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Sample records for gram-positive antibacterial activity

  1. Antibacterial activity of Withania somnifera against Gram-positive isolates from pus samples

    PubMed Central

    Bisht, Punum; Rawat, Vinita

    2014-01-01

    Background: Withania somnifera is an important medicinal plant that has been used in Ayurvedic and indigenous medicine since ancient times. In the view of its varied therapeutic potential, it has also been the subject of considerable modern scientific attention. Attention has been drawn to antibacterial activity of the plant and its metabolites due to the challenge on growing antibacterial resistant pathogens. Aim: To examine the antimicrobial potential of leaf extract of W. somnifera against Gram-positive cocci. Materials and Methods: In this study, leaf extract of W. somnifera was used to examine their antimicrobial potential against Gram-positive cocci (n = 20) from pus samples of patients admitted in Government Medical College, Haldwani. Agar well diffusion method was used by taking methanolic leaf extract of W. somnifera. Results: It was observed that the methanolic leaf extract of W. somnifera was very effective in inhibiting the test pathogens including methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus spp., with an average zone of inhibition of 20.6 mm and 19.4 mm at 2 mg/ml (100 μl) concentration, respectively. Conclusion: These results indicate that the antimicrobial property of W. somnifera leaf supports the traditional use of the plant in therapeutic use against microbial infections. PMID:25972723

  2. Antibacterial activity of oregano (Origanum vulgare Linn.) against gram positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Sabahat; Tariq, Perween

    2009-10-01

    The present investigation is focused on antibacterial potential of infusion, decoction and essential oil of oregano (Origanum vulgare) against 111 Gram-positive bacterial isolates belonging to 23 different species related to 3 genera. Infusion and essential oil exhibited antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus saprophyticus, S. aureus, Micrococcus roseus, M. kristinae, M. nishinomiyaensis, M. lylae, M. luteus, M. sedentarius, M. varians, Bacillus megaterium, B. thuringiensis, B. alvei, B. circulans, B. brevis, B. coagulans, B. pumilus, B. laterosporus, B. polymyxa, B. macerans, B. subtilis, B. firmus, B. cereus and B. lichiniformis. The infusion exhibited maximum activity against B. laterosporus (17.5 mm mean zone of inhibition+/-1.5 Standard deviation) followed by B. polymyxa (17.0 mm+/-2.0 SD) and essential oil of oregano exhibited maximum activity against S. saprophyticus (16.8 mm+/-1.8 SD) followed by B. circulans (14.5 mm+/-0.5 SD). While all these tested isolates were found resistant to decoction of oregano.

  3. Enhanced antibacterial and anti-biofilm activities of silver nanoparticles against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have been used as antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, anti-inflammtory, and antiangiogenic due to its unique properties such as physical, chemical, and biological properties. The present study was aimed to investigate antibacterial and anti-biofilm activities of silver nanoparticles alone and in combination with conventional antibiotics against various human pathogenic bacteria. Here, we show that a simple, reliable, cost effective and green method for the synthesis of AgNPs by treating silver ions with leaf extract of Allophylus cobbe. The A. cobbe-mediated synthesis of AgNPs (AgNPs) was characterized by ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), dynamic light scattering (DLS), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Furthermore, the antibacterial and anti-biofilm activity of antibiotics or AgNPs, or combinations of AgNPs with an antibiotic was evaluated using a series of assays: such as in vitro killing assay, disc diffusion assay, biofilm inhibition, and reactive oxygen species generation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Shigella flexneri, Staphylococcus aureus, and Streptococcus pneumonia. The results suggest that, in combination with antibiotics, there were significant antimicrobial and anti-biofilm effects at lowest concentration of AgNPs using a novel plant extract of A. cobbe, otherwise sublethal concentrations of the antibiotics. The significant enhancing effects were observed for ampicillin and vancomycin against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, respectively. These data suggest that combining antibiotics and biogenic AgNPs can be used therapeutically for the treatment of infectious diseases caused by bacteria. This study presented evidence of antibacterial and anti-biofilm effects of A. cobbe-mediated synthesis of AgNPs and their enhanced capacity against various human pathogenic bacteria. These results

  4. Enhanced antibacterial and anti-biofilm activities of silver nanoparticles against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurunathan, Sangiliyandi; Han, Jae Woong; Kwon, Deug-Nam; Kim, Jin-Hoi

    2014-07-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have been used as antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, anti-inflammtory, and antiangiogenic due to its unique properties such as physical, chemical, and biological properties. The present study was aimed to investigate antibacterial and anti-biofilm activities of silver nanoparticles alone and in combination with conventional antibiotics against various human pathogenic bacteria. Here, we show that a simple, reliable, cost effective and green method for the synthesis of AgNPs by treating silver ions with leaf extract of Allophylus cobbe. The A. cobbe-mediated synthesis of AgNPs (AgNPs) was characterized by ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), dynamic light scattering (DLS), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Furthermore, the antibacterial and anti-biofilm activity of antibiotics or AgNPs, or combinations of AgNPs with an antibiotic was evaluated using a series of assays: such as in vitro killing assay, disc diffusion assay, biofilm inhibition, and reactive oxygen species generation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Shigella flexneri, Staphylococcus aureus, and Streptococcus pneumonia. The results suggest that, in combination with antibiotics, there were significant antimicrobial and anti-biofilm effects at lowest concentration of AgNPs using a novel plant extract of A. cobbe, otherwise sublethal concentrations of the antibiotics. The significant enhancing effects were observed for ampicillin and vancomycin against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, respectively. These data suggest that combining antibiotics and biogenic AgNPs can be used therapeutically for the treatment of infectious diseases caused by bacteria. This study presented evidence of antibacterial and anti-biofilm effects of A. cobbe-mediated synthesis of AgNPs and their enhanced capacity against various human pathogenic bacteria. These results

  5. Antibacterial activity of sphingoid bases and fatty acids against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Carol L; Drake, David R; Dawson, Deborah V; Blanchette, Derek R; Brogden, Kim A; Wertz, Philip W

    2012-03-01

    There is growing evidence that the role of lipids in innate immunity is more important than previously realized. How lipids interact with bacteria to achieve a level of protection, however, is still poorly understood. To begin to address the mechanisms of antibacterial activity, we determined MICs and minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBCs) of lipids common to the skin and oral cavity--the sphingoid bases D-sphingosine, phytosphingosine, and dihydrosphingosine and the fatty acids sapienic acid and lauric acid--against four Gram-negative bacteria and seven Gram-positive bacteria. Exact Kruskal-Wallis tests of these values showed differences among lipid treatments (P < 0.0001) for each bacterial species except Serratia marcescens and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. D-sphingosine (MBC range, 0.3 to 19.6 μg/ml), dihydrosphingosine (MBC range, 0.6 to 39.1 μg/ml), and phytosphingosine (MBC range, 3.3 to 62.5 μg/ml) were active against all bacteria except S. marcescens and P. aeruginosa (MBC > 500 μg/ml). Sapienic acid (MBC range, 31.3 to 375.0 μg/ml) was active against Streptococcus sanguinis, Streptococcus mitis, and Fusobacterium nucleatum but not active against Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, S. marcescens, P. aeruginosa, Corynebacterium bovis, Corynebacterium striatum, and Corynebacterium jeikeium (MBC > 500 μg/ml). Lauric acid (MBC range, 6.8 to 375.0 μg/ml) was active against all bacteria except E. coli, S. marcescens, and P. aeruginosa (MBC > 500 μg/ml). Complete killing was achieved as early as 0.5 h for some lipids but took as long as 24 h for others. Hence, sphingoid bases and fatty acids have different antibacterial activities and may have potential for prophylactic or therapeutic intervention in infection.

  6. Antibacterial activity of silver-doped hydroxyapatite nanoparticles against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciobanu, Carmen Steluta; Iconaru, Simona Liliana; Le Coustumer, Phillippe; Constantin, Liliana Violeta; Predoi, Daniela

    2012-06-01

    Ag-doped nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite nanoparticles (Ag:HAp-NPs) (Ca10- x Ag x (PO4)6(OH)2, x Ag = 0.05, 0.2, and 0.3) with antibacterial properties are of great interest in the development of new products. Coprecipitation method is a promising route for obtaining nanocrystalline Ag:HAp with antibacterial properties. X-ray diffraction identified HAp as an unique crystalline phase in each sample. The calculated lattice constants of a = b = 9.435 Å, c = 6.876 Å for x Ag = 0.05, a = b = 9.443 Å, c = 6.875 Å for x Ag = 0.2, and a = b = 9.445 Å, c = 6.877 Å for x Ag = 0.3 are in good agreement with the standard of a = b = 9.418 Å, c = 6.884 Å (space group P63/m). The Fourier transform infrared and Raman spectra of the sintered HAp show the absorption bands characteristic to hydroxyapatite. The Ag:HAp nanoparticles are evaluated for their antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Providencia stuartii, Citrobacter freundii and Serratia marcescens. The results showed that the antibacterial activity of these materials, regardless of the sample types, was greatest against S. aureus, K. pneumoniae, P. stuartii, and C. freundii. The results of qualitative antibacterial tests revealed that the tested Ag:HAp-NPs had an important inhibitory activity on P. stuartii and C. freundii. The absorbance values measured at 490 nm of the P. stuartii and C. freundii in the presence of Ag:HAp-NPs decreased compared with those of organic solvent used (DMSO) for all the samples ( x Ag = 0.05, 0.2, and 0.3). Antibacterial activity increased with the increase of x Ag in the samples. The Ag:HAp-NP concentration had little influence on the bacterial growth ( P. stuartii).

  7. Antibacterial activity of silver-doped hydroxyapatite nanoparticles against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Ag-doped nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite nanoparticles (Ag:HAp-NPs) (Ca10-xAgx(PO4)6(OH)2, xAg = 0.05, 0.2, and 0.3) with antibacterial properties are of great interest in the development of new products. Coprecipitation method is a promising route for obtaining nanocrystalline Ag:HAp with antibacterial properties. X-ray diffraction identified HAp as an unique crystalline phase in each sample. The calculated lattice constants of a = b = 9.435 Å, c = 6.876 Å for xAg = 0.05, a = b = 9.443 Å, c = 6.875 Å for xAg = 0.2, and a = b = 9.445 Å, c = 6.877 Å for xAg = 0.3 are in good agreement with the standard of a = b = 9.418 Å, c = 6.884 Å (space group P63/m). The Fourier transform infrared and Raman spectra of the sintered HAp show the absorption bands characteristic to hydroxyapatite. The Ag:HAp nanoparticles are evaluated for their antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Providencia stuartii, Citrobacter freundii and Serratia marcescens. The results showed that the antibacterial activity of these materials, regardless of the sample types, was greatest against S. aureus, K. pneumoniae, P. stuartii, and C. freundii. The results of qualitative antibacterial tests revealed that the tested Ag:HAp-NPs had an important inhibitory activity on P. stuartii and C. freundii. The absorbance values measured at 490 nm of the P. stuartii and C. freundii in the presence of Ag:HAp-NPs decreased compared with those of organic solvent used (DMSO) for all the samples (xAg = 0.05, 0.2, and 0.3). Antibacterial activity increased with the increase of xAg in the samples. The Ag:HAp-NP concentration had little influence on the bacterial growth (P. stuartii). PMID:22721352

  8. Synthesis and biological evaluation of levofloxacin core-based derivatives with potent antibacterial activity against resistant Gram-positive pathogens.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaoguang; Bao, Yingxia; Zhu, Shaoxuan; Zhang, Xiaona; Lan, Shilong; Wang, Ting

    2015-09-15

    A series of C10 non-basic building block-substituted, levofloxacin core-based derivatives were synthesized in 43-86% yield. The antibacterial activity of these new fluoroquinolones was evaluated using a standard broth microdilution technique. The quinolone (S)-9-fluoro-10-(4-hydroxypiperidin-1-yl)-3-methyl-7-oxo-3,7-dihydro-2H-[1,4]oxazino[2,3,4-ij]quinoline-6-carboxylic acid L-arginine tetrahydrate exhibited superior antibacterial activity against quinolone-susceptible and resistant strains compared with the clinically used fluoroquinolones ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, moxifloxacin, penicillin, and vancomycin, especially to the methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus clinical isolates, penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae clinical isolates, and Streptococcus pyogenes.

  9. Significance of postgrowth processing of ZnO nanostructures on antibacterial activity against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Mehmood, Shahid; Rehman, Malik A; Ismail, Hammad; Mirza, Bushra; Bhatti, Arshad S

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we highlighted the effect of surface modifications of one-dimensional (1D) ZnO nanostructures (NSs) grown by the vapor–solid mechanism on their antibacterial activity. Two sets of ZnO NSs were modified separately – one set was modified by annealing in an Ar environment, and the second set was modified in O2 plasma. Annealing in Ar below 800°C resulted in a compressed lattice, which was due to removal of Zn interstitials and increased O vacancies. Annealing above 1,000°C caused the formation of a new prominent phase, Zn2SiO4. Plasma oxidation of the ZnO NSs caused an expansion in the lattice due to the removal of O vacancies and incorporation of excess O. Photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy was employed for the quantification of defects associated with Zn and O in the as-grown and processed ZnO NS. Two distinct bands were observed, one in the ultraviolet (UV) region, due to interband transitions, and other in the visible region, due to defects associated with Zn and O. PL confirmed the surface modification of ZnO NS, as substantial decrease in intensities of visible band was observed. Antibacterial activity of the modified ZnO NSs demonstrated that the surface modifications by Ar annealing limited the antibacterial characteristics of ZnO NS against Staphylococcus aureus. However, ZnO NSs annealed at 1,000°C or higher showed a remarkable antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli. O2 plasma–treated NS showed appreciable antibacterial activity against both E. coli and S. aureus. The minimum inhibition concentration was determined to be 0.5 mg/mL and 1 mg/mL for Ar-annealed and plasma-oxidized ZnO NS, respectively. It was thus proved that the O content at the surface of the ZnO NS was crucial to tune the antibacterial activity against both selected gram-negative (E. coli) and gram-positive (S. aureus) bacterial species. PMID:26213466

  10. Enhancement of Antibacterial Activity of Capped Silver Nanoparticles in Combination with Antibiotics, on Model Gram-Negative and Gram-Positive Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Kora, Aruna Jyothi; Rastogi, Lori

    2013-01-01

    The nanoparticles used in this study were prepared from AgNO3 using NaBH4 in the presence of capping agents such as citrate, sodium dodecyl sulfate, and polyvinylpyrrolidone. The formed nanoparticles were characterized with UV-Vis, TEM, and XRD. The generation of silver nanoparticles was confirmed from the appearance of yellow colour and an absorption maximum between 399 and 404 nm. The produced nanoparticles were found to be spherical in shape and polydisperse. For citrate, SDS, and PVP capped nanoparticles, the average particle sizes were 38.3 ± 13.5, 19.3 ± 6.0, and 16.0 ± 4.8 nm, respectively. The crystallinity of the nanoparticles in FCC structure is confirmed from the SAED and XRD patterns. Also, the combined antibacterial activity of these differently capped nanoparticles with selected antibiotics (streptomycin, ampicillin, and tetracycline) was evaluated on model Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, employing disc diffusion assay. The activity of the tested antibiotics was enhanced in combination with all the stabilized nanoparticles, against both the Gram classes of bacteria. The combined effects of silver nanoparticles and antibiotics were more prominent with PVP capped nanoparticles as compared to citrate and SDS capped ones. The results of this study demonstrate potential therapeutic applications of silver nanoparticles in combination with antibiotics. PMID:23970844

  11. Enhancement of antibacterial activity of capped silver nanoparticles in combination with antibiotics, on model gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kora, Aruna Jyothi; Rastogi, Lori

    2013-01-01

    The nanoparticles used in this study were prepared from AgNO3 using NaBH4 in the presence of capping agents such as citrate, sodium dodecyl sulfate, and polyvinylpyrrolidone. The formed nanoparticles were characterized with UV-Vis, TEM, and XRD. The generation of silver nanoparticles was confirmed from the appearance of yellow colour and an absorption maximum between 399 and 404 nm. The produced nanoparticles were found to be spherical in shape and polydisperse. For citrate, SDS, and PVP capped nanoparticles, the average particle sizes were 38.3 ± 13.5, 19.3 ± 6.0, and 16.0 ± 4.8 nm, respectively. The crystallinity of the nanoparticles in FCC structure is confirmed from the SAED and XRD patterns. Also, the combined antibacterial activity of these differently capped nanoparticles with selected antibiotics (streptomycin, ampicillin, and tetracycline) was evaluated on model Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, employing disc diffusion assay. The activity of the tested antibiotics was enhanced in combination with all the stabilized nanoparticles, against both the Gram classes of bacteria. The combined effects of silver nanoparticles and antibiotics were more prominent with PVP capped nanoparticles as compared to citrate and SDS capped ones. The results of this study demonstrate potential therapeutic applications of silver nanoparticles in combination with antibiotics.

  12. Blue green alga mediated synthesis of gold nanoparticles and its antibacterial efficacy against Gram positive organisms.

    PubMed

    Suganya, K S Uma; Govindaraju, K; Kumar, V Ganesh; Dhas, T Stalin; Karthick, V; Singaravelu, G; Elanchezhiyan, M

    2015-02-01

    Biofunctionalized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) play an important role in design and development of nanomedicine. Synthesis of AuNPs from biogenic materials is environmentally benign and possesses high bacterial inhibition and bactericidal properties. In the present study, blue green alga Spirulina platensis protein mediated synthesis of AuNPs and its antibacterial activity against Gram positive bacteria is discussed. AuNPs were characterized using Ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy, Fluorescence spectroscopy, Fourier Transform-Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, High Resolution-Transmission Electron Microscopy (HR-TEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX). Stable, well defined AuNPs of smaller and uniform shape with an average size of ~ 5 nm were obtained. The antibacterial efficacy of protein functionalized AuNPs were tested against Gram positive organisms Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus.

  13. In-Vitro, Anti-Bacterial Activities of Aqueous Extracts of Acacia catechu (L.F.)Willd, Castanea sativa, Ephedra sinica stapf and shilajita mumiyo Against Gram Positive and Gram Negative Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Dashtdar, Mehrab; Dashtdar, Mohammad Reza; Dashtdar, Babak; shirazi, Mohammad khabaz; Khan, Saeed Ahmad

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Evaluations of the in-vitro anti-bacterial activities of aqueous extracts of Acacia catechu (L.F.)Willd, Castanea sativa, Ephedra sinica stapf and Shilajita mumiyo against gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumonia) and gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli, klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa) are reasonable since these ethnomedicinal plants have been used in Persian folk medicine for treating skin diseases, venereal diseases, respiratory problems and nervous disorders for ages. Methods: The well diffusion method (KB testing) with a concentration of 250 μg/disc was used for evaluating the minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC). Maximum synergistic effects of different combinations of components were also observed. Results: A particular combination of Acacia catechu (L.F.) Willd, Castanea sativa, Ephedra sinica stapf and shilajita mumiyo extracts possesses an outstanding anti-bacterial activity. It's inhibiting effect on microorganisms is significant when compared to the control group (P< 0.05). Staphylococcus aureus was the most sensitive microorganism. The highest antibacterial activity against gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumonia) or gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumonia, Proteus mirabilis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) was exerted by formula number 2 (Table1). Conclusion: The results reveal the presence of antibacterial activities of Acacia catechu, Castanea sativa husk, Ephedra sp. and Mumiyo against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. Synergistic effects in a combined formula, especially in formula number 2 (ASLANⓇ) can lead to potential sources of new antiseptic agents for treatment of acute or chronic skin ulcers. These results considering the significant antibacterial effect of the present formulation, support ethno-pharmacological uses against diarrheal and venereal diseases and demonstrate use of these plants to treat

  14. In Vitro Antibacterial Activity of AZD0914, a New Spiropyrimidinetrione DNA Gyrase/Topoisomerase Inhibitor with Potent Activity against Gram-Positive, Fastidious Gram-Negative, and Atypical Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Bradford, Patricia A.; Otterson, Linda G.; Basarab, Gregory S.; Kutschke, Amy C.; Giacobbe, Robert A.; Patey, Sara A.; Alm, Richard A.; Johnstone, Michele R.; Potter, Marie E.; Miller, Paul F.; Mueller, John P.

    2014-01-01

    AZD0914 is a new spiropyrimidinetrione bacterial DNA gyrase/topoisomerase inhibitor with potent in vitro antibacterial activity against key Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus pyogenes, and Streptococcus agalactiae), fastidious Gram-negative (Haemophilus influenzae and Neisseria gonorrhoeae), atypical (Legionella pneumophila), and anaerobic (Clostridium difficile) bacterial species, including isolates with known resistance to fluoroquinolones. AZD0914 works via inhibition of DNA biosynthesis and accumulation of double-strand cleavages; this mechanism of inhibition differs from those of other marketed antibacterial compounds. AZD0914 stabilizes and arrests the cleaved covalent complex of gyrase with double-strand broken DNA under permissive conditions and thus blocks religation of the double-strand cleaved DNA to form fused circular DNA. Whereas this mechanism is similar to that seen with fluoroquinolones, it is mechanistically distinct. AZD0914 exhibited low frequencies of spontaneous resistance in S. aureus, and if mutants were obtained, the mutations mapped to gyrB. Additionally, no cross-resistance was observed for AZD0914 against recent bacterial clinical isolates demonstrating resistance to fluoroquinolones or other drug classes, including macrolides, β-lactams, glycopeptides, and oxazolidinones. AZD0914 was bactericidal in both minimum bactericidal concentration and in vitro time-kill studies. In in vitro checkerboard/synergy testing with 17 comparator antibacterials, only additivity/indifference was observed. The potent in vitro antibacterial activity (including activity against fluoroquinolone-resistant isolates), low frequency of resistance, lack of cross-resistance, and bactericidal activity of AZD0914 support its continued development. PMID:25385112

  15. Non-Aqueous Glycerol Monolaurate Gel Exhibits Antibacterial and Anti-Biofilm Activity against Gram-Positive and Gram-Negative Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Elizabeth A.; Schlievert, Patrick M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Skin and surgical infections due to Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Acinetobacter baumannii are causes of patient morbidity and increased healthcare costs. These organisms grow planktonically and as biofilms, and many strains exhibit antibiotic resistance. This study examines the antibacterial and anti-biofilm activity of glycerol monolaurate (GML), as solubilized in a non-aqueous vehicle (5% GML Gel), as a novel, broadly-active topical antimicrobial. The FDA has designated GML as generally recognized as safe for human use, and the compound is commonly used in the cosmetic and food industries. Methods In vitro, bacterial strains in broths and biofilms were exposed to GML Gel, and effects on bacterial colony-forming units (CFUs) were assessed. In vivo,subcutaneous incisions were made in New Zealand white rabbits; the incisions were closed with four sutures. Bacterial strains were painted onto the incision sites, and then GML Gel or placebo was liberally applied to cover the sites completely. Rabbits were allowed to awaken and were examined for CFUs as a function of exposure time. Results In vitro, GML Gel was bactericidal for all broth culture and biofilm organisms in <1 hour and <4 hour, respectively; no CFUs were detected after the entire 24 h test period. In vivo, GML Gel inhibited bacterial growth in the surgical incision sites, compared to no growth inhibition in controls. GML Gel significantly reduced inflammation, as viewed by lack of redness in and below the incision sites. Conclusions Our findings suggest that 5% GML Gel is useful as a potent topical antibacterial and anti-inflammatory agent for prevention of infections. PMID:25799455

  16. Antibacterial activity of Lactobacillus acidophilus strains isolated from honey marketed in Malaysia against selected multiple antibiotic resistant (MAR) Gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Aween, Mohamed Mustafa; Hassan, Zaiton; Muhialdin, Belal J; Eljamel, Yossra A; Al-Mabrok, Asma Saleh W; Lani, Mohd Nizam

    2012-07-01

    A total of 32 lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were isolated from 13 honey samples commercially marketed in Malaysia, 6 strains identified as Lactobacillus acidophilus by API CHL50. The isolates had antibacterial activities against multiple antibiotic resistant's Staphylococcus aureus (25 to 32 mm), Staphylococcus epidermis (14 to 22 mm) and Bacillus subtilis (12 to 19 mm) in the agar overlay method after 24 h incubation at 30 °C. The crude supernatant was heat stable at 90 °C and 121 °C for 1 h. Treatment with proteinase K and RNase II maintained the antimicrobial activity of all the supernatants except sample H006-A and H010-G. All the supernatants showed antimicrobial activities against target bacteria at pH 3 and pH 5 but not at pH 6 within 72 h incubation at 30 °C. S. aureus was not inhibited by sample H006-A isolated from Libyan honey and sample H008-D isolated from Malaysian honey at pH 5, compared to supernatants from other L. acidophilus isolates. The presence of different strains of L. acidophilus in honey obtained from different sources may contribute to the differences in the antimicrobial properties of honey.

  17. Antibacterial Efficacy of Eravacycline In Vivo against Gram-Positive and Gram-Negative Organisms

    PubMed Central

    Monogue, Marguerite L.; Hamada, Yukihiro

    2016-01-01

    Members of the tetracycline class are frequently classified as bacteriostatic. However, recent findings have demonstrated an improved antibacterial killing profile, often achieving ≥3 log10 bacterial count reduction, when such antibiotics have been given for periods longer than 24 h. We aimed to study this effect with eravacycline, a novel fluorocycline, given in an immunocompetent murine thigh infection model over 72 h against two methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates (eravacycline MICs = 0.03 and 0.25 μg/ml) and three Enterobacteriaceae isolates (eravacycline MICs = 0.125 to 0.25 μg/ml). A humanized eravacycline regimen, 2.5 mg/kg of body weight given intravenously (i.v.) every 12 h (q12h), demonstrated progressively enhanced activity over the 72-h study period. A cumulative dose response in which bacterial density was reduced by more than 3 log10 CFU at 72 h was noted over the study period in the two Gram-positive isolates, and eravacycline performed similarly to comparator antibiotics (tigecycline, linezolid, and vancomycin). A cumulative dose response with eravacycline and comparators (tigecycline and meropenem) over the study period was also observed in the Gram-negative isolates, although more variability in bacterial killing was observed for all antibacterial agents. Overall, a bacterial count reduction of ≥3 log was achieved in one of the three isolates with both eravacycline and tigecycline, while meropenem achieved a similar endpoint against two of the three isolates. Bactericidal activity is typically defined in vitro over 24 h; however, extended regimen studies in vivo may demonstrate an improved correlation with clinical outcomes by better identification of antimicrobial effects. PMID:27353265

  18. Antibacterial properties of biosurfactants against selected Gram-positive and -negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Díaz De Rienzo, Mayri A; Stevenson, Paul; Marchant, Roger; Banat, Ibrahim M

    2016-01-01

    The antibacterial properties and ability to disrupt biofilms of biosurfactants (rhamnolipids, sophorolipids) and sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) in the presence and absence of selected organic acids were investigated. Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 was inhibited by sophorolipids and SDS at concentrations >5% v/v, and the growth of Escherichia coli NCTC 10418 was also inhibited by sophorolipids and SDS at concentrations >5% and 0.1% v/v, respectively. Bacillus subtilis NCTC 10400 was inhibited by rhamnolipids, sophorolipids and SDS at concentrations >0.5% v/v of all three; the same effect was observed with Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 9144. The ability to attach to surfaces and biofilm formation of P. aeruginosa PAO1, E. coli NCTC 10418 and B. subtilis NCTC 10400 was inhibited by sophorolipids (1% v/v) in the presence of caprylic acid (0.8% v/v). In the case of S. aureus ATCC 9144, the best results were obtained using caprylic acid on its own. It was concluded that sophorolipids are promising compounds for the inhibition/disruption of biofilms formed by Gram-positive and Gram-negative microorganisms and this activity can be enhanced by the presence of booster compounds such as caprylic acid.

  19. The thuggacins, novel antibacterial macrolides from Sorangium cellulosum acting against selected Gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Irschik, Herbert; Reichenbach, Hans; Höfle, Gerhard; Jansen, Rolf

    2007-12-01

    In our screening program we found an activity against some Gram-positive bacteria, including mycobacteria in the culture supernatant of Sorangium cellulosum strain So ce895. The antibiotic responsible for this activity was isolated and named thuggacin. Initial studies towards the mechanism of action showed that thuggacin A inhibits a late step of the respiratory chain of some bacteria.

  20. First Multitarget Chemo-Bioinformatic Model To Enable the Discovery of Antibacterial Peptides against Multiple Gram-Positive Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Speck-Planche, Alejandro; Kleandrova, Valeria V; Ruso, Juan M; Cordeiro, M N D S

    2016-03-28

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have emerged as promising therapeutic alternatives to fight against the diverse infections caused by different pathogenic microorganisms. In this context, theoretical approaches in bioinformatics have paved the way toward the creation of several in silico models capable of predicting antimicrobial activities of peptides. All current models have several significant handicaps, which prevent the efficient search for highly active AMPs. Here, we introduce the first multitarget (mt) chemo-bioinformatic model devoted to performing alignment-free prediction of antibacterial activity of peptides against multiple Gram-positive bacterial strains. The model was constructed from a data set containing 2488 cases of AMPs sequences assayed against at least 1 out of 50 Gram-positive bacterial strains. This mt-chemo-bioinformatic model displayed percentages of correct classification higher than 90.00% in both training and prediction (test) sets. For the first time, two computational approaches derived from basic concepts in genetics and molecular biology were applied, allowing the calculations of the relative contributions of any amino acid (in a defined position) to the antibacterial activity of an AMP and depending on the bacterial strain used in the biological assay. The present mt-chemo-bioinformatic model constitutes a powerful tool to enable the discovery of potent and versatile AMPs.

  1. Bactericidal Activity and Mechanism of Photoirradiated Polyphenols against Gram-Positive and -Negative Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Keisuke; Ishiyama, Kirika; Sheng, Hong; Ikai, Hiroyo; Kanno, Taro; Niwano, Yoshimi

    2015-09-09

    The bactericidal effect of various types of photoirradiated polyphenols against Gram-positive and -negative bacteria was evaluated in relation to the mode of action. Gram-positive bacteria (Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, and Streptococcus mutans) and Gram-negative bacteria (Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) suspended in a 1 mg/mL polyphenol aqueous solution (caffeic acid, gallic acid, chlorogenic acid, epigallocatechin, epigallocatechin gallate, and proanthocyanidin) were exposed to LED light (wavelength, 400 nm; irradiance, 260 mW/cm(2)) for 5 or 10 min. Caffeic acid and chlorogenic acid exerted the highest bactericidal activity followed by gallic acid and proanthocyanidin against both Gram-positive and -negative bacteria. It was also demonstrated that the disinfection treatment induced oxidative damage of bacterial DNA, which suggests that polyphenols are incorporated into bacterial cells. The present study suggests that blue light irradiation of polyphenols could be a novel disinfection treatment.

  2. Antimicrobial Activities of Leaf Extracts of Guava (Psidium guajava L.) on Two Gram-Negative and Gram-Positive Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Bipul; Rogers, Kimberly; McLaughlin, Fredrick; Yadav, Anand

    2013-01-01

    Aim. To determine the antimicrobial potential of guava (Psidium guajava) leaf extracts against two gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli and Salmonella enteritidis) and two gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus cereus) which are some of foodborne and spoilage bacteria. The guava leaves were extracted in four different solvents of increasing polarities (hexane, methanol, ethanol, and water). The efficacy of these extracts was tested against those bacteria through a well-diffusion method employing 50 μL leaf-extract solution per well. According to the findings of the antibacterial assay, the methanol and ethanol extracts of the guava leaves showed inhibitory activity against gram-positive bacteria, whereas the gram-negative bacteria were resistant to all the solvent extracts. The methanol extract had an antibacterial activity with mean zones of inhibition of 8.27 and 12.3 mm, and the ethanol extract had a mean zone of inhibition of 6.11 and 11.0 mm against B. cereus and S. aureus, respectively. On the basis of the present finding, guava leaf-extract might be a good candidate in the search for a natural antimicrobial agent. This study provides scientific understanding to further determine the antimicrobial values and investigate other pharmacological properties. PMID:24223039

  3. Antimicrobial Activities of Leaf Extracts of Guava (Psidium guajava L.) on Two Gram-Negative and Gram-Positive Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Bipul; Rogers, Kimberly; McLaughlin, Fredrick; Daniels, Dwayne; Yadav, Anand

    2013-01-01

    Aim. To determine the antimicrobial potential of guava (Psidium guajava) leaf extracts against two gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli and Salmonella enteritidis) and two gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus cereus) which are some of foodborne and spoilage bacteria. The guava leaves were extracted in four different solvents of increasing polarities (hexane, methanol, ethanol, and water). The efficacy of these extracts was tested against those bacteria through a well-diffusion method employing 50  μ L leaf-extract solution per well. According to the findings of the antibacterial assay, the methanol and ethanol extracts of the guava leaves showed inhibitory activity against gram-positive bacteria, whereas the gram-negative bacteria were resistant to all the solvent extracts. The methanol extract had an antibacterial activity with mean zones of inhibition of 8.27 and 12.3 mm, and the ethanol extract had a mean zone of inhibition of 6.11 and 11.0 mm against B. cereus and S. aureus, respectively. On the basis of the present finding, guava leaf-extract might be a good candidate in the search for a natural antimicrobial agent. This study provides scientific understanding to further determine the antimicrobial values and investigate other pharmacological properties.

  4. [Antimicrobial spectrum of dalbavancin. Mechanism of action and in vitro activity against Gram-positive microorganisms].

    PubMed

    Cercenado, Emilia

    2017-01-01

    Because of the increase in bacterial resistance, there is a need for new antimicrobial agents. Dalbavancin is a semisynthetic glycopeptide that inhibits the late stages of bacterial cell wall synthesis in the same way as vancomycin, but in addition, its lipophilic side chain anchors dalbavancin to the cellular membrane and allows enhanced activity compared with that of vancomycin. Dalbavancin possesses a broad spectrum of in vitro activity against Gram-positive aerobic and anaerobic microorganisms, being 4-8 times more potent than vancomycin. The spectrum of dalbavancin includes staphylococci, enterococci, streptococci, and anaerobic Gram-positive cocci and bacilli. It is active against different species of multiresistant microorganisms, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and penicillin-resistant viridans streptococci and Streptococcus pneumoniae. Although it shows in vitro activity against Enterococcus spp., it is inactive against isolates expressing the VanA phenotype of vancomycin resistance. It also shows slow bactericidal activity against S. aureus, coagulase-negative staphylococci, and Streptococcus pyogenes. In general, the MIC90 (minimum inhibitory concentration 90%) against the majority of the microorganisms is 0.06mg/L and, more than 98% of the isolates that have been tested are inhibited at concentrations of ≤ 0.12mg/L. Dalbavancin is an interesting addition to the therapeutic armamentarium for the treatment of infections caused by Gram-positive microorganisms, including multidrug-resistant isolates.

  5. Armadillidin: a novel glycine-rich antibacterial peptide directed against gram-positive bacteria in the woodlouse Armadillidium vulgare (Terrestrial Isopod, Crustacean).

    PubMed

    Herbinière, Juline; Braquart-Varnier, Christine; Grève, Pierre; Strub, Jean-Marc; Frère, Jacques; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Martin, Gilbert

    2005-01-01

    We report the isolation and the characterization of a novel antibacterial peptide from hemocytes of the woodlouse Armadillidium vulgare, naturally infected or uninfected by Wolbachia, an intracellular Gram-negative bacterium. This molecule displays antibacterial activity against Gram-positive bacteria despite its composition which classes it into the glycine-rich antibacterial peptide family, usually directed against fungi and Gram-negative bacteria. The complete sequence was determined by a combination of Edman degradation, mass spectrometry and cDNA cloning using a hemocyte library. The mature peptide (53 residues) has a 5259 Da molecular mass and is post-translationally modified by a C-terminal amidation. This peptide is characterized by a high level of glycine (47%) and a fivefold repeated motif GGGFH(R/S). As no evident sequence homology to other hitherto described antibacterial peptides has been found out, this antibacterial peptide was named armadillidin. Armadillidin is constitutively expressed in hemocytes and appears to be specific of A. vulgare.

  6. Effect of kojic acid-grafted-chitosan oligosaccharides as a novel antibacterial agent on cell membrane of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoli; Xia, Wenshui; Jiang, Qixing; Xu, Yanshun; Yu, Peipei

    2015-09-01

    Our work here, for the first time, reported the antibacterial activity of kojic acid-grafted-chitosan oligosaccharides (COS/KA) against three gram-positive and three gram-negative bacteria. Integrity of cell membrane, outer membrane (OM) and inner membrane (IM) permeabilization assay, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) assay, and SDS-PAGE assay techniques were used to investigate the interactions between COS/KA and bacterial membranes. The antibacterial activity of COS/KA was higher than those of unmodified COS. The electric conductivity of bacteria suspensions increased, followed by increasing of the units of average release for ALP and G6PDH. COS/KA can also rapidly increase the 1-N-phenylanphthylamine (NPN) uptake and the release of β-galactosidase via increasing the permeability of OM and IM in Escherichia coli. SDS-PAGE indicated the content of cellular soluble proteins decreased significantly in COS/KA-treated bacteria. Hence, COS/KA has potential in food industry and biomedical sciences.

  7. Anti-bacterial performance of azithromycin nanoparticles as colloidal drug delivery system against different gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Azhdarzadeh, Morteza; Lotfipour, Farzaneh; Zakeri-Milani, Parvin; Mohammadi, Ghobad; Valizadeh, Hadi

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Azithromycin (AZI) is a new macrolide antibiotic with a better activity against intracellular gram negative bacteria in comparison with Erythromycin. The purpose of this research was to prepare AZI nanoparticles (NPs) using PLGA polymer and to compare the effectiveness of prepared nanoparticles with untreated AZI solution. Methods: AZI NPs were prepared by Modified Quasi-Emulsion Solvent Diffusion method. The antibacterial activities of prepared NPs in comparison with AZI solution were assayed against indicator bacteria of Escherichia coli (PTCC 1330), Haemophilus influenzae (PTCC 1623) and Streptococcus pneumoniae (PTCC 1240) using agar well diffusion. Inhibition zone diameters (IZD) of nano-formulation were compared to the corresponding untreated AZI. Mean Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) values of AZI were also determined using serial dilution method in nutrient broth medium. Results: Mean IZD of nano-formulations for all indicator bacteria were significantly higher than that of untreated AZI (P<0.01). The enhanced antibacterial efficacy was more dominant in the gram positive species. The MIC values of NPs against the tested bacteria were reduced 8 times in comparison to those of untreated AZI. Conclusion: These results indicated an improved potency of AZI NPs which could be attributed to the modified surface characteristics as well as increased drug adsorption and uptake. PMID:24312766

  8. 18β-Glycyrrhetinic Acid Derivatives Possessing a Trihydroxylated A Ring Are Potent Gram-Positive Antibacterial Agents.

    PubMed

    Huang, Li-Rong; Hao, Xiao-Jiang; Li, Qi-Ji; Wang, Dao-Ping; Zhang, Jian-Xin; Luo, Heng; Yang, Xiao-Sheng

    2016-04-22

    The oleanane-type triterpene 18β-glycyrrhetinic acid (1) was modified chemically through the introduction of a trihydroxylated A ring and an ester moiety at C-20 to enhance its antibacterial activity. Compounds 22, 23, 25, 28, 29, 31, and 32 showed more potent inhibitory activity against Streptomyces scabies than the positive control, streptomycin. Additionally, the inhibitory activity of the most potent compound, 29, against Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus, and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus was greater than that of the positive controls. The antibacterial mode of action of the active derivatives involved the regulation of the expression of genes associated with peptidoglycans, the respiratory metabolism, and the inherent virulence factors found in bacteria, as determined through a quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase PCR assay.

  9. Tribolium castaneum defensins are primarily active against Gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Tonk, Miray; Knorr, Eileen; Cabezas-Cruz, Alejandro; Valdés, James J; Kollewe, Christian; Vilcinskas, Andreas

    2015-11-01

    The red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum is a destructive insect pest of stored food and feed products, and a model organism for development, evolutionary biology and immunity. The insect innate immune system includes antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) with a wide spectrum of targets including viruses, bacteria, fungi and parasites. Defensins are an evolutionarily-conserved class of AMPs and a potential new source of antimicrobial agents. In this context, we report the antimicrobial activity, phylogenetic and structural properties of three T. castaneum defensins (Def1, Def2 and Def3) and their relevance in the immunity of T. castaneum against bacterial pathogens. All three recombinant defensins showed bactericidal activity against Micrococcus luteus and Bacillus thuringiensis serovar tolworthi, but only Def1 and Def2 showed a bacteriostatic effect against Staphylococcus epidermidis. None of the defensins showed activity against the Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas entomophila or against the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. All three defensins were transcriptionally upregulated following a bacterial challenge, suggesting a key role in the immunity of T. castaneum against bacterial pathogens. Phylogenetic analysis showed that defensins from T. castaneum, mealworms, Udo longhorn beetle and houseflies cluster within a well-defined clade of insect defensins. We conclude that T. castaneum defensins are primarily active against Gram-positive bacteria and that other AMPs may play a more prominent role against Gram-negative species.

  10. Antioxidant activity via DPPH, gram-positive and gram-negative antimicrobial potential in edible mushrooms.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Nisar; Mahmood, Fazal; Khalil, Shahid Akbar; Zamir, Roshan; Fazal, Hina; Abbasi, Bilal Haider

    2014-10-01

    Edible mushrooms (EMs) are nutritionally rich source of proteins and essential amino acids. In the present study, the antioxidant activity via 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and antimicrobial potential in EMs (Pleurotus ostreatus, Morchella esculenta, P. ostreatus (Black), P. ostreatus (Yellow) and Pleurotus sajor-caju) were investigated. The DPPH radical scavenging activity revealed that the significantly higher activity (66.47%) was observed in Morchella esculenta at a maximum concentration. Similarly, the dose-dependent concentrations (200, 400, 600, 800 and 1000 µg) were also used for other four EMs. Pleurotus ostreatus exhibited 36.13% activity, P. ostreatus (Black (B)) exhibited 30.64%, P. ostreatus (Yellow (Y)) exhibited 40.75% and Pleurotus sajor-caju exhibited 47.39% activity at higher concentrations. Furthermore, the antimicrobial potential were investigated for its toxicity against gram-negative bacterial strains (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeroginosa, Salmonella typhi, Klebsiella pneumonia, Erwinia carotovora and Agrobacterium tumifaciens), gram-positive bacterial strains (Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus atrophaeus and Staphylococcus aureus) and a fungal strain (Candida albicans) in comparison with standard antibiotics. Antimicrobial screening revealed that the ethanol extract of P. ostreatus was active against all microorganism tested except E. coli. Maximum zone of inhibition (13 mm) was observed against fungus and A. tumifaciens. P. sajor-caju showed best activities (12.5 mm) against B. subtilis, B. atrophaeus and K. pneumonia. P. ostreatus (Y) showed best activities against P. aeroginosa (21.83 mm), B. atrophaeus (20 mm) and C. albicans (21 mm). P. ostreatus (B) exhibited best activities against C. albicans (16 mm) and slightly lower activities against all other microbes except S. typhi. M. esculenta possess maximum activities in terms of inhibition zone against all microorganisms tested except S. typhi.

  11. Gram-positive bacterial cell envelopes: The impact on the activity of antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Malanovic, Nermina; Lohner, Karl

    2016-05-01

    A number of cationic antimicrobial peptides, effectors of innate immunity, are supposed to act at the cytoplasmic membrane leading to permeabilization and eventually membrane disruption. Thereby, interaction of antimicrobial peptides with anionic membrane phospholipids is considered to be a key factor in killing of bacteria. Recently, evidence was provided that killing takes place only when bacterial cell membranes are completely saturated with peptides. This adds to an ongoing debate, which role cell wall components such as peptidoglycan, lipoteichoic acid and lipopolysaccharide may play in the killing event, i.e. if they rather entrap or facilitate antimicrobial peptides access to the cytoplasmic membrane. Therefore, in this review we focused on the impact of Gram-positive cell wall components for the mode of action and activity of antimicrobial peptides as well as in innate immunity. This led us to conclude that interaction of antimicrobial peptides with peptidoglycan may not contribute to a reduction of their antimicrobial activity, whereas interaction with anionic lipoteichoic acids may reduce the local concentration of antimicrobial peptides on the cytoplasmic membrane necessary for sufficient destabilization of the membranes and bacterial killing. Further affinity studies of antimicrobial peptides toward the different cell wall as well as membrane components will be needed to address this problem on a quantitative level. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Antimicrobial peptides edited by Karl Lohner and Kai Hilpert.

  12. Design and characterization of novel antimicrobial peptides, R-BP100 and RW-BP100, with activity against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Torcato, Inês M; Huang, Yen-Hua; Franquelim, Henri G; Gaspar, Diana; Craik, David J; Castanho, Miguel A R B; Troeira Henriques, Sónia

    2013-03-01

    BP100 is a short cationic antimicrobial peptide with a mechanism of action dependent on peptide-lipid interactions and microbial surface charge neutralization. Although active against Gram-negative bacteria, BP100 is inactive against Gram-positive bacteria. In this study we report two newly designed BP100 analogues, RW-BP100 and R-BP100 that have the Tyr residue replaced with a Trp and/or the Lys residues replaced with an Arg. The new analogues in addition to being active against Gram-negative bacteria, possess activity against all tested Gram-positive bacteria. Mechanistic studies using atomic force microscopy, surface plasmon resonance and fluorescence methodologies reveal that the antibacterial efficiency follows the affinity for bacterial membrane. The studies suggest that the activity of BP100 and its analogues against Gram-negative bacteria is mainly driven by electrostatic interactions with the lipopolysaccharide layer and is followed by binding to and disruption of the inner membrane, whereas activity against Gram-positive bacteria, in addition to electrostatic attraction to the exposed lipoteichoic acids, requires an ability to more deeply insert in the membrane environment, which is favoured with Arg residues and is facilitated in the presence of a Trp residue. Knowledge on the mechanism of action of these antimicrobial peptides provides information that assists in the design of antimicrobials with higher efficacy and broader spectra of action, but also on the design of peptides with higher specificity if required.

  13. In-vitro activities of 14-, 15- and 16-membered macrolides against gram-positive cocci.

    PubMed

    Hamilton-Miller, J M

    1992-02-01

    The in-vitro activities of the 14-membered macrolides erythromycin, dirithromycin, roxithromycin, clarithromycin, the 15-membered compound azithromycin and the 16-membered macrolides (16 MM) josamycin, spiramycin and midecamycin acetate (MOM) have been compared against staphylococci, enterococci and streptococci. Results have been analysed separately according to the sensitivity status of the tested strains to erythromycin, namely sensitive (S), inducibly resistant (IR) or constitutively resistant (CR). 14- and 15-membered macrolides were active only against S strains; the order of potency in vitro was clarithromycin = erythromycin greater than azithromycin = roxithromycin greater than dirithromycin. The 16 MM were slightly less active against S strains than were the 14- and 15-membered compounds, and inhibited most IR strains; MOM and josamycin were about twice as potent as spiramycin. IR and S Staphylococcus aureus strains were equally sensitive to 16 MM, while IR strains of coagulase-negative staphylococci were less sensitive than were S strains. All CR strains of S. aureus were resistant to 16 MM, as were most of the other CR strains. However, 5/21 CR coagulase-negative staphylococci and 2/20 CR enterococci tested were sensitive to 16 MM. The seven CR strains showing anomalous sensitivity to the 16 MM (five Staphylococcus haemolyticus and two enterococci) were only 'moderately resistant' to erythromycin (MIC 8-64 mg/L), while all the other CR strains were 'highly resistant' (MIC greater than 128 mg/L). These results indicate that it may be difficult to predict the sensitivity of Gram-positive cocci to 16 MM, and therefore individual sensitivity testing to specific compounds is essential.

  14. In vitro activity of Ozenoxacin against quinolone-susceptible and quinolone-resistant gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    López, Y; Tato, M; Espinal, P; Garcia-Alonso, F; Gargallo-Viola, D; Cantón, R; Vila, J

    2013-12-01

    In vitro activity of ozenoxacin, a novel nonfluorinated topical (L. D. Saravolatz and J. Leggett, Clin. Infect. Dis. 37:1210-1215, 2003) quinolone, was compared with the activities of other quinolones against well-characterized quinolone-susceptible and quinolone-resistant Gram-positive bacteria. Ozenoxacin was 3-fold to 321-fold more active than other quinolones. Ozenoxacin could represent a first-in-class nonfluorinated quinolone for the topical treatment of a broad range of dermatological infections.

  15. In vitro activity of paldimycin (U-70138F) against gram-positive bacteria isolated from patients with cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Rolston, K V; LeBlanc, B; Ho, D H; Bodey, G P

    1987-01-01

    The in vitro activity of paldimycin, a novel antimicrobial agent, was compared with that of vancomycin against 306 gram-positive isolates (representing 12 bacterial species) obtained from patients with cancer. Paldimycin had lower MICs for 90% of isolates than vancomycin did against most isolates tested. Its activity, however, was medium and pH dependent, being greatest in Nutrient broth at a pH of 6.8. PMID:3606069

  16. In Vitro Activities of a New Lipopeptide, HMR 1043, against Susceptible and Resistant Gram-Positive Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Bemer, Pascale; Juvin, Marie-Emmanuelle; Bryskier, Andre; Drugeon, Henri

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the activity of HMR 1043 with those of daptomycin and teicoplanin against gram-positive isolates. Susceptibility tests were performed for 52 strains, 26 parental strains, including staphylococcal, streptococcal, enterococcal, and listerial strains, and 26 HMR 1043-resistant mutants obtained from parental strains by using the Szybalski method. Agar dilution and disk diffusion susceptibility tests were performed by the procedures outlined by the NCCLS. HMR 1043 demonstrated good activity against susceptible and resistant gram-positive bacteria. The activity of HMR 1043 in vitro was less influenced by the presence of calcium ions than that of daptomycin. Susceptibility test breakpoints were not defined because of the poor correlation coefficients obtained with the different disks tested. PMID:12937020

  17. In vitro activities of a new lipopeptide, HMR 1043, against susceptible and resistant gram-positive isolates.

    PubMed

    Bemer, Pascale; Juvin, Marie-Emmanuelle; Bryskier, Andre; Drugeon, Henri

    2003-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the activity of HMR 1043 with those of daptomycin and teicoplanin against gram-positive isolates. Susceptibility tests were performed for 52 strains, 26 parental strains, including staphylococcal, streptococcal, enterococcal, and listerial strains, and 26 HMR 1043-resistant mutants obtained from parental strains by using the Szybalski method. Agar dilution and disk diffusion susceptibility tests were performed by the procedures outlined by the NCCLS. HMR 1043 demonstrated good activity against susceptible and resistant gram-positive bacteria. The activity of HMR 1043 in vitro was less influenced by the presence of calcium ions than that of daptomycin. Susceptibility test breakpoints were not defined because of the poor correlation coefficients obtained with the different disks tested.

  18. Isolation of highly active monoclonal antibodies against multiresistant gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Rossmann, Friederike S; Laverde, Diana; Kropec, Andrea; Romero-Saavedra, Felipe; Meyer-Buehn, Melanie; Huebner, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Multiresistant nosocomial pathogens often cause life-threatening infections that are sometimes untreatable with currently available antibiotics. Staphylococci and enterococci are the predominant Gram-positive species associated with hospital-acquired infections. These infections often lead to extended hospital stay and excess mortality. In this study, a panel of fully human monoclonal antibodies was isolated from a healthy individual by selection of B-cells producing antibodies with high opsonic killing against E. faecalis 12030. Variable domains (VH and VL) of these immunoglobulin genes were amplified by PCR and cloned into an eukaryotic expression vector containing the constant domains of a human IgG1 molecule and the human lambda constant domain. These constructs were transfected into CHO cells and culture supernatants were collected and tested by opsonophagocytic assay against E. faecalis and S. aureus strains (including MRSA). At concentrations of 600 pg/ml, opsonic killing was between 40% and 70% against all strains tested. Monoclonal antibodies were also evaluated in a mouse sepsis model (using S. aureus LAC and E. faecium), a mouse peritonitis model (using S. aureus Newman and LAC) and a rat endocarditis model (using E. faecalis 12030) and were shown to provide protection in all models at a concentration of 4 μg/kg per animal. Here we present a method to produce fully human IgG1 monoclonal antibodies that are opsonic in vitro and protective in vivo against several multiresistant Gram-positive bacteria. The monoclonal antibodies presented in this study are significantly more effective compared to another monoclonal antibody currently in clinical trials.

  19. Isolation of Highly Active Monoclonal Antibodies against Multiresistant Gram-Positive Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Rossmann, Friederike S.; Laverde, Diana; Kropec, Andrea; Romero-Saavedra, Felipe; Meyer-Buehn, Melanie; Huebner, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Multiresistant nosocomial pathogens often cause life-threatening infections that are sometimes untreatable with currently available antibiotics. Staphylococci and enterococci are the predominant Gram-positive species associated with hospital-acquired infections. These infections often lead to extended hospital stay and excess mortality. In this study, a panel of fully human monoclonal antibodies was isolated from a healthy individual by selection of B-cells producing antibodies with high opsonic killing against E. faecalis 12030. Variable domains (VH and VL) of these immunoglobulin genes were amplified by PCR and cloned into an eukaryotic expression vector containing the constant domains of a human IgG1 molecule and the human lambda constant domain. These constructs were transfected into CHO cells and culture supernatants were collected and tested by opsonophagocytic assay against E. faecalis and S. aureus strains (including MRSA). At concentrations of 600 pg/ml, opsonic killing was between 40% and 70% against all strains tested. Monoclonal antibodies were also evaluated in a mouse sepsis model (using S. aureus LAC and E. faecium), a mouse peritonitis model (using S. aureus Newman and LAC) and a rat endocarditis model (using E. faecalis 12030) and were shown to provide protection in all models at a concentration of 4 μg/kg per animal. Here we present a method to produce fully human IgG1 monoclonal antibodies that are opsonic in vitro and protective in vivo against several multiresistant Gram-positive bacteria. The monoclonal antibodies presented in this study are significantly more effective compared to another monoclonal antibody currently in clinical trials. PMID:25706415

  20. Active infective endocarditis due to Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae: zoonosis caused by vancomycin-resistant gram-positive rod.

    PubMed

    Miura, Takashi; Hashizume, Koji; Ariyoshi, Tsuneo; Miwa, Takashi; Furumoto, Akitsugu; Izumida, Mai; Yanagihara, Katsunori; Eishi, Kiyoyuki

    2013-02-01

    A 42-year-old female who was a voluntary worker in a school for handicapped children was referred to us for surgery for active infective endocarditis. Trans-esophageal echocardiography showed 2 large mobile vegetations on the aortic valve and severe aortic regurgitation. Aortic valve replacement was performed to prevent septic embolism and deterioration of congestive heart failure. The empiric therapy with vancomycin, ampicillin, and gentamycin was initiated because a pathogen was not identified. But Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae (gram-positive rod) was isolated on the 4th day after surgery. The target therapy with penicillin G and clindamycin was started and continued for 4 weeks after surgery. The inflammatory parameters improved steadily and the patient was discharged on the 36th day after surgery. Infective endocarditis due to gram-positive rods can be easily mistaken for streptococci or dismissed as a skin contamination. But, E. rhusiopathiae endocarditis should be considered in the differential diagnosis.

  1. In Vitro and In Vivo Activities of a Bi-Aryl Oxazolidinone, RBx 11760, against Gram-Positive Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Barman, Tarani Kanta; Kumar, Manoj; Mathur, Tarun; Chaira, Tridib; Ramkumar, G; Kalia, Vandana; Rao, Madhvi; Pandya, Manisha; Yadav, Ajay Singh; Das, Biswajit; Upadhyay, Dilip J; Hamidullah; Konwar, Rituraj; Raj, V Samuel; Singh, Harpal

    2016-12-01

    RBx 11760, a bi-aryl oxazolidinone, was investigated for antibacterial activity against Gram-positive bacteria. The MIC90s of RBx 11760 and linezolid against Staphylococcus aureus were 2 and 4 mg/liter, against Staphylococcus epidermidis were 0.5 and 2 mg/liter, and against Enterococcus were 1 and 4 mg/liter, respectively. Similarly, against Streptococcus pneumoniae the MIC90s of RBx 11760 and linezolid were 0.5 and 2 mg/liter, respectively. In time-kill studies, RBx 11760, tedizolid, and linezolid exhibited bacteriostatic effect against all tested strains except S. pneumoniae RBx 11760 showed 2-log10 kill at 4× MIC while tedizolid and linezolid showed 2-log10 and 1.4-log10 kill at 16× MIC, respectively, against methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) H-29. Against S. pneumoniae 5051, RBx 11760 showed bactericidal activity, with 4.6-log10 kill at 4× MIC compared to 2.42-log10 and 1.95-log10 kill for tedizolid and linezolid, respectively, at 16× MIC. RBx 11760 showed postantibiotic effects (PAE) at 3 h at 4 mg/liter against MRSA H-29, and linezolid showed the same effect at 16 mg/liter. RBx 11760 inhibited biofilm production against methicillin-resistant S. epidermidis (MRSE) ATCC 35984 in a concentration-dependent manner. In a foreign-body model, linezolid and rifampin resulted in no advantage over stasis, while the same dose of RBx 11760 demonstrated a significant killing compared to the initial control against S. aureus (P < 0.05) and MRSE (P < 0.01). The difference in killing was statistically significant for the lower dose of RBx 11760 (P < 0.05) versus the higher dose of linezolid (P > 0.05 [not significant]) in a groin abscess model. In neutropenic mouse thigh infection, RBx 11760 showed stasis at 20 mg/kg of body weight, whereas tedizolid showed the same effect at 40 mg/kg. These data support RBx 11760 as a promising investigational candidate.

  2. Bacteriocins of gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Jack, R W; Tagg, J R; Ray, B

    1995-01-01

    posttranslational modification and depending on the pH, the molecules may either be released into the environment or remain bound to the cell wall. The antibacterial action against a sensitive cell of a gram-positive strain is produced principally by destabilization of membrane functions. Under certain conditions, gram-negative bacterial cells can also be sensitive to some of these molecules. By application of site-specific mutagenesis, bacteriocin variants which may differ in their antimicrobial spectrum and physicochemical characteristics can be produced. Research activity in this field has grown remarkably but sometimes with an undisciplined regard for conformity in the definition, naming, and categorization of these molecules and their genetic effectors. Some suggestions for improved standardization of nomenclature are offered. PMID:7603408

  3. Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of 4-benzoyl-1-dichlorobenzoylthiosemicarbazides as potent Gram-positive antibacterial agents.

    PubMed

    Paneth, Agata; Plech, Tomasz; Kaproń, Barbara; Hagel, Dominika; Kosikowska, Urszula; Kuśmierz, Edyta; Dzitko, Katarzyna; Paneth, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Twelve 4-benzoyl-1-dichlorobenzoylthiosemicarbazides have been tested as potential antibacterials. All the compounds had MICs between 0.49 and 15.63 µg/ml toward Micrococcus luteus, Bacillus cereus, Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus epidermidis indicating, in most cases, equipotent or even more effective action than cefuroxime. In order to clarify if the observed antibacterial effects are universal, further research were undertaken to test inhibitory potency of two most potent compounds 3 and 11 on clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus. Compound 11 inhibited the growth of methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) at MICs of 1.95-7.81 µg/ml, methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) at MICs of 0.49-1.95 µg/ml and MDR-MRSA at MIC of 0.98 and 3.90 µg/ml, respectively. Finally, inhibitory efficacy of 3 and 11 on planktonic cells and biofilms formation in clinical isolates of S. aureus and Haemophilus parainfluenzae was tested. The majority of cells in biofilm populations of MSSA and MRSA were eradicated at low level of 3, with MBICs in the range of 7.82-15.63 µg/ml.

  4. Assessing the interactions of a natural antibacterial clay with model Gram-positive and Gram-negative human pathogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Londono, S. C.; Williams, L. B.

    2013-12-01

    The emergence of antibiotic resistant bacteria and increasing accumulations of antibiotics in reclaimed water, drive the quest for new natural antimicrobials. We are studying the antibacterial mechanism(s) of clays that have shown an ability to destroy bacteria or significantly inhibit their growth. One possible mode of action is from soluble transition metal species, particularly reduced Fe, capable of generating deleterious oxygen radical species. Yet another possibility is related to membrane damage as a consequence of physical or electrostatic interaction between clay and bacteria. Both mechanisms could combine to produce cell death. This study addresses a natural antibacterial clay from the NW Amazon basin, South America (AMZ clay). Clay mineralogy is composed of disordered kaolinite (28.9%), halloysite (17.8%) illite (12%) and smectite (16.7%). Mean particle size is 1.6μm and total and specific surface area 278.82 and 51.23 m2/g respectively. The pH of a suspension (200mg/ml) is 4.1 and its Eh is 361mV after 24h of equilibration. The ionic strength of the water in equilibrium with the clay after 24 h. is 6 x10-4M. These conditions, affect the element solubility, speciation, and interactions between clay and bacteria. Standard microbiological methods were used to assess the viability of two model bacteria (Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis) after incubation with clay at 37 degC for 24 hrs. A threefold reduction in bacterial viability was observed upon treatment with AMZ clay. We separated the cells from the clay using Nycodenz gradient media and observed the mounts under the TEM and SEM. Results showed several membrane anomalies and structural changes that were not observed in the control cells. Additionally, clay minerals appeared in some places attached to cell walls. Experiments showed that exchanging AMZ clay with KCl caused loss of antibacterial property. Among the exchangeable -and potentially toxic- ions we measured Al+3, Cu+2, Zn+2, Ba+2 and Co+2

  5. Thusin, a Novel Two-Component Lantibiotic with Potent Antimicrobial Activity against Several Gram-Positive Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Bingyue; Zheng, Jinshui; Liu, Hualin; Li, Junhua; Ruan, Lifang; Peng, Donghai; Sajid, Muhammad; Sun, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Due to the rapidly increasing prevalence of multidrug-resistant bacterial strains, the need for new antimicrobial drugs to treat infections has become urgent. Bacteriocins, which are antimicrobial peptides of bacterial origin, are considered potential alternatives to conventional antibiotics and have attracted widespread attention in recent years. Among these bacteriocins, lantibiotics, especially two-component lantibiotics, exhibit potent antimicrobial activity against some clinically relevant Gram-positive pathogens and have potential applications in the pharmaceutical industry. In this study, we characterized a novel two-component lantibiotic termed thusin that consists of Thsα, Thsβ, and Thsβ' (mutation of Thsβ, A14G) and that was isolated from a B. thuringiensis strain BGSC 4BT1. Thsα and Thsβ (or Thsβ') exhibit optimal antimicrobial activity at a 1:1 ratio and act sequentially to affect target cells, and they are all highly thermostable (100°C for 30 min) and pH tolerant (pH 2.0 to 9.0). Thusin shows remarkable efficacy against all tested Gram-positive bacteria and greater activities than two known lantibiotics thuricin 4A-4 and ticin A4, and one antibiotic vancomycin against various bacterial pathogens (Bacillus cereus, Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Staphylococcus sciuri, Enterococcus faecalis, and Streptococcus pneumoniae). Moreover, thusin is also able to inhibit the outgrowth of B. cereus spores. The potent antimicrobial activity of thusin against some Gram-positive pathogens indicates that it has potential for the development of new drugs. PMID:27486447

  6. A super-family of transcriptional activators regulates bacteriophage packaging and lysis in Gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Quiles-Puchalt, Nuria; Tormo-Más, María Ángeles; Campoy, Susana; Toledo-Arana, Alejandro; Monedero, Vicente; Lasa, Iñigo; Novick, Richard P; Christie, Gail E; Penadés, José R

    2013-08-01

    The propagation of bacteriophages and other mobile genetic elements requires exploitation of the phage mechanisms involved in virion assembly and DNA packaging. Here, we identified and characterized four different families of phage-encoded proteins that function as activators required for transcription of the late operons (morphogenetic and lysis genes) in a large group of phages infecting Gram-positive bacteria. These regulators constitute a super-family of proteins, here named late transcriptional regulators (Ltr), which share common structural, biochemical and functional characteristics and are unique to this group of phages. They are all small basic proteins, encoded by genes present at the end of the early gene cluster in their respective phage genomes and expressed under cI repressor control. To control expression of the late operon, the Ltr proteins bind to a DNA repeat region situated upstream of the terS gene, activating its transcription. This involves the C-terminal part of the Ltr proteins, which control specificity for the DNA repeat region. Finally, we show that the Ltr proteins are the only phage-encoded proteins required for the activation of the packaging and lysis modules. In summary, we provide evidence that phage packaging and lysis is a conserved mechanism in Siphoviridae infecting a wide variety of Gram-positive bacteria.

  7. A super-family of transcriptional activators regulates bacteriophage packaging and lysis in Gram-positive bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Quiles-Puchalt, Nuria; Tormo-Más, María Ángeles; Campoy, Susana; Toledo-Arana, Alejandro; Monedero, Vicente; Lasa, Íñigo; Novick, Richard P.; Christie, Gail E.; Penadés, José R.

    2013-01-01

    The propagation of bacteriophages and other mobile genetic elements requires exploitation of the phage mechanisms involved in virion assembly and DNA packaging. Here, we identified and characterized four different families of phage-encoded proteins that function as activators required for transcription of the late operons (morphogenetic and lysis genes) in a large group of phages infecting Gram-positive bacteria. These regulators constitute a super-family of proteins, here named late transcriptional regulators (Ltr), which share common structural, biochemical and functional characteristics and are unique to this group of phages. They are all small basic proteins, encoded by genes present at the end of the early gene cluster in their respective phage genomes and expressed under cI repressor control. To control expression of the late operon, the Ltr proteins bind to a DNA repeat region situated upstream of the terS gene, activating its transcription. This involves the C-terminal part of the Ltr proteins, which control specificity for the DNA repeat region. Finally, we show that the Ltr proteins are the only phage-encoded proteins required for the activation of the packaging and lysis modules. In summary, we provide evidence that phage packaging and lysis is a conserved mechanism in Siphoviridae infecting a wide variety of Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:23771138

  8. Structure-Activity Analysis of Gram-positive Bacterium-producing Lasso Peptides with Anti-mycobacterial Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inokoshi, Junji; Koyama, Nobuhiro; Miyake, Midori; Shimizu, Yuji; Tomoda, Hiroshi

    2016-07-01

    Lariatin A, an 18-residue lasso peptide encoded by the five-gene cluster larABCDE, displays potent and selective anti-mycobacterial activity. The structural feature is an N-terminal macrolactam ring, through which the C-terminal passed to form the rigid lariat-protoknot structure. In the present study, we established a convergent expression system by the strategy in which larA mutant gene-carrying plasmids were transformed into larA-deficient Rhodococcus jostii, and generated 36 lariatin variants of the precursor protein LarA to investigate the biosynthesis and the structure-activity relationships. The mutational analysis revealed that four amino acid residues (Gly1, Arg7, Glu8, and Trp9) in lariatin A are essential for the maturation and production in the biosynthetic machinery. Furthermore, the study on structure-activity relationships demonstrated that Tyr6, Gly11, and Asn14 are responsible for the anti-mycobacterial activity, and the residues at positions 15, 16 and 18 in lariatin A are critical for enhancing the activity. This study will not only provide a useful platform for genetically engineering Gram-positive bacterium-producing lasso peptides, but also an important foundation to rationally design more promising drug candidates for combatting tuberculosis.

  9. Structure-Activity Analysis of Gram-positive Bacterium-producing Lasso Peptides with Anti-mycobacterial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Inokoshi, Junji; Koyama, Nobuhiro; Miyake, Midori; Shimizu, Yuji; Tomoda, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Lariatin A, an 18-residue lasso peptide encoded by the five-gene cluster larABCDE, displays potent and selective anti-mycobacterial activity. The structural feature is an N-terminal macrolactam ring, through which the C-terminal passed to form the rigid lariat-protoknot structure. In the present study, we established a convergent expression system by the strategy in which larA mutant gene-carrying plasmids were transformed into larA-deficient Rhodococcus jostii, and generated 36 lariatin variants of the precursor protein LarA to investigate the biosynthesis and the structure-activity relationships. The mutational analysis revealed that four amino acid residues (Gly1, Arg7, Glu8, and Trp9) in lariatin A are essential for the maturation and production in the biosynthetic machinery. Furthermore, the study on structure-activity relationships demonstrated that Tyr6, Gly11, and Asn14 are responsible for the anti-mycobacterial activity, and the residues at positions 15, 16 and 18 in lariatin A are critical for enhancing the activity. This study will not only provide a useful platform for genetically engineering Gram-positive bacterium-producing lasso peptides, but also an important foundation to rationally design more promising drug candidates for combatting tuberculosis. PMID:27457620

  10. Production of a bacteriocin by a poultry derived Campylobacter jejuni isolate with antimicrobial activity against Clostridium perfringens and other Gram positive bacteria.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have purified a bacteriocin peptide (termed CUV-3), produced by a poultry cecal isolate of Campylobacter jejuni (strain CUV-3) with inhibitory activity against Gram positive bacteria including Clostridium perfringens (38 strains), Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Listeria mon...

  11. Highly active modulators of indole signaling alter pathogenic behaviors in Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Minvielle, Marine J; Eguren, Kristen; Melander, Christian

    2013-12-16

    Indole is a universal signal that regulates various bacterial behaviors, such as biofilm formation and antibiotic resistance. To generate mechanistic probes of indole signaling and control indole-mediated pathogenic phenotypes in both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, we have investigated the use of desformylflustrabromine (dFBr) derivatives to generate highly active indole mimetics. We have developed non-microbicidal dFBr derivatives that are 27-2000 times more active than indole in modulating biofilm formation, motility, acid resistance, and antibiotic resistance. The activity of these analogues parallels indole, because they are dependent on temperature, the enzyme tryptophanase TnaA, and the transcriptional regulator SdiA. This investigation demonstrates that molecules based on the dFBr scaffold can alter pathogenic behaviors by mimicking indole-signaling pathways.

  12. Antimicrobial and Efflux Pump Inhibitory Activity of Caffeoylquinic Acids from Artemisia absinthium against Gram-Positive Pathogenic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Fiamegos, Yiannis C.; Kastritis, Panagiotis L.; Exarchou, Vassiliki; Han, Haley; Bonvin, Alexandre M. J. J.; Vervoort, Jacques; Lewis, Kim; Hamblin, Michael R.; Tegos, George P.

    2011-01-01

    Background Traditional antibiotics are increasingly suffering from the emergence of multidrug resistance amongst pathogenic bacteria leading to a range of novel approaches to control microbial infections being investigated as potential alternative treatments. One plausible antimicrobial alternative could be the combination of conventional antimicrobial agents/antibiotics with small molecules which block multidrug efflux systems known as efflux pump inhibitors. Bioassay-driven purification and structural determination of compounds from plant sources have yielded a number of pump inhibitors which acted against gram positive bacteria. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study we report the identification and characterization of 4′,5′-O-dicaffeoylquinic acid (4′,5′-ODCQA) from Artemisia absinthium as a pump inhibitor with a potential of targeting efflux systems in a wide panel of Gram-positive human pathogenic bacteria. Separation and identification of phenolic compounds (chlorogenic acid, 3′,5′-ODCQA, 4′,5′-ODCQA) was based on hyphenated chromatographic techniques such as liquid chromatography with post column solid-phase extraction coupled with nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and mass spectroscopy. Microbial susceptibility testing and potentiation of well know pump substrates revealed at least two active compounds; chlorogenic acid with weak antimicrobial activity and 4′,5′-ODCQA with pump inhibitory activity whereas 3′,5′-ODCQA was ineffective. These intitial findings were further validated with checkerboard, berberine accumulation efflux assays using efflux-related phenotypes and clinical isolates as well as molecular modeling methodology. Conclusions/Significance These techniques facilitated the direct analysis of the active components from plant extracts, as well as dramatically reduced the time needed to analyze the compounds, without the need for prior isolation. The calculated energetics of the docking poses supported the

  13. Antimicrobial activity of Enterococcus Faecium Fair-E 198 against gram-positive pathogens

    PubMed Central

    do Nascimento, Maristela da Silva; Moreno, Izildinha; Kuaye, Arnaldo Yoshiteru

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT This study investigated the antimicrobial activity of Enterococcus faecium FAIR-E 198 against Bacillus cereus, Listeria monocytogenes and Staphylococcus aureus. Using the critical-dilution method, the bacteriocin produced by E. faecium FAIR-E 198 inhibited all L. monocytogenes strains evaluated (1,600 to 19,200 AU mL-1). However, none of the B. cereus and S. aureus strains investigated were inhibited. The maximum activity of this bacteriocin (800 AU mL-1) was observed in MRS broth, while the activity in milk was 100 AU mL-1. In the co-cultivation test in milk, B. cereus K1-B041 was reduced to below the detection limit (1.00 log CFU mL-1) after 48 h. E. faecium reduced the initial L. monocytogenes Scott A population by 1 log CFU mL-1 after 3 h at 35°C, However, the pathogen regained growth, reaching 3.68 log CFU mL-1 after 48 h. E. faecium did not influence the growth of S. aureus ATCC 27154 during the 48 h of co-cultivation, Therefore, it can be concluded that the effectiveness of the antimicrobial activity of E. faecium FAIR-E 198 is strictly related to the species and strain of the target microorganism and to the culture medium, PMID:24031466

  14. The position of prenylation of isoflavonoids and stilbenoids from legumes (Fabaceae) modulates the antimicrobial activity against Gram positive pathogens.

    PubMed

    Araya-Cloutier, Carla; den Besten, Heidy M W; Aisyah, Siti; Gruppen, Harry; Vincken, Jean-Paul

    2017-07-01

    The legume plant family (Fabaceae) is a potential source of antimicrobial phytochemicals. Molecular diversity in phytochemicals of legume extracts was enhanced by germination and fungal elicitation of seven legume species, as established by RP-UHPLC-UV-MS. The relationship between phytochemical composition, including different types of skeletons and substitutions, and antibacterial properties of extracts was investigated. Extracts rich in prenylated isoflavonoids and stilbenoids showed potent antibacterial activity against Listeria monocytogenes and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus at concentrations between 0.05 and 0.1% (w/v). Prenylated phenolic compounds were significantly (p<0.01) correlated with the antibacterial properties of the extracts. Furthermore, the position of the prenyl group within the phenolic skeleton also influenced the antibacterial activity. Overall, prenylated phenolics from legume seedlings can serve multiple purposes, e.g. as phytoestrogens they can provide health benefits and as natural antimicrobials they offer preservation of foods.

