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Sample records for grafted polyurethane foam

  1. Preparation, degradation, and calcification of biodegradable polyurethane foams for bone graft substitutes.

    PubMed

    Gorna, Katarzyna; Gogolewski, Sylwester

    2003-12-01

    Autogenous cancellous bone graft is used to heal critical-size segmental long bone defects and defects in the maxillofacial skeleton. Harvesting of bone graft is traumatic, causes morbidity of the donor site, and often results in complications. Thus, there is a need for new biologically functional bone graft substitutes that, instead of autogenous bone graft, could be used to facilitate bone regeneration in critical-size defects. Porous biodegradable elastomeric polyurethane scaffolds combined with the patient's own bone marrow could potentially be such bone substitutes. The elastomeric bone substitute prevents shear forces at the interface between bone and rigid, e.g., ceramic bone substitutes and establishes an intimate contact with the native bone ends, thus facilitating the proliferation of osteogenic cells and bone regeneration. Crosslinked 3D biodegradable polyurethane scaffolds (foams) with controlled hydrophilicity for bone graft substitutes were synthesized from biocompatible reactants. The scaffolds had hydrophilic-to-hydrophobic content ratios of 70:30, 50:50, and 30:70. The reactants used were hexamethylene diisocyanate, poly(ethylene oxide) diol (MW = 600) (hydrophilic component), and poly(epsilon-caprolactone) diol (M(w) = 2000), amine-based polyol (M(w) = 515) or sucrose-based polyol (M(w) = 445) (hydrophobic component), water as the chain extender and foaming agent, and stannous octoate, dibutyltin dilaurate, ferric acetylacetonate, and zinc octoate as catalysts. Citric acid was used as a calcium complexing agent, calcium carbonate, glycerol phosphate calcium salt, and hydroxyapatite were used as inorganic fillers, and lecithin or solutions of vitamin D(3) were used as surfactants. The scaffolds had an open-pore structure with pores whose size and geometry depended on the material's chemical composition. The compressive strengths of the scaffolds were in the range of 4-340 kPa and the compressive moduli in the range of 9-1960 kPa, the values of

  2. Polyurethane-Foam Maskant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bodemeijer, R.

    1985-01-01

    Brown wax previously used to mask hardware replaced with polyurethane foam in electroplating and electroforming operations. Foam easier to apply and remove than wax and does not contaminate electrolytes.

  3. Electrically conductive rigid polyurethane foam

    DOEpatents

    Neet, T.E.; Spieker, D.A.

    1983-12-08

    A rigid, moldable polyurethane foam comprises about 2 to 10 weight percent, based on the total foam weight, of a carbon black which is CONDUCTEX CC-40-220 or CONDUCTEX SC, whereby the rigid polyurethane foam is electrically conductive and has essentially the same mechanical properties as the same foam without carbon black added.

  4. Electrically conductive rigid polyurethane foam

    DOEpatents

    Neet, Thomas E.; Spieker, David A.

    1985-03-19

    A rigid, polyurethane foam comprises about 2-10 weight percent, based on the total foam weight, of a carbon black which is CONDUCTEX CC-40-220 or CONDUCTEX SC, whereby the rigid polyurethane foam is electrically conductive and has essentially the same mechanical properties as the same foam without carbon black added.

  5. Rigid zeolite containing polyurethane foams

    DOEpatents

    Frost, C.B.

    1984-05-18

    A closed cell rigid polyurethane foam has been prepared which contains up to about 60% by weight of molecular sieves capable of sorbing molecules with effective critical diameters of up to about 10 A. The molecular sieve component of the foam can be preloaded with catalysts or with reactive compounds that can be released upon activation of the foam to control and complete crosslinking after the foam is formed. The foam can also be loaded with water or other flame-retarding agents, after completion. Up to about 50% of the weight of the isocyanate component of the foam can be replaced by polyimide resin precursors for incorporation into the final polymeric network.

  6. Rigid zeolite containing polyurethane foams

    DOEpatents

    Frost, Charles B.

    1985-01-01

    A closed cell rigid polyurethane foam has been prepared which contains up to about 60% by weight of molecular sieves capable of sorbing molecules with effective critical diameters of up to about 10 .ANG.. The molecular sieve component of the foam can be preloaded with catalysts or with reactive compounds that can be released upon activation of the foam to control and complete crosslinking after the foam is formed. The foam can also be loaded with water or other flame-retarding agents, after completion. Up to about 50% of the weight of the isocyanate component of the foam can be replaced by polyimide resin precursors for incorporation into the final polymeric network.

  7. Washing Off Polyurethane Foam Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burley, Richard K.; Fogel, Irving

    1990-01-01

    Jet of hot water removes material quickly and safely. Simple, environmentally sound technique found to remove polyurethane foam insulation from metal parts. Developed for (but not limited to) use during rebuilding of fuel system of Space Shuttle main engine, during which insulation must be removed for penetrant inspection of metal parts.

  8. Open-celled polyurethane foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, L. W.

    1970-01-01

    Open-celled polyurethane foam has a density of 8.3 pounds per cubic foot and a compressive strength of 295 to 325 psi. It is useful as a porous spacer in layered insulation and as an insulation material in vacuum tight systems.

  9. Polyurethane Foam Roofing.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-04-01

    use of asphaltic . bitumen , or coal tar based mastics and plastic type patching materials should be avoided. For purposes of this Guide, maintenance...Applicator Skills......................49 *Spray Foam Equipment and Material Problems. ........ 49 Excess Isocyanate or "A" Component. ............ 50 Excess...surface .. ......... ... 46 35. Isocyanate rich surface .... .............. . 50 36 Resin rich surface ...... ................. ... 51 37 UV

  10. Mechanical Characterization of Rigid Polyurethane Foams

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Wei-Yang

    2014-12-01

    Foam materials are used to protect sensitive components from impact loading. In order to predict and simulate the foam performance under various loading conditions, a validated foam model is needed and the mechanical properties of foams need to be characterized. Uniaxial compression and tension tests were conducted for different densities of foams under various temperatures and loading rates. Crush stress, tensile strength, and elastic modulus were obtained. A newly developed confined compression experiment provided data for investigating the foam flow direction. A biaxial tension experiment was also developed to explore the damage surface of a rigid polyurethane foam.

  11. Thermal Expansion of Polyurethane Foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerch, Bradley A.; Sullivan, Roy M.

    2006-01-01

    Closed cell foams are often used for thermal insulation. In the case of the Space Shuttle, the External Tank uses several thermal protection systems to maintain the temperature of the cryogenic fuels. A few of these systems are polyurethane, closed cell foams. In an attempt to better understand the foam behavior on the tank, we are in the process of developing and improving thermal-mechanical models for the foams. These models will start at the microstructural level and progress to the overall structural behavior of the foams on the tank. One of the key properties for model characterization and verification is thermal expansion. Since the foam is not a material, but a structure, the modeling of the expansion is complex. It is also exacerbated by the anisoptropy of the material. During the spraying and foaming process, the cells become elongated in the rise direction and this imparts different properties in the rise direction than in the transverse directions. Our approach is to treat the foam as a two part structure consisting of the polymeric cell structure and the gas inside the cells. The polymeric skeleton has a thermal expansion of its own which is derived from the basic polymer chemistry. However, a major contributor to the thermal expansion is the volume change associated with the gas inside of the closed cells. As this gas expands it exerts pressure on the cell walls and changes the shape and size of the cells. The amount that this occurs depends on the elastic and viscoplastic properties of the polymer skeleton. The more compliant the polymeric skeleton, the more influence the gas pressure has on the expansion. An additional influence on the expansion process is that the polymeric skeleton begins to breakdown at elevated temperatures and releases additional gas species into the cell interiors, adding to the gas pressure. The fact that this is such a complex process makes thermal expansion ideal for testing the models. This report focuses on the thermal

  12. Efficient continuous dryer for flexible polyurethane foam and cleaning apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Jody, Bassam; Daniels, Edward; Libera, Joseph A.

    1999-01-01

    A method of cleaning polyurethane foams where the material is transported through a wash station while alternately soaking the polyurethane foam in an organic solvent and squeezing solvent from the polyurethane foam a number of times. Then the polyurethane foam is sent through a rinse or solvent transfer station for reducing the concentration of solvent in the foam. The rinsed polyurethane foam is sent to a drying station wherein the foam is repeatedly squeezed while being exposed to hot air to remove wet air from the foam.

  13. Efficient continuous dryer for flexible polyurethane foam and cleaning apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Jody, B.; Daniels, E.; Libera, J.A.

    1999-03-16

    A method of cleaning polyurethane foams where the material is transported through a wash station while alternately soaking the polyurethane foam in an organic solvent and squeezing solvent from the polyurethane foam a number of times. Then the polyurethane foam is sent through a rinse or solvent transfer station for reducing the concentration of solvent in the foam. The rinsed polyurethane foam is sent to a drying station wherein the foam is repeatedly squeezed while being exposed to hot air to remove wet air from the foam. 4 figs.

  14. Flame Retardants Used in Flexible Polyurethane Foam

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The partnership project on flame retardants in furniture seeks to update the health and environmental profiles of flame-retardant chemicals that meet fire safety standards for upholstered consumer products with polyurethane foam

  15. Formulation, Preparation, and Characterization of Polyurethane Foams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinto, Moises L.

    2010-01-01

    Preparation of laboratory-scale polyurethane foams is described with formulations that are easy to implement in experiments for undergraduate students. Particular attention is given to formulation aspects that are based on the main chemical reactions occurring in polyurethane production. This allows students to develop alternative formulations to…

  16. Measuring Rind Thickness on Polyurethane Foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, C.; Miller, J.; Brown, H.

    1985-01-01

    Nondestructive test determines rind thickness of polyurethane foam. Surface harness of foam measured by Shore durometer method: hardness on Shore D scale correlates well with rind thickness. Shore D hardness of 20, for example, indicates rind thickness of 0.04 inch (1 millimeter). New hardness test makes it easy to determine rind thickness of sample nondestructively and to adjust fabrication variables accordingly.

  17. Modeling of skeletal members using polyurethane foam

    SciTech Connect

    Sena, J.M.F.; Weaver, R.W.

    1983-11-01

    At the request of the University of New Mexico's Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, members of the Plastic Section in the Process Development Division at SNLA undertook the special project of the Chaco Lady. The project consisted of polyurethane foam casting of a disinterred female skull considered to be approximately 1000 years old. Rubber latex molds, supplied by the UNM Anthropology Department, were used to produce the polymeric skull requested. The authors developed for the project a modified foaming process which will be used in future polyurethane castings of archaeological artifacts and contemporary skeletal members at the University.

  18. Rigid polyurethane and kenaf core composite foams

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rigid polyurethane foams are valuable in many construction applications. Kenaf is a bast fiber plant where the surface stem skin provides bast fibers whose strength-to-weight ratio competes with glass fiber. The higher volume product of the kenaf core is an under-investigated area in composite appli...

  19. Polyurethane Foam Impact Experiments and Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Chhabildas, L.C.; Kipp, M.E.; Reinhart, W.D.; Wong, M.K.

    1999-06-17

    Uniaxial strain impact experiments have been performed to obtain shock compression and release response of a 0.22 g/cm{sup 3} polyurethane foam in a configuration where the foam impacts a thin target witness plate. Wave profiles from a suite of ten experiments have been obtained, where shock amplitudes range from 40 to 500 MPa. A traditional p-{alpha} porous material model generally captures the material response. A fully three-dimensional explicit representation of the heterogeneous foam structure modeled with numerical simulations recovers some of the high frequency aspects of the particle velocity records.

  20. An overview of polyurethane foams in higher specification foam mattresses.

    PubMed

    Soppi, Esa; Lehtiö, Juha; Saarinen, Hannu

    2015-02-01

    Soft polyurethane foams exist in thousands of grades and constitute essential components of hospital mattresses. For pressure ulcer prevention, the ability of foams to control the immersion and envelopment of patients is essential. Higher specification foam mattresses (i.e., foam mattresses that relieve pressure via optimum patient immersion and envelopment while enabling patient position changes) are claimed to be more effective for preventing pressure ulcers than standard mattresses. Foam grade evaluations should include resiliency, density, hardness, indentation force/load deflection, progressive hardness, tensile strength, and elongation along with essential criteria for higher specification foam mattresses. Patient-specific requirements may include optimal control of patient immersion and envelopment. Mattress cover characteristics should include breathability, impermeability to fluids, and fire safety and not affect mattress function. Additional determinations such as hardness are assessed according to the guidelines of the American Society for Testing and Materials and the International Organization for Standardization. At this time, no single foam grade provides an optimal combination of the above key requirements, but the literature suggests a combination of at least 2 foams may create an optimal higher specification foam mattress for pressure ulcer prevention. Future research and the development of product specification accuracy standards are needed to help clinicians make evidence-based decisions about mattress use.

  1. Thermal Conductivity of Weathered Polyurethane Foam Roofing.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-09-01

    Experimental polyurethane foam roofing systems, by J. R. Keeton , R. L. Alumbaugh, Ph.D , and E. F. Humm. Port Hueneme, Calif., Aug 1976. 2. . Purchase...101. Pearl Harbor, HI; CODE 09P PEARL HARBOR HI: Code 2011 Pearl Harbor. HI; Code 402. RDT&E. Pearl Harbor HI; Commander. Pearl Harbor. HI: Library...Code 2011 San Bruno, CA NAVFACENGCOM CONTRACTS AROICC MCAS El Toro; AROICC, NAVSTA Brooklyn, NY; AROICC, Point Mugu CA; AROICC, Quantico, VA; Colts

  2. "Grinding" cavities in polyurethane foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brower, J. R.; Davey, R. E.; Dixon, W. F.; Robb, P. H.; Zebus, P. P.

    1980-01-01

    Grinding tool installed on conventional milling machine cuts precise cavities in foam blocks. Method is well suited for prototype or midsize production runs and can be adapted to computer control for mass production. Method saves time and materials compared to bonding or hot wire techniques.

  3. The Utilization of Bark to Make Rigid Polyurethane Foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Souza, Jason

    This work focused on the characterization of polyols derived from the liquefaction or alkoxylation of bark. Regarding liquefaction, it was found that both temperature and solvent structure played a significant role in polyol properties. High temperature liquefaction resulted in the degradation of sugars, while liquefaction at mild temperatures preserved sugar structures as shown by 31P-NMR. It was also shown that liquefaction at 130°C was ideal in terms of producing a polyol with a relatively at, broad, plateau of molecular weight distribution, whereas liquefaction at 90 and 160°C produced polyols with a large amount of low molecular weight compounds. Regarding solvent structure, it was found that polyhydric alcohols with short chain primary hydroxyls resulted in less sugar degradation products and less formation of condensation side-products. It is proposed that the highly polar environment promoted grafting and prevented condensation onto other biopolymers. Using organic solvents it was found that ketonic solvents like acetyl acetone and cyclohexanone, through their highly polar carbonyl group could engage in hydrogen bonding through electron donation/proton accepting interactions. These enabled the solvent to reduce the amount of condensation reactions and improve liquefaction yield. The liquefied bark-based polyols were then used to make polyurethane foams. It was found that when a diversity of hydroxyl groups were present the foaming rate was reduced and this may react a slower rate of curing and explain why the bark foams had a greater amount of cells that underwent coalescence. It was also observed that the bark foams had a low amount of closed-cell content. Since closed-cell content plays a role in dictating elastic compression, this may explain why the bark foams exhibited a lower elastic modulus. Finally, as a contrast to liquefaction, bark was alkoxylated. It was observed that the conversion yield was higher than liquefaction. The polyols had a high

  4. Nano-Aramid Fiber Reinforced Polyurethane Foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Semmes, Edmund B.; Frances, Arnold

    2008-01-01

    Closed cell polyurethane and, particularly, polyisocyanurate foams are a large family of flexible and rigid products the result of a reactive two part process wherein a urethane based polyol is combined with a foaming or "blowing" agent to create a cellular solid at room temperature. The ratio of reactive components, the constituency of the base materials, temperature, humidity, molding, pouring, spraying and many other processing techniques vary greatly. However, there is no known process for incorporating reinforcing fibers small enough to be integrally dispersed within the cell walls resulting in superior final products. The key differentiating aspect from the current state of art resides in the many processing technologies to be fully developed from the novel concept of milled nano pulp aramid fibers and their enabling entanglement capability fully enclosed within the cell walls of these closed cell urethane foams. The authors present the results of research and development of reinforced foam processing, equipment development, strength characteristics and the evolution of its many applications.

  5. Auxetic polyurethane foam: Manufacturing and processing analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahan, Md Deloyer

    Materials with negative Poisson's ratio are referred to as auxetic materials. They are different from conventional materials in their deformation behavior when responding to external stresses. The cross-section of the materials widens in the lateral direction when being stretched in the longitudinal direction and becomes narrower when being compressed longitudinally. While a number of natural auxetic materials exist, most auxetic materials are synthetic. They show interesting properties and have potential in several important applications. Auxetic materials exhibit better mechanical properties than conventional materials such as enhanced indentation resistance, shear resistance, toughness, damping and energy absorption capacity, sound absorption, variable permeability and capability of producing complex curvature. These properties are beneficial in a wide range of applications including personal protective equipments, sound absorbers, packaging, smart filtration, drug delivery, tissue scaffolding, seat cushioning, etc. A wide range of auxetic materials has been synthesized. They include different polymers, metals, composites and ceramics. Among these, auxetic polyurethane (PU) foam is one of the most widely studied types of auxetic materials. Auxetic PU foams are usually fabricated by altering the microstructure of conventional foams and the unusual mechanical properties originate from the deformation characteristics of the microstructures. Three most important processing parameters in fabricating auxetic PU foam that dictate auxetic behavior are processing temperature, heating time and volumetric compression ratio. This study addresses several important issues in the manufacturing and characterization of auxetic PU foam. First, an improved automatic measuring technique has been developed to determine Poisson's ratio of auxetic PU foam. The technique involves development of a Matlab based image processing program. The second part of the study includes an

  6. Unified Creep Plasticity Damage (UCPD) Model for Rigid Polyurethane Foams.

    SciTech Connect

    Neilsen, Michael K.; Lu, Wei-Yang; Scherzinger, William M.; Hinnerichs, Terry D.; Lo, Chi S.

    2015-06-01

    Numerous experiments were performed to characterize the mechanical response of several different rigid polyurethane foams (FR3712, PMDI10, PMDI20, and TufFoam35) to large deformation. In these experiments, the effects of load path, loading rate, and temperature were investigated. Results from these experiments indicated that rigid polyurethane foams exhibit significant volumetric and deviatoric plasticity when they are compressed. Rigid polyurethane foams were also found to be very strain-rate and temperature dependent. These foams are also rather brittle and crack when loaded to small strains in tension or to larger strains in compression. Thus, a new Unified Creep Plasticity Damage (UCPD) model was developed and implemented into SIERRA with the name Foam Damage to describe the mechanical response of these foams to large deformation at a variety of temperatures and strain rates. This report includes a description of recent experiments and experimental findings. Next, development of a UCPD model for rigid, polyurethane foams is described. Selection of material parameters for a variety of rigid polyurethane foams is then discussed and finite element simulations with the new UCPD model are compared with experimental results to show behavior that can be captured with this model.

  7. Uncertainty Analysis of Decomposing Polyurethane Foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hobbs, Michael L.; Romero, Vicente J.

    2000-01-01

    Sensitivity/uncertainty analyses are necessary to determine where to allocate resources for improved predictions in support of our nation's nuclear safety mission. Yet, sensitivity/uncertainty analyses are not commonly performed on complex combustion models because the calculations are time consuming, CPU intensive, nontrivial exercises that can lead to deceptive results. To illustrate these ideas, a variety of sensitivity/uncertainty analyses were used to determine the uncertainty associated with thermal decomposition of polyurethane foam exposed to high radiative flux boundary conditions. The polyurethane used in this study is a rigid closed-cell foam used as an encapsulant. Related polyurethane binders such as Estane are used in many energetic materials of interest to the JANNAF community. The complex, finite element foam decomposition model used in this study has 25 input parameters that include chemistry, polymer structure, and thermophysical properties. The response variable was selected as the steady-state decomposition front velocity calculated as the derivative of the decomposition front location versus time. An analytical mean value sensitivity/uncertainty (MV) analysis was used to determine the standard deviation by taking numerical derivatives of the response variable with respect to each of the 25 input parameters. Since the response variable is also a derivative, the standard deviation was essentially determined from a second derivative that was extremely sensitive to numerical noise. To minimize the numerical noise, 50-micrometer element dimensions and approximately 1-msec time steps were required to obtain stable uncertainty results. As an alternative method to determine the uncertainty and sensitivity in the decomposition front velocity, surrogate response surfaces were generated for use with a constrained Latin Hypercube Sampling (LHS) technique. Two surrogate response surfaces were investigated: 1) a linear surrogate response surface (LIN) and 2

  8. Rigid open-cell polyurethane foam for cryogenic insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faddoul, J. R.; Lindquist, C. R.; Niendorf, L. R.; Nies, G. E.; Perkins, P. J., Jr.

    1971-01-01

    Lightweight polyurethane foam assembled in panels is effective spacer material for construction of self-evacuating multilayer insulation panels for cryogenic liquid tanks. Spacer material separates radiation shields with barrier that minimizes conductive and convective heat transfer between shields.

  9. Toxicity studies of a polyurethane rigid foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilado, C. J.; Schneider, J. E.

    1977-01-01

    Relative toxicity tests were performed on a polyurethane foam containing a trimethylopropane-based polyol and an organophosphate flame retardant. The routine screening procedure involved the exposure of four Swiss albino male mice in a 4.2 liter hemispherical chamber to the products generated by pyrolyzing a 1.00 g sample at a heating rate of 40 deg C/min from 200 to 800 C in the absence of air flow. In addition to the routine screening, experiments were performed with a very rapid rise to 800 C, with nominal 16 and 48 ml/sec air flow and with varying sample rates. No unusual toxicity was observed with either gradual or rapid pyrolysis to 800 C. Convulsions and seizures similar to those previously reported were observed when the materials were essentially flash pyrolyzed at 800 C in the presence of air flow, and the toxicity appeared unusual because of low sample weights required to produce death.

  10. Thermal, chemical, and mechanical response of rigid polyurethane foam

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, M.L.

    1997-12-01

    Rigid polyurethane foams are frequently used as encapsulants to isolate and support thermally sensitive components within weapon systems. When exposed to abnormal thermal environments, such as fire, the polyurethane foam decomposes to form products having a wide distribution of molecular weights and can dominate the overall thermal response of the system. Mechanical response of the decomposing foam, such as thermal expansion under various loading conditions created by gas generation, remains a major unsolved problem. A constitutive model of the reactive foam is needed to describe the coupling between mechanical response and chemical decomposition of foam exposed to environments such as fire. Towards this end, a reactive elastic-plastic constitutive model based on bubble mechanics describing nucleation, decomposition chemistry, and elastic/plastic mechanical behavior of rigid polyurethane foam has been developed. A local force balance, with mass continuity constraints, forms the basis of the constitutive model requiring input of temperature and the fraction of the material converted to gas. This constitutive model provides a stress-strain relationship which is applicable for a broad class of reacting materials such as explosives, propellants, pyrotechnics, and decomposing foams. The model is applied to a block of foam exposed to various thermal fluxes. The model is also applied to a sphere of foam confined in brass. The predicted mechanical deformation of the foam block and sphere are shown to qualitatively agree with experimental observations.

  11. IDENTIFICATION OF CFC AND HCFC SUBSTITUTES FOR BLOWING POLYURETHANE FOAM INSULATION PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a cooperative effort to identiry chlorofluorocarbons and hydrochlorofluorocarbon substitutes for blowing polyurethane foam insulation products. The substantial ongoing effort is identifying third-generation blowing agets for polyurethane foams to repla...

  12. Fiber glass prevents cracking of polyurethane foam insulation on cryogenic vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forge, D. A.

    1968-01-01

    Fiber glass material, placed between polyurethane foam insulation and the outer surfaces of cryogenic vessels, retains its resilience at cryogenic temperatures and provides an expansion layer between the metal surfaces and the polyurethane foam, preventing cracking of the latter.

  13. The Modification of Polyurethane Foams Using New Boroorganic Polyols (II) Polyurethane Foams from Boron-Modified Hydroxypropyl Urea Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The work focuses on research related to determination of application possibility of new, ecofriendly boroorganic polyols in rigid polyurethane foams production. Polyols were obtained from hydroxypropyl urea derivatives esterified with boric acid and propylene carbonate. The influence of esterification type on properties of polyols and next on polyurethane foams properties was determined. Nitrogen and boron impacts on the foams' properties were discussed, for instance, on their physical, mechanical, and electric properties. Boron presence causes improvement of dimensional stability and thermal stability of polyurethane foams. They can be applied even at temperature 150°C. Unfortunately, introducing boron in polyurethanes foams affects deterioration of their water absorption, which increases as compared to the foams that do not contain boron. However, presence of both boron and nitrogen determines the decrease of the foams combustibility. Main impact on the decrease combustibility of the obtained foams has nitrogen presence, but in case of proper boron and nitrogen ratio their synergic activity on the combustibility decrease can be easily seen. PMID:24587721

  14. The modification of polyurethane foams using new boroorganic polyols (II) polyurethane foams from boron-modified hydroxypropyl urea derivatives.

    PubMed

    Zarzyka, Iwona

    2014-01-01

    The work focuses on research related to determination of application possibility of new, ecofriendly boroorganic polyols in rigid polyurethane foams production. Polyols were obtained from hydroxypropyl urea derivatives esterified with boric acid and propylene carbonate. The influence of esterification type on properties of polyols and next on polyurethane foams properties was determined. Nitrogen and boron impacts on the foams' properties were discussed, for instance, on their physical, mechanical, and electric properties. Boron presence causes improvement of dimensional stability and thermal stability of polyurethane foams. They can be applied even at temperature 150 °C. Unfortunately, introducing boron in polyurethanes foams affects deterioration of their water absorption, which increases as compared to the foams that do not contain boron. However, presence of both boron and nitrogen determines the decrease of the foams combustibility. Main impact on the decrease combustibility of the obtained foams has nitrogen presence, but in case of proper boron and nitrogen ratio their synergic activity on the combustibility decrease can be easily seen.

  15. 40 CFR 63.1293 - Standards for slabstock flexible polyurethane foam production.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... polyurethane foam production. 63.1293 Section 63.1293 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... CATEGORIES National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Flexible Polyurethane Foam Production § 63.1293 Standards for slabstock flexible polyurethane foam production. Each owner or operator of...

  16. 40 CFR 63.1300 - Standards for molded flexible polyurethane foam production.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... polyurethane foam production. 63.1300 Section 63.1300 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... CATEGORIES National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Flexible Polyurethane Foam Production § 63.1300 Standards for molded flexible polyurethane foam production. Each owner or operator of a...

  17. 40 CFR 63.1300 - Standards for molded flexible polyurethane foam production.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... polyurethane foam production. 63.1300 Section 63.1300 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... CATEGORIES National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Flexible Polyurethane Foam Production § 63.1300 Standards for molded flexible polyurethane foam production. Each owner or operator of a...

  18. 40 CFR 63.1293 - Standards for slabstock flexible polyurethane foam production.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... polyurethane foam production. 63.1293 Section 63.1293 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... CATEGORIES National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Flexible Polyurethane Foam Production § 63.1293 Standards for slabstock flexible polyurethane foam production. Each owner or operator of...

  19. 76 FR 19182 - Petition for Rulemaking-Classification of Polyurethane Foam and Certain Finished Products...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-06

    ... in delivery of dairy products or frozen foods, and in refrigerated freight containers. COSTHA said to... Polyurethane Foam and Certain Finished Products Containing Polyurethane Foam as Hazardous Materials AGENCY... finished products containing polyurethane foam as hazardous material for purposes of transportation...

  20. Characterization of synthesized polyurethane/montmorillonite nanocomposites foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, Farahnaz; Sachse, Sophia; Michalowski, S.; Kavosh, Masoud; Pielichowski, Krzysztof; Njuguna, James

    2014-08-01

    Nanophased hybrid composites based on polyurethane/montmorillonite (PU/MMT) have been fabricated. The nanocomposite which was formed by the addition of a polyol premix with 4,4'-diphenylmethane diisocyanate to obtain nanophased polyurethane foams which were then used for fabrication of nanocomposite panels has been shown to have raised strength, stiffness and thermal insulation properties. The nanophased polyurethane foam was characterized by means of scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM) measurements and X-ray diffraction (XRD). TEM and SEM analysis indicated that nanophased particles are dispersed homogeneously in the polyurethane matrix on the nanometer scale indicating that PU/MMT is an intercalated nanocomposite with a 2-3 nm nanolayer thickness.

  1. Electrical conductivity of rigid polyurethane foam at high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, R. T., Jr.

    1982-08-01

    The electrical conductivity of rigid polyurethane foam, used for electronic encapsulation, was measured during thermal decomposition to 3400 C. At higher temperatures the conductance continues to increase. With pressure loaded electrical leads, sample softening results in eventual contact between electrodes which produces electrical shorting. Air and nitrogen environments show no significant dependence of the conductivity on the atmosphere over the temperature range. The insulating characteristics of polyurethane foam below approx. 2700 C are similar to those for silicone based materials used for electronic case housings and are better than those for phenolics. At higher temperatures (greater than or equal to 2700 C) the phenolics appear to be better insulators to approx. 5000 C and the silicones to approx. 6000 C. It is concluded that the Sylgard 184/GMB encapsulant is a significantly better insulator at high temperature than the rigid polyurethane foam.

  2. Labeled leukocyte scans for detection of retained polyurethane foam

    SciTech Connect

    Ellenberger, P.; Graham, W.P. 3d.; Manders, E.K.; Basarab, R.M.

    1986-01-01

    Complete removal of an infected polyurethane-covered breast prosthesis is difficult, and retained tissue-embedded foam can form a nidus for persistent infection. Scanning the chest wall after administration of indium-111 oxine-labeled autogenous leukocytes will locate areas of infection around retained fragments of foam, thereby facilitating their removal and allowing eventual successful reconstruction. This technique may deserve wider application for locating infected foreign bodies in a variety of patient problems.

  3. Mechanical Properties of a Metal Powder-Loaded Polyurethane Foam

    SciTech Connect

    C. L. Neuschwanger; L. L. Whinnery; S. H. Goods

    1999-04-01

    Quasi-static compression tests have been performed on polyurethane foam specimens. The modulus of the foam exhibited a power-law dependence with respect to density of the form: E* {proportional_to} {rho}*{sup n}, where n = 1.7. The modulus data is well described by a simple geometric model (attributed to the work of Gibson and Ashby) for closed-cell foam in which the stiffness of the foam is governed by the flexure of the cell struts and cell walls. The compressive strength of the foam is also found to follow a power-law behavior with respect to foam density. In this instance, Euler buckling is used to rationalize the density dependence. The modulus of the polyurethane foam was modified by addition of a gas atomized, spherical aluminum powder. Additions of 30 and 50 weight percent of the powder significantly increased the foam modulus. However, there were only slight increases in modulus with 5 and 10 weight percent additions of the metal powder. Strength was also slightly increased at high loading fractions of powder. This increase in modulus and strength could be predicted by combining the above geometric model with a well-known model describing the effect on modulus of a rigid dispersoid in a compliant matrix.

  4. Fiber-modified polyurethane foam for ballistic protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fish, R. H.; Parker, J. A.; Rosser, R. W.

    1975-01-01

    Closed-cell, semirigid, fiber-loaded, self-extinguishing polyurethane foam material fills voids around fuel cells in aircraft. Material prevents leakage of fuel and spreading of fire in case of ballistic incendiary impact. It also protects fuel cell in case of exterior fire.

  5. Toxicology of urea formaldehyde and polyurethane foam insulation.

    PubMed

    Harris, J C; Rumack, B H; Aldrich, F D

    1981-01-16

    Two types of foam insulation are in wide use. Urea formaldehyde foam is a relatively inexpensive, easily installed, and efficient insulation. Toxicity from this insulation is related to release of free formaldehyde into the home. Mild to incapacitating symptoms have been reported in occupants of urea formaldehyde-insulated homes. Airborne formaldehyde levels frequently have exceeded standards set for occupational exposure. The long-term consequences of such exposure are unknown. Because of publicity over the toxicity of urea formaldehyde foam, many physicians and patients have confused urea formaldehyde and polyurethane foam. Unlike urea formaldehyde, polyurethane foam is fully cured before construction. Toxicity occurs only during manufacture and curing. To date, there have been no reports to our knowledge of toxicity in occupants of polyurethane-insulated homes. However, toxicity caused by pyrolysis products may occur during combustion in homes insulated with either type of insulation. This report details 48 patients in whom complete medical data were obtained out of the first 100 patients contacting the Rocky Mountain Poison Center.

  6. Tests of two new polyurethane foam wheelchair tires.

    PubMed

    Gordon, J; Kauzlarich, J J; Thacker, J G

    1989-01-01

    The performance characteristics of four 24-inch wheelchair tires are considered; one pneumatic and three airless. Specifically, two new airless polyurethane foam tires (circular and tapered cross-section) were compared to both a molded polyisoprene tire and a rubber pneumatic tire. Rolling resistance, coefficient of static friction, spring rate, tire roll-off, impact absorption, wear resistance, and resistance to compression set were the characteristics considered for the basis of comparison. Although the pneumatic tire is preferred by many wheelchair users, the two new polyurethane foam tires were found to offer a performance similar to the high-pressure pneumatic tire. In addition, the foam tires are less expensive and lighter in weight than the other tires tested.

  7. 40 CFR 63.1297 - Standards for slabstock flexible polyurethane foam production-HAP ABA emissions from the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... polyurethane foam production-HAP ABA emissions from the production line. 63.1297 Section 63.1297 Protection of... Pollutants for Flexible Polyurethane Foam Production § 63.1297 Standards for slabstock flexible polyurethane... § 63.1293(a)(1) shall control HAP ABA emissions from the slabstock polyurethane foam production line...

  8. 40 CFR 63.1297 - Standards for slabstock flexible polyurethane foam production-HAP ABA emissions from the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... polyurethane foam production-HAP ABA emissions from the production line. 63.1297 Section 63.1297 Protection of... Pollutants for Flexible Polyurethane Foam Production § 63.1297 Standards for slabstock flexible polyurethane... § 63.1293(a)(1) shall control HAP ABA emissions from the slabstock polyurethane foam production line...

  9. Bio-based polyurethane foams from renewable resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanzione, M.; Russo, V.; Sorrentino, A.; Tesser, R.; Lavorgna, M.; Oliviero, M.; Di Serio, M.; Iannace, S.; Verdolotti, L.

    2016-05-01

    In the last decades, bio-derived natural materials, such as vegetable oils, polysaccharides and biomass represent a rich source of hydroxyl precursors for the synthesis of polyols which can be potentially used to synthesize "greener" polyurethane foams. Herein a bio-based precursor (obtained from succinic acid) was used as a partial replacement of conventional polyol to synthesize PU foams. A mixture of conventional and bio-based polyol in presence of catalysts, silicone surfactant and diphenylmethane di-isocyanate (MDI) was expanded in a mold and cured for two hours at room temperature. Experimental results highlighted the suitability of this bio-precursor to be used in the production of flexible PU foams. Furthermore the chemo-physical characterization of the resulting foams show an interesting improvement in thermal stability and elastic modulus with respect to the PU foams produced with conventional polyol.

  10. Laboratory evaluation of polyurethane foam for geothermal lost-circulation plugging

    SciTech Connect

    Tschoepe, E. III

    1982-04-01

    To evaluate polyurethane foam formulations for use in plugging hot (such as geothermal) formations when lost circulation is encountered during drilling, laboratory tests of three foams were performed. Foams were mixed at high temperature (up to 300/sup 0/F) and high pressure (up to 900 psig); the mechanical and fluid loss properties of the foams were subsequently determined. The results show that polyurethane foams can be mixed at downhole conditions and yield acceptable plugging properties.

  11. Cellulose based hybrid hydroxylated adducts for polyurethane foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Pisapia, Laura; Verdolotti, Letizia; Di Mauro, Eduardo; Di Maio, Ernesto; Lavorgna, Marino; Iannace, Salvatore

    2012-07-01

    Hybrid flexible polyurethane foams (HPU) were synthesized by using a hybrid hydroxilated adduct (HHA) based on renewable resources. In particular the HHA was obtained by dispersing cellulose wastes in colloidal silica at room temperature, pressure and humidity. The colloidal silica was selected for its ability of modifying the cellulose structure, by inducing a certain "destructurization" of the crystalline phase, in order to allow cellulose to react with di-isocyanate for the final synthesis of the polyurethane foam. In fact, cellulose-polysilicate complexes are engaged in the reaction with the isocyanate groups. This study provides evidence of the effects of the colloidal silica on the cellulose structure, namely, a reduction of the microfiber cellulose diameter and the formation of hydrogen bonds between the polysilicate functional groups and the hydroxyl groups of the cellulose, as assessed by IR spectroscopy and solid state NMR. The HHA was added to a conventional polyol in different percentages (between 5 and 20%) to synthesize HPU in presence of catalysts, silicone surfactant and diphenylmethane diisocyanate (MDI). The mixture was expanded in a mold and cured for two hours at room temperature. Thermal analysis, optical microscopy and mechanical tests were performed on the foams. The results highlighted an improvement of thermal stability and a decrease of the cell size with respect neat polyurethane foam. Mechanical tests showed an improvement of the elastic modulus and of the damping properties with increasing HHA amount.

  12. Mechanical properties and energy absorption characteristics of a polyurethane foam

    SciTech Connect

    Goods, S.H.; Neuschwanger, C.L.; Henderson, C.; Skala, D.M.

    1997-03-01

    Tension, compression and impact properties of a polyurethane encapsulant foam have been measured as a function of foam density. Significant differences in the behavior of the foam were observed depending on the mode of testing. Over the range of densities examined, both the modulus and the elastic collapse stress of the foam exhibited power-law dependencies with respect to density. The power-law relationship for the modulus was the same for both tension and compression testing and is explained in terms of the elastic compliance of the cellular structure of the foam using a simple geometric model. Euler buckling is used to rationalize the density dependence of the collapse stress. Neither tension nor compression testing yielded realistic measurements of energy absorption (toughness). In the former case, the energy absorption characteristics of the foam were severely limited due to the inherent lack of tensile ductility. In the latter case, the absence of a failure mechanism led to arbitrary measures of energy absorption that were not indicative of true material properties. Only impact testing revealed an intrinsic limitation in the toughness characteristics of the material with respect to foam density. The results suggest that dynamic testing should be used when assessing the shock mitigating qualities of a foam.

  13. Recovery of flexible polyurethane foam from shredder residue.

    SciTech Connect

    Daniels, E. J.; Jody, b. J.

    1999-06-29

    Argonne National Laboratory has developed a patented, continuous process for the recovery of flexible polyurethane foam (PUF) from auto shredder residue (ASR). To test the process, Argonne researchers conceived of, designed, and built a continuous foam washing and drying system that was pilot-tested at a shredder facility for six months. Economic analysis of the process, using manufacturers' quotes and operating data from Argonne's pilot plant, indicates a payback of less than two years for a plant producing about 1,000 ton/yr of foam. Samples of clean foam were shipped to three major foam reprocessors; all three indicated that the quality of the PUF recovered by the Argonne process met their requirements. Tests of the recovered foam by an independent testing laboratory showed that the recycled foam met the specifications for several automotive applications, including carpet padding, headliner, and sound-suppression support materials. Recovery of foam reduces the mass and the volume of material going to the landfill by about 5% and 30%, respectively. Annually, recovery will save about 1.2 x 10{sup 12} Btu of energy, cut the amount of solid waste being landfilled by about 150,000 tons, and eliminate the emission of about 250 tons of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into the air.

  14. Preparation and characterization of new biologically active polyurethane foams.

    PubMed

    Savelyev, Yuri; Veselov, Vitali; Markovskaya, Ludmila; Savelyeva, Olga; Akhranovich, Elena; Galatenko, Natalya; Robota, Ludmila; Travinskaya, Tamara

    2014-12-01

    Biologically active polyurethane foams are the fast-developed alternative to many applications of biomedical materials. Due to the polyurethane structure features and foam technology it is possible to incorporate into their structure the biologically active compounds of target purpose via structural-chemical modification of macromolecule. A series of new biologically active polyurethane foams (PUFs) was synthesized with polyethers (MM 2500-5000), polyesters MM (500-2200), 2,4(2,6) toluene diisocyanate, water as a foaming agent, catalysts, foam stabilizers and functional compounds. Different functional compounds: 1,4-di-N-oxy-2,3-bis-(oxymethyl)-quinoxaline (DOMQ), partial sodium salt of poly(acrylic acid) and 2,6-dimethyl-N,N-diethyl aminoacetatanilide hydrochloride were incorporated into the polymer structure/composition due to the chemical and/or physical bonding. Structural peculiarities of PUFs were studied by FTIR spectroscopy and X-ray scattering. Self-adhesion properties of PUFs were estimated by measuring of tensile strength at break of adhesive junction. The optical microscopy method was performed for the PUF morphology studies. Toxicological estimation of the PUFs was carried out in vitro and in vivo. The antibacterial action towards the Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli ATC 25922, E. coli ATC 2150, Klebsiella pneumoniae 6447, Staphylococcus aureus 180, Pseudomonas aeruginosa 8180, Proteus mirabilis F 403, P. mirabilis 6054, and Proteus vulgaris 8718) was studied by the disc method on the solid nutrient. Physic-chemical properties of the PUFs (density, tensile strength and elongation at break, water absorption and vapor permeability) showed that all studied PUFs are within the operational requirements for such materials and represent fine-cellular foams. Spectral studies confirmed the incorporation of DOMQ into the PUF's macrochain. PUFs are characterized by microheterogeneous structure. They are antibacterially active, non

  15. Method for providing a low density high strength polyurethane foam

    DOEpatents

    Whinnery, Jr., Leroy L.; Goods, Steven H.; Skala, Dawn M.; Henderson, Craig C.; Keifer, Patrick N.

    2013-06-18

    Disclosed is a method for making a polyurethane closed-cell foam material exhibiting a bulk density below 4 lbs/ft.sup.3 and high strength. The present embodiment uses the reaction product of a modified MDI and a sucrose/glycerine based polyether polyol resin wherein a small measured quantity of the polyol resin is "pre-reacted" with a larger quantity of the isocyanate in a defined ratio such that when the necessary remaining quantity of the polyol resin is added to the "pre-reacted" resin together with a tertiary amine catalyst and water as a blowing agent, the polymerization proceeds slowly enough to provide a stable foam body.

  16. Feasibility study on polyurethane foam roofing insulation business

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, C.

    1987-05-04

    The Amador-Tuolumne Community Action Agency has evaluated the feasibility of starting a polyurethane foam roofing insulation business in the foothills counties of El Dorado, Amador, Calaveras, Tuolumne and Mariposa. This idea evolved from A-TCAA's efforts to insulate mobile homes through low-income weatherization programs. Thorough investigation of the product, market and financial requirements for this business indicate that the feasibility is questionable.

  17. Preparation of linear hydroxy substituted polyphosphazenes. [flame retardant polyurethane foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paciorek, K. L.; Ito, T. I.; Kratzer, R. H.

    1978-01-01

    The synthesis of partially hydroxy-substituted phosphazene prepolymers amenable to processing into cellular, flexible polyurethane foams was investigated. Factors determined include (1) the environment of the hydroxyl group; (2) the ease of the hexachlorocyclotriphosphazene polymerization; (3) the nature of the nonreactive substituents; and (4) the mode of introduction of the hydroxyl entity. The specific approaches taken, the rationale of the selections made, and the results are discussed.

  18. Structure-property relationships of flexible polyurethane foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aneja, Ashish

    This study examined several features of flexible polyurethane foams from a structure-property perspective. A major part of this dissertation addresses the issue of connectivity of the urea phase and its influence on mechanical and viscoelastic properties of flexible polyurethane foams and their plaque counterparts. Lithium salts (LiCl and LiBr) were used as additives to systematically alter the phase separation behavior, and hence the connectivity of the urea phase at different scale lengths. Macro connectivity, or the association of the large scale urea rich aggregates typically observed in flexible polyurethane foams was assessed using SAXS, TEM, and AFM. These techniques showed that including a lithium salt in the foam formulation suppressed the formation of the urea aggregates and thus led to a loss in the macro level connectivity of the urea phase. WAXS and FTIR were used to demonstrate that addition of LiCl or LiBr systematically disrupted the local ordering of the hard segments within the microdomains, i.e., it led to a reduction of micro level connectivity or the regularity in segmental packing of the urea phase. Based on these observations, the interaction of the lithium salt was thought to predominantly occur with the urea hard segments, and this hypothesis was confirmed using quantum mechanical calculations. Another feature of this research investigated model trisegmented polyurethanes based on monofunctional polyols, or "monos", with water-extended toluene diisocyanate (TDI) based hard segments. The formulations of the monol materials were maintained similar to those of flexible polyurethane foams with the exceptions that the conventional polyol was substituted by an oligomeric monofunctional polyether of ca. 1000 g/mol molecular weight. Plaques formed from these model systems were shown to be solid materials even at their relatively low molecular weights of 3000 g/mol and less, AFM phase images, for the first time, revealed the ability of the hard

  19. Effect of foam age on toxicity of pyrolysis gases from polyurethane flexible foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilado, C. J.; Murphy, R. M.

    1978-01-01

    The toxicity of the pyrolysis gases from some samples of polyurethane flexible foams appears to have decreased with age, while other samples seem to exhibit no significant change with age in this respect. The changes observed were greater than could be accounted for by variations in the material, or test variations or artifacts.

  20. Modeling Manufacturing Impacts on Aging and Reliability of Polyurethane Foams

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, Rekha R.; Roberts, Christine Cardinal; Mondy, Lisa Ann; Soehnel, Melissa Marie; Johnson, Kyle; Lorenzo, Henry T.

    2016-10-01

    Polyurethane is a complex multiphase material that evolves from a viscous liquid to a system of percolating bubbles, which are created via a CO2 generating reaction. The continuous phase polymerizes to a solid during the foaming process generating heat. Foams introduced into a mold increase their volume up to tenfold, and the dynamics of the expansion process may lead to voids and will produce gradients in density and degree of polymerization. These inhomogeneities can lead to structural stability issues upon aging. For instance, structural components in weapon systems have been shown to change shape as they age depending on their molding history, which can threaten critical tolerances. The purpose of this project is to develop a Cradle-to-Grave multiphysics model, which allows us to predict the material properties of foam from its birth through aging in the stockpile, where its dimensional stability is important.

  1. Dielectric properties of novel polyurethane-PZT-graphite foam composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolvanen, Jarkko; Hannu, Jari; Nelo, Mikko; Juuti, Jari; Jantunen, Heli

    2016-09-01

    Flexible foam composite materials offer multiple benefits to future electronic applications as the rapid development of the electronics industry requires smaller, more efficient, and lighter materials to further develop foldable and wearable applications. The aims of this work were to examine the electrical properties of three- and four-phase novel foam composites in different conditions, find the optimal mixture for four-phase foam composites, and study the combined effects of lead zirconate titanate (PZT) and graphite fillers. The flexible and highly compressible foams were prepared in a room-temperature mixing process using polyurethane, PZT, and graphite components as well as their combinations, in which air acted as one phase. In three-phase foams the amount of PZT varied between 20 and 80 wt% and the amount of graphite, between 1 and 15 wt%. The four-phase foams were formed by adding 40 wt% of PZT while the amount of graphite ranged between 1 and 15 wt%. The presented results and materials could be utilized to develop new flexible and soft sensor applications by means of material technology.

  2. Synergization of silicone with developed crosslinking to soy-based polyurethane foam matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elvistia Firdaus, Flora

    2014-06-01

    Flexible polyurethane foam obtained from reaction of soybased polyol with TDI:MDI (80:20), and surfactant. The goal of this research is to determine the synergization effect of silicone with low molecular alcohols; methanol and ethylene glycol (EG) in soy-polyurethane formula on holding moisture of foams to density, foam solutions capacity, and cellular morphology. The optimized of polyol was achieved by ratio of epoxide/methanol 1:6 (mol/mol), and epoxide/EG 1:3 (mol/mol). It was found silicone surfactant can minimize solution absorbency in polyurethane foam matrix.

  3. The use of flexible polyurethane foam in orthotics.

    PubMed

    Taylor, A G

    1984-08-01

    The casting of flexible polyurethane foam into a wide range of customised shapes has been found to offer a relatively straightforward solution to a number of problems associated with providing support for the physically handicapped. This note describes the techniques used for the production of such supports and reports on clinical experience of their use. A suitably prepared plaster cast of the patient, obtained in the usual way via vacuum consolidation of polystyrene beads, forms the lower surface of a wooden moulding box. Suitable quantities of the two chemicals, an isocyanate and a polyol, are then thoroughly and rapidly mixed together before being poured into the moulding box over which a weighted lid is placed to contain the foam and to improve its consistency. After removal, the finished product can then be trimmed and if necessary covered with fire-retardant leathercloth. To date polyurethane foam mouldings have been used with considerable success as seat cushions, seat backs and as spinal body supports which allow a patient to be nursed prone and supine following spinal fusion.

  4. Biodegradative Activities of Selected Environmental Fungi on a Polyester Polyurethane Varnish and Polyether Polyurethane Foams

    PubMed Central

    Álvarez-Barragán, Joyce; Domínguez-Malfavón, Lilianha; Vargas-Suárez, Martín; González-Hernández, Ricardo; Aguilar-Osorio, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Polyurethane (PU) is widely used in many aspects of modern life because of its versatility and resistance. However, PU waste disposal generates large problems, since it is slowly degraded, there are limited recycling processes, and its destruction may generate toxic compounds. In this work, we isolated fungal strains able to grow in mineral medium with a polyester PU (PS-PU; Impranil DLN) or a polyether PU (PE-PU; Poly Lack) varnish as the only carbon source. Of the eight best Impranil-degrading strains, the six best degraders belonged to the Cladosporium cladosporioides complex, including the species C. pseudocladosporioides, C. tenuissimum, C. asperulatum, and C. montecillanum, and the two others were identified as Aspergillus fumigatus and Penicillium chrysogenum. The best Impranil degrader, C. pseudocladosporioides strain T1.PL.1, degraded up to 87% after 14 days of incubation. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy analysis of Impranil degradation by this strain showed a loss of carbonyl groups (1,729 cm−1) and N—H bonds (1,540 and 1,261 cm−1), and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis showed a decrease in ester compounds and increase in alcohols and hexane diisocyanate, indicating the hydrolysis of ester and urethane bonds. Extracellular esterase and low urease, but not protease activities were detected at 7 and 14 days of culture in Impranil. The best eight Impranil-degrading fungi were also able to degrade solid foams of the highly recalcitrant PE-PU type to different extents, with the highest levels generating up to 65% of dry-weight losses not previously reported. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis of fungus-treated foams showed melted and thinner cell wall structures than the non-fungus-treated ones, demonstrating fungal biodegradative action on PE-PU. IMPORTANCE Polyurethane waste disposal has become a serious problem. In this work, fungal strains able to efficiently degrade different types of

  5. Glycolysis recycling of rigid waste polyurethane foam from refrigerators.

    PubMed

    Zhu, P; Cao, Z B; Chen, Y; Zhang, X J; Qian, G R; Chu, Y L; Zhou, M

    2014-01-01

    Rapid growth of rigid waste polyurethane (WPUR) foam from refrigerators attracts the attention all over the world. In this study, glycolysis was chosen to treat WPUR from scrapped refrigerators collected in Shanghai, China. Glycolysis reagents and catalysts were selected. The results indicated that the glycolysis efficiency of ethylene glycol (EG) was higher than that of diethylene glycol, and the catalytic efficiency of alkali metal salts (NaOH) was more excellent than that of triethanolamine and organic salts of alkali metal (NaAc). When EG was 100%WPUR as a glycolysis reagent and NaOH was 1%WPUR as a catalyst at a constant temperature of 197.85°C for 2 h, the glycolysis product had the highest glycolysis conversion rate. In order to maximize the recycling of WPUR, regenerative Polyurethane was performed by adding 10% distilled mixed polyol, which conformed to the QB/T 26689-2011 requirements.

  6. Effect of silica nanoparticles on polyurethane foaming process and foam properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francés, A. B.; Navarro Bañón, M. V.

    2014-08-01

    Flexible polyurethane foams (FPUF) are commonly used as cushioning material in upholstered products made on several industrial sectors: furniture, automotive seating, bedding, etc. Polyurethane is a high molecular weight polymer based on the reaction between a hydroxyl group (polyol) and isocyanate. The density, flowability, compressive, tensile or shearing strength, the thermal and dimensional stability, combustibility, and other properties can be adjusted by the addition of several additives. Nanomaterials offer a wide range of possibilities to obtain nanocomposites with specific properties. The combination of FPUF with silica nanoparticles could develop nanocomposite materials with unique properties: improved mechanical and thermal properties, gas permeability, and fire retardancy. However, as silica particles are at least partially surface-terminated with Si-OH groups, it was suspected that the silica could interfere in the reaction of poyurethane formation.The objective of this study was to investigate the enhancement of thermal and mechanical properties of FPUF by the incorporation of different types of silica and determining the influence thereof during the foaming process. Flexible polyurethane foams with different loading mass fraction of silica nanoparticles (0-1% wt) and different types of silica (non treated and modified silica) were synthesized. PU/SiO2 nanocomposites were characterized by FTIR spectroscopy, TGA, and measurements of apparent density, resilience and determination of compression set. Addition of silica nanoparticles influences negatively in the density and compression set of the foams. However, resilience and thermal stability of the foams are improved. Silica nanoparticles do not affect to the chemical structure of the foams although they interfere in the blowing reaction.

  7. TG-FTIR characterization of flame retardant polyurethane foams materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, W.; Tang, Y.; Li, F.; Ge, X. G.; Zhang, Z. J.

    2016-07-01

    Dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP) and trichloroethyl phosphtate (TCEP) have been used to enhance the flame retardancy of polyurethane foams materials (PUF). Flame retardancy and thermal degradation of PUF samples have been investigated by the LOI tests and thermal analysis. The results indicate that the excellent flame retardancy can be achieved due to the presence of the flame retardant system containing DMMP and TCEP. TG-FTIR reveals that the addition of DMMP/TCEP can not only improve the thermal stability of PUF samples but can also affect the gaseous phase at high temperature.

  8. Separation of uranium on polyurethane foam impregnated with trioctylphosphine oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Korkisch, J.; Steffan, I.

    1983-01-01

    A method is described for the quantitative separation of uranium from practically all other elements in 1M hydrochloric acid solution containing ascorbic acid. From such a solution uranium is retained selectively by a column containing open-cell polyurethane foam impregnated with tri-n-octylphosphine oxide (TOPO). The uranium together with TOPO is eluted with ethanol and then it is adsorbed on a column of Dowex 1 anion exchange resin from a HCl-organic solvent system. Uranium is eluted with 1M hydrochloric acid. 5 tables.

  9. A phenomenological constitutive model for low density polyurethane foams

    SciTech Connect

    Neilsen, M.K.; Morgan, H.S.; Krieg, R.D.

    1987-04-01

    Results from a series of hydrostatic and triaxial compression tests which were performed on polyurethane foams are presented in this report. These tests indicate that the volumetric and deviatoric parts of the foam behavior are strongly coupled. This coupling behavior could not be captured with any of several commonly used plasticity models. Thus, a new constitutive model was developed. This new model was based on a decomposition of the foam response into two parts: (1) response of the polymer skeleton, and (2) response of the air inside the cells. The air contribution was completely volumetric. The new constitutive model was implemented in two finite element codes, SANCHO and PRONTO. Results from a series of analyses completed with these codes indicated that the new constitutive model captured all of the foam behaviors that had been observed in the experiments. Finally, a typical dynamic problem was analyzed using the new constitutive model and other constitutive models to demonstrate differences between the models. Results from this series of analyses indicated that the new constitutive model generated displacement and acceleration predictions that were between predictions obtained using the other models. This result was expected. 9 refs., 45 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. APPLICATION OF POLYURETHANE FOAM FOR IMPACT ABSORPTION AND THERMAL INSULATION FOR RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS PACKAGINGS.

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, A; Glenn Abramczyk, G; Paul Blanton, P; Steve Bellamy, S; William Daugherty, W; Sharon Williamson, S

    2007-05-15

    Polyurethane foam has been widely used as an impact absorbing and thermal insulating material for large radioactive materials packages, since the 1980's. With the adoption of the regulatory crush test requirement, for smaller packages, polyurethane foam has been adopted as a replacement for cane fiberboard, because of its ability to withstand the crush test. Polyurethane foam is an engineered material whose composition is much more closely controlled than that of cane fiberboard. In addition, the properties of the foam can be controlled by controlling the density of the foam. The conditions under which the foam is formed, whether confined or unconfined have an affect on foam properties. The study reported here reviewed the application of polyurethane foam in RAM packagings and compared property values reported in the literature with published property values and test results for foam specimens taken from a prototype 9977 packaging. The study confirmed that, polyurethane foam behaves in a predictable and consistent manner and fully satisfies the functional requirements for impact absorption and thermal insulation.

  11. Effect of aluminum phosphate on alkaline phosphatase activity of polyurethane foam immobilized cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Ramalingam, N; Prasanna, B Gowtham

    2006-09-01

    The impact of insoluble phosphorus such as aluminum and rock phosphate on alkaline phosphatase activity of polyurethane foam immobilized cyanobacteria was assessed. Polyurethane foam immobilized Nodularia recorded the highest alkaline phosphatase activity of 9.04 (m. mol p-nitrophenol released h(-1) mg(-1) protein) in vitro. A higher concentration of aluminum phosphate was recorded a 25% reduction in alkaline phosphatase activity, ammonia content, and available phosphorus in culture filtrate of polyurethane foam immobilized cyanobacteria. In general, immobilized cyanobacteria exhibited a higher alkaline phosphatase activity in rock phosphate than aluminum phosphate.

  12. Experiments to Populate and Validate a Processing Model for Polyurethane Foam: Additional Data for Structural Foams

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, Rekha R.; Celina, Mathias C.; Giron, Nicholas Henry; Long, Kevin Nicholas; Russick, Edward M.

    2015-01-01

    We are developing computational models to help understand manufacturing processes, final properties and aging of structural foam, polyurethane PMDI. Th e resulting model predictions of density and cure gradients from the manufacturing process will be used as input to foam heat transfer and mechanical models. BKC 44306 PMDI-10 and BKC 44307 PMDI-18 are the most prevalent foams used in structural parts. Experiments needed to parameterize models of the reaction kinetics and the equations of motion during the foam blowing stages were described for BKC 44306 PMDI-10 in the first of this report series (Mondy et al. 2014). BKC 44307 PMDI-18 is a new foam that will be used to make relatively dense structural supports via over packing. It uses a different catalyst than those in the BKC 44306 family of foams; hence, we expect that the reaction kineti cs models must be modified. Here we detail the experiments needed to characteriz e the reaction kinetics of BKC 44307 PMDI-18 and suggest parameters for the model based on these experiments. In additi on, the second part of this report describes data taken to provide input to the preliminary nonlinear visco elastic structural response model developed for BKC 44306 PMDI-10 foam. We show that the standard cu re schedule used by KCP does not fully cure the material, and, upon temperature elevation above 150°C, oxidation or decomposition reactions occur that alter the composition of the foam. These findings suggest that achieving a fully cured foam part with this formulation may be not be possible through therma l curing. As such, visco elastic characterization procedures developed for curing thermosets can provide only approximate material properties, since the state of the material continuously evolves during tests.

  13. 40 CFR 63.1296 - Standards for slabstock flexible polyurethane foam production-HAP ABA equipment leaks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Standards for slabstock flexible polyurethane foam production-HAP ABA equipment leaks. 63.1296 Section 63.1296 Protection of Environment... Flexible Polyurethane Foam Production § 63.1296 Standards for slabstock flexible polyurethane...

  14. 40 CFR 63.1299 - Standards for slabstock flexible polyurethane foam production-source-wide emission limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Standards for slabstock flexible polyurethane foam production-source-wide emission limitation. 63.1299 Section 63.1299 Protection of Environment... Flexible Polyurethane Foam Production § 63.1299 Standards for slabstock flexible polyurethane...

  15. 40 CFR 63.1299 - Standards for slabstock flexible polyurethane foam production-source-wide emission limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Standards for slabstock flexible polyurethane foam production-source-wide emission limitation. 63.1299 Section 63.1299 Protection of Environment... Flexible Polyurethane Foam Production § 63.1299 Standards for slabstock flexible polyurethane...

  16. 40 CFR 63.1296 - Standards for slabstock flexible polyurethane foam production-HAP ABA equipment leaks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Standards for slabstock flexible polyurethane foam production-HAP ABA equipment leaks. 63.1296 Section 63.1296 Protection of Environment... Flexible Polyurethane Foam Production § 63.1296 Standards for slabstock flexible polyurethane...

  17. Fracture Toughness Evaluation of Space Shuttle External Tank Thermal Protection System Polyurethane Foam Insulation Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGill, Preston; Wells, Doug; Morgan, Kristin

    2006-01-01

    Experimental evaluation of the basic fracture properties of Thermal Protection System (TPS) polyurethane foam insulation materials was conducted to validate the methodology used in estimating critical defect sizes in TPS applications on the Space Shuttle External Fuel Tank. The polyurethane foam found on the External Tank (ET) is manufactured by mixing liquid constituents and allowing them to react and expand upwards - a process which creates component cells that are generally elongated in the foam rise direction and gives rise to mechanical anisotropy. Similarly, the application of successive foam layers to the ET produces cohesive foam interfaces (knitlines) which may lead to local variations in mechanical properties. This study reports the fracture toughness of BX-265, NCFI 24-124, and PDL-1034 closed-cell polyurethane foam as a function of ambient and cryogenic temperatures and knitline/cellular orientation at ambient pressure.

  18. SPUF - a simple polyurethane foam mass loss and response model.

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, Michael L.; Lemmon, Gordon H.

    2003-07-01

    A Simple PolyUrethane Foam (SPUF) mass loss and response model has been developed to predict the behavior of unconfined, rigid, closed-cell, polyurethane foam-filled systems exposed to fire-like heat fluxes. The model, developed for the B61 and W80-0/1 fireset foam, is based on a simple two-step mass loss mechanism using distributed reaction rates. The initial reaction step assumes that the foam degrades into a primary gas and a reactive solid. The reactive solid subsequently degrades into a secondary gas. The SPUF decomposition model was implemented into the finite element (FE) heat conduction codes COYOTE [1] and CALORE [2], which support chemical kinetics and dynamic enclosure radiation using 'element death.' A discretization bias correction model was parameterized using elements with characteristic lengths ranging from 1-mm to 1-cm. Bias corrected solutions using the SPUF response model with large elements gave essentially the same results as grid independent solutions using 100-{micro}m elements. The SPUF discretization bias correction model can be used with 2D regular quadrilateral elements, 2D paved quadrilateral elements, 2D triangular elements, 3D regular hexahedral elements, 3D paved hexahedral elements, and 3D tetrahedron elements. Various effects to efficiently recalculate view factors were studied -- the element aspect ratio, the element death criterion, and a 'zombie' criterion. Most of the solutions using irregular, large elements were in agreement with the 100-{micro}m grid-independent solutions. The discretization bias correction model did not perform as well when the element aspect ratio exceeded 5:1 and the heated surface was on the shorter side of the element. For validation, SPUF predictions using various sizes and types of elements were compared to component-scale experiments of foam cylinders that were heated with lamps. The SPUF predictions of the decomposition front locations were compared to the front locations determined from real-time X

  19. Relative toxicity of pyrolysis products of some polyurethane and polychloroprene foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilado, C. J.; Slattengren, C. L.; Kourtides, D. A.; Parker, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    Results of toxicity screening tests on some polyurethane and polychloroprene flexible foams are presented. The test method involves the exposure of four Swiss albino male mice in a 4.2-liter hemispherical chamber to the pyrolysis effluents from 1 g of sample exposed to temperatures rising from 200 to 800 C at a rate of 40 C/min. Mortality and times to incapacitation and to death are recorded. Comparisons indicate that flexible polyurethane foams without fire retardant are more toxic than the corresponding foams containing fire retardant, and polychloroprene foams are least toxic.

