-Ottawa Scale (NOS). Results: Seven studies met inclusion criteria (1 level 1; 2 level 2, 4 level 3), including 788 patients treated with autograft tissue and 228 with various allografts. The mean age across studies was 21.7 years (64% male), and follow-up ranged between 24 and 51 months. The pooled failure prevalence was 9.6% (76/788) for autografts and 25.0% (57/228) for allografts (relative risk, 0.36; 95% CI, 0.24-0.53; P < 0.00001; I2 = 16%). The number needed to benefit to prevent 1 failure by using autograft was 7 patients (95% CI, 5-10). No difference between hamstrings autograft and patella tendon autograft was noted. Lysholm score was reported in 3 studies and did not differ between autograft and allograft. Conclusion: While systematic reviews comparing allograft and autograft ACLR have been equivocal

  15. Quantitative measures of osteoinductivity of a porous poly(propylene fumarate) bone graft extender.

    PubMed

    Lewandrowski, Kai-Uwe; Hile, David D; Thompson, Benjamin M J; Wise, Donald L; Tomford, William W; Trantolo, Debra J

    2003-02-01

    Bioresorbable bone graft substitutes could alleviate disadvantages associated with the use of autografts, allografts, and other synthetic materials. However, little is known about the minimum autograft/extender ratio for a given material at which a sufficient osteoinductive effect is still seen. Therefore, we investigated a bioresorbable bone graft substitute made from the unsaturated polyester poly(propylene fumarate), PPF, at various mixing ratios with autograft. The bone graft extender is cross-linked in the presence of a hydroxylapatite filler and effervescent foaming agents citric acid and sodium bicarbonate. The porous bone graft extender material develops porosity in vivo by generating carbon dioxide during the effervescent reaction, resulting in foam formation and expansion with respective pore sizes of 50 to 1000 microm. In an attempt to determine how much cancellous autograft bone could be extended with the poly(propylene fumarate) material and at which ratio the autograft/extender combination remained supportive of the overall structural integrity of the repairing defect site, we studied the amount of new bone formation on implantation of the materials in 3-mm holes made in the anteromedial tibial metaphysis of Sprague-Dawley rats. The extender formulation was analyzed at high autograft/extender (75% autograft/25% extender) and low autograft/extender (25% autograft/75% extender) mixing ratios and compared with negative (extender alone) and positive (autograft alone) controls. Animals from each of the formulations were killed in groups of eight at 6 weeks postoperatively. Hence, a total of 32 animals were included in this study. Histologic analysis of the healing process revealed enhanced in vivo osteoinduction with the bone graft extender regardless of the autograft loading. Histomorphometry did not show any statistically significant difference between the high and low autograft/extender ratios. All formulations maintained implant integrity and did not

  16. Hybrid Graft Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: A Predictable Graft for Knee Stabilization.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Pinzon, Andres M; Barksdale, Leticia; Krill, Michael K; Leo, Brian M

    2015-06-01

    Trauma to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is a season-ending injury and involves months of activity modification and rehabilitation. The annual incidence of ACL tears in the United States is approximately 200,000, which allows for a broad range of individualized treatment options. Various surgical techniques, including transtibial and independent tunnel drilling, allograft and autograft tissue, and various implants, have been described in the literature. This article describes the indications and technique for a hybrid soft tissue graft for ACL reconstruction. Autologous grafts eliminate the risk of disease transmission and have recently been shown to have a lower rerupture rate, particularly in younger, active patients; however, the harvesting of autologous hamstring grafts carries a risk of donor-site morbidity, iatrogenic injury of the graft, and inadequate graft size. In contrast to a traditional autologous soft tissue graft, the hybrid graft allows for graft size customization for a desired reconstruction, especially in cases where autograft hamstrings may be iatrogenically damaged or of inadequate size when harvested. The goal of a hybrid graft ACL reconstruction is to provide a favorable-sized graft with clinical outcomes comparable with autologous soft tissue grafts. In contrast to a traditional autologous soft tissue graft, this technique provides another option in the event of unforeseen deficiencies or complications associated with harvesting and preparation of the autologous gracilis and semitendinosis soft tissue graft. PMID:26091219

  17. Hybrid Graft Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: A Predictable Graft for Knee Stabilization.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Pinzon, Andres M; Barksdale, Leticia; Krill, Michael K; Leo, Brian M

    2015-06-01

    Trauma to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is a season-ending injury and involves months of activity modification and rehabilitation. The annual incidence of ACL tears in the United States is approximately 200,000, which allows for a broad range of individualized treatment options. Various surgical techniques, including transtibial and independent tunnel drilling, allograft and autograft tissue, and various implants, have been described in the literature. This article describes the indications and technique for a hybrid soft tissue graft for ACL reconstruction. Autologous grafts eliminate the risk of disease transmission and have recently been shown to have a lower rerupture rate, particularly in younger, active patients; however, the harvesting of autologous hamstring grafts carries a risk of donor-site morbidity, iatrogenic injury of the graft, and inadequate graft size. In contrast to a traditional autologous soft tissue graft, the hybrid graft allows for graft size customization for a desired reconstruction, especially in cases where autograft hamstrings may be iatrogenically damaged or of inadequate size when harvested. The goal of a hybrid graft ACL reconstruction is to provide a favorable-sized graft with clinical outcomes comparable with autologous soft tissue grafts. In contrast to a traditional autologous soft tissue graft, this technique provides another option in the event of unforeseen deficiencies or complications associated with harvesting and preparation of the autologous gracilis and semitendinosis soft tissue graft.

  18. Osteochondral Autograft from the Ipsilateral Femoral Head by Surgical Dislocation for Treatment of Femoral Head Fracture Dislocation: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Won, Yougun; Lee, Gi Soo; Kim, Sang Bum; Kim, Sun Joong; Yang, Kyu Hyun

    2016-11-01

    As anatomical reduction of the articular surface of femoral head fractures and restoration of damaged cartilage are essential for good long-term results, many treatment options have been suggested, including fixation of the fracture using various surgical exposures and implants, as well as arthroscopic irrigation and debridement, bone marrow stimulating techniques, osteochondral allograft, autograft, and autogenous chondrocyte implantation. We report a case of osteochondral autograft harvested from its own femoral articular surface through surgical hip dislocation. The osteochondral graft was harvested from the inferior non-weight-bearing articular surface and grafted to the osteochondral defect. One year later, the clinical and radiological results were good, without the collapse of the femoral head or arthritic change. This procedure introduced in our case is considered convenient and able to lessen surgical time without morbidity of the donor site associated with the harvest. PMID:27593886

  19. Osteochondral Autograft from the Ipsilateral Femoral Head by Surgical Dislocation for Treatment of Femoral Head Fracture Dislocation: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Won, Yougun; Kim, Sang Bum; Kim, Sun Joong; Yang, Kyu-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    As anatomical reduction of the articular surface of femoral head fractures and restoration of damaged cartilage are essential for good long-term results, many treatment options have been suggested, including fixation of the fracture using various surgical exposures and implants, as well as arthroscopic irrigation and debridement, bone marrow stimulating techniques, osteochondral allograft, autograft, and autogenous chondrocyte implantation. We report a case of osteochondral autograft harvested from its own femoral articular surface through surgical hip dislocation. The osteochondral graft was harvested from the inferior non-weight-bearing articular surface and grafted to the osteochondral defect. One year later, the clinical and radiological results were good, without the collapse of the femoral head or arthritic change. This procedure introduced in our case is considered convenient and able to lessen surgical time without morbidity of the donor site associated with the harvest. PMID:27593886

  20. Anatomic Reconstruction of the Medial Patellofemoral Ligament Using the Fascia Lata as an Autograft

    PubMed Central

    Haupert, Alexander; Lorbach, Olaf

    2015-01-01

    The medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) ensures stability of the patella against lateral forces. In cases of recurrent lateral patellar luxation, surgical reconstruction of the MPFL has an important role in treating lateral patellar instability. Several biomechanical studies have presented valuable pieces of information about various techniques for re-creating this medial patellofemoral complex mainly using the gracilis tendon as an autograft. However, with the increasing number of MPFL reconstructions, there are also an increasing number of patients requiring revision MPFL reconstruction. Therefore alternative graft options may become more relevant. Furthermore, the gracilis tendon as a tubular graft may not be able to fully restore patellofemoral kinematics compared with the native MPFL. This article introduces a surgical technique using the fascia lata as an alternative graft option for the anatomic reconstruction of the MPFL. PMID:25973375

  1. Arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with quadriceps tendon autograft: clinical outcome in 4-7 years.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chih-Hwa; Chuang, Tai-Yuan; Wang, Kun-Chuang; Chen, Wen-Jer; Shih, Chun-Hsiung

    2006-11-01

    Surgical reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is indicated in the ACL-deficient knee with symptomatic instability and multiple ligaments injuries. In the present study, we describe the clinical results of quadriceps tendon-patellar bone autograft for ACL reconstruction. From 1996 to 1998, the graft has been used in 38 patients. Thirty-four patients with complete final follow-up for 4-7 years were analyzed. The average follow-up time was 62 (48-84) months. Thirty-two patients (94%) achieved good or excellent results by Lysholm knee rating. Twenty-six patients (76%) could return to moderate or strenuous activity after reconstruction. Twenty-eight patients (82%) had ligament laxity of less than 2 mm. Finally; 31 patients (91%) were assessed as normal or nearly normal rating by IKDC guideline. Twenty-five patients (73%) had less than 10 mm difference in thigh girth between their reconstructed and normal limbs. Thirty-two (94%) and 31 (91%) patients could achieve recovery of the extensor and flexor muscle strength in the reconstructed knee to 80% or more of normal knee strength, respectively. A statistically significant difference exists in thigh girth difference, extensor strength ratio, and flexor strength ratio before and after reconstruction. Tunnel expansion with more than 1 mm was identified in 2 (6%) tibial tunnels. Our study revealed satisfactory clinical subjective and objective results at 4-7 years follow-up. Quadriceps tendon autograft has the advantage of being self-available, relatively easier arthroscopic technique, and having a suitable size, making it an acceptable graft choice for ACL reconstruction. There is little quadriceps muscle strength loss after quadriceps harvest. A quadriceps tendon-patellar autograft is an adequate graft choice to ACL reconstruction.

  2. One-incision endoscopic technique for posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with quadriceps tendon-patellar bone autograft.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chih-Hwa; Chen, Wen-Jer; Shih, Chun-Hsiung

    2001-03-01

    Quadriceps tendon-patellar bone autograft is an alternative graft choice for posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) reconstruction. A 2-incision technique with outside-in fixation at the femoral condyle is generally used. In this article, we describe a 1-incision endoscopic technique for PCL reconstruction with quadriceps tendon-patellar bone autograft. The graft consists of a proximal patellar bone plug and central quadriceps tendon. The bone plug is trapezoidal, 20 mm long, 10 mm wide, and 8 mm thick. The tendon portion is 80 mm long, 10 mm wide, and 6 mm thick, including the full-thickness of the rectus femoris and partial thickness of the vastus intermedius. Three arthroscopic portals, including anteromedial, anterolateral, and posteromedial, are used. All procedures are performed in an endoscopic manner with only 1 incision at the proximal tibia. At the femoral side, the bone plug is fixed by an interference screw. At the tibial side, the tendon portion is fixed by a suture to a screw on the anterior cortex and an interference bioscrew in the posterior tibial tunnel opening. Quadriceps tendon autograft has the advantages of being self-available, allowing for easier arthroscopic technique, and providing comparable graft size. The 1-incision technique provides a simple reconstruction method for PCL insufficiency without a second incision at the medial femoral condyle.

  3. Visual outcome and efficacy of conjunctival autograft, harvested from the body of pterygium in pterygium excision

    PubMed Central

    Bhandari, Vipul; Rao, Chandan Latha; Ganesh, Sri; Brar, Sheetal

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the efficacy of conjunctival autograft after the pterygium excision with fibrin adhesive using conjunctiva over the pterygium. Patients and methods This prospective study included 25 eyes of 25 patients with a mean age of 40±10 years, who underwent the pterygium excision with conjunctival autograft derived from the body of the pterygium and attached using fibrin glue. The mean follow-up period was 6 months. On all postoperative visits, changes in uncorrected visual acuity, corrected distance visual acuity, astigmatism, complications, and the evidence of recurrence were recorded. Results At the end of mean follow-up, uncorrected visual acuity and corrected distance visual acuity improved by one or two lines in all eyes treated. Mean astigmatism reduced significantly from a preoperative value from 2.308D to 1.248D postoperatively (P<0.026). Minor postoperative complications such as congestion, chemosis, and subconjunctival hemorrhage were seen, which resolved with time. No major sight-threatening or graft-related complications were detected. There was no evidence of recurrence during a follow-up period of 6 months. Conclusion Self-conjunctival autograft following the pterygium excision appears to be a feasible, safe, and effective alternative method for management of pterygium. It also preserves the superior conjunctiva for future surgeries. However, longer follow-up is required to study the long-term outcomes, especially the incidence of recurrence. PMID:26664044

  4. "Flypaper technique" a modified expansion method for preparation of postage stamp autografts.

    PubMed

    Lee, Su-Shin; Lin, Tsai-Ming; Chen, Yi-Hui; Lin, Sin-Daw; Lai, Chung-Sheng

    2005-09-01

    The gold standard for management of extensive burn has been early excision, temporary allografting and final autografting. However, "lack of donor skin" is a challenge condition when autografting in the treatment of extensive burns. Designing an efficient and easy to apply expansion method may improve burn care quality and shorten the hospital stay period. From December 1998 to May 2004, we have performed fly paper technique postage stamp skin autografting for eight major burn patients in the Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital. By using a quick cutting plate, chessboard tray and petrolatum gauze, the skin islands can be uniformly located and correctly oriented on gauze. Then, the gauze with skin islands was grafted on to the wound. The wound healing time depends on the size of skin islands and expansion ratio. This method allows true expansion ratio up to nine times. The average wound healing times are 27.2 days for six times expansion and 34 days for nine times expansion. However, the burn scar needs further compression therapy to improve the cosmetic result. In comparison with the mesh technique, the skin islands are independent of each other, any dislodgement of a skin island will not interfere with the surrounding skin squares. When compared with the modified Meek technique, this method also offers rapid wound reepithilization but with lower cost. This flypaper technique is worthy of consideration in dealing with the extensive burns.

  5. [Biomaterials for bone filling: comparisons between autograft, hydroxyapatite and one highly purified bovine xenograft].

    PubMed

    Chappard, D; Zhioua, A; Grizon, F; Basle, M F; Rebel, A

    1993-12-01

    Bone grafts are becoming increasingly common in orthopaedics, neurosurgery and periodontology. Twenty one New Zealand rabbits were used in the present study comparing several materials usable as bone substitutes. A 4.5 mm hole was drilled in the inner femoral condyles. Holes were filled with either an autograft (from the opposite condyle), an hydroxylapatite (Bioapatite), or a highly purified bovine xenograft (T650 Lubboc). Animals were sacrificed at 1, 3 and 6 months post implantation and a quantitative analysis of newly-formed bone volume (BNF/IV) and remaining biomaterials (BMAT/IV) was done. In addition, some holes were left unfilled and served as controls. At 6 months, there was no tendency for spontaneous repair in the control animals. The autografted animals have repaired their trabecular mass and architecture within the first month. Hydroxylapatite appeared unresorbed at six months and only thin and scanty new trabeculae were observed. The xenograft induced woven bone trabeculae formation on the first month. This was associated with resorption of the material by two multinucleated cell populations. At six months, the epiphyseal architecture was restored and the biomaterial has disappeared in most cases. Xenografts appear a promising alternative to autografts and allografts, whose infectious risks and ethical problems should always be borne in mind.

  6. Grafts for Ridge Preservation

    PubMed Central

    Jamjoom, Amal; Cohen, Robert E.

    2015-01-01

    Alveolar ridge bone resorption is a biologic phenomenon that occurs following tooth extraction and cannot be prevented. This paper reviews the vertical and horizontal ridge dimensional changes that are associated with tooth extraction. It also provides an overview of the advantages of ridge preservation as well as grafting materials. A Medline search among English language papers was performed in March 2015 using alveolar ridge preservation, ridge augmentation, and various graft types as search terms. Additional papers were considered following the preliminary review of the initial search that were relevant to alveolar ridge preservation. The literature suggests that ridge preservation methods and augmentation techniques are available to minimize and restore available bone. Numerous grafting materials, such as autografts, allografts, xenografts, and alloplasts, currently are used for ridge preservation. Other materials, such as growth factors, also can be used to enhance biologic outcome. PMID:26262646

  7. A Computational Model of Optimal Vein Graft Adaptation in an Arterial Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramachandra, Abhay B.; Sankaran, Sethuraman; Humphrey, Jay; Marsden, Alison

    2012-11-01

    In coronary artery disease, surgical revascularization using venous bypass grafts is performed to relieve symptoms and prolong life. Coronary bypass graft surgery is performed on approximately 500,000 people every year in the United States, with graft failure rates as high as 50% within 5 years. When a vein graft is implanted in the arterial system it adapts to the high flow rate and high pressure of the arterial environment by changing composition and geometry, and thus stiffness. Hemodynamic loads, resulting in altered wall shear and intramural stresses, are major factors impacting vein graft remodeling. Here, a constrained mixture theory of growth and remodeling for arteries is extended to model the evolution of a vein graft subjected to arterial flow and pressure conditions. A derivative-free optimization method is used to estimate the optimal set of constitutive parameters that best match passive biaxial mouse inferior vena cava data from experiments. Optimization is performed using surrogate management framework, a pattern search method with established convergence theory. The resulting parameter set is used to predict optimal vein adaptation in an arterial environment for two illustrative cases: a) Step change b) Gradual change in loading. Results are compared against vein graft data from the literature and a possible set of mechanisms for sub-optimal vein graft remodeling is suggested.

  8. Endothelial cell transplantation onto polymeric arteriovenous grafts evaluated using a canine model.

    PubMed

    Williams, S K; Jarrell, B E; Kleinert, L B

    1994-01-01

    Prosthetic arteriovenous grafts (AVG) placed for hemodialysis access fail in humans due to the thrombogenicity of the flow surface and development of cellular intimal hyperplasia, particularly at the venous anastomosis. The poor patency rates of prosthetic AVG result in significant morbidity and mortality in dialysis patients. Consequently, investigators have been evaluating methods to improve the patency of prosthetic grafts by examining endothelial cell transplantation as a means of creating an antithrombogenic lining on artificial polymers. A canine model was developed to study the effects of cell transplantation of autologous, fat-derived microvessel endothelial cells (MVEC) onto the luminal surface of expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) grafts. Microvessel endothelial cells were isolated from falciform ligament fat, with each dog receiving its own endothelial cells. Isolated cells were subsequently placed into the lumen of the graft (4 mm by 20 cm ePTFE). The graft lumen was pressurized to 5 pounds per square inch (psi) resulting in the partial denucleation of the graft, due to the flow of buffer into the interstices of the graft, and the forced deposition of cells onto the luminal surface. Animals were maintained on aspirin and persantine during the implant phase. During the implant phase, grafts were evaluated by both duplex ultrasound and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). At explant, gross observation of the sodded grafts revealed a glistening white flow surface with no evidence of thrombosis. Morphologic and scanning electron microscopic evaluations revealed the presence of a cellular lining on the luminal flow surface that exhibited characteristics of antithrombogenic endothelial cells. Midgraft samples were evaluated by immunocytochemistry and indicated that cells on the luminal surface react positively with antibodies to von Willebrand factor. Results from this study demonstrate that the canine model provides an excellent method of studying the

  9. “Over-inlay” block graft and differential morphometry: a novel block graft model to study bone regeneration and host-to-graft interfaces in rats

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to present new a model that allows the study of the bone healing process, with an emphasis on the biological behavior of different graft-to-host interfaces. A standardized “over-inlay” surgical technique combined with a differential histomorphometric analysis is presented in order to optimize the use of critical-size calvarial defects in pre-clinical testing. Methods Critical-size defects were created into the parietal bone of 8 male Wistar rats. Deproteinized bovine bone (DBBM) blocks were inserted into the defects, so that part of the block was included within the calvarial thickness and part exceeded the calvarial height (an “over-inlay” graft). All animals were sacrificed at 1 or 3 months. Histomorphometric and immunohistochemical evaluation was carried out within distinct regions of interest (ROIs): the areas adjacent to the native bone (BA), the periosteal area (PA) and the central area (CA). Results The animals healed without complications. Differential morphometry allowed the examination of the tissue composition within distinct regions: the BA presented consistent amounts of new bone formation (NB), which increased over time (24.53%±1.26% at 1 month; 37.73%±0.39% at 3 months), thus suggesting that this area makes a substantial contribution toward NB. The PA was mainly composed of fibrous tissue (71.16%±8.06% and 78.30%±2.67%, respectively), while the CA showed high amounts of DBBM at both time points (78.30%±2.67% and 74.68%±1.07%, respectively), demonstrating a slow remodeling process. Blood vessels revealed a progressive migration from the interface with native bone toward the central area of the graft. Osterix-positive cells observed at 1 month within the PA suggested that the periosteum was a source of osteoprogenitor elements. Alkaline phosphatase data on matrix deposition confirmed this observation. Conclusions The present model allowed for a standardized investigation of distinct graft

  10. Arthroscopic Distal Clavicular Autograft for Treating Shoulder Instability With Glenoid Bone Loss

    PubMed Central

    Tokish, John M.; Fitzpatrick, Kelly; Cook, Jay B.; Mallon, William J.

    2014-01-01

    Glenoid bone loss is a significant risk factor for failure after arthroscopic shoulder stabilization. Multiple options are available to reconstruct this bone loss, including coracoid transfer, iliac crest bone graft, and osteoarticular allograft. Each technique has strengths and weaknesses. Coracoid grafts are limited to anterior augmentation and, along with iliac crest, do not provide an osteochondral reconstruction. Osteochondral allografts do provide a cartilage source but are challenged by the potential for graft rejection, infection, cost, and availability. We describe the use of a distal clavicular osteochondral autograft for bony augmentation in cases of glenohumeral instability with significant bone loss. This graft has the advantages of being readily available and cost-effective, it provides an autologous osteochondral transplant with minimal donor-site morbidity, and it can be used in both anterior and posterior bone loss cases. The rationale and technical aspects of arthroscopic performance will be discussed. Clinical studies are warranted to determine the outcomes of the use of the distal clavicle as a graft in shoulder instability. PMID:25264509

  11. Vascularized proximal fibular autograft for treatment of post-traumatic segmental bony defects in the distal radius.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Takamasa; Yajima, Hiroshi; Kobata, Yasunori; Shigematsu, Koji; Kawamura, Kenji; Takakura, Yoshinori

    2008-11-01

    Vascularized proximal fibular autograft is reported as one of the reconstructive procedures for the wrists following tumor resection in the distal end of the radius. However, it is rarely performed for the treatment of segmental bony defects in the distal radius after trauma. A 19-year-old man who had traumatic bony defects in the distal radius involving the articular surface underwent vascularized proximal fibular grafting for reconstruction of the wrist. After surgery, he regained wrist functions, with 40 degrees of flexion, 45 degrees of extension, 90 degrees of pronation, and 45 degrees of supination. No evidence of instability or degenerative changes was noted in the reconstructed wrist at 3 years after surgery. Vascularized proximal fibular autograft appears a useful procedure both for reconstruction of the wrist in cases with segmental bony defects in the distal radius after trauma, as well as for after tumor resection. PMID:18925543

  12. Bone graft materials in fixation of orthopaedic implants in sheep.

    PubMed

    Babiker, Hassan

    2013-07-01

    Bone graft is widely used within orthopaedic surgery especially in revision joint arthroplasty and spine fusion. The early implant fixation in the revision situation of loose joint prostheses is important for the long-term survival. Bone autograft has been considered as gold standard in many orthopaedic procedures, whereas allograft is the gold standard by replacement of extensive bone loss. However, the use of autograft is associated with donor site morbidity, especially chronic pain. In addition, the limited supply is a significant clinical challenge. Limitations in the use of allograft include the risk of bacterial contamination and disease transmission as well as non-union and poor bone quality. Other bone graft and substitutes have been considered as alternative in order to improve implant fixation. Hydroxyapatite and collagen type I composite (HA/Collagen) have the potential in mimicking skeletal bones. The osteoconductive properties of the composite might be improved by adding bone marrow aspirate (BMA), which can be harvested during surgery. Other alternatives to bone graft are demineralised bone matrix (DBM) and human cancellous bone (CB). DBM is prepared by acid extraction of human bone and includes bone collagen, morphogenetic proteins and growth factors. The combination of DBM with CB and with allograft might improve the healing potential of these grafts around non-cemented orthopaedic implants and thereby the implant fixation. Study I investigates the effect of HA/Collagen composite alone and in combination with BMA on the early fixation of porous coated titanium implants. In addition, the study compares also the effect of autograft with the gold standard allograft. By using a sheep model, the implants were inserted in the trabecular bone of femoral condyles. The test biomaterials were placed in a well defined peri-implant gap. After the observation period, the bone-implant specimens were harvested and evaluated mechanically by a destructive push

  13. Synthetic grafts for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Rizzello, Giacomo; Berton, Alessandra; Fumo, Caterina; Maltese, Ludovica; Khan, Wasim S; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2013-11-01

    Several artificial biomaterials are available as ligament grafts. No ideal prosthesis mimicking natural human tissue have been found to date. The emerging field of tissue engineering holds the promise to use artificial ligaments as a viable alternative to the patellar or hamstring tendon autografts. Preliminary studies support the idea that these biomaterials have the ability to provide an alternative for autogenous grafts. However, no definitive conclusions have been found. Additionally, the incidence of postoperative complications varies within different studies. Prospective investigations are required to better understand the potential of artificial biomaterials as ligament grafts.

  14. Fresh Versus Frozen Engineered Bone–Ligament–Bone Grafts for Sheep Anterior Cruciate Ligament Repair

    PubMed Central

    Mahalingam, Vasudevan D.; Behbahani-Nejad, Nilofar; Ronan, Elizabeth A.; Olsen, Tyler J.; Smietana, Michael J.; Wojtys, Edward M.; Wellik, Deneen M.; Arruda, Ellen M.

    2015-01-01

    Surgical intervention is often required to restore knee instability in patients with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. The most commonly used grafts for ACL reconstruction are tendon autografts or allografts. These current options, however, have shown failure rates requiring revision and continued instability in the long term. The mismatched biomechanical properties of the current tendon grafts compared with native ACL tissue are thought to contribute to these poor outcomes and potential risk of early onset osteoarthritis. As a possible solution to these issues, our laboratory has fabricated tissue-engineered ligament constructs that exhibit structural and functional properties similar to those of native ACL tissue after 6 months implantation. In addition, these tissue-engineered grafts achieve vascular and neural development that exceeds those of patellar tendon grafts. However, the utility of our tissue-engineered grafts is limited by the labor-intensive method required to produce the constructs and the need to use the constructs fresh, directly from the cell culturing system. Ideally, these constructs would be fabricated and stored until needed. Thus, in this study, we investigated the efficacy of freezing our tissue-engineered constructs as a method of preservation before use for ACL reconstruction. We hypothesized that frozen constructs would have similar histological and biomechanical outcomes compared with our fresh model. Our results showed that 6 months postimplantation as an ACL replacement graft, both our tissue-engineered fresh and frozen grafts demonstrated similar mechanical and histological outcomes, indicating that freezing is a suitable method for preserving and storing our graft before ACL reconstruction. The ability to use frozen constructs significantly increases the versatility of our graft technology expanding the clinical utility of our graft. PMID:25397990

  15. Autograft, allograft and bone substitutes in reconstructive orthopedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Chiarello, Eugenio; Cadossi, Matteo; Tedesco, Giuseppe; Capra, Paola; Calamelli, Carlotta; Shehu, Alba; Giannini, Sandro

    2013-10-01

    Reconstruction of bone defects is a challenge for all orthopedic surgeons worldwide; to overcome this problem there are different options: the use of autografts, allografts and bone substitutes (BSs) to enhance and accelerate bone repair. Autografts have excellent biological properties but are associated with morbidity of the donor site and are restricted in volume. Allografts are available in adequate quantity but concerns still remain about the risk of infections, moreover they do not have osteogenetic properties. Bone substitutes have different indications and are very attractive for orthopedic surgeons. The present paper briefly reviews the advantages and disadvantages of autografts, allografts and BSs for bone reconstruction.

  16. Hydrodynamic radius fluctuations in model DNA-grafted nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas-Lara, Fernando; Starr, Francis W.; Douglas, Jack F.

    2016-05-01

    We utilize molecular dynamics simulations (MD) and the path-integration program ZENO to quantify hydrodynamic radius (Rh) fluctuations of spherical symmetric gold nanoparticles (NPs) decorated with single-stranded DNA chains (ssDNA). These results are relevant to understanding fluctuation-induced interactions among these NPs and macromolecules such as proteins. In particular, we explore the effect of varying the ssDNA-grafted NPs structural parameters, such as the chain length (L), chain persistence length (lp), NP core size (R), and the number of chains (N) attached to the nanoparticle core. We determine Rh fluctuations by calculating its standard deviation (σRh) of an ensemble of ssDNA-grafted NPs configurations generated by MD. For the parameter space explored in this manuscript, σR h shows a peak value as a function of N, the amplitude of which depends on L, lp and R, while the broadness depends on R.

  17. Novel Approaches to Bone Grafting: Porosity, Bone Morphogenetic Proteins, Stem Cells, and the Periosteum

    PubMed Central

    Petrochenko, Peter; Narayan, Roger J.

    2011-01-01

    The disadvantages involving the use of a patient’s own bone as graft material have led surgeons to search for alternative materials. In this review, several characteristics of a successful bone graft material are discussed. In addition, novel synthetic materials and natural bone graft materials are being considered. Various factors can determine the success of a bone graft substitute. For example, design considerations such as porosity, pore shape, and interconnection play significant roles in determining graft performance. The effective delivery of bone morphogenetic proteins and the ability to restore vascularization also play significant roles in determining the success of a bone graft material. Among current approaches, shorter bone morphogenetic protein sequences, more efficient delivery methods, and periosteal graft supplements have shown significant promise for use in autograft substitutes or autograft extenders. PMID:21488823

  18. Establishment of an Animal Model of Vascular Restenosis with Bilateral Carotid Artery Grafting

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ruixiong; Lan, Bin; Zhu, Tianxiang; Yang, Yanlong; Wang, Muting; Ma, Chensheng; Chen, Shu

    2014-01-01

    Background Vascular restenosis occurring after CABG is a major clinical problem that needs to be addressed. Vein grafts are associated with a higher degree of stenosis than artery grafts. However, the mechanism responsible for this effect has not been elucidated. We aimed to establish a rabbit model of vascular restenosis after bilateral carotid artery grafting, and to investigate the associated spatiotemporal changes of intimal hyperplasia in carotid artery and jugular vein grafts after surgery. Material/Methods Twenty adult New Zealand white rabbits (10 males; 10 females), weighing 2.0–2.5 kg, were obtained from the Experimental Animal Center of Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, China (License No.: scxk-Guangdong-2006-0015). We quantitatively analyzed intimal thickness, area, and degree of stenosis in carotid artery and jugular vein bridges. Results After 8 weeks of a high-fat diet, rabbit carotid arteries showed early atherosclerotic lesions. With increasing time after surgery, carotid artery and jugular vein grafts showed histopathological and morphological changes, including smooth muscle cell migration, lipid deposition, intimal hyperplasia, and vascular stenosis. The degree of vascular stenosis was significantly higher in vein grafts than in artery grafts at all time points – 35.1±6.7% vs. 16.1±2.6% at Week 12, 56.2±8.5% vs. 23.4±3.4% at Week 16, and 71.2±1.3% vs. 25.2±5.3% at Week 20. Conclusions Rabbit bilateral carotid arteries were grafted with carotid artery and jugular vein bridges to simulate pathophysiological processes that occur in people after CABG surgery. PMID:25549796

  19. Donor’s site evaluation after restoration with autografts or synthetic plugs in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Intzoglou, Konstantinos S; Mastrokalos, Dimitrios S; Korres, Dimitrios S; Papaparaskeva, Kleo; Koulalis, Dimitrios; Babis, George C

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate donor site’s area histological and immunohistochemical knee cartilage appearances after resurfacing iatrogenic defects with biosynthetic plugs orautografts. METHODS: Thirty New Zealand White rabbits were used in this study. A full-thickness cylindrical defect of 4.5 mm (diameter) × 7 mm (depth) was created with a hand drill in the femoral groove of every animal. In Group A (n = 10) the defect of the donor site was repaired with a biosynthetic osteochondral plug, in Group B (n = 10) with an osteochondral autograft, while in Group C (control group of 10) rabbits were left untreated. RESULTS: Twenty-four weeks postoperatively, smooth articular cartilage was found macroscopically in some trocleas’ surfaces; in all others, an articular surface with discontinuities was observed. Twenty-eight out of 30 animals were found with predominantly viable chondrocytes leaving the remaining two -which were found only in the control group- with partially viable chondrocytes. However, histology revealed many statistical differences between the groups as far as the International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS) categories are concerned. Immunofluoresence also revealed the presence of collagen II in all specimens of Group B, whereas in Group A collagen II was found in less specimens. In Group C collagen IIwas not found. CONCLUSION: The matrix, cell distribution, subchondral bone and cartilage mineralization ICRS categories showed statistically differences between the three groups. Group A was second, while group B received the best scores; the control group got the worst ICRS scores in these categories. So, the donor site area, when repairing osteochondral lesions with autografting systems, is better amended with osteochondral autograft rather than bone graft substitute implant. PMID:25232531

  20. Impaction grafted bone chip size effect on initial stability in an acetabular model: Mechanical evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Holton, Colin; Bobak, Peter; Wilcox, Ruth; Jin, Zhongmin

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Acetabular bone defect reconstruction is an increasing problem for surgeons with patients undergoing complex primary or revision total hip replacement surgery. Impaction bone grafting is one technique that has favourable long-term clinical outcome results for patients who undergo this reconstruction method for acetabular bone defects. Creating initial mechanical stability of the impaction bone graft in this technique is known to be the key factor in achieving a favourable implant survival rate. Different sizes of bone chips were used in this technique to investigate if the size of bone chips used affected initial mechanical stability of a reconstructed acetabulum. Methodology Twenty acetabular models were created in total. Five control models were created with a cemented cup in a normal acetabulum. Then five models in three different groups of bone chip size were constructed. The three groups had an acetabular protrusion defect reconstructed using either; 2–4 mm3, 10 mm3 or 20 mm3 bone chip size for impaction grafting reconstruction. The models underwent compression loading up to 9500 N and displacement within the acetabular model was measured indicating the initial mechanical stability. Results This study reveals that, although not statistically significant, the largest (20 mm3) bone chip size grafted models have an inferior maximum stiffness compared to the medium (10 mm3) bone chip size. Interpretations Our study suggests that 10 mm3 size of bone chips provide better initial mechanical stability compared to smaller or larger bone chips. We dismissed the previously held opinion that the biggest practically possible graft is best for acetabular bone graft impaction. PMID:24396238

  1. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Using a Bone–Patellar Tendon–Bone Autograft to Avoid Harvest-Site Morbidity in Knee Arthroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Eitaku; Oe, Kenichi; Takemura, Seisuke; Iida, Hirokazu

    2015-01-01

    Although anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using a bone–patellar tendon–bone (BPTB) autograft has many advantages (e.g., high strength and solid fixation), there are also several complications (e.g., anterior knee pain or kneeling pain) due to harvest-site morbidity associated with the use of this graft type compared with the use of hamstring tendon. Therefore the ultimate goal of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using a BPTB graft is to minimize harvest-site morbidity. We have used a technique for harvesting central-third BPTB grafts that involves only a 3-cm-long, longitudinal, curved incision in the medial tibial tuberosity for both graft harvesting and fixation. The purpose of this report is to describe the technique, which can avoid the harvest-site morbidities associated with BPTB autografts during knee arthroscopy. We believe that this less invasive reconstruction may reduce the harvest-site morbidities associated with BPTB grafts because it allows for BPTB graft harvesting without incising the synovial bursa or paratenon and mitigates scarring and adhesion formation. PMID:26052497

  2. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound treatment improved the rate of autograft peripheral nerve regeneration in rat

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Wenli; Wang, Yuexiang; Tang, Jie; Peng, Jiang; Wang, Yu; Guo, Quanyi; Guo, Zhiyuan; Li, Pan; Xiao, Bo; Zhang, Jinxing

    2016-01-01

    Low intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) has been widely used in clinic for the treatment of repairing pseudarthrosis, bone fractures and of healing in various soft tissues. Some reports indicated that LIPUS accelerated peripheral nerve regeneration including Schwann cells (SCs) and injured nerves. But little is known about its appropriate intensities on autograft nerves. This study was to investigate which intensity of LIPUS improved the regeneration of gold standard postsurgical nerves in experimental rat model. Sprague-Dawley rats were made into 10 mm right side sciatic nerve reversed autologous nerve transplantation and randomly treated with 250 mW/cm2, 500 mW/cm2 or 750 mW/cm2 LIPUS for 2–12 weeks after operation. Functional and pathological results showed that LIPUS of 250 mW/cm2 significantly induced faster rate of axonal regeneration. This suggested that autograft nerve regeneration was improved. PMID:27102358

  3. Particles deposition induced by the magnetic field in the coronary bypass graft model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernad, Sandor I.; Totorean, Alin F.; Vekas, Ladislau

    2016-03-01

    Bypass graft failures is a complex process starting with intimal hyperplasia development which involve many hemodynamic and biological factors. This work presents experimental results regarding the possibility to use magnetic drug delivery to prevent the development of the intimal hyperplasia using a simplified but intuitive model. The primary goal is to understand the magnetic particle deposition in the anastomosis region of the bypass graft taking into account the complex flow field created in this area which involves recirculation region, flow mixing and presence of particles with high residence time. The three-dimensional geometry model was used to simulate the motion and accumulation of the particles under the magnetic field influence in anastomotic region of the coronary bypass graft. The flow patterns are evaluated both numerically and experimentally and show a good correlation in term of flow parameters like vortex length and flow stagnation point positions. Particle depositions are strongly dependent on the magnet position and consequently of the magnetic field intensity and field gradient. Increased magnetic field controlled by the magnet position induces increased particle depositions in the bypass graft anastomosis. The result shows that particle depositions depend on the bypass graft angle, and the deposition shape and particle accumulation respectively, depend by the flow pattern in the anastomosis region.

  4. Modeling and optimization aspects of radiation induced grafting of 4-vinylpyridene onto partially fluorinated films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasef, Mohamed Mahmoud; Ahmad Ali, Amgad; Saidi, Hamdani; Ahmad, Arshad

    2014-01-01

    Modeling and optimization aspects of radiation induced grafting (RIG) of 4-vinylpyridine (4-VP) onto partially fluorinated polymers such as poly(ethylene-co-tetrafluoroethene) (ETFE) and poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) films were comparatively investigated using response surface method (RSM). The effects of independent parameters: absorbed dose, monomer concentration, grafting time and reaction temperature on the response, grafting yield (GY) were correlated through two quadratic models. The results of this work confirm that RSM is a reliable tool not only for optimization of the reaction parameters and prediction of GY in RIG processes, but also for the reduction of the number of the experiments, monomer consumption and absorbed dose leading to an improvement of the overall reaction cost.

  5. Patient-Specific Multiscale Modeling of Blood Flow for Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Sankaran, Sethuraman; Moghadam, Mahdi Esmaily; Kahn, Andrew M.; Tseng, Elaine E.; Guccione, Julius M.; Marsden, Alison L.

    2013-01-01

    We present a computational framework for multiscale modeling and simulation of blood flow in coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) patients. Using this framework, only CT and non-invasive clinical measurements are required without the need to assume pressure and/or flow waveforms in the coronaries and we can capture global circulatory dynamics. We demonstrate this methodology in a case study of a patient with multiple CABGs. A patient-specific model of the blood vessels is constructed from CT image data to include the aorta, aortic branch vessels (brachiocephalic artery and carotids), the coronary arteries and multiple bypass grafts. The rest of the circulatory system is modeled using a lumped parameter network (LPN) 0 dimensional (0D) system comprised of resistances, capacitors (compliance), inductors (inertance), elastance and diodes (valves) that are tuned to match patient-specific clinical data. A finite element solver is used to compute blood flow and pressure in the 3D (3 dimensional) model, and this solver is implicitly coupled to the 0D LPN code at all inlets and outlets. By systematically parameterizing the graft geometry, we evaluate the influence of graft shape on the local hemodynamics, and global circulatory dynamics. Virtual manipulation of graft geometry is automated using Bezier splines and control points along the pathlines. Using this framework, we quantify wall shear stress, wall shear stress gradients and oscillatory shear index for different surgical geometries. We also compare pressures, flow rates and ventricular pressure–volume loops pre- and post-bypass graft surgery. We observe that PV loops do not change significantly after CABG but that both coronary perfusion and local hemodynamic parameters near the anastomosis region change substantially. Implications for future patient-specific optimization of CABG are discussed. PMID:22539149

  6. Patient-specific multiscale modeling of blood flow for coronary artery bypass graft surgery.

    PubMed

    Sankaran, Sethuraman; Esmaily Moghadam, Mahdi; Kahn, Andrew M; Tseng, Elaine E; Guccione, Julius M; Marsden, Alison L

    2012-10-01

    We present a computational framework for multiscale modeling and simulation of blood flow in coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) patients. Using this framework, only CT and non-invasive clinical measurements are required without the need to assume pressure and/or flow waveforms in the coronaries and we can capture global circulatory dynamics. We demonstrate this methodology in a case study of a patient with multiple CABGs. A patient-specific model of the blood vessels is constructed from CT image data to include the aorta, aortic branch vessels (brachiocephalic artery and carotids), the coronary arteries and multiple bypass grafts. The rest of the circulatory system is modeled using a lumped parameter network (LPN) 0 dimensional (0D) system comprised of resistances, capacitors (compliance), inductors (inertance), elastance and diodes (valves) that are tuned to match patient-specific clinical data. A finite element solver is used to compute blood flow and pressure in the 3D (3 dimensional) model, and this solver is implicitly coupled to the 0D LPN code at all inlets and outlets. By systematically parameterizing the graft geometry, we evaluate the influence of graft shape on the local hemodynamics, and global circulatory dynamics. Virtual manipulation of graft geometry is automated using Bezier splines and control points along the pathlines. Using this framework, we quantify wall shear stress, wall shear stress gradients and oscillatory shear index for different surgical geometries. We also compare pressures, flow rates and ventricular pressure-volume loops pre- and post-bypass graft surgery. We observe that PV loops do not change significantly after CABG but that both coronary perfusion and local hemodynamic parameters near the anastomosis region change substantially. Implications for future patient-specific optimization of CABG are discussed. PMID:22539149

  7. The use of bone graft substitutes in large cancellous voids: any specific needs?

    PubMed

    Faour, Omar; Dimitriou, Rozalia; Cousins, Charlotte A; Giannoudis, Peter V

    2011-09-01

    Bone graft is the second most common transplantation tissue, with blood being by far the commonest. Autograft is considered ideal for grafting procedures, providing osteoinductive growth factors, osteogenic cells and an osteoconductive scaffold. Limitations, however, exist regarding donor site morbidity and graft availability. Allograft on the other hand poses the risk of disease transmission. Synthetic graft substitutes lack osteoinductive or osteogenic properties. Composite grafts combine scaffolding properties with biological elements to stimulate cell proliferation and differentiation and eventually osteogenesis. We present here an overview of bone graft substitutes available for clinical application in large cancellous voids.

  8. Time-sequential changes of differentially expressed miRNAs during the process of anterior lumbar interbody fusion using equine bone protein extract, rhBMP-2 and autograft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Da-Fu; Zhou, Zhi-Yu; Dai, Xue-Jun; Gao, Man-Man; Huang, Bao-Ding; Liang, Tang-Zhao; Shi, Rui; Zou, Li-Jin; Li, Hai-Sheng; Bünger, Cody; Tian, Wei; Zou, Xue-Nong

    2014-03-01

    The precise mechanism of bone regeneration in different bone graft substitutes has been well studied in recent researches. However, miRNAs regulation of the bone formation has been always mysterious. We developed the anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) model in pigs using equine bone protein extract (BPE), recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) on an absorbable collagen sponge (ACS), and autograft as bone graft substitute, respectively. The miRNA and gene expression profiles of different bone graft materials were examined using microarray technology and data analysis, including self-organizing maps, KEGG pathway and Biological process GO analyses. We then jointly analyzed miRNA and mRNA profiles of the bone fusion tissue at different time points respectively. Results showed that miRNAs, including let-7, miR-129, miR-21, miR-133, miR-140, miR-146, miR-184, and miR-224, were involved in the regulation of the immune and inflammation response, which provided suitable inflammatory microenvironment for bone formation. At late stage, several miRNAs directly regulate SMAD4, Estrogen receptor 1 and 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin) receptor 2C for bone formation. It can be concluded that miRNAs play important roles in balancing the inflammation and bone formation.

  9. A phenomenological contact model: Understanding the graft-tunnel interaction in anterior cruciate ligament reconstructive surgery.

    PubMed

    Salehghaffari, Shahab; Dhaher, Yasin Y

    2015-07-16

    In this paper, we sought to expand the fidelity of a validated model of the anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACL-R) procedure by incorporating a stick-slip contact model with linear pressure-overclosure relationship at the interface. The suggested model is characterized by three unknown parameters, friction coefficient, shear stress softening and contact stiffness. In the absence of any isolated experiments exploring the graft-tunnel interactions during an aggregate joint load, the calibration data used in this study are derived from a reported biomechanical study. A Bayesian calibration procedure was employed to find the unknown probability distribution function (PDF) of these contact parameters. Initially, the response surface approximations of the predicted graft forces from laxity test simulations was adopted to estimate the likelihood of noisy experimental data reported in the literature. Then, the wide domain of contact parameters was sampled sequentially based on the Marcov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method with acceptance-rejection criteria to search for population of samples in significantly narrower domain of unknown parameters that are associated with the highest occurrence likelihood of noisy experimental data. Our simulations with calibrated contact parameters indicate that pre-tensioning applied at 30° of flexion leads to larger graft force after the joint is fully extended compared to the graft force when the same pre-tensioning force is applied at full extension. Moreover, regardless of the pre-tensioning force, the graft-tunnel contact pressure is larger when the fixation of the graft is performed at full extension, increasing with the pre-tensioning force.

  10. A phenomenological contact model: Understanding the graft-tunnel interaction in anterior cruciate ligament reconstructive surgery.

    PubMed

    Salehghaffari, Shahab; Dhaher, Yasin Y

    2015-07-16

    In this paper, we sought to expand the fidelity of a validated model of the anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACL-R) procedure by incorporating a stick-slip contact model with linear pressure-overclosure relationship at the interface. The suggested model is characterized by three unknown parameters, friction coefficient, shear stress softening and contact stiffness. In the absence of any isolated experiments exploring the graft-tunnel interactions during an aggregate joint load, the calibration data used in this study are derived from a reported biomechanical study. A Bayesian calibration procedure was employed to find the unknown probability distribution function (PDF) of these contact parameters. Initially, the response surface approximations of the predicted graft forces from laxity test simulations was adopted to estimate the likelihood of noisy experimental data reported in the literature. Then, the wide domain of contact parameters was sampled sequentially based on the Marcov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method with acceptance-rejection criteria to search for population of samples in significantly narrower domain of unknown parameters that are associated with the highest occurrence likelihood of noisy experimental data. Our simulations with calibrated contact parameters indicate that pre-tensioning applied at 30° of flexion leads to larger graft force after the joint is fully extended compared to the graft force when the same pre-tensioning force is applied at full extension. Moreover, regardless of the pre-tensioning force, the graft-tunnel contact pressure is larger when the fixation of the graft is performed at full extension, increasing with the pre-tensioning force. PMID:26100464

  11. Uterus transplantation model in sheep with heterotopic whole graft and aorta and cava anastomoses.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Pinto, I M; Tryphonopoulos, P; Avison, D L; Nishida, S; Tekin, A; Santiago, S; Tzakis, A G

    2013-06-01

    Uterine transplantation in the sheep model has been described as a partial or whole orthotopic graft from a living donor with vascular anastomoses. As an alternative to surrogate pregnancy or adoption uterus transplantation might be indicated for cases of infertility of uterine origin. The main complications might be rejection and thrombosis. The objective of this work was to develop a model of whole uterus transplantation that was applicable to the human setting, using grafts obtained from brain-dead donors, and suitable for immunologic and viability follow-up with a reduced risk of thrombosis. Two donors and 1 recipient were operated. The first graft was used for an anatomic study; the second was used for transplantation. The donor operation consisted of an en bloc harvest of the uterus, adnexa, and proximal vagina with the distal aorta and cava. After harvest the donor sheep was humanely killed. In the recipient ewe, heterotopic implantation was performed in the lower abdomen. An End-to-side anastomoses of aorta and cava were performed below the recipient's renal vessels. A cutaneous vaginal stoma was performed in the right lower quadrant. The recipient ewe was humanely killed for an autopsy study. The anatomy of uterine veins of the ewe differs from the human. The uterine and ovarian veins join, forming the utero-ovarian vein, which drains at the confluence of the common iliac to the cava. En bloc harvesting allows for rapid graft preparation, with vascular cuffs easily anastomosed with a low risk of thrombosis. The vaginal stoma seems appropriate to facilitate follow-up and graft biopsy. This approach can be a suitable experimental model applicable to humans using grafts from brain-dead donors. PMID:23769047

  12. Fresh-frozen Complete Extensor Mechanism Allograft versus Autograft Reconstruction in Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guanyin; Zhang, Hongtao; Ma, Qiong; Zhao, Jian; Zhang, Yinglong; Fan, Qingyu; Ma, Baoan

    2016-01-01

    Different clinical results have been reported in the repair of extensor mechanism disruption using fresh-frozen complete extensor mechanism (CEM) allograft, creating a need for a better understanding of fresh-frozen CME allograft reconstruction. Here, we perform histological and biomechanical analyses of fresh-frozen CEM allograft or autograft reconstruction in an in vivo rabbit model. Our histological results show complete incorporation of the quadriceps tendon into the host tissues, patellar survival and total integration of the allograft tibia, with relatively fewer osteocytes, into the host tibia. Vascularity and cellularity are reduced and delayed in the allograft but exhibit similar distributions to those in the autograft. The infrapatellar fat pad provides the main blood supply, and the lowest cellularity is observed in the patellar tendon close to the tibia in both the allograft and autograft. The biomechanical properties of the junction of quadriceps tendon and host tissues and those of the allograft patellar tendon are completely and considerably restored, respectively. Therefore, fresh-frozen CEM allograft reconstruction is viable, but the distal patellar tendon and the tibial block may be the weak links of the reconstruction. These findings provide new insight into the use of allograft in repairing disruption of the extensor mechanism. PMID:26911538

  13. Use of the reamer-irrigator-aspirator technique to obtain autograft for ankle and hindfoot arthrodesis.

    PubMed

    Herscovici, D; Scaduto, J M

    2012-01-01

    The use of autograft bone is the best option when undertaking a procedure that requires bone graft because it is osteogenic, osteoconductive and osseo-inductive. Pain, morbidity and complications associated with harvesting iliac or non-iliac sites occur in between 6% and 30% of cases. An alternative source of graft with possibly a lower morbidity is the intramedullary canal. In this study, 28 patients undergoing 30 arthrodesis procedures on the hindfoot had a mean of 48 cm(3) (43 to 50) of bone harvested locally from the hindfoot or the tibial shaft by antegrade or retrograde reaming. No patient sustained a fracture of the calcaneum, talus or tibia. There was no morbidity except for one complication when the reamer breached the medial tibial cortex. This healed uneventfully. This method of using the reamer-irrigator-aspirator system is an extension of the standard technique of intramedullary reaming of the lower limb: it produces good-quality bone graft with viable growth factors consistent with that of the iliac crest, and donor site morbidity is low. This is an efficient method of obtaining autologous bone for use in arthrodesis of the ankle or hindfoot. PMID:22219251

  14. Effectively Axonal-supercharged Interpositional Jump-Graft with an Artificial Nerve Conduit for Rat Facial Nerve Paralysis

    PubMed Central

    Niimi, Yosuke; Takeuchi, Yuichi; Sasaki, Ryo; Watanabe, Yorikatsu; Yamato, Masayuki; Miyata, Mariko; Sakurai, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Background: Interpositional jump graft (IPJG) is a nerve graft axonally supercharged from the hypoglossal nerve. However, for using the technique, an autologous nerve, which should contain the great auricular and sural nerves, must be obtained. Depending on the donor site, unavoidable issues such as nerve disorders and postoperative scarring may appear. To reduce the issues, in this study, the authors developed an end-to-side neurorrhaphy technique with the recipient nerve and an artificial nerve conduit and investigated the efficacy of an IPJG with an artificial nerve conduit in a rat facial nerve paresis model. Methods: A ligature clip was used to crush the facial nerve trunk, thereby creating a partial facial nerve paresis model. An artificial nerve conduit was then prepared with a 10-mm-long silicone tube containing 10 μL type I collagen and used to create an IPJG between the facial nerve trunk and the hypoglossal nerve (the silicone tube group). Thirteen weeks after the surgery, the outcome was histologically and physiologically compared with conventional IPJG with autograft using the great auricular nerve. Results: Retrograde tracer test confirmed a double innervation by the facial and hypoglossal nerve nuclei. In the autograft and silicone tube groups, the regeneration of myelinated axons was observed. Conclusion: In this study, the authors successfully developed an end-to-side neurorrhaphy technique with the recipient nerve and an artificial nerve conduit, and revealed that an IPJG in the conduit was effective in the rat facial nerve paresis model. PMID:26180717

  15. Non-invasive diffuse correlation tomography reveals spatial and temporal blood flow differences in murine bone grafting approaches

    PubMed Central

    Han, Songfeng; Proctor, Ashley R.; Vella, Joseph B.; Benoit, Danielle S. W.; Choe, Regine

    2016-01-01

    Longitudinal blood flow during murine bone graft healing was monitored non-invasively using diffuse correlation tomography. The system utilized spatially dense data from a scanning set-up, non-linear reconstruction, and micro-CT anatomical information. Weekly in vivo measurements were performed. Blood flow changes in autografts, which heal successfully, were localized to graft regions and consistent across mice. Poor healing allografts showed heterogeneous blood flow elevation and high inter-subject variabilities. Allografts with tissue-engineered periosteum showed responses intermediate to both autografts and allografts, consistent with healing observed. These findings suggest that spatiotemporal blood flow changes can be utilized to differentiate the degree of bone graft healing.

  16. Intrastriatal Grafting of Chromospheres: Survival and Functional Effects in the 6-OHDA Rat Model of Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Boronat-García, Alejandra; Palomero-Rivero, Marcela; Guerra-Crespo, Magdalena; Millán-Aldaco, Diana; Drucker-Colín, René

    2016-01-01

    Cell replacement therapy in Parkinson's disease (PD) aims at re-establishing dopamine neurotransmission in the striatum by grafting dopamine-releasing cells. Chromaffin cell (CC) grafts produce some transitory improvements of functional motor deficits in PD animal models, and have the advantage of allowing autologous transplantation. However, CC grafts have exhibited low survival, poor functional effects and dopamine release compared to other cell types. Recently, chromaffin progenitor-like cells were isolated from bovine and human adult adrenal medulla. Under low-attachment conditions, these cells aggregate and grow as spheres, named chromospheres. Here, we found that bovine-derived chromosphere-cell cultures exhibit a greater fraction of cells with a dopaminergic phenotype and higher dopamine release than CC. Chromospheres grafted in a rat model of PD survived in 57% of the total grafted animals. Behavioral tests showed that surviving chromosphere cells induce a reduction in motor alterations for at least 3 months after grafting. Finally, we found that compared with CC, chromosphere grafts survive more and produce more robust and consistent motor improvements. However, further experiments would be necessary to determine whether the functional benefits induced by chromosphere grafts can be improved, and also to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the functional effects of the grafts. PMID:27525967

  17. Intrastriatal Grafting of Chromospheres: Survival and Functional Effects in the 6-OHDA Rat Model of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Boronat-García, Alejandra; Palomero-Rivero, Marcela; Guerra-Crespo, Magdalena; Millán-Aldaco, Diana; Drucker-Colín, René

    2016-01-01

    Cell replacement therapy in Parkinson’s disease (PD) aims at re-establishing dopamine neurotransmission in the striatum by grafting dopamine-releasing cells. Chromaffin cell (CC) grafts produce some transitory improvements of functional motor deficits in PD animal models, and have the advantage of allowing autologous transplantation. However, CC grafts have exhibited low survival, poor functional effects and dopamine release compared to other cell types. Recently, chromaffin progenitor-like cells were isolated from bovine and human adult adrenal medulla. Under low-attachment conditions, these cells aggregate and grow as spheres, named chromospheres. Here, we found that bovine-derived chromosphere-cell cultures exhibit a greater fraction of cells with a dopaminergic phenotype and higher dopamine release than CC. Chromospheres grafted in a rat model of PD survived in 57% of the total grafted animals. Behavioral tests showed that surviving chromosphere cells induce a reduction in motor alterations for at least 3 months after grafting. Finally, we found that compared with CC, chromosphere grafts survive more and produce more robust and consistent motor improvements. However, further experiments would be necessary to determine whether the functional benefits induced by chromosphere grafts can be improved, and also to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the functional effects of the grafts. PMID:27525967

  18. Nonallograft osteoconductive bone graft substitutes.

    PubMed

    Bucholz, Robert W

    2002-02-01

    An estimated 500,000 to 600,000 bone grafting procedures are done annually in the United States. Approximately (1/2) of these surgeries involve spinal arthrodesis whereas 35% to 40% are used for general orthopaedic applications. Synthetic bone graft substitutes currently represent only 10% of the bone graft market, but their share is increasing as experience and confidence in their use are accrued. Despite 15 to 20 years of clinical experience with various synthetic substitutes, there have been few welldesigned, controlled clinical trials of these implants. Synthetic bone graft substitutes consist of hydroxyapatite, tricalcium phosphate, calcium sulfate, or a combination of these minerals. Their fabrication technique, crystallinity, pore dimensions, mechanical properties, and resorption rate vary. All synthetic porous substitutes share numerous advantages over autografts and allografts including their unlimited supply, easy sterilization, and storage. However, the degree to which the substitute provides an osteoconductive structural framework or matrix for new bone ingrowth differs among implants. Disadvantages of ceramic implants include brittle handling properties, variable rates of resorption, poor performance in diaphyseal defects, and potentially adverse effects on normal bone remodeling. These inherent weaknesses have refocused their primary use to bone graft extenders and carriers for pharmaceuticals. The composition, histologic features, indications, and clinical experience of several of the synthetic bone graft substitutes approved for orthopaedic use in the United States are reviewed. PMID:11937865

  19. Arthroscopic posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with allograft versus autograft

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiujiang; Zhang, Jianfeng; Qu, Xiaoyi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The aim of the study was to compare and analyze retrospectively the outcomes of arthroscopic posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with autograft versus allograft. Material and methods Seventy-one patients who underwent arthroscopic posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with an autograft or allograft met our inclusion criteria. There were 36 patients in the autograft group and 35 patients in the allograft group. All the patients were evaluated by physical examination and a functional ligament test. Comparative analysis was done in terms of operation time, incision length, fever time, postoperative infection rate, incidence of numbness and dysesthesia around the incision, as well as a routine blood test. Results The average follow-up of the autograft group was 3.2 ±0.2 years and that of the allograft group was 3.3 ±0.6 years; there was no significant difference (p > 0.05). No differences existed in knee range of motion, Lysholm scores, International Knee Documentation Committee standard evaluation form and Tegner activity score at final follow-up (p > 0.05), except that patients in the allograft group had a shorter operation time and incision length and a longer fever time (p < 0.05). We found a difference in posterior drawer test and KT-2000 arthrometer assessment (p < 0.05). The posterior tibia displacement averaged 3.8 ±1.5 mm in the autograft group and 4.8 ±1.7 mm in the allograft group (p < 0.05). The incidence of numbness and dysesthesia around the incision in the autograft group was higher than that in the allograft group (p < 0.05). There was no infection postoperatively. The white blood cells and neutrophils in the allograft group increased more than those in the autograft group postoperatively (p < 0.05). Conclusions Both groups of patients had satisfactory outcomes after the operation. However, in the instrumented posterior laxity test, the autograft gave better results than the allograft. No differences in functional scores

  20. Combined Reconstruction of the Medial Collateral Ligament and Anterior Cruciate Ligament Using Ipsilateral Quadriceps Tendon-Bone and Bone-Patellar Tendon-Bone Autografts.

    PubMed

    Hetsroni, Iftach; Mann, Gideon

    2016-06-01

    The exclusive autograft choice for medial collateral ligament (MCL) reconstruction that has been described until today is the semitendinosus tendon. However, this has some potential disadvantages in a knee with combined MCL-anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury, including weakening of the hamstring's anterior restraining action in an already ACL-injured knee and nonanatomic distal MCL graft insertion when leaving the semitendinosus insertion intact at the pes anserinus during reconstruction. Moreover, because some surgeons prefer to use the hamstring for autologous ACL reconstruction, the contralateral uninjured knee hamstring needs to be harvested as a graft source for the MCL reconstruction if autografts and not allografts are the surgeons' preference. We describe a technique for performing combined reconstruction of the MCL and ACL using ipsilateral quadriceps tendon-bone and bone-patellar tendon-bone autografts. This technique of MCL reconstruction spares the hamstring tendons and benefits from the advantage provided by bone-to-bone healing on the femur with distal and proximal MCL tibial fixation that closely reproduces the native MCL tibia insertion. PMID:27656381

  1. Combined Reconstruction of the Medial Collateral Ligament and Anterior Cruciate Ligament Using Ipsilateral Quadriceps Tendon-Bone and Bone-Patellar Tendon-Bone Autografts.

    PubMed

    Hetsroni, Iftach; Mann, Gideon

    2016-06-01

    The exclusive autograft choice for medial collateral ligament (MCL) reconstruction that has been described until today is the semitendinosus tendon. However, this has some potential disadvantages in a knee with combined MCL-anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury, including weakening of the hamstring's anterior restraining action in an already ACL-injured knee and nonanatomic distal MCL graft insertion when leaving the semitendinosus insertion intact at the pes anserinus during reconstruction. Moreover, because some surgeons prefer to use the hamstring for autologous ACL reconstruction, the contralateral uninjured knee hamstring needs to be harvested as a graft source for the MCL reconstruction if autografts and not allografts are the surgeons' preference. We describe a technique for performing combined reconstruction of the MCL and ACL using ipsilateral quadriceps tendon-bone and bone-patellar tendon-bone autografts. This technique of MCL reconstruction spares the hamstring tendons and benefits from the advantage provided by bone-to-bone healing on the femur with distal and proximal MCL tibial fixation that closely reproduces the native MCL tibia insertion.

  2. Modeling the Assembly of Polymer-Grafted Nanoparticles at Oil-Water Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Yong, Xin

    2015-10-27

    Using dissipative particle dynamics (DPD), I model the interfacial adsorption and self-assembly of polymer-grafted nanoparticles at a planar oil-water interface. The amphiphilic core-shell nanoparticles irreversibly adsorb to the interface and create a monolayer covering the interface. The polymer chains of the adsorbed nanoparticles are significantly deformed by surface tension to conform to the interface. I quantitatively characterize the properties of the particle-laden interface and the structure of the monolayer in detail at different surface coverages. I observe that the monolayer of particles grafted with long polymer chains undergoes an intriguing liquid-crystalline-amorphous phase transition in which the relationship between the monolayer structure and the surface tension/pressure of the interface is elucidated. Moreover, my results indicate that the amorphous state at high surface coverage is induced by the anisotropic distribution of the randomly grafted chains on each particle core, which leads to noncircular in-plane morphology formed under excluded volume effects. These studies provide a fundamental understanding of the interfacial behavior of polymer-grafted nanoparticles for achieving complete control of the adsorption and subsequent self-assembly. PMID:26439456

  3. [Vascular graft prosthesis].

    PubMed

    Chakfé, N; Dieval, F; Thaveau, F; Rinckenbach, S; Hassani, O; Camelot, G; Durand, B; Kretz, J-G

    2004-06-01

    Performed since the 1950s, vascular grafting has opened modern era of vascular surgery. Autologous venous grafts are of first choice for revascularisation of small arteries. Synthetic grafts are mainly modelled using microporous polytetrafluoroethylene or terephtalate polyethylene. These prosthesis are mainly used for revascularization of medium and large size arteries. PMID:15220107

  4. Functional integration of grafted neural stem cell-derived dopaminergic neurons monitored by optogenetics in an in vitro Parkinson model.