  15. Sortase activity is controlled by a flexible lid in the pilus biogenesis mechanism of gram-positive pathogens.

    PubMed

    Manzano, Clothilde; Izoré, Thierry; Job, Viviana; Di Guilmi, Anne Marie; Dessen, Andréa

    2009-11-10

    Pili are surface-linked virulence factors that play key roles in infection establishment in a variety of pathogenic species. In Gram-positive pathogens, pilus formation requires the action of sortases, dedicated transpeptidases that covalently associate pilus building blocks. In Streptococcus pneumoniae, a major human pathogen, all genes required for pilus formation are harbored in a single pathogenicity islet which encodes three structural proteins (RrgA, RrgB, RrgC) and three sortases (SrtC-1, SrtC-2, SrtC-3). RrgB forms the backbone of the streptococcal pilus, to which minor pilins RrgA and RrgC are covalently associated. SrtC-1 is the main sortase involved in polymerization of the RrgB fiber and displays a lid which encapsulates the active site, a feature present in all pilus-related sortases. In this work, we show that catalysis by SrtC-1 proceeds through a catalytic triad constituted of His, Arg, and Cys and that lid instability affects protein fold and catalysis. In addition, we show by thermal shift analysis that lid flexibility can be stabilized by the addition of substrate-like peptides, a feature shared by other periplasmic transpeptidases. We also report the characterization of a trapped acyl-enzyme intermediate formed between SrtC-1 and RrgB. The presence of lid-encapsulated sortases in the pilus biogenesis systems in many Gram-positive pathogens points to a common mechanism of substrate recognition and catalysis that should be taken into consideration in the development of sortase inhibitors.

  16. Comparative in vitro activity of gatifloxacin, grepafloxacin, levofloxacin, moxifloxacin and trovafloxacin against 4151 Gram-negative and Gram-positive organisms.

    PubMed

    Blondeau, J M; Laskowski, R; Bjarnason, J; Stewart, C

    2000-02-01

    Gatifloxacin, grepafloxacin, moxifloxacin and trovafloxacin are fluoroquinolones with enhanced Gram-positive activity while retaining broad-spectrum activity against Gram-negative pathogens. Levofloxacin and ciprofloxacin are older quinolones with broad activity against Gram-negative pathogens and borderline activity against some Gram-positive organisms. We compared the in vitro activity of these compounds against 4151 Gram-negative and -positive organisms. Gatifloxacin, grepafloxacin, moxifloxacin and trovafloxacin were highly active against penicillin sensitive and resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes and Streptococcus agalactiae. Ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin were active but less potent. All compounds were highly active (overall) against Gram-negative pathogens with ciprofloxacin being the most active agent against Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Our data indicate that the advanced fluoroquinolones will be important compounds for treating infections caused by Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogens.

  17. Kinetics and quantification of antibacterial effects of beta-lactams, macrolides, and quinolones against gram-positive and gram-negative RTI pathogens.

    PubMed

    Schaper, K-J; Schubert, S; Dalhoff, A

    2005-12-01

    Traditionally, the in vitro activity of antibacterial agents is characterized by their minimal inhibitory concentrations. However, these endpoints are, by nature, discrete and do not provide information on time-dependent killing of the bacteria during the incubation period. Nevertheless, the pharmacodynamic characteristics of antibacterial agents are almost always defined by correlating a static endpoint describing the antibacterial activity of an agent with the pharmacokinetics, describing the time-dependent fluctuation of drug concentrations. This approach is basically a contradiction in itself. Therefore, it would be more logical to correlate pharmacokinetics to in vitro parameters describing the time- and concentration-dependent antibacterial action of an agent. Thus, experimental methods and mathematical models quantifying the decrease in growth rate of a bacterial population due to the action of an antibacterial agent as a function of time and drug concentration have been applied to quantitate their pharmacodynamics. The effect of nine antibacterial agents representing drug classes of penicillins, cephalosporins, penems, macrolides, and fluoroquinolones were mathematically analyzed by using three different but related models. The kill rate, maximal kill, the 50%-effective concentration (EC50), the Hill coefficient, and concentrations and times needed to obtain a 1,000-fold decrease of the initial number of viable counts were calculated. Both the phenotypic description of the time-kill curves and these five parameters mirror the bacteriostatic or bactericidal activity of all nine agents studied as a function of time and concentration. Therefore, it would be more logical to correlate a parameter quantifying the kinetics of antibacterial in vitro activity with the pharmacokinetics of the drug, thus, replacing static endpoints like minimal inhibitory concentrations.

  18. Comparative in vitro activity of gemifloxacin against gram-positive and gram-negative clinical isolates in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Lopez, H; Stepanik, D; Vilches, V; Scarano, S; Sarachian, B; Mikaelian, G; Finlay, J; Sucari, A

    2001-08-01

    The in vitro activity of gemifloxacin against 1,000 clinical isolates of 147 Streptococcus pneumoniae (115, penicilin susceptible; 26, intermediate penicillin-resistant and 6, penicillin-resistant), 127 Hemophilus influenzae (109, beta lactamasa non-producer; 18, beta lactamase producers), 95 Streptococcus pyogenes (6, azytromycin-resistant), 84 Moraxella catarrhalis (79, beta lactamase producers), 110 Staphilococcus aureus (89, methicillin-susceptible; 21, methicilin-resistant), 98 Eenterococcus faecalis and 339 Enterobacteriacea, (recovered from patients with respiratory tract infection; skin and soft tissue infection and urinary tract infection), was compared with the activities of four fluorquinolones and five other antimicrobial agents. Of the quinolones tested, gemifloxacin was the most potent against Streptococcus pneumoniae, including penicillin intermediate and resistant strains. Mic(90) values obtained for gemifloxacin, ciprofloxacin, ofloxacin, levofloxacin and trvafloxacin were 0.03, 2, 2, 1 and 0.25 mg/L respectively. Gemifloxacin was 16 fold more potent than ciprofloxacin against methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus and 32 fold more potent than ciprofloxacin against Streptococcus pyogenes. When tested against Hemophilus influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis and Enterobacteriaceae, all the quinolones showed similar activity. Our results demonstrate that gemifloxacin has similar activity than the other quinolones tested against Gram-negative organisms and is considerably more potent against Gram-positive organisms.

  19. ZL-2, a cathelicidin-derived antimicrobial peptide, has a broad antimicrobial activity against gram-positive bacteria and gram-negative bacteria in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Tu, Jiancheng; Wu, Geping; Zuo, Yun; Zhao, Lei; Wang, Shusheng

    2015-10-01

    Alloferons are a group of naturally occurring peptides primarily isolated from insects that are capable of stimulating mouse and human NK cell cytotoxicity toward cancer cells. In this study, we found that a modified antibacterial peptide had a broad range of action against both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. A time-course experiment showed that CFU counts rapidly decreased after ZL-2 treatment, with the bacteria nearly eliminated within 4 h. We also examined the synergy between the peptide and antibiotics. The peptide ZL-2 resulted in a significant synergistic improvement in the potencies of ampicillin, erythromycin and ceftazidime against methicillin-resistant bacteria. In addition, ZL-2 had no detectable cytotoxicity in mouse spleen cells or a mouse animal model. In the mouse model by i.p. inoculation with Escherichia coli, timely treatment of i.p. injection with ZL-2 resulted in 100-fold reduction in bacteria load in blood as well as 80% protection from death in the inoculated animals. In conclusion, we successfully identified a modified peptide with maximal bactericidal activity. This study also provides a potential therapeutic for the treatment of E. coli septicemia by increasing the activity of antimicrobials.

  20. First study on antimicriobial activity and synergy between isothiocyanates and antibiotics against selected Gram-negative and Gram-positive pathogenic bacteria from clinical and animal source.

    PubMed

    Dias, Carla; Aires, Alfredo; Bennett, Richard N; Rosa, Eduardo A S; Saavedra, Maria J

    2012-05-01

    The emergence of new diseases and the resurgence of several infections that were controlled in the past, associated with recent increase of bacterial resistance have created the necessity for more studies towards to the development of new antimicrobials and new treatment strategies. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the in vitro synergy between different classes of important glucosinolates hydrolysis products-isothiocyanates with antibiotics (gentamycin and vancomycin), against important pathogenic bacteria: Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis, Listeria monocytogenes, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. A disc diffusion method was used to evaluate the antibacterial activity. The antimicrobial activity of phytochemicals and combinations between gentamycin, vancomycin and phytochemicals were quantitatively assessed by measuring the inhibitory halos. The results showed a selective antimicrobial effect of isothiocyanates, and this effect was strictly related with their chemical structure. In general the benzylisothiocyanate was the most effective compound against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. The Listeria monocytogenes and Staphylococcus aureus were the bacteria most affected either by the phytochemicals alone or by the combination phytochemical-antibiotic. The bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa was the less affected pathogen. The most important synergism detected occurred between the commercial antibiotics with benzylisothiocyanate and 2-phenylethylisothiocyanate. In conclusion, some isothiocyanates are effective inhibitors of in vitro bacterial growth, and they can act synergistically with antibiotics.

  1. In vitro activity of Oritavancin against gram-positive pathogens isolated in Canadian hospital laboratories from 2011 to 2015.

    PubMed

    Karlowsky, James A; Walkty, Andrew J; Baxter, Melanie R; Arhin, Francis F; Moeck, Gregory; Adam, Heather J; Zhanel, George G

    2017-04-01

    Gram-positive bacterial pathogens isolated from patient specimens submitted to 15 Canadian hospital laboratories from 2011 to 2015 were tested in the coordinating laboratory for susceptibility to oritavancin and comparative antimicrobial agents using the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute M07-A10 (2015) broth microdilution method. Oritavancin's in vitro activity was equivalent to, or more potent than, vancomycin, daptomycin, linezolid, and tigecycline against methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (n=2680; oritavancin MIC90, 0.12μg/mL; 99.9% oritavancin-susceptible), methicillin-resistant S. aureus (n=728; oritavancin MIC90, 0.12μg/mL; 99.7% oritavancin-susceptible), Streptococcus pyogenes (n=218; oritavancin MIC90, 0.25μg/mL; 100% oritavancin-susceptible), Streptococcus agalactiae (n=269; oritavancin MIC90, 0.12μg/mL; 100% oritavancin-susceptible), and vancomycin-susceptible Enterococcus faecalis (n=508; oritavancin MIC90, 0.06μg/mL; 100% oritavancin-susceptible). Oritavancin, dalbavancin, and telavancin demonstrated equivalent in vitro activities (MIC90, μg/mL) against 602 isolates of MSSA (0.06, 0.06, 0.06, respectively) and 144 isolates of MRSA (0.12, 0.06, 0.06, respectively) collected in 2015.

  2. In vitro activity of monoclonal and recombinant yeast killer toxin-like antibodies against antibiotic-resistant gram-positive cocci.

    PubMed Central

    Conti, S.; Magliani, W.; Arseni, S.; Dieci, E.; Frazzi, R.; Salati, A.; Varaldo, P. E.; Polonelli, L.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Monoclonal (mAbKT) and recombinant single-chain (scFvKT) anti-idiotypic antibodies were produced to represent the internal image of a yeast killer toxin (KT) characterized by a wide spectrum of antimicrobial activity, including gram-positive cocci. Pathogenic eukaryotic and prokaryotic microorganisms, such as Candida albicans, Pneumocystis carinii, and a multidrug-resistant strain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, presenting specific, although yet undefined, KT-cell wall receptors (KTR), have proven to be killed in vitro by mAbKT and scFvKT. mAbKT and scFvKT exert a therapeutic effect in vivo in experimental models of candidiasis and pneumocystosis by mimicking the functional activity of protective antibodies naturally produced in humans against KTR of infecting microorganisms. The swelling tide of concern over increasing bacterial resistance to antibiotic drugs gives the impetus to develop new therapeutic compounds against microbial threat. Thus, the in vitro bactericidal activity of mAbKT and scFvKT against gram-positive, drug-resistant cocci of major epidemiological interest was investigated. MATERIALS AND METHODS: mAbKT and scFvKT generated by hybridoma and DNA recombinant technology from the spleen lymphocytes of mice immunized with a KT-neutralizing monoclonal antibody (mAb KT4) were used in a conventional colony forming unit (CFU) assay to determine, from a qualitative point of view, their bactericidal activity against Staphylococcus aureus, S. haemolyticus, Enterococcus faecalis, E. faecium, and Streptococcus pneumoniae strains. These bacterial strains are characterized by different patterns of resistance to antibiotics, including methicillin, vancomycin, and penicillin. RESULTS: According to the experimental conditions adopted, no bacterial isolate proved to be resistant to the activity of mAbKT and scFvKT. CONCLUSIONS: scFvKT exerted a microbicidal activity against multidrug resistant bacteria, which may represent the basis for the drug modeling

  3. Design of a Nanostructured Active Surface against Gram-Positive and Gram-Negative Bacteria through Plasma Activation and in Situ Silver Reduction.

    PubMed

    Gilabert-Porres, Joan; Martí, Sara; Calatayud, Laura; Ramos, Victor; Rosell, Antoni; Borrós, Salvador

    2016-01-13

    Nowadays there is an increasing focus for avoiding bacterial colonization in a medical device after implantation. Bacterial infection associated with prosthesis implantation, or even along the lifetime of the implanted prosthesis, entails a serious problem, emphasized with immunocompromised patients. This work shows a new methodology to create highly hydrophobic micro-/nanostructured silver antibacterial surfaces against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, using low-pressure plasma. PDMS (polydimethylsiloxane) samples, typically used in tracheal prosthesis, are coated with PFM (pentafluorophenyl methacrylate) through PECVD (plasma enhance chemical vapor deposition) technique. PFM thin films offer highly reactive ester groups that allow them to react preferably with amine bearing molecules, such as amine sugar, to create controlled reductive surfaces capable of reducing silver salts to a nanostructured metallic silver. This micro-/nanostructured silver coating shows interesting antibacterial properties combined with an antifouling behavior causing a reduction of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria viability. In addition, these types of silver-coated samples show no apparent cytotoxicity against COS-7 cells.

  4. Lysis of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria by antibacterial porous polymeric monolith formed in microfluidic biochips for sample preparation.

    PubMed

    Aly, Mohamed Aly Saad; Gauthier, Mario; Yeow, John

    2014-09-01

    Bacterial cell lysis is demonstrated using polymeric microfluidic biochips operating via a hybrid mechanical shearing/contact killing mechanism. These biochips are fabricated from a cross-linked poly(methyl methacrylate) (X-PMMA) substrate by well-controlled, high-throughput laser micromachining. The unreacted double bonds at the surface of X-PMMA provide covalent bonding for the formation of a porous polymeric monolith (PPM), thus contributing to the mechanical stability of the biochip and eliminating the need for surface treatment. The lysis efficiency of these biochips was tested for gram-positive (Enterococcus saccharolyticus and Bacillus subtilis) and gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas fluorescens) and confirmed by off-chip PCR without further purification. The influence of the flow rate when pumping the bacterial suspension through the PPM, and of the hydrophobic-hydrophilic balance on the cell lysis efficiency was investigated at a cell concentration of 10(5) CFU/mL. It was shown that the contribution of contact killing to cell lysis was more important than that of mechanical shearing in the PPM. The biochip showed better lysis efficiency than the off-chip chemical, mechanical, and thermal lysis techniques used in this work. The biochip also acts as a filter that isolates cell debris and allows PCR-amplifiable DNA to pass through. The system performs more efficient lysis for gram-negative than for gram-positive bacteria. The biochip does not require chemical/enzymatic reagents, power consumption, or complicated design and fabrication processes, which makes it an attractive on-chip lysis device that can be used in sample preparation for genetics and point-of-care diagnostics. The biochips were reused for 20 lysis cycles without any evidence of physical damage to the PPM, significant performance degradation, or DNA carryover when they were back-flushed between cycles. The biochips efficiently lysed both gram-positive and gram

  5. In vitro activity of tigecycline and comparators against Gram-positive and Gram-negative isolates collected from the Middle East and Africa between 2004 and 2011.

    PubMed

    Kanj, Souha S; Whitelaw, Andrew; Dowzicky, Michael J

    2014-02-01

    The Tigecycline Evaluation and Surveillance Trial (T.E.S.T.) was established in 2004 to monitor longitudinal changes in bacterial susceptibility to numerous antimicrobial agents, specifically tigecycline. In this study, susceptibility among Gram-positive and Gram-negative isolates between 2004 and 2011 from the Middle East and Africa was examined. Antimicrobial susceptibilities were determined using Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) interpretive criteria, and minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined by broth microdilution methods. US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved breakpoints were used for tigecycline. In total, 2967 Gram-positive and 6322 Gram-negative isolates were examined from 33 participating centres. All Staphylococcus aureus isolates, including meticillin-resistant S. aureus, were susceptible to tigecycline, linezolid and vancomycin. Vancomycin, linezolid, tigecycline and levofloxacin were highly active (>97.6% susceptibility) against Streptococcus pneumoniae, including penicillin-non-susceptible strains. All Enterococcus faecium isolates were susceptible to tigecycline and linezolid, including 32 vancomycin-resistant isolates. Extended-spectrum β-lactamases were produced by 16.6% of Escherichia coli and 32.9% of Klebsiella pneumoniae. More than 95% of E. coli and Enterobacter spp. were susceptible to amikacin, tigecycline, imipenem and meropenem. The most active agents against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii were amikacin (88.0% susceptible) and minocycline (64.2% susceptible), respectively; the MIC90 (MIC required to inhibit 90% of the isolates) of tigecycline against A. baumannii was low at 2mg/L. Tigecycline and carbapenem agents were highly active against most Gram-negative pathogens. Tigecycline, linezolid and vancomycin showed good activity against most Gram-positive pathogens from the Middle East and Africa.

  6. Zulu medicinal plants with antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Kelmanson, J E; Jäger, A K; van Staden, J

    2000-03-01

    Aqueous, methanolic and ethyl acetate extracts of 14 plants used in traditional Zulu medicine for treatment of ailments of an infectious nature were screened for antibacterial activity. Most of the activity detected was against gram-positive bacteria. Tuber bark extracts of Dioscorea sylvatica had activity against gram-negative Escherichia coli and extracts of Dioscorea dregeana, Cheilanthes viridis and Vernonia colorata were active against Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The highest antibacterial activity was found in extracts of C. viridis, D. dregeana, D. silvatica, Melianthus comosus and V. colorata. In general, methanolic extracts exhibited higher activity than aqueous and ethyl acetate extracts.

  7. Natural product derivatives with bactericidal activity against Gram-positive pathogens including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecalis.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Joshua B; Smith, Adrienne E; Kusche, Brian R; Bessette, Bradley A; Swain, P Whitney; Bergmeier, Stephen C; McMills, Mark C; Wright, Dennis L; Priestley, Nigel D

    2010-10-01

    We have shown that the intentional engineering of a natural product biosynthesis pathway is a useful way to generate stereochemically complex scaffolds for use in the generation of combinatorial libraries that capture the structural features of both natural products and synthetic compounds. Analysis of a prototype library based upon nonactic acid lead to the discovery of triazole-containing nonactic acid analogs, a new structural class of antibiotic that exhibits bactericidal activity against drug resistant, Gram-positive pathogens including Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus faecalis.

  8. Surveillance of tedizolid activity and resistance: In vitro susceptibility of Gram-positive pathogens collected over 5 years from the United States and Europe.

    PubMed

    Bensaci, Mekki; Sahm, Daniel

    2017-02-01

    In vitro activity of tedizolid and comparators against 11,231 Gram-positive clinical isolates from the United States (84 centers) and Europe (115 centers) were summarized as part of the Surveillance of Tedizolid Activity and Resistance program between 2009 and 2013. Susceptibility testing was performed according to Clinical Laboratory and Standards Institute (CLSI) guidelines. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) interpretations were based on CLSI and European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing criteria. Tedizolid inhibited 99.7% of all isolates at MIC ≤0.5 mg/L; activity was similar regardless of methicillin or vancomycin resistance phenotypes of Staphylococcus aureus and enterococci, respectively. Tedizolid MIC >1 mg/L was reported for 3 S. aureus, 4 coagulase-negative staphylococci, and 2 enterococcal isolates; all streptococci were inhibited at MIC ≤0.5 mg/L. Tedizolid was ≥4-fold more potent than linezolid against all groups, including resistant phenotypes. Tedizolid had potent/stable activity against a large, contemporary collection of Gram-positive clinical isolates, with low rates of resistance.

  9. In Vitro Activity of AZD0914, a Novel Bacterial DNA Gyrase/Topoisomerase IV Inhibitor, against Clinically Relevant Gram-Positive and Fastidious Gram-Negative Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Huband, Michael D.; Hackel, Meredith; de Jonge, Boudewijn L. M.; Sahm, Daniel F.; Bradford, Patricia A.

    2015-01-01

    AZD0914, a new spiropyrimidinetrione bacterial DNA gyrase inhibitor with a novel mode of inhibition, has activity against bacterial species commonly cultured from patient infection specimens, including fluoroquinolone-resistant isolates. This study assessed the in vitro activity of AZD0914 against key Gram-positive and fastidious Gram-negative clinical isolates collected globally in 2013. AZD0914 demonstrated potent activity, with MIC90s for AZD0914 of 0.25 mg/liter against Staphylococcus aureus (n = 11,680), coagulase-negative staphylococci (n = 1,923), streptococci (n = 4,380), and Moraxella catarrhalis (n = 145), 0.5 mg/liter against Staphylococcus lugdunensis (n = 120) and Haemophilus influenzae (n = 352), 1 mg/liter against Enterococcus faecalis (n = 1,241), and 2 mg/liter against Haemophilus parainfluenzae (n = 70). The activity against Enterococcus faecium was more limited (MIC90, 8 mg/liter). The spectrum and potency of AZD0914 included fluoroquinolone-resistant isolates in each species group, including methicillin-resistant staphylococci, penicillin-resistant streptococci, vancomycin-resistant enterococci, β-lactamase-producing Haemophilus spp., and M. catarrhalis. Based on these in vitro findings, AZD0914 warrants further investigation for its utility against a variety of Gram-positive and fastidious Gram-negative bacterial species. PMID:26195518

  10. Antibacterial activity of traditional Australian medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Palombo, E A; Semple, S J

    2001-10-01

    Fifty-six ethanolic extracts of various parts of 39 plants used in traditional Australian Aboriginal medicine were investigated for their antibacterial activities against four Gram-positive (Bacillus cereus, Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes) and four Gram-negative (Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Salmonella typhimurium) bacterial species. In a plate-hole diffusion assay, 12 extracts inhibited the growth of one or more of the bacteria, with five extracts showing broad spectrum antibacterial activity against Gram-positive bacteria. B. cereus was the most susceptible bacterium, with all 12 extracts displaying activity against this organism. Extracts from the leaves of Eremophila species (Myoporaceae) were the most active, with Eremophila duttonii exhibiting the greatest activity (against Gram-positive bacteria). The antibacterial effects of E. duttonii were further investigated by time-course growth assays which showed that significant growth inhibition was observed in cultures incubated in the presence of the extract within 1 h for B. cereus, E. faecalis and S. aureus and 2 h for S. pyogenes.

  11. Facile synthesis of gold nanoparticles on propylamine functionalized SBA-15 and effect of surface functionality of its enhanced bactericidal activity against gram positive bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhuyan, Diganta; Gogoi, Animesh; Saikia, Mrinal; Saikia, Ratul; Saikia, Lakshi

    2015-07-01

    The facile synthesis of an SBA-15-pr-+NH3.Au0 nano-hybrid material by spontaneous autoreduction of aqueous chloroaurate anions on propylamine functionalized SBA-15 was successfully demonstrated. The as-synthesized SBA-15-pr-+NH3.Au0 nano-hybrid material was well characterized using low and wide angle x-ray diffraction (XRD), N2 adsorption-desorption isotherms, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), UV-Visible spectroscopy and atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). The activity of the nano-hybrid material as a potent bactericidal agent was successfully tested against Gram positive/negative bacteria viz. Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The colony killing percentage of Gram positive bacteria was found to be higher than Gram negative bacteria due to the stronger electrostatic interaction between the positively-charged amine functionality of SBA-15 and the negatively charged functionality of the bacterial cell wall.

  12. Alternating electric fields combined with activated carbon for disinfection of Gram negative and Gram positive bacteria in fluidized bed electrode system.

    PubMed

    Racyte, Justina; Bernard, Séverine; Paulitsch-Fuchs, Astrid H; Yntema, Doekle R; Bruning, Harry; Rijnaarts, Huub H M

    2013-10-15

    Strong electric fields for disinfection of wastewaters have been employed already for several decades. An innovative approach combining low strength (7 V/cm) alternating electric fields with a granular activated carbon fluidized bed electrode (FBE) for disinfection was presented recently. For disinfection performance of FBE several pure microbial cultures were tested: Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus subtilis subsp. subtilis, Enterococcus faecalis as representatives from Gram positive bacteria and Erwinia carotovora, Pseudomonas luteola, Pseudomonas fluorescens and Escherichia coli YMc10 as representatives from Gram negative bacteria. The alternating electric field amplitude and shape were kept constant. Only the effect of alternating electric field frequency on disinfection performance was investigated. From the bacteria tested, the Gram negative strains were more susceptible and the Gram positive microorganisms were more resistant to FBE disinfection. The collected data indicate that the efficiency of disinfection is frequency and strain dependent. During 6 h of disinfection, the decrease above 2 Log units was achieved with P. luteola and E. coli at 10 kHz and at dual frequency shift keying (FSK) modulated signal with frequencies of 10 kHz and 140 kHz. FBE technology appears to offer a new way for selective bacterial disinfection, however further optimizations are needed on treatment duration, and energy input, to improve effectiveness.

  13. Occurrence of ferredoxin:NAD+ oxidoreductase activity and its ion specificity in several Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Hess, Verena; Gallegos, Rene; Jones, J Andrew; Barquera, Blanca; Malamy, Michael H

    2016-01-01

    A ferredoxin:NAD+ oxidoreductase was recently discovered as a redox-driven ion pump in the anaerobic, acetogenic bacterium Acetobacterium woodii. The enzyme is assumed to be encoded by the rnf genes. Since these genes are present in the genomes of many bacteria, we tested for ferredoxin:NAD+ oxidoreductase activity in cytoplasmic membranes from several different Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria that have annotated rnf genes. We found this activity in Clostridium tetanomorphum, Clostridium ljungdahlii, Bacteroides fragilis, and Vibrio cholerae but not in Escherichia coli and Rhodobacter capsulatus. As in A. woodii, the activity was Na+-dependent in C. tetanomorphum and B. fragilis but Na+-independent in C. ljungdahlii and V. cholerae. We deleted the rnf genes from B. fragilis and demonstrated that the mutant has greatly reduced ferredoxin:NAD+ oxidoreductase activity. This is the first genetic proof that the rnf genes indeed encode the reduced ferredoxin:NAD+ oxidoreductase activity. PMID:26793417

  14. A new hybrid bacteriocin, Ent35–MccV, displays antimicrobial activity against pathogenic Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Acuña, Leonardo; Picariello, Gianluca; Sesma, Fernando; Morero, Roberto D.; Bellomio, Augusto

    2012-01-01

    Bacteriocins and microcins are ribosomally synthesized antimicrobial peptides that are usually active against phylogenetically related bacteria. Thus, bacteriocins are active against Gram-positive while microcins are active against Gram-negative bacteria. The narrow spectrum of action generally displayed by bacteriocins from lactic acid bacteria represents an important limitation for the application of these peptides as clinical drugs or as food biopreservatives. The present study describes the design and expression of a novel recombinant hybrid peptide combining enterocin CRL35 and microcin V named Ent35–MccV. The chimerical bacteriocin displayed antimicrobial activity against enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli and Listeria monocytogenes clinical isolates, among other pathogenic bacteria. Therefore, Ent35–MccV may find important applications in food or pharmaceutical industries. PMID:23650575

  15. Antibacterial activity of ent-kaurene diterpenoids from Rabdosia rosthornii.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Isao; Xu, Yunlong; Shimizu, Kuniyoshi

    2004-02-01

    Biological activities of ent-kaurene diterpenoids, rosthornins A-D, isolated from the ether extract of the dried leaves of Rabdosia rosthornii (Diels) Hara (Labiatae) were tested. They exhibited antibacterial activity specifically against Gram-positive bacteria, among which Propionibacterium acnes was noted to be the most susceptible.

  16. Design and synthesis of novel antimicrobials with activity against Gram-positive bacteria and mycobacterial species, including M. tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Tiruveedhula, V.V.N. Phani Babu; Witzigmann, Christopher M.; Verma, Ranjit; Kabir, M. Shahjahan; Rott, Marc; Schwan, William R.; Medina-Bielski, Sara; Lane, Michelle; Close, William; Polanowski, Rebecca L.; Sherman, David; Monte, Aaron; Deschamps, Jeffrey R.; Cook, James M.

    2013-01-01

    The alarming increase in bacterial resistance over the last decade along with a dramatic decrease in new treatments for infections has led to problems in the healthcare industry. Tuberculosis (TB) is caused mainly by Mycobacterium tuberculosis which is responsible for 1.4 million deaths per year. A world-wide threat with HIV co-infected with multi and extensively drug-resistant strains of TB has emerged. In this regard, herein, novel acrylic acid ethyl ester derivatives were synthesized in simple, efficient routes and evaluated as potential agents against several Mycobacterium species. These were synthesized via a stereospecific process for structure activity relationship (SAR) studies. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) assays indicated that esters 12, 13, and 20 exhibited greater in vitro activity against Mycobacterium smegmatis than rifampin, one of the current, first-line anti-mycobacterial chemotherapeutic agents. Based on these studies the acrylic ester 20 has been developed as a potential lead compound which was found to have an MIC value of 0.4 μg/mL against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The SAR and biological activity of this series is presented; a Michael – acceptor mechanism appears to be important for potent activity of this series of analogs. PMID:24200931

  17. Antibacterial activity of grepafloxacin.

    PubMed

    Wiedemann, B; Heisig, P

    1997-12-01

    Grepafloxacin has an extremely broad spectrum of activity. Its activity against Gram-positive bacteria exceeds that of currently available quinolones. Grepafloxacin-resistant mutants seem to occur less frequently than ciprofloxacin- or ofloxacin-resistant mutants, and the increase in MIC against the former mutants is less than that of the latter. This applies only to the relative differences (in dilution steps); the absolute values are similar. Grepafloxacin kills Gram-positive bacteria at concentrations little above the MIC. Its pharmacodynamic profile against pneumococci is promising, favouring use of this drug for respiratory tract infections.

  18. Site-specific mutagenesis and functional analysis of active sites of sulfur oxygenase reductase from Gram-positive moderate thermophile Sulfobacillus acidophilus TPY.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huijun; Guo, Wenbin; Xu, Changan; Zhou, Hongbo; Chen, Xinhua

    2013-12-14

    Sequence alignments revealed that the conserved motifs of SORSa which formed an independent branch between archaea and Gram-negative bacteria SORs according to the phylogenetic relationship were similar with the archaea and Gram-negative bacteria SORs. In order to investigate the active sites of SORSa, cysteines 31, 101 and 104 (C31, C101, C104), histidines 86 and 90 (H86 and H90) and glutamate 114 (E114) of SORSa were chosen as the target amino acid residues for site-specific mutagenesis. The wild type and six mutant SORs were expressed in E. coli BL21, purified and confirmed by SDS-PAGE and Western blotting analysis. Enzyme activity determination revealed that the active sites of SORSa were identical with the archaea and Gram-negative bacteria SORs reported. Replacement of any cysteine residues reduced SOR activity by 53-100%, while the mutants of H86A, H90A and E114A lost their enzyme activities largely, only remaining 20%, 19% and 32% activity of the wild type SOR respectively. This study will enrich our awareness for active sites of SOR in a Gram-positive bacterium.

  19. Antibacterial activity of Thymus daenensis methanolic extract.

    PubMed

    Mojab, Faraz; Poursaeed, Mahshid; Mehrgan, Hadi; Pakdaman, Shima

    2008-07-01

    Medicinal plants are potential of antimicrobial compounds. The present study deals with the antibacterial activity of methanolic extract of Thymus daenensis. Aerial parts of the plant were collected from Alvand mountainside (Hamadan, Iran) in May 2005, air-dried and extracted by methanol. The dried extract was redissolved in methanol to make a 100 mg/ml solution and then filtered. Antibacterial activity of the extract was evaluated against various Gram-positive and Gram-negatives bacteria using disk diffusion technique. Blank paper disks were loaded with 40 microl of the methanol solution and then dried up. The impregnated disks were placed on Mueller-Hinton agar inoculated with bacterial suspension equal to 0.5 McFarland. The extract inhibited the growth Gram-positive bacteria, i.e., Staphylococcus aureus, Micrococcus luteus, Entrococcus faecalis, Streptococcus pyogenes, but it showed no activity against Gram-negative bacteria. The most significant effect was seen against S.aureus including MRSA, which are important nosocomial pathogens. MIC90 of the extract was determined against Gram-positive bacteria (3.12 mg/ml) and 11 MRSA strain (1.56 mg/ml).

  20. In vitro activity of ceftazidime, ceftaroline and aztreonam alone and in combination with avibactam against European Gram-negative and Gram-positive clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Testa, Raymond; Cantón, Rafael; Giani, Tommaso; Morosini, María-Isabel; Nichols, Wright W; Seifert, Harald; Stefanik, Danuta; Rossolini, Gian Maria; Nordmann, Patrice

    2015-06-01

    Recent clinical isolates of key Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria were collected in 2012 from hospitalised patients in medical centres in four European countries (France, Germany, Italy and Spain) and were tested using standard broth microdilution methodology to assess the impact of 4 mg/L avibactam on the in vitro activities of ceftazidime, ceftaroline and aztreonam. Against Enterobacteriaceae, addition of avibactam significantly enhanced the level of activity of these antimicrobials. MIC(90) values (minimum inhibitory concentration that inhibits 90% of the isolates) of ceftazidime, ceftaroline and aztreonam for Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterobacter cloacae, Enterobacter aerogenes, Citrobacter freundii and Morganella morganii were reduced up to 128-fold or greater when combined with avibactam. A two-fold reduction in the MIC(90) of ceftazidime to 8 mg/L was noted in Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates when combined with avibactam, whereas little effect of avibactam was noted on the MIC values of the test compounds when tested against Acinetobacter baumannii isolates. Avibactam had little effect on the excellent activity of ceftazidime, ceftaroline and aztreonam against Haemophilus influenzae. It had no impact on the in vitro activity of ceftazidime and ceftaroline against staphylococci and streptococci. This study demonstrates that addition of avibactam enhances the activities of ceftazidime, ceftaroline and aztreonam against Enterobacteriaceae and P. aeruginosa but not against A. baumannii.

  1. Gram-Positive Anaerobic Cocci

    PubMed Central

    Murdoch, D. A.

    1998-01-01

    Gram-positive anaerobic cocci (GPAC) are a heterogeneous group of organisms defined by their morphological appearance and their inability to grow in the presence of oxygen; most clinical isolates are identified to species in the genus Peptostreptococcus. GPAC are part of the normal flora of all mucocutaneous surfaces and are often isolated from infections such as deep organ abscesses, obstetric and gynecological sepsis, and intraoral infections. They have been little studied for several reasons, which include an inadequate classification, difficulties with laboratory identification, and the mixed nature of the infections from which they are usually isolated. Nucleic acid studies indicate that the classification is in need of radical revision at the genus level. Several species of Peptostreptococcus have recently been described, but others still await formal recognition. Identification has been based on carbohydrate fermentation tests, but most GPAC are asaccharolytic and use the products of protein degradation for their metabolism; the introduction of commercially available preformed enzyme kits affords a physiologically more appropriate method of identification, which is simple and relatively rapid and can be used in routine diagnostic laboratories. Recent reports have documented the isolation in pure culture of several species, notably Peptostreptococcus magnus, from serious infections. Studies of P. magnus have elucidated several virulence factors which correlate with the site of infection, and reveal some similarities to Staphylococcus aureus. P. micros is a strongly proteolytic species; it is increasingly recognized as an important pathogen in intraoral infections, particularly periodontitis, and mixed anaerobic deep-organ abscesses. Comparison of antibiotic susceptibility patterns reveals major differences between species. Penicillins are the antibiotics of choice, although some strains of P. anaerobius show broad-spectrum β-lactam resistance. PMID:9457430

  2. Bacillus subtilis subsp. subtilis CBMDC3f with antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive foodborne pathogenic bacteria: UV-MALDI-TOF MS analysis of its bioactive compounds.

    PubMed

    Torres, M J; Petroselli, G; Daz, M; Erra-Balsells, R; Audisio, M C

    2015-06-01

    In this work a new Bacillus sp. strain, isolated from honey, was characterized phylogenetically. Its antibacterial activity against three relevant foodborne pathogenic bacteria was studied; the main bioactive metabolites were analyzed using ultraviolet matrix assisted laser desorption-ionization mass spectrometry (UV-MALDI MS). Bacillus CBMDC3f was phylogenetically characterized as Bacillus subtilis subsp. subtilis after rRNA analysis of the 16S subunit and the gyrA gene (access codes Genbank JX120508 and JX120516, respectively). Its antibacterial potential was evaluated against Listeria monocytogenes (9 strains), B. cereus (3 strains) and Staphylococcus aureus ATCC29213. Its cell suspension and cell-free supernatant (CFS) exerted significant anti-Listeria and anti-S. aureus activities, while the lipopeptides fraction (LF) also showed anti-B. cereus effect. The UV-MALDI-MS analysis revealed surfactin, iturin and fengycin in the CFS, whereas surfactin predominated in the LF. The CFS from CBMDC3f contained surfactin, iturin and fengycin with four, two and four homologues per family, respectively, whereas four surfactin, one iturin and one fengycin homologues were identified in the LF. For some surfactin homologues, their UV-MALDI-TOF/TOF (MS/MS; Laser Induced Decomposition method, LID) spectra were also obtained. Mass spectrometry analysis contributed with relevant information about the type of lipopeptides that Bacillus strains can synthesize. From our results, surfactin would be the main metabolite responsible for the antibacterial effect.

  3. Antimicrobial activity of Calendula officinalis petal extracts against fungi, as well as Gram-negative and Gram-positive clinical pathogens.

    PubMed

    Efstratiou, Efstratios; Hussain, Abdullah I; Nigam, Poonam S; Moore, John E; Ayub, Muhammad A; Rao, Juluri R

    2012-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the antimicrobial activity of methanol and ethanol extracts of pot marigold (Calendula officinalis) petals against clinical pathogens. The antimicrobial potential of C. officinalis extracts was evaluated against a panel of microorganisms isolated from patients at the Belfast City Hospital (BCH), including bacteria and fungi, using disc diffusion assay. Methanol extract of C. officinalis exhibited better antibacterial activity against most of the bacteria tested, than ethanol extract. Both methanol and ethanol extracts showed excellent antifungal activity against tested strains of fungi, while comparing with Fluconazole.

  4. Collagen-binding Microbial Surface Components Recognizing Adhesive Matrix Molecule (MSCRAMM) of Gram-positive Bacteria Inhibit Complement Activation via the Classical Pathway*

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Mingsong; Ko, Ya-Ping; Liang, Xiaowen; Ross, Caná L.; Liu, Qing; Murray, Barbara E.; Höök, Magnus

    2013-01-01

    Members of a family of collagen-binding microbial surface components recognizing adhesive matrix molecules (MSCRAMMs) from Gram-positive bacteria are established virulence factors in several infectious diseases models. Here, we report that these adhesins also can bind C1q and act as inhibitors of the classical complement pathway. Molecular analyses of Cna from Staphylococcus aureus suggested that this prototype MSCRAMM bound to the collagenous domain of C1q and interfered with the interactions of C1r with C1q. As a result, C1r2C1s2 was displaced from C1q, and the C1 complex was deactivated. This novel function of the Cna-like MSCRAMMs represents a potential immune evasion strategy that could be used by numerous Gram-positive pathogens. PMID:23720782

  5. Transformation of gram positive bacteria by sonoporation

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Yunfeng; Li, Yongchao

    2014-03-11

    The present invention provides a sonoporation-based method that can be universally applied for delivery of compounds into Gram positive bacteria. Gram positive bacteria which can be transformed by sonoporation include, for example, Bacillus, Streptococcus, Acetobacterium, and Clostridium. Compounds which can be delivered into Gram positive bacteria via sonoporation include nucleic acids (DNA or RNA), proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, viruses, small organic and inorganic molecules, and nano-particles.

  6. Preparation of active antibacterial LDPE surface through multistep physicochemical approach: I. Allylamine grafting, attachment of antibacterial agent and antibacterial activity assessment.

    PubMed

    Bílek, František; Křížová, Táňa; Lehocký, Marián

    2011-11-01

    Low-density polyethylene (LDPE) samples were treated in air plasma discharge, coated by polyallyamine brush thought copolymeric grafting surface-from reaction and deposited four common antibacterial agents (benzalkonium chloride, bronopol, chlorhexidine and triclosan) to gain material with active antibacterial properties. Surface characteristics were evaluated by static contact angle measurement with surface energy evaluation ATR-FTIR, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and SEM analysis. Inhibition zone on agar was used as in vitro test of antibacterial properties on two representative gram positive Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and gram negative Escherichia coli (E. coli) strains. It was confirmed, that after grafting of polyallyamine, more antibacterial agent is immobilized on the surface. The highest increase of antibacterial activity was observed by the sample containing triclosan. Samples covered by bronopol did not show significant antibacterial activity.

  7. Antimicrobial Peptides Targeting Gram-Positive Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Malanovic, Nermina; Lohner, Karl

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have remarkably different structures as well as biological activity profiles, whereupon most of these peptides are supposed to kill bacteria via membrane damage. In order to understand their molecular mechanism and target cell specificity for Gram-positive bacteria, it is essential to consider the architecture of their cell envelopes. Before AMPs can interact with the cytoplasmic membrane of Gram-positive bacteria, they have to traverse the cell wall composed of wall- and lipoteichoic acids and peptidoglycan. While interaction of AMPs with peptidoglycan might rather facilitate penetration, interaction with anionic teichoic acids may act as either a trap for AMPs or a ladder for a route to the cytoplasmic membrane. Interaction with the cytoplasmic membrane frequently leads to lipid segregation affecting membrane domain organization, which affects membrane permeability, inhibits cell division processes or leads to delocalization of essential peripheral membrane proteins. Further, precursors of cell wall components, especially the highly conserved lipid II, are directly targeted by AMPs. Thereby, the peptides do not inhibit peptidoglycan synthesis via binding to proteins like common antibiotics, but form a complex with the precursor molecule, which in addition can promote pore formation and membrane disruption. Thus, the multifaceted mode of actions will make AMPs superior to antibiotics that act only on one specific target. PMID:27657092

  8. Antibacterial and antifungal activity of Syzygium jambolanum seeds.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekaran, M; Venkatesalu, V

    2004-03-01

    The water and methanolic extracts of Syzygium jambolanum seeds were examined for antibacterial and antifungal activity in vitro using the disc diffusion method, minimum inhibitory concentration, minimum bactericidal concentration and minimum fungicidal concentration. Activity against gram positive bacteria (Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus), gram negative bacteria (Salmonella typhimurium, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli) and fungal strains (Candida albicans, Cryptococcus neoformans, Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus fumigatus, Aspergillus niger, Rhizopus sp., Trichophyton rubrum, Trichophyton mentagrophytes and Microsporum gypseum) is discussed.

  9. Identification of proteins capable of metal reduction from the proteome of the Gram-positive bacterium Desulfotomaculum reducens MI-1 using an NADH-based activity assay

    SciTech Connect

    Otwell, Annie E.; Sherwood, Roberts; Zhang, Sheng; Nelson, Ornella D.; Li, Zhi; Lin, Hening; Callister, Stephen J.; Richardson, Ruth E.

    2015-01-01

    Metal reduction capability has been found in numerous species of environmentally abundant Gram-positive bacteria. However, understanding of microbial metal reduction is based almost solely on studies of Gram-negative organisms. In this study, we focus on Desulfotomaculum reducens MI-1, a Gram-positive metal reducer whose genome lacks genes with similarity to any characterized metal reductase. D. reducens has been shown to reduce not only Fe(III), but also the environmentally important contaminants U(VI) and Cr(VI). By extracting, separating, and analyzing the functional proteome of D. reducens, using a ferrozine-based assay in order to screen for chelated Fe(III)-NTA reduction with NADH as electron donor, we have identified proteins not previously characterized as iron reductases. Their function was confirmed by heterologous expression in E. coli. These are the protein NADH:flavin oxidoreductase (Dred_2421) and a protein complex composed of oxidoreductase FAD/NAD(P)-binding subunit (Dred_1685) and dihydroorotate dehydrogenase 1B (Dred_1686). Dred_2421 was identified in the soluble proteome and is predicted to be a cytoplasmic protein. Dred_1685 and Dred_1686 were identified in both the soluble as well as the insoluble (presumably membrane) protein fraction, suggesting a type of membrane-association, although PSORTb predicts both proteins are cytoplasmic. Furthermore, we show that these proteins have the capability to reduce soluble Cr(VI) and U(VI) with NADH as electron donor. This study is the first functional proteomic analysis of D. reducens, and one of the first analyses of metal and radionuclide reduction in an environmentally relevant Gram-positive bacterium.

  10. Identification of proteins capable of metal reduction from the proteome of the Gram-positive bacterium Desulfotomaculum reducens MI-1 using an NADH-based activity assay

    PubMed Central

    Otwell, A.E.; Sherwood, R.W.; Zhang, S.; Nelson, O.D.; Li, Z.; Lin, H.; Callister, S.J.; Richardson, R.E.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Understanding of microbial metal reduction is based almost solely on studies of Gram-negative organisms. In this study, we focus on Desulfotomaculum reducens MI-1, a Gram-positive metal reducer whose genome lacks genes with similarity to any characterized metal reductase. Using non-denaturing separations and mass spectrometry identification, in combination with a colorimetric screen for chelated Fe(III)-NTA reduction with NADH as electron donor, we have identified proteins from the D. reducens proteome not previously characterized as iron reductases. Their function was confirmed by heterologous expression in E. coli. Furthermore, we show that these proteins have the capability to reduce soluble Cr(VI) and U(VI) with NADH as electron donor. The proteins identified are NADH:flavin oxidoreductase (Dred_2421) and a protein complex composed of oxidoreductase FAD/NAD(P)-binding subunit (Dred_1685) and dihydroorotate dehydrogenase 1B (Dred_1686). Dred_2421 was identified in the soluble proteome and is predicted to be a cytoplasmic protein. Dred_1685 and Dred_1686 were identified in both the soluble as well as the insoluble protein fraction, suggesting a type of membrane-association, although PSORTb predicts both proteins are cytoplasmic. This study is the first functional proteomic analysis of D. reducens and one of the first analyses of metal and radionuclide reduction in an environmentally relevant Gram-positive bacterium. PMID:25389064

  11. Results of the surveillance of Tedizolid activity and resistance program: in vitro susceptibility of gram-positive pathogens collected in 2011 and 2012 from the United States and Europe.

    PubMed

    Sahm, Daniel F; Deane, Jennifer; Bien, Paul A; Locke, Jeffrey B; Zuill, Douglas E; Shaw, Karen J; Bartizal, Ken F

    2015-02-01

    The in vitro activity and spectrum of tedizolid and comparators were analyzed against 6884 Gram-positive clinical isolates collected from multiple US and European sites as part of the Surveillance of Tedizolid Activity and Resistance Program in 2011 and 2012. Organisms included 4499 Staphylococcus aureus, 537 coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS), 873 enterococci, and 975 β-hemolytic streptococci. The MIC values that inhibited 90% of the isolates within each group (MIC90) were 0.25 μg/mL for Staphylococcus epidermidis and β-hemolytic streptococci and 0.5 μg/mL for S. aureus, other CoNS, and enterococci. Of 16 isolates with elevated tedizolid or linezolid MIC values (intermediate or resistant isolates), 10 had mutations in the genes encoding 23S rRNA (primarily G2576T), 5 had mutations in the genes encoding ribosomal proteins L3 or L4, and 5 carried the cfr multidrug resistance gene. Overall, tedizolid showed excellent activity against Gram-positive bacteria and was at least 4-fold more potent than linezolid against wild-type and linezolid-resistant isolates. Given the low overall frequency of isolates that would be resistant to tedizolid at the proposed break point of 0.5 μg/mL (0.19%) and potent activity against contemporary US and European isolates, tedizolid has the potential to serve as a valuable therapeutic option in the treatment of infections caused by Gram-positive pathogens.

  12. In vitro activities of tedizolid compared with other antibiotics against Gram-positive pathogens associated with hospital-acquired pneumonia, skin and soft tissue infection and bloodstream infection collected from 26 hospitals in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuguang; Guo, Yu; Zhao, Chunjiang; Chen, Hongbin; Hu, Bijie; Chu, Yunzhuo; Zhang, Zhijie; Hu, Yunjian; Liu, Zhiyong; Du, Yan; Gui, Qiaodi; Ji, Ping; Zeng, Ji; Cao, Bin; Fu, Quan; Zhang, Rong; Wang, Zhongxin; Zhuo, Chao; Feng, Xianju; Jia, Wei; Jin, Yan; Xu, Xuesong; Liao, Kang; Ni, Yuxing; Yu, Yunsong; Xu, Xiuli; Hu, Zhidong; Lei, Jin-E; Yang, Qing; Wang, Hui

    2016-10-01

    To evaluate the in vitro antimicrobial activities of tedizolid, linezolid and other comparators against clinically significant Gram-positive cocci isolates from hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP), skin and soft tissue infection (SSTI) and bloodstream infection (BSI), 2140 nonduplicate isolates (23.7 % isolated from HAP, 46.8 % from SSTI and 29.5 % from BSI) were consecutively collected in 26 hospitals in 17 cities across China during 2014. These pathogens included 632 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, 867 methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcusaureus, 299 coagulase-negative Staphylococcus (CoNS), 104 Enterococcus faecalis, 99 Enterococcusfaecium, 13 Streptococcus pneumoniae, 23 α-haemolytic Streptococcus and 103 β-haemolytic Streptococcus. MICs of routine clinical antibiotics were determined by broth microdilution method according to the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines 2015. Tedizolid, linezolid, vancomycin, daptomycin, teicoplanin and tigecycline showed high in vitro activity against Gram-positive pathogens (≥98.0 % susceptible), and tedizolid exhibited four- to eight fold greater activity than linezolid against the pathogens tested, with MIC90s of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, α-haemolytic Streptococcus and β-haemolytic Streptococcus (0.25 vs 2 µg ml-1); methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcu saureus, E. faecalis and E. faecium (0.5 vs 2 µg ml-1); methicillin-resistant CoNS and methicillin-sensitive CoNS (0.25 vs 1 µg ml-1); and Streptococcuspneumoniae (0.125 vs 0.5 µg ml-1). Tedizolid MIC90s associated with different infections did not show significant differences, and the drug exhibited excellent activity against surveyed Gram-positive pathogens associated with HAP, SSTI and BSI, including linezolid-nonsusceptible strains. These data suggest that tedizolid could be an alternative to linezolid for the treatment of infections caused by Gram-positive organisms.

  13. Antibacterial activity of silver bionanocomposites synthesized by chemical reduction route

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The aim of this study is to investigate the functions of polymers and size of nanoparticles on the antibacterial activity of silver bionanocomposites (Ag BNCs). In this research, silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) were incorporated into biodegradable polymers that are chitosan, gelatin and both polymers via chemical reduction method in solvent in order to produce Ag BNCs. Silver nitrate and sodium borohydride were employed as a metal precursor and reducing agent respectively. On the other hand, chitosan and gelatin were added as a polymeric matrix and stabilizer. The antibacterial activity of different sizes of silver nanoparticles was investigated against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria by the disk diffusion method using Mueller-Hinton Agar. Results The properties of Ag BNCs were studied as a function of the polymer weight ratio in relation to the use of chitosan and gelatin. The morphology of the Ag BNCs films and the distribution of the Ag NPs were also characterized. The diameters of the Ag NPs were measured and their size is less than 20 nm. The antibacterial trait of silver/chitosan/gelatin bionanocomposites was investigated. The silver ions released from the Ag BNCs and their antibacterial activities were scrutinized. The antibacterial activities of the Ag BNC films were examined against Gram-negative bacteria (E. coli and P. aeruginosa) and Gram-positive (S. aureus and M. luteus) by diffusion method using Muller-Hinton agar. Conclusions The antibacterial activity of Ag NPs with size less than 20 nm was demonstrated and showed positive results against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. The Ag NPs stabilized well in the polymers matrix. PMID:22967920

  14. Developing of a novel antibacterial agent by functionalization of graphene oxide with guanidine polymer with enhanced antibacterial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ping; Sun, Shiyu; Dong, Alideertu; Hao, Yanping; Shi, Shuangqiang; Sun, Zijia; Gao, Ge; Chen, Yuxin

    2015-11-01

    New materials with excellent antibacterial activity attract numerous research interests. Herein, a facile synthetic method of polyethylene glycol (PEG) and polyhexamethylene guanidine hydrochloride (PHGC) dual-polymer-functionalized graphene oxide (GO) (GO-PEG-PHGC), a novel antibacterial material, was reported. The as-prepared products were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray pattern (XRD) and elemental analysis. The antibacterial effect on the bacterial strain was investigated by incubating both Gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli) and Gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus). The results show that GO-PEG-PHGC has enhanced antibacterial activity when compared to GO, GO-PEG or GO-PHGC alone. The improved antibacterial activity was described to be related to a better dispersion of GO-PEG-PHGC in the presence of PEG. This better dispersion leads to a greater contact between the bacteria membrane and nanomaterials, therefore leading to greater cell damage. Not only Gram-negative bacteria but also Gram-positive bacteria are greatly inhibited by this antibacterial agent. With the powerful antibacterial activity as well as its low cost and facile preparation, the GO-PEG-PHGC as a novel antibacterial agent can find potential application in the areas of healthcare and environmental engineering.

  15. Antibiotics for gram-positive organisms.

    PubMed

    Pagan, F S

    1981-01-01

    Most infections due to Gram-positive organisms can be treated with quite a small number of antibiotics. Penicillin, cloxacillin, and erythromycin should be enough to cover 90 per cent of Gram-positive infections. The relatively narrow spectrum of these drugs should be the incentive to prescribers to use them selectively, together with adequate bacteriological investigation, in order to achieve effective treatment with a minimum of disturbance to the patient's normal bacterial flora and without any other harmful side effects.

  16. Suicin 90-1330 from a nonvirulent strain of Streptococcus suis: a nisin-related lantibiotic active on gram-positive swine pathogens.

    PubMed

    LeBel, Geneviève; Vaillancourt, Katy; Frenette, Michel; Gottschalk, Marcelo; Grenier, Daniel

    2014-09-01

    Streptococcus suis serotype 2 is known to cause severe infections (meningitis, endocarditis, and septicemia) in pigs and is considered an emerging zoonotic agent. Antibiotics have long been used in the swine industry for disease treatment/prevention and growth promoters. This pattern of utilization resulted in the spread of antibiotic resistance in S. suis worldwide. Interestingly, pigs may harbor S. suis in their tonsils without developing diseases, while North American strains belonging to the sequence type 28 (ST28) are nonvirulent in animal models. Consequently, the aim of this study was to purify and characterize a bacteriocin produced by a nonvirulent strain of S. suis serotype 2, with a view to a potential therapeutic and preventive application. S. suis 90-1330 belonging to ST28 and previously shown to be nonvirulent in an animal model exhibited antibacterial activity toward all S. suis pathogenic isolates tested. The bacteriocin produced by this strain was purified to homogeneity by cationic exchange and reversed-phase fast protein liquid chromatography. Given its properties (molecular mass of <4 kDa, heat, pH and protease stability, and the presence of modified amino acids), the bacteriocin, named suicin 90-1330, belongs to the lantibiotic class. Using a DNA-binding fluorophore, the bacteriocin was found to possess a membrane permeabilization activity. When tested on other swine pathogens, the suicin showed activity against Staphylococcus hyicus and Staphylococcus aureus, whereas it was inactive against all Gram-negative bacteria tested. Amino acid sequencing of the purified bacteriocin showed homology (90.9% identity) with nisin U produced by Streptococcus uberis. The putative gene cluster involved in suicin production was amplified by PCR and sequence analysis revealed the presence of 11 open reading frames, including the structural gene and those required for the modification of amino acids, export, regulation, and immunity. Further studies will

  17. Design, Synthesis, and Antibacterial Activities of Novel Heterocyclic Arylsulphonamide Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Singh, Anuradha; Srivastava, Ritika; Singh, Ramendra K

    2017-02-13

    Design, synthesis, and antibacterial activities of a series of arylsulphonamide derivatives as probable peptide deformylase (PDF) inhibitors have been discussed. Compounds have been designed following Lipinski's rule and after docking into the active site of PDF protein (PDB code: 1G2A) synthesized later on. Furthermore, to assess their antibacterial activity, screening of the compound was done in vitro conditions against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial strains. In silico, studies revealed these compounds as potential antibacterial agents and this fact was also supported by their prominent scoring functions. Antibacterial results indicated that these molecules possessed a significant activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Escherichia coli with MIC values ranging from 0.06 to 0.29 μM. TOPKAT results showed that high LD50 values and the compounds were assumed non-carcinogenic when various animal models were studied computationally.

  18. Trans-generational Immune Priming Protects the Eggs Only against Gram-Positive Bacteria in the Mealworm Beetle

    PubMed Central

    Dubuffet, Aurore; Zanchi, Caroline; Boutet, Gwendoline; Moreau, Jérôme; Teixeira, Maria; Moret, Yannick

    2015-01-01

    In many vertebrates and invertebrates, offspring whose mothers have been exposed to pathogens can exhibit increased levels of immune activity and/or increased survival to infection. Such phenomena, called “Trans-generational immune priming” (TGIP) are expected to provide immune protection to the offspring. As the offspring and their mother may share the same environment, and consequently similar microbial threats, we expect the immune molecules present in the progeny to be specific to the microbes that immune challenged the mother. We provide evidence in the mealworm beetle Tenebrio molitor that the antimicrobial activity found in the eggs is only active against Gram-positive bacteria, even when females were exposed to Gram-negative bacteria or fungi. Fungi were weak inducers of TGIP while we obtained similar levels of anti-Gram-positive activity using different bacteria for the maternal challenge. Furthermore, we have identified an antibacterial peptide from the defensin family, the tenecin 1, which spectrum of activity is exclusively directed toward Gram-positive bacteria as potential contributor to this antimicrobial activity. We conclude that maternal transfer of antimicrobial activity in the eggs of T. molitor might have evolved from persistent Gram-positive bacterial pathogens between insect generations. PMID:26430786

  19. Trans-generational Immune Priming Protects the Eggs Only against Gram-Positive Bacteria in the Mealworm Beetle.

    PubMed

    Dubuffet, Aurore; Zanchi, Caroline; Boutet, Gwendoline; Moreau, Jérôme; Teixeira, Maria; Moret, Yannick

    2015-10-01

    In many vertebrates and invertebrates, offspring whose mothers have been exposed to pathogens can exhibit increased levels of immune activity and/or increased survival to infection. Such phenomena, called "Trans-generational immune priming" (TGIP) are expected to provide immune protection to the offspring. As the offspring and their mother may share the same environment, and consequently similar microbial threats, we expect the immune molecules present in the progeny to be specific to the microbes that immune challenged the mother. We provide evidence in the mealworm beetle Tenebrio molitor that the antimicrobial activity found in the eggs is only active against Gram-positive bacteria, even when females were exposed to Gram-negative bacteria or fungi. Fungi were weak inducers of TGIP while we obtained similar levels of anti-Gram-positive activity using different bacteria for the maternal challenge. Furthermore, we have identified an antibacterial peptide from the defensin family, the tenecin 1, which spectrum of activity is exclusively directed toward Gram-positive bacteria as potential contributor to this antimicrobial activity. We conclude that maternal transfer of antimicrobial activity in the eggs of T. molitor might have evolved from persistent Gram-positive bacterial pathogens between insect generations.

  20. Antimicrobial Activity of Cationic Antimicrobial Peptides against Gram-Positives: Current Progress Made in Understanding the Mode of Action and the Response of Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Omardien, Soraya; Brul, Stanley; Zaat, Sebastian A. J.

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have been proposed as a novel class of antimicrobials that could aid the fight against antibiotic resistant bacteria. The mode of action of AMPs as acting on the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane has often been presented as an enigma and there are doubts whether the membrane is the sole target of AMPs. Progress has been made in clarifying the possible targets of these peptides, which is reported in this review with as focus gram-positive vegetative cells and spores. Numerical estimates are discussed to evaluate the possibility that targets, other than the membrane, could play a role in susceptibility to AMPs. Concerns about possible resistance that bacteria might develop to AMPs are addressed. Proteomics, transcriptomics, and other molecular techniques are reviewed in the context of explaining the response of bacteria to the presence of AMPs and to predict what resistance strategies might be. Emergent mechanisms are cell envelope stress responses as well as enzymes able to degrade and/or specifically bind (and thus inactivate) AMPs. Further studies are needed to address the broadness of the AMP resistance and stress responses observed. PMID:27790614

  1. Antibacterial activity of lichen Usnea rubrotincta, Ramalina dumeticola, and Cladonia verticillata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunasekaran, Saranyapiriya; Rajan, Vinoshene Pillai; Samsudin, Mohd. Wahid; Din, Laily; Ramanathan, Surash; Murugaiyah, Vikneswaran

    2015-09-01

    The present study was carried out to evaluate the antibacterial activity of extract and chemical constituents of Usnea rubrotincta, Ramalina dumeticola and Cladonia verticillata. Extracts of U. rubrotincta and R. dumeticola showed promising antibacterial activity against gram positive bacteria Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis. The lowest value of MIC (15.63 μg/mL) was observed for the acetone extract of U. rubrotincta against B. subtilis. While extract of C. verticillata was neither active against gram positive nor gram negative bacteria at the highest tested concentration of 500 μg/m. This is the first evaluation of antibacterial activity of lichens found in Malaysia and to our knowledge, this is the first report of antibacterial

  2. Antibacterial activity of Aegle marmelos against leaf, bark and fruit extracts

    PubMed Central

    Poonkothai, M.; Saravanan, M.

    2008-01-01

    The antibacterial activity of the methanol, chloroform and aqueous extracts from the leaves, bark and fruit of A. marmelos was studied using disc diffusion method against Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus (Gram Positive), Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilis, Escherichia coli, Salmonella paratyphi A and Salmonella paratyphi B (Gram Negative). Results suggest that the methanolic extract has significant antibacterial activity against tested bacteria. The present study justifies the claimed uses of A. marmelos in the traditional system of medicine to treat various infectious diseases. PMID:22557272

  3. Synthesis and antibacterial activity of some new non-proteinogenic amino acids containing thiazole residues.

    PubMed

    Stanchev, M; Pajpanova, T; Golovinsky, E

    2000-01-01

    Some new thioamides and thiazoles have been synthesized using canavanine, S-cysteine, homo-S-cysteinesulfonamides and their N-omega aminoethylated derivatives as adducts in order to investigate the structure-antimicrobial activity relationships. The compounds showed substantial antibacterial activity in vitro against various gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus etc.) and gram-negative (Escherichia coli, Proteus vulgaris etc.) bacteria. These findings indicate that the presence of the thiazole residue is an essential factor for the antibacterial effect.

  4. Evolving resistance among Gram-positive pathogens.

    PubMed

    Munita, Jose M; Bayer, Arnold S; Arias, Cesar A

    2015-09-15

    Antimicrobial therapy is a key component of modern medical practice and a cornerstone for the development of complex clinical interventions in critically ill patients. Unfortunately, the increasing problem of antimicrobial resistance is now recognized as a major public health threat jeopardizing the care of thousands of patients worldwide. Gram-positive pathogens exhibit an immense genetic repertoire to adapt and develop resistance to virtually all antimicrobials clinically available. As more molecules become available to treat resistant gram-positive infections, resistance emerges as an evolutionary response. Thus, antimicrobial resistance has to be envisaged as an evolving phenomenon that demands constant surveillance and continuous efforts to identify emerging mechanisms of resistance to optimize the use of antibiotics and create strategies to circumvent this problem. Here, we will provide a broad perspective on the clinical aspects of antibiotic resistance in relevant gram-positive pathogens with emphasis on the mechanistic strategies used by these organisms to avoid being killed by commonly used antimicrobial agents.

  5. In vitro antibacterial activity of some plant essential oils

    PubMed Central

    Prabuseenivasan, Seenivasan; Jayakumar, Manickkam; Ignacimuthu, Savarimuthu

    2006-01-01

    Background: To evaluate the antibacterial activity of 21 plant essential oils against six bacterial species. Methods: The selected essential oils were screened against four gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteus vulgaris) and two gram-positive bacteria Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus at four different concentrations (1:1, 1:5, 1:10 and 1:20) using disc diffusion method. The MIC of the active essential oils were tested using two fold agar dilution method at concentrations ranging from 0.2 to 25.6 mg/ml. Results: Out of 21 essential oils tested, 19 oils showed antibacterial activity against one or more strains. Cinnamon, clove, geranium, lemon, lime, orange and rosemary oils exhibited significant inhibitory effect. Cinnamon oil showed promising inhibitory activity even at low concentration, whereas aniseed, eucalyptus and camphor oils were least active against the tested bacteria. In general, B. subtilis was the most susceptible. On the other hand, K. pneumoniae exhibited low degree of sensitivity. Conclusion: Majority of the oils showed antibacterial activity against the tested strains. However Cinnamon, clove and lime oils were found to be inhibiting both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. Cinnamon oil can be a good source of antibacterial agents. PMID:17134518

  6. Ethanol production in Gram-positive microbes

    DOEpatents

    Ingram, L.O.; Barbosa-Alleyne, M.D.F.

    1996-01-09

    The subject invention concerns the transformation of Gram-positive bacteria with heterologous genes which confer upon these microbes the ability to produce ethanol as a fermentation product. Specifically exemplified is the transformation of bacteria with genes, obtainable from Zymomonas mobilis, which encode pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase. 2 figs.

  7. Ethanol production in Gram-positive microbes

    DOEpatents

    Ingram, L.O.; Barbosa-Alleyne, M.D.F.

    1999-06-29

    The subject invention concerns the transformation of Gram-positive bacteria with heterologous genes which confer upon these microbes the ability to produce ethanol as a fermentation product. Specifically exemplified is the transformation of bacteria with genes, obtainable from Zymomonas mobilis, which encode pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase. 2 figs.

  8. Ethanol production in gram-positive microbes

    DOEpatents

    Ingram, Lonnie O'Neal; Barbosa-Alleyne, Maria D. F.

    1999-01-01

    The subject invention concerns the transformation of Gram-positive bacteria with heterologous genes which confer upon these microbes the ability to produce ethanol as a fermentation product. Specifically exemplified is the transformation of bacteria with genes, obtainable from Zymomonas mobilis, which encode pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase.

  9. Ethanol production in Gram-positive microbes

    DOEpatents

    Ingram, Lonnie O'Neal; Barbosa-Alleyne, Maria D. F.

    1996-01-01

    The subject invention concerns the transformation of Gram-positive bacteria with heterologous genes which confer upon these microbes the ability to produce ethanol as a fermentation product. Specifically exemplified is the transformation of bacteria with genes, obtainable from Zymomonas mobilis, which encode pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase.

  10. Antiadhesion agents against Gram-positive pathogens.

    PubMed

    Cascioferro, Stella; Cusimano, Maria Grazia; Schillaci, Domenico

    2014-01-01

    A fundamental step of Gram-positive pathogenesis is the bacterial adhesion to the host tissue involving interaction between bacterial surface molecules and host ligands. This review is focused on antivirulence compounds that target Gram-positive adhesins and on their potential development as therapeutic agents alternative or complementary to conventional antibiotics in the contrast of pathogens. In particular, compounds that target the sortase A, wall theicoic acid inhibitors, carbohydrates able to bind bacterial proteins and proteins capable of influencing the bacterial adhesion, were described. We further discuss the advantages and disadvantages of this strategy in the development of novel antimicrobials and the future perspective of this research field still at its first steps.

  11. Mechanism of action of recombinant acc-royalisin from royal jelly of Asian honeybee against gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Shen, Lirong; Liu, Dandan; Li, Meilu; Jin, Feng; Din, Meihui; Parnell, Laurence D; Lai, Chao-Qiang

    2012-01-01

    The antibacterial activity of royalisin, an antimicrobial peptide from the royal jelly produced by honeybees, has been addressed extensively. However, its mechanism of action remains unclear. In this study, a recombinant royalisin, RAcc-royalisin from the royal jelly of Asian honeybee Apis cerana cerana, was expressed by fusing with glutathione S-transferase (GST) in Escherichia coli BL21, isolated and purified. The agar dilution assays with inhibition zone showed that RAcc-royalisin, similar to nisin, inhibits the growth of Gram-positive bacteria. The antibacterial activity of RAcc-royalisin was associated with its concentration, and was weakened by heat treatment ranging from 55°C to 85°C for 15 min. Both RAcc-royalisin and nisin exhibited the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of 62.5 µg/ml, 125 µg/ml, and 250 µg/ml against Gram-positive bacterial strains, Bacillus subtilis and Micrococcus flavus and Staphyloccocus aureus in the microplate assay, respectively. However, RAcc-royalisin did not show antimicrobial activity against tested Gram-negative bacterial and fungal strains. The antibacterial activity of RAcc-royalisin agrees well with the decrease in bacterial cell hydrophobicity, the leakage of 260-nm absorbing materials, and the observation by transmission electron microscopy, all indicating that RAcc-royalisin induced the disruption and dysfunction of cell walls and membranes. This is the first report detailing the antibacterial mechanism of royalisin against Gram-positive bacteria, and provides insight into the application of recombinant royalisin in food and pharmaceutical industries as an antimicrobial agent.

  12. Mechanism of Action of Recombinant Acc-Royalisin from Royal Jelly of Asian Honeybee against Gram-Positive Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Lirong; Liu, Dandan; Li, Meilu; Jin, Feng; Din, Meihui; Parnell, Laurence D.; Lai, Chao-Qiang

    2012-01-01

    The antibacterial activity of royalisin, an antimicrobial peptide from the royal jelly produced by honeybees, has been addressed extensively. However, its mechanism of action remains unclear. In this study, a recombinant royalisin, RAcc-royalisin from the royal jelly of Asian honeybee Apis cerana cerana, was expressed by fusing with glutathione S-transferase (GST) in Escherichia coli BL21, isolated and purified. The agar dilution assays with inhibition zone showed that RAcc-royalisin, similar to nisin, inhibits the growth of Gram-positive bacteria. The antibacterial activity of RAcc-royalisin was associated with its concentration, and was weakened by heat treatment ranging from 55°C to 85°C for 15 min. Both RAcc-royalisin and nisin exhibited the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of 62.5 µg/ml, 125 µg/ml, and 250 µg/ml against Gram-positive bacterial strains, Bacillus subtilis and Micrococcus flavus and Staphyloccocus aureus in the microplate assay, respectively. However, RAcc-royalisin did not show antimicrobial activity against tested Gram-negative bacterial and fungal strains. The antibacterial activity of RAcc-royalisin agrees well with the decrease in bacterial cell hydrophobicity, the leakage of 260-nm absorbing materials, and the observation by transmission electron microscopy, all indicating that RAcc-royalisin induced the disruption and dysfunction of cell walls and membranes. This is the first report detailing the antibacterial mechanism of royalisin against Gram-positive bacteria, and provides insight into the application of recombinant royalisin in food and pharmaceutical industries as an antimicrobial agent. PMID:23056609

  13. Screening of Ethanol, Petroleum Ether and Chloroform Extracts of Medicinal Plants, Lawsonia inermis L. and Mimosa pudica L. for Antibacterial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Akter, A.; Neela, F. A.; Khan, M. S. I.; Islam, M. S.; Alam, M. F.

    2010-01-01

    Organic extracts (ethanol, petroleum ether and chloroform) of two medicinal plants Lawsonia inermis L. and Mimosa pudica L. were proven for antibacterial properties against 15 Gram-positive and Gram-negative human pathogenic bacteria. Among the three types of extracts tested, ethanol extract was found to possess maximum antibacterial activity. The diameter of the zone of inhibition of bacterial growth showed that Gram-negative bacteria are more sensitive than Gram-positive bacteria to plant extracts. Between the two plants species studied, Lawsonia inermis extract showed more antibacterial activity compared to Mimosa pudica extract. PMID:21188055

  14. Synthesis and structure-activity relationships of novel amino/nitro substituted 3-arylcoumarins as antibacterial agents.

    PubMed

    Matos, Maria J; Vazquez-Rodriguez, Saleta; Santana, Lourdes; Uriarte, Eugenio; Fuentes-Edfuf, Cristina; Santos, Ysabel; Muñoz-Crego, Angeles

    2013-01-24

    A new series of amino/nitro-substituted 3-arylcoumarins were synthesized and their antibacterial activity against clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus (Gram-positive) and Escherichia coli (Gram-negative) was evaluated. Some of these molecules exhibited antibacterial activity against S. aureus comparable to the standards used (oxolinic acid and ampicillin). The preliminary structure-activity relationship (SAR) study showed that the antibacterial activity against S. aureus depends on the position of the 3-arylcoumarin substitution pattern. With the aim of finding the structural features for the antibacterial activity and selectivity, in the present manuscript different positions of nitro, methyl, methoxy, amino and bromo substituents on the 3-arylcoumarin scaffold were reported.

  15. Antiproliferative and antibacterial activity of some glutarimide derivatives.

    PubMed

    Popović-Djordjević, Jelena B; Klaus, Anita S; Žižak, Željko S; Matić, Ivana Z; Drakulić, Branko J

    2016-12-01

    Antiproliferative and antibacterial activities of nine glutarimide derivatives (1-9) were reported. Cytotoxicity of compounds was tested toward three human cancer cell lines, HeLa, K562 and MDA-MB-453 by MTT assay. Compound 7 (2-benzyl-2-azaspiro[5.11]heptadecane-1,3,7-trione), containing 12-membered ketone ring, was found to be the most potent toward all tested cell lines (IC50 = 9-27 μM). Preliminary screening of antibacterial activity by a disk diffusion method showed that Gram-positive bacteria were more susceptible to the tested compounds than Gram-negative bacteria. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) determined by a broth microdilution method confirmed that compounds 1, 2, 4, 6-8 and 9 inhibited the growth of all tested Gram-positive and some of the Gram-negative bacteria. The best antibacterial potential was achieved with compound 9 (ethyl 4-(1-benzyl-2,6-dioxopiperidin-3-yl)butanoate) against Bacillus cereus (MIC 0.625 mg/mL; 1.97 × 10(-3 )mol/L). Distinction between more and less active/inactive compounds was assessed from the pharmacophoric patterns obtained by molecular interaction fields.