  20. In vitro analysis of polyurethane foam as a topical hemostatic agent.

    PubMed

    Broekema, Ferdinand I; van Oeveren, Wim; Zuidema, Johan; Visscher, Susan H; Bos, Rudolf R M

    2011-04-01

    Topical hemostatic agents can be used to treat problematic bleedings in patients who undergo surgery. Widely used are the collagen- and gelatin-based hemostats. This study aimed to develop a fully synthetic, biodegradable hemostatic agent to avoid exposure to animal antigens. In this in vitro study the suitability of different newly developed polyurethane-based foams as a hemostatic agent has been evaluated and compared to commonly used agents. An experimental in vitro test model was used in which human blood flowed through the test material. Different modified polyurethane foams were compared to collagen and gelatin. The best coagulation was achieved with collagen. The results of the polyurethane foam improved significantly by increasing the amount of polyethylene glycol. Therefore, the increase of the PEG concentration seems a promising approach. Additional in vivo studies will have to be implemented to assess the application of polyurethane foam as a topical hemostatic agent.

  1. Development of test systems for characterizing emissions from spray polyurethane foam insulation (SPFI)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The relationship between onsite manufacture of spray polyurethane foam insulation (SPFI) and potential exposures to diisocyanates, amines, flame retardants (FRs), blowing agents, aldehydes and other organic compounds that may be emitted from SPFI is not well understood. EPA is de...

  2. 40 CFR 63.1297 - Standards for slabstock flexible polyurethane foam production-HAP ABA emissions from the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... polyurethane foam production-HAP ABA emissions from the production line. 63.1297 Section 63.1297 Protection of... flexible polyurethane foam production—HAP ABA emissions from the production line. (a) Each owner or... foam production line in accordance with the provisions in this section. Compliance shall be...

  3. 40 CFR 63.1297 - Standards for slabstock flexible polyurethane foam production-HAP ABA emissions from the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... polyurethane foam production-HAP ABA emissions from the production line. 63.1297 Section 63.1297 Protection of... foam production—HAP ABA emissions from the production line. (a) Each owner or operator of a new or... § 63.1293(a)(1) shall control HAP ABA emissions from the slabstock polyurethane foam production line...

  4. 40 CFR 63.1297 - Standards for slabstock flexible polyurethane foam production-HAP ABA emissions from the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... polyurethane foam production-HAP ABA emissions from the production line. 63.1297 Section 63.1297 Protection of... flexible polyurethane foam production—HAP ABA emissions from the production line. (a) Each owner or... foam production line in accordance with the provisions in this section. Compliance shall be...

  5. Isocyanate emissions from pyrolysis of mattresses containing polyurethane foam.

    PubMed

    Garrido, María A; Gerecke, Andreas C; Heeb, Norbert; Font, Rafael; Conesa, Juan A

    2017-02-01

    This study examined the emissions of powerful asthmatic agents called isocyanates from small-scale pyrolysis experiments of two common foams employed in mattress production such as flexible polyurethane foam (FPUF) and viscoelastic memory foam (VMF). A nitrogen atmosphere and five different temperatures, 300, 350, 400, 450 and 850 °C, were selected to carry out the experiments in order to evaluate the worst possible conditions for thermal degradation. A similar trend for both materials was found. At lower temperatures, diisocyanates were the most important products whereas at 850 °C monoisocyanates, and mainly isocyanic acid released mainly from the thermal cracking of diisocyanates evolved directly from the polymer chains. The total yields of isocyanates were in the range of 1.43-11.95 mg/m(3) for FPUF at 300-850 °C and 0.05-6.13 mg/m(3) for VMF, 300-850 °C. This difference could be a consequence of the lower amount of isocyanates employed in the VMF production which was confirmed by the nitrogen content of the foams, 5.95% FPUF vs. 3.34% in VMF. Additionally, a qualitative search for so far unknown isocyanates was performed in samples from the pyrolysis of FPUF at 300, 400 and 850 °C. It was confirmed that six different aminoisocyanates at 300 °C were evolved, whereas at 400 and 850 °C only five of them were detected. The general trend observed was a decrease of the aminoisocyanate levels with increasing pyrolysis temperature.

  6. Prompt radiation-induced conductivity in polyurethane foam and glass microballoons

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, E. Frederick; Zarick, Thomas Andrew; Sheridan, Timothy J.; Preston, Eric F.

    2014-06-01

    We performed measurements and analyses of the prompt radiation-induced conductivity (RIC) in thin samples of polyurethane foam and glass microballoon foam at the Little Mountain Medusa LINAC facility in Ogden, UT. The RIC coefficient was non-linear with dose rate for polyurethane foam; however, typical values at 1E11 rad(si)/s dose rate was measured as 0.8E-11 mho/m/rad/s for 5 lb./cu ft. foam and 0.3E-11 mho/m/rad/s for 10 lb./cu ft. density polyurethane foam. For encapsulated glass microballoons (GMB) the RIC coefficient was approximately 1E-15 mho/m/rad/s and was not a strong function of dose rate.

  7. Sensitivity and uncertainty analysis of a polyurethane foam decomposition model

    SciTech Connect

    HOBBS,MICHAEL L.; ROBINSON,DAVID G.

    2000-03-14

    Sensitivity/uncertainty analyses are not commonly performed on complex, finite-element engineering models because the analyses are time consuming, CPU intensive, nontrivial exercises that can lead to deceptive results. To illustrate these ideas, an analytical sensitivity/uncertainty analysis is used to determine the standard deviation and the primary factors affecting the burn velocity of polyurethane foam exposed to firelike radiative boundary conditions. The complex, finite element model has 25 input parameters that include chemistry, polymer structure, and thermophysical properties. The response variable was selected as the steady-state burn velocity calculated as the derivative of the burn front location versus time. The standard deviation of the burn velocity was determined by taking numerical derivatives of the response variable with respect to each of the 25 input parameters. Since the response variable is also a derivative, the standard deviation is essentially determined from a second derivative that is extremely sensitive to numerical noise. To minimize the numerical noise, 50-micron elements and approximately 1-msec time steps were required to obtain stable uncertainty results. The primary effect variable was shown to be the emissivity of the foam.

  8. Improving the mechanical performance of wood fiber reinforced bio-based polyurethane foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Li-Chi

    Because of the environmental impact of fossil fuel consumption, soybean-based polyurethane (PU) foam has been developed as an alternative to be used as the core in structural insulated panels (SIPs). Wood fibers can be added to enhance the resistance of foam against bending and buckling in compression. The goal of this work is to study the effect of three modifications: fiber surface treatment, catalyst choice, and mixing method on the compression performance of wood fiber-reinforced PU foam. Foams were made with a free-rising process. The compression performance of the foams was measured and the foams were characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and X-ray computed tomography (CT). The foam reinforced with alkali-treated fibers had improved compression performance. The foams made with various catalysts shared similar performance. The foam made using a mechanical stirrer contained well-dispersed fibers but the reinforcing capability of the fibers was reduced.

  9. Biodegradable, thermoplastic polyurethane grafts for small diameter vascular replacements.

    PubMed

    Bergmeister, Helga; Seyidova, Nargiz; Schreiber, Catharina; Strobl, Magdalena; Grasl, Christian; Walter, Ingrid; Messner, Barbara; Baudis, Stefan; Fröhlich, Sophie; Marchetti-Deschmann, Martina; Griesser, Markus; di Franco, Matt; Krssak, Martin; Liska, Robert; Schima, Heinrich

    2015-01-01

    Biodegradable vascular grafts with sufficient in vivo performance would be more advantageous than permanent non-degradable prostheses. These constructs would be continuously replaced by host tissue, leading to an endogenous functional implant which would adapt to the need of the patient and exhibit only limited risk of microbiological graft contamination. Adequate biomechanical strength and a wall structure which promotes rapid host remodeling are prerequisites for biodegradable approaches. Current approaches often reveal limited tensile strength and therefore require thicker or reinforced graft walls. In this study we investigated the in vitro and in vivo biocompatibility of thin host-vessel-matched grafts (n=34) formed from hard-block biodegradable thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU). Expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) conduits (n=34) served as control grafts. Grafts were analyzed by various techniques after retrieval at different time points (1 week; 1, 6, 12 months). TPU grafts showed significantly increased endothelial cell proliferation in vitro (P<0.001). Population by host cells increased significantly in the TPU conduits within 1 month of implantation (P=0.01). After long-term implantation, TPU implants showed 100% patency (ePTFE: 93%) with no signs of aneurysmal dilatation. Substantial remodeling of the degradable grafts was observed but varied between subjects. Intimal hyperplasia was limited to ePTFE conduits (29%). Thin-walled TPU grafts offer a new and desirable form of biodegradable vascular implant. Degradable grafts showed equivalent long-term performance characteristics compared to the clinically used, non-degradable material with improvements in intimal hyperplasia and ingrowth of host cells.

  10. APPLICATION OF POLYURETHANE FOAM FOR IMPACT ABSORPTION AND THERMAL INSULATION FOR GENERAL PURPOSE RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS PACKAGINGS

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, A; Glenn Abramczyk, G; Paul Blanton, P; Steve Bellamy, S; William Daugherty, W; Sharon Williamson, S

    2009-02-18

    Polyurethane foam has been employed in impact limiters for large radioactive materials packagings since the early 1980's. Its consistent crush response, controllable structural properties and excellent thermal insulating characteristics have made it attractive as replacement for the widely used cane fiberboard for smaller, drum size packagings. Accordingly, polyurethane foam was chosen for the overpack material for the 9977 and 9978 packagings. The study reported here was undertaken to provide data to support the analyses performed as part of the development of the 9977 and 9978, and compared property values reported in the literature with published property values and test results for foam specimens taken from a prototype 9977 packaging. The study confirmed that, polyurethane foam behaves in a predictable and consistent manner and fully satisfies the functional requirements for impact absorption and thermal insulation.

  11. Active Debris Removal System Based on Polyurethane Foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzitelli, Federico; Valdatta, Marcelo; Bellini, Niccolo; Candini Gian, Paolo; Rastelli, Davide; Romei, Fedrico; Locarini, Alfredo; Spadanuda, Antonio; Bagassi, Sara

    2013-08-01

    Space debris is an increasing problem. The exponential increase of satellite launches in the last 50 years has determined the problem of space debris especially in LEO. The remains of past missions are dangerous for both operative satellites and human activity in space. But not only: it has been shown that uncontrolled impacts between space objects can lead to a potentially dangerous situation for civil people on Earth. It is possible to reach a situation of instability where the big amount of debris could cause a cascade of collisions, the so called Kessler syndrome, resulting in the infeasibility of new space missions for many generations. Currently new technologies for the mitigation of space debris are under study: for what concerning the removal of debris the use of laser to give a little impulse to the object and push it in a graveyard orbit or to be destroyed in the atmosphere. Another solution is the use of a satellite to rendezvous with the space junk and then use a net to capture it and destroy it in the reentry phase. In a parallel way the research is addressed to the study of deorbiting solutions to prevent the formation of new space junk. The project presented in this paper faces the problem of how to deorbit an existing debris, applying the studies about the use of polyurethane foam developed by Space Robotic Group of University of Bologna. The research is started with the Redemption experiment part of last ESA Rexus program. The foam is composed by two liquid components that, once properly mixed, trig an expansive reaction leading to an increase of volume whose entity depends on the chemical composition of the two starting components. It is possible to perform two kind of mission: 1) Not controlled removal: the two components are designed to react producing a low density, high expanded, spongy foam that incorporates the debris. The A/m ratio of the debris is increased and in this way also the ballistic parameter. As a consequence, the effect of

  12. CPUF - a chemical-structure-based polyurethane foam decomposition and foam response model.

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, Thomas H. (Brigham Young University, Provo, UT); Thompson, Kyle Richard; Erickson, Kenneth L.; Dowding, Kevin J.; Clayton, Daniel (Brigham Young University, Provo, UT); Chu, Tze Yao; Hobbs, Michael L.; Borek, Theodore Thaddeus III

    2003-07-01

    A Chemical-structure-based PolyUrethane Foam (CPUF) decomposition model has been developed to predict the fire-induced response of rigid, closed-cell polyurethane foam-filled systems. The model, developed for the B-61 and W-80 fireset foam, is based on a cascade of bondbreaking reactions that produce CO2. Percolation theory is used to dynamically quantify polymer fragment populations of the thermally degrading foam. The partition between condensed-phase polymer fragments and gas-phase polymer fragments (i.e. vapor-liquid split) was determined using a vapor-liquid equilibrium model. The CPUF decomposition model was implemented into the finite element (FE) heat conduction codes COYOTE and CALORE, which support chemical kinetics and enclosure radiation. Elements were removed from the computational domain when the calculated solid mass fractions within the individual finite element decrease below a set criterion. Element removal, referred to as ?element death,? creates a radiation enclosure (assumed to be non-participating) as well as a decomposition front, which separates the condensed-phase encapsulant from the gas-filled enclosure. All of the chemistry parameters as well as thermophysical properties for the CPUF model were obtained from small-scale laboratory experiments. The CPUF model was evaluated by comparing predictions to measurements. The validation experiments included several thermogravimetric experiments at pressures ranging from ambient pressure to 30 bars. Larger, component-scale experiments were also used to validate the foam response model. The effects of heat flux, bulk density, orientation, embedded components, confinement and pressure were measured and compared to model predictions. Uncertainties in the model results were evaluated using a mean value approach. The measured mass loss in the TGA experiments and the measured location of the decomposition front were within the 95% prediction limit determined using the CPUF model for all of the

  13. Polyurethane foam (PUF) passive samplers for monitoring phenanthrene in stormwater.

    PubMed

    Dou, Yueqin; Zhang, Tian C; Zeng, Jing; Stansbury, John; Moussavi, Massoum; Richter-Egger, Dana L; Klein, Mitchell R

    2016-04-01

    Pollution from highway stormwater runoff has been an increasing area of concern. Many structural Best Management Practices (BMPs) have been implemented for stormwater treatment and management. One challenge for these BMPs is to sample stormwater and monitor BMP performance. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of using polyurethane foam (PUF) passive samplers (PSs) for sampling phenanthrene (PHE) in highway stormwater runoff and BMPs. Tests were conducted using batch reactors, glass-tube columns, and laboratory-scale BMPs (bioretention cells). Results indicate that sorption for PHE by PUF is mainly linearly relative to time, and the high sorption capacity allows the PUF passive sampler to monitor stormwater events for months or years. The PUF passive samplers could be embedded in BMPs for monitoring influent and effluent PHE concentrations. Models developed to link the results of batch and column tests proved to be useful for determining removal or sorption parameters and performance of the PUF-PSs. The predicted removal efficiencies of BMPs were close to the real values obtained from the control columns with errors ranging between -8.46 and 1.52%. This research showed that it is possible to use PUF passive samplers for sampling stormwater and monitoring the performance of stormwater BMPs, which warrants the field-scale feasibility studies in the future.

  14. Polyurethane Foam-Based Ultramicroporous Carbons for CO2 Capture.

    PubMed

    Ge, Chao; Song, Jian; Qin, Zhangfeng; Wang, Jianguo; Fan, Weibin

    2016-07-27

    A series of sustainable porous carbon materials were prepared from waste polyurethane foam and investigated for capture of CO2. The effects of preparation conditions, such as precarbonization, KOH to carbon precursor weight ratio, and activation temperature, on the porous structure and CO2 adsorption properties were studied for the purpose of controlling pore sizes and nitrogen content and developing high-performance materials for capture of CO2. The sample prepared at optimum conditions shows CO2 adsorption capacities of 6.67 and 4.33 mmol·g(-1) at 0 and 25 °C under 1 bar, respectively, which are comparable to those of the best reported porous carbons prepared from waste materials. The HCl treatment experiment reveals that about 80% of CO2 adsorption capacity arises from physical adsorption, while the other 20% is due to the chemical adsorption originated from the interaction of basic N groups and CO2 molecules. The relationship between CO2 uptake and pore size at different temperatures indicates that the micropores with pore size smaller than 0.86 and 0.70 nm play a dominant role in the CO2 adsorption at 0 and 25 °C, respectively. It was found that the obtained carbon materials exhibited high recyclability and high selectivity to adsorption of CO2 from the CO2 and N2 mixture.

  15. 40 CFR 63.1298 - Standards for slabstock flexible polyurethane foam production-HAP emissions from equipment cleaning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Standards for slabstock flexible polyurethane foam production-HAP emissions from equipment cleaning. 63.1298 Section 63.1298 Protection of... Pollutants for Flexible Polyurethane Foam Production § 63.1298 Standards for slabstock flexible...

  16. 40 CFR 63.1298 - Standards for slabstock flexible polyurethane foam production-HAP emissions from equipment cleaning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Standards for slabstock flexible polyurethane foam production-HAP emissions from equipment cleaning. 63.1298 Section 63.1298 Protection of... Pollutants for Flexible Polyurethane Foam Production § 63.1298 Standards for slabstock flexible...

  17. Measurement of the responses of polyurethane and CONFOR(TM) foams and the development of a system identification technique to estimate polyurethane foam parameters from experimental impulse responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundaram, Vaidyanadan

    Flexible polyurethane foam is the main cushioning element used in car seats. Optimization of an occupied seat's static and dynamic behavior requires models of foam that are accurate over a wide range of excitation and pre-compression conditions. Experiments were conducted to measure the response of foam over a wide range of excitation which include slowly varying uniaxial compression tests on a 3 inch cube foam sample, base excitation and impulse excitation test on a foam-mass system. The foam used was the same in all of the experiments, thus obtaining all the responses on the same foam sample which helps eliminate the sample to sample variation. Similar efforts were taken to conduct impulse and base excitation tests on CONFOR(TM) foam to help in future modeling efforts of CONFOR(TM) foam. All the experimental protocols and data pre-processing protocols along with results are presented. Previous researcher developed a linear model for a single-degree of freedom foam-mass system subjected to an impulsive excitation. Free response data from impulse tests on a foam-mass system with different masses was used to identify model parameters at various pre-compression levels (settling points). The free response of the system was modeled as a Prony series (sum of exponentials) whose parameters can be related to the parameters in the foam-mass system model. Models identified from tests at one settling point performed poorly when used to predict the response at other settling points. In this research, a method is described to estimate the parameters of a global model of the foam behavior from data gathered in a series of impulse tests at different settling points. The global model structure includes a nonlinear elastic term and a hereditary viscoelastic term. The model can be used to predict the settling point for each mass used and, by expanding the model about that settling point, local linear models of the response to impulsive excitation can be derived. From this analysis

  18. Parameters estimation of sandwich beam model with rigid polyurethane foam core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbieri, Nilson; Barbieri, Renato; Winikes, Luiz Carlos

    2010-02-01

    In this work, the physical parameters of sandwich beams made with the association of hot-rolled steel, Polyurethane rigid foam and High Impact Polystyrene, used for the assembly of household refrigerators and food freezers are estimated using measured and numeric frequency response functions (FRFs). The mathematical models are obtained using the finite element method (FEM) and the Timoshenko beam theory. The physical parameters are estimated using the amplitude correlation coefficient and genetic algorithm (GA). The experimental data are obtained using the impact hammer and four accelerometers displaced along the sample (cantilevered beam). The parameters estimated are Young's modulus and the loss factor of the Polyurethane rigid foam and the High Impact Polystyrene.

  19. The effect of TiO2 nanostructures on self-degrading polyurethane foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chao; Charpentier, Paul A.

    2014-03-01

    Waste polyurethane foams are becoming a serious environmental problem due to their low degradation rates upon exposure to the environment. By adding TiO2 nanostructures as a photocatalyst, we can simultaneously enhance mechanical properties during use for higher performance applications, while enhancing degradation when exposed to light when placed in landfills. In this work, we integrated anatase TiO2 nanoparticles into polyurethane foams using a unique bifunctional monomer approach and studied the photodegradation ability and mechanism in a weathering chamber simulating natural environmental conditions. We found that the TiO2 nanoparticles increased the degradation rate in a significant manner showing the utility of this approach.

  20. Studies on incorporation of exfoliated bentonitic clays in polyurethane foams for increasing flame retardancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quagliano, J.; Gavilán García, Irma

    2012-09-01

    In this contribution we report the results of studying the incorporation of exfoliated bentonitic clays into polyurethane foams. A suspension in water of a sodium bentonite from Argentine Patagonia was interchanged with cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) for 4 h at 80°C, rendering an exfoliated clay, which is nanometric in only one dimension. This nanoclay, when dispersed in the polyurethane, resulted in the same fire retardancy rating (UL-94) than when polyurethane was treated with a commercial nanoclay. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) at low augmentations of polyurethane samples treated with the synthethized nanoclay (2,5% w/w) showed no differences respect to untreated polyurethane, except for the irregularity of void edges.

  1. Flame retardancy and thermal stability of polyurethane foam composites containing carbon additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Pyoung-Chan; Kim, Bo-Ram; Jeoung, Sun Kyoung; Lee, Geesoo; Han, San Wook; Kim, Hyunchul; Lee, Ki-Dong; Han, Joo-Kwon

    2016-03-01

    Polyurethane (PU) is an important class of polymers that have wide application in a number of different industrial sectors. The goal of this work was the synthesis of flame-retarded PU foam with expandable graphite (EG) or commercial graphene. The flame retardancy and thermal stability of the foams has been studied through cone calorimeter analysis, the limited oxygen index and thermal conductivity. The presence of expandable graphite brings an improvement in fire behavior. In particular, the limited oxygen index increases in a linear way and the highest limited oxygen index values are obtained for EG-PU foams. The results from the cone calorimeter are in agreement with those of oxygen index; EG filled foams show a considerable decrease of maximum-heat release rate (M-HRR) with respect to unfilled foams. The results of thermal conductivity show that an increase in expandable graphite amount in PU foams lead to an increased conductivity.

  2. Mechanical properties of a structural polyurethane foam and the effect of particulate loading

    SciTech Connect

    Goods, S.H.; Neuschwanger, C.L.; Whinnery, L.L.

    1998-04-01

    The room temperature mechanical properties of a closed-cell, polyurethane encapsulant foam have been measured as a function of foam density. Tests were performed on both unfilled and filler reinforced specimens. Over the range of densities examined, the modulus of the unloaded foam could be described by a power-law relationship with respect to density. This power-law relationship could be explained in terms of the elastic compliance of the cellular structure of the foam using a simple geometric model found in the literature. The collapse stress of the foam was also found to exhibit a power-law relationship with respect to density. Additions of an aluminum powder filler increased the modulus relative to the unfilled foam.

  3. Biomimetic surface modification of polyurethane with phospholipids grafted carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Tan, Dongsheng; Liu, Liuxu; Li, Zhen; Fu, Qiang

    2015-08-01

    To improve blood compatibility of polyurethane (PU), phospholipids grafted carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were prepared through zwitterion-mediated cycloaddition reaction and amide condensation, and then were added to the PU as fillers via solution mixing to form biomimetic surface. The properties of phospholipids grafted CNTs (CNT-PC) were investigated by thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1) H NMR). The results indicated that the phospholipids were grafted onto CNTs in high efficiency, and the hydrophilicity and dispersibility of the modified CNTs were improved effectively. The structures and properties of composites containing CNT-PC were investigated by optical microscope, XPS, and water contact angles. The results indicated that phospholipids were enriched on the surface with addition of 0.1 wt % of CNT-PC, which significantly reduced protein adsorption and platelet adhesion. The method of carrying phospholipids on the nanofiller to modify polymers has provided a promising way of constructing biomimetic phospholipid membrane on the surface to improve blood compatibility.

  4. Preparation of conductive polypyrrole/polyurethane foams and their application as chemical sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanbing

    Electrically conductive polypyrrole/polyurethane (PPy/PU) composite foams were prepared by first impregnating the PU foams with iodine, and then exposing the iodine-loaded PU foams to pyrrole vapor, which resulted in the in situ oxidative polymerization of pyrrole monomer by iodine oxidant. Iodine sorption by polyurethane (PU) and melamine-formaldehyde (MF) foams was studied using both iodine sublimation and iodine solutions with hexanes and toluene. In the sublimation process, the diffusion kinetics was investigated and the interaction between iodine and PU foams was characterized by DSC, TGA, Raman spectroscopy and electrical conductivity measurements. In the solution process, the equilibrium absorption followed the distribution law and the distribution coefficients varied depending on the solvent used. MF foam achieved no iodine absorption in both processes which can be attributed to the lack of charge-transfer interactions. The kinetics, equilibrium and mechanism of the in situ polymerization of pyrrole by iodine in a PU foam was investigated and discussed. The dopant for the PPy was primarily I3-, which formed a charge-transfer complex (PPy-I2) with the amine groups of the PPy. The conductivity of the composite foams was measured and several factors affecting the conductivity were analyzed. The chemical structure, morphology, mechanical properties and thermal stability of the composite foams, and the relationships between these factors were characterized. The PPy/PU composite foams were investigated as sensors for various volatile chemicals, including some chemical warfare simulants. High sensitivity has been demonstrated for organic amine compounds, as well as two mustard agent simulants. The quasireversibility and time scale of the resistance response was qualitatively explained based on the mass uptake characteristic of amine by the composite foam. Humidity also demonstrated its influence on the resistance of the foam sensor in a completely reversible

  5. MANUAL: BEST MANAGEMENT PRACTICES FOR POLLUTION PREVENTION IN THE SLABSTOCK AND MOLDED FLEXIBLE POLYURETHANE FOAM INDUSTRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments require EPA to develop standards for major emission sources of 189 hazardous air pollutants (HAPs). EPA has identified the flexible polyurethane foam industry as a large emitter of HAPs and has slated the industry for regulation under Title III, ...

  6. Evaluation of Sprayed Polyurethane Foam Roofing and Protective Coatings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-11-01

    Blowholes in Foam Surface 16 9 Rippling in Foam Surface 16 10 Isocyanate -Rich Surface 18 I I Resin-Rich Surface 18 12 Foam Application Over Wet...residual oil or grease, or which contain rem- nants of old asphalt vapor retarders, may need to be The foam should have a uniform structure, of which...offer asparticula value and to prevent absorption of water. primer for use with their foamn. Cutback asphalt , such)as American Society for Testing and

  7. Results of experiments on rigid polyurethane foam (RPF) for protection from mines

    SciTech Connect

    Woodfin, R.L.; Hance, B.G.; Schmidt, C.O.; Banks, M.

    1998-04-01

    Sandia National Labs has been investigating the use of rigid polyurethane foam (RPF) for military use, particularly for mine protection for the past two years. Results of explosive experiments and mine/foam interaction experiments are presented. The RPF has proved to be effective in absorbing direct shock from explosives. Quantitative data are presented. As reported elsewhere, it has proved effective in reducing the signature of vehicles passing over anti-tank (AT) mines to prevent the mine from firing. This paper presents the results of experiments done to understand the interaction of RPF with anti-craft (AC) mines during foam formation in shallow water in a scaled surf environment.

  8. Hemocompatibility of Chitosan/poly(acrylic acid) Grafted Polyurethane Tubing

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun-Su; Tomczyk, Nancy; Kandel, Judith; Composto, Russell J.; Eckmann, David M.

    2013-01-01

    The activation and adhesion of platelets or whole blood exposed to chitosan (CH) grafted surfaces is used to evaluate the hemocompatibility of biomaterials. The biomaterial surfaces are polyurethane (PU) tubes grafted with an inner poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) and an outer CH or quaternary ammonium modified CH (CH-Q) brush. The CH, CH-Q and PAA grafted layers were characterized by ellipsometry and fluorescence microscopy. Material wear tests demonstrate that CH (CH-Q) is stably grafted onto PU tubes upon exposure to saline solution for 7 days. Using quartz-crystal microbalances with dissipation (QCM-D), in-situ adsorption of blood plasma proteins on CH and CH-Q compared to a silicon oxide control was measured. The QCM-D results showed that the physically adsorbed plasma protein layer on CH-Q and CH surfaces is softer and more viscous than the protein layer on the SiO2 surface. The CH-Q layer thus has the weakest interaction with plasma proteins. Whole blood and platelet adhesion was reduced by ~92% on CH-Q, which showed the weakest interaction with plasma protein but more viscous adsorbed plasma protein layer, compared to SiO2. Last, to examine the biologic response of platelets and neutrophils to biomaterial surfaces, CH (CH-Q)/PAA, PAA and PU tubes were tested using a Chandler Loop apparatus as an ex vivo model and flow cytometry. The blood adhesion and biologic response results showed that CH and CH-Q reduced adhesion and activation of platelets and neutrophils and improved hemocompatibility relative to other surfaces (PU and PAA). Our studies demonstrated that the properties of physically adsorbed plasma protein layer on biomaterial surfaces correlates with blood coagulation on biomaterial surfaces. PMID:24349719

  9. Polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane grafted polymer in polymeric foam

    DOEpatents

    King, Bruce A.; Patankar, Kshitish A.; Costeux, Stephane; Jeon, Hyun K.

    2017-01-17

    A polymeric foam article with a polymer matrix defining multiple cells therein has a polymer component with a first polymer that is a polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane grafted polymer that has a weight-average molecular weight of two kilograms per mole or higher and 200 kilograms per mole or lower.

  10. Solvent stimulated actuation of polyurethane-based shape memory polymer foams using dimethyl sulfoxide and ethanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyle, A. J.; Weems, A. C.; Hasan, S. M.; Nash, L. D.; Monroe, M. B. B.; Maitland, D. J.

    2016-07-01

    Solvent exposure has been investigated to trigger actuation of shape memory polymers (SMPs) as an alternative to direct heating. This study aimed to investigate the feasibility of using dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and ethanol (EtOH) to stimulate polyurethane-based SMP foam actuation and the required solvent concentrations in water for rapid actuation of hydrophobic SMP foams. SMP foams exhibited decreased T g when submerged in DMSO and EtOH when compared to water submersion. Kinetic DMA experiments showed minimal or no relaxation for all SMP foams in water within 30 min, while SMP foams submerged in EtOH exhibited rapid relaxation within 1 min of submersion. SMP foams expanded rapidly in high concentrations of DMSO and EtOH solutions, where complete recovery over 30 min was observed in DMSO concentrations greater than 90% and in EtOH concentrations greater than 20%. This study demonstrates that both DMSO and EtOH are effective at triggering volume recovery of polyurethane-based SMP foams, including in aqueous environments, and provides promise for use of this actuation technique in various applications.

  11. Investigation on the mechanical properties of palm-based flexible polyurethane foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    On, Ahmad Zuhdi Mohd; Badri, Khairiah Haji

    2015-09-01

    A series of modification polyurethane (PU) system was prepared by introducing palm kernel based polyol (PKO-p) to progressively replaced commercial polyether polyol from petrochemical based material. This paper describes the effect of PKO-p on the physical-mechanical properties of polyurethane foams. Stress-strain analysis in tensile mode was conducted with physicochemical analysis by performing Fourier transform infrared (FTIR). The morphological studies were observed by the optical microscope. The foam showed an increment on the modulus up to 458.3kPa as more incorporation of PKO-p introduced to the system. In contrast, tensile strength of PU foam depicted the highest up to 162 kPa at 60:40. The elongation at break showed decrement as the composition of the renewable polyol increased to a ratio 60/40 of PKO-p to petrochemical based polyol.

  12. In vivo response to an implanted shape memory polyurethane foam in a porcine aneurysm model.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Jennifer N; Clubb, Fred J; Wilson, Thomas S; Miller, Matthew W; Fossum, Theresa W; Hartman, Jonathan; Tuzun, Egemen; Singhal, Pooja; Maitland, Duncan J

    2014-05-01

    Cerebral aneurysms treated by traditional endovascular methods using platinum coils have a tendency to be unstable, either due to chronic inflammation, compaction of coils, or growth of the aneurysm. We propose to use alternate filling methods for the treatment of intracranial aneurysms using polyurethane-based shape memory polymer (SMP) foams. SMP polyurethane foams were surgically implanted in a porcine aneurysm model to determine biocompatibility, localized thrombogenicity, and their ability to serve as a stable filler material within an aneurysm. The degree of healing was evaluated via gross observation, histopathology, and low vacuum scanning electron microscopy imaging after 0, 30, and 90 days. Clotting was initiated within the SMP foam at time 0 (<1 h exposure to blood before euthanization), partial healing was observed at 30 days, and almost complete healing had occurred at 90 days in vivo, with minimal inflammatory response.

  13. In vivo tissue response following implantation of shape memory polyurethane foam in a porcine aneurysm model

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Jennifer N.; Clubb, Fred J.; Wilson, Thomas S.; Miller, Matthew W.; Fossum, Theresa W.; Hartman, Jonathan; Tuzun, Egemen; Singhal, Pooja; Maitland, Duncan J.

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral aneurysms treated by traditional endovascular methods using platinum coils have a tendency to be unstable, either due to chronic inflammation, compaction of coils, or growth of the aneurysm. We propose to use alternate filling methods for the treatment of intracranial aneurysms using polyurethane based shape memory polymer (SMP) foams. SMP polyurethane foams were surgically implanted in a porcine aneurysm model to determine biocompatibility, localized thrombogenicity, and their ability to serve as a stable filler material within an aneurysm. The degree of healing was evaluated via gross observation, histopathology and low vacuum scanning electron microscopy (LV-SEM) imaging after zero, thirty and ninety days. Clotting was initiated within the SMP foam at time zero (less than one hour exposure to blood prior to euthanization), partial healing was observed at thirty days, and almost complete healing had occurred at ninety days in vivo, with minimal inflammatory response. PMID:23650278

  14. A sticky situation: management of spray polyurethane foam insulation in body orifices.

    PubMed

    Sowerby, Robert J; Sowerby, Leigh J; Vinden, Chris

    2011-11-01

    Spray polyurethane foam insulation is commonly used in the construction industry to fill gaps, seal, and insulate. We present three cases of intentional spray foam insertion in body orifices and discuss the management of such situations in the emergency department. This series includes a case of oral foam insertion used in a suicide attempt by suffocation and two cases of rectal insertion. All of these cases had potential long-term consequences; one was life-threatening. To our knowledge, this is the first published report on the medical management and removal of foam insulation from body orifices. In all three cases, the foam insulation material was successfully removed after allowing the material to harden.

  15. Effects of Polyurethane Foams on Microbial Growth in Fuel-Water Systems

    PubMed Central

    Cooney, J. J.

    1969-01-01

    Four, open-cell, ester-base polyurethane foams were examined for their effect on growth of fuel-utilizing organisms in jet fuel-water systems. Three foams contained a potential biocide, tetraethylthiuram E (0.66%), sodium omadine (0.07%), or zinc omadine (0.07%), all w/v. These were compared with a control foam which did not contain an additive. Each foam was examined in fuel-water systems containing JP-4 fuel, JP-4 fuel plus 0.1% anti-icing additive (AIA), or JP-5 fuel. Pure cultures of a fuel-grown bacterium, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and of a fuel-grown fungus, Hormodendrum (Cladosporium) sp., served as test organisms. In control cultures without foam and in cultures containing control foam, P. aeruginosa achieved maximum stationary-phase populations of approximately 108 viable cells per ml, and Hormodendrum sp. produced an extensive mycelial mat. In the three fuel systems examined, tetraethylthiuram E- and sodium omadine-containing foams had little effect on growth of the bacterium; foam with zinc omadine decreased the rate of bacterial growth but had little effect on total populations. Tetraethylthiuram E decreased the rate of fungal growth and showed its greatest effect in JP-4 plus AIA. Foam with sodium omadine or zinc omadine markedly decreased fungal growth in all three fuel systems. The data suggest that either sodium omadine or zinc omadine in polyurethane foam may be a useful antifungal agent; and that tetraethylthiuram E and AIA could exert a synergistic effect, particularly at AIA concentrations which have been reported to occur in some field situations. Images PMID:16349836

  16. Properties of polyurethane foam/coconut coir fiber as a core material and as a sandwich composites component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azmi, M. A.; Abdullah, H. Z.; Idris, M. I.

    2013-12-01

    This research focuses on the fabrication and characterization of sandwich composite panels using glass fiber composite skin and polyurethane foam reinforced coconut coir fiber core. The main objectives are to characterize the physical and mechanical properties and to elucidate the effect of coconut coir fibers in polyurethane foam cores and sandwich composite panels. Coconut coir fibers were used as reinforcement in polyurethane foams in which later were applied as the core in sandwich composites ranged from 5 wt% to 20 wt%. The physical and mechanical properties found to be significant at 5 wt% coconut coir fiber in polyurethane foam cores as well as in sandwich composites. It was found that composites properties serve better in sandwich composites construction.

  17. Preliminary Guidelines for Maintenance of Polyurethane Foam (PUF) Roofing Systems.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-03-01

    in Figure 2. All of these except the long-bristled, heavy-duty push broom were used *NCEL has experimental weathering sites at the following...being off ratio when dispensed, (2) the foam sustaining mechanical damage following application, or (3) the foam becoming wet. In such cases , it is...believed to be the variability of the substrate that was maintained. In some cases , the primer was applied to the sanded foam, while in other cases

  18. Polyurethane foams electrophoretically coated with carbon nanotubes for tissue engineering scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Zawadzak, Ewelina; Bil, Monika; Ryszkowska, Joanna; Nazhat, Showan N; Cho, Johann; Bretcanu, Oana; Roether, Judith A; Boccaccini, Aldo R

    2009-02-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were deposited on the surfaces of polyurethane (PUR) foams by electrophoretic deposition (EPD). The parameters of EPD were optimized in order to obtain homogeneous CNT coatings on PUR foams and adequate infiltration of the three-dimensional (3D) porous network. The microstructure of the composites was investigated by high-resolution scanning electron microscopy (HRSEM), revealing that optimal quality of the coatings was achieved by an EPD voltage of 20 V. The thermal properties of the CNT-coated specimens, determined by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), were correlated to the foam microstructure. In vitro tests in concentrated simulated body fluid (1.5 SBF) were performed to study the influence of the presence of CNTs on the bioactivity of PUR-based scaffolds, assessed by the formation of calcium phosphate (CaP) compounds, e.g. hydroxyapatite (HA), on the foam surfaces. It was observed that CNTs accelerate the precipitation of CaP, which is thought to be due to the presence of more nucleation centres for crystal nucleation and growth, as compared with uncoated foams. Polyurethane foams with CNT coating have the potential to be used as bioactive scaffolds in bone tissue engineering due to their high interconnected porosity, bioactivity and nanostructured surface topography.

  19. Rigid polyurethane foam/cellulose whisker nanocomposites: preparation, characterization, and properties.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Ren, Hongfeng; Ragauskas, Arthur J

    2011-08-01

    Novel rigid polyurethane nanocomposite foams have been prepared by the polymerization of a sucrose-based polyol, a glycerol-based polyol and polymeric diphenylmethane diisocyanate in the presence of cellulose whiskers. Varying amounts of sulfuric acid hydrolyzed cellulose whiskers (0.25, 0.50, 0.75 and 1.00 wt%) prepared from a commercial fully bleached softwood kraft pulp were incorporated to investigate the effect of its dosage on the mechanical and thermal properties of polyurethane nanocomposites. Fourier transform infrared spectra of the nanocomposite foams suggested that additional hydrogen bonds were developed and crosslinking occurred between the hydroxyl groups of cellulose whiskers and isocyanate groups which increased the phase separation of soft and hard segments in the polyurethane. The closed cells of control foam and nanocomposite foams were homogeneously dispersed and the cell sizes were approximately 350 microm in diameter as observed by scanning electron microscope. A substantial improvement of mechanical properties at low whisker content (< or = 1.00 wt%) was obtained, especially the compressive strength and modulus at 1.00 wt% whiskers content which were increased by 269.7% and 210.0%, respectively. Thermal stability of the nanocomposites was also enhanced as determined by differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetric analysis.

  20. Tracking composition of microbial communities for simultaneous nitrification and denitrification in polyurethane foam.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuan; Wang, Li; Ma, Fang; Yang, Ji-xian; Qiu, Shan

    2014-01-01

    The process of simultaneous nitrification and denitrification (SND) of immobilized microorganisms in polyurethane form is discussed. The effect of different positions within the polyurethane carrier on microbial community response for the SND process is investigated by a combination of denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis profiles of the 16S rRNA gene V3 region and scanning electron microscopy. Results show that polyurethane, which consists of a unique porous structure, is an ideal platform for biofilm stratification of aerobe, anaerobe and facultative microorganisms in regard to the SND process. The community structure diversity response to different positions was distinct. The distributions of various functional microbes, detected from the surface aerobic stratification to the interior anaerobic stratification of polyurethane, were mainly nitrifying and denitrifying bacteria. Meanwhile aerobic denitrifying bacteria such as Paracoccus sp., Agrobacterium rubi and Ochrobactrum sp. were also adhered to the interior and surface of polyurethane. The SND process occurring on polyurethane foam was carried out by two independent processes: nitrogen removal and aerobic denitrification.

  1. a Vibrational Model of Open Celled Polyurethane Foam Automotive Seat Cushions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patten, W. N.; Sha, S.; Mo, C.

    1998-10-01

    A mechanistic model of a seat cushion is developed. The work relates the kinematic motion of the seat to the geometric and constitutive properties of the cellular foam used in the seat. The model includes the influence of pneumatic damping caused by friction between the gas within the open-celled foam and matrix polymer. A continuous shape function is introduced to characterize the piecewise continuous stress-strain characteristic of flexible open-celled foam. After some simplification, a non-linear dynamic automotive seat cushion model is derived, which relies explicitly on the constitutive properties of polyurethane foams and on the geometry of the seat cushion. Experimental and analytical models of the two automotive seats are compared to verify the model. The comparisons indicate that the new model is able to predict the dynamic performance of an automotive seat cushion with fidelity.

  2. Chemically induced graft copolymerization of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate onto polyurethane surface for improving blood compatibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Chunli; Wang, Miao; Cai, Xianmei; Huang, Xiaobo; Li, Li; Zhu, Haomiao; Shen, Jian; Yuan, Jiang

    2011-11-01

    To improve hydrophilicity and blood compatibility properties of polyurethane (PU) film, we chemically induced graft copolymerization of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) onto the surface of polyurethane film using benzoyl peroxide as an initiator. The effects of grafting temperature, grafting time, monomer and initiator concentrations on the grafting yields were studied. The maximum grafting yield value was obtained 0.0275 g/cm2 for HEMA. Characterization of the films was carried out by attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), water contact angle measurements. ATR-FTIR data showed that HEMA was successfully grafted onto the PU films surface. Water contact angle measurement demonstrated the grafted films possessed a relatively hydrophilic surface. The blood compatibility of the grafted films was preliminarily evaluated by a platelet-rich plasma adhesion test and hemolysis test. The results of platelet adhesion experiment showed that polyurethane grafted polymerization with monomer of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate had good blood compatibility featured by the low platelet adhesion. Hemolysis rate of the PU-g-PHEMA films was dramatically decreased than the ungrafted PU films. This kind of new biomaterials grafted with HEMA monomers might have a potential usage for biomedical applications.

  3. Experiments to populate and validate a processing model for polyurethane foam. BKC 44306 PMDI-10

    SciTech Connect

    Mondy, Lisa Ann; Rao, Rekha Ranjana; Shelden, Bion; Soehnel, Melissa Marie; O'Hern, Timothy J.; Grillet, Anne; Celina, Mathias Christopher; Wyatt, Nicholas B.; Russick, Edward Mark; Bauer, Stephen J.; Hileman, Michael Bryan; Urquhart, Alexander; Thompson, Kyle Richard; Smith, David Michael

    2014-03-01

    We are developing computational models to elucidate the expansion and dynamic filling process of a polyurethane foam, PMDI. The polyurethane of interest is chemically blown, where carbon dioxide is produced via the reaction of water, the blowing agent, and isocyanate. The isocyanate also reacts with polyol in a competing reaction, which produces the polymer. Here we detail the experiments needed to populate a processing model and provide parameters for the model based on these experiments. The model entails solving the conservation equations, including the equations of motion, an energy balance, and two rate equations for the polymerization and foaming reactions, following a simplified mathematical formalism that decouples these two reactions. Parameters for the polymerization kinetics model are reported based on infrared spectrophotometry. Parameters describing the gas generating reaction are reported based on measurements of volume, temperature and pressure evolution with time. A foam rheology model is proposed and parameters determined through steady-shear and oscillatory tests. Heat of reaction and heat capacity are determined through differential scanning calorimetry. Thermal conductivity of the foam as a function of density is measured using a transient method based on the theory of the transient plane source technique. Finally, density variations of the resulting solid foam in several simple geometries are directly measured by sectioning and sampling mass, as well as through x-ray computed tomography. These density measurements will be useful for model validation once the complete model is implemented in an engineering code.

  4. Toluene diisocyanate emission to air and migration to a surface from a flexible polyurethane foam.

    PubMed

    Vangronsveld, Erik; Berckmans, Steven; Spence, Mark

    2013-06-01

    Flexible polyurethane foam (FPF) is produced from the reaction of toluene diisocyanate (TDI) and polyols. Because of the potential for respiratory sensitization following exposure to TDI, concerns have been raised about potential consumer exposure to TDI from residual 'free TDI' in FPF products. Limited and conflicting results exist in the literature concerning the presence of unreacted TDI remaining in FPF as determined by various solvent extraction and analysis techniques. Because residual TDI results are most often intended for application in assessment of potential human exposure to TDI from FPF products, testing techniques that more accurately simulated human contact with foam were designed. To represent inhalation exposure to TDI from polyurethane foam, a test that measured the emission of TDI to air was conducted. For simulation of human dermal exposure to TDI from polyurethane foam, a migration test technique was designed. Emission of TDI to air was determined for a representative FPF using three different emission test cells. Two were commercially available cells that employ air flow over the surface of the foam [the Field and Laboratory Emission Cell (FLEC®) and the Micro-Chamber/Thermal Extraction™ cell]. The third emission test cell was of a custom design and features air flow through the foam sample rather than over the foam surface. Emitted TDI in the air of the test cells was trapped using glass fiber filters coated with 1-(2-methoxyphenyl)-piperazine (MP), a commonly used derivatizing agent for diisocyanates. The filters were subsequently desorbed and analyzed by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. Measurement of TDI migration from representative foam was accomplished by placing glass fiber filters coated with MP on the outer surfaces of a foam disk and then compressing the filters against the disk using a clamping apparatus for periods of 8 and 24 h. The sample filters were subsequently desorbed and analyzed in the same manner as for the

  5. Rigid polyurethane foam as an efficient material for shock wave attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komissarov, P. V.; Borisov, A. A.; Sokolov, G. N.; Lavrov, V. V.

    2016-09-01

    A new method for reducing parameters of blast waves generated by explosions of HE charges on ground is presented. Most of the traditional techniques reduce the wave parameters at a certain distance from the charge, i.e. as a matter of fact the damping device interacts with a completely formed shock wave. The proposed approach is to use rigid polyurethane foam coating immediately the explosive charge. A distributed structure of such a foam block that provides most efficient shock wave attenuation is suggested. Results of experimental shock wave investigations recorded in tests in which HE charges have been exploded with damping devices and without it are compared.

  6. Rigid Polyurethane Foam (RPF) Technology for Countermines (Sea) Program Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    WOODFIN,RONALD L.; FAUCETT,DAVID L.; HANCE,BRADLEY G.; LATHAM,AMY E.; SCHMIDT,C.O.

    1999-10-01

    This Phase II report documents the results of one subtask initiated under the joint Department of Energy (DOE)/Department of Defense (DoD) Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) for Countermine Warfare. The development of Rigid Polyurethane Foams for neutralization of mines and barriers in amphibious assault was the objective of the tasking. This phase of the program concentrated on formation of RPF in water, explosive mine simulations, and development of foam and fabric pontoons. Field experimentation was done primarily at the Energetic Materials Research and Testing Center (EMRTC) of the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM between February 1996 and September 1998.

  7. Compressive properties of commercially available polyurethane foams as mechanical models for osteoporotic human cancellous bone

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Purvi SD; Shepherd, Duncan ET; Hukins, David WL

    2008-01-01

    Background Polyurethane (PU) foam is widely used as a model for cancellous bone. The higher density foams are used as standard biomechanical test materials, but none of the low density PU foams are universally accepted as models for osteoporotic (OP) bone. The aim of this study was to determine whether low density PU foam might be suitable for mimicking human OP cancellous bone. Methods Quasi-static compression tests were performed on PU foam cylinders of different lengths (3.9 and 7.7 mm) and of different densities (0.09, 0.16 and 0.32 g.cm-3), to determine the Young's modulus, yield strength and energy absorbed to yield. Results Young's modulus values were 0.08–0.93 MPa for the 0.09 g.cm-3 foam and from 15.1–151.4 MPa for the 0.16 and 0.32 g.cm-3 foam. Yield strength values were 0.01–0.07 MPa for the 0.09 g.cm-3 foam and from 0.9–4.5 MPa for the 0.16 and 0.32 g.cm-3 foam. The energy absorbed to yield was found to be negligible for all foam cylinders. Conclusion Based on these results, it is concluded that 0.16 g.cm-3 PU foam may prove to be suitable as an OP cancellous bone model when fracture stress, but not energy dissipation, is of concern. PMID:18844988

  8. Exposure to MDI during the process of insulating buildings with sprayed polyurethane foam.

    PubMed

    Crespo, J; Galán, J

    1999-08-01

    Buildings are often insulated with sprayed-in-place polyurethane foam in spite of the fact that few studies have been carried out on exposure levels to isocyanates during the spraying process. This paper is meant to provide new data on personal exposure to methylene-bis (4-phenylisocyanate) (MDI) while dwellings and office buildings are being insulated with polyurethane foam. An impinger using a 1-(2-methoxyphenyl)piperazine toluene solution as absorbent was used to take personal samples for the sprayer and helper during indoor and outdoor applications. The analytical results show that the levels of exposure were significant, especially for the sprayer, with values of up to 0.077 mg m-3 and 0.400 mg m-3 during outdoor and indoor applications, respectively. The helper's exposure was always lower.

  9. Use of microorganisms immobilized on composite polyurethane foam to remove Cu(II) from aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lin-Cheng; Li, Yan-Feng; Bai, Xue; Zhao, Guang-Hui

    2009-08-15

    Composite polyurethane (PU) foams were made via the polymerization of toluene diisocyanate (TDI) and polyether polyol with activated carbon fiber, and immobilized microorganisms on polyurethane (IPU) foam were prepared by cultivating the microbe B350 in a mixture of culture medium and PU. We used batch adsorption techniques to study the removal of Cu(II) ions from aqueous solutions via PU and IPU. Moreover, the effects of pH, temperature, carrier amount, and biosorption time on the removal rate of Cu(II), adsorption equilibrium, and adsorption kinetics were investigated in detail. The IPU showed an excellent removal rate for Cu(II). The adsorption kinetics data were in good agreement with the pseudo-second-order rate model, and the adsorption isotherms could be adequately described by the Langmuir equation. For synthetic wastewater containing Cu(II), the removal rates for Cu(II) and COD after 4h treatment were 85% and 80%, respectively.

  10. Polyurethane waste recycling; glycolysis and hydroglycolysis of water-blown foams

    SciTech Connect

    Gerlock, J.; Braslaw, J.; Zinbo, M.

    1984-07-01

    In this paper, glycolysis of toluenediisocyanate based water-blown polyurethane foam has been examined by high performance liquid chromatography and gel permeation chromatography to determine the product distribution. Glycolysis with diethylene glycol (DEG) yields toluenediamine (TDA), TDA mono- and di- DEG carbamates, a series of urea-linked mono- and di- DEG carbamate TDA oligomers, and polyether triol (polyol). The complexity of the product mixture suggests problems in applying simple glycolysis to the recovery of mixed and/or contaminated polyurethane wastes. A simpler product mixture results when water and a base catalyst are added to the glycolysis reaction (hydroglycolysis). Hydroglycolysis yields TDA and polyol as principal products. Data for the rate of the hydroglycolysis reaction are presented in the temperature range of 150 to 190/sup 0/C. These results suggest that hydroglycolysis could be used to recover polyols from mixed and/or contaminated water-blown polyurethane wastes.

  11. Green engineering: Green composite material, biodiesel from waste coffee grounds, and polyurethane bio-foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Hsiang-Fu

    In this thesis we developed several ways of producing green materials and energy resources. First, we developed a method to fabricate natural fibers composites, with the purpose to develop green textile/woven composites that could potentially serve as an alternative to materials derived from non-renewable sources. Flax and hemp fabrics were chosen because of their lightweight and exceptional mechanical properties. To make these textile/woven composites withstand moist environments, a commercially available marine resin was utilized as a matrix. The tensile, three-point bending, and edgewise compression strengths of these green textile/woven composites were measured using ASTM protocols. Secondly, we developed a chemical procedure to obtain oil from waste coffee grounds; we did leaching and liquid extractions to get liquid oil from the solid coffee. This coffee oil was used to produce bio-diesel that could be used as a substitute for petroleum-based diesel. Finally, polyurethane Bio-foam formation utilized glycerol that is the by-product from the biodiesel synthesis. A chemical synthesis procedure from the literature was used as the reference system: a triol and isocynate are mixed to produce polyurethane foam. Moreover, we use a similar triol, a by-product from bio-diesel synthesis, to reproduce polyurethane foam.

  12. Closure of oroantral communications using biodegradable polyurethane foam: a long term study in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Visscher, Susan H; van Minnen, Baucke; van Leeuwen, M Barbara M; van Kooten, Theo G; Bos, Rudolf R M

    2009-11-01

    An oroantral communication (OAC) is an open connection between the oral cavity and maxillary sinus. Closure of OACs is commonly performed with a surgical procedure using a mucoperiosteal flap. An alternative technique using synthetic biodegradable polyurethane (PU) foam for closure of OACs is presented. This PU foam is composed of hard urethane segments, and soft segments made of D/L lactide (50/50), epsilon-caprolactone, and 5% polyethyleneglycol (PEG). To evaluate the use of PU foam for this application, OACs were created in the edentulous part of the maxilla in 21 rabbits, after which PU foams were fitted in the defects. Results showed complete healing of the oral mucosa after 4-10 weeks, healing of the antral mucosal lining after 6 months and complete bony regeneration after 1 year. No reopening of the defects occurred and no maxillary sinusitis was observed. Degradation of the PU foam had not yet reached completion 1 year after implantation. In conclusion, PU foam with 5% PEG provides adequate closure of an OAC in the rabbit model to support healing of the oral and maxillary sinus mucosa. Longer time intervals are needed to assess the complete degradation of the PU foam.

  13. Treatment of concentrated industrial wastewaters originating from oil shale and the like by electrolysis polyurethane foam interaction

    DOEpatents

    Tiernan, Joan E.

    1990-01-01

    Highly concentrated and toxic petroleum-based and synthetic fuels wastewaters such as oil shale retort water are treated in a unit treatment process by electrolysis in a reactor containing oleophilic, ionized, open-celled polyurethane foams and subjected to mixing and laminar flow conditions at an average detention time of six hours. Both the polyurethane foams and the foam regenerate solution are re-used. The treatment is a cost-effective process for waste-waters which are not treatable, or are not cost-effectively treatable, by conventional process series.

  14. Development of a gelatin-based polyurethane vascular graft by spray, phase-inversion technology.

    PubMed

    Losi, Paola; Mancuso, Luisa; Al Kayal, Tamer; Celi, Simona; Briganti, Enrica; Gualerzi, Alice; Volpi, Silvia; Cao, Giacomo; Soldani, Giorgio

    2015-08-04

    The capacity of a composite vascular graft constituting polyurethane (PU) and gelatin to support cell growth was investigated using human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). Gelatin-based polyurethane grafts were fabricated by co-spraying polyurethane and gelatin using a spray, phase-inversion technique. Graft microstructure was investigated by light and scanning electron microscopy. Uniaxial tensile tests were performed to assess the grafts' mechanical properties in longitudinal and circumferential directions. hMSCs obtained from bone marrow aspirate were seeded onto flat graft samples. After 24, 48, and 72 h of incubation, cell morphology was evaluated by Giemsa staining and cell viability was calculated by XTT assay. SEM analysis evidenced that PU samples display a microporous structure, whereas the gelatin-based PU samples show a fibrillar appearance. The presence of cross-linked gelatin produced a significant increase of ultimate tensile strength and ultimate elongation in circumferential directions compared to PU material. Qualitative analysis of hMSC adhesion onto the grafts revealed remarkable differences between gelatin-based PU and control graft. hMSCs grown onto gelatin-based PU graft form a monolayer that reached confluence at 72 h, whereas cells seeded onto the control graft were not able to undergo appropriate spreading. hMSCs grown onto gelatin-based PU graft showed significantly higher viability than cells seeded onto bare PU at all time points. In conclusion, a composite vascular graft was successfully manufactured by simultaneous co-spraying of a synthetic polymer and a protein to obtain a scaffold that combines the mechanical characteristics of polyurethanes with the favorable cell interaction features of gelatin.

  15. Polyurethane foam with multi walled carbon nanotubes/magnesium hybrid filler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adnan, Sinar Arzuria; Zainuddin, Firuz; Zaidi, Nur Hidayah Ahmad; Akil, Hazizan Md.; Ahmad, Sahrim

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs)/magnesium (Mg) hybrid filler in polyurethane (PU) foams with different weight percentages (0.5 wt.% to 3.0 wt.%). The PU/MWCNTs/Mg foam composites were formed by reaction of based palm oil polyol (POP) with methylene diphenyl diisocyanate (MDI) with ratio 1:1.1 by weight. The foam properties were evaluated in density, morphology and compressive strength. The addition of 2.5 wt.% hybrid filler showed the higher density in 59.72 kg/m3 and thus contribute to the highest compressive strength at 1.76 MPa. The morphology show cell in closed structure and addition hybrid filler showed uneven structure.

  16. Validation of Heat Transfer Thermal Decomposition and Container Pressurization of Polyurethane Foam.

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, Sarah Nicole; Dodd, Amanda B.; Larsen, Marvin E.; Suo-Anttila, Jill M.; Erickson, Kenneth L

    2014-09-01

    Polymer foam encapsulants provide mechanical, electrical, and thermal isolation in engineered systems. In fire environments, gas pressure from thermal decomposition of polymers can cause mechanical failure of sealed systems. In this work, a detailed uncertainty quantification study of PMDI-based polyurethane foam is presented to assess the validity of the computational model. Both experimental measurement uncertainty and model prediction uncertainty are examined and compared. Both the mean value method and Latin hypercube sampling approach are used to propagate the uncertainty through the model. In addition to comparing computational and experimental results, the importance of each input parameter on the simulation result is also investigated. These results show that further development in the physics model of the foam and appropriate associated material testing are necessary to improve model accuracy.

  17. The effect of magnetic particles on pore size distribution in soft polyurethane foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schümann, M.; Günther, S.; Odenbach, S.

    2014-07-01

    The combination of elastomeric matrices with magnetic particles to obtain magnetically controllable hybrid materials is an actual field of intense research. An important aspect in this context is the stiffness of the matrix, which determines the effectiveness of the magnetically driven changes in the material properties. In this paper an approach has been undertaken to use soft polyurethane foams as matrix material. By means of x-ray computed microtomography and digital image processing the pore size distribution has been determined to get information on how this distribution is affected by the introduction of magnetic microparticles. To do so, 20 000 to 40 000 pores per foam sample were evaluated. As a result, it could be proven that the pore sizes of the analysed foams clearly obey the Weibull distribution. Increasing the carbonyl iron particle concentrations leads to a decrement of the shape parameter of the distribution. Based on known particle stabilization mechanisms, an approach to explain the experimental results is proposed.

  18. Elimination of toxicity from polyurethane foam plugs used for plant culture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, R. M.; Schwartzkopf, S. H.; Tibbitts, T. W.; Langhans, R. W.

    1985-01-01

    Polyurethane foam plugs commonly are used as collars or supports to grow plants in solution culture. Despite their utility, these foam plugs can be quite toxic to plants, particularly to small seedlings. We have observed tissue injury in tests using plugs to support lettuce, red beet, and potato plants in solution culture. Typically, the injury is initiated on the hypocotyl or stem tissue in direct contact with the foam, and appears within 30 hr as a brownish discoloration on the tissue surface. This discoloration can be followed by complete collapse of affected tissue and eventual death of the seedling. When injury does not progress beyond surface browning, the seedling survives but growth is slowed. In this paper, we report on different treatments that can be used to remove the toxicity of these plugs so they can be used in plant research.

  19. Elimination of toxicity from polyurethane foam plugs used for plant culture.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, R M; Schwartzkopf, S H; Tibbitts, T W; Langhans, R W

    1985-06-01

    Polyurethane foam plugs commonly are used as collars or supports to grow plants in solution culture. Despite their utility, these foam plugs can be quite toxic to plants, particularly to small seedlings. We have observed tissue injury in tests using plugs to support lettuce, red beet, and potato plants in solution culture. Typically, the injury is initiated on the hypocotyl or stem tissue in direct contact with the foam, and appears within 30 hr as a brownish discoloration on the tissue surface. This discoloration can be followed by complete collapse of affected tissue and eventual death of the seedling. When injury does not progress beyond surface browning, the seedling survives but growth is slowed. In this paper, we report on different treatments that can be used to remove the toxicity of these plugs so they can be used in plant research.

  20. Properties of 30 lb/ft{sup 3} rigid polyurethane foams

    SciTech Connect

    Wenski. E.G.; Stinebaugh, R.E.; York, A.R. II

    1997-03-01

    This report summarizes tests on five different foams. Two are manufactured at Allied Signal, two at North Carolina Foam Industries, and one at General Plastics. The tests conducted are: thermal conductivity at various temperatures, specific heat at 60{degrees}C, compressive strength at ambient and 60{degrees}C, thermogravimetric analysis to 800{degrees}C, intumescence, and char formation properties. A CHN analysis was also performed. Funding for the testing of rigid polyurethane foams originated from the AT-400A container program at Sandia National Laboratories. This testing supported the development of the AT-400A container. The AT-400A is a storage and transportation container that will be used initially at the Pantex Plant for storage of plutonium from dismantled nuclear weapons.