    PubMed

    Tønnesen, Jan; Parish, Clare L; Sørensen, Andreas T; Andersson, Angelica; Lundberg, Cecilia; Deisseroth, Karl; Arenas, Ernest; Lindvall, Olle; Kokaia, Merab

    2011-03-04

    Intrastriatal grafts of stem cell-derived dopamine (DA) neurons induce behavioral recovery in animal models of Parkinson's disease (PD), but how they functionally integrate in host neural circuitries is poorly understood. Here, Wnt5a-overexpressing neural stem cells derived from embryonic ventral mesencephalon of tyrosine hydroxylase-GFP transgenic mice were expanded as neurospheres and transplanted into organotypic cultures of wild type mouse striatum. Differentiated GFP-labeled DA neurons in the grafts exhibited mature neuronal properties, including spontaneous firing of action potentials, presence of post-synaptic currents, and functional expression of DA D₂ autoreceptors. These properties resembled those recorded from identical cells in acute slices of intrastriatal grafts in the 6-hydroxy-DA-induced mouse PD model and from DA neurons in intact substantia nigra. Optogenetic activation or inhibition of grafted cells and host neurons using channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) and halorhodopsin (NpHR), respectively, revealed complex, bi-directional synaptic interactions between grafted cells and host neurons and extensive synaptic connectivity within the graft. Our data demonstrate for the first time using optogenetics that ectopically grafted stem cell-derived DA neurons become functionally integrated in the DA-denervated striatum. Further optogenetic dissection of the synaptic wiring between grafted and host neurons will be crucial to clarify the cellular and synaptic mechanisms underlying behavioral recovery as well as adverse effects following stem cell-based DA cell replacement strategies in PD.

  5. Evaluation of parathyroid autograft growth and function in hemodialysis patients

    SciTech Connect

    Karsenty, G.; Petraglia, A.; Bourdeau, A.; Gambini, D.J.; Moreau, J.F.; Lecharpentier, Y.; Zingraff, J.; Bournerias, F.; Buisson, C.; Dubost, C.

    1986-07-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the function and growth of parathyroid tissue autografted into the forearm of hemodialysis patients using several presently available methods. In a dynamic study, the secretory function of autografted tissue was evaluated in seven patients using either zero calcium dialysate or calcium infusion. In an additional prospective study, seven patients had repeated determinations of plasma immunoreactive parathyroid hormone (iPTH) concentration on samples from both forearms, a radionuclide evaluation of autograft function using thallium-201 chloride, and real time ultrasonography. Light microscopy analysis was performed in two patients. The dynamic study demonstrated that induction of hypocalcemia was followed by an increase, and induction of hypercalcemia by a decrease in circulating iPTH in both forearms using three different radioimmunoassays similar to what has been reported for normal parathyroid tissue. A significant gradient (ie, greater than 2.0) of plasma iPTH concentration in samples from both forearms was observed in only three out of the seven patients of the prospective study. Two of these patients disclosed an increased uptake of /sup 201/TI chloride at the site of autografted tissue and had an echographically detectable mass. In both, hyperplastic parathyroid tissue was removed. At present, the remaining third patient does not have other features of recurrent hyperparathyroidism. In conclusion, autotransplanted parathyroid tissue of hemodialysis patients shows an adequate response to physiologic stimuli such as hypo- and hypercalcemia. Dynamic tests, therefore, appear to be a useful tool in the assessment of its function. In addition, radionuclide and echographic studies may be reliable adjuncts in the detection of marked parathyroid autograft hyperplasia.

  6. Development and validation of technique for in-vivo 3D analysis of cranial bone graft survival

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernstein, Mark P.; Caldwell, Curtis B.; Antonyshyn, Oleh M.; Ma, Karen; Cooper, Perry W.; Ehrlich, Lisa E.

    1997-05-01

    Bone autografts are routinely employed in the reconstruction of facial deformities resulting from trauma, tumor ablation or congenital malformations. The combined use of post- operative 3D CT and SPECT imaging provides a means for quantitative in vivo evaluation of bone graft volume and osteoblastic activity. The specific objectives of this study were: (1) Determine the reliability and accuracy of interactive computer-assisted analysis of bone graft volumes based on 3D CT scans; (2) Determine the error in CT/SPECT multimodality image registration; (3) Determine the error in SPECT/SPECT image registration; and (4) Determine the reliability and accuracy of CT-guided SPECT uptake measurements in cranial bone grafts. Five human cadaver heads served as anthropomorphic models for all experiments. Four cranial defects were created in each specimen with inlay and onlay split skull bone grafts and reconstructed to skull and malar recipient sites. To acquire all images, each specimen was CT scanned and coated with Technetium doped paint. For purposes of validation, skulls were landmarked with 1/16-inch ball-bearings and Indium. This study provides a new technique relating anatomy and physiology for the analysis of cranial bone graft survival.

  7. Medial Patellofemoral Ligament Reconstruction for Recurrent Patellar Instability Using a Gracilis Autograft without Bone Tunnel

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae-Seong; Kim, Hee-June; Ra, In-Hoo

    2015-01-01

    Background Several tendon graft and fixation methods have been introduced in medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) reconstruction for recurrent patellar dislocation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the results of MPFL reconstruction using a gracilis autograft fixation without bone tunnel in patients with recurrent patellar instability. Methods Nine patients (four males and five females) diagnosed with recurrent patellar instability from July 2009 to January 2013 and had MPFL reconstruction using a gracilis autograft were included. The average age of the patients was 24.6 years (range, 13 to 48 years), and the average follow-up period was 19.3 months (range, 12 to 30 months). For every patient, femoral attachment was fixed using suture anchors securing the patella by suturing the periosteum and surrounding soft tissue. Clinical evaluation included the Kujala, Lysholm, and Tegner scores; in addition, patients were examined for any complication including recurrent dislocation. The congruence angle and patella alta were assessed radiologically before and after surgery. Results The Kujala score improved from an average of 42.7 ± 8.4 before surgery to 79.6 ± 13.6 (p = 0.008) at final follow-up; the Lysholm score improved from 45.8 ± 5.7 to 82.0 ± 10.5 (p = 0.008); and the Tegner score improved from 2.8 ± 0.8 to 5.6 ± 1.5 (p = 0.007). The Insall-Salvati ratio changed from 1.16 ± 0.1 (range, 0.94 to 1.35) before surgery to 1.14 ± 0.1 (range, 0.96 to 1.29; p = 0.233) at the final follow-up without significance. The congruence angle significantly improved from 26.5° ± 10.6° (range, 12° to 43°) before surgery to -4.0° ± 4.3° (range, -12° to 5°; p = 0.008) at final follow-up. Subluxation was observed in one patient and hemarthrosis occurred in another patient 2 years after surgery, but these patients were asymptomatic. Conclusions We achieved good results with a patellar fixation technique in MPFL reconstruction using a gracilis autograft employing

  8. A Novel Nude Mouse Model of Hypertrophic Scarring Using Scratched Full Thickness Human Skin Grafts

    PubMed Central

    Alrobaiea, Saad M.; Ding, Jie; Ma, Zengshuan; Tredget, Edward E.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Hypertrophic scar (HTS) is a dermal form of fibroproliferative disorder that develops following deep skin injury. HTS can cause deformities, functional disabilities, and aesthetic disfigurements. The pathophysiology of HTS is not understood due to, in part, the lack of an ideal animal model. We hypothesize that human skin with deep dermal wounds grafted onto athymic nude mice will develop a scar similar to HTS. Our aim is to develop a representative animal model of human HTS. Approach: Thirty-six nude mice were grafted with full thickness human skin with deep dermal scratch wound before or 2 weeks after grafting or without scratch. The scratch on the human skin grafts was made using a specially designed jig that creates a wound >0.6 mm in depth. The xenografts were morphologically analyzed by digital photography. Mice were euthanized at 1, 2, and 3 months postoperatively for histology and immunohistochemistry analysis. Results: The mice developed raised and firm scars in the scratched xenografts with more contraction, increased infiltration of macrophage, and myofibroblasts compared to the xenografts without deep dermal scratch wound. Scar thickness and collagen bundle orientation and morphology resembled HTS. The fibrotic scars in the wounded human skin were morphologically and histologically similar to HTS, and human skin epithelial cells persisted in the remodeling tissues for 1 year postengraftment. Innovation and Conclusions: Deep dermal injury in human skin retains its profibrotic nature after transplantation, affording a novel model for the assessment of therapies for the treatment of human fibroproliferative disorders of the skin. PMID:27366591

  9. The influence of hamstring autograft size on patient reported outcomes and risk of revision following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: A MOON cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Mariscalco, Michael W.; Flanigan, David C.; Mitchell, Joshua; Pedroza, Angela D.; Jones, Morgan H.; Andrish, Jack T.; Parker, Richard D.; Kaeding, Christopher C.; Magnussen, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effect of graft size on patient-reported outcomes and revision risk following ACL reconstruction. Methods A retrospective chart review of prospectively collected cohort data, 263 of 320 consecutive patients (82.2%) undergoing primary ACL reconstruction with hamstring autograft were evaluated. Graft size, femoral tunnel drilling technique, patient age, sex, and BMI at the time of ACL reconstruction, pre-operative and 2-year post-operative KOOS and IKDC scores, and whether each patient underwent revision ACL reconstruction during the 2 year follow-up period were recorded. Revision was used as a marker for graft failure. The relationship between graft size and patient-reported outcomes was determined by multiple linear regression. The relationship between graft size and risk of revision was determined by dichotomizing graft size at 8mm and stratifying by age. Results After controlling for age, sex, operative side, surgeon, BMI, graft choice, and femoral tunnel drilling technique, a 1 mm increased in graft size was noted to correlate with 3.3-point increase in the KOOS-pain subscale (p = 0.003), a 2.0-point increased in the KOOS activities of daily living subscale (p = 0.034), a 5.2-point increase in the KOOS-sport/recreation function subscale (p = 0.004), and a 3.4-point increase in the subjective IKDC score (p = 0.026). Revision was required in 0 of 64 patients (0.0%) with grafts greater than 8mm in diameter and 14 of 199 patients (7.0%) with 8 mm or smaller grafts (p = 0.037). Among patients age 18 and under, revision was required in 0 of 14 patients (0.0%) with grafts greater than 8mm in diameter and 13 of 71 patients (18.3 %) with 8 mm or smaller grafts. Conclusions Smaller hamstring autograft size is a predictor of poorer KOOS Sport and Recreation function 2 years following primary ACL reconstruction. Larger sample size is required to confirm the relationship between graft size and risk of revision ACL

  10. Impact of radiation therapy on healing and stability of vascularized bone grafts in a dog model.

    PubMed

    Eisenschenk, Andreas; Witzel, Christiane; Lautenbach, Martin; Ekkernkamp, Axel; Weber, Ulrich; Küntscher, Markus V

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to observe the impact of radiation therapy on healing and biomechanical properties of vascularized bone grafts, and thus to establish an appropriate large animal model. Ten male beagles were divided into two experimental groups: radiation (R) and control (C). The left 5th to 7th ribs of the animals of group R were irradiated 3 and 2 weeks preoperatively, using a dose of 8 Gy each time. Each animal of both groups underwent the following operative procedures. The 5th and 7th ribs were removed, and the 5th rib was replaced by a vascularized pedicle transfer of the 4th rib. The 7th rib was reconstructed using a pedicle transplant of the 8th rib. The 5th and 7th ribs were used as nonvascularized bone grafts to replace the donor sites of the 4th and 8th ribs, respectively. Group R received two further irradiation cycles 2 and 3 weeks postoperatively. The vascularized rib grafts of group R demonstrated a higher number of delayed unions in plain x-rays and avascular bone segments in microangiography than the control group. The presence of vital osteocytes in histology was not significantly different between groups. Biomechanical tests focusing on the durability of vascularized ribs against bending and torsion forces demonstrated a reduction of average maximum bending moments by 56.6% after radiation compared to controls (P < 0.05). Twisting moments were reduced by 47.6% (P < 0.05). The data demonstrate a significant worsening in bone healing and stability after pre- and postoperative radiation therapy to the wound bed and bone grafts. Thus, a large animal model is established for further determination of different strategies of radiotherapy in combination with vascularized bone transfers.

  11. Nogo-A Neutralization Improves Graft Function in a Rat Model of Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Seiler, Stefanie; Di Santo, Stefano; Widmer, Hans Rudolf

    2016-01-01

    Transplantation of fetal human ventral mesencephalic (VM) dopaminergic neurons into the striatum is a promising strategy to compensate for the characteristic dopamine deficit observed in Parkinson’s disease (PD). This therapeutic approach, however, is currently limited by the high number of fetuses needed for transplantation and the poor survival and functional integration of grafted dopaminergic neurons into the host brain. Accumulating evidence indicates that contrasting inhibitory signals endowed in the central nervous system (CNS) might support neuronal regeneration. Hence, in the present study we aimed at improving survival and integration of grafted cells in the host brain by neutralizing Nogo-A, one of the most potent neurite growth inhibitors in the CNS. For that purpose, VM tissue cultures were transplanted into rats with a partial 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesion causing a hemi-PD model and concomitantly treated for 2 weeks with intra-ventricular infusion of neutralizing anti-Nogo-A antibodies. Motor behavior using the cylinder test was assessed prior to and after transplantation as functional outcome. At the end of the experimental period the number of dopaminergic fibers growing into the host brain, the number of surviving dopaminergic neurons in the grafts as well as graft size was examined. We found that anti-Nogo-A antibody infusion significantly improved the asymmetrical forelimb use observed after lesions as compared to controls. Importantly, a significantly three-fold higher dopaminergic fiber outgrowth from the transplants was detected in the Nogo-A antibody treated group as compared to controls. Furthermore, Nogo-A neutralization showed a tendency for increased survival of dopaminergic neurons (by two-fold) in the grafts. No significant differences were observed for graft volume and the number of dopaminergic neurons co-expressing G-protein-coupled inward rectifier potassium channel subunit two between groups. In sum, our findings support the

  12. Nogo-A Neutralization Improves Graft Function in a Rat Model of Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Seiler, Stefanie; Di Santo, Stefano; Widmer, Hans Rudolf

    2016-01-01

    Transplantation of fetal human ventral mesencephalic (VM) dopaminergic neurons into the striatum is a promising strategy to compensate for the characteristic dopamine deficit observed in Parkinson's disease (PD). This therapeutic approach, however, is currently limited by the high number of fetuses needed for transplantation and the poor survival and functional integration of grafted dopaminergic neurons into the host brain. Accumulating evidence indicates that contrasting inhibitory signals endowed in the central nervous system (CNS) might support neuronal regeneration. Hence, in the present study we aimed at improving survival and integration of grafted cells in the host brain by neutralizing Nogo-A, one of the most potent neurite growth inhibitors in the CNS. For that purpose, VM tissue cultures were transplanted into rats with a partial 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesion causing a hemi-PD model and concomitantly treated for 2 weeks with intra-ventricular infusion of neutralizing anti-Nogo-A antibodies. Motor behavior using the cylinder test was assessed prior to and after transplantation as functional outcome. At the end of the experimental period the number of dopaminergic fibers growing into the host brain, the number of surviving dopaminergic neurons in the grafts as well as graft size was examined. We found that anti-Nogo-A antibody infusion significantly improved the asymmetrical forelimb use observed after lesions as compared to controls. Importantly, a significantly three-fold higher dopaminergic fiber outgrowth from the transplants was detected in the Nogo-A antibody treated group as compared to controls. Furthermore, Nogo-A neutralization showed a tendency for increased survival of dopaminergic neurons (by two-fold) in the grafts. No significant differences were observed for graft volume and the number of dopaminergic neurons co-expressing G-protein-coupled inward rectifier potassium channel subunit two between groups. In sum, our findings support the

  13. Comparative assessment of cultured skin substitutes and native skin autograft for treatment of full-thickness burns.

    PubMed Central

    Boyce, S T; Goretsky, M J; Greenhalgh, D G; Kagan, R J; Rieman, M T; Warden, G D

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Comparison of cultured skin substitutes (CSSs) and split-thickness autograft (STAG) was performed to assess whether the requirement for autologous skin grafts may be reduced in the treatment of massive burns. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Cultured skin substitutes consisting of collagen-glycosaminoglycan substrates populated with autologous fibroblasts and keratinocytes have been demonstrated to close full-thickness skin wounds in athymic mice and to express normal skin antigens after closure of excised wounds in burn patients. METHODS: Data were collected from 17 patients between days 2 and 14 to determine incidence of exudate, incidence of regrafting, coloration, keratinization, and percentage of site covered by graft (n = 17). Outcome was evaluated on an ordinal scale (0 = worst; 10 = best) beginning at day 14, with primary analyses at 28 days (n = 10) and 1 year (n = 4) for erythema, pigmentation, epithelial blistering, surface roughness, skin suppleness, and raised scar. RESULTS: Sites treated with CSSs had increased incidence of exudate (p = 0.06) and decreased percentage of engraftment (p < 0.05) compared with STAG. Outcome parameters during the first year showed no differences in erythema, blistering, or suppleness. Pigmentation was greater, scar was less raised, but regrafting was more frequent in CSS sites than STAG. No differences in qualitative outcomes were found after 1 year, and antibodies to bovine collagen were not detected in patient sera. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that outcome of engrafted CSSs is not different from STAG and that increased incidence of regrafting is related to decreased percentage of initial engraftment. Increased rates of engraftment of CSSs may lead to improved outcome for closure of burn wounds, allow greater availability of materials for grafting, and reduce requirements for donor skin autograft. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. PMID:8526581

  14. Clinical application of cultured epithelial autografts on acellular dermal matrices in the treatment of extended burn injuries.

    PubMed

    Fang, Taolin; Lineaweaver, William C; Sailes, Frederick C; Kisner, Carson; Zhang, Feng

    2014-11-01

    Achieving permanent replacement of skin in extensive full-thickness and deep partial-thickness burn injuries and chronic wounds remains one of the fundamental surgical problems. Presently, split-thickness skin grafts are still considered the best material for surgical repair of an excised burn wound. However, in burns that affect greater than 50% of total body surface area, the patient has insufficient areas of unaffected skin from which split-thickness skin grafts can be harvested. The use of cultured epithelial (or epidermal) autografts (CEAs) has achieved satisfactory results. But the take rate of CEAs is poor in full-thickness bed or in chronically infected area. Providing temporary cover with allograft skin, or a more permanent allodermis, may increase clinical take. This review aims to (1) describe the use of CEAs in the regeneration of the epidermis, (2) introduce the application of the acellular dermal matrices (ADMs) in the clinics, and (3) enhance understanding of the CEAs applied with ADM as an appropriate strategy to treat the extended burn injuries. The current evidence regarding the cultured epithelial cell or keratinocyte autograft and dermal grafts applied in the treatment of burn injuries was investigated with an extensive electronic and manual search (MEDLINE and EMBASE). The included literature (N=136 publications) was critically evaluated focusing on the efficacy and safety of this technique in improving the healing of the deep dermal and full-thickness burn injuries. This review concluded that the use of ADM with CEAs is becoming increasingly routine, particularly as a life-saving tool after acute thermal trauma.

  15. Bone Grafts

    MedlinePlus

    A bone graft transplants bone tissue. Surgeons use bone grafts to repair and rebuild diseased bones in your hips, knees, ... fractures or cancers. Once your body accepts the bone graft, it provides a framework for growth of new, ...

  16. A biomimetic approach for designing stent-graft structures: Caterpillar cuticle as design model.

    PubMed

    Singh, Charanpreet; Wang, Xungai

    2014-02-01

    Stent-graft (SG) induced biomechanical mismatch at the aortic repair site forms the major reason behind postoperative hemodynamic complications. These complications arise from mismatched radial compliance and stiffness property of repair device relative to native aortic mechanics. The inability of an exoskeleton SG design (an externally stented rigid polyester graft) to achieve optimum balance between structural robustness and flexibility constrains its biomechanical performance limits. Therefore, a new SG design capable of dynamically controlling its stiffness and flexibility has been proposed in this study. The new design is adopted from the segmented hydroskeleton structure of a caterpillar cuticle and comprises of high performance polymeric filaments constructed in a segmented knit architecture. Initially, conceptual design models of caterpillar and SG were developed and later translated into an experimental SG prototype. The in-vitro biomechanical evaluation (compliance, bending moment, migration intensity, and viscoelasticity) revealed significantly better performance of hydroskeleton structure than a commercial SG device (Zenith(™) Flex SG) and woven Dacron(®) graft-prosthesis. Structural segmentation improved the biomechanical behaviour of new SG by inducing a three dimensional volumetric expansion property when the SG was subjected to hoop stresses. Interestingly, this behaviour matches the orthotropic elastic property of native aorta and hence proposes segmented hydroskeleton structures as promising design approach for future aortic repair devices. PMID:24216309

  17. Platelet adhesion on endothelium early after vein grafting mediates leukocyte recruitment and intimal hyperplasia in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Chi-Nan; Chang, Ya-Ting; Lengquist, Mariette; Kronqvist, Malin; Hedin, Ulf; Eriksson, Einar E

    2015-04-01

    Intimal hyperplasia (IH) is the substrate for accelerated atherosclerosis and limited patency of vein grafts. However, there is still no specific treatment targeting IH following graft surgery. In this study, we used a mouse model of vein grafting to investigate the potential for early intervention with platelet function for later development of graft IH. We transferred the inferior vena cava (IVC) from donor C57BL/6 mice to the carotid artery in recipients using a cuff technique. We found extensive endothelial injury and platelet adhesion one hour following grafting. Adhesion of leukocytes was distinct in areas of platelet adhesion. Platelet and leukocyte adhesion was strongly reduced in mice receiving a function-blocking antibody against the integrin αIIbβ3. This was followed by a reduction of IH one month following grafting. Depletion of platelets using antiserum also reduced IH at later time points. These findings indicate platelets as pivotal to leukocyte recruitment to the wall of vein grafts. In conclusion, the data also highlight early intervention of platelets and inflammation as potential treatment for later formation of IH and accelerated atherosclerosis following bypass surgery.

  18. Simulation of the in vivo resorption rate of β-tricalcium phosphate bone graft substitutes implanted in a sheep model.

    PubMed

    Bashoor-Zadeh, Mahdieh; Baroud, Gamal; Bohner, Marc

    2011-09-01

    A few years ago, a model was proposed to predict the effect of the pore architecture of a bone graft substitute on its cell-mediated resorption rate. The aim of the present study was to compare the predictions of the model with the in vivo resorption rate of four β-tricalcium phosphate bone graft substitutes implanted in a sheep model. The simulation algorithm contained two main steps: (1) detection of the pores that could be accessed by blood vessels of 50 μm in diameter, and (2) removal of one solid layer at the surface of these pores. This process was repeated until full resorption occurred. Since the pore architecture was complex, μCT data and fuzzy imaging techniques were combined to reconstruct the precise bone graft substitute geometry and then image processing algorithms were developed to perform the resorption simulation steps. The proposed algorithm was verified by comparing its results with the analytical results of a simple geometry and experimental in-vivo data of β-TCP bone substitutes with more complex geometry. An excellent correlation (r(2)>0.9 for all 4 bone graft substitutes) was found between simulation results and in-vivo data, suggesting that this resorption model could be used to (i) better understand the in vivo behavior of bone graft substitutes resorbed by cell-mediation, and (ii) optimize the pore architecture of a bone graft substitute, for example to maximize its resorption rate.

  19. A System for Computer-Assisted Design of Stent-Grafts for Aortic Aneurysms Using 3-D Morphological Models

    SciTech Connect

    Imai, Yasuhiro; Urayama, Shin-ich; Uyama, Chikao; Inoue, Kanji; Ueno, Katsuya; Kuribayashi, Sachio; Takamiya, Makoto; Hamada, Seiki; Hirane, Yoshihisa

    2001-07-15

    A three-dimensional model was constructed from helical CT images for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA). A stent-graft was designed and positioned endoluminally on the computer. One hundred and nine stent-grafts for 101 patients were designed by this method and deployed well in all patients. The design time was reduced from 4 to 0.5 hr.

  20. Assessment of Novel Anti-thrombotic Fusion Proteins for Inhibition of Stenosis in a Porcine Model of Arteriovenous Graft

    PubMed Central

    Terry, Christi M.; Zhuplatov, Ilya; He, Yuxia; Wun, Tze-Chein; Kim, Seong-Eun; Cheung, Alfred K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Hemodialysis arteriovenous synthetic grafts (AVG) provide high volumetric blood flow rates shortly after surgical placement. However, stenosis often develops at the vein-graft anastomosis contributing to thrombosis and early graft failure. Two novel fusion proteins, ANV-6L15 and TAP-ANV, inhibit the tissue factor/factor VIIa coagulation complex and the factor Xa/factor Va complex, respectively. Each inhibitor domain is fused to an annexin V domain that targets the inhibitor activity to sites of vascular injury to locally inhibit thrombosis. This study’s objective was to determine if these antithrombotic proteins are safe and effective in inhibiting AVG stenosis. Methods A bolus of either TAP-ANV or ANV-6L15 fusion protein was administered intravenously immediately prior to surgical placement of a synthetic graft between the external jugular vein and common carotid artery in a porcine model. At surgery, the vein and artery were irrigated with the anti-thrombotic fusion protein. Control animals received intravenous heparin. At 4 weeks, MRI was performed to evaluate graft patency, the pigs were then euthanized and grafts and attached vessels were explanted for histomorphometric assessment of neointimal hyperplasia at the vein-graft anastomosis. Blood was collected at surgery, immediately after surgery and at euthanasia for serum metabolic panels and coagulation chemistries. Results No acute thrombosis occurred in the control group or in either experimental group. No abnormal serum chemistries, activated clotting times or PT, PTT values were observed after treatment in experimental or control animals. However, at the vein-graft anastomosis, there was no difference between the control and experimental groups in cross-sectional lumen areas, as measured on MRI, and no difference in hyperplasia areas as determined by histomorphometry. These results suggest that local irrigation of TAP-ANV or ANV-6L15 intra-operatively was as effective in inhibiting acute graft

  1. Review of the biomechanics and biotribology of osteochondral grafts used for surgical interventions in the knee

    PubMed Central

    Bowland, Philippa; Ingham, E; Jennings, Louise; Fisher, John

    2015-01-01

    A review of research undertaken to evaluate the biomechanical stability and biotribological behaviour of osteochondral grafts in the knee joint and a brief discussion of areas requiring further improvement in future studies are presented. The review takes into consideration osteochondral autografts, allografts, tissue engineered constructs and synthetic and biological scaffolds. PMID:26614801

  2. Sex, Age, and Graft Size as Predictors of ACL Re-tear

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Duong

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The minimum size required for a successful quadrupled hamstring autograft ACL reconstruction remains controversial. The risks of ACL re-tear in younger patients who tend to participate in a higher level of sports activity, and female athletes who have numerous predisposing factors, are poorly defined. Purpose: To identify risk factors for graft re-tears within 2 years of ACL surgery. The hypotheses are that female sex, a smaller size graft, and younger patients will increase the odds of failure. Study Design Cohort Study. Level of evidence, 3. Methods: A cohort of 503 athletes undergoing primary, autograft hamstring ACL reconstruction, performed by a single surgeon using the same surgical technique and rehabilitation protocol, between September-December 2012, was followed for a total duration of 2 years. Return to play was allowed between 6 and 12 months post-surgery upon completion of functional testing. Exclusion criteria included infections, revisions, double bundle techniques, multi-ligament injuries, non-compliance, BTB/allografts/hybrid grafts. Primary outcome consisted of binary data (ACL graft re-tear or no tear) as measured on physical exam (Lachman and pivot shift) and MRI. Multivariate logistic regression statistical analysis with model fitting was used to investigate the predictive value of sex, age, and graft size on ACL re-tear. Secondary sensitivity analyses were performed on the adolescent subgroup, age and graft size as categorical variables, and testing for interactions among variables. Sample size was calculated based on the rule of 10 events per independent variable for logistic regression. Results: The mean age of the 503 athletes was 27.5 (SD 10.6; range = 12-61). There were 235 females (47%) and 268 males (53%) with a 6% rate of re-tears (28 patients; 17 females). Mean graft size was 7.9 (SD 0.6; range = 6-10). Univariate analyses of graft size, sex, and age only in the model showed that younger age (odds ratio [OR] = 0.86; 95

  3. Autograft ossicle selection in cholesteatomatous ear disease: histopathological considerations.

    PubMed

    Rupa, V; Krishnaswami, H; Job, A

    1997-09-01

    In order to determine whether selection of autograft ossicles in cholesteatomatous ear disease should be based upon their appearance under the surgical operating microscope, we studied the histopathological features of 113 such ossicles. We attempted to correlate the extent of erosion of the ossicle, as noted under the surgical operating microscope, with their histopathological appearance. There were 60 mallei and 53 includes. Seventy-nine ossicles were eroded and 34 were intact. The commonest abnormality noted was erosion of the long process of the incus (75 per cent). Both intact and eroded ossicles had similar histological features. There was no evidence of intra-ossicular cholesteatoma. The results suggest that the extent of erosion of these ossicles as seen under the surgical operating microscope should in no way prejudice their use as autografts when required. PMID:9373543

  4. Kinetics of corneal epithelial maintenance and graft loss. A population balance model.

    PubMed

    Sharma, A; Coles, W H

    1989-09-01

    We use a population balance model to study the mechanism and the rate of centripetal migration of epithelial cells, renewal of the corneal epithelial population by the cell derived from (progeny of) the limbal stem cells and the kinetics of the replacement of the donor corneal epithelium. The epithelial mass is constant under the normal circumstances and therefore the rate of cellular entry due to centripetal motion and mitosis into any epithelial volume must equal the cell loss from the same volume. The magnitude of the centripetal velocity and the rate of replacement of the donor tissue following keratoplasty are shown to depend only on the following directly quantifiable factors--the difference in the mitotic rates of the corneal and limbal epithelia and the radii of these two epithelia. The a priori model predictions are found to be in very good agreement with the observed centripetal velocities and the rate of corneal graft replacement. The model provides an independent support for the hypothesis that the stem cells for the corneal epithelium are located in the limbus and are responsible for a slow replenishment of the corneal epithelial cell. The model suggests some factors that diminish the centripetal supply of cells and thus provides insights into the pathogenesis of persistent corneal defects and delayed reepithelialization of defects and grafts. The model is suitable for interpreting and quantitatively correlating the influence of some epithelial alterations and drugs on the centripetal supply of epithelial cells. PMID:2674050

  5. Immune Reconstitution and Graft-Versus-Host Reactions in Rat Models of Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Zinöcker, Severin; Dressel, Ralf; Wang, Xiao-Nong; Dickinson, Anne M.; Rolstad, Bent

    2012-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT) extends the lives of thousands of patients who would otherwise succumb to hematopoietic malignancies such as leukemias and lymphomas, aplastic anemia, and disorders of the immune system. In alloHCT, different immune cell types mediate beneficial graft-versus-tumor (GvT) effects, regulate detrimental graft-versus-host disease (GvHD), and are required for protection against infections. Today, the “good” (GvT effector cells and memory cells conferring protection) cannot be easily separated from the “bad” (GvHD-causing cells), and alloHCT remains a hazardous medical modality. The transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells into an immunosuppressed patient creates a delicate environment for the reconstitution of donor blood and immune cells in co-existence with host cells. Immunological reconstitution determines to a large extent the immune status of the allo-transplanted host against infections and the recurrence of cancer, and is critical for long-term protection and survival after clinical alloHCT. Animal models continue to be extremely valuable experimental tools that widen our understanding of, for example, the dynamics of post-transplant hematopoiesis and the complexity of immune reconstitution with multiple ways of interaction between host and donor cells. In this review, we discuss the rat as an experimental model of HCT between allogeneic individuals. We summarize our findings on lymphocyte reconstitution in transplanted rats and illustrate the disease pathology of this particular model. We also introduce the rat skin explant assay, a feasible alternative to in vivo transplantation studies. The skin explant assay can be used to elucidate the biology of graft-versus-host reactions, which are known to have a major impact on immune reconstitution, and to perform genome-wide gene expression studies using controlled combinations of minor and major histocompatibility between the donor and the recipient

  6. Risk Factors of Graft Survival After Diagnosis of Post-kidney Transplant Malignancy: Using Cox Proportional Hazard Model

    PubMed Central

    Rahimi Foroushani, Abbas; Salesi, Mahmoud; Rostami, Zohreh; Mehrazmay, Ali Reza; Mohammadi, Jamile; Einollahi, Behzad; Eshraghian, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background: All recipients of kidney transplantation, especially those with posttransplant malignancy, are at risk of long-term graft failure. Objectives: The purpose of our study was to evaluate the risk factors associated with graft survival after diagnosis of malignancy. Patients and Methods: To reach this purpose, we conducted a historical cohort study in Iran and 266 cases with posttransplant malignancy were followed up from diagnosis of malignancy until long-term graft loss or the date of last visit. These patients were taken as a census from 16 Transplant Centers in Iran during 22 years follow-up period since October 1984 to December 2008. A Cox proportional hazards model was performed to determine the important independent predictors of graft survival after malignancy. Results: At the end of the study, long-term graft failure was seen in 27 (10.2%) cases. One-year and 2-year graft survival after diagnosis of cancer were 93.6% and 91.7%, respectively. The univariate analysis showed that the incidence of chronic graft loss was significantly higher in male patients with solid cancers, withdrawal of immunosuppressant regimen, no response to treatment, and tumor metastasis. In continuation, the Cox model indicated that the significant risk factors associated with graft survival were type of cancer (P < 0.0001), response to treatment (P < 0.0001, HR = 0.14, 95% CI: 0.06 - 0.32), metastasis (P < 0.0001, HR = 5.68, 95% CI: 2.24 - 14.42), and treatment modality (P = 0.0001). Conclusions: By controlling the modifiable risk factors and modality of treatment in our study, physicians can reach more effective treatment. PMID:26734477

  7. Current status of bone graft options for anterior interbody fusion of the cervical and lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Chau, Anthony Minh Tien; Xu, Lileane Liang; Wong, Johnny Ho-Yin; Mobbs, Ralph Jasper

    2014-01-01

    Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) and anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) are common surgical procedures for degenerative disc disease of the cervical and lumbar spine. Over the years, many bone graft options have been developed and investigated aimed at complimenting or substituting autograft bone, the traditional fusion substrate. Here, we summarise the historical context, biological basis and current best evidence for these bone graft options in ACDF and ALIF. PMID:23743981

  8. Late quadriceps tendon rupture at the donor site following cruciate ligament reconstruction using central quadriceps tendon graft.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Vivek; Madi, Sandesh; Joseph, Amy; Acharya, Kiran

    2015-10-16

    Central quadriceps tendon (CQT) graft has been successfully used as a viable autograft option in cruciate ligament reconstruction of the knee. The prime emphasis in the majority of the literature is given to surgical details of quadriceps graft harvesting and outcome of cruciate ligament reconstruction. There is less discussion about donor site morbidity in CQT graft, and it is less frequent as compared to that in bone patellar tendon bone graft. We report an extremely unusual case of late quadriceps tendon rupture at the donor site following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using CQT graft.

  9. Mild Anastomotic Stenosis in Patient-Specific CABG Model May Enhance Graft Patency: A New Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Huo, Yunlong; Luo, Tong; Guccione, Julius M.; Teague, Shawn D.; Tan, Wenchang; Navia, José A.; Kassab, Ghassan S.

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that flow patterns at the anastomosis of coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) are complex and may affect the long-term patency. Various attempts at optimal designs of anastomosis have not improved long-term patency. Here, we hypothesize that mild anastomotic stenosis (area stenosis of about 40–60%) may be adaptive to enhance the hemodynamic conditions, which may contribute to slower progression of atherosclerosis. We further hypothesize that proximal/distal sites to the stenosis have converse changes that may be a risk factor for the diffuse expansion of atherosclerosis from the site of stenosis. Twelve (12) patient-specific models with various stenotic degrees were extracted from computed tomography images using a validated segmentation software package. A 3-D finite element model was used to compute flow patterns including wall shear stress (WSS) and its spatial and temporal gradients (WSS gradient, WSSG, and oscillatory shear index, OSI). The flow simulations showed that mild anastomotic stenosis significantly increased WSS (>15 dynes⋅cm−2) and decreased OSI (<0.02) to result in a more uniform distribution of hemodynamic parameters inside anastomosis albeit proximal/distal sites to the stenosis have a decrease of WSS (<4 dynes⋅cm−2). These findings have significant implications for graft adaptation and long-term patency. PMID:24058488

  10. Mild anastomotic stenosis in patient-specific CABG model may enhance graft patency: a new hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Huo, Yunlong; Luo, Tong; Guccione, Julius M; Teague, Shawn D; Tan, Wenchang; Navia, José A; Kassab, Ghassan S

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that flow patterns at the anastomosis of coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) are complex and may affect the long-term patency. Various attempts at optimal designs of anastomosis have not improved long-term patency. Here, we hypothesize that mild anastomotic stenosis (area stenosis of about 40-60%) may be adaptive to enhance the hemodynamic conditions, which may contribute to slower progression of atherosclerosis. We further hypothesize that proximal/distal sites to the stenosis have converse changes that may be a risk factor for the diffuse expansion of atherosclerosis from the site of stenosis. Twelve (12) patient-specific models with various stenotic degrees were extracted from computed tomography images using a validated segmentation software package. A 3-D finite element model was used to compute flow patterns including wall shear stress (WSS) and its spatial and temporal gradients (WSS gradient, WSSG, and oscillatory shear index, OSI). The flow simulations showed that mild anastomotic stenosis significantly increased WSS (>15 dynes · cm(-2)) and decreased OSI (<0.02) to result in a more uniform distribution of hemodynamic parameters inside anastomosis albeit proximal/distal sites to the stenosis have a decrease of WSS (<4 dynes · cm(-2)). These findings have significant implications for graft adaptation and long-term patency. PMID:24058488

  11. Vascular replacement using a layered elastin-collagen vascular graft in a porcine model: one week patency versus one month occlusion.

    PubMed

    Koens, M J W; Krasznai, A G; Hanssen, A E J; Hendriks, T; Praster, R; Daamen, W F; van der Vliet, J A; van Kuppevelt, T H

    2015-01-01

    A persistent clinical demand exists for a suitable arterial prosthesis. In this study, a vascular conduit mimicking the native 3-layered artery, and constructed from the extracellular matrix proteins type I collagen and elastin, was evaluated for its performance as a blood vessel equivalent. A tubular 3-layered graft (elastin-collagen-collagen) was prepared using highly purified type I collagen fibrils and elastin fibers, resembling the 3-layered native blood vessel architecture. The vascular graft was crosslinked and heparinised (37 ± 4 μg heparin/mg graft), and evaluated as a vascular graft using a porcine bilateral iliac artery model. An intra-animal comparison with clinically-used heparinised ePTFE (Propaten®) was made. Analyses included biochemical characterization, duplex scanning, (immuno)histochemistry and scanning electron microscopy. The tubular graft was easy to handle with adequate suturability. Implantation resulted in pulsating grafts without leakage. One week after implantation, both ePTFE and the natural acellular graft had 100% patencies on duplex scanning. Grafts were partially endothelialised (Von Willebrand-positive endothelium with a laminin-positive basal membrane layer). After one month, layered thrombi were found in the natural (4/4) and ePTFE graft (1/4), resulting in occlusion which in case of the natural graft is likely due to the porosity of the inner elastin layer. In vivo application of a molecularly-defined tubular graft, based on nature's matrix proteins, for vascular surgery is feasible.

  12. Vascular replacement using a layered elastin-collagen vascular graft in a porcine model: one week patency versus one month occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Koens, M J W; Krasznai, A G; Hanssen, A E J; Hendriks, T; Praster, R; Daamen, W F; van der Vliet, J A; van Kuppevelt, T H

    2015-01-01

    abstract A persistent clinical demand exists for a suitable arterial prosthesis. In this study, a vascular conduit mimicking the native 3-layered artery, and constructed from the extracellular matrix proteins type I collagen and elastin, was evaluated for its performance as a blood vessel equivalent. A tubular 3-layered graft (elastin-collagen-collagen) was prepared using highly purified type I collagen fibrils and elastin fibers, resembling the 3-layered native blood vessel architecture. The vascular graft was crosslinked and heparinised (37 ± 4 μg heparin/mg graft), and evaluated as a vascular graft using a porcine bilateral iliac artery model. An intra-animal comparison with clinically-used heparinised ePTFE (Propaten®) was made. Analyses included biochemical characterization, duplex scanning, (immuno)histochemistry and scanning electron microscopy. The tubular graft was easy to handle with adequate suturability. Implantation resulted in pulsating grafts without leakage. One week after implantation, both ePTFE and the natural acellular graft had 100% patencies on duplex scanning. Grafts were partially endothelialised (Von Willebrand-positive endothelium with a laminin-positive basal membrane layer). After one month, layered thrombi were found in the natural (4/4) and ePTFE graft (1/4), resulting in occlusion which in case of the natural graft is likely due to the porosity of the inner elastin layer. In vivo application of a molecularly-defined tubular graft, based on nature's matrix proteins, for vascular surgery is feasible. PMID:26060888

  13. Vascular replacement using a layered elastin-collagen vascular graft in a porcine model: one week patency versus one month occlusion.

    PubMed

    Koens, M J W; Krasznai, A G; Hanssen, A E J; Hendriks, T; Praster, R; Daamen, W F; van der Vliet, J A; van Kuppevelt, T H

    2015-01-01

    A persistent clinical demand exists for a suitable arterial prosthesis. In this study, a vascular conduit mimicking the native 3-layered artery, and constructed from the extracellular matrix proteins type I collagen and elastin, was evaluated for its performance as a blood vessel equivalent. A tubular 3-layered graft (elastin-collagen-collagen) was prepared using highly purified type I collagen fibrils and elastin fibers, resembling the 3-layered native blood vessel architecture. The vascular graft was crosslinked and heparinised (37 ± 4 μg heparin/mg graft), and evaluated as a vascular graft using a porcine bilateral iliac artery model. An intra-animal comparison with clinically-used heparinised ePTFE (Propaten®) was made. Analyses included biochemical characterization, duplex scanning, (immuno)histochemistry and scanning electron microscopy. The tubular graft was easy to handle with adequate suturability. Implantation resulted in pulsating grafts without leakage. One week after implantation, both ePTFE and the natural acellular graft had 100% patencies on duplex scanning. Grafts were partially endothelialised (Von Willebrand-positive endothelium with a laminin-positive basal membrane layer). After one month, layered thrombi were found in the natural (4/4) and ePTFE graft (1/4), resulting in occlusion which in case of the natural graft is likely due to the porosity of the inner elastin layer. In vivo application of a molecularly-defined tubular graft, based on nature's matrix proteins, for vascular surgery is feasible. PMID:26060888

  14. Effect of Intraoperative Platelet-Rich-Plasma Treatment on Post Operative Donor Site Knee Pain in Patellar Tendon Autograft ACL Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Brian L.; Hobart, Sarah; Porter, David; Hogan, Daniel E.; McHugh, Malachy P.; Bedford, Benjamin B.; Nicholas, Stephen J.; Klein, Devon; Harousseau, Kendall

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Donor site morbidity in the form of anterior knee pain is a frequent complication after bone-patellar tendon-bone (BPTB) autograft ACL reconstruction. The purpose of this Level I study was to examine the effect of the intraoperative administration of platelet-rich plasma on post operative knee pain and patellar defect healing. Methods: Fifty-nine patients (29±12 y/o) undergoing BPTB ACL reconstruction and eligible to enter the study, were randomized to the treatment (PRP; n=31) or non treatment (sham n=28) arms of the study just prior to surgery. In either case, 10 cc of venous blood was drawn prior to the induction of anesthesia and either discarded (sham) or processed (PRP) for preparation of a PRP gel to be later mixed with donor site bone chips and inserted into the patellar defect. At 12 weeks and 6 months after surgery, patients completed IKDC forms and VAS pain scores for ADLs and kneeling (0-10 scale). Healing indices at the donor site were assessed by MRI at 6 months and included the following measurements taken from axial sequences: AP tendon dimensions at the level of the superior tibial cortex, roof of the intercondylar notch and width at the largest patella graft deficit. Mixed model ANOVA was used to assess the effect of PRP on patient symptoms and MRI indices of donor site healing. The primary dependent variable was VAS kneeling pain. It was estimated that with 25 patients per group there would be 80% power to detect a 1.5-point difference in kneeling pain between treatments at P<0.05. A between group difference of 1.5-points in VAS for kneeling pain was deemed to represent a clinically relevant difference. Results: VAS Kneeling Pain at 12 weeks tended to be lower in the PRP versus placebo group (4.5±3.6 vs. 6.2±2.4, P=0.051) but no difference was apparent at 6 months (3.7±3.2 vs. 4.4±2.9, P=0.41). Kneeling pain decreased from 12 weeks to 6 months (P<0.001) with a trend for a greater decrease in the placebo group (Time by Treatment P

  15. Uncemented acetabular components with femoral head autograft for acetabular reconstruction in developmental dysplasia of the hip: a concise follow-up report at a mean of twenty years.

    PubMed

    Abdel, Matthew P; Stryker, Louis S; Trousdale, Robert T; Berry, Daniel J; Cabanela, Miguel E

    2014-11-19

    We previously reported the five to twelve-year results of total hip arthroplasty with an uncemented acetabular component and an autogenous femoral head graft in forty-four consecutive hips with developmental dysplasia. The goal of the present study was to report the implant survival rate, status of bone grafts, and clinical outcomes in thirty-five of these hips (in twenty-nine patients) followed for a mean of 21.3 years. Functional, radiographic, and survivorship results were examined. Radiographic analysis revealed an average cup inclination angle of 43° and a mean arc of cup coverage by the graft of 30°. The twenty-year survivorship free from acetabular revision was 66% (twelve acetabular revisions; eight since our previous report). Of the twelve revisions, nine were for liner wear and/or osteolysis, one was for a liner fracture, one was for aseptic loosening, and one was for instability. All bone grafts healed to the pelvis. The graft facilitated revision cup placement as no additional structural grafts or metal augments were required. We concluded that an uncemented porous-coated socket used in conjunction with a bulk femoral head autograft provides good long-term fixation and restores bone stock. PMID:25410505

  16. First experience using cultured epidermal autografts in Taiwan for burn victims of the Formosa Fun Coast Water Park explosion, as part of Japanese medical assistance.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Hajime; Harunari, Nobuyuki; Ikeda, Hiroto

    2016-05-01

    On June 27, 2015, a flammable starch-based powder exploded at Formosa Fun Coast in Taipei, Taiwan, injuring 499 people, and more than 200 people were in critical condition with severe burns. Although a cultured epidermal autograft (CEA) was not approved or used in clinical practice, the Taiwan Food and Drug Administration requested a Japanese CEA manufacturer to donate CEA for the burn victims as part of international medical assistance. The authors cooperated in this project and participated in the patient selection, wound bed management for CEA, and technical assistance for CEA use. Here, we provide an overview of the project. Nine patients were enrolled, and two patients were excluded from the skin biopsy; seven skin biopsies were collected approximately 1 month after the disaster. The average TBSA% burned was 81.0%, and the mean age was 20.1 years. CEA was grafted in five patients; wound closure had been obtained in one patient, and one patient was severely ill at the time of grafting. The CEA was combined with a wide split auto mesh graft or patch graft. The mean re-epithelization rate at 4 weeks after the grafting was 84.2% by patient, and all of the patients survived. Although this project had many obstacles to overcome, CEA grafting was successful and contributed to wound closure and survival. PMID:26818956

  17. Epiphyseal Sparing and Reconstruction by Frozen Bone Autograft after Malignant Bone Tumor Resection in Children

    PubMed Central

    Hamed Kassem Abdelaal, Ahmed; Yamamoto, Norio; Hayashi, Katsuhiro; Takeuchi, Akihiko; Miwa, Shinji; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Limb salvage surgery has become the standard treatment for malignant primary bone tumors in the extremities. Limb salvage represents a challenge in skeletally immature patients. Several treatment options are available for limb reconstruction after tumor resection in children. We report our results using the technique of epiphyseal sparing and reconstruction with frozen autograft bone in 18 children. The mean follow-up period for the all patients included in this study is 72 ± 26 m. Eight patients remained disease-free, seven patients lived with no evidence of disease, two were alive but with disease, and one patient died of the disease. Five- and ten-year rates of survival were 94.4%. Graft survival at 5 and 10 years was 94.4%. Functional outcome using the Enneking scale was excellent in 17 patients (94.4%) and poor in one patient (5.5%). Complications include 2 nonunions, 2 fractures, 2 deep infections, 1 soft tissue recurrence, and leg length discrepancy in 7 cases. This technique is a good reconstructive choice in a child with a nonosteolytic primary or secondary bone tumor, responsive to chemotherapy, without involvement of the articular cartilage. It is a straight forward, effective, and biological technique, which affords immediate mobilization of joints and possible cryoimmune effects, with excellent long term functional outcome and less complication. PMID:27034614

  18. Physiologically Modeled Pulse Dynamics to Improve Function in In Vitro-Endothelialized Small-Diameter Vascular Grafts.

    PubMed

    Uzarski, Joseph S; Cores, Jhon; McFetridge, Peter S

    2015-11-01

    The lack of a functional endothelium on small-diameter vascular grafts leads to intimal hyperplasia and thrombotic occlusion. Shear stress conditioning through controlled hydrodynamics within in vitro perfusion bioreactors has shown promise as a mechanism to drive endothelial cell (EC) phenotype from an activated, pro-inflammatory wound state toward a quiescent functional state that inhibits responses that lead to occlusive failure. As part of an overall design strategy to engineer functional vascular grafts, we present a novel two-phase shear conditioning approach to improve graft endothelialization. Axial rotation was first used to seed uniform EC monolayers onto the lumenal surface of decellularized scaffolds derived from the human umbilical vein. Using computer-controlled perfusion circuits, a flow-ramping paradigm was applied to adapt endothelia to arterial levels of fluid shear stress and pressure without graft denudation. The effects of constant pulse frequencies (CF) on EC quiescence were then compared with pulse frequencies modeled from temporal fluctuations in blood flow observed in vivo, termed physiologically modeled pulse dynamics (PMPD). Constructs exposed to PMPD for 72 h expressed a more functional transcriptional profile, lower metabolic activity (39.8% ± 8.4% vs. 62.5% ± 11.5% reduction, p = 0.012), and higher nitric oxide production (80.42 ± 23.93 vs. 48.75 ± 6.93 nmol/10(5) cells, p = 0.028) than those exposed to CF. By manipulating in vitro flow conditions to mimic natural physiology, endothelialized vascular grafts can be stimulated to express a nonactivated phenotype that would better inhibit peripheral cell adhesion and smooth muscle cell hyperplasia, conditions that typically lead to occlusive failure. Development of robust, functional endothelia on vascular grafts by modulation of environmental conditions within perfusion bioreactors may ultimately improve clinical outcomes in vascular bypass grafting. PMID:25996580

  19. Modeling heterogeneous polymer-grafted nanoparticle networks having biomimetic core-shell structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mbanga, Badel L.; Yashin, Victor V.; Holten-Andersen, Niels; Balazs, Anna C.

    Inspired by the remarkable mechanical properties of such biological structures as mussel adhesive fibers, we use 3D computational modeling to study the behavior of heterogeneous polymer-grafted nanoparticle (PGN) networks under tensile deformation. The building block of a PGN network is a nanoparticle with grafted polymer chains whose free ends' reactive groups can form both permanent and labile bonds with the end chains on the nearby particles. The tunable behavior of cross-linked PGN networks makes them excellent candidates for designing novel materials with enhanced mechanical properties. Here, we consider the PGN networks having the core-shell structures, in which the type and strength of the inter-particle bonds in the outer shell differ from those in the core. Using the computer simulations, we obtain and compare the ultimate tensile properties (strength, toughness, ductility) and the strain recovery properties for the uniform samples and various core-shell structures. We demonstrate that the core-shell structures could be designed to obtain highly resilient self-healing materials

  20. Grafting of a model protein on lactide and caprolactone based biodegradable films for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Larrañaga, Aitor; Guay-Bégin, Andrée-Anne; Chevallier, Pascale; Sabbatier, Gad; Fernández, Jorge; Laroche, Gaétan; Sarasua, Jose-Ramon

    2014-01-01

    Thermoplastic biodegradable polymers displaying elastomeric behavior and mechanical consistency are greatly appreciated for the regeneration of soft tissues and for various medical devices. However, while the selection of a suitable base material is determined by mechanical and biodegradation considerations, it is the surface properties of the biomaterial that are responsible for the biological response. In order to improve the interaction with cells and modulate their behavior, biologically active molecules can be incorporated onto the surface of the material. With this aim, the surface of a lactide and caprolactone based biodegradable elastomeric terpolymer was modified in two stages. First, the biodegradable polymer surface was aminated by atmospheric pressure plasma treatment and second a crosslinker was grafted in order to covalently bind the biomolecule. In this study, albumin was used as a model protein. According to X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), albumin was efficiently immobilized on the surface of the terpolymer, the degree of albumin surface coverage (ΓBSA) reached ~35%. Moreover, gel permeation chromatography (GPC) studies showed that the hydrolytic degradation kinetic of the synthesized polymer was slightly delayed when albumin was grafted. However, the degradation process in the bulk of the material was unaffected, as demonstrated by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) analyses. Furthermore, XPS analyses showed that the protein was still present on the surface after 28 days of degradation, meaning that the surface modification was stable, and that there had been enough time for the biological environment to interact with the modified material. PMID:24509417

  1. Grafting of a model protein on lactide and caprolactone based biodegradable films for biomedical applications

    PubMed Central

    Larrañaga, Aitor; Guay-Bégin, Andrée-Anne; Chevallier, Pascale; Sabbatier, Gad; Fernández, Jorge; Laroche, Gaétan; Sarasua, Jose-Ramon

    2014-01-01

    Thermoplastic biodegradable polymers displaying elastomeric behavior and mechanical consistency are greatly appreciated for the regeneration of soft tissues and for various medical devices. However, while the selection of a suitable base material is determined by mechanical and biodegradation considerations, it is the surface properties of the biomaterial that are responsible for the biological response. In order to improve the interaction with cells and modulate their behavior, biologically active molecules can be incorporated onto the surface of the material. With this aim, the surface of a lactide and caprolactone based biodegradable elastomeric terpolymer was modified in two stages. First, the biodegradable polymer surface was aminated by atmospheric pressure plasma treatment and second a crosslinker was grafted in order to covalently bind the biomolecule. In this study, albumin was used as a model protein. According to X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), albumin was efficiently immobilized on the surface of the terpolymer, the degree of albumin surface coverage (ΓBSA) reached ~35%. Moreover, gel permeation chromatography (GPC) studies showed that the hydrolytic degradation kinetic of the synthesized polymer was slightly delayed when albumin was grafted. However, the degradation process in the bulk of the material was unaffected, as demonstrated by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) analyses. Furthermore, XPS analyses showed that the protein was still present on the surface after 28 days of degradation, meaning that the surface modification was stable, and that there had been enough time for the biological environment to interact with the modified material. PMID:24509417

  2. Vein Graft-Coated Vascular Stents: A Feasibility Study in a Canine Model

    SciTech Connect

    Schellhammer, Frank; Haberstroh, Joerg; Wakhloo, Ajay K.; Gottschalk, Eva; Schumacher, Martin

    1998-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate different vein grafts for luminal coating of endovascular stents in normal canine arteries. Methods: Twenty-four tantalum Strecker stents were coated with either autologous (n= 10), denatured heterologous (n= 11), or denatured homologous vein grafts (n= 3). The carotid artery (n= 11) and the iliac artery (n= 13) were stented using a transfemoral approach. Angiograms were performed at days 0, 7, and 21, and months 3, 6, and 9. All grafts underwent histological examination. Results: Eight of 10 autologous vein grafts showed patency during the whole observation period of 9 months, without histological signs of inflammation. Denatured heterologous vein grafts revealed acute (n= 3), subacute (n= 5), or delayed (n= 3) vessel occlusion. Hyaloid transformation of the vein graft and lympho-plasmacellular formations were seen. Denatured homologous vein grafts showed acute vessel occlusion. Although significant inflammatory tissue response was seen, no host-versus-graft reaction was present. Conclusion: Autologous vein graft-coated stents showed good biocompatibility in canine arteries. Preparation was cumbersome and required surgical venae-sectio. Denatured vein grafts, however, were limited by inflammatory reactions.

  3. Electrospun Vascular Grafts with Improved Compliance Matching to Native Vessels

    PubMed Central

    Nezarati, Roya M.; Eifert, Michelle B.; Dempsey, David K.; Cosgriff-Hernandez, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) is one of the most commonly performed major surgeries in the United States. Autologous vessels such as the saphenous vein are the current gold standard for treatment; however, synthetic vascular prostheses made of expanded poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (ePTFE) or poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) are used when autologous vessels are unavailable. These synthetic grafts have a high failure rate in small diameter (<4 mm) applications due to rapid re-occlusion via intimal hyperplasia. Current strategies to improve clinical performance are focused on preventing intimal hyperplasia by fabricating grafts with compliance and burst pressure similar to native vessels. To this end, we have developed an electrospun vascular graft from segmented polyurethanes with tunable properties by altering material chemistry and graft microarchitecture. Relationships between polyurethane tensile properties and biomechanical properties were elucidated to select polymers with desirable properties. Graft thickness, fiber tortuosity, and fiber fusions were modulated to provide additional tools for controlling graft properties. Using a combination of these strategies, a vascular graft with compliance and burst pressure exceeding the saphenous vein autograft was fabricated (compliance = 6.0 ± 0.6 %/mmHg × 10−4, burst pressure = 2260 ± 160 mmHg). This graft is hypothesized to reduce intimal hyperplasia associated with low compliance in synthetic grafts and improve long term clinical success. Additionally, the fundamental relationships between electrospun mesh microarchitecture and mechanical properties identified in this work can be utilized in various biomedical applications. PMID:24846218

  4. Arthroscopic Technique for Acetabular Labral Reconstruction Using Iliotibial Band Autograft.

    PubMed

    Chahla, Jorge; Soares, Eduardo; Bhatia, Sanjeev; Mitchell, Justin J; Philippon, Marc J

    2016-06-01

    The dynamic function of the acetabular labrum makes it an important structure for both hip stability and motion. Because of this, injuries to the labrum can cause significant dysfunction, leading to altered hip kinematics. Labral repair is the gold standard for symptomatic labral tears to keep as much labral tissue as possible; however, in cases where the labrum has been injured to such a degree that it is either deficient or repair is not possible, arthroscopic labral reconstruction is preferred. This article describes our preferred approach for reconstruction of the acetabular labrum using iliotibial band autograft.

  5. Arthroscopic Technique for Acetabular Labral Reconstruction Using Iliotibial Band Autograft.

    PubMed

    Chahla, Jorge; Soares, Eduardo; Bhatia, Sanjeev; Mitchell, Justin J; Philippon, Marc J

    2016-06-01

    The dynamic function of the acetabular labrum makes it an important structure for both hip stability and motion. Because of this, injuries to the labrum can cause significant dysfunction, leading to altered hip kinematics. Labral repair is the gold standard for symptomatic labral tears to keep as much labral tissue as possible; however, in cases where the labrum has been injured to such a degree that it is either deficient or repair is not possible, arthroscopic labral reconstruction is preferred. This article describes our preferred approach for reconstruction of the acetabular labrum using iliotibial band autograft. PMID:27656395

  6. The development of a normalization method for comparing nerve regeneration effectiveness among different graft types.

    PubMed

    Chang, Wei; DeVince, Jeffrey; Green, Gabriella; Shah, Munish Bhupendra; Johns, Michael S; Meng, Yan; Yu, Xiaojun

    2013-12-01

    The inability to compare directly different nerve grafts has been a significant factor hindering the advance of nerve graft development. Due to the abundance of variables that exist in nerve graft construction and multiple assessment types, there has been limited success in comparing nerve graft effectiveness among experiments. Using mathematical techniques on nerve conduction velocity (NCV) autograft data, a normalization function was empirically derived that normalizes differences in gap lengths. Further analysis allowed for the development of the relative regeneration ratio (RRR). The RRR function allows researchers to directly compare nerve graft results based on the NCV data from their respective studies as long as the data was collected at the same post-operation time. This function also allows for comparisons between grafts tested at different gap lengths. Initial testing of this RRR function provided confidence that the function is accurate for a continuum of gap lengths and different nerve graft types. PMID:24118184

  7. Hamstring graft size and anthropometry in south Indian population

    PubMed Central

    Challa, Supradeeptha; Satyaprasad, Jonnalagedda

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aim The role of anthropometric measurements in the prediction of hamstring autograft size in Indian population remains unclear. Till now, no studies have been done on Indian population. Methods We evaluated 41 consecutive patients (34 males, 7 females) prospectively with anterior cruciate ligament deficiency scheduled for reconstruction using hamstring autograft at our institution between June 2011 and June 2013. Preoperatively we recorded age, gender, height, weight, body mass index, and activity level. Intraoperative measurements of semitendinosus tendon like absolute length, diameter before fashioning the graft and final diameter of the tripled graft using sizing tubes calibrated to 1 mm. Correlation coefficient (Pearson's r) analysis was used. Results As per study there is no correlation between graft diameter, age, sex, weight, activity, and body mass index, of patients. Height of patients correlated to graft diameter in both Indian men and women (p < 0.001). Conclusion Anthropometric measurements such as weight, gender, activity level cannot be used as definitive predictors for the hamstring graft diameter during harvest but height of the patients can be taken as good predictor in Indian population. PMID:26403553

  8. Early Inflammatory Responses Following Cell Grafting in the CNS Trigger Activation of the Subventricular Zone: A Proposed Model of Sequential Cellular Events.

    PubMed

    Praet, Jelle; Santermans, Eva; Daans, Jasmijn; Le Blon, Debbie; Hoornaert, Chloé; Goossens, Herman; Hens, Niel; Van der Linden, Annemie; Berneman, Zwi; Ponsaerts, Peter

    2015-01-01

    While multiple rodent preclinical studies, and to a lesser extent human clinical trials, claim the feasibility, safety, and potential clinical benefit of cell grafting in the central nervous system (CNS), currently only little convincing knowledge exists regarding the actual fate of the grafted cells and their effect on the surrounding environment (or vice versa). Our preceding studies already indicated that only a minor fraction of the initially grafted cell population survives the grafting process, while the surviving cell population becomes invaded by highly activated microglia/macrophages and surrounded by reactive astrogliosis. In the current study, we further elaborate on early cellular and inflammatory events following syngeneic grafting of eGFP(+) mouse embryonic fibroblasts (mEFs) in the CNS of immunocompetent mice. Based on obtained quantitative histological data, we here propose a detailed mathematically derived working model that sequentially comprises hypoxia-induced apoptosis of grafted mEFs, neutrophil invasion, neoangiogenesis, microglia/macrophage recruitment, astrogliosis, and eventually survival of a limited number of grafted mEFs. Simultaneously, we observed that the cellular events following mEF grafting activates the subventricular zone neural stem and progenitor cell compartment. This proposed model therefore further contributes to our understanding of cell graft-induced cellular responses and will eventually allow for successful manipulation of this intervention.

  9. Autologous Graft-versus-Tumor Effect: Reality or Fiction?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, the current dogma is not an evidence of graft-versus-tumor effect in autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation; thus, it is assumed that autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation only relies on the high-dose chemotherapy to improve clinical outcomes. However, recent studies argue in favor of the existence of an autologous graft-versus-tumor without the detrimental complications of graft-versus-host disease due to the nonspecific immune response from the infused donor alloreactive immune effector cells in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Herein, this paper reviews the clinical evidence of an autologous graft-versus-tumor effect based on the autograft collected and infused host immune effector cells and host immunity recovery after autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation affecting clinical outcomes in cancer patients.

  10. Autologous Graft-versus-Tumor Effect: Reality or Fiction?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, the current dogma is not an evidence of graft-versus-tumor effect in autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation; thus, it is assumed that autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation only relies on the high-dose chemotherapy to improve clinical outcomes. However, recent studies argue in favor of the existence of an autologous graft-versus-tumor without the detrimental complications of graft-versus-host disease due to the nonspecific immune response from the infused donor alloreactive immune effector cells in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Herein, this paper reviews the clinical evidence of an autologous graft-versus-tumor effect based on the autograft collected and infused host immune effector cells and host immunity recovery after autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation affecting clinical outcomes in cancer patients. PMID:27635143

  11. Plant grafting.

    PubMed

    Melnyk, Charles W; Meyerowitz, Elliot M

    2015-03-01

    Since ancient times, people have cut and joined together plants of different varieties or species so they would grow as a single plant - a process known as grafting (Figures 1 and 2). References to grafting appear in the Bible, ancient Greek and ancient Chinese texts, indicating that grafting was practised in Europe, the Middle East and Asia by at least the 5(th) century BCE. It is unknown where or how grafting was first discovered, but it is likely that natural grafting, the process by which two plants touch and fuse limbs or roots in the absence of human interference (Figure 3), influenced people's thinking. Such natural grafts are generally uncommon, but are seen in certain species, including English ivy. Parasitic plants, such as mistletoe, that grow and feed on often unrelated species may have also contributed to the development of grafting as a technique, as people would have observed mistletoe growing on trees such as apples or poplars. PMID:25734263

  12. Lethal graft-versus-host disease in nude mice. I. Establishment of model systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kuribayashi, K.; Masuda, T.; Hanaoka, M.