  16. Screening of solvent dependent antibacterial activity of Prunus domestica.

    PubMed

    Yaqeen, Zahra; Naqvi, Naim-ul-Hasan; Sohail, Tehmina; Rehman, Zakir-ur; Fatima, Nudrat; Imran, Hina; Rehman, Atiqur

    2013-03-01

    Fruit of Prunus domestica was extracted in ethanol. The ethanol extract was further extracted with two solvents ethyl acetate and chloroform. The crude ethanol extract and two fractions (ethyl acetate and chloroform) were screened for their antibacterial activity using the agar well diffusion method .They were tested against nine bacteria; five Gram positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcuc intermedius, Bacillus cereus, Bacillus pumilus) and four Gram negative bacteria (Eschrichia coli, Proteus mirabilis Shigella flexneri, Salmonella typhi and Klebsiela pneumoniae). The susceptibility of microorganisms to all three fractions was compared with each other and with standard antibiotic (Ampicillin) Among all fractions ethyl acetate exhibited highest antibacterial activity (average zone of inhibition 34.57mm ± 1.3) while ethyl alcohol exhibited least antibacterial activity (average zone of inhibition 17.42mm ± 3.3). Minimum inhibitory concentration of ethanol, ethyl acetate and chloroform fractions was found in the range of 78 μ g/ml to 2500 μ gl/ml against gram positive and gram negative bacteria.

  17. Antimicrobial Activities of Methanol, Ethanol and Supercritical CO2 Extracts of Philippine Piper betle L. on Clinical Isolates of Gram Positive and Gram Negative Bacteria with Transferable Multiple Drug Resistance.

    PubMed

    Valle, Demetrio L; Cabrera, Esperanza C; Puzon, Juliana Janet M; Rivera, Windell L

    2016-01-01

    Piper betle L. has traditionally been used in alternative medicine in different countries for various therapeutic purposes, including as an anti-infective agent. However, studies reported in the literature are mainly on its activities on drug susceptible bacterial strains. This study determined the antimicrobial activities of its ethanol, methanol, and supercritical CO2 extracts on clinical isolates of multiple drug resistant bacteria which have been identified by the Infectious Disease Society of America as among the currently more challenging strains in clinical management. Assay methods included the standard disc diffusion method and the broth microdilution method for the determination of the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and the minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBC) of the extracts for the test microorganisms. This study revealed the bactericidal activities of all the P. betle leaf crude extracts on methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE), extended spectrum β-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae, carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, and metallo-β-lactamase-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii, with minimum bactericidal concentrations that ranged from 19μg/ml to 1250 μg/ml. The extracts proved to be more potent against the Gram positive MRSA and VRE than for the Gram negative test bacteria. VRE isolates were more susceptible to all the extracts than the MRSA isolates. Generally, the ethanol extracts proved to be more potent than the methanol extracts and supercritical CO2 extracts as shown by their lower MICs for both the Gram positive and Gram negative MDRs. MTT cytotoxicity assay showed that the highest concentration (100 μg/ml) of P. betle ethanol extract tested was not toxic to normal human dermal fibroblasts (HDFn). Data from the study firmly established P. betle as an alternative source of anti-infectives against multiple drug resistant bacteria.

  18. Antimicrobial Activities of Methanol, Ethanol and Supercritical CO2 Extracts of Philippine Piper betle L. on Clinical Isolates of Gram Positive and Gram Negative Bacteria with Transferable Multiple Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Valle, Demetrio L.; Cabrera, Esperanza C.; Puzon, Juliana Janet M.; Rivera, Windell L.

    2016-01-01

    Piper betle L. has traditionally been used in alternative medicine in different countries for various therapeutic purposes, including as an anti-infective agent. However, studies reported in the literature are mainly on its activities on drug susceptible bacterial strains. This study determined the antimicrobial activities of its ethanol, methanol, and supercritical CO2 extracts on clinical isolates of multiple drug resistant bacteria which have been identified by the Infectious Disease Society of America as among the currently more challenging strains in clinical management. Assay methods included the standard disc diffusion method and the broth microdilution method for the determination of the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and the minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBC) of the extracts for the test microorganisms. This study revealed the bactericidal activities of all the P. betle leaf crude extracts on methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE), extended spectrum β-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae, carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, and metallo-β-lactamase-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii, with minimum bactericidal concentrations that ranged from 19μg/ml to 1250 μg/ml. The extracts proved to be more potent against the Gram positive MRSA and VRE than for the Gram negative test bacteria. VRE isolates were more susceptible to all the extracts than the MRSA isolates. Generally, the ethanol extracts proved to be more potent than the methanol extracts and supercritical CO2 extracts as shown by their lower MICs for both the Gram positive and Gram negative MDRs. MTT cytotoxicity assay showed that the highest concentration (100 μg/ml) of P. betle ethanol extract tested was not toxic to normal human dermal fibroblasts (HDFn). Data from the study firmly established P. betle as an alternative source of anti-infectives against multiple drug resistant bacteria. PMID

  19. Draft genome sequence analysis of a Pseudomonas putida W15Oct28 strain with antagonistic activity to Gram-positive and Pseudomonas sp. pathogens.

    PubMed

    Ye, Lumeng; Hildebrand, Falk; Dingemans, Jozef; Ballet, Steven; Laus, George; Matthijs, Sandra; Berendsen, Roeland; Cornelis, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida is a member of the fluorescent pseudomonads known to produce the yellow-green fluorescent pyoverdine siderophore. P. putida W15Oct28, isolated from a stream in Brussels, was found to produce compound(s) with antimicrobial activity against the opportunistic pathogens Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and the plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae, an unusual characteristic for P. putida. The active compound production only occurred in media with low iron content and without organic nitrogen sources. Transposon mutants which lost their antimicrobial activity had the majority of insertions in genes involved in the biosynthesis of pyoverdine, although purified pyoverdine was not responsible for the antagonism. Separation of compounds present in culture supernatants revealed the presence of two fractions containing highly hydrophobic molecules active against P. aeruginosa. Analysis of the draft genome confirmed the presence of putisolvin biosynthesis genes and the corresponding lipopeptides were found to contribute to the antimicrobial activity. One cluster of ten genes was detected, comprising a NAD-dependent epimerase, an acetylornithine aminotransferase, an acyl CoA dehydrogenase, a short chain dehydrogenase, a fatty acid desaturase and three genes for a RND efflux pump. P. putida W15Oct28 genome also contains 56 genes encoding TonB-dependent receptors, conferring a high capacity to utilize pyoverdines from other pseudomonads. One unique feature of W15Oct28 is also the presence of different secretion systems including a full set of genes for type IV secretion, and several genes for type VI secretion and their VgrG effectors.

  20. Caprolactam-silica network, a strong potentiator of the antimicrobial activity of kanamycin against gram-positive and gram-negative bacterial strains.

    PubMed

    Voicu, Georgeta; Grumezescu, Valentina; Andronescu, Ecaterina; Grumezescu, Alexandru Mihai; Ficai, Anton; Ficai, Denisa; Ghitulica, Cristina Daniela; Gheorghe, Irina; Chifiriuc, Mariana Carmen

    2013-03-25

    Here, we report the fabrication of a novel ε-caprolactam-silica (ε-SiO2) network and assessed its biocompatibility and ability to improve the antimicrobial activity of kanamycin. The results of the quantitative antimicrobial assay demonstrate that the obtained ε-SiO2 network has efficiently improved the kanamycin activity on Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923 and Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 strains, with a significant decrease of the minimum inhibitory concentration. The ε-SiO2 network could be feasibly obtained and represents an alternative for the design of new antibiotic drug carriers or delivery systems to control bacterial infections.

  1. Conjugation in Gram-Positive Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Goessweiner-Mohr, Nikolaus; Arends, Karsten; Keller, Walter; Grohmann, Elisabeth

    2014-08-01

    Conjugative transfer is the most important means of spreading antibiotic resistance and virulence factors among bacteria. The key vehicles of this horizontal gene transfer are a group of mobile genetic elements, termed conjugative plasmids. Conjugative plasmids contain as minimum instrumentation an origin of transfer (oriT), DNA-processing factors (a relaxase and accessory proteins), as well as proteins that constitute the trans-envelope transport channel, the so-called mating pair formation (Mpf) proteins. All these protein factors are encoded by one or more transfer (tra) operons that together form the DNA transport machinery, the Gram-positive type IV secretion system. However, multicellular Gram-positive bacteria belonging to the streptomycetes appear to have evolved another mechanism for conjugative plasmid spread reminiscent of the machinery involved in bacterial cell division and sporulation, which transports double-stranded DNA from donor to recipient cells. Here, we focus on the protein key players involved in the plasmid spread through the two different modes and present a new secondary structure homology-based classification system for type IV secretion protein families. Moreover, we discuss the relevance of conjugative plasmid transfer in the environment and summarize novel techniques to visualize and quantify conjugative transfer in situ.

  2. Activities of Tedizolid and Linezolid Determined by the Reference Broth Microdilution Method against 3,032 Gram-Positive Bacterial Isolates Collected in Asia-Pacific, Eastern Europe, and Latin American Countries in 2014

    PubMed Central

    Pfaller, Michael A.; Flamm, Robert K.; Jones, Ronald N.; Farrell, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Tedizolid and linezolid in vitro activities against 3,032 Gram-positive pathogens collected in Asia-Pacific, Eastern European, and Latin American medical centers during 2014 were assessed. The isolates were tested for susceptibility by the current reference broth microdilution methods. Due to concern over the effect of MIC endpoint criteria on the results of testing the oxazolidinones tedizolid and linezolid, MIC endpoint values were read by two methods: (i) reading the MIC at the first well where the trailing began without regard for pinpoint trailing, according to CLSI M07-A10 and M100-S26 document instructions for reading linezolid (i.e., 80% inhibition of growth; these reads were designated tedizolid 80 and linezolid 80), and (ii) at 100% inhibition of growth (designated tedizolid 100 and linezolid 100). All Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes, Streptococcus agalactiae, Streptococcus anginosus group, and Enterococcus faecalis isolates were inhibited at tedizolid 80 and 100 MIC values of 0.25 and 0.5, 0.25 and 0.25, 0.25 and 0.5, 0.12 and 0.25, and 0.5 and 1 μg/ml, respectively. Generally, MIC50 and MIC90 results for tedizolid 80 and linezolid 80 were one doubling dilution lower than those read at 100% inhibition. Tedizolid was 4- to 8-fold more potent than linezolid against all the isolates tested regardless of the MIC endpoint criterion used. Despite the differences in potency, >99.9% of isolates tested in this survey were susceptible to both linezolid and tedizolid using CLSI and EUCAST interpretive criteria. In conclusion, tedizolid demonstrated greater in vitro potency than linezolid against Gram-positive pathogens isolated from patients in medical centers across the Asia-Pacific region, Eastern Europe, and Latin America. PMID:27353270

  3. Catechol 1,2-dioxygenase from the Gram-positive Rhodococcus opacus 1CP: quantitative structure/activity relationship and the crystal structures of native enzyme and catechols adducts.

    PubMed

    Matera, Irene; Ferraroni, Marta; Kolomytseva, Marina; Golovleva, Ludmila; Scozzafava, Andrea; Briganti, Fabrizio

    2010-06-01

    The first crystallographic structures of a catechol 1,2-dioxygenase from a Gram-positive bacterium Rhodococcus opacus 1CP (Rho 1,2-CTD), a Fe(III) ion containing enzyme specialized in the aerobic biodegradation of catechols, and its adducts with catechol, 3-methylcatechol, 4-methylcatechol, pyrogallol (benzene-1,2,3-triol), 3-chlorocatechol, 4-chlorocatechol, 3,5-dichlorocatechol, 4,5-dichlorocatechol and protocatechuate (3,4-dihydroxybenzoate) have been determined and analyzed. This study represents the first extensive characterization of catechols adducts of 1,2-CTDs. The structural analyses reveal the diverse modes of binding to the active metal iron ion of the tested catechols thus allowing to identify the residues selectively involved in recognition of the diverse substrates by this class of enzymes. The comparison is further extended to the structural and functional characteristics of the other 1,2-CTDs isolated from Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Moreover the high structural homology of the present enzyme with the 3-chlorocatechol 1,2-dioxygenase from the same bacterium are discussed in terms of their different substrate specificity. The catalytic rates for Rho 1,2-CTD conversion of the tested compounds are also compared with the calculated energies of the highest occupied molecular orbital (E(HOMO)) of the substrates. A quantitative relationship (R=0.966) between the ln k(cat) and the calculated electronic parameter E(HOMO) was obtained for catechol, 3-methylcatechol, 4-methylcatechol, pyrogallol, 3-chlorocatechol, 4-chlorocatechol. This indicates that for these substrates the rate-limiting step of the reaction cycle is dependent on their nucleophilic reactivity. The discrepancies observed in the quantitative relationship for 3,5-dichlorocatechol, 4,5-dichlorocatechol and protocatechuate are ascribed to the sterical hindrances leading to the distorted binding of such catechols observed in the corresponding structures.

  4. [Antibacterial activity of sulopenem, a new parenteral penem antibiotic].

    PubMed

    Inoue, E; Komoto, E; Taniyama, Y; Mitsuhashi, S

    1996-04-01

    Sulopenem, a new penem antibiotic, was compared with other antibiotics with regard to in vitro antibacterial and bactericidal activities, stabilization against beta-lactamases, and effect on the release of lipopolysaccharide from Gram-negative bacteria. The results are summarized as follows. 1. Sulopenem showed more potent activities than other antibiotics against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria except Pseudomonas aeruginosa. 2. Sulopenem showed potent bactericidal activities (MIC/MBC) against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Time kill studies against Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Enterobacter cloacae and Citrobacter freundii showed potent bactericidal activities of sulopenem. 3. Sulopenem was found to possess a stronger activity than other antibiotics against beta-lactamase-producing strains except P. aeruginosa and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. 4. In particular, sulopenem was found to be more stable to the hydrolysis by various beta-lactamases produced by Gram-negative bacteria than any other antibiotics tested. Vmax/Km values of sulopenem were smaller than those of cefotiam for all tested beta-lactamases, which reflected a broad antibacterial spectrum of sulopenem. 5. E. coli ML4707 exposed to sulopenem and imipenem released less endotoxin than did controls at all concentration ranges tested. In contrast, the strain exposed to ceftazidime at bacteriostatic concentrations released a large amount of endotoxin.

  5. Chemical Composition and Antibacterial Activity of Essential Oil of Cosmos bipinnatus Cav. Leaves from South Africa.

    PubMed

    Olajuyigbe, Olufunmiso; Ashafa, Anofi

    2014-01-01

    The chemical composition of essential oils isolated from the leaves of Cosmos bipinnatus and its antibacterial activity were analyzed by GC-MS and microbroth dilution assay respectively. The essential oil extracted from this plant was predominantly composed of monoterpenes (69.62%) and sesquiterpenes (22.73%). The antibacterial assay showed that the oil had significant inhibitory effects against both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria isolates. The MIC of Gram-positive strains ranged between 0.16 and 0.31 mg/mL while those of Gram-negative bacteria ranged between 0.31 and 0.63 mg/mL. The Gram-positive bacteria were more susceptible to the essential oil than the Gram-negative bacteria. Most of the major components of this oil in other plants have been reported for antimicrobial activities. The antibacterial activity can be attributed to effects of the combination of several components of the oil. The results indicate that the C. bipinnatus might be exploited as natural antibacterial agent and have application in the treatment of several infectious diseases caused by these bacteria. Since this species is endemic to the eastern Free State, the plant could be collected during its bloom and used efficiently in the management of bacterial infections in South Africa.

  6. Chemical Composition and Antibacterial Activity of Essential Oil of Cosmos bipinnatus Cav. Leaves from South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Olajuyigbe, Olufunmiso; Ashafa, Anofi

    2014-01-01

    The chemical composition of essential oils isolated from the leaves of Cosmos bipinnatus and its antibacterial activity were analyzed by GC-MS and microbroth dilution assay respectively. The essential oil extracted from this plant was predominantly composed of monoterpenes (69.62%) and sesquiterpenes (22.73%). The antibacterial assay showed that the oil had significant inhibitory effects against both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria isolates. The MIC of Gram-positive strains ranged between 0.16 and 0.31 mg/mL while those of Gram-negative bacteria ranged between 0.31 and 0.63 mg/mL. The Gram-positive bacteria were more susceptible to the essential oil than the Gram-negative bacteria. Most of the major components of this oil in other plants have been reported for antimicrobial activities. The antibacterial activity can be attributed to effects of the combination of several components of the oil. The results indicate that the C. bipinnatus might be exploited as natural antibacterial agent and have application in the treatment of several infectious diseases caused by these bacteria. Since this species is endemic to the eastern Free State, the plant could be collected during its bloom and used efficiently in the management of bacterial infections in South Africa. PMID:25587332

  7. [Antioxidant and antibacterial activities of dimeric phenol compounds].

    PubMed

    Ogata, Masahiro

    2008-08-01

    We studied the antioxidant and antibacterial activities of monomeric and dimeric phenol compounds. Dimeric compounds had higher antioxidant activities than monomeric compounds. Electron spin resonance spin-trapping experiments showed that phenol compounds with an allyl substituent on their aromatic rings directly scavenged superoxide, and that only eugenol trapped hydroxyl radicals. We developed a generation system of the hydroxyl radical without using any metals by adding L-DOPA and DMPO to PBS or MiliQ water in vitro. We found that eugenol trapped hydroxyl radicals directly and is metabolized to a dimer. On the other hand, dipropofol, a dimer of propofol, has strong antibacterial activity against Gram-positive bacteria. However, it lacks solubility in water and this property is assumed to limit its efficacy. We tried to improve the solubility and found a new solubilization method of dipropofol in water with the addition of a monosaccharide or ascorbic acid.

  8. Size-dependent antimicrobial properties of CuO nanoparticles against Gram-positive and -negative bacterial strains

    PubMed Central

    Azam, Ameer; Ahmed, Arham S; Oves, M; Khan, MS; Memic, Adnan

    2012-01-01

    Background CuO is one of the most important transition metal oxides due to its captivating properties. It is used in various technological applications such as high critical temperature superconductors, gas sensors, in photoconductive applications, and so on. Recently, it has been used as an antimicrobial agent against various bacterial species. Here we synthesized different sized CuO nanoparticles and explored the size-dependent antibacterial activity of each CuO nanoparticles preparation. Methods CuO nanoparticles were synthesized using a gel combustion method. In this approach, cupric nitrate trihydrate and citric acid were dissolved in distilled water with a molar ratio of 1:1. The resulting solution was stirred at 100°C, until gel was formed. The gel was allowed to burn at 200°C to obtain amorphous powder, which was further annealed at different temperatures to obtain different size CuO nanoparticles. We then tested the antibacterial properties using well diffusion, minimum inhibitory concentration, and minimum bactericidal concentration methods. Results XRD spectra confirmed the formation of single phase CuO nanoparticles. Crystallite size was found to increase with an increase in annealing temperature due to atomic diffusion. A minimum crystallite size of 20 nm was observed in the case of CuO nanoparticles annealed at 400°C. Transmission electron microscopy results corroborate well with XRD results. All CuO nanoparticles exhibited inhibitory effects against both Gram-positive and -negative bacteria. The size of the particles was correlated with its antibacterial activity. Conclusion The antibacterial activity of CuO nanoparticles was found to be size-dependent. In addition, the highly stable minimum-sized monodispersed copper oxide nanoparticles synthesized during this study demonstrated a significant increase in antibacterial activities against both Gram-positive and -negative bacterial strains. PMID:22848176

  9. In vitro antibacterial activity in seed extracts of Manilkara zapota, Anona squamosa, and Tamarindus indica.

    PubMed

    Kothari, Vijay; Seshadri, Sriram

    2010-01-01

    Extracts prepared from seeds of Manilkara zapota, Anona squamosa, and Tamarindus indica were screened for their antibacterial activity by disc diffusion and broth dilution methods. Acetone and methanol extracts of T. indica seeds were found active against both gram-positive and gram-negative organisms. MIC values of potent extracts against susceptible organisms ranged from 53-380 μg/mL. Methanol extract of T. indica and acetone extract of M. zapota seeds were found to be bactericidal.

  10. Syntheses and Antibacterial Activity of N-Acylated Ciprofloxacin Derivatives Based on the Trimethyl Lock

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Several N-acyl ciprofloxacin quinone derivatives based on a trimethyl lock structure were synthesized, and their in vitro antibacterial activity against a panel of clinically relevant bacteria was evaluated. A few new analogues displayed enhanced activity against Gram-positive species compared to the parent drug. Additionally, studies of 8-Cip, which was the most potent compound tested, indicate that it may act through a dual-action mechanism. PMID:26101578

  11. Chemical composition and antibacterial activity of the essential oil of Retrohpyllum rospigliosii fruits from Colombia.

    PubMed

    Quijano-Celis, Clara E; Gaviria, Mauricio; Consuelo, Vanegas-López; Ontiveros, Ina; Echeverri, Leonardo; Morales, Gustavo; Pino, Jorge A

    2010-07-01

    The essential oil from fruits of Retrophyllum rospigliosii (Pilger) C.N. Page grown in Colombia was analyzed by GC and GC/MS. Ninety-one compounds were identified, of which the most prominent were limonene (37.7%) and alpha-pinene (16.3%). The in vitro antibacterial activity of the essential oil was studied against seven bacterial strains using the disc diffusion method. The strongest activity of the oil was against the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus cereus.

  12. Probing interaction of gram-positive and gram-negative bacterial cells with ZnO nanorods.

    PubMed

    Jain, Aanchal; Bhargava, Richa; Poddar, Pankaj

    2013-04-01

    In the present work, the physiological effects of the ZnO nanorods on the Gram positive (Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis) and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli and Aerobacter aerogenes) bacterial cells have been studied. The analysis of bacterial growth curves for various concentrations of ZnO nanorods indicates that Gram positive and Gram negative bacterial cells show inhibition at concentrations of ~64 and ~256 μg/mL respectively. The marked difference in susceptibility towards nanorods was also validated by spread plate and disk diffusion methods. In addition, the scanning electron micrographs show a clear damage to the cells via changed morphology of the cells from rod to coccoid etc. The confocal optical microscopy images of these cells also demonstrate the reduction in live cell count in the presence of ZnO nanorods. These, results clearly indicate that the antibacterial activity of ZnO nanorods is higher towards Gram positive bacterium than Gram negative bacterium which indicates that the structure of the cell wall might play a major role in the interaction with nanostructured materials and shows high sensitivity to the particle concentration.

  13. Antibacterial activity of 2-(2',4'-dibromophenoxy)-4,6-dibromophenol from Dysidea granulosa.

    PubMed

    Shridhar, Divya M P; Mahajan, Girish B; Kamat, Vijayendra P; Naik, Chandrakant G; Parab, Rajashri R; Thakur, Nidhi R; Mishra, Prabhu D

    2009-09-22

    2-(2',4'-Dibromophenoxy)-4,6-dibromophenol isolated from the marine sponge Dysidea granulosa (Bergquist) collected off the coast of Lakshadweep islands, Indian Ocean, exhibited potent and broad spectrum in-vitro antibacterial activity, especially against methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), methicillin sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA), vancomycin resistant Enterococci (VRE), vancomycin sensitive Enterococci (VSE) and Bacillus spp. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) was evaluated against 57 clinical and standard strains of Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria. The observed MIC range was 0.117-2.5 microg/mL against all the Gram positive bacteria and 0.5-2 microg/mL against Gram negative bacteria. The in-vitro antibacterial activity observed was better than that of the standard antibiotic linezolid, a marketed anti-MRSA drug. The results establish 2-(2',4'-dibromophenoxy)-4,6-dibromophenol, as a potential lead molecule for anti-MRSA and anti-VRE drug development.

  14. Assessment of the Activity of Tigecycline against Gram-Positive and Gram-Negative Organisms Collected from Italy between 2012 and 2014, as Part of the Tigecycline Evaluation and Surveillance Trial (T.E.S.T.)

    PubMed Central

    Stefani, Stefania; Dowzicky, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    As part of the Tigecycline Evaluation and Surveillance Trial (T.E.S.T) we report the in vitro activity of tigecycline and its comparators against Gram-negative and Gram-positive organisms collected from Italian centers between 2012 and 2014. Minimum inhibitory concentrations were determined according to the broth microdilution methodology of the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute, and antimicrobial resistance was determined using the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing interpretive criteria. Among the Enterobacteriaceae, 31% of Escherichia coli isolates, 22% of Klebsiella pneumoniae, and 1% of Klebsiella oxytoca were extended-spectrum β-lactamase producers (ESBLs). Resistance rates among ESBL-K. pneumoniae and ESBL-E. coli to meropenem were 24% and <1%, respectively. Thirty-seven percent of K. pneumoniae were multidrug resistant (MDR) strains. Resistance rates among isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii to amikacin, levofloxacin and meropenem were between 84% and 94%. Eighty percent of A. baumannii isolates were MDR strains. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) accounted for 38% of S. aureus isolates. No isolates of MRSA were resistant to linezolid, tigecycline or vancomycin. Antimicrobial resistance remains a problem in Italy with increasing numbers of MDR organisms. Despite high levels, MRSA rates appear to be stabilising. Tigecycline retains its in vitro activity against the majority of organisms, including those with multidrug resistance. PMID:27898030

  15. Synthesis and Antibacterial Activity of Pentacyclines: A Novel Class of Tetracycline Analogs

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Employing a highly efficient total synthesis approach, we synthesized and evaluated for antibacterial activity diverse and novel pentacycline analogs with systematic variations at C7, C8, C9, and C10. Certain substitution groups, as well as substitution patterns at various positions, were found to be preferred for increased antibacterial activity. A number of pentacycline analogs displayed potent activity in vitro and in vivo, especially against Gram-positive organisms. Several analogs have also shown promising oral bioavailability in rats and cynomolgus monkey. PMID:21500832

  16. Antibacterial and cytotoxic activities of the sesquiterpene lactones cnicin and onopordopicrin.

    PubMed

    Bach, Sandra M; Fortuna, Mario A; Attarian, Rodgoun; de Trimarco, Juliana T; Catalán, César A N; Av-Gay, Yossef; Bach, Horacio

    2011-02-01

    The antimicrobial and cytotoxic activities of chloroform extracts from the weeds Centaurea tweediei and C. diffusa, and the main sesquiterpene lactones isolated from these species, onopordopicrin and cnicin, respectively, were assayed. Results show that the chloroform extracts from both Centaurea species possess antibacterial activities against a panel of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Remarkable antibacterial activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus was also measured. Both the extracts and the purified sesquiterpene lactones show high cytotoxicity against human-derived macrophages. Despite this cytotoxicity, C. diffusa chloroform extract and cnicin are attractive candidates for evaluation as antibiotics in topical preparations against skin-associated pathogens.

  17. [Epidemiology of the infection by resistant Gram-positive microorganisms].

    PubMed

    Cercenado, E

    2016-09-01

    Resistance among Gram-positive microorganisms to classical and new antimicrobials is a therapeutic threat. In Spain, methicillin resistance among Staphylococcus aureus (25-30%) and coagulase-negative staphylococci (50-60%) seems to have stabilized in the last decade. Among enterococci, vancomycin resistance is less than 5%. Both linezolid and daptomycin, in general, show good activity against these microorganisms. However, the resistance rates of Staphylococcus epidermidis to linezolid (20.9%), and of Enterococcus faecium to daptomycin (10.5%) in isolates from intensive care units are a worrying.

  18. Current and novel antibiotics against resistant Gram-positive bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Federico; Salata, Robert A; Bonomo, Robert A

    2008-01-01

    The challenge posed by resistance among Gram-positive bacteria, epitomized by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE) and vancomycin-intermediate and -resistant S. aureus (VISA and VRSA) is being met by a new generation of antimicrobials. This review focuses on the new β-lactams with activity against MRSA (ceftobiprole and ceftaroline) and on the new glycopeptides (oritavancin, dalbavancin, and telavancin). It will also consider the role of vancomycin in an era of existing alternatives such as linezolid, daptomycin and tigecycline. Finally, compounds in early development are described, such as iclaprim, friulimicin, and retapamulin, among others. PMID:21694878

  19. Rose Bengal-decorated silica nanoparticles as photosensitizers for inactivation of gram-positive bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yanyan; Rogelj, Snezna; Zhang, Peng

    2010-02-01

    A new type of photosensitizer, made from Rose Bengal (RB)-decorated silica (SiO2-NH2-RB) nanoparticles, was developed to inactivate gram-positive bacteria, including Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), with high efficiency through photodynamic action. The nanoparticles were characterized microscopically and spectroscopically to confirm their structures. The characterization of singlet oxygen generated by RB, both free and immobilized on a nanoparticle surface, was performed in the presence of anthracene-9,10-dipropionic acid. The capability of SiO2-NH2-RB nanoparticles to inactivate bacteria was tested in vitro on both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. The results showed that RB-decorated silica nanoparticles can inactivate MRSA and Staphylococcus epidermidis (both gram-positive) very effectively (up to eight-orders-of-magnitude reduction). Photosensitizers of such design should have good potential as antibacterial agents through a photodynamic mechanism.

  20. Structure-activity relationship in the oxazolidinone-quinolone hybrid series: influence of the central spacer on the antibacterial activity and the mode of action.

    PubMed

    Hubschwerlen, Christian; Specklin, Jean-Luc; Baeschlin, Daniel K; Borer, Yves; Haefeli, Sascha; Sigwalt, Christine; Schroeder, Susanne; Locher, Hans H

    2003-12-01

    Oxazolidinone-quinolone hybrids, which combine the pharmacophores of a quinolone and an oxazolidinone, were synthesised and shown to be active against a variety of susceptible and resistant Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. The nature of the spacer greatly influences the antibacterial activity by directing the mode of action, that is quinolone- and/or oxazolidinone-like activity. The best compounds in this series have a balanced dual mode of action and overcome all types of resistance, including resistance to quinolones and linezolid, in clinically relevant Gram-positive pathogens.

  1. Glycerol Monolaurate Antibacterial Activity in Broth and Biofilm Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Schlievert, Patrick M.; Peterson, Marnie L.

    2012-01-01

    Background Glycerol monolaurate (GML) is an antimicrobial agent that has potent activity against gram-positive bacteria. This study examines GML antibacterial activity in comparison to lauric acid, in broth cultures compared to biofilm cultures, and against a wide range of gram-positive, gram-negative, and non-gram staining bacteria. Methodology/Principal Findings GML is ≥200 times more effective than lauric acid in bactericidal activity, defined as a ≥3 log reduction in colony-forming units (CFU)/ml, against Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes in broth cultures. Both molecules inhibit superantigen production by these organisms at concentrations that are not bactericidal. GML prevents biofilm formation by Staphylococcus aureus and Haemophilus influenzae, as representative gram-positive and gram-negative organisms, tested in 96 well microtiter plates, and simultaneously is bactericidal for both organisms in mature biofilms. GML is bactericidal for a wide range of potential bacterial pathogens, except for Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterobacteriaceae. In the presence of acidic pH and the cation chelator ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid, GML has greatly enhanced bactericidal activity for Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterobacteriaceae. Solubilization of GML in a nonaqueous delivery vehicle (related to K-Y Warming®) enhances its bactericidal activity against S. aureus. Both R and S, and 1 and 2 position lauric acid derivatives of GML exhibit bactericidal activity. Despite year-long passage of Staphylococcus aureus on sub-growth inhibitory concentrations of GML (0.5 x minimum bactericidal concentration), resistance to GML did not develop. Conclusions/Significance GML may be useful as a broad-spectrum human or animal topical microbicide and may be useful as an environmental surface microbicide for management of bacterial infections and contamination. PMID:22808139

  2. Classification of Bacteriocins from Gram-Positive Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rea, Mary C.; Ross, R. Paul; Cotter, Paul D.; Hill, Colin

    Bacteriocins are ribosomally synthesised antimicrobial peptides produced by bacteria, including many Gram-positive species. The classification of bacteriocins from Gram-positive bacteria is complicated by their heterogeneity and thus, as the number of Gram-positive bacteriocins identified has continued to increase, classification schemes have had to continuously evolve. Here, we review the various classification approaches, both historical and current, their underlying scientific basis and their relative merit, and suggest a rational scheme given the state of the art.

  3. Antibacterial and antifungal activities of some Mexican medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Bustos, E; Velazquez, C; Garibay-Escobar, A; García, Z; Plascencia-Jatomea, M; Cortez-Rocha, M O; Hernandez-Martínez, J; Robles-Zepeda, R E

    2009-12-01

    In Mexico about 4,000 plant species have some medicinal use. The aim of this work was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of six Mexican medicinal plants against fungi and Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Methanolic extracts were prepared from the Mexican medicinal plants Amphypteringium adstrigens, Castella tortuosa, Coutarea latiflora, Ibervillea sonorae, Jatropha cuneata, and Selaginella lepidophylla. The antibacterial and antifungal activities of the plants were determined by the broth microdilution method and the radial growth inhibition assay, respectively. All Mexican plants tested showed antimicrobial activity. Among the six plant extracts analyzed, J. cuneata showed the highest growth-inhibitory activity against fungi, Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria (J. cuneata > A. adstrigens > C. latiflora > C. tortuosa > I. sonorae approximately S. lepidophylla). Shigella flexneri and Staphylococcus aureus were the most susceptible bacteria to plant extracts. Complete inhibition of S. flexneri growth was observed with J. cuneata methanolic extract at 90 microg/mL. This plant extract also showed the strongest antifungal activity against Fusarium verticillioides and Aspergillus niger. Our data suggest that the medicinal plants tested have important antimicrobial properties. This is the first report describing the antimicrobial activities of several of the Mexican medicinal plants used in this study.

  4. Antibacterial Activity of Myristica fragrans against Oral Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Shafiei, Zaleha; Shuhairi, Nadia Najwa; Md Fazly Shah Yap, Nordiyana; Harry Sibungkil, Carrie-Anne; Latip, Jalifah

    2012-01-01

    Myristica fragrans Houtt is mostly cultivated for spices in Penang Island, Malaysia. The ethyl acetate and ethanol extracts of flesh, mace and seed of Myristica fragrans was evaluated the bactericidal potential against three Gram-positive cariogenic bacteria (Streptococcus mutans ATCC 25175, Streptococcus mitis ATCC 6249, and Streptococcus salivarius ATCC 13419) and three Gram-negative periodontopathic bacteria (Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans ATCC 29522, Porphyromonas gingivalis ATCC 33277, and Fusobacterium nucleatum ATCC 25586). Antibacterial activities of the extracts was determined by twofold serial microdilution, with minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) ranging from 1.25 to 640 mg/mL and 0.075 to 40 mg/mL. The minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) was obtained by subculturing method. Among all extracts tested, ethyl acetate extract of flesh has the highest significant inhibitory effects against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria with mean MIC value ranging from 0.625 to 1.25 ± 0.00 (SD) mg/mL; P = 0.017) and highest bactericidal effects at mean MBC value ranging from 0.625 mg/mL to 20 ± 0.00 (SD) mg/mL. While for seed and mace of Myristica fragrans, their ethanol extracts exhibited good antibacterial activity against both groups of test pathogens compared to its ethyl acetate extracts. All of the extracts of Myristica fragrans did not show any antibacterial activities against Fusobacterium nucleatum ATCC 25586. Thus, our study showed the potential effect of ethyl acetate and ethanol extracts from flesh, seed and mace of Myristica fragrans to be new natural agent that can be incorporated in oral care products. PMID:23049613

  5. Antibacterial Activity of Myristica fragrans against Oral Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Shafiei, Zaleha; Shuhairi, Nadia Najwa; Md Fazly Shah Yap, Nordiyana; Harry Sibungkil, Carrie-Anne; Latip, Jalifah

    2012-01-01

    Myristica fragrans Houtt is mostly cultivated for spices in Penang Island, Malaysia. The ethyl acetate and ethanol extracts of flesh, mace and seed of Myristica fragrans was evaluated the bactericidal potential against three Gram-positive cariogenic bacteria (Streptococcus mutans ATCC 25175, Streptococcus mitis ATCC 6249, and Streptococcus salivarius ATCC 13419) and three Gram-negative periodontopathic bacteria (Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans ATCC 29522, Porphyromonas gingivalis ATCC 33277, and Fusobacterium nucleatum ATCC 25586). Antibacterial activities of the extracts was determined by twofold serial microdilution, with minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) ranging from 1.25 to 640 mg/mL and 0.075 to 40 mg/mL. The minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) was obtained by subculturing method. Among all extracts tested, ethyl acetate extract of flesh has the highest significant inhibitory effects against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria with mean MIC value ranging from 0.625 to 1.25 ± 0.00 (SD) mg/mL; P = 0.017) and highest bactericidal effects at mean MBC value ranging from 0.625 mg/mL to 20 ± 0.00 (SD) mg/mL. While for seed and mace of Myristica fragrans, their ethanol extracts exhibited good antibacterial activity against both groups of test pathogens compared to its ethyl acetate extracts. All of the extracts of Myristica fragrans did not show any antibacterial activities against Fusobacterium nucleatum ATCC 25586. Thus, our study showed the potential effect of ethyl acetate and ethanol extracts from flesh, seed and mace of Myristica fragrans to be new natural agent that can be incorporated in oral care products.

  6. Biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles using citrus sinensis peel extract and its antibacterial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaviya, S.; Santhanalakshmi, J.; Viswanathan, B.; Muthumary, J.; Srinivasan, K.

    2011-08-01

    Biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) was achieved by a novel, simple green chemistry procedure using citrus sinensis peel extract as a reducing and a capping agent. The effect of temperature on the synthesis of silver nanoparticles was carried out at room temperature (25 °C) and 60 °C. The successful formation of silver nanoparticles has been confirmed by UV-vis, FTIR, XRD, EDAX, FESEM and TEM analysis and their antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Gram-negative), and Staphylococcus aureus (Gram-positive) has been studied. The results suggest that the synthesized AgNPs act as an effective antibacterial agent.

  7. Fabrication of silver-coated cobalt ferrite nanocomposite and the study of its antibacterial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kooti, M.; Saiahi, S.; Motamedi, H.

    2013-05-01

    A new silver coated cobalt ferrite nanocomposite, Ag@CoFe2O4, was prepared by a two-step procedure. In the first step, cobalt ferrite nanoparticles were synthesized by a combustion method using glycine as a fuel. This ferrite was then coated with nanosilver via chemical reduction of Ag+ solution. The as-synthesized Ag@CoFe2O4 was characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and vibrating sample magnetometer. The antibacterial activity of this composite was investigated against some Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and compared with those of silver nanoparticles and some standard antibacterial drugs.

  8. Report: Studies on antibacterial activity of some traditional medicinal plants used in folk medicine.

    PubMed

    Israr, Fozia; Hassan, Fouzia; Naqvi, Baqir Shyum; Azhar, Iqbal; Jabeen, Sabahat; Hasan, S M Farid

    2012-07-01

    Ethanolic extracts of eight medicinal plants commonly used in folk medicine were tested for their antibacterial activity against four Gram positive strains (Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis and, Streptococcus pneumoniae) and six Gram negative strains (Escherichia coli, Proteus vulgaris, Proteus mirabilis. Salmonella typhi para A, Salmonella typhi para B and Shigella dysenteriae) that were obtained from different pathological laboratories located in Karachi, Pakistan. Disc diffusion method was used to analyze antibacterial activity. Out of eight, five medicinal plants showed antibacterial activity against two or more than two microbial species. The most effective antimicrobial plant found to be Punica granatum followed by Curcuma zedoaria Rosc, Grewia asiatica L and Carissa carandas L, Curcuma caesia Roxb respectively. From these results, it is evident that medicinal plants could be used as a potential source of new antibacterial agents.

  9. Synthesis and Antibacterial Activity of Quaternary Ammonium 4-Deoxypyridoxine Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Shtyrlin, Nikita V; Sapozhnikov, Sergey V; Galiullina, Albina S; Kayumov, Airat R; Bondar, Oksana V; Mirchink, Elena P; Isakova, Elena B; Firsov, Alexander A; Balakin, Konstantin V; Shtyrlin, Yurii G

    2016-01-01

    A series of novel quaternary ammonium 4-deoxypyridoxine derivatives was synthesized. Two compounds demonstrated excellent activity against a panel of Gram-positive methicillin-resistant S. aureus strains with MICs in the range of 0.5-2 μg/mL, exceeding the activity of miramistin. At the same time, both compounds were inactive against the Gram-negative E. coli and P. aeruginosa strains. Cytotoxicity studies on human skin fibroblasts and embryonic kidney cells demonstrated that the active compounds possessed similar toxicity with benzalkonium chloride but were slightly more toxic than miramistin. SOS-chromotest in S. typhimurium showed the lack of DNA-damage activity of both compounds; meanwhile, one compound showed some mutagenic potential in the Ames test. The obtained results make the described chemotype a promising starting point for the development of new antibacterial therapies.

  10. Synthesis and Antibacterial Activity of Quaternary Ammonium 4-Deoxypyridoxine Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Shtyrlin, Nikita V.; Sapozhnikov, Sergey V.; Galiullina, Albina S.; Kayumov, Airat R.; Bondar, Oksana V.; Mirchink, Elena P.; Isakova, Elena B.; Firsov, Alexander A.; Balakin, Konstantin V.

    2016-01-01

    A series of novel quaternary ammonium 4-deoxypyridoxine derivatives was synthesized. Two compounds demonstrated excellent activity against a panel of Gram-positive methicillin-resistant S. aureus strains with MICs in the range of 0.5–2 μg/mL, exceeding the activity of miramistin. At the same time, both compounds were inactive against the Gram-negative E. coli and P. aeruginosa strains. Cytotoxicity studies on human skin fibroblasts and embryonic kidney cells demonstrated that the active compounds possessed similar toxicity with benzalkonium chloride but were slightly more toxic than miramistin. SOS-chromotest in S. typhimurium showed the lack of DNA-damage activity of both compounds; meanwhile, one compound showed some mutagenic potential in the Ames test. The obtained results make the described chemotype a promising starting point for the development of new antibacterial therapies. PMID:27800491

  11. Microcins from Enterobacteria: On the Edge Between Gram-Positive Bacteriocins and Colicins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebuffat, Sylvie

    Most bacteria and archaea produce gene-encoded antimicrobial peptides/proteins called bacteriocins, which are secreted by the producing bacteria to compete against other microorganisms in a given niche. They are considered important mediators of intra- and interspecies interactions and therefore a factor in ­maintaining the microbial diversity and stability. They are ribosomally synthesized, and most of them are produced as inactive precursor proteins, which in some cases are further enzymatically modified. Bacteriocins generally exert potent antibacterial activities directed against bacterial species closely related to the producing bacteria. Bacteriocins are abundant and diverse in Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. This chapter focuses on colicins and microcins from enterobacteria (mainly Escherichia coli) and on bacteriocins from lactic acid bacteria (LAB). Microcins are the lower-molecular-mass bacteriocins produced by Gram-negative bacteria with a repertoire of only 14 representatives. They form a very restricted family of bacteriocins, compared to the huge family of LAB bacteriocins that is constituted of several hundreds of peptides, with which microcins share common characteristics. Nevertheless, microcins also show similarities, particularly in their uptake mechanisms, with the higher-molecular-mass colicins, also produced by E. coli strains. On the edge between LAB bacteriocins and colicins, microcins appear to combine highly efficient strategies developed by both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria at different levels, including uptake, translocation, killing of target cells, and immunity of the producing bacteria, making them important actors of bacterial competitions and fascinating models for novel concepts toward antimicrobial strategies and against resistance mechanisms.

  12. Structure-activity relationship of indolicidin, a Trp-rich antibacterial peptide.

    PubMed

    Ando, Setsuko; Mitsuyasu, Keitarou; Soeda, Yoshitake; Hidaka, Mariko; Ito, Yuki; Matsubara, Kouki; Shindo, Mitsuno; Uchida, Yoshiki; Aoyagi, Haruhiko

    2010-04-01

    A series of Trp and Arg analogs of antibacterial indolicidin (Ind) was synthesized and the antimicrobial and hemolytic activities were investigated. [L(9)]Ind, [L(11)]Ind, [K(8),L(9)]Ind and [K(6, 8),L(9)]Ind showed desirable characteristics, exhibiting negligible hemolytic activity while keeping strong antibacterial activity. The results indicated that the Trp residue at position 11 essentially contributes to both activities and one can not be exchanged for the other, whereas the Trp residues at positions 4 and 9 play important roles in antimicrobial and hemolytic activities, respectively. The Trp residues at positions 6 and 8 play no important roles in biological activities. We then found that the retro analog of Ind showed higher antibacterial activity than Ind against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria but remarkably lower hemolytic activity than that of Ind.

  13. Evaluation of Parmotrema reticulatum Taylor for Antibacterial and Antiinflammatory Activities

    PubMed Central

    Jain, A. P.; Bhandarkar, S.; Rai, G.; Yadav, A. K.; Lodhi, S.

    2016-01-01

    Lichens produce variety of secondary metabolites including depsides, depsidones and dibenzofurans having multifunctional activity in response to external environmental condition. Present study provides evidence for in vitro antibacterial and in vivo antiinflammatory activity of acetone and ethanol extracts of Parmotrema reticulatum. In vitro antibacterial activity was investigated against gram positive and gram negative bacteria. Cotton pellet-induced granuloma, xylene-induced ear swelling, carragennan-induced edema, histamine-induced and carboxymethylcellulose sodium-induced leukocyte emigration in mice models were used to quantify the antiinflammatory activity. Acetone and ethanol extracts were showed antibacterial activity against Bacillus subtilis (minimal inhibitory concentration: 100 and 150 μg/ml) and Staphylococcus aureus (minimal inhibitory concentration: 100 and 200 μg/ml), Escherichia coli (minimal inhibitory concentration: 200 and 250 μg/ml), and Pseudomonasa eruginosa (minimal inhibitory concentration: 200 and 300 μg/ml). Acetone extract was inhibited edema significantly at 200 mg/kg with xylene, cotton pellet, carragennan and histamine induced edema in vivo models. Ethanol extract was found effective at dose of 300 mg/kg with all in vivo antiinflammatory models. The results showed significant (P<0.01) antiinflammatory effects at 200 and 300 mg/kg dose of acetone and ethanol extracts, respectively, which can be concluded that significant activity may be due to presence of flavanoids in ethanol extract and usnic acid in acetone extract. PMID:27168687

  14. Methods for targetted mutagenesis in gram-positive bacteria

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Yunfeng

    2014-05-27

    The present invention provides a method of targeted mutagenesis in Gram-positive bacteria. In particular, the present invention provides a method that effectively integrates a suicide integrative vector into a target gene in the chromosome of a Gram-positive bacterium, resulting in inactivation of the target gene.

  15. [Update of antimicrobial resistance in Gram-positive microorganisms].

    PubMed

    Cercenado, Emilia

    2010-12-01

    In the last few decades, resistance among Gram-positive microorganisms to classical antimicrobials as well as the emergence of resistance to new antimicrobials has been observed in our environment. Methicillin resistance among Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococci seems to have stabilized at around 30% and 70%, respectively, however, multiresistance of these species to other antimicrobials, emergence of linezolid resistance, and decreased susceptibility to glycopeptides is a cause of concern. Daptomycin has good antimicrobial activity, although some strains with slightly increased MICs have been detected. Among enterococci, vancomycin resistance is less than 5%, but multiresistance among these microorganisms, emerging linezolid resistance and reports of some isolates with decreased susceptibility to daptomycin are worrying. Adequate use of antimicrobials could help to prevent the increase in resistance and dissemination of these pathogens and will allow their efficacy to be guaranteed in the future.

  16. Synthesis and antibacterial activity of of silver nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maliszewska, I.; Sadowski, Z.

    2009-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles have been known to have inhibitory and bactericidal effects but the antimicrobial mechanism have not been clearly revealed. Here, we report on the synthesis of metallic nanoparticles of silver using wild strains of Penicillium isolated from environment. Kinetics of the formation of nanosilver was monitored using the UV-Vis. TEM micrographs showed the formation of silver nanoparticles in the range 10-100 nm. Obtained Ag nanoparticles were evaluated for their antimicrobial activity against the gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. As results, Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were effectively inhibited. Nanosilver is a promising candidate for development of future antibacterial therapies because of its wide spectrum of activity.

  17. Antibacterial activity of Salvia tomentosa essential oil.

    PubMed

    Haznedaroglu, M Z; Karabay, N U; Zeybek, U

    2001-11-01

    The essential oil of Salvia tomentosa aerial parts, consisting of 1,8-cineol (17%), beta-caryophyllene (11%), cyclofenchene (10%) and delta-cadinene (6%), was screened for its antimicrobial activity. The essential oil remarkably inhibited the growth of tested Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria except for Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

  18. Antioxidant Content, Antioxidant Activity, and Antibacterial Activity of Five Plants from the Commelinaceae Family

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Joash Ban Lee; Yap, Wei Jin; Tan, Shen Yeng; Lim, Yau Yan; Lee, Sui Mae

    2014-01-01

    Commelinaceae is a family of herbaceous flowering plants with many species used in ethnobotany, particularly in South America. However, thus far reports of their bioactivity are few and far between. The primary aim of this study was to quantify the antioxidant and antibacterial activity of five Commelinaceae methanolic leaf extracts. The antioxidant content was evaluated by the total phenolic content (TPC), total tannin content (TTC), and total flavonoid content (TFC) assays. The antioxidant activities measured were DPPH free radical scavenging (FRS), ferric reducing power (FRP), and ferrous ion chelating (FIC); of the five plants, the methanolic leaf extract of Tradescantia zebrina showed the highest antioxidant content and activity, and exhibited antibacterial activity against six species of Gram-positive and two species of Gram-negative bacteria in a range of 5–10 mg/mL based on the broth microdilution method. PMID:26785239

  19. Antibacterial activity of antibacterial cutting boards in household kitchens.

    PubMed

    Kounosu, Masayuki; Kaneko, Seiichi

    2007-12-01

    We examined antibacterial cutting boards with antibacterial activity values of either "2" or "4" in compliance with the JIS Z 2801 standard, and compared their findings with those of cutting boards with no antibacterial activity. These cutting boards were used in ten different households, and we measured changes in the viable cell counts of several types of bacteria with the drop plate method. We also identified the detected bacterial flora and measured the minimum antimicrobial concentrations of several commonly used antibacterial agents against the kinds of bacteria identified to determine the expected antibacterial activity of the respective agents. Cutting boards with activity values of both "2" and "4" proved to be antibacterial in actual use, although no correlation between the viable cell counts and the antibacterial activity values was observed. In the kitchen environment, large quantities of Pseudomonas, Flavobacterium, Micrococcus, and Bacillus were detected, and it was confirmed that common antibacterial agents used in many antibacterial products are effective against these bacterial species. In addition, we measured the minimum antimicrobial concentrations of the agents against lactobacillus, a typical good bacterium, and discovered that this bacterium is less sensitive to these antibacterial agents compared to more common bacteria.

  20. In Vitro Study to Evaluate Antibacterial and Non-haemolytic Activities of Four Iranian Medicinal Plants

    PubMed Central

    Sepahi, S; Ghorani-Azam, A; Sepahi, S; Asoodeh, A; Rostami, S

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Aqueous extracts of four medicinal plants including Ferula gummosa, Echinophora orientalis, Nasturtium microphyllum and Verbascum thapsus were used to determine their antibacterial activities and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). The aim of this study was to assess antibacterial activity of extracts of four medicinal plants against a Gram-positive and a Gram-negative bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus PTCC1431, and Escherichia coli HP101BA 7601c). Methods: Radial diffusion assay was used to assess the antibacterial activity of extracted samples. Haemolysis assay was also used to examine their nontoxic effects on human red blood cells. Results: This study showed that all the mentioned plants have satisfactory antibacterial effects against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Minimum inhibitory concentration values of these samples were less than 750 μg/mL. In addition, no significant haemolytic activity was observed at their MIC values. Conclusion: The results of this study showed that all these studied plants have good potential for further studies for drug discovery. PMID:25429470

  1. Antibacterial activities of tellurium nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zong-Hong; Lee, Chia-Hsin; Chang, Hsin-Yun; Chang, Huan-Tsung

    2012-05-01

    We prepared four differently shaped Te nanomaterials (NMs) as antibacterial reagents against Escherichia coli. By controlling the concentrations of hydrazine (N(2)H(4)) as reducing agent, NaCl, and temperature, we prepared Te nanowires, nanopencils, nanorices, and nanocubes. These four Te NMs resulted in a live/dead ratio of E. coli cells of less than 0.1, which is smaller than that of Ag nanoparticles. The order of antibacterial activity against E. coli is nanocubes ≈ nanorices > nanopencils ≈ nanowires. This is in good agreement with the concentration order of tellurite (TeO(3)(2-)) ions released from Te NMs in E. coli cells, revealing that TeO(3)(2-) ions account for the antibacterial activity of the four Te NMs. We found that spherical Te nanoparticles (32 nm in diameter) with TeO(3)(2-) ions were formed in the E. coli cells. Compared to Ag nanoparticles that are commonly used as antibacterial reagents, Te NMs have higher antibacterial activity and lower toxicity. Thus, Te NMs hold great practical potential as a new and efficient antibacterial agent.

  2. Combination of Pantothenamides with Vanin Inhibitors as a Novel Antibiotic Strategy against Gram-Positive Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, Patrick A. M.; Hermkens, Pedro H. H.; Zeeuwen, Patrick L. J. M.; Botman, Peter N. M.; Blaauw, Richard H.; Burghout, Peter; van Galen, Peter M.; Mouton, Johan W.; Rutjes, Floris P. J. T.

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of resistance against current antibiotics calls for the development of new compounds to treat infectious diseases. Synthetic pantothenamides are pantothenate analogs that possess broad-spectrum antibacterial activity in vitro in minimal media. Pantothenamides were shown to be substrates of the bacterial coenzyme A (CoA) biosynthetic pathway, causing cellular CoA depletion and interference with fatty acid synthesis. In spite of their potential use and selectivity for bacterial metabolic routes, these compounds have never made it to the clinic. In the present study, we show that pantothenamides are not active as antibiotics in the presence of serum, and we found that they were hydrolyzed by ubiquitous pantetheinases of the vanin family. To address this further, we synthesized a series of pantetheinase inhibitors based on a pantothenate scaffold that inhibited serum pantetheinase activity in the nanomolar range. Mass spectrometric analysis showed that addition of these pantetheinase inhibitors prevented hydrolysis of pantothenamides by serum. We found that combinations of these novel pantetheinase inhibitors and prototypic pantothenamides like N5-Pan and N7-Pan exerted antimicrobial activity in vitro, particularly against Gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Streptococcus pyogenes) even in the presence of serum. These results indicate that pantothenamides, when protected against degradation by host pantetheinases, are potentially useful antimicrobial agents. PMID:23877685

  3. Antibacterial Activity of Ti₃C₂Tx MXene.

    PubMed

    Rasool, Kashif; Helal, Mohamed; Ali, Adnan; Ren, Chang E; Gogotsi, Yury; Mahmoud, Khaled A

    2016-03-22

    MXenes are a family of atomically thin, two-dimensional (2D) transition metal carbides and carbonitrides with many attractive properties. Two-dimensional Ti3C2Tx (MXene) has been recently explored for applications in water desalination/purification membranes. A major success indicator for any water treatment membrane is the resistance to biofouling. To validate this and to understand better the health and environmental impacts of the new 2D carbides, we investigated the antibacterial properties of single- and few-layer Ti3C2Tx MXene flakes in colloidal solution. The antibacterial properties of Ti3C2Tx were tested against Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Bacillus subtilis (B. subtilis) by using bacterial growth curves based on optical densities (OD) and colonies growth on agar nutritive plates. Ti3C2Tx shows a higher antibacterial efficiency toward both Gram-negative E. coli and Gram-positive B. subtilis compared with graphene oxide (GO), which has been widely reported as an antibacterial agent. Concentration dependent antibacterial activity was observed and more than 98% bacterial cell viability loss was found at 200 μg/mL Ti3C2Tx for both bacterial cells within 4 h of exposure, as confirmed by colony forming unit (CFU) and regrowth curve. Antibacterial mechanism investigation by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) coupled with lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release assay indicated the damage to the cell membrane, which resulted in release of cytoplasmic materials from the bacterial cells. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) dependent and independent stress induction by Ti3C2Tx was investigated in two separate abiotic assays. MXenes are expected to be resistant to biofouling and offer bactericidal properties.

  4. In vitro antibacterial activity and beta-lactamase stability of CP-70,429 a new penem antibiotic.

    PubMed Central

    Minamimura, M; Taniyama, Y; Inoue, E; Mitsuhashi, S

    1993-01-01

    In in vitro susceptibility tests, the new penem CP-70,429 showed potent antibacterial activity against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria except Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Xanthomonas maltophilia. CP-70,429 was stable to various types of beta-lactamases except for the enzyme from X. maltophilia and was 16- to 128-fold more active than the other compounds against beta-lactamase-producing strains of Enterobacter cloacae and Citrobacter freundii. PMID:8363389

  5. In vitro antibacterial activity and beta-lactamase stability of CP-70,429 a new penem antibiotic.

    PubMed

    Minamimura, M; Taniyama, Y; Inoue, E; Mitsuhashi, S

    1993-07-01

    In in vitro susceptibility tests, the new penem CP-70,429 showed potent antibacterial activity against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria except Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Xanthomonas maltophilia. CP-70,429 was stable to various types of beta-lactamases except for the enzyme from X. maltophilia and was 16- to 128-fold more active than the other compounds against beta-lactamase-producing strains of Enterobacter cloacae and Citrobacter freundii.

  6. Chemical composition and antibacterial activity of the essential oil of Espeletia nana.

    PubMed

    Peña, Alexis; Rojas, Luis; Aparicio, Rosa; Alarcón, Libia; Baptista, José Gregorio; Velasco, Judith; Carmona, Juan; Usubillaga, Alfredo

    2012-05-01

    The essential oil of the leaves of Espeletia nana Cuatrec., obtained by hydrodistillation, was analyzed by GC-MS, which allowed the identification of 24 components, which made up 99.9% of the oil. The most abundant compounds were a-pinene (38.1%), beta-pinene (17.2%), myrcene (15.0%), spathulenol (4.2%), bicyclogermacrene (4.0%), a-zingiberene (4.0%), and gamma-himachalene (3.7%). Antibacterial activity was tested against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria using the agar disk diffusion method. Activity was observed only against Gram-positive bacteria. MIC values were determined for Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923 (200 microg/mL) and Enterococcusfaecalis ATCC 29212 (600 microg/mL).

  7. Antibacterial Activities of Actinomycete Isolates Collected from Soils of Rajshahi, Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Md. Ajijur; Islam, Mohammad Zahidul; Islam, Md. Anwar Ul

    2011-01-01

    This study was performed to isolate actinomycete colonies having antibacterial activity from soil samples collected from different places around Rajshahi, Bangladesh. Thirty actinomycete colonies were isolated in pure culture from five soil samples using Starch-casein-nitrate-agar medium. The isolates were grouped in five color series based on their aerial mycelia color and screened for their antibacterial activity against a range of test bacteria. Sixteen isolates (53.3%) were found to have moderate to high activity against four gram-positive and four gram-negative bacteria. Since many isolates showed inhibitory activity against indicator bacteria, it is suggestive that Bangladeshi soil could be an interesting source to explore for antibacterial secondary metabolites. PMID:21904683

  8. Synthesis of novel bisindolylmethane Schiff bases and their antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Imran, Syahrul; Taha, Muhammad; Ismail, Nor Hadiani; Khan, Khalid Mohammed; Naz, Farzana; Hussain, Memona; Tauseef, Saima

    2014-08-06

    In an effort to develop new antibacterial drugs, some novel bisindolylmethane derivatives containing Schiff base moieties were prepared and screened for their antibacterial activity. The synthesis of the bisindolylmethane Schiff base derivatives 3-26 was carried out in three steps. First, the nitro group of 3,3'-((4-nitrophenyl)-methylene)bis(1H-indole) (1) was reduced to give the amino substituted bisindolylmethane 2 without affecting the unsaturation of the bisindolylmethane moiety using nickel boride in situ generated. Reduction of compound 1 using various catalysts showed that combination of sodium borohydride and nickel acetate provides the highest yield for compound 2. Bisindolylmethane Schiff base derivatives were synthesized by coupling various benzaldehydes with amino substituted bisindolylmethane 2. All synthesized compounds were characterized by various spectroscopic methods. The bisindolylmethane Schiff base derivatives were evaluated against selected Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial strains. Derivatives having halogen and nitro substituent display weak to moderate antibacterial activity against Salmonella typhi, S. paratyphi A and S. paratyphi B.

  9. Plants used in Guatemala for the treatment of respiratory diseases. 1. Screening of 68 plants against gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Caceres, A; Alvarez, A V; Ovando, A E; Samayoa, B E

    1991-02-01

    Respiratory ailments are important causes of morbidity and mortality in developing countries. Ethnobotanical surveys and literature reviews conducted in Guatemala during 1986-88 showed that 234 plants from 75 families, most of them of American origin, have been used for the treatment of respiratory ailments. Three Gram-positive bacteria causing respiratory infections (Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Streptococcus pyogenes) were used to screen 68 of the most commonly used plants for activity. Twenty-eight of these (41.2%) inhibited the growth of one or more of the bacteria tested. Staphylococcus aureus was inhibited by 18 of the plant extracts, while 7 extracts were effective against Streptococcus pyogenes. Plants of American origin which exhibited antibacterial activity were: Gnaphalium viscosum, Lippia alba, Lippia dulcis, Physalis philadelphica, Satureja brownei, Solanum nigrescens and Tagetes lucida. These preliminary in vitro results provide scientific basis for the use of these plants against bacterial respiratory infections.

  10. Antibacterial activity of leaves extracts of Trifolium alexandrinum Linn. against pathogenic bacteria causing tropical diseases

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Abdul Viqar; Ahmed, Qamar Uddin; Shukla, Indu; Khan, Athar Ali

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate antibacterial potential of Trifolium alexandrinum (T. alexandrinum) Linn. against seven gram positive and eleven gram negative hospital isolated human pathogenic bacterial strains responsible for many tropical diseases. Methods Non-polar and polar extracts of the leaves of T. alexandrinum i.e., hexane, dichloromethane (DCM), ethyl acetate (EtOAc), methanol (MeOH) and aqueous (AQ) extracts at five different concentrations (1, 2, 5, 10 and 15 mg/mL) were prepared to evaluate their antibacterial value. NCCL standards were strictly followed to perform antimicrobial disc susceptibility test using disc diffusion method. Results Polar extracts demonstrated significant antibacterial activity against tested pathogens. EtOAc and MeOH extracts showed maximum antibacterial activity with higher inhibition zone and were found effective against seventeen of the tested pathogens. While AQ plant extract inhibited the growth of sixteen of the test strains. EtOAc and MeOH plant extracts inhibited the growth of all seven gram positive and ten of the gram negative bacterial strains. Conclusions The present study strongly confirms the effectiveness of crude leaves extracts against tested human pathogenic bacterial strains causing several tropical diseases. Since Egyptian clover is used as a fodder plant, it could be helpful in controlling various infectious diseases associated with cattle as well. PMID:23569896

  11. Microwave-assisted synthesis of CdO-ZnO nanocomposite and its antibacterial activity against human pathogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karthik, K.; Dhanuskodi, S.; Gobinath, C.; Sivaramakrishnan, S.

    2015-03-01

    CdO-ZnO nanocomposite was prepared by microwave-assisted method and characterized by X-ray crystallography (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR). It exhibits hexagonal cubic structure with an average crystallite size of 27 nm. From the UV-Vis spectra, the bandgap is estimated as 2.92 eV. The fluorescence spectrum shows a near band edge emission at 422 nm. In addition the antibacterial activity of CdO-ZnO nanocomposite was carried out in-vitro against two kinds of bacteria: gram negative bacteria (G -ve) i.e. Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae and gram positive bacteria (G +ve): Staphylococcus aureus, Proteus vulgaris and Bacillus spp. This study indicates the zone of inhibition of 40 mm has high antibacterial activity towards the gram positive bacterium S. aureus.

  12. Microwave-assisted synthesis of CdO-ZnO nanocomposite and its antibacterial activity against human pathogens.

    PubMed

    Karthik, K; Dhanuskodi, S; Gobinath, C; Sivaramakrishnan, S

    2015-03-15

    CdO-ZnO nanocomposite was prepared by microwave-assisted method and characterized by X-ray crystallography (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR). It exhibits hexagonal cubic structure with an average crystallite size of 27 nm. From the UV-Vis spectra, the bandgap is estimated as 2.92 eV. The fluorescence spectrum shows a near band edge emission at 422 nm. In addition the antibacterial activity of CdO-ZnO nanocomposite was carried out in-vitro against two kinds of bacteria: gram negative bacteria (G -ve) i.e. Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae and gram positive bacteria (G +ve): Staphylococcus aureus, Proteus vulgaris and Bacillus spp. This study indicates the zone of inhibition of 40 mm has high antibacterial activity towards the gram positive bacterium S. aureus.

  13. Antibacterial Activity of Sirodesmin PL Phytotoxin: Application to the Selection of Phytotoxin-Deficient Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Boudart, Georges

    1989-01-01

    Sirodesmin PL, a phytotoxin and mycotoxin produced by Leptosphaeria maculans, the causal agent of stem-canker disease of crucifers, exhibited antibacterial activity against gram-positive bacteria and particularly Bacillus subtilis. The importance of the disulfide bridge of the molecule in antibacterial activity was demonstrated. A simple and reliable bioassay based on the antibacterial activity of the toxin was performed for screening sirodesmin PL-deficient mutants when grown on solid culture medium. A mutant was selected and found to produce 3,700-fold less toxin than did the wild-type strain. A sensitive procedure for quantification of the toxin by high-pressure liquid chromatography was developed. Levels of product as low as 100 ng could be detected by this procedure. Images PMID:16347949

  14. Antibacterial activity of cotton coated with ZnO and ZnO-CNT composites.

    PubMed

    Yazhini, K Bharathi; Prabu, H Gurumallesh

    2015-01-01

    With the growing public health awareness of the pathogenic effects and strain formations caused by microorganisms, there is an increasing need for antibacterial materials in many applications. Zinc oxide (ZnO)-1,2,3,4-butanetetracarboxylic acid (BTCA) and ZnO-BTCA-carbon nanotube (CNT) composites were synthesized by simple stirring method. The synthesized materials were coated on cotton fabric by pad-dry-cure method separately. The coated fabrics were characterized by FT-IR analysis that revealed the cross-linking in the composites. The fabrics were screened for antibacterial activity by agar well diffusion method against gram positive Staphylococcus aureus and gram negative Escherichia coli. The results showed that the ZnO-BTCA-CNT-coated fabric has improved antibacterial activity when compared with the ZnO-BTCA-coated fabric.

  15. Enhanced antibacterial activity of silver/polyrhodanine-composite-decorated silica nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Song, Jooyoung; Kim, Hyunyoung; Jang, Yoonsun; Jang, Jyongsik

    2013-11-27

    This work describes the synthesis of silver/polyrhodanine-composite-decorated silica nanoparticles and their antibacterial activity. Polymerization of polyrhodanine proceeded preferentially on the surface of the silica nanoparticles where Ag(+) ions were located. In addition, the embedded Ag(+) ions were reduced to form metallic Ag nanoparticles; consequently, silver/polyrhodanine-composite nanoparticles (approximately 7 nm in diameter) were formed on the surface of the silica nanoparticles. The resulting nanostructure was investigated using electron microscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The silver/polyrhodanine-nanocomposite-decorated silica nanoparticles exhibited excellent antimicrobial activity toward gram-negative Escherichia coli and gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus because of the antibacterial effects of the silver nanoparticles and the polyrhodanine. The silver/polyrhodanine-composite nanoparticles may therefore have potential for use as a long-term antibacterial agent.

  16. In vitro antibacterial activities and mechanism of sugar fatty acid esters against five food-related bacteria.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lei; Zhang, Heyan; Hao, Tianyang; Li, Siran

    2015-11-15

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial activities of sugar fatty acid esters, with different fatty acid and saccharide moieties, against five food-related bacteria including Bacillus cereus, Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium. Sucrose monocaprate showed the strongest antibacterial activity against all tested bacteria, especially Gram-positive bacteria. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) for Gram-positive bacteria and Gram-negative bacteria were 2.5 and 10 mM, respectively. The minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBCs) for Gram-positive bacteria were 10 mM. Time-kill assay also showed that sucrose monocaprate significantly inhibit the growth of tested bacteria. The permeability of the cell membrane and intracellular proteins were both changed by sucrose monocaprate according to cell constituents' leakage, SDS-PAGE and scanning electron microscope assays. It is suggested that sucrose monocaprate, with both emulsifying and antibacterial activities, have a potential to serve as a safe multifunctional food additive in food industries.

  17. Antibacterial activity of some selected medicinal plants of Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Screening of the ethnobotenical plants is a pre-requisite to evaluate their therapeutic potential and it can lead to the isolation of new bioactive compounds. Methods The crude extracts and fractions of six medicinal important plants (Arisaema flavum, Debregeasia salicifolia, Carissa opaca, Pistacia integerrima, Aesculus indica, and Toona ciliata) were tested against three Gram positive and two Gram negative ATCC bacterial species using the agar well diffusion method. Results The crude extract of P. integerrima and A. indica were active against all tested bacterial strains (12-23 mm zone of inhibition). Other four plant's crude extracts (Arisaema flavum, Debregeasia salicifolia, Carissa opaca, and Toona ciliata) were active against different bacterial strains. The crude extracts showed varying level of bactericidal activity. The aqueous fractions of A. indica and P. integerrima crude extract showed maximum activity (19.66 and 16 mm, respectively) against B. subtilis, while the chloroform fractions of T. ciliata and D. salicifolia presented good antibacterial activities (13-17 mm zone of inhibition) against all the bacterial cultures tested. Conclusion The methanol fraction of Pistacia integerrima, chloroform fractions of Debregeasia salicifolia &Toona ciliata and aqueous fraction of Aesculus indica are suitable candidates for the development of novel antibacterial compounds. PMID:21718504

  18. Antibacterial activity of epidural infusions.

    PubMed

    Coghlan, M W; Davies, M J; Hoyt, C; Joyce, L; Kilner, R; Waters, M J

    2009-01-01

    The incidence of epidural abscess following epidural catheterisation appears to be increasing, being recently reported as one in 1000 among surgical patients. This study was designed to investigate the antibacterial activity of various local anaesthetics and additives, used in epidural infusions, against a range of micro-organisms associated with epidural abscess. The aim was to determine which, if any, epidural infusion solution has the greatest antibacterial activity. Bupivacaine, ropivacaine and levobupivacaine crystals were dissolved and added to Mueller-Hinton Agar in concentrations of 0.06%, 0.125%, 0.2%, 0.25%, 0.5% and 1%. Fentanyl, adrenaline and clonidine were also mixed with agar in isolation and in combination with the local anaesthetics. Using a reference agar dilution method, the minimum inhibitory concentrations were determined for a range of bacteria. Bupivacaine showed antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis and Escherichia coli with minimum inhibitory concentrations between 0.125% and 0.25%. It did not inhibit the growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa at any of the concentrations tested. Levobupivacaine and ropivacaine showed no activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, even at the highest concentrations tested, and minimal activity against Escherichia coli (minimum inhibitory concentrations 0.5% and 1% respectively). The presence of fentanyl, adrenaline and clonidine had no additional effect on the antibacterial activity of any of the local anaesthetic agents. The low concentrations of local anaesthetic usually used in epidural infusions have minimal antibacterial activity. While the clinical implications of this in vitro study are not known, consideration should be given to increasing the concentration of bupivacaine in an epidural infusion or to administering a daily bolus of 0.25% bupivacaine to reduce the risk of epidural bacterial growth.

  19. Screening for antibacterial and antibiofilm activities in Astragalus angulosus

    PubMed Central

    Kanaan, Hussein; El-Mestrah, Majid; Sweidan, Alaa; As-Sadi, Falah; Bazzal, Ali Al; Chokr, Ali

    2017-01-01

    Aim: In a search for finding novel therapeutic agents, extracts from an endemic Lebanese plant, Astragalus angulosus, were evaluated for their potential in-vitro antibacterial and antibiofilm activities against three Gram-positive bacterial strains; Staphylococcus epidermidis (CIP444), Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC25923), and Enterococcus faecalis (ATCC29212); in addition to two Gram-negative strains, Escherichia coli (ATCC35218) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ATCC27853). Materials and Methods: The plant was collected in April of 2013 and divided into several different portions, then its extracts were obtained by maceration using two different solvents. Extract analysis followed directly where microtiter broth dilution method was employed to assess antibacterial activity, while antibiofilm potential was tested using colorimetric method. Results: Whole plant ethanolic extract showed the highest bacteriostatic effect at a concentration of 12.78 mg/ml and also was the most versatile exerting its effect against 3 different strains. Other extracts also exhibited an effect but at higher concentrations and each against a single strain. Regarding antibiofilm activity, the majority of the extracts were able to eradicate >50% of S. epidermidis preformed biofilm, where the highest activity was obtained with flower fraction extracted in water, achieving 67.7% biofilm eradication at 0.2 mg/ml. Conclusions: This plant possesses a promising potential in regard to eradicating bacteria and their biofilms and it is the first contributing step of establishing a library for the endemic Lebanese plants in this domain. PMID:28163960

  20. Resistance to bacteriocins produced by Gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Bastos, Maria do Carmo de Freire; Coelho, Marcus Lívio Varella; Santos, Olinda Cabral da Silva

    2015-04-01

    Bacteriocins are prokaryotic proteins or peptides with antimicrobial activity. Most of them exhibit a broad spectrum of activity, inhibiting micro-organisms belonging to different genera and species, including many bacterial pathogens which cause human, animal or plant infections. Therefore, these substances have potential biotechnological applications in either food preservation or prevention and control of bacterial infectious diseases. However, there is concern that continuous exposure of bacteria to bacteriocins may select cells resistant to them, as observed for conventional antimicrobials. Based on the models already investigated, bacteriocin resistance may be either innate or acquired and seems to be a complex phenomenon, arising at different frequencies (generally from 10(-9) to 10(-2)) and by different mechanisms, even amongst strains of the same bacterial species. In the present review, we discuss the prevalence, development and molecular mechanisms involved in resistance to bacteriocins produced by Gram-positive bacteria. These mechanisms generally involve changes in the bacterial cell envelope, which result in (i) reduction or loss of bacteriocin binding or insertion, (ii) bacteriocin sequestering, (iii) bacteriocin efflux pumping (export) and (iv) bacteriocin degradation, amongst others. Strategies that can be used to overcome this resistance are also addressed.