  1. Highly Efficient Flame Retardant Polyurethane Foam with Alginate/Clay Aerogel Coating.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong-Bing; Shen, Peng; Chen, Ming-Jun; Zhao, Hai-Bo; Schiraldi, David A

    2016-11-30

    Highly efficient flame retardant polyurethane foams with alginate/clay aerogel coatings were fabricated using a freeze-drying method. The microstructure and the interaction of the samples were characterized with scanning electron and optical microscopy (SEM) and (OM). The results show that PU foam has a porous structure with pore sizes of several hundred microns, and that of aerogel ranges from 10 to 30 μm. The PU foam matrix and the aerogel coatings have strong interactions, due to the infusion of aerogel into the porous structure of the foam and the tension generated during the freeze-drying process. Both the PU foam and the aerogel exhibit good thermal stabilities, with onset decomposition temperatures above 240 °C. Combustion parameters, including LOI, TTI, HRR, TSR, FIGRA, CO, and CO2, all indicate significantly reduced fire risk. Total heat release of all but one of the samples was maintained, indicating that the flame retardant mechanism is to decrease flame spread rate by forming a heat, oxygen, and smoke barrier, rather than by reducing fuel content. This facile and inexpensive post-treatment of PU foam could expand its fire safe applications.

  2. Experimental study of moisture uptake of polyurethane foam subjected to a heat sink below 30 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X. B.; Chen, J. Y.; Gan, Z. H.; Qiu, L. M.; Zhang, K. H.; Yang, R. P.; Ma, X. J.; Liu, Z. H.

    2014-01-01

    Rigid closed-cell foam is widely used to thermally insulate liquid hydrogen and oxygen tanks of space launch vehicles due to its lightweight, mechanical strength and thermal-insulating performance. Up to now, little information is available on the intrusion of moisture into the foam that subjects one side to liquid hydrogen temperatures and the other side to room temperatures and high relative humidity. A novel cryogenic moisture uptake apparatus has been designed and fabricated to measure the moisture uptake into the polyurethane foam. For safety and convenience, two identical single-stage pulse tube cryocoolers instead of liquid hydrogen are used to cool one side of the foam specimen to the lowest temperature of 26 K. Total of eight specimens in three groups, according to whether there is a butt-joint or weathering period, are tested respectively for both 5 h and 9 h. The additional weight due to moisture uptake of the foam for the 26 K cases is compared to previous measurements at 79 K. The results are instructive for the applications of foam to the insulation of liquid hydrogen tanks in space launch vehicles.

  3. Water-Vapor-Barrier Coatings for Polyurethane Foams

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-06-01

    Water-Vapor Transmission-Rate Determination The ASTM C355 -64 desiccant method was followed, except for the design of the test dishes. For the...0.06 4 12.0 0.06 Av 14.4 + 2.9 0.07 ± 0.01 1 22.9 0.11 2 22.3 0.10 3 27.7 0.13 Av 24.3 + 3.0 0.11 ± 0.02 49 4H 20 62 3 7 *By ASTM C355 -64... C355 -64 desiccant method; nominal thickness of plain foam specimen, 0.810 in. these coatings applied to the foam. All the coatings made

  4. Fractional derivative and hereditary combined model for memory effects on flexible polyurethane foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elfarhani, Makram; Jarraya, Abdessalem; Abid, Said; Haddar, Mohamed

    2016-06-01

    In a quasi-static regime with cyclic loading, the force-displacement curve of flexible polyurethane exhibits complicated behavior: nonlinearity, visco-elasticity, hysteresis, residual force, etc. Beside nonlinearity and visco-elasticity, this material displays high dependence on the displacement rate and past loading history. Its dependence on compression rate helps to appropriately identify the force-displacement curve. Based on the new curve identification, the overall foam response is assumed to be a composite of a nonlinear elastic component and a visco-elastic component. The elastic component is expressed as a polynomial function in displacement, while the visco-elastic one is formulated according to the hereditary approach to represent the foam visco-elastic damping force during the loading phase and according to the fractional derivative approach during unloading to represent the visco-elastic residual force in the material. The focus of this study was to develop mathematical formulations and identification parameters to faithfully characterize the visco-elastic behavior of flexible polyurethane foam under multi-cycle compressive tests. A parameter calibration methodology based on the separation of the measurement data of each component force was established. This optimization process helps to avoid the parameter values admixture problem during the phase of numeric calculations of the same component force. The validity of the model results is checked according to the simulation accuracy, the physical significance of results and their agreement with the obtained force-displacement curve identification.

  5. Experimental study on cryogenic moisture uptake in polyurethane foam insulation material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X. B.; Yao, L.; Qiu, L. M.; Gan, Z. H.; Yang, R. P.; Ma, X. J.; Liu, Z. H.

    2012-12-01

    Rigid foam is widely used to insulate cryogenic tanks, in particular for space launch vehicles due to its lightweight, mechanical strength and thermal-insulating performance. Up to now, little information is available on the intrusion of moisture into the material under cryogenic conditions, which will bring substantial additional weight for the space vehicles at lift-off. A cryogenic moisture uptake apparatus has been designed and fabricated to measure the amount of water uptake into the polyurethane foam. One side of the specimen is exposed to an environment with high humidity and ambient temperature, while the other with cryogenic temperature at approximately 78 K. A total of 16 specimens were tested for up to 24 h to explore the effects of the surface thermal protection layer, the foam thickness, exposed time, the butt joints, and the material density on water uptake of the foam. The results are constructive for the applications of the foam to the cryogenic insulation system in space launch vehicles.

  6. Identification of Flame Retardants in Polyurethane Foam Collected from Baby Products

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    With the phase-out of PentaBDE in 2004, alternative flame retardants are being used in polyurethane foam to meet flammability standards. However, insufficient information is available on the identity of the flame retardants currently in use. Baby products containing polyurethane foam must meet California state furniture flammability standards, which likely affects the use of flame retardants in baby products throughout the U.S. However, it is unclear which products contain flame retardants and at what concentrations. In this study we surveyed baby products containing polyurethane foam to investigate how often flame retardants were used in these products. Information on when the products were purchased and whether they contained a label indicating that the product meets requirements for a California flammability standard were recorded. When possible, we identified the flame retardants being used and their concentrations in the foam. Foam samples collected from 101 commonly used baby products were analyzed. Eighty samples contained an identifiable flame retardant additive, and all but one of these was either chlorinated or brominated. The most common flame retardant detected was tris(1,3-dichloroisopropyl) phosphate (TDCPP; detection frequency 36%), followed by components typically found in the Firemaster550 commercial mixture (detection frequency 17%). Five samples contained PBDE congeners commonly associated with PentaBDE, suggesting products with PentaBDE are still in-use. Two chlorinated organophosphate flame retardants (OPFRs) not previously documented in the environment were also identified, one of which is commercially sold as V6 (detection frequency 15%) and contains tris(2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP) as an impurity. As an addition to this study, we used a portable X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analyzer to estimate the bromine and chlorine content of the foam and investigate whether XRF is a useful method for predicting the presence of halogenated flame

  7. Ultrasonication assisted preparation of carbonaceous nanoparticles modified polyurethane foam with good conductivity and high oil absorption properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Hengchong; Shi, Dean; Yin, Ligang; Yang, Zhihua; Luan, Shifang; Gao, Jiefeng; Zha, Junwei; Yin, Jinghua; Li, Robert K. Y.

    2014-10-01

    In this work, we report a facile, low cost and time-saving method for the fabrication of compressible, electrically conductive, oil absorptive, cost-effective and flexible polyurethane (PU) foam through ultrasonication induced carbonaceous nanoparticles (CNP) onto flexible PU foam (CNP-PU foam). SEM images showed that the CNP could be firmly anchored onto the PU foam, and made the PU foam surface much rougher. Zero-dimensional carbonaceous nanoparticles were easier to anchor onto the PU foam surface than one-dimensional nanoparticles (e.g., carbon nanotube) or two-dimensional nanoparticles (e.g., graphene oxide). The CNP-PU foam exhibited excellent elasticity and high mechanical durability even when it was subjected to 500 cyclic compression. The CNP-PU foam had excellent absorption of organic solvents up to 121 times the weight of the initial PU foam. In addition, the electrical conductivity of PU foams was considerably increased with the anchoring of CNP onto the matrix. In addition, compression experiments confirmed that the electrical conductivity of CNP-PU foams changed with their compression ratios, thus exhibiting excellent pressure sensitivity. The as-prepared materials have significant potential as oil absorbents, elastic conductors, flexible electrodes, pressure sensors, etc.In this work, we report a facile, low cost and time-saving method for the fabrication of compressible, electrically conductive, oil absorptive, cost-effective and flexible polyurethane (PU) foam through ultrasonication induced carbonaceous nanoparticles (CNP) onto flexible PU foam (CNP-PU foam). SEM images showed that the CNP could be firmly anchored onto the PU foam, and made the PU foam surface much rougher. Zero-dimensional carbonaceous nanoparticles were easier to anchor onto the PU foam surface than one-dimensional nanoparticles (e.g., carbon nanotube) or two-dimensional nanoparticles (e.g., graphene oxide). The CNP-PU foam exhibited excellent elasticity and high mechanical

  8. Development of Expanded Thermoplastic Polyurethane Bead Foams and Their Sintering Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossieny, Nemat

    Polymer bead foaming technology represents a breakthrough in the production of low density plastic foamed components that have a complex geometrical structure and has helped to expand the market for plastic foams by broadening their applications. In this research, the unique microstructure of thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) consisting of phase-separated hard segment (HS) domains dispersed in the soft segment (SS) matrix has been utilized to develop expanded TPU (E-TPU) bead foam with microcellular morphologies and also to create inter-bead sintering into three dimensional products using steam-chest molding machine. The phase-separation and crystallization behavior of the HS chains in the TPU microstructure was systematically studied in the presence of dissolved gases and also by changing the microstructure of TPU by melt-processing and addition of nano-/micro-sized additives. It was observed that the presence of gas improved the phase separation (i.e. crystallization) of HSs and increased the overall crystallinity of the TPU. It was also shown that by utilizing the HS crystalline domains, the overall foaming behavior of TPU (i.e. cell nucleation and expansion ratio) can be significantly improved. Moreover, the HS crystalline domains can be effective for both sintering of the beads as well strengthening the individual beads to improve the property of the moulded part. It was also observed that unlike other polymer bead foaming technologies, the E-TPU bead foaming sintering does not require formation of double melting-peak. The original broad melting peak existing in the TPU microstructure due to the wide size distribution of HS crystallites can be effectively utilized for the purpose of sintering as well as maintenance of the overall dimensional stability of the moulded part.

  9. Potential role of fire retardant-treated polyurethane foam as a source of brominated diphenyl ethers to the US environment.

    PubMed

    Hale, Robert C; La Guardia, Mark J; Harvey, Ellen; Mainor, T Matt

    2002-02-01

    Five tetra- to hexabrominated diphenyl ether (BDE) congeners (BDE-47, -99, -100, -153 and -154) are the most frequently reported in wildlife and humans. The commercial penta-BDE product, used predominantly to flame-retard polyurethane foam, consists primarily of these same congeners. In 1999, North American demand accounted for 98% of the total global penta-market of 8500 metric tons. Frogs, housed with flame retardant-treated polyurethane foam as a dry substrate, accumulated 10,100 microg/kg (wet weight) of the above BDEs. Crickets kept therein as food contained 14,400 microg/kg. The crickets are believed to have browsed directly on the foam and, in turn, were consumed by the frogs. BDE congener composition in all three matrices matched that of the penta-commercial product. Similar congeners were also observed in soil and stream sediments collected near a polyurethane foam manufacturing plant. Summed concentrations of BDE-47, -99 and -100, the dominant congeners observed in these samples, ranged from < 1 to 132 microg/kg (dry weight basis). Sunfish fillets obtained from a nearby, off-site pond contained a total of 624 microg/kg (lipid basis). Sewage treatment plant (STP) sludge exhibited these same congeners at 1370 microg/kg (dry weight). BDE-209, the fully brominated congener predominant in the commercial deca-BDE product, was also present at 1470 microg/kg. While no known polyurethane foam manufacturers discharged to this plant, the distribution pattern of the low brominated congeners in the sludge matched that of the penta-product. After four weeks of exposure to ambient outdoor conditions, the surface of flame-retarded polyurethane foam became brittle and began to disintegrate. Subsequent dispersal of these penta-containing foam fragments may be one mechanism by which these BDEs reach the environment.

  10. Innovative vibration technique applied to polyurethane foam as a viable substitute for conventional fatigue testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peralta, Alexander; Just-Agosto, Frederick; Shafiq, Basir; Serrano, David

    2012-12-01

    Lifetime prediction using three-point bending (TPB) can at times be prohibitively time consuming and costly, whereas vibration testing at higher frequency may potentially save time and revenue. A vibration technique that obtains lifetimes that reasonably match those determined under flexural TPB fatigue is developed. The technique designs the specimen with a procedure based on shape optimization and finite element analysis. When the specimen is vibrated in resonance, a stress pattern that mimics the stress pattern observed under conventional TPB fatigue testing is obtained. The proposed approach was verified with polyurethane foam specimens, resulting in an average error of 4.5% when compared with TPB.

  11. [Combined polyurethane foam and hydrogel dressing. Outcome in lesions of diverse etiology].

    PubMed

    Rueda López, Justo; Arboix Perejamo, Montserrat; Muñoz Bueno, Ana Maria; Rosell Moreno, Carmen; Blanco Blanco, Joan; Ballester Torralba, Jordi; Gago Fornells, Manuel; García González, R Fernando

    2004-11-01

    The authors present an observational evaluation on the effectiveness of a dressing included in the Indafoam brand for treatment of skin lesions due to different etiology which have an acute or chronic diagnosis; the authors include some very valuable information for professionals who use combined polyurethane foam and hydrogel dressings in their daily practice. Due to their composition, these dressings may be considered combined dressings having only one structure which maintains a stable temperature at the lesion site; these dressings have a high absorption capacity which prevents maceration of the skin surrounding lesions and protects lesions from contamination by exogenous germs.

  12. A model of smoldering combustion applied to flexible polyurethane foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohlemiller, T. J.; Rogers, F.; Bellan, J.

    1979-01-01

    Smoldering combustion, particularly in upholstery and bedding materials, has been proven a serious life hazard. The simplest representation of this hazard situation is one-dimensional downward propagation of a smolder wave against a buoyant upflow (cocurrent smolder); the configuration treated here is identical in all respects to this except for the presence of a forced flow replacing the buoyant one. The complex degradation chemistry of the polyurethanes is here reduced to the two major overall reactions of char formation and char oxidation. The model solutions, which are in reasonable agreement with experimental results, show the smolder process to be oxygen-limited, which leads to some very simple trends. More subtle behavior aspects determine actual propagation velocity, fraction of fuel consumed, and apparent equivalence ratio (all of which are variable). The self-insulating character of the smolder wave makes it viable in a wide-ranging set of conditions if the igniting stimulus is sufficiently long. These results have significant implications regarding the problem of smolder prevention or hindrance.

  13. Identification of CFC and HCFC substitutes for blowing polyurethane foam insulation products. Final report, September 1993-November 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, P.H.; Tunkel, J.L.; Banerjee, S.

    1995-10-01

    The report gives results of a cooperative effort to identify chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) and hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC) substitutes for blowing polyurethane foam insulation products. More than 100 chemicals have been identified and ranked as polyurethane foam blowing agent candidates. The systematic investigation involved the analysis of vapor thermal conductivity predictive models and utilizing this methodology to identify and screen potential new foam blowing agents. Collection of physical/chemical properties of the new candidates enabled an overall evaluation. Based on the vapor thermal conductivity, boiling point, and other important properties, the chemical compounds were ranked to identify the most promising new blowing agent candidates. To efficiently evaluate new foam blowing agents, the compounds were placed and evaluated in 14 groups based on chemical structure.

  14. Experimental polyurethane foam roof systems - II. Technical note Oct 75-Jul 81

    SciTech Connect

    Alumbaugh, R.L.; Keeton, J.R.; Humm, E.F.

    1983-01-01

    An experimental roofing installation is described in which polyurethane foam (PUF) was spray-applied directly to metal Butlerib-type metal decks, the roof divided into five approximately equal areas, and the PUF protected with five different elastomeric coating systems. Three of the coating systems were damaged by hailstones about a year after installation; these systems were recoated within 3 years of the initial installation. The current coatings include two of the original coating systems - a plural component silicone and a single component silicone - and those applied over the three systems damaged by hail - a single component silicone, an aluminum filled, hydrocarbon-extended catalyzed urethane, and a catalyzed urethane. The performance of these five PUF systems over a 7-year period is reported. The temperature distributions throughout the roof systems are described. The decay in the thermal conductivity of the PUF roof over a 5-year period is presented, and the energy savings realized by foaming the roof are presented.

  15. Retention of polyurethane foam fragments during VAC therapy: a complication to be considered.

    PubMed

    Dessy, Luca A; Serratore, Francesco; Corrias, Federico; Parisi, Paola; Mazzocchi, Marco; Carlesimo, Bruno

    2015-04-01

    Vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) therapy is a closed-loop, non-invasive active system, characterised by a controlled and localised negative pressure applied on porous polyurethane absorbent foams. It promotes healing of acute and chronic wounds. Therapeutic effects of VAC therapy have been proved and demonstrated; however, this method can have some disadvantages. Even if it is a quite versatile device, only qualified medical/paramedical personnel should use it in order to avoid possible complications that can occur after an improper application. In this report, 11 cases of foam-fragment retention within the wound are presented. This rare complication did not promote healing, but further hindered it. On the basis of our experience, it is mandatory to define the indications, benefits and limitations of VAC therapy.

  16. Computational modelling of the complex dynamics of chemically blown polyurethane foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ireka, I. E.; Niedziela, D.; Schäfer, K.; Tröltzsch, J.; Steiner, K.; Helbig, F.; Chinyoka, T.; Kroll, L.

    2015-11-01

    This study presents computational analysis of the complex dynamics observed in chemically blown polyurethane foams during reaction injection molding process. The mathematical formulation introduces an experimentally motivated non-divergence free setup for the continuity equations which reflects the self expanding behaviour observed in the physical system. The foam growth phenomena which is normally initiated by adequate pre-mixing of necessary reactant polymers, leading to an exothermic polymerization reaction, bubble nucleation, and gas formation, is captured numerically. We assume the dependence of material viscosity on the degree of cure/polymerization, gas volume fraction, and temperature as well as non-dependence of mixture density on pressure. The set of unsteady nonlinear coupled partial differential equations describing the dynamics of the system are solved numerically for state variables using finite volume techniques such that the front of the flow is tracked with high resolution interface capturing schemes. Graphical representation of the foam volume fraction, evolution of foam heights, and temperature distributions is presented. Results from our simulations are validated with experimental data. These results show good quantitative agreement with observations from experiments.

  17. Immobilization of degradative bacteria in polyurethane-based foams: embedding efficiency and effect on bacterial activity

    SciTech Connect

    Wilde, E.W.; Radway, J.C.; Hazen, T.C.; Hermann, P.

    1996-09-03

    The immobilization of TCE-degrading bacterium Burkholderia cepacia was evaluated using hydrophilic polyurethane foam. The influence of several foam formulation parameters upon cell retention was examined. Surfactant type was a major determinant of retention, with a lecithin- based compound retaining more cells than pluronic or silicone based surfactants. Excessive amounts of surfactant led to increased washout of bacteria. Increasing the biomass concentration from 4.8% to 10.5% caused fewer cells to be washed out. Embedding at reduced temperature did not significantly affect retention, while the use of a silane binding agent gave inconsistent results. The optimal formulation retained all but 0.2% of total embedded cells during passage of 2 liters of water through columns containing 2 g of foam. All foam formulations tested reduced the culturability of embedded cells by several orders of magnitude. However, O{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} evolution rates of embedded cells were never less than 50% of unembedded cells. Nutrient amendments stimulated an increase in cell volume and ribosomal activity as indicated by hybridization studies using fluorescently labeled ribosomal probes. these results indicated that, although immobilized cells were nonculturable, they were metabolically active and thus could be used for biodegradation of toxic compounds.

  18. Production and characterization of biopolyols and polyurethane foams from crude glycerol based liquefaction of soybean straw.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shengjun; Wan, Caixia; Li, Yebo

    2012-01-01

    The feasibility of using crude glycerol to liquefy soybean straw for the production of biopolyols and polyurethane (PU) foams was investigated in this study. Liquefaction conditions of 240 °C, >180 min, 3% sulfuric acid loading, and 10-15% biomass loading were preferred for the production of biopolyols with promising material properties. Biopolyols produced under preferential conditions showed hydroxyl numbers from 440 to 540 mg KOH/g, acid numbers below 5 mg KOH/g, and viscosities from 16 to 45 Pa.s. PU foams produced under preferential conditions showed densities from 0.033 to 0.037 g/cm3 and compressive strength from 148 to 227 kPa. These results suggest that crude glycerol can be used as an alternative solvent for the liquefaction of lignocellulosic biomass such as soybean straw for the production of biopolyols and PU foams. The produced biopolyols and PU foams showed material properties comparable to their analogs from petroleum solvent based liquefaction processes.

  19. Dynamic characterization of frequency response of shock mitigation of a polymethylene diisocyanate (PMDI) based rigid polyurethane foam

    DOE PAGES

    Song, Bo; Nelson, Kevin

    2015-09-01

    Kolsky compression bar experiments were conducted to characterize the shock mitigation response of a polymethylene diisocyanate (PMDI) based rigid polyurethane foam, abbreviated as PMDI foam in this study. The Kolsky bar experimental data was analyzed in the frequency domain with respect to impact energy dissipation and acceleration attenuation to perform a shock mitigation assessment on the foam material. The PMDI foam material exhibits excellent performance in both energy dissipation and acceleration attenuation, particularly for the impact frequency content over 1.5 kHz. This frequency (1.5 kHz) was observed to be independent of specimen thickness and impact speed, which may represent themore » characteristic shock mitigation frequency of the PMDI foam material under investigation. The shock mitigation characteristics of the PMDI foam material were insignificantly influenced by the specimen thickness. As a result, impact speed did have some effect.« less

  20. Dynamic characterization of frequency response of shock mitigation of a polymethylene diisocyanate (PMDI) based rigid polyurethane foam

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Bo; Nelson, Kevin

    2015-09-01

    Kolsky compression bar experiments were conducted to characterize the shock mitigation response of a polymethylene diisocyanate (PMDI) based rigid polyurethane foam, abbreviated as PMDI foam in this study. The Kolsky bar experimental data was analyzed in the frequency domain with respect to impact energy dissipation and acceleration attenuation to perform a shock mitigation assessment on the foam material. The PMDI foam material exhibits excellent performance in both energy dissipation and acceleration attenuation, particularly for the impact frequency content over 1.5 kHz. This frequency (1.5 kHz) was observed to be independent of specimen thickness and impact speed, which may represent the characteristic shock mitigation frequency of the PMDI foam material under investigation. The shock mitigation characteristics of the PMDI foam material were insignificantly influenced by the specimen thickness. As a result, impact speed did have some effect.

  1. Ultrasonication assisted preparation of carbonaceous nanoparticles modified polyurethane foam with good conductivity and high oil absorption properties.

    PubMed

    Shi, Hengchong; Shi, Dean; Yin, Ligang; Yang, Zhihua; Luan, Shifang; Gao, Jiefeng; Zha, Junwei; Yin, Jinghua; Li, Robert K Y

    2014-11-21

    In this work, we report a facile, low cost and time-saving method for the fabrication of compressible, electrically conductive, oil absorptive, cost-effective and flexible polyurethane (PU) foam through ultrasonication induced carbonaceous nanoparticles (CNP) onto flexible PU foam (CNP-PU foam). SEM images showed that the CNP could be firmly anchored onto the PU foam, and made the PU foam surface much rougher. Zero-dimensional carbonaceous nanoparticles were easier to anchor onto the PU foam surface than one-dimensional nanoparticles (e.g., carbon nanotube) or two-dimensional nanoparticles (e.g., graphene oxide). The CNP-PU foam exhibited excellent elasticity and high mechanical durability even when it was subjected to 500 cyclic compression. The CNP-PU foam had excellent absorption of organic solvents up to 121 times the weight of the initial PU foam. In addition, the electrical conductivity of PU foams was considerably increased with the anchoring of CNP onto the matrix. In addition, compression experiments confirmed that the electrical conductivity of CNP-PU foams changed with their compression ratios, thus exhibiting excellent pressure sensitivity. The as-prepared materials have significant potential as oil absorbents, elastic conductors, flexible electrodes, pressure sensors, etc.

  2. Review of the literature on the gaseous products and toxicity generated from the pyrolysis and combustion of rigid polyurethane foams

    SciTech Connect

    Paabo, M.; Levin, B.C.

    1985-12-01

    The literature on rigid polyurethane foam was reviewed with an emphasis on the gaseous products generated under various thermal-decomposition conditions and the toxicity of those products. The review is limited to publications in English through 1984. Carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrogen cyanide (HCN) were the predominant toxicants found among more than 100 other gaseous products. The generation of CO and HCN was found to increase with increasing combustion temperatures. Many test methods were used to assess the acute inhalation toxicity of combustion products from various rigid polyurethane foams. Lethality, incapacitation, physiological, and biochemical parameters were employed as biological and points. In general, the combustion products generated from rigid polyurethane foam in the flaming mode appear to be more toxic than those produced in the non-flaming mode. The LC50 values for 30 minute exposures ranged from 10 to 17 mg/l in the flaming mode and were greater than 34 mg/l in the nonflaming mode. With the exception of one case in which a reactive type phosphorus containng fire retardant was used, the addition of fire retardants to rigid polyurethane foams does not appear to generate unusual toxic combustion products.

  3. Transient Thermal Response of Lightweight Cementitious Composites Made with Polyurethane Foam Waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kismi, M.; Poullain, P.; Mounanga, P.

    2012-07-01

    The development of low-cost lightweight aggregate (LWA) mortars and concretes presents many advantages, especially in terms of lightness and thermal insulation performances of structures. Low-cost LWA mainly comes from the recovery of vegetal or plastic wastes. This article focuses on the characterization of the thermal conductivity of innovative lightweight cementitious composites made with fine particles of rigid polyurethane (PU) foam waste. Five mortars were prepared with various mass substitution rates of cement with PU-foam particles. Their thermal conductivity was measured with two transient methods: the heating-film method and the hot-disk method. The incorporation of PU-foam particles causes a reduction of up to 18 % of the mortar density, accompanied by a significant improvement of the thermal insulating performance. The effect of segregation on the thermal properties of LWA mortars due to the differences of density among the cementitious matrix, sand, and LWA has also been quantified. The application of the hot-disk method reveals a gradient of thermal conductivity along the thickness of the specimens, which could be explained by a non-uniform repartition of fine PU-foam particles and mineral aggregates within the mortars. The results show a spatial variation of the thermal conductivity of the LWA mortars, ranging from 9 % to 19 %. However, this variation remains close to or even lower than that observed on a normal weight aggregate mortar. Finally, a self-consistent approach is proposed to estimate the thermal conductivity of PU-foam cement-based composites.

  4. Material characterization and computer model simulation of low density polyurethane foam used in a rodent traumatic brain injury model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liying; Gurao, Manish; Yang, King H; King, Albert I

    2011-05-15

    Computer models of the head can be used to simulate the events associated with traumatic brain injury (TBI) and quantify biomechanical response within the brain. Marmarou's impact acceleration rodent model is a widely used experimental model of TBI mirroring axonal pathology in humans. The mechanical properties of the low density polyurethane (PU) foam, an essential piece of energy management used in Marmarou's impact device, has not been fully characterized. The foam used in Marmarou's device was tested at seven strain rates ranging from quasi-static to dynamic (0.014-42.86 s⁻¹) to quantify the stress-strain relationships in compression. Recovery rate of the foam after cyclic compression was also determined through the periods of recovery up to three weeks. The experimentally determined stress-strain curves were incorporated into a material model in an explicit Finite Element (FE) solver to validate the strain rate dependency of the FE foam model. Compression test results have shown that the foam used in the rodent impact acceleration model is strain rate dependent. The foam has been found to be reusable for multiple impacts. However the stress resistance of used foam is reduced to 70% of the new foam. The FU_CHANG_FOAM material model in an FE solver has been found to be adequate to simulate this rate sensitive foam.

  5. Zwitterionic monomer graft copolymerization onto polyurethane surface through a PEG spacer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jingjing; Xu, Weilin

    2010-04-01

    A new zwitterionic surface was obtained by a novel three-step grafting procedure. The zwitterionic monomer was introduced by cerium-induced graft copolymerization in the presence of N,N'-methylene bisacrylamide (MBAA) as cross-linking agent. Attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis confirmed the MBAA could stimulate zwitterionic monomer grafting onto the membrane surface. Surface properties were also determined by atomic force microscope (AFM) and water contact angle. The hemocompatibility of the modified PU membranes was evaluated by the activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), thrombin time (TT) and prothrombin time (PT). The TT and APTT of PU were significantly prolonged by the zwitterion of sulfobetaine monomer grafting copolymerization. The new polyurethane membrane could have a great potential in biomedical applications.

  6. Ventilation Guidance To Promote the Safe Use of Spray Polyurethane Foam (SPF) Insulation, Incluyendo la Versión de Español

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This guidance describes basic ventilation principles and strategies to help protect workers and building occupants and promote the safe use of spray polyurethane foam (SPF) insulation. Guia para la ventilacion sobre la application del aerosol de espuma.

  7. Accelerated Aging of BKC 44306-10 Rigid Polyurethane Foam: FT-IR Spectroscopy, Dimensional Analysis, and Micro Computed Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbertson, Robert D.; Patterson, Brian M.; Smith, Zachary

    2014-01-02

    An accelerated aging study of BKC 44306-10 rigid polyurethane foam was carried out. Foam samples were aged in a nitrogen atmosphere at three different temperatures: 50 °C, 65 °C, and 80 °C. Foam samples were periodically removed from the aging canisters at 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, and 15 month intervals when FT-IR spectroscopy, dimensional analysis, and mechanical testing experiments were performed. Micro Computed Tomography imaging was also employed to study the morphology of the foams. Over the course of the aging study the foams the decreased in size by a magnitude of 0.001 inches per inch of foam. Micro CT showed the heterogeneous nature of the foam structure likely resulting from flow effects during the molding process. The effect of aging on the compression and tensile strength of the foam was minor and no cause for concern. FT-IR spectroscopy was used to follow the foam chemistry. However, it was difficult to draw definitive conclusions about the changes in chemical nature of the materials due to large variability throughout the samples.

  8. Synthesis of Lipid Based Polyols from 1-butene Metathesized Palm Oil for Use in Polyurethane Foam Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasidharan Pillai, Prasanth Kumar

    This thesis explores the use of 1-butene cross metathesized palm oil (PMTAG) as a feedstock for preparation of polyols which can be used to prepare rigid and flexible polyurethane foams. PMTAG is advantageous over its precursor feedstock, palm oil, for synthesizing polyols, especially for the preparation of rigid foams, because of the reduction of dangling chain effects associated with the omega unsaturated fatty acids. 1-butene cross metathesis results in shortening of the unsaturated fatty acid moieties, with approximately half of the unsaturated fatty acids assuming terminal double bonds. It was shown that the associated terminal OH groups introduced through epoxidation and hydroxylation result in rigid foams with a compressive strength approximately 2.5 times higher than that of rigid foams from palm and soybean oil polyols. Up to 1.5 times improvement in the compressive strength value of the rigid foams from the PMTAG polyol was further obtained following dry and/or solvent assisted fractionation of PMTAG in order to reduce the dangling chain effects associated with the saturated components of the PMTAG. Flexible foams with excellent recovery was achieved from the polyols of PMTAG and the high olein fraction of PMTAG indicating that these bio-derived polyurethane foams may be suitable for flexible foam applications. PMTAG polyols with controlled OH values prepared via an optimized green solvent free synthetic strategy provided flexible foams with lower compressive strength and higher recovery; i.e., better flexible foam potential compared to the PMTAG derived foams with non-controlled OH values. Overall, this study has revealed that the dangling chain issues of vegetable oils can be addressed in part using appropriate chemical and physical modification techniques such as cross metathesis and fractionation, respectively. In fact, the rigidity and the compressive strength of the polyurethane foams were in very close agreement with the percentage of terminal

  9. Removal of ammonia by immobilized Nitrosomonas europaea in a biotrickling filter packed with polyurethane foam.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, Martín; Gómez, José Manuel; Aroca, Germán; Cantero, Domingo

    2009-03-01

    A biotrickling filter with Nitrosomonas europaea immobilized on polyurethane foam is proposed for treating ammonia contaminated air. The effect of the surface velocity of the recirculation medium, nitrite concentration, pH, empty bed residence time (EBRT) and ammonia inlet load on the NH(3) removal process was investigated. The total amount of biomass immobilized on the carrier was 3.29+/-0.52 x 10(10) cells g(-1) dry carrier. The maximum elimination capacity of the biotrickling filter was 270 g Nm(-3)h(-1) at pH 7.5, an EBRT of 11s, and nitrite concentrations below 100mM. These results show that system studied can be considered as a viable alternative for the treatment of gaseous emissions containing high concentrations of ammonia.

  10. Preconcentration of flavonoids on polyurethane foam and their direct determination by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Dmitrienko, Stanislava G; Apyari, Vladimir V; Kudrinskaya, Vera A; Stepanova, Alexandra V

    2012-12-15

    Sorption preconcentration of flavonoids quercetin, rutin, chrysin, morin, naringenin and naringin on polyurethane foam was investigated. Several parameters that could affect the preconcentration efficiency were evaluated. The preconcentration efficiency is more than 75% for all the flavonoids except for those that are carbohydrate substituted (preconcentration efficiency less than 11%). This can be used for the separation of these two types of flavonoids. An ability of some flavonoids to absorb light in PUF phase allows their direct determination by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. Validation of calibration linearity, reproducibility, limits of detection and quantification was performed. The method developed allows to determine flavonoids with detection limits 0.01-0.2 μg mL(-1). The method was utilized for the determination of quercetin in some plant extracts.

  11. Polyurethane foam pica in a patient with excessive interdialytic weight gain.

    PubMed

    Iyasere, Osasuyi; Allington, Ying; Cafferkey, Michele

    2010-08-31

    Maintaining fluid balance in haemodialysis patients is important because of the adverse effects of excessive interdialytic weight gain. This often requires fluid restriction that patients often struggle with. We report a case of a 31-year-old female diabetic patient on haemodialysis with repeated excessive interdialytic weight gains despite fluid restriction and dry weight adjustment. It was subsequently discovered that she devised an unusual, albeit unsuccessful, strategy of eating the polyurethane foam from her dialysis chair while increasing her fluid intake hoping that it would absorb excess water in the gut! This under-diagnosed phenomenon known as pica has been reported in renal patients with substances such as ice, clay and baking soda.

  12. Immobilization of Streptomyces thermotolerans 11432 on polyurethane foam to improve production of acetylisovaleryltylosin.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hongji; Wang, Weihua; Liu, Jiaheng; Caiyin, Qinggele; Qiao, Jianjun

    2015-01-01

    In this study, polyurethane foam (PUF) was chemically treated to immobilize Streptomyces thermotolerans 11432 for semi-continuous production of acetylisovaleryltylosin (AIV). Based on experimental results, positive cross-linked PUF (PCPUF) was selected as the most effective carrier according to immobilized cell mass. The effect of adsorption time on immobilized mass was investigated. AIV concentration (33.54 mg/l) in batch fermentations with immobilized cells was higher than with free cells (20.34 mg/l). In repeated batch fermentations with immobilized S. thermotolerans 11432 using PCPUF cubes, high AIV concentrations and conversion rates were attained, ranging from 25.56 to 34.37 mg/l and 79.93 to 86.31 %, respectively. Significantly, this method provides a feasible strategy for efficient AIV production and offers the potential for large-scale production.

  13. Pollutant emissions during the pyrolysis and combustion of flexible polyurethane foam.

    PubMed

    Garrido, María A; Font, Rafael; Conesa, Juan A

    2016-06-01

    Thermal decomposition of flexible polyurethane foam (FPUF) was studied under nitrogen and air atmospheres at 550°C and 850°C using a laboratory scale reactor to analyse the evolved products. Ammonia, hydrogen cyanide and nitrile compounds were obtained in high yields in pyrolysis at the lower temperature, whereas at 850°C polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and other semivolatile compounds, especially compounds containing nitrogen (benzonitrile, aniline, quinolone and indene) were the most abundant products. Different behaviour was observed in the evolution of polychlorodibenzo-p-dioxins and furans (PCDD/Fs) at 550°C and 850°C. At 550°C, the less chlorinated congeners, mainly PCDF, were more abundant. Contrarily, at 850°C the most chlorinated PCDD were dominant. In addition, the total yields of PCDD/Fs in the pyrolysis and combustion runs at 850°C were low and quite similar.

  14. Sodium hydrogen carbonate as an alternative blowing agent in the preparation of palm-based polyurethane foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakir, Amira Shakim Abdul; Badri, Khairiah Haji; Hua, Chia Chin

    2016-11-01

    An environmental-friendly blowing agent has been used to fabricate flexible polyurethane (PU) foam. Polyurethane foam was prepared from palm kernel oil-based monoester polyol (PKO-p) via prepolymerization method. Acetone has been used as solvent in this study. The developed polyurethane foam was characterized using tensile, differential scanning calorimetry analysis (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), optical microscope and drop shape analyzer. The mechanical properties of the PU-reference (PU-R) and PU-NaHCO3 foam was analyzed by tensile using ASTM D 3574-01. From the results, the elongation of PU- NaHCO3 shows reduction to 26.3 % compared to PU-R. The DSC showed two glass transition temperatures in all samples that belonged to the PU-R and PU-NaHCO3. TGA revealed that the incorporation of sodium hydrogen carbonate into the PU system did not show significant difference as compared to the control PU. The morphology of both PU was investigated using optical microscope. Contact angle has been measured to determine the hydrophobicity of the PU. The PU- NaHCO3 exhibited an increase in contact angle (93.1°).

  15. Hydroxyalkylation and polyether polyol grafting of graphene tailored for graphene/polyurethane nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Appel, Anna-Katharina; Thomann, Ralf; Mülhaupt, Rolf

    2013-08-01

    Graphene functionalization by hydroxyalkylation and grafting with polyether polyols enables polyurethane (PU) nanocomposites formation by in situ polymerization with isocyanates combined with effective covalent interfacial coupling. Functionalized graphene (FG) hydroxylation is achieved either by alkylation, transesterification, or grafting of thermally reduced graphite oxide. In the presence of K2 CO3 as catalyst the reaction of FG-OH with ethylene carbonate at 180 °C affords hydroxyethylated FG, whereas transesterification with castor oil produces riconoleiate-modified FG polyols. In the "grafting-from" process, FG-alkoholate macro initiators initiate the graft polymerization of propylene oxide to produce hybrid FG polyols containing 38 and 59 wt% oligopropylene oxide. In the "grafting-to" process 3-ethyl-3-hydroxymethyl-oxetane is cationically polymerized onto FG-OH, producing novel hyperbranched FG-based polyether polyols. Whereas hydroxylation and grafting of FG greatly improve FG dispersion in organic solvents, polyols and even PU, as confirmed by transmission electron microscopy, matrix reinforcement of FG/PU is impaired by increasing alkyl chain length and polyol graft copolymer content.

  16. Straightforward approach to graft bioactive polysaccharides onto polyurethane surfaces using an ionic liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigot, Sandra; Louarn, Guy; Kébir, Nasreddine; Burel, Fabrice

    2014-09-01

    Surface properties directly affect the performance of a material in a biological environment. In this study, the goal was to develop a simple procedure allowing the grafting of antibacterial polysaccharides onto biomedical grade polyurethanes (e.g. Tecothane®). Thus, a straightforward chemical pathway involving an isothiocyanate-alcohol reaction in an ionic liquid (IL) was developed. PU isothiocyanted surfaces (PU-NCS) were first prepared by reacting p-phenylene diisothiocyanate with the surface urethane groups. Then, unmodified bioactive seaweed polysaccharides were directly grafted onto the surface, in mild conditions. The selected IL, i.e. 1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium phosphate, was of particular interest since this liquid worked as solvent for p-phenylene diisothiocyanate and the polysaccharides and as catalyst for the grafting reactions. Successful grafting of the different polysaccharides was attested by changes in the surface functional groups, using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Atomic force microscopy (AFM) showed that polysaccharide grafting, slightly increased the surface roughness from 1.9 to more than 7 nm. Contact angle with water decreased from 88° (for native PU) to around 75° after polysaccharide grafting, attesting a more hydrophilic surface. This procedure would be transposed to the grafting onto PU surfaces of any macromolecule of interest bearing hydroxyl, thiol or amine groups.

  17. Effect of replacing polyol by organosolv and kraft lignin on the property and structure of rigid polyurethane foam

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Lignin is one of the three major components in plant cell walls, and it can be isolated (dissolved) from the cell wall in pretreatment or chemical pulping. However, there is a lack of high-value applications for lignin, and the commonest proposal for lignin is power and steam generation through combustion. Organosolv ethanol process is one of the effective pretreatment methods for woody biomass for cellulosic ethanol production, and kraft process is a dominant chemical pulping method in paper industry. In the present research, the lignins from organosolv pretreatment and kraft pulping were evaluated to replace polyol for producing rigid polyurethane foams (RPFs). Results Petroleum-based polyol was replaced with hardwood ethanol organosolv lignin (HEL) or hardwood kraft lignin (HKL) from 25% to 70% (molar percentage) in preparing rigid polyurethane foam. The prepared foams contained 12-36% (w/w) HEL or 9-28% (w/w) HKL. The density, compressive strength, and cellular structure of the prepared foams were investigated and compared. Chain extenders were used to improve the properties of the RPFs. Conclusions It was found that lignin was chemically crosslinked not just physically trapped in the rigid polyurethane foams. The lignin-containing foams had comparable structure and strength up to 25-30% (w/w) HEL or 19-23% (w/w) HKL addition. The results indicated that HEL performed much better in RPFs and could replace more polyol at the same strength than HKL because the former had a better miscibility with the polyol than the latter. Chain extender such as butanediol could improve the strength of lignin-containing RPFs. PMID:23356502

  18. Osteoinductive PolyHIPE Foams as Injectable Bone Grafts

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Jennifer L.; McEnery, Madison A.P.; Pearce, Hannah; Whitely, Michael E.; Munoz-Pinto, Dany J.; Hahn, Mariah S.; Li, Huinan; Sears, Nicholas A.

    2016-01-01

    We have recently fabricated biodegradable polyHIPEs as injectable bone grafts and characterized the mechanical properties, pore architecture, and cure rates. In this study, calcium phosphate nanoparticles and demineralized bone matrix (DBM) particles were incorporated into injectable polyHIPE foams to promote osteoblastic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Upon incorporation of each type of particle, stable monoliths were formed with compressive properties comparable to control polyHIPEs. Pore size quantification indicated a negligible effect of all particles on emulsion stability and resulting pore architecture. Alizarin red calcium staining illustrated the incorporation of calcium phosphate particles at the pore surface, while picrosirius red collagen staining illustrated collagen-rich DBM particles within the monoliths. Osteoinductive particles had a negligible effect on the compressive modulus (∼30 MPa), which remained comparable to human cancellous bone values. All polyHIPE compositions promoted human MSC viability (∼90%) through 2 weeks. Furthermore, gene expression analysis indicated the ability of all polyHIPE compositions to promote osteogenic differentiation through the upregulation of bone-specific markers compared to a time zero control. These findings illustrate the potential for these osteoinductive polyHIPEs to promote osteogenesis and validate future in vivo evaluation. Overall, this work demonstrates the ability to incorporate a range of bioactive components into propylene fumarate dimethacrylate-based injectable polyHIPEs to increase cellular interactions and direct specific behavior without compromising scaffold architecture and resulting properties for various tissue engineering applications. PMID:26739120

  19. Osteoinductive PolyHIPE Foams as Injectable Bone Grafts.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Jennifer L; McEnery, Madison A P; Pearce, Hannah; Whitely, Michael E; Munoz-Pinto, Dany J; Hahn, Mariah S; Li, Huinan; Sears, Nicholas A; Cosgriff-Hernandez, Elizabeth

    2016-03-01

    We have recently fabricated biodegradable polyHIPEs as injectable bone grafts and characterized the mechanical properties, pore architecture, and cure rates. In this study, calcium phosphate nanoparticles and demineralized bone matrix (DBM) particles were incorporated into injectable polyHIPE foams to promote osteoblastic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Upon incorporation of each type of particle, stable monoliths were formed with compressive properties comparable to control polyHIPEs. Pore size quantification indicated a negligible effect of all particles on emulsion stability and resulting pore architecture. Alizarin red calcium staining illustrated the incorporation of calcium phosphate particles at the pore surface, while picrosirius red collagen staining illustrated collagen-rich DBM particles within the monoliths. Osteoinductive particles had a negligible effect on the compressive modulus (∼30 MPa), which remained comparable to human cancellous bone values. All polyHIPE compositions promoted human MSC viability (∼90%) through 2 weeks. Furthermore, gene expression analysis indicated the ability of all polyHIPE compositions to promote osteogenic differentiation through the upregulation of bone-specific markers compared to a time zero control. These findings illustrate the potential for these osteoinductive polyHIPEs to promote osteogenesis and validate future in vivo evaluation. Overall, this work demonstrates the ability to incorporate a range of bioactive components into propylene fumarate dimethacrylate-based injectable polyHIPEs to increase cellular interactions and direct specific behavior without compromising scaffold architecture and resulting properties for various tissue engineering applications.

  20. Experimental determination of drag coefficients in low-density polyurethane foam

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, M L

    2006-04-18

    We describe several experiments performed at the LLNL Site 300 firing range and on the LLNL 1/3 scale gun to investigate the deceleration of small projectiles (l {approx} 3-5 [mm]) in low-density foam ({rho} {approx} 0.08-0.32 [g/cm{sup 3}]). The experiments at the firing range researched a passive velocity diagnostic based on Faraday's law of induction, while experiments on the 1/3 scale gun investigated the effects of varying projectile surface area, projectile shape, and foam density on the drag coefficient c{sub d}. Analysis shows that the velocity diagnostic has an uncertainty on the order of 1 percent for projectiles with velocity v {approx} 0.8-1.2 [km/s]. The 1/3 scale gun experiments, dubbed the Krispy Kreme series, included nine shots considering the combinations of 3 projectile surface areas with 3 target densities. The experiments used Tantalum square surface area block projectiles (with an initial velocity v{sub 0} {approx} 1.2 [km/s], a common thickness T = 2.67 [mm], and square side lengths of 3, 4, and 5 [mm]) decelerating in polyurethane foams (with densities {rho}{sub f} of 0.08, 0.16 and 0.32 [g/cm{sup 3}]). Standard fluid models of the Krispy Kreme experiments predict Reynolds numbers Re {approx} 10{sup 5} - 10{sup 6}, Mach numbers Ma {approx} 0.5-2.0, and drag coefficients c{sub d} {approx} 2-3. However, the data indicate that c{sub d} = 1.1-1.2 (c{sub d} = 1.7) for all three block projectiles in the 0.08 and 0.16 [g/cm{sup 3}] targets (0.32 [g/cm{sup 3}] target). First, we conclude that the drag force on projectiles in solid polyurethane foam is less than in fluids with equivalent dimensionless parameters. This result is also supported by an additional Krispy Kreme experiment that used a disk projectile (with diameter d = 4.51 [mm] and thickness T = 2.67 [mm]) penetrating a target with density {rho} = 0.16 [g/cm{sup 3}], i.e., the fluid-like c{sub d} = 1.15 while the measured c{sub d} = 0.63. Second, we conclude that the measured drag

  1. Examples of the application of optical process and quality sensing (OPQS) to beer brewing and polyurethane foaming processes.

    PubMed

    Engelhard, Sonja; Kumke, Michael U; Löhmannsröben, Hans-Gerd

    2006-03-01

    Optical methods play an important role in process analytical technologies (PAT). Four examples of optical process and quality sensing (OPQS) are presented, which are based on three important experimental techniques: near-infrared absorption, luminescence quenching, and a novel method, photon density wave (PDW) spectroscopy. These are used to evaluate four process and quality parameters related to beer brewing and polyurethane (PU) foaming processes: the ethanol content and the oxygen (O2) content in beer, the biomass in a bioreactor, and the cellular structures of PU foam produced in a pilot production plant.

  2. Healing efficiency of shape memory polyurethane fiber reinforced syntactic foam under applied load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogunmekan, Babatunde

    Shape memory composite materials have received a great deal of interest in recent structural developments, both in sandwich and in lightweight structures. Experimental procedures involving the free body healing of these materials have been carried out; however, it is important to investigate the healing behaviors of these SMP materials while under load. In this study, syntactic foams reinforced with strain-hardened short-shape memory polyurethane fibers (SMPUFs) were prepared to evaluate their ability to heal wide-opened cracks using the two-step biomimetic close-then-heal (CTH) self-healing scheme while under varying loads. The syntactic foam samples manufactured consisted of an epoxy matrix with dispersed thermoplastic particles, glass microballoons and short SMPUFs. The SMPUF strands were cold-drawn (stretched-then-released) for up to four cycles and then cut to 10 mm short fibers before casting the polymer matrix. Three types of syntactic foam specimens, consisting of 5%, 10%, and 15% thermoplastic particle volume fraction compositions, respectively, were manufactured, and notched beam samples were then prepared. Fracture-healing by uniaxial tension was conducted for five cycles on each sample. Material characterization techniques, such as scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), were utilized to highlight the crack healing characteristics and thermal properties. In addition, a high-resolution charge-coupled device (CCD) camera with a resolution of 3.7 x 3.7 μm/pixel was used to capture the crack tip opening displacement (CTOD). It is seen that the healing ability of the composite varies with changes in both the load carried and the volume fraction of thermoplastic particles. As the thermoplastic volume fraction increased from 5% to 10% to 15%, the tensile strength values recorded decreased, but there was also an increase in the healing efficiency. Moreover, SEM images revealed partial healing in samples with lower

  3. Identification of CFC and HCFC substitutes for blowing polyurethane foam insulation products. Report for September 1993-August 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, P.H.; Tunkel, J.L.; Hendriks, R.V.

    1996-04-01

    The paper gives results of a systematic search to identify additional candidates as third-generation blowing agents, chemical compounds that are not stratospheric ozone depleters that can be used as substitutes for chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) and hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC) blowing agents in rigid polyurethane foam insulating materials. To identify the most promising substitutes, potential third-generation blowing agents were ranked using a methodology developed for this project.

  4. Treatment of concentrated industrial wastewaters originating from oil shale and the like by electrolysis polyurethane foam interaction

    DOEpatents

    Tiernan, Joan E.

    1991-01-01

    Highly concentrated and toxic petroleum-based and synthetic fuels wastewaters such as oil shale retort water are treated in a unit treatment process by electrolysis in a reactor containing oleophilic, ionized, open-celled polyurethane foams and subjected to mixing and l BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION The invention described herein arose in the course of, or under, Contract No. DE-AC03-76SF00098 between the U.S. Department of Energy and the University of California.

  5. A study of aerosol entrapment and the influence of wind speed, chamber design and foam density on polyurethane foam passive air samplers used for persistent organic pollutants.

    PubMed

    Chaemfa, Chakra; Wild, Edward; Davison, Brian; Barber, Jonathan L; Jones, Kevin C

    2009-06-01

    Polyurethane foam disks are a cheap and versatile tool for sampling persistent organic pollutants (POPs) from the air in ambient, occupational and indoor settings. This study provides important background information on the ways in which the performance of these commonly used passive air samplers may be influenced by the key environmental variables of wind speed and aerosol entrapment. Studies were performed in the field, a wind tunnel and with microscopy techniques, to investigate deployment conditions and foam density influence on gas phase sampling rates (not obtained in this study) and aerosol trapping. The study showed: wind speed inside the sampler is greater on the upper side of the sampling disk than the lower side and tethered samplers have higher wind speeds across the upper and lower surfaces of the foam disk at a wind speed > or = 4 m/s; particles are trapped on the foam surface and within the body of the foam disk; fine (<1 um) particles can form clusters of larger size inside the foam matrix. Whilst primarily designed to sample gas phase POPs, entrapment of particles ensures some 'sampling' of particle bound POPs species, such as higher molecular weight PAHs and PCDD/Fs. Further work is required to investigate how quantitative such entrapment or 'sampling' is under different ambient conditions, and with different aerosol sizes and types.

  6. Polyurethane rigid foam, a proven thermal insulating material for applications between +130°C and -196°C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demharter, Anton

    Polyurethanes are high molecular weight polymers based on the polyaddition of polyfunctional hydroxyl-group containing compounds and polyisocyanates. A wide variety of properties can be tailored to fulfil the requirements of different applications: soft to hard, plastic, elastic or thermoset, compact or foamed. Compared with other insulating materials, PUR rigid foam is highly competitive. There are five product-related advantages: lowest thermal conductivity, high mechanical and chemical properties at both high and low temperatures, all major international fire safety requirements can be satisfied, the ability to form sandwich structures with various facer materials, and the new generation of PUR is CFC-free and recyclable. Rigid polyurethane foams perform well in most areas of low-temperature insulations. Products in density ranging from approximately 30 to 200 kg m -3 withstand temperatures down to -196°C. Typical applications are: refrigerated vehicles, road and rail tankers, vessels for refrigerated cargo, pipelines, liquid gas tanks for LPG and LNG and cryogenic wind tunnels. The paper presents applications, corresponding properties of the rigid foams used, and also other insulating materials in competition to PUR are discussed.

  7. Cancer incidence and mortality in the Swedish polyurethane foam manufacturing industry.

    PubMed Central

    Hagmar, L; Welinder, H; Mikoczy, Z

    1993-01-01

    Toluene diisocyanate (TDI) and methylene diphenyldiisocyanate (MDI) are used in large quantities in the polyurethane foam manufacturing industry. Both substances are mutagenic and at least TDI is carcinogenic to animals, but the occupational hazard with respect to cancer is not known. Cancer incidence and mortality patterns were therefore investigated in a cohort of 4154 workers from nine Swedish plants manufacturing polyurethane foam, employed for at least one year. Each workplace and job task in the nine plants was categorically assessed for each calendar year by an experienced occupational hygienist, for "no exposure", "low or intermittent exposure", or "apparent exposure" to TDI and MDI. The observed deficit for all cause mortality (standardised mortality ratio (SMR) 0.78, (95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.66-0.93) became smaller (SMR 0.92) excluding the first 10 years since the start of exposure and was ascribed to a healthy worker effect. No increased risk for death from bronchial obstructive diseases was found. An almost statistically significant deficit occurred for all malignant neoplasms (standardised incidence ratio (SIR) 0.81, 95% CI 0.63-1.02); slight (not significant) increased risks were found for rectal cancer (SIR 1.66) and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (SIR 1.53). The SIR for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma increased to 2.80 (95% CI 0.76-7.16) when the first 10 years since first exposure were excluded from the observation period. The corresponding figure for rectal cancer was 1.92 (95% CI 0.52-4.92). Further restricting the analysis to those who had experienced an apparent exposure to TDI or MDI increased the SIR for both rectal cancer (3.19, 95% CI 0.66-9.33), and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (3.03, 95% CI 0.37-10.9). These estimates were based, however, on few incident cases. As the cohort is still young and little time has elapsed since the start of exposure, future follow ups will enable a more conclusive evaluation. PMID:8392362

  8. Transition from Forward Smoldering to Flaming in Small Polyurethane Foam Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Ilan, A.; Putzeys, O.; Rein, G.; Fernandez-Pello, A. C.

    2004-01-01

    Experimental observations are presented of the effect of the flow velocity and oxygen concentration, and of a thermal radiant flux, on the transition from smoldering to flaming in forward smoldering of small samples of polyurethane foam with a gas/solid interface. The experiments are part of a project studying the transition from smolder to flaming under conditions encountered in spacecraft facilities, i.e., microgravity, low velocity variable oxygen concentration flows. Because the microgravity experiments are planned for the International Space Station, the foam samples had to be limited in size for safety and launch mass reasons. The feasible sample size is too small for smolder to self propagate because of heat losses to the surrounding environment. Thus, the smolder propagation and the transition to flaming had to be assisted by reducing the heat losses to the surroundings and increasing the oxygen concentration. The experiments are conducted with small parallelepiped samples vertically placed in a wind tunnel. Three of the sample lateral-sides are maintained at elevated temperature and the fourth side is exposed to an upward flow and to a radiant flux. It is found that decreasing the flow velocity and increasing its oxygen concentration, and/or increasing the radiant flux enhances the transition to flaming, and reduces the delay time to transition. Limiting external ambient conditions for the transition to flaming are reported for the present experimental set-up. The results show that smolder propagation and the transition to flaming can occur in relatively small fuel samples if the external conditions are appropriate. The results also indicate that transition to flaming occurs in the char left behind by the smolder reaction, and it has the characteristics of a gas-phase ignition induced by the smolder reaction, which acts as the source of both gaseous fuel and heat.

  9. Speciation of inorganic antimony (III & V) employing polyurethane foam loaded with bromopyrogallol red.

    PubMed

    Vinhal, Jonas O; Gonçalves, Aline D; Cruz, Graziela F B; Cassella, Ricardo J

    2016-04-01

    In this work, the speciation analysis of inorganic antimony (Sb(III) and Sb(V)) is proposed using polyurethane foam loaded with bromopyrogallol red (PUF-BPR) as a selective sorbent for Sb(III). The quantification of Sb in the solutions was performed by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GF AAS), and several variables that could affect the performance of the method were carefully evaluated. The best conditions for the sorption of Sb(III) were achieved by shaking 50mg of PUF-BPR with the solutions containing Sb(III) at pH 4.0 for 90 min. In this condition, the retention of Sb(V) was not significant, whereas the removal of Sb(III) from the solution was higher than 95%. The desorption of Sb(III) from loaded PUF-BPR was possible by shaking the loaded foam with 7.5 mL of a 2.5 mol L(-1) HNO3 solution for 30 min. No interference of metal cations was observed on the solid-phase extraction of Sb(III) by PUF-BPR. The developed method was applied in the speciation analysis of antimony in river water samples fortified with different concentrations of Sb(III) and Sb(V). Also, we performed the determination of Sb(III) in a sample of a Sb-based drug utilized in the treatment of leishmaniasis. The results show that Sb(III) can be separated from high concentrations of Sb(V), since recoveries in the range of 81-110% were obtained in the analysis of the samples. The method presented limits of detection and quantification of 0.6 and 2 µg L(-1), respectively, for Sb(III) and 1 and 3 µg L(-1) for Sb(V), respectively.

  10. Understanding and Improving the Elastic Compressive Modulus of Fibre Reinforced Soy-Based Polyurethane Foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Sadakat

    Soy-based polyurethane foams (PUFs) were reinforced with fibres of different aspect ratios to improve the compressive modulus. Each of the three fibre types reinforced PUF differently. Shorter micro-crystalline cellulose fibres were found embedded inside the cell struts of PUF and reinforced them. The reinforcement was attributed to be stress transfer from the matrix to the fibre by comparing the experimental results to those predicted by micro-mechanical models for short fibre reinforced composites. The reinforced cell struts increased the overall compressive modulus of the foam. Longer glass fibres (470 microns, length) provided the best reinforcement. These fibres were found to be larger than the cell diameters. The micro-mechanical models could not predict the reinforcement provided by the longer glass fibres. The models predicted negligible reinforcement because the very low modulus PUF should not transfer load to the higher modulus fibres. However, using a finite element model, it was determined that the fibres were providing reinforcement through direct fibre interaction with each other. Intermediate length glass fibres (260 microns, length) were found to poorly reinforce the PUF and should be avoided. These fibres were too short to interact with each other and were on average too large to embed and reinforce cell struts. In order to produce natural fibre reinforced PUFs in the future, a novel device was invented. The purpose of the device is to deliver natural fibres at a constant mass flow rate. The device was found to consistently meter individual loose natural fibre tufts at a mass flow rate of 2 grams per second. However, the device is not robust and requires further development to deliver a fine stream of natural fibre that can mix and interact with the curing polymeric components of PUF. A design plan was proposed to address the remaining issues with the device.

  11. Piloted Ignition to Flaming in Smoldering Fire-Retarded Polyurethane Foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putzeys, O.; Fernandez-Pello, A. C.; Urban, D. L.

    2007-01-01

    Experimental results are presented on the piloted transition from smoldering to flaming in the fire-retarded polyurethane foam Pyrell . The samples are small rectangular blocks with a square cross section, vertically placed in the wall of a vertical wind tunnel. Three of the vertical sample sides are insulated and the fourth side is exposed to an upward oxidizer flow of variable oxygen concentration and to a variable radiant heat flux. The gases emitted from the smoldering reaction pass upwards through a pilot, which consists of a coiled resistance heating wire. In order to compensate for the solid-phase and gas-phase effects of the fire retardants on the piloted transition from smoldering to flaming in Pyrell, it was necessary to assist the process by increasing the power supplied to the smolder igniter and the pilot (compared to that used for non-fire retarded foam). The experiments indicate that the piloted transition from smoldering to flaming occurs when the gaseous mixture at the pilot passes the lean flammability limit. It was found that increasing the oxygen concentration or the external heat flux increases the likelihood of a piloted transition from smoldering to flaming, and generally decreases the time delay to transition. The piloted transition to flaming is observed in oxygen concentrations of 23% and above in both low-density and high-density Pyrell. Comparisons with previous experiments show that the piloted transition from smoldering to flaming is possible under a wider range of external conditions (i.e. lower oxygen concentration) than the spontaneous transition from smoldering to flaming. The results show that the fire retardants in Pyrell are very effective in preventing the piloted transition to flaming in normal air, but Pyrell is susceptible to smoldering and the piloted transition to flaming in oxygen-enriched environments. Therefore, precautions should be taken in the design of applications of Pyrell in oxygen-enriched environments to reduce

  12. System Description for the K-25/K-27 D&D Project Polyurethane Foam Delivery System, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Boris, G.

    2008-02-21

    The Foam Delivery System used in the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) project for the K-25/K-27 Buildings at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) is comprised of a trailer-mounted Gusmer{reg_sign} H20/35 Pro-TEC Proportioning Unit and the associated equipment to convey electrical power, air, and foam component material to the unit. This high-pressure, plural-component polyurethane foam pouring system will be used to fill process gas and non-process equipment/piping (PGE/P) within the K-25/K-27 Buildings with polyurethane foam to immobilize contaminants prior to removal. The system creates foam by mixing isocyanate and polyol resin (Resin) component materials. Currently, the project plans to utilize up to six foaming units simultaneously during peak foaming activities. Also included in this system description are the foam component material storage containers that will be used for storage of the component material drums in a staging area outside of the K-25/K-27 Buildings. The Foam Delivery System and foam component material storage enclosures (i.e., Foaming Component Protective Enclosures) used to store polymeric methylene diphenyl diisocyanate (PMDI) component material are identified as Safety Significant (SS) Structures, Systems and Components (SSC) in the Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) for the project, Documented Safety Analysis for the K-25 and K-27 Facilities at the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, DSA-ET-K-25/K-27-0001.