    1988-08-01

    We examined whether nude mice, which are deficient in T cell function, could be used as a model for induction of lethal graft-versus-host disease. Nude mice injected with MHC-disparate spleen cells exhibited only transient GVH reaction such as splenomegaly. Inoculation of B6 spleen cells into BALB/c nude mice produced high titers of alloantibodies to the donor cells. These alloantibodies eliminated host-MHC-reactive donor T cells from the host. After abolition by 400 rads irradiation of the capacity of nude mice to produce antibody, lethal GVHD could be induced by allogeneic spleen cell transfer and was mediated by donor T cells. This lethal GVHD was prevented by prior administration of antidonor alloantibody to the irradiated recipients at least 24 hr before donor-cell grafting. The role of alloantibody was substantiated in 2 other combinations in which little or no alloantibodies to donor spleen cells were produced. Engraftment of either MHC-identical but non-MHC disparate donor spleen cells into BALB/c nude mice or of parental spleen cells into F1 nude mice resulted in death mediated by T cells. In addition, irradiated BALB/c nude mice inoculated with non-MHC-incompatible B10.D2 spleen cells were much more sensitive to alloaggression by the donor cells than were nonirradiated hosts, indicating the presence of some radiation-sensitive component(s) acting in nude mice against GVHD induction by donor T cells. Thus the nude mouse is considered to be a useful recipient for clarifying the basic mechanisms involved in lethal GVHD.

  13. Embryonic Cell Grafts in a Culture Model of Spinal Cord Lesion: Neuronal Relay Formation Is Essential for Functional Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Tscherter, Anne; Heidemann, Martina; Kleinlogel, Sonja; Streit, Jürg

    2016-01-01

    Presently there exists no cure for spinal cord injury (SCI). However, transplantation of embryonic tissue into spinal cord (SC) lesions resulted in axon outgrowth across the lesion site and some functional recovery, fostering hope for future stem cell therapies. Although in vivo evidence for functional recovery is given, the exact cellular mechanism of the graft support remains elusive: either the grafted cells provide a permissive environment for the host tissue to regenerate itself or the grafts actually integrate functionally into the host neuronal network reconnecting the separated SC circuits. We tested the two hypotheses in an in vitro SC lesion model that is based on propagation of activity between two rat organotypic SC slices in culture. Transplantation of dissociated cells from E14 rat SC or forebrain (FB) re-established the relay of activity over the lesion site and thus, provoked functional regeneration. Combining patch-clamp recordings from transplanted cells with network activity measurements from the host tissue on multi-electrode arrays (MEAs) we here show that neurons differentiate from the grafted cells and integrate into the host circuits. Optogenetic silencing of neurons developed from transplanted embryonic mouse FB cells provides clear evidence that they replace the lost neuronal connections to relay and synchronize activity between the separated SC circuits. In contrast, transplantation of neurospheres (NS) induced neither the differentiation of mature neurons from the grafts nor an improvement of functional regeneration. Together these findings suggest, that the formation of neuronal relays from grafted embryonic cells is essential to re-connect segregated SC circuits. PMID:27708562

  14. Calcar bone graft

    SciTech Connect

    Bargar, W.L.; Paul, H.A.; Merritt, K.; Sharkey, N.

    1986-01-01

    A canine model was developed to investigate the use of an autogeneic iliac bone graft to treat the calcar deficiency commonly found at the time of revision surgery for femoral component loosening. Five large male mixed-breed dogs had bilateral total hip arthroplasty staged at three-month intervals, and were sacrificed at six months. Prior to cementing the femoral component, an experimental calcar defect was made, and a bicortical iliac bone graft was fashioned to fill the defect. Serial roentgenograms showed the grafts had united with no resorption. Technetium-99 bone scans showed more uptake at three months than at six months in the graft region. Disulfine blue injection indicated all grafts were perfused at both three and six months. Thin section histology, fluorochromes, and microradiographs confirmed graft viability in all dogs. Semiquantitative grading of the fluorochromes indicated new bone deposition in 20%-50% of each graft at three months and 50%-80% at six months. Although the calcar bone graft was uniformly successful in this canine study, the clinical application of this technique should be evaluated by long-term results in humans.

  15. Control of graft-versus-host disease with maintenance of the graft-versus-leukemia effect in a murine allogeneic transplant model using retrovirally transduced murine suicidal lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kornblau, Steven M.; Aycox, Preston G.; Stephens, L. Clifton; McCue, David; Champlin, Richard E.; Marini, Frank C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Limited clinical trials have validated the hypothesis of controlling graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) arising from stem cell transplant utilizing suicidal T-lymphocytes that have been transduced to express the HSV-TK gene. However, clinical utility has been limited by diminished T-cell function arising from the production process. To evaluate strategies for harnessing the graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) effect while improving the safety and function of suicidal lymphocytes, we have developed techniques to produce fully functional, retrovirally transduced, HSV-TK–positive murine T cells (TK+TC). Methods Utilizing a murine major histocompatibility complex–matched transplant model, we evaluated the ability of TK+TC to generate a GVL effect and the ability to control GVHD in experiments where we varied the dose of TK+TC, ganciclovir (GCV) dose, the start of GCV administration (day 4, 7, 10, 13, 15, or 19) posttransplantation, and the GCV administration route (osmotic pump versus intraperitoneal). Results At TK+TC doses in excess of the standard lethal dose (SLD) of unmanipulated T-cells, GCV administration completely (2 × SLD) and partially (4 × SLD) controlled GVHD. Additionally, GVHD remained reversible despite delaying administration of GCV for a week after GVHD developed. Importantly, GVHD was controlled with a 1-log but not 2-log reduction in GCV dose, and this “partial suicide” preserved more circulating TK+TC compared with standard-dose GCV. Survival of leukemia-positive mice receiving TK+TC and GCV was significantly increased compared with control cohorts not receiving GCV or transplanted with unmanipulated T cells, thereby demonstrating a GVL effect. Conclusion Retrovirally transduced suicidal lymphocytes generate a potent GVL effect while simultaneously enabling control of GVHD, which results in improved leukemia and GVHD-free survival. PMID:17577932

  16. Submillimeter Diameter Poly(Vinyl Alcohol) Vascular Graft Patency in Rabbit Model.

    PubMed

    Cutiongco, Marie F A; Kukumberg, Marek; Peneyra, Jonnathan L; Yeo, Matthew S; Yao, Jia Y; Rufaihah, Abdul Jalil; Le Visage, Catherine; Ho, Jackie Pei; Yim, Evelyn K F

    2016-01-01

    Microvascular surgery is becoming a prevalent surgical practice. Replantation, hand reconstruction, orthopedic, and free tissue transfer procedures all rely on microvascular surgery for the repair of venous and arterial defects at the millimeter and submillimeter levels. Often, a vascular graft is required for the procedure as a means to bridge the gap between native arteries. While autologous vessels are desired for their bioactivity and non-thrombogenicity, the tedious harvest process, lack of availability, and caliber or mechanical mismatch contribute to graft failure. Thus, there is a need for an off-the-shelf artificial vascular graft that has low thrombogenic properties and mechanical properties matching those of submillimeter vessels. Poly(vinyl alcohol) hydrogel (PVA) has excellent prospects as a vascular graft due to its bioinertness, low thrombogenicity, high water content, and tunable mechanical properties. Here, we fabricated PVA grafts with submillimeter diameter and mechanical properties that closely approximated those of the rabbit femoral artery. In vitro platelet adhesion and microparticle release assay verified the low thrombogenicity of PVA. A stringent proof-of-concept in vivo test was performed by implanting PVA grafts in rabbit femoral artery with multilevel arterial occlusion. Laser Doppler measurements indicated the improved perfusion of the distal limb after implantation with PVA grafts. Moreover, ultrasound Doppler and angiography verified that the submillimeter diameter PVA vascular grafts remained patent for 2 weeks without the aid of anticoagulant or antithrombotics. Endothelial cells were observed in the luminal surface of one patent PVA graft. The advantageous non-thrombogenic and tunable mechanical properties of PVA that are retained even in the submillimeter diameter dimensions support the application of this biomaterial for vascular replacement in microvascular surgery. PMID:27376059

  17. Submillimeter Diameter Poly(Vinyl Alcohol) Vascular Graft Patency in Rabbit Model.

    PubMed

    Cutiongco, Marie F A; Kukumberg, Marek; Peneyra, Jonnathan L; Yeo, Matthew S; Yao, Jia Y; Rufaihah, Abdul Jalil; Le Visage, Catherine; Ho, Jackie Pei; Yim, Evelyn K F

    2016-01-01

    Microvascular surgery is becoming a prevalent surgical practice. Replantation, hand reconstruction, orthopedic, and free tissue transfer procedures all rely on microvascular surgery for the repair of venous and arterial defects at the millimeter and submillimeter levels. Often, a vascular graft is required for the procedure as a means to bridge the gap between native arteries. While autologous vessels are desired for their bioactivity and non-thrombogenicity, the tedious harvest process, lack of availability, and caliber or mechanical mismatch contribute to graft failure. Thus, there is a need for an off-the-shelf artificial vascular graft that has low thrombogenic properties and mechanical properties matching those of submillimeter vessels. Poly(vinyl alcohol) hydrogel (PVA) has excellent prospects as a vascular graft due to its bioinertness, low thrombogenicity, high water content, and tunable mechanical properties. Here, we fabricated PVA grafts with submillimeter diameter and mechanical properties that closely approximated those of the rabbit femoral artery. In vitro platelet adhesion and microparticle release assay verified the low thrombogenicity of PVA. A stringent proof-of-concept in vivo test was performed by implanting PVA grafts in rabbit femoral artery with multilevel arterial occlusion. Laser Doppler measurements indicated the improved perfusion of the distal limb after implantation with PVA grafts. Moreover, ultrasound Doppler and angiography verified that the submillimeter diameter PVA vascular grafts remained patent for 2 weeks without the aid of anticoagulant or antithrombotics. Endothelial cells were observed in the luminal surface of one patent PVA graft. The advantageous non-thrombogenic and tunable mechanical properties of PVA that are retained even in the submillimeter diameter dimensions support the application of this biomaterial for vascular replacement in microvascular surgery.

  18. Submillimeter Diameter Poly(Vinyl Alcohol) Vascular Graft Patency in Rabbit Model

    PubMed Central

    Cutiongco, Marie F. A.; Kukumberg, Marek; Peneyra, Jonnathan L.; Yeo, Matthew S.; Yao, Jia Y.; Rufaihah, Abdul Jalil; Le Visage, Catherine; Ho, Jackie Pei; Yim, Evelyn K. F.

    2016-01-01

    Microvascular surgery is becoming a prevalent surgical practice. Replantation, hand reconstruction, orthopedic, and free tissue transfer procedures all rely on microvascular surgery for the repair of venous and arterial defects at the millimeter and submillimeter levels. Often, a vascular graft is required for the procedure as a means to bridge the gap between native arteries. While autologous vessels are desired for their bioactivity and non-thrombogenicity, the tedious harvest process, lack of availability, and caliber or mechanical mismatch contribute to graft failure. Thus, there is a need for an off-the-shelf artificial vascular graft that has low thrombogenic properties and mechanical properties matching those of submillimeter vessels. Poly(vinyl alcohol) hydrogel (PVA) has excellent prospects as a vascular graft due to its bioinertness, low thrombogenicity, high water content, and tunable mechanical properties. Here, we fabricated PVA grafts with submillimeter diameter and mechanical properties that closely approximated those of the rabbit femoral artery. In vitro platelet adhesion and microparticle release assay verified the low thrombogenicity of PVA. A stringent proof-of-concept in vivo test was performed by implanting PVA grafts in rabbit femoral artery with multilevel arterial occlusion. Laser Doppler measurements indicated the improved perfusion of the distal limb after implantation with PVA grafts. Moreover, ultrasound Doppler and angiography verified that the submillimeter diameter PVA vascular grafts remained patent for 2 weeks without the aid of anticoagulant or antithrombotics. Endothelial cells were observed in the luminal surface of one patent PVA graft. The advantageous non-thrombogenic and tunable mechanical properties of PVA that are retained even in the submillimeter diameter dimensions support the application of this biomaterial for vascular replacement in microvascular surgery. PMID:27376059

  19. The Ross II procedure: pulmonary autograft in the mitral position.

    PubMed

    Athanasiou, Thanos; Cherian, Ashok; Ross, Donald

    2004-10-01

    The surgical management of mitral valve disease in women of childbearing age, young patients, and children with congenital mitral valve defects is made difficult by the prospect of lifelong anticoagulation. We suggest the use of a pulmonary autograft in the mitral position (Ross II procedure) as an alternative surgical technique. We present a review of the literature, historical perspectives, indications, selection criteria, and surgical technique for the Ross II procedure. Our literature search identified 14 studies that reported results from the Ross II operation. Performed in 103 patients, the overall in-hospital mortality was 7 (6.7%), with a late mortality of 10 (9%). Although further research is needed, current evidence suggests the Ross II operation is a valuable alternative in low-risk young patients where valve durability and the complication rate from other procedures is unsatisfactory and anticoagulation not ideal.

  20. Optogenetics enables functional analysis of human embryonic stem cell-derived grafts in a Parkinson's disease model.

    PubMed

    Steinbeck, Julius A; Choi, Se Joon; Mrejeru, Ana; Ganat, Yosif; Deisseroth, Karl; Sulzer, David; Mosharov, Eugene V; Studer, Lorenz

    2015-02-01

    Recent studies have shown evidence of behavioral recovery after transplantation of human pluripotent stem cell (PSC)-derived neural cells in animal models of neurological disease. However, little is known about the mechanisms underlying graft function. Here we use optogenetics to modulate in real time electrophysiological and neurochemical properties of mesencephalic dopaminergic (mesDA) neurons derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). In mice that had recovered from lesion-induced Parkinsonian motor deficits, light-induced selective silencing of graft activity rapidly and reversibly re-introduced the motor deficits. The re-introduction of motor deficits was prevented by the dopamine agonist apomorphine. These results suggest that functionality depends on graft neuronal activity and dopamine release. Combining optogenetics, slice electrophysiology and pharmacological approaches, we further show that mesDA-rich grafts modulate host glutamatergic synaptic transmission onto striatal medium spiny neurons in a manner reminiscent of endogenous mesDA neurons. Thus, application of optogenetics in cell therapy can link transplantation, animal behavior and postmortem analysis to enable the identification of mechanisms that drive recovery.

  1. Miniature Swine as a Clinically Relevant Model of Graft-Versus-Host Disease

    PubMed Central

    Duran-Struuck, Raimon; Huang, Christene A; Orf, Katherine; Bronson, Roderick T; Sachs, David H; Spitzer, Thomas R

    2015-01-01

    Miniature swine provide a preclinical model of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) for studies of graft-versus-host disease. HCT between MHC-matched or ‑mismatched pigs can be performed to mimic clinical scenarios with outcomes that closely resemble those observed in human HCT recipients. With myeloablative conditioning, HCT across MHC barriers is typically fatal, with pigs developing severe (grade III or IV) GVHD involving the gastrointestinal tract, liver, and skin. Unlike rodent models, miniature swine provide an opportunity to perform extended longitudinal studies on individual animals, because multiple tissue biopsies can be harvested without the need for euthanasia. In addition, we have developed a swine GVHD scoring system that parallels that used in the human clinical setting. Given the similarities of GVHD in pigs and humans, we hope that the use of this scoring system facilitates clinical and scientific discourse between the laboratory and the clinic. We anticipate that results of swine studies will support the development of new strategies to improve the identification and treatment of GVHD in clinical HCT scenarios. PMID:26473348

  2. Miniature Swine as a Clinically Relevant Model of Graft-Versus-Host Disease.

    PubMed

    Duran-Struuck, Raimon; Huang, Christene A; Orf, Katherine; Bronson, Roderick T; Sachs, David H; Spitzer, Thomas R

    2015-10-01

    Miniature swine provide a preclinical model of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) for studies of graft-versus-host disease. HCT between MHC-matched or -mismatched pigs can be performed to mimic clinical scenarios with outcomes that closely resemble those observed in human HCT recipients. With myeloablative conditioning, HCT across MHC barriers is typically fatal, with pigs developing severe (grade III or IV) GVHD involving the gastrointestinal tract, liver, and skin. Unlike rodent models, miniature swine provide an opportunity to perform extended longitudinal studies on individual animals, because multiple tissue biopsies can be harvested without the need for euthanasia. In addition, we have developed a swine GVHD scoring system that parallels that used in the human clinical setting. Given the similarities of GVHD in pigs and humans, we hope that the use of this scoring system facilitates clinical and scientific discourse between the laboratory and the clinic. We anticipate that results of swine studies will support the development of new strategies to improve the identification and treatment of GVHD in clinical HCT scenarios. PMID:26473348

  3. μCT-Based Measurement of Cortical Bone Graft-to-Host Union

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, David G.; Shaikh, Saad; Papuga, Mark Owen; Lerner, Amy L.; O'Keefe, Regis J.; Schwarz, Edward M.; Awad, Hani A.

    2009-01-01

    Evaluation of structural bone grafts risk of failure requires noninvasive quantitative predictors of functional strength. We hypothesized that a quantitative graft-to-host union biometric would correlate significantly with biomechanical properties as a surrogate for the risk of fracture. To test this, we developed a novel algorithm to compute the union between host callus and graft, which was termed the union ratio. We compared the union ratio of live autografts to devitalized allografts implanted into the mid-diaphysis of mouse femurs for 6 and 9 wk. Surprisingly, the autograft union ratio decreased from 0.228 ± 0.029 at 6 wk to 0.15 ± 0.011 at 9 wk (p < 0.05) and did not correlate with the torsional properties of the autografts . The allograft union ratio was 0.105 ± 0.023 at 6 wk but increased to 0.224 ± 0.029 at 9 wk (p < 0.05). As a single variable, the union ratio correlated significantly with ultimate torque (R 2 = 0.58) and torsional rigidity (R 2 = 0.51) of the allografts. Multivariable regression analyses of allografts that included the union ratio, the graft bone volume, the maximum and minimum polar moment of inertia, and their first-order interaction terms with the union ratio as independent variables resulted in significant correlations with the ultimate torque and torsional rigidity (adjusted R 2 = 0.80 and 0.89, respectively). These results suggest that, unlike live autografts, the union between the devitalized allograft and host contributes significantly to the strength of grafted bone. The union ratio has important clinical implications as a novel biometric for noninvasive assessment of functional strength and failure risk. PMID:19063685

  4. Inhaled Hydrogen Sulfide Improves Graft Function in an Experimental Model of Lung Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    George, Timothy J.; Arnaoutakis, George J.; Beaty, Claude A.; Jandu, Simran K.; Santhanam, Lakshmi; Berkowitz, Dan E.; Shah, Ashish S.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Ischemia-reperfusion(IRI) is a common complication of lung transplantation(LTx). Hydrogen sulfide(H2S) is a novel agent previously shown to slow metabolism and scavenge reactive oxygen species, potentially mitigating IRI. We hypothesized that pre-treatment with inhaled H2S would improve graft function in an ex vivo model of LTx. Methods: Rabbits(n=10) were ventilated for 2 hours prior to heart-lung bloc procurement. The treatment group(n=5) inhaled room air(21% O2) supplemented with 150 ppm H2S while the control group(n=5) inhaled room air alone. Both groups were gradually cooled to 34 C. All heart-lung blocs were then recovered and cold-stored in low potassium dextran solution for 18 hours. Following storage, the blocs were reperfused with donor rabbit blood in an ex vivo apparatus. Serial clinical parameters were assessed and serial tissue biochemistry was examined. Results: Prior to heart-lung bloc procurement, rabbits pre-treated with H2S exhibited similar oxygenation(p=0.1), ventilation(p=0.7), and heart rate(p=0.5); however, treated rabbits exhibited consistently higher mean arterial blood pressures(p=0.01). During reperfusion, lungs pre-treated with H2S had better oxygenation(p<0.01) and ventilation(p=0.02) as well as lower pulmonary artery pressures(p<0.01). Reactive oxygen species levels were lower in treated lungs during reperfusion(p=0.01). Additionally, prior to reperfusion, treated lungs demonstrated more preserved mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase activity(p=0.01). Conclusions: To our knowledge, this study represents the first reported therapeutic use of inhaled H2S in an experimental model of LTx. After prolonged ischemia, lungs pre-treated with inhaled H2S exhibited improved graft function during reperfusion. Donor pre-treatment with inhaled H2S represents a potentially novel adjunct to conventional preservation techniques and merits further exploration. PMID:22771242

  5. Future Economics of Liver Transplantation: A 20-Year Cost Modeling Forecast and the Prospect of Bioengineering Autologous Liver Grafts.

    PubMed

    Habka, Dany; Mann, David; Landes, Ronald; Soto-Gutierrez, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    During the past 20 years liver transplantation has become the definitive treatment for most severe types of liver failure and hepatocellular carcinoma, in both children and adults. In the U.S., roughly 16,000 individuals are on the liver transplant waiting list. Only 38% of them will receive a transplant due to the organ shortage. This paper explores another option: bioengineering an autologous liver graft. We developed a 20-year model projecting future demand for liver transplants, along with costs based on current technology. We compared these cost projections against projected costs to bioengineer autologous liver grafts. The model was divided into: 1) the epidemiology model forecasting the number of wait-listed patients, operated patients and postoperative patients; and 2) the treatment model forecasting costs (pre-transplant-related costs; transplant (admission)-related costs; and 10-year post-transplant-related costs) during the simulation period. The patient population was categorized using the Model for End-Stage Liver Disease score. The number of patients on the waiting list was projected to increase 23% over 20 years while the weighted average treatment costs in the pre-liver transplantation phase were forecast to increase 83% in Year 20. Projected demand for livers will increase 10% in 10 years and 23% in 20 years. Total costs of liver transplantation are forecast to increase 33% in 10 years and 81% in 20 years. By comparison, the projected cost to bioengineer autologous liver grafts is $9.7M based on current catalog prices for iPS-derived liver cells. The model projects a persistent increase in need and cost of donor livers over the next 20 years that's constrained by a limited supply of donor livers. The number of patients who die while on the waiting list will reflect this ever-growing disparity. Currently, bioengineering autologous liver grafts is cost prohibitive. However, costs will decline rapidly with the introduction of new manufacturing

  6. Reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament: a comparison between bone-patellar tendon-bone grafts and fourstrand hamstring grafts

    PubMed Central

    Razi, Mohammad; Sarzaeem, Mohammad Mahdi; Kazemian, Gholam Hossein; Najafi, Farideh; Najafi, Mohammad Amin

    2014-01-01

    Background: Disruption of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is a common ligamentous injury of the knee. The choice of graft for (ACL) reconstruction remains controversial. This prospective, randomized clinical trial aimed to compare clinical results of bone-patellar tendon-bone (BPTB) grafts and four-strand semitendinosus-gracilis (ST) grafts for ACL reconstruction over a 3-year follow-up interval. Methods: Seventy-one patients with an average age of 29± 4.5yearswere treated for torn ACL between 2008 and 2009. Forty-sixpatients underwent reconstruction with BPTB autograft, and 41 were treated with ST autograft. At the time of final follow-up, 37 patients in patella group and 34 patients in hamstring group were evaluated in terms of return to pre-injury activity level, pain, knee stability, range of motion, IKDC (International Knee Documentation Committee) score and complications. Results: At 36thmonth of follow-up, 34 (92%) and 28 (82%) patients in BPTB and ST group, respectively had good-to-excellent IKDC score (p > 0.05). The activity levels were higher in BPTB group (p> 0.05). At 3rd yearof follow up, the Lachman test was graded normal, for 23 (62%) and 11 (32%) patients in BPTB and ST group, respectively (p=0.019). Regarding the pivot-shift test, 29 (79%) and 15 (44%) patients in patella and hamstring group, respectively had normal test at the latest follow-up (p=0.021).There were no significant differences in terms of thigh circumference difference, effusion, knee range of motion, pain and complications. Conclusion: The results indicate a trend toward increased graft laxity and pivot-shift grades in patients undergoing reconstruction with hamstring autograft compared with patella tendon. However, the two groups had comparable results in terms of activity level and knee function. PMID:25694992

  7. A Pre-operative Risk Model for Post-operative Pneumonia following Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting

    PubMed Central

    Strobel, Raymond J.; Liang, Qixing; Zhang, Min; Wu, Xiaoting; Rogers, Mary A. M.; Theurer, Patricia F.; Fishstrom, Astrid B.; Harrington, Steven D.; DeLucia, Alphonse; Paone, Gaetano; Patel, Himanshu J.; Prager, Richard L.; Likosky, Donald S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Post-operative pneumonia is the most prevalent of all hospital-acquired infections following isolated coronary artery bypass grafting (CAB). Accurate prediction of a patient’s risk of this morbid complication is hindered by its low relative incidence. In an effort to support clinical decision-making and quality improvement, we developed a pre-operative prediction model for post-operative pneumonia following CAB. Methods We undertook an observational study of 16,084 patients undergoing CAB between Q3 2011 – Q2 2014 across 33 institutions participating in the Michigan Society of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgeons – Quality Collaborative. Variables related to patient demographics, medical history, admission status, comorbid disease, cardiac anatomy and the institution performing the procedure were investigated. Logistic regression via forwards stepwise selection (p < 0.05 threshold) was utilized to develop a risk prediction model for estimating the occurrence of pneumonia. Traditional methods were employed to assess the model’s performance. Results Post-operative pneumonia occurred in 3.30% of patients. Multivariable analysis identified 17 pre-operative factors, including: demographics, laboratory values, comorbid disease, pulmonary and cardiac function, and operative status. The final model significantly predicted the occurrence of pneumonia, and performed well (C-statistic: 0.74). These findings were confirmed via sensitivity analyses by center and clinically important sub-groups. Conclusions We identified 17 readily obtainable pre-operative variables associated with post-operative pneumonia. This model may be used to provide individualized risk estimation and to identify opportunities to reduce a patient’s pre-operative risk of pneumonia through pre-habilitation. PMID:27261082

  8. Treatment of a traumatic osteochondral defect in the thumb carpometacarpal joint with a periosteal autograft.

    PubMed

    Stein, B E; Rosenwasser, M P

    1999-11-01

    We report a case in which an autogenous periosteal autograft was used to resurface a large osteochondral defect in the thumb carpometacarpal joint of a young woman. Good results were found at 4-year follow-up examination.

  9. In vivo evaluation of electrospun polycaprolactone graft for anterior cruciate ligament engineering.

    PubMed

    Petrigliano, Frank A; Arom, Gabriel A; Nazemi, Azadeh N; Yeranosian, Michael G; Wu, Benjamin M; McAllister, David R

    2015-04-01

    The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is critical for the structural stability of the knee and its injury often requires surgical intervention. Because current reconstruction methods using autograft or allograft tissue suffer from donor-site morbidity and limited supply, there has been emerging interest in the use of bioengineered materials as a platform for ligament reconstruction. Here, we report the use of electrospun polycaprolactone (PCL) scaffolds as a candidate platform for ACL reconstruction in an in vivo rodent model. Electrospun PCL was fabricated and laser cut to facilitate induction of cells and collagen deposition and used to reconstruct the rat ACL. Histological analysis at 2, 6, and 12 weeks postimplantation revealed biological integration, minimal immune response, and the gradual infiltration of collagen in both the bone tunnel and intra-articular regions of the scaffold. Biomechanical testing demonstrated that the PCL graft failure load and stiffness at 12 weeks postimplantation (13.27±4.20N, 15.98±5.03 N/mm) increased compared to time zero testing (3.95±0.33N, 1.95±0.35 N/mm). Taken together, these results suggest that electrospun PCL serves as a biocompatible graft for ACL reconstruction with the capacity to facilitate collagen deposition.

  10. Rabbit maxillary sinus augmentation model with simultaneous implant placement: differential responses to the graft materials

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Sung; Kim, Su-Hwan; Kim, Kyoung-Hwa; Jhin, Min-Ju; Kim, Won-Kyung; Lee, Young-Kyoo; Seol, Yang-Jo

    2012-01-01

    Purpose This study was performed to establish an experimental rabbit model for single-stage maxillary sinus augmentation with simultaneous implant placement. Methods Twelve mature New Zealand white rabbits were used for the experiments. The rabbit maxillary sinuses were divided into 3 groups according to sinus augmentation materials: blood clot (BC), autogenous bone (AB), and bovine-derived hydroxyapatite (BHA). Small titanium implants were simultaneously placed in the animals during the sinus augmentation procedure. The rabbits were sacrificed 4 and 8 weeks after surgery and were observed histologically. Histomorphometric analyses using image analysis software were also performed to evaluate the parameters related to bone regeneration and implant-bone integration. Results The BC group showed an evident collapse of the sinus membrane and limited new bone formation around the original sinus floor at 4 and 8 weeks. In the AB group, the sinus membrane was well retained above the implant apex, and new bone formation was significant at both examination periods. The BHA group also showed retention of the elevated sinus membrane above the screw apex and evident new bone formation at both points in time. The total area of the mineral component (TMA) in the area of interest and the bone-to-implant contact did not show any significant differences among all the groups. In the AB group, the TMA had significantly decreased from 4 to 8 weeks. Conclusions Within the limits of this study, the rabbit sinus model showed satisfactory results in the comparison of different grafting conditions in single-stage sinus floor elevation with simultaneous implant placement. We found that the rabbit model was useful for maxillary sinus augmentation with simultaneous implant placement. PMID:23346463

  11. Cyclooxygenase-2 inhibition does not impair block bone grafts healing in rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Moreschi, Eduardo; Biguetti, Claudia Cristina; Comparim, Eliston; De Andrade Holgado, Leandro; Ribeiro-Junior, Paulo Domingos; Nary-Filho, Hugo; Matsumoto, Mariza Akemi

    2013-12-01

    Success of alveolar reconstructions using onlay autogenous block bone grafts depends on their adequate integration to the recipient bed influenced by a number of local molecules. Considering the fundamental role of cyclooxygenase (COX-2) in bone repair, the aim of this study was to analyze the effect of its inhibition in the integration of endochondral (EC) iliac crest, and intramembranous (IM) calvaria bone grafts. Thirty-two rabbits were divided into 4 groups: Calvaria Control (CC) and Iliac Control--treated with oral 0.9 % saline solution, and Calvarial-NSAID (C-NSAID) and Iliac-NSAID (I-NSAID) groups--treated with oral 6 mg/Kg non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug etoricoxib. After 7, 14, 30 and 60 days the animals were euthanized and the specimens removed for histological, histomorphometric and immunohistochemistry analysis. At day 60, a tight integration of IM blocks could be seen with the presence of remodeling bone, whereas integration of EC grafts was mainly observed at the edges of the grafts. A significant higher percentage of bone matrix in the interface region of the CC grafts in comparison to C-NSAID only at day 14, whereas no differences were detected comparing the EC grafts. No differences were observed in Runx-2 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) immunolabeling when comparing CC and C-NSAID groups, while a significant weaker Runx-2 and VEGF labeling was detected in I-NSAID group at day 60. Although some influence was detected in osteogenesis, it is concluded that drug induced inhibition of COX-2 does not impair onlay bone grafts' healing of both embryologic origins in rabbits. PMID:23783533

  12. Non-invasive diffuse correlation tomography reveals spatial and temporal blood flow differences in murine bone grafting approaches

    PubMed Central

    Han, Songfeng; Proctor, Ashley R.; Vella, Joseph B.; Benoit, Danielle S. W.; Choe, Regine

    2016-01-01

    Longitudinal blood flow during murine bone graft healing was monitored non-invasively using diffuse correlation tomography. The system utilized spatially dense data from a scanning set-up, non-linear reconstruction, and micro-CT anatomical information. Weekly in vivo measurements were performed. Blood flow changes in autografts, which heal successfully, were localized to graft regions and consistent across mice. Poor healing allografts showed heterogeneous blood flow elevation and high inter-subject variabilities. Allografts with tissue-engineered periosteum showed responses intermediate to both autografts and allografts, consistent with healing observed. These findings suggest that spatiotemporal blood flow changes can be utilized to differentiate the degree of bone graft healing. PMID:27699097

  13. Protective Effect of Remote Limb Ischemic Perconditioning on the Liver Grafts of Rats with a Novel Model

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Li; Zhang, Jing; Chen, Shasha; Wang, Li; Zhou, Yanfei; Xie, Haiyang; Zhou, Lin; Zheng, Shusen

    2015-01-01

    Background Remote ischemic conditioning (RIC) is a known manual conditioning to decrease ischemic reperfusion injury (IRI) but not increase ischemic time. Here we tried to establish a rat RIC model of liver transplantation (LT), optimize the applicable protocols and investigate the protective mechanism. Methods The RIC model was developed by a standard tourniquet. Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned randomly to the sham operated control (N), standard rat liver transplantation (OLT) and RIC groups. According to the different protocols, RIC group was divided into 3 subgroups (10min×3, n = 6; 5min×3, n = 6; 1min×3, n = 6)respectively. Serum transaminases (ALT, AST), creatine kinase (CK), histopathologic changes, malondialdehyde (MDA), myeloperoxidase (MPO) and expressions of p-Akt were evaluated. Results Compared with the OLT group, the grafts subjected to RIC 5min*3 algorithm showed significant reduction of morphological damage and improved the graft function. Also, production of reactive oxygen species (MDA) and neutrophil accumulation (MPO) were markedly depressed and p-Akt was upregulated. Conclusion In conclusion, we successfully established a novel model of RIC in rat LT, the optimal RIC 5min*3 algorithm seemed to be more efficient to alleviate IRI of the liver graft in both functional and morphological categories, which due to its antioxidative, anti-inflammation activities and activating PI3K Akt pathway. PMID:25785455

  14. Comparison of nerve, vessel, and cartilage grafts in promoting peripheral nerve regeneration.

    PubMed

    Firat, Cemal; Geyik, Ylmaz; Aytekin, Ahmet Hamdi; Gül, Mehmet; Kamşl, Suat; Yiğitcan, Birgül; Ozcan, Cemal

    2014-07-01

    Peripheral nerve injury primarily occurs due to trauma as well as factors such as tumors, inflammatory diseases, congenital deformities, infections, and surgical interventions. The surgical procedure to be performed as treatment depends on the etiology, type of injury, and the anatomic region. The goal of treatment is to minimize loss of function due to motor and sensory nerve loss at the distal part of the injury. Regardless of the cause of the injury, the abnormal nerve regeneration due to incomplete nerve regeneration, optimal treatment of peripheral nerve injuries should provide adequate coaptation of proximal and distal sides without tension, preserving the neurotrophic factors within the repair line. The gold standard for the treatment of nerve defects is the autograft; however, due to denervation of the donor site, scarring, and neuroma formation, many studies have aimed to develop simpler methods, better functional results, and less morbidity. In this study, a defect 1 cm in length was created on the sciatic nerve of rats. The rats were treated with the following procedures: group 1, autograft; group 2, allogeneic aorta graft; group 3, diced cartilage graft in allogeneic aorta graft; and group 4, tubularized cartilage graft in allogeneic aorta graft. Group 5 was the control group. The effects of cartilage tissue in nerve regeneration were evaluated by functional and histomorphological methods.Group 1, for which the repair was performed with an autograft, was evaluated to be the most similar to the control group. There was not a statistically significant difference in myelination and Schwann cell rates between group 2, in which an allogeneic aorta graft was used, and group 3, in which diced cartilage in an allogeneic aorta graft was used. In group 4, myelination and Schwann cell formation were observed; however, they were scattered and irregular, likely due to increased fibrosis.In all of the groups, nerve regeneration at various rates was observed both

  15. Fine specificities of anti-nuclear antibodies in murine models of graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed Central

    van Dam, A P; Meilof, J F; van den Brink, H G; Smeenk, R J

    1990-01-01

    Two models of murine graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) were studied with respect to autoantibody production and development of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) like disease. One model was induced by injection of (B10.A(4R) x B10.A(2R]F1 mice with parental (B10.A(4R] spleen and lymph node cells (groups I GVHD), the other by injection of (DBA/2 x C57/B16)F1 mice with DBA/2 cells (group II GVHD). Group I GVHD mice remained in a seemingly healthy condition and did not show any proteinuria, in spite of high titres of anti-nuclear antibodies including antibodies to dsDNA, anti-Sm and anti-ribosomal P protein antibodies. Measured levels of these autoantibodies as well as their isotypes were comparable with those found in MRL/lpr and NZB/W mice. Group II GVHD mice developed SLE-like disease signs, including severe proteinuria. At 4 months after induction of the GVHD, almost 50% of these mice had died. At the time nephritis was present, group II mice also produced anti-dsDNA and anti-nuclear antibodies of other (unknown) specificities, but no anti-Sm or anti-P. Furthermore, the incidence of these antibodies was lower than observed in group I GVHD, MRL/lpr or NZB/W mice. It is concluded that (high avidity) anti-dsDNA as well as anti-Sm and anti-P may be present in the circulation without giving rise to the development of nephritis. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:2379320

  16. The impact of uncertainty on shape optimization of idealized bypass graft models in unsteady flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankaran, Sethuraman; Marsden, Alison L.

    2010-12-01

    It is well known that the fluid mechanics of bypass grafts impacts biomechanical responses and is linked to intimal thickening and plaque deposition on the vessel wall. In spite of this, quantitative information about the fluid mechanics is not currently incorporated into surgical planning and bypass graft design. In this work, we use a derivative-free optimization technique for performing systematic design of bypass grafts. The optimization method is coupled to a three-dimensional pulsatile Navier-Stokes solver. We systematically account for inevitable uncertainties that arise in cardiovascular simulations, owing to noise in medical image data, variable physiologic conditions, and surgical implementation. Uncertainties in the simulation input parameters as well as shape design variables are accounted for using the adaptive stochastic collocation technique. The derivative-free optimization framework is coupled with a stochastic response surface technique to make the problem computationally tractable. Two idealized numerical examples, an end-to-side anastomosis, and a bypass graft around a stenosis, demonstrate that accounting for uncertainty significantly changes the optimal graft design. Results show that small changes in the design variables from their optimal values should be accounted for in surgical planning. Changes in the downstream (distal) graft angle resulted in greater sensitivity of the wall-shear stress compared to changes in the upstream (proximal) angle. The impact of cost function choice on the optimal solution was explored. Additionally, this work represents the first use of the stochastic surrogate management framework method for robust shape optimization in a fully three-dimensional unsteady Navier-Stokes design problem.

  17. Phase I/II Clinical Evaluation of StrataGraft: A Consistent, Pathogen-Free Human Skin Substitute

    PubMed Central

    Schurr, Michael J.; Foster, Kevin N.; Centanni, John M.; Comer, Allen R.; Wicks, April; Gibson, Angela L.; Thomas-Virnig, Christina L.; Schlosser, Sandy J.; Faucher, Lee D.; Lokuta, Mary A.; Allen-Hoffmann, B. Lynn

    2009-01-01

    Background Large wounds often require temporary allograft placement to optimize the wound bed and prevent infection until permanent closure is feasible. We developed and clinically tested a second-generation living human skin substitute (StrataGraft). StrataGraft provides both a dermis and a fully-stratified, biologically-functional epidermis generated from a pathogen-free, long-lived human keratinocyte progenitor cell line, Neonatal Immortalized KeratinocyteS (NIKS). Methods Histology, electron microscopy, quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and bacterial growth in vitro were used to analyze human skin substitutes generated from primary human keratinocytes or NIKS cells. A phase I/II, National Institute of Health-funded, randomized, safety, and dose escalation trial was performed to assess autograft take in 15 patients 2 weeks after coverage with StrataGraft skin substitute or cryopreserved cadaver allograft. Results StrataGraft skin substitute exhibited a fully stratified epidermis with multilamellar lipid sheets and barrier function as well as robust human β defensin-3 mRNA levels. Analysis of the primary endpoint in the clinical study revealed no differences in autograft take between wound sites pretreated with StrataGraft skin substitute or cadaver allograft. No StrataGraft-related adverse events or serious adverse events were observed. Conclusions The major finding of this phase I/II clinical study is that performance of StrataGraft skin substitute was comparable to cadaver allograft for the temporary management of complex skin defects. StrataGraft skin substitute may also eliminate the risk for disease transmission associated with allograft tissue and offer additional protection to the wound bed through inherent antimicrobial properties. StrataGraft is a pathogen-free human skin substitute that is ideal for the management of severe skin wounds before autografting. PMID:19276766

  18. Non-contact scanning diffuse correlation tomography system for three-dimensional blood flow imaging in a murine bone graft model.

    PubMed

    Han, Songfeng; Johansson, Johannes; Mireles, Miguel; Proctor, Ashley R; Hoffman, Michael D; Vella, Joseph B; Benoit, Danielle S W; Durduran, Turgut; Choe, Regine

    2015-07-01

    A non-contact galvanometer-based optical scanning system for diffuse correlation tomography was developed for monitoring bone graft healing in a murine femur model. A linear image reconstruction algorithm for diffuse correlation tomography was tested using finite-element method based simulated data and experimental data from a femur or a tube suspended in a homogeneous liquid phantom. Finally, the non-contact system was utilized to monitor in vivo blood flow changes prior to and one week after bone graft transplantation within murine femurs. Localized blood flow changes were observed in three mice, demonstrating a potential for quantification of longitudinal blood flow associated with bone graft healing.

  19. Non-contact scanning diffuse correlation tomography system for three-dimensional blood flow imaging in a murine bone graft model.

    PubMed

    Han, Songfeng; Johansson, Johannes; Mireles, Miguel; Proctor, Ashley R; Hoffman, Michael D; Vella, Joseph B; Benoit, Danielle S W; Durduran, Turgut; Choe, Regine

    2015-07-01

    A non-contact galvanometer-based optical scanning system for diffuse correlation tomography was developed for monitoring bone graft healing in a murine femur model. A linear image reconstruction algorithm for diffuse correlation tomography was tested using finite-element method based simulated data and experimental data from a femur or a tube suspended in a homogeneous liquid phantom. Finally, the non-contact system was utilized to monitor in vivo blood flow changes prior to and one week after bone graft transplantation within murine femurs. Localized blood flow changes were observed in three mice, demonstrating a potential for quantification of longitudinal blood flow associated with bone graft healing. PMID:26203392

  20. Non-contact scanning diffuse correlation tomography system for three-dimensional blood flow imaging in a murine bone graft model

    PubMed Central

    Han, Songfeng; Johansson, Johannes; Mireles, Miguel; Proctor, Ashley R.; Hoffman, Michael D.; Vella, Joseph B.; Benoit, Danielle S. W.; Durduran, Turgut; Choe, Regine

    2015-01-01

    A non-contact galvanometer-based optical scanning system for diffuse correlation tomography was developed for monitoring bone graft healing in a murine femur model. A linear image reconstruction algorithm for diffuse correlation tomography was tested using finite-element method based simulated data and experimental data from a femur or a tube suspended in a homogeneous liquid phantom. Finally, the non-contact system was utilized to monitor in vivo blood flow changes prior to and one week after bone graft transplantation within murine femurs. Localized blood flow changes were observed in three mice, demonstrating a potential for quantification of longitudinal blood flow associated with bone graft healing. PMID:26203392

  1. Scaffolds from alternating block polyurethanes of poly(ɛ-caprolactone) and poly(ethylene glycol) with stimulation and guidance of nerve growth and better nerve repair than autograft.

    PubMed

    Niu, Yuqing; Li, Linjing; Chen, Kevin C; Chen, Feiran; Liu, Xiangyu; Ye, Jianfu; Li, Wei; Xu, Kaitian

    2015-07-01

    Nerve repair scaffolds from novel alternating block polyurethanes (PUCL-alt-PEG) based on PCL and PEG without additional growth factors or proteins were prepared by a particle leaching method. The scaffolds have pore size 10-20 µm and porosity 92%. Mechanical tests showed that the polyurethane scaffolds have maximum loads of 5.97 ± 0.35 N and maximal stresses of 8.84 ± 0.5 MPa. Histocompatiblity of the nerve repair scaffolds was tested in a SD rat model for peripheral nerve defect treatment. Two types of treatments including PUCL-alt-PEG scaffolds and autografts were compared in rat model. After 32 weeks, bridging of a 12 mm defect gap by the regenerated nerve was observed in all rats. The nerve regeneration was systematically characterized by sciatic function index (SFI), electrophysiology, histological assessment including HE staining, immunohistochemistry, ammonia sliver staining, Masson's trichrome staining and TEM observation. Results revealed that nerve repair scaffolds from PUCL-alt-PEG exhibit better regeneration effects compared to autografts. Electrophysiological recovery was seen in 90% and 87% of rats in PUCL-alt-PEG and autograft groups respectively. Biodegradation in vitro and in vivo shows good degradation match of PUCL-alt-PEG scaffolds with nerve regeneration. It demonstrates that plain nerve repair scaffolds from PUCL-alt-PEG biomaterials can achieve peripheral nerve regeneration satisfactorily.

  2. IL-35 inhibits acute graft-versus-host disease in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Hui; Zhou, Yi; Zhang, Jia-Min; Zhou, Shi-Yuan; Wang, Min; Feng, Ru; Feng, Fer-Er; Wang, Qian-Ming; Zhu, Xiao-Lu; Zhao, Xiao-Su; Lv, Meng; Kong, Yuan; Chang, Ying-Jun; Huang, Xiao-Jun

    2015-12-01

    Acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) is a serious complication of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT). Our previous study found that the novel anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-35 could suppress aGVHD in patients after allo-HSCT. In this study, we used C57BL/6 (B6, H-2b) mice as donors and (B6×DBA/2) F1 (BDF1, H-2b×d) mice as recipients to create a model of aGVHD and explore the relationship between IL-35 and aGVHD. The mice receiving IL-35 survived longer than did the control mice. We observed that treatment with IL-35 and RAPA could reduce the incidence of aGVHD. Additionally, this treatment inhibited intestinal and thymic epithelial cell apoptosis and liver infiltration by the donor T-cells, thereby ameliorating the enteropathy and liver injury caused by aGVHD. We found that IL-35 and RAPA also markedly suppressed TNF-α and IL-17A expression and enhanced IFN-γ expression in the intestine and liver. We measured Tregs in spleen and found that IL-35 and RAPA treatment expanded the number of Tregs in spleen. We found that the phosphorylation of STAT1 and STAT4 were inhibited in mice with aGVHD. In contrast, STAT1 and STAT4 were phosphorylated when the mice were treated with IL-35. IL-35 may have therapeutic potential in the treatment of aGVHD after allo-HSCT. PMID:26507167

  3. IL-35 inhibits acute graft-versus-host disease in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Hui; Zhou, Yi; Zhang, Jia-Min; Zhou, Shi-Yuan; Wang, Min; Feng, Ru; Feng, Fer-Er; Wang, Qian-Ming; Zhu, Xiao-Lu; Zhao, Xiao-Su; Lv, Meng; Kong, Yuan; Chang, Ying-Jun; Huang, Xiao-Jun

    2015-12-01

    Acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) is a serious complication of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT). Our previous study found that the novel anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-35 could suppress aGVHD in patients after allo-HSCT. In this study, we used C57BL/6 (B6, H-2b) mice as donors and (B6×DBA/2) F1 (BDF1, H-2b×d) mice as recipients to create a model of aGVHD and explore the relationship between IL-35 and aGVHD. The mice receiving IL-35 survived longer than did the control mice. We observed that treatment with IL-35 and RAPA could reduce the incidence of aGVHD. Additionally, this treatment inhibited intestinal and thymic epithelial cell apoptosis and liver infiltration by the donor T-cells, thereby ameliorating the enteropathy and liver injury caused by aGVHD. We found that IL-35 and RAPA also markedly suppressed TNF-α and IL-17A expression and enhanced IFN-γ expression in the intestine and liver. We measured Tregs in spleen and found that IL-35 and RAPA treatment expanded the number of Tregs in spleen. We found that the phosphorylation of STAT1 and STAT4 were inhibited in mice with aGVHD. In contrast, STAT1 and STAT4 were phosphorylated when the mice were treated with IL-35. IL-35 may have therapeutic potential in the treatment of aGVHD after allo-HSCT.

  4. Use of grafting to prevent Hypsipyla grandella (Zeller) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) damage to new world Meliaceae species.

    PubMed

    Perez, Julian; Eigenbrode, Sanford D; Hilje, Luko; Tripepi, Robert R; Aguilar, Maria E; Mesen, Francisco

    2010-01-01

    The susceptible species Cedrela odorata and Swietenia macrophylla to attack by Hypsipyla grandella (Zeller) larvae were grafted onto the resistant species Khaya senegalensis and Toona ciliata. Six-month-old grafted plants were then compared to their reciprocal grafts and to both intact (non-grafted) and autografted plants for damage due to H. grandella larvae and for their effects on larval performance. Two experiments were conducted: one in which the apical bud of the main plant shoot was inoculated with H. grandella eggs, and the other in which the bud was inoculated with third instars. Damage in each experiment was assessed by the number of frass piles, number and length of tunnels, number of damaged leaves, and damage to the apical bud. Larval performance was evaluated in terms of time to reach pupation and pupal weight and length. In both experiments, plant damage differed significantly among treatments (P < 0.03). Resistant rootstocks conferred resistance to susceptible scions. In both experiments, grafting by itself, regardless of the rootstock and scion combination, also reduced damage caused by H. grandella larvae. Scions of autografted susceptible species had similar resistance to susceptible scions grafted on resistant rootstocks. Few larvae reached pupation, and their pupal weight and length were similar.

  5. Neuro-peptide treatment with Cerebrolysin improves the survival of neural stem cell grafts in an APP transgenic model of Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Rockenstein, Edward; Desplats, Paula; Ubhi, Kiren; Mante, Michael; Florio, Jazmin; Adame, Anthony; Winter, Stefan; Brandstaetter, Hemma; Meier, Dieter; Masliah, Eliezer

    2015-07-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) have been considered as potential therapy in Alzheimer's disease (AD) but their use is hampered by the poor survival of grafted cells. Supply of neurotrophic factors to the grafted cells has been proposed as a way to augment survival of the stem cells. In this context, we investigated the utility of Cerebrolysin (CBL), a peptidergic mixture with neurotrophic-like properties, as an adjunct to stem cell therapy in an APP transgenic (tg) model of AD. We grafted murine NSCs into the hippocampus of non-tg and APP tg that were treated systemically with CBL and analyzed after 1, 3, 6 and 9months post grafting. Compared to vehicle-treated non-tg mice, in the vehicle-treated APP tg mice there was considerable reduction in the survival of the grafted NSCs. Whereas, CBL treatment enhanced the survival of NSCs in both non-tg and APP tg with the majority of the surviving NSCs remaining as neuroblasts. The NSCs of the CBL treated mice displayed reduced numbers of caspase-3 and TUNEL positive cells and increased brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and furin immunoreactivity. These results suggest that CBL might protect grafted NSCs and as such be a potential adjuvant therapy when combined with grafting.

  6. Optimal Covering Material for Stent-Grafts Placed in the Portal Vein in a Canine Model

    SciTech Connect

    Ishii, Seigo; Sato, Morio Sonomura, Tetsuo; Yamada, Katsuyuki; Tanihata, Hirohiko; Ishikawa, Hime; Terada, Masaki; Sahara, Shinya; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Kimura, Masashi; Mori, Ichiro

    2005-06-15

    Purpose. We evaluated the suitability of Dacron, polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), and small intestinal submucosa (SIS) as a covering material for stent-grafts placed in the portal vein as compared with a bare stent. Methods. Using 24 beagle dogs, either bare stents or stent-grafts covered with Dacron, PTFE, or SIS were placed in the main trunk of the portal vein in 6 animals each. Portography was performed immediately after stent placement, and at 2, 4, and 12 weeks thereafter. Next, the extracted stents or stent-grafts were examined histopathologically. Neointimal thickness adjacent to the stent wire and at the midportion between the stent wires was compared among the groups. Then, the neointimal thickness at the sub- and supragraft sites was compared between each stent-graft group. Serial changes in the histologic features of the thickened neointima were also investigated. Results. No significant difference was noted in the mean stenotic ratio of the portal vein diameter between the bare stent and PTFE groups, whereas it was significantly higher in the Dacron and SIS groups compared with the bare stent group. In neither of the studies on neointimal thickness adjacent to the stent wire and at the midportion between the stent wires were any significant differences noted between the neointimal thickness of the bare stent group and the sum of the neointimal thickness of the PTFE group, whereas the sum of the neointimal thickness of the Dacron and SIS groups was significantly greater than that of the bare stent group at both sites. In the comparison of the supragraft neointimal thickness, the SIS group showed significantly greater thickness than the PTFE group, while the difference between the Dacron and PTFE groups was not significant. In the comparison of the subgraft neointimal thickness, the Dacron and SIS groups showed significantly greater thickness than the PTFE group. Conclusion. The present results indicate that of the three covering materials examined here

  7. Grafting with rootstocks induces extensive transcriptional re-programming in the shoot apical meristem of grapevine

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Grafting is widely used in the agriculture of fruit-bearing crops; rootstocks are known to confer differences in scion biomass in addition to improving other traits of agricultural interest. However, little is known about the effect of rootstocks on scion gene expression. The objective of this study was to determine whether hetero-grafting the grapevine variety Vitis vinifera cv. 'Cabernet Sauvignon N’ with two different rootstocks alters gene expression in the shoot apex in comparison to the auto-grafted control. Cabernet Sauvignon was hetero-grafted with two commercial rootstock genotypes and auto-grafted with itself. Vigor was quantified by measurements of root, stem, leaf and trunk biomass. Gene expression profiling was done using a whole genome grapevine microarray; four pools of five shoot apex samples were harvested 4 months after grafting for each scion/rootstock combination. Results The rootstocks increased stem biomass or conferred increased vigor by the end of the first growth cycle. Globally hetero-grafting two different genotypes together triggered an increase in shoot apex gene expression; however no genes were differentially expressed between the two hetero-grafts. The functional categories related to DNA, chromatin structure, histones, flavonoids and leucine rich repeat containing receptor kinases were the most enriched in the up-regulated genes in the shoot apex of hetero-grafted plants. Conclusions The choice of rootstock genotype had little effect on the gene expression in the shoot apex; this could suggest that auto- and hetero-grafting was the major factor regulating gene expression. PMID:24083813

  8. Accelerated adhesion of grafted skin by laser-induced stress wave-based gene transfer of hepatocyte growth factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aizawa, Kazuya; Sato, Shunichi; Terakawa, Mitsuhiro; Saitoh, Daizoh; Tsuda, Hitoshi; Ashida, Hiroshi; Obara, Minoru

    2009-11-01

    Gene therapy using wound healing-associated growth factor gene has received much attention as a new strategy for improving the outcome of tissue transplantation. We delivered plasmid DNA coding for human hepatocyte growth factor (hHGF) to rat free skin grafts by the use of laser-induced stress waves (LISWs); autografting was performed with the grafts. Systematic analysis was conducted to evaluate the adhesion properties of the grafted tissue; angiogenesis, cell proliferation, and reepithelialization were assessed by immunohistochemistry, and reperfusion was measured by laser Doppler imaging as a function of time after grafting. Both the level of angiogenesis on day 3 after grafting and the increased ratio of blood flow on day 4 to that on day 3 were significantly higher than those in five control groups: grafting with hHGF gene injection alone, grafting with control plasmid vector injection alone, grafting with LISW application alone, grafting with LISW application after control plasmid vector injection, and normal grafting. Reepithelialization was almost completed on day 7 even at the center of the graft with LISW application after hHGF gene injection, while it was not for the grafts of the five control groups. These findings demonstrate the validity of our LISW-based HGF gene transfection to accelerate the adhesion of grafted skins.

  9. Future Economics of Liver Transplantation: A 20-Year Cost Modeling Forecast and the Prospect of Bioengineering Autologous Liver Grafts

    PubMed Central

    Habka, Dany; Mann, David; Landes, Ronald; Soto-Gutierrez, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    During the past 20 years liver transplantation has become the definitive treatment for most severe types of liver failure and hepatocellular carcinoma, in both children and adults. In the U.S., roughly 16,000 individuals are on the liver transplant waiting list. Only 38% of them will receive a transplant due to the organ shortage. This paper explores another option: bioengineering an autologous liver graft. We developed a 20-year model projecting future demand for liver transplants, along with costs based on current technology. We compared these cost projections against projected costs to bioengineer autologous liver grafts. The model was divided into: 1) the epidemiology model forecasting the number of wait-listed patients, operated patients and postoperative patients; and 2) the treatment model forecasting costs (pre-transplant-related costs; transplant (admission)-related costs; and 10-year post-transplant-related costs) during the simulation period. The patient population was categorized using the Model for End-Stage Liver Disease score. The number of patients on the waiting list was projected to increase 23% over 20 years while the weighted average treatment costs in the pre-liver transplantation phase were forecast to increase 83% in Year 20. Projected demand for livers will increase 10% in 10 years and 23% in 20 years. Total costs of liver transplantation are forecast to increase 33% in 10 years and 81% in 20 years. By comparison, the projected cost to bioengineer autologous liver grafts is $9.7M based on current catalog prices for iPS-derived liver cells. The model projects a persistent increase in need and cost of donor livers over the next 20 years that’s constrained by a limited supply of donor livers. The number of patients who die while on the waiting list will reflect this ever-growing disparity. Currently, bioengineering autologous liver grafts is cost prohibitive. However, costs will decline rapidly with the introduction of new manufacturing

  10. The outcome at 15 years of endoscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using hamstring tendon autograft for 'isolated' anterior cruciate ligament rupture.

    PubMed

    Bourke, H E; Gordon, D J; Salmon, L J; Waller, A; Linklater, J; Pinczewski, L A

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to report the outcome of 'isolated' anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) ruptures treated with anatomical endoscopic reconstruction using hamstring tendon autograft at a mean of 15 years (14.25 to 16.9). A total of 100 consecutive men and 100 consecutive women with 'isolated' ACL rupture underwent four-strand hamstring tendon reconstruction with anteromedial portal femoral tunnel drilling and interference screw fixation by a single surgeon. Details were recorded pre-operatively and at one, two, seven and 15 years post-operatively. Outcomes included clinical examination, subjective and objective scoring systems, and radiological assessment. At 15 years only eight of 118 patients (7%) had moderate or severe osteo-arthritic changes (International Knee Documentation Committee Grades C and D), and 79 of 152 patients (52%) still performed very strenuous activities. Overall graft survival at 15 years was 83% (1.1% failure per year). Patients aged < 18 years at the time of surgery and patients with > 2 mm of laxity at one year had a threefold increase in the risk of suffering a rupture of the graft (p = 0.002 and p = 0.001, respectively). There was no increase in laxity of the graft over time. ACL reconstructive surgery in patients with an 'isolated' rupture using this technique shows good results 15 years post-operatively with respect to ligamentous stability, objective and subjective outcomes, and does not appear to cause osteoarthritis.

  11. Changes in the expression of epidermal differentiation markers at sites where cultured epithelial autografts were transplanted onto wounds from burn scar excision.

    PubMed

    Kadoya, Kuniko; Amano, Satoshi; Nishiyama, Toshio; Inomata, Shinji; Tsunenaga, Makoto; Kumagai, Norio; Matsuzaki, Kyoichi

    2016-06-01

    This study investigated the recovery process during which grafted cultured epithelium formed normal epidermis. The subjects were 18 patients whose burn scars were excised at a depth not exposing the fat layer and who subsequently received cultured epithelial autografts. A total of 24 samples were obtained from the grafted sites: 6 samples within 6 weeks (stage 1), 5 samples after 6 weeks and within 6 months (stage 2), 6 samples after 6 months and within 18 months (stage 3) and 7 samples beyond 18 months (stage 4) after transplantation. These samples were stained for monoclonal antibodies against filaggrin, transglutaminase (TG), cytokeratin 6 and involucrin. Their expressions were examined in the epidermis. The expression patterns were classified using a six-grade scale. The grades of filaggrin and TG were significantly higher at stage 3 and 4 compared with stage 1. There was a marginally significant increase in the grade of cytokeratin 6 at stage 3 and it was significantly higher at stage 4 compared with stage 1. These results showed that wound healing continued at a molecular level until the end of stage 3. The recovery of involucrin was delayed compared with that of other markers. TG and involucrin are thought to be regulated independently at the grafted sites.

  12. Evaluation of Polycaprolactone Scaffold with Basic Fibroblast Growth Factor and Fibroblasts in an Athymic Rat Model for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Kabir, Nima; Arshi, Armin; Nazemi, Azadeh; Wu, Ben; Petrigliano, Frank A.; McAllister, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture is a common ligamentous injury often necessitating surgery. Current surgical treatment options include ligament reconstruction with autograft or allograft, which have their inherent limitations. Thus, there is interest in a tissue-engineered substitute for use in ACL regeneration. However, there have been relatively few in vivo studies to date. In this study, an athymic rat model of ACL reconstruction was used to evaluate electrospun polycaprolactone (PCL) grafts, with and without the addition of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and human foreskin fibroblasts. We examined the regenerative potential of tissue-engineered ACL grafts using histology, immunohistochemistry, and mechanical testing up to 16 weeks postoperatively. Histology showed infiltration of the grafts with cells, and immunohistochemistry demonstrated aligned collagen deposition with minimal inflammatory reaction. Mechanical testing of the grafts demonstrated significantly higher mechanical properties than immediately postimplantation. Acellular grafts loaded with bFGF achieved 58.8% of the stiffness and 40.7% of the peak load of healthy native ACL. Grafts without bFGF achieved 31.3% of the stiffness and 28.2% of the peak load of healthy native ACL. In this in vivo rodent model study for ACL reconstruction, the histological and mechanical evaluation demonstrated excellent healing and regenerative potential of our electrospun PCL ligament graft. PMID:25744933

  13. Evaluation of polycaprolactone scaffold with basic fibroblast growth factor and fibroblasts in an athymic rat model for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Leong, Natalie Luanne; Kabir, Nima; Arshi, Armin; Nazemi, Azadeh; Wu, Ben; Petrigliano, Frank A; McAllister, David R

    2015-06-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture is a common ligamentous injury often necessitating surgery. Current surgical treatment options include ligament reconstruction with autograft or allograft, which have their inherent limitations. Thus, there is interest in a tissue-engineered substitute for use in ACL regeneration. However, there have been relatively few in vivo studies to date. In this study, an athymic rat model of ACL reconstruction was used to evaluate electrospun polycaprolactone (PCL) grafts, with and without the addition of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and human foreskin fibroblasts. We examined the regenerative potential of tissue-engineered ACL grafts using histology, immunohistochemistry, and mechanical testing up to 16 weeks postoperatively. Histology showed infiltration of the grafts with cells, and immunohistochemistry demonstrated aligned collagen deposition with minimal inflammatory reaction. Mechanical testing of the grafts demonstrated significantly higher mechanical properties than immediately postimplantation. Acellular grafts loaded with bFGF achieved 58.8% of the stiffness and 40.7% of the peak load of healthy native ACL. Grafts without bFGF achieved 31.3% of the stiffness and 28.2% of the peak load of healthy native ACL. In this in vivo rodent model study for ACL reconstruction, the histological and mechanical evaluation demonstrated excellent healing and regenerative potential of our electrospun PCL ligament graft. PMID:25744933

  14. Evaluation of polycaprolactone scaffold with basic fibroblast growth factor and fibroblasts in an athymic rat model for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Leong, Natalie Luanne; Kabir, Nima; Arshi, Armin; Nazemi, Azadeh; Wu, Ben; Petrigliano, Frank A; McAllister, David R

    2015-06-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture is a common ligamentous injury often necessitating surgery. Current surgical treatment options include ligament reconstruction with autograft or allograft, which have their inherent limitations. Thus, there is interest in a tissue-engineered substitute for use in ACL regeneration. However, there have been relatively few in vivo studies to date. In this study, an athymic rat model of ACL reconstruction was used to evaluate electrospun polycaprolactone (PCL) grafts, with and without the addition of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and human foreskin fibroblasts. We examined the regenerative potential of tissue-engineered ACL grafts using histology, immunohistochemistry, and mechanical testing up to 16 weeks postoperatively. Histology showed infiltration of the grafts with cells, and immunohistochemistry demonstrated aligned collagen deposition with minimal inflammatory reaction. Mechanical testing of the grafts demonstrated significantly higher mechanical properties than immediately postimplantation. Acellular grafts loaded with bFGF achieved 58.8% of the stiffness and 40.7% of the peak load of healthy native ACL. Grafts without bFGF achieved 31.3% of the stiffness and 28.2% of the peak load of healthy native ACL. In this in vivo rodent model study for ACL reconstruction, the histological and mechanical evaluation demonstrated excellent healing and regenerative potential of our electrospun PCL ligament graft.