  1. Regulation of Apoptosis by Gram-Positive Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Ulett, Glen C.; Adderson, Elisabeth E.

    2008-01-01

    Apoptosis, or programmed cell death (PCD), is an important physiological mechanism, through which the human immune system regulates homeostasis and responds to diverse forms of cellular damage. PCD may also be involved in immune counteraction to microbial infection. Over the past decade, the amount of research on bacteria-induced PCD has grown tremendously, and the implications of this mechanism on immunity are being elucidated. Some pathogenic bacteria actively trigger the suicide response in critical lineages of leukocytes that orchestrate both the innate and adaptive immune responses; other bacteria proactively prevent PCD to benefit their own survival and persistence. Currently, the microbial virulence factors, which represent the keys to unlocking the suicide response in host cells, are a primary focus of this field. In this review, we discuss these bacterial “apoptosis regulatory molecules” and the apoptotic events they either trigger or prevent, the host target cells of this regulatory activity, and the possible ramifications for immunity to infection. Gram-positive pathogens including Staphylococcus, Streptococcus, Bacillus, Listeria, and Clostridia species are discussed as important agents of human infection that modulate PCD pathways in eukaryotic cells. PMID:19081777

  2. In vitro antibacterial activity of water-soluble extract of aghalokpe.

    PubMed

    Williams, B; Popoola, B

    1983-06-01

    Water-soluble extracts of the bark of aghalokpe, a big tropical tree which grows in the rainforest of Bendel State of Nigeria, showed in vitro antibacterial activity against several of the Enterobacteriaceae. The activity was more pronounced with gram-positive than the gram-negative species. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) which is in the range of 3.125-50 micrograms/ml, compares well with some broad-spectrum antibiotics on the market. The extract was remarkably effective against Neisseria gonorrhoea.

  3. Antibacterial activity of Pseudonocardia sp. JB05, a rare salty soil actinomycete against Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Jafari, Nesa; Behroozi, Reza; Farajzadeh, Davoud; Farsi, Mohammad; Akbari-Noghabi, Kambiz

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a Gram-positive bacterium that causes many harmful and life-threatening diseases. Some strains of this bacterium are resistant to available antibiotics. This study was designed to evaluate the ability of indigenous actinomycetes to produce antibacterial compounds against S. aureus and characterize the structure of the resultant antibacterial compounds. Therefore, a slightly modified agar well diffusion method was used to determine the antibacterial activity of actinomycete isolates against the test microorganisms. The bacterial extracts with antibacterial activity were fractionated by silica gel and G-25 sephadex column chromatography. Also, the active fractions were analyzed by thin layer chromatography. Finally, the partial structure of the resultant antibacterial compound was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. One of the isolates, which had a broad spectrum and high antibacterial activity, was designated as Pseudonocardia sp. JB05, based on the results of biochemical and 16S rDNA gene sequence analysis. Minimum inhibitory concentration for this bacterium was 40 AU mL(-1) against S. aureus. The antibacterial activity of this bacterium was stable after autoclaving, 10% SDS, boiling, and proteinase K. Thin layer chromatography, using anthrone reagent, showed the presence of carbohydrates in the purified antibacterial compound. Finally, FT-IR spectrum of the active compound illustrated hydroxyl groups, hydrocarbon skeleton, and double bond of polygenic compounds in its structure. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report describing the efficient antibacterial activity by a local strain of Pseudonocardia. The results presented in this work, although at the initial stage in bioactive product characterization, will possibly contribute toward the Pseudonocardia scale-up for the production and identification of the antibacterial compounds.

  4. Novel cajaninstilbene acid derivatives as antibacterial agents.

    PubMed

    Geng, Zhi-Zhong; Zhang, Jian-Jun; Lin, Jing; Huang, Mei-Yan; An, Lin-Kun; Zhang, Hong-Bin; Sun, Ping-Hua; Ye, Wen-Cai; Chen, Wei-Min

    2015-07-15

    Discovery of novel antibacterial agents with new structural scaffolds that combat drug-resistant pathogens is an urgent task. Cajaninstilbene acid, which is isolated from pigeonpea leaves, has shown antibacterial activity. In this study, a series of cajaninstilbene acid derivatives were designed and synthesized. The antibacterial activities of these compounds against gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria, as well as nine strains of methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteria are evaluated,and the related structure-activity relationships are discussed. Assays suggest that some of the synthetic cajaninstilbene acid derivatives exhibit potent antibacterial activity against gram-positive bacterial strains and MRSA. Among these compounds, 5b, 5c, 5j and 5k show better antibacterial activity than the positive control compounds. The results of MTT assays illustrate the low cytotoxicity of the active compounds.

  5. Interaction of cationic peptides with lipoteichoic acid and gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Scott, M G; Gold, M R; Hancock, R E

    1999-12-01

    Compounds with antiendotoxin properties have been extensively studied for their potential as therapeutic agents for sepsis attributable to gram-negative bacteria. However, with the increasing incidence of gram-positive sepsis, there is interest in identifying compounds with a broad spectrum of action against both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. A series of synthetic alpha-helical cationic peptides related to bee melittin and silk moth cecropin have previously been shown to bind lipopolysaccharide (LPS) with high affinity, inhibit LPS-induced tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) production in vitro and in vivo, and kill gram-negative bacteria. In this study, we analyzed whether these peptides were active against gram-positive bacteria; whether they could bind to lipoteichoic acid (LTA), the major proinflammatory structure on gram-positive bacteria; and whether they could block the ability of LTA to promote the release of cytokines by the RAW 264.7 murine macrophage cell line. We found that the cationic peptides demonstrated moderate growth-inhibitory activity toward gram-positive bacteria. In addition, the peptides bound LTA with high affinity. This correlated with the ability of the peptides to block LTA-induced production of TNF and interleukin-6 by RAW 264.7 cells but did not correlate with their ability to kill the bacteria. The peptides also effectively inhibited LTA-induced TNF production in a whole human blood assay. The peptides were also able to partly block the ability of heat-killed Staphylococcus aureus, as well as soluble products of live S. aureus, to stimulate cytokine production by macrophages. Our results indicate that these cationic peptides may be useful to prevent sepsis and inflammation caused by both gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria.

  6. Photodynamic inactivation of Gram-positive bacteria employing natural resources.

    PubMed

    Mamone, L; Di Venosa, G; Gándara, L; Sáenz, D; Vallecorsa, P; Schickinger, S; Rossetti, M V; Batlle, A; Buzzola, F; Casas, A

    2014-04-05

    The aim of this paper was to investigate a collection of plant extracts from Argentina as a source of new natural photosensitizers (PS) to be used in Photodynamic Inactivation (PDI) of bacteria. A collection of plants were screened for phototoxicity upon the Gram-positive species Staphylococcus epidermidis. Three extracts turned out to be photoactive: Solanum verbascifolium flower, Tecoma stans flower and Cissus verticillata root. Upon exposure to a light dose of 55J/cm(2), they induced 4, 2 and 3logs decrease in bacterial survival, respectively. Photochemical characterisation of S. verbascifolium extract was carried out. PDI reaction was dependent mainly on singlet oxygen and to a lesser extent, on hydroxyl radicals, through type II and I reactions. Photodegradation experiments revealed that the active principle of the extract was not particularly photolabile. It is noticeable that S. verbascifolium -PDI was more efficient under sunlight as compared to artificial light (total eradication vs. 4 logs decrease upon 120min of sunlight). The balance between oxidant and antioxidant compounds is likely to be masking or unmasking potential PS of plant extracts, but employing the crude extract, the level of photoactivity of S. verbascifolium is similar to some artificial PS upon exposure to sunlight, demonstrating that natural resources can be employed in PDI of bacteria.

  7. Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial extracellular vesicles.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Hyun; Lee, Jaewook; Park, Jaesung; Gho, Yong Song

    2015-04-01

    Like mammalian cells, Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria release nano-sized membrane vesicles into the extracellular environment either in a constitutive manner or in a regulated manner. These bacterial extracellular vesicles are spherical bilayered proteolipids enriched with bioactive proteins, lipids, nucleic acids, and virulence factors. Recent progress in this field supports the critical pathophysiological functions of these vesicles in both bacteria-bacteria and bacteria-host interactions. This review provides an overview of the current understanding on Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial extracellular vesicles, especially regarding the biogenesis, components, and functions in poly-species communities. We hope that this review will stimulate additional research in this emerging field of bacterial extracellular vesicles and contribute to the development of extracellular vesicle-based diagnostic tools and effective vaccines against pathogenic Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria.

  8. Gram-positive resistance: challenge for the development of new antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Baquero, F

    1997-05-01

    The incidence of infections caused by multidrug-resistant Gram-positive organisms is increasing despite advances in antibacterial therapy over the last 20 years. As the pathogens causing these infections are frequently resistant to most currently available antibacterials, they are extremely difficult to treat. Problematic pathogens include strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae resistant to beta-lactams and macrolides, viridans group streptococci resistant to beta-lactams and aminoglycosides, enterococci resistant to vancomycin and teicoplanin and highly resistant to penicillins and aminoglycosides, and Staphylococcus aureus resistant to methicillin, other beta-lactams, macrolides, lincosamides and aminoglycosides. Other important pathogens include Streptococcus pyogenes resistant to macrolides (and suspected to be resistant to penicillin), macrolide-resistant streptococci of groups B, C, and G, coagulase-negative staphylococci resistant to beta-lactams, aminoglycosides, macrolides, lincosamides and glycopeptides, multiresistant strains of Listeria and Corynebacterium and Gram-positive anaerobes, such as Peptostreptococcus and Clostridium, resistant to penicillins and macrolides. Thus, there is an urgent need for new antibacterial agents that are able to overcome multidrug-resistant mechanisms. The novel semisynthetic injectable streptogramin quinupristin/dalfopristin offers the prospect of effective treatment against many of the above pathogens.

  9. Negatively charged silver nanoparticles with potent antibacterial activity and reduced toxicity for pharmaceutical preparations

    PubMed Central

    Salvioni, Lucia; Galbiati, Elisabetta; Collico, Veronica; Alessio, Giulia; Avvakumova, Svetlana; Corsi, Fabio; Tortora, Paolo; Prosperi, Davide; Colombo, Miriam

    2017-01-01

    Background The discovery of new solutions with antibacterial activity as efficient and safe alternatives to common preservatives (such as parabens) and to combat emerging infections and drug-resistant bacterial pathogens is highly expected in cosmetics and pharmaceutics. Colloidal silver nanoparticles (NPs) are attracting interest as novel effective antimicrobial agents for the prevention of several infectious diseases. Methods Water-soluble, negatively charged silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were synthesized by reduction with citric and tannic acid and characterized by transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, zeta potential, differential centrifuge sedimentation, and ultraviolet–visible spectroscopy. AgNPs were tested with model Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria in comparison to two different kinds of commercially available AgNPs. Results In this work, AgNPs with higher antibacterial activity compared to the commercially available colloidal silver solutions were prepared and investigated. Bacteria were plated and the antibacterial activity was tested at the same concentration of silver ions in all samples. The AgNPs did not show any significant reduction in the antibacterial activity for an acceptable time period. In addition, AgNPs were transferred to organic phase and retained their antibacterial efficacy in both aqueous and nonaqueous media and exhibited no toxicity in eukaryotic cells. Conclusion We developed AgNPs with a 20 nm diameter and negative zeta potential with powerful antibacterial activity and low toxicity compared to currently available colloidal silver, suitable for cosmetic preservatives and pharmaceutical preparations administrable to humans and/or animals as needed.

  10. Mode of antibacterial activity of Eclalbasaponin isolated from Eclipta alba.

    PubMed

    Ray, A; Bharali, P; Konwar, B K

    2013-12-01

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate the mode of antibacterial activity of Eclalbasaponin isolated from Eclipta alba, against selected Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. The probable chemical structure was determined by using various spectroscopic techniques such as Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and mass spectroscopy. The antibacterial activity was evaluated by well diffusion technique, pH sensitivity, chemotaxis, and crystal violet assays. Eclalbasaponin showed clear zone of inhibition against both Bacillus subtilis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa and exhibited growth inhibition at the pH range of 5.5-9.0. The isolated saponin exhibited its positive chemoattractant property for both bacterial strains. Results of crystal violet assay and the presence of UV-sensitive materials in the cell-free supernatant confirmed the cellular damages caused by the treatment of Eclalbasaponin. The release of intracellular proteins due to the membrane damage was determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Changes in the cell surface structure and membrane disruption were further revealed by FTIR and scanning electron microscopy analysis. The present study suggests that the isolated saponin from E. alba causes the disruption of the bacterial cell membrane which leads to the loss of bacterial cell viability.

  11. Silver colloid nanoparticles: synthesis, characterization, and their antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Panacek, Ales; Kvítek, Libor; Prucek, Robert; Kolar, Milan; Vecerova, Renata; Pizúrova, Nadezda; Sharma, Virender K; Nevecna, Tat'jana; Zboril, Radek

    2006-08-24

    A one-step simple synthesis of silver colloid nanoparticles with controllable sizes is presented. In this synthesis, reduction of [Ag(NH(3))(2)](+) complex cation by four saccharides was performed. Four saccharides were used: two monosaccharides (glucose and galactose) and two disaccharides (maltose and lactose). The syntheses performed at various ammonia concentrations (0.005-0.20 mol L(-1)) and pH conditions (11.5-13.0) produced a wide range of particle sizes (25-450 nm) with narrow size distributions, especially at the lowest ammonia concentrations. The average size, size distribution, morphology, and structure of particles were determined by dynamic light scattering (DLS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and UV/Visible absorption spectrophotometry. The influence of the saccharide structure (monosacharides versus disaccharides) on the size of silver particles is briefly discussed. The reduction of [Ag(NH(3))(2)](+) by maltose produced silver particles with a narrow size distribution with an average size of 25 nm, which showed high antimicrobial and bactericidal activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, including highly multiresistant strains such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Antibacterial activity of silver nanoparticles was found to be dependent on the size of silver particles. A very low concentration of silver (as low as 1.69 mug/mL Ag) gave antibacterial performance.

  12. A Carbocyclic Curcumin Inhibits Proliferation of Gram-Positive Bacteria by Targeting FtsZ.

    PubMed

    Groundwater, Paul W; Narlawar, Rajeshwar; Liao, Vivian Wan Yu; Bhattacharya, Anusri; Srivastava, Shalini; Kunal, Kishore; Doddareddy, Munikumar; Oza, Pratik M; Mamidi, Ramesh; Marrs, Emma C L; Perry, John D; Hibbs, David E; Panda, Dulal

    2017-01-24

    Inhibition of FtsZ assembly has been found to stall bacterial cell division. Here, we report the identification of a potent carbocyclic curcumin analogue (2d) that inhibits Bacillus subtilis 168 cell proliferation by targeting the assembly of FtsZ. 2d also showed potent inhibitory activity (minimum inhibitory concentrations of 2-4 mg/L) against several clinically important species of Gram-positive bacteria, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. In addition, 2d displayed a significantly reduced inhibitory effect on human cervical cancer cells in comparison to its effect on bacterial cells. Using live cell imaging of GFP-FtsZ by confocal microscopy, 2d was found to rapidly perturb the cytokinetic FtsZ rings in Bacillus subtilis cells. The immunofluorescence imaging of FtsZ also showed that 2d destroyed the Z-ring in bacteria within 5 min. Prolonged treatment with 2d produced filamentous bacteria, but 2d had no detectable effect either on the nucleoids or on the membrane potential of bacteria. 2d inhibited FtsZ assembly in vitro, whereas it had minimal effects on tubulin assembly. Interestingly, 2d strongly enhanced the GTPase activity of FtsZ and reduced the GTPase activity of tubulin. Furthermore, 2d bound to purified FtsZ with a dissociation constant of 4.0 ± 1.1 μM, and the binding of 2d altered the secondary structures of FtsZ. The results together suggested that the non-natural curcumin analogue 2d possesses powerful antibacterial activity against important pathogenic bacteria, and the evidence indicates that 2d inhibits bacterial proliferation by targeting FtsZ.

  13. Novel antimicrobial peptides that inhibit gram positive bacterial exotoxin synthesis.

    PubMed

    Merriman, Joseph A; Nemeth, Kimberly A; Schlievert, Patrick M

    2014-01-01

    Gram-positive bacteria, such as Staphylococcus aureus, cause serious human illnesses through combinations of surface virulence factors and secretion of exotoxins. Our prior studies using the protein synthesis inhibitor clindamycin and signal transduction inhibitors glycerol monolaurate and α-globin and β-globin chains of hemoglobin indicate that their abilities to inhibit exotoxin production by S. aureus are separable from abilities to inhibit growth of the organism. Additionally, our previous studies suggest that inhibition of exotoxin production, in absence of ability to kill S. aureus and normal flora lactobacilli, will prevent colonization by pathogenic S. aureus, while not interfering with lactobacilli colonization. These disparate activities may be important in development of novel anti-infective agents that do not alter normal flora. We initiated studies to explore the exotoxin-synthesis-inhibition activity of hemoglobin peptides further to develop potential agents to prevent S. aureus infections. We tested synthesized α-globin chain peptides, synthetic variants of α-globin chain peptides, and two human defensins for ability to inhibit exotoxin production without significantly inhibiting S. aureus growth. All of these peptides were weakly or not inhibitory to bacterial growth. However, the peptides were inhibitory to exotoxin production with increasing activity dependent on increasing numbers of positively-charged amino acids. Additionally, the peptides could be immobilized on agarose beads or have amino acid sequences scrambled and still retain exotoxin-synthesis-inhibition. The peptides are not toxic to human vaginal epithelial cells and do not inhibit growth of normal flora L. crispatus. These peptides may interfere with plasma membrane signal transduction in S. aureus due to their positive charges.

  14. Preparation, characterization, and antibacterial activity studies of silver-loaded poly(styrene-co-acrylic acid) nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Song, Cunfeng; Chang, Ying; Cheng, Ling; Xu, Yiting; Chen, Xiaoling; Zhang, Long; Zhong, Lina; Dai, Lizong

    2014-03-01

    A simple method for preparing a new type of stable antibacterial agent was presented. Monodisperse poly(styrene-co-acrylic acid) (PSA) nanospheres, serving as matrices, were synthesized via soap-free emulsion polymerization. Field-emission scanning electron microscopy micrographs indicated that PSA nanospheres have interesting surface microstructures and well-controlled particle size distributions. Silver-loaded poly(styrene-co-acrylic acid) (PSA/Ag-NPs) nanocomposites were prepared in situ through interfacial reduction of silver nitrate with sodium borohydride, and further characterized by transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Their effects on antibacterial activity including inhibition zone, minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC), and bactericidal kinetics were evaluated. In the tests, PSA/Ag-NPs nanocomposites showed excellent antibacterial activity against both gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus and gram-negative Escherichia coli. These nanocomposites are considered to have potential application in antibacterial coatings on biomedical devices to reduce nosocomial infection rates.

  15. Antimicrobial Peptide Resistance Mechanisms of Gram-Positive Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Nawrocki, Kathryn L; Crispell, Emily K; McBride, Shonna M

    2014-10-13

    Antimicrobial peptides, or AMPs, play a significant role in many environments as a tool to remove competing organisms. In response, many bacteria have evolved mechanisms to resist these peptides and prevent AMP-mediated killing. The development of AMP resistance mechanisms is driven by direct competition between bacterial species, as well as host and pathogen interactions. Akin to the number of different AMPs found in nature, resistance mechanisms that have evolved are just as varied and may confer broad-range resistance or specific resistance to AMPs. Specific mechanisms of AMP resistance prevent AMP-mediated killing against a single type of AMP, while broad resistance mechanisms often lead to a global change in the bacterial cell surface and protect the bacterium from a large group of AMPs that have similar characteristics. AMP resistance mechanisms can be found in many species of bacteria and can provide a competitive edge against other bacterial species or a host immune response. Gram-positive bacteria are one of the largest AMP producing groups, but characterization of Gram-positive AMP resistance mechanisms lags behind that of Gram-negative species. In this review we present a summary of the AMP resistance mechanisms that have been identified and characterized in Gram-positive bacteria. Understanding the mechanisms of AMP resistance in Gram-positive species can provide guidelines in developing and applying AMPs as therapeutics, and offer insight into the role of resistance in bacterial pathogenesis.

  16. Protein secretion and surface display in Gram-positive bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Schneewind, Olaf; Missiakas, Dominique M.

    2012-01-01

    The cell wall peptidoglycan of Gram-positive bacteria functions as a surface organelle for the transport and assembly of proteins that interact with the environment, in particular, the tissues of an infected host. Signal peptide-bearing precursor proteins are secreted across the plasma membrane of Gram-positive bacteria. Some precursors carry C-terminal sorting signals with unique sequence motifs that are cleaved by sortase enzymes and linked to the cell wall peptidoglycan of vegetative forms or spores. The sorting signals of pilin precursors are cleaved by pilus-specific sortases, which generate covalent bonds between proteins leading to the assembly of fimbrial structures. Other precursors harbour surface (S)-layer homology domains (SLH), which fold into a three-pronged spindle structure and bind secondary cell wall polysaccharides, thereby associating with the surface of specific Gram-positive microbes. Type VII secretion is a non-canonical secretion pathway for WXG100 family proteins in mycobacteria. Gram-positive bacteria also secrete WXG100 proteins and carry unique genes that either contribute to discrete steps in secretion or represent distinctive substrates for protein transport reactions. PMID:22411983

  17. Antibacterial activity of silver nanoparticles synthesized from serine.

    PubMed

    Jayaprakash, N; Judith Vijaya, J; John Kennedy, L; Priadharsini, K; Palani, P

    2015-04-01

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) were synthesized by a simple microwave irradiation method using polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) as a capping agent and serine as a reducing agent. UV-Visible spectra were used to confirm the formation of Ag NPs by observing the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) band at 443nm. The emission spectrum of Ag NPs showed an emission band at 484nm. In the presence of microwave radiation, serine acts as a reducing agent, which was confirmed by Fourier transformed infrared (FT-IR) spectrum. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) and high-resolution scanning electron microscopy (HR-SEM) were used to investigate the morphology of the synthesized sample. These images showed the sphere-like morphology. The elemental composition of the sample was determined by the energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX). Selected area electron diffraction (SAED) was used to find the crystalline nature of the Ag NPs. The electrochemical behavior of the synthesized Ag NPs was analyzed by the cyclic voltammetry (CV). Antibacterial experiments showed that the prepared Ag NPs showed relatively similar antibacterial activities, when compared with AgNO3 against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria.

  18. Mycosynthesis: antibacterial, antioxidant and antiproliferative activities of silver nanoparticles synthesized from Inonotus obliquus (Chaga mushroom) extract.

    PubMed

    Nagajyothi, P C; Sreekanth, T V M; Lee, Jae-il; Lee, Kap Duk

    2014-01-05

    In the present study, silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were rapidly synthesized from silver nitrate solution at room temperature using Inonotus obliquus extract. The mycogenic synthesized AgNPs were characterized by UV-Visible absorption spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). SEM revealed mostly spherical nanoparticles ranging from 14.7 to 35.2nm in size. All AgNPs concentrations showed good ABT radical scavenging activity. Further, AgNPs showed effective antibacterial activity against both gram negative and gram positive bacteria and antiproliferative activity toward A549 human lung cancer (CCL-185) and MCF-7 human breast cancer (HTB-22) cell lines. The samples demonstrated considerably high antibacterial, and antiproliferative activities against bacterial strains and cell lines.

  19. Diversity of pigmented Gram-positive bacteria associated with marine macroalgae from Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Leiva, Sergio; Alvarado, Pamela; Huang, Ying; Wang, Jian; Garrido, Ignacio

    2015-12-01

    Little is known about the diversity and roles of Gram-positive and pigmented bacteria in Antarctic environments, especially those associated with marine macroorganisms. This work is the first study about the diversity and antimicrobial activity of culturable pigmented Gram-positive bacteria associated with marine Antarctic macroalgae. A total of 31 pigmented Gram-positive strains were isolated from the surface of six species of macroalgae collected in the King George Island, South Shetland Islands. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities ≥99%, 18 phylotypes were defined, which were clustered into 11 genera of Actinobacteria (Agrococcus, Arthrobacter, Brachybacterium, Citricoccus, Kocuria, Labedella, Microbacterium, Micrococcus, Rhodococcus, Salinibacterium and Sanguibacter) and one genus of the Firmicutes (Staphylococcus). It was found that five isolates displayed antimicrobial activity against a set of macroalgae-associated bacteria. The active isolates were phylogenetically related to Agrococcus baldri, Brachybacterium rhamnosum, Citricoccus zhacaiensis and Kocuria palustris. The results indicate that a diverse community of pigmented Gram-positive bacteria is associated with Antartic macroalgae and suggest its potential as a promising source of antimicrobial and pigmented natural compounds.

  20. Antibacterial activity of indole alkaloids from Aspidosperma ramiflorum.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, J C A; Silva, C C da; Oliveira, A J B de; Nakamura, C V; Dias Filho, B P

    2006-03-01

    We evaluated the antibacterial activities of the crude methanol extract, fractions (I-V) obtained after acid-base extraction and pure compounds from the stem bark of Aspidosperma ramiflorum. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was determined by the microdilution technique in Mueller-Hinton broth. Inoculates were prepared in this medium from 24-h broth cultures of bacteria (10(7) CFU/mL). Microtiter plates were incubated at 37 masculineC and the MICs were recorded after 24 h of incubation. Two susceptibility endpoints were recorded for each isolate. The crude methanol extract presented moderate activity against the Gram-positive bacteria B. subtilis (MIC = 250 microg/mL) and S. aureus (MIC = 500 microg/mL), and was inactive against the Gram-negative bacteria E. coli and P. aeruginosa (MIC > 1000 microg/mL). Fractions I and II were inactive against standard strains at concentrations of < or =1000 microg/mL and fraction III displayed moderate antibacterial activity against B. subtilis (MIC = 500 microg/mL) and S. aureus (MIC = 250 microg/mL). Fraction IV showed high activity against B. subtilis and S. aureus (MIC = 15.6 microg/mL) and moderate activity against E. coli and P. aeruginosa (MIC = 250 microg/mL). Fraction V presented high activity against B. subtilis (MIC = 15.6 microg/mL) and S. aureus (MIC = 31.3 microg/mL) and was inactive against Gram-negative bacteria (MIC > 1000 microg/mL). Fractions III, IV and V were then submitted to bioassay-guided fractionation by silica gel column chromatography, yielding individual purified ramiflorines A and B. Both ramiflorines showed significant activity against S. aureus (MIC = 25 microg/mL) and E. faecalis (MIC = 50 microg/mL), with EC50 of 8 and 2.5 microg/mL for ramiflorines A and B, respectively, against S. aureus. These results are promising, showing that these compounds are biologically active against Gram-positive bacteria.

  1. Relation between molecular electrostatic potential, several electronic properties and antibacterial activity of some synthetic furane derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monasterios, Melina; Avendaño, Milagros; Amaro, María Isabel; Infante, Wilson; Charris, Jaime

    2006-10-01

    The present work reports the preliminary evaluation of the antibacterial activity, molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) determination and relevant electronic properties for their behavior as one electron acceptor, of a serial of compounds, active and inactive analogues, derived form furan, that were previously synthesized within our investigation group, with the purpose of establishing the existence of a valid correlation between their antibacterial activity and those electrostatic and electronic properties. According to the balance between the positive and negative areas in combination with the size of the MEP's area it was determined that these derivatives exhibit activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria or only against Gram-positive ones. We found no valid correlation between the single point energy, the energy associated to the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO); LUMO's density, nucleophilic susceptibility, Log P and the dipole moment, with the experimental activity determined for them. This could be because this is an homologous serial where the properties derived from the electronic distribution just change between those molecules that have a nitro group (active) in contrast with those wherein this group is absent (inactive).

  2. Conjugative Plasmid Transfer in Gram-Positive Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Grohmann, Elisabeth; Muth, Günther; Espinosa, Manuel

    2003-01-01

    Conjugative transfer of bacterial plasmids is the most efficient way of horizontal gene spread, and it is therefore considered one of the major reasons for the increase in the number of bacteria exhibiting multiple-antibiotic resistance. Thus, conjugation and spread of antibiotic resistance represents a severe problem in antibiotic treatment, especially of immunosuppressed patients and in intensive care units. While conjugation in gram-negative bacteria has been studied in great detail over the last decades, the transfer mechanisms of antibiotic resistance plasmids in gram-positive bacteria remained obscure. In the last few years, the entire nucleotide sequences of several large conjugative plasmids from gram-positive bacteria have been determined. Sequence analyses and data bank comparisons of their putative transfer (tra) regions have revealed significant similarities to tra regions of plasmids from gram-negative bacteria with regard to the respective DNA relaxases and their targets, the origins of transfer (oriT), and putative nucleoside triphosphatases NTP-ases with homologies to type IV secretion systems. In contrast, a single gene encoding a septal DNA translocator protein is involved in plasmid transfer between micelle-forming streptomycetes. Based on these clues, we propose the existence of two fundamentally different plasmid-mediated conjugative mechanisms in gram-positive microorganisms, namely, the mechanism taking place in unicellular gram-positive bacteria, which is functionally similar to that in gram-negative bacteria, and a second type that occurs in multicellular gram-positive bacteria, which seems to be characterized by double-stranded DNA transfer. PMID:12794193

  3. Inactivation of Gram-Positive Bacteria by Novel Phenolic Branched-Chain Fatty Acids.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xuetong; Wagner, Karen; Sokorai, Kimberly J B; Ngo, Helen

    2017-01-01

    Novel phenolic branched-chain fatty acids (PBC-FAs) were evaluated for their antimicrobial properties against both gram-positive ( Listeria innocua , Bacillus subtilis , Enterococcus faecium ) and gram-negative ( Escherichia coli , Salmonella Typhimurium, and Pseudomonas tolaasii ) bacteria. In addition, PBC-FA derivatives, such as PBC-FA methyl ester mixture, methyl-branched fatty acid mixtures, and trimethylsilyl-PBC-FA methyl esters, were synthesized to study the structure activity relationship. Results showed that PBC-FAs were a potent antimicrobial against gram-positive bacteria with MICs of 1.8 to 3.6 μg/ml. The compounds were less effective against gram-negative bacteria. Derivatives of PBC-FAs and an equimolar mixture of oleic acid and phenol all had MICs above 233 μg/ml against both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. Comparison of antimicrobial activities of the PBC-FAs with those of the derivatives suggests that the carboxylic group in the fatty acid moiety and the hydroxyl group on the phenol moiety were responsible for the antimicrobial efficacy. Growth curves of L. innocua revealed that PBC-FAs prevented bacterial growth, while MBC-FAs only delayed the onset of rapid growth of L. innocua . Our results demonstrated that the novel PBC-FAs have potential for use as antimicrobials against gram-positive bacteria.

  4. Study of the antibacterial and antifungal activities of synthetic benzyl bromides, ketones, and corresponding chalcone derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Shakhatreh, Muhamad Ali K; Al-Smadi, Mousa L; Khabour, Omar F; Shuaibu, Fatima A; Hussein, Emad I; Alzoubi, Karem H

    2016-01-01

    Several applications of chalcones and their derivatives encouraged researchers to increase their synthesis as an alternative for the treatment of pathogenic bacterial and fungal infections. In the present study, chalcone derivatives were synthesized through cross aldol condensation reaction between 4-(N,N-dimethylamino)benzaldehyde and multiarm aromatic ketones. The multiarm aromatic ketones were synthesized through nucleophilic substitution reaction between 4-hydroxy acetophenone and benzyl bromides. The benzyl bromides, multiarm aromatic ketones, and corresponding chalcone derivatives were evaluated for their activities against eleven clinical pathogenic Gram-positive, Gram-negative bacteria, and three pathogenic fungi by the disk diffusion method. The minimum inhibitory concentration was determined by the microbroth dilution technique. The results of the present study demonstrated that benzyl bromide derivatives have strong antibacterial and antifungal properties as compared to synthetic chalcone derivatives and ketones. Benzyl bromides (1a and 1c) showed high ester activity against Gram-positive bacteria and fungi but moderate activity against Gram-negative bacteria. Therefore, these compounds may be considered as good antibacterial and antifungal drug discovery. However, substituted ketones (2a–b) as well as chalcone derivatives (3a–c) showed no activity against all the tested strains except for ketone (2c), which showed moderate activity against Candida albicans. PMID:27877017

  5. Antibacterial and EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitory activities of polyhydroxylated xanthones from Garcinia succifolia.

    PubMed

    Duangsrisai, Susawat; Choowongkomon, Kiattawee; Bessa, Lucinda J; Costa, Paulo M; Amat, Nurmuhammat; Kijjoa, Anake

    2014-11-28

    Chemical investigation of the methanol extract of the wood of Garcinia succifolia Kurz (Clusiaceae) led to the isolation of 1,5-dihydroxyxanthone (1), 1,7-dihydroxyxanthone (2), 1,3,7-trihydroxyxanthone (3), 1,5,6-trihydroxyxanthone (4), 1,6,7-trihydroxyxanthone (5), and 1,3,6,7-tetrahydroxyxanthone (6). All of the isolated xanthones were evaluated for their antibacterial activity against bacterial reference strains, two Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus ATTC 25923, Bacillus subtillis ATCC 6633) and two Gram-negative (Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853), and environmental drug-resistant isolates (S. aureus B1, Enteroccoccus faecalis W1, and E. coli G1), as well as for their epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) of tyrosine kinase inhibitory activity. Only 1,5,6-trihydroxy-(4), 1,6,7-trihydroxy-(5), and 1,3,6,7-tetrahydroxyxanthones (6) exhibited antibacterial activity against Gram-positive bacteria, however none was active against vancomycin-resistant E. faecalis. Additionally, 1,7-dihydroxyxanthone (2) showed synergism with oxacillin, but not with ampicillin. On the other hand, only 1,5-dihydroxyxanthone (1) and 1,7-dihydroxyxanthone (2) were found to exhibit the EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitory activity, with IC50 values of 90.34 and 223 nM, respectively.

  6. Antibacterial activity and cytotoxicity of PEGylated poly(amidoamine) dendrimers.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Analette I; Reins, Rose Y; McDermott, Alison M; Trautner, Barbara W; Cai, Chengzhi

    2009-10-01

    We have investigated the antibacterial activity and cytotoxicity of a series of amino-terminated poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimers modified with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) groups. The antibacterial activity of the PAMAM dendrimers and their derivatives against the common ocular pathogens, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus, was evaluated by their minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs). For the unmodified third and fifth generation (G3 and G5) amino-terminated dendrimers, the MICs against both P. aeruginosa and S. aureus were in the range of 6.3-12.5 microg mL(-1), comparable to that of the antimicrobial peptide LL-37 (1.3-12.5 microg mL(-1)) and within the wide range of 0.047-128 microg mL(-1) for the fluoroquinolone antibiotics. PEGylation of the dendrimers decreased their antibacterial activities, especially for the Gram-positive bacteria (S. aureus). The reduction in potency is likely due to the decrease in the number of protonated amino groups and shielding of the positive charges by the PEG chains, thus decreasing the electrostatic interactions of the dendrimers with the negatively-charged bacterial surface. Interestingly, localization of a greater number of amino groups on G5 vs. G3 dendrimers did not improve the potency. Significantly, even a low degree of PEGylation, e.g. 6% with EG(11) on G3 dendrimer, greatly reduced the cytotoxicity towards human corneal epithelial cells while maintaining a high potency against P. aeruginosa. The cytotoxicity of the PEGylated dendrimers to host cells is much lower than that reported for antimicrobial peptides. Furthermore, the MICs of these dendrimers against P. aeruginosa are more than two orders of magnitude lower than other antimicrobial polymers reported to date. These results motivate further exploration of the potential of cationic dendrimers as a new class of antimicrobial agents that may be less likely to induce bacterial resistance than standard antibiotics.

  7. Screening of antibacterial activity of Amaicha del Valle (Tucumán, Argentina) propolis.

    PubMed

    Nieva Moreno, M I; Isla, M I; Cudmani, N G; Vattuone, M A; Sampietro, A R

    1999-12-15

    Propolis is extensively used in Argentine folk medicine. Alcoholic extracts of propolis from four localities of Amaicha del Valle (El Paraiso, La Banda Este, La Banda Oeste and El Molino), Province of Tucumán and from Cerrillos, Province of Santiago del Estero, Argentina were prepared. All showed antibacterial activity against Gram positive bacteria, the propolis from La Banda Este being the most active (MIC = 7.8 microg/ml) against Streptococcus piogenes, an antibiotic resistant bacterium. Thin layer chromatographic (TLC) separation profiles of propolis from Amaicha del Valle region were similar but differ from the alcoholic extract of the propolis from Cerrillos, another phytogeographical region of Argentina (provincia chaqueña). Bioautographic assays of the TLC profiles showed that several separated compounds of the Amaicha del Valle propolis have antibacterial activity. The difference in composition between Amaicha del Valle and Cerrillos propolis coincides with a different phytogeographical formation.

  8. Chemical composition and antibacterial activity of the essential oil of Moroccan Juniperus phoenicea.

    PubMed

    Fouad, Bahri; Abderrahmane, Romane; Youssef, Arjouni; Rajae, Harrak; El Fels, M Ahmed El Alaoui

    2011-10-01

    The antibacterial activity of the essential oil from leaves of Juniperus phoenicea (Cupressaceae) and its chemical constituents were investigated in this study. The essential oil was obtained by hydro-distillation and analyzed by gas chromatography equipped with a flame ionisation detector (GC-FID), and gas chromatography coupled to a mass spectrometer (GC-MS). Sixty-three volatile compounds were identified representing 52 to 92% of the total oil compositions. The main monoterpenes were a-pinene (26.7-78.7%) and 6-3carene (7.6-15.4%). The antibacterial activity of J. phoenicea essential oil, when tested against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, showed high activity against all bacteria tested, except Pseudomonas.

  9. Synergistic antibacterial activity between Thymus vulgaris and Pimpinella anisum essential oils and methanol extracts.

    PubMed

    Al-Bayati, Firas A

    2008-03-28

    Essential oils (EOs) and methanol extracts obtained from aerial parts of Thymus vulgaris and Pimpinella anisum seeds were evaluated for their single and combined antibacterial activities against nine Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria: Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus, Escherichia coli, Proteus vulgaris, Proteus mirabilis, Salmonella typhi, Salmonella typhimurium, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The essential oils and methanol extracts revealed promising antibacterial activities against most pathogens using broth microdilution method. Maximum activity of Thymus vulgaris and Pimpinella anisum essential oils and methanol extracts (MIC 15.6 and 62.5mug/ml) were observed against Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus and Proteus vulgaris. Combinations of essential oils and methanol extracts showed an additive action against most tested pathogens especially Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

  10. Facile Preparation of Ag/NiO Composite Nanosheets and Their Antibacterial Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Cui-E.; Pan, Lu; Wang, Cheng-Run; He, Yi; Wu, Yong-Feng; Xue, Sai-Sai

    2016-01-01

    Sheet-like precursors of NiO and Ag/NiO with different Ag contents were synthesized by a facile and easily controlled hydrothermal method. The NiO and Ag/NiO composite nanosheets were prepared by calcination of the corresponding precursors at 400°C for 3 h. The as-synthesized samples were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis, x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. The antibacterial activity of NiO and Ag/NiO composites to several gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria was examined. Results showed that NiO nanosheets hardly exhibited antibacterial activity; however, Ag/NiO composites displayed higher activity even with low Ag content.

  11. Multiplex PCR for colony direct detection of Gram-positive histamine- and tyramine-producing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Coton, Emmanuel; Coton, Monika

    2005-12-01

    Formation of biogenic amines (BA) may occur in fermented foods and beverages due to the amino acid decarboxylase activities of Gram-positive bacteria. These compounds may cause food poisoning and therefore could imply food exportation problems. A set of consensual primers based on histidine decarboxylase gene (hdc) sequences of different bacteria was designed for the detection of histamine-producing Gram-positive bacteria. A multiplex PCR based on these hdc primers and recently designed primers targeting the tyrosine decarboxylase (tyrdc) gene was created. A third set of primers targeting the 16S rRNA gene of eubacteria was also used as an internal control. This multiplex PCR was performed on extracted DNA as well as directly on cell colonies. The results obtained show that this new molecular tool allowed for the detection of Gram-positive histamine- and/or tyramine-producing bacteria. The use of this molecular tool for early and rapid detection of Gram-positive BA-producing bacteria is of interest in evaluating the potential of cultured indigenous strains to produce biogenic amines in a fermented food product as well as to validate the innocuity of potential starter strains in the food industry.

  12. Native and heterologous production of bacteriocins from gram-positive microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Mabel; Jaramillo, Diana; Melendez, Adelina Del Pilar; J Alméciga-Diaz, Carlos; Sánchez, Oscar F

    2011-12-01

    In nature, microorganisms can present several mechanisms for setting intercommunication and defense. One of these mechanisms is related to the production of bacteriocins, which are peptides with antimicrobial activity. Bacteriocins can be found in Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Nevertheless, bacteriocins produced by Gram-positive bacteria are of particular interest due to the industrial use of several strains that belong to this group, especially lactic acid bacteria (LAB), which have the status of generally recognized as safe (GRAS) microorganisms. In this work, we will review recent tendencies in the field of invention and state of art related to bacteriocin production by Gram-positive microorganism. Hundred-eight patents related to Gram-positive bacteriocin producers have been disclosed since 1965, from which 57% are related bacteriocins derived from Lactococcus, Lactobacillus, Streptococcus, and Pediococcus strains. Surprisingly, patents regarding heterologous bacteriocins production were mainly presented just in the last decade. Although the major application of bacteriocins is concerned to food industry to control spoilage and foodborne bacteria, during the last years bacteriocin applications have been displacing to the diagnosis and treatment of cancer, and plant disease resistance and growth promotion.

  13. Protein Secretion in Gram-Positive Bacteria: From Multiple Pathways to Biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Anné, Jozef; Economou, Anastassios; Bernaerts, Kristel

    2016-11-25

    A number of Gram-positive bacteria are important players in industry as producers of a diverse array of economically interesting metabolites and proteins. As discussed in this overview, several Gram-positive bacteria are valuable hosts for the production of heterologous proteins. In contrast to Gram-negative bacteria, proteins secreted by Gram-positive bacteria are released into the culture medium where conditions for correct folding are more appropriate, thus facilitating the isolation and purification of active proteins. Although seven different protein secretion pathways have been identified in Gram-positive bacteria, the majority of heterologous proteins are produced via the general secretion or Sec pathway. Not all proteins are equally well secreted, because heterologous protein production often faces bottlenecks including hampered secretion, susceptibility to proteases, secretion stress, and metabolic burden. These bottlenecks are associated with reduced yields leading to non-marketable products. In this chapter, besides a general overview of the different protein secretion pathways, possible hurdles that may hinder efficient protein secretion are described and attempts to improve yield are discussed including modification of components of the Sec pathway. Attention is also paid to omics-based approaches that may offer a more rational approach to optimize production of heterologous proteins.

  14. Primary Structure and Antibacterial Activity of Chicken Bone Marrow-Derived β-Defensins▿

    PubMed Central

    Derache, Chrystelle; Labas, Valérie; Aucagne, Vincent; Meudal, Hervé; Landon, Céline; Delmas, Agnès F.; Magallon, Thierry; Lalmanach, Anne-Christine

    2009-01-01

    Three biologically active β-defensins were purified by chromatography from chicken bone marrow extract: avian β-defensin 1 (AvBD1), AvBD2, and the newly isolated β-defensin AvBD7. Mass spectrometry analyses showed that bone marrow-derived AvBD1, -2, and -7 peptides were present as mature peptides and revealed posttranslational modifications for AvBD1 and AvBD7 in comparison to their in silico-predicted amino acid sequences. Tandem mass spectrometry analysis using the nanoelectrospray-quadrupole time of flight method showed N-terminal glutaminyl cyclization of mature AvBD7 and C-terminal amidation of mature AvBD1 peptide, while posttranslational modifications were absent in bone marrow-derived mature AvBD2 peptide. Furthermore, mass spectrometry analysis performed on intact cells confirmed the presence of these three peptides in mature heterophils. In addition, the antibacterial activities of the three β-defensins against a large panel of gram-positive and -negative bacteria were assessed. While the three defensins displayed similar antibacterial spectra of activity against gram-positive strains, AvBD1 and AvBD7 exhibited the strongest activity against gram-negative strains in comparison to AvBD2. PMID:19738012

  15. Antibacterial activity of baking soda.

    PubMed

    Drake, D

    1997-01-01

    The antibacterial activity of baking soda (sodium bicarbonate) was assessed using three different experimental approaches. Standard minimum inhibitory concentration analyses revealed substantial inhibitory activity against Streptococcus mutans that was not due to ionic strength or high osmolarity. Short-term exposure assays showed significant killing of bacterial suspensions when baking soda was combined with the detergent sodium dodecylsulfate. Multiple, brief exposures of sucrose-colonized S mutans to baking soda and sodium dodecylsulfate caused statistically significant decreases in numbers of viable cells. Use of oral health care products with high concentrations of baking soda could conceivably result in decreased levels of cariogenic S mutans in saliva and plaque.

  16. Antibacterial activity of baking soda.

    PubMed

    Drake, D

    1996-01-01

    The antibacterial activity of baking soda (sodium bicarbonate) was assessed using three different experimental approaches. Standard minimum inhibitory concentration analyses revealed substantial inhibitory activity against Streptococcus mutans that was not due to ionic strength or high osmolarity. Short-term exposure assays showed significant killing of bacterial suspensions when baking soda was combined with the detergent sodium dodecylsulfate. Multiple, brief exposures of sucrose-colonized S mutans to baking soda and sodium dodecylsulfate caused statistically significant decreases in numbers of viable cells. Use of oral health care products with high concentrations of baking soda could conceivably result in decreased levels of cariogenic S mutans in saliva and plaque.

  17. Antibacterial activity on Citrullus colocynthis Leaf extract

    PubMed Central

    gowri, S. Shyamala; Priyavardhini, S.; Vasantha, K.; Umadevi, M.

    2009-01-01

    Studies on the antibacterial activities of the leaf extract of Citrullus colocynthis (Cucurbitaceae), a medicinal plant used for the treatment of various ailments was carried out using agar disc diffusion technique. The results revealed that the crude acetone extract exhibited antibacterial activities against Pseudomonas aeruginosa with zones of inhibition measuring 14.0mm. The chloroform leaf extract exhibited no antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus. The minimum inhibitory concentration for the chloroform extract was 4.0mm for Escherichia coli. PMID:22557336

  18. [In vitro and in vivo antibacterial activities of sulopenem, a new penem antibiotic].

    PubMed

    Komoto, A; Otsuki, M; Nishino, T

    1996-04-01

    The in vitro and in vivo antibacterial activities of sulopenem, a new penem, were evaluated in comparison with imipenem (IPM), meropenem (MEPM), ceftazidime (CAZ) and flomoxef (FMOX). Sulopenem had broad and potent antibacterial spectra against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, including Enterococcus faecalis, Proteus vulgaris, Morganella morganii, Enterobacter spp. and Citrobacter freundii. Sulopenem showed concentration-dependent bactericidal activities against Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Acinetobacter calcoaceticus. Morphological observation using phase-contrast microscope revealed that sulopenem induced spherical cell formation with E. coli and K. pneumoniae at lower concentrations and bacteriolysis at higher concentrations. Therapeutic efficacies of sulopenem against systemic infections in mice were almost equal to those of imipenem against Streptococcus pneumoniae. While its therapeutic efficacies were superior to those of meropenem, ceftazidime and flomoxef against S. aureus and S. pneumoniae, they were inferior to those of imipenem/cilastatin against S. aureus, K. pneumoniae and A. calcoaceticus.

  19. Decoction, infusion and hydroalcoholic extract of cultivated thyme: antioxidant and antibacterial activities, and phenolic characterisation.

    PubMed

    Martins, Natália; Barros, Lillian; Santos-Buelga, Celestino; Silva, Sónia; Henriques, Mariana; Ferreira, Isabel C F R

    2015-01-15

    Bioactivity of thyme has been described, but mostly related to its essential oils, while studies with aqueous extracts are scarce. Herein, the antioxidant and antibacterial properties of decoction, infusion and hydroalcoholic extract, as also their phenolic compounds, were evaluated and compared. Decoction showed the highest concentration of phenolic compounds (either phenolic acids or flavonoids), followed by infusion and hydroalcoholic extract. In general, the samples were effective against gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis) and gram-negative (Escherichia coli, Klebsiella spp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterococcus aerogenes, Proteus vulgaris and Enterobacter sakazakii) bacteria, with decoction presenting the most pronounced effect. This sample also displayed the highest radical scavenging activity and reducing power. Data obtained support the idea that compounds with strong antioxidant and antibacterial activities are also water-soluble. Furthermore, the use of thyme infusion and decoction, by both internal and external use, at recommended doses, is safe and no adverse reactions have been described.

  20. Synthesis and antibacterial activity of Schiff bases and amines derived from alkyl 2-(2-formyl-4-nitrophenoxy)alkanoates.

    PubMed

    Goszczyńska, Agata; Kwiecień, Halina; Fijałkowski, Karol

    A series of novel Schiff bases and secondary amines were obtained in good yields, as a result of the reductive amination of alkyl 2-(2-formyl-4-nitrophenoxy)alkanoates with both aniline and 4-methoxyaniline under established mild reaction conditions. Sodium triacetoxyborohydride as well as hydrogen in the presence of palladium on carbon were used as efficient reducing agents of the Schiff bases, in both direct and stepwise reductive amination processes. The Schiff bases, amines, and amine hydrochlorides were designed as potential antibacterial agents, and structure-activity relationship could be established following in vitro assays against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. The minimal inhibitory concentration and zone of inhibition were also determined. In these tests, some of Schiff bases and secondary amine hydrochlorides showed moderate-to-good activity against Gram-positive bacteria, including S. aureus, M. luteus, and S. mutans.

  1. Postantibiotic effect of ceftaroline against gram-positive organisms.

    PubMed

    Pankuch, G A; Appelbaum, P C

    2009-10-01

    The postantibiotic effects (PAEs), postantibiotic sub-MIC effects (PA-SMEs), and sub-MIC effects (SMEs) of ceftaroline, a novel injectable cephalosporin, were determined for 15 gram-positive organisms. The pneumococcal, staphylococcal, and enterococcal PAEs were 0.8 to 1.8 h, 0.7 to 2.2 h, and 0.2 to 1.1 h, respectively. The corresponding PA-SMEs (0.4 times the MIC) were 2.5 to 6.7 h, 2.9 to >0.0 h, and 7.9 to >10.3 h, respectively. The PA-SMEs were longer than the PAEs, suggesting that sub-MIC levels extend the PAE of ceftaroline against gram-positive cocci.

  2. Which antibiotic for resistant Gram-positives, and why?

    PubMed

    Bradley, John S

    2014-01-01

    Increasing resistance in Gram-positive pathogens, particularly Staphylococcus aureus, and enterococcus, has become a major clinical problem, particularly in the hospital environment, causing significant morbidity and mortality in both healthy hosts and in those with underlying comorbidities. Increased resistance drives the use of empiric therapy with less well-studied and potentially more toxic agents. Resistance mechanisms for currently recommended agents are discussed, with options for therapy of resistant pathogens. For any new agent used, resistance is likely to develop, which underscores the concept that both antibiotics and antimicrobial resistance are ancient, and only by prudent use of antimicrobial agents and effective infection control measures when resistance arises, will effective agents be available to treat Gram-positive pathogens in the future.

  3. Virulence Plasmids of Nonsporulating Gram-Positive Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Van Tyne, Daria; Gilmore, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Gram-positive bacteria are leading causes of many types of human infection, including pneumonia, skin and nasopharyngeal infections, as well as urinary tract and surgical wound infections among hospitalized patients. These infections have become particularly problematic because many of the species causing them have become highly resistant to antibiotics. The role of mobile genetic elements, such as plasmids, in the dissemination of antibiotic resistance among Gram-positive bacteria has been well studied; less well understood is the role of mobile elements in the evolution and spread of virulence traits among these pathogens. While these organisms are leading agents of infection, they are also prominent members of the human commensal ecology. It appears that these bacteria are able to take advantage of the intimate association between host and commensal, via virulence traits that exacerbate infection and cause disease. However, evolution into an obligate pathogen has not occurred, presumably because it would lead to rejection of pathogenic organisms from the host ecology. Instead, in organisms that exist as both commensal and pathogen, selection has favored the development of mechanisms for variability. As a result, many virulence traits are localized on mobile genetic elements, such as virulence plasmids and pathogenicity islands. Virulence traits may occur within a minority of isolates of a given species, but these minority populations have nonetheless emerged as a leading problem in infectious disease. This chapter reviews virulence plasmids in nonsporulating Gram-positive bacteria, and examines their contribution to disease pathogenesis. PMID:25544937

  4. Conjugative type IV secretion systems in Gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Goessweiner-Mohr, Nikolaus; Arends, Karsten; Keller, Walter; Grohmann, Elisabeth

    2013-11-01

    Bacterial conjugation presents the most important means to spread antibiotic resistance and virulence factors among closely and distantly related bacteria. Conjugative plasmids are the mobile genetic elements mainly responsible for this task. All the genetic information required for the horizontal transmission is encoded on the conjugative plasmids themselves. Two distinct concepts for horizontal plasmid transfer in Gram-positive bacteria exist, the most prominent one transports single stranded plasmid DNA via a multi-protein complex, termed type IV secretion system, across the Gram-positive cell envelope. Type IV secretion systems have been found in virtually all unicellular Gram-positive bacteria, whereas multicellular Streptomycetes seem to have developed a specialized system more closely related to the machinery involved in bacterial cell division and sporulation, which transports double stranded DNA from donor to recipient cells. This review intends to summarize the state of the art of prototype systems belonging to the two distinct concepts; it focuses on protein key players identified so far and gives future directions for research in this emerging field of promiscuous interbacterial transport.

  5. Cyclic diguanylate signaling in Gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Purcell, Erin B; Tamayo, Rita

    2016-09-01

    The nucleotide second messenger 3'-5' cyclic diguanylate monophosphate (c-di-GMP) is a central regulator of the transition between motile and non-motile lifestyles in bacteria, favoring sessility. Most research investigating the functions of c-di-GMP has focused on Gram-negative species, especially pathogens. Recent work in Gram-positive species has revealed that c-di-GMP plays similar roles in Gram-positives, though the precise targets and mechanisms of regulation may differ. The majority of bacterial life exists in a surface-associated state, with motility allowing bacteria to disseminate and colonize new environments. c-di-GMP signaling regulates flagellum biosynthesis and production of adherence factors and appears to be a primary mechanism by which bacteria sense and respond to surfaces. Ultimately, c-di-GMP influences the ability of a bacterium to alter its transcriptional program, physiology and behavior upon surface contact. This review discusses how bacteria are able to sense a surface via flagella and type IV pili, and the role of c-di-GMP in regulating the response to surfaces, with emphasis on studies of Gram-positive bacteria.

  6. Coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.) essential oil: its antibacterial activity and mode of action evaluated by flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Silva, Filomena; Ferreira, Susana; Queiroz, João A; Domingues, Fernanda C

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this work was to study the antibacterial effect of coriander (Coriandrum sativum) essential oil against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Antibacterial susceptibility was evaluated using classical microbiological techniques concomitantly with the use of flow cytometry for the evaluation of cellular physiology. Our results showed that coriander oil has an effective antimicrobial activity against all bacteria tested. Also, coriander oil exhibited bactericidal activity against almost all bacteria tested, with the exception of Bacillus cereus and Enterococcus faecalis. Propidium iodide incorporation and concomitant loss of all other cellular functions such as efflux activity, respiratory activity and membrane potential seem to suggest that the primary mechanism of action of coriander oil is membrane damage, which leads to cell death. The results obtained herein further encourage the use of coriander oil in antibacterial formulations due to the fact that coriander oil effectively kills pathogenic bacteria related to foodborne diseases and hospital infections.

  7. Optical control of antibacterial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velema, Willem A.; van der Berg, Jan Pieter; Hansen, Mickel J.; Szymanski, Wiktor; Driessen, Arnold J. M.; Feringa, Ben L.

    2013-11-01

    Bacterial resistance is a major problem in the modern world, stemming in part from the build-up of antibiotics in the environment. Novel molecular approaches that enable an externally triggered increase in antibiotic activity with high spatiotemporal resolution and auto-inactivation are highly desirable. Here we report a responsive, broad-spectrum, antibacterial agent that can be temporally activated with light, whereupon it auto-inactivates on the scale of hours. The use of such a ‘smart’ antibiotic might prevent the build-up of active antimicrobial material in the environment. Reversible optical control over active drug concentration enables us to obtain pharmacodynamic information. Precisely localized control of activity is achieved, allowing the growth of bacteria to be confined to defined patterns, which has potential for the development of treatments that avoid interference with the endogenous microbial population in other parts of the organism.

  8. Bioinspired synthesis of polydopamine/Ag nanocomposite particles with antibacterial activities.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chengjiao; Zhang, Guoxing; Xia, Tian; Li, Zhenni; Zhao, Kai; Deng, Ziwei; Guo, Dingzong; Peng, Bo

    2015-10-01

    Mussel-inspired chemistry (polydopamine) offers great opportunities to develop inexpensive and efficient process for many types of materials with complex shapes and functions in a mild and friendly environment. This paper describes a facile, yet green approach to synthesize polydopamine/silver (PDA/Ag) nanocomposite particles with a combination use of polydopamine chemistry and electroless metallization of Ag. In this approach, monodisperse spherical polydopamine particles are first synthesized by the oxidation and self-polymerization of dopamine (monomer) in an alkaline water-ethanol solution at room temperature, which are served as the active templates for secondary reactions due to the abundant catechol and amine groups on the surface. Subsequently, the silver precursor-[Ag(NH3)2](+) ions introduced are easily absorbed onto the surface of the PDA particles, and are immediately in situ reduced to metallic Ag nanoparticles with the help of these active catechol and amine groups. During the preparation, no additional reductants, toxic reagents and intricate instruments are needed. These as-synthesized PDA/Ag nanocomposite particles are ideal candidates for antibacterial application because they do not show significant cytotoxicity against HEK293T human embryonic kidney cells in the in vitro cytotoxicity assay, whereas demonstrate enhanced antibacterial abilities against Escherichia coli (Gram-negative bacteria) and Staphylococcus aureus (Gram-positive bacteria) in the antibacterial assays. Owing to their excellent cytocompatibilities and antibacterial activities, these PDA/Ag nanocomposite particles can be considered as the promising antibacterial materials for future biomedical applications.

  9. Silver/poly (lactic acid) nanocomposites: preparation, characterization, and antibacterial activity

    PubMed Central

    Shameli, Kamyar; Ahmad, Mansor Bin; Yunus, Wan Md Zin Wan; Ibrahim, Nor Azowa; Rahman, Russly Abdul; Jokar, Maryam; Darroudi, Majid

    2010-01-01

    In this study, antibacterial characteristic of silver/poly (lactic acid) nanocomposite (Ag/PLA-NC) films was investigated, while silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) were synthesized into biodegradable PLA via chemical reduction method in diphase solvent. Silver nitrate and sodium borohydride were respectively used as a silver precursor and reducing agent in the PLA, which acted as a polymeric matrix and stabilizer. Meanwhile, the properties of Ag/PLA-NCs were studied as a function of the Ag-NP weight percentages (8, 16, and 32 wt% respectively), in relation to the use of PLA. The morphology of the Ag/PLA-NC films and the distribution of the Ag-NPs were also characterized. The silver ions released from the Ag/PLA-NC films and their antibacterial activities were scrutinized. The antibacterial activities of the Ag/PLA-NC films were examined against Gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli and Vibrio parahaemolyticus) and Gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus) by diffusion method using Muller–Hinton agar. The results indicated that Ag/PLA-NC films possessed a strong antibacterial activity with the increase in the percentage of Ag-NPs in the PLA. Thus, Ag/PLA-NC films can be used as an antibacterial scaffold for tissue engineering and medical application. PMID:20856832

  10. Antibacterial activity evaluation of bioactive glass and biphasic calcium phosphate nanopowders mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazemi, Zahra; Mehdikhani-Nahrkhalaji, Mehdi; Haghbin-Nazarpak, Masoumeh; Staji, Hamid; Kalani, Mohammad Mehdi

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the antibacterial activity of bioactive glass (BG) and biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) nanopowders mixtures for the first time. 37S BG and BCP (50% HA-50% β-TCP) nanopowders were prepared via sol-gel technique. Characterization techniques such as X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transition electron microscopy, and X-ray fluorescent. The antibacterial activity was studied using Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhi as gram-negative, and Staphylococcus aureus as gram-positive bacteria. The antibacterial effect of BG, BCP nanopowders, and their mixtures was evaluated at different concentrations. The 37S BG nanopowders showed minimum bactericidal concentration at 25 mg/ml. At broth concentrations below 300 mg/ml, BCP showed no antibacterial activity. BCP and BG nanopowders mixture (M2) with 60/40 ratio of BCP/BG showed noticeable antibacterial effect. It was concluded that BCP and 37S BG nanopowders mixture could be used as a good candidate for dental and orthopedic applications.

  11. Preparation, characterization and antibacterial activity of ZnO nanoparticles on broad spectrum of microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Siddique, Sumera; Shah, Zaheer Hussain; Shahid, Sammia; Yasmin, Farida

    2013-01-01

    Nano particles have received increased attention regarding their potential utility in biomedicine. In this study, we have investigated the antibacterial activity of ZnO nano particles with various particle sizes. ZnO nano particles were synthesized by conventional precipitation method using zinc sulphate and sodium hydroxide as precursors followed by the calcinations of precipitates at 350 °C for 6 h (sample A) and 550 °C for 2 h (sample B). The products were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis and morphology of the particles was evaluated by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Antibacterial activities against four different microorganisms were evaluated by determining the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) and zones of inhibitions using different concentrations of ZnO nanoparticles. The antibacterial activity was directly proportional to the concentration and inversely proportional to the particle size in all the microorganisms; moreover Gram positive bacteria were generally more affected than Gram negative bacteria. The stability of ZnO nanoparticles combined with potent antibacterial properties favours their application as antibacterials against broad spectrum of microorganisms.

  12. Evaluation of diffusion and dilution methods to determine the antibacterial activity of plant extracts.

    PubMed

    Klancnik, Anja; Piskernik, Sasa; Jersek, Barbara; Mozina, Sonja Smole

    2010-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate diffusion and dilution methods for determining the antibacterial activity of plant extracts and their mixtures. Several methods for measurement of the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of a plant extract are available, but there is no standard procedure as there is for antibiotics. We tested different plant extracts, their mixtures and phenolic acids on selected gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus, and Listeria monocytogenes) and gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella Infantis, Campylobacter jejuni, Campylobacter coli) with the disk diffusion, agar dilution, broth microdilution and macrodilution methods. The disk diffusion method was appropriate only as a preliminary screening test prior to quantitative MIC determination with dilution methods. A comparison of the results for MIC obtained by agar dilution and broth microdilution was possible only for gram-positive bacteria, and indicated the latter as the most accurate way of assessing the antimicrobial effect. The microdilution method with TTC (2,3,5-triphenyl tetrazolium chloride) or INT (2-p-iodophenyl-3-p-nitrophenyl-5-phenyl tetrazolium chloride) to indicate the viability of aerobic bacteria was found to be the best alternative approach, while only ATP determination was appropriate for microaerophilic Campylobacter spp. Using survival curves the kinetics of bacterial inactivation on plant extract exposure was followed for 24h and in this way the MIC values determined by the microdilution method were confirmed as the concentrations of extracts that inhibited bacterial growth. We suggest evaluation of the antibacterial activity of plant extracts using the broth microdilution method as a fast screening method for MIC determination and the macrodilution method at selected MIC values to confirm bacterial inactivation. Campylobacter spp. showed a similar sensitivity to plant extracts as the tested gram-positive bacteria, but S

  13. The investigation of antibacterial activity of selected native plants from North of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Koohsari, H; Ghaemi, EA; Sadegh Sheshpoli, M; Jahedi, M; Zahiri, M

    2015-01-01

    Plant derived products have been used for medicinal purposes during centuries. Bacterial resistance to currently used antibiotics has become a concern to public health. The development of bacterial super resistant strains has resulted in the currently used antibiotic agents failing to end many bacterial infections. For this reason, the search is ongoing for new antimicrobial agents, both by the design and by the synthesis of new agents, or through the search of natural sources for yet undiscovered antimicrobial agents. Herbal medications in particular have seen a revival of interest due to a perception that there is a lower incidence of adverse reactions to plant preparations compared to synthetic pharmaceuticals. Coupled with the reduced costs of plant preparations, this makes the search for natural therapeutics an attractive option. This research was carried out to assess the antibacterial activity aqueous and ethanolic extracts of six Azadshahr township Native plants in north of Iran against six species of pathogen bacteria by using three methods of Disk diffusion, Well method and MBC. The results of this research indicated that the effect of ethanol extracts were more than aqueous extract and among six plants, Lippia citriodora and Plantago major ethanol extract had the most antibacterial activity in any of the three methods. Gram-positive bacteria were more sensitive than gram-negative bacteria. Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus aureus were the most susceptible Gram-positive bacteria.

  14. Antifungal and antibacterial activity of marine microorganisms.

    PubMed

    El Amraoui, B; El Amraoui, M; Cohen, N; Fassouane, A

    2014-03-01

    In order to explore marine microorganisms with pharmaceutical potential, marine bacteria, collected from different coastal areas of the Moroccan Atlantic Ocean, were previously isolated from seawater, sediment, marine invertebrates and seaweeds. The antimicrobial activities of these microorganisms were investigated against the pathogens involved in human pathologies. Whole cultures of 34 marine microorganisms were screened for antimicrobial activities using the method of agar diffusion against three Gram-positive bacteria, two Gram-negative bacteria, and against yeast. The results showed that among the 34 isolates studied, 28 (82%) strains have antimicrobial activity against at least one pathogen studied, 11 (32%) strains have antifungal activity and 24 (76%) strains are active against Gram-positive bacteria, while 21 (62%) strains are active against Gram-negative bacteria. Among isolates having antimicrobial activity, 14 were identified and were assigned to the genera Acinetobacter, Aeromonas, Alcaligenes, Bacillus, Chromobacterium, Enterococcus, Pantoea and Pseudomonas. Due to a competitive role for space and nutrient, the marine microorganisms can produce antibiotic substance; therefore, these marine microorganisms were expected to be potential resources of natural antibiotic products.

  15. Evaluation of the antibacterial activity of Ventilago madraspatana Gaertn., Rubia cordifolia Linn. and Lantana camara Linn.: isolation of emodin and physcion as active antibacterial agents.

    PubMed

    Basu, Subhalakshmi; Ghosh, Abhijit; Hazra, Banasri

    2005-10-01

    The antibacterial activity of the extracts of Ventilago madraspatana stem-bark, Rubia cordifolia root and Lantana camara root-bark, prepared with solvents of different polarity, was evaluated by the agar-well diffusion method. Twelve bacteria, six each of gram-positive and gram-negative strains, were used in this study. Chloroform and ethanol extracts of V. madraspatana showed broad-spectrum activity against most of the bacteria except S. aureus, E. coli and V. cholerae. On the other hand, the activity of the chloroform and methanol extracts of R. cordifolia and L. camara was found to be more specific towards the gram-positive strains, although gram-negative P. aeruginosa was also inhibited by the methanol extracts of both these plants in a dose dependent manner. The water extracts of V. madraspatana and L. camara were found to be inactive, while that of R. cordifolia was significantly active against B. subtilis and S. aureus compared with streptomycin and penicillin G used as standards. In the course of bio-assay guided fractionation, emodin and physcion were isolated for the first time from the stem-bark of V. madraspatana. It was noteworthy to find the MICs of emodin in the range 0.5-2.0 microg/mL against three Bacillus sp. Both the anthraquinonoid compounds inhibited P. aeruginosa, emodin being more effective, showing an MIC of 70 microg/mL.

  16. Functional synergy of α-helical antimicrobial peptides and traditional antibiotics against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Feng, Q; Huang, Y; Chen, M; Li, G; Chen, Y

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the antimicrobial activities based on the synergistic effects of traditional antibiotics (imipenem, cefepime, levofloxacin hydrochloride and vancomycin) and antimicrobial peptides (AMPs; PL-5, PL-31, PL-32, PL-18, PL-29 and PL-26), alone or in combination, against three Gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Staphylococcus epidermidis) and three Gram-negative bacteria (Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae) were investigated. In addition, the antimicrobial activity that was based on the synergistic effects of levofloxacin hydrochloride and PL-5 against Staphylococcus aureus in vivo was explored in a mouse infection model. Traditional antibiotics and AMPs showed significant synergistic effects on the antibacterial activities against the different Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria in vitro. A strong synergistic effect in the PL-5 and levofloxacin hydrochloride combination against Staphylococcus aureus was observed in the mouse infection model in vivo. The mechanism of synergistic action was due to the different targets of AMPs and traditional antibiotics. The combination of AMPs and traditional antibiotics can dramatically enhance antimicrobial activity and may help prevent or delay the emergence of antibiotic resistance. Thus, this combination therapy could be a promising approach to treat bacterial infections, particularly mixed infections and multi-antibiotic-resistant infections, in the clinics.

  17. Synthesis of N-halamine-functionalized silica-polymer core-shell nanoparticles and their enhanced antibacterial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Alideertu; Huang, Jinfeng; Lan, Shi; Wang, Tao; Xiao, Linghan; Wang, Weiwei; Zhao, Tianyi; Zheng, Xin; Liu, Fengqi; Gao, Ge; Chen, Yuxin

    2011-07-01

    N-halamine-functionalized silica-polymer core-shell nanoparticles with enhanced antibacterial activity were synthesized through the encapsulation of silica nanoparticles as support with polymeric N-halamine. The as-synthesized nanoparticles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive x-ray spectrometry (EDX), dynamic light scattering (DLS), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR). These N-halamine-functionalized silica-polymer core-shell nanoparticles displayed powerful antibacterial performance against both Gram-positive bacteria and Gram-negative bacteria, and their antibacterial activities have been greatly improved compared with their bulk counterparts. Therefore, these N-halamine-functionalized silica-polymer core-shell nanoparticles have the potential for various significant applications such as in medical devices, healthcare products, water purification systems, hospitals, dental office equipment, food packaging, food storage, household sanitation, etc.

  18. Synthesis and structure-activity relationship studies of novel [6,6,5] tricyclic oxazolidinone derivatives as potential antibacterial agents.

    PubMed

    Xue, Tao; Ding, Shi; Guo, Bin; Chu, Wenjing; Wang, Hui; Yang, Yushe

    2015-01-01

    In our previous Letter, we reported the discovery of a novel benzoxazinyl-oxazolidinone antibacterial candidate 2. In order to identify a potential backup compound, extensive modifications on the B/C ring and C3 side chain were undertaken. A series of novel [6,6,5] tricyclic analogues were synthesized and their in vitro antibacterial activities were tested against a panel of susceptible and resistant Gram-positive pathogens. Among of them, benzothiazinyl-oxazolidinones with acetamide or thioamide as C3 side chains exhibited moderate to good antibacterial activity, such as compounds 54, 58, 59 and 63. In vitro liver microsomal stability was further evaluated and the results manifested that compounds 54 and 58 were both metabolically stable in rat and human liver microsomes. Additionally, insights gained from this investigation should provide directions for the further research of new oxazolidinone antibiotics.

  19. Pilins in gram-positive bacteria: A structural perspective.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Vengadesan

    2015-07-01

    Pilins or fimbrilins are a class of proteins found in bacterial surface pilus, a hair-like surface appendage. Both the Gram-negative and -positive bacteria produce pilins to assemble pili on their cell-surface for different purposes including adherence, twitching motility, conjugation, immunomodulation, biofilm formation, and electron transfer. Immunogenic properties of the pilins make them attractive vaccine candidates. The polymerized pilins play a key role in the initiation of host adhesion, which is a critical step for bacterial colonization and infection. Because of their key role in adhesion and exposure on the cell surface, targeting the pilins-mediated adhesion (anti-adhesion therapy) is also seen as a promising alternative approach for preventing and treating bacterial infections, one that may overcome their ever-increasing repertoires of resistance mechanisms. Individual pilins interact with each other non-covalently to assemble the pilus fiber with the help of associated proteins like chaperones and Usher in Gram-negative bacteria. In contrast, the pilins in Gram-positive bacteria often connect with each other covalently, with the help of sortases. Certain unique structural features present on the pilins distinguish them from one another across different bacterial strains, and these dictate their cellular targets and functions. While the structure of pilins has been extensively studied in Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria, the pilins in Gram-positive pathogenic bacteria have been in only during the last decade. Recently, the discovery of pilins in non-pathogenic bacteria, such as Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG, has received great attention, though traditionally the attention was on pathogenic bacteria. This review summarizes and discusses the current structural knowledge of pilins in Gram-positive bacteria with emphasis on those pilins which are sortase substrates.

  20. Full Spectrum Visible LED Light Activated Antibacterial System Realized by Optimized Cu2O Crystals.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiaotong; Xue, Chaowen; Fang, Fang; Song, Xiangwei; Yu, Fen; Liu, Miaoxing; Wei, Zhipeng; Fang, Xuan; Zhao, Dongxu; Xin, Hongbo; Wang, Xiaolei

    2016-04-06

    Assisted by three-dimensional printing technology, we proposed and demonstrated a full spectrum visible light activated antibacterial system by using a combination of 500 nm sized Cu2O crystals and light-emitting diode (LED) lamps. Further improved antibacterial ratios were achieved, for the first time, with pure Cu2O for both Gram-positive bacteria and Gram-negative bacteria among all of the six different color LED lamps. For practical antibacterial applications, we revealed that the nonwoven fabric could act as excellent carrier for Cu2O crystals and provide impressive antibacterial performance. Furthermore, integrated with our self-developed app, the poly(ethylene terephthalate) film loaded with Cu2O crystals also showed significant antibacterial property, thus making it possible to be applied in field of touch screen. The present research not only provided a healthier alternative to traditional ultraviolet-based sterilization but also opened an auto-response manner to decrease the rate of microbial contamination on billions of touch screen devices.