  13. Generation of Vascular Graft Biomaterials via the Modification of Polyurethane with Hyaluronic Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, Amaliris

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of mortality in the United States, necessitating surgical interventions such as small diameter (I.D. <6 mm) bypass grafting. Although the use of autologous veins as small diameter grafts produces favorable results, their limited availability provides a significant obstacle. Meanwhile, several synthetic materials have demonstrated success as large-diameter vascular grafts, but exhibit poor patency and high failure rates in small-diameter applications. Based on these limitations and the clinical issues associated with them, it is clear that there is a significant need to develop new materials for cardiovascular and blood-contacting applications that could be used to fabricate small-diameter vascular grafts. Thus, in this thesis we have designed and characterized a new polymer that is composed of both synthetic and natural elements with the goal of generating a material that is appropriate for use in cardiovascular applications. Specifically, we describe the modification of polyurethane (PU), a synthetic polymer with many favorable physical characteristics, with hyaluronic acid (HA), a native glycosaminoglycan that possesses anti-thrombotic properties as well as the ability to modulate endothelial cell proliferation in a molecular weight-dependent manner. The goal of the present work was to assess in detail the impact of 1) HA molecular weight, 2) HA quantity, and 3) the method of HA incorporation (bulk vs. surface-grafted) on the vascular-specific performance of polyurethane-HA (PU-HA) materials, under static conditions and upon exposure to physiological shear stresses. The initial findings presented in this thesis indicate that these PU-HA materials possess many of the physical and biological properties that are necessary for implementation in vascular applications. These materials were able to simultaneously address the three major design criteria in vascular graft fabrication: hemocompatibility, endothelialization, and

  14. Road Maintenance Experience Using Polyurethane (PU) Foam Injection System and Geocrete Soil Stabilization as Ground Rehabilitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fakhar, A. M. M.; Asmaniza, A.

    2016-07-01

    There are many types of ground rehabilation and improvement that can be consider and implement in engineering construction works for soil improvement in order to prevent road profile deformation in later stage. However, when comes to road maintenance especially on operated expressways, not all method can be apply directly as it must comply to opreation's working window and lane closure basis. Key factors that considering ideal proposal for ground rehabilitation are time, cost, quality and most importantly practicality. It should provide long lifespan structure in order to reduce continuous cycle of maintenance. Thus, this paper will present two approaches for ground rehabilitation, namely Polyurethane (PU) Foam Injection System and Geocrete Soil Stabilization. The first approach is an injection system which consists two-parts chemical grout of Isocynate and Polyol when mixed together within soil structure through injection will polymerized with volume expansion. The strong expansion of grouting causes significant compression and compacting of the surrounding soil and subsequently improve ground properties and uplift sunken structure. The later is a cold in-place recyclying whereby mixture process that combines in-situ soil materials, cement, white powder (alkaline) additive and water to produce hard yet flexible and durable ground layer that act as solid foundation with improved bearing capacity. The improvement of the mechanical behaviour of soil through these two systems is investigated by an extensive testing programme which includes in-situ and laboratory test in determining properties such as strength, stiffness, compressibility, bearing capacity, differential settlement and etc.

  15. Removal of hydrogen sulfide by immobilized Thiobacillus thioparus in a biotrickling filter packed with polyurethane foam.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, Martín; Gómez, José Manuel; Aroca, Germán; Cantero, Domingo

    2009-11-01

    In the work described here, a biotrickling filter with Thiobacillus thioparus (ATCC 23645) immobilized on polyurethane foam is proposed for the removal of hydrogen sulfide contained in air. The effect of surface velocity of the recirculation medium (5.9-1.2 m/h), sulfate concentration inhibition (3.0-10.7 g/L), pH (6.0-8.2), empty bed residence time (EBRT) (150-11 s) for constant loads of 11.5 and 2.9 g S/m(3)/h, and pressure drop of the system were investigated. The total amount of biomass immobilized on the carrier was 8.2+/-1.3x10(10) cells/g. The optimal values of the operating variables were: pH between 7.0 and 7.5, surface velocity of 5.9 m/h and sulfate concentration below 5 g/L. The critical EC value was 14.9 g S/m(3)/h (removal efficiency of 99.8%) and the EC(max) was 55.0 g S/m(3)/h (removal efficiency of 79.8%) for an EBRT of 150 s. For loads of 2.89+/-0.05 and 11.5+/-0.1 g S/m(3)/h, the removal efficiency was higher than 99% for an EBRT over 90 s.

  16. One-pot, bioinspired coatings to reduce the flammability of flexible polyurethane foams.

    PubMed

    Davis, Rick; Li, Yu-Chin; Gervasio, Michelle; Luu, Jason; Kim, Yeon Seok

    2015-03-25

    In this manuscript, natural materials were combined into a single "pot" to produce flexible, highly fire resistant, and bioinspired coatings on flexible polyurethane foam (PUF). In one step, PUF was coated with a fire protective layer constructed of a polysaccharide binder (starch or agar), a boron fire retardant (boric acid or derivative), and a dirt char former (montmorillonite clay). Nearly all coatings produced a 63% reduction in a critical flammability value, the peak heat release rate (PHRR). One formulation produced a 75% reduction in PHRR. This technology was validated in full-scale furniture fire tests, where a 75% reduction in PHRR was measured. At these PHRR values, this technology could reduce the fire threat of furniture from significant fire damage in and beyond the room of fire origin to being contained to the burning furniture. This flammability reduction was caused by three mechanisms-the gas-phase and condensed-phase processes of the boron fire retardant and the condensed-phase process of the clay. We describe the one-pot coating process and the impact of the coating composition on flammability.

  17. Thermochemical conversion of crude glycerol to biopolyols for the production of polyurethane foams.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xiaolan; Hu, Shengjun; Zhang, Xiang; Li, Yebo

    2013-07-01

    This study aimed to produce biopolyols from crude glycerol via a novel thermochemical conversion process. The effect of operational parameters, including sulfuric acid loading and reaction temperature and time, on the properties of the produced biopolyols was investigated. Biopolyols produced under preferred reaction conditions of 200°C, 90 min, and 3% sulfuric acid loading showed a hydroxyl number of around 481 mg KOH/g, an acid number of around 5mg KOH/g, and a viscosity of around 25.0 Pas. The resulting polyurethane (PU) foams showed a compressive strength of around 184.5 kPa and a density of around 43.0 kg/m(3), comparable to those of some petroleum-based analogs. Characterization of the biopolyols via pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (Py-GC-MS), gas chromatography (GC), and thermogravimetrical analysis (TGA) showed that the major reactions of this process were the formation of monoglycerides and diglycerides through the esterification and transesterification of different components in crude glycerol.

  18. Application of acid modified polyurethane foam surface for detection and removing of organochlorine pesticides from wastewater.

    PubMed

    Moawed, E A; Radwan, A M

    2017-02-15

    The commercial polyurethane foam was acid modified to get an inexpensive adsorbent (AM-PUF) has highly surface polarity and sorption capacity. The elemental analysis, scanning electron microscopy, thermal analysis, ultraviolet/visible/infrared spectroscopies and X-ray diffraction were used for characterization of AM-PUF. The surface of AM-PUF has amorphous character (broadband at 2θ, 21.75°) and contains several active sites e.g. NH, OH, CO, CC and COC groups. The electrical conductivity (σ), iodine value and methylene blue index of AM-PUF are 1.7×10(-5)Ω(-1)m(-1), 208mg/g and 107mg/g. The AM-PUF has a high efficiency for completely removing (99-100%) of Aldrin, DDT, Endrin, Heptachlor, Heptachlor epoxide and Lindane pesticides in both acidic and alkaline solutions. The removing rates of the organochlorine pesticides from wastewater are very rapid (t1/2=22s). The negative value of ΔG (-10.9kJ/mol) for removing of OCPs using AM-PUF showed that the feasibility of the removing process and its spontaneous nature.

  19. Field calibration of polyurethane foam (PUF) disk passive air samplers for PCBs and OC pesticides.

    PubMed

    Chaemfa, Chakra; Barber, Jonathan L; Gocht, Tilman; Harner, Tom; Holoubek, Ivan; Klanova, Jana; Jones, Kevin C

    2008-12-01

    Different passive air sampler (PAS) strategies have been developed for sampling in remote areas and for cost-effective simultaneous spatial mapping of POPs (persistent organic pollutants) over differing geographical scales. The polyurethane foam (PUF) disk-based PAS is probably the most widely used. In a PUF-based PAS, the PUF disk is generally mounted inside two stainless steel bowls to buffer the air flow to the disk and to shield it from precipitation and light. The field study described in this manuscript was conducted to: compare performance of 3 different designs of sampler; to further calibrate the sampler against the conventional active sampler; to derive more information on field-based uptake rates and equilibrium times of the samplers. Samplers were also deployed at different locations across the field site, and at different heights up a meteorological tower, to investigate the possible influence of sampler location. Samplers deployed <5m above ground, and not directly sheltered from the wind gave similar uptake rates. Small differences in dimensions between the 3 designs of passive sampler chamber had no discernable effect on accumulation rates, allowing comparison with previously published data.

  20. Field calibration of polyurethane foam disk passive air samplers for PBDEs.

    PubMed

    Chaemfa, Chakra; Barber, Jonathan L; Moeckel, Claudia; Gocht, Tilman; Harner, Tom; Holoubek, Ivan; Klanova, Jana; Jones, Kevin C

    2009-10-01

    A field study was performed to derive uptake rates of airborne polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) to polyurethane foam (PUF) disk passive air samplers (PAS) and to investigate the influence of deployment location and device design. Data are presented on the gas-particle partitioning of PBDEs, since atmospheric phase distribution was considered to be a variable which could affect sampler performance. Uptake rates for these compounds were similar to those derived previously for other classes of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) (approximately 2-6 m(3)/day), with rates higher for the higher brominated species. Whilst other compound classes (e.g. polychlorinated biphenyls) are predominantly present in the air in the gas phase, heavier PBDEs have an association with particulates in the atmosphere at ambient temperatures. In this study, the PUF disk PAS therefore sampled PBDEs present in the gas phase and on fine aerosols with a similar sampling efficiency to those which are predominantly gas phase compounds. Compounds which are exclusively on particles are sampled less efficiently. A comparison of the three most commonly used PUF deployment configurations, used by different research groups, indicated little difference in uptake rates. The ranges of derived air concentrations for BDE-47, -99, and -183 between three sampler designs were 7.5-9.8, 7.4-12.4, and 4.7-6.6 pg/m(3), respectively. This suggests the robustness of this sampler in comparisons between regional and global campaigns where these three designs are employed.

  1. Separation of hematopoietic stem cells from human peripheral blood through modified polyurethane foaming membranes.

    PubMed

    Higuchi, Akon; Sekiya, Mayu; Gomei, Yumiko; Sakurai, Masaru; Chen, Wen-Yih; Egashira, Satsuki; Matsuoka, Yuki

    2008-06-15

    Cell separation from peripheral blood was investigated using polyurethane (PU) foam membranes having 5.2 mum pore size and coated with Pluronic F127 or hyaluronic acid. The permeation ratio of hematopoietic stem cells (CD34(+) cells) and lymphocytes through the membranes was lower than for red blood cells and platelets. Adhered cells were detached from membrane surfaces using human serum albumin (HSA) solution after permeation of blood through the membranes, allowing isolation of CD34(+) cells in the permeate (recovery) solution. High-yield isolation of CD34(+) cells was achieved using Pluronic-coated membranes. This was because the Pluronic coating dissolved into the recovery solution at 4 degrees C, releasing adhered cells from the surfaces of the membranes during permeation of HSA solution through these membranes. Dextran and/or bovine serum albumin solutions were also evaluated for use as recovery solutions after blood permeation. A high recovery ratio of CD34(+) cells was achieved at 4 degrees C in a process using 20% dextran solution through PU membranes having carboxylic acid groups.

  2. Case study for model validation : assessing a model for thermal decomposition of polyurethane foam.

    SciTech Connect

    Dowding, Kevin J.; Leslie, Ian H.; Hobbs, Michael L.; Rutherford, Brian Milne; Hills, Richard Guy; Pilch, Martin M.

    2004-10-01

    A case study is reported to document the details of a validation process to assess the accuracy of a mathematical model to represent experiments involving thermal decomposition of polyurethane foam. The focus of the report is to work through a validation process. The process addresses the following activities. The intended application of mathematical model is discussed to better understand the pertinent parameter space. The parameter space of the validation experiments is mapped to the application parameter space. The mathematical models, computer code to solve the models and its (code) verification are presented. Experimental data from two activities are used to validate mathematical models. The first experiment assesses the chemistry model alone and the second experiment assesses the model of coupled chemistry, conduction, and enclosure radiation. The model results of both experimental activities are summarized and uncertainty of the model to represent each experimental activity is estimated. The comparison between the experiment data and model results is quantified with various metrics. After addressing these activities, an assessment of the process for the case study is given. Weaknesses in the process are discussed and lessons learned are summarized.

  3. High temperature testing of TRUPACT-I materials: Kevlar, honeycomb, rigid polyurethane foam

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, M.L.

    1985-12-01

    When the Transuranic Package Transporter Model-I (TRUPACT-I) failed to afford sufficient containment after a 35-minute JP-4 fueled open-pool fire, component tests were conducted, in conjunction with analyses, to guide and assess the redesign of TRUPACT-I. Since materials which change phase or combust are difficult to numerically analyze, the component tests determined the behavior of these materials in TRUPACT-I. The component tests approximated the behavior of Kevlar (registered trademark of DuPont), metal honeycomb, and rigid polyurethane foam, as they appear in TRUPACT-I, in an open-pool fire environment. Six series of tests were performed at Sandia's Radiant Heat Facility and one test at the wind-shielded fire test facility (LAARC Chimney). Each test facility was controlled to yield temperatures or heat fluxes equivalent to those measured in the TRUPACT-I, Unit 0, open-pool fire. This extensive series of component tests (34 runs total) provided information on the high-temperature behavior of unique materials which was not previously available or otherwise attainable. The component tests were a timely and cost-effective means of providing the data for the TRUPACT-I redesign.

  4. Pristine stratospheric collection of interplanetary dust on an oil-free polyurethane foam substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messenger, Scott; Nakamura-Messenger, Keiko; Keller, Lindsay P.; Clemett, Simon J.

    2015-08-01

    We performed chemical, mineralogical, and isotopic studies of the first interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) collected in the stratosphere without the use of silicone oil. The collection substrate, polyurethane foam, effectively traps impacting particles, but the lack of an embedding medium results in significant particle fragmentation. Two dust particles found on the collector exhibit the typical compositional and mineralogical properties of chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles (CP-IDPs). Hydrogen and nitrogen isotopic imaging revealed isotopic anomalies of typical magnitude and spatial variability observed in previous CP-IDP studies. Oxygen isotopic imaging shows that individual mineral grains and glass with embedded metal and sulfide (GEMS) grains are dominated by solar system materials. No systematic differences are observed in element abundance patterns of GEMS grains from the dry collection versus silicone oil-collected IDPs. This initial study establishes the validity of a new IDP collection substrate that avoids the use of silicone oil as a collection medium, removing the need for this problematic contaminant and the organic solvents necessary to remove it. Additional silicone oil-free collections of this type are needed to determine more accurate bulk element abundances of IDPs and to examine the indigenous soluble organic components of IDPs.

  5. The role of nanocrystalline cellulose on the microstructure of foamed castor-oil polyurethane nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Cordero, Andrés Ignacio; Amalvy, Javier Ignacio; Fortunati, Elena; Kenny, José María; Chiacchiarelli, Leonel Matías

    2015-12-10

    Nanocrystalline cellulose (CNC), obtained by sulphuric acid hydrolysis, was used to synthesize polyurethane foams (PUFs) based on a functionalized castor oil polyol and a Methylene diphenyl diisocyanate (MDI). Formulations with varying isocyanate index (FI) and NCO number were prepared. At 0.5 wt.%, SEM's of the fractured surface underlined that the CNC acted both as a nucleation agent and as a particulate surfactant with cell geometries and apparent density changing selectively. The chemical structure of the PUF (FTIR) changed after the incorporation of CNC by a relative change of the amount of urea, urethane and isocyanurate groups. A low NCO number and isocyanate index contributed to the migration of the CNC to the Hard Segment (HS), acting as reinforcement and improving substantially the compressive mechanical properties (Ec and σc improvements of 63 and 50%, respectively). For a high NCO number or isocyanate index, the CNC migrated to the Soft Segment (SS), without causing a reinforcement effect. The migration of the CNC was also detected with DSC, TGA and DMA, furtherly supporting the hypothesis that a low NCO number and index contributed both to the formation of a microstructure with a higher content of urethane groups.

  6. Effect of DMMP on the pyrolysis products of polyurethane foam materials in the gaseous phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, W.; Li, F.; Ge, X. G.; Zhang, Z. J.; He, J.; Gao, N.

    2016-07-01

    Dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP) has been used as a flame retardant containing phosphorus to decrease the flammability of the polyurethane foam material (PUF). Flame retardancy and thermal degradation of PUF samples have been investigated by the LOI tests and thermal analysis. The results show that LOI values of all PUF/DMMP samples are higher than that of the neat PUF sample and the LOI value of the samples increases with both DMMP concentration and the %P value. Thermal analysis indicates that flame retardant PUF shows a dominant condensed flame retardant activity during combustion. Thermogravimetric analysis-infrared spectrometry (TG-FTIR) has been used to study the influence of DMMP on the pyrolysis products in the gaseous phase during the thermal degradation of the PUF sample. Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR) spectra of the PUF sample at the maximum evolution rates and the generated trends of water and the products containing -NCO have been examined to obtain more information about the pyrolysis product evolutions of the samples at high temperature. These results reveal that although DMMP could improve the thermal stability of PUF samples through the formation of the residual char layer between fire and the decomposed materials, the influence of DMMP on the gaseous phase can be also observed during the thermal degradation process of materials.

  7. Fabrication of Reticulated Graphitic Foam.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    mesophase pitch (MP). Mesophase pitch is...goes through several heat treatments to stabilize the mesophase pitch , burn out the polyurethane, carbonize and finally graphitize the foam, all the while maintaining the same morphology as the initial polyurethane foam....struts gives some initial molecular orientation. The dipped foam is dried, leaving behind a the polyurethane foam coated with the pitch . The foam

  8. An approach to model validation and model-based prediction -- polyurethane foam case study.

    SciTech Connect

    Dowding, Kevin J.; Rutherford, Brian Milne

    2003-07-01

    Enhanced software methodology and improved computing hardware have advanced the state of simulation technology to a point where large physics-based codes can be a major contributor in many systems analyses. This shift toward the use of computational methods has brought with it new research challenges in a number of areas including characterization of uncertainty, model validation, and the analysis of computer output. It is these challenges that have motivated the work described in this report. Approaches to and methods for model validation and (model-based) prediction have been developed recently in the engineering, mathematics and statistical literatures. In this report we have provided a fairly detailed account of one approach to model validation and prediction applied to an analysis investigating thermal decomposition of polyurethane foam. A model simulates the evolution of the foam in a high temperature environment as it transforms from a solid to a gas phase. The available modeling and experimental results serve as data for a case study focusing our model validation and prediction developmental efforts on this specific thermal application. We discuss several elements of the ''philosophy'' behind the validation and prediction approach: (1) We view the validation process as an activity applying to the use of a specific computational model for a specific application. We do acknowledge, however, that an important part of the overall development of a computational simulation initiative is the feedback provided to model developers and analysts associated with the application. (2) We utilize information obtained for the calibration of model parameters to estimate the parameters and quantify uncertainty in the estimates. We rely, however, on validation data (or data from similar analyses) to measure the variability that contributes to the uncertainty in predictions for specific systems or units (unit-to-unit variability). (3) We perform statistical analyses and

  9. Impact of the irregular microgeometry of polyurethane foam on the macroscopic acoustic behavior predicted by a unit-cell model.

    PubMed

    Doutres, O; Ouisse, M; Atalla, N; Ichchou, M

    2014-10-01

    This paper deals with the prediction of the macroscopic sound absorption behavior of highly porous polyurethane foams using two unit-cell microstructure-based models recently developed by Doutres, Atalla, and Dong [J. Appl. Phys. 110, 064901 (2011); J. Appl. Phys. 113, 054901 (2013)]. In these models, the porous material is idealized as a packing of a tetrakaidecahedra unit-cell representative of the disordered network that constitutes the porous frame. The non-acoustic parameters involved in the classical Johnson-Champoux-Allard model (i.e., porosity, airflow resistivity, tortuosity, etc.) are derived from characteristic properties of the unit-cell and semi-empirical relationships. A global sensitivity analysis is performed on these two models in order to investigate how the variability associated with the measured unit-cell characteristics affects the models outputs. This allows identification of the possible limitations of a unit-cell micro-macro approach due to microstructure irregularity. The sensitivity analysis mainly shows that for moderately and highly reticulated polyurethane foams, the strut length parameter is the key parameter since it greatly impacts three important non-acoustic parameters and causes large uncertainty on the sound absorption coefficient even if its measurement variability is moderate. For foams with a slight inhomogeneity and anisotropy, a micro-macro model associated to cell size measurements should be preferred.

  10. Estimation of organophosphoric acid triesters in soft polyurethane foam using a concentrated sulfuric acid dissolution technique and gas chromatography with flame photometric detection.

    PubMed

    Nagase, Makoto; Toba, Mineki; Kondo, Hiroyuki; Yasuhara, Akio; Hasebe, Kiyoshi

    2003-12-01

    A concentrated sulfuric acid dissolution technique and a GC method are described for the estimation of tributyl phosphate, tris(2-chloroethyl) phosphate, tris(chloropropyl) phosphate, tris(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl) phosphate, triphenyl phosphate and tris(butoxyethyl) phosphate in soft polyurethane foam. A soft polyurethane foam sample containing organophosphoric acid triesters was dissolved in concentrated sulfuric acid. The solution was added to water, where only the polyurethane was separated out. The pH of the solution was adjusted, and organophosphoric acid triesters were extracted with toluene. After purification, the compounds were determined by GC. The detection limits of the organophosphoric acid triesters were 0.3 - 0.9 microg g(-1). The recoveries of the organophosphoric acid triesters from a 0.05 g sample of soft polyurethane foam were 80.0 - 90.0%, when the spiked amounts were 0.25 - 1 microg. The compounds were detected from soft polyurethane foam at the level of 0.4 - 23.3 microg g(-1).

  11. [Treatment of infected wounds and abscesses in bovine limbs with Ligasano-polyurethane-soft foam dressing material].

    PubMed

    Kofler, Johann; Martinek, Birgit; Reinöhl-DeSouza, Cornelia

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this report is to present the most important indications for the use of Ligasano-polyurethane-soft-foam dressing material in the treatment of infected wounds in cattle. For this study, 28 cattle were selected, which were treated at the clinic (2000-2003) for infected cut, puncture and laceration wounds on the limbs, purulent tarsal hygromas, large abscesses in the tarsal, crural and thigh regions, and purulent tenosynovitis of the digital flexor tendon sheath caused by penetrating puncture wounds. After routine wound cleansing, debridement or adequate surgery with wound lavage, Ligasano-polyurethane-soft-foam (Ligamed Medical Produkte, Cadolzburg-Wachendorf, Germany) was applied as a primary wound dressing instead of the conventional cotton gauze swabs or as drainage material in all these wounds. The porous surface structure of this material caused subtle wound debridement and mechanical stimulation of the wound surface increasing exudation and decreasing fibrinous adhesions. The pores ensured good drainage, reduced infection, avoided the accumulation of exudate and the following destruction of the wound surface. In all these indications, except abscesses and purulent hygromas, no or only slight purulent exudation of the treated wounds was observed. Especially in the treatment of purulent tenosynovitis of the digital flexor tendon sheath with tendon resection a rapid healing of these large surgical wounds--often within 2 weeks--was found. The therapeutic effect of Ligasano-polyurethane-soft-foam as a primary wound dressing was so convincing in these bovine patients, that it is now used exclusively as primary wound dressing material for treatment of infected wounds.

  12. Electrospinning thermoplastic polyurethane/graphene oxide scaffolds for small diameter vascular graft applications.

    PubMed

    Jing, Xin; Mi, Hao-Yang; Salick, Max R; Cordie, Travis M; Peng, Xiang-Fang; Turng, Lih-Sheng

    2015-04-01

    Fabrication of small diameter vascular grafts plays an important role in vascular tissue engineering. In this study, thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU)/graphene oxide (GO) scaffolds were fabricated via electrospinning at different GO contents as potential candidates for small diameter vascular grafts. In terms of mechanical and surface properties, the tensile strength, Young's modulus, and hydrophilicity of the scaffolds increased with an increase of GO content while plasma treatment dramatically improved the scaffold hydrophilicity. Mouse fibroblast (3T3) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were cultured on the scaffolds separately to study their biocompatibility and potential to be used as vascular grafts. It was found that cell viability for both types of cells, fibroblast proliferation, and HUVEC attachment were the highest at a 0.5wt.% GO loading whereas oxygen plasma treatment also enhanced HUVEC viability and attachment significantly. In addition, the suture retention strength and burst pressure of tubular TPU/GO scaffolds containing 0.5wt.% GO were found to meet the requirements of human blood vessels, and endothelial cells were able to attach to the inner surface of the tubular scaffolds. Platelet adhesion tests using mice blood indicated that vascular scaffolds containing 0.5% GO had low platelet adhesion and activation. Therefore, the electrospun TPU/GO tubular scaffolds have the potential to be used in vascular tissue engineering.

  13. Simple and rapid extraction of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons collected on polyurethane foam adsorbent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maddalena, Randy L.; McKone, Thomas E.; Kado, Norman Y.

    A single-pass flow through extraction (FTE) method for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) that have been collected on poly-ether type polyurethane foam (PUF) is described and demonstrated. The method is based on the principles of trace enrichment and solid-phase extraction where the analyte of interest is collected or concentrated on the expanded PUF matrix. Following collection, the PUF is compressed to reduce the solvent requirement and a single-pass gravity fed mobile-phase extraction is used to remove the analyte. Two extraction mobile phases were tested (dichloromethane, DCM and a 10% (V:V) mixture of acetone in hexane, AH). We obtained quantitative recoveries of 18 PAHs from 115 cm 3 PUF plugs with less than 4 ml of DCM or 6 ml of AH. Average standard recoveries of 18 spiked PAHs were 97% and 104% for the DCM and the AH extractions, respectively. The semi-volatile fraction of PAHs in an environmental sample of a complex mixture (diesel exhaust) were also quantitatively extracted using the FTE method. Finally, the FTE method was used to extract samples collected from an exposure chamber that was designed to measure the transfer of semi-volatile atmospheric pollutants into vegetation. Total variance reported as percent relative standard deviation in the measured steady-state atmospheric concentrations of pyrene, fluoranthene, anthracene and phenanthrene were 3.4, 10.5, 8.5 and 4.4%, respectively, thus demonstrating the excellent precision of the method. The FTE method is simple, fast and effective for extracting PAH that has been collected on PUF adsorbent.

  14. Assessment of exposure to TDI and MDI during polyurethane foam production in Poland using integrated theoretical and experimental data.

    PubMed

    Kupczewska-Dobecka, Małgorzata; Czerczak, Sławomir; Brzeźnicki, Sławomir

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study was to develop an optimal strategy for the assessment of inhalation exposure to isocyanates such as TDI and MDI in the production of polyurethane foam by integration of theoretical and experimental data. ECETOC TRA and EASE predictive models were used to determine the estimated levels of exposure to isocyanates. The results of our study suggest that both applications EASE and ECETOC TRA can be used as a screening 1st Tier tool in this case study. PROC12 ECETOC TRA category can be linked to exposure on TDI during polyurethane foam manufacturing because it is working properly and exceeds 90th percentile measured concentration with factor 3 and the maximum measured value with factor 1, 5. The value estimated by using category PROC2 is underestimated so this category should not be linked to this scenario. At the same time, the applications of EASE overstate the expected concentrations although the scenario "Use in closed process" seems to underestimate the exposure at the "lower end". For MDI the both models estimate exposure in a conservative manner.

  15. Polyurethane foams based on crude glycerol-derived biopolyols: One-pot preparation of biopolyols with branched fatty acid ester chains and its effects on foam formation and properties

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Cong; Luo, Xiaolan; Li, Tao; Tong, Xinjie; Li, Yebo

    2014-01-01

    Environmentally friendly biopolyols have been produced with crude glycerol as the sole feedstock using a one-pot thermochemical conversion process without the addition of extra catalysts and reagents. Structural features of these biopolyols were characterized by rheology analysis. Rigid polyurethane (PU) foams were obtained from these crude glycerol-based biopolyols and the foaming mechanism was explored. Investigations revealed that partial carbonyl groups hydrogen-bonded with NeH were replaced by aromatic rings after the introduction of branched fatty acid ester chains in the “urea rich” phase, and that distinct microphases had formed in the foams. Studies showed that branched fatty acid ester chains in the biopolyols played an important role in reducing the degree of microphase separation and stabilizing bubbles during foaming processes. PU foams with thermal conductivity comparable to commercial products made from petroleum-based polyols were obtained. These studies show the potential for development of PU foams based on crude glycerol, a renewable resource.

  16. The effects of neutralized particles on the sampling efficiency of polyurethane foam used to estimate the extrathoracic deposition fraction.

    PubMed

    Tomyn, Ronald L; Sleeth, Darrah K; Thiese, Matthew S; Larson, Rodney R

    2016-01-01

    In addition to chemical composition, the site of deposition of inhaled particles is important for determining the potential health effects from an exposure. As a result, the International Organization for Standardization adopted a particle deposition sampling convention. This includes extrathoracic particle deposition sampling conventions for the anterior nasal passages (ET1) and the posterior nasal and oral passages (ET2). This study assessed how well a polyurethane foam insert placed in an Institute of Occupational Medicine (IOM) sampler can match an extrathoracic deposition sampling convention, while accounting for possible static buildup in the test particles. In this way, the study aimed to assess whether neutralized particles affected the performance of this sampler for estimating extrathoracic particle deposition. A total of three different particle sizes (4.9, 9.5, and 12.8 µm) were used. For each trial, one particle size was introduced into a low-speed wind tunnel with a wind speed set a 0.2 m/s (∼40 ft/min). This wind speed was chosen to closely match the conditions of most indoor working environments. Each particle size was tested twice either neutralized, using a high voltage neutralizer, or left in its normal (non neutralized) state as standard particles. IOM samplers were fitted with a polyurethane foam insert and placed on a rotating mannequin inside the wind tunnel. Foam sampling efficiencies were calculated for all trials to compare against the normalized ET1 sampling deposition convention. The foam sampling efficiencies matched well to the ET1 deposition convention for the larger particle sizes, but had a general trend of underestimating for all three particle sizes. The results of a Wilcoxon Rank Sum Test also showed that only at 4.9 µm was there a statistically significant difference (p-value = 0.03) between the foam sampling efficiency using the standard particles and the neutralized particles. This is interpreted to mean that static

  17. Checklist of Safe Work Practices for Spray Polyurethane Foam (SPF) for Contractors, Incluyendo la Versión de Español

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    A contractor checklist aimed at helping spray polyurethane foam (SPF) professional contractors protect themselves, workers and others. Guía de las prácticas seguras en el lugar de trabajo para la aplicación del aerosol de espuma aislante de poliuretano.

  18. Platelet adhesive resistance of segmented polyurethane film surface-grafted with vinyl benzyl sulfo monomer of ammonium zwitterions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun; Yuan, Jiang; Yuan, Youling; Zang, Xiaopeng; Shen, Jian; Lin, Sicong

    2003-10-01

    Platelet from human plasma adhered on the segmented poly(ether urethane) (SPEU) film grafted with N,N-dimethyl-N-(p-vinylbenyl)-N-(3-sulfopropyl) ammonium (DMVSA) was studied. SPEU films were hydroxylated by potassium peroxosulfate (KPS) and then grafted with DMVSA using ceric ammonium nitrate (CAN) as initiator. The mixing time of hydroxylated SPEU/CAN and the monomer concentration effect on graft polymerization yield were determined by ATR-FTIR. Surface analysis of the grafted films by ATR-FTIR and ESCA confirmed that DMVSA was successfully grafted onto the SPEU film surface. The grafted film possessed a relatively hydrophilic surface, as revealed by water contact angle measurement. The improved blood compatibility of the grafted films was preliminarily evaluated by a platelet-rich plasma adhesion study and scanning electron microscopy, using original SPEU and hydroxylated SPEU films as the controls. The results showed that platelet attachment was decreased greatly on the segmented polyurethane films grafted with DMVSA. This kind of new biomaterials grafted with sulfo ammonium zwitterionic monomers might have potential for biomedical applications.

  19. Field estimates of polyurethane foam - air partition coefficients for hexachlorobenzene, alpha-hexachlorocyclohexane and bromoanisoles.

    PubMed

    Bidleman, Terry F; Nygren, Olle; Tysklind, Mats

    2016-09-01

    Partition coefficients of gaseous semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) between polyurethane foam (PUF) and air (KPA) are needed in the estimation of sampling rates for PUF disk passive air samplers. We determined KPA in field experiments by conducting long-term (24-48 h) air sampling to saturate PUF traps and shorter runs (2-4 h) to measure air concentrations. Sampling events were done at daily mean temperatures ranging from 1.9 to 17.5 °C. Target compounds were hexachlorobenzene (HCB), alpha-hexachlorocyclohexane (α-HCH), 2,4-dibromoanisole (2,4-DiBA) and 2,4,6-tribromoanisole (2,4,6-TriBA). KPA (mL g(-1)) was calculated from quantities on the PUF traps at saturation (ng g(-1)) divided by air concentrations (ng mL(-1)). Enthalpies of PUF-to-air transfer (ΔHPA, kJ mol(-1)) were determined from the slopes of log KPA/mL g(-1) versus 1/T(K) for HCB and the bromoanisoles, KPA of α-HCH was measured only at 14.3 to 17.5 °C and ΔHPA was not determined. Experimental log KPA/mL g(-1) at 15 °C were HCB = 7.37; α-HCH = 8.08; 2,4-DiBA = 7.26 and 2,4,6-TriBA = 7.26. Experimental log KPA/mL g(-1) were compared with predictions based on an octanol-air partition coefficient (log KOA) model (Shoeib and Harner, 2002a) and a polyparameter linear free relationship (pp-LFER) model (Kamprad and Goss, 2007) using different sets of solute parameters. Predicted KP values varied by factors of 3 to over 30, depending on the compound and the model. Such discrepancies provide incentive for experimental measurements of KPA for other SVOCs.

  20. Two-step sequential liquefaction of lignocellulosic biomass by crude glycerol for the production of polyols and polyurethane foams.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shengjun; Li, Yebo

    2014-06-01

    A two-step sequential biomass liquefaction process was developed to produce bio-based polyols and polyurethane (PU) foams using crude glycerol as a liquefaction solvent. The first step, acid-catalyzed liquefaction, was highly effective in liquefying biomass, while the second step, base-catalyzed liquefaction, featured extensive condensation reactions. By using the developed two-step liquefaction process, the polyols produced from lignocellulosic biomass and crude glycerol containing 26-40% organic impurities showed hydroxyl numbers ranging from 536 to 936mgKOH/g, viscosities from 20.6 to 28.0Pas, and molecular weights (Mw) from 444 to 769g/mol. The PU foams produced had densities ranging from 0.04 to 0.05g/cm(3), compressive strengths from 223 to 420kPa, and thermal conductivities from 32.2 to 38.9mW/mK. Polyols and PU foams produced from the two-step liquefaction process had improved properties over their analogs derived from a one-step biomass liquefaction by crude glycerol process catalyzed by acid or base.

  1. Estimation of the Human Extrathoracic Deposition Fraction of Inhaled Particles Using a Polyurethane Foam Collection Substrate in an IOM Sampler.

    PubMed

    Sleeth, Darrah K; Balthaser, Susan A; Collingwood, Scott; Larson, Rodney R

    2016-03-07

    Extrathoracic deposition of inhaled particles (i.e., in the head and throat) is an important exposure route for many hazardous materials. Current best practices for exposure assessment of aerosols in the workplace involve particle size selective sampling methods based on particle penetration into the human respiratory tract (i.e., inhalable or respirable sampling). However, the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) has recently adopted particle deposition sampling conventions (ISO 13138), including conventions for extrathoracic (ET) deposition into the anterior nasal passage (ET₁) and the posterior nasal and oral passages (ET₂). For this study, polyurethane foam was used as a collection substrate inside an inhalable aerosol sampler to provide an estimate of extrathoracic particle deposition. Aerosols of fused aluminum oxide (five sizes, 4.9 µm-44.3 µm) were used as a test dust in a low speed (0.2 m/s) wind tunnel. Samplers were placed on a rotating mannequin inside the wind tunnel to simulate orientation-averaged personal sampling. Collection efficiency data for the foam insert matched well to the extrathoracic deposition convention for the particle sizes tested. The concept of using a foam insert to match a particle deposition sampling convention was explored in this study and shows promise for future use as a sampling device.

  2. Estimation of the Human Extrathoracic Deposition Fraction of Inhaled Particles Using a Polyurethane Foam Collection Substrate in an IOM Sampler

    PubMed Central

    Sleeth, Darrah K.; Balthaser, Susan A.; Collingwood, Scott; Larson, Rodney R.

    2016-01-01

    Extrathoracic deposition of inhaled particles (i.e., in the head and throat) is an important exposure route for many hazardous materials. Current best practices for exposure assessment of aerosols in the workplace involve particle size selective sampling methods based on particle penetration into the human respiratory tract (i.e., inhalable or respirable sampling). However, the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) has recently adopted particle deposition sampling conventions (ISO 13138), including conventions for extrathoracic (ET) deposition into the anterior nasal passage (ET1) and the posterior nasal and oral passages (ET2). For this study, polyurethane foam was used as a collection substrate inside an inhalable aerosol sampler to provide an estimate of extrathoracic particle deposition. Aerosols of fused aluminum oxide (five sizes, 4.9 µm–44.3 µm) were used as a test dust in a low speed (0.2 m/s) wind tunnel. Samplers were placed on a rotating mannequin inside the wind tunnel to simulate orientation-averaged personal sampling. Collection efficiency data for the foam insert matched well to the extrathoracic deposition convention for the particle sizes tested. The concept of using a foam insert to match a particle deposition sampling convention was explored in this study and shows promise for future use as a sampling device. PMID:26959046

  3. Sol-Gel Microspheres Doped with Glycerol: A Structural Insight in Light of Forthcoming Applications in the Polyurethane Foam Industry

    PubMed Central

    Ciriminna, Rosaria; Fidalgo, Alexandra; Ilharco, Laura M; Pagliaro, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Porous silica-based microspheres encapsulating aqueous glycerol can be potential curing agents for one-component foams (OCFs). Such agents have the advantage of an enhanced sustainability profile on top of being environmentally friendly materials. A synthetically convenient and scalable sol-gel process was used to make silica and organosilica microspheres doped with aqueous glycerol. These methyl-modified silica microspheres, named “GreenCaps”, exhibit remarkable physical and chemical stability. The microspheres were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy at reduced pressure, and cryogenic nitrogen adsorption—desorption analysis. The structure of the materials was also analyzed at the molecular level by diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform (DRIFT) spectroscopy. As expected, the degree of methylation affects the degree of encapsulation and pore structure. Microspheres similarly methylated, however, can differ considerably in surface area and pore size due to the templating effect of glycerol on the organosilica structure. The results of the structure analysis reveal that glycerol is efficiently encapsulated, acts as a template, barely leaches over time, but is released by depressurization. A proper application of these microspheres can later on enhance both the environmental and health profile, as well as the technical performance (curing speed, foam quality, and froth thixotropy) of spray polyurethane foams. PMID:25969809

  4. Quantification of isocyanates and amines in polyurethane foams and coated products by liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Mutsuga, Motoh; Yamaguchi, Miku; Kawamura, Yoko

    2014-01-01

    An analytical method for the identification and quantification of 10 different isocyanates and 11 different amines in polyurethane (PUR) foam and PUR-coated products was developed and optimized. Isocyanates were extracted and derivatized with di-n-butylamine, while amines were extracted with methanol. Quantification was subsequently performed by liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry. Using this methodology, residual levels of isocyanates and amines in commercial PUR products were quantified. Although the recoveries of certain isocyanates and amines were low, the main compounds used as monomers in the production of PUR products, and their decomposition species, were clearly identified at quantifiable levels. 2,4-and 2,6-toluenediisocyanate were detected in most PUR foam samples and a pastry bag in the range of 0.02–0.92 mg/kg, with their decomposition compounds, 2,4-and 2,6-toluenediamine, detected in all PUR foam samples in the range of 9.5–59 mg/kg. PUR-coated gloves are manufactured using 4,4′-methylenebisphenyl diisocyanate as the main raw material, and a large amount of this compound, in addition to 4,4′-methylenedianiline and dicyclohexylmethane-4,4′-diamine were found in these samples. PMID:24804074

  5. Global pilot study of legacy and emerging persistent organic pollutants using sorbent-impregnated polyurethane foam disk passive air samplers.

    PubMed

    Genualdi, Susie; Lee, Sum Chi; Shoeib, Mahiba; Gawor, Anya; Ahrens, Lutz; Harner, Tom

    2010-07-15

    Sorbent-impregnated polyurethane foam (SIP) disk passive air samplers were deployed alongside polyurethane foam (PUF) disk samplers at 20 sites during the 2009 spring sampling period of the Global Atmospheric Passive Sampling (GAPS) Network. The SIP disk samplers consisted of PUF disks impregnated with finely ground XAD-4 resin. The addition of XAD-4 greatly improves the sorptive capacity of the PUF disk samplers for more volatile and polar chemicals, and allows for linear-phase sampling over several weeks for these compounds. The SIP and PUF disks were analyzed for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), neutral polyfluoroalkyl compounds (PFCs), and ionic PFCs. Correlations between sampler-derived air concentrations for PCBs in the PUF and SIP disks samplers were significant (p < 0.05). The SIP disks effectively captured 4-50% more of the low molecular weight PCBs than the PUF disks samplers, and the PUF disks also had limitations for time-weighted passive sampling of neutral PFCs in air. Theoretical uptake curves for PUF disks showed rapid equilibration occurring in just hours for 8:2 FTOH and in a few days for MeFOSE, while theoretical curves for SIP disks showed superior sampling profiles for the neutral PFCs. PFCs were measured on SIP disks at all sites with 8:2 FTOH being the dominant compound detected and urban centers (n = 3) having the highest total neutral PFC concentrations ranging from 51.7 to 248 pg/m(3). A positive correlation was found between the FTOHs and FOSAs/FOSEs (p < 0.001, Pearson correlation) indicating similar contamination sources. The SIP disk appears to be a promising passive air sampler for measuring both emerging and legacy POPs on a global scale. They can also be used as a complement to the PUF disk sampler for capturing broader classes of compounds, or as a replacement for PUF disks entirely, especially when longer than quarterly deployment periods are desired.

  6. Characterization of polyurethane foam (PUF) and sorbent impregnated PUF (SIP) disk passive air samplers for measuring organophosphate flame retardants.

    PubMed

    Abdollahi, Atousa; Eng, Anita; Jantunen, Liisa M; Ahrens, Lutz; Shoeib, Mahiba; Parnis, J Mark; Harner, Tom

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to characterize the uptake of organophosphate esters (OPEs) by polyurethane foam (PUF) and sorbent-impregnated polyurethane foam (SIP) disk passive air samplers (PAS). Atmospheric OPE concentrations were monitored with high-volume active air samplers (HV-AAS) that were co-deployed with passive air samplers. Samples were analyzed for tris(2-chloroisopropyl) phosphate (TCIPP), tri(phenyl) phosphate (TPhP), tris(2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP), and tris(2,3-dichloropropyl) phosphate (TDCIPP). The mean concentration of ∑OPEs in air was 2650 pg/m(3) for the HV-AAS. Sampling rates and the passive sampler medium (PSM)-air partition coefficient (KPSM-Air) were calculated for individual OPEs. The average calculated sampling rates (R) for the four OPEs were 3.6 ± 1.2 and 4.2 ± 2.0 m(3)/day for the PUF and SIP disks, respectively, and within the range of the recommended default value of 4 ± 2 m(3)/day. Since most of the OPEs remained in the linear uptake phase during the study, COSMO-RS solvation theory and an oligomer-based model were used to estimate KPUF-Air for the OPEs. The estimated values of log KPUF-Air were 7.45 (TCIPP), 9.35 (TPhP), 8.44 (TCEP), and 9.67 (TDCIPP). Finally, four configurations of the PUF and SIP disks were tested by adjusting the distance of the gap opening between the upper and lower domes of the sampler housing: i.e. 2 cm, 1 cm, no gap and 1 cm overlap. The sampling rate did not differ significantly between these four configurations (p < 0.05).

  7. Utilization of microbial oil obtained from crude glycerol for the production of polyol and its subsequent conversion to polyurethane foams.

    PubMed

    Uprety, Bijaya K; Reddy, Jayanth Venkatarama; Dalli, Sai Swaroop; Rakshit, Sudip K

    2017-03-24

    We have demonstrated possible use of microbial oil in biopolymer industries. Microbial oil was produced from biodiesel based crude glycerol and subsequently converted into polyol. Fermentation of crude glycerol in a batch bioreactor using Rhodosporidium toruloides ATCC 10788 produced 18.69g/L of lipid at the end of 7days. The microbial oil was then chemically converted to polyol and characterized using FT-IR and (1)H NMR. For comparison, canola oil and palm oil were also converted into their respective polyols. The hydroxyl numbers of polyols from canola, palm and microbial oil were found to be 266.86, 222.32 and 230.30 (mgKOH/g of sample) respectively. All the polyols were further converted into rigid and semi-rigid polyurethanes (maintaining the molar -NCO/-OH ratio of 1.1) to examine their suitability in polymer applications. Conversion of microbial lipid to polyurethane foam also provides a new route for the production of polymers using biodiesel based crude glycerol.

  8. Validation of heat transfer, thermal decomposition, and container pressurization of polyurethane foam using mean value and Latin hypercube sampling approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, Sarah N.; Dodd, Amanda B.; Larsen, Marvin E.; Suo-Anttila, Jill M.; Erickson, Ken L.

    2014-12-09

    In this study, polymer foam encapsulants provide mechanical, electrical, and thermal isolation in engineered systems. It can be advantageous to surround objects of interest, such as electronics, with foams in a hermetically sealed container in order to protect them from hostile environments or from accidents such as fire. In fire environments, gas pressure from thermal decomposition of foams can cause mechanical failure of sealed systems. In this work, a detailed uncertainty quantification study of polymeric methylene diisocyanate (PMDI)-polyether-polyol based polyurethane foam is presented and compared to experimental results to assess the validity of a 3-D finite element model of the heat transfer and degradation processes. In this series of experiments, 320 kg/m3 PMDI foam in a 0.2 L sealed steel container is heated to 1,073 K at a rate of 150 K/min. The experiment ends when the can breaches due to the buildup of pressure. The temperature at key location is monitored as well as the internal pressure of the can. Both experimental uncertainty and computational uncertainty are examined and compared. The mean value method (MV) and Latin hypercube sampling (LHS) approach are used to propagate the uncertainty through the model. The results of the both the MV method and the LHS approach show that while the model generally can predict the temperature at given locations in the system, it is less successful at predicting the pressure response. Also, these two approaches for propagating uncertainty agree with each other, the importance of each input parameter on the simulation results is also investigated, showing that for the temperature response the conductivity of the steel container and the effective conductivity of the foam, are the most important parameters. For the pressure response, the activation energy, effective conductivity, and specific heat are most important. The comparison to experiments and the identification of the drivers of uncertainty allow

  9. Validation of heat transfer, thermal decomposition, and container pressurization of polyurethane foam using mean value and Latin hypercube sampling approaches

    DOE PAGES

    Scott, Sarah N.; Dodd, Amanda B.; Larsen, Marvin E.; ...

    2014-12-09

    In this study, polymer foam encapsulants provide mechanical, electrical, and thermal isolation in engineered systems. It can be advantageous to surround objects of interest, such as electronics, with foams in a hermetically sealed container in order to protect them from hostile environments or from accidents such as fire. In fire environments, gas pressure from thermal decomposition of foams can cause mechanical failure of sealed systems. In this work, a detailed uncertainty quantification study of polymeric methylene diisocyanate (PMDI)-polyether-polyol based polyurethane foam is presented and compared to experimental results to assess the validity of a 3-D finite element model of themore » heat transfer and degradation processes. In this series of experiments, 320 kg/m3 PMDI foam in a 0.2 L sealed steel container is heated to 1,073 K at a rate of 150 K/min. The experiment ends when the can breaches due to the buildup of pressure. The temperature at key location is monitored as well as the internal pressure of the can. Both experimental uncertainty and computational uncertainty are examined and compared. The mean value method (MV) and Latin hypercube sampling (LHS) approach are used to propagate the uncertainty through the model. The results of the both the MV method and the LHS approach show that while the model generally can predict the temperature at given locations in the system, it is less successful at predicting the pressure response. Also, these two approaches for propagating uncertainty agree with each other, the importance of each input parameter on the simulation results is also investigated, showing that for the temperature response the conductivity of the steel container and the effective conductivity of the foam, are the most important parameters. For the pressure response, the activation energy, effective conductivity, and specific heat are most important. The comparison to experiments and the identification of the drivers of uncertainty allow for

  10. Formation of layer-by-layer assembled titanate nanotubes filled coating on flexible polyurethane foam with improved flame retardant and smoke suppression properties.

    PubMed

    Pan, Haifeng; Wang, Wei; Pan, Ying; Song, Lei; Hu, Yuan; Liew, Kim Meow

    2015-01-14

    A fire blocking coating made from chitosan, titanate nanotubes and alginate was deposited on a flexible polyurethane (FPU) foam surface by a layer-by-layer assembly technique in an effort to reduce its flammability. First, titanate nanotubes were prepared by a hydrothermal method. And then the coating growth was carried out by alternately submerging FPU foams into chitosan solution, titanate nanotubes suspension and alginate solution. The mass gain of coating on the surface of FPU foams showed dependency on the concentration of titanate nanotubes suspension and the trilayers's number. Scanning electron microscopy indicated that titanate nanotubes were distributed well on the entire surface of FPU foam and showed a randomly oriented and entangled network structure. The cone calorimeter result indicated that the coated FPU foams showed reduction in the peak heat release rate (peak HRR), peak smoke production rate (peak SPR), total smoke release (TSR) and peak carbon monoxide (CO) production compared with those of the control FPU foam. Especially for the FPU foam with only 5.65 wt % mass gain, great reduction in peak HRR (70.2%), peak SPR (62.8%), TSR (40.9%) and peak CO production (63.5%) could be observed. Such a significant improvement in flame retardancy and the smoke suppression property for FPU foam could be attributed to the protective effect of titanate nanotubes network structure formed, including insulating barrier effect and adsorption effect.

  11. Extremely robust and conformable capacitive pressure sensors based on flexible polyurethane foams and stretchable metallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandeparre, H.; Watson, D.; Lacour, S. P.

    2013-11-01

    Microfabricated capacitive sensors prepared with elastomeric foam dielectric films and stretchable metallic electrodes display robustness to extreme conditions including stretching and tissue-like folding and autoclaving. The open cellular structure of the elastomeric foam leads to significant increase of the capacitance upon compression of the dielectric membrane. The sensor sensitivity can be adjusted locally with the foam density to detect normal pressure in the 1 kPa to 100 kPa range. Such pressure transducers will find applications in interfaces between the body and support surfaces such as mattresses, joysticks or prosthetic sockets, in artificial skins and wearable robotics.

  12. Polyurethane foam loaded with sodium dodecylsulfate for the extraction of 'quat' pesticides from aqueous medium: Optimization of loading conditions.

    PubMed

    Vinhal, Jonas O; Lima, Claudio F; Cassella, Ricardo J

    2016-09-01

    The cationic herbicides paraquat, diquat and difenzoquat are largely used in different cultures worldwide. With this, there is an intrinsic risk of environmental contamination when these herbicides achieve natural waters. The goal of this work was to propose a novel and low-cost sorbent for the removal of the cited herbicides from aqueous medium. The proposed sorbent was prepared by loading polyurethane foam with sodium dodecylsulfate. The influence of several parameters (SDS concentration, HCl concentration and shaking time) on the loading process was investigated. The results obtained in this work demonstrated that all studied variables influenced the loading process, having significant effect on the extraction efficiency of the resulted PUF-SDS. At optimized conditions, the PUF was loaded by shaking 200mg of crushed foam with 200mL of a solution containing 5.0×10(-3)molL(-1) SDS and 0.25molL(-1) HCl, for 30min. The obtained PUF-SDS was efficient for removing the three herbicides from aqueous medium, achieving extraction percentages higher than 90%. The sorption process followed a pseudo second-order kinetics, which presented excellent predictive capacity of the amount of herbicide retained with time.

  13. Durable modification of segmented polyurethane for elastic blood-contacting devices by graft-type 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine copolymer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yihua; Inoue, Yuuki; Mahara, Atsushi; Kakinoki, Sachiro; Yamaoka, Tetsuji; Ishihara, Kazuhiko

    2014-01-01

    We propose a novel application of 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC) polymers for enhancing the performance of modified segmented polyurethane (SPU) surfaces for the development of a small-diameter vascular prosthesis. The SPU membranes were modified by random-type, block-type, and graft-type MPC polymers that were prepared using a double-solution casting procedure on stainless steel substrates. Among these MPC polymers, the graft-type poly(MPC-graft-2-ethylhexyl methacrylate [EHMA]), which is composed of a poly(MPC) segment as the main chain and poly(EHMA) segments as side chains, indicated a higher stability on the SPU membrane after being peeled off from the stainless steel substrate, as well as after immersion in an aqueous medium. This stability was caused by the intermiscibility in the domain of the poly(EHMA) segments and the soft segments of the SPU membrane. Each SPU/MPC polymer membrane exhibited a dramatic suppression of protein adsorption from human plasma and endothelium cell adhesion. Based on these results, the performance of SPU/poly(MPC-graft-EHMA) tubings 2 mm in diameter as vascular prostheses was investigated. Even after blood was passed through the tubings for 2 min, the graft-type MPC polymers effectively protected the blood-contacting surfaces from thrombus formation. In summary, SPU modified by graft-type MPC polymers has the potential for practical application in the form of a non-endothelium, small-diameter vascular prosthesis.

  14. [Clinical cases about the therapeutic use of debriding dressing hidrodetersive polyacrylate fibers with TLC and foam dressings TLC-NOSF polyurethane in chronic wounds].

    PubMed

    Blasco García, Carmen; Segovia Gómez, Teresa; Bermejo Martínez, Mariano; Cuesta Cuesta, Juan José; Alventosa Cortés, Ana María

    2012-10-01

    The treatment of chronic wounds requires the use of highly specific products for different phases of the healing process. This article raises a number of clinical cases with chronic wounds of vascular origin and pressure ulcers. Such cases required a initial debridement because of the large content of fibrin covering the wound bed at this stage was used dressing hidrodetersive polyacrylate fibers with TLC. Once the debridement is continued treatment with a polyurethane foam dressing with TLC-NOSF.

  15. Short- and long-term releases of fluorocarbons from disposal of polyurethane foam waste.

    PubMed

    Kjeldsen, Peter; Scheutz, Charlotte

    2003-11-01

    Several halocarbons having very high global warming or ozone depletion potentials have been used as a blowing agent (BA) for insulation foam in home appliances, such as refrigerators and freezers. Many appliances are shredded after the end of their useful life. Release experiments carried out in the laboratory on insulation foam blown with the blowing agents CFC-11, HCFC-141b, HCF-134fa, and HFC-245fa revealed that not all blowing agents are released during a 6-week period following the shredding process. The experiments confirmed the hypothesis that the release could be divided into three segments: By shredding foam panels, a proportion of the closed cells is either split or damaged to a degree allowing for a sudden release of the contained atmosphere in the cell (the instantaneous release). Cells adjacent to the cut surface may be only slightly damaged by tiny cracks or holes allowing a relative slow release of the BA to the surroundings (the short-term release). A significant portion of the cells in the foam particle will be unaffected and only allows release governed by slow diffusion through the PUR cell wall (the long-term release). The magnitude of the releases is for all three types highly dependent on how fine the foam is shredded. The residual blowing agent remaining after the 6-week period may be very slowly released if the integrity of the foam particles with respect to diffusion properties is kept after disposal of the foam waste on landfills. It is shown by setting up a national model simulating the BA releases following decommissioning of used domestic refrigerators/freezers in the United States that the release patterns are highly dependent on how the appliances are shredded.

  16. Prosthetic Vascular Graft Infections: Bacterial Cultures from Negative-Pressure-Wound-Therapy Foams Do Not Improve Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Bloemberg, Guido; Zbinden, Reinhard; Zinkernagel, Annelies S.; Fuchs, Claudio; Frauenfelder, Sandra; Rancic, Zoran; Mayer, Dieter; Hasse, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed the diagnostic value of microorganisms cultured from negative-pressure-wound-therapy (NPWT) foam samples compared to that of microorganisms cultured from deep tissue samples from patients with vascular graft infections. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) were 58%, 86%, 81%, and 66%, respectively. The diagnostic value of microbiological cultures from NPWT foams was poor. PMID:27252462

  17. Determination of Solids Content of Charcoal-Impregnated Polyurethane Foams Using Density Measurements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-09-01

    de la mousse de polyurethane impr~gnge au charbon de bois donnant des r~sultats dont les 6carts types sont inf~rieurs A 0,7 %. Sont pr~sentges des...que la teneur en charbon de bois. iii TABLE OF CONTENTS Page ABSTRACT/R9SUMf . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...... . . . . . . ii INTRODUCTION...tione of title, body of abstract arid indexi ng annotation must he entered wvlheii the overall docuiletil is classiliedl I. ORIGINATING ACTiVITY 2a

  18. Graft copolymers of polyurethane with various vinyl monomers via radiation-induced miniemulsion polymerization: Influential factors to grafting efficiency and particle morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hua; Wang, Mozhen; Ge, Xuewu

    2009-02-01

    Graft copolymers of polyurethane (PU) with various vinyl monomers were synthesized through a one-pot but two-step miniemulsion polymerization process. Firstly, the polycondensation of isophorone diisocyanate (IPDI) with hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB) had been performed in aqueous miniemulsion at 40 °C in order to obtain PU dispersions. Consecutively, an in-situ graft copolymerization of the vinyl monomers with the synthesized PU was initiated by γ-ray radiation at room temperature. The grafting efficiency of PU with vinyl monomer ( GPU/monomer) was calculated from 1H NMR spectra and the particle morphology of the final hybrid latex was observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). As there was no monomer transferring in miniemulsion system, homogenous hybrid particles would be synthesized provided that the monomer was miscible with PU, such as styrene. With the increase of the polarity of the monomer, the compatibility of PU with monomer decreased. GPU/monomer varied as GPU/styrene(37%)> GPU/butyl acrylate (BA)(21%)> GPU/methyl methacrylate (MMA)(12%). The proportion of homogeneous nucleation would increase as the hydrophilicity of the monomer increased. High temperature would destabilize the miniemulsion so as to result in a less grafting efficiency. Compared to the phase separation during the seeded emulsion polymerization, the miniemulsion polymerization method facilitated the preparation of homogeneous materials owing to its monomer droplet nucleation mechanism.

  19. Biomimetic CO2 capture using a highly thermostable bacterial α-carbonic anhydrase immobilized on a polyurethane foam.

    PubMed

    Migliardini, Fortunato; De Luca, Viviana; Carginale, Vincenzo; Rossi, Mosè; Corbo, Pasquale; Supuran, Claudiu T; Capasso, Clemente

    2014-02-01

    The biomimetic approach represents an interesting strategy for carbon dioxide (CO2) capture, offering advantages over other methods, due to its specificity for CO2 and its eco-compatibility, as it allows concentration of CO2 from other gases, and its conversion to water soluble ions. This approach uses microorganisms capable of fixing CO2 through metabolic pathways or via the use of an enzyme, such as carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1). Recently, our group cloned and purified a novel bacterial α-CA, named SspCA, from the thermophilic bacteria, Sulfurihydrogenibium yellowstonense YO3AOP1 living in hot springs at temperatures of up to 110 °C. This enzyme showed an exceptional thermal stability, retaining its high catalytic activity for the CO2 hydration reaction even after being heated at 70 °C for several hours. In the present paper, the SspCA was immobilized within a polyurethane (PU) foam. The immobilized enzyme was found to be catalytically active and showed a long-term stability. A bioreactor containing the "PU-immobilized enzyme" (PU-SspCA) as shredded foam was used for experimental tests aimed to verify the CO2 capture capability in conditions close to those of a power plant application. In this bioreactor, a gas phase, containing CO2, was put into contact with a liquid phase under conditions, where CO2 contained in the gas phase was absorbed and efficiently converted into bicarbonate by the extremo-α-CA.

  20. Evaluating the effect of dissolved oxygen on simultaneous nitrification and denitrification in polyurethane foam contact oxidation reactors.

    PubMed

    Tan, Chong; Ma, Fang; Li, Ang; Qiu, Shan; Li, Jianzheng

    2013-03-01

    The effects of dissolved oxygen on simultaneous nitrification and denitrification were evaluated in polyurethane foam contact oxidation reactors in a municipal wastewater treatment process. It was observed that nitrate could be removed at low dissolved oxygen levels, but the removal rate was gradually reduced as the dissolved oxygen concentration increased to a higher level of 6.0 mg/L. Nitrogen removal remained optimal within the dissolved oxygen range of 0.5 to 1.0 mg/L. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis revealed that the diversity of the microbial community changed accompanying dissolved oxygen values of 0.5 to 1.0 mg/L, 2.5 to 3.5 mg/L, 6.0 to 6.5 mg/L, and 10.0 to 12.0 mg/L, in turn, which was supported by the Shannon-Wiener index of 1.56, 1.71, 1.43, and 1.56, accordingly. Both DGGE profiling and phylogenetic analysis confirmed that the nitrifiers in reactors that are responsible for nitrification during the experiment include Nitrosospira sp., Nitrosomonas sp., and Nitrospira sp.

  1. Repeated batch cultivation of the hydrocarbon-degrading, micro-algal strain Prototheca zopfii RND16 immobilized in polyurethane foam.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Ryohei; Wada, Shun; Urano, Naoto

    2008-01-01

    This study reports on the stability of the cells of a heterotrophic green micro-algal strain Prototheca zopfii RND16 immobilized in polyurethane foam (PUF) cubes during degradation of mixed hydrocarbon substrate, which was composed of n-alkanes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), in 5 successive cycles of repeated batch cultivation at 30 degrees C. Both RND16 cells and mixed hydrocarbon substrate components had been entrapped in PUF cubes through cultivation. PUF-immobilized RND16 degraded n-alkanes almost completely, whereas the strain hardly degraded PAHs in PUFs, rather they accumulated in the matrices. It is noteworthy that this result is strikingly different from that of the free-living cell culture, where RND16 reduced concentrations of both n-alkanes and PAHs. However, PAHs accumulation in the PUFs did not impair the performance of the immobilized alga to utilize n-alkanes. These results suggest that the PUFs harboring RND16 cells could be used repeatedly for selective retrieval of PAHs from oil-polluted waters after preferential biodegradation of n-alkanes by algae.

  2. Polyurethane foam chips combined with liquid chromatography in the determination of unmetabolized polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons excreted in human urine.