  15. Intrastriatal grafts of fetal ventral mesencephalon improve allodynia-like withdrawal response to mechanical stimulation in a rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Ryuichiro; Ishida, Yasushi; Ebihara, Kosuke; Abe, Hiroshi; Matsuo, Hisae; Ikeda, Tetsuya; Koganemaru, Go; Kuramashi, Aki; Funahashi, Hideki; Magata, Yasuhiro; Kawai, Keiichi; Nishimori, Toshikazu

    2014-06-24

    We previously reported that a unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) rat model of Parkinson's disease showed allodynia-like withdrawal response to mechanical stimulation of the ipsilateral side of the rat hindpaw. The goal of this study was to investigate the effect of intrastriatal grafts of fetal ventral mesencephalon (VM) on the withdrawal response in 6-OHDA rats. The withdrawal threshold in response to the mechanical stimulation of the rat hindpaw was measured using von Frey filaments. In the ipsilateral side of the 6-OHDA lesions, the withdrawal threshold in response to mechanical stimulation significantly increased in 6-OHDA rats with VM grafts compared with those with sham grafts, but did not change in the contralateral side at 5 weeks after transplantation. The present results suggest that the intrastriatal grafts of fetal VM may relieve pain sensation induced by mechanical stimulation in 6-OHDA rats. PMID:24831182

  16. Simulation and modelling of slip flow over surfaces grafted with polymer brushes and glycocalyx fibres

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Mingge; Li, Xuejin; Liang, Haojun; Caswell, Bruce; Karniadakis, George Em

    2013-01-01

    Fabrication of functionalized surfaces using polymer brushes is a relatively simple process and parallels the presence of glycocalyx filaments coating the luminal surface of our vasculature. In this paper, we perform atomistic-like simulations based on dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) to study both polymer brushes and glycocalyx filaments subject to shear flow, and we apply mean-field theory to extract useful scaling arguments on their response. For polymer brushes, a weak shear flow has no effect on the brush density profile or its height, while the slip length is independent of the shear rate and is of the order of the brush mesh size as a result of screening by hydrodynamic interactions. However, for strong shear flow, the polymer brush is penetrated deeper and is deformed, with a corresponding decrease of the brush height and an increase of the slip length. The transition from the weak to the strong shear regime can be described by a simple ‘blob’ argument, leading to the scaling γ̇0 ∝ σ3/2, where γ̇0 is the critical transition shear rate and σ is the grafting density. Furthermore, in the strong shear regime, we observe a cyclic dynamic motion of individual polymers, causing a reversal in the direction of surface flow. To study the glycocalyx layer, we first assume a homogeneous flow that ignores the discrete effects of blood cells, and we simulate microchannel flows at different flow rates. Surprisingly, we find that, at low Reynolds number, the slip length decreases with the mean flow velocity, unlike the behaviour of polymer brushes, for which the slip length remains constant under similar conditions. (The slip length and brush height are measured with respect to polymer mesh size and polymer contour length, respectively.) We also performed additional DPD simulations of blood flow in a tube with walls having a glycocalyx layer and with the deformable red blood cells modelled accurately at the spectrin level. In this case, a plasma cell

  17. Rib cartilage grafting in upper limb surgery: an overview

    PubMed Central

    Obert, Laurent; Loisel, François; Gindraux, Florelle; Tropet, Yves; Lepage, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Used routinely in maxillofacial reconstructive surgery, the chondrocostal graft is also used in hand surgery. The purpose of this overview was to analyze at long follow-up the radiological and histological evolution of this autograft, in the hand and wrist surgery. Materials and methods: Since 1992, 144 patients have benefitted from a chondrocostal autograft: 116 osteoarthritis of the thumb carpometacarpal joint, 18 radioscaphoid arthritis, six articular malunions of the distal radius, four kienbock, and four traumatic loss of cartilage of the PIP joint. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) was performed in 19 patients and histological study in 12 patients with a mean follow-up of 68 months (4–159). Results: Whatever the indication, the reconstruction by a chondrocostal or ostochondrocostal graft has allowed us to obtain satisfactory clinical results at long follow-up. The main question was the viability of the graft. The radiological study has shown the non-wear of the graft and a certain degree of ossification. The MRI confirmed a very small degree of osseous metaplasia but its viability. The biopsies showed a neo-vascularization of the cartilage. Conclusion: Despite the strong mechanical strain in the hand and wrist, the chondrocostal graft is a biological arthroplasty, trustworthy and secure at long time even if it can cause infrequent complications inherent to this type of surgery. Despite the inevitable histological modification, the cartilage remains alive and is of satisfactory quality at long term follow-up and fulfilling the requirements for interposition and reconstruction of an articular surface. PMID:27163069

  18. High compliance vascular grafts based on semi-interpenetrating networks

    PubMed Central

    Dempsey, David K.; Nezarati, Roya M.; Mackey, Calvin E.

    2014-01-01

    Current synthetic vascular grafts have poor patency rates in small diameter applications (<6 mm) due to intimal hyperplasia arising from a compliance mismatch between the graft and native vasculature. Enormous efforts have focused on improving biomechanical properties; however, polymeric grafts are often constrained by an inverse relationship between burst pressure and compliance. We have developed a new, semi-interpenetrating network (semi-IPN) approach to improve compliance without sacrificing burst pressure. The effects of heat treatment on graft morphology, fiber architecture, and resultant biomechanical properties are presented. In addition, biomechanical properties after equilibration at physiological temperature were investigated in relation to polyurethane microstructure to better predict in vivo performance. Compliance values as high as 9.2 ± 2.7 %/mmHg x 10−4 were observed for the semi-IPN graft while also maintaining high burst pressure, 1780 ± 230 mm Hg. The high compliance of these heat-treated poly(carbonate urethane) (PCU) and semi-IPN grafts is expected to improve long-term patency rates beyond even saphenous vein autografts by preventing intimal hyperplasia. The fundamental structure-property relationships gained from this work may also be utilized to advance biomedical device designs based on thermoplastic polyurethanes. PMID:25601822

  19. Neural Stem Cell or Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived GABA-ergic Progenitor Cell Grafting in an Animal Model of Chronic Temporal Lobe Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Upadhya, Dinesh; Hattiangady, Bharathi; Shetty, Geetha A; Zanirati, Gabriele; Kodali, Maheedhar; Shetty, Ashok K

    2016-01-01

    Grafting of neural stem cells (NSCs) or GABA-ergic progenitor cells (GPCs) into the hippocampus could offer an alternative therapy to hippocampal resection in patients with drug-resistant chronic epilepsy, which afflicts >30% of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) cases. Multipotent, self-renewing NSCs could be expanded from multiple regions of the developing and adult brain, human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), and human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs). On the other hand, GPCs could be generated from the medial and lateral ganglionic eminences of the embryonic brain and from hESCs and hiPSCs. To provide comprehensive methodologies involved in testing the efficacy of transplantation of NSCs and GPCs in a rat model of chronic TLE, NSCs derived from the rat medial ganglionic eminence (MGE) and MGE-like GPCs derived from hiPSCs are taken as examples in this unit. The topics comprise description of the required materials, reagents and equipment, methods for obtaining rat MGE-NSCs and hiPSC-derived MGE-like GPCs in culture, generation of chronically epileptic rats, intrahippocampal grafting procedure, post-grafting evaluation of the effects of grafts on spontaneous recurrent seizures and cognitive and mood impairments, analyses of the yield and the fate of graft-derived cells, and the effects of grafts on the host hippocampus. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27532817

  20. Neural Stem Cell or Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived GABA-ergic Progenitor Cell Grafting in an Animal Model of Chronic Temporal Lobe Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Upadhya, Dinesh; Hattiangady, Bharathi; Shetty, Geetha A; Zanirati, Gabriele; Kodali, Maheedhar; Shetty, Ashok K

    2016-08-17

    Grafting of neural stem cells (NSCs) or GABA-ergic progenitor cells (GPCs) into the hippocampus could offer an alternative therapy to hippocampal resection in patients with drug-resistant chronic epilepsy, which afflicts >30% of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) cases. Multipotent, self-renewing NSCs could be expanded from multiple regions of the developing and adult brain, human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), and human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs). On the other hand, GPCs could be generated from the medial and lateral ganglionic eminences of the embryonic brain and from hESCs and hiPSCs. To provide comprehensive methodologies involved in testing the efficacy of transplantation of NSCs and GPCs in a rat model of chronic TLE, NSCs derived from the rat medial ganglionic eminence (MGE) and MGE-like GPCs derived from hiPSCs are taken as examples in this unit. The topics comprise description of the required materials, reagents and equipment, methods for obtaining rat MGE-NSCs and hiPSC-derived MGE-like GPCs in culture, generation of chronically epileptic rats, intrahippocampal grafting procedure, post-grafting evaluation of the effects of grafts on spontaneous recurrent seizures and cognitive and mood impairments, analyses of the yield and the fate of graft-derived cells, and the effects of grafts on the host hippocampus. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  1. Pretreatment with antilymphocyte globulin and donor cells on graft prolongation in an experimental model and some observations on graft-versus-host reaction.

    PubMed

    Pegrum, G D; Williams, G; Markwick, J; Barnes, R M

    1976-01-01

    Survival of Lewis X Brown Norway F1 renal allografts was prolonged in Lewis recipients by pretreatment with small numbers of donor marrow cells and low dose antilymphocyte globulin(ALG)in combination. Either marrow cells or ALG alone were ineffective at these doses. It was also shown that pretreatment with marrow cells and antilymphocyte serum (ALS) considerably suppressed the local graft-versus-host reaction.

  2. Comparison of Clinical Outcome of Autograft and Allograft Reconstruction for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Tears

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Yu-Hua; Sun, Peng-Fei

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hamstring (HS) autograft and bone-patellar tendon-bone allograft are the most common choice for reconstruction of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). There was a little report about the clinical outcome and difference of arthroscopic ACL reconstruction using allograft and autograft. This study aimed to compare the clinical outcome of autograft and allograft reconstruction for ACL tears. Methods: A total of 106 patients who underwent surgery because of ACL tear were included in this study. The patients were randomly divided into two groups, including 53 patients in each group. The patients in group I underwent standard ACL reconstruction with HS tendon autografts, while others in group II underwent reconstruction with bone-patellar tendon-bone allograft. All the patients were followed up and analyzed; the mean follow-up was 81 months (range: 28–86 months). Clinical outcomes were evaluated using the International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC), Lysholm scores, physical instability tests, and patient satisfaction questionnaires. The complication rates of both groups were compared. Tibial and femoral tunnel widening were assessed using lateral and anteroposterior radiographs. Results: At the end of follow-up, no significant differences were found between the groups in terms of IKDC, Lysholm scores, physical instability tests, patient satisfaction questionnaires, and incidences of arthrofibrosis. Tibial and femoral tunnel widening was less in the HS tendon autografts. This difference was more significant on the tibial side. Conclusions: In the repair of ACL tears, allograft reconstruction is as effective as the autograft reconstruction, but the allograft can lead to more tunnel widening evidently in the tibial tunnel, particularly. PMID:26612290

  3. Ankle arthrodesis fusion rates for mesenchymal stem cell bone allograft versus proximal tibia autograft.

    PubMed

    Anderson, John J; Boone, Joshua J; Hansen, Myron; Brady, Chad; Gough, Adam; Swayzee, Zflan

    2014-01-01

    Ankle arthrodesis is commonly used in the treatment of ankle arthritis. The present study compared mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) bone allografts and proximal tibia autografts as adjuncts in performing ankle arthrodesis. A total of 109 consecutive ankle fusions performed from 2002 to 2008 were evaluated retrospectively. Of the 109 fusions, 24 were excluded from the present study, leaving 85 patients who had undergone ankle arthrodesis. Of the 85 patients, 41 had received a proximal tibia autograft and 44, an MSC bone allograft. These 2 groups were reviewed and compared retrospectively at least 2 years postoperatively for the overall fusion rate, interval to radiographic fusion, and interval to clinical fusion. A modified and adjusted American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons ankle scale was used to measure patient satisfaction. The overall fusion rate was 84.1% in the MSC bone allograft group and 95.1% in the proximal tibia autograft group (p = .158). The corresponding mean intervals to radiographic fusion were 13.0 ± 2.5 weeks and 11.3 ± 2.8 weeks (p ≤ .001). The interval to clinical fusion was 13.1 ± 2.1 weeks and 11.0 ± 1.5 weeks (p ≤ .001) in the MSC bone allograft and proximal tibia autograft group, respectively. No statistically significant difference was found in the fusion rates between the MSC bone allograft and proximal tibia autograft groups. Also, no statistically significant difference was found between the preoperative and postoperative scores using a modified and adjusted American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons ankle scale between the 2 groups (p = .41 and p = .44, respectively). A statistically significant delay to radiographic and clinical fusion was present in the MSC bone allograft group compared with the proximal tibia autograft group; however, no difference was found in patient satisfaction. PMID:25158608

  4. [Study of the revascularizing properties of the greater omentum for creating prefabricated complex autografts under experimantal conditions].

    PubMed

    Milanov, N O; Trofimov, E I; Sheremet'eva, G F; Bogomolova, N S; Zhidkov, I L; Startseva, O I; Shimbireva, O Iu

    2006-01-01

    The revascularizing properties of the greater omentum used as a vascular pedicle for the prefabrication of skin, skin/cartilage or skin/ bone autografts, and their viability after rotation and recipient zone infection were studied in rat experiments. The experiment showed that complexity factor did not have a significant effect on the revascularizing properties of the greater omentum, and required only an insignificant prolongation of prefabrication period. Skin/omental, skin/cartilageous, and skin/bony autografts based on the greater omentum formed by day 7, 14, and 21, respectively. After these periods prefabricated autografts remained viable upon rotation. In case of infection, the survival rate of prefabricated skin/bone autografts, revascularized with two-layer greater omentum, is lower than that of skin/cartilage ones. The technique of prefabrication of autografts including skin, cartilage, and bone, is a promising method for closure of vast multicomponent defects in complicated clinical situations.

  5. Short-term recovery after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a prospective comparison of three autografts.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Michael; Fulkerson, John; Nissen, Carl; Sheehan, T Joseph

    2006-03-01

    Sixty-four patients with three different autografts were prospectively evaluated following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction for motion return, thigh girth, quadriceps activity, assistive device usage, and duration of pain medication usage. The quadriceps tendon group achieved knee extension sooner than the patellar tendon group. The hamstring group used assistive devices for less time than the patellar tendon group. The quadriceps group required less pain medication than either of the groups. There are significant differences in short-term pain medication requirements and restoration of function among patients following ACL reconstruction using different autografts.

  6. Successful Repair of a Bicuspid Pulmonary Autograft Valve Causing Early Insufficiency After a Ross Procedure.

    PubMed

    Vistarini, Nicola; Gebhard, Caroline; Desjardins, Georges; El-Hamamsy, Ismail

    2016-04-01

    The Ross procedure is an excellent option in terms of long-term outcomes for young patients requiring aortic valve replacement. We report the case of a 49-year-old woman who presented with worsening dyspnea and episodes of presyncope in the context of a patient-prosthesis mismatch, 13 years after mechanical aortic valve replacement. She underwent a Ross procedure despite the pulmonary valve being bicuspid at intraoperative examination. Following implantation, the autograft valve showed an eccentric jet of regurgitation requiring bicuspid valve repair. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of successful repair of a bicuspid pulmonary autograft valve. PMID:27000622

  7. Matched Comparison of Fusion Rates between Hydroxyapatite Demineralized Bone Matrix and Autograft in Lumbar Interbody Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dae Hwan; Lee, Nam; Shin, Dong Ah; Yi, Seong; Kim, Keung Nyun

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare the fusion rate of a hydroxyapatite demineralized bone matrix (DBM) with post-laminectomy acquired autograft in lumbar interbody fusion surgery and to evaluate the correlation between fusion rate and clinical outcome. Methods From January 2013 to April 2014, 98 patients underwent lumbar interbody fusion surgery with hydroxyapatite DBM (HA-DBM group) in our institute. Of those patients, 65 received complete CT scans for 12 months postoperatively in order to evaluate fusion status. For comparison with autograft, we selected another 65 patients who underwent lumbar interbody fusion surgery with post-laminectomy acquired autograft (Autograft group) during the same period. Both fusion material groups were matched in terms of age, sex, body mass index (BMI), and bone mineral density (BMD). To evaluate the clinical outcomes, we analyzed the results of visual analogue scale (VAS), Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), and Short Form Health Survey (SF-36). Results We reviewed the CT scans of 149 fusion levels in 130 patients (HA-DBM group, 75 levels/65 patients; Autograft group, 74 levels/65 patients). Age, sex, BMI, and BMD were not significantly different between the groups (p=0.528, p=0.848, p=0.527, and p=0.610, respectively). The HA-DBM group showed 39 of 75 fused levels (52%), and the Autograft group showed 46 of 74 fused levels (62.2%). This difference was not statistically significant (p=0.21). In the HA-DBM group, older age and low BMD were significantly associated with non-fusion (61.24 vs. 66.68, p=0.027; -1.63 vs. -2.29, p=0.015, respectively). VAS and ODI showed significant improvement after surgery when fusion was successfully achieved in both groups (p=0.004, p=0.002, HA-DBM group; p=0.012, p=0.03, Autograft group). Conclusion The fusion rates of the hydroxyapatite DBM and Autograft groups were not significantly different. In addition, clinical outcomes were similar between the groups. However, older age and low BMD are risk factors that might

  8. Successful endothelialization and remodeling of a cell-free small-diameter arterial graft in a large animal model.

    PubMed

    Koobatian, Maxwell T; Row, Sindhu; Smith, Randall J; Koenigsknecht, Carmon; Andreadis, Stelios T; Swartz, Daniel D

    2016-01-01

    The large number of coronary artery bypass procedures necessitates development of off-the-shelf vascular grafts that do not require cell or tissue harvest from patients. However, immediate thrombus formation after implantation due to the absence of a healthy endothelium is very likely. Here we present the successful development of an acellular tissue engineered vessel (A-TEV) based on small intestinal submucosa that was functionalized sequentially with heparin and VEGF. A-TEVs were implanted into the carotid artery of an ovine model demonstrating high patency rates and significant host cell infiltration as early as one week post-implantation. At one month, a confluent and functional endothelium was present and the vascular wall showed significant infiltration of host smooth muscle cells exhibiting vascular contractility in response to vaso-agonists. After three months, the endothelium aligned in the direction of flow and the medial layer comprised of circumferentially aligned smooth muscle cells. A-TEVs demonstrated high elastin and collagen content as well as impressive mechanical properties and vascular contractility comparable to native arteries. This is the first demonstration of successful endothelialization, remodeling, and development of vascular function of a cell-free vascular graft that was implanted in the arterial circulation of a pre-clinical animal model.

  9. Correlation Analysis of Potential Factors Influencing Graft Maturity After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hong; Chen, Shuang; Tao, Hongyue; Li, Hongyun; Chen, Shiyi

    2014-01-01

    Background: Postoperatively, signal changes of the reconstructed anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) graft on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) images commonly occurs, which may be a cause for concern. The signal intensity changes are usually expressed by signal/noise quotient (SNQ) value, representing graft maturity. To date, little is known about the factors influencing the SNQ value of the reconstructed ACL graft. Purpose: To evaluate ACL graft SNQ value and associated factors after ACL reconstruction. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: Male patients who underwent ACL reconstruction using autograft or allograft tendon from September 2004 to September 2011 were randomly invited to take part in this investigation, including functional scores, physical examination, and MRI scan. The femoral side graft was fixed with Endobutton CL or Rigidfix pins, and the tibial side graft was fixed with a bio-intrafix. SNQ values of each graft were measured on MRI to represent graft maturity. Sagittal ACL angle, ACL–Blumensaat line angle, and medial and lateral posterior tibial slope (PTS) were measured using MRI 3-dimensional dual-echo steady-state images. Potential risk factors, including age, body mass index, postoperative time, Tegner activity scale (TAS), sagittal ACL angle, ACL–Blumensaat line angle, medial PTS, lateral PTS, and primary graft diameter, were tested for their association with the graft SNQ value by multivariate stepwise regression analysis. Results: A total of 104 male subjects (mean follow-up, 30.7 months) were examined, including 62 allograft and 42 autograft reconstructions. There was a significant association between graft SNQ and postoperative time (r = −0.431, P < .001), TAS (r = 0.295, P = .002), and ACL–Blumensaat line angle (r = −0.304, P = .002). Univariate regression analysis showed that TAS (β = 6.15, P < .001) positively correlated, postoperative time (β = −0.26, P < .001) negatively correlated, and ACL

  10. Bioreactor-based engineering of osteochondral grafts: from model systems to tissue manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Wendt, David; Jakob, Marcel; Martin, Ivan

    2005-11-01

    Osteochondral defects (i.e., those that affect both the articular cartilage and underlying subchondral bone) are often associated with mechanical instability of the joint, and therefore with the risk of inducing osteoarthritic degenerative changes. The in vitro fabrication of osteochondral grafts of predefined size and shape, starting from autologous cells combined with three-dimensional porous biomaterials, is a promising approach for the treatment of osteochondral defects. However, the quality of ex vivo generated cartilage and bone-like tissues is currently restricted by a limited understanding of the regulatory role of physicochemical culture parameters on tissue development. By allowing reproducible and controlled changes in specific biochemical and biomechanical factors, bioreactor systems provide the technological means to reveal fundamental mechanisms of cell function in a three-dimensional environment and the potential to improve the quality of engineered tissues. In addition, by automating and standardizing the manufacturing process in controlled closed systems, bioreactors could reduce production costs and thus facilitate broader clinical impact of engineered osteochondral grafts.

  11. Choosing a Graft for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: Surgeon Influence Reigns Supreme.

    PubMed

    Salminen, Matthew; Kraeutler, Matthew J; Freedman, Kevin B; Tucker, Brad S; Salvo, John P; Ciccotti, Michael G; Cohen, Steven B

    2016-01-01

    Selection of a graft type is an important decision for patients undergoing reconstructive surgery for a ligamentous injury. The purpose of this study was to determine the weight of key factors affecting patient selection of graft type for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction and to assess patients' knowledge of their particular graft type. We prospectively enrolled 304 patients who underwent primary ACL reconstruction. Patients filled out questionnaires at their first follow-up appointment after surgery and at least 1 year postoperatively. Questionnaires asked which type of graft was used and why they chose that graft. At their first postoperative appointment, 88% of autograft patients and 71% of allograft patients were accurate in stating their graft type and harvest location. The most common factor influencing graft selection was physician recommendation (81.6%). At the time of follow-up, 96% of patients were satisfied with their graft choice. There is a high rate of accuracy with which patients remember the type of graft used for their ACL reconstruction. The majority of patients undergoing ACL reconstruction are primarily influenced by the physician's recommendation. PMID:27327925

  12. Modelling and simulation of the mechanical response of a Dacron graft in the pressurization test and an end-to-end anastomosis.

    PubMed

    Bustos, Claudio A; García-Herrera, Claudio M; Celentano, Diego J

    2016-08-01

    This work presents the modeling and simulation of the mechanical response of a Dacron graft in the pressurization test and its clinical application in the analysis of an end-to-end anastomosis. Both problems are studied via an anisotropic constitutive model that was calibrated by means of previously reported uniaxial tensile tests. First, the simulation of the pressurization test allows the validation of the experimental material characterization that included tests carried out for different levels of axial stretching. Then, the analysis of an end-to-end anastomosis under an idealized geometry is proposed. This case consists in evaluating the mechanical performance of the graft together with the stresses and deformations in the neighborhood of the Dacron with the artery. This research contributes important data to understand the functioning of the graft and the possibility of extending the analysis to complex numerical cases like its insertion in the aortic arch. PMID:26826765

  13. Modelling and simulation of the mechanical response of a Dacron graft in the pressurization test and an end-to-end anastomosis.

    PubMed

    Bustos, Claudio A; García-Herrera, Claudio M; Celentano, Diego J

    2016-08-01

    This work presents the modeling and simulation of the mechanical response of a Dacron graft in the pressurization test and its clinical application in the analysis of an end-to-end anastomosis. Both problems are studied via an anisotropic constitutive model that was calibrated by means of previously reported uniaxial tensile tests. First, the simulation of the pressurization test allows the validation of the experimental material characterization that included tests carried out for different levels of axial stretching. Then, the analysis of an end-to-end anastomosis under an idealized geometry is proposed. This case consists in evaluating the mechanical performance of the graft together with the stresses and deformations in the neighborhood of the Dacron with the artery. This research contributes important data to understand the functioning of the graft and the possibility of extending the analysis to complex numerical cases like its insertion in the aortic arch.

  14. Predicting Hamstring Graft Diameter Using MRI and Anthropometry

    PubMed Central

    Fritsch, Brett A; Mhaskar, Vikram A; An, Vincent Vinh Gia; Scholes, Corey

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Graft diameter is one variable that may affect outcome of ACL reconstruction. The ability to predict the size of a graft in a given patient pre-operatively may help guide graft selection and preparation technique. Various papers have correlated anthropometric data and MRI tendon measurements to intraoperative graft diameter, although no papers have investigated these together. The intra-operative diameter of a hamstring autograft will be influenced by graft preparation technique. Our study aimed to investigate the prediction of intraoperative graft diameter of 2 different graft construct techniques (4-strand semitendinosus versus quadrupled semitendinosus) using anthropometry and MRI measurements. Methods: Retrospective review of two groups of ACL reconstruction using different graft preparation techniques was performed. “Conventional” 4-strand gracilis + semitendinosus with fixed suspension at the femur and screw fixation at the tibia were compared with quadrupled semitendinosus grafts with adjustable suspensory fixation at each end (Graftlink). Cross-sectional areas (XSA) of the semitendinosus and gracilis tendons was measured in the axial slice of a T2 weighted MRI image using a region-of-interest tool. Stepwise linear regression using intraoperative graft diameter as the dependant variable was performed using MRI XSA of the semitendinosus and gracilis tendons, gender and height as predictors. Results: 129 ACL Reconstruction in 127 patients were done in the time period, 89 of which were done conventionally, and 40 which employed the Graftlink construct. The median graft diameter in the Graftlink group (8.5mm IQR8-9) was greater than that of the conventional group (8mm, IQR 7.5-8) (p < 0.001). MRI XSA of semitendinosus and height were statistically significant predictors of diameter in the Graftlink group (R2 = 51%), whilst MRI XSA of semitendinosus + gracilis and gender were predictors in the conventional group (R2 = 36%). Conclusion: Graftlink

  15. Computational blood flow and vessel wall modeling in a CT-based thoracic aorta after stent-graft implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazer, Dilana; Stoll, Markus; Schmidt, Eduard; Richter, Goetz-M.; Dillmann, Rüdiger

    2010-03-01

    Abnormal blood flow conditions and structural fatigue within stented vessels may lead to undesired failure causing death to the patient. Image-based computational modeling provides a physical and realistic insight into the patientspecific biomechanics and enables accurate predictive simulations of development, growth and failure of cardiovascular diseases as well as associated risks. Controlling the efficiency of an endovascular treatment is necessary for the evaluation of potential complications and predictions on the assessment of the pathological state. In this paper we investigate the effects of stent-graft implantation on the biomechanics in a patient-specific thoracic aortic model. The patient geometry and the implanted stent-graft are obtained from morphological data based on a CT scan performed during a controlling routine. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and computational structure mechanics (CSM) simulations are conducted based on the finite volume method (FVM) and on the finite element method (FEM) to compute the hemodynamics and the elastomechanics within the aortic model, respectively. Physiological data based on transient pressure and velocity profiles are used to set the necessary boundary conditions. Further, the effects of various boundary conditions and definition of contact interactions on the numerical stability of the blood flow and the vessel wall simulation results are also investigated. The quantification of the hemodynamics and the elastomechanics post endovascular intervention provides a realistic controlling of the state of the stented vessel and of the efficiency of the therapy. Consequently, computational modeling would help in evaluating individual therapies and optimal treatment strategies in the field of minimally invasive endovascular surgery.

  16. Bone graft substitutes for spine fusion: A brief review

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Ashim; Kukkar, Nitin; Sharif, Kevin; Main, Benjamin J; Albers, Christine E; El-Amin III, Saadiq F

    2015-01-01

    Bone graft substitutes are widely used in the field of orthopedics and are extensively used to promote vertebral fusion. Fusion is the most common technique in spine surgery and is used to treat morbidities and relieve discomfort. Allograft and autograft bone substitutes are currently the most commonly used bone grafts to promote fusion. These approaches pose limitations and present complications to the patient. Numerous alternative bone graft substitutes are on the market or have been developed and proposed for application. These options have attempted to promote spine fusion by enhancing osteogenic properties. In this review, we reviewed biology of spine fusion and the current advances in biomedical materials and biological strategies for application in surgical spine fusion. Our findings illustrate that, while many bone graft substitutes perform well as bone graft extenders, only osteoinductive proteins (recombinant bone morphogenetic proteins-2 and osteogenic protein-1) provide evidence for use as both bone enhancers and bone substitutes for specific types of spinal fusion. Tissue engineered hydrogels, synthetic polymer composites and viral based gene therapy also holds the potential to be used for spine fusion in future, though warrants further investigation to be used in clinical practice. PMID:26191491

  17. A novel silk-based artificial ligament and tricalcium phosphate/polyether ether ketone anchor for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction - safety and efficacy in a porcine model.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang; He, Jiankang; Bian, Weiguo; Li, Zheng; Zhang, Wenyou; Li, Dichen; Snedeker, Jess G

    2014-08-01

    Loss of ligament graft tension in early postoperative stages following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction can come from a variety of factors, with slow graft integration to bone being widely viewed as a chief culprit. Toward an off-the-shelf ACL graft that can rapidly integrate to host tissue, we have developed a silk-based ACL graft combined with a tricalcium phosphate (TCP)/polyether ether ketone anchor. In the present study we tested the safety and efficacy of this concept in a porcine model, with postoperative assessments at 3months (n=10) and 6months (n=4). Biomechanical tests were performed after euthanization, with ultimate tensile strengths at 3months of ∼370N and at 6months of ∼566N - comparable to autograft and allograft performance in this animal model. Comprehensive histological observations revealed that TCP substantially enhanced silk graft to bone attachment. Interdigitation of soft and hard tissues was observed, with regenerated fibrocartilage characterizing a transitional zone from silk graft to bone that was similar to native ligament bone attachments. We conclude that both initial stability and robust long-term biological attachment were consistently achieved using the tested construct, supporting a large potential for silk-TCP combinations in the repair of the torn ACL.

  18. Penile enhancement using a porcine small intestinal submucosa graft in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Leungwattanakij, S; Pummangura, N; Ratana-Olarn, K

    2006-01-01

    Several biodegradable materials have been experimented for penile enhancement, but none show the potential for clinical use. This study was designed to use porcine small intestinal submucosa (SIS) augmenting the normal tunica albuginea to increase the functional girth of the rat penis. In all, 20 adult male Sprague-Dawley rats constituted the study population. The animals were divided into two groups: group 1 consisted of the control (n=10) and group 2 (n=10) consisted of rats that underwent penile enhancement by a longitudinal I-shaped incision of the tunica albuginea on both sides, and the dissection of the plane between tunica albuginea and cavernosal tissue was carried out (n=10). The incision was then patched with a 3 x 10 mm2 piece of SIS, using a 6/0 nylon suture material. The penile length and mid-circumference were then measured using a Vernier Caliper before and 2 months after surgery. All rat penises underwent histological examination using Masson's trichome and Verhoff's van Giesen's stain for collagen and elastic fibers. The penile length, mid-circumference and degree of fibrosis score were expressed as mean+/-s.e. (standard error) and analyzed using a Wilcoxon rank-sum test. A statistical significance was accepted at P-value < or =0.05. Our results showed similar preoperative penile length and circumference in both groups. However, 2 months after the surgery, the mean penile circumference of the SIS group has grown significantly larger than the control group, while the mean penile length remained unchanged. The histological study of the rat penises revealed minimal amounts of fibrosis under the graft, and the elastic fibers of the graft showed orientation in a circular manner. In conclusion, SIS appears promising for material use in a penile enhancement. PMID:16049525

  19. Arthroscopy-assisted anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with patellar tendon or hamstring autografts.

    PubMed

    Doral, M N; Leblebicioglu, G; Atay, O A; Baydar, M L; Tetik, O; Atik, S

    2000-01-01

    Isolated ACL reconstructions were performed in 138 patients between 1994 and 1998. Patellar bone-patellar tendon-bone, and hamstring tendon autografts were used in 88 patients, and allografts were used in 50 patients. Eighty-eight knees of 88 patients with autograft reconstructions (17 female, 71 male) were included in this study and evaluation of the patients with allograft reconstruction reported separately. The mean age at the time of the operation was 32 years. All ACL reconstructions were performed arthroscopically. Twenty-seven bone-patellar tendon-bone, and 61 hamstring tendon autografts were used. The mean follow-up was 29 months. In the postoperative course the Lachman test was negative in 62 patients, 1+ in 22 patients, and 2+ in 4 patients. In 17 patients, anterior drawer sign were 1+ in comparison to the contralateral side. Pivot shift test was moderately positive only in 5 cases in the bone-patellar tendon-bone and hamstring tendon autograft groups postoperatively. There were 3 patients with subjective "giving way" symptoms. Second look arthroscopy revealed rupture of the neo-ligament. Arthroscopic washout and debridement were performed, and no revision ligamentoplasties were performed. Two of these patients improved with accelerated proprioceptive physical therapy, and one had to decrease his previous level of activity. There were no cases of arthrofibrosis, infection, or extension lag. Clinical results of patellar bone-tendon-bone and hamstring groups did not show any significant clinical difference. Avoiding the disturbance of the extensor mechanism of the knee is probably the most significant advantage of the hamstring autograft.

  20. Arthroscopy-assisted anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with patellar tendon or hamstring autografts.

    PubMed

    Doral, M N; Leblebicioglu, G; Atay, O A; Baydar, M L; Tetik, O; Atik, S

    2000-01-01

    Isolated ACL reconstructions were performed in 138 patients between 1994 and 1998. Patellar bone-patellar tendon-bone, and hamstring tendon autografts were used in 88 patients, and allografts were used in 50 patients. Eighty-eight knees of 88 patients with autograft reconstructions (17 female, 71 male) were included in this study and evaluation of the patients with allograft reconstruction reported separately. The mean age at the time of the operation was 32 years. All ACL reconstructions were performed arthroscopically. Twenty-seven bone-patellar tendon-bone, and 61 hamstring tendon autografts were used. The mean follow-up was 29 months. In the postoperative course the Lachman test was negative in 62 patients, 1+ in 22 patients, and 2+ in 4 patients. In 17 patients, anterior drawer sign were 1+ in comparison to the contralateral side. Pivot shift test was moderately positive only in 5 cases in the bone-patellar tendon-bone and hamstring tendon autograft groups postoperatively. There were 3 patients with subjective "giving way" symptoms. Second look arthroscopy revealed rupture of the neo-ligament. Arthroscopic washout and debridement were performed, and no revision ligamentoplasties were performed. Two of these patients improved with accelerated proprioceptive physical therapy, and one had to decrease his previous level of activity. There were no cases of arthrofibrosis, infection, or extension lag. Clinical results of patellar bone-tendon-bone and hamstring groups did not show any significant clinical difference. Avoiding the disturbance of the extensor mechanism of the knee is probably the most significant advantage of the hamstring autograft. PMID:10983256

  1. Graft selection in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Miller, Suzanne L; Gladstone, James N

    2002-10-01

    Selecting the appropriate graft for ACL reconstruction depends on numerous factors including surgeon philosophy and experience, tissue availability (affected by anatomical anomalies or prior injury or surgery), and patient activity level and desires. Although the patella tendon autograft has the widest experience in the literature, and is probably the most commonly used graft source, this must be tempered with the higher reported incidences of potential morbidity and pitfalls associated with its use. The hamstring tendons are gaining increasing popularity, mostly due to reduced harvest morbidity and improved soft tissue fixation techniques, and many recent studies in the literature report equal results to BTB ACL reconstruction with respect to functional outcome and patient satisfaction. On the other hand, many of these studies report higher degrees of instrument (KT-100) tested laxity for hamstring reconstruction, and some have reported lower returns to preinjury levels of activity. One question that remains to be addressed is how closely objectively measured laxity tests correlate with subjectively assessed outcomes and ability to return to high levels of competitive sports. Allograft use, which decreased in popularity during the 1990s, appears to be undergoing a resurgence, with better sterilization processes and new graft sources (tibialis tendons), leading to increased availability and improved fixation techniques. The benefits of decreased surgical morbidity and easier rehabilitation must be weighed against the potential for greater failure of biologic incorporation, infection, and possibly slower return to activities. In our practice, for high-demand individuals (those playing cutting, pivoting, or jumping sports and skiing) BTB tends to be the graft of choice. For lower demand or older individuals, hamstring reconstructions will be performed. Allograft tissue will be used in older individuals (generally over 45 years old), those with signs of arthritis (and

  2. Graft selection in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Miller, Suzanne L; Gladstone, James N

    2002-10-01

    Selecting the appropriate graft for ACL reconstruction depends on numerous factors including surgeon philosophy and experience, tissue availability (affected by anatomical anomalies or prior injury or surgery), and patient activity level and desires. Although the patella tendon autograft has the widest experience in the literature, and is probably the most commonly used graft source, this must be tempered with the higher reported incidences of potential morbidity and pitfalls associated with its use. The hamstring tendons are gaining increasing popularity, mostly due to reduced harvest morbidity and improved soft tissue fixation techniques, and many recent studies in the literature report equal results to BTB ACL reconstruction with respect to functional outcome and patient satisfaction. On the other hand, many of these studies report higher degrees of instrument (KT-100) tested laxity for hamstring reconstruction, and some have reported lower returns to preinjury levels of activity. One question that remains to be addressed is how closely objectively measured laxity tests correlate with subjectively assessed outcomes and ability to return to high levels of competitive sports. Allograft use, which decreased in popularity during the 1990s, appears to be undergoing a resurgence, with better sterilization processes and new graft sources (tibialis tendons), leading to increased availability and improved fixation techniques. The benefits of decreased surgical morbidity and easier rehabilitation must be weighed against the potential for greater failure of biologic incorporation, infection, and possibly slower return to activities. In our practice, for high-demand individuals (those playing cutting, pivoting, or jumping sports and skiing) BTB tends to be the graft of choice. For lower demand or older individuals, hamstring reconstructions will be performed. Allograft tissue will be used in older individuals (generally over 45 years old), those with signs of arthritis (and

  3. A Monoclonal Antibody Specific for the Programmed Death-1 Homolog Prevents Graft Versus Host Disease in Mouse Models1

    PubMed Central

    Flies, Dallas B; Wang, Shengdian; Xu, Haiying; Chen, Lieping

    2011-01-01

    Upon interaction with B7 homolog 1, Programmed Death-1 transmits a critical co-inhibitory signal to T cells to negatively regulate immune responses. By extensively searching the genomic database with the immunoglobulin variable region of PD-1, we identified a homolog and named it Programmed Death-1 homolog (PD-1H). PD-1H is broadly expressed on the cell surface of hematopoietic cells, and could be further upregulated on CD4+ and CD8+ T cells following activation. We have generated a monoclonal antibody against PD-1H, which strikingly prevents acute graft versus host disease (GVHD) in semi- and fully-allogeneic murine models, leading to full chimerism following treatment. GVHD remains a primary hindrance to successful allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation therapy for the treatment of hematologic malignancy. Therefore, manipulation of PD-1H function may provide a new modality for controlling T cell responses to allogeneic tissues in transplant medicine. PMID:21768399

  4. Technique for 3-Dimesional (3D) Modeling of Osteoarticular Medial Femoral Condyle Vascularized Grafting to Replace the Proximal Pole of Unsalvagable Scaphoid Nonunions.

    PubMed

    Houdek, Matthew T; Matsumoto, Jane M; Morris, Jonathan M; Bishop, Allen T; Shin, Alexander Y

    2016-09-01

    This study describes a novel technique for the preoperative surgical planning for an osteoarticular medial femoral condyle (MFC) graft to replace the proximal pole of a scaphoid. In cases of proximal pole scaphoid nonunion or in Preiser disease, fragmentation of the articular surface can occur, leading to significant pain and disability. Osteoarticular MFC bone grafting can be used to treat these injuries by providing a vascularized osteoarticular surface. Using 3-dimensional imaging and printing we are able to precisely model the injured scaphoid, and also accurately plan the harvest of MFC osteoarticular graft. This technique allows for accurate preoperative planning of a complex 3-dimensional bone, and has improved our execution of the plan intraoperatively. PMID:27466049

  5. Technique for 3-Dimesional (3D) Modeling of Osteoarticular Medial Femoral Condyle Vascularized Grafting to Replace the Proximal Pole of Unsalvagable Scaphoid Nonunions.

    PubMed

    Houdek, Matthew T; Matsumoto, Jane M; Morris, Jonathan M; Bishop, Allen T; Shin, Alexander Y

    2016-09-01

    This study describes a novel technique for the preoperative surgical planning for an osteoarticular medial femoral condyle (MFC) graft to replace the proximal pole of a scaphoid. In cases of proximal pole scaphoid nonunion or in Preiser disease, fragmentation of the articular surface can occur, leading to significant pain and disability. Osteoarticular MFC bone grafting can be used to treat these injuries by providing a vascularized osteoarticular surface. Using 3-dimensional imaging and printing we are able to precisely model the injured scaphoid, and also accurately plan the harvest of MFC osteoarticular graft. This technique allows for accurate preoperative planning of a complex 3-dimensional bone, and has improved our execution of the plan intraoperatively.

  6. Influence of autograft removal on rabbit patellar tendon length.

    PubMed

    Monllau, J C; Hinarejos, P; Alvarez, P; Alameda, F; Ballester, J

    2004-02-01

    Twelve adult New Zealand white rabbits were randomly divided into two groups. In group 1, 30% of the central mass of the right patellar tendon was removed. In group 2, 60% was removed. The left knees served as controls. The animals were killed 1 year later. The patella-patellar tendon-tibial tuberosity units of all knees were studied using histological and morphometric analysis. In both groups, the tendons had lengthened. Lengthening average was 2.50 mm in group 1 and 8.17 mm in group 2. In both groups, histology revealed poor alignment of the collagen fibres and high cellularity, although the findings in group 1 were nearer the normal histological pattern. The results suggest that removal of significant portions of the patellar tendon leads to lengthening of the resulting tendon. In clinical practice, it seems prudent to pay attention to the dimensions of the patellar tendon when harvesting a graft.

  7. Synovial Mesenchymal Stem Cells Promote Meniscus Regeneration Augmented by an Autologous Achilles Tendon Graft in a Rat Partial Meniscus Defect Model

    PubMed Central

    Ozeki, Nobutake; Muneta, Takeshi; Matsuta, Seiya; Koga, Hideyuki; Nakagawa, Yusuke; Mizuno, Mitsuru; Tsuji, Kunikazu; Mabuchi, Yo; Akazawa, Chihiro; Kobayashi, Eiji; Saito, Tomoyuki; Sekiya, Ichiro

    2015-01-01

    Although meniscus defects and degeneration are strongly correlated with the later development of osteoarthritis, the promise of regenerative medicine strategies is to prevent and/or delay the disease's progression. Meniscal reconstruction has been shown in animal models with tendon grafting and transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs); however, these procedures have not shown the same efficacy in clinical studies. Here, our aim was to investigate the ability of tendon grafts pretreated with exogenous synovial-derived MSCs to prevent cartilage degeneration in a rat partial meniscus defect model. We removed the anterior half of the medial meniscus and grafted autologous Achilles tendons with or without a 10-minute pretreatment of the tendon with synovial MSCs. The meniscus and surrounding cartilage were evaluated at 2, 4, and 8 weeks (n = 5). Tendon grafts increased meniscus size irrespective of synovial MSCs. Histological scores for regenerated menisci were better in the tendon + MSC group than in the other two groups at 4 and 8 weeks. Both macroscopic and histological scores for articular cartilage were significantly better in the tendon + MSC group at 8 weeks. Implanted synovial MSCs survived around the grafted tendon and native meniscus integration site by cell tracking assays with luciferase+, LacZ+, DiI+, and/or GFP+ synovial MSCs and/or GFP+ tendons. Flow cytometric analysis showed that transplanted synovial MSCs retained their MSC properties at 7 days and host synovial tissue also contained cells with MSC characteristics. Synovial MSCs promoted meniscus regeneration augmented by autologous Achilles tendon grafts and prevented cartilage degeneration in rats. Stem Cells 2015;33:1927–1938 PMID:25993981

  8. Histological and biochemical characteristics of the rabbit anterior cruciate ligament in comparison to potential autografts.

    PubMed

    Hoyer, Mariann; Meier, Carola; Kohl, Benjamin; Lohan, Anke; Kokozidou, Maria; Schulze-Tanzil, Gundula

    2016-08-01

    Tissue engineering of an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) implant with ACL cells requires detailed analysis of the tissue characteristics that should be mimicked. Therefore, we studied the histological and biochemical properties of rabbit derived ACLs in comparison to other knee-associated tendons that are used as autografts in men. Rabbit derived ACLs and Musculus (M.) semimembranosus, M. semitendinosus tendons and patellar ligaments were explanted from adult New Zealand white rabbits and analyzed histologically for tissue organization (e.g. cellularity, nuclear shapes, elastic fibers), total collagen and sulfated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) contents. Gene expression analysis was performed for the main extracellular matrix (ECM) components type I collagen, decorin and the glycoprotein tenomodulin. The ACLs had a dimension of 1.39x0.39x0.1 cm in situ. They were characterized by high sGAG content in comparison to the other tendons/ligaments, whereas the total collagen content did not differ. ACLs possessed higher cellularity and lower feret diameter of the cell nuclei compared with the investigated rabbit-derived tendons. In ACLs long elastic fibers were observed. Concerning the gene expression level, lower transcription of tenomodulin was detected in the ACL compared with the other tendons, without significant difference in the decorin gene expression. The M. semitendinosus tendon had a significantly higher type I collagen expression than the ACL and the other investigated tendons. This phenotypical characterization of the lapine ACL presented in this study provides some key standards to evaluate tissue engineered ACL constructs to be tested in the rabbit model.

  9. [The latest results of the advanced hypopharyngeal cancer surgery with immediate reconstruction using the free jejunal autograft].

    PubMed

    Jegliński, T; Szmidt, J; Szlenk, Z; Frunze, S

    1994-01-01

    In 21 patients with T3, T4 pharyngo-laryngeal cancer circumferential resection with immediate reconstruction using a free revascularized jejunal autograft was performed. In 13 cases the jejunal reconstruction was successful. In patients previously not irradiated the rate of success was 75% and in irradiated ones 37.5%. Five patients survived more than 5 years: one more than 7, two more than 6 and one more than 5. One patient with an unsuccessful jejunal graft and with subsequent skin reconstruction survived more than 6 years. The causes of failure were:-irreversible spasm of the arteries in 2 cases, skinking of the vessels resulting in flap necrosis in flap necrosis in 2 cases, -necrosis due to widespread atherosclerosis of the cervical arteries in 3 cases and of an unknown cause in 1 case. The cause of death was: widespread metastases in 12 cases, C.V.A. in 1 case, road traffic accident in 1 case, complications of the ileus in 1 case and carotid artery haemorrhage in 1 case. One of the successful patients was irradiated postoperatively, because the pathology report stated there was incomplete resection, and survived more than 6 years with no disturbance of swallowing. In general 10 patients died in the first year, 4 in the second, 1 in the third and 1 in the fourth--without any signs of recurrence. The five year survival of 24% in the presented group is relatively high in comparison with the generally accessible data for T3, T4 hypopharyngeal carcinoma treated by any of the usual methods. PMID:7970759

  10. Primordial Follicle Transplantation within Designer Biomaterial Grafts Produce Live Births in a Mouse Infertility Model

    PubMed Central

    Kniazeva, E.; Hardy, A. N.; Boukaidi, S. A.; Woodruff, T. K.; Jeruss, J. S.; Shea, L. D.

    2015-01-01

    The gonadotoxic effects of chemotherapy and radiation may result in premature ovarian failure in premenopausal oncology patients. Although autotransplantation of ovarian tissue has led to successful live births, reintroduction of latent malignant cells inducing relapse is a significant concern. In this report, we investigated the design of biomaterial grafts for transplantation of isolated ovarian follicles as a means to preserve fertility. Primordial and primary ovarian follicles from young female mice were extracted and encapsulated into biomaterials for subsequent transplantation into adult mice. Among the formulations tested, aggregated follicles encapsulated within fibrin had enhanced survival and integration with the host tissue following transplantation relative to the fibrin-alginate and fibrin-collagen composites. All mice transplanted with fibrin-encapsulated follicles resumed cycling, and live births were achieved only for follicles transplanted within VEGF-loaded fibrin beads. The extent to which these procedures reduce the presence of metastatic breast cancer cells among the isolated follicles was evaluated, with significantly reduced numbers of cancer cells present relative to intact ovaries. This ability to obtain live births by transplanting isolated primordial and primary follicles, while also reducing the risk of re-seeding disease relative to ovarian tissue transplantation, may ultimately provide a means to preserve fertility in premenopausal oncology patients. PMID:26633657

  11. A New Method for Xenogeneic Bone Graft Deproteinization: Comparative Study of Radius Defects in a Rabbit Model

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Pengfei; Sun, Rongxin; Wang, Long; Zhou, Jialin; Wan, Lifei; Zhou, Tianjian; Hu, Yihe

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives Deproteinization is an indispensable process for the elimination of antigenicity in xenograft bones. However, the hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) deproteinized xenograft, which is commonly used to repair bone defect, exhibits limited osteoinduction activity. The present study was designed to develop a new method for deproteinization and compare the osteogenic capacities of new pepsin deproteinized xenograft bones with those of conventional H2O2 deproteinized ones. Methods Bones were deproteinized in H2O2 or pepsin for 8 hours. The morphologies were compared by HE staining. The content of protein and collagen I were measured by the Kjeldahl method and HPLC-MS, respectively. The physical properties were evaluated by SEM and mechanical tests. For in vivo study, X-ray, micro-CT and HE staining were employed to monitor the healing processes of radius defects in rabbit models transplanted with different graft materials. Results Compared with H2O2 deproteinized bones, no distinct morphological and physical changes were observed. However, pepsin deproteinized bones showed a lower protein content, and a higher collagen content were preserved. In vivo studies showed that pepsin deproteinized bones exhibited better osteogenic performance than H2O2 deproteinized bones, moreover, the quantity and quality of the newly formed bones were improved as indicated by micro-CT analysis. From the results of histological examination, the newly formed bones in the pepsin group were mature bones. Conclusions Pepsin deproteinized xenograft bones show advantages over conventional H2O2 deproteinized bones with respect to osteogenic capacity; this new method may hold potential clinical value in the development of new biomaterials for bone grafting. PMID:26719896

  12. Effects of Local Administration of Boric Acid on Posterolateral Spinal Fusion with Autogenous Bone Grafting in a Rodent Model.

    PubMed

    Kömürcü, Erkam; Özyalvaçlı, Gülzade; Kaymaz, Burak; Gölge, Umut Hatay; Göksel, Ferdi; Cevizci, Sibel; Adam, Gürhan; Ozden, Raif

    2015-09-01

    Spinal fusion is among the most frequently applied spinal surgical procedures. The goal of the present study was to evaluate whether the local administration of boric acid (BA) improves spinal fusion in an experimental spinal fusion model in rats. Currently, there is no published data that evaluates the possible positive effects if the local administration of BA on posterolateral spinal fusion. Thirty-two rats were randomly divided into four independent groups: no material was added at the fusion area for group 1; an autogenous morselized corticocancellous bone graft was used for group 2; an autogenous morselized corticocancellous bone graft with boric acid (8.7 mg/kg) for group 3; and only boric acid was placed into the fusion area for group 4. The L4-L6 spinal segments were collected at week 6, and the assessments included radiography, manual palpation, and histomorphometry. A statistically significant difference was determined between the groups with regard to the mean histopathological scores (p = 0.002), and a paired comparison was made with the Mann-Whitney U test to detect the group/groups from which the difference originated. It was determined that only the graft + BA practice increased the histopathological score significantly with regard to the control group (p = 0.002). Whereas, there was no statistically significant difference between the groups in terms of the manual assessment of fusion and radiographic analysis (respectively p = 0.328 and p = 0.196). This preliminary study suggests that BA may clearly be useful as a therapeutic agent in spinal fusion. However, further research is required to show the most effective dosage of BA on spinal fusion, and should indicate whether BA effects spinal fusion in the human body.

  13. Preclinical models of acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease: how predictive are they for a successful clinical translation?

    PubMed

    Zeiser, Robert; Blazar, Bruce R

    2016-06-23

    Despite major advances in recent years, graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) remains a major life-threatening complication of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT). To improve our therapeutic armory against GVHD, preclinical evidence is most frequently generated in mouse and large animal models of GVHD. However, because every model has shortcomings, it is important to understand how predictive the different models are and why certain findings in these models could not be translated into the clinic. Weaknesses of the animal GVHD models include the irradiation only-based conditioning regimen, the homogenous donor/recipient genetics in mice, canine or non-human primates (NHP), anatomic site of T cells used for transfer in mice, the homogenous microbial environment in mice housed under specific pathogen-free conditions, and the lack of pharmacologic GVHD prevention in control groups. Despite these major differences toward clinical allo-HCT, findings generated in animal models of GVHD have led to the current gold standards for GVHD prophylaxis and therapy. The homogenous nature of the preclinical models allows for reproducibility, which is key for the characterization of the role of a new cytokine, chemokine, transcription factor, microRNA, kinase, or immune cell population in the context of GVHD. Therefore, when carefully balancing reasons to apply small and large animal models, it becomes evident that they are valuable tools to generate preclinical hypotheses, which then have to be rigorously evaluated in the clinical setting. In this study, we discuss several clinical approaches that were motivated by preclinical evidence, novel NHP models and their advantages, and highlight the recent advances in understanding the pathophysiology of GVHD.

  14. Indian hedgehog signaling and the role of graft tension in tendon-to-bone healing: Evaluation in a rat ACL reconstruction model.

    PubMed

    Carbone, Andrew; Carballo, Camila; Ma, Richard; Wang, Hongsheng; Deng, Xianghua; Dahia, Chitra; Rodeo, Scott

    2016-04-01

    The structure and composition of the native enthesis is not recapitulated following tendon-to-bone repair. Indian Hedgehog (IHH) signaling has recently been shown to be important in enthesis development in a mouse model but no studies have evaluated IHH signaling in a healing model. Fourteen adult male rats underwent ACL reconstruction using a flexor tendon graft. Rats were assigned to two groups based on whether or not they received 0N or 10N of pre-tension of the graft. Specimens were evaluated at 3 and 6 weeks post-operatively using immunohistochemistry for three different protein markers of IHH signaling. Quantitative analysis of staining area and intensity using custom software demonstrated that IHH signaling was active in interface tissue formed at the healing tendon-bone interface. We also found increased staining area and intensity of IHH signaling proteins at 3 weeks in animals that received a pre-tensioned tendon graft. No significant differences were seen between the 3-week and 6-week time points. Our data suggests that the IHH signaling pathway is active during the tendon-bone healing process and appears to be mechanosensitive, as pre-tensioning of the graft at the time of surgery resulted in increased IHH signaling at three weeks. PMID:26447744

  15. The Effects of Exendin-4 Treatment on Graft Failure: An Animal Study Using a Novel Re-Vascularized Minimal Human Islet Transplant Model

    PubMed Central

    Sahraoui, Afaf; Winzell, Maria Sörhede; Gorman, Tracy; Smith, Dave M.; Skrtic, Stanko; Hoeyem, Merete; Abadpour, Shadab; Johansson, Lars; Korsgren, Olle; Foss, Aksel; Scholz, Hanne

    2015-01-01

    Islet transplantation has become a viable clinical treatment, but is still compromised by long-term graft failure. Exendin-4, a glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonist, has in clinical studies been shown to improve insulin secretion in islet transplanted patients. However, little is known about the effect of exendin-4 on other metabolic parameters. We therefore aimed to determine what influence exendin-4 would have on revascularized minimal human islet grafts in a state of graft failure in terms of glucose metabolism, body weight, lipid levels and graft survival. Introducing the bilateral, subcapsular islet transplantation model, we first transplanted diabetic mice with a murine graft under the left kidney capsule sufficient to restore normoglycemia. After a convalescent period, we performed a second transplantation under the right kidney capsule with a minimal human islet graft and allowed for a second recovery. We then performed a left-sided nephrectomy, and immediately started treatment with exendin-4 with a low (20μg/kg/day) or high (200μg/kg/day) dose, or saline subcutaneously twice daily for 15 days. Blood was sampled, blood glucose and body weight monitored. The transplanted human islet grafts were collected at study end point and analyzed. We found that exendin-4 exerts its effect on failing human islet grafts in a bell-shaped dose-response curve. Both doses of exendin-4 equally and significantly reduced blood glucose. Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), C-peptide and pro-insulin were conversely increased. In the course of the treatment, body weight and cholesterol levels were not affected. However, immunohistochemistry revealed an increase in beta cell nuclei count and reduced TUNEL staining only in the group treated with a low dose of exendin-4 compared to the high dose and control. Collectively, these results suggest that exendin-4 has a potential rescue effect on failing, revascularized human islets in terms of lowering blood glucose, maintaining beta

  16. Guided Bone Regeneration in Long-Bone Defects with a Structural Hydroxyapatite Graft and Collagen Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Walker, John A.; Singleton, Brian M.; Hernandez, Jesus W.; Son, Jun-Sik; Kim, Su-Gwan; Oh, Daniel S.; Appleford, Mark R.; Ong, Joo L.; Wenke, Joseph C.

    2013-01-01

    There are few synthetic graft alternatives to treat large long-bone defects resulting from trauma or disease that do not incorporate osteogenic or osteoinductive factors. The aim of this study was to test the additional benefit of including a permeable collagen membrane guide in conjunction with a preformed porous hydroxyapatite bone graft to serve as an improved osteoconductive scaffold for bone regeneration. A 10-mm-segmental long-bone defect model in the rabbit radius was used. The hydroxyapatite scaffolds alone or with a collagen wrap were compared as experimental treatment groups to an empty untreated defect as a negative control or a defect filled with autologous bone grafts as a positive control. All groups were evaluated after 4 and 8 weeks of in vivo implantation using microcomputed tomography, mechanical testing in flexure, and histomorphometry. It was observed that the use of the wrap resulted in an increased bone volume regenerated when compared to the scaffold-only group (59% greater at 4 weeks and 27% greater after 8 weeks). Additionally, the increase in density of the regenerated bone from 4 to 8 weeks in the wrap group was threefold than that in the scaffold group. The use of the collagen wrap showed significant benefits of increased interfacial bone in-growth (149% greater) and periosteal remodeling (49%) after 4 weeks compared to the scaffold-alone with the two groups being comparable after 8 weeks, by when the collagen membrane showed close-to-complete resorption. While the autograft and wrap groups showed significantly greater flexural strength than the defect group after 8 weeks, the scaffold-alone group was not significantly different from the other three groups. It is most likely that the wrap shows improvement of function by acting like a scaffold for periosteal callus ossification, maintaining the local bone-healing environment while reducing fibrous infiltration (15% less than scaffold only at 4 weeks). This study indicates that the use of

  17. Autologously generated tissue-engineered bone flaps for reconstruction of large mandibular defects in an ovine model.

    PubMed

    Tatara, Alexander M; Kretlow, James D; Spicer, Patrick P; Lu, Steven; Lam, Johnny; Liu, Wei; Cao, Yilin; Liu, Guangpeng; Jackson, John D; Yoo, James J; Atala, Anthony; van den Beucken, Jeroen J J P; Jansen, John A; Kasper, F Kurtis; Ho, Tang; Demian, Nagi; Miller, Michael John; Wong, Mark E; Mikos, Antonios G

    2015-05-01

    The reconstruction of large craniofacial defects remains a significant clinical challenge. The complex geometry of facial bone and the lack of suitable donor tissue often hinders successful repair. One strategy to address both of these difficulties is the development of an in vivo bioreactor, where a tissue flap of suitable geometry can be orthotopically grown within the same patient requiring reconstruction. Our group has previously designed such an approach using tissue chambers filled with morcellized bone autograft as a scaffold to autologously generate tissue with a predefined geometry. However, this approach still required donor tissue for filling the tissue chamber. With the recent advances in biodegradable synthetic bone graft materials, it may be possible to minimize this donor tissue by replacing it with synthetic ceramic particles. In addition, these flaps have not previously been transferred to a mandibular defect. In this study, we demonstrate the feasibility of transferring an autologously generated tissue-engineered vascularized bone flap to a mandibular defect in an ovine model, using either morcellized autograft or synthetic bone graft as scaffold material.

  18. Autologously Generated Tissue-Engineered Bone Flaps for Reconstruction of Large Mandibular Defects in an Ovine Model

    PubMed Central

    Tatara, Alexander M.; Kretlow, James D.; Spicer, Patrick P.; Lu, Steven; Lam, Johnny; Liu, Wei; Cao, Yilin; Liu, Guangpeng; Jackson, John D.; Yoo, James J.; Atala, Anthony; van den Beucken, Jeroen J.J.P.; Jansen, John A.; Kasper, F. Kurtis; Ho, Tang; Demian, Nagi; Miller, Michael John; Wong, Mark E.

    2015-01-01

    The reconstruction of large craniofacial defects remains a significant clinical challenge. The complex geometry of facial bone and the lack of suitable donor tissue often hinders successful repair. One strategy to address both of these difficulties is the development of an in vivo bioreactor, where a tissue flap of suitable geometry can be orthotopically grown within the same patient requiring reconstruction. Our group has previously designed such an approach using tissue chambers filled with morcellized bone autograft as a scaffold to autologously generate tissue with a predefined geometry. However, this approach still required donor tissue for filling the tissue chamber. With the recent advances in biodegradable synthetic bone graft materials, it may be possible to minimize this donor tissue by replacing it with synthetic ceramic particles. In addition, these flaps have not previously been transferred to a mandibular defect. In this study, we demonstrate the feasibility of transferring an autologously generated tissue-engineered vascularized bone flap to a mandibular defect in an ovine model, using either morcellized autograft or synthetic bone graft as scaffold material. PMID:25603924

  19. Autologously generated tissue-engineered bone flaps for reconstruction of large mandibular defects in an ovine model.

    PubMed

    Tatara, Alexander M; Kretlow, James D; Spicer, Patrick P; Lu, Steven; Lam, Johnny; Liu, Wei; Cao, Yilin; Liu, Guangpeng; Jackson, John D; Yoo, James J; Atala, Anthony; van den Beucken, Jeroen J J P; Jansen, John A; Kasper, F Kurtis; Ho, Tang; Demian, Nagi; Miller, Michael John; Wong, Mark E; Mikos, Antonios G

    2015-05-01

    The reconstruction of large craniofacial defects remains a significant clinical challenge. The complex geometry of facial bone and the lack of suitable donor tissue often hinders successful repair. One strategy to address both of these difficulties is the development of an in vivo bioreactor, where a tissue flap of suitable geometry can be orthotopically grown within the same patient requiring reconstruction. Our group has previously designed such an approach using tissue chambers filled with morcellized bone autograft as a scaffold to autologously generate tissue with a predefined geometry. However, this approach still required donor tissue for filling the tissue chamber. With the recent advances in biodegradable synthetic bone graft materials, it may be possible to minimize this donor tissue by replacing it with synthetic ceramic particles. In addition, these flaps have not previously been transferred to a mandibular defect. In this study, we demonstrate the feasibility of transferring an autologously generated tissue-engineered vascularized bone flap to a mandibular defect in an ovine model, using either morcellized autograft or synthetic bone graft as scaffold material. PMID:25603924

  20. Combined conjunctival autograft and overlay amniotic membrane transplantation; a novel surgical treatment for pterygium.

    PubMed

    Ghanavati, Siamak Zarei; Shousha, Mohamed Abou; Betancurt, Carolina; Perez, Victor L

    2014-01-01

    The authors report the long-term results of combined conjunctival autograft and overlay amniotic membrane transplantation (AMT) for treatment of pterygium as a new surgical technique. Nineteen patients including 12 male and 7 female subjects with pterygium (primary, 14 cases; recurrent, 5 cases) underwent combined conjunctival autograft and overlay AMT and were followed from 10 to 26 months. Mean age was 44.21±12.49 (range, 29.0-73.0) years. In one patient with grade T3 primary pterygium, the lesion recurred (5.2%, recurrence rate). No intra-and postoperative complication developed. This procedure seems a safe and effective surgical technique for pterygium treatment. Protection of the ocular surface during the early postoperative period reduces the friction-induced inflammation and might be helpful to prevent the recurrence.

  1. Grafting-responsive miRNAs in cucumber and pumpkin seedlings identified by high-throughput sequencing at whole genome level.