  1. Evaluation of cytotoxicity, immune compatibility and antibacterial activity of biogenic silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Składanowski, M; Golinska, P; Rudnicka, K; Dahm, H; Rai, M

    2016-12-01

    The study was focused on assessment of antibacterial activity, cytotoxicity and immune compatibility of biogenic silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) synthesized from Streptomyces sp. NH28 strain. Nanoparticles were biosynthesized and characterized by UV-Vis spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, nanoparticle tracking analysis system and zeta potential. Antibacterial activity was tested against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria; minimal inhibitory concentration was recorded. Cytotoxicity was estimated using L929 mouse fibroblasts via 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide test. Biocompatibility of AgNPs was performed using THP1-XBlue™ cells. Biogenic AgNPs presented high antibacterial activity against all tested bacteria. Minimum inhibitory concentration of AgNPs against bacterial cells was found to be in range of 1.25-10 μg/mL. Silver nanoparticles did not show any harmful interaction to mouse fibroblast cell line, and no activation of nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B (NF-κB) cells was observed at concentration below 10 µg/mL. The half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) value was established at 64.5 μg/mL. Biological synthesis of silver can be used as an effective system for formation of metal nanoparticles. Biosynthesized AgNPs can be used as an antibacterial agent, which can be safe for eukaryotic cells.

  2. [Update on antibiotic resistance in Gram-positive bacteria].

    PubMed

    Lozano, Carmen; Torres, Carmen

    2017-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance among Gram-positive bacteria, especially in Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecium, Enterococcus faecalis, and Streptococcus pneumoniae, is a serious threat to public health. These microorganisms have multiple resistance mechanisms to agents currently used in clinical practice. Many of these resistance mechanisms are common to all 4 of these bacterial species, but other mechanisms seem to be more specific. The prevalence and dissemination of these mechanisms varies considerably, depending on the microorganism. This review discusses the resistance mechanisms to the most clinically relevant antibiotics, with particular emphasis on the new mechanisms described for widely used antibiotics and for newer agents such as lipopeptides, lipoglycopeptides, glycylcyclines and oxazolidinones.

  3. Di-N-Methylation of Anti-Gram-Positive Aminoglycoside-Derived Membrane Disruptors Improves Antimicrobial Potency and Broadens Spectrum to Gram-Negative Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Benhamou, Raphael I; Shaul, Pazit; Herzog, Ido M; Fridman, Micha

    2015-11-09

    The effect of di-N-methylation of bacterial membrane disruptors derived from aminoglycosides (AGs) on antimicrobial activity is reported. Di-N-methylation of cationic amphiphiles derived from several diversely structured AGs resulted in a significant increase in hydrophobicity compared to the parent compounds that improved their interactions with membrane lipids. The modification led to an enhancement in antibacterial activity and a broader antimicrobial spectrum. While the parent compounds were either modestly active or inactive against Gram-negative pathogens, the corresponding di-N-methylated compounds were potent against the tested Gram-negative as well as Gram-positive bacterial strains. The reported modification offers a robust strategy for the development of broad-spectrum membrane-disrupting antibiotics for topical use.

  4. Enhanced antibacterial activity of copper/copper oxide nanowires prepared by pulsed laser ablation in water medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swarnkar, R. K.; Pandey, J. K.; Soumya, K. K.; Dwivedi, P.; Sundaram, S.; Prasad, Sanjay; Gopal, R.

    2016-07-01

    Copper/copper oxide nanowires (NWs) are well known for its antibacterial activity against various pathogens. In the present study, we have shown the enhanced antibacterial activity of the NWs against gram-negative bacterial strains ( Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Salmonella typhi) and gram-positive bacterial strains ( Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus). The increase in the activity is because of the shape and size of the colloidal NWs which were prepared at room temperature in a one-step process by pulsed laser ablation of copper metal target. The purity, shape and size of the colloidal NWs were well characterized by UV-visible absorption spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The NWs were of diameters in the range of 15-30 nm and lengths ranging from 200 to 600 nm. The dose-dependent antibacterial activity of these NWs was found to be more effective against gram-negative bacteria compared to gram-positive bacteria. As gram-negative bacteria have thinner layer of cell wall made up of peptidoglycan possibly which makes them more susceptible to Cu/Cu2O NWs, Cu/Cu2O NWs can be a potent candidate to be used as bactericidal or as growth inhibitor.

  5. Antibacterial, antifungal and antiviral activity of propolis of different geographic origin.

    PubMed

    Kujumgiev, A; Tsvetkova, I; Serkedjieva, Y; Bankova, V; Christov, R; Popov, S

    1999-03-01

    Propolis samples from different geographic origins were investigated for their antibacterial (against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli), antifungal (against Candida albicans) and antiviral (against Avian influenza virus) activities. All samples were active against the fungal and Gram-positive bacterial test strains, and most showed antiviral activity. The activities of all samples were similar in spite of the differences in their chemical composition. In samples from the temperate zone, flavonoids and esters of phenolic acids are known to be responsible for the above mentioned activities of bee glue; tropical samples did not contain such substances but showed similar activities. Obviously, in different samples, different substance combinations are essential for the biological activity of the bee glue. It seems that propolis has general pharmacological value as a natural mixture and not as a source of new powerful antimicrobial, antifungal and antiviral compounds.

  6. Novel antibacterial polypeptide laparaxin produced by Lactobacillus paracasei strain NRRL B-50314 via fermentation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study reports the production and characterization of a novel antibacterial polypeptide, designated laparaxin, which is secreted by Lactobacillus paracasei NRRL B-50314. Crude laparaxin has antibacterial activity against a wide variety of Gram-positive bacteria, including: lactic acid bacteria ...

  7. Novel antibacterial polypeptide produced by Lactobacillus paracasei strain NRRL B-50314

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study reports the production and characterization of a novel antibacterial polypeptide, designated as laparaxin, which is secreted by Lactobacillus paracasei NRRL B-50314. The crude laparaxin has antibacterial activity against a range of Gram-positive bacteria including the following: lactic a...

  8. Artemisia capillaris extracts as a green factory for the synthesis of silver nanoparticles with antibacterial activities.

    PubMed

    Park, Youmie; Noh, Hwa Jung; Han, Lina; Kim, Hyun-Seok; Kim, Yong-Jae; Choi, Jae Sue; Kim, Chong-Kook; Kim, Yeong Shik; Cho, Seonho

    2012-09-01

    We report a green synthesis of silver nanoparticles that uses extracts from the aerial part of Artemisia capillaris. Both water and 70% ethanol extracts successfully generated silver nanoparticles. The formation of silver nanoparticles was confirmed by surface plasmon resonance bands, Fourier transform-infrared spectra, high resolution-transmission electron and atomic force microscopic images. Various shapes of silver nanoparticles were generated with an average diameter of 29.71 nm with water extract and 29.62 nm with 70% ethanol extract. An improvement in antibacterial activity (MIC 8.35-16.7 microg/mL) was observed against a total of twenty different strains of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. A remarkable enhancement (approximately 12-fold) was observed against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Enterobacter cloacae, Klebsiella oxytoca, and Klebsiella areogenes when compared with the extract alone. Silver nanoparticles produced by the 70% ethanol extract showed slightly higher antibacterial activity than those generated with the water extract. The correlation between total flavonoid content of each extract and the antibacterial activity did not exert any significant relationships. This report suggests that plant extracts have the potential to be used as powerful reducing agents for the production of biocompatible silver nanoparticles possessing enhanced antibacterial activities.

  9. Synthesis and antibacterial activity evaluation of two androgen derivatives.

    PubMed

    Lauro, Figueroa-Valverde; Francisco, Díaz-Cedillo; Elodia, García-Cervera; Eduardo, Pool-Gómez; Maria, López-Ramos; Marcela, Rosas-Nexticapa; Lenin, Hau-Heredia; Bety, Sarabia-Alcocer

    2015-01-01

    In this study two androgen derivatives were synthesized using several strategies; the first stage an aza-steroid derivative (3) was developed by the reaction of a testosterone derivative (1) with thiourea (2) in presence of hydrogen chloride. The second step, involves the synthesis of an amino-steroid derivative (4) by the reaction of 1 with 2 using boric acid as catalyst. The third stage was achieved by the preparation of an aminoaza-androgen derivative (6) by the reaction of 3 with ethylenediamine using boric acid as catalyst. In addition, the compound 6 was made reacting with dihydrotestosterone to form a new androgen derivative (7) in presence of boric acid. The following step was achieved by the reaction of 7 with chloroacetyl chloride to synthesize an azetidinone-androgen derivative (8) using triethylamine as catalyst. Additionally, a thiourea-androgen derivative (9) was synthetized by the reaction of 4 with dihydrotestosterone using boric acid as catalyst. Finally, the compound 9 was made reacting with chloroacetyl chloride in presence of triethylamine to synthesize a new azetidinone-androgen derivative (10). On the other hand, antibacterial activity of compounds synthesized was evaluated on Gram negative (Escherichia coli and Vibrio cholerae) and Gram positive (Staphylococos aureus) bacteria. The results indicate that only the compound 3 and 8 decrease the growth bacterial of E. coli and V. cholerae. Nevertheless, growth bacterial of S. aureus was not inhibited by these compounds. These data indicate that antibacterial activity exerted by the compounds 3 and 8 depend of their structure chemical in comparison with the controls and other androgen derivatives that are involved in this study.

  10. Highly bacterial resistant silver nanoparticles: synthesis and antibacterial activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chudasama, Bhupendra; Vala, Anjana K.; Andhariya, Nidhi; Mehta, R. V.; Upadhyay, R. V.

    2010-06-01

    In this article, we describe a simple one-pot rapid synthesis route to produce uniform silver nanoparticles by thermal reduction of AgNO3 using oleylamine as reducing and capping agent. To enhance the dispersal ability of as-synthesized hydrophobic silver nanoparticles in water, while maintaining their unique properties, a facile phase transfer mechanism has been developed using biocompatible block co-polymer pluronic F-127. Formation of silver nanoparticles is confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and UV-vis spectroscopy. Hydrodynamic size and its distribution are obtained from dynamic light scattering (DLS). Hydrodynamic size and size distribution of as-synthesized and phase transferred silver nanoparticles are 8.2 ± 1.5 nm (σ = 18.3%) and 31.1 ± 4.5 nm (σ = 14.5%), respectively. Antimicrobial activities of hydrophilic silver nanoparticles is tested against two Gram positive ( Bacillus megaterium and Staphylococcus aureus), and three Gram negative ( Escherichia coli, Proteus vulgaris and Shigella sonnei) bacteria. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values obtained in the present study for the tested microorganisms are found much better than those reported for commercially available antibacterial agents.

  11. Essential oil composition and antibacterial activity of Monticalia greenmaniana (Asteraceae).

    PubMed

    Cárdenas, José; Rojas, Janne; Rojas-Fermin, Luís; Lucena, María; Buitrago, Alexis

    2012-02-01

    The essential oils from fresh aerial parts of Monticalia greenmaniana (Hieron) C. Jeffrey (Asteraceae) collected in March, were analyzed by GC/MS. Oil yields (w/v) of 0.1% (flowers), 0.07%, (stems) and 0.1% (leaves) were obtained by hydrodistillation. Thirteen, sixteen and eighteen components, respectively, were identified by comparison of their mass spectra with those in the Wiley GC-MS Library data base. The major components of the flower and stem oils were 1-nonane (38.8% flowers; 33.5% stems), alpha-pinene (29.0% flowers; 14.8% stems) and germacrene D (15.6% flowers; 18.6% stems). However, in the leaf oil, germacrene D was observed at 50.7%, followed by beta-cedrene at 8.4%. The leaf essential oil showed a broad spectrum of antibacterial activity against the important human pathogenic Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 25923), Enterococcus faecalis (ATCC 19433), Escherichia coli (ATCC 25922), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ATCC 27853) and Klebsiella pneumoniae (ATCC 25955) with MIC values ranging from 75 to 6000 ppm.

  12. Review of meta-analyses of vancomycin compared with new treatments for Gram-positive skin and soft-tissue infections: Are we any clearer?

    PubMed

    Tsoulas, Christos; Nathwani, Dilip

    2015-07-01

    Vancomycin has been considered the standard of care for treatment of Gram-positive skin and soft-tissue infections (SSTIs). Its value has been questioned over the last decade owing to well acknowledged limitations in efficacy and tolerability and the emergence of newer meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)-active antibacterial agents. However, no single agent has shown better results versus vancomycin in SSTI trials. The aim of this review was to identify and summarise data from meta-analyses (MAs) for the treatment of Gram-positive and MRSA SSTIs. A systematic search identified 21 published MAs examining the use of newer antibiotics and vancomycin in SSTIs. In terms of clinical and microbiological efficacy, linezolid (in Gram-positive and MRSA SSTIs) and telavancin (in MRSA SSTIs) were shown to be more effective than vancomycin. The safety of newer antimicrobials in general was comparable with vancomycin, except for telavancin, which was associated with more severe adverse events (AEs), and tigecycline owing to an all-cause mortality imbalance observed in all infections but not confirmed in SSTIs. Specific AEs were related to the use of newer agents, such as nephrotoxicity for telavancin, creatine phosphokinase elevations for daptomycin, and thrombocytopenia with linezolid. Some evidence suggests that daptomycin could be associated with reduced treatment duration, and linezolid with reduced length of intravenous treatment and hospital length of stay compared with vancomycin. Considering the limitations of this type of research and the comparative efficacy results demonstrated in head-to-head randomised controlled trials, data are still not sufficient to support the widespread use of new agents over vancomycin.

  13. Andrographolide: antibacterial activity against common bacteria of human health concern and possible mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Malabika; Parai, Debaprasad; Chattopadhyay, Subrata; Mukherjee, Samir Kumar

    2017-01-17

    Increasing bacterial resistance to common drugs is a major public health concern for the treatment of infectious diseases. Certain naturally occurring compounds of plant sources have long been reported to possess potential antimicrobial activity. This study was aimed to investigate the antibacterial activity and possible mechanism of action of andrographolide (Andro), a diterpenoid lactone from a traditional medicinal herb Andrographis paniculata. Extent of antibacterial action was assessed by minimal bactericidal concentration method. Radiolabeled N-acetyl glucosamine, leucine, thymidine, and uridine were used to determine the effect of Andro on the biosyntheses of cell wall, protein, DNA, and RNA, respectively. In addition, anti-biofilm potential of this compound was also tested. Andro showed potential antibacterial activity against most of the tested Gram-positive bacteria. Among those, Staphylococcus aureus was found to be most sensitive with a minimal inhibitory concentration value of 100 μg/mL. It was found to be bacteriostatic. Specific inhibition of intracellular DNA biosynthesis was observed in a dose-dependent manner in S. aureus. Andro mediated inhibition of biofilm formation by S. aureus was also found. Considering its antimicrobial potency, Andro might be accounted as a promising lead for new antibacterial drug development.

  14. Synthesis, characterization, and antibacterial activities of novel methacrylate polymers containing norfloxacin.

    PubMed

    Dizman, Bekir; Elasri, Mohamed O; Mathias, Lon J

    2005-01-01

    A novel methacrylate monomer containing a quinolone moiety was synthesized and homopolymerized in N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) by using azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN) as an initiator. The new monomer was copolymerized with poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate (MPEGMA) in DMF using the same initiator. The monomer, homopolymer, and copolymer were characterized by elemental analysis, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), size exclusion chromatography (SEC), FTIR, (13)C NMR, and (1)H NMR. The antibacterial activities of the monomer as well as polymers were investigated against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli, which are representative of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, respectively. All compounds showed excellent antibacterial activities against these two types of bacteria. The antibacterial activities were determined using the shaking flask method, where 25 mg/mL concentrations of each compound were tested against 10(5) CFU/mL bacteria solutions. The number of viable bacteria was calculated by using the spread plate method, where 100 microL of the incubated antibacterial agent in bacteria solutions were spread on agar plates and the number of viable bacteria was counted after 24 h of incubation period at 37 degrees C.

  15. In Vitro Antibacterial Activity of Rhodanine Derivatives against Pathogenic Clinical Isolates

    PubMed Central

    AbdelKhalek, Ahmed; Ashby, Charles R.; Patel, Bhargav A.; Talele, Tanaji T.; Seleem, Mohamed N.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial infections present a serious challenge to healthcare practitioners due to the emergence of resistance to numerous conventional antibacterial drugs. Therefore, new bacterial targets and new antimicrobials are unmet medical needs. Rhodanine derivatives have been shown to possess potent antimicrobial activity via a novel mechanism. However, their potential use as antibacterials has not been fully examined. In this study, we determined the spectrum of activity of seven rhodanine derivatives (compounds Rh 1–7) against clinical isolates of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial strains and Candida albicans. We also synthesized and tested three additional compounds, ethyl ester and amide of rhodanine 2 (Rh 8 and Rh 10, respectively) and ethyl ester of rhodanine 3 (Rh 9) to determine the significance of the carboxyl group modification towards antibacterial activity and human serum albumin binding. A broth microdilution assay confirmed Rh 1–7 exhibit bactericidal activity against Gram-positive pathogens. Rh 2 had significant activity against various vancomycin-resistant (MIC90 = 4 μM) and methicillin-resistant (MIC90 = 4 μM) Staphylococcus aureus (VRSA and MRSA), Staphylococcus epidermidis (MIC = 4 μM) and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE) strains (MIC90 = 8 μM). The rhodanine compounds exhibited potent activity against Bacillus spp., including Bacillus anthracis, with MIC range of 2–8 μM. In addition, they had potent activity against Clostridium difficile. The most potent compound, Rh 2, at 4 and 8 times its MIC, significantly decreased S. epidermidis biofilm mass by more than 35% and 45%, respectively. None of the rhodanine compounds showed antimicrobial activity (MIC > 128 μM) against various 1) Gram-negative pathogens (Acinetobacter baumannii, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumonia, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Salmonella Typhimurium) or 2) strains of Candida albicans (MIC > 64 μM). The MTS assay confirmed that rhodanines were not toxic to

  16. Synthesis and evaluation of isatin-β-thiosemicarbazones as novel agents against antibiotic-resistant Gram-positive bacterial species.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xu-Meng; Guo, Hui; Li, Zai-Shun; Song, Fu-Hang; Wang, Wei-Min; Dai, Huan-Qin; Zhang, Li-Xin; Wang, Jian-Guo

    2015-08-28

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE) have caused an increasing mortality rate, which means that antibiotic resistance is becoming an important health issue. In the course to screen new agents for resistant bacteria, we identified that a series of isatin-β-thiosemicarbazones (IBTs) could inhibit the growth of MRSA and VRE. This was the first time that the "familiar" IBT compounds exhibited significant anti Gram-positive pathogen activity. Against a clinical isolated MRSA strain, 20 of the 51 synthesized compounds showed minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) data of 0.78 mg/L and another 12 novel compounds had MICs of 0.39 mg/L. Moreover, these compounds also inhibited Enterococcus faecalis and VRE at similar levels, indicating that IBTs might have different mode of action compared with vancomycin. For these IBTs, comparative field analysis (CoMFA) models were further established to understand the structure-activity relationships in order to design new compounds from steric and electrostatic contributions. This work has suggested that IBTs can be considered as potential lead compounds to discover antibacterial inhibitors to combat drug resistance.

  17. The Antibacterial Activity of Cassia fistula Organic Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Seyyednejad, Seyyed Mansour; Motamedi, Hossein; Vafei, Mouzhan; Bakhtiari, Ameneh

    2014-01-01

    Background: Cassia fistula, is a flowering plant and a member of Fabaceae family. Its leaves are compound of 4 - 8 pairs of opposite leaflets. There are many Cassia species around the world which are used in herbal medicine. Objectives: This study was designed to examine in vitro anti-bacterial activity of methanolic and ethanolic extracts of C. fistula native to Khuzestan, Iran. Materials and Methods: The microbial inhibitory effect of methanolic and ethanolic extracts of C. fistula was tested on 3 Gram positive: Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus and S. epidermidis and 5 Gram negative: Salmonella Typhi, Kelebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Proteus mirabilis bacterial species using disc diffusion method at various concentrations. The minimum inhibitory and bactericidal concentrations (MIC and MBC) were measured by the tube dilution assay. Results: The extract of C. fistula was effective against B. cereus, S. aureus, S. epidermidis, E. coli and K. pneumoniae. The most susceptible microorganisms to ethanolic and methanolic extracts were E. coli and K. pneumoniae, respectively. Also B. cereus and S. aureus showed the least sensitivity to ethanolic and methanolic extracts, respectively. The MIC (minimum inhibitory concentration) and MBC (minimum bactericidal concentration) of ethanolic extracts against S. aureus, E. coli, S. epidermidis and K. pneumoniae were also determined. Conclusions: With respect to the obtained results and regarding to the daily increase of the resistant microbial strains to the commercial antibiotics, it can be concluded that these extracts can be proper candidates of antibacterial substance against pathogenic bacterial species especially S. aureus, E. coli, K. pneumoniae and S. epidermidis. PMID:25147664

  18. In vitro antibacterial and cytotoxic activities of different parts of plant Swietenia mahagony.

    PubMed

    Haque, M; Ullah, M Obayed; Nahar, K

    2009-04-01

    Crude extracts from different parts (leaf, bark and seed) of Swietenia mahagony (Family: Meliaceae) were screened for their antibacterial activity against 4 Gram positive and 8 Gram negative bacteria. Disc diffusion technique was used for in vitro screening. Among the crude extracts, chloroform and ethyl acetate extracts of leaf and bark showed good activity against all the tested organisms. The chloroform and ethyl acetate extracts of seed exhibited little or positive effect against most of the tested bacteria. The activities were compared to a standard antibiotic-kanamycin. Cytotoxic activity of crude extracts were determined using brine shrimp lethality bioassay and standard vincristine sulphate was used as positive control. The chloroform extract of seed and ethyl acetate extract of bark showed good cytotoxic activities and the LC50 values were found 13.75 and 11.64 microg mL(-1), respectively.

  19. [Strategies for management of resistant Gram-positive infections: from S. pneumoniae to MRSA].

    PubMed

    Cristini, Francesco

    2007-09-01

    S. pneumoniae and methicillin-resistant S. aureus are the main Gram-positive pathogens responsible for severe infections. In the context of community infections S. pneumoniae is the leading Gram-positive pathogen causing severe infections such as purulent meningitis and pneumonia. The typical pattern of antibiotic sensitivity of this bacterium, frequently resistant to macrolides and with significantly reduced sensitivity to penicillin, is only a relative therapeutic problem in that the preserved sensitivity to third-generation cephalosporins and respiratory fluoroquinolones is sufficient to make these antibiotics valid therapeutic solutions without having to use the latest generation of drugs. On the other hand, methicillin-resistant S. aureus, one of the main bacteria responsible for nosocomial infections such as bacteraemia and respiratory tract infections in severely ill patients, is a more challenging therapeutic problem since, historically, the therapeutic options available in clinical practice have been fewer and essentially limited to glycopeptides. The recent availability of oxazolidinones and the pharmacologically more rational and appropriate use of the glycopeptides have undoubtedly brought substantial benefits; the imminent introduction of new molecules active against Gram-positive pathogens will certainly make an important contribution, although their use in clinical practice will need to be monitored.

  20. Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria differ in their sensitivity to cold plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mai-Prochnow, Anne; Clauson, Maryse; Hong, Jungmi; Murphy, Anthony B.

    2016-12-01

    Cold atmospheric-pressure plasma (CAP) is a relatively new method being investigated for antimicrobial activity. However, the exact mode of action is still being explored. Here we report that CAP efficacy is directly correlated to bacterial cell wall thickness in several species. Biofilms of Gram positive Bacillus subtilis, possessing a 55.4 nm cell wall, showed the highest resistance to CAP, with less than one log10 reduction after 10 min treatment. In contrast, biofilms of Gram negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa, possessing only a 2.4 nm cell wall, were almost completely eradicated using the same treatment conditions. Planktonic cultures of Gram negative Pseudomonas libanensis also had a higher log10 reduction than Gram positive Staphylococcus epidermidis. Mixed species biofilms of P. aeruginosa and S. epidermidis showed a similar trend of Gram positive bacteria being more resistant to CAP treatment. However, when grown in co-culture, Gram negative P. aeruginosa was more resistant to CAP overall than as a mono-species biofilm. Emission spectra indicated OH and O, capable of structural cell wall bond breakage, were present in the plasma. This study indicates that cell wall thickness correlates with CAP inactivation times of bacteria, but cell membranes and biofilm matrix are also likely to play a role.

  1. Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria differ in their sensitivity to cold plasma

    PubMed Central

    Mai-Prochnow, Anne; Clauson, Maryse; Hong, Jungmi; Murphy, Anthony B.

    2016-01-01

    Cold atmospheric-pressure plasma (CAP) is a relatively new method being investigated for antimicrobial activity. However, the exact mode of action is still being explored. Here we report that CAP efficacy is directly correlated to bacterial cell wall thickness in several species. Biofilms of Gram positive Bacillus subtilis, possessing a 55.4 nm cell wall, showed the highest resistance to CAP, with less than one log10 reduction after 10 min treatment. In contrast, biofilms of Gram negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa, possessing only a 2.4 nm cell wall, were almost completely eradicated using the same treatment conditions. Planktonic cultures of Gram negative Pseudomonas libanensis also had a higher log10 reduction than Gram positive Staphylococcus epidermidis. Mixed species biofilms of P. aeruginosa and S. epidermidis showed a similar trend of Gram positive bacteria being more resistant to CAP treatment. However, when grown in co-culture, Gram negative P. aeruginosa was more resistant to CAP overall than as a mono-species biofilm. Emission spectra indicated OH and O, capable of structural cell wall bond breakage, were present in the plasma. This study indicates that cell wall thickness correlates with CAP inactivation times of bacteria, but cell membranes and biofilm matrix are also likely to play a role. PMID:27934958

  2. Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria differ in their sensitivity to cold plasma.

    PubMed

    Mai-Prochnow, Anne; Clauson, Maryse; Hong, Jungmi; Murphy, Anthony B

    2016-12-09

    Cold atmospheric-pressure plasma (CAP) is a relatively new method being investigated for antimicrobial activity. However, the exact mode of action is still being explored. Here we report that CAP efficacy is directly correlated to bacterial cell wall thickness in several species. Biofilms of Gram positive Bacillus subtilis, possessing a 55.4 nm cell wall, showed the highest resistance to CAP, with less than one log10 reduction after 10 min treatment. In contrast, biofilms of Gram negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa, possessing only a 2.4 nm cell wall, were almost completely eradicated using the same treatment conditions. Planktonic cultures of Gram negative Pseudomonas libanensis also had a higher log10 reduction than Gram positive Staphylococcus epidermidis. Mixed species biofilms of P. aeruginosa and S. epidermidis showed a similar trend of Gram positive bacteria being more resistant to CAP treatment. However, when grown in co-culture, Gram negative P. aeruginosa was more resistant to CAP overall than as a mono-species biofilm. Emission spectra indicated OH and O, capable of structural cell wall bond breakage, were present in the plasma. This study indicates that cell wall thickness correlates with CAP inactivation times of bacteria, but cell membranes and biofilm matrix are also likely to play a role.

  3. Improvement of antibacterial activity of some sulfa drugs through linkage to certain phthalazin-1(2H)-one scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Hany S; Eldehna, Wagdy M; Abdel-Aziz, Hatem A; Elaasser, Mahmoud M; Abdel-Aziz, Marwa M

    2014-10-06

    RAB1 5 is a lead antibacterial agent in which trimethoprim is linked to phthalazine moiety. Similarly, our strategy in this research depends on the interconnection between some sulfa drugs and certain phthalazin-1(2H)-one scaffolds in an attempt to enhance their antibacterial activity. This approach was achieved through the combination of 4-substituted phthalazin-1(2H)-ones 9a, b or 14a, b with sulfanilamide 1a, sulfathiazole 1b or sulfadiazine 1c through amide linkers 6a, b to produce the target compounds 10a-d and 15a-e, respectively. The antibacterial activity of the newly synthesized compounds showed that all tested compounds have antibacterial activity higher than that of their reference sulfa drugs 1a-c. Compound 10c represented the highest antibacterial activity against Gram-positive bacteria Streptococcus pneumonia and Staphylococcus aureus with MIC = 0.39 μmol/mL. Moreover, compound 10d displayed excellent antibacterial activity against Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium with MIC = 0.39 and 0.78 μmol/mL, respectively.

  4. In vitro and in vivo antibacterial activities of CS-023 (RO4908463), a novel parenteral carbapenem.

    PubMed

    Koga, Tetsufumi; Abe, Tomomi; Inoue, Harumi; Takenouchi, Takashi; Kitayama, Akiko; Yoshida, Tatsuhiko; Masuda, Nobuhisa; Sugihara, Chika; Kakuta, Masayo; Nakagawa, Miyuki; Shibayama, Takahiro; Matsushita, Yoko; Hirota, Takashi; Ohya, Satoshi; Utsui, Yukio; Fukuoka, Takashi; Kuwahara, Syogo

    2005-08-01

    CS-023 (RO4908463, formerly R-115685) is a novel 1beta-methylcarbapenem with 5-substituted pyrrolidin-3-ylthio groups, including an amidine moiety at the C-2 position. Its antibacterial activity was tested against 1,214 clinical isolates of 32 species and was compared with those of imipenem, meropenem, ceftazidime, ceftriaxone, ampicillin, amikacin, and levofloxacin. CS-023 exhibited a broad spectrum of activity against gram-positive and -negative aerobes and anaerobes, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis, penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae (PRSP), beta-lactamase-negative ampicillin-resistant Haemophilus influenzae, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. CS-023 showed the most potent activity among the compounds tested against P. aeruginosa and MRSA, with MICs at which 90% of isolates tested were inhibited of 4 microg/ml and 8 microg/ml, respectively. CS-023 was stable against hydrolysis by the beta-lactamases from Enterobacter cloacae and Proteus vulgaris. CS-023 also showed potent activity against extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli. The in vivo efficacy of CS-023 was evaluated with a murine systemic infection model induced by 13 strains of gram-positive and -negative pathogens and a lung infection model induced by 2 strains of PRSP (serotypes 6 and 19). Against the systemic infections with PRSP, MRSA, and P. aeruginosa and the lung infections, the efficacy of CS-023 was comparable to those of imipenem/cilastatin and vancomycin (tested against lung infections only) and superior to those of meropenem, ceftriaxone, and ceftazidime (tested against P. aeruginosa infections only). These results suggest that CS-023 has potential for the treatment of nosocomial bacterial infections by gram-positive and -negative pathogens, including MRSA and P. aeruginosa.

  5. Particle-Cell Contact Enhances Antibacterial Activity of Silver Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Bondarenko, Olesja; Ivask, Angela; Käkinen, Aleksandr; Kurvet, Imbi; Kahru, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Background It is generally accepted that antibacterial properties of Ag nanoparticles (AgNPs) are dictated by their dissolved fraction. However, dissolution-based concept alone does not fully explain the toxic potency of nanoparticulate silver compared to silver ions. Methodology/Principal Findings Herein, we demonstrated that the direct contact between bacterial cell and AgNPs' surface enhanced the toxicity of nanosilver. More specifically, cell-NP contact increased the cellular uptake of particle-associated Ag ions – the single and ultimate cause of toxicity. To prove that, we evaluated the toxicity of three different AgNPs (uncoated, PVP-coated and protein-coated) to six bacterial strains: Gram-negative Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas fluorescens, P. putida and P. aeruginosa and Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus. While the toxicity of AgNO3 to these bacteria varied only slightly (the 4-h EC50 ranged from 0.3 to 1.2 mg Ag/l), the 4-h EC50 values of protein-coated AgNPs for various bacterial strains differed remarkably, from 0.35 to 46 mg Ag/l. By systematically comparing the intracellular and extracellular free Ag+ liberated from AgNPs, we demonstrated that not only extracellular dissolution in the bacterial test environment but also additional dissolution taking place at the particle-cell interface played an essential role in antibacterial action of AgNPs. The role of the NP-cell contact in dictating the antibacterial activity of Ag-NPs was additionally proven by the following observations: (i) separation of bacterial cells from AgNPs by particle-impermeable membrane (cut-off 20 kDa, ∼4 nm) significantly reduced the toxicity of AgNPs and (ii) P. aeruginosa cells which tended to attach onto AgNPs, exhibited the highest sensitivity to all forms of nanoparticulate Ag. Conclusions/Significance Our findings provide new insights into the mode of antibacterial action of nanosilver and explain some discrepancies in this field, showing that

  6. Evaluation of antibacterial and anthelmintic activities with total phenolic contents of Piper betel leaves

    PubMed Central

    Akter, Kazi Nahid; Karmakar, Palash; Das, Abhijit; Anonna, Shamima Nasrin; Shoma, Sharmin Akter; Sattar, Mohammad Mafruhi

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The study was conducted to investigate the antibacterial and anthelmintic activities and to determine total phenolic contents of methanolic extract of Piper betel leaves. Materials and Methods: The extract was subjected to assay for antibacterial activity using both gram positive and gram negative bacterial strains through disc diffusion method; anthelmintic activity with the determination of paralysis and death time using earthworm (Pheritima posthuma) at five different concentrations and the determination of total phenolic contents using the Folin-ciocalteau method. Results: The extract showed significant (p<0.01) zone of inhibitions against gram positive Staphylococcus aureus [(6.77±0.25) mm] and Gram negative Escherichia coli [(8.53±0.25) mm], Salmonella typhi [(5.20±0.26) mm], Shigella dysenteriae [(11.20±0.26) mm] compared to positive control Azithromycin (ranging from 20.10±0.17 to 25.20±0.35 mm) while no zone inhibitory activity was found for both the extract and the standard drug against Gram positive Bacillus cereus. The extract also showed potent anthelmintic activity requiring less time for paralysis and death compared to the standard drug albendazole (10 mg/ml). At concentrations 10, 20, 40, 60 and 80 mg/ml, leaves extract showed paralysis at mean time of 9.83±0.60, 8.50±0.29, 6.60±0.17, 6.20±0.44 and 4.16±0.60; death at 11.33±0.88, 9.67±0.33, 7.83±0.17, 7.16±0.60 and 5.16±0.72 minutes, respectively. Whereas the standard drug showed paralysis and death at 19.33±0.71 and 51.00±0.23 minutes respectively. The extract confirmed the higher concentration of phenolic contents (124.42±0.14 mg of GAE /g of extract) when screened for total phenolic compounds. Conclusion: As results confirmed potential antibacterial and anthelmintic activities of Piper betel leaves extract, therefore it may be processed for further drug research. PMID:25386394

  7. Antibacterial activity of silver: the role of hydrodynamic particle size at nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Khurana, Chandni; Vala, Anjana K; Andhariya, Nidhi; Pandey, O P; Chudasama, Bhupendra

    2014-10-01

    Silver shows the highest antimicrobial activities amongst all metals. It is better than many first line antibiotics. The antimicrobial properties of silver can be tuned by altering its physical and surface properties. Researchers have demonstrated enhancement in the antibacterial properties of silver with decreasing particle size from bulk to nano. In the present article, we study the effect of particle size of silver at nanoscale on their antimicrobial properties. Two samples of silver nanoparticles (SNPs) of same physical size (≈8 nm) but different hydrodynamic size (59 and 83 nm) are prepared by chemical reduction of AgNO3 with oleylamine followed by phase transfer with triblock copolymer Pluronic F-127. Their antimicrobial properties are investigated by microdilution method against clinically important strains of gram positive (S. aureus and B. megaterium) and gram negative (P. vulgaris and S. sonnei) bacteria. Nearly 38-50% enhancement in the antibacterial action of SNPs was observed when their hydrodynamic size was reduced to 59 nm from 83 nm. It has been observed that the antibacterial action of SNPs was governed by their hydrodynamic size and not by their crystallite and physical size. The phenomenological model was also proposed which makes an attempt to explain the microscopic mechanism responsible for the size dependent antibacterial activities of silver.

  8. Controlling the antibacterial activity of CuSn thin films by varying the contents of Sn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Yujin; Park, Juyun; Kim, Dong-Woo; Kim, Hakjun; Kang, Yong-Cheol

    2016-12-01

    We investigated antibacterial activity of CuSn thin films against Gram positive Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus). CuSn thin films with different Cu to Sn ratios were deposited on Si(100) by radio frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering method using Cu and Sn metal anodes. The film thickness was fixed at 200 nm by varying the sputtering time and RF power on the metal targets. The antibacterial test was conducted in various conditions such as different contact times and Cu to Sn ratios in the CuSn films. The antibacterial activities of CuSn thin films increased as the ratio of Cu and the contact time between the film and bacteria suspension increased execpt in the case of CuSn-83. The oxidation states of Cu and Sn and the chemical composition of CuSn thin films before and after the antibacterial test were investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). When the contact time was fixed, the Cu species was further oxidized as the RF power on Cu target increased. The intensity of Sn 3d decreased with increasing Cu ratio. When the sample was fixed, the peak intensity of Sn 3d decreased as the contact time increased due to the permeation of Sn into the cell.

  9. Antibacterial activities of novel nicotinic acid hydrazides and their conversion into N-acetyl-1,3,4-oxadiazoles.

    PubMed

    Morjan, Rami Y; Mkadmh, Ahmed M; Beadham, Ian; Elmanama, Abdelrauof A; Mattar, Mohammed R; Raftery, James; Pritchard, Robin G; Awadallah, Adel M; Gardiner, John M

    2014-12-15

    Synthesis of a series of novel N-acylhydrazones of nicotinic acid hydrazides 3a-j via condensation of nicotinic acid hydrazide 1 with the corresponding aldehydes and ketones is described. The series 3a-j was evaluated for in vitro antibacterial activity against two gram negative (Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumoniae) and two gram positive (Streptococcus pneumoniae and Staphylococcus aureus) bacteria. The zone of inhibition was measured using the disk diffusion method, and in vitro minimum inhibitory concentration indicating that compounds 3a and 3e were effective against P. aeruginosa with MICs of 0.220 and 0.195 μg respectively.

  10. Tandem affinity purification vectors for use in gram positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiao; Doherty, Geoff P; Lewis, Peter J

    2008-01-01

    Tandem affinity purification has become a valuable tool for the isolation of protein complexes. Here we describe the construction and use of a series of plasmid vectors for Gram positive bacteria. The vectors utilize the SPA tag as well as variants containing a 3C rather than the TEV protease site as 3C protease has been shown to work efficiently at the low temperatures (4 degrees C) used to isolate protein complexes. In addition, a further vector incorporates a GST moiety in place of the 3xFLAG of the SPA tag which provides an additional tagging option for situations where SPA binding may be inefficient. The vectors are all compatible with previously constructed fluorescent protein fusion vectors enabling construction of a suite of affinity and fluorescently tagged genes using a single PCR product.

  11. Response of gram-positive bacteria to copper stress.

    PubMed

    Solioz, Marc; Abicht, Helge K; Mermod, Mélanie; Mancini, Stefano

    2010-01-01

    The Gram-positive bacteria Enterococcus hirae, Lactococcus lactis, and Bacillus subtilis have received wide attention in the study of copper homeostasis. Consequently, copper extrusion by ATPases, gene regulation by copper, and intracellular copper chaperoning are understood in some detail. This has provided profound insight into basic principles of how organisms handle copper. It also emerged that many bacterial species may not require copper for life, making copper homeostatic systems pure defense mechanisms. Structural work on copper homeostatic proteins has given insight into copper coordination and bonding and has started to give molecular insight into copper handling in biological systems. Finally, recent biochemical work has shed new light on the mechanism of copper toxicity, which may not primarily be mediated by reactive oxygen radicals.

  12. Surface enhanced Raman scattering, antibacterial and antifungal active triangular gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smitha, S. L.; Gopchandran, K. G.

    2013-02-01

    Shape controlled syntheses of gold nanoparticles have attracted a great deal of attention as their optical, electronic, magnetic and biological properties are strongly dependent on the size and shape of the particles. Here is a report on the surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) activity of Cinnamomum zeylanicum leaf broth reduced gold nanoparticles consisting of triangular and spherical like particles, using 2-aminothiophenol (2-ATP) and crystal violet (CV) as probe molecules. Nanoparticles prepared with a minimum leaf broth concentration, having a greater number of triangular like particles exhibit a SERS activity of the order of 107. The synthesized nanoparticles exhibit efficient antibacterial activity against the tested gram negative bacterium Escherichia coli and gram positive bacterium Staphylococcus aureus. Investigations on the antifungal activity of the synthesized nanoparticles against Aspergillus niger and Fusarium oxysporum positive is also discussed.

  13. Antibacterial activities of Groebke-Blackburn-Bienaymé derived imidazo[1,2-a]pyridin-3-amines

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Nikunj M.; Salunke, Deepak B.; Yoo, Euna; Mutz, Cole A.; Balakrishna, Rajalakshmi; David, Sunil A.

    2012-01-01

    We sought to explore the imidazo[1,2-a]pyridin-3-amines for TLR7 (or 8)-modulatory activities. This chemotype, readily accessed via the Groebke-Blackburn-Bienaymé multi-component reaction, resulted in compounds that were TLR7/8-inactive, but exhibited bacteriostatic activity against Gram-positive bacteria, including methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). To investigate the mechanism of antibacterial activity of this new chemotype, a resistant strain of S. aureus was generated by serially passaging the organism in escalating doses of the most active analogue. A comparison of minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of known bacteriostatic agents in wild-type and resistant strains indicates a novel mechanism of action. Structure-activity relationship studies have led to the identification of positions on the scaffold for additional structural modifications that should allow for the introduction of probes designed to examine cognate binding partners and molecular targets, while not significantly compromising antibacterial potency. PMID:22925449

  14. Potential enhancement of antibacterial activity of graphene oxide-silver nanocomposite by introducing C2 carbon chain linkage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Hyosuk; Ahmed, Mohammad Shamsuddin; Lee, Kyungmi; Jeon, Seungwon; Lee, Chul Won

    2016-01-01

    Various carbon chain linkages were introduced during the process of synthesizing silver-nanoparticles (AgNPs)-decorated graphene nanocomposites [referred to as GO-Cx-Ag where, HS-(CH2)x-SH = Cx and x = 0, 2, or 4] to evaluate antibacterial properties. The nano-structures of GO-Cx-Ag were characterized using TEM and XPS, revealing that GO-C2-Ag comprises well-dispersed and smaller AgNPs anchored onto the surface of graphene sheets than the GO-C0-Ag and GO-C4-Ag. The antibacterial activities of those nanocomposites were assessed using paper-disk diffusion and minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) methods against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. The results showed that carbon chain linkers enhanced the antibacterial activity against Gram-negative Salmonella typhimurium and Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus. In particular, GO-C2-Ag showed higher antibacterial activity than GO-C0-Ag and GO-C4-Ag due to nearly eight times higher reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation which determined by fluorescence-based ROS detection experiment. Also, LC-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (LC-ICP-MS) demonstrated that the Ag release from GO-Cx-Ag was insignificant (0.03%). However, the higher ROS formation from GO-C2-Ag was facilitated by higher dispersion, smaller size, and well attachment of AgNPs with AgO species onto graphene sheets. These results suggest that the medium length carbon chain linkers in between Ag and GO can be utilized to improve antibacterial activity.

  15. Antibacterial and antioxidant activities in Sideritis italica (Miller) Greuter et Burdet essential oils.

    PubMed

    Basile, Adriana; Senatore, Felice; Gargano, Rosalba; Sorbo, Sergio; Del Pezzo, Marisa; Lavitola, Alfredo; Ritieni, Alberto; Bruno, Maurizio; Spatuzzi, Daniela; Rigano, Daniela; Vuotto, Maria Luisa

    2006-09-19

    Sideritis italica (Miller) Greuter et Burdet is a widespread Lamiacea in the Mediterranean region used in traditional medicine. Essential oils were antibacterial against nine ATCC and as many clinically isolated Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial strains. Antibacterial activity was also found against Helicobacter pylori: a dose-dependant inhibition was shown between 5 and 25 microg/ml. The antibacterial activity of the oils was expressed as MICs (minimum inhibitory concentrations) and MBCs (minimum bactericidal concentrations). At a concentration between 3.9 and 250 microg/ml the oils showed a significant antibacterial effect against both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. In particular the ATCC strains Pseudomonas aeruginosa (MIC=3.9 microg/ml and 7.8 for flowerheads and leaves, respectively), Proteus mirabilis (MIC=15.6 and 7.8 microg/ml), Salmonella typhi (MIC=7.8 microg/ml) and Proteus vulgaris (MIC=15.6 microg/ml) were the most inhibited. Only Pseudomonas aeruginosa showed MBC at a concentration between 62.6 and 125 microg/ml. The antioxidant activity of the essential oils was evaluated by two cell free colorimetric methods: ABTS and DMPD; leaf oil is more active (4.29 +/- 0.02 trolox equivalents and 4.53 +/- 0.67 ascorbic acid equivalents by ABTS and DMPD, respectively). Finally the antioxidant activity of the essential oils was also evaluated by their effects on human whole blood leukocytes (WB) and on isolated polymorphonucleate (PMN) chemiluminescence. Comparing the effects of the oils from leaves and flowerheads on both PMN and WB chemiluminescence emission, we found no significant differences. Essential oils showed a dose-dependent and linear inhibitory activity on isolated PMN as well as on WB CL emission when PMA-stimulated. On the contrary, the inhibitory activity on resting cells was nonlinear. Our data represent an answer to the continual demand for new antibiotics and antioxidants for the continuous emergence of antibiotic

  16. Antibacterial activity of Cuminum cyminum L. and Carum carvi L. essential oils.

    PubMed

    Iacobellis, Nicola S; Lo Cantore, Pietro; Capasso, Francesco; Senatore, Felice

    2005-01-12

    Essential oils extracted by hydrodistillation from fruits of Cuminum cyminum L. and Carum carvi L. were analyzed by gas chromatography (GC) and GC-mass spectrometry (MS). The main components of C. cyminum oil were p-mentha-1,4-dien-7-al, cumin aldehyde, gamma-terpinene, and beta-pinene, while those of the C. carvi oil were carvone, limonene, germacrene D, and trans-dihydrocarvone. Antibacterial activity, determined with the agar diffusion method, was observed against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial species in this study. The activity was particularly high against the genera Clavibacter, Curtobacterium, Rhodococcus, Erwinia, Xanthomonas, Ralstonia, and Agrobacterium, which are responsible for plant or cultivated mushroom diseases worldwide. In general, a lower activity was observed against bacteria belonging to the genus Pseudomonas. These results suggest the potential use of the above essential oils for the control of bacterial diseases.

  17. Antibacterial Activity of Alkaloid Fractions from Berberis microphylla G. Forst and Study of Synergism with Ampicillin and Cephalothin.

    PubMed

    Manosalva, Loreto; Mutis, Ana; Urzúa, Alejandro; Fajardo, Victor; Quiroz, Andrés

    2016-01-11

    Berberis microphylla is a native plant that grows in Patagonia and is commonly used by aboriginal ethnic groups in traditional medicine as an antiseptic for different diseases. The present study evaluated the antibacterial and synergistic activity of alkaloid extracts of B. microphylla leaves, stems and roots used either individually or in combination with antibiotics against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. The in vitro antibacterial activities of leaf, stem and root alkaloid extracts had significant activity only against Gram-positive bacteria. Disc diffusion tests demonstrated that the root extract showed similar activity against B. cereus and S. epidermidis compared to commercial antibiotics, namely ampicillin and cephalothin, and pure berberine, the principal component of the alkaloid extracts, was found to be active only against S. aureus and S. epidermidis with similar activity to that of the root extract. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of the alkaloid extracts ranged from 333 to 83 μg/mL, whereas minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBCs) varied from 717 to 167 μg/mL. In addition, synergistic or indifferent effects between the alkaloid extracts and antibiotics against bacterial strains were confirmed.

  18. Using Chemoinformatics, Bioinformatics, and Bioassay to Predict and Explain the Antibacterial Activity of Nonantibiotic Food and Drug Administration Drugs.

    PubMed

    Kahlous, Nour Aldin; Bawarish, Muhammad Al Mohdi; Sarhan, Muhammad Arabi; Küpper, Manfred; Hasaba, Ali; Rajab, Mazen

    2017-03-27

    Discovering of new and effective antibiotics is a major issue facing scientists today. Luckily, the development of computer science offers new methods to overcome this issue. In this study, a set of computer software was used to predict the antibacterial activity of nonantibiotic Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs, and to explain their action by possible binding to well-known bacterial protein targets, along with testing their antibacterial activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. A three-dimensional virtual screening method that relies on chemical and shape similarity was applied using rapid overlay of chemical structures (ROCS) software to select candidate compounds from the FDA-approved drugs database that share similarity with 17 known antibiotics. Then, to check their antibacterial activity, disk diffusion test was applied on Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. Finally, a protein docking method was applied using HYBRID software to predict the binding of the active candidate to the target receptor of its similar antibiotic. Of the 1,991 drugs that were screened, 34 had been selected and among them 10 drugs showed antibacterial activity, whereby drotaverine and metoclopramide activities were without precedent reports. Furthermore, the docking process predicted that diclofenac, drotaverine, (S)-flurbiprofen, (S)-ibuprofen, and indomethacin could bind to the protein target of their similar antibiotics. Nevertheless, their antibacterial activities are weak compared with those of their similar antibiotics, which can be potentiated further by performing chemical modifications on their structure.

  19. In vitro antibacterial and hemolytic activities of crotamine, a small basic myotoxin from rattlesnake Crotalus durissus.

    PubMed

    Oguiura, Nancy; Boni-Mitake, Malvina; Affonso, Regina; Zhang, Guolong

    2011-04-01

    Crotamine, a myotoxin from the venom of South American rattlesnake, is structurally related to β-defensins, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) found in vertebrate animals. Here, we tested the antibacterial properties of crotamine and found that it killed several strains of Escherichia coli, with the MICs ranging from 25 to 100 μg ml⁻¹. Time-kill and bacterial membrane permeabilization assays revealed that killing of bacteria by crotamine occurred within 1 h and reached the maximum by 2 h. Additionally, the anti-E. coli activity of crotamine was completely abolished with 12.5 mM NaCl. Furthermore, the three intramolecular disulfide bonds of crotamine appeared dispensable for its antibacterial activity. The reduced form of crotamine was active against E. coli as well. However, crotamine showed no or weak activity up to 200 μg ml⁻¹ against other species of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. Crotamine showed no appreciable hemolytic activity to erythrocytes. Our studies revealed that crotamine is also an AMP that kills bacteria through membrane permeabilization. However, crotamine appears to have a narrow antibacterial spectrum, distinct from many classical β-defensins, reinforcing the notion that crotamine originated from the β-defensin gene lineage, but has undergone significant functional diversification.

  20. Walnut (Juglans regia L.) leaves: phenolic compounds, antibacterial activity and antioxidant potential of different cultivars.

    PubMed

    Pereira, José Alberto; Oliveira, Ivo; Sousa, Anabela; Valentão, Patrícia; Andrade, Paula B; Ferreira, Isabel C F R; Ferreres, Federico; Bento, Albino; Seabra, Rosa; Estevinho, Letícia

    2007-11-01

    Different cultivars of walnut (Juglans regia L.) leaves (Cv. Lara, Franquette, Mayette, Marbot, Mellanaise and Parisienne) grown in Portugal, were investigated in what concerns phenolic compounds and antimicrobial and antioxidant properties. Phenolics analysis was performed by reversed-phase HPLC/DAD and 10 compounds were identified and quantified: 3- and 5-caffeoylquinic acids, 3- and 4-p-coumaroylquinic acids, p-coumaric acid, quercetin 3-galactoside, quercetin 3-pentoside derivative, quercetin 3-arabinoside, quercetin 3-xyloside and quercetin 3-rhamnoside. The antimicrobial capacity was screened against Gram positive (Bacillus cereus, B. subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus) and Gram negative bacteria (Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae) and fungi (Candida albicans, Cryptococcus neoformans). Walnut leaves selectively inhibited the growth of Gram positive bacteria, being B. cereus the most susceptible one (MIC 0.1mg/mL). Gram negative bacteria and fungi were resistant to the extracts at 100mg/mL. Lara walnut leaves were also submitted to antibacterial assays using 18 clinical isolates of Staphylococcus sp. Antioxidant activity was accessed by the reducing power assay, the scavenging effect on DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl) radicals and beta-carotene linoleate model system. In a general way, all of the studied walnut leaves cultivars presented high antioxidant activity (EC(50) values lower than 1mg/mL), being Cv. Lara the most effective one.

  1. Anti-bacterial activity and brine shrimp lethality bioassay of methanolic extracts of fourteen different edible vegetables from Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Ullah, M. Obayed; Haque, Mahmuda; Urmi, Kaniz Fatima; Zulfiker, Abu Hasanat Md.; Anita, Elichea Synthi; Begum, Momtaj; Hamid, Kaiser

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the antibacterial and cytotoxic activity of fourteen different edible vegetables methanolic extract from Bangladesh. Methods The antibacterial activity was evaluated using disc diffusion assay method against 12 bacteria (both gram positive and gram negative). The plant extracts were also screened for cytotoxic activity using the brine shrimp lethality bioassay method and the lethal concentrations (LC50) were determined at 95% confidence intervals by analyzing the data on a computer loaded with “Finney Programme”. Results All the vegetable extracts showed low to elevated levels of antibacterial activity against most of the tested strains (zone of inhibition=5-28 mm). The most active extract against all bacterial strains was from Xanthium indicum which showed remarkable antibacterial activity having the diameter of growth inhibition zone ranging from 12 to 28 mm followed by Alternanthera sessilis (zone of inhibition=6-21 mm). All extracts exhibited considerable general toxicity towards brine shrimps. The LC50 value of the tested extracts was within the range of 8.447 to 60.323 µg/mL with respect to the positive control (vincristine sulphate) which was 0.91 µg/mL. Among all studied extracts, Xanthium indicum displayed the highest cytotoxic effect with LC50 value of 8.447 µg/mL. Conclusions The results of the present investigation suggest that most of the studied plants are potentially good source of antibacterial and anticancer agents. PMID:23570009

  2. Antibacterial Activity of Geminized Amphiphilic Cationic Homopolymers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Shi, Xuefeng; Yu, Danfeng; Zhang, Jian; Yang, Guang; Cui, Yingxian; Sun, Keji; Wang, Jinben; Yan, Haike

    2015-12-22

    The current study is aimed at investigating the effect of cationic charge density and hydrophobicity on the antibacterial and hemolytic activities. Two kinds of cationic surfmers, containing single or double hydrophobic tails (octyl chains or benzyl groups), and the corresponding homopolymers were synthesized. The antimicrobial activity of these candidate antibacterials was studied by microbial growth inhibition assays against Escherichia coli, and hemolysis activity was carried out using human red blood cells. It was interestingly found that the homopolymers were much more effective in antibacterial property than their corresponding monomers. Furthermore, the geminized homopolymers had significantly higher antibacterial activity than that of their counterparts but with single amphiphilic side chains in each repeated unit. Geminized homopolymers, with high positive charge density and moderate hydrophobicity (such as benzyl groups), combine both advantages of efficient antibacterial property and prominently high selectivity. To further explain the antibacterial performance of the novel polymer series, the molecular interaction mechanism is proposed according to experimental data which shows that these specimens are likely to kill microbes by disrupting bacterial membranes, leading them unlikely to induce resistance.

  3. New Gram-Positive Agents: the Next Generation of Oxazolidinones and Lipoglycopeptides

    PubMed Central

    Crotty, Matthew P.; Krekel, Tamara

    2016-01-01

    The growing problem of antimicrobial resistance among bacterial pathogens, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE), has reached a critical state. Tedizolid phosphate, dalbavancin, and oritavancin have recently been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI) and represent the next generation of oxazolidinones and lipoglycopeptides. All three agents exhibit in vitro activity and clinical efficacy against MRSA. Tedizolid phosphate and oritavancin demonstrate in vitro activity against VRE. These new Gram-positive agents are reviewed here. PMID:26962092

  4. Antioxidant and antibacterial activities of selected varieties of thai mango seed extract.

    PubMed

    Khammuang, Saranyu; Sarnthima, Rakrudee

    2011-01-01

    This study reports the antioxidant and antibacterial activities of four fresh mango seed extracts from Thai varieties. Total phenol contents determined by the Folin-ciocalteu method revealed the highest values to be in MKE, Chok-a-nan variety (399.8 mgGAE/g extract) and MSE of Nam-dok-mai variety (377.2 mgGAE/g extract). Both extracts showed potent ABTS˙+ radical and DPPH˙ radical scavenging activities with the lower half inhibition concentration (IC50) values than those of the reference compounds; vitamin C, trolox and BHA, respectively. Their antioxidant property of MSE and MKE is strongly correlated with the total phenol contents (r=0.98 and 0.98, respectively). When combined the MSE and MKE of the Fah-lun variety showed the strongest antioxidant activity. All mango seed extracts showed interesting antibacterial activity against both gram positive and gram negative bacteria as determined by disc diffusion method. The most sensitive pathogenic strain inhibited by all extracts (especially Kaew variety) was Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853. This work suggests potential applications for practical uses of mango seed extracts from Thai varieties, as sources of antioxidant and antibacterial agents.

  5. Characterization, antibacterial, antioxidant, and cytotoxic activities of ZnO nanoparticles using Coptidis Rhizoma.

    PubMed

    Nagajyothi, P C; Sreekanth, T V M; Tettey, Clement O; Jun, Yang In; Mook, Shin Heung

    2014-09-01

    Here, we report a simple, eco-friendly and inexpensive approach for the synthesis of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) using Coptidis Rhizoma. The ZnO NPs were characterized by UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, FTIR, SEM-EDX, TGA, TEM, SAED and XRD. TEM images confirmed the presence of spherical and rod shaped ZnO NPs in the range of 2.90-25.20 nm. Green synthesized ZnO NPS exhibited moderate antibacterial activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and excellent DPPH free radical scavenging activity. Synthesized ZnO NPs had no toxic effects on the RAW 264.7 cell line.

  6. [Antibacterial Activity of Alkylated and Acylated Derivatives of Low-Molecular Weight Chitosan].

    PubMed

    Shagdarova, B Ts; Il'ina, A V; Varlamov, V P

    2016-01-01

    A number of alkylated (quaternized) and acylated derivatives of low-molecular weight chitosan were obtained. The structure and composition of the compounds were confirmed by the results of IR and PMR spectroscopy, as well as conductometric titration. The effect of the acyl substituent and the degree of substitution of N-(2-hydroxy-3-trimethylammonium) with the propyl fragment appended to amino groups of the C2 atom of polymer chains on antibacterial activity against typical representatives of gram-positive and gram-negative microorganisms (Staphylococcus epidermidis and Escherichia coli) was studied. The highest activity was in the case of N-[(2-hydroxy-3-trimethylammonium)propyl]chitosan chloride with the maximal substitution (98%). The minimal inhibitory concentration of the derivative was 0.48 µg/mL and 3.90 µg/mL for S. epidermis and E. coli, respectively.

  7. In vitro antibacterial, antioxidant activity and total phenolic content of some essential oils.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Upma; Ojha, Swati; Tripathi, N N; Singh, Pooja

    2015-11-01

    In vitro antibacterial activity of 16 essential oils was investigated by disc diffusion method against two Gram positive bacteria Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus and two Gram negative bacteria, Shigella flexneri and Escherichia coli. Oils of Cymbopogon citratus and Ocimum basilicum showed highest antibacterial activity. Gram positive bacteria were found to be more sensitive than Gram negative. Antioxidant activities were tested by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging assay and ABTS radical cation decolourization assay while Folin-Ciocalteu method was used to determine the total phenolic content. In DPPH assay, highest antioxidant activity was observed in 0. basilicum oil followed by Azeratum conyzoides, A. marmelos and C. citratus, with percent inhibition and IC50 value ranging from 66.11-71.93% and 14.10-17.92 µl ml(-1) respectively. In ABTS assay, similar results were obtained but with higher percent inhibition which ranged from 67.48-76.23% and lower IC50 value (12.12-17.21 µ ml(-1)). Moreover, radical scavenging activity of essential oils was lower than that observed for the synthetic antioxidant BHA and BHT. The total phenolic content of the essential oils as GAE in mg 100 µl(-1) of EO was found to be highest in O. basilicum (0.406) oil followed byA. conyzoides (0.322), A. marmelos (0.238) and C. citratus (0.231). The results provide evidence that the oils of C. citratus and O. basilicum can be further commended for treatment of infections caused by these bacterial pathogens and are potential source of natural antioxidants having appreciable amount of total phenolic content.

  8. Butyltin(IV) 2-sulfobenzoates: synthesis, structural characterization and their cytostatic and antibacterial activities.

    PubMed

    Pruchnik, Hanna; Lis, Tadeusz; Latocha, Małgorzata; Zielińska, Aleksandra; Ułaszewski, Stanisław; Pelińska, Irena; Pruchnik, Florian P

    2012-06-01

    Three butyltin complexes with 2-sulfobenzoic acid [Sn(C(4)H(9))(2){O(3)SC(6)H(4)COO-2}(H(2)O)]·(C(2)H(5)OH) (1), [Sn(C(4)H(9))(3){O(3)SC(6)H(4)COOH-2}] (2) and [Sn(2)(C(4)H(9))(6){μ-O(3)SC(6)H(4)COO-2}] (3) have been synthesized and characterized by IR and (1)H, (13)C and (119)Sn NMR spectra. They show interesting properties in solid state and solutions because there are many modes of coordination of the Sbz ligand. The structure of complex 1 has been determined by X-ray crystallography. It is a chain compound with 2-sulfonatobenzoate coordinated to Sn atoms as a bridging and chelate ligand via O atoms of COO and SO(3) groups. In solutions the chains dissociate giving mainly mononuclear complexes. The NMR spectra and calculation at the DFT B3LYP/3-21G** level indicate that in solutions of compounds 1, 2 and 3 in polar solvents, many complexes showing dynamic properties are formed. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations showed that many five- and six-coordinate isomers and conformers can exist in equilibrium. All compounds effectively interact with AMP and ATP. The NMR spectra showed that nucleotides are coordinated to Sn atoms via PO(4) groups. The complexes are very active cytostatic agents against tumor strains. They are more effective than cisplatin. It is interesting that activity of 3 against non-tumor cell NHDF is lower than against tumor cells. Antibacterial activity of 1 and 2 has been investigated. Compound 2 is a very effective agent against Gram-positive bacteria. Antibacterial activity of 1 is lower than that of 2. Activity of 1 both against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria is similar.

  9. Antibacterial products of marine organisms.

    PubMed

    Ng, Tzi Bun; Cheung, Randy Chi Fai; Wong, Jack Ho; Bekhit, Adnan A; Bekhit, Alaa El-Din

    2015-05-01

    Marine organisms comprising microbes, plants, invertebrates, and vertebrates elaborate an impressive array of structurally diverse antimicrobial products ranging from small cyclic compounds to macromolecules such as proteins. Some of these biomolecules originate directly from marine animals while others arise from microbes associated with the animals. It is noteworthy that some of the biomolecules referred to above are structurally unique while others belong to known classes of compounds, peptides, and proteins. Some of the antibacterial agents are more active against Gram-positive bacteria while others have higher effectiveness on Gram-negative bacteria. Some are efficacious against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and against drug-resistant strains as well. The mechanism of antibacterial action of a large number of the chemically identified antibacterial agents, possible synergism with currently used antibiotics, and the issue of possible toxicity on mammalian cells and tissues await elucidation. The structural characteristics pivotal to antibacterial activity have been ascertained in only a few studies. Demonstration of efficacy of the antibacterial agents in animal models of bacterial infection is highly desirable. Structural characterization of the active principles present in aqueous and organic extracts of marine organisms with reportedly antibacterial activity would be desirable.

  10. Antibacterial activity of the pancreatic fluid.

    PubMed

    Rubinstein, E; Mark, Z; Haspel, J; Ben-Ari, G; Dreznik, Z; Mirelman, D; Tadmor, A

    1985-04-01

    The antibacterial activity of canine pancreatic fluid was investigated in an attempt to understand the resistance of this organ, when intact, to ascending bacterial infections. The pancreatic fluid demonstrated bactericidal activity against Escherichia coli, Shigella species, Salmonella species, and Klebsiella pneumoniae; bacteriostatic activity against coagulase-positive and coagulase-negative staphylococci and Pseudomonas aeruginosa; and fungistatic activity against Candida albicans. There was no demonstrable antibacterial activity against Bacteroides fragilis and Streptococcus faecalis. The antibacterial activity was dialyzable and pH dependent, but independent of heat, the activity of several digestive pancreatic enzymes, and the bacterial inoculum. Electron micrographs of Escherichia coli exposed to pancreatic fluid did not demonstrate changes in the bacterial cell wall. Tracer studies of susceptible bacteria demonstrated decreased leucine uptake when briefly exposed to pancreatic fluid. The antibacterial activity was found by column chromatography to be a small molecular peptide. It is likely that pancreatic antibacterial factors protect the pancreas from ascending bacterial infections and operate along with other factors in the homeostasis of the upper small bowel flora.

  11. High-level fluorescence labeling of gram-positive pathogens.

    PubMed

    Aymanns, Simone; Mauerer, Stefanie; van Zandbergen, Ger; Wolz, Christiane; Spellerberg, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    Fluorescence labeling of bacterial pathogens has a broad range of interesting applications including the observation of living bacteria within host cells. We constructed a novel vector based on the E. coli streptococcal shuttle plasmid pAT28 that can propagate in numerous bacterial species from different genera. The plasmid harbors a promoterless copy of the green fluorescent variant gene egfp under the control of the CAMP-factor gene (cfb) promoter of Streptococcus agalactiae and was designated pBSU101. Upon transfer of the plasmid into streptococci, the bacteria show a distinct and easily detectable fluorescence using a standard fluorescence microscope and quantification by FACS-analysis demonstrated values that were 10-50 times increased over the respective controls. To assess the suitability of the construct for high efficiency fluorescence labeling in different gram-positive pathogens, numerous species were transformed. We successfully labeled Streptococcus pyogenes, Streptococcus agalactiae, Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis, Enterococcus faecalis, Enterococcus faecium, Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus anginosus and Staphylococcus aureus strains utilizing the EGFP reporter plasmid pBSU101. In all of these species the presence of the cfb promoter construct resulted in high-level EGFP expression that could be further increased by growing the streptococcal and enterococcal cultures under high oxygen conditions through continuous aeration.

  12. Antibacterial Activity of Salvadora persica L. (Miswak) Extracts against Multidrug Resistant Bacterial Clinical Isolates.

    PubMed

    Al-Ayed, Mohamed Saeed Zayed; Asaad, Ahmed Morad; Qureshi, Mohamed Ansar; Attia, Hany Goda; AlMarrani, Abduljabbar Hadi

    2016-01-01

    Much effort has focused on examining the inhibitory effect of Salvadora persica (miswak) on oral microorganisms, but information concerning its antibacterial activity against other human pathogens, particularly multidrug resistant (MDR) isolates, is scarce. Therefore, this study aimed to assess the in vitro antibacterial activities of Salvadora persica L. extracts against 10 MDR bacterial clinical isolates other than oral pathogens. The antibacterial activity of aqueous and methanol miswak extracts was assessed using the agar dilution and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) methods. Overall, the 400 mg/mL of miswak extract was the most effective on all strains. The methanol extract exhibited a stronger antibacterial activity against Gram-negative (3.3-13.6 mm) than Gram-positive (1.8-8.3 mm) bacteria. The lowest MIC value was seen for E. coli (0.39, 1.56 µg/mL), followed by Streptococcus pyogenes (1.56 µg/mL). The highest MIC value (6.25, 12.5 µg/mL) was recorded for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Acinetobacter baumannii, and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. This study demonstrates, for the first time, the moderate to strong antibacterial activity of miswak extracts against all tested MDR-pathogens. Methanol extract appears to be a potent antimicrobial agent that could be considered as complementary and alternative medicine against resistant pathogens. Further studies on a large number of MDR organisms are necessary to investigate and standardize the inhibitory effect of miswak extracts against these emerging pathogens.

  13. Antibacterial Activity of Salvadora persica L. (Miswak) Extracts against Multidrug Resistant Bacterial Clinical Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Al-Ayed, Mohamed Saeed Zayed; Asaad, Ahmed Morad; Qureshi, Mohamed Ansar; Attia, Hany Goda; AlMarrani, Abduljabbar Hadi

    2016-01-01

    Much effort has focused on examining the inhibitory effect of Salvadora persica (miswak) on oral microorganisms, but information concerning its antibacterial activity against other human pathogens, particularly multidrug resistant (MDR) isolates, is scarce. Therefore, this study aimed to assess the in vitro antibacterial activities of Salvadora persica L. extracts against 10 MDR bacterial clinical isolates other than oral pathogens. The antibacterial activity of aqueous and methanol miswak extracts was assessed using the agar dilution and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) methods. Overall, the 400 mg/mL of miswak extract was the most effective on all strains. The methanol extract exhibited a stronger antibacterial activity against Gram-negative (3.3–13.6 mm) than Gram-positive (1.8–8.3 mm) bacteria. The lowest MIC value was seen for E. coli (0.39, 1.56 µg/mL), followed by Streptococcus pyogenes (1.56 µg/mL). The highest MIC value (6.25, 12.5 µg/mL) was recorded for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Acinetobacter baumannii, and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. This study demonstrates, for the first time, the moderate to strong antibacterial activity of miswak extracts against all tested MDR-pathogens. Methanol extract appears to be a potent antimicrobial agent that could be considered as complementary and alternative medicine against resistant pathogens. Further studies on a large number of MDR organisms are necessary to investigate and standardize the inhibitory effect of miswak extracts against these emerging pathogens. PMID:26904146

  14. Assessment of total phenolic, antioxidant, and antibacterial activities of Passiflora species.

    PubMed

    Ramaiya, Shiamala Devi; Bujang, Japar Sidik; Zakaria, Muta Harah

    2014-01-01

    This study focused on total phenolic content (TPC) and antioxidant and antibacterial activities of the leaves and stems of Passiflora quadrangularis, P. maliformis, and P. edulis extracted using three solvents: petroleum ether, acetone, and methanol. The maximum extraction yields of antioxidant components from the leaves and stems were isolated using methanol extracts of P. edulis (24.28%) and P. quadrangularis (9.76%), respectively. Among the leaf extracts, the methanol extract of P. maliformis had the significantly highest TPC and the strongest antioxidant activity, whereas among the stem extracts, the methanol extract of P. quadrangularis showed the highest phenolic amount and possessed the strongest antioxidant activity. The antibacterial properties of the Passiflora species were tested using the disc diffusion method against 10 human pathogenic bacteria. The largest inhibition zone was observed for the methanol extract of P. maliformis against B. subtilis. Generally, extracts from the Passiflora species exhibit distinct inhibition against Gram-positive but not Gram-negative bacteria. Based on the generated biplot, three clusters of bacteria were designated according to their performance towards the tested extracts. The present study revealed that methanol extracts of the Passiflora contain constituents with significant phenolic, antioxidant, and antibacterial properties for pharmaceutical and nutraceutical uses.

  15. Assessment of Total Phenolic, Antioxidant, and Antibacterial Activities of Passiflora Species

    PubMed Central

    Ramaiya, Shiamala Devi; Bujang, Japar Sidik; Zakaria, Muta Harah

    2014-01-01

    This study focused on total phenolic content (TPC) and antioxidant and antibacterial activities of the leaves and stems of Passiflora quadrangularis, P. maliformis, and P. edulis extracted using three solvents: petroleum ether, acetone, and methanol. The maximum extraction yields of antioxidant components from the leaves and stems were isolated using methanol extracts of P. edulis (24.28%) and P. quadrangularis (9.76%), respectively. Among the leaf extracts, the methanol extract of P. maliformis had the significantly highest TPC and the strongest antioxidant activity, whereas among the stem extracts, the methanol extract of P. quadrangularis showed the highest phenolic amount and possessed the strongest antioxidant activity. The antibacterial properties of the Passiflora species were tested using the disc diffusion method against 10 human pathogenic bacteria. The largest inhibition zone was observed for the methanol extract of P. maliformis against B. subtilis. Generally, extracts from the Passiflora species exhibit distinct inhibition against Gram-positive but not Gram-negative bacteria. Based on the generated biplot, three clusters of bacteria were designated according to their performance towards the tested extracts. The present study revealed that methanol extracts of the Passiflora contain constituents with significant phenolic, antioxidant, and antibacterial properties for pharmaceutical and nutraceutical uses. PMID:25028673

  16. A novel short anionic antibacterial peptide isolated from the skin of Xenopus laevis with broad antibacterial activity and inhibitory activity against breast cancer cell.

    PubMed

    Li, Siming; Hao, Linlin; Bao, Wanguo; Zhang, Ping; Su, Dan; Cheng, Yunyun; Nie, Linyan; Wang, Gang; Hou, Feng; Yang, Yang

    2016-07-01

    A vastarray of bioactive peptides from amphibian skin secretions is attracting increasing attention due to the growing problem of bacteria resistant to conventional antibiotics. In this report, a small molecular antibacterial peptide, named Xenopus laevis antibacterial peptide-P1 (XLAsp-P1), was isolated from the skin of Xenopus laevis using reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. The primary structure of XLAsp-P1, which has been proved to be a novel peptide by BLAST search in AMP database, was DEDDD with a molecular weight of 607.7 Da analysed by Edman degradation and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS). The highlight of XLAsp-P1 is the strong in vitro potency against a variety of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria with minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) starting at 10 μg/mL and potent inhibitory activity against breast cancer cell at tested concentrations from 5 to 50 μg/mL. In addition, only 6.2 % of red blood cells was haemolytic when incubated with 64 μg/mL (higher than MICs of all bacterial strain) of XLAsp-P1. The antimicrobial mechanism for this novel peptide was the destruction of the cell membrane investigated by transmission electron microscopy. All these showed that XLAsp-P1 is a novel short anionic antibacterial peptide with broad antibacterial activity and inhibitory activity against breast cancer cell.

  17. Diaminomaleonitrile-based azo receptors: Synthesis, DFT studies and their antibacterial activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanmohammadi, Hamid; Arab, Vajihe; Rezaeian, Khatereh; Talei, Gholam Reza; Pass, Maryam; Shabani, Nafiseh

    2017-02-01

    New unsymmetric diaminomaleonitrile-based azo receptors (H3Ln, n = 1-3) have been synthesized via condensation reaction of 5-(4-X-phenyl)-azo-salicyladehyde (X = NO2, OMe and CH3) with 2-amino-3-(5-bromo-2-hydroxybenzylamino)maleonitrile. The solvatochromic behaviors of the molecules were probed by studying their UV-Vis spectra in five pure organic solvents of different polarities. The p-NO2 substituted receptor shows a dramatic color change from yellow to blue upon the addition of fluoride ion in CH3CN. This capability was studied by systematic TD-DFT calculations. These compounds were assayed for their in vitro antibacterial activities against Gram-positive (S. aureus, S. epidermidis and L. monocytogenes) and Gram-negative (E. coli, P. aeruginosa and K. pneumonia.) bacteria by disc diffusion method. The results indicated that the compounds show good inhibition against Gram positive bacteria namely L. monocytogenes as compared to standard drugs.