    PubMed

    Buratti, Marina; Pellegrino, Oronzo; Valla, Carla; Rubino, Federico Maria; Verduci, Cinzia; Colombi, Antonio

    2006-09-01

    A method suitable for the determination of unmetabolized polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) excreted at trace levels (ng/L) in human urine for the monitoring of exposure of the general population to PAH contamination was developed. PAHs were determined, after enrichment by solid-phase extraction on polyurethane foam (PUF) chips, by HPLC with fluorescence detection. Different parameters affecting analyte extraction to the PUF, including urine salting-out and organic additives, and optimization of conditions for clean-up and desorption have been investigated. Optimized conditions were 40 mL acidified urine sample, added with magnesium sulfate, tetrahydrofuran and a 2 cm3 PUF chip, and extracted by shaking at 30 rpm for 1 h at ambient temperature. Desorption was performed, after a clean-up step with diluted sodium hydroxide, using a small amount of diethyl ether. The recovery of PAH congeners from spiked urines was >90% in the 2-100 ng/L range; the detection limit was 0.1-0.5 ng/L, depending on the considered PAH congener; day-to-day precision, at 50 ng/L native PAH content, was CV = 10-20%. The proposed technique provides a simple, economical and effective procedure for the determination of trace amounts of unmetabolized PAHs excreted in human urine spot samples.

  3. Evaluation of polyurethane foam cartridges for measurement of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons in air. Final report, 1 August-31 December 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, C.C.; Bresler, W.E.; Hannan, S.W.

    1985-08-01

    The objective of this project was to evaluate polyurethane foam (PUF) cartridges as collection media for quantification of vapor-phase polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in air. Two cleanup methods for PUF cartridges--compression rinsing and combined compression rinsing and Soxhlet extraction--were evaluated. Both methods successfully remove interfering material and background PAHs from the PUF. The compression rinsing method is recommended because it is easier, faster, and cheaper. Two procedures for extraction of PAHs from the PUF matrix, Soxhlet extraction and compression rinsing, were compared. These sample extracts were analyzed by on-column injection, electron impact gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (EI GC/MS) to determine PAHs. The results showed that compression rinsing is comparable to conventional Soxhlet extraction, and that both methods successfully remove PAHs from the PUF cartridges. The compression rinsing method was then used in the stability study. The stability study was carried out to determine the stability of PAHs adsorbed on PUF cartridges as a function of storage time between collection and extraction. The results indicated that the levels of the spiked perdeuterated benzo(a)pyrene decreased significantly during storage. The rate of decrease was much faster when the PUF cartridges were stored in light. Other PAH levels were not adversely influenced by the storage time.

  4. Modeling, kinetic, and equilibrium characterization of paraquat adsorption onto polyurethane foam using the ion-pairing technique.

    PubMed

    Vinhal, Jonas O; Lage, Mateus R; Carneiro, José Walkimar M; Lima, Claudio F; Cassella, Ricardo J

    2015-06-01

    We studied the adsorption of paraquat onto polyurethane foam (PUF) when it was in a medium containing sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS). The adsorption efficiency was dependent on the concentration of SDS in solution, because the formation of an ion-associate between the cationic paraquat and the dodecylsulfate anion was found to be a fundamental step in the process. A computational study was carried out to identify the possible structure of the ion-associate in aqueous medium. The obtained data demonstrated that the structure is probably formed from four units of dodecylsulfate bonded to one paraquat moiety. The results showed that 94% of the paraquat present in 45 mL of a solution containing 3.90 × 10(-5) mol L(-1) could be retained by 300 mg of PUF, resulting in the removal of 2.20 mg of paraquat. The experimental data were reasonably adjusted to the Freundlich isotherm and to the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Also, the application of Morris-Weber and Reichenberg models indicated that both film-diffusion and intraparticle-diffusion processes were active during the control of the adsorption kinetics.

  5. Immunological evaluation of four arc welders exposed to fumes from ignited polyurethane (isocyanate) foam: antibodies and immune profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Broughton, A.; Thrasher, J.D.; Gard, Z.

    1988-01-01

    Four arc welders having a flu-like illness with multiple health complaints following an exposure to high concentrations of isocyanate fumes from ignited polyurethane foam underwent immunological tests as follows: ELISA antibody assays, activated lymphocyte profiles, and lymphocyte blastogenesis. ELISA procedures revealed the presence of antibodies to hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI) and formaldehyde (F) conjugated to human serum albumin (HDI-SA and F-SA). The results from the activated lymphocyte profiles showed deviations from the norm as follows: three welders had elevated helper/suppressor (H/S) ratios; all four had elevated percentages of Tal positive cells; two had decreases in B cells; and one had low total white cell and lymphocyte counts. In contrast, the percentage and absolute numbers of ILS receptor cells were normal in the four subjects. T cell blastogenesis to PHA, Con A and PWM resulted in the following: T-cells from one subject responded normally; in another, a high response (212% of controls) to PHA occurred with normal mitogenesis to Con A and PWM. In the remaining two welders, the T cells responded abnormally low (50 to 75% of controls) to the three mitogens. In conclusion, the existence of IgG antibodies to HDI-SA and F-SA, the altered activated immune profiles, the elevated Tal cells, and the abnormal blastogenesis are interpreted as being linked with the episode of HDI and F exposure and the subsequent flu-like illness of the four welders.

  6. Rigid polyurethane foam (RPF) technology for Countermine (Sea) Program -- Phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Woodfin, R.L.

    1997-01-01

    This Phase 1 report documents the results of one of the subtasks that was initiated under the joint Department of Energy (DOE)/Department of Defense (DoD) Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) for Countermine Warfare. The development of a foam that can neutralize mines and barriers and allow the safe passage of amphibious landing craft and vehicles was the objective of this subtask of the Sea Mine Countermeasures Technology program. This phase of the program concentrated on laboratory characterization of foam properties and field experiments with prefabricated foam blocks to determine the capability of RPF to adequately carry military traffic. It also established the flammability characteristics of the material under simulated operational conditions, extended the understanding of explosive cavity formation in RPF to include surface explosions, established the tolerance to typical military fluids, and the response to bullet impact. Many of the basic analyses required to establish the operational concept are reported. The initial field experiments were conducted at the Energetic Materials Research and Testing Center (EMRTC) of the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM in November 1995 through February 1996.

  7. Low density biodegradable shape memory polyurethane foams for embolic biomedical applications

    PubMed Central

    Singhal, Pooja; Small, Ward; Cosgriff-Hernandez, Elizabeth; Maitland, Duncan J; Wilson, Thomas S

    2014-01-01

    Low density shape memory polymer foams hold significant interest in the biomaterials community for their potential use in minimally invasive embolic biomedical applications. The unique shape memory behavior of these foams allows them to be compressed to a miniaturized form, which can be delivered to an anatomical site via a transcatheter process, and thereafter actuated to embolize the desired area. Previous work in this field has described the use of a highly covalently crosslinked polymer structure for maintaining excellent mechanical and shape memory properties at the application-specific ultra low densities. This work is aimed at further expanding the utility of these biomaterials, as implantable low density shape memory polymer foams, by introducing controlled biodegradability. A highly covalently crosslinked network structure was maintained by use of low molecular weight, symmetrical and polyfunctional hydroxyl monomers such as Polycaprolactone triol (PCL-t, Mn 900 g), N,N,N0,N0-Tetrakis (hydroxypropyl) ethylenediamine (HPED), and Tris (2-hydroxyethyl) amine (TEA). Control over the degradation rate of the materials was achieved by changing the concentration of the degradable PCL-t monomer, and by varying the material hydrophobicity. These porous SMP materials exhibit a uniform cell morphology and excellent shape recovery, along with controllable actuation temperature and degradation rate. We believe that they form a new class of low density biodegradable SMP scaffolds that can potentially be used as “smart” non-permanent implants in multiple minimally invasive biomedical applications. PMID:24090987

  8. A novel microporous polyurethane vascular graft: in vivo evaluation of the UTA prosthesis implanted as infra-renal aortic substitute in dogs.

    PubMed

    Marois, Y; Akoum, A; King, M; Guidoin, R; von Maltzahn, W; Kowligi, R; Eberhart, R C; Teijeira, F J; Verreault, J

    1993-01-01

    A novel microporous polyurethane blood conduit developed at the University of Texas at Arlington was implanted as an infra-renal substitute in dogs. The prosthesis was fabricated by precipitating a solution of the polymer with dry nitrogen onto a rotating mandrel. The grafts were sterilized either by gamma radiation (series I) or ethylene oxide (series II); they were implanted for the following prescheduled periods: 4, 24, 48 hours, and 1 week (short-term) and 2, 4 weeks, 3 and 6 months (medium-term). The thrombohematological characteristics of each animal were evaluated prior to implantation and confirmed that the index of blood coagulability was normal. In the short-term group, five out of eight grafts were patent and three were partially occluded; four grafts in the medium-term group were patent; one was partially occluded; and three were thrombosed at retrieval. One week after implantation, the prostheses were surrounded by an external capsule, which was present mainly at the two anastomoses. The external capsule covered the entire graft at 3 months. No kinking of the grafts was observed and the presence of a mild yellow stain related to bilirubin uptake was detected at 2 weeks, 1, 3, and 6 months. Histological studies have revealed the formation of a thin internal capsule at both anastomoses, 2 weeks postimplantation, which was not anchored to the graft wall. In the medium-term group, the thrombosed grafts failed to develop an internal capsule, whereas the patent graft exhibited a thick internal capsule made of neocollagenous tissue over the entire graft. This new microporous polyurethane prosthesis did not perform satisfactorily as an infra-renal substitute in dogs and its in vivo stability requires further assessment. Thus, the concept of a polyurethane with closed pores does not achieve what was anticipated.

  9. Polyurethane Masks Large Areas in Electroplating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beasley, J. L.

    1985-01-01

    Polyurethane foam provides effective mask in electroplating of copper or nickel. Thin layer of Turco maskant painted on area to be masked: Layer ensures polyurethane foam removed easily after served its purpose. Component A, isocyanate, and component B, polyol, mixed together and brushed or sprayed on mask area. Mixture reacts, yielding polyurethane foam. Foam prevents deposition of nickel or copper on covered area. New method saves time, increases productivity and uses less material than older procedures.

  10. In vivo resorption of a biodegradable polyurethane foam, based on 1,4-butanediisocyanate: a three-year subcutaneous implantation study.

    PubMed

    van Minnen, B; van Leeuwen, M B M; Kors, G; Zuidema, J; van Kooten, T G; Bos, R R M

    2008-06-15

    Degradable polyurethanes (PUs), based on aliphatic diisocyanates, can be very useful in tissue regeneration applications. Their long-term in vivo degradation has not been extensively investigated. In this study a biodegradable PU with copolyester soft segments of DL-lactide/epsilon-caprolactone and hard segments synthesized from 1,4-butanediisocyanate was evaluated with regard to tissue response during degradation and, ultimately, the resorption of the material. Highly porous PU foam discs were subcutaneously implanted in rats and rabbits for intervals up to 3 years. A copolymer foam of DL-lactide and epsilon-caprolactone served as a control. The foams, the surrounding tissues and the draining lymph nodes were evaluated with light and electron microscopy. In the first stages of degradation the number of macrophages and giant cells increased. As the resorption stage set in their numbers gradually decreased. Electron microscopy showed macrophages containing pieces of PU. The size of the intracellular PU particles diminished and cells containing these remnants gradually disappeared after periods from 1 to 3 years. After 3 years an occasional, isolated macrophage with biomaterial remnants could be traced in both PU and copolymer explants. Single macrophages with biomaterial remnants were observed in the lymph nodes between 39 weeks and 1.5 years following implantation. It is concluded that the PU foam is biocompatible during degradation. After 3 years PU samples had been resorbed almost completely. These results indicate that the PU foam can be safely used as a biodegradable implant.

  11. EVALUATION OF THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY OF INSTALLED-IN-PLACE POLYURETHANE FOAM INSULATION BY EXPERIMENT AND ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, A; Bruce Hardy, B; Kurt Eberl, K; Nick Gupta, N

    2007-12-05

    In the thermal analysis of the 9977 package, it was found that calculated temperatures, determined using a typical thermal analysis code, did not match those measured in the experimental apparatus. The analysis indicated that the thermal resistance of the overpack in the experimental apparatus was less than that expected, based on manufacturer's reported value of thermal conductivity. To resolve this question, the thermal conductivity of the installed foam was evaluated from the experimental results, using a simplified analysis. This study confirmed that the thermal resistance of the experimental apparatus was lower than that which would result from the manufacturer's published values for thermal conductivity of the foam insulation. The test package was sectioned to obtain samples for measurement of material properties. In the course of the destructive examination a large uninsulated region was found at the bottom of the package, which accounted for the anomalous results. Subsequent measurement of thermal conductivity confirmed the manufacturer's published values. The study provides useful insight into the use of simplified, scoping calculations for evaluation of thermal performance of packages.

  12. Growth of endothelial cells on different concentrations of Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp photochemically grafted in polyethylene glycol modified polyurethane.

    PubMed

    Lin, Y S; Wang, S S; Chung, T W; Wang, Y H; Chiou, S H; Hsu, J J; Chou, N K; Hsieh, K H; Chu, S H

    2001-08-01

    To improve endothelial cell adhesion and growth on the surface of polyethylene glycol modified polyurethane (PU-PEG), cell adhesive peptide Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp (GRGD) was photochemically grafted to the surface. The surface grafted GRGD-N-Succinimidyl-6-[4'-azido-2'-nitrophenylamino]hexanoate (SANPAH) on a PU-PEG surface was performed by adsorption and subsequent ultraviolet irradiation. Fourier transform infrared spectra (FTIR) and electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA) confirmed the GRGD grafted to form a PU-PEG-GRGD surface. The composition fraction of nitrogen calculated from ESCA analysis for the PU-PEG-GRGD surface was well correlated with the concentration of GRGD to be immobilized. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (ECs) were well adhered and growing on the PU-PEG-GRGD surface. Moreover, the viability of ECs growing on PU-PEG-GRGD surfaces, analyzed by MTT test, was also well correlated with the GRGD concentrations immobilized on the surface. With photochemical techniques, we could manipulate different contents of GRGD to form multiple regions of PU-PEG-GRGD surface that could enhance the growth of ECs on the surface, and the enhancement efficiency was well correlated with GRGD contents.

  13. In vivo degradation of polyurethane foam with 55 wt % polyethylene glycol.

    PubMed

    Broekema, Ferdinand I; Van Leeuwen, M Barbara M; Van Minnen, Baucke; Bos, Rudolf R M

    2015-11-01

    Most topical hemostatic agents are based on animal-derived products like collagen and gelatin. They carry the potential risk of pathogen transmission while adjustments in the production process of these materials are limited. A synthetic hemostatic agent based on polyurethane (PU) and polyethylene glycol (PEG) was developed to overcome these disadvantages. The goal of this study was to compare the degradation process of this biomaterial to collagen and gelatin hemostatic agents. Samples of the test materials were implanted subcutaneously in both rats and rabbits. The animals were sacrificed at certain time intervals up to three years and the explanted samples were microscopically assessed. The histological examination showed a comparable pattern of degradation for the different test materials. Remnants of gelatin and collagen were seen up to 26 and 39 weeks, respectively. For PU, it took up to three years before micro-particles of the material were no longer detected. All biomaterials showed a good biocompatibility and no severe foreign body reactions occurred. The good biocompatibility and predictable pattern of resorption indicate that PU can be used as a topical hemostatic agent. However, a degradation time comparable to collagen and gelatin would be favorable.

  14. Sorption characteristics and chromatographic separation of gold (I and III) from silver and base metal ions using polyurethane foams.

    PubMed

    Farag, A B; Soliman, M H; Abdel-Rasoul, O S; el-Shahawi, M S

    2007-10-10

    The influence of different parameters on the sorption profiles of trace and ultra traces of gold (I) species from the aqueous cyanide media onto the solid sorbents ion exchange polyurethane foams (IEPUFs) and commercial unloaded polyurethane foams (PUFs) based polyether type has been investigated. The retention of gold (I) species onto the investigated solid sorbents followed a first-order rate equation with an overall rate constant k in the range 2.2-2.8+/-0.2 s(-1). The sorption data of gold (I) followed Freundlich and Langmuir isotherm models. Thus, the a dual-mode of sorption mechanism involving absorption related to "weak base anion exchanger" and an added component for "surface adsorption" seems the most likely proposed dual mechanism for retention profile of gold (I) by the IEPUFs and PUFs solid sorbents. The capacity of the IEPUFs and PUFs towards gold (I) sorption calculated from the sorption isotherms was found to be 11.21+/-1.8 and 5.29+/-0.9 mg g(-1), respectively. The chromatographic separation of the spiked inorganic gold (I) from de ionized water at concentrations 5-15 microg mL(-1) onto the developed IEPUFs and PUFs packed columns at 10 mL min(-1) flow rate was successfully achieved. The retained gold (I) species were then recovered quantitatively from the IEPUFs (98.4+/-2.4%, n=5) and PUFs (95.4+/-3.4%, n=5) packed columns using perchloric acid (60 mL, 1.0 mol L(-1)) as a proper eluting agent. Thiourea (1.0 mol L(-1))-H2SO4 (0.1 mol L(-1)) system was also used as eluting agent for the recovery of gold (I) from IEPUFS (95.4+/-5.4%, n=3) and also PUFs (93.4+/-4.4%, n=3) packed columns. The performance of the IEPUFs and PUFs packed columns in terms of the height equivalent to the theoretical plates (HETP), number of plates (N), and critical and breakthrough capacities towards gold (I) species were evaluated. The developed IEPUFs packed column was applied successfully for complete retention and recovery (98.5+/-2.7) of gold (III) species spiked onto

  15. Removal of copper and iron by polyurethane foam column in FIA system for the determination of nickel in pierced ring.

    PubMed

    Vongboot, Monnapat; Suesoonthon, Monrudee

    2015-01-01

    Polyurethane foam (PUF) mini-column was used to eliminate copper and iron for the determination of nickel in pierced rings. The PUF mini-column was connected to FIA system for on-line sorption of copper and iron in complexes form of CuSCN(+) and FeSCN(2+). For this season, the acid solution containing a mixture of Ni(II), Fe(III), Cu(II) and SCN(-) ions was firstly flew into the PUF column. Then, the percolated solution which Fe(III) and Cu(II) ions is separated from analysis was injected into FIA system to react with 4-(2-pyridylazo) resorcinol (PAR) reagent in basic condition which this method is called pH gradient technique. The Ni-PAR complexes obtained were measured theirs absorbance at 500 nm by UV visible spectrophotometer. In this study, it was found that Cu(II) and Fe(III) were completely to form complexes with 400 mmol/L KSCN and entirely to eliminate in acidic condition at pH 3.0. In the optimum condition of these experiments, the method provided the linear relationship between absorbance and the concentration of Ni(II) in the range from 5.00 to 30.00 mg/L. Linear equation is y=0.0134x+0.0033 (R(2)=0.9948). Precision, assessed in the term of the relative standard deviation, RSD, and accuracy for multiple determinations obtained in values of 0.77-1.73% and 97.4%, respectively. The level of an average amount of Ni(II) in six piercing rings was evaluated to be 14.78 mg/g.

  16. Stability of polycyclic aromatic compounds in polyurethane foam-type passive air samplers upon O3 exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jariyasopit, Narumol; Liu, Yongchun; Liggio, John; Harner, Tom

    2015-11-01

    Stability of polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs) in polyurethane foam (PUF) disks upon O3 exposure was studied in a flow tube. A wide range of PACs was evaluated by spiking PUF disks with PACs and exposing to O3 at concentrations that were equivalent to two months exposure, a typical deployment period for these passive air samplers. Ambient concentrations of O3 (∼50 ppb) at 0% and 50% relative humidity (RH) were applied. At 0% RH, 23 of 68 PACs yielded more than 50% loss after exposure. The mean percent loss was 30% with perylene and 9,10-dimethylanthracene the most reactive polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and alkylated PAHs, respectively. At 50% RH, 77% of the studied PACs was stable upon O3 exposure (PACexposed/PACunexposed > 0.7). The mean percent loss was 17% and only 7 of 68 PACs yielded greater than 50% loss. In general, the reactivity of most of the PACs decreased at higher RH, except for the reactive PAHs (acenaphthylene, 2,3-dimethylanthracene, 9,10-dimethylanthracene, dibenzothiophene, and 2-methyldibenzothiophene) which demonstrated lower RH dependence. The experimental conditions in this study represent a worst case scenario for the stability of PACs sorbed to PUF. In reality, the sampling of PACs in ambient air represents an 'aged' component of PACs where the most reactive species have already partially been removed. Also, PACs in ambient air will be associated with the particle phase to varying extents that will help to enhance their stability. Therefore, under regular operating conditions, over a 2-month exposure, we expect a minimal error in the measurement of total concentration of PACs in air using the PUF disk passive sampler.

  17. Simplification and validation of a large volume polyurethane foam sampler for the analysis of persistent hydrophobic compounds in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Choi, J W; Lee, J H; Moon, B S; Kannan, K

    2008-08-01

    The use of a large volume polyurethane foam (PUF) sampler was validated for rapid extraction of persistent organic pollutants (POPs), such as polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs), in raw water and treated water from drinking water plants. To validate the recovery of target compounds in the sampling process, a (37)Cl-labeled standard was spiked into the 1st PUF plug prior to filtration. An accelerated solvent extraction method, as a pressurized liquid extractor (PLE), was optimized to extract the PUF plug. For sample preparation, tandem column chromatography (TCC) clean-up was used for rapid analysis. The recoveries of labeled compounds in the analytical method were 80-110% (n = 9). The optimized PUF-PLE-TCC method was applied in the analysis of raw water and treated potable water from seven drinking water plants in South Korea. The sample volume used was between 18 and 102 L for raw water at a flow rate of 0.4-2 L min(-1), 95 and 107 L for treated water at a flow rate of 1.5-2.2 L min(-1). Limit of quantitation (LOQ) was a function of sample volume and it decreased with increasing sample volume. The LOQ of PCDD/Fs in raw waters analyzed by this method was 3-11 times lower than that described using large-size disk-type solid phase extraction (SPE) method. The LOQ of PCDD/F congeners in raw water and treated water were 0.022-3.9 ng L(-1) and 0.018-0.74 ng L(-1), respectively. Octachlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin (OCDD) was found in some raw water samples, while their concentrations were well below the tentative criterion set by the Japanese Environmental Ministry for drinking water. OCDD was below the LOQ in the treated drinking water.

  18. Development of mass production type rigid polyurethane foam for LNG carrier using ozone depletion free blowing agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yeongbeom; Baek, Kye Hyun; Choe, Kunhyung; Han, Chonghun

    2016-12-01

    Nowadays the price of natural gas has become higher and the efficiency of propulsion system of liquefied natural gas (LNG) carriers has improved. Due to these trends, required boil-off rate (BOR) for LNG carrier has been lowered from 0.15%/day to 0.12%/day for conventional LNG carriers with sizes between 125,000 m3 and 170,000 m3. This requirement of BOR can be satisfied by using a rigid polyurethane foam (PUF) blown by 1,1-dichloro-1-fluoroethane (HCFC-141b) as an insulator. However, ozone depletion potential (ODP) of HCFC-141b requires alternative blowing agents with zero ODP such as hydroflurocarbons (HFCs) because of tougher environmental regulations. This paper introduces use of HFCs and additives to enhance properties of rigid PUFs under a mass production environment. Among the additives, perfluoroalkane (PFA) reduces thermal conductivity down to 12% and increases compressive strength up to 15% of a rigid PUF prepared in a laboratory scale. Based on this result, a mass production type rigid PUF is manufactured and is evaluated for BOR, mechanical strengths over operation temperature range, and thermal shock stability for LNG carriers. The BOR of the manufactured rigid PUF is below 0.12%/day, which satisfies the recent BOR specification for LNG carriers. The other required properties are also met the specifications for a conventional LNG carrier. Consequently, it is expected that the results in this paper will bring low BOR (<0.12%/day) LNG carries with rigid PUFs using ODP free blowing agents and contribute environmental protection through saving energy and preserving the ozone layer in the stratosphere.

  19. Polyurethane Filler for Electroplating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beasley, J. L.

    1984-01-01

    Polyurethane foam proves suitable as filler for slots in parts electroplated with copper or nickel. Polyurethane causes less contamination of plating bath and of cleaning and filtering tanks than wax fillers used previously. Direct cost of maintenance and indirect cost of reduced operating time during tank cleaning also reduced.

  20. A polyurethane dressing is beneficial for split-thickness skin-graft donor wound healing.

    PubMed

    Akita, Sadanori; Akino, Kozo; Imaizumi, Toshifumi; Tanaka, Katsumi; Anraku, Kuniaki; Yano, Hiroki; Hirano, Akiyoshi

    2006-06-01

    Few comparative studies have been performed on the various wound-dressing materials or methods proposed for use. To clarify the efficacy of wound dressing, 35 patients (17 females, aged 44.8+/-26.86 years and 18 males, aged 35.4+/-29.70) were subjected to a prospective study comparing a polyurethane dressing and a hydrogel dressing for split-thickness skin donors from the lateral thighs. We examined their clinical usefulness such as accelerated healing time, frequency of changing the dressing, degree of pain, or amount of exudates, and performed moisture meter analysis at 1 month and 1 year after re-epithelialization, which reflects the quality of the stratum corneum and subsequent scarring. The polyurethane dressing was superior to hydrogel in the wound healing time, amount of exudates, and frequency of dressing changes: the hydrogel was better for regulating the degree of pain. There was a positive correlation between transepidermal water loss and the effective contact coefficient, which indicates skin barrier function and affected by skin surface electrolytes and reflects water content, in moisture meter analysis (r(2)=0.32, p<0.01). Transepidermal water loss returned to the control level at 1 year after healing with both dressings. The effective contact coefficient of the polyurethane wound was significantly lower than that of hydrogel at 1 month (p<0.01), while both dressing wounds demonstrated significantly higher values at both 1 month and 1 year compared to the control (p<0.01). The polyurethane dressing is therefore superior both clinically and in moisture meter analysis.

  1. Halogenated flame-retardant concentrations in settled dust, respirable and inhalable particulates and polyurethane foam at gymnastic training facilities and residences.

    PubMed

    La Guardia, Mark J; Hale, Robert C

    2015-06-01

    Halogenated flame-retardants (FRs) are used in a wide array of polymer-containing products. Animal studies and structure-activity modeling exercises suggest that FR exposure may result in detrimental toxicological effects. Workers with extended contact with such polymers (e.g., electronic dismantlers, carpet installers and aircraft personnel) have previously been observed to exhibit elevated body burdens of FRs, e.g., polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs). Recently, elevated PBDE blood levels were also reported in a non-occupational exposure group, gymnasts. These levels were hypothesized to be related to the large volumes of FR-treated polyurethane foam in gymnastics facilities. To further our understanding of workers' potential exposure, we analyzed FR concentrations in indoor dust and size-fractionated air particulates (respirable (<4 μm) and inhalable (>4 μm)) from gymnastic studios. Values were compared to samples from the homes of coaches employed at these facilities. Polyurethane foam blocks (i.e., pit foam) were also analyzed to characterize potential FR sources. FRs examined included those used to flame-retard polyurethane foam: 8 PBDE congeners, two brominated components of Firemaster 550 (2-ethylhexyl 2, 3, 4, 5-tetrabromobenzoate (TBB) and bis(2-ethylhexyl) 3, 4, 5, 6-tetrabromophthalate (TBPH)) and three chlorinated organophosphates (tris(2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP), tris(1-chloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TCPP) and tris(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TDCPP)). Several additional FRs not used in polyurethane were also evaluated. These have also been detected in indoor dust and air and may also lead to adverse health effects. These include: BDE-183 and its replacement product (1, 2-bis(2, 4, 6-tribromophenoxy) ethane (BTBPE), two congeners of the deca-BDE formulation (BDE-206, -209) and their replacement decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE) and hexabromocyclododecane (α-, β-, γ-HBCD), and tetrabromobisphenol-A (TBBPA)). Pit foam contained multiple

  2. Assessing the influence of meteorological parameters on the performance of polyurethane foam-based passive air samplers.

    PubMed

    Klánová, Jana; Eupr, Pavel; Kohoutek, Jirí; Harner, Tom

    2008-01-15

    Polyurethane foam (PUF) disk passive air samplers were evaluated under field conditionsto assessthe effect of temperature and wind speed on the sampling rate for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and organochlorine pesticides (OCPs). Passive samples integrated over 28-day periods were compared to high-volume air samples collected for 24 h, every 7 days. This provided a large data set of 42 passive sampling events and 168 high-volume samples over a 3-year period, starting in October 2003. Average PUF disk sampling rates for gas-phase chemicals was approximately 7 m3 d(-1) and comparable to previous reports. The high molecular weight PAHs, which are mainly particle-bound, experienced much lower sampling rates of approximately 0.7 m3 d(-1). This small rate was attributed to the ability of the sampling chamber to filter out coarse particles with only the fine/ultrafine fraction capable of penetration and collection on the PUF disk. Passive sampler-derived data were converted to equivalent air volumes (V(EQ), m3) using the high-volume air measurement results. Correlations of V(EQ) against meteorological data collected on-site yielded different behavior for gas- and particle-associated compounds. For gas-phase chemicals, sampling rates varied by about a factor of 2 with temperature and wind speed. The higher sampling rates at colder temperatures were explained bythe wind effecton sampling rates. Temperature and wind were strongly correlated with the greatest winds at coldertemperatures. Mainly particle-phase compounds (namely, the high molecular weight PAHs) had more variable sampling rates. Sampling rates increased greatly atwarmertemperatures as the high molecular weight PAH burden was shifted toward the gas phase and subject to higher gas-phase sampling rates. At colder temperatures, sampling rates were reduced as the partitioning of the high molecular weight PAHs was shifted toward the particle phase. The observed wind effect

  3. A study on the ability of quaternary ammonium groups attached to a polyurethane foam wound dressing to inhibit bacterial attachment and biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Tran, Phat L; Hamood, Abdul N; de Souza, Anselm; Schultz, Gregory; Liesenfeld, Bernd; Mehta, Dilip; Reid, Ted W

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial infection of acute and chronic wounds impedes wound healing significantly. Part of this impediment is the ability of bacterial pathogens to grow in wound dressings. In this study, we examined the effectiveness of a polyurethane (PU) foam wound dressings coated with poly diallyl-dimethylammonium chloride (pDADMAC-PU) to inhibit the growth and biofilm development by three main wound pathogens, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Acinetobacter baumannii, within the wound dressing. pDADMAC-PU inhibited the growth of all three pathogens. Time-kill curves were conducted both with and without serum to determine the killing kinetic of pDADMAC-PU. pDADMAC-PU killed S. aureus, A. baumannii, and P. aeruginosa. The effect of pDADMAC-PU on biofilm development was analyzed quantitatively and qualitatively. Quantitative analysis, colony-forming unit assay, revealed that pDADMAC-PU dressing produced more than eight log reduction in biofilm formation by each pathogen. Visualization of the biofilms by either confocal laser scanning microscopy or scanning electron microscopy confirmed these findings. In addition, it was found that the pDADMAC-PU-treated foam totally inhibited migration of bacteria through the foam for all three bacterial strains. These results suggest that pDADMAC-PU is an effective wound dressing that inhibits the growth of wound pathogens both within the wound and in the wound dressing.

  4. Fire retardant foams developed to suppress fuel fires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fish, R.; Gilwee, W. J.; Parker, J. A.; Riccitiello, S. R.

    1968-01-01

    Heat insulating polyurethane foam retards and suppresses fuel fires. Uniformly dispersed in the foam is a halogenated polymer capable of splitting off hydrogen halide upon heating and charring of the polyurethane.

  5. Assessment of the degradation of polyurethane foams after artificial and natural ageing by using pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and headspace-solid phase microextraction-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lattuati-Derieux, A; Thao-Heu, S; Lavédrine, B

    2011-07-15

    Polyurethane foams are widely present in museum collections either as part of the artefacts, or as a material for their conservation. Unfortunately many of PU foam artefacts are in poor condition and often exhibit specific conservation issues. Their fast thermal and photochemical degradations have been the aim of previous researches. It is now accepted that hydrolysis predominates for polyester-based polyurethane PU(ES) whereas oxidation is the principal cause of degradation for polyether-based polyurethane PU(ET) variety. Only a few studies have been devoted to volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted by polyurethanes and, to our knowledge, none were performed on polyurethane foams by using headspace-solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME). The objective of the work described here is to assess the impact of some environmental factors (humidity, temperature and daylight) on the degradation of PU foams by evaluating their volatile fractions. We investigated morphological changes, polymerized fractions and volatile fractions of (i) one modern produced PU(ES) foam and one modern PU(ET) foam artificially aged in different conditions as well as (ii) four naturally aged foams collected from various daily life objects and selected for the representativeness of their analytical data. Characterization procedure used was based on attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS) and non-invasive headspace solid-phase microextraction coupled with gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (HS-SPME-GC/MS). In this paper, the formation of alcohol and acid raw products for PU(ES) and glycol derivatives for PU(ET) during natural and artificial ageing is confirmed. These main products can be considered as degradation markers for PU foams. Results show that artificial and natural ageing provide similar analytical results, and confirm that the dominant degradation paths for PU(ES) and for PU(ET) are

  6. Biodecolorization and Bioremediation of Denim Industrial Wastewater by Adapted Bacterial Consortium Immobilized on Inert Polyurethane Foam (PUF) Matrix: A First Approach with Biobarrier Model.

    PubMed

    Rajendran, R; Prabhavathi, P; Karthiksundaram, S; Pattab, S; Kumar, S Dinesh; Santhanam, P

    2015-01-01

    The present experiments were studied on bioremediation of denim industry wastewater by using polyurethane foam (PU foam) immobilized bacterial cells. About 30 indigenous adapted bacterial strains were isolated from denim textile effluent out of which only four isolates were found to be efficient against crude indigo carmine degradation using broth decolorization method. The selected bacterial strains were identified as Actinomyces sp., (PK07), Pseudomonas sp., (PK18), Stenotrophomonas sp., (PK23) and Staphylococcus sp., (PK28) based on microscopic and biochemical characteristics. The bacterial immobilized cells have the highest number of viable cells (PK07, PK18, PK23 and PK28 appeared to be 1 x 10(8), 1 x 10(9), 1 x 10(6) and 1 x 10(7) CFU/ml respectively) and maximum attachment efficiency of 92% on PU foam. The complete degradation using a consortium of PU foam immobilized cells was achieved at pH 6, 27 degrees C, 100% of substrate concentration and allowed to develop biofilm for one day (1.5% W/V). In SEM analysis, it was found that immobilization of bacterial cells using PUF stably maintained the production of various extracellular enzymes at levels higher than achieved with suspended forms. Finally, isatin and anthranilic acid were found to be degradation products by NMR and TLC. The decolorized dye was not toxic to monkey kidney cell (HBL 100) at a concentration of 50 μl and 95% of cell viability was retained. A mathematical model that describes bacterial transport with biodegradation involves a set of coupled reaction equations with non-standard numerical approach based on the time step scheme.

  7. Assessing levels and seasonal variations of current-use pesticides (CUPs) in the Tuscan atmosphere, Italy, using polyurethane foam disks (PUF) passive air samplers.

    PubMed

    Estellano, Victor H; Pozo, Karla; Efstathiou, Christos; Pozo, Katerine; Corsolini, Simonetta; Focardi, Silvano

    2015-10-01

    Polyurethane foam disks (PUF) passive air samplers (PAS) were deployed over 4 sampling periods of 3-5-months (≥ 1 year) at ten urban and rural locations throughout the Tuscany Region. The purpose was to assess the occurrence and seasonal variations of ten current-use pesticides (CUPs). PUF disk extracts were analyzed using GC-MS. The organophosphates insecticides; chlorpyrifos (3-580 pg m(-3)) and chlorpyrifos-methyl (below detection limit - to 570 pg m(-3)) presented the highest levels in air, and showed seasonal fluctuation coinciding with the growing seasons. The relative proportion urban/(urban + rural) ranged from 0.4 to 0.7 showing no differences between urban and rural concentrations. Air back trajectories analysis showed air masses passing over agricultural fields and potentially enhancing the drift of pesticides into the urban sites. This study represents the first information regarding CUPs in the atmosphere of Tuscany region using PAS-PUF disk.

  8. Graft-copolymer-based approach to clear, durable, and anti-smudge polyurethane coatings.

    PubMed

    Rabnawaz, Muhammad; Liu, Guojun

    2015-05-26

    Clear anti-smudge coatings with a thickness of up to tens of micrometers have been prepared through a graft-copolymer-based approach from commercial precursors. The coatings repel water, diiodomethane, hexadecane, ink, and an artificial fingerprint liquid. In addition, they can be readily applied onto different substrates using different coating methods. These coatings could find applications in protecting hand-held electronic devices from fingerprints, windows from stains, and buildings from graffiti.

  9. Surface grafting of a thermoplastic polyurethane with methacrylic acid by previous plasma surface activation and by ultraviolet irradiation to reduce cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Alves, P; Pinto, S; Kaiser, Jean-Pierre; Bruinink, Arie; de Sousa, Hermínio C; Gil, M H

    2011-02-01

    The material performance, in a biological environment, is mainly mediated by its surface properties and by the combination of chemical, physical, biological, and mechanical properties required, for a specific application. In this study, the surface of a thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) material (Elastollan(®)1180A50) was activated either by plasma or by ultra-violet (UV) irradiation. After surface activation, methacrylic acid (MAA) was linked to the surface of TPU in order to improve its reactivity and to reduce cell adhesion. Grafted surfaces were evaluated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and by contact angle measurements. Blood compatibility studies and cell adhesion tests with human bone marrow cells (HBMC) were also performed. If was found that UV grafting method led to better results than the plasma activation method, since cell adhesion was reduced when methacrylic acid was grafted to the TPU surface by UV.

  10. Results from Screening Polyurethane Foam Based Consumer Products for Flame Retardant Chemicals: Assessing Impacts on the Change in the Furniture Flammability Standards

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Flame retardant (FR) chemicals have often been added to polyurethane foam to meet required state and federal flammability standards. However, some FRs (e.g., PBDEs and TDCIPP) are associated with health hazards and are now restricted from use in some regions. In addition, California’s residential furniture flammability standard (TB-117) has undergone significant amendments over the past few years, and TDCIPP has been added to California’s Proposition 65 list. These events have likely led to shifts in the types of FRs used, and the products to which they are applied. To provide more information on the use of FRs in products containing polyurethane foam (PUF), we established a screening service for the general public. Participants residing in the US were allowed to submit up to 5 samples from their household for analysis, free of charge, and supplied information on the product category, labeling, and year and state of purchase. Between February 2014 and June 2016, we received 1141 PUF samples for analysis from various products including sofas, chairs, mattresses, car seats and pillows. Of these samples tested, 52% contained a FR at levels greater than 1% by weight. Tris(1,3-dichloroisopropyl)phosphate (TDCIPP) was the most common FR detected in PUF samples, and was the most common FR detected in all product categories. Analysis of the data by purchasing date suggests that the use of TDCIPP decreased in recent years, paralleled with an increase in the use of TCIPP and a nonhalogenated aryl phosphate mixture we call “TBPP.” In addition, we observed significant decreases in FR applications in furniture products and child car seats, suggesting the use of additive FRs in PUF may be declining, perhaps as a reflection of recent changes to TB-117 and Proposition 65. More studies are needed to determine how these changes in FR use relate to changes in exposure among the general population. PMID:27552529

  11. Application of sorbent impregnated polyurethane foam (SIP) disk passive air samplers for investigating organochlorine pesticides and polybrominated diphenyl ethers at the global scale.

    PubMed

    Koblizkova, Martina; Genualdi, Susan; Lee, Sum Chi; Harner, Tom

    2012-01-03

    As part of continued efforts under the Global Atmospheric Passive Sampling (GAPS) Network to develop passive air samplers applicable to a wide-range of compounds, sorbent-impregnated polyurethane foam (SIP) disk samplers were codeployed and tested against conventional polyurethane foam (PUF) disk samplers. The SIP disk sampler has a higher sorptive capacity compared to the PUF disk sampler, due to its impregnation with ground XAD resin. The two sampler types were codeployed at 20 sites during the 2009, 3-month long spring sampling period of the GAPS Network. Air concentrations for chlordanes (trans-chlordane, cis-chlordane, and trans-nonachlor) and endosulfans (endosulfan I, endosulfan II, and endosulfan sulfate) derived from PUF disk and SIP disk samplers showed near 1:1 agreement and confirmed previous results for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Discrepancies observed for α-HCH and γ-HCH in PUF disk versus SIP disk are attributed to lack of "comparability" of the PUF and SIP data sets, due to differences in effective air sampled by the two devices caused by saturation of these higher volatility compounds in the lower capacity PUF disk samplers. Analysis of PBDEs in PUF and SIP disks showed relatively good agreement but highlighted challenges associated with high blanks levels for PBDEs. The higher capacity SIP disk samplers allowed for the analysis of pentachlorobenzene (PeCBz) and hexachlorobenzene (HCBz) and revealed a relatively uniform global distribution of these compounds. The results of this study further validate the SIP disk sampler as a complement to the PUF disk sampler, with capabilities for a broad range of POPs targeted under international POPs treaties such as the Stockholm Convention on POPs and its Global Monitoring Plan.

  12. A case-controlled, retrospective, comparative study on the use of biodegradable synthetic polyurethane foam versus polyvinyl acetate sponge after nasal fracture reduction.

    PubMed

    Jeong, H-S; Lee, H-K; Kim, H-S; Moon, M-S; Tark, K-C

    2014-06-01

    One of the most frequently used packing materials in closed reduction of a nasal bone fracture is the hydroxylated polyvinyl acetate sponge (PVAS; Merocel(®)); however this may cause synechia, epistaxis, and pain. Synthetic polyurethane foam (SPF; Nasopore(®) Forte) has recently been used in septoplasty to prevent synechia or restenosis and haematoma formation. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of PVAS and SPF on postoperative appearance and discomfort following the reduction of nasal bone fractures. We retrospectively reviewed all patient questionnaires and medical histories, and clinical photographs and computed tomography scans obtained before and after surgery. Outcomes were assessed using the Global Aesthetic Improvement Scale (GAIS) score and visual analogue scale (VAS) scores, which were used to assess discomfort during the 6-month follow-up period. Postoperatively, there was no statistically significant difference in the GAIS for the two packing materials (P > 0.05). Postoperative epistaxis was observed at a significantly lower rate in the SPF group than in the PVAS group, whereas anterior rhinorrhea and posterior nasal drip occurred at significantly higher rates following removal of packing in the SPF group (P < 0.05). The results of this study suggest that synthetic dissolvable polyurethane may be a reliable alternative material for nasal packing and postoperative management following the reduction of nasal bone fractures.

  13. Fabrication of microporous polyurethane by spray phase inversion method as small diameter vascular grafts material.

    PubMed

    Khorasani, M T; Shorgashti, S

    2006-05-01

    Microporous polyurethane vascular prostheses with a 4 mm diameter and 0.3-0.4 mm wall thickness were fabricated by a spray phase inversion technique. In this study, the effect of distance between spray guns (SG) and rotating mandrel (RM), the effect of rate of rotating mandrel (RRM), and the type of nonsolvent on pore morphology of PU films were evaluated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) technique. It was observed that when the distance between SG and RM was increased or the rate of RM was decreased, the porosity of PU films increased and consequently the tensile strength decreased and compliance value increased. Compliance was measured in vitro by volume and vessel diameter changes. Furthermore, when the coagulant (water) was changed to the water/methanol, the porosity of PU film increased and porous morphology changed to filamentous morphology. Attachment of anchorage dependent cells, namely L929 fibroblast cells, were investigated in stationary culture conditions. The cells adhesion and cells growth were studied using optical photomicrographs. The results show that by increasing the porosity content of PU films would consequently increase the cell ingrowths.

  14. Development of an analytical method for trace gold in aqueous solution using polyurethane foam sorbents: kinetic and thermodynamic characteristic of gold(III) sorption.

    PubMed

    Bashammakh, A S; Bahaffi, S O; Al-Shareef, F M; El-Shahawi, M S

    2009-03-01

    The kinetic parameters of gold(III) sorption by unloaded polyurethane foams (PUFs) and PUFs impregnated with some onium cations e.g. tetramethylammonium perchlorate (TMA(+)ClO(4)(-)), tetrabutylammonium iodide (TBA(+)I(-)), and tetraheptylammonium bromide (THA(+)Br(-)), have been determined. The retention steps were found to be fast, reached equilibrium in a few minutes and followed a first-order rate equation with an overall rate constant, k, of 0.0076 and 0.007 min(-1), respectively. The thermodynamic characteristics of gold(III) retention by the unloaded PUFs and THA(+)Br(-) immobilized PUFs have been critically studied. The negative values of DeltaH and DeltaS are interpreted as the exothermic and spontaneous reaction of gold(III) sorption onto unloaded PUFs and foams impregnated with THA(+)Br(-). The cellular structure of the PUFs sorbent offer unique advantages over conventional bulk-type sorbents in the rapid, versatile effective separation and/or preconcentration of gold ions.

  15. Multi-Partner Demonstration of Energy-Efficient and Environmentally Improved Methods for the Production of Polyurethane Foam

    SciTech Connect

    Mark L. Listemann

    2006-03-08

    The work described was focused on commercializing a new energy-efficient, enabling technology silicon surfactants that will allow the flexible foam industry to utilize environmentally benign CO2 as a blowing agent. These new products provide the means for more cost-effective and energy-efficient production of foam in an industry that is under increasing threat from foreign competition and environmental regulation.

  16. Experimental Polyurethane Foam (PUF) Roofing Systems. III. Naval Station, Roosevelt Roads, Puerto Rico, and Naval Facility, Cape Hatteras, North Carolina.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-01-01

    other sources of energy loss must be investigated. The units had jalousie windows that permitted a moderate degree of air infiltration and resultant...units with jalousie windows, optimum energy conservation is obtained with 1-1/2 to 3 inches of foam. Naval Facility, Cape Hatteras, N.C. 1. A 25- to...replacing jalousie windows with a closed window. Two to 3 inches of foam should be used to provide maximum energy conservation in semitropical

  17. A polyethylene glycol grafted bi-layered polyurethane scaffold: preliminary study of a new candidate prosthesis for repair of a partial tracheal defect.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hong-Shik; Suh, Hwal; Lee, Ja-Hyun; Park, Si-Nae; Shin, Sang-Hyun; Kim, Young-Ho; Chung, Sung Min; Kim, Hyun Kyung; Lim, Jae-Yol; Kim, Han Su

    2008-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an artificial prosthesis for use in the reconstruction of a tracheal defect due to trauma, malignancy, stenosis, or other causes. Bi-layered porous-dense film polyurethane (PU) was manufactured for the main framework. Polyethylene glycol (PEG) was grafted onto the inner surface of the PU scaffold to act as a surfactant. The scaffold was transplanted into three beagles. An endoscopic examination was performed for the evaluation of the formation granulation tissue, to evaluate the status of the respiratory mucosa and the amount of crust at 1, 4, 8, and 12 weeks after surgery. A histological examination was also performed at 4, 8, and 12 weeks after surgery. All three beagles studied survived to the expected date. The endoscopic examination showed formation of granulation tissue; the crust was not very severe and the circular tracheal framework was well preserved. The histological examination showed that a large amount of fibrous tissue had grown through the pores of the porous scaffold. Pseudostratified columnar ciliated mucosa was also noted on the surface of scaffold, as visualized by scanning electron microscopy. The use of a bi-layered polyethylene grafted polyurethane scaffold is a good candidate prosthesis for tracheal reconstruction.

  18. Soft silicone foam dressing is more effective than polyurethane film dressing for preventing intraoperatively acquired pressure ulcers in spinal surgery patients: the Border Operating room Spinal Surgery (BOSS) trial in Japan.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Mine; Ohura, Norihiko; Tanaka, Junko; Ichimura, Shoichi; Kasuya, Yusuke; Hotta, Oruto; Kagaya, Yu; Sekiyama, Takuya; Tannba, Mitsuko; Suzuki, Nao

    2016-12-07

    Preventing intraoperatively acquired pressure ulcers (IAPUs) in patients undergoing spinal surgery in the prone position using a Relton-Hall frame is challenging. We investigated the efficacy of soft silicone foam dressings in preventing IAPUs. A prospective dual-center sham study was conducted among patients undergoing elective spinal surgery in a general hospital and a university hospital in Japan. The incidence of IAPUs that developed when soft silicone foam dressings and polyurethane film dressings were used was compared on two sides in the same patient. IAPUs developed on the chest in 11 of 100 patients (11%). Polyurethane film dressings were associated with a significantly higher rate of IAPUs than soft silicone foam dressings (11 versus 3, P = 0·027). A multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that a diastolic blood pressure of <50 mmHg (P = 0·025, OR 3·74, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1·18-13·08) and the length of surgery (by 1 hour: P = 0·038, OR 1·61, 95% CI 1·03-2·64) were independently associated with the development of IAPUs. The use of soft silicone foam dressings reduced the risk of IAPUs (P = 0·019, OR 0·23, 95% CI 0·05-0·79) and was more effective than film dressings for preventing IAPUs in spinal surgery patients.

  19. Fabrication and characterization of a foamed polylactic acid (PLA)/ thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) shape memory polymer (SMP) blend for biomedical and clinical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Janice J.; Srivastava, Ijya; Kowalski, Jennifer; Naguib, Hani E.

    2014-03-01

    Shape memory polymers (SMP) are a class of stimuli-responsive materials that are able to respond to external stimulus such as heat by altering their shape. Bio-compatible SMPs have a number of advantages over static materials and are being studied extensively for biomedical and clinical applications (such as tissue stents and scaffolds). A previous study has demonstrated that the bio-compatible polymer blend of polylactic acid (PLA)/ thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) (50/50 and 70/30) exhibit good shape memory properties. In this study, the mechanical and thermo-mechanical (shape memory) properties of TPU/PLA SMP blends were characterized; the compositions studied were 80/20, 65/35, and 50/50 TPU/PLA. In addition, porous TPU/PLA SMP blends were fabricated with a gas-foaming technique; and the morphology of the porous structure of these SMPs foams were characterized with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The TPU/PLA bio-compatible SMP blend was fabricated with melt-blending and compression molding. The glass transition temperature (Tg) of the SMP blends was determined with a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC). The mechanical properties studied were the stress-strain behavior, tensile strength, and elastic modulus; and the thermomechanical (or shape memory) properties studied were the shape fixity rate (Rf), shape recovery rate (Rr), response time, and the effect of recovery temperature on Rr. The porous 80/20 PLA/TPU SMP blend was found to have the highest tensile strength, toughness and percentage extension, as well as the lowest density and uniform pore structure in the micron and submicron scale. The porous 80/20 TPU/PLA SMP blend may be further developed for specific biomedical and clinical applications where a combination of tensile strength, toughness, and low density are required.

  20. Evaluation of polyurethane foam, polypropylene, quartz fiber, and cellulose substrates for multi-element analysis of atmospheric particulate matter by ICP-MS.

    PubMed

    Upadhyay, Nabin; Majestic, Brian J; Prapaipong, Panjai; Herckes, Pierre

    2009-05-01

    Traditional methods for the analysis of trace metals require particulate matter (PM) collected on specific filter substrates. In this paper, methods for elemental analysis of PM collected on substrates commonly used for organic analysis in air quality studies are developed. Polyurethane foam (PUF), polypropylene (PP), and quartz fiber (QF) substrates were first digested in a mixture of HNO(3)/HCl/HF/H(2)O(2) using a microwave digestion system and then analyzed for elements by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Filter blanks and recoveries for standard reference materials (SRMs) on these substrates were compared with a cellulose (CL) substrate, more commonly used for trace metal analysis in PM. The results show concentrations of filter blanks in the order of QF > PUF > PP > CL with a high variability in PUF and PP blanks relative to QF. Percent recovery of most elements from the SRMs on all substrates are within +/-20% of certified or reference values. QF substrates showed consistent blanks with a reproducibility better than +/-10% for the majority of elements. Therefore, QF substrates were applied to ambient PM collected in a variety of environments from pristine to polluted. Concentrations of field blanks for > or = 18 of 31 elements analyzed on a small section of QF substrate are < or = 25% of the amounts present in samples for urban atmospheres. Results suggest that QF used in a high-volume sampler can be a suitable substrate to quantify trace elements, in addition to organic species and hence reduce logistics and costs in air pollution studies.

  1. On-line determination of Sb(III) and total Sb using baker's yeast immobilized on polyurethane foam and hydride generation inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menegário, Amauri A.; Silva, Ariovaldo José; Pozzi, Eloísa; Durrant, Steven F.; Abreu, Cassio H.

    2006-09-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was immobilized in cubes of polyurethane foam and the ability of this immobilized material to separate Sb(III) and Sb(V) was investigated. A method based on sequential determination of total Sb (after on-line reduction of Sb(V) to Sb(III) with thiourea) and Sb(III) (after on-line solid-liquid phase extraction) by hydride generation inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry is proposed. A flow system assembled with solenoid valves was used to manage all stages of the process. The effects of pH, sample loading and elution flow rates on solid-liquid phase extraction of Sb(III) were evaluated. Also, the parameters related to on-line pre-reduction (reaction coil and flow rates) were optimized. Detection limits of 0.8 and 0.15 μg L - 1 were obtained for total Sb and Sb(III), respectively. The proposed method was applied to the analysis of river water and effluent samples. The results obtained for the determination of total Sb were in agreement with expected values, including the river water Standard Reference Material 1640 certified by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). Recoveries of Sb(III) and Sb(V) in spiked samples were between 81 ± 19 and 111 ±15% when 120 s of sample loading were used.

  2. Flow injection determination of cobalt after its sorption onto polyurethane foam loaded with 2-(2-thiazolylazo)-p-cresol (TAC).

    PubMed

    Cassella, R J; Salim, V A; Jesuíno, L S; Santelli, R E; Ferreira, S L; de Carvalho, M S

    2001-03-30

    This paper reports the development of a new methodology for determination of cobalt in water samples by using a flow injection system with loaded PUF as solid phase to preconcentrate analytes. Procedure is based on on-line retention of Co(III) ions (generated in alkaline medium by Co(II) oxidation) in a minicolumn packed with a polyether type polyurethane foam loaded with TAC (2-(2-thiazolylazo)-p-cresol) and elution with 2 mol l(-1) HCl directly to the flame atomic absorption spectrometer nebulizer. Several chemical and flow variables that could affect the performance of this system were investigated as well as the possible interferents. For 2 min of preconcentration time (10.0 ml of sample volume) the system achieved a detection limit 3.2 mug l(-1), a R.S.D. 5% at 20 mug l(-1) and an analytical throughput 24 h(-1). Whereas for 3 min of preconcentration time (15.0 ml of sample volume) a detection limit 2.4 mug l(-1), a R.S.D. under 8% at 10 mug l(-1) and a sampling frequency 17 h(-1) were reported.

  3. Mineralization and Detoxification of the Carcinogenic Azo Dye Congo Red and Real Textile Effluent by a Polyurethane Foam Immobilized Microbial Consortium in an Upflow Column Bioreactor

    PubMed Central

    Lade, Harshad; Govindwar, Sanjay; Paul, Diby

    2015-01-01

    A microbial consortium that is able to grow in wheat bran (WB) medium and decolorize the carcinogenic azo dye Congo red (CR) was developed. The microbial consortium was immobilized on polyurethane foam (PUF). Batch studies with the PUF-immobilized microbial consortium showed complete removal of CR dye (100 mg·L−1) within 12 h at pH 7.5 and temperature 30 ± 0.2 °C under microaerophilic conditions. Additionally, 92% American Dye Manufactureing Institute (ADMI) removal for real textile effluent (RTE, 50%) was also observed within 20 h under the same conditions. An upflow column reactor containing PUF-immobilized microbial consortium achieved 99% CR dye (100 mg·L−1) and 92% ADMI removal of RTE (50%) at 35 and 20 mL·h−l flow rates, respectively. Consequent reduction in TOC (83 and 79%), COD (85 and 83%) and BOD (79 and 78%) of CR dye and RTE were also observed, which suggested mineralization. The decolorization process was traced to be enzymatic as treated samples showed significant induction of oxidoreductive enzymes. The proposed biodegradation pathway of the dye revealed the formation of lower molecular weight compounds. Toxicity studies with a plant bioassay and acute tests indicated that the PUF-immobilized microbial consortium favors detoxification of the dye and textile effluents. PMID:26086710

  4. Mineralization and Detoxification of the Carcinogenic Azo Dye Congo Red and Real Textile Effluent by a Polyurethane Foam Immobilized Microbial Consortium in an Upflow Column Bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Lade, Harshad; Govindwar, Sanjay; Paul, Diby

    2015-06-16

    A microbial consortium that is able to grow in wheat bran (WB) medium and decolorize the carcinogenic azo dye Congo red (CR) was developed. The microbial consortium was immobilized on polyurethane foam (PUF). Batch studies with the PUF-immobilized microbial consortium showed complete removal of CR dye (100 mg·L-1) within 12 h at pH 7.5 and temperature 30 ± 0.2 °C under microaerophilic conditions. Additionally, 92% American Dye Manufactureing Institute (ADMI) removal for real textile effluent (RTE, 50%) was also observed within 20 h under the same conditions. An upflow column reactor containing PUF-immobilized microbial consortium achieved 99% CR dye (100 mg·L-1) and 92% ADMI removal of RTE (50%) at 35 and 20 mL·h-l flow rates, respectively. Consequent reduction in TOC (83 and 79%), COD (85 and 83%) and BOD (79 and 78%) of CR dye and RTE were also observed, which suggested mineralization. The decolorization process was traced to be enzymatic as treated samples showed significant induction of oxidoreductive enzymes. The proposed biodegradation pathway of the dye revealed the formation of lower molecular weight compounds. Toxicity studies with a plant bioassay and acute tests indicated that the PUF-immobilized microbial consortium favors detoxification of the dye and textile effluents.

  5. Assessing and monitoring the ecotoxicity of pulp and paper wastewater for irrigating reed fields using the polyurethane foam unit method based on monitoring protozoal communities.

    PubMed

    Ding, Cheng; Chen, Tianming; Li, Zhaoxia; Yan, Jinlong

    2015-05-01

    Using the standardized polyurethane foam unit (PFU) method, a preliminary investigation was carried out on the bioaccumulation and the ecotoxic effects of the pulp and paper wastewater for irrigating reed fields. Static ectoxicity test had shown protozoal communities were very sensitive to variations in toxin time and effective concentration (EC) of the pulp and paper wastewater. Shannon-Wiener diversity index (H) was a more suitable indicator of the extent of water pollution than Gleason and Margalef diversity index (d), Simpson's diversity index (D), and Pielou's index (J). The regression equation between S eq and EC was S eq  = - 0.118EC + 18.554. The relatively safe concentration and maximum acceptable toxicant concentration (MATC) of the wastewater for the protozoal communities were about 20 % and 42 %, respectively. To safely use this wastewater for irrigation, more than 58 % of the toxins must be removed or diluted by further processing. Monitoring of the wastewater in representative irrigated reed fields showed that the regularity of the protozoal colonization process was similar to the static ectoxicity, indicating that the toxicity of the irrigating pulp and paper wastewater was not lethal to protozoal communities in the reed fields. This study demonstrated the applicability of the PFU method in monitoring the ecotoxic effects of pulp and paper wastewater on the level of microbial communities and may guide the supervision and control of pulp and paper wastewater irrigating within the reed fields ecological system (RFES).

  6. Effect of CNT as a Nucleating Agent on Cell Morphology and Thermal Insulation Property of the Rigid Polyurethane Foams.

    PubMed

    Ahn, WonSool; Lee, Joon-Man

    2015-11-01

    The effects of MWCNT on the cell sizes, cell uniformities, thermal conductivities, bulk densities, foaming kinetics, and compressive mechanical properties of the rigid PUFs were investigated. To obtain the better uniform dispersed state of MWCNT, grease-type master batch of MWCNT/surfactant was prepared by three-roll mill. Average cell size of the PUF samples decreased from 185.1 for the neat PUF to 162.9 μm for the sample of 0.01 phr of MWCNT concentration. Cell uniformity was also enhanced showing the standard cell-size deviation of 61.7 and 35.2, respectively. While the thermal conductivity of the neat PUF was 0.0222 W/m(o)K, that of the sample with 0.01 phr of MWCNT showed 0.0204 W/m(o)K, resulting 8.2% reduction of the thermal conductivity. Bulk density of the PUF samples was observed as nearly the same values as 30.0 ± 1.0 g/cm3 regardless of MWCNT. Temperature profiles during foaming process showed that an indirect indication of the nucleation effect of MWCNT for the PUF foaming system, showing faster and higher temperature rising with time. The compressive yield stress is nearly the same as 0.030 x 10(5) Pa regardless of MWCNT.

  7. Comparison of polyurethane foam to nylon flocked swabs for collection of secretions from the anterior nares in performance of a rapid influenza virus antigen test in a pediatric emergency department.

    PubMed

    Scansen, Kimberly A; Bonsu, Bema K; Stoner, Erin; Mack, Kathy; Salamon, Douglas; Leber, Amy; Marcon, Mario J

    2010-03-01

    Rapid antigen testing of upper respiratory secretions collected with various swab types is often utilized for laboratory diagnoses of influenza virus infection. There are limited data on the effects of swab composition on test performance. This study compared the performance of the Quidel QuickVue Influenza A+B test on secretions from the anterior nares when a polyurethane foam swab was used for collection to that when a nylon flocked swab was used for collection. One hundred subjects who presented to a pediatric emergency department with symptoms suggestive of an influenza virus infection were recruited for the study. Foam and flocked swabs of the anterior nares were obtained from separate nares of each subject before a posterior nasopharyngeal swab was collected and placed into viral transport medium. The QuickVue test was performed directly on each swab type, and the results were compared to the results of reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR), direct fluorescent antibody (DFA) test, and viral culture performed on the transport medium. RT-PCR alone and DFA combined with culture were utilized as separate gold standards. There were 56 cases of influenza detected by RT-PCR; the QuickVue test was positive for 40 foam and 30 flocked swabs, for sensitivities of 71% and 54%, respectively (P = 0.01). Similarly, there were 49 influenza cases detected by DFA and/or culture; the QuickVue test was positive for 38 foam and 30 flocked swabs, for sensitivities of 78% and 61%, respectively (P = 0.13). This study suggests that polyurethane foam swabs perform better than nylon flocked swabs for the collection of secretions from anterior nares in the Quidel QuickVue Influenza A+B test.

  8. Synthesis, characterization and foaming of PHEA-PLLA, a new graft copolymer for biomedical engineering.

    PubMed

    Carfì Pavia, Francesco; La Carrubba, Vincenzo; Brucato, Valerio; Palumbo, Fabio Salvatore; Giammona, Gaetano

    2014-08-01

    In this study a chemical grafting procedure was set up in order to link high molecular weight poly L-lactic acid (PLLA) chains to the hydrophilic α,β-poly(N-2-hydroxyethyl)-DL-aspartamide (PHEA) backbone. A graft copolymer named PHEA-g-PLLA (or simply PHEA-PLLA) was obtained bearing a degree of derivatization of 1.0 mol.% of PLLA as grafted chain. This new hybrid derivative offers both the opportune crystallinity necessary for the production of scaffolds trough a thermally induced phase separation (TIPS) technique and the proper chemical reactivity to perform further functionalizations with bio-effectors and drugs. PHEA-PLLA porous scaffolds for tissue engineering applications were successfully obtained via TIPS and characterized. Structures with an open porosity and a good level of interconnection were detected. As the applicability of the scaffold is mainly dependent on its pore size, preliminary studies about the mechanisms governing scaffold's pore diameter were carried out.