    PubMed

    Li, Chaohan; Li, Yansu; Bai, Longqiang; Zhang, Tieyao; He, Chaoxing; Yan, Yan; Yu, Xianchang

    2014-08-01

    Grafting is an important agricultural technique widely used for improving growth, yields and tolerance of crops to abiotic and biotic stresses. As one type of endogenous, non-coding small RNAs, microRNAs (miRNAs) regulate development and responsiveness to biotic and abiotic stresses by negatively mediating expression of target genes at the post-transcriptional level. However, there have been few detailed studies to evaluate the role of miRNAs in mediation of grafting-induced physiological processes in plants. Cucumis sativus and Cucurbita moschata are important vegetables worldwide. We constructed eight small RNA libraries from leaves and roots of seedlings that were grafted in the following four ways: (1) hetero-grafting, using cucumber as scion and pumpkin as rootstock; (2) hetero-grafting, with pumpkin as scion and cucumber as rootstock; (3) auto-grafting of cucumbers and (4) auto-grafting of pumpkins. High-throughput sequencing was employed, and more than 120 million raw reads were obtained. We annotated 112 known miRNAs belonging to 40 miRNA families and identified 48 new miRNAs in the eight libraries, and the targets of these known and novel miRNAs were predicted by bioinformatics. Grafting led to changes in expression of most miRNAs and their predicted target genes, suggesting that miRNAs may play significant roles in mediating physiological processes of grafted seedlings by regulating the expression of target genes. The potential role of the grafting-responsive miRNAs in seedling growth and long-distance transport of miRNA was discussed. These results are useful for functional characterization of miRNAs in mediation of grafting-dependent physiological processes.

  2. Intra-articular osteoid osteoma at the femoral trochlea treated with osteochondral autograft transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Leeman, Joshua J; Motamedi, Daria; Wildman-Tobriner, Ben; O’Donnell, Richard J; Link, Thomas M

    2016-01-01

    We present the case of an intra-articular osteoid osteoma at the femoral trochlea. Intra-articular osteoid osteoma can present a diagnostic challenge both clinically and with imaging because it presents differently from the classic cortical osteoid osteoma. Given the lesion’s proximity to overlying cartilage, the patient underwent resection of the lesion with osteochondral autograft transplantation at the surgical defect. A comprehensive literature review and discussion of intra-articular osteoma will be provided. PMID:27761182

  3. Arthroscopic autograft reconstruction of the inferior glenohumeral ligament: Exploration of technical feasibility in cadaveric shoulder specimens.

    PubMed

    Bouaicha, Samy; Moor, Beat K

    2013-01-01

    Failure of primary arthroscopic Bankart repair in anterior-inferior glenohumeral instability is low, but in some cases revision surgery is required. Revision procedures show good to excellent results but typically are done open and do not respect the anatomical functionality of the joint capsule. The purpose of this cadaveric study was to explore the feasibility of a completely arthroscopic anatomical reconstruction of the inferior glenohumeral ligament using a hamstring autograft.

  4. Effect of bursa Fabricius extracts on antibody production in bursectomized or bursal cell autografted chickens.

    PubMed Central

    Baba, T; Okuno, Y

    1976-01-01

    Restoration and enhancement of immune response against BSA antigen was achieved by 5-day consecutive doses of BF estract from 4-5-week-old chickens, in birds which had been surgically bursectomized or given BF-cell autografts at 17 days of age. A similar 5-day treatment with other tissue extract, i.e. liver, spleen, pancreas or intestine, or with LPS of E. coli, in contrast, failed to provide such restoration or enhancement. PMID:61937

  5. Neuropeptide Treatment with Cerebrolysin Enhances the Survival of Grafted Neural Stem Cell in an α-Synuclein Transgenic Model of Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rockenstein, Edward; Desplats, Paula; Ubhi, Kiren; Mante, Michael; Florio, Jazmin; Adame, Anthony; Winter, Stefan; Brandstaetter, Hemma; Meier, Dieter; Moessler, Herbert; Masliah, Eliezer

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal stem cell (NSC) grafts have been investigated as a potential neuro-restorative therapy in Parkinson’s disease (PD) but their use is compromised by the death of grafted cells. We investigated the use of Cerebrolysin (CBL), a neurotrophic peptide mixture, as an adjunct to NSC therapy in the α-synuclein (α-syn) transgenic (tg) model of PD. In vehicle-treated α-syn tg mice, there was decreased survival of NSCs. In contrast, CBL treatment enhanced the survival of NSCs in α-syn tg groups and ameliorated behavioral deficits. The grafted NSCs showed lower levels of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling positive cells in the CBL-treated mice when compared with vehicle-treated α-syn tg mice. No evidence of tumor growth was detected. Levels of α-syn were similar in the vehicle in CBL-treated tg mice. In conclusion, CBL treatment might be a potential adjuvant for therapeutic NSC grafting in PD. PMID:27429559

  6. Neuropeptide Treatment with Cerebrolysin Enhances the Survival of Grafted Neural Stem Cell in an α-Synuclein Transgenic Model of Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Rockenstein, Edward; Desplats, Paula; Ubhi, Kiren; Mante, Michael; Florio, Jazmin; Adame, Anthony; Winter, Stefan; Brandstaetter, Hemma; Meier, Dieter; Moessler, Herbert; Masliah, Eliezer

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal stem cell (NSC) grafts have been investigated as a potential neuro-restorative therapy in Parkinson's disease (PD) but their use is compromised by the death of grafted cells. We investigated the use of Cerebrolysin (CBL), a neurotrophic peptide mixture, as an adjunct to NSC therapy in the α-synuclein (α-syn) transgenic (tg) model of PD. In vehicle-treated α-syn tg mice, there was decreased survival of NSCs. In contrast, CBL treatment enhanced the survival of NSCs in α-syn tg groups and ameliorated behavioral deficits. The grafted NSCs showed lower levels of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling positive cells in the CBL-treated mice when compared with vehicle-treated α-syn tg mice. No evidence of tumor growth was detected. Levels of α-syn were similar in the vehicle in CBL-treated tg mice. In conclusion, CBL treatment might be a potential adjuvant for therapeutic NSC grafting in PD.

  7. Transplantation of amniotic membrane and limbal autograft for patients with recurrent pterygium associated with symblepharon

    PubMed Central

    Shimazaki, J.; Shinozaki, N.; Tsubota, K.

    1998-01-01

    AIM—Treatment of recurrent pterygium associated with symblepharon requires both suppression of fibrosis and reconstruction of limbal barrier. To achieve this, human amniotic membrane was transplanted and limbal autografts performed.
METHODS—Four patients with severe symblepharon resulting from multiple surgeries for pterygium were treated. Human amniotic membrane was obtained at caesarean section and preserved until surgery. After excision of the fibrous tissues, the amniotic membrane was placed on the sclera, and a limbal autograft transplantation was performed using limbal tissues taken from the affected eye.
RESULTS—Recurrence of symblepharon was not observed in any of the patients and significant suppression of the subconjunctival fibrosis was achieved. Ocular movement improved in all cases. Complete remission of pterygium regrowth occurred in three cases, and a slight (about 1 mm) recurrence occurred in one case. The limbal donor site showed the presence of mild depressions without the formation of pseudopterygium.
CONCLUSION—Transplantation of human amniotic membrane with a limbal autograft appears to be a promising surgical treatment for reconstructing the ocular surface in patients with recurrent pterygium associated with symblepharon.

 Keywords: pterygium; limbal transplantation; amniotic membrane; symblepharon PMID:9602618

  8. Possible Role of α1-Antitrypsin in Endometriosis-Like Grafts From a Mouse Model of Endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Kazuhiro; Takashima, Haruka; Fumoto, Keiko; Kajihara, Takeshi; Uchino, Satomi; Ishihara, Osamu; Yoshie, Mikihiro; Kusama, Kazuya; Tachikawa, Eiichi

    2015-09-01

    Previous study indicated that bleeding into the peritoneum may accelerate inflammatory response in endometriosis-like grafts in mice. To identify changes in protein levels in the grafts from mice that underwent unilateral ovariectomy (uOVX), which causes bleeding from ovarian arteries and vein, the grafts were generated by injecting a suspension of human endometrial cells in BALB/c nude female mice, and protein profile changes were compared with non-uOVX control mice. The level of α1-antitrypsin (α1-AT) decreased in grafts from nude mice that underwent uOVX. The levels of phosphorylated Akt, mammalian target of rapamycin, S6K, regulatory factors for cell survival, and of phosphorylated nuclear factor κB, an inflammatory mediator, were higher in endometriosis-like grafts from the uOVX group than from the control. The grafts were mostly comprised of stromal cells. The bioactivity of α1-AT was assessed by investigating cytokine expression in protease-activated receptor (PAR) 1/2 agonists-stimulated stromal cells. The PARs promoted the expression of interleukin 8 (IL-8), but treatment with α1-AT blocked IL-8 expression dose dependently. Knocking down α1-AT expression increased the constitutive IL-6, IL-8, and cyclooxygenase 2 expression as well as PAR1 agonist-stimulated IL-6 expression. These findings support the notion that decreased α1-AT protein in the grafts constituted with human endometrial cells in mice may have exacerbated inflammation in endometriosis-like grafts, suggesting the possible involvement of α1-AT in the pathophysiology of endometriosis.

  9. Allogeneic Versus Autologous Derived Cell Sources for Use in Engineered Bone-Ligament-Bone Grafts in Sheep Anterior Cruciate Ligament Repair

    PubMed Central

    Mahalingam, Vasudevan D.; Behbahani-Nejad, Nilofar; Horine, Storm V.; Olsen, Tyler J.; Smietana, Michael J.; Wojtys, Edward M.; Wellik, Deneen M.; Arruda, Ellen M.

    2015-01-01

    The use of autografts versus allografts for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is controversial. The current popular options for ACL reconstruction are patellar tendon or hamstring autografts, yet advances in allograft technologies have made allogeneic grafts a favorable option for repair tissue. Despite this, the mismatched biomechanical properties and risk of osteoarthritis resulting from the current graft technologies have prompted the investigation of new tissue sources for ACL reconstruction. Previous work by our lab has demonstrated that tissue-engineered bone-ligament-bone (BLB) constructs generated from an allogeneic cell source develop structural and functional properties similar to those of native ACL and vascular and neural structures that exceed those of autologous patellar tendon grafts. In this study, we investigated the effectiveness of our tissue-engineered ligament constructs fabricated from autologous versus allogeneic cell sources. Our preliminary results demonstrate that 6 months postimplantation, our tissue-engineered auto- and allogeneic BLB grafts show similar histological and mechanical outcomes indicating that the autologous grafts are a viable option for ACL reconstruction. These data indicate that our tissue-engineered autologous ligament graft could be used in clinical situations where immune rejection and disease transmission may preclude allograft use. PMID:25397361

  10. Allogeneic versus autologous derived cell sources for use in engineered bone-ligament-bone grafts in sheep anterior cruciate ligament repair.

    PubMed

    Mahalingam, Vasudevan D; Behbahani-Nejad, Nilofar; Horine, Storm V; Olsen, Tyler J; Smietana, Michael J; Wojtys, Edward M; Wellik, Deneen M; Arruda, Ellen M; Larkin, Lisa M

    2015-03-01

    The use of autografts versus allografts for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is controversial. The current popular options for ACL reconstruction are patellar tendon or hamstring autografts, yet advances in allograft technologies have made allogeneic grafts a favorable option for repair tissue. Despite this, the mismatched biomechanical properties and risk of osteoarthritis resulting from the current graft technologies have prompted the investigation of new tissue sources for ACL reconstruction. Previous work by our lab has demonstrated that tissue-engineered bone-ligament-bone (BLB) constructs generated from an allogeneic cell source develop structural and functional properties similar to those of native ACL and vascular and neural structures that exceed those of autologous patellar tendon grafts. In this study, we investigated the effectiveness of our tissue-engineered ligament constructs fabricated from autologous versus allogeneic cell sources. Our preliminary results demonstrate that 6 months postimplantation, our tissue-engineered auto- and allogeneic BLB grafts show similar histological and mechanical outcomes indicating that the autologous grafts are a viable option for ACL reconstruction. These data indicate that our tissue-engineered autologous ligament graft could be used in clinical situations where immune rejection and disease transmission may preclude allograft use.

  11. Uses of Various Grafting Techniques in External Approach Rhinoplasty: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Khan, Nazir A; Rehman, Ayaz; Yadav, Rajshri

    2016-09-01

    The surgeons performing rhinoplasty found Graft selection the greatest challenge. To avoid an immune response the preferred choice thus far for nasal reconstruction would be autograft compared to allograft due to its lower rate of rejection. We have evaluated 30 patients who underwent open rhinoplasty and We used conchal and septal cartilaginous grafts in various forms by the open approach to correct various nasal deformities compared our experience regarding the operative technique, graft availability, indications, and limitations. No bony graft material or synthetic materials were used. Preoperative extensive evaluation of the patient was done in order to determine the type of deformity and the type of graft to be used in order to correct the deformity. Preoperative and postoperative photographs were taken in four basic views: frontal, lateral, lateral-oblique and basal in order to assess the results of the surgery. The study was done on 30 patients (20 male and 10 females) using the external rhinoplasty approach using the septal and conchal cartilages in different forms. Autologous septal cartilage was used in most of the patients (25 out of 30) and conchal cartilage was used in 5 patients. Multiple grafting techniques were used in some patients. Three patients had traumatic etiology. Columellar strut graft along with TIG technique was used in 16 patients, spreader graft was used in 8 patients, and septal extension graft was used in 5 patient and shield graft in 1 patient. Septorhinoplasty continues to evolve through various new techniques and modifications with the main goal to improve functional nasal airway and to restore cosmetic harmony to the face. Optimum result is very much dependent on the surgeon's attention to functional, aesthetic, and reconstructive principles and graft selection.

  12. An equivalent astable multivibrator model to assess flow instability and dysfunction risk in in-vitro stenotic arteriovenous grafts.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chia-Hung; Kan, Chung-Dann; Chen, Wei-Ling; Wu, Ming-Jui; Yu, Fan-Ming

    2016-05-18

    Narrowed vessel accesses produce blood flow changes, and induce flow instability and vessel wall vibration, resulting in blood pressure, flow velocity, and flow resistance increases. The vessel wall vibrates and propagates the low axial blood flow, as representing the resistance (R) to blood flow. The compliance is a blood pressure-blood volume relation, representing the systole and diastole capacity of the blood vessel. These dynamic behaviors increase blood flow resistances and reduce blood vessel compliances. Vibration phenomena result on the elastic vessel walls and induce simple harmonic motion due to transverse vibration pressure (TVP). The rise time, amplitude, and pulse duration of transverse waves are determined by the flow resistances (R) and vessel compliances (C). Thus, a stenotic arteriovenous access has high resistance and low compliance, which can be expressed an astable multivibrator as an equivalent model consisting of a lumped resistor (R) and a lumped capacitor (C). TVP's oscillation frequency, rise time, and amplitude are determined by the flow resistances and vessel compliances. Hence, an astable multivibrator is used to model TVP parameters to estimate negative time constants, τ=(R× C), which are used to evaluate the flow instability and the dysfunction risk in in-vitro arteriovenous grafts (AVGs). Experimental results show the average negative time constants have the positive correlation as the degree of stenosis (DOS) increases (R2 = 0.8944), and their variations with the flow resistance and vessel compliance are also validated. Positive pole values, s=(-1/τ), are used to show that the force responses of the vessel walls grow in a finite time, 0.5415 ± 7.60 × 10-3 sec, and the equivalent model would be also unstable as DOS increases (R2 = 0.8802). By comparison with hemodynamic analysis, the finding of proposed model can be further carried out for screening AVG dysfunction risk during hemodialysis treatment.

  13. An equivalent astable multivibrator model to assess flow instability and dysfunction risk in in-vitro stenotic arteriovenous grafts.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chia-Hung; Kan, Chung-Dann; Chen, Wei-Ling; Wu, Ming-Jui; Yu, Fan-Ming

    2016-05-18

    Narrowed vessel accesses produce blood flow changes, and induce flow instability and vessel wall vibration, resulting in blood pressure, flow velocity, and flow resistance increases. The vessel wall vibrates and propagates the low axial blood flow, as representing the resistance (R) to blood flow. The compliance is a blood pressure-blood volume relation, representing the systole and diastole capacity of the blood vessel. These dynamic behaviors increase blood flow resistances and reduce blood vessel compliances. Vibration phenomena result on the elastic vessel walls and induce simple harmonic motion due to transverse vibration pressure (TVP). The rise time, amplitude, and pulse duration of transverse waves are determined by the flow resistances (R) and vessel compliances (C). Thus, a stenotic arteriovenous access has high resistance and low compliance, which can be expressed an astable multivibrator as an equivalent model consisting of a lumped resistor (R) and a lumped capacitor (C). TVP's oscillation frequency, rise time, and amplitude are determined by the flow resistances and vessel compliances. Hence, an astable multivibrator is used to model TVP parameters to estimate negative time constants, τ=(R× C), which are used to evaluate the flow instability and the dysfunction risk in in-vitro arteriovenous grafts (AVGs). Experimental results show the average negative time constants have the positive correlation as the degree of stenosis (DOS) increases (R2 = 0.8944), and their variations with the flow resistance and vessel compliance are also validated. Positive pole values, s=(-1/τ), are used to show that the force responses of the vessel walls grow in a finite time, 0.5415 ± 7.60 × 10-3 sec, and the equivalent model would be also unstable as DOS increases (R2 = 0.8802). By comparison with hemodynamic analysis, the finding of proposed model can be further carried out for screening AVG dysfunction risk during hemodialysis treatment. PMID:26835723

  14. MR imaging of osteochondral grafts and autologous chondrocyte implantation

    PubMed Central

    Millington, S. A.; Szomolanyi, P.; Marlovits, S.

    2006-01-01

    Surgical articular cartilage repair therapies for cartilage defects such as osteochondral autograft transfer, autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) or matrix associated autologous chondrocyte transplantation (MACT) are becoming more common. MRI has become the method of choice for non-invasive follow-up of patients after cartilage repair surgery. It should be performed with cartilage sensitive sequences, including fat-suppressed proton density-weighted T2 fast spin-echo (PD/T2-FSE) and three-dimensional gradient-echo (3D GRE) sequences, which provide good signal-to-noise and contrast-to-noise ratios. A thorough magnetic resonance (MR)-based assessment of cartilage repair tissue includes evaluations of defect filling, the surface and structure of repair tissue, the signal intensity of repair tissue and the subchondral bone status. Furthermore, in osteochondral autografts surface congruity, osseous incorporation and the donor site should be assessed. High spatial resolution is mandatory and can be achieved either by using a surface coil with a 1.5-T scanner or with a knee coil at 3 T; it is particularly important for assessing graft morphology and integration. Moreover, MR imaging facilitates assessment of complications including periosteal hypertrophy, delamination, adhesions, surface incongruence and reactive changes such as effusions and synovitis. Ongoing developments include isotropic 3D sequences, for improved morphological analysis, and in vivo biochemical imaging such as dGEMRIC, T2 mapping and diffusion-weighted imaging, which make functional analysis of cartilage possible. PMID:16802126

  15. Inhibition of EGFR Tyrosine Kinase by Erlotinib Prevents Sclerodermatous Graft-Versus-Host Disease in a Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Morin, Florence; Kavian, Niloufar; Marut, Wioleta; Chéreau, Christiane; Cerles, Olivier; Grange, Philippe; Weill, Bernard; Nicco, Carole; Batteux, Frédéric

    2015-10-01

    Chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) follows allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. It results from alloreactive processes induced by minor histocompatibility antigen incompatibilities leading to the activation of CD4 T cells and the development of fibrosis and inflammation of the skin and visceral organs and autoimmunity that resemble systemic sclerosis. EGFR is a ubiquitous cell receptor deeply involved in cell proliferation, differentiation, and motility. EGFR has recently been implicated in autoimmune and fibrotic diseases. Therefore, we tested whether Erlotinib, an EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor, can prevent sclerodermatous GVHD (Scl-GVHD). Scl-GVHD was induced in BALB/c mice by B10.D2 bone marrow and spleen cell transplantation. Transplanted mice displayed severe clinical symptoms including alopecia, fibrosis of the skin and visceral organs, vasculitis, and diarrhea. The symptoms were reversed in mice treated with Erlotinib. These beneficial effects were mediated by the decreased production of activated/memory CD4(+) T cells and the reduction in T-cell infiltration of the skin and visceral organs along with a decrease in IFN-γ and IL-13 production and autoimmune B-cell activation. The improvement provided by Erlotinib in the mouse model of Scl-GVHD supplies a rationale for the evaluation of Erlotinib in the management of patients affected by chronic GVHD.

  16. Electrostrictive Graft Elastomers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Ji (Inventor); Harrison, Joycelyn S. (Inventor); St.Clair, Terry L. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    An electrostrictive graft elastomer has a backbone molecule which is a non-crystallizable, flexible macromolecular chain and a grafted polymer forming polar graft moieties with backbone molecules. The polar graft moieties have been rotated by an applied electric field, e.g., into substantial polar alignment. The rotation is sustained until the electric field is removed. In another embodiment, a process for producing strain in an elastomer includes: (a) providing a graft elastomer having a backbone molecule which is a non-crystallizable, flexible macromolecular chain and a grafted polymer forming polar graft moieties with backbone molecules; and (b) applying an electric field to the graft elastomer to rotate the polar graft moieties, e.g., into substantial polar alignment.

  17. Viability of human ovarian tissue confirmed 5 years after freezing with spontaneous ice-formation by autografting and chorio-allantoic membrane culture.

    PubMed

    Isachenko, Vladimir; Orth, Ingrid; Isachenko, Evgenia; Mallmann, Peter; Peters, Doris; Schmidt, Torsten; Morgenstern, Bernd; Foth, Dolores; Hanstein, Bettina; Rahimi, Gohar

    2013-06-01

    To achieve optimal and uniform outcomes, slow cooling protocols for human ovarian tissues generally initiate ice formation at high sub-zero temperatures (-6 to -9 °C). The aim of the study was to investigate the function of ovarian tissue that had unintentionally self seeded at -20 °C during the freezing step, by examining its development following chicken embryonic chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) grafting and after transplantation back to the patient. Ovarian tissue was frozen in 6% (v/v) dimethyl sulfoxide, 6% (v/v) ethylene glycol and 0.15M sucrose which had self-seeded at -20 °C. Five years after cryopreservation, 8 pieces were thawed and transplanted back to the patient. Two small (1 × 2 × 1 mm) pieces of this thawed tissue were cultured in a CAM-system for 5 days to assess the tissue viability. The autografted ovarian tissue re-established spontaneous menstrual bleeding within five months and raised serum 17-β Estradiol from 19 to 330 pg/ml. Ultrasound revealed a dominant follicle at the site of the transplanted tissue in the follicular phase after the menstrual bleed. Analysis of the CAM cultured tissue established that 88% of the primordial follicles are degenerated and there was limited in growth of blood vessels. In conclusion, in spite of the damage caused by the cryopreservation with spontaneous ice-formation the viability could be confirmed by CAM culture and the restoration of ovarian function after auto-transplantation.

  18. Modified Extracorporeal Photopheresis with Cells from a Healthy Donor for Acute Graft-versus-Host Disease in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Budde, Holger; Kolb, Susanne; Salinas Tejedor, Laura; Wulf, Gerald; Reichardt, Holger M.; Riggert, Joachim; Legler, Tobias J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) is a major challenge after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation but treatment options for patients are still limited. In many cases first-line treatment with glucocorticoids is not successful. Among second-line therapies the extracorporeal photopheresis (ECP) is frequently performed, due to induction of selective tolerance instead of general immunosuppression. However, for some patients with severe acute GvHD the leukapheresis step of the ECP procedure is physically exhausting and limits the number of ECP cycles. Methods We hypothesized that leukocytes from healthy cell donors could be used as a replacement for ECP leukocytes gained from the GvHD patient. For this purpose we used a well established mouse model of acute GvHD. The ECP therapy was based on cells with the genetic background of the initial donor of the stem cell transplantation. As a precondition we developed a protocol representing conventional ECP in mice equivalent to clinical used ECP setup. Results We could demonstrate that conventional, clinically derived ECP setup is able to alleviate acute GvHD. By using leukocytes obtained from healthy mice with the bone marrow donor’s genetic background we could not observe a statistically significant therapeutic effect. Conclusions Conventional human ECP setup is effective in the mouse model of severe acute GvHD. In addition we could not prove that ECP cells from healthy mice with bone marrow donor’s genetic background are as effective as ECP cells derived from GvHD mice. Based on our findings, new questions arise for further studies, in which the cellular characteristics for ECP mediated immune tolerance are a matter of investigation. PMID:25148404

  19. [Use of the calvarium for bone grafting in cranio-maxillo-facial surgery].

    PubMed

    Raulo, Y; Baruch, J

    1990-01-01

    Bone grafts's traditional donor sites in cranio-maxillo-facial surgery have been for many years and are still in some occasions the ribs, iliac crest and tibia. Bone grafts taken from the calvaria have been used by some surgeons in the past but its wide acceptance was only achieved after Paul Tessier had reported his own experience. The calvaria is composed of inner and outer tables that encloses a layer of cancellous bone called the diploe. A high degree of variability exist with respect to skull thickness. Nevertheless parietal bones is the preferable site for the harvesting of the graft. The embryonic origin of the cranium should be responsible for greater survival of the graft. Membranous bone would maintain its volume to a greater extent than endochondral bone when autografted in the cranio-facial region. However this remains controversial. Two techniques can be used for the harvesting of a calvarial bone grafts. A split thickness calvarial graft involves removal of the outer table while leaving the inner layer in place. Its main disadvantage is the relatively thinness of the bone transferred. A full thickness segment of skull involves the cranium cavity be entered. A half of the graft can be split along the diploe space and returned to fill the donor site. The other half is used for reconstruction. It is a more complicated procedure. Cranial grafts have been used in the following cases. Correction of contour defect of the forehead and zygomatic bones, orbital floor reconstruction, restoration of the nasal bridge, bone grafting of the maxilla and mandibule. The advantages are the following: the donor and recipient sites are in adjacent surgical fields, the donor site scar is hidden in the scalp, morbidity associated with removing the graft is almost inexistent. (ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Therapeutic effects of glatiramer acetate and grafted CD115⁺ monocytes in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Koronyo, Yosef; Salumbides, Brenda C; Sheyn, Julia; Pelissier, Lindsey; Li, Songlin; Ljubimov, Vladimir; Moyseyev, Michelle; Daley, David; Fuchs, Dieu-Trang; Pham, Michael; Black, Keith L; Rentsendorj, Altan; Koronyo-Hamaoui, Maya

    2015-08-01

    Weekly glatiramer acetate immunization of transgenic mice modelling Alzheimer's disease resulted in retained cognition (Morris water maze test), decreased amyloid-β plaque burden, and regulation of local inflammation through a mechanism involving enhanced recruitment of monocytes. Ablation of bone marrow-derived myeloid cells exacerbated plaque pathology, whereas weekly administration of glatiramer acetate enhanced cerebral recruitment of innate immune cells, which dampened the pathology. Here, we assessed the therapeutic potential of grafted CD115(+) monocytes, injected once monthly into the peripheral blood of transgenic APPSWE/PS1ΔE9 Alzheimer's disease mouse models, with and without weekly immunization of glatiramer acetate, as compared to glatiramer acetate alone. All immune-modulation treatment groups were compared with age-matched phosphate-buffered saline-injected control transgenic and untreated non-transgenic mouse groups. Two independent cohorts of mice were assessed for behavioural performance (6-8 mice/group); treatments started in 10-month-old symptomatic mice and spanned a total of 2 months. For all three treatments, our data suggest a substantial decrease in cognitive deficit as assessed by the Barnes maze test (P < 0.0001-0.001). Improved cognitive function was associated with synaptic preservation and reduction in cerebral amyloid-β protein levels and astrogliosis (P < 0.001 and P < 0.0001), with no apparent additive effects for the combined treatment. The peripherally grafted, green fluorescent protein-labelled and endogenous monocytes, homed to cerebral amyloid plaques and directly engulfed amyloid-β; their recruitment was further enhanced by glatiramer acetate. In glatiramer acetate-immunized mice and, moreover, in the combined treatment group, monocyte recruitment to the brain was coupled with greater elevation of the regulatory cytokine IL10 surrounding amyloid-β plaques. All treated transgenic mice had increased cerebral levels of MMP9

  1. Therapeutic effects of glatiramer acetate and grafted CD115+ monocytes in a mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Koronyo, Yosef; Salumbides, Brenda C.; Sheyn, Julia; Pelissier, Lindsey; Li, Songlin; Ljubimov, Vladimir; Moyseyev, Michelle; Daley, David; Fuchs, Dieu-Trang; Pham, Michael; Black, Keith L.; Rentsendorj, Altan

    2015-01-01

    Weekly glatiramer acetate immunization of transgenic mice modelling Alzheimer’s disease resulted in retained cognition (Morris water maze test), decreased amyloid-β plaque burden, and regulation of local inflammation through a mechanism involving enhanced recruitment of monocytes. Ablation of bone marrow-derived myeloid cells exacerbated plaque pathology, whereas weekly administration of glatiramer acetate enhanced cerebral recruitment of innate immune cells, which dampened the pathology. Here, we assessed the therapeutic potential of grafted CD115+ monocytes, injected once monthly into the peripheral blood of transgenic APPSWE/PS1ΔE9 Alzheimer’s disease mouse models, with and without weekly immunization of glatiramer acetate, as compared to glatiramer acetate alone. All immune-modulation treatment groups were compared with age-matched phosphate-buffered saline-injected control transgenic and untreated non-transgenic mouse groups. Two independent cohorts of mice were assessed for behavioural performance (6–8 mice/group); treatments started in 10-month-old symptomatic mice and spanned a total of 2 months. For all three treatments, our data suggest a substantial decrease in cognitive deficit as assessed by the Barnes maze test (P < 0.0001–0.001). Improved cognitive function was associated with synaptic preservation and reduction in cerebral amyloid-β protein levels and astrogliosis (P < 0.001 and P < 0.0001), with no apparent additive effects for the combined treatment. The peripherally grafted, green fluorescent protein-labelled and endogenous monocytes, homed to cerebral amyloid plaques and directly engulfed amyloid-β; their recruitment was further enhanced by glatiramer acetate. In glatiramer acetate-immunized mice and, moreover, in the combined treatment group, monocyte recruitment to the brain was coupled with greater elevation of the regulatory cytokine IL10 surrounding amyloid-β plaques. All treated transgenic mice had increased cerebral levels of

  2. Computer-based planning of optimal donor sites for autologous osseous grafts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krol, Zdzislaw; Chlebiej, Michal; Zerfass, Peter; Zeilhofer, Hans-Florian U.; Sader, Robert; Mikolajczak, Pawel; Keeve, Erwin

    2002-05-01

    Bone graft surgery is often necessary for reconstruction of craniofacial defects after trauma, tumor, infection or congenital malformation. In this operative technique the removed or missing bone segment is filled with a bone graft. The mainstay of the craniofacial reconstruction rests with the replacement of the defected bone by autogeneous bone grafts. To achieve sufficient incorporation of the autograft into the host bone, precise planning and simulation of the surgical intervention is required. The major problem is to determine as accurately as possible the donor site where the graft should be dissected from and to define the shape of the desired transplant. A computer-aided method for semi-automatic selection of optimal donor sites for autografts in craniofacial reconstructive surgery has been developed. The non-automatic step of graft design and constraint setting is followed by a fully automatic procedure to find the best fitting position. In extension to preceding work, a new optimization approach based on the Levenberg-Marquardt method has been implemented and embedded into our computer-based surgical planning system. This new technique enables, once the pre-processing step has been performed, selection of the optimal donor site in time less than one minute. The method has been applied during surgery planning step in more than 20 cases. The postoperative observations have shown that functional results, such as speech and chewing ability as well as restoration of bony continuity were clearly better compared to conventionally planned operations. Moreover, in most cases the duration of the surgical interventions has been distinctly reduced.

  3. Local immunostimulation leading to rejection of accepted male skin grafts by female mice as a model for cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Bourdeaux, Christophe; Lurquin, Christophe; Jacquemart, Isabelle; Lethé, Bernard; Brasseur, Francis; van Baren, Nicolas; Baurain, Jean-François; Dyson, Julian; Van Snick, Jacques; Uyttenhove, Catherine; Boon, Thierry

    2014-01-01

    Female mice of inbred strain CBA do not reject syngeneic male skin grafts even though they mount a T-cell response against the male-specific HY antigen. We show that local immunostimulation performed by injecting cytokines and Toll-like receptor ligands in close vicinity to the graft causes rejection. We feel that this approach should be tested in tumor-bearing human patients in combination with antitumor vaccination. Relief of intratumor immunosuppression may increase considerably the fraction of patients who respond to vaccination directed against tumor antigens recognized by T cells. PMID:24550491

  4. Design of Phosphonated Imidazolium-Based Ionic Liquids Grafted on γ-Alumina: Potential Model for Hybrid Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Pizzoccaro, Marie-Alix; Drobek, Martin; Petit, Eddy; Guerrero, Gilles; Hesemann, Peter; Julbe, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Imidazolium bromide-based ionic liquids bearing phosphonyl groups on the cationic part were synthesized and grafted on γ-alumina (γ-Al2O3) powders. These powders were prepared as companion samples of conventional mesoporous γ-alumina membranes, in order to favor a possible transfer of the results to supported membrane materials, which could be used for CO2 separation applications. Effective grafting was demonstrated using energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX), N2 adsorption measurements, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and special attention was paid to 31P and 13C solid state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). PMID:27472321

  5. Free bone graft reconstruction of irradiated facial tissue: Experimental effects of basic fibroblast growth factor stimulation

    SciTech Connect

    Eppley, B.L.; Connolly, D.T.; Winkelmann, T.; Sadove, A.M.; Heuvelman, D.; Feder, J. )

    1991-07-01

    A study was undertaken to evaluate the potential utility of basic fibroblast growth factor in the induction of angiogenesis and osseous healing in bone previously exposed to high doses of irradiation. Thirty New Zealand rabbits were evaluated by introducing basic fibroblast growth factor into irradiated mandibular resection sites either prior to or simultaneous with reconstruction by corticocancellous autografts harvested from the ilium. The fate of the free bone grafts was then evaluated at 90 days postoperatively by microangiographic, histologic, and fluorochrome bone-labeling techniques. Sequestration, necrosis, and failure to heal to recipient osseous margins was observed both clinically and histologically in all nontreated irradiated graft sites as well as those receiving simultaneous angiogenic stimulation at the time of graft placement. No fluorescent activity was seen in these graft groups. In the recipient sites pretreated with basic fibroblast growth factor prior to placement of the graft, healing and reestablishment of mandibular contour occurred in nearly 50 percent of the animals. Active bone formation was evident at cortical margins adjacent to the recipient sites but was absent in the more central cancellous regions of the grafts.

  6. Pseudocyclops: two cases of ACL graft partial tears mimicking cyclops lesions on MRI.

    PubMed

    Simpfendorfer, Claus; Miniaci, Anthony; Subhas, Naveen; Winalski, Carl S; Ilaslan, Hakan

    2015-08-01

    Arthroscopic reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) using autografts or allografts is a common surgical procedure, particularly in young athletes. Although the procedure has excellent success rates, complications such as mechanical impingement, graft rupture, and arthrofibrosis can occur, often necessitating additional surgery. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has become a valuable tool in evaluating complications after ACL reconstruction. We report two cases of ACL reconstruction complicated by arthroscopically proven partial graft tears. In both cases the torn anterior graft fibers were flipped into the intercondylar notch, mimicking anterior arthrofibrosis, i.e., a "cyclops lesion," on MR imaging. Careful review of the direction of graft fibers on MR imaging in the "pseudocyclops" lesions can help differentiate these partial tears from the fibrosis of a true cyclops. The "pseudocyclops" lesion is a previously undescribed MR imaging sign of partial ACL graft tear. Larger studies are required to determine the sensitivity and specificity of the sign, as well as the clinical importance of these partial graft tears. PMID:25620690

  7. Reconstruction of chronic patellar tendon rupture with contralateral BTB autograft: a case report.

    PubMed

    Milankov, Miroslav Z; Miljkovic, Natasa; Stankovic, Milan

    2007-12-01

    Chronic patellar tendon rupture is a rare disabling injury that is technically difficult to repair. Many different surgical methods have been reported for the reconstruction of chronic patellar tendon ruptures. We are reporting the use of contralateral bone-tendon-bone (BTB) autograft for chronic patellar tendon rupture reconstruction followed by double-wire loop reinforcement and without postoperative immobilization. One year after the operation, our patient had full knee extension and up to 130 degrees of flexion. He had good quadriceps strength, and isokinetic muscle testing showed no deficit comparing to his right leg. Patient returned to playing basketball in his spare time, without having any limitation.

  8. Grafting versus seed propagated apricot populations: two main gene pools in Tunisia evidenced by SSR markers and model-based Bayesian clustering

    PubMed Central

    Bourguiba, Hedia; Khadari, Bouchaib; Krichen, Lamia; Trifi-Farah, Neila; Santoni, Sylvain

    2010-01-01

    Apricot was introduced into the Mediterranean Basin from China and Asian mountains through the Middle-East and the Central Europe. Traditionally present in Tunisia, we were interested in accessing the origin of apricot species in the country, and in particular in the number and the location of its introductions. A set of 82 representative apricot accessions including 49 grafted cultivars and 33 seed propagated ‘Bargougs’ were genotyped using 24 microsatellite loci revealing a total of 135 alleles. The model-based Bayesian clustering analysis using both Structure and InStruct programs as well as the multivariate method revealed five distinct genetic clusters. The genetic differentiation among clusters showed that cluster 1, with only four cultivars, was the most differentiated from the four remaining genetic clusters, which constituted the largest part of the studied germplasm. According to their geographic origin, the five identified groups (north, centre, south, Gafsa oasis and other oases groups) enclosed a similar variation within group, with a low level of differentiation. Overall results highlighted the distinction of two apricot gene pools in Tunisia related to the different mode of propagation of the cultivars: grafted and seed propagated apricot, which enclosed a narrow genetic basis. Our findings support the assumption that grafting and seed propagated apricots shared the same origin. PMID:20838857

  9. Grafting versus seed propagated apricot populations: two main gene pools in Tunisia evidenced by SSR markers and model-based Bayesian clustering.

    PubMed

    Bourguiba, Hedia; Khadari, Bouchaib; Krichen, Lamia; Trifi-Farah, Neila; Santoni, Sylvain; Audergon, Jean-Marc

    2010-10-01

    Apricot was introduced into the Mediterranean Basin from China and Asian mountains through the Middle-East and the Central Europe. Traditionally present in Tunisia, we were interested in accessing the origin of apricot species in the country, and in particular in the number and the location of its introductions. A set of 82 representative apricot accessions including 49 grafted cultivars and 33 seed propagated 'Bargougs' were genotyped using 24 microsatellite loci revealing a total of 135 alleles. The model-based Bayesian clustering analysis using both Structure and InStruct programs as well as the multivariate method revealed five distinct genetic clusters. The genetic differentiation among clusters showed that cluster 1, with only four cultivars, was the most differentiated from the four remaining genetic clusters, which constituted the largest part of the studied germplasm. According to their geographic origin, the five identified groups (north, centre, south, Gafsa oasis and other oases groups) enclosed a similar variation within group, with a low level of differentiation. Overall results highlighted the distinction of two apricot gene pools in Tunisia related to the different mode of propagation of the cultivars: grafted and seed propagated apricot, which enclosed a narrow genetic basis. Our findings support the assumption that grafting and seed propagated apricots shared the same origin. PMID:20838857

  10. Excision, skin grafting, corticosteroids, adjuvant radiotherapy, pressure therapy, and emancipation: the ESCAPE model for successful taming of giant auricular keloids.

    PubMed

    Masoodi, Zulqarnain; Ahmad, Imran; Khurram, M Fahud; Haq, Ansarul

    2014-09-01

    The authors treated 24 giant auricular keloids (mean size, 11 cm) from January 2008 to July 2012 using a novel protocol consisting of complete excision, skin grafting, a 1-time intraoperative injection of triamcinolone, immediate radiotherapy, and sustained pressure therapy. At 1 year, the success rate was 87.5%.

  11. Bone grafts in dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Prasanna; Vinitha, Belliappa; Fathima, Ghousia

    2013-01-01

    Bone grafts are used as a filler and scaffold to facilitate bone formation and promote wound healing. These grafts are bioresorbable and have no antigen-antibody reaction. These bone grafts act as a mineral reservoir which induces new bone formation. PMID:23946565

  12. Autograft HIV-DNA load predicts HIV-1 peripheral reservoir after stem cell transplantation for AIDS-related lymphoma patients.

    PubMed

    Zanussi, Stefania; Bortolin, Maria Teresa; Pratesi, Chiara; Tedeschi, Rosamaria; Basaglia, Giancarlo; Abbruzzese, Luciano; Mazzucato, Mario; Spina, Michele; Vaccher, Emanuela; Tirelli, Umberto; Rupolo, Maurizio; Michieli, Mariagrazia; Di Mascio, Michele; De Paoli, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) is a widely used procedure for AIDS-related lymphomas, and it represents an opportunity to evaluate strategies curing HIV-1 infection. The association of autograft HIV-DNA load with peripheral blood HIV-1 reservoir before ASCT and its contribution in predicting HIV-1 reservoir size and stability during combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) after transplantation are unknown. Aiming to obtain information suggesting new functional cure strategies by ASCT, we retrospectively evaluated HIV-DNA load in autograft and in peripheral blood before and after transplantation in 13 cART-treated HIV-1 relapse/refractoring lymphoma patients. Among them seven discontinued cART after autograft infusion. HIV-DNA was evaluated by a sensitive quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). After debulking chemotherapy/mobilization, the autograft HIV-1 reservoir was higher than and not associated with the peripheral HIV-1 reservoir at baseline [median 215 HIV-DNA copies/10(6) autograft mononuclear cells, range 13-706 vs. 82 HIV-DNA copies/10(6) peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), range 13-479, p = 0.03]. After high dose chemotherapy and autograft infusion, HIV-DNA levels reached a plateau between month 6 and 12 of follow-up. No association was found between peripheral HIV-DNA levels at baseline and after infusion in both cART interrupting and not interrupting patients. Only in the last subgroup, a stable significant linear association between autograft and peripheral blood HIV-1 reservoir emerged from month 1 (R(2) = 0.84, p = 0.01) to month 12 follow-up (R(2) = 0.99, p = 0.0005). In summary, autograft HIV-1 reservoir size could be influenced by the mobilization phase and predicts posttransplant peripheral HIV-1 reservoir size in patients on continuous cART. These findings could promote new research on strategies reducing the HIV-1 reservoir by using the ASCT procedure.

  13. Fifteen Year Prospective Comparison of Patellar & Hamstring Tendon Grafts for ACL Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Roe, Justin; Salmon, Lucy; Kok, Alison; Linklater, James; Pinczewski, Leo

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This prospective longitudinal study compares isolated endoscopic ACL reconstruction utilizing 4-strand hamstring tendon (HT) or patellar tendon (PT) autograft over a 15-year period with respect to clinical outcomes and the development of osteoarthritis. Method: 90 consecutive patients with isolated ACL rupture were reconstructed with a PT autograft and 90 patients received HT autograft, with an identical surgical technique. Patients were assessed at 2, 5, 7, 10 and 15 years. Assessment included the IKDC Knee Ligament Evaluation including radiographic evaluation, KT1000, kneeling pain, and clinical outcomes. Results: Subjects who received the PT graft had significantly worse outcomes at 15 years for the variables of radiologically detectable osteoarthritis (p=0.001), motion loss (p=0.02), single leg hop test (p=0.002), participation in strenuous activity (p=0.03), knee related decrease in activity level (p=0.002) and kneeling pain (p=0.03). There was no significant difference between the HT and PT groups in overall IKDC grade (p=0.28). ACL graft rupture occurred in 16% of HT group and 8% of the PT group (p=0.10). Contralateral ACL rupture occurred in significantly more PT patients (24%) than HT patients (12%) (p=0.03). Conclusion: Significant differences have developed at 15 years after surgery which were not seen at earlier reviews. Compared to the HT Group, the PT group had significantly worse outcomes with respect to radiological osteoarthritis, range of motion and functional tests but no significant difference in laxity was identified. There was a high incidence of ACL injury after reconstruction, to both the reconstructed and the contralateral knee.

  14. Specific Biomimetic Hydroxyapatite Nanotopographies Enhance Osteoblastic Differentiation and Bone Graft Osteointegration

    PubMed Central

    Loiselle, Alayna E.; Wei, Lai; Faryad, Muhammad; Paul, Emmanuel M.; Lewis, Gregory S.; Gao, Jun; Lakhtakia, Akhlesh

    2013-01-01

    Impaired healing of cortical bone grafts represents a significant clinical problem. Cadaveric bone grafts undergo extensive chemical processing to decrease the risk of disease transmission; however, these processing techniques alter the bone surface and decrease the osteogenic potential of cells at the healing site. Extensive work has been done to optimize the surface of bone grafts, and hydroxyapatite (HAP) and nanotopography both increase osteoblastic differentiation. HAP is the main mineral component of bone and can enhance osteoblastic differentiation and bone implant healing in vivo, while nanotopography can enhance osteoblastic differentiation, adhesion, and proliferation. This is the first study to test the combined effects of HAP and nanotopographies on bone graft healing. With the goal of identifying the optimized surface features to improve bone graft healing, we tested the hypothesis that HAP-based nanotopographic resurfacing of bone grafts improves integration of cortical bone grafts by enhancing osteoblastic differentiation. Here we show that osteoblastic cells cultured on processed bones coated with specific-scale (50–60 nm) HAP nanotopographies display increased osteoblastic differentiation compared to cells on uncoated bone, bones coated with poly-l-lactic acid nanotopographies, or other HAP nanotopographies. Further, bone grafts coated with 50–60-nm HAP exhibited increased formation of new bone and improved healing, with mechanical properties equivalent to live autografts. These data indicate the potential for specific HAP nanotopographies to not only increase osteoblastic differentiation but also improve bone graft incorporation, which could significantly increase patient quality of life after traumatic bone injuries or resection of an osteosarcoma. PMID:23510012

  15. Doppler derived quantitative flow estimate in coronary artery bypass graft: a computational multiscale model for the evaluation of the current clinical procedure.

    PubMed

    Ponzini, Raffaele; Lemma, Massimo; Morbiducci, Umberto; Montevecchi, Franco M; Redaelli, Alberto

    2008-09-01

    In order to investigate the reliability of the so called mean velocity/vessel area formula adopted in clinical practice for the estimation of the flow rate using an intravascular Doppler guide wire instrumentation, a multiscale computational model was used to give detailed predictions on flow profiles within Y-shaped coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) models. At this purpose three CABG models were built from clinical patient's data and used to evaluate and compare, in each model, the computed flow rate and the flow rate estimated according to the assumption of parabolic velocity profile. A consistent difference between the exact and the estimated value of the flow rate was found in every branch of all the graft models. In this study we showed that this discrepancy in the flow rate estimation is coherent to the theory of Womersley regarding spatial velocity profiles in unsteady flow conditions. In particular this work put in evidence that the error in flow rate estimation can be reduced by using the estimation formula recently proposed by Ponzini et al. [Ponzini R, Vergara C, Redaelli A, Veneziani A. Reliable CFD-based estimation of flow rate in haemodynamics measures. Ultrasound Med Biol 2006;32(10):1545-55], accounting for the unsteady nature of blood, applicable in the clinical practice without resorting to further measurements. PMID:17980641

  16. The use of Reamer Irrigator Aspirator (RIA) autograft harvest in the treatment of critical-sized iliac wing defects in sheep: investigation of dexamethasone and beta-tricalcium phosphate augmentation.

    PubMed

    Beck, Aswin; Nehrbass, Dirk; Stoddart, Martin J; Schiuma, Damiano; Green, Jim; Lansdowne, Jennifer L; Richards, R Geoff; Bouré, Ludovic P

    2013-04-01

    Bone grafts are commonly used for the treatment of segmental bone defects and fracture non-unions. Recently, osseous particles obtained during intermedullary canal reaming (using a Reamer-Irrigator-Aspirator (RIA) device) have been evaluated as graft material during in vitro and clinical studies. The aim of this study was to evaluate and quantify new bone formation after implantation of bone graft material obtained after reaming of the tibia in a bilateral critical-sized iliac wing defect in sheep and to investigate the effect of the augmentation of this graft. A reamer bone graft alone, or after short term incubation in a dexamethasone enriched solution, and a reamer graft collected using beta-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) granules in the filter of the RIA collection device were compared to autologous iliac wing graft. In addition, reamer graft was combined with the cellular fraction collected from the irrigation fluid with and without short-term incubation in a dexamethasone enriched solution. It was hypothesized that the amount of physical bone in the reamer bone graft groups would be higher than the amount in the autologous iliac wing graft group and that augmentation of a reamer bone graft would increase bone formation. Three months after implantation, the amount of new bone formation (as percentage of the total defect volume) in the defects was evaluated ex-vivo by means of micro-CT and histomorphometry. The mean amount of bone in the autologous iliac wing graft group was 17.7% and 16.8% for micro-CT and histomorphometry, respectively. The mean amount of bone in all reamer graft groups ranged between 20.4-29.2% (micro-CT) and 17.0-25.4% (histomorphometry). Reamer graft collected using β-TCP granules (29.2±1.7%) in the filter produced a significantly higher amount of bone in comparison to an autologous iliac wing graft evaluated by micro-CT. RIA bone grafts added a small increase in bone volume to the 3month graft volume in this preclinical sheep model. The

  17. The effects of the centrifugation speed on the survival of autogenous fat grafts in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Bozkurt, Mehmet; Kapı, Emin; Şirinoğlu, Hakan; Güvercin, Emre; Filinte, Gaye Taylan; Filinte, Deniz

    2016-06-01

    Purpose The most important problem in fat transplantation is the durability, which is closely associated with the applied technique. This study includes the comparison of different centrifugation speeds on the survival of autogenous fat grafts in rats. Materials and methods Forty-nine Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into seven groups and the left inguinal fat pad was extracted and re-implanted under the scalp after performing appropriate preparation processes. In the first group the fatty tissue was re-implanted in en-bloc fashion and in the second group it was re-implanted after trimming. After trimming, centrifugation with a G-force of 111.8 (1000 rpm) was performed in the third group, 447.2 (2000 rpm) in the fourth group, 1006.2 (3000 rpm) in the fifth group, 1788.8 (4000 rpm) in the sixth group, and 2795 (5000 rpm) in the seventh group for 4 minutes. The fat grafts were taken after 3 months and histopathological and statistical evaluations were performed. Results The rate of viable fat grafts was significantly higher in the 4th and 5th groups comparing to the first three groups. Total weight and volume amounts of the 4th and 5th groups were also significantly higher comparing to the first three groups. Conclusion Maximal long-term durability and fat cell viability results were obtained in the groups with 2000 rpm or 447.2 G-force/4 minutes and 3000 rpm or 1006.2 G-force/4 minutes centrifugation speed, indicating that 4 minutes centrifugation with an average G-force of 698.75 or 2500 rpm provides the best results for the survival of autogenous fat grafts. PMID:26898924

  18. Structural exploration and Förster theory modeling for the interpretation of gas-phase FRET measurements: Chromophore-grafted amyloid-β peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulesza, Alexander; Daly, Steven; MacAleese, Luke; Antoine, Rodolphe; Dugourd, Philippe

    2015-07-01

    The distance-dependence of excitation energy transfer, e.g., being described by Förster theory (Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)), allows the use of optical techniques for the direct observation of structural properties. Recently, this technique has been successfully applied in the gas phase. The detailed interpretation of the experimental FRET results, however, relies on the comparison with structural modeling. We therefore present a complete first-principles modeling approach that explores the gas-phase structure of chromophore-grafted peptides and achieves accurate predictions of FRET efficiencies. We apply the approach to amyloid-β 12-28 fragments, known to be involved in amyloid plaque formation connected to Alzheimer's disease. We sample structures of the peptides that are grafted with 5-carboxyrhodamine 575 (Rh575) and QSY-7 chromophores by means of replica-exchange molecular dynamics simulations upon an Amber-type forcefield parametrization as a function of the charge state. The generated ensembles provide chromophore-distance and -orientation distributions which are used with the spectral parameters of the Rh575/QSY-7 chromophores to model FRET-efficiencies for the systems. The theoretical values agree with the experimental average "action"-FRET efficiencies and motivate to use the herein reported parametrization, sampling, and FRET-modeling technique in future studies on the structural properties and aggregation-behavior of related systems.

  19. Structural exploration and Förster theory modeling for the interpretation of gas-phase FRET measurements: Chromophore-grafted amyloid-β peptides.

    PubMed

    Kulesza, Alexander; Daly, Steven; MacAleese, Luke; Antoine, Rodolphe; Dugourd, Philippe

    2015-07-14

    The distance-dependence of excitation energy transfer, e.g., being described by Förster theory (Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)), allows the use of optical techniques for the direct observation of structural properties. Recently, this technique has been successfully applied in the gas phase. The detailed interpretation of the experimental FRET results, however, relies on the comparison with structural modeling. We therefore present a complete first-principles modeling approach that explores the gas-phase structure of chromophore-grafted peptides and achieves accurate predictions of FRET efficiencies. We apply the approach to amyloid-β 12-28 fragments, known to be involved in amyloid plaque formation connected to Alzheimer's disease. We sample structures of the peptides that are grafted with 5-carboxyrhodamine 575 (Rh575) and QSY-7 chromophores by means of replica-exchange molecular dynamics simulations upon an Amber-type forcefield parametrization as a function of the charge state. The generated ensembles provide chromophore-distance and -orientation distributions which are used with the spectral parameters of the Rh575/QSY-7 chromophores to model FRET-efficiencies for the systems. The theoretical values agree with the experimental average "action"-FRET efficiencies and motivate to use the herein reported parametrization, sampling, and FRET-modeling technique in future studies on the structural properties and aggregation-behavior of related systems. PMID:26178129

  20. The natural history of bacterial biofilm graft infection.

    PubMed

    Bergamini, T M; Corpus, R A; Brittian, K R; Peyton, J C; Cheadle, W G

    1994-05-01

    A mouse model was developed to study the natural history of vascular prosthetic graft infection due to Staphylococcus epidermidis. Graft infections were established in the back subcutaneous tissue of 46 mice by implantation of Dacron prostheses colonized in vitro with slime-producing S. epidermidis to form an adherent bacterial biofilm [1.7 x 10(7) colony forming units (CFU)/cm2 graft]. Control animals (n = 16) had implantation of sterile Dacron prostheses. None of the control animals developed a graft infection or graft-cutaneous sinus tract. All study animals developed a biofilm graft infection with typical anatomic (perigraft abscess), microbiologic (low bacterial concentration in surface biofilm), and immunologic (normal white blood count) characteristics. A graft-cutaneous sinus tract developed in a significantly higher number of mice with infected grafts by 8-10 weeks (9 of 21) compared to infected grafts explanted at 2 and 4-6 weeks (1 of 25, P < 0.01) and controls (0 of 16, P < 0.03). By 8-10 weeks, 2 animals had no signs of graft infection and the S. epidermidis study strain was not recoverable from 7 grafts. The natural history of bacterial biofilm vascular prostheses infection in the mouse model was similar to that in man, provoking a chronic inflammatory process curiously presenting as a perigraft abscess or graft-cutaneous sinus tract.

  1. Sphincter Contractility After Muscle-Derived Stem Cells Autograft into the Cryoinjured Anal Sphincters of Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Sung-Bum; Lee, Haet Nim; Lee, Ji Young; Park, Jun-Seok; Lee, Hye Seung

    2008-01-01

    Purpose This study was designed to determine whether the injection of muscle-derived stem cells into the anal sphincter can improve functional properties in a fecal incontinence rat model. Methods Cryoinjured rats were utilized as a fecal incontinence model. The gastrocnemius muscles of normal three-week-old female Sprague-Dawley rats were used for the purification of the muscle-derived stem cells. The experimental group was divided into three subgroups: normal control; cryoinjured; and muscle-derived stem cells (3 × 106 cells) injection group of cryoinjured rats. All groups were subsequently employed in contractility experiments using muscle strips from the anal sphincter, one week after preparation. Results Contractility in the cryoinjured group was significantly lower than in the control after treatment with acetylcholine and KCl. In the muscle-derived stem cells injection group, contraction amplitude was higher than in the cryoinjured group but not significantly (20.5 ± 21.3 vs. 17.3 ± 3.4 g per gram tissue, with acetylcholine (10−4 mol/l); 31 ± 14.2 vs. 18.4 ± 7.9 g per gram tissue, with KCl (10−4 mol/l)). PKH-26-labeled transplanted cells were detected in all of the grafted sphincters. Differentiated muscle masses stained positively for alpha smooth muscle actin and myosin heavy chain at the muscle-derived stem cells injection sites. Conclusions This is the first study reporting that autologous muscle-derived stem cell grafts may be a tool for improving anal sphincter function. PMID:18536965

  2. [Elimination of isolated gingival atrophy by laterally positioned flap and free mucogingival autografts in combination with coronally positioned flap].

    PubMed

    Kovaćević, K; Leković, V

    1991-01-01

    Mucogingival surgical procedures such as laterally (horizontally) positioned flap, double papillae positioned flap and free mucogingival autografts have been recommended for the prevention and treatment of isolated gingival atrophy. These procedures can bi performed either independently or in combination with coronally positioned flap. In our study, for covering of exposed tooth roots, we applied laterally positioned flap and free mucogingival autografts in combination with coronally positioned flap. The obtained therapeutic results showed that six months after the surgery the exposure of tooth necks in patients treated by laterally positioned flap, decreased by 2.54 mm. Somewhat better results were obtained in the group of patients treated by fre mucogingival autografts in combination with coronally positioned flap. Within the same time interval, the total surface area of exposed tooth roots decreased by 59.76% in the group of patients treated by laterally positioned flap, i.e. by 62.25% in the group of patients treated by free mucogingival autografts in combination with coronally positioned flap. PMID:1785128

  3. An experiment to study the effects of space flight cells of mesenchymal origin in the new model 3D-graft in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volova, Larissa

    One of the major health problems of the astronauts are disorders of the musculoskeletal system, which determines the relevance of studies of the effect of space flight factors on osteoblastic and hondroblastic cells in vitro. An experiment to study the viability and proliferative activity of cells of mesenchymal origin on culture: chondroblasts and dermal fibroblasts was performed on SC "BION -M" № 1 with scientific equipment " BIOKONT -B ." To study the effect of space flight conditions in vitro at the cellular level has developed a new model with 3D- graft as allogeneic demineralized spongiosa obtained on technology Lioplast ®. For space and simultaneous experiments in the laboratory of the Institute of Experimental Medicine and Biotechnology Samara State Medical University were obtained from the cell culture of hyaline cartilage and human skin, which have previously been grown, and then identified by morphological and immunohistochemical methods. In the experiment, they were seeded on the porous 3D- graft (controlled by means of scanning electron and confocal microscopy) and cultured in full growth medium. After completion of the flight of spacecraft "BION -M" № 1 conducted studies of biological objects using a scanning electron microscope (JEOL JSM-6390A Analysis Station, Japan), confocal microscopy and LDH - test. According to the results of the experiment revealed that after a 30- day flight of the cells not only retained vitality, but also during the flight actively proliferate, and their number has increased by almost 8 times. In synchronous experiment, all the cells died by this date. The experimentally confirmed the adequacy of the proposed model 3D- graft in studying the effect of space flight on the morphological and functional characteristics of cells in vitro.

  4. Unique patterns of CD8+ T-cell-mediated organ damage in the Act-mOVA/OT-I model of acute graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    Érsek, Barbara; Lupsa, Nikolett; Pócza, Péter; Tóth, Anett; Horváth, Andor; Molnár, Viktor; Bagita, Bence; Bencsik, András; Hegyesi, Hargita; Matolcsy, András; Buzás, Edit I; Pós, Zoltán

    2016-10-01

    T-cell receptor (TCR)-transgenic models of acute graft-versus-host disease (aGvHD) offer a straightforward and highly controlled approach to study the mechanisms and consequences of T-cell activation following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (aHSCT). Here, we report that aHSCT involving OT-I mice as donors, carrying an ovalbumin-specific CD8+ TCR, and Act-mOVA mice as recipients, expressing membrane-bound ovalbumin driven by the β-actin promoter, induces lethal aGvHD in a CD8+ T-cell-dependent, highly reproducible manner, within 4-7 days. Tracking of UBC-GFP/OT-I graft CD8+ T cells disclosed heavy infiltration of the gastrointestinal tract, liver, and lungs at the onset of the disease, and histology confirmed hallmark features of gastrointestinal aGVHD, hepatic aGvHD, and aGvHD-associated lymphocytic bronchitis in infiltrated organs. However, T-cell infiltration was virtually absent in the skin, a key target organ of human aGvHD, and histology confirmed the absence of cutaneous aGVHD, as well. We show that the model allows studying CD8+ T-cell responses in situ, as selective recovery of graft CD45.1/OT-I CD8+ T cells from target organs is simple and feasible by automated tissue dissociation and subsequent cell sorting. Assessment of interferon-gamma production by flow cytometry, granzyme-B release by ELISA, TREC assay, and whole-genome gene expression profiling confirmed that isolated graft CD8+ T cells remained intact, underwent clonal expansion, and exerted effector functions in all affected tissues. Taken together, these data demonstrate that the OT-I/Act-mOVA model is suitable to study the CD8+ T-cell-mediated effector mechanisms in a disease closely resembling fatal human gastrointestinal and hepatic aGVHD that may develop after aHSCT using HLA-matched unrelated donors.

  5. DNA nanosensor surface grafting and salt dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, B. G.; Fagundes, J.; Martin, A. A.; Raniero, L.; Favero, P. P.

    2013-02-01

    In this paper we investigated the Paracoccidoides brasiliensis fungus nanosensor by simulations of simple strand DNA grafting on gold nanoparticle. In order to improve the knowledge of nanoparticle environment, the addiction of salt solution was studied at the models proposed by us. Nanoparticle and DNA are represented by economic models validated by us in this paper. In addition, the DNA grafting and salt influences are evaluated by adsorption and bond energies calculations. This theoretical evaluation gives support to experimental diagnostics techniques of diseases.

  6. Comparison of three calcium phosphate bone graft substitutes from biomechanical, histological, and crystallographic perspectives using a rat posterolateral lumbar fusion model.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ming-Hsien; Lee, Pei-Yuan; Chen, Wen-Cheng; Hu, Jin-Jia

    2014-12-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of three calcium phosphate bone graft substitutes with different chemical compositions on spinal fusion using a rat posterolateral lumbar fusion model. Specifically, two recently developed non-dispersive tetracalcium phosphate/dicalcium phosphate anhydrous-based calcium phosphate cements (CPCs), namely a CPC consisting of equimolar amounts of the two compounds (nd-CPC) and a CPC consisting of a two-fold greater amount of dicalcium phosphate anhydrous (DCP-rich CPC), were compared with a commercial calcium phosphate bone graft (c-CPG) consisting of hydroxyapatite (60%) and β-tricalcium phosphate (40%). Single-level posterolateral lumbar fusion was performed at the L4-L5 vertebrae in fifteen adult rats (n=5 for each group). Spinal fusion was evaluated with radiographs, manual palpation, mechanical testing, micro-CT, and histology 8 weeks post-surgery. In particular, the crystallographic phases in the three substitutes were identified before and 8 weeks after their implantation. Manual palpation revealed stable constructs in nearly all of the spine specimens. The stiffness and bending load of fused spines in the two CPC groups were comparable to those in the c-CPG group. The radiographs specifically revealed implant resorption and bone remodeling in the DCP-rich CPC group. Analysis of 3D micro-CT images revealed that the bone volume ratio in the DCP-rich CPC group was significantly greater than those in the nd-CPC and c-CPG groups. Histology showed that the DCP-rich CPC group exhibited the highest degree of bone regeneration and osseointegration. Notably, DCP-rich CPC led to a pronounced phase transformation, generating the greatest amount of poorly crystalline apatite among the three groups, which together with adequate resorption may explain the aforementioned positive findings. We therefore conclude that of the bone graft substitutes considered, DCP-rich CPC has the greatest potential to be used in spinal fusion.