  18. Synthesis of SiC/Ag/Cellulose Nanocomposite and Its Antibacterial Activity by Reactive Oxygen Species Generation

    PubMed Central

    Borkowski, Andrzej; Cłapa, Tomasz; Szala, Mateusz; Gąsiński, Arkadiusz; Selwet, Marek

    2016-01-01

    We describe the synthesis of nanocomposites, based on nanofibers of silicon carbide, silver nanoparticles, and cellulose. Silver nanoparticle synthesis was achieved with chemical reduction using hydrazine by adding two different surfactants to obtain a nanocomposite with silver nanoparticles of different diameters. Determination of antibacterial activity was based on respiration tests. Enzymatic analysis indicates oxidative stress, and viability testing was conducted using an epifluorescence microscope. Strong bactericidal activity of nanocomposites was found against bacteria Escherichia coli and Bacillus cereus, which were used in the study as typical Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, respectively. It is assumed that reactive oxygen species generation was responsible for the observed antibacterial effect of the investigated materials. Due to the properties of silicon carbide nanofiber, the obtained nanocomposite may have potential use in technology related to water and air purification. Cellulose addition prevented silver nanoparticle release and probably enhanced bacterial adsorption onto aggregates of the nanocomposite material. PMID:28335299

  19. Chemical Composition and In Vitro Antibacterial Activity of Mentha spicata Essential Oil against Common Food-Borne Pathogenic Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Shahbazi, Yasser

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate chemical composition and antibacterial activity of essential oil from the leaf of Mentha spicata plant against common food-borne pathogenic bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus cereus, Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella typhimurium, and Escherichia coli O157:H7). Chemical composition of the essential oil was identified by gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometer detector (GC-MS). The antibacterial activity of the essential oil was evaluated by broth microdilution method and agar disk diffusion assay. According to the result of GC-MS analysis, 18 components were identified, accounting for 99.89% of the whole essential oil. The main components were carvone (78.76%), limonene (11.50%), β-bourbonene (11.23%), cis-dihydrocarveol (1.43%), trans-caryophyllene (1.04%), menthone (1.01%), menthol (1%), and terpinen-4-ol (0.99). The essential oil exhibited moderate level of antibacterial activity against all test microorganisms. In general, Gram-positive bacteria were more susceptible to M. spicata essential oil than Gram-negative bacteria. L. monocytogenes was the most sensitive of the microorganisms to the antibacterial activity of M. spicata essential oil (inhibition zone = 22 mm and MIC and MBC = 2.5 µL/mL). Based on our results, the essential oil of M. spicata plant collected from Kermanshah province, west of Iran, has a potential to be applied as antibacterial agent.

  20. Chemical Composition and In Vitro Antibacterial Activity of Mentha spicata Essential Oil against Common Food-Borne Pathogenic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Shahbazi, Yasser

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate chemical composition and antibacterial activity of essential oil from the leaf of Mentha spicata plant against common food-borne pathogenic bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus cereus, Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella typhimurium, and Escherichia coli O157:H7). Chemical composition of the essential oil was identified by gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometer detector (GC-MS). The antibacterial activity of the essential oil was evaluated by broth microdilution method and agar disk diffusion assay. According to the result of GC-MS analysis, 18 components were identified, accounting for 99.89% of the whole essential oil. The main components were carvone (78.76%), limonene (11.50%), β-bourbonene (11.23%), cis-dihydrocarveol (1.43%), trans-caryophyllene (1.04%), menthone (1.01%), menthol (1%), and terpinen-4-ol (0.99). The essential oil exhibited moderate level of antibacterial activity against all test microorganisms. In general, Gram-positive bacteria were more susceptible to M. spicata essential oil than Gram-negative bacteria. L. monocytogenes was the most sensitive of the microorganisms to the antibacterial activity of M. spicata essential oil (inhibition zone = 22 mm and MIC and MBC = 2.5 µL/mL). Based on our results, the essential oil of M. spicata plant collected from Kermanshah province, west of Iran, has a potential to be applied as antibacterial agent. PMID:26351584

  1. ‘Artilysation’ of endolysin λSa2lys strongly improves its enzymatic and antibacterial activity against streptococci

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Rubio, Lorena; Chang, Wai-Ling; Gutiérrez, Diana; Lavigne, Rob; Martínez, Beatriz; Rodríguez, Ana; Govers, Sander K.; Aertsen, Abram; Hirl, Christine; Biebl, Manfred; Briers, Yves; García, Pilar

    2016-01-01

    Endolysins constitute a promising class of antibacterials against Gram-positive bacteria. Recently, endolysins have been engineered with selected peptides to obtain a new generation of lytic proteins, Artilysins, with specific activity against Gram-negative bacteria. Here, we demonstrate that artilysation can also be used to enhance the antibacterial activity of endolysins against Gram-positive bacteria and to reduce the dependence on external conditions. Art-240, a chimeric protein of the anti-streptococcal endolysin λSa2lys and the polycationic peptide PCNP, shows a similar species specificity as the parental endolysin, but the bactericidal activity against streptococci increases and is less affected by elevated NaCl concentrations and pH variations. Time-kill experiments and time-lapse microscopy demonstrate that the killing rate of Art-240 is approximately two-fold higher compared to wildtype endolysin λSa2lys, with a reduction in viable bacteria of 3 log units after 10 min. In addition, lower doses of Art-240 are required to achieve the same bactericidal effect. PMID:27775093

  2. Tunable, antibacterial activity of silicone polyether surfactants.

    PubMed

    Khan, Madiha F; Zepeda-Velazquez, Laura; Brook, Michael A

    2015-08-01

    Silicone surfactants are used in a variety of applications, however, limited data is available on the relationship between surfactant structure and biological activity. A series of seven nonionic, silicone polyether surfactants with known structures was tested for in vitro antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli BL21. The compounds varied in their hydrophobic head, comprised of branched silicone structures with 3-10 siloxane linkages and, in two cases, phenyl substitution, and hydrophilic tail of 8-44 poly(ethylene glycol) units. The surfactants were tested at three concentrations: below, at, and above their Critical Micelle Concentrations (CMC) against 5 concentrations of E. coli BL21 in a three-step assay comprised of a 14-24h turbidometric screen, a live-dead stain and viable colony counts. The bacterial concentration had little effect on antibacterial activity. For most of the surfactants, antibacterial activity was higher at concentrations above the CMC. Surfactants with smaller silicone head groups had as much as 4 times the bioactivity of surfactants with larger groups, with the smallest hydrophobe exhibiting potency equivalent to sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). Smaller PEG chains were similarly associated with higher potency. These data link lower micelle stability and enhanced permeability of smaller silicone head groups to antibacterial activity. The results demonstrate that simple manipulation of nonionic silicone polyether structure leads to significant changes in antibacterial activity.

  3. Flavonoid glycosides from Prunus armeniaca and the antibacterial activity of a crude extract.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Fahima; Ahmed, Rehana; Mahmood, Azhar; Ahmad, Zaheer; Bibi, Nazia; Kazmi, Shahana Urooj

    2007-08-01

    Investigations on the chemical constituents of the fruits of Prunus armeniaca have led to the isolation of two new flavonoid glycosides, 4',5,7-trihydroxy flavone-7-O-[beta-D-mannopyranosyl (1'''-->2")]-beta-D-allopyranoside (1) and 3,4',5,7-tetrahydroxy-3',5'-di-methoxy flavone 3-O-[alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl (1'''-->6")]-beta-D-galactopyranoside (2), from the butanolic fraction of the fruits. The butanolic extract exhibited antibacterial activity against both Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria. The structures of these compounds were elucidated through spectral studies, including 2D-NMR (COSY, NOESY, J-resolved), HMQC and HMBC experiments.

  4. Silver deposition on polypyrrole films electrosynthesised onto Nitinol alloy. Corrosion protection and antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Saugo, M; Flamini, D O; Brugnoni, L I; Saidman, S B

    2015-11-01

    The electrosynthesis of polypyrrole films onto Nitinol from sodium salicylate solutions of different concentrations is reported. The morphology and corrosion protection properties of the resulting coatings were examined and they both depend on the sodium salicylate concentration. The immobilisation of silver species in PPy films constituted by hollow rectangular microtubes was studied as a function of the polymer oxidation degree. The highest amount of silver was deposited when the coated electrode was prepolarised at -1.00V (SCE) before silver deposition, suggesting an increase in the amount of non-oxidised segments in the polymer. Finally, the antibacterial activity of the coating against the Gram positive Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis bacteria was evaluated. Both strains resulted sensitive to the modified coatings, obtaining a slightly better result against S. aureus.

  5. Antibacterial activity of Pd(II) complexes with salicylaldehyde-amino acids Schiff bases ligands.

    PubMed

    Rîmbu, Cristina; Danac, Ramona; Pui, Aurel

    2014-01-01

    Palladium(II) complexes with Schiff bases ligands derived from salicylaldehyde and amino acids (Ala, Gly, Met, Ser, Val) have been synthesized and characterized by Fourier transform (FT)-IR, UV-Vis and (1)H-NMR spectroscopy. The electrospray mass spectrometry (ES-MS) spectrometry confirms the formation of palladium(II) complexes in 1/2 (M/L) molar ratio. All the Pd(II) complexes 1, [Pd(SalAla)2]Cl2; 2, [Pd(SalGly)2]Cl2; 3, [Pd(SalMet)2]Cl2; 4, [Pd(SalSer)2]Cl2; 5, [Pd(SalVal)2]Cl2; have shown antibacterial activity against Gram-positive bacteria Staphylococcus aureus and Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli.

  6. Palm kernel oil-based polyurethane film: Biocompatibility and antibacterial activity studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zulkifli, Nurul Nabilah bt; Badri, Khairiah bt Hj; Nor, Mohd Al Amin Muhamad; Amin, Khairul Anuar Mat

    2017-02-01

    In this study, polyurethane (PU) film was prepared from palm kernel oil-based polyester (PKO-p) via pre-polymerization with isocyanate/polyol group ([NCO/OH]). PU films were physically characterized to investigate the mechanical properties, thermal behavior, water uptake, water vapor transmission rates as well as biocompatibility and antibacterial activities against Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus) and Gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli). Results showed that PU 2 film exhibited optimum mechanical performance and thermal properties with the water vapor transmission rates at 267 ± 17 g m-2 d-1, comparable to commercial dressing. Biocompatibility studies revealed that PU films were non-cytotoxic to the human skin fibroblast cells (CRL2522) and exhibited bactericidal effect against both bacteria.

  7. Hierarchical-structured anatase-titania/cellulose composite sheet with high photocatalytic performance and antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yan; Huang, Jianguo

    2015-02-02

    Bulk hierarchical anatase-titania/cellulose composite sheets were fabricated by subjecting an ultrathin titania gel film pre-deposited filter paper to a solvo-co-hydrothermal treatment by using titanium butoxide as the precursor to grow anatase-titania nanocrystallites on the cellulose nanofiber surfaces. The titanium butoxide specie is firstly absorbed onto the nanofibers of the cellulose substance through a solvothermal process, which was thereafter hydrolyzed and crystallized upon the subsequent hydrothermal treatment, leading to the formation of fine anatase-titania nanoparticles with sizes of 2-5 nm uniformly anchored on the cellulose nanofibers. The resulting anatase-titania/cellulose composite sheet shows a significant photocatalytic performance towards degradation of a methylene blue dye, and introduction of silver nanoparticles into the composite sheet yields an Ag-NP/anatase-titania/cellulose composite material possessing excellent antibacterial activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria.

  8. Bioinspired synthesis of highly stabilized silver nanoparticles using Ocimum tenuiflorum leaf extract and their antibacterial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Rupali S.; Kokate, Mangesh R.; Kolekar, Sanjay S.

    2012-06-01

    Biosynthesis of nanoparticles is under exploration due to wide biomedical applications and research interest in nanotechnology. We herein reports bioinspired synthesis of silver nanoparticles with the aid of novel, non toxic ecofriendly biological material namely Ocimum tenuiflorum leaf extract. It acts as reducing as well as stabilizing agent. An intense surface plasmon resonance band at ˜450 nm in the UV-visible spectrum clearly reveals the formation of silver nanoparticles. The photoluminescence spectrum was recorded to study excitation and emission. TEM and PSD by dynamic light scattering studies showed that size of silver nanoparticles to be in range 25-40 nm. Face centered cubic structure of silver nanoparticles are confirmed by SAED pattern. The charge on synthesized silver nanoparticles was determined by zeta potential. The colloidal solution of silver nanoparticles were found to exhibit high antibacterial activity against three different strains of bacteria Escherichia coli (Gram negative), Corney bacterium (gram positive), Bacillus substilus (spore forming).

  9. Bioinspired synthesis of highly stabilized silver nanoparticles using Ocimum tenuiflorum leaf extract and their antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Patil, Rupali S; Kokate, Mangesh R; Kolekar, Sanjay S

    2012-06-01

    Biosynthesis of nanoparticles is under exploration due to wide biomedical applications and research interest in nanotechnology. We herein reports bioinspired synthesis of silver nanoparticles with the aid of novel, non toxic ecofriendly biological material namely Ocimum tenuiflorum leaf extract. It acts as reducing as well as stabilizing agent. An intense surface plasmon resonance band at ∼450 nm in the UV-visible spectrum clearly reveals the formation of silver nanoparticles. The photoluminescence spectrum was recorded to study excitation and emission. TEM and PSD by dynamic light scattering studies showed that size of silver nanoparticles to be in range 25-40 nm. Face centered cubic structure of silver nanoparticles are confirmed by SAED pattern. The charge on synthesized silver nanoparticles was determined by zeta potential. The colloidal solution of silver nanoparticles were found to exhibit high antibacterial activity against three different strains of bacteria Escherichia coli (Gram negative), Corney bacterium (gram positive), Bacillus substilus (spore forming).

  10. Synthesis of silver nanoparticles using A. indicum leaf extract and their antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Ashokkumar, S; Ravi, S; Kathiravan, V; Velmurugan, S

    2015-01-05

    Green synthesis of silver nanoparticles has been achieved using environmentally acceptable plant extract. It is observed that Abutilon indicum leaf extract can reduce silver ions into silver nanoparticles within 15 min of reaction time. The formation and stability of the reduced silver nanoparticles in the colloidal solution were monitored by UV-Vis spectrophotometer analysis. The mean particle diameter of silver nanoparticles was calculated from the XRD pattern. FT-IR spectra of the leaf extract after the development of nanoparticles are determined to allow identification of possible functional groups responsible for the conversion of metal ions to metal nanoparticles. The AgNPs thus obtained showed highly potent antibacterial activity toward Gram-positive (Staphyloccocus aureus and Bacillus subtilis) and Gram-negative (Salmonella typhi and Escherichia coli) microorganisms.

  11. Spectroscopic study of silver halides in montmorillonite and their antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Sohrabnezhad, Sh; Rassa, M; Mohammadi Dahanesari, E

    2016-10-01

    In this study silver halides (AgX, X=Cl, Br, I) in montmorillonite (MMT) were prepared by dispersion method in dark. AgNO3 was used as a silver precursor. The nanocomposites (NCs) (AgX-MMT) were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and ultraviolet-visible diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS). The powder X-ray diffraction showed intercalation of AgCl and AgBr nanoparticles (NPs) into the clay interlayer space. The diffuse reflectance spectra indicated a broad surface plasmon resonance (SPR) absorption band in the visible region for AgCl-MMT and AgBr-MMT NCs, resulting of metallic Ag nanoparticles (Ag NPs). But the results were opposite in case of AgI-MMT NC. The antibacterial activity of NCs was investigated against Gram-positive bacteria, i.e., Staphylococcus aureus and Micrococcus luteus and Gram-negative bacteria, i.e., Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, by the well diffusion method. The antibacterial effects on Staphylococcus aureus, Micrococcus luteus and Escherichia coli decrease in the order: AgCl-MMT>AgBr-MMT>AgI-MMT. No antibacterial activity was detected for Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

  12. Study on antibacterial activity of chemically synthesized PANI-Ag-Au nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boomi, Pandi; Prabu, Halliah Gurumallesh; Manisankar, Paramasivam; Ravikumar, Sundaram

    2014-05-01

    Pristine polyaniline (PANI), PANI-Ag, PANI-Au and PANI-Ag-Au nanocomposites have been successfully synthesized by chemical oxidative polymerization method using aniline as monomer, ammonium persulphate as oxidant and metal (Ag, Au and Ag-Au) colloids. UV-Vis analysis exhibited surface Plasmon resonances of Ag, Au, Ag-Au nanoparticles. FT-IR spectra revealed the shift in peak position of N-H stretching. X-ray diffraction (XRD) results confirm the presence of Ag, Au and Au-Ag nanoparticles. HR-TEM images show nanosizes of Ag, Au, Ag-Au and the incorporation of such nanoparticles into the PANI matrix. Pristine PANI, PANI-Ag, PANI-Au and PANI-Ag-Au nanocomposites were tested for antibacterial activity by agar well diffusion method. PANI-Ag-Au nanocomposite exhibited higher antibacterial activity against both gram-positive [Streptococcus sp. (MTCC 890), Staphylococcus sp. (MTCC 96)] and gram-negative bacteria [Escherichia coli (MTCC 1671) and Klebsiella sp. (MTCC 7407)] when compared with PANI-Ag nanocomposite, PANI-Au nanocomposite and pristine PANI. The novelty of this study is the polymer-bimetal synthesis and its antibacterial potential.

  13. Microplate assay for screening the antibacterial activity of Schiff bases derived from substituted benzopyran-4-one.

    PubMed

    Amin, Rehab M; Abdel-Kader, Nora S; El-Ansary, Aida L

    2012-09-01

    Schiff bases (SB(1)-SB(3)) were synthesized from the condensation of 6-formyl-7-hydroxy-5-methoxy-2-methylbenzopyran-4-one with 2-aminopyridine (SB(1)), p-phenylenediamine (SB(2)) and o-phenylenediamine (SB(3)), while Schiff bases (SB(4)-SB(6)) were synthesized by condensation of 5,7-dihydroxy-6-formyl-2-methylbenzopyran-4-one with 2-aminopyridine (SB(4)), p-phenylenediamine (SB(5)) and o-phenylenediamine (SB(6)). Schiff bases were characterized using elemental analysis, IR, UV-Vis, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR and mass spectroscopy. These compounds were screened for antibacterial activities by micro-plate assay technique. Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus capitis were exposed to different concentrations of the Schiff bases. Results showed that the antibacterial effect of these Schiff bases on Gram-negative bacteria were higher than that on Gram-positive bacteria moreover, the Schiff bases containing substituent OCH(3) on position five have higher antibacterial activity than that containing hydroxy group on the same position.

  14. Differences in antibacterial activity of benzalkonium chloride.

    PubMed

    Richards, R M; Mizrahi, L M

    1978-03-01

    Benzalkonium solutions obtained from different manufacturers were shown to have different activities. This difference in activity was related to the composition of the benzalkonium chloride. The potential seriousness of this situation is emphasized, and a recommendation is made that the official monographs on benzalkonium chloride be amended appropriately, noting the apparently superior antibacterial activity of the tetradecyl (C14) homolog.

  15. Superior Antibacterial Activity of Fe3O4-TiO2 Nanosheets under Solar Light.

    PubMed

    Ma, Shuanglong; Zhan, Sihui; Jia, Yanan; Zhou, Qixing

    2015-10-07

    Fe3O4-TiO2 nanosheets (Fe3O4-TNS) were synthesized by means of lamellar reverse micelles and solvothermal method, which were characterized by TEM, XRD, XPS, BET, and magnetic property analysis. It can be found that Fe3O4-TNS nanosheets exhibited better photocatalytic antibacterial activity toward Gram-negative Escherichia coli and Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus than pure Fe3O4 and TNS, and the antibacterial efficiency could reach 87.2% and 93.7% toward E. coli and S. aureus with 100 μg/mL Fe3O4-TNS after 2 h of simulated solar light illumination, respectively. The photocatalytic destruction of bacteria was further confirmed by fluorescent-based cell live/dead test and SEM images. It was uncovered that Fe3O4-TNS inactivated G- E. coli and G+ S. aureus by different mechanisms: the destruction of outer membranes and ruptured cell bodies were responsible for the bactericidal effect against E. coli, while the antibacterial effect toward S. aureus were due to the fact that the cells were adsorbed in form of clusters by massive Fe3O4-TNS, which could restrict their activities and cause malfunction of the selective permeable barriers. Furthermore, the antibacterial mechanism was studied by employing scavengers to understand exact roles of different reactive species, indicating the key roles of h(+) and H2O2. The recovery and reusability experiments indicated that Fe3O4-TNS still retained more than 90% bacteria removal efficiency even after five cycles. Considering the easy magnetic separation, bulk availability, and high antibacterial activity of Fe3O4-TNS, it is a promising candidate for cleaning the microbial contaminated water environment.

  16. Antibacterial activity of graphene layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dybowska-Sarapuk, Ł.; Kotela, A.; Krzemiński, J.; Janczak, D.; Wróblewska, M.; Marchel, H.; Łegorz, P.; Jakubowska, M.

    2016-09-01

    The bacterial biofilm is a direct cause of complications in management of various medical conditions. There is an ongoing search for a feasible method to prevent its growth, as an alternative to antibiotics, which are ineffective. The aim of the study was to prepare and evaluate a detailed algorithm for production of graphene coatings, using economically efficient methods of printed electronics (such as ink-jet printing or spray coating), and assess their antibacterial properties. Based on the preliminary results of our work we suggest that graphene coating may inhibit the formation of microbial biofilms. Further research is needed to verify antibacterial properties of graphene coatings and its future applications in prevention of biofilm-related infections, e.g. by coating surgical instruments, catheters or tracheostomy tubes. In addition, we propose a series of hypotheses to be evaluated in further work.

  17. Antibacterial activity of the essential oil from Ferula gummosa seed.

    PubMed

    Eftekhar, Fereshteh; Yousefzadi, Morteza; Borhani, K

    2004-12-01

    Antibacterial activity of Ferula gummosa essential oil was studied against bacterial laboratory ATCC standards using the disk diffusion method. The results showed activity against Gram(+) bacteria and Escherichia coli. Little antibacterial activity was found against Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

  18. Antibacterial Activity of 2-(2′,4′-Dibromophenoxy)-4,6-dibromophenol from Dysidea granulosa

    PubMed Central

    Shridhar, Divya M. P.; Mahajan, Girish B.; Kamat, Vijayendra P.; Naik, Chandrakant G.; Parab, Rajashri R.; Thakur, Nidhi R.; Mishra, Prabhu D.

    2009-01-01

    2-(2′,4′-Dibromophenoxy)-4,6-dibromophenol isolated from the marine sponge Dysidea granulosa (Bergquist) collected off the coast of Lakshadweep islands, Indian Ocean, exhibited potent and broad spectrum in-vitro antibacterial activity, especially against methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), methicillin sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA), vancomycin resistant Enterococci (VRE), vancomycin sensitive Enterococci (VSE) and Bacillus spp. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) was evaluated against 57 clinical and standard strains of Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria. The observed MIC range was 0.117–2.5 μg/mL against all the Gram positive bacteria and 0.5–2 μg/mL against Gram negative bacteria. The in-vitro antibacterial activity observed was better than that of the standard antibiotic linezolid, a marketed anti-MRSA drug. The results establish 2-(2′,4′-dibromophenoxy)-4,6-dibromophenol, as a potential lead molecule for anti-MRSA and anti-VRE drug development. PMID:19841726

  19. Recently approved and investigational antibiotics for treatment of severe infections caused by Gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Appelbaum, Peter C; Jacobs, Michael R

    2005-10-01

    The development of resistance in the major pathogenic Gram-positive genera Staphylococcus and Streptococccus has led to the need for new agents that are able to overcome existing resistance mechanisms or that have novel mechanisms of action. There is currently a dearth of new agents that are active against resistant bacterial species. Agents that have recently been approved for clinical use include linezolid, the first oxazolidinone in clinical use, daptomycin, the first lipopeptide in clinical use, and telithromycin, a ketolide that is derived from clarithromycin. Agents currently in clinical development include tigecycline, a broad-spectrum intravenous tetracycline, ceftobiprole, a broad-spectrum cephalosporin that has activity against methicillin-resistant staphylococci, DX-619 and WCK-771, which are potent quinolones that have activity against quinolone-resistant staphylococci, oritavancin and dalbavancin, both of which are new glycopeptides, and iclaprim, which is a diaminopyrimidine. Additional agents that are in preclinical development against Gram-positive pathogens include quinoline-naphthyridine agents, which target novel DNA gyrase sites, other novel quinolones that have high potency, peptide deformylase inhibitors, and new lincosamide, oxazolidinone, lipopeptide and cephalosporin derivatives. Misuse of potent new agents will, however, result in the inevitable development of resistance to these agents; responsible use of potent new agents is required to prevent continuation of this vicious cycle.

  20. Preparation, characterization, and antibacterial activity of silver nanoparticle-decorated graphene oxide nanocomposite.

    PubMed

    Shao, Wei; Liu, Xiufeng; Min, Huihua; Dong, Guanghui; Feng, Qingyuan; Zuo, Songlin

    2015-04-01

    In this work, we report a facile and green approach to prepare a uniform silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) decorated graphene oxide (GO) nanocomposite (GO-Ag). The nanocomposite was fully characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra, ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) absorption spectra, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), which demonstrated that AgNPs with a diameter of approximately 22 nm were uniformly and compactly deposited on GO. To investigate the silver ion release behaviors, HEPES buffers with different pH (5.5, 7, and 8.5) were selected and the mechanism of release actions was discussed in detail. The cytotoxicity of GO-Ag nanocomposite was also studied using HEK 293 cells. GO-Ag nanocomposite displayed good cytocompatibility. Furthermore, the antibacterial properties of GO-Ag nanocomposite were studied using Gram-negative E. coli ATCC 25922 and Gram-positive S. aureus ATCC 6538 by both the plate count method and disk diffusion method. The nanocomposite showed excellent antibacterial activity. These results demonstrated that GO-Ag nanocomposite, as a kind of antibacterial material, had a great promise for application in a wide range of biomedical applications.

  1. Electrospun chitosan nanofibers with controlled levels of silver nanoparticles. Preparation, characterization and antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Jin; Heo, Dong Nyoung; Moon, Ji-Hoi; Ko, Wan-Kyu; Lee, Jung Bok; Bae, Min Soo; Park, Se Woong; Kim, Ji Eun; Lee, Dong Hyun; Kim, Eun-Cheol; Lee, Chang Hoon; Kwon, Il Keun

    2014-10-13

    The ideal wound dressing would have properties that allow for absorption of exudates, and inhibition of microorganism for wound protection. In this study, we utilized an electrospinning (ELSP) technique to design a novel wound dressing. Chitosan (CTS) nanofibers containing various ratios of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were obtained. AgNPs were generated directly in the CTS solution by using a chemical reduction method. The formation and presence of AgNPs in the CTS/AgNPs composite was confirmed by x-ray diffraction (XRD), ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The electrospun CTS/AgNPs nanofibers were characterized morphologically by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). These nanofibers were subsequently tested to evaluate their antibacterial activity against gram-negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) and gram-positive Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Results of this antibacterial testing suggest that CTS/AgNPs nanofibers may be effective in topical antibacterial treatment in wound care.

  2. Novel Synthesis of Kanamycin Conjugated Gold Nanoparticles with Potent Antibacterial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Jason N.; Waghwani, Hitesh K.; Connor, Michael G.; Hamilton, William; Tockstein, Sarah; Moolani, Harsh; Chavda, Fenil; Badwaik, Vivek; Lawrenz, Matthew B.; Dakshinamurthy, Rajalingam

    2016-01-01

    With a sharp increase in the cases of multi-drug resistant (MDR) bacteria all over the world, there is a huge demand to develop a new generation of antibiotic agents to fight them. As an alternative to the traditional drug discovery route, we have designed an effective antibacterial agent by modifying an existing commercial antibiotic, kanamycin, conjugated on the surface of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). In this study, we report a single-step synthesis of kanamycin-capped AuNPs (Kan-AuNPs) utilizing the combined reducing and capping properties of kanamycin. While Kan-AuNPs have increased toxicity to a primate cell line (Vero 76), antibacterial assays showed dose-dependent broad spectrum activity of Kan-AuNPs against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, including Kanamycin resistant bacteria. Further, a significant reduction in the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of Kan-AuNPs was observed when compared to free kanamycin against all the bacterial strains tested. Mechanistic studies using transmission electron microscopy and fluorescence microscopy indicated that at least part of Kan-AuNPs increased efficacy may be through disrupting the bacterial envelope, resulting in the leakage of cytoplasmic content and the death of bacterial cells. Results of this study provide critical information about a novel method for the development of antibiotic capped AuNPs as potent next-generation antibacterial agents. PMID:27330535

  3. Novel Synthesis of Kanamycin Conjugated Gold Nanoparticles with Potent Antibacterial Activity.

    PubMed

    Payne, Jason N; Waghwani, Hitesh K; Connor, Michael G; Hamilton, William; Tockstein, Sarah; Moolani, Harsh; Chavda, Fenil; Badwaik, Vivek; Lawrenz, Matthew B; Dakshinamurthy, Rajalingam

    2016-01-01

    With a sharp increase in the cases of multi-drug resistant (MDR) bacteria all over the world, there is a huge demand to develop a new generation of antibiotic agents to fight them. As an alternative to the traditional drug discovery route, we have designed an effective antibacterial agent by modifying an existing commercial antibiotic, kanamycin, conjugated on the surface of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). In this study, we report a single-step synthesis of kanamycin-capped AuNPs (Kan-AuNPs) utilizing the combined reducing and capping properties of kanamycin. While Kan-AuNPs have increased toxicity to a primate cell line (Vero 76), antibacterial assays showed dose-dependent broad spectrum activity of Kan-AuNPs against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, including Kanamycin resistant bacteria. Further, a significant reduction in the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of Kan-AuNPs was observed when compared to free kanamycin against all the bacterial strains tested. Mechanistic studies using transmission electron microscopy and fluorescence microscopy indicated that at least part of Kan-AuNPs increased efficacy may be through disrupting the bacterial envelope, resulting in the leakage of cytoplasmic content and the death of bacterial cells. Results of this study provide critical information about a novel method for the development of antibiotic capped AuNPs as potent next-generation antibacterial agents.

  4. Effect of ester to amide or N-methylamide substitution on bacterial membrane depolarization and antibacterial activity of novel cyclic lipopeptides.

    PubMed

    Bionda, Nina; Fleeman, Renee M; Shaw, Lindsey N; Cudic, Predrag

    2013-08-01

    Cyclic lipopeptides derived from the fusaricidin/LI-F family of naturally occurring antibiotics represent particularly attractive candidates for the development of new antibacterial agents. In comparison with natural products, these derivatives may offer better stability under physiologically relevant conditions and lower nonspecific toxicity, while preserving their antibacterial activity. In this study we assessed the ability of cyclic lipodepsipeptide 1 and its analogues--amide 2, N-methylamide 3, and linear peptide 4--to interact with the cytoplasmic membranes of selected Gram-positive bacteria. We also investigated their bacteriostatic/bactericidal modes of action and in vivo potency by using a Galleria mellonella model of MRSA infection. Cyclic lipopeptides 1 and 2 depolarize the cytoplasmic membranes of Gram-positive bacteria in a concentration-dependent manner. The degree of membrane depolarization was influenced by the structural and physical properties of 1 and 2, with the more flexible and hydrophobic peptide 1 being most efficient. However, membrane depolarization does not correlate with bacterial cell lethality, suggesting that membrane-targeting activity is not the main mode of action for this class of antibacterial peptides. Conversely, substitution of the depsipeptide bond in 1 with an N-methylamide bond in 3, or its hydrolysis to peptide 4, lead to a complete loss of antibacterial activity and indicate that the conformation of cyclic lipopeptides plays a role in their antibacterial activities. Cyclic lipopeptides 1 and 2 are also capable of improving the survival of G. mellonella larvae infected with MRSA at varying efficiencies, reflecting their in vitro activities. Gaining more insight into the structure-activity relationship and mode of action of these cyclic lipopeptides may enable the development of new antibiotics of this class with improved antibacterial activity.

  5. Synthesis, antibacterial and anti-MRSA activity, in vivo toxicity and a structure-activity relationship study of a quinoline thiourea.

    PubMed

    Dolan, Niamh; Gavin, Declan P; Eshwika, Ahmed; Kavanagh, Kevin; McGinley, John; Stephens, John C

    2016-01-15

    We report the synthesis, antibacterial evaluation of a series of thiourea-containing compounds. 1-(3,5-Bis(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)-3-((S)-(6-methoxyquinolin-4-yl)-((1S,2S,4S,5R)-5-vinylquinuclidin-2-yl)methyl)thiourea 5, was the most active against a range of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, and exhibited bacteriostatic activity against methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) comparable to that of the well-known antibacterial agent vancomycin. Quinoline thiourea 5 was subjected to a detailed structure-activity relationship study, with 5 and its derivatives evaluated for their bacteriostatic activity against both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. A number of structural features important for the overall activity of quinoline thiourea 5 have been identified. A selection of compounds, including 5, was also evaluated for their in vivo toxicity using the larvae of the Greater wax moth, Galleria mellonella. Compound 5, and a number of derivatives, were found to be non-toxic to the larvae of Galleria mellonella. A new class of antibiotic can result from the further development of this family of compounds.

  6. Enhanced antibacterial activity of bimetallic gold-silver core-shell nanoparticles at low silver concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Madhuchanda; Sharma, Shilpa; Chattopadhyay, Arun; Ghosh, Siddhartha Sankar

    2011-12-01

    Herein we report the development of bimetallic Au@Ag core-shell nanoparticles (NPs) where gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) served as the seeds for continuous deposition of silver atoms on its surface. The core-shell structure and morphology were examined by UV-Vis spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The core-shell NPs showed antibacterial activity against both Gram negative (Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) and Gram positive (Enterococcus faecalis and Pediococcus acidilactici) bacteria at low concentration of silver present in the shell, with more efficacy against Gram negative bacteria. TEM and flow cytometric studies showed that the core-shell NPs attached to the bacterial surface and caused membrane damage leading to cell death. The enhanced antibacterial properties of Au@Ag core-shell NPs was possibly due to the more active silver atoms in the shell surrounding gold core due to high surface free energy of the surface Ag atoms owing to shell thinness in the bimetallic NP structure.Herein we report the development of bimetallic Au@Ag core-shell nanoparticles (NPs) where gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) served as the seeds for continuous deposition of silver atoms on its surface. The core-shell structure and morphology were examined by UV-Vis spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The core-shell NPs showed antibacterial activity against both Gram negative (Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) and Gram positive (Enterococcus faecalis and Pediococcus acidilactici) bacteria at low concentration of silver present in the shell, with more efficacy against Gram negative bacteria. TEM and flow cytometric studies showed that the core-shell NPs attached to the bacterial surface and caused membrane damage leading to cell death. The enhanced antibacterial properties of Au@Ag core-shell NPs was

  7. N-Substituted N'-(2-alkylthio-4-chloro-5-methylbenzenesulfonyl)guanidines--Antibacterial, Cytotoxic Activities and Some Structure-Activity Relationships.

    PubMed

    Zołnowska, Beata; Sławiński, Jarosław; Grzonek, Aleksandra; Kędzia, Anna; Kwapisz, Ewa; Kawiak, Anna

    2015-01-01

    A series of N-substituted N'-(2-alkylthio-4-chloro-5-methylbenzenesulfonyl)guanidine derivatives bearing sulfonamide moiety have been screened in vitro for antibacterial activity against isolates from patients with infections of oral cavity, respiratory tract and intestinal tract. The majority of compounds exhibited good antibacterial potency. 1-[4-Chloro-5-methyl-2-(4-trifluoromethylbenzylthio)benzenesulfonyl]-3-(3-sulfamoylphenyl)guanidine (13) showed very strong activity, with MIC ≤ 6.2 μg/ml against eleven bacteria strains belonged to Gram-positive anaerobes and aerobes. Furthermore, compound 13 exhibited promising activity toward highly resistant microorganisms such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcusfaecalis. It was found that Parvimonas micra, Finegoldia magna, Peptostreptococcus anaerobius, Propionibacterium acnes showed the highest susceptibility toward the investigated guanidines.

  8. Symmetrically Substituted Xanthone Amphiphiles Combat Gram-Positive Bacterial Resistance with Enhanced Membrane Selectivity.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shuimu; Koh, Jun-Jie; Aung, Thet Tun; Lim, Fanghui; Li, Jianguo; Zou, Hanxun; Wang, Lin; Lakshminarayanan, Rajamani; Verma, Chandra; Wang, Yingjun; Tan, Donald T H; Cao, Derong; Beuerman, Roger W; Ren, Li; Liu, Shouping

    2017-02-23

    This is the first report of the design of a new series of symmetric xanthone derivatives that mimic antimicrobial peptides using a total synthesis approach. This novel design is advantageous because of its low cost, synthetic simplicity and versatility, and easy tuning of amphiphilicity by controlling the incorporated cationic and hydrophobic moieties. Two water-soluble optimized compounds, 6 and 18, showed potent activities against Gram-positive bacteria, including MRSA and VRE (MICs = 0.78-6.25 μg/mL) with a rapid bactericidal effect, low toxicity, and no emergence of drug resistance. Both compounds demonstrated enhanced membrane selectivity that was higher than those of most membrane-active antimicrobials in clinical trials or previous reports. The compounds appear to kill bacteria by disrupting their membranes. Significantly, 6 was effective in vivo using a mouse model of corneal infection. These results provide compelling evidence that these compounds have therapeutic potential as novel antimicrobials for multidrug-resistant Gram-positive infections.

  9. Mercury(II) complexes of unsymmetric phosphorus ylides: Synthesis, spectroscopic and antibacterial activity studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabounchei, Seyyed Javad; Panahimehr, Mohammad; Hosseinzadeh, Marjan; Karamian, Roya; Asadbegy, Mostafa; Masumi, Azadeh

    2014-03-01

    The reaction of Ph2PCH2PPh2 (dppm) with 2-bromo-3-nitroacetophenone and 2,2‧,4‧-trichloroacetophenone in chloroform produce the new phosphonium salts [Ph2PCH2PPh2CH2C(O)C6H4NO2]Br (1) and [Ph2PCH2PPh2CH2C(O)C6H3Cl2]Cl (2). Further, by reaction of the monophosphonium salts of dppm with the strong base triethylaminethe corresponding bidentate phosphorus ylides, Ph2PCH2PPh2C(H)C(O)C6H4NO2 (3) and Ph2PCH2PPh2C(H)C(O)C6H3Cl2 (4) were obtained. The reaction of these ligands with mercury(II) halides in dry methanol led to the formation of the mononuclear complexes {HgX2[(Ph2PCH2PPh2C(H)C(O)C6H4NO2)]} [X = Cl (5), Br (6), I (7)] and {HgX2[(Ph2PCH2PPh2C(H)C(O)C6H3Cl2)]} [X = Cl (8), Br (9), I (10)]. Characterization of the obtained compounds was performed by elemental analysis, IR, 1H, 31P and 13C NMR. The structure of compound 1 being unequivocally determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction techniques. The mass spectrum of compound 6 (as an instance) also demonstrates the synthesize of these compounds. In all complexes the title ylides are coordinated through the ylidic carbon and the phosphine atom. These compounds form five membered ring under complexation. The antibacterial effects of DMSO solutions of the ligands and their metal complexes were evaluated by the disc diffusion method against six Gram positive and negative bacteria. All compounds represent antibacterial activity against these bacteria with high levels of inhibitory potency exhibited against the Gram positive species.

  10. Priming the tooth surface with chlorhexidine and antibacterial activity of resin cement

    PubMed Central

    Saini, Monika; Singh, Yashpal; Garg, Rishabh; Pandey, Anita

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effect of priming the tooth surface with 2% chlorhexidine gluconate on antibacterial activity of resin cement. METHODS: Ten patients in whom a single missing tooth was present on both the right and left side in the upper or lower arch were selected. Two fixed partial dentures (FPDs) in each patient on the right and left side were planned. Each FPD was assigned either to the control or test group. In the control group, FPD was luted with resin cement and in the test group, the tooth surface was primed with 2% chlorhexidine gluconate before luting with resin cement. Bacteriological samples were collected at base line level, as the patient came to the outpatient department before the start of any treatment, 5 wk prior to cementation of FPD and at 13 wk (8 wk after final cementation). Microbiological processing of all samples was done and the results were statistically analyzed. RESULTS: In the test group, a predominance of aerobic/facultative gram positive cocci rod was seen which indicates a healthy periodontal site, whereas in the control group, a predominance of anaerobic gram negative rods was present which indicates an unhealthy periodontal condition. This is evident by the fact that the anaerobic bacteria percentage in the control sample is 57% and 15% in the test sample after 13 wk, whereas the aerobic/facultative bacteria percentage is 43% in the control sample and 85% in the test sample after 13 wk. The percentage of gram negative bacteria in the control sample is 61% and in the test sample is 20% after 13 wk, whereas the percentage of gram positive bacteria in the control sample is 39% and in the test sample is 80% after 13 wk. The shift from anaerobic gram negative bacteria to aerobic gram positive bacteria is clearly seen from the control to test sample after 13 wk. CONCLUSION: The present study demonstrated that priming the tooth surface with 2% chlorhexidine gluconate may enhance antibacterial activity of the resin cement. PMID

  11. Distinctive Binding of Avibactam to Penicillin-Binding Proteins of Gram-Negative and Gram-Positive Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Asli, Abdelhamid; Brouillette, Eric; Krause, Kevin M; Nichols, Wright W; Malouin, François

    2016-02-01

    Avibactam is a novel non-β-lactam β-lactamase inhibitor that covalently acylates a variety of β-lactamases, causing inhibition. Although avibactam presents limited antibacterial activity, its acylation ability toward bacterial penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) was investigated. Staphylococcus aureus was of particular interest due to the reported β-lactamase activity of PBP4. The binding of avibactam to PBPs was measured by adding increasing concentrations to membrane preparations of a variety of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria prior to addition of the fluorescent reagent Bocillin FL. Relative binding (measured here as the 50% inhibitory concentration [IC50]) to PBPs was estimated by quantification of fluorescence after gel electrophoresis. Avibactam was found to selectively bind to some PBPs. In Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Haemophilus influenzae, and S. aureus, avibactam primarily bound to PBP2, with IC50s of 0.92, 1.1, 3.0, and 51 μg/ml, respectively, whereas binding to PBP3 was observed in Streptococcus pneumoniae (IC50, 8.1 μg/ml). Interestingly, avibactam was able to significantly enhance labeling of S. aureus PBP4 by Bocillin FL. In PBP competition assays with S. aureus, where avibactam was used at a fixed concentration in combination with varied amounts of ceftazidime, the apparent IC50 of ceftazidime was found to be very similar to that determined for ceftazidime when used alone. In conclusion, avibactam is able to covalently bind to some bacterial PBPs. Identification of those PBP targets may allow the development of new diazabicyclooctane derivatives with improved affinity for PBPs or new combination therapies that act on multiple PBP targets.

  12. Antibacterial activity of selected Malaysian honey

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Antibacterial activity of honey is mainly dependent on a combination of its peroxide activity and non-peroxide components. This study aims to investigate antibacterial activity of five varieties of Malaysian honey (three monofloral; acacia, gelam and pineapple, and two polyfloral; kelulut and tualang) against Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Methods Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) and Minimum Bactericidal Concentration (MBC) were performed for semi-quantitative evaluation. Agar well diffusion assay was used to investigate peroxide and non-peroxide activities of honey. Results The results showed that gelam honey possessed lowest MIC value against S. aureus with 5% (w/v) MIC and MBC of 6.25% (w/v). Highest MIC values were shown by pineapple honey against E. coli and P. aeruginosa as well as acacia honey against E. coli with 25% (w/v) MIC and 50% (w/v) MBC values. Agar inhibition assay showed kelulut honey to possess highest total antibacterial activity against S. aureus with 26.49 equivalent phenol concentrations (EPC) and non-peroxide activity of 25.74 EPC. Lowest antibacterial activity was observed in acacia honey against E. coli with total activity of 7.85 EPC and non-peroxide activity of 7.59 EPC. There were no significant differences (p > 0.05) between the total antibacterial activities and non-peroxide activities of Malaysian honey. The intraspecific correlation between MIC and EPC of E. coli (r = -0.8559) was high while that between MIC and EPC of P. aeruginosa was observed to be moderate (r = -0.6469). S. aureus recorded a smaller correlation towards the opposite direction (r = 0.5045). In contrast, B.cereus showed a very low intraspecific correlation between MIC and EPC (r = -0.1482). Conclusions Malaysian honey, namely gelam, kelulut and tualang, have high antibacterial potency derived from total and non-peroxide activities, which implies that both peroxide and other

  13. Chemical modification of capuramycins to enhance antibacterial activity

    PubMed Central

    Bogatcheva, Elena; Dubuisson, Tia; Protopopova, Marina; Einck, Leo; Nacy, Carol A.; Reddy, Venkata M.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To extend capuramycin spectrum of activity beyond mycobacteria and improve intracellular drug activity. Methods Three capuramycin analogues (SQ997, SQ922 and SQ641) were conjugated with different natural and unnatural amino acids or decanoic acid (DEC) through an ester bond at one or more available hydroxyl groups. In vitro activity of the modified compounds was determined against Mycobacterium spp. and representative Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Intracellular activity was evaluated in J774A.1 mouse macrophages infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (H37Rv). Results Acylation of SQ997 and SQ641 with amino undecanoic acid (AUA) improved in vitro activity against most of the bacteria tested. Conjugation of SQ922 with DEC, but not AUA, improved its activity against Gram-positive bacteria. In the presence of efflux pump inhibitor phenylalanine arginine β-naphthyl amide, MICs of SQ997-AUA, SQ641-AUA and SQ922-DEC compounds improved even further against drug-susceptible and drug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. In Gram-negative bacteria, EDTA-mediated permeabilization caused 4- to 16-fold enhancement of the activity of AUA-conjugated SQ997, SQ922 and SQ641. Conjugation of all three capuramycin analogues with AUA improved intracellular killing of H37Rv in murine macrophages. Conclusions Conjugation of capuramycin analogues with AUA or DEC enhanced in vitro activity, extended the spectrum of activity in Gram-positive bacteria and increased intracellular activity against H37Rv. PMID:21186194

  14. Biotransformation of fluoroquinolone antibiotics by ligninolytic fungi--Metabolites, enzymes and residual antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Čvančarová, Monika; Moeder, Monika; Filipová, Alena; Cajthaml, Tomáš

    2015-10-01

    A group of white rot fungi (Irpex lacteus, Panus tigrinus, Dichomitus squalens, Trametes versicolor and Pleurotus ostreatus) was investigated for the biodegradation of norfloxacin (NOR), ofloxacin (OF) and ciprofloxacin (CIP). The selected fluoroquinolones were readily degraded almost completely by I. lacteus and T. versicolor within 10 and 14 d of incubation in liquid medium, respectively. The biodegradation products were identified by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. The analyses indicated that the fungi use similar mechanisms to degrade structurally related antibiotics. The piperazine ring of the molecules is preferably attacked via either substitution or/and decomposition. In addition to the degradation efficiency, attention was devoted to the residual antibiotic activities estimated using Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Only I. lacteus was able to remove the antibiotic activity during the course of the degradation of NOR and OF. The product-effect correlations evaluated by Principal Component Analysis (PCA) enabled elucidation of the participation of the individual metabolites in the residual antibacterial activity. Most of the metabolites correlated with the antibacterial activity, explaining the rather high residual activity remaining after the biodegradation. PCA of ligninolytic enzyme activities indicated that manganese peroxidase might participate in the degradation.

  15. Daptomycin: an evidence-based review of its role in the treatment of Gram-positive infections

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Ruiz, Armando; Seaton, R Andrew; Hamed, Kamal

    2016-01-01

    Infections caused by Gram-positive pathogens remain a major public health burden and are associated with high morbidity and mortality. Increasing rates of infection with Gram-positive bacteria and the emergence of resistance to commonly used antibiotics have led to the need for novel antibiotics. Daptomycin, a cyclic lipopeptide with rapid bactericidal activity against a wide range of Gram-positive bacteria including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, has been shown to be effective and has a good safety profile for the approved indications of complicated skin and soft tissue infections (4 mg/kg/day), right-sided infective endocarditis caused by S. aureus, and bacteremia associated with complicated skin and soft tissue infections or right-sided infective endocarditis (6 mg/kg/day). Based on its pharmacokinetic profile and concentration-dependent bactericidal activity, high-dose (>6 mg/kg/day) daptomycin is considered an important treatment option in the management of various difficult-to-treat Gram-positive infections. Although daptomycin resistance has been documented, it remains uncommon despite the increasing use of daptomycin. To enhance activity and to minimize resistance, daptomycin in combination with other antibiotics has also been explored and found to be beneficial in certain severe infections. The availability of daptomycin via a 2-minute intravenous bolus facilitates its outpatient administration, providing an opportunity to reduce risk of health care-associated infections, improve patient satisfaction, and minimize health care costs. Daptomycin, not currently approved for use in the pediatric population, has been shown to be widely used for treating Gram-positive infections in children. PMID:27143941

  16. Opioid Exacerbation of Gram-positive sepsis, induced by Gut Microbial Modulation, is Rescued by IL-17A Neutralization

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Jingjing; Banerjee, Santanu; Li, Dan; Sindberg, Gregory M.; Wang, Fuyuan; Ma, Jing; Roy, Sabita

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis is the predominant cause of mortality in ICUs, and opioids are the preferred analgesic in this setting. However, the role of opioids in sepsis progression has not been well characterized. The present study demonstrated that morphine alone altered the gut microbiome and selectively induced the translocation of Gram-positive gut bacteria in mice. Using a murine model of poly-microbial sepsis, we further demonstrated that morphine treatment led to predominantly Gram-positive bacterial dissemination. Activation of TLR2 by disseminated Gram-positive bacteria induced sustained up-regulation of IL-17A and IL-6. We subsequently showed that overexpression of IL-17A compromised intestinal epithelial barrier function, sustained bacterial dissemination and elevated systemic inflammation. IL-17A neutralization protected barrier integrity and improved survival in morphine-treated animals. We further demonstrated that TLR2 expressed on both dendritic cells and T cells play essential roles in IL-17A production. Additionally, intestinal sections from sepsis patients on opioids exhibit similar disruption in gut epithelial integrity, thus establishing the clinical relevance of this study. This is the first study to provide a mechanistic insight into the opioid exacerbation of sepsis and show that neutralization of IL-17A might be an effective therapeutic strategy to manage Gram-positive sepsis in patients on an opioid regimen. PMID:26039416

  17. Organic solvent adaptation of Gram positive bacteria: applications and biotechnological potentials.

    PubMed

    Torres, Sebastian; Pandey, Ashok; Castro, Guillermo R

    2011-01-01

    Organic-solvent-tolerant bacteria are considered extremophiles with different tolerance levels that change among species and strains, but also depend on the inherent toxicity of the solvent. Extensive studies to understand the mechanisms of organic solvent tolerance have been done in Gram-negative bacteria. On the contrary, the information on the solvent tolerance mechanisms in Gram-positive bacteria remains scarce. Possible shared mechanisms among Gram-(-) and Gram-(+) microorganisms include: energy-dependent active efflux pumps that export toxic organic solvents to the external medium; cis-to-trans isomerization of unsaturated membrane fatty acids and modifications in the membrane phospholipid headgroups; formation of vesicles loaded with toxic compounds; and changes in the biosynthesis rate of phospholipids to accelerate repair processes. However, additional physiological responses of Gram-(+) bacteria to organic solvents seem to be specific. The aim of the present work is to review the state of the art of responsible mechanisms for organic solvent tolerance in Gram-positive bacteria, and their industrial and environmental biotechnology potential.

  18. Cyclodepsipeptides produced by actinomycetes inhibit cyclic-peptide-mediated quorum sensing in Gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Desouky, Said E; Shojima, Akane; Singh, Ravindra Pal; Matsufuji, Takahisa; Igarashi, Yasuhiro; Suzuki, Takashi; Yamagaki, Tohru; Okubo, Ken-Ichi; Ohtani, Kaori; Sonomoto, Kenji; Nakayama, Jiro

    2015-07-01

    Cyclic peptides are commonly used as quorum-sensing autoinducers in Gram-positive Firmicutes bacteria. Well-studied examples of such molecules are thiolactone and lactone, used to regulate the expression of a series of virulence genes in the agr system of Staphylococcus aureus and the fsr system of Enterococcus faecalis, respectively. Three cyclodepsipeptides WS9326A, WS9326B and cochinmicin II/III were identified as a result of screening actinomycetes culture extracts for activity against the agr/fsr system. These molecules are already known as receptor antagonists, the first two for tachykinin and the last one for endothelin. WS9326A also inhibited the transcription of pfoA regulated by the VirSR two-component system in Clostridium perfringens. Receptor-binding assays using a fluorescence-labeled autoinducer (FITC-GBAP) showed that WS9326A and WS9326B act as receptor antagonists in this system. In addition, an ex vivo assay showed that WS9326B substantially attenuated the toxicity of S. aureus for human corneal epithelial cells. These results suggest that these three natural cyclodepsipeptides have therapeutic potential for targeting the cyclic peptide-mediated quorum sensing of Gram-positive pathogens.

  19. Characterization of Antibacterial Activities of Eastern Subterranean Termite, Reticulitermes flavipes, against Human Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Yuan; Hu, Xing Ping

    2016-01-01

    The emergence and dissemination of multidrug resistant bacterial pathogens necessitate research to find new antimicrobials against these organisms. We investigated antimicrobial production by eastern subterranean termites, Reticulitermes flavipes, against a panel of bacteria including three multidrug resistant (MDR) and four non-MDR human pathogens. We determined that the crude extract of naïve termites had a broad-spectrum activity against the non-MDR bacteria but it was ineffective against the three MDR pathogens Pseudomonas aeruginosa, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), and Acinetobacter baumannii. Heat or trypsin treatment resulted in a complete loss of activity suggesting that antibacterial activity was proteinaceous in nature. The antimicrobial activity changed dramatically when the termites were fed with either heat-killed P. aeruginosa or MRSA. Heat-killed P. aeruginosa induced activity against P. aeruginosa and MRSA while maintaining or slightly increasing activity against non-MDR bacteria. Heat-killed MRSA induced activity specifically against MRSA, altered the activity against two other Gram-positive bacteria, and inhibited activity against three Gram-negative bacteria. Neither the naïve termites nor the termites challenged with heat-killed pathogens produced antibacterial activity against A. baumannii. Further investigation demonstrated that hemolymph, not the hindgut, was the primary source of antibiotic activity. This suggests that the termite produces these antibacterial activities and not the hindgut microbiota. Two-dimensional gel electrophoretic analyses of 493 hemolymph protein spots indicated that a total of 38 and 65 proteins were differentially expressed at least 2.5-fold upon being fed with P. aeruginosa and MRSA, respectively. Our results provide the first evidence of constitutive and inducible activities produced by R. flavipes against human bacterial pathogens. PMID:27611223

  20. Performance properties and antibacterial activity of crosslinked films of quaternary ammonium modified starch and poly(vinyl alcohol).

    PubMed

    Sekhavat Pour, Zahra; Makvandi, Pooyan; Ghaemy, Mousa

    2015-09-01

    There has been a growing interest in developing antibacterial polymeric materials. In the present work, novel antibacterial cross-linked blend films were prepared based on polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and quaternary ammonium starch (ST-GTMAC) using citric acid (CA) as plasticizer and glutaraldehyde (GA) as cross-linker. The ST-GTMAC was successfully synthesized from reaction between water-soluble oxidized starch and glycidyltrimethylammonium chloride (GTMAC). The effect of ST-GTMAC, CA and GA contents on the swelling, solubility, mechanical and thermal properties of the films was investigated. It was found that incorporation of ST-GTMAC reduced UV-transmittance and provided antibacterial properties, increasing GA content increased tensile strength and decreased solubility and swelling degree of the films, while CA acted as plasticizer when its concentration was above 10 wt%. The results showed that ST-GTMAC/PVA/CA/GA film has fair antibacterial activity against Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis) and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) bacteria. These results suggest that the prepared film might be used as potential antibacterial material in medical and packaging applications.

  1. Chemical Composition, Antioxidant, DNA Damage Protective, Cytotoxic and Antibacterial Activities of Cyperus rotundus Rhizomes Essential Oil against Foodborne Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Qing-Ping; Cao, Xin-Ming; Hao, Dong-Lin; Zhang, Liang-Liang

    2017-01-01

    Cyperus rotundus L. (Cyperaceae) is a medicinal herb traditionally used to treat various clinical conditions at home. In this study, chemical composition of Cyperus rotundus rhizomes essential oil, and in vitro antioxidant, DNA damage protective and cytotoxic activities as well as antibacterial activity against foodborne pathogens were investigated. Results showed that α-cyperone (38.46%), cyperene (12.84%) and α-selinene (11.66%) were the major components of the essential oil. The essential oil had an excellent antioxidant activity, the protective effect against DNA damage, and cytotoxic effects on the human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cell, as well as antibacterial activity against several foodborne pathogens. These biological activities were dose-dependent, increasing with higher dosage in a certain concentration range. The antibacterial effects of essential oil were greater against Gram-positive bacteria as compared to Gram-negative bacteria, and the antibacterial effects were significantly influenced by incubation time and concentration. These results may provide biological evidence for the practical application of the C. rotundus rhizomes essential oil in food and pharmaceutical industries. PMID:28338066

  2. The human Lactobacillus acidophilus strain LA1 secretes a nonbacteriocin antibacterial substance(s) active in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Bernet-Camard, M F; Liévin, V; Brassart, D; Neeser, J R; Servin, A L; Hudault, S

    1997-01-01

    The adhering human Lactobacillus acidophilus strain LA1 inhibits the cell association and cell invasion of enteropathogens in cultured human intestinal Caco-2 cells (M. F. Bernet, D. Brassard, J. R. Neeser, and A. L. Servin, Gut 35:483-489, 1994). Here, we demonstrate that strain LA1 developed its antibacterial activity in conventional or germ-free mouse models orally infected by Salmonella typhimurium. We present evidence that the spent culture supernatant of strain LA1 (LA1-SCS) contained antibacterial components active against S. typhimurium infecting the cultured human intestinal Caco-2 cells. The LA1-SCS antibacterial activity was observed in vitro against a wide range of gram-negative and gram-positive pathogens, such as Staphylococcus aureus, Listeria monocytogenes, S. typhimurium, Shigella flexneri, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterobacter cloacae. By contrast, no activity was observed against species of the normal gut flora, such as lactobacilli and bifidobacteria. The LA1-SCS antibacterial activity was insensitive to proteases and independent of lactic acid production. PMID:9212421

  3. Detection of antibacterial activity of an enzymatic hydrolysate generated by processing rainbow trout by-products with trout pepsin.

    PubMed

    Wald, Maleen; Schwarz, Karin; Rehbein, Hartmut; Bußmann, Bettina; Beermann, Christopher

    2016-08-15

    Trout by-product hydrolysates, generated using trout pepsin, were characterized and studied in terms of their antibacterial effects against food contaminants and fish farming pathogens. After a hydrolysis time of 25 min, the hydrolysates demonstrated inhibitory activity against several gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. The degree of hydrolysis (DH) was found to exert a considerable influence on antibacterial activity, with a significant increase in the observed inhibitory effect at the beginning of hydrolysis. The highest antibacterial activity was obtained at a DH of 30% (enzyme/protein ratio 0.04 U/mg of protein, enzyme activity 6.5 U/mg protein, hydrolysis conditions 37°C, pH 3.0). The highest antibacterial activity detected was against the fish farming bacteria Flavobacterium psychrophilum and Renibacterium salmoninarum, with minimal inhibition concentrations of 2mg/ml and 5mg/ml, respectively. The amino acid determination of the hydrolysate (DH 30%) revealed that lysine, leucine, alanine, arginine, glycine, aspartic acid and glutamic acid residues represented the major amino acids.

  4. Antibacterial Activity of Honey on Cariogenic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi – Motamayel, Fatemeh; Hendi, Seyedeh Sare; Alikhani, Mohammad Yusof; Khamverdi, Zahra

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Honey has antibacterial activity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial activity of honey on Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus. Materials and Methods: In this in vitro study, solutions containing 0%, 5%, 10%, 20%, 50% and 100%(w/v) of natural Hamadan honey were prepared. Each blood (nutrient) agar plate was then filled with dilutions of the honey. The strains of bacteria were inoculated in blood agar for 24 hours at 37°C and were adjusted according to the McFarland scale (10×10 cfumcl−1). All assays were repeated 10 times for each of the honey concentrations. Data were analyzed by non parametric Chi-Square test. Statistical significance was set at α=0.05. Results: Significant antibacterial activity was detected for honey on Streptococcus mutans in concentrations more than 20% and on Lactobacillus in 100% concentration (P<0.05). Conclusion: It seems that antibacterial activity of honey could be used for prevention and reduction of dental caries. PMID:23724198

  5. Synthesis, cytotoxicity and antibacterial activity of new esters of polyether antibiotic - salinomycin.

    PubMed

    Antoszczak, Michał; Popiel, Katarzyna; Stefańska, Joanna; Wietrzyk, Joanna; Maj, Ewa; Janczak, Jan; Michalska, Greta; Brzezinski, Bogumil; Huczyński, Adam

    2014-04-09

    A series of 12 novel ester derivatives of naturally occurring polyether antibiotic - salinomycin were synthesized, characterised by spectroscopic method and evaluated for their in vitro antibacterial activity and cytotoxicity. The new esters were demonstrated to form complexes with monovalent and divalent metal cation of 1:1 stoichiometry in contrast to the salinomycin which forms only complexes with monovalent cations. All the obtained compounds show potent antiproliferative activity against human cancer cell lines and a good selectivity index for cancer versus mammalian cells. Additionally, 3 compounds showed higher antiproliferative activity against the drug-resistant cancer cells and lower toxicity towards normal cells than those of unmodified salinomycin and standard anticancer drugs such as cisplatin and doxorubicin. Some of the synthesized compounds showed good inhibitory activity against Staphylococcus strains and clinical isolates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Staphylococcus epidermidis (MRSE). These studies show that salinomycin esters are interesting scaffolds for the development of novel anticancer and Gram-positive antibacterial agents.

  6. Eco-friendly decoration of graphene oxide with biogenic silver nanoparticles: antibacterial and antibiofilm activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Faria, Andreia Fonseca; de Moraes, Ana Carolina Mazarin; Marcato, Priscyla Daniely; Martinez, Diego Stéfani Teodoro; Durán, Nelson; Filho, Antônio Gomes Souza; Brandelli, Adriano; Alves, Oswaldo Luiz

    2014-02-01

    This work reports on preparation, characterization, and antibacterial activity of graphene oxide (GO) decorated with biogenic silver nanoparticles (Bio-AgNPs) produced by the fungus Fusarium oxysporum. This nanocomposite (Bio-GOAg) was prepared by an ex situ process through the physical mixture of a GO dispersion with the previously prepared Bio-AgNPs. The adsorption of the Bio-AgNPs onto the GO sheets was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy. The average size of the Bio-AgNPs anchored onto the GO surface was found to be 3.5 nm. The antibacterial activity of the Bio-GOAg nanocomposite against Gram-positive and Gram-negative microorganisms was investigated and a very promising result was found for the Gram-negative strains. In addition, the Bio-GOAg nanocomposite displayed a very strong biocidal activity against the Salmonella typhimurium strain at a concentration of 2.0 μg/mL. The antibiofilm activity toward S. typhimurium adhered on stainless steel surfaces was also investigated. The results showed 100 % inhibition of the adhered cells after exposure to the Bio-GOAg nanocomposite for 1 h.

  7. Synthesis, characterization and antibacterial activity of biodegradable films prepared from Schiff bases of zein.

    PubMed

    Soliman, E A; Khalil, A A; Deraz, S F; El-Fawal, G; Elrahman, S Abd

    2014-10-01

    Pure zein is known to be very hydrophobic, but is still inappropriate for coating and film applications because of their brittle nature. In an attempt to improve the flexibility and the antimicrobial activity of these coatings and films, Chemical modification of zein through forming Schiff bases with different phenolic aldhydes was tried. Influence of this modifications on mechanical, topographical, wetting properties and antimicrobial activity of zein films were evaluated. The chemical structure of the Schiff bases films were characterized by ATR-FTIR spectroscopy. The results indicate an improvement in mechanical properties with chemically modification of zein to form Schiff bases leading to a reduction in the elastic modulus. An increase in the elongation at break has been observed, but with slight influence on tensile strength. Plasticized zein films have similar initial contact angle (∼40°). An increase in reaction temperature and time increases film's affinity towards water. As shown by contact angle measurements, a noticeable relation was found between film composition and the hydrophilicity. Surface topography also varied by forming Schiff bases, becoming rougher than zein-based films. The antibacterial activities of zein and Schiff bases of zein-based films were investigated against gram-positive bacteria (Listeria innocua, Listeria monocytogenes, Bacillus cereus and Clostridium sporogenes) and gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli, Yersinia enterocolitica and Salmonella enterica). It was found that the antibacterial activity of the Schiff bases-based films was more effective than that of zein-based films.

  8. A novel green synthesis of silver nanoparticles using soluble starch and its antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Yakout, Sobhy M; Mostafa, Ashraf A

    2015-01-01

    A green method of Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) preparation has been established. This method depends on reduction of silver nitrate with soluble starch. The formation of AgNPs was observed by the color change from colorless to dark brown through the starch addition into silver nitrate solution. It was observed that use of starch makes convenient method for the synthesis of silver nanoparticles and can reduce silver ions into the produced silver nanoparticles within one hour of reaction time without using any harsh conditions. The prepared silver nanoparticles were characterized by using UV-visible spectroscopy and evaluated for its antimicrobial activity. The synthesized green AgNPs showed a potential antibacterial activity that was stronger against Gram positive pathogenic bacteria (Staphylococus aureus and Streptococus pyogenes) than against Gram negative pathogenic bacteria (Salmonella typhi, Shigellasonnei and Pseudomonas aeruginosa). Inhibition zones diameter of antibacterial activity depends upon nanoparticles concentration as AgNPs exhibited greater inhibition zone for S.aureus (16.4 mm) followed by P. aeruginosa and S. pyogenes while the least activity was observed for S. typhi (10.4 mm) at 40 μl/ disc. These results suggested that AgNPs can be used as an effective antiseptic agents in medical fields and process of synthesis creates new opportunities in process development for the synthesis of safe and eco-friendly AgNPs.

  9. A novel green synthesis of silver nanoparticles using soluble starch and its antibacterial activity

    PubMed Central

    Yakout, Sobhy M; Mostafa, Ashraf A

    2015-01-01

    A green method of Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) preparation has been established. This method depends on reduction of silver nitrate with soluble starch. The formation of AgNPs was observed by the color change from colorless to dark brown through the starch addition into silver nitrate solution. It was observed that use of starch makes convenient method for the synthesis of silver nanoparticles and can reduce silver ions into the produced silver nanoparticles within one hour of reaction time without using any harsh conditions. The prepared silver nanoparticles were characterized by using UV-visible spectroscopy and evaluated for its antimicrobial activity. The synthesized green AgNPs showed a potential antibacterial activity that was stronger against Gram positive pathogenic bacteria (Staphylococus aureus and Streptococus pyogenes) than against Gram negative pathogenic bacteria (Salmonella typhi, Shigellasonnei and Pseudomonas aeruginosa). Inhibition zones diameter of antibacterial activity depends upon nanoparticles concentration as AgNPs exhibited greater inhibition zone for S.aureus (16.4 mm) followed by P. aeruginosa and S. pyogenes while the least activity was observed for S. typhi (10.4 mm) at 40 μl/ disc. These results suggested that AgNPs can be used as an effective antiseptic agents in medical fields and process of synthesis creates new opportunities in process development for the synthesis of safe and eco-friendly AgNPs. PMID:26064246

  10. Antibacterial activity of nanosilver ions and particles.

    PubMed

    Sotiriou, Georgios A; Pratsinis, Sotiris E

    2010-07-15

    The antibacterial activity of nanosilver against Gram negative Escherichia coli bacteria is investigated by immobilizing nanosilver on nanostructured silica particles and closely controlling Ag content and size. These Ag/SiO(2) nanoparticles were characterized by S/TEM, EDX spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction the exposed Ag surface area was measured qualitatively by O(2) chemisorption. Furthermore, the fraction of dissolved nanosilver was determined by measuring the released (leached) Ag(+) ion concentration in aqueous suspensions of such Ag/SiO(2) particles. The antibacterial effect of Ag(+) ions was distinguished from that of nanosilver particles by monitoring the growth of E. coli populations in the presence and absence of Ag/SiO(2) particles. The antibacterial activity of nanosilver was dominated by Ag(+) ions when fine Ag nanoparticles (less than about 10 nm in average diameter) were employed that release high concentrations of Ag(+) ions. In contrast, when relatively larger Ag nanoparticles were used, the concentration of the released Ag(+) ions was lower. Then the antibacterial activity of the released Ag(+) ions and nanosilver particles was comparable.

  11. Solid-phase synthesis, characterization, and antibacterial activities of metallocene-peptide bioconjugates.

    PubMed

    Chantson, Janine T; Verga Falzacappa, Maria Vittoria; Crovella, Sergio; Metzler-Nolte, Nils

    2006-11-01

    This work shows how the introduction of an organometallic group enhances and modifies the specificity of biologically active peptides. Ferrocene was chosen as an organometallic group because it has been shown to alter the pharmacodynamic profile of bioactive compounds. A comparison with the isosteric cobaltocenium group allows one to explore the influence of charge and redox potential on the biological activity of the conjugates. Arginine and tryptophan containing peptides H-WRWRWR-NH(2) and H-RWRWRW-NH(2) and the metallocene peptide bioconjugates [M]-C(O)-RWRWR-NH(2) and [M]-C(O)-WRWRW-NH(2), where [M]=[Co(Cp)(C(5)H(4))](+), [Fe(Cp)(C(5)H(4))] were prepared by solid-phase peptide synthesis (SPPS). They were purified by HPLC, characterized by ESIMS and NMR spectroscopy, and tested for antibacterial properties against Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Staphylococcus aureus using the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) test. In most cases, no metal-specific activity could be observed. However, the conjugate [Fe(Cp)(C(5)H(4))-C(O)-WRWRW-NH(2)] 6 was found to be particularly effective against the Gram-positive S. aureus. The activity of this metallocene-pentapeptide conjugate (7.1 microM) was even better than the 20 amino acid naturally occurring pilosulin 2, which was used as a positive control. Unlike all other compounds tested, which were most active against the Gram-negative E. coli strain, the ferrocene conjugate 6 was the only compound in this series that was most active against Gram-positive bacteria. Given the health concerns resulting from multidrug resistant S. aureus strains, the incorporation of metallocenes may provide a novel line of attack.

  12. Synthesis, Structure–Activity Relationship Studies, and Antibacterial Evaluation of 4-Chromanones and Chalcones, as Well as Olympicin A and Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    On the basis of recently reported abyssinone II and olympicin A, a series of chemically modified flavonoid phytochemicals were synthesized and evaluated against Mycobacterium tuberculosis and a panel of Gram-positive and -negative bacterial pathogens. Some of the synthesized compounds exhibited good antibacterial activities against Gram-positive pathogens including methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus with minimum inhibitory concentration as low as 0.39 μg/mL. SAR analysis revealed that the 2-hydrophobic substituent and the 4-hydrogen bond donor/acceptor of the 4-chromanone scaffold together with the hydroxy groups at 5- and 7-positions enhanced antibacterial activities; the 2′,4′-dihydroxylated A ring and the lipophilic substituted B ring of chalcone derivatives were pharmacophoric elements for antibacterial activities. Mode of action studies performed on selected compounds revealed that they dissipated the bacterial membrane potential, resulting in the inhibition of macromolecular biosynthesis; further studies showed that selected compounds inhibited DNA topoisomerase IV, suggesting complex mechanisms of actions for compounds in this series. PMID:25238443

  13. A Novel Surface Structure Consisting of Contact-active Antibacterial Upper-layer and Antifouling Sub-layer Derived from Gemini Quaternary Ammonium Salt Polyurethanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Wei; Zhang, Yi; Li, Jiehua; Gao, Yunlong; Luo, Feng; Tan, Hong; Wang, Kunjie; Fu, Qiang

    2016-08-01

    Contact-active antibacterial surfaces play a vital role in preventing bacterial contamination of artificial surfaces. In the past, numerous researches have been focused on antibacterial surfaces comprising of antifouling upper-layer and antibacterial sub-layer. In this work, we demonstrate a reversed surface structure which integrate antibacterial upper-layer and antifouling sub-layer. These surfaces are prepared by simply casting gemini quaternary ammonium salt waterborne polyurethanes (GWPU) and their blends. Due to the high interfacial energy of gemini quaternary ammonium salt (GQAS), chain segments containing GQAS can accumulate at polymer/air interface to form an antibacterial upper-layer spontaneously during the film formation. Meanwhile, the soft segments composed of polyethylene glycol (PEG) formed the antifouling sub-layer. Our findings indicate that the combination of antibacterial upper-layer and antifouling sub-layer endow these surfaces strong, long-lasting antifouling and contact-active antibacterial properties, with a more than 99.99% killing efficiency against both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria attached to them.

  14. A Novel Surface Structure Consisting of Contact-active Antibacterial Upper-layer and Antifouling Sub-layer Derived from Gemini Quaternary Ammonium Salt Polyurethanes

    PubMed Central

    He, Wei; Zhang, Yi; Li, Jiehua; Gao, Yunlong; Luo, Feng; Tan, Hong; Wang, Kunjie; Fu, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Contact-active antibacterial surfaces play a vital role in preventing bacterial contamination of artificial surfaces. In the past, numerous researches have been focused on antibacterial surfaces comprising of antifouling upper-layer and antibacterial sub-layer. In this work, we demonstrate a reversed surface structure which integrate antibacterial upper-layer and antifouling sub-layer. These surfaces are prepared by simply casting gemini quaternary ammonium salt waterborne polyurethanes (GWPU) and their blends. Due to the high interfacial energy of gemini quaternary ammonium salt (GQAS), chain segments containing GQAS can accumulate at polymer/air interface to form an antibacterial upper-layer spontaneously during the film formation. Meanwhile, the soft segments composed of polyethylene glycol (PEG) formed the antifouling sub-layer. Our findings indicate that the combination of antibacterial upper-layer and antifouling sub-layer endow these surfaces strong, long-lasting antifouling and contact-active antibacterial properties, with a more than 99.99% killing efficiency against both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria attached to them. PMID:27561546

  15. Colloidal and antibacterial properties of novel triple-headed, double-tailed amphiphiles: exploring structure-activity relationships and synergistic mixtures.