  9. Polyurethane foam (PUF) disk passive samplers derived polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) concentrations in the ambient air of Bursa-Turkey: Spatial and temporal variations and health risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Birgül, Aşkın; Kurt-Karakus, Perihan Binnur; Alegria, Henry; Gungormus, Elif; Celik, Halil; Cicek, Tugba; Güven, Emine Can

    2017-02-01

    Polyurethane foam (PUF) passive samplers were employed to assess air concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in background, agricultural, semi-urban, urban and industrial sites in Bursa, Turkey. Samplers were deployed for approximately 2-month periods from February to December 2014 in five sampling campaign. Results showed a clear rural-agricultural-semi-urban-urban-industrial PCBs concentration gradient. Considering all sampling periods, ambient air concentrations of Σ43PCBs ranged from 9.6 to 1240 pg/m(3) at all sites with an average of 24.1 ± 8.2, 43.8 ± 24.4, 140 ± 190, 42.8 ± 24.6, 160 ± 280, 84.1 ± 105, 170 ± 150 and 280 ± 540 pg/m(3) for Mount Uludag, Uludag University Campus, Camlica, Bursa Technical University Osmangazi Campus, Hamitler, Agakoy, Kestel Organised Industrial District and Demirtas Organised Industrial District sampling sites, respectively. The ambient air PCB concentrations increased along a gradient from background to industrial areas by a factor of 1.7-11.4. 4-Cl PCBs (31.50-81.60%) was the most dominant homologue group at all sampling sites followed by 3-Cl, 7-Cl, 6-Cl and 5-Cl homologue groups. Sampling locations and potential sources grouped in principal component analysis. Results of PCA plots highlighted a large variability of the PCB mixture in air, hence possible related sources, in Bursa area. Calculated inhalation risk levels in this study indicated no serious adverse health effects. This study is one of few efforts to characterize PCB composition in ambient air seasonally and spatially for urban and industrial areas of Turkey by using passive samplers as an alternative sampling method for concurrent monitoring at multiple sites.

  10. Spatial and seasonal distributions of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans and polychlorinated biphenyls around a municipal solid waste incinerator, determined using polyurethane foam passive air samplers.

    PubMed

    Gao, Lirong; Zhang, Qin; Liu, Lidan; Li, Changliang; Wang, Yiwen

    2014-11-01

    Twenty-six ambient air samples were collected around a municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) in the summer and winter using polyurethane foam passive air samplers, and analyzed to assess the spatial and seasonal distributions of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Three stack gas samples were also collected and analyzed to determine PCDD/F (971 pg m(-3) in average) and PCB (2,671 pg m(-3) in average) emissions from the MSWI and to help identify the sources of the pollutants in the ambient air. The total PCDD/F concentrations in the ambient air samples were lower in the summer (472-1,223 fg m(-3)) than the winter (561-3913 fg m(-3)). In contrast, the atmospheric total PCB concentrations were higher in the summer (716-4,902 fg m(-3)) than the winter (489-2,298 fg m(-3)). Principal component analysis showed that, besides emissions from the MSWI, the domestic burning of coal and wood also contributed to the presence of PCDD/Fs and PCBs in the ambient air. The PCDD/F and PCB spatial distributions were analyzed using ordinary Kriging Interpolation and limited effect was found to be caused by emissions from the MSWI. Higher PCDD/F and PCB concentrations were observed downwind of the MSWI than in the other directions, but the highest concentrations were not to be found in the direction with the greatest wind frequency which might be caused by emissions from domestic coal and wood burning. We used a systemic method including sampling and data analysis method which can provide pioneering information for characterizing risks and assessing uncertainty of PCDD/Fs and PCBs in the ambient air around MSWIs in China.

  11. Comparison of polyurethane foam and XAD-2 sampling matrices to measure airborne organophosphorus pesticides and their oxygen analogs in an agricultural community.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Jenna L; Fenske, Richard A; Yost, Michael G; Tchong-French, Maria; Yu, Jianbo

    2013-07-01

    Side-by-side active air sampling for the organophosphorus (OP) pesticide, chlorpyrifos (CPF) and its oxygen analog, chlorpyrifos-oxon (CPF-O) was conducted with two recommended air sampling matrices: OSHA Versatile Sampling (OVS) tubes with XAD-2 resin, polyurethane foam (PUF) tubes, and passive PUF deposition disks. The study compared the proportion of artificially transformed CPF-O in the laboratory and in the field during a tree fruit application in Washington State. Lab results demonstrated that the NIOSH-recommended OVS tubes artificially transformed up to 32% of CPF to CPF-O during the sampling process, whereas PUF tubes had little to no artificial transformation (⩽0.1%). In the field, the proportion of CPF-O in the sample was significantly higher on OVS tubes than on PUF tubes (p<0.001), confirming that OVS tubes were converting a significant portion of CPF to CPF-O. In addition, PUF tubes reported measurable levels CPF-O in the field even when no artificial transformation was expected. We conclude that the PUF matrix is the superior sampling medium for OP oxygen analogs when compared to XAD-two resin. Community-located PUF tube samples 24h post-application had considerably higher levels CPF-O (16-21ngm(-3)) than near field samples during application (2-14ngm(-3)), suggesting that the oxygen analog is volatile and formed during atmospheric transport. It is recommended that worker and community risk assessments begin to take into consideration the presence of the more toxic oxygen analogs when measuring for OP pesticide mixtures.

  12. Proliferation of endothelial cells on the plasma-treated segmented-polyurethane surface: attempt of construction of a small caliber hybrid vascular graft and antithrombogenicity.

    PubMed

    Kaibara; Takahashi; Kurotobi; Suzuki

    2000-12-30

    To prepare a porous segmented-polyurethane (SPU) tube, a solution of SPU containing different concentrations of NaCl was coated on a glass rod and the coated SPU was immediately immersed in water. When the surface of the porous SPU, where bovine aortic endothelial cells are not normally capable of adhering and proliferating, was modified by plasma treatment, the proliferation of endothelial cells could be drastically improved. The cells proliferated confluently on the porous SPU surface prepared at low concentrations of NaCl below 10 g per 100 ml, but poorly on the porous surface prepared at high concentrations of NaCl. The construction of a hybrid vascular graft consisting of a porous SPU tube (2 mm in inner diameter, 5 cm in length) and endothelial cells was attempted. The cells cultured on the inner surface of the tube proliferated to confluency everywhere. From an in vitro antithrombogenic evaluation test, which involved the use of human blood, the present hybrid graft can be considered to provide an inert surface against thrombus formation and blood coagulation. Negligible changes in shape of human leukocytes in contact with bovine aortic endothelial cell surface occurred, suggesting that the bovine aortic endothelial cells used are immunologically less active against human blood.

  13. Protein-resistant polyurethane by sequential grafting of poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) and poly(oligo(ethylene glycol) methacrylate) via surface-initiated ATRP.

    PubMed

    Jin, Zhilin; Feng, Wei; Zhu, Shiping; Sheardown, Heather; Brash, John L

    2010-12-15

    Protein-resistant polyurethane (PU) surfaces were prepared by sequentially grafting poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (poly(HEMA)) and poly(oligo(ethylene glycol) methacrylate) (poly(OEGMA)) via surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (s-ATRP). The chain lengths of poly(HEMA) and poly(OEGMA) were regulated via the ratio of monomer to sacrificial initiator in solution. The surfaces were characterized by water contact angle and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The protein resistant properties of the surfaces were assessed by single and binary adsorption experiments with fibrinogen (Fg), lysozyme (Lys), and lactalbumin (Lac). The adsorption of all three proteins on the sequentially grafted poly(HEMA)-poly(OEGMA) surfaces (PU/PH/PO) was greatly reduced compared with the unmodified PU. Adsorption decreased with increasing poly(OEGMA) chain length. On the PU/PH/PO surface with longest poly(OEGMA) chain length (∼100), the decrease in Lys adsorption was in the range of 95-98% and the decrease in Fg and Lac adsorption was >99% compared with the unmodified PU. Adsorption from binary protein solutions showed that the PU/PH/PO surfaces resisted these proteins more or less equally, that is, independent of protein size.

  14. Storage-stable foamable polyurethane is activated by heat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Polyurethane foamable mixture remains inert in storage unit activated to produce a rapid foaming reaction. The storage-stable foamable composition is spread as a paste on the surface of an expandable structure and, when heated, yields a rigid open-cell polyurethane foam that is self-bondable to the substrate.

  15. Split skin graft application over an integrating, biodegradable temporizing polymer matrix: immediate and delayed.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, John Edward; Dearman, Bronwyn Louise

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study is to further investigate the NovoSorb™ biodegradable polyurethane in generating dermal scaffolds; to perform a pilot study comparing the previously used spun mat against a recently developed NovoSorb™ foam, ascertaining the optimum structure of the matrix; and to evaluate the successful matrix as an immediate adjunct to split skin grafting and as a temporizing matrix in a prospective six-pig study. A pilot study comparing a previously investigated form of the polymer (spun mat) against a new structural form, a foam, was performed. This was followed by a six-pig study of the foam matrix with three treatment arms-autologous split skin graft alone, polymer foam with immediate engraftment, and polymer foam with delayed engraftment. The foams allowed less wound contraction than the spun mats. The foam structure is less dense (cheaper to produce and having less degradation products). The material remained in situ despite clinical wound infection. Proof of concept was achieved in both treatment modalities in the main study. Split skin graft applied immediately over the polymer foam was able to engraft successfully. The result was "thicker" to pinch and "flush" with the skin surrounding the wound. There was no significant difference in the degree of wound contraction between the graft alone and the polymer plus immediate graft groups. Split skin graft also "took" when applied to the surface of a polymer that had been applied to a wound 11 days earlier, again with a thicker result, flush with the surrounding skin. Split skin grafts alone left a persisting depression. However, a significant degree of wound contraction (compared with the other two groups) was observed in the polymer plus delayed graft group. This has prompted further investigation into "sealing" the polymer foam with a membrane, to prevent evaporative water loss, when the foam is to be used as a biodegradable temporizing matrix. The studies indicate that the Novo

  16. Preparation and characterization of shape memory composite foams with interpenetrating polymer networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yongtao; Zhou, Tianyang; Yang, Cheng; Liu, Yanju; Leng, Jinsong

    2016-03-01

    The present study reports a feasible approach of fabricating shape memory composite foams with an interpenetrating polymer network (IPN) based on polyurethane (PU) and shape memory epoxy resin (SMER) via a simultaneous polymerization technique. The PU component is capable of constructing a foam structure and the SMER is grafted on the PU network to offer its shape memory property in the final IPN foams. A series of IPN foams without phase separation were produced due to good compatibility and a tight chemical interaction between PU and SMER components. The relationships of the geometry of the foam cell were investigated via varying compositions of PU and SMER. The physical property and shape memory property were also evaluated. The stimulus temperature of IPN shape memory composite foams, glass temperature (Tg), could be tunable by varying the constituents and Tg of PU and SMER. The mechanism of the shape memory effect of IPN foams has been proposed. The shape memory composite foam with IPN developed in this study has the potential to extend its application field.

  17. Materials for foam type insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, W. E.

    1971-01-01

    An internal foam fabrication is one of the concepts being considered for cryogenic insulation on the hydrogen tanks of the shuttle vehicle. The three-dimensional polyurethane used on the S-4 B tanks failed to meet the higher temperature requirements of the shuttle vehicle, however, and other foams under consideration include polyisocyanurates, polyphenylene oxides, polyimides, and polybenzimidazoles. Improved adhesive systems for attaching the foams to the interior tank wall are under study.

  18. A multi-center, randomized, clinical trial comparing adhesive polyurethane foam dressing and adhesive hydrocolloid dressing in patients with grade II pressure ulcers in primary care and nursing homes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Pressure ulcers (PrUs) are ischemic wounds in the skin and underlying tissues caused by long-standing pressure force over an external bone or cartilaginous surface. PrUs are an important challenge for the overall health system because can prolong patient hospitalization and reduce quality of life. Moreover, 95% of PrUs are avoidable, suggesting they are caused by poor quality care assistance. PrUs are also costly, increasing national costs. For example, they represent about 5% of overall annual health expenses in Spain. Stages I and II PrUs have a combined prevalence of 65%. According main clinical guidelines, stage II PrUs (PrU-IIs) are usually treated by applying special dressings (polyurethane or hydrocolloid). However, little scientific evidence regarding their efficacy has been identified in scientific literature. Our aim is to assess the comparative efficacy of adhesive polyurethane foam and hydrocolloid dressings in the treatment of PrU-IIs in terms of healed ulcer after 8 weeks of follow-up. Methods/design This paper describes the development and evaluation protocol of a randomized clinical trial of two parallel treatment arms. A total of 820 patients with at least 1 PrU-II will be recruited from primary health care and home care centers. All patients will receive standardized healing procedures and preventive measures (e.g. positional changes and pressure-relieving support surfaces), following standardized procedures. The main outcome will be the percentage of wounds healed after 8 weeks. Secondary outcomes will include cost-effectiveness, as evaluated by cost per healed ulcer and cost per treated patient and safety evaluated by adverse events. Discussion This trial will address the hypothesis that hydrocolloid dressings will heal at least 10% more stage II PrUs and be more cost-effective than polyurethane foam dressings after 8 weeks. Trial registration This trial has been registered with controlled-trials number ISCRCTN57842461 and Eudra

  19. Panelized wall system with foam core insulation

    DOEpatents

    Kosny, Jan; Gaskin, Sally

    2009-10-20

    A wall system includes a plurality of wall members, the wall members having a first metal panel, a second metal panel, and an insulating core between the first panel and the second panel. At least one of the first panel and the second panel include ridge portions. The insulating core can be a foam, such as a polyurethane foam. The foam can include at least one opacifier to improve the k-factor of the foam.

  20. Hydrodynamics of wet foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langevin, Dominique; Saint-Jalmes, Arnaud; Marze, Sébastien; Cox, Simon; Hutzler, Stefan; Drenckhan, Wiebke; Weaire, Denis; Caps, Hervé; Vandewalle, Nicolas; Adler, Micheàle; Pitois, Olivier; Rouyer, Florence; Cohen-Addad, Sylvie; Höhler, Reinhard; Ritacco, Hernan

    2005-10-01

    Foams and foaming pose important questions and problems to the chemical industry. As a material, foam is unusual in being a desired product while also being an unwanted byproduct within industry. Liquid foams are an essential part of gas/liquid contacting processes such as distillation and absorption, but over-production of foam in these processes can lead to downtime and loss of efficiency. Solid polymeric foams, such as polystyrene and polyurethane, find applications as insulation panels in the construction industry. Their combination of low weight and unique elastic/plastic properties make them ideal as packing and cushioning materials. Foams made with proteins are extensively used in the food industry. Despite the fact that foam science is a rapidly maturing field, critical aspects of foam physics and chemistry remain unclear. Several gaps in knowledge were identified to be tackled as the core of this MAP project. In addition, microgravity affords conditions for extending our understanding far beyond the possibilities offered by ground-based investigation. This MAP project addresses the challenges posed by the physics of foams under microgravity.

  1. Epoxy Foam Encapsulants: Processing and Dielectric Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Linda Domeier; Marion Hunter

    1999-01-01

    The dielectric performance of epoxy foams was investigated to determine if such materials might provide advantages over more standard polyurethane foams in the encapsulation of electronic assemblies. Comparisons of the dielectric characteristics of epoxy and urethane encapsulant foams found no significant differences between the two resin types and no significant difference between as-molded and machined foams. This study specifically evaluated the formulation and processing of epoxy foams using simple methylhydrosiloxanes as the flowing agent and compared the dielectric performance of those to urethane foams of similar density.

  2. Cryogenic line insulation made from prefabricated polyurethane shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerma, G.

    1975-01-01

    Prefabricated polyurethane foam insulation is inexpensive and easily installed on cryogenic lines. Insulation sections are semicircular half shells. Pair of half shells is placed to surround cryogenic line. Cylindrically-shaped knit sock is pulled over insulation then covered with polyurethane resin to seal system.

  3. Polyurethane retainers for ball bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christy, R. I.

    1973-01-01

    Evaluation of a new ball bearing retainer material is reported. A special composite polyurethane foam ball retainer has been developed that has virtually zero wear, is chemically inert to hydrocarbon lubricants, and stores up to 60 times as much lubricant per unit volume as the most commonly used retainer material, cotton phenolic. This new retainer concept shows promise of years of ball bearing operation without reoiling, based on life testing in high vacuum.

  4. Foam-Mixing-And-Dispensing Machine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chong, Keith Y.; Toombs, Gordon R.; Jackson, Richard J.

    1996-01-01

    Time-and-money-saving machine produces consistent, homogeneously mixed foam, enhancing production efficiency. Automatically mixes and dispenses polyurethane foam in quantities specified by weight. Consists of cart-mounted, air-driven proportioning unit; air-activated mechanical mixing gun; programmable timer/counter, and controller.

  5. 40 CFR 63.1301 - Standards for rebond foam production.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Standards for rebond foam production... National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Flexible Polyurethane Foam Production § 63.1301 Standards for rebond foam production. Each owner or operator of a new or existing rebond...

  6. Advances in cryogenic foam insulations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemons, C. R.; Salmassy, O. K.; Watts, C. R.

    1971-01-01

    Description of a discretely oriented thread-reinforced polyurethane foam thermal insulation system for liquid hydrogen fuel tanks. The 3-D foam and glass liner composite is designed to be adhesively bonded to the inside surface of the tank wall and to be in direct contact with liquid hydrogen. All elements of this insulation composite are capable of sustaining the loads and environmental conditions imposed by testing under simulated Space Shuttle vehicle requirements at temperatures between -423 and +350 F.

  7. Control of Surface Wound Infection: Skin Versus Synthetic Grafts

    PubMed Central

    Saymen, Dennis G.; Nathan, Paul; Holder, Ian Alan; Hill, Edward O.; Macmillan, Bruce G.

    1973-01-01

    Auto-, iso-, or xenografts of skin and synthetics placed on surface wounds freshly contaminated with Pseudomonas aeruginosa stabilizes the wound bacterial population in rats over a 24-h period. When these wounds contained a bacterial contamination established for 24 h prior to grafting, only skin and the synthetic polyhydroxyethylmethacrylate were effective in lowering the initial bacterial concentration. Polyurethane foam and nylon velour were not effective in the established infection model. Skin placed on a contaminated wound for 2 h or longer appeared to equilibrate with the underlying muscle so that the bacterial count per milligram of skin was similar to that of the muscle. It was suggested that this preparation would be useful to obtain an estimate of surface contamination without biopsy of the infected muscle. Skin grafts in place for 2 h significantly lowered the bacterial count in a wound with an established infection. A second decrease occurred between 4 and 24 h after grafting. Histological studies of contaminated and exposed panniculus muscle showed that leukocytes tend to migrate from the muscle surface to its base. Skin grafts and polyhydroxyethylmethacrylate appear to reverse the white cell migration so that the cells move toward the surface of the muscle with preservation of normal staining characteristics in the muscle. It is suggested that this alteration in cell movement after graft application might modify the white cell function and result in a greater bactericidal activity. Apparently, grafts lower bacterial levels in an established infection by modifying the host response to the surface contamination. Images PMID:4197768

  8. Graphene based polyurethane material: As highly pressure sensitive composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodlur, R. M.; Rabinal, M. K.

    2012-06-01

    In our present work, we describe a simple method for uniform coating of Graphite oxide (GO) onto flexible polyurethane (PU) foams. These PU foams loaded with GO were made electrically conducting by converting insulating GO to conducting graphene by chemical reduction process without damaging the foam properties. These PU foams loaded with graphene were characterized by SEM and TGA. The morphology, thermal properties and pressure dependent electrical conductivity of these foams was studied. The electric current increased by five orders of magnitude due to applied pressure.

  9. The Synergize effect of Chain extender to Phosporic acid catalyst to the ultimate property of Soy-Polyurethane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elvistia Firdaus, Flora

    2016-04-01

    The polyurethanes (PUs) foam were made from vegetable oil; a soybean based polyol. The foams were categorized into flexible and semi rigid. This research is manufacturally designed polyurethane foams by a process requiring the reaction of mixture of 2, 4- and 2, 6-Toluene di Isocyanate isomers, soy polyol in the presence of other ingredients. The objective of this work was to functionalized soy-polyol using phosporic acid catalyst and chain extender, study their collaborative reaction in producing ultimate property of PU foam. Correlates the foam morphology images in accordance to mechanical properties of foams.

  10. Polyurethane membranes for surgical gown applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ukpabi, Pauline Ozoemena

    The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) recently issued a directive requiring all employers to supply personnel protective equipment to employees who are at risk of exposure to blood or other potentially infectious body fluids. For the healthcare worker, a wide variety of surgical gowns is available commercially but there are concerns over their barrier effectiveness and/or wearer comfort. To successfully create a barrier fabric which combines resistance to fluid penetration with comfort, a complete understanding of the relationship between membrane structure and functional properties is required. In this study, we investigated the surface properties of hydrophilicity and hydrophobicity in polyurethane membranes intended for use in surgical gowns. The polyurethane membranes were grafted with side chains of varying lengths, polyethylene glycol (PEG) being used for the hydrophilic modifications and perfluoroalkyl compounds (a monofunctional acid and a difunctional amino alcohol) for the hydrophobic modifications. The hydrophilic treatment was intended to improve the comfort properties of monolithic membranes without adversely affecting their barrier properties. The hydrophobic treatment, on the other hand, was intended to improve the fluid repellency and hence barrier properties of microporous membranes without adversely affecting their comfort properties. Reflection infrared spectroscopy showed that fluorine was successfully grafted onto the polyurethane backbone during the hydrophobic modification, but was not sensitive enough to detect PEG grafting in leached polyethylene glycol-treated polyurethanes. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed that the perfluoroalkylated polyurethanes contained up to 40% fluorine on their surfaces and the PEG-treated polyurethanes showed an increase in their C-O content over the unmodified polyurethane. Scanning electron microscopy not only showed that perfluoroalkylation yielded polyurethane membranes with very

  11. Foam formation in low gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wessling, Francis C.; Mcmanus, Samuel P.; Matthews, John; Patel, Darayas

    1990-01-01

    An apparatus that produced the first polyurethane foam in low gravity has been described. The chemicals were mixed together in an apparatus designed for operation in low gravity. Mixing was by means of stirring the chemicals with an electric motor and propeller in a mixing chamber. The apparatus was flown on Consort 1, the first low-gravity materials payload launched by a commercial rocket launch team. The sounding rocket flight produced over 7 min of low gravity during which a polyurethane spheroidal foam of approximately 2300 cu cm was formed. Photographs of the formation of the foam during the flight show the development of the spheroidal form. This begins as a small sphere and grows to approximately a 17-cm-diam spheroid. The apparatus will be flown again on subsequent low-gravity flights.

  12. Open-pore polyurethane product

    DOEpatents

    Jefferson, R.T.; Salyer, I.O.

    1974-02-17

    The method is described of producing an open-pore polyurethane foam having a porosity of at least 50% and a density of 0.1 to 0.5 g per cu cm, and which consists of coherent spherical particles of less than 10 mu diam separated by interconnected interstices. It is useful as a filter and oil absorbent. The product is admirably adapted to scavenging of crude oil from the surface of seawater by preferential wicking. The oil-soaked product may then be compressed to recover the oil or burned for disposal. The crosslinked polyurethane structures are remarkably solvent and heat-resistance as compared with known thermoplastic structures. Because of their relative inertness, they are useful filters for gasoline and other hydrocarbon compounds. (7 claims)

  13. The Development of Testing Methods for Characterizing Emissions and Sources of Exposures from Polyurethane Products

    EPA Science Inventory

    The relationship between onsite manufacture of spray polyurethane foam insulation (SPFI) and potential exposures is not well understood. Currently, no comprehensive standard test methods exist for characterizing and quantifying product emissions. Exposures to diisocyanate compoun...

  14. Radiation Crosslinking of Polyurethane Enhanced by Introducing Terminal Double-Bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Cheng-Fei; Liu, Yang; Jiu, Yong-Bin; Cao, Wei; Zhai, Tong; Wang, Lian-Cai

    2016-05-01

    In this article, the enhanced radiation crosslinking of polyurethane via double-bond capping method were discussed in detail. Meanwhile, the Enhanced radiation crosslinking of polyurethane based on polyimide as hard segment were emphasized. In addition, the preparation of radiation crosslinking foam by introducing terminal double-bond were introduced.

  15. Polyurethanes: versatile materials and sustainable problem solvers for today's challenges.

    PubMed

    Engels, Hans-Wilhelm; Pirkl, Hans-Georg; Albers, Reinhard; Albach, Rolf W; Krause, Jens; Hoffmann, Andreas; Casselmann, Holger; Dormish, Jeff

    2013-09-02

    Polyurethanes are the only class of polymers that display thermoplastic, elastomeric, and thermoset behavior depending on their chemical and morphological makeup. In addition to compact polyurethanes, foamed variations in particular are very widespread, and they achieve their targeted properties at very low weights. The simple production of sandwich structures and material composites in a single processing step is a key advantage of polyurethane technology. The requirement of energy and resource efficiency increasingly demands lightweight structures. Polyurethanes can serve this requirement by acting as matrix materials or as flexible adhesives for composites. Polyurethanes are indispensable when it comes to high-quality decorative coatings or maintaining the value of numerous objects. They are extremely adaptable and sustainable problem solvers for today's challenges facing our society, all of which impose special demands on materials.

  16. Space Shuttle Stiffener Ring Foam Failure Analysis, a Non-Conventional Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Philip M.

    2015-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Program made use of the excellent properties of rigid polyurethane foam for cryogenic tank insulation and as structural protection on the solid rocket boosters. When foam applications de-bond, classical methods of failure analysis did not provide root cause of the failure of the foam. Realizing that foam is the ideal media to document and preserve its own mode of failure, thin sectioning was seen as a logical approach for foam failure analysis to observe the three dimensional morphology of the foam cells. The cell foam morphology provided a much greater understanding of the failure modes than previously achieved.

  17. Bio-based Polymer Foam from Soyoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnaillie, Laetitia M.; Wool, Richard P.

    2006-03-01

    The growing bio-based polymeric foam industry is presently lead by plant oil-based polyols for polyurethanes and starch foams. We developed a new resilient, thermosetting foam system with a bio-based content higher than 80%. The acrylated epoxidized soybean oil and its fatty acid monomers is foamed with pressurized carbon dioxide and cured with free-radical initiators. The foam structure and pore dynamics are highly dependent on the temperature, viscosity and extent of reaction. Low-temperature cure hinds the destructive pore coalescence and the application of a controlled vacuum results in foams with lower densities ˜ 0.1 g/cc, but larger cells. We analyze the physics of foam formation and stability, as well as the structure and mechanical properties of the cured foam using rigidity percolation theory. The parameters studied include temperature, vacuum applied, and cross-link density. Additives bring additional improvements: nucleating agents and surfactants help produce foams with a high concentration of small cells and low bulk density. Hard and soft thermosetting foams with a bio content superior to 80% are successfully produced and tested. Potential applications include foam-core composites for hurricane-resistant housing, structural reinforcement for windmill blades, and tissue scaffolds.

  18. Shape memory polyurethane nanocomposites with functionalized graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jin Taek; Dung Dao, Trung; Oh, Kyung Min; Lee, Hyung-il; Jeong, Han Mo; Kim, Byung Kyu

    2012-07-01

    The roles of graphene in shape memory polyurethane nanocomposite (SMPUN) as a reinforcing filler, as a fixed structure for memorizing a specified original shape, and as a conductive filler to actuate shape recovery by resistive heating, were examined. The effectiveness of each role was modulated by functionalizing graphene with a hydroxyl group through oxidation with H2O2. The reinforcing effect of graphene and its role as a fixed structure were enhanced by the hydroxyl groups due to the increased grafting of polyurethane chains on graphene during the in situ preparation of SMPUN. However, the oxidation reduced the conductivity of SMPUN, resulting in deterioration of the resistive heating.

  19. Response of Polyurethane to Shock Waves: An Experimental Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayaram, V.; Rao, Keshava Subba; Thanganayaki, N.; Kumara, H. K. T.; Reddy, K. P. J.

    Formation of polyurethane (PU) in vacuum environment and controlling density of polyurethane foams are the present day challenges. Polyurethane exists in numerous forms ranging from flexible to rigid and lightweight foams to tough, stiff elastomers [1]. PU can be used to produce lightweight foams for insulation or hard rubber used as wheels to transport heavy loads and it can be used in high pressure applications. The largest volumes of commercial PU elastomers are made from toluene diisocyanate (TDI) or diphenylmethane-4, 4'-diisocyanate (MDI) [2]. Linear polyurethanes can be processed into final products by any of the standard thermoplastic processes (injection molding, extrusion, thermoforming) as well as by low pressure cast processes in presence of catalysts. Tin, tetrabutyl titanate and zirconium chelates are few effective catalysts used to produce polyurethane for particular application [3]. Thermoset elastomers are formed due to irreversible cross-links, when polymers are chemically cured. Highly porous biodegradable PU was synthesized by thermally induced phase separation technique used in tissue engineering and also in bio-degradable based fluids [4]. Properties of PU like hardness, stress/strain modulus, tear strength etc, was determine using ASTM (American Society for Testing and Materials) standard methods. PU possesses extremely high mechanical properties, excellent abrasion, tear and extrusion resistance. It has outstanding low-temperature limit (-600C) and high temperature limit up to (1500C).

  20. Experimental Polyurethane Foam Roof Systems - II.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-01

    hourly temperatures for each day were plotted on graph paper, and areas were measured with a compensating polar planimeter that reads to four digits...INN \\k I, N’. tlir’I’iii V A I \\’A SIurelS42r. K110i tlIe. I ct Ili Solair i imip .\\r nill. Kiw\\\\, tMe. I N I C(I’ 0)1,4 (IC, Ni’rtolk. \\.A ( ( I

  1. Ventilation Guidance for Spray Polyurethane Foam Application

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Properly designed ventilation can reduce airborne levels of aerosols, mists, and vapors generated during spray application and can help protect SPF applicators, helpers, and others who may be working in adjacent areas.

  2. Effective Disposal of Fuel Cell Polyurethane Foam

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-01

    June 1986, EPA announced proposed changes to the EP Toxicity Test. A new test, known as the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure ( TCLP ), W...benzene and toluene under the TCLP are 0.07 mg/L and 14.4 mg/L, respectively. A modified TCLP Test was performed at the AFESC on samples of...functional group with water to give carbon dioxide gas (a technique employed by SCOTFOAM) or by addition of a 3 fluorocarbon blowing agent. Dyes are added to

  3. Modeling Decomposition of Unconfined Rigid Polyurethane Foam

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-11-01

    phthalic anhydride .13 14 O N H O N H O O O O H N H NO O O O H N O HN O O N H O N H O O O O O O O N H O N H O O O O O O O H N O HN O O O O ~60% ~20% ~10% ~4...4% ~2% ProbabilityGraphicStructural Units toluene diisocyanate trimethylol propane adipic acid diethylene glycol phthalic anhydride phosphoric acid...the formation and destruction of the secondary polymer, and the reaction enthalpy . A one percent

  4. Health Concerns about Spray Polyurethane Foam

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Exposures to SPF's key ingredient, isocyanates and other SPF chemicals in vapors, aerosols, and dust created during and after installation, can cause: asthma, sensitization, lung damage, other respiratory and breathing problems, skin and eye irritation.

  5. Post-processing flame-retardant for polyurethane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monaghan, P.; Sidman, K. R.

    1980-01-01

    Treatment of polyurethane form with elastomer formulation after processing makes foam fire resistant without compromising physical properties. In testing, once ignition source is removed, combustion stops. Treatment also prevents molten particle formation, generates no smoke or toxic gases in fire, and does not deteriorate under prolonged exposure to Sun.

  6. Degradation of pentachlorophenol by polyurethane-immobilized Flavobacterium cells.

    PubMed Central

    O'Reilly, K T; Crawford, R L

    1989-01-01

    Polyurethane-immobilized Flavobacterium cells (ATCC 39723) degraded pentachlorophenol (PCP) at initial concentrations as high as 300 mg liter-1. The reversible binding of PCP to the polyurethane was shown to be important in the protection of the cells from inhibition of PCP degradation. The degradation activity of the bacteria was monitored for 150 days in semicontinuous batch reactors. The degradation rate dropped by about 0.6% per day. PCP was degraded in a continuous-culture bioreactor at a rate of 3.5 to 4 mg g of foam-1 day-1 for 25 days. Electron micrographs of the polyurethane suggested that the cells were entrapped within 50- to 500-microns-diameter pockets in the foam. PMID:2508552

  7. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart III of... - Compliance Requirements for Slabstock Foam Production Affected Sources Complying With the Source...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Foam Production Affected Sources Complying With the Source-Wide Emission Limitation 4 Table 4 to... Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Flexible Polyurethane Foam Production Pt. 63, Subpt. III, Table 4 Table 4 to Subpart III of Part 63—Compliance Requirements for Slabstock Foam Production Affected...

  8. Antimicrobial polyurethane thermosets based on undecylenic acid: synthesis and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Lluch, Cristina; Esteve-Zarzoso, Braulio; Bordons, Albert; Lligadas, Gerard; Ronda, Juan C; Galià, Marina; Cádiz, Virginia

    2014-08-01

    In the present study, plant oil-derived surface-modifiable polyurethane thermosets are presented. Polyol synthesis is carried out taking advantage of thiol-yne photopolymerization of undecylenic acid derivatives containing methyl ester or hydroxyl moieties. The prepared methyl ester-containing polyurethanes allow surface modification treatment to enhance their hydrophilicity and impart antimicrobial activity through the following two steps: i) grafting poly(propylene glycol) monoamine (Jeffamine M-600) via aminolysis and ii) Jeffamine M-600 layer complexation with iodine. The antimicrobial activity of the iodine-containing polyurethanes is demonstrated by its capacity to inhibit the growth of Staphylococcus aureus, and Candida albicans in agar media.

  9. Springback Foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    A decade ago, NASA's Ames Research Center developed a new foam material for protective padding of airplane seats. Now known as Temper Foam, the material has become one of the most widely-used spinoffs. Latest application is a line of Temper Foam cushioning produced by Edmont-Wilson, Coshocton, Ohio for office and medical furniture. The example pictured is the Classic Dental Stool, manufactured by Dentsply International, Inc., York, Pennsylvania, one of four models which use Edmont-Wilson Temper Foam. Temper Foam is an open-cell, flameresistant foam with unique qualities.

  10. Biodegradable foam plastics based on castor oil.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong Juan; Rong, Min Zhi; Zhang, Ming Qiu; Hu, Jing; Chen, Hui Wen; Czigány, Tibor

    2008-02-01

    In this work, a simple but effective approach was proposed for preparing biodegradable plastic foams with a high content of castor oil. First of all, castor oil reacted with maleic anhydride to produce maleated castor oil (MACO) without the aid of any catalyst. Then plastic foams were synthesized through free radical initiated copolymerization between MACO and diluent monomer styrene. With changes in MACO/St ratio and species of curing initiator, mechanical properties of MACO foams can be easily adjusted. In this way, biofoams with comparable compressive stress at 25% strain as commercial polyurethane (PU) foams were prepared, while the content of castor oil can be as high as 61 wt %. The soil burial tests further proved that the castor oil based foams kept the biodegradability of renewable resources despite the fact that some petrol-based components were introduced.

  11. Organically Modified Nanoclay-Reinforced Rigid Polyurethane Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Yong Tae; Qian, Yuqiang; Lindsay, Chris; Stein, Andreas; Macosko, Christopher

    2012-02-01

    The nanodispersion of vermiculite in polyurethanes was investigated to produce organoclay-reinforced rigid gas barrier films. Reducing gas transport can improve the insulation performance of closed cell polyurethane foam. In a previous study, the dispersion of vermiculite in polyurethanes without organic modification was not sufficient due to the non-uniform dispersion morphology. When vermiculite was modified by cation exchange with long-chain quaternary ammonium cations, the dispersion in methylene diphenyl diisocyanate (MDI) was significantly improved. Dispersion was improved by combining high intensity dispersive mixing with efficient distributive mixing. Polymerization conditions were also optimized in order to provide a high state of nanodispersion in the polyurethane nanocomposite. The dispersions were characterized using rheological, microscopic and scattering/diffraction techniques. The final nanocomposites showed enhancement of mechanical properties and reduction in permeability to carbon dioxide at low clay concentration (around 2 wt percent).

  12. Polyether/Polyester Graft Copolymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, Vernon L., Jr.; Wakelyn, N.; Stoakley, D. M.; Proctor, K. M.

    1986-01-01

    Higher solvent resistance achieved along with lower melting temperature. New technique provides method of preparing copolymers with polypivalolactone segments grafted onto poly (2,6-dimethyl-phenylene oxide) backbone. Process makes strong materials with improved solvent resistance and crystalline, thermally-reversible crosslinks. Resulting graft copolymers easier to fabricate into useful articles, including thin films, sheets, fibers, foams, laminates, and moldings.

  13. Experimental Investigations of Space Shuttle BX-265 Foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerch, Bradley A.; Sullivan, Roy M.

    2009-01-01

    This report presents a variety of experimental studies on the polyurethane foam, BX-265. This foam is used as a close-out foam insulation on the space shuttle external tank. The purpose of this work is to provide a better understanding of the foam s behavior and to support advanced modeling efforts. The following experiments were performed: Thermal expansion was measured for various heating rates. The in situ expansion of foam cells was documented by heating the foam in a scanning electron microscope. Expansion mechanisms are described. Thermogravimetric analysis was performed at various heating rates and for various environments. The glass transition temperature was also measured. The effects of moisture on the foam were studied. Time-dependent effects were measured to give preliminary data on viscoelastoplastic properties.

  14. Application of an Elongated Kelvin Model to Space Shuttle Foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Roy M.; Ghosn, Louis J.; Lerch, Bradley A.

    2009-01-01

    The space shuttle foams are rigid closed-cell polyurethane foams. The two foams used most-extensively oil space shuttle external tank are BX-265 and NCFL4-124. Because of the foaming and rising process, the foam microstructures are elongated in the rise direction. As a result, these two foams exhibit a nonisotropic mechanical behavior. A detailed microstructural characterization of the two foams is presented. Key features of the foam cells are described and the average cell dimensions in the two foams are summarized. Experimental studies are also conducted to measure the room temperature mechanical response of the two foams in the two principal material directions (parallel to the rise and perpendicular to the rise). The measured elastic modulus, proportional limit stress, ultimate tensile strength, and Poisson's ratios are reported. The generalized elongated Kelvin foam model previously developed by the authors is reviewed and the equations which result from this model are summarized. Using the measured microstructural dimensions and the measured stiffness ratio, the foam tensile strength ratio and Poisson's ratios are predicted for both foams and are compared with the experimental data. The predicted tensile strength ratio is in close agreement with the measured strength ratio for both BX-265 and NCFI24-124. The comparison between the predicted Poisson's ratios and the measured values is not as favorable.

  15. Foaming volume and foam stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Sydney

    1947-01-01

    A method of measuring foaming volume is described and investigated to establish the critical factors in its operation. Data on foaming volumes and foam stabilities are given for a series of hydrocarbons and for a range of concentrations of aqueous ethylene-glycol solutions. It is shown that the amount of foam formed depends on the machinery of its production as well as on properties of the liquid, whereas the stability of the foam produced, within specified mechanical limitations, is primarily a function of the liquid.

  16. Cost Benefit Analysis: Closed-Cell Polyurethane Foam Use in DOD Forward-Deployed Structures and As An Alternative Building Material to Reduce Operational Fuel Demand and Associated Costs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    vehicle use and generators providing power for communication, information technology systems , air conditioning, heating , lighting, and other... system , typically less than 250 pounds per square inch (psi), and provides greater ability to resist conductive heat transfer, with an R-value of...25 Figure 9. CCSF two-component, professional, high-pressured system foam application (from EPA, 2015a

  17. Hybrid Deployable Foam Antennas and Reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivellini, Tommaso; Willis, Paul; Hodges, Richard; Spitz, Suzanne

    2006-01-01

    Hybrid deployable radio antennas and reflectors of a proposed type would feature rigid narrower apertures plus wider adjoining apertures comprising reflective surfaces supported by open-cell polymeric foam structures (see figure). The open-cell foam structure of such an antenna would be compressed for compact stowage during transport. To initiate deployment of the antenna, the foam structure would simply be released from its stowage mechanical restraint. The elasticity of the foam would drive the expansion of the foam structure to its full size and shape. There are several alternatives for fabricating a reflective surface supported by a polymeric foam structure. One approach would be to coat the foam with a metal. Another approach would be to attach a metal film or a metal-coated polymeric membrane to the foam. Yet another approach would be to attach a metal mesh to the foam. The hybrid antenna design and deployment concept as proposed offers significant advantages over other concepts for deployable antennas: 1) In the unlikely event of failure to deploy, the rigid narrow portion of the antenna would still function, providing a minimum level of assured performance. In contrast, most other concepts for deploying a large antenna from compact stowage are of an "all or nothing" nature: the antenna is not useful at all until and unless it is fully deployed. 2) Stowage and deployment would not depend on complex mechanisms or actuators, nor would it involve the use of inflatable structures. Therefore, relative to antennas deployed by use of mechanisms, actuators, or inflation systems, this antenna could be lighter, cheaper, amenable to stowage in a smaller volume, and more reliable. An open-cell polymeric (e.g., polyurethane) foam offers several advantages for use as a compressible/expandable structural material to support a large antenna or reflector aperture. A few of these advantages are the following: 3) The open cellular structure is amenable to compression to a very

  18. Fluorinated polyurethane scaffolds for 19F magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Rahimi, Khosrow; Shi, Yang; Schulz, Volkmar; Kuehne, Alexander J. C.; Jockenhoevel, Stefan; Kiessling, Fabian

    2017-01-01

    Polymers are increasingly employed in implant materials. To reduce the incidence of complications, which in the case of vascular grafts include incorrect placement and restenosis, materials are needed which allow for image-guided implantation, as well as for accurate and efficient postoperative implant imaging. We here describe amorphous fluorinated polymers based on thermoplastic polyurethane (19F-TPU), and show that are useful starting materials for developing tissue-engineered vascular grafts which can be detected using 19F MRI.

  19. Synthesis of Foam-Shaped Nanoporous Zeolite Material: A Simple Template-Based Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saini, Vipin K.; Pires, Joao

    2012-01-01

    Nanoporous zeolite foam is an interesting crystalline material with an open-cell microcellular structure, similar to polyurethane foam (PUF). The aluminosilicate structure of this material has a large surface area, extended porosity, and mechanical strength. Owing to these properties, this material is suitable for industrial applications such as…

  20. Foam-based adsorbents having high adsorption capacities for recovering dissolved metals and methods thereof

    DOEpatents

    Janke, Christopher J.; Dai, Sheng; Oyola, Yatsandra

    2015-06-02

    Foam-based adsorbents and a related method of manufacture are provided. The foam-based adsorbents include polymer foam with grafted side chains and an increased surface area per unit weight to increase the adsorption of dissolved metals, for example uranium, from aqueous solutions. A method for forming the foam-based adsorbents includes irradiating polymer foam, grafting with polymerizable reactive monomers, reacting with hydroxylamine, and conditioning with an alkaline solution. Foam-based adsorbents formed according to the present method demonstrated a significantly improved uranium adsorption capacity per unit weight over existing adsorbents.

  1. Highly fluorinated polyurethanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stump, E. C., Jr.; Rochow, S. E. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    The reaction perfluorinated hydroxyl terminated polyether with diisocyanate to form polyurethane is discussed. Data are given on the resin's oxidation stability, chemical resistance, and low temperature flexibility.

  2. Coating processes for increasing the moisture resistance of polyurethane baffle material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilow, N.; Sawko, P.

    1974-01-01

    An investigation was conducted with the objective to improve the hydrolytic stability of reticulated polyurethane baffle material. This material is used in fuel tanks of aircraft and ground vehicles. The most commonly used foam of this type is hydrolytically unstable. Potential moisture barrier coatings which were evaluated include Parylene, epoxy-polysulfide, polyether based polyurethanes, polysulfides, polyolefin rubbers, and several other materials. Parylene coatings of at least 0.2 mil were found to provide the greatest improvement in hydrolytic stability.

  3. Fire-Induced Response in Foam Encapsulants

    SciTech Connect

    Borek, T.T.; Chu, T.Y.; Erickson, K.L.; Gill, W.; Hobbs, M.L.; Humphries, L.L.; Renlund, A.M.; Ulibarri, T.A.

    1999-04-02

    The paper provides a concise overview of a coordinated experimental/theoretical/numerical program at Sandia National Laboratories to develop an experimentally validated model of fire-induced response of foam-filled engineered systems for nuclear and transportation safety applications. Integral experiments are performed to investigate the thermal response of polyurethane foam-filled systems exposed to fire-like heat fluxes. A suite of laboratory experiments is performed to characterize the decomposition chemistry of polyurethane. Mass loss and energy associated with foam decomposition and chemical structures of the virgin and decomposed foam are determined. Decomposition chemistry is modeled as the degradation of macromolecular structures by bond breaking followed by vaporization of small fragments of the macromolecule with high vapor pressures. The chemical decomposition model is validated against the laboratory data. Data from integral experiments is used to assess and validate a FEM foam thermal response model with the chemistry model developed from the decomposition experiments. Good agreement was achieved both in the progression of the decomposition front and the in-depth thermal response.

  4. SmartFoams with magneto-sensitive elastic behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorrentino, Luigi; D'Auria, Marco; Davino, Daniele; Visone, Ciro; Iannace, Salvatore

    2014-05-01

    Polymeric foams with embedded magnetic particles can be considered as a new class of lightweight systems that could lead to relevant industrial applications both for their enhanced directional (anisotropic) mechanical properties and for their sensitivity to magnetic field that can be used to actively control their elastic modulus. A new polyurethane (PU)/magnetosensitive particles composite foam (SmartFoam) was prepared by applying a magnetic field during its in situ polymerization/foaming process. A chain-like structure of magneto-sensitive particles was induced along the magnetic field lines, in turn controlling the degree of both structural anisotropy and functional properties without affecting the foam cellular morphology. The anisotropic distribution of magnetic particles in the SmartFoam imparted the capability to real-time control its structural properties under working conditions.

  5. Monolithic Ceramic Foams for Ultrafast Photocatalytic Inactivation of Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Pinggui; Xie, Rongcai; Imlay, Kari; Shang, Jian Ku

    2011-01-01

    Palladium-modified nitrogen-doped titanium dioxide (TiON/PdO) foams were synthesized by a sol-gel process on a polyurethane foam template. The TiON/PdO foam was tested for microbial killing using Escherichia coli cells as a target. Under visible-light illumination, the TiON/PdO foam displayed a strong antimicrobial effect on the bacteria cells in water. The antimicrobial effect was found to be dependent on the palladium content and the calcination temperature. In a flow-through dynamic photoreactor, the new photocatalyst efficiently inactivated E. coli within a short contact time (< 1 min), the shortest ever reported for photocatalytic killing of bacteria. The strong antimicrobial functions of the TiON/PdO foam were related to the charge trapping by PdO and to the high contact efficiency of the foam structure. PMID:21423830

  6. Morphologies, Processing and Properties of Ceramic Foams from Pre-Ceramic Foams from Pre-Ceramic Polymer Routes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stackpoole, Mairead; Simoes, Conan R.; Venkatapathy, Ethiras (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The current research is focused on processing ceramic foams that have potential as a thermal protection material. Ceramic foams with different architectures were formed from the pyrolysis of pre-ceramic polymers at 1200 C in different atmospheres. In some systems a sacrificial polyurethane was used as the blowing agent. We have also processed foams using sacrificial fillers to introduce controlled cell sizes. Each sacrificial filler or blowing agent leads to a unique morphology. The effect of different fillers on foam morphologies will be presented. The presentation will also focus on characterization of these foams in terms of mechanical and thermal properties. Foams processed using these approaches having bulk densities ranging from 0.15 to 0.9 g per cubic centimeter and a cell sizes from 5 to 500 micrometers. Compression strengths ranged from 2 to 7 MPa for these materials.

  7. NMR Investigation of Filler Effects of (Gamma) Irradiation in Polyurethane Adhesives

    SciTech Connect

    Chinn, S C; Gjersing, E L; Maxwell, R S; Cohenour, R

    2007-06-11

    Polyurethane and polyester elastomers have been used for decades in a wide variety of applications, from seat cushion foams to prosthetic materials to high performance adhesives. Adiprene LW-520 is a polyurethane-based adhesive used in a number of U. S. Department of Energy applications. Several investigations have been performed to determine aging properties of polyurethanes. For example, {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation times have been shown to be sensitive to thermal degradation in polyurethanes. Detailed information about the exact nature of the oxidative thermal degradation in related materials has also been obtained via {sup 17}O and {sup 13}C NMR, with additional insight into morphological changes being obtained using {sup 1}H spin diffusion experiments. Radiation has also been shown to change the physical and mechanical properties of the polymers; in fact many polyurethanes are cured using radiation to affect the isocyanate and free radical reactive groups, thus controlling the properties such as thermal or solvent resistance.

  8. Polyimide foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gagliani, John (Inventor); Lee, Raymond (Inventor); Sorathia, Usman A. K. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    Copolymide foams derived from a diester of 3,3',4,4'-benzophenonetetracarboxylic acid, an aromatic diamine, and a heterocyclic diamine. A molar concentration of the heterocyclic diamine approaching but not exceeding 0.42 is employed. This results in a flexible foam with a homogeneous cellular structure and a reduced compression set loss.

  9. Polyimide foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gagliani, John (Inventor); Lee, Raymond (Inventor); Sorathia, Usman A. K. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    Copolyimide foams derived from a diester of 3,3',4,4'-benzophenonetetracarboxylic acid, an aromatic diamine, and a heterocyclic diamine. A molar concentration of the heterocyclic diamine approaching but not exceeding 0.42 is employed. This results in a flexible foam with a homogeneous cellular structure and a reduced compression set loss.

  10. Polyimide foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gagliani, John (Inventor); Lee, Raymond (Inventor); Sorathia, Usman A. K. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    Copolyimide foams derived from a diester of 3,3',4,4'-benzophenonetetracarboxylic acid, an aromatic diamine, and a heterocyclic diamine. A molar concentration of the heterocyclic diamine approaching but not exceeding 0.42 is employed. This results in a flexible foam with a homogeneous cellular structure and a reduced compression set loss.

  11. Foam clogging.

    PubMed

    Rouyer, F; Haffner, B; Louvet, N; Khidas, Y; Pitois, O

    2014-09-28

    To what extent are aqueous foams prone to clogging? Foam permeability is measured as a function of particulate loading (trapped hydrophilic particles) under conditions where the particle to bubble size ratio is allowed to increase when the number of particles per bubble is fixed. In addition to experiments performed on the foam scale, we investigated experimentally and numerically the hydrodynamic resistance of a single foam node loaded with one particle. It is shown that, with respect to solid porous media, aqueous foams clog more efficiently due to two reasons: (i) the deformation of interfaces allows for larger particles to be incorporated within the interstitial network and (ii) the interfacial mobility contributes to lowering of the reduced permeability.

  12. Composite foams

    DOEpatents

    Williams, Jr., Joel M.; Nyitray, Alice M.; Wilkerson, Mark H.

    1991-01-01

    Composite foams are provided comprising a first rigid, microcellular, open-celled organic polymer foam having a density of from about 0.015 g/cm.sup.3 to about 0.20 g/cm.sup.3 and a pore size of from about 1 micron to about 30 microns, said first foam containing a second polymer having a density of from about 0.015 g/cm.sup.3 to about 0.20 g/cm.sup.3 or a second polymer foam having a density of from about 0.015 g/cm.sup.3 to about 0.20 g/cm.sup.3 and a pore size of from about 0.01 microns to about 1.0 micron within the open cells of said first foam.

  13. Composite foams

    DOEpatents

    Williams, Jr., Joel M.; Nyitray, Alice M.; Wilkerson, Mark H.

    1990-01-01

    Composite foams are provided comprising a first rigid, microcellular, open-celled organic polymer foam having a density of from about 0.015 g/cm.sup.3 to about 0.20 g/cm.sup.3 and a pore size of from about 1 micron to about 30 microns, said first foam containing a second polymer having a density of from about 0.015 g/cm.sup.3 to about 0.20 g/cm.sup.3 or a second polymer foam having a density of from about 0.015 g/cm.sup.3 to about 0.20 g/cm.sup.3 and a pore size of from about 0.01 microns to about 1.0 micron within the open cells of said first foam.

  14. TEPIC -- A new high temperature structural foam

    SciTech Connect

    L. L. Whinnery; S. H. Goods; M. L. Tootle; C. L. Neuschwanger

    1998-10-01

    The formulation, processing characteristics, microstructure and mechanical properties of a new structural foam, suitable for use at service temperatures up to 200 C, are reported. In each of these respects, the foam is compared to an existing material, called APO-BMI that is currently in use. When these two foams are directly compared, the new foam, called TEPIC, is found to be superior in its mechanical performance. TEPIC is formulated from a non-carcinogenic isocyanate, a di-functional epoxide, and glass microballoons. The authors' approach was to combine chemistries known to form thermally stable products. The principal polymerization products are an oxizolidinone produced by the reaction of the isocyanate with the epoxide and isocyanurate rings formed by the trimerization of the isocyanate. Processing has been examined and large-scale production is discussed in detail. Compared to APO-BMI processing, TEPIC processing is facile and economical. The structure of the foam resembles a traditional rigid polyurethane foam rather than that of the APO-BMI. That is, the foam is comprised of a continuous resin phase rather than weakly bonded glass microballoons. At a density of 0.42 g/cm{sup 3} or greater, maximum pore size in TEPIC was less than 2 mm, as required for the application.

  15. Thermal Performance of Aircraft Polyurethane Seat Cushions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, D. A.; Parker, J. A.

    1982-01-01

    Aircraft seat materials were evaluated in terms of their thermal performance. The materials were evaluated using (a) thermogravimetric analysis, (b) differential scanning calorimetry, (c) a modified NBS smoke chamber to determine the rate of mass loss and (d) the NASA T-3 apparatus to determine the thermal efficiency. In this paper, the modified NBS smoke chamber will be described in detail since it provided the most conclusive results. The NBS smoke chamber was modified to measure the weight loss of material when exposed to a radiant heat source over the range of 2.5 to 7.5 W/sq cm. This chamber has been utilized to evaluate the thermal performance of various heat blocking layers utilized to protect the polyurethane cushioning foam used in aircraft seats. Various kinds of heat blocking layers were evaluated by monitoring the weight loss of miniature seat cushions when exposed to the radiant heat. The effectiveness of aluminized heat blocking systems was demonstrated when compared to conventional heat blocking layers such as neoprene. All heat blocking systems showed good fire protection capabilities when compared to the state-of-the-art, i.e., wool-nylon over polyurethane foam.

  16. Forming foam structures with carbon foam substrates

    DOEpatents

    Landingham, Richard L.; Satcher, Jr., Joe H.; Coronado, Paul R.; Baumann, Theodore F.

    2012-11-06

    The invention provides foams of desired cell sizes formed from metal or ceramic materials that coat the surfaces of carbon foams which are subsequently removed. For example, metal is located over a sol-gel foam monolith. The metal is melted to produce a metal/sol-gel composition. The sol-gel foam monolith is removed, leaving a metal foam.

  17. FOAM DENSITY SENSITIVITY STUDY FOR THE 9977 PACKAGE

    SciTech Connect

    Gorczyca, J; Tsu-Te Wu, T

    2008-05-02

    Two layers of insulation fill the volume of the 9977 package between the drum liner and the shell. One of these layers is composed of General Plastics FR-3716 polyurethane foam (also known as Last-A-Foam{reg_sign}), poured through fill holes in the drum bottom and foamed in place. There was concern that the density of the foam insulating layer may vary due to the manufacturing process and that variations in foam density would compromise the safety basis of the package. Thus, a structural finite element analysis was performed to investigate this concern. The investigation examined the effect of replacing the material properties for the FR-3716 polyurethane foam, which has a density equal to 16 lb{sub m}/ft{sup 3}, with material properties of similar foam with varying densities through finite element analysis of hypothetical accident conditions (HAC) pertaining to impact conditions. The results showed that the functional performance of the containment vessel (CV) was not compromised under the conditions investigated.

  18. Foam patterns

    DOEpatents

    Chaudhry, Anil R; Dzugan, Robert; Harrington, Richard M; Neece, Faurice D; Singh, Nipendra P; Westendorf, Travis

    2013-11-26

    A method of creating a foam pattern comprises mixing a polyol component and an isocyanate component to form a liquid mixture. The method further comprises placing a temporary core having a shape corresponding to a desired internal feature in a cavity of a mold and inserting the mixture into the cavity of the mold so that the mixture surrounds a portion of the temporary core. The method optionally further comprises using supporting pins made of foam to support the core in the mold cavity, with such pins becoming integral part of the pattern material simplifying subsequent processing. The method further comprises waiting for a predetermined time sufficient for a reaction from the mixture to form a foam pattern structure corresponding to the cavity of the mold, wherein the foam pattern structure encloses a portion of the temporary core and removing the temporary core from the pattern independent of chemical leaching.

  19. Foam Microrheology

    SciTech Connect

    KRAYNIK,ANDREW M.; LOEWENBERG,MICHAEL; REINELT,DOUGLAS A.

    1999-09-01

    The microrheology of liquid foams is discussed for two different regimes: static equilibrium where the capillary number Ca is zero, and the viscous regime where viscosity and surface tension are important and Ca is finite. The Surface Evolver is used to calculate the equilibrium structure of wet Kelvin foams and dry soap froths with random structure, i.e., topological disorder. The distributions of polyhedra and faces are compared with the experimental data of Matzke. Simple shearing flow of a random foam under quasistatic conditions is also described. Viscous phenomena are explored in the context of uniform expansion of 2D and 3D foams at low Reynolds number. Boundary integral methods are used to calculate the influence of Ca on the evolution of foam microstructure, which includes bubble shape and the distribution of liquid between films, Plateau borders, and (in 3D) the nodes where Plateau borders meet. The micromechanical point of view guides the development of structure-property-processing relationships for foams.

  20. Replacements For Ozone-Depleting Foaming Agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blevins, Elana; Sharpe, Jon B.

    1995-01-01

    Fluorinated ethers used in place of chlorofluorocarbons and hydrochlorofluorocarbons. Replacement necessary because CFC's and HCFC's found to contribute to depletion of ozone from upper atmosphere, and manufacture and use of them by law phased out in near future. Two fluorinated ethers do not have ozone-depletion potential and used in existing foam-producing equipment, designed to handle liquid blowing agents soluble in chemical ingredients that mixed to make foam. Any polyurethane-based foams and several cellular plastics blown with these fluorinated ethers used in processes as diverse as small batch pours, large sprays, or double-band lamination to make insulation for private homes, commercial buildings, shipping containers, and storage tanks. Fluorinated ethers proved useful as replacements for CFC refrigerants and solvents.

  1. Durability of running shoes with ethylene vinyl acetate or polyurethane midsoles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; Hong, Youlian; Li, Jing Xian

    2012-12-01

    Ethylene vinyl acetate and polyurethane are widely used materials for shoe midsoles. The present study investigated the durability of running shoes made from ethylene vinyl acetate and one type of polyurethane (polyurethane-1), which have similar hardness and density, and another type of polyurethane (polyurethane-2), which has high hardness/density. All shoes differed from one another only in terms of the midsole material used. Eight male runners participated in the present study and used the shoes to run 500 km (10 × 50 km). The cushioning and energy return characteristics of each shoe were measured using an impact tester before and after each 50-km run. The results showed that as the running distance increased, the peak force of midsole materials changed with different patterns. Ethylene vinyl acetate and polyurethane-1 showed greater cushioning than polyurethane-2 over 500 km (ethylene vinyl acetate, 918.2-968.0 N; polyurethane-1, 909.6-972.9 N; polyurethane-2, 983.0-1105.6 N). Polyurethane-1 showed greater cushioning from 200 km to 300 km compared with 0 km (0 km, 972.9 ± 66.3 N; 200 km, 909.6 ± 61.2 N; 250 km, 921.9 ± 51.2 N; 300 km, 924.6 ± 51.9 N). The cushioning of ethylene vinyl acetate shoes was diminished after 500 km compared with that at 0 km (968.0 ± 25.9 N vs. 921.1 ± 20.1 N). Ethylene vinyl acetate resulted in greater energy returns than polyurethane. Both foam category and hardness/density affected the critical biomechanical properties of running shoes.

  2. Foam Micromechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Kraynik, A.M.; Neilsen, M.K.; Reinelt, D.A.; Warren, W.E.

    1998-11-03

    Foam evokes many different images: waves breaking at the seashore, the head on a pint of Guinness, an elegant dessert, shaving, the comfortable cushion on which you may be seated... From the mundane to the high tech, foams, emulsions, and cellular solids encompass a broad range of materials and applications. Soap suds, mayonnaise, and foamed polymers provide practical motivation and only hint at the variety of materials at issue. Typical of mukiphase materiaIs, the rheoIogy or mechanical behavior of foams is more complicated than that of the constituent phases alone, which may be gas, liquid, or solid. For example, a soap froth exhibits a static shear modulus-a hallmark of an elastic solid-even though it is composed primarily of two Newtonian fluids (water and air), which have no shear modulus. This apparent paradox is easily resolved. Soap froth contains a small amount of surfactant that stabilizes the delicate network of thin liq- uid films against rupture. The soap-film network deforms in response to a macroscopic strain; this increases interracial area and the corresponding sur- face energy, and provides the strain energy of classical elasticity theory [1]. This physical mechanism is easily imagined but very challenging to quantify for a realistic three-dimensional soap froth in view of its complex geome- try. Foam micromechanics addresses the connection between constituent properties, cell-level structure, and macroscopic mechanical behavior. This article is a survey of micromechanics applied to gas-liquid foams, liquid-liquid emulsions, and cellular solids. We will focus on static response where the foam deformation is very slow and rate-dependent phenomena such as viscous flow can be neglected. This includes nonlinear elasticity when deformations are large but reversible. We will also discuss elastic- plastic behavior, which involves yield phenomena. Foam structures based on polyhedra packed to fill space provide a unify- ing geometrical theme. Because a two

  3. Temper Foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Fabricated by Expanded Rubber & Plastics Corporation, Temper Foam provides better impact protection for airplane passengers and enhances passenger comfort on long flights because it distributes body weight and pressure evenly over the entire contact area. Called a "memory foam" it matches the contour of the body pressing against it and returns to its original shape once the pressure is removed. As a shock absorber, a three-inch foam pad has the ability to absorb the impact of a 10-foot fall by an adult. Applications include seat cushioning for transportation vehicles, padding for furniture and a variety of athletic equipment medical applications including wheelchair padding, artificial limb socket lining, finger splint and hand padding for burn patients, special mattresses for the bedridden and dental stools. Production and sales rights are owned by Temper Foam, Inc. Material is manufactured under license by the Dewey and Almy Division of Grace Chemical Corporation. Distributors of the product are Kees Goebel Medical Specialties, Inc. and Alimed, Inc. They sell Temper Foam in bulk to the fabricators who trim it to shapes required by their customers.