  7. Comparison of three calcium phosphate bone graft substitutes from biomechanical, histological, and crystallographic perspectives using a rat posterolateral lumbar fusion model.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ming-Hsien; Lee, Pei-Yuan; Chen, Wen-Cheng; Hu, Jin-Jia

    2014-12-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of three calcium phosphate bone graft substitutes with different chemical compositions on spinal fusion using a rat posterolateral lumbar fusion model. Specifically, two recently developed non-dispersive tetracalcium phosphate/dicalcium phosphate anhydrous-based calcium phosphate cements (CPCs), namely a CPC consisting of equimolar amounts of the two compounds (nd-CPC) and a CPC consisting of a two-fold greater amount of dicalcium phosphate anhydrous (DCP-rich CPC), were compared with a commercial calcium phosphate bone graft (c-CPG) consisting of hydroxyapatite (60%) and β-tricalcium phosphate (40%). Single-level posterolateral lumbar fusion was performed at the L4-L5 vertebrae in fifteen adult rats (n=5 for each group). Spinal fusion was evaluated with radiographs, manual palpation, mechanical testing, micro-CT, and histology 8 weeks post-surgery. In particular, the crystallographic phases in the three substitutes were identified before and 8 weeks after their implantation. Manual palpation revealed stable constructs in nearly all of the spine specimens. The stiffness and bending load of fused spines in the two CPC groups were comparable to those in the c-CPG group. The radiographs specifically revealed implant resorption and bone remodeling in the DCP-rich CPC group. Analysis of 3D micro-CT images revealed that the bone volume ratio in the DCP-rich CPC group was significantly greater than those in the nd-CPC and c-CPG groups. Histology showed that the DCP-rich CPC group exhibited the highest degree of bone regeneration and osseointegration. Notably, DCP-rich CPC led to a pronounced phase transformation, generating the greatest amount of poorly crystalline apatite among the three groups, which together with adequate resorption may explain the aforementioned positive findings. We therefore conclude that of the bone graft substitutes considered, DCP-rich CPC has the greatest potential to be used in spinal fusion. PMID

  8. Randomized Clinical Trial of the Innovative Bilayered Wound Dressing Made of Silk and Gelatin: Safety and Efficacy Tests Using a Split-Thickness Skin Graft Model.

    PubMed

    Hasatsri, Sukhontha; Angspatt, Apichai; Aramwit, Pornanong

    2015-01-01

    We developed the novel silk fibroin-based bilayered wound dressing for the treatment of partial thickness wounds. And it showed relevant characteristics and accelerated the healing of full-thickness wounds in a rat model. This study is the clinical evaluation of the bilayered wound dressing to confirm its safety and efficacy for the treatment of split-thickness skin donor sites. The safety test was performed using a patch model and no evidence of marked and severe cutaneous reactions was found. The efficacy test of the bilayered wound dressing was conducted on 23 patients with 30 split-thickness skin graft donor sites to evaluate healing time, pain score, skin barrier function, and systemic reaction in comparison to Bactigras. We found that the healing time of donor site wounds treated with the bilayered wound dressing (11 ± 6 days) was significantly faster than those treated with Bactigras (14 ± 6 days) (p = 10(-6)). The wound sites treated with the bilayered wound dressing showed significantly less pain and more rapid skin functional barrier recovery than those treated with Bactigras (p = 10(-5)). Therefore, these results confirmed the clinical safety and efficacy of the bilayered wound dressing for the treatment of split-thickness skin graft donor sites. PMID:26221170

  9. Randomized Clinical Trial of the Innovative Bilayered Wound Dressing Made of Silk and Gelatin: Safety and Efficacy Tests Using a Split-Thickness Skin Graft Model

    PubMed Central

    Hasatsri, Sukhontha; Angspatt, Apichai; Aramwit, Pornanong

    2015-01-01

    We developed the novel silk fibroin-based bilayered wound dressing for the treatment of partial thickness wounds. And it showed relevant characteristics and accelerated the healing of full-thickness wounds in a rat model. This study is the clinical evaluation of the bilayered wound dressing to confirm its safety and efficacy for the treatment of split-thickness skin donor sites. The safety test was performed using a patch model and no evidence of marked and severe cutaneous reactions was found. The efficacy test of the bilayered wound dressing was conducted on 23 patients with 30 split-thickness skin graft donor sites to evaluate healing time, pain score, skin barrier function, and systemic reaction in comparison to Bactigras. We found that the healing time of donor site wounds treated with the bilayered wound dressing (11 ± 6 days) was significantly faster than those treated with Bactigras (14 ± 6 days) (p = 10−6). The wound sites treated with the bilayered wound dressing showed significantly less pain and more rapid skin functional barrier recovery than those treated with Bactigras (p = 10−5). Therefore, these results confirmed the clinical safety and efficacy of the bilayered wound dressing for the treatment of split-thickness skin graft donor sites. PMID:26221170

  10. Modeling and optimization of the flocculation processes for removal of cationic and anionic dyes from water by an amphoteric grafting chitosan-based flocculant using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hu; Yang, Ran; Li, Ruihua; Long, Chao; Yang, Hu; Li, Aimin

    2015-09-01

    In this study, an amphoteric grafting chitosan-based flocculant (carboxymethyl chitosan-graft-poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl) trimethyl ammonium chloride, denoted as CMC-g-PDMC) was applied to removal of the anionic and cationic dyes, acid Green 25 (AG25) and Basic Bright Yellow (7GL), from water. Flocculation conditions have been optimized by response surface methodology (RSM) on the basis of central composite design (CCD) using flocculant dosage, initial solution pH and temperature as input variables. The second-order and cubic regression models, which have been both tested by the analysis of variance (ANOVA), were constructed to link the output response (the dye removal factor) with the aforementioned input variables, respectively. The second-order regression model well described the process of AG25 removal, whereas the cubic one is more suitable for that of 7GL. The effects of those variables on the flocculation performance of CMC-g-PDMC for removal of the two dyes containing opposite charges from aqueous solutions have been studied, and the flocculation mechanisms including the interactive effects between various influencing factors have been discussed in detail also.

  11. Compliant model of a coupled sequential coronary arterial bypass graft: effects of vessel wall elasticity and non-Newtonian rheology on blood flow regime and hemodynamic parameters distribution.

    PubMed

    Kabinejadian, Foad; Ghista, Dhanjoo N

    2012-09-01

    We have recently developed a novel design for coronary arterial bypass surgical grafting, consisting of coupled sequential side-to-side and end-to-side anastomoses. This design has been shown to have beneficial blood flow patterns and wall shear stress distributions which may improve the patency of the CABG, as compared to the conventional end-to-side anastomosis. In our preliminary computational simulation of blood flow of this coupled sequential anastomoses design, the graft and the artery were adopted to be rigid vessels and the blood was assumed to be a Newtonian fluid. Therefore, the present study has been carried out in order to (i) investigate the effects of wall compliance and non-Newtonian rheology on the local flow field and hemodynamic parameters distribution, and (ii) verify the advantages of the CABG coupled sequential anastomoses design over the conventional end-to-side configuration in a more realistic bio-mechanical condition. For this purpose, a two-way fluid-structure interaction analysis has been carried out. A finite volume method is applied to solve the three-dimensional, time-dependent, laminar flow of the incompressible, non-Newtonian fluid; the vessel wall is modeled as a linearly elastic, geometrically non-linear shell structure. In an iteratively coupled approach the transient shell equations and the governing fluid equations are solved numerically. The simulation results indicate a diameter variation ratio of up to 4% and 5% in the graft and the coronary artery, respectively. The velocity patterns and qualitative distribution of wall shear stress parameters in the distensible model do not change significantly compared to the rigid-wall model, despite quite large side-wall deformations in the anastomotic regions. However, less flow separation and reversed flow is observed in the distensible models. The wall compliance reduces the time-averaged wall shear stress up to 32% (on the heel of the conventional end-to-side model) and somewhat

  12. Compliant model of a coupled sequential coronary arterial bypass graft: effects of vessel wall elasticity and non-Newtonian rheology on blood flow regime and hemodynamic parameters distribution.

    PubMed

    Kabinejadian, Foad; Ghista, Dhanjoo N

    2012-09-01

    We have recently developed a novel design for coronary arterial bypass surgical grafting, consisting of coupled sequential side-to-side and end-to-side anastomoses. This design has been shown to have beneficial blood flow patterns and wall shear stress distributions which may improve the patency of the CABG, as compared to the conventional end-to-side anastomosis. In our preliminary computational simulation of blood flow of this coupled sequential anastomoses design, the graft and the artery were adopted to be rigid vessels and the blood was assumed to be a Newtonian fluid. Therefore, the present study has been carried out in order to (i) investigate the effects of wall compliance and non-Newtonian rheology on the local flow field and hemodynamic parameters distribution, and (ii) verify the advantages of the CABG coupled sequential anastomoses design over the conventional end-to-side configuration in a more realistic bio-mechanical condition. For this purpose, a two-way fluid-structure interaction analysis has been carried out. A finite volume method is applied to solve the three-dimensional, time-dependent, laminar flow of the incompressible, non-Newtonian fluid; the vessel wall is modeled as a linearly elastic, geometrically non-linear shell structure. In an iteratively coupled approach the transient shell equations and the governing fluid equations are solved numerically. The simulation results indicate a diameter variation ratio of up to 4% and 5% in the graft and the coronary artery, respectively. The velocity patterns and qualitative distribution of wall shear stress parameters in the distensible model do not change significantly compared to the rigid-wall model, despite quite large side-wall deformations in the anastomotic regions. However, less flow separation and reversed flow is observed in the distensible models. The wall compliance reduces the time-averaged wall shear stress up to 32% (on the heel of the conventional end-to-side model) and somewhat

  13. Conjunctival Autograft Alone or Combined With Adjuvant Beta-Radiation? A Randomized Clinical Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Arruda Viani, Gustavo; Carrara Fonseca, Ellen; De Fendi, Ligia Issa; Melani Rocha, Eduardo

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of postoperative low single-dose of beta-irradiation ({beta}-RT) in pterygium comparing conjunctival autograft (CAG) surgery with CAG plus adjuvant {beta}-RT in a randomized clinical trial. Methods: This trial was designed as a prospective, randomized, single-center study. Surgery was performed in all cases according to the CAG technique. One hundred and eight pterygia were postoperatively randomized to CAG + {beta}-RT or CAG alone. In the case of {beta}-RT, a (90) Sr eye applicator was used to deliver 10 Gy to the sclera surface at a dose rate of between 200 and 250 cGy/min. After treatment, both an ophthalmologist and a radiation oncologist performed the follow-up examinations. The accumulated data were analyzed using a group sequential test. Results: Between February 2008 and September 2008, 116 eyes with primary pterygium were operated on according to the trial protocol. Adjuvant treatment was performed within 24 h postoperatively. Eight patients were lost to follow-up, resulting in 108 patients who could be analyzed. At a mean follow-up of 18 months (range, 8-33), in the 54 eyes randomized to receive CAG + {beta}-RT, 5 relapses occurred compared with 12 recurrences in the 54 eyes in CAG, for a crude control rate of 90.8 % vs. 78%; p = 0.032, respectively. The treatment complications as hyperemia, total dehiscence of the autograft and dellen were significantly more frequent in the CAG (p < 0.05). The arm of {beta}-RT resulted in better cosmetic results and improves of symptoms than CAG. Conclusions: A low single-dose of {beta}-RT of 10 Gy after CAG surgery was a simple, effective, and safe treatment that reduced the risk of primary pterygium recurrence, improved symptoms after surgery, resulting in a better cosmetic effect than only CAG.

  14. Late failure of a split-thickness skin graft in the setting of homozygous factor V Leiden mutation: a case report and correlative animal model from the Wound Etiology and Healing (WE-HEAL) study.

    PubMed

    Shanmugam, Victoria K; McNish, Sean; Duncan, Joanna; Root, Brandy; Tassi, Elena; Wellstein, Anton; Kallakury, Bhaskar; Attinger, Christopher E

    2015-10-01

    We present the case of a 53-year-old Caucasian male smoker with remote history of left lower extremity deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and a strong family history of thrombosis, who presented to the Center for Wound Healing at MedStar Georgetown University Hospital with spontaneous left leg ulceration. Prothrombotic evaluation showed homozygosity for the factor V Leiden (FVL) mutation. Therapeutic anticoagulation was commenced with warfarin (Coumadin®) and the patient underwent successful debridement and Apligraf® followed by split-thickness skin graft (STSG) of two wounds. He had an uneventful postoperative course and on the 27th postoperative day the grafts were 95% intact. However, by postoperative day 41 there was 10% graft loss, and over the subsequent 2 weeks both grafts necrosed. On further questioning, it transpired that the patient had discontinued his warfarin on postoperative day 37 because he thought that it was no longer necessary. The patient is enrolled in the Wound Etiology and Healing (WE-HEAL) study, and at the time of the original graft, residual skin fragments from the STSG were transplanted onto a nude mouse for development of an animal model of wound healing. The mouse graft was successful and was harvested at postoperative day 87 for pathological examination. We review the mechanisms by which prothrombotic states, particularly FVL mutation, can contribute to skin graft failure and delayed wound healing. This case highlights the importance of considering prothrombotic conditions in patients with spontaneous leg ulcerations and the impact of therapeutic anticoagulation on healing. It further allows us to demonstrate the efficacy of the animal model in which residual fragments of STSG tissue are utilised for transplant onto nude mice for manipulation in the laboratory. PMID:24028566

  15. Difference in canal encroachment by the fusion mass between anterior cervical discectomy and fusion with bone autograft and anterior plating, and stand-alone cage.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soo Eon; Chung, Chun Kee; Kim, Chi Heon

    2016-07-01

    We conducted a prospective randomized study comparing stand-alone cage and bone autograft and plate implants in anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (www.clinicaltrials.gov, NCT01011569). Our interim analysis showed autologous bone graft with plating was superior to a stand-alone cage for segmental lordosis. During this analysis, we noted a difference in canal encroachment by the fusion mass between the two fusion groups. A narrow cervical spinal canal is an important factor in the development of cervical spondylotic myelopathy, therefore this unexpected potential risk of spinal cord compression necessitated another interim analysis to investigate whether there was a difference in canal encroachment by the fusion mass between the two groups. Patients had a minimum 1year of follow-up. The Neck Disability Index, neck and arm pain Visual Analog Scales and lateral radiographs, including bone fusion patterns, were evaluated. Twenty-seven (16 males, 11 females, mean age 54.8years) and 31 (24 males, seven females, mean age 54.5years) patients were in the cage and plate group, respectively. Both groups improved after surgery. Fusion began at 2.6months and 1.3months and finished at 6.7months and 4.0months in 24 (88.9%) and 28 (90.3%) patients in the cage and plate group, respectively. Encroachment into the spinal canal by the fusion mass was significantly different between the fusion types, occuring in 21 (77.8%) patients in the cage group versus six (19.4%) in the plate group (p=0.003). There was a high incidence of spinal canal encroachment by the fusion mass in the stand-alone cage group, possibly limiting use in narrow spinal canals.

  16. Intraoperative Fluorescein Staining of Cryopreserved Amniotic Membrane Grafts to Improve Visualization During and After Pterygium Surgery: A Novel Technique

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, J. Alberto; Korchak, Michael; Cremers, Sandra L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To describe a new method of enhancing the visualization of amniotic membrane grafts with fluorescein staining during pterygium surgery. Methods: Pterygium excision surgery using intraoperatively stained cryopreserved amniotic membranes was performed on 346 eyes. A sterile 0.6 mg sodium fluorescein strip was placed directly onto the amniotic membrane in the manufacturer's original packaging, and the stained allograft was then transplanted onto the planned site. Staining intensities, at 3, 5, and 10 minutes of dye immersion, were compared. Immediate postoperative pain rating (scale 0–10), visibility of the fluorescein-stained amniotic membrane graft, and conjunctival autograft and amniotic membrane graft elevation, dehiscence, retraction, or displacement were recorded. The recurrence rate of the study population was compared with that of a previous cohort of 121 patients who underwent pterygium excision with conjunctival autograft without stained amniotic membrane. Results: Direct contact of the fluorescein strip on the amniotic membrane at 3, 5, and 10 minutes showed no differences in subjective staining intensity. Fluorescein-stained amniotic membrane was easily detected on the ocular surface during and 24 hours after pterygium surgery. The average immediate postoperative pain rating was 0.8 ± 1.8. No intraoperative complications or postoperative amniotic membrane graft dehiscence, retraction, or displacement occurred. The recurrence rate using fluorescein-stained amniotic membrane (3 patients, 0.9%, mean follow-up time 31.8 ± 18.6 weeks) did not differ from that of the previous cohort without the stained amniotic membrane (2.5%; χ2(1) = 1.837, P = 0.183). Conclusions: Fluorescein strip staining of the amniotic membrane is a novel and safe intraoperative method to enhance visualization and handling of the graft during and after ocular surgeries. PMID:26751995

  17. Design and optimization of a tissue-engineered bone graft substitute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimko, Daniel Andrew

    2004-12-01

    In 2000, 3.1 million surgical procedures on the musculoskeletal system were reported in the United States. For many of these cases, bone grafting was essential for successful fracture stabilization. Current techniques use intact bone obtained either from the patient (autograft) or a cadaver (allograft) to repair large defects, however, neither source is optimal. Allografts suffer integration problems, and for autografts, the tissue supply is limited. Because of these shortcomings, and the high demand for graft tissues, alternatives are being explored. To successfully engineer a bone graft replacement, one must employ a three pronged research approach, addressing (1) the cells that will inhabit the new tissue, (2) the culture environment that these cells will be exposed to, and (3) the scaffold in which these cells will reside. The work herein examines each of these three aspects in great detail. Both adult and embryonic stem cells (ESCs) were considered for the tissue-engineered bone graft. Both exhibited desirable qualities, however, neither were optimal in all categories examined. In the end, the possibility of teratoma formation and ethical issues surrounding ESCs, made the use of adult marrow-derived stem cells in the remaining experiments obligatory. In subsequent experiments, the adult stem cells' ability to form bone was optimized. Basic fibroblast growth factor, fetal bovine serum, and extracellular calcium supplementation studies were all performed. Ultimately, adult stem cells cultured in alpha-MEM supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum, 10mM beta-glycerophosphate, 10nM dexamethasone, 50mug/ml ascorbic acid, 1%(v/v) antibiotic/antimycotic, and 10.4mM CaCl2 performed the best, producing nearly four times more mineral than any other medium formulation. Several scaffolds were then investigated including those fabricated from poly(alpha-hydroxy esters), tantalum, and poly-methylmethacrylate. In the final study, the most appealing cell type, medium

  18. Approaches to repigmentation of vitiligo skin: new treatment with ultrasonic abrasion, seed-grafting and psoralen plus ultraviolet A therapy.

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, Katsuhiko; Osada, Atsushi; Kitamura, Reiko; Ohkouchi, Masayuki; Shimada, Shinji; Takayama, Osami

    2002-10-01

    Vitiligo vulgaris is a common disease throughout the world although its pathogenesis is not yet known. The most frequent treatment used for vitiligo is PUVA (psoralen plus ultraviolet A) and topical steroids but against stable refractory vitiligo, various other surgical techniques have been developed such as autografting, epidermal grafting with suction blisters, epithelial sheet grafting, and transplantation of cultured melanocytes. We have discovered a new method using ultrasonic abrasion, seed-grafting and PUVA therapy. The ultrasonic surgical aspirator abrades only the epidermis of recipient sites. This easily and safely removes only the epidermis, even on spotty lesions or intricate regions which are difficult to remove using a conventional motor-driven grinder or liquid nitrogen. Epidermal seed-grafting can cover more area than sheet-grafting, and subsequent PUVA treatment can enlarge the area of pigmentation with coalescence of adjacent grafts. In this article, we provide a general overview of the current surgical therapies including our method for treating stable refractory vitiligo.

  19. Inhibition of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase by stereoisomers of 1-methyl tryptophan in an experimental graft-versus-tumor model.

    PubMed

    Lim, Ji-Young; Lee, Sung-Eun; Park, Gyenogsin; Choi, Eun Young; Min, Chang-Ki

    2014-10-01

    Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) is a rate-limiting enzyme in tryptophan catabolism that plays an important role in the induction of immune tolerance. Its role in graft-versus-tumor effect after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) remains unclear. Using a murine graft-versus-tumor model of reduced-intensity allo-HSCT followed by donor leukocyte infusion (DLI), we examined the role of IDO inhibition. Two stereoisomers of 1-methyl tryptophan (1-MT), a small-molecule inhibitor of IDO, reduced the growth of inoculated tumor in the mice that received DLI and had higher expression of IDO1 and IFNγ. However, L-1MT, but not D-1MT, mitigated tumor growth in mice that did not receive DLI and did not express IDO1 and IFNγ. Accordingly, both stereoisomers reduced plasma kynurenine concentrations early after DLI and enhanced in vitro cytotoxic lymphocyte function after allogeneic mixed lymphocyte reaction. Furthermore, L-1MT was more efficient in causing direct cytotoxic effects than D-1MT. Our results suggest that IDO inhibition can benefit anti-tumor therapy in the setting of reduced-intensity allo-SCT using DLI. PMID:24971697

  20. Adaptive significance of root grafting in trees

    SciTech Connect

    Loehle, C.; Jones, R.

    1988-12-31

    Root grafting has long been observed in forest trees but the adaptive significance of this trait has not been fully explained. Various authors have proposed that root grafting between trees contributes to mechanical support by linking adjacent root systems. Keeley proposes that this trait would be of greatest advantage in swamps where soils provide poor mechanical support. He provides as evidence a greenhouse study of Nyssa sylvatica Marsh in which seedlings of swamp provenance formed between-individual root grafts more frequently than upland provenance seedlings. In agreement with this within-species study, Keeley observed that arid zone species rarely exhibit grafts. Keeley also demonstrated that vines graft less commonly than trees, and herbs never do. Since the need for mechanical support coincides with this trend, these data seem to support his model. In this paper, the authors explore the mechanisms and ecological significance of root grafting, leading to predictions of root grafting incidence. Some observations support and some contradict the mechanical support hypothesis.

  1. Delayed skin grafting.

    PubMed

    Ceilley, R I; Bumsted, R M; Panje, W R

    1983-04-01

    The use of skin grafts on granulating wounds is an established practice. Delaying the application of a full- or split-thickness skin graft may be an advantageous alternative method of surgical reconstruction in selected cases. Partial healing by secondary intention is useful for filling in deeper defects and usually produces a wound that is much smaller and of more normal contour than the original defect. Contraction of the graft bed is markedly influenced by location, tissue laxity, surface tension lines, motion, and wound geometry. Proper wound care, correct surgical preparation of the defect, and timing of the graft procedure are all important considerations in maximizing the overall result. Through-and-through defects and wounds produced over areas with little underlying support (eyelids and lip) often need flap reconstruction or immediate grafting to prevent undesirable functional and cosmetic results. By combining delayed healing and conventional reconstructive techniques, major tissue loss can often be restored while minimizing patient morbidity.

  2. Grafts in "closed" rhinoplasty.

    PubMed

    Scattolin, A; D'Ascanio, L

    2013-06-01

    Rhinoplasty is a fascinating and complex surgical procedure aiming at attaining a well-functioning and aesthetically pleasant nose. The use of grafts is of the utmost importance for the nasal surgeon to achieve such results. However, the philosophy and technical use of nasal grafts are different in "closed" and "open" rhinoplasty. The aim of this paper is not detailed description of the numerous grafts reported in the literature; we will describe the main principles of grafts use in "closed" rhinoplasty derived from our experience, with special reference to the philosophical and technical differences in their employment between "closed" and "open" rhinoplasty. Some cases are reported as an example of graft use in "endonasal" approach rhinoplasty.

  3. Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging evaluation of semitendinosus tendon in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: Does this have an effect on graft choice?

    PubMed Central

    Cobanoglu, Mutlu; Ozgezmez, Ferit Tufan; Omurlu, Imran Kurt; Ozkan, Ilhan; Savk, Sevki Oner; Cullu, Emre

    2016-01-01

    Background: Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction with ST autograft is sometimes unsuccessful because of harvested thin graft. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be a useful tool to evaluate the thickness of the graft. This study is performed to evaluate whether there is any correlation between diameters and cross-sectional area (CSA) of the semitendinosus tendon (ST) on the preoperative magnetic MRI and the diameter of the 4-stranded ST autograft in ACL reconstruction. Materials and Methods: Seventy patients who underwent single-bundle ACL reconstruction with 4-stranded ST for full-thickness ACL ruptures were included in this study. Anteroposterior (AP) and mediolateral (ML) diameters of ST at the levels of the joint line (JL) and femoral physeal line (PL), and also CSA at these levels were measured on T2-weighted fat-suppressed MRI examinations. The data obtained were compared with intraoperatively measured diameters of 4-stranded ST autograft. Correlations between variables were evaluated using Spearman's rho. Receiver operating characteristic and area under the curve statistics were used to evaluate the cut-off value for the correlation between 4-stranded ST graft diameter of 8 mm and CSA (mm2) on MRI. Results: On MRI measurements, no correlation was found between AP diameters at the level of the JL and 4-stranded ST diameter (P = 0.180). However, correlations were found between diameter of 4-stranded ST and ML diameter at the level of JL (P = 0.003) and PL (P = 0.002), AP diameter at the level of the PL (P = 0.009), CSA at the level of the JL (P < 0.001) and at the level of PL (P < 0.001). Correlation between the diameter of 4-stranded ST and CSA at both levels was more significant than that between AP-ML diameters of ST and diameter of autograft. The cut-off value for the 8 mm diameter CSA of 4-stranded ST was 5.9 mm2 at the JL and 8.99 mm2 at the PL. Conclusion: Preoperative MRI evaluation of CSA at the JL of the ST is a reliable parameter to

  4. Oral glutamine supplementation improves intestinal permeability dysfunction in a murine acute graft-vs.-host disease model.

    PubMed

    Noth, Rainer; Häsler, Robert; Stüber, Eckhard; Ellrichmann, Mark; Schäfer, Heiner; Geismann, Claudia; Hampe, Jochen; Bewig, Burkhard; Wedel, Thilo; Böttner, Martina; Schreiber, Stefan; Rosenstiel, Philip; Arlt, Alexander

    2013-04-01

    Although a profound barrier dysfunction has been reported, little is known about the pathophysiological mechanism evoking gastrointestinal graft-vs.-host disease (GI-GvHD) and apparent therapeutic options. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of oral glutamine on the course of GI-GvHD in an acute semiallogenic graft-vs.-host disease (GvHD) in irradiated B6D2F1 mice. An acute semiallogenic GvHD was induced by intraperitoneal injection of lymphocytes from C57BL/6 mice to irradiated B6D2F1 mice. Half of the GvHD animals received oral glutamine supplementation for 6 days started at the time of lymphocyte transfer. Six days after induction of the semiallogenic GvHD, jejunum specimens were prepared. The expression of the proinflammatory cytokine TNF-α and the tight junction protein occludin was investigated by PCR. Histological changes along with the apoptotic response were evaluated and intestinal permeability was assessed. Animals with GvHD showed a strong increase in paracellular permeability as a sign of the disturbed barrier function. TNF-α expression was significantly increased and the expression of the tight junction protein occludin decreased. GvHD led to mucosal atrophy, crypt hyperplasia, crypt apoptosis, and a disintegration of the tight junctions. Glutamine-treated mice showed reduced expression of TNF-α, increased occludin expression, fewer histological changes in the jejunum, smaller number of apoptotic cells in the crypt, and reduced gastrointestinal permeability. In conclusion, oral glutamine seems to have beneficial effects on the severity of inflammatory changes in the course of GvHD and might be a therapeutic option.

  5. A minimum 2-year comparative study of autologous cancellous bone grafting versus beta-tricalcium phosphate in anterior cervical discectomy and fusion using a rectangular titanium stand-alone cage.

    PubMed

    Yamagata, Toru; Naito, Kentaro; Arima, Hironori; Yoshimura, Masaki; Ohata, Kenji; Takami, Toshihiro

    2016-07-01

    Although titanium stand-alone cages are commonly used in anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF), there are several concerns such as cage subsidence after surgery. The efficacy of β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) granules as a packing material in 1- or 2-level ACDF using a rectangular titanium stand-alone cage is not fully understood. The purpose of this study is to investigate the validity of rectangular titanium stand-alone cages in 1- and 2-level ACDF with β-TCP. This retrospective study included 55 consecutive patients who underwent ACDF with autologous iliac cancellous bone grafting and 45 consecutive patients with β-TCP grafting. All patients completed at least 2-year postoperative follow-up. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to examine the associations between study variables and nonunion after surgery. Significant neurological recovery after surgery was obtained in both groups. Cage subsidence was noted in 14 of 72 cages (19.4 %) in the autograft group and 12 of 64 cages (18.8 %) in the β-TCP group. A total of 66 cages (91.7 %) in the autograft group showed osseous or partial union, and 58 cages (90.6 %) in the β-TCP group showed osseous or partial union by 2 years after surgery. There were no significant differences in cage subsidence and the bony fusion rate between the two groups. Multivariate analysis using a logistic regression model showed that fusion level at C6/7, 2-level fusion, and cage subsidence of grades 2-3 were significantly associated with nonunion at 2 years after surgery. Although an acceptable surgical outcome with negligible complication appears to justify the use of rectangular titanium stand-alone cages in 1- and 2-level ACDF with β-TCP, cage subsidence after surgery needs to be avoided to achieve acceptable bony fusion at the fused segments. Fusion level at C6/7 or 2-level fusion may be another risk factor of nonunion. PMID:27098659

  6. A minimum 2-year comparative study of autologous cancellous bone grafting versus beta-tricalcium phosphate in anterior cervical discectomy and fusion using a rectangular titanium stand-alone cage.

    PubMed

    Yamagata, Toru; Naito, Kentaro; Arima, Hironori; Yoshimura, Masaki; Ohata, Kenji; Takami, Toshihiro

    2016-07-01

    Although titanium stand-alone cages are commonly used in anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF), there are several concerns such as cage subsidence after surgery. The efficacy of β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) granules as a packing material in 1- or 2-level ACDF using a rectangular titanium stand-alone cage is not fully understood. The purpose of this study is to investigate the validity of rectangular titanium stand-alone cages in 1- and 2-level ACDF with β-TCP. This retrospective study included 55 consecutive patients who underwent ACDF with autologous iliac cancellous bone grafting and 45 consecutive patients with β-TCP grafting. All patients completed at least 2-year postoperative follow-up. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to examine the associations between study variables and nonunion after surgery. Significant neurological recovery after surgery was obtained in both groups. Cage subsidence was noted in 14 of 72 cages (19.4 %) in the autograft group and 12 of 64 cages (18.8 %) in the β-TCP group. A total of 66 cages (91.7 %) in the autograft group showed osseous or partial union, and 58 cages (90.6 %) in the β-TCP group showed osseous or partial union by 2 years after surgery. There were no significant differences in cage subsidence and the bony fusion rate between the two groups. Multivariate analysis using a logistic regression model showed that fusion level at C6/7, 2-level fusion, and cage subsidence of grades 2-3 were significantly associated with nonunion at 2 years after surgery. Although an acceptable surgical outcome with negligible complication appears to justify the use of rectangular titanium stand-alone cages in 1- and 2-level ACDF with β-TCP, cage subsidence after surgery needs to be avoided to achieve acceptable bony fusion at the fused segments. Fusion level at C6/7 or 2-level fusion may be another risk factor of nonunion.

  7. Effect of Rejection on Electrophysiologic Function of Canine Intestinal Grafts: Correlation with Histopathology and Na–K-ATPase Activity

    PubMed Central

    TAKEYOSHI, IZUMI; ZHANG, SHIMIN; KOKUDO, YASUTAKA; NAKAMURA, KENJIRO; IKOMA, AKIRA; ZHU, YUE; STARZL, THOMAS E.; TODO, SATORU

    2010-01-01

    To investigate whether electrophysiologic changes can detect the early onset and progress of intestinal rejection, changes in in vitro electrophysiologic function, intestinal histopathology, and Na–K-ATPase activity were studied in dogs. Adult mongrel dogs of both sexes, weighing 18–24 kg, were used for auto and allo small bowel transplantation. The entire small bowels, except for short segments at the proximal and distal ends, were switched between a pair of dogs (allograft). Animals receiving intestinal autotransplantation were used as controls. Allograft recipients were sacrificed 3, 4, 5, 7, or 9 days after transplantation, and autograft recipients were sacrificed 3, 7, or 14 days after transplantation. Immunosuppression was not used. Electrophysiologic measurements were done with an Ussing chamber. Histological analysis was performed blindly using whole thickness sections. Na–K–ATPase activity in the mucosal tissue, which is said to regulate the potential difference, was also measured. Potential difference, resistance, and Na–K-ATPase activity of the allograft intestine decreased with time and were significantly lower 7 and 9 days after transplantation compared to host intestine, normal intestine, and graft intestine of controls (autograft). Potential difference, resistance, and Na–K-ATPase activity of the native intestinal tissue and the autografts did not decrease with time. Detection of histologically mild rejection of the intestine, which is important for appropriate immunosuppressive treatment in clinical cases, could not be achieved based on electrophysiology or Na–K-ATPase activity. Deterioration of electrophysiologic function during rejection correlated with the histological rejection process and Na–K-ATPase activity; however, electrophysiology may not be a reliable tool for monitoring grafts, since it cannot detect early intestinal rejection. PMID:8519738

  8. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with synthetic grafts. A review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Ventura, Alberto; Terzaghi, Clara; Borgo, Enrico; Albisetti, Walter

    2010-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture, one of the most common knee injuries in sports, results in anteroposterior laxity, which often leads to an unstable knee. Traditional ACL reconstruction is performed with autograft; disadvantages of this technique are donor site morbidity and a long rehabilitation period. In the 1980s, artificial ligaments became an attractive alternative to biological grafts. The initial enthusiasm surrounding their introduction stemmed from their lack of donor morbidity, their abundant supply and significant strength, immediate loading and reduced postoperative rehabilitation. Synthetic grafts made of different materials such as carbon fibers, polypropylene, Dacron and polyester have been utilised either as a prosthesis or as an augmentation for a biological ACL graft substitute. Nevertheless, every material presented serious drawbacks: cross-infections, immunological responses, breakage, debris dispersion leading to synovitis, chronic effusions, recurrent instability and knee osteoarthritis. Recently, a resurgence of interest in the use of synthetic prostheses has occurred and studies regarding new artificial grafts have been reported. Although many experimental studies have been made and much effort has been put forth, currently no ideal prosthesis mimicking natural human tissue has been found. PMID:20157811

  9. The Performance of Cross-linked Acellular Arterial Scaffolds as Vascular Grafts; Pre-clinical Testing in Direct and Isolation Loop Circulatory Models

    PubMed Central

    Pennel, Timothy; Fercana, George; Bezuidenhout, Deon; Simionescu, Agneta; Chuang, Ting-Hsien; Zilla, Peter; Simionescu, Dan

    2014-01-01

    There is a significant need for small diameter vascular grafts to be used in peripheral vascular surgery; however autologous grafts are not always available, synthetic grafts perform poorly and allografts and xenografts degenerate, dilate and calcify after implantation. We hypothesized that chemical stabilization of acellular xenogenic arteries would generate off-the-shelf grafts resistant to thrombosis, dilatation and calcification. To test this hypothesis, we decellularized porcine renal arteries, stabilized elastin with penta-galloyl glucose and collagen with carbodiimide / activated heparin and implanted them as transposition grafts in the abdominal aorta of rats as direct implants and separately as indirect, isolation-loop implants. All implants resulted in high patency and animal survival rates, ubiquitous encapsulation within a vascularized collagenous capsule, and exhibited lack of lumen thrombogenicity and no graft wall calcification. Peri-anastomotic neo-intimal tissue overgrowth was a normal occurrence in direct implants; however this reaction was circumvented in indirect implants. Notably, implantation of non-treated control scaffolds exhibited marked graft dilatation and elastin degeneration; however PGG significantly reduced elastin degradation and prevented aneurismal dilatation of vascular grafts. Overall these results point to the outstanding potential of crosslinked arterial scaffolds as small diameter vascular grafts. PMID:24816365

  10. Indium 111-labeled platelet deposition in woven and knitted Dacron bifurcated aortic grafts with the same patient as a clinical model

    SciTech Connect

    Robicsek, F.; Duncan, G.D.; Anderson, C.E.; Daugherty, H.K.; Cook, J.W.; Selle, J.G.; Hess, P.J.; Easton, E.J.; Burtoft, J.N.

    1987-06-01

    A study was designed to compare platelet deposition between knitted and woven Dacron grafts in the same patient. Twenty patients received aortoiliac or aortofemoral bifurcated Dacron grafts, each composed of one woven and one double-velour knitted limb. External nuclear graft imaging was carried out after injection of autologous platelets labeled with indium 111. The patients were studied postoperatively in time periods ranging from 6 days to 42 months. Platelet accumulation was almost identical in knitted and woven limbs in all patients. This study appears to indicate that there is no difference in thrombogenicity between knitted and woven bifurcated Dacron grafts in the aortoiliac or aortofemoral positions measured by platelet accumulation.

  11. Bone graft and mesenchimal stem cells: clinical observations and histological analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bertolai, Roberto; Catelani, Carlo; Aversa, Alessandro; Rossi, Alessandro; Giannini, Domenico; Bani, Daniele

    2015-01-01

    Summary Autologous bone, for its osteoconductive, osteoinductive and osteogenetic properties, has been considered to be the gold standard for maxillary sinus augmentation procedures. Autograft procedures bring also some disadvantages: sometimes the limited amount of available intraoral bone makes necessary to obtain bone from an extraoral site, and this carries an associated morbidity. To overcome this problem we started using homologous freeze-dried bone in maxillary sinus augmentation procedures. This bone is industrially processed with γ-irradiation to eliminate its disease transmission potential and it’s considered safe, but this treatment also eliminates the osteoinductive and osteogenetic properties, making it just an inert scaffold for regeneration. Mesenchymal stem cells are successfully used in and orthopedic surgery for their amplification potential of healing mechanisms. We assumed that mesenchymal stem cells can restore the osteogenetic and osteoinductive properties in homologous bone grafts. The aim of this study was an histological evaluation of bone regeneration in maxillary sinus elevation using: 1) mesenchymal stem cells engineered freeze-dried bone allografts; 2) freeze-dried bone allografts. Twenty patients (10M, 10F) with a mean age of 55.2 years affected by severe maxillary atrophy were treated with bilateral maxillary sinus floor elevation. For each patient were randomly assigned a “test” side and a “control” side, different from each other exclusively in the composition of the graft material. The “control” sides were composed by corticocancellous freeze-dried bone chips and the “test” sides were composed by corticocancellous freeze-dried bone chips engineered in a bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells concentrate. After three months bone biopsies were performed on the grafts and histological specimens were made in order to evaluate the healed bone from an histological point of view. Histologically all the specimens showed

  12. Infrainguinal anastomotic arterial graft infections treated by selective graft preservation.

    PubMed Central

    Calligaro, K D; Westcott, C J; Buckley, R M; Savarese, R P; DeLaurentis, D A

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the type of graft material and bacteria involved in an infrainguinal arterial anastomotic infection can be used as guidelines for graft preservation. Between 1972 and 1990, the authors treated 35 anastomotic infections involving a common femoral or distal artery. The graft material was Dacron in 14 patients, polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) in 14, and vein in 7. Of the 14 Dacron grafts, immediate graft excision was required for overwhelming infection in eight patients (bleeding in five, sepsis in three) and for an occluded graft in one patient. Three of five patients failed attempted graft preservation because of nonhealing wounds. Thus, 12 of the 14 Dacron grafts ultimately required graft excision. Of the 21 "smooth-walled" vein and PTFE grafts, 10 required immediate graft excision for occluded grafts (five PTFE, one vein) or bleeding (three PTFE, one vein). Ten of the remaining 11 (91%) patients with patent "smooth-walled" grafts, intact anastomoses, and absence of sepsis managed by graft preservation healed their wounds and maintained distal arterial perfusion. Wound cultures grew pure gram-positive cocci in 17 of 21 "smooth-walled" graft infections versus 8 of 14 Dacron graft infections. In the absence of systemic sepsis, graft preservation is the treatment of choice for gram-positive infections involving an intact anastomosis of patent PTFE and vein grafts. Regardless of the bacterial cause, the authors recommend that any infrainguinal anastomotic infection of a Dacron graft be treated by immediate excision of all infected graft material. PMID:1632705

  13. Skin flaps and grafts - self-care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Free flap - self-care; Skin autografting - self-care; Pressure ulcer skin flap self-care; Burns skin flap self- ... skin infection Surgery for skin cancer Venous ulcers , pressure ulcers , or diabetic ulcers that DO NOT heal After ...

  14. Crosslinked grafted PVC obtained by direct radiation grafting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegazy, El-Sayed A.; Dessouki, Ahmed M.; El-Dessouky, Maher M.; El-Sawy, Naeem M.

    Direct radition-induced grafting of 4-vinylpyridine onto both pure and plasticized poly(vinyl chloride) has been studied. The effect of grafting conditions such as solvent, monomer concentration, irradiation dose, and inhibitor concentration on the grafting yield was investigated. The grafting process was enhanced by using distilled water as diluent and higher degrees of grafting were obtained as compared with other solvents used (benzene, methanol, and a mixture of methanol and water). The homopolymerization of 4-vinylpyridine was reduced to a minimum using ammonium ferrous sulfate and the suitable optimum concentration of the inhibitor was found to be 0.25 wt %. It was observed that the degrees of grafting onto plasticized PVC were higher than those onto pure one, at constant grafting conditions. The diffusibility of the monomer solution through the trunk polymers enhanced at higher monomer concentrations. The higher the monomer concentration the higher the degrees of grafting obtained. The dependence of the grafting rate on monomer concentration was found to be 0.15 and 0.4 order for the grafting onto pure and plasticized PVC films, respectively. The degree of grafting, at the higher irradiation doses, deviated from linearity and it tends to level off due to the recombination of some of the free radicals without initiating graft polymerization. Gel determination in the grafted films was investigated. The gel content in both grafted extracted pure and plasticized PVC films increased with the degree of grafting to reach a certain limiting values.

  15. Irradiation autogenous mandibular grafts in primary reconstructions

    SciTech Connect

    Hamaker, R.C.

    1981-07-01

    The procedure, irradiated mandibular autografts, for primary reconstruction, is presented with an immediate success rate of 88%. Eight cases have undergone primary mandibular reconstruction with the tumorous mandible irradiated to 10,000 rads in a single dose. The longest follow-up is 2 3/4 years. The autograft has proven to be an ideal implant. Major resections of the mandible in conjunction with large myocutaneous flaps have been reconstructed utilizing this implant.

  16. Corneal recovery in a rabbit limbal stem cell deficiency model by autologous grafts of tertiary outgrowths from cultivated limbal biopsy explants

    PubMed Central

    Durak, Ismet; Gürdal, Mehmet; Baysal, Kemal; Ates, Halil; Ozbek, Zeynep; Wang, Zheng; Wu, Albert; Wolosin, J. Mario

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To determine the corneal regenerative capacity of sequentially generated primary, secondary, and tertiary limbal explant outgrowths in a limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD) surgical model. Methods Two-millimeter-long limbal shallow biopsies were surgically excised from the upper quadrant of the right eye of rabbits and set on preserved amniotic membrane for explant culture. After the generation of primary outgrowth, the biopsies were sequentially transferred to new amniotic membrane to generate secondary and then tertiary outgrowths. Eighteen rabbits were subjected to a 360° limbal peritomy extending into the scleral zone and combined with superficial keratectomy of the corneal periphery and thorough mechanical debridement of the central cornea in their left eye. Right eye outgrowths, six of each generation, were engrafted on the ocular surface. Clinical outcomes (neovascularization, corneal clarity, and corneal fluorescein staining) were graded after 6 months. Post-mortem corneas were compared with histology, immunochemistry for p63 and Krt3, ABCG2-dependent dye exclusion, and capacity for outgrowths in explant culture. Results Immunohistology and western blot of the outgrowths for p63 and Krt3 indicated no differences in expression between the primary and tertiary outgrowths for these two markers of growth and differentiation. Clinically, all rabbits treated with amniotic membrane alone developed severe LSCD. Most rabbits grafted with cell outgrowths from all three outgrowth generations achieved stable (>6 months) recovery of the ocular surface. There were partial failures of grafts performed with two secondary and tertiary outgrowths. However, Kruskal–Wallis statistical analysis of the clinical scores yielded no significant difference between the three groups (p=0.524). Histology showed full anatomic recovery of grafts made with primary and tertiary outgrowths. Krt3 and p63 expression throughout the whole limbal corneal epithelium with primary or

  17. Proximal Tibial Bone Graft

    MedlinePlus

    ... Complications Potential problems after a PTBG include infection, fracture of the proximal tibia and pain related to the procedure. Frequently Asked Questions If proximal tibial bone graft is taken from my knee, will this prevent me from being able to ...

  18. The effects of early postoperative radiation on vascularized bone grafts

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, H.B.; Brown, S.; Hurst, L.N. )

    1991-06-01

    The effects of early postoperative radiation were assessed in free nonvascularized and free vascularized rib grafts in the canine model. The mandibles of one-half of the dogs were exposed to a cobalt 60 radiation dose of 4080 cGy over a 4-week period, starting 2 weeks postoperatively. The patency of vascularized grafts was confirmed with bone scintigraphy. Histological studies, including ultraviolet microscopy with trifluorochrome labeling, and histomorphometric analyses were performed. Osteocytes persist within the cortex of the vascularized nonradiated grafts to a much greater extent than in nonvascularized, nonradiated grafts. Cortical osteocytes do not persist in either vascularized or nonvascularized grafts subjected to radiation. New bone formation is significantly retarded in radiated grafts compared with nonradiated grafts. Periosteum and endosteum remained viable in the radiated vascularized grafts, producing both bone union and increased bone turnover, neither of which were evident to any significant extent in nonvascularized grafts. Bone union was achieved in vascularized and non-vascularized nonradiated bone. In the radiated group of dogs, union was only seen in the vascularized bone grafts.

  19. Arthroscopic Labrum Reconstruction in the Hip Using the Indirect Head of Rectus Femoris as a Local Graft: Surgical Technique.

    PubMed

    Sharfman, Zachary T; Amar, Eyal; Sampson, Thomas; Rath, Ehud

    2016-04-01

    The importance of the acetabular labrum has been well documented for the health and function of the hip joint. Labral reconstruction has proven effective but often requires the use of a cadaveric allograft or auto graft from the fascia lata or gracilis. The indirect head of the rectus femoris is in close proximity with the anterior superior acetabulum, which is the most common site of labral tears. Using the indirect head of the rectus femoris as a local graft minimizes surgical invasiveness by mitigating the need to harvest the graft from a different location, in case of an autograft, and by minimizing donor site morbidity and damage to local tissues. The graft is harvested and fixed to the acetabular rim through the same arthroscopic portals. Hip labral reconstruction using the reflected head of the rectus femoris tendon is a minimally invasive surgical procedure that restores stability to the hip joint, is applicable in all patients undergoing hip labral reconstruction, and offers decreased tissue morbidity compared with other grafting techniques. PMID:27462534

  20. Measurements of tissue oxygen tension in vascularised jejunal autografts in pigs.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, I M; Riis, A; Jahn, H; Gottrup, F

    1995-12-01

    Tissue oxygen measurements were evaluated as a monitor of the jejunal flap in seven female landrace pigs. A small polarographic sensor (diameter 0.55 mm) was used in which interstitial tissue oxygen tension was measured continuously in a jejunal flap and a muscle flap (rectus abdominis) during arterial and venous occlusion. Mean (SEM) tissue oxygen tension in the two types of flap were 44(9) mmHg (jejunal flap) and 47(8) mmHg (rectus flap). After arterial occlusion for 30 minutes the values dropped to 17(4) mmHg for the jejunal flap and 12(2) mmHg for the muscle flap. The decline became significant after five minutes. During venous occlusion (30 minutes) the values fell to 20(4) mmHg and 14(1) mmHg. The arterial occlusion was undetectable by the naked eye, but the enteric tissue after venous occlusion became severely congested and blue-black in colour. The condition returned to normal after release of the clamp. We conclude that direct measurement of tissue oxygen tension in a jejunal flap is a reliable method of detecting impaired perfusion. This method may in the future be used to monitor vascularised jejunal autografts. PMID:8771255

  1. A Pilot Clinical Study of Olfactory Mucosa Autograft for Chronic Complete Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    IWATSUKI, Koichi; TAJIMA, Fumihiro; OHNISHI, Yu-ichiro; NAKAMURA, Takeshi; ISHIHARA, Masahiro; HOSOMI, Koichi; NINOMIYA, Koshi; MORIWAKI, Takashi; YOSHIMINE, Toshiki

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies of spinal cord axon regeneration have reported good long-term results using various types of tissue scaffolds. Olfactory tissue allows autologous transplantation and can easily be obtained by a simple biopsy that is performed through the external nares. We performed a clinical pilot study of olfactory mucosa autograft (OMA) for chronic complete spinal cord injury in eight patients according to the procedure outlined by Lima et al. Our results showed no serious adverse events and improvement in both the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) Impairment Scale (AIS) grade and ASIA motor score in five patients. The preoperative post-rehabilitation ASIA motor score improved from 50 in all cases to 52 in case 2, 60 in case 4, 52 in case 6, 55 in case 7, and 58 in case 8 at 96 weeks after OMA. The AIS improved from A to C in four cases and from B to C in one case. Motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were also seen in one patient, reflecting conductivity in the central nervous system, including the corticospinal tract. The MEPs induced with transcranial magnetic stimulation allow objective assessment of the integrity of the motor circuitry comprising both the corticospinal tract and the peripheral motor nerves.We show the feasibility of OMA for chronic complete spinal cord injury. PMID:27053327

  2. A Modification to Simplify the Harvest of a Hemi-hamate Autograft.

    PubMed

    DeNoble, Peter H; Record, Nicole C

    2016-05-01

    Hemi-hamate arthroplasty is a valuable option for subacute dorsal fracture-dislocations of the proximal interphalangeal joint. Various harvesting techniques have been recommended via both anterograde and retrograde directions, both posing some technical challenges. We propose a technique for simplifying the hemi-hamate graft harvest by creating a window of visualization onto the dorsal hamate articular surface. This is achieved by resection of the dorsal-ulnar base of fourth metacarpal and the dorsal-radial base of the fifth metacarpal. This makes it easier to measure and cut the hamate articular surface. It also provides a properly shaped graft that can be inset in the middle phalangeal defect without using backgrafting, and allowing screws to be placed perpendicular to the graft defect to obtain direct compression.

  3. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with BPTB autograft, irradiated versus non-irradiated allograft: a prospective randomized clinical study.

    PubMed

    Sun, Kang; Tian, Shaoqi; Zhang, Jihua; Xia, Changsuo; Zhang, Cailong; Yu, Tengbo

    2009-05-01

    The effect of using gamma irradiation to sterilize bone-patellar tendon-bone (BPTB) allograft on the clinical outcomes of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction with irradiated allograft remains controversial. Our study was aimed to analyze the clinical outcomes of arthroscopic ACL reconstruction with irradiated BPTB allograft compared with non-irradiated allograft and autograft. All BPTB allografts were obtained from a single tissue bank and the irradiated allografts were sterilized with 2.5 Mrad of irradiation prior to distribution. A total of 102 patients undergoing arthroscopic ACL reconstruction were prospectively randomized consecutively into three groups. The same surgical technique was used in all operations done by the same senior surgeon. Before surgery and at the average of 31 months follow-up (range 24-47 months) patients were evaluated by the same observer according to objective and subjective clinical evaluations. Of these patients, 99 (autograft 33, non-irradiated allograft 34, irradiated allograft 32) were available for full evaluation. When compared the irradiated allograft group to non-irradiated allograft group or autograft group at 31 months follow-up by the Lachman test, ADT, pivot shift test and KT-2000 arthrometer testing, statistically significant differences were found. Most importantly, 87.8% of patients in the Auto group, 85.3% in the Non-Ir-Auto group and just only 31.3% in the Ir-Allo group had a side-to-side difference of less than 3 mm according to KT-2000. The failure rate of the ACL reconstruction with irradiated allograft (34.4%) was higher than that with autograft (6.1%) and non-irradiated allograft (8.8%). The anterior and rotational stability decreased significantly in the irradiated allograft group. According to the overall IKDC, functional, subjective evaluations and activity level testing, no statistically significant differences were found between the three groups. However, there was a trend that the functional and

  4. Multiple osteochondral autograft transfer to the proximal interphalangeal joint: case report.

    PubMed

    Ozyurekoglu, Tuna

    2010-06-01

    A 17-year-old boy who played baseball presented with swelling, pain, and crepitation in the right ring finger proximal interphalangeal joint after a remote trauma. Multiple osteochondral defects were identified on opposing articular surfaces. Cylindrical osteochondral grafts of 2.0, 2.5, and 5.0 mm were applied to the defects and congruency was restored. We confirmed vascularity of the grafts by magnetic resonance. The boy returned to full sports activities. No signs of arthritis were seen at 4-year follow-up radiographs.

  5. Development of a method to extend by boron neutron capture process the therapeutic possibilities of a liver autograft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinelli, Tazio; Altieri, Saverio; Fossati, F.; Zonta, Aris; Prati, U.; Roveda, L.; Nano, Rosanna

    1997-02-01

    We present results on surgical technique, neutron filed and irradiation facility concerning the original treatment of the liver diffused metastases. Our method plans to irradiate the isolated organ at a thermal neutron field soon after having been explanted and boron enriched and before being grafted into the same donor. In particular the crucial point of boron uptake was investigated by a rat model with a relevant number of procedure. We give for the first time statistically significant results on the selective boron absorption by tumor tissues.

  6. Autologous Hamstring Anterior Cruciate Ligament Graft Failure Using the Anteromedial Portal Technique With Suspensory Femoral Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Galdi, Balazs; Reyes, Allan; Brabston, Eugene W.; Levine, William N.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The anteromedial portal technique for drilling of the femoral tunnel during anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction has been advocated by many surgeons as allowing improved access to the anatomical footprint. Furthermore, suspensory fixation of soft tissue grafts has become popularized because of complications associated with cross-pin fixation. Concerns regarding the use of both have recently arisen. Purpose: To raise awareness of the increased risk of graft failure when using the anteromedial portal technique with suspensory femoral fixation during ACL reconstruction. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: From November 1998 to August 2012, a total of 465 primary ACL reconstructions were performed using quadrupled hamstring autograft tendons, with drilling of the femoral tunnel performed via the transtibial portal. Graft fixation on the femur was achieved with cross-pin fixation, while interference screw fixation was used on the tibia. From September 2012 to October 2013, there were 69 reconstructions performed through an anteromedial portal. While there was no change in graft choice, a change was made to using suspensory femoral fixation. No other surgical or postoperative rehabilitation changes were made. Results: During the 14-year period in which ACL reconstructions were performed via the transtibial portal and with cross-pin fixation, 2 graft failures (0.4% failure rate) were reported. After switching to the anteromedial portal with suspensory fixation, 7 graft failures (10.1% failure rate) were reported over a 13-month period. These were 5 male and 2 female patients, with a mean age of 18.8 years—all elite athletes. The same surgical technique was used in all patients, and all patients had at least an 8 mm–diameter graft. Patients were cleared to return to sport at an average of 8.4 months postoperatively, after completing functional performance tests. Of the 7 patients, 6 sustained a rerupture of the graft within

  7. A canine hybrid double-bundle model for study of arthroscopic ACL reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Cook, James L; Smith, Patrick A; Stannard, James P; Pfeiffer, Ferris M; Kuroki, Keiichi; Bozynski, Chantelle C; Cook, Cristi R

    2015-08-01

    Development and validation of a large animal model for pre-clinical studies of intra-articular anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction that addresses current limitations is highly desirable. The objective of the present study was to investigate a translational canine model for ACL reconstruction. With institutional approval, adult research hounds underwent arthroscopic debridement of the anteromedial bundle (AMB) of the ACL, and then either received a tendon autograft for "hybrid double-bundle" ACL reconstruction (n = 12) or no graft to remain ACL/AMB-deficient (n = 6). Contralateral knees were used as non-operated controls (n = 18) and matched canine cadaveric knees were used as biomechanical controls (n = 6). Dogs were assessed using functional, diagnostic imaging, gross, biomechanical, and histologic outcome measures required for pre-clinical animal models. The data suggest that this canine model was able to overcome the major limitations of large animal models used for translational research in ACL reconstruction and closely follow clinical aspects of human ACL reconstruction. The "hybrid double-bundle" ACL reconstruction allowed for sustained knee function without the development of osteoarthritis and for significantly improved functional, diagnostic imaging, gross, biomechanical, and histologic outcomes in grafted knees compared to ACL/AMB-deficient knees.

  8. Time-dependent bladder tissue regeneration using bilayer bladder acellular matrix graft-silk fibroin scaffolds in a rat bladder augmentation model.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yang; He, Yi; Zhou, Zhe; Guo, Jian-hua; Wu, Jia-sheng; Zhang, Ming; Li, Wei; Zhou, Juan; Xiao, Dong-dong; Wang, Zhong; Sun, Kang; Zhu, Ying-jian; Lu, Mu-jun

    2015-09-01

    With advances in tissue engineering, various synthetic and natural biomaterials have been widely used in tissue regeneration of the urinary bladder in rat models. However, reconstructive procedures remain insufficient due to the lack of appropriate scaffolding, which should provide a waterproof barrier function and support the needs of various cell types. To address these problems, we have developed a bilayer scaffold comprising a porous network (silk fibroin [SF]) and an underlying natural acellular matrix (bladder acellular matrix graft [BAMG]) and evaluated its feasibility and potential for bladder regeneration in a rat bladder augmentation model. Histological (hematoxylin and eosin and Masson's trichrome staining) and immunohistochemical analyses demonstrated that the bilayer BAMG-SF scaffold promoted smooth muscle, blood vessel, and nerve regeneration in a time-dependent manner. At 12weeks after implantation, bladders reconstructed with the BAMG-SF matrix displayed superior structural and functional properties without significant local tissue responses or systemic toxicity. These results demonstrated that the bilayer BAMG-SF scaffold may be a promising scaffold with good biocompatibility for bladder regeneration in the rat bladder augmentation model.

  9. Time-dependent bladder tissue regeneration using bilayer bladder acellular matrix graft-silk fibroin scaffolds in a rat bladder augmentation model.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yang; He, Yi; Zhou, Zhe; Guo, Jian-hua; Wu, Jia-sheng; Zhang, Ming; Li, Wei; Zhou, Juan; Xiao, Dong-dong; Wang, Zhong; Sun, Kang; Zhu, Ying-jian; Lu, Mu-jun

    2015-09-01

    With advances in tissue engineering, various synthetic and natural biomaterials have been widely used in tissue regeneration of the urinary bladder in rat models. However, reconstructive procedures remain insufficient due to the lack of appropriate scaffolding, which should provide a waterproof barrier function and support the needs of various cell types. To address these problems, we have developed a bilayer scaffold comprising a porous network (silk fibroin [SF]) and an underlying natural acellular matrix (bladder acellular matrix graft [BAMG]) and evaluated its feasibility and potential for bladder regeneration in a rat bladder augmentation model. Histological (hematoxylin and eosin and Masson's trichrome staining) and immunohistochemical analyses demonstrated that the bilayer BAMG-SF scaffold promoted smooth muscle, blood vessel, and nerve regeneration in a time-dependent manner. At 12weeks after implantation, bladders reconstructed with the BAMG-SF matrix displayed superior structural and functional properties without significant local tissue responses or systemic toxicity. These results demonstrated that the bilayer BAMG-SF scaffold may be a promising scaffold with good biocompatibility for bladder regeneration in the rat bladder augmentation model. PMID:26049152

  10. Protein Adsorption on Surfaces with Grafted Polymers

    PubMed Central

    Szleifer, I.

    1997-01-01

    A general theoretical framework for studying the adsorption of protein molecules on surfaces with grafted polymers is presented. The approach is a generalization of the single-chain mean-field theory, in which the grafted polymer-protein-solvent layer is assumed to be inhomogeneous in the direction perpendicular to the grafting surface. The theory enables the calculation of the adsorption isotherms of the protein as a function of the surface coverage of grafted polymers, concentration of protein in bulk, and type of solvent molecules. The potentials of mean force of the protein with the surface are calculated as a function of polymer surface coverage and amount of protein adsorbed. The theory is applied to model lysozyme on surfaces with grafted polyethylene oxide. The protein is modeled as spherical in solution, and it is assumed that the protein-polymer, protein-solvent, and polymer-solvent attractive interactions are all equal. Therefore, the interactions determining the structure of the layer (beyond the bare polymer-surface and protein-surface interactions) are purely repulsive. The bare surface-protein interaction is taken from atomistic calculations by Lee and Park. For surfaces that do not have preferential attractions with the grafted polymer segments, the adsorption isotherms of lysozyme are independent of the polymer length for chains with more than 50 ethylene oxide units. However, the potentials of mean force show strong variations with grafted polymer molecular weight. The competition between different conformations of the adsorbed protein is studied in detail. The adsorption isotherms change qualitatively for surfaces with attractive interactions with ethylene oxide monomers. The protein adsorption is a function of chain length—the longer the polymer the more effective it is in preventing protein adsorption. The structure of the layer and its deformation upon protein adsorption are very important in determining the adsorption isotherms and the

  11. Microparticulate Cortical Allograft: An Alternative to Autograft in the Treatment of Osseous Defects

    PubMed Central

    Temple, H. Thomas; Malinin, Theodore I

    2008-01-01

    Benign bone tumors are commonly diagnosed and treated. Following tumor removal, the defect in the bone can be filled with auto- or allografts, (degradable) bone substitutes or non-degradable polymethylmethacrylate. The ideal substitute for this purpose should provide immediate structural support and readily incorporate into bone over a short period of time. Experimentally, microparticulate allograft has been shown to incorporate quickly in metaphyseal and metadiaphyseal cortico-cancellous defects in primates [1]. Using a combination of small allogeneic cortical graft particles (< 250 µm), bone defects were filled following intralesional excision in 97 consecutive patients with benign and low grade malignant tumors and tumor-like conditions of bone. The clinical results and rate of radiographic incorporation and osseous consolidation were recorded and analyzed. These patients underwent 104 procedures in which osseous defects were packed with microparticulate allograft. The follow-up was from 23 to 49 months. There were 94 (90.3%) closed defects and 10 (9.7%) open defects. The average size of the grafted defect was 42.8 cm3 (0.48 - 315.0 cm3). Internal fixation was used in 11 of the 104 procedures (10.6 %). Radiographically, incorporation was observed in 91% of patients and consolidation in 60%. There were eleven failures (10.6 %), eight (72 %) due to tumor recurrence. Seven of eight patients with tumor recurrence underwent a second resection and grafting procedure that resulted in allograft incorporation and defect healing. There were two deep infections requiring debridement with retention of the graft; both resolved with satisfactory healing. Both incorporation and consolidation were observed in over 90% of patients with a low rate of complications. The use of small-particle cortical allograft proved to be an effective alternative to autogenous bone graft in patients with metaphyseal and metadiaphyseal surgical bone defects. PMID:19478936

  12. Use of a strontium-enriched calcium phosphate cement in accelerating the healing of soft-tissue tendon graft within the bone tunnel in a rabbit model of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Kuang, G M; Yau, W P; Lu, W W; Chiu, K Y

    2013-07-01

    We investigated whether strontium-enriched calcium phosphate cement (Sr-CPC)-treated soft-tissue tendon graft results in accelerated healing within the bone tunnel in reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). A total of 30 single-bundle ACL reconstructions using tendo Achillis allograft were performed in 15 rabbits. The graft on the tested limb was treated with Sr-CPC, whereas that on the contralateral limb was untreated and served as a control. At timepoints three, six, nine, 12 and 24 weeks after surgery, three animals were killed for histological examination. At six weeks, the graft-bone interface in the control group was filled in with fibrovascular tissue. However, the gap in the Sr-CPC group had already been completely filled in with new bone, and there was evidence of the early formation of Sharpey fibres. At 24 weeks, remodelling into a normal ACL-bone-like insertion was found in the Sr-CPC group. Coating of Sr-CPC on soft tissue tendon allograft leads to accelerated graft healing within the bone tunnel in a rabbit model of ACL reconstruction using Achilles tendon allograft.

  13. Preoperative selective desensitization of live donor liver transplant recipients considering the degree of T lymphocyte cross-match titer, model for end-stage liver disease score, and graft liver volume.