    PubMed

    Marafino, John N; Gallagher, Tara M; Barragan, Jhosdyn; Volkers, Brandi L; LaDow, Jade E; Bonifer, Kyle; Fitzgerald, Gabriel; Floyd, Jason L; McKenna, Kristin; Minahan, Nicholas T; Walsh, Brenna; Seifert, Kyle; Caran, Kevin L

    2015-07-01

    Two novel series of tris-cationic, tripled-headed, double-tailed amphiphiles were synthesized and the effects of tail length and head group composition on the critical aggregation concentration (CAC), thermodynamic parameters, and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) against six bacterial strains were investigated. Synergistic antibacterial combinations of these amphiphiles were also identified. Amphiphiles in this study are composed of a benzene core with three benzylic ammonium bromide groups, two of which have alkyl chains, each 8-16 carbons in length. The third head group is a trimethylammonium or pyridinium. Log of critical aggregation concentration (log[CAC]) and heat of aggregation (ΔHagg) were both inversely proportional to the length of the linear hydrocarbon chains. Antibacterial activity increases with tail length until an optimal tail length of 12 carbons per chain, above which, activity decreased. The derivatives with two 12 carbon chains had the best antibacterial activity, killing all tested strains at concentrations of 1-2μM for Gram-positive and 4-16μM for Gram-negative bacteria. The identity of the third head group (trimethylammonium or pyridinium) had minimal effect on colloidal and antibacterial activity. The antibacterial activity of several binary combinations of amphiphiles from this study was higher than activity of individual amphiphiles, indicating that these combinations are synergistic. These amphiphiles show promise as novel antibacterial agents that could be used in a variety of applications.

  16. Microwave-assisted synthesis, characterization and antibacterial activity of Ag/ZnO nanoparticles supported bentonite clay.

    PubMed

    Motshekga, Sarah C; Ray, Suprakas S; Onyango, Maurice S; Momba, Maggie N B

    2013-11-15

    Composites of silver-zinc oxide nanoparticles supported on bentonite clay were synthesized by the microwave-assisted synthesis method for use as an antibacterial material. Silver nitrate was used as the precursor of silver nanoparticles while zinc oxide nanoparticles were commercially sourced. The composites were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and BET surface area measurements. XRD spectra showed peaks of silver confirming the formation of the silver and not of the silver nitrate or any other impurity of the metal. Meanwhile TEM confirmed the formation of silver and zinc oxide nanoparticles on the clay layers, with particle sizes ranging from 9-30 nm and 15-70 nm, respectively. The antibacterial activities of the composites were evaluated against Gram negative Escherichia coli bacteria and Gram positive Enterococcus faecalis bacteria by the disc diffusion method. Whereas both composites of Ag-clay and ZnO-clay showed good antibacterial activity against bacteria, a better antibacterial activity was observed with Ag/ZnO-clay composite. The results therefore reveal that Ag/ZnO-clay composite is a promising bactericide that can be used for deactivating microbes in water.

  17. Antibacterial activities of crude extract of Aloe barbadensis to clinically isolated bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Ruchi; Mishra, Avinash

    2010-03-01

    The antibacterial activity of Aloe barbadensis was tested on clinically isolated bacterial pathogens i.e. Enterococcus bovis, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Proteus vulgaris, Proteus mirabilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Morganella morganii, and Klebsiella pneumoniae causing infection in human being. Ethanolic and aqueous extracts were used for the antibacterial effect, which was measured by the appearance of zone of inhibition. Relatively higher MIC concentrations were obtained for gram negative bacteria E. coli and K. pneumoniae, with ethanol extract; however, no inhibitory effect was noted for aqueous extract. Ethanolic extract possesses great inhibitory activity for gram positive bacteria, E. bovis followed by S. aureus. Among gram negative bacteria, highest inhibitory effect was observed with P. aeruginosa, followed by M. morganii, P. mirabilis, and P. vulgaris, which was significant (p < 0.01) than E. coli and K. pneumoniae. Antimicrobial activity tests of crude extract of A. barbadensis were carried out to validate the use of traditional medicinal herbal and results of this study tend to give credence to the common use of A. barbadensis gel and leaf.

  18. Chemical composition, antibacterial and antioxidant activities of six essentials oils from the Alliaceae family.

    PubMed

    Mnayer, Dima; Fabiano-Tixier, Anne-Sylvie; Petitcolas, Emmanuel; Hamieh, Tayssir; Nehme, Nancy; Ferrant, Christine; Fernandez, Xavier; Chemat, Farid

    2014-12-01

    Six essential oils (EOs) from the Alliaceae family, namely garlic (Allium sativum), onion (Allium cepa), leek (Allium porrum), Chinese chive (Allium tuberosum), shallot (Allium ascalonicum) and chive (Allium schoenoprasum) were characterized by GC and GC-MS and evaluated for their functional food properties. Antibacterial properties were tested on five food-borne pathogens: Two Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 25923), Listeria monocytogenes (ATCC 19115) and three Gram-negative Salmonella Typhimurium (ATCC 14028), Escherichia coli (ATCC 8739) and Campylobacter jejuni (ATCC 33291) bacteria. Antioxidant and radical-scavenging properties were tested by means of Folin-Ciocalteu and 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assays. Garlic, Chinese chive and onion EOs had the highest antibacterial activity whereas shallot and leek EOs were the strongest antioxidants. Heating caused a decrease in the antioxidant activity of these Eos, as shown in the Total Polar Materials (TPM) test. Suggestions on relationships between chemical composition and biological activities are presented. Results show that the EOs could be of value in the food industry as alternatives to synthetic antioxidants.

  19. Structural, optical, photocatalytic and antibacterial activity of zinc oxide and manganese doped zinc oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rekha, K.; Nirmala, M.; Nair, Manjula G.; Anukaliani, A.

    2010-08-01

    Polycrystalline ZnO doped with Mn (5 and 10 at%) was prepared by the co-precipitation method. The effect of Mn doping on the photocatalytic, antibacterial activities and the influence of doping concentration on structural, optical properties of nanoparticles were studied. Structural and optical properties of the particles elucidated that the Mn 2+ ions have substituted the Zn 2+ ions without changing the Wurtzite structure of ZnO. The optical spectra showed a blue shift in the absorbance spectrum with increasing dopant concentration. The photocatalytic activities of ZnO powders were evaluated by measuring the degradation of methylene blue (MB) in water under the UV region. It was found that undoped ZnO bleaches MB much faster than manganese doped ZnO upon its exposure to the UV light. The potential toxicity of nanosized ZnO and Mn doped ZnO were investigated using both Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria as test organisms. The results showed that Mn doped ZnO nanoparticles enhanced the antibacterial activity than ZnO nanoparticles.

  20. Antitubercular and antibacterial activity of quinonoid natural products against multi-drug resistant clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Dey, Diganta; Ray, Ratnamala; Hazra, Banasri

    2014-07-01

    Multi-drug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis and other bacterial pathogens represent a major threat to human health. In view of the critical need to augment the current drug regime, we have investigated therapeutic potential of five quinonoids, viz. emodin, diospyrin, plumbagin, menadione and thymoquinone, derived from natural products. The antimicrobial activity of quinonoids was evaluated against a broad panel of multi-drug and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (M/XDR-TB) strains, rapid growing mycobacteria and other bacterial isolates, some of which were producers of β-lactamase, Extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL), AmpC β-lactamase, metallo-beta-lactamase (MBL) enzymes, as well as their drug-sensitive ATCC counterparts. All the tested quinones exhibited antimycobacterial and broad spectrum antibacterial activity, particularly against M. tuberculosis (lowest MIC 0.25 µg/mL) and Gram-positive bacteria (lowest MIC <4 µg/mL) of clinical origin. The order of antitubercular activity of the tested quinonoids was plumbagin > emodin ~ menadione ~ thymoquinone > diospyrin, whereas their antibacterial efficacy was plumbagin > menadione ~ thymoquinone > diospyrin > emodin. Furthermore, this is the first evaluation performed on these quinonoids against a broad panel of drug-resistant and drug-sensitive clinical isolates, to the best of our knowledge.

  1. Honey: its medicinal property and antibacterial activity

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, Manisha Deb; Mandal, Shyamapada

    2011-01-01

    Indeed, medicinal importance of honey has been documented in the world's oldest medical literatures, and since the ancient times, it has been known to possess antimicrobial property as well as wound-healing activity. The healing property of honey is due to the fact that it offers antibacterial activity, maintains a moist wound condition, and its high viscosity helps to provide a protective barrier to prevent infection. Its immunomodulatory property is relevant to wound repair too. The antimicrobial activity in most honeys is due to the enzymatic production of hydrogen peroxide. However, another kind of honey, called non-peroxide honey (viz., manuka honey), displays significant antibacterial effects even when the hydrogen peroxide activity is blocked. Its mechanism may be related to the low pH level of honey and its high sugar content (high osmolarity) that is enough to hinder the growth of microbes. The medical grade honeys have potent in vitro bactericidal activity against antibiotic-resistant bacteria causing several life-threatening infections to humans. But, there is a large variation in the antimicrobial activity of some natural honeys, which is due to spatial and temporal variation in sources of nectar. Thus, identification and characterization of the active principle(s) may provide valuable information on the quality and possible therapeutic potential of honeys (against several health disorders of humans), and hence we discussed the medicinal property of honeys with emphasis on their antibacterial activities. PMID:23569748

  2. Honey: its medicinal property and antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Manisha Deb; Mandal, Shyamapada

    2011-04-01

    Indeed, medicinal importance of honey has been documented in the world's oldest medical literatures, and since the ancient times, it has been known to possess antimicrobial property as well as wound-healing activity. The healing property of honey is due to the fact that it offers antibacterial activity, maintains a moist wound condition, and its high viscosity helps to provide a protective barrier to prevent infection. Its immunomodulatory property is relevant to wound repair too. The antimicrobial activity in most honeys is due to the enzymatic production of hydrogen peroxide. However, another kind of honey, called non-peroxide honey (viz., manuka honey), displays significant antibacterial effects even when the hydrogen peroxide activity is blocked. Its mechanism may be related to the low pH level of honey and its high sugar content (high osmolarity) that is enough to hinder the growth of microbes. The medical grade honeys have potent in vitro bactericidal activity against antibiotic-resistant bacteria causing several life-threatening infections to humans. But, there is a large variation in the antimicrobial activity of some natural honeys, which is due to spatial and temporal variation in sources of nectar. Thus, identification and characterization of the active principle(s) may provide valuable information on the quality and possible therapeutic potential of honeys (against several health disorders of humans), and hence we discussed the medicinal property of honeys with emphasis on their antibacterial activities.

  3. Antibacterial activity in vitro of Thymus capitatus from Jordan.

    PubMed

    Qaralleh, Haitham N; Abboud, Muayad M; Khleifat, Khaled M; Tarawneh, Khaled A; Althunibat, Osama Y

    2009-07-01

    This study was carried out to evaluate the antibacterial activity of aqueous and organic extracts of Thymus capitatus L. (Lamiaceae) leaves and stems. Dried ground powder leaves and stems were extracted with water (aqueous extracts), ethanol, dichloromethane and hexane (Soxhlet extracts). The antibacterial activity of these extracts was evaluated against bacteria using disc diffusion method. The result obtained showed that the leaves had stronger antibacterial activity than the stems extracts. The ethanolic extract had the highest yield products and the high antibacterial activity than all other solvents. The results suggest that essential oil as non-polar organic compounds could be the main active compounds in this plant. Therefore the antibacterial activity of leaves ethanol extracts (LEE) was compared with essential oils leaves extracts (LEO) of T. capitatus. The LEO showed greater antibacterial activity than LEE. The LEO showed a broad spectrum of antibacterial activity and the Pseudomonas aeruginosa was the most sensitive bacteria.

  4. Considering the antibacterial activity of Zataria multiflora Boiss essential oil treated with gamma-irradiation in vitro and in vivo systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faezeh, Fatema; Salome, Dini; Abolfazl, Dadkhah; Reza, Zolfaghari Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the antibacterial activities of essential oils (EOs) obtained from the aerial parts of Zataria multiflora Boiss against Bacillus cereus, Pseudomonas aeroginosa, Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus by in vivo and in vitro methods. Also, the effects of gamma-irradiation (0, 10 and 25 kGy) as a new microbial decontamination on the antibacterial activities of Z. multiflora were examined. For this purpose, the collected herbs were exposed to radiation at doses of 0, 10 and 25 kGy following essential oil (EOs) extraction by steam distillation. Then, the in vitro antibacterial potency of the irradiated and non-irradiated oils was determined by using disc diffusion, agar well diffusion and MIC and MBC determination assays. The in vivo antibacterial activity was also studied in sepsis model induced by CLP surgery by Colony forming units (CFUs) determination. The results showed that the extracted oils were discovered to be effective against all the gram positive and gram negative pathogens in vitro system. In addition, the oil significantly diminished the increased CFU count observed in CLP group. Moreover, the irradiated samples were found to possess the antibacterial activities as the non-irradiated ones both in vitro and in vivo systems. These data indicated the potential use of gamma-irradiation as a safe technique for preservation of Z. multiflora as a medicinal plant with effective antibacterial activities.

  5. Antifungal and antibacterial activities of Mexican tarragon (Tagetes lucida).

    PubMed

    Céspedes, Carlos L; Avila, J Guillermo; Martínez, Andrés; Serrato, Blanca; Calderón-Mugica, José C; Salgado-Garciglia, Rafael

    2006-05-17

    Mexican tarragon (Tagetes lucida Cv. Asteraceae: Campanulatae) is an important, nutritious plant and an effective herbal medicine. Seven coumarins, 7,8-dihydroxycoumarin (4), umbelliferone (7-hydroxycoumarin) (5), scoparone (6,7-dimethoxycoumarin) (7), esculetin (6,7-dihydroxycoumarin) (11), 6-hydroxy-7-methoxycoumarin (12), herniarin (7-methoxycoumarin) (13), and scopoletin (6-methoxy-7-hydroxycoumarin) (14), and three flavonoids, patuletin (18), quercetin (19), and quercetagetin (20), were isolated from CH2Cl2 and MeOH extracts from aerial parts of T. lucida. In addition, 6,7-diacetoxy coumarin (15), 6-methoxy-7-acetylcoumarin (16), and 6-acetoxy-7-methoxycoumarin (17) derivatives were synthesized. 8-Methoxypsoralen (1), 8-acetyl-7-hydroxycoumarin (2), 7,8-dihydroxy-6-meth-oxycoumarin (3), 6,7-dimethoxy-4-methylcoumarin (6), 5,7-dihydroxy-4-methylcoumarin (8), 4-hydroxycoumarin (9), 4-hydroxy-6,7-dimethylcoumarin (10), naringenin (21), glycoside-7-rhamnonaringin (22), and rutin (23) were commercially obtained (Sigma-Aldrich). All of these compounds and extracts (M1 and M2) were assayed against bacteria and fungi. The antibacterial activity was determined on Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, Proteus mirabilis, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Salmonella typhi, Salmonella sp., Shigella boydii, Shigella sp., Enterobacter aerogenes, Enterobacter agglomerans, Sarcina lutea, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus, Yersinia enterolitica, Vibrio cholerae (three El Tor strains, CDC-V12, clinic case, and INDRE-206, were obtained from contaminated water), and V. cholerae (NO-O1). The evaluated fungi were Aspergillus niger, Penicillium notatum, Fusarium moniliforme, Fusarium sporotrichum, Rhizoctonia solani, and Trichophyton mentagrophytes. The most active compounds against Gram-positive and -negative bacteria were the dihydroxylated coumarins 3 and 4. In addition, 2-4, 6, 7, and 11 showed an interesting activity against V. cholerae, a key bacterium in the contaminated

  6. Antibacterial and antifungal activities of crude plant extracts from Colombian biodiversity.

    PubMed

    Niño, Jaime; Mosquera, Oscar M; Correa, Yaned M

    2012-12-01

    On a global scale, people have used plants to treat diseases and infections, and this has raised interest on the plant biodiversity potencial in the search of antimicrobial principles. In this work, 75 crude n-hexanes, dichloromethane and methanol extracts from the aerial parts of 25 plants belonging to four botanical families (Asteraceae, Euphorbiaceae, Rubiaceae and Solanaceae), collected at the Natural Regional Park Ucumari (Risaralda, Colombia), were evaluated for their antibacterial and antifungal activities by the agar well diffusion method. The antibacterial activities were assayed against two Gram-positive bacteria Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis, and three Gram-negative ones named, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In addition, the same plant extracts were tested against the yeast Candida albicans and the fungi Aspergillus fumigatus and Fusarium solani. Overall, the plant extracts examined displayed better bactericide rather than fungicide activities. In general, the best antibacterial activity was showed by the plant extracts from the Rubiaceae family, followed in order by the extracts from the Euphorbiaceae and Solanaceae ones. It is important to emphasize the great activity displayed by the methanol extract of Alchornea coelophylla (Euphorbiaceae) that inhibited four out of five bacteria tested (B. Subtilis, P. aeruginosa, S. aureus and E. coli). Furthermore, the best Minimal Inhibitory Concentration for the extracts with antifungal activities were displayed by the dichloromethane extracts from Acalypha diversifolia and Euphorbia sp (Euphorbiaceae). The most susceptible fungus evaluated was F. Solani since 60% and 20% of the dichloromethane and methanol extracts evaluated inhibited the growth of this phytopathogenic fungus. The antimicrobial activity of the different plant extracts examined in this work could be related to the secondary metabolites contents and their interaction and susceptibility of

  7. Antibacterial and antifungal activities of acetonic extract from Paullinia cupana Mart. seeds.

    PubMed

    Basile, Adriana; Rigano, Daniela; Conte, Barbara; Bruno, Maurizio; Rosselli, Sergio; Sorbo, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    The antibacterial and antifungal activities of the acetone extract from Paullinia cupana var. sorbilis Mart. (Sapindaceae) seeds, commonly called guarana, were assessed against selected bacterial and fungal strains. We tested the extract against both standard American Type Culture Collection (ATCC) and clinically isolated (CI) bacterial strains and three fungal strains. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) values for bacteria and MIC and minimum fungicidal concentration for fungi were determined. The extract showed an activity against the nine bacterial strains tested, both CI and ATCC strains (MIC comprised between 32 and 128 μm/mL and MBC between 128 and 512 μm/mL), showing a significant antibacterial effect against both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. Also, the tested fungi were sensitive to the extract (MIC between 125 and 250 μm/mL). The contemporaneous presence of different bioactivities in the extract from guarana suggests this plant as a source of bioactive substances.

  8. Star-shaped ZnO/Ag hybrid nanostructures for enhanced photocatalysis and antibacterial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade, George R. S.; Nascimento, Cristiane C.; Lima, Zenon M.; Teixeira-Neto, Erico; Costa, Luiz P.; Gimenez, Iara F.

    2017-03-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) particles with a star-shaped morphology have been synthesized by a novel and simple room-temperature method and decorated with silver nanoparticles (SNPs) for enhanced photocatalysis and bactericide applications. The presence of thiourea during the precipitation of ZnO in alkaline conditions allowed the control of morphological features (e.g. average size and shape) and the surface functionalization with thiocyanate ions (SCN-). SNPs were deposited into the ZnO surface by a photoreduction method and their sizes could be easily controlled by changing the ZnO/AgNO3 ratio. The presence of SCN- on the semiconductor surface prevents uncontrollable growth of Ag nanoparticles into different morphologies and high degrees of polydispersity. XRD, SEM, TEM, FTIR, UV-vis-NIR and PL were employed for characterizing the structure, morphology and optical properties of the as-obtained pure and hybrid nanostructures. Finally, the hybrid ZnO/Ag particles have shown plasmon-enhanced performance for applications in photocatalysis and antibacterial activity compared to the pure ZnO counterpart. In this work, evaluation of the photodegradation of an aqueous methylene blue solution under UV-A irradiation and the antibacterial activity toward 4 bacterial strains, including Gram-positive bacteria Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 43300, ATCC 25923 and ATCC 33591) and Gram-negative bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ATCC 27853).

  9. Newly Developed Topical Cefotaxime Sodium Hydrogels: Antibacterial Activity and In Vivo Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Zakaria, Azza S; Afifi, Samar A; Elkhodairy, Kadria A

    2016-01-01

    In an attempt to reach better treatment of skin infections, gel formulations containing Cefotaxime (CTX) were prepared. The gel was formulated using Carbopol 934 (C934), Hydroxypropyl Methylcellulose 4000 (HPMC 4000), Carboxymethylcellulose Sodium (Na CMC), Pectin (PEC), Xanthan Gum (XG), or Guar Gum (GG). Thirteen different formulas were prepared and characterized physically in terms of color, syneresis, spreadability, pH, drug content, and rheological properties. Drug-excipients compatibility studies were confirmed by FTIR and then in vitro drug release study was conducted. In vitro and in vivo antibacterial activities of CTX were studied against wound pathogens such as, Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), Escherichia coli (E. coli), and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa), using either pure drug or Fucidin® cream as control. F13 provides better spreadability compared to F1 (XG) or F11 (HPMC). Moreover, the release of the drug from hydrogel F13 containing C934 was slower and sustained for 8 h. Stability study revealed that, upon storage, there were no significant changes in pH, drug content, and viscosity of the gels. Also, F13 showed the larger inhibition zone and highest antibacterial activity among other formulations. Histological analysis demonstrated that after single treatment with F13 gel formulation, a noticeable reduction in microbial bioburden occurred in case of both Gram positive and Gram negative bacterial isolates.

  10. Family of class I lantibiotics from actinomycetes and improvement of their antibacterial activities.

    PubMed

    Maffioli, Sonia I; Monciardini, Paolo; Catacchio, Bruno; Mazzetti, Carlo; Münch, Daniela; Brunati, Cristina; Sahl, Hans-Georg; Donadio, Stefano

    2015-04-17

    Lantibiotics, an abbreviation for "lanthionine-containing antibiotics", interfere with bacterial metabolism by a mechanism not exploited by the antibiotics currently in clinical use. Thus, they have aroused interest as a source for new therapeutic agents because they can overcome existing resistance mechanisms. Starting from fermentation broth extracts preselected from a high-throughput screening program for discovering cell-wall inhibitors, we isolated a series of related class I lantibiotics produced by different genera of actinomycetes. Analytical techniques together with explorative chemistry have been used to establish their structures: the newly described compounds share a common 24 aa sequence with the previously reported lantibiotic planosporicin (aka 97518), differing at positions 4, 6, and 14. All of these compounds maintain an overall -1 charge at physiological pH. While all of these lantibiotics display modest antibacterial activity, their potency can be substantially modulated by progressively eliminating the negative charges, with the most active compounds carrying basic amide derivatives of the two carboxylates originally present in the natural compounds. Interestingly, both natural and chemically modified lantibiotics target the key biosynthetic intermediate lipid II, but the former compounds do not bind as effectively as the latter in vivo. Remarkably, the basic derivatives display an antibacterial potency and a killing effect similar to those of NAI-107, a distantly related actinomycete-produced class I lantibiotic which lacks altogether carboxyl groups and which is a promising clinical candidate for treating Gram-positive infections caused by multi-drug-resistant pathogens.

  11. Antioxidant, Antibacterial, and Cytotoxic Activities of the Ethanolic Origanum vulgare Extract and Its Major Constituents

    PubMed Central

    Coccimiglio, John; Alipour, Misagh; Jiang, Zi-Hua; Gottardo, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Oregano is a perennial shrub that grows in the mountains of the Mediterranean and Euro/Irano-Siberian regions. This study was conducted to identify the major constituents of the ethanolic Origanum vulgare extract and examine the cytotoxic, antioxidant, and antibacterial properties of the extract but more importantly the contribution of its specific major constituent(s) or their combination to the overall extract biological activity. Gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy analysis showed that the extract contained monoterpene hydrocarbons and phenolic compounds, the major ones being carvacrol and thymol and to a lesser extent p-cymene, 1-octacosanol, creosol, and phytol. A549 epithelial cells challenged with the extract showed a concentration-dependent increase in cytotoxicity. A combination of thymol and carvacrol at equimolar concentrations to those present in the extract was less cytotoxic. The A549 cells pretreated with nonlethal extract concentrations protected against hydrogen-peroxide-induced cytotoxicity, an antioxidant effect more effective than the combination of equimolar concentrations of thymol/carvacrol. Inclusion of p-cymene and/or 1-octacosanol did not alter the synergistic antioxidant effects of the carvacrol/thymol mixture. The extract also exhibited antimicrobial properties against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial strains including clinical isolates. In conclusion, the oregano extract has cytotoxic, antioxidant, and antibacterial activities mostly attributed to carvacrol and thymol. PMID:27051475

  12. Fabrication of silver nanoparticles doped in the zeolite framework and antibacterial activity

    PubMed Central

    Shameli, Kamyar; Ahmad, Mansor Bin; Zargar, Mohsen; Yunus, Wan Md Zin Wan; Ibrahim, Nor Azowa

    2011-01-01

    Using the chemical reduction method, silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) were effectively synthesized into the zeolite framework in the absence of any heat treatment. Zeolite, silver nitrate, and sodium borohydride were used as an inorganic solid support, a silver precursor, and a chemical reduction agent, respectively. Silver ions were introduced into the porous zeolite lattice by an ion-exchange path. After the reduction process, Ag NPs formed in the zeolite framework, with a mean diameter of about 2.12–3.11 nm. The most favorable experimental condition for the synthesis of Ag/zeolite nanocomposites (NCs) is described in terms of the initial concentration of AgNO3. The Ag/zeolite NCs were characterized by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence, and Fourier transform infrared. The results show that Ag NPs form a spherical shape with uniform homogeneity in the particle size. The antibacterial activity of Ag NPs in zeolites was investigated against Gram-negative bacteria (ie, Escherichia coli and Shigella dysentriae) and Gram-positive bacteria (ie, Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) by disk diffusion method using Mueller–Hinton agar at different sizes of Ag NPs. All of the synthesized Ag/zeolite NCs were found to have antibacterial activity. These results show that Ag NPs in the zeolite framework can be useful in different biological research and biomedical applications. PMID:21383858

  13. Antioxidant and antibacterial activity of six edible wild plants (Sonchus spp.) in China.

    PubMed

    Xia, Dao-Zong; Yu, Xin-Fen; Zhu, Zhuo-Ying; Zou, Zhuang-Dan

    2011-12-01

    The total phenolic and flavonoid, antioxidant and antibacterial activities of six Sonchus wild vegetables (Sonchus oleraceus L., Sonchus arvensis L., Sonchus asper (L.) Hill., Sonchus uliginosus M.B., Sonchus brachyotus DC. and Sonchus lingianus Shih) in China were investigated. The results revealed that S. arvensis extract and S. oleraceus extract contained the highest amount of phenolic and flavonoid, respectively. Among the methanol extracts of six Sonchus species, S. arvensis extract exhibited the highest radical (DPPH and ABTS+ scavenging power and lipid peroxidation inhibitory power. It also exhibited the highest reducing power at 500 µg mL⁻¹ by A (700) = 0.80. The results of antibacterial test indicated that the S. oleraceus extract showed higher activity than the other five Sonchus wild vegetables extracts, both in Gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica and Vibrio parahaemolyticus) and in a Gram-positive bacterium (Staphylococcus aureus). These results indicate that Sonchus wild food plants might be applicable in natural medicine and healthy food.

  14. Antioxidant, Antibacterial, and Cytotoxic Activities of the Ethanolic Origanum vulgare Extract and Its Major Constituents.

    PubMed

    Coccimiglio, John; Alipour, Misagh; Jiang, Zi-Hua; Gottardo, Christine; Suntres, Zacharias

    2016-01-01

    Oregano is a perennial shrub that grows in the mountains of the Mediterranean and Euro/Irano-Siberian regions. This study was conducted to identify the major constituents of the ethanolic Origanum vulgare extract and examine the cytotoxic, antioxidant, and antibacterial properties of the extract but more importantly the contribution of its specific major constituent(s) or their combination to the overall extract biological activity. Gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy analysis showed that the extract contained monoterpene hydrocarbons and phenolic compounds, the major ones being carvacrol and thymol and to a lesser extent p-cymene, 1-octacosanol, creosol, and phytol. A549 epithelial cells challenged with the extract showed a concentration-dependent increase in cytotoxicity. A combination of thymol and carvacrol at equimolar concentrations to those present in the extract was less cytotoxic. The A549 cells pretreated with nonlethal extract concentrations protected against hydrogen-peroxide-induced cytotoxicity, an antioxidant effect more effective than the combination of equimolar concentrations of thymol/carvacrol. Inclusion of p-cymene and/or 1-octacosanol did not alter the synergistic antioxidant effects of the carvacrol/thymol mixture. The extract also exhibited antimicrobial properties against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial strains including clinical isolates. In conclusion, the oregano extract has cytotoxic, antioxidant, and antibacterial activities mostly attributed to carvacrol and thymol.

  15. Newly Developed Topical Cefotaxime Sodium Hydrogels: Antibacterial Activity and In Vivo Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Zakaria, Azza S.; Afifi, Samar A.; Elkhodairy, Kadria A.

    2016-01-01

    In an attempt to reach better treatment of skin infections, gel formulations containing Cefotaxime (CTX) were prepared. The gel was formulated using Carbopol 934 (C934), Hydroxypropyl Methylcellulose 4000 (HPMC 4000), Carboxymethylcellulose Sodium (Na CMC), Pectin (PEC), Xanthan Gum (XG), or Guar Gum (GG). Thirteen different formulas were prepared and characterized physically in terms of color, syneresis, spreadability, pH, drug content, and rheological properties. Drug-excipients compatibility studies were confirmed by FTIR and then in vitro drug release study was conducted. In vitro and in vivo antibacterial activities of CTX were studied against wound pathogens such as, Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), Escherichia coli (E. coli), and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa), using either pure drug or Fucidin® cream as control. F13 provides better spreadability compared to F1 (XG) or F11 (HPMC). Moreover, the release of the drug from hydrogel F13 containing C934 was slower and sustained for 8 h. Stability study revealed that, upon storage, there were no significant changes in pH, drug content, and viscosity of the gels. Also, F13 showed the larger inhibition zone and highest antibacterial activity among other formulations. Histological analysis demonstrated that after single treatment with F13 gel formulation, a noticeable reduction in microbial bioburden occurred in case of both Gram positive and Gram negative bacterial isolates. PMID:27314033

  16. Fused-Ring Oxazolopyrrolopyridopyrimidine Systems with Gram-Negative Activity

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yiyuan; Moloney, Jonathan G.; Christensen, Kirsten E.; Moloney, Mark G.

    2017-01-01

    Fused polyheterocyclic derivatives are available by annulation of a tetramate scaffold, and been shown to have antibacterial activity against a Gram-negative, but not a Gram-positive, bacterial strain. While the activity is not potent, these systems are structurally novel showing, in particular, a high level of polarity, and offer potential for the optimization of antibacterial activity. PMID:28098784

  17. [Antibacterial activity of natural compounds - essential oils].

    PubMed

    Hassan, Sherif T S; Majerová, Michaela; Šudomová, Miroslava; Berchová, Kateřina

    2015-12-01

    Since the problem of bacterial resistance has become a serious problem worldwide, it was necessary to search for new active substances that can overcome the problem and enhance the treatment efficacy of bacterial infections. Numerous plant-derived essential oils exhibited significant antibacterial activities. This review aimed to summarize the most promising essential oils that exhibited remarkable antibacterial activities against various bacterial infections, including staphylococcal infections, Helicobacter pylori infections, skin infections, tuberculosis infection and dental bacterial infection. The synergy effect of essential oils in combination with antibiotics, as well as their role in the treatment of bacterial infections have been discussed. Essential oils can be used as models for further studies in vivo and clinical trials.

  18. Efficient Catalytic Oxidation of 3-Arylthio- and 3-Cyclohexylthio-lapachone Derivatives to New Sulfonyl Derivatives and Evaluation of Their Antibacterial Activities.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Mariana F do C; Gomes, Ana T P C; Moreira, Caroline Dos S; Simões, Mário M Q; Neves, Maria G P M S; da Rocha, David R; da Silva, Fernando de C; Moreirinha, Catarina; Almeida, Adelaide; Ferreira, Vitor F; Cavaleiro, José A S

    2017-02-16

    New sulfonyl-lapachones were efficiently obtained through the catalytic oxidation of arylthio- and cyclohexylthio-lapachone derivatives with hydrogen peroxide in the presence of a Mn(III) porphyrin complex. The antibacterial activities of the non-oxidized and oxidized lapachone derivatives against the Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli and the Gram-positive bacteria Staphylococcus aureus were evaluated after their incorporation into polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) micelles. The obtained results show that the PVP-formulations of the lapachones 4b-g and of the sulfonyl-lapachones 7e and 7g reduced the growth of S. aureus.

  19. Papain-templated Cu nanoclusters: assaying and exhibiting dramatic antibacterial activity cooperating with H2O2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Hong; Zhong, Dan; Zhou, Zinan; Yang, Xiaoming

    2015-11-01

    Herein, papain-functionalized Cu nanoclusters (CuNCs@Papain) were originally synthesized in aqueous solution together with a quantum yield of 14.3%, and showed obviously red fluorescence at 620 nm. Meanwhile, their corresponding fluorescence mechanism was fully elucidated by fluorescence spectroscopy, HR-TEM, FTIR spectroscopy, and XPS. Subsequently, the as-prepared CuNCs were employed as probes for detecting H2O2. Using CuNCs as probes, H2O2 was determined in the range from 1 μM to 50 μM based on a linear decrease of fluorescence intensity as well as a detection limit of 0.2 μM with a signal-to-noise ratio of 3. More significantly, it has been proved that CuNCs could convert H2O2 to &z.rad;OH, which exhibited dramatic antibacterial activity. Both in vitro and in vivo experiments were performed to validate their antibacterial activity against Gram-positive/negative bacteria and actual wound infection, suggesting their potential for serving as one type of promising antibacterial material.Herein, papain-functionalized Cu nanoclusters (CuNCs@Papain) were originally synthesized in aqueous solution together with a quantum yield of 14.3%, and showed obviously red fluorescence at 620 nm. Meanwhile, their corresponding fluorescence mechanism was fully elucidated by fluorescence spectroscopy, HR-TEM, FTIR spectroscopy, and XPS. Subsequently, the as-prepared CuNCs were employed as probes for detecting H2O2. Using CuNCs as probes, H2O2 was determined in the range from 1 μM to 50 μM based on a linear decrease of fluorescence intensity as well as a detection limit of 0.2 μM with a signal-to-noise ratio of 3. More significantly, it has been proved that CuNCs could convert H2O2 to &z.rad;OH, which exhibited dramatic antibacterial activity. Both in vitro and in vivo experiments were performed to validate their antibacterial activity against Gram-positive/negative bacteria and actual wound infection, suggesting their potential for serving as one type of promising

  20. Purification Techniques of Bacteriocins from Lactic Acid Bacteria and Other Gram-Positive Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saavedra, Lucila; Sesma, Fernando

    The search for new antimicrobial peptides produced by lactic acid ­bacteria and other Gram-positive microorganisms has become an interesting field of research in the past decades. The fact that bacteriocins are active against numerous foodborne and human pathogens, are produced by generally regarded as safe (GRAS) microorganisms, and are readily degraded by proteolytic host systems makes them attractive candidates for biotechnological applications. However, before suggesting or choosing a new bacteriocin for future technology developments, it is necessary to elucidate its biochemical structure and its mode of action, which may be carried out once the bacteriocin is purified to homogeneity. This chapter focuses on describing the main strategies used for the purification of numerous bacteriocins.

  1. [Resistance to "last resort" antibiotics in Gram-positive cocci: The post-vancomycin era].

    PubMed

    Rincón, Sandra; Panesso, Diana; Díaz, Lorena; Carvajal, Lina P; Reyes, Jinnethe; Munita, José M; Arias, César A

    2014-04-01

    New therapeutic alternatives have been developed in the last years for the treatment of multidrug-resistant Gram-positive infections. Infections caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) are considered a therapeutic challenge due to failures and lack of reliable antimicrobial options. Despite concerns related to the use of vancomycin in the treatment of severe MRSA infections in specific clinical scenarios, there is a paucity of solid clinical evidence that support the use of alternative agents (when compared to vancomycin). Linezolid, daptomycin and tigecycline are antibiotics approved in the last decade and newer cephalosporins (such as ceftaroline and ceftobiprole) and novel glycopeptides (dalvavancin, telavancin and oritavancin) have reached clinical approval or are in the late stages of clinical development. This review focuses on discussing these newer antibiotics used in the "post-vancomycin" era with emphasis on relevant chemical characteristics, spectrum of antimicrobial activity, mechanisms of action and resistance, as well as their clinical utility.

  2. Regulating the Intersection of Metabolism and Pathogenesis in Gram-positive Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    RICHARDSON, ANTHONY R.; SOMERVILLE, GREG A.; SONENSHEIN, ABRAHAM L.

    2015-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria must contend with immune systems that actively restrict the availability of nutrients and cofactors, and create a hostile growth environment. To deal with these hostile environments, pathogenic bacteria have evolved or acquired virulence determinants that aid in the acquisition of nutrients. This connection between pathogenesis and nutrition may explain why regulators of metabolism in nonpathogenic bacteria are used by pathogenic bacteria to regulate both metabolism and virulence. Such coordinated regulation is presumably advantageous because it conserves carbon and energy by aligning synthesis of virulence determinants with the nutritional environment. In Gram-positive bacterial pathogens, at least three metabolite-responsive global regulators, CcpA, CodY, and Rex, have been shown to coordinate the expression of metabolism and virulence genes. In this chapter, we discuss how environmental challenges alter metabolism, the regulators that respond to this altered metabolism, and how these regulators influence the host-pathogen interaction. PMID:26185086

  3. Target recognition, resistance, immunity and genome mining of class II bacteriocins from Gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kjos, Morten; Borrero, Juan; Opsata, Mona; Birri, Dagim J; Holo, Helge; Cintas, Luis M; Snipen, Lars; Hernández, Pablo E; Nes, Ingolf F; Diep, Dzung B

    2011-12-01

    Due to their very potent antimicrobial activity against diverse food-spoiling bacteria and pathogens and their favourable biochemical properties, peptide bacteriocins from Gram-positive bacteria have long been considered promising for applications in food preservation or medical treatment. To take advantage of bacteriocins in different applications, it is crucial to have detailed knowledge on the molecular mechanisms by which these peptides recognize and kill target cells, how producer cells protect themselves from their own bacteriocin (self-immunity) and how target cells may develop resistance. In this review we discuss some important recent progress in these areas for the non-lantibiotic (class II) bacteriocins. We also discuss some examples of how the current wealth of genome sequences provides an invaluable source in the search for novel class II bacteriocins.

  4. Isolation of the Entomopathogenic Fungal Strain Cod-MK1201 from a Cicada Nymph and Assessment of Its Antibacterial Activities.

    PubMed

    Sangdee, Kusavadee; Nakbanpote, Woranan; Sangdee, Aphidech

    2015-01-01

    The entomopathogenic fungus Cod-MK1201 was isolated from a dead cicada nymph. Three regions of ribosomal nuclear DNA, the internal transcribed spacers of nuclear ribosomal DNA repeats (ITS), the partial small subunit of rDNA (nrSSU) , and the partial large subunit of rDNA (nrLSU), and two protein-coding regions, the elongation factor 1α (EF-1α), and the largest subunit of the RNA polymerase II (rpb1) gene, were sequenced and used for fungal identification. The phylogenetic analysis of the ITS and the combined data set of the five genes indicated that the fungal isolate Cod-MK1201 is a new strain of Cordyceps sp. that is closely related to Cordyceps nipponica and C. kanzashiana. Crude extracts of mycelium-cultured Cod-MK1201 were obtained using distilled water and 50% (v/v) ethanol, and the antibacterial activity of each was determined. Both extracts had activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, but the ethanol extract was the more potent of the two. The antibacterial activity of the protein fractions of these extracts was also determined. The protein fraction from the ethanol extract was more antibacterial than the protein fraction from the aqueous extract. Three antibacterial constituents including adenosine, the total phenolic content (TPC), and the total flavonoid content (TFC) was also determined. The results showed that the adenosine content, the TPC, and the TFC of the ethanol extract were more active than those of the aqueous extract. Moreover, synergism was detected between these antibacterial constituents. In conclusion, the entomopathogenic fungal isolate Cod-MK1201 represents a natural source of antibacterial agents.

  5. Synergy of nitric oxide and silver sulfadiazine against gram-negative, gram-positive, and antibiotic-resistant pathogens.

    PubMed

    Privett, Benjamin J; Deupree, Susan M; Backlund, Christopher J; Rao, Kavitha S; Johnson, C Bryce; Coneski, Peter N; Schoenfisch, Mark H

    2010-12-06

    The synergistic activity between nitric oxide (NO) released from diazeniumdiolate-modified proline (PROLI/NO) and silver(I) sulfadiazine (AgSD) was evaluated against Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis, Proteus mirabilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis using a modified broth microdilution technique and a checkerboard-type assay. The combination of NO and AgSD was defined as synergistic when the fractional bactericidal concentration (FBC) was calculated to be <0.5. Gram-negative species were generally more susceptible to the individual antimicrobial agents than the Gram-positive bacteria, while Gram-positive bacteria were more susceptible to combination therapy. The in vitro synergistic activity of AgSD and NO observed against a range of pathogens strongly supports future investigation of this therapeutic combination, particularly for its potential use in the treatment of burns and chronic wounds.

  6. Evaluation of Antibacterial Activity, Phytochemical Constituents, and Cytotoxicity Effects of Thai Household Ancient Remedies

    PubMed Central

    Sinvaraphan, Naruephan; Chaipak, Ploypailin; Luxsananuwong, Atita; Voravuthikunchai, Supayang Piyawan

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aim: Household ancient remedies reported here are described in the National List of Essential Medicines and have traditionally been used in Thailand to treat infection-related ailments. However, the safety and effectiveness of these remedies have been poorly evaluated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial properties of these remedies against seven gram-positive and gram-negative multidrug-resistant bacteria species. Phytochemical constituents and cytotoxicity of these remedies were also determined. Methods: Seven remedies, consisting of Um-Ma-Luk-Ka-Wa-Tee, Chan-Ta-Lee-La, Kheaw-Hom, Learng-Pid-Sa-Mud, Pra-Sa-Chan-Dang, Dhart-Ban-Chob, and Tree-Hom, were prepared by a licensed traditional medical doctor using a mixture of medicinal plants. Antibacterial activity of ethanol extracts of the remedies was determined by using a broth microdilution method. Qualitative phytochemical screening analysis was carried out to identify the presence of major components. Cytotoxicity activities of the extracts against Vero cells were assessed by green fluorescent protein–based assay. Results: With the exception of Dhart-Ban-Chob extract, significant minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of <16 to 32 μg/mL were observed for the remedy extracts depending on the bacterial strains. The Um-Ma-Luk-Ka-Wa-Tee extract was noncytotoxic against Vero cells and possessed the highest activity, with MICs of <16 to 31 μg/mL against all methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates. Conclusions: Remarkable antibacterial activities against multidrug-resistant pathogens, as well as low toxicity on Vero cells, of Um-Ma-Luk-Ka-Wa-Tee support the use of this remedy in traditional medicine. Further investigation on other biological activities related to traditional applications, appropriate biomarkers, and treatment mechanisms of the household remedy are required. PMID:25415453

  7. Synthesis, micellisation and interaction of novel quaternary ammonium compounds derived from l-Phenylalanine with 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine as model membrane in relation to their antibacterial activity, and their selectivity over human red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Joondan, Nausheen; Caumul, Prakashanand; Akerman, Matthew; Jhaumeer-Laulloo, Sabina

    2015-02-01

    A series of quaternary ammonium compounds (QUATS) derived from l-Phenylalanine have been synthesized and their antibacterial efficiencies were determined against various strains of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. The antibacterial activity increased with increasing chain length, exhibiting a cut-off effect at C14 for Gram-positive and C12 for Gram-negative bacteria. The l-Phenylalanine QUATS displayed enhanced antibacterial properties with a higher cut-off point compared to their corresponding l-Phenylalanine ester hydrochlorides. The CMC was correlated with the MIC, inferring that micellar activity contributes to the cut-off effect in antibacterial activity. The hemolytic activities (HC50) of the QUATS against human red blood cells were also determined to illustrate the selectivity of these QUATS for bacterial over mammalian cells. In general, the MIC was lower than the HC50, and assessment of the micellar contribution to the antibacterial and hemolytic evaluation in TBS as a common medium confirmed that these QUATS can act as antibacterial, yet non-toxic molecules at their monomer concentrations. The interaction of the QUATS with the phospholipid vesicles (1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, DPPC) in the presence of 1-anilino-8-naphthalene sulfonate (ANS) and 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH) as fluorescence probes showed that the presence of the quaternary ammonium moiety causes an increase in hydrophobic interactions, thus causing an increase in antibacterial activity.

  8. A novel study of antibacterial activity of copper iodide nanoparticle mediated by DNA and membrane damage.

    PubMed

    Pramanik, Arindam; Laha, Dipranjan; Bhattacharya, Debalina; Pramanik, Panchanan; Karmakar, Parimal

    2012-08-01

    In this article potential activity of nanoparticles (NPs) of copper iodide (CuI) as an antibacterial agent has been presented. The nano particles are synthesized by co-precipitation method with an average size of 8 nm as determined by Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM). The average charge of the NPs is -21.5 mV at pH 7 as obtained by zeta potential measurement and purity is determined by XRD. These NPs are able to kill both gram positive and gram negative bacteria. Among the bacteria tested, DH5α is more sensitive but Bacillus subtilis is more resistant to NPs of CuI. Consequently, the MIC and MBC values of DH5α is least (0.066 mg/ml and 0.083 mg/ml respectively) and B. subtilis is highest (0.15 mg/ml and 0.18 mg/ml respectively) among the tested bacterial strains. From our studies it is inferred that CuI NPs produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) in both gram negative and gram positive bacteria and it also causes ROS mediated DNA damage for the suppression of transcription as revealed by reporter gene assay. Probably ROS is formed on the surface of NPs of CuI in presence of amine functional groups of various biological molecules. Furthermore they induce membrane damage as determined by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Thus production of ROS and membrane damage are major mechanisms of the bactericidal activity of these NPs of CuI.

  9. Green synthesis of silk sericin-capped silver nanoparticles and their potent anti-bacterial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aramwit, Pornanong; Bang, Nipaporn; Ratanavaraporn, Juthamas; Ekgasit, Sanong

    2014-02-01

    In this study, a `green chemistry' approach was introduced to synthesize silk sericin (SS)-capped silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) under an alkaline condition (pH 11) using SS as a reducing and stabilizing agent instead of toxic chemicals. The SS-capped AgNPs were successfully synthesized at various concentrations of SS and AgNO3, but the yields were different. A higher yield of SS-capped AgNPs was obtained when the concentrations of SS and AgNO3 were increased. The SS-capped AgNPs showed a round shape and uniform size with diameter at around 48 to 117 nm. The Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy result proved that the carboxylate groups obtained from alkaline degradation of SS would be a reducing agent for the generation of AgNPs while COO- and NH2 + groups stabilized the AgNPs and prevented their precipitation or aggregation. Furthermore, the SS-capped AgNPs showed potent anti-bacterial activity against various gram-positive bacteria (minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) 0.008 mM) and gram-negative bacteria (MIC ranging from 0.001 to 0.004 mM). Therefore, the SS-capped AgNPs would be a safe candidate for anti-bacterial applications.

  10. Chemical composition and antibacterial and cytotoxic activities of Allium hirtifolium Boiss.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Salmiah; Jalilian, Farid Azizi; Talebpour, Amir Hossein; Zargar, Mohsen; Shameli, Kamyar; Sekawi, Zamberi; Jahanshiri, Fatemeh

    2013-01-01

    Allium hirtifolium Boiss. known as Persian shallot, is a spice used as a traditional medicine in Iran and, Mediterranean region. In this study, the chemical composition of the hydromethanolic extract of this plant was analyzed using GC/MS. The result showed that 9-hexadecenoic acid, 11,14-eicosadienoic acid, and n-hexadecanoic acid are the main constituents. The antibacterial activity of the shallot extract was also examined by disk diffusion and microdilution broth assays. It was demonstrated that Persian shallot hydromethanolic extract was effective against 10 different species of pathogenic bacteria including methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), methicillin sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA), Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella typhimurium, Proteus mirabilis, and Klebsiella pneumoniae. Specifically, the minimum concentration of the extract which inhibited bacterial growth (MIC values) was 1.88 mg/mL for most of the gram-positive bacteria. This concentration was not much different from the concentration that was safe for mammalian cells (1.50 mg/mL) suggesting that the hydromethanolic extract of Persian shallot may be a safe and strong antibacterial agent.

  11. Electrodeposition, characterization, and antibacterial activity of zinc/silver particle composite coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes-Vidal, Y.; Suarez-Rojas, R.; Ruiz, C.; Torres, J.; Ţălu, Ştefan; Méndez, Alia; Trejo, G.

    2015-07-01

    Composite coatings consisting of zinc and silver particles (Zn/AgPs) with antibacterial activity were prepared using an electrodeposition technique. The morphology, composition, and structure of the Zn/AgPs composite coatings were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), inductively coupled plasma (ICP) spectrometry, and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The antibacterial properties of the coatings against the microorganisms Escherichia coli as a model Gram-negative bacterium and Staphylococcus aureus as a model Gram-positive bacterium were studied quantitatively and qualitatively. The results revealed that the dispersant cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) assisted in the formation of a stable suspension of Ag particles in the electrolytic bath for 24 h. Likewise, a high concentration of CTAB in the electrolytic bath promoted an increase in the number of Ag particles occluded in the Zn/AgPs coatings. The Zn/AgPs coatings that were obtained were compact, smooth, and shiny materials. Antimicrobial tests performed on the Zn/AgPs coatings revealed that the inhibition of bacterial growth after 30 min of contact time was between 91% and 98% when the AgPs content ranged from 4.3 to 14.0 mg cm-3.

  12. Synthesis and characterization of dextran-capped silver nanoparticles with enhanced antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guili; Lin, Qiuxia; Wang, Chunren; Li, Junjie; Wang, Jian; Zhou, Jin; Wang, Yan; Wang, Changyong

    2012-05-01

    Dextran-capped silver nanoparticles were synthesized by reducing silver nitrate with NaBH4 in the presence of dextran as capping agent. The characters of silver nanoparticles were investigated using UV-Vis spectrophotometer, nano-grainsize analyzer, X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy. Results showed that the silver nanoparticles capped with dextran were in uniform shape and narrow size distribution. Moreover, compared with polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)-capped silver nanoparticles, the dextran-capped ones possessed better stability. Antibacterial tests of these silver nanoparticles were carried out for Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Klebsiella pneumoniae. Results suggested that the dextran-capped silver nanoparticles had high antibacterial activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. In addition, the cytotoxicity in vitro of the dextran-capped silver nanoparticles was investigated using mouse fibrosarcoma cells (L929). The toxicity was evaluated by the changes of cell morphology and 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide assay. Results indicated that these silver nanoparticles had slight effect on the survival and proliferation of L-929 cells at their minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC). After modified by dextran, the physiochemical properties of the silver nanoparticles had been improved. We anticipated that these dextran-capped silver nanoparticles could be integrated into systems for biological and pharmaceutical applications.

  13. Anthemis wiedemanniana essential oil prevents LPS-induced production of NO in RAW 264.7 macrophages and exerts antiproliferative and antibacterial activities in vitro.

    PubMed

    Conforti, Filomena; Menichini, Federica; Formisano, Carmen; Rigano, Daniela; Senatore, Felice; Bruno, Maurizio; Rosselli, Sergio; Celik, Sezgin

    2012-01-01

    Anthemis wiedemanniana is known in folk medicine for the treatment of microbial infections, cancer and also urinary and pulmonary problems. In this study, the chemical composition of the essential oil from A. wiedemanniana was evaluated and its antibacterial activity was tested against 10 bacterial strains. The oil was also tested for its potentiality to inhibit nitric oxide production in RAW 264.7 macrophages and for its cytotoxicity against four human cancer cell lines. A. wiedemanniana oil, rich of oxygenated monoterpenes (25.4%), showed a good antibacterial activity against Gram-positive bacteria and a good activity against the two Gram-negative bacteria, Escherichia coli and Proteus vulgaris. Besides that, it exhibited a high inhibitory effect on the LPS-induced nitrite production and a strong cytotoxic activity, especially against amelanotic melanoma (C32) and large lung cell carcinoma (COR-L23) cell lines.

  14. Brush-like polycarbonates containing dopamine, cations, and PEG providing a broad-spectrum, antibacterial, and antifouling surface via one-step coating.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chuan; Ding, Xin; Ono, Robert J; Lee, Haeshin; Hsu, Li Yang; Tong, Yen Wah; Hedrick, James; Yang, Yi Yan

    2014-11-19

    An antibacterial and antifouling surface is obtained by simple one-step immersion of a catheter surface with brush-like polycarbonates containing pendent adhesive dopamine, antifouling polyethylene glycol (PEG), and antibacterial cations. This coating demonstrates excellent antibacterial and antifouling activities against both Gram-positive (S. aureus) and Gram-negative (E. coli) bacteria, proteins, and platelets, good stability under simulated blood-flow conditions, and no toxicity.

  15. Inherent antibacterial activity of a peptide-based beta-hairpin hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Salick, Daphne A; Kretsinger, Juliana K; Pochan, Darrin J; Schneider, Joel P

    2007-11-28

    Among several important considerations for implantation of a biomaterial, a main concern is the introduction of infection. We have designed a hydrogel scaffold from the self-assembling peptide, MAX1, for tissue regeneration applications whose surface exhibits inherent antibacterial activity. In experiments where MAX1 gels are challenged with bacterial solutions ranging in concentrations from 2 x 10(3) colony forming units (CFUs)/dm2 to 2 x 10(9) CFUs/dm2, gel surfaces exhibit broad-spectrum antibacterial activity. Results show that the hydrogel surface is active against Gram-positive (Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus, and Streptococcus pyogenes) and Gram-negative (Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli) bacteria, all prevalent in hospital settings. Live-dead assays employing laser scanning confocal microscopy show that bacteria are killed when they engage the surface. In addition, the surface of MAX1 hydrogels was shown to cause inner and outer membrane disruption in experiments that monitor the release of beta-galactosidase from the cytoplasm of lactose permease-deficient E. coli ML-35. These data suggest a mechanism of antibacterial action that involves membrane disruption that leads to cell death upon cellular contact with the gel surface. Although the hydrogel surface exhibits bactericidal activity, co-culture experiments indicate hydrogel surfaces show selective toxicity to bacterial versus mammalian cells. Additionally, gel surfaces are nonhemolytic toward human erythrocytes, which maintain healthy morphologies when in contact with the surface. These material attributes make MAX1 gels attractive candidates for use in tissue regeneration, even in nonsterile environments.

  16. Inherent Antibacterial Activity of a Peptide-Based β-Hairpin Hydrogel

    PubMed Central

    Salick, Daphne A.; Kretsinger, Juliana K.; Pochan, Darrin J.; Schneider, Joel P.

    2009-01-01

    Among several important considerations for implantation of a biomaterial, a main concern is the introduction of infection. We have designed a hydrogel scaffold from the self-assembling peptide, MAX1, for tissue regeneration applications whose surface exhibits inherent antibacterial activity. In experiments where MAX1 gels are challenged with bacterial solutions ranging in concentrations from 2 × 103 colony forming units (CFUs)/dm2 to 2 × 109 CFUs/dm2, gel surfaces exhibit broad-spectrum antibacterial activity. Results show that the hydrogel surface is active against Gram-positive (Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus, and Streptococcus pyogenes) and Gram-negative (Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli) bacteria, all prevalent in hospital settings. Live–dead assays employing laser scanning confocal microscopy show that bacteria are killed when they engage the surface. In addition, the surface of MAX1 hydrogels was shown to cause inner and outer membrane disruption in experiments that monitor the release of β-galactosidase from the cytoplasm of lactose permease-deficient E. coli ML-35. These data suggest a mechanism of antibacterial action that involves membrane disruption that leads to cell death upon cellular contact with the gel surface. Although the hydrogel surface exhibits bactericidal activity, co-culture experiments indicate hydrogel surfaces show selective toxicity to bacterial versus mammalian cells. Additionally, gel surfaces are nonhemolytic toward human erythrocytes, which maintain healthy morphologies when in contact with the surface. These material attributes make MAX1 gels attractive candidates for use in tissue regeneration, even in nonsterile environments. PMID:17985907

  17. A novel beta-defensin structure: a potential strategy of big defensin for overcoming resistance by Gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kouno, Takahide; Fujitani, Naoki; Mizuguchi, Mineyuki; Osaki, Tsukasa; Nishimura, Shin-ichiro; Kawabata, Shun-ichiro; Aizawa, Tomoyasu; Demura, Makoto; Nitta, Katsutoshi; Kawano, Keiichi

    2008-10-07

    Big defensin is a 79-residue peptide derived from hemocytes of the Japanese horseshoe crab. It has antimicrobial activities against Gram-positive and -negative bacteria. The amino acid sequence of big defensin can be divided into an N-terminal hydrophobic half and a C-terminal cationic half. Interestingly, the trypsin cleaves big defensin into two fragments, the N-terminal and C-terminal fragments, which are responsible for antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive and -negative bacteria, respectively. To explore the antimicrobial mechanism of big defensin, we determined the solution structure of mature big defensin and performed a titration experiment with DPC micelles. Big defensin has a novel defensin structure; the C-terminal domain adopts a beta-defensin structure, and the N-terminal domain forms a unique globular conformation. It is noteworthy that the hydrophobic N-terminal domain undergoes a conformational change in micelle solution, while the C-terminal domain remains unchanged. Here, we propose that the N-terminal domain achieves its antimicrobial activity in a novel fashion and explain that big defensin has developed a strategy different from those of other beta-defensins to suppress the growth of Gram-positive bacteria.

  18. Mechanisms of action of newer antibiotics for Gram-positive pathogens.

    PubMed

    Hancock, Robert Ew

    2005-04-01

    Certain Gram-positive bacteria, including meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, vancomycin-resistant enterococci, and quinolone-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae have achieved the status of "superbugs", in that there are few or no antibiotics available for therapy against these pathogens. Only a few classes of novel antibiotics have been introduced in the past 40 years, and all since 1999, including the streptogramin combination quinupristin/dalfopristin (Synercid), the oxazolidinone linezolid, and the lipopeptide daptomycin. This review discusses the mechanisms of antibiotic action against Gram-positive pathogens, and resistance counter-mechanisms developed by Gram-positive bacteria, with emphasis on the newer agents.

  19. Potential Impact of Rapid Blood Culture Testing for Gram-Positive Bacteremia in Japan with the Verigene Gram-Positive Blood Culture Test

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Mari; Iguchi, Shigekazu; Mizutani, Tomonori; Hiramatsu, Keiichi; Tega-Ishii, Michiru; Sansaka, Kaori; Negishi, Kenta; Shimada, Kimie; Umemura, Jun; Notake, Shigeyuki; Yanagisawa, Hideji; Yabusaki, Reiko; Araoka, Hideki; Yoneyama, Akiko

    2017-01-01

    Background. Early detection of Gram-positive bacteremia and timely appropriate antimicrobial therapy are required for decreasing patient mortality. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the performance of the Verigene Gram-positive blood culture assay (BC-GP) in two special healthcare settings and determine the potential impact of rapid blood culture testing for Gram-positive bacteremia within the Japanese healthcare delivery system. Furthermore, the study included simulated blood cultures, which included a library of well-characterized methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) isolates reflecting different geographical regions in Japan. Methods. A total 347 BC-GP assays were performed on clinical and simulated blood cultures. BC-GP results were compared to results obtained by reference methods for genus/species identification and detection of resistance genes using molecular and MALDI-TOF MS methodologies. Results. For identification and detection of resistance genes at two clinical sites and simulated blood cultures, overall concordance of BC-GP with reference methods was 327/347 (94%). The time for identification and antimicrobial resistance detection by BC-GP was significantly shorter compared to routine testing especially at the cardiology hospital, which does not offer clinical microbiology services on weekends and holidays. Conclusion. BC-GP generated accurate identification and detection of resistance markers compared with routine laboratory methods for Gram-positive organisms in specialized clinical settings providing more rapid results than current routine testing. PMID:28316631

  20. Antibacterial activity of peptides derived from the C-terminal region of a hemolytic lectin, CEL-III, from the marine invertebrate Cucumaria echinata.

    PubMed

    Hatakeyama, Tomomitsu; Suenaga, Tomoko; Eto, Seiichiro; Niidome, Takuro; Aoyagi, Haruhiko

    2004-01-01

    Several synthetic peptides derived from the C-terminal domain sequence of a hemolytic lectin, CEL-III, were examined as to their action on bacteria and artificial lipid membranes. Peptide P332 (KGVIFAKASVSVKVTASLSK-NH(2)), corresponding to the sequence from residue 332, exhibited strong antibacterial activity toward Gram-positive bacteria. Replacement of each Lys in P332 by Ala markedly decreased the activity. However, when all Lys were replaced by Arg, the antibacterial activity increased, indicating the importance of positively charged residues at these positions. Replacement of Val by Leu also led to higher antibacterial activity, especially toward Gram-negative bacteria. The antibacterial activity of these peptides was correlated with their membrane-permeabilizing activity toward the bacterial inner membrane and artificial lipid vesicles, indicating that the antibacterial action is due to perturbation of bacterial cell membranes, leading to enhancement of their permeability. These results also suggest that the hydrophobic region of CEL-III, from which P332 and its analogs were derived, may play some role in the interaction with target cell membranes to trigger hemolysis.

  1. Synthesis, Antibacterial and Antitubercular Activities of Some 5H-Thiazolo[3,2-a]pyrimidin-5-ones and Sulfonic Acid Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Cai, Dong; Zhang, Zhi-Hua; Chen, Yu; Yan, Xin-Jia; Zou, Liang-Jing; Wang, Ya-Xin; Liu, Xue-Qi

    2015-09-10

    A series of 5H-thiazolo[3,2-a]pyrimidin-5-ones were synthesized by the cyclization reactions of S-alkylated derivatives in concentrated H₂SO₄. Upon treatment of S-alkylated derivatives at different temperatures, intramolecular cyclization to 7-(substituted phenylamino)-5H-thiazolo[3,2-a]pyrimidin-5-ones or sulfonation of cyclized products to sulfonic acid derivatives occurred. The structures of the target compounds were confirmed by IR, ¹H-NMR, (13)C-NMR and HRMS studies. The compounds were evaluated for their preliminary in vitro antibacterial activity against some Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and screened for antitubercular activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis by the broth dilution assay method. Some compounds showed good antibacterial and antitubercular activities.

  2. Extraction of chitosan from shrimp shells waste and application in antibacterial finishing of bamboo rayon.

    PubMed

    Teli, M D; Sheikh, Javed

    2012-06-01

    Chitosan can be best utilized as safe antibacterial agent for textiles but there is always a limitation of its durability. The chitin containing shellfish waste is available in huge quantities, but very low quantities are utilized for extraction of high value products like chitosan. In the current work chitosan was extracted from shrimp shells and then used as antibacterial exhaust finishing agent for grafted bamboo rayon. Chitosan bound bamboo rayon was then evaluated for antibacterial activity against both gram positive and gram negative bacteria. The product showed antibacterial activity against both types of bacterias which was durable till 30 washes.

  3. Antibacterial and Antifungal Activities of Stereum ostrea, an Inedible Wild Mushroom.

    PubMed

    Imtiaj, Ahmed; Jayasinghe, Chandana; Lee, Geon Woo; Lee, Tae Soo

    2007-12-01

    Antibacterial and antifungal activities of liquid culture filtrate, water and ethanol extract (solid culture) of Stereum ostrea were evaluated against 5 bacteria and 3 plant pathogenic fungi. To determine the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC), we studied 5~300 mg/ml concentrations against bacteria and fungi separately. The MIC was 10 mg/ml for Bacillus subtilis and 40 mg/ml for Colletotrichum gloeosporioides and Colletotrichum miyabeanus. Liquid culture filtrate was more effective against Gram positive than Gram negative bacteria, and Staphylococcus aureus was the most inhibited (20.3 mm) bacterium. Water and ethanol extracts were effective against both Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria, and water extract was better than ethanol extract. In water and ethanol extract, inhibition zones were 23.6 and 21.0 mm (S. aureus) and 26.3 and 22.3 mm (Pseudomonas aeruginosa), respectively. For plant pathogenic fungi, the highest and lowest percent inhibition of mycelial growth (PIMG) was found 82.8 and 14.4 against C. miyabeanus and Botrytis cinerea in liquid culture filtrate, respectively. In water extract, the PIMG was found to be the highest 85.2 and lowest 41.7 for C. miyabeanus and C. gloeosporioides, respectively. The inhibitory effect of ethanol extract was better against C. miyabeanus than C. gloeosporioides and B. cinerea. Among 3 samples, water extract was the best against tested pathogenic fungi. This study offers that the extracts isolated from S. ostrea contain potential compounds which inhibit the growth of both bacteria and fungi.

  4. Green Synthesis of Silver Nanoparticles, Their Characterization, Application and Antibacterial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Okafor, Florence; Janen, Afef; Kukhtareva, Tatiana; Edwards, Vernessa; Curley, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Our research focused on the production, characterization and application of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), which can be utilized in biomedical research and environmental cleaning applications. We used an environmentally friendly extracellular biosynthetic technique for the production of the AgNPs. The reducing agents used to produce the nanoparticles were from aqueous extracts made from the leaves of various plants. Synthesis of colloidal AgNPs was monitored by UV-Visible spectroscopy. The UV-Visible spectrum showed a peak between 417 and 425 nm corresponding to the Plasmon absorbance of the AgNPs. The characterization of the AgNPs such as their size and shape was performed by Atom Force Microscopy (AFM), and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) techniques which indicated a size range of 3 to 15 nm. The anti-bacterial activity of AgNPs was investigated at concentrations between 2 and 15 ppm for Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. Staphylococcus aureus and Kocuria rhizophila, Bacillus thuringiensis (Gram-positive organisms); Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Salmonella typhimurium (Gram-negative organisms) were exposed to AgNPs using Bioscreen C. The results indicated that AgNPs at a concentration of 2 and 4 ppm, inhibited bacterial growth. Preliminary evaluation of cytotoxicity of biosynthesized silver nanoparticles was accomplished using the InQ™ Cell Research System instrument with HEK 293 cells. This investigation demonstrated that silver nanoparticles with a concentration of 2 ppm and 4 ppm were not toxic for human healthy cells, but inhibit bacterial growth. PMID:24157517

  5. Antibacterial and Antifungal Activities of Stereum ostrea, an Inedible Wild Mushroom

    PubMed Central

    Imtiaj, Ahmed; Jayasinghe, Chandana; Lee, Geon Woo

    2007-01-01

    Antibacterial and antifungal activities of liquid culture filtrate, water and ethanol extract (solid culture) of Stereum ostrea were evaluated against 5 bacteria and 3 plant pathogenic fungi. To determine the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC), we studied 5~300 mg/ml concentrations against bacteria and fungi separately. The MIC was 10 mg/ml for Bacillus subtilis and 40 mg/ml for Colletotrichum gloeosporioides and Colletotrichum miyabeanus. Liquid culture filtrate was more effective against Gram positive than Gram negative bacteria, and Staphylococcus aureus was the most inhibited (20.3 mm) bacterium. Water and ethanol extracts were effective against both Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria, and water extract was better than ethanol extract. In water and ethanol extract, inhibition zones were 23.6 and 21.0 mm (S. aureus) and 26.3 and 22.3 mm (Pseudomonas aeruginosa), respectively. For plant pathogenic fungi, the highest and lowest percent inhibition of mycelial growth (PIMG) was found 82.8 and 14.4 against C. miyabeanus and Botrytis cinerea in liquid culture filtrate, respectively. In water extract, the PIMG was found to be the highest 85.2 and lowest 41.7 for C. miyabeanus and C. gloeosporioides, respectively. The inhibitory effect of ethanol extract was better against C. miyabeanus than C. gloeosporioides and B. cinerea. Among 3 samples, water extract was the best against tested pathogenic fungi. This study offers that the extracts isolated from S. ostrea contain potential compounds which inhibit the growth of both bacteria and fungi. PMID:24015099

  6. Green synthesis of silver nanoparticles, their characterization, application and antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Okafor, Florence; Janen, Afef; Kukhtareva, Tatiana; Edwards, Vernessa; Curley, Michael

    2013-10-21

    Our research focused on the production, characterization and application of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), which can be utilized in biomedical research and environmental cleaning applications. We used an environmentally friendly extracellular biosynthetic technique for the production of the AgNPs. The reducing agents used to produce the nanoparticles were from aqueous extracts made from the leaves of various plants. Synthesis of colloidal AgNPs was monitored by UV-Visible spectroscopy. The UV-Visible spectrum showed a peak between 417 and 425 nm corresponding to the Plasmon absorbance of the AgNPs. The characterization of the AgNPs such as their size and shape was performed by Atom Force Microscopy (AFM), and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) techniques which indicated a size range of 3 to 15 nm. The anti-bacterial activity of AgNPs was investigated at concentrations between 2 and 15 ppm for Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. Staphylococcus aureus and Kocuria rhizophila, Bacillus thuringiensis (Gram-positive organisms); Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Salmonella typhimurium (Gram-negative organisms) were exposed to AgNPs using Bioscreen C. The results indicated that AgNPs at a concentration of 2 and 4 ppm, inhibited bacterial growth. Preliminary evaluation of cytotoxicity of biosynthesized silver nanoparticles was accomplished using the InQ™ Cell Research System instrument with HEK 293 cells. This investigation demonstrated that silver nanoparticles with a concentration of 2 ppm and 4 ppm were not toxic for human healthy cells, but inhibit bacterial growth.

  7. Evaluation of antibacterial, antioxidant and nootropic activities of Tiliacora racemosa Colebr. leaves: In vitro and in vivo approach.

    PubMed

    T, Vivek Kumar; M, Vishalakshi; M, Gangaraju; Das, Parijat; Roy, Pratiti; Banerjee, Anindita; Dutta Gupta, Sayan

    2017-02-01

    The antibacterial and antioxidant potential of Tiliacora racemosa leaf extracts in various solvents (methanolic, hexane, chloroform and ethyl acetate) was determined. Additionally, the presence of bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloids in the plant prompted us to evaluate the nootropic activity of the methanolic extract in mice. Further, we seek to verify the nootropic effect by examining the anticholinesterase inhibition potential of the methanolic extract. The leaf extracts in various solvents were evaluated for their antibacterial and antioxidant activity by agar diffusion technique and α, α-diphenyl-β-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical scavenging method, respectively. The ex vivo acetylcholine esterase inhibitory activity of the methanolic extract was carried out by Ellman's method in male Wistar rats. The nootropic capacity of the methanolic extract was examined in Swiss albino mice by utilizing the diazepam induced acute amnesic model. The chloroform/n-hexane and ethyl acetate fraction showed promising antioxidant and antibacterial (Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria) property, respectively. The methanolic extract was able to diminish the amnesic effect induced by diazepam (1mg/kg i.p.) in mice. The extract also showed significant acetyl cholinesterase inhibition in rats. The findings prove that the memory enhancing capability is due to increased acetyl choline level at the nerve endings. The strong antioxidant nature and potential nootropic activity shown by the extract suggests its future usage in the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders such as dementia and Alzheimer.

  8. Chemical composition and in vitro antioxidant and antibacterial activity of Heracleum transcaucasicum and Heracleum anisactis roots essential oil

    PubMed Central

    Torbati, Mohammadali; Nazemiyeh, Hossein; Lotfipour, Farzaneh; Nemati, Mahboob; Asnaashari, Solmaz; Fathiazad, Fatemeh

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: In vitro antioxidant and antibacterial activity and volatile compositions of two Heracleum species (Apiaceae) including Heracleum transcaucasicum and Heracleum anisactis roots Essential Oil (EO) were investigated. Methods: The volatile compositions of EOs were analyzed by GC/Mass spectroscopy. To detect the antioxidant activity of essential oils TLC-bioautography and DPPH radical scavenging assay by spectrophotometry was performed. Additionally, the antibacterial activity of two essential oils were studied and compared against four pathogenic bacteria by agar disc diffusion method and MIC values of the EOs were determined using the broth dilution method. Results: Myristicin was the dominant component in both EOs. It was identified as 96.87% and 95.15% of the essential oil composition of H. transcaucasicum and H. anisactis roots, respectively. The TLC-bioautography showed antioxidant spots in both EOs and IC50 of H. anisactis and H. transcaucasicum EO was found to be 54 μg × ml (-1) and 77 μg × ml (-1), respectively. Regarding the antimicrobial assay, H. anisactis EO exhibited weak to moderate antibacterial activity against gram-positive bacteria and also Escherichia coli, whereas the essential oil from H. transcaucasicum was inactive. Conclusion: Based on the results from this study, both tested EOs mainly consist of myristicin. Despite the presence of myristicin with known antibacterial property, the EO from H. transcacausicum showed no antibacterial activity. Thus it is supposed that the biological activity of plants is remarkably linked to the extracts’ chemical profile and intercomponents’ synergistic or antagonistic effect could play a crucial role in bioactivity of EOs and other plant extracts. PMID:25035849

  9. Cefpodoxime: comparative antibacterial activity, influence of growth conditions, and bactericidal activity.

    PubMed

    Knothe, H; Shah, P M; Eckardt, O

    1991-01-01

    The antimicrobial activity of cefpodoxime, the active metabolite of the new cephalosporin ester cefpodoxime proxetil, in comparison to cefixime, cefotiam, cefuroxime, and cefotaxime was determined against a broad spectrum of freshly isolated gram-positive and gram-negative bacterial strains. Cefpodoxime was demonstrated to be inhibitory at concentrations of less than or equal to 1 mg/l against 90% of strains of Moraxella catarrhalis, Haemophilus influenzae, Escherichia coli (beta-lactamase- negative strains), Klebsiella spp., Serratia spp., Proteus mirabilis, Proteus vulgaris, Providencia spp., and Salmonella spp. This antimicrobial activity of cefpodoxime was generally superior to that of cefuroxime and similar to that of cefixime. Cefpodoxime was active at less than or equal to 1 mg/l against 50% of the members of beta-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli, Enterobacter cloacae, Enterobacter aerogenes, Citrobacter spp., and Morganella morganii. Cefpodoxime proved to be highly inhibitory against group A, B, and G streptococci and Streptococcus pneumoniae (MIC90 less than 0.015 mg/l). The MICs of cefpodoxime and those of the other cephalosporins were less than 2 mg/l for greater than or equal to 90% of the strains of Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis, with the exception of cefixime which had no activity with MICs below 8 mg/l against these bacteria. Pseudomonas spp., Acinetobacter spp., and Enterococcus spp. were resistant to cefpodoxime. The antibacterial activity of cefpodoxime was only to a minor degree influenced by different growth conditions with the exception of high inoculum sizes against some beta-lactamase producing strains of gram-negative bacilli.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Isolating "Unknown" Bacteria in the Introductory Microbiology Laboratory: A New Selective Medium for Gram-Positives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKillip, John L.; Drake, MaryAnne

    1999-01-01

    Describes the development, preparation, and use of a medium that can select against a wide variety of Gram-negative bacteria while still allowing growth and differentiation of a wide range of Gram-positives. (WRM)

  11. In vitro antibacterial activity of Omani and African honey.

    PubMed

    Al-Jabri, A A; Nzeako, B; Al Mahrooqi, Z; Al Naqdy, A; Nsanze, H

    2003-01-01

    The study aims to investigate the antibacterial activity of honey obtained from different parts of Oman and compare it with that of honey obtained from elsewhere in Africa. A total of 24 honey samples (16 from different parts of Oman and eight from elsewhere in Africa) were investigated for their antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus (NCTC 6571), Escherichia coli (NCTC 10418) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (NCTC 10662) using standard antimicrobial assays. Marked variations in the antibacterial activity of the different honey samples were observed. Fourteen of the 16 Omani samples and five of the eight African samples showed antibacterial activity ranked as either fair, good or excellent to at least one of the three bacterial strains tested. Both Omani and African honeys possess in vitro antibacterial activity against the three bacterial strains tested, with 25% of the samples showing excellent antibacterial activity.