  4. Foam drainage

    SciTech Connect

    Kraynik, A.M.

    1983-11-01

    Transient drainage from a column of persistent foam has been analyzed theoretically. Gravity-driven flow was assumed to occur through an interconnected network of Plateau borders that define the edges of foam cells taken to be regular pentagonal dodecahedrons. A small liquid volume fraction and monodisperse cell size distribution were assumed. In the basic model, it is assumed that all liquid is contained in Plateau borders that are bounded by rigid gas-liquid interfaces. The predicted half life, the time required for one half of the liquid to drain from the foam, is inversely proportional to the square of the cell diameter, illustrating the importance of foam structure in drainage. Liquid hold up in the films separating adjacent cells, nonuniform initial liquid volume fraction distribution and interfacial mobility are explored. Border suction due to reduced pressure in the Plateau borders provides a mechanism for film drainage. Simultaneous film drainage and flow through the Plateau borders are analyzed. Sufficient conditions for neglecting film drainage kinetics are obtained. The results indicate that improved foam stability is related to small cells, liquid hold up in the films and slow film drainage kinetics.

  5. Starch based polyurethanes: A critical review updating recent literature.

    PubMed

    Zia, Fatima; Zia, Khalid Mahmood; Zuber, Mohammad; Kamal, Shagufta; Aslam, Nosheen

    2015-12-10

    Recent advancements in material science and technology made it obvious that use of renewable feed stock is the need of hour. Polymer industry steadily moved to get rid of its dependence on non-renewable resources. Starch, the second largest occurring biomass (renewable) on this planet provides a cheap and eco-friendly way to form huge variety of materials on blending with other biodegradable polymers. Specific structural versatility design for individual application and tailor-made properties have established the polyurethane (PU) as an important and popular class of synthetic biodegradable polymers. Blending of starch with polyurethane is relatively a developing area in PU chemistry but with lot of attraction for researchers. Herein, various starch based polyurethane materials including blends, grafts, copolymers, composites and nano-composites, as well as the prospects and latest developments are discussed. Additionally, an overview of starch based polymeric materials, including their potential applications are presented.

  6. Space Shuttle Stiffener Ring Foam Failure, a Non-Conventional Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Philip M.

    2007-01-01

    The Space Shuttle makes use of the excellent properties of rigid polyurethane foam for cryogenic tank insulation and as structural protection on the solid rocket boosters. When foam applications debond, classical methods of analysis do not always provide root cause of the failure of the foam. Realizing that foam is the ideal media to document and preserve its own mode of failure, thin sectioning was seen as a logical approach for foam failure analysis. Thin sectioning in two directions, both horizontal and vertical to the application, was chosen to observe the three dimensional morphology of the foam cells. The cell foam morphology provided a much greater understanding of the failure modes than previously achieved.

  7. Polyurethane toilet seat contact dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Turan, Hakan; Saricaoğlu, Hayriye; Turan, Ayşegül; Tunali, Sükran

    2011-01-01

    Polyurethane chemicals are produced by the reaction of isocyanates and they may cause allergic contact dermatitis or precipitate asthma attacks. Contact dermatitis to polyurethane toilet seat has not been reported before. Herein we present a case of allergic contact dermatitis to polyurethane toilet seat.

  8. Erosion of polyurethane insulation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraus, S.

    1973-01-01

    Detailed description of the test program in which erosion of the spray foam insulation used in the S-II stage of the Saturn-V Apollo launch vehicle was investigated. The behavior of the spray foam was investigated at the elevated temperature and static pressure appropriate to the S-II stage environment, but in the absence of the aerodynamic shear stress.

  9. Injectable silk foams for soft tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Bellas, Evangelia; Lo, Tim J; Fournier, Eric P; Brown, Joseph E; Abbott, Rosalyn D; Gil, Eun S; Marra, Kacey G; Rubin, J Peter; Leisk, Gary G; Kaplan, David L

    2015-02-18

    Soft tissue fillers are needed for restoration of a defect or augmentation of existing tissues. Autografts and lipotransfer have been under study for soft tissue reconstruction but yield inconsistent results, often with considerable resorption of the grafted tissue. A minimally invasive procedure would reduce scarring and recovery time as well as allow the implant and/or grafted tissue to be placed closer to existing vasculature. Here, the feasibility of an injectable silk foam for soft tissue regeneration is demonstrated. Adipose-derived stem cells survive and migrate through the foam over a 10-d period in vitro. The silk foams are also successfully injected into the subcutaneous space in a rat and over a 3-month period integrating with the surrounding native tissue. The injected foams are palpable and soft to the touch through the skin and returning to their original dimensions after pressure is applied and then released. The foams readily absorb lipoaspirate making the foams useful as a scaffold or template for existing soft tissue filler technologies, useful either as a biomaterial alone or in combination with the lipoaspirate.

  10. Injectable Silk Foams for Soft Tissue Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Bellas, E.; Lo, T.J.; Fournier, E.P.; Brown, J.E.; Abbott, R.D.; Gil, E.S.; Marra, K.G.; Rubin, J.P.; Leisk, G.G.; Kaplan, D.L.

    2015-01-01

    Soft tissue fillers are needed for restoration of a defect or augmentation of existing tissues. Autografts and lipotransfer have been under study for soft tissue reconstruction but yield inconsistent results, often with considerable resorption of the grafted tissue. A minimally invasive procedure would reduce scarring and recovery time as well as allow for the implant and/or grafted tissue to be placed closer to existing vasculature. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of an injectable silk foam for soft tissue regeneration. Adipose derived stem cells survive and migrate through the foam over a 10 day period in vitro. The silk foams are also successfully injected into the subcutaneous space in a rat and over a 3 month period integrating with the surrounding native tissue. The injected foams are palpable and soft to the touch through the skin and returning to their original dimensions after pressure was applied and then released. The foams readily absorb lipoaspirate making the foams useful as a scaffold or template for existing soft tissue filler technologies, useful either as a biomaterial alone or in combination with the lipoaspirate. PMID:25323438

  11. Autoclavable highly cross-linked polyurethane networks in ophthalmology.

    PubMed

    Bruin, P; Meeuwsen, E A; van Andel, M V; Worst, J G; Pennings, A J

    1993-11-01

    Highly cross-linked aliphatic polyurethane networks have been prepared by the bulk step reaction of low molecular weight polyols and hexamethylenediisocyanate (HDI). These polyurethane networks are optically transparent, colourless and autoclavable amorphous glassy thermosets, which are suited for use in ophthalmic applications such as intraocular lenses and keratoprostheses. The properties of these glassy polyurethanes, obtained from the reaction of the low molecular weight polyols triisopropanolamine (TIPA) or tetrakis (2-hydroxypropyl)ethylenediamine (Quadrol) and HDI in stoichiometric proportions, have been investigated in more detail. The glassy Quadrol/HDI-based polyurethane exhibits a reduction in ultimate glass transition temperature from 85 to 48 degrees C by uptake of 1% of water, and good ultimate mechanical properties (tensile strength 80-85 MPa, elongation at break ca 15%, modulus ca 1.5 GPa). IR spectra of these hydrophobic polyurethane networks revealed the absence of an isocyanate absorption, indicating that all isocyanates, apparently, had reacted during the cross-linking reaction. The biocompatibility could be increased by grafting tethered polyacrylamide chains onto the surface during network formation. These transparent cross-linked polyurethanes did not transmit UV light up to 400 nm, by incorporation of a small amount of the UV absorbing chromophore Coumarin 102, and could be sterilized simply by autoclaving. They were implanted in rabbit eyes, either in the form of small circular disks or in the form of a keratoprosthesis (artificial cornea). It was shown that the material was well tolerated by the rabbit eyes. Serious opacification of the cornea, a direct result of an adverse reaction to the implant, was never seen. Even 1 yr after implantation of a polyurethane keratoprosthesis the eye was still 'quiet'.

  12. Foam flotation

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, A.N.; Wilson, D.J.

    1983-01-01

    This book is a review of precipitate and absorbing colloid flotation and mathemataical analyses of physical models regarding foam flotation phenomena. Over 800 literature references are cited. Contents include some fluid mechanical aspects of particle flotation, theoretical aspects of particulate flotation, column design considerations, solvent sublation, the future and appendices.

  13. Polyimide foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vazquez, Juan M. (Inventor); Cano, Roberto J. (Inventor); Jensen, Brian J. (Inventor); Weiser, Erik S. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A fully imidized, solvent-free polyimide foam having excellent mechanical, acoustic, thermal, and flame resistant properties is produced. A first solution is provided, which includes one or more aromatic dianhydrides or derivatives of aromatic dianhydrides, and may include one or more aromatic diamines, dissolved in one or more polar solvents, along with an effective amount of one or more blowing agents. This first solution may also advantageously include effective amounts respectively of one or mores catalysts, one or more surfactants, and one or more fire retardants. A second solution is also provided which includes one or more isocyanates. The first and second solutions are rapidly and thoroughly mixed to produce an admixture, which is allowed to foam--in an open container, or in a closed mold--under ambient conditions to completion produce a foamed product. This foamed product is then cured by high frequency electromagnetic radiation, thermal energy, or a combination thereof. Alternatively, the process is adapted for spraying or extrusion.

  14. Polyimide foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vazquez, Juan M. (Inventor); Cano, Roberto J. (Inventor); Jensen, Brian J. (Inventor); Weiser, Erik S. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A fully imidized, solvent-free polyimide foam having excellent mechanical, acoustic, thermal, and flame resistant properties is produced. A first solution is provided, which includes one or more aromatic dianhydrides or derivatives of aromatic dianhydrides, and may include one or more aromatic diamines, dissolved in one or more polar solvents, along with an effective amount of one or more blowing agents. This first solution may also advantageously include effective amounts respectively of one or mores catalysts, one or more surfactants, and one or more fire retardants. A second solution is also provided which includes one or more isocyanates. The first and second solutions are rapidly and thoroughly mixed to produce an admixture, which is allowed to foam?in an open container, or in a closed mold?under ambient conditions to completion produce a foamed product. This foamed product is then cured by high frequency electromagnetic radiation, thermal energy, or a combination thereof. Alternatively, the process is adapted for spraying or extrusion.

  15. Toxicology evaluation and hazard review for non-CFC containing rigid foams BKC 44317 and last-a-foam MSL-02A

    SciTech Connect

    Greulich, K.A.; Archuleta, M.M.

    1996-06-01

    New pour-in-place, low density, rigid polyurethane foam kits have been developed to mechanically stabilize damaged explosive ordnance. Although earlier foam systems used chlorofluorocarbons as blowing agents, the current versions rely on carbon dioxide generated by the reaction of isocynates with water. In addition, these kits were developed to manually generate small quantifies of rigid foam in the field with minimal or no protective equipment. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and summarize available hazard information for the components of these rigid foam kits and to provide recommendations for personal protective equipment to be used while performing the manual combination of the components. As with most rigid foam systems, these kits consist of two parts, one a mixture of isocyanates; the other, a combination of polyols, surfactants, and amine catalysts. Once completely deployed, the rigid foam is non-toxic. The components, however, have some important health effects which must be considered when establishing handling procedures.

  16. Development of multifunctional shape memory polymer foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Janice J.; Srivastava, Ijya; Naguib, Hani E.

    2015-05-01

    Shape memory polymers (SMP) are a class of stimuli-responsive materials which are able to respond to external stimulus such as temperature and deformation by changing their shape, and return to their original shape upon reversal or removal of the external stimulus. Although SMP materials have been studied extensively and have been used in a wide range of applications such as medicine, aerospace, and robotics, only few studies have looked at the potential of designing multifunctional SMP foams and blends. In this study, we investigate the feasibility of a design of SMP foam materials and blends. The actuator construct will contain a core SMP epoxy and blend of polylactic acid and polyurethane. The effects of the processing parameters of shape memory polymer (SMP) foams on the shape memory effect (SME) were investigated. The solid state foaming technique was employed to obtain the desired foamed cellular structure. One particular point of interest is to understand how the processing parameters affect the SMP and its glass transition temperature (Tg). By correctly tailoring these parameters it is possible to modify the SMP to have an improved shape memory effect SME.

  17. Bone graft

    MedlinePlus

    Autograft - bone; Allograft - bone; Fracture - bone graft; Surgery - bone graft; Autologous bone graft ... Fuse joints to prevent movement Repair broken bones (fractures) that have bone loss Repair injured bone that ...

  18. A review: fabrication of porous polyurethane scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Janik, H; Marzec, M

    2015-03-01

    The aim of tissue engineering is the fabrication of three-dimensional scaffolds that can be used for the reconstruction and regeneration of damaged or deformed tissues and organs. A wide variety of techniques have been developed to create either fibrous or porous scaffolds from polymers, metals, composite materials and ceramics. However, the most promising materials are biodegradable polymers due to their comprehensive mechanical properties, ability to control the rate of degradation and similarities to natural tissue structures. Polyurethanes (PUs) are attractive candidates for scaffold fabrication, since they are biocompatible, and have excellent mechanical properties and mechanical flexibility. PU can be applied to various methods of porous scaffold fabrication, among which are solvent casting/particulate leaching, thermally induced phase separation, gas foaming, emulsion freeze-drying and melt moulding. Scaffold properties obtained by these techniques, including pore size, interconnectivity and total porosity, all depend on the thermal processing parameters, and the porogen agent and solvents used. In this review, various polyurethane systems for scaffolds are discussed, as well as methods of fabrication, including the latest developments, and their advantages and disadvantages.

  19. Foam Cushioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    One innovation developed by a contractor at Ames Research Center was an open cell polymeric foam material with unusual properties. Intended as padding for aircraft seats the material offered better impact protection against accidents, and also enhanced passenger comfort because it distributed body weight evenly over the entire contact area. Called a slow springback foam, it flows to match the contour of the body pressing against it, and returns to its original shape once the pressure is removed. It has many applications including aircraft cushions and padding, dental stools, and athletic equipment. Now it's used by Dynamic Systems, Inc. for medical applications such as wheel chairs for severely disabled people which allow them to sit for 3-8 hours where they used to be uncomfortable in 15-30 minutes.

  20. Infiltrated carbon foam composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucas, Rick D. (Inventor); Danford, Harry E. (Inventor); Plucinski, Janusz W. (Inventor); Merriman, Douglas J. (Inventor); Blacker, Jesse M. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    An infiltrated carbon foam composite and method for making the composite is described. The infiltrated carbon foam composite may include a carbonized carbon aerogel in cells of a carbon foam body and a resin is infiltrated into the carbon foam body filling the cells of the carbon foam body and spaces around the carbonized carbon aerogel. The infiltrated carbon foam composites may be useful for mid-density ablative thermal protection systems.

  1. Thermal performance of aircraft polyurethane seat cushions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, D. A.; Parker, J. A.

    1982-01-01

    Measurements were conducted on 7.6 x 7.6 cm samples of polyurethane seat cushion material in a modified National Bureau of Standards smoke density chamber to simulate real life conditions for an onboard aircraft fire or post-crash fire. In this study, a non-flaming heat radiation condition was simulated. Two aluminized polymeric fabrics (Norfab 11HT-26-A and Preox 1100-4) and one neoprene type material in two thicknesses (Vonar 2 and 3) were tested as heat blocking layers to protect the urethane foam from rapid heat degradation. Thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry were performed to characterize thermally the materials tested. It was found that Vonar 2 or 3 provided approximately equal thermal protection to F.R. urethane as the aluminized fabrics, but at a significant weight penalty. The efficiency of the foams to absorb heat per unit mass loss when protected with the heat blocking layer decreases in the heating range of 2.5-5.0 W/sq cm, but remains unchanged or slightly increases in the range of 5.0-7.5 W/sq cm. The results show that at all heat flux ranges tested the usage of a heat blocking layer in aircraft seats significantly improves their thermal performance.

  2. Evaluation of Human Amniotic Membrane as a Wound Dressing for Split-Thickness Skin-Graft Donor Sites

    PubMed Central

    Loeffelbein, Denys J.; Rohleder, Nils H.; Eddicks, Matthias; Baumann, Claudia M.; Stoeckelhuber, Mechthild; Wolff, Klaus-D.; Drecoll, Enken; Steinstraesser, Lars; Hennerbichler, Simone; Kesting, Marco R.

    2014-01-01

    Human amniotic membrane (HAM) has been used as a biomaterial in various surgical procedures and exceeds some qualities of common materials. We evaluated HAM as wound dressing for split-thickness skin-graft (STSG) donor sites in a swine model (Part A) and a clinical trial (Part B). Part A: STSG donor sites in 4 piglets were treated with HAM or a clinically used conventional polyurethane (PU) foil (n = 8 each). Biopsies were taken on days 5, 7, 10, 20, 40, and 60 and investigated immunohistochemically for alpha-smooth muscle actin (αSMA: wound contraction marker), von Willebrand factor (vWF: angiogenesis), Ki-67 (cell proliferation), and laminin (basement membrane integrity). Part B: STSG donor sites in 45 adult patients (16 female/29 male) were treated with HAM covered by PU foam, solely by PU foam, or PU foil/paraffin gauze (n = 15 each). Part A revealed no difference in the rate of wound closure between groups. HAM showed improved esthetic results and inhibitory effects on cicatrization. Angioneogenesis was reduced, and basement membrane formation was accelerated in HAM group. Part B: no difference in re-epithelialization/infection rate was found. HAM caused less ichor exudation and less pruritus. HAM has no relevant advantage over conventional dressings but might be a cost-effective alternative. PMID:25003117

  3. Energy Absorption of Polyurethane-Based Polymer Alloys.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-01-31

    AD-fli64 537 ENERGY BSORPTION OF POLYURETHANE-BASED POLYMER ALLOYS i/i (U) DETROIT UN V MI POLYME INST S ONI ET AL. UNCLASSIFIED U R R-26 -SDR2...Preparation of Samples 1 1. IPN Elastomers 1 2. IPN Foams 2 C. Testing 2 1. Dynamic Mechanical Spectroscopy 2 2. Standing Wave Apparatus (Bruel & 3...conditioned at 250C and 50% relative humidity for at least three days prior to testing. C. Testing 1. Dynamic Mechanical Spectroscopy All dynamic

  4. Nano-TiO2/polyurethane composites for antibacterial and self-cleaning coatings.

    PubMed

    Charpentier, P A; Burgess, K; Wang, L; Chowdhury, R R; Lotus, A F; Moula, G

    2012-10-26

    Grafting from polymerization was used to synthesize nano-titania/polyurethane (nTiO(2)/polyurethane) composite coatings, where nTiO(2) was chemically attached to the backbone of the polyurethane polymer matrix with a bifunctional monomer, 2,2-bis(hydroxymethyl) propionic acid (DMPA). This bifunctional monomer can coordinate to nTiO(2) through an available -COOH group, with two available hydroxyl groups that can react with diisocyanate terminated pre-polyurethane through step-growth polymerization. The coordination reaction was monitored by FTIR and TGA, with the coordination reaction found to follow first order kinetics. After step-growth polymerization, the polyurethane nanocomposites were found to be stable on standing with excellent distribution of Ti in the polymer matrix without any significant agglomeration compared to simple physical mixtures of nTiO(2) in the polyurethane coatings. The functionalized nTiO(2)-polyurethane composite coatings showed excellent antibacterial activity against gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli; 99% of E. coli were killed within less than one hour under solar irradiation. Self-cleaning was also demonstrated using stearic acid as a model for 'dirt'.

  5. Nano-TiO2/polyurethane composites for antibacterial and self-cleaning coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charpentier, P. A.; Burgess, K.; Wang, L.; Chowdhury, R. R.; Lotus, A. F.; Moula, G.

    2012-10-01

    Grafting from polymerization was used to synthesize nano-titania/polyurethane (nTiO2/polyurethane) composite coatings, where nTiO2 was chemically attached to the backbone of the polyurethane polymer matrix with a bifunctional monomer, 2,2-bis(hydroxymethyl) propionic acid (DMPA). This bifunctional monomer can coordinate to nTiO2 through an available -COOH group, with two available hydroxyl groups that can react with diisocyanate terminated pre-polyurethane through step-growth polymerization. The coordination reaction was monitored by FTIR and TGA, with the coordination reaction found to follow first order kinetics. After step-growth polymerization, the polyurethane nanocomposites were found to be stable on standing with excellent distribution of Ti in the polymer matrix without any significant agglomeration compared to simple physical mixtures of nTiO2 in the polyurethane coatings. The functionalized nTiO2-polyurethane composite coatings showed excellent antibacterial activity against gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli; 99% of E. coli were killed within less than one hour under solar irradiation. Self-cleaning was also demonstrated using stearic acid as a model for ‘dirt’.

  6. Application of an Elongated Kelvin Model to Space Shuttle Foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Roy M.; Ghosn, Louis J.; Lerch, Bradley A.

    2008-01-01

    Spray-on foam insulation is applied to the exterior of the Space Shuttle s External Tank to limit propellant boil-off and to prevent ice formation. The Space Shuttle foams are rigid closed-cell polyurethane foams. The two foams used most extensively on the Space Shuttle External Tank are BX-265 and NCFI24-124. Since the catastrophic loss of the Space Shuttle Columbia, numerous studies have been conducted to mitigate the likelihood and the severity of foam shedding during the Shuttle s ascent to space. Due to the foaming and rising process, the foam microstructures are elongated in the rise direction. As a result, these two foams exhibit a non-isotropic mechanical behavior. In this paper, a detailed microstructural characterization of the two foams is presented. The key features of the foam cells are summarized and the average cell dimensions in the two foams are compared. Experimental studies to measure the room temperature mechanical response of the two foams in the two principal material directions (parallel to the rise and perpendicular to the rise) are also reported. The measured elastic modulus, proportional limit stress, ultimate tensile stress and the Poisson s ratios for the two foams are compared. The generalized elongated Kelvin foam model previously developed by the authors is reviewed and the equations which result from this model are presented. The resulting equations show that the ratio of the elastic modulus in the rise direction to that in the perpendicular-to-rise direction as well as the ratio of the strengths in the two material directions is only a function of the microstructural dimensions. Using the measured microstructural dimensions and the measured stiffness ratio, the foam tensile strength ratio and Poisson s ratios are predicted for both foams. The predicted tensile strength ratio is in close agreement with the measured strength ratios for both BX-265 and NCFI24-124. The comparison between the predicted Poisson s ratios and the measured

  7. Stabilizing nanocellulose-nonionic surfactant composite foams by delayed Ca-induced gelation.

    PubMed

    Gordeyeva, Korneliya S; Fall, Andreas B; Hall, Stephen; Wicklein, Bernd; Bergström, Lennart

    2016-06-15

    Aggregation of dispersed rod-like particles like nanocellulose can improve the strength and rigidity of percolated networks but may also have a detrimental effect on the foamability. However, it should be possible to improve the strength of nanocellulose foams by multivalent ion-induced aggregation if the aggregation occurs after the foam has been formed. Lightweight and highly porous foams based on TEMPO-mediated oxidized cellulose nanofibrils (CNF) were formulated with the addition of a non-ionic surfactant, pluronic P123, and CaCO3 nanoparticles. Foam volume measurements show that addition of the non-ionic surfactant generates wet CNF/P123 foams with a high foamability. Foam bubble size studies show that delayed Ca-induced aggregation of CNF by gluconic acid-triggered dissolution of the CaCO3 nanoparticles significantly improves the long-term stability of the wet composite foams. Drying the Ca-reinforced foam at 60 °C results in a moderate shrinkage and electron microscopy and X-ray tomography studies show that the pores became slightly oblate after drying but the overall microstructure and pore/foam bubble size distribution is preserved after drying. The elastic modulus (0.9-1.4 MPa) of Ca-reinforced composite foams with a density of 9-15 kg/m(3) is significantly higher than commercially available polyurethane foams used for thermal insulation.

  8. Quantum Foam

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, Don

    2014-10-24

    The laws of quantum mechanics and relativity are quite perplexing however it is when the two theories are merged that things get really confusing. This combined theory predicts that empty space isn’t empty at all – it’s a seething and bubbling cauldron of matter and antimatter particles springing into existence before disappearing back into nothingness. Scientists call this complicated state of affairs “quantum foam.” In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln discusses this mind-bending idea and sketches some of the experiments that have convinced scientists that this crazy prediction is actually true.

  9. Modeling shock-driven reaction in low density PMDI foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brundage, Aaron; Alexander, C. Scott; Reinhart, William; Peterson, David

    Shock experiments on low density polyurethane foams reveal evidence of reaction at low impact pressures. However, these reaction thresholds are not evident over the low pressures reported for historical Hugoniot data of highly distended polyurethane at densities below 0.1 g/cc. To fill this gap, impact data given in a companion paper for polymethylene diisocyanate (PMDI) foam with a density of 0.087 g/cc were acquired for model validation. An equation of state (EOS) was developed to predict the shock response of these highly distended materials over the full range of impact conditions representing compaction of the inert material, low-pressure decomposition, and compression of the reaction products. A tabular SESAME EOS of the reaction products was generated using the JCZS database in the TIGER equilibrium code. In particular, the Arrhenius Burn EOS, a two-state model which transitions from an unreacted to a reacted state using single step Arrhenius kinetics, as implemented in the shock physics code CTH, was modified to include a statistical distribution of states. Hence, a single EOS is presented that predicts the onset to reaction due to shock loading in PMDI-based polyurethane foams. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's NNSA under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  10. FLASHFOAM : a triboluminescent polymer foam for mechanical sensing.

    SciTech Connect

    Dentinger, Paul M.; Whinnery, LeRoy L., Jr.; Goods, Steven Howard

    2003-07-01

    The formulation and processing of a brittle polyurethane foam containing triboluminescent powder additives is described. Two powder additives, known to exhibit triboluminescence, were individually examined: triethylammonium tetrakis (dibenzoylmethanato) europate [NEt3H][Eu(DBM)4] and ordinary table sugar (sucrose, C12H22O11). In each instance, the powders were mixed into the polyol component of the foam. When combined with the isocyanate component, the resulting foams had these powders incorporated into their cellular structure so as to induce a triboluminescent response upon crushing during impact testing. The triboluminescent response of foam specimens containing each of these powder additives was characterized by measuring: the time rate of change in the optical output (measured as Watts), the peak optical output, the total integrated output (Watt-seconds), during the impact event. Foams containing the europate compound were found to yield several orders of magnitude higher output when compared to the sugar-containing foam. Strain rate and concentration of the powder (in the foam) were important variables with respect to optical output. Both the peak and total triboluminescent output increased with increasing powder concentration. Peak output was also found to increase with increasing strain rate. However, the total output was found to be roughly constant for a given concentration regardless of strain rate (over the strain rate range: 20 sec-1< e& < 150 sec-1). At very low strain rates, no triboluminescent response was measured.

  11. Stable Polyurethane Coatings for Electronic Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, D. E.

    1983-01-01

    Alkane-based polyurethanes resist deterioration while maintaining good dielectric properties. Weight loss after prolonged immersion in hot water far less for alkane-based polyurethanes than for more common ether based polyurethanes, at any given oxygen content. Major uses of polyurethanes are as connector potting materials and conformal coatings for printed circuit boards.

  12. 21 CFR 177.1680 - Polyurethane resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Polyurethane resins. 177.1680 Section 177.1680... Components of Single and Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1680 Polyurethane resins. The polyurethane...) For the purpose of this section, polyurethane resins are those produced when one or more of...

  13. Polyurethane synthesis reactions in asphalts

    SciTech Connect

    Bukowski, A.; Gretkiewicz, J.

    1982-04-01

    A series of asphalt-polyurethane composites was prepared by means of polyurethane synthesis in asphalt and carried out in melt. The applied materials were asphalts of differentiated group components content, polyester polyols of chain structure from linear to strongly branched, 2,4-tolylene diisocyanate, 4,4-methylenebis(phenyl isocyanate), and tinorganic catalyst. The asphalt components react with isocyanates to a minimal degree. The influence of the applied substrates, temperature, and polyurethane content in the system on the basic kinetic relations characterizing the process is presented. Polyurethane synthesis in asphalts does not differ in a fundamental way from the obtaining of polyurethanes, especially when their content in the composition is significant, 20 wt% and more.

  14. Amines: possible causative agents in the development of bronchial hyperreactivity in workers manufacturing polyurethanes from isocyanates.

    PubMed Central

    Belin, L; Wass, U; Audunsson, G; Mathiasson, L

    1983-01-01

    Investigations of respiratory symptoms among workers in a factory producing polyurethane foam included measurement of air pollution with amines and isocyanates and a simultaneous health investigation of the exposed workers. An increased bronchial reactivity to inhaled methacholine was found in the study group compared with two unexposed control groups. This finding, together with visual disturbances in the exposed group, were assumed to be caused mainly by the volatile amines. The concentrations of isocyanates in air were well below 0.005 ppm. The amine concentration was 1000 to 10 000 times higher than the isocyanate concentration. The most volatile amine, N-methylmorpholine, occurred in the air in concentrations higher than 10 ppm. The results indicate that not only the isocyanates but also the amines might well be responsible for respiratory symptoms among exposed workers in polyurethane foam production. PMID:6307337

  15. Quantum Foam

    ScienceCinema

    Lincoln, Don

    2016-07-12

    The laws of quantum mechanics and relativity are quite perplexing however it is when the two theories are merged that things get really confusing. This combined theory predicts that empty space isn’t empty at all – it’s a seething and bubbling cauldron of matter and antimatter particles springing into existence before disappearing back into nothingness. Scientists call this complicated state of affairs “quantum foam.” In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln discusses this mind-bending idea and sketches some of the experiments that have convinced scientists that this crazy prediction is actually true.

  16. Pitch based foam with particulate

    DOEpatents

    Klett, James W.

    2001-01-01

    A thermally conductive, pitch based foam composite having a particulate content. The particulate alters the mechanical characteristics of the foam without severely degrading the foam thermal conductivity. The composite is formed by mixing the particulate with pitch prior to foaming.

  17. Plastic Foam Porosity Characterization by Air-Borne Ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffrén, H.; Karppinen, T.; Hæggström, E.

    2006-03-01

    We continue to develop an ultrasonic burst-reflection method for estimating porosity and tortuosity of solid materials. As a first step we report on method design considerations and measurements on polyurethane foams (Sylomer® vibration dampener) with well-defined porosity. The ultrasonic method is experimentally tested by measuring 235 kHz and 600 kHz air-borne ultrasound reflection from a foam surface at two incidence angles. The reflected sound wave from different foam samples (32% - 64% porosity) was compared to a wave that had traveled from the transmitter to the detector without reflection. The ultrasonically estimated sample porosities coincided within 8% with the porosity estimates obtained by a gravimetric reference method. This parallels the uncertainty of the gravimetric method, 8%. The repeatability of the ultrasonic porosity measurements was better than 5%.

  18. A construction of novel iron-foam-based calcium phosphate/chitosan coating biodegradable scaffold material.

    PubMed

    Wen, Zhaohui; Zhang, Liming; Chen, Chao; Liu, Yibo; Wu, Changjun; Dai, Changsong

    2013-04-01

    Slow corrosion rate and poor bioactivity restrict iron-based implants in biomedical application. In this study, we design a new iron-foam-based calcium phosphate/chitosan coating biodegradable composites offering a priority mechanical and bioactive property for bone tissue engineering through electrophoretic deposition (EPD) followed by a conversion process into a phosphate buffer solution (PBS). Tensile test results showed that the mechanical property of iron foam could be regulated through altering the construction of polyurethane foam. The priority coatings were deposited from 40% nano hydroxyapatite (nHA)/ethanol suspension mixed with 60% nHA/chitosan-acetic acid aqueous solution. In vitro immersion test showed that oxidation-iron foam as the matrix decreased the amount of iron implanted and had not influence on the bioactivity of this implant, obviously. So, this method could also be a promising method for the preparation of a new calcium phosphate/chitosan coating on foam construction.

  19. Rigid polyurethane foam – kenaf core composites for structural applications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus L.) is a fast growing summer annual crop with numerous commercial applications (fibers, biofuels, bioremediation, paper pulp, building materials, cover crops, and livestock forages). The stalks of the kenaf plants contain two distinct fiber types, bast and core fibers. The...

  20. Cryogenic Moisture Uptake in Foam Insulation for Space Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fesmire, James E.; ScholtensCoffman, Brekke E.; Sass, Jared P.; Williams, Martha K.; Smith, Trent M.; Meneghelli, Barrry J.

    2008-01-01

    Rigid polyurethane foams and rigid polyisocyanurate foams (spray-on foam insulation), like those flown on Shuttle, Delta IV, and will be flown on Ares-I and Ares-V, can gain an extraordinary amount of water when under cryogenic conditions for several hours. These foams, when exposed for eight hours to launch pad environments on one side and cryogenic temperature on the other, increase their weight from 35 to 80 percent depending on the duration of weathering or aging. This effect translates into several thousand pounds of additional weight for space vehicles at lift-off. A new cryogenic moisture uptake apparatus was designed to determine the amount of water/ice taken into the specimen under actual-use propellant loading conditions. This experimental study included the measurement of the amount of moisture uptake within different foam materials. Results of testing using both aged specimens and weathered specimens are presented. To better understand cryogenic foam insulation performance, cryogenic moisture testing is shown to be essential. The implications for future launch vehicle thermal protection system design and flight performance are discussed.

  1. Fire retardant polyisocyanurate foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riccitiello, S. R.; Parker, J. A.

    1972-01-01

    Fire retardant properties of low density polymer foam are increased. Foam has pendant nitrile groups which form thermally-stable heterocyclic structures at temperature below degradation temperature of urethane linkages.

  2. Diamine curing agents for polyurethanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, V. L.; St. Clair, T. L.

    1975-01-01

    Three aromatic diamines have properties that make them promising candidates as curing agents for converting isocyanates to polyurethanes with higher adhesive strengths, higher softening temperatures, better toughness, and improved abrasion resistance.

  3. Light Stability of Polyurethane Coatings.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-06-16

    photo-Fries rearrangement products obtained upon photolysis of MDI and 2,4-TDI based polyurethanes. Using a combination of fluorescence spectroscopy...conducted using a Xenon lamp/monochromator combination with 10 nm slits. Photolysis of ,4-TDI-dodecanediol polyurethane films were accomplished using a 100... polyrethane in which the rearrangement is apparently inhibited by the restrictive nature of the crystalline morphology. Similar photolysis of a semi

  4. Flame retardant spandex type polyurethanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howarth, J. T.; Sheth, S.; Sidman, K. R.; Massucco, A. A. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    Flame retardant elastomeric compositions were developed, comprised of: (1) spandex type polyurethane having incorporated into the polymer chain, halogen containing polyols; (2) conventional spandex type polyurethanes in physical admixture flame retardant additives; and (3) fluoroelastomeric resins in physical admixture with flame retardant additives. Methods of preparing fibers of the flame retardant elastomeric materials are presented and articles of manufacture comprised of the elastomeric materials are mentioned.

  5. Bone grafts.

    PubMed

    Hubble, Matthew J W

    2002-09-01

    Bone grafts are used in musculoskeletal surgery to restore structural integrity and enhance osteogenic potential. The demand for bone graft for skeletal reconstruction in bone tumor, revision arthroplasty, and trauma surgery, couple with recent advances in understanding and application of the biology of bone transplantation, has resulted in an exponential increase in the number of bone-grafting procedures performed over the last decade. It is estimated that 1.5 million bone-grafting procedures are currently performed worldwide each year, compared to a fraction of that number 20 years ago. Major developments also have resulted in the harvesting, storage, and use of bone grafts and production of graft derivatives, substitutes, and bone-inducing agents.

  6. Shooting in a foam.

    PubMed

    Le Goff, Anne; Quéré, David; Clanet, Christophe

    2014-09-21

    We study the motion of a solid sphere after its fast impact on a bath of liquid foam. We identify two regimes of deceleration. At short times, the velocity is still large and the foam behaves similar to a Newtonian fluid of constant viscosity. Then we measure a velocity threshold below which the sphere starts experiencing the foam's elasticity. We interpret this behavior using a visco-elasto-plastic model for foam rheology. Finally we discuss the possibility of stopping a projectile in the foam, and evaluate the capture efficiency.

  7. Designing of dynamic polyethyleneimine (PEI) brushes on polyurethane (PU) ureteral stents to prevent infections.

    PubMed

    Gultekinoglu, Merve; Tunc Sarisozen, Yeliz; Erdogdu, Ceren; Sagiroglu, Meral; Aksoy, Eda Ayse; Oh, Yoo Jin; Hinterdorfer, Peter; Ulubayram, Kezban

    2015-07-01

    Permanent antibacterial coatings have been developed by brush-like polyethyleneimine (PEI) on polyurethane (PU) ureteral stents since bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation with the following encrustation on stent surface limit their long term usage. In order to control or prevent bacterial infections; PEI chains with two different molecular weights (Mn: 1800 or 60,000 Da) were covalently attached on the polyurethane (PU) surface by "grafting to" approach to obtain a brush-like structure. Then, PEI brushes were alkylated with bromohexane to enhance the disruption of bacterial membranes with increasing polycationic character. X-ray Photoelectron and Infrared Spectroscopy investigations confirmed that PEI grafting and alkylation steps were performed successfully. Surface roughness in dry state increased dramatically from 65.8 nm to 277.7 nm and 145.2 nm for short chain PEI and long chain PEI grafted samples, respectively. Both low and high molecular weight PEI grafts exhibited a brush-like structure and potent antibacterial activity by lowering the adherence of Klebsiella pneumonia, Escherichia coli and Proteus mirabilis species up to two orders of magnitude without any cytotoxic effect on L929 and G/G cells. Thus, permanent bactericidal activity was achieved by the contact-active strategy of dynamic PEI brush-like structures on polyurethane ureteral stent.

  8. Structural graphitic carbon foams

    SciTech Connect

    Kearns, K.M.; Anderson, H.J.

    1998-12-31

    Graphitic carbon foams are a unique material form with very high structural and thermal properties at a light weight. A process has been developed to produce microcellular, open-celled graphitic foams. The process includes heating a mesophase pitch preform above the pitch melting temperature in a pressurized reactor. At the appropriate time, the pressure is released, the gas nucleates bubbles, and these bubbles grow forming the pitch into the foam structure. The resultant foamed pitch is then stabilized in an oxygen environment. At this point a rigid structure exists with some mechanical integrity. The foam is then carbonized to 800 C followed by a graphitization to 2700 C. The shear action from the growing bubbles aligns the graphitic planes along the foam struts to provide the ideal structure for good mechanical properties. Some of these properties have been characterized for some of the foam materials. It is known that variations of the blowing temperature, blowing pressure and saturation time result in foams of variously sized with mostly open pores; however, the mechanism of bubble nucleation is not known. Therefore foams were blown with various gases to begin to determine the nucleation method. These gases are comprised of a variety of molecular weights as well as a range of various solubility levels. By examining the resultant structures of the foam, differences were noted to develop an explanation of the foaming mechanism.

  9. Foam consolidation and drainage.

    PubMed

    Jun, S; Pelot, D D; Yarin, A L

    2012-03-27

    A theoretical model of foam as a consolidating continuum is proposed. The general model is applied to foam in a gravity settler. It is predicted that liquid drainage from foam in a gravity settler begins with a slow drainage stage. Next, a stage with faster drainage occurs where the drainage rate doubles compared to the initial stage. The experiments conducted within the framework of this work confirmed the theoretical predictions and allowed measurements of foam characteristics. Foams of three different concentrations of Pantene Pro-V Classic Care Solutions shampoo were studied, as well as the addition of polyethylene oxide (PEO) in one case. The shampoo's main foaming components are sodium lauryl sulfate and sodium laureth sulfate. It is shown to what extent foam drainage is slowed down by using higher shampoo concentrations and how it is further decreased by adding polymer (PEO).

  10. Foam process models.

    SciTech Connect

    Moffat, Harry K.; Noble, David R.; Baer, Thomas A.; Adolf, Douglas Brian; Rao, Rekha Ranjana; Mondy, Lisa Ann

    2008-09-01

    In this report, we summarize our work on developing a production level foam processing computational model suitable for predicting the self-expansion of foam in complex geometries. The model is based on a finite element representation of the equations of motion, with the movement of the free surface represented using the level set method, and has been implemented in SIERRA/ARIA. An empirically based time- and temperature-dependent density model is used to encapsulate the complex physics of foam nucleation and growth in a numerically tractable model. The change in density with time is at the heart of the foam self-expansion as it creates the motion of the foam. This continuum-level model uses an homogenized description of foam, which does not include the gas explicitly. Results from the model are compared to temperature-instrumented flow visualization experiments giving the location of the foam front as a function of time for our EFAR model system.

  11. Operator spin foam models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahr, Benjamin; Hellmann, Frank; Kamiński, Wojciech; Kisielowski, Marcin; Lewandowski, Jerzy

    2011-05-01

    The goal of this paper is to introduce a systematic approach to spin foams. We define operator spin foams, that is foams labelled by group representations and operators, as our main tool. A set of moves we define in the set of the operator spin foams (among other operations) allows us to split the faces and the edges of the foams. We assign to each operator spin foam a contracted operator, by using the contractions at the vertices and suitably adjusted face amplitudes. The emergence of the face amplitudes is the consequence of assuming the invariance of the contracted operator with respect to the moves. Next, we define spin foam models and consider the class of models assumed to be symmetric with respect to the moves we have introduced, and assuming their partition functions (state sums) are defined by the contracted operators. Briefly speaking, those operator spin foam models are invariant with respect to the cellular decomposition, and are sensitive only to the topology and colouring of the foam. Imposing an extra symmetry leads to a family we call natural operator spin foam models. This symmetry, combined with assumed invariance with respect to the edge splitting move, determines a complete characterization of a general natural model. It can be obtained by applying arbitrary (quantum) constraints on an arbitrary BF spin foam model. In particular, imposing suitable constraints on a spin(4) BF spin foam model is exactly the way we tend to view 4D quantum gravity, starting with the BC model and continuing with the Engle-Pereira-Rovelli-Livine (EPRL) or Freidel-Krasnov (FK) models. That makes our framework directly applicable to those models. Specifically, our operator spin foam framework can be translated into the language of spin foams and partition functions. Among our natural spin foam models there are the BF spin foam model, the BC model, and a model corresponding to the EPRL intertwiners. Our operator spin foam framework can also be used for more general spin

  12. 40 CFR 721.8095 - Silylated polyurethane.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Silylated polyurethane. 721.8095... Substances § 721.8095 Silylated polyurethane. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a silylated polyurethane (PMN P-95-1356)...

  13. 40 CFR 721.8095 - Silylated polyurethane.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Silylated polyurethane. 721.8095... Substances § 721.8095 Silylated polyurethane. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a silylated polyurethane (PMN P-95-1356)...

  14. 40 CFR 721.8090 - Polyurethane polymer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Polyurethane polymer. 721.8090 Section... Substances § 721.8090 Polyurethane polymer. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a polyurethane polymer (P-94-47) is...

  15. 40 CFR 721.8090 - Polyurethane polymer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Polyurethane polymer. 721.8090 Section... Substances § 721.8090 Polyurethane polymer. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a polyurethane polymer (P-94-47) is...

  16. 40 CFR 721.8090 - Polyurethane polymer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Polyurethane polymer. 721.8090 Section... Substances § 721.8090 Polyurethane polymer. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a polyurethane polymer (P-94-47) is...

  17. 40 CFR 721.8090 - Polyurethane polymer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Polyurethane polymer. 721.8090 Section... Substances § 721.8090 Polyurethane polymer. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a polyurethane polymer (P-94-47) is...

  18. 40 CFR 721.8090 - Polyurethane polymer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Polyurethane polymer. 721.8090 Section... Substances § 721.8090 Polyurethane polymer. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a polyurethane polymer (P-94-47) is...

  19. High bacterial load in negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) foams used in the treatment of chronic wounds.

    PubMed

    Yusuf, Erlangga; Jordan, Xavier; Clauss, Martin; Borens, Olivier; Mäder, Mark; Trampuz, Andrej

    2013-01-01

    No earlier study has investigated the microbiology of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) foam using a standardized manner. The purpose of this study is to investigate the bacterial load and microbiological dynamics in NPWT foam removed from chronic wounds (>3 months). To determine the bacterial load, a standardized size of the removed NPWT foam was sonicated. The resulting sonication fluid was cultured, and the colony-forming units (CFU) of each species were enumerated. Sixty-eight foams from 17 patients (mean age 63 years, 71% males) were investigated. In 65 (97%) foams, ≥ 1 and in 37 (54%) ≥ 2 bacterial types were found. The bacterial load remained high during NPWT treatment, ranging from 10(4) to 10(6) CFU/ml. In three patients (27%), additional type of bacteria was found in subsequent foam cultures. The mean bacterial count ± standard deviation was higher in polyvinyl alcohol foam (6.1 ± 0.5 CFU/ml) than in polyurethane (5.5 ± 0.8 CFU/ml) (p = 0.02). The mean of log of sum of CFU/ml in foam from 125 mmHg (5.5 ± 0.8) was lower than in foam from 100 mmHg pressure (5.9 ± 0.5) (p = 0.01). Concluding, bacterial load remains high in NPWT foam, and routine changing does not reduce the load.

  20. Characterization of Deformation and Failure Modes of Ordinary and Auxetic Foams at Different Length Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Fu-Pen

    Sandwich panels with foam core have gained substantial importance in marine structures for the past several decades. However, designers of ships still lack the confidence in composites when compared to traditional structural materials such as aluminum or steel. As a result, composite structures tend to be overdesigned to provide added safety. While there have been numerous studies, most investigators treat the foam cores as made of homogeneous and isotropic materials. But at the length scale of the order of millimeter or smaller, foam is neither homogeneous nor isotropic. In this paper, we present some results of the characteristics of deformation and failure mechanism of polymer foam composites at different length scales. Central to this investigation is a multiscale digital speckle photography technique whereby we can measure detailed full deformation with spatial resolution ranging from centimeters to micrometers. We first investigate the size effect on the mechanical properties of polyurethane foams with and without nanoparticles, crack tip deformation field at different length scales, and the crack propagation characteristics in a foam. Then we present results for a newly created auxetic PVC foam composite. Auxetic materials have a negative Poisson's ratio rendering them to be more resistant to shear failure, indentation, and impact damages. We describe the manufacturing process of this material and demonstrate its advantageous properties as compared to the original foam.

  1. The compressive behaviour and constitutive equation of polyimide foam in wide strain rate and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimoto, Akifumi; Kobayashi, Hidetoshi; Horikawa, Keitaro; Tanigaki, Kenichi

    2015-09-01

    These days, polymer foams, such as polyurethane foam and polystyrene foam, are used in various situations as a thermal insulator or shock absorber. In general, however, their strength is insufficient in high temperature environments because of their low glass transition temperature. Polyimide is a polymer which has a higher glass transition temperature and high strength. Its mechanical properties do not vary greatly, even in low temperature environments. Therefore, polyimide foam is expected to be used in the aerospace industry. Thus, the constitutive equation of polyimide foam that can be applied across a wide range of strain rates and ambient temperature is very useful. In this study, a series of compression tests at various strain rates, from 10-3 to 103 s-1 were carried out in order to examine the effect of strain rate on the compressive properties of polyimide foam. The flow stress of polyimide foam increased rapidly at dynamic strain rates. The effect of ambient temperature on the properties of polyimide foam was also investigated at temperature from - 190 °C to 270°∘C. The flow stress decreased with increasing temperature.

  2. Initial development and testing of a novel foam-based pressure sensor for wearable sensing

    PubMed Central

    Dunne, Lucy E; Brady, Sarah; Smyth, Barry; Diamond, Dermot

    2005-01-01

    Background This paper provides an overview of initial research conducted in the development of pressure-sensitive foam and its application in wearable sensing. The foam sensor is composed of polypyrrole-coated polyurethane foam, which exhibits a piezo-resistive reaction when exposed to electrical current. The use of this polymer-coated foam is attractive for wearable sensing due to the sensor's retention of desirable mechanical properties similar to those exhibited by textile structures. Methods The development of the foam sensor is described, as well as the development of a prototype sensing garment with sensors in several areas on the torso to measure breathing, shoulder movement, neck movement, and scapula pressure. Sensor properties were characterized, and data from pilot tests was examined visually. Results The foam exhibits a positive linear conductance response to increased pressure. Torso tests show that it responds in a predictable and measurable manner to breathing, shoulder movement, neck movement, and scapula pressure. Conclusion The polypyrrole foam shows considerable promise as a sensor for medical, wearable, and ubiquitous computing applications. Further investigation of the foam's consistency of response, durability over time, and specificity of response is necessary. PMID:15740623

  3. Characterization of compressive and short beam shear strength of bamboo opened cell foam core sandwich composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setyawan, Paryanto Dwi; Sugiman, Saputra, Yudhi

    2016-03-01

    The paper presents the compressive and the short beam shear strength of a sandwich composite with opened cell foam made of bamboo fiber as the core and plywood as the skins. The core thickness was varied from 10 mm to 40 mm keeping the volume fraction of fiber constant. Several test s were carried out including the core density, flatwise compressive and the short beam shear testing in three point bending. The results show that the density of bamboo opened cell foam is comparable with commercial plastic foam, such as polyurethane foam. The compressive strength tends to increase linearly with increasing the core thickness. The short beam shear failure load of the sandwich composite increases with the increase of core thickness, however on the contrary, the short beam shear strength which tends to sharply decrease from the thickness of 10 mm to 30 mm and then becomes flat.

  4. Structure of Random Foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraynik, Andrew M.; Reinelt, Douglas A.; van Swol, Frank

    2004-11-01

    The Surface Evolver was used to compute the equilibrium microstructure of dry soap foams with random structure and a wide range of cell-size distributions. Topological and geometric properties of foams and individual cells were evaluated. The theory for isotropic Plateau polyhedra describes the dependence of cell geometric properties on their volume and number of faces. The surface area of all cells is about 10% greater than a sphere of equal volume; this leads to a simple but accurate theory for the surface free energy density of foam. A novel parameter based on the surface-volume mean bubble radius R32 is used to characterize foam polydispersity. The foam energy, total cell edge length, and average number of faces per cell all decrease with increasing polydispersity. Pentagonal faces are the most common in monodisperse foam but quadrilaterals take over in highly polydisperse structures.

  5. Orbital foamed material extruder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Dennis S. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    This invention is a process for producing foamed material in space comprising the steps of: rotating the material to simulate the force of gravity; heating the rotating material until it is molten; extruding the rotating, molten material; injecting gas into the extruded, rotating, molten material to produce molten foamed material; allowing the molten foamed material to cool to below melting temperature to produce the foamed material. The surface of the extruded foam may be heated to above melting temperature and allowed to cool to below melting temperature. The extruded foam may also be cut to predetermined length. The starting material may be metal or glass. Heating may be accomplished by electrical heating elements or by solar heating.

  6. Amorphous metallic foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroers, Jan; Veazey, Chris; Johnson, William L.

    2003-01-01

    The bulk glass forming alloy Pd43Ni10Cu27P20 is processed into a low-density amorphous metallic foam. Pd43Ni10Cu27P20 is mixed with hydrated B2O3, which releases gas at elevated temperature and/or low pressure. Very homogeneous foams are achieved due to the high viscosity of the alloy even at its liquidus temperature. By processing at the liquidus temperature and decreasing the pressure to 10-2 mbar, well-distributed bubbles expand to foam the material. Foam densities as low as 1.4×103 kg/m3 were obtained, corresponding to a bubble volume fraction of 84%. The bubble diameter ranges between 2×10-4 and 1×10-3 m. Thermal analysis by differential scanning calorimetry confirms the amorphous nature of the foam. Furthermore, it reveals that the foam's thermal stability is comparable to the bulk material.

  7. Structure of random foam.

    SciTech Connect

    Reinelt, Douglas A.; van Swol, Frank B.; Kraynik, Andrew Michael

    2004-06-01

    The Surface Evolver was used to compute the equilibrium microstructure of dry soap foams with random structure and a wide range of cell-size distributions. Topological and geometric properties of foams and individual cells were evaluated. The theory for isotropic Plateau polyhedra describes the dependence of cell geometric properties on their volume and number of faces. The surface area of all cells is about 10% greater than a sphere of equal volume; this leads to a simple but accurate theory for the surface free energy density of foam. A novel parameter based on the surface-volume mean bubble radius R32 is used to characterize foam polydispersity. The foam energy, total cell edge length, and average number of faces per cell all decrease with increasing polydispersity. Pentagonal faces are the most common in monodisperse foam but quadrilaterals take over in highly polydisperse structures.

  8. The heat resistance of a polyurethane coating filled with modified nano-CaCO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bin; Li, Song-Mei; Liu, Jian-Hua; Yu, Mei

    2014-10-01

    The modification of polyurethane coating by adding surface-modified CaCO3 nanoparticles (nano-CaCO3) was investigated in this paper. To improve interfacial interaction between the nano-CaCO3 and the polyurethane (PU) matrix, a silane coupling agent (KH560) was used to modify the nano-CaCO3. The grafting of KH560 on the nano-CaCO3 surfaces was characterized by the TEM, FTIR and TGA techniques. The modification of the nano-CaCO3 surfaces with KH560 was demonstrated to improve the dispersity of nano-CaCO3. FTIR, SEM and AFM were used to characterize the polyurethane coating. The FTIR spectrum indicated that the modification of nano-CaCO3 does not influence the chemical structure of the PU matrix. The roughness and gloss of the nanocomposite coatings containing various amount of nano-CaCO3 were evaluated using a roughness tester and a brightness meter. The heat resistance of the polyurethane coating containing various amounts of nano-CaCO3 was evaluated using the TGA technique. The results revealed that nano-CaCO3 treatment with KH560 improves the nanoparticle dispersion and heat-resistance of polyurethane coating.

  9. New DEA materials by organic modification of silicone and polyurethane networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kussmaul, Björn; Risse, Sebastian; Wegener, Michael; Bluemke, Martin; Krause, Jens; Wagner, Joachim; Feller, Torsten; Clauberg, Karin; Hitzbleck, Julia; Gerhard, Reimund; Krueger, Hartmut

    2013-04-01

    Dielectric elastomer actuators (DEAs) can be optimized by modifying the dielectric or mechanical properties of the electroactive polymer. In this work both properties were improved simultaneously by a simple process, the one-step film formation for polyurethane and silicone films. The silicone network contains polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) chains, as well as cross-linker and grafted molecular dipoles in varying amounts. The process leads to films, which are homogenous down to the molecular level and show higher permittivities as well as reduced stiffnesses. The dipole modification of a new silicone leads to 40 times higher sensitivities, compared to the unmodified films. This new material reaches the sensitivity of the widely used acrylate elatomer VHB4905. A similar silicone modification was obtained by using smart fillers consisting of organic dipoles and additional groups realizing a high compatibility to the silicon network. Polyurethanes are alternative elastomers for DEAs which are compared with the silicones in important properties. Polyurethanes have an intrinsically high dielectric constant (above 7), which is based on the polar nature of the polyurethane fragments. Polyurethanes can be made in roll-to-roll process giving constant mechanical and electrical properties on a high level.

  10. A novel microporous polyurethane blood conduit: biocompatibility assessment of the UTA arterial prosthesis by an organo-typic culture technique.

    PubMed

    Sigot-Luizard, M F; Sigot, M; Guidoin, R; King, M; von Maltzahn, W W; Kowligi, R; Eberhart, R C

    1993-01-01

    An organotypic culture assay has been used to assess the biocompatibility and cytotoxicity of an arterial prosthesis developed at the University of Texas-Arlington (the UTA graft) from a structurally modified polyurethane (PU) elastomer (Tecoflex). The cell culture test was applied to the UTA graft after sterilization by ethylene oxide and by gamma radiation in two separate series. First, small specimens of the prosthesis were incubated for 7 days on a semisolid nutrient medium with their luminal surface in direct contact with endothelium explanted from the aorta of chick embryos. Second, the possibility of cytotoxic contaminants being leached from the polyurethane was assessed by immersing the biomaterial in the liquid culture medium for 5 days at 37 degrees C prior to conducting the organo-typic culture assay on a standard control surface. The structure of the UTA polyurethane prosthesis is porous, but the graft wall is impervious because it contains closed (i.e., noncommunicating) pores. In addition, four other vascular prostheses were included in the study for comparison. They were the Hydrophilic Mitrathane PU graft with a similar impervious, closed pore structure, an experimental Hydrophobic Mitrathane PU graft with a fibrous, open pore structure, and the commercial Impra and Reinforced Goretex expanded PTFE grafts. Following 7 days of cell culture, the biocompatibility and cytotoxicity of the various biomaterials were measured in terms of the area of migrating cells, the density of cells surrounding the explants, and the level of cell adhesion. Comparison of the results against control cultures demonstrated that the UTA graft, along with the other four prostheses, does not release cytotoxic extractables. Microscopic observations of its cultured surface indicated that the UTA graft promotes a high density of cell growth over a limited area, similar to the Hydrophilic Mitrathane graft. This level of biocompatibility is considered inferior to that of the two

  11. Fire-retardant foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gagliani, J.

    1978-01-01

    Family of polyimide resins are being developed as foams with exceptional fire-retardant properties. Foams are potentially useful for seat cushions in aircraft and ground vehicles and for applications such as home furnishings and building-construction materials. Basic formulations can be modified with reinforcing fibers or fillers to produce celular materials for variety of applications. By selecting reactants, polymer structure can be modified to give foams with properties ranging from high resiliency and flexibility to brittleness and rigidity.

  12. High performance polymeric foams

    SciTech Connect

    Gargiulo, M.; Sorrentino, L.; Iannace, S.

    2008-08-28

    The aim of this work was to investigate the foamability of high-performance polymers (polyethersulfone, polyphenylsulfone, polyetherimide and polyethylenenaphtalate). Two different methods have been used to prepare the foam samples: high temperature expansion and two-stage batch process. The effects of processing parameters (saturation time and pressure, foaming temperature) on the densities and microcellular structures of these foams were analyzed by using scanning electron microscopy.

  13. Flame retardant polymeric foams: Manufacturing, applications, and hazards. July 1984-August 1989 (Citations from the Rubber and Plastics Research Association data base). Report for July 1984-August 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-09-01

    This bibliography contains citations concerning flame-retardant compositions and additives used in the manufacture of polymeric foams. Latex, polyurethane, polyether, silicone rubber, phenol formaldehyde, polyisocyanurate, polystyrene, PVC and polyphenylene ether are among the foam polymers discussed relative to tests performed to evaluate the toxicity of flame retardants in smoke and during manufacturing. Applications including public transportation, furniture, automotive, medical, and building materials are discussed. (This updated bibliography contains 303 citations, 61 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

  14. Polyols and polyurethanes from the liquefaction of lignocellulosic biomass.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shengjun; Luo, Xiaolan; Li, Yebo

    2014-01-01

    Polyurethanes (PUs), produced from the condensation polymerizations between polyols and isocyanates, are one of the most versatile polymer families. Currently, both polyols and isocyanates are largely petroleum derived. Recently, there have been extensive research interests in developing bio-based polyols and PUs from renewable resources. As the world's most abundant renewable biomass, lignocellulosic biomass is rich in hydroxyl groups and has potential as a feedstock to produce bio-based polyols and PUs. Lignocellulosic biomass can be converted to liquid polyols for PU applications through acid- or base-catalyzed atmospheric liquefaction processes using polyhydric alcohols as liquefaction solvents. Biomass liquefaction-derived polyols can be used to prepare various PU products, such as foams, films and adhesives. The properties of biomass liquefaction-derived polyols and PUs depend on various factors, such as feedstock characteristics, liquefaction conditions, and PU formulations.

  15. Skin graft

    MedlinePlus

    ... that need skin grafts to heal Venous ulcers, pressure ulcers , or diabetic ulcers that do not heal Very ... chap 17. Read More Burns Patient Instructions Preventing pressure ulcers Surgical wound care - open Review Date 3/13/ ...

  16. Morphologies, Processing and Properties of Ceramic Foams and Their Potential as TPS Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stackpoole, Mairead; Simoes, Conan R.; Johnson, Sylvia M.

    2002-01-01

    The current research is focused on processing ceramic foams with compositions that have potential as a thermal protection material. The use of pre-ceramic polymers with the addition of sacrificial blowing agents or sacrificial fillers offers a viable approach to form either open or closed cell insulation. Our work demonstrates that this is a feasible method to form refractory ceramic foams at relatively low processing temperatures. It is possible to foam complex shapes then pyrolize the system to form a ceramic while retaining the shape of the unfired foam. Initial work focused on identifying suitable pre-ceramic polymers with desired properties such as ceramic yield and chemical make up of the pyrolysis product after firing. We focused on making foams in the Si system (Sic, Si02, Si-0-C), which is in use in current acreage TPS systems. Ceramic foams with different architectures were formed from the pyrolysis of pre-ceramic polymers at 1200 C in different atmospheres. In some systems a sacrificial polyurethane was used as the blowing agent. We have also processed foams using sacrificial fillers to introduce controlled cell sizes. Each sacrificial filler or blowing agent leads to a unique morphology. The effect of different fillers on foam morphologies and the characterization of these foams in terms of mechanical and thermal properties are presented. We have conducted preliminary arc jet testing on selected foams with the materials being exposed to typical re-entry conditions for acreage TPS and these results will be discussed. Foams processed using these approaches have bulk densities ranging from 0.15 to 0.9 g/cm3 and cell sizes ranging from 5 to 500 pm. Compression strengths ranged from 2 to 7 MPa for these systems. Finally, preliminary oxidation studies have been conducted on selected systems and will be discussed.

  17. A study of some physical characteristics of liquid foams including resistance to bodies of revolution from subsonic to high supersonic Mach numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Krasinski, S. J.; Fan, Y.

    Drag measurements were conducted in a dry liquid foam from subsonic to high supersonic Mach numbers. A shooting range was set up and spherical bullets were used crossing a foam column. Because of a very low velocitty of sound in liquid foams, high Mach numbers could be reached with very low projectile velocities. The results in the range from subsonic to high supersonic speeds justified the method giving numerical values identical to those in the air. Sound wave attenuation in a viscoelastic fluid is discussed and compared to expressions in Newtonian fluids. For a liquid foam which is viscoelastic, an equation is derived giving the attenuation constant as function of the surface tension, velocity of the fluid, diameter of the bubbles, frequency of the oscillations and the velocity of sound in the liquid foam. The experimental results confirm this approach and give attenuation constants considerably higher than for a polyurethane dry foam.