    PubMed

    Hong, Geun; Yi, Nam-Joon; Suh, Suk-won; Yoo, Tae; Kim, Hyeyoung; Park, Min-Su; Choi, YoungRok; Lee, Kyungbun; Lee, Kwang-Woong; Park, Myoung Hee; Suh, Kyung-Suk

    2014-05-01

    Several studies have suggested that a positive lymphocyte cross-matching (XM) is associated with low graft survival rates and a high prevalence of acute rejection after adult living donor liver transplantations (ALDLTs) using a small-for-size graft. However, there is still no consensus on preoperative desensitization. We adopted the desensitization protocol from ABO-incompatible LDLT. We performed desensitization for the selected patients according to the degree of T lymphocyte cross-match titer, model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) score, and graft liver volume. We retrospectively evaluated 230 consecutive ALDLT recipients for 5 yr. Eleven recipients (4.8%) showed a positive XM. Among them, five patients with the high titer (> 1:16) by antihuman globulin-augmented method (T-AHG) and one with a low titer but a high MELD score of 36 were selected for desensitization: rituximab injection and plasmapheresis before the transplantation. There were no major side effects of desensitization. Four of the patients showed successful depletion of the T-AHG titer. There was no mortality and hyperacute rejection in lymphocyte XM-positive patients, showing no significant difference in survival outcome between two groups (P=1.000). In conclusion, this desensitization protocol for the selected recipients considering the degree of T lymphocyte cross-match titer, MELD score, and graft liver volume is feasible and safe. PMID:24851018

  14. Mechanisms of Fat Graft Survival.

    PubMed

    Pu, Lee L Q

    2016-02-01

    Although more fat grafting procedures have been performed by plastic surgeons with the primary goal to restore soft tissue loss, the actual mechanism on how fat graft survives remains less completely understood. An established old theory on fat graft survival is still based on the cell survival theory proposed by Peer in the early 1950s. On the basis of his preliminary experimental study, he proposed that the mechanism of fat graft survival is based on established early blood circulation through anastomosis of the fat graft and host blood vessels. Recently, several investigators have demonstrated new concepts of the fat graft survival: One further advanced the old Peer cell survival theory and another based on new discovery and understanding of adipose-derived stem cells. This article serves as a scientific review on how fat graft survives after in vivo transplantation based on a number of well-conducted experimental studies. Both the graft survival and graft replacement theories on how fat graft survives are true based on the previously mentioned well-conducted experimental studies. Each theory may play a role in fat graft survival. It is possible that graft survival may be more dominant in some patients but the graft replacement may be more dominant in other patients.

  15. Histopathological features of bone regeneration in a canine segmental ulnar defect model

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Today, finding an ideal biomaterial to treat the large bone defects, delayed unions and non-unions remains a challenge for orthopaedic surgeions and researchers. Several studies have been carried out on the subject of bone regeneration, each having its own advantages. The present study has been designed in vivo to evaluate the effects of cellular auto-transplantation of tail vertebrae on healing of experimental critical bone defect in a dog model. Methods Six indigenous breeds of dog with 32 ± 3.6 kg average weight from both sexes (5 males and 1 female) received bilateral critical-sized ulnar segmental defects. After determining the health condition, divided to 2 groups: The Group I were kept as control I (n = 1) while in Group II (experimental group; n = 5) bioactive bone implants were inserted. The defects were implanted with either autogeneic coccygeal bone grafts in dogs with 3-4 cm diaphyseal defects in the ulna. Defects were stabilized with internal plate fixation, and the control defects were not stabilized. Animals were euthanized at 16 weeks and analyzed by histopathology. Results Histological evaluation of this new bone at sixteen weeks postoperatively revealed primarily lamellar bone, with the formation of new cortices and normal-appearing marrow elements. And also reformation cortical compartment and reconstitution of marrow space were observed at the graft-host interface together with graft resorption and necrosis responses. Finally, our data were consistent with the osteoconducting function of the tail autograft. Conclusions Our results suggested that the tail vertebrae autograft seemed to be a new source of autogenous cortical bone in order to supporting segmental long bone defects in dogs. Furthermore, cellular autotransplantation was found to be a successful replacement for the tail vertebrae allograft bone at 3-4 cm segmental defects in the canine mid- ulna. Clinical application using graft expanders or bone

  16. The effect of graft choice on functional outcome in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Sajovic, Matjaz; Strahovnik, Andrej; Komadina, Radko; Dernovsek, Mojca Z

    2008-08-01

    A prospective, randomised, 5-year follow-up study was designed to compare the functional results between patellar tendon and hamstring tendon autografts after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Primary reconstruction was performed in 32 patients using the central third of the patellar ligament and in 32 patients using double-looped semitendinosus and gracilis tendons. All reconstructions were performed by a single surgeon, with identical surgical technique and rehabilitation protocol. Of the total 64 patients in the study, 54 (85%) were available for the 5-year follow-up. No statistically significant differences were seen with respect to Lysholm score, International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) classification, clinical and KT-2000 arthrometer laxity testing, single-legged hop test and anterior knee pain. Graft rupture occurred in two patients (8%) in the patellar tendon group and in two patients (7%) in the hamstring tendon group; 23 patients (88%) in the patellar tendon group and 23 patients (82%) in the hamstring tendon group returned to their pre-injury activity level. Good subjective outcome and stability can be obtained by using either graft; no statistically significant differences were found in functional outcome between the grafts.

  17. Graft-versus-host disease

    MedlinePlus

    GVHD; Bone marrow transplant - graft-versus-host disease; Stem cell transplant - graft-versus-host disease; Allogeneic transplant - ... GVHD may occur after a bone marrow, or stem cell, transplant in which someone receives bone marrow ...

  18. Nerve regeneration and elastin formation within poly(glycerol sebacate)-based synthetic arterial grafts one-year post-implantation in a rat model

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Robert A.; Wu, Wei; Yao, Mingyi; Dutta, Debaditya; Duan, Xinjie; Bachman, Timothy N.; Champion, Hunter C.; Stolz, Donna B.; Robertson, Anne M.; Kim, Kang; Isenberg, Jeffrey S.; Wang, Yadong

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the long term performance of cell-free vascular grafts made from a fast-degrading elastic polymer. We fabricated small arterial grafts from microporous tubes of poly(glycerol sebacate) (PGS) reinforced with polycaprolactone (PCL) nanofibers on the outer surface. Grafts were interpositioned in rat abdominal aortas and characterized at 1 year post-implant. Grafts remodeled into “neoarteries” (regenerated arteries) with similar gross appearance to native rat aortas. Neoarteries mimic arterial tissue architecture with a confluent endothelium and media and adventita-like layers. Patent vessels (80%) showed no significant stenosis, dilation, or calcification. Neoarteries contain nerves and have the same amount of mature elastin as native arteries. Despite some differences in matrix organization, regenerated arteries had similar dynamic mechanical compliance to native arteries in vivo. Neoarteries responded to vasomotor agents, albeit with different magnitude than native aortas. These data suggest that an elastic vascular graft that resorbs quickly has potential to improve the performance of vascular grafts used in small arteries. This design may also promote constructive remodeling in other soft tissues. PMID:24119457

  19. Grafting effects on vegetable quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the United States, vegetable grafting is rare and few experiments have been done to determine optimal grafting procedures and production practices for different geographical and climatic regions in America. Grafting vegetables to control soilborne disease is a common practice in Asia, parts of E...

  20. Vascularized tail bone grafts in rats.

    PubMed

    Sempuku, T; Tamai, S; Mizumoto, S; Yajima, H

    1993-03-01

    A new experimental model for vascularized corticocancellous bone grafts was established by investigation of vascular anatomy of the tail in 15 adult Fischer 344 rats and determination of the viability of vascularized tail bone grafts into the abdominal wall in 22 7-week-old rats. The tail bones of 40 rats were then raised on the pedicle of the caudal artery and its venae comitantes, transferred to a resected portion in the femur, and observed for 16 weeks. The vascularized graft showed marked reactive periosteal bone formation during the first and second weeks following transfer, and thereafter, the graft continued to show active bone formation. In transverse section, the sharp processes became rounded. In the cancellous bone, both bone resorption and bone formation were noticeably activated early after transfer, although resorption predominated and the amount of the cancellous bone consequently diminished. The nonvascularized grafts showed "creeping substitution." The results suggest that morphologic adaptation occurs if living (i.e., vascularized) tail bones are transferred to long-bone femurs.

  1. Grafting for disease resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The primary purpose of grafting vegetables worldwide has been to provide resistance to soil-borne diseases. The potential loss of methyl bromide as a soil fumigant combined with pathogen resistance to commonly used pesticides will make resistance to soil-borne pathogens even more important in the fu...

  2. Acrylonitrile grafted to PVDF

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Jin; Eitouni, Hany Basam

    2015-03-31

    PVDF-g-PAN has been synthesized by grafting polyacrylonitrile onto polyvinylidene fluoride using an ATRP/AGET method. The novel polymer is ionically conducive and has much more flexibility than PVDF alone, making it especially useful either as a binder in battery cell electrodes or as a polymer electrolyte in a battery cell.

  3. Vascular graft infections.

    PubMed

    Hasse, Barbara; Husmann, Lars; Zinkernagel, Annelies; Weber, Rainer; Lachat, Mario; Mayer, Dieter

    2013-01-01

    Vascular procedures are rarely complicated by infection, but if prosthetic vascular graft infection (PVGI) occurs, morbidity and mortality are high. Several patient-related, surgery-related and postoperative risk factors are reported, but they are not well validated. PVGI is due to bacterial colonisation of the wound and the underlying prosthetic graft, generally as a result of direct contamination during the operative procedure, mainly from the patient's skin or adjacent bowel. There is no consensus on diagnostic criteria or on the best management of PVGI. On the basis of reported clinical studies and our own experience, we advocate a surgical approach combining repeated radical local debridement, with graft preservation whenever possible or partial excision of the infected graft, depending on its condition, plus simultaneous negative-pressure wound therapy (NPWT). In addition, antimicrobial therapy is recommended, but there is no consensus on which classes of agent are adequate for the treatment of PVGI and whether certain infections may be treated by means of NPWT alone. Since staphylococci and Gram-negative rods are likely to be isolated, empirical treatment might include a penicillinase-resistant beta-lactam or a glycopeptide, plus an aminoglycoside, the latter for Gram-negative coverage and synergistic treatment of Gram-positive cocci. Additionally, empirical treatment might include rifampicin since it penetrates well into biofilms.

  4. Blind prediction performance of RosettaAntibody 3.0: grafting, relaxation, kinematic loop modeling, and full CDR optimization.

    PubMed

    Weitzner, Brian D; Kuroda, Daisuke; Marze, Nicholas; Xu, Jianqing; Gray, Jeffrey J

    2014-08-01

    Antibody Modeling Assessment II (AMA-II) provided an opportunity to benchmark RosettaAntibody on a set of 11 unpublished antibody structures. RosettaAntibody produced accurate, physically realistic models, with all framework regions and 42 of the 55 non-H3 CDR loops predicted to under an Ångström. The performance is notable when modeling H3 on a homology framework, where RosettaAntibody produced the best model among all participants for four of the 11 targets, two of which were predicted with sub-Ångström accuracy. To improve RosettaAntibody, we pursued the causes of model errors. The most common limitation was template unavailability, underscoring the need for more antibody structures and/or better de novo loop methods. In some cases, better templates could have been found by considering residues outside of the CDRs. De novo CDR H3 modeling remains challenging at long loop lengths, but constraining the C-terminal end of H3 to a kinked conformation allows near-native conformations to be sampled more frequently. We also found that incorrect VL -VH orientations caused models with low H3 RMSDs to score poorly, suggesting that correct VL -VH orientations will improve discrimination between near-native and incorrect conformations. These observations will guide the future development of RosettaAntibody.

  5. Following-up changes in red blood cell deformability and membrane stability in the presence of PTFE graft implanted into the femoral artery in a canine model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toth, Csaba; Kiss, Ferenc; Klarik, Zoltan; Gergely, Eszter; Toth, Eniko; Peto, Katalin; Vanyolos, Erzsebet; Miko, Iren; Nemeth, Norbert

    2014-05-01

    It is known that a moderate mechanical stress can even improve the red blood cells' (RBC) micro-rheological characteristics, however, a more significant stress causes deterioration in the deformability. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effect of the presence of artificial graft on the RBC deformability and membrane stability in beagles. In the Control group only anesthesia was induced and in the postoperative (p.o.) period blood samplings were carried out. In the Grafted group under general anesthesia, the left femoral artery was isolated, from which a 3.5 cm segment was resected and a PTFE graft (O.D.: 3 mm) of equal in length was implanted into the gap. On the 1st, 3rd, 5th, 7th and 14th p.o. days blood was collected the cephalic veins and RBC deformability was determined ektacytometry (LoRRca MaxSis Osmoscan). Membrane stability test consisted of two deformability measurements before and after the cells were being exposed to mechanical stress (60 or 100 Pa for 300 seconds). Compared to the Control group and the baseline values the red blood cell deformability showed significant deterioration on the 3rd, 5th and mainly on the 7th postoperative day after the graft implantation. The membrane stability of erythrocyte revealed marked inter-group difference on the 3rd, 5th and 7th day: in the Grafted group the deformability decreased and during the membrane stability test smaller difference was observed between the states before and after shearing. We concluded that the presence of a PTFE graft in the femoral artery may cause changes in RBC deformability in the first p.o. week. RBC membrane stability investigation shows a lower elongation index profile for the grafted group and a narrowed alteration in the deformability curves due to mechanical stress.

  6. Assessment of SiCaP-30 in a Rabbit Posterolateral Fusion Model with Concurrent Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Smucker, Joseph D; Petersen, Emily B; Al-Hili, Ali; Nepola, James V; Fredericks, Douglas C

    2015-01-01

    Chemotherapy derivatives of the rabbit posterolateral fusion model are considered a challenging environment in which to test bone graft materials. The purpose of this study was to determine the performance characteristics of SiCaP-30 as a bone graft substitute relative to autograft (iliac crest bone graft [ICBG]), Actifuse ABX and β-Tricalcium Phosphate-Bioactive Glass-Type I Collagen (βTCP-BG) in a rabbit posterolateral spine fusion model with concurrent chemotherapy treatment This was a randomized, controlled study in a laboratory setting with blinded assessment of fusion by manual palpation and flexibility testing. Sixty rabbits were entered into the study with 45 used for analysis. Chemotherapeutic agents, doxorubicin and cis-platin (2.5 mg/kg), were administered one week prior to surgery, and one, two and three weeks post surgery. Bilateral posterolateral lumbar intertransverse process fusions were performed at L5-L6. The lateral two thirds of the transverse processes were decorticated and covered with 3cc/side of one of the following graft materials: autologous ICBG, Actifuse ABX (ApaTech Ltd, UK), Vitoss BA (Orthovita, USA) or SiCaP-30 (ApaTech Ltd., UK). Animals were euthanized 12 weeks post surgery. The ICBG group had a 45% (5/11) manual palpation fusion rate and correlated with motion analysis fusion results of 36% (4/11). The Actifuse ABX group had a 33% (4/12) manual palpation fusion rate and a motion analysis fusion rate of 25% (3/12). No motion segments in the Vitoss BA group (0/11) showed any signs of fusion. The SiCaP-30 group demonstrated a statistically higher manual palpation and motion analysis fusion rate of 82% (9/11; p<0.05) and produced superior bone formation compared with Actifuse ABX and βTCP-BG.

  7. Assessment of SiCaP-30 in a Rabbit Posterolateral Fusion Model with Concurrent Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Smucker, Joseph D; Petersen, Emily B; Al-Hili, Ali; Nepola, James V; Fredericks, Douglas C

    2015-01-01

    Chemotherapy derivatives of the rabbit posterolateral fusion model are considered a challenging environment in which to test bone graft materials. The purpose of this study was to determine the performance characteristics of SiCaP-30 as a bone graft substitute relative to autograft (iliac crest bone graft [ICBG]), Actifuse ABX and β-Tricalcium Phosphate-Bioactive Glass-Type I Collagen (βTCP-BG) in a rabbit posterolateral spine fusion model with concurrent chemotherapy treatment This was a randomized, controlled study in a laboratory setting with blinded assessment of fusion by manual palpation and flexibility testing. Sixty rabbits were entered into the study with 45 used for analysis. Chemotherapeutic agents, doxorubicin and cis-platin (2.5 mg/kg), were administered one week prior to surgery, and one, two and three weeks post surgery. Bilateral posterolateral lumbar intertransverse process fusions were performed at L5-L6. The lateral two thirds of the transverse processes were decorticated and covered with 3cc/side of one of the following graft materials: autologous ICBG, Actifuse ABX (ApaTech Ltd, UK), Vitoss BA (Orthovita, USA) or SiCaP-30 (ApaTech Ltd., UK). Animals were euthanized 12 weeks post surgery. The ICBG group had a 45% (5/11) manual palpation fusion rate and correlated with motion analysis fusion results of 36% (4/11). The Actifuse ABX group had a 33% (4/12) manual palpation fusion rate and a motion analysis fusion rate of 25% (3/12). No motion segments in the Vitoss BA group (0/11) showed any signs of fusion. The SiCaP-30 group demonstrated a statistically higher manual palpation and motion analysis fusion rate of 82% (9/11; p<0.05) and produced superior bone formation compared with Actifuse ABX and βTCP-BG. PMID:26361457

  8. Circulation, bone scans, and tetracycline labeling in microvascularized and vascular bundle implanted rib grafts

    SciTech Connect

    Lalonde, D.H.; Williams, H.B.; Rosenthall, L.; Viloria, J.B.

    1984-11-01

    The circulation in microvascularized rib grafts has been compared with that in conventional rib grafts and in those augmented by a direct vascular bundle implantation into the bone grafts. A new experimental model has been designed to correlate vascular perfusion, bone scan patterns, tetracycline labeling, and histological findings in these bone grafts. Posterior microvascularized rib grafts were found to have a circulatory pattern identical to that of the normal rib. Failed microvascularized rib grafts were revascularized more slowly than conventional rib grafts. Vascular bundles implanted into rib grafts remained patent and increased the rate of revascularization. The stripping or preservation of periosteum had no observable effects on the rate or pattern of conventional rib graft revascularization. The circulation in rib grafts was accurately reflected in technetium 99 bone scans, as was the patency of the anastomoses of microvascularized rib grafts and of implanted vascular bundles. In contrast, tetracycline labeling was repeatedly observed in avascular areas of bone grafts and, therefore, is not a reliable indicator of bone graft circulation.

  9. Endothelialized ePTFE Graft by Nanobiotechnology

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-11-29

    The Apparatus for Processing the Tubular Graft Modification Will be Designed and Evaluated.; The On-site Capturing of the Endothelial (Progenitor) Cells by Peptide-mediated Selective Adhesion in Vitro and in Vivo Will Also be Elucidated.; The Patency Rate of ITRI-made Artificial Blood Vessels Will be Evaluated by the Porcine Animal Model.

  10. Prophylactic antibiotics prevent bacterial biofilm graft infection.

    PubMed

    Bergamini, T M; Peyton, J C; Cheadle, W G

    1992-02-01

    Bacterial biofilm graft infection is due to prostheses colonization by Staphylococcus epidermidis, a pathogen frequently recovered from perigraft tissues of man during vascular procedures despite the use of asepsis and prophylactic antibiotics. The effect of preoperative intraperitoneal cefazolin, administered at a standard (15 or 30 mg/kg) and high (120 mg/kg) dose, on the prevention of bacterial biofilm infection was studied in a rat model. Seventy-four Dacron grafts, colonized in vitro with S. epidermidis to produce an adherent biofilm (3.19 +/- 0.71 x 10(7) colony-forming units/cm2 graft), were implanted in the dorsal subcutaneous tissue at 0.5, 2, and 4 hr after antibiotic administration. The study strain was a slime-producing clinical isolate with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 15-30 micrograms/ml to cefazolin. Subcutaneous tissue antibiotic levels were determined at each time interval. One week after implantation, the concentration of bacteria in the surface biofilm by quantitative agar culture was significantly decreased (P less than 0.05) only for grafts implanted when antibiotic tissue levels were greater than or equal to the MIC of the study strain. The result of no growth by biofilm broth culture was significantly achieved (P less than 0.01) only for grafts implanted 0.5 hr after high dose cefazolin, in which the tissue antibiotic level was above the MIC of the study strain. Antibiotics can markedly reduce the bacteria concentration of a prosthetic surface biofilm. The effectiveness of prophylactic antibiotics on the prevention of graft infection is dependent upon maintaining an adequate antibiotic level in the perigraft tissues for the duration of the procedure.

  11. The effect of graft strength on knee laxity and graft in-situ forces after posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yu-Shu; Chen, Wen-Chuan; Huang, Chang-Hung; Cheng, Cheng-Kung; Chan, Kam-Kong; Chang, Ting-Kuo

    2015-01-01

    Surgical reconstruction is generally recommended for posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injuries; however, the use of grafts is still a controversial problem. In this study, a three-dimensional finite element model of the human tibiofemoral joint with articular cartilage layers, menisci, and four main ligaments was constructed to investigate the effects of graft strengths on knee kinematics and in-situ forces of PCL grafts. Nine different graft strengths with stiffness ranging from 0% (PCL rupture) to 200%, in increments of 25%, of an intact PCL's strength were used to simulate the PCL reconstruction. A 100 N posterior tibial drawer load was applied to the knee joint at full extension. Results revealed that the maximum posterior translation of the PCL rupture model (0% stiffness) was 6.77 mm in the medial compartment, which resulted in tibial internal rotation of about 3.01°. After PCL reconstruction with any graft strength, the laxity of the medial tibial compartment was noticeably improved. Tibial translation and rotation were similar to the intact knee after PCL reconstruction with graft strengths ranging from 75% to 125% of an intact PCL. When the graft's strength surpassed 150%, the medial tibia moved forward and external tibial rotation greatly increased. The in-situ forces generated in the PCL grafts ranged from 13.15 N to 75.82 N, depending on the stiffness. In conclusion, the strength of PCL grafts have has a noticeable effect on anterior-posterior translation of the medial tibial compartment and its in-situ force. Similar kinematic response may happen in the models when the PCL graft's strength lies between 75% and 125% of an intact PCL.

  12. The effect of graft strength on knee laxity and graft in-situ forces after posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yu-Shu; Chen, Wen-Chuan; Huang, Chang-Hung; Cheng, Cheng-Kung; Chan, Kam-Kong; Chang, Ting-Kuo

    2015-01-01

    Surgical reconstruction is generally recommended for posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injuries; however, the use of grafts is still a controversial problem. In this study, a three-dimensional finite element model of the human tibiofemoral joint with articular cartilage layers, menisci, and four main ligaments was constructed to investigate the effects of graft strengths on knee kinematics and in-situ forces of PCL grafts. Nine different graft strengths with stiffness ranging from 0% (PCL rupture) to 200%, in increments of 25%, of an intact PCL's strength were used to simulate the PCL reconstruction. A 100 N posterior tibial drawer load was applied to the knee joint at full extension. Results revealed that the maximum posterior translation of the PCL rupture model (0% stiffness) was 6.77 mm in the medial compartment, which resulted in tibial internal rotation of about 3.01°. After PCL reconstruction with any graft strength, the laxity of the medial tibial compartment was noticeably improved. Tibial translation and rotation were similar to the intact knee after PCL reconstruction with graft strengths ranging from 75% to 125% of an intact PCL. When the graft's strength surpassed 150%, the medial tibia moved forward and external tibial rotation greatly increased. The in-situ forces generated in the PCL grafts ranged from 13.15 N to 75.82 N, depending on the stiffness. In conclusion, the strength of PCL grafts have has a noticeable effect on anterior-posterior translation of the medial tibial compartment and its in-situ force. Similar kinematic response may happen in the models when the PCL graft's strength lies between 75% and 125% of an intact PCL. PMID:26001045

  13. Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Antagonist Attenuates Lacrimal Gland, Lung, and Liver Fibrosis in a Murine Model of Chronic Graft-Versus-Host Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yaguchi, Saori; Ogawa, Yoko; Shimmura, Shigeto; Kawakita, Tetsuya; Hatou, Shin; Satofuka, Shingo; Nakamura, Shigeru; Imada, Toshihiro; Miyashita, Hideyuki; Yoshida, Satoru; Yaguchi, Tomonori; Ozawa, Yoko; Mori, Takehiko; Okamoto, Shinichiro; Kawakami, Yutaka; Ishida, Susumu; Tsubota, Kazuo

    2013-01-01

    Chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD), a serious complication following allogeneic HSCT (hematopoietic stem cell transplantation), is characterized by systemic fibrosis. The tissue renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is involved in the fibrotic pathogenesis, and an angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) antagonist can attenuate fibrosis. Tissue RAS is present in the lacrimal gland, lung, and liver, and is known to be involved in the fibrotic pathogenesis of the lung and liver. This study aimed to determine whether RAS is involved in fibrotic pathogenesis in the lacrimal gland and to assess the effect of an AT1R antagonist on preventing lacrimal gland, lung, and liver fibrosis in cGVHD model mice. We used the B10.D2→BALB/c (H-2d) MHC-compatible, multiple minor histocompatibility antigen-mismatched model, which reflects clinical and pathological symptoms of human cGVHD. First, we examined the localization and expression of RAS components in the lacrimal glands using immunohistochemistry and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Next, we administered an AT1R antagonist (valsartan; 10 mg/kg) or angiotensin II type 2 receptor (AT2R) antagonist (PD123319; 10 mg/kg) intraperitoneally into cGVHD model mice and assessed the fibrotic change in the lacrimal gland, lung, and liver. We demonstrated that fibroblasts expressed angiotensin II, AT1R, and AT2R, and that the mRNA expression of angiotensinogen was greater in the lacrimal glands of cGVHD model mice than in controls generated by syngeneic-HSCT. The inhibition experiment revealed that fibrosis of the lacrimal gland, lung, and liver was suppressed in mice treated with the AT1R antagonist, but not the AT2R antagonist. We conclude that RAS is involved in fibrotic pathogenesis in the lacrimal gland and that AT1R antagonist has a therapeutic effect on lacrimal gland, lung, and liver fibrosis in cGVHD model mice. Our findings point to AT1R antagonist as a possible target for therapeutic intervention in c

  14. Siloxane-grafted membranes

    DOEpatents

    Friesen, Dwayne T.; Obligin, Alan S.

    1989-01-01

    Composite cellulosic semipermeable membranes are disclosed which are the covalently bonded reaction product of an asymmetric cellulosic semipermeable membrane and a polysiloxane containing reactive functional groups. The two reactants chemically bond by ether, ester, amide or acrylate linkages to form a siloxane-grafted cellulosic membrane having superior selectivity and flux stability. Selectivity may be enhanced by wetting the surface with a swelling agent such as water.

  15. Siloxane-grafted membranes

    DOEpatents

    Friesen, D.T.; Obligin, A.S.

    1989-10-31

    Composite cellulosic semipermeable membranes are disclosed which are the covalently bonded reaction product of an asymmetric cellulosic semipermeable membrane and a polysiloxane containing reactive functional group. The two reactants chemically bond by ether, ester, amide or acrylate linkages to form a siloxane-grafted cellulosic membrane having superior selectivity and flux stability. Selectivity may be enhanced by wetting the surface with a swelling agent such as water.

  16. Platelet-rich plasma increases transforming growth factor-beta1 expression at graft-host interface following autologous osteochondral transplantation in a rabbit model

    PubMed Central

    Boakye, Lorraine A; Ross, Keir A; Pinski, John M; Smyth, Niall A; Haleem, Amgad M; Hannon, Charles P; Fortier, Lisa A; Kennedy, John G

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To explore the effect of platelet-rich plasma on protein expression patterns of transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-β1) in cartilage following autologous osteochondral transplantation (AOT) in a rabbit knee cartilage defect model. METHODS: Twelve New Zealand white rabbits received bilateral AOT. In each rabbit, one knee was randomized to receive an autologous platelet rich plasma (PRP) injection and the contralateral knee received saline injection. Rabbits were euthanized at 3, 6 and 12 wk post-operatively. Articular cartilage sections were stained with TGF-β1 antibody. Histological regions of interest (ROI) (left, right and center of the autologous grafts interfaces) were evaluated using MetaMorph. Percentage of chondrocytes positive for TGF-β1 was then assessed. RESULTS: Percentage of chondrocytes positive for TGF-β1 was higher in PRP treated knees for selected ROIs (left; P = 0.03, center; P = 0.05) compared to control and was also higher in the PRP group at each post-operative time point (P = 6.6 × 10-4, 3.1 × 10-4 and 7.3 × 10-3 for 3, 6 and 12 wk, respectively). TGF-β1 expression was higher in chondrocytes of PRP-treated knees (36% ± 29% vs 15% ± 18%) (P = 1.8 × 10-6) overall for each post-operative time point and ROI. CONCLUSION: Articular cartilage of rabbits treated with AOT and PRP exhibit increased TGF-β1 expression compared to those treated with AOT and saline. Our findings suggest that adjunctive PRP may increase TGF-β1 expression, which may play a role in the chondrogenic effect of PRP in vivo. PMID:26716092

  17. [Migration and distribution of allogeneic T lymphocytes in organs of graft-versus-host disease mouse model].

    PubMed

    Wen, Hong-Sheng; Wang, Jian-Min; Zhou, Hong; Xia, Rong; Qiu, Hui-Ying; Gao, Lei; Hu, Xiao-Xia

    2006-10-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the migration and distribution processes of allogeneic donor T lymphocytes in the organs of recipient mice. GVHD model was established by transfusion of the splenocytes of eGFP transgeneic C57BL/6 mice together with born marrow cells harvested from C57BL/6 mice into BALB/c mice underwent 8.0 Gy total body irradiation. The migration and homing of eGFP(+) cells were tracked by stereo-fluorescent microscopy or inverted fluorescent microscopy and flow cytometry. The enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was performed on supernatants from the tissue homogenates to detect the amount of MIP-1alpha. The results indicated that GVHD clinical manifestation and pathological changes of organs appeared on day 8 post transplantation. eGFP-positive donor T cells in recipient organs were observed by inverted fluorescence microscope in frozen section, or by stereo-fluorescence microscopy in living organs, such as liver, spleen, skin, lungs, bowels, and tongue. The highest expression of MIP-1alpha was on day 7 post transplantation in the liver (491.3 +/- 32.1 pg/ml), and day 3 post transplantation in the spleen (881.5 +/- 45.2 pg/ml), respectively (P < 0.05). It is concluded that GVHD was induced by splenocytes of eGFP transgeneic C57BL/6 mice. eGFP(+) cells in the organs can be observed by fluorescent microscopy. In this GVHD model, donor T cells proliferate and infiltrate in liver, skin, bowels, as well as lungs and tongue. MIP-1alpha may be in relation with the infiltration of T lymphocytes in liver and spleen.

  18. Magnesium inference screw supports early graft incorporation with inhibition of graft degradation in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Pengfei; Han, Pei; Zhao, Changli; Zhang, Shaoxiang; Zhang, Xiaonong; Chai, Yimin

    2016-01-01

    Patients after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction surgery commonly encounters graft failure in the initial phase of rehabilitation. The inhibition of graft degradation is crucial for the successful reconstruction of the ACL. Here, we used biodegradable high-purity magnesium (HP Mg) screws in the rabbit model of ACL reconstruction with titanium (Ti) screws as a control and analyzed the graft degradation and screw corrosion using direct pull-out tests, microCT scanning, and histological and immunohistochemical staining. The most noteworthy finding was that tendon graft fixed by HP Mg screws exhibited biomechanical properties substantially superior to that by Ti screws and the relative area of collagen fiber at the tendon-bone interface was much larger in the Mg group, when severe graft degradation was identified in the histological analysis at 3 weeks. Semi-quantitative immunohistochemical results further elucidated that the MMP-13 expression significantly decreased surrounding HP Mg screws with relatively higher Collagen II expression. And HP Mg screws exhibited uniform corrosion behavior without displacement or loosening in the femoral tunnel. Therefore, our results demonstrated that Mg screw inhibited graft degradation and improved biomechanical properties of tendon graft during the early phase of graft healing and highlighted its potential in ACL reconstruction. PMID:27210585

  19. Magnesium inference screw supports early graft incorporation with inhibition of graft degradation in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Pengfei; Han, Pei; Zhao, Changli; Zhang, Shaoxiang; Zhang, Xiaonong; Chai, Yimin

    2016-05-01

    Patients after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction surgery commonly encounters graft failure in the initial phase of rehabilitation. The inhibition of graft degradation is crucial for the successful reconstruction of the ACL. Here, we used biodegradable high-purity magnesium (HP Mg) screws in the rabbit model of ACL reconstruction with titanium (Ti) screws as a control and analyzed the graft degradation and screw corrosion using direct pull-out tests, microCT scanning, and histological and immunohistochemical staining. The most noteworthy finding was that tendon graft fixed by HP Mg screws exhibited biomechanical properties substantially superior to that by Ti screws and the relative area of collagen fiber at the tendon-bone interface was much larger in the Mg group, when severe graft degradation was identified in the histological analysis at 3 weeks. Semi-quantitative immunohistochemical results further elucidated that the MMP-13 expression significantly decreased surrounding HP Mg screws with relatively higher Collagen II expression. And HP Mg screws exhibited uniform corrosion behavior without displacement or loosening in the femoral tunnel. Therefore, our results demonstrated that Mg screw inhibited graft degradation and improved biomechanical properties of tendon graft during the early phase of graft healing and highlighted its potential in ACL reconstruction.

  20. Magnesium inference screw supports early graft incorporation with inhibition of graft degradation in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Pengfei; Han, Pei; Zhao, Changli; Zhang, Shaoxiang; Zhang, Xiaonong; Chai, Yimin

    2016-01-01

    Patients after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction surgery commonly encounters graft failure in the initial phase of rehabilitation. The inhibition of graft degradation is crucial for the successful reconstruction of the ACL. Here, we used biodegradable high-purity magnesium (HP Mg) screws in the rabbit model of ACL reconstruction with titanium (Ti) screws as a control and analyzed the graft degradation and screw corrosion using direct pull-out tests, microCT scanning, and histological and immunohistochemical staining. The most noteworthy finding was that tendon graft fixed by HP Mg screws exhibited biomechanical properties substantially superior to that by Ti screws and the relative area of collagen fiber at the tendon-bone interface was much larger in the Mg group, when severe graft degradation was identified in the histological analysis at 3 weeks. Semi-quantitative immunohistochemical results further elucidated that the MMP-13 expression significantly decreased surrounding HP Mg screws with relatively higher Collagen II expression. And HP Mg screws exhibited uniform corrosion behavior without displacement or loosening in the femoral tunnel. Therefore, our results demonstrated that Mg screw inhibited graft degradation and improved biomechanical properties of tendon graft during the early phase of graft healing and highlighted its potential in ACL reconstruction. PMID:27210585

  1. Evaluation of ABM/P-15 versus autogenous bone in an ovine lumbar interbody fusion model.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Blake P; Lindley, Emily M; Turner, A Simon; Seim, Howard B; Benedict, James; Burger, Evalina L; Patel, Vikas V

    2010-12-01

    A prospective, randomized study was performed in an ovine model to compare the efficacy of an anorganic bovine-derived hydroxyapatite matrix combined with a synthetic 15 amino acid residue (ABM/P-15) in facilitating lumbar interbody fusion when compared with autogenous bone harvested from the iliac crest. P-15 is a biomimetic to the cell-binding site of Type-I collagen for bone-forming cells. When combined with ABM, it creates the necessary scaffold to initiate cell invasion, binding, and subsequent osteogenesis. In this study, six adult ewes underwent anterior-lateral interbody fusion at L3/L4 and L4/L5 using PEEK interbody rings filled with autogenous bone at one level and ABM/P-15 at the other level and no additional instrumentation. Clinical CT scans were obtained at 3 and 6 months; micro-CT scans and histomorphometry analyses were performed after euthanization at 6 months. Clinical CT scan analysis showed that all autograft and ABM/P-15 treated levels had radiographically fused outside of the rings at the 3-month study time point. Although the clinical CT scans of the autograft treatment group showed significantly better fusion within the PEEK rings than ABM/P-15 at 3 months, micro-CT scans, clinical CT scans, and histomorphometric analyses showed there were no statistical differences between the two treatment groups at 6 months. Thus, ABM/P-15 was as successful as autogenous bone graft in producing lumbar spinal fusion in an ovine model, and it should be further evaluated in clinical studies.

  2. Biomechanical evaluation of an endplate-conformed polycaprolactone-hydroxyapatite intervertebral fusion graft and its comparison with a typical nonconformed cortical graft.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Aakash; Palepu, Vivek; Agarwal, Anand K; Goel, Vijay K; Yildirim, Eda D

    2013-06-01

    In the thoracolumbar region, between 7% and 30% of spinal fusion failures are at risk for pseudarthrosis. From a biomechanical perspective, the nonconformity of the intervertebral graft to the endplate surface could contribute to pseudarthrosis, given suboptimal stress distributions. The objective of this study was to quantify the effect of endplate-graft conformation on endplate stress distribution, maximum Von Mises stress development, and stability. The study design used an experimentally validated finite element (FE) model of the L4-L5 functional spinal unit to simulate two types of interbody grafts (cortical bone and polycaprolactone (PCL)-hydroxyapatite (HA) graft), with and without endplate-conformed surfaces. Two case studies were completed. In Case Study I, the endplate-conformed grafts and nonconformed grafts were compared under without posterior instrumentation condition, while in Case Study II, the endplate-conformed and nonconformed grafts were compared with posterior instrumentation. In both case studies, the results suggested that the increased endplate-graft conformity reduced the maximum stress on the endplate, created uniform stress distribution on endplate surfaces, and reduced the range of motion of L4-L5 segments by increasing the contact surface area between the graft and the endplate. The stress distributions in the endplate suggest that the load sharing is greater with the endplate-conformed PCL-HA graft, which might reduce the graft subsidence possibility. PMID:23699717

  3. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with preservation of remnant bundle using hamstring autograft: technical note.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jin Hwan; Lee, Yong Seuk; Ha, Hae Chan

    2009-08-01

    During an arthroscopic examination for an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, there is a relatively thick remnant ACL tibial stump attached to the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) or rarely remained between the femur origin and the tibia insertion. We thought that preservation of the remnant ACL original bundle might promote graft healing or be helpful in preserving the proprioception and function to stabilize the knee. Therefore, we established a remnant preservation procedure without additional instruments during an ACL reconstruction using a bio-cross pin (RIGIDfix system: Mitek, Johnson & Johnson, USA) for the femoral tunnel fixation. The remnant ACL was sutured (usually three stitches) using a suture hook (Linvatec, Largo, FL), and both ends of the sutures were pulled to the far anteromedial (AM) portal. These sutures protected the remnant tissue during the ACL reconstruction because medial traction of these sutures can provide a wide view during the reconstruction. After the femoral and tibial tunnel formation, these sutures were pulled out to the inferior sleeve of the cross pin using a previously inserted wire loop via an inferior sleeve. After graft passage, a superior cross pin was first fixed and tibial fixation was then performed. Finally, inferior cross pin fixation was performed and ties were made at the entrance of the inferior cross pin. PMID:18299859

  4. Orthogonal cutting of cancellous bone with application to the harvesting of bone autograft.

    PubMed

    Malak, Sharif F F; Anderson, Iain A

    2008-07-01

    Autogenous bone graft harvesting results in cell death within the graft and trauma at the donor site. The latter can be mitigated by using minimally invasive tools and techniques, while cell morbidity may be reduced by improving cutter design and cutting parameters. We have performed orthogonal cutting experiments on bovine cancellous bone samples, to gain a basic understanding of the cutting mechanism and to determine design guidelines for tooling. Measurements were performed at cutting speeds from 11.2 to 5000 mm/min, with tool rake angles of 23 degrees, 45 degrees and 60 degrees, and depths of cut in the range of 0.1-3.0 mm. Horizontal and vertical cutting forces were measured, and the chip formation process video recorded. Continuous chip formation was observed for rake angles of 45 degrees and 60 degrees , and depths of cut greater than 0.8 mm. Chip formation for depths of cut greater than 1.0 mm was accompanied by bone marrow extruding out of the free surfaces and away from the rake face. Specific cutting energies decreased with increasing rake angle, increasing depth of cut and increasing cutting speed. Our orthogonal cutting experiments showed that a rake angle of 60 degrees and a depth of cut of 1mm, will avoid excessive fragmentation, keep specific cutting energy low and promote bone marrow extrusion, which may be beneficial for cell survival. We demonstrate how drill bit clearance angle and feed rate can be calculated facilitating a 1mm depth of cut.

  5. Inside-out autologous vein grafts fail to restore erectile function in a rat model of cavernous nerve crush injury after nerve-sparing prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Bessede, T; Moszkowicz, D; Alsaid, B; Zaitouna, M; Diallo, D; Peschaud, F; Benoit, G; Droupy, S

    2015-01-01

    Some autologous tissues can restore erectile function (EF) in rats after a resection of the cavernous nerve (CN). However, a cavernous nerve crush injury (CNCI) better reproduces ED occurring after a nerve-sparing radical prostatectomy (RP). The aim was to evaluate the effect on EF of an autologous vein graft after CNCI, compared with an artificial conduit. Five groups of rats were studied: those with CN exposure, exposure+vein, crush, crush+guide and crush+vein. Four weeks after surgery, the EF of rats was assessed by electrical stimulation of the CNs. The intracavernous pressure (ICP) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) were monitored during stimulations at various frequencies. The main outcome, that is, the rigidity of the erections, was defined as the ICP/MAP ratio. At 10 Hz, the ICP/MAP ratios were 41.8%, 34.7%, 20.9%, 33.9% and 20.5%, respectively. The EF was significantly lower in rats if the CNCI was treated with a vein graft instead of an artificial guide. Contrary to cases of CN resection, autologous vein grafts did not improve EF after CNCI. In terms of clinical use, the study suggests to limit an eventual use of autologous vein grafts to non-nerve-sparing RPs.

  6. Azide functional monolayers grafted to a germanium surface: model substrates for ATR-IR studies of interfacial click reactions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuo; Koberstein, Jeffrey T

    2012-01-10

    High-quality azide-functional substrates are prepared by a low temperature reaction of 11-bromoundecyltrichlorosilane with UV-ozone-treated germanium ATR-IR plates followed by nucleophilic substitution of the terminal bromine by addition of sodium azide. The resulting monolayer films are characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM), contact angle analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy (ATR-IR), and ellipsometry. XPS and ellipsometric thickness data correspond well to the results of molecular model calculations confirming the formation of a densely packed azide-functional monolayer. These azide-functional substrates enable interfacial "click" reactions with complementary alkyne-functional molecules to be studied in situ by ATR-IR. To illustrate their potential utility for kinetic studies we show that, in the presence of copper(I) catalyst, the azide-modified surfaces react rapidly and quantitatively with 5-chloro-pentyne to form triazoles via a 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction. Time-resolved ATR-IR measurements indicate that the interfacial click reaction is initially first order in azide concentration as expected from the reaction mechanism, with a rate constant of 0.034 min(-1), and then transitions to apparent second order dependence, with a rate constant of 0.017 min(-1)/(chains/nm(2)), when the surface azide and triazole concentrations become similar, as predicted by Oyama et al. The reaction achieves an ultimate conversion of 50% consistent with the limit expected due to steric hindrance of the 5-chloro-pentyne reactant at the surface. PMID:22081885

  7. Human Urine-derived Stem Cells Seeded Surface Modified Composite Scaffold Grafts for Bladder Reconstruction in a Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jun Nyung; Chun, So Young; Lee, Hyo-Jung; Jang, Yu-Jin; Choi, Seock Hwan; Kim, Dae Hwan; Oh, Se Heang; Song, Phil Hyun; Lee, Jin Ho; Kim, Jong Kun; Kwon, Tae Gyun

    2015-12-01

    We conducted this study to investigate the synergistic effect of human urine-derived stem cells (USCs) and surface modified composite scaffold for bladder reconstruction in a rat model. The composite scaffold (Polycaprolactone/Pluronic F127/3 wt% bladder submucosa matrix) was fabricated using an immersion precipitation method, and heparin was immobilized on the surface via covalent conjugation. Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) was loaded onto the heparin-immobilized scaffold by a simple dipping method. In maximal bladder capacity and compliance analysis at 8 weeks post operation, the USCs-scaffold(heparin-bFGF) group showed significant functional improvement (2.34 ± 0.25 mL and 55.09 ± 11.81 µL/cm H2O) compared to the other groups (2.60 ± 0.23 mL and 56.14 ± 9.00 µL/cm H2O for the control group, 1.46 ± 0.18 mL and 34.27 ± 4.42 µL/cm H2O for the partial cystectomy group, 1.76 ± 0.22 mL and 35.62 ± 6.69 µL/cm H2O for the scaffold group, and 1.92 ± 0.29 mL and 40.74 ± 7.88 µL/cm H2O for the scaffold(heparin-bFGF) group, respectively). In histological and immunohistochemical analysis, the USC-scaffold(heparin-bFGF) group showed pronounced, well-differentiated, and organized smooth muscle bundle formation, a multi-layered and pan-cytokeratin-positive urothelium, and high condensation of submucosal area. The USCs seeded scaffold(heparin-bFGF) exhibits significantly increased bladder capacity, compliance, regeneration of smooth muscle tissue, multi-layered urothelium, and condensed submucosa layers at the in vivo study.

  8. [Bone grafts in orthopedic surgery].

    PubMed

    Zárate-Kalfópulos, Barón; Reyes-Sánchez, Alejandro

    2006-01-01

    In orthopedic surgery the demand for the use of bone grafts increases daily because of the increasing quantity and complexity of surgical procedures. At present, the gold standard is the autologous bone graft but the failure rate, morbidity of the donor site and limited availability have stimulated a proliferation for finding materials that work as bone graft substitutes. In order to have good success, we must know the different properties of these choices and the environment where the graft is going to be used. As bone graft substitutes and growth factors become clinical realities, a new gold standard will be defined. Tissue engineering and gene therapy techniques have the objective to create an optimum bone graft substitute with a combination of substances with properties of osteconduction, osteogenesis and osteoinduction. PMID:16875525

  9. [Bone grafts in orthopedic surgery].

    PubMed

    Zárate-Kalfópulos, Barón; Reyes-Sánchez, Alejandro

    2006-01-01

    In orthopedic surgery the demand for the use of bone grafts increases daily because of the increasing quantity and complexity of surgical procedures. At present, the gold standard is the autologous bone graft but the failure rate, morbidity of the donor site and limited availability have stimulated a proliferation for finding materials that work as bone graft substitutes. In order to have good success, we must know the different properties of these choices and the environment where the graft is going to be used. As bone graft substitutes and growth factors become clinical realities, a new gold standard will be defined. Tissue engineering and gene therapy techniques have the objective to create an optimum bone graft substitute with a combination of substances with properties of osteconduction, osteogenesis and osteoinduction.

  10. Neuromuscular and biomechanical landing performance subsequent to ipsilateral semitendinosus and gracilis autograft anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Vairo, Giampietro L; Myers, Joseph B; Sell, Timothy C; Fu, Freddie H; Harner, Christopher D; Lephart, Scott M

    2008-01-01

    The hamstrings musculature is a vital component of an intricate dynamic knee joint restraint mechanism. However, there is evidence based on research studies suggesting potential deficits to this complex mechanism due to donor site morbidity resulting from harvest of the ipsilateral semitendinosus and gracilis autograft (ISGA) for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR). The purpose of this retrospective research study was to investigate the effects of ISGA ACLR on neuromuscular and biomechanical performance during a single-leg vertical drop landing (VDL), a functional task and associated mechanism of anterior cruciate ligament disruption during physical activity. Fourteen physically active participants 22.5 +/- 4.1 years of age and 21.4 +/- 10.7 months post ISGA ACLR underwent bilateral neuromuscular, biomechanical and isokinetic strength and endurance evaluations matched to 14 control participants by sex, age, height and mass. Kinetic and kinematic data was obtained with 3-D motion analyses utilizing inverse dynamics while performing single-leg VDLs from a height of 30 cm. Integrated surface electromyography (SEMG) assessments of the quadriceps, hamstrings and gastrocnemius musculature were also conducted. Additionally, knee joint flexion strength (60 degrees s(-1)) and endurance (240 degrees s(-1)) measurements were tested via isokinetic dynamometry. No significant differences existed in hip and net summated extensor moments within or between groups. The ISGA ACLR participants recorded significantly decreased peak vertical ground reaction force (VGRF) landing upon the involved lower extremity compared to uninvolved (P = 0.028) and matched (P < 0.0001) controls. Participants having undergone ISGA ACLR also displayed greater peak hip joint flexion angles landing upon the involved lower extremity compared to uninvolved (P = 0.020) and matched (P = 0.026) controls at initial ground contact. The ISGA ACLR group furthermore exhibited increased peak hip joint

  11. Grafting: A Technique to Modify Ion Accumulation in Horticultural Crops

    PubMed Central

    Nawaz, Muhammad A.; Imtiaz, Muhammad; Kong, Qiusheng; Cheng, Fei; Ahmed, Waqar; Huang, Yuan; Bie, Zhilong

    2016-01-01

    studies have focused on model and non-grafted plants, and information on grafted plants is limited. Such information will improve the development of nutrient-efficient rootstocks.

  12. Analysis of cartilage-polydioxanone foil composite grafts.

    PubMed

    Kim, James H; Wong, Brian

    2013-12-01

    This study presents an analytical investigation into the mechanical behavior of a cartilage-polydioxanone (PDS) plate composite grafts. Numerical methods are used to provide a first-order, numerical model of the flexural stiffness of a cartilage-PDS graft. Flexural stiffness is a measure of resistance to bending and is inversely related to the amount of deformation a structure may experience when subjected to bending forces. The cartilage-PDS graft was modeled as a single composite beam. Using Bernoulli-Euler beam theory, a closed form equation for the theoretical flexural stiffness of the composite graft was developed. A parametric analysis was performed to see how the flexural properties of the composite model changed with varying thicknesses of PDS foil. The stiffness of the cartilage-PDS composite using 0.15-mm-thick PDS was four times higher than cartilage alone. The composite with a 0.5-mm-thick PDS graft was only 1.7 times stiffer than the composite with the 0.15-mm-thick PDS graft. Although a thicker graft material will yield higher flexural stiffness for the composite, the relationship between composite stiffness and PDS thickness is nonlinear. After a critical point, increments in graft thickness produce gradually smaller improvements in flexural stiffness. The small increase in stiffness when using the thicker PDS foils versus the 0.15 mm PDS foil may not be worth the potential complications (prolonged foreign body reaction, reduction in nutrient diffusion to cartilage) of using thicker artificial grafts. PMID:24327249

  13. Hydrogen, a potential safeguard for graft-versus-host disease and graft ischemia-reperfusion injury?

    PubMed

    Yuan, Lijuan; Shen, Jianliang

    2016-09-01

    Post-transplant complications such as graft-versus-host disease and graft ischemia-reperfusion injury are crucial challenges in transplantation. Hydrogen can act as a potential antioxidant, playing a preventive role against post-transplant complications in animal models of multiple organ transplantation. Herein, the authors review the current literature regarding the effects of hydrogen on graft ischemia-reperfusion injury and graft-versus-host disease. Existing data on the effects of hydrogen on ischemia-reperfusion injury related to organ transplantation are specifically reviewed and coupled with further suggestions for future work. The reviewed studies showed that hydrogen (inhaled or dissolved in saline) improved the outcomes of organ transplantation by decreasing oxidative stress and inflammation at both the transplanted organ and the systemic levels. In conclusion, a substantial body of experimental evidence suggests that hydrogen can significantly alleviate transplantation-related ischemia-reperfusion injury and have a therapeutic effect on graft-versus-host disease, mainly via inhibition of inflammatory cytokine secretion and reduction of oxidative stress through several underlying mechanisms. Further animal experiments and preliminary human clinical trials will lay the foundation for hydrogen use as a drug in the clinic. PMID:27652837

  14. Hydrogen, a potential safeguard for graft-versus-host disease and graft ischemia-reperfusion injury?

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Lijuan; Shen, Jianliang

    2016-01-01

    Post-transplant complications such as graft-versus-host disease and graft ischemia-reperfusion injury are crucial challenges in transplantation. Hydrogen can act as a potential antioxidant, playing a preventive role against post-transplant complications in animal models of multiple organ transplantation. Herein, the authors review the current literature regarding the effects of hydrogen on graft ischemia-reperfusion injury and graft-versus-host disease. Existing data on the effects of hydrogen on ischemia-reperfusion injury related to organ transplantation are specifically reviewed and coupled with further suggestions for future work. The reviewed studies showed that hydrogen (inhaled or dissolved in saline) improved the outcomes of organ transplantation by decreasing oxidative stress and inflammation at both the transplanted organ and the systemic levels. In conclusion, a substantial body of experimental evidence suggests that hydrogen can significantly alleviate transplantation-related ischemia-reperfusion injury and have a therapeutic effect on graft-versus-host disease, mainly via inhibition of inflammatory cytokine secretion and reduction of oxidative stress through several underlying mechanisms. Further animal experiments and preliminary human clinical trials will lay the foundation for hydrogen use as a drug in the clinic. PMID:27652837

  15. Hydrogen, a potential safeguard for graft-versus-host disease and graft ischemia-reperfusion injury?

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Lijuan; Shen, Jianliang

    2016-01-01

    Post-transplant complications such as graft-versus-host disease and graft ischemia-reperfusion injury are crucial challenges in transplantation. Hydrogen can act as a potential antioxidant, playing a preventive role against post-transplant complications in animal models of multiple organ transplantation. Herein, the authors review the current literature regarding the effects of hydrogen on graft ischemia-reperfusion injury and graft-versus-host disease. Existing data on the effects of hydrogen on ischemia-reperfusion injury related to organ transplantation are specifically reviewed and coupled with further suggestions for future work. The reviewed studies showed that hydrogen (inhaled or dissolved in saline) improved the outcomes of organ transplantation by decreasing oxidative stress and inflammation at both the transplanted organ and the systemic levels. In conclusion, a substantial body of experimental evidence suggests that hydrogen can significantly alleviate transplantation-related ischemia-reperfusion injury and have a therapeutic effect on graft-versus-host disease, mainly via inhibition of inflammatory cytokine secretion and reduction of oxidative stress through several underlying mechanisms. Further animal experiments and preliminary human clinical trials will lay the foundation for hydrogen use as a drug in the clinic.

  16. Antimicrobial Graft Copolymer Gels.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Amanda C; Madsen, Jeppe; Douglas, C W Ian; MacNeil, Sheila; Armes, Steven P

    2016-08-01

    In view of the growing worldwide rise in microbial resistance, there is considerable interest in designing new antimicrobial copolymers. The aim of the current study was to investigate the relationship between antimicrobial activity and copolymer composition/architecture to gain a better understanding of their mechanism of action. Specifically, the antibacterial activity of several copolymers based on 2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl phosphorylcholine [MPC] and 2-hydroxypropyl methacrylate (HPMA) toward Staphylococcus aureus was examined. Both block and graft copolymers were synthesized using either atom transfer radical polymerization or reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization and characterized via (1)H NMR, gel permeation chromatography, rheology, and surface tensiometry. Antimicrobial activity was assessed using a range of well-known assays, including direct contact, live/dead staining, and the release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), while transmission electron microscopy was used to study the morphology of the bacteria before and after the addition of various copolymers. As expected, PMPC homopolymer was biocompatible but possessed no discernible antimicrobial activity. PMPC-based graft copolymers comprising PHPMA side chains (i.e. PMPC-g-PHPMA) significantly reduced both bacterial growth and viability. In contrast, a PMPC-PHPMA diblock copolymer comprising a PMPC stabilizer block and a hydrophobic core-forming PHPMA block did not exhibit any antimicrobial activity, although it did form a biocompatible worm gel. Surface tensiometry studies and LDH release assays suggest that the PMPC-g-PHPMA graft copolymer exhibits surfactant-like activity. Thus, the observed antimicrobial activity is likely to be the result of the weakly hydrophobic PHPMA chains penetrating (and hence rupturing) the bacterial membrane. PMID:27409712

  17. Role of complement in graft rejection after organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Bos, Ineke G A; Ten Berge, Ineke J M; Hack, C Erik

    2002-07-01

    Activation of the complement system may significantly contribute to the inflammatory reaction after solid organ transplantation. In allotransplantation, the complement system may be activated by ischemia/reperfusion and, possibly, by antibodies directed against the graft. In xenotransplantation from nonprimates to primates, the major activators for complement are preexisting antibodies. Studies in animal models have shown that the use of complement inhibitors may significantly prolong graft survival. This review describes the role of the complement system in organ injury after organ transplantation and the use of complement inhibitors to prevent damage to the graft after allo- or xenotransplantation.

  18. Computer-aided osteotomy design for harvesting autologous bone grafts in reconstructive surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krol, Zdzislaw; Zerfass, Peter; von Rymon-Lipinski, Bartosz; Jansen, Thomas; Hauck, Wolfgang; Zeilhofer, Hans-Florian U.; Sader, Robert; Keeve, Erwin

    2001-05-01

    Autologous grafts serve as the standard grafting material in the treatment of maxillofacial bone tumors, traumatic defects or congenital malformations. The pre-selection of a donor site depends primarily on the morphological fit of the available bone mass and the shape of the part that has to be transplanted. To achieve sufficient incorporation of the autograft into the host bone, precise planning and simulation of the surgical intervention based on 3D CT studies is required. This paper presents a method to identify an optimal donor site by performing an optimization of appropriate similarity measures between donor region and a given transplant. At the initial stage the surgeon has to delineate the osteotomy border lines in the template CT data set and to define a set of constraints for the optimization of appropriate similarity measures between donor region and a given transplant. At the initial stage the surgeon has to delineate the osteotomy border lines in the template CT data set and to define a set of constraints for the optimization task in the donor site CT data set. The following fully automatic optimization stage delivers a set of sub-optimal and optimal donor sites for a given template. All generated solutions can be explored interactively on the computer display using an efficient graphical interface. Reconstructive operations supported by our system were performed on 28 patients. We found that the operation time can be considerably shortened by this approach.

  19. An Injectable Hydrogel as Bone Graft Material with Added Antimicrobial Properties

    PubMed Central

    Tommasi, Giacomo; Perni, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Currently, the technique which provides the best chances for a successful bone graft, is the use of bone tissue from the same patient receiving it (autograft); the main limitations are the limited availability and the risks involved in removing living bone tissue, for example, explant site pain and morbidity. Allografts and xenografts may overcome these limitations; however, they increase the risk of rejection. For all these reasons the development of an artificial bone graft material is particularly important and hydrogels are a promising alternative for bone regeneration. Gels were prepared using 1,4-butanediol diacrylate as crosslinker and alpha tricalciumphosphate; ZnCl2 and SrCl2 were added to the aqueous phase. MTT results demonstrated that the addition of strontium had a beneficial effect on the osteoblast cells density on hydrogels, and zinc instead did not increase osteoblast proliferation. The amount of calcium produced by the osteoblast cells quantified through the Alizarin Red protocol revealed that both strontium and zinc positively influenced the formation of calcium; furthermore, their effect was synergistic. Rheology properties were used to mechanically characterize the hydrogels and especially the influence of crosslinker's concentration on them, showing the hydrogels presented had extremely good mechanical properties. Furthermore, the antimicrobial activity of strontium and zinc in the hydrogels against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis was determined. PMID:27174392

  20. Solitary haemangioma of the shaft of long bones: resection and reconstruction with autologous bone graft.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhaoxu; Tang, Jicun; Ye, Zhaoming

    2013-04-01

    Bone haemangiomas are uncommon lesions, occurring in the skull or spine. A solitary haemangioma in the diaphysis of a long bone is rare. We retrospectively investigated six patients who presented with a solitary haemangioma in a long bone diaphysis. After segmental bone resection, the bone defect was replaced by a bone autograft. Patients were reviewed clinically and with radiographs. The mean follow-up was 6 years (range : 1-20 years). At the time of latest follow-up, no patient had a recurrence. Postoperative complications were one wound necrosis and one superficial wound infection. Union of the gap filling graft with the host bone was achieved in all patients at an average of 4 months (range: 3-8 months). The average Musculoskeletal Tumor Society functional score was 77% (range: 53%-90%) of normal at 6 months postoperatively, and 97% (range: 95%-99%) at the last follow-up evaluation. Segmental resection for solitary haemangioma and reconstruction with autologous bone graft can be considered as a suitable treatment option.

  1. An Injectable Hydrogel as Bone Graft Material with Added Antimicrobial Properties.

    PubMed

    Tommasi, Giacomo; Perni, Stefano; Prokopovich, Polina

    2016-06-01

    Currently, the technique which provides the best chances for a successful bone graft, is the use of bone tissue from the same patient receiving it (autograft); the main limitations are the limited availability and the risks involved in removing living bone tissue, for example, explant site pain and morbidity. Allografts and xenografts may overcome these limitations; however, they increase the risk of rejection. For all these reasons the development of an artificial bone graft material is particularly important and hydrogels are a promising alternative for bone regeneration. Gels were prepared using 1,4-butanediol diacrylate as crosslinker and alpha tricalciumphosphate; ZnCl2 and SrCl2 were added to the aqueous phase. MTT results demonstrated that the addition of strontium had a beneficial effect on the osteoblast cells density on hydrogels, and zinc instead did not increase osteoblast proliferation. The amount of calcium produced by the osteoblast cells quantified through the Alizarin Red protocol revealed that both strontium and zinc positively influenced the formation of calcium; furthermore, their effect was synergistic. Rheology properties were used to mechanically characterize the hydrogels and especially the influence of crosslinker's concentration on them, showing the hydrogels presented had extremely good mechanical properties. Furthermore, the antimicrobial activity of strontium and zinc in the hydrogels against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis was determined. PMID:27174392

  2. Accuracy of Motor Axon Regeneration Across Autograft, Single Lumen, and Multichannel Poly(lactic-co-glycolic Acid) (PLGA) Nerve Tubes

    PubMed Central

    de Ruiter, Godard C.; Spinner, Robert J.; Malessy, Martijn J. A.; Moore, Michael J.; Sorenson, Eric J.; Currier, Bradford L.; Yaszemski, Michael J.; Windebank, Anthony J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Accuracy of motor axon regeneration becomes an important issue in the development of a nerve tube for motor nerve repair. Dispersion of regeneration across the nerve tube may lead to misdirection and polyinnervation. In this study, we present a series of methods to investigate the accuracy of regeneration, which we used to compare regeneration across autografts and single lumen poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nerve tubes. We also present the concept of the multichannel nerve tube that may limit dispersion by separately guiding groups of regenerating axons. Methods Simultaneous tracing of the tibial and peroneal nerves with fast blue (FB) and diamidino yellow (DY), 8 weeks after repair of a 1-cm nerve gap in the rat sciatic nerve, was performed to determine the percentage of double-projecting motoneurons. Sequential tracing of the peroneal nerve with DY 1 week before and FB 8 weeks after repair was performed to determine the percentage of correctly directed peroneal motoneurons. Results In the cases in which there was successful regeneration across single lumen nerve tubes, more motoneurons had double projections to both the tibial and peroneal nerve branches after single lumen nerve tube repair (21.4%) than after autograft repair (5.9%). After multichannel nerve tube repair, this percentage was slightly reduced (16.9%), although not significantly. The direction of regeneration was nonspecific after all types of repair. Conclusion Retrograde tracing techniques provide new insights into the process of regeneration across nerve tubes. The methods and data presented in this study can be used as a basis in the development of a nerve tube for motor nerve repair. PMID:18728579

  3. Effects of pre- and postoperative irradiation on the healing of bone grafts in the rabbit

    SciTech Connect

    Morales, M.J.; Marx, R.E.; Gottlieb, C.F.

    1987-01-01

    Healing of cellular bone grafts irradiated at various times in the postsurgical course was compared to the healing characteristics of bone grafts placed into already irradiated tissue and to controls of irradiated host mandible in a rabbit model. Physical graft consolidation was assessed by load stress characteristics and serial histologic examination. Results indicated that grafts placed into already irradiated tissues failed to form bone in both phases of expected regeneration resulting in structurally weakened and histologically deficient ossicles. Bone grafts irradiated after placement were tolerant of irradiation. Bone grafts irradiated after four weeks were found to be less affected by irradiation than those irradiated within the first four weeks, forming an ossicle structurally and histologically superior to that of bone ossicles developed from grafts placed into irradiated tissues.

  4. Listeria monocytogenes Endovascular Graft Infection

    PubMed Central

    Heysell, Scott K.; Hughes, Molly A.

    2016-01-01

    Although best managed by surgical resection, we present a case of Listeria monocytogenes endovascular graft infection alternatively treated with graft retention and antibiotic induction followed by a lifelong suppressive course. The epidemiological, pathological, and clinical features of this unique entity are reviewed. PMID:26835477

  5. Grafting effects on vegetable quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vegetable grafting began in the 1920s to control soil-borne disease. It is now a common practice in Asia, parts of Europe, and the Middle East. In Japan and Korea most of the cucurbits and tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) grown are grafted. This practice is rare in the U.S. and there have...

  6. Polyether/Polyester Graft Copolymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, Vernon L., Jr.; Wakelyn, N.; Stoakley, D. M.; Proctor, K. M.

    1986-01-01

    Higher solvent resistance achieved along with lower melting temperature. New technique provides method of preparing copolymers with polypivalolactone segments grafted onto poly (2,6-dimethyl-phenylene oxide) backbone. Process makes strong materials with improved solvent resistance and crystalline, thermally-reversible crosslinks. Resulting graft copolymers easier to fabricate into useful articles, including thin films, sheets, fibers, foams, laminates, and moldings.