  12. Antibacterial properties of compounds isolated from Carpobrotus edulis.

    PubMed

    Martins, A; Vasas, A; Viveiros, M; Molnár, J; Hohmann, J; Amaral, L

    2011-05-01

    Several compounds isolated from the plant Carpobrotus edulis were evaluated for their activity against multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacteria and their efflux pump systems. Amongst the compounds isolated, six compounds were tested, namely uvaol, β-amyrin, oleanolic acid, catechin, epicatechin and monogalactosyldiacylglycerol. Oleanolic acid presented high antibacterial activity against a large number of bacterial strains. The triterpene uvaol was the most active compound for modulation of efflux activity by MDR Gram-positive strains.

  13. Impact of protecting ligands on surface structure and antibacterial activity of silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Padmos, J Daniel; Boudreau, Robert T M; Weaver, Donald F; Zhang, Peng

    2015-03-31

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) have attracted much attention in the past decade because of their unique physicochemical properties and notable antibacterial activities. In particular, thiol-protected Ag NPs have come to the forefront of metal nanoparticle studies, as they have been shown to possess high stability and interesting structure-property relationships. However, a clear correlation between thiol-protecting ligands, the resulting Ag NP surface structure, and their antibacterial properties has yet to be determined. Here, a multielement (Ag and S), multi-edge (Ag K-edge, Ag L3-edge, S K-edge) X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) methodology was used to identify the structure and composition of Ag NPs protected with cysteine. XAS characterization was carried out on similar-sized Ag NPs protected with poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP), in order to provide a valid comparison of the ligand effect on surface structure. The PVP-Ag NPs showed a metallic Ag surface and composition, consistent with metal NPs protected by weak protecting ligands. On the other hand, the Cys-Ag NPs exhibited a distinct surface shell of silver sulfide, which is remarkably different than previously studied Cys-Ag NPs. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of both types of Ag NPs against Gram-positive (+) and Gram-negative (-) bacteria were tested, including Staphylococcus aureus (+), Escherichia coli (-), and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (-). It was found that the MICs of the Cys-Ag NPs were significantly lower than the PVP-Ag NPs for each bacteria, implicating the influence of the sulfidized surface structure. Overall, this work shows the effect of ligand on the surface structure of Ag NPs, as well as the importance of surface structure in controlling antibacterial activity.

  14. σECF factors of gram-positive bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Bianca Mendes; Castro, Thiago Luiz de Paula; Carvalho, Rodrigo Dias de Oliveira; Seyffert, Nubia; Silva, Artur; Miyoshi, Anderson; Azevedo, Vasco

    2014-01-01

    The survival of bacteria to different environmental conditions depends on the activation of adaptive mechanisms, which are intricately driven through gene regulation. Because transcriptional initiation is considered to be the major step in the control of bacterial genes, we discuss the characteristics and roles of the sigma factors, addressing (1) their structural, functional and phylogenetic classification; (2) how their activity is regulated; and (3) the promoters recognized by these factors. Finally, we focus on a specific group of alternative sigma factors, the so-called σECF factors, in Bacillus subtilis and some of the main species that comprise the CMNR group, providing information on the roles they play in the microorganisms’ physiology and indicating some of the genes whose transcription they regulate. PMID:24921931

  15. Synthesis and structure-activity relationship of amidine derivatives of 3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene as novel antibacterial agents.

    PubMed

    Stolić, Ivana; Čipčić Paljetak, Hana; Perić, Mihaela; Matijašić, Mario; Stepanić, Višnja; Verbanac, Donatella; Bajić, Miroslav

    2015-01-27

    Current antibacterial chemotherapeutics are facing an alarming increase in bacterial resistance pressuring the search for novel agents that would expand the available therapeutic arsenal against resistant bacterial pathogens. In line with these efforts, a series of 9 amidine derivatives of 3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene were synthesized and, together with 18 previously synthesized analogs, evaluated for their relative DNA binding affinity, in vitro antibacterial activities and preliminary in vitro safety profile. Encouraging antibacterial activity of several subclasses of tested amidine derivatives against Gram-positive (including resistant MRSA, MRSE, VRE strains) and Gram-negative bacterial strains was observed. The bis-phenyl derivatives were the most antibacterially active, while compound 19 from bis-benzimidazole class exhibited the widest spectrum of activity (with MIC of 4, 2, 0.5 and ≤0.25 μg/ml against laboratory strains of Staphyloccocus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus pyogenes, Moraxella catarrhalis, respectively and 4-32 μg/ml against clinical isolates of sensitive and resistant S. aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Enterococcus faecium) and also demonstrated the strongest DNA binding affinity (ΔTm of 15.4 °C). Asymmetrically designed compounds and carboxamide-amidines were, in general, less active. Molecular docking indicated that the shape of the 3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene derivatives and their ability to form multiple electrostatic and hydrogen bonds with DNA, corresponds to the binding modes of other minor-groove binders. Herein reported results encourage further investigation of this class of compounds as novel antibacterial DNA binding agents.

  16. [GEIPC-SEIMC and GTEI-SEMICYUC recommendations for antibiotic treatment of gram positive coccal infections in the critical patient].

    PubMed

    Olaechea Astigarraga, P M; Garnacho Montero, J; Grau Cerrato, S; Rodríguez Colomo, O; Palomar Martínez, M; Zaragoza Crespo, R; Muñoz García-Paredes, P; Cerdá Cerdá, E; Alvarez Lerma, F

    2007-01-01

    In recent years, an increment of infections caused by gram-positive cocci has been documented in nosocomial and hospital-acquired infections. In diverse countries, a rapid development of resistance to common antibiotics against gram-positive cocci has been observed. This situation is exceptional in Spain but our country might be affected in the near future. New antimicrobials active against these multi-drug resistant pathogens are nowadays available. It is essential to improve our current knowledge about pharmacokinetic properties of traditional and new antimicrobials to maximize its effectiveness and to minimize toxicity. These issues are even more important in critically ill patients because inadequate empirical therapy is associated with therapeutic failure and a poor outcome. Experts representing two scientific societies (Grupo de estudio de Infecciones en el Paciente Critico de la SEIMC and Grupo de trabajo de Enfermedades Infecciosas de la SEMICYUC) have elaborated a consensus document based on the current scientific evidence to summarize recommendations for the treatment of serious infections caused by gram-positive cocci in critically ill patients.

  17. Recent Advances in Multi-Drug Resistance (MDR) Efflux Pump Inhibitors of Gram-Positive Bacteria S. aureus

    PubMed Central

    Handzlik, Jadwiga; Matys, Anna; Kieć-Kononowicz, Katarzyna

    2013-01-01

    The paper focuses on recent achievements in the search for new chemical compounds able to inhibit multidrug resistance (MDR) mechanisms in Gram-positive pathogens. An analysis of the results of the search for new efflux pump inhibitors (EPIs) for Gram-positive bacteria, which have been performed over the last decade, indicates that almost all efforts are focused on the NorA (MFS) efflux pump in S. aureus. Considering the chemical structures of the NorA EPIs that have been identified, it can be observed that the most active agents belong to the families of compounds possessing conjugated double bonds, e.g., chalcones, piperine-like compounds, N-cinnamoylphenalkylamides or citral amide derivatives. Indole-, dihydronaphthyl-, 2-chloro-5-bromo-phenyl- or piperidine moieties seem to be profitable for the EPI properties, as well. These results, together with an increasing knowledge about a variety of efflux pumps that are involved in MDR of Gram-positive pathogens underline that further search for new EPIs should pay more attention to develop MDR efflux protein targets, including SMR, MATE, ABC or other members of the MFS family. PMID:27029290

  18. Recent Advances in Multi-Drug Resistance (MDR) Efflux Pump Inhibitors of Gram-Positive Bacteria S. aureus.

    PubMed

    Handzlik, Jadwiga; Matys, Anna; Kieć-Kononowicz, Katarzyna

    2013-02-05

    The paper focuses on recent achievements in the search for new chemical compounds able to inhibit multidrug resistance (MDR) mechanisms in Gram-positive pathogens. An analysis of the results of the search for new efflux pump inhibitors (EPIs) for Gram-positive bacteria, which have been performed over the last decade, indicates that almost all efforts are focused on the NorA (MFS) efflux pump in S. aureus. Considering the chemical structures of the NorA EPIs that have been identified, it can be observed that the most active agents belong to the families of compounds possessing conjugated double bonds, e.g., chalcones, piperine-like compounds, N-cinnamoylphenalkylamides or citral amide derivatives. Indole-, dihydronaphthyl-, 2-chloro-5-bromo-phenyl- or piperidine moieties seem to be profitable for the EPI properties, as well. These results, together with an increasing knowledge about a variety of efflux pumps that are involved in MDR of Gram-positive pathogens underline that further search for new EPIs should pay more attention to develop MDR efflux protein targets, including SMR, MATE, ABC or other members of the MFS family.

  19. Predominance of Gram-positive bacteria in house dust in the low-allergy risk Russian Karelia.

    PubMed

    Pakarinen, Jaakko; Hyvärinen, Anne; Salkinoja-Salonen, Mirja; Laitinen, Sirpa; Nevalainen, Aino; Mäkelä, Mika J; Haahtela, Tari; von Hertzen, Leena

    2008-12-01

    Simple living conditions and farming environment have been associated with reduced risk for allergic diseases such as atopy and asthma but the factors responsible for this effect remain unresolved. We examined the bacterial composition of house dusts obtained from Finnish and Russian Karelia, two adjacent areas with high and low occurrence of atopic diseases respectively. Two dust mixes, both composed of 10 randomly selected dust samples from 349 Finnish and 417 Russian Karelian households were studied for bacterial biomarkers (DNA, Limulus-active endotoxin, 3-OH fatty acids, muramic acid) and for 16S rRNA gene sequences. Overall, the DNA cloning revealed more taxons (94 different genera) of dustborne bacteria than seen in any previous study on residential environments. Majority (67%) of the bacterial DNA clones in house dust from the low-allergy Russian Kareliarepresented Gram-positive bacteria (Firmicutes and Actinobacteria), predominantly Staphylococcaceae and Corynebacteriaceae. Russian Karelian dust showed up to 20-fold higher contents of muramic acid (marker of Gram-positive bacteria) and a sevenfold higher number of clones of animal-associated species, whereas in Finnish Karelian dust Gram-negatives (mainly Proteobacteria) predominated. Clones of plant-associated bacterial species and of chloroplast, indicating plant biomass, were more numerous in Finnish than in Russian Karelian dust. In conclusion, this study revealed major disparities between Finnish and Russian house dusts. The higher bacterial content and the predominance of Gram-positive bacteria in Russian dust may have implications for occurrence of atopy.

  20. A toll-like receptor 2-responsive lipid effector pathway protects mammals against skin infections with gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Georgel, Philippe; Crozat, Karine; Lauth, Xavier; Makrantonaki, Evgenia; Seltmann, Holger; Sovath, Sosathya; Hoebe, Kasper; Du, Xin; Rutschmann, Sophie; Jiang, Zhengfan; Bigby, Timothy; Nizet, Victor; Zouboulis, Christos C; Beutler, Bruce

    2005-08-01

    flake (flk), an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea-induced recessive germ line mutation of C57BL/6 mice, impairs the clearance of skin infections by Streptococcus pyogenes and Staphylococcus aureus, gram-positive pathogens that elicit innate immune responses by activating Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2). Positional cloning and sequencing revealed that flk is a novel allele of the stearoyl coenzyme A desaturase 1 gene (Scd1). flake homozygotes show reduced sebum production and are unable to synthesize the monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) palmitoleate (C(16:1)) and oleate (C(18:1)), both of which are bactericidal against gram-positive (but not gram-negative) organisms in vitro. However, intradermal MUFA administration to S. aureus-infected mice partially rescues the flake phenotype, which indicates that an additional component of the sebum may be required to improve bacterial clearance. In normal mice, transcription of Scd1-a gene with numerous NF-kappaB elements in its promoter--is strongly and specifically induced by TLR2 signaling. Similarly, the SCD1 gene is induced by TLR2 signaling in a human sebocyte cell line. These observations reveal the existence of a regulated, lipid-based antimicrobial effector pathway in mammals and suggest new approaches to the treatment or prevention of infections with gram-positive bacteria.

  1. A Toll-Like Receptor 2-Responsive Lipid Effector Pathway Protects Mammals against Skin Infections with Gram-Positive Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Georgel, Philippe; Crozat, Karine; Lauth, Xavier; Makrantonaki, Evgenia; Seltmann, Holger; Sovath, Sosathya; Hoebe, Kasper; Du, Xin; Rutschmann, Sophie; Jiang, Zhengfan; Bigby, Timothy; Nizet, Victor; Zouboulis, Christos C.; Beutler, Bruce

    2005-01-01

    flake (flk), an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea-induced recessive germ line mutation of C57BL/6 mice, impairs the clearance of skin infections by Streptococcus pyogenes and Staphylococcus aureus, gram-positive pathogens that elicit innate immune responses by activating Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) (K. Takeda and S. Akira, Cell. Microbiol. 5:143-153, 2003). Positional cloning and sequencing revealed that flk is a novel allele of the stearoyl coenzyme A desaturase 1 gene (Scd1). flake homozygotes show reduced sebum production and are unable to synthesize the monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) palmitoleate (C16:1) and oleate (C18:1), both of which are bactericidal against gram-positive (but not gram-negative) organisms in vitro. However, intradermal MUFA administration to S. aureus-infected mice partially rescues the flake phenotype, which indicates that an additional component of the sebum may be required to improve bacterial clearance. In normal mice, transcription of Scd1—a gene with numerous NF-κB elements in its promoter—is strongly and specifically induced by TLR2 signaling. Similarly, the SCD1 gene is induced by TLR2 signaling in a human sebocyte cell line. These observations reveal the existence of a regulated, lipid-based antimicrobial effector pathway in mammals and suggest new approaches to the treatment or prevention of infections with gram-positive bacteria. PMID:16040962

  2. Evidence for Direct Electron Transfer by a Gram-Positive Bacterium Isolated from a Microbial Fuel Cell▿†

    PubMed Central

    Wrighton, K. C.; Thrash, J. C.; Melnyk, R. A.; Bigi, J. P.; Byrne-Bailey, K. G.; Remis, J. P.; Schichnes, D.; Auer, M.; Chang, C. J.; Coates, J. D.

    2011-01-01

    Despite their importance in iron redox cycles and bioenergy production, the underlying physiological, genetic, and biochemical mechanisms of extracellular electron transfer by Gram-positive bacteria remain insufficiently understood. In this work, we investigated respiration by Thermincola potens strain JR, a Gram-positive isolate obtained from the anode surface of a microbial fuel cell, using insoluble electron acceptors. We found no evidence that soluble redox-active components were secreted into the surrounding medium on the basis of physiological experiments and cyclic voltammetry measurements. Confocal microscopy revealed highly stratified biofilms in which cells contacting the electrode surface were disproportionately viable relative to the rest of the biofilm. Furthermore, there was no correlation between biofilm thickness and power production, suggesting that cells in contact with the electrode were primarily responsible for current generation. These data, along with cryo-electron microscopy experiments, support contact-dependent electron transfer by T. potens strain JR from the cell membrane across the 37-nm cell envelope to the cell surface. Furthermore, we present physiological and genomic evidence that c-type cytochromes play a role in charge transfer across the Gram-positive bacterial cell envelope during metal reduction. PMID:21908627

  3. Biosynthesis characterization of silver nanoparticles using Cassia roxburghii DC. aqueous extract, and coated on cotton cloth for effective antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Balashanmugam, Pannerselvam; Kalaichelvan, Pudupalayam Thangavelu

    2015-01-01

    The present study reports the green synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) from silver precursor using a plant biomaterial, Cassia roxburghii DC., aqueous extract. The AgNPs were synthesized from the shade-dried leaf extract and assessed for their stability; they elucidated characteristics under UV-visible spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The synthesized AgNPs exhibited a maximum absorption at 430 nm, and the X-ray diffraction patterns showed that they were crystal in nature. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis confirmed the conversion of Ag+ ions to AgNPs due to the reduction by capping material of plant extract. The HR-TEM analysis revealed that they are spherical ranging from 10 nm to 30 nm. The spot EDAX analysis showed the presence of silver atoms. In addition, AgNPs were evaluated for their antibacterial activity against six different pathogenic bacteria: three Gram-positive bacteria, Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus, and Micrococcus luteus, and three Gram-negative bacteria, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, and Enterobacter aerogenes. They were highly sensitive to AgNPs, whereas less sensitive to AgNO3. Furthermore, the green synthesized AgNPs were immobilized on cotton fabrics and screened for antibacterial activity. The immobilized AgNPs on cotton cloth showed high antibacterial activity. Therefore, they could be a feasible alternative source in treating wounds or may help in replacing pharmaceutical band-aids.

  4. Characterization of the antibacterial activity and the chemical components of the volatile oil of the leaves of Rubus parvifolius L.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yongqing; Hu, Xiaogang; Huang, Mingchun; Sun, Fengjun; Yang, Bo; He, Juying; Wang, Xianfeng; Xia, Peiyuan; Chen, Jianhong

    2012-06-25

    Rubus parvifolius L. (Rp) is a medicinal herb that possesses antibacterial activity. In this study, we extracted the volatile oil from the leaves of Rp to assess its antibacterial activity and analyze its chemical composition. A uniform distribution design was used to optimize the extraction procedure, which yielded 0.36% (w/w) of light yellowish oil from the water extract of Rp leaves. We found that the extracted oil effectively inhibited the growth of a wide range of Gram positive and negative bacteria, including Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter baumanii, Bacillus cloacae, and Klebsiella pneumoniae. We further analyzed the components contained in the hydro-distillated Rp volatile oil by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy. Twenty nine compounds were identified, including 4-hydroxy-3-methoxystyrene (66%), 3,7,11,15-tetramethyl-2-hexadecen-1-ol (10%) and 4-tert-butylbenzoic acid (2%). Our results suggest that one or multiple constituents contained in Rp volatile oil may account for its antibacterial activity.

  5. Gram-Positive Uropathogens, Polymicrobial Urinary Tract Infection, and the Emerging Microbiota of the Urinary Tract

    PubMed Central

    Kline, Kimberly A.; Lewis, Amanda L.

    2015-01-01

    Gram-positive bacteria are a common cause of urinary tract infection (UTI), particularly among individuals who are elderly, pregnant, or who have other risk factors for UTI. Here we review the epidemiology, virulence mechanisms, and host response to the most frequently isolated Gram-positive uropathogens: Staphylococcus saprophyticus, Enterococcus faecalis, and Streptococcus agalactiae. We also review several emerging, rare, misclassified, and otherwise underreported Gram-positive pathogens of the urinary tract including Aerococcus, Corynebacterium, Actinobaculum, and Gardnerella. The literature strongly suggests that urologic diseases involving Gram-positive bacteria may be easily overlooked due to limited culture-based assays typically utilized for urine in hospital microbiology laboratories. Some UTIs are polymicrobial in nature, often involving one or more Gram-positive bacteria. We herein review the risk factors and recent evidence for mechanisms of bacterial synergy in experimental models of polymicrobial UTI. Recent experimental data has demonstrated that, despite being cleared quickly from the bladder, some Gram-positive bacteria can impact pathogenic outcomes of co-infecting organisms. When taken together, the available evidence argues that Gram-positive bacteria are important uropathogens in their own right, but that some can be easily overlooked because they are missed by routine diagnostic methods. Finally, a growing body of evidence demonstrates that a surprising variety of fastidious Gram-positive bacteria may either reside in or be regularly exposed to the urinary tract and further suggests that their presence is widespread among women, as well as men. Experimental studies in this area are needed; however, there is a growing appreciation that the composition of bacteria found in the bladder could be a potentially important determinant in urologic disease, including susceptibility to UTI. PMID:27227294

  6. Uptake of indolmycin in gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Werner, R G

    1980-01-01

    The antimicrobial activity of indolmycin correlates with the generation time of the investigated strains. Thus, in Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 13150 with a 37-min generation time, the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) was 0.6 microgram ml-1, and in Bacillus subtilis ATCC 27142 with a generation time of 23 min, the MIC reached 10.5 micrograms ml-1. Competition experiments in staphylococci and B. subtilis with aromatic amino acids demonstrated that indolmycin uses the uptake systems that are responsible for tryptophan. When the Ki values of indolmycin for the uptake of the aromatic amino acids in staphylococci were compared, there was a significantly higher influence on the uptake of tryptophan with respect to phenylalanine and tyrosine. In addition, indolmycin low resistant mutants of S. aureus ATCC 13150 showed a 10- to 100-fold decrease in Km value for the uptake of tryptophan and a 10-fold decrease for tyrosine uptake. The Km value for phenylalanine remained unchanged. A significant correlation existed between the Ki values of indolmycin for the uptake of tryptophan in the wild-type strains of S. aureus and B. subtilis and the MIC against the corresponding strain. Low Ki values corresponded to low MIC. These results imply that, in addition to improvement of the antibiotic structure for target affinity, the tryptophan uptake system can be used as a test model for the structural evaluation of indolmycin with respect to an increased transport activity into bacterial cells. PMID:7235673

  7. The Structure and Function of the Gram-Positive Bacterial RNA Degradosome

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Kyu Hong

    2017-01-01

    The RNA degradosome is a highly structured protein complex responsible for bulk RNA decay in bacteria. The main components of the complex, ribonucleases, an RNA helicase, and glycolytic enzymes are well-conserved in bacteria. Some components of the degradosome are essential for growth and the disruption of degradosome formation causes slower growth, indicating that this complex is required for proper cellular function. The study of the Escherichia coli degradosome has been performed extensively for the last several decades and has revealed detailed information on its structure and function. On the contrary, the Gram-positive bacterial degradosome, which contains ribonucleases different from the E. coli one, has been studied only recently. Studies on the Gram-positive degradosome revealed that its major component RNase Y was necessary for the full virulence of medically important Gram-positive bacterial pathogens, suggesting that it could be a target of antimicrobial therapy. This review describes the structures and function of Gram-positive bacterial RNA degradosomes, especially those of a Gram-positive model organism Bacillus subtilis, and two important Gram-positive pathogens, Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes. PMID:28217125

  8. The Structure and Function of the Gram-Positive Bacterial RNA Degradosome.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kyu Hong

    2017-01-01

    The RNA degradosome is a highly structured protein complex responsible for bulk RNA decay in bacteria. The main components of the complex, ribonucleases, an RNA helicase, and glycolytic enzymes are well-conserved in bacteria. Some components of the degradosome are essential for growth and the disruption of degradosome formation causes slower growth, indicating that this complex is required for proper cellular function. The study of the Escherichia coli degradosome has been performed extensively for the last several decades and has revealed detailed information on its structure and function. On the contrary, the Gram-positive bacterial degradosome, which contains ribonucleases different from the E. coli one, has been studied only recently. Studies on the Gram-positive degradosome revealed that its major component RNase Y was necessary for the full virulence of medically important Gram-positive bacterial pathogens, suggesting that it could be a target of antimicrobial therapy. This review describes the structures and function of Gram-positive bacterial RNA degradosomes, especially those of a Gram-positive model organism Bacillus subtilis, and two important Gram-positive pathogens, Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes.

  9. [Interpretative reading of the antibiogram in gram-positive cocci].

    PubMed

    Torres, Carmen

    2002-01-01

    Resistance to methicillin in Staphylococcus is related to expression of the gene mecA, and implies resistance to all beta-lactams. Breakpoints for interpretation of this mechanism differ in S. aureus and in coagulase-negative species. In relation to macrolides-lincosamides-streptograminsB, the most frequent mechanism among resistant strains is expression of methylases (erm genes). Topoisomerase changes caused by point mutations and expression of the efflux pump NorA determine resistance to quinolones, but there are great differences on the activity of different compounds, which makes interpretative reading difficult. Strains of S. aureus with intermediate susceptibility to glycopeptides (GISA strains) have been recently described. In Spain, there is a high percentage of S. pneumoniae strains intermediate or resistant to penicillin, and a low percentage of strains intermediate or resistant to third generation cephalosporins, because of mutations in genes encoding penicillin-binding proteins. The most frequent phenotype of resistance to macrolides in this species is caused by methylase production. Resistance to quinolones is still uncommon, and is related to the mechanisms previously indicated for Staphylococcus, but clinical interpretation of the antibiograma for this organism is even more complex. No strains of S. pyogenes resistant to penicillin have yet been described. In Spain the most common phenotype of resistance to macrolides in S. pyogenes is determined by efflux pumps (mef genes), affecting 14- and 15-membered macrolides. E. faecalis is usually susceptible to ampicillin, in contrast to E. faecium. Enterococci show intrinsic resistance to aminoglycosides, but still remain susceptible to the combination of these antimicrobials and cell-wall active agents. Strains expressing different aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes became resistant to the combination. Glycopeptide-resistant strains of enterococci are uncommon in our country, but several genotypes, of which

  10. Synthesis and antibacterial and cytotoxic activities of new N-3 substituted thiazolidine-2,4-dione derivatives bearing the pyrazole moiety.

    PubMed

    Desai, Nisheeth C; Satodiya, Hitesh M; Kotadiya, Ghanshyam M; Vaghani, Hasit V

    2014-07-01

    Two new series of N-3 substituted thiazolidine-2,4-dione derivatives bearing the pyrazole moiety (5a-j and 7a-j) were synthesized and assessed in vitro for their efficacy as antibacterial agents against gram-positive and gram-negative bacterial strains. Among the tested compounds, 7b, 7c, 7i, and 7j were found to be active against gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes) with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values in the range of 6.25-25 µg/mL, and some compounds were also tested against methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Compounds 7c and 7j inhibited the growth of MRSA at MIC values of 6.25 and 12.5 µg/mL, respectively. The influence of the lipophilicity (C log P) on the biological profile (MIC) of the prepared products was also discussed. From the standpoint of structure-activity relationship studies, it was observed that the lipophilic profiles of the compounds were crucial for their antibacterial activities. Further, the results of the MTT cytotoxicity studies on a human cervical cancer cell line (HeLa) and a mouse embryonic fibroblast cell line (NIH 3T3) suggested that compounds 7b, 7c, 7i, and 7j were endowed with low levels of cytotoxicity.

  11. Thermophilic Gram-Positive Biocatalysts for Biomass Conversion to Ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Shanmugam, K.T.; Ingram, L.O.; Maupin-Furlow, J.A.; Preston, J.F.; Aldrich, H.C.

    2003-12-01

    Production of energy from renewable sources is receiving increased attention due to the finite nature of fossil fuels and the environmental impact associated with the continued large scale use of fossil energy sources. Biomass, a CO2-neutral abundant resource, is an attractive alternate source of energy. Biomass-derived sugars, such as glucose, xylose, and other minor sugars, can be readily fermented to fuel ethanol and commodity chemicals. Extracellular cellulases produced by fungi are commercially developed for depolymerization of cellulose in biomass to glucose for fermentation by appropriate biocatalysts in a simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) process. Due to the differences in the optimum conditions for the activity of the fungal cellulases and the growth and fermentation characteristics of the current industrial biocatalysts, SSF of cellulose is envisioned at conditions that are not optimal for the fungal cellulase activity leading to higher than required cost of cellulase in SSF. We have isolated bacterial biocatalysts whose growth and fermentation requirements match the optimum conditions for commercial fungal cellulase activity (pH 5.0 and 50 deg. C). These isolates fermented both glucose and xylose, major components of cellulose and hemicellulose, respectively, to L(+)-lactic acid. Xylose was metabolized through the pentose-phosphate pathway by these organisms as evidenced by the fermentation profile and analysis of the fermentation products of 13C1-xylose by NMR. As expected for the metabolism of xylose by the pentose-phosphate pathway, 13C-lactate accounted for more than 90% of the total 13C-labeled products. All three strains fermented crystalline cellulose to lactic acid with the addition of fungal cellulase (Spezyme CE) (SSF) at an optimum of about 10 FPU/g cellulose. These isolates also fermented cellulose and sugar cane bagasse hemicellulose acid hydrolysate simultaneously. Based on fatty acid profile and 16S rRNA sequence, these

  12. Quaternized chitosan/κ-carrageenan/caffeic acid-coated poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) fibrous materials: Preparation, antibacterial and antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Ignatova, Milena; Manolova, Nevena; Rashkov, Iliya; Markova, Nadya

    2016-11-20

    Novel fibrous materials with antioxidant and antibacterial properties from poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB), quaternized chitosan (QCh), κ-carrageenan (Car) and caffeic acid (CA) were obtained. These materials were prepared by applying electrospinning or electrospinning in conjunction with dip-coating and polyelectrolyte complex (PEC) formation. It was found that the CA release depended on the fiber composition. X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) revealed that CA incorporated in the fibers was in the amorphous state, whereas CA included in the coating was in the crystalline state. In contrast to the neat PHB mats, the CA-containing mats and the PEC QCh/Car-coated mats were found to kill the Gram-positive bacteria S. aureus and the Gram-negative bacteria E. coli and were effective in suppressing the adhesion of pathogenic bacteria S. aureus. Enhancement of the antioxidant activity of the fibrous materials containing both CA and QCh/Car coating was observed.

  13. Antibacterial and hemolytic activities of linenscin OC2, a hydrophobic substance produced by Brevibacterium linens OC2.

    PubMed

    Boucabeille, C; Mengin-Lecreulx, D; Henckes, G; Simonet, J M; van Heijenoort, J

    1997-08-15

    Linenscin OC2 is an antibacterial substance produced by the orange cheese coryneform bacterium Brevibacterium linens OC2. It inhibits the growth of Gram-positive bacteria but it is inactive against Gram-negative bacteria. The intact outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria was shown to be an effective permeability barrier against linenscin OC2. At high dosage the effect of linenscin OC2 was bacteriolytic on Listeria innocua. Bacteriostasis was observed at low dosage and peptidoglycan biosynthesis was affected at an early step upstream of the UDP-N-acetylglucosamine. Hemolytic activity of this substance on sheep erythrocytes suggested a common mode of action on prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. It also suggested that the cytoplasmic membrane might be the primary target of linenscin OC2.

  14. In-vitro antibacterial, antifungal and cytotoxic activity of cobalt (II), copper (II), nickel (II) and zinc (II) complexes with furanylmethyl- and thienylmethyl-dithiolenes: [1, 3-dithiole- 2-one and 1,3-dithiole-2-thione].

    PubMed

    Chohan, Zahid H; Shaikh, Ali U; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2006-12-01

    Some antibacterial and antifungal furanylmethyl-and thienylmethyl dithiolenes and, their Co(II), Cu(II), Ni (II) and Zn (II) complexes have been synthesized, characterized and screened for their in vitro antibacterial activity against four Gram-negative; Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella typhi and Shigella flexeneri, and two Gram-positive; Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus bacterial strains, and for in-vitro antifungal activity against Trichophyton longifusus, Candida albicans, Aspergillus flavus, Microsporum canis, Fusarium solani and Candida glaberata. All compounds showed significant antibacterial and antifungal activity. The metal complexes, however, were shown to possess better activity as compared to the simple ligands. The brine shrimp bioassay was also carried out to study their in-vitro cytotoxic properties.

  15. Influence of Co doping on combined photocatalytic and antibacterial activity of ZnO nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anandan, M.; Dinesh, S.; Krishnakumar, N.; Balamurugan, K.

    2016-11-01

    The present work aims to investigate the structural, optical, photocatalyst and antibacterial properties of bare and cobalt doped ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) with different concentrations Zn1-x Co x O (x = 0, 0.03, 0.06 and 0.09) synthesized by co-precipitation method. The XRD patterns confirmed that all samples of cobalt doped ZnO nanostructures revealed the formation of single phase having hexagonal wurtzite structure with crystallite size in the range of 31-41 nm. Further, the decreasing trend in lattice parameters and grain sizes were also seen with increasing doping concentrations which confirms the incorporation of Co ions into the ZnO lattice. This result was further supported by the FT-IR data. HR-TEM images demonstrated the distinct hexagonal like morphology with small agglomeration. The UV-visible absorption spectra exhibits red shift with increase in Co doping concentration in ZnO while corresponding bandgap energy of cobalt doped ZnO NPs decreased with increased Co doping concentration. PL spectra showed a weak UV and visible emission band which may be ascribed to the reduction in oxygen vacancy and defects by cobalt doping. XPS and EDX spectral results confirm the composition and the purity of Co doped ZnO NPs. Furthermore, the Co doped ZnO NPs were found to exhibit lesser photocatalytic activity for the degradation of methyl green dye under UV light illumination in comparison with the bare ZnO NPs. Moreover, anti-bacterial studies reveals that the Co doped ZnO NPs possess more antibacterial effect against gram positive Basillus subtills and gram negative Klebsiella pneumoniae bacterial strains than the bare ZnO NPs.

  16. Fabrication of Fe3O4@CuO core-shell from MOF based materials and its antibacterial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajabi, S. K.; Sohrabnezhad, Sh.; Ghafourian, S.

    2016-12-01

    Magnetic Fe3O4@CuO nanocomposite with a core/shell structure was successfully synthesized via direct calcinations of magnetic Fe3O4@HKUST-1 in air atmosphere. The morphology, structure, magnetic and porous properties of the as-synthesized nano composites were characterized by using scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), and vibration sample magnetometer (VSM). The results showed that the nanocomposite material included a Fe3O4 core and a CuO shell. The Fe3O4@CuO core-shell can be separated easily from the medium by a small magnet. The antibacterial activity of Fe3O4-CuO core-shell was investigated against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. A new mechanism was proposed for inactivation of bacteria over the prepared sample. It was demonstrated that the core-shell exhibit recyclable antibacterial activity, acting as an ideal long-acting antibacterial agent.

  17. Screening for antibacterial and antifungal activities in marine benthic invertebrates from northern Norway.

    PubMed

    Tadesse, Margey; Gulliksen, Bjørn; Strøm, Morten B; Styrvold, Olaf B; Haug, Tor

    2008-11-01

    Benthic marine invertebrates collected from sub-Arctic regions of northern Norway, were found to be a promising source of novel bioactive compounds against human and fish pathogenic bacteria and fungi. Lyophilized material from seven species of ascidians, six sponges and one soft alcyonid coral were extracted with 60% acidified acetonitrile (ACN). After separation into an ACN-rich phase (ACN-extract) and an aqueous phase, and subsequent solid-phase extraction of the aqueous phase, fractions differing in polarity were obtained and screened for antibacterial and antifungal activities, along with the more lipophilic ACN-extracts. Antimicrobial activity was determined against two gram-negative, two gram-positive bacteria, and two strains of fungi. Notably, all the invertebrate species in the study showed activity against all four strains of bacteria and the two strains of fungi. In general, the aqueous fractions displayed highest antimicrobial activity, and the most potent extracts were obtained from the colonial ascidian Synoicum pulmonaria which displayed activity against bacteria and fungi at a concentration of 0.02 mg/ml; the lowest concentration tested.

  18. Syntheses and antibacterial activity of soluble 9-bromo substituted indolizinoquinoline-5,12-dione derivatives.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hui; Wang, Hao-Wen; Zhu, Teng-Wei; Yu, Le-Mao; Chen, Jian-Wen; Wang, Lu-Xia; Shi, Lei; Li, Ding; Gu, Lian-Quan; Huang, Zhi-Shu; An, Lin-Kun

    2017-02-15

    In our previous research, 9-bromo indolizinoquinoline-5,12-dione 1 has been found to be a good anti-MRSA agent. However, it had very low bioavailability in vivo possibly due to its low solubility in water. In order to obtain the derivatives with higher anti-MRSA activity and good water solubility, twenty eight bromo-substituted indolizinoquinoline-5,12-dione derivatives were synthesized in the present study. The antibacterial activity of the synthesized compounds was evaluated against one gram-negative and some gram-positive bacterial strains including 100 clinical MRSA strains. The UV assays were carried out to determine the solubility of six active compounds 16, 21, 23 and 27-29. The most potent compound 28 exhibited strong activity against clinical MRSA strains with both MIC50 and MIC90 values lower than 7.8 ng/mL. Compound 27 had good water solubility of 1.98 mg/mL and strong activity against clinical MRSA strains with MIC50 value of 63 ng/mL and MIC90 value of 125 ng/mL, 16-fold higher than that of Vancomycin.

  19. The Antibacterial Activity of Date Syrup Polyphenols against S. aureus and E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Taleb, Hajer; Maddocks, Sarah E.; Morris, R. Keith; Kanekanian, Ara D.

    2016-01-01

    Plant-derived products such as date syrup (DS) have demonstrated antibacterial activity and can inhibit bacteria through numerous different mechanisms, which may be attributed to bioactive compounds including plant-derived phenolic molecules. DS is rich in polyphenols and this study hypothesized that DS polyphenols demonstrate inherent antimicrobial activity, which cause oxidative damage. This investigation revealed that DS has a high content of total polyphenols (605 mg/100 g), and is rich in tannins (357 mg/100 g), flavonoids (40.5 mg/100 g), and flavanols (31.7 mg/100 g) that are known potent antioxidants. Furthermore, DS, and polyphenols extracted from DS, the most abundant bioactive constituent of DS are bacteriostatic to both Gram positive and Gram negative Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus, respectively. It has further been shown that the extracted polyphenols independently suppress the growth of bacteria at minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 30 and 20 mg/mL for E. coli and S. aureus, and have observed that DS behaves as a prooxidant by generating hydrogen peroxide that mediates bacterial growth inhibition as a result of oxidative stress. At sub-lethal MIC concentrations DS demonstrated antioxidative activity by reducing hydrogen peroxide, and at lethal concentrations DS demonstrated prooxidant activity that inhibited the growth of E. coli and S. aureus. The high sugar content naturally present in DS did not significantly contribute to this effect. These findings highlight that DS’s antimicrobial activity is mediated through hydrogen peroxide generation in inducing oxidative stress in bacteria. PMID:26952177

  20. Evaluation of in-vitro antibacterial activity and anti-inflammatory activity for different extracts of Rauvolfia tetraphylla L. root bark

    PubMed Central

    Ganga Rao, B.; Umamaheswara Rao, P.; Sambasiva Rao, E.; Mallikarjuna Rao, T.; Praneeth. D, V. S.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To assess the in-vitro antibacterial activity and anti-inflammatory activity of orally administered different extracts (Hydro-alcoholic, methanolic, ethyl acetate and hexane) of Rauvolfia tetraphylla (R. tetraphylla) root bark in Carrageenan induced acute inflammation in rats. Methods In-vitro antibacterial activity was evaluated for extracts against four Gram positive and four Gram negative bacteria by using cylinder plate assay. Hydro-alcoholic extract (70% v/v ethanol) at 200, 400 and 800 mg/kg doses and methanolic, ethyl acetate and hexane extracts at doses 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg were tested for anti-inflammatory activity in Carrageenan induced rat paw oedema model and paw thickness was measured every one hour up to 6 hrs. Results All extracts of R. tetraphylla root bark showed good zone of inhibition against tested bacterial strains. In Carrageenan induced inflammation model, hydro-alcoholic and methanolic extract of R. tetraphylla root bark at three different doses produced significant (P<0.001) reduction when compared to vehicle treated control group and hexane, ethyl acetate extracts. Conclusions In the present study extracts of R. tetraphylla root bark shows good in-vitro antibacterial activity and in-vivo anti-inflammatory activity in rats. PMID:23569853

  1. Injectable bioadhesive hydrogels with innate antibacterial properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giano, Michael C.; Ibrahim, Zuhaib; Medina, Scott H.; Sarhane, Karim A.; Christensen, Joani M.; Yamada, Yuji; Brandacher, Gerald; Schneider, Joel P.

    2014-06-01

    Surgical site infections cause significant postoperative morbidity and increased healthcare costs. Bioadhesives used to fill surgical voids and support wound healing are typically devoid of antibacterial activity. Here we report novel syringe-injectable bioadhesive hydrogels with inherent antibacterial properties prepared from mixing polydextran aldehyde and branched polyethylenimine. These adhesives kill both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, while sparing human erythrocytes. An optimal composition of 2.5 wt% oxidized dextran and 6.9 wt% polyethylenimine sets within seconds forming a mechanically rigid (~\

  2. Synthesis and antibacterial activity of novel 4-bromo-1H-indazole derivatives as FtsZ inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Yan, Mi; Ma, Ruixin; Ma, Shutao

    2015-04-01

    A series of novel 4-bromo-1H-indazole derivatives as filamentous temperature-sensitive protein Z (FtsZ) inhibitors were designed, synthesized, and assayed for their in vitro antibacterial activity against various phenotypes of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and their cell division inhibitory activity. The results indicated that this series showed better antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus epidermidis and penicillin-susceptible Streptococcus pyogenes than the other tested strains. Among them, compounds 12 and 18 exhibited 256-fold and 256-fold more potent activity than 3-methoxybenzamide (3-MBA) against penicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, and compound 18 showed 64-fold better activity than 3-MBA but 4-fold weaker activity than ciprofloxacin in the inhibition of S. aureus ATCC29213. Particularly, compound 9 presented the best activity (4 µg/mL) against S. pyogenes PS, being 32-fold, 32-fold, and 2-fold more active than 3-MBA, curcumin, and ciprofloxacin, respectively, but it was four times less active than oxacillin sodium. In addition, some synthesized compounds displayed moderate inhibition of cell division against S. aureus ATCC25923, Escherichia coli ATCC25922, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC27853, sharing a minimum cell division concentration of 128 µg/mL.

  3. In vitro reconstitution of peptidoglycan assembly from the Gram-positive pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Zapun, André; Philippe, Jules; Abrahams, Katherine A; Signor, Luca; Roper, David I; Breukink, Eefjan; Vernet, Thierry

    2013-12-20

    Understanding the molecular basis of bacterial cell wall assembly is of paramount importance in addressing the threat of increasing antibiotic resistance worldwide. Streptococcus pneumoniae presents a particularly acute problem in this respect, as it is capable of rapid evolution by homologous recombination with related species. Resistant strains selected by treatment with β-lactams express variants of the target enzymes that do not recognize the drugs but retain their activity in cell wall building, despite the antibiotics being mimics of the natural substrate. Until now, the crucial transpeptidase activity that is inhibited by β-lactams was not amenable to in vitro investigation with enzymes from Gram-positive organisms, including streptococci, staphylococci, or enterococci pathogens. We report here for the first time the in vitro assembly of peptidoglycan using recombinant penicillin-binding proteins from pneumococcus and the precursor lipid II. The two required enzymatic activities, glycosyl transferase for elongating glycan chains and transpeptidase for cross-linking stem-peptides, were observed. Most importantly, the transpeptidase activity was dependent on the chemical nature of the stem-peptide. Amidation of the second residue glutamate into iso-glutamine by the recently discovered amido-transferase MurT/GatD is required for efficient cross-linking of the peptidoglycan.

  4. Antibacterial Activity of Leptadenia reticulata (Retz.) Wight. & Arn. (Asclepidaceae).

    PubMed

    Kalidass, C; Glory, M; Borgio, Francis; Manickam, V S

    2009-04-01

    Leptadenia reticulata of Asclepidaceae family is a shrub, originally property of Petroleum ether, Alcohol & Chloroform extract of L. reticulata. The antimicrobial testing was carried out by "Disc diffusion method". Amongst the tested three extracts, chloroform extract showed high antimicrobial activity against E. coli, alcoholic extract showed high antibacterial activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, while Petroleum ether extract showed antibacterial activity against Klebsilla pneumonae.

  5. Chemical composition, olfactory analysis and antibacterial activity of Thymus vulgaris chemotypes geraniol, 4-thujanol/terpinen-4-ol, thymol and linalool cultivated in southern France.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Erich; Wanner, Jürgen; Hiiferl, Martina; Jirovetz, Leopold; Buchbauer, Gerhard; Gochev, Velizar; Girova, Tania; Stoyanova, Albena; Geissler, Margit

    2012-08-01

    The essential oils of four chemotypes of Thymus vulgaris L. (Lamiaceae) were analyzed for their composition and antibacterial activity to assess their different properties. GC-MS and GC-FID analyses revealed that the essentials oils can be classified into the chemotypes thymol (41.0% thymol), geraniol (26.4% geraniol), linalool (72.5% linalool) and 4-thujanol/terpinen-4-ol (42.2% cis- and 7.3% trans-sabinene hydrate, 6.5 % terpinen-4-ol). The olfactory examination confirmed the explicit differences between these chemotypes. Furthermore, antibacterial activity was investigated against several strains of two Gram-positive (Brochothrix thermosphacta and Staphylococcus aureus) and four Gram-negative food-borne bacteria (Escherichia coli, Salmonella abony, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and P. fragi). All essential oil samples were demonstrated to be highly effective against Gram-positive strains, whereas the impact on Gram-negative microorganisms was significantly smaller, but still considerable. The results obtained indicate that, despite their different properties, the essential oils of selected T. vulgaris chemotypes are potent antimicrobials to be employed as useful additives in food products as well as for therapeutic applications.

  6. Antibacterial activity of endophytic fungi from leaves of Indigofera suffruticosa Miller (Fabaceae)

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Irailton Prazeres; da Silva, Luís Cláudio Nascimento; da Silva, Márcia Vanusa; de Araújo, Janete Magali; Cavalcanti, Marilene da Silva; Lima, Vera Lucia de Menezes

    2015-01-01

    Endophytic fungi were isolated from healthy leaves of Indigofera suffruticosa Miller, a medicinal plant found in Brazil which is used in folk medicine to treat various diseases. Among 65 endophytic fungi isolated, 18 fungi showed activity against at least one tested microorganism in preliminary screening, and the best results were obtained with Nigrospora sphaerica (URM-6060) and Pestalotiopsis maculans (URM-6061). After fermentation in liquid media and in semisolid media, only N. sphaerica demonstrated antibacterial activity (in Potato Dextrose Broth-PDB and in semisolid rice culture medium). In the next step, a methanolic extract from rice culture medium (NsME) and an ethyl acetate extract (NsEAE) from the supernatant of PDB were prepared and both exhibited antimicrobial activity against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. The best result was observed against Staphylococcus aureus, with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) values of 1.56 mg/mL and 6.25 mg/mL, respectively, for NsME and MIC and MBC values of 0.39 mg/mL and 3.12 mg/mL, respectively, for NsEAE. This study is the first report about the antimicrobial activity of endophytic fungi residing in I. suffruticosa leaves, in which the fungus N. sphaerica demonstrated the ability to produce bioactive agents with pharmaceutical potential, and may provide a new lead in the pursuit of new biological sources of drug candidates. PMID:25999918

  7. Antibacterial Activity of Eravacycline (TP-434), a Novel Fluorocycline, against Hospital and Community Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, W.; Fyfe, C.; Grossman, T. H.

    2013-01-01

    Eravacycline (TP-434 or 7-fluoro-9-pyrrolidinoacetamido-6-demethyl-6-deoxytetracycline) is a novel fluorocycline that was evaluated for antimicrobial activity against panels of recently isolated aerobic and anaerobic Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. Eravacycline showed potent broad-spectrum activity against 90% of the isolates (MIC90) in each panel at concentrations ranging from ≤0.008 to 2 μg/ml for all species panels except those of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia cenocepacia (MIC90 values of 32 μg/ml for both organisms). The antibacterial activity of eravacycline was minimally affected by expression of tetracycline-specific efflux and ribosomal protection mechanisms in clinical isolates. Furthermore, eravacycline was active against multidrug-resistant bacteria, including those expressing extended-spectrum β-lactamases and mechanisms conferring resistance to other classes of antibiotics, including carbapenem resistance. Eravacycline has the potential to be a promising new intravenous (i.v.)/oral antibiotic for the empirical treatment of complicated hospital/health care infections and moderate-to-severe community-acquired infections. PMID:23979750

  8. Antibacterial and Antifungal Activity of Biopolymers Modified with Ionic Liquid and Laponite.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Anshu; Prakash, Prem; Rawat, Kamla; Solanki, Pratima R; Bohidar, H B

    2015-09-01

    In the present study, the antimicrobial properties of modified biopolymers such as gelatin and agar have been investigated. These biopolymers (agar and gelatin) are modified by dissolving in ionic liquid (IL) [1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([C2mim][Cl]) and 1-octyl-3-methyl imidazolium chloride ([C8mim][Cl])] solutions. It was noticed that agar-ionogel (Ag-IL), gelatin-ionogel (GB-IL), and gelatin organogel (gelatin-glycerol solution along with laponite, nanoclay) nanocomposite (GA-NC) formed are highly stable, optically clear, and transparent without any air bubbles. The antimicrobial activity of these (Ag-IL), (GB-IL), and GA-NC were analyzed for both gram-negative (Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae) and gram-positive bacterial strains (Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus pyogenes) and fungus A. niger, C. albicans. Antibacterial and antifungal activity studies were carried out at different dilutions such as 100, 99, and 90 % (v/v). It was found that Ag-IL, GB-IL, and individual IL ([C8mim][Cl]) exhibited superior antimicrobial activities, indicating that longer IL chain enhance the cell membrane permeability of S. aureus, S. pyogenes, and E. coli cells. However, GA-NC nanocomposite and [C2mim][Cl]-based composites does not exhibit any bacterial inhibition activity for all bacterial strains.

  9. Synthesis and evaluation of antibacterial and antitumor activities of new galactopyranosylated amino alcohols.

    PubMed

    de Souza Fernandes, Fábio; Fernandes, Tayrine Silva; da Silveira, Lígia Souza; Caneschi, Wiliam; Lourenço, Maria Cristina S; Diniz, Claudio G; de Oliveira, Pollyanna Francielli; Martins, Sabrina de Paula Lima; Pereira, Daiane Eleutério; Tavares, Denise Crispim; Le Hyaric, Mireille; de Almeida, Mauro V; Couri, Mara Rubia C

    2016-01-27

    Three series of d-galactose derivatives linked to a lipophilic aminoalcohol moiety were synthesized and their antibacterial activity was evaluated against Mycobacterium tuberculosis and representative species of Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria. Five out of the thirteen tested compounds displayed activity against M. tuberculosis, with a minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 12.5 μg/mL and seven compounds were active against the four bacterial strains tested. The best results were obtained for amino alcohols 10 and 11 against Staphylococcus epidermidis (MIC = 2 μg/mL). The antitumor activity was evaluated against three tumor cell lines (MCF-7, HeLa and MO59J) and compared to the normal cell line GM07492A. The results showed that the lowest IC50 values were observed for the amino alcohol 16 against MCF-7 (11.9 μM) and MO59J (10.0 μM).

  10. In vitro Antioxidant and Antibacterial Activities of Methanol Extract of Kyllinga nemoralis

    PubMed Central

    Sindhu, T.; Rajamanikandan, S.; Srinivasan, P.

    2014-01-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the antioxidant and antibacterial activity of methanol extract of Kyllinga nemoralis. Six different in vitro antioxidant assays including 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl, hydroxyl radical, superoxide anion radical, hydrogen peroxide radical, ferric reducing antioxidant power assay and reducing power were carried out to ensure the scavenging effect of the plant on free radicals. In addition, total antioxidant capacity assay, total phenolic contents, tannins, flavonoids and flavonol contents of the plant were also analysed by the standard protocols. Kyllinga nemoralis exhibited high antioxidant activity on 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl assay (IC50= 90 μg/ml), superoxide radical scavenging assay (IC50= 180 μg/ml) and hydrogen peroxide radical scavenging assay (IC50= 200 μg/ml), compared with standards. These observations provide comprehensible supporting evidence for the antioxidant potential of the plant extract. Reducing power (IC50= 213.16 μg/ml) and hydroxyl radical scavenging activity (IC50= 223 μg/ml) of the plant extract was remarkable. The methanol extract of K. nemoralis exhibited significant antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive human pathogenic bacteria. Standard in vitro antioxidant assays assessed the electron donating ability of the plant extract in scavenging free radicals. The inhibitory effect of the plant extract against bacterial pathogens may be due to the presence of phytochemicals. Thus, the results suggest that Kyllinga nemoralis is a potential source of antioxidants and could serve as the base for drug development. PMID:24843192

  11. Antifungal and Antibacterial Activity of Extracts and Alkaloids of Selected Amaryllidaceae Species.

    PubMed

    Ločárek, Miroslav; Nováková, Jitka; Klouček, Pavel; Hošt'álkoviá, Anna; Kokoška, Ladislav; Lucie Gábrlová; Šafratová, Marcela; Opletal, Lubomír; Cahliková, Lucie

    2015-09-01

    Alkaloidal extracts of six selected species of Amaryllidaceae were studied with respect to their antibacterial and anti-yeast activity and their alkaloidal fingerprint. Twenty-five alkaloids were determined by GC/MS, and sixteen of them identified from their mass spectra, retention times and retention indexes. In the antimicrobial assay, Gram-negative Escherichia coli and Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus were used, along with isolates of the human pathogenic yeasts Candida albicans, C. glabrata, C. dubliniensis and Lodderomyces elongiosporus. The six extracts, together with 19 Amaryllidaceae alkaloids isolated in our laboratory, showed almost no inhibitory activity against the bacteria tested. However, promising anti-yeast properties were detected; the most potent activity was shown by lycorine, which inhibited C. dubliniensis with a MIC of 32 µg/mL, C. albicans and L. elongiosporus, both with MICs of 64 µg/mL, followed by caranine inhibiting C. dubliniensis with a MIC of 128 µg/mL. Among the alkaloidal extracts, Narcissus jonquilla cv. Baby Moon showed the most potent anti-yeast activity, with minimal and average MIC values of 128 and 192 µg/mL, respectively, followed by Leucojum aestivum, Narcissus poeticus var. recurvus and N. canaliculatus (average MICs 256, 267 and 299 µg/mL, respectively). The lowest MIC value among extracts was obtained for N. canaliculatus against L. elongiosporus (MIC 64 µg/mL).

  12. Antibacterial activity against Porphyromonas gingivalis and biological characteristics of antibacterial stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dan; Ren, Ling; Zhang, Yang; Xue, Nan; Yang, Ke; Zhong, Ming

    2013-05-01

    To evaluate the possibility of an alternative to the traditional orthodontic stainless steel implants, the antibacterial activity against Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis) and the related cytotoxicity of a type 304 Cu bearing antibacterial stainless steel were studied. The results indicated that the antibacterial stainless steel showed excellent antibacterial property against P. gingivalis, compared with the control steel (a purchased medical grade 304 stainless steel). Compared to the control steel, there were fewer bacteria on the surface of the antibacterial stainless steel, with significant difference in morphology. The cytotoxicities of the antibacterial stainless steel to both MG-63 and KB cells were all grade 1, the same as those of the control steel. There were no significant differences in the apoptosis rates on MG-63 and KB cells between the antibacterial stainless steel and the control steel. This study demonstrates that the antibacterial stainless steel is possible to reduce the incidence of implant-related infections and can be a more suitable material for the micro-implant than the conventional stainless steel in orthodontic treatment.

  13. Antibacterial activity of Artemisia nilagirica leaf extracts against clinical and phytopathogenic bacteria

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The six organic solvent extracts of Artemisia nilagirica were screened for the potential antimicrobial activity against phytopathogens and clinically important standard reference bacterial strains. Methods The agar disk diffusion method was used to study the antibacterial activity of A. nilagirica extracts against 15 bacterial strains. The Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) of the plant extracts were tested using two fold agar dilution method at concentrations ranging from 32 to 512 μg/ml. The phytochemical screening of extracts was carried out for major phytochemical derivatives in A. nilagirica. Results All the extracts showed inhibitory activity for gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria except for Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterococcus faecalis and Staphylococcus aureus. The hexane extract was found to be effective against all phytopathogens with low MIC of 32 μg/ml and the methanol extract exhibited a higher inhibition activity against Escherichia coli, Yersinia enterocolitica, Salmonella typhi, Enterobacter aerogenes, Proteus vulgaris, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (32 μg/ml), Bacillus subtilis (64 μg/ml) and Shigella flaxneri (128 μg/ml). The phytochemical screening of extracts answered for the major derivative of alkaloids, amino acids, flavonoids, phenol, quinines, tannins and terpenoids. Conclusion All the extracts showed antibacterial activity against the tested strains. Of all, methanol and hexane extracts showed high inhibition against clinical and phytopathogens, respectively. The results also indicate the presence of major phytochemical derivatives in the A. nilagirica extracts. Hence, the isolation and purification of therapeutic potential compounds from A. nilagirica could be used as an effective source against bacterial diseases in human and plants. PMID:20109237

  14. Transport capabilities of eleven gram-positive bacteria: comparative genomic analyses.

    PubMed

    Lorca, Graciela L; Barabote, Ravi D; Zlotopolski, Vladimir; Tran, Can; Winnen, Brit; Hvorup, Rikki N; Stonestrom, Aaron J; Nguyen, Elizabeth; Huang, Li-Wen; Kim, David S; Saier, Milton H

    2007-06-01

    The genomes of eleven Gram-positive bacteria that are important for human health and the food industry, nine low G+C lactic acid bacteria and two high G+C Gram-positive organisms, were analyzed for their complement of genes encoding transport proteins. Thirteen to 18% of their genes encode transport proteins, larger percentages than observed for most other bacteria. All of these bacteria possess channel proteins, some of which probably function to relieve osmotic stress. Amino acid uptake systems predominate over sugar and peptide cation symporters, and of the sugar uptake porters, those specific for oligosaccharides and glycosides often outnumber those for free sugars. About 10% of the total transport proteins are constituents of putative multidrug efflux pumps with Major Facilitator Superfamily (MFS)-type pumps (55%) being more prevalent than ATP-binding cassette (ABC)-type pumps (33%), which, however, usually greatly outnumber all other types. An exception to this generalization is Streptococcus thermophilus with 54% of its drug efflux pumps belonging to the ABC superfamily and 23% belonging each to the Multidrug/Oligosaccharide/Polysaccharide (MOP) superfamily and the MFS. These bacteria also display peptide efflux pumps that may function in intercellular signalling, and macromolecular efflux pumps, many of predictable specificities. Most of the bacteria analyzed have no pmf-coupled or transmembrane flow electron carriers. The one exception is Brevibacterium linens, which in addition to these carriers, also has transporters of several families not represented in the other ten bacteria examined. Comparisons with the genomes of organisms from other bacterial kingdoms revealed that lactic acid bacteria possess distinctive proportions of recognized transporter types (e.g., more porters specific for glycosides than reducing sugars). Some homologues of transporters identified had previously been identified only in Gram-negative bacteria or in eukaryotes. Our studies

  15. Transport Capabilities of Eleven Gram-positive Bacteria: Comparative Genomic Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Lorca, Graciela L.; Barabote, Ravi D.; Zlotopolski, Vladimir; Tran, Can; Winnen, Brit; Hvorup, Rikki N.; Stonestrom, Aaron J.; Nguyen, Elizabeth; Huang, Li-Wen; Kim, David S.; Saier, Milton H.

    2007-01-01

    The genomes of eleven Gram-positive bacteria that are important for human health and the food industry, nine low G+C lactic acid bacteria and two high G+C Gram-positive organisms, were analyzed for their complement of genes encoding transport proteins. Thirteen to eighteen percent of their genes encode transport proteins, larger percentages than observed for most other bacteria. All of these bacteria possess channel proteins, some of which probably function to relieve osmotic stress. Amino acid uptake systems predominate over sugar and peptide cation symporters, and of the sugar uptake porters, those specific for oligosaccharides and glycosides often outnumber those for free sugars. About 10% of the total transport proteins are constituents of putative multidrug efflux pumps with Major Facilitator Superfamily (MFS)-type pumps (55%) being more prevalent than ATP-binding cassette (ABC)-type pumps (33%), which, however, usually greatly outnumber all other types. An exception to this generalization is Streptococcus thermophilus with 54% of its drug efflux pumps belonging to the ABC superfamily and 23% belonging each to the Multidrug/Oligosaccharide/Polysaccharide (MOP) superfamily and the MFS. These bacteria also display peptide efflux pumps that may function in intercellular signalling, and macromolecular efflux pumps, many of predictable specificities. Most of the bacteria analyzed have no pmf-coupled or transmembrane flow electron carriers. The one exception is Brevibacterium linens, which in addition to these carriers, also has transporters of several families not represented in the other ten bacteria examined. Comparisons with the genomes of organisms from other bacterial kingdoms revealed that lactic acid bacteria possess distinctive proportions of recognized transporter types (e.g., more porters specific for glycosides than reducing sugars). Some homologues of transporters identified had previously been identified only in Gram-negative bacteria or in eukaryotes

  16. Photocatalytic and antibacterial activities of gold and silver nanoparticles synthesized using biomass of Parkia roxburghii leaf.

    PubMed

    Paul, Bappi; Bhuyan, Bishal; Purkayastha, Debraj Dhar; Dhar, Siddhartha Sankar

    2016-01-01

    The present study reports a green approach for synthesis of gold (Au) and silver (Ag) nanoparticles (NPs) using dried biomass of Parkia roxburghii leaf. The biomass of the leaf acts as both reductant as well as stabilizer. The as-synthesized nanoparticles were characterized by time-dependent UV-visible, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analyses. The UV-visible spectra of synthesized Au and Ag NPs showed surface plasmon resonance (SPR) at 555 and 440 nm after 12h. Powder XRD studies revealed formation of face-centered cubic structure for both Au and Ag NPs with average crystallite size of 8.4 and 14.74 nm, respectively. The TEM image showed the Au NPs to be monodispersed, spherical in shape with sizes in the range of 5-25 nm. On the other hand, Ag NPs were polydispersed, quasi-spherical in shape with sizes in the range of 5-25 nm. Investigation of photocatalytic activities of Au and Ag NPs under solar light illumination reveals that both these particles have pronounced effect on degradation of dyes viz., methylene blue (MB) and rhodamine b (RhB). Antibacterial activity of the synthesized NPs was studied on Gram positive bacteria Staphylococcus aureus and Gram negative bacteria Escherichia coli. Both Au and Ag NPs showed slightly higher activity on S. aureus than on E. coli.

  17. Volatile compounds of Lamiaceae exhibit a synergistic antibacterial activity with streptomycin

    PubMed Central

    Araújo, Sthéfane G.; Alves, Lucas F.; Pinto, Maria Eduarda A.; Oliveira, Graziela T.; Siqueira, Ezequias P.; Ribeiro, Rosy I. M. A.; Ferreira, Jaqueline M. S.; Lima, Luciana A. R. S.

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial infections cause thousands of deaths in the world every year. In most cases, infections are more serious because the patient is already weakened, and often, the bacteria are already resistant to the antibiotics used. Counterparting this negative scenario, the interest in medicinal plants as an alternative to the synthetic antimicrobial drugs is blossoming worldwide. In the present work, we identified the volatile compounds of ethanol extracts of Melissa officinalis, Mentha sp., Ocimum basilicum, Plectranthus barbatus, and Rosmarinus officinalis by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Also was evaluated antimicrobial activity of ethanol extracts against 6 bacteria of clinical interest, and was tested the interaction of these extracts with a commercial antibiotic streptomycin. Phytol was a compound identified in all extracts by GC/MS, being majoritary component in Plectranthus barbatus and Rosmarinus officinalis. The Gram-positive bacteria were more sensitive to ethanol extracts, and Plectranthus barbatus and Rosmarinus officinalis were the most active extracts. Ethanol extracts exhibited a synergetic effect with streptomycin. These results encourage additional studies, in order to evaluate the possibilities of using ethanol extracts of Lamiaceae family as natural source for antibacterial activity. PMID:25763039

  18. Antibacterial activity of the nitrovinylfuran G1 (Furvina) and its conversion products

    PubMed Central

    Allas, Ülar; Toom, Lauri; Selyutina, Anastasia; Mäeorg, Uno; Medina, Ricardo; Merits, Andres; Rinken, Ago; Hauryliuk, Vasili; Kaldalu, Niilo; Tenson, Tanel

    2016-01-01

    2-Bromo-5-(2-bromo-2-nitrovinyl)furan (G1 or Furvina) is an antimicrobial with a direct reactivity against thiol groups. It is active against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, yeasts and filamentous fungi. By reacting with thiol groups it causes direct damage to proteins but, as a result, is very short-living and interconverts into an array of reaction products. Our aim was to characterize thiol reactivity of G1 and its conversion products and establish how much of antimicrobial and cytotoxic effects are due to the primary activity of G1 and how much can be attributed to its reaction products. Stability of G1 in growth media as well as its conversion in the presence of thiols was characterized. The structures of G1 decomposition products were determined using NMR and mass-spectroscopy. Concentration- and time-dependent killing curves showed that G1 is bacteriostatic for Escherichia coli at the concentration of 16 μg/ml and bactericidal at 32 μg/ml. However, G1 is inefficient against non-growing E. coli. Addition of cysteine to medium reduces the antimicrobial potency of G1. Nevertheless, the reaction products of G1 and cysteine enabled prolonged antimicrobial action of the drug. Therefore, the activity of 2-bromo-5-(2-bromo-2-nitrovinyl)furan is a sum of its immediate reactivity and the antibacterial effects of the conversion products. PMID:27830730

  19. Mechanistic antimicrobial approach of extracellularly synthesized silver nanoparticles against gram positive and gram negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Tamboli, Dhawal P; Lee, Dae Sung

    2013-09-15

    The development of eco-friendly and reliable processes for the synthesis of nanoparticles has attracted considerable interest in nanotechnology. In this study, an extracellular enzyme system of a newly isolated microorganism, Exiguobacterium sp. KNU1, was used for the reduction of AgNO₃ solutions to silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). The extracellularly biosynthesized AgNPs were characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy, Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The AgNPs were approximately 30 nm (range 5-50 nm) in size, well-dispersed and spherical. The AgNPs were evaluated for their antimicrobial effects on different gram negative and gram positive bacteria using the minimum inhibitory concentration method. Reasonable antimicrobial activity against Salmonella typhimurium, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus was observed. The morphological changes occurred in all the microorganisms tested. In particular, E. coli exhibited DNA fragmentation after being treated with the AgNPs. Finally, the mechanism for their bactericidal activity was proposed according to the results of scanning electron microscopy and single cell gel electrophoresis.

  20. Gram-positive pathogenic bacteria induce a common early response in human monocytes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background We infected freshly isolated human peripheral monocytes with live bacteria of three clinically important gram-positive bacterial species, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Listeria monocytogenes and studied the ensuing early transcriptional response using expression microarrays. Thus the observed response was unbiased by signals originating from other helper and effector cells of the host and was not limited to induction by solitary bacterial constituents. Results Activation of monocytes was demonstrated by the upregulation of chemokine rather than interleukin genes except for the prominent expression of interleukin 23, marking it as the early lead cytokine. This activation was accompanied by cytoskeleton rearrangement signals and a general anti-oxidative stress and anti-apoptotic reaction. Remarkably, the expression profiles also provide evidence that monocytes participate in the regulation of angiogenesis and endothelial function in response to these pathogens. Conclusion Regardless of the invasion properties and survival mechanisms of the pathogens used, we found that the early response comprised of a consistent and common response. The common response was hallmarked by the upregulation of interleukin 23, a rather unexpected finding regarding Listeria infection, as this cytokine has been linked primarily to the control of extracellular bacterial dissemination. PMID:21044323

  1. Antimicrobial susceptibility of non-enterococcal intrinsic glycopeptide-resistant Gram-positive organisms.

    PubMed

    Vay, Carlos; Cittadini, Roxana; Barberis, Claudia; Hernán Rodríguez, Carlos; Perez Martínez, Herminia; Genero, Fabiana; Famiglietti, Angela

    2007-02-01

    Non-enterococcal Gram-positive bacteria that are intrinsically vancomycin-resistant have been infrequently isolated in association with serious infections. However, well-documented infections have lately been reported with increasing frequency. Because these organisms may be pathogens, we tested the MICs of 19 antimicrobial agents by the agar dilution method for predicting susceptibility. The activity of these antimicrobial agents was assessed against 28 strains (Lactobacillus rhamnosus, 6; Lactobacillus acidophilus, 1; Lactobacillus casei, 1; Lactobacillus fermentum, 2; Lactobacillus brevis, 1; Lactobacillus plantarum, 1; Weissella confusa, 2; Leuconostoc mesenteroides, 7; Leuconostoc lactis, 4; Pediococcus acidilactici, 2; Pediococcus pentosaceus, 1), isolated from clinical specimens in an Argentinian university hospital from 1997 to 2003. The MICs of penicillin for 67% of the Lactobacillus strains and 100% of the Leuconostoc spp. and Pediococcus spp. strains tested were in the 0.25-2 microg/mL range. Erythromycin was the most active antimicrobial overall. Multiresistance was observed in 2 strains (Lactobacillus rhamnosus, 1; Lactobacillus plantarum, 1).

  2. Chemical conjugation of 2-hexadecynoic acid to C5-curcumin enhances its antibacterial activity against multi-drug resistant bacteria.

    PubMed

    Sanabria-Ríos, David J; Rivera-Torres, Yaritza; Rosario, Joshua; Gutierrez, Ricardo; Torres-García, Yeireliz; Montano, Nashbly; Ortíz-Soto, Gabriela; Ríos-Olivares, Eddy; Rodríguez, José W; Carballeira, Néstor M

    2015-11-15

    The first total synthesis of a C5-curcumin-2-hexadecynoic acid (C5-Curc-2-HDA, 6) conjugate was successfully performed. Through a three-step synthetic route, conjugate 6 was obtained in 13% overall yield and tested for antibacterial activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains. Our results revealed that 6 was active against eight MRSA strains at MICs that range between 31.3 and 62.5 μg/mL. It was found that the presence of 2-hexadecynoic acid (2-HDA, 4) in conjugate 6 increased 4-8-fold its antibacterial activity against MRSA strains supporting our hypothesis that the chemical connection of 4 to C5-curcumin (2) increases the antibacterial activity of 2 against Gram-positive bacteria. Combinational index (CIn) values that range between 1.6 and 2.3 were obtained when eight MRSA strains were treated with an equimolar mixture of 2 and 4. These results demonstrated that an antagonistic effect is taking place. Finally, it was investigated whether conjugate 6 can affect the replication process of S. aureus, since this compound inhibited the supercoiling activity of the S. aureus DNA gyrase at minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of 250 μg/mL (IC50=100.2±13.9 μg/mL). Moreover, it was observed that the presence of 4 in conjugate 6 improves the anti-topoisomerase activity of 2 towards S. aureus DNA gyrase, which is in agreement with results obtained from antibacterial susceptibility tests involving MRSA strains.

  3. Human cytokine responses induced by Gram-positive cell walls of normal intestinal microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Chen, T; Isomäki, P; Rimpiläinen, M; Toivanen, P

    1999-01-01

    The normal microbiota plays an important role in the health of the host, but little is known of how the human immune system recognizes and responds to Gram-positive indigenous bacteria. We have investigated cytokine responses of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) to Gram-positive cell walls (CW) derived from four common intestinal indigenous bacteria, Eubacterium aerofaciens (Eu.a.), Eubacterium limosum(Eu.l.), Lactobacillus casei(L.c.), and Lactobacillus fermentum (L.f.). Our results indicate that Gram-positive CW of the normal intestinal microbiota can induce cytokine responses of the human PBMC. The profile, level and kinetics of these responses are similar to those induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or CW derived from a pathogen, Streptococcus pyogenes (S.p.). Bacterial CW are capable of inducing production of a proinflammatory cytokine, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), and an anti-inflammatory cytokine, IL-10, but not that of IL-4 or interferon-gamma (IFN-γ). Monocytes are the main cell population in PBMC to produce TNF-α and IL-10. Induction of cytokine secretion is serum-dependent; both CD14-dependent and -independent pathways are involved. These findings suggest that the human cytokine responses induced by Gram-positive CW of the normal intestinal microbiota are similar to those induced by LPS or Gram-positive CW of the pathogens. PMID:10540188

  4. Importance of the disulfide bridges in the antibacterial activity of human hepcidin.

    PubMed

    Hocquellet, Agnès; le Senechal, Caroline; Garbay, Bertrand

    2012-08-01

    Hepcidin was first identified as an antimicrobial peptide present in human serum and urine. It was later demonstrated that hepcidin is the long sought hormone that regulates iron homeostasis in mammals. The native peptide of 25 amino acids (Hepc25) contains four disulfide bridges that maintain a β-hairpin motif. The aim of the present study was to assess whether the intramolecular disulfide bridges are necessary for Hepc25 antimicrobial activity. We show that a synthetic peptide corresponding to human Hepc25, and which contains the four disulfide bridges, has an antibacterial activity against several strains of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. On the contrary, a synthetic peptide where all cysteines were replaced by alanines (Hepc25-Ala) had no detectable activity against the same strains of bacteria. In a further step, the mode of action of Hepc25 on Escherichia coli was studied. SYTOX Green uptake was used to assess bacterial membrane integrity. No permeabilization of the membrane was observed with Hepc25, indicating that this peptide does not kill bacteria by destroying their membranes. Gel retardation assay showed that the Hepc25 binds to DNA with high efficiency, and that this binding ability is dependent on the presence of the intramolecular disulfide bridges. Reduction