  18. Novel Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-g-vinyl alcohol) Polyurethane Scaffold for Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, Adriana Pétriz; Martínez Torres, Ataúlfo; Carreón Castro, Ma. del Pilar; Rodríguez Talavera, José Rogelio; Muñoz, Susana Vargas; Aguilar, Víctor Manuel Velázquez; Torres, Maykel González

    2016-01-01

    The design of new synthetic grafted poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) as composite 3D-scaffolds is a convenient alternative for tissue engineering applications. The chemically modified poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) is receiving increasing attention for use as biomimetic copolymers for cell growth. As of yet, these copolymers cannot be used efficiently because of the lack of good mechanical properties. Here, we address this challenge, preparing a composite-scaffold of grafted poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) polyurethane for the first time. However, it is unclear if the composite structure and morphology can also offer a biological application. We obtained the polyurethane by mixing a polyester hydroxylated resin with polyisocyanate and the modified polyhydroxyalkanoates. The results show that the poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) grafted with poly(vinyl alcohol) can be successfully used as a chain extender to form a chemically-crosslinked thermosetting polymer. Furthermore, we show a proposal for the mechanism of the polyurethane synthesis, the analysis of its morphology and the ability of the scaffolds for growing mammalian cells. We demonstrated that astrocytes isolated from mouse cerebellum, and HEK293 can be cultured in the prepared material, and express efficiently fluorescent proteins by adenoviral transduction. We also tested the metabolism of Ca2+ to obtain evidence of the biological activity. PMID:27502732

  19. Novel Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-g-vinyl alcohol) Polyurethane Scaffold for Tissue Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes, Adriana Pétriz; Martínez Torres, Ataúlfo; Carreón Castro, Ma. Del Pilar; Rodríguez Talavera, José Rogelio; Muñoz, Susana Vargas; Aguilar, Víctor Manuel Velázquez; Torres, Maykel González

    2016-08-01

    The design of new synthetic grafted poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) as composite 3D-scaffolds is a convenient alternative for tissue engineering applications. The chemically modified poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) is receiving increasing attention for use as biomimetic copolymers for cell growth. As of yet, these copolymers cannot be used efficiently because of the lack of good mechanical properties. Here, we address this challenge, preparing a composite-scaffold of grafted poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) polyurethane for the first time. However, it is unclear if the composite structure and morphology can also offer a biological application. We obtained the polyurethane by mixing a polyester hydroxylated resin with polyisocyanate and the modified polyhydroxyalkanoates. The results show that the poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) grafted with poly(vinyl alcohol) can be successfully used as a chain extender to form a chemically-crosslinked thermosetting polymer. Furthermore, we show a proposal for the mechanism of the polyurethane synthesis, the analysis of its morphology and the ability of the scaffolds for growing mammalian cells. We demonstrated that astrocytes isolated from mouse cerebellum, and HEK293 can be cultured in the prepared material, and express efficiently fluorescent proteins by adenoviral transduction. We also tested the metabolism of Ca2+ to obtain evidence of the biological activity.

  20. Preparation and characterization of high-specific-surface-area activated carbons from K2CO3-treated waste polyurethane.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, J; Yamamoto, N; Horikawa, T; Muroyama, K; Gomes, V G

    2005-01-15

    An activated carbon with high specific surface area was prepared from polyurethane foam by chemical activation with K2CO3 and the influences of carbonization temperature and impregnation ratio on the pore structure of the prepared activated carbon were investigated. It was found that the specific surface area of the activated carbon was at a maximum value (about 2800 m(2)/g) at a carbonization temperature of 1073 K and at an impregnation ratio of 1.0. It was concluded that the polyurethane foam structure was modified during impregnation by K2CO3, K2CO3 promoted charring during carbonization, and then the weight loss behavior was changed below 700 and above 1000 K, carbon in the char was consumed by K2CO3 reduction, and this led to the high specific surface area. The prepared activated carbon had a very sharp micropore size distribution, compared with the commercial activated carbon having high specific surface area. The amounts of three organic vapors (benzene, acetone, and octane) adsorbed on the prepared activated carbons was much larger than those on the traditional coconut shell AC and the same as those on the commercial activated carbon except for octane. We surmised that the high specific surface area was due to the modification of the carbonization behavior of polyurethane foam by K2CO3.

  1. High Temperature Structural Foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiser, Erik S.; Baillif, Faye F.; Grimsley, Brian W.; Marchello, Joseph M.

    1997-01-01

    The Aerospace Industry is experiencing growing demand for high performance polymer foam. The X-33 program needs structural foam insulation capable of retaining its strength over a wide range of environmental conditions. The High Speed Research Program has a need for low density core splice and potting materials. This paper reviews the state of the art in foam materials and describes experimental work to fabricate low density, high shear strength foam which can withstand temperatures from -220 C to 220 C. Commercially available polymer foams exhibit a wide range of physical properties. Some with densities as low as 0.066 g/cc are capable of co-curing at temperatures as high as 182 C. Rohacell foams can be resin transfer molded at temperatures up to 180 C. They have moduli of elasticity of 0.19 MPa, tensile strengths of 3.7 Mpa and compressive strengths of 3.6 MPa. The Rohacell foams cannot withstand liquid hydrogen temperatures, however Imi-Tech markets Solimide (trademark) foams which withstand temperatures from -250 C to 200 C, but they do not have the required structural integrity. The research activity at NASA Langley Research Center focuses on using chemical blowing agents to produce polyimide thermoplastic foams capable of meeting the above performance requirements. The combination of blowing agents that decompose at the minimum melt viscosity temperature together with plasticizers to lower the viscosity has been used to produce foams by both extrusion and oven heating. The foams produced exhibit good environmental stability while maintaining structural properties.

  2. Gravitational Effects on Closed-Cellular-Foam Microstructure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noever, David A.; Cronise, Raymond J.; Wessling, Francis C.; McMannus, Samuel P.; Mathews, John; Patel, Darayas

    1996-01-01

    Polyurethane foam has been produced in low gravity for the first time. The cause and distribution of different void or pore sizes are elucidated from direct comparison of unit-gravity and low-gravity samples. Low gravity is found to increase the pore roundness by 17% and reduce the void size by 50%. The standard deviation for pores becomes narrower (a more homogeneous foam is produced) in low gravity. Both a Gaussian and a Weibull model fail to describe the statistical distribution of void areas, and hence the governing dynamics do not combine small voids in either a uniform or a dependent fashion to make larger voids. Instead, the void areas follow an exponential law, which effectively randomizes the production of void sizes in a nondependent fashion consistent more with single nucleation than with multiple or combining events.

  3. High compliance vascular grafts based on semi-interpenetrating networks

    PubMed Central

    Dempsey, David K.; Nezarati, Roya M.; Mackey, Calvin E.

    2014-01-01

    Current synthetic vascular grafts have poor patency rates in small diameter applications (<6 mm) due to intimal hyperplasia arising from a compliance mismatch between the graft and native vasculature. Enormous efforts have focused on improving biomechanical properties; however, polymeric grafts are often constrained by an inverse relationship between burst pressure and compliance. We have developed a new, semi-interpenetrating network (semi-IPN) approach to improve compliance without sacrificing burst pressure. The effects of heat treatment on graft morphology, fiber architecture, and resultant biomechanical properties are presented. In addition, biomechanical properties after equilibration at physiological temperature were investigated in relation to polyurethane microstructure to better predict in vivo performance. Compliance values as high as 9.2 ± 2.7 %/mmHg x 10−4 were observed for the semi-IPN graft while also maintaining high burst pressure, 1780 ± 230 mm Hg. The high compliance of these heat-treated poly(carbonate urethane) (PCU) and semi-IPN grafts is expected to improve long-term patency rates beyond even saphenous vein autografts by preventing intimal hyperplasia. The fundamental structure-property relationships gained from this work may also be utilized to advance biomedical device designs based on thermoplastic polyurethanes. PMID:25601822

  4. Chronicles of foam films.

    PubMed

    Gochev, G; Platikanov, D; Miller, R

    2016-07-01

    The history of the scientific research on foam films, traditionally known as soap films, dates back to as early as the late 17th century when Boyle and Hooke paid special attention to the colours of soap bubbles. Their inspiration was transferred to Newton, who began systematic study of the science of foam films. Over the next centuries, a number of scientists dealt with the open questions of the drainage, stability and thickness of foam films. The significant contributions of Plateau and Gibbs in the middle/late 19th century are particularly recognized. After the "colours" method of Newton, Reinold and Rücker as well as Johhonnot developed optical methods for measuring the thickness of the thinner "non-colour" films (first order black) that are still in use today. At the beginning of the 20th century, various aspects of the foam film science were elucidated by the works of Dewar and Perrin and later by Mysels. Undoubtedly, the introduction of the disjoining pressure by Derjaguin and the manifestation of the DLVO theory in describing the film stability are considered as milestones in the theoretical development of foam films. The study of foam films gained momentum with the introduction of the microscopic foam film methodology by Scheludko and Exerowa, which is widely used today. This historical perspective serves as a guide through the chronological development of knowledge on foam films achieved over several centuries.

  5. Preparation of highly fluorinated polyurethanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rochow, S. E.; Stump, E. C., Jr.

    1971-01-01

    New polyurethanes, formed from a reaction of a prepolymer diol and a perfluorinated diisocyanate, are nonflammable and possess high corrosion resistance and good low temperature flexibility. Polymer hardness increases rapidly with increasing ratio of diisocaynate to diol, but its glass transition temperature is not adversely affected.

  6. Deployment, Foam Rigidization, and Structural Characterization of Inflatable Thin-Film Booms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schnell, Andrew R.; Leigh, Larry M., Jr.; Tinker, Michael L.; McConnaughey, Paul R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Detailed investigation of the construction, packaging/deployment, foam rigidization, and structural characterization of polyimide film inflatable booms is described. These structures have considerable potential for use in space with solar concentrators, solar sails, space power systems including solar arrays, and other future missions. Numerous thin-film booms or struts were successfully constructed, inflated, injected with foam, and rigidized. Both solid-section and annular test articles were fabricated, using Kapton polyimide film, various adhesives, Styrofoam end plugs, and polyurethane pressurized foam. Numerous inflation/deployment experiments were conducted and compared to computer simulations using the MSC/DYTRAN code. Finite element models were developed for several foam-rigidized struts and compared to model test results. Several problems encountered in the construction, deployment, and foam injection/rigidization process are described. Areas of difficulty included inadequate adhesive strength, cracking of the film arid leakage, excessive bending of the structure during deployment, problems with foam distribution and curing properties, and control of foam leakage following injection into the structure. Many of these problems were overcome in the course of the research.

  7. Quasi-static characterisation and impact testing of auxetic foam for sports safety applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, Olly; Foster, Leon; Senior, Terry; Alderson, Andrew; Allen, Tom

    2016-05-01

    This study compared low strain rate material properties and impact force attenuation of auxetic foam and the conventional open-cell polyurethane counterpart. This furthers our knowledge with regards to how best to apply these highly conformable and breathable auxetic foams to protective sports equipment. Cubes of auxetic foam measuring 150 × 150 × 150 mm were fabricated using a thermo-mechanical conversion process. Quasi-static compression confirmed the converted foam to be auxetic, prior to being sliced into 20 mm thick cuboid samples for further testing. Density, Poisson’s ratio and the stress-strain curve were all found to be dependent on the position of each cuboid from within the cube. Impact tests with a hemispherical drop hammer were performed for energies up to 6 J, on foams covered with a polypropylene sheet between 1 and 2 mm thick. Auxetic samples reduced peak force by ˜10 times in comparison to the conventional foam. This work has shown further potential for auxetic foam to be applied to protective equipment, while identifying that improved fabrication methods are required.

  8. Ultrafast Synthesis of Multifunctional N-Doped Graphene Foam in an Ethanol Flame.

    PubMed

    Du, Xusheng; Liu, Hong-Yuan; Mai, Yiu-Wing

    2016-01-26

    A hard template method to prepare N-doped graphene foams (NGF) with superfast template removal was developed through a pyrolyzing commercial polyurethane (PU) sponge coated with graphene oxide (GO) sheets in an ethanol flame. The removal of the template was fast and facile, and could be completed in less than 60 s in an open environment. The synthesized graphene foams consisted of a unique structure of 3D interconnected hollow struts with highly wrinkled surfaces, and the morphology of the hollow struts could be tuned by controlling the GO dispersion concentration. The foams showed high hydrophobicity and were used as absorbents for a variety of organic solvents and oils. The unique NGF structure afforded a high absorption rate and capacity, and a remarkable 98.7% pore volume of the foam could be utilized for absorption of hexane, exhibiting one of the highest capacity values among existing absorptive counterparts. The N-doping brought higher capacitive performance than conventional graphene foams prepared by chemical vapor deposition on nickel foam templates. The NGFs also displayed high elasticity and could recover completely after 50% compressive strain. Owing to easy availability and reduction environment of the flame, complete thermal decomposition of the PU sponge and highly porous open-cell structure, and flame resistance of the graphene foam, the present flame method was demonstrated to be a simple, effective, and ultrafast approach to fabricate ultra-low-density NGFs with good electromechanical response, excellent organic liquid absorption, and high-energy dissipation capabilities.

  9. Synthesis of Transesterified Palm Olein-Based Polyol and Rigid Polyurethanes from this Polyol.

    PubMed

    Arniza, Mohd Zan; Hoong, Seng Soi; Idris, Zainab; Yeong, Shoot Kian; Hassan, Hazimah Abu; Din, Ahmad Kushairi; Choo, Yuen May

    Transesterification of palm olein with glycerol can increase the functionality by introducing additional hydroxyl groups to the triglyceride structure, an advantage compared to using palm olein directly as feedstock for producing palm-based polyol. The objective of this study was to synthesize transesterified palm olein-based polyol via a three-step reaction: (1) transesterification of palm olein, (2) epoxidation and (3) epoxide ring opening. Transesterification of palm olein yielded approximately 78 % monoglyceride and has an hydroxyl value of approximately 164 mg KOH g(-1). The effect of formic acid and hydrogen peroxide concentrations on the epoxidation reaction was studied. The relationships between epoxide ring-opening reaction time and residual oxirane oxygen content and hydroxyl value were monitored. The synthesized transesterified palm olein-based polyol has hydroxyl value between 300 and 330 mg KOH g(-1) and average molecular weight between 1,000 and 1,100 Da. On the basis of the hydroxyl value and average molecular weight of the polyol, the transesterified palm olein-based polyol is suitable for producing rigid polyurethane foam, which can be designed to exhibit desirable properties. Rigid polyurethane foams were synthesized by substituting a portion of petroleum-based polyol with the transesterified palm olein-based polyol. It was observed that by increasing the amount of transesterified palm olein-based polyol, the core density and compressive strength were reduced but at the same time the insulation properties of the rigid polyurethane foam were improved.

  10. Development of Natural Flaw Samples for Evaluating Nondestructive Testing Methods for Foam Thermal Protection Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.; Davis, Jason; Farrington, Seth; Walker, James

    2007-01-01

    Low density polyurethane foam has been an important insulation material for space launch vehicles for several decades. The potential for damage from foam breaking away from the NASA External Tank was not realized until the foam impacts on the Columbia Orbiter vehicle caused damage to its Leading Edge thermal protection systems (TPS). Development of improved inspection techniques on the foam TPS is necessary to prevent similar occurrences in the future. Foamed panels with drilled holes for volumetric flaws and Teflon inserts to simulate debonded conditions have been used to evaluate and calibrate nondestructive testing (NDT) methods. Unfortunately the symmetric edges and dissimilar materials used in the preparation of these simulated flaws provide an artificially large signal while very little signal is generated from the actual defects themselves. In other words, the same signal are not generated from the artificial defects in the foam test panels as produced when inspecting natural defect in the ET foam TPS. A project to create more realistic voids similar to what actually occurs during manufacturing operations was began in order to improve detection of critical voids during inspections. This presentation describes approaches taken to create more natural voids in foam TPS in order to provide a more realistic evaluation of what the NDT methods can detect. These flaw creation techniques were developed with both sprayed foam and poured foam used for insulation on the External Tank. Test panels with simulated defects have been used to evaluate NDT methods for the inspection of the External Tank. A comparison of images between natural flaws and machined flaws generated from backscatter x-ray radiography, x-ray laminography, terahertz imaging and millimeter wave imaging show significant differences in identifying defect regions.

  11. The effects of composition and sintering temperature on the silica foam fabricated by slurry method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baharom, Syazwani; Ahmad, Sufizar; Taib, Hariati; Muda, Rizamarhaiza

    2016-07-01

    Reticulated ceramic or open pore ceramic foam is a well-known material which exhibits extremely high porosities, with a significant degree of interconnectivity that makes them desirable in a wide range of applications. There were broad types of ceramic foam fabrication method such as polymeric sponge method, direct foaming, and starch consolidation. In this study, the slurry method has been chosen to fabricate Silica (SiO2) foam. In this process, Polyurethane (PU) foam template was dipped into ceramic slurry and followed by drying and sintering to obtain foam which contains porosity in the range of 50% to 70%. The compositions of SiO2 were varied starting from 55 wt.%, 60 wt.%, 65 wt.% and 70 wt.%. The samples of SiO2 that have been dipped and dried were sintered at 900°C, 1000°C, 1100°C, and 1250°C. The sintered SiO2 ceramic foam samples were characterized to observe their morphology, and physical properties. Thus, the microstructure of the SiO2 ceramic foams samples was examined by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), and Electron Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS). Meanwhile, the physical properties of the SiO2 ceramic foam samples such as the total porosity (%) and bulk density were determined using Archimedes method. It was found that the density of ceramic foam produced was in the range of 0.25 g/cm3 up to 0.75 g/cm3, whereas the level of porosity percentage was in the range of 61.81% to 82.18% with the size of open pore or window cells were in between 141 µm up to 626 µm.

  12. Foam For Filtering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Like nature's honeycomb, foam is a structure of many-sided cells, apparently solid but actually only three percent material and 97 percent air. Foam is made by a heat-producing chemical reaction which expands a plastic material in a manner somewhat akin to the heat-induced rising of a loaf of bread. The resulting structure of interconnected cells is flexible yet strong and extremely versatile in applicati6n. Foam can, for example, be a sound absorber in one form, while in another it allows sound to pass through it. It can be a very soft powder puff material and at the same time a highly abrasive scrubber. A sampling of foam uses includes stereo speaker grilles, applying postage meter ink, filtering lawnmower carburetor air; deadening noise in trucks and tractors, applying cosmetics, releasing fabric softener and antistatic agents in home clothes dryers, painting, filtering factory heating and ventilating systems, shining shoes, polishing cars, sponge-mopping floors, acting as pre-operative surgical scrubbers-the list is virtually limitless. The process by which foam is made produces "windows," thin plastic membranes connecting the cell walls. Windowed foam is used in many applications but for certain others-filtering, for example-it is desirable to have a completely open network. Scott Paper Company's Foam Division, Chester, Pennsylvania, improved a patented method of "removing the windows," to create an open structure that affords special utility in filtering applications. NASA technology contributed to Scott's improvement.

  13. Structures and Properties of Polyurethanes. Part II,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-03-23

    small. Relaxatio" processes in polyurethane elastomers on three following LKeasons must differ from the same in other elastomeric systems the idLge... elastomeric polyurethane fibers is given also in work [22b]. The authors will examine the structure of the linear polyurethane elastomers , formed from rigid...properties of polyuretuane elastomers to a considerable degree depend on structure and aoiecular weight of basic component - polyether/polyester. Stuaied tne

  14. Low density microcellular foams

    DOEpatents

    Aubert, J.H.; Clough, R.L.; Curro, J.G.; Quintana, C.A.; Russick, E.M.; Shaw, M.T.

    1985-10-02

    Low density, microporous polymer foams are provided by a process which comprises forming a solution of polymer and a suitable solvent followed by rapid cooling of the solution to form a phase-separated system and freeze the phase-separated system. The phase-separated system comprises a polymer phase and a solvent phase, each of which is substantially continuous within the other. The morphology of the polymer phase prior to and subsequent to freezing determine the morphology of the resultant foam. Both isotropic and anisotropic foams can be produced. If isotropic foams are produced, the polymer and solvent are tailored such that the solution spontaneously phase-separates prior to the point at which any component freezes. The morphology of the resultant polymer phase determines the morphology of the reusltant foam and the morphology of the polymer phase is retained by cooling the system at a rate sufficient to freeze one or both components of the system before a change in morphology can occur. Anisotropic foams are produced by forming a solution of polymer and solvent that will not phase separate prior to freezing of one or both components of the solution. In such a process, the solvent typically freezes before phase separation occurs. The morphology of the resultant frozen two-phase system determines the morphology of the resultant foam. The process involves subjecting the solution to essentially one-dimensional cooling. Foams having a density of less than 0.1 g/cc and a uniform cell size of less than 10 ..mu..m and a volume such that the foams have a length greater than 1 cm are provided.

  15. Low density microcellular foams

    DOEpatents

    Aubert, James H.; Clough, Roger L.; Curro, John G.; Quintana, Carlos A.; Russick, Edward M.; Shaw, Montgomery T.

    1987-01-01

    Low density, microporous polymer foams are provided by a process which comprises forming a solution of polymer and a suitable solvent followed by rapid cooling of the solution to form a phase-separated system and freeze the phase-separated system. The phase-separated system comprises a polymer phase and a solvent phase, each of which is substantially continuous within the other. The morphology of the polymer phase prior to and subsequent to freezing determine the morphology of the resultant foam. Both isotropic and anisotropic foams can be produced. If isotropic foams are produced, the polymer and solvent are tailored such that the solution spontaneously phase-separates prior to the point at which any component freezes. The morphology of the resultant polymer phase determines the morphology of the resultant foam and the morphology of the polymer phase is retained by cooling the system at a rate sufficient to freeze one or both components of the system before a change in morphology can occur. Anisotropic foams are produced by forming a solution of polymer and solvent that will not phase separate prior to freezing of one or both components of the solution. In such a process, the solvent typically freezes before phase separation occurs. The morphology of the resultant frozen two-phase system determines the morphology of the resultant foam. The process involves subjecting the solution to essentially one-dimensional cooling. Means for subjecting such a solvent to one-dimensional cooling are also provided. Foams having a density of less than 0.1 g/cc and a uniform cell size of less than 10 .mu.m and a volume such that the foams have a length greater than 1 cm are provided.

  16. The foaming of lavas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okeefe, J. A.; Walton, W.

    1976-01-01

    Foaming is of great practical and theoretical significance for volcanic processes on the earth, the moon, and perhaps the meteorite parent bodies. The theory of foams agrees with steelmaking experience to indicate that their presence depends on the existence of solutes in the lavas which reduce the surface tension, and are not saturated. These solutes concentrate at the surface, and are called surfactants. The surfactant responsible for the formation of volcanic ash was not identified; it appears to be related to the oxygen partial pressure above the lava. This fact may explain why lunar and meteoritic melts are not observed to foam. Experimental studies are needed to clarify the process.

  17. Foam encapsulated targets

    DOEpatents

    Nuckolls, John H.; Thiessen, Albert R.; Dahlbacka, Glen H.

    1983-01-01

    Foam encapsulated laser-fusion targets wherein a quantity of thermonuclear fuel is embedded in low density, microcellular foam which serves as an electron conduction channel for symmetrical implosion of the fuel by illumination of the target by one or more laser beams. The fuel, such as DT, is contained within a hollow shell constructed of glass, for example, with the foam having a cell size of preferably no greater than 2 .mu.m, a density of 0.065 to 0.6.times.10.sup.3 kg/m.sup.3, and external diameter of less than 200 .mu.m.

  18. Synthesis and wound healing of alternating block polyurethanes based on poly(lactic acid) (PLA) and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG).

    PubMed

    Li, Linjing; Liu, Xiangyu; Niu, Yuqing; Ye, Jianfu; Huang, Shuiwen; Liu, Chao; Xu, Kaitian

    2016-04-05

    Alternating block polyurethanes (abbreviated as PULA-alt-PEG) and random block polyurethanes (abbreviated as PULA-ran-PEG) based on biodegradable poly(lactic acid) (PLA) and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) were prepared. Results showed that alternating block polyurethane gives higher crystal degree, higher mechanical properties, more patterned and rougher surface than the random counterpart, due to the regular and controlled structure. Water absorptions of the polyurethanes were in the range of 620 to 780%. Cytocompatibility of the amphiphilic block polyurethanes (PU) (water static angle 41.4°-61.8°) was assessed by CCK-8 assay using human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells. Wound healing evaluation of the PU foam scaffolds was carried out by full-thickness SD rat model experiment, with medical gauze as control. It was found that the skin of rat in PU groups was fully covered with new epithelium without any significant adverse reactions and PU dressings give much rapid and better healing than medical gauze. Histological examination revealed that PU dressings suppress the infiltration of inflammatory cells and accelerate fibroblast proliferation. It was also demonstrated that PULA-alt-PEG exhibits obvious better healing effect than PULA-ran-PEG does. This study has demonstrated that without further modification, plain alternating block polyurethane scaffold would help wound recovery efficiently. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2016.

  19. Polyurethanes from fluoroalkyl propyleneglycol polyethers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trischler, F. D. (Inventor)

    1969-01-01

    A description is given of highly stable polyurethane polymers prepared by reacting a polyether with a diisocyanate. Compounded stocks of these polymers may be shaped and cured in conventional equipment used in the rubber industry. The solutions are dispersed gels prepared from the polymers and may be used for forming supported or unsupported films for coating fabrics or solid surfaces, and for forming adhesive bonds between a wide variety of plastics, elastomers, fabrics, metals, wood, leather, ceramics and the like.

  20. Improved Polyurethane Storage Tank Performance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-15

    temperature using a color change temperature indicator tape and using an Infrared (IR) pyrometer . Based on the flow of compound during welding, it is...AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Seaman Corporation,1000 Venture...congressionally mandated research project was undertaken to study polyurethane coated fabric systems and fabrication processes that are or may be used, in

  1. Mechanical Foam Remover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Streech, Neil

    1994-01-01

    Filter removes foam from soapy water stream discharged by primary phase separator of water-reclamation system. Uses no antifoam chemicals, contains no moving parts and requires no energy input other than small energy needed to pump water through filter.

  2. Aging of clean foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weon, Byung Mook; Stewart, Peter S.

    2014-11-01

    Aging is an inevitable process in living systems. Here we show how clean foams age with time through sequential coalescence events: in particular, foam aging resembles biological aging. We measure population dynamics of bubbles in clean foams through numerical simulations with a bubble network model. We demonstrate that death rates of individual bubbles increase exponentially with time, independent on initial conditions, which is consistent with the Gompertz mortality law as usually found in biological aging. This consistency suggests that clean foams as far-from-equilibrium dissipative systems are useful to explore biological aging. This work (NRF-2013R1A22A04008115) was supported by Mid-career Researcher Program through NRF grant funded by the MEST.

  3. Responsive foams for nanoparticle delivery.

    PubMed

    Tang, Christina; Xiao, Edward; Sinko, Patrick J; Szekely, Zoltan; Prud'homme, Robert K

    2015-09-01

    We have developed responsive foam systems for nanoparticle delivery. The foams are easy to make, stable at room temperature, and can be engineered to break in response to temperature or moisture. Temperature-responsive foams are based on the phase transition of long chain alcohols and could be produced using medical grade nitrous oxide as a propellant. These temperature-sensitive foams could be used for polyacrylic acid (PAA)-based nanoparticle delivery. We also discuss moisture-responsive foams made with soap pump dispensers. Polyethylene glycol (PEG)-based nanoparticles or PMMA latex nanoparticles were loaded into Tween 20 foams and the particle size was not affected by the foam formulation or foam break. Using biocompatible detergents, we anticipate this will be a versatile and simple approach to producing foams for nanoparticle delivery with many potential pharmaceutical and personal care applications.

  4. Ocean foam generation and modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, R. A.; Bechis, K. P.

    1976-01-01

    A laboratory investigation was conducted to determine the physical and microwave properties of ocean foam. Special foam generators were designed and fabricated, using porous glass sheets, known as glass frits, as the principal element. The glass frit was sealed into a water-tight vertical box, a few centimeters from the bottom. Compressed air, applied to the lower chamber, created ocean foam from sea water lying on the frit. Foam heights of 30 cm were readily achieved, with relatively low air pressures. Special photographic techniques and analytical procedures were employed to determine foam bubble size distributions. In addition, the percentage water content of ocean foam was determined with the aid of a particulate sampling procedure. A glass frit foam generator, with pore diameters in the range 70 - 100 micrometers, produced foam with bubble distributions very similar to those found on the surface of natural ocean foam patches.

  5. Small caliber vascular grafts. Part I: state of the art.

    PubMed

    Zdrahala, R J

    1996-04-01

    Vascular grafts, devices designed to augment inefficiently functioning vascular systems, represent a significant part of implantable medical devices, with major participation in over a million vascular surgeries performed worldwide. By definition accepted in the art, a small caliber graft is a conduit with internal diameter (ID) of 6 mm or less; large caliber grafts start at ID of 7 mm. While the autologous grafts utilizing saphenous veins (SVG) and internal iliac, or mammary arteries are used exclusively in cardiac artery bypass grafts (CABG) procedures and preferentially in many peripheral indications, and while the use of grafts with biological origin did not proliferate, polymer-based artificial grafts of controlled patterns and porosity are prostheses of choice for the large caliber. The polyester (PET) yarn is knitted or woven into various porous patterns. The PTFE tubes are expanded into porous conduits (ePTFE). Although these technologies are used to produce the grafts with ID larger than 6 mm, the dominant principles are being applied to the development of small caliber graft. Polyurethanes are also evaluated for small caliber application. The grafts (regardless of the ID) produced by the above technologies are porous. This porosity, considered to be critical for proper healing and overall graft patency, causes the blood to leak through the graft wall or at anastomosis through the suture holes. Both the wall leakage and suture hole bleeding remain rather serious drawbacks. Currently, collagen, gelatin, albumin and their derivatives are used as sealants. Various modes of application and degrees of crosslinking are utilized to control in vivo degradation and graft healing. Other hydrogels, both natural and synthetic, could play significant roles as sealants and modifiers of the graft performance. Enhancement of graft patency via improvement of initial hemocompatibility could be achieved by application of bioactive coatings. Heparinized systems seem to

  6. Final Report: Research Study on Development of Environmental Friendly Spray-on Foam Insulation (SOFI) for the External Tank (ET)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuckey, James M.

    1996-01-01

    The selection and quantification of four foams using a more environmentally friendly HCFC-141b blowing agent replacing foams that used the CFC-11 blowing agent for the external tank (ET) LWT has been addressed along with problems and solutions that were encountered during verification. The effort on two lower density spray foams for the ET SLWT are presented, but predicted weight savings were not encouraging. Suggestions for possible problem solving are included along with a new approach for selecting foams for qualification as back-up foams for the foams used on the ET LWT. We investigated three resins for use as thermally sprayed coatings for corrosion prevention on metal. The best coating was obtained with a thermoplastic polyimide resin. This coating has a good chance of meeting ET requirements. Possible third generation blowing agents have been shown usable in polyurethane spray and pour foams, and solubility in isocyannate foam components are acceptable. We considered aerogels as insulation materials on space vehicles, and suggested a liner for a liquid oxygen (LOX) composite tank.

  7. Fabrication and evaluation of physical properties and cytotoxicity of zein-based polyurethanes.

    PubMed

    Du, Xinshen; Li, Yinping; Liu, Xing; Wang, Xiong; Huselstein, Celine; Zhao, Yanteng; Chang, Peter R; Chen, Yun

    2014-03-01

    Polyurethane prepolymer (PUP) was first synthesized from polycaprolactone diol and isophorone diisocyanate; and then a series of zein-based polyurethane (ZEPU) sheets was fabricated from PUP and zein (ZE) using a hot press and moulding process without addition of other additives. Effects of ZE content (WZE) on the structure and properties of the resultant ZEPU sheets were investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, dynamic mechanical analysis, tensile testing, and dissolubility testing in alcohol. The results indicated that cross-linking and grafting reactions occurred between ZE and PUP to form new polyurethane showing a higher thermal stability, flexibility, and alcohol-resistance than the neat ZE sheets. For example, the elongation at break of ZEPU with 50 % WZE was 211.2 %, which was 47 times higher than that of neat ZE sheet. ZE molecules acted as both cross-linkers and polymer fillers in ZEPU sheets. The cytotoxicity and cytocompatibility of ZEPU sheets were evaluated by cell culture in vitro. The ZEPU sheets showed non- or low-cytotoxicity, and L929 cells grew and expanded well on the surfaces of the sheets with WZE over 50 %. Undoubtedly, the fabrication of ZE-based polyurethanes without toxic additives such as catalysts, cross-linkers and chain extenders improved the physical properties and cytocompatibility of zein, thus widening the possible range of applications for zein-based biomaterials.

  8. Aromatic Polyimide Foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiser, Erik S. (Inventor); St.Clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Echigo, Yoshiaki (Inventor); Kaneshiro, Hisayasu (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A mechanically undensified aromatic polyimide foam is made from an aromatic polyimide precursor solid residuum and has the following combination of properties: a density according to ASTM D-3574A of about 0.5 pounds/cu.ft to about 20 pounds/cu.ft; a compression strength according to ASTM D-3574C of about 1.5 psi to about 1500 psi; and a limiting oxygen index according to ASTM D-2863 of about 35% oxygen to about 75% oxygen at atmospheric pressure. The aromatic polyimide foam has no appreciable solid inorganic contaminants which are residues of inorganic blowing agents. The aromatic polyimide which constitutes the aromatic polyimide foam has a glass transition temperature (Tg) by differential scanning calorimetry of about 235 C to about 400 C; and a thermal stability of 0 to about 1% weight loss at 204 C as determined by thermogravinietric analysis (TGA). The aromatic polyimide foam has utility as foam insulation and as structural foam, for example, for aeronautical, aerospace and maritime applications.

  9. Foam Optics and Mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durian, Douglas J.; Zimmerli, Gregory A.

    2002-01-01

    The Foam Optics and Mechanics (FOAM) project will exploit the microgravity environment to more accurately measure the rheological and optical characteristics of wet aqueous foams. Using both rheology and laser light scattering diagnostics, the goal is to quantify the unusual elastic character of foams in terms of their underlying microscopic structure and dynamics. Of particular interest is determining how the elastic character vanishes, i.e., how the foam 'melts' into a simple viscous liquid, as a function of both increasing liquid content and increasing shear strain rate. The unusual elastic character of foams will be quantified macroscopically by measurement of the shear stress as a function of shear strain rate and of time following a step strain. Such data will be analyzed in terms of a yield stress, shear moduli, and dynamical time scales. Microscopic information about bubble packing and rearrangement dynamics, from which the macroscopic non-Newtonian properties ultimately arise, will be obtained non-invasively by multiple-light scattering: diffuse transmission spectroscopy (DTS) and diffusing wave spectroscopy (DWS). Quantitative trends with materials parameters, most importantly average bubble size and liquid content, will be sought in order to elucidate the fundamental connection between the microscopic structure and dynamics and the macroscopic rheology.

  10. Ultralight metal foams

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Bin; He, Chunnian; Zhao, Naiqin; Nash, Philip; Shi, Chunsheng; Wang, Zejun

    2015-01-01

    Ultralight (<10 mg/cm3) cellular materials are desirable for thermal insulation; battery electrodes; catalyst supports; and acoustic, vibration, or shock energy damping. However, most of these ultralight materials, especially ultralight metal foams, are fabricated using either expensive materials or complicated procedures, which greatly limit their large-scale production and practical applications. Here we report a simple and versatile method to obtain ultralight monolithic metal foams. These materials are fabricated with a low-cost polymeric template and the method is based on the traditional silver mirror reaction and electroless plating. We have produced ultralight monolithic metal foams, such as silver, nickel, cobalt, and copper via this method. The resultant ultralight monolithic metal foams have remarkably low densities down to 7.4 mg/cm3 or 99.9% porosity. The metal foams have a long flat stress-train curve in compression tests and the densification strain εD of the Ni/Ag foam with a porosity of 99.8% can reach 82%. The plateau stress σpl was measured and found to be in agreement with the value predicted by the cellular solids theory. PMID:26349002

  11. Rigid molecular foams

    SciTech Connect

    Steckle, W.P. Jr.; Mitchell, M.A.; Aspen, P.G.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Organic analogues to inorganic zeolites would be a significant step forward in engineered porous materials and would provide advantages in range, selectivity, tailorability, and processing. Rigid molecular foams or {open_quotes}organic zeolites{close_quotes} would not be crystalline materials and could be tailored over a broader range of pore sizes and volumes. A novel process for preparing hypercrosslinked polymeric foams has been developed via a Friedel-Crafts polycondensation reaction. A series of rigid hypercrosslinked foams have been prepared using simple rigid polyaromatic hydrocarbons including benzene, biphenyl, m-terphenyl, diphenylmethane, and polystyrene, with dichloroxylene (DCX) as the pore size. After drying the foams are robust and rigid. Densities of the resulting foams can range from 0.15 g/cc to 0.75 g/cc. Nitrogen adsorption studies have shown that by judiciously selecting monomers and the crosslinking agent along with the level of crosslinking and the cure time of the resulting gel, the pore size, pore size distribution, and the total surface area of the foam can be tailored. Surface areas range from 160 to 1,200 m{sup 2}/g with pore sizes ranging from 6 {angstrom} to 2,000 {angstrom}.

  12. Electrostrictive Graft Elastomers and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, J.; Harrison, J. S.; St.Clair, T. L.; Bar-Cohen, Y.; Leary, S.

    1999-01-01

    Efficient actuators that are lightweight, high performance and compact are needed to support telerobotic requirements for future NASA missions. In this work, we present a new class of electromechanically active polymers that can potentially be used as actuators to meet many NASA needs. The materials are graft elastomers that offer high strain under an applied electric field. Due to its higher mechanical modulus, this elastomer also has a higher strain energy density as compared to previously reported electrostrictive polyurethane elastomers. The dielectric, mechanical and electromechanical properties of this new electrostrictive elastomer have been studied as a function of temperature and frequency. Combined with structural analysis using x-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry on the new elastomer, structure-property interrelationship and mechanisms of the electric field induced strain in the graft elastomer have also been investigated. This electroactive polymer (EAP) has demonstrated high actuation strain and high mechanical energy density. The combination of these properties with its tailorable molecular composition and excellent processability makes it attractive for a variety of actuation tasks. The experimental results and applications will be presented.

  13. Flame-retardant polymeric foams: manufacturing, applications, and hazards. July 1984-August 1988 (Citations from the Rubber and Plastics Research Association data base). Report for July 1984-August 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-08-01

    This bibliography contains citations concerning flame-retardant compositions and additives used in the manufacture of polymeric foams. Latex, polyurethane, polyether, silicone rubber, phenol formaldehyde, polyisocyanurate, polystyrene, PVC, and polyphenylene ether are among the foam polymers discussed relative to tests performed to evaluate the toxicity of flame retardants in smoke and during manufacturing. Applications including public transportation, furniture, automotives, medical and building materials are discussed. (This updated bibliography contains 199 citations, 17 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

  14. Ambient cure polyimide foams. [thermal resistant foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawko, P. M.; Riccitiello, S. R.; Hamermesh, C. L. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    Flame and temperature resistant polyimide foams are prepared by the reaction of an aromatic dianhydride, (pyromellitic dianhydride) with an aromatic polyisocyanate, (polymethylene polyphenylisocyanate), in the presence of an inorganic acid and furfuryl alcohol. Usable acids include dilute sulfuric acid, dilute nitric acid, hydrochloric acid, polyphosphoric acid, and phosphoric acid, with the latter being preferred. The dianhydride and the isocyanate in about equimolar proportions constitute about 50% of the reaction mixture, the rest being made up with the acid and the alcohol in a ratio of about 1:10. An exothermic reaction between the acid and the alcohol provides the heat necessary for the other components to polymerize without recourse to external heat sources. The mixture can be sprayed on any surface to form polymeric foam in locations where the application of heat is not practical or possible, for instance, between walls or on mine tunnel surfaces.

  15. Validation of a Polyimide Foam Model for Use in Transmission Loss Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, Kwanwoo; Bolton, J. Stuart; Cano, Roberto J.; Weiser, Erik S.; Jensen, Brian J.; Silcox, Rich; Howerton, Brian M.; Maxon, John; Wang, Tongan; Lorenzi, Tyler

    2010-01-01

    The work described in this paper was focused on the use of a new polyimide foam in a double wall sound transmission loss application. Recall that polyimide foams are functionally attractive, compared to polyurethane foams, for example, owing to their fire resistance. The foam considered here was found to have a flow resistivity that was too high for conventional acoustical applications, and as a result, it was processed by partial crushing to lower the flow resistivity into an acceptable range. Procedures for measuring the flow resistivity and Young s modulus of the material have been described, as was an inverse characterization procedure for estimating the remaining Biot parameters based on standing wave tube measurements of transmission loss and absorption coefficient. The inverse characterization was performed using a finite element model implementation of the Biot poro-elastic material theory. Those parameters were then used to predict the sound transmission loss of a double panel system lined with polyimide foam, and the predictions were compared with full-scale transmission loss measurements. The agreement between the two was reasonable, especially in the high and low frequency limits; however, it was found that the SEA model resulted in an under-prediction of the transmission loss in the mid-frequency range. Nonetheless, it was concluded that the performance of polyimide foam could be predicted using conventional poro-elastic material models and that polyimide foam may offer an attractive alternative to other double wall linings in certain situations: e.g., when fire resistance is a key issue. Future work will concentrate on reducing the density of the foam to values similar to those used in current aircraft sidewall treatments, and developing procedures to improve the performance of the foam in transmission loss applications.

  16. The "stegosaurus" dressing: a simple and effective method of securing skin grafts in the burn patient.

    PubMed

    Fullerton, J K; Smith, C E; Milner, S M

    2000-10-01

    Skin grafts are vulnerable to shear stress, infection, and hematoma formation during the postoperative period, all of which reduce graft survival. Various methods of dressing application and materials have been described in the literature to try and prevent graft loss. The authors report the use of the "stegosaurus dressing" (Eggcrate Pad) in 6 patients to secure skin grafts. Patients chosen were those who were either noncompliant or who sustained burns in unfavorable anatomic sites. All grafts demonstrated complete take without infection and hematoma formation. This foam dressing provides an even pressure to the recipient bed, absorbs drainage, and protects the graft from shearing. It also demonstrates the versatility to be used in difficult nonburn skin graft areas. The stegosaurus dressing is easy to apply, inexpensive, and provides a very secure dressing over the skin graft.

  17. Microwave-assisted synthesis of cyclodextrin polyurethanes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cyclodextrin (CD) has often been incorporated into polyurethanes in order to facilitate its use in encapsulation or removal of organic species for various applications. In this work a microwave-assisted method has been developed to produce polyurethanes consisting of alpha-, ß-, and gamma-CD and thr...

  18. Application of Spray Foam Insulation Under Plywood and Oriented Strand Board Roof Sheathing

    SciTech Connect

    Grin, A.; Smegal, J.; Lstiburek, J.

    2013-10-01

    Unvented roof strategies with open cell and closed cell spray polyurethane foam insulation sprayed to the underside of roof sheathing have been used since the mid-1990's to provide durable and efficient building enclosures. However, there have been isolated moisture related incidents reported anecdotally that raise potential concerns about the overall hygrothermal performance of these systems. This project involved hygrothermal modeling of a range of rainwater leakage and field evaluations of in-service residential roofs using spray foam insulation. All of the roof assemblies modeled exhibited drying capacity to handle minor rainwater leakage. All field evaluation locations of in-service residential roofs had moisture contents well within the safe range for wood-based sheathing. Explorations of eleven in-service roof systems were completed. The exploration involved taking a sample of spray foam from the underside of the roof sheathing, exposing the sheathing, then taking a moisture content reading. All locations had moisture contents well within the safe range for wood-based sheathing. One full-roof failure was reviewed, as an industry partner was involved with replacing structurally failed roof sheathing. In this case the manufacturer's investigation report concluded that the spray foam was installed on wet OSB based on the observation that the spray foam did not adhere well to the substrate and the pore structure of the closed cell spray foam at the ccSPF/OSB interface was indicative of a wet substrate.

  19. New Twist on an Old Favorite: Gentian Violet and Methylene Blue Antibacterial Foams

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Significance: Absorptive antibacterial dressings that assist in controlling bioburden without risks of cytotoxicity or residual absorption can be effectively used for prolonged periods throughout the wound healing continuum. Recent Advances: Until recently, gentian violet and methylene blue (GV/MB) antibacterial dressings have been commercially available only in polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) foam; polyurethane (PU) foam bonded with GV and MB with thin film backing is now commercially available. GV/MB PU foam does not require hydration or a necessary secondary dressing. GV/MB PVA and PU foam dressings were recently granted FDA clearance as antibacterial dressings, as opposed to bacteriostatic dressings as previously classified. Within the class of antibacterial dressings, GV/MB foam dressings are of lower cost alternative to silver- or iodine-based antibacterial dressings with no risk of absorption of any of the foam components into the tissues. Critical Issues: Control of wound bioburden levels by antibacterial agents and absorption of excess exudate are crucial in preventing infections that drastically increase the price of wound care. Use of GV/MB dressings may improve wound healing outcomes and decrease overall costs through super absorption, promotion of autolytic debridement, bioburden reduction, ease of use, and decreased dressing change frequency. Future Directions: Evolution in resistant bacterial strains will drive continual changes in advanced wound care products. Demand will increase for economically priced, versatile wound care dressings that assist in debridement, maintain a moist wound environment, absorb and trap bacterial debris, and decrease dressing change frequency. PMID:26858911

  20. Isothermal aging of three polyurethane elastomers

    SciTech Connect

    Guess, T.R.

    1996-05-01

    Two polyurethane systems, EN-7 and L-100, have a long history as encapsulants and coatings in Sandia programs. These materials contain significant amounts of toluene diisocyanate (TDI), a suspect human carcinogen. As part of efforts to reduce the use of hazardous materials in the workplace, PET-90A, a polyurethane with less than 0.1% free TDI, was identified as a candidate for new applications and as a replacement for the more hazardous polyurethanes in selected programs. This report documents the results of a two-year accelerated aging study of PET-90A, EN-7, and L-100 polyurethane elastomers to characterize the effect of 135{degrees}F isothermal aging on selected physical, electrical, mechanical and thermal properties. In general, there was very little change in properties over the two year period for the three elastomers. The largest changes occurred in EN-7, which is the polyurethane with the longest service history in Sandia applications.

  1. The effect of native silk fibroin powder on the physical properties and biocompatibility of biomedical polyurethane membrane.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Yan; Zhang, Qian; Feng, Jinqi; Wang, Na; Xu, Weilin; Yang, Hongjun

    2017-04-01

    Naturally derived fibers such as silk fibroin can potentially enhance the biocompatibility of currently used biomaterials. This study investigated the physical properties of native silk fibroin powder and its effect on the biocompatibility of biomedical polyurethane. Native silk fibroin powder with an average diameter of 3 µm was prepared on a purpose-built machine. A simple method of phase inversion was used to produce biomedical polyurethane/native silk fibroin powder hybrid membranes at different blend ratios by immersing a biomedical polyurethane/native silk fibroin powder solution in deionized water at room temperature. The physical properties of the membranes including morphology, hydrophilicity, roughness, porosity, and compressive modulus were characterized, and in vitro biocompatibility was evaluated by seeding the human umbilical vein endothelial cells on the top surface. Native silk fibroin powder had a concentration-dependent effect on the number and morphology of human umbilical vein endothelial cells growing on the membranes; cell number increased as native silk fibroin powder content in the biomedical polyurethane/native silk fibroin powder hybrid membrane was increased from 0% to 50%, and cell morphology changed from spindle-shaped to cobblestone-like as the native silk fibroin powder content was increased from 0% to 70%. The latter change was related to the physical characteristics of the membrane, including hydrophilicity, roughness, and mechanical properties. The in vivo biocompatibility of the native silk fibroin powder-modified biomedical polyurethane membrane was evaluated in a rat model; the histological analysis revealed no systemic toxicity. These results indicate that the biomedical polyurethane/native silk fibroin powder hybrid membrane has superior in vitro and in vivo biocompatibility relative to 100% biomedical polyurethane membranes and thus has potential applications in the fabrication of small-diameter vascular grafts and in

  2. Proximal Tibial Bone Graft

    MedlinePlus

    ... All Site Content AOFAS / FootCareMD / Treatments Proximal Tibial Bone Graft Page Content What is a bone graft? Bone grafts may be needed for various ... the proximal tibia. What is a proximal tibial bone graft? Proximal tibial bone graft (PTBG) is a ...

  3. A kinetic approach to modeling the manufacture of high density strucutral foam: Foaming and polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, Rekha R.; Mondy, Lisa Ann; Noble, David R.; Brunini, Victor; Roberts, Christine Cardinal; Long, Kevin Nicholas; Soehnel, Melissa Marie; Celina, Mathias C.; Wyatt, Nicholas B.; Thompson, Kyle R.; Tinsley, James

    2015-09-01

    We are studying PMDI polyurethane with a fast catalyst, such that filling and polymerization occur simultaneously. The foam is over-packed to tw ice or more of its free rise density to reach the density of interest. Our approach is to co mbine model development closely with experiments to discover new physics, to parameterize models and to validate the models once they have been developed. The model must be able to repres ent the expansion, filling, curing, and final foam properties. PMDI is chemically blown foam, wh ere carbon dioxide is pr oduced via the reaction of water and isocyanate. The isocyanate also re acts with polyol in a competing reaction, which produces the polymer. A new kinetic model is developed and implemented, which follows a simplified mathematical formalism that decouple s these two reactions. The model predicts the polymerization reaction via condensation chemis try, where vitrification and glass transition temperature evolution must be included to correctly predict this quantity. The foam gas generation kinetics are determined by tracking the molar concentration of both water and carbon dioxide. Understanding the therma l history and loads on the foam due to exothermicity and oven heating is very important to the results, since the kinetics and ma terial properties are all very sensitive to temperature. The conservation eq uations, including the e quations of motion, an energy balance, and thr ee rate equations are solved via a stabilized finite element method. We assume generalized-Newtonian rheology that is dependent on the cure, gas fraction, and temperature. The conservation equations are comb ined with a level set method to determine the location of the free surface over time. Results from the model are compared to experimental flow visualization data and post-te st CT data for the density. Seve ral geometries are investigated including a mock encapsulation part, two configur ations of a mock stru ctural part, and a bar geometry to

  4. Low density metal hydride foams

    DOEpatents

    Maienschein, Jon L.; Barry, Patrick E.

    1991-01-01

    Disclosed is a low density foam having a porosity of from 0 to 98% and a density less than about 0.67 gm/cc, prepared by heating a mixture of powered lithium hydride and beryllium hydride in an inert atmosphere at a temperature ranging from about 455 to about 490 K for a period of time sufficient to cause foaming of said mixture, and cooling the foam thus produced. Also disclosed is the process of making the foam.

  5. Aqueous foams and foam films stabilised by surfactants. Gravity-free studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langevin, Dominique

    2017-01-01

    There are still many open questions and problems in both fundamental research and practical applications of foams. Despite the fact that foams have been extensively studied, many aspects of foam physics and chemistry still remain unclear. Experiments on foams performed under microgravity allow studying wet foams, such as those obtained early during the foaming process. On Earth, wet foams evolve too quickly due to gravity drainage and only dry foams can be studied. This paper reviews the foam and foam film studies that we have performed in gravity-free conditions. It highlights the importance of surface rheology as well as of confinement effects in foams and foam films behaviour.

  6. Ambient curing fire resistant foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamermesh, C. L.; Hogenson, P. A.; Tung, C. Y.; Sawko, P. M.; Riccitiello, S. R.

    1979-01-01

    The feasibility of development of an ambient curing foam is described. The thermal stability and flame spread index of the foams were found to be comparable to those of the high-temperature cured polyimide foams by Monsanto two-foot tunnel test and NASA T-3 Fire test. Adaptation of the material to spray in place applications is described

  7. Surfactant monitoring by foam generation

    DOEpatents

    Mullen, Ken I.

    1997-01-01

    A device for monitoring the presence or absence of active surfactant or other surface active agents in a solution or flowing stream based on the formation of foam or bubbles is presented. The device detects the formation of foam with a light beam or conductivity measurement. The height or density of the foam can be correlated to the concentration of the active surfactant present.

  8. Spectrophotometry of PRESAGETM polyurethane dosimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krstajic, N.; Wai, P.; Adamovics, J.; Doran, S.

    2004-01-01

    Preliminary optical density results on irradiated PRESAGE dosimeter are outlined in this article. PRESAGE is a solid dosimeter, based on a clear polyurethane combined with the leuco-dye leuco-malachite green. The purpose of these measurements was a) to obtain spectra for optimizing the wavelength of a new light source for the equipment and b) to obtain a dose-response relation. 10 PRESAGE cuvettes were given uniform doses from 0.1 to 40 Gy and later read out by spectrophotometer. The instrument used was CAMSPEC M350 Double Beam Spectrophotometer.

  9. Polyurethane elastomers for facial prostheses.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, J B

    1978-02-01

    A review of the polyurethane elastomers used for facial prostheses has been presented. A description of the casting technique was given. The materials require accuracy and care in handling to insure the successful casting of a prosthesis. They seem to simulate the characteristics of the facial tissues and are more durable and comfortable than previously used materials. Over 300 patients have been exposed to or treated with these materials without evidencing significant adverse tissue reaction. In spite of the improvements that these materials present over previous ones (PVC and silicones), much work is still required to understand their behavior and their physical and mechanical characteristics and to compensate for the metameric phenomenon.

  10. Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting? Coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) is ... bypass multiple coronary arteries during one surgery. Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting Figure A shows the location of ...

  11. Fiber-reinforced syntactic foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yi-Jen

    Long fibers are generally preferred for reinforcing foams for performance reasons. However, uniform dispersion is difficult to achieve because they must be mixed with liquid resin prior to foam expansion. New approaches aiming to overcome such problem have been developed at USC's Composites Center. Fiber-reinforced syntactic foams with long fibers (over 6 mm in length) manufactured at USC's Composites Center have achieved promising mechanical properties and demonstrated lower density relative to conventional composite foams. Fiber-reinforced syntactic foams were synthesized from thermosetting polymeric microspheres (amino and phenolic microspheres), as well as thermoplastic PVC heat expandable microspheres (HEMs). Carbon and/or aramid fibers were used to reinforce the syntactic foams. Basic mechanical properties, including shear, tensile, and compression, were measured in syntactic foams and fiber-reinforced syntactic foams. Microstructure and crack propagation behavior were investigated by scanning electron microscope and light microscopy. Failure mechanisms and reinforcing mechanisms of fiber-reinforced syntactic foams were also analyzed. As expected, additions of fiber reinforcements to foams enhanced both tensile and shear properties. However, only limited enhancement in compression properties was observed, and fiber reinforcement was of limited benefit in this regard. Therefore, a hybrid foam design was explored and evaluated in an attempt to enhance compression properties. HEMs were blended with glass microspheres to produce hybrid foams, and hybrid foams were subsequently reinforced with continuous aramid fibers to produce fiber-reinforced hybrid foams. Mechanical properties of these foams were evaluated. Findings indicated that the production of hybrid foams was an effective way to enhance the compressive properties of syntactic foams, while the addition of fiber reinforcements enhanced the shear and tensile performance of syntactic foams. Another approach

  12. Low density microcellular foams

    DOEpatents

    LeMay, James D.

    1991-01-01

    Disclosed is a process of producing microcellular foam which comprises the steps of: (a) selecting a multifunctional epoxy oligomer resin; (b) mixing said epoxy resin with a non-reactive diluent to form a resin-diluent mixture; (c) forming a diluent containing cross-linked epoxy gel from said resin-diluent mixture; (d) replacing said diluent with a solvent therefore; (e) replacing said solvent with liquid carbon dioxide; and (f) vaporizing off said liquid carbon dioxide under supercritical conditions, whereby a foam having a density in the range of 35-150 mg/cc and cell diameters less than about 1 .mu.m is produced. Also disclosed are the foams produced by the process.

  13. Low density microcellular foams

    DOEpatents

    LeMay, J.D.

    1991-11-19

    Disclosed is a process of producing microcellular foam which comprises the steps of: (a) selecting a multifunctional epoxy oligomer resin; (b) mixing said epoxy resin with a non-reactive diluent to form a resin-diluent mixture; (c) forming a diluent containing cross-linked epoxy gel from said resin-diluent mixture; (d) replacing said diluent with a solvent therefore; (e) replacing said solvent with liquid carbon dioxide; and (f) vaporizing off said liquid carbon dioxide under supercritical conditions, whereby a foam having a density in the range of 35-150 mg/cc and cell diameters less than about 1 [mu]m is produced. Also disclosed are the foams produced by the process. 8 figures.

  14. Microcellular foams; For what

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, J.H.; Sylwester, A.P. )

    1991-04-01

    This paper discusses the cells of microcellular foams which are thousands of times smaller than those found in conventional foams. They can be used for a whole range of applications, from porous electrodes and high-temperature insulation to electrically conductive composites, and as porous media for studying comet dust. First, the authors will show you how to make them so you can envision their unique characteristics. Then they will show some uses already developed. By far the most versatile preparation technique involves thermally induced phase separation (TIPS) of polymer solutions. In this technique a polymer solution is quenched in order to induce phase separation, either through liquid-liquid phase separation or polymer crystallization. If the TIPS process results in the formation of a continuous polymer-rich phase, two additional processing steps can lead to a microcellular foam.

  15. Limits on spacetime foam

    SciTech Connect

    Christiansen, Wayne A.; Ng, Y. Jack; Floyd, David J. E.; Perlman, Eric S.

    2011-04-15

    Plausibly spacetime is foamy on small distance scales, due to quantum fluctuations. We elaborate on the proposal to detect spacetime foam by looking for seeing disks in the images of distant quasars and active galactic nuclei. This is a null test in the sense that the continued presence of unresolved point sources at the milliarcsecond level in samples of distant compact sources puts severe constraints on theories of quantized spacetime foam at the Planckian level. We discuss the geometry of foamy spacetime, and the appropriate distance measure for calculating the expected angular broadening. We then deal with recent data and the constraints they put on spacetime foam models. While time lags from distant pulsed sources such as gamma ray bursts have been posited as a possible test of spacetime foam models, we demonstrate that the time-lag effect is rather smaller than has been calculated, due to the equal probability of positive and negative fluctuations in the speed of light inherent in such models. Thus far, images of high-redshift quasars from the Hubble ultra-deep field provide the most stringent test of spacetime foam theories. While random-walk models ({alpha}=1/2) have already been ruled out, the holographic ({alpha}=2/3) model remains viable. Here {alpha}{approx}1 parametrizes the different spacetime foam models according to which the fluctuation of a distance l is given by {approx}l{sup 1-{alpha}l}{sub P}{sup {alpha}} with l{sub P} being the Planck length. Indeed, we see a slight wavelength-dependent blurring in the ultra-deep field images selected for this study. Using existing data in the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) archive we find it is impossible to rule out the {alpha}=2/3 model, but exclude all models with {alpha}<0.65. By comparison, current gamma ray burst time-lag observations only exclude models with {alpha}<0.3.

  16. Composite foam structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Brian E. (Inventor); Brockmeyer, Jerry (Inventor); Tuffias, Robert H. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A composite rigid foam structure that has a skin or coating on at least one of its surfaces. The skin is formed in situ by thermal spray techniques. The skin is bonded substantially throughout the surface of the porous substrate to the peripheries of the pores. The skin on the average does not penetrate the surface of the substrate by more than the depth of about 2 to 5 pores. Thus, thermal spraying the skin onto the rigid foam produces a composite that is tightly and uniformly bonded together without unduly increasing the weight of the composite structure. Both thermal conductivity and bonding are excellent.

  17. Long lasting decontamination foam

    DOEpatents

    Demmer, Ricky L.; Peterman, Dean R.; Tripp, Julia L.; Cooper, David C.; Wright, Karen E.

    2010-12-07

    Compositions and methods for decontaminating surfaces are disclosed. More specifically, compositions and methods for decontamination using a composition capable of generating a long lasting foam are disclosed. Compositions may include a surfactant and gelatin and have a pH of less than about 6. Such compositions may further include affinity-shifting chemicals. Methods may include decontaminating a contaminated surface with a composition or a foam that may include a surfactant and gelatin and have a pH of less than about 6.

  18. Fabrication of macroporous carbonate apatite foam by hydrothermal conversion of alpha-tricalcium phosphate in carbonate solutions.

    PubMed

    Wakae, H; Takeuchi, A; Udoh, K; Matsuya, S; Munar, M L; LeGeros, R Z; Nakasima, A; Ishikawa, K

    2008-12-15

    Bone consists of a mineral phase (carbonate apatite) and an organic phase (principally collagen). Cancellous bone is characterized by interconnecting porosity necessary for tissue ingrowth and nourishment of bone cells. The purpose of the present study was to fabricate macroporous carbonate apatite (CAP) blocks with interconnecting porosity as potential bone substitute biomaterials by hydrothermal conversion of alpha-TCP foam in carbonate solution. The fabrication of the macroporous CAP was accomplished in two steps: (1) preparation of alpha-TCP foams using polyurethane foams as templates, and (2) hydrothermal conversion at 200 degrees C of alpha-TCP foam in the presence of ammonium carbonate solutions of different concentrations. The maximum carbonate content of the resultant CAP foam was approximately 7.4 wt %. The mean porosity of the CAP foam was as high as 93 vol %. The macroporous CAP blocks or granules prepared in this manner has properties similar to that of bone in mineral composition and in having interconnecting macroporosity necessary for osteoconductivity and tissue ingrowth. On the basis of composition and interconnecting macroporosity, the CAP foam materials could be ideal biomaterials for bone repair and as scaffolds for tissue engineering.

  19. Control technology overview report: CFC (chlorofluorocarbon) emissions from rigid foam manufacturing. Final report, March-November 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Wert, K.P.; Nelson, T.P.; Quass, J.D.

    1988-01-01

    The report estimates total chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) emissions from the various rigid foam manufacturing processes and from the foam products themselves, and examines potential methods for reducing these emissions. Options studied include replacement of CFC-blown products with alternative products not requiring CFCs, replacement of ozone-depleting CFCs with other chemicals less likely to destroy stratospheric ozone, and recovery/recycle of CFCs released during manufacturing processes. In the production of rigid cellular foams, CFCs are used as physical blowing agents to reduce foam density and impart thermal insulating properties. Such rigid foams include polyurethane, polystyrene, polyethylene, polypropylene, polyvinyl chloride, and phenolic foams. Uses of these foams include building insulation, packaging materials, and single-service dinnerware. Depletion of stratospheric ozone through action of halocarbons, particularly CFCs, has been the subject of extensive study and wide debate. Although many uncertainties remain, current scientific evidence strongly suggests that anthropogenic CFCs could contribute to depletion of the stratospheric ozone layer as was first postulated in 1974.

  20. Flexible starch-polyurethane films: Physiochemical characteristics and hydrophobicity.

    PubMed

    Tai, N L; Adhikari, Raju; Shanks, Robert; Adhikari, Benu

    2017-05-01

    Starch-polyurethane (PU) composite films with improved mechanical and hydrophobic properties were developed in this work. A simple and effective microwave-aided starch gelatinisation instrument was used to prepare glycerol plasticized high amylose starch (HAGS) material. Polyethylene glycol-isocyanate (PEG-iso) linker was prepared by reacting PEG 1000 with hexamethylene diisocyanate (HMDI). PEG-iso linker was then grafted into HAGS forming three dimensional urethane networks (PEG-PU). HAGS-PEG-PU composite blends were prepared and dried at ambient temperature to obtain HAGS-PEG-PU films. The mechanical properties and hydrophobicity (as contact angle, CA) of the HAGS-PEG-PU films were measured and analysed. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy showed good grafting of PEG-iso into starch structure. Increase of PEG-iso concentration up to 20% (w/w) improved the molecular mixing and interpenetration between the starch and PEG-PU. The HAGS-PEG-PU films had improved hydrophobicity as indicated by CA values ranging from 51 to 110°and very high flexibility as evidenced from elongation at break (εB) values from 17 to 1000%. The HAGS-PEG-PU film formulation containing 20% (w/w) PEG-iso provided the best flexibility (εB>1000%) and hydrophobicity (CA>110°).