  7. Poly(amide-graft-acrylate) interfacial compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamora, Michael Perez

    Graft copolymers with segments of dissimilar chemistries have been shown to be useful in a variety of applications as surfactants, compatibilizers, impact modifiers, and surface modifiers. The most common route to well defined graft copolymers is through the use of macromonomers, polymers containing a reactive functionality and thus capable of further polymerization. However, the majority of the studies thus far have focused on the synthesis of macromonomers capable of reacting with vinyl monomers to form graft copolymers. This study focused on the synthesis of macromonomers capable of participating in condensation polymerizations. A chain transfer functionalization method was utilized. Cysteine was evaluated as a chain transfer agent for the synthesis of amino acid functionalized poly(acrylate) and poly(methacrylate) macromonomers. Low molar mass, functionalized macromonomers were produced. These macromonomers were proven to be capable of reacting with amide precursors to form poly(amide-g-acrylate) graft copolymers. Macromonomers and graft copolymers were characterized by gel permeation chromatography (GPC), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, elemental analysis (EA), inductively coupled plasma (ICP), and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The second part of this research involved poly(dimethacrylate) dental restorative materials. Volumetric shrinkage during the cure of these resins results in a poor interface between the resin and the remaining tooth structure, limiting the lifetime of these materials. Cyclic anhydrides were incorporated into common monomer compositions used in dental applications. Volume expansion from the ring opening hydrolysis of these anhydrides was shown to be feasible. The modified dental resins were characterized by swelling, extraction and ultraviolet spectroscopy (UV), and density measurements. Linear poLymers designed to model the crosslinked dental resins were

  8. [Stent Grafting for Aortic Dissection].

    PubMed

    Uchida, Naomichi

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of stent graft for aortic dissection is to terminate antegrade blood flow into the false lumen through primary entry. Early intervention for primary entry makes excellent aortic remodeling and emergent stent grafting for complicated acute type B aortic dissection is supported as a class I. On the other hand stent grafting for chronic aortic dissection is controversial. Early stent grafting is considered with in 6 months after on-set if the diameter of the descending aorta is more than 40 mm. Additional interventions for residual false lumen on the downstream aorta are still required. Stent graft for re-entry, candy-plug technique, and double stenting, other effective re-interventions were reported. Best treatment on the basis of each anatomical and physical characteristics should be selected in each institution. Frozen elephant trunk is alternative procedure for aortic dissection without the need to take account of proximal anatomical limitation and effective for acute type A aortic dissection. PMID:27440026

  9. Motexafin lutetium in graft coronary artery disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodburn, Kathryn W.; Rodriquez, Shari L.; Yamaguchi, Atsushi; Hayase, Motoya; Robbins, Robert C.; Kessel, David

    2000-03-01

    Graft coronary artery disease (GCAD) is the chief complication following cardiac transplantation. Presently, there are limited treatment options. Insights into more expedient diagnosis and amelioration, if only partially, of GCAD are fervently sought. The selectivity of Antrin Injection (Lu-Tex) with subsequent photoactivation has been evaluated in several preclinical atherosclerosis models. The inhibitory effect of Lu-Tex induced photosensitization was demonstrated with human bypass coronary smooth muscle cells. The biodistribution of Lu-Tex was evaluated in a rat model of heterotopic cardiac allografts 60 days following transplantation. Lu-Tex was retained in the cardiac allograft, exhibiting a five-fold increase in retention between the allograft and native heart. These findings lead us to suggest that further studies are warranted to ascertain the merits of Lu-Tex for the diagnosis and possible attenuation of chronic graft vascular disease.

  10. Radiation grafting on natural films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacroix, M.; Khan, R.; Senna, M.; Sharmin, N.; Salmieri, S.; Safrany, A.

    2014-01-01

    Different methods of polymer grafting using gamma irradiation are reported in the present study for the preparation of newly functionalized biodegradable films, and some important properties related to their mechanical and barrier properties are described. Biodegradable films composed of zein and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) were gamma-irradiated in presence of different ratios of acrylic acid (AAc) monomer for compatibilization purpose. Resulting grafted films (zein/PVA-g-AAc) had their puncture strength (PS=37-40 N mm-1) and puncture deformation (PD=6.5-9.8 mm) improved for 30% and 50% PVA in blend, with 5% AAc under 20 kGy. Methylcellulose (MC)-based films were irradiated in the presence of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) or silane, in order to determine the effect of monomer grafting on the mechanical properties of films. It was found that grafted films (MC-g-HEMA and MC-g-silane) using 35% monomer performed higher mechanical properties with PS values of 282-296 N mm-1 and PD of 5.0-5.5 mm under 10 kGy. Compatibilized polycaprolactone (PCL)/chitosan composites were developed via grafting silane in chitosan films. Resulting trilayer grafted composite film (PCL/chitosan-g-silane/PCL) presented superior tensile strength (TS=22 MPa) via possible improvement of interfacial adhesion (PCL/chitosan) when using 25% silane under 10 kGy. Finally, MC-based films containing crystalline nanocellulose (CNC) as a filling agent were prepared and irradiated in presence of trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate (TMPTMA) as a grafted plasticizer. Grafted films (MC-g-TMPTMA) presented superior mechanical properties with a TS of 47.9 MPa and a tensile modulus (TM) of 1792 MPa, possibly due to high yield formation of radicals to promote TMPTMA grafting during irradiation. The addition of CNC led to an additional improvement of the barrier properties, with a significant 25% reduction of water vapor permeability (WVP) of grafted films.

  11. Impact of top end anastomosis design on patency and flow stability in coronary artery bypass grafting.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Sachi; Kitamura, Tadashi; Itatani, Keiichi; Yamamoto, Tadashi; Miyazaki, Shohei; Oka, Norihiko; Nakashima, Kouki; Horai, Tetsuya; Ono, Minoru; Miyaji, Kagami

    2016-05-01

    For coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), free grafts such as a saphenous vein or radial artery are often used for grafts to the lateral and posterior walls. However, the relationship between top-end anastomosis design and long-term patency remains unknown. Because coronary artery blood flow is dominant during diastole, top-end anastomosis may work better if the graft is directed towards the apex, whereas the shortest graft pathway appears to be most efficient. Using computational fluid dynamic models, we evaluated the hemodynamic variables that were affected by the angle of the top-end anastomosis. We created three-dimensional geometries of the aortic root with coronary arteries that involved 75 % stenosis in the obtuse marginal and postero-lateral branches. Two bypass models under vasodilator administration were created: in a"Model A", the top-end anastomosis is parallel to the long axis of the ascending aorta and the graft passed over the conus directed towards the apex; in a "Model B", the top-end anastomosis is directed toward the shortest pathway, and form near the right angles to the long axis of the ascending aorta. Wall shear stress (WSS) and its fluctuation, an oscillatory shear index (OSI) were evaluated to predict fibrosis progression at the anastomosis site and graft flow. Graft flow was 197.3 ml/min and 207.3 ml/min in the "Model A" and "Model B", respectively. The minimal WSS value inside the graft with the "Model A" and "Model B" was 0.53 Pa and 4.09 Pa, respectively, and the OSI value was 0.46 and 0.04, respectively. The top-end anastomosis of a free graft should be directed vertically towards the aorta to achieve the shortest graft pathway to maintain a high graft flow rate and to avoid the risks of endothelial fibrosis and plaque progression over the long-term after CABG.

  12. Preliminary Study on Electrophysiological Changes After Cellular Autograft in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Limoli, Paolo Giuseppe; Vingolo, Enzo Maria; Morales, Marco Ulisses; Nebbioso, Marcella; Limoli, Celeste

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Evolving atrophic macular degeneration represents at least 80% of all macular degenerations and is currently without a standardized care. Autologous fat transplantation efficacy was demonstrated by several studies, as these cells are able to produce growth factors. The aim of the work was to demonstrate possible therapeutic effect of the joined suprachoroidal graft of adipocytes, adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) in stromal vascular fractions (SVFs) of adipose tissue, and platelet-rich plasma (PRP). Twelve eyes in 12 dry age-related macular degeneration (AMD) patients, aged 71.25 (SD ± 6.8) between 62 and 80 years, were analyzed. A complete ocular evaluation was performed using best corrected visual acuity (BCVA), retinographic analysis, spectral-domain optical coherence tomography, microperimetry, computerized visual field, and standard electroretinogram (ERG). Each eye received a cell in graft between choroid and sclera of mature fat cells and ADSCs in SVF enriched with PRP by means of the variant second Limoli (Limoli retinal restoration technique [LRRT]). In order to test if the differences pre- and post-treatment were significant, the Wilcoxon signed-rank test has been performed. Adverse effects were not reported in the patients. After surgery with LRRT, the most significant increase in the ERG values was recorded by scotopic rod-ERG (answer coming from the rods), from 41.26 to 60.83 μV with an average increase of 47.44% highly significant (P < 0.05). Moderately significant was the one recorded by scotopic maximal ERG (answer coming from the rods and cones), from 112.22 to 129.68 μV with an average increase of 15.56% (P < 0.1). Cell-mediated therapy based on growth factors used appears interesting because it can improve the retinal functionality responses in the short term. The ERG could, therefore, be used to monitor the effect of cell-mediated regenerative therapies. PMID:25546695

  13. A comparative study of incorporation rates between non-xenograft and bovine-based structural bone graft in foot and ankle surgery.

    PubMed

    Shibuya, Naohiro; Holloway, Brandon K; Jupiter, Daniel C

    2014-01-01

    Several types of structural bone grafts are available, each with different characteristics. Our previous study showed poor performance with the bovine-based xenograft in foot and ankle applications. In the present study, we compared the incorporation rates of non-xenografts, including allografts and autografts, with the bovine-based xenograft to determine whether the poor result was unique to the graft type and not institutional. The proportion of incorporated grafts at 12, 24, 36, and 48 weeks was compared between the nonxenograft and xenograft groups. Furthermore, Cox regression analysis was used to evaluate the factors associated with nonunion. A total of 61 patients (23 women and 38 men) with a median age of 24.0 years were enrolled. The factors associated with slower incorporation included side of operation (p = .033), tobacco use (p = .010), and graft type (p = .001). At 48 weeks, 5% of the nonxenografts and 58% of the xenografts were not incorporated. The median incorporation time for the non-xenograft and xenograft group was 16 and 57 weeks, respectively. We have concluded that it is not advisable to use a bovine-based bone xenograft in foot and ankle surgery.

  14. Vascular grafts in microvascular surgery. An experimental study

    SciTech Connect

    Marrangoni, A.G.; Marcelli, G.; Culig, M.; Simone, S.T.

    1988-02-01

    The patency of microvascular grafts depends on the luminal diameter, which is determined by the amount of fibrin and platelets deposited on the intraluminal surface and the anastomotic site, and the extent of pseudointimal formation. An experimental microvascular model in rats has been developed in our laboratory using Indium-111-labeled platelets to measure the amount of deposition on grafts inserted into the infrarenal aorta. This study was designed to assess the patency rates in these grafts and the pathologic maturation as determined by light and electron microscopy. Our study suggests that substantial patency rates can be achieved in aspirin-treated rats, although there was little influence on the pathologic maturation. Indium-111 oxine-labeled platelets can be used to document platelet aggregation, and the technique can be a valuable adjunct in the study of microvascular grafts.

  15. The Effect of Graft Strength on Knee Laxity and Graft In-Situ Forces after Posterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Yu-Shu; Chen, Wen-Chuan; Huang, Chang-Hung; Cheng, Cheng-Kung; Chan, Kam-Kong; Chang, Ting-Kuo

    2015-01-01

    Surgical reconstruction is generally recommended for posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injuries; however, the use of grafts is still a controversial problem. In this study, a three-dimensional finite element model of the human tibiofemoral joint with articular cartilage layers, menisci, and four main ligaments was constructed to investigate the effects of graft strengths on knee kinematics and in-situ forces of PCL grafts. Nine different graft strengths with stiffness ranging from 0% (PCL rupture) to 200%, in increments of 25%, of an intact PCL’s strength were used to simulate the PCL reconstruction. A 100 N posterior tibial drawer load was applied to the knee joint at full extension. Results revealed that the maximum posterior translation of the PCL rupture model (0% stiffness) was 6.77 mm in the medial compartment, which resulted in tibial internal rotation of about 3.01°. After PCL reconstruction with any graft strength, the laxity of the medial tibial compartment was noticeably improved. Tibial translation and rotation were similar to the intact knee after PCL reconstruction with graft strengths ranging from 75% to 125% of an intact PCL. When the graft’s strength surpassed 150%, the medial tibia moved forward and external tibial rotation greatly increased. The in-situ forces generated in the PCL grafts ranged from 13.15 N to 75.82 N, depending on the stiffness. In conclusion, the strength of PCL grafts have has a noticeable effect on anterior-posterior translation of the medial tibial compartment and its in-situ force. Similar kinematic response may happen in the models when the PCL graft’s strength lies between 75% and 125% of an intact PCL. PMID:26001045

  16. Endothelial cell seeding of a 4-mm I.D. polyurethane vascular graft.

    PubMed

    Fields, Charles; Cassano, Anthony; Allen, Cynthia; Meyer, Andrew; Pawlowski, Kristin J; Bowlin, Gary L; Rittgers, Stanley E; Szycher, Michael

    2002-07-01

    We evaluated the extent (luminal coverage) of the endothelial cell (EC) lining/neointimal development and the thromboresistance of electrostatically EC seeded small diameter ChronoFlex-polyurethane vascular grafts. The evaluation consisted of harvesting autologous, canine jugular vein ECs, electrostatically seeding the polyurethane grafts (4-mm I.D., length = 6 cm) with the harvested ECs, implanting the grafts in a canine femoral artery model for four to six weeks, and excising the grafts for histological and scanning electron microscopy evaluations. Results of the histological evaluation (mid-graft region only) indicated that electrostatic EC seeding led to neointimal development and to minimal to no thrombus formation within the EC seeded grafts. The unseeded control grafts resulted in no neointimal development and substantial thrombus formation on the graft luminal surfaces. Scanning electron microscopy examination demonstrated a mature, confluent endothelium with a "cobblestone" appearance on the EC seeded graft luminal surface after six weeks. We conclude that electrostatic EC seeding enhanced the development of a neointima and reduced the incidence of thrombosis in polyurethane grafts implanted in a canine femoral artery model. PMID:12222757

  17. Are Aortic Stent Grafts Safe in Pregnancy?

    PubMed Central

    Khandanpour, Nader; Mehta, Tapan A.; Adiseshiah, M.; Meyer, Felicity J.

    2015-01-01

    Aortic stent grafts are increasingly used to treat aortic aneurysms and also other aortic pathologies. The safety of aortic stent grafts in pregnancy has never been studied or reported. We report on two cases of aortic stent grafts in pregnant women and discuss the effect of pregnancy on these aortic stent grafts. PMID:26229702

  18. Tissue-Engineered Small Diameter Arterial Vascular Grafts from Cell-Free Nanofiber PCL/Chitosan Scaffolds in a Sheep Model.

    PubMed

    Fukunishi, Takuma; Best, Cameron A; Sugiura, Tadahisa; Shoji, Toshihiro; Yi, Tai; Udelsman, Brooks; Ohst, Devan; Ong, Chin Siang; Zhang, Huaitao; Shinoka, Toshiharu; Breuer, Christopher K; Johnson, Jed; Hibino, Narutoshi

    2016-01-01

    Tissue engineered vascular grafts (TEVGs) have the potential to overcome the issues faced by existing small diameter prosthetic grafts by providing a biodegradable scaffold where the patient's own cells can engraft and form functional neotissue. However, applying classical approaches to create arterial TEVGs using slow degrading materials with supraphysiological mechanical properties, typically results in limited host cell infiltration, poor remodeling, stenosis, and calcification. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of novel small diameter arterial TEVGs created using fast degrading material. A 1.0mm and 5.0mm diameter TEVGs were fabricated with electrospun polycaprolactone (PCL) and chitosan (CS) blend nanofibers. The 1.0mm TEVGs were implanted in mice (n = 3) as an unseeded infrarenal abdominal aorta interposition conduit., The 5.0mm TEVGs were implanted in sheep (n = 6) as an unseeded carotid artery (CA) interposition conduit. Mice were followed with ultrasound and sacrificed at 6 months. All 1.0mm TEVGs remained patent without evidence of thrombosis or aneurysm formation. Based on small animal outcomes, sheep were followed with ultrasound and sacrificed at 6 months for histological and mechanical analysis. There was no aneurysm formation or calcification in the TEVGs. 4 out of 6 grafts (67%) were patent. After 6 months in vivo, 9.1 ± 5.4% remained of the original scaffold. Histological analysis of patent grafts demonstrated deposition of extracellular matrix constituents including elastin and collagen production, as well as endothelialization and organized contractile smooth muscle cells, similar to that of native CA. The mechanical properties of TEVGs were comparable to native CA. There was a significant positive correlation between TEVG wall thickness and CD68+ macrophage infiltration into the scaffold (R2 = 0.95, p = 0.001). The fast degradation of CS in our novel TEVG promoted excellent cellular infiltration and neotissue formation

  19. Tissue-Engineered Small Diameter Arterial Vascular Grafts from Cell-Free Nanofiber PCL/Chitosan Scaffolds in a Sheep Model

    PubMed Central

    Fukunishi, Takuma; Best, Cameron A.; Sugiura, Tadahisa; Shoji, Toshihiro; Yi, Tai; Udelsman, Brooks; Ohst, Devan; Ong, Chin Siang; Zhang, Huaitao; Shinoka, Toshiharu; Breuer, Christopher K.; Johnson, Jed; Hibino, Narutoshi

    2016-01-01

    Tissue engineered vascular grafts (TEVGs) have the potential to overcome the issues faced by existing small diameter prosthetic grafts by providing a biodegradable scaffold where the patient’s own cells can engraft and form functional neotissue. However, applying classical approaches to create arterial TEVGs using slow degrading materials with supraphysiological mechanical properties, typically results in limited host cell infiltration, poor remodeling, stenosis, and calcification. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of novel small diameter arterial TEVGs created using fast degrading material. A 1.0mm and 5.0mm diameter TEVGs were fabricated with electrospun polycaprolactone (PCL) and chitosan (CS) blend nanofibers. The 1.0mm TEVGs were implanted in mice (n = 3) as an unseeded infrarenal abdominal aorta interposition conduit., The 5.0mm TEVGs were implanted in sheep (n = 6) as an unseeded carotid artery (CA) interposition conduit. Mice were followed with ultrasound and sacrificed at 6 months. All 1.0mm TEVGs remained patent without evidence of thrombosis or aneurysm formation. Based on small animal outcomes, sheep were followed with ultrasound and sacrificed at 6 months for histological and mechanical analysis. There was no aneurysm formation or calcification in the TEVGs. 4 out of 6 grafts (67%) were patent. After 6 months in vivo, 9.1 ± 5.4% remained of the original scaffold. Histological analysis of patent grafts demonstrated deposition of extracellular matrix constituents including elastin and collagen production, as well as endothelialization and organized contractile smooth muscle cells, similar to that of native CA. The mechanical properties of TEVGs were comparable to native CA. There was a significant positive correlation between TEVG wall thickness and CD68+ macrophage infiltration into the scaffold (R2 = 0.95, p = 0.001). The fast degradation of CS in our novel TEVG promoted excellent cellular infiltration and neotissue formation

  20. Fat Grafting for Facial Filling and Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Sydney R; Katzel, Evan B

    2015-07-01

    Plastic surgeons have come to realize that fat grafting can rejuvenate an aging face by restoring or creating fullness. However, fat grafting does much more than simply add volume. Grafted fat can transform or repair the tissues into which it is placed. Historically, surgeons have hesitated to embrace the rejuvenating potential of fat grafting because of poor graft take, fat necrosis, and inconsistent outcomes. This article describes fat grafting techniques and practices to assist readers in successful harvesting, processing, and placement of fat for optimal graft retention and facial esthetic outcomes.

  1. Soft Tissue Augmentation with Silk Composite Graft

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yong-Tae; Kweon, Hae Yong; Kim, Seong-Gon

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of this study was to evaluate the interaction between 4-hexylresorcinol (4HR) and antibody as that affects the performance of a silk-4HR combination graft for soft tissue augmentation in an animal model. Methods: The silk graft materials consisted of four types: silk+10% tricalcium phosphate (TCP) (ST0), silk+10% TCP+1% 4HR (ST1), silk+10% TCP+3% 4HR (ST3), and silk+10% TCP+6% 4-HR (ST6). The antibody binding assay tested the 4HR effect and scanning electron microscopic (SEM) exam was done for silk grafts. The animal experiment used a subcutaneous pocket mouse model. The graft – SH0 or SH1 or SH3 or SH6 – was placed in a subcutaneous pocket. The animals were killed at one, two, and four weeks, postoperatively. The specimens were subjected to histological analysis and lysozyme assay. Results: Groups with 4HR applied showed lower antibody binding affinity to antigen compared to groups without 4HR. In the SEM examination, there was no significant difference among groups. Histological examinations revealed many foreign body giant cells in ST0 and ST1 group at four weeks postoperatively. Both ST3 and ST6 groups developed significantly lower levels of giant cell values compared to ST0 and ST1 groups (P <0.001) at four weeks postoperatively. In the lysozyme assay, the ST1 and ST3 groups showed denser signals than the other groups. Conclusion: 4HR combined silk implants resulted in high levels of vascular and connective tissue regeneration. PMID:27489833

  2. Bone Grafting the Cleft Maxilla

    MedlinePlus

    ... amount of bone from one place (usually the hip, head, ribs, or leg) and placing it in ... adjacent teeth into the bone graft; 2) prosthetic replacement (dental bridge); or 3) dental metallic bone implants. ...

  3. EFFECT OF DEXTRAN-graft-POLYACRYLAMIDE INTERNAL STRUCTURE ON FLOCCULATION PROCESS PARAMETERS

    SciTech Connect

    Bezugla, T.; Kutsevol, N.; Shyichuk, A.; Ziolkowska, D.

    2008-08-28

    Dextran-graft-Polyacrylamide copolymers (D-g-PAA) of brush-like architecture were tested as flocculation aids in the model kaolin suspensions. Due to expanded conformation the D-g-PAA copolymers are more effective flocculants than individual PAA with close molecular mass. The internal structure of D-g-PAA copolymers which is determined by number and length of grafted PAA chains, the distance between grafts, etc., has the significant influence on flocculation behavior of such polymers.

  4. Treatment of aggressive multiple myeloma by high-dose chemotherapy and total body irradiation followed by blood stem cells autologous graft

    SciTech Connect

    Fermand, J.P.; Levy, Y.; Gerota, J.; Benbunan, M.; Cosset, J.M.; Castaigne, S.; Seligmann, M.; Brouet, J.C.

    1989-01-01

    Eight patients with stage III aggressive multiple myeloma, refractory to current chemotherapy in six cases, were treated by high-dose chemotherapy (nitrosourea, etoposide, and melphalan) (HDC) and total body irradiation (TBI), followed by autografting with blood stem cells. These cells were previously collected by leukapheresis performed during hematologic recovery following cytotoxic drug-induced bone marrow aplasia. Seven patients were alive 9 to 17 months after HDC-TBI and graft. One died at day 40 from cerebral bleeding. All living patients achieved a 90% or greater reduction in tumor mass. In two cases, a complete remission (CR) has persisted at a follow-up of 15 and 16 months. Three patients have been well and off therapy with stable minimal residual disease (RD) since 10, 11, and 17 months, respectively. A patient in apparent CR and another with RD have relapsed 9 to 12 months posttreatment. Autologous blood-derived hematopoietic stem cells induced successful and sustained engraftment in all living patients. These results, although still preliminary, indicate that HDC and TBI, followed by blood stem cells autograft, which has both practical and theoretical interest over allogeneic or autologous bone marrow transplantation, deserve consideration in selected patients with multiple myeloma.

  5. P-15 small peptide bone graft substitute in the treatment of non-unions and delayed union. A pilot clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Orozco, Rafael; Villar, Jose Luis; Arrizabalaga, Federico

    2006-01-01

    Treatment of non-unions and delayed unions often requires osteogenic material. Recently, a biomimetic bone matrix that simulates the cellular environment of hard tissue, identified as P-15, was introduced to the orthopaedic community. A total of 22 patients with mal-union or delayed union fractures was treated from June 2000 to October 2003 with P15- bone graft substitute (P15-BGS) in the site of fracture and mostly with internal fixation. Patients were examined by independent radiographic analysis. Assessment criteria included time elapsed until bone bridging and time to full consolidation. In addition, histological assessment of the callus was done at the time of recovery of metal implants in five patients. Full consolidation was achieved in 90% (20 out of 22) of the patients treated with P15-BGS. The average time for full consolidation was 4.2 months. Histological assessment of the fracture callus in five of the patients confirmed the positive clinical and radiographic results. P15-BGS appears to offer a safe, economical and clinically useful alternative to autograft in the repair of ununited fractures. These results compare favourably with those in the published literature as an alternative to autograft. PMID:16761146

  6. Two-strand posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with a quadriceps tendon-patellar bone autograft: technical considerations and clinical results.

    PubMed

    Noyes, Frank R; Barber-Westin, Sue D

    2006-01-01

    In patients with complete posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) ruptures in which 10 mm or more of increased posterior tibial translation is detected, associated knee disorders must be treated at the same time as the PCL injury. Varus malalignment and any abnormal medial or lateral ligament deficiency must be corrected before or with PCL reconstruction to avoid the risk of failure of the PCL graft. Gait retraining is recommended for patients with abnormal knee hyperextension patterns before ligament reconstruction is performed. Advances in PCL reconstruction include the use of a two-strand graft that may be placed using either a tibial inlay or an all-arthroscopic tibial tunnel technique. Biomechanical studies have shown a reduction in graft tension and improved load sharing in these constructs compared with single-strand reconstructions. The tibial inlay method can be used in athletic patients, and it also is required in PCL revisions in which a prior tibial tunnel must be avoided to achieve graft fixation. The tibial tunnel technique is used to treat dislocated knees for which reconstruction of multiple knee ligaments is required or when prior arterial injury or posterior skin or muscle damage limits the indications for a posterior open approach. Postoperative rehabilitation should protect the PCL graft from high forces and repetitive cyclic knee motions during the first 4 weeks postoperatively.

  7. Bilateral internal thoracic artery grafting

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The effectiveness of the left internal mammary artery graft to the anterior descending coronary artery as a surgical strategy has been shown to improve the survival rate and decrease the risk of adverse cardiac events in patients undergoing coronary bypass surgery. These clinical benefits appear to be related to the superior short and long-term patency rates of the internal thoracic artery graft. Although the advantages of using of both internal thoracic arteries (ITA) for bypass grafting have taken longer to prove, recent results from multiple data sets now support these findings. The major advantage of bilateral ITA grafting appears to be improved survival rate, while the disadvantages of complex ITA grafting include the increased complexity of operation, and an increased risk of wound complications. While these short-term disadvantages have been mitigated in contemporary surgical practice, they have not eliminated. Bilateral ITA grafting should be considered the procedure of choice for patients undergoing coronary bypass surgery that have a predicted survival rate of longer than ten years. PMID:23977627

  8. Costal Grafting in Mandibular Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Bourlet, Jerôme; Château, Joseph; Jacquemart, Mathieu; Dufour, Clémence; Mojallal, Ali; Gleizal, Arnaud

    2015-01-01

    Background: Reconstruction of mandibular bone defect is a common indication in craniomaxillofacial surgery, and free fibular flap is the gold standard for this indication. However, there are alternatives; nonvascular bone grafting is one of them, and we present the costal grafting for mandibular reconstruction, a classic technique that is reliable, efficient, and produced less morbidity than the technique of using composite free flaps. Method: A 9-year retrospective review of 54 patients treated surgically for mandibular reconstruction was performed. The criterion mainly analyzed was graft survival. The surgical technique was described in detail. Results: A total of 54 patients with mandibular bone defect were identified. Five symphysis, 46 corpus, and 20 ramus defects were considered. These patients underwent reconstruction by costal grafting, and the engrafting was successful in 92.6% of cases. Dental rehabilitation with dental implants was realized in 70% of cases. Conclusions: The approach described in this article allowed the authors to obtain good results with costal grafting for mandibular reconstruction and dental rehabilitation. Costal grafting is a good alternative for fibula free flap in specific indications. Reconstruction of mandibular bone defect is a common indication in craniomaxillofacial surgery. Since the 1980s, the gold standard for these defects is the use of free fibular flap.1 In some cases, this technique is contradicted; the surgeon then has several possibilities for the use of free osteomyocutaneous flaps (iliac crest, scapula, and serrato-costal flaps).2–8 PMID:26893990

  9. Dynamics of electron transport by elastic bending of short DNA duplexes. Experimental study and quantitative modeling of the cyclic voltammetric behavior of 3'-ferrocenyl DNA end-grafted on gold.

    PubMed

    Anne, Agnès; Demaille, Christophe

    2006-01-18

    The dynamics of electron transport within a molecular monolayer of 3'-ferrocenylated-(dT)(20) strands, 5'-thiol end-grafted onto gold electrode surfaces via a short C2-alkyl linker, is analyzed using cyclic voltammetry as the excitation/measurement technique. It is shown that the single-stranded DNA layer behaves as a diffusionless system, due to the high flexibility of the ss-DNA chain. Upon hybridization by the fully complementary (dA)(20) target, the DNA-modified gold electrode displays a highly unusual voltammetric behavior, the faradaic signal even ultimately switching off at a high enough potential scan rate. This remarkable extinction phenomenon is qualitatively and quantitatively justified by the model of elastic bending diffusion developed in the present work which describes the motion of the DNA-borne ferrocene moiety as resulting from the elastic bending of the duplex DNA toward and away from the electrode surface. Its use allows us to demonstrate that the dynamics of electron transport within the hybridized DNA layer is solely controlled by the intrinsic bending elasticity of ds-DNA. Fast scan rate cyclic voltammetry of end-grafted, redox-labeled DNA layers is shown to be an extremely efficient method to probe the bending dynamics of short-DNA fragments in the submillisecond time range. The persistence length of the end-anchored ds-DNA, a parameter quantifying the flexibility of the nanometer-long duplex, can then be straightforwardly and accurately determined from the voltammetry data.

  10. Cryopreservation of the tracheal grafts

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Transplantation of the trachea may become the preferred method for the reconstruction of extensive tracheal defects, however, several unresolved problems must be addressed, such as immunosuppression, preservation and donor shortage. In this manuscript, the cryopreservation of tracheal grafts is reviewed, which potentially is associated with a lessened immunological response. Cryopreservation may be used clinically for long-term preservation and may solve the donor shortage. It is very important to confirm the immunomodulatory effect of cryopreservation on tracheal allografts in order to expand the potential clinical application of tracheal transplantation in the future. The cartilage as well as the epithelium and lamina propria serve as targets for rejection. However, the effect of cryopreservation on chondrocytes could be associated with reduced allogenicity of the trachea. The long-term cryopreservation of cartilage must be investigated in basic research models of chondrocyte viability. Growth of cryopreserved tracheal allografts is less well understood. Further studies are needed to elucidate the mechanism of synergistic effects of both cryopreservation and adequate immunosuppression for tracheal xenografts. PMID:20046673

  11. Does Gracilis Tendon Harvest During ACL Reconstruction with a Hamstring Autograft Affect Torque of Muscles Responsible for Shin Rotation?

    PubMed Central

    Królikowska, Aleksandra; Czamara, Andrzej; Kentel, Maciej

    2015-01-01

    Background A growing body of evidence indicates that in patients after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) with a combined semitendinosus and gracilis (STGR) graft there are large deficits in the internal rotation strength, which has led some authors to recommend harvest of only ST tendon whenever possible. The purpose of this study was to assess the isometric (IT) and peak torque (PT) of the muscles responsible for shin rotation in patients after ACLR with an ST or with an STGR graft. Material/Methods Twenty patients with an ST graft and 20 patients with a combined STGR graft underwent a 6-month postoperative rehabilitation program after ACLR. At the end of the rehabilitation program, the IT and PT of the muscles responsible for internal (IR) and external rotation (ER) of the shin were measured. The results were compared to the results of a control group. Additionally, to determine the reliability of the dynamometer for clinical research, a test-retest assessment was performed. Results There were no statistically significant differences between the 3 groups of participants. Nevertheless, in the STGR group there was a statistically significant difference between the IT of muscles internally rotating the shin in the involved knee and uninvolved knee at 25° of the internal shin rotation. Conclusions Comparison of IT and PT measurements performed after 24 weeks of postoperative rehabilitation generally showed no differences between patients after ACLR with the use of ST graft and patients who received a combination graft consisting of STGR. Nevertheless, there was an influence of GR harvest on internal shin rotation torque at a deep internal rotation angle. PMID:26190033

  12. Craniofacial Bone Grafting: Wolff's Law Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Oppenheimer, Adam J.; Tong, Lawrence; Buchman, Steven R.

    2008-01-01

    Bone grafts are used for the reconstruction of congenital and acquired deformities of the facial skeleton and, as such, comprise a vital component of the craniofacial surgeon's armamentarium. A thorough understanding of bone graft physiology and the factors that affect graft behavior is therefore essential in developing a more intelligent use of bone grafts in clinical practice. This article presents a review of the basic physiology of bone grafting along with a survey of pertinent concepts and current research. The factors responsible for bone graft survival are emphasized. PMID:22110789

  13. Plant grafting: new mechanisms, evolutionary implications

    PubMed Central

    Goldschmidt, Eliezer E.

    2014-01-01

    Grafting, an old plant propagation practice, is still widely used with fruit trees and in recent decades also with vegetables. Taxonomic proximity is a general prerequisite for successful graft-take and long-term survival of the grafted, composite plant. However, the mechanisms underlying interspecific graft incompatibility are as yet insufficiently understood. Hormonal signals, auxin in particular, are believed to play an important role in the wound healing and vascular regeneration within the graft union zone. Incomplete and convoluted vascular connections impede the vital upward and downward whole plant transfer routes. Long-distance protein, mRNA and small RNA graft-transmissible signals currently emerge as novel mechanisms which regulate nutritional and developmental root/top relations and may play a pivotal role in grafting physiology. Grafting also has significant pathogenic projections. On one hand, stock to scion mechanical contact enables the spread of diseases, even without a complete graft union. But, on the other hand, grafting onto resistant rootstocks serves as a principal tool in the management of fruit tree plagues and vegetable soil-borne diseases. The ‘graft hybrid’ historic controversy has not yet been resolved. Recent evidence suggests that epigenetic modification of DNA-methylation patterns may account for certain graft-transformation phenomena. Root grafting is a wide spread natural phenomenon; both intraspecific and interspecific root grafts have been recorded. Root grafts have an evolutionary role in the survival of storm-hit forest stands as well as in the spread of devastating diseases. A more fundamental evolutionary role is hinted by recent findings that demonstrate plastid and nuclear genome transfer between distinct Nicotiana species in the graft union zone, within a tissue culture system. This has led to the formation of alloploid cells that, under laboratory conditions, gave rise to a novel, alloploid Nicotiana species

  14. Graft Diameter matters in Hamstring ACL reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Clatworthy, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Recently techniques have been developed to increase graft diameter in hamstring ACL reconstruction with the hope to decrease graft failure. To date there is limited evidence to show that a smaller graft diameter results in a higher ACL failure rate. Method: The factors for failure in 1480 consecutive single surgeon hamstring ACL reconstructions were evaluated prospectively. Patients were followed for 2-15 years. A multivariate analysis was performed which looked at graft size, age, sex, time to surgery, meniscal integrity, meniscal repair and ACL graft placement to determine whether graft diameter matters in determining the failure of hamstring ACL reconstruction. Results: Graft diameters ranged from 6-10 mm. The mean graft diameter for all patients was 7.75 mm. 83 ACL reconstructions failed. The mean size of graft failures was 7.55 mm ACL reconstructions that failed had a significantly smaller hamstring graft diameter p=0.001. The Hazard Ratio for a smaller diameter graft is 0.517 p=<0.0001. For every 1 mm decrease in graft diameter there is a 48.3% higher chance of failure. The multivariate analysis showed a hazard ratio of 0.543 p=0.002. For every 1 mm decrease in graft diameter there is a 45.7% higher chance of failure. Conclusion: Smaller diameter hamstring grafts do have a higher failure rate. Grafts ≤ 7.5 mm had twice the failure rate of grafts ≥8 mm using a multivariate analysis for every 1 mm decrease in graft diameter there is a 45.7% higher chance of failure.

  15. Insitu grafting silica nanoparticles reinforced nanocomposite hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jun; Han, Chun-Rui; Duan, Jiu-Fang; Xu, Feng; Sun, Run-Cang

    2013-10-01

    Highly flexible nanocomposite hydrogels were prepared by using silica nanoparticles (SNPs) as fillers and multi-functional cross-links to graft hydrophilic poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) by free radical polymerization from an aqueous solution. The SNPs were collected by neighboring polymer chains and dispersed uniformly within a PAA matrix. The mechanical properties of the nanocomposite hydrogels were tailored by the concentration of SNPs according to the percolation model. It was proposed that covalent bonds of adsorbed chains on the filler surface resulted in the formation of a shell of an immobilized glassy layer and trapped entanglements, where the glassy polymer layer greatly enhanced the elastic modulus and the release of trapped entanglements at deformation contributed to the viscoelastic properties.Highly flexible nanocomposite hydrogels were prepared by using silica nanoparticles (SNPs) as fillers and multi-functional cross-links to graft hydrophilic poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) by free radical polymerization from an aqueous solution. The SNPs were collected by neighboring polymer chains and dispersed uniformly within a PAA matrix. The mechanical properties of the nanocomposite hydrogels were tailored by the concentration of SNPs according to the percolation model. It was proposed that covalent bonds of adsorbed chains on the filler surface resulted in the formation of a shell of an immobilized glassy layer and trapped entanglements, where the glassy polymer layer greatly enhanced the elastic modulus and the release of trapped entanglements at deformation contributed to the viscoelastic properties. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: FTIR spectra of SNP after silane treatment, dynamic oscillatory shear measurements as a function of frequency, constrained polymer chain analysis by a change in the peak height in loss factor spectra, molecular weight of grafted chains at different stages of gelation, prediction of the SNP reinforcing mechanism in the

  16. Secure fixation of femoral bone plug with a suspensory button in anatomical anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with bone-patellar tendon-bone graft

    PubMed Central

    TAKETOMI, SHUJI; INUI, HIROSHI; NAKAMURA, KENSUKE; YAMAGAMI, RYOTA; TAHARA, KEITARO; SANADA, TAKAKI; MASUDA, HIRONARI; TANAKA, SAKAE; NAKAGAWA, TAKUMI

    2015-01-01

    Purpose the efficacy and safety of using a suspensory button for femoral fixation in anatomical anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction with bone-patellar tendon-bone (BPTB) graft have not been established. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate bone plug integration onto the femoral socket and migration of the bone plug and the EndoButton (EB) (Smith & Nephew, Andover, MA, USA) after rectangular tunnel ACL reconstruction with BPTB autograft. Methods thirty-four patients who underwent anatomical rectangular ACL reconstruction with BPTB graft using EB for femoral fixation and in whom three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT) was performed one week and one year after surgery were included in this study. Bone plug integration onto the femoral socket, bone plug migration, soft tissue interposition, EB migration and EB rotation were evaluated on 3D CT. The clinical outcome was also assessed and correlated with the imaging outcomes. Results the bone plug was integrated onto the femoral socket in all cases. The incidence of bone plug migration, soft tissue interposition, EB migration and EB rotation was 15, 15, 9 and 56%, respectively. No significant association was observed between the imaging outcomes. The postoperative mean Lysholm score was 97.1 ± 5.0 points. The postoperative side-to-side difference, evaluated using a KT-2000 arthrometer, averaged 0.5 ± 1.3 mm. There were no complications associated with EB use. Imaging outcomes did not affect the postoperative KT side-to-side difference. Conclusions the EB is considered a reliable device for femoral fixation in anatomical rectangular tunnel ACL reconstruction with BPTB autograft. Level of evidence Level IV, therapeutic case series. PMID:26889465

  17. Quantitative Analogy Between Polymer Grafted Nanoparticles and Patchy Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asai, Makoto; Cacciuto, Angelo; Kumar, Sanat

    2015-03-01

    We establish a quantitative analogy between polymer grafted nanoparticles (PGNPs) and patchy nanoparticles (NPs). Over much of the experimentally relevant parameter space, we show that PGNPs behave quantitatively like Janus NPs, with the patch size having a universal dependence on the number of grafted chains and the ratio of the size the NPs to the grafted chain size. The widely observed anisotropic self-assembly of PGNPs into superstructures can thus be understood through simple geometric considerations of single patch model, in the same spirit as the geometry-based surfactant models of Israelachvili The authors thank the National Science Foundation for financial support of this work. AC acknowledges financial supported from the National Science Foundation under CAREER Grant No. DMR-0846426.

  18. Robot-Assisted Antegrade In-Situ Fenestrated Stent Grafting

    SciTech Connect

    Riga, Celia V. Bicknell, Colin D.; Wallace, Daniel; Hamady, Mohamad; Cheshire, Nicholas

    2009-05-15

    To determine the technical feasibility of a novel approach of in-situ fenestration of aortic stent grafts by using a remotely controlled robotic steerable catheter system in the porcine model. A 65-kg pig underwent robot-assisted bilateral antegrade in-situ renal fenestration of an abdominal aortic stent graft with subsequent successful deployment of a bare metal stent into the right renal artery. A 16-mm iliac extension covered stent served as the porcine aortic endograft. Under fluoroscopic guidance, the graft was punctured with a 20-G customized diathermy needle that was introduced and kept in place by the robotic arm. The needle was exchanged for a 4 x 20 mm cutting balloon before successful deployment of the renal stent. Robot-assisted antegrade in-situ fenestration is technically feasible in a large mammalian model. The robotic system enables precise manipulation, stable positioning, and minimum instrumentation of the aorta and its branches while minimizing radiation exposure.

  19. Mechanical characterisation of Dacron graft: Experiments and numerical simulation.

    PubMed

    Bustos, Claudio A; García-Herrera, Claudio M; Celentano, Diego J

    2016-01-01

    Experimental and numerical analyses focused on the mechanical characterisation of a woven Dacron vascular graft are presented. To that end, uniaxial tensile tests under different orientations have been performed to study the anisotropic behaviour of the material. These tests have been used to adjust the parameters of a hyperelastic anisotropic constitutive model which is applied to predict through numerical simulation the mechanical response of this material in the ring tensile test. The obtained results show that the model used is capable of representing adequately the nonlinear elastic region and, in particular, it captures the progressive increase of the rigidity and the anisotropy due to the stretching of the Dacron. The importance of this research lies in the possibility of predicting the graft׳s mechanical response under generalized loading such as those that occur under physiological conditions after surgical procedures. PMID:26627367

  20. Mechanical characterisation of Dacron graft: Experiments and numerical simulation.

    PubMed

    Bustos, Claudio A; García-Herrera, Claudio M; Celentano, Diego J

    2016-01-01

    Experimental and numerical analyses focused on the mechanical characterisation of a woven Dacron vascular graft are presented. To that end, uniaxial tensile tests under different orientations have been performed to study the anisotropic behaviour of the material. These tests have been used to adjust the parameters of a hyperelastic anisotropic constitutive model which is applied to predict through numerical simulation the mechanical response of this material in the ring tensile test. The obtained results show that the model used is capable of representing adequately the nonlinear elastic region and, in particular, it captures the progressive increase of the rigidity and the anisotropy due to the stretching of the Dacron. The importance of this research lies in the possibility of predicting the graft׳s mechanical response under generalized loading such as those that occur under physiological conditions after surgical procedures.

  1. Bioabsorbable Bypass Grafts Biofunctionalised with RGD Have Enhanced Biophysical Properties and Endothelialisation Tested In vivo

    PubMed Central

    Antonova, Larisa V.; Seifalian, Alexander M.; Kutikhin, Anton G.; Sevostyanova, Victoria V.; Krivkina, Evgeniya O.; Mironov, Andrey V.; Burago, Andrey Y.; Velikanova, Elena A.; Matveeva, Vera G.; Glushkova, Tatiana V.; Sergeeva, Evgeniya A.; Vasyukov, Georgiy Y.; Kudryavtseva, Yuliya A.; Barbarash, Olga L.; Barbarash, Leonid S.

    2016-01-01

    Small diameter arterial bypass grafts are considered as unmet clinical need since the current grafts have poor patency of 25% within 5 years. We have developed a 3D scaffold manufactured from natural and synthetic biodegradable polymers, poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV) and poly(𝜀-caprolactone) (PCL), respectively. Further to improve the biophysical properties as well as endothelialisation, the grafts were covalently conjugated with arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) bioactive peptides. The biophysical properties as well as endothelialisation of PHBV/PCL and PCL 2 mm diameter bypass grafts were assessed with and without biofunctionalisation with RGD peptides in vitro and in vivo. Morphology of the grafts was assessed by scanning electron microscopy, whereas physico-mechanical properties were evaluated using a physiological circulating system equipped with a state of art ultrasound vascular wall tracking system. Endothelialisation of the grafts in vitro and in vivo were assessed using a cell viability assay and rat abdominal aorta replacement model, respectively. The biofunctionalisation with RGD bioactive peptides decreased mean fiber diameter and mean pore area in PHBV/PCL grafts; however, this was not the case for PCL grafts. Both PHBV/PCL and PCL grafts with RGD peptides had lower durability compared to those without; these durability values were similar to those of internal mammary artery. Modification of PHBV/PCL and PCL grafts with RGD peptides increased endothelial cell viability in vitro by a factor of eight and enhanced the formation of an endothelial cell monolayer in vivo 1 month postimplantation. In conclusion, PHBV/PCL small-caliber graft can be a suitable 3D scaffold for the development of a tissue engineering arterial bypass graft. PMID:27252652

  2. Quantitative Comparison of Volume Maintenance between Inlay and Onlay Bone Grafts in the Craniofacial Skeleton

    PubMed Central

    Sugg, Kristoffer B.; Rosenthal, Andrew H.; Ozaki, Wayne; Buchman, Steven R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Nonvascularized autologous bone grafts are the criterion standard in craniofacial reconstruction for bony defects involving the craniofacial skeleton. The authors have previously demonstrated that graft microarchitecture is the major determinant of volume maintenance for both inlay and onlay bone grafts following transplantation. This study performs a head-to-head quantitative analysis of volume maintenance between inlay and onlay bone grafts in the craniofacial skeleton using a rabbit model to comparatively determine their resorptive kinetics over time. Methods Fifty rabbits were divided randomly into six experimental groups: 3-week inlay, 3-week onlay, 8-week inlay, 8-week onlay, 16-week inlay, and 16-week onlay. Cortical bone from the lateral mandible and both cortical and cancellous bone from the ilium were harvested from each animal and placed either in or on the cranium. All bone grafts underwent micro–computed tomographic analysis at 3, 8, and 16 weeks. Results All bone graft types in the inlay position increased their volume over time, with the greatest increase in endochondral cancellous bone. All bone graft types in the onlay position decreased their volume over time, with the greatest decrease in endochondral cancellous bone. Inlay bone grafts demonstrated increased volume compared with onlay bone grafts of identical embryologic origin and microarchitecture at all time points (p < 0.05). Conclusions Inlay bone grafts, irrespective of their embryologic origin, consistently display less resorption over time compared with onlay bone grafts in the craniofacial skeleton. Both inlay and onlay bone grafts are driven by the local mechanical environment to recapitulate the recipient bed. PMID:23629083

  3. The Periosteal Autografts Transplantation for Cartilage Defects of the Hip in Older Children With Developmental Dysplasia as an Adjunctive Procedure.

    PubMed

    Du, Ming-Hua; Ding, Yu; Shi, Xian; Xu, Rui-Jiang

    2016-04-01

    Cartilage lesions are at a high prevalence in dysplastic hips and may relate to arthritic changes and hip joint dysfunction. To date, the effectiveness of repair of articular cartilage defects in the dysplastic hips has not yet been thoroughly evaluated. Here we retrospectively reviewed the effects of acetabuloplasty procedures with/without concomitant autologous tibial periosteal transplantation (ATPT) for articular cartilage defects of the hip in older children with developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH).Older DDH children with focal cartilage defects of the acetabular or femoral cartilage or both in the hip joint were treated by acetabuloplasty procedures with (Group I) or without (Group II) concomitant ATPT to evaluate the improvements in range of motion (ROM), pain relief of hip, walking tolerability (WL), radiologic evaluations, and outcomes in the long-term follow-up.More satisfactory functional outcome is readily achieved among patients treated with combined acetabuloplasty and ATPT, evidenced by marked pain relief and improved ROM and WL. The latest favorable radiologic evaluation was 70.6% in Group I and 60.0% in Group II, respectively. More hips exhibited congruency between the femoral head and the shell, with less deformity of femoral head and acetabulum or narrowed joint space in Group I. Few major complications were recorded in Group I.Application of periosteal autograft for repair of cartilage defects within the hip joint might be an effective adjunctive treatment for acetabuloplasty in preventing stiffness, reducing pain, and improving ROM and outcomes in hip rehabilitation in the long-term follow-up in older children with DDH. PMID:27124031

  4. Outcome of Simultaneous Arthroscopic Anterior Cruciate Ligament and Posterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction With Hamstring Tendon Autograft: A Multicenter Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Panigrahi, Ranajit; Kumari Mahapatra, Amita; Priyadarshi, Ashok; Singha Das, Dibya; Palo, Nishit; Ranjan Biswal, Manas

    2016-01-01

    Background: Multiligamentous injuries of knee are a complex problem in orthopaedics. Combined ACL-PCL injuries are uncommon, usually associated with knee dislocations. Extremity vascular status is essential because of possible arterio-venous compromise. These complex injuries require a systematic evaluation and treatment. Single setting simultaneous arthroscopic ACL and PCL reconstruction or a staged approach can be adopted to treat these cases. Objectives: To evaluate functional outcome of simultaneous arthroscopic ACL and PCL reconstruction with hamstring tendon autograft in multiligamentous knee injuries. Patients and Methods: This prospective study was performed on 20 patients with combined ACL-PCL injuries who underwent simultaneous arthroscopic ACL-PCL reconstruction with hamstring tendon. Evaluation of functional outcome was by IKDC and Lysholm-Tegner scores. Results: In 20 patients, mean age 34 years, return to full-time work and to full sports was 8 weeks and 6.2 months respectively. All patients had full range of motion except 2 patients with < 5 degrees flexion loss; 90% had negative Lachmann test; 95% had negative pivot shift and 10% patients had mild posterior drawer at 90 degrees (1+) at final follow up. Mean IKDC score was 90 (range 81 - 94); mean Tegner activity score was 7 and mean Lysholm knee score was 89. 85% returned to preinjury activity level and a 90% satisfaction rate. Conclusions: Simultaneous arthroscopic ACL and PCL reconstructions using hamstring tendon for combined ACL and PCL injuries is a clinically effective, safe, time saving and cost-effective procedure with better patient compliance and reproducible for a timely return of motion, strength, and function with favorable outcome. PMID:27217932

  5. The Periosteal Autografts Transplantation for Cartilage Defects of the Hip in Older Children With Developmental Dysplasia as an Adjunctive Procedure

    PubMed Central

    Du, Ming-Hua; Ding, Yu; Shi, Xian; Xu, Rui-Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cartilage lesions are at a high prevalence in dysplastic hips and may relate to arthritic changes and hip joint dysfunction. To date, the effectiveness of repair of articular cartilage defects in the dysplastic hips has not yet been thoroughly evaluated. Here we retrospectively reviewed the effects of acetabuloplasty procedures with/without concomitant autologous tibial periosteal transplantation (ATPT) for articular cartilage defects of the hip in older children with developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH). Older DDH children with focal cartilage defects of the acetabular or femoral cartilage or both in the hip joint were treated by acetabuloplasty procedures with (Group I) or without (Group II) concomitant ATPT to evaluate the improvements in range of motion (ROM), pain relief of hip, walking tolerability (WL), radiologic evaluations, and outcomes in the long-term follow-up. More satisfactory functional outcome is readily achieved among patients treated with combined acetabuloplasty and ATPT, evidenced by marked pain relief and improved ROM and WL. The latest favorable radiologic evaluation was 70.6% in Group I and 60.0% in Group II, respectively. More hips exhibited congruency between the femoral head and the shell, with less deformity of femoral head and acetabulum or narrowed joint space in Group I. Few major complications were recorded in Group I. Application of periosteal autograft for repair of cartilage defects within the hip joint might be an effective adjunctive treatment for acetabuloplasty in preventing stiffness, reducing pain, and improving ROM and outcomes in hip rehabilitation in the long-term follow-up in older children with DDH. PMID:27124031

  6. Costal Cartilage Grafts in Rhinoplasty.

    PubMed

    Fedok, Fred G

    2016-01-01

    Cartilage grafts are regularly used in rhinoplasty. Septal and auricular donor sites are commonly used. Many situations compel the surgeon to use other alternative donor sites, including revision rhinoplasty and trauma. Many patients have a small amount of native septal cartilage and are unable to provide adequate septal cartilage to be used for frequently performed rhinoplasty maneuvers. The rib cage provides an enormous reserve of costal cartilage that can be carved into a variety of necessary grafts. A description of the technique of harvesting costal cartilage, a review of complications and management, and illustrative cases examples are included. PMID:26616708

  7. Behavior of grafted polymers on nanofillers and their influence on polymer nanocomposite properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dukes, Douglas Michael

    grafted with varying amounts of polymer chains at different curvatures. Particles as small as 15 monomers in size were found to already be in the large particle limit, a result that has many implications regarding the dispersibility of grafted fillers in composites. At low graft densities, melt chains were found to form entanglements with the brush all the way to the particle surface, implying the particle is not effectively screened by the grafted chains. The mechanical properties of these grafted silica composites were studied as a function of matrix polymer fraction. As more matrix polymer is introduced, the dominant contribution to the behavior shifts from the grafted chains to the matrix chains. This elucidates the role of grafted chains on the mechanical properties of grafted nanoparticle composites. As the graft density is increased, the wettability of grafted chains was shown to decrease, causing fewer entanglements between grafted chains and matrix chains, resulting in poorer reinforcement. Interesting behavior was observed at low graft densities; a pronounced shape memory effect occurred at high particle concentrations. It is proposed that the grafted chains entangle with adjacent grafted chains, forming a three-dimensional network of entangled brushes attached to silica cores. This structure effectively forms "cross-links" as in elastomeric systems, giving an entropic restorative force to stretched chains. Thus, above Tg, when chains have a higher degree of mobility, the composites can be stretched to over 800%. When cooled to below Tg, they retain the deformed geometry. Upon reheating above Tg, the composite is restored to its original dimensions. This work has identified means of improving theoretical models to better guide future experiments and lead to predictability in polymer composite design. Grafted chains have the demonstrated ability to control the morphology and reinforcement in polymer composites. The behavior of grafted chains were shown to

  8. Recanalization of an Occluded Infrainguinal Vein Graft Complicated by Graft Aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Kakani, Nirmal; Travis, Simon; Hancock, John

    2007-11-15

    The technique of subintimal angioplasty has been described for the recanalisation of native vessels after occlusion of infrainguinal vascular bypass grafts. We report a case in which an attempt at such treatment resulted in inadvertent but successful recanalisation of the occluded vein graft instead. This was complicated by graft perforation and subsequent graft aneurysm which was successfully treated with a covered stent.

  9. Treatment of gingival recession using free gingival graft with fibrin fibronectin sealing system: A novel approach

    PubMed Central

    Srinivas, B. V. V.; Rupa, N.; Halini Kumari, K. V.; Rajender, A.; Reddy, M. Narendra

    2015-01-01

    Periodontal plastic surgery is the branch of periodontology that is focused mainly on the correction or elimination of mucogingival problems associated with lack of attached gingiva, a shallow vestibule and aberrant frenum. Various mucogingival surgical procedures are used to halt the progression of the gingival recession and to correct poor esthetic appearance. Free gingival autograft is one of the most common techniques used for a gingival recession in areas of inadequate attached gingiva in the mandibular anterior region. Fibrin sealants are human plasma derivatives that mimic the final stages of blood coagulation, forming a fibrin clot. Fibrin Sealants enhances the overall outcome of surgical intervention because of their hemostatic, adhesive, and healing properties. These properties of fibrin sealants may reduce operating time, prevent complications, and enhance the overall outcome of many surgical interventions. Hence, this case report aims to investigate the clinical effectiveness of free gingival graft along with the commercially available fibrin-fibronectin sealing system (Tissucol®) in the treatment of Miller's class II gingival recession. PMID:26538956

  10. Primary Breast Augmentation with Fat Grafting.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Sydney R; Saboeiro, Alesia P

    2015-07-01

    The controversy over fat grafting to the breasts has now been settled. In 2009, the American Society of Plastic Surgeons Fat Graft Task Force stated that "Fat grafting may be considered for breast augmentation and correction of defects associated with medical conditions and previous breast surgeries; however, results are dependent on technique and surgeon expertise." This article discusses the history, indications, planning, complications, and present technique of fat grafting to the breast using the Coleman technique.

  11. An Exploratory Clinical Trial of a Novel Treatment for Giant Congenital Melanocytic Nevi Combining Inactivated Autologous Nevus Tissue by High Hydrostatic Pressure and a Cultured Epidermal Autograft: Study Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Jinno, Chizuru; Sakamoto, Michiharu; Kakudo, Natsuko; Yamaoka, Tetsuji; Kusumoto, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Background Giant congenital melanocytic nevi (GCMNs) are large brown to black skin lesions that appear at birth and are associated with a risk of malignant transformation. It is often difficult to reconstruct large full-thickness skin defects after the removal of GCMNs. Objective To overcome this difficulty we developed a novel treatment to inactivate nevus tissue and reconstruct the skin defect using the nevus tissue itself. For this research, we designed an exploratory clinical study to investigate the safety and efficacy of a novel treatment combining the engraftment of autologous nevus tissue inactivated by high hydrostatic pressurization with a cultured epidermal autograft (CEA). Methods Patients with congenital melanocytic nevi that were not expected to be closed by primary closure will be recruited for the present study. The target number of nevi is 10. The full-thickness nevus of the target is removed and pressurized at 200 MPa for 10 minutes. The pressurized and inactivated nevus is sutured to the original site. A small section of the patient’s normal skin is taken from around the nevus region and a CEA is prepared after a 3-week culturing process. The CEA is then grafted onto the engrafted inactivated nevus at four weeks after its retransplantation. The primary endpoint is the engraftment of the CEA at 8 weeks after its transplantation and is defined as being engrafted when the engraftment area of the inactivated nevus is 60% or more of the pretransplantation nevus area and when 80% or more of the transplanted inactivated nevus is epithelialized. Results The study protocol was approved by the Institutional Review Board of Kansai Medical University (No. 1520-2, January 5, 2016: version 1.3). The study opened for recruitment in February 2016. Conclusions This protocol is designed to show feasibility in delivering a novel treatment combining the engraftment of inactivated autologous nevus tissue and CEA. This is the first-in-man clinical trial of this

  12. Application of Hydrogel in Reconstruction Surgery: Hydrogel/Fat Graft Complex Filler for Volume Reconstruction in Critical Sized Muscle Defects.

    PubMed

    Lui, Y F; Ip, W Y

    2016-01-01

    Autogenic fat graft usually suffers from degeneration and volume shrinkage in volume reconstruction applications. How to maintain graft viability and graft volume is an essential consideration in reconstruction therapies. In this presented investigation, a new fat graft transplantation method was developed aiming to improve long term graft viability and volume reconstruction effect by incorporation of hydrogel. The harvested fat graft is dissociated into small fragments and incorporated into a collagen based hydrogel to form a hydrogel/fat graft complex for volume reconstruction purpose. In vitro results indicate that the collagen based hydrogel can significantly improve the survivability of cells inside isolated graft. In a 6-month investigation on artificial created defect model, this hydrogel/fat graft complex filler has demonstrated the ability of promoting fat pad formation inside the targeted defect area. The newly generated fat pad can cover the whole defect and restore its original dimension in 6-month time point. Compared to simple fat transplantation, this hydrogel/fat graft complex system provides much improvement on long term volume restoration effect against degeneration and volume shrinkage. One notable effect is that there is continuous proliferation of adipose tissue throughout the 6-month period. In summary, the hydrogel/fat graft system presented in this investigation demonstrated a better and more significant effect on volume reconstruction in large sized volume defect than simple fat transplantation. PMID:27446947

  13. Application of Hydrogel in Reconstruction Surgery: Hydrogel/Fat Graft Complex Filler for Volume Reconstruction in Critical Sized Muscle Defects

    PubMed Central

    Ip, W. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Autogenic fat graft usually suffers from degeneration and volume shrinkage in volume reconstruction applications. How to maintain graft viability and graft volume is an essential consideration in reconstruction therapies. In this presented investigation, a new fat graft transplantation method was developed aiming to improve long term graft viability and volume reconstruction effect by incorporation of hydrogel. The harvested fat graft is dissociated into small fragments and incorporated into a collagen based hydrogel to form a hydrogel/fat graft complex for volume reconstruction purpose. In vitro results indicate that the collagen based hydrogel can significantly improve the survivability of cells inside isolated graft. In a 6-month investigation on artificial created defect model, this hydrogel/fat graft complex filler has demonstrated the ability of promoting fat pad formation inside the targeted defect area. The newly generated fat pad can cover the whole defect and restore its original dimension in 6-month time point. Compared to simple fat transplantation, this hydrogel/fat graft complex system provides much improvement on long term volume restoration effect against degeneration and volume shrinkage. One notable effect is that there is continuous proliferation of adipose tissue throughout the 6-month period. In summary, the hydrogel/fat graft system presented in this investigation demonstrated a better and more significant effect on volume reconstruction in large sized volume defect than simple fat transplantation. PMID:27446947

  14. Organosiloxane-grafted natural polymer coatings

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, Toshifumi

    1998-01-01

    A new family of polysaccharide graft polymers are provided as corrosion resistant coatings having antimicrobial properties which are useful on light metals such as aluminum, magnesium, zinc, steel and their alloys. Methods of making the polysaccharide graft polymers are also included. The methods of making the polysaccharide graft polymers involve reacting a polysaccharide source with an antimicrobial agent under conditions of hydrolysis-condensation.

  15. New variant for whole pancreas grafting

    SciTech Connect

    Kootstra, G.; van Hooff, J.P.; Joerning, P.J.L.; Leunissen, K.M.; van der Linden, C.J.; Beukers, E.; Buurman, W.A.

    1987-02-01

    A new variant for whole pancreas grafting is described in which a segment of the duodenum and the spleen is included in the graft. The graft is placed extraperitoneally as in kidney transplantation. The exocrine drainage is with side-to-side anastomosis between duodenum and bladder. The spleen is irradiated to prevent the occurrence of GVHD, as is reported in splenic transplantation.

  16. The Right Gastroepiploic Artery Graft for Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting: A 30-Year Experience

    PubMed Central

    Suma, Hisayoshi

    2016-01-01

    Throughout its 30-year history, the right gastroepiploic artery (GEA) has been useful for in situ grafts in coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). The early graft patency rate is high, and the late patency rate has improved by using the skeletonized GEA graft and proper target selection, which involves having a target coronary artery with a tight >90% stenosis. Total arterial revascularization with the internal thoracic artery and GEA grafts is an option for achieving better outcomes from CABG procedures. PMID:27525230

  17. Infiltrating cells from host brain restore the microglial population in grafted cortical tissue.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cong; Tao, Sijue; Fang, Yukun; Guo, Jing; Zhu, Lirui; Zhang, Shengxiang

    2016-01-01

    Transplantation of embryonic cortical tissue is considered as a promising therapy for brain injury. Grafted neurons can reestablish neuronal network and improve cortical function of the host brain. Microglia is a key player in regulating neuronal survival and plasticity, but its activation and dynamics in grafted cortical tissue remain unknown. Using two-photon intravital imaging and parabiotic model, here we investigated the proliferation and source of microglia in the donor region by transplanting embryonic cortical tissue into adult cortex. Live imaging showed that the endogenous microglia of the grafted tissue were rapidly lost after transplantation. Instead, host-derived microglia infiltrated and colonized the graft. Parabiotic model suggested that the main source of infiltrating cells is the parenchyma of the host brain. Colonized microglia proliferated and experienced an extensive morphological transition and eventually differentiated into resting ramified morphology. Collectively, these results demonstrated that donor tissue has little contribution to the activated microglia and host brain controls the microglial population in the graft.

  18. Polyether-polyester graft copolymer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, Vernon L. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    Described is a polyether graft polymer having improved solvent resistance and crystalline thermally reversible crosslinks. The copolymer is prepared by a novel process of anionic copolymerization. These polymers exhibit good solvent resistance and are well suited for aircraft parts. Previous aromatic polyethers, also known as polyphenylene oxides, have certain deficiencies which detract from their usefulness. These commercial polymers are often soluble in common solvents including the halocarbon and aromatic hydrocarbon types of paint thinners and removers. This limitation prevents the